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Title: Chaucer's Works, Volume 6 (of 7) —  Introduction, Glossary, and Indexes
Author: Chaucer, Geoffrey, 1343?-1400
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Chaucer's Works, Volume 6 (of 7) —  Introduction, Glossary, and Indexes" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



Transcriber's note: A few typographical errors have been corrected: they
are listed at the end of the text.

       *       *       *       *       *


In this text [*e] represents the "schwa" or obscure vowel, printed as
inverted-e, and [gh] represents the Middle English letter "yogh", similar
to the numeral 3. [=a] signifies "a macron", [)a] "a breve", and so forth.
['e] signifies "e acute"; [`e] "e grave"; [:e] "e diaresis"; and so forth
(or, mostly, stress indicators resembling these accents). aesc, eth and
thorn are expanded to ae, dh and th.

       *       *       *       *       *


THE COMPLETE WORKS

OF

GEOFFREY CHAUCER

_EDITED, FROM NUMEROUS MANUSCRIPTS_

BY THE

REV. WALTER W. SKEAT, M.A.
LITT.D., LL.D., D.C.L., PH.D.
ELRINGTON AND BOSWORTH PROFESSOR OF ANGLO-SAXON
AND FELLOW OF CHRIST'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

  *  *  *
  *  *  *

INTRODUCTION, GLOSSARY, AND INDEXES

 'Thou shall have yit, or hit be eve,
  Of every word of this sentence
  A preve, by experience;
  And with thyn eres heren wel
  Top and tail, and everydel.'
                    _The Hous of Fame_, 876-880.

Oxford

AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

M DCCC XCIV

       *       *       *       *       *

Oxford

PRINTED AT THE CLARENDON PRESS
BY HORACE HART, M.A.,
PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

IN GRATEFUL MEMORY

OF

HENRY BRADSHAW

       *       *       *       *       *

CONTENTS.

  GENERAL INTRODUCTION.--s. 1. Objects in view in preparing this
  edition. s. 2. Romaunt of the Rose. s. 3. The Minor Poems; Canon of
  Chaucer's works. s. 4. A Compleint to his Lady; the Former Age;
  Merciless Beautee; Balade to Rosemounde; Against Women Unconstaunt;
  Complaints. s. 5. Boethius. s. 6. Troilus. s. 7. The House of Fame.
  s. 8. The Legend of Good Women. s. 9. The Astrolabe. s. 10. The
  Canterbury Tales. s. 11. Obligations to others. s. 12. Thomas
  Tyrwhitt; Thomas Wright; Bell and others. s. 13. Prof. Child; Dr.
  Ellis; Dr. Sweet; Prof. Ten Brink; and others. s. 14. The Glossarial
  Index. s. 15. Aesthetic criticism. s. 16. The Dialect of Chaucer.
  s. 17. Chaucer's Kenticisms. s. 18. Pronunciation. s.19. The Vowels
  and Diphthongs. s. 20. The Consonants. s. 21. Accentuation. s. 22.
  Explanation of phonetic symbols. s. 23. The M.E. vowels. Example of
  pronunciation. s. 24. Scansion and accents. s. 25. Rimes illustrating
  the Pronunciation. Open and close [=o]. Long and short open o.
  s. 26. Long and short open o in the Minor Poems. s. 27. The same; in
  the Legend. s. 28. The same; in the Tales. s. 29. Open and close [=o]
  in Chaucer. s. 30. Open and close [=e]. s. 31. Sources of long e.
  s. 32. Development of long e. s. 33. Development of close [=e]. s. 34.
  Summary of the preceding results. s.35. Examples of unstable [=e].
  s.36. Word-lists. s. 37. Apparent exceptions in the Tales. s. 38.
  Apparent exceptions elsewhere. s. 39. Use of the above tests. s. 40.
  Further examples. s. 41. Fuller word-lists; types A, B, and C,
  Chaucer's rules. s. 42. Some peculiarities of rime. s. 43. Rimes
  involving two words; other feminine rimes. s. 44. Permissible rimes.
  Double word-forms. s. 45. Repetitions. s. 46. Prof. Lounsbury's
  objections: supposed false rimes in Chaucer and Gower. s. 47.
  _Feet_, accusative, and _fete_, dative; _entente_; _fore_;
  _broughte_ riming with _nought_. s. 48. Further attacks upon rimes
  in Chaucer and Gower. s. 49. General failure of these attacks. s. 50.
  Assonances. s. 51. Non-riming of -y and -y-[:e].  s. 52. Metres and
  Forms of Verse. s. 53. Lines of four accents; ballad-metre;
  four-line stanza. s. 54. The eight-line stanza.  s. 55. The seven-line
  stanza; from Machault. s. 56. Terza Rima. s. 57. A ten-line stanza.
  s. 58. Two nine-line stanzas. s. 59. Stanzas of six and five lines.
  s. 60. Stanzas in Anelida. s. 61. Roundels. s.62. Chaucer as a metrist.
  s.63. Balades and Terns. s. 64. The Envoy. s. 65. The Heroic Couplet.
  s. 66. Grammatical Outlines. s. 67. General Rules. s. 68. The Strong
  Declension of Substantives. s. 69. Archaisms. s. 70. Three Types of
  Strong Substantives. s. 71. Effect of Accent. s. 72. Double forms.
  s. 73. The Weak Declension. s. 74. Genitive Singular. s. 75. Dative
  Singular. s. 76. Plurals. s. 77. Substantives of French origin. s. 78.
  Adjectives. s. 79. Comparatives. s. 80. Superlatives. s. 81. Numerals.
  s. 82. Pronouns. s. 83. Possessives. s. 84. Demonstratives. s. 85.
  Interrogatives. s. 86. Relatives. s. 87. Other pronominal forms. s. 88.
  Verbs. s. 89. General formulae for verbs. s. 90. Seven Conjugations
  of Strong Verbs. s. 91. Formation of Weak Verbs. s. 92. Three Classes
  of Weak Verbs. s. 93. Some other Verbs. s. 94. Negative forms. s. 95.
  Adverbs. s. 96. Prepositions and Conjunctions. s. 97. Constructions.
  s. 98. Versification. s. 99. Three Latin terms; iamb, trochee,
  amphibrach. s. 100. Speech-waves.   s. 101. Prose and Verse. s. 102.
  Some new symbols. s. 103. Old French metres. s. 104. Sixteen forms
  of lines. s. 105. Chaucer's chief licences. s. 106. Examples of
  scansion. s. 107. His moveable pause. s. 108. Additional syllables
  explained. s. 109. Examples of additional syllables. s. 110. Syllable
  dropped in the midst of a line. s. 111. Accentuation. s. 112. Elision.
  s. 113. The vowel i not counted as a syllable. s. 114. Suppression
  of syllables. s. 115. Contraction. s. 116. No elision at a pause.
  s. 117. Four-accent metre. s. 118. Alliteration. s. 119. Chaucer's
  authorities                                                            ix

  GLOSSARIAL INDEX                                                        1

  GLOSSARY TO FRAGMENTS B AND C OF THE ROMAUNT OF THE ROSE              311

  GLOSSARY TO GAMELYN                                                   347

  INDEX OF PROPER NAMES                                                 359

  INDEX OF AUTHORS QUOTED OR REFERRED TO BY CHAUCER                     381

  INDEX OF BOOKS REFERRED TO IN THE NOTES                               390

  LIST OF MANUSCRIPTS                                                   399

  GENERAL LIST OF ERRATA                                                400

  GENERAL INDEX                                                         410

       *       *       *       *       *


GENERAL INTRODUCTION

s. 1. In the very brief Introduction to vol. I., I have given a sketch of
the general contents of the present work. I here take occasion, for the
reader's information, to describe somewhat more particularly the chief
objects which I have had in view.

In the first place, my endeavour has been to produce a thoroughly sound
text, founded solely on the best MSS. and the earliest prints, which shall
satisfy at once the requirements of the student of language and the reader
who delights in poetry. In the interest of both, it is highly desirable
that Chaucer's genuine works should be kept apart from those which were
recklessly associated with them in the early editions, and even in modern
editions have been but imperfectly suppressed. It was also desirable, or
rather absolutely necessary, that the recent advances in our knowledge of
Middle-English grammar and phonetics should be rightly utilised, and that
no verbal form should be allowed to appear which would have been
unacceptable to a good scribe of the fourteenth century[1].

I have also provided a large body of illustrative notes, many of them
gathered from the works of my predecessors, but enlarged by illustrations
due to my own reading during a long course of years, and by many others due
to the labours of the most recent critics. The number of allusions that
have been traced to their origin during the last fifteen years is
considerable; and much additional light has thus been thrown upon Chaucer's
method of treating his originals. How far such investigation has been
successful, can readily be gathered from an inspection of the Index of
Authors Quoted in the present volume, in which the passages quoted by
Chaucer are collected and arranged, and an alphabetical list is given of
the authors whom he appears to have most consulted.

The Glossary has been compiled on a much larger scale than any hitherto
attempted, wherein the part of speech of almost every word is duly marked,
and every verbal form is sufficiently parsed. A special feature of the
Glossary is the exclusion from it of non-Chaucerian words and forms; and in
order to secure this result, separate Glossaries are given of the chief
words occurring in Fragments B and C of the Romaunt of the Rose and in
Gamelyn; and we are thus enabled to detect a marked difference in the
vocabulary employed in these pieces from that which was employed by
Chaucer[2]. And I cannot refrain from here expressing the hope, that the
practical usefulness of the Glossary and Indexes may predispose the critic
to forgive some errors in other parts of the work. And further, also in the
interest of every true student, much pains have been bestowed on the mode
of numbering the lines. It is not so easy a matter as it would seem to be.
Many editors give no numbering at all; and, where it is given, it is not
always correct[3]. The numbering of the Canterbury Tales, in particular,
was especially troublesome. I give three distinct systems of counting the
lines, and even thus have failed in giving the numbering of Wright's
edition beyond l. 11928, where he suddenly begins a new numbering of his
own[4].

I append a few remarks on the text of the various pieces.

s. 2. ROMAUNT OF THE ROSE. The old text is often extremely and even
ludicrously corrupt. Thanks to the patient labours of Dr. Max Kaluza, and
his restoration, by the collation of MSS., of the French original, many
emendations have been made, for several of which I am much indebted to him.
A paper (by myself) containing a summary of the principal passages which
are thus, for the first time, rendered intelligible, has lately appeared in
the Transactions of the Cambridge Philological Society, vol. iii. p. 239;
but the whole subject is treated, in an exhaustive and highly satisfactory
manner, in two works by Kaluza. The former of these is his edition of the
Romaunt, from the Glasgow MS., side by side with the French text in an
emended form, as published for the Chaucer Society; and the other work is
entitled 'Chaucer und der Rosenroman,' published at Berlin in 1893[5].

See also the valuable paper on 'The Authorship of the English Romaunt of
the Rose' by Prof. G. L. Kittredge, printed in 'Studies and Notes in
Philology and Literature,' and published by Ginn and Co., Boston, U.S.A.,
in 1892. This essay shews, in opposition to Prof. Lounsbury, that there is
no reason for attributing to Chaucer the Fragments B and C of the Romaunt.

The notes to the Romaunt of the Rose are largely my own. Some are borrowed
from the notes to Bell's edition.

s. 3. MINOR POEMS. In preparing a new edition of the Minor Poems, I have
been much assisted by the experience acquired from the publication of my
separate edition of the same in 1888. A large number of criticisms were
made by Prof. Koch, which have been carefully considered; and some of them
have been gratefully adopted.

The question of authenticity chiefly applies here. Practically, the modern
'Canon' of Chaucer's genuine works has been taken, strangely enough, from
Moxon's reprint of the Poetical Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, which bears 'by
Thomas Tyrwhitt' on the title-page, and contains twenty-five poems which
Tyrwhitt never edited, as has been fully shewn in vol. v. pp. x-xiv. This
curious production, by an anonymous editor, was really made up by
reprinting such pieces as were supposed by Tyrwhitt, in 1778, to be not
spurious. The six unauthorised pieces which it contains are The Court of
Love, The Complaint of the Black Knight, Chaucer's Dream, The Flower and
the Leaf, The Cuckoo and the Nightingale, and a Virelai. Of these, The
Complaint of the Black Knight is now known to be Lydgate's, whilst The
Court of Love, Chaucer's Dream, and the Virelai are written in language
very different from that of the fourteenth century. The Flower and the
Leaf, like The Assembly of Ladies, claims to have been written by 'a
gentlewoman,' and perhaps it was. It does not seem possible to refer it to
the fourteenth century, but rather to the middle of the fifteenth. The
oldest poem of this set is The Cuckoo and the Nightingale; but it has
already been shewn (vol. i. p. 39) that it contains several rimes that are
not like Chaucer's. In addition to these I would now also note the
extraordinary rime of _upon_ with _mon_ (for _man_) in l. 85; it is merely
a matter of common prudence to discover a similar use of _mon_ for _man_ in
Chaucer before we rashly assign to him this rather pretty poem.

Suffice it to say, that no manuscript or other evidence has ever been
produced, or is known, that connects any of the above poems with the
authorship of Chaucer; though it is a very common mistake, on the part of
such critics as have never studied the facts, to _assume_ the genuineness
of these poems, and to expect an editor to prove the contrary! Surely, it
is enough to say that the external evidence wholly fails, and that the
internal evidence points, decisively, the other way. There is no reason for
attributing poems to Chaucer on grounds which would not for a moment be
allowed in the case of any other poet.

s. 4. All the other Minor Poems in Moxon's reprint are well known to be
genuine, and are therefore included in my first volume. I add a few last
words on the poems which are also printed there, though they do not appear
in Tyrwhitt's list.

A COMPLEINT TO HIS LADY. The internal evidence in favour of this poem is so
remarkable, that I need not enlarge upon it here. In particular, it is
difficult to see how any other poet of that age could have known anything
about Dante's _terza rima_. However, the matter is fairly settled by Dr.
Furnivall's discovery of the additional final stanza, with the name of
'Chaucer' appended to it. Cf. vol. i. p. 75; and p. lx. (footnotes) below.

THE FORMER AGE. Well known to be genuine, as occurring in two MSS., both of
which give Chaucer's name.

MERCILESS BEAUTE. Discussed in vol. i. p. 80. The external evidence is,
that it is the last poem in a MS., in which it is immediately preceded by
nine of Chaucer's acknowledged pieces.

In addition to the internal evidence already given in vol. i. p. 80, I have
just discovered further evidence of great interest, as bearing upon
Chaucer's treatment of the long open and close _e_, which to Lydgate's ear
sounded sufficiently alike. In the first Roundel, all the _e_'s are close,
whereas, in the last Roundel, all the _e_'s are open (s. 38)[6]. This is a
strong point in its favour.

BALADE TO ROSEMOUNDE. The unique MS. copy appends Chaucer's name.

AGAINST WOMEN UNCONSTAUNT. Discussed in vol. i. p. 88; and in vol. v. p.
xv. We must give great weight to the connection of this poem with Machault,
from whom Chaucer certainly borrowed, though his works do not appear to
have influenced any other English author; see s. 55 below. However, this
poem is placed in the Appendix.

AN AMOROUS COMPLEINT. Likewise placed in the Appendix. I believe it to be
genuine, on the strength of the internal evidence, and its obvious
connection with Troilus and other genuine poems; see the Notes, vol. i. p.
567. All the rimes are perfect, according to Chaucer's use, though it
extends to 91 lines.

A BALADE OF COMPLEYNT. In the Appendix. The genuineness of this poem is not
insisted on. It is added rather by way of illustration of the peculiar
style of poems entitled 'Complaint,' of which Chaucer was so fond. He must
have written many which have not been preserved.

WOMANLY NOBLESSE. Printed in vol. iv. p. xxv. Attributed to Chaucer in the
unique MS. copy. A unique example of rhythm, in which Chaucer was an
experimentalist. I know of no other poem having 33 lines on only 3 rimes,
similarly arranged. Cf. vol. v. p. xvi.

COMPLAINT TO MY MORTAL FOE; and COMPLAINT TO MY LODESTERRE. These also are
added as illustrative of Complaints. But I do not say they are Chaucer's;
though they _may_ be so.

One reason for printing the Balade to Rosemounde, An Amorous Complaint, A
Balade of Compleynt, Womanly Noblesse, and the two Complaints
last-mentioned is, that they have never been printed before, and are wholly
unknown. The Balade to Rosemounde and Womanly Noblesse are certainly
genuine; and there is a high probability that An Amorous Complaint is the
same.

The piece called A Compleint to his Lady was first printed in Stowe's
edition of 1561, but without the last stanza, and was reprinted in the same
imperfect state by Chalmers. It was omitted in Moxon's reprint, which
accounts for its being usually neglected. It is strange that poems which
are certainly spurious should be much better known and more highly prized.

s. 5. BOETHIUS. It is sufficiently explained in the Preface to vol. ii.
that this piece is now printed, for the first time, with modern
punctuation, and with Chaucer's glosses in italics. This is also the first
edition with explanatory notes.

s. 6. TROILUS. The text is much improved by the use of the Campsall and
Corpus MSS., which have never been before collated for any edition, though
they are the two best. The third best MS. is that printed by Dr. Morris. It
is a sad drawback to the use of his edition that Book IV begins in the
wrong place, so that all his references to this book are wrong, and require
the addition of 28. Thus Tyrwhitt's Glossary gives the reference to 'Nettle
in, dock out,' as T. iv. 461. In Morris's edition, it is T. iv. 433.

A few notes to Troilus occur in Bell's edition. I have added to them
largely, and supplied the schemes in vol. ii. pp. 461, 467, 474, 484, 494,
which enable ready reference to be made to the corresponding passages in
Boccaccio's Filostrato.

The valuable work on 'The Language of Troilus,' by Prof. Kittredge, is of
great importance. I regret that I was unable to use it at the time when my
own text was in course of preparation.

s. 7. THE HOUSE OF FAME. Previously edited by me in 1888 among the 'Minor
Poems,' and again, separately, in 1893. Much help has been received from
the (incomplete) edition by Hans Willert (Berlin, 1888). As some
lexicographers number the lines of each book separately, this mode of
numbering is duly given, as well as a continuous one.

s. 8. THE LEGEND OF GOOD WOMEN. Previously edited by me in 1889, when I
made the curious discovery that the MSS. can be divided into two sets of
types, which may be called A and B; that type A is considerably the better;
and yet, that no MS. of type A had ever before been made the basis of an
edition! The natural result was the easy correction of many corrupt
passages, the publication of the Prologue in its earlier as well as in its
later form, and the addition of a few previously unknown lines. As regards
the Notes, the most help was obtained from the edition by Prof. Corson. The
admirable article by Bech deserves a special mention.

s. 9. A TREATISE ON THE ASTROLABE. Previously edited by me for the Early
English Text Society's Extra Series, in 1872; when I discovered that none
but inferior MSS. had ever been previously printed, and that all other
editions are, in various ways, incomplete. The only one of any worth is the
modern edition by Mr. Brae, who was an excellent astronomer; but he
unfortunately based his edition upon an 'edited' MS., written about 1555,
which is not, after all, of a good type. The extraordinary errors in the
early editions of the Astrolabe are well illustrated by Mr. Brae. For
example, the statement in Part II. s. 6. l. 8 (vol. iii. p. 194) that 'the
nadir of the sonne is thilke degree that is opposit to the degree of the
sonne, _in the seventhe signe_,' appears in most early editions as 'in the
320 signe.' But 320 signs for the zodiac is much too liberal an allowance.

My edition for the E.E.T.S. also contains an edition of Messahala's Latin
treatise, from which Chaucer derived about two-thirds of his work; see vol.
iii. p. lxx.

This Treatise is of more importance than might be supposed, owing to
Chaucer's frequent allusions to astronomical subjects. Every editor of
Chaucer should know that there are nine spheres; otherwise, he may fall (as
three editors have done) into the trap prepared by the scribe of the
Harleian MS., who gives lines 1280 and 1283 of Group F of the Canterbury
Tales in this extraordinary form:--

 'And by his _thre speeres_ in his worching' ...
 'That in the _fourthe speere_ considred is.'

It was a special pleasure to find that Chaucer's star Aldiran (Cant. Tales,
F 265) was one of the stars marked on the 'Rete' or web of a Parisian
astrolabe in A.D. 1223, and is described (in MS. Ii. 3. 3, in the Camb.
Univ. Library) as being 'in fronte Leonis.' See vol. v. p. 380.

Some attempts have been made to calculate the date of the Canterbury Tales
from ll. 10, 11 of the Parson's Prologue. The absurdity of such an
endeavour is patent to any one who knows enough of the old astronomy and
astrology to be aware that the 'moon's exaltation' is merely a name for a
sign of the zodiac, and has nothing whatever to do with the position of the
moon itself. Here, again, the scribe of the Harleian MS. has turned the
phrase _I mene_ into _In mena_[7], misleading many enquirers who fail to
realise that he was as careless in this passage as in the former one.

s. 10. THE CANTERBURY TALES. The great gain in this poem has been the
foundation of the text upon the basis of the Ellesmere MS., the most
satisfactory of all existing MSS. having any reference to Chaucer.

The general excellence and correctness of its spellings and readings render
it the safest on which to found rules for our guidance as to pronunciation,
syntax, and prosody. For further remarks, see the Introduction to vol. iv.
p. xvii.

Much help has been obtained from the experience gained in editing various
portions of the Tales from the same MS. in former years. The edition of the
Prologue, the Knightes Tale, and the Nonnes Preestes Tale, originally
issued by Dr. Morris, underwent a considerable amount of revision by him
and by myself conjointly; and so great was the interest which he took in
the work, and so freely were the results of our researches thrown, as it
were, into a common fund, that in many instances I am unable to say which
of us it was that suggested the illustrations given in the Notes. Dr.
Morris was justly celebrated for his acuteness in unravelling the
intricacies of the various Middle-English dialects, and for his swiftness
of perception of the right use of grammatical inflections; and he
communicated the results of his labours with unsparing generosity.

The Prioresses Tale, Sire Thopas, the Monkes Tale, the Clerkes Tale, and
the Squieres Tale were first edited by me, with Notes and a Glossary, as
far back as 1874; and the book has passed through several editions since
that date[8].

The Tale of the Man of Lawe, the Pardoneres Tale, the Second Nonnes Tale,
and the Chanouns Yemannes Tale, were first edited by me, with Notes and a
Glossary, in 1877; and have been several times revised in subsequent
editions[8].

It will now be readily understood that nearly all the notes and
illustrations that have appeared in these various books are here collected
and reproduced (with corrections where necessary); and that many others
have been added of a like kind.

Perhaps I may fairly introduce here the remark that many illustrations and
explanations which are now perfectly familiar to readers of Chaucer
originally appeared for the first time in these smaller editions. Thus, to
mention a matter of no great importance, my note on Group C, l. 321,
demonstrates the exact form and position of the _ale-stake_, and shews that
the old interpretation of 'may-pole' in Speght is wrong, and that
Tyrwhitt's statement as to its being 'set up' is misleading; for its
position was horizontal. And only a little further on, at l. 405, I explain
how the peculiar construction arose which admitted of such a phrase as
'goon a-blakeberied'; an explanation which is duly quoted as mine in the
New E. Dict., s.v. _Begged_.

Nevertheless, provided that correct explanations are given, it makes but
little difference to the reader by whom they were first made. Hence notes
have been included from all accessible sources, and it has not always
seemed to be necessary, in minor instances, to specify whence they are
derived; though this has usually been done.

s. 11. It remains for me to express my great obligations to the labours of
others, and to acknowledge, with thankfulness, their assistance and
guidance.

As regards the texts, my chief debt is to the Chaucer Society, which means,
practically, Dr. Furnivall, through whose zeal and energy so many splendid
and accurate prints of the MSS. have been produced, thus rendering the
actual readings and spellings of the scribes accessible to students in all
countries. It is obvious that, but for such work, no edition of Chaucer
could have been attempted without an enormous increase of labour and a
prodigal expenditure of time.

Next to the MSS., the only authorities of any value are a few of the
earliest prints; viz. those by Caxton, and (in the case of the Envoy to
Bukton) by Julian Notary; and the editions by Thynne and Stowe. Thynne's
text of the Book of the Duchesse is, in _one_ passage, the sole authority;
and his text of the Romaunt of the Rose is, not unfrequently, correct where
the Glasgow MS. is wrong. His text of the House of Fame is also valuable,
and so is that of Caxton; and the same remark applies to some of the Minor
Poems. Both Caxton and Thynne furnish very fair texts of Boethius. Thynne's
version of Troilus follows a good MS., and is worth collation throughout;
but his Legend of Good Women follows a MS. of a very poor type, and his
Treatise on the Astrolabe is decidedly bad. Very little help is to be got
from Thynne as regards the Canterbury Tales; indeed, it is the chief fault
of Tyrwhitt's text that he trusted far too much to the old black-letter
editions.

Stowe's edition of 1561 is useful in the case of A Complaint to his Lady
and Words to Adam. Otherwise, it may usually be ignored.

As regards later editions, I am most indebted to the following.

To Dr. John Koch, for his edition of the shorter Minor Poems, viz. those
which in the present edition are numbered as I. VIII. IX. X., XIII-XVII.,
and XIX. His text is excellent, and there are numerous notes. He has also
written several important criticisms in Anglia, besides a detailed
examination in Englische Studien (xv. 399) of my own edition of the Minor
Poems, published in 1888.

To Dr. Max Lange, whose dissertation on the Book of the Duchesse is careful
and useful.

To Professor Lounsbury, who has published an edition of the Parliament of
Foules, though I have not made much use of it. On the other hand, I am
deeply indebted to him, as many other Chaucer students must be also, for
his great work, in three large volumes, entitled Studies in Chaucer. I
would draw particular attention to his excellent chapters on Chaucer's
Life, in which he separates the true accounts from the false, giving the
latter under the title of 'The Chaucer Legend,' in a chapter which is
highly instructive and furnishes a good example of true criticism. The
subjects entitled 'The Text of Chaucer,' 'The Writings of Chaucer,' 'The
Learning of Chaucer,' 'Chaucer in Literary History,' and 'Chaucer as a
Literary Artist' are all admirably handled, and command, in general, the
reader's assent; though he may wish, at times, that the material could have
been condensed into a shorter space. It seems invidious, in the midst of so
much that is good and acceptable, to express any adverse criticism; but it
is difficult to believe that the linguistic part of the work is as sound as
that which is literary; and many must hope that a time may come when the
author will cease to maintain that The Romaunt of the Rose, in its known
form, is all the product of one author. However this may be, it should be
clearly understood that I fully recognise and thankfully acknowledge the
general value of this helpful book. It is a special pleasure to record that
(by no means in this work alone) the study of Chaucer has received much
encouragement from America.

Dr. Piaget has completely solved the construction of the Compleynt of
Venus, by his recovery of the three original Balades by Sir Otes de
Granson, which are somewhat freely translated by Chaucer in this poem. See
vol. i. pp. 86, 559.

The best general commentary on Boethius is the essay by Mr. H. F. Stewart;
see vol. ii. p. x.

The best commentary on Troilus is Mr. W. M. Rossetti's line by line
collation of Chaucer's work with the Filostrato of Boccaccio. Besides this,
remarkably little has been done with regard to this important poem, with
the splendid exception of the Remarks on the Language of 'Troilus' by Prof.
Kitteredge, only recently issued by the Chaucer Society.

I have already acknowledged the usefulness of Dr. Willert's dissertation on
the House of Fame; see vol. iii. p. xiii. Also of the articles by Dr. Koch;
see the same, p. xv; and of the article by Rambeau, which is surely
somewhat extravagant, though right in the main contention.

Of the Legend of Good Women it has already been said that the chief article
is that by Bech (vol. iii. p. xli); and that some useful notes are given by
Corson. The discovery that the Prologue exists in two separate forms, both
of them being genuine, was really made by Mr. Henry Bradshaw, who was
familiar with the Cambridge MS. (which contains the earlier version) for
some time before he disclosed the full significance of it.

s. 12. As regards the Canterbury Tales, my debts are almost too numerous to
recount. First and foremost, must be mentioned the honoured name of Thomas
Tyrwhitt, whose diligence, sagacity, and discrimination have never been
surpassed by any critic, and to whom are due nearly all the more important
discoveries as to Chaucer's sources. See the admirably just remarks on this
'great scholar' in Lounsbury's Studies in Chaucer, vol. i. pp. 300-5. 'The
sanest of English poets had the good fortune to meet with the sanest of
editors.' And again--'It seems almost too much to hope that a combination
of learning, of critical sagacity, of appreciation of poetry as poetry,
will ever again meet in the person of another willing to assume and
discharge the duties of an editor of Chaucer.'

I would add my humble testimony to Tyrwhitt's unfailing greatness; and it
will readily be understood, that, whenever it becomes necessary, in
consequence of recent linguistic discoveries, to point out that Tyrwhitt's
knowledge of Middle-English grammar was naturally imperfect, certainly from
no fault of his own, I never waver in my admiration of his great qualities.
Even as regards linguistic knowledge, he was certainly in advance of his
time; and it is remarkable to observe with what diligence he once edited
the 'Rowley Poems' of Chatterton, merely as a piece of literary duty,
although he was one of the very first to see that they were hopelessly the
reverse of genuine.

A great deal of information has also been obtained from the notes in the
editions by Thomas Wright and by Bell; from the various publications of the
Chaucer Society, especially from the 'Essays on Chaucer,' by various
authors, and from the 'Originals and Analogues'; from Thor Sundby's
wonderful edition of Albertano of Brescia's Liber Consolationis et
Consilii; from the Essay by Dr. Eilers on the Parson's Tale; and from
various books, notes, and articles, by well-known German critics,
especially Ten Brink, Koch, K[:o]lbing, K[:o]ppel, Zupitza, and others.
Much encouragement and various useful hints have been received from
Professor Hales. If I have anywhere failed to notice the true discoverer of
any important suggestion, each in his due place, I trust it will be
regarded as an oversight. The fact that some points, and even some rather
important ones, were really discovered by myself, is somewhat embarrassing.
I have no wish to claim as my own anything that can, with any shew of
reason, be claimed by another; but would rather say, with Chaucer himself,
that 'I nam but a lewd compilatour of the labour of' other men; 'and with
this swerd shal I sleen envye[9].'

s. 13. PHONETICS. All the more important and somewhat recent discoveries as
regards Middle-English grammar and rhythm are due to the increased
attention paid to phonetics and rhythmical details. It is well known that
this impulse came from America, and was due, as Dr. Ellis has justly said,
to 'the wonderful industry, acuteness, and accuracy' of Prof. F. J. Child,
of Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts. His celebrated 'Observations
on the Language of Chaucer' were well followed up by others; notably by Dr.
Alexander J. Ellis, in his work 'On Early English Pronunciation,' and by
Dr. Sweet, in his 'History of English Sounds' and his First and Second
Middle-English Primers. Also, by Ten Brink, in his admirable work on
'Chaucers Sprache und Verskunst.' The latest essays of this character are,
like the first, from America, viz. the essay on 'The Language of the Legend
of Good Women' by J. M. Manly, and the full and exhaustive essay on 'The
Language of Chaucer's Troilus' by Prof. Kittredge[10].

s. 14. THE GLOSSARY. As regards the Glossary, I have much pleasure in
recording my thanks to Miss Gunning and Miss Wilkinson, of Cambridge, who
prepared the 'slips' recording the references, and, in most cases, the
meanings also, throughout a large portion of the whole work, with
praiseworthy carefulness and patience. My obligations to these two ladies
began many years ago, as they undertook most of the glossarial work of my
smaller edition of the Man of Law's Tale (with others); work which is now
incorporated with the rest. It required some devotion to analyse the
language of Boethius and the Romaunt, of Melibeus and the Parson's Tale,
all of which they successfully undertook.

Mr. Sapsworth, formerly scholar of St. John's College, was the original
compiler of the glossary to the Minor Poems and the Legend of Good Women.
Amongst the pieces which I specially undertook myself, I may mention the
Treatise on the Astrolabe, and some of the Canterbury Tales, including
those of the Miller, the Reeve, the Shipman, the Merchant, and the Wife of
Bath. The original references for the Prioresses Tale (and others) were
made by my wife, more than twenty years ago; and I have, in various ways,
received help from other members of my family. I think Dr. Morris and
myself may claim to have done much for Middle-English by way of compiling
glossaries. Dr. Morris led the way by the very full glossaries to his Early
English Alliterative Poems, Sir Gawayne and the Grene Knight, and Genesis
and Exodus; whilst it fell to my lot to gloss Lancelot of the Laik, the
Romance of Partenay, Piers the Plowman (305 pages, in double columns),
Pierce the Ploughman's Crede, the alliterative Joseph of Arimathie,
Barbour's Bruce (114 pages), The Wars of Alexander[11], and Alexander and
Dindimus[12]; besides preparing the glossary to Specimens of English, Part
III., and rewriting Part II. of the same. In the present instance, I have
revised the meanings assigned and all the references; and I trust that not
many are incorrect.

The glossaries to Chaucer by Tyrwhitt and Dr. Morris are both excellent;
but we now require one on a larger scale.

s. 15. CRITICISM. A brief explanation may here suffice. The conspicuous
avoidance, in this edition, of any approach to what has been called
aesthetic criticism, has been intentional. Let it not be hence inferred
that I fail to appreciate the easy charm of Chaucer's narrative, the
delicious flow of his melodious verse, the saneness of his opinions, the
artistic skill with which his characters are drawn, his gentle humour, and
his broad sympathy. It is left to the professed critic to enlarge upon this
theme; he can be trusted to do it thoroughly.

s. 16. THE DIALECT OF CHAUCER.

The dialect of Chaucer does not materially differ from that which has
become the standard literary language; that is to say, it mainly represents
the East-Midland, as spoken in London and by the students of Oxford and
Cambridge. This dialect, as is well known, is not wholly pure, but is of a
comprehensive nature, admitting several forms that strictly belong to other
dialects, chiefly Northern. Remarkable examples occur in the words _they_,
_their_, _them_, and the verbal form _are_, all of which were originally
Northern. Chaucer, however, does not employ the forms _their_ and _them_,
though he admits the nominative _they_; instead of _their_, he has _her_,
_hir_, _here_, or _hire_ (always monosyllabic); and for _them_ he
invariably has _hem_[13]. Examples of _are_ occur here and there in Chaucer
(see _Are_, _Arn_ in the Glossary), but are remarkably rare; his usual form
is _been_ or _ben_. We even find the Southern _beth_ (F 648). In fact, the
Midland dialect, from its intermediate position, was the one which was most
widely understood; and, in extending its dominion over the other dialects,
occasionally admitted forms that did not originally belong to it.

s. 17. KENTISH FORMS. It is, however, well worth notice that Chaucer was at
one time resident at Greenwich, perhaps during the whole period between
1385 and 1399 (see vol. i. pp. xxxviii, xlii, xlv); and was even chosen a
member of parliament for Kent. The effect of this upon his writings is
rather plainly marked, and has been clearly shewn in my paper on this
subject printed for the Chaucer Society, from which some examples are here
extracted.

The chief test for Kentish is the use of _e_ to represent the A.S. short
_y_, which usually became _u_ in Southern, and _i_ in Midland. Thus the
A.S. verb _cyssan_, to kiss, is represented by the Southern _kussen_, the
Midland _kissen_ (as in literary English), but in Kentish by _kessen_.
Hence we find in Chaucer, the infin. _kisse_, D 1254, and the pt. t.
_kiste_, B 3746, regularly; but we also find the Kentish _kesse_, E 1057,
and the pt. t. _keste_, F 350. We can well understand that these variations
were made for the sake of the rimes, since the riming words are,
respectively, _blisse_, _wiste_, and _stedfastnesse_, _reste_. Other double
forms are _brigge_, _bregge_ (in the compound _Cantebregge_)[14];
_fulfille_, _fulfelle_; _kin_, _ken_; _knitte_, _knette_, and the pp.
_knit_, _knet_[15]; the pp. _y-stint_, _stent_; _thinne_, _thenne_ (thin).
Further, we find Midland _abye_, Kentish _abegge_; and (without
corresponding Midland forms) the Kentish _berien_, to bury; _dent_ (in
_thonder-dent_)[16]; _melle_, a mill; _selle_, a floor, Mod. E. _sill_
(A.S. _syll_); _sherte_, shirt (Icel. _skyrta_); _shetten_ to shut, pp.
_y-shet_ (A.S. _scyttan_); _steren_, to stir (A.S. _styrian_)[17]. In one
case Chaucer uses all three forms, viz. _merie_ (A 208); _mirie_, E 2217,
2326; and _murie_ (A 1386, E 1733). The Southern _murie_ is only resorted
to in order to secure a rime to _Merc['u]rie_.

Another test for Kentish is the use of _[=e]_ for A.S. long _[=y]_; as in
Kentish _fer_, _feer_, A.S. _f[=y]r_, fire. Here, also, we find in Chaucer
the occurrence of duplicate forms. Examples are seen in Midland _dr[=y]e_,
dry (A.S. _dr[=y]ge_), Kentish _dr[=e]ye_; Midland _f[=y]r_, fire (A.S.
_f[=y]r_), Kentish _f[=e]re_, Troil. i. 229, iii. 978; Midland _hid_,
hidden, Kentish _hed_; Midl. _thriste_, to thrust, Kentish _threste_[18].

This use of Kentish forms by Chaucer is of considerable interest. Of
course, they occur still more freely in Gower, who was of a Kentish family.

s. 18. PRONUNCIATION.

The M.E. pronunciation was widely different from the present, especially in
the case of the vowel-sounds. The sounds of the vowels were nearly as in
French and Italian. They can be denoted by phonetic _invariable_ symbols,
here distinguished by being enclosed within marks of parenthesis. I shall
here use the same symbols as are employed in my Principles of English
Etymology. Of course, these symbols must be used as defined. Thus the
symbol (oo), being defined to mean the sound of the German _o_ in _so_,
will not be understood by the reader who pronounces it like the _oo_ in
_root_.

s. 19. VOWELS. (aa), as _a_ in f_a_ther; (a) short, as in _a_ha! (ae), open
long _e_, as _a_ in M_a_ry; (e), open short _e_, as _e_ in b_e_d; (ee),
close long _e_, as _e_ in v_e_il[19]; (i) short, as French _i_ in f_i_n_i_,
or nearly, as Eng. _i_ in f_i_n; (ii), as (_ee_) in d_ee_p: (ao), open long
_o_, as _aw_ in s_aw_, or _o_ in gl_o_ry; (o), open short _o_, as _o_ in
n_o_t; (oo), close long _o_, as _o_ in n_o_te, or _o_ in German s_o_; (u),
as _u_ in f_u_ll; (uu), as _oo_ in f_oo_l; (y), as F. _u_ in F. ['e]c_u_;
(yy), as long G. _[:u]_ in gr_[:u]_n. Also ([*e]), as the final _a_ in
China.

DIPHTHONGS. (ai), as _y_ in fl_y_; (au), as _ow_ in n_ow_; (ei), as _ei_ in
v_ei_l, or _ey_ in pr_ey_; (oi), as _oi_ in b_oi_l.

s. 20. CONSONANTS (SPECIAL). (k), as _c_ in _c_at; (s), as _c_ in _c_ity;
(ch), as _ch_ in _ch_urch; (tch), as in ca_tch_; (th), as voiceless _th_ in
_th_in; (dh), as voiced _th_ in _th_ine. I also use (h), when _not
initial_, to denote a guttural sound, like G. _ch_ in Na_ch_t, Li_ch_t, but
weaker, and slightly varying with the preceding vowel. This sound was
usually denoted by (gh) in Chaucer MSS., but was then rapidly becoming
extinct, with a lengthening of the preceding vowel. Thus the word _light_,
originally (liht), with short _i_ and a strong guttural, was about to
become (liit), in which the guttural has disappeared. At the end of the
fourteenth century, the vowel was already half-long, and the guttural sound
was slight; yet Chaucer never rimes such words as _bright_, _light_,
_right_, with words such as _despyt_, _spite_[20]; cf. p. xxviii. l. 5.

s. 21. An accent is denoted by (.), as in M.E. _name_ (naa.m[*e]), where
the _a_ is long and accented, and the final _e_ is like _a_ in China.

By help of these symbols, it is possible to explain the meaning of the M.E.
symbols employed by the scribe of the Ellesmere MS. of the Canterbury
Tales; which furnishes a sufficient approximate guide for the spelling here
adopted throughout. The scribe of the Fairfax MS., whence many of the Minor
Poems are taken, agrees with the 'Ellesmere' scribe in essentials, though
he makes a large number of grammatical mistakes, owing to the loss (in
pronunciation) of the final _e_ in the fifteenth century.

s. 22. SYMBOLS. The following is a list of the sounds which the symbols
denote.

The forms in thick type are the forms actually written and printed; the
forms within parenthesis denote the spoken sounds.

A short; (a). Ex. _al_ (al); _as_ (az). We have no clear evidence to shew
that the modern _a_ (ae) in _cat_ (kaet) occurs anywhere in Chaucer; though
it is possible that the sound occurred in Southern English, without any
special symbol to represent it[21].

A long, or AA; (aa): (1) at the end of an open syllable, as _age_
(aa.j[*e]); (2) before _s_ or _ce_, as _caas_ or _cas_ (kaas); _face_
(faa.s[*e]).

AI, AY (ei). Ex. _array_ (arei.); _fair_ (feir). As in modern English[22].
Note that modern English does not distinguish _pray_ from _prey_ in
pronunciation; and spells _way_, from A.S. _weg_, with _ay_ instead of
_ey_.

AU, AW (au). Ex. _avaunt_ (avau.nt), riming with mod. E. _count_; _awe_
(au.[*e]).

C, as (k), except before _e_ and _i_: as (s), before _e_ and _i_. As in
modern English. Hence, we find some scribes writing _selle_ for _celle_
(sel.l[*e]), mod. E. _cell_; and conversely, the 'Ellesmere' scribe writes
_celle_ for _selle_ in A 3822, causing a great difficulty; see the note to
the line.

CH (ch); CCH (tch). Ex. _chambre_ (chaam.br[*e]); _cacche_ (cat.ch[*e]).

E short; (e). Ex. _fetheres_ (fedh.rez); the middle _e_ being dropped. It
is often convenient to use the symbol '[e.]' to denote an _e_ that is lost
in pronunciation. Thus we might print 'feth[e.]res' to shew the loss of the
middle _e_ in this word.

E final, unaccented: ([*e]). This final _e_ marks a variety of grammatical
inflections, and is frequently either elided or very slightly sounded, and
sometimes wholly suppressed in some common words. Ex. _swete_ (swee.t[*e]),
sweet. The word _wolde_, would, is often a mere monosyllable: (wuld).

E long and open, or EE; (ae) or ([`e][`e]). Ex. _heeth_ (haeth), or
(h[`e][`e]th). This open _e_ came to be denoted by _ea_, and the symbol,
though not the sound, is commonly preserved in mod. English; as in _heath_
(hiith). Note that this long _e_, at the end of an open syllable, is
usually written with a _single_ letter, as in _clene_ (klae.n[*e]), or
(kl[`e][`e].n[*e]), clean. But _cleene_ also occurs in the MSS.

E long and close, or EE; (ee) or (['e]['e]). Ex. _weep_ (weep), or
(w['e]['e]p). Note that this long _e_, at the end of an open syllable, is
usually written with a _single_ letter, as in _swete_ (swee.t[*e]), sweet.
But _sweete_ is also found in MSS.

EW (ee, _followed by_ w). Ex. _newe_ (nee.w[*e]); with a tendency,
probably, towards the modern sound (iuu), as in _new_ (niuu).

G hard, i.e. (g), as in _gable_ (gaa.bl[*e]) or (gaa.bl), except before _e_
and _i_ in words of French origin. Thus _gilt_ (gilt), guilt, is of A.S.
origin; but _gin_ (jin), a snare, is a shortened form of F. _engin_.

GGE (dj[*e]). Ex. _brigge_ (bridj[*e]).

GH (h), G. _ch_. Ex. _light_ (liiht). As said above, the vowel was at first
short, then half-long, as probably in Chaucer, and then wholly long, when
the (h) dropped out. Later, (ii) became (ei), and is now (ai). Chaucer
never rimes _-ight_ with _-yt_, as in the case of _dight_, _delyt_; Rom. of
the Rose, Fragment B 2555.

GN (n), with long preceding vowel; as _digne_ (dii.n[*e]). As Dr. Sweet
says, the F. _gn_ was perhaps sometimes pronounced as _ny_ (where the _y_
is consonantal), but in familiar conversation was a simple _n_, preceded by
a long vowel or a diphthong.

H (h), as in modern English, when initial. Ex. _hand_ (hand). Chiefly in
words of English origin. In words of French origin, initial _h_ was usually
mute, and is sometimes not written, as in _eyr_ (eir), an heir. In
unemphatic words, it was also frequently mute; so that _hit_ was frequently
written _it_, as in modern English.

I, Y, short; (i). Ex. _him_ (him). Owing to the indistinctness of the old
written character for _i_, when preceding or following _m_ or _n_, the
scribes frequently wrote _y_ instead of it; as in _myd_, _nyl_, _hym_,
_dynt_. But as this indistinctness does not reappear in modern printing, I
have usually restored the true forms _mid_, _nil_, _him_, _dint_; which
enables me to use _y_ as a symbol for long _i_, without confusion. But I
use _y_ finally, as in mod. English. Ex. _many_ (man.i).

I, Y, long; (ii). The scribes prefer the symbol _y_; hence I use it almost
throughout. Ex. _byte_ (bii.t[*e]), bite; _delyt_ (delii.t), delight.

I consonantal, I (j). There was no symbol for _j_ in M.E., though the sound
was common, in words of French origin. The scribes usually wrote _I_, when
the sound was initial, as in _Iay_ (jei), a jay. In the middle of a word,
it is not distinguishable from the vowel, except by the fact that it
precedes a vowel or diphthong, as in _conioyne_ (konjoi.n[*e]), to conjoin.

The old spelling has here been retained, as the use of the modern E. _j_
seemed to involve too great an anachronism; but perhaps this is
unpractical. Fortunately, the sound is not common. It is also denoted by
_g_ before _e_ or _i_, as noted above. Ex. _Iuge_ (jy.j[*e]), judge.

IE (ee); the same as _ee_, long and close. Not common. Ex. _mischief_, also
written _mischeef_ (mischee.f).

LE, often vocalic (l), as in E. _temple_ (temp.l). But note _stables_
(staa.blez).

NG (ngg); always as in E. _linger_. Ex. _thing_ (thingg).

O, short (o), as in _of_ (ov). But here _note particularly_, that it is
always (u), i.e. as _u_ in f_u_ll, wherever it has in mod. E. the sound of
the written _o_ in _company_, _son_, _monk_, _cousin_, &c. Ex. _sonne_
(sun.n[*e]), sun; _sone_ (sun.[*e]), son[23]; _monk_ (mungk); _moche_
(much.[*e]). In fact, the modern spelling arose from the use of _o_ for
_u_, for mere distinctness in the written form, whenever the sound (u)
preceded or followed _m_ or _n_ or _i_; and in a few other cases.

O long and open, or OO; (ao) or ([`o][`o]); mod. E. _au_ in _Paul_, or _a_
in _fall_. Ex. _stoon_ (staon) or (st[`o][`o]n), a stone; pl. _stones_
(stao.nez). See s. 25.

O long and close, or OO; (oo) or (['o]['o]); mod. E. _o_ in _note_, or G.
_o_ in _so_. Ex. _sote_ (soo.t[*e]), sweet; _good_ (good).

N.B. The M.E. _[=o]_ or _oo_ was never pronounced like the mod. E. _oo_ in
_root_ (ruut).

OI, OY (oi). Ex. _noise_ (noi.z[*e]): _voys_ (vois).

OU, OW (uu); except before _gh_. Ex. _flour_ (fluur); _now_ (nuu). Rarely
(aou), as in _soule_ (saou.l[*e]) from the A.S. _s[=a]wol_.

OGH (aouh); with open short _o_ as in E. _not_; the _u_ being very slight,
and perhaps sometimes almost neglected. It is also written _ough_, as
_noght_, _nought_ (naouht). The _u_, in fact, is the result of a peculiar
pronunciation of the _gh_. Dr. Sweet clearly explains that, after _e_, _i_,
the _gh_ (h) was sounded like the G. _ch_ in _ich_. 'This front _gh_ was
vocalized into consonantal _y_ before a vowel, and then generally dropped,
as in the plural _hy[:e]_ (hii._y_[*e])[24]. The other _gh_ had the sound
of G. _ch_ in _auch_ = the G. _ch_ in _ach_ rounded. Hence it is always
preceded either by (uu), as in _ynough_ (inuu.h), _plough_ (pluu.h), or by
_u_ forming the second element of a diphthong. This _u_ is always written
after _a_, as in _taughte_ (tau.ht[*e]), _laughter_ (lau.hter), while after
_o_ it is sometimes written, sometimes left to be inferred from the
following _gh_.' See Sweet, Second Middle-English Primer, p. 5.

R is always strongly trilled; never reduced to a vocal murmur, as
frequently in modern English.

S (s); as in _sit_ (sit). But voiced to _z_ (z) between two vowels, and
finally, as in _ryse_ (rii.z[*e]), to rise, _shoures_ (shuu.rez).

SH (sh), as in modern English, SSH (shsh); as in _fresshe_ (fresh.sh[*e]).

U short; (y). The French sound, as in _Iuge_ (jy.j[*e]). Rarely (u), as in
_cut_ (kut), _ful_ (ful); which are not French words.

U long; (yy). Not common; and only French. Ex. _vertu_ (vertyy.); _nature_
(natyy.r[*e]).

V (v), as in modern English. But the MSS. very rarely use this symbol. The
sound of _v_ was awkwardly denoted by the use of _u_, followed by a vowel;
as in _loue_ (luv.[*e]), love. In the present edition, _v_ is used
throughout to denote the consonant.

WE final; (w[*e]), but often merely (u). Ex. _arwes_ (ar.wez); _bowe_
(b[`o].w[*e], b[`o]u.[*e]); _morwe_ (mor.u). So also _blew_ (blee.u);
_newe_ (nee.w[*e]).

WH (wh), as in the North of England; not a mere _w_, as in the South.

For the sound of _th_, modern English may be taken as the guide; and the
same remark applies to the distinction between _f_ and _v_, and to the
variable sound of _s_. Moreover, every letter should be distinctly sounded;
the _k_ in _knee_ (kn['e]['e]) and the _w_ in _wryte_ (wrii.t[*e]) were
still in use in the time of Chaucer, though now only preserved in the
written forms.

s. 23. It will readily be understood that the M.E. vowel-sounds were
intermediate between those of Anglo-Saxon and of modern English. They can
best be understood by consulting the table at p. 42 of my Primer of English
Etymology; and, for French words, that at p. 126 of my Principles of
English Etymology, Second Series. The pronunciation of M.E. and of
Anglo-French vowels did not materially differ. Instead of here reproducing
these tables, I give the approximate pronunciation of the first eighteen
lines of the Canterbury Tales. But we must remember, that the pronunciation
of words _in a sentence_ is not always the same as when they are taken
singly, owing to the accent (or want of accent) due to their position. The
word _his_ (hiz) may have its initial _h_ aspirated, when standing alone;
but in the phrase _his shoures_, it is taken along with _shoures_, loses
its accent and its initial _h_, and becomes (iz). Words are much affected
by the manner in which they are thus grouped together. I denote this
grouping by the use of a hyphen, and mark the accented syllables by a
sloping stroke over every accented vowel; as is usual[25]. The elided final
_e_ is denoted by ('). There is no elision at the medial pause; see below
(s. 116). The medial pause is here denoted by a sloping stroke, as in the
Ellesmere MS.

  Wh['a]n-dhat Apr['i]ll[*e]/ w['i]dh iz-sh['u]urez s['o]ot[*e]
  dh[*e]-dr['u]uht' ov-M['a]rch[*e]/ hath-p['e]rsed t['o]o
      dh[*e]-r['o]ot[*e],
  [*e]nd-b['a]adhed ['e]v'ri v['e]in[*e]/ in-sw['i]ch lik['u]ur,
  ov-wh['i]ch vert['y]y/ enj['e]ndred ['i]z dh[*e]-fl['u]ur,
  whan-Z['e]fir['u]s ['a]ek/ w['i]dh-iz sw['e]et[*e] br['a]eth
  insp['i]ired h['a]th/ in-['e]v'ri h['o]lt [*e]nd-h['a]eth
  dhe-t['e]ndre kr['o]pez/ ['a]nd dhe-y['u]ngg[*e] s['u]nn[*e]
  h['a]th-in dh[*e]-R['a]m/ iz-h['a]lf[*e] k['u]urs ir['u]nn[*e],
  [*e]nd-sm['a]al[*e] f['u]ulez/ m['a]aken m['e]lod['i]i[*e],
  dhat-sl['e]epen ['a]l dh[*e]-n['i]iht/ widh-['a]open ['i]i-[*e]--
  sao-pr['i]keth h['e]m nat['y]yr[*e]/ in-h['e]r kur['a]ajez--
  dhan-l['o]nggen f['o]lk/ too-g['a]on on-p['i]lgrim['a]ajez,
  [*e]nd-p['a]lmerz f['o]r too-s['e]eken/ str['a]unj[*e] str['o]ndez
  too-f['e]rn[*e] h['a]lwez/ k['u]uth' in-s['u]ndri l['o]ndez;
  [*e]nd sp['e]siall['i]i/ from-['e]v'ri sh['i]irez ['e]nd[*e]
  ov-['E]nggel['o]nd/ too-K['a]unter.br['i] dhei-w['e]nd[*e],
  dh[*e]-h['a]oli bl['i]sful m['a]rtir/ f['o]r too-s['e]ek[*e]
  dhat-h['e]m hath-h['o]lpen/ wh['a]n-dhat dh['e]i waer'-s['e]ek[*e].

s. 24. The above example also shews the mode of scanning the lines, as will
be more particularly explained hereafter. It will be seen that the normal
number of accents in the line is five, though the fifth line, quite
exceptionally, has six, with an additional accent at the caesural pause. It
may also be noted here, by the way, that accents are by no means of equal
strength. The accents on _with_ in lines 1 and 5, on _to_ in line 2, and on
_is_ in l. 4, are but slight; whilst those on the former syllables of
_straunge_ and _strondes_ in line 13 are of unusual force.

s. 25. RIMES ILLUSTRATING THE PRONUNCIATION OF LONG O AND LONG E.

It has been said that the values of the M.E. vowels are intermediate
between those of the Anglo-Saxon and the modern vowels. The best and surest
guide to them is afforded by the A.S. sounds, and it is worth while to
illustrate this by special instances.

Let us consider the case of the open and close _o_. These are distinguished
by their origin. Thus open long _o_ (ao) arises (1) from A.S. _[=a]_; or
(2) from the lengthening of A.S. short _o_ at the end of an open syllable.
I have observed that Chaucer frequently makes a difference between the open
_o_ that arises from these two sources.

The M.E. (ao) from A.S. _[=a]_ was doubtless wholly long. Examples occur in
_lore_ (lao.r[*e]), lore, from A.S. _l[=a]r_; and in _more_ (mao.re), more,
from A.S. _m[=a]ra_.

But the M.E. (ao) from the lengthening of A.S. short _o_ was probably
somewhat less full, or only half-long, or perhaps, as Dr. Sweet suggests,
was somewhat closer. At any rate, Chaucer usually makes a difference
between this sound and the former. To keep up the distinction, I shall now
write ([`o][`o]) for the former open _o_, and ([`o]) for the latter; so
that _lore_ and _more_ will be denoted by (l[`o][`o].r[*e]),
(m[`o][`o].r[*e]). Examples of the other (ao) occur in _forlore_
(forl[`o].r[*e]), from A.S. _forloren_, forlorn; _to-fore_
(t['o]['o]-f[`o].r[*e]), from A.S. _t[=o]-foran_; and in the curious word
_more_ (m[`o].r[*e]), a root, from the A.S. _mora_. In the fourth stanza of
Troilus, Book V, Chaucer distinguishes between ([`o][`o]) and ([`o]) in a
very marked manner, since the riming formula of the stanza is _ababbcc_,
i.e. the first line rimes with the third, and the second with the fourth
and fifth. Observe, that Chaucer emphasizes this variation by making a
similar distinction between open and close _e_ in the preceding stanza. I
here give the pronunciation of the whole stanza; and, in order not to
confuse the marks over the (o) with those of accentuation, the accent is
here denoted by (.) placed _after_ the accented vowel or syllable.

  dhis-Troo.ilus. widhuu.ten r[`e][`e]d. or-l[`o][`o].r[*e],
  az-man. dhat-hath. iz-joi.ez aek. forl[`o].r[*e],
  waz-wei.tingg' on. iz-laa.di ev.erm[`o][`o].r[*e],
  az-shee. dhat-waz. dh[*e]-sooth.fast krop. [*e]nd-m[`o].r[*e]
  ov-al. iz-lust., or-joi.ez heer.toof[`o].r[*e].
  but-Troo.ilus., nuu-far.wel al. dhii-joi.[*e],
  for-shal.tuu nev.er seen.-ir eft. in-Troi.[*e].

The same distinction is preserved throughout the whole of the poem of
Troilus, as may be seen by the following references, where the numbers
refer, _not_ to the _lines_, but to the stanzas.

_lore_, _more_; I. 93. _sore_, _more_, _sore_; I. 96; where the former
_sore_ is from A.S. _s[=a]re_, adv., and the latter _sore_ is of French
origin[26], _sore_, _more_, _lore_; I. 108, 156; II. 81, 192; III. 35.
_more_, _sore_; III. 139, 151; IV. 19, 129, 161; V. 97, 106, 171. _rore_
(A.S. _r[=a]rian_), _sore_, _more_; IV. 54. _yore_ (A.S. _ge[=a]ra_),
_more_; IV. 214; V. 8. _yore_, _more_, _lore_, V. 47. _evermore_, _more_;
V. 117. _more_, _sore_, _evermore_, V. 194. _more_, _evermore_, _yore_, V.
248. Also: _more_, _Antenore_; IV. 95; where _Antenore_, being a proper
name, may be treated much as the author pleases. And further: _more_,
_restore_, IV. 193; V. 239; where the _o_ in _restore_ is due to Lat. _au_.
And lastly, _pore_, _rore_, V. 7: where the _o_ in _pore_ is of variable
quality, from O.F. _povre_ (Lat. _pauperem_).

On the other hand, we find another set of words in Troilus, in which the
open _o_ was originally short. Examples are: _tofore_, _wherfore_, _bore_,
i.e. born; II. 202: from A.S. _t[=o]foran_; from A.S. _hw[=ae]r_ combined
with _fore_; and A.S. _boren_. _y-shore_, _bifore_, _therfore_; IV. 143;
where _y-shore_, shorn, is from A.S. _gescoren_. _therfore_, _bifore_; IV.
149. _forlore_, _m[)o]re_, _heretofore_, V. 4; already noticed above.

In all the above examples, the open _o_ occurs before _r_; the only other
examples of open _o_ from original short _o_ are seen in Book I. stanzas 13
and 30. In both these stanzas we find the riming words _spoken_, _wroken_,
_broken_, which obviously belong to the same set. _Broken_ is from A.S.
_br[)o]cen_; but _spoken_ and _wroken_ are new forms, altered from the A.S.
_sprecen_ and _wrecen_ by analogy with the very word _broken_ here used.
Chaucer never rimes these words with _t[=o]ken_, from A.S. _t[=a]cen_.

s. 26. An analysis of the rimes in the Minor Poems reveals an exceptional
use of but one word ending in _-ore_, viz. the word _more_. On account,
probably, of its frequency and utility, we find it used to rime with
_heretofore_ and _heerbefore_; both examples occurring in the Book of the
Duchesse, 189, 1127. This shews that the rime was permissible, and the
difference extremely slight. Nevertheless we find, with the exception of
these two instances only, that the Minor Poems again present two distinct
sets of rimes: (1) from A.S. _[=a]_, the words _evermore_, _namore_,
_more_, _sore_, _lore_, _rore_, _yore_, together with _tresore_ (of F.
origin, from Lat. _thesaurum_); and (2) from A.S. _o_, the words _before_,
_bore_, _wherfore_, _lore_ (A.S. _loren_), _herebefore_, _tofore_.

s. 27. In the Legend of Good Women, the result is just the same. The
exceptional rimes are shewn by _m[=o]re_ riming with _before_, 540, 1516;
with _y-swore_, 1284; and with _therfore_, 443. But with these exceptions,
we find, as before: (1) the set of words _more_, _yore_, _sore_, with the
French words _store_ and _radevore_[27]; and (2) the set _bore_,
_forswore_, _swore_ (all past participles), and _therfore_.

s. 28. In the Canterbury Tales, we find from Mr. Cromie's Rime-Index, pp.
185, 189, that the word _m[=o]re_ is again used exceptionally, riming once
with the pp. _bore_, A 1542, and frequently with _before_; but we find,
further, that _before_ is also used exceptionally, riming once with _more_
and _lore_, E 789; once with _sore_, D 631; once with _more_ and _yore_, E
65; and once with _gore_, A 3237, from A.S. _g[=a]r_. Similarly, _therfore_
rimes with _yore_, E 1140. But, with these exceptions, we again find the
two sets kept distinct, viz. (1) _evermore_, _namore_, _more_, _lore_,
_hore_ (from A.S. _h[=a]r_), _gore_, _ore_ (from A.S. _[=a]r_), _rore_,
_sore_; together with the French _restore_; and (2) _before_, _bore_,
_y-bore_, _forlore_, _swore_, _therfore_, _wherfore_[28].

In spite of all the exceptional uses of the two words _more_ and _before_,
we cannot but see, in the above examples, a most remarkable tendency to
keep asunder two vowel-sounds which it must have required a delicate ear to
distinguish. This is interesting, as proving exceptional care on the part
of the author.

We find, accordingly, that later writers did not take the same pains. Thus,
in Lydgate's Complaint of the Black Knight, 218, we find _sore_ (from A.S.
_s[=a]r_) riming with _tore_, pp. (from A.S. _toren_). In Fragment B of the
Romaunt of the Rose, it is startling to find _more_ actually altered to
_mar_ or _mare_ (the Northern form) in order to rime with _thar_ (for
_there_), 1854; with _fare_, 2710; and with _ar_, 2215.

s. 29. OPEN AND CLOSE [=O]. After making the above investigation, we shall
naturally expect to find that Chaucer takes care to distinguish between the
open _[=o]_ and the close one; and such is really the case.

The chief source of long close _o_ is the A.S. and Icel. _[=o]_. Ex.
_b['o]['o]k_, _fors['o]['o]k_, _d['o]m_, _b['o]ne_ (a boon); from A.S.
_b[=o]c_, _fors[=o]c_, _d[=o]m_, and Icel. _b[=o]n_. The distinction
between the two kinds of _o_ is perfectly easy to follow, because the
sounds are still kept apart in modern English, in which the old open long
_o_ is now a close _[=o]_, whilst the old close _[=o]_ is lowered to the
sound of _[=u]_ (uu).

Easy examples occur in A.S. _b[=a]n_, M.E. _boon_ (baon, b[`o][`o]n), mod.
E. _bone_; as contrasted with Icel. _b[=o]n_, M.E. _boon_ (boon,
b['o]['o]n), mod. E. _boon_ (buun). In other words, the mod. E. _bone_ was
pronounced in M.E. so as to rime with _lawn_; whilst the mod. E. _boon_ was
then pronounced so as to rime with _lone_.

A few exceptions occur, shewing occasional relaxations of the general rule.
They are doubtless due, as Ten Brink suggests, to a paucity of rimes in
some particular ending. Thus, when the long _o_ is absolutely final, as in
_go_ (gao), _do_ (doo), Chaucer considers these as _permissible_ rimes, and
pairs them together freely; and owing to such usage, we even find _agoon_
(agaon) riming with _doon_ (doon) in Troilus, ii. l. 410. But this is the
only instance in Troilus of this character; in all other places, the ending
_-oon_ relates to the open _o_; the riming words being _alloon_, _anoon_,
_atoon_, _boon_ (bone), _foon_ (foes, A.S. _fan_), _goon_, _noon_, _stoon_;
to which add _roon_, it rained, _woon_, quantity. In the Cant. Tales, B
3127, we find the rime _d[=o]m_, doom, _h[=o]m_, home; but words in
_-[=o]m_ are, of course, extremely scarce, so that there was little else to
be done. For a like reason, _sooth_ (sooth) sometimes rimes with _wrooth_
(wraoth), Bk. of the Duchesse, 513, 519, 1189; and _sothe_ (soo.dh[*e])
with _bothe_ (bao.dh[*e]), Sec. Nonnes Tale, G 167; Troil. iv. 1035.

With these few exceptions, the rule of distinguishing the two qualities of
_o_ is rigorously observed. Thus we find in Troilus, rimes in _-[`o][`o]t_,
viz. _hoot_, _noot_, _woot_, _wroot_, A.S. _h[=a]t_, _n[=a]t_, _w[=a]t_,
_wr[=a]t_, ii. 890, 1196, iv. 1261. And we find, on the other hand, rimes
in _-['o]['o]t_, viz. _foot_, _moot_, _soot_, A.S. _f[=o]t_, _m[=o]t_,
_s[=o]t_, iii. 1192. Once more, we find, in the same poem, rimes in
_-[`o]te_, viz. _hote_, _note_, _grote_; cf. A.S. _h[=a]te_, adv., A.F.
_note_ (Lat. _n[)o]ta_), O. Friesic _gr[=a]ta_; iv. 583. And yet again,
there are rimes in _-['o]te_, viz. _bote_, _fote_, _rote_, _sote_, from
A.S. _b[=o]t_, _f[=o]t_, Icel. _r[=o]t_, A.S. _sw[=o]te_, adv.; ii. 345,
1378, v. 671, 1245. Every one knows the first rime in the Cant. Tales, that
of _sote_, _rote_, (pronounced as mod. E. _soata_, _roata_)[29].

s. 30. OPEN AND CLOSE [=E]. In like manner, Chaucer distinguishes to some
extent, and with certain rather more numerous exceptions, between the open
and close long e. This is a somewhat more intricate matter, so that it is
best to give the results succinctly. It is also a little more difficult to
follow, because modern English has confused the sounds; though they are
frequently distinguished by a different mode of spelling, the old open _e_
being represented by _ea_, and the old close _e_ by _ee_. A good example
occurs in the case of the words _sea_ and _see_. The former, in Chaucer, is
(sae) or (s[`e][`e]), with long open _e_; whilst the latter is (s['e]['e]),
with long close e. Both were written _see_ in M.E.; with the result, that
the words were spelt alike at that time, though pronounced differently; but
are spelt differently now, though pronounced alike. The difference in
spelling is due to an Elizabethan habit, when the two sounds were purposely
distinguished; and it may be remarked that such words as are spelt with
_ea_ are precisely those which still have a peculiar pronunciation in
Ireland. Some writers try to denote this by using such spellings as _say_,
_tay_, _baste_, _mate_, and the like, instead of the standard English
_sea_, _tea_, _beast_, _meat_.

s. 31. STABLE AND UNSTABLE [=E]. The two kinds of _[=e]_ are best
understood by observing their sources.

Before we can shew these clearly, it is necessary to observe that the A.S.
[=AE] has two values, which must be carefully distinguished. The first,
which I shall call 'stable [=AE],' because it regularly produces an open
_[=e]_ in M.E., answers to Germanic and Gothic _ai_, and is generally due
to mutation. Thus _h[=ae]lan_, to heal, answers to Goth. _hailjan_, and is
mutated from _h[=a]l_, whole, Goth. _hails_. This produced M.E. _h[=e]len_
(hael[*e]n), with open _[=e]_. Again, M.E. _spr[=e]de_, to _spread_ (note
_ea_ in the modern form), answers to a Gothic _*spraidjan_[30]; for,
although no such Gothic form actually occurs, we can infer it from
comparison with the G. _spreiten_; cf. G. _heilen_ with Goth. _hailjan_
above.

The second kind of _[=ae]_, which I shall call the A.S. 'unstable [=AE],'
because it occurs in forms which are treated both ways in Chaucer, answers
to an original Germanic _[=ae]_, Goth, _[=e]_, and does not arise from
mutation, though it may arise from gradation. Thus the M.E. _d[=e]de_,
deed, A.S. _d[=ae]d_, answers to Goth. _gad[=e]ds_, a deed, G. _That_; and
the contrast between the vowel in G. _That_ and that in G. _heilen_, to
heal, is very clearly marked. It is from words of this class that some
trouble arises.

s. 32. If we inquire further, why there should have been any difference of
development in such cases, and how the same form could, apparently, yield
both an open _[=e]_ and a close one, I believe that a clear answer can be
given. For it is precisely in such cases that we find different forms in
the Old Mercian (or Midland) dialect and in the A.S. (or Southern). Thus,
whilst the A.S. (Southern) form of 'deed' was _d[=ae]d_, the Mercian form
was _d[=e]d_. In fact, the mod. E. _deed_ is clearly Mercian, and that is
why it is not spelt with _ea_ in Elizabethan English. Hence Chaucer had,
ready to his use, two forms of this word. One was the Southern
_d[`e][`e]d_, with open _[=e]_, from A.S. _d[=ae]d_; the other was the
Midland _d['e]['e]d_, with close _[=e]_; and, as the Midland dialect was
then rapidly gaining the ascendency, he could hardly go wrong if he
sometimes used the more popular form. Chaucer knew nothing of etymology,
but he knew how words were pronounced by his cotemporaries; a fact which
sufficiently explains his habits.

In order to complete this part of the case, it is necessary to add that the
M.E. _[=e]_ which results from A.S. _[=e]a_ is ALWAYS open[31].

s. 33. A similar ambiguity occurs in the case of a long _e_ which we should
expect to be close. Here again we must distinguish between two kinds. The
A.S. _[=e]o_ yields an M.E. _[=e]_ which is ALWAYS close; as in _d[=e]op_,
deep, M.E. _d['e]['e]p_. Again, there is an A.S. _[=e]_ which results from
mutation, as in A.S. _bl[=e]dan_, to bleed, from _bl[=o]d_, blood; and the
resulting M.E. _[=e]_ is ALWAYS close, as in _bl[=e]den_
(bl['e]['e]d[*e]n), to bleed.

But there is also the UNSTABLE vowel in the M.E. _y-s[=e]ne_, visible. Of
this word the A.S. forms are various; we find _ges[=i]ene_, _ges[=y]ne_,
_ges[=e]ne_, all three. Of these, _ges[=i]ene_ is the earlier spelling of
_ges[=y]ne_, and may be neglected; but _ges[=y]ne_ and _ges[=e]ne_ still
remain. _Ges[=y]ne_ is the usual A.S. (Southern) form, whilst _ges[=e]ne_
is Midland and Northern. From the Midland _ges[=e]ne_ came M.E. _ys[=e]ne_
(is['e]['e]n[*e]), with close _e_, regularly; and this is the form which
Chaucer usually adopts. The A.S. _ges[=y]ne_ would have developed regularly
into M.E. _ys[=y]ne_ (isiin[*e]), just as the A.S. _m[=y]s_ answers to M.E.
_m[=y]s_, mod. E. _mice_. But the _y_-sound was difficult of treatment, as
the true sound (yy) was lost; and Ten Brink has observed a corresponding
variation in the development of A.S. short _y_, which became sometimes
short _i_ and sometimes short open _e_ in M.E. In the same way, I should
suppose that this A.S. long _y_ corresponded to a Kentish long open _e_;
thus producing M.E. _ys[=e]ne_ (is[`e][`e]n[*e]), in which the _e_ was
open. There is a remarkable example of such a variety in the development of
the A.S. _f[=y]r_, fire. This usually became M.E. _fyr_ (fiir), with long
_i_; but in Troilus, i. 229[32], we have the remarkable form _afere_
(af[`e][`e]r[*e]), on fire, riming quite regularly with _were_
(w[`e][`e]r[*e]), were (from A.S. _w[=ae]ron_), and with _stere_, to stir
(from A.S. _styrian_). Indeed _stere_, to stir, is really another example
of the like development, since the _e_ in it is merely lengthened from an
A.S. short _y_.

s. 34. SUMMARY. As this investigation has run to some length, I here give a
summary of all the above results.

OPEN AND CLOSE [=O]. 1. The M.E. open and close _[=o]_ have resulted in
mod. E. sounds which are still kept apart; cf. M.E. _st[`o][`o]n_ and M.E.
_d['o]['o]m_ with the mod. E. _stone_ and _doom_.

2. A.S. _[=a]_ produced M.E. open _[=o]_. A.S. _o_, when lengthened, also
produced M.E. open _[=o]_. But the two M.E. sounds somewhat differed, and
Chaucer avoids riming them together. The few exceptions are noted above;
the commonest of these being due to the variable treatment of the words
_m[=o]re_ and _before_.

3. A.S. and Icel. _[=o]_ produced M.E. close _[=o]_. Chaucer avoids riming
the close _[=o]_ with the open one; the chief exceptions being when the
vowel-sound is final, and in other cases where rimes are scarce.

4. The different spellings of the mod. E. _sea_ and _see_, now pronounced
alike, answer to the different sounds of the M.E. form _see_. If the _ee_
was open, it meant the _sea_; if it was close, it was part of the verb to
_see_.

5. The A.S. _[=e]a_ produced M.E. open _[=e]_.

6. The A.S. _[=ae]_, if answering to Gothic _ai_, produced M.E. open
_[=e]_. But if answering to Goth. _[=e]_, the M.E. _[=e]_ was close in the
Midland dialect, but was allowed to rime with open _[=e]_ in Southern;
giving Chaucer a choice of forms.

7. The A.S. _[=e]o_ and _[=e]_ (if arising from mutation of _[=o]_)
produced M.E. close _[=e]_.

8. In words such as A.S. _ges[=y]ne_, Mercian _ges[=e]ne_, visible, the
M.E. _y-s[=e]ne_ had an _[=e]_ which rimed with open _[=e]_ in Kentish, and
a close _[=e]_ in Midland, giving Chaucer a choice of forms.

s. 35. It will be now easily understood, that Chaucer's general rule, of
avoiding the riming of close _[=e]_ with open _[=e]_, admits of a
considerable number of exceptions, in which the _[=e]_ is really of a
doubtful or unstable character.

It is clear that, in considering Chaucer's forms, we must set aside, as
UNSTABLE, all words in which long _e_ corresponds either to a Germanic
_[=ae]_ (Gothic _[=e]_, German _[=a]_), or otherwise to A.S. unstable
_[=y]_ (Mercian _[=e]_). I proceed to enumerate the chief of these, as
occurring, first of all, in TROILUS.

Words ending in -ECHE. The verb _[=e]che_, to eke, answers to A.S.
_[=y]can_. _Leche_, a leech, is allied to Goth. _l[=e]keis_, a physician.
_Speche_, speech, is from the stem seen in _spr[=ae]c-on_, they spoke, with
the same vowel, originally, as in Goth. _br[=e]kun_, they broke. All these
words have unstable e.

-EDE. _Dede_, deed; A.S. _d[=ae]d_, Goth. _gad[=e]ds_. _Drede_, to dread,
A.S. _on-dr[=ae]dan_, O.H.G. _tr[=a]tan_. From V. 1654-7, it is difficult
to draw any clear inference; _brede_ should have open _[=e]_ (cf. A.S.
_br[=a]d_, Goth. _braids_); _hede_, heed, goes with A.S. _h[=y]dan_, and
its vowel is unstable; and _Diomede_, though the _e_ should be close, is at
proper name, and needs no exact treatment.

-EKE. Besides the correct form _[`e][`e]k_ (A.S. _[=e]ac_), Chaucer has a
form _eke_, with unoriginal final _e_; he probably connected it with the
verb _eche_, to eke, in which the _e_ is unstable, as it arose from
mutation.

_Cheke_ answers to A.S. _c[=e]ace_, Anglian _c[=e]ce_, mod. E. _cheek_; but
here the _[=e]a_ is not the usual A.S. _[=e]a_, being merely due to the
initial _c_, and the West-Germanic type is _*k[=a]k[=a]_ (New E. Dict.),
answering to Germanic _*k[=ae]k[=a]_; whence the A.S. original form
_*c[=ae]ce_; so that the _e_ is unstable, by the rule above given.

-ELE; -ENE. Rimes in _-[=e]le_ and _-[=e]ne_ are all regular. So also in
-EME, -EMETH. The rimes in _[=e]men_ are imperfect.

-EPE. _Slepe_ has unstable _e_; cf. Goth. _sl[=e]pan_.

-ERE. Unstable _e_ occurs in _fere_, fire, as explained above; also in
_here_, to hear, A.S. _h[=y]ran_, _h[=e]ran_; and again, in _dere_, dear,
A.S. _d[=y]re_ (as well as _d[=e]ore_). Also in _yere_, year, because the
_[=e]a_ in A.S. _g[=e]ar_ is not the usual diphthong _[=e]a_, but due to
the preceding _g_; the Goth. form is _j[=e]r_, so that the M.E. is
unstable, by the rule. _Bere_, a bier, is from the verbal stem
_b[=ae]r-on_, corresponding to Goth, _b[=e]run_; hence the _e_ is unstable.

But a real exception occurs in the riming of _lere_, to teach, with _here_,
here (T. ii. 97, iv. 440). _Lere_, A.S. _l[=ae]ran_, Goth. _laisjan_,
should have the open _e_; but it here rimes with a word in which the _e_ is
close. This is one of the exceptional words noted by Ten Brink (_Chaucers
Sprache_, s. 25). No explanation is offered, and I know of none, unless it
be that it was confused with _l['e]re_, cheek, from A.S. _hl[=e]or_. But we
must note the fact.

-ETE. The exceptional words are _bihete_, _mete_ (to dream), _strete_,
street. _Bihete_ is really a false form for _bihote_ (A.S. _bih[=a]tan_);
the _e_ is due to confusion with the pt. t. _bih[=e]t_, where _h[=e]t_ is
for A.S. _h[=e]ht_, the result of contraction; hence the _e_ is doubtful
and unstable. _Mete_, to dream, is from A.S. _m[=ae]tan_, of unknown
origin; hence we may regard the _e_ as doubtful. _Strete_, a street,
answers to A.S. _str[=ae]t_, Mercian _str[=e]t_, mod. E. _street_; hence
the _e_ is unstable, as explained above.

-EVE. Ten Brink (_Ch. Studien_, ss. 25, 23) thinks that _leve_, sb.,
leave, was treated as if with close _e_ by confusion with _bil[=e]ven_, to
believe, which, he says, has close e. Whatever be the right explanation, we
must set aside _leve_, leave, as an exceptional word. So also _eve_, eve,
A.S. _[=ae]fen_, Mercian _[=e]fen_, has a variable vowel; see Sweet, O.E.
Texts, p. 602.

s. 36. Having now considered the doubtful cases, which may be altogether
set aside, it remains to draw up the list of words in which the quality of
the long _e_, at least in Troilus, admits of no doubt. The result gives us
a valuable set of test-rimes, by which the genuineness of a poem attributed
to Chaucer may be investigated. Of course, a _few_ divergences may admit of
explanation; but the presence of a large number of them should make us
extremely suspicious.

The list is as follows.

    (A) The following words (in Troilus) have _open e_ only. (I omit some
    doubtful cases, in addition to those discussed above; and only give
    those which ought certainly to have the open vowel.)

    _teche_, to teach.

    _dede_, dead; _lede_, lead (the metal); _rede_, red. Also _lede_, to
    lead; _sprede_, to spread. Other words in _-ede_ are doubtful.

    _breke_, to break, _speke_, to speak, _wreke_, to wreak, have open _e_;
    but it was originally short, and these words are kept apart from
    others.

    _bene_, bean; _clene_, clean; _lene_, lean; _mene_, to mean.

    _hepe_, heap; _lepe_, to leap.

    _there_, there; _were_, were; _where_, where. Also _ere_, ear; _gere_,
    gear; _tere_, a tear. (_Fere_, fear, has unstable _e_; cf. G.
    _Gefahr_.)

    _bere_, to bear, _dere_, to harm, _swere_, to swear, _tere_, to tear,
    besides _bere_, a bear, _spere_, a spear[33], _were_, a weir, _here_,
    her, _stere_, to stir, likewise have open _e_; but the _e_ was
    originally short, and these words are kept apart from those in the
    preceding set.

    _bete_, to beat; _grete_, great; _hete_, heat; _spete_, to spit;
    _swete_, to sweat; _threte_, to threat. Also _[)e]te_, to eat,
    _fory[)e]te_, to forget. (I omit doubtful cases.)

    _reve_, to reave; _greve_, a grove. (But _leve_, to leave, is
    doubtful.)

(B) The following (in Troilus) have close long _e_ only.

    _seche_, to seek; _biseche_, to beseech.

    _forbede_, to forbid; _nede_, need; _yede_, went. Also _bede_, to
    offer, _blede_, to bleed; _brede_, to breed; _fede_, to feed; _glede_,
    a glowing coal; _spede_, to speed; _stede_, a steed.

    _meke_, meek; _seke_, to seek.

    _bitwene_, between; _grene_, green; _kene_, keen; _quene_, queen;
    _tene_, vexation; _wene_, to ween.

    _kepe_, to keep; _wepe_, to weep; also _depe_, deep.

    _fere_, companion; _yfere_, together; _here_, here.

    _bete_, _flete_, _grete_, _mete_, to mend, float, greet, meet; _swete_,
    sweet.

    _leve_, dear.

s. 37. Of course, the rime-tests consist in this, that not one of the words
in class A can possibly rime with one of those in class B, either in
Troilus or in any genuine work of Chaucer.

To test this, we must first refer to Cromie's Rime-Index to the Canterbury
Tales, under the headings, _-eche_, _-ede_ (_-eede_), _-eke_, _-ene_,
_-epe_, _-ere_, _-ete_, _-eve_.

The only apparent exceptions that I can find are two; and they are worth
notice.

Under _-eepe_, we are told that _leepe_, 3 s. perf., rimes with _keepe_, n.
obj. The reference is to Group A, 2688. When we look, we find that the
Ellesmere MS. has wrong spellings; the words should be _leep_, _keep_. Or
rather, we find that the final _e_ is not real, but only represents a
meaningless flourish in the MS. Now it is a neat point of grammar that,
although _lepen_, to leap (A.S. _hl[=e]apan_), has an open _e_, its past
tense (A.S. _hl[=e]op_) has a close _e_; so that the rime is quite correct.
In both words, the _e_ is close.

The other case (A 1422) is worth citing. Mr. Cromie says, at p. 108, that
_here_, adv., rimes with the inf. _bere_, to bear; which is, in my view,
impossible.

The lines run thus:--

 'He fil in office with a chamberleyn,
  The which that dwelling was with Emelye.
  For he was wys, and coude sone aspye
  Of every servaunt, which that serveth _here_.
  Wel coude he hewen wode, and water bere.'

This is a case where the sound decides the sense. The _e_ in _bere_ is
properly short; hence the same is true of _here_. Accordingly, _here_ is
not an adverb, nor does it mean 'here'; it is the personal pronoun, A.S.
_hire_, and it means 'her'; precisely as it does in Troilus, ii. 1662.

s. 38. In the Minor Poems, the following passages are the only ones that I
can find that present any difficulty.

In the Death of Blaunche, 1253, we find _need_ riming with _heed_ (head);
so that _need_ has here, apparently, an open e. Ten Brink has noted this
exception (at p. 20), and explains it by remarking that there is a double
form of the word in A.S., viz. _n[=e]ad_ as well as _n[=e]od_. At any rate,
we see that the word _nede_ cannot be relied on as a test-word, and must be
struck out; though there is only this one example of its use with open e.

In the Death of Blaunche, 773, we find _dere_ (dear) riming with _were_,
were. And once more, viz. in Clk. Ta., E 882, we find _were_ riming with
_dere_; but, after all, _dere_ (see s. 35) has unstable e. The Death of
Blaunche presents many difficulties, and the text of it is far more
uncertain and unsatisfactory than that of any other genuine poem.

In the House of Fame, 1885, we find the rime _here_ (here), _lere_ (to
teach). This only shews that _lere_ is here once more used with the close
_e_; I have already said (s. 35) that it is no sure test-word.

I just note the rime of _here_ (here) with _were_ (perplexity); H. Fame,
980. _Were_ is of F. origin; and several such words have the close _e_; see
Ten Brink, p. 48.

In the Legend of Good Women, 1870, we have the unusual rime _there_ (there)
with _dere_ (dear). Ten Brink has noted this (p. 20). He remarks that it is
the only example in which _there_ seems to have close _e_; but it is rather
one of three cases in which _dere_ has open _e_ (from A.S. _d[=y]re_).

These are all the difficulties which I could find, after a search through
the Index to the Minor Poems. The only modifications they suggest are
these: the word _need_ is once found riming with _heed_ (head); and the
word _dere_ (though it usually has a close _e_) really has unstable _e_
(A.S. _d[=e]ore_, _d[=y]re_).

It is interesting to apply the results to other Poems.

The beautiful Roundels entitled Merciless Beauty answer the test
surprisingly (s. 4). In the first stanza, the author uses the rimes
_sustene_, _kene_, _grene_, _quene_, _sene_, where all the vowels are
close, if we include _sene_, which has the variable _e_ (close in Midland).
In the second stanza, the rimes are _pleyne_, _cheyne_, _feyne_, _atteyne_,
_pleyne_, all of French origin, in which the sound is slightly varied to
that of the nearest diphthong. And in the third stanza, we find _lene_,
_bene_, _mene_, v., _clene_, _mene_, s., in which the _e_ is now open.

In the poem called A Compleint to his Lady, the final stanza of which, with
Chaucer's name appended, was discovered by Dr. Furnivall after I had
claimed it for Chaucer, every rime is entirely perfect, and many of them
are highly characteristic of him, being used elsewhere very freely.

The poem which I have called An Amorous Complaint has every rime perfect,
except in l. 16, where the author rimes _do_ (with close _o_) with _wo_,
_go_ (with open _o_). It has already been shown that Chaucer frequently
does this very thing (s. 29).

s. 39. This shews one side of the argument. It is instructive to turn to a
piece like The Complaint of the Black Knight, which we now know to be
Lydgate's, as printed in the Aldine Chaucer, vi. 235. In the very first
stanza we find _white_ riming with _brighte_ and _nighte_, which, to the
student of Chaucer, is sufficiently astonishing. Other non-Chaucerian rimes
are seen in _pitously_, _malady_ (st. 20), where the form should be
_maladye_, and the same error occurs in st. 27; in _ageyn_, _tweyn_, _peyn_
(34), where the latter forms should be _tweyne_, _peyne_; in _forjuged_,
_excused_ (40), which is not a true rime at all; in _ywreke_, _clepe_ (41),
a mere assonance; in _feithfully_, _cry_ (65), where _I cry_ should rather
be _I cry-e_; in _wrecche_, with short _e_, riming with _leche_, _seche_
(68); _seyn_, _peyn_ (for _peyn-e_, 82); _went_ (for _went-e_), pt. t.,
_shent_, pp. (93); _peyn_ (for _peyn-e_), _ayeyn_ (93); _quen-e_,
dissyllabic, _seen_ (miswritten _sene_), monosyllabic, (97). Here are
twelve difficulties in the course of ninety-seven stanzas; but there are
more behind. For the test-words already given above would alone suffice.
The riming of _s[=o]re_ with _tore_ (A.S. _toren_) has already been
noticed, in s. 28. In st. 4, we find _sw['e]te_, sweet, paired off with
_h[`e]te_, heat; in st. 18, we find _gr['e]ne_ paired off with _cl[`e]ne_;
and in st. 86, we have _r[`e]de_, red, paired off with _sp['e]de_, to
speed. That is, we have here four exceptions in the course of 97 stanzas,
being more than can be found in the whole of Chaucer's genuine works put
together. In fact, the indiscriminate riming of close and open _e_ is a
capital test for Lydgate and for work of the fifteenth century. Using this
test alone, we should see cause to suspect The Flower and the Leaf, which
has three false rimes of this class, viz. _[`e]te_, to eat, _sw['e]te_,
sweet (st. 13); _b[`e]te_, pp. beaten, actually riming with the pp. _set_
(31); and _gr['e]ne_ riming with _cl[`e]ne_ (42); not to mention that the
author makes the dissyllabic words _wene_, _grene_, rime with the pp.
_seen_ (36); and again, _grene_, _tene_ rime with the pp. _been_ (56); and
yet again, _grene_ rime with the pp. _seen_ (57), and with _been_ (77). ON
THIS POINT ALONE, the author differs from Chaucer SEVEN times[34]!

The Court of Love differs from Chaucer in instances too many to enumerate;
but, as to this particular point, I only observe the riming of _gr['e]ne_
with _cl[`e]ne_, l. 816; and of _d['e]re_ with _require_, l. 851; but we
may alter _require_ to the Chaucerian form _requere_. At l. 79, we find the
dissyllabic _grene_; it rimes with the monosyllable _been_.

s. 40. Similar tests apply to open and close _o_. We might arrange these,
similarly, into two classes, viz. (A) with the open sound, and (B) with the
close sound; and we should find that they do not rime together; i.e., if we
first eliminate those words which are observed to be of a variable
character. For a few exceptions, see s. 29. I give the list below.

It is also curious to observe that, in Troilus, the words _wolde_, _nolde_,
_sholde_, usually rime together. _Wolde_ rimes with _biholde_ once only,
iii. 115; but _sholde_ never rimes with any words but _wolde_ and _nolde_.
In the Cant. Tales, _wolde_ rimes with several words, but _sholde_ only
with _wolde_ and _nolde_. The only exception is in the Book of the Duchess,
1200, where _sholde_ rimes with _tolde_. It would greatly improve the sense
as well as the metre to substitute _wolde_ for _sholde_ in this passage.

s. 41. Now that I have exemplified the mode of using these test-words, I
give fuller lists, slightly augmented by help of Mr. Cromie's Rime-Index,
and adding a third class (C) of words which have a variable vowel, and are
therefore _not_ available as test-words; for it is useful to know the
character of these also.

The following is THE KEY to the meaning of the lists.

1. (A) contains words with open long _e_ and open long _o_. The _chief_
sources of open long _e_ are (1) A.S. _[=e]a_ and (2) the stable A.S.
_[=ae]_ answering to Goth. _ai_ (O.H.G. _ei_) and usually due to mutation
of A.S. _[=a]_. We may include words with A.S. short _e_, though these
often keep the vowel somewhat short; perhaps it was only half-long.

The sources of open long _o_ are (1) A.S. _[=a]_ and (2) a lengthening of
A.S. short _o_; perhaps the latter was only half-long.

2. (B) contains words with close long _e_ and close long _o_. The _chief_
sources of close long _e_ are (1) A.S. _[=e]o_ and (2) A.S. _[=e]_ (from
mutation of _[=o]_). The chief source of close long _o_ is A.S. _[=o]_.

3. (C) contains words with variable long _e_ and variable long _o_. The
chief source of variable long _e_ is the unstable A.S. _[=ae]_ answering to
Gothic _[=e]_ (Germanic _[=a]_); this _[=ae]_ occurs in _spr[=ae]c-on_,
third stem of the strong verb _sprecan_, and in its derivative
_spr[=ae]ce_, whence M.E. _speche_, speech. It also appears to arise from
sounds corresponding to A.S. _[=i]e_, _[=y]_, mutation of _[=e]a_, _[=e]o_.

CHAUCER'S USE. Words in (A) rime with each other, but never rime with words
in (B). Words in (B) rime with each other, but never with words in (A).
Words in (C) rime with words both in (A) and (B).

    -ECHE. (A) _t[`e]che_, _bit[`e]che_. (B) _s['e]che_, _bis['e]che_. (C)
    _eche_, to eke, _leche_, _speche_.

    -EDE. (A) _dede_, dead, _hede_, head, _lede_, lead (metal), _rede_,
    red, _sprede_, to spread. (B) _bede_, to offer, _blede_, v., _brede_,
    v., _crede_, _fede_, _forbede_, _glede_, _nede_[35], _spede_, v.,
    _stede_, a steed. (C) _dede_, deed, _drede_, s. and v., _hede_, to
    heed, _rede_, to advise. Words in _-hede_ almost always shew open _e_,
    but a few exceptions occur.

    -EKE. (A) _br[)e]ke_, v., _sp[)e]ke_, v., _wr[)e]ke_, v., _awr[)e]ke_,
    _ywr[)e]ke,_ with (original) short _e_; _leke_, leek. (B) _meke_,
    _seke_, v., _seke_, sick, _biseke_.

    -ENE. (A) _bene_, bean, _clene_, _lene_, adj., _mene_, to mean,
    _unclene_. (B) _bitwene_, _grene_, _kene_, _quene_, _tene_, vexation,
    _wene_, v. (C) _sene_, adj., visible, _y-sene_ (the same), _shene_,
    bright[36].

    -EPE. (A) _chepe_, to buy, _hepe_, _lepe_, v., _stepe_, bright. (B)
    _crepe_, v., _depe_, _kepe_, _wepe_. (C) _slepe_.

    -ERE. (A) _b[)e]re_, a bear, _b[)e]re_, to bear, _d[)e]re_, to harm,
    _[)e]re_, to plough, _h[)e]re_, her, _sp[)e]re_, spear, _st[)e]re_, to
    stir, _sw[)e]re_, to swear, _t[)e]re_, to tear, _w[)e]re_, a weir,
    _w[)e]re_, to defend; all with (original) short e. Also _ere_, ear,
    _gere_, gear, _tere_, tear; and _there_[37], _were_[38], _where_. (B)
    _fere_, companion, _here_, here, _yfere_, together. (Here belong the F.
    words, _chere_, _clere_, _manere_, _matere_, _spere_, sphere.) (C)
    _bere_, bier, _dere_, dear[39], _fere_, fear, _here_, to hear, _lere_,
    to teach, _yere_, year.

    -ETE. (A) _bete_, to beat, _grete_, great, _hete_, heat, _spete_, to
    spit, _swete_, to sweat, _threte_, v., _wete_, wet, _ybete_, beaten.
    Also _[)e]te_, to eat, _fory[)e]te_, to forget, _m[)e]te_, meat
    (originally with short _e_). (B) _bete_, to mend, _flete_, to float,
    _grete_, to greet, _swete_, sweet. (C) _bihete_, to promise, _forlete_,
    to let go, _lete_, to let, _mete_, to dream, _shete_, sheet, _strete_,
    street.

    -EVE. (A) _bireve_, _deve_, pl., deaf, _greve_, grove, _reve_, to
    reave. (B) _leve_, dear, _reve_, a reeve. (C) _eve_, eve, _leve_, to
    believe, _bileve_, belief, _leve_, to permit. Note that _yeve_, to
    give, usually rimes with _live_, to live, as in mod. English.

    -O. All words in _-o_ are allowed to rime together; of these, _to_,
    _therto_, _unto_, _do_, _fordo_ should have the close sound.

    -OLDE. _Nolde_, _sholde_, _wolde_, usually rime together. Occasionally
    _wolde_ rimes with other words. In only one case does _sholde_ rime
    with _tolde_ (B. Duch. 1200), where _wolde_ would make better sense.

    -ONE. (A) _alone_, _echone_, _bone_, bone, _grone_, to groan, _lone_,
    loan, _mone_, to moan, _one_, one. (B) _bone_, boon, _eftsone_, _mone_,
    moon, _sone_, soon. (C) _done_, to do. [Note that _s[)o]ne_, son,
    _w[)o]ne_, to dwell, are really written for _sune_, _wune_, and only
    rime with each other.]

    -ONGE. [Note that _songe_, pp., _spronge_, pp., _tonge_, _yonge_, are
    really written for _sunge_, _sprunge_, _tunge_, _yunge_. They rime
    together, but are quite distinct from _fonge_, _honge_, _longe_,
    _stronge_, _wronge_; just as in mod. English.]

    -OOK. (A) _ook_, _strook_. (B) _awook_, _book_, _cook_, _forsook_,
    _hook_, _look_, _quook_, _shook_, _took_, _wook_.

    -OOT. (A) _boot_, he bit, _goot_, goat, _hoot_, hot, _noot_, know not,
    _smoot_, smote, _woot_, know, _wroot_, wrote. (B) _foot_, _moot_, must,
    _soot_.

    -OOTH. (A) _clooth_, _gooth_, _looth_, _ooth_, _wrooth_. (B) _dooth_,
    _sooth_, _tooth_.

    -ORE. _Bifore_, _bore_, pp., born, _forlore_, pp., _more_, a root,
    _shore_, pp., _swore_, pp., _therfore_, _wherfore_, originally had a
    short _o_, and usually rime together. _Hore_, pl., hoary, _lore_,
    _more_, _rore_, _sore_, _yore_, have open long _o_, and usually rime
    together. In a few cases, _bifore_ and _more_ rime with words in the
    other set.

    -OTE. (A) _grote_, groat, _hote_, hot, _throte_, throat (from A.S.
    _throtu_). (B) _bote_, satisfaction, _fote_, _rote_, root, _swote_,
    sweet.

The above lists are offered for what they are worth. I believe them to be
fairly correct; but they may not be quite exhaustive. Nevertheless, they
record ascertained facts; and the facts remain true and useful, even if the
theories be wrong.

s. 42. SOME PECULIARITIES OF RIME.

The subject of Chaucer's rimes is fully discussed by Ten Brink; _Studien_,
p. 190. As the critical reader will necessarily consult this work, it is
only necessary to give here a few of the chief results.

Chaucer's rimes are usually either (1) masculine, or (2) feminine.
Masculine rimes are those in which the rime is confined to _a single_ final
syllable, as 'lic_our_,' 'fl_our_'; Prol. l. 3. Feminine rimes are those in
which the rime extends through _two_ syllables, as 's_ote_,' 'r_ote_';
Prol. l. 1. It is necessary to remember that _every_ unaccented final _e_
at the end of a line is to be sounded, and constitutes a syllable.

Sometimes the rime extends, apparently, over more than two syllables; but
it will be found that, in such a case, the penultimate or antepenultimate
syllable can either be suppressed, or consists of the shortest possible
sound. Ex. _sw['e]venis_, _sw['e]ven is_, really _sw['e]v'nis_, _sw['e]v'n
is_; B 4111. _B['e]ryis_, _m['e]ry is_; B 4155. _Vict['o]ri[:e]_,
_gl['o]ri[:e]_; A 2405. _Merc['u]ri[:e]_, _m['u]ry[:e]_; A 1385.
_M['a]ri[:e]d_, _t['a]ri[:e]d_; B 3461. _B['e]ri[:e]d_,
_a-bl['a]keb['e]ri[:e]d_; C 405. _To-sc['a]t'red_, _y-fl['a]t'red_; D 1969.
_Contr['a]ri[:e]_, _Ianu['a]ri[:e]_; E 2319; &c.[40] Note that feminine
rimes are extremely numerous, and are sometimes kept up through whole
stanzas in such a poem as Troilus. Thus, in Troilus, iii. 407-434, we find
four consecutive stanzas, or twenty-eight consecutive lines, in which every
rime is feminine; and this is by no means an extreme case. Feminine rimes
are extremely old in English, and are found even in Anglo-Saxon.

s. 43. The most striking examples are those in which the feminine rime is
composed of two distinct words, as these prove at once the reality of the
final _-e_. Thus _Ro-me_ rimes with _t['o] me_; A 671. _You-the_ rimes with
_allow thee_ (aluu.dhe); F 675. _Ty-me_, with _by me_; G 1204. Similarly,
the final _-es_ of the plural substantive constitutes a syllable, as shewn
by such a rime as _werk-[:e]s_, _derk is_; G 64. In such a case, some
scribes write _werkis_ for _werkes_, to make the rime more complete, but it
is quite needless, as there is no necessity for an absolute coincidence of
vowel-sound in a mere unaccented syllable. In Lenvoy a Scogan, 15, it would
be quite absurd to alter _goddes_ to _goddis_(!), merely because it rimes
with _forbod'is_; the really weak part of the rime is in the linking of the
short _o_ in _goddes_, with the longer _o_ in _forbode_. For the same
reason, the rime of _lyte is_ with _dytees_ (HF. 621) is good enough;
indeed, we cannot write _dytis_ (as Ten Brink proposes to do) because the
word meant is the plural of _ditee_. Unusual rimes of this sort are still
in common use, especially where a slightly humorous effect is intended; and
this may very well excuse the above examples, as well as such rimes as
_Davit_[41] (for _David_), _eructavit_, D 1933; _saveth_, _significavit_, A
661; _wounded_, _wounde hid_, B 102; _agon is_, _onis_[42], D 9; and the
like.

s. 44. There are several cases in which the rimes are rather to be
considered as permissible than exact. The frequent riming of _go_ (gao)
with _do_ (doo) has already been noted. Similarly, owing to the paucity of
words ending in open _[=e]_, the word _s[`e][`e]_, sea, is allowed to rime
with close _[=e]_. The proper M.E. form of 'beast' is _b[`e][`e]st_, which
rimes, exactly, with _[`e][`e]st_, east, and with _alm[`e][`e]st_, almost;
but, inexactly, with _for[`e]st_, in which the _e_ is short. Yet, in Sir
Thopas, B 1944-8, we find the words _forest_, _best_, _est_, _almest_, all
reduced by the scribe to the same apparent form. In G 1324, we find
_br['e]['e]st_ (A.S. _br[=e]ost_), breast, riming with _pr['e]['e]st_,
priest, exactly; but elsewhere _br['e]['e]st_ is treated as if the _e_ were
short, so that it rimes with _lest_ (Kentish form of _lust_), A 2983; E
617. The mod. E. form suggests that the vowel was beginning to be
shortened. In the rime _up[)o]n_, _g[=o]n_, G 562, the _o_ in the former
word is short, but in the latter is long; both are open, and the rime is
admissible. A similar variation in vowel-length is seen in the riming of
_h[)a]dde_, had, with _bl[=a]de_, blade, A 617, and with _sp[=a]de_, spade,
A 553; and here again, some scribes try to better the matter by using the
form _hade_. The rime is really (had.d[*e]), (spaa.d[*e]); and the right
lesson to be learnt from it is, that the _a_ in _spade_ was still (aa), and
thus very different in sound from the _a_ in mod. E. _spade_ (speid). Long
and short _u_ are rimed in _hous_ (huus), _Caucasus_ (kau.kasus.) D 1139;
and elsewhere. Note _neyghebores_, _dores_[43], i.e. (nei.h[*e]buu.rez),
(du.rez); in HF. 649. One of the most licentious rimes is in Troil. ii.
933, viz. _riden_, _abiden_, _yeden_, properly (rid.n), (abid.n),
(y['e]['e]d.n); which suggests that _yeden_ is here (y[)e]d.n); and we are
reminded of the M.E. form of the verb 'to give,' which hovers between
_y[)e]ven_ and _yiven_, and rimes in Chaucer with _liven_, to live, though
frequently written _yeven_. The singular form _y[=e]de_ rimes with _nede_
(n['e]['e].d[*e]) in G 1280, and with _dede_ (d['e]['e].d[*e]) in G 1140.

Chaucer certainly sometimes uses two forms of the same word; the most
noticeable are _heer_ and _here_ for 'here'; _theer_ and _there_ for
'there'; _eek_ and _eke_ for 'eek.' These can be explained by the tendency
to add a final _-e_ in adverbial forms. Of course the double form was
highly convenient. Remarkable double forms are _chivachy[:e]_, A 85, and
_chevauchee_, Mars, 144; _perry[:e]_, A 2936, and _perree_, B 3550.

s. 45. REPETITIONS. Such rimes as _aff-ecciouns_, _prot-ecciouns_, F 55,
wherein the penultimate and antepenultimate syllables are repeated, are
disliked by later writers. Chaucer had found many such in Le Roman de la
Rose[44]. In discussing such repeated rimes as _seke_, to seek, _seke_,
sick, A 17, we must remember that they are common in Old French poetry,
though it was usual for the poet to take care that the repeated forms
should be used _in different senses_. This rule Chaucer usually observes;
cf. _s['e]['e]_, see, _s[`e][`e]_, sea, A 3615; _here_, here, _here_, to
hear, A 4339; _style_, style, _style_, a stile, F 105; _fern_, fern,
_fern_, long ago, F 255; &c. But he also allowed himself such repetitions
as _nones_, _noon is_, A 523; _clerkes_, _clerk is_, B 4425; _places_,
_place is_, D 1767; &c. We now avoid such rimes as _acordes_, _cordes_, HF.
695; _acorde_, _recorde_, Parl. Foules, 608; and still more, such rimes
(all too easy) as _goodnesse_, _soothfastnesse_, E 793; _soothfastnesse_,
_wrecchednesse_, I 34; _more_, _evermore_, Anelida, 240.

s. 46. MISTAKES AS TO CHAUCER'S USES. Some of the facts concerning
Chaucer's rimes have been misunderstood, even by so good a scholar as Prof.
Lounsbury, in his Studies of Chaucer, vol. ii[45]. It is therefore
desirable to point out some of these errors.

He calls attention, among others, to the following false rimes:--

_Desyre_, _manere_, T. iv. 817 (p. 54). But the right reading is _martyre_,
which alone makes sense. For the actual use of the false rime here
censured, see Rom. Rose, 2779.

_Kinde_, _binde_, _wende_, T. iii. 1437 (p. 54). Read _winde_, that thou
mayst wind. 'Gower will furnish a number of similar illustrations' (p.
54)[46].

Prof. Lounsbury is extremely anxious to prove that assonances (i.e. such
imperfect rimes as we see in _kepe_, _eke_, with a mere correspondence in
the vowel-sound only) occur in Chaucer; and endeavours to strengthen his
position by considering various difficult rimes. At p. 60, he says: 'All
difficulty with _crown_ and _person_ (R.R. 3201) disappears the moment they
receive the forms _coroun_ and _persoun_ (as in Gower, iii. 112, 141, 227,
234).' But Gower has no such forms; he has _cor['o]ne_, _pers['o]ne_ in
every instance, emphasised by the use of _cor['o]ned_, _envir['o]ned_ (iii.
112), and by such lines as, 'If it in his pers['o]n-e be'; ii. 202. Chaucer
rimes _persone_ with _allone_, D 1162; and with _done_, T. ii. 701, 1485,
iv. 83; and he uses the forms _c['o]rone_ or _c['o]roune_ and _cor['o]ne_.
But R.R. 3201 has, 'And on hir heed she hadde a _crown_'; and, only two
lines below, has the dissyllabic _crownet_.

'Gower,' we are told, 'rymes the preterite _had_ with _bed_, _leiser_ with
_desire_, and _dore_, a door, with the verb _dare_, in the form _dore_'; p.
64. Gower does none of these things; he rimes the correct preterite
_hedde_[47], which means 'hid,' and which Pauli (regardless of sense) turns
into _hadde_, with the form _a-bedde_ (i. 256). Further, he rimes _desir_
with _leiser_, according to Pauli (ii. 95); but there is no reason why
Gower may not have meant to use the form _leisir_, since that is the true
A.F. form corresponding to O.F. _loisir_ (still in use)[48]. Lastly, Gower
rimes _dore_ (dur[*e]), a door, with _dore_ (dur[*e]), the 1st p. pr. subj.
of the verb _durren_, to dare, corresponding to A.S. _durre_ (ii. 96). The
fact that the pres. indicative is _dar_, with a different vowel, has
nothing to do with the passage in question. It is the critic, not Gower,
who is here at fault; even Gower must have known that _dar_ is
monosyllabic, and could not possibly rime with the dissyllabic sb. _dore_.

Chaucer uses 'the pp. _smitted_ for _smitten_'; T. v. 1545; p. 65. Not so;
_smitted_ and _smitten_ are totally different words.

Chaucer uses 'the form _houn_ for _hound_'; T. iv. 210; p. 65. What _howne_
means, I do not know; but, as it is dissyllabic, it cannot mean _hound_;
nor has it any connection therewith.

'In HF. 959, the infin. _demeine_ is found riming with _seyen_'; p. 71. Not
so; it rimes with the dative of the infinitive, _to seyne_ (A.S. _t[=o]
secganne_); precisely as _to seyne_ rimes with _reyne_ in F 313. In the
face of this quotation, the next remark loses all its point, viz. that 'the
suggestive fact about this peculiarity of ryme is that it is not found in
the Canterbury Tales'; the answer being, that it _is_ found there. So
again, we find _to seyne_, _peyne_, Parl. Foules, 78.

Next we read--'if it be contended that the usage is based upon the
derivation of one of the forms from the A.S. gerundial ending _-anne_, it
is enough to reply that its occurrence in these cases is not borne out by
the poet's practice elsewhere'; p. 71. Of course, it is _not_ enough; for
we cannot divorce Chaucer's language from the general usage of
Middle-English, in which very few forms of this character had survived.
Even if it _were_ enough, the assertion that there is no other such case
happens not to be true; for we often find _to done_; as in A 3543, 3778, B
770, D 2194, F 334, G 932, I 62.

And again, we find _to sene_, riming with _grene_, A 1035. And yet again,
_to bene_, Rom. Rose, 1265. It is impossible to respect arguments which
derive all their apparent force from the principle of heaping one mistake
upon another.

s. 47. It is tedious to reply to special pleading of this kind. Thus, at p.
72, I am quoted, correctly, as objecting to the false rime in R. Rose,
1981, where the acc. pl. _feet_ is made to pair with the infinitive _lete_.
And we are told that 'the force of this example is altogether impaired by
the fact that in the Man of Lawes Tale (B 1104) the same plural rimes with
the infin. _mete_.' So far from impairing my argument, the 'fact'
strengthens it immensely; for, in that passage, we have no longer to do
with the acc. _feet_, but with the _dative_ plural in the phrase _to
fet-e_, answering to the A.S. phrase _to f[=o]tum_, which just makes all
the difference. Correctly, it should be _to f[=o]te_; but the _[=e]_ was,
by this time, so strongly associated with the plural use, that _to f[=e]te_
took its place.

We see that the _e_ was sounded, because there is a third riming word, in
the phrase _in the strete_. Stratmann's Dictionary duly notes this very
passage. It is, however, true that Chaucer is not always consistent about
this; he has _under fete_, riming with _swete_, Book of the Duchess, 399;
_in a strete_, riming with _on my fete_, HF. 1049; but in the Cant. Tales,
we find _at his feet_, A 2047; _al about hir feet_, A 2075; _unto his
beddes feet_, A 4213. The one thing which he does not do is to use _fete_
in the accusative, which is precisely what the author of Fragment B of the
Romaunt does; unless, as is more likely, he drops the _-e_ of the infin.
_lete_, which Chaucer invariably keeps (at any rate when final). We can
easily understand the suppression of a final _e_; but it is difficult to
understand why a writer should invent one.

Once more, when I argue that the rime of _entente_ with the adj. _present_
in R. Rose, 5869, does not accord with Chaucer's usage, the reply is made
(p. 72) that _entent_ rimes with the pp. _shent_ in the Man of Lawes Tale
(B 930). But it is clear that Chaucer here has _entente_ as usual, and
rimes it with the form _shent-e_, which is the pp. treated as a _plural_
adjective; as in several other places.

Next (on p. 72), Gower is rated for riming the prep. _for_ with the pp.
_forlore_; Gower, C.A. ii. 239. But Gower's phrase is 'that thou art comen
fore'; and I suspect that he knew the language of his own time. The _fore_
may answer to the A.S. _fore_, on account of (Grein, i. 320); or, more
probably, _that ... fore_ was taken as the equivalent of _therfore_, which
constantly takes the final _e_, as in Chaucer, E 1141.

On p. 72, again, it is said that, in F 1273, Chaucer rimes the pt. t.
_broght-e_ with _nought_, i.e. he uses the incorrect form _broght_. This
charge, for once, is quite true, and it is as well to say at once, that
Chaucer's rimes are not _quite_ immaculate; but his sins of this
description are not, after all, very numerous, and not by any means so
numerous as Prof. Lounsbury, for the purpose of his argument, would have us
believe. The only right method is to make out a fair list, without
straining to make it much worse than it should be.

s. 48. In his Studies, vol. i. pp. 402-5, Prof. Lounsbury makes another
attack upon the unfortunate poet's rimes. Many of his instances are wrong;
so much so, that four of Chaucer's supposed errors and two of Gower's are
admitted to be no errors in vol. iii. 453. It would have been well if all
the rest of the charges had been withdrawn at the same time. I here draw
attention to them accordingly.

'In Parl. Foules, 121, the preterite _broughte_ rymes with the pp.
_wrought_.' Answer; the rimes are: _broght-e_, _y-wroght-e_, _thoght-e_;
the form _y-wroghte_ occurs in the phrase 'with lettres large y-wroghte,'
where _y-wroghte_ is treated as a plural adjective; and there is no error
at all.

'In Troilus, i. 463, the pp. _fled_ rymes with the preterite _bredde_.' As
before, the phrase is: 'Alle othere dredes weren from him _fledde_.' Here
_fledde_ is treated as a plural adjective, and there is no error at all.
One would have thought that Chaucer knew something of the language of his
time.

'In Troilus, ii. 1079, the pp. _excused_ [rimes] with the preterite
_accusede_.' But the preterite of _accusen_ was _accused_; the addition of
the full suffix _-ede_ is rare, and chiefly confined to monosyllabic roots.

'In Troil. iv. 1422, the pp. _sprad_ [rimes] with the preterite _hadde_'
The line ends, 'with herte and eres _spradde_'; where _spradde_ is treated
as a plural adjective. No error.

'In Troil. v. 1758, the preterite _mette_ [rimes] with the pp. _whet_.' It
is the same story; the phrase is 'hir speres weren _whette_.' No error.

'In the Legend, 786, the preterite _heryede_ rymes with the pp. _beryed_.'
As the usual preterite was _heryed_ (_h['e]r-y-ed-e_ being too cumbrous and
almost unpronounceable), there is no error.

'In the Legend, 2384, the pp. _served_ [rimes] with the preterite
_deservede_' But the preterite was _deserved_. The full ending _-ede_ was
seldom added to roots of more than one syllable, least of all when the verb
happened to be of French origin. By ignoring the habits of the language of
Chaucer's time, such objections might have been largely multiplied; it is
surprising to find that so few have been noted.

'In the Knightes Tale, A 2343, the preterite _signifyede_ rymes with the
pp. _cried_.' However, the preterite was _signifyed_.

'In the Man of Lawes Tale, B 559, the preterite _mette_ rymes with the pp.
_yshet_; [in B 435] the pp. _converted_ with the preterite _astertede_; [in
B 547] the pp. _exiled_ with the preterite _bigilede_; and [in B 1115] the
pp. _ymet_ with the infin. _lette_ and the preterite _sette_.' All the
charges against Chaucer break down. The pp. _yshet_ is properly _yshette_,
plural. The preterite of _asterten_ is _asterted_. The preterite of
_bigilen_ is _bigiled_. And the pp. _ymet_ should be _ymette_, plural. A
critic who imagines that such cumbrous preterites as _astertede_ and
_bigilede_ were in common use, should be asked to read Middle-English
authors till he meets with a few examples of them.

'In the Clerkes Tale, E 498, the preterite _amevede_ rimes with the pp.
_agreved_.' But the preterite was _ameved_.

'In the Somnours Tale, D 1833, the pp. _amended_ rymes with the preterite
_defendede_.' But the preterite was _defended_. Similarly, the preterites
_redressede_, _tariede_, _espyede_, _cryede_, _eylede_, _sewede_ are
conjured up to put Chaucer in the wrong; an argument which requires no
serious refutation. So far was Chaucer from using the form _espyede_ that,
whenever he desires to vary from the form _espyed_, he naturally uses the
form _espyde_, as in G 1230. Our ancestors were but human; they did not
mind saying either _espyed_ or _espyde_; but _espy-e-de_ was a little too
much.

'In the Compl. of Mars, 65, the preterite _com_ rymes with the pp.
_overcome_; but as in this instance, there is a possibility that _com_ may
be deemed a relic of the ancient subj. usage, and therefore entitled to a
final _e_, the example will not be insisted upon at this point.' This seems
to suggest, as an alternative, that _come_ may be the preterite
subjunctive; however it is neither the preterite nor the preterite
subjunctive, but simply the present subjunctive, being perfectly correct.
The line is: 'That dwell'th in solitud-e til she come,' i.e. that dwells
[present tense] in solitude till she may come. The preterite subj.
_c[=o]me_ would have a long close _o_, and could not possibly rime (in
Chaucer) with the short _u_ in _overcome_ (aoverkum[*e]).

It is objected to Legend, 1391, that the insertion of _hath_ causes 'the
adj. _goode_, of the definite declension, to be shorn of its final _e_ in
pronunciation.' The line is: 'As shal the good-man that therfor hath
payed,' where _good-man_ is a compound word, occurring in Matt. xxiv. 43,
and elsewhere; and it is interesting to find that Chaucer even uses _good
men_ in the vocative plural, instead of _good-e_ men, as a familiar form of
address; B 4630. If, as seems to be proposed, we remove the word _hath_,
and read _good-e_, we get: 'As shal the good-e man that therfor payed';
which rimes just as well as before, _payed_ being an admissible form of the
preterite, as well as _payde_. But then the epithet _goode_ becomes
comparatively otiose.

In the Legend, 1696, it is maintained that _wroghte_ is a past participle.
It is surely a preterite, the word _they_, i.e. the besiegers, being
understood. This is a little forced, but it cannot be helped. To take it as
a pp. gives no sense; for it then becomes, 'the siege lay full long, and
(was) little wrought.' To 'work a siege' would be a harsh expression. If,
on the other hand, we are to understand _was_ before _wrought_, we may just
as well understand _they_. It is quite as easy.

s. 49. My position is, in short, that the attack upon Chaucer in this
passage (Studies in Chaucer, i. 402-405) fails in every single instance. It
is called 'a formidable' list; but is nothing of the kind. The attack
against Gower also fails in every single instance. Omitting the two charges
which the author himself withdraws, the passage (p. 405) runs thus:--

'In the Confessio Amantis, the preterites _herde_, _wente_, _tremblede_,
and _com_ will be found ryming respectively with the past participles
_answerd_, _went_, _assembled_, and _overcome_ (see i. 151, ii. 7, iii.
263, 350). He has also the infin. _wedde_ ryming with the pp. _sped_ (iii.
265).'

Answer. _Herde_ rimes with the _plural_ pp. _answerde_. In ii. 7, the text
is wrong, and makes nonsense[49]. _Trembled_ is a correct preterite.
_C[=o]m_ could not rime with _overc[)o]me_ in the least, if it were a
preterite; the reading _c[)o]me_ is right, and represents the pres. sing.
subj. = may come. In iii. 265, the reading is obviously false, as the line
consists of _eleven_ syllables; we have merely to strike out _were_, which
reduces the line to the normal length, and turns the pp. _sped_ into the
pt. t. _spedde_, correctly. The syllables should have been counted.

s. 50. ASSONANCES. I have drawn attention to the above passages because it
affords an opportunity of illustrating Chaucer's habits. I have said that
Prof. Lounsbury is very anxious to fasten upon Chaucer the charge of using
mere assonances, i.e. syllables in which nothing rimes but the vowel-sound;
for specimens of which see vol. i. p. 5. I doubt if the charge can be
fairly proved. But it is well to examine the cases.

Book of the Duchesse, 79, 80. L. 79 ends with _terme_. L. 80, according to
Thynne's edition[50], ends in _yerne_. The correction of _yerne_ to _erme_,
which produces a perfect rime, is so obvious, that it occurred to Mr.
Bradshaw, to myself, and to Ten Brink (to the best of my belief)
independently. As the reading _yerne_ is due to no MS., but rests upon
Thynne, who is, practically, the sole authority for ll. 31-96, I decline to
bow down to him; seeing that Chaucer himself uses _erme_ elsewhere (C 312),
to rime with the same word _terme_.

In Troil. v. 9, most MSS. have _clere_, to rime with _grene_ and _quene_; a
mere assonance. But, as some MSS. have _shene_ (see vol. ii. p. lxxii), it
seems absurd to reject such an easy correction. In the Parl. Foules, 296,
the same two words _grene_ and _quene_ rime with 'the somer-sonne _shene_';
a highly suggestive fact. And in the Cant. Tales, _shene_ rimes six times
with _grene_, and three times with _queene_, and with no other word except
_sustene_ (once); which is, again, a suggestive fact.

Only one more instance is known, viz. in Troil. ii. 884, where _syke_ rimes
with _endyte_ and _whyte_. It is not impossible that Chaucer wrote _syte_;
see my note.

These three doubtful instances, being all that have been found in the whole
of Chaucer's works, compare favourably, to say the least, with the six
indubitable instances occurring in Fragment B (only) of the Romaunt of the
Rose; see vol. i. p. 5. In calculating in errors, we must observe the
percentage.

When every mistake, or rather slight inaccuracy or licence, that can be
found in Chaucer's works, has been reckoned to his discredit, it will still
be found that he observes certain laws with rigid persistence; and it is
possible to use these observed peculiarities as tests whereby to enable us
to reject decisively such poems as have been attributed to him with more
zeal than judgement. It is my deliberate opinion, for example, that
Fragment B of the Romaunt of the Rose shews so many deviations[51] from his
known habits of riming as to render it impossible that he had anything to
do with it.

s. 51. ENDINGS IN -Y and -Y-E. The non-riming of _-y_ with _-y-[:e]_ (see
vol. i. p. 5) is a test which cannot be ignored; and it is better to accept
its guidance than to attempt to circumvent it, if we would be free from
bias.

Even on this point, Prof. Lounsbury is incorrect. In his anxiety to make
out a case, he tells us (Studies, i. 389) that the adjective _dry_,
'whether used attributively or predicatively,' rimes always with words of
the _-y[:e]_ group, whereas _sly_ is sometimes (correctly) monosyllabic.
The two words are essentially different. _Sly_, from Icel. _sloegr_, is
monosyllabic when used indefinitely; whereas 'dry' answers to M.E. _drye_,
A.S. _dr[=y]ge_, and was never a monosyllable till its final _-e_ at last
dropped off. Chaucer handles these two words in different ways, in strict
accordance with their etymology.

Yet again (i. 390) he accuses Gower of a false rime in his Confessio
Amantis, iii. 320, because he rimes _enemy_ with _envy-e_. This is a
serious charge; but an examination of the passage explains the riddle. The
answer is that, in this particular passage, the right reading is _enemy-e_,
because the word is feminine, as it refers to a woman. The distinction
between O.F. _enemi_ (Lat. _inimicum_) and _enemi[:e]_ (Lat. _inimica_) is
clear enough in O.F. poetry, as Gower knew very well; and there is no
reason why he should not have used his knowledge. The noticeable point is,
that every charge of this character, when it comes to be explained, tells
precisely the other way. The attempt to prove Chaucer wrong, where he
happens to be precisely right, does him more good than harm.

s. 52. METRES AND FORMS OF VERSE.

In the List of Chaucer's Works in vol. i. p. lxii, the various forms of his
metre are noticed. It is certain that he adapted most of them from French,
especially from Guillaume de Machault, though he no doubt improved the
general structure of his lines by the study of Italian models. He nowhere
employs Boccaccio's _ottava rima_, and only once attempted a short piece in
Dante's _terza rima_, in the Compleint to his Lady. However, this attempt
is of unique interest, as Dante's verse was never again imitated till about
1540, when Sir Thomas Wiat wrote his Three Satires.

s. 53. OLD VERSE-FORMS. Chaucer was but little indebted to the forms of
English verse used by his predecessors. He doubtless adopted the line of
four accents for his translation of The Romaunt of the Rose, because such
was the metre of the original. Still, this metre was in use long before his
time. It was employed by Wace and Gaimar, and we have an excellent specimen
of it in English in the Lay of Havelok, written before A.D. 1300; as well
as a long example in the Cursor Mundi. It is also the metre employed by
Barbour in his 'Bruce,' and by Gower in his 'Confessio Amantis.' Chaucer
employed it in his translation of the Romaunt; in his Ceys and Alcioun,
portions of which survive in the Book of the Duchesse; in the Book of the
Duchesse itself; and in the House of Fame. Very likely he employed it also
in the lost Book of the Lion, as Machault's Dit du Lion is in this metre.

The ballad-metre which appears, in varying forms, in Sir Thopas, was also
older than Chaucer's time; it is obvious that this poem is a burlesque.

The four-line stanza employed in the 'Proverbs' was also already known:
see, for example, 'The Five Joys of the Virgin,' in An Old Eng. Miscellany,
ed. Morris, p. 87.

s. 54. THE EIGHT-LINE STANZA. The poet's first attempt at naturalising a
French metre in stanzas, as far as we know, was in his A B C; although the
original of this poem is in a different metre. The metre must have been
known to Machault, of whose poems only fragments appear in Tarb['e]'s
edition; for good examples, see the works of Eustache Deschamps. The same
metre is used in the Monkes Tale, the Former Age, and Lenvoy to Bukton;
and, thrice repeated, with a refrain, in the Balade to Rosemounde, Fortune,
and the Complaint of Venus. It was afterwards taken up by Hoccleve and
Lydgate, and by G. Douglas, in his 'King Hart,' but is not a particularly
favourite metre. However, with the addition of an Alexandrine line at the
end, it became the famous Spenserian stanza of the Faerie Queene[52].

s. 55. THE SEVEN-LINE STANZA. His next achievement was of vast importance.
He naturalised the famous seven-line stanza, employed by Machault in
several poems, one of which evidently furnished the refrain of Against
Women Unconstant; and this is good evidence in favour of the genuineness of
this Balade. On account of the great interest attaching to this metre, I
here transcribe Machault's Balade in full. And I take occasion to remark,
at the same time, that it illustrates the absurdity of an unlucky
suggestion that has been lately made, viz. that 'all Balades must needs
have an _envoy_, and that envoys to some of Chaucer's Balades must have
been lost[53].'

  BALLADE: by GUILLAUME de MACHAULT (ed. Tarb['e], p. 55).

  Se pour ce muir qu'amours ay bien servi,
  Fait mauvais servir si fait signour;
  Ne je n'ay pas, ce croy, mort desservi
  Pour bien amer de tr[`e]s loial amour[54].
  Mais je voy bien que finer faut un jour,
  Quant je congnois et voy tout en appert
  Qu'en lieu de bleu, Dame, vous vestez vert.

  H['e]las! Dame, je vous ay tant chieri
  En desirant de merci la doucour[55],
  Que je n'ay mais sens ne pooir en mi,
  Tant qu'ont min['e] mi soupir et mi plour.
  Et m'esp['e]rance est morte sans retour[56],
  Quant souvenirs me monstre [`a] d['e]couvert
  Qu'en lieu de bleu, Dame, vous vestez vert.

  Pour ce maudi les iex dont je vous vi,
  L'eure, le jour, et le tr[`e]s cointe atour,
  Et la biaut['e] qui ont mon cuer ravi,
  Et la plaisir enyvr['e] de folour,
  Le dous regart qui me mist en errour;
  Et loyaut['e] qui souffre et a souffert
  Qu'en lieu de bleu, Dame, vous vestez vert.

This metre is much used by our poet; it occurs in the Lyf of St. Cecile,
the Clerkes Tale, the original Palamon and Arcite, the Compleint to his
Lady, An Amorous Complaint, Complaint unto Pit[`e], Anelida, Of the
Wretched Engendring of Mankinde, the Man of Lawes Tale, the Compleint of
Mars, Troilus, Words to Adam, Parliament of Foules, the Prioresses Tale,
and Lenvoy to Scogan. It occurs thrice repeated, with a refrain, in Against
Women Unconstant, Compleint to his Purs, Lak of Stedfastnesse, Gentilesse,
and Truth; as well as in the Balade introduced into the Legend of Good
Women, ll. 249-269.

The Envoy to 'Fortune' also consists of a seven-line stanza, but the
arrangement of the rimes is different, there being only two rimes in place
of the usual three.

This metre was much used by Hoccleve, Lydgate, King James I of Scotland,
and others; but is now uncommon.

s. 56. TERZA RIMA. We have only a few lines of _terza rima_, in the
Compleint to his Lady; see vol. i. p. 76.

s. 57. TEN-LINE STANZA. A ten-line stanza occurs in the Compleint to his
Lady. Perhaps it was an experiment; and perhaps it is somewhat of a
failure. The Envoy to the Complaint of Venus also consists of 10 lines.

s. 58. NINE-LINE STANZAS. Chaucer has two nine-line stanzas. Of these, the
former has the rimes arranged according to the formula _aabaabbab_, which
occurs in Anelida[57]: and two of these stanzas are rendered much more
complex, by the use of internal rimes. As this metre is rare, it is perhaps
worth noticing that it was employed by Gawain Douglas in his Palace of
Honour; and that in the last three stanzas of that poem he even imitates
these internal rimes.

The other nine-line stanza, with the formula _aabaabbcc_, occurs in the
Complaint of Mars.

s. 59. OTHER STANZAS. A six-line stanza (_ababcb_), repeated six times,
forms the Envoy to the Clerkes Tale.

There is another six-line stanza (_ababaa_) in the Envoy to Womanly
Noblesse; vol. iv. p. xxvi.

A five-line stanza occurs in the Envoy to the Complaint to his Purse. It
was copied in the poem called The Cuckoo and the Nightingale.

s. 60. In Anelida, 256-271, and 317-324, we have two unique stanzas, with
lines of varying lengths; the rime-formula being _aaabaaab_, repeated in
the inverse order _bbbabbba_. This may be called a virelay in the English
sense, and is possibly what Chaucer intended by that name[58].

s. 61. ROUNDELS. Four Roundels occur; three in Merciless Beautee; and one
in the Parliament of Foules. For the structure of the Roundel, see vol. i.
p. 524.

s. 62. It readily appears that Chaucer was a great metrist, and bestowed
many new forms of metre upon our literature. Most of them were, of course,
simply borrowed and adapted from French; but it is possible that a few of
them were due to his own constructive ability. The poems called Anelida and
A Complaint to his Lady exhibit clear examples of his experiments in
metrical construction; and he has given us several examples of his skill in
overcoming the difficulties of rime. Of these, the chief are The Complaint
of Venus, with 72 lines on 9 rimes; The Balade to Rosemounde, with 24 lines
on 3 rimes; Womanly Noblesse, with 33 lines on 4 rimes; and the Envoy to
the Clerkes Tale, with 36 lines on only 3 rimes.

s. 63. BALADES AND TERNS. The usual form for a Balade was in three stanzas,
with a refrain. This rule is partially observed, not only in Balades, but
in other poems. Chaucer was fond of grouping his stanzas by threes; such a
group has been called a Tern. For examples, see the latter part of the
Complaint to Pit[`e], in three groups of three stanzas each; the five
groups of three stanzas at the end of the Complaint of Mars; the three
stanzas forming the Proem to Anelida; the three groups of three stanzas
each in Fortune; and the Triple Roundel. The latter part of the Compleint
to his Lady consists of nine stanzas, i.e. thrice three. The Envoy to
Scogan has six stanzas, i.e. twice three; whilst the Envoy to Bukton has
three only.

s. 64. ENVOYS. There are, usually, _no_ Envoys to Chaucer's Balades. There
is one to Fortune, called Lenvoy de Fortune; one addressed to King Richard
II, at the end of Lak of Stedfastnesse; one addressed to Scogan; and one
addressed to Bukton. That appended to the Complaint to his Purs was
obviously supplied at a later date; whilst the so-called Envoy to Truth
(only found in one MS.) is hardly an Envoy at all, but merely an additional
stanza, in the same strain as the rest.

s. 65. THE HEROIC COUPLET. But Chaucer's greatest metrical gift to England
was his use of the Heroic Couplet, which he employed with remarkable
success, first in the Legend of Good Women, and soon after, in his
Canterbury Tales. This he may well have borrowed from Machault, as has been
already explained above; see vol. iii. p. 383, and note 2 on the same page.

The heroic couplet was first copied by Lydgate, who wrote in it two poems
of great length, the Siege of Thebes and the Troy-boke. It was also used by
Henry the Minstrel in his patriotic poem named the Wallace. It is
remarkable that it was almost entirely neglected by Dunbar; the only piece
in this metre that is certainly his is one of 34 lines called 'In Prays of
Woman.' However, a much longer piece entitled The Freiris of Berwick has
also been attributed to him. This metre was also employed by Gawain Douglas
in his translation of Vergil.

s. 66. GRAMMATICAL OUTLINES OF CHAUCER'S ENGLISH.

I shall only attempt here a general outline of the most distinguishing
characteristics of the grammatical forms used by Chaucer. The student will
necessarily consult such works as Prof. Child's Observations on the
Language of Chaucer and Gower, which refer to the Canterbury Tales only;
the Observations on the Language of Chaucer's Troilus, by Prof. Kittredge
(published for the Chaucer Society); the Observations on the Language of
Chaucer's Legend of Good Women, by J. M. Manly (in Studies and Notes on
Philology and Literature, vol. ii; Ginn and Co., Boston, 1893); and Ten
Brink's compact and excellent volume entitled Chaucers Sprache und
Verskunst; Leipzig, 1884.

It would be easy to devote a large volume to the study of Chaucer's
grammatical forms. The forms of the substantives, in particular, are
frequently variable, sometimes on account of their accentuation, which is
accommodated to the line in which they happen to occur, and sometimes for
reasons which appear somewhat arbitrary. Nothing short of complete lists
can satisfy the scholar.

At the same time, such lists are rather bewildering. I therefore attempt
here a sketch of the general principles by which Chaucer's usage appears to
be regulated; whilst at the same time the reader is requested to remember
that most of the rules given below are subject to exceptions; and that
sometimes such exceptions are rather numerous. But it is plain that we must
begin with general rules.

s. 67. GENERAL RULES. Before noticing these, the following _empirical_
rules for the reading of Chaucer's verse may conveniently be here repeated.
Cf. vol. v. p. xxiii.

1. Always pronounce the final _-es_, _-ed_, _-en_, _-er_, or _-e_ in any
word, as a distinct and separate syllable at the _end_ of a line and at the
caesural pause; so also elsewhere, with the exceptions noted here below,
and a few others.

2. The final _-e_ is almost invariably elided, and other light syllables
(chiefly final _-ed_, _-en_, _-er_, _-es_, _-y_) are slurred over and
nearly absorbed, whenever the word next following begins with a vowel or is
one of certain words beginning with _h_, viz. (1) a pronoun, as _he_,
_his_, _him_, _her_, _hem_: (2) part of the verb _have_: (3) _heer_ and
_how_: (4) mute _h_ in a French word, such as _honour_. Ex. _ev'r_, A
50[59]; _rid'n_, A 57; _ov'ral_, A 249; _ov'rest_, A 290; _fith'l_, 296;
_get'n_, 291; _som'r_, 394; _wat'r_, 400; _many_, 406.

NOTE. The caesural pause prevents elision.

3. The final _-e_ is frequently, but not always, suppressed in a few common
words (best learnt by observation), such as _were_, _hadde_, _wolde_,
_sholde_, and some others. _Thise_, these, is invariably monosyllabic. So
also, the medial _-e_ is usually suppressed in such words as _havenes_
(haavnez)[60], _othere_ (oodhr[*e]) _owene_ (aou.n[*e]), _everich_
(aevrich), _sovereyn_ (suvrein). Similarly, the second _e_ is dropped in
_t['a]vernes_ (tav.ernz), when the accent is on the first syllable. If it
be on the second, then the word is trisyllabic: (taver.nez). Accentuation
plays an important part in determining the forms of words.

These three rules meet a large number of cases. Exceptions should be
noticed as they arise; and it will usually be found that the exception can
be justified.

s. 68. THE STRONG DECLENSION OF SUBSTANTIVES. The forms of substantives
frequently present much difficulty in individual cases. The primary rules
are these.

1. Substantives which end in a vowel in Anglo-Saxon, in the nominative
case, take a final _-e_ in Chaucer, in the nom. and dative. The accusative
may be taken to be the same as the nominative in every instance.

The A.S. masculine and neuter nouns include _jo_-stems (Sievers, A.S. Gram.
ed. Cook, sect. 246), as _ende_[61]; short _i_-stems (s. 262), as _mete_,
A 127; short _u_-stems (s. 270), as _wode_, wood; as well as sbs. of the
weak declension, as _ape_.

The A.S. _wo_-stems give M.E. final _-we_, reduced to (u) in pronunciation,
as in _sparwe_ (spar.u). The A.S. feminines in _-u_ give M.E. final _-e_;
as _sake_, _dore_. Feminine sbs. of the weak declension end in final _-e_,
as _tonge_, tongue.

2. Most of the A.S. monosyllabic feminine nouns with a long stem-syllable
take a final _-e_ in Chaucer, in the nom., acc., and dative, doubtless
because all the oblique cases were dissyllabic. And owing to this tendency,
some A.S. monosyllabic nouns of the masculine and neuter genders do the
same.

Ex. A.S. _l[=a]r_, lore, Ch. _lore_ (never _loor_); A.S. _borh_, a pledge,
Ch. _borwe_. Prof. Child remarks that 'two forms not unfrequently occur,
one with, and the other without, the vowel.' Ex. _carte_, acc., B 4208;
_cart_, acc., D 1539.

3. The monosyllabic sbs. in Chaucer (i.e. sbs. having no final _-e_) mostly
correspond to A.S. masculine and neuter _o_-stems (Sievers, s. 238). If a
final _-e_ appears, it is usually in the dative case; but even in this
case, it is frequently dropped. Ex. _arm_ (of the body), _boor_, a boar,
_breeth_, breath, _corn_, _deer_, _stoon_. Datives: _breeth_, A 5; _doom_,
F 928; _day_, A 19; _ring_, F 247; _folk_, A 25; _gold_, A 160. Datives in
_-e_; _horne_, Book Duch. 376; _londe_, B 522; _horse_, T. v. 37.

Many of these dative forms may be explained as occurring in 'petrified'
phrases, i.e. to phrases (involving datives) that were in common use.
'These,' says Mr. Manly, 'are the phrases which have given rise to the
supposition that the regular ending of the dative in Chaucer is _-e_. An
examination of the facts, however, will shew that this is not true. The
dative ending was preserved in certain phrases which were transmitted and
used as phrases, the force of the dative as such being no longer felt. This
will appear from a comparison of such phrases as _a bedde_, _to bedde_,
_over borde_, _to dethe_, _for fere_, _a-fere_ (afire), _to-hepe_,
_a-lyve_, _a-slepe_, _to wyve_, _to the brimme_.' So also _to rede_, T. iv.
679: _in house_, D 352. Nevertheless, a few true datives in _-e_ occur,
though they are certainly scarce. We can hardly explain the use of _horne_
in Book Duch. 376 as occurring in a petrified phrase. Cf. also _on a
berne_, C 397; _of his lone_, D 1861; and, in particular, the curious
instances in which the A.S. nom. has disappeared. Thus the A.S. _h[=i]w_ is
always _hewe_ in Chaucer, in all cases; the A.S. _gr[=a]f_ is always
_grove_; the A.S. _hol_ is _hole_; _sore_ in A 2743 is a nom. case; and so
on.

s. 69. ARCHAISMS. The easiest way of understanding Chaucer's language is to
remember that it is _archaic_; the use of the final _-e_ was fast
disappearing, and he probably was anxious to retain it for the sake of
metrical effect. He could not but have remarked its usefulness in Old
French poetry; and his study of Italian must have led him to admire the
frequency of the vowel-endings in that language. But the use of the English
final _-e_ had become extremely uncertain, owing to the complete fusion of
the nom. and acc., and the loss (to a large extent) of the dative, except
in old phrases which contained (usually) some common preposition.

s. 70. THREE TYPES OF STRONG SUBSTANTIVES. If I may beg leave to offer my
own view of the forms of Chaucer's substantives of the strong declensions,
I should be inclined to explain his usages in the following way.

Let us put aside the weak declension, and the etymology of the A.S. words,
and let us look at the actual forms of the singular nouns. And, since the
genitive case, in Chaucer, usually has a form of its own, let us consider
the nom., acc., and dative only.

All the representative words given in Sievers (A.S. Gram. s. 238, &c.) can
be collected under a few general types, for the present purpose. The fem.
sb. _giefu_ had the accus. _giefe_; but as _-u_ and _-e_ both became _-e_
at a later period, the nom. and acc. are, practically, alike.

Further, datives in _-a_, as _sun-a_, _feld-a_, became datives in _-e_, and
may here be so considered. Hence, in very late A.S. and in Early English,
we find, neglecting stems in _-r_, the few words which shew mutation in the
dative, and others which do not affect the general result, the following
uses.

1. Every dative case ends in _-e_.

2. Every accusative resembles either the nominative or the dative; if the
latter, it ends in _-e_.

Hence, there are ONLY THREE main types, which we may illustrate by the
words _d[=o]m_, _ende_, and _l[=a]r_. The A.S. _d[=o]m_ became M.E. _doom_,
whilst the form _ende_ persisted without any change of spelling.

The A.S. _l[=a]r_ would, we should expect, become M.E. _loor_, which may
here represent it, provisionally, for the present purpose (I substitute it
for the type _[=a]r_ in Sievers, merely as being a commoner word). The
resulting forms are, accordingly, these:--

        A.                 B.                   C.
  nom. acc. _end-e_    (nom. _loor_)      nom. acc. _doom_
       dat. _end-e_.  dat. acc. _lor-e_.       dat. _dom-e_.

A. As to this type, there could be no hesitation; all such words would
naturally retain the final _-e_ for a considerable period. Examples appear
in _ende_, end, and words declined like it, such as M.E. _herd-e_,
herdsman, _l[=e]che_, physician, _wyte_, punishment; and numerous agential
words in _-ere_, as _mill['e]re_, miller. Also in A.S. _giefu_, and words
declined like it, such as M.E. _care_, care; _shame_, shame; _sake_, sake;
_love_, love. Also in A.S. _wine_, _sife_, and words like them, such as
M.E. _mete_, meat, _stede_, stead, _reye_, rye, _hate_, hate, _spere_,
spear. Also in A.S. _sunu_, son, _wudu_, wood; M.E. _sone_, _wode_. Also in
A.S. _duru_, door, _nosu_, nose; M.E. _dore_, _nose_.

B. In type B, we have a majority for the form _lor-e_; the Early E. nom.
_loor_ gave way, and is seldom found, so that _lore_ became the standard
type, in Chaucer, for nom., dat., and acc. alike.

Examples occur in A.S. _l[=a]r_, and words like it, as M.E. _fore_,
journey, path, _halle_, hall, _sorwe_, sorrow, _stounde_, time, _wounde_,
wound, _ore_, mercy. Also in A.S. _b[=e]n_, petition, and words like it,
such as M.E. _quene_, queen; _hyde_, hide, skin; _tyde_, time; _dede_,
deed.

C. In type C, the nom. and acc. combined against the dative form.
Consequently, the monosyllabic form prevailed, in this instance only, for
all cases. Nevertheless, the dative in _-e_ is not uncommon, owing, as has
been said, to its preservation in particular phrases. Besides which, it
occurs sporadically after some prepositions. It must be remembered that the
dative form was once very common, owing to its use after some very common
prepositions, such as _at_, _by_, _in_, _of_, _on_, _to_. Examples of the
monosyllabic nominative occur in A.S. _d[=o]m_, and words declined like it,
as M.E. _ooth_, oath, _ring_, _arm_ (of the body), _erl_, _mouth_, _dreem_,
dream, _boon_, bone, _deer_, _fyr_, fire, _wyf_; _day_, _path_, _staf_,
_ship_, _writ_, _shoo_. Also in A.S. _secg_, and words declined like it, as
_net_, _bed_, _wed_. Also in A.S. _wyrm_, and words declined like it, as
M.E. _deel_, deal, part, _gest_, guest, _hil_, _dint_, _loon_, loan,
_wight_. Examples of datives occur in _a-fyre_, _to wyve_, _a-bedde_, _to
wedde_, _lone_ (see Glossary).

If we thus consider the whole history, I think it becomes clear that the
form of the dative in _-e_ is really of considerable importance. It occurs,
of course, in type A; it helps to determine type B; and, even in type C, is
not always suppressed.

s. 71. EFFECT OF ACCENT. I add two more notes before dismissing this part
of the subject. One is, that such a word as _millere_ is only trisyllabic
when accented on the penultimate, as in A 542. When accented on the _first_
syllable, the final _e_ is dropped in pronunciation, and some scribes drop
it in the written form also; see A 545. There are many such instances in
words of French origin. A large number of sbs. in _-ing_, derived from
verbal roots, come under this rule. In the middle of the verse, the
dissyllabic form is usual, as _yelding_, A 596, _woning_, A 606. But at the
end of the line, the trisyllabic form occurs frequently, owing to the
accent, especially in order to secure a rime with an infinitive mood. Thus
in A 1616 we find _beddinge_, which rimes with _bringe_, and is accented on
the _i_.

s. 72. DOUBLE FORMS. The other remark which I have to make here is, that
double forms of a word are not uncommon in Anglo-Saxon; and we find double
forms in M.E. corresponding to them. A notable instance occurs in the A.S.
_gewil_, will, a strong sb., beside A.S. _willa_, will, a weak sb. Hence
Chaucer has both _wil_ and _wille_; see the Glossarial Index.

s. 73. THE WEAK DECLENSION. The three A.S. types are _steorra_, star,
masc.; _tunge_, tongue, fem.; and _[=e]age_, eye, neuter. In M.E., the
genders were disregarded, and all three types became merged in one, with
final _-e_. Hence Chaucer has _sterre_, star, _tonge_, tongue, _y[:e]_,
eye; with one invariable form for the nom., acc., and dative.

A.S. WORDS IN -EN. A.S. words ending in _-en_ usually drop the _-n_ in M.E.
Hence, in place of the A.S. _[=ae]fen_, Chaucer has _eve_; though _even_
also occurs. So also _game_ for A.S. _gamen_; _kinrede_, A.S.
_cyn-r[=ae]den_; _mayde_, A.S. _maegden_; _morwe_, A.S. _morgen_.

s. 74. GENITIVE SINGULAR. The genitive almost invariably ends in _-es_[62],
sometimes shortened to _-s_. Ex. _cherles_, _maydens_. A few old feminines
in _-e_ occur occasionally; as _halle_, _helle_, _love_ (in the comp.
_loveday_). A few genitives in _-e_ are due to the A.S. _-an_ of the weak
declension; as _herte_, _sonne_, _cherche_, _widwe_. Here belongs _lady_
(short for _lady-e_). _Hevene_ occurs as well as _hevenes_. The gen. of
_fader_, father, is both _fader_ and _fadres_.

s. 75. DATIVE SINGULAR. As explained above, the dative ends in _-e_, except
for words of type C (s. 70). The accusative always resembles the
nominative.

s. 76. PLURALS. The usual ending is _-es_ (also written _-is_) or _-s_; as
_dayes_, _maydens_. The same ending is usually employed even for sbs. of
the weak declension, where the A.S. suffix was _-an_. Only a few old weak
plurals survive; as _oxen_, _pesen_, peas, _asshen_ (rarely _asshes_),
_hosen_, _y[:e]n_, eyes, _foon_, foes, _toon_, toes, _been_, bees (seldom
_bees_), _fleen_, fleas. We also find _kyn_, kine, _bretheren_, (never
_brothers_), _doghtren_ and _doghtres_, _sustren_ and _sustres_. So also
_children_.

Some words, originally neuter, remain unchanged in the plural; as _deer_,
_folk_, _hors_, _neet_, _pound_, _sheep_, _swyn_; sometimes _thing_ (also
_thinges_), _yeer_ (also _yeres_). So also _winter_. A few plurals shew
mutation; as _feet_, _teeth_, _men_, _wommen_, _gees_, _mys_. _Breech_ is
really an old plural; but Chaucer has the double plural _breches_ (I 330).
_Monthe_ (B 1674) is an old genitive plural, after the numeral _twelf_. In
_wyf_, pl. _wyves_, _f_ becomes _v_. In _ship_, pl. _shippes_, the _p_ is
doubled, to shew that the vowel is short.

s. 77. SUBSTANTIVES OF FRENCH ORIGIN. Substantives of French origin take a
genitive in _-es_ or _-s_, and remain unchanged in the dat. and accusative.
The plural likewise ends in _-es_ or _-s_. The final _-e_ appears in a
large number of words, such as _face_, _grace_, &c.; but is sometimes
suppressed, even when etymologically correct, as in _fors_ for _force_,
_sours_ for _source_, _beest_ for _beste_, _host_ for _hoste_, _princess_
for _princesse_[63]. In Sir Thopas, _plas_ occurs for _place_, and _gras_
for _grace_. Cf. vol. iv. p. xxxii.

In words like _nature_, _fortune_, _science_, the final _-e_ is sounded if
the accent is on the second syllable, but is usually dropped if it falls on
the first. The same usage prevails with regard to the plural suffix _-es_.
Hence we find the plurals _fl['o]ur-es_, _['a]vent['u]r-es_ on the one
hand, and _p['i]lour-s_, _l['a]zar-s_ on the other; and _p['i]lgrimes_ is
pronounced as _pilgrims_. So also _a['u]ditours_, because the accent on
_ou_ is only secondary. _Ep['i]stell[`e]s_ (B 55) is a 'learned' form.
Words in _-nt_ usually have the plural in _-nts_, often written _-ntz_; as
_tyraunts_ or _tyrauntz_. The A.F. _z_ had the sound of _ts_. A remarkable
plural occurs in _org[`o]n_ or _org[`o][`o]n_ (cf. Lat. _organa_). Words in
_s_ remain unchanged in the gen. sing. and in the pl. Thus _Bachus_, in
Leg. 2376, is a gen. sing.; and _caas_, in A 323, is plural. The pl. of
_advocat_ is _advocats_, with mute _t_, which might be written _advocaas_;
and _condys_ (for _condyts_ with mute _t_) occurs as the pl. of _condyt_.

s. 78. ADJECTIVES. These occur both in the indefinite and in the definite
form. The latter is known by its being preceded by the definite article, or
a demonstrative or possessive pronoun, in which case it takes a final _-e_;
as _the yonge_, _his halfe_, _this ilke_. Also when used in the vocative
case, as _O strange god_, A 2373.

The indefinite form usually follows the A.S. type, and so depends upon the
etymology. Hence we find, on the one hand, _blak_, _good_, _foul_; and, on
the other, _sw[=e]te_, _gr[=e]ne_, _sh[=e]ne_, _k[=e]ne_, where the long
_e_ is due to mutation in a _jo_-stem, and the final _-e_ represents a
faint survival of that stem. So also _clene_ (with open long _e_), _dere_,
_drye_, _blythe_; and even _softe_, _swote_ (without mutation). Other
dissyllables are _fewe_, _newe_, _trewe_, _riche_, _sene_ (visible),
_narwe_ (nar.u), _stille_, _thikke_, _wilde_. _Moche_ is due to loss of _l_
in _mochel_; so, perhaps, _lyte_ for _lytel_.

Several adjectives, however, occur in Chaucer with a final _-e_ in the
indefinite form, contrary to the A.S. usage. Examples: _bare_, _fayre_,
_fresshe_, _longe_, _tame_. So also _badde_, _meke_. In some cases, the
final _-e_ may be due to old usage; thus, in B 50, we find _Of olde tyme_,
A.S. _of ealdum t[=i]man_.

The plural of monosyllabic adjectives ends in _-e_. The same is the case
with some of the pronouns and many of the cardinal numbers. Even
monosyllabic past participles, when used adjectivally, may have a plural in
_-e_, as: _with y[:e]n faste y-shette_; B 560[64]; _eres spradde_, T. iv.
1422; _bente_, T. iv. 40: indeed, we even find this plural form after the
word _weren_, as in _weren fledde_, T. i. 463; _weren whette_, T. v. 1760.
So too _y-mette_, B 1115.

But adjectives and participles of more than one syllable usually remain
unaltered in the plural.

Ordinals and monosyllabic superlatives (few in number) have final _-e_ in
the definite form; as _the firste_, _the thridde_, _the ferthe_, _the
beste_, _the laste_, _the leste_, _the moste_, _the nexte_, _the werste_
(or _worste_).

Some adjectives of French origin take the French pl. suffix _-s_; as,
_capitals_, _delitables_, _espirituels_, _temporeles_.

s. 79. COMPARATIVES. Comparatives usually end in _-er_, and remain
unaltered when definite. _Better_ is sometimes written _bettre_. We also
find the comparatives _lasse_, _lesse_, less; _worse_ or _wers_, worse;
_more_, more, greater. _Bet_, better, is properly an adverb, but is also
used as an adjective. _Mo_ is properly an adverb, but is also used as an
adjective; usually, _mo_ means 'more in number,' as distinguished from
_more_, meaning 'greater in size.' Mutation is seen in _elder_, _lenger_,
_strenger_. _For-m-er_ is due to adding _-er_ to the stem of an old
superlative, _for-m-a_.

s. 80. SUPERLATIVES. Superlatives usually end in _-est_, and remain
unaltered when definite. We also find the superlatives _first_ (def.
_firste_); _best_ (def. _beste_); _last_ (def. _laste_); _leest_ (def.
_leeste_, _leste_); _most_ (def. _moste_); _next_ (def. _nexte_); _werst_
(def. _werste_, _worste_). Mutation is seen in _eldest_, _lengest_,
_strengest_. _Ferrest_ is formed from the comp. adv. _ferre_. Note also the
forms _hind-r-est_, _upp-er-est_, _utt-er-est_, _ov-er-est_. The old
superl. _for-me_ (A.S. _for-ma_, Lat. _pri-mus_) occurs in the comp. sb.
_forme-fader_; and hence the double superl. _for-m-est_.

If an accent falls on the suffix _-est_, the def. form may take final _-e_;
but examples are rare. Yet we find _the seemlieste man_, _the uttereste
preve_, _the wofulleste wight_.

s. 81. NUMERALS. The cardinal numbers are as follows. 'One' is _[`o][`o]n_,
often _[`o][`o]_ or _[`o]_ before a consonant, whence the indef. article
_an_, a. Hence also _al ones_, altogether of one accord, C 696; _for the
nones_ = _for then ones_, for the once, for the nonce; also _aloon_, alone,
more commonly _allone_. 'Two' is _tweye_ or _tweyne_, originally the masc.
form; also _tw[=o]_, originally the fem. and neuter form. The other numbers
are _three_, _foure_, _fyf_ or _fyve_, _six_, _sevene_, _eighte_, _nyne_,
_ten_; &c. The ordinals are _firste_, _othere_ or _secounde_, _thridde_,
_ferthe_ or _fourthe_, _fifte_, _sixte_, &c. Ten Brink remarks that the
form _eightetethe_ is unauthorised, and that it should be _eightetenthe_;
but this is a mistake; see vol. v. p. 134.

s. 82. PRONOUNS. The first pers. pron. is _I_, dat. and acc. _me_; pl.
_we_; dat. and acc. _us_. For _I_, we also find the Northern _ik_, not only
in the Reves Tale, but in the compound _theek_ = _thee ik_. Also, the
Southern _ich_, rarely, both alone and in the compound _theech_ = _thee
ich_. The gen. pl. _our_ occurs in _our aller_, of us all; A 823.

The second pers. pron. is _thou_, _thow_, dat. and acc. _thee_; pl. _ye_,
dat. and acc. _you_. _Thou_ is often appended to verbs, in the form _tow_;
as in _shaltow_, _wiltow_, &c.

The third pers. pron. masc. is _he_, dat. and acc. _him_; pl. _they_, gen.
_hir_ (as in _hir aller_), dat. and acc. _hem_ (never _them_), for all
genders. The fem. form is _she_, dat. and acc. _hir_ or _hire_, also
_h[`e]re_ at the end of a line or at the caesura (see Glossary). The neut.
form is _hit_ or _it_, dat. _him_; acc. _hit_ or _it_.

s. 83. POSSESSIVES. The forms are: _myn_, _my_; _thyn_, _thy_; _his_[65]
(masc. and neut.), _hire_, _hir_, _here_ (fem.); _oure_, _our_; _youre_,
_your_; _hire_, _here_, _hir_, _her_ = their. The Northern form _thair_ is
purposely introduced in A 4172. When standing alone, we also find _oure_,
_oures_, ours; _youre_, _youres_, yours; _hires_, hers; _hirs_, theirs.

s. 84. DEMONSTRATIVES. _The_ is used for the def. article in all genders
and in both numbers. A trace of the old dat. _then_ (A.S. _dh[=a]m_) occurs
in _for the nones_ (= _for then ones_). _Atte_ = _at the_.

The demonstratives are _that_; pl. _tho_, those; and _this_, pl. _thise_.
Note that _thise_ (dhiiz) is always monosyllabic; the final _e_ merely
marks (probably) a longer vowel-sound. It is probable that, in the same
way, the form _hise_, his, used with plurals, may have meant (hiiz); the
Cambridge MS. has the curious form _hese_; but it is monosyllabic.

s. 85. INTERROGATIVES. These are: _who_, _what_; gen. _whoos_, _wh[=o]s;_
dat. _wh[=o]m_; acc. _wh[=o]m_, _what_. Also _which_; pl. _whiche_,
_which_. Also _whether_, which of the two.

s. 86. RELATIVES. _That_ is used generally; also _which_, pl. _whiche_,
_which_. _Whos_ occurs as expressing a genitive; and _whom_ for a dative;
but we never find _who_ as a nominative. We also meet with _that-he_ for
'who'; _that-his_ for 'whose'; _that-him_ for 'whom'; cf. A 2710. Also _the
which_; or, when used adjectivally, _the whiche_ (A 3923); _which that_;
_the which that_; _who that_, _what that_; _who so_, _what so_.

s. 87. OTHER PRONOMINAL FORMS. _Men_ sometimes occurs as a weakened form of
_man_, with the sense of mod. E. 'one'; and it therefore takes a singular
verb. Ex. _men smoot_, one smote, A 149; _men moot_, one must, one ought
to, A 232. _Self_ is used adjectivally, as in _Thy selve neighebour_, B
115. Hence also _myself_, _myselven_, _myselve_; _thyself_, _thyselven_,
_thyselve_; _hemself_, themselves, _hemselven_, _hemselve_. _Thilke_, a
def. form, means 'that'; we also find _this ilke_, _that ilke_; cf. A 721.
_Swich_, such; pl. _swiche_, _swich_. _Oon_, _oo_, one; _noon_, _non_,
none; _other_; _any_. _Som_, pl. _som_, _some_, _somme_; the plural is
written all three ways, but is usually monosyllabic. _Al_, _alle_, _all_; a
word causing some difficulty, being very often written _alle_, though very
seldom dissyllabic. The gen. _aller_ occurs, both alone and in compounds.
_Aught_, _ought_, _oght_; _naught_, _nought_, _noght_. _Either_, gen.
_eith(e)res_; _neither_, gen. _neith(e)res_.

For 'each,' we find _[=e]ch_ (aech), reduced to _ich_ or _y_ in the
compound _everich_, _every_; cf. _everichoon_, every one. _Many_ is used
alone; also in _many oon_, _many on_, _many a_.

s. 88. VERBS.

Verbs are distinguished as being weak or strong. In the former, the pp.
(past participle) ends in _-ed_, _-d_, or _-t_; in the latter, it ends in
_-en_ or _-e_.

A simple rule is to observe that, in weak verbs, a final _-e_ is common in
the past tense, but never ends a pp. unless it is used as a plural
adjective; conversely, in strong verbs, it is common (varying with _-en_)
in the pp., but never occurs in the pt. t. _singular_. The frequent
disregard of this usage is a great blemish in Tyrwhitt's edition of the
Canterbury Tales.

s. 89. The general formulae for the conjugation of verbs are as follows.

PRESENT TENSE. Singular: 1. _-e_; 2. _-est_, _-st_; 3. _-eth_, _-th_ (or a
contracted form). Plural: _-en_, _-n_, _-e_; for all persons. In the 3rd
pers. singular, _-eth_ is often sounded as _-th_, even when _-eth_ is fully
written. We also find contracted forms, as in A.S.; such as _rit_, rideth;
_hit_, hideth; _sit_, sitteth; _bit_, biddeth; _slit_, slideth; _writ_,
writeth; _stant_, standeth; _fint_, findeth; _et_, eateth; _set_, setteth.
In all these instances the stem or root of the verb ends in _d_ or _t_.
Besides these, we find _rist_, riseth; _worth_ for _wortheth_, becomes; and
the curious form _wryth_, writheth, T. iii. 1231. In the very same line
_Bitrent_ is short for _Bitrendeth_. In the 2 pers. sing. _-est_ is often
_-st_, even when written in full; in the pl., _-en_ may be reduced to _-n_,
as in _seyn_, say, or else to _-e_, as in _sey-e_.

PAST TENSE OF STRONG VERBS. Singular: 1. 3. no suffix; 2. _-e_,
occasionally, but usually dropped. Plural: 1. 2. 3. _-en_, _-e_.

PAST TENSE OF WEAK VERBS. Singular: 1. 3. _-ede_, _-ed_, _-de_, _-te_; 2.
_-edest_, _-dest_, _-test_. Plural: 1. 2. 3. _-eden_, _-den_, _-ten_;
_-ede_, _-de_, _-te_, also _-ed_ (occasionally).

SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD: PRESENT. Singular: 1. 2. 3. _-e_. Plural: _-en_, _-e_.
PAST (STRONG VERBS); suffixes as in the present subjunctive. PAST (WEAK
VERBS); like the past tense of the indicative; but _-st_ may be dropped in
the second pers. singular.

IMPERATIVE MOOD. Singular: 2 pers. (no suffix, usually); _-e_ (in some weak
verbs). Plural: 2 pers. _-eth_, _-th_, sometimes _-e_[66]. The rest of the
Mood is supplied from the subjunctive.

INFINITIVE: _-en_, (often) _-e_. The gerundial infinitive, preceded by the
prep, _to_, and usually expressive of purpose, has a special form only in a
very few instances, as _to bene_, to be; _to done_, to do; _to sene_, to
see, A 1035; _to seyne_, to say; for which _to doon_, _to seen_ or _to
see_, _to seyn_ or _to seye_, also occur. In other verbs, it does not
differ from the ordinary infinitive. The true infinitive occurs without the
prep. _to_, and remains in mod. E. in such expressions as _I can sing_, _I
might go_.

PARTICIPLES. Present: _-inge_, _-ing_. The fuller form in _-inge_ is rare,
being chiefly employed, for the rime, at the end of a line, as
_gliteringe_, A 2890; _thunderinge_, A 2174; _flikeringe_, A 1962.

NOTE. The pres. part. is not to be confounded with the sb. of verbal
origin. Thus _singinge_, _floytinge_ (A 91), _whistling_ (A 170), are
present participles; but _priking_, _hunting_ (A 191), _winning_ (A 275),
_lerninge_ (A 300), _teching_ (A 518) are substantives. The pl. sb.
_rekeninges_ occurs in A 760.

PAST PARTICIPLES. The pp. of weak verbs ends in _-ed_, _-d_, or _-t_; and
that of strong verbs in _-en_, _-n_, _-e_. The prefix _y-_ (i),
representing the A.S. _ge-_ (_ye-_), often occurs with past participles; as
in _y-ronne_, A 8, from A.S. _gerunnen_. The same prefix occurs, very
rarely, before an infinitive; as in _y-finde_, _y-here_, _y-knowe_,
_y-see_, _y-thee_. It also appears in the adj. _y-sene_ (A.S. _ges[=e]ne_),
which has often been mistaken for a pp. But the pp. of _see_ is _y-seyn_ or
_y-seye_.

s. 90. SEVEN CONJUGATIONS OF STRONG VERBS. Strong verbs usually exhibit a
vowel-change (gradation) in the stem, as in the mod. E. _sing_, _sang_,
_sung_.

There are seven conjugations, corresponding to the types of the verbs
_drive_, _choose_, _drink_, _bear_, _give_, _shake_, _fall_. See Sievers,
A.S. Grammar.

The 'principal parts' of strong verbs are (_a_) the infinitive (which has
the primary grade); (_b_) the past tense singular (which has the middle
grade); (_c_) the past tense plural (which in A.S. usually differs, as to
its vowel, from the singular); and (_d_) the pp. In strict grammar, the 2
p. s. of the pt. t. has the same vowel as the pp. Thus _biginne_ has the
pp. _bigonnen_, and the 2 p. s. pt. t. is _bigonne_, thou didst begin,
without any final _-st_.

1. Infin. _dryven_ (driiv[*e]n); Pt. s. _dr[`o][`o]f_, _dr[`o]f_ (draof);
Pt. pl. _driven_ (driv[*e]n); Pp. _driven_ (driv[*e]n).

Thus the characteristic vowels are: _y_ (ii); _[`o][`o]_ (ao); _i_; _i_. So
are conjugated _abyden_ or _abyde_, _agryse_, _aryse_, _byde_, _byte_,
_glyde_, _ryde_, _ryse_, _ryve_, _shyne_, _shryve_, _slyde_, _smyte_,
_(be)stryde_, _stryke_, _thryve_, _wryte_, _wrythe_[67]. Chaucer also
treats _stryve_ as a strong verb, though it was originally weak; with pt.
t. _str[`o][`o]f_, pp. _striven_. To this conjugation belongs _wryen_, to
hide, put for _wr[=i]hen_; hence the pp. would be _wr[)i]h-en_, which
appears in Chaucer as _wryen_.

2. Infin. _ch[=e]sen_ (cheez[*e]n); Pt. s. _ch[`e][`e]s_ (chaes); Pt. pl.
_ch[=o]sen_ (chao.z[*e]n); Pp. _ch[=o]sen_ (chao.z[*e]n).

Here the vowel of the pp. has been lengthened, and the vowel of the pt. pl.
assimilated to that of the pp. So are conjugated: _b[=e]den_, to offer;
_brewen_ or _brewe_ (pt. t. _brew_), _cleve_, to slit, _crepe_, _flee_ (pt.
t. _fleigh_, _fley_), _flete_, to float, _flye_, to fly (pt. t. _fleigh_,
_fley_, pl. and pp. _flowen_), _lese_, to lose (pp. _loren_, _lorn_),
_lye_, to tell lies, _sethe_, to boil (pt. t. _s[`e][`e]th_, pp.
_s[)o]den_), _shete_, to shoot (pp. _sh[)o]ten_).

Here belong a few verbs with _ou_ (uu) in the infinitive; as _brouke_,
_shouven_, to shove (pt. t. _sh[`o][`o]f_, pp. _sh[)o]ven_). Also the pp.
_l[)o]ken_, as if from _louken_.

3. In this class there are two sets: (_a_) verbs in which the radical _e_
is preserved, as _swelle_; (_b_) those in which _e_ becomes _i_ before _m_
or _n_, as _drinke_.

(_a_) Infin. _swellen_; Pt. s. _swal_; Pt. pl. _swollen_; Pp. _swollen_. So
are conjugated: _bresten_ or _breste_, _delve_, _fighte_ (originally
_feghte_; pt. s. _faught_, pt. pl. and pp. _foughten_), _helpe_, _kerve_,
_melte_, _sterve_, _thresshe_, _yelde_, _yelpe_. Here belongs _worthen_
(originally _werthe_); the pt. t. and pp. do not occur. _Abreyde_ was also
originally a strong verb, and Chaucer twice uses the pt. t. _abrayd_ or
_abreyd_, riming with the pp. _sayd_ or _seyd_; but it was easily confused
with weak verbs that made the pt. t. in _-de_, and in all other places
appears as a weak verb. It was already obsolescent.

(_b_) Infin. _drinken_; Pt. s. _drank_[68]; Pt. pl. _dronken_
(drung.k[*e]n); Pp. _dronken_ (drung.k[*e]n).

So are conjugated: _biginnen_ or _biginne_, _binde_, _climbe_ (pt. s.
_clomb_), _finde_ (pt. s. _fond_, pt. pl. and pp. _founden_), _ginne_,
_grinde_ (pp. _grounden_), _ringe_, _renne_ ( = _rinne_), _shrinke_,
_singe_ (pt. s. _song_), _sinke_, _slinge_ (pt. _slong_), _spinne_,
_springe_ (pt. s. _sprong_), _stinge_ (pt. s. _stong_), _stinke_, _swimme_,
_swinke_, _thringe_ (pt. s. _throng_), _winde_ (pt. s. _wond_, pp.
_wounden_), _winne_, _wringe_ (pt. s. _wrong_).

4. Infin. _beren_; Pt. s. _bar_ (also _ber_, _beer_); Pt. pl. _b[=e]ren_;
Pp. _boren_, _bore_, _born_. Confused in M.E. with conj. 5. So also:
_breken_ or _breke_, _shere_, _speke_, _stele_, _tere_ (cf. pt. s.
_to-tar_), _trede_, _wreke_. Here belongs pt. s. _nam_, pp. _nomen_, as if
from an infin. _nemen_, which became _nimen_. Also _come_, pt. s. _cam_
(also _coom_), pt. pl. _camen_ (also _c[=o]men_), pp. _comen_ (kum.[*e]n).

5. Infin. _yeven_, _yeve_, and frequently _yive_; Pt. s. _yaf_; Pt. pl.
_yaven_ (more correctly _y[=e]ven_); Pp. _yeven_, and frequently _yiven_.
Here belong _eten_ or _ete_ (pt. s. _eet_, pp. _eten_), _forgete_, _gete_,
_mete_, to mete, _steke_ (pt. s. _stak_), _weve_ (pt. s. _waf_, pp.
_woven_); also _bidde_, _sitte_ (pt. s. _sat_, _seet_, pt. pl. _s[=e]ten_),
_ligge_ or _lye_ (pt. s. _lay_, pt. pl. _layen_). Here belongs _quethen_,
to say, which only appears in the pt. s. _quoth_ or _quod_. Also _seen_, to
see, pp. _y-seyn_, _y-seye_, with various forms of the pt. s., as _seigh_,
_sey_, _say_, _sy_, _saugh_, _saw_. The verbs _speke_, _trede_, _wreke_,
have gone over to conj. 4; and the same might be said of _weve_.

6. Infin. _shaken_; Pt. t. _sh['o]['o]k_; Pt. pl. _shooken_; Pp. _shaken_,
_shake_.

So also: _awake_ (pt. s. also _awaked_), _bake_, _drawe_ (pt. s. _drow_),
_fare_, _forsake_, _gnawe_ (pt. s. _gnow_), _grave_, _laughe_ (pt. s.
_lough_), _shape_, _shave_, _stande_ (pt. s. _stood_, pp. _stonden_),
_stapen_ (pp. _stapen_ in MS. E., which is more correct than _stopen_ in
other MSS.), _take_, _wake_, _wasshe_ (pt. s. _wessh_, _wissh_), _waxe_
(pt. s. _wex_, pp. _woxen_ instead of _waxen_). Here also belong _heve_
(pt. s. _heef_, _haf_); _sleen_ or _slee_, slay (pt. s. _slow_, _slough_,
pp. _slawe_, _slayn_); _swere_ (pt. s. _swoor_, pp. _sworen_, _sworn_).
Also _quake_, originally a weak verb, of which Chaucer has the pt. s.
_qu['o]['o]k_. Conversely, the pt. s. of _fare_ is weak, viz. _ferde_.

7. Infin. _fallen_; Pt. s. _fel_ (also _fil_); Pt. pl. _fellen_ (also
_fillen_); Pp. _fallen_. This conjugation originally made the pt. t. by
duplication, and the root-vowel varies. But the vowel of the pp. agrees
with that of the infinitive, and the vowel of the pt. t. is the same in the
singular and plural. Here belong _biholde_, pt. s. _bih[=e]ld_; _holde_,
pt. s. _heeld_; _honge_, _hange_, pt. s. _heeng_, _heng_; _bete_, pt. s.
_beet_; _hewe_; _lete_, _late_, pt. s. _leet_, pp. _leten_, _laten_;
_slepe_, pt. s. _sleep_; _blowe_, pt. s. _blew_; _crowe_, pt. s. _crew_;
_growe_, pt. s. _grew_; _knowe_, pt. s. _knew_; _sowe_; _throwe_, pt. s.
_threw_; _lepe_ (laep[*e], l[`e][`e]p[*e]), pt. s. _leep_ (l['e]['e]p);
_wepe_ (w['e]['e]p[*e]), pt. s. _weep_ (w['e]['e]p).

Besides _holde_, _biholde_, we also find the curious infinitives _helde_,
_behelde_.

Here belongs _hote_, to command, promise, pt. s. _heet_, _hight_ (from A.S.
_h[=e]ht_), pp. _hoten_. Closely connected with this is the form _hatte_
(A.S. _h[=a]tte_, Gothic _haitada_), with the passive sense 'is named,' or
'is called'; variant forms being _hette_, _highte_, the latter due to some
confusion with the strong pt. s. _hight_, mentioned above. Hence _hatte_,
_hette_, _highte_ were also used with the past sense 'was named' or 'was
called.' In Chaucer's time these forms and senses were much confused, so
that we actually find _hight_ with the sense 'was named'; and conversely,
_highte_ with the sense 'promised.' And further, we find the pp. _hoten_
with the sense 'called,' and the pp. _hight_ with the sense 'promised.'
See, in the Glossary, _Hote_, _Bihote_, _Bihete_, _Bihighte_.

Here also belongs _goon_, _gon_, _go_, to go; pp. _goon_, _gon_. The pt. t.
is supplied by _wente_ or _yede_.

s. 91. FORMATION OF WEAK VERBS.

In the case of weak verbs, which include a large number of verbs of
Anglo-French origin, much depends upon the form and even upon the length of
the stem. The standard suffix for the pt. t. is _-de_, and for the pp.,
_-d_; but this necessarily becomes _-te_ (pp. _-t_) after a voiceless
consonant and in some other cases, especially after _l_ and _gh_. A third
variety of form is caused by the frequent occurrence of _-e-_ before the
final _-de_ or _-d_, due, usually, to the form of the infinitive mood; and,
in long words especially, the form _-ede_ is frequently reduced to _-ed_.
This short explanation applies, practically, to all weak verbs.

INFINITIVES IN _-ien_, _-ie_. The A.S. infin. in _-ian_ became _-ien_,
_-ie_ in M.E., and was frequently reduced to _-e_. Ex. A.S. _lufian_, later
_lovien_; in Chaucer only _loven_, _love_, though a trace of the _i_
remains in the derived word _lovyere_, A 80. These are the verbs which make
the pt. t. in _-e-de_, the _-e-_ being due to the formative suffix _-i-_,
which is actually preserved in the pp. _ber-i-ed_, _her-i-ed_[69]. Hence
Chaucer uses the pt. t. _dwell-ed_, short for _dwell-e-de_; but he also
uses the syncopated form _dwel-te_, where _d_ has become _t_ after _l_. We
can only understand these weak verbs by help of the etymology, so that it
is unnecessary to enlarge upon the subject.

A form such as _lovede_ was liable to syncope, which means, practically,
that the word was frequently pronounced (luv.d[*e]) or (luv.ed); it
mattered little which was chosen. Before a vowel, the final _-e_ could
suffer elision, which reduced the form to _lov'd'_ (luvd).

This explains the scansion of many lines. Thus, in A 1196, it does not
matter whether we say (luv.d[*e]) or (luv.ed); but in A 1197, 1198, the
only possible form is (luv.d).

s. 92. THREE CLASSES OF WEAK VERBS. We may distribute the weak verbs into
three classes; the types being, respectively, _loven_, _heren_, to hear,
and _tellen_.

1. Infin. _lov-en_, _lov-e_; pt. t. _lov-[:e]de_, _lov-[:e]d_, _lov-(e)de_;
pp. _lov[:e]d_, _lov(e)d_. The pt. t. pl. sometimes adds _-n_. Past tenses
in which the full form in _-ede_ occurs are not common, on account of the
tendency to shorten the word. We find _lakk-ede_, _wedd-ede_, _ned-ede_, in
full, and the plurals _lok-eden_, _knokk-eden_, _yell-eden_; and even
_aqueynt-eden_, from a word of French origin. _Liv-eden_ in D 1877 is
really _liv'den_. The second _e_ is dropped in _ax-ed_, _folw-ed_,
_lok-ed_, _long-ed_, &c. As an example of the convenience of a double form,
observe the pt. s. _espy-ed_ riming with the pp. _all-yed_, B 3718; and the
pt. pl. subj. _espy-de_ riming with _tyde_, L. 771.

Here belong _answere_, pt. t. _answer-de_; _make_, pt. t. _mak-ed_, _ma-de_
(for _mak-e-de_), an extreme example of syncope, pp. _mak-ed_, _maad_,
_m[=a]d_; _clepe_, pt. t. _clep-ed_, _clep-te_; _pley-en_, pt. t.
_pley-de_, &c. Also some in which the stem has suffered some alteration, as
_twicche_, pt. t. _twigh-te_; _picche_, pt. t. _pigh-te_; _prike_, pt. t.
_prigh-te_; _reve_, pt. t. _ref-te_, _raf-te_, pp. _raf-t_; _clothe_, pt.
t. _cladde_, _cledde_, pp. _cloth-ed_, _clad_, and even _cled_; _syke_, to
sigh, pt. s. _syk-ed_, _sigh-te_.

NOTE. The second person of the past tense takes the suffix _-st_, as in
_lovedest_, contrary to the habit of the strong verbs. An anomalous form
occurs in _thou made_, instead of _thou madest_.

2. Pt. t. _h[=e]r-en_, _h[=e]r-e,_ to hear; Pt. s. _h[)e]r-de_, Pp.
_h[)e]r-d_. The vowel is shortened in the pt. s. and pp. before the two
consonants. Here belong verbs ending in _-an_ in A.S., which almost
invariably exhibit a mutated vowel in the infinitive mood; cf. A.S.
_sendan_, Goth, _sandjan_.

Here belong: _blende_, pt. _blente_; _f[=e]de_, pt. _fedde_; _f[=e]le_, pt.
_felte_; _fille_, pt. _filde_; _gr[=e]te_, to greet, pt. _grette_; _hente_,
pt. _hente_; _hyde_, pt. _hidde_, pp. _hid_, Kentish _hed_; _kepe_, pt.
_kepte_; _kisse_, pt. _kiste_, Kentish _keste_; _lede_, pt. _ledde_,
_ladde_; _mene_, to mean, pt. _mente_, _m[=e]te_, to meet, pt. _mette_;
_rende_, pt. _rente_; _sende_, pt. _sende_, _sente_; _sette_, pt. _sette_;
_spr[=e]de_, pt. _spradde_; _swete_, pt. _swatte_; _wende_, to go, pt.
_wente_; _w[=e]ne_, to imagine, pt. _wende_. So also, _d[=e]men_, to deem,
_s[=e]men_, to seem, which should make the pt. tenses _demde_, _semde_;
but, as these forms seemed awkward, they became _demed_, _semed_.

So also _l[=e]ve_, to leave, pt. _lefte_, _lafte_; _kythe_, to make known,
pt. _kid-de_, pp. _kid_ or _kythed_.

The old combinations _enct_, _engd_, became M.E. _eynt_, _eynd_. Hence we
have _blenche_, pt. _bleynte_; _drenche_, pt. _dreynte_; _quenche_, pt.
_queynte_; also the pp. forms _y-meynd_, _seynd_, _y-spreynd_, as if from
the infin. _menge_, _senge_, _sprenge_.

3. Infin. _tell-en_, _tell-e_; Pt. s. _tol-de_; Pp. _tol-d_.

Here _tol-de_ is for an O. Mercian _tal-de_ (A.S. _teal-de_), from a stem
TAL. The infin. shews mutation. The chief key to verbs of this class is to
remember that the pt. t. depends upon the original form of the stem, whilst
the infin. exhibits mutation; i.e. the pt. t. stem is more original than
the present. An old _ct_ becomes _ht_ in A.S., and _ght_ in M.E.

Here belong: _leye_, also _leggen_, to lay, pt. _layde_, _leyde_; _recche_,
to reck, pt. _roghte_, _roughte_; _seye_, pt. _seide_, _saide_; _s[=e]ke_,
pt. _soghte_, _soughte_; _selle_, pt. _solde_; _strecche_, pt. _straughte_.
Also _bye_, Kentish _begge_ (in the comp. _abegge_), to buy, pt. _boghte_,
_boughte_; _werche_, to work, pt. _wroghte_, _wroughte_ (by metathesis for
_worghte_). In a few words a radical _n_ has disappeared before _h_ (M.E.
_gh_) in the past tense: as in _bringe_, pt. _broghte_, _broughte_;
_thinke_, to seem, pt. _thoughte_ (thuuht[*e]); _thenke_, to think, pt.
_thoghte_, _thoughte_ (thaoht[*e], th[`o]uht[*e]).

_R[=e]che_, to reach, _t[=e]che_, to teach, properly belong to conj. 2; but
their past tenses became _raughte_, _taughte_, so that they seem to belong
here.

The preceding examples give most of the more important weak verbs; others
can be found in the Glossary.

Verbs of French origin seldom take _-ede_ in the pt. t., as in the case of
_aqueyntede_; the usual suffix is _-ed_ or _-de_, or both; as _crye_, to
cry, pt. _cry-ed_, _cry-de_; _espye_, pt. _espy-ed_, _espy-de_.

The pp. results from the pt. t. by omitting final _-e_; if the pt. t. ends
in _-ed_, the pp. coincides with it.

NOTE. Some verbs have both strong and weak forms; thus _abreyde_ has the
str. pt. t. _abrayd_, and the weak pt. t. _abrayde_. More striking examples
occur in _cr[=e]pe_, to creep, pt. _creep_, _crepte_, pp. _cropen_;
_sl[=e]pe_, to sleep, pt. t. _sleep_ and _slepte_; _wepe_, to weep, pt. t.
_weep_ and _wepte_. _Drede_, _rede_, once strong verbs, are weak in
Chaucer; pt. t. _dredde_, _dradde_, _redde_, _radde_. _Cleve_, to cleave,
has the weak pt. t. _clefte_, and the strong pp. _cloven_. _Broided_ is a
curious substitution for _broiden_, the true pp. of _breyde_ (A.S.
_bregdan_). _Werien_, to wear, is a weak verb of the 1st class; hence the
true pt. t. is _werede_, _wered_, as in Chaucer. The mod. E. _wore_ is a
new formation.

s. 93. SOME OTHER VERBS. _Haven_, _have_, _han_, to have; pt. t. _hadde_,
also _hade_; pp. _had_. A weak verb; often used as auxiliary.

_Doon_, _don_, to do. Pres. indic. 1. _do_, 2. _doost_, 3. _dooth_ or
_doth_; pl. _doon_, _don_. Pres. subj. _do_; pl. _doon_, _don_. Imper.
_do_; pl. _dooth_, _doth_. Pp. _doon_, _don_. Pt. t. _dide_ (weak). Gerund,
_to done_.

_Goon_, _gon_, _go_, to go. Pres. indic. 1. _go_, 2. _goost_ or _g[=o]st_,
3. _gooth_ or _g[=o]th_, also _geeth_ and _gas_ (Northern); pl. _goon_,
_gon_, _go_. Imper. _go_; pl. _gooth_. Pp. _goon_, _gon_, _go_; also _geen_
(Northern). The pt. t. is supplied by _yede_ or _wente_.

_Wol_, I will. Pres. indic. 1. _wol_ (_wil_, also written _wole_); 2.
_wolt_, _wilt_; 3. _wol_ (also written _wole_), _wil_; pl. _wollen_,
_woln_, _wole_, _wol_. Pt. _wolde_. Pp. _wold_.

THE VERB SUBSTANTIVE. Infin. _been_, _ben_, _be_. Pres. indic. 1. _am_[70],
2. _art_, 3. _is_; pl. _been_, _ben_, _be_, _beth_, rarely _aren_, _are_.
Pres. subj. _be_; pl. _been_, _be_. Imp. _be_; pl. _beeth_, _beth_. Pp.
_been_, _ben_, _be_. Gerund, _to bene_. Pt. t. 1. _was_, 2. _were_, 3.
_was_; pl. _weren_, _were_, _wer_. Pt. t. subj.; _were_; pl. _weren_,
_were_.

ANOMALOUS VERBS (Praeterito-praesentia).

CAN. Pres. indic. 1. _can_, 2. _canst_, 3. _can_; pl. _connen_, _conne_,
sometimes _can_. Pres. subj. _conne_; pl. _connen_, _conne_. Infin.
_conne_. Pt. t. _coude_, _couthe_, could, knew. Pp. _coud_, _couth_.

DAR. Pres. indic. 1. _dar_, 2. _darst_, 3. _dar_; pl. _dar_. Pt. t.
_dorste_, _durste_. Gerund, _to durre_.

MAY. Pres. indic. 1. _may_, 2. _mayst_, 3. _may_; pl. _mowen_, _mowe_.
Pres. subj. _mowe_, _mow_. Pt. t. _mighte_. Infin. _mowen_.

MOOT. Pres. indic. 1. _moot_ (_m[=o]t_), 2. _most_, 3. _moot_ (_m[=o]t_);
pl. _moten_, _mote_. Pres. subj. _mote_ (but often written _moot_ or
_mot_). Pt. t. _moste_.

OW. Pres. indic. 1. _ow_ (?), 2. _owest_, 3. _oweth_; pl. _owen_. Pt. t.
_oghte_, _oughte_.

SHAL. Pres. indic. 1. _shal_, 2. _shalt_, 3. _shal_; pl. _shullen_,
_shuln_, _shul_ (or _shal_). Pt. t. _sholde_, _shulde_.

THAR. Pres. indic. _thar_, impersonal. Pt. t. _thurfte_, _hurte_,
impersonal.

WOOT. Pres. indic. 1. _w[`o][`o]t_ (_wot_), 2. _w[`o][`o]st_ (_wost_), 3.
_w[`o][`o]t_ (_wot_); pl. _witen_, _wite_, also _woot_ (incorrectly). Pres.
subj. _wite_. Infin. _witen_, _wite_; also _weten_. Pt. t. _wiste_. Pp.
_wist_.

s. 94. NEGATIVE FORMS. _Ne_, not, is prefixed to some verbal forms, and
coalesces with them.

Ex. _nam_, for _ne am_; _nart_, for _ne art_; _nis_, for _ne is_; _nas_,
for _ne was_; _nere_, for _ne were_. _Nadde_, ne hadde; _nadstow_, ne
haddest thou; _nath_, ne hath. _Nil_, ne wil; _niltow_, ne wilt thou;
_nolde_, ne wolde. _Noot_, ne woot; _niste_, ne wiste. We even find
_nacheveth_ written for _ne acheveth_; &c. Cf. _nof_, for _ne of_; _nin_
for _ne in_.

s. 95. ADVERBS.

Some adverbs are formed by adding _-e_ to the adjectival form; as
_d[=e]p-e_, deeply, from _deep_, A 129; _loud-e_, loudly, from _loud_, A
714. Hence, beside the usual forms _heer_, here, _ther_, there, _wher_,
where, _eek_, eke, we find the anomalous forms _her-e_, _ther-e_, _wher-e_,
_ek-e_; which we should hardly expect. So also _moste_, E 1714, F 1622, as
well as _most_; probably because the word _the_ precedes, which suggested
the definite adjectival form, though the word is really used adverbially.
Other double forms are _thanne_, _than_, then; _whanne_, _whan_, when.
Amongst other forms in _-e_ may be mentioned: _asyde_, _atwinne_,
_bihinde_, _bisyde_, _bothe_, _nouthe_, _ofte_, _selde_, _sone_. Remarkable
forms are _ther-fore_, _wher-fore_ (see Stratmann). Some forms result from
loss of _n_, as _aboute_ from _abouten_; so also _above_, _bifore_ (also
_biforn_), _henne_, _inne_, _withoute_; cf. _binethen_, _sithen_.

Many adverbs are characterised by the suffix _-es_; as _agates_, _amiddes_,
_amonges_, _bisydes_, _bitymes_, _elles_, _nedes_, _togidres_, _unnethes_.
So also _hennes_, _thennes_, _whennes_; _ones_, _twyes_, _thryes_. The gen.
suffix _-es_ appears clearly in _his thankes_, A 1626.

Some adverbs have an internal _-e-_, which is not found in A.S., as in
_bold-e-ly_, A.S. _bealdl[=i]ce_; and this _-e-_ counts as a syllable. So
also _nedely_, D 968 (but _n[=e]d(e)l['y]_ in B 4434); _softely_, E 323;
_trewely_, A 773. So also _semely_, _rudeliche_.

Other noteworthy adverbs are: _bet_, better; _fer_, far, comparative
_ferre_; _negh_, nigh, _neer_, _ner_, nearer; _leng_, _lenger_, longer;
_mo_, more; _more_, more; _uppe_, up.

s. 96. PREPOSITIONS AND CONJUNCTIONS.

These are given in the Glossary. We may note the occasional use of the form
_til_ (usually Northern) for _to_, chiefly before a vowel. Also the use of
_ne ... ne_ for neither ... nor; _other ... other_, either ... or; _what
... what_, partly ... partly; _what for ... and_, both for ... and; _what
with ... and_, both by ... and.

s. 97. CONSTRUCTIONS. Amongst unusual constructions we may particularly
note the position of _with_, when used adverbially. In such a case, it is
immediately subjoined to the verb, instead of being separated from it as in
mod. E. Ex. 'to _shorte with_ your weye,' to shorten your way with, A 791;
'to helen with this hauk,' to heal this hawk with, F 641.

Another remarkable construction is seen in such a phrase as 'The kinges
meting Pharao,' the dream of king Pharaoh; see note to F 209.

At the beginning of a sentence _ther_ frequently means 'where'; it makes
all the difference to the sense.

s. 98. VERSIFICATION.

The structure of English versification has been much obscured by the use of
classical terms in senses for which they are ill-adapted, and by artificial
and wooden systems of prosody which obscure the natural pronunciation of
sentences. In order to prevent all obscurity, the terms employed shall be
carefully defined.

STRONG AND WEAK SYLLABLES. An accented syllable is _strong_, An unaccented
syllable is _weak_. A syllable that bears a secondary or a slight emphasis
is _half-strong_. A very weak or slightly pronounced syllable is _light_.

Examples. In the words _light_, _alight_, _lighter_, the syllable _light_
is, in each case, 'strong'; the syllables _a-_ and _-er_ are 'weak.'
Chaucer sometimes uses such a word as _light-e_, in which the final _-e_
may constitute a syllable of the verse, in which case it is 'weak'; or it
may be elided or nearly elided before a vowel, in which case it may
conveniently be described as being 'light.' In such a word as
_c['o]nquer[`o]r_, there are really two accents. The true 'strong' accent
is now on the first syllable; the 'half-strong' or secondary accent is on
the third syllable; and it is not unusual to denote this by the use of an
acute accent for the strong, and grave accent for the half-strong syllable.

s. 99. THREE LATIN TERMS. A word such as _alight_ is often described as
constituting an 'iambus' or 'iamb'; and I shall sometimes here use this
term, but under protest. An iambus is properly a short syllable followed by
a long one; whereas the English iamb is a weak syllable followed by a
strong one, which is a very different thing. The confusion between _length_
in Latin verses and _strength_ in English verses is pernicious, and has
greatly misled many writers on metre; for the difference between them is
fundamental.

In the same way, such a word as _lighter_ may be called a 'trochee'; but it
must never be forgotten that, in English poetry, it means a strong syllable
followed by a weak one, and is independent of the notion of 'length.'

Similarly, such a word as _alighted_, in which a strong syllable is
situated between two weak ones, may be called an 'amphibrach.' The
amphibrach plays a highly important part in English verse, though it is
usual not to mention it at all. I shall use these three terms, _iamb_,
_trochee_, and _amphibrach_, only occasionally, and for the convenience of
the names; it being now well understood that I merely mean such groups of
strong and weak syllables as occur in the English words _alight_,
_lighter_, and _alighted_.

Having thus explained that an 'iamb' has nothing to do with long and short
syllables, I shall nevertheless use, to denote it, the ordinary symbol v -.
Similarly, the symbol - v means a trochee; and the symbol v - v means an
amphibrach. It follows that v here means, not a _short_, but a _weak_
syllable; and - here means, not a _long_, but a _strong_ one. If this be
remembered, all will be clear; but not otherwise.

s. 100. I shall attempt, first, to describe the versification of the lines
in the Canterbury Tales; it will be easy to explain the shorter lines (of
four accents) afterwards.

SPEECH-WAVES. In English, accent plays a very important part; and for this
reason, we may consider English speech as consisting of a succession of
utterances which form, as it were, speech-waves, in which each wave or jet
of breath contains a strong syllable; and this strong syllable may either
stand alone, or may be preceded or followed by a weak syllable, or may even
be both preceded and followed by a weak syllable during the emission of the
same jet of breath[71].

Thus each jet of breath, due to a slight impulse emitting inhaled air, may
be denoted by -, or by v -, or by - v, or by v - v. That is, the words
_light_, _alight_, _lighted_, _alighted_ can all be produced in a single
speech-wave. But if a word has _two_ accents, it requires two impulses to
utter it, and really contains two speech-waves. Such words are extremely
common; as _c['o]nque-r[`o]r_, _am['a]l-gam[`a]te_, &c.; and many English
words require _three_ speech-waves, as _ins[`o]l-ub['i]li-t[`y]_; or even
_four_, as _[`i]n-comb[`u]sti-b['i]li-t[`y]_.

s. 101. Here comes in the distinction between prose and verse. It is
equally easy to describe the accentual structure of either; and it is
readily perceived that, in prose, the speech-waves succeed each other so
that there is, usually, no perceptible regularity in the distribution of
strong and weak syllables; but, in verse, we expect them to be distributed
in a manner sufficiently regular for the ear to recognise some law of
recurrence, and to expect it.

An extremely regular line occurs in Goldsmith's Deserted Village:--

  And-f['o]ols, who-c['a]me to-sc['o]ff, rem['a]ined to-pr['a]y.

This obviously consists of five consecutive iambs, and may be denoted by: v
- . v - . v - . v - . v -. Here the dot (.) is introduced to shew precisely
where the natural pause in the voice, or the separation of the
speech-waves, occurs.

It is usual, in books of prosody, to introduce a bar instead of a dot, and
thus to break up the line into bits of equal length, and to exhibit the
result as the Procrustean formula to which all lines of five accents should
be reduced. There is little to be learnt from this wooden method, which
amounts to little more than leaving the reader to find out the scansion for
himself as he best may; for few lines really conform to it.

If, bidding adieu to this artificial system, we inquire into the way in
which a good reader really articulates the lines, we find that he,
following the poet, is so far from conforming to this uniform type of line,
that he usually does his best to avoid it; and the more skilfully he does
this, the more he is appreciated for his variety. Indeed, the number of
possible variations is considerable, as Goldsmith may again teach us, if,
instead of using a bar to denote the _artificial_ pause, we use a dot to
denote the _natural_ and the _actual_ one. Good examples occur in the
following lines, all different in their effect. Observe that the hyphen is
used to bring together words that are pronounced in a single speech-wave;
for just as _c['o]nque.r['o]r_ requires _two_ jets of breath, it often
happens that two words (one of them enclitic) can be uttered in _one_.

  How-['o]ften . h['a]ve-I . pa['u]s'd . on-['e]v'ry . ch['a]rm,
  The-sh['e]lter'd . cot . the-c['u]lti.v[`a]ted . f['a]rm,
  The-n['e]ver . fa['i]ling . br['o]ok . the-b['u]sy . m['i]ll.

These may be analysed as below.

  v - v . - v . - . v - v . -
  v - v . - . v - v . - v . -
  v - v . - v . - . v - v . -

These three lines are obviously different, and all differ from the line
already quoted.

If, however, we now remove the dots, all four lines can be included in the
same formula: v - v - v - v - v -. And this is what is really meant (or
ought to be meant) by saying that Goldsmith's line consists of five iambic
feet; the general type v - being called an iambic foot.

s. 102. As the use of dots, as above, is rather confusing, we might employ
the usual bars instead; assigning to them natural instead of artificial
positions. But it will be better, under the circumstances, to employ
special types. I shall use ¯¯ to denote a strong syllable, and ¯ to denote
a half-strong syllable. Then, if the weak syllable be denoted by a thin
up-stroke or down-stroke, we have |¯ to denote an iamb; ¯| for a trochee;
and |¯| for an amphibrach; and the four lines from Goldsmith may be thus
scanned[72]:--

  And-fools, who-came to-scoff, remained to-pray. |¯ |¯ |¯ |¯ |¯
  How-often have-I paused on-every charm,         |¯| ¯| ¯¯ |¯| ¯¯
  The-sheltered cot, the culti.vated farm,        |¯| ¯¯ |¯| ¯| ¯¯
  The never . failing brook, the-busy mill.       |¯| ¯| ¯¯ |¯| ¯¯

In every case an upstroke is followed by a horizontal one, i.e. a weak
syllable by a strong one, but the general effect is variable, and is easily
caught by the eye. This method at once detects a real recurrence of a line
cast in precisely the same mould. Thus the line--'For-talking age
and-whispering lovers made' is to be scanned: |¯| ¯¯ |¯| ¯| ¯¯ and thus
closely resembles the _third_ of the above lines, being denoted by the same
formula.

s. 103. When we come to apply a similar system of scansion to Chaucer, we
find that he differs from Goldsmith in FOUR important particulars. This is
because he followed, more immediately, the rules of verse as exhibited in
the Old French metres. I quote the following from P. Toynbee's Specimens of
Old French, p. liii:--

'In ten-syllabled lines [i.e. in lines of five accents] the pause or
caesura is after the fourth syllable:--

  Mors est Rollanz, | Deus en ad Panme es cielz.

At the caesura, and also at the end of the line, a feminine syllable [i.e.
a weak or light additional syllable] is admissible, which does not count,
even if it is not elided. It is thus possible to have no less than four
different forms of ten-syllabled epic lines, all equally correct; viz.

  (_a_) Plurent lur filz | lur frer[:e]s, lur nevulz.

  (_b_) Encuntre ter_re_ | se pasment li plusur.

  (_c_) A lur chevals | unt toleit[:e]s les sel_[:e]s_.

  (_d_) Cons fut de Ro_m[:e]_ | del mielz qui donc i er_[:e]t_.'

Here, in (_b_) and (_d_), there is an _additional_ syllable at the caesura
or _middle pause_; and, in (_c_) and (_d_) there is an additional syllable
at the end of the line. Hence the number of syllables is, in (_a_), _ten_;
in (_b_) and (_c_), _eleven_; and in (_d_) _twelve_. But the number of
accents is the same in all, viz. _five_. It is therefore better to speak of
these lines as containing _five accents_ than to call them _ten-syllabled_
lines.

All the above varieties are found in Chaucer; and we thus see TWO of the
particulars in which he differs from Goldsmith, viz. (1) that he sometimes
introduces an additional syllable at the end of the line; and (2) that he
does the same after the caesura, or at what may (roughly) be called the end
of the half-line.

s. 104. But the fact is that Old French verse admits of more licences than
the above. It was also permissible for the poet (besides _adding_ to the
line at the _end_) to _subtract_ from it at the _beginning_, viz. by
omitting the first weak syllable at the beginning, or the first weak
syllable in the second half-line; i.e. after the caesura. This accounts for
TWO MORE particulars of variation from the modern line of Goldsmith.

The result is that the Old French verse absolutely exhibited no less than
sixteen varieties; and the actual number of syllables varied from eight
(the least) to twelve (the greatest number). Dr. Schipper gives the true
scheme in his Englische Metrik, p. 440, as follows; where the number
_following_ each scheme expresses the number of syllables.

   I. Chief forms.

   1.  v - v -  |  v - v - v -          10.
   2.  v - v - v  |  v - v - v -      11.
   3.  v - v -  |  v - v - v - v      11.
   4.  v - v - v  |  v - v - v - v  12.

  II. Without the first syllable.

   5.  - v -  |  v - v - v -           9.
   6.  - v - v  |  v - v - v -      10.
   7.  - v -  |  v - v - v - v      10.
   8.  - v - v  |  v - v - v - v  11.

   III. Syllable dropped after the caesura.

   9.  v - v -  |  - v - v -           9.
  10.  v - v - v  |  - v - v -      10.
  11.  v - v -  |  - v - v - v      10.
  12.  v - v - v  |  - v - v - v  11.

   IV. Two syllables dropped.

  13.  - v -  |  - v - v -               8.
  14.  - v - v  |  - v - v -           9.
  15.  - v -  |  - v - v - v           9.
  16.  - v - v  |  - v - v - v      10.

s. 105. Thus Chaucer had, unquestionably, sixteen forms of verse to choose
from. It only remains to discover how many of these he actually employed.

The shortest answer is, that he freely accepted the principles of adding a
syllable at the end of the line and at the end of the half-line. He also
allowed himself to accept the principle of dropping the first syllable of
the line[73]. But he disliked forms 9, 11, 13, and 15, which introduce a
most disagreeable jerk into the middle of the line, such as he very rarely
allows[74].

s. 106. The general rules for the mode of reading Chaucer's lines have been
given above (s. 67); and need not be here repeated.

I now subjoin some examples. In each case the prefixed number refers to one
of the sixteen forms given in s. 104; whilst the symbols following the
lines give the natural method of scansion. Words joined by hyphens are
pronounced in the same jet of breath. I may also note here that a trochee
is sometimes substituted for an iamb, i.e. ¯| for |¯; especially at the
beginning of a line, or of the latter half-line. The place of the caesura
is denoted by a bar. A shorter down-stroke than usual signifies a _light_
syllable, as defined in s. 98. The following examples are from Group A of
the Canterbury Tales:--

  12. Wh['a]n-that Apr['i]ll[:e] | with his-sh['o]ures s['o]te (1).
        ¯| |¯| . ¯ |¯| ¯|
   4. The-dr['o]ght' of-M['a]rch[:e] | hath-p['e]rced t['o] the-r['o]te.
        |¯ |¯' . |¯| ¯ |¯|
   1. Of-wh['i]ch vert['u] | eng['e]ndred ['i]s the-fl['o]ur (4).
        |¯ |¯ . |¯| ¯ |¯
   3. Hath-['i]n the-R['a]m | his-h['a]lfe c['o]urs y-r['o]nne (8).
        |¯ |¯ . |¯| ¯¯ |¯|
  10. That-fr['o] the-t['y]me | th['a]t he-f['i]rst big['a]n (44).
        |¯ |¯| . ¯ |¯ |¯
   2. Whan-th['e]y were-w['o]nne | and-['i]n the-Gr['e]te S['e]e.
        |¯ |¯ . |¯ |¯| ¯¯
  14. ['A]l bism['o]t'red | w['i]th his-h['a]ber. ge['o]un (76).
        ¯¯ |¯| . ¯ |¯| ¯¯
   6. Th['a]t no-dr['o]pe | ne-f['i]ll' up['o]n hir-br['e]st (131).
        ¯ |¯' . |¯ |¯ |¯
   7. G['i]nglen ['i]n | a-wh['i]stling w['i]nd as-cl['e]re[75] (170).
        ¯| ¯ . |¯| ¯¯ |¯|
  16. F['o]r to-d['e]len | w['i]th no-sw['i]ch por['a]ille (247).
        ¯¯ |¯| . ¯ |¯ |¯|
   5. N['o][:e]s fl['o]od | com'-w['a]lwing ['a]s the-s['e]e (3616).
        ¯| ¯¯ . |¯| ¯ |¯

We have here examples of many of the above forms, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
10, 12, 14, 16; sufficient to shew Chaucer's general conformity with his
French models.

s. 107. But a very superficial examination of Chaucer's verse soon shews
that he continually sets aside the rigid rule of the Old French prosody
that regulated the position of the medial pause. His study of Italian soon
shewed him a better way; for there is a great tendency to monotony in the
French mode. Dante frequently includes _three_ accents in the former part
of his line, which gives much greater freedom to the verse. Thus l. 14 of
the Divina Commedia is as follows:--

  L[`a]-ove terminava | quella valle.   |¯| ¯| ¯| . ¯| ¯|

Consequently, we must allow the bar denoting the caesura to shift its
position to a later place in the line, as in A 3; though we may still use
Dr. Schipper's number, as above, to denote the general type of the line.
That is, A 3 becomes:--

  Cf. 2. And-b['a]thed ['e]v'ry v['e]yn[:e] | in-sw['i]ch lic['o]ur.
        |¯| ¯| ¯| . |¯ |¯

But this is not the only variety; for the mark denoting the caesura is
actually inserted in the Ellesmere MS. with much care, and is seldom
misplaced. This shews that some lines are divided much more unequally; so
that, in fact, the former portion of the line may contain _one_ accent
only, or it may contain _four_; in addition to the above instances in which
it contains _two_ or _three_. I give examples from the Cant. Tales, Group
A:--

  12. And-sh['o]rtly | wh['a]n the-s['o]nne w['a]s to-r['e]ste (30).
        |¯ . ¯¯ |¯| ¯¯ |¯|
  10. And-['a]fter | ['a]mor u['i]ncit ['o]mni.['a] (162).
        |¯| . ¯| ¯| ¯| ¯¯
   3. And th['u]s | with-f['e]yned fl['a]te.r['y]' and-j['a]pes (705).
        |¯ . |¯| ¯| ¯¯ |¯|
   3. Arc['i]t' is-h['u]rt as-m['u]ch' as-h['e] | or-m['o]re (1116).
        |¯ |¯ |¯ |¯ . |¯|

In some places the Ellesmere MS. marks _two_ pauses in a line, but we need
only consider one of them as constituting the true caesura. Thus, in A 923,
there is a mark after _been_ and another after _duchesse_; the latter may
be considered as subsidiary.

The occurrence of initial portions of a line containing _one_ accent or
_four_ is comparatively rare; but the inclusion of _three_ accents is very
common.

s. 108. The addition of a weak syllable at the end of a line is easily
explained. It is because, at this point, the poet is FREE; that is, the
pause that naturally occurs there enables him to insert an additional
syllable with ease. Shakespeare did not hesitate even to add _two_
syllables there, if he was so minded; as in Rich. III. iii. 6.
9:--'Untainted, unexamin'd, free, at liberty.'

For a like reason, the medial pause likewise gives him freedom, and enables
an additional syllable to be inserted with comparative ease. We may believe
that, in old times, when poetry was recited by minstrels to large
assemblies, the enunciation of it was slow and deliberate, and the pauses
were longer than when we now read it to a friend or to ourselves. The
importance attached to suffixes denoting inflexions tends to prove this.
The minstrel's first business was to be understood. Many speakers speak too
fast, and make too short pauses, till experience teaches them better.

Hence there is _no need_ to elide a vowel at the caesura; it must therefore
be sounded clearly. In A 2, the final _-e_ in _March-e_ should be fully
pronounced.

The fact is made much clearer by observing such instances as the following,
all from the Cant. Tales, Group B:--

  Or-['e]lles c['e]rt[:e]s | ye b['e]en to d['a]un.ger[`o]us (2129).
        |¯| ¯| . |¯ |¯ |¯
  Which-th['a]t my-f['a]der | in-h['i]s prosp['e]r.it['e]e (3385).
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯ |¯
  That-g['o]d of-h['e]ven | had d['o]m.in['a].ci['o]un (3409).
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯ |¯
  To-M['e]des [`a]nd to-P['e]rses y['e]ven | quod-h['e] (3425).
        |¯| ¯ |¯| ¯| . |¯
  O['u]t-of his-d['o]r[:e]s | an['o]n he-h['a]th him-d['i]ght (3719).
        ¯| |¯| . |¯ |¯ |¯

In the same way, the inflexional final _-e_ should be fully sounded in
Group B, l. 102:--

  If-th['o]u noon-['a]sk[:e] | with-n['e]d' art['o]w so-w['o]unded.
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯ |¯|

So also in B 1178:--

  N['a]y-by my-f['a]der s['o]ul[:e] | that-sh['a]l he-n['a]t.
        ¯| |¯| ¯| . |¯ |¯

Similar examples abound. Thus we should fully pronounce _length-e_, B 8;
_declar-e_, B 1672; _loud-e_, B 1803; _thought-e_, B 1852; _fynd-e_, B
3112; _raft-e_, B 3288; _hadd-e_, B 3309; _biraft-e_, B 3404; _son-e_, B
3413; _son-e_, B 3593; _shet-te_, B 3615; _wend-e_, B 3637.

Notice some examples where the caesura necessarily preserves a final _-e_
from elision, as in B 3989; where _tal-e_ occurs before _al_. So also
_ensamp-le_ in B 3281. Similar instances are rather numerous.

s. 109. The student who has followed the explanation of Chaucer's scansion
up to this point is now in a position to understand the whole mystery of
additional syllables in other positions. According to the usual method of
cutting up lines into 'feet,' such additional syllables make the line seem
awkward; whereas, if properly handled, they are very acceptable.

Thus the line B 3385 used to be cut up after the following fashion--Which
that | my fa | der in his | prosper | itee; and the third foot was called
trisyllabic. Yet the truth is, that the syllable _-der_ in _fader_ really
belongs to the former part of the line (for we cannot pause after _fa-_),
and therefore belongs to the 'second foot'; and it would have been better
to cut up the line accordingly. But the whole system of chopping up into
imaginary equal lengths is inefficient and clumsy; and we have only to
adopt a natural accentuation. Thus, in B 3368 (just below), the final _-y_
in _many_ causes no real difficulty, though it adds a syllable to the
line:--

  And-y['a]f him-w['i]t | and-th['a]n with-m['a]ny a-t['e]re.
        |¯ |¯ . |¯ |¯' |¯|

So again, in B 3105, the final _-es_ in _ell-es_ is easily sounded:--

  Or-['e]ll[:e]s I-['a]m but-l['o]st | but-['i]f that-I.
        |¯' |¯ |¯ . |¯ |¯

Compare Sir Thopas, B 2097:--

  And-th['e]r-in st['i]ked | a-l['i]ly fl['o]ur.
        |¯| ¯| . |¯| ¯¯

The poet's chief business, in such a case, is to see to it, that the
syllable thus inserted shall be a light one, in order to prevent the line
from becoming clogged. Chaucer is very particular about this; and we shall
find that he almost invariably employs, in such a position, such light
syllables as these; viz. _-e_ before a consonant, and _-ed_, _-el_, _-en_,
_-er_, _-es_, often before a vowel. This is a matter which requires a good
ear and skilful care; which he certainly possessed. Even at the caesura, it
will be found that he usually inserts only light syllables of this
character, and the effect is extremely good. A beautiful example occurs in
A 2144:--

  As-['a]ny r['a]v'nes f['e]ther | it-sh['o]on for-bl['a]k.
        |¯| ¯| ¯' . |¯ |¯

We may also compare B 1659:--

  Thou-r['a]vi.sed[`e]st | doun-fr['o] the-d['e].it['e]e.
        |¯' |¯ . |¯ |¯ |¯

Also D 334:--

  A-m['a]n to-l['i]ght' his-c['a]ndle | at-h['i]s lant['e]rne.
        |¯ |¯ |¯' . |¯ |¯|

s. 110. We have now to consider the possibility, that Chaucer sometimes
dropped the initial syllable of the _latter_ part of a line, after the
caesura; a licence of which Lydgate availed himself to a painful extent. It
is clear that his ear disliked it; yet there seem to be just a few cases
that cannot fairly be explained away, the MSS. being sadly unanimous. It is
better to learn the truth than to suppress what we should ourselves
dislike. One example occurs in E 1682:--

  My-t['a]l is-d['o]on | f['o]r my-w['i]t is-th['i]nne
        |¯ |¯ . ¯ |¯ |¯|

The two worst MSS. alter _doon_ to _don-e_, which is impossible. The rest
agree.

Another occurs in B 2141:--

  I-m['e]n' of-M['a]rk | M['a]thew, L['u]k, and-I['o]hn.
        |¯ |¯ . ¯| ¯¯ |¯

Four MSS. have a tag after the _k_ in _Mark_; hence I have printed
_Mark-e_. But I fear it can hardly be justified.

Lines B 3384, 3535 are unsatisfactory. Line E 2240, which is obviously
incomplete, is easily mended.

s. 111. ACCENTUATION. The above sections explain most of the more difficult
points in the scansion of Chaucer, and should enable the student to scan
most of the lines. But it is necessary to add a few words as regards his
system of accentuation, elision, contraction, and other noteworthy points.

ACCENT. Most words of native origin are to be accented as in modern
English; as _f['a]der_, _wr['y]ting_, _h['o]lier_, _pl['o]wman_,
_['u]pright_, _ar['y]sen_, _alm['i]ghty_, _mish['a]p_. In words like
_s['e]emli[`e]ste_, _o['u]tryd[`e]re_, the secondary accent was stronger
than at present, especially when the final _-e_ was sounded.

But many compound words, and some others, have a variable accent, being
also used with an accent on a later syllable than in modern English; as,
_answ['e]re_, _forh['e]ed_, _upr['i]ght_, _manh['o]od_, _wind['o]we_,
_gladn['e]sse_, _godd['e]sse_, _wryt['i]ng_, _bod['y]_. This usage is
frequent, and must always be borne in mind.

Words of French origin commonly have their accent on a later syllable than
at present; as _vict['o]rie_, _hon['o]ur_, _pit['e]e_, _vert['u]_,
_mir['a]cle_, _nat['u]re_, _man['e]re_, _contr['a]rie_, _[`i]mposs['i]ble_,
_[`a]ccept['a]ble_, _d[`e]ceyv['a]ble_; and even _adv['o]cat_,
_d[`e]sir['o]us_. Such accents are usually due to the etymology; cf. Lat.
_uert['u]tem_, _nat['u]ra_.

But as the English method inclined towards throwing the accent further
back, such words were peculiarly liable to receive an English accent; hence
we also find _h['o]nour_, _p['i]tee_, _v['e]rtu_, _n['a]ture_, _m['a]nere_;
and, in general, the English habit has so prevailed in modern speech, that
the original accentuation of these words has been lost. It must evidently
be restored, for the purpose of reading Chaucer aright.

This change of accent even affected the number of syllables. Thus
_man['e]r[:e]_ is trisyllabic, but _m['a]nere_ is dissyllabic. In the
latter case the scribes frequently write _maner_; but are not consistent in
this. Hence the fact has to be remembered.

Words now ending in _-ion_ end, in Chaucer, in _-i-[`o]un_, which is
dissyllabic, with a secondary accent on _-oun_. Cases in which the suffix
_-ioun_ is melted, as it were, into one syllable, are very rare; however,
we find _cond['i]cion_ for _condici-oun_ in B 99; and _religioun_ in G 427
is really _rel['i]gion_. As this agrees with the modern method, it is
readily understood.

s. 112. ELISION. The general rules for elision and the slurring of light
syllables are given above, in s. 67. For examples of elision of final _-e_,
see _droght'_, A 2; _couth'_, A 14; _nyn'_, A 24; _['a]ventur'_, A 25;
_tym'_, A 35; _Alisaundr'_, A 51; _Gernad'_, A 56; _n['o]bl'_, A 60;
_mek'_, A 69; _lat'_, A 77; _whyt'_, A 90; _long'_, A 93; _sitt'_, A 94;
_Iust'_, A 96; _purtr['e]y'_, A 96; _coud'_, A 106[76].

We must here particularly note the article _the_, which is very often
elided before a word beginning with a vowel or mute _h_. Hence the scribes
frequently write _theffect_ for _the effect_, _tharray_, _thonour_ for _the
hon['o]ur_, and so on. Even if they write _the effect_ as two words, we
must often read them as one. In one case, we even find _the_ thus treated
before an aspirated _h_, as in _th'harneys_, A 2896; however, _harneys_ is,
after all, of French origin.

Much more curious is the similar treatment of the pronoun _thee_; as in
_thalighte_ for _thee alighte_, B 1660. Also, of the pronoun _me_; as in
_d['o] m'endyte_, G 32; see _M'_ in the Glossary, p. 157.

_Ne_ is usually elided; cf. _nis_, _nam_, _nat_, _nin_, _nof_, &c., in the
Glossary; but not in A 631, 3110.

Even unaccented _o_ can be elided; in fact, it is very common in the case
of the word _to_; so that the scribes often write _tabyde_ for _to abyde_,
and the like. This vowel is easily run on to another, as in Italian poetry,
without counting as a syllable; as in _So est['a]tly_[77], A 281; cf.
_Plac['e]bo answ['e]rde_, E 1520.

s. 113. The vowel _i_ blends so easily with a following vowel that we feel
no surprise at finding _f['u]rial_ used, practically, as a dissyllable (F
448); _mer['i]dion[`a]l_ treated as if it had but four syllables (F 263);
and _sp['e]ciall[`y]_ as if it had but three (A 15). A similar slurring is
easily perceived with regard to the _o_ in _['a]morousl[`y]_ (E 1680) and
the _u_ in _n['a]turell[`y]_ (B 298). The reader of English poetry must be
quite familiar with similar usages. _V['a]l-er-y['a]n_, instead of
_Val['e]rian_, in G 350, is a little forced. In many cases of difficulty,
the accent is marked in the Glossary.

s. 114. SUPPRESSION OF SYLLABLES. We find, not only in Chaucer, but
elsewhere, that _light_ or _very weak_ syllables do not always count for
the scansion; so that, whilst, on the one hand, we can read
_C['a]unterb[`u]ry_ as four syllables, with a secondary accent on _u_ (as
in A 27), there is no difficulty in pronouncing it, as many do, as if it
were _C['a]unterb'r[`y]_, with the secondary accent on the _y_ (as in A 16,
A 22)[78]. It seems hardly necessary to enlarge upon this part of the
subject; it is sufficient to say that mere counting of syllables will not
explain the scansion of English poetry. Accent reigns supreme, and the
strong syllables overpower the weak ones, even to the extent of suppressing
them altogether.

A few common words may be noted, in which the final _-e_ is usually
suppressed, and often not written. Such are _hire_, _here_, her; _oure_,
_youre_, _myne_, _thyne_; _swiche_, _whiche_, _eche_; _were_; _here_,
_there_; _have_, _hadde_; _wolde_, _sholde_ (less frequently); and some
others. Even here accent still plays its part. If _here_, her, is emphatic,
as at the end of a line, it is dissyllabic; see _Here_ in the Glossary. If
_hadde_ is emphatic, meaning 'he possessed,' it is usually dissyllabic; we
even find _had-d[:e] he_ (A 298, 386).

_Thise_ (dhiiz) is written as the pl. of _this_; but is always
monosyllabic. Similarly, the Ellesmere MS. usually has _hise_ (hiiz) as the
plural of the possessive pronoun _his_; but I have altered this to _his_,
except in the prose pieces. The pl. of _som_ is written _some_ and _somme_,
but is usually monosyllabic (sum).

A good example of the power of accent is in the phrase _At th['a]t tym'_, A
102; where _tym[:e]_ becomes enclitic, and loses its accent and its final
_-e_.

In the endings _-ed_, _-el_, _-en_, _-er_, _-es_, as has been already
noted, the _e_ may be suppressed, when the final _-l_, _-n_, _-r_
practically become vocalic.

But observe, that the _e_ is also dropped, not unfrequently, even in
_-est_, _-eth_; hence _seyst_ for _seyest_, and the like. This requires
care, because the final _-eth_ is usually written _in full_, though seldom
sounded. In A 1641, _her-eth_ is dissyllabic, and so also is _brek-eth_ in
1642; but in 1643, we have _think'th_ for _thinketh_, and _com'th_ for
_cometh_. This is the more remarkable, because it is contrary to modern
usage; but note the old habit of contracting the _third person singular_;
as in _rit_ for _rydeth_.

Note the dissyllabic _b['a]nish'd_ in A 1725, with the accent on the first
syllable; as contrasted with the trisyllabic _des['e]rv-ed_ in A 1726, with
the accent on the second.

s. 115. CONTRACTION. Certain contractions need special notice. _This is_
was pronounced as _one_ word, and often written _this_. Whether written
_this_ or _this is_, the sense is the same, but the usual pronunciation was
_this_ (dhis); see A 1091, E 56, &c.

_Whether_ is usually cut down to _whe'r_, and is frequently written _wher_.

_Benedicite_ once occurs as a word of five syllables, where Theseus drawls
it out to express his wonder, A 1785. where else (I believe) it is
_ben'cite_, in three syllables only. So also _By'r_ for _by our_, Book
Duch. 544; _A godd's halfe_, id. 370.

The phrase _I ne_ at the beginning of a line was very rapidly pronounced,
almost as _I n'_ (iin); as in _I n' saugh_, A 764; _I n' seye_, B 1139; so
also _Me n'_ (meen) for _Me ne_, Pitee, 105 (see the note).

s. 116. For further details, see Ten Brink's work on Chaucers Sprache und
Verskunst. It may be as well to say that he has remarkably failed to
understand the effect of the caesura, and is much troubled by the
occurrence there of extra syllables. Yet this was the necessary result of
Chaucer's copying French models.

The explanation is simple. The caesura implies a pause. But elision can
only take place where there is NO pause. Hence the caesural pause ALWAYS
prevents elision. Hence, also, there is often a redundant syllable here,
just as there is at the end of the line. This is a lesson which the student
should learn at once; it is easily verified.

I am aware that this lesson is difficult, being opposed to modern ideas;
and it will be long before some readers will come to understand that the
final _e_ should be kept in the French word _seg-e_, A 56; in the pp.
_wonn-e_, A 59; in the pp. _y-com-e_, A 77; in the pl. _crull-e_, A 81; and
so on. It is true that Chaucer, in such cases, usually begins the latter
part of the line with a vowel, for the sake of smoothness; but he does not
do this invariably; see A 77. Much clearer examples occur in the following
(A 84, 130, 184, 198, 224, 343, 491):--

  And-w['o]nder.l[`y] del['i]ver and-gr['e]et of-str['e]ngthe.
        |¯| ¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯|
  Wel-c['o]ud' she-c['a]rie | a-m['o]rsel [`a]nd wel-k['e]pe.
        |¯ |¯| . |¯| ¯ |¯|
  What-sh['o]ld' he-st['u]die | and m['a]k' him-s['e]lven w['o]od.
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯| ¯¯
  His-h['e]ed was-b['a]ll[:e]d | that-sh['o]on as-['a]ny gl['a]s.
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯| ¯¯
  Ther-['a]s he-w['i]st[:e] | to-h['a]n a-g['o]od pit['a]unc[:e].
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯ |¯|
  With['o]ute b['a]k[:e] m['e]t[:e] | was-n['e]v'r his-h['o]us.
        |¯| ¯| ¯| . |¯ |¯
  [79]W['y]d-was his-p['a]rish' | and-h['o]uses f['e]r as['o]nder.
        ¯| |¯| . |¯| ¯¯ |¯|

We have noted, however, that Chaucer varied from his French models in
making the place of the caesura moveable; and the result was to bring the
two portions of each line into closer relationship. Hence he takes great
care to make his redundant syllables as light as possible; thus preparing
the way for later authors, who came to regard a redundant syllable as a
thing to be sparingly used. Moreover, when they did use it, inasmuch as the
original value of the caesura was little known, they inserted such a
redundant syllable in other positions; in order to avoid monotony.

s. 117. A discussion of the four-accent metre, as in The House of Fame,
&c., need not occupy us long. The line is shorter, so that the middle pause
is less necessary and of much less account. Hence redundant syllables at
the caesura are rare. On the other hand, omission of the first syllable is
much commoner. In all other respects the laws are the same.

Two examples of the loss of the initial syllable may suffice.

  C['a]useth sw['i]che | dr['e]mes oft[:e] (HF. 35).
        ¯| ¯| . ¯| ¯|
  T['u]rn'-us ['e]v'ry | dr['e]em to-g['o]d[:e] (HF. 58).
        ¯| ¯| . ¯¯ |¯|

Examples of medial redundant syllables are these:--

  I-n['o]ot, but-wh['o]so | of-th['e]se mir['a]cles (HF. 12).
        |¯ |¯' . |¯ |¯|
  In-st['u]die | or-m[`e]l.anc['o]l.i[`o]us (30).
        |¯' . |¯ |¯ |¯
  And-wh['e]n she-w['i]ste | that-h['e] was-f['a]ls (393).
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯
  Til-th['a]t he-f['e]lte | that-['I] had-h['e]t[:e] (569).
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯|
  J['o]y' or-s['o]row' | wher-s['o] hit-b['e] (BD. 10).
        ¯| |¯| . |¯ |¯
  For-c['e]rtes sw['e]t[:e] | I-n['a]m but-d['e]ed (204).
        |¯| ¯| . |¯ |¯
  To-sl['e]p[:e] | that-r['i]ght up['o]n my-b['o]ok (273).
        |¯| . |¯ |¯ |¯
  That-h['a]dd' y-f['o]low'd | and-c['o]ud' no-g['o]od (390).
        |¯ |¯| . |¯ |¯

Feminine or double rimes are very common. Thus, in HF. 531-546, we have
eight such rimes in succession.

s. 118. ALLITERATION. As our oldest poetry was alliterative, alliteration
has always been considered a permissible, and indeed a favourite, ornament
of English verse. I shall only remark here that Chaucer affords excellent
examples of it, and employs it with much skill. One well-known passage in
the Knightes Tale (A 2601-16) has often been admired on this account. It is
needless to cite more examples. The reader may consult the dissertation on
'The Alliteration of Chaucer,' by C.F. McClumpha; Leipzig, n. d. (about
1886).

s. 119. CHAUCER'S AUTHORITIES. The question as to 'The Learning of Chaucer'
is so fully discussed in the second volume of Lounsbury's Studies in
Chaucer, that it is unnecessary to say much here upon this subject. The
reader will find, in the 'Index of Authors Quoted or Referred to' given at
p. 381 below, not only a fairly complete list of such authors, but a
detailed enumeration of all the quotations which, with tolerable certainty,
have been traced to their origin.

In particular, we cannot but be struck by his familiarity with the Vulgate
version of the Bible. He quotes it, as may be seen, very nearly three
hundred times, and his quotations refer to nearly all parts of it,
including the apocryphal books of Tobit, Judith, Susannah, the Maccabees,
and especially Ecclesiasticus. It is somewhat remarkable that the book of
the Old Testament which is quoted most frequently is not, as we might
expect, the Psalms, but the Book of Proverbs, which was a mine of
sententious wealth to the medieval writers. The book of the New Testament
which received most of his attention was the Gospel of St. Matthew.

As regards the languages in which Chaucer was skilled, we may first of all
observe that, like his contemporaries, he was totally ignorant of Greek.
There are some nine or ten quotations from Plato, three from Homer, two
from Aristotle, and one from Euripides; but they are all taken at
second-hand, through the medium of Boethius. The sole quotation from
Herodotus in the Canterbury Tales is copied from Jerome.

On the other hand, Chaucer was remarkable for his knowledge of Italian, in
which it does not appear that any other English writer of his period was at
all skilled. His obligations to Boccaccio are well known; the Filostrato
being the principal source of the long poem of Troilus, whilst the
influence of the Teseide appears not only in the Knightes Tale, but in the
Parliament of Foules, in Anelida, and (to the extent of five stanzas) in
Troilus. We also find a few references, as Dr. K[:o]ppell has shewn, to
Boccaccio's Amorosa Visione. With Dante's Divina Commedia he seems to have
been especially familiar, as he quotes from all parts of it; we may note,
however, that the greatest number of quotations is taken from the Inferno;
whilst the only cantos of the Paradiso which he cites are the first, the
fourteenth, the twenty-second, and the thirty-third. The poem which most
bears the impress of Dante is The House of Fame; in the Canterbury Tales,
the principal borrowings from that author appear in the story of Ugolino
(in the Monkes Tale); in some of the stanzas of the Invocation at the
beginning of the Second Nonnes Tale (one of which bears a remarkable
resemblance to a stanza in the Prioresses Tale[80]); and in the very
express reference which occurs in the Wife of Bath's Tale (D 1125).
Chaucer's sole quotation from the Italian works of Petrarch is in Troilus,
where he translates the eighty-eighth Sonnet. It must not be forgotten, at
the same time, that Chaucer was further indebted to Boccaccio's Latin
works, entitled De Casibus Virorum Illustrium, De Genealogia Deorum, and De
Mulieribus Claris. On the other hand, Prof. Lounsbury is perfectly
justified in contending that 'there is not the slightest proof that Chaucer
had a knowledge of the existence' of the Decameron. Reasonable carefulness
will certainly shew that he was wholly ignorant of it; and the notion that
Chaucer borrowed the general plan of his Tales from that of his Italian
predecessor, is wholly baseless; the plans are, in fact, more remarkable
for their divergence than for their similarity. The only apparent point of
contact between Chaucer and the Decameron is in the Tale of Griselda; and
in this case we know clearly that it was from Petrarch's Latin version, and
not from the Italian, that the story was really derived.

With Anglo-French Chaucer may well have been familiar from an early age, so
that the adaptation of the Man of Lawes Tale from the Chronicle by Nicholas
Trivet could not have caused him much trouble. But he was also perfectly
familiar with the French of the continent, and was under great obligations
to Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun, and to Guillaume de Machault. He
made translations of poems by Guillaume de Deguileville and Oto de
Graunson. He was doubtless well acquainted with the writings of Froissart
and of Eustace Deschamps. He also quotes from Jean de Vignay, and refers
(once only) to the Alexandreid of Philippe Gautier de Chatillon. There is
some reason to think that he consulted the Miracles de Notre Dame by
Gautier de Coincy; see vol. v. 491. The Nun's Priest's Tale was derived,
most likely, from the Roman de Renard, and not from Marie de France, who
gives the tale in a briefer form. The Parson's Tale is from a French
treatise by Fr[`e]re Lorens. We may also well suppose that Chaucer had seen
several of the old romances in a French form; such as the romances relating
to Alexander, Arthur, Charlemagne, and Octovien; Sir Bevis, Sir Guy,
Libeaus Desconus, Sir Tristram and Sir Percival; though he makes remarkably
little use of such material. What was the extent of his knowledge of the
Roman de Troie as written by Benoist de Sainte-More, it is not very easy to
say; but he probably had read it. Several of the Canterbury Tales seem to
have been derived from French Fabliaux or from Latin stories of a similar
character. The Squieres Tale reminds us of the romance of Cleomades and of
the Travels of Marco Polo.

But it is to Latin authors that Chaucer was, on the whole, most indebted
for his quotations and illustrations; and especially to the authors of
medieval times. Of the great poets of antiquity, he was not acquainted with
many; but he read such as he could attain to with great diligence. His
chief book was Ovid; and it is almost certain, from the freedom with which
he quotes him, that he had a MS. copy of his own among his 'sixty bokes
olde and newe' (Leg. G.W.; A. 273). He quotes from the Ars Amatoria,
Amores, Epistolae ex Ponto, Fasti, Heroides, Metamorphoses, Remedia Amoris,
and Tristia; so that he had read this author rather extensively. His next
prime favourites were Vergil and Statius; and he knew something of Lucan
and Claudian. We may be sure that his quotations from Horace and Juvenal
were taken at second-hand; and that he had never read those authors
himself. He glanced at the Prologue to the Satires of Persius, and he was
acquainted with the first Elegy of Maximian. He seems to have seen a copy
of Valerius Flaccus.

Of the older prose writers, he was best acquainted with the famous treatise
by Boethius, and with the Somnium Scipionis of Cicero as preserved and
commented on by Macrobius. He also quotes from other works by Cicero; from
the work De Factis Memorabilibus by Valerius Maximus; and from some of the
letters and treatises of Seneca[81]. There is evidence of his acquaintance
with Suetonius and Florus; and, possibly, with the Fables of Hyginus. I
find no sure trace of his acquaintance with Orosius, or with the works of
the elder Pliny. It is almost certain that he was unacquainted with Livy;
the story of Lucretia is really from St. Augustine[82] and Ovid; and that
of Virginia, from Le Roman de la Rose.

As to the Latin fathers, we have the most ample evidence that Chaucer had
very carefully studied the treatise of St. Jerome against Jovinian, which
happens to include all that is known of the Liber Aureolus de Nuptiis by
Theophrastus. How far he was really acquainted with the writings of St.
Augustine and St. Bernard, we cannot very well discover. The quotations
from St. Gregory, St. Basil, and others, in the Parson's Tale, are all
given at second-hand.

The authors of later times whom Chaucer quotes or mentions are rather
numerous; although, in many instances, he only quotes them at second-hand;
as is (usually) pointed out in the Index. It may suffice to mention here
some of the more important examples.

The life of St. Cecilia is from Jacobus de Voragine and Simeon
Metaphrastes. The treatise by pope Innocent III. entitled De Contemptu
Mundi, or otherwise, De Miseria Conditionis Humanae, was translated by our
author into English verse; but only portions of it are preserved, viz. in
the Man of Lawes Tale, and (adapted to the heroic measure) in the
Pardoner's Tale. Alanus de Insulis wrote pieces entitled De Planctu
Naturae, Anticlaudianus, and Liber Parabolarum; all of these are
occasionally quoted or referred to, and the first of them clearly suggested
the Parliament of Foules.

The Historia Troiae of Guido delle Colonne is made use of in Troilus and in
the Legend of Good Women; and it is likely that Dares Phrygius and Dictys
Cretensis were only known to Chaucer through the medium of Guido and of
Benoist de Sainte-More. The Liber Consolationis et Consilii of Albertano of
Brescia was most useful in supplying material for the Tale of Melibeus;
which, however, was more immediately derived from the French version by
Jean de Meun. Chaucer also knew something of the Liber de Amore Dei by the
same author; and probably had read a third treatise of his, entitled De
Arte Tacendi et Loquendi. Other books which drew his attention were the
famous Gesta Romanorum; the Polycraticus of John of Salisbury; the Epistola
Valerii ad Rufinum by Walter Map; the Liber Distichorum of Dionysius Cato,
with the supplement entitled Facetus; and Albricus De Imaginibus Deorum. We
also find casual allusions to the Aurora of Petrus de Riga; a poem by
Martianus Capella; the Bestiary entitled Physiologus; the Burnellus of
Nigellus Wireker; the Liber de Amore of Pamphilus Maurilianus; the
Megacosmos of Bernardus Silvestris; the Nova Poetria of Geoffrey de
Vinsauf; and the Speculum Historiale of Vincent of Beauvais. We need not
include in the list authors such as Cassiodorus and Isidore of Seville, who
are certainly quoted at second-hand. On the other hand, we must not forget
the writers whom Chaucer consulted for special purposes, in connection with
astrology and alchemy; such as, in the former case, Messahala, Ptolemy,
Alchabitius, Almansor, Zael, and the aphorisms attributed to Hermes
Trismegistus; and, in the latter case, the same Hermes, Jean de Meun,
Arnoldus de Villa Nova, Senior Zadith, and others whose names do not
expressly appear. Several authors are mentioned by name, with whose
writings he was probably unacquainted; such as Alhazen, Averroes, Avicenna,
Constantinus Afer, Dioscorides, Galen, Gatisden, Hippocrates, Rhasis,
Rufus, and Vitellio; and we can see that some of these names were simply
borrowed from Le Roman de la Rose. There is small reason to suppose that he
knew more than the name of the huge work De Causa Dei by Thomas
Bradwardine. As to Agathon, Corinnus, Lollius, and Zanzis, the suggestions
already made in the notes upon the passages where these names occur
contain, to the best of my belief, all that has hitherto been ascertained.

       *       *       *       *       *

GLOSSARIAL INDEX.

The references in this index are given according to the following scheme.

Poems denoted by Arabic numerals are Minor Poems, as printed in vol. i.
Thus, under 'A, _prep._ on,' the reference '3. 370' means Minor Poem no. 3,
line 370, or l. 370 of the Book of the Duchesse. The letter 'R.' refers to
the Romaunt of the Rose, Fragment A, in vol. i. pp. 93-164; the rest of the
Poem, not being Chaucer's, is indexed separately. Thus 'R. 163' means l.
163 of the Romaunt.

The five books of Boethius (in vol. ii.) are denoted by B 1, B 2, B 3, B 4,
B 5, respectively; and the 'prose' and 'metrical' sections are denoted by
'p' and 'm'. Thus, under 'Abaissen,' the reference 'B 4. p 7. 56' means
'Boethius, bk. iv. prose 7, line 56.' The five books of Troilus (also in
vol. ii.) are denoted by T. i., T. ii., T. iii., T. iv., and T. v. Thus 'T.
iii. 1233' means 'Troilus, bk. iii., line 1233.'

The House of Fame and the Legend of Good Women (in vol. iii.) are denoted
by 'HF.' and 'L.' respectively. If, in the latter case, the italic letter
'_a_' follows the number of the line, the reference is to the earlier (or
A-text) of the Prologue to the Legend. Thus 'HF. 865' means 'House of Fame,
line 865.' Again, 'L. 2075' means 'Legend of Good Women, line 2075'; and
'L. 200 _a_' means 'Legend, &c., line 200 of the text in the upper part of
the page.'

The Prologue and the two books of the Treatise on the Astrolabe (in vol.
iii.) are denoted, respectively, by 'A. pr.', 'A. i.', and 'A. ii.' Thus,
under 'Abate', the reference 'A. ii. 10. 8' means 'Astrolabe, bk. ii. s.
10, line 8'; and 'A. pr. 10' means 'Astrolabe, prologue, line 10.'

References to the Canterbury Tales (in vol. iv.) are known by the use of
the letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and I, which are used to denote the
various Groups into which the Tales are divided. In this case, 'A' is never
followed by a full stop or by Roman numerals, as when the 'Astrolabe' is
referred to; and such a reference as 'B 5,' meaning line 5 of Group B, is
quite distinct from 'B 5. p 1. 1,' where 'B 5' means bk. v. of Boethius,
and is invariably accompanied by the 'p' or 'm' denoting the 'prose' or
'metre.'

SUMMARY OF THE CONTENTS OF VOLUMES I-IV. Vol. i. contains R. (Romaunt of
the Rose), Fragment A alone being Chaucer's; and the Minor Poems, which are
all numbered, viz. 1 (ABC.); 2 (Compleynte unto Pite); 3 (Book of the
Duchesse); 4 (Mars); 5 (Parlement of Foules); 6 (Compleint to his Lady); 7
(Anelida); 8 (Wordes to Adam); 9 (Former Age); 10 (Fortune); 11 (Merciless
Beauty); 12 (To Rosemounde); 13 (Truth); 14 (Gentilesse); 15 (Lak of
Stedfastnesse); 16 (Envoy to Scogan); 17 (Envoy to Bukton); 18 (Venus); 19
(To his Purse); 20 (Proverbs); 21 (Against Women Unconstant); 22 (Amorous
Complaint); 23 (Balade of Compleynt).

Vol. ii. contains B. (Boethius, in five books, viz. B 1, B 2, &c.); and T.
(Troilus, in five books, viz. T. i., T. ii., &c.).

Vol. iii. contains HF. (House of Fame); L. (Legend of Good Women, with two
Prologues, the older one being marked _a_); and A. (Astrolabe), with its
pr. (prologue), and two books (i. and ii.).

Vol. iv. contains the Canterbury Tales, divided into Groups denoted by A,
B, C ... F. (The Tale of Gamelyn, not being Chaucer's, is indexed
separately.)

ALPHABETICALLY, the references are to A (Group A of Cant. Tales); A.
(Astrolabe); B (Group B of C. T.); B 1 ... B 5 (Boethius, books 1 to 5); C,
D, E, F, G, H, I (Groups C to I of C. T.); HF. (House of Fame); L. (Legend
of Good Women); R. (Romaunt of the Rose); T. i. ... T. v. (Troilus, books 1
to 5). The Minor Poems, numbered 1 to 23, are given above. When the letter
'_n_' follows a reference, the given form will not be found in the text,
but in the footnotes.

ABBREVIATIONS. Besides _s._, _adj._, and _adv._, for _substantive_,
_adjective_, _adverb,_, the following are used in a special sense:--_v._, a
verb in the infinitive mood; _ger._, gerund; _pr. s._, present tense, 3rd
person singular; _pr. pl._, present tense, 3rd person plural. Other persons
are denoted by the figures 1 or 2.

The etymology of words is given occasionally, in the case of some of the
more difficult words. Languages are cited in the usual manner, as A.F. for
Anglo-French, O.F. for Old French, A.S. for Anglo-Saxon, and the like.

A large number of references are given, but they are by no means
exhaustive. I have tried to include nearly all words to which any interest
is likely to be attached. In the case of verbal forms, every form is duly
parsed. References to 'notes' are to the Notes in the present edition.

Proper names will be found in a separate Index.

       *       *       *       *       *

A, the first letter of the alphabet, T. i. 171; the letter A, A 161.

A, _indef. art._ a, A 24, &c.; _al a_, the whole of a, E 1165; one, D 1396;
one and the same, 21. 5; about, some, L. 2075.

A, _prep._ on, T. ii. 1098; A 3516; on (the), R. 163; in, H 318; for, 3.
370, 758; in (the), T. i. 363; A-nighte, by night, B 3758, G 880; A-dayes,
a-days, E 1164, G 1396; A-morwe, on the morrow, A 822; A three, in three, A
2934; A goddes half, 'on God's side,' in God's name, D 50; A goddes name,
in God's name, A 854.

A! _int._ ah! 3. 213.

A! HA! _interj._ aha! T. i. 868, ii. 589, iii. 65; B 1629, D 586; HF. 865.

ABAISSEN, _ger._ to be dismayed, B 4. p 7. 56; Abaisshed, _pp._ abashed, B
1. p 1. 57; Abaysshed, _pp._ abashed, shy, T. iii. 1233; Abayst, _pp._
amazed, spell-bound, B 3. m 12. 23; abashed, cast down, T. iii. 94, 1122;
disconcerted, E 317, 1011; Abaysed, amazed, E 1108. See ABASSHEN.

ABAK, _adv._ backwards, A 3736, B 2017; aback, back, L. 864.

ABAKWARD, _adv._ backward, B 3. m 12. 41.

ABANDOUNE, _v._ devote, I 713; Abandouneth, _pr. s._ abandons, B 2767;
Abaundoneth, B 2767.

ABASSHEN, _v._ fear, be abashed, R. 1552; Abasshed, _pp._ abashed,
confused, 5. 447; confounded, R. 805, 1519; disconcerted, B 568. See
ABAISSEN.

ABATE, _v._ lower, put down, B 3780; depreciate, R. 286; Abate, _2 pr. s.
subj._ subtract, A. ii. 10. 8; Abated, _pp._ enfeebled, B 3. p 5. 33; put
down, I 191.

ABAUNDONETH, _pr. s._ abandons, B 2767. See ABANDOUNE.

ABAVED, _pp._ confounded, disconcerted, 3. 614. Answering to an O.F.
_*abavir_, due to O.F. _esbahir_, to astonish; with _v_ in place of lost
_h_; see Brachet's Etym. F. Dict. s.v. _glaive_.

ABAWED, _the same as_ ABAVED, 3. 614_n_.

ABAYST; see ABAISSEN.

ABBESSE, _s._ abbess, D 678.

ABBEY, _s._ abbey, B 4044; Abb['e]ye, B 1488; Abbay, B 1814.

ABBOT, _s._ A 161.

ABC., alphabet, A. i. 11. 2.

A-BEDDE, in bed, T. i. 915, iii. 689, 693; D 1084, 1259.

ABEGGE, _v._ pay for it, A 3938. A Kentish form, from A.S. _[=a]bycgan_.
See ABEYE, ABYE.

A-BEGGED, a-begging (see note), F 1580.

ABET, _s._ abetment, abetting, aid, T. ii. 357.

ABEYE, _v._ pay for, C 100. Cf. A.S. _[=a]bycgan_. See ABYE.

ABHOMIN['A]BLE, _adj._ hateful, C 471, 631, D 2006, H 343; loathsome, I
122.

ABHOMINACIOUNS, _s. pl._ abominations, horrible occurrences, B 88. See
ABOMINACIOUN.

ABIDEN, ABIT; see ABYDE.

ABITE, _s._ habit, dress, L. 146a.

A-BLAKEBERIED; see BLAKEBERIED.

ABLE, _adj._ capable, 3. 786; A 584; fit, suitable, adapted, A 167; fit, L.
320; fit for, 3. 779; deemed deserving, 1. 184; fitting, R. 986.

ABLEN, _v._; Ablinge, _pr. pt._ enabling, lifting, B 3. m 9. 24; fitting, B
1. m 6. 12.

ABLUCIONS, _s. pl._ ablutions, washings, G 856.

ABODES, _pl. of_ Abood, _s._

ABOGHTE, ABOGHT; see ABYE.

ABOMINACIOUN, _s._ disgust, D 2179. See ABHOMINACIOUNS.

ABOOD, _s._ delay, A 965; tarrying, T. v. 1307; abiding, continuance, HF.
1963; Abodes, _pl._ delays, T. iii. 854.

ABOOD, _pt. s. of_ Abyde.

ABOUNDE, _v._ abound, T. ii. 159.

ABOUTE, _prep._ about, round, A 158; throughout, T. ii. 734; Abouten, round
about, R. 1563; near, E 1106.

ABOUTE, _adv._ about, engaged in, T. v. 1645; in due order, in turn, A 890;
around, A 488; here and there, 5. 247; _been a._, go about, endeavour, A
1142.

ABOVEN, _prep._ above, A 53, 2769, E 826; B 1. p 1. 21; A. ii. 45. 47.

ABREGGE, _ger._ to abridge, shorten, T. iii. 262; B 2233, I 243; Abrigge
with thy peynes, to shorten thy pains with, T. iv. 426; _v._ A 2999, E
1614, 1657.

ABREGGINGE, _s._ abridging, B 5. p 1. 57 (see note); diminishing, I 568.
See above.

A-BREYDE, _v._ awake, T. iii. 1113; come to my senses, HF. 559; _ger._ T.
v. 520 _n_; Abreyde, _pr. s. subj._ awake, A 4190; Abrayd, _pt. s._
(_strong form_), woke up, started up, 3. 192; Abreyd, _1 pt. s._ started
from sleep, HF. 110; Abrayde, _pt. s._ (_weak form_), started, B 4198;
Abreyde, awoke, T. i. 724, iv. 1212; E 1061. A.S. _[=a]bregdan_, pt. t.
_[=a]braegd_ (_strong form_). Ch. also uses the weak form, as above.

ABROCHE, _v._ broach, D 177.

ABROOD, _adv._ abroad, i.e. wide open, F 441.

ABS['E]NT, _adj._ absent, T. iii. 488, v. 637; Absent, 7. 93, 138.

ABS['E]NTE, _2 pr. pl. subj._ absent yourself, 1. 43.

ABSOLUCIOUN, _s._ absolution, A 222.

ABSOLUT, _adj._ absolute, B 3. p 11. 16; free, B 5. p 6. 169.

ABSOLUTLY, _adv._ wholly, B 4. p 2. 147.

ABSTINENCE, _s._ HF. 660; T. iv. 784; I 831.

ABUSIOUN, _s._ abuse, absurdity, T. iv. 990; deceit, B 214; Abusion, a
shameful thing, scandal, T. iv. 1060; I 445.

ABYDEN, _v._ abide, await, 1. 131; wait for, HF. 1086; _ger._ A 927; Abyde,
_v._ wait, R. 1451; T. i. 956; B 4270; be still, withdraw, F 1522; Abyde,
_ger._ to await, B 1. p 1. 58; Abydest, _2 pr. s._ awaitest, B 4. p 6. 256;
dost expect, B 1. p 4. 3; Abydeth, _pr. s._ awaits, B 2175; dwells, T. ii.
987; Abit, _pr. s._ waits for, T. i. 1091; abides, G 1175; Abyd, _imp. s._
stay, wait, A 3129; A. ii. 23. 9; Abydeth, _imp. pl._ B 1175; _pres. pt._
Abyding, E 757; Abood, _pt. s._ awaited, T. iv. 156; stopped, HF. 1062;
expected, 3. 247; Abood, _1 pt. s._ waited, L. 309; B 3. p 1. 16;
Ab[)i]den, _pt. pl._ abode, T. i. 474 (an awkward construction; see the
note); Abiden, _pp._ waited, B 3. p 9. 139; T. ii. 935; A 2982. A.S.
_[=a]b[=i]dan_, pt. t. _[=a]b[=a]d_, pt. t. pl. _[=a]bidon_; pp.
_[=a]biden_.

ABYDINGE, _s._ expectation, B 2. p 3. 41.

ABYE, _v._ pay for, A 4393, C 756, D 2155, G 694; Abyen, _v._ B 2012;
Abyest, _2 pr. s._ sufferest, B 2. p 4. 8; Abyeth, _pr. s._ suffers,
undergoes,B 4. p 1. 21; pays for, R. 272; Abyen, _pr. pl._ undergo, B 4. p
4. 58; Aboughte, _pt. s._ paid for, T. v. 1756; A 2303; Aboghte, suffered
for, A 2303, I 267; Aboght, _pp._ paid for, L. 2483; A 3100; purchased, 18.
37; bought dearly, L. 1387 (see note); atoned for, A 3100, C 503. A.S.
_[=a]bycgan_. See ABEGGE, ABEYE.

A-CATERWAWED, a-caterwauling, D 354 (see note).

ACCEPT['A]BLE, _adj._ D 1913.

ACCEPTE, _v._ to accept; Accepted, _pp._ A 2267; Accepteth, _imp. pl._ E
96, 127

ACC['E]SSE, _s._ feverish attack, T. ii. 1315, 1543, 1578.

ACCIDENT, _s._ that which is accidental, T. iv. 1505; incident, T. iii.
918; accidental occurrence, HF. 1976; unusual appearance, E 607; outward
appearance (see note), C 539.

ACCIDIE, _s._ sloth, I 388, 677.

ACCIOUN, _s._ action, i.e. accusation, 1. 20; Accions, _pl._ I 82.

ACCOMPLICE, _v._ accomplish, A 2864, B 2258. See ACOMPLISSHEN.

ACCORD, _s._ agreement, B 2988, C 25, F 791; harmony, B 4069; peace, I 992.
See ACORD.

ACCORDAUNCE, _s._ concord, harmony, R. 496; Acordaunce, B 2. m 8. 9.

ACCORDAUNT, _adj._ suitable, B 4026; Accordant, F 103.

ACCORDE, _v._ agree; Accorde, _pr. s. subj._ G 638; Accordeth, _pr. s._
beseems, L. 2583; Accorded, _pt. s._ agreed, B 1504; _pp._ L. 1635;
Acorded, _pp._ B 238; ['A]ccordinge, _pr. pt._ agreeing, D 924. See ACORDE.

ACCOUNTES, _pl._ accounts, B 1277.

ACCUSE, _v._; Accuseth, _pr. s._ reveals, R. 1591; Acused, _pt. s._ blamed,
T. ii. 1081; Accused, _pp._ accused, A 1765.

ACCUSEMENT, _s._ accusation (of her), T. iv. 556.

ACCUSOUR, _s._ accuser, L. 353; revealer, T. iii. 1450; Accusor, B 1. P 4.
75.

ACH['A]T, _s._ buying, purchase, A 571; B 1. p 4. 64.

ACH['A]TOURS, _pl._ buyers, caterers, A 568.

ACHE, _s._ ache, T. iv. 728.

A-CHEKKED, _pp._ checked, hindered, HF. 2093.

ACHEVE, _v._ achieve, L. 1614; Acheveth, _pr. s._ T. ii. 808; Acheved,
_pp._ B 1. p 4. 141.

ACHOKEN, _v._ choke, stifle, B 2. p 5. 57; Achoked, _pp._ L. 2008.

ACLOYETH, _pr. s._ overburdens, 5. 517. See ACCLOY in the New E. Dict.

A-COMPAS, _adv._ in a circle, L. 300.

ACOMPLISSHEN, _ger._ to achieve, B 4. p 2. 191; Acomplisshe, _pr. s. subj._
fulfil, comprehend, B 3. p 10. 122. See ACCOMPLICE.

ACORD, _s._ agreement, 5. 371; L. 159; A 838, 3082; Acorde, concord, 5.
381, 668; accord, 3. 316; _in accord_, in tune, 5. 197; _al of oon acorde_,
in tune, 3. 305; Acordes, _pl._ agreements, HF. 695. See ACCORD.

ACORDABLE, _adj._ harmonious, B 2. m 8. 14.

ACORDAUNCE, _s._ concord, B 2. m 8. 9; Accordaunce, R. 496.

ACORDAUNT, _adj._ suitable, A 37, 3363; agreeing, B 1. p 4. 164; Acordant
to, in harmony with, 5. 203.

ACORDE, _v._ accord, T. v. 446; _1 pr. s._ grant, allow, L. 3; Acordeth,
_pr. s._ agrees, B 2. p 4. 67; F 798; concerns, L. 955; Acorden, _pr. pl._
agree, B 2137; Accorde, _pr. pl._ B 2395; Acorde, _pr. pl._ A 830; Acorded,
_pt. s._ suited, A 244; Acordeden, _pt. pl._ agreed, L. 168, 1739;
According, _pres. part._ agreeing, B 1737; A. ii. 14. 5; Acorded, _pp._
agreed, A 818, 1214, D 812; T. v. 1310.

ACORNS, _pl._ B 1. m 6. 5; Acornes, B 2. m 5. 4; Akornes, fruits, B 4. m 3.
19.

ACORSE, _1 pr. s._ curse, T. iv. 839.

ACOUNTE, _v._ consider, B 3591; Acounted, _pt. s._ valued, cared, 3. 1237;
Acountedest, _2 pt. s._ didst reckon, B 2. p 5. 71.

ACOUNTINGE, _s._ reckoning, calculation, B 1. m 2. 10.

ACOYE, _v._; Acoyede, _pt. s._ caressed, B 2. p 3. 45.

ACQUITANCE, _s._ release, A 4411; Acquitaunce, release, 1. 60; deed of
release, A 3327.

ACQUYTE, _v._ acquit, D 1599; acquit oneself, E 936; Acquiten, I 179;
Acquiteth, _imp. pl._ B 37.

ACTES, _pl._ acts, deeds, C 574, D 114, E 1838; records, B 4326.

ACTIF, _adj._ active, B 1. p 1. 21.

ACTUEL, _adj._ actual, I 357.

ACURSE, _v._ curse, T. iii. 1072; Acursed, _pp._ R. 468; 1. 150.

ACUSED, _pt. s._ blamed, T. ii. 1081. See ACCUSE.

ACUSTOMAUNCE, _s._ system of habits, habitual method of life, HF. 28; _had
of acustumaunce_, was accustomed, B 3701.

ADAMANT, _s._ adamant, A 1990; Adamaunt, loadstone, magnet, R. 1182;
Adamauntes, _pl._ loadstones, 5. 418.

ADAWE, _v._ awake, recover, T. iii. 1120; Adawed, _pp._ E 2400.

A-DAY, in the day, T. ii. 60. See A, _prep._

ADDEN, _v._ add, B 3. p 9. 31, 34; Added, _pt. s._ A 499.

ADDER, _s._ adder, viper, E 1786_n_; Addres, _pl._ B 5. m 5. 4_n_.

ADDING, _s._ (the) addition, A. ii. 41. 10.

ADIECCIOUN (Adjeccioun), _s._ addition, B 5. p 6. 134.

A-DIEU! T. i. 1041.

ADIURACIOUN (Adjuracioun), _s._ adjuration, I 603.

ADORNE, _v._; Adorneth, _pr. pl._ adorn, T. iii. 2.

A-DOUN, _adv._ downwards, down, L. 178, 250, 792, 1413, 1726; A 393, B
3630, F 351, 464, 862, G 1113, I 72; down below, HF. 889; below, H 105; at
the bottom, G 779.

ADOURING, _s._ adoration, I 682.

ADRAD, _pp._ afraid, A 605, 3425; R. 1228; T. ii. 115; L. 300 _a_; B 2. p
4. 113; 3. 493, 879; HF. 928; Adred, 3. 1190.

ADRESSINGE, _s._ directing, B 5. p 4. 63.

ADVERSARIE, _adj._ hostile, I 697.

ADVERS['A]RIE, _s._ adversary, B 3868, C 194, G 1476; Adversaire, 1. 8;
Advers['a]ries, _pl._ T. ii. 1435.

ADVERSITEE, _s._ adversity, A 484, F 502; 1. 101; harm, 7. 258, 276.

ADVERTENCE, _s._ attention, heed, T. iv. 698, v. 1258; HF. 709; G 467.

ADV['O]CAC['Y][:E]S, _pl._ pleas, T. ii. 1469.

ADV['O]CAT, _s._ advocate, intercessor, B 2211, G 68; 1. 102; Advocats,
_pl._ (in which the _t_ is mute), C 291; B 4. p 4. 183.

AFER, _adv._ afar, HF. 1215; L. 212; B 5. p 4. 103.

A-F[`E]RE, on fire, T. i. 229. See A-FYRE.

A-FEREN, _v._ to frighten; A-fered, _pp._ afraid, affrighted, T. i. 974,
iii. 482; A 1518, C 284; L. 53 _a_, 2321; Aferd, _pp._ afraid, A 628, 4095;
B 4611.

AFFECCIOUN, _s._ affection, devotion, A 1158; L. 1229.

AFFECT, _s._ desire; Affectis, _pl._ T. iii. 1391

AFFERME, _v._ affirm, T. ii. 1588; Affermeth, _pr. s._ affirms, B 4315;
fixes, B 4. m 6. 31; Affermed, _pp._ agreed upon, L. 790; established, A
2349.

AFFIANCE, _s._ trust, B 1330.

AFFINITEE, _s._ relation, B 1. p 4. 196.

AFFORCED, _pp._ forced, I 974.

AFFRAY, _s._ fray, quarrel, D 2156; terror, B 1137, 3273; fright, 4. 214;
HF. 553; Afray, dread, 7. 334.

AFFRAYE, _v._ to frighten; Affrayeth, _pr. s._ arouses, excites, R. 91;
Affrayed, _pp._ frightened, afraid, B 563; scared, B 4468; roused, 3. 296.

AFFYLE, _v._ file, i.e. render smooth, A 712; T. ii. 1681.

AFOR-YEYN, _prep._ over against, T. ii. 1188. See _Afornens_ in the New E.
Dict.

AFOUNDE, _v._ founder, perish, 12. 21. (Not in the New E. Dict.; but see
_Afounder_ in the same).

AFRAYED, _adj._ scared, distracted, R. 154. See AFFRAYE.

AFRIGHTE, _v._ to frighten; Afright, _pp._ affrighted, B 4085.

AFTER, _prep._ according to, A 125, 3220, B 2460, 2646, C 52, D 1642, F
100, 1033, G 25; L. 91, 2651; 1. 143; 3. 1095; 5. 305; A. pr. 61; A. ii.
17. 25; in expectation of, for, B 467; to get, A 525; later than, A. i. 21.
15; according as, L. 575; after, i.e. to fetch, L. 1130; T. v. 280;
towards, A 136; in accordance with, 8. 4; by inheritance from, L. 1072;
After as, according as, 5. 216; After oon, alike, A. 1781; After me,
according to my command, E 327; After the yeer, according to the season of
the year, F 47; After that, according as, T. ii. 1347; E 203.

AFTER, _adv._ afterwards, next, 5. 59, A 162, B 98; L. 75.

AFTERWARD, _adv._ afterwards, R. 5,29; A 497.

A-FYRE, on fire, D 726, 1982; HF. 1858; L. 2493; A-fyr, 1. 94; T. iii. 856;
A-f[`e]re, T. i. 229.

AGAIN, _prep._ when exposed to, L. 2426; Agayn, against, B 580, 1754, C
181, 427, G 1415, I 110; towards, A 2680; (so as) to meet, R. 785; D 1000;
opposite to, R. 1577; exposed to, H 110; contrary to, F 748; just before, B
4268, H 301; near, G 1279; to meet, B 391, G 1342; in comparison with, L.
189; Ageyn, against, A 66, F 142; 13. 11; compared with, R. 1011; turned
towards, L. 48.

AGAIN, _adv._ again; Agayn, A 801; Ageyn, F 654.

AGAINS, _prep._ against; Agayns, C 181, I 154; contrary to, B 2776; in
answer to, L. 344; instead of, I 187, 192; before, in presence of, C 743;
to meet, E 911; near to, A. ii. 23. 8; Agaynes, against, 3. 16; near, E
2325; Ageyns, against, B 3754; L. 330.

A-GAME, _adv._ in play, in jest, in mockery, in sport, 4. 277; T. iii. 636,
648.

AGASTE, _ger._ to terrify, T. ii. 901; _v._ B 4178; Agasteth, _pr. s._
deters, frightens, B 4. p 6. 201; L. 1171; Agasten, _pr. pl._ terrify, B 3.
m 12. 24; Agaste, _pt. s._ frightened, L. 1221; B 3395; Agaste, _pt. s.
refl._ was affrighted, A 2424; Agast, _pp._ scared, frightened, terrified,
A 2931, 3834; 7. 316; HF. 557; aghast, B 4079, D 798; afraid, A 4267, B
1859, E 1052; T. i. 715, v. 893; L. 1534; B 2. p 2. 43, p 4. 115; B 3. p 5.
28, 44.

AGAYN, AGAYNS; see AGAIN, AGAINS.

AGAYN-WARD, _adv._ backward, at the point of return, A. i. 17. 9; back
again, B 441.

AGE, _s._ age, A 82, 601; life, E 627; Ages, _pl._ times, periods, B 3177;
T. ii. 27.

AGEIN, AGEINS; see AGAIN, AGAINS.

AGEYN, AGEYNS; see AGAIN, AGAINS.

AGGREGGE; see AGREGGE.

AGILTEN, _v._ do wrong, L. 436; Agilte, _pt. s._ did offence, D 392;
wrongly committed, L. 2385; _1 pt. s._ wronged, HF. 329; offended, T. iii.
840; Agilte, _pr. s. subj._ (if he) offend, I 150; Agilt, _pp._ offended,
1. 122; offended by sin, I 131; sinned, T. v. 1684, L. 463; B 3008.

AGON, _v._ to go away; Ago, _pp._ gone away, T. v. 1054; E 1764; 7. 61;
gone, F 1204; passed away, A 2802; past, L. 1766; dead, L. 916; _to ben
ago_, to be off, 5. 465; Agon, _pp._ departed, A 1276; gone away C 810;
past, C 246; _nat longe agon is_, it is not long ago, D 9; Agoon, _pp._
gone, departed, L. 1110; D 2070; passed away, A 1782; dead, E 631; 3. 479,
7. 150; ago, B 1841, C 436.

AGONYE, _s._ agony, struggle, A 3452.

AGREABLE (['a]gre['a]ble), pleasing, HF. 1097; 18. 41; Agr['e]able, 18. 68;
Agreables, _pl._ pleasant, B 3. m 2. 19.

AGREABLELY, _adv._ complacently, B 2. p 4. 92.

AGREABLETEE, _s._ equability, B 2. p 4. 83.

A-GREEF, in dudgeon, lit. 'in grief,' T. iii. 862, 1621; sadly, T. iv. 613;
Agref, amiss, 5. 543; A-grief, in dudgeon, B 4083, D 191.

AGRE[:E]N, _v._ agree, consent, T. iii. 131; Agree, _pr. s. subj._ agree,
5. 409; suit, T. i. 409.

AGREGGE, _v._ aggravate; Agreggeth, _pr. s._ I 960; Aggreggeth, B 2477;
Agreggen, _pr. pl._ I 892; Agreggeden, _pt. pl._ aggravated, B 2209.

AGREVE, _v._ to vex; Agreved, _pp._ angry, A 2057; vexed, L. 345;
aggrieved, E 500.

AGRIEF; see AGREEF.

AGRISEN, AGROOS; see AGRYSEN.

AGROTED, _pp._ surfeited, cloyed, L. 2454. See the New E. Dict.

AGRYSEN, _v._ shudder, tremble, feel terror, B 1. p 3. 15; Agryse, _v._
feel terror, HF. 210; T. ii. 1435; B 614, C 280, D 1649; Agrysest, _2 pr.
s._ dreadest, B 2. p 1. 45; Agryseth, _pr. s._ trembles, shivers, B 1. m 6.
7; Agr[`o][`o]s, _pt. s._ shuddered, was terrified, became frightened, T.
ii. 930; L. 830, 2314; A-grisen, _pp._ filled with dread, B 3. p 1. 12.
A.S. _[=a]gr[=i]san_; pt. t. _[=a]gr[=a]s_; pp. _[=a]grisen_.

AGU, _s._ ague, B 4150.

AGUILER, _s._ needle-case, R. 98.

A-HEIGH, _adv._ aloft, B 5. m 5. 16.

AIOURNE (Ajourne), _imp. s._ adjourn, summon on another day, 1. 158.

AIR, _s._ air, D 2254. See EIR.

AIUGED (Ajuged), _pp._; _a. biforn_, prejudged, B 1. p 4. 72 (Lat.
_praeiudicatae_.)

AKE, _v._ ache, T. ii. 549; L. 705; _ger._ HF. 632; Ake, _pr. pl._ ache, T.
iii. 1561; Aken, _pr. pl._ B 2113.

AKETOUN, _s._ a short sleeveless tunic, worn under the hauberk, B 2050. Fr.
_hoqueton_, O.Fr. _auqueton_, a cloak, a stuff for cloaks; originally
_alqueton_, Span. _alcoton_, Arabic _al-q[=u]tun_, where _al_ is the
article, and _q[=u]tun_ is our _cotton_.

AKINGE, _s._ aching, pain, T. i. 1088.

AKNOWE, _v._; Aknowe, _pp._ conscious; _am aknowe_, I acknowledge, B 1. p
4. 109, B 4. p 4. 1.

AKORNES, _s. pl._ acorns, fruits, B 4. m 3. 19. See ACORNS.

AL, _adj._ all, A 10; Alle, _pl._ all, A 26, 53; Al, every, R. 1586; _as
s._ everything, T. iii. 1764; _al a_, the whole of a, A 854, G 996; _and
al_, and all, 3. 116; B 3275; _at al_, in every respect, wholly, C 633, E
1222; at all, D 1078; _in al_, altogether, entirely, B 1. p 6. 43; B 4. p
4. 193; _al day_, all the day, 3. 1105:--Al, 	_adv._ quite, entirely,
altogether, 5. 540; L. 1765, 1766; B 2289, 3215, 3451, E 1629, I 357; all
over, R. 840; _al on highte_, quite aloud, A 1784; _al by oon assent_,
quite with one accord, 5. 557:--Al, 	_conj._ although, HF. 1740; T. i. 17;
B 2173, C 212, D 87, F 878; L. 58, 160, 384, 1392, 1420, 1841, 2392;
whether, G 839; _al be_, although, albeit, 4. 274, 5, 436; A 297; _al be
that_, although, 5. 8:--Al 	and som, the whole matter (collectively and
severally), D 91, F 1606; T. ii. 363; L. 998, 2384; Al and somme, each and
all, all, the whole, 7. 26; Al and som, 5. 650; Alle and some, one and all,
A 3136, B 263, C 336, D 1643, E 941; T. iii. 607, v. 883; HF. 46; Al only,
_adv._ merely, simply, 2. 62; B 2662; Al so, so, E 1226; Al thing,
everything, R. 53; Al thus, exactly thus, 5. 30. See ALLE.

AL, _s._ awl, 13. 11. See OULES.

ALABASTRE, _s._ alabaster, A 1910.

ALAMBYK (['a]lamb['y]k), _s._ alembic, T. iv. 520; Alembykes, _pl._ G 794.
'_Alambique_, a limbeek, a stillatory'; Cotgrave. A kind of retort for
distilling. O.F. _alambic_, from Span. _alambique_; from Arab, _al-anbiq_;
where _anbiq_ answers to Gk. [Greek: ambix], a cup, also the cap of a
still.

ALAUNTS, _pl._ dogs of a huge size (see note), A 2148.

ALAYES, _s. pl._ alloy, E 1167.

AL-BE-IT, although, L. 1363; E 1537; A. ii. 12. 8; Al be it so that, A. ii.
31. 6.

ALBIFICACIOUN, _s._ albefaction, whitening, rendering of a white colour, G
805.

ALDAY, AL-DAY, _adv._ continually, A 1168, 1524, 3902, B 4282, F 481, I
106; T. i. 217, iv. 1563; R. 1506; always, L. 1250, 1877; B 1702; everyday,
at any time, 4. 237.

ALDER, _s._ alder-tree, A 2921.

ALDER, _gen. pl._ of all; _oure alder_, of us all, 1. 84; L. 298 (see
note). See ALLER, ALTHER.

ALDER-BEST, _adv._ best of all, 3. 87; T. i. 1008; A 710. See ALLER.

ALDERBESTE, _adj._ best of all, 3. 246, 1279; T. iii. 1597; Alderbest, 3.
907.

ALDERFAIRESTE, _adj. fem. def._ fairest of all, 3. 1050; Alder-fayrest, B
3. m 9. 8.

ALDERFIRST, _adv._ first of all, B 2393, E 1618, F 550, G 423; T. i. 1069,
iv. 74, 832; in the first place, R. 1000; for the first time, B 1. p 3. 17;
Alderfirste, L. 2635.

ALDERFIRSTE, _adj._ first of all, T. iii. 97.

ALDERLAST, _adv._ lastly, R. 449.

ALDER-LEST, least of all, T. i. 604.

ALDERLEVEST, dearest of all, T. iii. 239, v. 576.

ALDERMAN, _s._ alderman, the head of a guild, A 372.

ALDERMOST, _adv._ most of all, T. i. 152, 248, 1003; L. 2117, 2567; B 4. p
4. 37, B 5. p 3. 114.

ALDER-NEXT, _adv._ nearest of all, next, 5. 244.

ALDERWORST, _adj. superl._ worst of all, B 5. p 3. 113.

ALDERWYSEST, _adj. pl._ the wisest of all, T. i. 247.

ALE, _s._ ale, A 341, 382, 3378, C 315, D 171; Ale and breed, drink and
meat, B 2062; _gen._ Ale, of ale, B 3083.

ALEGGE; see ALLEGGE.

ALEMANDRES, _pl._ almond-trees, R. 1363.

ALEMBYKES, _pl._ alembics, G 794. See ALAMBYK.

ALENGE, _the same as_ Elenge, B 1412_n_, D 1199_n_.

ALESTAKE, _s._ ale-stake, i.e. a horizontal stake or short pole projecting
from an ale-house to support a sign or bush, A 667, C 321.

ALEY, _s._ an alley, B 1758; Aleyes, _pl._ alleys, walks, E 2324, F 1013;
T. ii. 820.

ALEYS, _1 pl._ service-berries, berries of the service-tree, R. 1377. O.F.
_alie_, F. _alise_; cf. G. _Elsebeere_.

ALGATE, _adv._ always, A 571; at any rate, 3. 887, 1087; L. 361, 461; C
292, E 885, G 318, 904; nevertheless, L. 238; I 514; in any case, T. ii.
964; all the same, D 588; at all hazards, HF. 943.

ALGATES, _adv._ in every way, 22. 43; D 756; by all means, D 1514; at any
rate, in any case, 3. 1171; 4. 234; 6. 85; T. iii. 24; L. 594; B 2760,
2841, G 1096; wholly, F 246; nevertheless, B 2222; B 4. m 3. 16; all the
same, B 3. p 10. 162; B 520.

ALIENE, _v._ alienate, B 1. p 6. 43.

AL-IF, even if, T. iii. 398.

ALIGHTE, _v._ alight, E 981; Alighte, _pt. s._ 1. 161; T. v. 189, 1017; A
983; Alight, _pp._ A 722, 2189.

ALKALY, _s._ alkali, G 810.

ALKAMISTRE, _s._ alchemist, G 1204.

ALLAS, _interj._ alas! 1. 124.

ALLE, _dat. s. and pl. of_ Al; _at alle_, in every case, 4. 36; _in alle_,
in any case, 3. 141; Alle, _pl._ all, A 922, E 1787; all (of you), T. ii.
402. See AL, ALLER.

ALLEGGE (1), _v._ allege, adduce, A 3000, E 1658; Alegge, T. iii. 297;
Alegge, _1 pr. s._ HF. 314.

ALLEGGE (2), _v._ alleviate; Allegged, _pp._ allayed, B 4. p 4. 12.

ALLER, of all, _gen. pl. of_ Al; _our aller_, of us all, A 823; _hir
aller_, of them all, A 586. A.S. _ealra_, gen. pl. of _eall_. See ALDER.

ALLIAUNCE, _s._ alliance, 2. 42, 83; A 2973, C 605; kindred, 1. 58;
Alliance, marriage, espousal, E 357; All['i]aunc[`e], alliance, B 3523;
Alyaunce, B 4. p 6. 221.

ALLONE, _adj._ alone, 4. 141, 5. 455; B 2294, D 1862; _lat me a._, let me
alone, i.e. trust to me, T. iii. 413.

ALLOW, _1 p. s. pr._ (I) approve, (I) applaud, F 676.

ALLYE, _s._ ally, G. 292, 297; relative, B 3593.

ALLYEN, _ger._ to ally myself, E 1414; Allye, C 613; Allyen, _v._ C 618;
Allyed, _pp._ allied, 2. 65; T. i. 87; provided with friendly aid, B 3720.

ALMENAK, _s._ almanac, A. pr. 67.

ALMES-DEDE, _s._ alms-deed, alms-doing, B 1156.

ALMESSE, _s._ alms, B 168, 2757, D 1609, I 377; Almesses, _s. pl._
almsdoings, I 1030.

ALMEST; see ALMOST.

ALMICANTERAS, _s. pl._ small circles of declination (in the celestial
sphere), A. i. 18. 2, 8. Arabic _muqantarah_, a solar quadrant, or
sun-dial; pl. _muqantar[=a]t_, circles parallel to the horizon; from
_qantara_, he bent.

ALMIGHTY, _adj._ 1. 1.

ALMOST, _adv._ almost, A 155, 894; Almest, B 3. p 2. 52; B 1948.

ALMURY, _s._ the 'denticle' or tooth-like point or pointer situate on the
Rete near the 'head' of Capricorn, A. i. 23. 1. Arabic _al-mur'[=i]_, the
indicator.

ALOES, _pl._ aloe, _in comp._ ligne-aloes, T. iv. 1137. (_Aloes_ is a pl.,
not a gen. case here; see _Aloe_ in the New E. Dict.)

A-LOFTE, _adv._ aloft, up, T. i. 922; on high, T. v. 259.

A-LONDE, _adv._ on land, ashore, L. 2166; _him were lever a-londe_, he
would rather be on land, L. 2413.

ALONG ON, along of, owing to, T. iii. 783; Along on me, along of me, T. ii.
1001.

ALOON, _adj._ alone, R. 450; _her aloon_, all by herself, L. 2378.

AL-OONLY, _adv._ solely, B 5. p 4. 95; Al-only, B 3. P 6. 35; T. v. 1779.

ALOSE, _v._ commend, T. iv. 1473. O.F. _aloser_, to praise; from _los_,
praise.

AL-OUTERLY, _adv._ entirely, absolutely, 3. 1244; L. 626; Al-outrely, T. i.
382, v. 1694; wholly, B 3. p 12. 82; B 4. p 2. 135, p 7. 3; All-utterly,
HF. 296. Lit. 'all utterly.'

ALPES, _pl._ bull-finches, R. 658. 'Alpe, a byrde, _Ficedula_'; Prompt.
Parv.

ALSO, AL-SO, _adv._ and _conj._ as, R. 212, 1122; T. iii. 1388; HF. 656,
1532; A 730, 3870, B 396, D 1215, H 80; Al-so, _adv._ so, A 3104; HF. 629;
Alswa, also (Northern), A 4085; Also many, as many, L. 528; Also muche as,
as much as, D 2134; Als, also, besides, 3. 728; HF. 2071; T. ii. 726; B
3973, F 1598; as, B 2850; _frequently used in expressing a wish_, 4. 267,
7. 202.

ALTERCACIOUN, _s._ altercation, dispute, B 4427, E 1473.

ALTEREN, _v._ to alter; Altered, _pt. s._ T. iii. 1778.

ALTHER, _gen. pl._ of all, A 823_n_. _The same as_ Alder, Aller, _gen. pl.
of_ Al.

ALTHER-FAIREST, _adj. superl._ fairest of all, R. 625.

ALTHER-FASTEST, _adv. sup._ as fast as possible, HF. 2131.

ALTHERFIRST, _adv._ first of all, at first, HF. 1368.

ALTHER-FIRSTE, _adj._ first of all, 3. 1173.

ALTHOGH, although, A 230; Al-though, A 1089.

ALTITUDE, _s._ the elevation of a celestial object above the horizon,
measured along a vertical arc, A. pr. 60; height, A. ii. 41. 9.

ALUM, _s._ alum, G 813.

AL-UTTERLY; see AL-OUTERLY.

ALWEY, _adv._ always, A 185, 341, E 458, 810; ceaselessly, F 422; all the
while, I 11; Alway, A 275.

ALYAUNCE; see ALLIAUNCE.

ALYNE, _adv._ in an exact line, A. ii. 38. 17.

A-LYVE, alive, R. 866; 3. 915, 10. 32; A 2698, E 139. For _on lyve_, in
life; hence orig. an adv.; but also used as adj.

AM, am, A 1131, E 838; _in phr._ it am I = it is I, B 1109.

AMADRIDES, hamadryads, A 2928.

AMALGAMING, _s._ the formation of an amalgam, G 771. An _amalgam_ is a
pasty mixture of mercury with other substances (properly with a metal).

AMASE, _v._ amaze; Amased, _pp._ G 935.

AMAYE, _v._ to dismay; A-mayed, _pp._ dismayed, T. i. 648, iv. 641. O.F.
_amaier_ = _esmaier_, to dismay; cf. Ital. _smagare_.

AMBAGES, _pl._ ambiguous words, T. v. 897.

AMBASSIATOURS, _pl._ ambassadors, T. iv. 140 _n_.

AMBEL, _s._ amble; _an ambel_, in an amble, at an ambling pace, B 2075.

AMBES AS, double aces, B 124 (see note). O.F. _ambes_, a pair; Lat. _ambo_,
both.

AMBLE, _v._ amble; Amble, _imp. s._ D 838; Ambling, _pres. pt._ E 388.

AMBLERE, _s._ an ambling nag, A 469.

AMELE, _v._ to enamel; Ameled, _pp._ R. 1080. Cf. O.F. _esmail_, enamel.

AMENDE, _v._ amend; Amenden, _v._ make amends, A 3074; Amende, _v._ amend,
3. 551; improve, F 197; to surpass in demeanour, F 97; Amende, _pr. s.
subj._ may (He) amend, D 1810; Amended, _pt. s._ improved, R. 1427; did
good, 3. 1102; Amended, _pp._ improved, B 4048; remedied, D 1097;
surpassed, B 3444.

AMENDEMENT, _s._ amends, A 4185.

AMENDER, _s._ D 1197.

AMENDES, _pl._ amends, T. ii. 342.

AMENUSE, _ger._ to lessen, I 496; _v._ diminish, I 360; Amenuseth, _pr. s._
diminishes, I 359, 481; becomes less, A. i. 21. 47; Amenused, _pt. s._ I
709; Amenused, _pp._ B 1. p 4. 51; B 2. p 4. 31; B 3. p 10. 19.

AMENUSINGE, _s._ diminution, B 3. p 10. 13.

AMERCIMENTS, _s. pl._ fines, exactions, I 752.

AMESURE, _v._ measure; Amesureth, _pr. s._ B 2. p 1. 62.

AMEVE, _v._ move; Ameved, _pt. s._ moved, changed; _nought ameved_, changed
not, altered not, E 498; Amoeved, _pp._ perturbed, I 670; moved, B 1. p 5.
2; Amoved, _pp._ perturbed, B 1. p 1. 33.

AMIABLE, _adj._ amiable, pleasant, A 138; kind, B 2168; courteous, I 629;
kindly, R. 1226.

A-MIDDE, _adv._ in the midst, R. 147; in the middle, A. i. 4. 4.

AMIDDE, _prep._ amid, in the midst of, F 409. A.S. _on-middan_, in the
middle.

AMIDDES, _adv._ in the midst, 5. 277; Amiddes of, in the midst of, HF. 845.

A-MIDDES, _prep._ in the midst of, A. i. 18. 4; in the middle, A 2009.

AMINISTRE, _v._ administer; Aministreth, _pr. s._ B 4. p 6. 62.

AMIS, _adv._ amiss, 3. 1141, 7. 318; F 780, H 278; wrong, L. 1291; wrongly,
B 3370, C 642, F 7; _seyde amis_, gave an unwelcome answer, 5. 446.

AMOEVE; see AMEVE.

AMONESTE, _v._ admonish; Amonesteth, _pr. s._ B 5. p 5. 14; I 76;
recommends, B 2484.

AMONESTINGE, _s._ admonition, B 5. p 1. 3; I 518.

AMONG, _adv._ as well, T. iii. 1816; all the while, 3. 298.

AMONGES, _adv._ sometimes, variously, B 2. p 1. 77.

AMONGES, _prep._ amongst, A 759, B 3344, G 608.

AMONICIOUN, _s._ pointing out, B 1. p 4. 7.

AMONTE; see AMOUNTE.

AMORETTES, _pl._ love-knots, R. 892.

AMOROUS, _adj._ full of love, 12. 22; R. 83; T. iii. 17; L. 1189; A 2861,
3355, F 1500; Amorouse, _fem._ T. iv. 1431.

AMOROUSLY, _adv._ E 1680.

AMORTISE, _v._ deaden; Amortised, _pp._ deadened, rendered dead, I 233 _n_,
247 _n_.

AMOR VINCIT OMNIA, love conquers all, A 162.

AMORWE, A-MORWE, on the morrow, A 822, 1621, D 593; L. 1757; in the
morning, 3. 1103; T. ii. 405; HF. 2106.

AMOUNTE, _v._ amount to, mean; Amounteth, _pr. s._ means, A 2362, B 569,
2258; amounts to, F 108; Amonteth, _pr. s._ A. i. 16. 4.

AMOVE; see AMEVE.

AMPHIBOLOGYES, _pl._ ambiguities, T. iv. 1406.

AMY, _s._ friend, C 318. F. _ami._

AN, a, A 575, &c.; A, 578, &c.; An eighte busshels, a quantity equal to
eight bushels, C 771.

AN, _prep._ on, L. 1191; An heigh, on high, E 2326; An hye, HF. 215.

ANCESTRES, _pl._ ancestors, B 3. p 6. 30.

ANCILLE, _s._ handmaiden, 1. 109.

ANCLE, _s._ A 1660.

ANCRE, _s._ anchor, 10. 38; Anker, L. 2501; Ancres, _pl._ B 2. p 4. 40.

AND, and, A 3, &c.

AND, _conj._ if, 6. 112; L. 217, 319, 357, 1790; A 1214, B 3140, E 2433, G
145, 602, 1371; T. i. 125, 695, ii. 289, iv. 1343.

ANES, _adv._ once (Northern), A 4074.

ANEXED; see ANNEXE.

ANGEL, _s._ angel, D 1678, 1682; Angels, _pl._ R. 672. See AUNGEL.

ANGELUS AD VIRGINEM (see note), A 3216.

ANGLE, _s._ angle (a technical term in astrology), B 304 (see note), F 263
(see note); angular distance from the meridian, A. ii. 4. 30; Angles, _pl._
angles, F 230.

ANGLE-HOOK, _s._ fish-hook, 4. 238.

ANGRE, _s._ anger, trouble, F 1553; anguish, R. 320.

ANGUISSH, _s._ anxiety, B 3. p 3. 22; anguish, I 169, 678; Anguish, E 462;
Angwish, A 1030.

ANGUISSHE, _v._ to cause pain; Anguissheth, _pr. s._ wounds, pains, B 3. m
7. 1.

ANGUISSOUS, _adj._ anxious, B 2. p 4. 56; tormenting, B 2. m 5. 22; full of
anxiety, B 3. p 2. 77, p 7. 17; full of distress, B 2. p 4. 53; distressed,
R. 520; sorry, I 304; Anguisshous, distressful, T. iii. 816.

ANHANGE, _ger._ to hang, C 259; Anhanged, _pp._ B 3945, 3949, 4252, 4330, C
275; Anhonged, R. 453; T. ii. 1620.

ANIENTISSE, _v._ annihilate; Anientissed, _pp._ brought to naught, B 2438.
Cf. O.F. _nient_, _neant_, nothing.

A-NIGHT, in the night, A 1042, 2007, D 202, E 464; at night, D 1827; L.
1292, 1475.

A-NIGHTES, _adv._ by night, R. 18; A 3214.

ANIMAL, _adj._ A 2749.

ANKER; see ANCRE.

ANLAS, _s._ a short, two-edged knife or dagger, broad at the hilt and
tapering to the point, formerly worn at the girdle, A 357 (see note).

ANNEXE, _v._ to annex; Annexed, _pp._ tied, 2. 72; annexed, attached, C
482, D 1147; Anexed, B 4. p 4. 80.

ANNI COLLECTI, collected years, A. ii. 44. 17. When a table contains
quantities denoting the change in a planet's place during round periods of
years, such as 20, 40, or 60 years, such a change is entered under the
heading _Anni Collecti_.

ANNI EXPANSI, expanse years, A. ii. 44. 17. When a table contains
quantities denoting the change in a planet's place during only a few years,
viz. from 1 to 19 years, such changes are entered separately under the
headings 1, 2, 3, &c., years, which are designated the _expanse_ (or
separate) years.

ANNIS COLLECTIS ET EXPANSIS, the collected years and expanse years, A. ii.
45. 11. See above.

ANNUELEER, _s._ a priest who received _annuals_ (see the note), a chaplain,
G 1012.

ANNUNCIAT, _pp._ pre-announced, i.e. whose birth was foretold, B 3205.

ANOINTE, _v._ anoint; Anoynten, _pr. pl._ R. 1057; Anoint, _pp._ A 199;
Anoynted, I 502 _n_.

ANON, _adv._ anon, immediately, at once, A 32, 748, B 34, 326, C 864, 881,
&c.; B 3. p 4. 53; Anoon, forthwith, A 965, 971; B 1896, 3299, E 435, F
1011; HF. 339; &c.

ANON-RIGHT, _adv._ immediately, L. 115, 1503; 3. 354, 5. 218; R. 1334; A.
ii. 34. 3; A 3847, G 1141; Anoon-right, 3. 450; HF. 132.

ANON-RIGHTES, _adv._ immediately, A 3480.

ANOTHER, another, A 163; &c.

ANOY, _s._ vexation, T. iv. 845; trouble, B 1320; torture, B 3. m 12. 25;
sadness, I 678, 680; Anoyes, _pl._ troubles, I 518.

ANOYAUNCE, _s._ annoyance; Anoyaunces, _pl._ I 656.

ANOYE, _v._ annoy, vex, T. iv. 1304; Anoye, _2 pr. s. subj._ grieve, B 2. p
4. 49; Anoyeth, _pr. s._ annoys, vexes, B 2234, 3979; B 1. m 5. 32; gives
offence, 5. 518; does harm, F 875; _impers._ it vexes, G 1036; Anoyeth,
_pr. pl._ harm, B 2187; _imp. pl._ Anoyeth, injure ye, B 494; Anoyed, _pp._
annoyed, displeased, D 1848; wearied, I 726; peevish, I 1051.

ANOYFUL, _adj._ annoying, tiresome, B 2222.

ANOYINGE, _adj._ injurious, B 1. m 5. 27.

ANOYNTED; see ANOINTE.

ANOYOUS, _adj._ annoying, tedious, B 2433; disagreeable, B 2235; hurtful, B
2. p 5. 60; harmful, B 1. m 2. 3; vexatious, B 1. m 5. 25; Anoyouse,
vexatious, I 365.

ANOYOUSLY, _adv._ harmfully, B 3. p 8. 11.

ANSLETS, _for_ Hainselins, I 422 _n_.

ANSWERE, _s._ answer, 3. 1243.

ANSWERE, _v._ answer, D 1077; _a. of_, answer for, be responsible for, L.
2212; Answery, be suitable for, B 4. p 3. 44; Answerde, _pt. s._ answered,
B 1170, 1172, E 21, F 1008; Answerden, _pt. pl._ L. 1847.

ANSWERING, _s._ answer, E 512.

ANTARTIK, _adj._ southern, A. ii. 25. 7.

ANTEM, _s._ anthem, B 1850.

ANTIPHONER, _s._ anthem-book, _antiphonarium_, B 1709.

ANTONY, FYR OF SEINT, erysipelas, I 427.

ANVELT, _s._ anvil, 3. 1165.

ANY, any, A 580, &c.

ANY-THING, at all, in any degree, T. i. 848; A. ii. 17. 6, 38. 10.

AORNEMENT, _s._ adornment, I 432. O.F. _aorner_, to adorn.

APAIRE; see APEIREN.

APALLE, _v._ to render pallid; Apalled, _pp._ vapid, I 723; weakened, A
3053; Appalled, pale, F 365; languid, B 1292.

APARAILE, _s._ apparel; Apparayle, R. 575, 1276; Apparaile, attire (F.
_atour_), 1. 153; Apparaille, E 1208; Aparayles, _s. pl._ ornaments, B 2. p
4. 46 (Lat. _ornamentis_.)

APARAILE, _v._ apparel; Apparaille, D 343; prepare, L. 2473; Apparaillen,
_v._ prepare, B 2532, 3797; Apparailleth, _pr. s._ endues, I 462;
Apparaille, _imp. s._ prepare, B 2534; Aparailen, _pt. pl. subj._ set in
array, B 1. p 4. 137; Aparailede, _pt. s. refl._ clothed himself, B 3. m 4.
2; Aparayled, _pp._ ornamented, B 1. p 5. 27.

APARAILEMENTS, _s. pl._ adornments, ornaments, B 2. p 5. 114.

APARAILING, _s._; Apparaillinge, preparation, A 2913; Apparailling, B 2537.

APARCEYVE; see APERCEIVE.

A-PART, _adv._ aside, apart, A 3210, B 1446, F 252.

APASEN; see APESE.

APASSE, _v._ pass; Apassed, _pp._ passed away, B 2. p 5. 22.

APAYE, _v._ to satisfy; Apayed, _pp._ satisfied, B 2. p 5. 57, p 7. 56; T.
v. 1249; pleased, T. iii. 421; _yvel a._, ill pleased, E 1052; Apayd, _pp._
satisfied, A 1868, F 1548, I 900; _yvel a._, ill pleased, L. 80; 6. 69; 7.
123; D 1282, G 921, 1049, H 358.

APAYRE; see APEIREN.

APAYSE; see APESE.

APE, _s._ ape, HF. 1212; B 1630 (see note), 3100, D 1464, I 651; T. ii.
1042; dupe, A 3389, 4202, G 1313; Apes, _pl._ apes, HF. 1806; B 4282;
dupes, T. i. 913; A 706.

APEIREN, _ger._ to injure, impair, A 3147; Apeyren, _v._ I 1079; Apaire,
grow worse, HF. 756; Apeyre, _1 pr. pl._ perish, T. ii. 329; Apayred, _pp._
impaired, B 1. p 5. 42; Apeyred, injured, T. i. 38. Variant of E. _impair_.

APERCEIVE, _v._ perceive; Aperceyve, E 600; A. ii. 35. 4; Ap['a]rceyve, T.
iv. 656; Aperceyveth, _pr. s._ conceives, B 4. p 6. 57; discerns, I 294;
Aperceivede, _1 pt. s._ perceived, B 3. p 12. 58; Aperceived, _pp._ made
known, B 1. p 4. 89.

APERCEIVING, _s._; Aperceyvinges, _pl._ perceivings, perceptions,
observations, F 286.

APERT, _adj._ manifest, I 649.

APERT, _adv._ openly, F 531; Aperte, HF. 717.

APERTENANT, _adj._ belonging to, such as belongs to, 2. 70; Apertenaunt, B
3505; Apertinent, suitable, E 1010.

APERTENE, _v._ appertain; Aperteneth, _pr. s. impers._ B 2171; Apertenen,
_pr. pl._ I 83; Apertienen, B 3. p 4. 25; Apertening, _pres. pt._
belonging, A. pr. 10; G 785.

APERTLY, _adv._ openly, B 1. p 4. 126, B 3. p 10. 90; clearly, I 294.

APESE, APEISE, _v._ appease, pacify; Apese, E 433, H 98; Apasen (=
Apaisen), _2 pr. pl._ T. iii. 22 _n_; Apeseth, _imp. pl._ mitigate, 4. 10;
Appeseth, _pr. s. refl._ is pacified, B 3051; Apeysen, _2 pr. pl._ T. iii.
22; Apaysede, _pt. s._ appeased, B 4. m 7. 36, 38; Apaysed, _pt. s._ B
2290; Apesed, _pp._ appeased, T. i. 250, 940.

APEYRE; see APEIRE.

APEYSE; see APESE.

APOCALIPS, _s._ apocalypse, I 136.

APOINTE, _v._ appoint; Apoynte, T. v. 1620; settle (herself), T. ii. 691;
Apoynted him, _pt. s._ determined, set himself, E 1595; Apoynteden, _pt.
pl._ appointed, made appointments, T. iii. 454; Apoynted, _pp._ resolved, E
1616.

APOSE; see APPOSE.

APOSTELLES, _s. pl._ apostles, G 1002; Apostles, _gen. pl._ A 527.

APOTECARIE, _s._ apothecary, B 4138; Apothecaries, preparers of medicines,
A 425.

APOYNTE; see APOINTE.

APPALLED; see APALLE.

APPARAILLE, APPARAYL, APPARAILING; see APARAILE, APARAILING.

APPARAUNTE, _adj. pl._ apparent, manifest, R. 5.

APPARENCE, _s._ appearance, F 218; seeming, HF. 265; apparition, F 1602;
false show, F 1157; Apparaunce, L. 1372; Apparences, _pl._ apparitions, F
1140.

APPEL, _s._ apple, R. 819; A 4406; Apples, _pl._ R. 1374; 9. 37; B 4. m 7.
24.

APPERE, _v._ appear, 1. 19; Apperen, _v._ B 3064; _ger._ L. 273.

APPESE; see APESE.

APPETYT, _s._ desire, A 1680; appetite, 10. 55; Appetytes, _pl._ B 3390, I
207.

APPETYTE, _v._; Appetyteth, _pr. s._ seeks to have, desires, L. 1582.

APPLYEN, _v._ be attached to, B 5. p 4. 9.

APPOSE, _v._; Apposed, _pt. s._ questioned, G 363 (see the note); Aposed,
_pp._ opposed, alleged, B 1. p 5. 34.

APPRENTICE, _s._ D 303.

APPRENTYS, _adj._ unskilled, as novices, R. 687.

APPREVE, _v._ approve; Appreved, _pp._ E 1349; approved as true, L. 21.

APPROPRE, _v._; Appropred, _pp._ appropriated, made the property of, 14.
18.

APPROWOUR, _s._; Approwours, _pl._ approvers, informers, D 1343 (see note).

APREYNTE, _v._; Apreynted, _pp._ imprinted, B 5. m 4. 10 _n_.

APROCHEN, _v._ approach, T. v. 1; B 1. p 1. 31.

APURTENANCE, _s._ appurtenance; Apurtenaunces, _s. pl._ I 793.

APYKE, _v._; Apyked, _pp._ trimmed, adorned, A 365.

AQUEINTE, _v._ acquaint; Aqueynte me, make myself acquainted, 3. 532;
Aqueynteden, _pt. pl._ became acquainted, HF. 250; Aqueinted, _pp._
acquainted, B 1219; Aqueynted, R. 600, 1139.

AQUEYNTAUNCE, _s._ acquaintance, A 245; Acqueyntances, _pl._ friends, D
1991.

AQUYTE, _v._; Aquyte, _imp. s._ requite, T. ii. 1200.

ARACE, _v._ eradicate, uproot, T. v. 954; B 1. p 6. 42; tear away, 6. 20,
21. 18; E 1103, F 1393; Arace, _pr. s. subj._ root out, eradicate, T. iii.
1015; Araced, _pp._ torn, B 1. p 3. 30; Arraced, _pp._ torn up, borne
along, B 5. m 1. 9; torn away, B 3. p 11. 110. A.F. _aracer_, as if for
Lat. _ab-r[=a]dicare_.

ARAISE; see AREISE.

ARAY, _s._ array, dress, L. 1505; 4. 176, 5. 96, 318; Dress, 5. 219;
arrangement, T. iii. 536; Array, state, dress, A 41, 73; attire, I 932;
array of garments, L. 2607; order, E 262; ordinance, E 670; position, D
902; condition, A 934.

ARAYE, _v._ array; Arayed, _pp._ dressed, ready, T. iii. 423; clad, R. 472;
L. 1207; adorned, T. ii. 1187; _wel a._, well situated, T. ii. 680;
Arrayed, _pp._ equipped, A 2046; dressed, F 389; ordered, B 252; appointed,
F 1187.

ARBITRE, _s._ will, choice, B 5. p 3. 12.

ARCH; see ARK.

ARCHAUNGEL, _s._ titmouse, R. 915.

ARCH['E]R, _s._ archer, H 108; Arch['e]er, B 1929; Archers, _pl._ 2523 _n_.

ARCHEWYVES, _s. pl._ archwives, ruling wives, E 1195.

ARDAUNT, _adj._ ardent, B 3. p 12. 10; eager, B 4. p 3. 73.

ARE, _2 pr. pl._ are, A 4045.

AREDE, _v._ explain, disclose, T. ii. 1505, iv. 1570; counsel, T. iv. 1112;
interpret, 3. 289; _ger._ to divine, T. ii. 132. A.S. _[=a]r[=ae]dan_.

AREISE, _v._ raise; Areysen, _ger._ to levy, I 567; Areyseth, _pr. s._
raises, B 4. m 1. 7; Araiseth, arouses, B 4. m 2. 7; Areysen, _2 pr. pl._
exalt, B 2. p 6. 3; Areysed, _pp._ praised, L. 1525; Areisid, raised, A.
ii. 2. 5.

AREST, _s._ rest (for a spear), A 2602.

ARESTE, _s._ arrest, B 4090; detention, A 1310; responsibility, E 1282;
delay, L. 806; hesitation, L. 1929; deliberation, L. 397.

ARESTE, _v._ stop (a horse), A 827; Do aresten, cause to be stopped, B
4210; Aresten, _ger._ to arrest, B 2. p 1. 81.

ARETTEN, _v._ impute, B 2. p 4. 9; Arretteth upon, _pr. s._ accuses, I 580;
Arrette, _pr. pl. subj._ ascribe, I 1082; _ye n'arette it nat_, ye impute
it not, consider it not, A 726; Aretted, _pp._ imputed, A 2729. O.F.
_areter_, to reckon; from Lat. _ad_ and _reputare_.

A-REWE, _adv._ successively, lit. in a row, D 1254.

AREYSE; see AREISE.

ARGOILE, _s._ crude tartar (see note), G 813.

ARG['U]E, _v._ argue, T. ii. 694; Arg['u]we, T. iv. 497; Argued, _pt. s._
3. 504.

ARGUINGE, _s._ argument, L. 475.

ARGUMENT, _s._ T. iv. 956, 1179; Arguments, _pl._ 5. 538; 'arguments', in
astronomy (see note), F 1277; Argumentes, E 1619; T. ii. 1025, iv. 969.

ARGUMENTE, _v._ argue; Argumenten, _pr. pl._ B 212; Argumented, _pt. s._ T.
i. 377.

ARIGHT, _adv._ rightly, well, A 267, 3115, 3426; T. ii. 1261, iii. 462, v.
871; aright, G 1418; properly, F 694; wholly, A 189; exactly, T. v. 364;
certainly, B 3135, 4641.

ARISEN, ARIST; see ARYSE.

ARISTE, _s._ arising, rising, A. ii. 12. 10.

ARK, _s._ arc, referring to the arc of the horizon extending from sunrise
to sunset, B 2 (see note); daily course of the sun, E 1795; arc, the
apparent angular distance passed over by the sun in a day and a night, A.
ii. 7. 7; Arch (the same), A. ii. 9. 2; Arches, _pl._ arcs, A. ii. 7. 9.

ARM, _s._ arm, A 111, 158; Arm in arm, T. ii. 823, 1116, 1725; Armes, _pl._
arms (an oath), D 833; arms, 3. 953; T. iii. 1247.

ARMEE, _s._ army (_error for_ ariuee = arive), A 60 _n_. See ARYVE.

ARMEN, _ger._ to arm, A 1651; Armeth, _imp. pl._ G 385; Armed, _pp._ 2. 38;
T. ii. 625.

ARMES, _pl._ arms, weapons, 7. 1; Man of armes, valiant man-at-arms, T. ii.
631; coat-of-arms, A 1012.

ARM-GREET, _adj._ thick as one's arm, A 2145.

ARMHOLES, _s. pl._ A. i. 21. 53.

ARMINGE, _s._ arming, putting on of armour, B 2037.

ARMIPOTENTE, _adj._ powerful in arms, A 1982, 2441.

ARMLEES, _adj._ armless, without an arm, B 3393.

ARMONIAK, _adj._ ammoniac; applied to _bole_, G 790, and _sal_, G 798. It
is a corruption of Lat. _armeniacum_, i.e. Armenian, belonging to Armenia;
see notes.

ARMONYE, _s._ harmony, 3. 313, 5. 63, 191; HF. 1396; T. v. 1812.

ARMURE, _s._ defensive armour, 4. 130; R. 1271; B 936, 2523, F 158, G 385;
Armoure, B. 2009; Armures, _pl._ defensive armour, B 1. p 2. 6, B 2. m 5.
17, B 4. m 2. 4.

ARMURERS, _pl._ armourers, A 2507.

ARN, _pr. pl._ are, HF. 1008; T. i. 1006, v. 1374; B 2833, E 342, I 734.

AROOS; see ARYSE.

A-ROUME, _adv._ at large, in an open space, HF. 540.

A-ROWE, _adv._ in a row, HF. 1835; L. 554.

AROWE, _s._; see ARWE.

ARRACE; see ARACE.

ARRAY, ARRAYE; see ARAY, ARAYE.

ARRERAGE, _s._ arrears, A 602.

ARRETTE; see ARETTEN.

ARRIVAGE, _s._ coming to shore, HF. 223.

ARROG['A]NCE, _s._ D 1112, I 391.

ARROGANT, _adj._ I 396.

ARRYVE, _v._ arrive, come to land, 10. 38; Arriveth, _pr. s._ (it) arrives,
L. 2309; Aryvede, _pt. s._ drove ashore, B 4. m 3. 1; Aryved, _pp._ come to
land, L. 1049; _yvel-a._, ill-fated, R. 1068.

ARSENIK, _s._ arsenic, G 798.

ARS-METR['Y]KE, _s._ arithmetic, D 2222; Ars-m['e]trik, A 1898.

ART, _s._ art, A 476, 3191, 3209; Cunning, 5. 245; kind, sort, E 1241;
Artes, _pl._ arts, F 1120.

ART, _2 pr. s._ art, A 1154, E 838.

ARTELLERIES, _s. pl._ engines for shooting, B 2523.

ARTEN, _ger._ to constrain, urge, T. i. 388. L. _artare_.

ARTIFICIAL, _adj._ A. ii. 7. _rub._; B 2. The _day artificial_ is the
length of the day, from the moment of sunrise to that of sunset.

ARTIK, arctic, northern, A. i. 14. 6, A. ii. 22. 2.

ARTOW, art thou, A 1141, 3157, B 102, 308, 1885, 3195; T. iv. 533; B 1. p
4. 2; thou art, L. 986.

ARWE, _s._ arrow, T. ii. 641; F 1112; Arowe, 7. 185; Arwes, _pl._ arrows, A
107, 1966, B 3448, D 1381, E 1203, F 1194; 5. 512, 16. 26; L. 972; B 4. m
7. 24; Arowes, R. 939.

ARYSE, _v._ arise, be raised, T. iv. 1480; Aryseth, _pr. s._ rises, I 971;
Arist, _pr. s._ (_contr. from_ ariseth) arises, B 265; Ar[`o][`o]s, _pt.
s._ arose, 5. 575; stood up, L. 831; Arisen, _pt. pl._ arose, T. ii. 1598;
Aryse, _pr. s. subj._ may arise; Fro the sonne aryse, from the point where
the sun rises, A. ii. 11. 10, A. ii. 12. 4; Aryseth, _imp. pl._ rise up, T.
ii. 221.

ARYSING, _s._ rising, rise, A. ii. 12. 1; Arysinges, _pl._ (Lat. _ortus_),
B 1. m 5. 9.

ARYVE, _s._ lit. arrival; landing, disembarkation of troops, A 60.
(_Pronounced_ n[`o]bl' ar['y]v[:e].)

ARYVE; see ARRYVE.

AS, so (in asseverations), 3. 838, 1235; an expletive, expressing a wish,
commonly used with an imperative, e.g. _as lat_, pray let, B 859; _as
lene_, pray lend, A 3777; _as go we_, pray let us go, T. v. 523; _as
dooth_, pray do, C 166; _as have_, may (he) have, B 1061; _as make_, be
sure to make, T. ii. 1025; cf. D 191:--As, 	  as if, 3. 1323; R. 428; A 81,
199, 636, B 1636; like, B 1864; as that, F 1018; As after, according to, B
3555; As ferforth as, as far as, B 19, G 1087; As in, i.e. for, B 3688; As
now, at present, at this time, A 2264, B 740, F 652; HF. 1617; on the
present occasion, G 944; for the present, G 1019; As nouthe, as at this
time, at present, A 462; As of, with respect to, 5. 26; F 17; As swythe, as
soon as possible, at once, 7. 226; G 1030, 1194, 1294; As that, as soon as,
F 615; as though, 3. 1200; As ther, there, 4. 117; As to, with reference
to, F 107; As to my wit, as it seems to me, 5. 547.

AS, _s._ an ace, B 3851; Ambes as = double aces, B 124.

ASAY; see ASSAY.

ASCAPE, _v._ escape; Ascapen, _pr. pl._ B 4. p 4. 88.

ASCAUNCE, as if, perhaps, G 838 (see note); in case that, L. 2203;
Ascaunces, as if, D 1745; as if to say, T. i. 205, 292. Compounded of E.
_as_, and O.F. _quanses_, as if (Godefroy).

ASCENCIOUN, _s._ ascension, ascending degree, A. ii. 26. 5; B 4045; rising
up, G. 778; Assensiouns, _pl._ A. ii. 26. 2.

ASCENDE, _v._ ascend, rise (a term in astrology), I 11; Ascended, _pt. s._
rose above the horizon, A. ii. 40. 51; Assended, A. ii. 40. 29; Ascending,
_pres. part._ ascending, in the ascendant, i.e. near the eastern horizon, F
264.

ASCENDENT, _s._ ascendant, A 417, B 302, D 613; Assendent, A. ii. 3. 24, 4.
1; Ascendentes, _pl._ HF. 1268. The 'ascendant' is that degree of the
ecliptic which is rising above the horizon at a given moment.

ASCRY, _s._ an alarm, T. ii. 611 _n_. Cf. O.F. _escrier_, to cry out.

ASEMBLE; see ASSEMBLE.

AS[:E]URAUNCE, _s._ assurance, T. v. 1259.

ASH; see ASSHE.

ASHAME, _v._ shame; Ashamed, _pp._ put to shame, A 2667; ashamed, R. 1296;
_for pure ashamed_, for being ashamed, for very shame, T. ii. 656.

ASKEN, _ger._ to ask, B 101; Asketh, _pr. s._ requires, T. i. 339; Aske, _2
pr. s. subj._ B 102; Aske, _pr. s. subj._ may ask, R. 35; 3. 32. See AXE.

ASKING, _s._ question, 3. 33; L. 313. See AXING.

ASLAKE, _v._ diminish, A 3553; Aslaked, _pp._ satiated, L. 2008 _n_;
assuaged, A 1760.

A-SLEPE, _adv._ asleep, L. 547, 2171, 2175.

ASONDER, _adv._ asunder, apart, A 491, B 1157, D 1674; T. v. 983; 3. 425.

ASP, _s._ aspen tree, 5. 180; A 2921; _collectively_, R. 1384; Aspes,
_gen._ T. iii. 1200; Aspe, _dat._ L. 2648. A.S. _aeps_.

ASPECT, _s._ an (astrological) aspect, A 1087; Aspectes, _pl._ L. 2597; T.
ii. 682, iii. 716; A. ii. 4. 31. An 'aspect' is the angular distance
between two planets. The principal aspects are _five_, viz. conjunction,
sextile, quartile, trine, and opposition, corresponding to the angular
distances 0deg, 60deg, 90deg, 120deg, and 180deg, respectively.

ASPEN, _adj._ belonging to an aspen-tree; _or s._ an aspen, T. iii. 1200
_n_. (An adjectival form.)

ASPEN-LEEF, _s._ leaf of an aspen tree, D 1667.

ASPRE, _adj._ sharp, bitter, T. iv. 827, 847, 1501, v. 265; B 4. p 4. 186,
p 5. 23; vexatious, B 3. p 8. 12; cruel, B 2. p 8. 23; fierce, hardy, 7.
23; Aspere, irritable, irritated, B 2. p 1. 72.

ASPRENESSE, _s._ sharpness, B 4. p 4. 106; tribulation, B 4. p 7. 62.

ASPYE, _s._ spy, C 755.

ASPYE, _v._ spy, see, A 1420; Aspyen, _v._ behold, T. ii. 649; Aspyed, _1
pt. s._ perceived, 5. 250.

ASSAILE, _v._ assail, attack; Assaille, _v._ B 3953; Assayleth, _pr. s._ T.
i. 607; Assailed, R. 1665.

ASSAUT, _s._ assault, A 989; Assautes, _pl._ B 2613.

ASSAY, _s._ trial, D 290, E 621, 1138, G 1249, 1338; T. iv. 1508; 3. 552,
18. 62; L. 9; _doon his a._, make his attempt, L. 1594; A-say, test, L. 28
_a_; Assayes, _pl._ E 697, 1166.

ASSAYE, _v._ try, make trial of, B 3149; try, 3. 574; endeavour, F 1567;
Assayen, _ger._ to assail, T. i. 928; Assayeth, _pr. s._ experiences, B 3.
m 2. 13; Assayen, _pr. pl._ try, L. 487; Assay, _imp. s._ try, B 2406, D
942; make trial of, L. 1884; Assayeth, _imp. pl._ try, E 1740; Assaye, let
him try, E 1229; Assayed, _pp._ proved, tested, B 2. p 7. 86; D 286;
proved, B 2279; tried, E 1054; experienced, B 2. p 4. 70; T. iii. 1220,
1447; A 1811.

ASSAYLE; see ASSAILE.

ASSE, _s._ ass, 5. 255; B 1. p 4. 2; B 4. p 3. 83; T. i. 731; Asses, _gen._
D 954, 976; T. ii. 1042; Asses, _pl._ D 285.

ASSEGE, _s._ siege, T. i. 464, ii. 107, 123.

ASSEGE, _v._ besiege; Assegeden, _pt. pl._ T. i. 60; Asseged, _pp._ A 881.

ASSEMBLE, _v._; Assemblen, _v._ come together, I 909; Asemble, _ger._ to
amass, B 3. p 8. 5; Assembled, _pp._ 5. 367; A 717; united, G 50, I 905.

ASSEMBLEE, _s._ assembly, R. 635; coming together, I 907.

ASSEMBLINGE, _s._ union, I 904, 917.

ASSENDENT; see ASCENDENT.

ASSENT, _s._ assent, agreement, 4. 52; A 777, 817; consent, A 852;
conspiracy, C 758; opinion, E 1532; _of thyn assent_, consenting to thee,
T. iv. 535.

ASSENTE, _v._ agree to, A 374; assent, A 3092; consent, B 3469; agree, E
11, 88, 129; Assenten, _pr. pl._ agree, E 176; Assentedest, _2 pr. s._
consentedest, didst pay heed, G 233; Assenteden, _pt. pl._ assented, E
1570; Assented, _pp._ agreed, 2. 53; agreed to, C 146.

ASSHE (1), _s._ ash-tree, 5. 176; Ash, A 2922; Asshe, _collectively_,
ash-trees, R. 1384.

ASSHE (2), _s._ ash (of something burnt); Ash, ash (of burnt wood), L.
2649; Asshen, _pl._ ashes, 7. 173; A 1302, 1364, 3882, C 209, F 255, G 807;
T. ii. 539, iv. 119; Asshes, G 807. A.S. _asce_, _aesce_, a cinder.

ASSHY, _adj._ strewn with ashes, A 2883.

ASSIGNE, _v._ assign, T. v. 1302; Assigned, _pp._ B 4. p 6. 238.

ASSOILEN, _ger._ to discharge, pay, B 5. p 1. 9; _v._ loosen, B 5. p 3. 21;
Assoile, _1 pr. s._ absolve, pardon, C 913; Assoille, C 387; Assoilen, _pr.
pl._ investigate, explain, B 5. p 4. 17; Assoileth, _imp. pl._ resolve,
answer, E 1654; Assoiled, _pp._ explained, B 5. p 6. 198.

ASSOILING, _s._ absolution, A 661.

ASSURE, _s._ assurance, protestation, 7. 331.

ASSURE, _v._ feel secure, trust, T. v. 870; rely, T. v. 1624; declare (to
be) sure, 7. 90; Assure her, _refl._ be bold enough, L. 908; Assure, _1 pr.
s._ promise, 18. 15; comfort, give confidence to, 5. 448; Assureth, _pr.
s._ renders secure, A 926; vows, I 379; Assuren, _pr. pl._ make secure, A
1924; Assure, _imp. s._ trust, rely, T. i. 680; Assured, _pp._ assured, HF.
581; self-reliant, 2. 40; self-possessed, T. i. 182; secured, B 1. p 4. 77.

ASSWAGE; see ASWAGE.

ASSYSE, _s._ assize, session, A 314; judgement, 1. 36; position, R. 900,
1237, 1392.

ASTAT, _s._ state, B 2. p 1. 10 _n_; Astate, I 325 _n_.

ASTERTE, _v._ escape, 6. 23, 22. 13; L. 1802; A 1595, C 414, F 1022; escape
from, L. 2338; D 968; get away, withdraw, 3. 1154; release, D 1314;
Asterten, _v._ L. 1615; Asterte, _pr. s. subj._ should escape, T. i. 1050;
may escape (me), T. v. 1343; _pt. t. subj._ might escape, B 475; Asterte,
_pt. s._ escaped, T. iii. 97, v. 1492; escaped from, T. iii. 1070;
Asterted, _pp._ escaped, B 437; Astert, _pp._ suddenly freed, escaped, A
1592. Lit. 'start off.'

ASTONIE, _v._ astonish; Astonieth, _pr. s._ astonishes, HF. 1174;
Astonyeth, 5. 5; Astonied, _pp._ HF. 549; T. ii. 427; F 1339; Astoned,
_pp._ astonished, T. i. 274, iii. 1089; A 2361, E 316; confounded, I 233;
stupid, B 4. p 3. 82.

ASTONYINGE, _s._ astonishment, B 4. p 5. 21; Astoninge, B 1. p 2. 9, 11.

ASTORE, _v._ to store; Astored, _pp._ stored, provided, A 609.

ASTROLABIE, _s._ astrolabe, A. pr. 4; Astrelabie, A 3209.

ASTROLOGER, _s._ T. iii. 1415.

ASTROLOGIEN, _s._ astrologer, astronomer, D 324; A. pr. 53; Astrologiens,
_pl._ A. pr. 44.

ASTROLOGYE, _s._ astrology, A 3192, 3514; F 1266; Astrologie, A. pr. 75.

ASTROMYE (_for_ Astronomye), _an ignorant form_, A 3451, 3457.

ASTRONOMYE, _s._ astronomy, B 1. m 2. 11; astrology, T. iv. 115; A 414.

ASUNDER, _adv._ asunder, B 3. m 1. 2. See ASONDER.

ASURE, _s._ azure, R. 477; 7. 330; T. iii. 1370; E 254; Asur, B 4052.

ASWAGE, _v._ assuage, mitigate, R. 1230; B 3834; diminish, F 835; Asswage,
T. iv. 255.

ASWEVE, _v._; A-sweved, _pp._ dazed, put to sleep, HF. 549. A.S.
_[=a]swebban_ (= _[=a]swefian_), to put to sleep.

A-SWOWN, _adv._ (_from pp._) in a swoon, L. 2207; 3. 123; Aswowe, 7. 354;
_hence_ Aswowne, in a swoon, T. iii. 1092; A 3823, C 245, 253, E 1079, F
474.

ASYDE, _adv._ aside, 3. 558, 862; A 896, E 303.

AT, _prep._ at, A 20, &c.; of, R. 378; T. ii. 894; G 542, 621; as to, 6.
114; by, D 2095; in the presence of, T. ii. 984; with, beside, HF. 1593;
to, HF. 1603; At me, with respect to me, B 1975; At erste, first of all,
HF. 512; At his large, free, free to speak or be silent, A 2288; At on, at
one, agreed, A 4197; At shorte wordes, briefly, 5. 481; At regard, with
regard, I 180; At y[:e], at (your) eye, with your own eyes, visibly, A
3016; _have at thee_, I attack thee, L. 1383.

AT-AFTER, _prep._ after, B 1445, E 1921, F 302, 918, 1219.

ATAKE, _v._ overtake, G 556, 585; A-take, _pp._ overtaken, 4. 55; L. 2182;
D 1384.

ATASTE, _2 pr. s. subj._ taste, B 2. p 1. 26.

ATAYNT; see ATTEINE.

ATAZIR, _s._ evil influence, B 305. See note.

ATEINT; see ATTEINE.

ATEMPRAUNCE, _s._ temperament, B 4. p 6. 134; adjustment, B 4. m 6. 23;
Attemperance, moderation, B 2725; Attemperaunce, temperance, C 46, I 833;
Atempraunces, _pl._ B 4. p 6. 136.

ATEMPRE, _adj._ temperate, mild, 3. 341, 1008; L. 128, 1483; moderate, B 2.
p 8. 18; T. i. 953; subdued, B 2. p 1. 2; discreet, B 2. p 4. 25; Attempre,
_adj._ mild, 5. 204; R. 131; Attempree, moderate, temperate, B 2178, 4028,
I 481; modest, I 932.

ATEMPRE, _v._; Atempreth, _pr. s._ attempers, B 1. m 2. 15, B 4. p 6. 102;
regulates, B 4. m 1. 20; _refl._ controls himself, B 2704.

ATEMPRELY, _adv._ temperately, I 861; Attemprely, temperately, B 2570, E
1679; moderately, B 2728, D 2053.

ATEMPRINGE, _s._ controlling, B 5. p 4. 62.

ATEYNE; see ATTEINE.

ATHAMAUNT, _s._ adamant, A 1305.

ATHINKEN, _v._ displease, T. v. 878; Athinketh, _pr. s. impers._ (it)
repents, T. i. 1050.

AT-ONES, _adv._ at once, at one and the same time, B 670, 2225, E 1178; L.
1815, 1840; A. pr. 32.

ATOON, _adv._ at one, E 437.

AT-REDE, _v._ surpass in counsel, T. iv. 1456; A 2449.

AT-RENNE, _v._ surpass in running, T. iv. 1456; A 2449.

ATTAMED, _pp._ broached, B 4008. From Low Lat. _attaminare_, to
contaminate, from an obsolete Lat. _taminare_; cf. F. _entamer_, from a
form _intaminare_.

ATTAYNE; see ATTEINE.

ATTE, _for_ at the, D 404, F 1369; 3. 619, 652, 4. 25; HF. 821; Atte beste,
in the best way, A 29, 749; Atte fan, at the fan, H 42; Atte fulle, at the
full, completely, A 651, B 203, E 749, F 1069; Atte gate, at the gate, B
1563; Atte hasard, at dice, C 608; Atte laste, at the last, B 506, C 844;
HF. 955; R. 521; Atte leste, at the least, at least, B 38, D 73, E 130; 5.
452; Atte Bowe, at Bow, A 125.

ATTEINE, _v._ attain; Atteyne, _v._ R. 1495; 10. 79, 11. 22; A 1243, E 447,
F 775; Attayne, B 3774; Ateyne, succeed in, 4. 161; Atteyneth, _pr. s._
appertains, B 2. p 7. 100; Ateint, _pp._ apprehended, B 3. p 3. 15; Ataynt,
experienced, B 2. p 1. 41.

ATTEMPERAUNCE; see ATEMPRAUNCE.

ATTEMPRE; see ATEMPRE.

ATTENDAUNCE, _s._; Attendaunces, _pl._ attentions, T. i. 339.

ATTRICIOUN, _s._ attrition, T. i. 557.

ATTRY, _adj._ venomous, I 583. A.S. _[=a]ttor_, _[=a]tor_, poison.

A-TWEYN, _adv._ in two, 3. 1193.

A-TWINNE, _adv._ apart, T. iii. 1666, iv. 1614; A 3589, G 1170; asunder, B
3. p 11. 106.

ATWIXE, _prep._ betwixt, R. 854.

A-TWIXEN, _prep._ between, T. v. 472.

A-TWO, in twain, 7. 94; L. 758, 2347; T. iii. 1475; B 600, 697, C 677, 936,
E 1169, G 528, H 341, I 888.

A-TYR, _s._ attire, dress, T. i. 181; I 430; Atyre, 5. 225.

AUCTOR; see AUCTOUR.

AUCTORITEE, _s._ authority, B 2355, C 387; 5. 506; HF. 2158; L. 2394; B 1.
p 4. 29; recognized text, A 3000; statements of good authors, D 1, F 482;
Auctoritees, _pl._ authorities, D 1276; texts of authors, E 2276;
Autoritees, L. 83 a.

AUCTOUR, _s._ author, HF. 314; L. 470; E 1141, I 882; originator, H 359;
Auctor, author, creator, T. iii. 1765; author, T. ii. 49, iii. 502; Autour,
T. i. 394; L. 1228; Authour, R. 7; Auctours, _pl._ authors, L. 575; A. ii.
39. 23; D 1212; Autours, _pl._ L. 88 _a_; B 2. p 7. 63.

AUDIENCE, _s._ hearing, 5. 308; T. v. 255; E 329, 637, 1179; audience, B
3991; open assembly, D 1032.

AUDITOUR, _s._ auditor, A 594; Auditours, _pl._ hearers, D 1937.

AUGHT, _s._ anything, A 389; _as adv._ in any way, B 1034.

AUGRIM, _s._ algorism, i.e. numeration, A. i. 7. 4; Arabic numerals, A. i.
8. 4.

AUGRIM-STONES, _pl._ stones or counters for calculating, A 3210.

AUG['U]RIE, _s._ augury, T. iv. 116, v. 380.

AUNCESSOUR, _s._ ancestor; Auncessours, _pl._ R. 391.

AUNCESTRE, _s._ ancestor, 5. 41; D 1156; Auncestres, _pl._ D 1160, 1172; L.
2536.

AUNCETRYE, _s._ ancestry, A 3982.

AUNGEL, _s._ angel, R. 916; 5. 191; A 1055; Aungels, _gen._ angel's, 5.
356; Aungels, _pl._ I 137; Aung['e]les, B 642. See ANGEL.

AUNGELLYK, _adj._ angelical, T. i. 102.

AUNGELLYKE, _adv._ like an angel, L. 236.

AUNTRE IT, _v._ risk it, A 4209; Auntred him, _pt. s._ adventured himself,
A 4205.

AUNTROUS, _adj._ adventurous, B 2099. Short for _aventrous_.

AUTENTYKE, _adj._ authentic, 3. 1086.

AUTER, _s._ altar, 5. 249; T. v. 1466; A 1905, 2252, B 451, 1826, I 582.

AUTHOUR. See AUCTOUR.

AUTOMPNE, _s._ autumn, B. 1. m 2. 17; Autumpne, B 1. p 4. 17, B 4. m 6. 22.

AUTORITEE; see AUCTORITEE.

AUTOUR; see AUCTOUR.

AVAILE, _v._ avail, aid, 2. 49; Avaylle, I 90; Availle, B 3950; be useful,
E 1194; Avayle, aid, T. i. 756; Availleth, _pr. s._ prevails, A 3040;
Availeth, avails, 2. 78; _impers._ (it) avails, 11. 15; Avayled, _pp._ done
good, 9. 25.

AVALE, _v._ fall down, T. iii. 626; doff, take off, A 3122; Avalen, _pr.
pl._ sink down, B 4. m 6. 19. O.F. _avaler_.

AVANTAGE, _s._ advantage, F 772, G 731; _to don his a._, to suit his own
interests, B 729; _as adj._ advantageous, B 146; Avauntage, A 1293.

AVANTE; see AVAUNTE.

AVARICE, _s._ Avarice, R. 1155; Avaryce, C 428.

AVAUNCE, _v._ promote, L. 2022; _ger._ T. i. 518; be profitable, A 246;
aid, cause to prosper, HF. 640; help, 10. 31; Avaunced, _pp._ advanced, C
410; Avaunsed, helped forward, B 2. p 4. 48.

AVAUNT, _s._ vaunt, boast, A 227, E 1457, F 1576; T. i. 1050, ii. 727;
Avauntes, _pl._ T. iii. 289.

AVAUNTAGE; see AVANTAGE.

AVAUNTE (her), _v. refl._ boast (herself), 7. 296; _ger._ to extol, HF.
1788; Avante, _v. refl._ boast, vaunt himself, D 1014; Avanten, B 2741;
Avaunte, _1 pr. s._ boast, D 403; 5. 470; _pr. pl. refl._ T. iii. 318;
Avauntede, _1 p. pt. s._ (I) boasted, B 1. p 4. 158; _2 pt. pl._ B 1. m 1.
21.

AVAUNTING, _s._ boasting, A 3884; Avauntinge, I 391.

AVAUNTOUR, _s._ boaster, 5. 430; T. ii. 724, iii. 308, 309, 314; B 4107, I
393.

AVENAUNT, _adj._ graceful, comely, R. 1263. O.F. _avenant_.

AVENTAYLE, _s._ ventail, T. v. 1558 _n_; Aventaille, E 1204 (see note).

AVENTURE, _s._ chance, 4. 21; L. 1051; A 25, 1160, 1186, B 465, D 1224, E
812; peril, B 1151, G 946; L. 909; misfortune, L. 657; chance, hap, F 940;
fortune, 18. 22; T. i. 1092; luck, T. ii. 288, 291; lot (Lat. _sortem_), B
2. m 4. 8; accident, B 5. p 1. 41; circumstance, L. 1907; T. iii. 1217;
jeopardy, I 1068; _of a._, by chance, HF. 2090; F 1501, 1508; _on a._, in
case of mishap, T. v. 298; _in a._, in the hands of fortune, T. i. 784;
_per a._, perchance, A. ii. 12. 6; _in a. and grace_, on luck and favour,
4. 60; _good a._, good fortune, 5. 131, 7. 324; Aventures, _pl._
adventures, A 795, E 15, F 659, 710; L. 1515; accidents, C 934;
Avent['u]res, circumstances, T.* i. 3; chances, HF. 1631.

AVENTUROUS, _adj._ random, B 1. p 6. 68; adventitious (Lat. _fortuitae_), B
2. p 4. 12; Aventurouse, risky, B 2858.

AVISEE, AVISELY, AVISEMENT; see AVYSEE, AVYSELY, AVYSEMENT.

AVISIOUN, _s._ vision, R. 9; HF. 7, 104, 513; B 4304, D 1858; Avision, I
126; Avisiouns, _pl._ HF. 40; T. v. 374. O.F. _avision_.

AVOUTERYE, _s._ adultery, 5. 361; L. 1809; Avoutrye, D 1304, E 1435;
Avoutrie, B 2223, I 840, 844, 875. O.F. _avouterie_.

AVOUTIER, _s._ adulterer; Avoutiers, _pl._ I 841 (MSS. E. Hn. Auowtiers;
Pt. Ln. aduoutrers; Hl. Aduoutris); Avouter, adulterer, D 1372. O.F.
_avoutrier_, _avoutre_.

AVOW, _s._ vow, A 2414, 2237, B 334, C 695 (see note), I 892; Avowe
(_better spelt_ Avow) avowal, 3. 93. Cf. F. _aveu_.

AVOWE, _v._ avow, own, proclaim, G 642; Avoweth, _pr. s._ vows, 7. 355.
O.F. _avoer_.

AVOY, _interj._ fie! B 4098. O.F. _avoi_.

AVYS, _s._ advice, consideration, opinion, A 786, B 2442, I 54; T. i. 620;
counsel, B 2916; T. iii. 453.

AVYSE, _v._ consider, T. i. 364; ponder, B 5. p 6. 79; contemplate, T. v.
1814; _refl._ consider, B 664, 2324, E 238, 350; Avyse, _1 pr. s._
consider, R. 1694; _refl._ reflect, 3. 697; Avyseth him, _pr. s._
considers, D 1228; Avyse, _2 pr. pl._ observe, T. ii. 276; Avyse thee,
_imp. s._ take heed, A 4188; L. 335; Avyseth, _imp. pl._ consider,
deliberate, A 3185, C 583; T. ii. 1124; Avysed her, _pt. s._ considered, L.
867; Avysed, _pp._ considered, I 1003; clearly seen, R. 475; being well
considered, T. ii. 1726; with mind made up, T. iii. 1186; advised, careful,
A 3584; deliberate, I 448; wary, A 4333; forewarned, B 2538; _well a._,
well advised, B 2514; Avysing, _pres. pt._ considering, taking notice, T.
v. 1657; Avysinge him, _pres. pt._ taking notice, C 124.

AVYSEE, _adj._ deliberate; Avisee, L. 1521. O.F. _avise_, pp.

AVYSELY, _adv._ advisedly, B 2488, H 327; seriously, I 1024; Avisely,
carefully, A. ii. 29. 18.

AVYSEMENT, _s._ consideration, B 2941; L. 407; counsel, T. ii. 343, iv.
936; deliberation, B 86, E 1531; 5. 555; Avisement, consideration, I 541;
determination, L. 1417.

AWAIT, _s._ watch, D 1657; surveillance, H 149; Awayt, waiting, T.iii. 579;
watchfulness, T. iii. 457; wait, B 4415; Have hir in awayt, watch her, B
3915; Awaytes, _pl._ plots, B 3. p 8. 11.

AWAITE, _v._ await; Awaiteth, _pr. s._ waits, I. 111; watches, B 1776;
Awayte, _imp. s._ observe, A. ii. 46. 8; Awaite, A. ii. 35. 6; Awayted,
_pp._ waylaid, R. 1611; Awaiting, _pres. pt._ watching, D 2052.

AWAITING, AWAYTING, _s._ attending, attendance, 7. 250.

AWAITOUR, _s._ lier in wait, B 4. p 3. 77.

AWAKE, _v._ wake, awake, 4. 15; F 476, H 7; Awook, _1 pt. s._ aroused, 3.
1324; _pt. s._ awoke, F 367; Awaked, _pt. s._ awoke, A 2523; Awak, _imp.
s._ HF. 556, 560; 3. 179; Awaketh, _imp. pl._ 3. 183.

AWARD, _s._ decision, I 483.

AWARDE, _v._ award; _1 pr. s._ C 202.

AWAYT; see AWAIT.

AWE, _s._ awe, fear, dread, terror, A 654, B 3749; T. i. 1006, iv. 620;
_dat._ B 3875.

AWEN, own (Northern), A 4239.

A-WEPE, a-weeping, in tears, T. ii. 408.

A-WERKE, _adv._ at work, D 215; Awerk, A 4337.

AWEYE, _adv._ out of the way, done with, T. ii. 123; L. 25; gone, 7. 319;
from home, B 593; astray, B 609; Awey, 5. 656 (_rather read_ aweye, weye,
seye).

AWEYWARD, _adv._ away, backwards, H 262.

AWHAPE, _v._ amaze; Awhaped, _pp._ scared, L. 132, 814, 2321; stupefied, 7.
215; confounded, T. i. 316 (i.e. he was not utterly confounded). Cf. Goth.
_afhwapjan_, to choke.

AWOOK; see AWAKE.

AWREKE, _v._ avenge, 2. 11; Awreketh, _pr. s._ avenges, R. 278; Awreke,
_pp._ H 298; Awroken, _pp._ A 3752.

AWRY, _adv._ on one side, R. 291.

AX, _s._ ax, A 2124, 3569; L. 2000; Axes, _pl._ T. iv. 46.

AXEN, _v._ ask, L. 835; T. ii. 147, 153; E 696; Axe, _v._ 1. 120; C 24, E
326; _ger._ 3. 416, 1276; Axe at, ask of, T. ii. 894; Axe, _1 pr. s._ A
1347, D 21, E 348, G 426; Axest, _2 pr. s._ seekest, B 5. m 5. 14; Axestow,
_2 pr. s._ askest thou, B 1. p 6. 47; dost thou ask, B 1. p 4. 101; Axeth,
_pr. s._ asks, 1. 12; L. 1456, 1509, 1724, 1804; requires, T. ii. 227; B 2.
p 2. 41; seeks, tends, B 4. p 6. 93; Axen, _pr. pl._ L. 1833; Axede, _1 pt.
s._ asked, R. 588; Axed, _pt. s._ 3. 185; A 3413, B 2200, G 357; _2 pt.
pl._ G 430; Axe, _imp. s._ B 2352; Axeth, _imp. pl._ E 653; Axed, _pp._ 17.
2; HF. 1766.

AXES, _s._ attack of illness, T. i. 626 _n_. See ACCESSE.

AXING, _s._ question, L. 239 _a_; request, A 1826; HF. 1541; Axinge,
question, 17. 3; G 423.

AY, _adv._ aye, ever, A 63, 233, B 296, 1701, 3721, D 1114, H 174; 2. 95,
5. 210; L. 1834; For ay, F 535; Ay whyl that, all the while that, 4. 252.

AY-DWELLINGE, _adj._ perpetual, ever-abiding, B 5. p 6. 61, 195.

AYEIN, _prep._ opposite to, T. ii. 920; against, T. i. 902; Ayen, over
against, when meeting, 5. 443.

AYEIN, _adv._ again, back, 5. 100; Ayeyn, 1. 68; F 127; Ayen, 5. 295.

AYEIN-LEDINGE, _adj._ returning, reconducting, B 3. m 9. 27.

AYEINS, _prep._ against, A 1787; R. 1540; at the approach of, L. 1356; 7.
347; Ayeines, against, E 320; Ayens, towards, at the approach of, 5. 342.

AYEINS, _adv._ against, to; Ayeyns, A 3155.

AYEINWARD, _adv._ again, on the other hand, B 2. p 4. 82, p 5. 87, p 6. 18;
B 4. p 5. 23; back again, T. iii. 750, iv. 1581.

AYEL, _s._ grandfather, A 2477. F. _a[:i]eul_.

AYEN, AYEYN; see AYEIN.

AYENS, AYEYNS; see AYEINS.

AYLEN, _v._ ail, L. 1833; Ayleth, _pr. s._ 3. 449, 481; T. i. 766.

AZIMUT, _s._ azimuth, A. ii. 31. 14; Azimuthz, _pl._ A. i. 19. 4; Azimutz,
A. ii. 31. 5.



BA, _v._ kiss, D 433; Ba, _imp. s._ kiss (see note), A 3709.

BABEURIES, _for_ Babewinnes, HF. 1189 _n_.

BABEWINNES, _pl._ (lit. baboons), grotesque figures in architecture, HF.
1189.

BACHELERE, _s._ young knight, R. 918, 1469; D 883; Bacheler, A 3085, F 24;
Bachiler, an aspirant to knighthood, A 80; Bacheler of lawe, bachelor of
law, F 1126; Bacheleres, _pl._ R. 935; Bachileres, E 1274, 1278.

BACHELRYE, _s._ bachelor-hood, H 125; company of young men, E 270.

BACIN, _s._ basin; Basin, brass basin, R. 540; Bacins, _pl._ D 287, I 603;
Basins, B 4. m 5. 12.

BACOUN, _s._ bacon, B 4035, D 217; Bacon, swine's flesh, D 418, 1753.

BAD; see BIDDE.

BADDE, _adj._ bad, A 3155, B 3612; L. 277 _a_; _dat._ HF. 1768; _as s._
what is bad, T. iv. 1676; _pl._ 6. 72; E 522; B 4. p 2. 47.

BADDELY, _adv._ badly, B 2594, I 711.

BADDER, _adj. comp._ worse, F 224.

BAGGE, _s._; Bagges, _pl._ (full) bags, 9. 38; money-bags, B 124, 1272.

BAGGE, _v._; Baggeth, _pr. s._ looks askant, 3. 623.

BAGGEPYPE, _s._ bagpipe, A 565.

BAGGINGLY, _adv._ squintingly, R. 292. See BAGGE.

BAILLIF, _s._ bailiff, A 603, D 1419; Bailly, D 1392, 1396.

BAITE, _v._ bait; Bayte, feed, B 466; Bayten, T. i. 192; Baiteth, _pr. s._
4. 238; feeds, B 2103; Bayted, _pp._ baited, tormented, R. 1612.

BAK, _s._ back, 3. 957; B 4569; T. iii. 1247; cloth for the back, coarse
mantle, rough cloak, G 881; Bakke, _dat._ 3. 458; Bakkes, _pl._ backs, B 4.
m 7. 46.

BAKBYTE, _ger._ to backbite, I 1018.

BAKBYTER, _s._ backbiter, I 495.

BAKBYTING, _s._ backbiting, I 493.

BAKE, _v._ to bake, A 384; _ger._ to burn, D 1731; _pp._ baked, A 343, B
95; Bake metes, baked meats, meat-pies, I 445.

BAKERE, _s._ baker, B 4324.

BAKHALF, the back or flat side of the astrolabe, A. i. 4. 1, ii. 1. 6.

BAK-SIDE, _s._ the back of the astrolabe, A. i. 15. 3, see above.

BAKWARD, backwards, D 793.

BAL, _s._ ball, A 2614; 13. 9; Balles, _pl._ L. 2003.

B['A]LADE, _s._ ballad, L. 270; Bal['a]de, L. 539; B['a]lades, _pl._ L. 423
(see note).

BALAUNCE, _s._ a balance, G 611; Balance, B 3776; _in balaunce_, in
jeopardy, G 611; T. ii. 466, iv. 1560; in suspense, 3. 1021; in
uncertainty, 7. 344.

BALE, _s._ sorrow, 3. 535; G 1481; T. iv. 739; _for bote ne bale_, for good
nor for ill, 3. 227.

BALKE, _s._ balk, beam, A 3920; (see note); Balkes, _pl._ transverse beams
beneath a roof, A 3626; L. 2253.

BALLED, _adj._ bald, A 198, 2518.

BANDE, _dat._ band, string, R. 240. See BEND.

BANE, _s._ death, L. 2159, 2180; T. ii. 320, iv. 907; destruction, HF. 408;
T. v. 602; cause of death, A 1097, B 4150; slayer, T. iv. 333; L. 2147,
2659; 4. 196; A 1681.

BANER, _s._ banner, A 966, 976, 2410; 7. 30.

BANES, _pl._ bones (Northern), A 4073.

BANISSHE, _v._ banish; Banisshed, _pp._ A 1725.

BAPTISME, _s._ baptism, I 98; Baptesme, I 335.

BAR, BARE; see BERE, _v._

BARBE, _s._ barb (part of a woman's head-dress, still sometimes used by
nuns, consisting of a piece of white plaited linen, passed over or under
the chin, and reaching midway to the waist), T. ii. 110.

BARBOUR, _s._ barber, A 2025.

BARBRE, _adj._ barbarian, B 281.

BARE, _adj._ bare, A 683, 2877; insufficient, D 1480; useless, T. i. 662.

BAREFOOT, _adj._ F 1077, I 105; Barfoot, HF. 98; Barfot, L. 2189.

BAREINE, _adj._ barren, B 4. p 2. 125; Bareyne, B 2. p 1. 78; A 1244, B 68,
D 372, E 448; Bareyn, A 1977.

BAREL, _s._ barrel, D 302; Barel ale, barrel of ale, vol. iv. p. 424,
footnote, l. 3; B 3083.

BARGAIN, _s._ bargain; Bargaynes, _pl._ A 282.

BARGAININGE, _s._ bargaining; Bargayninge, I 787.

BARGE, _s._ barge, ship, A 410, 3550, F 850; L. 621, 2150.

BARK, _s._ (of a tree). T. iii. 727, iv. 227, 229, 1139; C 544.

BARLY-BREED, _s._ barley-bread, D 144, 145.

BARM-CLOOTH, _s._ apron, A 3236.

BARME, _s._ (_dat._) bosom, lap, B 3256, 3630, F 631; Barm, E 551. A.S.
_bearm_.

BARONAGE, _s._ assembly of barons, A 3096, B 239.

BAR['O]UN, _s._ baron, T. iv. 190; B['a]rouns, _pl._ R. 1204.

BARRE, _s._ bar, A 1075; Barres, _pl._ stripes across a girdle, A 329 (see
note); R. 1103; L. 1200.

BARRED, _pp._ furnished with 'bars,' A 3225. See above.

BARRINGE, _s._ adorning with (heraldic) bars, I 417.

BAS, _s._ base, A. ii. 41. 2; Baas, A. ii. 43. 2.

BASILICOK, _s._ basilisk, I 853; Basiliskoc, I 853 _n_.

BASIN; see BACIN.

BASKET, _s._ basket, HF. 1687; Baskettes, _pl._ C 445.

BASTE, _v._ baste; Basting, _pres. part._ basting, tacking on, R. 104.

BATAILE, _s._ battle, fight, L. 1647; troop, B 5. m 1. 3; Batayle, battle,
5. 539; A 1609; Bataille, A 879, B 3879, G 386; B['a]tail, L. 1631;
B['a]tailes, _pl._ B 3509; B['a]tailles, A 61; Bat['a]illes, F 659.

BATAILEN, _v._ fight, B 1. p 4. 149; _pr. pl._ B 4. p 7. 31.

BATAILLED, _adj._ embattled, i.e. notched with indentations, B 4050.

BATERE, _v._ batter; Batereth, _pr. s._ strikes, I 556.

BATH, _s._ D 1253.

BATHE, both (Northern), A 4087.

BATHE, _ger._ to bathe, to bask, T. ii. 849; _refl._ to bask, B 4457;
Batheth, _pr. s._ bathes, E 1085; Bathen, _2 pr. pl._ bathe, T. i. 22;
Bathed, _pp._ A 3, 2006, D 1253.

BAUDE, _s._ bawd, T. ii. 353; D 1354; Baudes, _pl._ C 479, D 1339, I 886.

BAUDERYE, _s._ bawdry, act of a pandar, T. iii. 397; D 1303; Bauderie,
gaiety, mirth, A 1926.

BAUDRIK, _s._ baldric, belt worn transversely over one shoulder; Bawdrik, A
116.

BAUDY, _adj._ dirty, G 635.

BAUME, _s._ balm; Bawme, T. ii. 53; HF. 1686.

BAUNDON, _s._ power, disposal, R. 1163. O.F. _bandon_.

BAY, _adj._ bay-coloured, A 2157; T. i. 1073; Baye, _def._ T. ii. 624, v.
1038.

BAYARD, a horse's name; hence, a horse, A 4115.

BAYTE; see BAITE.

BE; see BEN.

BE-, _prefix_; see also BI-.

BEAU, _adj._ fair; _beau sir_, fair sir, HF. 643; _beau sire_, R. 800.

BEAUTEE, _s._ beauty, B 162, C 7, F 34; Beauty (personified), R. 952, 1006;
2. 39, 67.

BEAUTEES, _s. pl._ (_also_ Beauteis, Beautes, Bewtees), _apparently an
error for_ Busshes, bushes, I 858 _n_.

BE-BLED, _pp._ bloodied, covered with blood, B 3. m 2. 9. See BI-BLEDDE.

BEBLOTTE, _imp. s._ blot, T. ii. 1027.

BECHEN, _adj._ beechen, made of beech, G 1160.

BECOME, _v._ become, 3. 115; go to, L. 2214; _pp._ gone to, 7. 247.

BED, _s._ L. 2211; station, B 3862; bed (of herbs), B 4411; Beddes, _gen._
3. 1254; A 293, F 643; L. 1334; Bedde, _dat._ L. 2210.

BEDDINGE, _s._ bedding, couch, A 1616.

BEDE, _v._ offer, proffer, HF. 32; G 1065; T. iv. 1105; _ger._ to offer, T.
v. 185; to present, 1. 110; _1 pr. s._ proffer, 7. 304; Bedeth, _pr. s._
proffers, E 1784; Bede, _2 pr. pl._ offer, E 360; Bede, _1 pt. pl._
directed, told, I 65; Boden, _pp._ commanded, T. iii. 691; ordered, L. 266;
bidden, D 1030. A.S. _b[=e]odan_.

BEDE, _pt. pl. and pp. of_ Bidde.

BEDEN, _pt. pl. of_ Bidde.

BEDES, _pl._ beads, A 159.

BEDOTE, _v._ befool, L. 1547.

BEDREDE, _adj._ bedridden, D 1769, E 1292.

BEDSTRAW, _s._ straw of the bed, E 1783.

BEE, _s._ G 195; Bees, _pl._ B 4582, D 1693, E 2422, I 468; Been, _pl._ F
204; B 3. m 7. 3; T. ii. 193, 1356; HF. 1522.

BEECH, _s._ beech-tree, A 2923; beech-wood, G 928; see BECHEN.

BEEF, _s._ D 1753, E 1420 _n_.

BEEK, _s._ beak, F 418; Bek, 5. 378; Bekes, _pl._ L. 148.

BEEM, _s._ balk, B 4362; Bemes, _pl._ beams, R. 1574; B 1. m 3. 12; T. iii.
1; balks, B 4132.

BEEN, be; see BEN.

BEEN, _pl. of_ Bee.

BEER, bare; _pt. s. of_ Bere.

BEEST, _s._ beast, F 460, 874; Beest roial = royal beast, i.e. Leo, F 264;
animal, B 1. p 6. 48; Best, beast, D 1034; Beste, beast, 1. 45; L. 113,
1094; animal, 3. 637; creature, L. 1788; brute, G 288; beast, quarry, R.
1452; Beestes, _pl._ animals, R. 895; B 3. p 3. 1; Bestes, _pl._ beasts, B
3363, E 201, 572, 683; animals, 5. 86; cattle, C 361, 365; animals (in the
constellations or in the zodiacal signs), HF. 932, 965; A. i. 21. 38.

BEET, _pt. s. and imp. s. of_ Bete.

BEETH, _imp. pl. of_ Ben.

BEFALLE, BEFIL; see BIFALLE.

BEFORNSEYD; see BIFORNSEYD.

BEGAN; see BIGINNE.

BEGAT; see BIGETE.

BEGGARLY, _adv._ like a beggar, R. 223.

BEGGE, _ger._ to beg, D 1712; _v._ B 105; Beggen, C 446.

BEGGERE, _s._ beggar, A 252; Begger, F 1564.

BEGGESTERE, _s._ beggar, properly a female beggar, A 242.

BEGON, BEGOON; see BIGOON.

BEGONNE; see BIGINNE.

BEGYLE; see BIGYLE.

BEH--; see BIH--.

BEINGE, _s._ existence, B 3. p 11. 143, B 5. p 6. 151.

BEK, BEKES; see BEEK.

BEKENNE; see BIKENNE.

BEKKE, _1 pr. s._ (I) nod, C 396; Bekked on, _pt. s._ nodded to, T. ii.
1260; _imp. s._ nod, H 346.

BEKNEW; see BIKNOWE.

BEL AMY, i.e. good friend, fair friend, C 318; Bele, _adj. fem._ fair,
beautiful, HF. 1796; T. ii. 288; Bele chere, excellent fare, B 1599; Bele
chose, beautiful part, D 447, 510.

BELEVE; see BILEVE (1).

BELLE, _s._ bell, T. ii. 1615, iii. 189, v. 1062; A 263, B 1186, 3970, C
662; (of a clock), 3. 1322; (sign of an inn), A 719; _bere the b._, be the
first, T. iii. 198 (see New E. Dict.); Belles, _pl._ bells, T. ii. 805; B
3984.

BELT, _s._ belt, A 105.

BELWEN, _v._ bellow; Belweth, _pr. s._ belloweth, roars, HF. 1803.

BELY, _s._ belly, D 2167.

BELY, _s._ a pair of bellows, I 351.

BELY-NAKED, _adj._ entirely naked, E 1326.

BEME, _s._ trumpet, HF. 1240; Bemes, _pl._ B 4588. A.S. _b[=e]me_,
_b[=y]me_.

BEMES, _pl. of_ Beem.

B[=E]N, BEEN, _v._ be, 1. 182; A 140, B 3524, F 1564; Be, _v._ R. 389,
1178; Be, _1 pr. s._ am, 3. 588; _1 pr. pl._ are, 3. 582; Ben, _2 pr. pl._
are, B 122, 129; _pr. pl._ B 118, 124; exist, B 5. p 6. 63; consist, I 82;
Beth, _pr. pl._ are, F 648; Be, _pr. s. subj._ exists, B 5. p 3. 67; it
should be, 4. 49; Be, _1 pr. s. subj._ be, am, D 1245; Beth, _imp. pl._ be,
C 683, G 937; Beeth, _imp. pl._ B 229; T. iii. 168; Been, _pp._ 3. 530; A
199; Be, _pp._ been, R. 322; 3. 972; A 60, F 803, G 262; _I had be_, I
should have been, 3. 222; Be as be may, be it as it may, however it be, L.
1852, 2703; B 3319; Be what she be, be she who she may, T. i. 679; Lat be,
let alone, D 1289; Bene, _ger._ to be (A.S. _b[=e]onne_), R. 1265.

BENCH, _s._ bench, T. ii. 91; D 1773, 1775; table, B 1548; footstool, I
589; bench (law-court), 1. 159 (see note).

BENCHED, _pp._ provided with benches, L. 204; T. ii. 822.

BEND, _s._ band, R. 1079. See BANDE.

BENDE, _v._ bend, R. 1334, 1336; turn, T. ii. 1250; Bente, _pt. s._ bent, H
264; _pt. pl._ T. ii. 861; Bent, _pp._ 1. 29; arched, A 3246; Bente, _pp.
as def. adj._ bent, curved, T. iii. 624; _pp. pl._ arched, R. 542, 861,
1217.

BENDINGE, _s._ adorning with (heraldic) bends, I 417. A _bend_, in
heraldry, is a broad horizontal band across a shield.

_Bendiste_, for _Benedicite_, T. i. 780 _n_.

B[`E]NE, _s._ bean, 11. 29; T. iii. 1167, v. 363; A 3772, B 94, 4004.

_Benedicite_, bless ye (the Lord), A 1785; (pronounced _ben'cit[`e]_), T.
i. 780, iii. 757, 860; B 1170, 1974, D 1087, 1456, 1584, 2170.

BENEFYCE, BENEFICE, _s._ benefice, A 291, 507, B 4506, I 785.

BENEME, BENETHEN; see BINIME, BINETHEN.

BENE-STRAW, _s._ bean-straw, E 1422.

BENIGNE, _adj._ benign, kind, gracious, 2. 58, 79; L. 243; T. v. 1869; A
483, 518, 2215, B 2933, E 343, F 21, I 467; B['e]nigne, E 411; _voc._ T.
iii. 1261.

BENIGNELY, _adv._ benignly, kindly, 5. 370; B 2993, E 21, I 373; meekly, I
109.

B['E]NIGNEST, most benign, 22. 53.

BENIGNITEE, _s._ benignity, goodness, 18. 74; E 929, F 486, 1039; kindness,
B 2428; favour, L. 261 _a_; magnanimity, I 455; Benignetees, _pl._
kindness, T. v. 1859.

BENISOUN, _s._ benison, blessing, B 2288, E 1365, I 443.

BENT, BENTE; see BENDE.

BENT, _s._ grassy slope; Bente, _dat._ A 1981; L. 234 a.

BERAFTE; see BIREVE.

BERD, _s._ beard, A 270, 2173, F 1252; Berde, _dat._ R. 833; 3. 456; _in
the berd_, face to face, T. iv. 41; _make a berd_, deceive, A 4096; _make
his berd_, delude him, D 361; Berdes, _pl._ HF. 689.

B[`E]RE, _s._ bear, L. 1214; B 4. m 4. 6; T. iii. 1780, iv. 1453; A 1640;
the constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, HF. 1004; Ursa Major, B 4. m
6. 6; Beres, _gen._ bear's, A 2142; Beres, _pl._ HF. 1589; A 2018, B 3451,
4125. A.S. _bera_.

B[`E]RE, _s._ bier, 2. 105; 19. 5; HF. 1744; L. 1866; T. ii. 1638, iv. 863;
A 2871, 2879, B 1815, 1825, 3371; _on bere_, on his bier, D 587. A.S.
_b[=ae]r_.

B[`E]RE, _v._ bear, carry, B 3564, 3815; Beren, _v._ transport, F 119;
confer on, L. 2135; Bere yow, conduct yourself, D 1108; Beren on honde,
accuse, D 393; Beren him on hond, assure him, D 232 (cf. 226); Bereth, _pr.
s._ R. 925; Berth, _pr. s._ bears, carries, 10. 39; L. 298; T. v. 460;
Bereth him, conducts himself, behaves, A 796; Bereth hir, comports herself,
T. ii. 401; Berth hir on hond, bears false witness against her, B 620;
Bereth him on hond, accuses him, I 505; Sickly berth, take ill, dislike, E
625; Bere, _pr. pl._ 3. 894; Bere, _2 pt. s._ barest, T. iv. 763; didst
carry, B 2. p 3. 46; Bare, barest, E 1068; L. 2229; Bar, _pt. s._ bare,
carried, A 105, 158, 558, B 3083, 4569, G 221, 1264; 3. 196; possessed, D
997; _pt. s. refl._ conducted himself, T. iii. 490; Bar on honde, made him
believe, D 575; Bar her on honde, brought against her a charge which he
feigned to believe, 7. 158; Ber, _pt. s._ B 722; Beer, _pt. s._ bare, L.
216; carried, A 3692, B 4526; Baren us, _1 pt. pl._ conducted ourselves, A
721; Baren, _pt. pl._ bare, R. 1360; Baren me on hond, bore false witness
against me, B 1. p 4. 180; Beren, _pt. pl._ bore, HF. 1332; Bere, _pt. pl._
R. 1374; Bere, _1 pr. s. subj._ 5. 459; _pr. s. subj._ may pierce, A 2256;
Bere, _pt. s. subj._ bore, R. 1245, 1525; Ber, _imp. s._ carry, D 1139; Ber
ayein, take back, T. ii. 1141; Boren, _pp._ born, D 1153; Bore, _pp._ born,
3. 1301; 6. 46; A 1542, C 215, E 401; L. 2234; Born, _pp._ borne, D 593, E
444; carried, D 1857, F 178; conducted (himself), A 87; behaved thyself, 5.
109; worn, F 43; Borne, _pp. as def. adj._ born, E 1790. A.S. _beran_.

BERE, _s._ head-sheet, pillow-case, 3. 254. Cf. _pilwebeer_, in the
Prologue, A 694.

BERER, _s._ conductor, B 3. m 9. 34. (Lat. _uector_.)

BEREVE, BEREFT; see BIREVE.

BERIE, _s._ berry, A 4368; Berye, A 207; Bery, R. 928; Beryis, _pl._ B
4155.

BERIE, _v._ bury, C 884; Beried, _pp._ C 405; L. 787.

BERINGE, _s._ bearing, behaviour, B 2022; carriage, E 1604; Bering, gait, I
399; carriage, C 47.

BERKE, _v._ bark; Borken, _pp._ shrieked (lit. barked), B 1. p 5. 1.

BERKING, _s._ barking, B 4576.

BERM, _s._ barm, i.e. yeast, G 813. A.S. _beorma_.

BERN, _s._ barn, B 3759; Berne, _dat._ A 3258, C 397; Bernes, _pl._ B 1256,
D 871.

BERY, BERYE, _s._; see BERIE.

BERYLE, _s._ beryl, HF. 1184, 1288.

BESAUNT-WIGHT, _s._ weight of a besant, R. 1106. (_Besant_, a gold coin of
Byzantium.)

BESECHE, BESETTE, &c.; see Biseche, &c.

BESILY, BESINESSE; see BISI-.

BESPREYNT; see BISPRENGE.

BEST, BESTE; Bestes, _pl._; see BEEST.

BEST, _adv._ best, A 206.

BESTE, _def. adj._ best, A 252; 3. 64, 684, 10. 78; _as for thy beste_, as
will be best for thee, D 1986; _your beste_, your advantage, T. ii. 382; B
2427; _for the beste_, for the best, F 356.

BESTIALITEE, _s._ animal condition, T. i. 735.

BESTOWE; see BISTOWE.

BESY; see BISY.

BESYDE; see BISYDE.

BESYE; see BISIE.

BET, _adj. comp._ better, 10. 47; HF. 108; T. i. 257; B 311, 1091, 2566, G
1410, I 497.

BET, _adv._ better, A 242, B 114, 1622, D 775, F 488, 600, G 1283, 1344; 3.
668; 5. 152; T. i. 887; _go bet_, go faster, go as quickly as possible, 3.
136; L. 1213; C 667 (see note); _the bet_, the better, HF. 559; _bet and
bet_, better and better, T. iii. 714.

BETAKE; see BITAKE.

B['E]TE, _v._ remedy, heal, T. i. 665; amend, 6. 78; mend, A 3927; assist,
I 421; kindle, A 2253, 2292; Betten, _pt. pl._ kindled, G 518; Bete, _imp.
pl._ amend, T. iv. 928. A.S. _b[=e]tan_.

B[`E]TE, _ger._ to beat, flap, B 4512; to hammer out, C 17; Beteth, _pr.
s._ beats, T. iv. 910; smites, B 1. m 3. 9; flaps, F 766; Beet, _pt. s._
adjoined (lit. beat), R. 129; Bet, _pt. s._ beat, T. iv. 752; Betten, _pt.
pl._ beat, B 2161; scourged, B 2694; Bette, _pt. pl._ A 4316; Beten, _pp._
beaten, B 1732, D 712, I 670; _as adj._ beaten, ornamented with the hammer,
R. 837; Bete, _pp._ HF. 1150; E 1158; Bet, _weak pp._ (_some_ MSS. bete), D
511; Beting, _pres. pt._ beating, L. 863; Beet, _imp. s._ T. i. 932; Bete,
_pr. s. subj._ hammer, C 14. A.S. _b[=e]atan_.

BETH, _pr. pl._ are, B 2350; _imp. pl._ be, 1. 134, 5. 660, 19. 7; L. 411;
B 2905. See BEN.

BETHENKE, BETID; see BI-.

BETING, _s._ beating, HF. 1034; Betinges, _pl._ B 3. m 2. 8.

BETRAISING, _s._ betrayal, L. 2460. See BITRAISE.

BETRAYSED; see BITRAISE.

BETTRE, _adj._ better, A 256; _b. arm_, right arm, T. ii. 1650; _adv._ A
342.

BETWIX, -EN; see BITWIX.

BEVER, _adj._ made of beaver, A 272.

BE-WAR, _imper. s._ let (her) beware, F 1541. See WAR.

BEWAYLE; see BIWAILE.

BEWRYE; see BIWRYEN.

BEYE, _ger._ to buy, T. v. 1843; G 637; _v._ buy, B 1462, 1468, C 845. See
BYE.

BIBBE, _v._; Bibbed, _pp._ imbibed, A 4162.

BIBLE, _s._ bible, A 438, D 650, 687, 1845; 3. 987; book, HF. 1334; G 857.

BI-BLEDDE, _pp. pl._ covered with blood, A 2002. See BE-BLED.

BICCHED BONES, _s. pl._ dice, C 656. See the note.

BI-CLAPPE, _ger._ to clasp, grasp, catch (as in a trap), G 9.

BICOME, _ger._ to become, D 1644; _v._ 1. 58; Bicomth, _pr. s._ goes, T.
ii. 795, 797; Bicom, _pt. s._ became, T. i. 1079; Bicome, _pr. s. subj._
may go (i.e. what may become of him), T. ii. 1151; Bicomen, _pp._ become,
R. 407.

BIDDE, _v._ ask (_confused with_ B['e]de,_v._ command, bid); _ger._ to
request, L. 838; _v._ bid, F. 327; Bidde, _1 pr. s._ pray, T. i. 1027, iii.
875, v. 1007; Bit, _pr. s._ bids, A 187, E 1377, F 291; Bad, _pt. s._
prayed, begged, T. iii. 1249, iv. 68; besought, T. i. 112, 357; requested,
E 373. F 497; _1 pt. s._ bade, F 1212; _pt. s._ bade, commanded, D 108; 3.
135; L. 1000; Bede, _1 pt. pl._ (we) bade, directed, I 65; Beden, _pt. pl._
bade, B 2233; Bidde, _pp._ commanded, B 440 (where _han bidde_ = have
bidden); Bede, _pp._ bidden (_as if from_ Bede), 3. 194; _1 pt. s. subj._
would seek (see note), R. 791; Bid, _imp. s._ pray, T. iii. 342; bid, 3.
144; Biddeth, _imp. pl._ pray, T. i. 36; Bidde, _imp. pl._ bid, F 321;
Biddinge, _pres. pt._ praying, G 140.

BIDAFFED, _pp._ befooled, E 1191. M.E. _daffe_, a foolish person. "_Daffe_,
or dastard, or he that spekythe not yn tyme. _Oridurus_"; Prompt. Parv.

BIDDING, _s._ request, L. 837.

BIDELVE, _v._; Bidolven, _pp._ buried, B 5. p 1. 51.

BIDEN, _pp. of_ Byde.

BIDEWE, _v._ bedew; Bideweth, _pr. s._ B 4. m 6. 23.

BIFALLE, _v_. befall; Bifalleth, _pr. s._ happens, E 449; Bifel, _pt. s._
(it) befell, A 19, F 42; Bifil, _pt. s._ B 3613, E 2133; Befil, _pt. s._ R.
1455; Bifalle, _pr. s. subj._ may befall, l 68; (it) shall befall, 8. 1;
Befalle, may happen, 5. 664; Bifille, _pt. s. subj._ should happen, B 1. p
4. 22; Bifelle, were to befall, E 136; Bifallen, _pp._ befallen, B 1. p 3.
15; Bifalle, _pp._ A 795, B 726; Befalle, _pp._ come to pass, R. 29.

BIFALLINGE, _s._ coming to pass, T. iv. 1018.

BIFORE, _prep._ before, A 450; above (_al bifore_ = above all), R. 1119.

BIFORE, _adv._ before, A 377, F 1465.

BIFOREN, _prep._ before, B 3553, F 926, Biforn, B 997, C 665, F 79, 98; HF.
60; in front of, G 680.

BIFOREN, _adv._ in the front part (of his head), A 1376; Biforn, before, A
3535, B 704, 1668, F 339; 5. 107, 486; beforehand, A 1148, B 1184; B 1. p
4. 72; in front, A 590; T. i. 221; in a good position, A 572; of old time,
F 551; first, E 446.

BIFORN, _prep._ before; Byforn, A. ii. 3. 15.

BIFORN-HOND, _adv._ before-hand, G 1317.

BIFORNSEYD; Befornseyd, _pp._ aforesaid, A. ii. 42 b. 5.

BIG, _adj._ big, A 546, B 3111; Bigge, _pl._ large, T. iv. 40.

BIGAMYE, _s._ bigamy, 7. 153; marrying twice, D 33.

BIGETE, _v._ beget; Begat, _pt. s._ L. 1562; Bigeten, _pp._ B 3138, 3199;
Bigete, _pp._ T. i. 977.

BIGINNE, _v._ begin, A 42; _ger._ A 428; Bigunne, _2 pt. s._ didst begin, B
2. p 3. 23, B 3. p 12. 122; Bigonne, _2 pt. s._ G 442; Began, _2 pt. s._
(_false form for_ Bigunne), L. 2230; Bigan, _pt. s._ A 44, 822, B 98, 1883;
Bigonne, _pt. pl._ F 1015; _1 pt.pl._ T. ii. 512; Bigonne, _pp._ T. ii.
779; L. 229; A 52, D 169; Begonnen, _pp._ R. 43; Begonne, _pp._ T. ii. 48;
L. 196, 1007; G 428.

BIGOON, _pp._ ornamented, R. 943; _wel b._, well contented, joyous, merry,
5. 171; R. 580; T. ii. 597; D 606 (or it may here mean "well clad");
fortunate, T. ii. 294; _wel bigo_, well content, R. 693; _wo b._,
distressed, L. 1487, 2497; B 918, F 1316; _sorwfully b._, distressed, T. i.
114; _wers b._, more wretched, T. v. 1328. See _Bego_ in the New E. Dict.

BIGYLE, BEGYLE, _v._ beguile, deceive,3. 674; T. v. 404; L. 1570; E 252;
_ger._ L. 780; Bigylen, _ger._ to beguile, deceive, R. 1055; Bigylestow, _2
pr. s._ deceivest thou, I 1022; Begyled, _pt. s._ L. 2525; Begylde, _pt.
s._ L. 2199; Bigyled, _pp._ deceived, B 1. m 6. 4; G 985, 1385; destroyed,
C 274; Begyled, _pp._ L. 2547; Bigyle, _2 pr. s. subj._ beguile, B 4618.

BIGYLERES, _pl._ beguilers, I 299.

BIHALVE, _s. dat._ behalf, T. ii. 1458; B 2987; Behalfe, L. 497.

BIHATE, _v._ hate; Behated, _pp._ hated, detested, B 3. m 4. 4.

BIHESTE, _s._ promise, B 37, 41, D 1059, F 698, 1163, 1538, 1541; T. v.
1191; command, T. ii. 359; Behest, promise, 5. 245; Bihestes, _s. pl._
promises, T. v. 1431; B 2419; promises, i.e. all that they profess to
prove, A. pr. 17.

BIHETE, _1 pr. s._ promise, G 707; A. pr. 78; Bihetest, _2 pr. s._ dost
promise, B 4. p 2. 1; Biheteth, _pr. s._ promises, I 379; Bihete, _2 pr.
pl._ T. i. 539; Bi-heten, _pr. pl._ promise, B 3. p 3. 13; p 8. 3. See
BIHOTE.

BIHETINGE, _s._ promising, B 2. p 8. 10.

BIHEWE, _v._; Behewe, _pp._ hewn, carved, HF. 1306.

BIHIGHTE, _pt. s._ promised, T. v. 1204; _1 pt. s._ F 1559; Bihighten, _2
pt. pl._ T. v. 496; F 1327; Bi-highten, _pt. pl._ B 3. p 3. 41; Bihighte,
_pt. pl._ T. iii. 319; Bihight, _pp._ B 5. p 3. 110; T. v. 354; B 2256, F
788, I 251; Byhight, T. v. 1104. See Bihote.

BIHINDE, _prep._ behind, A 1050; T. ii. 639; Bihinden, T. i. 179.

BIHINDE, _adv._ in the rear, T. ii. 1107; future, G 1291.

BIHOLDE, _v._ behold, A 2293; gaze, F 863; _ger._ to look upon, A 1301;
Beholde, _ger._ to look upon, look at, 3. 405, 1050; Behelde, _v._ behold,
7. 80 (see note); Behelde, _pt. s. subj._ should see, T. ii. 378; Bihelden,
_pt. pl._ beheld, T. i. 177; Biholde, _pp._ beheld, T. v. 1252; G 179.

BIHOLDER, _s._ beholder, B 5. p 6. 121.

BIHOTE, _1 pr. s._ promise, A 1854; Behoteth, _pr. s._ 3. 621; Bihoteth,
_pr. s._ I 291; Behette, _pt. s._ 5. 436. A.S. _beh[=a]tan_. See BIHETE,
BIHIGHTE.

BIHOVE, _s. dat._ profit (lit. behoof), R. 1092.

BIHOVE, _v._ suit, 13. 5; Bihoveth, _pr. s._ (it) behoves, B 1. p 4. 4: T.
iv. 1004, 1018; F 602, 1359; Bihoven, _pr. pl._ are necessary, I 83;
Behoved, _pt. s._ (it) behoved, R. 1479.

BIHOVELY, _adj._ helpful, T. ii. 261; needful, I 107, 387.

BI-IAPE (Bijape), _v._; Bi-iaped, _pp._ jested at, tricked, T. i. 531;
By-iaped, T. v. 1119; A 1585, G 1385, II 145.

BIKENNE, _v._; Bekenne, _1 pr. s._ commit, C 292 _n_.

BIKER, _s._ quarrel, L. 2661.

BIKNOWE, _v._ acknowledge, B 5. p 6. 119; A 1556, B 886; Biknowen, _v._ B
3. p 3. 46; I 170; Bi-knowe, _1 pr. s._ acknowledge, B 3. p 3. 45;
Biknoweth, _pr. s._ I 481; Beknew, _pt. s._ confessed, L. 1058; Biknewe,
_pt. pl._ B 4251; Bi-knowen, _pp._; _hence_, I am bi-knowen = I
acknowledge, B 3. p 10. 58.

BILDE, _ger._ to build, B 2. m 4. 4; Bilden, _ger._ HF. 1133; Bilt, _pr.
s._ HF. 1135; Bilt, _pp._ 1. 183. See BULDE.

BILDER, _s. as adj._ builder, used for building, 5. 176.

BILDING, _s._; Bildinges, _pl._ buildings, i.e. making of houses, HF. 1966.

BILE, _s._ bill, B 4051; Biles, _pl._ bills (of birds), HF. 868. A.S.
_bile_.

BILEVE, _s._ belief, faith, L. 2109; F 1133, G 63; creed, A 3456.

BILEVE (1), _v._ believe; Beleve, L. 27, 99; Bilevest, _2 pr. s._ B 1. p 6.
67; Bileveth, _imp. pl._ G 1047.

BILEVE (2), _v._ to remain, stay behind, F 583. A.S. _bel[=ae]fan_. See
BLEVE.

BILINNE, _v._ cease, T. iii. 1365. From A.S. _linnan_. See BLINNE.

BILLE, _s._ bill, petition, 1. 59, 110; 2. 44; T. ii. 1130; C 166, 170,
176, 190; letter, E 1937; writ, D 1586.

BILONGE, _v._ belong; Bilongeth, _pr. s._ appertains, R. 1634.

BILOVED, _pp._ beloved, A 215, 1429, F 946; R. 46, 473.

BINDE, _v._ bind, enthral, 4. 249; Bynt (_for_ Bint), _pr. s._ binds, 4.
47, 48; Bond, _pt. s._ bound, fastened, R. 241; HF. 1590; A 2991, B 634,
3222, E 1262; Bounden, _pp._ bound, B 270; bound up, D 681; Bounde, _pp._
12. 13; Bonde, _pp._ T. i. 255, ii. 1223; D 378; in slavery, 17. 32; B
3460; Binde, _2 pr. s. subj._ bind, E 1205; Bonde, _pp._ bound, enthralled,
B 2751; 17. 32.

BINDING, _s._ constraint, A 1304.

BINETHEN, _adv._ beneath, B 2. p 5. 109; Benethen, _prep._ below, 4. 219.

BINIME, _v._ take away, B 2. p 4. 101 _n_; B 4. p 3. 22; Beneme, _v._ B 2.
p 4. 101; Binimeth, _pr. s._ B 4. p 3. 18; I 335, 461; Binemen, _pr. pl._ B
3. p 3. 47; Bi-nomen, _pp._ taken away, B 3. p 3. 44, 50; B 4. p 4. 10; R.
1509.

BINNE, _s._ bin, hutch, chest, A 593.

BI-PATH; see BY-PATH.

BIQUETHE, _v._ bequeath, D 1121; Bequethe, _v._ 14. 17; _1 pr. s._ T. iv.
786; A 2768; _pp_. D 1164.

BIRAFT,-E; see BIREVE.

BIRCH, _s._ birch-tree, A 2921.

BIREINE, _v._; Bireyned, _pp._ rained upon, T. iv. 1172.

BIREVE, _v._ bereave, B 3359; restrain, T. i. 685; take away, G 482;
Bireven, _v._ deprive, rob, B 3. p 8. 6; _me wo bereve_, rob me of woe, 6.
12; Bireveth, _pr. s._ bereaves, I 249; Bireve, _1 pr. pl._ deprive, T. ii.
1722; Bireved, _pt. s._ bereft, D 2071; Birafte, _pt. s._ B 83, 3386, 3404,
D 461, F 1400; reft, B 4. m 7. 21; Birefte, bereft, B 3. p 2. 57; Berafte,
robbed of, 5. 87; Biraft, _pp._ bereft, T. iv. 225; A 1361, B 2190, D 475,
E 2067; Bereft, _pp._ 18. 78.

BIRTHE, _s._ birth, B 192, E 402.

BISCORNE, _v._; Biscorned, _pp._ scorned, I 278.

BISECHE, _v._ beseech, ask, 1. 136; 3. 1132; Bisechen, B 3. p 8. 7;
Besechen, _pr. pl._ HF. 1554; Biseching, _pres. pt._ 1. 43; Beseching, 5.
421. See BISEKEN.

BISEGE, _v._ besiege; Bisegeth, _pr. s._ L. 1902; Bisegede, _pt. pl._ T. i.
149; Bisegeden, _pt. pl._ T. v. 1496; Biseged, _pp._ besieged, L. 1694; B
2289, 3514; beset, B 4. m 3. 14.

BIS['E]KEN, _v._ beseech, pray, B 2306, 2910; By-s['e]ke, _v._ beseech, T.
iv. 131; Biseke, _1 pr. s._ T. iii. 731; B 3174, D 807, E 1037; _1 pr. pl._
T. ii. 1674; Biseken, implore, A. 918; Bisekinge, _pres. pt._ E 178, 592;
Bisoughtest, _2 pt. s._ didst beseech, T. v. 1734; Bisoghte, _pt. s._ B
2164; Bisoughte, _1 pt. s. subj._ T. i. 769.

BISEMARE, _s._ contemptuous conduct, A 3965. See _bismer_ in Stratmann.

BISETTE, _v._; Besette, _v._. employ, L. 1069; bestow, 3. 772; _1 pr. s._
bestow, 4. 182; Bisette, _pt. s._ employed, T. iii. 471, 1552; A 279;
Besette, disposed of, L. 2558; _1 pt. s._ employed, 3. 1096; Bisette, _pt.
pl._ employed, B 1565; Biset, _pp._ employed, A 3299; T. iii. 1413; used
up, D 1952; bestowed, A 3715; established, A 3012; fixed, I 366; Beset,
_pp._. bestowed, T. i. 521; ii. 834; 3. 863, 1043; employed, 5. 598.

BISEYE, _pp._ beseen; _wel beseye_, fair to see, good-looking, R. 821; well
provided, 3. 829; _goodly beseyn_, fair to see, good in appearance, T. ii.
1262; _yvel biseye_, ill-looking, E 965; _richely biseye_, rich-looking,
splendid, E 984. Cf. 'right well _beseene_'; Spenser, F.Q. i. 12. 5.

BISHENDE, _v._; Beshende, _v._ bring to ruin, L. 2696. See note.

BISHITTE, _v._; Bishet, _pp._ shut up, T. iii. 602. From A.S. _scyttan_.

BISHREWE, _1 pr. s._ beshrew, D 844, 845.

BISIE, _v. refl._ take pains, B 3034; Bisie me, employ myself, G 758;
Bisien, _ger._ to urge on, B 4. m 4. 2; Bisien, _pr. pl._ trouble, ruffle,
B 1. m 2. 12; Besyed hem,_pt. pl._ occupied themselves, 5. 192.

BISILY, _adv._. busily, F 88; diligently, A. ii. 38. 8; completely, T. iii.
1153; eagerly, F 1051; attentively, R. 143, A 301; Besily, busily,
industriously, well, 2. 33; 5. 74.

BISINESSE, _s._ business, B 1415; busy endeavour, A 1007, G 24; diligence,
3. 1156; C 56; E 1008, F 642; industry, G. 5; labour, 5. 86; work,
activity, T. i. 795; trouble, ado, 7. 99; careful attention, B 2979;
attentiveness, 7. 250; anxiety, care, B 3. m 3. 5; D 1196; care, B 3. m 2.
17; A 520, B 2205; Besinesses, _pl._ employments, T. ii. 1174.

BI-SMOKEDE, _adj. pl._ dirtied with smoke, B 1. p 1. 19.

BISMOTERED, _pp._ besmutted, dirtied, marked with spots of rust, &c., A 76.

BISOGHTE, BISOUGHTE; see BISEKE.

BISPET, _pp._ spit upon, I 276.

BI-SPOTTEN, _pr. pl._ smirch, B 3. p 4. 38.

BISPRENGE, _v._; Bespreynt, _pp._ sprinkled, bedewed, 2. 10.

BISSHOP, bishop, T. ii. 104; Bisshopes, _gen._ high priests, I 838.

BISTAD, _pp._ bestead, in trouble, R. 1227; _hard b._, greatly imperilled,
B 649.

BISTOWE, _v._ bestow; Bistowed, _pp._ bestowed, B 1. p 5. 31; placed, T. i.
967; disposed, R. 968; spent, B 1609; Bestowed me weel, given me good
fortune, 6. 37.

BISTRYDEN, _v._; Bistrood, _pt. s._ bestrode, B 2093.

BISY, BESY, _adj._ busy, industrious, R. 1052; A 321; active, L. 103;
useful, I 474; attentive, F 509; anxious, 2. 2, 119; 5. 89; B 2. p 5. 126
(Lat. _sollicitus_); T. ii. 274; Bisier, _comp._ busier, A 322.

BISYDE, _prep._ beside, A 874, E 777, 1105, F 374, 649; Besyde, 3. 208;
_ther besyde_, beside that place, 3. 1316; _of bisyde_, from the
neighbourhood of, A 445; _beside his leve_, without his leave, HF. 2105.

BISYDES, _prep._; _him b._, near him, A 402.

BISYDES; Besydes, _adv._ on one side, G 1416.

BIT, _s._ bit, L. 1208.

BIT, _pr. s. of_ Bidde.

BITAKE, _1 pr. s._ commend, I 1043; commit, E 161, 559, H 307; resign, A
3750; Betake, _1 pr. s._ deliver, entrust, L. 2297; Bitakest, _2 pr. s._
entrustest, B 2. p 1. 74; Bitook, _pt. s._ entrusted, G 541; Bitaken, _pp._
committed (_traditus_), B 3. m 2. 29; B 2. p 1. 78.

BITECHE, _1 pr. s._ commit (to), consign (to), B 2114.

BITEN, _pp. of_ Byte.

BITERNESSES, _pl._ bitter things, B 2. p 4. 87. See BITTERNESSE.

BITHINKE, _v._ imagine, think of, T. iii. 1694; D 772, H 166, I 171;
Bethinke, _v._ 2. 107; _ger._ to reflect, HF. 1176; Bithenke, _1 pr. s.
refl._ bethink me, consider, B 2635; Bethenke, 3. 698; Bithinke, 1. 121;
Bithoughte, _1 pt. s. refl._ bethought myself, R. 521; Bethoghte, 3. 1183,
1195; Bethoghte, _pt. s._ L. 1439; Bithoght, _pp._; I am bithought, I have
thought (of), A 767; Bithought, _pp._ T. ii. 225; Bethenk, _imp. s._
reflect, 3. 1304.

BITID, BITIT; see BITYDE.

BITOKNE, _v._ betoken; Bitokneth, _pr. s._ signifies, B 3942; Bitokened,
_pt. s._ betokened, R. 1244.

BITOOK; see BITAKE.

BITORE, _s._ bittern, D 972. Cotgrave gives: '_Butor_, a Bittor.'

BITRAYE, _v._ betray; Bitrayen, _pr. pl._ L. 486; Bitrayed, _pp._ T. v.
1247; B 3570.

BITRAISE, BITRAISSHE, _v._ betray; Bitrayseth, _pr. s._ C 92; Bitrayse,
_pr. pl._ T. v. 1783; Bitraysed, _pp._ betrayed, T. iv. 1648, v. 1780; I
269; Betraysed, 3. 1120; L. 266; Bitraisshed, R. 1648; Bitrasshed, R. 1520.
From _traiss-_, _trahiss-_, lengthened stem of F. _trahir_, to betray.

BITRENDEN, _v._; Bi-trent, _pr. s._ encircles, goes round, T. iv. 870;
twines round, T. iii. 1231. See _trenden_ in Stratmann.

BITTER, _adj._ 1. 50; G 878; Bittre, _dat._ B 1. p 3. 45; Bittre, _pl._ T.
iii. 1116, iv. 1136.

BITTERNESSE, _s._ bitterness, T. iii. 1220; Biternesses, bitter things, B
2. p 4. 87.

BITWIXEN, _prep._ between, A 880, 3094, C 832, E 815; Betwixen, 5. 148;
Bitwixe, A 277, 3590, B 3830, F 333, I 185; Bytwixe, A. ii. 28. 11; Betwix,
5. 40; D 1140; Bitwix, L. 729; F 317.

BITYDE, BITYDEN, _v._ happen, T. ii. 623, iii. 644; B 2599, C 900, F 1001,
G 400; arrive, B 3730; _pr. s. subj._ E 306; Bityde what b., happen what
may, T. v. 750; B 2064; Bitit, _pr. s._ betides, happens, T. ii. 48, v.
345; Bitidde, _pt. s._ befell, B 3. p 3. 19; T. v. 1641; R. 1548; came to
pass, T. ii. 55; Bitidden, _pt. pl._ happened, B 5. p 3. 64; Bitid, _pp._ B
5. p 6. 152; T. iii. 288; B 1949, D 2191; Betid, HF. 384, 578, 680, 2048.

BITYDINGE, _s._ an event, B 5. p 1. 23, 64.

BITYMES, _adv._ betimes, early, soon, G 1008.

BIWAILE, _v._. bewail; Biwayle, _ger._ T. i. 755; Biwaille, _v._ B 3952, E
1381; Biwailen, _v._ B 26, I 87; Biweyledest, _2 pt. s._ didst bewail, B 1.
p 6. 15; Bewayled, _pt. s._ 3. 1247; Biwailled, _pp._ E 530.

BIWARE, _v._; Biwared, _pp._ spent, expended, laid out (as on wares), T. i.
636.

BIWEPE, _ger._ to beweep, weep for, bemoan, T. i. 763; I 178; Biweptest, _2
pt. s._ didst lament, B 1. p 6. 15; Biwopen, _pp._ bathed in tears, T. iv.
916.

BI-WORD; see BY-WORD.

BIWREYE, _v._ make manifest, reveal, T. iii. 377; A 2229, B 1328, 3219, C
823, D 948, E 1873, F 954, G 147; Biwreye, _ger._ to reveal, T. ii. 1370;
Biwreyen, _v._ G 150; By-wreye, _v._ T. iii. 367; Biwreyest, _2 pr. s._
revealest, B 773, 4241; Biwreyed, _1 pt. s._ revealed, D 533; Biwreye,
_imp. s._ betray, D 974; Biwrey, _imp. s._ B 2330; Biwreyd, _pp._ betrayed
(viz. by having your words revealed), H 352.

BIWREYING, _s._ betraying, B 2330, I 645.

BI-WRYEN, _v._ disclose, reveal, T. ii. 537; Bewrye, betray, 5. 348.
(Wrongly used for Biwreye.)

BIYOND, _prep._ beyond, R. 283.

BLABBE, _s._ a tell-tale, T. iii. 300_n_.

BLADDRE, _s._ bladder, G 439.

BLADE, _s._ blade, sword, A 618, 3930.

BLAK, _adj._ black, A 294; Blake, _pl._ A 557, 899; D 1364, F 859, G 557; B
1. m 7. 1; R. 229; 5. 682; Blakke, _def._ HF. 1801.

BLAK, _s._ black clothing, 3. 445; Blakke, 3. 457.

BLAKE, _s._ black writing, ink, T. ii. 1320.

BLAKEBERIED, A, a-blackberrying, i.e. a-wandering at will, astray, C 406.
See the note.

BLAKED, _pp._ blackened, rendered black, B 3321.

BLAME, _s._ imputation, B 1. p 4. 106; slander, R. 979.

BLAME, _ger._ to blame, A 375, E 76; 3. 675; Blameth, _imp. pl._ A 3181, B
2151; Blamestow, thou blamest, T. i. 841.

BLANDISHE, _pr. s. subj._ fawn, I 376. See BLAUNDISSHINGE.

BLANKET, _s._ D 1751.

BLANKMANGER, _s._ a compound of minced capon, with cream, sugar, and flour,
A 387. Named from its white colour.

BLASE, _s._ blaze, T. iv. 184.

BLASEN, _ger._ to blow, HF. 1802.

BLASPHEME, _s._ blaspheming, 16. 15; C 593.

BLASPHEME, _v._; Blasphemed, _pp._ D 2183.

BL['A]SPHEM['O]UR, _s._ blasphemer, C 898, D 2213.

BLAST, _s._ puff, T. ii. 1387; Blastes, _pl._ blasts, B 4. m 5. 17.

BLASTE, _ger._ to blow a trumpet, HF. 1866.

BLAUNCHE, _adj. fem._ white (see Fevere), T. 1. 916.

BLAUNDISSHINGE, _pret. pt. as adj._ bewitching, B 3. m 12, 14;
Blaundissinge, flattering, B 2. p 1. 20. See BLANDISHE.

BLECHE, _v._; Bleched, _pp._ bleached, 9. 45.

BLEDE, _v._ bleed, L. 2696; T. v. 1047; F 1194; _pr.pl._ A 1801; Bledde,
_pt. s._ bled, T. ii. 950; A 145, B 1368.

BLEMISSHE, _v._; Blemisshed, _pp._ injured, B 1. p 4. 200.

BLENDE, _v._ blind, B 1. m 7. 14; T. iv. 648; _ger._ to deceive, T. iii.
207; to blind (_or read_ to-blende, _v._ blind utterly), T. ii. 1496;
Blent, _pr. s._ blinds, 5. 600; 13. 4; T. iv. 5; G 1391; Blente, _pt. s._
blinded, T. v. 1194; Blent, _pp._ 15. 18; T. ii. 1743; I 723; deceived, E
2113, G 1077.

BLERE, _v._ blear, bedim; Blere hir y[:e], dim their eye, cajole them, A
4049; Blered, _pp._ dimmed, deceived, G 730, H 252.

BLERING, _s._ dimming; _bl. of an y[:e]_, deceiving, cajoling, A 3865.

BLESSE, _v._ bless; Blesseth hir, _pr. s._ crosses herself, B 449; Blesse,
_pr. s. subj._ (God) bless, B 3978, E 1240. See BLISSE.

BLEVE, _v._ remain, T. iv. 1484, v. 478, 491; remain (at home), T. iii.
623; Bleven, _v._ T. iv. 539, v. 1180; Bleve, _ger._ to remain, stay,
dwell, T. iv. 1357. See BILEVE (2).

BLEW, _pt. s. of_ of Blowe.

BLEW, _adj._ blue, A 564; 3. 340; _as s._ blue clothing, 21. 7; Blewe,
_pl._ R. 1578; 5. 186; T. ii. 51; F 644; blue with weeping (see note), 4.
8.

BLEYNE, _s._ blain, blemish, R. 553.

BLEYNTE, _pt. s._ blenched, started back, A 1078; turned aside, T. iii.
1346. _Pt. s. of_ Blenche, _v._

BLIND, _adj._ blind, R. 1101; Blinde, _voc._ T. i. 211; _pl._ 1. 105; dim,
G 658.

BLINDE, _v._; Blynde with, _ger._ to blind (the priest) with, G 1151.

BLINNE, _v._ leave off, cease, T. iii. 1365 _n_; G 1171. See BILINNE.

BLISFUL, _adj._ happy, 9. 1; B 3, p 7. 9; E 844, 1121; conferring bliss, 1.
24, 28; fortunate, B 2. p 3. 51; blessed, 3. 854; B 845, 2388, F 1045;
merry, R. 80; B 403; sainted, A 17, 770.

BLISFUL, _adv._ joyously, 5. 689.

BLISFULLY, _adv._ happily, A 1236.

BLISFULNESSE, _s._ happiness, B 2. p 4. 75.

BLISSE, _s._ bliss, happiness, 3. 211; 5. 39; _dat._ 4. 43; Blis, B 33.

BLISSE, _v._ bless, E 553. Perhaps read _blesse_, _kesse_. See BLESSE.

BLISSED, _pp._ happy, 9. 43. See BLISFUL.

BLO, _adj._ blue, ash-coloured, smoke-coloured, HF. 1647. Icel. _bl['a]r_.
See BLEW.

BLODY, _adj._ bloody, L. 1388; causing bloodshed, A 2512; bloodstained, T.
iii. 724.

BLONDREN; see BLUNDRE.

BLOOD, _s._ blood, A 635; race, lineage, 7. 65; offspring, E 632;
kinswoman, T. ii. 594.

BLOOD-SHEDINGE, _s._ blood-shed, HF. 1241.

BLOSME, _s._ blossom, A 3324; Blosmes, _pl._ L. 143, 157.

BLOSME, _v._ blossom; Blosmeth, _pr. s._ buds, E 1462; Blosmed, _pp._
blossomed, covered with blossoms, R. 108.

BLOSMY, _adj._ blossoming, T. ii. 821; full of buds or blossoms, 5. 183; E
1463.

BLOTTE, _s._ blemish, defect, fault, I 1010.

BLOWE, _v._ blow, A 565; 3. 345; Blowen, _pr. pl._ A 2512; Blew, _pt. s._
3. 182; L. 1364; (it) blew, T. iii. 678; Blowen, _pp._ proclaimed by
trumpets, A 2241; Blowe, _pp._ blown, L. 1365, 1383; filled with wind, G
440.

BLUNDRE, _v._; Blundreth, _pr. s._ runs heedlessly, G 1414; _1 p. pl. pr._
Blondren, we fall into confusion, we confuse ourselves, become mazed, 670.

BLYNDE; see BLINDE.

BLYTHE, _adj._ blithe, fain, A 846; joyful, glad, happy, R. 811; 7. 225; A
1878, B 1154, 4002; of good cheer, L. 647.

BLYTHENESSE, _s._ joy, B 2. p 3. 37.

BLYTHLY, _adv._ gladly, 3. 749, 755.

BLYVE, _adv._ quickly, soon, L. 60, 1473, 2176; T. i. 595, ii. 1537, 1605,
v. 1549; A 2697, D 391; _as bl._ very soon, as soon as possible, T. i. 965,
ii. 137, 208, 1513; L. 435; 3. 248, 1277; HF. 1106; forthwith, R. 706, 992;
_also bl._, as soon as possible, T. iv. 174.

BOBANCE, _s._ presumption, boast, D 569; Bobaunce, 1. 84. O.F. _bobance_.

BOCE, _s._ protuberance (boss), I 423. O.F. _boce_. See BOS.

BOCH, _s._ botch, pustule, B 3. p 4. 9.

BOCHER, _s._ butcher, A 2025.

BOCL['E]R, _s._ buckler, A 3266. See BOKELER.

BODE (1), _s._ foreboding, token, omen, 5. 343. A.S. _bod_, _gebod_.

BODE (2), _s._ abiding, delay, 7. 119. Cf. _abode_.

BODE, _v._ proclaim; Bodeth, _pr. s._ heralds, B 4. m 6. 11.

BODEN, _pp. of_ Bede.

BODWORD, _s._ presage, 5. 343 _n_.

BODY, _s._ person, F 1005; principal subject, E 42; corpse, 3. 142; B 1872;
_my b._, myself, B 1185; Bodyes, _pl._ A 1005; Bodies, R. 813; metallic
bodies (metals), answering to celestial bodies (planets), G 820, 825.

BOEF, _s._ beef, E 1420.

BO[:E]S, _pr. s._ (it) behoves, A 4026. (Northern). See the note.

BOGHT, BOGHTE; see BYE.

BOILE, _v._ boil; Boille, _ger._ A 380; Boyleth, _pr. s._ I 951; Boilinge,
_pres. pt._ B 2. m 3. 12.

BOIST, _s._ box, C 307; Boyste, I 947; Boistes, _pl._ HF. 2129. O.F.
_boiste_ (F. _bo[^i]te_).

BOISTOUS, _adj._ rude, plain, H 211.

BOISTOUSLY, _adv._ loudly, E 791.

BOKEL, _s._ buckle, R. 1086.

BOKELER, _s._ buckler, A 112, 471, 668, 4019. A small round shield usually
carried by a handle at the back. See BOCLER.

BOKELINGE, _pres. pt._ buckling, A 2503.

BOKES, _pl. of_ Book.

BOKET, _s._ bucket, A 1533.

BOLAS, _pl._ bullace-plums, bullaces, R. 1377.

BOLD, _adj._ bold, A 458, 755.

BOLDE, _v._ grow bold, 5. 144.

BOLDELY, _adv._ boldly, A 3433, F 581.

BOLDNESSE, _s._ boldness, 3. 617; impudence, C 71.

B[)O]LE, _s._ bull, B 3. p 8. 20; T. iii. 723, iv. 239; B 2515, I 898;
Boles, _gen._ G 797; Boles, _pl._ 4. 86; L. 1432; A 2139, B 4125.

B[=O]LE ARMONIAK, Armenian clay, G 790. See the note.

BOLLE, _s._ a bowl, often a wooden bowl, G 1210. A.S. _bolla_.

BOLT, _s._ crossbow-bolt, A 3264.

BOLT-UPRIGHT, on (her) back, A 4266, B 1506.

BOMBLE (bumbl[*e]), _v._; Bombleth, _pr. s._ booms (as a bittern), D 972.

BON, _adj._ good, HF. 1022.

BOND, _s._ bond, obligation, A 1604; band, fetter, T. iii. 1766, 1768;
obligation (compelling the service of spirits), F 131; Bonde (Bond?), oath,
HF. 321; 3. 935; Bonde, _dat._ bond, 2. 42; B 1. m 5. 41; Bondes, _pl._ T.
iii. 1116; I 132.

BOND, BONDE; see BINDE.

BONDE, _s._ bondman, D 1660, I 149.

BONDE-FOLK, _s. pl._ bondmen, I 754, 758.

BONDE-MEN, _s. pl._ bondmen, I 752.

BONDES, _pl. of_ Bounde.

B['O]NE, _s._ petition, boon, prayer, request, 3. 129, 835; 5. 643; HF.
1537; L. 1596, 2340; A 2269, E 1618, G 234, 356; T. i. 1027, iv. 68, v.
594.

BONES, _pl. of_ Boon.

BONTEE; see BOUNTEE.

BOOD, _pt. s. of_ Byde.

B['O]['O]K, _s._ book, A 185, B 52; Boke, _dat._ R. 998; 3. 52; Bokes,
_pl._ A 294, 1198, B 3499; B 1. p 5. 30.

B[`O][`O]N, _s._ bone, R. 1059; 3. 940; A 1177, B 3090, 4589; ivory, T. ii.
926; B[`o]nes, _pl._ bones, A 546, 700; _by goddes b._, by the bones of
Christ, B 3087 (cf. 3096).

B[`O][`O]R, _s._ boar, A 2070, B 2516, 3299, D 1829; L. 980, 1121; B 4. m
3. 8, m 7. 39; T. iii. 1780, v. 1238, 1454; Bores, _gen. sing._ boar's, B
2060; Bores, _pl._ A 1658, 1699.

B[`O][`O]ST, _s._ loud talk, A 4001; noise, _hence_, boast, L. 267; pride,
B 3289; boasting, C 764; Bost, boasting, 4. 37; noise, outcry, L. 887 (see
note); boast, B 401; pride, swelling, G 441.

B[`O][`O]T, _s._ boat, T. i. 416, ii. 3; E 1424, F 994.

B['O]['O]T, _s._ help, remedy, T. iii. 1208. See BOTE.

BOOT, _pt. s. of_ Byte.

BORAS, _s._ borax, A 630, G 790. '_Borax_, biborate of soda; a salt formed
by a combination of boracic acid with soda'; Webster.

BORD, _s._ table, A 52 (see note), B 430; 4033, D 2167, E 3, F 79; plank,
3. 74; board, i.e. meals, G 1017; _to b._, to board, A 3188, D 528; _into
shippes bord_, on board the ship, A 3585; _over-bord_, overboard, B 922.

BORDELS, _s. pl._ brothels, I 885.

BORDEL-WOMEN, _pl._ women of the brothel, I 976.

BORDURE, _s._ border, B 1. p 1. 20; raised rim on the front of an
astrolabe, A. i. 4. 2, 16. 1; ii. 38. 2; Border, R. 1465.

BORE, _s._ bore, hole, T. iii. 1453.

BORE, Boren, _pp. of_ Bere.

BOREL, _s._ garment, cloth clothes, D 356; Borel men, laymen, B 3145 (see
note). See BUREL.

BORES; see BOOR.

BORKEN, _pp. of_ Berke.

BORN, _pp. of_ Bere.

BORNE, _v._; Borneth, _pr. s._ burnishes, smoothes, T. i. 327. See BURNE.

BORWE, _s._ pledge, A 1622; Borow, T. ii. 134; Borw, T. i. 1038; _to
borwe_, in pledge, as a pledge, T. v. 1664, L. 2105; A 1622, F 596, 1234;
_leyd to borwe_, laid in pledge, pawned, T. ii. 963; _to borowe_, for
surety, 4. 205; _to borow_, 4. 9; _Venus here to borwe_, Venus being your
pledge, T. ii. 1524; Borwes, _pl._ sureties, B 2997. A.S. _borh_.

BORWE, _v._ borrow, B 105; _ger._ 6. 10.

BOS, _s._ boss, A 3266. See BOCE.

BOSOM, _s._ T. ii. 1155; D 1993.

BOSSES, _pl._ bushes, B 3, m 1. 2 _n_. See BUSH.

BOST, _s._; see BOOST.

B[`O]STE, _v._ boast; Bosteth, _pr. s._ D 1672, I 393; Bosten, _2 pr. pl._
B 3. m 6. 7; Bosted, _pt. s._ L. 1262.

B['O]TE, _s._ good, benefit, D 472; remedy, profit, 3. 38; HF. 32; A 424, B
2183, F 154; L. 1992; advantage, T. i. 352; healing, T. i. 763; help, T.
ii. 345; L. 1076, 2710; healer, 22. 45; relief,G 1481; salvation, B 1656;
_doth b._, gives the remedy for, 5. 276; _for b. ne bale_, for good nor for
ill, 3. 227. See BOOT.

BOTEL, _s._ bottle (of hay), H 14; bottle, D 1931; _pl._ Botels, bottles, C
871.

BOTELEES, _adj._ without remedy, T. i. 782.

BOTELER, _s._ butler, HF. 592; B 4324.

BOTERFLYE, _s._ butterfly, B 3980, 4464, E 2304.

BOTES, _pl._ boots, A 203, 273.

BOTHE, both, A 540, B 221; 1. 63; Bothe two, both, A 3184; _your bothes_,
of both of you, 1. 83; _your bother_, of you both, T. iv. 168.

BOTME, _s._ bottom, R. 126, 1557; B 1. m 4. 5; B 4291, G 1321, I 363.

BOTMELEES, _adj._ bottomless, hollow, unreal, T. v. 1431; Botomlees, L.
1584.

BOUGH, _s._ bough, R. 1403; Bowes, _pl._ R. 108; 5. 183; T. ii. 821; A
1643, 2917.

BOUGHT, BOUGHTE; see BYE.

BOUK, _s._ trunk of the body, A 2746. A.S. _b[=u]c_.

BOUN, _adj._ prepared, F 1503. Icel. _b['u]inn_.

BOUNDE, BOUNDEN, _pp. of_ Binde.

BOUNDE, _s._ bound; Boundes, _pl._ bounds, limits, L. 546, 1673; T. iii.
1272; A 2993, F 571; Bondes, A. ii. 4. 18.

BOUNDE, _v._; Bounded, _pp._ bounded, A. ii. 39. 12.

BOUNTEE, _s._ goodness, kindness, 1. 9; 2. 38; HF. 1698; L. 522; B 2265, C
136, E 157, 415, 2246, I 368, 525; good deed, I 393; goodness,
delightfulness, R. 1444; Bontee, E 2289; Bountees, _pl._ good qualities, I
396; virtues, B 2. p 4. 27.

BOUNTEVOUS, _adj._ bountiful, bounteous, T. i. 883; C 110. From O.F.
_bontif_, kind.

BOUR, _s._ bed-chamber, HF. 1186; B 1932; lady's chamber, R. 1014; inner
room, B 4022; Boures, _gen._ bedroom's, A 3677; Boures, _pl._ chambers for
ladies, D 869; bowers, 5. 304.

BOURDE, _s._ jest, H 81; Bourdes, _pl._ D 680.

BOURDE, _1 pr. s._ jest, C 778; Bourded, _pp._ 5. 589. O.F. _bourder_.

BOWE, _s._ bow, 1. 29; 5. 213, 282; A 108, D 1369; Bowes, _pl._ R. 923.

BOWE, _v._ bow down, B 2638; Bowen, _v._ bow, bend, T. i. 257; give way, D
440; Bowed, _pt. s._ bent down, R. 1703; Boweth, _imp. pl._ C 909, E 113;
Bowing, _pres. pt._ 3. 1216.

BOWES, _pl. of_ Bough _and_ Bowe.

BOWGES, _pl._ bags, budgets, HF. 2129 _n_.

BOX (1), _s._ box-tree, A 2922; box-wood, L. 866, 4588; money-box, A 4390;
box, C 869; Boxes, _pl._ HF. 2129 _n_.

BOX (2), _s._ blow, L. 1388.

BOX-TREE, _s._ A 1302; 5. 178.

BOY, _s._ knave, D 1322.

BOYDEKIN, _s._. dagger, A 3960; Boydekins, _pl._ B 3892, 3897.

BOYLETH, BOYSTE; see BOI-.

BRAC['E]R, _s._ bracer, a guard for the arm in archery, A 111.

BRAGOT, _s._ bragget, a beverage made of honey and ale, A 3261.

BRAID, _s._ quick movement; _at a braid_, in a moment, R. 1336; Brayd, a
start, L. 1166. See BREYDE.

BRAIN, _s._; Brayn, T. iii. 1504; HF. 24; D 769; Braynes, _pl._ T. iv. 46.

BRAK, _pt. s. of_ Breke.

BRANCHED; see BRAUNCHED.

BRANCHES; see BRAUNCHE, _s._

BRAS, _s._ brass, A 366, B 4588, E 1168, F 115, 181, 303; B 4. m 5. 12; HF.
142.

BRASIL, _s._ dye made from a certain dye-wood (see note), B 4649.

BRAST, BRASTE; see BRESTE.

BRAT, _s._ cloth cloak, G 881 _n_.

BRAUN, _s._ brawn, muscle, A 546; brawn (of the boar), F 1254; Brawn, D
1750; Braunes, _pl._ muscles, L. 1071; A 2135, B 4645; Brawnes, muscles, B
3131.

BRAUNCHE, _s._ branch, T. v. 844; R. 558; Braunches, _pl._ 5. 304; A 1067,
I 114; Branches, D 1128.

BRAUNCHED (_written_ Branched), _adj._ full of branches, F 159.

BRAWN; see BRAUN.

BRAYD, _s._; see BRAID.

BRAYD, BRAYDE; see BREYDE.

BRAYN; see BRAIN.

BRECHE, -ES; see BREECH.

BREDE (1), _s._ breadth, R. 825, 1124; 3. 956; A. ii. 19. 9; A 1970, 2916,
B 3350, G 1228; space, T. i. 179; _on brede_, abroad, T. i. 530.

BREDE (2), _s._ roast meat, HF. 1222. See note.

BREDE, _ger._ to breed, T. iii. 1546; grow, T. v. 1027; Breden, _ger._ to
breed, arise, L. 1156 (cf. Vergil, Aen. iv. 2); Bredeth, _pr. s._ breeds,
increases, E 1783; Bredde, _pt. s._ produced, T. i. 465; Bred, _pp._ bred
up, F 499.

BREECH, _s._ breeches, B 2049, C 948; Breche, breech, B 4638; Breches,
_pl._ breeches, 'aprons,' I 330.

BR[`E][`E]D, _s._ bread, A 147, 341, B 2780, 3624, D 143, F 614; R. 216.

BREEM, _s._ bream, a fish, A 350.

BREEST, _s._; see BREST.

BR[`E][`E]TH, _s._ breath, A 5; R. 547, 1509.

BREIDE, _v._; _usually_ Breyde, q.v.

BREKE, _v._ break, A 551, C 936; _br. his day_, fail to pay on the day, G
1040; Breke, _ger._ B 40; 2. 83; Breken, _ger._ to interrupt, B 2233; Brak,
_pt. s._ 3. 71; A 1468, B 288; Breke, _pr. s. subj._ 4. 242; I 24; Breke,
_2 pr. pl. subj._ break off, T. v. 1032; Breke, _pt. s. subj._ would break,
B 4578; Broke, _pp._ broken, 3. 730; A 3571; Broken, _pp._ shipwrecked, L.
1487.

BREKERS, _s. pl._ breakers, transgressors, 5. 78.

BREKINGE, _s._ breaking, I 884.

BREKKE, _s._ break, flaw, defect, 3. 940.

BREMBLE-FLOUR, _s._ flower of the bramble, B 1936.

BREME, _adj._ furious, T. iv. 184.

BREME, _adv._ furiously, A 1699.

BREN, _s._ bran, A 4053, B 4430, D 478.

BRENNE, _v._ burn, 17. 18; D 816, 1142, G 1192, I 183; Brennen, _v._ B 111,
G 313; Brenne, _ger._ 4. 88; 5. 249; Brennen, _ger._ to burn, H 229; to be
burnt, T. i. 91; Brinne, _ger._ to burn, D 52; Brenne, _1 pr. s._ 12. 22;
Brenneth, _pr. s._ D 374, E 1876; T. iv. 678; Brenne, _pr. pl._ A 2331;
Brennen, _pr. pl._ L. 2610; B 964; Brendest, _2 pt. s._ didst burn, A 2384;
Brende, _pt. s._ 1. 90; HF. 1844; T. i. 440; A 3812, B 3669, 4558, 4560;
was burnt, HF. 163; was set on fire, HF. 537; burned, B 4. m 7. 30;
Brenned, _pt. s._ was inflamed with anger, R. 297; Brende, _pt. pl._ caught
fire, HF. 954; Brente, _pt. pl._ L. 731; Brent, _pp._ 7. 115; HF. 2080; B
2. p 2. 44; A 2017, D 375, G 759, 1197, 1407; Brend, _pp._ L. 292 _a_; B
4555; burnt, forged, A 2162, 2896; _as adj._ bright, R. 1109; Brenning,
_pres. pt._ burning, B 2. m 6. 18; A 2000; Brenninge, 1. 90; B 1. p 1. 4; B
1658, G 114, I 172; Brenne, _pr. s. subj._ G 1423; Brenne, _imp. s._ G 515.
Icel. _brenna_.

BRENNING, _s._ burning, 4. 133; greed of gold, R. 188; Brenninge, burning,
A 996; Brenninge of wilde fyr, burning of spirits, I 445.

BRENNINGLY, _adv._ ardently, T. i. 607; fervently, A 1564.

BRERE, _s._ briar, R. 858; E 1825; Breres, _pl._ I 721; brushwood,
underwood, A 1532.

BREST, _s._ breast, A 115, 131; E 617; Breest, B 4646; Brestes, _gen._ T.
i. 453; Brestes, _pl._ 3. 956; T. iii. 1250; A 3975.

BREST-BOON, _s._ breast-bone, A 2710.

BRESTE, _v._ burst, T. v. 1008; afflict, T. iii. 1434; break, D 1103, E
1169; _ger._ to burst, HF. 2018; T. ii. 408, iv. 1638; Bresten, _v._ burst,
break, T. iv. 373; A 1980; Brest, _pr. s._ bursts, A 2610; breaks, T. i.
258, iii. 1637; Brast, _pt. s._ burst out, T. v. 1078; F 1480; burst, L.
1033; B 697, 4408; H 263; broke, 3. 1193; Brast, _pt. s._ burst (_or read_
braste = would burst), T. v. 180; 7. 94; Braste, _pt. pl._ burst, T. ii.
326; Broste, _pt. pl._ B 671, C 234; Brosten, _pt. pl._ 4. 96; Breste, _pr.
s. subj._ burst, break, F 759; may break, T. i. 599; Braste, _pt. s. subj._
would burst, T. ii. 1108, v. 530; would break, 3. 1193; Brosten, _pp._
burst, T. ii. 976; broken, L. 1300, 2416; A 3829.

BRESTING, _s._ bursting, F 973.

BREST-PLAT, _s._ breast-plate, A 2120.

BRETFUL, _adj._ brimful, A 687, 2164; HF. 2123. Cf. Swed. _br[:a]ddful_,
full to the brim.

BRETHEREN, _pl._ brethren, brothers, 7. 60; T. v. 1227; A 252 _c_, F 668.

BRETHERHED, _s._ brotherhood, religious order, A 511; Bretherhede, B 1232;
Brotherhede, D 1399.

BREWE, _v._ brew; Brew, _pt. s._ contrived, B 3575.

BREWHOUS, _s._ brew-house, beer-house, A 3334.

BREYDE, _ger._ to start, T. iv. 230, 348; _v._ awake, F 477; Breyde, _1 pr.
s._ start, T. v. 1262; Breyde, _1 pt. s._ awoke, D 799; Breyde, _pt. s._
started, T. v. 1243; F 1027; awoke, A 4285; started, went (out of his
wits), B 3728; drew, B 837; Brayde, _pt. s._ took hastily, HF. 1678; Brayd,
_pp._ started, gone suddenly, 7. 124. A.S. _bregdan_, str. verb; pt. t.
_braegd_. But Ch. usually employs it as a weak verb.

BRID, _s._ bird, HF. 1003; L. 1757; A 3699, F 460, 874, G 1342, H 163;
Briddes, _gen._ 4. 23; T. ii. 921; B 3366; Briddes, _pl._ birds, R. 71, 88,
101; 5. 190; B 4. p 4. 132; A 2929, B 4071, E 572, F 611, I 195; young of
birds, 5. 192.

BRIGE, _s._ contention, B 2872. Cf. F. _brigue_, Ital. _briga_.

BRIGGE, _s._ bridge, A 3922.

BRIGHT, _adj._ fair, R. 1009; Brighte, _voc._ bright, 1. 181; Brighte,
_pl._ 3, 337; A 104, 1700.

BRIGHTE, _adj. as s._ brightness (after _for_), T. ii. 864.

BRIGHTE, _adv._ brightly, B 11, 2034.

BRIKE, _s._ a trap, snare, 'fix,' dilemma, B 3580. O.F. _bricque_, also
_briche_, 'trappe, attrape, pi[`e]ge'; Godefroy.

BRIMME, _s. dat._ brim of a lake, water, L. 2451.

BRIMSTOON, _s._ brimstone, sulphur, A 629, G 798, 824, 1439, I 548.

BRINGE, _v._ bring; Bringe forth, _v._ educe, B 3. p. 12. 30; Bringen, _v._
B 3623; Bringes, _2 pr. s._ bringest, HF. 1908 (a Northern form); Bringeth,
_imp. pl._ bring, B 3384; conduct, F 1489; Broghten, _pt. pl._ B 2590;
Brought, _pp._ induced, B 3. p 4. 15; introduced, brought in, B 2. m 8. 6;
_made broght_, caused to be brought, HF. 155.

BRINGER, _s._ one who brings; _br. out_, remover, D 1196.

BRINK, _s._ brink; Brinke. _dat._ B 3. m. 10. 10; E 1401, F 858, 1160;
Brinkes, _pl._ R. 1417; HF. 803.

BRINNE, _ger._ to burn, D 52. See BRENNE.

BRISTLEDE, _adj. def._ bristly, B 4. m 7. 39.

BRISTLES, _pl._ bristles, A 556, E 1824.

BROCAGE, _s._ mediation, A 3375. See note.

BROCHE, _s._ brooch, R. 1193; HF. 1740; T. iii. 1370, v. 1040, 1661, 1669;
A 160; small ornament, bracelet, 4. 245; Broches, _pl._ L. 1131, 1275; C
908, E 255.

BRODDER; see BRODERE.

BRODE, _adj._; see BROOD.

BRODE, _adv._ broadly, plainly, B 2. p 5. 112; A 739; far and wide, HF.
1683; wide awake, G 1420.

BRODERE, _adj._ larger, A. ii. 38. 1; Brodder, broader, D 1688.

BROGHT, -EN; see BRINGE.

BROIDE, _v._ braid; Broyded, _pp._ braided, A 1049.

BROIDEN; _written_ Broyden, _pp._ embroidered, A 3238 _n_. See BREIDE.

BROILLE, _v._ broil, A 383.

BROK, i.e. Badger, a horse's name, D 1543.

BROKEN; see HARM. And see BREKE.

BROKKINGE, _pres. pt._ using a quavering voice, A 3377. See _Brock_, v., in
the New E. Dict.

BR[=O]M (Br['o]['o]m); Br['o]me, _dat._ broom (the plant), R. 902; Bromes,
_pl._ broom (bushes so called), HF. 1226.

BROND, _s._ torch, L. 2252; E 1777; firebrand, B 3224; Bronde, _dat._ piece
of burning wood, B 2095; Brondes, _gen. pl._ of the brands, A 2339; _pl._
brands, A 2338.

BR['O]['O]D, _s._ brood, L. 133.

BR[`O][`O]D, _adj._ broad, A 155, 471, 549; thick, large, F 82, 191, 394;
Brode, broad, i.e. large (like the sun at sunset), T. v. 1017; _pl._ R.
939; A 2917, 3024, B 3448; expanded, R. 1681.

BR['O]['O]K, _s._ brook, A 3922.

BROSTE, -EN; see BRESTE.

BROTEL, _adj._ brittle, frail, B 3. p 8. 16, 17; T. iii. 820; fickle, L.
1885, 2556; I 473; unsafe, insecure, E 1279; Brotil, B 2640; transitory, E
2061; Brutel, _adj._ brittle, fragile, B 2. p 5. 4.

BROTELNESSE, _s._ frailty, T. v. 1832; insecurity, E 1279; fickleness, 10.
63; 21. 15; Brotilnesse, E 2241; Brutelnesse, _s._ brittleness, frailty,
fickleness, 10. 63 _n_.

BROTHER, _s._ brother, A 529; L. 2392; _gen. sing._ brother's, B 3593. G
1432; Brothers, _gen. sing._ 3. 1164.

BROTHERHEDE, _s._ brotherhood, D 1399. See BRETHERHED.

BROUDED, _pp._ embroidered, A 3238, B 3659. See _Browd_ in the New E. Dict.

BROUGHT, _pp. of_ Bringe.

BROUKE, _v._ enjoy, use, B 4490; keep, E 2308; _1 pr. s. subj._
(_optative_), may have the use of, HF. 273; Brouken, _pr. pl. subj._
(_opt._), may (they) profit by, L. 194. A.S. _br[=u]can_.

BROUN, _adj._ brown, R. 1009, 1213,1262; HF. 139; A 109, 207, 394; _b.
bread_, brown bread, B 4034.

BROWDING, _s._ embroidery, A 2498. See BROUDED.

BROWE, _s._ brow, eye-brow, T. i. 204; Browes, _pl._ R. 542, 861, 1217; T.
v. 813; A 627, 3245.

BROYDED, -EN; see BROIDED, -EN.

BRUTEL; see BROTEL.

BRYBE, _v._ steal, filch, A 4417; rob, D 1378.

BRYBERYES, _pl._ ways of robbing, D 1367.

BRYD, bride, L. 2622, 2672; Bryd[:e], E 1890.

BRYDALE, _s._ bridal, wedding, A 4375.

BRYDEL, _s._ bridle, 7. 184; L. 1208; T. i. 953, iii. 1762; A 169, 904, B
3985, D 813, F 340; Brydeles, _pl._ B 2. m 8. 11; Brydles, B 4. m 6. 29.

BRYDELEN, _v._ bridle; Brydeleth, _pr. s._ controls, 4. 41; Brydle, _imp.
s._ restrain, T. iii. 1635.

BRYKES, _error for_ crykes, B 3. m 8. 8 _n_.

BUFFET, _s._ blow; Buffettes, _pl._ I 258.

BUGLE-HORN, _s._ drinking-horn made from the 'bugle' or ox, F 1253.

BUILDEN, _ger._ to build up, D 1977. See BULDE, BILDE.

BUK, _s._ buck (A.S. _bucc_), 5. 195; Bukke (A.S. _bucca_), B 1946; Bukkes,
_gen._ buck's (see note), A 3387; Bukkes, _pl._ 3. 429.

BULDE, _v._ build; Bulte, _pt. s._ built, A 1548. A.S. _byldan_. See BILDE,
BUILDEN.

BULLE, _s._ papal bull, C 909; Bulles, _pl._ C 336, E 739, 744.

BULTE; _pt. s. of_ Bulde.

BULTE, _v._ boult, sift, B 4430.

BUMBE, _v._; Bumbith, _pr. s._ booms (as a bittern), D 972 _n_.

BURDOUN, _s._ burden of a song, bass-accompaniment, A 673; Burdon, A 4165.

BUREL, _adj._ rough, unlettered, F 716; lay (people), D 1872, 1874. The
idea is that of a man dressed in _burel_, or coarse woollen cloth. See
BOREL.

BURGEYS, _s._ burgess, citizen, T. iv. 345; A 369, 754.

BURGH, _s._ borough; Burghes, _pl._ D 870.

BURIE, _v._ bury; Buried, _pp._ 2. 14; Burieth, _imp. pl._ E 571; Bury, _2
pr. pl. subj._ 3. 207.

BURIELS, _s. pl._ burial-places, i.e. the Catacombs, G 186. Originally
_buriels_ as the _singular_ form of the sb. (see the note).

BURNE, _v._ burnish; Burned, _pp._ burnished, A 1983, B 4054, F 1247;
polished, HF. 1387; lustrous, C 38. See BORNE.

BURNET, _adj._ made of coarse brown cloth, R. 226.

BURTHE, _s._ birth, B 3. m 6. 10; T. v. 209; B 2757. See BIRTHE.

BURYING, _s._ burial, L. 1831; Buryinge, T. v. 1499.

BUSH, _s._ 1. 89; HF. 485; A 1517, 1527, E 2155, 2208; Busshes, _pl._ 9.
34; B 3. m 1. 2.

BUSK, _s._ bush, R. 54; A 2013 _n_; Buskes, _pl._ R. 102 _n_; A 1579.

BUSSHEL, _s._ bushel (of), T. iii. 1025; bushel, A 4244, D 1746; B 1. p 4.
66; bushel-measure, I 1036.

BUSSHES, _pl._ bushes, I 858. (MSS. E. Seld. Sn. beautees; Cm. beauteis;
Hl. beautes; Pt. bewtees.) Apparently a corrupt passage.

BUT, _conj._ except, unless, 2. 82; 3. 117, 592, 1000, 1188, 1234; 4. 49,
208; 5. 159, 459, 567; 11. 4; L. 35, 1616, 2645; T. i. 987, ii. 370; A 582,
B 431, C 741, D 1245, E 174, F 803, 1115, &c.; but, A 73, 148, &c.

BUT, _as s._ an exception, a 'but,' I 494.

BUT AND, but if, L. 1790.

BUT-IF, _conj._ unless, R. 250; 3. 1023; 15. 11; L. 13; T. iv. 637; A 351;
656, B 2001, 2750, 3688, F 687, 912, 1172; But-yif, B 2. p 4. 71.

BUTTOK, _s._ buttock, A 3803; D 2142; Buttokes, _pl._ A 3975, I 424.

BUXOM, _adj._ yielding, 6. 125; B 1367; obedient, B 1287, 1333.

BUXOMLY, _adv._ obediently, E 186.

BUXUMNESSE, _s._ yielding, submission, 13. 15.

BY, _prep._ by, A 25, &c.; as regards, with respect to, concerning, 6. 126;
L. 271; T. i. 225, 957; B 4. p 2. 111; B 5. p 1. 33; A 244, B 2425, D 229,
G 1005, 1438; with reference to, 5. 4, 158, 477; HF. 286; H 187; A. ii. 3.
50; for, on account of, R. 844; _by proces_, in process, B 2665; _by me_,
beside me (_with accent on_ by), T. ii. 991; _by this_, already, B 4. m 3.
16; _by the morwe_, in the morning, L. 49; H 16.

BY, _adv._ beside; _faste by_, close at hand, R. 1274; L. 2091; B 3116.

BY, _for_ Bye, _v._

BY AND BY, _adv._ one after another, in due order, in due place, L. 304, A
1011, 4143.

BY-CAUSE, because, A 174, F 961.

BYDE, _v._ wait, T. i. 1067; A 1576; B[`o][`o]d, _pt. s._ waited, T. v. 29;
stayed, A 4399; B[)i]den, _pp._ stayed, E 1888; Byd, _imp. s._ wait, T.
iii. 740.

BYE, _v._ buy, pay for (it), D 167; By (_for_ Bye, _before a vowel_), in
phr. _go by_, let us go to buy, G 1294; Byen, _v._ redeem, B 2. p 4. 22;
Bye, _1 pr. s._ buy, 7. 255; Byen, _pr. pl._ buy, I 772; undergo, B 4. p 4.
58 _n_; Bye, _pr. pl. subj._ 18. 26; Boghte, _pt. s._ bought, A 2088, C
293, I 132; redeemed, E 1153; _b. agayn_, redeemed, C 776, D 718; Boughte,
_pt. s._ 1. 117; Boghten, _2 pt. pl._ L. 258; Boght, _pp._ 4. 168; Bought,
_pp._ 1. 86. See BEYE.

BYFORN, _prep._ before, A. ii. 3. 15. See BIFOREN.

BYHIGHT, _pp._ promised, T. v. 1104. See BIHIGHTE.

BYING, _s._ buying, A 569.

BY-IAPED (Byjaped), _pp._ tricked, made a jest of, T. v. 1119; A 1585, G
1385, H 145. See BI-IAPE, IAPE.

BYNT, _for_ Bint, _pr. s. of_ Binde, _v._ bind; Bynt him, binds himself, 4.
47; Bynt her, 4. 48.

BY-PATH, side-road, by-way, T. iii. 1705.

BYRDE, _s._ maiden, lady, R. 1014. (Distinct from _bride_.)

BY-S['E]KE, _v._ beseech, T. iv. 131. See BISEKEN.

BYTE, _v._ bite, T. iii. 737; cut deeply, F 158; burn, A 631; Byten, _v._
HF. 1044; Byte, _ger._ to bite, B 3634; to sting, F 513; Byteth, _pr. s._
bites, L. 392; Byte, _pr. s. subj._ cut, 7. 270; B[`o][`o]t, _pt. s._ bit,
B 2. p 6. 40; B 3791; B[)i]ten, _pp._ bitten, L. 2318; Bytinge, _pres. pt.
as adj._ biting, sharp, A 2546; gnawing (_mordax_), B 3. m 3. 5; fretting,
vexatious, B 3. p 7. 15.

BYTINGE, _s._ wound, B 3. m 7. 5.

BYTINGLY, _adv._ sharply, sarcastically, B 2. p 7. 97.

BY-TWIXE, _prep._ between, A. ii. 28. 11, 14. See BITWIXEN.

BY-WORD, _s._ proverb, T. iv. 769.

BY-WREYE, _v._ reveal, T. iii. 367. See BIWREYE.



CAAS, _s._ case, circumstance, I 105; _sette caas_ = suppose, A. ii. 42.
15; Caas, _pl._ cases of law, A 323. See CAS.

CABLE, _s._ cord, 18. 33.

CACCHE, _v._ catch, G 11; lay hold of, 3. 969; come by, HF. 404; _ger._ to
catch, R. 1621; 3. 781; B 2368; to draw, I 852; Cacchen, _v._ take, gain, I
689; _imp. s._ lay hold of, T. ii. 291; Caughte, _pt. s._ took, conceived,
E 619; took, A 498; pulled, L. 1854; Caught, _pp._ caught, A 145;
perceived, A. ii. 17. 8; obtained, E 1110; taken, F 740.

CADENCE, _s._ HF. 623. See note.

CAGE, HF. 1985; A 1294, F 613, H 131; Cages, _pl._ F 611.

CAITIF, _adj._ captive, miserable, wretched, B 4. p 2,128; A 1552; Caytif,
R. 211; I 344. See below.

CAITIF, _s._ wretch, R. 340; 1. 124; T. iv. 104; Caytif, B 3269; captive,
T. iii. 382; Caityf, wretch, C 728; Caitifs, _pl._ captives, A 924;
Caytives, captives, I 214; Caytyves, wretches, A 1717. See above.

CAKE, _s._ a round, and rather flat loaf of bread (in the shape of a large
bun), A 668, 4094, C 322. The phrase '_cake_ of bread,' or simply '_cake_,'
is still common in this sense; as, e.g. in Shropshire. Hence it was
something like a buckler.

CAKELINGE, _s._ cackling, 5. 562.

CALCENING, _s._ calcination, G 771. From Lat. _calx_.

CALCINACIOUN, _s._ calcination; _of c._, for calcining, G 804.

CALCULE, _v._ calculate, A. i. 22. 3; Calculed, _pt. s._ F. 1284; Calculed,
_pp._ A. pr. 55.

CALCULINGE, _s._ calculation, T. i. 71; iv. 1398.

CALDEN, _pt. pl. of_ Calle.

CALENDES, _pl._ kalends, introduction to a new time, T. ii. 7.

CALF, _s._ calf, B 4575.

CALF, _s._ calf (of the leg), A 592.

CALKULER, _s._ the calculator or pointer, A. i. 23. 2. See ALMURY.

CALLE, _s._ caul, a net used to confine women's hair, A. i. 19. 3;
head-dress, D 1018; to 'make a hood above a caul' = to befool, T. iii. 775.

CALLE, _v._ call, cry out, B 3724; Calle, _pr. pl._ A 284; Calden, _2 pt.
pl._ called, 7. 251.

CALME, _adj._ calm, B 2. p 2. 32.

CAM, _pt. s. of_ Come.

CAMAILLE, _s._ a camel, E 1196.

CAMUSE, _adj._ low and concave, A 3934, 3974. See the note to A 3934.

CAN, _1 pr. s._ know, L. 1987, B 1726, 1898, D 56; know how, am able, E
304, F 4; can, B 42; understand, F 1266; am able to say, 5. 14; Can _pr.
s._ knows, 3. 673; L. 1175; T. iv. 1160; A 210, 3456, B 47, G 600, 620,
1091; has, E 2245; knows (of), A 1780; has skill, T. ii. 1197; _can on_,
has knowledge of, F 786; _can hir good_, knows her own advantage, D 231;
_can thank_, owes (them) thanks, A 1818; _2 pr. pl._ (_for_ Conne), know, B
1169; _pr. pl._ (_for_ Conne), know, D 1004, F 185. See CONNE, CANSTOW.

CANCRE, _s._ cancer, I 427.

CANDELE, _s._ candle, T. iii. 859, 1141; Candel, torch, light, 4. 7;
Candels, _pl._ R. 1012; Candeles, _pl._ candles, i.e. bright stars, T. v.
1020.

CANDLE-STIKKE, _s._ candlestick, I 1036.

CANEL-BOON, _s._ collar-bone (lit. channel-bone, with reference to the
depression in the neck behind the collar-bone), 3. 943.

CANELLE _s._ cinnamon, R. 1370. See _Canel_ in the New E. Dict.

CANEVAS, _s._ canvas, G 939. F. _canevas_.

CANKEDORT. _s._ state of suspense, critical position, T. ii. 1752.

CANON, _s._ the 'Canon,' the title of a book by Avicenna, C 890 (see the
note); rule, explanation, A. pr. 68; Canoun, a canon, table, A. ii. 32. 3.

CANSTOW, _2 p. s. pr._ knowest thou, A. pr. 20; canst thou, T. iv. 460; B
632, C 521. See CAN.

CANTEL, _s._ portion, A 3008.

CAPE, _s._ cape, headland, A 408.

CAPE, _ger._ to gape, T. iii. 558 _n_; _pr. pl._ A 3841 _n_; gape after, T.
v. 1133; Caped, _pt. s._ A 3473 _n_; Caping, _pres. pt._ (_for_ Gaping), A
3444 _n_. See GAPE.

CAPEL, _s._ horse, nag, H 64; Capul, A 4088, 4105; cart-horse, D 2150;
Caples, _pl._ horses, D 1554.

CAPITAIN, _s._ captain, H 230; Capitayn, B 3741, C 582.

CAPITAL, _adj._; Capitalles, _pl._ capital, A. ii. 3. 21; Capitals, A. i.
16. 8.

CAPOUN, _s._ capon, L. 1389; Capon, D 1839; Capouns, _pl._ C 856.

CAPPE, _s._ cap, A 586, 683; _set the wrightes cappe_, i.e. made a fool of
him, A 3143.

CAPUL; see CAPEL.

CARAYNE; see CAREYNE.

CARBOUCLE, _s._ carbuncle-stone, R. 1120; Carbuncle, HF. 1363.

CARDIACLE, _s._ pain about the heart, C 313. Cotgrave gives _Cardiaque_ as
an adj., one meaning being 'wrung at the heart.'

CARDINAL, _s._; Cardinales, _pl._ cardinals, B 2039, C 342.

CARE, anxiety, sorrow, grief, trouble, 7. 63; T. i. 505, 587; v. 20, 958; A
1321, B 514, 1949, D 990, F 837; ill-luck, 5. 363; Cares, _pl._ anxieties,
miseries, T. i. 264; L. 762, 1955; G 347.

CARE, _v._ feel anxiety, E 1212; Care, _pr. s. subj._ may care, T. iv. 462;
Care thee, _imp. s._ be anxious, A 3298.

CAREFUL, _adj._ full of care, full of trouble, 6. 44, 133; sorrowful, A
1565.

CAREYNE, _s._ corpse, carcase, carrion, 5. 177; A 2013, B 3814, I 441;
Carayne, B 4. p 2. 144.

CARF, cut; see KERVE.

CARIAGE, _s._ a carrying away; _upon c._, in the way of carrying anything
away, i.e. that I can carry away, D 1570; Cariages, _s. pl._ tolls due from
the tenant to his feudal lord imposed by authority, I 752; taxes, B 1. p 4.
52.

CARIE, _v._ carry, convey, L. 1866; A 130, E 585; Carien, _v._ HF. 1280;
Carien, _pr. pl._ B 1814; Carieden, _pt. pl._ A 2900, G 1219.

CARL, _s._ man, A 3469; fellow, rustic, countryman, A 545, C 717, D 1568.

C['A]ROLE, _s._ a dance accompanied with singing, R. 744, 781, 793; L. 687;
Car['o]les, _pl._ R. 759; A 1931.

CAROLE, _v._ dance round singing, 3. 849; Caroled, _pt. s._ carolled, sang,
R. 745; _pp._ danced, R. 810.

CAROLE-WYSE, carol-wise, a way like a carol, L. 201 a.

CAROLING, _s._ carolling, singing, R. 754; dancing, R. 804; Carolinge,
song, G 1345.

CARPE, _v._ talk, discourse, A 474.

CARPENTER, _s._ carpenter, L. 2418, A 361; Carpenteres, _gen._ A 3356,
3861.

CARRIK, _s._ barge, D 1688.

CART, _s._ chariot, HF. 943; B 4. m 1. 22; T. v. 665; cart, D 1539; Carte,
chariot, B 3. m 2. 26; T. v. 278; A 2041, E 2233; cart, A 2022, B 4208;
Cartes, _pl._ cars, chariots, B 5. p 4. 63; carts, 5. 102; vehicles,
vessels, B 3. m 9. 24.

CARTERE, _s._ carter, charioteer, B 5. p 4. 62; A 2022; Carter, carter, 5.
102; D 1540.

CART-HORS, _pl._ chariot-horses, HF. 944.

CARTWHEEL, _s._ D 2255.

CARYINGE, _s._ carrying, C 875.

CAS, _s._ accident, chance, HF. 254, 1052; A 844, 1074, E 316; case, A 797;
affair, L. 409, 1558; occasion, B 36; circumstance, condition, L. 583; T.
ii. 285; B 123, 305, 311, 983; adventure, L. 1630; mischance, L. 1056; _in
cas that_, in case, A. ii. 3. 2; _upon cas_, by chance, A 3661; by
accident, T. i. 271; _in cas if that_, in case that, T. ii. 758; _in no
maner cas_, in no way, D 1831; _set a cas_, suppose that, T. ii. 729; _to
deyen in the cas_, though death were the result, E 859; Cas, _pl._
circumstances, A 2971; cases, matters, C 163. See CAAS.

CAS, _s._ quiver (for arrows), L. 982, A 2358.

CAST, _s._ occasion, turn, B 3477; contrivance, plan, HF. 1178; A 3605;
casting, throwing, T. ii. 868; Castes, _pl._ contrivances, A 2468.

CASTE, _v._ cast (accounts), B 1406; Casten, _v._ throw, T. ii. 513; _c.
with a spere_, throw with a spear, HF. 1048; fling, A 3330; contrive, HF.
1170; Caste, _1 pr. s._ conjecture, A 2172; Casteth, _pr. s._ casts about,
I 692; considers, G 1414; applies, B 2781; _refl._ devotes himself, G 738;
Cast, _pr. s._ casts, R. 1574; D 782, 783; Caste, _1 pt. s._ cast, threw,
5. 172; _pt. s_. HF. 956; L. 311; B 1761, 2018, H 48; considered, A 2854;
designed, planned, T. i. 75, 1071; contrived, devised, B 406, 584, 805;
determined, T. iv. 34; Casten, _pt. pl._ (they) proposed, L. 2605; plotted,
T. i. 88; laid down, B 5. p 1. 34; _refl._ proposed, intended, B 4265;
Caste, _pt. pl._ threw, R. 773; exhaled, emitted, G 244; Casten, _pp._
thrown, B 1796; Cast, _pp._ overthrown, T. ii. 1389; contrived, B 3891, C
880; cunningly devised, 2. 26; _c. biforn_, premeditated, I 543; _c. out_,
opposed with success, B 1. p 4. 42; Caste, _pr. s. subj._ let (him) cast,
20. 4; Cast, _imp. s._ throw away, T. ii. 222.

CASTEL, _s._ castle, 3. 1318, 1322; F 847; Castelles, _pl._ B 2523.

CASTELLED, _pp. as adj._ castellated, I 445.

CASTEL-WAL, _s._ wall of a castle, B 4050, D 263.

CASTEL-YATE, castle-gate, HF. 1294.

CASTIGACIOUN, punishment, 15. 26.

CASUEL, _adv._. casual, T. iv. 419.

CASUELLY, _adv._ accidentally, by chance, HF. 679; B 4291.

CAT, _s._ A 3347, 3441, D 348, 350, 1775, H 175; Cattes, _gen._ cat's, D
349, 351.

CATAPUCE, _s._ caper-spurge (_Euphorbia Lathyris_), B 4155.

CATEL, _s._ property, wealth, possessions, goods, A 373, 540, B 27, 4017, C
594, I 500, 743.

CAUGHT, -E; see CACCHE.

CAUSE, _s._ cause, 1. 26; A 419; reason, B 1. p 4. 25; T. v. 527; L. 409; A
716, B 252; plea, 2. 46; sake, benefit, B 3. p 1. 32, p 2. 33; Cause
causinge, first cause (see note), T. iv. 829; _by the c. that_, because, A
2488; _by that c._, because, T. iv. 99; Cause why, the reason why, T. iii.
795; the reason for it (was), A 4144, E 2435, F 185; Causes, _pl._ reasons,
B 2224; causes, B 2583.

CAUSE, _v._ cause; Causen, _pr. pl._ F 452.

CAUSELES, _adj._ without any reason, HF. 667; T. iii. 889; Causelees,
without a cause, E 1975.

CAUSELES, _adv._ without cause, causelessly, 4. 159; F 825.

CAUSER, _s._ causer, creator, 4. 46.

CAVE, _s._ cave, HF. 70, 1584; L. 811, 1225; B 3297; used to translate the
astrological term 'puteus,' 4. 119 (see note); Caves, _pl._ 9. 42.

CAVILLACIOUN, _s._ cavilling, D 2136.

CAYTIF, -IVES; see CAITIF.

CEDRE, _s._ cedar, T. ii. 918; Cedres, _pl._ R. 1314.

CELEBRABLE, _adj._ worthy of honour, B 3. p 9. 48; celebrated, B 4. m 7.
20.

CELEBRITEE, _s._ celebrity, B 3. p 9. 38.

CELERE, _s._ cellar, B 2. p 2. 54; Celer, I 411.

CELERER, _s._ cellarer, keeper of a cellar, B 3126.

CELESTIAL, _adj._ heavenly, T. i. 979, 983; A. pr. 64; Celestials, _pl._
HF. 460.

CELLE, _s._ cell, A 172, 1376 (see note), B 3162 (see note).

CELLE, _s._ (_for_ Selle = Sylle), boarding, flooring, A 3822. See note.

CEMENTING, _s._ cementing, hermetically sealing, G 817.

CENTAURE, _s._. centaury, _Centaurea nigra_, B 4153.

CENTRE, _s._ centre, B 4. p 6. 81; a point on a _rete_ representing a star,
A i. 21. 7, ii. 3. 22, ii. 18. 1; Centres, _pl._ F 1277 (see note).

CEPTRE, _s._ sceptre, B 1. p 1. 30, B 2. m 6. 10; 5. 256; L. 1131; B 3334,
3563.

CERCLE, _s._ circle, A. i. 9. 1, i. 10. 1; HF. 791; sphere, 16. 9; orbit, B
4. m 6. 5; Cercles, _pl._ circles, A 2131.

CERCLEN, _ger._ to encircle, T. iii. 1767; Cercleth, _pr. s._ encircles, R.
1619; Cercled, _pp._ extended in a circle, 12. 2.

CERED, _pp. as adj._ waxed, G 808. See the note. From Lat. _cera_.

CERIAL, _adj._ belonging to a species of oak (see note), A 2290.

CERIMONIES, _s. pl._ ceremonious acts, acts of courtship, F 515.

CERIOUSLY, _adv._ minutely, with full details; (see note), B 185. The word
is glossed by _ceriose_ in the Ellesmere MS., and Ducange has '_Seriose_,
fuse, minutatim, articulatim.' From Lat. _series_, order.

CERTEIN, _adj._ sure, unerring. B 4. m. 7. 24; Certeins, _pl._ certain, B
5. p 5. 71; Certein, _adj. as s._ a certain, A. pr. 10; _a c. holes_, a
certain number of holes, A. i. 13. 2; _c. gold_, a stated sum of money, B
242; _c. tresor_, a quantity of treasure, B 442; _c. yeres_, a certain
number of years, B 3367; Certeyn, a certain sum, a fixed quantity, G 776,
1024; Certayn, a certain number, T. iii. 596; Certeyn, _as s._ certain
number, selection, A 3193; Certayn, certainty, B 1918; Certeyne, _pl._
certain, A 2996.

CERTEIN, _adv._ certainly, indeed, assuredly, A 375; Cert['e]yn, 1. 169; A
451, B 45, 1853, 3945, F 719; Certayn, E 694.

CERTEINLY, _adv._ certainly, assuredly, A 235, 395, B 3990; Certeynly, 1.
130.

CERTES, _adv._ certainly, R. 374, 439; 1. 25, 28, 98; 3. 853, 1117; 7. 241,
256; B 1. p 4. 93; L. 1628; A 927, B 1729, 1898, D 1093, E 106, 659, F 2, G
1478.

CERTRES, _error for_ sterres, A 2037 _n_.

CERUCE, _s._ white lead, A 630.

CESE, _v._ cease, B 2. m 2. 6; cause to cease, T. i. 445; put an end to, 4.
11. See CESSE.

CESSE, _v._ cease, B 1066, E 154; Cessed, _pt. s._ G 124, 538; Cesse, _pr.
s. subj._ cease; _c. cause_, when the cause ceases, T. 11. 483; Cesse; _c.
wind_, when the wind ceases, T. ii. 1388; Cessed, _pt. s. subj._ would
cease, T. i. 849.

CETEWALE, _s._ zedoary, A 3207, B 1951. O.F. _citoal_. The Promptorium
Parvulorum has the following-- '_Setuale_, or seduale, setwale, setwaly,
herbe: _Zedoarium_.' And we find in Webster, ed. Mahn, the
following--'_Zedoary_, n. (F. _z['e]doaire_, Prov. _zeduari_, Ital.
_zedoario_, _zettovario_, Span. and Port. _zedoaria_, _zodoaria_, Low Lat.
_amomum zedoaria_, Ger. _zitwer_, O.H. Ger. _zitawar_, Arab. Pers. Hind.
_djedw[^a]r_) a medicinal substance obtained in the East Indies, having a
fragrant smell, and a warm, bitter, aromatic taste, used in medicine as a
stimulant. "It is the root of a species of _Curcuma_, and comes in short,
firm pieces, externally of a wrinkled, gray, ash-coloured appearance, but
within of a brownish-red colour. There are two kinds: _round zedoary_, said
to be the root of _Curcuma zerumbet_, or _Kaempferia rotunda_, and _long
zedoary_, of _Curcuma zedoaria_."--Dunglison.' The English Cyclopaedia
explains _C. Zedoaria_ as broad-leaved turmeric, and says that 'its
sensible properties are very like those of ginger, but not so powerful.'
All the _curcumae_ belong to the natural order of _Zingiberiacae_, or
Ginger tribe. (The name _setwall_ was also given to valerian.)

CEYNT, _s._ cincture, girdle, A 3235.

CHAAST; see CHAST.

CHACE, _ger._ to hunt, T. i. 908; to pursue, E 341, 393; _v._ pursue, F
457; Chase, _ger._ to follow after, harass, T. iii. 1801; Chasen, _pr. pl._
chase, 1. 15; Chacedest, _2 pt. s._ didst chase, B i. p 4. 182; Chaced,
_pp._ driven away, 11. 14; D 2157.

CHAF, _s._ chaff, L. 529 _a_; B 4633.

CHAFF['A]RE, _s._ bargaining, I 851; traffic, G 1421; trade, A 4389;
merchandise, ware, B 1475, D 521; matter, subject, E 2438; Ch['a]ffar,
merchandise, B 138.

CHAFF['A]RE, _ger._. to trade, barter, deal, traffic, B 139. See above.

CHAIRES, _s. pl._ thrones, B 4. m 2. 3. See CHAYER.

CHAL['A]NGE, _v._; Chal['e]nge, _v._ claim, D 1200; Chalange, _pr. s. 1 p._
claim, F 1324; Chalaunged, _pt. s._ arrogated, B 2. p 6. 23.

CHALANGING, _s._ false claim, accusation, C 264.

CHALAUNDRE, _s._ a species of lark (_Alauda calandra_), R. 914; Chelaundre,
R. 81; Chalaundres, _pl._ R. 663.

CHALICE, _s._ cup, I 879.

CHALK, _s._ chalk, F 409.

CHALK-STOON, _s._ a piece of chalk, G 1207.

CHALONS, _pl._ blankets or coverlets for a bed, A 4140. Cf. E. _shalloon_.

CHAMBERERE, _s._ maidservant, lady's maid, D 300; chambermaid, E 819;
Chambereres, _pl._ E 977.

CHAMBERLEYN, _s._ chamberlain, A 1418.

CHAMBRE, _s._ chamber, mansion, 4. 85; B 167, F 269; Chambres, _pl._ A 28;
sleeping-rooms, E 263; Chaumbres, _pl._ chambers, B 4. m 7. 3 (Lat.
_thalamos_).

CHAMBRE-DORE, chamber-door, L. 1718; A 3435.

CHAMBRE-ROOF, roof of my room, 3. 299.

CHAMBRE-WAL, chamber-wall, T. ii. 919.

CHAMPARTYE, _s._ equality, participation in power, A 1949. From F. _champ
parti_.

CHAMPIOUN, _s._ champion, 10. 17; chosen fighter, A 239.

CHANON, _s._ canon, G 573 (see the note); Chanoun, 972.

CHAPEL-BELLE, _s._ chapel-bell, A 171.

CHAPELEINE, _s._ chaplain, A 164; Chapelleyns, _pl._ I 617.

CHAPELET, _s._ fillet, circlet for the head, chaplet, R. 563, 845, 908.

CHAP['I]TRE, _s._ chapter, D 1945; Ch['a]pitre, B 4255, D 1361, I 238; A.
ii. 2. 8, 9. 2; Chapitres, _pl._ 5. 32.

CHAPMAN, _s._ trader, merchant, A 397; Chapmen, _pl._ B 135, 1416.

CHAPMANHEDE, _s._ bargaining, B 1428; Chapmanhode, trade, B 143.

CHAR, _s._ chariot, 7, 24, 39, 40; T. iii. 1704; A 2138, B 3550, 3784,
3800, F 671.

CHARBOCLE, _s._ carbuncle (a precious stone), B 2061. See CARBOUCLE.

CHARGE, _s._ load, burden, R. 1352; 7. 32; HF. 1439; B 1. p 3. 11, p 4.
215; B 2. p 3. 34; I 92; tax, B 3. p 4. 58; responsibility, 5. 507; A 2287,
E 163, 193; consideration, A 1284; importance, 3. 894; F 359; care, A 733;
care, particular note, D 321; a heavy thing, HF. 746; weight, L. 620;
consequence, L. 2383; _of that no ch._, for that no matter, it is of no
importance, G 749.

CHARGE, _v._ load, L. 2151; command, L. 493; Chargen, _v._ implore, T. ii.
1437; Charge, _1 pr. s._ (I) command, L. 548; E 164; Charged, _pt. s._
loaded, R. 1651; _pp._ B 3556, D 1539, E 2211; burdened, I 92; bidden, L
940; oppressed, wearied, B 4. p 6. 254.

CHARGEANT, _adj._ burdensome, B 2433; Chargeaunt, I 692.

CHAR-HORS, _pl._ chariot-horses, T. v. 1018.

CHARIET, _s._ chariot, B 2. m 8. 4; Chariettes, _pl._ B. 2. m 3. 2;
Charietes, B 5. p 4. 63.

CHARIT['A]BLE, _adj._ loving, L. 444; T. v. 823; kind, A 143, D 1795.

CHARITEE, _s._ charity, love, T. 1. 49; A 452, 532, E 221; favour with God,
I 235; Charite, 3. 642; Charitee, for seinte, i.e. _either_ (1) for holy
charity; _or_ (2) for the sake of St. Charity, A 1721, B 4510, D 2119.

CHARME, _s._ charm, T. ii. 1314, 1580; Charmes, _pl._ A 1927, I 607.

CHARMERESSES, _fem. pl._ workers with charms, HF. 1261.

CHARTRE, _s._ charter, agreement, A 3327; Chartres, _pl._ T. iii. 340; E
2173.

CHASE; see CHACE.

CHAST, _adj._ chaste, L. 1577; Chaast, D 1917; Chaste, _def._ B 2. p 4. 63;
L. 1862; A 2051.

CHASTEYN, _s._ chestnut, A 2922. See CHESTEYNES.

CHASTIE, CHASTE, _v._ to chasten; Chastied, _pp._ chastened, B 4. p 4. 59
_n_; Chasted, taught, F 491. O.F. _chastier_. See CHASTYSE.

CH['A]STISINGE, _s._ chastening, 1. 129; Chastysinge, chastisement, B 2622.

CHASTITEE, _s._ chastity, F 1453.

CHASTYSE, _v._ to rebuke, restrain, B 3695; chasten, 1. 39; _imp. s._ 1.
129; Chastysed, _pp._ admonished, T. iii. 329. See CHASTIE.

CHATERINGE, _s._ chattering, B 1. p 3. 56.

CHAUNCE, _s._ chance, A 1752, B 125; incident, 3. 1285; destiny, 3. 1113;
luck, G 593; 'chance,' a technical term in the game of hazard, C 653.

CHAUNCEL, _s._ chancel, A 3656.

CHAUNGE, _s._ change, exchange, F 535.

CHAUNGE, _v._ change; Chaunged, _pt. s._ A 348; _pp._ E 601; Chaungeth,
_imp. pl._ T. ii. 303.

CHAUNGEABLE, _adj._ changeable, A 1242.

CHAUNGINGE, _s._ changing, F 782; Chaunging, change, 21. 17; T. iii. 549.

CHAUNTE, _v._ Chaunteth, _pr. s._ sings, A 3367, E 1850.

CHAUNTE-PLEURE, title of a song upon grief following joy, 7. 320. See note.
Cf. 'It is like to the _chante-plure_. Beginning with ioy, endyng in
wretchednes'; Lydgate, Falls of Princes, bk. i. c. 7.

CHAUNTERIE, _s._ an endowment for the payment of a priest to sing mass,
agreeably to the appointment of the founder, A 510.

CHAYER, _s._ chair, B 3803; throne, B 1. m 5. 3; Chayere (professor's)
chair, D 1518; Chayres, _pl._ thrones, B 1. m 5. 27; Chaires, B 4. m 2. 3.

CHEEF, _adj._ chief, 3. 910, 911; Chief, A 1057.

CHEEF, _s._ chief, head, L. 2109.

CHEEK, _s._ cheek, i.e. cheekbone, B 3228; Cheke, _dat._ cheek, B 3233; D
792, F 1078; Chekes, _pl._ cheeks, 12. 4; A 633, 2834.

CHEEP, _s._ market, price; _to greet cheep_, too cheap, D 523; _as good
chep_, as cheaply, T. iii. 641; Chepe, _dat._ a time of cheapness, HF.
1974.

CHEES; see CHESE.

CHEESTE, _s._ wrangling, I 556. A.S. _c[=e]ast_.

CHEK, _s. as int._ check (at chess), 3. 659.

CHEKE, -S; see CHEEK.

CHEKKERE, _s._ chess-board, 3. 660.

CHEKMAT, checkmate, T. ii. 754.

CHELAUNDRE; see CHALAUNDRE.

CHEP, -E; see CHEEP.

CH[`E]PE, _ger._ to bargain (with her), D 268.

CHERCHE; see CHIRCHE.

CHERE, _s._ face, countenance, B 1. m 1. 19; T. i. 14; L. 64, 265, 1762; F
1309, I 737; look, mien, R. 1014; HF. 154, 179, 214; 3. 545; 4. 42; 5. 488;
7. 253; A 913; B 97, 1901, D 1266; E 238, 241, 782, F 103, 545, G 1233;
entertainment, A 747, B 180; favour, 7. 108; T. ii. 360, 578; appearance,
19. 4; A 728; behaviour, A 139; look, glance, sign, T. i. 312; good cheer,
mirth, A 4363; F 1098, 1257; kindly greeting, 4. 146; show, B 2377, E 678;
kindly expression, E 1112; _doth him chere_, makes him good cheer, L. 2452;
_be of good ch._, be of good cheer, T. i. 879; _sory ch._, mournful look, D
588; Cheres, _pl._ faces, R. 813, 936; looks, B 2. m 3. 3; T. ii. 1507.

CHERISSE, _v._ cherish; Cherisseth, _pr. s._ F 1554; Cherisse, _imp. s._ E
1388; Cherish, _imp. s._ 15. 23; Cherissheth, _imp. pl._ F 353. See
CHERYCE.

CHERL, _s._ churl, boor, fellow, 5. 596; L. 136; A 3182, B 2837, C 140,
289, 750, D 460, 1158, 2206, I 147; slave, I 463; man (in the moon), T. i.
1024; Cherles, _gen._ A 3169, D 2206; Cherles, _pl._ churls, B 3733;
violent men, fierce men, R. 880; _gen. pl._ of the countrymen, A 2429.

CHERLISH, _adj._, churlish, mean, ill-conditioned, R 177; malicious, F
1523.

CHERT['E]E, _s._ affection, B 1526. See CHIERTEE.

CHERUBINNES, _gen._ cherub's, A 624.

CHERYCE, _v._ cherish, 9. 52; L. 472; T. ii. 726; _ger._ T. i. 986; to
indulge, B 3710; Cherycen, _v._ T. iii. 175. See CHERISSE.

CHERYSE, _pl._ cherries, R. 1376.

CHES, _s._ chess, 3. 619, 652, 664; F 900; Chesse, _dat._ 3. 51.

CH['E]SE, _v._ choose, 5. 399, 400; 18. 60; L. 1811; B 227, E 130, D 176,
1748; _ger._ 5. 146, 310, 388; D 898; Chesen, _v._ 22. 86; _ger._ B 3. p 5.
35; Chese, _1 pr. s._ 5. 417; _2 pr. pl._ T. iv. 189; Cheest, _pr. s._
chooseth, 5. 623; Chees, _1 pt. s._ chose, 3. 791; R. 1691; L. 146; E 2148,
2165; Chees, _pt. s._ chose, 1. 108; L. 513, 698, 965, 1455; T. v. 1532; B
3706, D 915, 1179, F 1384, 1403, G 38; Chees, _imp. s._ choose, L. 1449; A
1595, 1614, G 458; Chese, _imp. s._ (_better_ Chees?), T. ii. 955, D 1219;
Chese, let him choose, A 3177, F 1086; _2 pr. pl. subj._ A 3181; Cheseth,
_imp. pl._ 4. 17; D 1232; Chose, _pp._ chosen, 3. 1004.

CHESE, _s._ cheese, D 1739.

CHESINGE, _s._ choosing, choice, B 2305, E 162.

CHESTE, _s._ chest, casket, T. v. 1368; box, trunk, L. 510; C 734; coffin,
D 502, E 29. See CHISTE.

CHESTEYNES, _pl._ chestnuts, R. 1375. See CHASTEYN.

CHEVAL-; see CHIVAL-.

CHEVAUCHEE; see CHIVACHEE.

CHEVE, _v._; _in phr._ yvel mote he cheve = ill may he end, _or_ ill may he
thrive, G 1225.

CHEVESAILE, _s._ (ornamented) collar or neckband of a gown, R. 1082. See
New E. Dict.

CHEVISAUNCE, _s._ borrowing, L. 2434 (see note); agreement to borrow, B
1519, 1537, 1581; dealing for profit, A 282. O.F. _chevisance_.

CHEVISE, _v. refl._ accomplish (her) desire, 4. 289. O.F. _chevir_.

CHEWE, _v._ chew; Cheweth, _pr. s._ A 3690.

CHEYNE, _s._ chain, 7. 284; 11. 16; F 1356; Cheynes, _pl._ chains, B 1. m
2. 21; A 1343, B 3554.

CHIDDE, Chiden; see CHYDE.

CHIDERESSE, _s._ a scold, R. 150.

CHIEF; see CHEEF.

CHIEFTAYN, _s._ captain, A 2555.

CHIERE, _for_ Chere, B 1196 _n_.

CHIERTEE, _s._ fondness, D 396; love, F 881; (_for_ Chertee), B 1526 _n_.
See CHERTEE.

CHIKE, _s._ chicken, R. 541.

CHIKNES, _pl._ chickens, A 380.

CHILD, _s._ young man, A 3325, B 2000, 3345; Childes pley, child's play, E
1530; Childe, with, with child, L. 1323; A 2310, B 720, 3474; Children,
_pl._ A 628.

CHILDHEDE, _s._ childhood, R. 399; B 1691, 2635, 3445.

CHILDISH, _adj._ E 1276.

CHILDISH, _adv._ childishly, T. iii. 1168.

CHILDISHLY, _adv._ T. iv. 804.

CHILDLY, _adj._ childlike, 3. 1095.

CHILINDRE, _s._ cylinder, portable sun-dial, B 1396. See note.

CHIMBE, _s._ rim of the barrel (see note), A 3895.

CHIMBE, _v._ chime (as a bell), A 3896.

CHIMENEE, _s._ fireplace, A 3776; Chimeneye, T. iii. 1141; Chiminees, _pl._
chimneys, B 1. m 4. 7.

CHIN, _s._ R. 550; HF. 1230; A 195.

CHINCHE, _s._ niggard, miser, B 2793, 2809.

CHINCHERYE, _s._ niggardliness, miserliness, B 2790; _spelt_ Chingerie, B
2790 _n_.

CHIPPES, _pl._ chips, A 3748.

CHIRCHE, _s._ church, A 708, 2760, E 1384, 1662; Cherche, G 546.

CHIRCHEDORE, _s._ church-door, A 460, D 6.

CHIRCHE-HAWE, _s._ churchyard, I 964; -hawes, _pl._ I 801.

CHIRCHE-REVES, _pl._ church-officers, churchwardens, D 1306.

CHIRKE, _v._; Chirketh, _pr. s._ chirps, D 1804; Chirkinge, _pres. pt._
rustling, B 1. m 6. 7.

CHIRKING, _s._ creaking, grating noises, A 2004, I 605; Chirkinges, _pl._
shriekings, cries, HF. 1943 (see note).

CHIRTETH, _for_ Chirketh, D 1804 _n_; see CHIRKE.

CHISELS, _s._ scissors, I 418.

CHISTE, _for_ Cheste, T. v. 1368 _n_, D 317.

CHIT, _pr. s. of_ Chyde.

CHITEREN, _v._ chatter, prattle, G 1397.

CHITERINGE, _s._ chattering, chirping, T. ii. 68.

CHIV['A]CHEE, _s._ feat of horsemanship, H 50; Chevauchee, swift course
(lit. ride), 4. 144. O.F. _chevauchee_, an expedition on horseback.

CH['I]VACH['Y]E, _s._ a military expedition, A 85.

CHIVALROUS, _adj._ chivalrous, valiant, L. 1905; Chevalrous, T. v. 802.

CHIVALRYE, _s._ knighthood, the accomplishments of a knight, A 45;
chivalrous daring, gallant deeds, knightly conduct, valour, R. 1207; L.
608; A 865, B 3585; troops of horse, cavalry, company of knights, A 878, B
235, 3871; Chivalry, knightly deeds, B 2084; Chevalrye, chivalry,
knighthood, HF. 1340.

CHOGH, _s._ chough, 5. 345.

CHOIS, _s._ choice, T. iv. 971, 980; B 2273; Choys, 5. 406; B 4436, E 154,
170.

CHOPPEN, _v._ strike downwards, knock, HF. 1824.

CHOSE, _pp. of_ Chese.

CHUK, _s._ cluck, 'chucking' noise, B 4364.

CHUKKE, _v._; Chukketh, _pr. s._ clucks, B 4372.

CHYDE, _v._ chide, 3. 937; T. iii. 1433; F 776; complain, F 650; reproach,
T. v. 1093; Chyden, _v._ I 201; Chiden, _ger._ to chide, blame, B 4541;
Chit, _pr. s._ chides, scolds, G 921; Chidde, _1 pt. s._ chid, D 223; _pt.
s._ made complaint, A 3999; Chydeth, _imp. pl._ reprove, D 1824.

CHYDESTER, _s._ (female) scold, E 1535.

CHYDINGES, _pl._ scoldings, HF. 1028; abusive language, reproaches, B 4. p
3. 76; I 206.

CHYNING, _adj._ gaping, yawning, B 1. p 6. 28. A.S. _c[=i]nan_, to gape
open.

CICLATOUN, _s._ a costly kind of thin cloth, B 1924. See note. I may add
that the expression 'hwite ciclatune' = _white ciclatoun_ occurs in O. Eng.
Hom. ed. Morris, 1st ser. p. 193.

CINAMOME, _s._ cinnamon, as a term of endearment, sweet one, A 3699.

CINK, _num._ cinque, five, C 653. See SIS.

CIPRES, _s._ cypress, 5. 179; Ciprees, B 2071; Cipres (_collectively_),
cypresses, R. 1381.

CIRCUIT (sirku-it), _s._ circuit, circumference, A 1887.

CIRCUMSCRYVE, _v._ bound, enclose, comprehend, T. v. 1865.

CIRCUMSTAUNCES, _pl._ circumstances, C 419; accompaniments, A 2263.

CISER, _s._ cider, B 3245 _n_.

CITEE, _s._ city, B 289, F 46; Citees, _pl._ L. 1895.

CITEZEIN, _s._ citizen, HF. 930.

CITOLE, _s._ kind of harp, a stringed instrument, A 1959. See the New E.
Dict.

CITRINACIOUN, _s._ citronising, the turning to the colour of citron, a
process in alchemy, G 816. See note.

CITRYN, _adj._ citron-coloured, A 2167.

CLAD, CLADDE; see CLOTHEN.

CLAIME, _1 pr. s._ claim, L 2070; Clayme, _v._ E 1300; Claymeth, _pr. s._
14. 2; _1 pr. pl._ D 1120.

CLAMB, _pt. s. of_ Climben.

CLAMOUR, _s._ A 995; outcry, D 889.

CLAPERES, _pl._ burrows (for rabbits), R. 1405.

CLAPPE, _s._ thunderclap, HF. 1040.

CLAPPE, _s._ prating, foolish talk, A 3144.

CLAPPE, _v._ clap; _hence_, chatter, prattle, G 965; Clappeth, _pr. s._
talks fast, B 3971; knocks, D 1581, 1584; Clappen, _pr. pl._ talk
unceasingly, I 406; Clappeth, _imp. pl._ chatter unceasingly, E 1200;
Clapte, _pt. s._ clapped to, closed, shut quickly, A 3740, D 1699, E 2159;
clapped, F 1203.

CLAPPING, _s._ chatter, idle talk, E 999.

CLAPSE, _v._ clasp; Clapsed, _pp._ A 273 _n_.

CLARIONING, _s._ the music of the clarion, HF. 1242.

CLARIOUN, _s._ clarion, trumpet, HF. 1240, 1573, 1579; Clarion, HF. 1258;
Clariounes, _pl._ clarions, A 2511; Clariouns, B 2. m 5. 16.

CLARREE, _s._ clarified wine, wine mixed with honey and spices, and
afterwards strained till clear, B 2. m 5. 6; A 1471, E 1807, 1843; Clarre,
9. 16.

CLASPE, _v._ clasp; Clasped, _pp._ fastened, A 273.

CLATERE, _v._ clatter; Clatereth, _pr. s._ says noisily, B 2259; Clateren,
_pr. pl._ clatter, rattle, A 2359; Clatereden, _pt. pl._ rattled, A 2423.

CLATERINGE, _s._ clanking, A 2492; clashing, D 1865.

CLAUSE, _s._ sentence; _also_, agreement, stipulation, T. ii. 728; _in a
clause_, in a short sentence, compendiously, briefly, 22. 38; A 715, 1763,
B 251.

CLAWE, _v._ rub, D 940; Clawen, _ger._ to rub, scratch, T. iv. 728; Clawed,
_pt. s._ stroked, A 4326; Clew, _1 pt. s._ rubbed, HF. 1702 (see note). Cf.
Lowl. Sc. _clow_, to rub, scratch.

CLAWES, _pl._ claws, HF. 545; L. 2320; A. i. 19. 2; B 3366; Clowes, HF.
1785.

CLAYME; _see_ Claime.

CLED, Cledde; see CLOTHEN.

CLEER, _adj._ clear, fine, bright, A 1062; free, T. iii. 526; magnificent,
B 3. p 5. 6. And see CLERE.

CLEERLY, _adv._ entirely, B 1566.

CLEERNESSE, _s._ brightness, B 2. m 3. 1; B 5. m 4. 35; glory, G 403.

CLEFTE, _pt. s. of_ Cleve (1).

CL[`E]NE, _adj._ clean, A 504; unmixed, B 1183; pure, T. ii. 580. A.S.
_cl[=ae]ne_.

CL[`E]NE, _adv._ clean, entirely, wholly, R. 1380; 3. 423; 11. 35; F 626, G
625, 1425; _adv. or adj._ clean, A 133.

CLENNESSE, _s._ purity, L. 297 _a_; A 506.

CLENSE, _v._ cleanse, A 631.

CLEPEN, _v._ call, name, 3. 810, 814; A 643, 2730, B. 2347, D 1211; call
out, A 3577; _ger._ L. 1889; Clepen, _ger._ F 331; Clepe, _1 pr. s._ L.
164, 293; B 1. p 3. 23; Clepeth, _pr. s._ 1. 177; 3. 185; 5. 352; D 102; F
382; _men. cl._, people call, E 115; Clepen, _pr. pl._ A 620; speak of,
mention, A. ii. 29. 23; Clepe, _pr. pl._ R. 594; B 92; Clepe ... ayein
(_or_ again), _v._ recall, T. ii. 521; H 354; Cleped, _pt. s._ called, F
374; Clepte, _pt. s._ R. 1331; Cleped, _pp._ 1. 159; HF. 1400; L. 724, 944,
1689; A. i. 4. 4; R. 48; A 121, 269, 1788, 2044, B 61, 2166, D 147, F 808,
H 218, I 81; summoned, B 2432; Clept, _pp._ named, G 863; Clepinge, _pres.
pt._ calling, T. iv. 1157; Clepe, _imp. s._ call, A. ii. 23. 3; A 3432.

CLERE, _adj._ clear, R. 681; bright, 3. 340; well-sounding, 3. 347; noble,
pure, HF. 1575; _pl._ noble, 5. 77; bright, 1. 88; E 779; beautiful, L.
249. See CLEER.

CLERE, _adv._ clearly, A 170; L. 139.

CLERE, _v._ grow clear, T. ii. 2, 806; _ger._ to grow bright, T. v. 519; to
shine clearly, L. 773.

CLERER, _adj. comp._ brighter, 3. 822.

CLERGEON, _s._ a chorister-boy, B 1693. See the note.

CLERGIAL, _adj._ clerkly, learned, G 752.

CLERG['Y]E, _s._ learning, D 1277.

CLERK, _s._ clerk, scholar, student, A 285, E 1; writer, D 689, 706, 707;
Clerkes, _pl._ writers, scholars, R. 378; HF. 1503; 4. 275; B 480, 3990, D
1184, E 933.

CLERNESSE, _s._ brightness, L. 84.

CLEVE (1), _v._ cleave, cut, split, R. 859; L. 758; Cleve, _pr. s. subj._
may (he) cleave, split, T. iii. 375; Clefte, _pt. s._ split, 3. 72; Cloven,
_pp._ A 2934; L. 738; Clove, _pp._ cleft, dimpled, R. 550.

CLEVE (2), _v._ adhere; Cleven, _pr. pl._ cleave, adhere, B 2. p 4. 40; B
3. p 11. 76; Clyven, _pr. pl._ cleave, keep, B 3. p 11. 104; Clyvinge,
_pres. pt._ B 2. p 6. 35.

CLEW, _s._ clew, L. 2140; Clewe, _dat._ L. 2016.

CLEW, _pt. s. of_ Clawe.

CLEY, _s._ clay, G 807. A.S. _cl['ae]g_.

CLEYME, _ger._ to claim, T. v. 1487. See CLAIME.

CLIF, _s._ cliff, L. 1497; _pl._ Clyves, L. 1470; Cliffes, rocks, 3. 161.

CLIFTE, _s._ cleft, L. 740, 744, 776; B 3. p 9. 10; chink, B 4. p 4. 198;
cleft (of the buttocks), D 2145.

CLIKET, _s._ latch-key, E 2046, 2117, 2121, 2123. See note to E 2046.

CLIMBEN, _v._ climb, B 1. p 1. 25; F 106; Clymbeth, _pr. s._ B 3966; Clamb,
_pt. s._ B 1987; Clomb, _1 pt. s._ climbed, 4. 271; HF. 1118; Clomben, _pt.
pl._ climbed, A 3636; Clamben, _pt. pl._ climbed, HF. 2151; Cloumben, B
2590; Clomben, _pp._ T. i. 215; ascended, B 4388; Clombe, _pp._ risen, B
12; _were clombe_, hadst climbed, B 3592; Cloumben, _pp._ B 2. p 7. 43.

CLIMBING, _s._ 13. 3.

CLINKEN, _v._ clink, jingle, ring, B 1186; Clinke, _v._ C 664.

CLINKING, _s._ tinkling, B 3984.

CLIPPE (1), _1 pr. s._ embrace, T. iii. 1344; Clippeth, _pr. s._ L. 876; E
2413.

CLIPPE (2), _v._ cut hair, A 3326; Clippe, _ger._ to clip, cut, B 3257;
Clipped, _pp._ B 3261.

CLIPPING, _s._ embracing, R. 342.

CLOBBED, _adj._ clubbed, B 3088.

CLOISTERER, _s._ resident in a cloister, A 259, 3661, B 3129.

CLOISTERLEES, _adj._ outside of a cloister, A 179.

CLOISTRE, _s._ cloister, A 181, D 2099, G 43.

CLOKE, _s._ cloak, T. iii. 738; A 157, 1999.

CLOKKE, _s._ clock, A. pr. 60; B 4044, I 5; _of the cl._, by the clock, B
14.

CLOM, _interj._ be silent, mum! A 3638.

CLOMBE, -N; see CLIMBEN.

CL[`O][`O]S, _adj._ close, hidden, secret, T. ii. 1534; B 2336, G 1369;
closed, B 4522; Clos, shut up, closed, R. 1675.

CL[`O][`O]S, _adv._ close, B 2811.

CL[`O][`O]TH, _s._ piece of clothing, D 1633; infants' clothing, T. iii.
733. See CLOTH.

CLOOTH-MAKING, _s._ making of cloth, A 447.

CLOS, _s._ enclosure, B i. p 5. 22; B 2. p 7. 36; B 4550.

CLOS, _adj._; see CLOOS.

CL[`O]SE, _v._ close, 3. 873; shut up, L. 198; _1 pr. s._ include, R. 40.

CLOSET, _s._ small room, T. ii. 599, 1215; iii. 663.

CLOSET-DORE, _s._ closet-door, T. iii. 684.

CLOSING, _s._ enclosure, boundary, R. 527.

CLOSURE, _s._ enclosure, I 870.

CLOTE-LEEF, _s._ a leaf of the burdock or clote-bur (see note), G 577. A.S.
_cl[=a]te_, a burdock.

CL[`O]TH, _s._ cloth, garment, R. 234, 1239; D 238; covering, 5. 273;
clothes, D 1881; Clothes, _pl._ clothes, R. 452; 20. 1; L. 1857; E 1960.
See CLOOTH.

CLOTHEN, _v._ clothe, T. v. 1418; Clothe, _v._ R. 95; _ger._ R. 231;
Cladde, _pt. s._ clothed, clad, T. iv. 1690; _refl._ clothed himself, 7.
145; Cledde, _pt. s._ T. iii. 1521; Cladden, _2 pt. pl._ clad, E 864;
Clothed, _pp._ clad, L. 242, 341; A 363; Clad, _pp._ R. 409; A 103, E 376;
covered, A 294; furnished, 3. 352; Clothe, _imp. s._ clothe, 1. 46.

CLOTHERED, _pp._ clotted, coagulated, A 2745. (Other MSS. _clotered_,
_clotred_.)

CLOTHING, _s._ R. 1133.

CLOTHLEES, _adj._ naked, I 343.

CLOUD, _s._ T. ii. 766, 781; iv. 200; Cloude, 3. 343; T. i. 175; sky, T.
iii. 433; Cloudes, _pl._ HF. 966.

CLOUDELES, _adj._ cloudless, B 4. m 1. 14.

CLOUDY, _adj._ darkening, T. ii. 768.

CLOUMBEN; see CLIMBEN.

CLOUT, _s._ bit of cloth, C 736; patch, R. 458; Cloutes, _pl._ fragments, E
1953; rags, B 1. p 3. 30; C 348.

CLOUTED, _pp._ clothed in patched garments, patched up, R. 223.

CLOVEN, _pp. of_ Cleve (1).

CLOWES, _pl._ claws, HF. 1785. See CLAWES.

CLOW-GELOFRE, _pp._ clove, the spice so called, R. 1368; Clowe-gilofre, B
1952. Fr. _clou de girofle_.

CLUSTRED, _pp._ covered with clouds, B 1. m 3. 4. (Lat. _glomerantur_.)

CLYMAT, _s._ a belt or zone of the earth included between two given lines
of latitude, A ii. 39. 18; _pl._ Clymatz, climates, i.e. zones of latitude,
A. i. 3. 3; Clymates, sets of almicanteras calculated for various
terrestrial latitudes, A. i. 14. 2.

CLYVE, _v._; Clyven, _pr. pl._ cleave, keep, B 3. p 11. 104; Clyvinge,
_pres. part._ cleaving, B 2. p 6. 35. See CLEVE (2).

CLYVES, _pl._ cliffs, L. 1470. See CLIF.

COAGULAT, _pp._ coagulated, clotted, G 811.

COD, _s._ bag; used of the receptacle of the stomach, C 534.

COEMPCIOUN, _s._ an imposition so called, lit. joint purchase, the buying
up of the whole of any commodity in the market (see New E. Dict.), B 1. p
4. 59, 63, 64.

CO[:E]TERNE, _adj._ coeternal, B 5. p 6. 39.

COFRE, _s._ coffer, chest, L. 380; A 298, B 26, 1955, E 585; money-chest,
money-box, F 1571, G 836; coffin, 5. 177.

COGGE, _s._ cock-boat, L. 1481. See note.

COGHE, _ger._ to cough. T. ii. 254; Cogheth, _pr. s._ A 3697. See COUGHEN.

COILLONS, _pl._ testicles, C 952. F. _couillon_.

COK, _s._ cock, 5. 350; T. iii. 1415; B 4039; _thridde c._, third cock, A
4233 (see note); Cokkes crowe, cock-crow (see note), A 3675; Cokkes, _pl._
A 3357.

COK! COK! the noise made by a cock, B 4467. See note.

COKENAY, _s._ cockney, effeminate creature, A 4208 (see note).

COKES, _pl. of_ Cook.

COKEWOLD, _s._ cuckold, A 3152, 3226, C 382, D 1214, 1616, E 1306, 2256.
See _Cuckold_ in the New E. Dict.

COKKEL, _s._ cockle, i.e. the corn-cockle, _Agrostemma githago_, B 1183.

COKKES, _a corruption of_ Goddes, H 9, I 29.

COKKOW, _s._ cuckoo, 5. 498; HF. 243; A 1810, 1930; Cukkow, 5. 358, 603.

C[`O]L, _s._ coal, T. ii. 1332; Cole, A 2692, 3731; Coles, _pl._ B 3323, G
1114.

COL-BLAK, _adj._ coal-black, A 2142, 3240.

COLD, _adj._ cold, A 420; Colde, _def. adj._ chilling, T. i. 612; Colde,
_pl._ 3. 411; chilling (often in phr. _cares colde_), T. iii. 1260;
disastrous, B 4446.

COLDE, _s._ cold, chill, R. 411, 456; T. ii. 967.

COLDE, _v._ grow cold, 5. 145; L. 240; T. iii. 800, B 879, F 1023; _ger._
T. v. 535; Colden, _v._ T. iv. 362.

COLER, _s._ collar, T. v. 811, 1660; A 3239, 3242; Colere, R. 1190; Colers,
_pl._ collars, A 2152 (or read _colerd_, provided with collars; see note).

COLERA (Lat.), choler, B 4118.

COLERE, _s._ choler, B 4136.

COLERIK, _adj._ choleric, A 587, B 4145, F 51 (see note).

COL-FOX, _s._ coal-fox, black fox, B 4405. See note.

COLLACIOUN, _s._ comparison, B 4. p 4. 49, B 5. p 6. 12; conference, E 325.

COLLATERAL, _adj._ adventitious, subordinate, T. i. 262.

COLLECT, _pp._ collected in groups, F 1275. See note.

COLLEGGE, _s._ college, A 3989.

COLLUSIOUN, _s._ collusion, conspiracy, 15. 11.

COL['O]UR, _s._ colour, 7. 173; complexion, hue, R. 213, 303, 355; outward
appearance, 2. 66; pretence, 10. 21; C['o]lour, excuse, D 399; C['o]lours,
_pl._ colours, hues, R. 1406; Col['o]urs, colours, F 723; fine phrases, HF.
859; E 16, F 726; Col['o]ures, _pl._ hues, pretences (a pun), F 511.

COL['O]URED, _adj._ coloured, R. 548; C['o]loured, of the same colour
(with), B 3574.

COLPONS, _pl._ shreds, bundles, A 679; billets, A 2867.

COLT, _s._ colt, A 3263, 3282; Coltes, _gen._ A 3888, D 602.

COLTISH, _adj._ like a colt, E 1847.

COLUMBYN, _adj._ dove-like, E 2141.

COLVER (kulver), _s._ dove, L. 2319. A.S. _culfre_.

COMAUNDE, _v._ command, T. i. 1057, v. 1413; A 1695; Comaunded, _pt. s._
commanded, B 4270; C['o]maunded, L. 1091.

COMAUNDEMENT, _s._ commandment, A 2869; order, E 649; Commaundement,
command, HF. 2021.

COMAUNDOUR, _s._ commander, B 495.

COMB, _s._ comb, HF. 136; (of a cock), B 4049.

COMBRED, _pp._ encumbered, B 3. m 10. 6.

COMBRE-WORLD, _s._ one who encumbers the world, one who lives too long, T.
iv. 279.

COMBUST, _pp._ burnt, G 811; quenched (as being too near the sun), A. ii.
4. 33; T. iii. 717; see notes.

COME, _v._ come; _come thereby_, come by it, acquire it, G 1395; Come,
_ger._ to come, future, 3. 708; Comen, _ger._ to come, 5. 76; arise from, B
3. p 4. 40; Comestow, comest thou, L. 1887; Cometh, _pr. s. as fut._ shall
come, 4. 11; Comth, _pr. s._ comes, B 407, 603, C 781, F 765; Cam, _pt. s._
came, A 252 _c_, 547, F 81; C[=o]m, _pt. s._ 3. 134; 5. 252, 413; HF. 2061;
C[=o]men, _pt. pl._ L. 1241; B 145; C[=o]me, _pt. pl._ G 1220; C[)o]men,
_pp._ come, 4. 81; 5. 98; L. 37, 45; B 260; _ben comen_, are come, B 1130;
C[)o]me, _pp._ 3. 135; 5. 36; A 23, B 4601, F 96; C[)o]me, _2 pres. s.
subj._ mayst come, B 119; _pres. s. subj._ may come, comes, F 653; come, L.
2215; C[=o]me, _1 pt. s. subj._ might come, came, HF. 1906; Com, _imp. s._
A 672; Com of, i.e. seize the opportunity, be quick, T. ii. 1738, 1742,
1750; D 1602; Cometh, _imp. pl._ A 839, I 161.

C[)O]ME (kum[*e]), _s._ coming, G 343. A.S. _cyme_.

COM['E]DIE, _s._ comedy, pleasant tale, T. v. 1788.

COMENDABLE, _adj._ commendable, B 3050.

COMENDE, _v._ commend; Commende, _ger._ E 1024; Comendeth, _pr. s._
praises, B 76; _pr. pl._ L. 1688; Comendeden, _pt. pl._ T. iii. 217.

COMEVE, _v._ commove; Comeveden, _2 pr. pl. as 2 pr. s._, didst instigate,
T. iii. 17. See COMMEVE.

COMFORT, _s._ 1. 17, 77; 5. 170; T. ii. 1755; G 32; Comf['o]rt, 18. 1.

COMLILY, _adv._ in a comely way, 3. 848.

COMLINESSE, _s._ comeliness, 3. 827, 966.

COMMAUNDEMENT, _s._ command, HF. 2021. See COMAUNDEMENT.

COMMAUNDETH, _pr. s._ commands, R. 34. See COMAUNDE.

COMMENDACION, _s._ I 473.

COMMENDE, _ger._ to commend, E 1024. See COMENDE.

COMMEVE, _v._; Commeveth, _pr. s._ moves, induces, T. v. 1783; Commeve,
_pr. s. subj._ move, T. v. 1386. See COMMOEVE, COMEVE.

COMMISSIOUN, _s._ commission, A 315.

COMMITTE, _v._ commit; Committeth, _pr. s._ entrusts, T. v. 4; Committed,
_pp._ T. v. 1542.

COMMODIOUS, _false reading for_ Comeveden, T. iii. 17 _n_.

COMMOEVE, _ger._ to move, influence, B 4. p 4. 184; Commoeveth, _pr. s._
compels, B 5. m 4. 36; Commoevede, _pt. s._ moved to pity, B 3. m 12. 19.
See COMEVE, COMMEVE.

COMMOEVINGE, _s._ moving, disturbing, B 1. m 4. 4.

COMMUNE, _adj._ general, common, B 155, 3436, E 431; common, ordinary, I
102; _in c._, commonly, A 1261, 2681. See COMUNE.

COMMUNE, _s._ the commons, E 70; Communes, _pl._ commons, commoners, A
2509. See COMUNE.

COMMUNE, _v._ commune, converse, G 982.

COMMUNION, _s._ I 312.

COMPAIGNABLE, _adj._ companionable, B 1194, 4062.

COMPAIGNYE, _s._ company, B 4183. See COMPANYE.

COMPAME, Com pa me, _for_ Com ba me (see Ba), come kiss me, A 3709 _n_.

COMPANYE, _s._ company, B 3. m 3. 6; A 24, 898, B 134, 1187, D 860;
companionship, 4. 219; (personified), R. 958.

COMPARISONED, _pp._ compared, B 2. p 7. 72.

COMPARISOUN, _s._ comparison, L. 122; B 4507, E 666; Comparison, E 817.

COMPAS, _s._ compass, circuit, 4. 137; circumference, circuit, R. 526;
circlet, wreath, R. 900; circle, B 3. m 11. 4; A 1889; A. ii. 38. 2; a very
large circle, HF. 798; broad circle, zone, A. i. 21. 24; circumference, 20.
5; enclosure, orb, world, as in _tryne compus_, the threefold world (earth,
sea, and heaven), G 45; pair of compasses, A. ii. 40. 9; craft, contriving,
HF. 462; Compace, plan, HF. 1170; Compasses, _pl._ circles (_or, perhaps_,
pairs of compasses), HF. 1302.

COMPASMENT, _s._ plotting, contrivance, L. 1416.

COMPASSE, _v._ contrive, R. 194; Compassed, _pt. s._ planned, L. 1414;
Compassed, _pp._ drawn with compasses, fashioned circularly, A. i. 18. 1;
enclosed, 11. 21; planned, L. 1543.

COMPASSING, _s._ dimension, R. 1350; contrivance, A 1996; Compassinges,
_pl._ contrivances, HF. 1188; devices, B 4. p 4. 32.

COMPASSIOUN, _s._ compassion, L. 1974; A 1110, F 463; Compassion, 4. 64.

COMPEER, _s._ gossip, close friend, A 670; comrade, A 4419.

COMPELLE, _v._ compel, I 592; Compelled, _pp._ bribed (see note), B 1. p 4.
82.

COMPILATOUR, _s._ compiler, A. pr. 43.

COMPLEET, _adj._ complete, E 1893; Complet, completed, B 4379; complete
(_or_, completely), T. v. 828.

COMPLEYNE, _v._ complain, lament, 4. 93; complain of, B 3975; _ger._ to
lament, C 239, 241; Compleyneth, _pr. s._ L. 1980; Compleyne, _2 pr. pl._
complain, lament, A 908; Compleyne, _2 pr. pl. subj._ 4. 280;
Compleynedest, _2 pt. s._ didst lament, B 4539; Compleinede, _pt. s._
lamented, B 1. p 1. 62; Compleyned, _pt. s._ L. 1968; Compleyned, _pp._
uttered his plaint, F 523; Compleyning, _pres. pt._ complaining, 4. 135;
Compleyneth, _imp. pl._ lament, 4. 290, 293.

COMPLEYNING, _s._ complaining, F 945; C['o]mpleyning, lamenting, 18. 28;
complaint, 7. 208; a complaint, B 929; Compleyninge, complaint, L. 1357.

C['O]MPLEYNT, _s._ complaint, lament, 3. 464; A 2862; Compl['a]ynte,
lament, 3. 487; Compl['e]ynt, a 'complaint' or ballad, 2. 43; 3. 464; 4.
24, 150; E 1881; Compleintes, _pl._ complaints, F 948; Compleyntes, L. 363
a.

COMPLEXIOUN, _s._ complexion, A 333, 2475, F 782; temperament, I 585;
Complexiouns, _pl._ complexions, T. v. 369; characteristics, B 4. p 6. 137;
the (four) temperaments, HF. 21 (see note); Complecciouns, _pl._
complexions, B 4114.

COMPLINE, _s._ evening service, A 4171; Complin, I 386.

COMPLISSHEN, _v._ accomplish, B 4. p 4. 16.

COMPORTE, _v._ bear, endure, T. v. 1397.

COMPOSICIOUN, _s._ agreement, A 848, 2651; Composiciouns, _pl._ suitable
arrangements, F 229.

COMPOTENT, _adj._ all-powerful, B 5. p 6. 33.

COMPOUNE, _ger._ to form, compound, B 3. m 9. 6; Compounen, _pr. pl._
compose, B 3. p 10. 144; Compouned, _pp._ composed, HF. 1029; tempered, L.
2585; mingled, HF. 2108; constructed, drawn, A. pr. 7; marked, A. i. 18. 8;
A. ii. 5. 2.

COMPREHENDE, _ger._ to understand, 3. 762; Comprehenden, _ger._ to
comprehend, 3. 903; Comprehende, _v._ take (it) in, T. iv. 891; take in (in
the mind), F 223; Comprehendeth, _pr. s._ comprises, I 1043; Comprehended,
_pp._ collected, B 5. p 2. 22; briefly described, 7. 83. See COMPRENDE.

COMPRENDE, _v._ comprehend, contain, T. iii. 1687; Comprendith, _pr. s._
comprehends, B 5. p 4. 136 _n_; Comprended, _pp._ comprehended, B 1. m 2.
10 _n_. _Short for_ COMPREHENDE.

COMPRESSED, _pp._ restricted, B 2. p 7. 46.

COMUNABLETES, _pl._ communities, B 1. p 4. 20 _n_.

COMUNALITEE, _s._ dominion, empire, B 4. p 6. 250; Comunalitees, _s. pl._
commonwealths, communities, B 1. p 4. 20, 22; B 2. p 7. 4.

COMUNE, _adj._ common, general, common to all, T. iii. 1415, iv. 392;
indiscriminate, B 1. p 4. 154; public, B 1. p 4. 51; accustomed to, 3. 812;
Comun profit, the good of the country, 5. 47, 75. See COMMUNE.

COMUNE, _s._ commonwealth, B 2. p 7. 7, 42; a common share in a thing, E
1313. See COMMUNE.

COMUNLY, _adv._ commonly, A. ii. 19. 7; E 726; ordinarily, I 105; in
common, together, R. 1308.

COMYN, _s._ cummin, B 2045. 'A dwarf umbelliferous plant, somewhat
resembling fennel, cultivated for its seeds.'--Webster.

CON, _imp. s._ grant; Con me thank, grant me thanks, thank me, A. pr. 39.
See CONNE; and _Con_, _v._ (1), s. 4 in the New E. Dict.

CONCEITE, _s._ conception, B 3. p 10. 28; thought, L. 1764; idea, G 1214;
notion, T. i. 996; Conseyte, conception, B 5. p 4. 138; Conceytes, _pl._
fancies, T. iii. 804.

CONCEIVE, _v._; Conceived, _pp._ taken in, observed, L. 1746; Conceyved,
_pp._ conceived, R. 469; B 3675.

CONCEPCION, _s._ conception, I 576.

CONCLUDE, _v._ conclude, draw a conclusion, B 14; include, put together, G
429; attain to success, G 773; C['o]nclude, _v._ draw a conclusion, A 3067;
Concl['u]de, _1 pr. s._ (I) draw the conclusion, G 1472; Concluden, _ger._
to sum up, A 1895; to summarize, A 1358; Concluded, _pp._ come to a
conclusion, E 1607.

CONCLUSIOUN, _s._ decision, judgement, A 1845, 1869; decision, L. 2646;
result, successful end of an experiment, G 672; purpose, D 115, 430; plan,
15. 11 _n_; moral, L. 2723; reason, F 492; performance, F 1263; result,
summary, A 1743; result, HF. 848, 871; end (of life), HF. 103; fated end,
fate, 22. 23; _as in c._, after all, 4. 257; 15. 4; Conclusiouns, _pl._
mathematical propositions, theorems, A. pr. 9; A 3193.

CONC['O]RD, _s._ concord, T. iii. 506; C['o]ncord, E 1129, I 642.

CONCORDE, _v._ concord; Concordinge, agreeing, T. iii. 1752.

CONCUBYN, _s._ concubine, A 650.

CONCUPISCENCE, _s._ I 335.

CONDESCENDE, _v._ stoop to, F 407; Condescende in especial, be pleased to
consider in particular, B 2424; Condescended, _pp._ settled, B 2447, E
1605.

CONDICIONEL, _adj._ conditional, B 5. p 6. 128; B 4440.

CONDICIOUN, _s._ condition, A 38; L. 40; state, B 99; _in this c._, on this
condition, 5. 407; Condiciouns, _pl._ conduct, manners, B 2. p 5. 66;
circumstances, I 319; sorts, HF. 1530.

CONDUIT, _s._ conduit, L. 852; Condys, _pl._ conduits, R. 1414. _Condys_ is
for _condyts_; the pl. _condwys_ (for _condwyts_) occurs in the Ayenbite of
Inwyt, p. 91.

CONFEDERACIE, _s._ conspiracy, B. 2. p 6. 39.

CONFEDRED, _pp._ rendered confederates, conjoined, 2. 42, 52.

CONFERME, _v._ confirm, T. ii. 1526; _ger._ T. ii. 1589; Confirme, _ger._ B
4. p 7. 61 (but an error for _conforme_; Lat. 'conformandae'); C['o]nferme,
_1 pr. s._ confirm, E 1508; Confermed, _pp._ decreed, A 2350; confirmed,
firm, C 136; Confermeth, _imp. pl._ strengthen, 4. 20.

CONFESSIOUN, _s._ confession, T. ii. 528; A 221, I 108; Confession, I 114.

CONFITEOR, 'I confess,' I 386.

CONFITURE, _s._ composition, C 862. Fr. _confiture_, a mixture, preserve,
from _confire_, to preserve, pickle; Lat. _conficere_, in late sense of to
'make up' a medicine.

CONFORT, _s._ comfort, pleasure, A 773, 776, F 826.

CONFORTEN, _v._ comfort, E 1918; Conforteth, _pr. s._ encourages, A 2716;
Conforten, _pr. pl._ comfort, F 823; strengthen, I 652; Conforted, _pp._
comforted, T. i. 249; supported, strengthened, fortified, A. ii. 4. 31.

CONFOUNDE, _ger._ to subdue, B 2. p 6. 36; _v._ destroy, 1. 40; 12. 10;
Confoundeth, _pr. s._ perturbs, B 1. p 6. 75; Confounded, _pp._ put to
confusion, 1. 5; overwhelmed, B 100; destroyed in soul, G 137. Cf. the use
of the word at the end of the _Te Deum_.

C['O]NFUS, _pp. as adj._ confused, T. iv. 356; convicted of folly, G 463;
Conf['u]s, confused, HF. 1517; C['o]nfus, confused, confounded, A 2230;
Confuse, confused, B 4. p 5. 29; overcome, B 4. m 5. 10.

CONFUSIOUN, _s._ confusion, 1. 18; F 869.

CONGELED, _pp._ congealed, frozen, HF. 1126.

CONGEYEN, _v._ give us our cong['e]e, tell us to depart. T. v. 479.

CONGREGACIOUN, _s._ gathering together, B 3. p 2. 13; congregation,
assemblage, HF. 2034; B 4178, I 163.

CONIES, _pl. of_ Cony.

CONIECTEN (Conjecten), _v._ suppose, B 3. p 10. 157; Coniecte, _1 pr. s._
conjecture, guess, B 1. p 6. 20; B 5. p 3. 3; _1 pr. s. subj_. B 4. p 2.
71; Coniectest, _2 pr. s._ supposest, T. iv. 1026.

CONIECTINGE (Conjectinge), _s._ conjecturing, B 2592; Coniectinges, _pl._
conjectures, B 2598.

CONIOININGE (Conjoininge), _s._ conjoining, conjunction, G 95.

CONIOYNE (Conjoine), _v._ conjoin; Conioigned, _pp._ joined, B 3. p 4. 27;
composed, made up, B 3. p 10. 149; Conioynt, joined, I 924.

CONIUNCCIOUN (Conjunccioun), _s._ conjunction, B 3. p 11. 47; joining, B 5.
m 3. 2; Coniunccion, conjunction, A. ii. 32. 1. (It means a very close
apparent approach of two celestial bodies.)

CONIURACIOUN (Conjuracioun), _s._ conjuring, I 603; conspiracy, B 1. p 4.
133; B 2. p 6. 38.

CONIURE (Conjure), _v._ to conjure, B 1834; _1 pr. s._ beseech, T. ii.
1733; Coni['u]reth, _pr. s._ conjures, prays, L. 1312.

CONNE, _v._ be able, L. 2044; T. v. 1404; D 1518; know, T. iii. 83; know,
have experience, T. i. 647; know how, T. iii. 377; B 2901; _ger._ to be
able, 3. 279; con, learn, B 1730; Conne, _1 pr. s._ can, T. ii. 49; _2 pr.
s. subj._ canst, knowest how, T. ii. 1497; _pr. s. subj._ may, A 4396; _1
pr. pl._ can, are able, B 483, D 950; know, HF. 335; Conne, _2 pr. pl._
can, A 4123; can (do), T. i. 776; owe (me thanks), T. ii. 1466; Connen, _2
pr. pl._ know, F 3; Conne, _2 pr. pl. subj._ can, A 3118; _pr. pl._ can, 3.
541; L. 2565; know, E 1424; know how, B 2753; are able, T. ii. 1587; are
capable of, T. ii. 175; Connen, _pr. pl._ know how to, E 2438; _al conne
he_, whether he may know, G 846.

CONNING, _s._ skill, knowledge, L. 68, 412; T. i. 83, ii. 4; B 1099, G 653,
1087; experience, B 1671, F 35; Conninge, learning, B 2929, I 1082;
Conn['i]nge, B 1847; Cunning, 5. 167, 487.

CONNING, _adj._ skilful, B 3690; Cunning, 2. 97.

CONNINGEST, most skilful, T. i. 331.

CONNINGLY, _adv._ skilfully, E 1017.

CONQUEREN, _ger._ to conquer, L. 585; Conqu['e]reden, _pt. pl._ B 542;
Conqu['e]red, _pp._ 7. 37.

CONQUERING, _s._ victory, 5. 2.

CONQUEROUR, _s._ conqueror, 19. 22; A 862, 916.

CONQUEST, _s._ L. 1676.

CONSCIENCE, _s._ feeling, pity, sympathy, A 142, 150.

CONSECRAT, consecrated, B 3207.

CONSEIL, _s._ council, B 204; counsel, B 425; secret counsel, A 1141, B
3218; secret, A 3504, D 966, 980, E 2431; a secret, C 561, 819, G 145;
secrets, D 538; advice, B 2211; purpose, intention, B 4. p 4. 108;
counsellor, A 1147. See COUNSEIL.

CONSEILE, _v._ counsel; Conseilleden, _pt. pl._ B 2554; Conseiled, _pt. s._
I 126; Conseyled, _pp._ swayed, B 3. p 5. 47. See COUNSEYLE.

CONSEILERES, _s. pl._ consuls, B 2. p 3. 35, 41; councillors, L. 1550.

CONSEILINGE, _s._ giving of counsel, I 1033.

CONSEILOUR, _s._; Conseillour, counseller, E 1501; Conseilours, _pl._
senators, B 2. p 4. 31.

CONSENTANT, _adj._ consentient, consenting (to), C 276.

CONSENTE, _v._ agree to, E 537; Consenteth, _pr. s._ agrees, B 2576;
Consente, _2 pr. pl._ consent, L. 2645; Consenteden, _pt. pl._ consented, B
2551.

CONSENTEMENT, _s._ consenting, I 967.

CONSENTINGE, _s._ consenting, consent, B 2550, I 293; Consentinges, _pl._ I
293.

CONSENTRIK, _adj._. having the same centre, A. i. 17. 3; tending to the
same centre, A. i. 16. 6; at the same altitude, A. ii. 3. 48.

CONSEQUENCE, _s._ B 3. p 9. 53.

CONSEQUENT, _s._ sequel, result, B 2577.

CONSERVATIF, _adj._ preserving; _conservatif the soun_, preserving the
sound, HF. 847.

CONSERVE, _v._ keep, preserve, T. iv. 1664; _2 pr. s. subj._ T. v. 310;
Conserveth, _pr. s._ B 2185; Conserved, _pp._ preserved, kept, HF. 732,
1160; B 2393, 3053, G 387; Conserve, _imp. s._ preserve, A 2329.

CONSEYTE; see CONCEITE.

CONSIDRE, _v._ (to) consider, L. 408; Considered, _pp._ thought upon, A
3088; (being) considered, L. 225; T. iii. 923; Considere, _imp. s._
compare, A. ii. 20. 6; Considereth, _imp. pl. 2 p._ consider, G 1388.

CONSIST['O]RIE, _s._ council, T. iv. 65; court of justice, C 162, 257.

CONSOLACIOUN, _s._ consolation, T. i. 708; F 834.

CONSPIRACYE, _s._ plot, B 3889, C 149.

C['O]NSTABLE, _s._ constable, governor, B 512.

CONST['A]BLESSE, _s._ constable's wife, B 539. See above.

CONSTAUNCE, _s._ constancy, I 737; Constance, E 668, 1000, 1008, 2283.

CONSTELLACIOUN, constellation, T. iv. 745; A 1088, D 616; cluster of stars,
F 129; influence of the stars, F 781.

CONSTREINE, _ger._ to comprise, B 4. p 6. 154; Constreineth, _pr. s._ binds
together, B 4. p 6. 106; restrains, B 4. p 6. 113; Constreyneth, _pr. s._
restrains, B 2. m 8. 6; constrains, E 800; Constreyned, _pt. s._ L. 105;
Constreinede, _pt. s. refl._ contracted herself, B 1. p 1. 9; Constreinede,
_pt. s. subj._ should restrain, B 4. p 6. 14; Constreined, _pp._
constrained, B 4. p 6. 88; afflicted, B 4. p 4. 122; Constreyned, _pp._
constrained, compelled, E 527, F 764, 769.

CONSTREYNTE, _s._ distress, T. iv. 741; C['o]nstreynt, T. ii. 776.

CONSTR['U]E, _v._ divine, make out, T. iii. 33; _ger._ to construe,
translate, B 1718; Construeth, _imp. pl._ construe, interpret, L. 152.

CONSULERS, _s. pl._ consuls, B 2. p 6. 8. See CONSEILERES.

CONSUMPTE, _pp. pl._ consumed, B 2. m 7. 17.

CONTAGIOUS, _adj._ contiguous, B 3. p 12. 4.

CONTEK, _s._ strife, contest, B 4. m 4. 3; T. v. 1479; A 2003, B 4122.

CONTEMPLACIOUN, _s._ contemplation, devotional thought, HF. 34, 1710.

CONTEMPLATIF, _adj._ contemplative, B 1. p 1. 23.

CONTEMPLAUNCE, _s._ contemplation, D 1893.

CONTENANCE, _s._ countenance, appearance, F 1485; show, B 2378;
Contenaunce, gesture, B 2227; demeanour, E 924; self-possession, E 1110;
pretence, I 858; _fond his c._, i.e. disposed himself, T. iii. 979;
Contenaunces, _pl._ modes of behaviour, R. 1001; gestures, B 1198. See
COUNTENANCE.

CONTENE, _v._ contain, T. iii. 502; Contienen, _v._ A. pr. 56; Contieneth,
_pr. s._ A. i. 7. 8; Contienen, _pr. pl._ comprise, B 4. p 2. 139; contain,
A. i. 9. 2; Contenede, _pt. s._ held together, B 3. p 12. 29.

CONTINENCE, _s._ D 1907.

CONTINUACIOUN, _s._ continuance, T. iii. 77; endurance, B 4. p 6. 220.

CONTINUE, _imp. s._ 1. 88; 7. 6; Continued, _pp._ accompanied, eked out, I
1046.

CONTINUELLY, _adv._ always, B 1419.

CONTINUING, _s._ continuance, I 139.

CONTRACT, _pp._ contracted, incurred, I 334.

CONTRACTES, _pl._ contracts, D 1306.

CONTRAIRE, _adj._ contrary, R. 348; T. i. 212; adverse, L. 1360; Contrayre,
contrary, 3. 1290.

CONTRAIRE, _s._ the contrary, HF. 1540; adversary, 2. 64.

CONTR['A]RIE, _adj._ contrary, B. 3964; _in c._, in contradiction, G 1477;
Contr['a]rie, _pl._ contrary, R. 991.

C['O]NTRARIE, _s._ contrary, A 3057; Contr['a]rie, contrary thing, HF. 808,
T. i. 637; opposite, foe, opponent, A 1859, B 4470; contrary sides,
opposition, T. i. 418; Contr['a]ries, pl. T. i. 645.

CONTR['A]RIEN, _v._ go contrary to, oppose, F 705; _ger._ to contradict, B
5. p 3. 5; Contr['a]rie, _v._ oppose, E 2319; Contr['a]ried, _1 pt. s._
opposed, E 1497; _pt. s._ gainsaid, D 1044.

CONTRARIOUS, _adj._ contrary, adverse, B 2249, D 698; B 2. p 6. 57;
hostile, B 1. p 4. 215; Contrariouse, _pl._ B 2311.

CONTRARIOUSTEE, _s._ contrary state, I 1077.

CONTREE, country, R. 768; L. 5; A 216, 340, B 434, 1908, 1912, E 456, F
319, 800, I 104; region, B 4. m 5. 2; fatherland, home, B 2. p 4. 79.

CONTREE-FOLK, people of his country, L. 2161.

CONTREE-HOUSES, _pl._ houses of his country, homes, 7. 25. Lat. _domos
patrias_; see note.

CONTREE-WARD, TO HIS, towards his country, L. 2176.

CONTREFETE, _v._ counterfeit, T. v. 1578. See COUNTREFETE.

CONTRICIOUN, _s._ contrition, I 108.

CONTRIT, _adj._ contrite, I 128, 1005.

CONTUBERNIAL, _adj._ familiar, at home with (lit. sharing the same tent
with), I 760.

CONTUMACIE, _s._ contumacy, I 391.

_Contumax_, _adj._ contumacious, I 402.

CONVENIENT, _adj._ fitting, suitable, B 1. p 4. 187; I 421; Convenients,
_pl._ suitable, F 1278.

CONVERS; _in convers_, on the reverse side, T. v. 1810.

CONVERSACIOUN, _s._ conversation, i.e. manner of life, B 2501.

CONVERTE, _v._ convert, change, T. i. 308; swerve, C 212; _ger._ to change
his ways, T. iv. 1412; to change her mind, T. ii. 903; Converted, _pp._ T.
i. 999, 1004; Converting, _pres. pt._ turning back, A 3037.

CONVERT['I]BLE, _adj._ equivalent, A 4395.

CONVEYEN, _v._ convey, introduce, E 55; Conveyeth, _pr. s._ accompanies, L.
2305; C['o]nveyed, _pt. pl._ accompanied, conducted on their way, A 2737;
Conv['e]yed, _pt. pl._ E 391.

CONVICT, _pp._ convicted, B 1. p 4. 172, 177; overcome, 1. 86.

CONVOYEN, _for_ Conveyen, E 55 _n_.

CONY, _s._ rabbit; Conies, _pl._ R. 1404; Conyes, _pl._ 5. 193.

COOK, _s._ cook, A. 351, 379, 4325; Cokes, _pl._ C 538.

COOL, _adj._ unimaginative, dull, L. 258 a.

COOMEN, _pt. pl._ came, B 1805. See COME.

COOST, coast; see COSTE.

COP, _s._ top, A 554; summit, B 2. m 4. 4; Coppe, _dat._ hill-top, HF.
1166.

COPE, _s._ cope, A 260, B 3139; cape, R. 408; cloak, T. iii. 724; vault, L.
1527.

COPER, _s._ copper, HF. 1487; G 829.

COPIE, _s._ copy, T. ii. 1697.

COPPE, _dat. of_ Cop.

COPPE, _s._ cup, A 134, F 942; Coppes, _pl._ A 3928. See COUPE, CUPPE.

COR['A]G[`E], C['O]RAGE, _s._ heart, spirit, mind, disposition, mood,
inclination, R. 257, 423, 849, 1302, 1614; 3. 794; B 1. p 4. 183; B 2. p 1.
24, p 6. 34; B 3. p 2. 58; B 4. p 3. 80; E 220, 692, 787, 950, 1254; L.
397; A 22; courage, B 1970, 3836; will, desire, B 2713, 4642, E 907; soul,
B 4. p 4. 31; passions, B 3. m 5. 1; impetuosity, I 655; strength (Lat.
_robur_), B 1. p 2. 5; savage nature, B 3. m 2. 10; attention, H 164;
spite, R. 151; encouragement, R. 22; _of his c._, in his disposition, F 22;
Corages, _pl._ dispositions, B 4. p 6. 134; natures, A 11.

C['O]RAGEOUS, _adj._ bold, courageous, T. v. 800; B 3527; ardent, I 585.

COR['A]L, _s._ coral, A 158, 1910, B 4049.

CORBETS, _pl._ corbels, HF. 1304.

CORDE, _s._ string, cord, T. v. 443; L. 2485; A 1746; Cordes, _pl._ chords,
HF. 696.

CORDE, _v._; Cordeth, _pr. s._ agrees, T. ii. 1043.

CORDEWANE, _s._ Cordovan leather, B 1922.

CORDIAL, _s._ cordial, something that cheers the heart, A 443.

CORECTE, _ger._ to correct, T. v. 1858. See CORRECTE.

CORFEW-TYME, _s._ curfew-time, about 8 p.m., A 3645.

CORIGE, _v._ correct; Corigeth, _pr. s._ B 4. p 7. 26; Coriged, _pp._ B 4.
p 4. 61. F. _corriger_.

CORMERAUNT, _s._ cormorant, 5. 362.

_Cor meum eructavit_ (see note), D 1934.

CORN, _s._ corn, grain, A 562, C 863; 5. 23; L. 74, 190; chief portion, B
3144; Cornes, _pl._ crops of corn, B 4. m 6. 21; B 3225; grains of corn,
HF. 698.

CORNEMUSE, _s._ bagpipe, HF. 1218. Fr. _cornemuse_.

CORNER, _s._ 5. 260; HF. 2142; T. v. 575.

CORNICULERE, _s._ registrar, secretary, G 369. See the note. Lat.
_cornicularius_, a registrar, clerk to a magistrate.

CORNY, _adj._ applied to ale, strong of the corn or malt, C 315, 456.

COROLARIE, _s._ corollary, B 4. p 3. 30; Corollarie, B 3. p 10. 101, 113.

COROMPEN; see CORRUMPE.

CORONE, _s._ crown, garland, E 381; prize of a race, B 4. p 3. 7; Coroune,
crown, garland, B 3. p 10. 102; 2. 58; 3. 980; A 2290, E 1118; C['o]roun,
crown, L. 216, 222; the constellation called 'the Northern Crown,' L. 2224;
Cor['o]unes, _pl._ crowns, T. ii. 1735; L. 2614; Cor['o]nes, _pl._ G 221.

COROSIF, _adj._ corrosive, G 853.

COROUMPINGE, _s._ corruption, B 3. p 12. 57.

COROUN, -E; see CORONE.

COR['O]UNED, _pp._ crowned, B 3555; L. 242; C['o]rouned, L. 230.

CORPS, _s._ corpse, 2. 19, 51; A 2819, D 768, F 519. See CORS.

_Corpus_, _s._ body, A 3743; _Corpus_, the body (e. g. of Christ), B 3096;
_corpus Dominus_, false Latin for _corpus Domini_, the body of the Lord, B
1625; Corpus Madrian (see note), B 3082; Corpus bones, _an intentionally
nonsensical oath, composed of_ 'corpus domini,' the Lord's body, and
'bones,' C 314. See the note.

CORRECCIOUN, _s._ correction, A 2461, I 60; fine, D 1617.

CORRECTE, _ger._ to correct, 8. 6; Corecte, T. v. 1858.

CORRUMPABLE, _adj._ corruptible, A 3010.

CORRUMPE, _v._ corrupt; Corrumpeth, _pr. s._ becomes corrupt, A 2746 _n._,
L. 2237 (see note); Corompen, _pr. pl. refl._ become corrupt, B 3. p 11.
103; Corrumped, _pt. s._ corrupted, I 819. See CORUMPE.

CORRUPCIOUN, _s._ destroyer, 5. 614; Corupcioun, corruption, B 3. p 4. 10.

CORRUPTE, _v._ corrupt; Corrupteth, _pr. s._ becomes corrupt, A 2746;
Corrupt, _pp._ C 504; bribed, I 167.

CORS, _s._ body, L. 676, 876, B 2098, C 304, H 67; corpse, T. v. 742; A
3429, C 665. See CORPS.

CORSE, _pr. s. subj._ curse, E 1308; Corsed, _pp._ T. iv. 745; v. 1849. See
CURSEN.

CORSEDNESSE, _s._ cursedness, abomination, T. iv. 994; impiety, B 3. 10.
69. See CURSEDNESSE.

CORSEYNT, _s._ a saint (_lit._ holy body); esp. a shrine, HF. 117. O.F.
_cors seint_.

CORUMPE, _v._ become corrupt, B 3. p 11. 40. See CORRUMPE.

CORUPCIOUN, _s._ corruption, B 3. p 4. 10. See CORRUPCIOUN.

CORVE, -N; see KERVE.

COSIN, _s._ cousin, A 1131, B 1333; Cosyn, B 1337; _as adj._ akin, suitable
to, A 742, H 210; Cosins, _pl._ cousins, I 836; Cosines, _as adj._ akin, B
3. p 12. 154; Cosins germayns, cousins-german, first cousins, B 2558.

COSINAGE, _s._ kinship, B 1226, 1329.

COST (1), _s._ expense, A 192, 213, 799, B 3564, D 1580, F 1557; L. 1448.

COST (2), _s._ choice, condition; Nedes cost, of necessity (lit. by
condition of necessity), L. 2697. Icel. _kostr_, choice, condition, state.
See _cost_ in M[:a]tzner.

COSTAGE, _s._ cost, expense, B 1235, 1562, D 249, E 1126; Costages, _pl._
expenses, B 2526.

C[`O]STE, _s._ coast, B 1626; Cost, region, D 922; quarter, direction, A.
ii. 46. 6; Coste, A. ii. 46. 19; Coost, F 995; Costes, _pl._ parts of the
sky, A. i. 19. 6.

COSTE, _v._ cost, A 768; Coste, _pt. s._ A 1908, B 1925; T. v. 438.

COSTEYE, _v._; Costeying, _pres. part._ coasting, R. 134.

COSTLEWE, _adj._ costly, I 415. Cf. Icel. _kostligr_.

COSTREL, _s._ flask, kind of bottle, L. 2666. See note.

COTAGE, _s._ cottage, B 4012.

COTE, _s._ cot, E 398; _hence_, dungeon, A 2457.

COTE, _s._ coat, jacket (for a man), A 103, 328; skirt, petticoat, _or_
gown (for a woman), R. 226, 459, 573, 1242, B 4026, E 913; Cotes, _pl._
coats, surcoats, or coats-of-arms (see below), HF. 1332.

COTE-ARMURE, coat-armour, coat shewing the arms, coat-of-arms, T. v. 1651;
HF. 1326; A 2140; Cote-armour, B 2056; Cote-armures, _pl._ A 1016.

COUCHE, _s._ bed, L. 205; D 88, 1769, H 176.

COUCHE, _v._ lay down, place; Couchen, _ger._ G 1152; Couche, _v._ cower, E
1206; Couch[e] adoun, lie down, A. ii. 29. 14; Couched, _pt. s._ laid in
order, placed, 5. 216; G 1157; Couched, _pp._ set, placed, laid, B 2. p 2.
54; A 2933, 3211, G 1182, 1200; beset, begemmed, A 2161.

COUCHING, _s._ laying down, letting the astrolabe lie flat on the ground,
A. ii. 29. 18.

COUDE, _1 pt. s._ could, was able, L. 116; knew how, 3. 517; _pt. s._ knew,
3. 667, 1012; 7. 63; T. ii. 1078; A 110, 467, 3193, B 1735; understood, R.
179; _as aux._ could, R. 175; A 236, 326, B 3375, F 97; Coude her good,
knew what was for Dido's advantage, L. 1182; Coude no good, knew no good,
was untrained, 3. 390; Coude, _pt. pl._ could, 3. 235; Coud, _pp._ known,
3. 787, 998; learnt, I 1041. See CAN, CONNE.

COUGHE, _s._ cough, E 1957.

COUGHEN, _v._ cough, E 2208. See COGHE.

COUNSEIL, _s._ counsel, advice, A 784; secrets, A 665; Counseyl, secret, 5.
348; T. i. 992; counsel, 5. 631. See CONSEIL.

COUNSEILLER, _s._ senator, B 1. p 4. 73. See CONSEILOR.

COUNS['E]YLE, _v._ counsel, 5. 633; Counsayllen, _v._ T. i. 648;
Counseyled, _pt. s._ counselled, 4. 67; Couns['a]ile, _imp. s._ 1. 155. See
CONSEILE.

COUNTE, _1 pr. s._ account, 11. 29; Counted, _pt. s._ accounted, 3. 718.

COUNTENAUNCE, _s._ appearance, show, 10. 34; A 1926; looks, appearance, 3.
613; G 1264; shewing favour, 3. 1022; demeanour, R. 814; pretext, A 4421;
Countenaunces, _pl._ looks, R. 1309; F 284. See CONTENAUNCE.

COUNTESSE, countess, L. 500; E 590.

COUNTING-BORD, _s._ counting-house table, B 1273.

COUNTOUR (1), _s._ arithmetician, 3. 435; (perhaps) auditor, A 359.

COUNTOUR (2), _s._ abacus, counting-board, 3. 436; counting-house, B 1403.

COUNTOUR-DORE, _s._ counting-house door, B 1275.

COUNTOUR-HOUS, _s._ counting-house, B 1267.

COUNTREFETE, _v._ counterfeit, imitate, A 139, B 4511, C 13, H 134; _ger._
to counterfeit, T. ii. 1532; Counterfete, _v._ C 447, F 554; repeat, 3.
1241; Countrefeten, _v._ B 5. p 6. 50; Countrefeted, _pp._ 3. 869, C 51;
Counterfeted, _pp._ L. 1376, B 746, 793.

COUNTREPEISE, _v._ render equivalent, HF. 1750; Countrepeyse, _v._
counterpoise, countervail, T. iii. 1407.

COUNTREPLETE, _v._ counterplead; Countrepleted, _pp._ made the subject of
pleadings and counter-pleadings, argued against, L. 476.

COUNTRETAILLE, _s._ lit. countertally, i.e. correspondence (of sound); _at
the countretaille_, correspondingly, in reply, E 1190. Fr. _contre_,
against, _taille_, a cut, incision.

COUNTREWAITE, _pr. s. subj._ keep watch over, I 1005; Countrewayte, _v._
watch against, B 2509.

COUPABLE, _adj._ culpable, blameworthy, B 1. p 3. 8; B 2731, I 414.

COUPE, _s._ cup, L. 1122. See COPPE.

COURE, _v._; Coured, _pt. s._ cowered, R. 465.

COURS, _s._ course, T. ii. 970; 4. 55, 114; L. 1340; A 8, 1694, B 704,
3186, F 66, 1066; life on earth, G 387; path, A. ii. 13. 5; orbit, A 2454.

COURSER, _s._ horse, T. ii. 1011, v. 85; A 1502, 1513, F 310; Coursere, L.
1114; Cours['e]res, _pl._ coursers, steeds, A 2501; Coursers, L. 1195.

COURT, _s._ court, A 140, 671; D 1589; 1. 158; manor-house, D 2162.

COURTEPY, an upper short coat of a coarse material, R. 220; A 290, D 1382.

COURT-MAN, _s._ courtier, E 1492.

COUTHE, _1 pt. s._ could, R. 513; knew, 3. 800; _pt. s._ knew, R. 753; knew
how, A 390; could, A 1872; _pt. pl._ knew, R. 771; Couth, _pp._ known, B 1.
p 5. 38; T. iv. 61; E 942, I 766; Couthe, _pt. pl._ well-known, A 14.

COUTHE, _adv._ in a known way, manifestly, HF. 757.

COVEITE, _v._ become covetous of, I 336; Covete, _v._ 4. 269; Cov['e]yteth,
_pr. s._ D 1187; Coveiteden, _pt. pl._ coveted, B 2. p 6. 10.

COVEITYSE, _s._ Coveteousness, R. 181; covetousness, A 3884, C 424; bodily
craving, I 818; Coveitise, covetousness, B 1. p 4. 181; B 2312, I 739;
lust, I 336, 337; Covetyse, 9. 32; 15. 18; L. 136.

COVENABLE, _adj._ fit, proper, fitting, suitable, 18. 25; B 3. p 11. 101; B
4. p 6. 171; T. ii. 1137; B 2782, I 80, 317; agreeable, B 4. p 6. 140;
congruous, B 3. p 12. 126.

COVENABLY, _adv._ suitably, fitly, B 4. p 6. 234; B 2423.

COVENAUNT, _s._ covenant, A 600; agreement, R. 864; Covenant, L. 688, 693;
F 1587.

COVENT, _s._ convent, conventual body, B 1827, D 1863, 2130, 2259, G 1007.

COVERCHIEF, _s._ kerchief worn on the head, D 590, 1018; _for_ Kerchef, 5.
272 _n_; Coverchiefs, _pl._ kerchiefs, A 453.

COVERCLE, _s._ pot-lid, HF. 792 (see note).

COVERE, _ger._ to cover, hide, 7. 156; Covereth, _pr. s._ B 2. p 1. 42;
Covered, _pt. s._ E 914; _pp._ covered, A 354; recovered from, healed of,
L. 762.

COVERTLY, _adv._ secretly, R. 19.

COVERTURE, _s._ disguise, R. 1588; Covertures, _pl._ coverings, I 198;
Covertoures, B 4. m 2. 1; B 5. m 3. 15.

COVETE, _ger._ to covet, 4. 269. See COVEITE.

COVETOUR, _s._ one who covets, 4. 262.

COVETYSE; see COVEITYSE.

COV['E]YTETH, _pr. s._ covets, D 1187, 1189. See COVEITE.

COVYNE, _s._ deceitfulness, A 604; Covines, _pl._ devices, plots, B 1. p 4.
220. 'Covine, a deceitful agreement between two or more to the prejudice of
another'; Cowel, Law Dictionary.

COW (1), _s._ cow, C 354.

COW (2), _s._ chough, D 232. See note; and see CHOGH.

COWARD, _adj._ cowardly, 5. 349; T. i. 792, iv. 1573; B 2517, 3100; Cowarde
(_error for_ Coward), T. iv. 1409.

COWARDYE, _s._ cowardice, A 2730.

COWARDYSE, _s._ cowardice, T. iv. 602, v. 412.

COY, _adj._ quiet, A 119, E 2; coy, shy, L. 1548.

COYE, _v._ quiet, calm, cajole, T. ii. 801.

COYN, _s._ coin, 9. 20; E 1168. (In E 1168, read _coyn_, not _coyne_.)

COYNES, _pl._ quinces, R. 1374. O.F. _coin_, quince.

CRABBED, _adj._ shrewish, cross, bitter, E 1203.

CRACCHING, _s._ scratching, A 2834.

CRADEL, _s._ cradle, A 2019, 3972, 4156, 4212, 4251, G 122.

CRAFT, _s._ cunning, C 84; skill, T. i. 665; HF. 1177; A 401, B 2460, E
1424; art, R. 687; 5. 1; L. 139; trade, occupation, 3. 791; A 692, 3189,
4366; secret, mystery, R. 1634; working, method, A. ii. 40. 54; F 185;
might, B 3258; subtle contrivance, F 249; Craftes, _pl._ skilful deeds, A
2409.

CRAFTIER, _comp._ more crafty, 3. 662.

CRAFTILY, _adv._ artfully, in a studied manner, T. ii. 1026; skilfully, B
48; artfully, R. 1166; Craftely, cunningly, R. 1568.

CRAFTY, _adj._ skilful, clever, A 1897, G 1290; sensible, 3. 439.

CRAGGES, _s. pl._ crags, B 5. m 1. 2.

CRAKE, _v._ crack; Craketh, _pr. s._ utters boldly, A 4001; sings in a
grating tone (like a corncrake), E 1850.

CRAKKINGE, _s._ cracking, I 605.

CRAMMED, _pp._ crammed, stuffed, HF. 2129.

CRAMPE, _s._ cramp, T. iii. 1071.

CRAMPISSHETH, _pr. s._ draws convulsively together, contracts, 7. 171. See
note. Cf. 'Deth _crampishing_ into their hert gan crepe'; Lydgate, Falls of
Princes, bk. i. c. 9. Cf. O.F. _crampir_, '[^e]tre tordu'; Godefroy. MS.
Harl. 7333 alone reads _craumpisshed_, pp.; but the verb (see note),
usually has a transitive sense in English.

CRANE, _s._ crane, 5. 344.

CRASED, _pp._ cracked, G 934.

CRAVE, _v._ beg, ask, D 518.

CREACIOUN, _s._ creation, F 870.

CREANT, _adj._; _seith creant_, acknowledges himself beaten, I 698.
Probably short for _recreant_.

CREAT, _pp._ created, 16. 2; B 3. p 11. 131; B 2293, I 218.

CREATOUR, _s._ Creator, B 2602, C 901, G 49, I 131.

CR[:E]ATURE, _s._ creature, R. 1475; 3. 625; C 12, G 49.

CREAUNCE, _s._ credence, belief, creed, 1. 61; B 915; Creance, object of
faith, B 340. O.F. _creance_.

CREAUNCE, _v._ borrow on credit, B 1479; Creaunceth, _pr. s._ borrows, B
1493; Creaunced, _pp._ B 1556. See above.

CREDE, _s._ creed, belief, G 1047.

CRED['E]NCE, _s._ belief, credence, L. 20, 31, 97.

CREEP, _pt. s. of_ Crepe.

CREKES, _pl._ crooked devices, wiles, A 4051. See _Creek_, _s._ (1), s. 7,
in the New E. Dict.

CRENKLED, _pp._ full of turnings, L. 2012 _n_. See CRINKLED.

CREPE, _v._ creep, 3. 144; HF. 2086; B 3627; Crepeth, _pr. s._ D 1994, E
1134; Creep, _pt. s._ crept, 3. 391; A 4226; Crepten, _pt. pl._ D 1698;
Cropen, _pp._ crept, T. iii. 1011; A 4259, F 1614.

CREPUL, _s._ cripple, T. iv. 1459.

CREPUSCULIS, _s. pl._ twilights, durations of twilight, A. ii. 6. _rub._;
A. ii. 9. 1.

CREVACE, _s._ crevice, crack, HF. 2086; I 363.

CREW, _pt. s. of_ Crowe.

CRINKLED, _pp._ full of turns or cranks, L. 2012. See note.

CRIPS, _adj._ crisp, curly, HF. 1386; Crisp, R. 824; D 304; Crispe, _def._
curly, A 2165.

CRIST['A]L, _s._ crystal, R. 1579; Cr['i]stal, R. 1600; 12. 3.

CRISTAL, _adj._ crystal, R. 1568, 1576; C 347.

CRISTEN, _adj._ Christian, B 222, 1679.

CRISTENDOM, _s._ the Christian religion, B 351; Christianity, G 447, I 875.

CRISTENLY, _adv._ in a Christian manner, B 1122.

CRISTIANITEE, _s._ company of Christians, B 544.

CRISTNED, _pp._ baptized, B 226, 355; _pt. s._ G 352.

CROCE, _s._ staff, stick, D 484. See _Crose_, s. 2, in the New E. Dict.

CROIS, _s._ cross, 1. 60. See CROS, CROYS.

CROKED, _adj._ crooked, R. 926, 987; C 761, I 624; crooked (things), 13. 8;
Crooked, 1. 70; Crokede, _pl._ A. i. 19. 1; 'tortuous,' A. ii. 28. 20.

CROKEDLY, _adv._ crookedly, 7. 171.

CROKES, _pl._ crooks, hooks, L. 640.

CROKKE, _s._ earthenware pot, 13. 12.

CROMMES, _s. pl._ crumbs, G 60. A.S. _crume_, a crumb.

CRONE, _s._ crone, hag, B 432.

CRONICLE, _s._ chronicle, B 4398 _n_.

CRONIQUE, _s._ chronicle, B 4398.

CROOKED, _adj._ 1. 70. See CROKED.

CROOS-LYNE, _s._ cross-line, the line from right to left through the
centre, in Fig. 1; A. i. 12. 5; Cros-lyne, A. i. 12. 1.

CROP, _s._ top, sprout, new twig, T. ii. 348, v. 25; B 3. m 2. 23; _crop
and rote_, top and root, everything, T. v. 1245; Croppe, _dat._ top, A
1532; Croppes, _pl._ tree-tops, ends of branches, R. 1396; new shoots, A 7;
tops, 3. 424.

CROPEN, _pp. of_ Crepe.

CROPER (kruper), _s._ crupper, G 566; Crouperes, _pl._ I 433.

CROS, _s._ cross, 1. 82; T. v. 1843; Crois, 1. 60. See CROYS.

CROSLET, _s._ crucible, G 1147; Crosselet, G 1117; Croslets, _pl._ G 793.

CROUCHE, _1 pr. s._ mark with the cross (to defend from elves), A 3479;
Crouched, _pt. s._ marked with the cross, E 1707.

CROUDE, _v._ push, HF. 2095; B 801; _pr. s. 2 p._ Crowdest, dost press,
dost push, B 296 (see note to l. 299).

CROUKE, _s._ pitcher, jug, A 4158. A.S. _cr[=u]ce._ See CROKKE.

CROUN, _s._ crown (of the head), A 4041, 4099; Croune, _dat._ HF. 1825;
_voc._ crown, chief, T. v. 547; Crowne, _dat._ (referring to the tonsure),
B 1499.

CROUNED, _pp._ crowned, R. 1266; 1. 144; supreme, F 526; Crowned, T. iv.
1238; A 161.

CROUPE, _s._ crupper, D 1559.

CROUPERES, _pl._ cruppers, I 433. See CROPER.

CROWDING, _s._ pressure, motive power, B 299. See the note.

CROWE, _s._ crow, H 130, 133, 240, 257, 270; A 2692; Crow, 5. 363; Crowes,
_gen._ crow's (see note), T. ii. 403.

CROWE, _v._ crow, T. iii. 1416; _ger._ B 4466; Croweth, _pr. s. refl._
crows, C 362; Crew, _pt. s._ B 4048; Crowe, _pp._ A 3687.

CROWING, _s._ B 4040.

CROWNE, _s. dat._ crown (of the head), B 1499. See CROUN.

CROWNED, _pp. as adj._ surmounted by a crown, A 161; T. iv. 1238. See
CROUNED.

CROYS, _s._ cross, A 699, 4286, B 450, C 532, E 556, I 259; A. i. 5. 3;
Crois, 1. 60; Cros, 1. 82; T. v. 1843.

CRUEL, _adj._ 1. 8; Cruel, stern, B 1. p 1. 33; B 2. m 7. 20 (but see the
note); Cru['e]l, L. 377; D 2001.

CRUELLICHE, _adv._ cruelly, T. iv. 1304.

CRUELTEE, _s._ cruelty, E 1225, I 132.

CRUL, _adj._ curly, A 3314; Crulle, _pl._ A 81. Friesic _krul_, curly.

CRYE, _s._ cry, 5. 256.

CRYE, _v._ cry out, A 636; Cryen, _v._ lament, 4. 112; Crydestow, didst
thou cry out, A 1083; Cryden, _pt. pl._ cried, cried out, 7. 27; A 949,
1756, B 4580; Cryed, _pp._ proclaimed, B 1. p 4. 59; HF. 2107.

CRYINGE, _s._ crying, outcry, A 906.

CRYKE, _s._ creek, A 409; Crykes, _pl._ B 3. m 8. 8.

CUB['Y]TE, _s._ cubit, HF. 1370; Cub['y]tes, _pl._ B 3350.

CUC['U]RBIT[`E]S, _s. pl._ cucurbites, G 794. '_Cucurbite_, a chemical
vessel, originally made in the shape of a gourd, but sometimes shallow,
with a wide mouth, and used in distillation'; Webster. From Lat.
_cucurbita_, a gourd.

CUKKOW, _s._ cuckoo, 5. 358, 603. See COKKOW.

_Culpa, mea_, i.e. I acknowledge my fault, T. ii. 525.

CULPE, _s._ guilt, blame, I 335.

CULTER, _s._ coulter (of a plough), A 3763, 3776, 3785, 3812.

CUNNE, _v._ know (how), HF. 2004 (see note). See CONNE.

CUNNING, _adj._ skilful, 2. 97. See CONNING.

CUNNING, _s._ skill, 5. 167, 487. See CONNING.

CUPPE, _s._ a cup, F 616; Cuppes, _pl._ A 2949. See COPPE.

CURACIOUN, _s._ cure, healing, B 1. p 6. 3; B 2. p 3. 16; B 2463; mode of
cure, T. i. 791.

CURAT, _s._ parish-priest, vicar, A 219, D 2095, I 1008; (the words _vicar_
and _curate_ have now, practically, changed places); Curates, _s. pl._
parish-priests, I 791; Curats, D 1816.

CURE, _s._ cure, remedy, 5. 128; T. i. 469; charge, B 2. p 3. 21;
diligence, A 1007, 2853; attention, A 303, D 1074; heed, care, 2. 82; 4.
171; HF. 464, 1298; L. 1145; T. ii. 283; care, L. 1145; B 1. p 6. 16; T. i.
369; C 22, D 138; endeavour, B 188; care, careful purpose, HF. 1298;
supervision, D 1333; _I do no cure_, I care not, L. 152; _lyth in his
cure_, depends on his care for me, L. 1176; _did his besy cure_, was busily
employed, 5. 369; _his lyves cure_, the object of his thoughts always, 4.
131; _honest cure_, care for honourable things, C 557; _in cure_, in her
power, B 230; Cures, _pl._ endeavours, B 3. p 2. 3; cares, pursuits, E 82.

CURE, _v._ heal, cure; Cureth, _pr. s._ 10. 36; Curen, _pr. pl._ T. ii.
1580; Cured, _pp._ T. i. 758.

CURIOSITEE, _s._ curious workmanship, HF. 1178; intricacy, 18. 81;
overdaintiness, epicurism, I 829.

CURIOUS, _adj._ careful, attentive, B 1433; eager, R. 1052; skilful, A 577;
delicately made, A 196; magical, F 1120; ornate, A. pr. 32.

CURRE, _s._ cur, L. 396.

CURROURS, runners, couriers, HF. 2128.

CURS, _s._ curse, A 655, 661, 4349, D 1347.

CURSEDLY, _adv._ wickedly, abominably, B 3419, I 604.

CURSEDNESSE, _s._ abominable sin, wickedness, 9. 31; C 276, 400, 498, 638,
F 1272, G 1101, I 911; shrewishness, E 1239; Cursednes, malice, B 1821. See
CORSEDNESSE.

CURSEN, _ger._ to curse, A 486; _v._ T. iii. 896; D 1624; Cursed, _pp._ 9.
27; A 933, C 528; horrible, B 80. See CORSE.

CURSING, _s._ cursing, A 660; Cursinges, _pl._ I 206.

CURTEIS, _adj._ courteous, _hence_, compassionate, I 246; Curteys,
courteous, R. 538; A 99, 250, B 2950, 4061.

CURTEISLY, _adv._ courteously, R. 799; 12. 13; B 1636, 3045.

CURTEISYE, _s._ courtesy, A 46, 132, B 166, 3686, E 74, F 95, 1569;
Curtesye, R. 796, 1251; 2. 68.

CURTEYN, _s._ curtain, 5. 240. See CURTIN.

CURTEYS; see CURTEIS.

CURTIN, _s._ curtain, T. iii. 60; D 1249; Curteyn, 5. 240.

CUSSED, _pt. s._ kissed, T. ii. 1090 _n_. See KESSE.

CUSSHIN, _s._ cushion, T. ii. 1229 _n._, iii. 964 _n_.

CUSTUME, _s._ custom, D 682, E 1889; Custumes, _pl._ payments, I 752;
customs, imports, I 567.

CUT, _s._ lot, A 835, 845, 854, C 793.

CUTTE, _v._ cut, C 954; Cutted, _pp._ cut short, L. 973 (see note); I 422.
See KITTE.

CYDER, _s._ cider, B 3245 _n_.



DAF, _s._ foolish person, A 4208. See Gl. to P. Plowman.

DAGGED, _adj._ tagged, cut into hanging peaks at the lower edge, I 421.

DAGGERE, _s._ dagger, A 113, 392; Dagger, C 830.

DAGGINGE, _s._ a cutting into tags, I 418. See DAGGED.

DAGON, _s._ small piece, D 1751.

DALE, _s._ valley, dale, 5. 327; B 4013.

DALF, _pt. s. of_ Delve.

DALIAUNCE, _s._ gossip, A 211; playful demeanour, favour, 12. 8; B 1894, G
572; Daliance, pleasant talk, favour, L. 356; D 1406; Daliaunces, _pl._
dalliance, toying, C 66.

DAMAGE, _s._ pity, loss, L. 598.

DAMAGEOUS, _adj._ injurious, I 438.

DAME, _s._ mother, C 684, D 576, H 317; dam, A 3260; madam, A 3956;
goodwife, D 1797; Dames, _gen._ D 583.

_Dame, ma_, madam, A 376.

DAMISELLE, _s._ damsel, R. 1240; Damisel, B 2. p 1. 31; Damoysele, Miss, B
4060; Damiselles, _pl._ R. 776; Damoysels, R 1622.

DAMPN['A]BLE, _adj._ damnable, B 3795, C 472, I 695.

DAMPNABLY, _adv._ damnably, B 3016, I 604.

DAMPNACIOUN, _s._ damnation, condemnation, 1. 23, 167; C 500, I 335; curse,
D 1067; judicial condemnation, B 1. p 4. 96.

DAMPNE, _ger._ to condemn, L. 401; Dampne, _1 pr. s._ condemn, 10. 49;
Dampned, _1 pt. s._ D 2038; _pt. s._ T. v. 1823; D 891; Dampned, _pp._
condemned, 3. 725; B 1. p 4. 174; L. 1953; A 1175, 1342, B 1110, 3605, C
88, D 70, G 310; damned, I 191.

DAN, _s._ (_for_ Dominus), lord, sir, a title of respect, HF. 161; B 3982;
Daun, HF. 137, 175; R. 1616; T. v. 1488; A 1379, 2673, 3761, B 4502. O.F.
_dan_.

DANGEROUS; see DAUNGEROUS.

DAPPEL-GRAY, _adj._ dapple-gray, B 2074.

DAR, _1 pr. s._ dare, 1. 53; 3. 904; L. 2216; A 1151, B 273, 3110, E 803, F
36, 581, G 214; Darst, _2 pr. s._ darest, T. i. 768; B 860; Darstow, darest
thou, L. 1450; T. v. 1279; Darstou, B 2337; Dar, _pr. s._ 1. 102; T. iv.
1201; L. 2024; G 312; Dar, _2 pr. pl._ T. ii. 1747; Dorste, _1 pt. s._
durst, might venture (to), 5. 541; L. 2054; _pt. s._ A 227, B 753, 1995,
3527, D 969, F 736, 943; _pt. pl._ E 403; dared to do, L. 749; Dorstestow,
wouldst thou dare, T. i. 767; Durste, _1 pt. s._ durst, 3. 929; _1 pt. s.
subj._ might dare, 2. 60; _pt. s. subj._ would dare, R. 1036. See DURRE.

DARE, _pr. pl._ doze, B 1293. See note.

DARKETH, _pr. s._ lies in the dark, lies hid, L. 816. See _derken_ in
M[:a]tzner.

DARREYNE, _ger._ to decide one's right to, A 1853; to decide, A 1631, 2098;
_v._ to decide your claims (to), A 1609. See note to A 1609. O.F.
_deraisnier_.

DART, _s._ dart, 6. 40; (given as a prize in an athletic contest; see
note), D 75; Darte, T. iv. 771; L. 2245; Dartes, _pl._ darts, weapons, B 4.
m 4. 10; T. ii. 513; iv. 44; L. 235.

DASEN, _pr. pl._ are dazed, H 31 _n_; Dased, _pp._ dazed, HF. 658 _n_.

DASWEN, _pt. pl._ daze, are dazed, are dazzled, H 31; Daswed, _pp._ dazed,
confused, HF. 658. Cf. E. _daze_; O.F. _daser_ (Godefroy).

DATE, _s._ a date, term, period, G 1411; date, A. ii. 44. 5.

DATE-TREE, _s._ date-tree, R. 1364.

DAUN; see DAN.

DAUNCE, _s._ dance, R. 808; D 991, F 277; play, T. iv. 1431; set, company,
HF. 639; T. i. 517; _the newe d._, the new dance, T. ii. 553; _the olde
d._, the old game, the old mode, the old way of love, T. iii. 695; A 476, C
79; Daunces, _pl._ R. 508; F 283.

DAUNCEN, _v._ dance, A 2202; Daunce, _v._ 3. 848; 12. 6; _ger._ R. 811; F
312; Daunsen, _ger._ R. 345; Daunceth, _pr. s._ 5. 592; Dauncen, _pr. pl._
dance, F 272, 900; Daunceden, _pt. pl._ danced, 5. 232; Daunceth, _imp.
pl._ R. 802; Daunsinge, _pres. pt. pl._ A 2201.

DAUNCING-CHAMBRES, _pl._ dancing-rooms, L. 1106.

DAUNGER, _s._ disdain, R. 1524; T. ii. 384, 399, 1243; imperiousness, 7.
186; liability, A 1849; sparing, stint, R. 1147; power, control, R. 1470;
Power to harm (personified), 5. 136; 11. 16; L. 160; _in daunger_, within
his jurisdiction, under his control, A 663; _in hir d._, at her disposal,
R. 1049; _with d._, sparingly, charily, D 521 (see note); Daungers, _pl._ A
402. O.F. _dangier_, 'puissance, pouvoir, droit, empire, ... caprice, ...
insulte, ... difficult['e]'; Godefroy.

DAUNGEROUS, _adj._ forbidding, sparing, A 517; sparing, A 3338; niggardly,
D 1427; grudging, difficult of access, hard to please, R. 1482, 1492; B
2129, D 151, 1090; disdainful, sparing, R. 591; grudging, reluctant, D 514;
unsuitable, inhospitable, R. 490.

DAUNSEN; see DAUNCEN.

DAUNSING, _s._ dancing, R. 853. See DAUNCEN.

DAUNTEN, _v._ tame, subdue, R. 880; B 3. m 5. 1; Daunte, _v._ I 270;
Dauntest, _2 pr. s._ 5. 114; 13. 13; Daunteth, _pr. s._ subdues, T. ii.
399, iv. 1589; Dauntede, _pt. s._ conquered, B 4. m 7. 20; Daunted, _pt.
s._ B 3799; Daunted, _pp._ frightened, D 463; Daunte, _imp. s._ 13. 13.

DAWE, _v._ dawn, B 3872, E 1832; Daweth, _pr. s._ dawns, L. 46; A 1676;
Dawe, _pr. s. subj._ dawn, A 4249, E 2195; Dawed, _pp._ arrived at
daybreak, D 353.

DAWENINGE, _s._ dawn, A 4234, B 4072; Dawening, L. 1188, 2185; A. ii. 23.
8. See DAWING.

DAWES, _s. pl._ days, F 1180. See DAY.

DAWING, _s._ the Dawn (Aurora), T. iii. 1466; dawning, A. ii. 23. 21.

DAWNING, _s._ dawn, 3. 292; Aurora, T. iii. 1466 _n_. See DAWENINGE.

DAY, _s._ day, A 19, 91, 354; time, B 3374; appointed time for repaying
money, G 1040; _on a day_, one day, some day, R. 1493; Dayes, _pl._
appointed days for payment, F 1568, 1575; lifetime, B 118; Dawes, F 1180;
_now a dayes_, at this time, E 1164.

DAYERYE, _s._ dairy, A 597; Dayeryes, _pl._ D 871. See DEYE, _s._

DAYESYE, _s._ daisy, L. 182, 184, 218, 293; A 332; Daysie, L. 224; Daysies,
_pl._ L. 43 (see note).

DAY-STERRE, _s._ day-star, B 3. m 1. 7.

DEBAAT, _s._ strife, A 3230, B 2867, D 822, 1288, E 1496, G 1389; Debat, A
1754; war, B 130; struggle, mental conflict, 3. 1192; quarrelling, T. ii.
753.

DEBATE, _v._ fight, war, B 2058; quarrel, C 412; _ger._ to quarrel over, 9.
51.

DEBONAIR, _adj._ calm, benign, B 3. p 12. 99; merciful, B 4. p 4. 189;
Deboneir, gentle, B 1. m 5. 15; Debonaire, _adj._ gentle, I 658; meek,
pious, B 3. m 9. 34; favourable, B 2. p 8. 9; Debonaire, _fem._
well-mannered, B 4061; gracious, courteous, R. 797, 1220, 1244; 1. 6; L.
276; A 2282; _as s._ kind person, 3. 624 (cf. 1. 6); Deb['o]nair, 3. 860;
Debonaire, _voc. fem._ T. iii. 4; _pl._ gentle, B 2930; pleasing, H 192.

DEBONAIRELY, _adv._ gently, B 4. m 3. 11 (Lat. _mitis_); meekly, I 660;
Debonairly, graciously, 3. 851, 1284; B 2254, I 315; with a good grace, HF.
2013; courteously, 3. 518; T. ii. 1259; Deb['o]nerly, with kindness, 7.
127.

DEBONAIRETEE, _s._ gentleness, I 467, 540, 654, 655, 657, 658; B 2811;
Debonairtee, _s._ graciousness, 6. 108; Debonairte, 3. 986.

DECEIVABLE, _adj._ capable of deceiving, full of deceit, deceitful, 15. 3;
B 2. m 1. 6; B 3. p 6. 1; E 2058; Deceyvable, 18. 43; B 1. m 1. 19.

DECERNE, _v._ discern; Decerneth, _pr. s._ B 5. p 2. 9. See DISCERNE.

DECLAME, _v._; Declamed, _pt. pl._ discussed, T. ii. 1247.

DECLARACIOUN, _s._ declaration, A. i. 3. 4, &c.; I 595.

DECLAREN, _v._ declare, A 2356; Declare, _v._ 2. 63.

DECLARING, _s._ declaration, B 3172.

DECLINACIOUN, _s._ declination, angular distance N. or S. of the equator, E
2223, F 1033, 1246; A. i. 17. 4; Declinacions, _pl._ A. pr. 58.

DECLYNE, _v._ decline; Declyneth, _pr. s._ turns aside, B 4. p 6. 122;
Declineth, _pr. s._ possesses declination, A. ii. 19. 8; verges, A. i. 21.
57; Declynen, _pr. pl._ possess declination (by passing to the N. or S. of
the ecliptic), A. ii. 17. 29; turn from, B 4. p 7. 32.

DECLYNINGE, _adj._ sloping, B 5. m 1. 11.

DECOPED, _pp._ lit. 'cut down'; hence, pierced, cut in openwork patterns,
R. 843. In Rock's 'Church of our Fathers' mention is made of such shoes,
stamped, or 'windowed,' shewing the stocking through. See note to A 3318.

DECREE, _s._ decree, A 640; Decrets, _pl._ B 1. p 4. 114.

DEDE, deed; see DEED.

D[`E]DE, dead; see D[`E][`E]D.

D[`E]DE, _ger._ to grow dead, become stupefied, HF. 552; Dedid, _pp._ made
dead, B 4. p 4. 103 _n_.

DEDEN, _pt. pl._ did, T. i. 82. See DOON.

DEDICAT, _pp._ dedicated, I 964.

DEDLY; see DEEDLY.

DEDUYT, _s._ pleasure, A 2177. O.F. _deduit_.

DEED, _s._ deed, act; Dede, _dat._ 1. 45; B 1999, E 241, F 456; _in dede_,
indeed, A 659, B 3511; _with the dede_, with the act thereof, D 70; Dede,
_pl._ (A.S. _d[=ae]da_), 5. 82; Dedes, _pl._ D 1115.

D[`E][`E]D, _adj._ dead, R. 215; 2. 14; 3. 469, 588, 1188, 1300; 5. 585;
16. 45; HF. 184; L. 894, 1676; A 145, 148, 781, B 3517, 3633, D 1156, F
287; dead, livid (of hue), R. 441; C 209; _for d._, as dead, T. iv. 733;
Dede, _def._ L. 876; B 3680; _d. slepe_, heavy sleep, 3. 127; T. ii. 924; A
3643; Dede, _pl._ sluggish, 5. 187; dead, 4. 223; 5. 50; A 1015; _woundes
dede_, deadly wounds, 3. 1211.

D[`E][`E]DLY, _adj._ subject to death, B 5. p 6. 128; mortal, I 99; dying,
L. 885; deathlike, 3. 162, 462; A 913, 1082; Dedly, mortal, 5. 128; dying,
F. 1040; perishable, B 2. m 7. 7; Deedlich, deadly, T. v. 536.

DEEDLY, _adv._ deadly, mortally, G 476.

D[`E][`E]F, _adj._ deaf, B 1. m 1. 15; T. i. 753; A 446, D 636, 668; Deve,
_pl._ G 286.

DEEL, _s._ part, R. 1074; _never a deel_, not at all, I 1007; not a bit,
HF. 331; B 4024; _every deel_, every whit, wholly, T. ii. 590; G 1269;
Deel, _pl._ times, 6. 35; Del, part, R. 28; share, 3. 1001; _every d._,
every whit, A 1825; _eche a d._, every whit, T. iii. 694; _a greet del_,
largely, to a large extent, A 415; _a gret d._, very often, 3. 1159; _no
del_, no whit, T. i. 1089; _never a d._, not a whit, 3. 543, 937; R. 805;
Del, _pl._ times, HF. 1495.

D['E]['E]P, _adj._ deep; Depe, B 3988; _def._ A 3031; _as s._, the deep,
the sea, B 455.

DEEPNESSE, _s._ dejection, B 1. m 2. 2.

DEER, _s._ deer, T. ii. 1535; _pl._ animals, B 1926.

DEES, _pl._ dice, T. ii. 1347, iv. 1098; C 467, 623, F 690; Dys, A 1238,
4384, 4386.

DEES, _s._ da[:i]s, HF. 1360, 1658. See DEYS.

DEETH, _s._ death, B 3567, E 36, 510, F 1022; pestilence, plague, T. i.
483; _the deeth_, the pestilence (with special references to the
pestilences of 1349, 1361, and 1369), A 605; cf. C 675.

DEFACE, _v._ deface, HF. 1164; spoil, T. iv. 804; dim, T. iv. 1682;
obliterate, E 510.

DEFAME, _s._ dishonour, B 3788, C 612. See DIFFAME.

DEFAME, _v._ defame, T. iv. 565; Defamen, _pr. pl._ revile, T. ii. 860;
Defamed, _pp._ slandered, C 415. See DIFFAME.

DEFAUTE, _s._ fault, 22. 56; F. 790, I 99; fault (as a hunting term), 3.
384 (_were on a defaute y-falle_, had a check); lack, defect, want, 3. 5,
25, 223; B 2. p 7. 38; E 1018, G 954, I 182; sin, wickedness, B 3718, C
370; Defautes, _pl._ defects, B 2684, D 1810.

DEFENCE, _s._ defence, L. 279; resistance, L. 1931; interference,
hindrance, R. 1142; concealment, covering, 5. 273; prohibition, T. iii.
138, 1299; denial, D 467.

DEFENDAUNT, _s._; _in his d._, in defending himself, in self-defence, I
572.

DEFENDE, _ger._ to defend, B. 2631; to forbid, G 1470; _v._ forbid, T. ii.
413; Defenden, _v._ C 590; Defende, _1 pr. s._ T. ii. 1733; Defendeth, _pr.
s._ forbids, B 2. p 7. 103; Defenden, _pr. pl._ B 2411; Defended, _pt. s._
forbade, D 60, 1834; Defended, _pp._ forbidden, B 2. p 2. 25; B 2178, C
510, I 332; Defende, _imp. s._ defend, 1. 95. See DEFFENDEN.

DEFET, _pp._ exhausted, (lit. defeated), T. v. 618; cast down, T. v. 1219;
Defeted, _pp._ overcome, B 2. p 1. 7.

DEFFENDEN, _v._ defend, I 584; Deffendeth, _pr. s._ forbids, I 651;
Deffended, _pp._ forbidden, I 600. See DEFENDE.

DEFFENDOURS, _s. pl._ defenders, B 4. p 4. 193.

DEFFYE; see DEFYE.

DEFFYNE; see DEFYNE.

DEFOULEN, _v._ trample down, _hence_, defile, F 1418; Defouled, _pp._
trampled down, I 191; defiled, B 1. p 4. 181; T. v. 1339; F 1396, 1421,
1423; disgraced, B 4. m 7. 30 (Lat. _turpatus_). O.F. _defouler_, confused
with E. _foul_.

DEFYE, _1 pr. p._ defy, 10. 8; B 1592; Deffye, _imp. s._ E 1310. See
DIFFYE.

DEFYNE, _v._ define, depict, T. v. 271; Deffyne, _v._ lay (it) down, T.
iii. 834; Defyne, _1 pr. s._ pronounce, declare, T. iv. 390; Defyned, _pp._
laid down, B 3. p 2. 49. See DIFFYNE.

DEGREE, _s._ rank, 5. 453; 14. 18; L. 384, 399; A 40, 55; condition,
position, A 1841; step, R. 485; footstep, B 4. m 1. 27; Degrees, _pl._
steps, A 1890; horizontal stripes, B 1. p 1. 24; degrees of the zodiac, F
386; _at lowe degree_, in low rank, R. 883; _at alle degrees_, in every
way, wholly, A 3724.

DEGYS[`E], _adj._ elaborate, I 417. Cf. 'Moult iert sa robe _desguisee_';
Rom. de la Rose, 827 (see vol. i. p. 128).

DEGYSINESSE, _s._ elaborate style, I 414.

DEGYSINGE, _s._ elaborate ornamentation, I 425.

DEIGNED; see DEYNE.

DEITEE, _s._ deity, L. 346; T. iii. 1017; rule (as of a god), F 1047;
Deit[`e], T. iv. 1543.

DEKNE, _s._ deacon, I 891; Deknes, _pl._ G 547.

DEL; see DEEL.

DELAY, _s._ T. iii. 879; A 2268; Delayes, _pl._ delays, T. ii. 1744.

DELEN, _ger._ to have dealing with, A 247; Dele, _ger._ to have dealings,
T. iii. 322; to deal, L. 1158; _v._ argue, T. ii. 1749; Delte, _pt. s._
dealt, G 1074; Deled, _pt. pl._ had intercourse, L. 1517; Deled, _pp._
dealt, I 907; apportioned, D 2249.

DELIBERACIOUN, _s._ deliberation, T. iii. 519; B 2219, C 139.

DELIBEREN, _v._ deliberate, consider, T. iv. 169; Delibered, _pt. s._
deliberated, B 2916; _pp._ considered, T. iv. 211.

DELICACYE, _s._ amusement, B 3669; wantonness, 9. 58; Delicasye, 5. 359.

DELICAT, _adj._ delicious, E 1646; delicate, E 682; luxurious, B 4. m 7.
46; sensitive, B 2. p 4. 71; dainty, I 432; Delicaat, delicate, tender, E
927.

DELICES, _s. pl._ delights, B 2602; tender feelings, B 2. p 4. 52; sinful
pleasures, B 3. p 7. 1. See DELYCES.

DELICIOUS, _adj._ delightful, giving delight, T. v. 443.

DELICIOUSLY, _adv._ luxuriously, E 2025.

DELITABLE, _adj._ pleasing, B 2. p 1. 27; delightful, R. 1440; E 62, 199;
delicious, R. 1371; Delitables, _pl._ delightful, F 899. See DELYTABLE.

DELITABLY, _adv._ pleasingly, B 4. p 1. 1.

DELITOUS, _adj._ delicious, R. 489.

DELIVER, _adj._ quick, active, R. 831; A 84.

DELIVERE, _v._ set free, 13. 7; do away with, T. iii. 1012; _ger._ to set
free (after a legal decision), 5. 508; Deliveren, _ger._ to deliver, T.
iii. 1116; Delivered, _pp._ let go; _to ben d._, to be let go (after a
legal decision), 5. 491; Delivereth, _imp. pl._ deliver, T. v. 1400.

DELIVERLY, _adv._ nimbly, B 4606; Deliverliche, quickly, T. ii. 1088.

DELIVERNESSE, _s._ activity, B 2355, I 452.

DELPHYN, _s._ the constellation Delphin, or the Dolphin, HF. 1006.

DELTE, _pt. s. of_ Delen.

DEL['U]GE, deluge, 16. 14; Diluge, I 839.

DELVE, _v._ dig, A 536; dig up, F 638; Dalf, _1 pt. s._ dug, B 5. p 1. 63;
_pt. s._ dug, B 2. m 5. 24; B 5. p 1. 50; Dolve, _pt. s. subj._ had digged,
B 5. P 1. 55; Dolven, _pp._ buried, 3. 222. A.S. _delfan_.

DELVER, _s._ digger, delver, B 5. p 1. 61.

DELYCES, _s. pl._ delights, pleasures, C 547, G 3, I 186, 276, 472;
favourites (Lat. _delicias_), B 2. p 3. 46. See DELICES.

DELY[`E], _adj._ delicate, fine, B 1. p 1. 14. O. F. _deli['e]_.

DELYT, _s._ delight, joy, 3. 606; L. 1770, 1939; A 335, 337, 1679, B 1135,
3340, 3590, C 31, 159, D 1875, E 68, G 1070, I 111; Delight (personified),
5. 224; pleasing ornamentation, L. 1199. O. F. _delit_.

DELYTABLE, _adj._ delightful, L. 321; I 329. See DELITABLE.

DELYTE, _v._ delight, please, 5. 27; L. 415; _ger._ to please, delight, 7.
201, 266; _refl._ take pleasure, 5. 66; Delyte me, _1 pr. s._ delight, L.
30; Delyteth, _pr. s._ delights, B 4. m 4. 1; B 2348; Delyten, _pr. pl._ R.
659; Delyting, _pres. part._ E 997.

DELYTOUS, _adj._ delicious, R. 90.

DEMAUNDE, _s._ question, T. iv. 1694, v. 859; B 472, E 1870; question
(about it), T. iv. 1295; Demande, G 430; Demaundes, _pl._ questions, B 1. p
6. 2, 25; Demandes, E 348.

DEME, _v._ judge, 14. 6; decide, conclude, T. ii. 371, 372; B 1091;
imagine, suppose, 4. 158; T. iii. 763; B 1038; give a verdict, G 595;
Demen, _v._ deem, judge, A 3161, D 2236; judge, decide, B 3045; Deme, _1
pr. s._ doom, condemn, D 2024; decree, C 199; suppose, E 753; Demestow, _2
pr. s._ thou supposest, B 1. p 6. 58; Demeth, _pr. s._ judges, esteems, T.
i. 644; judges, B 5. p 2. 9; fancies, G 689; passes an opinion, 5. 166;
Demen, _pr. pl._ suppose, E 988, F 224; Demed, _1 pt. s._ supposed, F 563;
Demed, _pt. pl._ F 202; Demed, _pp._ condemned, B 1. p 4. 85; Demeth, _imp.
pl._ judge, decide, L. 453; A 1353, F 1498; suppose, A 3172, G 993.

DEMEINE, _v._ manage, HF. 959. O. F. _demener_, to carry on, make.

DEMEYNE, _s._ dominion, B 3855. O. F. _demeine_, from Low Lat. _dominium_,
power.

DEMONIAK, _s._ madman, D 2240, 2292.

DEMONSTRACIOUN, _s._ proof, HF. 727; D 2224.

DEMONSTRATIF, _adj._ demonstrable, D 2272.

DEN, _s._ den, B 4416; Dennes, _pl._ B 3453.

DENEYE; see DENYE.

DENTICLE, _s._ pointer, A. i. 23. 1. See ALMURY.

DENYE, _v._ refuse, T. ii. 1489; Deneye, _1 pr. s._ deny, B 4. p 2. 141;
Denyestow, dost thou deny, B 4. p 4. 159; Deneyed, _pp._ denied, B 3. p 10.
10.

DEPARDIEUX, _interj._ on the part of God, by God's help, T. ii. 1058, 1212;
B 39 (see note); D 1395.

DEPARTE, _v._ separate, part, 7. 285; L. 897; A 1134, I 355; sever, T. ii.
531, iii. 1709, iv. 470; divide, I 1006; Departen, _v._ part, B 2805;
Departeth, _pr. s._ departs, B 4. p 6. 91; divides, apportions, B 4. p 6.
181; A. i. 17. 31; Departen, _pr. pl._ separate, B 5. m 1. 5; part, T. v.
1073; divide, I 426; sever, 4. 207 _n_; Departed, _pt. s._ separated, T.
iii. 1666; Departe, _1 pr. s. subj._ should sever, F 1532; _pr. s. subj._
separate, D 1049; Departe, _2 pr. pl. subj._ divide, apportion, D 2133;
Departed, _pp._ parted, A 1621; divided, A. ii. 4. 39; C 812, I 972; marked
by lines, A. i. 21. 35; Departe, _imp. s._ distinguish, T. iii. 404.

DEPARTINGE, _s._ dividing, I 425, 1008; departure, 5. 675; B 260, 293;
separation, 4. 25; Departing, separation, A 2774; departure, 4. 132.

DEPE, _adj._; see DEEP.

DEPE, _adv._ deeply, 3. 165; 7. 8; L. 1234, 1954; A 129, B 4, 3684.

DEPEYNTED, _pp._ depicted, B 4. m 1. 13 _n_; L. 1025; A 2027, 2031, 2034;
painted, R. 478; stained, T. v. 1599; covered with paintings, 3. 322; 4.
86; Depeint, _pp._ stained, C 950.

DEPPER, _adj. comp._ deeper, B 2. p 3. 9.

DEPPER, _adv. comp._ deeper, B 1. p 6. 20; T. ii. 485; B 630, G 250.

DEPRAVE, _v._ calumniate; Depraven, _pr. pl._ 4. 207.

DEPRESSIOUN, _s._ the angular distance of the southern pole from the
horizon, A. ii. 25. 6.

DEPRYVE, _v._ deprive, T. iv. 269; Depryved, _pp._ 2. 69.

DERE, _adj._ dear, 1. 99; 4. 147, 293; A 1822, B 447, 1641, D 1087, E 101,
999, 1056, G 257, 321; _pl._ E 1089, 1093, F 272, 341.

DERE, _adv._ dearly, 1. 86; 18. 26, 37; L. 258; HF. 1752; A 3100, C 100;
_to d._, too dearly, C 293.

DERE, _s. dat._ deer, R. 1453.

D[`E]RE, _v._ injure, harm, T. i. 651; A 1822, B 3191, F 240. A.S.
_derian_.

DERELING, _s._ darling, A 3793.

DEREWORTHE, _adj._ beloved, dear, B 2. p 1. 55; valuable, B 2. p 6. 19.

DERK, _adj._ dark, R. 1009; 3. 170; I 182; inauspicious, 4. 120; _as s._
inauspicious position, 4. 122 (see note); Derke, _def._ 3. 155; A 1995, F
844, 1074; Dirk, obscure, A. ii. 6. 13; Derke, _indef._ 3. 912; Derke,
_adj. pl._ dim, 10. 36.

DERKE, _s._ darkness, gloom, 3. 609.

DERKEN, _v._ darken, B 1. p 4. 179; _pr. pl._ grow dim, B 5. p 2. 26;
Derked, _pp._ darkened, B 1. p 1. 18; obscured, B 3. p 2. 60; grown dim,
10. 36 _n_.

DERKEST, _adj. superl._ darkest, B 304.

DERKLY, _adv._ darkly, HF. 51.

DERKNESSE, _s._ darkness, B 1451; I 176.

DERNE, _adj._ secret, A 3200, 3278, 3297. A.S. _derne_, _dyrne_.

DERRE, _adv. comp._ more dearly, T. i. 136, 174; A 1448.

DERTH, _s._ dearth, HF. 1974.

DERYVETH, _pr. s._ is derived, A 3006; Deryved, _pp._ A 3038.

DESARMEN, _v._ disarm, B 1. m 4. 11.

DESCEIVAUNCE, _s._ deception, B 3. p 8. 34.

DESCENCIOUN, _s._ descension, A. ii. 4. 34; Discencioun, ii. 4. 35. The
technical signification seems to be--the 'house' or portion of the sky just
above the western horizon, so that a planet in his descension is about to
set.

DESCENDE, _v._ descend, R. 1399; 1. 92; Descendeth, _pr. s._ is derived, B
4. p 2. 152; results, B 5. p 6. 164; descends, T. v. 859; Descending,
_pres. part._ A 3010; Descended, _pt. s._ was descended, T. v. 1480; _pp._
R. 1575.

DESCENSORIES, _s. pl._ G 792. '_Descensories_, vessels used in chemistry
for extracting oils _per descensum_'; Tyrwhitt.

DESCENTE, _s._ descent, T. i. 319.

DESCERNE, _v._ discern, T. iv. 200; _1 pr. s._ T. iii. 9.

DESCHARGE, _pr. s. subj._ disburden, I 360.

DESCLAUNDRED, _pp._ slandered, B 674. See DISSLAUNDRED, DISCLAUNDRE.

DESCORDAUNT, _adj._ discordant, B 4. m 4. 8. See DISCORDAUNT.

DESCRIPCIOUN, _s._ description, R. 1631; HF. 987, 1903; C 117;
Discripcioun, F 580.

DESCRYVE, _v._ describe, R. 705; HF. 1105; L. 1098; Descryven, _v._ B 3. p
11. 152; I 533; Descryved, _pp._ described, marked, A. i. 17. 1. See
DISCRYVE.

DESDEYN, _s._ disdain, contempt, A 789, F 700, I 142; Desdayn, indignation,
T. iv. 1191. See DISDEYN.

DESERT, _s._ wilderness, HF. 488.

DES['E]RT, _s._ merit, 4. 31; L. 608; F 532; Deserte, merit, B 3. p 6. 30;
deserving, thing merited (by), B 4. p 4. 91; Desertes, _pl._ merits, T.
iii. 1267; I 396; deservings, B 2. p 5. 106.

DESERT, _adj._ deserted, barren, B 4. p 2. 8; Deserte, lonely, HF. 417.

DESERVE, _v._; Deservede, _pt. s._ merited, B 1. p 3. 20; B 4. m 7. 42;
Deservedest, _2 pt. s._ didst deserve, C 216. See DISSERVE.

DESESPAIRED, _pp._ out of hope, in despair, 6. 7.

DESESPEIR, _s._ despair, T. i. 605; Desespeyr, T. ii. 6.

DESESPERAUNCE, _s._ despair, hopelessness, T. ii. 530, 1307.

DESHERITE, _ger._ to disinherit, B 3025; Desherited, _pp._ B 2941. See
DISHERITED.

DESHONESTEE, _s._ unseemliness, I 833.

DESIRE; see DESYRE.

D['E]SIRING, _s._ desire, R. 725; A 1922; Desiringes, _pl._ affections, B
1. p 6. 78.

D['E]SIR['O]US, _adj._ ambitious, 9. 59; desirous, T. i. 1058; ardent, F
23.

DESLAVEE, _adj._ foul, I 629; inordinate, unrestrained, I 834.
'_Deslav['e]_, pp. non lav['e], crasseux, sale'; Godefroy. '_Deslaver_,
ternir la reputation'; ib.

DESMAYE; see DISMAYE.

DESOLAT, _adj._ desolate, 4. 286; T. v. 540; forsaken, L. 1279; lacking
(in), B 131; depopulated, 7. 62; _holden desolaat_, shunned, C 598.

DESORDEYNEE, _adj._ unregulated, inordinate, I 818, 915; Desordenee, B 2. m
2. 13.

DESORDINAT, _adj._ inordinate, I 415.

DESPEIR, _s._ despair, A 3474.

DESPEIRED, _pp._ sunk in despair, 2. 91; T. v. 713; B 3645; I 696;
Despeyred, T. i. 36, 42, 779; F 943. See DISPEYRED.

DESPENCE, _s._ expense, D 1874; expenditure, money for expenses, B 105;
Despenses, _pl._ B 2842. See DISPENCE.

DESPENDE, _v._ spend, T. iv. 921; Despenden, _pr. pl._ B 2. p 5. 10; B
2796; Despendest, _2 pr. s._ wastest, B 2121; Despended, _pp._ spent, A
3983, B 1270, E 1403, I 253. See DISPENDE.

DESPENDOURS, _pl._ spenders, B 2843.

DESPENSE, _v._; Despensinge, _pres. pt._ dispensing, B 5. p 6. 212. See
DISPENSE.

DESPENSES, _pl._ expenditure, B 2842. See DESPENCE.

DESPERACIOUN, _s._ despair, 1. 21; Desperacion, I 1057.

DESPIT; see DESPYT.

D['E]SPITOUS, _adj._ spiteful, R. 173; angry, jealous, D 761; merciless, A
516; Desp['i]tous, scornful, A 1777, I 395; angry, A 1596. See DISPITOUS.
O. F. _despitous_.

DESP['I]TOUSLY, _adv._ scornfully, B 3785; angrily, A 4274; maliciously, B
605; cruelly, E 535. See DISPITOUSLY.

DESPLAYE, _v._; Desplayeth, _pr. s._ displays, spreads open, A 966.

DESPONE, _v._; Desponeth, _pr. s._ disposes, T. iv. 964.

DESPORT, _s._ sport, diversion, merriment, amusement, T. i. 592; B 2158,
3981, D 670, G 592; pleasure, D 1830. See DISPORT.

DESPORTE, _v._ rejoice, T. v. 1398. See DISPORTE.

DESPOYLED, _pp._ robbed, I 665. See DISPOILEN.

DESPUTEN, _ger._ to dispute, B 5. m 4. 2; Desputestow, _2 pr. s._ disputest
thou, B 5. p 6. 86; Desputedest, _2 pt. s._ didst dispute, B 1. p 4. 11.
See DISPUTE.

DESPYSE, _v._ despise, contemn, B 2. m 4. 3; B 115; _ger._ 4. 35;
Despyseth, _pr. s._ disdains, B 3. m 12. 28; Despysen, _pr. pl._ I 189;
Despysed, _pp._ R. 467.

DESPYT, _s._ malice, spite, T. i. 207; A 941, B 591, F 1371; contempt,
disdain, D 1876, F 1395, I 189; scorn, L. 372; D 2061, 2179, I 391; malice,
L. 1771, 1938; ill-humour, I 507; despite, a deed expressing contempt, B
3738; _in d. of_, in contempt of, 5. 281; _in your d._, in contempt of you,
B 1753; _in his d._, in scorn of him, L 134; Despit, dishonour, B 699;
contempt, B 2608. See DISPYT.

DESRAY, _s._ confusion, I 927. A. F. _desrei_, O. F. _desroi_, disorder.

DESSEVERAUNCE, _s._ separation, T. iii. 1424.

DESTEMPERAUNCE, _s._ inclemency, B 3. p 11. 88. See DISTEMPERAUNCE.

DESTEMPRED, _pp._ distempered, I 826. See DISTEMPRE.

DESTEN[`E]; see DESTINEE.

DESTINABLE, _adj._ predestinate, B 4. p 6. 251.

DESTINAL, _adj._ fatal, B 4. p 6. 108; B 5. p 2. 4; of destiny, B 4. p 6.
56; predestined, B 4. p 6. 70, 80.

DESTINEE, _s._ destiny, HF. 145; L. 2580; B 4. p 6. 75; Desten[`e], T. iii.
734; Destiny, 7. 348.

DESTOURBE, _ger._ to disturb; _d. of_, to disturb in, C 340; Destourbeth,
_pr. s._ hinders, I 576; interrupts, B 2167; Destorbeth, _pr. s._
disarranges, B 3. p 11. 124; Desturbeth, hinders, B 3. p 10. 111; prevents,
A. i. 2. 2; Destourben, _pr. pl._ hinder, I 83, 185, 1057; Destourbed,
_pp._ frustrated, I 890; prevented, B 1. p 4. 104; Destourbe, _pr. s.
subj._ prevent, I 991. See DISTOURBE.

DESTOURBING, _s._ disturbance, trouble, 18. 44.

DESTRAT, _pp._ distracted, B 3. p 8. 12.

DESTRESSE, _s._ distress, T. i. 1018, v. 715. See DISTRESSE.

DESTREYNE, _v._ distress, T. iii. 1528; _ger._ constrain, force, H 161;
Destreyneth, _pr. s._ oppresses, A 1455; constrains, I 109; Destreineth, I
104; Destrayned, _pt. pl._ constrained, T. i. 355; Destreyned, _pp._
shackled, bound, B 2. p 6. 74. See DISTREYNE.

DESTROUBLED, _pp._ disturbed, 3. 524.

DESTROYE, _ger._ to destroy, T. iv. 1059; Destroyed, _pp._ T. v. 907; A
1330.

DESTRUCCIOUN, _s._ destruction, 3. 1247; 4. 212; L. 930; A 2538.

DESTURBETH; see DESTOURBE.

DESYR, _s._ wish, A 1243.

DESYRE, _v._ desire; Desire, _v._ A 583; _1 pr. s._ wish, 2. 99; Desyre, _1
pr. pl._ 1. 32.

DESYRINGE, _adj._ desirous, B 2767.

DETERMINAT, _adj._ determinate, exact, fixed, D 1459; properly placed (on
the astrolabe), A. ii. 18 (rubric); properly ascertained, A. i. 21. 5.

DETERMYNIE, _v._ come to conclusions, B 4. p 4. 108; D['e]term['y]ne, _v._
come to an end, T. iii. 379; D['e]term['y]nen, _2 pr. pl._ end, HF. 343;
Determined, _pp._ settled, B 5. p 4. 6.

DETRACCIOUN, _s._ detraction, I 614; Detraccion, I 493.

DETTE, _s._ debt, L. 541; A 280, B 41, D 130, 153.

DETTELEES, _adj._ free from debt, A 582.

DETTOUR, _s._ debtor, B 1587, D 155, I 370; Dettours, _pl._ B 1603.

_Deus hic_, God (be) here, D 1770.

DEVE, _pl. of_ Deef.

DEVIL, _s._ L. 2493; Devel, E 1436, I 132; _what d._, what the devil, L.
2694; _how d._, how the devil, T. i. 623; _a d. weye_, in the way to the
devil, in the devil's name, A 3134 (see note), D 2242; _a twenty devil
way_, in the way of twenty devils, i.e. to utter destruction, L. 2177; an
exclamation of petulance, A 3713, 4257; Develes, _pl._ I 171.

DEVISIOUN, _s._ division, B 3. p 9. 13. See DIVISIOUN.

DEVOCIOUN, _s._ devotion, R. 430, HF. 33, 68; L. 39, 109.

DEVOIR, _s._ duty, T. iii. 1045; A 2598, B 38, E 966; debt, I 764.

DEVOURE, _v._ devour, L. 1937; Devouren, _v._ I 195; Devoured, _pp._ 7. 14;
L. 1947; expended, D 1720.

DEVOURER, _s._ L. 1369, 1581.

DEVOUT, _adj._ devout, 1. 145; A 22.

DEVOUTLY, _adv._ 3. 771; A 482.

DEVYDE, _v._ divide, mete out, R. 878.

DEVYN, _s._ divine, astrologer, T. i. 66.

DEVYNE, _adj._ divine; Devynes, _pl._ B 5. p 2. 16. See DIVYN.

DEVYNE, _v._ guess, T. v. 288; B 1414, D 26; _ger._ to guess, fancy, T.
iii. 765; to prophesy (by), 5. 182; Devyneth, _pr. s._ guesses, suspects,
T. ii. 1741; Devyne, _pr. pl._ suspect, T. ii. 1745; Devyne, _pr. s. subj._
let (him) guess, HF. 14. See DIVYNEN.

DEVYNERESSE, _s._ female diviner, T. v. 1522.

DEVYS, _s._ device, contrivance, R. 1413; L. 1102; guess, supposition, R.
651; decision, direction, A 816; _at his d._, according to his own wish, R.
1326; _at point d._, with great exactness _or_ exactitude, R. 830; HF. 917
(see Poynt); Devyses, _pl._ heraldic devices, badges, L. 1272.

DEVYSE, _v._ to relate, tell, describe, T. iii. 41; A 34, B 154, 349, 613,
3132, 3842, F 1043; recommend, T. ii. 388; B 2453; devise, suggest, ordain,
L. 437; plan, L. 1453; E 698; _ger._ to tell, describe, 5. 398; to relate,
A 994, 1048, E 52; to describe, F 65, 279; to frame, E 739; to tell of, T.
i. 277; _v._ tell of, D 999; Devysen, _v._ describe, R. 1112; tell, 5. 333;
imagine, E 108; Devyse, _1 pr. s._ tell, B 3693; relate, L. 202; say, 4.
18; Devyseth, _pr. s._ narrates, describes, 5. 317; D 1904; Devyse, _pr.
pl._ imagine, discourse, F 261; Devyse, _2 pr. s. subj._ explain, B 4. p 6.
3; Devysed, _pp._ described to, told, R. 476.

DEVYSING, _s._ arrangement, A 2496.

DEWE, _dat._ dew, 3. 415; Dewe, _nom._ (_before a vowel_), R. 1013.

DEWE, _adj._ due, just, B 1. m 5. 23; due, I 867. See DUE.

DEWELY, _adv._ duly, B 1. m 5. 25.

DEWETE, _s._ duty, T. iii. 970 _n_. See DUETEE.

DEXTRER, _s._ a courser, warhorse, B 2103. Fr. _destrier_, a war-horse, Low
Lat. _dextrarius_, from Lat. _dextra_, the right hand. The squire rode his
own horse, and led his master's horse beside him, on his _right_ hand.

DEYE, _s._ dairywoman, B 4036. Icel. _deigja_.

DEYE, _v._ die, 5. 469, 651; A 3034, B 525, 3232; _ger._ 1. 172; 3. 690; B
592, E 364; Deyen, _v._ L. 2598; Deyeth, _pr. s._ G 1436; Deyth, D 2039;
Deyde, _pt. s._ A 2846, C 580, E 550, 1062, G 138; Deyed, _pt. s._ A 2843;
Deyed, _pp._ R. 456, B 1841; Deyde, _pt. s. subj._ should die, A 3427;
Deyden, _pt. pl. subj._ D 1901. Icel. _deyja_. See DYE.

DEYEN, _ger._ to dye, to dip, B 4. m 6. 9; _v._ B 2. m 5. 9.

DEYINGE, _s._ dying, death, B 1850; _lay on deying_, lay a-dying, B 3906;
Dyinge, B 3073.

DEYNE, _v._ deign, 7. 231; Deynest, _2 pr. s._ T. iii. 1435; Deyneth him,
_pr. s._ he deigns, 7. 181; L. 395; Deyned, _pt. s._ deigned, T. i. 435;
_him deyned_, he deigned, B 3324, 4371; _hir deyned_, she deigned, 4. 39;
Deigned, _pt s. refl._; _d. hir_, she deigned, B 3460.

DEYNOUS, _adj._ disdainful, scornful, T. i. 290; A 3941.

DEYNTEE, _s._ worth, value, D 208, I 477; _took lesse d. for_, set less
value on, 7. 143; a peculiar pleasure, B 139; pleasure, F 681, 1003;
Deyntees, _pl._ dainties, A 346, B 419, F 301, H 166; L. 1100.

DEYNTEE, _(s. as) adj._ dainty, pleasant, rare, T. v. 438; B 1901, 4025, C
520, E 1112, F 70; good, A 168.

DEYNTEVOUS, _adj._ dainty, E 265, 1714.

DEYS, _s._ da[:i]s, platform, the high table in a dining-hall, A 370, 2200,
E 1711, F 59. See DEES.

DEY-STERRE, _s._ day-star, B 2. m 3. 4.

DIADEME, _s._ diadem, crown of an emperor, 14. 7; F 43, 60.

DIAMETRE, _s._ diameter, A. ii. 38. 8.

DI['A]PRED, _pp. as adj._ variegated, diversified with figures, A 2158;
D['i]apred, R. 934.

DICH, _s._ ditch, A 3964, B 4038, I 718.

DICHEN, _v._ make a dyke round, L. 708; Diched, _pp._ provided with a ditch
or moat, A 1888. See DYKE.

DIDE, DIDEST; see DOON.

DIETE, _s._ diet, daily food, A 435, B 1451, C 516; Dyete, B 4026.

DIFFAMACIOUN, _s._ defamation, D 1304.

DIFFAME, _s._ evil name, ill report, E 540, 730. See DEFAME.

DIFFAME, _ger._ to defame, dishonour, HF. 1581; A 3147; _v._ cry down, D
2212. See DEFAME.

DIFFERENCE, _s._ 5. 125.

DIFFINICIOUN, _s._ definition, clear exposition, D 25.

DIFFINISSHE, _pr. s. subj._ define, B 5. p 1. 22; Diffinisseth, _pr. s._
defines, B 5. p 4. 137; Diffinisshed, _pp._ clearly defined, B 5. p 5. 71;
explained, described, B 3. p 10. 6; B 4. p 11. 162. See DEFYNE.

DIFFINITIF, _adj._ definite, final, C 172.

DIFFUSIOUN, _s._ prolixity, T. iii. 296.

DIFFYE, _1 pr. s._ defy, spurn, D 1928. See DEFYE.

DIFFYNE, _ger._ define, state clearly, 5. 529; Diffynen, _2 pr. pl._
conclude, HF. 344. See DEFYNE.

DIGESTIBLE, _adj._ digestible, easy to be digested, A 437.

DIGESTIOUN, _s._ digestion, F 347.

DIGESTYVES, _pl._ digestives, B 4151.

DIGGEN, _ger._ to dig, B 5. m 5. 7.

DIGHTE, _v._ prepare, L. 1288, 2480; prepare (himself), L. 1000; _ger._ to
prepare, E 974; Dighte me, prepare myself to go, B 3104; ordain, place, T.
iv. 1188; lie with, D 767; Dighte, _pt. s. refl._ hastened, went, betook
himself, T. ii. 948; L. 2155, 2371; lay with, D 398; _pt. pl._ L. 1712;
Dight, _pp._ arrayed, equipped, T. iii. 1773; A 1041; served, H 312;
prepared, R. 941; prepared him to go, B 3719; Dighte, _pp. pl._ prepared,
L. 2611. A.S. _dihtan_; from Lat. _dictare_.

DIGNE, _adj._ worthy, T. i. 429, iii. 23, v. 1868; A 141, 2216, E 818, I
115; honourable, noble, B 2. p 4. 106; L. 321, 1738; B 1175, C 695;
suitable, B 778; proud, disdainful, A 517; scornful, repellent (see note),
A 3964.

DIGNELY, _adv._ worthily, B 3. p 10. 59; Digneliche, fittingly, B 2. p 6.
63; scornfully, T. ii. 1024.

DIGNITEE, _s._ worth, B 1. p 4. 178; dignity, 14. 5; C 701, 782; A. ii. 4.
31; rank, E 470; Dignetes, _pl._ A. pr. 77. Dignity, in astrology,
signifies the advantages which a planet has when in a particular position
in the zodiac, or in a particular position with regard to other planets
(Bailey).

DILATACIOUN, _s._ diffuseness, B 232.

DILIGENCE, _s._ H 141.

DILIGENT, _adj._ T. iii. 144; L. 70; A 483.

DILUGE, _s._ deluge, I 839; Diluve, I 839 _n_; Del['u]ge, 16. 14.

DIM, _adj._ indistinct, A 2433; Dimme, _pl._ dim, T. ii. 908.

DIMINUCIOUN, _s._ diminution, T. iii. 1335.

DINER, _s._ dinner, T. ii. 1489, 1560; B 1443.

DINT, _s._ stroke, HF. 534.

DIOCYSE, _s._ diocese, A 664.

DIRECT, _adj._ directed, addressed, 18. 75; direct, A. ii. 35. 11; _in
directe_, in a line with, A. ii. 44. 10. A planet's motion is direct when
it moves in the same direction as the sun in the zodiac.

DIRECTE, _1 pr. s._ dedicate, address, T. v. 1856.

DIRK, _adj._ obscure, A ii. 6. 13. See DERK.

DISAVAUNCE, _v._ defeat, T. ii. 511. O. F. _desavancir_, 'repousser';
Godefroy.

DISAVENTURE, _s._ misfortune, T. ii. 415, iv. 755.

DISBLAMETH, _imp. pl._ free (me) from blame, T. ii. 17.

DISCERNE, _v._ discern, see, A 1989; perceive, HF. 909; A 3003. See
DECERNE.

DISCEYVING, _s._ deception, R. 1590.

DISCHEVELE, _adj._ with (his) hair hanging loosely down, A 683; with hair
in disorder, L. 1315, 1720, 1829; Disshevele, with hair flowing down, 5.
235.

DISCIPLYNE, _s._ bodily mortification, I 1052.

DISCLAUNDRE, _s._ reproach, T. iv. 564; slander, I 623. See DESCLAUNDRED.

DISCONFITINGE, _s._ discomfiture, A 2719.

DISCONFITURE, _s._ defeat, A 1008; Discomfiture, discomfort, grief, 7. 326;
defeat, R. 254.

DISCONFORT, _s._ discouragement, discomfort, A 2010, F 896; grief, woe, T.
iv. 311; B 2174.

DISCONFORTEN, _v._ discourage, A 2704.

DISCONSOLAT, _adj._ T. v. 542.

DISCORD, _s._ discord, I 562; Disc['o]rd, E 432; Discordes, _pl._ enmities,
B 1. p 4. 76; Discords, strifes, HF. 685.

DISCORDABLE, discordant, T. iii. 1753; B 4. m 6. 14; B 5. m 3. 1.

DISCORDANCES, _s. pl._ discords, I 275.

DISCORDAUNT, _adj._ different, B 2. p 7. 50; discordant, T. ii. 1037;
Descordaunt, B 4. m 4. 8.

DISCORDEN, _pr. pl._ disagree, B 4. p 6. 130; differ, B 5. m 5. 10.

DISCORDINGE, _adj._ different, B 3. p 2. 86 (Lat. _dissidentes_).

DISCOVERE, _v._ reveal, G 1465; Discoveren, _v._ betray, T. i. 675;
Discoverest, _2 pr. s._ revealest, G 696; Discovered, _pt. s._ disclosed, B
2903; Discovered, _pp._ revealed, B 2. p 8. 24; G 1468.

DISCOVERT, _pp._ uncovered; _at d._, when unprotected, I 714.

DISCRECIOUN, _s._ discretion, 10. 3; 15. 18.; T. iii. 894; A 1779, 2537, H
182; discernment, B 3. p 10. 141.

DISCREET, _adj._ discreet, A 312, 518, B 4061, E 75, 410, I 1009, 1023.

DISCREVEN; see DISCRYVE.

DISCRIPCIOUN, _s._ description, F 580. See DESCRIPCIOUN.

DISCRYVE, _v._ describe, T. v. 267; F 424, 931; Discryven, _v._ 3. 897; F
40; Discryve, _ger._ 3. 916; HF. 2056; Discreven, _v._ T. iv. 802;
Discryveth, _pr. s._ E 43; Discryved, _pp._ B 3336. See DESCRYVE.

DISCURE, _v._ reveal, discover, 3. 549.

DISCUSSED, _pp._ discussed, 5. 624; driven away, B 1. m 3. 1.

DISDAIGNEN, _ger._ to disdain, be impatient, B 4. p 7. 56; Disdeyne, E 98.

DISDEYN, _s._ disdain, R. 296; Disdeynes, _gen._ T. ii. 1217. See DESDEYN.

DISENCRESETH, _pr. s._ decreases, B 5. P 6. 53.

DISESE, _s._ discomfort, grief, misery, 4. 216, 277; T. ii. 987, iii. 1276,
1816; F 467; sorrow, 7. 226; displeasure, T. ii. 147; disease, ill, HF. 89;
inconvenience, I 609; trouble, distress, B 616, 2735, 3961, G 747, H 97; R.
251; unrest, F 1314.

DISESEN, _ger._ to trouble, T. iii. 1468; Disese, _v._ vex, T. iv. 1304;
distress, T. i. 573; Disesen, _v._ incommode, T. ii. 1650; Disesed, _pp._
distressed, T. iii. 443.

DISESPERAT, _adj._ hopeless, without hope, HF. 2015.

DISFIGURAT, _adj._ disguised, 5. 222.

DISFIG['U]RE, _s._ disfigurement, D 960.

DISFIG['U]RE, _ger._ to disfigure, T. ii. 223; _v._ disguise, L. 2046;
Disfig['u]red, _pp._ changed, A 1403; Disf['i]gured, C 551.

DISGRESSIOUN, digression, T. i. 143.

DISGYSE, _ger._ to disguise, T. v. 1577.

DISH, _s._ D 836.

DISHERITED, _pp._ disinherited, deprived, L. 1065; A 2926; Disherit, A 2926
_n_. See DESHERITE.

DISH-METES, _pl._ spoon-meat, broth, I 445.

DISHONEST, _adj._ unfaithful, H 214; Dishoneste, shameful, E 876.

DISH['O]NOUR, _s._ T. v. 1066; Dishon['o]ur, T. ii. 731.

DISIOYNT (Disjoint), _s._ failure, A 2962; difficult position, B 1601; L.
1631; Disiointe, _dat._ peril, T. iii. 496, v. 1618. O.F. _desjointe_,
's['e]paration'; Godefroy.

DISMAL, _s._ unlucky day, 3. 1206. See note.

DISMAYE THEE, _imp. s._ be cast down, B 2. p 2. 60.

DISMEMBRE, _v._; Dismembred, _pt. pl._ dismembered, I 591.

DISMEMBRINGE, _s._ dismembering, I 591.

DISOBEYSAUNT, _adj._ disobedient, 5. 429; Disobeisaunt, I 338.

DISORDENAUNCE, _s._ disorder, B 5. p 1. 29; Disordinaunce, I 277; violation
of rules, HF. 27.

DISPARAGE, _s._ disparagement, disgrace, E 908.

DISPAR['A]GE, _v._ dishonour, A 4271; Dispar['a]ged, _pp._ misallied, D
1069.

DISPEIRE YOW, _imp. pl._ despair, E 1669. See DISPEYRE, DESPEIRED.

DISPENCE, _s._ expenditure, expense, A 441, 1882, D 1263, E 1209, 1297;
what I spend, D 1432; cost, B 1195, 1206; lavish help, HF. 260; Dispense,
expenditure, R. 1141; A 1928, 4388; Dispenses, _pl._ expenses, R. 1144. See
DESPENCE.

DISPENDE, _v._ spend, B 3500; _ger_. F 690; Dispended, _pp._ spent, shared,
B. 2560. See DESPENDE.

DISPENSACIOUN, _s._ dispensation, B 4. p 6. 169; E 746.

DISPENSE; see DISPENCE.

DISPENSE, _v._; Dispenseth, _pr. s._ dispenses, B 4. p 6. 207. See
DESPENSE.

DISPEYR, _s._ despair, L. 660.

DISPEYRE, _v. refl._ despair, T. v. 1569.

DISPEYRED, _adj._ despairing, F 1084. See DESPEIRED.

DISP['I]TOUS, _adj._ spiteful, R. 156; T. iii. 1458; D['i]spitous,
grievous, sad, T. v. 199; D['i]spit['o]us[:e], _voc._ pitiless, T. ii. 435;
_def. fem._ cruel, 3. 624. See DESPITOUS.

DISP['I]TOUSLY, _adv._ angrily, A 1124; spitefully, T. v. 1806; cruelly,
HF. 161. See DESPITOUSLY.

DISPLESANT, _adj._ displeasing, I 544, 697.

DISPLESAUNCE, _s._ displeasure, T. iii. 480; offence, C 74; Displesances,
_pl._ annoyances, C 420.

DISPLESE, _v._ displease, E 506; grieve, I 141.

DISPLESINGE, _s._ giving (you) offence, 22. 70.

DISPOILEN, _v._ despoil, i.e. strip, E 374. See DESPLOYED.

DISPONE, _imp. s._ dispose, T. v. 300; Disponeth, _pr. s._, disposes,
orders, regulates, B 4. p 6. 38, 44; Disponede, _pt. s._ B 3. p 12. 33;
Disponed, _pp._ arranged, B 4. p 6. 64.

DISPORT, _s._ sport, pleasantry, A 137, 775; amusement, diversioun, D 839,
F 895; pleasure, B 143; sport, 4. 177; 5. 260. See DESPORT.

DISPORTE, _ger._ to amuse, HF. 571; L. 1441; F. 849; to exhilarate, T. ii.
1673; Disporten, _v._ amuse, T. iv. 724; Disporte, _v._ cheer, T. iii.
1133; Disporte, _ger._ to disport himself, A 3660; Disporten hem, _pr. pl._
sport, play, E 2040. See DESPORTE.

DISPOSICIOUN, _s._ disposition, A 1378; disposal, T. ii. 526, v. 2; HF.
2113; A 2364, B 2955; position, A 1087; frame of mind, B 2326; appointed
time, B 4. m 4. 2; organization, B 4. p 5. 31.

DISPOSE, _v._ dispose; Disposed, _pt. s._ purposed, E 244; Disposed, _pp._
disposed, T. ii. 682, v. 984; ready, T. iv. 230; _wel d._, in good health
(the reverse of _indisposed_), H 33; Disposeth, _imp. pl._ dispose, D 1659.

DISPOYLINGE, _s._ spoil, B 4. m 7. 21. See DISPOILEN.

DISPREISEN, _ger._ to dispraise, disparage, R. 1053; Dispreise, _v._ blame,
B 2261; Dispreisinge, _pres. pt._ depreciating, B 2741.

DISPREISINGE, _s._ blame, I 497; Dispreysinge, contempt, B 2876.

DISPUTE, _ger._ to dispute, T. iii. 858; Disputed, _pt. s._ 3. 505;
Disputinge, _pres. part._ arguing, T. iv. 1084. See DESPUTEN.

DISPUTISOUN, _s._ disputation, B 5. p 1. 19 _n_; argument, E 1474; dispute,
B 4428, F 890. A. F. _desputeison_.

DISPYT, _s._ despite, scorn, L. 1822; disdain, HF. 1716; grief, vexation,
R. 1487; _in d. of_, in spite of, HF. 1668. See DESPYT.

DISSENSIOUN, _s._ strife, 15. 9.

DISSERVE, _v._; Disserveth, _pr. s._ deserves, I 756. See DESERVE.

DISSEVERAUNCE, _s._ severing, B 3. p 11. 44.

DISSEVEREN, _v._ dissever, B 2805; Dissever, _v._ part, 2. 115; 17. 15;
_ger._ to part, G 875; Dissever, _pr. s. subj._ sever, 4. 49; Dissevered,
_pp._ separated, B 4. p 3. 12.

DISSHEVELE, _adj._ with hair flowing down, 5. 235. See DISCHEVELE.

DISSIMULACIOUN, _s._ dissimulation, D 2123; Dissimulacions, _pl._ HF. 687.

DISSIMULEN, _v._ dissimulate, T. i. 322, iii. 434; B 5. p 6. 219;
Dissimuleth, _pr. s._ dissimulates, acts foolishly, G 466; Dissimule, _imp.
s._ H 347.

DISSIMULINGE, _s._ dissimulation, dissembling, T. v. 1613; G 1073;
Dissimulinges, _pl._ pretences that things are _not_ so, F 285.

DISSIMULOUR, _s._ dissembler, 10. 23; B 4418.

DISSLAUNDRED, _pp._ defamed, L. 1031. See DESCLAUNDRED.

DISSOLVE, _v._; Dissolveth, _pr. s._ puts an end to, B 2. p 3. 57.

DISTAF, _s._ distaff, A 3774, B 3097, 3564, 4574.

DISTANTZ, _adj. pl._ distant; _evene distantz_, equidistant, A. i. 17. 32.

DISTEMPERAUNCE, _s._ intemperance, B 4. p 2. 131; inclemency, I 421;
Destemperaunce, inclemency, B 3. p 11. 88.

DISTEMPRE, _adj._ distempered, furious, B 4. p 3. 79. See DESTEMPRED.

DISTEMPRE, _v._ vex, B 2426; _imp. s._ be out of temper, D 2195.

DISTEYNE, _v._ stain, bedim, dull, L. 255, 262, 269, 274.

DISTILLE, _v._ distil, melt, T. iv. 519.

DISTINCTLY, _adv._ A. ii. 40. 19.

DISTINGWED, _pp._ distinguished, B 2. p 5. 47.

DISTOURBE, _v._ disturb, T. iv. 563; (to) interfere with, T. iv. 934;
Distorben, prevent, T. iv. 1103; Distorbe, T. iv. 1113; Disturbed, _pp._
altered, T. ii. 622. See DESTOURBE.

DISTRESSE, _s._ misery, A 919; distress, 1. 106; F 737; suffering, L. 1055,
1081. See DESTRESSE.

DISTREYNE, _v._ constrain, A 1816; get into his grasp, clutch, 20. 8; _imp.
s._ constrain, T. v. 596; Distreyneth, _pr. s._ secures, clutches, grasps,
5. 337; B 2405; vexes, afflicts, F 820; Distreyned, _pp._ overcome, misled,
T. ii. 840; constrained, I 269; assessed, taxed, I 752. See DESTREYNE.

DISTROYE, _v._ destroy; Distroyeth, _pr. s._ R. 390. See DESTROYE.

DISTURBAUNCE, _s._ disturbance; _thy disturbaunce_, the disturbaunce thou
hadst to endure, 4. 107.

DISTURBED, _pp._ altered, T. ii. 622. See DISTOURBE.

DISTURNE, _v._ turn aside, T. iii. 718.

DITEE, _s._ ditty, song, B 3. p 1. 2; Dyte, 23. 16; Ditees, _pl._ B 1. m 1.
2; Dytees, _pl._ HF. 622.

DIURNE, _adj._ diurnal, E 1795.

DIVERS, _adj._ diverse, various, 3. 653; _dat._ different, 2. 17; _pl._
diverse, B 211, D 286, F 202; divergent, B 5. p 1. 13. See DYVERSE.

DIVERSELY, _adv._ in different ways, R. 1629; F 202.

DIVERSITEE, _s._ variety, T. v. 1793; Dyversitee, diversity, T. iii. 405.

DIVINES; see DIVYNIS.

DIVINISTRE, _s._ divine, theologian, A 2811.

DIVINITEE, _s._ divinity, B 1. p 4. 12; (the study of) divinity, D 1512,
1638.

DIVISIOUN, _s._ distinction, A 1781; difference, 10. 33; _of my d._, under
my influence, 4. 273; Devisioun, B 3. p 3. 13.

DIVYDE, _v._ divide, B 3380; _pp._ Divyded, B 3424.

DIVYN, _adj._ divine, B 3247; Divyne, _def._ A 122; _voc._ HF. 1101. See
DEVYNE.

DIVYNACIOUNS, _pl._ divinations, B 5. p 4. 3.

DIVYNAILES, _pl._ divinations, I 605. O. F. _devinaille_.

DIVYNEN, _v._ guess, T. iii. 458; _1 pr. s._ declare, 12. 19; Divyninge,
_pres. pt._ guessing, A 2515. See DEVYNE.

DIVYNINGE, _s._ guessing, opinion, A 2521.

DIVYNIS, _pl._ theologians, A 1323; Divines, I 957.

DIVYNOUR, _s._ seer, soothsayer, B 5. p 3. 95.

DO; see DOON.

DOCTOUR, _s._ doctor, A 411; (i.e. St. Augustine), C 117; theologian, I 85;
Doctours, _pl._ teachers, A. pr. 74; D 1648.

DOCTRINE, _s._ instruction, A. pr. 45; doctrine, L. 19; learning, B 2702;
Doctr['y]ne, instruction, B 4632.

DOERES, _pl._ doers, agents, B 5. p 6. 166.

DOES, _pl._ does (deer), R. 1401; 3. 429.

DOGEREL, _adj._ doggrel, B 2115.

DOGGE, _s._ dog, D 1369, E 2014; Dogges, _pl._ dogs, R. 221; T. iv. 626; B
3089, 4576.

DOGHTER, _s._ daughter, L. 114; B 151; _gen._ E 608; Doghtres, _pl._ B
4565, C 73, 76; Doghtren, _pl._ L. 1963; B 4019, F 1429, I 201; Doughter,
_sing._ T. iii. 3; Doughtren, _pl._ T. iv. 22.

DOING, _s._ deed, act, 3. 995; Doinges, _pl._ deeds, L. 1681.

DOKE (duk[*e]), _s._ duck, 5. 498, 589; A 3576; Dokes, _pl._ B 4580.

DOKKE, _s._ dock (plant), T. iv. 461.

DOKKED, _pp._ cut short, A 590.

DOLVE, DOLVEN; see DELVE.

DOMB (dumb), _adj._ dumb, HF. 656; B 1055; Doumb, B 1. p 2. 12; A 774;
Dombe, _def._ L. 2377, 2380; _pl._ G 286.

DOME, DOMES; see DOOM.

DOMESDAY, doom's day, HF. 1284.

DOMESMAN, _s._ judge, B 2. m 6. 8; B 3680, I 594.

DOMINACIOUN, _s._ power, A 2758, H 57; dominion, 15. 16; B 3409, C 560;
chiefest influence, F 352; supremacy, H 181.

_Dominus_; see _Corpus_.

_Domus Dedali_, the labyrinth of Daedalus, HF. 1920.

DON, _imp. s._ don, do on, put on, T. ii. 954, iii. 738.

DON, DONE; see DOON.

DONG, _s._ dung, manure, A 530, I 139; Donge, _dat._ B 4208, C 535.

DONG-CARTE, _s._ dung-cart, B 4226.

DONGE, _ger._ to dung, B 4226.

DONGEHUL, _s._ dunghill, I 911 _n_.

DONGEOUN, _s._ keep-tower, A 1057.

DONNE, _adj. pl._ dun, dusky, T. ii. 908; dun-coloured, 5. 334; Dun,
_sing._ swarthy, R. 1213.

DOOM, _s._ judgement, B 5. p 2. 8; F 928; opinion, B 3127, E 1000, F 677;
sentence, decision; _hir d._, the decision passed on them, 5. 308; Dome,
_dat._ opinion, T. i. 100; judgement, HF. 1905; C 637; _to my d._, in my
opinion, R. 901; 5. 480; 22. 52; _stonde to the d._, abide by the decision,
5. 546; Domes, _pl._ dooms, decisions, judgements, A 323, C 163; B 4. p 6.
130; rulings, R. 199.

DOON, _v._ do, execute, A 960; do, 3. 194; F 323; act, B 90; cause, B 3618;
_doon us honge_, cause us to be hung, C 790; Don, _v._ do; _don her
companye_, accompany her, 4. 125; _leet don cryen_, caused to be cried, F
46; Do, _v._ cause, T. iv. 1683; use, B 2204; fulfil, B 1653; make, 3. 145;
_do werche_, cause to be built, G 545; Done, _ger._ to do, T. i. 1026; to
have business with, 4. 234; _what to done_, what is to be done, 3. 689;
_for to done_, a fit thing to do, I 62; to be done, L. 1597; Doon, _ger._
to do, A 78, 768; to commit, I 90; to cause, R. 1178; 7. 283; to force, 5.
221; Don, _ger._: _to don_, from doing, B 4. p 6. 202; Do, _ger._ to make,
3. 1260; 5. 420; to cause, T. ii. 1022; to commit, I 129; Doost, _2 pr. s._
makest, C 312; Dostow, doest thou, L. 315; Dooth, _pr. s._ causes, A 2396,
2621, B 724, I 121; doth, B 23; Doth, _pr. s._ makes, 2. 7; L. 1728;
causes, 6. 21; Doth forth, continues, E 1015; Do, _2 pr. pl._ cause, 5.
651; make, T. i. 426; Don, _pr. pl._ do, F 770; Doon, _pr. pl._ do, A 268;
Do, _imp. s._ make, H 12; bring (it) about, A 2405; cause, G 32; _do
hange_, cause me to be hung, G 1029; _do fecche_, cause to be fetched, B
662; _do wey_, put away, lay aside, G 487; take away, A 3287; _do stryken
hir out_, cause her to be struck out, D 1364; _do come_, cause to come, B
2035; Dooth, _imp. pl._ do ye, C 745, I 105; do, E 568; Doth, _imp. pl._ E
652; _as dooth_, pray do, F 458; Didest, _2 pt. s._ didst, T. iii. 363;
Dide, _pt. s._ did, 3. 373; R. 1705 (see note); T. iii. 811; caused, R.
607; put on, B 2047; _dide hem drawe_, caused to be drawn, B 1823; _dide
don sleen_, caused to be slain, caused (men) to have them slain (_sleen_,
like _don_, is in the infin. mood), D 2042; _dide of_, took off, 3. 516;
Diden, _1 pt. pl._ did, C 967; Dide, _pt. s. subj._ should do, F 1404;
Diden, _pt. pl._ made, 22. 28; _pt. pl. subj._ should do, L. 723; Doon,
_pp._ done, 1. 54; past, ended, 3. 40, 708, 1334; _doon to dethe_, done to
death, L. 889; _doon make_, caused to be made, E 253; _hath doon yow kept_,
has caused you to be preserved, E 1098; _doon ther write_, caused to be
written (or described there), R. 413; Don, _pp._ done, 5. 70; _don to dye_,
done to death, murdered, R. 1063; Do, _pp._ done, L. 957; 3. 528, 562, 676,
680, 868; G 745, 1155; ended, 5. 693, E 2440; finished, T. ii. 10. And see
DEDEN, DOTH, DON.

DORE, _s._ door, R. 537, A 550, E 282, F 80, 615, G 1137, 1142, 1217; _out
at d._, out of doors, D 1757, H 306; Dores, _pl._ doors, HF. 650; T. v.
531, 552; A 1990, B 3615, 3719; _out at d._, out of doors, B 4567. A.S.
_duru_.

DORMANT; _table dormant_, a permanent side-table, A 353.

DORRE, DORRING; see DURRE, DURRING.

DORSTE; see DAR.

DORTOUR, _s._ dormitory, D 1855. O. F. _dortor_, _dortour_, 'dortoir';
Godefroy.

DOSEYN, _s._ a dozen, A 578.

DOSSERS, _pl._ baskets to carry on the back, HF. 1940. See note. From Fr.
_dos_, back.

DOST, _2 pr. s._ performest, T. iii. 1436; Dostow, doest thou, D 239. See
DOON.

DOT['A]GE, _s._ folly, 17. 8; E 1253; D['o]tage, A 3898.

DOTARD, _adj._ foolish, D 291; Dotardes, _adj. pl._ doting, I 857.

DOTE, _v._ dote, grow foolish, L. 261 _a_; Doten, act foolishly, G 983;
Dote, _1 pr. s._ rave, E 1441; Doted, _pp. as adj._ doating, stupid, 17.
13; foolish, R. 407.

DOTH, _pr. s._ causes, R. 389; Doth ... carie, causes to be carried, A
3410; makes, F 1257; _imp. pl._ do ye, B 2785; &c. See DOON.

DOUBLE, _adj._ double, T. i. 1; A 262; twofold, 4. 109; deceitful, 7. 87;
HF. 285; B 2. p 1. 41.

DOUBLE, _v._; Doublede, _pt. s._ doubled, B 3. m 12. 18.

DOUBLENESSE, _s._ duplicity, 7. 159; 9. 63; F 556, G 1300.

DOUCET, _adj._ dulcet, i.e. dulcet (pipe), sweet-sounding (pipe), HF. 1221.
See note.

DOUGHTER, _s._ daughter, T. iii. 3; Doughtren, _pl._ T. iv. 22. See
DOGHTER.

DOUGHTY, DOGHTY, _adj._ strong, valiant, R. 1210; B 1914, 3502, F 338;
warlike, F 11.

DOUMB, _adj._ dumb, B 1. p 2. 12; A 774. See DOMB.

DOUN, _s._ down, soft feathers, 9. 45; Downe, _dat._ 3. 250.

DOUN, _adv._ down, F 323; _up and doun_, in all directions, in all ways, B
53. See ADOUN.

DOUN, _s._ down, hill; Doune, _dat._ B 1986.

DOUNERE, _adv._ more downward, A. ii. 12. 14.

DOUN-RIGHT, _adv._ downright, at once, H 228.

DOUNWARD, _adv._ downward, R. 133; F 858; outward, southward, A ii. 40. 40.

DOUTANCE, _s._ doubt, T. iv. 963; Doutances, _pl._ perplexities, T. i. 200.

DOUTE, _s._ doubt, 1. 25; L. 383; B 777, G 833, I 296; fear, F 1096, I 91;
peril, L. 1613; suspense, E 1721; doubt, lack, T. ii. 366; _out of doute_,
doubtless, A 487, 3561, B 390, C 822, D 978; _sans d._, without doubt, D
1838; _withouten d._, certainly, L. 383, 1932; Doutes, _pl._ fears, F 220.

DOUTELEES, _adv._ without doubt, certainly, T. ii. 494; A 1831, B 2142, C
492, E 485, G 16, 1435; without hesitation, B 226; Douteles, B 91.

DOUTEN, _v._ fear, I 648; _ger._ to be feared, B 5. p 1. 14; Doute, _v._
fear, R. 1089; Doutest, _2 pr. s._ doubtest, B 1. p 6. 21; Doutestow,
doubtest thou, B 4. p 4. 165; Douteth, _pr. s._ fears, I 953; Doutedest, _2
pt. s._ didst doubt, B 1. p 6. 17; Doute, _2 pr. s. subj._ fear, B 2517;
Douteth, _imp. pl._ fear, T. i. 683.

DOUTOUS, _adj._ doubtful, B 1. p 1. 9; B 2. p 8. 26; T. iv. 992; dubious, B
2. p 1. 41.

D'OUTREMERE, _adj._ from beyond the seas, foreign, imported, 3. 253.

DOUVE, _s._ dove, 5. 341; E 2139; Dowve, R. 1219; pigeon, C 397; Dowves,
_gen._ dove's, T. iii. 1496; Dowves, _pl._ 3. 250; HF. 137; A 1962; Douves,
_pl._ R. 1298; Doves, _pl._ 5. 237.

DOWAIRE, _s._ dower, E 848; Dower, E 807.

DOWE, _1 pr. s._ grant, give, T. v. 230.

DOWNWARD, _prep._ down, T. ii. 1705.

DOWVE; see DOUVE.

DRADDE; see DREDE.

DRAF, _s._ draff, refuse (of corn), chaff, I 35; L. 312 a.

DRAF-SEK, _s._ sack full of 'draff,' A 4206. See above.

DRAGGES, _pl._ digestive sweetmeats, A 426 _n_ (in MS. Harl. only; other
MSS. have _drogges_). See DROGGES.

DRAGOUN, _s._ dragon, B 4. m 7. 24; L. 1430, 1581; B 3291, D 776, G 1435;
Dragon, I 195; _tail of the dr._, the Dragon's tail, A. ii. 4. 23: the
point where a planet (esp. the moon) passed from the northern to the
southern side of the ecliptic. (The opposite node was called the Dragon's
Head.)

DRAKE, _s._ drake, mallard, 5. 360; L. 2450; A 3576.

DRANK; see DRINKE.

DRASTY, _adj._ filthy, worthless, B 2113, 2120. Cf. A.S. _dresten_,
_daerstan_, dregs; M.E. _drestys_, lees (in Prompt. Parv.). Palsgrave has:
'_dresty_, full of drest, _lieux_.'

DRAT, _pr. s. of_ Drede.

DRAUGHT (of drink), B 4. p 6. 257; L. 2667; Draughte, R. 1516; A 135, 382,
C 360, 363; move at chess, 3. 682; Draughtes, _pl._ 3. 653.

DRAWE, _v._ draw, incline, E 314; _dr. him_, withdraw himself, F 355; bring
forward, R. 6; Drawen, _v._ attract, R. 1183; allure, B 2. p 7. 10; wrest,
B 1. p 3. 26; recall, A 2074; Drawe, _ger._ to draw, to carry, A 1416;
Drawen, _ger._ to draw, A 519; to bring back, I 239; Draweth along, _pr.
s._ prolongs, B 1. m 1. 20 (Lat. _protrahit_); Drawen, _pr. pl. refl._
withdraw themselves, F 252; Drough, _pt. s._ drew, A 4304, D 1549, F 965;
drew along, T. v. 1558; _refl._ drew himself, approached, B 1710, G 685;
Drogh, _1 pt. s._ R. 97; _pt. s._ A 3892; Drow, _pt. s._ drew, B 3292;
dragged, B 4. m 7. 26; drew near, D 993; moved (as the sun), 5. 490;
hoisted, L. 1563; Drew, _pt. s._ attracted, 3. 864; Drowe, _2 pt. s._
drewest: _drowe to record_, didst bring to witness, 16. 22; Drowe, _pt.
pl._ drew, R. 1678; Draw, _imp. s._ draw near, 13. 26; Draweth, _imp. pl._
draw, A 835; invite, B 1632; Drawe, _pp._ drawn, T. iii. 674; moved, 3.
682; Drawing, _pres. part._ resorting, B 1217.

DRECCHE, _v._ be tedious, T. ii. 1264; _ger._ to vex, T. ii. 1471; Drecche,
_2 pr. pl._ delay, tarry, T. iv. 1446; Drecched, _pp._ vexed, troubled, B
4077. A.S. _dreccan_.

DRECCHINGE, _s._ prolonging, I 1000; Drecching, delay, T. iii. 853.

DREDE, _s._ dread, fear, 1. 42; 4. 28; A 1998, B 2517, 3694, E 358, 462, F
736, G 204, I 119; fear of wrong-doing, 6. 30; uncertainty, 17. 28; doubt,
5. 52; 7. 303; 13. 7; D 1169; F 1544, 1612; _it is no drede_, without
doubt, B 869, E 1155; _out of drede_, without doubt, R. 131, 1038; E 634;
_withouten drede_, without doubt, R. 1442; HF. 292; 3. 1073, 1096; L. 464;
B 196, F 723; Dredes, _pl._ fears, T. i. 463. See DREED.

DREDE, _v._ dread, fear, 1. 76; 3. 1264; G 320; _refl._ dread, A 660;
_ger._ to be dreaded, to be feared, T. i. 84; B 4253, G 437; _1 pr. s._ E
636, F 1312; Dredeth, _pr. s._ fears, L. 86; Drat, _pr. s._ dreadeth,
dreads, T. iii. 328; Drede, _2 pr. s. subj._ thou mayst dread, G 477;
Dredde, _1 pt. s._ R. 1670; was afraid, T. ii. 482; Dreddest, _2 pt. s._
didst dread, 10. 19; Dredde, _pt. s._ feared, L. 199; E 181; Dradde, _pt.
s._ feared, 7. 185; B 3402, E 523; Dradde him, was afraid, B 3918; Dredden,
_2 pt. pl. subj._ shouldst fear, T. ii. 367; Dredde, _pt. pl._ dreaded, T.
i. 483; Dredden, _pt. pl._ L. 1813; Dradden, _pt. pl._ G 15; Drad, _pp._ E
69; Dred, _imp. s._ fear, E 1201; Dred thee, _imp. s. refl._ 5. 157; HF.
1043.

DREDELES, _adj._ fearless, B 3. m 12. 7.

DREDELES, _adv._ without doubt, certainly, 3. 764; Dredelees, T. iii. 526;
E 1316; Dredles, 3. 1272.

DREDFUL, _adj._ terrible, T. v. 590; B 3558; fearful, timid, 5. 195, 638; B
2. m 2. 16; B 4. p 3. 80; L. 109, 404, 811; T. ii. 776; F 1309; cautious, A
1479.

DREDFULLY, _adv._ timidly, T. ii. 1128.

DREED, _s._ dread, fear, L. 1728. See DREDE.

DREEM, _s._ dream, HF. 1, 58; B 4077; Dremes, _pl._ B 4119.

DREINT, -E; see DRENCHEN.

DREMEN, _v._ dream, T. v. 248; Dremeth, _pr. s._ 5. 101; Dremed me, _pt.
s._ I dreamt, R. 51.

DREMINGES, _pl._ dreams, B 4280.

DRENCHEN, (1) _ger._ to drown, T. iii. 1761; A 3617; Drenche, _v._ drown,
16. 12; HF. 205; _do me drenche_, make (men) drown me, cause me to be
drowned, T. iv. 510; E 2201; Drenchen (2) _v._ be drowned, A 3521, 3523, B
455; be overwhelmed, L. 2919; Drencheth, _pr. s._ dips, drowns, B 4. m 5.
4; overwhelms, B 4. m 6. 25; drowns, swamps, I 363; Dreinte, _pt. s._ (1)
drowned, 3. 72; Dreynte, _pt. s._ drowned, I 839; submerged, B 4. m 7. 31;
Dreynte, _pt. s._ (2) was drowned, HF. 923; B 923; T. i. 543; Dreynte, _2
pt. pl._ were drowned, T. iv. 930; Dreynte, _pt. pl._ drowned, F 1378;
Drenched, _pp._ drowned, L. 2178; G 949; Dreint, _pp._ B 1. m 2. 1; Dreynt,
_pp._ 3. 148; 4. 89; B 1. m 1. 18; T. v. 1503; L. 293 _a_; A 3520, B 4272,
D 2081, I 364; swallowed up, B 4. m 7. 15; Dreynte, _pp. as def. adj._
drowned, 3. 195, 229; B 69; _pp. pl._ HF. 233.

DRENCHING, _s._ drowning, A 2456, B 485; Drenchinge, B 489, I 364.

DRERINESSE, _s._ sorrow, sadness, B 1. p 6. 31; T. i. 701.

DRERY, _adj._ dreary, sad, B 1. m. 1. 4; E 514; terrified, L. 810.

DRESSE, _v._ direct, 14. 3; dispose, get ready, T. ii. 71; prepare, L.
1190; E 1049; set in order, A 106; _v. refl._ address oneself, E 1007, G
77, 1271; T. ii. 635; direct himself, go, A 3468; direct myself, R. 110;
address himself, direct himself (_or perhaps_, mount), T. v. 37; Dresse
her, settle herself, L. 804; Dresse, _ger._ to direct, B 2308; _ger. refl._
prepare himself, T. v. 279; prepare, 5. 88; Dresseth, _pr. s._ directs,
turns, B 4. p 6. 247; Dresseth hir, prepares herself, B 265; Dresse, _pr.
pl. refl._ array themselves, A 2594; direct themselves, go, B 263, 416, F
290; Dressede, _pt. s. refl._ raised himself, T. iii. 71; Dressed him, _pt.
s._ ranged himself, took up his station, A 3358; Dressed, _pp._ arrayed, E
2361; prepared, 5. 665; Dressed him, gone, E 1820; Dressinge, _part. pres._
addressing, directing, B 4. p 6. 117.

DREYE, _adj._ dry, A 3024, B 3233; _as s._, 5. 380; _pl._ T. iii. 352, iv.
1173; E 899. A.S. _dr[=y]ge_. See DRYE.

DREYE, _v._; Dreyeth, _pr. s._ dries up, drains, I 848.

DREYE, _ger._ to endure, T. v. 42 _n_. See DRYE.

DREYNT, -E; see DRENCHE.

DRINKE, _s._ drink, L. 177, 2040; A 345.

DRINKE, _v._ drink; Drinketh, _pr. s._ 5. 104; Drank (_better_ Drunke), _2
pt. s._ didst drink, B 3416; _pt. s._ drank, E 216; Dronk, _pt. s._ drank,
T. v. 1439; Dronken, _1 pt. pl._ A 820; _pt. pl._ 9. 8; B 3390; Dronke,
_pt. pl._ B 3418; Dronken, _pp._ drunken, drunk, B 3. p 2. 61; A 135, 637,
B 2602, D 246; Dronke, _pp._ T. iii 674; A 1261, 3128, B 3758, H 17.

DRINKELESS, _adj._ without drink, T. ii. 718.

DRIVE; see DRYVE.

DROGGES, _pl._ drugs, A 426. See DRAGGES.

DROGH; see DRAWE.

DROGHTE, _s._ drought, A 2, 595, 3196, F 118; Droughte, thirst (_siti_), B
2. p 7. 27.

DRONK, -E, -EN; see DRINKE.

DRONKELEWE, _adj._ addicted to drink, B 2383, C 495, D 2043, E 1533, I 626.
Cf. _costlewe_.

DRONKENESSE, drunkenness, T. ii. 716; B 771, C 484.

DROOF, _pt. s. of_ Dryve.

DROPE, _s._ drop, R. 384; 6. 131; 16. 10; T. i. 941; A 131, G 522; Dropes,
_pl._ A 1496. A.S. _dropa_.

DROPPE, _v._ drop; Droppedest, _2 pt. s._ didst drop, B 1. p 4. 185;
Dropping, _pres. part._ that drop with wet, leaky, D 278; Droppinge, leaky,
I 631.

DROUGH, _pt. s. of_ Drawe.

DROUGHTE, _s._ thirst (_siti_), B 2. p 7. 27. See DROGHTE.

DROUPE, _v._ droop; Drouped, _pt. s._ A 107. See note.

DROVY, _adj._ dirty, muddy, I 816. (Droupy _occurs as a variant_.)

DROW, -E; see DRAWE.

DRUERYE, _s._ affection, R. 844. O. F. _druerie_; from _dru_, a friend,
lover.

DRUGGE, _ger._ to drudge, A 1416.

DRUNKEN, _adj._ causing drunkenness, 5. 181. See DRINKE.

DRYE, _adj._ dry, R. 1566; 3. 1028; A 420, B 4038; dried up, wizened, R.
360; _pl._ left dry, 5. 139 (said of the fish caught in weirs which are
left dry by ebb of tide). See DREYE.

DRYE, _ger._ to endure, T. v. 42; _v._ suffer, endure, 4. 251; 22. 32; T.
iv. 154; Dryen, _v._ T. ii. 866; Drye, _1 pr. s._ endure, suffer, 7. 333;
HF. 1879; T. v. 296; Dryeth, _pr. s._ endures, T. i. 1092 _n_, v. 1540;
Dryen, _pr. pl._ suffer, endure, T. i. 303; Drye, 5. 251.

DRYVE, _v._ drive, F 183; hasten, D 1694; whirl round, 10. 46; pass away,
T. v. 394; _dryve away_, pass away, 3. 49; C 628; Dryveth forth, _pr. s._
continues, endures, goes on with, T. i. 1092, v. 1540 _n_; Dryfth, _pr. s._
driveth, impels, T. v. 1332; Dryven (the day), _pr. pl._ pass (the day), L.
2620; Dr[`o][`o]f, _pt. s._ drove, brought, T. v. 475; incited, T. iii.
994; Drof, _pt. s._ drove, 7. 190; T. iv. 1572; Dr[)i]ve, _pp._ driven,
passed away, T. v. 389; driven, A 4110, B 3203; completed, F 1230; Dryf,
_imp. s._ drive, B 1. m 7. 12; T. iv. 1615.

DUBBED, _pp._ dubbed (as a knight), I 767.

DUCAT, _s._ ducat, HF. 1348.

DUCHESSE, _s._ duchess, L. 2122; A 923; the Book of the Duchesse, I 1086;
Duchesses, _pl._ L. 2127.

DU[:E], _adj._ due, A 3044; necessary, L. 603; Duewe, L. 364 _a_; Dewe,
due, I 867; just, B 1. m 5. 23.

DUELLY, _adv._ duly, B 1. m 5. 25 _n_. See DEWELY.

DUETEE, _s._ duty, A 3060, I 408; L. 360 _a_; Du[:e]tee, T. iii. 970; debt,
D 1391; sum due, D 1352.

DUK, _s._ duke, L. 1654; A 860, 893, D 1157; Dukes, _gen. pl._ of dukes, R.
1078.

DUL, _adj._ dull, sad, 16. 45; T. i. 735; ii. 548; v. 1118; F 279; Dulle,
without emotion, 5. 162; Dulle, _pl._ 3. 900; stupid, B 202. A.S. _dol_.

D['U]LCARN['O]N, _s._ an inexplicable dilemma, one's wit's end, T. iii.
931; Dulcarnon, 933 (see note).

DULLE, _ger._ to feel dull, T. ii. 1035; Dullen, _v._ grow tired of, T. iv.
1489; Dulleth, _pr. s._ grows dull, B 1. m 2. 2; makes dull, stupefies, 18.
76; G 1073, 1172; Dulled, _pp._ made of none effect, I 233.

DULNESSE, _s._ dulness, 3. 879.

DUN, _adj._ swarthy, R. 1213; Donne, _pl._ dusky, T. ii. 908; dun-coloured,
5. 334.

DUN, _s._ the dun horse (see note), H 5.

DUNGEOUN, _s._ dungeon-tower, keep-tower, chief castle, L. 937. See
DONGEOUN.

DURABLETEE, _s._ durability, B 3. p 11. 127.

DURACIOUN, _s._ time of lasting, term, A 2996; time to last, HF. 2114.

DURE, _v._ last, endure, 1. 96; 5. 616; 22. 54; A 2770, B 189, 1078, E 166,
825; remain, A 1236; live, T. iv. 765; Duren, _v._ last, HF. 353; continue,
F 836; Duren, _ger._ to endure, B 3. p 11. 93; Dure, _ger._ 4. 20; 16. 2;
Duringe, _pres. pt._ lasting, T. iii. 1754; During, _as adj._ lasting, 4.
228.

DURESSE, _s._ hardship, T. v. 399.

DURINGE, _s._ duration, B 4. p 4. 117.

DURRE, _ger._ to dare (to do), T. v. 840. See _Durren_ in Stratmann; _and
see_ DAR.

DURRING, _s._ daring, bravery; _d. don_, daring to do, courage to execute,
T. v. 837. See the note.

DURSTE; see DAR.

DUSKE, _v._; Dusked, _pt. pl._ grew dim, A 2806; _pp._ dimmed, B 1. p 1.
18.

DUST, _s._ B 5. m 5. 2.

DWALE, _s._ soporific drink, A 4161.

DWELLE, _v._ remain, 4. 74; A 1661; tarry, stay, 3. 712; Dwellen, _v._
continue, B 3. p 11. 143; Dwelle, _ger._ to delay, HF. 252; Dwelte, _pt.
s._ dwelt, remained, A 512; dwelt, B 134; Dwelled, _pt. s._ H 105; Dwelten,
_pt. pl._ dwelt, lived, L. 1965; B 550; Dwelled, _pp._ continued, B 2. p 4.
36; dwelt, A 1228; Dwel, _imp. s._ remain, T. iv. 1449; Dwellinge, _pres.
pt._ remaining, B 2. m 7. 21; dwelling, 7. 72.

DWELLING, _s._ 3. 404; habitation, 5. 51; Dwellinges, _pl._ delays (Lat.
_moras_), B 1. m 1. 20.

DWYNED, _pp. as adj._ dwindled, R. 360. A.S. _dw[=i]nan_.

DY, say; _Je vous dy_, I say to you, I tell you, D 1832, 1838.

DYAMAUNTS, _pl._ diamonds, A 2147.

DYE, _v._ die, 2. 7; B 644, 3324, E 38, I 213; Dyen, _v._ E 665, I 210;
_ger._ to die, B 114, C 217, E 859; Dyde, _pt. s._ died, HF. 106, 380; C
658; Dyed, _pt. s._ 2. 32; Dyde, _pt. pl._ 5. 294; _pt. s. subj._ would
die, D 965. See DEYE.

DYEN, _ger._ to dye, B 4648; Dye, _pr. pl._ F 725; Dyed, _pt. s._ steeped,
F 511; Dyed, _pp._ C 37.

DYERE, _s._ dyer, A 362.

DYETE, _s._ diet, B 4026. See DIETE.

DYINGE, _s._ death, B 3073. See DEYINGE.

DYKE, _v._ to make dikes or ditches, A 536. See DICHEN.

DYNE, _v._ dine, T. v. 1126, 1129; dine (upon), D 1837.

DYS, _pl._ dice, A 1238, 4384, 4386. See DEES.

DYTE, _s._ ditty, 23. 16; Dytees, _pl._ HF. 622. See DITEE.

DYVERSE, _v._; Dyverseth, _pr. s._ varies, T. iii. 1752. See DIVERS.

DYVERSITEE, _s._ diversity, T. iii. 405; Diversitee, variety, T. v. 1793.



EBBE, _s._ low water, A. ii. 46. 14; F 259.

EBBEN, _v._ ebb, T. iv. 1145; Ebbe, 10. 61.

ECCLESIASTE, _s._ minister, A 708.

ECH, _adj._ each, 1. 136; A 39, 369.

ECHE, _v._ increase, augment, T. i. 887, iii. 1509, v. 110; _ger._ enlarge,
add to, HF. 2065; Eche, _pr. pl._ augment, T. i. 705; Eched, _pp._ added, B
3. p 6. 10; T. iii. 1329.

ECHINES, _s. pl._ sea-urchins, B 3. m 8. 14 (Lat. _echinis_).

ECHOON, each one, 3. 695, 817; L. 290; A 2655, E 124; Echon, 3. 335; A 820,
B 1818; Echone, _pl._ (?), all, every one, C 113.

ECLIPSE, _s._ B 4. m 5. 14; Eclips, A. i. 21, 20.

ECLIPTIK, _s._ ecliptic, A. pr. 71. A great circle of the sphere, drawn
along the middle of the zodiac, making an angle with the equator of about
23deg 18'; the apparent path of the sun.

EDIFIED, _pp._ built up, B 4. p 6. 177.

EEK, _adv._ also, eke, moreover, 2. 102; A 5, 41, B 140, 444, 1877; Eke, B
59; Eek therto, _adv._ moreover, F 135.

EEM, _s._ uncle, T. i. 1022, ii. 162, 309, iii. 587; Emes, _gen._ T. ii.
466, 472. A.S. _[=e]am_.

EEST, _s._ east, F 873. See EST.

EEST, _adv._ east, eastward, 3. 88. See EST.

EET, -E; see ETE.

EFFECT, _s._ deed, reality, 10. 34; T. i. 748; result, HF. 5; Theffect
(_for_ the effect), the sequel, L. 622; _in effect_, in fact, in reality,
in practice, A 319, G 511; in the result, 5. 619; Effectes, _pl._ results,
L. 929; results to be brought about, 4. 165; causes, T. iii. 15. See
THEFFECT.

EFFECTUEEL, _adj._ effectual, D 1870.

EFT, _adv._ again, 4. 11; 7. 331; 17. 8; HF. 2037; T. i. 137; A 1669, 3271,
B 792, E 1227, F 631, 1553, G 1263; another time, 3. 41.

EFTERS, _error for_ Estres, R. 1448 _n_; L. 1715 _n_.

EFT-SONE, _adv._ soon after, B 3476, G 1288; immediately afterwards, I 89;
soon after this, H 65; hereafter, G 933; again, B 909; Eftsones, _adv._
very soon, L. 2322; A 3489; soon after, D 808; hereafter again, HF. 359;
once again, once more, B 3. m 2. 26, B 4. m 6. 33, 39; again, A ii. 35. 7;
immediately, A. ii. 23. 11.

EGAL, _adj._ equal, B 2. m 7. 12; T. iii. 137.

EGAL, _adv._ equally, T. iv. 660.

EGALITEE, _s._ equanimity, B 2. p 4. 83; equality, I 949.

EGALY, _adv._ equably, B 2. p 4. 92; impartially, B 5. p 3. 90.

EGGE, _s._ edge, sharp side, T. iv. 927; edge, A. ii. 46. 7; sword, 9. 19.

EGGE, _v._; Eggeth, _pr. s._ incites, R. 182; Eggen, _pr. pl._ incite, I
968.

EGGEMENT, _s._ instigation, incitement, B 842. A hybrid word.

EGGING, _s._ instigation, E 2135.

EGLE, _s._ eagle, 5. 330, HF. 499; T. ii. 926; iii. 1496; L. 2319; A 2178,
F 123; Egles, _gen._ eagle's, HF. 507; B 3365.

EGRE, _adj._ sharp, sour, R. 217; sharp, bitter, fierce, B 1. p 5. 53; B 2.
m 5. 17; B 4. p 7. 67; E 1199; bitter, B 2367; keen, I 117.

EGREMOIN, _s._ agrimony, G 800.

EGREN, _v._ incite (lit. make eager), B 4. p 6. 209.

EIGHTE, eight, HF. 1401; C 771, E 2132. A.S. _eahta_.

EIGHTE, eighth, A. i. 21. 55; F 1280.

EIGHTETENE, eighteen, A 3223.

EIGHTETETHE, _ord. adj._ eighteenth, B 5. A.S. _eahtat[=e]odha_.

EIR, _s._ air, A 1246, 3473. See EYR, AIR.

EISEL, _s._ vinegar, R. 217. O.F. _eisel_, _aisel_.

EKKO, _s._ echo, E 1189.

ELAAT, _adj._ elate, B 3357.

ELACION, _s._ elation, boastfulness, I 391.

ELBOWE, _s._ elbow, L. 179.

ELDE, _s._ old age, age, R. 349, 360; B 1. p 1. 18; T. ii. 393, 399; iv.
1369; A 2447, 3230, D 1215, E 2180; long lapse of time, 7. 12; Eld, 7. 78;
18. 76.

ELDE, _v._ grow old, R. 396; Elden, _v._ wax feeble, B 2. p 7. 5; to age,
R. 396; Eldeth, _pr. s._ ages, makes old, R. 391.

ELDER, _adj._ older, B 3. p 10. 37; B 5. p 6. 46; B 1720, 3450.

ELDER-FADER, _s._ grandfather, B 2. p 4. 33.

ELDRES, _pl._ ancestors, B 3. m 6. 7; B 3388, D 1118, 1131, E 65, 156.

ELECCIOUN, _s._ choice, election, 5. 409, 621; 19. 23; election (in
astrology), B 312 (see note); A. ii. 4. 44; Elecciouns, _pl._ A. ii. 4. 2.

ELEMENT, _s._ element, 3, 694; sphere (of each of the four elements), T. v.
1810; HF. 975; Elements, _pl._ T. iii. 1753; Elementes, _pl._ G 1460.

ELENGE, _adj._ miserable, B 1412, D 1199. See note to B 1412.

ELES, _gen._ eel's, 5. 346; _pl._ eels, HF. 2154.

ELEVACIOUN, _s._ the altitude of the north pole above the horizon, A. ii.
23. 16.

ELEVAT, _pp._ elevated, A. ii. 23. 18. See ELEVACIOUN.

ELEVEN, _num_. I 6.

ELF, _s._ elf, B 754, D 873; Elves, _pl._ A 3479, D 864.

ELF-QUEEN, _s._ queen of the elves, fairy-queen, B 1978, 1980, D 860.

ELIXIR, _s._ elixir, G 863. Arabic _el iks['i]r_, the philosopher's stone.

ELLEBOR, _s._ hellebore, _Helleborus niger_, B 4154.

ELLES, _adv._ else, otherwise, 3. 997; HF. 23, 996; L. 13, 2044; A. i. 19.
2; A 375, 1228, B 644, C 274, D 844, G 1131, 1377; _elles god forbede_, God
forbid it should be otherwise, G 1046.

ELLES-WHERE, _adv._ elsewhere, R. 1646; 7. 180; