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Title: Our Artist in Cuba, Peru, Spain and Algiers - Leaves from The Sketch-Book of a Traveller, 1864-1868
Author: Carleton, George W., 1832-1901
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Our Artist in Cuba, Peru, Spain and Algiers - Leaves from The Sketch-Book of a Traveller, 1864-1868" ***

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SPAIN AND ALGIERS ***



produced from images available at The Internet Archive)



OUR

ARTIST IN CUBA,

PERU, SPAIN AND ALGIERS.

LEAVES FROM

_THE SKETCH-BOOK OF A TRAVELLER_.

1864-1868.

BY

GEORGE W. CARLETON.

    "Let observation, with expansive view,
     Survey mankind, from China to Peru."

[Illustration]

NEW YORK:

Copyright, 1877, by

_G. W. Carleton & Co., Publishers_.

LONDON: S. LOW & CO.

MDCCCLXXVII.

OUR ARTIST, [Illustration: colophon] HIS MARK.



CONTENTS.


        PAGE

CUBA,      5

PERU,     57

SPAIN,   109

ALGIERS, 131

[Illustration]



AN APOLOGY.


The Author of these unpretending little wayside sketches offers them to
the Public with the hesitating diffidence of an Amateur. The publication
a few years ago, of a portion of the drawings was attended with so
flattering a reception, that a new edition being called for, it is
believed a few more Leaves from the same vagabond sketch-book may not be
intrusive.

The out-of-the-way sort of places in which the Author's steps have led
him, must always present the most enticing subjects for a comic pencil;
and although no attempt is here made to much more than hint at the
oranges and volantes of Cuba, the earthquakes and buzzards of Peru, the
donkeys and beggars of Spain, or the Arabs and dates of Algiers, yet
sketches made upon the spot, with the crispy freshness of a first
impression, cannot fail in suggesting at least a panoramic picture of
such grotesque incidents as these strange Countries furnish.

The drawings are merely the chance results of leisure moments; and Our
Artist, in essaying to convey a ray of information through the glasses
of humor, has simply multiplied with printers' ink his pocket-book of
sketches, which, although caricatures, are exaggerations of actual
events, jotted down on the impulse of the moment, for the same sort of
idle pastime as may possibly lead the reader to linger along its
ephemeral pages.

NEW YORK, _Christmas_, 1877.



PART I.


CUBA.

[Illustration: colophon]


CUBAN SKETCHES.


  SICK TRANSIT.          THE SPANISH TONGUE.

  TWO BOOBIES.           AN UNWELCOME VISITOR.

  A COLORED HERCULES.    AN AGREEABLE BATH.

  THE CUBAN JEHU.        A CELESTIAL MAID.

  IGLESIA SAN FRANCISCO. A STATUE ON A BUST.

  A CUBAN MOTIVE.        A TAIL UNFOLDED.

  AN INFLUENZA.          MONEY IN THY PURSE.

  FLEE FOR SHELTER.      SUGAR AND WATER.

  THE RIDE.              GREEN FIELDS.

  A COCK-FIGHT.          A SEGAR WELL-LIGHTED.

  RATHER COOL.           SHALL REST BE FOUND.

  TAKE YOUR PICK.        ALL ABOARD.

  A SPANISH RETREAT.     THE MATANZAS CAVE.

  SPIDERS AND RATS.      HARD ROAD TO TRAVEL.

  BELLIGERENTS.          A SHADY RETREAT.

  MATERFAMILIAS.         A SPANISH GROCER.

  CULINARY DEPARTMENT.   COLORED HELP.

  A BUNDLE OF CLOTHES.   VERY MOORISH.

  A BUTTON-SMASHER.      CHACUN A SON GOUT.

  WHITE PANTALOONS.      NATURE'S RESTORER.

  CARNIVAL ACQUAINTANCE. AGRICULTURAL.

  BEAUTY AT THE BALL.    A COT IN THE VALLEY.

  A DISAPPOINTMENT.      A COLORED BEAUTY.

  DOLCE FAR NIENTE.      CORNER STONES.

  LOCOMOTION.            A SUDDEN DEPARTURE.



THE START.--THE STEAMSHIP COLUMBIA. AT SEA.

[Illustration: First day out.--The wind freshens up a trifle as we get
outside Sandy Hook; but our artist says he is'nt sea-sick, for he never
felt better in his life.]



IN THE GULF OF MEXICO.

