Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII | PDF ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Collier's Photographic Record of teh Russo-Japanese War
THE BATTLEGROUND OF THE RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR
es	_


OF THE RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR
EDITED AND ARRANGED BY
JAMES H. HARE, War Photographer
WITH PHOTOGRAPHS BY
VICTOR K. BULLA, ROBERT L. DUNN, JAMES F. J. ARCHIBALD, RICHARD BARRY
ASHMEAD BARTLETT, JAMES RICALTON
TOGETHER WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OF THE SEA OF JAPAN BY
CAPTAIN A. T. MAHAN, U. S. N., RETIRED

NEW YORK
P. F. COLLIER	SON
1905

COPYRIGHT 190S BY P. F. COLLIER & SON
     The photographs reproduced in this volume are fully pro-tected by copyright in the United States and Great Britain. Their reproduction, without express permission, is hereby forbidden.
     The work of Messrs. Hare, Dunn, Archibald, and Barry, under adverse conditions in the field, was greatly facilitated by the use of the films and developing machine of the Eastman Kodak Company, to whom they feel this acknowledgment is due.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIO
PAGE
The 13attlegrouncl of the Russo-Japanese War—
Frontispiece  	2
Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia  	7
Mutsuhito, Emperor of Japan  	7
Vice-Admiral Alexieff  	8
Marquis Ito Hirobumi  	8
Typical Street Scene in Russia's Capital City .	ro
PAGE
With the Russian Army on its March to the Front .	.	45
The Autocrat of Russia and the Royal Family .	.	.  	46
The Czar Leaving the Winter Palace to Bid Farewell
to Troops  	47
Departure of Red Cross Nurses from St. Petersburg .	48
The Czar Reviewing an Infantry Regiment  	49
Procession in Honor of the Chemulpo Sailors .	.	.	5o
An Everyday Scene in One of the Large Cities of Japan
r
Twenty-Third Artillery Brigade About to Leave Gatchina
51
Japanese Troops Preparing for War 	
The Czar Bidding Farewell to Commanders 	
52
Training Japanese Cavalrymen at the Tokio Barracks .	.
Grand buke Alexandrovitch Leading His Marines in
Changing Guard at the Oyarna Barracks in Tokio .	.	.
15
Review Before the Czar 	
53
Swapping Stories in the Guard House at Oyama Barracks
16
International Balloon Contest at St. Petersburg
54
Cleaning and Oiling Rifles in Preparation for War	.
Landing tbe Men who Fought at the Yalu 	
56
Departure of Baron Rosen from Yokohama 	
Artillerymen Landing at Chenampo 	
57
Russian Minister to Korea Departing- from Seoul	.
19
Japanese Bluejackets Coming Ashore at Chenampo
58
Newspaper Bulletins on the Chemulpo Battle .	•
20
Grooming Cavalry Horses at Chenampo 	
59
Patriotic Citizens Awaiting Their Turn to Enlist	•
21
Japanese Troopers Caring for a Sick Horse 	
60
Building Temporary Stables in Tokio 	
21
Koreans and Japanese Salesman at Chenampo .
61
Mobilization of Troops in Tokio at the Outbreak of War
22
With the Japanese on the Advance to the Yalu .
62
Troops Marching to Station Through the Streets of Tokio
23
Screens which Hid the Movements of the Japanese
63
Departure of Japanese Troops for Korea 	
24
General Kuroki and His Staff at Headquarters .	.
64
Japanese Troops Detraining at Hiroshima 	
25
Russians Crossing Lake Baikal in Midwinter .	.
66
Cavalry Train Leaving Shimbashi Station 	
26
With the Russian Forces on Their Way to the Front
67
Men of the Army Service Corps Ready to Entrain
27
Caissons and Sledges About to Cross Lake Baikal .
68
"Sayonara!"—Good-By 	
27
Russian Soldiers Marching Across Frozen Lake Baikal
69
Engineers at Hiroshima Practicing Building Bridges	.
28
Russian Infantry \Vanning Up with Hot Tea .	.	.
70
Bridge at Hiroshima Ready for the Pontoons .	.	.	.
29
The Russian Advance to the Front 	
71
"Tikoku Banzai l"—"Long Live the Empire!" .	.	.	.
3o
Traveling- Soup Kitchen and Soup-Kettle Ovens .	.
72
Destruction of the "Variag" and "Korietz" 	
32
With the Russians During the Advance to the Front .	.
73
Wrecks of the Russian Warships in Cheinuipo Harbor .
33
Chinese Coolies with Russian Overseer Ready for Work
74
Japanese Salvage Corps on the Wreck of the "Variag" .
34
Cossacks Dismounted and Lined Up for Inspection .	.
75
The Night Landing of the Japanese Troops at Chemulpo
35
General Herschelmann's Division of Cavalry at Antung .
76
Coolies Handling Japanese Supplies 	
36
Russian Artillery Advancing Toward the Yalu •	.	.	.
77
Mrs. Pavlov, Wife of the Russian IlIinister to Korea .	.
37
Russian Cobblers at Work in the Field on Soldiers' Boots
78
Dr. H. N. Allen, United States Minister to Korea .
37
Dinner Time with the Nineteenth Siberian Rifle Corps •
79
The Japanese Advance Through Korea 	
38
General Sassulitch and Staff at the Battle of the Yalu .	•
8o
The Japanese Occupation of Seoul 	
39
Incideuts of the Battle of the Yalu 	
82
Japanese Troops Waiting to Cross at Ping-Yang .	•
40
The Crossing of the Yalu 	
83
Koreans Watching the Entry of the Japanese at Seoul .
41
With the Wounded After the Fight at the Yalu .
84
The Japanese Red Cross Hospital at Chemulpo .	.	.	•
42
Hospital Corps and Wounded Japanese 	
85
Russia.n Ladies Sewing fort the Red Cross 	
44
Japanese Reserves Watching the Battle 	
86
NS
PAGE
Artillery Spoils Captured by the Japanese 	 87
Some of the Wounded Russian Prisoners 	 88
Japanese Burying a Russian Captain 	 89
Japanese Transportation Trains and Infantry . . . 	 90
Fire and Devastation in the Wake of the Retreating Army 91 The Japanese Occupation of Feng-Wang-Cheng . . . 92 English Nurses Sent by the Queen to Inspect the Work
ings of the Japanese Red Cross 	 93
Shinto Ceremony Held by the Japanese 	 94
Feng-Wang-Cheng After the Japanese Occupation . • 95 Japanese Getting Ready to Push on into Manchuria . 96 'Recreations of the Japanese Between Battles in Manchuria 97 Japanese Battery Going into Action at Feng-Wang-Ch6ng 98
With the Japanese Invaders in Manchuria	 99
Whiling Away the Time Between Battles 	 too
Incidents of the Advance from Feng-Wang-Cheng . 	 Jot
Crossing the So River in the Advance on Liao-Yang . 102 General Nishi and His Staff Halting to Study Maps and Scouts' Reports 	 103
With the Victorious Japanese at Lienshankwan . .	ro4
Arrival of Mail for the Army in the Field 	 105
Into Manchuria with the Japanese Invaders 	 io6
Kwantei Temple Near Motien Pass 	 107
Detachment of Japanese Coming Up at the Double-Quick io8
Sharpshooters Covering the Advance 	 io9
Scenes During the Battle of Motienling 	 110
General Kuroki and His Chief of Staff, Lieutenant-Gen
    eral Fuji, Watching the Fight at Motienling . . • iii Bringing Wounded Russians to the Dressing Station • 112 Russian Red Cross Soldier Wounded at Motien Pass . 113
Russian Wounded and Dead at Motien Pass 	
With the Wounded and Captured at Motien Pass . . • 115 Japanese Skirmishers Advancing to Flank the Enemy • 116
Prisoners and Captors at Motienling 	 117
Incidents of the Attempt to Recapture Motien Pass . • 118
.Geperal Okasaki, who Defeated the Russians .	. • 119
Field Dressing Station for Those Severely Wounded . . 120
With the Japanese Advance from the Yalu 	 121
With the Japanese During the Fighting Near Anping . . 122 Japanese and Captured Russians in Manchuria . . • 123 Smokeless Batteries Hidden in Fields of Kowliang . • 124

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE
In the Neighborhood of Towan During the Fighting . . 125 Difficulties of Campaigning During the Rainy Season . 126 Russian Guns Captured at Nanshan Used by the Japanese 127 Along the Line of Battle in the Manchurian Passes . . 128 Pressing the Russians in the Neighborhood of Liao-Yang 129
With the Japanese on August 30 	 130
View of the Harbor Entrance of Port Arthur	 132
Looking Southward Across the Docks at Port Arthur 	 133
Scenes Along the Water Front at Port Arthur .	. 	 134
Naval and Civilian Activity in Port Arthur 	 135
Russian Warships in the Harbor at Port Arthur . . 	 136
Getting Ready for the Japanese on a Russian Warship 137
Russian Ships at Pcirt Arthur 	 138
Part of Russia's Fighting Fleet at Port Arthur . . . 	 139
The Man who Bottled Up Port Arthur, and His Flagship 140 Russian Troops Detraining at Mukden Early in March . 142 Mukden when the Japanese were Still Many Miles Away 143  Russians at Mukden on Their Way to the Front   144
With the Russians in Manchuria 	 145
Passing General Herschelmann's Division 	 146
With the Russian Advance in Manchuria 	 147
In the Field with the Russians in Manchuria 	 148
General Kuropatkin at the Telescope 	 149
With the Russians on the Way to the Front 	 150
General Kuropatkin Inspecting the Staff of the Fourth Army Corps	 151
Part of the Movement of Forty Thousand Men	152
Scenes at Liao-Yang oti the Arrival of the Russians	153
Courtyard of Rich Manchurian's House at Liao-Yang .	154
When News from the Firing Line Came Back to Those
who had not yet Met the Japanese 	 155
A Disheartened Japanese Spy 	 156
Russian Battery Getting into Position at Kansuitan	157
One of the Shrewdly Screened Russian Batteries .	158
The Sixth East Siberian Regiment Calculating the Range 159
Russian Infantry Marching to Their Position . . . 	 t6o
With the Russian Troops Near Haicheng 	 161
With the Russian Troops During the Engagement with
    the Japanese in the Neighborhood of Haicheng .   162 Battery of the Sixth East Siberian Artillery in Position 163 With the Russian Officers and Fighting Men  164 With the Russian Troops During the Early Campaigning 165 With the Russians at Towan Pass   166 Russian Firing Line Just Before the Battle at Yushuling 167 Japanese Shells Bursting Neal the Yushuling Battery . . 168
PAGE
Rewards.of Valor with Kuropatkin's Army in Manchuria 169
With the Russian Forces in Manchuria 	 170
Russian Skirmishers Advancing Against the Japanese 	 171
With the Tenth Russian Army Corps at Yushuling . 	 172
With the Russian Troops During the Early Campaigning 173 With the Russian Red Cross Service in Manchuria . • 174 War Balloon and Gas Bag Used by the Russians . . • 175 In the Russian Trenches During the Fighting at Taling . 176 Japanese Resting on the Banks of the Tang River . • 178 On the Last of the Hills, on September Third . 179
Searching Out and Burying the Dead 	 180
Incidents of the Evacuation of Liao-Yang 	 181
Views of Fortifications and Entanglements 	 182
Liao-Yang the Morning of Its Occupation by the Japanese 183
The First Entry of the Japanese into Liao-Yang . . . 184
Scenes in Liao-Yang After Its Capture 	 185
Liao-Yang After Its Occupation by the Japanese Forces 	 186
Liao-Yang Immediately After the Capture of the City 	 187
Dr. Westwater, Medical Missionary 	 188
Dr.Westwater and Rev.T.McNaughton in a Bomb-Proof 188 Operating on Manchurian who had Forty-Seven 'Wounds 188 Innocent Manchurian Victims of the War   188 Liao-Yang Before and After the Arrival of the Japanese 189
After the Russians Evacuated Liao-Yang 	 190
Japanese Activity at Liao-Yang 	 191
Liao-Yang After Oyama's Armies had Taken the City 	 192
General Kuroki, Staff, Correspondents, and Attaches . 	 194
Correspondents with the Russian Forces in Manchuria 	 195
Civilians and Military Attaches with the Russian Forces 196 The Target-Shoot Given for the Military Attaches . . 197 Military Attaches Firing at a Target-Shoot   198 With the War Correspondents In Korea and Manchuria 199 Attaches and Correspondents with General Kuroki's Army 200 Scenes During the Fighting Early in October .
* 202
Close to the Firing Line Near Yentai Coal Mines .
                                                     * 203 Russian Shells Bursting Close to Japanese Battery • • 204 Photograph Showing Shrapnel Shells Bursting . .
                                                     * 204 With the Japanese on October Tenth at the Sha-Ho . • 205 On the Sha-Ho Battlefield with the Japanese . . . • 206 Victors and Vanquished of the Sha-Ho . . .	. • 207
The Aftermath of Battle in the Neighborhood of Yentai . 208 Preparing Charcoal for the Army while it was Encamped 209 Winter Quarters with the Japanese Army on the Sha-Ho 210 Japanese Army in December in Camp on the Sha-Ho . 211 Between Battles with the Japanese Near the Sha-Ho . . 212

PAGE
With the Japanese in Winter Quarters at the Sha sHo . 	 213
Typical View of Manchurian Peasants 	 214
Scenes at Newchwang After the Fall of Port Arthur . 	 215
Josses of an Ancient Chinese Temple 	 216
With the Japanese During the Last Days of the Siege . 	 218
1 he Great Siege Guns Throwing Eleven-Inch Shells . 	 219
Two of the Great Twenty-eight Centimeter Siege Guns 	 220
	Shells Waiting to be Hurled into Port Arthur . .   221
	Scenes Near Port Arthur During the Long Siege .   222
Infantry Hidden by Cornfields and Ravines 	 223
Japanese Infantry Creeping Through a Cornfield .	224
Japanese War Balloon Near Port Arthur   225 General Nogi and His Staff, Conquerors of Port Arthur 226 With the Japanese as They Closed in Around Port Arthur 227 Incidents of the Surrender of Port Arthur  228
One of the Many "Bomb-Proofs" Used by Civilians .	229
Engineers' Stores Set on Fire by Japanese Shells .	230
Japanese Shell Bursting in the Basin 	 231
View of the Old Town After a Bombardment	232
The Price of Victory 	 233
Russian Dead Awaiting Burial 	 234
Photographer's Studio at Port Arthur After it had been
Struck by Japanese Shells 	 235
Views of Port Arthur in October 	 236
Inside Some of the Russian Forts After the Surrender 	 237
Scenes at Port Arthur After the Surrender .	238-239
Sunken Russian Battleships   240 Harbor of Port Arthur when the Japanese Took Possession 241 Convalescent Russian Sailors and Japanese Nurses . .   242 Views at Port Arthur and with a Russian Battery on the
    Hun River 	 244
Russian Cavalry and Native Horsemen in the Neighbor
    hood of Mukden 	 245
Muster of One of Kuroki's Divisions After the Battle of
    Mukden   246 Mukden Neighborhood Before the Japanese were Near . 247 Where Some of the Shells Burst During the Artillery
Duels Near Mukden 	 248
Desolation in the Path of the Japanese Attack .	249
Scenes in the Vicinity of Mukden   250 Fighting Ships of Various Classes in Russia's Baltic Fleet 253 Formidable Fighting Ships of Russia's Baltic Fleet . . . 254 Four of the Battleships of Russia's Baltic Fleet . . 255 The Battleground of the War and the Victorious Progress
of the Japanese	 256

INTROD
THE RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR was notable for the fact
that, although there were more men on the spot ready to
transmit the news to the world than there have been in any
other war in modern times, there never has been a war since
the days of the telegraph and the professional correspondent
the daily news of which the
world at large knew so little.
There is, therefore, a unique
interest in so vivid and com
prehensive a pictorial history
as that gathered by Collier's
correspondent photographers
and presented in the following
pages. Practically all the pho
tographs, with the exception of
a very few of those depicting
scenes in Russia and with the
Russian forces, were taken
originally and exclusively for
Collier's, and they have not
appeared elsewhere except by
special arrangement and permission. A large number of
these photographs have never been printed in Collier's, and
they are published in this book for the first time. Even
these were chosen from many hundreds of others, and they
represent but a small part of the great mass of photographs
which were secured by Collier's indefatigable representatives

at the front. In each weekly issue of Collier's it was obviously impossible to devote more than a few pages exclusively to war pictures, and in such a small space it is a task of exceeding difficulty to convey to the casual reader any adequate realization of the unique value and the comprehensive extent of Collier's Russo-Japanese War service. In this book the cumulative effect of many pictures helps to give at least a partial idea of the 'amount of material gathered by Collier's corre-spondents, and it should be further explained that almost every one of the pictures herein reproduced is chosen from perhaps a dozen or score of photographs of similar scenes.
      Since the days of the tele-graph and the modern war correspondent, there has never been a war in which the work. of the chroniclers was beset with such difficulties. During the early months of hostilities practically all of the correspondents were bottled up in Tokio, chafing at their delay, beseeching this official and that, buying winter outfits only to be com-pelled to change them for summer equipment, and wasting their energies during this fretful period of uncertainty in the.

INTRODUCTION

description of conventional phases of Japanese life or of the
entertainments given them ..by their inscrutable hosts of the
Japanese war departments. It was only by some rare stroke
of forehandedness, daring, or luck, by which he escaped tem
porarily from the Japanese watchfulness and censorship, that
any correspondent was able at this time to do effective work.
Of the little army of men who tried to chronicle the war,
with pencil or camera, none
more really “made good" than
Collier's photographer, James
H. Hare. Mr. Hare worked
in Tokio before war was de
clared, and he followed Kuro
ki's army from its landing in
Korea through the Yalu cam
paign and until the battle of
the Sha-Ho. Mr. Hare is a
specialist—not in any sense a
“button-pusher," as he calls the
amateur who carries a camera
as an incidental. (c When we
stood on the heights of Wiju,"
wrote Collier's correspondent,
Frederick Palmer, tt the soldiers appeared only as the veriest
specks to a camera lens. Jimmy wanted to see the charge as
much as the rest of us. But the detail had to be shown and the
photographer must be near the detail, so Jimmy slipped away
when the censor wasn't looking. I wonder if those who saw the
realistic pictures of the groups of wounded around the hospital
tents at the Yalu realized at all what they cost this little man,

UCTIOI?T
who is nearing his fiftieth year. He was the first of the correspondents' corps to cross the river. He trudged through miles of sand up to his knees. His pony was worn out; his weary servant promptly resigned. But Jimmy himself was up the next morning at daybreak, ill and pale, developing the first photographs of the army at the front to be published."
      Another of Collier's photographers, Robert L. Dunn, was sent to Chemulpo before hostilities broke out and “beat" the newspaper and periodical world with his pictures of the first battle of the war and the landing of Japanese troops. The greater portion of the Russian pictures were taken by Victor K. Bulla, whose work in this country was controlled exclusively by Collier's. Dozens of photographs which the reader may survey at his ease were taken only after long marches over frozen and windswept country. Films were developed in the field with the help of Korean coolies or. Japanese commissary officers, and they reached Collier's office only after being carried scores and perhaps hundreds of miles by coolie runners through a country. where a mail service was unknown. Every one of the photographs printed in this book represents an outlay of time, energy, and money of which the uninitiated reader can have only a slight understanding.

CHAP'
THE CAUSES OF THE
THE WAR between Russia and japan was a fight for disputed territory. Its immediate cause was the failure of the two nations to agree on the relation which each should maintain toward Korea and Manchuria. The underlying cause of the struggle was the mighty clash that was bound to come when those measures which japan 'believed were necessary to her self-existence met the glacier-like progress of Russia eastward toward the Pacific. Through nearly three centuries the Russian Empire had advanced from the Ural Mountains to outposts and outlets on the Pacific Coast. Her mighty plans met no serious check until they came athwart the am-bitions and policy of the modernized japan, which saw in this alleged expansion for industrial development a menace to her integrity as a kingdom. Korea, a buffer between these two powers, became involved in the dispute by the results of the war between japan and China in 1894.. The intervention of the European Powers in the terms of treaty settlement robbed japan of her chief spoil, the Liaotung Peninsula, whose strong-hold .was Port Arthur. Russia, Germany, and France intima-ted that Japanese occupation of this base must be regarded as a permanent threat to the independence of China and Korea. Three years later, Russia began to fortify Port Arthur, on the pretext that German acquisition of Kiaochau would otherwise disturb the balance of power in North China.
     The Boxer outbreak of 1 9oo furnished Russia reasons for vastly increasing her military strength in Manchuria, to

TER I
.RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR
safeguard her railway across Siberia and her rapidly expanding commercial and colonization interests. Promises were made, and broken, that Manchuria would be evacuated and restored to Chinese control as soon as peaceful conditions were resumed in accordance with the joint agreements of the powers that the integrity of China should be preserved. When it became certain that Russia had no intention of loosening her grip on Manchuria, the Japanese Government proposed a conference, in July of 1903, for the purpose of assuring the lasting peace of Eastern Asia, by agreeing upon a working basis for settlement of the points at issue with Russia. Japan wished guarantees of the territorial integrity of China and Korea, and the tc open door" in both countries for commercial opportunity. Russia replied that she was ready to recognize the rights of Japan as the predominating influence in Korea, but refused to discuss further pledges regarding the future of China and Manchuria. The Russian attitude was influenced most strongly by the facts that Russia wanted an outlet to the Pacific, and that the outlay of three hundred million dollars in Manchuria, to make that province both Russian and prosperous, called for some tangible return. Japan refused to consider herself outside the sphere of active interest in Manchuria, and negotiations came to a deadlock early in 1904.
     On January 4, Japanese advices said that a conflict with Russia was inevitable, that the newspapers were urging the opening of hostilities, and that the Government was massing

CAUSES OF THE RUS

Steneograph Copyr{ghted by Underwood k Limen.i
TYPICAL STREET SCENE IN RUSSIA'S CAPITAL CITY
This photograph represents a procession leaving St. Catherine's Church, in St. Petersburg, to
go down to the Neva to bless the river waters, an example of that picturesque mediwvalism
which survives in so many forms, and is such a real part of the everyday life of the people

SO-JAPANESE WAR
troops ready to embark on transports. The diplomats in St. Petersburg were delaying over the final reply to the Japanese note and were not expecting war, according to their assurances.
    During the following week, Russia was hurrying troops toward the frontier and 'buying horses, while the Argentine cruisers, Nisshin and Kasuga, bought by japan, were making ready to leave Genoa with rush orders to proceed to Yoko-hama. Meantime, the negotiations were continued with pro-posals and counter-proposals that made no progress.
    On January 13, a conference before the Throne in Tokio decided upon the final terms to be sent to Russia, the only conditions which could avert war. Russia started two divisions of troops over the Trans-Siberian Railway to China, an obvious war measure. Two days later two transports crowded with Russian troops for the Far East sailed through the Bosphorus. Russia asked Turkey for permission to send the Black Sea fleet through the Dardanelles, and Lord Lansdowne said that such action would be considered a breach of treaty in which Great Britain could not acquiesce.
There was a lull of nearly two weeks, while Tokio fretted
over the delay of the Russian reply. japan adopted plans for
raising seventy-five million dollars of an emergency war fund.
The long-drawn tension of January ended with a pre
tence of negotiations oscillating between Tokio and St. Peters
burg, but by this time the pursuits of diplomacy had become a
farce, and both nations were making all possible preparation's
for a long struggle at arms. Although the Russian ultimatum
had not been officially delivered, its contents were forecasted,
and it was known that Japan's final demands had been

.USSR-JAPANESE WAR
AN EVERYDAY SCENE IN ONE OF THE LARGE CITIES OF JAPAN
These are the little people whose surface daintiness covers a martial spirit more truly Spartan
than that manifested by any other nation of the modern world. This street, gay with Japanese
flags, is the " Isezakieho," which has sometimes been called the Bowery of Yokohama

CAUSES OF THE RL
with the Russian replies, and the obvious futility of the negotiations, Japan considered it useless to continue diplomatic relations. Japan would take such steps as she deemed proper for the protection of her interests, therefore M. Kurino asked for his passports. The Russian Minister, a few hours later, prepared to leave Tokio as soon as possible.
    The startling action of Japan, in severing diplomatic relations before the actual delivery of the Russian note, came like a bolt from a clear sky at St. Petersburg. It was expected that Japan would invade Korea and seek a naval battle within the next twenty-four hours. This was an accurate surmise, for in even less time forty Japanese transports were loaded with troops to be landed at various points in Southern and Central Korea. One naval division sailed from Japanese waters for Chemulpo, and another for Port Arthur, as soon as the news that there could be no peace was sent by wireless telegraphy to the waiting ships.
     In the afternoon of February 8 a fleet of Japanese transports, escorted by a squadron of battleships and powerful cruisers, appeared off the harbor of Chemulpo. The Russian gunboat Korietz, on its way to Port Arthur with despatches, sighted the hostile craft; the commander cleared for action, fired a shot at the Japanese torpedo scouts, then returned at full speed to shelter near the Russian cruiser Fariag, inside the Korean harbor. This proved to be the first shot of the war, and was so claimed by the Japanese when accused of attacking Port Arthur without formal declaration of war later in the same day. Early on the morning of February 9, Admiral Uriu, commander of the Japanese fleet, notified the two Russians that they must surrender or leave the harbor by noon,

TSSO-JAPANESE WAR
else he would attack them where they lay. The Russians did not surrender, but sailed out of the bay, with bands playing, to certain destruction. By four o'clock that afternoon the Variag and the Korietz were at the bottom of Chemulpo Harbor, and the war was on.
    The man who judges things by weight, bulk, and dollars may well wonder at Japanese temerity. To Japan, with her 147,000 square miles, the annexation of Korea, with 82,000 square miles, meant what the annexation of Mexico would to the United States. To Russia, with her 8,666,000 square miles, it meant less than Southern California to us. Russia's population was 140,000,000; Japan's +4,000,000. On a peace footing the Russian army had 1,000,000 officers and men; the Japanese, 175,000. On a war footing, the Russian 4,600,000 and the Japanese 675,000.
    Russia is the Christian non which has been slowest in development. Mentally, she jtist out of the Dark Ages, equipped with the mechanical progress of modern times. Japan is the pagan nation which has been foremost in adopting the worldly essentials of a civilization which is Christian in its origin. Russia is a union of nomadic races, but lately ushered into feudalism, which have, in turn, conquered many other races. Japan has had a stable, organized government longer than England, and the Japanese were a free people when the Saxons were the serfs of the Normans. The Czar is a pope; the Mikado divinity itself. If the Jews were still a nation and a descendant of Moses were their king, he would mean to them what the Mikado means to the Japanese. For all the centuries of the nation's existence the Japanese had known no acquisition of territory. The Russians have lived by this.


RECRUITS GOING THROUGH FIRING DRILL WITHOUT RIFLES

SOLDIERS LEARNING HOW TO CARRY WOUNDED COMRADES
JAPANESE TROOPS I
These photographs were takeif on the parade ground at the Oyama already been practically oh a war footing for months, and the busy vailed throughout the nation and brought Japan's army to a state of

)R_EPA RI NG FOR WA R
 Barracks in Tokio just before the outbreak of the war. Japan had work of preparation here suggested was typical of the spirit that pre-preparedness perhaps never before duplicated in the history of war

a
.	i bei '16.	''' 4
-4k .-..I .... *4 'Or ,
r---k,
A11
* '	•	,	__ _
-...ft-"'.e_t.L.:ii	— ,. , - 4' , . ,ff,7-..it-',-";',.,
-	,	—,t,, '	- ..— !4 4 '. ,:- . r'' ,:,..' '	)	• '61141''.--..	_. .	. ,	, .. ,,
-.:.14.-‘	A'	'''.'	' '	?•- . ! • • : 7	-	'	-.'
CAVALRY RECRUIT LEARNING TO RIDE WITHOUT STIRRUPS OR BRIDLE


TRAINING JAPANESE CAVALRYMEN AT THE TOKI? BARRACKS
The Japanese cavalry was the weakest branch of the service. The Japanese are not natural horsemen, and both the men and their
mounts were inferior, in a military sense, to the other branches of the service. The horses were scrubby little beasts with neither speed
nor tractability. The trooper whose mount finally succeeded in clearing the bar shown above thought the feat very remarkable
14


CHANGING GUARD AT THE OYAMA BARRACKS IN TOKIO


SWAPPING STORIES IN THE GUARD HOUSE AT OYAMA BARRACKS
In spite of his inscrutable manner the Japanese soldier when with a crowd of his comrades becomes almost as
loquacious as the typical regular of other countries. In the Oyama Barracks, where this photograph was taken,
a large number of troops were cluartered ready to he rushed to the front as soon as hostilities were declared


CLEANING AND OILING RIFLES IN PREPARATION FOR WAR
i7


DEPARTURE OF BARON ROSEN, THE RUSSIAN MINISTER, FROM YOKOHAMA
On the breaking off of diplomatic relations the Russian Minister took passage for Marseilles on the French steamship" Yarra." He
left Yokohama on February 12, when war had actually been begun by the actions at Chemulpo and Port Arthur. The French
and Belgian Ministers and attaches and a few other friends from the diplomatic circle accompanied him to the dock to bid him farewell

-‘,

3IINI.STER PAVLOV LEAVING LEGATION UNDER ESCORT
RUSSIAN IVIINISTEB


          REPRESENTATIVES OF NEUTRAL POWERS TALKING WITH M. PA V LOV AT THE WHARF TO KOREA DEPARTING FROM SEOUL

1-fli-IgailifillbaniffilIKAPIPIIIr".143.111111.

L.---
   4.:..1... 	, •'111:7._.	•.-	k.7.1::::.	r6....1::t	-411.:..	'??.'i."	,;:
.1	,1	4	.	,	. .	il	i	...^"--	rii.:	i .::...	?1	:.	:;.-4	,,,,k	-	•	•
:tr,	NI	%	4-	: if,	.	, 	.e..._.	r
"•-	fq.	"!	-kr,	'	el

11.
11.



