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Title: The Art of Cookery - Made Easy and Refined
Author: Mollard, John
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "The Art of Cookery - Made Easy and Refined" ***

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Internet Archive)



    THE
    ART OF COOKERY
    _MADE EASY AND REFINED_.


[Transcriber's Notes: Text that was superscripted in the original is
framed as w^{th.}. Spelling in this text is fluid and archaic. Changes
made are noted in the list at the end of this text.]

THE ART OF COOKERY _MADE EASY AND REFINED_;

COMPRISING

AMPLE DIRECTIONS FOR PREPARING EVERY ARTICLE REQUISITE FOR FURNISHING
THE TABLES

OF THE

NOBLEMAN, GENTLEMAN, AND TRADESMAN.

BY

JOHN MOLLARD, COOK;

    Lately one of the Proprietors of Freemasons' Tavern, Great
    Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields; now removed to
    Dover Street, Piccadilly, formerly THOMAS'S.

    _SECOND EDITION._

    _LONDON_:

    PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR,
    AND SOLD BY J. NUNN, GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S
    INN FIELDS, AND ALL BOOKSELLERS IN TOWN
    AND COUNTRY.

    1802.
    _T. Bensley, Bolt Court, Fleet Street._



PREFACE.


THE mode of cookery which the author of the following sheets has pursued
for a series of years having obtained the most distinguished approbation
of the public, has induced him to commit his practice to paper; in doing
which, a deviation has been made from the usual introductory methods of
other treatises of the kind, in omitting to give particular directions
for the choice of fish, meats, poultry, and vegetables, and at what
times they respectively might be in season, &c. &c. the author
conceiving the simpler method to be the most acceptable: and,
therefore, as actual knowledge must ever supersede written forms, he
would advise a frequent attendance at the different markets, fully
assured that experience will convey greater instruction in marketing
than all the theories which could be advanced. There are, nevertheless,
some useful observations interspersed in the course of the work for that
purpose; the author having confined himself chiefly to the practical
part of cookery; he has also given some directions in a branch of the
confectionary business: in both of which it has been his constant
endeavour that they might be rendered as simple and easy as possible,
and that economy might pervade the whole.

The receipts are written for the least possible quantities in the
different made-dishes and sauces, it being a frequent error in most of
the books that they are too expensive and too long; by which means the
art has been rendered intricate in the extreme, both in theory and
practice.

Independent, also, of a close adherence to any given rules, there are
other qualities essential to the completion of a thorough cook; such as,
an acute taste, a fertile invention, and a rigid attention to
cleanliness.

The preceding hints and subsequent directions, it is hoped, will prove
fully adequate to perfection in cookery; the work being entirely
divested of the many useless receipts from other professions, (which
have been uniformly introduced in books of the like nature,) and
nothing inserted but what has an immediate reference to the art itself.

There is prefixed a Bill of Fare for each month in the year, as a
specimen of the seasons, which may be altered as judgment directs. There
is annexed, also, at the end of the volume, an Index, by which, from the
first letter or word of the different articles, will be found their
respective receipts.

    February 2d, 1802.



CONTENTS.

                                                         PAGE
  Beef stock                                                1

  Veal stock, for soups                                   ib.

  Consumé, or the essence of meat                           2

  Cullis, or a thick gravy                                ib.

  Liquid of colour for sauces, &c.                          3

  Benshamelle                                               4

  To make a passing of flour and butter for cullis
  or benshamelle                                          ib.

  Soup a la reine                                           5

  Crayfish soup                                           ib.

  Vermicelli soup (white)                                   6

  To make a leason                                        ib.

  Cleared brown stock for gravy soups                     ib.

  Rice soup                                                 7

  Celery soup                                               8

  Turnip soup                                             ib.

  Cressey soup                                            ib.

  Santé, or spring soup                                     9

  Onion soup                                               10

  Green peas soup                                         ib.

  Old peas soup                                            11

  Peas soup another way                                    12

  Giblet soup                                              13

  Fish Meagré soup                                         14

  Mock turtle of calf's head                              ib.

  Mutton broth                                             15

  Real turtle                                              16

  Callipee                                                 19

  Glaize for hams, larding, roasted poultry, &c.           20

  Fish plain boiled, how to be prepared                    21

  Fish generally fried                                     22
  ---- to prepare for frying, &c.                          23

  Broiled fish, how prepared                              ib.
  ------ salmon ditto                                      24
  ------ mackarel, common way                              25

  To stew fish                                            ib.

  Water souchée of perch, flounders, soles, eels, &c.      26

  Roasted pike or sturgeon                                ib.

  Bacquillio with herbs                                    27

  Entrée of eels                                           28
  ------ of soles                                         ib.
  ------ of whitings, &c.                                  29
  ------ of salmon                                        ib.
  ------ of smelts, &c.                                    30
  ------ of mackarel                                       31

  Mackarel the german way                                 ib.

  Olios, or a spanish dish                                 32

  The olio, how to be made                                 34

  Hodge podge, or english olio                             36

  Light forcemeat for pies or fowls, &c.                   38

  Forcemeat balls for ragouts, &c.                        ib.

  Egg for balls                                            39

  Omlets of eggs for garnishing or cutting in slips       ib.

  Ox cheek                                                 40

  Beef tails                                               41

  Haricot sauce                                            41

  Beef collops                                             42

  Fillet of beef larded                                   ib.

  Beef palates                                             43

  Rump of beef a-la-daube, or braised                     ib.

  To make Spanish onion sauce                              44

  Savoy sauce                                             ib.

  Ashée sauce                                              45

  Brisket of beef with Spanish onions                     ib.
  ------- with ashée or haricot                            46

  Rump of beef a-la mode                                  ib.

  Baked beef                                               47

  Marrow bones                                             48

  Mutton rumps marinated                                  ib.

  To make marinate                                         49

  Haricot mutton cutlets                                  ib.

  Fillet of mutton with cucumbers                          50

  Stewed cucumbers                                        ib.

  Mutton cutlets with potatoes                             51
  ------ a la Maintenon                                    52

  Cutlets a la Irish stew                                  53

  Pork cutlets with red or white cabbage                  ib.

  To stew cabbage                                          54

  Pork cutlets with robert sauce                          ib.

  To make robert sauce                                     55

  Pork cutlets another way                                ib.

  Fillet of pork roasted                                   56

  Pigs feet and ears                                      ib.

  To prepare pigs feet and ears                            57

  Compotte of pigeons                                     ib.

  Pigeons a la craupidine                                  58

  Pigeons glaized                                          59

  Pigeons a la sousell                                    ib.

  Hashed calf's head                                       60

  Breast of veal en gallentine                             61

  Breast of veal ragout                                   ib.

  Neck of veal en erison                                   62

  Neck of veal larded                                      63

  Veal cutlets larded                                     ib.

  Loin of veal a la cream                                  64

  Veal tendrons (brown or white)                           65

  Celery sauce, (white), for veal, chickens, turkies,&c.   66

  Celery sauce, (brown), for pullets, &c.                 ib.

  Veal cutlets au natural                                  67

  Veal collops (brown)                                    ib.
  ------------ (white)                                     68

  Fricando veal                                            69

  Sorrel sauce                                            ib.

  Veal olives                                              70

  Breast of veal with oysters                             ib.

  Lamb's head minced                                       71

  Breast of lamb with benshamelle                          72

  Breast or tendrons of lamb en matelote                  ib.
  ------ of lamb with peas                                 73

  To stew peas for sauce, for lamb, veal, chickens, &c.   ib.

  Lamb cutlets with cucumbers                              74

  Neck of lamb glaized                                     75

  Onion sauce                                             ib.

  Lamb cutlets with tendrons                              ib.

  Turnip sauce                                             76

  Lamb cutlets with tendrons another way                   77

  Shoulder of lamb glaized                                 77
  ---------------- en epigram                              78
  ---------------- grilled                                ib.

  Hind quarter of lamb marinated                           79
  -------------------- with spinach                        80

  Leg of lamb with oysters                                ib.

  Currie                                                   81

  Plain rice to be eaten with currie                       82

  Currie of lobster                                        83
  ----- of veal                                           ib.
  ------ of mutton                                        ib.

  Pig's head currie                                        84

  Directions for roasting                                 ib.

  Soup for a family                                        85

  To prepare a haunch of venison, or mutton, for
        roasting                                           86

  To roast woodcocks or snipes                             87
  -------- larks                                           88

  To fry breadcrumbs                                      ib.

  To roast turkies                                         89
  -------- rabbits                                        ib.
  -------- hares                                          ib.
  -------- hares another way                              ib.
  -------- pigeons                                         90
  -------- quails, or ruffs and rees                      ib.
  -------- guinea fowls, pea fowls, pullets, chickens,
        and turkey poults                                  91
  -------- wild fowl                                      ib.
  -------- partridges and pheasants                       ib.
  -------- green geese and ducklings                      ib.
  -------- other geese and tame ducks                      92
  -------- a pig                                           92
  -------- sweetbreads                                     93
  -------- ribs of beef                                   ib.
  -------- fillet of veal                                 ib.

  Observations on meat and poultry                         94

  Stuffing for turkies, hares, veal, &c.                  ib.

  Gravy for roast meat, steaks, and poultry                95

  Peloe of rice                                           ib.
  ------------- another way                                96

  Timbol of rice                                           97

  Petit patties of chicken and ham                         98

  Patties of lobsters or oysters                           99

  Forcemeat patties                                       ib.

  Pulpton of chicken, rabbits, &c.                        100

  Fishmeagre pie                                          101

  Raised ham pie, with directions for making a
        raised crust                                      102

  Raised chicken pie                                      103

  Flat chicken pie (or tourte)                            ib.

  Pigeon pie                                              104

  Raised turkey pie with a tongue                         105
  ------ macaroni pie                                     106
  ------ beef steak pie                                   ib.

  Veal pie                                                107

  Pork pie                                                108

  Eel pie                                                 109

  Mutton pie                                              ib.

  Sea pie                                                 110

  Rissoles                                                ib.

  To fry parsley                                          111

  Puffs with chicken, &c.                                 ib.

  Wings and legs of fowls with colours                    112
  ----- larded and glaized                                113

  Fowl a la Menehout                                      114

  Pulled chicken (or turkey)                              ib.

  Another way                                             115

  Pullet a la Memorancy                                   ib.

  Chickens with lemon sauce                               116

  To make lemon sauce                                     ib.

  Fricassee of chickens or rabbits (white)                117

  Chickens or turkies with celery                         118

  Turkies, pullets, or chickens, with oyster sauce        ib.

  To make white oyster sauce                              ib.

  Chickens with peas                                 119, 120

  Fricassee of chickens or rabbits (brown)                ib.

  To fry oysters for a dish                               121

  Directions for poultry, &c. plain boiled                ib.

  Jugged hare                                             122

  Glaized hare                                            123

  Duck aux naves                                          ib.

  A duck with cucumbers                                   124
  ------ a la benshamelle                                 125

  Hashed mutton                                           ib.
  ------ venison                                          126
  ------ fowls                                            127
  ------ hare, wild fowl, pheasants, or partridges        128

  Broiled beef steaks                                     ib.

  Beef steak pudding                                      129

  Oyster sauce for beef steaks                            130

  To dress mutton, lamb, or pork chops in a plain
        manner                                            ib.

  To dress veal cutlets                                   131

  Minced veal for a dish                                  ib.
  ----------- another way                                 132

  Partridges or pheasants au choux                        ib.
  ----------------------- with truffles                   133

  Turkey with truffles                                    134

  Truffle sauce for turkies, &c.                          ib.

  Turkey with chesnuts                                    135
  ------ with ragout                                      136

  Rabbits with onions                                     ib.

  Glaized sweetbreads                                     137

  Matelote of rabbits                                     ib.

  Sweetbreads en erison                                   138

  Stewed giblets plain                                    ib.
  ------ with peas                                        139

  Green truffles for a dish                               ib.

  Rabbits en gallentine for a dish                        140

  Ham braised                                             ib.

  Jerusalem artichokes stewed                             141
  -------------------- another way                        142

  Mashed potatoes                                         ib.

  Cauliflower with parmezan cheese                        143
  ----------- a la sauce                                  ib.
  ----------- a la cream                                  144

  Stewed artichoke bottoms                                ib.

  French beans a la cream for a dish                      145

  Stewed cardoons                                         ib.

  Vegetables in a mould                                   146

  Broiled mushrooms                                       147

  Stewed mushrooms (brown) and (white)               147, 148

  Mashed turnips                                          ib.

  Potatoes creamed                                        149

  Stewed watercresses                                     ib.

  A neat dish of vegetables                               150

  Vegetable pie                                           ib.

  Fried potatoes                                          151

  Fried onions with parmezan cheese                       152

  Pickle tongue forced                                    153

  Stewed endive                                           ib.

  Forced cucumbers                                        154

  To stew peas for a dish                                 ib.

  Salad of asparagus                                      155

  Asparagus peas                                          ib.
  --------- another way                                   156

  Stewed asparagus for sauce                              157

  Directions for vegetables                               ib.

  Pickled oysters                                         158

  Oyster atlets                                           159

  Scollop oysters                                         160

  Oyster loaves                                           161

  Ragout of sweetbreads (brown)                           ib.
  --------------------- (white)                           162

  Poached eggs with forrel or endive                      163

  Buttered eggs                                           ib.

  Fried eggs, &c.                                         164

  Eggs a la trip                                          165

  Omlet of eggs                                           ib.

  Fricassee of tripe                                      167

  Lambs tails and ears                                    ib.

  Curried atlets                                          168

  To stew maccaroni                                       169

  Stewed cheese                                           ib.

  To prepare a batter for frying different articles,
        being a sufficient quantity for one dish          170

  Fried celery                                            ib.
  ----- peths                                             171
  ----- sweetbreads                                       ib.
  ----- artichoke bottoms                                 ib.
  ----- tripe and onions                                  172

  Hard eggs fried                                         ib.

  To dress a lamb's fry                                   173
  --------------------- another way                       ib.

  Puffs with forcemeat of vegetables                      ib.

  Rammequins                                              174

  To dress part of a wild boar                            175

  Plovers eggs, to be served up different ways            176

  Buttered lobsters                                       ib.

  Meat cake                                               177

  Collared pig                                            178

  Red beef for slices                                     179

  Savory jelly                                            180

  Aspect of fish                                          181
  ------ of meat or fowl                                  182

  Canopies                                                183

  Salmagundy                                              ib.

  Salad of lobster                                        184

  French salad                                            185

  Blancmange                                              ib.

  Dutch blancmange                                        186

  Riband blancmange                                       187

  Cleared calves feet jelly                               ib.

  Marbrée jelly                                           188

  Bagnets a l'eau                                         189

  Apple fritters for a dish                               190

  Golden pippins a la cream                               191
  -------------- another way                              192

  Stewed pippins another way                              193

  Cream for pies                                          193

  Mince meat                                              194

  Compote of oranges                                      195

  Tea cream                                               196

  Virgin cream                                            197

  Coffee cream                                            ib.

  Burnt cream                                             ib.

  Pastry cream                                            198

  Almond paste                                            ib.

  Cheese cakes                                            199

  Almond nuts                                             200

  To make syllabub                                        ib.

  Trifle                                                  201

  Tarts or tartlets                                       202

  Paste for stringing tartlets                            ib.

  To stew apples for tarts                                203

  Fried puffs with sweetmeats                             204

  Pyramid paste                                           ib.

  Icing for a cake                                        206

  Cherries in brandy for desserts                         ib.

  To make buns                                            207

  Orgeat                                                  ib.

  Orange marmalade                                        208

  Raspberry jam                                           209

  Quince jam                                              210

  Green gage jam                                          ib.

  Apricot jam                                             211

  Preserved apricots for tarts or desserts                ib.

  Currant jelly                                           212

  Crisp tart paste                                        213

  Eggs and bacon another way                              ib.

  To make puff paste                                      214
  ------- an almond cake                                  215

  Almond custards                                         216

  Rhubarb tart                                            ib.

  Orange pudding                                          217

  Rice pudding                                            218

  Tansey pudding                                          219

  Almond pudding                                          ib.

  Marrow pudding                                          220

  Bread pudding                                           ib.

  A rich plum pudding                                     221

  Batter pudding                                          ib.

  Boiled apple pudding                                    222

  Apple dumplings                                         223

  Baked apple pudding                                     ib.

  Damson pudding                                          224
  -------------- another way                              ib.

  Baked fruit pudding another way                         225

  Muffin pudding with dried cherries                      226

  Potatoe pudding                                         227

  Carrot pudding                                          ib.

  Ice cream                                               228

  Observation on stores                                   ib.

  Partridge soup                                          229

  Collared eels                                           230

  White puddings                                          231

  Sausage meat                                            232

  Calf's liver roasted                                    233

  To dry herbs                                            ib.

  To make anchovie liquor to be used in fish sauces       234

  Potted lobster                                          ib.

  To clarify butter for potting                           235

  Potted cheese                                           236
  ------ veal                                             236
  ------ larks or small birds                             237

  To dry morells, mushrooms, and champignons              238

  Mushroom powder                                         ib.

  Potted beef                                             239

  Tarragon vinegar                                        ib.

  Walnut ketchup for fish sauces                          240

  To pickle tongues, &c.                                  ib.

  India pickle                                            241

  To dry artichoke bottoms                                243

  To pickle cucumbers, &c.                                244

  Rules to be observed in pickling                        245

  To pickle onions                                        246
  --------- mushrooms                                     ib.
  --------- beet roots                                    247
  --------- artichoke bottoms                             248
  --------- large cucumbers                               249
  --------- red cabbage                                   250
  --------- currants                                      251
  --------- barberries                                    ib.

  Sour crout                                              252

  Peas pudding, to be eaten with boiled pork              253

  Currie, or pepper water                                 254

  Grills and sauce, which are generally eaten after
        dinner                                            255

  Salmé of woodcocks                                      256

  To make a haggess                                       ib.

  French black puddings                                   257

  Milk punch                                              258

  Plum pottage                                            259

  Candied orange or lemon peels                           260

  Lemonade or orangeade                                   261

  Poivrade sauce for game, Maintenon cutlets, &c.         261

  Lobster sauce for fish                                  262

  Oyster sauce for fish                                   263

  Shrimp sauce for fish                                   264

  Dutch sauce for fish                                    ib.

  Anchovie sauce for fish                                 265

  Observations in respect of fish sauces, &c.             ib.

  Apple sauce, for pork, geese, &c.                       267

  Green sauce for ducklings or green geese                268

  Fennel sauce for mackarel                               ib.

  Bread sauce, for turkies, game, &c.                     269

  Melted butter                                           ib.

  To make melon citron                                    270

  Rusks, or tops and bottoms                              271

  Wafers                                                  ib.

  Cracknels                                               272

  To bake pears                                           273

  To clarify sugar                                        ib.

  Syrup of cloves, &c.                                    274
  ----- golden pippins                                    275
  ----- capillaire                                        276

  Flowers in sugar                                        ib.

  Syrup of roses                                          277

  To preserve cucumbers                                   ib.
  ----------- currants                                    278
  ----------- barberries                                  279

  Gooseberry fool                                         280

  Sago                                                    281

  Oatmeal pottage, or gruel                               ib.

  To bottle gooseberries, &c. for tarts                   282
  ----------------------- another way                     283

  Small cakes                                             ib.

  Diet bread cake                                         284

  Sponge biscuits                                         ib.

  Common seed cake                                        285

  Cinnamon cakes                                          ib.

  To make red colouring for pippin paste, &c. for
        garnishing twelfth cakes                          286

  Twelfth cakes                                           ib.

  Bristol cakes                                           287

  Hyde park corner cakes                                  288

  Good gingerbread nuts                                   ib.

  Bride cake                                              289

  Rice cakes                                              290

  Bath cakes                                              291

  Pancakes                                                ib.

  Shrewsbury cakes                                        292

  Portugal cakes, or heart cakes                          293

  Macaroons                                               ib.

  Mirangles                                               294

  Ratafias                                                295

  Lemon puffs                                             ib.

  Chantilly basket                                        296

  Green codlins, frosted with sugar                       297

  Pound cake                                              ib.

  Yest cake                                               298

  Rich plum cake                                          299

  Dried cherries                                          300

  Pippins with rice                                       301

  To make English bread                                   ib.

  French bread                                            302

  Pulpton of apples                                       303

  A sweet omlet of eggs                                   304

  To keep cucumbers for winter use for sauces             ib.

  To preserve mushrooms for sauces                        305

  Pullet roasted with batter                              ib.

  Dutch beef                                              306

  Mushroom ketchup                                        ib.

  Suet pudding                                            307

  Savoy cake                                              308

  Nutmeg syrup                                            ib.

  Sweetbreads with veal and ham                           309

  Essence of ham for sauces                               310

  Ox heart roasted                                        ib.

  Slices of cod fried with oysters                        311

  Small crusts to be eaten with cheese or wine after
        dinner                                            ib.

  Devilled almonds                                        312

  Boiled tripe and onions                                 ib.
  ------ sweetbreads                                      313

  Broiled sweetbreads                                     ib.

  Conclusion, with remarks                                314



ERRATA.

  Page  43, line 1 and 2, for _beef pallets_ read _beef palates_.
  ----  61, ----    19,   ---- _half_ read _halves_.
  ----  77, ----    17,   ---- _tarragon of vinegar_ read _tarragon
                                    vinegar_.
  ---- 177, ----    18,   ---- _pickled_ read _picked_.
  ---- 183, ----    19,   ---- _solomongundy_ read _salmagundy_.

[Illustration:

For January.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Soup Santé_
    _Small Ham_
    _Tendlons Veal white_
    _Slises Crimp'd Cod_
    _M^{d.} & whole Potatoes_
    _Rump Beef glaiz^{d} w^{th.} Harricott_
    _Brocoli_
    _Whitings Broil'd_
    _Pullet w^{th.} Oyster Sauce_
    _Raiz'd Lamb Pies_
    _Mock'd Turtle_


2^{d.} Course

    _Wood Cocks Roast._
    _Scollop Shells_
    _Stew'd Mushrooms_
    _Apple Fritters_
    _Triffle_
    _Shellfish in an Ornamented Ba^{s.}_
    _Jelly_
    _Fry'd Puffs w^{th.} Sweetmeats_
    _Stew'd Cardoons_
    _Omlett w^{th.} Cullis_
    _Partridges Roast._

Neele Sc. Strand]


[Illustration: FEBRUARY.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Soup Cressey_
    _Frieandd Veal w^{th.} Sorrell_
    _Petite Patties_
    _Tongue w^{th.} M^{d.} Turnips_
    _Fillet Mutton Roasted w^{th.} Celleri_
    _Chickens Boil'd_
    _Beef Pallets_
    _Cutlets Pork w^{th.} Stew'd red Cabbage_
    _Rice Soup_

    _Crimp'd Seaite_ }
                     } _to remove Soup_
    _Water Soucher_  }


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Capon Roasted_
    _Golding Pippins Cream'd_
    _Lobster Sallad_
    _Forc'd Asparagus_
    _Sweetbread Roast_
    _Forc'd French Beans_
    _Slic'd Brawn_
    _Teal Roast_
    _Ribband Blancmange_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: MARCH.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Soup and Boullie_
    _Soles Fry'd and Boild_
    _Crimp'd Cods Head_
    _Soup ala Reine_

_2^{d.} Course_

    _Fillet Pork Roast._
    _Harricott of Begetables_
    _Potatoes Mash'd_
    _French Pie_
    _Mash'd Turnips_
    _Veal Olives_
    _Leg Lamb and Spinach_

_3^{d.} Course_

    _Turkey Roast._
    _Marbree Jelly_
    _Tourte_
    _Brocoli ala Sauce_
    _Pick'd Crabb_
    _Sausages_
    _Pyrimid of Paste_
    _Large Pidgeons Roast._
    _Pippins w^{th.} Rice_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: APRIL.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Mock'd Turtle_
    _Tongue Boild &c._
    _Chickens w^{th.} Sweetbreads White_
    _Sallad_
    _Beef Forc'd and Roasted w^{th.} Oy^{s.} Sauce_
    _Rice_
    _Currie_
    _Vermiceli Soup_
    _Cutlets Lamb_

    _Crimp'd Salmon & Fry'd Smelts_ }
                                    } _to remove Soup_
    _Stew'd Tench_                  }


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Levrett Roast_
    _Apricot tart w^{th.} Carrimel_
    _Dutch Blancmange_
    _Stew'd Cellery_
    _Prawnes_
    _Mushrooms Broild_
    _Almond Cake_
    _Ducklings Roast._
    _Apple Tart_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: MAY

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Giblet Soup_
    _Mullets Broild_
    _Turbot_
    _Spring Soup_


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Haunch Mutton roast_
    _Potatoes Each way_
    _Compotte of Pidgeons_
    _Chickens_
    _Beef Tails Stew'd_
    _Ham Glaiz'd_
    _Vegetable Puffs Fry'd_


_3^{d.} Course_

    _Green Goose Roast_
    _Jelly w^{th.} Strawberrys_
    _Asparagus_
    _Pine Apple Tartlets_
    _Goosberry Tart_
    _Artichoack Bottoms_
    _White Blancmange_
    _Turkey Poults Roast_
    _Ornament w^{th.} Flowers_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: JUNE.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Green Peas Soup_
    _Chicken Tourte_
    _Cutlets Mutton_
    _Cauliflowers_
    _Roast Beef_
    _New Potatoes_
    _Tendlons Veal w^{th.} Peas_
    _Crimp'd Trout_
    _Lambs Head Minc'd_

_2^{d.} Course_

    _Duckling Roast._
    _Shellfish_
    _Cherry Tart_
    _French Beans ala Cream_
    _Sweetbread Roast._
    _Jelly & Blancmange_
    _Neck House Lamb Roast._
    _Codling tart Cream'd_
    _Green Peas_
    _Plovers Eggs_
    _Pidgeons Roast._

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: JULY.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Rabbits w^{th.} Onions_
    _Turtle_
    _Chickens_
    _Garden Beans_
    _Calla Pash_
    _Cauliflower_
    _Small Ham Glaiz'd_
    _Turtle_
    _Fillet Lamb w^{th.} Cucumbers_

    _2 Small dishes Fish
    to remove Turtle_


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Goosberry Cream in Cups_
    _Haunch Venison roast_
    _Apricot Tart_
    _French Beans_
    _Pick'd Crabb_
    _Artichoak Bottoms_
    _Raspberry Tourte_
    _Poullet roast._
    _Mirangles_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: AUGUST.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Soles Each way_
    _Brest Lamb w^{th.} Celleri_
    _Pullet w^{th.} Oy^{s.}_
    _Potatoes_
    _Onion Soup_
    _Stew'd Spanish Onions_
    _Fillet Beef Larded & Glaiz'd_
    _Salmon & Fry'd Fillets of Haddock_
    _Raiz'd Ham Pie_

    _Small Chine Mutton Roasted to remove the Soup_


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Wheat Ears roast_
    _Orange Puffs_
    _Jelly w^{th.} Peaches_
    _Scollop Shells_
    _Frame_
    _Mushrooms Stew'd White_
    _Almond Custards_
    _Levrett Roast_
    _Pulpton of Apples_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: SEPTEMBER.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _a Pike Baked_
    _Fricassee of Chickens_
    _Fillet Mutton & Stew'd Endive_
    _Fry'd Celleri_
    _Turnip Soup_
    _French Sallad_
    _Fillet Pork Roast_
    _Crimp'd Cod and Fry'd Smelts_
    _Cutlets Veal Larded_


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Partridges Roast_
    _Ragout of Sweetbreads_
    _Maceroni_
    _Muffing pud^{g.} w^{th.} dry'd Cherries_
    _Chantillie Baskett_
    _Damson Tart_
    _Eggs ala Trip_
    _Larks Roast_
    _Lambs Fry_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: OCTOBER.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Johndoree_
    _Pidgeons ala Craupidine_
    _Foule w^{th.} Trouffles Sauce_
    _Cauliflower_
    _Partridge Soup_
    _Stew'd Spinach_
    _Chicken Puffs_
    _Trout_
    _Rump Beef w^{th.} Spanish Onions_


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Wild Duck Roast_
    _Raspberry Tourte_
    _Jellys_
    _Fry'd Sweetbreads_
    _Ribs House Lamb Roast_
    _Oyster Attets_
    _Apples Frosted_
    _Pheasant Roast_
    _Marrow Pud^{g.}_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: NOVEMBER.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Water Souchee_
    _Pickle Tongue Forc'd_
    _Raiz'd Pie w^{th.} Macroni_
    _Ragout of Vegetables_
    _Soup and Boullie_
    _Cauliflower & French Beans_
    _Chickens w^{th.} Bershamelle_
    _Slices Cod Fry'd w^{th.} Oyster Sauce_
    _Cutlets Pork w^{th.} Fry'd Potatoes_

    _Loine Veale ala Cream to remove Soup_


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Wood Cocks Roast_
    _Fritters_
    _Coffee Cream_
    _Jerusalem Artichoaks_
    _Potted Beef Moddled_
    _Stew'd Water Cresses_
    _Preserved Apricot Tart_
    _Partridges Roast_
    _Golding Pippins w^{th.} Jelly_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]


[Illustration: DECEMBER.

_1^{st.} Course_

    _Turbot_
    _Leg Lamb w^{th.} Spinach_
    _Wings and Legs Fowles Glaiz'd_
    _Pidgeon Tourte_
    _Hodge Podge_
    _Pickled Beet Roots_
    _Pheasant Au Choux_
    _Crimp'd Cods Head_
    _Small Chine Mutton Roast_


_2^{d.} Course_

    _Turkey Roast_
    _Apple Tart w^{th.} Perfumed Cream_
    _Potted Charr_
    _Pancakes_
    _Stew'd Cardoons Brown_
    _Jellies_
    _Lambs Tails w^{th.} Bershamelle_
    _Minced Pies_
    _Prawnes_
    _Potatoe Pudding_
    _Snipes Roast_

_Neele Sc. Strand_]



THE

ART OF COOKERY.


_Beef Stock._

CUT chuck beef into pieces, put it into a pot, set it on the fire, with
a sufficient quantity of water to cover it. When it boils skim it clean;
add a bunch of parsley and thyme, cleaned carrots, leeks, onions,
turnips, celery, and a little salt. Let the meat boil till tender, skim
off the fat, then strain it through a fine hair sieve.


_Veal Stock, for Soups._

TAKE a leg of veal and some lean ham, cut them into pieces, put them
into a pan with a quart of water, some peeled carrots, turnips, onions,
leeks, and celery; draw them down till nearly tender, but of no colour;
then add a sufficient quantity of beef stock to cover the ingredients,
boil all together one hour, skim it free from fat, and strain it. Some
game drawn down with it will make it excellent.

N. B. I have directed the veal stock not to be drawn down to a colour,
as in that state it will answer two purposes; first, for white soups;
and, secondly, as it might be coloured with a bright liquid to any
height, which will be directed for gravy soups. It frequently happens,
likewise, that, if not strictly attended to, it will burn.


_Consumé, or the Essence of Meat._

REDUCE veal stock to a good consistence, but be careful not to let it
colour.


_Cullis, or a thick Gravy._

TAKE slices of ham, veal, celery, carrots, turnips, onions, leeks, a
small bunch of sweet herbs, some allspice, black pepper, mace, a piece
of lemon-peel, and two bay leaves; put them into a pan with a quart of
water, and draw them down till of a light brown colour, but be careful
not to let it burn; then discharge it with beef stock. When it boils,
skim it very clean from fat, and thicken it with flour and water, or
flour and butter passed. Let it boil gently three quarters of an hour;
season it to the palate with cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and salt;
strain it through a tamis cloth or sieve, and add a little liquid of
colour, which may be made as in the following receipt.


_Liquid of Colour for Sauces, &c._

PUT a quarter of a pound of the best brown sugar into a frying pan very
clean from grease, and half a gill of water; set it over a gentle fire,
stirring it with a wooden spoon till it is thoroughly burnt and of a
good bright colour, then discharge it with water; when it boils skim it
and strain it. Put it by for use in a vessel close covered.


_Benshamelle._

TAKE white veal, lean ham, turnips, celery, onions cut in pieces, a
blade of mace, a little whole white pepper; sweat them down till three
parts tender, then discharge it with beef stock. Let it boil, skim it
clean, and thicken with flour and water, or flour and butter passed; add
to it a sufficient quantity of cream to make it quite white. Let it
simmer gently half an hour, and strain it through a tamis cloth.

N. B. Let it be of the thickness of light batter.


_To make a passing of Flour and Butter for Cullis or Benshamelle._

PUT fresh butter into a stewpan over a fire, when it is melted add a
sufficient quantity of sifted flour to make it into a paste, and mix
them together with a whisk over a very slow fire for ten minutes.


_Soup a la Reine._

TAKE three quarts of veal stock with a blade of mace boiled in it; then
strain it to the crumb of four penny french rolls, three quarters of a
pound of sweet almonds blanched and pounded very fine, likewise the
white meat of dressed fowl pounded. Let all simmer together for ten
minutes, and rub them through a tamis cloth till the soup is of a proper
thickness; season it to the palate with salt; make it boil, and serve it
up with a gill of cream in it.