[Illustration: A "Booby"--as seen _from_ the ship's deck.]

[Illustration: A "Booby"--as seen _on_ the ship's deck.]



ARRIVAL AT HAVANA.

[Illustration: A side elevation of the colored gentleman who carried our
luggage from the small boat to the Custom House.]



STREETS OF HAVANA.--CALLE MERCADERES.

[Illustration: The first volante driver that our artist saw in Havana.]



VIEW FROM OUR WINDOW AT THE HOTEL ALMY.

[Illustration: The old Convent and Bell Tower of the Church of San
Francisco,--now used as a Custom House.]



STREETS OF HAVANA.--CALLE TENIENTE RE.

[Illustration: A Cuban Cart and its Motive Power.--Ye patient Donkey.]



AT THE CAFE LOUVRE.

[Illustration: Manners and Customs of a Cuban with a Cold in his Head.]



THE [WICKED] FLEA OF HAVANA.

[Illustration: PART I.--The beast in a torpid condition.]

[Illustration: PART II.--When he "smells the blood of an Englishmun."]



THE NATIONAL VEHICLE OF HAVANA.

[Illustration: Manner and Custom of Harnessing ye Animiles to ye Cuban
Volante.]



A COCK-FIGHT IN CUBA.

[Illustration: I.--Chanticleer as he goes in.]

[Illustration: II.--Chanticleer considerably "played out."]



STREETS OF HAVANA.--CALLE LAMPARILLA.

[Illustration: The cool and airy style in which they dress the rising
colored generation of Havana.]



THE CUBAN TOOTH-PICK.

[Illustration: Two ways of carrying it--behind the ear, and in the
back-hair.]



THE CAPTAIN GENERAL'S QUINTA.

[Illustration: View of the Canal and Cocoa Tree; looking East from the
Grotto.]



THE DOMESTIC INSECTS OF HAVANA.

[Illustration: Agitation of the Better-Half of Our Artist, upon entering
her chamber and making their acquaintance.]



A LITTLE EPISODE IN THE CALLE BARRATILLO.

[Illustration: A slight difference arises between the housekeeper's cat
and the butcher's dog, who has just come out in his summer costume.]



STREETS OF HAVANA.--CALLE COMPOSTELLA.

[Illustration: The Free Negro.--An every-day scene, when the weather is
fine.]



AN INTERIOR IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: Kitchen, chief-cook and bottle-washer in the
establishment of Mrs. Franke, out on the "Cerro."]



HEADS OF THE PEOPLE.

[Illustration: A portrait of the young lady, whose family (after
considerable urging) consents to take in our washing.]



PRIMITIVE HABITS OF THE NATIVES.

[Illustration: Washing in Havana.--$4 00 a dozen in gold.]



WASHING IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: I.--My pantaloons as they went _in_. II.--My pantaloons
as they came _out_.]



CARNIVAL IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: A Masquerade at the Tacon Theatre.--Types of Costume,
with a glimpse of the "Cuban Dance" in the background.]



A MASK BALL AT THE TACON.

[Illustration: Our artist mixes in the giddy dance, and falls
desperately in love with this sweet creature--but]



LATER IN THE EVENING,

[Illustration: When the "sweet creature" unmasks, our Artist suddenly
recovers from his fit of admiration. Alas! beauty is but mask deep.]



STREETS OF HAVANA--CALLE OBRAPIA.

[Illustration: The Cuban Wheelbarrow--In Repose.]



STREETS OF HAVANA--CALLE O'REILLY.

[Illustration: The Cuban Wheelbarrow--In action.]



    FIRST HOUR!      SECOND HOUR!!      THIRD HOUR!!!

[Illustration: Our Artist forms the praiseworthy determination of
studying the Spanish language, and devotes three hours to the
enterprise.]



BED-ROOMS IN CUBA.

[Illustration: The Scorpion of Havana,--encountered in his native
jungle.]



SEA-BATHS IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: Our Artist having prepared himself for a jolly plunge,
inadvertently observes an insect peculiar to the water, and rather
thinks he won't go in just now.]



HOTELS IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: A cheerful Chinese Chambermaid (?) at the Fonda de
Ingleterra, outside the walls.]



HIGH ART IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: A gay (but slightly mutilated) old plaster-of-Paris girl,
that I found in one of the avenues of the Bishop's Garden, on the
"Cerro."]



LOCOMOTION IN THE COUNTRY.

[Illustration: A Cuban Planter going into town with his plunder.]



SHOPPING IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: Our Artist just steps around the corner, to look at a
"sweet thing in fans" that his wife has found.]

[Illustration: RESULT!]



THE NATIONAL BEVERAGE OF HAVANA.

[Illustration: Our Artist indulges in a _panale frio_ (a sort of
lime-ade), at the Café Dominica, and gets so "set up," that he vows he
won't go home till morning.]



THE LIZARDS OF CUBA.

[Illustration: Our Artist, on an entomological expedition in the
Bishop's Garden, is disagreeably surprised to find such sprightly
specimens.]



SMOKING IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: An English acquaintance of Our Artist wants a light for
his paper segar; whereupon the waiter, according to custom, brings a
live coal.]



THE MUSQUITOS OF HAVANA.

[Illustration: A midsummer's night dream.--Our Artist is just the least
bit disturbed in his rest, and gently remonstrates.]



PUBLIC SERVANTS IN CUBA.

[Illustration: A gay and festive Chinese brakeman, on the railroad near
Guines.--The shirt-collar-and-pair-of-spurs style of costume.]



ONE OF THE SENSATIONS IN CUBA.

[Illustration: The Great Cave near Matanzas.--Picturesque House over the
Entrance.]



THE GREAT CAVE NEAR MATANZAS.

[Illustration: A section of the interior--showing the comfortable manner
in which our artist followed the guide, inspected the stalactites, and
comported himself generally.]



THE OUTSKIRTS OF MATANZAS.

[Illustration: One of the Fortifications.--Sketched from the end of the
_Paseo_, on a day hot enough to give anything but a donkey the brain
fever.]



ARCHITECTURE IN MATANZAS.

[Illustration: A romantic little _tienda mista_ (grocery store) on a
corner, in the Calle Ona.]



A _CAFFETAL_ NEAR MATANZAS.

[Illustration: Our Artist becomes dumb with admiration, at the ingenious
manner of toting little niggers.]



THE PICTURESQUE IN MATANZAS.

[Illustration: A singular little bit, out of the Calle Manzana.]



A SUGAR PLANTATION, NEAR THE YUMORI.

[Illustration: Our Artist essays to drink the milk from a green Cocoa:]

[Illustration: Fatal effect.--An uncomfortable sensation!]



A BED-CHAMBER IN MATANZAS.

[Illustration: First night at the "Gran Hotel Leon de Oro."--Our artist
is accommodated with quarters on the ground-floor, convenient to the
court-yard, and is lulled to sleep by a little domestic concert of cats,
dogs, donkeys, parrots and game-cocks.]



ECONOMY IS WEALTH.

[Illustration: Showing the manner in which one ox accomplishes the labor
of two, in San Felipe.]



THE SUBURBS OF CALABAZAR.

[Illustration: A Planter's Hut, and three scraggly Palm Trees in the dim
distance.]



PLANTATIONS NEAR MARIANAO.

[Illustration: A Colored Beauty toting Sugar Cane from the field to the
grinding mill.]



ARCHITECTURE IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: A conglomerate _Esquina_, on the corner of Calle Obispo
and Monserate.]



LAST NIGHT IN HAVANA.

[Illustration: Alarm of Our Artist and Wife, upon going to their room to
pack, and discovering that a Tarantula has taken possession of their
trunk.]



PART II.

PERU.

[Illustration]



PERUVIAN SKETCHES.


  FRIENDLY COUNSELS.           GOOD FOR DIGESTION.

  A DISAGREEABLE BERTH.        AN EYE FOR AN EYE.

  A COLORED RECEPTION.         WHO KNOWS? (NOSE).

  THE NAKED TRUTH.             DISCRETION IN VALOR.

  A PANAMA LAUNDRESS.          BLACK WARRIORS.

  A MAN FOR A' HAT.            MUSIC HATH CHARMS.

  DOMESTIC BLISS.              A CHARIOT RACE.

  A BIT OF A CHURCH.           AN ANTIQUE.

  HOT WEATHER.                 FAMILY ARRANGEMENT.

  WHAT AN ASS!                 HEADS OF THE PEOPLE.

  A HAPPY FAMILY.              BY THEIR FRUITS.

  LAND AT LAST.                A BEAST OF BURDEN.

  CALLAO CATHEDRAL.            A NIGHT ADVENTURE.