Mal W?v,`.777•77..":" •

NEWSPAPER BULLETINS ON THE CHEMULPO BATTLE IN THE MAIN STREET OF TOKIO
NEWSPAPER BULLETINS ON THE CHEMULPO BATTLE IN THE MAIN STREET OF TOKIO
20
--
* ..-	.
- .d.
r	..	, _.......---	_....
.	. -- • .-.--:-- 	j..I i.°,1C- --  	:	' 
. 	-7.  11.1	r
. -----
I	__.1- ..-...,-•
.%.	I
.,. •
I
.	. ...	.	...-- •
••	— . '
....
	,..../.---.	,--..
* .•	_ ._..	,	. •._	,,
.1--	4'.- . • •	.	....1m.
	_.,...	'.	.,;,....:	—p----.	411111.-
* --.	.-- ._ . .	. . icplfibl
.,v.	.
..-"'. .
......
. 4 0	..,, •
	-....::•,:	.-...-*--_--73-
.;, •	,	:	i	1.	...
•• .	..,:
.	.
...1	ii	•	.	.	1, 1--.	i
-
f	•	1
.....11	'1,	J.1
:1.	,	14.
.	11 
,.•	,,,,
..,......
.	,
444 ____,,,,,,,	- -
"	.....___. 	.. 1r
--------- _. -	•
	lb.	-  	_._	.-.
. _.	..,....--....mig,-P- • -
:-	,
..,•,,
___
	.telli-"811°11.11=1.. • ... 1111111M.	.---
.....--------- 
	It	-	1	-•	:
11'	-., liellir
411.	:	..	1
.	,
.	710,..
	•••	.10	..
: 74'
?	1
  -' 00f
	----	q
	.-- it...	..	;..,	-	icalliir-	...---. .4,. -,. _...r. .-	•f'----	.. ',..---.----.. -	.	-
..407:-.'-'••-•,` . --- :,-	,	---1:1._.. ik	k
....,...._,....
	S `r r,-	..	-•:-..,..7....,	111••°"n".2111.1.11°..1..---7-11:.
.	h
.	-	•	..,	,;	•	?	'(''
r • 711
r...)
-.. -1001115
.•
.	.
.•	,. '	1:2'_,--::•--.	• - 7_,.-,.4,.. -- ---'-	A :--.."-,
ierk
.	41	;..r4,...=,...:	..- •	•
,,.. , . .•
_.-
,	I •
___.	.-.	.,	'S	.
1	...	, 	.	.
	- -.	II
4 
f	, ' • 1	t.--.	't
— ' -: • .4	771	11
. '	' .-;.'1-1;...	-.:	.- .- wit	•	Per	.-.'"	._ "	.	.	- '-	.	1	11111I	-	1 • .
* ..
.	.
	.	.	lirarmsro'	ell'ilwirr'• .•.: ..•	-	j  	al -	.	'	-
i
,Ei....	• Am_	— al	%
-	,.... _
-- • '..-ei	-.. d....-emiaNONINOSIMMIl& •
-o,
. ,
1	7- - -r--	.	M
-	1
r •	,	-rt.
:Arm
v
1

.	-
••••?-•••.".?	•	'	'
* -	•	•	'k•'.1 •
-	•	„	-4
•
1h.
7.r111
PATRIOTIC CITIZENS STANDING IN THE RAIN WAITING THEIR TURN TO ENLIST

BUILDING TEMPORARY STABLES IN TOKIO IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE DECLARATION OF WAR
21


ENLISTED TROOPS, NEWLY ARRIVED IN TOKIO, WAITING THEIR TURN TO BE FITTED OUT

IN HEAVY MARCHING ORDER READY TO DEPART	TROOPS BILLETED AT PRIVATE HOUSES IN TOKIO
MOBILIZATION OF TROOPS IN TOKIO AT THE IJLTBREAK OF WAR


iRCHING TO STATION THROUGH THE STREETS OF TOKIO


ENTRAINING AT TILE SHIMBASHI STATION, TOKIO

JAPANESE CAVALRYMEN ABOUT TO TARE THE TRAIN
DEPARTURE OF JAPANE
2i

             INDUCING A FRACTIOUS CAVALRY HORSE TO BOARD THE TRAIN ;E TROOPS FOR KOREA

JAPANESE TROOPS DETI
At Hiroshima the troops were detrained for the port of Ujina, whel
Many of the cavalry horses were injured during their railroa
6 collapsable" carts shmvn here were one of the features of the mobi

RAINING AT HIROSHIMA
rice a large part or the Japanese forces were embarked for Korea. d journey by kicking each other or their stalls. The light le Japanese equipment. They kept pace with the marching column


JAPANESE CAVALRYMEN IN RAILWAY CARRIAGE
CAVALRY TRAIN LEAVING SHIMBASHI STATION


TROOPERS IN CHARGE OF CARS CONTAINING HORSES

OFFICERS IN COMMAND OF CAVALRY REGIMENT

It was not until the troops had been departing from Tokio for several days that the general populace showed any such resemblance
to Occidental enthusiasm as this. When some of the members of the staff left Tokio, they awakened and behaved like any other
crowd at such a time. They shouted good-bys and the band, in a quaint imitation of Western customs, played "Auld Lang Syne"




        FIRST SECTION FINISHED SHOWING MANNER OF CONSTRUCTION WITH TIMBER AND ROPES CTICING BUILDING BRIDGES LIKE THOSE USED AT THE YALU


RIDGE AT HIROSHIMA READY FOR THE PONTOONS
 all planned and constructed in practice in Japan long before war was declared. After being built ag with the rest of the equipment, and put together when the time came. The Japanese engineers .ents of the streams in Manchuria, so that they always knew just what, difficulties were to be met


" TIKOKU BANZA1! "— " LONG LIVE THE EMPIRE?"
Enthusiasm at Kobe upon the departure of a troop train for Ugina, a port of embarkation for Korea. On leaving for the front the
Japanese soldier suppressed all emotions of sorrow. Not to be impassive was unmanly. It was only at such times as this that
the collective enthusiasm showed itself, and it was not until a number of trains had passed en route for the front that it awoke

CHAPT
THE FIRST BATT]
TT was on the night of February 8, 19o4., that all hope of   a peaceful solution of the Russo-Japanese entanglement was blown to the winds by the startling attack of Admiral Togo's torpedo-boats on the Russian fleet at Port Arthur. The Russians were quite unready for so swift an onslaught; many officers were on shore, while the lookouts and scouting service were scarcely more vigilant than in time of peace. The Japanese torpedo flotilla sped in among the close-huddled battleships, launched their missiles, and were scurrying to sea before the Russian crews began to repel the attack. The first-class battleships “Retvizan" and “Czarevitch" and the cruiser 44 Pallada" were so badly injured that they had to be beached. The Japanese fleet returned the next day and bombarded the Russian ships and forts. In this attack the battleship gt Poltava," and the cruisers “Diana," gg Novik," and tiAskold" were temporarily disabled.
    Before the news of the battle of Port Arthur had fairly reached the eyes of •the Western world came the more tragic story of the destruction of the “Variag" and the ic Korietz" in Chemulpo Harbor. Admiral Uriu, commanding six Japanese battleships, six cruisers, and twelve torpedo craft, appeared off Chemulpo and demanded the surrender of the two Russian ships. Captain Behr of the “Variag” and Captain Roudnoff of the ic Korietz" refused to surrender, and on the morning of February 9, the “Variag," with bands playing, steamed out of the harbor to meet the hopeless odds. She met the Japanese

ER II
LES OF THE WAR
fleet eight miles out, the enemy using long-range 12-inch guns, and pounding away at distances which made the 44Variag's" batteries harmless. Ten large projectiles riddled the cruiser, and in fifty minutes not a gun could be worked, the ship was on fire, engines crippled, and 109 officers and men of a complement of 540 lay dead and wounded on the decks. The (‘Variag," crept back into port, her crew was removed to the British cruiser ((Talbot" and the French cruiser ((Pascal," and she was set on fire. Three hours later, the (( Variag," after only eighteen months' service, was at the bottom, a shattered and blackened mass of steel. The (c Korietz" was a slow gunboat of only 1,200 tons, mounting one 6-inch gun and two 8-inch guns, with no armor protection. She was untouched, but after the fight her commander decided to destroy his ship, because Admiral Uriu had promised to renew the attack at four in the afternoon. Precisely at four o'clock, two deafening explosions came from the (4 Korietz." As the smoke cleared, where the (‘ Korietz" had been, only bits of wreckage and about four feet of her funnel could be seen.
    On the day after the Russian ships had been destroyed a division of the Japanese army was thrown ashore at Chemulpo. The landing was made in perfect order. The army was dependent for nothing upon the port. A large force was sent to occupy Seoul, and within two days Japan was in complete control of the most advantageous strategic bases of Korea.

THE RUSSIAN CRUISER " VARIAG " UN FIRE AT CHEMULPO	THE RUSSIAN GUNBOAT " KORIETZ "
DESTRUCTION OF THE " VARIAG " AND " KORIETZ " IN THE HARBOR OF CHEMU]


I' THE MOMENT OF THE EXPLOSION


FUNNEL OF THE GUNBOAT "KORIETZ "
WRECKS OF THE RUSSIAN WA,


TOPMASTS OF THE CRUISER " VARIAG "
RSHIPS IN CHUMULPO HARBOR

i

E SALVAGE CORPS WORKING ON THE WRECK OF THE " VARIAG " AT CHEMULPO


THE NI
Aii through tile night of February snow on the Korean shore. This la of the Mikado. In spite of the


IGHT LANDING OF THE JAPANESE TROOPS AT CHEW LP()
 9 boatloads of these little soldiers, with their inscrutable, unimpassioned faces, were landed in the .ndin• was one of the first proofs the Western world had of the wonderful preparedness of the soldiers darkness, fitfully punctuated by blazing torches, tires, and braziers, the task went on like clockwork

..-... 1
7, 'Itir-	' - ' Y . •	.	/ . '•';' • : .•	'. ,....;i! :: '.1.-.7., . ` ‘,,,' I. 7 ,	.• ..	.i.
.	..	•	_./...,	.,,
ii . 7"••••?	'''' • ' '-`1.4	''...1 -zj	'1, . (et . . '' ? ...: .1.1. --0.4'.i. ..,, eje
110t	' 4.4r.,'-': • .4...._, ..	•• .	t .•.7./N	.	.	....mile:,•'-, . 17. vq..4 ri'
leii rt.' .t. . AC:Wirv.	'itr ' ) \ -.). . :i •	1	,•,•--4M4itriii
a r . 414	ir • • • . ..:,, A . V, ..	. . .	%	.	•	• . V	. . •C	'10 •
,i'	y......,•••:;..:4:.,./.:44t t'. ...-.. , ,z .r.	• ,..), ,;,..•
	;/.t,t 4. , •	,10;	.
..,	.	,:i	,	...•	..	4;	5••z'i	,.... ..4 .:.	-.	..	. ,r et 	, 	...1;: ':•,:	'- (4:i• +40!...
	'1%.....	.	Ai, 	•	.4 /014,r".
i •
..., 4-	•	.. lei	ilr	.	. f. •	•	'',.-.. . ''•	•	.r,	.
.;..	1	.	...."	- -	N. -.	.1 .	r , .. •7:	Q
..	,
. , ..	.
	..; "04". . 'i'' , . .	'	.	.	' ....‘	4 . •	:'	.. ., ...	I
...401%L. • , -./
.	.1'	A.-	.. . • ,	.....	• • . Is ' Ail. . t	'
"	•	.	, : .	:" ..	e 4	• a . ?	:4' :"211 •01,	• •	• .,	•	I •	.	I
-P
4.1. ire,. ilbs:	---..,;•'.14.	'	..y. .	. -	rr
- r .	.	‘1-...: I ' !..	• t .- I - : • --"gli..	. i	•
	 \j,,,t, p.,..., . (	dir.,,....	.	.,li	,	,,.4r •• ,'	,r.	..... 	...	.	. .	,
* ',	7-''	: 	•-.. N., 1..:„ 
	't,itotir	..	• ..,i,	I	;N....,	{ ,	_ .. .	-7,L,.:-.11..fighfr: 914161%.14191111•17-1, . ,. , !lit	. .."..! r •8.42111,414111,1..--7.,......: :i
1,.
144411110001
	i	.	' •	'''Ikl..r.2.1 rii•eiV.._	- • ..	-11.•	,	• ,.	01,
,,,,,.,.. 116 ,..	wiwwriffit	i	...I td1 ris ."	' .,....•;,...71r '	"	. - •	IN	...;
k
.7.	-.	it ' 'RPLIII 3Fillni!	1 •	It, ....-	-*--4.1 •	, •	}Y.. "" 1,	'	.. .	4 	_..'
.. . -, - ...^ . ... •
11.	-	lorippir
	.	.	• i'''. .' .	.	d cNtio, -Z ;w101.4 18.- - ,,t4 'I" e .eti•
401-	P•	. t ' 1.4	"7 -1.... • .	.7„4
116•1°P'.	.476iyi
Al.
	. ,4	4\	..`:	i ..,_!..wr •	: .• Vit:A.4:•1!.	' •	-.	l'	• •	- •• '
'' 4 • .1	4 IN ' .	• ,	01.4r. ..c.." ,....
::,,Cr r 	• •	v	-- -	4
'44f:	?i116.\\,	. , i r1 • 	I*	t
. ,r.....	..	.   
.,..
* .
	,	tr,	J "1"	Y /AV	"	-	• ...1. • /	I	''...i	•
. -
1, 111[11..	- r ' • '	•	- i	,	46
,. 111 .	' ,	4	- lot, ,	• .. _	I	, -•
-.--
.	.	- ...,	-..,	/01	,,,,	•
,.. f	..4 .,	•	.	,j,,, ...	; .4	1/4 .
- • •
* '	.1.4t;	'''''	; .• . •
. i't	,	it	.	• - ...,.
	:rt, '	......
	o•.4 --_•	,•,	. .7, ,..
_	.	.
.	-	•	...	1
' 1 f	ir	--ir I	'	. : , .1). . ..	..	-I.	4	• • '	r	'	.	‘4.,	.	.	'•	' •	i _.	.	., t
.:	• ,	.
	. " . .	_er • . .-	.	taill1L-.	r.
Jr .000""-- 44 ''?
-1•, I	r 1..	...,...
* 1	14	Ai
. 1-	,
	11111	it	du
.	,..
.	,L	...-...la
,	• ' I t	-.'	-	,	‘..	-	.	-	t
	.,..,r4,	,	1/	.,	.	.	•
1.
'41.1111.1iri
'.."••	!	-•	--	.	•	•11.	_	• 5.	? 1
,. 04'4%1vai
,	11 .'..-.
„..	-iv, r..	,.•
- ,	.. ,..-„, 1,•	.	_	-4 I 4,	:.	'.y.	- - ...
,....	A ›ir A. .	, • , .	. ..
_AV.
* 'IV	.
- : id.,
411111111041.	4	4
	_-0,	,
ifilir 	... ,.	-	..issiganiasi
,.,	,..--:. 	'	.	.	.
.-	.. 4.	.	P -	.
-11+1-	r	, ?
..i_ .	.	-...
k 1
4k1\1.1. it diAllelittil	.t.
,	lir
	i	. ?
* li	111101111.
* ,..:--	.,,
 ...4	..	...9,-	,.	.	..	....,	E,,,
-r• .
- 1
.	...%
	i....., '	-..	•	- '71: I V' 44k.• i
V 1
i	-•, .,441444kN"?46 „.'''.k:14b-	N.	• & . '	t ......4
1	., .	.,	„...m,	....,t iilt.......	:,....,
...._.
,.. ,	.10 •
	.	61101111L	.
	‘Nle••... • • 	-	- am 1,, ' ,F.	P	. .. .
,..---..,	..
* ,......
..,.	/.	.	i	1
A iit
it....,,,ii. ,,.r. „,	, • .	.
	.....  	- . • ...	4.1 -1	•
..
	,	.,.. 
* ...	-	• 	i	........	,	*.,,,,,r4400....
4	, ..._ . .....	,..0 ,
	. ... ,	,
	 /	4
4
IlL fici l'.  	•
	.	/...	.:•-..•	.:	'
1.4
.	•	.	‘11/4. 41	•	,	/
	 ILL	• lilik	1	'. .	. . ___	.11 '11 I ,.
. r
COOLIES HANDLING JAPANESE SUPPLIES AFTER THE LANDING AT CHEMULPO
._ .
36


MRS. PAVLOV, WIFE OF THE RUSSIAN MINISTER TO KOREA, AT THE SEOUL RAILWAY STATION
Mrs. Pavlov, the wife of the Russian Minister, is a cousin of the Countess Cassini. on the arrival of the Japanese, she was accompanied to the station not only by the Ja men of the diplomatic circle. Dr. Allen, the United States Minister, is sh.Qwn star


DR. H. N. ALLEN, UNITED STATES MINISTER TO KOREA
 When the Minister was invited to leave Lpanese guard, but by all the gallant young 'ding at the door of the Legation at Seoul


KOREAN SENTRY AT SEOUL


BRINGING LANDING STAGES ASHORE AT CHENIULPG

PACKING HORSES WITH BAGGAGE KITS AT CHEMULPO


,GATION AT SEOUL	SAPPERS AND MINERS STARTING FOR NORTHERN KOREA

PANESE INFANTRY MARCHING THROUGH THE MAIN STREET OF SEOUL
THE JAPANESE OCCUPATION OF SEOUL



 'fort ;,-.1.,ttivet MijrionsW.. .
.	4.1., •
• ,.•	•	--
.•
	.:	.
?l4filitok`
..	• .	---_,.	-c-7	.	, ,.,...,„.4.,-p„, ,
..,. • '-411.4 - •IV.- '	'' 4. - '- '''.; ' -	•	.	-	' ..i. - 'Nr....44.71,	..,- . -"' .1-. . -:.;,..:4t-0144011::16;- 1 '-'.'-' ' " •	'	..'	..'. ,404._:•%	- ..." . . '
'' ''',.'4	' --IVTIP. -' :31 ` ,-1Z•_,, ,,4'.. -.	''•!,
* 4. :,,,,,r-• "-' ..	. .	,A; ''.. -	''''.?	• '''	-	:	41i , .,'. 1	' 'C'	.1•14t nir-..	.	,.,,,..,..,...,,..,_
 •	.	.
 4 1.1-„'.... : .	,,.. ti	fie,
44?.,4217,	'.	I ,	••	1 .ti' ' ''' , ‘• It. .5:110 - i
	'	r, mot
•
	%...-**-411/4 t:	1 ..0.14•1;7.- '4. :
.4*
	- ir,i)i.1 ..... I ..r	.	'	• .	•
1	•
k A 4N176,
. k- .44-4e"--,	. .` l• ---";111$ dr. ,_". ,; Il. ,i` •	-	' J	4	'-
- •-q,„,, --,-""'.;••••.;	" •	-,--6 ..._ -	.r-- : - 1, , ,
.i-„? .	. ..	1
* ,e.11	„,.6.--1,..-"' .0;,.	,.- '. ..-- .
, -
.- ..., rov 1 ..,. _7,-4.-.....,- . ..-1. , -..-	.4 .	• .	- --	,	1-	1.16—

JAPANESE TROOPS WAITING TO CROSS THE RIVER AT PING-YANG

40

rCHING FROM THE GREAT GATE THE ENTRY OF THE JAPANESE AT SEOUL


COMMISSARY TENTS IN THE JAPANESE CAMP AT CHEMULPO	EXTERIOR OF THE HOSPITAL BUILDING, RED CROSS FLAGS OVER THE GATE

JAPANESE RED CROSS NURSE ATTENDING RUSSIAN SAILORS WOUNDED IN THE BATTLE OF FEBRUARY 9
THE JAPANESE RED CROSS HOSPITAL AT CHEMULPO
As soon as the Japanese landed after the battle between the warships in Chemulpo Harbor, a hospital was improvised and the more
dangerously wounded Russians brought ashore from the foreioi battleships, where they had been cared for temi;orarily, and nursed by the
Japanese Red Cross service. As a mark of appreciation Russia contributed 2,000 yen ($1,000) to the Japanese branch of the Red Cross

CHAPT
RUSSIAN PREPAR,
N
—OT only were. the available Russian forces ill prepared
       for meeting the a.gile and ready Japanese, not only was their equipment ponderous and unwieldy, their knowledge of the strategic difficulties and advantages of the country in which the fighting was to be done scant-and inaccurate, but the big fact which put Russia at a disadvantage during the early months of the war was the immense distance between her military bases and the front. Across the trackless wastes of Siberia the only path was a single-track railroad—a line of communication none too well equipped in times of peace, . and open to complete and immediate disablement should the enemy succeed in cutting it at any point along a comparatively vulnerable stretch of many hundreds of miles. By sea—that
,
is to say, by the way of the Mediterranean, the Suez Canal, and the route round the southern coast of Asia Russian ships and soldiers were over 1 2,000 miles, or about fifty-one days, away from the seat of hostilities. When to these mate-rial difficulties were added the dissensions, jealousies, and shifting policies of St. Petersburg, the effective strength of Russia in these early days of the war could in no way be measured by her vast extent and apparently Wimitable power.
    In Japan, on the other hand, preparedness was the key-note of the situation. Although nominally at peace, japan had been practically on a war footing for months, yet so secretly was this preparation made that even after war was declared a casual and incurious visitor in Tokio would have

ER III
kTIONS FOR WAR
seen little to indicate that he was in one of the great military
centres of the world, and that all round and about him was
being planned one of the greatest struggles of modern times.
The results of this preparedness were vividly enough shown
when the “Variag" and the tiKorietz" were sunk in Chemulpo
Harbor, before the world was really aware that war was seriously
intended and inevitable. They were no less convincingly
demonstrated by the perfection of the Japanese field equip
ment, and by the almost microscopic exactness with which
every possible contingency had been foreseen and provided for.
Ever since their war with China the Japanese had been perfect
ing their military organization, as though the coming war with
RuSsia were a certainty. They had military maps of every nook
and corner of Korea and Manchuria; they had spies working
as coolies on the Russian railroads, and in Russian ports and
shipyards; they had their light equipment especially adapted
for the heavy Manchurian roads. Their baggage was so
arranged and distributed that it made compact cube-shaped
bundles which could he packed like so many building blocks,
or made into easily carried packs for coolies. The collapsable
boats with which a pontoon bridge was thrown across the
Yalu were made for that special purpose months before,
when the Korean peninsula was yet to be invaded. In fact,
the whole early part of the war was an almost grotesque
struggle between preparedness and unpreparedness, extreme
mobility and clodhopping heaviness, cleverness and stupidity.


RUSSIAN LADIES SEWING FOR THE RED CROSS IN THE PALACE OF THE GRAND DUKE VLADIMIR
Under the auspices of the Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna, a circle of titled ladies met regularly at the Grand Ducal residence to sew
for the men at the front. The Grand Duchess herself equipped and sent to the front an entire i.rain fitted out for hospital purposes.
At the Winter Palace the Czarina sewed with nearly a thousand ladies and the Dowager Empress presided over another sewing circle

r

WITH THE RUSSIAN ARMY ON ITS MARCH TO THE FRONT
A division of regular troops mobilizing in Southeastern Russia for transportation northward. The infantry regiments may be
seen marching along the main road, while the artillery and transport wagons are moving up in the middle distance, A
large body of cavalry, half hidden in dust clouds, is visible near the horizon, These troops were among the first mobilized


THE CZAR OF RUSSIA AND HIS FAMILY





THE CZAR LEAVING THE WINTER PALACE TO BID FAREWELL TO TROOPS STARTING FOR THE FRONT
  The most sorrowful figure in the Russian Court at the beginning of the war was the Autocrat from whom all the -	Muscovite power mid splendor radiated,	Helpless among the cliques of the bureaucracy, he knew not what course to
pursue and was beset with apprehensions not only of the fidelity of those about him, but for the safety of his own Iife


DEPARTURE OF RED CROSS NURSES FROM FE PETERSBURG


FOR THE FRONT


THE CZAR REVIEWING AN INFANTRY REGIMENT ON ITS DEPARTURE FOR THE FRONT
49


PROCESSION IN HONOR OF THE CHEMULPO SAILORS MARCHING TO THE WINTER PALACE
The Russian sailors were treated as heroes wherever they went after their return from the disastrous engagement at Chemulpo. There
were fttes and processions in their honor at Odessa, Moscow, and St. Petersburg. A ba.nquet was held at St. Petersburg, the officers
received costly mementos and the sailors souvenirs and money rewards. The welcome was Iike that given to a victorious army

111111111111111MMIN

	_	11	714
-	.	•	'-.	•
•
..I.r	..
,	i k
‘ 
1116	illor i al	'
416	.i
  i7 ,s " 1'  ..,
3
_	.	.	... t	?	P	I	-
..7.5.-	?	'
tin
--77
.	I
* ..)
.....
..	•....
...N. .....1 =.	. 0
-At
.0	, 411. . ?'4 :. ;11, i	'	' '.1. .
. • , . . .	•
.	. .--
. / 

.
.
0	:
f Ai,
4,,,.,.,.
7-.	,
i	!--.T.
	6	_ ...
....
..._
.,,,.,. . ,
..	.	..,
,
....__
* i	: .,
,
,
,
, 
i	( ,j
:  , ,
	.	, ,
r......
,
,, 	..,.
r -
I


THE CZAR BIDDING FAREWELL TO COMMANDERS ABOUT TO LEAVE FOR Tf


1E FRONT


GRAND DUKE ALEXANDHOVITCH LEADING HIS MARINES IN REVI




CAPTAIN VIEDUSTOIPE OF AUSTRIA AND HIS WIFE SURROUNDED BY RUSSIAN OFFICERS
INTERNATIONAL BALLOON 0



CHAPT
WITH THE JAPA
H
AVING secured a safe landing-place at Chemulpo, Japan poured troops into Korea and along the old
Peking Road through Seoul to Ping-Yang and on to the northward toward the Yalu. Russia abandoned all hope of effective aggression by sea with her crippled fleet, and, except for the elusive Vladivostok squadron of four powerful cruisers, Japan was free to rush her troops into Korea. Russia bent all her energies toward hurrying her levies and supplies into Manchuria. Seoul was occupied and the Russian minister invited to leave. He complied at once.
    Moving at the rapid pace of from fifteen to twenty-five miles a day, the mobile Japanese pushed on to Ping-Yang. No opposition was met with, the native Koreans staring dumbly at the invaders without much curiosity and with no desire to make resistance. The march from Seoul to Ping-Yang was made along the ancient road to Peking, which was a quagmire most of the distance, crowded with cavalry, infantry, pack-trains, bullock-carts, and long trains of white-clad natives burdened with bags of provisions, plodding knee-deep through slush and mud. Half-frozen at night, stumbling and slipping all day, each soldier carrying sixty pounds of equipment, this infantry column swept along at a speed of from fifteen to twenty-five miles a day. That such speed was possible was due to the lightness of the Japanese baggage and wagon equipment, which had been specially
\-.	prepared for the heavy Korean and Manchurian roads.

ER IV
NESE IN KOREA
    It was apparent even to casual observers that immense military operations were. under way, yet the civilized world was wholly in ignorance of their scope or direction. On February 15, for example, scores of crowded transports were leaving the Japanese naval bases, and a small army of alert correspondents from the world over could only guess whether these thousands of troops were going to Korea, to the Yalu region, or within a hundred miles of the Liaotung Penin-sula. While the Japanese troops were pushing northward, the advance guard of the Russian army crossed the Yalu into Korean territory and occupied Wiju. The Russian head-quarters were established at Harbin, the chief strategic centre of railway communication in inland Manchuria.
    Chenampo is one hundred and thirty miles north of Chemulpo on Korea Bay, and correspondingly nearer to the Yalu. Early in April, after the troops which had landed at Chemulpo two months before had completed their arduous march northward through the Korean Peninsula, and had captured the town of Wiju, on the east bank of the Yalu River, what was known as the main army, under General Kuroki, landed from transports at Chenampo. The success of the advance column had given the Japanese control of the mouth of the Yalu before Kuroki began to mobilize his co-operating columns, and two forces were thus ready by the end of April to force the passage of the Yalu and fight their way into Manchuria.

4	f
41114
* .1	1-11
* •	4.
1W. •	1)0,j,
y.)11





LANDING THE MEN WHO FOUGHT AT THE YALU
The Japanese troops were ferried from the transports to the shore at Chenampo in heavy, blunt-nosed sampans. These sampans are
sculled from the stern ordinarily with huge sweeps. The boatmen can be seen over the heads of the seated soldiers, standing over their
sweeps like gondoliers. At Chenampo the sampans were in most cases lashed together in groups of three or four and towed by tugs
56


ARTILLERYMEN IN HEAVY MARCHING ORDER LANDING AT CHENAMPO
57


JAPANESE BLUEJACKETS COMING ASHORE AT CHENAMPO


GROOMING CAVALRY HORSES AT CHENAMPO AFTER LANDING THEM FROM TRANSPORTS
59


JAPANESE TROOPERS CARING FOR A SICK HORSE


KOREANS AND JAPANESE SALESMAN AT CHENAMPO
The lone Japanese pedler is shown at lower right-hand corner of the picture sitting behind his wares. The men at the left of the
picture are not armless, as it might appear, but have their arms inside their kimonos, as is their habit on cold days. The march of the
Japanese through their country and the whole excitement of war stirred the placid Koreans to little more unrest than they show here




COLLIER'S PHOTOGRAPHER AND COOLIES WITH MILITARY BICYCLES

             JAPANESE EXTINGUISHING FIRE -CAUSED BY RUSSIAN SHRAPNEL iE ADVANCE TO THE YALU


SCREENS WHICH HID THE MOVEMENTS OF THE JAPANESE
General Kuroki not only misled the Russians as to the point at which he would probably cross the Yalu, but masked
the march of his forces to the point north of the WI:it', where the crossing was made, by these grass screens and by
marching behind hills. The Russians knew that some movement was going on, but could not make out the extent of it


GENERAL KUROKI AND HIS STAFF AT THEIR FIELD HEADQUARTERS IN ANTUNG
On the left of General Kuroki sits General Fuji, his chief of staff, on the right Prince Kuni. Next to Prince Kuni is Colonel Hageno, the Russian scholar of the staff. One of Ktiroki's absolute prohibitions to correspondents was the mention either of the general's name or of the place from which they Wrote, lest news of the army's location should be brought to the Russians

CHAPT
THE RUSSIAN ADVAN
T
HE supreme difficulty under which Russia labored during the early months of the war was the enormous
distance from her military base to the battle front. The only line of land communication between Russia and Manchuria was the single-track Siberian railroad, and when war began this line was broken by the ice-locked Lake Baikal. Russia had need of 300,000 men in Manchuria as soon as they could be rushed there, and with Lake Baikal frozen to the depth of nine feet, less than four thousand and. more often not more than one thousand men could cross it in a day.
Lake Baikal, this weakest link of a very weak chain, is
the largest body of fresh water in the Old World, except the
Victoria Nyanza in Africa. It is nearly 15,000 square miles
in extent, and therefore inferior only to Superior and Huron
among the great American lakes. It is boo versts long, with
a width varying from 27 to 85 versts. It is 3,185 feet deep.
The railroad was broken by the southern end of this lake,
where it is about 40 miles wide. This is the gap that disastrously
impairs the utility of the Trans-Siberian for the moving of
troops and war supplies to the Manchurian and Korean frontier.
The lake begins to freeze in November, is completely
ice-bound by the middle of December, remaining so for five
months. The ice freezes to a thickness of nine feet, which
would make sledge traffic perfect, were it not for the fact that
wide fissures break its surface, which have a way of frequently
closing up and piling the ice high into impassable windrows.

(ER V
CE TO THE FRONT
These crevices have a width of three to six feet, and are often more than a verst in length, forming a serious impediment to progress on the ice and rendering next to impossible the marching of troops across the lake or the safe sledging of supplies. A thunderous crash, as of an explosion, marks the forming of the crevice, followed by a long, rolling reverberation, The rift instantly fills with water to the level of the ice, and is so agitated at the surface by currents or other forces that eight to fourteen days are required for it to freeze over, when the operation of cracking begins anew, and is repeated throughout the coldest portion of the winter.
    The obvious solution to this difficulty was to build a railroad round the end of the lake, a detour of nearly Iso miles, and necessitating the construction of four tunnels. This was out of the question. A powerful ice-crusher, the “Baikal," modeled after the ice-crushers successfully used in the Straits of Mackinac, had been built. She could break ice four feet thick, but on the nine-foot ice of the Russian inland sea she made no successful impression. The result was that a line of track had to be laid across the lake, and that before this was completed the troops had to be marched across the forty-mile stretch of wind-swept ice, while their supplies and baggage had to be dragged after them in sledges. Many of the
wandering on to treacherous ice, were drowned; many were frost-bitten, and all suffered extremely from the arduous labor
of the march and the bitter cold.