_Crayfish Soup._

TAKE three quarts of veal stock, the crumb of four penny french rolls,
the meats of a hen lobster, and half a hundred crayfish pounded, with
some live lobster spawn; add all together, make it boil, skim it clean,
rub it through a tamis cloth, make it of a middling thickness, and
season to the palate with salt and a little cayenne pepper. Serve it up
with crust of french bread cut into small round pieces.


_Vermicelli Soup, white._

TAKE three quarts of veal stock and two ounces of vermicelli, boil them
together a quarter of an hour, rub it through a tamis cloth, season with
salt, make it boil, skim it, and add a leason. Let it simmer for five
minutes.


_To make the Leason._

TAKE the yolks of four eggs, half a pint of cream, and a little salt,
mixed well together.


_Cleared brown Stock for Gravy Soups._

TAKE three quarts of veal stock perfectly free from fat; add a small
quantity of liquid colour to make it of a fine brown; season to the
palate with salt and a little cayenne pepper; beat up together two
yolks, two whites, and two shells of eggs; whisk them with the stock,
set it over a fire, let it boil gently ten minutes, then strain it
through a tamis cloth. This stock is required for rice, brown
vermicelli, celery, santé, or turnip soups.

N. B. I have directed the brown stock, for gravy soups only, to be
cleared with eggs, as that method has been most approved, it being
pleasant to the eye, and equally agreeable to the palate.


_Rice Soup._

ADD to three quarts of cleared stock two ounces of rice, washed, picked,
parboiled, and drained dry. Let it boil gently till the rice is tender.


_Celery Soup._

CUT celery heads two inches long then, some of the white part into small
pieces; wash, blanch, and drain it, and put to it three quarts of
cleared stock. Make it boil, skim it, and let the celery simmer till
tender.


_Turnip Soup._

PARE good and firm turnips, cut them with a knife or scoop into shapes,
fry them with a bit of lard till of a light brown colour, then drain and
wipe them free from fat (or they may be steamed with a very little
water, to prevent them from burning, till they are half done); then put
to them cleared stock, and boil them gently till tender.


_Cressey Soup._

TAKE twelve large red carrots, scrape them clean, cut off only the red
part in thin slices, and put them in a stewpan with a quart of water;
add cleaned turnips, celery, leeks, and onions, cut in pieces, and half
a pint of split peas. Stew all together till tender, adding some stock
to prevent burning; then rub it through a tamis, and put to the pulp
five pints of veal stock and some blanched water-cresses; make it boil
for twenty minutes, skim it, season it with salt, and serve it up.

N. B. To be the thickness of peas soup.


_Santé, or Spring Soup._

PARE, and cut into shapes, turnips and carrots, likewise celery heads
about two inches long; wash them, and steam them separately with a very
little water till they are three parts done; then cut the white part of
the celery into small pieces, likewise leeks, cabbage, cos lettuces,
endive, and chervil, of each a small quantity; blanch and drain them
dry, then put all the vegetables together; add to them three quarts of
cleared brown stock, and boil them gently till tender. In spring add
young green peas, tops of asparagus, and button onions, steamed as the
above.

N. B. A small piece of bouillie beef may be stewed till tender; and ten
minutes before it is to be served up wipe it dry, and put it into the
soup with the vegetables.


_Onion Soup._

TAKE eight middling-sized peeled onions, cut them into very thin slices,
pass them with a quarter of a pound of fresh butter and flour till
tender; then add three quarts of veal stock; make it boil twenty
minutes; skim it, season it with salt, and add a leason; mix it well
with a whisk, make it simmer, and serve it up.


_Green Peas Soup._

TAKE one quart of young green peas, four turnips pared and cut in the
form of dice, two cos lettuces cut in small slices, two middling-sized
onions cut very fine; wash them, add a quarter of a pound of fresh
butter, and stew them till nearly done. Then take two quarts of large
fresh green peas, and boil them in three quarts of veal stock till
tender; strain and pound them, preserving the liquor; then rub the peas
through a tamis, and add the pulp with the liquor to the above herbs, a
little flour and water, pepper and salt, and season to the palate, with
a bit of sugar if approved. Boil all together half an hour; skim it and
when it is to be served up, add the pulp of some boiled parsley rubbed
through a tamis to make it look green.

N. B. Cut pieces of bread into thin sippets, dry them before the fire,
and serve up on a plate.


_Old Peas Soup._

TAKE chuck beef cut into pieces, knuckles of ham and veal, pickle pork
cut into square pieces of half a pound each; put all into a pot with
peeled turnips, leeks, onions, carrots, and celery, cut into slices, and
some old split peas, with a sufficient quantity of water; when it boils,
skim it, and add a very small bunch of dried mint. Let the ingredients
boil till tender, then take the mint out, rub the soup through a tamis
till of a good thickness; when done, add to the liquor, turnips cut in
form of dice, celery and leeks cut small and washed. Make the soup boil,
skim it, season with pepper and salt, and serve it up with the pork in
it. Some bread cut in form of dice, and fried, to be served up on a
dish.

N. B. The pork to be taken out when nearly done, and added to the soup
half an hour before it is served up.


_Peas Soup another way._

PUT the peas with the above-mentioned vegetables into a pot with some
water; stew them gently till tender, then add a little dried mint, and
rub them through a tamis cloth; put the pulp to some good veal stock,
likewise add some turnips pared and cut into forms like dice, some leeks
and celery cut small and blanched; season to the palate with pepper and
salt; then making it boil, skim it, and stew the herbs till tender.
Serve it up with pieces of pickle pork in it.

N. B. The pickle pork to be cut into small square pieces and boiled till
nearly done, and then added to the soup a quarter of an hour before it
is to be served up to table. Let the soup be of a proper thickness.


_Giblet Soup._

LET the giblets be scalded, picked clean, and cut in pieces; which done,
put them in a stewpan, season them with herbs and spice, the same as for
real turtle; add some veal stock, stew them till nearly done, pick them
free from the herbs, chop the bones down, strain, thicken, and season
the liquor, as for real turtle; make it boil, then add it to the
giblets, stew them till tender, and serve them up with egg and forcemeat
balls.


_Fish Meagré Soup._

TAKE pieces of different sorts of fish, such as salmon, skate, soles,
&c. Sweat them till tender, with turnip, onion, celery, a clove of
garlick, and a blade of mace; then add some plain veal broth. Let all
simmer together for half an hour; then strain and skim it free from fat;
season with salt and cayenne pepper; clear it with white of eggs, and
colour with a little saffron.

N. B. It may be served up with celery or rice in it.


_Mock Turtle of Calf's Head._

TAKE a scalp cleaned by the butcher, scald it for twenty minutes, then
wash it clean, cut it into pieces two inches square, add a gallon of
veal stock, and boil them till nearly done. Have ready some pieces of
veal cut in form of dice, but four times larger, seasoned with herbs,
spices, and onions, the same as real turtle; and strain to it the liquor
the scalp is boiled in. Let the meat simmer till almost done; pick it,
and add to it the scalp with forcemeat and egg balls; then thicken the
liquor as for real turtle, and when it boils skim it clean, put it to
the meats, and simmer all together half an hour.


_Mutton Broth._

TAKE a neck of mutton cut into pieces, preserving a handsome _piece_ to
be served up in the tureen. Put all in a stewpot with three quarts of
cold beef stock, or water with a little oatmeal mixed in it, some
turnips, onions, leeks, celery cut in pieces, and a small bunch of thyme
and parsley. When it boils skim it clean, and take the _piece_ of mutton
out when nearly done, and let the other boil till tender; then have
ready turnips cut in form of dice, some leeks, celery, half a cabbage,
and parsley, all cut small, and some marigolds; wash them, strain the
liquor of the meat, skim it free from fat, add it to the ingredients,
with the _piece_ of mutton, and a little pearl barley if approved;
season with salt, simmer all together till done, and serve it up with
toasted bread on a plate.


_Real Turtle._

HANG the turtle up by the hind fins, and cut off the head overnight; in
the morning cut off the fore fins at the joints, and the callipee all
round; then take out the entrails, and be careful not to break the gall;
after which cut off the hind fins and all the meat from the bones,
callipee and callipash; then chop the callipee and callipash into
pieces; scald them together, the fins being whole, but take care not to
let the scales set. When cleaned, chop the fins into pieces four inches
long; wash the pieces of the callipee, callipash, and fins, and put
them into a pot with the bones and a sufficient quantity of water to
cover; then add a bunch of sweet herbs and whole onions, and skim it
when the liquor boils. When the fins are nearly done take them out,
together with the remainder of the turtle, when done, picked free from
bone. Then strain the liquor and boil it down till reduced to one third
part; after which cut the meat into pieces four times larger than dice;
put it into a pot, add a mixture of herbs chopped fine, such as knotted
marjoram, savory, thyme, parsley, a very little basil, some chopped
onions, some beaten spices, as allspice, a few cloves, a little mace,
black pepper, salt, some veal stock, and the liquor that was reduced.
Boil the meat till three parts done, pick it free from herbs, strain the
liquor through a tamis sieve, make a passing of flour and three quarters
of a pound of fresh butter, mixing it well over a fire for some time,
and then add to it madeira wine, (if a turtle of seventy pounds weight,
three pints,) and the liquor of the meat. When it boils, skim it clean,
season to the palate with cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and salt, and
strain it to the pieces of fins and shell in one pot, and the lean meat
into another; and if the turtle produce any real green fat, let it be
boiled till done, then strained, cut into pieces, and added to the fins
and shell, and then simmer each meat till tender. When it is to be
served up, put a little fat at the bottom of the tureens, some lean in
the center, and more fat at the top, with egg and force-meat balls, and
a few entrails.

N. B. The entrails must be cleaned well, then boiled in water till very
tender, and preserved as white as possible, and just before they are
strained off add the balls. If a callipash is served up, the shell to be
cut down on each side, and chop the pieces for the soup; the remaining
part of the back shell to be pasted round with a raised crust, egged,
ornamented, and baked, and the soup served in it in the same manner as
in the tureens.


_Callipee._

TAKE a quarter of the under part of a turtle of sixty pounds weight, and
scald it, and when done, take the shoulder-bone out and fill the cavity
with a good high-seasoned forcemeat made with the lean of the turtle;
put it into a stewpan, and add a pint of madeira wine, cayenne pepper,
salt, lemon juice, a clove of garlick, a little mace, a few cloves and
allspice tied in a bag, a bunch of sweet herbs, some whole onions, and
three quarts of good beef stock. Stew gently till three parts done; then
take the turtle and put it into another stewpan, with some of the
entrails boiled and some egg balls; add a little thickening of flour and
butter to the liquor, let it boil, and strain it to the turtle, &c. then
stew it till tender, and the liquor almost reduced to a glaize. Serve it
up in a deep dish, pasted round as a callipash, ornamented and baked.

N. B. I think the above mode of serving it up in a dish the best, as it
frequently happens that the shell of the callipee is not properly baked.


_Glaize for Hams, Larding, roasted Poultry, &c._

TAKE a leg of veal, lean of ham, beef, some indifferent fowls, celery,
turnips, carrots, onions, leeks cleaned and cut into pieces, a little
lemon peel, mace, and black pepper, a small quantity of each; add three
quarts of water, sweat them down till three parts done, discharge with
water, and boil it till the goodness is extracted; then skim it, and
strain the liquor into a large pan. Next day take the fat from it very
clean; set the stock over a fire, and when warm clear it with whites and
a few yolks of eggs; then add a little colour and strain it through a
tamis; boil it quick till reduced to a glaize, and be careful not to let
it burn.

N. B. In the same manner may be made glaize of separate herbs or roots,
which will be serviceable on board a ship, or in the country, where
herbs or roots cannot be procured at all times; and they are to be
preserved in bottles, as they will not, when cold, be of a portable
substance.


_Fish plain boiled to be prepared thus:_

PUT them in clean boiling pump water well salted, and when served up to
be garnished with fresh picked parsley and scraped horseradish; except
salt fish, which should be properly soaked, then cut in pieces and put
in cold water, and when it boils let it simmer six or eight minutes, and
serve it up on a napkin with boiled parsnips and potatoes round, or on a
plate, and egg sauce in a boat.

N. B. Fish should be chosen very fresh and of good appearance, it adding
as much to their beauty as gratifying to the palate when dressed, there
being in my opinion but two sorts--good and bad. But as an exception to
the above observation, skate will be better for eating if kept for one
or two days in a cool place before it is dressed.


_Fish generally fried._

    PIECES of skate.
    Whitings.
    Fillets of haddocks.
    Smelts.
    Soles.
    Perch.
    Flounders.
    Slices of hollibut.
    Slices of cod.


_To prepare the above for frying, &c._

WIPE the different sorts of fish dry, beat yolk of eggs, and spread it
over them with a paste brush; then put crumbs of bread over the egg.
Have plenty of lard in an iron frying pan, and when it almost boils put
a proper quantity and fry them of a fine gold colour; drain them dry,
and serve them up with fried parsley.

N. B. The crumbs to be rubbed through a hair sieve. The parsley also to
be picked, washed, and dried with a cloth, then to be put into the lard
not very hot, and fried of a green colour. Sprinkle a little salt over.


_Broiled Fish prepared thus:_

WIPE the fish dry, flour them well, and have the gridiron clean; then
rub the bars with a veal caul, and put the fish at a proper distance.
Broil them gently over a clear coal fire till of a fine colour, and
serve them up directly.

N. B. Fish in general to be floured, except herrings, which are only to
be scored with a knife, and the following methods of broiling other fish
to be observed.


_Broiled Salmon to be prepared thus:_

TAKE pieces or slices of salmon, wipe them dry, dip them in sweet oil,
and season with pepper and salt; fold them in pieces of writing paper,
broil over a clear fire, and serve them up very hot.

N. B. In the same manner are to be done red mullets, &c.


_Broiled Mackarel, common way._

WIPE them dry, split them down the back, sprinkle with pepper and salt,
and broil them gently.


_To stew Fish._

ADD to some cullis a few chopped eshallots, anchovies, a bay leaf,
horseradish scraped, a little quantity of lemon peel, and some red port;
season it well with cayenne pepper, salt, and juice of lemon, and when
it boils let it be of a proper thickness, and strain it to the fish;
then stew it gently, and serve it up in a deep dish with the liquor, and
fried bread round it. If carp or tench, some of the hard roe mixed in
batter and fried in pieces. The roes likewise of different fish may be
stewed in the same manner, and served up as a dish of themselves. Eels,
soles, or other fish may be done the same way.


_Water souchée of Perch, Flounders, Soles, Eels, &c._

TAKE perch cleaned and fresh crimped; put them into boiling pump water
well-seasoned with salt, and when they boil, skim them clean. Take them
out with a large skimmer, put them into a deep dish, strew parsley roots
and scalded parsley over, and add some of the liquor. Serve them up as
hot as possible, with slices of brown bread and butter on a plate.

N. B. The time the fish are to boil must be according to their size; and
the parsley roots are to be cleaned, cut into slips, and boiled by
themselves till tender.


_Roasted Pike or Sturgeon._

LET the fish be well cleaned, then make a stuffing of capers,
anchovies, parsley and thyme chopped fine, a little grated nutmeg and
lemon peel, pepper, salt, breadcrumbs, fresh butter, and an egg. Fill
the fish and sew it up; turn it round, and fasten the head with the
tail; then egg the fish over and breadcrumb it; after which bake or
roast it gently till done, and of a good brown colour. Serve it up with
a sauce over, made of cullis, fresh butter, cayenne, anchovie essence,
and lemon pickle.


_Bacquillio with Herbs._

LET the fish be well soaked; then boil them and pick free from bone.
Wash and chop small some spinach, sorrel, green onions, and parsley;
after which add fresh butter, essence of anchovies, cayenne pepper, and
plenty of the juice of seville oranges. Sweat the herbs down, add the
fish, and simmer them till tender.


_Entrée of Eels._

TAKE good-sized eels, bone and cut them in pieces of three inches long;
pass them over a slow fire in a small quantity of sweet herbs and
eshallots, fresh butter, pepper, salt, and lemon juice. When three parts
done put all on a dish, dip each piece in the liquor, breadcrumb, and
broil them over a clear fire. Serve them up with anchovie sauce in a
boat.


_Entrée of Soles._

LET good-sized soles be cleaned and filletted; roll them up, put them
into a stewpan, add a little fresh butter, lemon juice, pepper, and
salt, and simmer them over a slow fire till done. Serve them up with a
sauce over, made of button onions, mushrooms, egg balls, pickle
cucumbers scooped round, slices of sweetbreads, and good strong cullis
coloured with lobster spawn.

N. B. The above fillets may be fried, and served up with the sauce
round.


_Entrée of Whitings, &c._

TAKE fillets of haddocks or whitings, wet them with whites of eggs, and
lay upon them slices of salmon, seasoned with pepper and salt. Put them
into a stewpan with a little fresh butter; stew the fish over a slow
fire till done, with the pan close covered. Serve them up with a sauce
over, made with chopped parsley, chopped mushrooms and eshallots, a
little rhenish wine, mustard, and cullis, mixed and boiled together for
ten minutes.


_Entrée of Salmon._

MAKE white paper cases, and put a little sweet oil at the bottom of
each. Cut into pieces some fresh salmon, pepper and salt them, and put
them into the cases; then set them over a fire on a baking plate and in
a stewpan covered over, with a fire at top and bottom. When broiled
enough, serve them up with poached eggs on the top of the salmon, and
anchovie sauce in a boat.


_Entrée of Smelts, &c._

CLEAN, turn round, and fry of a good colour, some fresh smelts; then
three parts boil a slice of fresh crimped cod cut two inches thick; pull
it into flakes, have ready some benshamelle, whisk it with the yolks of
two eggs, add the flakes of the cod, season with salt and lemon juice to
the palate, and simmer the fish over a slow stove till done. Serve it up
with the fried smelts round the dish, and a few over the stew.


_Entrée of Mackarel._

SPLIT them down the back, season with pepper and salt, and lay a sprig
of fennel in them. Broil them gently, and when served up, the fennel to
be taken out, and a mixture of fresh butter, chopped parsley, green
onions, pepper, salt, and plenty of lemon juice to be put in its stead.


_Mackarel the German way._

SPLIT them down the back and season with pepper and salt; broil them,
and serve them up with the following sauce in a boat:--pick and wash
fennel, parsley, mint, thyme, and green onions, a small quantity of
each. Boil them tender in a little veal broth; then chop and add to them
some fresh butter, the liquor, a grated nutmeg, the juice of half a
lemon, a little cayenne pepper and salt. Let it boil, and make it of a
proper thickness with flour and water.


_Olios, or a Spanish Dish._

THE articles that are wanted consist of the following: viz.

    Leg of mutton of ten pounds.
    Leg of veal ditto.
    Chuck beef ditto.
    Lean ham six pounds.
    Best end of a neck of mutton.
    Breast of veal, small.
    Two pieces of bouillie beef of one pound each.
    Two pair of pigs feet and ears.
    A bologna sausage.
    A fowl.
    A pheasant.
    Two partridges.
    Two ruffs and rees.
    Two quails.
    Two teal.
    Two pigeons.
    Two rabbits.
    One hare.
    Two stags tongues.
    One quart of burgonza peas.
    Turnips.
    Carrots.
    Celery.
    Onions.
    Leeks.
    Parsley.
    Thyme.
    Garlick.
    Allspice.
    Cloves.
    Mace.
    Nutmegs.
    Black pepper.
    Haricot roots.
    Fried bread.
    Eggs.
    Saffron, and
    Lemons.


_The Olio to be made as follows:_

TAKE the beef, veal, mutton, and ham; cut them into pieces, put them
into a pot, cover with water, and when it boils skim clean; then add
carrots, celery, turnips, onions, leeks, garlick, parsley, and thyme,
tied in a bunch; allspice, cloves, nutmeg, black pepper, mace, and a
little ginger, put in a cloth. Boil all together till it becomes a
strong stock, and strain it. Then cut the breast of veal into tendrons,
and best end of neck of mutton into steaks, and half fry them; pigs feet
and ears cleaned; hare cut into joints and daubed with bacon; bouillie
beef tied round with packthread; poultry trussed very neat, with the
legs drawn in close; the tongues scalded and cleaned; and the rabbits
cut into pieces. When the different articles are ready, blanch and wash
them, then braise each in a separate stewpan, with the stock that was
strained. When the different things are braised enough, pour the liquors
from them into a pan, leaving a little with each to preserve from
burning. When they are to be served up, skim the liquor very clean, and
clear it with whites of eggs; then cut turnips and carrots into
haricots, some button onions peeled, and heads of celery trimmed neat;
after which blanch them, cut the bologna sausage into slices, boil the
burgonza peas till three parts done, then mix all together, add some of
the cleared liquor, and stew them gently till done. The remainder of the
liquor to be coloured with a little saffron, and served up in a tureen
with a few burgonza peas in it.

When the olio is to be served up, take a very large deep dish, make
several partitions in it with slips of fried bread dipped in whites of
eggs, and set it in a slow oven or before a fire; then lay the
tendrons, birds, beef, mutton, fowls, &c. alternately in the partitions,
and serve up with the haricot roots, &c. over.

N. B. The whole of the liquor to be seasoned to the palate with cayenne
pepper and lemon juice.

[This receipt for a Spanish olio is only written to shew how expensive a
dish may be made, and which I saw done. As a substitute I have
introduced the following english one, which has been generally approved;
and I think, with particular attention, it will exceed the former in
flavour.]


_Hodge Podge, or English Olio._

TAKE four beef tails cut into joints, bouille beef two pieces about a
quarter of a pound each, and two pieces of pickle pork of the same
weight. Put them into a pot, cover with water, and when it boils skim
clean, and add half a savoy, two ounces of champignons, some turnips,
carrots, onions, leeks, celery, one bay leaf, whole black pepper, a few
allspice, and a small quantity of mace. When the meats are nearly done,
add two quarts of strong veal stock, and when tender take them out, put
them into a deep dish, and preserve them hot till they are to be served
up; then strain the liquor, skim it free from fat, season to the palate
with cayenne pepper, a little salt, and lemon juice, and add a small
quantity of colour; then have ready turnips and carrots cut into
haricots, some celery heads trimmed three inches long, and some whole
onions peeled. Let them be sweated down, till three parts tender, in
separate stewpans, and strain the essences of them to the above liquor;
clear it with whites of eggs, strain it through a tamis cloth, mix the
vegetables, add the liquor to them, boil them gently for ten minutes,
and serve them over the meats.


_Light Forcemeat for Pies or Fowls, &c._

CUT in pieces lean veal, ham, and fat bacon; add chopped parsley, thyme,
eschallots, a little beaten spices, juice of lemon, pepper and salt, a
few cleaned mushrooms, or mushroom powder. Put over a slow fire till
three parts done; then pound in a marble mortar till very fine, and add
a sufficient quantity of yolk of raw eggs and breadcrumbs to bind it.


_Forcemeat Balls for Ragouts, &c._

CUT lean veal and beef suet into small pieces, and add chopped parsley,
thyme, marjoram, savory, eschallots, pepper, salt, breadcrumbs, a little
grated nutmeg, and yolk of raw eggs. Pound all well together, and roll
into balls.

N. B. The balls should be boiled or fried before they are added to any
thing.


_Egg for Balls._

BOIL six eggs, take the yolks, pound them, and add a little flour and
salt, and the yolks of two raw eggs. Mix all well together, and roll
into balls. They must be boiled before added to any made dish or soup.


_Omlets of Eggs for garnishing or cutting in Slips._

TAKE eggs, break them, and put the yolks and whites into separate pans;
beat them up with a little salt, and then put them again into separate
earthen vessels rubbed with sweet oil. Have ready a pot of boiling
water over a fire, put them in close covered, and let the omlets steam
till thoroughly done.


_Ox Cheek._

BONE and wash clean the cheek; then tie it up like a rump of beef, put
it in a braising pan with some good stock (or water); when it boils,
skim it, add two bay leaves, a little garlick, some onions, champignons,
celery, carrots, half a small cabbage, turnips, a bundle of sweet herbs,
whole black pepper, a little allspice and mace. Let the cheek stew till
near done, then cut off the strings, put the cheek in a clean stewpan,
strain the liquor through a sieve, skim off the fat very clean, season
with lemon juice, cayenne pepper and salt, add a little colour, clear it
with eggs, strain it through a tamis cloth to the cheek, and stew it
till tender.


_Beef Tails._

CUT the tails into joints, and blanch and wash them; then braise them
till tender, drain them dry, and serve them up with haricot sauce over.


_Haricot Sauce._

TAKE clean turnips and carrots, and scoop or cut them into shapes, some
celery heads cut about two inches long, button onions peeled, some dry
or green morells, and artichoke bottoms cut into pieces. Let them all be
blanched in separate stewpans till three parts done; then drain and put
them all together with some small mushrooms stewed, and a good cullis
well-seasoned, and simmer the vegetables till done.


_Beef Collops._

TAKE the fillet from the under part of a rump of beef, cut it into small
thin slices, and fry them till three parts done; then add to them slices
of pickle cucumbers, small mushrooms stewed, blanched oysters, some
good-seasoned cullis, and stew them till tender.


_Fillet of Beef larded._

TAKE a fillet or piece of a rump, force it and lard it with bacon, turn
it round like a fillet of veal, roast it, glaize the top, and serve it
up with the following sauce made with cullis, lemon pickle, and ketchup;
add likewise some scalded celery heads and button onions; then stew till
tender, and put the sauce round the beef.


_Beef Pallets._

SCALD and scale the pallets clean, and boil them till tender; when cool
roll them up with forcemeat in the middle, and tie them with thread;
braise them as white as possible and serve them up with a sauce made of
ham, breast of fowl, pickle cucumbers, omlets of eggs, and good-seasoned
cullis or benshamelle.

N. B. The ham, &c. are to be cut in the form of dice, and the omlets
made as omlets for garnishing.


_Rump of Beef a-la-daube, or braised._

BONE a rump of beef and daub it with slips of fat bacon, seasoned with
sweet herbs, eschallots, beaten spices, pepper, and salt. Bind it round
with packthread, and braise it till tender; then wipe it dry, glaize
the top, and serve it up with the sauce round. Either Spanish onion
sauce, or savoy, haricot, or ashée sauce may be used.

N. B. It may be served with the sauce either plain or daubed.


_To make Spanish Onion Sauce._

BRAISE six Spanish onions with the beef till three parts done; then peel
them, and add some good cullis, seasoned with cayenne pepper, salt,
lemon juice, and a little sifted lump sugar, and stew them till tender.


_Savoy Sauce._

CUT some savoys in quarters, blanch them, and then tie them round and
braise them with the beef till half done. Take them out of the liquor,
cut off the string, and put them into a stewpan with good strong cullis,
and simmer them till tender.


_Ashée Sauce._

TAKE some pickle cucumbers chopped small, then capers, parsley,
eschallots, breast of a fowl, lean of ham, carrots, and yolks and whites
of eggs. Then add to them a good-seasoned cullis and a little mushroom
ketchup. Simmer all together a quarter of an hour.

N. B. The ham, fowl, egg, and carrot to be boiled before they are
chopped.


_Brisket of Beef with Spanish Onions._

TO be done in the same manner as the rump, but not to be daubed with
bacon.


_Brisket of Beef with Ashée or Haricot._

TO be done in the same manner as the preceding.


_Rump of Beef a-la mode._

BONE the rump, daub it with slips of fat bacon seasoned with sweet
herbs, beaten spices, and pepper and salt. Bind it round with
packthread, put it into a braising pan, cover it with some veal stock,
make it boil, skim it, and add a pint of red port, some onions, turnips,
celery, a few bay leaves, garlick, champignons, a few whole allspice,
and a little mace. Let it stew till nearly done; then take it out of the
liquor, cut off the strings, wipe it dry, and put it into a clean
stewpan. Then strain the liquor, skim the fat off clean, season with
cayenne, salt, a gill of vinegar, lemon pickle, and a small quantity of
juice of lemon; add a little colour, clear it with whites of eggs, and
strain it through a tamis cloth to the beef. Stew it gently till done,
and serve it up in a deep dish.

N. B. To the liquor, when cleared with eggs and strained, may be added
some passing of flour and butter, by way of thickening, if approved. The
reason for clearing the liquor is, that it will make it appear bright
either thickened or plain.


_Baked Beef._

BONE a leg of beef, wash it clean, chop plenty of parsley, a middling
quantity of thyme, eschallots, marjoram, savory, and a little basil.
Then mix them together, and add a small quantity of beaten allspice,
mace, cloves, pepper, and salt. Rub the beef well with the ingredients,
set it in an earthen pan, put to it a gill of vinegar, half a pint of
red port, eight middling-sized whole onions peeled, two bay leaves, a
few fresh or dried champignons. Let the meat remain till next day; then
add a sufficient quantity of water to it, cover the pan close, and bake
the meat till tender.


_Marrow Bones._

CHOP the bones at each end so as to stand steady; then wash them clean,
saw them in halves, set them upright in a saucepan with water, and boil
them two hours. Serve them up very hot, and with fresh toasted bread.


_Mutton Rumps marinated._

CLEAN and cut the rumps of an equal length, and lay them in a pan and
the marinate liquor for a whole night; then pass them in butter till
nearly done. Lay them on a dish to cool, wash them over with yolk of
egg, and breadcrumb them. Fry them gently in boiling lard till done,
and of a nice colour. Drain them dry, and serve them up with a very
good-seasoned cullis sauce and ketchup in it.

N. B. In the same manner may be done mutton steaks.


_To make Marinate._

TAKE a little gravy, vinegar, salt, whole black pepper, a few bay
leaves, onions sliced, a clove of garlick, and a little thyme. Boil all
together and strain it.


_Haricot Mutton Cutlets._

CUT a loin or best end of a neck of mutton into steaks, trim them neat,
and fry them till three parts done, and of a nice colour. Put them into
a stewpan, add a little liquor to preserve them from burning, and simmer
till tender. Lay the steaks round in a dish, and serve them up with
haricot sauce over.

N. B. The essence that the steaks were stewed in to be strained,
skimmed clean from fat, and added to the sauce.


_Fillet of Mutton with Cucumbers._

TAKE the best end of a neck of mutton, cut off the under bone, leaving
the long ones on; then trim it neat, lard it, or let it remain plain;
roast it gently, glaize it, and serve it up with cucumber sauce under.


_Stewed Cucumbers._

TAKE fresh gathered cucumbers, pare them, cut them into shapes if seedy,
or slices if young. Put them into a stewpan, and add a little salt,
vinegar, and an onion. Simmer them over a fire till nearly done and the
liquor reduced, or fry them with a bit of fresh butter, and add a good
strong cullis. Let the cucumbers stew till done, and serve them up with
the mutton, which may be roasted with larding (or plain).

N. B. The cucumbers may be served as an entrée of itself, and fried
bread put round them.


_Mutton Cutlets with Potatoes._

CUT a loin of mutton into steaks, beat them with a chopper, and trim
them neat. Pass them in sweet herbs, eschallots, pepper, salt, and lemon
juice. When nearly done, lay them on a dish till almost cool, and then
egg, breadcrumb, and fry them in boiling lard till of a light brown
colour. Place the steaks round in a dish, leaving a cavity in the
center, which is to be filled up with potatoes, and the sauce under the
steaks.

N. B. The potatoes to be peeled, scooped, or cut into shapes. Then fry
them of a light colour, and put them before the fire till wanted; and
add to the sauce the steaks were passed in, a little cullis and ketchup;
then strain and reduce it almost to a glaize.


_Mutton Cutlets a la Maintenon._

GET the best end of a loin of mutton, take off the under bone, and cut
it into chops; beat them, and trim them neat; then add to them a bit of
fresh butter, chopped parsley, thyme, eschallots, pepper, salt, a little
pounded mace, and lemon juice. Pass them till nearly done; then lay them
on a dish, pour the liquor over the chops, and, when nearly cool,
breadcrumb, and put them separately in oiled white paper; fold them up,
broil them over a slow fire, and serve them up with hot poivrade sauce
in a boat.

N. B. See _Poivrade Sauce_ receipt.


_Cutlets a la Irish Stew._

GET the best end of a neck of mutton, take off the under bone, and cut
it into chops; season them with pepper, salt, a little mushroom powder,
and beaten mace. Put them into a stewpan, add a large onion sliced, some
parsley and thyme tied in a bunch, and a pint of veal broth. Simmer the
chops till three parts done, then add some whole potatoes peeled, and
let them stew till done. Serve it up in a deep dish.

N. B. Let the parsley and thyme be taken out when the stew is to be
served up.


_Pork Cutlets with Red or White Cabbage._

TAKE a piece of back pork, cut it into chops, beat and trim them, season
with pepper and salt, broil them gently till done and of a light brown
colour. Serve them up with stewed red or white cabbage under.


_To stew Cabbage._

CUT the cabbage into slips, and blanch and drain them dry. Put them into
a stewpan, with a bit of fresh butter, pepper, salt, an onion, some
vinegar, half a pint of veal broth, and a little allspice tied in a
cloth. Stew the cabbage gently till done and the liquor nearly reduced,
and then take the spice and onion out.


_Pork Cutlets with Robert Sauce._

GET a piece of back pork, or the best end of a loin, and take off the
under bone; then cut the chops neat, season with pepper and salt, broil
them gently, and serve them up with the sauce underneath.