  A BAGGAGE TRAIN.             A RUNAWAY.

  CATHEDRAL AT LIMA.           THE LIGHT FANTASTIC.

  A WATER-CARRIER.             A ROOSTER.

  A BAG OF CUFFEY.             A CHIME OF BELLS.

  BIRDS OF A FEATHER.          DOG-DAYS.

  A CHINA BOWL OF SOUP.        PORK BUSINESS.

  THING OF BEAUTY.             WHEN SHALL WE THREE.

  FONDEST HOPES DECAY.         UNHAND ME!

  RAT-IFICATION MEETING.       NOTHING VENTURE.

  A BACK SEAT.                 A GREAT SELL.

  AN EXCELLENT VIEW.           A BEGGARLY SHOW.

  BREAD-BASKETS.               A DEAD-HEAD.



THE START--STEAMSHIP "HENRY CHAUNCEY." FROM NEW YORK TO ASPINWALL.

[Illustration: Sea-sickness being a weakness of Our Artist, he
determines to be fore-armed, and accordingly provides himself with a few
simple preventives, warmly recommended by his various friends.]



IN THE CARIBBEAN SEA.

[Illustration: Our Artist, having indulged rather freely in the
different preventives, gets things mixed, and wishes that his friends
and their confounded antidotes were at the bottom of the Dead Sea.]



ARRIVAL AT ASPINWALL.

[Illustration: First impressions of the city and its
inhabitants.--Colored citizens on the dock, awaiting the steamer's
advent.]



ISTHMUS OF DARIEN.

[Illustration: View from the window of a Panama railroad car--showing
the low-neck and short-sleeve style of costume adopted by the youthful
natives of Cruces.--Also a sprightly specimen of the one-eared greyhound
indigenous to the country.]



A VIEW IN PANAMA.

[Illustration: The old and weather-beaten church of Santa Ana--and in
the foreground, with basket on her head, baby under one arm, and bowl of
milk supported by the other, a colored lady of West Indian descent,
vulgarly known as a "Jamaica nigger."]



AN AFTERNOON AT PANAMA.

[Illustration: Deeming it always incumbent upon the traveller to invest
in the products of the country, Our Artist provides himself with a good
sensible Panama hat, and thus with wife and "mutual friend," he
peacefully and serenely meanders around among the suburbs of the city.]



A STREET SCENE IN PANAMA.

[Illustration: Our Artist, with the naked eye, beholds a pig, a
fighting-cock, and a black baby, all tied by the leg, at the humble
doorway of the residence of a colored citizen, in the principal street
of the capital of Central America.]



IN THE BAY OF PANAMA.

[Illustration: Our Artist wanders about the sleepy little neighboring
island, Taboga, where the English steamers lie, and sketches, among
other picturesque bits, the clean little whitewashed cathedral in the
dirty little Broadway of Taboga.]



STEAMSHIP "CHILE." FROM PANAMA TO CALLAO.

[Illustration: Crossing the equinoctial line, Our Artist discovers that
the rays of a vertical sun are anything but bracing and cool.]



PAYTA--A SEAPORT IN PERU.

[Illustration: Our Artist, having understood that this town is chiefly
remarkable for its fine breed of mules, ironically inquires of a native
Venus if this can be considered a good specimen. The N. V. treats Our
Artist with silent, stolid, Indian contempt.]



NATURAL HISTORY IN PERU.

[Illustration: Our Artist visits a coasting-vessel just arrived from
Guayaquil, loaded with every variety of tropical fruit, and a sprinkling
of tame monkeys, parrots, alligators, white herons, iguanas, paroquets,
spotted deer, etc.]



ARRIVAL AT CALLAO--THE HARBOR.

[Illustration: The landing-boat being a trifle too much loaded by the
head, Our Artist finds it somewhat difficult to steer.]



ARCHITECTURE IN CALLAO.

[Illustration: The little one-story Cathedral on the Plaza, which the
earthquakes have so frantically and so vainly tried to swallow up or
tumble down.]



ARRIVAL AT LIMA.

[Illustration: Triumphal entry of Our Artist and his
much-the-better-half; reviving the brilliant days of Pizarro and his
conquering warriors, as they entered the "City of the Kings."--The
Peruvian warriors in the present century, however, conquer but the
baggage, and permit the weary traveller to walk to his hotel at the
tail-end of the procession.]



THE CATHEDRAL AT LIMA.

[Illustration: An after-dinner sketch (rather shaky) from our balcony in
the Hotel Morin, on the Grand Plaza.]



DOMESTICS IN PERU.

[Illustration: One of the waiters at our hotel, clad in the inevitable
_poncho_--A genuine native Peruvian, perhaps a son of "Rolla the
Peruvian," who was "within."]



A PERUVIAN COOK.

[Illustration: Peeping into the kitchen one day, Our Artist perceives
that a costume, cool and negligé, may be improvised by making a hole in
a coffee-bag and getting into it.]



STREETS OF LIMA--CALLE JUDIOS.

[Illustration: Almost every other street in Lima has a stream of filthy
water or open sewer running through the middle of it, offering rich
fishing-grounds to the graceful _gallinazos_ or turkey-buzzards, who
thus constitute the street-cleaning department of the municipal
government.]



CELESTIALS IN PERU.

[Illustration: Our Artist is here seen resisting the tempting offer of a
bowl of what appears to be buzzard soup, in front of one of the Chinese
cook-shops that abound in the neighborhood of the market at Lima.]



DOLCE FAR NIENTE--A DREAM OF PERU.

[Illustration: Our Artist before going to Lima, during little poetical
siestas, had indulged in lovely romantic reveries, the burden of which
he sketches in his mind's eye, Horatio--but]



THE SAD REALITY.

[Illustration: Alas! too frequently his thirsty eye is met only by such
visions as the above--and the lovely beauties of Lima, where are they?]



BEDROOMS IN PERU.

[Illustration: A section of the inner-wall to our chamber at the Hotel
in Lima.--The condition of things at the witching hour of night, judging
by the sounds.]



STREETS OF LIMA.--CALLE PALACIO.

[Illustration: A young Peruvian accompanying its mamma to market in the
morning.]



STREETS OF LIMA--CALLE PLATEROS.

[Illustration: A picturesque little _mirador_ or lookout at the corner
of Calle Plateros and Bodegones, opposite the Hotel Maury, with
balconies _ad lib._]



OCCUPATIONS IN LIMA.

[Illustration: The _panadero_, or baker, as he appears on his mite of a
donkey, rushing round through the streets of Lima, delivering bread to
his customers.]



CARRIAGES AND PAVEMENTS IN LIMA.

[Illustration: Our Artist, after a hearty dinner, extravagantly engages
a three-horse coupé, and goes out for a regular, genuine, native
Peruvian ride.

That his bones are unbroken, and that he is yet alive to tell the tale,
remains to him an unfathomable mystery.]



COSTUMES IN LIMA.--THE SAYA Y MANTO.

[Illustration: Our Artist has heard a good deal about the magnificent
eyes of the Limanian women; but as he never sees more than one eye at a
time, he can't say much about them, with any regard for the truth.]



HEAD-DRESSES IN LIMA.--THE MANTO.

[Illustration: The Señoritas look very prettily sometimes, with their
black mantillas thrown gracefully over their heads, (_See Geographies,
etc._,) but when you come across a party possessing a decided nose, in
profile, the effect is rather startling.]



REVOLUTIONS IN PERU.

[Illustration: Our apartments look out upon the Grand Plaza, where the
fighting usually takes place; and as the windows are mostly broken by
the balls of the last Revolution, (Nov. 6, 1865,) and it's about time
for another, Our Artist gets into ambuscade every time he hears a
fire-cracker in the street.]



THE WAR WITH SPAIN.

[Illustration: Two native and dreadfully patriotic Peruvian soldiers on
review before their superior officer.]



MARTIAL MUSIC IN PERU.

[Illustration: The National Hymn, with variations, as rendered by the
Royal Band in front of President Prado's palace on the Grand Plaza.]



FINE ARTS IN PERU.

[Illustration: A hasty sketch of Mistress Juno and her peacocks, as
represented by fresco in the doorway of a Lima palace--Calle
Ayachucho.]



DARK AGES OF PERU.

[Illustration: The old unfinished church and deserted monastery of San
Francisco de Paula--Calle Malambo.]



LOCOMOTION IN SOUTH AMERICA.

[Illustration: What the country people would do down there, if the
jackasses were only long enough.--What they _do_ do, is but slightly
caricatured by Our Artist.]



HAIR-DRESSING IN LIMA.

[Illustration: Ladies' style as seen at the theatre.

Also Our Artist before and after he had his hair cut in the latest Lima
fashion.]



A FRUIT-STALL AT CHORRILLOS.

[Illustration: Our Artist, as he appeared when stricken with amazement
at the huge clusters of white grapes that are everywhere, for a mere
song, sold in Peru.]



SHOPPING IN PERU.

[Illustration: A Peruvian materfamilias, having bought a few simple
house-keeping articles in town, is here seen returning to her mountain
home, accompanied by her purchases.]



THE FLEAS OF LIMA.

[Illustration: Having been nearly devoured by these carnivorous little
devils, Our Artist sprinkles himself with Turkish flea-powder one night
before retiring, and is charmed at the rapid and parabolic manner with
which they desert him.]



THE LLAMAS OF PERU.

[Illustration: Our Artist had heretofore fancied that it would be
immensely jolly to ride one of these singular beasts of burden; but when
he encounters this one, on a lonely road outside the walls one day, he
begs to be excused.]



TERPSICHORE IN PERU.

[Illustration: Our Artist assists at a mask-ball in the Jardin Otaiza,
and is puzzled at the nationality of the costumes worn by the dancers.]



CHURCH ORNAMENTS IN LIMA.

[Illustration: The statues in the niches and on the spires of the
Cathedral look very well in the daytime; but at night, when the
turkey-buzzards roost on their heads, the solemnity of the thing is
somewhat marred.]



THE BELLS OF LIMA.

[Illustration: Lima is full of churches, and the churches are full of
bells; and as they ring and bang away from dewy eve till early morn,
their cadences are calculated to disturb somewhat the peaceful slumbers
of Our Artist.]



PERUVIAN BARK--IN THE ROUGH.

[Illustration: Our Artist is treated to plenty of this quinine (canine)
salutation, whenever and wherever he pays a visit in Lima.]



TRANSPORTATION IN PERU.

[Illustration: "This pig went to market," but as he wouldn't go
decently, he was tied upon the back of the ever-patient donkey, and so,
_nolens volens_, came to Lima, crossing the bridge over the Rimac, where
Our Artist sketched him.]



PRIESTS AND FRIARS OF LIMA.

[Illustration: A theological discussion of the gravest import takes
place between three jolly Fathers of the Roman Catholic Church--a
Dominican, a Mercedarian, and a Buena-Muertean.

Scene--The square in front of the church of San Francisco, with its
crooked cross.]



ENTOMOLOGY IN SOUTH AMERICA.

[Illustration: Our Artist doesn't want to say anything against the
insects of Peru; but the way in which one of his hands swelled up, after
a bite from some unknown varmit in the night, was, to say the least,
alarming.]



LOTTERIES IN PERU.

[Illustration: Having invested in the semi-monthly Lima lottery, Our
Artist feels so confident of drawing the $4,000 prize, that he gets
extravagant, wears his good clothes, and smokes one-dollar cigars; but a
revulsion of feeling takes place after the drawing produces nothing for
him but blanks.]



CURIOSITIES OF PERU.

[Illustration: Having been informed by a musty old sepulchral monk that
the remains of Pizarro might be seen behind this grating, Our Artist
tremblingly gazes therein--but as it is pitch dark, he doesn't recognize
Pizarro.]



A COUP D'OEIL IN LIMA.

[Illustration: A picturesque view of the great stone bridge over the
rapid river Rimac, showing the towers of the church Desamparados, the
Arch with illuminated clock, and the spire of Santo Domingo.--Sketched
with about ninety-seven Peruvian beggars looking over Our Artist's
shoulder.]



LAST DAY AT LIMA.

[Illustration: A visit to the Museum--which contains a not very
remarkable collection of Peruvian antiquities--and where Our Artist sees
all that remains of the once magnificent Atahualpa, last king of the
Incas.

Alas, poor Yorick! To this complexion must we come at last.--Fit sketch
wherewith to end this strange, eventful history of "Our Artist in
Peru."]



PART III.

SPAIN.

[Illustration]



A SPANISH OVERCOAT.

[Illustration: Our Artist, upon his arrival in "Sunny Spain," is
overtaken in the Pyrenees, on the French Frontier, by a terrific
snow-storm, and is compelled to provide himself, at BAYONNE, with an
Overcoat of the Country.]



HACKMEN IN SPAIN.

[Illustration: Portraits of the three Hackmen, who (upon our arrival at
the City of BURGOS, in the dead of night,) meet us at the Rail Road
station, and propose accompanying us to our Hotel.]



A CITIZEN OF VALLADOLID.

[Illustration: Here is a faithful portrait of the Old Party who entered
the cars at VALLADOLID; carrying with him a few travelling
conveniences.]



A MADRID HAT.

[Illustration: This is a Spanish Dandy at the Grand Opera House in
MADRID:--first, with his cigarette and new Hat of the period; second,
after his Hat had been sat upon by a fat old Señora, during the third
act of Lucia di Lammermoor.]



LOTTERIES IN SPAIN.

[Illustration: Nearly all the Lottery tickets in Spain are publicly sold
in the streets by Beggars: and _this_ is the sort of Vagabond in MADRID
to whom Our Artist confided $16 for a ticket that won a prize of $5.]



SIGHT-SEEING IN SPAIN.

[Illustration: There are so many hundred apartments to be seen in the
famous PALACE OF THE ESCORIAL, that Our Artist is obliged to follow his
Brigand of a Guide rather rapidly, in order to view them all in one
day.]



NAPOLEON BONAPARTE.

[Illustration: Our Artist sees from the car-window, at a Rail-Road
Station near Toledo, what, at a first glance, appears to be a statue of
Napoleon Bonaparte,--but: (_see next page_.)]



A RAIL-ROAD OFFICIAL.

[Illustration:---- the Statue suddenly becomes animated and revolves;
and the side-view reveals a CIVIL GUARD, with carbine and knapsack
beneath his big military cloak.]



ARCHITECTURE IN CORDOVA.

[Illustration: A picturesque little half Moorish and half Spanish
dwelling house, in the Calle Jesus Maria; with a couple of Priests in
earnest discussion.]



BALCONIES IN SEVILLE.

[Illustration: Sketch of a private residence in Calle San Pablo; from
the upper Balcony of which, Our Artist had a rose thrown to him, while a
cloaked Assassin of a probable Lover, glowered savagely at him from the
doorway.]



IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA.

[Illustration: The Barber of Seville, according to Rossini's Opera, and
according to the way in which he is popularly believed to disport
himself.--(_See next page._)]



A BARBAROUS PROCEEDING.

[Illustration: The Barber of Seville, as he actually exists in that
city, and precisely as he appeared while operating upon our Artist, one
day, in the Calle de las Sierpes.]



A CAFÉ IN SEVILLE.

[Illustration: Our Artist discovers, one day, in the Calle Tunidores,
not exactly the most fashionable Café in SEVILLE, but a Café glorying in
the ambitious name of JULIUS CÆSAR!]



TYPES OF SPANISH CHARACTER.

[Illustration: Fellow Passengers in the Diligence to MALAGA--one, a
corpulent and famous Bull-Fighter, and the other, an envious and
admiring follower of the same ennobling Profession.]



SPANISH STAGE-COACHES.

[Illustration: The light and graceful antediluvian Diligence that
transported us up the Sierra Nevada Mountains, from MALAGA To LOJA.]



LOCOMOTION IN SPAIN.

[Illustration: This sketch is an attempt to display the general
character and construction of one of the seven Mules that drew our
Diligence over the hills from MALAGA To LOJA.]



THE SPANISH GUITAR.

[Illustration: A characteristic little sketch of a Guitar Player, in the
window of a second-story dwelling, on the Alemeda de Verano, at
GRENADA.]



BEGGARS IN SPAIN.

[Illustration: Our Artist, having in a generous moment, distributed a
handful of copper coins to the poor of GRENADA, finds himself,
thereafter, in all his strolls about the ALHAMBRA, at the Head of such a
Procession as this!]



THE ALHAMBRA.

[Illustration: Sketch of the famous Gate of Justice, the principal
modern Entrance to the far-famed Moorish Palace of THE ALHAMBRA--with a
little Spanish Flirtation going on in the corner.]



THE ALHAMBRA.

[Illustration: Outline Sketch of an Ancient Moorish Well, inside the
enclosure of the ALHAMBRA; with a bit of the Old Wall.]



A SPANISH VEGETABLE MARKET.

[Illustration: A sketch in GIBRALTAR--This fellow was seen wandering
around the streets, selling vegetables to the natives, and steering his
Donkey by the tail.]



PART IV.

ALGIERS.

[Illustration]



LANDING IN AFRICA.

[Illustration: We leave Gibraltar by Steamer, and upon reaching the city
of NEMOURS, Our Artist and his Better-Half are taken ashore from the
small boat by the Natives in this summary manner!--A couple of inviting
Hotel-keepers are awaiting them on the beach.]



AN ARAB BEGGAR.

[Illustration: One of the first Objects that greets the eagle eye of Our
Artist, as he wanders around the streets of NEMOURS, is this cheerful
"What-is-it," who mournfully begs for a few grains of corn.]



AFRICAN WATER CARRIERS.

[Illustration: Sketch of a fantastic little Fountain in one of the
streets of the City of ORAN.]



BED-ROOMS IN AFRICA.

[Illustration: This is the sort of Thing that you find meandering round
on your pillow, when you retire to your Chamber for the night, at the
Hotel in ORAN.]



ANOTHER ARAB BEGGAR.

[Illustration: This Gentleman, who accosted us in the suburbs of ORAN,
assured us in tremulous accents that he had eaten nothing in seventeen
days--and we saw no reason for doubting his word.]



LOCOMOTION IN AFRICA.

[Illustration: Upon our arrival in the City of ALGIERS, we are much
amused at the first vehicle we see; where a diminutive donkey is hitched
in front of an enormous horse.]



COSTUMES IN AFRICA.

[Illustration: Alarm of Our Artist, as he, for the first time,
encounters a Moorish maiden, as she appears around the corner from a
dark and narrow street, in the Kasbah quarter of the City of ALGIERS.]



SOLDIERS IN AFRICA.

[Illustration: A French Zouave off duty, as he appeared while listening
to the Military Band that played every afternoon in the Place du
Gouvernment, ALGIERS.]



A STREET IN ALGIERS.

[Illustration: The Rue Staoueli--a narrow street in the old Arab Quarter
of ALGIERS, where the houses nearly touch each other at their tops.]



MANUFACTURES IN AFRICA.

[Illustration: Sketch in the Rue Kasbah.--A couple of Moorish Jews,
engaged in silk spinning, at the door of their palatial residence.]



MOORISH SHOP-KEEPER.

[Illustration: This graceful and fairy-like Will-o'-the-Wisp, sold us
some lovely silk embroideries, in ALGIERS, the like of which, Solomon,
in all his glory never dreamed of.]



FINE ARTS IN AFRICA.

[Illustration: We visit the not very interesting Museum in ALGIERS, and
sketch, among other curious objects, a Cast of an Arab Martyr [one
Géronimo], who had been buried alive in a box of Plaster of Paris.]



JARDIN D'ESSAI, ALGIERS.

[Illustration: Merely a sketch (for the last page of this little book)
of a Date-Palm Tree, in ALGIERS, with a couple of Arabs trying to get in
its shade.]

       *       *       *       *       *


=THE UNITED STATES LIFE INSURANCE CO.=

This company is one of the oldest in this city, and has a high
reputation for conservative and skilful management. Its Board of
Directors comprises a number of the best known, most influential, and
wealthiest of our merchants and bankers. Its officers are men of proved
integrity and ability.

The annual statement, submitted last January, and accepted by the State
Commissioner of Insurance as correct, shows the assets to be $4,654,274,
and the surplus, as already stated, to be over $800,000, or more than
twenty per cent, of all the liabilities.

The United States Life Insurance Co. is known in Life Insurance circles
as one of the most carefully handled institutions in the city.

So well has it been managed that its business has increased rather than
retrograded during the past year, as bad as it has been for all kinds of
business. And its losses have been less this year than in any of the
five preceding.

Its officers are among the best known and most highly esteemed citizens
of New York. JAMES BUELL, Esq., the President, is the President of the
Importers and Traders' Bank, a man whose name is a synonym for integrity
and skill in finance, and its stockholders are men equally well known in
business circles, and hold an equal share of public esteem.

=Organized 1850.=

=JAMES BUELL, _President_.=

C. P. FRALEIGH, Sec'y.      T. H. BROSNAN, Supt. Agencies.

HENRY W. BALDWIN,

Supt. Middle Department,

Office: Drexel Building, cor. Wall & Broad Streets,

NEW YORK.


OUR

=ARTIST IN CUBA,=

PERU, SPAIN AND ALGIERS

[Illustration]

BY

GEORGE W. CARLETON.

[Illustration]

Price

50 Cents.





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