UNLOADING ARMY TRANSPORT WAGONS AT THE LAKE	OFFICERS CROSSING THE ICE IN RUSSIAN SLEDGES

.
, - ...	, , .	•	.
Or7.7.Z..... : .	111:	•	7 I •	1
.	.
.,
i
!`..... r ..- ' ..-.	.	.	,
_	i	.
'...."--	. ' -
* • ? 7.:0".:: , '	.	-.,
t	.0	..	.
.	. . . ---,41444.1-AllarL "..—. '	• . ..qr,...
':-Z. ..,`	4.4 _
. _.. ,	.. _.	,
- .
.
.
.	.
$......
1 ' re ..-....r	.
Lfi,;47.4`......,, 7S. . 4.7-7 5.-	• .-	i ,.	2,
.....4r—Z.---i_. ',."!..zieff-..."-',.. ..__-__.,......._	.	.	_

"	•
* `.•-'• •
-	- •	•	--
•
	Vim	-••"'",,..2.•-. 7e,	_	A.V.•• • ,
_
.	•	,
.	•-•	•	—	•
40*	-•
_	-	•

DETACHMENT OF INFANTRY STOPPING FOR A MEAL OF HOT SOUP WHILE ON THE MARCH
RUSSIANS CROSSING LAKE BAIKAL IN MIDWINTER


RUSSIAN CAVALRY CROSSING LAKE BAIKAL




RUSSIAN CAVALRY READY TO CROSS THE LAKE
WITH THE RUSSIAN FORCES ON THEIR WAY TO TH]


DRAGGING FREIGHT CA RS ACROSS THE ICE




MOUNTED COSSACKS AT LAKE 13AIKAL


ARTILLERY CAISSONS AND SLEDGES ABOUT TO CROSS LAKE BAIKAL
68

-	a
     5	I i	x•
. - %
	lit•	.
...	.
- . • '	•	r	.;	•
$
....—	o
a 1
,
* I	'
 1	.'...
.	:
I 	•	...;tt - 	,..f, •
.	...	a•
4.	..
.	•
...
4	-	.	'	• .	-	.4, ' ••	"r•	•
./f
* . .	:	A: S- .	'i
.	-	...
* '	r	,	.	E •	. r	...	+I ,..,	,	•	' 0
i ,_•?	.!.1  ' -	;:l	1 ' ;fa i t	- 4
	.	-....	.'1	'
	'	. '5
t • 4 .
4I	r
* .	4 4. 7	: I t	•	.	- .
* . .	.	0 t
t• .4	I
i	• 4	•
. .	. 4 k-.
41	-	-I • -..X..	i.	.rr	•
4i
.• -
* 4.; 4..	40 , .	.
,.., 
	'	• 44 -.. ! ,i
•
* .	• .	.	. , • .	.
Alt	•	. '#	Jr
1
	-	. .- *
.	..-	..-	• ;., .	I	.
* 0 if	,
.	- .
* Alli0	.	i.
?
i	1 )
i•	• •
                                                               * , ...	)	-	1	t	•
.	.-	.	.
t
4
.-1t.	- i	A	. k	? .	:4
5 .
.., .
. .	.	I,. •	•	...
 •	.
,.,	ii .3	.	.;	. , ... • •
 f ,
. 11,, .	•	1	- *	,	,	'
A	Illj .	.! . 
	.	.	•	•
Pi t li 1  . 4	.  	4 -. • 1	• .
'' •	;	'
.	.	,.	...
.	•	1	- 1	' .1 ?	1-	•-•	"It
i :	•	f	r	-1.	•..: . N.	,
                                       * . t	4.-	•.
.	I ,
.•	'	-	i	• --101	,,'- i
.
..,
i. 	AO. ',.	J .1
.	•
. r	'	.? tr
	..	• 	•
	.4	-	r* •"••••	•	s ' ''	•	. ..	. .
:'	r ...	• 4.,.,
,	., 	:.
....	,
 __ 
:	0	4_	,	.	...	,	.• ......rii ,
.'	....	,	-
	5. .	.Acl•
ii	.	I.' .	‘',I. P ;..i'• ....	„.	..,-.
	o	•	'	I.	.-.'"?''''d•
	.	A	'	1	...‘,.	•	•.',.
14
	-	-.,...'	•	.4.4 •	..
	*	•1 i	'	.	. • Li.	. i • ti: -. - , . - :
.	r:_	.:-.	: •	-i ,.1 e• ..
le	,	7 .	1	.3.„	-4 .1., '•:':e#	,,..i.	.1
,:t	.	.	.	.„,	' 4 . . It.' S- T ; •
	..•	.	• .	_	.	f.' ' 4. • .1.. 14	.
••	• ..	't
0	'.	1101...1....-ill 11	; " ..	•	.. i 11.	1-
.	.; . -	.	.	-*
-	,	. 	.,	_..
	4,..11	.	•
.... ,_ .
.	..
_	_	•IIJ.. r
.	- .	,;:r`	...A. . ..1-14 1.•	.' .
* .._	•
	- r'l	4	.•	•.•	.1.	.. ,	.
	.	,4 1	•	/ ,	4.
.	'...• —	-	••..	'
	Alt	. al '	V- : . •
 e	arA'''
* . -	i• '.011t. 	•	-	1.,
i- A	• •	. ,
.,.	.	.1.
-	,.	'	. ,...: -14-•	,• ''	.• t.	', A .	r	.
... --•.:. A	. :pi,	1...,..., .	..1,.._;.	...
	,	• .I	'	. :	. . ; .	.414 • . 401.1k 4 ' .	'	:
•••
:,	r.c .., .1 ,..- ' . -.
—t	..	-• '
* -
—.n'iit 1 '	1i: VI •	i • .  
,	; 
'4
'	.,..•	..1	t# .7:11.1a..	'la; 1.10'.1H'	..4;	.. 1
	1	-•••	1,1	J.; IF :::•1. a-i: .,vr	h. 1	11.,
Ig	,	-	.i c	4 w,'	- i .. •• s..	.,... ...v.	..1.	,	,-	•
.	' -1	t	z
Eli	4 1"'	A. - - ,-	' L . I	..	.	...
.....
••	i i.	.-
1'11.1	. 4. r! , 1 CI t	,_	f
.	,	,.
:::;:t

MA"
-	• .,.
re. L,
...-",?
:1	.	. .. .
,. ' •	l'
4..	Aka A ARM"
110111,14 19 Of go 147
...„._. ,	.	r
.:.	_if 4	laiti
1:111
see
A	„...-	.
. ,	.
 ..,_ .
W	,
,	L- aiee
46	1'4=4
* ....	ill44 '	_)11161..4	.	i ,
	- .	-__, ',i,4,--1.7.1-•'•:.4094, „,_,-7',.
....P._ r	.1. ..V%ii
* -: ,-.7	4......-. -.:al!-'7.cr
.	,
 •, _ 
* -.4.: .,:.
-	•	-	•
* •!'
* t:	4:-.1-`••••S4.44..751101pre	-r
.s.	441P-7
* •  
4	-	; pt.. •
* 4- 1131r!ar'2.7.- /,‘Ana.•
' I
RUSSIAN INFANTRY WARMING UP WITH HOT TEA BEFORE STARTING ACROSS LAKE BAIKAL
76


A "PEKING CAR," THE MOST LUXURIOUS METHOD OF TRAVELING

TYPICAL RUSSIAN INFANTRYMEN IN HEAVY MARCHING ORDER


DETACHMENT OF RUSSIAN INFANTRY ENTEli INC; NEWCHWANG

              RUSSIAN SOLDIERS SWINGING THROUGH THE STREETS OF MUKDEN NCE TO THE FRONT


THE TRAVELING SOUP KITCHEN AND SOUP-KETTLE OVENS USED BY THE RUSSIANS
72


THE ENTRY OF THE RUSSIAN FORCES INTO NEWCHWANG
WITH THE RUSSIANS DURING THE EARLY


RUSSIAN INFANTRY, 1N SUMMER UNIFORMS, MARCHING THROUGH LIAO-YANG

              RUSSIAN TROOPS ENTERING YINKOW EARLY IN APRIL ADVANCE TO THE FRONT


CHINESE COOLIES WITH RUSSIAN OVERSEER READY FOR WORK
74


UAD OF COSSACKS DISMOUNTED AND LINED UP FOR INSPECTION


.AL HERSCHELMANN'S DIVISION OF RUSSIAN CAVALRY AT ANTUNG


RUSSIAN ARTILLERY ADVANCING TOWARD THE YALU
77


RUSSIAN COBBLERS AT WORK IN THE FIELD ON SOLDIERS' BOOTS
78


DINNER TIME WITH THE NINETEENTH EAST SIBERIAN RIFLE CORPS
79

.-- _	.--
C
- , •	f.'
...	.	r.	-
_
.... 
.
* ••
^II,
	t	..'.-tk	-„ 1 . .	' .,,. t ''..	. ' . ••• :!......
	-...Tuti,4	.; !, V,	.	• . Si.. Iliosp ..	. • •	. ,.	• -	---- - .
7	,-- — —	...1 .... i ._*.-	• .	.	.	. „	.	• ••- • ...--	• *
* '	.,'	7	.	.,:.	.,....i....)	...
	i.,.. - L ..- -..	. --•5.
. . - .411'	i. 'i.	• -	—	.	.	...4.7	—• . '•.
	.	.	.	.	.
	'41•44?--.•;i.,,,._ '...;:r	. .. 1,
_	.	.	.	.	... —,	. .	....
,-, • :A.	'.	e •	..	....... ,....... •	_	•.	•	•	•
.	•	.	,.	•	• •
. • t 7. •-•..//1 4 Ni...:. 4 •. .	•	•	t. ..\,.	• - .	• • . 11114, ,	.	V •	.1	el	\ .
.. •
	-,•, • ..	, ,...	-itim - •	k.li.	'..	Illt
'.-..	k,Y.:.?:.'41-.-,...	••	•..	_.
* 4.-
	....-.	.-	-	•	i	'	•.	•*	.
* —. •	7-. r •	. - •	.... _..-•	•	,.• - • -	• 0. .
..	• .
	'	... -	•	•	'	II .
.	.	.-	.	.	. ..
	A.141	1	I
1-.
..	?	.
... .•	. :Tigli% ... :- •	'	• ,
‘.•
' ..4.,...='.0,'..,..',••••••••
qd.
	..\11	.	..
* 1	-I0	.1
..... I
,,,. 
i. 
k..„ 
	,„....	W., •	- - • I..	?• ' • - •
. 
.	,	.	• ....'? --	'	' .	'....'	s 1,0...:s.	ik,	lb.. 
	,	.L......,..„4
/ 
.11 '. 1' 
1	.	• 11' 7....4f1.	...	..k.,	1 . . ..	• .	.....
..	\
	-'ir	--;I:	.	...._ 
-	-	9 ti....,-,NL	'fi	47,..	• .	1
* ,...• 
...„9
	.	.	... •	..	...	\	,,;	oori.e..	....-It	.....	-4,-..
olk	•
	,	•••	•	'	•	.
-	••,	4.,	-	. (	....	."	.-	.	'	.
	....,	I	.4..7 \ - .• . '''	Wt4‘ —:- 7114' '-' .	0 '-'' ' r	'.	•
.	,
,	?	'	•	i	'.• .i.	, —7,17.-	_. k• ,. •	1'	.. ,	..
	..-	-	x0	•
 ....	.	. .	...	)
.-	.	.
	i:	k& _ e. .-.. •••	7 1.	.	. ,	ii..	- 6	•
	. -''' •	.1.11 '	.	\S.".	t...4/..•	•	.	• ' 47.'
	' •	1 ..	1 '..	, .	.
' 1.:;. " ..;	1 .t ' ' - .45.' '	•	1410 ?	.-	:. 4,	• . ‘	-.	, i It -	. ; :	'	. .	—	. -- .." ' - \ ....,	. •	- . .. — .	.	.
	.	:•0 e .	. .	.;	.
.	.	•	•	s ,	.	.
..	•	• o.
.	' -	c	'	101 .	...	.	.	_	•	4.	.
. -I. ...	/	...„• ....
.	•	.....	,	.
'Dii"r - ' "4.1.4417A.,.. ' ' . -. ' ••' • . - P: ": -,1.44.•	'	•	• -% -.6.-	•	•	i	• •	•	' ? ... • .1	.
0;	•-• .44` . ''% -........; : '5111:13- .10...V4,	.'•+..irV..4 4,	.
4,	.	.	r	.	...	.	1
..	.•.•
	.	. ,
.	.	' .. 7.• 	1.'
* •	4. di	.r. ..... 4,4	'	....!'	...	••....
	r-	.	• •!••	—4 ..	'	•
t..	i	I,	'	.4.. . .4 .	•	•••	- .
	.•	.	Cy I.	A -	r	• • A
	r .	P
	-	. 'd. .	1 • '
	-	••	t	.	•	r	1	,
r	. •	.. i •	y	.	.	i.S.L.	, d	.	.	t	rs"	.,
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                * • r •
 1	,
t	.	?	.	• r •	- •	4	.
•
1	•• .	•	...
Y 4	'
.....	.	r	.	...,	i	}
I	.	•	.	i	.	.	.
.	.
,	1	. ll•	• . • •	.	•	N	.
,	;•	?	• 1
* , . -

CHAPT
THE BATTLE OF THE YALU A
T
HE battle of the Yalu was the first great land action of the Russo-Japanese War. The Russians were outnum
bered by their opponents, but they were also outwitted and outmanceuvred, and the result was an overwhelming victory for the Japanese. In the crossing of the Yalu the Japanese exhibited the decided superiority of their shell-fire, they accomplished the brilliant strategic feat of crossing a river in the face of an intrenched enemy, and their commander, General Kuroki, proved himself a tactician of the first rank.
     The first triumph of Japanese cleverness was in deceiving the enemy as to the probable place of crossing. Bridge materials were brought to the shore below Wiju and preparations were apparently made for building a bridge at that point. Under cover of night most of these materials were rushed to the north of Wiju and above the extreme left of the Russian line. From this position the main body of the Japanese army crossed to the Manchurian side with comparatively little opposition. On the Russian left (up the river) the bank rose in a precipitous rocky formation to a height of a thousand feet. At the base was a path and a line of sand left by the falling current. Stretching along this for a mile or more, like so many blue pencil marks on brown paper, were the Japanese. Any Russians above them could have done more damage with tumbling bowlders than with rifle-fire. Once on this, the Japanese were under a shelf. They could be reached only by shooting straight down the stream, and had gun or

'ER VI
ND THE JAPANESE ADVANCE
rifle ventured this the Russians would have found no cover save the smoke of shrapnel from the batteries which would have sent them back. The crossing of the Yalu was effected by a few rounds of musket-fire. The impregnable position of the enemy became cover for the Japanese advance.
    Once on the western bank and far enough north of the Russian line to be safe from attack on his own right flank, Kuroki's plan was to execute a series of flank movements and attacks from the rear which would drive the Russians from their position and render what slight fortifications they had made on the heights along the river valueless. In spite of the reckless bravery of the Russians and the stubbornness of their defence, the impetus of the Japanese attack and the marvelous speed and effectiveness of the Japanese shell-fire could not be withstood, and the Russians were routed all along the line. They made a last stand at Hamatan Hill, a few miles to the rear of their original position, but the Japanese surrounded them on three sides and before the force retreated nearly four hun-dred men were compelled to surrender. Of the Japanese forces, 5 officers and i6o men were killed, while 2 9 officers and 666 men were wounded. The Russian dead, buried by the Japanese, numbered nearly t,400, and 475 wounded Russians were taken to Japanese hospitals. Probably 5 oo wounded Russians, at least, escaped with the retreating army. The Japanese captured 28 guns, 5o ammunition wagons, and many other munitions of war.


JAPANESE CAVALRY FORDING A TRIBUTARY OF THE YALU

CORRESPONDENTS AND KOREANS WATCHING THE SHELLING OF KU-LIEN-CHENG








WOUNDED JAPANESE WAITING THEIR TURN AT THE OPERATING TABLE
WITH THE WOUNDED AFTER THE F


IRRYING SOLDIER TO HIS QUARTERS AFTER 1-1 5 WOUND HAD BEEN DRESSED




HOSPITAL CORPS WAITING DURING THE ACTION OF MAY 1

            THE HOSPITAL .AT ANTUNG TWO DAYS AFTER THE YALU BATTLE ,NESS AT THE BATTLE OF THE YALU

I,N1, 4
_al?I
••••'", , .	II.	'
0	Iv ,
0:-<.•-'71-.',..'-Y• . , ...	.	•
.	.... ..„-- , -.;,.:-	-	t-'..:.	: ...
..-- . ..'..; "...,""A.--.---./.	i
3? .
:s.	'	.
--
-	.	.	•..- . - d	r. - '.
!
.	.	. , . •	.
%
-,.	.	"	1	-
,/,
.	'	-17.,	.-
110.4T •Atirli- 11'' . ! -17:??7.P7'... ! *:' :- ,. '
	9,	. .
..	.	.	. a	•	.
i Jr..-
-	',It -•"M. 41..
	t:r i117.: ' . 444104 .., :AN:	4 „; y....' .r.. ..).,.	. ..	.	L. . . , ..,
.	': „. n	LI	P..' .
'	1 .	.
	'4 '1%	•	'	Z.-, 'T:1. ' t
..• it." y	- . ,	''.. '	r.c : -. ' Y i •	.:- ,14:. ..0-.4	''',1.- - ..,	-	-	.. -	.. -	-	,	- -	• .	:...	,..P.. '-.	.1
...4t-iiikii	, '	. .. . "	....	.N..
Ivk.'ll'Iti .p.p, ....4;40,07
4 .. •	.	IA
* . • -..-	...	,.. 4•Nr-.	.
	...	4 ...	...z	....N.:. -	?„•••,-, , ......q.: •••,, ;	,	-
\% :. ... . ''.. 1 •... '-
'4"	t •	,c.	Pc/ t‘
. . r	,:',.4,•,•..
0:101' ''' -• •	.7- ti• '
.. . , .	_	'.t.. • .„--ti":f.t,	'	,	-.	••et'' .•.;., '.-Nr,..o- L'-:-... -44: '?•••rd.7-:	--.-1.	-
.	.	;41101!. . . W`‘.Q...--, 'r • "- . N,	1 i A.	• i .
1" VC.	.	*	.-- '	.. a: 4	• ;Act, -	. . '• Ni4iPIC	"	. k :	'''-.7.4. -.....'.-,,mv..L.•..!"44% s/i-...'.r-•	‘..-Aip
-.......-ki...	.	'
* .	...	r.. ,.
--	-	..iilpic."-0171‘.	..	.	-	'A".	'..''.'N,	:,	,...i. `.%	_ ' f,	f .-'. • -	- .•- ••	..'" .. I.', • •'.'," -: .. -• ......:	,.
--dP 1	fl, \
	, 11.	. J t...,• ,	• .. 4 : ' ... '	:-^-:: ..	.	. • •	..,'Sn'lli-?,	T. - .'I-...,4„,;,.•	... -	.
..i.1;? ',.., ." '	.	:,• -,1•-larill.1:‘ -d'•	''' k
- ....P.i/:. j •'L '.4... 7- 411:301..°4 ?P' '..4	1	,	•	. .
1P
- -'.	'	. .
.1717,4;	.,,Itt	1... •	. 4. .' ..„ 11. • ....-64f4if 4 ff L..444 .' tz • •	...3" , .
* -. .	A .	•	j • .	.	•.
k	i	• - -'	- •	."	- -	' • ..it,...,1::.,' ,•-•• ....... ''	?
.._.thadminiiiiii
- .• ..• 'If '. ' -1:.' .	.- - 4. •.- 7 . .?17,4.. otitigt• . • 1 ''	i ''	' '	.	...	-:'	IV. :21.. . 'F":"PiRk. osp......	7.,.-,...A.:,.._	4	,.,.-..	._ .	...
....	.., .--..,/--•,: ertE, .• ,
. .	--..,..,
,-.. .	_.	. ,
	.	..	.	....( - -,4-	• i.,.	....,.. .r,•	f:-•	t. ,,,...	‘
.."' • . :Or ..	04,	...0, -..
* r	'.---	•' .	.
	''' %	_	....1 Al •	...}:,..,, rekar ' •_* A ,	'L., ,0 :.	• • • • ' . . •	.	4	.e...
'::-(0014. i': '.	*.'11. 4 .:',: NV	. _ 4 , ....	.....FrA'id	- ...	4'11-	' 1'	.	'Ai " . 1111A .	.	.	'r .	I el'
'/Y6e•L'
A' •
or ;4 litt,•+:.....	.	- ,
..
rkg .1116;	•
0 _...ii. .
0	..
	Or .	IP.. Ji or - e (00'7 r• 'W- ri",reregt ..'
* .......e.•	-
	/ .i_,..	.4„,ca .-. •	i eg4b .. •	•-9. •
	.	h.,. •
i.,	i	- .,	-•?•A •	4.,;•	•••.'	'	.--	f	-
LL-.1,...---.-_. -	1 f .r.'	. ,	or' .:'' . ,_q: - '	' •	...:_- 7	. •	.....	I •	-,'	-
.' I • . • .A	.:.1.: ...,	,. jr:.	.-1 ' .,	. .	.:.	.	."-
:-.•
.	4.10/412
.
.	.
	..	.
JAPANESE RESERVES WATCHING THE BATTLE FROM THE SOUTH BANK OF THE RIVER
The fence behind which these reserves are standing was one of those with which the Japanese concealed their march, from the
point south of Wiju where they first made a feint at crossing to the point north of the town where the brilliant cross
ing was finally made. The impetus of this final attack was such that the Russians were soon routed all along the line

rrigarevpinOrtrir. ill lir.
wato?pw... r	- •
Ve7111/11411.'
11:. 11111F-Ptall_.,7"7" -111rAw '114-‘ 141. 'T
'
 .4111P	-7.1a aiV
11111j
,
'	.W11-11
N.	--
A.	"flag-'17 Pirk
MI.5* -
"	'' t .11 ri.e'	''''	.,• .'c.1...17111111	' . Mr.
.	.
I	'	'k -	J--..	.41111. 	. 1	.	Nt	-
""	, _,WIINM • •	,., - - - _, .---'	'!	-	..,
t 
RUSSIAN GUN-CARRIAGE DEMOLISHED BY JAPANESE FIRE


RUSSIAN FIELD GUNS CAPTURED AND TAKEN TO ANTUNG
ARTILLERY SPOILS CAPTURED BY THE JAPANESE DURING THE YALU BATTLE


SOME OF THE RUSSIAN PRISONERS WOUNDED DURING THE YALU FIGHT
88


JAPANESE BURYING A RUSSIAN CAPTAIN WITH MILITARY HONORS AT ANTUNG
The care of the Russian wounded by the Japanese after the Yalu battle, and the burial of several Russian officers with
military honors, were things which surprised many sceptical observers of Japanese civilization, who had predicted that, once in
hand-to-hand conflict with the enemy, the veneer of European civilization would quickly drop off and reveal the barbarian

kTION TRAINS AND INFANTRY LEAVING FOR THE FRONT AFTER THE YALU BATTLE


LE AND DEVASTATION IN THE WAKE OF THE RETREATING ARMY


CHINESE MANDARIN GOING OUT TO MEET GENERAL KUROKI

FIELD POST-OFFICE ESTABLISHED IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE OCCUPATION

GENERAL KUROKI AND STAFF ENTERING FENG-WANG-CHENG

         OFFICIAL CHINESE ESCORT TO GENERAL KUROKI AT FENG-WANG-CHENG )N OF FENG-WANG-CHENG


ENGLISH NURSES SENT BY THE QUEEN TO INSPECT THE WORKINGS OF THE JAPANESE RED CROSS
These representatives of the Queen, Miss St. Aubyn and Miss McCall, accompanied by Madame Kuroda, a ,Japanese lady, and 'Dr.
Tamura, visited the hospitals at Feng-Wang-Cheng. Tiny found everything so satisfactory that they remained with the army only a
few days. The photograph shows them about to enter their palanquins, after visiting one of the hospitals. Miss McCall is at the right


INFANTRY DRAWN UP TO VIEW THE CERENIONIES

JAPANESE CAVALRY VIEWING FUNERAL CEREMONIES


SHINTO CEREMONY HELD BY THE JAPANESE IN HONOR OF THOSE WHO FELL AT THE YALLI
This impressive funeral ceremony was held at Feng-Wang-Cheng while the army was gathering its breath after the Yalu
victory to push on into Manchuria. The whole army was drawn up in a vast body on the plain, while on the hilltop, in view
Of all, the officers and priests stood, going through the curious Shinto ceremonies in honor of the dead who had fallen in battle


JAPANESE EXPLAINING TO MILITARY ATTACHAS TACTICS USED AT THE YALU

CAPTAIN OKADA INSPECTING BOMBPROOF AT FENG-WANG-CHENG


BUGLE SQUAD AT THE FUNERAL CEREMONY AT FENG-WANG-CHENG

       UNITED STATES ARMY ATTACHiS AND COLLIER'S SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT FTER THE JAPANESE OCCUPATION

t..	-	: \ - :	\ -	'' 41/4\\T	•:-• : :4•': . - '•!‘-,i; L.I. -...';' .V !?,-•• ' ,i,,	,r ,: ....
;,.-	• .,	_._.-	, -,j	Z	-' \ .\{'	\-.L----r.',.../,' k, ...- ":.. _. ,	, ' -
lilt
...
.	.,-"' 44%	"7:	',..' ,	‘I, -	IVIL	. lit-?	•
1-	Z-----	..	kocl•	,.
	4..*._-.?••• -kik .	. ... 1
11.--='<.	,..,	__ - • ,,---.
—5---_--,L_.--__c
1.11..-'----_.:_-_._	"-r•	.."L411
_ .	.• , , , ...	••?••- --,ItEb
* -	• . .	4.-- --- 	.,	.	. ,	-	ft._ .
*	-______ •_ .	.4$k
_._
--:Skt
'
* .7..••••-	N„,	..,--.;-/.	-. ,--	;,., '	, - A
_
. iik.,..,,,__P.	%.4‘..,
	.	L.
sir4r- 4.54r.	-	„ ,	•
  * •  -rok	.
L.'s.* •
* ..,1004IWI•t‘7%i	-	.	;
L.,•	-1444,
..k7C:0•\	-. •
                                                              * • -.4 trek,- •	-	•
•
•
- -
        * . -•••	•
. -
ISSUING KHAKI UNIFORMS TO JAPANESE TROOPS AT FENG-WANG-CHENG
	.	.
.	.	.	.	..,.	:.
1	.
1111111',	: ..	..;,.--:	',.	•	•	• •
_. ._ .	Ill	• ii	. t..1.•	'1r
..1	...•	,	.	.,,	•	.	,..., 
-	•	. i'f -"--- --;?•til ..	- 	- '	: 	.• 	r: ' r'.....;.:-	'.-t-
-7.7.._"_. --•i	-1..:: • --	...	.1,1. 	' I	4_....'	i (...: "'	-t•	i	..,.	•	r.--.-.,.. ,
* ..:.:	-...
-......
* •
4 44 I •	I . ..s •	f	.. '
* •	.	•	.
' • ' .	• ..4.44*	't? r	t	4 •	. . . -
* .
* -	...	:,	.1	..,	•	•
.	.
* -	•	-	...	.	• 1...,..Z.: r..:-••.. .- I... - , '-.:	4	•	..'.	i._?4.	.	•	. . ..	;.—.---.-.*Pr'	•	4.	,	. 4. L
..
	.	-	•	-	.
* •	' 7	r	'- . -.-' -..'1 -.AK	• . ? • . ;	-. mb - .-b°702-1,rzi-omir-Sy	.	-.	t.
' • • 	,,,,6
1...-,-..'-a,:-.•:;" 3,.,,._.., .. 0.;	' L':;:. -14 -: :‘‘• = r--""/-, - ---_,.. .,	'	... _ •	.., .	.	..
-t	-....-
	.	-	Bo
1	.	.
.... -..,
-..	•- . _.	i •	-	•	.- •	-_	•,...:•••7•'• .1. :•.- -	,, . --....	.4-. - ..	-	-	•	. I tt 1 r	- - • 
;-.4- ;___:1,.0,.....4-.',._.--. .-•-•--- 4,-	L.--r-*". . .1	• 4.--•• 7 -::-	-PI'	..._,.4--7--- 4m7111,•,- "7	-.._ _
--'	-	• -4---- 41v.	-	'`=iP1-it•	•-" - .,	.L. - -,.;-	.	• - •	•-•"5,'	-6-;-,,,,0	.. . ,- -	•••,- .-- - • ..4., - ,..., '45.....- •,- -l.,. 	-46,	'%7-1. _ .• •	vja..
	-%T.	'-. • -..s.--(,-,--	.	-.-	-	----. ,	'-.. ......-.
4 - ' . . •••,-- '.	OF ,..• .	' .P	-.	•frat .	.....-"' ' --'• .4 '. ' • f	. '	• • ' ' • ". ' ' •	'tie."' Aarke".0 -‘	: •	- '4' %.--.......L.47-4164- :	'`..---"-	''-	''''	'`-,._	k--...0
* ' ..."	.4.,-. .,.• -.. - -	,...e..-- ‘	.,•-•.- -
' -	-	-- r•-	" ' _N
* . . •	:i - ',,:.-_..,	-	4r....-
..:- 
--:-	',-,....- k-.	. -	.	.- ": , -..'. .: .--.,_	LI r,	.:.. - 'c-‘?	...... ic4-...- --'9•-• -441- .1...."mTP:j..	&..._	J.,___41kof ';--'-'it•t_ 2.....', ' • .-- .....e -'-'...
...... ' . : Over- -0,	e	.	- :	5--'''A..--- ..".."...:.... . .	A	-717.X.".‘ L . ' .	7.1.7"..	.,	. .1 •
	.. ,	...	,	•	.	,
* . 1 . • ,f42
4-•T •;:'-'_,..-ty._: -• ' . • -	• " "1 -	if- '	' '•••• ' !..'	'	•	;.-'11i;-r!. • ' - 47 .- .-	..1.- ".4*ttr...-  --`..----1.:. 	.:-.•;•2.14 '"if,	'. lri-- .3:;, --. ,-....yN"54. ...:4---_,	. 
' ',.'.	:*--'72,-, .,_:'	.t,„,1 ..,..,	71.4'. •,•,...	...;:, 	•	... ...1046.....
-4. ' •	•
- A - r.	.'." 4., r'_ .	'. '"	•..	; - - - . .	-	• ,.....,	.,„'..." .	1-••.: :. • :• :	i . '' •:.H471:: t r.....' '4" sip'
	6.'1Wle.	...atilt- jL. : .. ,,	' . .'-- - •?• ... . , •-••
* ;--. A '' A  - i.,:-	.
4	....,..r. ,,,	,	,	j:: .	e ...	. , ,. -,..L.	.-	.., -	49.- t •	•	-...0, ...,. •-- 	....,4• .- -	•	- t	: - r • . .
-	'''	• • '--. j•".7:-..N.,:171' .....'n	ni.• 	1., '10P ..,,:.,,I..., 	-1
* ..- 744-Cjw ..- .- ...-•	.	.
	-..	' '	,... • •,_AIr	•••::.,-,-	- • ......,7' . . .._ .'''''. ,	..111'	7-4406; ' • ,...	.., ,..	• ,
W-	.L., ' 4•-err''	"	1L.	- 1•2;,.:.	...., .„.4 • •-•.r	.	. i - .	-	..	'-- '6, °441.4:....-. ,-- :."•'-•• ' --..--- ''. ...--c,	- .	, . '	„,,•.„
	..."-',_.	';
. -.. .7-' C- 4	4'4? el''7. ..- --••".-1
	. '  ii-	... c. co:‘,...\:	..... -.-'7L ,...--4-7. - . '4.::•-'4F4•,	7t••?'-'''' *- - • -..
k	r 4r.a?.	',,,,110".	i .01,70-`' 	• - •	. 	sr ,4‘. .,.. - `""'s.a.,,,,:......, 1..L.4, ,.......„.	.:	e _._..	..,iii.,	,
.	d•	.
...	, ....	.. .	. . ''*: . •	-•*' •,•,41-.._	.7
r'all? r P -: Ir L 1 r...4 i L *4 3. '	.. 
	Azik-A .-•••-" ......r.-00-4	,' . '	4	.7,-.4 --. -- 't '	,111‘g ...I110.A- '. 7fl AAP' .-	,,,,,... 	- 'rt.' ' ....4.017:- ....-. '	. •	el-'
ENGINEERS OF K. ROKI'S ARMY BRIDGING A STREAM AT FENG-WANG-•HENG
JAPANESE GETTING READY TO PUSH ON INTO MANCHURIA


4.4
1/41,	•
* IG	.5"
a••
* •-?
.	A
                                                    * , •
. ,
DETACH IN G THE LIMBERS. AND GETTING GUNS INTO POSITION BEHIND THE BREASTWORKS



GUNNERS WHEELING GUN INTO POSITION	GETTING THE RANGE AND ADJUSTING THE SIGHT
JAPANESE BATTERY GOING INTO ACTION AT FENG-WANG-CHENG
9 8


JAPANESE GUIDE-POST AT FENG-WANG-CHENG


JAPANESE VISITING RUSSIAN GRAVES AT FEN( -WANG-CHENG

           CHINESE FARMERS VIEWING AN ENGAGEMENT FROM ABANDONED TRENCHES PANESE INVADERS IN MANCHURIA

	'..' ; ,:. ..	. ' '. '$!' .• :
. 4
* +	' f'..	_4. .4ur ' i
('''	-.	• in-TA.	.4ifyi,rp,,,Ii', •	, f. ....	11._...r lo te, 4,p,r1 • 14r. /
. ,
'	I	.'-'-&",' V= -	/, -• ' i' %I	10',.	• .-'•	-74- .- - ; ,..:'4„ii, f ,,
. J • •„(	.
. -z-.44'i-	,_:-._-_00-.4"--,-	-,• ..	.	.,	44.,,„.	.,
,..i.
	.	, .,...•	, ,,,,e1! ' -F '''''-''''-'".... _.._	•	) - * 7. +of ."'" 
4'
.
	,	...	r
_..., --	7.	••-..1 -	- 41". :	'1-	44
...	..,„	,........
-	' li  	•••	- 0 , 14dedif-.
: 	, At:t	;	, ..'•	. ".
	....6	ir .
w,
	%..	r .. ? . .i ! .., ?
. r .,.	.	-
	tr'	.•	'*„ 4	, •	,
	.	.1Y1,4/1.	fi...1.....	.
'•	.gt ••‘. 'r	.,	‘ •
-',	,?.,	k	."44' r
-
	'.".r	%	1. 4 .1	•	:4111,.:4t.-..4.. .. .	e
•
	,e	,	• "( .f '•/	,	L
	''''	.	;1 . '.
•• V i I
•
	4,:..1: I	,
ti:
': ,r/':	i
i rtvi• •rig' . .	.1	•
.., • 0	4 ..'
	i	N..
_.:a..... 	/
* .	.1'
	Z-. a- 1 •	..i-'44r	- • • •	n. •."	of'
alliglik
.	_ 7. -„	, : ',...	;•"...-A*11". -t"..	-.AI	, . •	•
' ' -.'-': 4W. - • • •	. •::	-‘ • -'-'	--
/	.4' . l'i	'' • 1 II
......	„,	,	.	.... ....k..	jc...),	1
.	...
,	• ...	_.,..1--	...---
- • - d
11, ,	•	-.	,N, ,	.%	1 (	.
-	--	..1"/7•71"•	. . ... :11.	\ist\iii
.	..._	.
* 2 ..,2.1	$	? ' '17' r	,	_	. '
	:. ? '•-?	*	.',.
, •
	.	I
..,	----c-_,,,,,,,‘„•_ ,.....• •	,	-,,t,,,,.	,	.-
1 ',...	•
-	fr....•	ri	,.. ..... ,	I
	' 1 it'-•::.-4	•	.	. fest'
...
. '.....;,,..,:•:' ,	'	4•.*. . •	, ; i
S	. 11:: . ..•r	' ?:-:\	1111/ 1	t	' .	1 iri.r_	•••	• ...
* .	"ir .	• .:.
MA,	...	• n.1".	%... ...n. ., ..,	= ! Att4li	',If- ;•	. ii,
2 / '
	I	•
..Altv '
* 44N '‘,	. • .7i-'	st	-
.+4--• A....	' .: "c'- 1 7, .	\
. ...	.-1.	S
	I 4 to	i.
•
1'	..." _....	4 . /	11117	•	4
._ "......V ..',. . •	..S.79....:.,04 ... .	' V '
,.	'-•s !	-.P•-% ' N\ ‘ .1	-	- , f \
,	,... ,,,..,	.. •	,
1 . • '	t• $ '	'''‘	'	r
%fer
-S.
v i ,iiiihrip&	....	..1_ , -"Ng.. ", l? .• . ....
'...4.	'	)1.
%	4., mai. •	' 3	lir	1111111111111111k , 'N'iiiiiii,


i
.	ri'•	i	.	4...
•
* '	'',	,-.
:	.
..	' ".	-t.'-	• - .. t.' "'. '	•--101.1	4
:	..-1... s':::.. -. ' . ,...,4--Aj• ii:	%AM
--.--_,...,_.
'	...r: . -=.• .	...?	0"--,	, VkLf.'	.
.	.	5.-	.	.
t	11 i'f:Z A', ' '. . . * •
401 -	.	....-1,.......!..f.,..:04....:....:111.t.4........ ,/....: •,	.
; 1 Illf
' ,	.	•	.
-	1 .4 •--„,,	'	i !!	.., 4 Alis,..	...v. _ .	, .9.
.Z' '.	- •	••••	. :-"!.4--, -_i	-	''''	..	',.?
..._ .
	-	• .4; 	•	-	'-' .i.'	-	- "'	•	..	• '
' V .,-'''	. '- .-.".ar	‘,"*..	. i 4	'	- •	4
...,
-	- Aii-„•_'	.
* -.- -	' :- • ,•.,• .	....	• - i, -
,	.* ,	. •.' i , .:; • -.J„ .,•.:.	.	.,	.	. 4 ' '	. '
I. .i". • V . . , 	--1
* (4..	.	0,	:..	•• .-4.	.
	%	. '	. ' - 4ki,,t.-•,4-.,	.	.	. ..
, 1
* '.
 il - . 6. 1 ; '	.-' ..	lair	- -.....nir.- 1:1 '..-=:. ‘	, ' :- . : _ .-	- .- , - " .-.,-1- ,	•	.	ye- . ,4' 4.4',1, .. 't.'
	 ' 'T.	r	• .	'. '......	.	'	-.	.F:='.• ". :-- ' ....	- •44--	'	7.; ‘ ,	. ' .	diak,=`..•.-.4, \--;'",
.., -	. .
'IVA;	. ,.1114,: - . , -„: -;'...--;:t-:,:.-., -	.	.	, .	• . -110-d ,' i ,-; ?
t'	,	- ,	• g	.
..--..	.	III• :.,	- .	.4'...r, •1: ,•!:..7 -	. '	••:%..p.	•"
	41	' ' % 4" -17- '- %	.41'..':: . •	? -	ii 1''	. -	.	' .	-4L%* .•, 24
,	.	• 
.II
.	, ?••• .	•
.	• '	. :	': . . .	L.A•iat •	• 1: ','-. ': i "T .	I • . -,.. •; -.	.	.,,_
-	•	. ' :	.. ,i	•	' F.'"'" ' . ../.`1,	-- -	'-'- --'!..- ••-c-. -,,,- 'IT	_	-..	' •?11.411
* 1.,	41-,,** _	I.	- .	,	.	.
A	;o-..,::4.41E. kl-::,
 .	' •	...	-	• .	.	. 
.1 ...	'•	- .	11 ..r , .	,	.... A..
	 i	. •
.	.	1
* 1	iss	..,... .st;	. ... 
't	' :;- 	I
i k' 1.	•	1 •••..
. ' e.t	; ,	, - -
41 .	.0 .-	.4 	.i.-...i.yr, •	‘:	•,%,...1 ,,A._

J APANESE INFANTRY LEAVING FENG-WANG-CHENG

CARRYINGr A WOUNDED RUSSIAN PRISONER ACROSS A STREAM
INCIDENTS OF THE ADVAN(


BATTERY FORDING ONE OF THE STREAMS THAT CROSS THE PEKING ROAD

                 CHINESE BRINGING WOOD FOR THE JAPANESE ARMY FROM FENG-WANG-CHENG


NTRY CROSSING THE SO RIVER IN THE ADVANCE ON LIAO-YANG


f HALTING TO STUDY MAPS AND SCOUTS' REPORTS ON THE MARCH FROM FENG-WANG-CHENG


CHINESE READING PROCLAMATION ISSUED BY THE JAPANESE

JAPANESE CHEERING NEWS OF A VICTORY NEAR LIENSHANKWAN
WITH THE VICTORIOUS JAP


                    OUTPOST HIDDEN IN FOLIAGE AND UNDER A SUNSHADE ANESE AT LIENSHANKWAN

47'
-'51;-^4.•
-'•"°•4*. •
-	, •	p	•	14
-OW	-
„	-	7	*,-41r4trt4
,	.	_	--"6"	•••	-	.....tmr•••••••	•••



'	4 aiti.	•
	- 41116.-	.	.11,..ri."....
	:	i•
                                                                                      * 0 IT: .
,	_	i	-	•V'N. . 'Iv -*'-._	'1	,	•	- tY
,
,	...	.	.	.	.
. , . ..e.t4
.	-	. •	,...:c._	•	-	.	'	,:	'`.	,	t. . ..,
,.
7-:	.
_, _r, •• -,,,. •	.	.	....•'	1'1/4	-itv	,.	4_, -	.
a
	4	.-. -,
	-34,%1`	.	'
	. . ..,4k.-- —	_	-
	_	.	%.	s,.... . $.,	N.
,	•	,fi-,	- l'	•	' icj. ' 4a.	,	,	0 IA t
.	1	-'-	••	1:16.1:r ...- 4	.	1	.	""'	- ' ' '` ---?::	--6	,	-	-s	F '
,. ..06:64.1#001viti' 1/.44"Oillat-.;..1-1.:?."7-'4".•-:s.,f1: • ' A, . -,*!.. %,i' .
,. voi- -	e	. _	-
<	"	- •	-.	..? . •	t.',1?:,:,. .'	'	.	,	.
,
,	,,_	n•-
                          * . :4:1''' -", . '	-	- '	' -%	4	. ..	IV t, --t-c.: '' .	:	..-
•
	.	-=,	.
	i.,	.	.	,	....k, k''' .	'	a
	..	,	• ••., 's	,	.
1........r	,	?	-...-.1%,„	.
.	. .	, ,	.
* •'1;:z. ,•-:_-:...f .-.3.-...-,	_.	4.,	,.	F.	,e-	'	' .	,.., ....,,..
	...	.
,
,	-..7.--:-:',;Ntip'..-0.".	, ..	...tolik	'-
.	,	,J-	,	-	h.	,.	.	, •
_	.
.	•
,	.7.,.	..
	.,_	.	.
ARRIVAL OF MAIL FOR THE ARMY IN THE FIELD AT LIENSHANKWArs1
105


JAPANESE OUTPOST ON DUTY
PIONEERS BUILDING MILITARY ROAD FOR THE ARMY
INTO MANCHURIA WITH THE JA


VETER AN, WITH COIL OF ROPE AT HIS BELT FOR TYING PRISONERS

-,-•••.•
.._
•
ME:-. .
	.	.
	.. It	.,k,	';	.4•11:r477
,	-	...	---	41.
	i	Wir'~o, -V7 '' • •`
.--
.-. ...,.../-7-1(	• :	.......
-	..	-.	:.....	.	.
, •	•	• •
.	.
...--:
* --	•?	-
* -	.	••-...-.	-	..--	.--......
- - ' ' ._....ii .T......a.i0;. .	•I	Mil. — • •:.-,:.	' .„'-'.	'	1,...,,
* •-•-;.--.... •	. •	.	.	• 1... . -	....4?01.-11r777•!"'"r"j7:7
	, ,..--	.4.	•
'	....	•
_.....	_....	. • •	,Irr
.- — • -	.	.
...•••• -
.• • ..-4!:".."	• .4-.1:',	_ . ..	_ .....
.., '-i,EX;•,1Fi.oat,-.	%. - • • •- .	'	.	.
	'	..	...1.4-...4,- ''	•	. ._...=$.,=...._,...._.......	.. 1....0c....,	...t, _,.... .	.
	.	'	.
..._	.. -
-	.-	• ..... 'LI,	' • ' ' 1'r; .. -4	--; Vir°•••••r. 51247.7;:-.....	-.11:7.5.1•••;11..	'	ili:..	.....r	''	•• ..	4 r • • -	••	• _	. 4 . 	.	•
.-
•
.	'.•..'	' '	•	••r	.	•••4T
	._	.
'-' .	• - 	• ....	. •	- ' 	...'•1"- 4 ....4• 440:1? '1-41i
	. .2 ''',..J145'..-;'-•'•,:P.W7' '	. -...r'''-‘TrAr9;:f	ST	' :-• •rz'A .'• ".... -	'
.	.-.  • 11414:2tIk
,4!TS -•11.- -- _ 7.11%,, pr.._ .	4' 117 • 4ft..."iir. -
	.	.	..
. ,.
(
 •	. -•
	.	•	..4....- .), ,..''.	,.-c•"' ?frt`. •	.. '
.	.
* . -	-.'`... .. ..	.	...-:-A,"-•
	.	•	•
.	•
.	.	. .	,	. , .	.	.	.	•	....A.,...	''	-
- ',SI	'	-- ''•	••.4 -	.4	-
•
* ';'	•	" •
•
	••	; -k•	•'	•	": •..	•• .. .	....
...- •	• :,	.	.	-	• . .	.
	.	•*•.4..	•
.	.1 4. -
	••• •• ••••••- . ' 	' ''''.• • 	• •••-•"•'••• 	0.: ,	- .	. .• •	' • - y.' . r:.•••• .,...	.	. ..	.	r; • • i I	-  .r..-,	,	...,.,'. r.	.	4.. ilf 4. .1,6%.	-	.	'-'4.••'',1*:! . ;••••• ;......'	...	•	ir. t?••• .7...	''''' .	',	. •
.	.	.
	. .	.	.	,
* 1*
* ...- ,	?.'?1 , : : , .., .	.:... ': •••	. '... .• •	?, •
* ...	..,	•

''.4	• 0 • ? .	-- -	!••	" • • ••
* ..	: • 4J	,.	.. •	-	.•'	..-- • ' 'I	-	•	44: 1 • "
.:	r4	4, •
* -.
'	••• 4 4.	•'	4	.	.
S••• 4".•	•-	1.•
.	J	•!•	'	4. '	••	• --' ,	t.	•	•	„•:°•.'. •	. I.	,
......„•
* .• , p	•	,	..	.	..	.	-.•	- •_,	•••4--....-,-,	.	..	.	.•
.	....	•	r*:	..:....,	• -:.,...,	.,	.	i	• •	.,,,,•-•	.. •	..
.	.	..	•	•	•
.
	.	.	_,	...•	-	.	. -,...	•	•
    ..,,.„	„,..	.,...	.7,
	,	o	4.i.....•	.:-	..	...,	.-	•	..,	•„ •	.	..	.	,o.	•	,.....•	.	•	.
.	, •Ir	'	r• ..	.	•• ,	. '''''...-• -.1'. • •	/ ...?, r•-•41. • :.: • • • • . • - • •	• ,	•	A	.	•	. .
.	.	.
.	•	L	•4 ,,,i.
* r	.	•	, ..	t.-•	,	-
....	•,,	..,	•	•.	.•	.	..	.	.
-	-,/ .	" 4'	• '	'
* A	,	-	., It.:	'''' -T.. •,T . ' ,	- .
	.	•	.1. 4
* • •
7	-	.
.	.	.	.	..,•	•
1	•	.	.	..1•-•	.	.
- :1............	•	...
' I: „	.	.r...	•.•	•••	.	:	.	.	.	,	.	.
	.	•	.	t	• ,	..-	.4.	'	fc% ,	.'	'''	.	.	.
.	.	.	.	.	4 •	. `. ..'	. 	?0"T. . ki	.	.
A a k....
A •	. 4 .... ....	...	.	.._.	..	.	.	.	.	14 '	•
..	.	•	I	'
* a/	...• .• jk •	4 .'	.-1	..	•	.	.	..	.	.	.	.
	.	.	..,	.
* 1	•
illk
	.	..
I	• 1, A	•	•-,,,..	- . .	•	.	_...	_ •
* , .	•	.	.	• •	. :	!,,	.	.
	- - -..1..,•	'.••• -.7.	,	.	.	.,	.	.	.	.	_	.	.	..	*26..
.	r.t	.., .	-I' • '	.	.	.
* -	•	'''	T	.	. :S..	lc. ho	. . ...,/	;	-	•	Iv	•	.	6	.	:	., •
',. A -!Pi	.	•. `'	.7 ..,....-.	r•	.
'	.	.	•	•	..i'''. n ,	.	.
	,	•	-	,.	....,	.
.	• ...,.	.	.
.	.	.	_	.- - .... .


'ANESE COMING UP AT THE DOUBLE-QUICK DURING THE FIGHT AT MOTIEN PASS

4147..f 61.Yr. ;Y. ILV4VVIFVO:Nnrr	.7,-40110
'	t.-1-$.1*,. • =	'	-
` • '	•

7"	•
•••
r 
.
	••-• •••	.. _
	.	-	•
	.	•	„,	,
.•-•?-,.'	; I	.-'
	....-- ..;	...	.	.	• rri 1.	'	'
,
'	• 
- „
	''.. ..'•	:..5,	-	'	- d*.	*,-__' -:\?,•-V..-	'''• '-	•
''. .'"'-'41te - / .1i;:' 7j1L111 r . -'	:	-	' e-,..a.10111"14.. •••-M.-4.1k.'A''7-IN.	''. • ' '	'	-
„-s• ''.''. ' • '.‘•-,`''`'"` -	' '
....	.
-: ,..
* ,
	.	. ,
* " 
_
.
.	..-- ..	_._	2.	llt•	' -.	? 4 .	• 41
* .	•	,	r
	.	.MY-...	1111b	--61111r	'.71.	''''''' ' '	'	• 111.?..r 11/14k.k ..	: . .... N.
-	.
.	, 7 ; • •	-...	-•	. •
	.	..	.•
f	'	4 tr,	• .	)-1:. 'Ir'	- - ,.., a.
	. •	. J
'	4	. " AT, Z. ••	„
-....•	O.	.1 ‘,. . , ,, :	:'	hiki•	5,...	r•lif •	••• ''' -	.
.e.
•
.	•	,	.	.
LI:	.	.	. ,	.	.	.	-.	„	•
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      * '. ' •••• I	''.	•	•	'	.	.
....
	-	.
..•	T	•r-e..' ' '	2.• - ' ' .
	,	•	,
	,	• _
.	'	•
* .
* . . ..	x`	•	: ''... .	•
e . •	•	' l At.	'	'
* , .
IOW	-7._ 19•••-+
...	,I•	0
.	•	,
	.	'	-41t-''	,	'	• -, •	, 4 •••	: -- ,4*-g:e ,"- ' , ',.; ..'-'---11.&;•-41--'74.,-_	...- ....L./ .-1 ' ' '	.	' ,_-,...-X.,?	'-- .	-	."
.	'	..
'	•-
r	'!••
.,	.. •	.ti	,	. '
.	- 7	-- • -. T• '4	,. - -•-•	'.:	,. '-' :: ''.•• -'• `. -'-'3F,''1_":-I''...L.	r_'---;--•' . '.	' .	.	-,3_ '	-- ''	r.t.A-1, ' :."
.	.	, ' 4 '
.	-.0004-	- '	....,........‘	.r.• .STr.VC-,112'2-___*-. -:''',7--". -:  	.."--. 	..,,-, rp,..!	; . 
_	..;	,	.	'	• , .- '	:	.-	—	":—.•-•;,--	..p.-.... J."- :, • -.--_,...44 .:'... 7!:- Alr„..Wi''......?; - ..,......,:ar '	- •	+ ,,.
' • ', .. '	. • . (. •-• • '	..114E•• • 7	-	-.x IL,..:..0"...-,...-4. „..... .4...".---'-'	1...	...	"	..„
•
* '''..'"ae-''. -..-* - - •	..., -	1	L'A	; .	.7.	.	.....	',1.7.,2;:.,,,..A... ,'..-----7t-Are.„ 4., z--21.1t.	d	I T • '1'141	. .
* ,.	• . 10 ''	'-	... . *	• ; ea	. r L. ••!1•- . - ...T451.1-1••	-.*:, . - .	---I-Atir,,,--.`, . : ,	L':. ...'7.ii.:; El••• s	.r . _	,	--- . I
-
	_	''	....L
	'is, 	'11..74.0i'Llt.: 1-,..- • ., . .f. '..a ' '.., „..	, 1, .
'	— ' '	-	..IP. ' '	••••••	:	:j..17.	, ' -11	!	ik!	' `s• ''.	ZP.....4. Z='' -	14;17.	---1.1-   	tI: ,,.." ..	'  	:, ar 	' ... , -	',. —	'	`• - '',-...-.	..., ..:•:!"`-`':,-• ..-:. ..; :
	--•-•°- '7..,.	-,	..	• -
R	, .
.e.k...,...;.?-.,,:' '	ii-% • ---	.,=.. ' -	_	k ..-	r: '.. .4 'ie..",	--..- 7	' ___, :1	ivg.alit - r• ,„ .	..t.	..1....
,	--	7...-
	:r.,,_-_A:: "!x war.	' 	• •;_. ....	..1-- ----. -	L.L,A :“.,-14."7t4"4•10.... - 	_.,.•_4 ?,{,ic	' -7.. ' - : "..- ,...., -
	,, ..-r. ''''`'	r C'i,.. , g? ..Z7.7,ik .	'77   	2.	....41... *n
._.
...	,  1	)VP -	-'' . ., _	.	11,t .: . . jiti+P..4.4( :i.. ,	• "•	--• •	:, - ' . • Th-" ;,_ _;	- . ' - te	q." -.1"t-	• 
. ,	.	i-,- --- .	• •	7-•*--'7---14--.0.	..,.:.:,r	. , ,i-: -ir'-_ . 	' . ' I 	..('''' ... '' —' '1••••-••••'#.1"	..	iliel, 	' ..	.. al. .	.''.. S...-.-..r...	At'...7•7.,,I, . .•	.
... i ....7-: It' -,_,..."' 
	i''''-'5. ' .-: . tr7:4?201r	'	'4-f	,_ .....----	.	.i..., -	-7'. .4r,....	- • ; irl.	..
.	--, -	- - . .. .",#.7,i.', .4 lop_:1-	-	- .	i .- Ne * . ....,...• _71.1(	'	.	, .
•
                                                                                                                                                                                                               * . . -	-	_
. -	. •




IN THE TRENCHES AT MOTIENLING ON JULY 4

DISTRIBUTING AMMUNITION TO THE MEN IN THE TRENCHES


ri*41
.0.0(


.	I
.•	•••7'"1111".
jti	•	. !VP,	•
ii\ 1
.1	TOr 411i .IF'
..	• I.,,	.	-...% P 7	.
ir
.1—•	, : •	.•
1	.
...-. .	..	, . ,	'	'
--	..	•
0 • • .. . . .- • t.i,1.1)4N	r
r	.4	....r .....0:.,	' 4	-, .1, .•	,,..r./..	!	,:	. .
.	L•	rei" .,- .-- ,	0 ‘ i.	,	, / 
 ,	.	.
..	.	r.	? •
0, •
* i
1•'	A
' k /	i•	....• .6 '•i,	-	,	.	ii
;	-
' 1 '	NI( '''	1 ,f,	*
	. .	. .	4 	.4  . V A.. .. ....
.i.,6 .1 •	•	i -
4
 '	• 4 
... 1	-	.	1; I,I 'IL-y..:. /.	- \ 
? %	4 . 4 .,,I ,.	..r..... '	1.-	-... :.- -111-1, ,41f0a..„.;.,T.0,	Iv: ii—., ' t ..	•	.'	4:".:?i.	''' -
.•	% ./	. .	—,....4.. ' .,	-.' 	1,. . ?...:.J'.	.	w	'	4t.	'e 4	•it•	k	I. '	•
., ..	•	. , ..•.- '1' . ,,.	j.'	.	Op ,.•'•	•	,	-r.	.44..4	e	'	.	2!1r.	•- ?	• it o.	$	•	?
.,.:
"k	..	' 7 ' .	...•	f	t	' lit'	•	•. .	• I% •
	.	.
..1-	•	'	I	4,j	. .	.	.	'	.	.	• ,	Ae.	•••?„.,,,	ri 	•
'Alf
. p	• 11	.. .	• 1	.
.. ''	•• ' f.' .* .	I.0 T+. ie	IFAir '	' 	1. •I 4(4 • ,	.fr, •
	..	.
* • ••	•	•	•	• .	).	•..•	•,,,.	tof.•	„	;	...?	%	)	/..-	.	•,,,	.	•	-	,.	..
* -•	!.	• ,-	• ,	,	,•1	.•	..,	„	.	.,, ,	:	" —	,	.1),.	•	...
	..	,
	,	0 4.	...	..	.	- • ..,:i.	iiii•••• '	•	j.	•	itt
,
	4.	,..,•••‘..,	• •.
k•	..	/1
it'	•	•	• .	/	.•	V: ' .	••	r	.... t
IS 	/ 	1.	.	a• . •	1 :-.0. • : .. r'.6t 1. . 1	. - - •	...	.•	,-0.	,	' ill
44	i	• ' /	" - .	-
,d'	,./.	• ,	:, 1	. l• 0%. ' .. .,	• r •??-	.	1 ,  	- '	. - r Ate f ' .` '	'	,	.":...."::, • ,,	•	.	"*"...1'	•'' c	• '' 0% •	„	_
le ,P....ti	J.'	r "...... ,r...,:. -r.'-: i	•	.	r ' , -	'',. e2.9	• .' ._,,-s.	.	.	Alff	-1	, •	,. .., 1,2.
.4- . '' %.	.	• ' '	,	7 • -	..	yt Adt: • _.	.4./. A .. el.	.	,,•,	'	.....	.	...."	4 4 • • .	1
S	•
4	. ..	.-	.	-% 'Jr .	•	.	•	.)	f	.	.	/ • '...	- '
.	.
a	.

* -% ,	Wr'-'71111111r1" .	ar - iliMINIFIIIIIRs	, "yr 71WWIIIIII II,	, r	'-• --.- . -"MI
	mi• NO	,	'IF IN ill.	., 1, — . ,
,	.,	,
iL,..4	..1# --- ' 717 -	— ' 01111 , ti	''r.	Pir Aid ilir %	-	tii:.17,-	qiitib	t	.; ,
	.	.
	,,	,	.
gt ,L. N . *
t/ ..)	11111•111,	yliff	. :	r	.
.
	.	.	•	- -
-	•
"
-	.--%. ,	'	)	•.„_ !
. T`',	rik1111...,.
I • •
V4..	,1 ,	rMillity	.	/11' '''}	1 A	if
	7 .1( ,	ii _ t,	a	. , .	-1 .	,.-	..-
	F •	....ed
	+-41111. libr.,	?	4.- - '	.	7ix ii so ,	4iiiyi,"v-.....	,	. .,_ .,_
	_ -	. lialow 1	,
111 s.	'	- '	.t.	-	-	.
	-111-	ji	.A.-Nwilatai
	iv_ ..	,	1 i	1„
A .---	MS	, 1 i	....
.	s	--
	.	-	,	, .
	,	.-,..	.	.	. .7.	,	-•	--if : -_.• - I
	.	_ v .1 -	op - Alai. 112	'0.114-7‘-.	It.
.	.-	. •-•	r	AI. •
* it Ilk
. --.,	._. , - i - ' i	Ar.1
	.	,
. , . •"•	•	...I	.	.	L	ti...„•,	•,„	,
	.,..	06,
.,
.._1!_l'il.	,
_	..	OP!,	:	'-•	•	•	•,-•••
..	...' -.. '- 1 Ir.	.	•	'	' ..- . .	-.	•
'. 1 4	"	I
	..110111i.	.	• •	.
	-	Ot:	'	. ..-' '.	L.: : • '	.‘16'
* ".,,	f ..-. . _
* ' i 't	• .
	!	f..-•	' . ' • j
.	1
ti''	•	. :. ' :	‘	•	•	• V L	' 5	'	....	. •	''' '.• .	', .4°4 .	- ' -	I _	-...	:•	• • .	s - .. . _	4	(
lillek
	:•A.. 7 .	•A -	4‘.'
......-r
* Nlio,:,.,.. ,.._ . 't..	.-41•111ftiv..---	..-
,... •	...	• ..‘	..- .. '4 ' '	. .	'VCP	.	' .
	.4-	. IMili:	".414..	.. .4.... ....'.:i.._	.. . :r . ''''' -..4'''' .	'	'	.. ih'
	.	'.	. :. CP, .i.,!...'. Ima?•
, Ailii, ) ..	,
, . . .-r - — • --7,—.A11110	... 1 : : . -'	.
	.. . r ..• • .- ;!. +A	- .	-.	. .-• A _i•	)	'''§, i''.:	lk..
.... A. )04
-.	1	•	I	'. !,,----	. - v
i .	.......' '!:	.	.,:-., -	..
.	•	,,'	-;	..	„	...
	:.	% 141:
	.	.	.	..
.
5 .	AS": ' . '
—	.,;..,	g.-,..... _	,.. .-.	.	..:, !Ic".N. _ .	. -	•
'
* -._.s	•	.	. ,	.	,	..
" - •	• _	• • •	-	S..	-	•;.1•41-0.••ai,;4-1.-	-..i.i•
..	-	- •	..	.	•••	•• -	1	. !..1	•	-'• .- .	• .— .-•':.*	----..-t'''.	0,	..	,r.	..77
...
'	.
ikelb...	'
ii	-	:•}.	.
.	.	• ‘.	. ..•	, .	or _	. „ le1;---	'''. t
* • •	. • \ .	-	..4` 'I '	••	-:‘,.. Iiii ,	.,	a- de • i 7. -.:11.4 ,9!Z	.	....	•••
.---	•:	-	%	...3	' .	f;?.-- • •	.	. ' . ' •	l•	• • '	.. ..,.... . • ';..,iii*. . .' - . 4* '. ' ' • : • it,::%.	' ' i ' „a-44-
..	.:	.	.	.....;_.:.....r......
111,41): ;0, .., _. - .
	r	•._ •,,„
.	..i.,___...._	1	,	_. . . , .. , . .	-	„ ,. .	_
. AV
* .	• ,	, i . .	.._ _ .	. ,	. ,
---...'7.--- -	4	,•••:.	•	.	. _	-
	.	-'''`.km..1E14,	--	.	. „	.
.
41/4;,-._,..	\-..	.: •-	'
* . ,, ..	.	•	.	•	?Inulow.--
* -.....	-	' • •
	.	•-,-:-• • -:-.. .	-17.7""""6-...,., _	'‘461411(...• •	.	; - .-- - .	.	•	. - '	.,':-AA'ql,:•.;:r.%.,_::' :. ,7
	'	''..1"	1.1 '6' --.:-,, --/-.;]--i'i--.*.,
.
--,	...	.	__ .
* -,-	. is".-- .	• '''IA'.'.' .y. ,
,,,iiiiii........„...
.
* ,,..-_.-
	,.	.	_
••	-...„	,
..
	-	•	••••/..	-• •
* •	t:	•	.	.	•	'	'.;...,••‘•_,	.	.•-•
,„ ,	.
,•- -.
..,
	_Iiiiiirt•_Aii:	-...,.
.	:.. :.. -..: - J.,.:„.	...ligiatiiiiit.	. lowiik_•..:•.• _	.
BRINGING WOUNDED RUSSIANS TO THE DRESSING STATION AT THE KWANTEI TEMPLE ON JULY . 4
1 I 2.


RUSSIAN RED CROSS SOLDIER WOUNDED AT MOTIEN PASS
113


BADLY WOUNDED AND DELIRIOUS RUSSIAN UNABLE TO WALK

JAPANESE BURYING A DEAD RUSSIAN AFTER THE FIGHT
RUSSIAN WOUNDED AND




WOUNDED PRISONERS HOBBLING INTO THE JAPANESE CAMP



.	.
	.	'
.	.	.	.
'	,	- '-•	'	,	' -
.	.
	.	r • .	. ,
. .. . :•.. •	',"	. ' •	•	•	. g	- •••. ,-,IPV.-	.	-4.	.
.	4.: • •	•	•	liAll.:1.*+-.- !.114011*
...-	W.	-,•	.	_	.
	P..	• -7 -- .. . .• ..	,.	.	.	.
'	.	-. ..." • .	• • • -1	.. '...?.:.1.%4 ..-. ."	.	•	• •	•	.-	•	.......	•
.	''' '-,'. ;‘.1:. L..-.1'.	• ...	-	. .
.	a-	4diP
	,	.	. . . : ._	:.•	. '. -. .	..•	4. '1'7 .11010‘)Slifilittio.
4 4111411
	..	•	.	1.,
* -I
	. -	...........	...	..	•
	.	-•	...	• ..•	.	.	. • . ...	• •	-
	'	•	Pas+
•
.	V. '	J-	. ' • •
r.	?••	•	,	.	•	.	•	,	.
	-••	.1r	... , ifr At	.	• •	- Ali.:'&,-	:, •.• . -	• - ' -- -
* 1	.	rn,,	.	' .	..-	-	.	.11.	/ ' ,	.	.	• ,.	,	.	•	..,..	-4	• ....- '...‘	..	4,
.	i ' • .	i	N	•	•	le	110.- , .. '	•	44	'	• ...., .."	'	.. •	• '	4.	•	r-	"ANt
1._	• '	''. 446•‘•	• ft • - - ,....- '
* • • i	, •?• ' • •
* :••• •
	 'r	•.....	-	t. • • 7. '	•	• ' 	•	•	• • •-• . • i  	...4•- 	, • 	- -	•	' •	.	'	- ' ••.:11.	,	,- - .	.	i	,...•	.	' : ,,-..	.-•	• ,	oh.	•	• ..,	.	' ' •r!. •	..giofk	e •	..
* . . 	4.6 • 	0,, I _
-'4...,	.	19. . ..	10,	x c
4,	.	k ..	. , ,.-	,,,.. 
••	. •
* • 	• - • "t•-•	.:	.	.	-• .
' liPit	.	•	.	......,,,,•	.1	• .0.
* .	.	•
ir ''' 1 •	'	.
.	, 4	4.
-	_mil	•	.	.	'	.-• :....44.,  	.	...•-•	,.,	.
'
* -	. o ......	•	.	.	•	7. L: .	••
	fr. .....;.. 4.. )	, ..,.	- • . •	.,	-ix -_,,--	'-'.1;	: I, .	• '',,...	' ,,r 7  ......_:•. :.• , .. ."'	. .i : • i . 	• 7-- 7.	i
* .7	•	, V	• ' . • '.	' . •	-, 6j ,..)	'	•	,,.'	' ti,.. '5r- --..	•
	'	1	4. •	.I	' ‘ .4 • r	...	-e;	c	,
	.	4'.	•I''	• . '	-	."	.	"F"	%,,":.. • •	"I' - '	' ,	1.	'	'.. -	•:. .7 .. ' , '	-	..'	11.	-..... '' t
'4.4	4#\ .	Ai f•	-•	•:• .44' •
••'•	•
_ ..i-, .1	--,-..., .,„ry	f•:-. ...,•c,,_,.r.-..	„v... • • ,..	•_
.	..	, • •	.r.	,...	.,
..101.	_ ... .	.„.-....• ....	.. „....1........-	ti-	l•	'	:. •	..-	. •!". N '	I .
	-r.	•	; ti	,	I	i	C'	•:'	.	n f •-
.	.....	4	•	o	..i..	-	••	. ,...:
1	)
it
' 	.	.4r	,	'	.r:.•
3.17‘	-	-..„. -	'-'	,	,•-• ,	„...,i
-	.	.	t.: 
i •	.de	.	.	5.	,: .	)1.- ',	\ i.,_• .:	I
4 ..„011
	. l..... IF	..	4
. .	..,	,
 . • ., vo
* .	1
_..,.. • it	.	.1.' \ . ..41/4 . • -..14"-	;....,
wi.	.	. .
	k _.	•	.	1.1i -	'	•
 1 . .	•
.	.* •	* milik I	..
-	• - , .	-w . - ' ;Le'	. -•	- er',0...	i-
- .	•--.	,
* itli,...14;	tk 	Ilii-o.
	.	.	.
	....	.	A	•
	Nif •	. .4	P'4 's	di-el Alegi-	-%	7 ill ,
o. • "	4	- r
,	„., •	• ....
* IA	a-	.	0	.	kfti	• :.•? .	- \.-	al	II.-	.	'	.	1110
.1 •	)	.	. I
* •	41
1	t ,	-	.	' i	.	r	•	-
	'	• •	1	•	lip Ak .•	.	04.	h. -	,	.	''.1.4	i	Iii•	.
	.-	•	..•	1	.	4
	.	r.	1.,.
4	.	.
* ?,• ,•	7	4	.	6
	-V	,t.:.	logo 4111111	•	?	e ..
.,,,,i ••••ii :- -.	,
	. ,	.	.	114	Ali
.	..,	.
	-	.1..	. .a
.,	11
A* 
a-	,


WANDERING IN HIS HEAD AND WOUNDED IN THE ARM
•

RUSSIAN PRISONERS TIED TO TELEPHONE POLE FOR SAFE-KEEPING

.-...,'.:.:14...	I
Fri	...	,	4	, 1
- IL
7111111111111f 	0 71111111111' *41 ( ' i‘
N1" 
'	.... '	\
''''''.% .
'e I ••••	, ,-	—	-	, .,:v
....	..,	.	,
?
111.77:	- 1
 . rig ci, '
.	1	- 	„),	•	,	" it
	,	-	—	,	q„.,
,,'	....	A'	P
,...:__...—...,
-:  	• 44.t.....	' ..T: r~itti 
..r	e.	.	-  
..,, :4e.-	• ,,if.'w-1,	. 4( -"41r.e.P16.4 it. ' " - L. 1"-- -	/I.'	,	.	6	.
4/,..	-•*_sig:, " '	,	.
?	4- ; , V.:.-,p - ' - -	y.	:	t_
'-',n. 4-licePr f'-i,.'• ._,..	' '	1	..:'	I	-..;=, — : —	- _	• .	,	.	..
---•-.:4,,-..,....,.,. }-,,,, -.---...	,	.,	,	,
.4414	,	, _	, 
- ,..
_	.	.	. _...	:_,,,,,,, _-
.	,
,	N../.40,	.,	.	. - -.0
---.4 , .4_,...--- 40,,	,_, ..._
-4:...4-2--4,--_,......,-.
* ":.;;--;‘,Ego-...i-7.-1.,.--	-. ik-.4,.. •TT.-.	11*;!!' • :-A
.	i
._ .	c	-,..t- -	....j-k =,...1 	. rk...;.. '."1k:,"....	• -	•
Nsvi_	,
-
  -rt 
- -
.	.	.	. , ,	.r -,„.
'	•
* g  	4
d	_	,	• - '	7	_	. '
'	g	.1 -..;7* :   
. ..1 .F... 4 ft46#41101L15
. 1	, . ,	' '	1
RUSSIAN PRISONERS SITTING ON THE TEMPLE STEPS	THE BIG PRISONER AND THE LITTLE CAPTORS
PRISONERS AND CAPTORS AT MOTIENLING


LIEUTENANT WHO CUT DOWN FOWL RUSSIANS WITH HIS SABRE

MAJOR TAKIJSAGO EXAMINING A MAP OF THE FIELD


.10VI \ JAPANESE COLLECTING THE SPOIL:.-; OF BATTLE

	'T.4..   	, 
&NEMUr . riirmc.:.,
5
_
" . .'ctr.i.'1 
7r1 ' •-.. '..	-
	Mt, : 1 11' .,?,"	.	,,bis;4,-.11'- ..  f.--, -.	. ); ' . 1111111.41E,.11.	,1-11 .0,,.-:-..„--.	. _ .•
1 •4r :	-'''.	.	,	.._,,,.,,,,,,--	•	-	-_-,. .-
.	.	_
„
.	..-.."'L----;:-:..::.... .---
-__--	.:-.,..:0,,.	.,-
.
	..ii.,•,.,„.......,....,.......,...,,,,,.....,..„-_,......,	4,, .
* ""n"..0"inewmpr7.- Ir.—........---, -...-----m	1
	mt..	4 ';':
1	i	,.
	,geo  	iiwe"..“..----
	.	.
	.	s 	.	Yr.:	.	.	.	,...	.1 .. ,..	-,1
- 	.., • ''' .	' -. -'	l''J!!: --- "..--
	1 :	06
AO,—	(	41-!%/e,	. •	.
, .-	..sr	.- ..:,, i :4,	:'-',	5	-••
..	-	r'	?.e.
' ''' NW: ' .iittl .4,' Lr -..r:L '	1-..	-.	.)-1' Iii - .?le•	rifr---- '..	.	,	,.	.	— —
'	- 4 "Loki!, „Ltr,	, ; /0",?\
.dft ,.	. ; :,----01 -..--'.	.?.... fli':: .	',	'2.:	'-' . •	i	_ .	_
* .,	7....••
ilk
	,	.
..	i, .....,.	_lip	...	.4 ..	.
'II	.....	- •	.	.i.	.
	_.	L.
.idr*i4,..,::::.,...ii,. rh,; ,.-',.., .2_ -.4 ,i.....•	• 1	'
VII ''..•.) IA.- 1 .e.1,10; ..40 Rua 161	.., I	. ..iiiii.	..
	.,.,.•,	.,4	'
	ci,.....„	•	,
..	....
.	..	'
l	•	I	)	:	• -	, .
* .
el
	, 4.* 41--elt likou OP 4' 1111	1
	,.. .'j:.111.11,111	!. 
,	..
	v•. :;!? 4 .4iiii 04111111112,	i---
,_,	_	r	,
	11P4.---	4-	. 
.ter
 e?'°r	4eleargai.7Fiiil il:or"	-71
.	_...	.
* ' 1	6	.	.	'	•
,,	4.	.
.•
‘
	. e	,or.,...	..i,..
1..
	...dr .,...	.
,	,	if	.v_7' '0- .'-- -•' , - .,: '	VO!	' '
!•.
'	. ' 1,	. •f.	• '	. , 5. . ,	_ ._	: r
'	J.-•	0._1.
	. ,. • .	..
	,..	,...-:7,' .	%, '. ...e."0...e ..,,CY • ., •• • .	's., • ,	•	•	•	.
	..-	.	..	..-	.	.	.	.	•	,.
'
* .	. -	,._•-•'-	--	• -
	-	• •
	. r	,.	.„,........_.....
	.,--"	IP4	11'6
, .
1:. -
. 
•
  .
Iri II
IP
•
•
;'-' '	ri	.	,	•	-	.,...,,,_	, fJ
 .	.	. .
i	l' . r	r	.74_4.	.: , • r .,z	. .,.., -	,. 	_...,H,	.,, ..:„l'10,.k,	.	-...:i...1-,r'..	_,	,.: VI	..,,kr
.	;,	-e-	..-.-	. ,.. ., 1,-.	..,., an::',d,'	-.3,,A: •	'" --•	.	A
,	' -1 • •-;,,•'4 -1. 11'•;''' •	... -
	L.,....._.	_	-4.	,..	.
,.........._	-:,,,,	.....4 t
* „,.	:	-	-r'	' _.••=!•.1 '-•• ...	.
.•
	.	-	._	....
.	..
,
,....
	...,.._	.	,,,
.	...	• .
	..,-	.
..,
:A '•	-	rilick liiiiV..**-••- -	. -4--	-Fift'VIIP°144.1111!"1
* iiii	-4,„,sibm-dlii---'	.	.	i- -
	*.-	.
                      * 4.4wieet2:-.: 7b: ...I.,
	.	•---''.\ .
	. . ..	,....44.0,- . -ar...e.A.r., ..-.	.. 4 )r rri.,,t	-^,.....	.0 .,-,
	,	r
...•.. 	dli
.
	te- '..17 • e, .,N	,--
,	....„.. , 	4	0• 	....•	...	or.  	.... ..	.1 iMrl,.........r:„.	......:	..	-	[
.	...	., ?' ,,,L.;......7„. '''	-'.	'	. .
. ,	•• .	' •	.	'	-	'	.-• ..eL;.,L.Ww", at,. "^4 - . - • , -
	IN.	-1::41?••
‘1?%.	• ' 1	..?••	.
* .	''";r% ' -31	'	,--(	, .,	V: ,- ,,. . _;; ,- . 1
.	..,- 4	- -	-	i .	-	,	.	. 1,- .- _	-,, - _.. . i /	4 ' ....?"A . '17''	a ' . r's	' I - '	-.	. -'414.11.'' . - d	'Ir	'''
	. -    	n 	•	, . 	. i ,. - 	•• 	.	• :	. X, .7	..`	P-.7e.'....V.' . ,...: , p it
 .-
	.	•Fk	i. T. -	. • • •	,•;•	, IA, VA '	'
.	.	.-,.	--	-	-	-	).. '	, ,^1?--,.--'' ,---........	Y -	-	' 
GENERAL OKASAKI, WHO DEFEATID THE RUSSIANS AT MOTIENLING
The Japanese commander is shown standing on the steps of the Kwantei temple during the battle of July 4, receiving reports from
his stafr and sending nut orders. Motien Pass was one of the places on the line of march taken by Kuroki's army which was thought
before the battle to be practically impregnable. The Russians attempted to recapture it afterward, but were defeated with great loss
I I 9


THE FIELD DRESSING' STATION FOR THOSE TOO SEVERELY WOUNDED '1'0 BE CA RR1ED To THE BASE HOSPITAL
120


JAPANESE MARCHING ON ONE OF THEIR MILITARY ROADS


GENERAL NISHI AND HIS STAFF HALTING TO LOOK OVER MAPS WHILE ON THE :11.110:11

                      JAPANESE COLOR SERGEANT GUARDING THE REGIMENTAL FLAG FROM THE YALU THROUGH THE MANCHURIAN MOUNTAINS

'FAKING SHELTER BEHIND A HELL WHILE AWAITING THE OPPORTUNITY TO NETACK

JAPANESE CREEPING ACROSS AN OPEN SPACE ON THE WAY TO THE FIRING LINE
WITH THE JAPANESE DURING




JAPANESE SOLDIERS BREAKFASTING IN THE RAIN NEAR KANSUITAN

A COMPANY OF THE SIXTEENTH REGIMENT HALTING AFTER A NIGHT ArrAcK


JAPANESE BATTERY FORDING THE SHALLOW TANG RIVER

THE ONLY SMOKE VISIBLE-THAT OF THE CARTRIDGE WITHDRAWN FROM THE GUN
WITH THE SMOKELESS BATTERIES

CARRYING SHELLS FROM THE CAISSONS TO THE GUNS

                    ARTILLERYIVIEN CLEANING OUT GUNS AFTER AN ACTION H IDDEN IN FIELDS OF KOWLIANG




PAGODA FROM WHICH THE RUSSIAN STAFF SAW THEIR DEFEAT
ITING IN THE FIRST WEEK OF JULY


CHINESE COOLIES FORDING A MANCHURIAN sTREAm SWOLLEN BY AINS

COOKING SUPPER UNDER DIFFICULTIES IN THE RAIN
DIFFICULTIES OF CAMPAIGNING DURIN1


JAPANESE SOLDIERS EATING SUPPER UN DER A SHELTER TENT iN THE BAIN

       SHELTERED EROM THE RAIN AND A SAFE DISTANCE FROM THE GROUND Ci THE RAINY SEASON IN MANCHURIA


RUSSIAN GUNS CAPTURED AT NANSHAN USED BY THE JAPANESE AT SHUZAN-HO
127


RUSSIAN BATTERY POSITION AT YUSHULING, WITH PROTECTING INFANTRY TRENCH CAPTURED BY THE JAPANESE

JAPANESE HORSES KILLED AT BATTERY POSITION NEAR TOWAN	RUSSIAN GUN OVERTURNED AND ABANDONED IN RETREAT FROM TOWAN
ALONG THE LINE OF BATTLE IN THE MANCHURIAN PASSES SOUTH OF LIAO-YANG




       SOLDIERS MAKING THEMSELVES COMFORTABLE ON A HOT, WET DAY IGHBORHOOD OF LIAO-YANG


GATHERING THE WOUNDED RUSSIANS WHO HAD LAIN ALL NIGHT IN THE RAIN

BODIES OF JAPANESE SOLDIERS READY FOR CREMATION
WITH THE JAPANESE ON AUGUST
13


SOME CF THE SPOILS GATHERED IN JUST BEFORE THE CAPTURE OF LIAO-YANG

            BURNING THE BODIES OF THE DEAD IN THE FIELDS NEAR LIAO-YANG THIRTIETH CLOSE TO LIAO-YANG

CHAP10;
                        BEGINNING THE SIEC S SOON- as the Japanese learned of Kuroki's success at
A
      the Yalu, they hurried troops ashore at Takushan and Pitsewo, on the eastern shore of the Liaotung Peninsula north of Port Arthur. This was on May 5. The landing was quite unexpected by the Russians; there was no sufficient force to attempt any resistance, and in three days an army was marching southward to begin the closing-in movement that ended in the fall of Russia's supposedly impregnable fortress. On May 26, after fighting in and about Kinchow for nine days, Nanshan Hill, on the narrow isthmus joining the Port Arthur Peninsula to the main part of the Liaotung Peninsula, was captured by assault. Every device of modern warfare—the railway, telegraph, telephones, a captive balloon, mine-fields, barbed wire network, iron-roofed trenches, search-lights, illuminating star-shells—was used at Nanshan Hill to increase the natural strength of the fort. The ranges were known and the approach was from but one direction. There hdd been three months and a half since the war began and three weeks since the landing at Pitsewo. If Russian troops could be driven from such a. position, and under such circum-stances, by the Japanese, it seemed perfectly certain that no fortifications that Russia could devise could withstand the enemy. One last and unsuccessful attempt was made to cut the Japanese off before it was too late. The Russian army at Tashichao, under General Stakelberg, made a sortie south-ward and met General Oku's army on June 14 at Wafengtien.

ER VII
3-E OF PORT ARTHUR
The Russians were completely defeated. The Liaotung Peninsula was then open to the Japanese, and as soon as General Nogi and his army arrived to hold it and to begin to close in on Port Arthur, Oku was free to wheel north, and to co-operate with the armies of Kuroki and Nodzu in the general movement toward Liao-Yang. By the middle of June parallel columns of Japanese were moving northward through the valleys of Manchuria like so many fingers of one giant hand.
    Meanwhile Admiral Togo had maintained a strict blockade of the harbor and the Russian fleet had been practically destroyed. Beginning with the destruction of the "Variag" and itKorietz" in February, and including the tragic sinking of the ic Petropavlovsk," and the death of Admiral Makaroff and the painter Verestchagin on April 13, the Japanese successes gradually wore down the Port Arthur fleet until the Russian naval power in the East was no longer a factor in the reckoning. Up until the end of April the Japanese losses were practically nothing at all. Then came the sinking, by submarine mines, of the battleship " Hatsuse," the third class cruiser "Miyako," and Torpedo Boat No. 48. The battleship "Yoshino" was sunk in a collision. These losses came too late, however, for the Russians to take advantage of them, and the death of Admiral Makaroff may be said to mark the climax of the naval campaign against Port Arthur. After that the land campaign against the 46 Gibraltar of the East" began in earnest.


VIEW OF THE HARBOR ENTRANCE OF PORT ARTHUR FROM THE LAND SIDE, THE RUSSIAN FLEET IN THE OFFING
132


C.pyrIghe by Lroderivaml & I.Noterww.el. New Tule
LOOKING SOUTHWARD ACROSS THE DOCKS AT PORT ARTHUR TO THE HEIGHTS AND ONE OF THE RUSSIAN FORTS


DRY DOCK AT PORT ARTHUR VIEWED FROM THE PUBLIC GARDEN	ENTRANCE TO DRY DOCK AND MACHINE SHOPS AT PORT ARTHUR

CHINESE SAMPANS AT THEIR LANDINGS AT PORT ARTHUR
SCENES ALONG THE WATER FRONT AT PORT ARTHUR BEFORE THE DECLARATION OF WAR


CHINESE SAMPANS USED AS LIGHTERS FOR UNLOADING VESSELS AT PORT ARTHUR

JAPANESE FUGITIVES LEAVING PORT ARTHUR IN CHINESE SAMPANS







Copy rfglit 6.1
RUSSIAN WARSHIPS IN THE HARBOR AT PORT ARTHUR JUST BEFORE THE OUTBREAK OF WAR


SAILORS AMUSING THEMSELVES WHILE OFF DUTY WITH BOOKS AND GAMES


GUN DRILL ON A RUSSIAN BAT'T'LESHIP-" LOAD "


SAILORS GOING THROUGH A DRILL IN LOWERING THE TORPEDO NETTING

                GUN DRILL ON A RUSSIAN BATTLESHIP-" FIRE I" A RUSSIAN WARSHIP AT PORT ARTHUR




THE PLUCKY urrLE "NOVIK," DISABLED IN THE FIRST FIGHT OF THE WAR.

         BATTLESHIP " RETVIZAN," TORPEDOED IN THE FIRST WEEK AND BEACHED ORB THE ARRIVAL OF THE JAPANESE




LESIIII' "P(}1;11.:1).1." DISABLED IlY A :111NE o

tMORED CRUISER " BAYAN," ONE OF THE LAST TO YIELD


THE FLAGSHIP OF THE SQUADRON, THE " MIKASA"

DECK VIEW OF THE " MIKASA" FROM THE FIGHTING TOPS	ADMIRAL TOGO ON THE QUARTER-DECK OF THE " MIK ASA"
THE MAN WHO BOTTLED UP PORT ARTHUR, AND THE FLAGSHIP OF HIS FLEET

CHAPT]
EARLY CAMPAIGNING BEFORE
WT H Port Arthur cut off from the north, the three
        Japanese armies pushed rapidly northward in a gen-eral closing-in movement on Liao-Yang. General Nodzu's army on June 26 captured Fengshuiling, on the main road northward from Takushan to Newchwang, and the Russian forces began to fall steadily back. At the same time, Kuroki) on the north, was capturing two passes of even greater impor-tance, Motienling and Taling, and Oku, to the southward, was driving the Russians back with similar success. On July 17 the Russians, under General Count Keller, did make a desperate effort to retake Motienling, but were repulsed with heavy loss. Keller made another attempt to force the Japanese back a fortnight later, but it was equally disastrous and the general himself was killed. Meanwhile, on July 2 2 and 23, General Oku, on the extreme south and west of the long Japanese front, closed in upon Tashichao, and, with the assistance of Nodzu's army, which had pushed up from Fengshuiling, captured the town and compelled the 4.o,000 Russians there to retreat. This, together with the unsuccessful battle in which Keller was killed, was practically the last of the Russians' attempts to make a forward movement. General Kuropatkin devoted himself to preparing for a decisive battle at Liao-Yang, mean-while keeping up all along the line just enough resistance to delay and hamper the Japanese advance.
    At the outset of the war Russia had in Manchuria about 4.5,7oo men and 1 20 field guns. Of this force about 2 0)000

ER VIII
THE BATTLE OF LIAO-YANG
men were at Port Arthur, 4400 at Talienwan, 1,400 at Yinkow, I,I5o at Haicheng, 1,900 at Liao-Yang, 2,75o at Tieling, north of Mukden, 1,250 at Ninguta in northeast Manchuria, 4,550 at Harbin, 1,950 at Tsitsihar in northwest Manchuria, and the rest in the smaller garrisons scattered through the territory from northeast Manchuria to Port Arthur. In addition there was a separate organization of railway patrol troops stationed in small bodies at many points on and near the railway. On January 1, 1904, the number of these railway troops was estimated at 15,200 with 32 guns, so that the grand total at the beginning of the war was about 6o,000 men with about 150 field guns. In spite of the pressure on the Siberian Railroad and the hard marches across Lake Baikal in the winter, Russia soon found that, however many millions she might have in Europe, she could not maintain in the field, at the end of 6,000 miles of single track, more than 300,000 troops, and keep them fully supplied with food, ammunition, and fresh men to take the place of the killed, wounded, and sick.
    During all this campaigning in Manchuria the Japanese showed the same preparedness and mobility which had been so strikingly characteristic of them during the earlier months of the war. They knew at all times the strength of their enemy as well as they knew the country, and to the information gathered by their spies and outposts was added that supplied by a generally friendly native population.


RUSSIAN TROOPS DETRAINING AT MUKDEN EARLY IN MARCH
142






ARRIVAL OF THE FIFTH ARMY CORPS AT MUKDEN

ADMINISTERING THE SACRAMENT TO SOLDIERS BEFORE THEIR DEPARTURE FOR THE FRONT
RUSSIANS AT MUKDEN ON THEIR WAY TO THE




A FLYING COLUMN OF RED CROSS SURGEONS

RUSSIAN FIELD TELEPHONES IN TRENCHES
WITH THE RUSSIA'




GENERAL KUROPATKIN PASSING GENERAL HERSCHELMANN'S DIVISION
146


GENERAL LEVISTAIN GIVING ORDERS TO HIS STAFF






NINETEENTH SIBERIAN RIFLE CORPS AT DINNER

COOLIES CARRYING WOUNDED RUSSIAN TO EIVIERGENCY HOSPITAL


GENERAL KUROPATKIN AT THE TELESCOPE SCANNING THE COUNTRY ABOUT LIAO-YANG
149




RUSSIAN REGIMENTAL BAND PLAYING IN CAMP

                COMMISSARY MEN DRAWING WATER FOR THE ARMY THE WAY TO THE FRONT

..	.
,-.	.	.	'."‘.. 1,	• ' ..	44 `i
..4-4•,,,...,	.	..	:
ti'•	1
'o•	.
.
:
r
.	,•
-	' -..,
1..	.'•	sr I... "
4.01116.' ;	'	ii'• . L 1,„•" 6 • ' , :	• .
?	•	• ' l'' .



rti-,-	•	•	•• •	\	.	- '... \	-	17-77.73. •:-..-‘	,...,....,.......	,.
,. •	''' I'''.	•	• . -tr.	...-99:	.	.71-•-•::::•17,•••'	.	i	_	• --,'.	4	,	4.•-•7'.' ,' ,:'' •'.•• •	• -
	.	.......
. :.,
,..	,	'	-39	.	• '.; ' 	•
'	A	k.-"1••	c	.--:...	• 7•‘,i i' • .I'.."'.	' .c•-•-.,	.1-5.)?.• .	•
4. •,...4.	.. . r•
' 4L1 'I'. .	.	-•,',-	'd	.	' 'c	444,' L: '	'	• ,.%.-.. -..• •• 1	• • '.g1	,	..	.	i	._."	.. ' • L. . •	•
.	,.	.
,	•
-•	•
!	'..y 1.1•Lii .	• '	A	%	•	. • .	..-	'..	.	.;.	.
'	I/2.-	1	.•- .4'44:s./70 • .' '	•	1.1 4.. ...•	- '	••	1
-.	-... 1.-,..5.:-,.)	•	' •	.	I	'; .0.	• • •
'.'•'--,-'111Skt .'•••	' SI)	.,.	..,..... I.	.	.	.	•• .1,,...$1,	• .	.	•	.
.	.. 1 .	:•;7	• . •.*,,,, ..,	.-4	'	•
1	' .	•• •	,	• 0	• .	.	,
fig •••.: .:•••!1)	.	L.,	, .	.	.
,	I. ..
.,	.....	• -' ,	-.-.	..	•-•!.	,.
.......	1	.	.
. - - .	...	.
	i.. --	•	,,.......
	-	•	...
* .1
.	...	.,	; r	1
...,	•	-	-•	:.-. - -	•	.
	 -...,..%.,...3v-	•	.. •
Vr_	.-...	. .	....	..,
.•	1.	1,...	.P.'9 ./-9"' .,.. •	•• -44,	'•,' . 1	.	.,
,	. . ....	.	..	.	.	.	.	.	.
.	•	.	, . ,.	- .	. •
1	r	1	k•:-.4t,f 1-:.F(.7.	.	- •	'	•L•-- •••	--- •	-_.- ' •:-,21.•!....:k 4-4'1' 1.4- -,..'	-' - • - ' ' .,?„4„.4",;.•,.... 7••• t 5.- - • •	•
 ':' ? -'11
 sue,
 .. w	•••• • -	!"	... '''44,-'-_.-,-,	'	. • 	• :•!Is"V:s•-•47t 	"   	. 	-•- •-•:..
. .1..	i":'•-? .-.- 1•,"'s%;	•	,-	___. ....4,:t7,01	;.'. Vs, •-,..s.''sY	sg . .	• ••	-.	.. .-
- 	:' 4`''•-	.C..itsjs •
.•	•	.	•
	. .	'IA	•	•	..--,•-•44:,,,fow-*	...:,:s41	'4	,.	... --.	4- ,...s	.	-	.--,.- ej.,'...,, .....,.	' ;-. , 4 :-:46014s, • .... .z...' ., - . ,. ., .,..	,:.
* '`.,44 ' -	g.i-.,, •••1'.,'-'i.04	''-'04'.4.-• :48..q.F1---',4"';`.. -' ..,f.--%'• •••••-•?r,--'.	'''-• - k'•'''' ':•-t,.....j:.•%.::?:".A.- -_."'"""•'••• - •	-
	..1.44, •	",-	'-...'•	7	•
* ,
* • .„...: .	..,,.....,,...!..,	...	. •-• ,/,1-...	-1,-.,	4- • 1.4 .arl. ..	.I..,/,`, •ti.-•1•44,.7= .	;._	•••L • V.,: •	-
Ai. - . '4.4 _ .1 --	... -••• .1't .. .e,,K%,:t...:;,.... _ ,•47'oaree.,-•:- . -•--1-,.44;,..‘"it.-,-,-_,,••-..e•&:....A..-.,-')'	- . ; •	'	• -	-
v.( t . ' •	-
,	,	_	...• . . .,.11.,.	..	, )" ......r... ...,	?• . , .-,.•-j..•.i.4.
' i -•'- - •••	• •• • • • •	• .	--. •	•	d',644, • 'il•-, - • • --- ...	•• ' L4. 0-74g.''''46777;-1••--	'	•-r	""	•?"	'	.	•	.e-P-•-•.'''• • 5.. - ".
- 	.... 	. ;	.	.	. 	. . ..	..	.	, ,	,.,	......	..-p.„4_ ..,,,,,,,,	_at.	.	. , :.......,	:.....4, •?-4.....4p,--	',10.7-:'1. •". ... - 4 '.---1....	...--*'•1-6• .. .-' -' --':'.--'..., ..- '	•	.A'1- -114,2C. '"  	..-. • •:
	;	.. JV..j..	...:• .1:...jr.i•1.l. i.
.	s.-
4....=, -•• -4
-...., s,.. ei.....Z-, re. z,-.1:4771Tri. 3 ','''.!--_-..,:A-...."7..r.s.?!t-7;!411>';',. ‘,...:..,::111!' .., 7 :.t• - f.'-•-• •'40-'	• - . ...	• • . - •-. --,,•_...-_,:,..,:k.rt'-•-. ----"-	_	...•
4	-..-•
.. ....•	.	...	;c.o.	-. •	- • ,	.:!••••••-.x-••. --,:,•-"_:•• • •- t-'• -• -0 ..'.11	4 ' ''...	.	.-- ''':Z ',.1''....' .... " f. lk..	. tt;'.2:. ' -..,..., e • • * "-r . :	7---..9-tP	''''	• '	•	•	-.-	-, -	.	. - .-..-L -0-	••• ; ' '	.;.-... .•
-•,of"•;.• ••,..	', • -.-,1: • •-•••••-....-0?...	-	. • .	,;;•-• '	;7" ...-9,-°` vi..:	• • ;-... -, -"
	,	-- • ..-	•	'	' ...
; • '4' •....j'y';4144`14:1-1 L.• • ..-Xvi".;41,,A-15:1_..1.-1.-	•	-' - --••-:;,k'v, t'''a.••,1,--5)- , ".- ••. •	• -4•;#,fri•Le. •e--:'-:..- .14:!-:.. ' '... ' . •	•	. ..	•
* ••• -e• -,.'...-4.	............ t..., - -..- •	_	,	...0.1.,......,..--::
'''.:.•' 1)- • 414: • ••• •• 444.	.•';',f1W•76.44101Itir•-...•	• • - ' . .---''''• .	l, 	' . -4- ."' .p..•	• - -t •-• -	•	. .- • .	•	. ••-.	"44'.7., .,,•,,,-,,'	,	•••• •••	1 -...-	.	. . 4?7"	.	l• ....
4. p4 . .:".'• ii.44A.V.:ii•'•-• 	, ,.., ;i' ....,..' • ---..0i1P- 44411ke ' '	:4,41.T4' :  • •• - • • ''-•--b•'. ' • i4firi...?	- .1-- • ',' • %.	•	•	: - • ....PFr' .'•.'	r.4. .. - ..:•-• '' - - •	. -	,	4.4
. .
..i.:- -...05 4‘1 .41.:...--%?.' :AIL, -• ..	'40-6NiFi.-=2.- •!: :.;N:=4:i.s.:.-F.::,;...--.•-
* ,....,.:, .v•-+'	•	...	_.:_ze 1 . 0: - v	,..	_ ,,,s.-..	,. -,.--'	, .	-,-	...- -	.••	.	..........,•__ .-,-",,*,.....in- veg-...:-.,.,.,• 	• •
.,	_.:4.---,-,-:-.--	k	•... -,...	•	.	....
	,	:.-... -4,,...-...,-,..._,-.,..,-- , •	, •
* -•
....,.. -.. • .- - __,..i	,:-•:..•;"•11.;7•••tve"' • • . .-r.-, W-A,?..14-170:•:01F	L.	• • -  	• 7  	• • s • • ."".	4. ....1.-...114- ...r...' • -7..
.	._ . . 	. • '	.	?...-.',....- J : -51-;• -- - -• - •-•	"	77.1-..:i.-';-.• ,	• .	.
. ••• .,	.. , •	.:,,,•, -',:i-	*,-	1,..t	p-•	:. • r 	.. t .. 	• . 7' ..."	....:yr	•••L.1.•'	.	-	.. '• •	a. 4	• •-••'• -• ''''	';'•4:	..•	"r• • • ,VL	•	•	•	•	••• • " -..-7,,	• • - ".•••••••....,.•	•••/•• ••• •	.. • • I - • •••	-•	•	; it,-
	--'• t	•
	.„, i .	... , 0.• .. . .,..b.rr•
., ....	,...,..•••••...-.., ALT • ., -,.. • ••• .0 • :tir,.i. PIP....-,•:.• ....-•t-
....d..I• ••• •	• • - '	• ;;••	• .i.1, • .	•••• •	1..-45••' •	....	. '	rs...-*••	L	...	.	..
* :' . ''4'••rni4-.111s5';"...'`• ' 4.6t;i0'.t'...•. .. '. - L: '''' ..
'	L .	.. • ,	-•.''' ,' 4. • -. ri	-.:,:, ,.•• ,..:Y	• .	. • • ,, A.. •., - .1	.,Je., -- - :."	. .&._-...ti--	.	\._:. .	, 1,•?.	4...4 ..,.
. -= N... -	.' Pik; ..	ss	• - ''. .	s	").-7 -	sl - -	• '. • '.' •	41' •
	, . 11	•• _ •••%... .. ....-.;:, „vie ,•••X.Irk.;;S . •	..,i'•_1/.44‘...	• -	, • . '	f . . •	' "	- ' MS: - • .- '',•• ,-•!,•. . .• L-4	SL.,F4.r.75._Wom”••'°., lot.: .'%. : ,. 4.•;...•;• -. • 4,er :71-..
                                                                                                                                                                                                   * .•	.A, •	.•	ill v	4.,	• ' '•'•	-	"''.	•	• •	.- • •	.5.1.,%, , • V' ' 54,, 4,--1,4%,	• .'51-4V41;;; •.,t .4.1t.?••7i.,;:*
:471. •
* .	-.. •	.. • •
••	•	11. •-••••-W.i12!"- .-• ..16'..-	'Z.r_ /	-1-•"' .. 7 ••	• l'	7.,•W741:••• ..	!.cy-,... .,..	...	,	,	.... _.	.	.	,.. .....	....	,..,;.:,\,,	.....,,_,..	., 7 . ,_.. _ ...	.... 	.	,/... ...
.	.	.. , .	la.' •	- 1-."	-5 ;	-	.
	...	.4.	-'-_.	... ,-.	.	, ...	.	.....,Lt
!.:-.f:•: ...-'2"-4-. L.,	4,- ,, .	•	• • • , ..., • ex..1.--. , ..,........ ..,• -..-A!-: :hp- -,. - . - - .
GENERAL KL:ROPATKIN INSPECTING THE STAFF OF THE FOURTH ARMY CORPS


ONE op"ri-iii: DROSKIES IN WHICH COMMANDING GENERALS RODE

RUSSIANS FORDING A SIIALLOW STREAM NEAR L1AO-YANG



THE BIG, BROAD-SHOULDERED SOLDIERS OF THE CZAR
PART OF THE MOVEMENT OF FORTY THOUSAND MEN SOUTHEAST OF LIAOIYANG
52


RUSSIAN TROOPS MARCHING THROUGH THE STREETS OF LIAO-YANG


RUSSIAN SOLDIERS TRADING WITH CHINESE PEDLERS



:
Fir Hiorp

_
.
.	.
...	•	.	.	.
r-	..
.
.	... -	.., -..	01.	....	-a"' 111 - Alr ---..—
* .
.	.
.-	-.	-	.1,
* I	•	,
.	. •	.
,	.	-	.
.
.
.	.
.
.
.
•
'
ilEll.	.	..	. ..,4,.	..	•	.	...
.	.	.	•
..	•
.	.	.
.	.	.
.	.
•
I
J-	•	.	.
.
•
* J.
`• _	.	"	• •	. •
.
.
.
•
•
	,	•	•	.	.
.	.	.
r	. .
..
r
•
	.	•	,
.	r
.	.	.	.
* . /1-,' i	.
..
.
	,	„	.. ..
•
	.	•	•	.
...
;
•
.
.
	,. 1; r.	.
.	.
.
.	1.
..
.
.
.	.	.
.
.
MU '	; .	• .2.."
-	• •
'	•
	.	.	.. . 7
                                                                                                                                                * . :
* •
.
, r
* •
. 6	r., .	.:
P	.
	.	1	.
1. '	.
...
.	S.,	,
.
.
.
•
.
.
;	- • 1- ••:'	•
* •	•
.-
....... i -	,	• .....
&	•	•••	i.	.	.•
Jeg•IC..; ..	.2	..•
-111' U'.- 0 Jul.' . . Jr... +Pk;	1 - a:gir. JT • • :'
.	.	o	.
. ' .
.
.
- , • a ,..14 . ...: airr".r., 01:_.
	±4:::1,41 ' • - I. , ., ..,'	.	.
*. I:. .11.,mr....	. Is , . - .. r• „go.
. illt°'''s	•
* ?	.	,
.
* •
pli, ..b.
. . ..
,'. 44'.	\ '	• -	,	.	..	. .	•	...	.	.
.
* •	.	_ A	fil4	•	,. WO	.,
.
.	.	•
.
-
._	. •	r•	•	.
.•..	.
.
,	.
.	....%.
•
.
.
1	.	'	'
.....	0
?0.	•
.
ill
	'	* .	' : '. 1k. \‘	.
I	I	....
.
I.
	5.	1
'4 V .: .: .	,	......
.
,	-	.
	.	.
I	.
1	.
.,
.	.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
A
11.4.4%,..
' .	.	*"..4, . ""	'	.
•
,
                                                                                                                        * .. , •
	.	.
.1	. '	I. , !--or	' en. •	.
.
.
. -
„
_
.
.• .---	.
r	,..•	- • . .
...-
.
* .
* .
0
-
:	..	.
-....1, 4	..
......
.
.
r
.
* ,	, •••
- •
•
,
'	•
I'.	..• •	r'.•..•..
...
r	•
.	•
.
.
.
..... • • -
.
•
.
. „
.	,
•
.•
-41 '
.
•
n
-
.".........
	..-•••	'.- ---	"
.
.
.
.. -
'
. •	.
.
.
.
.
n
n
-^.1-1-1,1
...•
	.	. ..M11,,,..„	•
.
* •
‘
	40IP. 1	allr	.
. ' ' Or-	•


SOLDIERS OFF DUTY LISTENING TO ONE OF THEIR COMRADES


   SOLDIERS CROWDING ABOUT HOSPITAL TRAIN TO HEAR Tim NEWS FROM THE FRONT TO THOSE WHO HAD NOT YET MET THE JAPANESE


A _DISHEARTENED JAPANESE SPY AND HIS QUIZZICAL RUSSIAN CAPTORS
156


RUSSIAN BATTERY GETTING INTO POSITION AT KANSUITAN JUST BEFORE THE BATTLE.
157


.	_	•....., .-t,,.-1 -	-.....-; •••••••••••.77,11F.11Prr'7"."77%!
.	'	, - ' ..	•-•	' -, -... ' 4i) i • ' - ...".;••f fki..*1179118611111LEt.	. . -----..,..,''' ;	. • ; ' . '- -`1- ,A7..'`.14--041r "z• 401004'	•
'	. :-.•-•-. !;,•,...••7 .../..1-, •	'	•	" 	. ,.	..4- .- 4,;...!..
 •,11.1.-;...*:rr	,
.	_
	.	.	•	.	••	.	•	•	..	,
.	.	.	• -
.	.	_
..	.	....	,	._..	,......,.
.	.	.	.' h„..• 'C.!.	,1, • -	.	..
	.	•	•	-	.	.	.	•
•
.	.
*  
'	•	•	.	, ' •-; ..	':- -..j...,.....,--"LF...• •?• •- 	- •k. •I•	-	•
* ,
	.	• itt40; .. ' - • '
.	•	• e-•	•	•-	.-...,.....1......	_	.	.
* •	.„,..	._	.	,•.• ,.	••.
.	.	..
.	.	.	• ,.
.	,
,	.
.	.	,	.	....
* .	.
.	. 
	.	.	.	.
.	.	.	•	.
	.	.
.	...	_	....., . .	....	..	,	.
•
.	,
* .-	•-,•-	_.--	.	I
.	.
.
,'" !	•	••	•	.	•	•	•	.
/	..	, _.	..
,	.
.	.
.	?1--; - • .•
* .	.	.	....	.	.	.	•	,
-..	.	.•	,	.
.	.	•	.
.	.	.	.	.
.	.	.
.	.
.	,	.	.	..	.
.	.	-	•
.	.	.	.
.	.
'f ' ....•	.	.	"	.	...	•	• 4"	.'-	•	•	•
	.	•	•	.	•
.	.	.	.
....	.
.	.	.	.	.
.	.	.	.
•
.	.	.
.	.	.	.	.	.	..	.	.	, ..,	.	.
	.	.
.	'
.	.	.
.	.
	.	.	.
* ....' . e	.	.
* / . e-f...	;...-.	,.	,	.	.•
.	_.	k <	. .-	• .	.	•
.	.	.
	.	.	•	-
* .•	..•	....	.
	.	•
.	,	'r•	.
.	.
.	.
..	.	.	.
.	.
	'	•	.	'
.	..	.	.	.	.
.	.	.	,
.	.	.
.	.
* ..._icr.›:",..:.•.,..?.?"1„.,....',.*:]..4.2...."......:....'c ":..... ,'7...,:!:.",.--"..,..i.::. -,..' •,:•!.-.7..,,f.;.'...' '1. ,	...: .	' .....•.•.... '	.	.	.	.
•
:	.
* ..
.	.	.. .•	..	•	:	,	.
•
	.	..	.	..	..
.	.	.
.	.	.
	.	...	.	.	.	.
.	,
..	.	•	•	.	•
.	,	.	.
.	.	.
.	•	.	. •	•	.	.	.
	.	.
.	.	.
.	.	.
.	.
.	.	.
.	.	.	..,	.	.•• .	.	•	•	•	3	.	•	•
.	.
,	.	..
.	.	.	.
* -	'.''. '.,	•	•	••	.	.
'	•	ir,..----... •-_.
	.	.	...
.	.	.
.	..	.
.	.
.	.
-	.. •	-	-	•



1
-	..	•	•	•
i .	_
,	•	'	•	,. .... 'f •.\ •. % • - . .	-. •	•.'.	,	• .1).1, —	--	1. '	L A'	• -, ,•	ti.	..	.
* --,.• -	•• - . •	i ,	,
',it ....,-(4e4	4	•	,)
.	: ...-.	-.., .,.
.	.	,
* .,-	4.„,
	'	.	..
.	.
, .)	..01- - - 4`..•	.	. - : ...	.	,
'	. - • .. • , 	' .'-..• io	''•	,,,t	. '	',8,	• 1,....:- •	.	.....	.	.	.	.	.
.	.	.
••
.	-	..	.	.
..	.	__..___...._ _	•
.• . .' ,r•-	.	.%•. ' ." s',. -.;	. - .	Ns_	\ •	•	•	1,i--	...
••?•	a	.
...	•	•	-.	••	.
,,tii.,--• '
.	.	,	.
'	'	,/	/	.	•	?	.	.	e	'.'	_ .•
.	..
...	,	• - „--	-
._------
' -4.;..• lijil-t'4.7,..	',..z...7-!•,--te„.'44-.,..	•-•	' -....%
* .	. , 1 .
....	..	.	..
..;	.	,	.‘	.	•	L , ''',	•.	f 1	.,••• •	-•	-4 . ; • i• ..,eiv)i. . ''..r.- ...•-• '	.1.	%Al.	'---*...). \ \ _
.	" .!' ' '	'.... 4'	. i	-. r . i	.- 0	'Al"	,	0 •	46?	,. .
-	.	.	ti.r..*, ....	;	.../	.1	- :!..1%. -.- A'," +..`	. • r.''.- -,•,--6\1; --	.lie- , ;	• • • --	'	'
•
.•	;	'	''-f--..?..-tr-'•	•	'	-•	;	•	, •	..........	I-7. --(_ -
* ;	.	• •	-	., *7	.	••	,-	1	•	-	.-	•
	...	4-.	.•	I 4. •	.	.1.. .	.	.
....	,	\	''''	t	.. •.‘	ji- ..	•	'•
'..N	e• :	.. , , , .	-	1 • - • • ; '" V ' i4
. .	.	.	•	".-	•	, . ' 1 :	,	--	, ir	- - .	- 	••••	' • 	• ' - (.....k	tol • r :'••	/	; . •
'	'	.	P '	•
t,	, o,	.	,	.	; ..	•	,,,,,..•	f. 	4	, 	/ . • 4:- -	.	,,AN 0' •‘" k-,...,
e •	•	/	49	.	.
,
I	•, 'i • . -..r.,,,•--	—	-•	4 ••'1;	.:,, i. ' '
t
.	• f. %	t •	:	. ,
.	•	"
...
.	•	.
.	.
.	1


AST SIBERIAN REGIMENT CALCULATING THE RANGE FROM ONE OF THE MANCHURIAN HILLS


3. d ..• .. j i ,..: • • • • • ,, ,.	•

FOURTH URAL REGIMENT ON THE MARCH TO HAICHENG

RUSSIANS ADVANCING FOR THE DEFENCE OF HAICHENG
WITH THE RUSSIAN TR



WITH THE RUSSIAN TROOPS DURING THE ENGAGEMENT WITH THE JAPANESE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF HAICHENG


BATTERY OF THE SIXTH EAST SIBERIAN ARTILLERY IN POSITION ON THE HEIGHTS ABOVE TOWAN
163

Y11.	..s.	^
-say,
* It	ge
.	1
.
.	t	•
.
* .5...	0	'
1	.	I. •
* ...	. s	. '144‘1	(	\	0 'IN	.
...
	4	....	... i	.:.	/
.... - _	. \	4 4 N ,,.
...
.0.
ill "II. \	.	. 4	.i ss„...
"" .
. ,	.	1	- :7,	-
N1	2 , ,	' ii's	. ,	j	OS
••?•?1	‘	1	,
.. i	) - -
* If ,`	-:	-
' k•	. i
.	-	' , ri \
a.	\ 7'
1	•
?
: alli
4111101,- •	. ., *...
.	4....
	.	,
..,9)
.,...	. ,,	...
	.	.,	,
* ..,.	.
4	.
.....
	....	.	? 1	lil
.
1.	::
lilli .	•	''....	. ...... ..	•
.1	: •	\ ,
	,	- 1._	•
.4,
	i	;	r A
V	i,	.,i, ,
	....	,	.	.	.	,	.	..
.„.	,• - A	11 ,
N - .
..	...	-
-',._	-
- .	1	. . ...1 .	',.,	,-	'	-	-1.	... sit s	1 I	R. : . 1
	t	''''•	.	t.w ti	#	' 4P	,	•
. . •	..1	•
-..—	.	ti..	..1,
4 .	i .1	.	•	"	• .
I	.	.
* ' .	. - . k ..	.	"..1..—t ,	1-14i-	-	•	:	, j.,........---• . - - '	.. •:xt	,	. Fr	at	J.	i	N.. ; ..	• ; .1-14	. - • ',	i
\	,	*--7. isi: :).	-.-....7,.
	. --.--,.., ,	A,	.....	t;
	..,	...	c
.	i	* • ' .	1.	.	r.	_ ..., .
* .....	.	,_	t.	..
..,	.	e
.	.r .	,	r, .	,,	,	1
,	1
.
-	i	...
-..., --	-, '...	. .	0	if;	*a	•	\
_N.-	.	.	.	..	a
- -
41.	IA
6	.
.	1	,--	-	.
	-	.	.	-	/ ' 4'.	..
.
V	. .
...,	,
.

!girl" 1494,:t
?.... .. ...r. ,'"..-;!	i 0 II I igr 4Fr. - . • .... '-'. ' 717 "7 7."1111111111 IIMPI	W. - -.non.
-: .r.I': -;:. "" i ' ' - .	'	:40:	/ "...4-"-kt,-:.. ,.:,!r-, ''-. :;. : !,.	.,.	„,
.	ilk 4-,:. ,
,
' i. v---',1-,...4 :t.-. -	;	. .
4
..	:. • ...-.- .;'. -4:4,„;.,:. A	. e..,-.....7.......0 fr.,	-A....
. - 71..7' - 4.?'''''Xilb;" ..t if.'" ,..;.-: .-: -,":44*
-.....+:...-1.1-!!....	_ .. •.:11.	4 -...1._,,i, ..... ,	_	.
'	:-,,, ,415...1.441#.40.4,7•7:74 ,yoPt5 ''.."--. :g?"-':' lit ' . '*".' . '11:: ':
-,•:.:....._,..,.'irlc.- 6..
- -	fe,r. - ,
, __-, :.	1 p c i-'-`77 .:11-.4./,11.2 ,	.	• 01,-	!! •
,
	-	?
._	,	iii
111111
ja.p.1,1,....... a-V..erit,.! ,
,-. , 7 ',..)-1,----cg.--; .,	•
.	..
-
.. _ .	..



                 RUSSIAN OFFICERS IN CONFERENCE BEFORE THE BATTLE EE EARLY CAMPAIGNING IN MANCHURIA


MOVING TO THE FRONT AT TOWAN PASS AT SIX O'CLOCK IN THE MORNING'
WITH THE RUSSIA!


               SENDING HELIOGRAPH SIGNALS DURING THE FIGHT AT ANPING iS AT TOWAN PASS

* •	I	i ;_-	,i...;,•	jc.-	...	•	—	.„.	.	.	..	.	,	.	.	. -,....:.,	.	'	„.	•	'	.	- '	' " ..•
7 - •	, . - . .: `3 i • •	•	.	'•	v.•	'-	.	'
AR ' - 0 ' _.y•	,... .. 4	.	" -	• — ••• , .s.-- - 7" r. Ir'r '.. • '	.r.	-	` 'c	." • .	•
.	.	• r-- • •
r .	.	.	' - '''•	-i .
-	-	'. 1111416	''' "'.	...-	dir- , . .	'IP': '	' .: -1:"'. 1-.. .-:'' ,	41111.11."‘	• .•	' .,LL'.4• -•%`-. -. --; .	I	• ' -Ti. .'';' :,:g...I: l'''.., .. ''. ."-. ''6: 4. .	- . v	'	• '	;
* -I., %,fi:•7. • 'i	..	.....	.
* •	....0 •	• • .
'	.
°If	•	.	. - 1' I.., 00" -	.	J	4‘`•.'"	4 !,.. . • -	' 'NI
't: • 't .? •,.% .	-' . • -	dpor	.,,,..,	.	.	.	....,	• ...._.	-	.. , • - LN.---,	- .	.•
.„	.. -• .	, ,	. r ; ....... /r :1,9.	,..	..„,	.	.	.
4..	• . .	.	.	• -	A	'f."- .	. :I„	Hi...7.. - .•-• ....; 7	.7 ._. . . •.t.,	.._	, .
.y -	'..•
f.,...
(.:.
'417
,..
,
'
--
I	. f	- • - '	.'- _-• ,
	..----_, , : . .%.	Cily'.
A ..	_.	.	•	..1	. A .	.
t •
•
	. 4*.. '	•	A.
A	.	• '	/ ..	• .1... ri
	..1-	' .• . 1-Ai•Li.	.
A.	,..
1A.A..,	.	."	• - •
-•••	•• • 4	.	• .;	LH'	•	1	........--.....	••	• • •••	.......	.
.. .-. "	,.... ;•...4. ,,...ss.90.0 1,11 y	. ''.. l....	A''	Iv., - .-	-- ...? .;..-. ...-•'-'	, 11%...ii?	' 1	N....1
	.	-1.	.''	.	, .	...N,Llt .	---:_.	:	‘•	. •	• •
	I r r . " -	J -9	1;	' ;"/	••• - A	-	4.'1-
•
or
	. , . • .	.f	. ,, . . _	47 .	4.
.	•	••...'-	4.' ,'	.-.	•	• '	(ill! 416H • . • : .. ' :	.	...FPI •
.	-	411rjere	, ,	-	..4t:	- •	. . . . ......4.„4 pot	` ...-.„.:•.*
it
. r	'-•	.	e%	•''' 4ellr ..k--• C : .	t• A,'	.•
.. .	. ......	'	t.T.1...
	..	. .=.	A	.	1 •	•	-	--	, -•
	a I- .0 •	..iiir	,er	.,„„.....ar.	..,,,,,...141...... ...0.......,...	, ... 	,	.	,	',.. r'' / .....,	AIL-
* r	*11 4FIFig.`-
* . -
I	.	''.	0..,.1.
- Afr011til.,•
itAitc1"11.....r
	.	.	•	•	, 
, ..... • .	. A	#	•	• r	• '	''''r	"1"41-191 ti".-	•	1
	....	, •	'	. °' -4-' .7.L.	rt. • .... -.	..........
. .	•	'4.	. , .	,.	.. It_ -
IF	...z
* • 40. .
* • ....	I 
1
...	.•	.	apt ..114. ...:are ...	.,
. ....4.0.	--
.e	4
	- '	O.	t .t	..	.•	..	.
,	._.
lb	•	,	..
	.	.	.	.	•	-	•F
. .	N	11...	.	-A.',	•	'	# ail"' " ..	1	•	. _	,
	-	-	.
1.1.. - 408.00r-	•	, ...
, .
	.	0, .	•	,_ .,
* v. .	'..-;	'	...	*.,	1 .	,
* )	4._ .,	*	-..
7ir' '. - '	Nialh.'; 411/''	• #	. . 'le'	•	' 1/1 •	.	4000iit	. . .	.	-
,	„	....
1	.	• .	,	' V	A% .1; . ....	i sr,
.	-	•
_ . .
	41	t: •	' .
.	.	'OW dir	...	•
•
* , ,.

, _
-	-...,	:.	..	••	•• --,,-...,,.	4-
_	....r. .
* . , -4,0;.-6r."--''	.	'	' '
_
	,	•.-.	.	1; ..-T	H%-7194- -..y•-c-	.,.,	,...-_, •	v	is	----	'..	,,-0 -.-12-2„:c-	L-„... -	.: 	-....:•_:..-...k.	----- 	.,i 
	1	.	'.0.'... --	-,...	"..i....,-..7b.	_.	,i	..'.	-	L.	.•	• •	• '".•	41k.:'	t.	'	--.	.
,..'_.7'.•:•:4	' .4?3??:4'.'	''''.:7	. -	"i.e.:- ••• •	..i.'•	A	1
..., . •	'..-,	. — c	--	•	'	-	.-- .•	:	'	..• . ....,	: ..: ..	.;
	c L	.
.	.	,
.	.
r	.	-
.i.!•	•-n-	.....	. - .-.• r)	._3•-•-,4-r. :-.•,- -	•	i-	.	_,	___......._	issi.....,.,,,	_,.....ein
* •	.	.
-A0- de - ..,	- -	.	-	---""?.-cdrl•;r,	-;4.1.11 19	•• mit•,,. --:- . . -..-- ,.. ,	. ;	...	.	.	-	•,-- -	--	4.	,	:,	, .0-	,
	--;/...,.	.	.--	.-7 .?	...0..:. .	.r.,	-- -	;;;'':i .	'	' z	'	.:	- „.0.,..•	.	.,	-.----•••• ,;:.	.	:..---.--,-..-	'.,,	.k.,_, •„.,	-	.-.;	.	-	-....	-	•	.	' - -,
.	...	.
-_-174v.	.,	:.-	.._,,-,1 ,,-. •. .-IZ,v-.. ,	i	—.--,,f-	1,--	.•	.... ,-	-.-
.	'.-..','	-,':.	--,- -•-•	1-i--	---m;r-_-.;---1.-‘1 (7r......•	t'-' •	•	,- •-t.	''"..'	- .	' •	'	•	- •	..	.. vaei.	--•
. , .	-1'..74:45.?:: Z..- . ' ' , - ,	i.:11; .12.5iMIYIRW:rt -•',. ' '-.)---.-...-4.4,4:::4-,	,...,,,,,_--- '	-	..7--••,..•:-,	-	___.	..
	:	,..,	..',.,_-...	,.	- ...-2 -	'	. '	:	'	-.L.,	---47-4.	:.,-;-",1,—	..	.• 4--',,,or'"'eff.7—,	,... .	.	—,'•'..	-	..,- .	-.-,,-----	..-	L' ,...---._	*,- ..,	,	...:_•,...	.	-
	:...•••%it.:-..." -, -	. -L,,,-4 -,2._,.. .	.	-	. -- --	- -, -,	,	•	lixdogitikt&14,-'---.	,.	:	'	.,•,....	- ..' ." •	•
 .	1,.--	-..•	'	--'	-	'.-: 
	'	I
	„...	-•,•.-
.	•

GENERAL KIJEOPATKIN PRESENTING ST. GEORGE'S CROSS TO PRIVATES ON THE BATTLEFIELD
THE REWARDS OF VALOR WITH KUROPATKIN'S ARMY IN Mt


REMOVING WOUNDED FROM HOSPITAL, TRAIN TO HOSPITAL

-
* -- 0E4'	'	_
* --	.
	. .	.	,	...._
.
, •
....
pppPP---.
	.,.....	....	• •	_	.• -eel,	. -	...
	= _•._•;.-..: 14..*2 itt.-'"--'46.:-..r r''':.	• .
••	..-4.i.... • -r ,f:-.5\.	; ..	..	,	-	,	•	•
— -	7-t7r ,OV	.	" • ft
,	1
C.	,_,	k.' - r.	kir,	-	,....- .
-	•	,	- -	..,	•
ss,kir,_-,i4 • 034. '0
6 ,	••1 • - • igijiirg4,-.1,---42.7. # ._ Of at ,..	. .•	...	'	.4.	' - -145.0-Vf-_14:_,q-;-•2:N••.:.--- • ...,40f	• ' ..	.	I, " .	-" .-	.•:.-	tiliPt •Nt4.	.	- •	•
-A • ;I' •••	'	'
1— 7"811,241.-144":;1'... - t - • - -
ilo'	'	.	.	11111111111.1.611111111411111111111,..., ,,,,., ,.,, •	. . .	. • im.	. .	,.. ,_,.. :, .0,.
.._
* r	...-	-2.;(0. 0
,	,	iire	• • •	.	.1J.. 4.1 A.i• -
....% . ../7.,00.,.	.	•k.
,'-.1....	•.•-•i	,	•	,	•-•	..,•_	...
...,,,.. •	- • ,....,...?- •	I	-	. fr 9: ,. ' -.2,?,	_	A14.	,,,.,1	.
__..	.._
.	f
1-f., . .: ''' .	V. t,e1:''.:'-r-------,-7 •	k •:•.	.•
.	_ ..	„....	:	•
. .....,	'-714. 4 •	r	.iir io r .)1,	-,..	••	.	,	r,..•	' ,*-,. f .	-	• '	4	.	.,	. .
,	,,,, --	4, ..,.. .,.	.
,.......,_L:,	.	..•	741,4..	.	'4 .1t. 4110. •
F•	"S.....-.11
	Illt --- •	,..-• 4	i .." '	.... / Ifi	..i.,, 4.111":.
7:4-' .• •	--.	. .	.	f'
* ' -irfres'W. ..-i7•5--,,	.	,	•	,	..	....	.
.
' A.	.	., ... 7
...	)wes. .,...	.	.	,-t• - .	t. - 4.	6	, ..',	.	, .	•	-	i• . .
.
-...	.
,	. !, 604 ve Jr,/	.,--.40.. ., . Imi	4.14	• -. - • /
.	. r	• .	. .	.	.	r:P ilk	••	) 3,......, , .:.,..,,,,... .4,
.	4"	-':	' '	-.
. -..	a` . 4 /	_.. ./1.0--, . —......._____.- :
,
- i•-' - . -
* r.,,== 4 . ..: ,,	, 4 ...f-V	., .	'	.	..
•
.	ii. x	A'	if	. : '	1-.Rtoo, 1	•, • -
* ....	,•	r•	. •
* ---	•	'' - '	;I.-	-	' .,' ,	-	•	.	.•
* -	••,;
_-	•,.- ;'..V •-.1T!iffi	.	. 7r......6SL	. . ,	...	• •	; .....	.	.	1. . Y. 4" ? ' .' '. . '' .	.. •e:' '''' 'r - .	..1"5	7	-..; ...'	.	1(	r	•	0
-	*. '	•	.-.-	•	ir	•
	.	.	., r .	!.. .!.i -	4 -- one..	•
* -';`r -' .;	'7'- -t .11-+Ps'	•	-	-	.	••	,	,F., •	r • t.ke, • . ',	..	i-d	V,- .• ,	....•
.	.	_	, _
....	..	,	•	,	,	.	.• • ow	• • ••..' '	1Z , • .;...,..;,•,
* -:	-1	• 4 - . . 01-.?-4-.',•' e-1" 1, ....1 ''Vt•hr...	,....,	: r	•	. ' .;-:1'".:.	..--	-• '- .	-.	'-•	•	.	.
* •	. • /
,	,,...„.....:••	.... ,-." ••• .. - ...•	.	,1„ag,,,t .	•-.4	'	•••	' ' n\.: ..1' .4	..i	• ....	• -. . ' ' ''	:	. .	in• I,.	a.%	:1/4..!	.1"
.	.-'•	.7.•	' •	.	?	,r..• -•,.
.	...,	..
.	1	. '	..- •	i
6	44A • i	-
* .	- .. ••	• . • •	•	/	•'.1.	,_	-..
* •	-	I	. ‘,.ri.:- . . . '1/4."4.-i - i ". . a	.......,L	. ‘	..	•	r •	i	.	•	•	.	•	•	,
. r_1.. .	s 4 "	..	•	-	,
--? .	....	• • v-•	. ..?	..'	'"	.	f M	..	.'.'	...	...
.	.
...	•?•••-,	. &
* 6	•
..	--, -,=-•.=••••••."..„ -- ..,	.-:"..- •	•	• k.	• • .	'-o_	,	.	-	. ,a:- ...:46,- -,	•,.
	- •	.,,,...	•	:-•-.	,4',.:4,..	. ..	...,	-
:.-......-,---....,..	•	••	.•	.L.	..	•-•••,•	•	...	•	..
- —
.	•
	t	14 .	...
* ,.11 • -, I •	-.71fillit
.e.
.
.
	1.-t	C.
' ...	,
L	.
oak
.
Ili
41.16	41111	swab	•	41110 li
-,	40	vb.
J	.
0 ,
IIIIIIL	411.
,01,4eis	geonit. .,-* -
.0.4)4tv 1,, 1"\K,	tio .-4k TIN il,
	oiiiir,	.... lipik#:
4 ,	'	A
.	.
t.i.iiii
ili# .,	? All til°1111R\ dta
TM"'	.	k411/4	o	',hi* ,	, 4,.	a	Itg• ..i, ,
.....„	.	,.. . 4	?	:-.	'flf ' .	'.	Id.
e
I	..
--,..
.	-	?	.
. illii‘i : !if .::.• -. •••""	° ?;	. -
-	.	/ •
.
.
,	,	... -	)
. — .	,	.
	.	,
	.	.
, ....	.	.	. Alb. - ,	..7.	1
...	.	.
.	••• •,...	-	•	.
:4	.	.	...1,,• .4t.	t
,
.
.
r
,	-	,
* ....'._ 1,..,..
.
_,	.	,	. -...f i.;4ii.	' ,. 7 '
'	.
I ' .7
:1'	\	-
r 1	•	\	r	.	.
A
•
i
.
.
7	. j `


RUSSIAN SKIRMISHERS ADVANCING AGAINST THE JAPANESE NEAR ANPING
1 7T


GENERAL SUREKOFF AND GENERAL MORO AT YUSHULING
INFANTRY INTRENCHED IN FRONT OF BATTERY

                RUSSIAN ARTILLERY AT YUSHULING IN POSITION ABANDONED THE NEXT DAY ISSIAN ARMY CORPS AT YUSHULING, NEAR LIAO—YANG

.	•
•
_
4
1..7*.	' . ..
	'•	--	-	,..	lit	g - 
'	-
.	.r
	.	...,	.
	,..,...........	.	..,	.	.,... ,..,. ,,,....,.,.._,,( •	-;,-	.	..,	,.	.	.	.
	.	.
.	.
9-	•
....
. • .. ,.,..,...:-.7. . '..'.7.'.!4-A11.' f'i" ' "' -• •	.	...	. r .	:	. _.
* .
	....	.......--	......„4.,_ - • -..0,5ic	i-• ;yam-," '•-: . • ,-•••-• • 'a-
--..: • ..	.-.	-	..•- • 7	-%...4.107.0„.....4, pi...- , ,.	-•	- • : • • :;e1,..'• + 4
...... ..	....	.	.	.	.	fr.	-•	••	•.,.	r-r.--.• :4e1A,,,...: , -,
?.:!;;..-	•-•'-'	..	••••	• .•	-•	•-e.0....•---•-,	le... .:	• 7. -e-	;- "."-?.-, .,-, • :', ."-•-'•	•
4.'4 -'• -••	..•	-	...,..	:r"	• •••.;•?....-:r..epoli,--t•-•.!.. • .Z.,•: '	: ... - .......'"Z.t.:•:!7,••, ---.
....
:. . ..	.	-,j•r ....tar-417.--.1 .1..t$,•..--;-,t..	-. •	..y..- •	. - . • .
.	: .	.:-	'.°	.......:.•••	'-..."...--4.1-0:,:- •-• ...,	. -•	'	,.—t...7:-. ,•_-:•:-	• - ...	m•-•- •;".• - ";
                                                                                     * ...-	4,-• •	:-, 7:1,...=.‘". --. .	-.:...-:' • .----•••:7.V.
INEANTItY MARCHING THROUGH -ALAIN STREET OF A MANCHURIAN VILLAGE
TURKESTAN REGIMENT ON PARADE NEAR MUKDEN

RUSSIAN INFANTRY ADVANCING THROUGH THE HILLS NEAR HAICHENG
WITH THE RUSSIAN TROOPS DURING THE EARLY CAMPAIGNING IN MANCHURIA



-
-
	mil isZfiiii,j___...N.P	,-., 4, .,.
.
* FL
--.	li
sk	'tit	4	.f
. -LI	• ' '.4	1 -.	: '	— ir VN.,
fr..	,.....,
0.:dpii-L04,—.- 
0	.
A.	'
.
- '`i	441(s..... •,.	..._	.	.,	.
* -•	:A.:.

OPERATING ON A WOUNDED SOLDIER IN THE HOSPITAL	HOSPITAL STAFF OF THE GRAND DUKE BORIS
WITH THE RUSSIAN RED CROSS SERVICE IN MANCHURIA
174


RUSSIAN BALLOON IN THE CAMP AT ANPING
SOLDIERS FORDING A RIVER WITH THE GAS BAG



ESCORT OF TURKESTAN COSSACKS WITH THE BALLOON	SIGNAL OFFICER ABOUT TO MAKE AN ASCENT	TAKING AN OBSERVATION FROM THE BALLOON
WAR BALLOON AND GAS BAG USED BY THE RUSSIANS IN MANCHURIA


IN THE RUSSIAN TRENCHES DURING THE FIGHTING AT TALING
176


JAPANESE RESTING ON THE BANKS OF THE TANG RIVER A FEW DAYS BEFORE THE TAKING OF LIAO-YANG
178


THE PAGODA AT LIAO-YANG SEEN IN THE DISTANCE

SCOUTING WITH GENERAL WATERNABE IN THE VICINITY OF LIAO-YANG
ON THE LAST OF THE HILLS, ON SEPTEMBER THIRD




JAPANESE FINDING THE BODY OF 'A COMRADE IN THE FIELDS NEAR LIAO-YANG

BURYING JAPANESE AND RUSSIAN DEAD TOGETHER OUTSIDE LIAO-YANG
SEARCHING OUT AND BURYING THE DEAD THE DAY THE JAPANESE E?


DEAD JAPANESE IN TRENCHES ON SEPTEMBER 'FOURTH


RUSSIANS RETREATING FROM MAO-YANG ACROSS THE TAITSE RIVER
INCIDENTS OF THE EVACUATION OF LIAO-YANG AN E


          BABY CARRIAGE LEFT BEHIND BY RUSSIANS IN THE PARK ) ITS OCCUPATION BY THE JAPANESE


CORRESPONDENT EXAMINING WIRE ENTANGLEMENTS BUILT BY THE RUSSIANS

PICKING THEIR WAY THROUGH WIRE ENTANGLEMENTS AND PITS
VIEWS OF FORTIFICATIONS AND ENTANGLEMI




NATIVES, WITH JAPANESE FLAGS FLYING, AWAITING THE CONQUERORS


        CHINESE MANDARIN AND ESCORT GETTING READY TO RECEIVE THE JAPANESE J OF ITS OCCUPATION BY THE JAPANESE


JAPANESE ENTERING LIAO-YANG THROUGH ONE OF THE MANY BREACHKS IN THE WALLS

TAKING A RUSSIAN PRISONER ouT OF THE BIG SOUTH GATE
VIEVI,'S OF THE FIRST ENTRY OF THE JAPAN.




A A
t.

mbirj.. • .11	•
";.4374-iti,
•

RUSSIAN STORES BURNING AT LIAO-YANG ON SEPTEMBER FOURTH, ON THE ARRIVAL OF THE JAPANESE
JAPANESE WORKING ON RAILROAD TRACK NEAR THE COMMISSARY SHEDS	THE DOME-SHAPED ICE HOUSE AND FRESH JAPANESE STORES AT LIAO-YANG
SCENES IN LIAO-YANG IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING ITS CAPTURE BY THE JAPANESE


CALLING THE ROLL IN A JAPANESE COMPANY AT LIAO-YANG
1:1tAlIAMS1:111.,44Jti, 1,L_1 IA?N	TEL11,414...1	AI:r:AwjAILD
TWO CORRESPONDENTS WITH THE RUSSIAN FORCES CAUGHT BY THE JAPANESE AT LIAO-YANG
SCENES AT LIAO-YANG AFTER ITS OCCUPATION BY THE


PUNISHMENT OF CHINESE CAUGHT LOOTING IN LIAO-YANG


JAPANESE SOLDIERS SITTING IN RUSSIAN DROSKIES CAPTURED AT LIAO-YANG

•
EXAMINING AS CURIOSITIES THE RUSSIAN SOUP KITCHENS CAPTURED AT LIAO-YANG
SCENES AT LIAO-YANG IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE CAPTURI


            GENERAL NODZU ENTERING THE SOUTH GATE THE CITY BY THE JAPANESE


DR. WESTWATER, IVIEDICAL MISSIONARY, AND HIS IVIANCHURIAN STAFF

DR. wESTWATER AND REV. T. McNAUGHTON AND THEIR WIVES IN A BOIVII3-111001,.
 Dr.iAlexander Westwater is a Scotch medical missionary ‘vho had the Rev. 'I'. MeNaughton, and their wives reniained in Liao-Val non-combatants. MrR. Westwater and Mrs. MeNaughton were ti

vorked for twenty-five years in Manchuria. He and his colleague,
rig during the siege and after it ministering to the defenceless
le only European ladies in the city when the Japanese arrived


GENERAL KUROPATKIN STANDING IN FRONT OF THE SHED BUILT TO SHELTER HIS TRAIN

JAPANESE IN THE TRAIN-SHED BUILT TO SHELTER GENERAL KUROPATKIN'S TRAIN
SCENES AT LIAO-YANG BEFORE AND AFTER THE ARRI

a
89

GENERAL KUROPATKIN DEPARTING BY TRAIN

RUSSIAN SISTERS OF MERCY AT LIAO-YANG


ALTERING TFIE GAUGE OF THE TRACKS TO FIT THE JAPANESE ROLLING STOCK

COOLIES PUSHING CARS BEFORE THE JAPANESE ENGINES ARRIVED
BRINGING ORDER OUT OF CHAOS AFTER


JAPANESE ENGINEERS STRINGING NEW TELEGRAPH WIRES AT LIAO-YANG

              FRESH TRANSPORT CARTS BROUGHT BY RAIL TO MAO-YANG THE RUSSIANS EVACUATED LIAO-YANG


FRESH SOLDIERS ARRIVING TO TAKE THE PLACES OF THOSE LOST AT LIAO-YANG

USING RUSSIAN TRAIN SERVICE TO BRING RESERVES TO LIAO-YANG
JAPANESE ACTIVITY AT LIAO-YANG MIMED]


i-NLOADING NEW GUNS TO STRENGTHEN THE JAPANESE BATTERIES

      ASSEMBLING THE PARTS OF GUNS AND PUTTING THEM TOGETHER AT LIAO-YANG [ATELY AFTER THE CAPTURE OF THE CITY


MARQUIS OYAMA, FIELD MARSHAL OF THE JAPANESE ARMIES


JAPANESE BAND PLAY[NG Al' GENERAL OYAMA'S HEADQUARTERS AT LIAO-YANG

            TRANSFERRING SUPPLIES FROM CARS TO COMMISSARY CARTS AT LIAO-YANG IREE ARMIES HAD TAKEN POSSESSION OF THE CITY

CHAP]
THE CHRONICLE
T
HE most interesting stories written by the correspondents who were sent to cover the Russo-Japanese War were probably the ones that never passed the censor, the most extraordinary sights those which the correspondents did' not see. There has never been a struggle since the days of the telegraph and the professional correspondent of which the world at large knew so little. During the early months of the war practically all of the correspondents were bottled up in Tokio, and when
at last a few of them were released and allowed to follow the
,
army, they were kept far in the rear, and were only permitted
to see the fighting at the Yalu from the top of a hill several miles from the firing line.
    Marking time in Tokio for months were newspaper men and special writers who were correspondent veterans of many wars, and who were compelled to waste their energies in the description of tea-houses, theatres, and other conventional show places. The unfortunate correspondents were repeatedly told that they were soon to leave for the front, only to learn presently that there was to be more delay, and to see a repetition of the Japanese smile, and hear again the Japanese 44 I'm so very, very sorry."
    R. L. Dunn, Collier's special photographer, who was fortunate enough to get into Korea before the rigid censorship of correspondents began, but was subsequently forced to return, thus described some of the distresses of the luckless who were held up in Tokio: «I found more than a hundred war

'ER X
RS OF THE WAR
correspondents at Tokio, hustling from morning to night in order to get ready in time, and buying a thousand odd things at war prices, so that their equipments might meet every conceiv-_ able emergency. That was in April. Spring changed into summer. Fur-lined sleeping bags and firepots made the days seem hotter than they were. The whole winter outfit had to be exchanged for one suited to summer. On June
everything was as it had been at the beginning, except that some correspondents were contemplating the necessity of acquiring a third outfit for the rainy season."
     ic Never was parting guest more happy to get away," wrote Collier's special correspondent, Frederick Palmer, when he and J. H. Hare, Collier's special photographer, at last left Tokio with three other Americans—the first to be allowed to go to the front; (4 never was parting guest more heartily and sincerely sped. With the correspondents of the first contingent actually going, the hopes of the second and the third rose, to the dignity of expectations. They gathered at Shimbashi Station with tin horns and gave the chosen few an Anglo-Saxon cheer. For over two months some of us have waited for official passes to join the Japanese army in the field. Now that we have the treasure it is not much to look at—only a slip of paper which would go into the average sized envelope. By rights, it should be on vellum, with marginal decorations of storks standing on one leg and an inscription of summa cum laude for patience in flourishes."


GENERAL KUROKI WITH HIS STAFF, CORRESPONDENTS, AND ATTACHfS Al"THE CELEBRATION IN HONOR OF THE SHA-HO VICTORY
This celebration was held in November at Palansansu. The Japanese correspondents as well as the foreign correspondents and
attach& are shown in the picture. The numbered fig-ures are (1) General Kuroki, (2) Prince Kuni, (S) General Fujii,
(4) Quartermaster Waternabe, with whom the correspondents had much to do. The picture was taken by a Japanese photographer

GROUP OF CORRESPONDENTS AT NEWCHWANG
(I) THE HONORABLE MAURICE BARING, LONDON "MORNING POST"; (()R. II. LITTLE. CHICAGO •.DAILY NEWS" y FRANCIS
McCULLOUGII, "NEW YORK HERALD"; (4) J. F. J. ARCHIBALD, “COLLIER'S"; (5) GEORGE DE.NNY, ASSOCIATED PRESS;
(8) GEORGES DE LA SALLE. FRENCH NEWS AGENCY; (7) VISCOUNT LORD BROOKE, REUTER'S AGENCY; (8) DUTKEWICD


G. ERASTOFF, RUSSIAN ARTIST	SIGNOR PARDO, "TRIBUNA" OF ROME	CAPTAIN SCHWARTZ, GERMAN	T. M. MILLARD, "SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE"
CORRESPONDENTS OF VARIOUS NATIONALITIES WITH THE RUSSIAN FORCES IN MANCHURIA


THREE RUSSIAN ARTISTS AND RUSSIAN PRESS CENSORS AT NEWCHWANG

CAPTAIN JUIk,uN	1.113C1'.-CoLONEI, SCHLI1CLEES	CAPTAIN RE ICEIMAti	MAJOR 11 [1V]Ill
UNITED STATES ARMY ATTACHkS WITH THE RUSSIAN FORCES
CIVILIANS AND MILITARY ATTACHAS WII


FUNERAL AT NEWCHWANG OF LOUIS ETZEL, THE FIRST CORRESPONDENT TO BE KILLED

          FOREIGN MILITARY ATTACHES WITH THE RUSSIAN FORCES IN MANCHURIA 1-1 THE RUSSIAN FORCES IN MANCHURIA


GENERAL KUROKI SHOOTING AT THE TARGET

GENERAL CROWDER, THE UNITED STATES ATTACHE


SIR IAN HAMILTON AND PRINCE KUNI
GENERAL FUJII TRYING A SHOT FROM A SITTING POSITION

CAPTAIN DANI, AUSTRIAN ATTACHE	GENERAL SIR IAN HAMILTON SHOOTING
TARY ATTACHES BY GENERAL KUROKI IN THE WINTER QUARTERS ON THE SHA-HO


CAPTAIN HEGARDT, SWEDISH ATTACHE, AND COLONEL HUME OF THE BRITISH ARMY

BARON CORVISART, FRENCH ATTACHE, SQUINTING AT THE MARK
MILITARY ATTACHES, FIRING AT GENERAL KUROICP:


MAJOR ETZEL, GERMAN ATTACHA, READY TO FIRE

            THE ITALIAN ATTACHE% MAJOR CAVIGLIA, SHOOTING FROM THE GROUND ; TARGET-SHOOT WITH CAPTURED RUSSIAN RIFLES


COLLIER'S PHOTOGRAPHER, VICTOR K. BULLA, WITH THE RUSSIAN FORCES

(1) JAMES H. HARE (COLLIER' ), (1) J. K BASS (CHICAt:() DAILY NEWS), (4) FREPERWE PALMER (COLLIER'S), (4) W. DINWIDDIE (NEW YORE
WORLD), (6) R. AL COLLINS (ASSOCIATED PRESS AND REUTERS)
AMERICAN CORRESPONDENTS WITH THE FIRST JAPANESE ARMY
WITH THE WAR CORRESPONDEN
IC


COLLIER'S PHOTOGRAPHER, ROBERT L. DUNN. AND HIS COOLIES IN KOREA

(1) RICHARD HARDING DAVIS (COLLIER'S). (4) W. H. LEWIS (NEW YORK HERALD), (3) JOHN FOX, JA. (SCRIBNER'S), (4) W. H. BRILL (ASSOCIATED
PRESS), (5) GEORGE LYNCH (ENGLISH), (LONDON DAILY CHRONICLE)
AMERICAN CORRESPONDENTS WITH THE SECOND JAPANESE ARMY
fTS IN KOREA AND MANCHURIA


ATTACHES AND CORRESPONDENTS WITH GENERAL KUROKI'S FIRST ARMY CORPS AT FENG-WANG-CHEN.G
(I) R. M. Collins ; (2) David Fraser; (3) Capt. Dani ; (4) Capt. Jardine ; (5) F. A. McKensie ; (6) E. F. Knight; (7) Victor Thomas ; (8) 0. K. Davis; (9) W. Maxwell ;
(10) R. J. McHugh; (11) W. Dinwiddie; (12) Frederick Palmer; (13) Capt. Vincent; (14) J. F. Bass ; (15) M. H. Donohue ; (16) Capt. Hegardt; (17) Capt. Hofmann;
(18) Capt. Payeur ; (10) Col. Hume ; (20) Baron Col. Corvisart ; (21) Gen. Sir Ian Hamilton ; (22) Major Caviglia; (23) Major Etzel ; (24) CoI. Gertsch; (25) Capt. Peyton C. March

CHAPrl
THE FIGHTING AL
THE Japanese armies occupied Liao-Yang on September
       4., and on September 8 the Russians announced that their entire forces had safely reached Mukden. For a fort-night or so the two vast armies paused for breath, while far to the southward the bombardment of Port Arthur con-tinued, and thousands of miles to the westward Russia's Baltic fleet sailed from Kronstadt for the Far East. During the latter part of September there was desultory fighting along a considerable battle front, and when General Gripenberg took command of the second Russian army in Manchuria, General Kuropatkin began, the first week in October, an offensive movement against his conquerors.
    Whether this advance was his own idea or whether it was prematurely ordered from St. Petersburg was not positively known, but it began with an oratorical proclamation to the army that the time had come for Russia to take the initiative and force japan to do her bidding. Kuropatkin's force num-bered nearly 3oo,000 men, his artillery was said to be superior to the Japanese, and it was plain that the fight was to be on as vast if not a vaster scale than that at Liao-Yang. For a time there were a few slight Russian successes, and after sharp fighting Kuropatkin succeeded in capturing Bentziaputze, about half-way between Liao-Yang and Mukden and on the Japanese right. The offensive movement was directed along the whole Japanese line, extending about thirty miles from Bentziaputze westward to the Sha-Ho. For nearly a fortnight

'ER XI
,ONG THE SH A-HO
fierce fighting continued, a test of endurance on both sides, until the Russians were finally obliged to retreat, leaving behind many guns and having lost, it was estimated, some sixty thousand men. The Japanese losses were about twenty thousand. Desultory engagements continued through October and November, in the midst of heavy rains, until the cold set in in earnest, and both armies went into winter quarters.
    In zero weather the two armies faced each other, burrowing underground in their dugouts, in many places so close to each other that the sentries could almost call one to another. The time was spent in target practice, in chopping up wood to be used for building and for making charcoal, and in drilling the recruits who were sent up to refill the shattered regiments. The quarters in which the armies found shelter were dugouts roofed over with logs, kowliang, and earth. That same attention to detail which was characteristic of the Japanese army during the campaign was as noticeable now that they were idle. There were even hot baths for the soldiers. Earthenware jars were sunk in the ground much like the Russian soup kettles.. Water was heated in these and baths could be taken as in so many vertical bathtubs. During the lull in the fighting there was a celebration in honor of the successes on the Sha-Ho at which there was a target-shoot between the military attaches. Meanwhile the Baltic fleet was pursuing its slow journey to the Orient, and the army of General Nogi was closing in on Port Arthur.


STAFF OF THE SECOND DIVISION AT THE BATTLE OF THE SHA-HO

GENERAL SIR IAN HAMILTON, BRITISH ATTACH, WITH GENERAL KUROKI
SCENES DURING THE FIGHTING EARLY IN OCTC




A'1 rAC1 il;ti WATCHING THE FIGHT FROM POSITION NEAR THE YENTAI COAL MINES

RESERVES UNDER FIRE SHELTERED BY AN EMBANKMENT
CLOSE TO THE FIRING LINE DURING THE El

        EMPTY SHELL CASES LEFT AT A BATTERY POSITION AFTER THE ACTION ?IGAGEMENT NEAR THE YENTAI COAL MINES

Of these two unusual dose-range photographs the lower one shows how shrapnel looks when it bursts properly. The thick white smoke is one bursting shell, and the little puffs of smoke to the right are the 250 or so shrapnel bullets zipping along the ground. Those to the left are from another shell. The photographs were taken at great personal risk by Collier's photographer, James H. Hare


EXHAUSTED- ENGINEERS SLEEPING UNDER FIRE DURING THE SHA-HO FIGHT

JAPANESE BATTERY PEPPERING THE RUSSIANS ACROSS THE FIELDS
WITH THE JAPANESE ON OCT


JAPANESE BATTERY IN ACTION NEAR CHONG-JU

                  IN THE KOWLIANG FIELDS WITH A JAPANESE BATTERY 'OBER TENTH AT THE SHA-HO


COLLIER'S PHOTOGRAPHER, JAMES H. HARE, RESUSCITATING WOUNDED RUSSIAN

W. EIAXWELL, LONDON "STANDARD" 	M.H. DONAHOE, "Mira' CHRONICLE"
CORRESPONDENTS ASSISTING DISABLED RUSSIANS DURING THE SHA-HO FIGHT


JAPANESE SOLDIERS ASSISTING WOUNDED RUSSIANS AFTER THE ENGAGEMENT

          SAPPERS REVERSING RUSSIAN TRENCH AFTER JAPANESE HAD TAKEN IT ELD WITH THE JAPANESE

RUSSIAN SOLDIER KILLED WITH HIS HAND ON THE TRIGGER

DAMAGE WROUGHT TO THE "TEMPLE OF EVERLASTING PEACE" AT THE SHA-HO
VICTORS AND VANQUISHED IN THE FIGHTIN




RICE FOR THE JAPANESE ARMY STORED AT YENTA!

JAPANESE QUARTERMASTER'S STORES PILED UP AT YENTAI
THE AFTERMATH OF BATTLE IN


THE YENTAI COAL MINES AFTER THE RUSSIANS HAD BEEN REPULSED

      RUSSIAN AND JAPANESE WOUNDED BUYING FROM CHINESE PEDLERS AT YENTAI THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF YENTAI


JAPANESE WOODSMAN SMOKING HIS LITTLE JAPANESE PIPE WHILE AT WORK

SALUTING THE CAPTAIN AS FIE EMERGES FROA1 1IIS DUGOUT
IN WINTER QUARTERS WITH THE


JAPANESE CUTTING TIMBER FOR FUEL WITH PORTABLE SAW

IN AN OUTPOST TRENCH ALONG THE SHA-HO


HEADQUAR'T'ERS OF THE REGIMENTAL COMMANDER	SENTRY ON DUTY AT OFFICER'S DOOR
WITH THE JAPANESE ARMY IN DECEMBER IN CAMP ON 1'














PEASANTS STACKING UP KOWLIANG FOR WINTER USE

                 MANCHURIAN WOMEN PREPARING VEGETABLES FOR PICKLING 3 AFTER THE ARRIVAL OF THE .JAPANESE


MAJOR YOKURA, FIRST JAPANESE ADMINISTRATOR
SCENES AT NEWCHWANG SHORTLY

JAPANESE CROSSIM; THE LIAO Al NEW(.11 \\- \\G BEAM V. IT FliOZE OVER

CHINESE CROSSING THE FROZEN LIAO RIVER ON SLEDS
AFTER THE FALL OF PORT ARTHUR


OSSES OF AN ANCIENT CHINESE TEMPLE LOOKING DOWN ON THE WOUNDED INVADER

CHAPT.
THE FALL OF
T
HE first day of January, 1905, witnessed the end of the gigantic siege that had furnished a tragic background
for eleven of the twelve months of 1904. The first blow struck by the Japanese in the war was aimed at Port Arthur, and during the month that followed they and the defenders employed and endured more terrific forces of destruction than were ever used at any other siege in the history of the world. The fall of this Gibraltar of the East seemed to prove that there can be no such thing as an impregnable fortress. The attack on Port Arthur began with Togo's dash against the Russian fleet on the night of February 8. Four months later, through the successes of the Japanese on the Liaotung peninsula, the fortress had been cut off from all outside help.
    From the outer line of defence at Nanshan, and thirty miles from the town, the Japanese worked their way literally inch by inch, burrowing underground, digging deep trenches that rig-zagged toward the enemy's lines, until near enough to make a rush. In many places the ground was solid rock and countermining was impossible. Barbed-wire entanglements covered the country for miles, and wide stretches of bare ground had been covered a foot deep with powdered white ash, which stirred into a thick white cloud when trodden on, so as to make a splendid target for machine guns. There were buried mines, some to explode automatically, others to explode when the lookout man in a distant fort pressed a button. At night searchlights flashed across every yard of the country

ER XII
PORT ARTHUR
near the lines of forts, and sometimes the Russian gunboats creeping along the shore outside the harbor got far enough to pour a cross-fire into the Japanese encampments. Day and night Togo's squadron sent in from long range the terrible Shimose shells, worse than lyddite, on the battered town and forts. Where it was impossible to tunnel or burrow, masses of rock and bags full of sand were rushed forward at night to make a temporary shelter where a regiment could go forward a hundred yards, rest, fire for a few minutes, and advance another hundred yards, until at last they were close to the enemy. Then, in the teeth of fierce rifle fire, reinforced, perhaps, by shells from the other forts, the final charge was made.
    The last stage of the advance began on November 30 with the capture of 203-Metre Hill. From this hill the Japanese were able for the first time to get the range of the Russian ships in the harbor. All the larger vessels of the Russian fleet were soon disabled. The great Keekwan Mountain fort was captured on December 18, and on the 3oth Ehrlung Fort, the key of the inner defences, was stormed. That day and the next the Japanese captured half a dozen neighboring positions, and finally, on January 1, General Stoessel, who had said at the beginning of the siege that Port Arthur would be his tomb, sent a message to General Nogi offering to surrender. For a second_ time Port Arthur passed into the hands of those from whom the European powers had wrested it ten years before.





/-I(	,•.'	r	v.
Stereograph (7011)710a by ttmler?voo8
SIEGE GUNS ON THE SLOPE, FIELD GUNS AT THE TOP OF THE HILL
THE GREAT SIEGE GUNS THROWING EL


Stereo:graph CopyrIght by Underwood & Underwood
         ONE OF THE SHELLS BEGINNING ITS LONG FLIGHT TOWARD THE TOWN EVEN-INCH SHELLS INTO PORT ARTHUR


NTY-EIGHT CENTIMETER SIEGE GUNS USED BY THE JAPANESE AGAINST PORT ARTHUR


Stewograpi? ['upyrIght by Untlenvool 1k Uncturwood
FIVE-HUNDRED-POUND SHELLS WAITING TO BE HURLED INTO PORT ARTHUR

blercograpb Copyright by Underwood & Underwood
RUSSIAN BOMB-PROOF NEAR NANSHAN HILL CAPTURED BY THE JAPANESE
SCENES IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF PO


Still-woo-10 Copyright by Underwood & Underwood
         THE SLOW WORK OF MOVING THE SIEGE GUNS TO NEW EMPLACEMENTS WI' ARTHUR  DURING THE LONG SIEGE
,2


sedreur.ph Cupyright bt Utulerw.....1
INFANTRY HIDDEN BY CORNFIELDS AND RAVINES WAITING THE ORDER TO ADVANCE

-kr
1 • ,	'
.	, •	'	"	. . - ". • .. 1:,-.11PeireekDet • L.' -	- . .L1
i ....lieleleVititi. .,i; _	...	. ,	...•	...tillil ..-	.•.	'•• ,	,-	•• •	. •••	. pA	..,..	_. , .. ..„ .'-. ,-‘.`-'..	, •	,	:..._..Z.: • --d.-11"-	-.... -dree"-	
* ti
* ,r. ,	,1. 3'. 1):	410	. ' .' •	:t.	PA. tef4-41,11:	ttt;j7 '	.- r`.se '4,‘ - 'Jo ar	.-;	- ..0	k -.,.. 	-..- • ,, I, ,., , ,'	.'„• 	,:r ,..'il,.	"	•.,:`` • .1/2•	•
* i. I.a.t;,?.%:177- ',: ;..'', ..	ki101,, Allir ,,i , :A , tt.i . 0 '1i11,.)41,t,'„., V t4 N 1 IC .	. IL 1.•
Pko rL•
e: - '. ..% 'I	-.10, :ere iii XL'  	•• 7511-4-°,f ;	' a ;-	....-.	•,....t!--.,4 v..eZir	4, ,'	',	i••-----..t.0-'11t14=t•' ''''41)"r"'! :1.-- .1--'‘.	l'il•''.11',11 le..v ; ii.•:..,,...:litir.'d-r . '	' ' 't1	-t. ?':	?1 'eN-td•-:: i.e. • 1it	t''J -11.'	'. I. '	1	'	L't`
* ''-' '-e '- I. ' 'f-4",•',A • . i'viel-t".-•,' -LAt .- i `1,! r` -e .d,,'. -.'::*0 ter.ve4n. idt's7.14 • ',,-i' ir'	,,,9_,' ---	,,,v‘-''.1	.1 1 ;43 1.1 ' i ;LAt 1, '-•:/;0;;;L-14.,4•';ft*dd‘' 401P, ',	',4 ‘ '0-.)1, r.	i ' I. 1'V %''1-1;(1\Ci ‘,.1 g)i,'"t\L'I.. ‘	't	(.'	14 . k''
., te:',' '	,.	A	1 i „-, i'7,00 -.'..	6,..3, •.,.	1,..,.. ,41:',.:'; est. tit, ..	.t- ,,...	..-	-Nr•	. .• Li-.	4	..- . s“ t - ki".'s-,--)- 1 ..f.Lil'e ..! • ' 	• 11. ..	-. ,. • ••A •	.-., 	iv:. ' fof .1.4.111	\ rt	1, t '.A	• t 1 r ,l'•	i%	:
.	. ., .	;",.:0 ki i.j',.iiii i!'.i.,. 7 .,trj‘ (,..,...i	:, : •r .	,4'41-L. 1.,10:.t.,%?:\t,..3/4?,:/../...r• .?'.. ir'''•dir',,z.........L.:.liP 	,_•-••"--_ IL	' -..	- l'''''- kki - kr -.•!•	..•-!ii'--:1•.'t.1,,,,,-.T.ii,	,-1-11, • ,'.`-.:r.. '-	•	--L '.. -' -•.:' rii .-1', • T ' 7‘ ..-4	1.'1'	% s	1-	/
iV •
	. -	- .	irl	'' ..:0. ' -..Atrr. 1 .: -,---,v,,,,- ....,. i,,,, 1, \	,, ,	.,,i	. . 4 . '	i	'	-. ., - i I	. . 4- .	' 4 '	..•'‘ • i 
d..	r ...,  	.... 	. ,•„ ../ .,,,	'r''	1. i 1 ? 4	.1 Y ;elk ) \1,11 , 7 . •	,1 „.?...	-^	..,	el	.	...'	-	..,	r .•	i•	- lit3/4	• 4- ••	41	-L•	' . .1-'r.• ".'	• ; •	•:ti I4h-"'	r i 	-.4	',	'	4r	.
.-' ..	.	L 	j	I 41;4'4	d•	.)	. if X	.,..:11••••	0'•') ;Fe ''r.	ii-f''
51:? •	4 ,	C./ .4. ' ',4.-•.. •v,.- ,1„,;,,!...... , ,1,,,, ,.	, . ;1.r' 1 ,',..,'	e	ai-.	' -	.,	ir.i.e, ,...	i ` L:i. ..--,-d	'tt '..	.4.	...44..dc:,3 ';!'r	." 4. ..' '.,	iJ.	‘,...-	,	41 .1•,.,	'.1.. r,.	.4:	-	. ,I	..',	..• '.mow-ter*,,•	- I. r p.	.„;	i„ ,..r4,v	•
,,,	e	...1.'	1.1./	,I.r;'.. 	I..:	'on:	•-	'	-	-
A,	•
.,;	el 3, '.	. •	. a -r,L	,, ,"'',-.'	--	!V 4	• a• • •	....•-	.	,-	!'	... 7.:r-•,;	-,J..1.	. :	.,z.	L •=0-,S, 7 i.... -,..L...,..„-„i.,, .. ...-• •	.....,..:	,1-:.	,.., ' .	1 •:.	‘	,
	r	- .	‘	!if-%	. ??. ''.11 '4"r-t • '' ' . .- • '../. '' ' tr " ..1r	'-' '
',..: ...if-,	-I? ',47f4-	.,,,r,..,..•-••/i-)J .-4.':-,c1:tr r'7.0.,	t4-.	L.'A5	-. 4V • ,	••	‘.--	''..,_	,"	`
4.'--	i..„	- '..„•. :',.VW,....,21:11.;.f„t•-•,.. li.„ ..---;,,, !ii...0;y.t. • .	- , )r -	.	... ._ .	.,. _	A:	..	.:	:•• ..	.	,	, -	, ,‘...In	..__	i	tr	. .	,	/	:- r- •	- - L-.	. ' ,	. .', I,	;41 --,, '	. - ).-
* -• t.; r':•-. tg‘	..!• +i•	(q(-'.:'. •	-1 ', .N.-; - -.' -,., i	ki '-'i • li	''' . •Li r'	: 1., • ....	. ''	•••• : '••• •. -.	...--ir-''	..	4
.	.,.4	,-. ,	.•••• 14•;..,,t '' ,',.•%. -.. ij	..' •	i ii„ddIfk	. ,or'• L,	,•Id...•	,	.` ,	• '..'" , litr,	• . e . .•• '-.	' ' ' -	-.''it4 ."	Ara" '1.-	'	• '''''t:-	?	.	..',	• r •	c.....--- - 'i'''
Al.:.	". --	-ti-/ .'. - r ,...	'4.	'-	.	•	.	•	,„.
 •  	1T• ,I.X	-.1 ' .''kt ..• '• ' \
.	.	•	-	•	-	•••	• ..
.-	..,,	.	'	.-I	k- 	1/4:	I	' 'I- . ,,P1	- - L.S -.,i-..	,'	•	- • .„„	,
.
-0.•  ,.•• ".4.4 ,  	....	I	•	- •	„
	...	ir	- •	.-., .t .	, ,. ,	, d -
...,4-...	-	•	....	,	•	.1‘	8t. -	-	- . -
	'	-	-	..:	-v--4c. r",.•/....,i	.	.	•	,	.
* .
7 ''''•`-9,	i ‘	1, I	i.	,i'-•	-'	..,.
' "fIe - i• •••'-'• - ,r	..t.0	.=	%	--• /7. ;
: • .V. 'i '	'. --'-L-	•r.ilt...%,--	('.,L)	.	• '	,	- •	.--r..11?1- . *....,	-,.„sriffif4- 1 7i._.-‘?..' . - :.:	. i	..	. .-1 .1.:-.. 	''..	'. L-L`'''-,	--%..- •'•	;	'' •k, '	' '	. 1:	. Is
* -•	\ 14	.,1,.,	-...p.-	X.
	••,-	•,-	---.....• 
9 ;;;;,-0:	7•14,-..- .N.. e-% r 	:''',.:. • - ::- ':• ''',a _ 	-
'	.	?	r .ro -f,	'	,„,,	. .	, : .1,;,4_.:-.-.. - ' ;	.,.	(4.. v	4 I),	-•	,l-1-
	.	-A.	-	„.7 . .	ok	....7selkos,• . .	. /
1	j„.....0;..;...	.	,	-.	,
	- ,	.t'L4	•	- 	'••	.  	. 	1	-,X-,	..'.-	' '.1,.-..- L' .‘i ''	L 	•
-";.--4•44'.'44::-; ?;..,-	. -;\ ',-;	r.C.7--••45-. -	' - . •- ' 4-‘1••'.-' 	-.:.	I	Ir ''..P	. .
* '- 4-11',e't	4-
	.	___ .
'1!1,2?V...•,-,	;	' '4.., \ t' 17 ,, .`i , rrtri.M44);-4Hf...-7--' .	- • "	' .. .-..--
	.• .	- If	'-	' -•	- -. '	'4 ._.,t+4,A,	:	'	-.1-,,,,	. .	LL•A_
	1fi	b"
	'	• •	e*•••-• • r.	,7.	• r• 14*-- • _ -.I' •.' ._,•:. ._	..,•,14....-7.	L - ••••" i -- ''•	-	-	.-•	.L.-'	.-	'T-••• 	VI:-	',.,,,, 	l';",-...i-14 Y
-	•- . it	':1/4.11.-	-- 	I.-, '= _.-•?• • hr.	.... 	-
, 
.	.,	. .	_	.• •	_	_	•	'	'	-7 ,%,‘ ..,	i	.._, 4, .
,,_ ..--,...;.,.. .1,e1.4.-)!;,',.:.	\:r•- 	.	' .	.!  	-	• 
J.,	t...,' dt --4..„.-4.1,;,,..........-...5-....-...-	.	.t...t 	•'?"......'----.	.	. 	.	.
	/	r	..	... .„....	..„- , - •	.	,.,..	...	.	.-. :,::._.--: :	,..,..	. ;.-.. -. 	... „.	....:or -,,,,. 
	-,-.,.	,1.-:	.,	. '.	--	....	.	..,-... 	:	.	---.- -	-4,k	., .	.,.-4	....   	:	A
‘ .
.11.11; '	,	/
r,-..." .t "gt..,7411k1W2, 	'	.....45.	.1 .	..-1/. „4 , .. I. 	--...	• 	.	'.1 t/	n 1	,'' . ,    ?01.2-	...-.:'")‘ .j:-.1"....•	• ,	,•-•	.1:1, -V..., ' 4 ..ti '	: .-	ir ' • , ,	.	.. /
t r.„....,444:,..44.. --....-..	,	-;".- F....0;i.	...,_,-_rzt,r1- ;'	_ _ ..:.: _._ , .7.2.,	... LL	.	. •	/ .,..-. k •	•••-• -, -r
P•40771D4..-7-1.1'...":4 ••'-- - ..:Ir..1-;-"---•'''LL-:-....- ---,,./.W2•+.7;1'-. - " • . - '''' .'.'. '	"-...• :, 	I ..7 T	, .;.1, - ,.. , ,	...	\
..
''-`. 4 : -'	'It.'-r-:':..-1'-f--:--:.-7- ;:',-:;;:-::-,--.. ---..'',.'':---L ...	' ''	.r.	./...rt	--	• .-.r..-•,,.-,.. -- .:- '-', 	..	.:L
- .--_,- -	,	.,	-.14-.r	,....,,,..-:.-,s-.	4	:.-	,r - iti '3' '. lj '.4- - . 	". .::	' 	• -- ,.-.	: "	- - 
:- •	- ,It.- -	-	T,!	--,,...	L.v...,--,..14- -	..... 2 -	‘..,•1	' 1 .. ... ,r .J.-•	--.-7-'...,. =-- -, ti	--....._	- ..,-	.. 44,•..
tr•-_,_.... " '''''.. - ri•- ..---j__.; ..' -• ....-z,	••,=-.-17:•7'.,1-./4..."- ., Yoirr :r L --'-'i :	-''	•	..	.'•	.'	,	---•	.	• ,,.:	1,
ev.v. - -...,:..". • i	4, *:.'.....-•'•:-1- __-•-/-2.'"":;"' :--r.;:-...7.--;"".	.d.,''	- '	V	.	..	, . •	. •	.,	.. rit..4` ..,.
,t'	' "-- ..._	,..k. .. -_,;_rti.:	. I,- :,.:-1-_7...	''''	-	',	.1 , ,,k .. .• ••	' •	-	' ? ',..-	i- LL7IS*-1".•• . .	'I	I.
. ...
•
,..	........	% .,f-4'
4,_.:------	- ..	.;.. 	- 4' ..-4'./ Ce•	r„	1.•	' ' • 4	. - p •?a .4/	-/ ,, ..	' '7.-	''	,,,,•• •	lit 7.- .....
'7-
* ..........	•••- , •	• t	"	.-• 4,	.... • ,• • ' '	•	'	tt. -	.. -	'Res---to	. • I	,	i'.... 	•	_	-	• ,....
	.	. •	•
:. r • ..i • • -_.,-,,,,tr't••-..=.• • . -de:	• WI", ..-.	-	.	'. I	• • ?	..	-,	,.	... ,	. . ,
- 7-	2414 2...- e , X . '-.47„	4.-'	.	..	-. ' • '. •;•••• • li A....i...ilef-	.4. ;,'" • •	''' - '	.1.'"'"	-...'".	I'	- ' ..	1
	-	I
'	•	' '"	-,..-1.:?_'''; et°. .. LL. - •5‘. 7 -IP c4Y	-J '	- • '• .- •-•	-
* VL-C	... , 'It , vreh . „..<;.rt. i ,	•.	, • • „ 0	"-?•i.
* "- •
* 1-;;LIL.....• 4?	.	'	7-• '''•	'•	f--'. •	I .
"--. 	. 	L4 •	.-	• /	•	''•'•- -
.4,:.,.# • l'•-	'----74. ..7.'.	4"` '',	.. '	. .	•	`	'.....	+- -	i.Or•11".	•	.	-....64 .t:	•-•,.t	•	' .-r
1,,,...:,:•.-_,40	..u...r,,,,......-.-•- ...-.1 • . ........-tot,	• .	•	A., ,•-,„.	: , ,,	t	"	It. •.
-	• -	-- Ao	•• . • • OIT.-:.' •.-- .-	-
-.	t,...	. • 1	.
	de '	"	•	-1.' . • ' • .4'• •• •• 411.	• ,,,,„,dpm.de	•
If	C .-. r. .1.7	;	..	•
L ‘,/›... • •/	',.„.	, '	\ '. \.1,1t ....	- -..,r'...:::10::::- ',--'"'..-.
•• %
..........	.
-	-1...-ilitr.04.-. k.	.,• -	_ ,
.	...	...
-•,-....	.	:NV"	.•'7:›;	I di.. •-eer!•1
-.. N.
* . ' - !-': . . '	.. •	.	•	I	L.';.i't,,
0" •-
•••1* -: .	b
. 	"	..s" 	L.:	'	. -'.**.	• • d •	id":4--	.	•    	'	'4...)	• , 1 '1	.. ....	•	••••••,--. •)'...*"..
--..-, ..i:.,:-	'	-	- 7	-	i -	''	-	•	-.... .,1-	...4 -4	.. ,, '. /- 7	..	• •	.: _.. . •••14,	•	,. 41'	-7.,.	t..	...;	' ''', ''''''' ,--.
* ,,...
.	LiT;• -fr.,	1.'"-•	T• qt.._ „.	',	...'	-,..--' . Ay'	•	... ..-	- -	•••	.. - V.. :7-'L'.- '' •	' .	• • -	• .. .` • •
 •	tt. • 1 S :e' ' ilke•S•lT•.";•it ..- •:••••
'	••	•	,,..	`'' • ' •	,er• -	:„.P. . iv .,. •	5.•....."7.	.	L---.	•'''	gli
0. •	,	• - •	• '1.10-.i,_	Jr..- -- )0,	0  	:	• -. ..,	& ri•	.	. _ . .
	P	•
	- -	•
* ^ e.	'	i 1,4	•••-•	..	.,1/	•••
, - i... . • • - . •••	-S.	,	.	• 41., .	.	`..	vp- 	1 '`-	>IC
. •	L• . ,-. '4-'4 : 5.-•	-,-	. -	.	•	1-	•	.	-
* -...	, t
••••• .",...: ...Id-	L.101:'- 7. -	'	•• ••!'"•••.; , ' , I	. • • P.	• '	'Le N.	4.4	4?-`4,.......
. L. "Q•••...; L It!' ;.	;- ',• *IA' :' - , -..	' .: . . •	-	.	...	,	_. .
* ..:'. . . .	.. , ,	1 .- ,	'..	,-. 1, .-‘ '	v'-i'-'•	-'' - .,	-.go
* -:-.. •:...-L. 'de'. Nt2•1	10 ...' .	". • ..:di
. • 1. '	.	.	.	•	t? ' • ' . . ...• ' r r '	. 't . • , .... ,NANht:....._	c I.: ...-" . ,,L,. - -
	.	....._ t
* .1'	'"' I '.."`.,....7	-	.. ',. . .'	.
* #r .-- ''	„. _	_ ..
. ''''' X.., • -	.. .. - Nik$1......ii,L.,.77*.tr.
ia • • 4-..1.`,..•-• • ' '1.• ' . t	ji'	.	,	... - .
	. .	..-	. ‘,..1	1	••0'• •	' -	•••• V:•• --'	. • •
	.	..	.


ti
?
a--
110... 17-	.	-	.4.4. •
"

iitereogriph Cupyright	WitIrtwocal @ Walervvimal
JAPANESE WAR BALLOON AND GAS BAG IN A FIELD ABOUT FOUR MILES NORTH OF PORT ARTHUR


GENERAL NOGI AND HIS STAFF, THE CONQUERORS OF PORT ARTHUR
General Nogi sits in the centre, the gray-bearded man with the round decoration on his breast. his chief of staff, who conducted the negotiations far the surrender. On Ijichi's right is the Army, and beyond, with the beard and many decorations, is Major Arriga, Japan's greatest
On his right is General Ijichi, Surgeon-General of the Third expert on international law

BETWEEN FIGHTS IN THE 'FRENCH AT SHOGERSAN FORT

SHELTERED INFANTRY AWAITING OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE




THE JAPANESE AND RLYSSIAN WHITE FLAGS OF TRUCE
INCIDENTS OF THE SURRENDER I





ONE OF THE MANY "BOMB-PROOFS" USED BY CIVILIANS AT PORT ARTHUR
Although a woman was killed in this shelter shortly before the photograph was taken, they were, generally speaking, fairly
effective protections. During the heavier bombardments, the occupants lived in them for days at a time. The Russo-Chinese
Bank transacted business underground in "bomb-proofs" constructed in this manner for some time during the latter part of the siege


ENGINEERS' STORES, SET ON FIRE BY JAPANESE SHELLS, BURNING AT PORT ARTHUR
230


ING IN THE BASIN IN THE EASTERN SECTION OF THE OW TOWN,' PORT ARTHUR


VIEW OF THE OLD TOWN, PORT ARTHUR, IN NOVEMBER, AFTER A BOMBARDMENT
231


THE PRICE OF VICTORY-PART OF THE JAPANESE DEAD LYING ON 208-METER HILL
233


DEAD AWAITING BURIAL IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF PORT ARTHUR

1";.- ;i: )..'
i	.	74 ,' :	'	- -• ....1....- , •:.	t 1	" .	. ,	A ,_
....... ,c1"-.4.644iktitib.,1111111111
. \ ..	.. \	...11....
..0. 1,..,-,...-....z./.-.„-ti • ----,114,
 „....,.
:,7 1 i.	•	-
I
	,A..6,4.111.,•461, .	-	.. .	, .. / _ 1 -	,.1
.74	--4	• r ' " '	-C. -': , :,_ • 
-	..
--
	.	.!	. , • r'.
* 1	' •
.	.
iy: ,..5	....
,......,.
	, •,.:,.•• --•••••=011•E	.'	-	•	C: ;I:
	-..-- .. •—••	.	il.
--r-r7	r
.	.	4	a. _	.044?1.-..•
-	.	t.._	•••"r -,....
-0- - -.....	•••••	•	.. -	- ?.7.--	• .... 4{44
* P7 ..... Z .	- :- '' "L.	.-;1-7-'41:Z.",.....	.:L.1 I .	.	1 1	.--	.	'	..	: '	.	11
	..	..	•
. ,
.	. •.
.	-	'-.. -,""t2..•	.	'
,'1.,114d,.	. lila	.	Jr ,. -.. - ,. _•,-__.... „.- ,	-... -o•or,o;iic.. - 71"1....:
—	i	,	--. _ %.,do:J. = .	•	mi	.
.." : j. ' - . ..t?'' - : . -	1 _	• , - 1...: . - -: ; t; •	-.._.	\ I
	.r-	•	_ _
	'	-	-	•	-	-	.	..	.	I,
.	.-
.	-- ,-.	-	- . .4.- •	L.	,	.s,'	i
e	11011whit	...1.
••	III'.	.	.	.	hi. I, il,	•	...	.
,	...	'
.. •	.	%	'	Vr.	•
,	I.	...	-..
.--	,..	V.	• -	..., e	'
.„..„	•	• .	-
-.....	.... .G - - lie - .7-11rft".	,	•	1 '
.	.	411	i
* ?•	-	A	7
.	. -
.	_
 - .
	- -	r	ih ..,-.	it	.t, ,	.;	_ II.
	.	..,	y 	Ir.	a _	...... -	,	-	- 4: - 
-
eve
1,11.1111 -	111',..... ' ii. • , -	.•	"	'	1 •
11-	.	4.	• .	?	. %	jA	' '	frill  	..t.
..............
* ...	. .. 444.4*	.	i'.'	. .	.
-..
	4._	'	40,	•	If
.	P 6 . ,	•	7,,	."1. '	_
	.	L.
415k	.
ns
-.-	.	.
i 4_
	......r.	.
...	../4	.
"-
.,1. .
I	, (42......— -	.11	• 4	iit,	• -
V a	' --3.• ,	'	rbi	41114 *1.4	.
••
ir
0	t	e;	--N-?,	.	'' '	. Nk."71:	%.
41
	Se	.	....-.4....
.	.
-	•
0	11111!".. 	'' . .-NV - 
pf	...	g .1: •	-•e. .Y	.••••	0 4
	_	.
)?-411	I. ,-	.411 4°1: AO..	. ' .; - : — •41.*	l'Ar
. ..	• I 0	ig•
IN	?L -- , •	n	' -!.. „ _ 	„Lz-  :    	.	•??	%a	1.
... -
..741.•	' 4:.	- -	.10.
.:1 • ..• 1..	•ib...	.., "	. i
.."-.	.-.
	7 7`	• 40.--.",-.4 --..'"-	"	...._
I	,	.,	....-•	._	,	1
P1OTOGRAI'I-IER'S STUI)10 AT PORT AR.TI-LUR AFTER IT HAD BEEN STRUCK BY ONE OF THE JAPANESE, SHELLS
2 3 s

MAIN ROAD OUT OF THE NEW TOWN, PORT ARTHUR

RUSSIAN POLICE STATION, PORT ARTHUR, HIT BY JAPANESE SHELL
VIEWS OF PORT ARTHUR, IN OCTOBER

.
.,,,-,
-----,;-:' - .-.4tt;:-	'1 l'..i.e....."_, ? •	). ' , : .r,. .1 •
.'	. Jo, '	.• .,;,.. ...7. a , , 7,	.
•	..	.	.
''''a7.."9:1•41'..1 '	• e	--' 41- -- I.: 12". !`. # -,z-"—
- Nr.	- 4F.,'-'-'71',.,'	"•.,	N,
....1.- - -.-..-	"-.-.isis:01.. al5, -":-- • :--
VIEW OIL' THE NEW TOWN, PORT ARTHUR, IN OCTOBER

        WHERE A JAPANESE SHELL HAD EXPLODED IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TOWN , WHEN THE SIEGE WAS HALF OVER




NORTH KEEKWANSAN FORT AFTER THE SURRENDER
'DISMOUNTED SIEGE GUNS INSIDE ONE OF THE RUSSIAN FORTS
FORTS AT PORT ARTHUR AFTER ITS SURRENDER


WOMEN AND CHILDREN ABOUT TO TAKE THE TRAIN FROM PORT ARTHUR

PRISONERS TAKEN AT PORT ARTHUR WAITING TO BOARD JAPANESE TRANSPORT
SCENES AT PORT ARTHUR IMMEDIATE]
•


RUSSIAN AND JAPANESE SOLDIERS CiETTING ACQUAINTED
LY AFTER THE SURRENDER






BATTLESHIP "POBIEDA" BEACHED AT PORT ARTHUR

THE "POLTAVA" AND "PERESVIET" AGROUND IN THE HARBOR



THE BATTERED "RETVIZAN," "POLTAVA" AND "PERESVI-ET"



FORWARD TURRET OF THE BATI'LESH1P "RETVIZAN"
,T PORT ARTHUR AFTER ITS CAPTURE BY THE JAPANESE


10.
•
THE BATTLESHIP "RETVIZAN" THE DAY AFTER THE SURRENDER OF PORT ARTHUR

THE RIVER GUNBOAT "GILYAK" OF THE RUSSIAN "VOLUNTEER FLEET"
VIEWS OF THE HARBOR OF PORT ARTHUR WHEN THE JAPANESE TOOK POSSESSION




L ) VALESCENT WOUNDED RUSSIAN SAILORS AND THEIR JAPANESE NURSES AND DOC ORS AT MATS YAM

dEP3

CHAPT
THE BATTLE
J
UDGED by the number of men engaged, the vast extent of the battlefield, and the losses, the battle of Mukden
was the greatest of modern times, if not of all history. Even the tremendous duel at Liao-Yang, which was on a larger scale than any modern battle that had preceded it, pales before this nineteen days' struggle. Between 750,000 and 800,000 men were engaged, of which about 361,000 were Russian and at least +oo,000 Japanese. When the nineteen days' struggle began, both sides faced each other in the valley of the Sha River, the Russian lines stretching back upon tiers of defences, backed up with over 1,300 guns and forming south of Mukden a barrier which foreign experts pronounced impregnable.
     From east to west the five Japanese armies were assigned under the following commanders—Kawamura, Kuroki, Nodzu, Oku, and Nogi. Field-Marshal Oyama's plan was for these five armies to form a crescent nearly one hundred miles in length, the cusps of which would gradually draw together, the western cusp being finally thrown forward so as to form a closed curve with the eastern. The plan thus outlined worked with perfect success. Kawamura, in the eastern sector, began the attack first on February 2 2) driving the Russians back toward Tita. For over a fortnight the fiercest sort of fighting continued in this part of the field, in the midst of zero weather and almost continuous snowstorms. It ended with the Russians driven across the Hun River and the right horn of the crescent having reached its final position opposite

ER XIV
OF MUKDEN
Mukden. Meanwhile, Kuroki broke through the formidable works which guarded the road to the Hun River from Pensihu, and arrived on March 5 in line with the general advance. Nodzu, to the left of Kuroki, drove the enemy from his last outworks south of the Sha River, and on March 6 paused to await the other turning attacks on east and west. Oku, between the Sha and Hun Rivers, rolled back the enemy's line until its superior numbers and strong intrenchments near Patishu, about ten miles from Mukden, forced him to await the final turning movement of Nogi's men on the extreme west. These men of Nogi's were Port Arthur veterans, who looked upon this work as a mere picnic. On March
they reached Sinmintung, thirty-three miles west of Mukden, where they wheeled to the right.	They carried position
after position, assisted Oku's attacks against the enemy's position southwest of Mukden, swinging eastward in an arch-shaped line with a front of fifteen miles.
The crisis of the fight had come.	On March 7
Kuropatkin gave the order to retreat. All along the hundred-mile line the Japanese closed in. The whole stupendous structure of the defence fell to pieces in an instant. The Russians poured northward almost in a rout, and on March io the Japanese occupied Mukden. The Russians had left more than 30,000 dead on the field, lost 50,000 prisoners, and they had over i oo,000 wounded. The total Japanese casualties, as reported by Oyama, were 50,000.


TYPICAL SCENE DURING THE RAINY-WEATHIO. CAMPAIGN ALONG T1 HUN

CHINESE DIGGING GRAVES FOR RUSSIAN DEAD AT HIGH HILL


GETTING THE RANGE THROUGH THE HYPOSCOPE FROM 3U3-METER HILL

IIAN BATTERY ON THE HUN RIVER




TENTH RUSSIAN DRAGOONS SCOUTING NEAR MUKDEN
RUSSIAN CAVALRY AND NATIVE HORSEMEN IN


CHUNCHUSE BANDITS RIDING THROUGH SINMINTUNG


MUSTER OF ONE OF KUROKI'S DIVISIONS AFTER THE BATTLE OF MUKDEN
All the battalions were full before the battle. There was not one that did not lose at least ten or fifteen per cent of its quota—as
the gaps in the ranks show. Kuroki's army during the closing-in movement on Mukden was between Nodzu's and Kawamura's,
the latter being on the extreme right wing. This photograph was taken by Frederick Palmer, Collier's special correspondent




CHUNCFIUSES LEAVING MUKDEN FOR SINMINTUNG

                 RLTSSIAN SCOUTS HALTING AT MONTOUR PASS, NEAR MUKDEN IOD BEFORE THE JAPANESE WERE NEAR


WHERE SOME OF THE SHELLS BURST DURING THE ARTILLERY DUELS NEAR MUKDEN
248

7•T- •	r	—-
, 4
..,,,,,....V.	I ,	, - .,:::	altrie 	il	r li.,	•	.t.,,	1	.-- ---.0"' ?r---. • 
.,7;:_•.:	-AI
mi.	,...
	?	S	1	;4_Pir 14	'.'. ..-...)$ .	.. ,	.,.?
. i' ' -	--	YI	'	•
Nil la •	keiki- 4i';:•';	•-.7t 7 ' : •- '	'•'.- . '- ' '	- ,,	•	• •
	.	r
	L	i i Illimmind
I'	)
?...,..°.	., --,	TY= '	,	:_ .	',7-•
.,Irs.	_	-;,.trsp...._	.-.	:{-,/ ,	, 'i	-1.1.,.	.
,4,44,-:
V •
* c
	I	•f;	.4 .:h	,(-4
....-,	,y	-, .	‘.,	•	-	.-  
_ 	... 
4 ts 	:-..,..-....,-.	• 
,..	,....-
1.6 ' ' .. Li	,,.. :	•'.- 'or.;	:- ,	'1 ,''.	.., 4'!v ,,,, • -
t ,7 .z. !,	• lili
.f,,i-v.....,
.	.
46,,	, "..,	'',:. ',ril	1174
	i	q 4
	 -..,	...,.......--	z	I
. .	'	•
	,	.1.ao........:::_;,_...,1 7 .r.7111.:... ....,,,,:iii'.1....,,i1_..11..::,'`I,.1..1_...._-,:t-..t.,.....'.:::::,..."...-1.,...,;_.,......4,,,,--.,,..,' 1.0.44.1'1:.'i'..z-N4,)6.i.-:' ,;::::...,:i.-4.1:1/41...7.:,',......m.:.4.1v.
	k	iliao. '7"--•.'	•	.7,:i•- • , ...'' .. -. .!--- -', • 4` , A :	... ,..1 • : i	• .	i.
	r.	'fl-	L,)t1/4,r	''..- ,--F- -- -• L - — ' 4,---	'°	1, •••	I
z.
	....r	........--	jeri	'.!,	, 7;;-	L; t./.• •-i	.r,:...' • \- IA, i .-:••••-`,	1,4.'1
	I t	-	.	.	_.	,	•	'-'\:.•,,,, -	.
..
	4_	1	/	. -	• • '	k V	°. . i. fL r 'r ' ' ..' 4..:. ''..1 '''
	, ?	•	? .	,
	.	-	.....-	.,-,...	• 7-
* tr:-	,,.......:-4-	,. ..
1,
	„4.;	,4	i r .	.- /If ,w
' V • / .
iu, .-	*-- • -- -:	'	..	,	,
,;...	:::sr,4it
	::, ,-	,ref--'' %
	1	'
. i
' ;"'•	,_	,
.	I	,
	.	7 '''::•-;---- tNc., ..	A	i	-	• , - , ''. ;qt.,. ...,:, ,,,
.... ,
..	.
--%e ,	4	.?
- . .	i-,:irie..-	... •-i--141	..	11....	r•	-
.	,
- , ,	•
....- .	......-.
	--	--
I -
I --  	0,1
	,>,.. r. ;..r =	t• :: - •
	.	.. -
	S.' '..•-..1F;. r	-	: / 4111	''';,-1	k	,	•V"......	, '1 1 ".
.2t.),' •-•	,	• .....
	.1.	•.>'.
oe : /it,	-
	,.. • .,...,.•.	.	.,.	......... 
	,.:•-' -.:?rier.	,
	/	A'	'i : ir	-4 • --.-	,.;-4!\	V ,
1733b/•\ 1..... 7
.; 1:4' 'I'S if	411,...,11	•	P	...„)
' i	.	•	k /	I..	,- -	,,,„,....,; 1.‘1..A Alifr.:,:,....	. -.1.--;	- ..,:e
	
'77.		:.- p	- Y.	g.	, „),,	i • i	Ni +.,."'"	il\--
	0 i  	ki.%	, c.. , c
.•	, r .: 0	•  3. "
.: ...r.:::.: `terI  	7 71 : 6..
1
	4 6 '	.- ' 	..1/ - A	_,. 11., . _.• ,
% t : 1.4.,-	-	.	, 4,..	r, ..
?" 15-4-A 
	 .L	..i.
-	, . „i ,	'	-------:......m•••• 1 •	• ...TR
'	:e.r ', • ?	i, ft	.	,?.,,r	,	;
. tti	.:	T.	' ..i1V1	.	4,p. •	.'• Fi	li - , -	,:-/ _ -.,
* i-• .	.! •	J	. tal-;
	..	.	• ;	4	.	L-I	,......-,L.
1. .,-	•	=. ..	-	-	--..„	...-	,	--	'. = .	.	.
, ..
rif '.	. •	•
.••,„	- ‘2 ...,	.; ,	. , „: ; L	-1	- i • - 0
r	• •• '' !	'	•	.r Li	;- • i., •	.
i .
di
.	_
	4.4	ti	,	, 	i	6	1
1.	• ,	.
jot
,
_	AI
	r .r	ik.• 7	.. ,	1
	.j-,:ig .'	I ,	.  t •	1	if
	\s".	•	.r.	, /..,	'	•	if i j ..•4
	"..	•
i '114	'r•kiek.'	T
;
1%.	)33;'1 	'' fl'/i	t -:15\ ,7,441b41,y ? ,7 1..
	. i	.
. c	,	1
wc '	4 ,	; ,	I . .	I,' . - -,	' r (' v ii II, _ 1	•	'1 \ ,r'', I S TI1	r,4,:. -	,
'1, 7 ';".:0:	' :	f	\	7'	4;..	• -\''-'1"i	;	-,	\ •	N''' i 4	1 ,	•	'	' 9-T	'.- i
,. 4-4, fa	r , . ,	. , .	,	..,y	. ?),,., 4,„	1 ,,,	,,	%! i	i• ',.': A- I"	\	' . ' r ''
	-",-:	•
--! "••.- 1411 	. 
.,	?". . 4 li,	,	•	'
- • ''`'	Ai '	1r	igr	F	i:	.	_	f	- r.'	i	, --L,„„„..	= N	..:.	h..	' ,	1,	•	.	' 7:-,,,_ -'	•	-
* ? - '' .	r	.	' 7 '.	'''. -	/	‘ •	- '	'‘thi?	'	/ ? '4	1 4	et:'..,,ti,.
_,.,,. TT.: _ ,:f , kli......'	\	: ,;"'.7:' \\ 7:\:\.- )..t,'	.	4 1_• .1i ! r, •:01 , /,'.,•'..?,..:,1 ',.... ', ,•:
?	.: ' :f	, ' .	' 1 f '	"1	4	it-I	-=.--
* i	t..•	4	.	it	LI	% 1
A	.... c
	,	.i.
........	. I	5	.7	r 1	'
1	T''	• ) IL , \	' -%	11 - I.:
if
,,q	..	.	11..
	,	,	, A4,	, \	.„, ;	.,,, ,	.. i.....,i t 	..
'	7::, -	t.
:	, .
. I	PI,r41.	- . . I.	'	1	- .	eL- .,..r.--'!-
* , ' • 1 	1	1 \A‘ \	I\!. r4••19.1,,,
,, .	• ..II,;i.	.r if,. '	'	-.(,-zr-'-	- -	44,	--A,	, , %	.	1. - .±,,,,- 7,-...,	•••.••
- .
...."'''AC
---	.•	;,---	' ii; -	1	'
--4;	'	4	I.	L•re!' , '''.	.... ,t '	/	' 7 4,	%	i •	•
	_ 	.k.\
,	.	a	, .	pi P	r	.	f r::,,0	7;,,,.i....,, 1. 4:1	•	. . 1	1	1 '
,,,;	.	,'f'.,i1.1.- .ti ,	•tt" .	.._--;_ii	,	i, 
I • 
 ,..	:	41 _	• t4,- ' ,--
	ii, ;	,	• • . \!'.71	‘„k?	,.	,,
* •	,
-	44	.r.	A{ • TT
'	2.	•i.xj	'plf-'
	,	-	'	‘...	'	_ V-‘.	\ . •	....,...st .4t,._	..;
.	. -..1 -, \	.	.4.-, .
,	i
,...., •
\ -'.-A.	...
e	- .	'1	'' Nil	:	•
	i	I	- 	-	it	•07--'-...,	• 1 i ' iffii i . -7-	\	.
- \ i 	-
-
	.	-	.	.
- VV\
* .	- ' •
i .11.i- - •	•	ii	t p' ..-	;	---
. . .,	.	-:'	••0 ' .;	'	1-. ,-X	.„,	,,,
,., ,e4	,,,..	...-1.• 1	, ....	;.. 4	• :,-,	* ,.,	- . L.
	r, 1,1,..-,	-----1..„,•.!:-7-:
.:r. -,t,-?..•	_	,
, I	i	1.•	'i•	;.-4
1•61(	r	4 	N. Li	.	x
`.	,,,, .	•	,	,	-,,. -
te.. 
1
,,,,,	i	• tr,	'')	I  	N"...-	7
1 k • . Sc\t: A:yr
4 	, .1	• •i,	.„._..i	' .1	.,I..	.
q1/4 l  	1	-	. 4. .	t	Ll.•	'...	•	7.,:' • . •
'	'	\	I .	I	:	..	1 • • I, ...IS:.	.
r	1	r.'	r. 7 •	.
	t'	'''	:'	%.•	/r11 1	i , t ?11........	r, \ \ 0	1.,,..,i5,	-, ‘?• ‘11;
	xil .;),-'- il. . - •------- 	' t i ;;;. `	Z,i4i
- ,
4 :	,,..„,•	_ . ,..:	Ar ••.e. .t..


JAPANESE CELEBRATION OF THE MUKDEN VICTORY



CHAPTI
THE END OF RUS
BY CAPTAIN A. T. MA
,	. HE Battle of the Japan Sea resulted from the wish
T
        of Russia to overthrow the naval control which has enabled the island Empire of Japan to sustain her land warfare upon the continent of Asia. Preliminary to this struggle, it was desirable that the fleet despatched for the purpose, under Admiral Rojestvensky, should reach Vladivostok. There it could refit after its long voyage, and there leave in security the train of supply ships which had been the necessary accompaniment of so distant an expedition.
    After the junction of a second division under Admiral Nebogatoff, the whole Russian fleet moved northward, passing between the Philippine Islands and Formosa. Rojestvensky thus left open to doubt, and retained in his hands the decision, whether he would seek his port by the Straits of Korea, or, circumnavigating the main island of Japan, pass through the Straits of Tsugaru, opposite Vladivostok. It may be presumed he was as ignorant as the rest of the world just where Togo was ; but he knew that, whether in the Straits of Korea or of Tsugaru, he would have to fight, if Togo chose, as he probably would. He' decided to take the most direct and shortest route through the Korean Channel.
    Toga awaited him there; at what particular point is immaterial, for the Straits are but sixty miles wide, which space is halved by the Island of Tsushima, whence the Straits have the alternate name—Tsushima. In such narrow waters,

KR XIII
SIA'S SEA POWER
.1-1AN, U. S. N., RETIRED
wherever the Japanese Admiral might be, he was certain, by an extensive scouting system, to receive notice timely enough to ensure intercepting his enemy. The notice came by wire-less telegraphy early on Saturday, May 27, from cruisers off Quelpaert Island, 5o miles southwest of Tsushima; and as the Russian fleet, heading for Vladivostok, drew up with Tsushima, the Japanese battleships were seen rounding its northern point. As regards the position of the Russian ships, it seems certain, that, upon sighting the enemy, they formed in two columns of vessels. One contained the armored ships, a very heterogeneous assembly in size and qualities, composed of battleships of the first and second class, armored cruisers, and coast-defence ironclads. The second column was of lighter cruisers. This took the left hand, toward Tsushima, while the battleships were on the right, toward Japan. At the head of the battle column were three battleships ; two of the first order of strength, 13,516 tons, the third of io,000 tons, between them.
    Admiral Togo divided his principal force of fighting ships into two squadrons. One, of four battleships and two armored cruisers, he kept under his own immediate direction. The other, of six armored cruisers, which are battleships of superior swiftness, but somewhat lighter armor and armament, was intrusted to Admiral Kami-mura. The first of these approached from the north of

THE END OF RU
'Tsushima; the second, and faster, followed a little later from
round its southern end. The head of the Russian battle
column received the weight of the Japanese fire, and the
superior speed of the latter enabled them so to choose their
positions as to keep their fire concentrated on these leading
ships. Kamimura's attack was on the rear, and after that the
battle soon became general. There was also a third Japanese
squadron, of vessels not belonging to the armored fleet.
These alone had been shown by Togo, until the Russian was
committed to the passage of the Straits. They are said now
to have attacked the other side of the Russian column. In
brief, while Togo threw the weight of his force upon the
head of the .enemy's order, he provided that the remainder
should be so occupied as not to render serious assistance.
There was a strong breeze from southwest with a heavy
sea. This favored the Japanese, because of their longer ex
perience and better training in the use of their guns when the
ships were in violent motion. This disadvantage of the Rus
sians was increased by the rolling of their vesse.ls, exposing the
underwater body, giving the Japanese a target more easily
pierced, and the holes from which are more dangerous.
Through the five hours oldaylight the contest was purely one
of gunnery under the conditions named: concentration upon
the head of the Russian columns, and heavy sea. The result
was twofold. The head of the column, beaten down by
superior gunfire, was disordered; and individual ships, pierced
below water, filled and sank. As described, the Japanese,
keeping ahead of their enemy, forced them to change direc
tion ; but this by no means need follow, were the Russians
holding their own in the gunnery contest. Had they given

SSIA'S SEA POWER
as good as they got, there was no reason why they should forsake their course. The disorder, thus occasioned in the front, was transmitted to the ships which followed; and there ensued the confusion which is the sure precursor of defeat.
   Upon this scene night fell. Of the Russians, three battleships and two others had already been sunk. Then came the time and opportunity for the torpedo vessels; darkness, and an enemy both crippled and broken. By a singular coincidence, the wind which in its strength favored the Japanese gunners—an advantage which they had earned and deserved—now fell somewhat; and with it fell the sea, rendering easier the work of the torpedo craft. This is one of the chances of war. Of the scenes of that night we as yet have little description, and from the fearful loss of life we possibly may never know enough justly to estimate the difficulties of the defence of the routed ships, or the degree of resistance experienced by the assailants. From Japanese sources we have heard that, under all the disadvantages of the Russians, some attacks were successfully repelled; and three torpedo destroyers were sunk. That pursuit continued to the Liancourt Rocks, 200 miles from the scene of the battle, indicates that, had not superior gunnery already won a decisive victory, the torpedo alone would scarcely so Kaye reduced the Russian fleet as to leave the Japanese the secure mastery they now possess of the waters which constitute their vital line of communications.
   The captured ships were the battleships “Orel" and cg Emperor Nicholas 1," the coast-defence vessels “General Admiral Apraxine " and c4 Admiral Seniavin," and the destroyer " Bedovy." Six battleships, five cruisers, one coast-defence ship, three destroyers, and a repair ship were sunk.


alft
-	111111111.1.1111111"1"111.11”1"._	'-'";;;;	7.
.	- 
TILE SECOND SQUADRON OF THE BALTIC FLEET JUST BEFORE IT SAILED FROM KRONSTADT

THE LITTLE ARMORED GUNBOAT KHRABRI"	THE FAST ARMORED CRUISER "SVIETLA NA **
Built in 1890; of 1499 tons, has one 9-inch, one 6-inch, eight Q. F. guns, and two torpedo tubes	Built in 1898; has six 5.9 Q. F. Cutlets, ten 1.8-inch guns, four torpedo tubes, and a speed of 20.2 knots
FIGHTING SHIPS OF VARIOUS CLASSES IN RUSSIA'S BALTIC FLEET
253


THE BATTLESHIP " EMPEROR ALEXANDER II "
An old boat, built in ma: armed with two Winch. four il-ineli. eight (1-inch, twenty-four smaller guns, and flve torpedo tubes
THE BA'rTLESHIP "SISSOI VEL1KY "
Built in INC of 8.800 tons. has four 12-ineh. six 6-inch Q. F., eighteen smaller Q. F.. and six torpedo tubes	Built i
FORMIDABLE FIGHTING SHIPS OF RI

THE POWERFUL BATTLESHIP " OSLABYA "
1898: of 12,374 tons, has four 10-ineh, eleven 0-inch Q. F.. sixteen S•inch, twenty-seven smaller guns. and six torpedo tubes

THE FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP " BORODINO"
n 1901; of 13,400 tons, has four 12-inch, twelve 3-inch Q. F., twenty 3-inch, many smaller guns, and six torpedo tubes
JSSIA'S BALTIC FLEET

GEORGES PLANCON.Serreinry	CONSTARTINE NABAKOFF,Sarrethry	SERGIIIS DE WITTE, PlonlpoLealfnry	BARON nF, ROSEN. Plaaipolewaare	IVAN KOROSTOVFT. E.

APACHI, $ectetary	Steretary	BAROiti	BOGOR° TANA IIIRA,likltehliary
THE PEACE COMMISSION IN SESSION AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.


* eng-I,Vann--('hem;. June	10. Fengshuiling, June	11. Motienling, July	19. At Anping in August	M. Towan battleground, August	14. Liao-Yang, September	15. Port Arthur in November	10. Mukden captured, March, 1005
THE BATTLEGROUND OF THE WAR AND THE VICTORIOUS PROGRESS OF THE JAPANESE



Home