_To make Robert Sauce._

TAKE some cullis, a bay leaf, an onion sliced, a blade of mace, a little
mustard, and a gill of rhenish wine. Boil all together a quarter of an
hour, strain it, and reduce it nearly to a glaize.


_Pork Cutlets another way._

TRIM the chops neat as above, pass them with a bit of fresh butter,
chopped eschallots, pepper, salt, and a little lemon juice. When nearly
done, breadcrumb and broil them till of a light brown colour. Serve them
up with the following sauce placed underneath; that is to say, cullis,
mushroom, ketchup, lemon pickle, and mustard, a little of each, and
reduce nearly to a glaize.


_Fillet of Pork roasted._

TAKE a piece of back pork, cut the chine bone from the under part, and
lay it in a marinate all night. When it is to be roasted run a lark spit
through, tie it on another spit, cover it with paper, and roast it
gently; and when to be served up, if not coloured enough, glaize it
lightly, and put some robert sauce underneath.


_Pigs Feet and Ears._

TAKE prepared feet and pass them, with chopped parsley, thyme,
eschallots, pepper, salt, and lemon juice. When done, breadcrumb and
broil them gently. Let the ears be cut in slices, and add cullis
well-seasoned; then stew them for ten minutes, and serve them up with
the feet over.


_To prepare Pigs Feet and Ears._

SCALD and clean them; then split the feet and tie them round with
packthread; put them in a pot covered with water; make it boil, skim it
clean, and add a little garlick, thyme, eschallots, onions, bay leaves,
whole black pepper, allspice, mace, salt, and udder of veal. Braise them
till tender, and put them in an earthen pan for use.


_Compotte of Pigeons._

CUT off the pinions, draw the legs in close, colour the breast in
boiling hot lard, and then blanch and wash them; which done, put them in
a stewpan, add a little veal broth, and simmer them gently till nearly
done, and then make a ragout of blanched sweetbreads, button mushrooms,
truffles, morells, artichoke bottoms, egg balls, cullis, and the liquor
of the pigeons strained, and season well to the palate. Let the
ingredients stew for ten minutes, then add them to the pigeons, and
serve up all together in a deep dish.


_Pigeons a la Craupidine._

CUT off the pinions, draw in the legs, cut the breast so as to lay back,
then pass them with sweet herbs, mushrooms, eschallots chopped fine, a
little fresh butter, grated nutmeg, lemon juice, pepper, and salt. Let
them simmer till nearly done; then lay them on a dish, and when nearly
cool, egg with yolk of eggs, and strew them with crumbs of bread rubbed
through a fine hair sieve. Fry them of a light colour in boiling hot
lard (or broil them). Serve them up with a good cullis and sharp sauce
underneath.


_Pigeons glaized._

PUT some good-seasoned forcemeat in the pigeons, cut off the pinions,
lay back the legs, blanch them, and roast them gently with vine leaves
and bards of fat bacon over them. When they are to be served up glaize
the top part, and serve them with cullis sauce, or celery heads, or
asparagus tops, &c. under them.


_Pigeons a la Sousell._

BONE the legs and wings of four pigeons and draw them in; then fill them
with a high-seasoned forcemeat, and braise them in a half pint of veal
stock. When done enough, take the pigeons out, wipe them dry, glaize the
top, and serve them up with stewed sorrel underneath.

N. B. The liquor they were braised in to be strained, skimmed free from
fat, and reduced almost to a glaize, and added to the sorrel. (Or they
may, when three parts done, be wiped dry, egged and breadcrumbed over,
then fried in boiling lard, and served up with sorrel sauce underneath
as above).


_Hashed Calf's Head._

TAKE a head, without the scalp, chopped in half; wash and blanch it,
peel the tongue, cut it in slices, and likewise the meat from the head.
Add blanched morells and truffles, egg and forcemeat balls, stewed
mushrooms, artichoke bottoms, and well-seasoned cullis. Let the meat
stew gently till nearly done, and then add slices of throat sweetbreads.
When it is to be served up, put round the hash the brains and rashers of
bacon; and, if approved, half the head to be put on the top, which is to
be prepared thus:--One half of the head when blanched to be done over
with yolk of raw egg; then season with pepper and salt, strew with fine
breadcrumbs, bake till very tender, and colour with a salamander if
requisite. The brains to be egged and rolled in breadcrumbs, and fried
in boiling lard. The rashers of bacon to be broiled.


_Breast of Veal en Gallentine._

BONE the veal and lay a light forcemeat over it, and upon that some
slips of lean ham, pickle cucumbers, fat bacon, and omlets of eggs white
and yellow. Roll it up tight in a cloth, tie each end, and braise it
till tender. When it is to be served up, take it out of the cloth, wipe
it dry, and glaize the top; then put under it stewed sorrel or stewed
celery heads, or ragout.


_Breast of Veal Ragout._

TAKE off the under bone and cut the breast in half, lengthways; then cut
them in middling-sized pieces, fry them in a little lard till of a
light brown colour, wipe them dry, put them into a stewpan with half a
pint of veal stock, simmer them till nearly done and the liquor almost
reduced; then add blanched morell, truffles, slices of throat
sweetbread, egg balls, artichoke bottoms, a little ketchup, and some
cullis; season to the palate with cayenne pepper and salt, and a little
lemon juice. Let all stew together till done.


_Neck of Veal en Erison._

CUT off the scragg and the under chine bone, then lay a light forcemeat
on the top of the veal about half the way, and wash it with whites of
eggs with a paste brush, and work a sprig or any other device as fancy
directs, with pickle cucumber, ham, breast of fowl, omlets of eggs white
and yellow, boiled carrots, and some capers. Put the veal into a
stewpan, add a little stock, and stew it gently till tender, taking care
the ornament is not disturbed. When it is to be served up glaize the
plain part, and put under a cullis sauce with asparagus or peas.

N. B. In the same manner may be done heart sweetbreads.


_Neck of Veal larded._

TAKE off the under bone of a neck of veal, leave only a part of the long
bones on; trim it neat, lard it, and roast it gently with a veal caul
over. Ten minutes before it is done take off the caul, and let the veal
be of a very light colour. When it is to be served up glaize it, and put
under some sorrel sauce, celery heads, or asparagus tops.


_Veal Cutlets larded._

CUT the best end of a neck of veal into chops, leaving only a part of
the long bone; then lard, blanch, and braise them; and when they are to
be served up, drain, dry, glaize, and place them round each other in a
dish, and put green truffle sauce, or white mushroom sauce, in the
center.


_Loin of Veal a la Cream._

TAKE the best end of a loin of veal, joint it, and cut a little of the
suet from the kidney; cause it to lay flat, and then make an incision in
the center of the top part about three inches deep and six inches long.
Take the piece out, chop it, add to it the suet or beef marrow, parsley,
thyme, green truffles, mushrooms, eschallots, lemon peel, chopped very
fine, and season it with pepper and salt, and a little beaten spice. Put
all together into a marble mortar, add the yolks of two eggs, and a
little french bread soaked in cream; then pound the ingredients well,
and fill the cavity with the forcemeat, and cover it with a piece of
veal caul; after which tie it down close and cover the whole with a
large piece of caul, roast it gently, and when it is to be served up,
take off the large piece of caul, let it colour a little, glaize it
lightly, and put under it a benshamelle or a ragout of sweetbreads, &c.

N. B. In the same manner may be done a fillet of veal instead of plain
stuffing.


_Veal Tendrons (brown or white)._

TAKE a breast of white veal, cut off the under bone and the top skin;
then cut it into three long slips, and the slips again into pieces of
two inches thick; blanch and put them into a stewpan, then add a little
water, bards of bacon, and slices of lemon. Braise them till tender,
drain them dry, and serve them up with green truffle sauce, or celery,
asparagus, or peas. The sauce to be served over the veal.


_Celery Sauce, (white), for Veal, Chickens, Turkies, &c._

CUT celery heads three inches long, trim them, wash and blanch them,
drain them dry, add a little stock, boil them till nearly done, and the
liquor almost reduced; then put to them some benshamelle, and, if
approved, five minutes before the sauce is put over the meat or poultry,
add a leason of two yolks of eggs and cream.


_Celery Sauce, (brown,) for Pullets, &c._

DRESS celery heads as above, but instead of benshamelle add a good
cullis only.

N. B. The above sauces may be served up in dishes with fried bread round
the celery heads, as an entrée of itself.


_Veal Cutlets au natural._

CUT the best end of a neck of veal into chops, trim off the bone, pass
the steaks with a bit of fresh butter, chopped parsley, thyme, and
eschallots, and season with pepper, salt, and lemon juice. When nearly
done, lay them on a dish with the liquor; and when cool, egg,
breadcrumb, and broil them gently. Serve them up placed round each
other, with a sauce in the center made with cullis, a little ketchup,
lemon pickle, and artichoke bottoms cut into pieces.


_Veal Collops (brown)._

CUT veal cutlets (taken from the fillet) into small thin pieces, and fry
them in a little boiling lard till of a light brown colour. Drain them
dry, put them into a stewpan, add cullis, stewed mushrooms, some
blanched truffles, morells, pieces of artichoke bottoms, some slices of
throat sweetbreads, and egg balls. Let them simmer over a slow fire till
tender, season to the palate, and serve them up with rashers of broiled
bacon round them.


_Veal Collops (white)._

CUT the collops as for brown, but instead of frying, put them into a
stewpan with a bit of fresh butter, a little lemon juice, and a blade of
mace. Simmer them till nearly done, then strain the liquor to some
benshamelle, and add the collops with some slices of throat sweetbreads,
some cocks combs blanched, egg balls, pieces of artichoke bottoms, and
stewed white mushrooms. Let them stew gently, season to the palate with
salt, and make the sauce of a sufficient thickness to adhere to the
ingredients.

N. B. Five minutes before the collops are to be served up a leason may
be added of eggs and cream.


_Fricando Veal._

CUT off a long or round piece of veal from the leg, beat it flat with a
chopper, and make an incision in the under part. Put into it a little
light forcemeat, sew it up, lard the top part with pieces of fat bacon
very neat, blanch it, put it into a stewpan with a little stock, and
cover it close; then let it stew till very tender, and the liquor nearly
reduced. When it is to be served up glaize the larding, and put stewed
sorrel under.

N. B. The forcemeat, if not approved, may be omitted; and instead of
only one piece of veal, three or four small pieces may be served on a
dish.


_Sorrel Sauce._

WASH clean, squeeze and chop fine, plenty of sorrel, and put it into a
stewpan with a bit of fresh butter; stew it till the liquor is almost
reduced, and then add a little strong cullis. Let the sauce be of a good
thickness.


_Veal Olives._

CUT thin bards of fat bacon of six inches long and four broad, lay upon
them very thin slices of veal of the same dimensions, wash the veal with
yolk of egg, and put upon it some light forcemeat. Then roll them up,
run a lark spit through sideway of each olive, tie a string over them to
prevent their falling off, trim each end with a sharp knife, roast them
gently, and froth and serve them up with a cullis sauce under


_Breast of Veal with Oysters._

CUT off the under bone of a breast of white veal, and the skin from the
top; then blanch and braise it, or roast it gently till very tender
with a veal caul over. When it is to be served up take off the caul,
glaize the top of the breast, and put round it white oyster sauce. (See
receipt for _Oyster Sauce_.)


_Lamb's Head minced._

CHOP the head in halves, and blanch it with the liver, heart, and
lights. Then chop the heart, &c. and add to them a little parsley
chopped very fine, a small quantity of shredded lemon peel, and some
cullis; then stew it gently till done, and season to the palate. Wash
the head over with yolk of egg, season it with pepper and salt, strew
fine breadcrumbs over, and bake it gently till very tender. When it is
to be served up, colour it with a salamander, put the mince under, and
the brains fried round it, with rashers of broiled bacon.

N. B. To prepare the brains, clean them in warm water, wipe them dry,
dip them in yolk of egg, breadcrumb, and fry them in boiling lard.


_Breast of Lamb with Benshamelle._

TAKE off the under bone, then blanch and put it into a stewpan, with
parsley, thyme, and eschallots, chopped very fine, a bit of fresh
butter, pepper, salt, a little essence of anchovie, and lemon juice. Let
it simmer over a slow fire till nearly done; then lay it on a dish, and,
when almost cool, egg and breadcrumb it, broil it over a slow clear fire
till tender, and let it be of a nice brown colour. Serve it up with a
benshamelle sauce under.


_Breast or Tendrons of Lamb en Matelote._

CUT the breast into two long slips, trim off the bone and skin, cut them
into small pieces, blanch and boil them in a little stock and lemon
juice. When nearly done, add peeled and half-boiled button onions,
pieces of pickle cucumber cut of the same size, a few button mushrooms
stewed, some slices of throat sweetbreads, blanched omlet of egg (the
same kind as for garnishing) cut into pieces the form of dice, and lean
ham cut in the same manner; then add a cullis or benshamelle. When it is
to be served up, put sippets of fried bread round.


_Breast of Lamb with Peas._

CUT off the under bone, and then blanch and braise it. When it is to be
served up, glaize the top and put the stewed peas under.


_To stew Peas for Sauce: for Lamb, Veal, Chickens, &c._

TO a quart of shelled young green peas add two ounces of fresh butter, a
very little sifted sugar, and some salt. Put them into a stewpan, cover
it close, simmer the peas till nearly done, then add some good-seasoned
cullis, and stew them till tender.


_Lamb Cutlets with Cucumbers._

TAKE the bone from a loin of lamb, cut it into chops, beat them flat
with a chopper, and trim off some of the fat. Pass them with a piece of
fresh butter, chopped parsley, thyme, eschallots, lemon juice, and
pepper and salt. When three parts done, put them on a dish, and, when
nearly cool, egg, breadcrumb, and fry them in boiling lard till of a
light brown colour. Drain them dry, place them round each other in the
dish, and serve them up with the cucumber sauce in the center.

N. B. In the same manner may be done mutton and veal cutlets.


_Neck of Lamb glaized._

CUT the scragg and the chine bone from a neck of house lamb; then take
off the skin, trim part of the fat away to lard the neck lengthways,
blanch it, and braise or roast it gently with a veal caul over. When it
is to be served up, glaize the larding, and put round it white onion
sauce made thus:


_Onion Sauce._

TAKE boiled onions, rub them through a hair sieve; then add to them
fresh butter, cream, flour, salt, a very little of each, and let it stew
five minutes.


_Lamb Cutlets with Tendrons._

CUT a neck of house lamb into chops, leaving only the long bone; then
beat them flat, and pass them with parsley, thyme, eschallots, chopped
very fine, and add a little lemon juice, mushroom powder, pepper, and
salt. When they are three parts done lay them on a dish, and when half
cold breadcrumb them and broil them on a stewpan cover over a slow fire
with a bit of fresh butter. When they are to be served up, put in the
center of the dish some braised tendrons of the breast of lamb, and
round them the cutlets, and turnip sauce over the center.


_Turnip Sauce._

PARE four turnips, sweat them with a little water till they are done and
the liquor reduced, then rub them through a tamis sieve. Add to them a
small quantity of benshamelle, and then cut some more turnips in shapes
as for a haricot. Sweat them in the like manner, and add the benshamelle
to them.


_Lamb Cutlets with Tendrons another way._

THE tendrons may be served in the center of the dish, with the cutlets
larded, braised, and glaized, to go round them; and the sauce made in
the same manner, but instead of benshamelle add cullis.


_Shoulder of Lamb glaized._

BONE a shoulder of house lamb, then season it with pepper, salt,
mushroom powder, and beaten spice; fill the cavity with some light
forcemeat; sew it up, and make it in the form of a leg of lamb; after
which blanch it, and braise in a little stock and bards of fat bacon.
When it is done wipe it dry, glaize it, and serve it up with sorrel
sauce under; or a strong cullis sauce with a little tarragon of vinegar
in it.


_Shoulder of Lamb en Epigram._

ROAST a shoulder of lamb till three parts done, and let it stand till
cold; then take the blade-bone out with the meat, leaving only the skin
whole in the form of a fan. Cut the meat into slips, add to it parsley,
thyme, eschallots, and mushrooms, chopped fine, some good-seasoned
cullis, and a little lemon pickle. Let it stew gently for a quarter of
an hour; and let the fan of the shoulder and the blade bone be broiled,
and served up over the stew.



_Shoulder of Lamb grilled._

ROAST it till three parts done, then score it with chequers, season with
pepper and salt, and grill it gently till done. Let it be of a light
brown colour, and serve it up with a sauce over it made with cullis,
ketchup, lemon juice, and a bit of fresh butter.


_Hind Quarter of Lamb marinated._

BONE the leg, fill the cavity with a light forcemeat well-seasoned, sew
it up and lard the top part of the quarter with slips of fat bacon. When
done, take a quart of veal stock, half a gill of vinegar, whole black
pepper, some salt, two bay leaves, three onions cut in pieces, a little
garlick, and half a pint of rhenish wine. Boil all the ingredients
together a quarter of an hour, put the lamb into a deep dish, and strain
the liquor to it. Let it lay five or six hours, turn it several times,
then roast the lamb gently with a veal caul over it. When it is nearly
done, let it colour a little and glaize the top. Serve it up with a
sauce under it, made with the above liquor boiled down almost to a
glaize, with some cullis added.

N. B. In the same manner may be done a shoulder or leg of lamb.


_Hind Quarter of Lamb with Spinach._

BOIL the leg, preserve it as white as possible, serve it up with spinach
under, and the steaks round it very hot. The loin to be cut into chops,
and seasoned with pepper and salt; then fried or broiled. Pick and boil
the spinach till nearly done; then strain and squeeze it dry, chop it,
and add a little piece of fresh butter, pepper, and salt, a little
cullis or cream, and let it stew for five minutes.

N. B. The spinach may be served up as a dish with fried bread round it.


_Leg of Lamb with Oysters._

BONE the leg, fill the cavity with light forcemeat, and some blanched
and bearded oysters pounded with it. Sew it up, put over it slices of
lemon, salt, bards of fat bacon, and paper. Roast it gently, and when
it is to be served up, glaize it, and put a sauce round it made with
oysters blanched and bearded, stewed mushrooms, boiled button onions,
some cullis, and the oyster liquor they were blanched in. Season to the
palate with cayenne and lemon juice.


_Currie._

CUT two young chickens into pieces, and blanch and drain them dry; then
put them into a stewpan with two table spoonfuls of currie powder and a
gill of veal stock, and stew them gently till half done. Then cut into
slices three middling-sized onions, and put them into a stewpan with a
table spoonful of currie powder, a quart of veal stock, two ounces of
jordan almonds blanched and pounded fine, and boil till the onions are
tender; then rub it through a tamis sieve to the chicken, and season to
the palate with cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon or tamarind juice. Let
the chickens stew till three parts done, then pour the liquor into
another stewpan, and add three ounces of fresh butter, a very little
flour and water, and reduce it to three gills. Strain it through a tamis
sieve to the chickens, and let them simmer till tender.

N. B. Rabbits may be done in the same manner.


_Plain Rice to be eaten with Currie._

PICK one pound of rice, and wash it very clean; then have ready some
boiling water and put the rice in. Let it simmer till three parts done,
and strain and wash it in several waters till free from slime. Drain it
in a large hair sieve, and when dry put it into a stewpan with some
paper and the cover over it. Set it in a moderate oven for one hour and
a half, or longer, if there be a greater quantity.


_Currie of Lobster._

BOIL lobsters till three parts done, and pick and cut the claws and
tails into good-sized pieces; then add currie powder, and proceed with
the same directions as with the chickens, only pound the body of the
lobsters and spawn, if any, and add them to the almonds and other
ingredients.


_Currie of Veal._

CUT a piece of breast of veal into tendrons, and fry them in a little
lard till of a light colour; then drain them dry, add currie powder, and
proceed with the same directions as for chicken currie.


_Currie of Mutton._

TAKE three pounds of the best end of a loin of mutton, cut off the bone
and some of the fat; then cut the meat into small square pieces, fry
them, and proceed with the same directions as for veal.


_Pig's Head Currie._

TAKE a young porker's head, cleave it in half, blanch and wash it, then
cut it into small thick pieces, fry them, and dress in the same manner
as veal and mutton; only omit the fresh butter, as there will be a
sufficient quantity of fat.


_Directions for roasting._

OBSERVE that in roasting it requires a good quick fire, but not too
strong, and the meats should be well-jointed, trimmed neat, and covered
with paper to preserve it from being too high a colour. Beef and mutton
should not be done too much; veal, pork, and lamb, should be done well;
and some little time before it is to be served up, take the paper off,
sprinkle the meat with salt, and when of a proper colour, froth it with
butter and flour. Large poultry to be papered and done in the same
manner; but small poultry, such as chickens, woodcocks, rabbits, wild
fowls, &c. will not require papering. The time the several articles will
take roasting depends upon a little practice, as the weather and the
different strengths of fires make a material alteration. I have given
directions for some particular roasts which require a preparation; as
for others which are served with sauces, they may be found under their
respective heads: and for the trimmings of meat, &c. I have wrote a
receipt to make into soup, or they may be put into the beef stock pot.


_Soup for a Family._

CUT the particles of meat from the trimmings of different joints, as
beef, mutton, veal, pork, &c. and when done put the bones into a pot,
cover with water, and boil them till the goodness is extracted. Then
strain the liquor, wash the trimmings of the vegetables, such as
turnips, carrots, onions, leeks, celery, and a little cabbage. Cut all
small, put them into a pot with the above liquor and some split peas;
boil till the peas are tender, add a little dry mint, and rub it through
a tamis cloth or sieve. Then season the meat with pepper and salt,
sweated down till three parts tender, and add the pulp. Boil all
together till the meat is done, skim it and serve it up with fried bread
in the form of dice.


_To prepare a Haunch of Venison, or Mutton, for roasting._

TAKE great care the venison is well hung and good. Wipe it, take the
skin from the top part, and put butter and plenty of salt over it; then
put paste confined on with four or five sheets of paper braced with
packthread. Roast it gently, and ten minutes before it is done, take off
the paper, let it colour gradually, and froth it with flour and butter.
Serve up with the venison warm currant jelly in a boat, and some good
gravy with a little red port in it in another sauce boat.


_To roast Woodcocks or Snipes._

TAKE out the trail, then roast the birds, and ten minutes before they
are done bake a toast, put the trail into a stewpan, with a little
cullis and fresh butter, and boil them together. When the woodcocks are
to be served up put the sauce over the toast, and the woodcocks upon it.

N. B. If the woodcocks are thin roast them with a bard of bacon over.


_To roast Larks._

TAKE the entrails out of the birds, wash and wipe them dry, put them
upon a lark spit, with small thin slices of fat bacon and a piece of a
vine or green sage leaf between each, if approved; and while roasting,
put over them crumbs of bread, or roast them plain. When they are done,
serve them up with fried breadcrumbs round them, and melted butter in a
sauce boat.


_To fry Breadcrumbs._

RUB crumbs of bread through a hair sieve, have ready a clean frying pan,
put them into it with a piece of fresh butter, set them over a moderate
fire, keep stirring with a wooden spoon till they are of a light brown
colour, and put them upon a plate.


_Turkeys._

TO be roasted with a stuffing in the breast, and served with bread sauce
in a boat.


_Rabbits._

TO be roasted either plain, or a stuffing, with the liver chopped in it,
put into the belly, and served up with parsley and butter in a boat.


_Hares._

TO be dressed in the same manner as rabbits, with stuffing; but served
up with cullis and fresh butter put over, and warm currant jelly in a
sauce boat.


_Hare roasted another way._

STUFF as above, and while roasting drudge it with flour, baste it with
milk, and so alternately till a quarter of an hour before the hare is
done; then baste it with a quarter of a pound of fresh butter put into
the dripping pan. Serve it up with a cullis sauce and butter put over,
and currant jelly in a sauce boat.

N. B. Baste it repeatedly, as there must be a good crust over. It will
require three pints of warm milk for that purpose.


_Pigeons._

MAY be roasted with a little stuffing in them, or plain; and served up
with parsley and butter.


_Quails, or Ruffs and Rees._

TO be roasted with bards of bacon and vine leaves over them, with sauce
in a boat made with cullis and red port in it.


_Guinea Fowls, Pea Fowls, Pullets, Chickens, and Turkey Poults._

TO be roasted either larded or plain, and served up with gravy under,
and bread and egg sauces in separate boats.


_Wild Fowl._

TO be roasted plain, not done too much, and served up with onion sauce
in a boat; as also a small quantity of gravy and red port boiled
together.


_Partridges and Pheasants._

TO be roasted plain, and served up with poivrade sauce hot, and bread
sauce in boats.


_Green Geese and Ducklings._

TO be roasted with pepper and salt put in the bellies, and served with
green sauce in a boat.


_Other Geese and tame Ducks._

TO be roasted with onion and sage chopped fine, seasoned with pepper and
salt put into the inside, and served up with apple sauce in a boat.


_To roast a Pig._

MAKE a stuffing with chopped sage, two eschallots, two eggs,
breadcrumbs, and fresh butter, and season with pepper and salt; put it
into the belly, sew it up, spit it, and rub it over with a paste brush
dipped in sweet oil. Roast it gently, and when done cut off the head;
then cut the body and the head in halves, lay them on a dish, put the
stuffing with the brains into a stewpan, add to them some good gravy,
make it boil, and serve up the pig with the sauce under it.


_To roast Sweetbreads._

BLANCH heart sweetbreads till half done, then wash and wipe them dry,
cut off some of the pipe, put yolk of eggs on the tops with a paste
brush, and strew fine breadcrumbs over. Roast them gently till done and
of a nice colour, serve them up with a toast under and melted butter
poured over, together with some cullis sauce round.


_To roast Ribs of Beef._

BONE the beef, roll it round like a fillet of veal, put a good stuffing
in the center, bind it tight, roast it gently, and serve it up with
brown oyster sauce round it.


_Fillet of Veal._

TO be done in the same manner as the above, with white oyster or cullis
sauce round.


_Observations on Meat and Poultry._

MEATS to be preferred when of a good fatness and the lean appears juicy,
but not particularly streaked with fat, as it then frequently happens to
eat hard. When the season will permit let it hang for a week, and not
more, as I have found that period bring it to its best state. Poultry,
likewise, should be chosen tolerably fat and of a soft grain. Let them
hang three or four days, which will add to their better eating; except
woodcocks, snipes, larks, or pigs, which should be dressed fresh. Be
particular that the poultry are trussed very neat.


_Stuffing for Turkies, Hares, Veal, &c._

CHOP very fine beef suet, parsley, thyme, eschallots, a very small
quantity of marjoram, savory, basil, and lemon peel, with grated nutmeg,
two eggs (or milk), pepper, salt, and an anchovie chopped (if approved).
Mix all well together.


_Gravy for Roast Meat, Steaks, and Poultry._

CUT slices of chuck beef, veal, and lean ham; pare onions, turnips, a
carrot, and cut them with celery; then add a bunch of parsley and thyme,
a few whole pepper, and a little mace. Put all the ingredients into a
stewpan, set them over a moderate fire, sweat down till the liquor
becomes of a light brown colour, and be careful not to let it burn.
Discharge it with water or beef stock, season to the palate with salt,
and, if required, add a little liquid of colour. Let it simmer till the
meat is perfectly done, skim it free from fat, and strain it through a
tamis cloth.


_Peloe of Rice._

WASH, pick, and dress, in the same manner as the directions for plain
rice, observing only, that, before it is to be set in the oven, add a
little pounded mace with the rice; and put into a stewpan a chicken half
boiled and a piece of pickle pork three parts boiled, and cover with the
rice. When it is to be served up, put the fowl and pork at the bottom of
the dish, the rice over, and garnish with boiled or fried button onions
and halves of hard eggs, which should be hot.


_Peloe of Rice another way._

WASH and pick two pounds of rice, boil it in plenty of water till half
done, with a dozen of whole cardamum seeds; then drain it, pick out the
seeds, put the rice into a stewpan, with three quarters of a pound of
fresh butter and some pounded mace, and salt to the palate. Take a loin
of house lamb or some fresh pork cut into small pieces; put them into a
frying-pan, add cinnamon, cloves, cummin and cardamum seeds, a small
quantity of each pounded and sifted, with a bit of butter and some
cayenne pepper, and fry the meat till half done. Then take two bay
leaves, four good-sized onions sliced, and add to them a pint and a half
of veal stock. Boil them till tender and rub them through a tamis cloth
or sieve; then boil the liquor over a fire till it is reduced to half a
pint, add it to the fried meat and spices, together with some peeled
button onions boiled. Then put some of the rice at the bottom of another
stewpan, then a layer of meat and onions on the rice, and so on
alternately till the whole is put in. Cover the pan close, set it in a
moderately heated oven for two hours and a half, and when it is to be
served up turn the rice out carefully on a dish.


_Timbol of Rice._

PICK, wash, and parboil the rice; then strain it, put it into a stewpan
with a little oiled butter and yolk of egg. Simmer it gently till
tender; then fill an oval tin mould with the rice, press it down close,
take the shape out of the mould, wash it lightly with a paste brush with
yolk of egg, and set it in a quick oven. When it is a good colour cut a
square piece out of the top, scoop out the inside, and fill the cavity
with fricassee of chickens, or any thing else you please.


_Petit Patties of Chicken and Ham._

SHEET the pans with puff paste, and put a bit of crumb of bread the
bigness of a dice in each; then cover them with more paste, trim round
the pan, wash the tops of the paste with egg, and bake the patties of a
light colour. When they are to be served up take out the bread, have
ready the white meat of dressed fowl, lean ham, an eschallot chopped
fine, a spoonful of consumé of veal, a little cream, flour, salt,
cayenne, and lemon juice, a small quantity of each. Mix all the
ingredients together over a fire, boil them for five minutes, fill the
patties with it, and serve them up very hot.


_Patties of Lobsters or Oysters._

BAKE patties as before directed, fill them with lobsters or oysters
chopped, add to them a little strong consumé of veal, a small quantity
of flour, lemon juice, cayenne pepper, a bit of lemon peel, an eschallot
chopped fine, an anchovie rubbed through a sieve, and mixed over a fire
for five minutes.

N. B. The lobsters or oysters are to be half boiled before they are
chopped.


_Forcemeat Patties._

SHEET the pans as for chicken patties, but instead of bits of bread fill
them with a light forcemeat well-seasoned. Cover and bake them, and
serve them up with a little cullis added to the forcemeat.


_Pulpton of Chicken, Rabbits, &c._

TAKE veal suet or beef marrow, chop it, put it into a stewpan over a
fire till melted, and when lukewarm mix it to some flour with a little
water into a paste. Knead it well, and rub fresh butter round the inside
of a mould of any shape, and strew vermicelli upon the butter. Then
sheet the mould over the vermicelli with the paste rolled of the
thickness of half an inch, and within the paste put a layer of chicken,
slices of sweetbread, mushrooms, artichoke bottoms, truffles, and
morells; after which put a little light forcemeat round with a paste
over, close it well, egg, and bake it gently. When to be served up, turn
it out of the mould, make a little hole in the top, and put into it a
good cullis.

N. B. Cut the chicken in pieces and blanch them; the sweetbreads,
truffles, and morels to be blanched, and afterwards season with pepper
and salt.


_Fishmeagre Pie._

BONE and cut into pieces a male carp; make it into a forcemeat with some
of the roe, parsley, thyme, eschallots chopped very fine, a quarter of a
pound of fresh butter, pepper, salt, a little beaten spice, half a pint
of cream, four eggs, and crumb of french bread. Afterwards take pieces
of eel, salmon, and skate, pass them with sweet herbs, pepper, salt,
lemon juice, and a bit of butter. When they are cold, put some of the
forcemeat at the bottom of a deep dish, and mix with the fish some
stewed mushrooms, button onions, truffles and morells blanched, and the
roe cut into pieces, and put them into the dish with more forcemeat
round the top; then cover with puff paste, ornament with leaves of
paste, egg it, and bake it. When it is to be served up cut a small hole
in the center of the top, and add a good cullis.


_Raised Ham Pie, with Directions for making a raised Crust._

TAKE water boiling hot, put a piece of fresh butter into it, and mix it
with flour into a paste, and as it gets cold knead it several times,
taking care it is of a good consistence but not too stiff, and then
raise it into any shape you please. Have ready part of a ham boiled till
half done, trim it to the shape of the crust, which must be big enough
to put some light forcemeat at the bottom and round the ham when in the
pie. Cover it with the same kind of paste, pinch round the top, and egg
and ornament it. Just before it is set in the oven add half a pint of
madeira wine, bake it gently for four hours, and when it is to be served
up add some good cullis, but be careful it is not too salt.


_Raised Chicken Pie._

CUT chicken into pieces, and put them into a stewpan, either blanched or
not, with a bit of fresh butter, lemon juice, pepper and salt, parsley,
thyme, eschallots chopped very fine, and a little pounded mace. When the
chicken are half done put them on a dish, and when cold raise the crust,
put light forcemeat at the bottom, the chicken upon it, and more
forcemeat round the top. Cover, bake gently, and when served up, cut off
the lid, and add a ragout of sweetbreads, cocks combs, &c. &c.

N. B. Rabbits and veal may be done in the same manner; as also pigeons,
but they are to be put into the crust whole.


_Flat Chicken Pie (or Tourte)._

CUT chicken into pieces, blanch them, and season with pepper and salt;
then put a light forcemeat at the bottom of a deep dish, and upon it
some of the chicken, some slices of throat sweetbreads seasoned, some
stewed mushrooms, truffles and morells, and upon them the remainder of
the chicken. Cover it with a puff paste, then egg and ornament the top
with leaves of paste of the same kind, bake it of a nice colour, and
when it is to be served up put into it a good cullis.

N. B. The chicken may be passed with sweet herbs, &c. and when cold put
into the dish as above. Rabbits also may be done in the same manner.


_Pigeon Pie._

WASH the pigeons in cold water and wipe them dry; then put into a deep
dish a rump steak cut into pieces, beat with a chopper, and seasoned
with pepper and salt, and upon it the pigeons with the liver, &c.
seasoned. Add also some yolk of hard eggs, cover it with puff paste, egg
and ornament it with small leaves, bake it, and add some cullis.


_Raised Turkey Pie with a Tongue._

BONE a turkey, and have ready a boiled pickled tongue; pare the
principal part, put it into the center of the turkey with some light
forcemeat well-seasoned, and some slices of throat sweetbreads. Sew it
up, and put it into boiling water for ten minutes. Then make a crust
with raised paste big enough to receive the turkey, which, when cold,
put in with bards of fat bacon upon it and forcemeat at the bottom of
the crust; then cover and ornament it as a raised chicken pie, and bake
it. When it is to be served up, take off the lid and the bards of bacon,
glaize the breast lightly, and add a cullis or green truffle sauce.

N. B. Pullets, chickens, partridges, and pheasants, may be done in the
same manner; but instead of the tongue put in whole green truffles
pared, and some truffles pounded with the forcemeat, and when served up,
add a good cullis. Or, instead of a raised crust, they may be put in a
dish and covered with puff paste, &c.


_Raised Macaroni Pie._

RAISE a crust and ornament and bake it, and when it is to be served up
have ready some hot macaroni stewed and a white fricassee of chicken in
separate stewpans. Put them alternately into the pie, strew a little
grated parmezan cheese over it, put a slip of paper round the edge of
the pie to prevent from burning, and colour the cheese with a
salamander.


_Raised Beef Steak Pie._

TAKE prime steaks of a rump of beef, cut the skin from the fat, beat the
steaks with a chopper, cut them into middling-sized pieces, then pass
them with a bit of fresh butter, pepper, salt, lemon juice, and
eschallots chopped, and when they are half done put them into a dish
till cold. Blanch oysters, strain them, and preserve the liquor; then
raise a crust, put a layer of steak at the bottom, some oysters upon it,
and so alternately; cover the pie, ornament and bake it. When it is to
be served up put into it a good cullis, with the oyster liquor and some
ketchup mixed with it.

N. B. In the same manner put steaks and oysters into a deep dish, and
cover them with puff paste.


_Veal Pie._

CUT the best end of a loin of veal into thin chops, take off part of the
bone and some of the fat from the kidney, season with pepper and salt,
put them into a deep dish with yolks of boiled eggs, cover with puff
paste, egg and ornament with leaves, bake it, and when it is to be
served up, put into it some good consumé.


_Pork Pie._

TAKE a piece of loin of pork with the rind and part of the under bone
cut off; then cut into chops, season them with pepper and salt, cover
them with puff paste, bake the pie, and when it is to be served up put
into it cullis, with the essence of two onions and a little mustard
mixed with it.

N. B. I have directed puff paste to be used for meat pies, it having the
best appearance when baked; but there is another mode which may be
thought preferable; and which is, to mix together half a pound of sifted
flour, six ounces of fresh butter, the yolks and whites of two eggs well
beaten, and a little milk and salt; then knead it well.


_Eel Pie._

SKIN and clean the eels, cut them into pieces of two inches long, pass
them with chopped parsley and eschallots, a little grated nutmeg,
pepper, salt, and lemon juice, for five minutes; then put a little light
forcemeat at the bottom of a deep dish, put the eels over it, cover with
puff paste, bake it, and put into it some benshamelle or cullis.


_Mutton Pie._

TAKE off the bone from part of a loin of mutton, cut it into chops, and
season with pepper and salt. Then put into a deep dish a layer of chops,
and upon them some slices of peeled potatoes (and if approved, some thin
slices of onions); put the remaining chops over, cover with puff paste,
bake it, and add some cullis. Or, the chops may be passed with sweet
herbs, &c. and when cold put into small or large raised crusts with the
above vegetables, and when baked add some cullis.


_Sea Pie._

TAKE small pieces of salt beef and pickle pork, veal and mutton chops, a
goose or a duck cut into pieces, onions and potatoes cut into thick
slices, and season with a little salt and plenty of pepper. Make a paste
with beef suet chopped fine, some flour and water; knead them well
together, then roll out the paste, sheet a large bowl with it, put into
it the above ingredients alternately; cover it with the paste, put a
cloth over, and boil four hours. When it is to be served up take off the
cloth, make a little hole in the top, and add a good consumé.


_Rissoles._

CUT into small slips breast of fowl, lean ham, pickle cucumbers, and
anchovies; add to them consumé, cayenne pepper, breadcrumbs, and raw
yolk of egg. Simmer them over a fire for five minutes, and be careful
not to let the mixture burn. Then put the mixture on a plate, and when
cold, cut into pieces, and dip them in yolk of raw egg, afterwards in
fine breadcrumbs, and mould them with the hands into what form you
please. Have ready boiling lard, fry them of a nice colour, drain them
dry, and serve them up with fried parsley under.


_To fry Parsley._

TAKE fresh gathered parsley, pick, wash, and drain it very dry with a
cloth. Have ready clean boiling lard, put the parsley into it, keep
stirring with a skimmer, and when a little crisp, take it out, put it on
a drainer, and strew salt over.


_Puffs with Chicken, &c._

CHOP breast of fowl, lean ham, and half an anchovie; then add a small
quantity of parsley, lemon peel, and eschallots, cut very fine, with a
little cayenne and pounded mace. Put them into a stewpan with a ragout
spoonful of benshamelle, set them over a fire for five minutes; then put
the mixture on a plate, and when cold roll out puff paste thin, cut it
into square pieces, put some of the mixture on them, fold the paste, run
a jagger iron round to make them in form of a puff, fry them in boiling
lard, and serve them up with fried parsley under.


_Wings and Legs of Fowls with Colours._

CUT the legs from a good-sized fowl and the wings as large as possible,
leaving no breast bone; then fill the cavities with light forcemeat, sew
them up neat, blanch them, drain them dry, wash the tops with raw white
of egg, and lay a small quantity of forcemeat on it, and work a sprig
with slips of lean ham and white and yellow omlets of eggs. Then put
them into a stewpan with a little stock, cover the pan close, and stew
them gently till done and the liquor nearly reduced. When they are to be
served up, put under a cullis boiled almost to a glaize.

N. B. They may be done in the same manner and served up cold; or put
round them savory jelly, instead of cullis, for an ornamental supper.


_Wings and Legs larded and glaized._

CUT the wings and legs and force them as before directed, then lard very
neat and blanch them, and stew them with a little stock. When they are
to be served up, glaize the larding, and put under a strong cullis, or
sorrel sauce, or benshamelle.

N. B. They may be done likewise in the above manner, and served up cold
for a ball supper.


_Fowl a la Menehout._

TAKE the bones out of the legs and wings, and draw them in; then split
the fowl from the top to the bottom of the back, skewer it down close,
pass it with chopped parsley, thyme, and eschallots, pepper, salt, and
lemon juice. When three parts done put it on a dish, and when cold wash
it with yolk of egg with a paste brush, strew breadcrumbs over, and
broil gently till done and of a light brown colour. Serve it up with a
cullis sauce under, with ketchup and lemon-pickle mixed in it.


_Pulled Chicken (or Turkey)._

BOIL a fowl till three parts done, and let it stand till cold; then take
off the skin, cut the white meat into slips, put them into a stewpan,
add a little cream, a very small quantity of grated lemon-peel and
pounded mace, cayenne, salt, one eschallot chopped, a little lemon
juice, and a spoonful of consumé; thicken with a little flour and water,
simmer it over a fire ten minutes, during which time score the legs and
rump, season them with pepper and salt, broil them of a good colour, and
serve them up over the pulled chicken.


_Another Way._

CUT the fowl as above, and add to it some benshamelle; or, instead of
thickening with flour and water as the above, add, five minutes before
it is to be served up, a leason of two eggs.


_Pullet a la Memorancy._

BONE it, leaving the legs and wings on; then season the inside with
pepper, salt, and beaten spice. Put a light forcemeat into it, sew it
up, truss it as for roasting, set it with hot water, lard it neat, and
roast it gently with a veal caul over. When it is done, take off the
caul, glaize the larding, and serve it up with white ragooed sweetbreads
round it, or with strong cullis or plain benshamelle.


_Chickens with Lemon Sauce._

BOIL two chickens as white as possible, or braise them with bards of
bacon over them; and when they are done wipe them dry and pour the sauce
over.


_To make Lemon Sauce._

PARE two lemons and cut them into very small pieces in the form of dice;
then take the liver and scalded parsley chopped, put them into a
stewpan, add some boiling benshamelle and a little melted butter, and
simmer over a fire for two minutes.


_Fricassee of Chickens or Rabbits (white)._

CUT them into pieces and blanch and drain them dry; then put them into a
stewpan with a little veal stock, a blade of mace, and a middling-sized
whole onion. Stew them gently till three parts done; then add slices of
blanched throat sweetbreads, stewed white button mushrooms, egg balls,
and pieces of artichoke bottoms. When they are all nearly stewed, season
with salt and a little lemon juice, add a leason of three eggs, simmer
it over a fire for five minutes, taking care not to let it curdle, and
serve it up very hot, with the mace and onion taken out.

N. B. Instead of a leason, the stock it is stewed in may be almost
reduced, and a benshamelle added with the sweetbreads, mushrooms, &c.


_Chickens or Turkies with Celery._

BOIL or braise them, and when they are to be served up wipe them dry,
and pour over them white celery sauce. Or they may be served with brown
celery sauce under them, and the breast of the poultry glaized. [See
_Celery Sauce, white and brown_.]


_Turkies, Pullets, or Chickens, with Oyster Sauce._

BOIL them, wipe them dry, and when they are to be served up pour over
them white oyster sauce.


_To make white Oyster Sauce._

BLANCH large oysters till half done, and strain and preserve the liquor;
then beard and wash them, and put the liquor, free from sediment, into
a stewpan. Add to it two ounces of fresh butter, half a pint of good
cream, a piece of lemon peel, and a blade of mace; put it over a fire,
and when it nearly boils add mixed flour and water to thicken it
properly. Season to the palate with lemon juice, salt, and a little
cayenne pepper if approved; then strain it through a fine hair sieve to
the oysters, and boil them gently five minutes.

N. B. In the same manner may be done stewed oysters for dishes, only
serve them up with sippets of bread round.


_Chickens with Peas._

TRUSS them as for boiling, blanch them five minutes, and wash them
clean; then braise them till tender with a little veal stock and bards
of fat bacon or with white paper over them. When they are to be served
up wipe them dry, glaize the tops lightly, and put pea sauce under.


_Another way to stew Chickens with Peas._

CUT the chickens into pieces, blanch and drain them dry, and put them
into a stewpan with a little veal stock; then stew them till tender and
the liquor almost reduced. When they are to be served up, put them on a
dish, and the peas sauce over.


_Fricassee of Chickens or Rabbits (brown)._

CUT the chickens into pieces, and fry them in a little lard till of a
light brown colour; then drain them with a cloth very dry; after which
put them into a stewpan, add button mushrooms stewed, pieces of
artichoke bottoms, blanched truffles, morells, egg balls, and some
good-seasoned cullis. Set them over a moderate fire, stew them gently
till done, and serve up with fried oysters round them.


_To fry Oysters for a Dish._

OPEN twenty-four large oysters, blanch them with their own liquor, and
when three parts done strain them, and preserve the liquor; then wash
and let them drain. In the meanwhile make a batter with four table
spoonfuls of flour, two eggs, a little pepper and salt, and their
liquor. Beat it well with a wooden spoon or a whisk for five minutes.
Put the oysters into the batter, mix them lightly, and have ready
boiling lard. Take the oysters out singly with a fork, put them into the
lard, and fry them of a nice brown colour. Then put them on a drainer,
strew over a small quantity of salt, and serve them up. If they are for
a dish put fried parsley under them, or stewed spinach.


_Directions for Poultry, &c. plain boiled._

LET it be observed that turkies, chickens, and meats, intended to be
plain boiled, should be soaked in cold water, and put afterwards into
plenty of boiling pump water, kept skimmed and preserved as white as
possible. The time they will take dressing depends on a little practice,
as in roasting. Be particular in trimming the meats neat, and in
trussing the poultry. The carving, likewise, should be carefully
attended to, which is frequently expressed by the phrase of _cutting
into pieces_.


_Jugged Hare._

CASE the hare, cut off the shoulders and legs, and the back into three
pieces. Daub them well with fat bacon, and put them into a stewpot with
the trimmings. Add to them allspice, mace, whole pepper, a little of
each; a small clove of garlick, three onions, two bay leaves, parsley,
thyme, and savory, tied together in a small bunch; a quart of veal
stock, three gills of red port; and simmer them over a fire till three
parts done. Then take out the shoulders, legs, and back; put them into
another stewpan, strain the liquor to them, and add some passed flour
and butter to thicken it a little. Let it stew till tender, skim it free
from fat, season with cayenne, salt, and lemon juice, and serve it up in
a deep dish.


_Glaized Hare._

CASE the hare, bone it as whole as possible, wash it, and fill the
inside with light forcemeat; then sew it up, and truss it as for
roasting. Lard the back with bacon, the same as a fricando veal; cover
it with a veal caul, and roast it very gently. When it is to be served
up, take off the caul, glaize the larding, and put strong cullis, with a
gill of red port boiled with it, under the hare.


_Duck aux Naves._

BONE a tame duck as whole as possible, and season the inside with
beaten spices, pepper, and salt; then draw in the legs and wings, and
fill the inside with light forcemeat. Sew it up, braise it in a pint of
veal stock, cover it with white paper and the cover of the stewpan. Let
it stew gently till tender, and the liquor almost reduced. When it is to
be served up glaize the breast, and pour the sauce round it, which is to
be made with turnips cut into shapes as for haricot; afterwards to be
put into a stewpan and sweated with a bit of fresh butter till three
parts done; then add a good cullis and the essence in which the duck was
braised. When it boils, skim free from fat, season to the palate, and
stew the turnips till done.


_A Duck with Cucumbers._

THE duck to be boned, braised, and served up in the same manner as the
above, but instead of turnips put cucumber sauce, or peas, as for veal
tendrons.


_A Duck a la Benshamelle._

BONE, braise, and glaize the duck as mentioned in the preceding article,
and when it is to be served up put a sauce round it made with heads of
sprue grass boiled in a little veal stock, and when tender rub them
through a tamis. Add the pulp to a small quantity of benshamelle, boil
them together for five minutes, and let the sauce be very white and
strong.


_Hashed Mutton for a Dish._

TAKE mutton ready dressed, cut it into thin slices, put them into a
stewpan with slices of pickle cucumbers, or walnuts, or onions; then
make a sauce with chopped eschallots or onions passed with a bit of
fresh butter over a slow fire till three parts done; after which add a
pint of veal stock, or gravy, and a little ketchup. Boil it ten minutes,
season to the palate with cayenne pepper and salt; then strain it to
the mutton, let it stew gently till thoroughly hot, and add a small
quantity of liquid of colour.

N. B. In the same manner may be done beef; and when it is to be served
up put the bones (which are to be seasoned with pepper and salt, and
grilled) over the hash.


_Hashed Venison._

TAKE the part least done of ready-dressed venison, cut it in slices, and
put them into a stewpan; then pass a bit of fresh butter and flour and
chopped eschallots over a slow fire for ten minutes, and add to them
half a pint of red port, a pint and a half of veal stock, its own gravy,
if any, a little piece of lemon peel, cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon
juice. Season to the palate, boil all together a quarter of an hour, and
strain it to the venison. Let it simmer gently till thoroughly hot.

N. B. The venison should not be put into the liquor above ten minutes
before it is to be served up, by reason of the fat dissolving too much.


_Hashed Fowls._

CUT into pieces (very neat) ready-dressed fowls, turkies, or rabbits,
and put them into a stewpan; then make a thickening with a bit of fresh
butter, flour, and chopped eschallots or onions mixed over a slow fire.
Discharge it with veal stock, add a little lemon pickle and ketchup,
season to the palate, put a small quantity of liquid of colour, boil for
ten minutes, strain to the poultry, and let it stew gently. When served
up, there may be put a few pieces of the fowl grilled round it.

N. B. Instead of the thickening and veal stock, may be added cullis with
lemon pickle and ketchup.


_Hashed Hare, Wild Fowl, Pheasants, or Partridges._

CUT the poultry into neat pieces, put them into a stewpan, and add a
liquor made in the same manner as for venison; or put cullis and red
port with their own gravy.


_Broiled Beef Steaks._

TAKE a small fat rump of beef, and cut off the fillet and the first two
or three steaks; then cut the remainder into steaks also, and cut the
skin from the fat. Beat them with a chopper, and season with pepper and
salt just before they are to be put on the gridiron, which should be
well cleaned, and the steaks frequently turned. When they are done
according to desire, serve them up on a hot dish with a little gravy
under, some scraped horseradish, chopped eschallots, and pickles, on
small plates, and oyster sauce in a sauce boat, or with slices of
onions dipped in batter and fried.

N. B. The fillet and outside steaks of the rump may be made into a
pudding, in order to have prime steaks for broiling.


_Beef Steak Pudding._

TAKE flour, chopped suet, some milk, a little salt, and one egg, and mix
them well together. Roll out the paste of half an inch thick, and sheet
a bason or a bowl with it. Then trim the skin from the meat, beat the
steaks well with a chopper, cut them into middling-sized pieces, season
with pepper and salt, put them into the bason with blanched oysters and
slices of potatoes alternately (or slices of onions, if approved). Cover
the top with paste, and tie a cloth over the bason. Boil the pudding (if
of a middling size) two hours; and when it is to be served up put into
it a little cullis and ketchup.


_Oyster Sauce for Beef Steaks._

BLANCH a pint of oysters, and preserve their liquor; then wash and beard
them, and put their liquor into a stewpan with india soy and ketchup, a
small quantity of each, and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Set
them over a fire, and when nearly boiling thicken with flour and water;
season to the palate with a little cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon
juice; strain it to the oysters, and stew them gently five minutes.


_To dress Mutton, Lamb, or Pork Chops in a plain Manner._

CUT a loin of mutton, lamb, or pork, into chops of a middling thickness;
beat them with a chopper, trim off a sufficient quantity of the bone and
fat; then season with pepper and salt, broil them over a clear moderate
fire, and serve them up very hot with gravy.

N. B. Lamb chops may have stewed spinach or fried parsley underneath.


_To dress Veal Cutlets._

BEAT the cutlets with a chopper, and cut them into middling-sized
pieces; then strew on each side of them a mixture of breadcrumbs,
chopped parsley and thyme, grated nutmeg, pepper and salt, and broil
them over a clear fire till done and of a nice colour. Serve them up
with cullis sauce and ketchup in it, or stewed mushrooms and cullis.
Rashers of broiled bacon and fried oysters (a few of each if approved)
may be put round the cutlets or chops, which may be done in the same
manner.


_Minced Veal for a Dish._

CUT into small pieces ready dressed veal, put it into a stewpan, add to
it a very small quantity of grated lemon peel and a little benshamelle;
season to the palate with cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and salt; stew
the veal gently ten minutes, and serve it up with sippets of bread round
it either fried or plain.


_Minced Veal another way._

ADD to the veal a little stock, one eschallot chopped fine, some grated
nutmeg and grated lemon peel, a very small quantity of each. Season with
cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and salt. Let it stew ten minutes, and just
before it is to be served up add a leason of two eggs and cream, simmer
them together five minutes, and be careful it does not burn nor curdle.
Sippets of bread, likewise, to be placed round.


_Partridges or Pheasants au Choux._

BONE the birds, put into them some light forcemeat well-seasoned; sew
them up, blanch and wipe them dry, and braise them in a pint of stock
till tender. After which cut two savoys into quarters and boil them till
a fourth part done; then squeeze them and tie round with twine, put them
into a stewpan, add a pint of stock, and boil them gently till done.
Then take the savoys out, cut off the strings, put the birds into the
center of a dish, the savoys round them, and set the dish in an oven or
in a warm place covered over. Then mix the two liquors together, season
to the palate with pepper, salt, and lemon juice. Make it of a proper
thickness with flour and water, boil it till three parts reduced, add a
little colour and strain it. When the birds are to be served up glaize
their breasts lightly, and put the sauce over the savoys.


_Partridges or Pheasants with Truffles._

BONE the birds, and force and braise them in a small quantity of stock.
When they are to be served up glaize the breasts lightly, and put green
truffle sauce round them, with the essence of the birds mixed in it.


_Turkey with Truffles._

TRUSS the turkey as for boiling, put some light forcemeat with truffles
pounded with it into the cavity near the breast, and secure it from
falling out. Then put slices of lemon, some salt, and bards of fat bacon
on the breast, and white paper over it bound on with packthread, and
roast gently (if a good-sized turkey) one hour and a half. When it is to
be served up, take off the paper, glaize the breast, and put the truffle
sauce round the turkey.

N. B. In the same manner may be done pullets or chickens.


_Truffle Sauce for Turkies, &c._

PUT green truffles into water, clean them well with a hard brush, cut
the outside paring thinly off, trim them into shapes or round, put the
trimmings into a marble mortar, pound them, and add to the forcemeat
which is to be put into the cavity near the breast of the turkey. Then
put the truffles into a stewpan with a pint of beef stock, stew them
gently, and when the liquor is almost reduced add some cullis
well-seasoned.


_Turkey with Chesnuts._

TRUSS the turkey as for boiling, stuff it with light forcemeat and
Spanish chesnuts whole, and paper and roast it as a turkey with
truffles. When it is to be served up, glaize the breast and put chesnut
sauce round it, made with good cullis and chesnuts, which should be
boiled till half done, and then roasted in a frying pan till wholly
done; after which let them be peeled and put into the cullis five
minutes before the turkey is served up.


_Turkey with Ragout._

STUFF it in the plain way, boil it, and when it is to be served up put
over the following sauce:--Take slices of throat sweetbreads blanched,
white button mushrooms stewed, artichoke bottoms boiled till half done
and cut in halves, cocks combs boiled till done, a few egg balls
scalded; add a good benshamelle, and stew them gently for ten minutes.
Or, instead of benshamelle, there may be put to the above ingredients
half a pint of veal stock, and let them all be boiled ten minutes; then
add a leason of three eggs and cream, simmer them together five minutes
more, and season with salt, lemon juice, and cayenne pepper.


_Rabbits with Onions._

BOIL them as white as possible, and when they are to be served up, wipe
them dry and put over onion sauce, made thus:--Take mild onions peeled,
and boiled till three parts done; then squeeze and chop them but not too
small; add a bit of fresh butter, a little salt and flour, a sufficient
quantity of cream to mix them, and a little white ground pepper, if
approved. Let the sauce be of a good thickness, and simmered over a slow
fire for ten minutes.


_Glaized Sweetbreads._

LARD very neat two heart sweetbreads, then blanch and braise or roast
them; and when they are to be served up, glaize the top part, and put
stewed endive under them.


_Matelote of Rabbits._

CUT them into pieces and blanch and wash them; then put them into a
stewpan with a gill of water, cover close and preserve them as white as
possible. When they are nearly done and the liquor almost reduced, which
should not be of any colour, add half a pint of good benshamelle, a few
whole boiled cocks combs, pickle cucumbers, ham, tongue, omlets of eggs
(the same as for garnishing) cut into small squares, and a few stewed
button mushrooms. Stew them together for ten minutes, and serve the
matelote up directly.


_Sweetbreads en Erison._

TO be done in the same manner as neck of veal, which see.


_Stewed Giblets plain._

CUT two pair of scalded goose giblets into pieces of two inches long;
then blanch them, trim the bones from the ends, and wash the giblets;
after which drain them dry, put them into a stewpan with half a pint of
stock, cover the pan close, simmer over a slow fire till three parts
done and the liquor nearly reduced, then add good-seasoned cullis, and
stew them till tender.


_Stewed Giblets with Peas._

PROCEED as with the above, except, instead of plain cullis, take a pint
of shelled young green peas, and sweat them till three parts done with a
bit of fresh butter and a little salt; then add some cullis, put them to
the giblets, and stew them till tender. If requisite put a little liquid
of colour.


_Green Truffles for a Dish._

WELL clean two pounds of green truffles; then put them into a stewpan
with half a pint of stock, a gill of red port, and a little salt, and
boil them gently half an hour. When they are to be served up, drain them
dry and put them into a folded napkin. They are to be eaten with cold
fresh butter, or with oil, vinegar, and cayenne pepper.

N. B. The liquor they were boiled in may be made into a cullis, and put
into different sauces, such as haricot, ragout, or celery, &c.


_Rabbits en Gallentine for a Dish._

BONE two rabbits, lay them flat, put a little light forcemeat upon them,
and slips of lean ham, breast of fowl, and omlets of eggs white and
yellow, the same as for garnishing. Roll the rabbits up tight and sew
them, lard the top part with slips of fat bacon very neat, and blanch
and braise them. When they are to be served up glaize the larding, and
put good cullis under them.


_Ham braised._

TAKE a mellow smoked ham perfectly clean; then well trim and put it
into a braising pan; after which, add to it four quarts of water, a
bottle of madeira wine, and a few bay leaves. Cover the pan close, and
simmer the ham over a moderate fire till very tender. Then wipe it quite
dry, take off the rind, glaize the top part, and serve it up on a large
dish with stewed spinach on one side and mashed turnips on the other.

N. B. Hams may be plain boiled and served up in the same manner.

Pickled tongues may be stuffed with marrow and boiled, then peeled, and
served up with the above vegetables and in the same manner.


_Jerusalem Artichokes stewed._

PARE and cut them into halves, boil them in a little consumé till nearly
done and the liquor almost reduced; then add a bit of fresh butter,
salt, flour, and cream, a small quantity of each. Set them over a fire
for five minutes, and serve them up with fried bread round.


_Jerusalem Artichokes another way._

PARE and cut them into shapes as for haricot, and fry them in
boiling-hot lard till of a light brown colour; then drain them dry, put
them into a stewpan, and add a little strong cullis with a small
quantity of vinegar and mustard mixed in it. Serve them up with fried
bread round.


_Mashed Potatoes._

PARE and steam or boil floury potatoes, and mash them with a wooden
spoon; then add a bit of fresh butter, a little salt, and some milk or
cream. Mix them well together over a fire for five minutes, then put
them in the center of a dish, make them smooth, chequer the top with the
back of a knife, and put some whole potatoes round if approved. Serve
them up very hot, but be careful the mash is not too thin, and preserve
them as white as possible.

N. B. The same mash may be put into scollop shells and coloured with a
salamander; or the mash may be mixed with yolk of egg, then moulded with
the hands into round balls, and fried in boiling lard.


_Cauliflower with Parmezan Cheese._

CUT off the leaves and stalk, boil it in salt and water till nearly
done, and drain till dry. Have ready a dish with fried bread dipped in
white of raw egg, and put round the rim. Set the flower in the center of
the dish, and pour over it a sauce made with boiling-hot benshamelle,
and, three minutes before it is to be put over the cauliflower, add
grated parmezan cheese.


_Cauliflower a la Sauce._

BOIL the flower, and either serve it up whole or in pieces, placed round
each other in a dish. The sauce over it to be boiling hot and of a good
thickness, made with strong cullis, a little vinegar, and fresh butter
mixed together.

N. B. Broccoli may be done in the same manner.


_Cauliflower a la Cream._

BOIL the flower and pour over it the following sauce:--Take a gill of
consumé and a table spoonful of vinegar, which put into a stewpan and
set over a fire till hot, and five minutes before it is to be sent to
table add a leason of two eggs and a gill of cream.


_Stewed Artichoke Bottoms._

BOIL six artichokes till half done; then take the leaves and choke away,
trim the bottoms neat with a knife, or cut them with a shape; after
which put them into a stewpan, add half a pint of stock, a little salt
and lemon juice, and boil them gently till done. When they are to be
served up wipe them dry, put them in the center of a dish with fried
bread round the rim, and a strong bright cullis over them, or
benshamelle.


_French Beans a la Cream for a Dish._

CUT young beans in slips, boil them in plenty of water and salt to
preserve them green, and when they are done drain them dry. Then put
into a stewpan two ounces of fresh butter, the yolks of three eggs beat
up in a gill of cream, and set over a slow fire. When it is hot add a
table spoonful of vinegar and the beans, simmer all together for five
minutes, and keep stirring the beans with a wooden spoon to prevent the
mixture from burning or curdling.


_Stewed Cardoons._

CUT the heads in pieces, take off the outside skin, wash, and scald
them; then put them into a stewpan, add a little stock to cover them,
boil till three parts done and the liquor almost reduced, then add a
small quantity of benshamelle and stew them gently till done. Serve them
up with sippets of fried bread and stewed watercresses alternately round
the rim of the dish, and the cardoons in the center. Or they may be done
in the same manner with cullis instead of benshamelle.


_Vegetables in a Mould._

SHEET the inside of an oval jelly or cake mould with bards of fat bacon;
then put upright alternately round the inside of the bacon slips of
cleaned turnips, carrots, pickle cucumbers, and celery and asparagus
heads. Lay a forcemeat at the bottom and round the inside of the
vegetables, filling the center with small pieces of veal or mutton
passed with sweet herbs, pepper, salt, and lemon juice. Cover it with
forcemeat, wash it with yolk of egg, and bake it. When it is to be
served up turn it gently out of the mould into a deep dish, take off the
bacon, make a little hole at the top, and add a small quantity of good
cullis.


_Broiled Mushrooms._

CLEAN with a knife fresh forced mushrooms, and wash and drain them dry.
Then make a case with a sheet of writing paper, rub the inside well with
fresh butter, and fill it with the mushrooms. Season them with pepper
and salt, put them upon a baking plate over a slow fire, cover them with
a stewpot cover with some fire upon it, and when the mushrooms are
nearly dry, serve them up very hot.


_Stewed Mushrooms (brown)._

CLEAN with a knife a pottle of fresh forced mushrooms, put them into
water, and when they are to be stewed take them out with the hands to
avoid the sediment. Then put them into a stewpan with an ounce and an
half of fresh butter, a little salt, and the juice of half a lemon.
Cover the stewpan close, put it over a fire, and let the mushrooms boil
for five minutes. Then thicken them with a little flour and water mixed,
add a small quantity of liquid of colour, (some cayenne if approved,)
and stew them gently for five minutes more.


_Stewed Mushrooms (white)._

LET the same process be followed as above; but instead of adding liquid
of colour put to them a gill of good cream.


_Mashed Turnips._

PARE and boil them till three parts done; then squeeze them between two
plates, put them into a stewpan, add flour, fresh butter, cream, and
salt, a little of each. Mix them well over a fire, stew them gently for
five minutes, and preserve them as white as possible.


_Potatoes creamed._

PARE good potatoes, cut them into quarters, trim them round, and put
them into a stewpan. Boil them gently till half done, drain them dry,
add to them cream, salt, and fresh butter, a small quantity of each, or
some benshamelle. Stew them very gently till they are done, and be
careful they do not break.


_Stewed Watercresses._

PICK and wash twelve bunches of watercresses, boil them till half done,
and drain and squeeze them dry; then chop and put them into a stewpan,
add to them cullis, cream, salt, pepper, and flour, a little of each.
Stew them gently ten minutes, and serve them up with fried bread round.


_A neat Dish of Vegetables._

WASH a dish with white of raw egg, then make four divisions in it with
fried bread, and put alternately in each the following vegetables:--in
the first, stewed spinach; in the second, mashed turnips; in the third,
mashed potatoes; and in the fourth, slices of carrots and some button
onions blanched: afterwards stew them in a little cullis, and when they
are put into the dish let the essence adhere to them: or in the fourth
partition put pieces of cauliflower or heads of broccoli.

N. B. Instead of fried bread to make the divisions, may be used mashed
potatoes and yolks of eggs mixed together, and put on a dish in as many
partitions as approved; afterwards baked till of a nice colour, and
served up with any kind of stewed vegetable alternately.


_Vegetable Pie._

CUT celery heads two inches long, turnips and carrots into shapes, some
peeled button onions or two Spanish onions, artichoke bottoms cut into
quarters, pieces of cauliflowers or heads of broccoli, and heads of
large asparagus. Let all the vegetables be washed clean; then boil each
separately in a sufficient quantity of water to cover them, and as they
get tender strain the liquor into one stewpan and put the vegetables
into another. Then add to their essences half a pint of strong consumé,
thicken it with flour and water, season to the palate with cayenne
pepper, salt, and lemon juice; add also a little colour. Let it boil ten
minutes and strain it to the vegetables; then simmer them together, and
serve them up in a raised pie crust, or in a deep dish with a raised
crust baked round it, of two inches high.


_Fried Potatoes._

PARE and slice potatoes half an inch thick; then wipe them dry, flour,
and put them into boiling hot lard or dripping, and fry them of a light
brown colour. Then drain them dry, sprinkle a little salt over, and
serve them up directly with melted butter in a sauce boat.


_Fried Onions with Parmezan Cheese._

PARE six large mild onions, and cut them into round slices of half an
inch thick. Then make a batter with flour, half a gill of cream, a
little pepper, salt, and three eggs, beat up for ten minutes; after
which add a quarter of a pound of parmezan cheese grated fine and mixed
well together, to which add the onions. Have ready boiling lard; then
take the slices of onions out of the batter with a fork singly, and fry
them gently till done and of a nice brown colour. Drain them dry, and
serve them up placed round each other. Melted butter with a little
mustard in it to be served in a sauce boat.


_Pickle Tongue forced._

BOIL it till half done, then peel it, and cut a piece out of the under
part from the center, and put it into a marble mortar. Then add three
ounces of beef marrow, half a gill of cream, the yolk of two eggs, a few
breadcrumbs, a little pepper, and a spoonful of madeira wine. Pound them
well together, fill the cavity in the tongue with it, sew it up, cover
it with a veal caul, and roast till tender, or boil it.


_Stewed Endive._

TRIM off the green part of endive heads, wash and cut them into pieces,
and scald them till half done; then squeeze, chop, and put them into a
stewpan; add a small quantity of strong cullis, stew it till tender, and
serve it up in a sauce boat, or it may be put under roast mutton.


_Forced Cucumbers._

PARE fresh gathered cucumbers of a middling-size; then cut them into
halves, take out the seeds with a knife, fill the cavity with forcemeat,
and bind the two halves together with strong thread. Put them into a
stewpan with vinegar, salt, and veal stock, a small quantity of each.
Set them over a fire, simmer them till three parts done, and reduce the
liquor; then add with it a strong cullis, put it to the cucumbers, and
stew them gently till done.


_To stew Peas for a Dish._

PUT a quart of fresh shelled young peas into a stewpan, add to them a
quarter of a pound of fresh butter, a middling-sized onion sliced very
fine, a cos or cabbage lettuce washed and cut into pieces, and a very
little salt. Cover the pan close, put it over a moderate fire, and
sweat the peas till half done. Make them of a proper thickness with
flour and water, add a spoonful of essence of ham, season to the palate
with cayenne pepper, and add a small lump of sugar if approved. Let the
peas stew gently till tender, being careful not to let them burn.


_Salad of Asparagus._

SCALE and cut off the heads of large asparagus, boil them till nearly
done, strain, and put them into cold water for five minutes, and drain
them dry; afterwards lay them in rows on a dish, put slices of lemon
round the rim, and mix well together a little mustard, oil, vinegar,
cayenne pepper, and salt, and put it over the asparagus just before they
are to be eaten.


_Asparagus Peas._

SCALE sprue grass, cut it into pieces the bigness of peas as far as the
green part extends from the heads, and wash and put them into a
stewpan. To a quart of grass peas add half a pint of hot water lightly
salted, and boil them till three parts done; after which strain and
preserve the liquor, which boil down till nearly reduced, and put to it
three ounces of fresh butter, half a gill of cream, a little sifted
sugar, flour, and water, sufficient to make it of a proper thickness;
add the peas, stew them till tender, and serve them up with the top of a
french roll toasted and buttered put under them in a dish.


_Another way._

BOIL the peas in salt and water till nearly done, strain and put them
into a stewpan, add to them a little sifted sugar, two ounces of fresh
butter, a table spoonful of essence of ham, half a gill of cream, with
two yolks of raw eggs beat up in it; stew them gently five minutes, and
be careful they do not burn. Serve them up in the same manner as the
above.

N. B. Large heads of asparagus may be done in the same manner whole.


_Stewed Asparagus for Sauce._

SCALE sprue or large asparagus, then cut off the heads as far as they
are eatable, boil them till nearly done, strain them, and pour cold
water over to preserve them green. Then make (boiling) a good strong
cullis, and put in the heads five minutes before the sauce is served up,
which may be put over tendrons of veal, lamb, &c.

N. B. Some tops of sprue grass may be boiled in a little stock till
tender, and rubbed through a tamis. The pulp to be put to the cullis
before the heads are added.


_Directions for Vegetables._

IT is necessary to remember, that in dressing vegetables of every kind,
they should be gathered fresh, picked clean, trimmed or pared neatly,
and washed in several waters. Those that are to be plain boiled should
be put into plenty of boiling water and salt. If they are not to be used
directly, when they are three parts done put them into cold water for
five minutes, such as spinach, greens, cauliflowers, and broccoli, as it
preserves their colour; and when they are to be served up put them again
into boiling water till done, then drain them dry.

N. B. Potatoes and carrots are best steamed.


_Pickled Oysters._

PUT two dozen of large oysters into a stewpan over a fire with their
liquor only, and boil them five minutes; then strain the liquor into
another stewpan, and add to it a bay leaf, a little cayenne pepper,
salt, a gill and a half of vinegar, half a gill of ketchup, a blade of
mace, a few allspice, and a bit of lemon peel. Boil it till three parts
reduced, then beard and wash the oysters, put them to the pickle, and
boil them together two minutes. When they are to be served up place the
oysters in rows, and strain the liquor over them. Garnish the dish with
slices of lemon or barberries.


_Oyster Atlets._

BLANCH throat sweetbreads, and cut them into slices; then take rashers
of bacon the bigness of the slices of the sweetbreads, and as many large
oysters blanched as there are pieces of sweetbread and bacon. Put the
whole into a stewpan with a bit of fresh butter, parsley, thyme, and
eschallots, chopped very fine, pepper, salt, and lemon juice, a small
quantity of each. Put them over a slow fire, and simmer them five
minutes; then lay them on a dish, and when a little cool, put upon a
small wooden or silver skewer a slice of sweetbread, a slice of bacon,
and an oyster, and so alternately till the skewers are full; then put
breadcrumbs over them, which should be rubbed through a hair sieve, and
broil the atlets gently till done and of a light brown colour. Serve
them up with a little cullis under them, together with the liquor from
the blanched oysters reduced and added to it.


_Scollop Oysters._

BLANCH the oysters and strain them; then add to their liquor, which must
be free from sediment, a good piece of fresh butter, a little pepper and
salt, some lemon peel and grated nutmeg, a small quantity of each. Then
beard and wash the oysters, add them to the ingredients, simmer them
over a fire five minutes, and put the oysters into scollop shells with
the liquor. If there be more than sufficient, boil it till nearly
reduced and add it; then put fine breadcrumbs over, smooth them with a
knife, bake or set them over a fire upon a gridiron for half an hour,
and colour the top part with a salamander.


_Oyster Loaves._

TAKE small french rasped rolls, and cut a little piece off the top part;
then take the crumb entirely out, and afterwards fry the case and tops
in boiling lard only till they are crisp and of a light colour. Drain
them dry, keep them warm, and just before they are to be served up put
oysters into them, done in the same manner as for scollops, with the top
of the rolls over.


_Ragout of Sweetbreads (brown)._

TAKE throat sweetbreads blanched and cut into slices; morells blanched,
cut into halves, and washed free from grit; some stewed mushrooms, egg
balls, artichoke bottoms, or jerusalem artichokes, boiled till half done
and cut into pieces; green truffles pared, cut into slices half an inch
thick, and stewed in a little stock till it is nearly reduced; and cocks
combs boiled till three parts done. Then mix all the ingredients
together, add some cullis, stew them gently a quarter of an hour, and
season to the palate.


_Ragout of Sweetbreads (white)._

PUT into a stewpan some stewed mushrooms, egg balls, slices of blanched
throat sweetbreads, cocks combs boiled till nearly done, and half a pint
of consumé. Stew them ten minutes, then pour the liquor into another
stewpan, and reduce it over a fire to one half the quantity. Beat up the
yolks of two eggs, a gill of cream, a little salt, and strain them
through a hair sieve to the sweetbreads, &c. then put them over a slow
fire and let them simmer five minutes; or the above four articles may be
put into a stewpan with some benshamelle only, and stewed till done.


_Poached Eggs with Sorrel or Endive._

TAKE a slice of bread round a loaf, and cut it to cover three parts of
the inside of a dish; then fry it in boiling lard till of a light
colour, drain it dry, and lay it in a warm place. Then wash and chop
sorrel, squeeze and put it into a stewpan with a bit of fresh butter,
cayenne pepper, and a table spoonful of essence of ham; simmer it till
done, thicken it with flour and water, boil it five minutes, butter the
toast, poach the eggs, and drain them; then lay them over the bread, put
the sorrel sauce round, and serve them up very hot.


_Buttered Eggs._

BREAK twelve eggs into a stewpan, add a little parsley chopped fine, one
anchovie picked and rubbed through a hair sieve, two table spoonfuls of
consumé or essence of ham, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter made
just warm, and a small quantity of cayenne pepper. Beat all together,
set them over a fire, and keep stirring with a wooden spoon till they
are of a good thickness, and to prevent their burning. Serve them up in
a deep dish with a fresh toast under them.


_Fried Eggs, &c._

TAKE slices of ham or rashers of bacon, and broil, drain, and put them
into a deep plate. Have ready a little boiling lard in a stewpan, break
the eggs into it, and when they are set, turn and fry them not more than
two minutes. Then take them out with a skimmer, drain them, and serve
them up very hot over the bacon or ham. Put a strong cullis, with a
little mustard and vinegar (but no salt) in it, under them.


_Eggs a la Trip._

BOIL the eggs gently five minutes, then peel, wash, and cut them in
halves; put them into a stewpan, add a little warm strong benshamelle,
and a small quantity of parsley chopped very fine. Simmer them over a
fire a few minutes, and serve them up plain, or with fried oysters round
them.


_Omlet of Eggs._

BREAK ten eggs, add to them a little parsley and one eschallot chopped
fine, one anchovie picked and rubbed through a hair sieve, a small
quantity of grated ham, a little pepper, and mix them well together.
Have ready an iron frying-pan, which has been prepared over a fire with
a bit of butter burnt in it for some time, in order that the eggs might
not adhere to the pan when turned out. Wipe the pan very clean and dry;
put into it two ounces of fresh butter, and when hot put in the mixture
of eggs; then stir it with a wooden spoon till it begins to thicken,
mould it to one side of the pan, let it remain one minute to brown, put
a stewpan cover over it, and turn it over into a dish, and if approved
(which will be a good addition) pour round it a little strong cullis,
and serve it up very hot.

There may be added also, a small quantity of boiled tops of asparagus or
celery, some fowl, or oysters, or other ingredients, pounded and rubbed
through a sieve, with a table spoonful of cream and one of ketchup. Then
add the pulp to the eggs, beat them well together, and fry them as
above. Or the mixture, instead of being fried, may be put over a fire
and stirred till it begins to thicken; then put it on a toast, colour it
with a hot salamander, and serve it up with a little cullis or
benshamelle, or green truffle sauce underneath.


_Fricassee of Tripe._

CUT the tripe into small slips, and boil in a little consumé till the
liquor is nearly reduced; then add to it a leason, of two yolks of eggs
and cream, a small quantity of salt, cayenne pepper, and chopped
parsley. Simmer all together over a slow fire for five minutes, and
serve it up immediately. Or instead of the leason, &c. a little
benshamelle and chopped parsley may be added.


_Lambs Tails and Ears._

SCALD four tails and five ears very clean, and braise them in a pint of
veal stock. When the tails are half done, take them out, egg and
breadcrumb them over, and broil them gently. Let the ears be stewed till
three parts done, and nearly reduce the liquor; then add cullis, stew
them till tender, and serve them up with the sauce in the center of the
dish, the tails round them, and a bunch of pickle barberries over each
ear. Or the tails and ears may be stewed in a little stock till tender;
then add a leason of eggs and cream, and serve them up with twelve heads
of large asparagus cut three inches long, boiled till done, and put over
plain. Let the heads be preserved as green as possible.


_Curried Atlets._

TAKE slices of throat sweetbreads, and slices of veal or mutton of the
same size; put them into a stewpan with a bit of fresh butter, a table
spoonful of currie powder, the juice of half a lemon, and a little salt.
Set them over a slow fire, and when they are half done add to them
blanched and bearded oysters with their liquor free from sediment.
Simmer all together five minutes, lay them on a dish, and when cold put
them alternately on small wooden or silver skewers. Then dip them in the
liquor, strew fine breadcrumbs on each side, broil them over a clear
fire till of a brown colour, and serve them up with some currie sauce
under them.

N. B. The slices of sweetbread, oysters, veal, and mutton, to be of an
equal number.


_To stew Maccaroni._

BOIL a quarter of a pound of riband maccaroni in beef stock till nearly
done; then strain it and add a gill of cream, two ounces of fresh
butter, a table spoonful of the essence of ham, three ounces of grated
parmezan cheese, and a little cayenne pepper and salt. Mix them over a
fire for five minutes, then put it on a dish, strew grated parmezan
cheese over it, smooth it with a knife, and colour with a very hot
salamander.


_Stewed Cheese._

CUT small into a stewpan cheshire and gloucester cheese, a quarter of a
pound of each; then add a gill of lisbon wine, a table spoonful of
water, and (if approved) a tea spoonful of mustard. Mix them over a fire
till the cheese is dissolved; then have ready a cheese plate with a
lighted lamp beneath, put the mixture in, and serve it up directly. Send
with it some fresh toasted bread in a toast rack.


_To prepare a Batter for frying the following different articles, being
a sufficient quantity for one Dish._

Take four ounces of best flour sifted, a little salt and pepper, three
eggs, and a gill of beer; beat them together with a wooden spoon or a
whisk for ten minutes. Let it be of a good thickness to adhere to the
different articles.


_Fried Celery._

CUT celery heads three inches long, boil them till half done, wipe them
dry, and add to the batter. Have ready boiling lard, take out the heads
singly with a fork, fry them of a light colour, drain them dry, and
serve them up with fried parsley under.


_Fried Peths._

TO be done, and served up in the same manner as the above.


_Fried Sweetbreads._

LET some throat sweetbreads be blanched, then cut into slices, and
served up in the like way.


_Fried Artichoke Bottoms._

LET the chokes be boiled till the leaves can be taken away, then cut the
bottoms into halves and fry them in batter as the beforementioned
articles; then serve them up with melted butter in a sauce boat with a
little ground white pepper in it.


_Fried Tripe and Onions._

CUT the tripe into slips of four inches long and three inches wide, dip
them in the batter and fry them. When it is to be served up put under it
slices of onions cut one inch thick, and fry them in the same manner.
Or, instead of slips of tripe, pieces of cowheel may be used; and let
melted butter be sent in a sauce boat with a little mustard in it, and
(if approved) a table spoonful of vinegar.


_Hard Eggs fried._

LET the eggs be boiled five minutes; then peel, wipe them dry, cut them
in halves, dip them in batter, and fry them of a light brown colour.
Serve them up with stewed spinach under, with a little strong cullis and
essence of ham mixed in it.


_To dress a Lamb's Fry._

SCALD the fry till half done; then strain, wash, and wipe it dry; dip
the pieces in yolks of eggs, and breadcrumb them; fry them in plenty of
boiling lard, and serve them up with fried parsley underneath.


_Another Way._

SCALD the fry as above, and instead of dipping them in egg fry them in a
plain way with a piece of butter till they are of a light brown colour;
then drain and sprinkle a little pepper and salt over, and serve them up
with fried parsley underneath.


_Puffs with Forcemeat of Vegetables._

PUT into a stewpan a little fat bacon cut small, the same quantity of
lean veal, some parsley and eschallots chopped together, and season
with pepper, salt, and beaten spice. Then add six french beans, twelve
heads of asparagus, six mushrooms chopped, and a little lemon juice.
Stew the ingredients gently for ten minutes, then put them into a marble
mortar, add a little cream, breadcrumbs, and yolk of egg, pounded well
together. Then roll out puff paste half an inch thick, cut it into
square pieces, fill them with the forcemeat, fold them, run a jagger
iron round to form them like a puff, and fry them in boiling lard. Let
them be of a brown colour, and drain them dry; then serve them up with
sauce under them, made with a little cullis, lemon pickle, and ketchup.


_Rammequins._

PUT into a pan four ounces of grated parmezan cheese, two ounces of
fresh butter just warm, two yolks of eggs, a little parsley and an
eschallot chopped fine, one anchovie picked and rubbed through a hair
sieve, some cream, pepper, and salt, a small quantity of each, and beat
them well together with a wooden spoon. Then make paper cases of three
inches long, two inches wide, and two inches deep, and fill them with
the mixture. Then whisk the whites of two eggs to a solid froth, put a
little over the mixture in each case, and bake them either in an oven,
or on a baking plate over a fire with a stewpot cover over them. Serve
them up as soon as they are done.


_To dress part of a Wild Boar._

PUT into a braising pan fourteen pounds weight of the boar; add to it a
bottle of red port, eight onions sliced, six bay leaves, cayenne pepper,
salt, a few cloves, mace, allspice, and two quarts of veal stock. Stew
it gently, and when tender take it out of the liquor, put it into a deep
dish, and set it in an oven. Then strain the liquor, reduce it to one
quart, thicken it a little with passed flour and butter, and season it
to the palate with lemon pickle. Let it boil ten minutes, skim it clean,
pour it over the meat, and serve it up.


_Plovers Eggs, to be served up in different ways._

BOIL them twenty minutes, and when they are cold peel and wipe them dry;
then lay them in a dish and put chopped savory jelly round and between
them, and slices of lemon and bunches of pickled barberries round the
rim of the dish. Or they may be served up in ornamental paper or wax
baskets, with pickled parsley under them, and either peeled or not. Or
they may be sent to the table hot in a napkin.


_Buttered Lobsters._

BOIL two lobsters till half done; then take off the tails, cut the
bodies in halves, pick out the meat, and leave the shells whole. Then
break the tails and claws, cut the meat very small, put it into a
stewpan with a table spoonful of the essence of ham, two ounces of fresh
butter, consumé and cream half a gill of each, a little beaten mace, one
eschallot and parsley chopped very fine, and a few breadcrumbs. Then mix
all together over a fire for five minutes, season to the palate with
cayenne pepper, salt, and lemon juice; fill the reserved shells with the
mixture, strew fine breadcrumbs over, and bake them gently twenty
minutes. When they are to be served up colour the crumbs with a
salamander.

N. B. In the same manner may be done a pickled crab.


_Meat Cake._

CUT the fillet from the inside of a rump of beef into small pieces,
also lean veal, and pound them very fine in a marble mortar. Then add a
little lemon juice, pepper, salt, chopped parsley, basil, thyme,
mushrooms, savory, and eschallots, a small quantity of each; some beaten
spices, and yolks of eggs a sufficient quantity to bind it. Then add and
mix with your hands some fat bacon and lean of ham cut into the form of
small dice. Have ready a stewpan or a mould lined with bards of fat
bacon, fill it with the mixture, press it down, put on the top bay
leaves and a little rhenish wine, cover it with bards of bacon, put it
into a moderate oven, and bake it thoroughly. When it is cold turn it
out of the mould, trim it clean, set it on a dish, put chopped savory
jelly round it, and a small modelled figure on the top; or the whole of
the cake may be modelled.


_Collared Pig._

BONE the pig; then have ready some light forcemeat, slips of lean ham,
pickled cucumbers, fat bacon, white meat of fowl, and omlet of eggs
white and yellow. Season the inside of the pig with beaten spices; then
lay on them the forcemeat, and on that the slips of the above different
articles alternately; after which roll it up, put it into a cloth, tie
each end, sew the middle part, put it into a stewpan with a sufficient
quantity of stock to cover it, and stew it two hours and a half. Then
take it out of the liquor, tie each end tighter, lay it between two
boards, and put a weight upon it to press it. When cold take it out of
the cloth, trim and serve it up whole, either modelled or plain, or cut
into slices, and put chopped savory jelly round.

N. B. In the same manner may be done a breast of veal, or a large fowl.


_Red Beef for Slices._

TAKE a piece of thin flank of beef, and cut off the skin; then rub it
well with a mixture made with two pounds of common salt, two ounces of
bay salt, two ounces of salt petre, and half a pound of moist sugar,
pounded in a marble mortar. Put it into an earthen pan, and turn and rub
it every day for a week; then take it out of the brine, wipe it, and
strew over pounded mace, cloves, pepper, a little allspice, and plenty
of chopped parsley and a few eschallots. Then roll it up, bind it round
with tape, boil it till tender, press it in like manner as collared pig,
and when it is cold, cut into slices, and garnish with pickled
barberries.


_Savory Jelly._

TAKE the liquor, when cold, that either poultry or meat was braised in,
or some veal stock, taking care it be very free from fat. Make it warm,
and strain it through a tamis sieve into a clean stewpan; then season it
to the palate with salt, lemon pickle, cayenne pepper, and tarragon or
plain vinegar. Add a sufficient quantity of dissolved isinglass to make
it of a proper stiffness, and whisk into it plenty of whites of eggs, a
small quantity of the yolks and shells, and add a little liquid of
colour. Then set it over a fire, and when it boils let it simmer a
quarter of an hour, and run it through a jelly bag several times till
perfectly bright.


_Aspect of Fish._

PUT into a plain tin or copper mould warm savory jelly about an inch and
an half deep; then take fresh smelts turned round, boil them gently in
strong salt and water till done, and lay them on a drainer. When the
savory jelly in the mould is quite cold, put the smelts upon it with the
best side downwards; then put a little more jelly just lukewarm over the
fish, and when that is cold fill the mould with more of the same kind.
When it is to be served up dip the mould in warm water, put the dish
upon the jelly, and turn it over.

N. B. Pieces of lobsters, fillets of soles, &c. may be done in the same
manner.


_Aspect of Meat or Fowl._

BONE either a shoulder of lamb or a fowl, and season the inside with
pepper, salt, and a little beaten spice; then put into it some light
forcemeat, sew it up, blanch, and then braise it in stock. When it is
done lay it on a dish with the breast downward to preserve it as white
as possible; and when the jelly which is in the mould is quite stiff,
work on it a sprig or star with small slips of ham, pickle cucumber,
breast of fowl, and omlets of egg white and yellow; then set it with a
little jelly, and when cold put the meat or poultry upon it, and fill
the mould with lukewarm jelly. When it is to be served up turn it out as
the aspect of fish.

N. B. In the same manner may be done pieces of meat or poultry without
forcing.


_Canopies._

CUT some pieces of the crumb of bread about four inches long, three
inches wide, and one inch thick, and fry them in boiling lard till of a
light brown colour; then put them on a drainer, and cut into slips some
breast of fowl, anchovies picked from the bone, pickle cucumbers, and
ham or tongue. Then butter the pieces of bread on one side, and lay upon
them alternately the different articles till filled. Trim the edges, and
put the pieces (cut into what form you please) upon a dish with slices
of lemon round the rim, and serve in a sauce boat a little mixture of
oil, vinegar, cayenne pepper, and salt.


_Solomongundy._

CHOP small and separately lean of boiled ham, breast of dressed fowl,
picked anchovies, parsley, omlets of eggs white and yellow (the same
kind as for garnishing), eshallots, a small quantity of pickle
cucumbers, capers, and beet root. Then rub a saucer over with fresh
butter, put it in the center of a dish, and make it secure from moving.
Place round it in partitions the different articles separately till the
saucer is covered, and put on the rim of the dish some slices of lemon.


_Salad of Lobster._

TAKE boiled hen lobsters, break the shells, and preserve the meat as
white as possible. Then cut the tails into halves, put them into the
center of a dish with the red side upwards, and the meat of the claws
whole. Then place round the lobster a row of parsley chopped fine, and a
row of the spawn from the inside chopped, and afterwards mix a little of
each and strew over the top of the lobster. Then put slices of lemon
round the rim of the dish, and send in a sauce boat a mixture of oil,
vinegar, mustard, cayenne pepper, and salt, a little of each.


_French Salad_

CONSISTS of the different herbs in season, as tarragon, chervil, sorrel,
chives, endive, silician lettuces, watercresses, dandelion, beet root,
celery, &c. all of which should be very young, fresh gathered, trimmed
neat, washed clean, drained dry, and served up in a bowl. The sauce to
be served up in a sauceboat, and to be made with oil, lemon pickle,
vinegar, ketchup, cayenne pepper, a boiled yolk of an egg, and salt.

N. B. Some persons eat with this salad cold boiled turbot or other fish.


_Blancmange._

TO a quart of new milk add an ounce of picked isinglass, a small stick
of cinnamon, a piece of lemon peel, a few coriander seeds washed, six
bitter almonds blanched and pounded, or a laurel leaf. Put it over a
fire, and when it boils simmer it till the isinglass is dissolved, and
strain it through a tamis sieve into a bason. Let it stand ten minutes,
skim it, pour it gently into another bason free from sediment, and when
it begins to congeal stir it well and fill the shapes.


_Dutch Blancmange._

PUT a pint of warm cleared calves feet jelly into a stewpan; mix with it
the yolks of six eggs, set it over a fire, and whisk it till it begins
to boil. Then set the pan in cold water and stir the mixture till nearly
cold, to prevent it from curdling, and when it begins to thicken fill
the shapes. When it is ready to be served up dip the shapes in warm
water.


_Riband Blancmange._

PUT into a shape some white blancmange two inches deep, and when it is
quite cold put alternately, in the same manner, cleared calves feet
jelly, white blancmange coloured with cochineal, or dutch blancmange.


_Cleared Calves Feet Jelly._

TAKE scalded calves feet, chop them into pieces, put them into a pot
with plenty of water to cover them, boil them gently four or five hours,
strain the liquor, and preserve it till the next day in order that it
may be quite stiff. Then take off the fat, and afterwards wash it with
warm water to make it perfectly clean; after which put it into a
stewpan, set it over a fire, and when it is dissolved season it well to
the palate with lemon and seville orange juices, white wine and sugar, a
piece of lemon peel, cinnamon, and coriander seeds whole, (or add a few
drops of liquid of colour if thought requisite). Then whisk into it
plenty of whites of eggs, a few yolks, and some shells. Let it boil
gently a quarter of an hour, run it through a fine flannel bag several
times till quite bright, and when it is nearly cold fill the shapes,
which should be very clean and wiped dry.

N. B. When seville oranges are not in season, orange flower water may be
added, or (if approved) syrup of roses or quinces. Old hock or madeira
wine will make it of the best quality.


_Marbrée Jelly._

PUT into a mould cleared calves feet jelly one inch deep, and when it is
cold put on the center, with the ornamented side downwards, a medallion
of wafer paper; or ripe fruits, such as, halves of peaches or nectarines
of a fine colour, or black grapes; or small shapes of cold blancmange;
or dried fruits, such as, cherries, barberries, green gages, &c. Then
set them with a little lukewarm jelly, and when that is quite cold fill
the mould with some nearly cold.


_Bagnets a l'Eau._

TAKE half a pint of water, a stick of cinnamon, a bit of lemon peel, a
gill of rhenish wine, and a few coriander seeds; sweeten to the palate
with sugar, boil the ingredients ten minutes, add an ounce of fresh
butter, and when it is melted strain the liquor to a sufficient quantity
of flour to make it into a batter. Then put it over the fire again to
simmer gently, and add six yolks of eggs. Have ready boiling lard, put
into it pieces of the mixture of the bigness of a damson; fry them of a
light brown colour, drain them, and serve them up with sifted sugar
over.

N. B. The butter should be well beaten.


_Apple Fritters for a Dish._

MIX together three ounces of sifted flour, a little salt, a gill of
cream or milk, and three eggs; beat them for ten minutes with a spoon or
whisk. Then pare twelve holland pippins, cut them into halves, core and
put them into the batter. Have ready boiling lard, take the halves out
singly with a fork, fry them till done and of a light colour, drain them
dry, serve them up with sifted sugar over, some pounded cinnamon on one
plate, and seville oranges on another.

N. B. Peaches or pears may be done in the same manner; or oranges, which
are to be peeled, divided into quarters, and then put into the batter.
Some jam likewise may be mixed with the batter instead of the apples,
and fried in small pieces.


_Golden Pippins a la Cream._

TAKE three gills of lisbon wine, a gill of water, a stick of cinnamon, a
bit of lemon peel, a small quantity of the juice, and a few coriander
seeds; sweeten well with lump sugar, and boil all together for ten
minutes. Then have ready twelve large ripe golden pippins pared, and
cored with a small iron apple scoop. Put them into a stewpan, strain the
above liquor to them, and stew them gently till done; then take them
out, put them into a trifle dish, and reduce the liquor to a strong
syrup. After which mix with it a pint of cream, the yolks of ten eggs,
and a dessert spoonful of syrup of cloves; then strain it, set it over a
slow fire, and whisk till it is of a good thickness. Put the pan in cold
water, stir the mixture some time, let it cool, and when the pippins are
to be served up pour the cream over them, and put round the edge of the
dish leaves of puff paste baked of a pale colour.

N. B. The same kind of cream may be put over codlins, gooseberries, or
cranberries, when made into pies, only omitting the pippins.


_Golden Pippins another way._

TAKE half a pint of white wine, a gill of water, a stick of cinnamon, a
few cloves and coriander seeds, a bit of lemon peel, a little juice, and
plenty of loaf sugar; boil them a quarter of an hour. Then strain the
liquor to twelve large pippins pared and cored, stew them gently till
done, and the liquor reduced to a strong syrup of a consistence
sufficient to adhere to the apples, and put them into a dish. When cold
serve them up with chopped cleared calves feet jelly round them.


_Stewed Pippins another Way._

PROCEED with the same ingredients as the preceding, but when the apples
are half done lay them on a dish to cool, and add to the syrup the yolk
of eight eggs and three gills of cream; then strain and set it over a
fire, whisk it till of a good thickness, and let it stand till cold.
Have ready boiling lard, dip the apples in batter of the same kind as
for fritters, and fry them of a light colour; then drain them, and when
cold serve them up with the cream under and sifted sugar over them.


_Cream for Pies._

TAKE a pint of new milk; then add a few coriander seeds washed, a bit of
lemon peel, a laurel leaf, a stick of cinnamon, four cloves, a blade of
mace, some sugar, and boil all together ten minutes. Then have ready in
another stewpan the yolks of six eggs and half a table spoonful of
flour mixed, and strain the milk to them. Then set it over a slow fire,
whisk it till it is of a good consistence, and be careful it does not
curdle. When it is cold it may be put over green codlins, gooseberries,
or currants, &c. in pies.

N. B. The cream may be perfumed, by adding, when nearly cold, a dessert
spoonful of orange flower water, a table spoonful of syrup of roses, and
a little ambergrise. Fruit pies, likewise, should be sweetened with
sifted loaf sugar, covered with puff or tart paste, and when served up
the top to be cut off, the fruit covered with either of the above
creams, and small leaves of baked puff paste put round.


_Mince Meat._

ROAST, with a paper over it, a fillet of beef cut from the inside of a
rump, and when cold chop it small. To two pounds of meat add two pounds
of beef suet chopped fine, two pounds of chopped apples, one pound of
raisins stoned and chopped, one pound of currants washed and picked,
half a pound of citron, a quarter of a pound of candied orange and a
quarter of a pound of candied lemon peels cut into small slices; add
some beaten cinnamon, mace, cloves, allspice, a small quantity of each,
a pint of brandy, and a very little salt. Then mix all the ingredients
well together, put them into a pan, and keep it close covered in a cool
place.

N. B. It is advised that the meat be omitted, and instead of it add one
pound of the yolks of hard eggs chopped.


_Compote of Oranges._

PEEL and divide into quarters china oranges; then put them into a clear
syrup, boil them gently five minutes, and take them out. Put into a gill
of water a small quantity of cinnamon, cloves, and mace, the juice of
two oranges, and a bit of the peel; boil them ten minutes, strain the
liquor to the syrup, and reduce it to a strong consistence. Then put
into it the quarters of the oranges, and when they are cold set them in
a trifle dish, and put some cleared calves feet jelly chopped round
them.


_Tea Cream._

TAKE a pint of cream, a few coriander seeds washed, a stick of cinnamon,
a bit of lemon peel, and sugar; boil them together for ten minutes; then
add a gill of very strong green tea. Have ready the whites of six eggs
beat up, and strain to them the cream; whisk it over a fire till it
begins to thicken, then fill cups or a deep dish, and when cold garnish
with whole ratafias.


_Virgin Cream._

TO be done in the same manner, only omitting the tea, and adding slices
of citron when put into a dish.


_Coffee Cream._

TO be done in the same way, but instead of the liquid boil an ounce of
whole coffee in the cream.


_Burnt Cream._

TO be done in the same manner as virgin cream, and when it is quite cold
and to be served up put sifted sugar over, and burn it with a clear
red-hot salamander. Put round the edge of the dish some ratafias.


_Pastry Cream._

TO a pint of cream add half a table spoonful of pounded cinnamon, a
little grated lemon peel, three table spoonfuls of flour, two ounces of
oiled fresh butter, eight yolks and the whites of three eggs well
beaten, half a pound of sifted sugar, and a table spoonful of orange
flower water. Put the ingredients over a fire, and when it begins to
thicken add four ounces of ratafias and two ounces of pounded citron,
mixing all well together. Let it stand till quite cold, then cut it into
what shapes you please, and dip them singly into yolk of raw egg; then
breadcrumb and fry them in boiling lard till of a light colour, drain
them dry, and serve them up hot.


_Almond Paste._

BLANCH and pound very fine half a pound of jordan almonds, add six
yolks of eggs, a sufficient quantity of flour to bind it well, an ounce
of oiled fresh butter, and sweeten to the palate with sifted sugar. Mix
the ingredients thoroughly in a marble mortar, and when it becomes a
stiff paste roll it out, and cut it into what shapes you please; bake
them, and when cold fill them with creams or jellies.


_Cheese Cakes._

TO three quarts of new milk add three parts of a gill of runnet; let it
stand in a warm place, and when it is thoroughly turned drain it well,
and mix into it with your hand half a pound of fresh butter, and sweeten
to the palate with pounded sugar. Then add a few currants washed and
picked, a little citron, candied orange and lemon peels cut into small
slices, and an ounce of jordan almonds pounded fine. Then beat up three
eggs, put them with the mixture, sheet the pans with puff paste, fill
them with the curd, and bake them in a brisk oven. Or the paste may be
made with half a pound of sifted flour, a quarter of a pound of fresh
butter, and cold pump water, mixed lightly and rolled out.


_Almond Nuts._

TAKE three eggs, their weight of sifted sugar, flour of the weight of
two eggs, and two ounces of almonds blanched and pounded fine; then beat
the whites to a solid froth, and mix the ingredients well with it. Have
ready wafer or writing paper rubbed over with fresh butter, and with a
teaspoon drop the mixture upon the paper in rows and bake them.


_To make Syllabub._

TO a pint and a half of cream add a pint of sweet wine, a gill of
brandy, sifted sugar, and a little lemon juice; whisk it well, take off
the froth with a spoon, lay it upon a large sieve, fill the glasses
three parts full with the liquor, add a little grated nutmeg, and put
the froth over.


_Trifle._

PUT into a deep china or glass dish half a pound of spunge biscuits, two
ounces of ratafias, two ounces of jordan almonds blanched and pounded,
citron and candied orange peel an ounce of each cut into small slices,
some currant jelly and raspberry jam, a small quantity of grated nutmeg
and lemon peel, half a pint of sweet wine, and a little of the liquor of
the syllabub. Then make the same kind of cream as for pies, and when
cold put it over the ingredients. When it is to be served up put plenty
of the stiff froth of a syllabub raised high on the cream, and garnish
with coloured comfits or rose leaves, which are recommended for
elegance.


_Tarts or Tartlets._

SHEET tart or tartlet pans with puff paste a quarter of an inch thick,
trim round the edge with a sharp knife; then fill with raspberry or
apricot jam, or orange marmalade or stewed apple, and put fine strings
of paste across in what form you please. Bake them in a brisk oven, and
be careful not to let the top colour too much.


_Paste for stringing Tartlets._

CUT a bit of puff paste into pieces, mix with it half a handful of
flour, a little cold water, and let it be of a moderate stiffness, and
mould it with the hands till it draws into fine threads. Roll a piece
out three inches long and two inches broad; then cut it into slips,
draw them out singly, and put them across the tarts in any form, which
may be repeated two or three times over each other, as it will add much
to their appearance when baked.


_To stew Apples for Tarts._

PARE, cut into quarters, and core, some apples; put them into a stewpan,
add to them a piece of lemon peel, a little water, and a stick of
cinnamon. Cover the pan close, put it over a fire till the apples are
dissolved, sweeten to the palate with sifted sugar, add a table spoonful
of syrup of cloves, and rub them through a hair sieve. Let it stand till
cold before it is put into the paste.

N. B. To make a very fine flavoured tart, stew golden pippins in the
same manner, and when they are rubbed through the sieve add only half a
table spoonful of syrup of cloves, and mix well with it a quarter of a
pound of pine-apple jam. This mixture will keep a month if close
covered.


_Fried Puffs with Sweetmeats._

ROLL out puff paste half an inch thick, cut it into slips of three
inches wide, the slips into square pieces, and put on each some
sweetmeat of any kind. Fold the paste, and run a jagger iron round to
form it, or cut it with a sharp knife. Have ready boiling lard, fry them
of a light colour, drain them dry, and serve them up with sifted sugar
over.


_Pyramid Paste._

TAKE a sheet of puff paste rolled of half an inch thick; cut or stamp it
into oval forms, the first to be the size of the bottom of the dish in
which it is to be served up, the second smaller, and so on till it
becomes a pyramid; then put each piece separately on paper laid on a
baking plate, and when the oven is ready, egg the top part of the pieces
and bake them of a light colour. When they are done take them off the
paper, lay them on a large dish till quite cold, and when to be served
up set the largest piece in the dish for which it was formed, and put on
it raspberry or apricot jams or currant jelly, the next size on that and
more sweetmeats, proceeding in the same manner till all the pieces are
placed on each other. Put dried fruits round the pyramid, such as green
gages, barberries, or cherries.

N. B. Instead of stamping the pieces it is thought better to cut them
with a sharp knife; then to cut out small pieces round the edges to make
them appear like spires, as, being done in this manner, it causes the
paste to appear lighter.


_Iceing for a Cake._

WHISK the whites of four eggs to a solid froth, and put to it as much
treble refined sifted sugar as you can; then add the juice of a lemon,
mix all well together with a spoon, and spread it over the cake when
warm.


_Cherries in Brandy for Desserts._

ON a dry day gather the largest ripe morella cherries, and be careful
they are not bruised; then cut off the stalk half way, prick each cherry
with a needle four times, put them into glasses, add strong best brandy
enough to cover them, and sweeten with clarified sugar. Tie over them a
bladder washed and wiped dry, some white leather over that bound tight,
and turn the glasses bottom upwards.

N. B. Grapes or apricots may be done in the same manner.


_To make Buns._

PUT five pounds of best flour into a wooden bowl, set a spunge of it
with a gill of yeast and a pint of warm milk; then mix with it one pound
of sifted sugar, one pound of oiled fresh butter, coriander seeds,
cinnamon, and mace, a small quantity of each pounded fine. Roll the
paste into buns, set them on a baking plate rubbed over with a little
butter, put them in a moderate oven to prove, then wash them with a
paste brush dipped in warm milk, and bake them of a good colour.


_Orgeat._

BLANCH a pound of jordan and one ounce of bitter almonds, pound them in
a marble mortar till very fine; then put to them a pint of pump water,
rub them through a tamis cloth till the almonds are quite dry, and add
to the liquor more water to make it of a proper consistence for
drinking; after which sweeten with clarified sugar, or sugarcandy, or
capillaire; then put it into a decanter, and when it is to be used shake
it together.


_Orange Marmalade._

TAKE seville oranges when in season, which is generally at the beginning
of March; cut them into halves, and the halves again into thin slices,
which put with the juice, but not too much of the core, and take away
the pips. To every pound weight of orange add two pounds of sifted sugar
and a gill of water; then put them into a preserving pan, set the pan
over a quick fire, and when the mixture boils keep stirring and skimming
till it becomes of a proper stiffness, which may be known by putting a
little into a saucer and setting it in cold water. Then fill the pots
with the marmalade, and when cold put over white paper dipped in brandy;
after which cover the pots with paper and white leather, and preserve
them in a dry place for use.

N. B. In the same way try the proper stiffness of other jellies or jams,
and cover them in like manner.


_Raspberry Jam._

TO every pound weight of ripe picked raspberries, add fourteen ounces of
sifted sugar and half a gill of currant juice; put them into a
preserving pan, set them over a brisk fire, and when it boils skim it
well and let it simmer till it becomes of a good consistence.

N. B. The raspberries may be mashed with a spoon previous to adding the
sugar, or rubbed through a wicker sieve.


_Quince Jam._

PARE ripe quinces, cut them into thin slices, put them into a stewpan
with a sufficient quantity of water to cover them, let them boil gently
till tender close covered, and rub them through a large hair sieve; add
to a pound of the pulp a pound and a half of sifted sugar and half a
gill of syrup of cloves; then put them into a preserving pan, and let
them simmer together till of a good strength.

N. B. A little of this jam mixed with apples in a pie will make it very
good.


_Green Gage Jam._

RUB ripe gages through a large hair sieve, and put them into a
preserving pan; then, to a pound of pulp add a pound of sifted sugar;
after which boil to a proper thickness, skim it clean, and put it into
small pots.


_Apricot Jam._

TAKE apricots when nearly ripe, pare and cut them into halves, break the
stones, blanch the kernels, and add them to the halves. To a pound of
fruit put a pound of sifted sugar and a gill of the water in which the
parings have been boiled. Then set it over a brisk fire, stir the
mixture well together till it becomes of a good strength, but let it not
be very stiff.


_Preserved Apricots for Tarts or Desserts._

CUT ripe apricots in halves, blanch the kernels and add them to the
fruit. Have ready clarified sugar boiling hot, put the apricots into it,
and let them stand till cold. Then boil the syrup again, add the
apricots as before, and when they are cold put the halves into small
pots or glasses, and if the syrup is too thin boil it again, and when it
is cold put it to the fruit, and cover it with paper dipped in brandy.

N. B. Green gages may be done whole in the same manner, or green
gooseberries with the seeds taken out. These fruits may be served up
with the syrup; or they may be dried on tin plates, in a moderately
heated oven, and when almost cold put sifted sugar over.


_Currant Jelly._

TAKE two thirds of ripe red currants and one third of white, pick them,
put them into a preserving pan over a good fire, and when they are
dissolved run their liquor through a flannel bag. To a pint of juice add
fourteen ounces of sifted sugar. Set it over a brisk fire, let it boil
quick, skim it clean, and reduce it to a good stiffness, which may be
known as before directed in orange marmalade.

N. B. In the same manner may be made black currant jelly, but allowing
sixteen ounces of sugar to a pint of juice.


_Crisp Tart Paste._

TAKE half a pound of sifted flour, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter,
two ounces of sifted sugar, and two eggs beaten; mix them with pump
water, and knead the paste well.


_Eggs and Bacon another way._

BOIL six eggs for five minutes, then peel and cut them into halves;
after which take out the yolks, put them into a marble mortar with a
small quantity of the white meat of dressed fowl, lean ham, a little
chopped parsley, one eschallot, a table spoonful of cream, a dessert
spoonful of ketchup, a little cayenne, some breadcrumbs, and sifted
mace, a very small quantity of each. Pound all well together, fill the
halves of the whites with the mixture, bake them gently ten minutes, and
serve them up on rashers of bacon or ham broiled, and put some cullis
over them.


_To make Puff Paste._

MOULD with the hands a pound of fresh or good salt butter and lay it in
cold water; then sift a pound of best white flour, rub lightly into it
half the butter, mix it with cold spring water, roll it out, put on it
(in pieces) half the remaining butter, fold the paste, roll it again,
and add the remainder of the butter. Strew lightly upon it a little
flour, fold it together, set it in a cold place, and when it is wanted
for use, roll it out twice more.

N. B. In summer time the white of an egg beat up may be added with the
water that mixes it.


_To make an Almond Cake._

TAKE eight ounces of jordan and one ounce of bitter almonds, blanch and
pound them very fine; then beat in with the almonds the yolks of eight
eggs, and let the whites be whisked up to a solid froth. Then take eight
table spoonfuls of sifted sugar, five spoonfuls of fine flour, a small
quantity of grated lemon peel and pounded cinnamon, and mix all the
ingredients. Rub the inside of a mould with fresh butter, fill it with
the mixture, and bake it of a light colour.


_Almond Custards._

ADD to a pint and a half of cream a small stick of cinnamon, a blade of
mace, a bit of lemon peel, some nutmeg, and sugar to the palate. Boil
the ingredients together ten minutes, and strain it; then blanch and
pound (quite fine) three ounces of jordan and eight single bitter
almonds; after which rub through a hair sieve, add the fine pulp to the
cream, likewise a little syrup of roses, and the yolks of six eggs beat
up, and put the mixture into small cups; or it may be baked in a dish
with a rim of puff paste round it.

N. B. Plain custards may be made in the same manner, but instead of
almonds add a little orange flower water.


_Rhubarb Tart._

TAKE slips of green rhubarb, wash it, and cut it into small pieces the
bigness of young gooseberries; put them into a dish, sweeten with
sifted sugar, add the juice of a lemon, cover it with puff paste, and
bake it. Serve it up either plain or with cream, the same as for an
apple pie.


_Orange Pudding._

PEEL four seville oranges thin, boil them till tender, rub them through
a hair sieve, and preserve the fine pulp. Take a pound of naples
biscuits, a little grated nutmeg, two ounces of fresh butter, and pour
over them a quart of boiling milk or cream in which a stick of cinnamon
has been boiled. When the ingredients are cold mix with them the pulp
and eight eggs well beaten, sweeten to the palate, and (if approved) add
half a gill of brandy. Edge a dish with puff paste, put in the mixture,
garnish the top with strings of paste as for tartlets, and bake it in a
moderately heated oven.

N. B. A lemon pudding may be made in the same manner.


_Rice Pudding._

TO a pint and a half of cream or new milk add a few coriander seeds, a
bit of lemon peel, a stick of cinnamon, and sugar to the palate. Boil
them together ten minutes, and strain it to two ounces of ground rice,
which boil for ten minutes more. Let it stand till cold, and then put to
it two ounces of oiled fresh butter, a little brandy, grated nutmeg, six
eggs well beaten, and a gill of syrup of pippins. Mix all together, put
it into a dish with puff paste round it, and bake it, taking care it is
not done too much. Should the pudding be made with whole rice it should
be boiled till nearly done before the cream is strained to it, and if
approved a few currants may be added.

N. B. Millet or sago (whole or ground) may be done in the same manner.


_Tansey Pudding._

BLANCH and pound very fine a quarter of a pound of jordan almonds; then
put them into a stewpan, add a gill of the syrup of roses, the crumb of
a french roll, a little grated nutmeg, half a gill of brandy, two table
spoonfuls of tansey juice, three ounces of fresh butter, and some slices
of citron. Pour over it a pint and a half of boiling cream or milk,
sweeten to the palate, and when it is cold mix it well, add the juice of
a lemon and eight eggs beaten. It may be either boiled or baked.


_Almond Pudding._

TO be made as a tansey pudding, only omitting the french bread and
tansey juice, and adding as substitutes a quarter of a pound of naples
biscuits and a spoonful of orange flower water.


_Marrow Pudding._

BOIL with a quart of new milk cinnamon and lemon peel, and strain it to
half a pound of beef marrow finely chopped, a few currants washed and
picked, some slices of citron and orange peel candied, a little grated
nutmeg, brandy, syrup of cloves, a table spoonful of each, and half a
pound of naples biscuits. When the mixture is cold add eight eggs beat
up, omitting five of the whites, and bake it in a dish with puff paste
round it.


_Bread Pudding._

TO be made as a marrow pudding, only omitting the naples biscuits and a
quarter of a pound of the beef marrow, adding as a substitute the crumb
of french bread.


_A rich Plum Pudding._

TAKE one pound of raisins stoned, one pound of currants washed and
picked, one pound of beef suet chopped, two ounces of jordan almonds
blanched and pounded, citron, candied orange and lemon peel pounded, two
ounces of each, a little salt, some grated nutmeg and sugar, one pound
of sifted flour, a gill of brandy, and eight eggs well beaten. Mix all
together with cream or milk, and let it be of a good thickness; then tie
it in a cloth, boil it five hours, and serve it up with melted butter
over.


_Batter Pudding._

TO a pound of flour sifted add a little salt and a gill of milk, mix
them till smooth, beat well six eggs, and add them together with more
milk till the batter is of a proper thickness; then put the mixture
into a bason rubbed with fresh butter, tie a cloth over, boil it an hour
and a quarter, turn it out of the bason, and serve it up with melted
butter, sugar, and grated nutmeg, in a sauce boat; to which may be added
also (if approved) a table spoonful of white wine, or a dessert spoonful
of vinegar.

N. B. When puddings are put into the pot the water in general should
boil.


_Boiled Apple Pudding._

MAKE a paste with flour, chopped beef suet, or marrow, a little salt and
water; then knead it well, roll it out thin, sheet a bowl or bason with
it, fill it with good baking apples pared, cut into quarters and cored;
add lemon peel grated, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon pounded fine, a
small quantity of each. Lay a thin paste on the top, tie the bason in a
cloth, and let the pudding boil till well done. When it is to be served
up cut a piece out of the top and mix with the apples, sugar to the
palate, and add a bit of fresh butter and a little syrup of quinces.


_Apple Dumplings._

PARE large baking apples, core them with a scoop, fill the cavities with
quince marmalade, roll out (a quarter of an inch thick) the same kind of
paste as for an apple pudding, mould over each apple a piece of paste,
and boil them separately in a cloth, or wash them with whites of eggs
with a paste brush, and bake them. Serve them up with grated nutmeg,
sifted sugar, and fresh butter, in different saucers.


_Baked Apple Pudding._

STEW the apples as for a tourte or tartlets, and when they are cold add
to them six eggs well beaten; put the mixture into a dish with puff
paste round the rim, and bake it.


_Damson Pudding._

MAKE paste and sheet a bason in the same manner as for an apple pudding;
then fill it with ripe or bottled damsons, cover it with paste, boil it,
and when it is to be served up cut a piece out of the top, mix with the
fruit, sifted sugar to the palate, and a small quantity of pounded
cinnamon or grated nutmeg.

N. B. Puddings made with gooseberries, currants, or bullies, may be done
in the same manner.


_Damson Pudding another way._

TO a pint of cream or milk add six eggs, four table spoonfuls of sifted
flour, a very little salt, a small quantity of pounded cinnamon, and
whisk them well together. Have ready ripe or bottled damsons, rub them
through a hair sieve, add to the mixture a sufficient quantity of the
fine pulp to make it in substance a little thicker than batter, sweeten
it to the palate, put it into a buttered bason, flour a cloth and tie
over, boil it an hour and a quarter, and when it is to be served up turn
it out of the bason and put melted butter over.

N. B. In the same manner may be done ripe peaches, nectarines,
gooseberries, apricots, green gages, or egg plums; or instead of boiling
may be baked in a tart pan, sheeted with puff paste.


_Baked Fruit Pudding another way._

RUB gooseberries or other ripe fruit through a hair sieve; and to half a
pint of the fine pulp add a quarter of a pound of naples biscuits,
three ounces of oiled fresh butter, half a pint of cream, grated nutmeg,
sugar to the palate, and six eggs. Beat all the ingredients together for
ten minutes; then add slices of citron, and bake the mixture in a dish
with puff paste round the rim.


_Muffin Pudding with dried Cherries._

TO a pint and a half of milk add a few coriander seeds, a bit of lemon
peel, sugar to the palate, and boil them together ten minutes. Then put
four muffins into a pan, strain the milk over them, and, when they are
cold, mash them with a wooden spoon; add half a gill of brandy, half a
pound of dried cherries, a little grated nutmeg, two ounces of jordan
almonds blanched and pounded very fine, and six eggs well beaten. Mix
all together and boil in a bason, or bake it in a dish with paste round
it.


_Potatoe Pudding._

PEEL potatoes, steam them, and rub them through a fine sieve. To half a
pound of pulp add a quarter of a pound of fresh butter oiled, sifted
sugar to the palate, half a gill of brandy, a little pounded cinnamon,
half a pint of cream, a quarter of a pound of currants washed and
picked, and eight eggs well beaten. Mix all together, bake (or boil) the
pudding, and serve it up with melted butter in a sauceboat.


_Carrot Pudding._

TAKE red carrots, boil them, cut off the red part, and rub them through
a sieve or tamis cloth. To a quarter of a pound of pulp add half a pound
of crumb of french bread, sifted sugar, a spoonful of orange flower
water, half a pint of cream, some slices of candied citron, some grated
nutmeg, a quarter of a pound of oiled fresh butter, eight eggs well
beaten, and bake it in a dish with a paste round the rim.


_Ice Cream._

TAKE a pint and a half of good cream, add to it half a pound of
raspberry or other jams, or ripe fruits, and sifted sugar; mix them well
together and rub through a fine sieve. Then put it into a freezing
mould, set it in ice and salt, and stir it till it begins to congeal.
After which put at the bottom of a mould white paper, fill with the
cream, put more paper over, cover close, set it in ice till well frozen,
and when it is to be turned out for table dip the mould in cold water.
Or it may be served up in glasses, taking the cream out of the freezing
mould.


_Observation on Stores._

AS frequent mention is made of syrups, jams, pounded spices, sugar
sifted, grated nutmeg, and orange flower water, to be used in puddings
and pies; and as a very small quantity of each is wanted at a time; it
is therefore recommended (as a saving of trouble and expence) that the
syrups, &c. be made when the fruits are in season, and preserved in
small bottles with the different stores. But should any of the receipts
be thought too expensive or rich, it is recommended, likewise, that a
curtailment be made in some of the articles, pursuing nearly the same
process, they being written in that state only to shew their first and
best manner. The same observation may be borne in remembrance with
respect to made dishes, roasting, pastry, or sauces.


_Partridge Soup._

CUT to pieces two or three picked and drawn partridges or pheasants, an
old fowl, a knuckle of veal, some lean ham, celeri, onions, turnips, a
carrot, and a blade of mace. Put them into a stewpot with half a pint
of water, set them over a fire close covered, and steam them till three
parts done. Then add three quarts of beef stock, simmer till the
ingredients are tender, strain the liquor through a fine sieve, and when
cold take the fat clean off, add a little liquid of colour, a small
quantity of salt and cayenne pepper, whisk with it two eggs and their
shells, clear it over a good fire, and strain it through a tamis cloth;
then cut half a middling-sized white cabbage into small slices, scald
it, add to the soup, and boil it gently till tender.


_Collared Eels._

SKIN and bone two large eels, lay them flat, and season with plenty of
parsley, an eschallot chopped very fine, pepper, salt, beaten spices,
and mushroom powder, a small quantity of each. Then roll and bind them
tight with tape, put them into a stewpan with a pint of veal stock and a
little lemon juice, simmer them over a fire till done, put them on a
dish, skim the liquor free from fat, season with salt to the palate,
clear it with two eggs, strain it through a tamis cloth, boil it down
gently till of a strong jelly, and put it into a bason. When the eels
are cold, take off the tape, trim the ends, wipe them dry, serve them up
with the chopped jelly round them, a few bunches of pickled barberries
on their tops, and slices of lemon round the rim of the dish.

N. B. Should the liquor be pale at the time it is cleared, add a few
drops of liquid of colour.


_White Puddings._

TO half a pound of beef marrow chopped fine, add six ounces of jordan
almonds blanched and pounded quite fine, with a dessert spoonful of
orange flower water, half a pound of the crumb of french bread, half a
pound of currants washed and picked, a quarter of a pound of sifted
sugar, a little mace, cloves, and cinnamon pounded, a gill of mountain
wine, and the yolks of four eggs beaten. Mix all well together, fill the
entrails of a pig three parts full, tie each end, and boil them half an
hour.


_Sausage Meat._

TAKE the lean meat of young pork chopped small, and to a pound of it add
a pound of the flay and fat chopped, some breadcrumbs, nutmeg, allspice
and mace pounded, a small quantity of each, a little grated lemon peel,
sage, parsley, thyme, and two eschallots, chopped very fine, an egg
beaten, and season with pepper and salt. Mix all well together, with the
hands, or pound it in a marble mortar; then make it into cakes and broil
it, or put it into the entrails of a pig nicely cleaned.


_Calf's Liver roasted._

MAKE an incision in the under part of a calf's liver, fill it with a
stuffing made with beef marrow, breadcrumbs, grated nutmeg, one
eschallot, two mushrooms, parsley and thyme chopped fine, and one egg
beaten. Then sew it up, lard it with small slips of fat bacon, put a
piece of veal caul over, and roast it gently. When it is to be served up
take off the caul, glaize the top, put under it some good cullis sauce,
and plenty of fried parsley round.


_To dry Herbs._

GATHER marjoram, savory, thyme, basil, parsley, &c. on a dry day, when
in season, and not blown. Divide them separately into small bunches, as
in that state they will dry best. Then hang them on a line in a dry room
or place where the air has free admission, but no direct rays of the
sun. When they are perfectly dry (which will require two or three weeks
to accomplish) put them in rows in boxes close covered, and set them in
a dry place.


_To make Anchovie Liquor to be used in Fish Sauces._

PUT into a stewpan one pound of best anchovies, two quarts of water, two
bay leaves, some whole pepper, a little scraped horseradish, a sprig of
thyme, two blades of mace, six eschallots chopped small, a gill of red
port, half the rind of a lemon, a gill of ketchup; boil all together
twenty minutes, and rub them through a tamis cloth with a wooden spoon.
When the essence is cold put it into pint bottles, cork them close, and
set them in a dry place.


_Potted Lobster._

BOIL two live hen lobsters in strong salt and water till half done; then
take the meat and spawn out of the shells, put it into a stewpan, add a
little beaten and sifted mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, salt, a small
quantity of lemon juice, a spoonful of essence of ham, a dessert
spoonful of anchovie liquor, the same as for fish sauce, and simmer them
over a fire for ten minutes. Then pound the meat in a marble mortar,
reduce the liquor almost to a glaize, put it to the meat with a quarter
of a pound of fresh butter, mix them well together, press the mixture
down into small flat preserving pots, cover with clarified butter, and
when cold put white paper over the pots, and set them in a dry place.

N. B. Prawns, shrimps, crayfish, and crabs, may be done in the same
manner.


_To clarify Butter for Potting._

PUT fresh butter into a stewpan with a spoonful of cold water, set it
over a gentle fire till oiled, skim it, and let it stand till the
sediment is settled; then pour off the oil, and when it begins to
congeal put it over the different ingredients.


_Potted Cheese._

TO a pound of grated parmezan or cheshire cheese add three ounces of
cold fresh butter, a little sifted mace, and a tea spoonful of mustard.
Mix all well in a marble mortar, put it into small pots, cover with
clarified butter, and set the pots in a cold dry place.


_Potted Veal._

CUT small a pound of lean white veal, put it into a stewpan, with two
ounces of fresh butter, the juice of a lemon, pepper, salt, sifted mace,
a bay leaf, allspice, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, and mushroom powder, a
small quantity of each, a little parsley, thyme, savory, and two
eschallots chopped fine. Put them over a fire and stew them ten
minutes; then pound them, and add a pound of the mellow part of a boiled
pickle tongue and half a pound of cold fresh butter. Mix them well
together with two eggs beaten; then press the mixture down tight into
small pots, cover them with paper, put them into a moderate oven, bake
them twenty minutes, and when the meat is cold put clarified butter
over.


_Potted Larks or Small Birds._

PASS them with the same ingredients as for veal, and when they are half
done take them out and put the lean veal in. When the forcemeat is made
put the birds into the pots with it, bake them, and proceed in the same
manner as with potted veal.

N. B. Pheasants, partridges, chickens, &c. may be done in the same way,
but will take a longer time baking.


_To dry Morells, Mushrooms, and Champignons._

TAKE morells and champignons of the largest size, forced mushrooms of
the size of a shilling, and let them be gathered fresh; then take off
the stalk, wash them free from grit, drain them dry with a cloth, run a
fine twine through them with a large needle, hang them up in a warm dry
place, and when they are perfectly dry put them into paper bags in boxes
close covered. When they are wanted for use lay them in warm water for
half an hour, and prepare them as if they were fresh.


_Mushroom Powder._

AFTER the mushrooms or champignons are dried whole they may be set
before a fire till crisp; then grind and sift them through a fine sieve,
and preserve the powder in small bottles close corked.


_Potted Beef._

TAKE two pounds of the fillet out of the inside of a rump of beef and
two pounds of best fat bacon. Cut them small, put them into a marble
mortar, add to them a small quantity of parsley, thyme, savory, four
eschallots chopped fine, some pepper, salt, two spoonsful of essence of
ham, a spoonful of mushroom powder, sifted mace, cloves, and allspice, a
little of each, two eggs beaten, and a gill of rhenish wine. Pound all
well together till quite fine; then fill small pots with the mixture,
cover with paper, bake it very gently for forty minutes, and when cold
cover with clarified butter.


_Tarragon Vinegar._

PUT into a stone jar half a pound of fresh gathered tarragon leaves and
two quarts of best common vinegar, and let them ferment a fortnight;
then run it through a flannel bag, and add to it a quarter of an ounce
of isinglass dissolved in cyder. Put it into a clean jar, let it stand
till fine, pour it off, put it into small bottles, cork them close, and
set them in a dry place.

N. B. In the same manner may be done elder flowers, &c. &c.


_Walnut Ketchup for Fish Sauces._

TO a quart of walnut pickle add a quarter of a pound of anchovies and
three gills of red port; boil them till reduced one third, strain it,
and when cold preserve it in small bottles close corked.


_To pickle Tongues, &c._

TAKE large tongues perfectly fresh, cut some of the root away, make an
incision in the under part, rub them well with common salt, and lay
them in a tub or pan close covered for four days. Then pound together
two parts of saltpetre, one part of common salt, one part of bay salt,
and one part of moist sugar. Rub the tongues well with the mixture, put
all into the pan, and turn them every two days till pickled enough,
which will be in ten days.

N. B. Pigs faces and hams to be done in the same manner, but according
to their size let them lay in the different pickles for longer periods,
and when well coloured smoke them. If it be wished to have the hams or
tongues of a westphalia flavour add some socho to the pickle.


_India Pickle._

TAKE large fresh cauliflowers in the month of July, pick them into small
pieces, wash them clean, put them into a pan with plenty of salt over
them for three days; then drain and lay them separately to dry in the
sun, repeatedly turning them till they are almost of a brown colour,
which will require several days. Then put plenty of whole ginger, slices
of horseradish, peeled garlick, whole long pepper, peeled eschallots and
onions, into salt and water for one night; drain and dry them also; and
when the ingredients are ready, boil more than a sufficient quantity of
vinegar to cover them, and to two quarts of it add an ounce of the best
pale turmeric, and put the flowers and the other ingredients into stone
jars, pour the vinegar boiling hot over, cover them till the next day,
then boil the pickle again, and the same on the third day; after which
fill the jars with liquor, cover them over close with bladder and white
leather, and set them in a dry place.

N. B. In the same manner may be done white cabbages cut into half
quarters, whole french beans, heads of celery, heads of asparagus,
onions whole or sliced, or pickling melons peeled thin, cut into halves,
and formed like an indian mango.


_To dry Artichoke Bottoms._

GATHER the largest firm artichokes when in season, cut off the stalks,
and boil them till the leaves and choke can be taken away. Afterwards
put them on a baking plate and set them in a very slow heated oven, or
hang them up in a warm place to dry, and when perfectly so put them into
paper bags. When they are wanted for use lay them in warm water and
salt, and when pliable trim them neat, braise them in stock and lemon
juice, which will preserve them white, and when they are done enough, if
for ragout, cut them into pieces; if for dishes, serve them whole with
good cullis sauce over them.


_To pickle Cucumbers, &c._

GATHER jerkins not too large, lay them in a strong brine of salt and
water for three days, then wipe them dry, and put them into stone jars.
Then put a sufficient quantity of vinegar to cover them into a
preserving pan, add plenty of whole ginger and black pepper, a middling
quantity of mace, allspice and cloves, some slices of horseradish,
peeled onions, eschallots, and a small quantity of garlick. Let the
ingredients boil for ten minutes, and pour them with the liquor over the
cucumbers; cover the jars with cabbage leaves and a plate, set them in a
warm place, the next day drain the liquor from them, boil it, and pour
over them again, and if on the third day they are not green enough, boil
the vinegar again, pour it over, and when cold tie bladder and white
leather over the jars, and set them in a dry place.

N. B. In the same manner may be done walnuts, love apples, barberries,
capsicums, french beans, nasturtiums, and small pickling melons peeled
very thin and cut into quarters.


_Rules to be observed in Pickling._

IT is recommended that the best common vinegar be in general used for
pickling, and that it be put into a well-cleaned copper or
brass-preserving pan just before it is to be put over the fire, and when
it boils not to remain in the pan.

There can be no occasion of the many arts that are used in order to
preserve the ingredients green, if the vegetables are gathered fresh, on
a dry day, when in season, and the process followed that has been
recommended.

Further directions could be given that might be attended with greater
expence, but which would scarcely answer a better purpose, excepting
only to those who are in the habit of extensive practice.


_To pickle Onions._

PEEL small button onions into milk and water, in which put plenty of
salt; set it over a fire, and when it boils strain the onions, wipe them
dry, and put them into glasses. Have ready cold white wine vinegar, in
which whole white pepper, ginger, mace, and slices of horseradish have
been boiled. Pour it over the onions, and cover them with bladder and
leather.


_To pickle Mushrooms._

TAKE a sufficient quantity of double distilled white wine vinegar to
cover the mushrooms; add to it whole white pepper, ginger, mace, peeled
eschallots, and a small quantity of garlick if approved; boil all
together ten minutes and let it stand till cold. Then peel fresh forced
button mushrooms into water, wash them clean, strain, and put them into
a stewpan. To a quart of mushrooms add the juice of a lemon and a table
spoonful of salt. Cover the pan close, set it over a fire, and when the
liquor is sufficiently drawn from the mushrooms put the whole into
glasses and cover them with the pickle. Tie bladder and white leather
over the glasses.

The general rule has been deviated from of making the pickle for onions
and mushrooms with double distilled white wine vinegar, as in this
instance it is requisite to preserve them white. It is likewise
recommended that they be put into small jars or glasses for use; for
this reason, that, if exposed to the air but for a short space of time,
they will discolour.


_To pickle Beet Roots._

BOIL the roots till three parts done, and cut them into slices of an
inch thick. Then take a sufficient quantity of vinegar to cover them,
and add to it whole allspice, a few cloves, mace, black pepper, slices
of horseradish, some onions, eschallots, a little pounded ginger, some
salt, and a few bay leaves. Boil the ingredients together twenty minutes
and strain it, and when the pickle is cold add a little bruised
cochineal. Put the slices of beet into jars, add the pickle, put a small
quantity of sweet oil on the top, and tie the jars down close.

N. B. When the beet is wanted for use mix well together sweet oil,
mustard, some of the liquor in which the roots were pickled, and a very
little sifted sugar. Lay the slices in a deep plate and pour the mixture
over.


_To pickle Artichoke Bottoms._

TAKE large fresh and sound artichokes, boil them just enough to take
the leaves and choke away, then trim and lay them in salt and water;
after which boil (for five minutes) a sufficient quantity of vinegar to
cover them, in which put whole allspice, black pepper, ginger, mace,
cloves, eschallots, salt, a few bay leaves, and some slices of
horseradish. Drain and wipe dry the bottoms, put them into jars, add the
liquor and ingredients to them, and tie them down close. When they are
fit for use serve them up in a deep plate with a little of the pickle,
oil, and mustard mixed with it.


_To pickle large Cucumbers._

PEEL them very thin, cut them into halves, throw the seeds away, and lay
the cucumbers in salt for a day. Then wipe them dry, fill them with
mustard seed, peeled eschallots, garlick, small slips of horseradish,
and mace. After which tie them round with twine, put them into jars,
pour over them some boiling liquor made as for india pickle or for
jerkins, and cover them down close till fit for use.


_To pickle Red Cabbage._

CUT a fresh light red cabbage into slips, wash it clean, and put it into
a pan with plenty of salt for two days. Then boil together for half an
hour a sufficient quantity of vinegar to cover the cabbage, together
with bruised black pepper, mace, allspice, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, and
mustard seed, a middling quantity of each. Strain the vinegar and
ingredients, and let them stand till cold; then add a little bruised
cochineal, drain the cabbage on a large sieve till dry, put it into the
jars, add the pickle, and tie the jars down close; or the liquor may be
poured over the cabbage boiling hot; and when cold, before the jars are
tied down, add a little bruised cochineal. This method will make the
cabbage sooner fit for use.

N. B. Onions may be peeled and done whole in the same manner, and mixed
with red cabbage.


_To pickle Currants._

TO a quart of double distilled white wine vinegar add half a pound of
loaf sugar, whole ginger, one ounce of salt, and a pint of red currant
juice; boil all together, skim it clean, and let it stand till cold.
Then pick and put some best ripe red currants into glasses, fill them
with the pickle, and cover them down close with bladder and leather.


_To pickle Barberries._

BRUISE and strain ripe barberries, and to a pint of juice add three
pints of vinegar, a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar, an ounce of salt,
and a quarter of an ounce of pounded and sifted ginger. Boil all
together, skim it clean, and put bunches of the best ripe barberries
into jars, pour the pickle boiling hot over, and let it stand till cold;
then add a little bruised cochineal, and tie the jars over close.

N. B. Bunches of currants may be done in like manner.


_Sour Crout._

TAKE large white cabbages when in season, cut them into halves, and then
into slips; wash them clean and drain them dry. After which put into a
tub a layer of cabbage, then a layer of salt, afterwards a small
quantity of pounded and sifted coriander seeds, and so on alternately;
when the tub is nearly full put a weight over to press it well, and set
it in a cold dry place covered with a coarse cloth. When it is wanted
for use put some of the cabbage into boiling water over a fire for five
minutes, and strain it. Have ready some pieces of salted bouillie beef
(of a quarter of a pound each) nearly boiled enough; likewise some
pieces of pickle pork of the same number and weight. Then put them into
a stewpan, add the cabbage, fresh butter, a little vinegar, onions
sliced very thin, some whole pepper, allspice, and mace, tied in a bit
of cloth. Let all stew till tender; then take out the spices, season the
cabbage to the palate with cayenne pepper, and serve it up with fried
onions (done as per receipt), with fried sausages round the crout.


_Peas Pudding, to be eaten with boiled Pork._

LAY a pint of best split peas into water for half an hour; strain, pick,
and put them into a cloth, tie them tight, and boil them gently for
three hours. Then put the peas out of the cloth into a stewpan, mash
them well with a wooden spoon, add a bit of fresh butter, a little
pepper and salt, the yolks of two eggs, and mix all well together. Put
the mixture into a clean cloth, tie it up, and let it hang near a fire
for half an hour; then turn it out on a dish, and pour melted butter
over.


_Currie, or Pepper Water._

CUT a chicken into pieces, blanch and wash it, put it into a small
stewpot, add a table spoonful of currie powder, half a pint of veal
broth, and simmer them till half done. Then peel and cut into thin
slices two good sized onions, fry them with two ounces of fresh butter
till nearly done and of a brown colour; then add them to the chicken,
together with a pint of veal broth, half a bay leaf, the juice of half a
lemon, two table spoonfuls of the juice of tamarinds, which are to be
dissolved in boiling water and strained. Boil all together till the
chicken is nearly done; then take it out, put it into another stewpan,
rub the ingredients through a tamis sieve, and add it to the fowl with
a table spoonful of flour and water to thicken it. Make it boil, season
it well to the palate with cayenne pepper and salt, skim it clean, and
serve it up in a bowl.


_Grills and Sauce, which are generally eaten after Dinner._

SEASON some small pieces of ready-dressed fowl or turkey with pepper and
salt, and grill them gently till of a nice brown colour. In the mean
time put into a stewpan a gill and a half of cullis, an ounce of fresh
butter, a table spoonful of mushroom ketchup, the juice of a lemon, and
a small bit of the rind, a little cayenne pepper, a tea spoonful of the
essence of anchovies, and one eschallot chopped fine. Boil all the
ingredients together five minutes, strain the liquor, and serve it up in
a sauceboat; the pieces of chicken, &c. on a dish.


_Salmé of Woodcocks._

TAKE two woodcocks half roasted, cut them up neatly, and let the
trimmings with the entrails be pounded in a marble mortar; then put them
into a stewpan, add half a pint of cullis, two eschallots chopped, half
a gill of red port, and a bit of rind of lemon; season to the palate
with pepper, salt, and lemon juice. Boil the ingredients ten minutes,
and strain the liquor to the carved woodcocks, which stew gently till
done. Serve them up in a deep dish with sippets of fried bread strewed
over.


_To make a Haggess._

TAKE the heart and lights of a sheep, and blanch and chop them; then add
a pound of beef suet chopped very fine, crumb of french roll soaked in
cream, a little beaten cinnamon, mace, cloves, and nutmeg, half a pint
of sweet wine, a pound of raisins stoned and chopped, a sufficient
quantity of flour to make it of a proper consistence, a little salt, the
yolks of three eggs, and some sheep chitterlings well cleaned and cut
into slips. Mix all together, and have ready a sheep's bag nicely
cleaned, in which put the mixture; then tie it tight and boil it three
hours.


_French Black Puddings._

PICK, wash, and boil, till three parts done, two pounds of grits or
rice; then drain it dry, put it into a stewpan with a quart of pigs
blood preserved from curdling, with plenty of salt stirred into it when
taken from the animal; add to them ground pepper, pounded and sifted
mace, cloves, nutmeg, and allspice, a small quantity of each, a gill of
cream with a bit of crumb of french bread soaked in it, together with
chopped savory, thyme, parsley, and pennyroyal, a little of each. Mix
the ingredients over a slow fire for twenty minutes, and when cold put
with them plenty of the flay cut into small dice. Have ready the
entrails cleaned very nice, fill them with the mixture three parts full,
tie the ends, put the puddings into hot water, boil them gently a
quarter of an hour; if they are to be eaten directly when done, prick
them with a fork and broil them upon a very clean gridiron for ten
minutes: if they are not to be eaten immediately when made, put them on
clean straw, and when they are wanted for use put them into boiling
water, let them simmer ten minutes, then take them out, and prick and
broil them as above.

N. B. If large puddings they will take longer periods in boiling and
broiling.


_Milk Punch._

TO a gallon of milk add a little cinnamon, cloves, mace, lemon and
orange peel, a pint of brandy, a pint of rum, plenty of orange and
lemon juice, and sweeten to the palate. Then whisk with it the yolks and
whites of eight eggs, put it over a brisk fire, and when it boils let it
simmer ten minutes; run it through a jelly bag till quite clear, put it
into bottles, and cork it close.

N. B. The rum and brandy should be added when the milk is cleared.


_Plum Pottage._

TO veal and beef broths (a quart of each) add a pound of stoned pruens
and the crumb of two penny french rolls, rubbing all through a tamis
cloth; then mix to the pulp half a pound of stoned raisins, a quarter of
a pound of currants, a little lemon juice, some pounded cinnamon, mace,
and cloves, a pint of red port, a pint of claret, a small quantity of
grated lemon peel, and season to the palate with lump sugar. Let all
simmer together for one hour; then add a little cochineal to make it of
a nice colour, and serve it up in a tureen. Let it be of the consistence
of water gruel.


_Candied Orange or Lemon Peels._

TAKE either lemon or orange peels well cleaned from the pulp, and lay
them in salt and water for two days; then scald and drain them dry, put
them into a thin syrup, and boil them till they look clear. After which
take them out, and have ready a thick syrup made with fine loaf sugar;
put them into it, and simmer till the sugar candies about the pan and
peels. Then lay them separately on a hair sieve to drain, strew sifted
sugar over, and set them to dry in a slow oven; or the peels may be cut
into chips, and done in the same manner.


_Lemonade or Orangeade._

TO a gallon of spring water add some cinnamon and cloves, plenty of
orange and lemon juices, with a bit of each peel; sweeten well with loaf
sugar, and whisk with it the whites of six eggs and one yolk. Put it
over a brisk fire, and when it boils let it simmer ten minutes; then run
it through a jelly bag, and let it stand till cold before it is drunk.
This mode is recommended, the liquor having been boiled.


_Poivrade Sauce for Game, Maintenon Cutlets, &c._

PEEL and chop small twelve eschallots; add to them a gill and a half of
vinegar, a table spoonful of veal consumé, half an anchovie rubbed
through a fine sieve, a little cayenne pepper, and salt. Serve it up in
a sauceboat cold, if to be eaten with cold game; but if to be eaten
with hot, roast, or grills, make it boiling.


_Lobster Sauce for Fish._

TAKE the spawn out of live lobsters before they are boiled, bruise it
well in a marble mortar, add a little cold water, strain it through a
sieve and preserve it till wanted; then boil the lobsters, and when
three parts done pick and cut the meat into small pieces, and put it
into a stewpan. To the meat of a large lobster add a pound of fresh
butter and a pint of water, including a sufficient quantity of the spawn
liquor to colour it. Put it over a fire, thicken it with flour and
water, keep stirring till it boils, and then season to the palate with
anchovie liquor, lemon juice, and cayenne pepper. Let it simmer five
minutes and skim it.

N. B. In place of the above the following method may be
adopted:--Instead of cutting the meat of the lobster into pieces, it
may be pounded in a marble mortar, then rubbed through a tamis cloth,
and the pulp put with the other ingredients when the sauce is to be
made. [See _Anchovie Essence for Fish Sauce_.]


_Oyster Sauce for Fish._

BLANCH the oysters, strain them, and preserve their liquor; then wash
and beard them, drain, and put them into a stewpan; then add fresh
butter and the oyster liquor free from sediment, some flour and water to
thicken it, season to the palate with lemon juice, anchovie liquor, a
little cayenne pepper, a spoonful of ketchup if approved, and a bit of
lemon peel. When it boils skim it, and let it simmer five minutes.

N. B. Muscles and cockles may be done in like manner.


_Shrimp Sauce for Fish._

BOIL live shrimps in salt and water for three minutes, then pick, wash,
and drain them dry; after which add fresh butter, water, anchovie
liquor, lemon juice, cayenne pepper, and flour and water to make it of a
sufficient thickness. Put the ingredients over a fire, and when it boils
skim it, and let the shrimps simmer for five minutes. Or it may be made
thus:--When the shrimps are picked, wash the shells, drain them dry, put
them into a stewpan, add a little water, and boil them ten minutes; then
strain the liquor to the butter (as above) instead of the water, which
will make it of a better flavour. The bodies of lobsters, also, when
picked, may be done in like manner for lobster sauce.


_Dutch Sauce for Fish._

BOIL for five minutes, with a gill and a half of vinegar, a little
scraped horseradish; then strain it, and when it is cold add to it the
yolks of two raw eggs, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, a dessert
spoonful of flour and water, and a little salt. Whisk the ingredients
over a fire till the mixture almost boils, and serve it up directly to
prevent it from curdling.


_Anchovie Sauce for Fish._

PUT half a pound of fresh butter into a stewpan, add to it three
spoonfuls of anchovie liquor, walnut and mushroom ketchups a spoonful of
each, the juice of half a lemon, a little cayenne pepper, a tea spoonful
of india soy if approved, a sufficient quantity of flour and water to
make it of a proper thickness. Make the mixture boil, and skim it clean.


_Observations in respect of Fish Sauces, &c._

LET it be particularly observed that fish sauces should be of the
thickness of light batter, so that it might adhere to the fish when
dressed, it being a frequent error that they are either too thick or too
thin. The thickening should be made with the best white flour sifted,
and some water, mixed smooth with a wooden spoon or a whisk, and to be
of the consistence of light batter also. A little of it is recommended
to be always ready where there is much cooking, as it is frequently
wanted both in fish and other sauces.

There are, likewise, other articles repeatedly wanted for the use of
stovework; and as their possession has been found to obviate much
inconvenience and trouble, they are here enumerated: that is to say,
liquid of colour preserved in a bottle, strained lemon juice preserved
in the same manner, cayenne pepper, ground spices, ground pepper and
salt mixed, which should be preserved separately in small jars; and
every day, when wanted, fresh breadcrumbs rubbed through a hair sieve;
parsley, thymes, eschallots, savoy, marjoram, and lemon peel, chopped
very fine, and put on a dish in separate partitions.

Directions are not given for serving the fish sauces with any particular
kind of fish,--such as turbot or salmon with lobster sauce, &c. but the
receipts have been written only for the making them; therefore it is
recommended that every person make a choice, and not be biassed
altogether by custom.


_Apple Sauce for Pork, Geese, &c._

PARE, quarter, and core, baking apples; put them into a stewpan, add a
bit of lemon rind, a small stick of cinnamon, a few cloves, and a small
quantity of water. Cover the pan close, set it over a moderate fire, and
when the apples are tender take the peel and spices out; then add a bit
of fresh butter, and sugar to the palate.


_Green Sauce for Ducklings or Green Geese._

PICK green spinach or sorrel, wash it, and bruise it in a marble mortar,
and strain the liquor through a tamis cloth. To a gill of the juice add
a little loaf sugar, the yolk of a raw egg, and a spoonful of vinegar;
if spinach juice, then put one ounce of fresh butter, and whisk all
together over a fire till it begins to boil.

N. B. Should the sauce be made of spinach juice instead of vinegar,
there may be put two table spoonfuls of the pulp of gooseberries rubbed
through a hair sieve.


_Fennel Sauce for Mackarel._

PICK green fennel, mint, and parsley, a little of each; wash, boil them
till tender, drain and press them, chop them fine, add melted butter,
and serve up the sauce immediately, for should the herbs be mixed with
the butter any length of time before it is served up, they will be
discoloured. The same observation should be noticed in making parsley
and butter sauce.


_Bread Sauce, for Turkies, Game, &c._

SOAK a piece of crumb of bread with half a pint of milk or cream, add a
peeled middling-sized onion, and put them over a fire; when the milk is
absorbed bruise the bread, mix with it two ounces of fresh butter, a
little white pepper, and salt; and when it is to be served up take out
the onion.


_Melted Butter._

IN order to prevent butter from oiling, the flour and water that may be
sufficient for the quantity of butter should be made boiling, skimmed
clean, and the butter added to dissolve, being careful it is of a proper
thickness.

In the same manner may be made fish sauces, adding the liquor of the
lobsters or oysters, &c. with flour and water, and when boiling add the
butter with the other ingredients.


_To make Melon Citron._

TAKE middling-sized melons when half ripe, cut them in quarters, take
away the seed, and lay the melons in salt and water for three days. Have
ready a thin syrup; then drain and wipe dry the quarters, put them into
the sugar, and let them simmer a quarter of an hour; the next day boil
them up again, and so on for three days; then take them out, and add to
the syrup some mountain wine, a little brandy, and more sugar; clarify
it, and boil it nearly to a candied height, put the melons into it and
boil them five minutes; then put them in glasses, and cover them close
with bladder and leather.


_Rusks, or Tops and Bottoms._

TAKE two eggs beat up, add them to a pint of good mild yest and a little
milk. Sift four pounds of best white flour, and set a sponge with the
above ingredients; then make boiling half a pound of fresh butter and
some milk, a sufficient quantity to make the sponge the stiffness of
common dough. Let it lay in the kneading trough till well risen; then
mould and make it into the form of loaves of the bigness of small
teacups; after which batch them flat, bake them in a moderate oven, and
when nearly done take them out, cut the top from the bottom, and dry
them till of a nice colour on tin plates in the oven.


_Wafers._

TAKE a table spoonful of orange flower water, a table spoonful of flour,
the same of good cream, sifted sugar to the palate, and a dessert
spoonful of syrup of cinnamon; beat all the ingredients together for
twenty minutes; then make the wafer tongs hot, and pour a little batter
just sufficient to cover the irons; bake them over a slow fire, and when
taken from the tongs roll them round, and preserve them in a dry place.


_Cracknels._

TO half a pound of best white flour sifted add half a pound of sifted
loaf sugar, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, two table spoonfuls of
rose water, a little salt, the yolks and whites of three eggs beat up,
and mix all well together for twenty minutes. Then roll it out, cut it
into what shapes you please with a pastry cutter, put them on baking
plates rubbed with butter, wash the tops of the paste with whites of
eggs well beaten, and bake them in a brisk oven.


_To bake Pears._

TO a pint of water add the juice of three seville oranges, cinnamon,
cloves, and mace, a small quantity of each, a bit of lemon peel, and
boil them together a quarter of an hour; then strain and add to the
liquor a pint of red port, plenty of loaf sugar, and a little cochineal;
after which pare, cut into halves, and core, twelve large baking pears,
put them into a pan, add the liquor, cover the pan with writing paper,
and bake them in a moderate oven.

N. B. They may be done in the same manner in a stewpan over a fire.


_To clarify Sugar._

TO four pounds of loaf sugar put two quarts of water into a preserving
pan, set it over a fire, and add (when it is warm) the whites of three
eggs beat up with half a pint of water; when the syrup boils skim it
clean, and let it simmer till perfectly clear.

N. B. To clarify sugar for carmel requires but a small quantity of
water; and the different degrees of strength, when wanted, must be
attended to with practice. They are generally thrown over a mould rubbed
with sweet oil; for cakes, with a fork dipped in the sugar, &c.


_Syrup of Cloves, &c._

PUT a quart of boiling water into a stewpan, add a quarter of a pound of
cloves, cover the pan close, set it over a fire, and let the cloves boil
gently for half an hour; then drain them dry, and add to a pint of the
liquor two pounds of loaf sugar. Clear it with the whites of two eggs
beat up with a little cold water, and let it simmer till it becomes a
strong syrup. Preserve it in vials close corked.

N. B. In the same manner may be done cinnamon or mace.


_Syrup of Golden Pippins._

TAKE the pippins when nearly ripe, pare, core, and cut them into very
thin slices, or bruise them a little in a marble mortar. Then put them
into an earthen vessel, add a small quantity of water, the rind of a
lemon, plenty of sifted sugar, and a little lemon juice. Let the
ingredients remain in the pan close covered for two days, then strain
the juice through a piece of lawn, add more sugar if requisite, clear it
with white of egg if necessary, and boil it to a syrup.

N. B. Nonpareils, quinces, pine-apples, or the rind of lemons peeled
very thin, may be done in the same manner.


_Syrup of Capillaire._

CLARIFY with three whites of egg four pounds of loaf sugar mixed with
three quarts of spring water and a quarter of an ounce of isinglass;
when it is cold add to the syrup a sufficient quantity of orange flower
water as will make it palatable, and likewise a little syrup of cloves.
Put it into bottles close corked for use.


_Flowers in Sugar._

CLARIFY sugar to a carmel height, which may be known by dipping in a
fork, and if it throws the sugar as fine as threads put in the flowers.
Have ready teacups with the insides rubbed with sweet oil; put into each
cup four silver table spoonfuls of the sugar and flowers, and when cold
turn them out of the cups, and serve them up piled on each other.


_Syrup of Roses._

GATHER one pound of damask rose leaves when in high season, put them
into an earthen vessel, add a quart of boiling spring water, cover the
pan close, and let it remain six hours; then run the liquor through a
piece of lawn, and add to a pint of the juice a pound and a half of loaf
sugar; boil it over a brisk fire till of a good syrup, being careful in
the skimming, and preserve it in bottles close corked.

N. B. The syrup may be cleared with two eggs.


_To preserve Cucumbers._

TAKE fresh gathered gerkins of a large size, and lay them in salt and
water for two days; then drain and wipe them dry, put them into glasses,
make boiling-hot a mixture of sugar, vinegar, and water, a small
quantity of each; pour it over the cucumbers, cover and set them in a
warm place, likewise boil the liquor and pour over them for three
successive days. Then take a quart of the liquor, add to it plenty of
cloves, mace, ginger, and lemon peel. Boil these ingredients for half an
hour, strain and put to it plenty of sifted sugar, clear it with whites
of eggs if requisite, boil to a strong syrup, and put it to the gerkins.
When wiped dry and in the glasses, cover them down very close.


_To preserve Currants._

TAKE large bunches of ripe currants, make a thin syrup with sugar and
water, set it over a fire, when it boils put in the fruit, and let them
remain in a cold place till the next day; then take them out carefully,
lay them on a dish, make the liquor boil again, and put in the
currants, taking care not to let them break. Take them out a second
time, add more sugar to the syrup, with a quart of currant juice;
clarify it, boil it to a strong syrup, and when it is cold put the
currants into glasses, pour the syrup over, and tie them down close.


_To preserve Barberries._

BRUISE a quart of ripe barberries, add a quart of spring water, put them
over a fire, when boiling run the liquor through a fine sieve, and put
with it three pounds of clarified sugar. Then add a sufficient quantity
of large bunches of ripe barberries, put them over a fire, when
boiling-hot set them away till the next day, take the barberries out of
the syrup and put them into glasses; boil the liquor to a good
consistence, pour it over, and cover them close.


_Gooseberry Fool._

PUT a quart of green gooseberries and a gill of water in a stewpan over
a fire close covered; when the fruit is tender rub it through a fine
hair sieve, add to the pulp sifted loaf sugar, and let it stand till
cold. In the mean time put a pint of cream or new milk into a stewpan,
with a stick of cinnamon, a small piece of lemon peel, sugar, a few
cloves and coriander seeds, and boil the ingredients ten minutes. Have
ready the yolks of six eggs and a little flour and water well beaten;
strain the milk to them, whisk it over a fire to prevent it from
curdling, when it nearly boils set the pan in cold water, stir the cream
for five minutes, and let it stand till cold. Then mix the pulp of the
gooseberries and the cream together, add a little grated nutmeg, and
sweeten it more if agreeable to the palate.

N. B. Strawberries, raspberries, apricots, and other ripe fruits, may be
rubbed through a sieve and the pulp added to the cream.


_Sago._

TO half an ounce of sago washed clean add a pint of water and a bit of
lemon peel; cover the pan close, set it over a fire, let it simmer till
the sago is nearly done, and the liquor absorbed. Then put to it half a
pint of red port, a tea spoonful of pounded cinnamon and cloves or mace,
sweeten to the palate with loaf sugar, and let it boil gently for ten
minutes.


_Oatmeal Pottage, or Gruel._

MIX together three table spoonfuls of oatmeal, a very little salt, and a
quart of water; put them over a fire, and let it boil gently for half an
hour. Then skim and strain it, add to it an ounce of fresh butter, some
loaf sugar, a little brandy, and grated nutmeg; or instead of these
ingredients put pepper, salt, and fresh butter, to the palate; then boil
it again five minutes, mix it till very smooth, and let it be of a
moderate consistence.


_To bottle Gooseberries, &c. for Tarts._

GATHER gooseberries on a dry day when about half grown, and pick off the
stalks and blossoms; then put the fruit into wide-mouthed bottles and
shake them down; cork them very close, bake them in a moderate oven till
thoroughly heated through, and set them in a dry cool place.

N. B. Damsons, currants, cherries, or plums may be done in the same way.

[The above mode of preserving fruits is recommended in preference to
preserving them with sugar, it frequently happening that fruits done
with syrup will fret, and in that event the whole be spoiled.]


_To bottle Gooseberries another way._

WHEN the gooseberries are picked put them into the bottles and cover
them with spring water; then set them in a large pan of cold water, put
them over a moderate fire, and when the gooseberries appear to be
scalded enough take out the bottles and set them in a cool place, and
when cold cork them close.

[This mode has been found to answer extremely well. The small champaign
gooseberry is recommended likewise for the purpose.]


_Small Cakes._

TAKE half a pound of sifted sugar, half a pound of fresh butter, three
quarters of a pound of sifted flour, and rub all together; then wet it
with a gill of boiling milk, strew in a few carraway seeds, and let it
lay till the next day; after which mould and cut it into eleven dozen
pieces, roll them as thin as possible, and bake them in an oven three
parts cold.


_Diet Bread Cake._

TAKE nine eggs and sifted sugar of their weight; break the whites into
one pan and the yolks into another; then whisk the whites till of a
solid froth, beat the yolks, and whisk them with the whites; add the
sugar with the weight of five eggs of flour, mix all well together, put
in a few carraway seeds, and bake it in a hoop.


_Sponge Biscuits._

TAKE the same mixture as for diet bread, only omitting the carraway
seeds; then rub the inside of small tin pans with fresh butter, fill
them with the mixture, sift sugar over, and bake them in a moderate
oven.


_Common Seed Cake._

TO one pound and a half of flour put half a pound of fresh butter broke
into small pieces round it, likewise a quarter of a pound of sifted
sugar, and half a grated nutmeg; then make a cavity in the center of the
flour and set a sponge with a gill of yest and a little warm milk; when
well risen add slices of candied orange or lemon peel and an egg beat
up. Mix all these ingredients well together with a little warm milk, let
the dough be of a proper stiffness, mould it into a cake, prove it in a
warm place, and then bake it.


_Cinnamon Cakes._

BREAK six eggs into a pan with three table spoonfuls of rose water,
whisk them well together, add a pound of sifted sugar, a dessert
spoonful of pounded cinnamon, and as much flour as will make it into a
good paste; then roll it out, cut it into what shapes you please, bake
them on white paper, and when done take them off, and preserve them in a
dry place for use.


_To make red Colouring for Pippin Paste, &c. for garnishing Twelfth
Cakes._

TAKE an ounce of cochineal beat very fine; add three gills of water, a
quarter of an ounce of roche-alum, and two ounces of lump sugar; boil
them together for twenty minutes, strain it through a fine sieve, and
preserve it for use close covered.


_Twelfth Cakes._

TAKE seven pounds of flour, make a cavity in the center, set a sponge
with a gill and a half of yest and a little warm milk; then put round
it one pound of fresh butter broke into small lumps, one pound and a
quarter of sifted sugar, four pounds and a half of currants washed and
picked, half an ounce of sifted cinnamon, a quarter of an ounce of
pounded cloves, mace, and nutmeg mixed, sliced candied orange or lemon
peel and citron. When the sponge is risen mix all the ingredients
together with a little warm milk; let the hoops be well papered and
buttered, then fill them with the mixture and bake them, and when nearly
cold ice them over with sugar prepared for that purpose as per receipt;
or they may be plain.


_Bristol Cakes._

TAKE six ounces of sifted sugar, six ounces of fresh butter, four whites
and two yolks of eggs, nine ounces of flour, and mix them well together
in an earthen pan with the hand; then add three quarters of a pound of
picked currants, and drop the mixture with a spoon upon tin plates
rubbed with butter, and bake them in a brisk oven.


_Hyde Park Corner Cakes._

TAKE two pounds of flour, four ounces of common sugar, and half an ounce
of carraway seeds pounded; then set a sponge with half a gill of yest
and some warm milk, and when it works take some boiling milk, add to it
five ounces of fresh butter, mix it up light, add let it lay some time;
then roll it out, cut it into what forms you please, and bake them in a
moderate oven.


_Good Gingerbread Nuts._

TAKE four pounds of flour, half a pound of sifted sugar, one ounce of
carraway seeds, half an ounce of ginger pounded and sifted, six ounces
of fresh butter, and two ounces of candied orange peel cut into small
slices. Then take a pound of treacle or honey and a gill of cream, make
them warm together, mix all the ingredients into a paste, and let it lay
six hours; then roll it out, make it into nuts, and bake them in a
moderate oven.


_Bride Cake._

TAKE two pounds of sifted loaf sugar, four pounds of fresh butter, four
pounds of best white flour dried and sifted, a quarter of an ounce of
mace and cinnamon, likewise the same quantity of nutmeg pounded and
sifted, thirty eggs, four pounds of currants washed, picked, and dried
before a fire, a pound of jordan almonds blanched and pounded, a pound
of citron, a pound of candied orange and a pound of candied lemon peels
cut into slices, and half a pint of brandy; then proceed as
follows:--First work the butter to a cream with the hand, then beat in
the sugar for a quarter of an hour, whisk the whites of eggs to a solid
froth, and mix them with the sugar and butter; then beat the yolks for a
quarter of an hour and put them to the above, likewise add the flour,
mace, and nutmeg; beat all well together till the oven is ready, and
then mix in lightly the brandy, currants, almonds, and sweetmeats. Line
a hoop with paper, rub it with butter, fill it with the mixture, bake it
in a brisk oven, and when it is risen cover it with paper to prevent it
from burning. It may be served up either iced or plain.


_Rice Cakes._

WHISK the yolks of seven eggs for a quarter of an hour, add five ounces
of sifted sugar, and mix them well; put to them a quarter of a pound of
rice, some flour, a little brandy, the rind of a lemon grated very fine,
and a small quantity of pounded mace; then beat six whites of eggs for
some time, mix all together for ten minutes, fill a hoop with the
mixture, and bake it in a brisk oven.


_Bath Cakes._

TAKE a pound of fresh butter and rub with it a pound of flour, mix them
into a light paste with a gill of yest and some warm cream, and set it
in a warm place to rise; then mould in with it a few carraway seeds,
make it into cakes the size of small french rolls, and bake them on tins
buttered.


_Pancakes._

TO half a pound of best white flour sifted add a little salt, grated
nutmeg, cream or new milk, and mix them well together; then whisk eight
eggs, put them to the above, and beat the mixture for ten minutes till
perfectly smooth and light, and let it be of a moderate thickness. When
the cakes are to be fried, put a little piece of lard or fresh butter in
each frying-pan over a regular fire, and when hot put in the mixture, a
sufficient quantity just to cover the bottom of each pan, fry them of a
nice colour, and serve them up very hot. Serve with them, likewise, some
sifted loaf sugar, pounded cinnamon, and seville orange, on separate
plates.

N. B. Before the frying pans are used let them be prepared with a bit of
butter put into each and burnt; then wipe them very clean with a dry
cloth, as this method prevents the batter from sticking to the pan when
frying.


_Shrewsbury Cakes._

BEAT half a pound of fresh butter to a cream, add to it the same
quantity of flour, one egg, six ounces of sifted sugar, and a quarter
of an ounce of carraway seeds. Mix all together into a paste, roll it
out thin, stamp it with a tin cutter, prick the cakes with a fork, lay
them on tin plates rubbed with butter, and bake them in a slow oven.


_Portugal Cakes, or Heart Cakes._

TAKE a pound of flour, a pound of sifted sugar, a pound of fresh butter,
and mix them with the hand (or a whisk) till they become like a fine
batter. Then add two spoonfuls of rose water, half a pound of currants
washed and picked, break ten eggs, whisk them, and mix well all
together. Butter ten moulds, fill them three parts full with the
mixture, and bake them in a brisk oven.


_Macaroons._

TAKE a pound of jordan almonds blanched and pounded fine, with a little
rose water to preserve them from oiling, and add a pound of sifted
sugar; then whisk the whites of ten eggs to a solid froth and add to the
above; beat all together for some time. Have ready wafer paper on tin
plates, drop the mixture over it separately the size of a shilling or
smaller, sift a little sugar over, and bake them.


_Mirangles._

TAKE the whites of nine eggs, and whisk them to a solid froth; then add
the rind of six lemons grated very fine and a spoonful of sifted sugar;
after which lay a wet sheet of paper on a tin, and with a spoon drop the
mixture in little lumps separately upon it, sift sugar over, and bake
them in a moderately heated oven, observing they are of a nice colour.
Then put raspberry, apricot, or any other kind of jam between two
bottoms, add them together, and lay them in a warm place or before the
fire to dry.


_Ratafias._

BLANCH and pound half a pound of jordan almonds, likewise the same
quantity of bitter almonds, and preserve them from oiling with rose
water; then add a pound of sifted sugar, beat the whites of four eggs
well, and mix lightly with them; after which put the mixture into a
preserving pan, set it over a moderate fire, stirring till it is pretty
hot, and when it is cold roll it into small rolls, cut them into small
cakes the bigness of a shilling, dip the top of your finger into flour
and touch lightly each cake, put them on wafer paper, sift sugar over,
and bake them in a slow oven.


_Lemon Puffs._

PUT a pound of sifted loaf sugar in a bowl with the juice of two lemons,
and beat them together; then whisk the white of an egg to a very high
froth, add it to the mixture, and whisk it for twenty minutes; after
which put to it the rind of three lemons grated very fine and three
eggs, mixing all well together. Sift sugar over wafer paper, drop on it
the mixture in small quantities, and bake them in a moderately heated
oven.


_Chantilly Basket._

HAVE ready a small quantity of warm clarified sugar boiled to a carmel
height, dip ratafia cakes into it, and place them round the inside of a
dish. Then cut more ratafia cakes into squares, dip them into the sugar,
pile them on the others, and so on for two or three stories high. After
which line the inside with wafer paper, fill with sponge biscuits,
sweetmeats, blanched almonds, and some made cream as for an apple pie,
put some trifle froth over that, and garnish the froth with rose leaves,
or coloured comfits or carmel of sugar thrown lightly over the top.


_Green Codlins, frosted with Sugar._

TAKE twelve codlins, blanch them in water with a little roche-alum in it
and some vine leaves; when they are nearly done take off the outside
skin, rub the apples over with oiled fresh butter, and sift plenty of
sugar over them; then lay them on a clean tin, put them into a slow
oven, and when the sugar sparkles like frost take them out. When they
are cold serve them up in a trifle glass with some perfumed cream round
them made as for an apple pie, and on the top of each codlin stick a
small flower for garnish.


_Pound Cake._

TAKE a pound of sifted sugar, a pound of fresh butter, and mix them with
the hand for ten minutes; then put to them nine yolks and five whites
of eggs beaten, whisk them well, and add a pound of sifted flour, a few
carraway seeds, a quarter of a pound of candied orange peel cut into
slices, a few currants washed and picked, and mix all together as light
as possible.


_Yest Cake._

TAKE one pound of flour, two pounds of currants washed and picked, a
quarter of a pound of fresh butter, a quarter of a pound of lisbon
sugar, a quarter of a pound of citron and candied orange peel cut into
slices, cinnamon and mace a small quantity of each pounded and sifted.
Make a cavity in the center of the ingredients, add a gill of sweet
wine, a little warm milk, a teacupful of yest, and let it stand till the
yest works; then put a little more warm milk, mix all together, fill a
hoop with it, and let it remain till risen, and bake it.


_Rich Plum Cake._

TAKE one pound of sifted sugar, one pound of fresh butter, and mix them
with the hand in a earthen dish for a quarter of an hour. Then beat well
ten yolks and five whites of eggs, put two thirds of them to the sugar
and butter, and mix them together till it begins to be tough; after
which add one pound and a half of currants washed and picked, a quarter
of a pound of citron, a quarter of a pound of candied orange or lemon
peel cut into slices, a quarter of a pound of jordan almonds blanched
and bruised very fine. Then pound a quarter of a pound of muscadine
raisins, put to them a gill of sweet wine and a spoonful of brandy,
strain the liquor through a cloth to the mixture, add the rest of the
eggs, and mix all together as light as possible.


_Dried Cherries._

GATHER the largest flemish cherries (or english bearers) when nearly
ripe, pick off the stalks and take the stones away; have ready a thin
syrup boiling-hot, put the cherries into it, and let them remain till
the next day; then strain and boil the liquor again, and add to the
cherries; the same again on the third day; on the fourth day strain the
syrup, add more sugar, and clarify it; boil it to a strong consistence,
add the cherries, put them into jars, and when they are cold cover them
close. When wanted for use take them out, lay them on large drying
sieves, and put them in a very slack oven.

N. B. In the same manner may be done apricots, pears, plums, &c.


_Pippins with Rice._

BOIL two ounces of whole rice with half a pint of milk, and when it is
nearly absorbed put the rice into a marble mortar, add a table spoonful
of brandy, a little grated lemon peel, a small quantity of pounded
cinnamon and cloves, two ounces of sifted sugar, two eggs, and pound all
together. Then pare twelve large ripe golden pippins, core them with an
apple scoop, mould over them some of the mixture with the hand, put
writing paper on a tin-plate, rub it over with sweet oil or butter, put
the apples on it, and bake them gently till done; then serve them up in
a deep dish with melted butter over and a little of the syrup of quinces
mixed with it.


_To make English Bread._

TAKE a peck of the best white flour, sift it into a trough, make a
cavity in the center, and strain through a hair sieve (mixed together)
a pint of good yest and a pint of lukewarm water; mix them lightly with
some of the flour till of a light paste, set it in a warm place covered
over to prove for an hour; then mix the whole with two quarts of
lukewarm water and a little salt, knead it, let it be of a good
stiffness, prove it an hour more and knead it again; prove it another
hour, mould it into loaves or batch two pieces together, and bake them
in a brisk oven.

N. B. A middling-size loaf will require an hour and a half in baking.


_French Bread._

SIFT a peck of fine flour into a trough, make a cavity in the center
with the hand, strain into it (mixed together) a pint of lukewarm milk
and a pint of good yest; mix them with some of the flour till of a
light sponge, set it in a warm place covered over to prove for an hour;
then add to it two quarts of lukewarm milk, half a pound of fresh
butter, an ounce of sifted loaf sugar, and a little salt; knead it till
of a nice stiffness, let it prove an hour more, knead it again, and let
it prove another hour; then mould it into bricks, lay them on tins, put
them into a very slack oven or warm place to prove for half an hour, and
bake them in a brisk oven.


_Pulpton of Apples._

PARE, cut into quarters, and core eight good-sized baking apples; put
them into a stewpan, add a bit of lemon peel and a table spoonful of
rose water; cover the pan close, put it over a slow fire, and when the
apples are tender rub them through a hair sieve, put to the pulp, sugar
to the palate, sifted cinnamon and cloves a small quantity of each, four
eggs well beaten, a quarter of a pound of the crumb of french bread
soaked in a gill of cream, and mix all the ingredients together. Rub the
inside of a mould with fresh butter, fill it with the mixture, bake it
in a moderately heated oven, when done turn it out on a dish, and serve
it up with sifted sugar over.


_A sweet Omlet of Eggs._

MIX well together ten eggs, half a gill of cream, a quarter of a pound
of oiled fresh butter and a little syrup of nutmeg; sweeten it with loaf
sugar, put the mixture into a prepared frying pan as for a savory omlet,
fry it in the same manner, and serve it up with a little sifted sugar
over it.


_To keep Cucumbers for Winter Use for Sauces._

TAKE fresh gathered middling-sized cucumbers, put them into a jar, have
ready half vinegar, half water, and some salt, a sufficient quantity to
cover them; make it boiling-hot, pour it over them, add sweet oil, cover
the jars down close with bladder and leather, and set them in a dry
place.


_To preserve Mushrooms for Sauces._

PEEL button forced mushrooms, wash them and boil till half done in a
sufficient quantity of salt and water to cover them; then drain them and
dry in the sun, boil the liquor with different spices, put the mushrooms
into a jar, pour the boiling pickle over them, add sweet oil, and tie
them over with bladder, &c.


_Pullet roasted with Batter._

BONE and force the pullet with good stuffing or forcemeat, paper it and
put it to roast; when half done take off the paper, and baste the fowl
with a little light batter; let it dry, baste it again, so repeating
till it is done and nicely crusted over; then serve it up with
benshamelle or poivrade sauce beneath.


_Dutch Beef._

RUB the prime ribs of fat beef with common salt, and let them lay in a
pan for three days; then rub them with the different articles as for
hams or tongues, and add plenty of bruised juniper berries. Turn the
meat every two days for three weeks, and smoke it.


_Mushroom Ketchup._

TAKE a parcel of mushrooms either natural or forced, the latter will
prove the best, and cut off part of the stalk towards the root. Wash the
mushrooms clean, drain them, then bruise them a little in a marble
mortar, put them into an earthen vessel with a middling quantity of
salt, let them remain for four days, and then strain them through a
tamis cloth. When the sediment is settled pour the liquor into a
stewpan, and to every pint of juice add half a gill of red port, a
little whole allspice, cloves, mace, and pepper. Boil them together
twenty minutes, then skim and strain the ketchup, and when cold put it
into small bottles and cork them close.


_Suet Pudding._

CHOP fine half a pound of beef suet, add to it the same quantity of
flour, two eggs beaten, a little salt, a small quantity of pounded and
sifted ginger, and mix them together with milk. Let the mixture be of a
moderate thickness. It may be either boiled or baked.


_Savoy Cake._

BEAT well together the yolks of eight eggs and a pound of sifted sugar,
and whisk the whites till of a solid froth; then take six ounces of
flour and a little sifted cinnamon, and mix all the ingredients lightly
together; after which rub a mould with fresh butter, fill it three parts
full with the mixture, and bake it in a slack heated oven.


_Nutmeg Syrup._

POUND a quarter of a pound of nutmegs, put them into a stewpan, add a
pint and a half of hot water, and boil them for half an hour; then
strain, and put to a pint of liquor two pounds of sifted sugar and one
egg beat up with a little cold water; set it over a fire, and when it
boils skim it till perfectly clear and reduced to a good syrup, and
when it is cold mix with it half a pint of brandy.

Having this syrup always at hand will answer a better purpose for
puddings, &c. than grated nutmeg and brandy, as the mixtures can be
better palated, and likewise save trouble and expense.


_Sweetbreads with Veal and Ham._

BLANCH heart sweetbreads eight minutes, and wash and wipe them dry; then
make an incision in the under part, take out a piece and pound it with a
small quantity of light forcemeat; after which fill the cavity in the
sweetbread, rub the top with white of egg, lay over it a thin slice of
lean ham, a slice of veal, and a bard of bacon; put paper and a thin
sheet of common paste over the whole, bake them gently for an hour, and
when they are to be served up take off the paste and paper, glaize
lightly the bacon, and put under the sweetbreads a good benshamelle.


_Essence of Ham for Sauces._

TAKE four pounds of slices of lean ham, and be careful it is of a good
flavour; put it into a stewpan with a little water, six peeled
eschallots, and two bay leaves; cover the pan close, set it over a fire,
and simmer the ham till three parts done; then add two quarts of water
and boil it till tender, strain it through a fine sieve, skim it
perfectly free from fat, clear it with whites of eggs, strain it through
a tamis, boil it till it is reduced to a pint, and when cold put it into
small bottles and cork them close.


_Ox Heart roasted._

LET the heart be very fresh, wash and wipe it, fill it with a stuffing
as for a fillet of veal, tie over the top a piece of veal caul, roast
it gently one hour and an half, and five minutes before it is done roast
it quick, froth it with flour and butter, and put it on a very hot dish.
Serve it up with a sauce under it made with cullis, fresh butter, a
table spoonful of ketchup, and half a gill of red port boiled together.


_Slices of Cod fried with Oysters._

EGG, breadcrumb, and fry in boiling lard, some slices of crimped cod;
when done, drain them dry, serve them up with oyster sauce in the
center, made in the same manner as for beef steaks.


_Small Crusts to be eaten with Cheese or Wine after Dinner._

TAKE the crumb of a new-baked loaf, pull it into small pieces, put them
on a baking plate, and set them in a moderately heated oven till they
are of a nice brown colour.


_Devilled Almonds._

BLANCH half a pound of jordan almonds and wipe them dry; then put into a
frying-pan two ounces of fresh butter, make it hot, add the almonds, fry
them gently till of a good brown colour, drain them on a hair sieve,
strew over cayenne pepper and some salt, and serve them up hot.


_Boiled Tripe and Onions._

CUT a prepared double of tripe into slips, then peel and boil some
spanish or other onions in milk and water with a little salt, and when
they are nearly done add the tripe and boil it gently ten minutes. Serve
it to table with the onions and a little of the liquor in a tureen.
Serve up, likewise, in a sauceboat, some melted butter with a little
mustard mixed with it, and (if approved) there may be added a table
spoonful of vinegar.


_Boiled Sweetbreads._

BLANCH two heart sweetbreads, wash and trim off the pipe, then boil them
in milk and water with a little salt for half an hour; drain them dry,
and when they are to be served to table put over them some boiling
benshamelle with a little parsley chopped very fine in it.


_Broiled Sweetbreads._

BLANCH the sweetbreads till half done, wash and trim off the pipe, then
cut them into large slices, season with a small quantity of cayenne
pepper and salt, broil them gently over a clear fire till of a nice
brown colour, and serve them up very hot, with some cold fresh butter on
a plate.


_Conclusion, with Remarks._

ALL sweets, pastry, shellfish or savoury dishes, either plain or
modelled, with fat or butter, or ornaments of any kind, that are served
up in second courses or ball suppers, &c. should be very light, airy,
and neat; the pastry, likewise, of the best puff paste, well-baked, and
rather inclining to a pale colour, which has a very good effect.

Let it also be observed, that mention should have been made in the
receipt for Mock Turtle, of an addition to the passing of flour and
butter, to each gallon of liquor half a pint of madeira wine; and (if
approved) the mock turtle may be made with pieces of cow-heel or pig's
head instead of calf's scalp.



INDEX.


  A.

  A LA reine soup, 5

  Almond cake, 215
  ------ custards, 216
  ------ nuts, 200
  ------ paste, 198
  ------ pudding, 219

  Almonds devilled, 312

  Anchovie essence for fish sauces, 234
  -------- sauce, 265

  Apples, to stew, for tarts, 203

  Apple dumplings, 223
  ----- fritters, 190
  ----- pudding baked, 223
  ------------- boiled, 222
  ----- sauce for pork, &c., 267

  Apricot jam, 211

  Apricots, preserved, for tarts or desserts, ib.

  Artichoke bottoms fried, 171
  ----------------- stewed, 144
  -----------------, to dry, 243
  -----------------, to pickle, 248

  Ashée sauce, 45

  Asparagus peas, 155
  --------- peas another way, 156
  --------- tops for sauces, 157

  Aspect of fish, 181
  ------ of meat or fowl, 182

  Atlets curried, 168


  B.

  Bacquillio with herbs, 27

  Bagnets a l'eau, 189

  Baked beef, 47
  ----- pears, 273

  Barberries, to pickle, 251
  ----------- to preserve. 279

  Bath cakes, 291

  Batter, to prepare, for frying, 170
  ------- pudding, 221

  Beef collops, 42
  ---- palates stewed, 43
  ---- red, for slices, 179
  ---- steaks broiled, 128
  ---- steak pudding, 129
  ---- stock, 1
  ---- tails, 41

  Beet root, to pickle, 247

  Benshamelle, or white cullis, 4

  Black puddings, french, 257

  Blancmange, white, 185

  Boiled sweetbreads, 313

  Breadcrumbs to prepare for frying, 88

  Bread pudding, 220
  ----- sauce for turkies, &c., 269

  Breast of lamb with benshamelle, 72
  -------------- en matelote, ib.
  -------------- with peas, 73

  Breast of veal en gallentine, 61
  -------------- ragout, ib.
  -------------- with oysters, 70

  Bride cakes, 289

  Brisket of beef with spanish onions, 45
  -------------------- ashée or haricot, 46

  Bristol cakes, 287

  Broiled mackarel, 25
  ------- salmon, 24
  ------- sweetbreads, 313

  Burnt cream, 197

  Butter clarified for potting, 235
  ------ melted, 269

  Buns, 207


  C.

  Cabbage, red, to pickle, 250
  -------- to stew, 54

  Calf's feet jelly, 187
  ------ head hashed, 60
  ------ liver roasted, 233

  Callipash, 18

  Callipee, 19

  Canopies, 183

  Cardoons stewed, 145

  Carrot pudding, 227

  Cauliflower a la cream, 144
  ----------- sauce, 143
  ----------- with parmezan cheese, ib.

  Celery fried, 170
  ------ sauce (brown), 66
  ------ sauce (white), ib.
  ------ soup, 8

  Champignons, &c. to dry, 238

  Chantilly basket, 296

  Cheese cakes, 199
  ------ stewed, 169

  Cherries in brandy for desserts, 206

  Chicken puffs, 111
  ------- tourte, 103
  ------- with lemon sauce, 116
  ------- or turkies with celery sauce, 118
  ------- with oyster sauce, ib.
  ------- with peas, 119
  -------------- another way, 120

  Cinnamon cakes, 285

  Citron of melons, 270

  Clarified butter for potting, 235
  --------- sugar, 273

  Cleared brown stock, 6

  Cloves, syrup of, 274

  Codlins, green, frosted with sugar, 297

  Coffee cream, 197

  Collared eels, 230
  -------- pig, 178

  Collops, veal (brown), 67
  ------- (white), 68

  Colouring for paste for garnishing, 286

  Compote of oranges, 195
  ------- of pigeons, 57

  Consumé, 2

  Cracknels, 272

  Crayfish soup, 5

  Cream for fruit pies, 193

  Cressey soup, 8

  Crisp tart paste, 213

  Cucumbers forced, 154
  ---------, to keep for winter use, 304
  ---------, to pickle, 244
  ---------, large, to pickle, 249
  ---------, to preserve, 277

  Cullis, or thick gravy, 2

  Currant jelly, 212

  Currants, to pickle, 251
  --------, to preserve, 278

  Currie or pepper water, 254
  ------ of chickens, 81
  ------ of lobsters, 83
  ------ of mutton, ib.
  ------ of pig's head, 84
  ------ of veal, 83

  Curried atlets, 168

  Cutlets, lamb, with cucumbers, 74
  -------------- with tendrons, 75
  -------------- another way, 77

  Cutlets, mutton, with haricot, 49
  ---------------, with potatoes, 51
  ---------------, a la Maintenon, 52
  ---------------, a la Irish stew, 53

  Cutlets, pork, with red or white cabbage, ib.
  -------------, with robert sauce, 54
  -------------, another way, 55

  Cutlets, veal, larded, 63
  -------------, natural, 67


  D.

  Damson pudding, 224
  -------------- another way, ib.

  Diet bread, 284

  Directions for meat and poultry plain boiled, 121
  ---------- for roasting, 84
  ---------- for vegetables, 157

  Dried cherries, 300

  Duck with benshamelle, 125
  ---- with cucumbers, 124
  ---- aux naves, 123

  Dutch beef, 306
  ----- blancmange, 186
  ----- sauce, 264


  E.

  Eel pie, 109

  Egg paste for balls, soups, &c., 39

  Eggs and bacon, 213
  ---- buttered, 163
  ---- fried with ham, &c., 164
  ---- poached with sorrel, &c., 163
  ---- a la tripe, 165

  Endive stewed, 153

  English bread, 301

  Entrée of eels, 28
  ------ of mackarel, 31
  ------ of salmon, 29
  ------ of smelts, 30
  ------ of soles, 28
  ------ of whitings, 29

  Essence of ham for sauces, 310


  F.

  Fennel sauce for mackarel, 268

  Fillet of beef larded, 42
  ------ of mutton with cucumbers, 50
  ------ of pork roasted, 56
  ------ of veal prepared for roasting, 93

  Fish for frying, 22
  ---- meagre pie, 101
  ---- meagré soup, 14
  ---- plain boiled, 21
  ---- prepared for broiling, 23
  ------------- for frying, ib.
  ------------- for stewing, 25

  Flat chicken pie, or tourte, 103

  Flowers in sugar, 276

  Forcemeat balls for soups and ragouts, 38

  Fowl a la Memorancy, 115
  --------- St. Menehout, 114

  Fowl, &c. with oyster sauce, 118

  French beans creamed, 145
  ------ black puddings, 257
  ------ bread, 302
  ------ salad, 185

  Fricando veal glaized, 69

  Fricassee of chicken or rabbits (white or brown), 117
  --------- of tripe, 167

  Fried parsley, 111
  ----- puffs with sweetmeats, 204

  Fruit pudding baked, 225


  G.

  Giblet soup, 13

  Giblets stewed plain, 138
  ------ stewed with peas, 139

  Gingerbread nuts, 288

  Glaize for hams, larding, &c., 20

  Golden pippins a la cream, 191
  -------------- another way, 192
  -------------- stewed, 193
  -------------- syrup of, 275

  Gooseberries, to bottle, 282
  ------------- another way, 283

  Gooseberry fool, 280

  Gravy for meats and poultry, 95

  Green codlins frosted, 297
  ----- gage jam, 210
  ----- geese for roasting, 91
  ----- peas soup, 10
  ----- sauce for poultry, 268
  ----- truffles for a dish, 139

  Grills generally eaten after dinner, 255

  Grown geese and ducks prepared for roasting, 92

  Guinea fowls for roasting, ib.


  H.

  Haggess, to make, 256

  Ham braised and glaized, 140

  Hard eggs fried, 172

  Hare glaized, 123
  ---- jugged, 122

  Hares to prepare for roasting, 89
  ----- another way, ib.

  Haricot mutton cutlets, 49
  ------- sauce, 41

  Hashed beef, in N. B., 126
  ------ calves head, 60
  ------ fowl, 127
  ------ hare, wild fowl, &c., 128
  ------ mutton, 125
  ------ venison, 126

  Haunch of venison, &c. to prepare for roasting, 86

  Herbs dried, 233

  Hodge podge, or an english olio, 36

  Hyde park corner cakes, 288


  I. J.

  Ice cream, 228

  Iceing for cakes, 206

  India pickle, 241

  Jerusalem artichokes stewed, 141
  -------------------- another way, 142



  L.

  Lamb, hind quarter of, marinated, 79
  ------------------ with spinach, 80
  ----, leg of, with oysters, ib.

  Lamb or pork chops plain broiled, 130

  Lamb's fry with parsley, 173
  ---------- another way, ib.
  ------ head minced, 71
  ------ tails and ears, 167

  Larks, to prepare for roasting, 88

  Leason for fricassees and soups, 6

  Lemonade or orangeade, 261

  Lemon peel candied, 260
  ----- puffs, 295
  ----- sauce, to make, 116

  Light forcemeat for pies, &c., 38

  Liquid of colour for sauces, 3

  Lobsters buttered, 176

  Lobster sauce for fish, 262

  Loin of veal a la cream, 64


  M.

  Macaroni stewed for a dish, 169

  Macaroons, 293

  Mackarel, broiled, common way, 25
  -------- the german way, 31

  Marbree jelly, 188

  Marinate, to make, 49

  Marrow bones, 48
  ------ pudding, 220

  Mashed potatoes, 142

  Mashed turnips, 148

  Matelote of rabbits, 137

  Meat cake, 177

  Melted butter, to prepare, 269

  Milk punch, 258

  Mince meat, 194

  Minced veal for a dish, 131
  ----------- another way, 132

  Mirangles, 294

  Mock turtle, 14

  Morells, &c. to dry, 238

  Muffin pudding with dried cherries, 226

  Mushroom ketchup, 306
  -------- powder, 238

  Mushrooms broiled, 147
  ---------, to dry, 238
  ---------, to pickle, 246
  ---------, to preserve, for sauces, 305
  ---------, stewed (brown), 147
  -----------------,(white), 148

  Mutton broth, 15
  ------ or lamb, &c. broiled, 130
  ------ pie, 109
  ------ rumps marinated, 48


  N.

  Neck of lamb glaized, 75
  ---- of veal en erison, 62
  ----------- larded, 63

  Nutmeg syrup, 308


  O.

  Oatmeal pottage or gruel, 281

  Observations on fish and sauces, 265
  ------------ on meat and poultry, 94
  ------------ on stores, 228

  Old or split peas soup, 11
  --- peas soup another way, 12

  Olios, or a spanish dish, 32
  ------ how to make, 34

  Omlets of eggs for garnishing, 39
  -------------- several ways, 165

  Onion sauce, 75
  ----- soup, 10

  Onions fried with parmezan cheese, 152
  ------, to pickle, 246

  Orangeade, 261

  Orange or lemon peel candied, 260
  ------ marmalade, 208
  ------ pudding, 217

  Orgeat, 207

  Ox cheek stewed, 40
  -- heart to prepare for roasting, 310

  Oyster atlets, 159
  ------ loaves, 161
  ------ sauce for beef steaks, 130
  ------------ for fish, 263
  ------------ (white), 118

  Oysters prepared for frying, 121
  ------- scolloped, 160


  P.

  Pancakes, 291

  Parsley, to fry, 111

  Partridge soup, 229

  Partridges or pheasants au choux, 132
  ----------------------- for roasting, 91
  ----------------------- with truffles, 133

  Passing of flour and butter, 4

  Paste for stringing tartlets, &c., 202

  Pastry cream, 198

  Patties of lobster or oysters, 99
  ------- with forcemeat, ib.

  Peas pudding to be eaten with pork, 253
  ---- stewed for a dish, 154
  ----, to stew, for sauce, 73

  Peloe of rice, 95
  -----, another way, 96

  Pepper or currie water, 254

  Peths fried, 171

  Petit patties of chicken and ham, 98

  Pickled oysters, 158
  ------- tongues, 240

  Pickle tongue forced, 153

  Pickling, rules to be observed in, 245

  Pig, to prepare for roasting, 92

  Pigs feet and ears, 56
  ------------------, to prepare, 57

  Pigeon pie, 104

  Pigeons a la craupidine, 58
  ------- glaized, 59
  ------- with sorrel, ib.
  ------- to prepare for roasting, 90

  Pike or sturgeon baked or roasted, 26

  Pippins with rice, 301

  Plovers eggs different ways, 176

  Plum pottage, 259
  ---- pudding, very rich, 221

  Poivrade sauce for game, 261

  Pork pie, 108

  Portugal or heart cakes, 293

  Potatoe pudding, 227

  Potatoes creamed, 149
  -------- fried, 151

  Potted beef, 239
  ------ cheese, 236
  ------ larks, &c., 237
  ------ lobster, 234
  ------ veal, 236

  Poultry, directions for plain boiling, 121

  Pound cake, 297

  Prepared batter for several articles, 170

  Preserved barberries, 279
  --------- cucumbers, 277
  --------- currants, 278

  Puff paste, 214

  Puffs with forcemeat of vegetables, 173

  Pulled chicken or turkey, 114

  Pullet a la Memorancy, 115
  ------ roasted with batter, 305
  ------ with celery sauce, 118
  ------ with oyster sauce (white), ib.

  Pulpton of apples, 303
  ------- of rabbits, &c., 100

  Pyramid of paste, 204


  Q.

  Quails, or ruffs and rees, to prepare for roasting, 90

  Quarter of lamb marinated, 79
  ------- -- ---- with spinach, 80

  Quince jam, 210


  R.

  Rabbits en gallentine, 140
  ------- with onions, 136
  ------- to roast, 89

  Ragout sweetbreads (brown), 161
  ------ ----------- (white), 162

  Raised beef steak pie, 106

  Raised chicken pie, 103
  ------ ham pie with directions to make a raised crust, 102

  Raised pie with macaroni, 106
  ------ turkey pie with a tongue, 105

  Rammequins, 174

  Raspberry jam, 209

  Ratafias, 295

  Real turtle, 16

  Red beef for slicing, 179
  --- cabbage, to pickle, 250

  Remarks in conclusion, 314

  Rhubarb tart, 216

  Riband blancmange, 187

  Ribs of beef to prepare for roasting, 93

  Rice cakes, 290
  ---- pudding, 218
  ---- soup, 7
  ----, plain, to be eaten with currie, 82

  Rich plum cake, 299

  Rissoles, 110

  Roasting, directions for, 84

  Robert sauce, to make, 55

  Rump of beef a-la mode, 46
  ------------ daubed or plain, 43

  Rules to be observed in pickling, 245

  Rusks, or tops and bottoms, 271


  S.

  Sago, 281

  Salad of asparagus, 155
  ----- of lobster, 184

  Salmagundy, 183

  Salmé of woodcocks, 256

  Salmon broiled, 24

  Santé soup, or with bouillie, 9

  Savory jelly, 180

  Savoy cake, 308
  ----- sauce, 44

  Sausage meat, 232

  Sea pie, 110

  Seed cakes common way, 285

  Shoulder of lamb en epigram, 78
  ---------------- glaized, 77
  ---------------- grilled, 78

  Shrewsbury cakes, 292

  Shrimp sauce, 264

  Slices of cod fried with oyster sauce, 311

  Small cakes, 283

  Small crusts to be eaten after dinner with cheese or wine, 311

  Sorrel sauce, 69

  Soup a la reine, 5
  ---- for a family, 85

  Sour crout, 252

  Spanish onion sauce, 44

  Sponge biscuits, 284

  Stewed apples for tarts, 203
  ------ cucumbers, 50
  ------ peas for a dish, 154
  ----------- for sauces, 73

  Stock, cleared, (brown), 6

  Stores, observation on, 228

  Stuffing for veal, turkey, &c., 94

  Sturgeon roasted, 26

  Suet pudding, 307

  Sugar, to clarify, 273

  Sweetbreads boiled, 313
  ----------- broiled, ib.
  ----------- en erison, 138
  ----------- fried, 171
  ----------- glaized, 137
  ----------- roasted, 93
  ----------- with veal and ham, 309

  Sweet omlet of eggs, 304

  Syllabub, 200

  Syrup of capillaire, 276
  ----- of cloves, 274
  ----- of golden pippins, 275
  ----- of roses, 277


  T.

  Tansey pudding, 219
  Tarragon vinegar, 239

  Tarts or tartlets, 202

  Tea cream, 196

  Tendrons of veal (brown or white), 65

  Timbol of rice, 97

  Tongues, &c. to pickle, 240

  Trifle, 201

  Tripe and onions boiled, 312
  ---------------- fried, 172

  Truffles, green, for a dish, 139

  Truffle sauce, 134

  Turkey with chesnuts, 135
  ------ with celery or oyster sauce, 118
  ------ with ragout, 136
  ------ with truffles, 134

  Turkies, to prepare for roasting, 89

  Turnip sauce, 76
  ------ soup, 8

  Twelfth cakes, 286


  V.

  Veal cutlets common way, 131
  ---- olives, &c., 70
  ---- pie, 107
  ---- stock for soups, 1

  Vegetable pie, 150

  Vegetables, a neat dish of, ib.
  ----------, directions for, 157
  ---------- in moulds, 146

  Venison, haunch of, to prepare for roasting, 86

  Vermicelli soup (white), 6

  Virgin cream, 197


  W.

  Wafers, 271

  Walnut ketchup for fish sauces, 240

  Watercresses stewed, 149

  Water souchée, 26

  White oyster sauce, 118

  White puddings, 231

  Wild boar, to dress, 175
  ---- fowls to prepare for roasting, 91

  Wings and legs of fowls glaized, 113
  ----------------------- with colours, 112

  Woodcocks and snipes, to prepare for roasting, 87


  Y.

  Yest cake, 298


    THE END.


    T. Bensley, Printer, Bolt Court, Fleet Street, London.

       *       *       *       *       *

Transcriber's Notes:

Text uses é for Fish Meagré Soup and e for Fishmeagre Pie. This was
retained.

All spelling on the monthly menus was retained as printed, for example,
"Begetables." To confirm this, please see the images included in the
HTML version. In the remaining text, spelling was only changed where a
clear majority of usage could be found in the same text. For example,
"benshamelle" for "béchamel" was retained while "posssible" for
"possible" was corrected.

Page x, "Fishmeagré" changed to "Fish Meagré" to match usage in text
(Fish Meagré soup)

Page xix, "Preser ed" changed to "Preserved" (Preserved apricots for)

Page 59, "glaise" changed to "glaize" to match rest of usage (dry,
glaize the top)

Page 69, "into it" changed to "it into" (it into a stewpan)

Page 142, "posssible" changed to "possible" (white as possible)

Page 185, "sallad" changed to "salad" (eat with this salad)

Page 281, "tea-poonful" changed to "tea spoonful" (red port, tea
spoonful)


Page 315, "dumplins" changed to "dumplings" (Apple dumplins, 223)

Page 317, "Blancmonge" changed to "Blancmange" (Blancmange, white, 185)

Page 318, "parmesan" changed to "parmezan" to match usage in text
(----------- with parmezan cheese, ib.)

Page 320, "blancmonge" changed to "blancmange" (----- blancmange, 186)

Page 322, "megre" changed to "meagré" to match usage in text (----
meagré soup)

Page 324, index, reference for "India pickle" moved to land above
"Jerusalem".

Page 331, "blancmonge" changed to "blancmange" (Riband blancmange, 187)





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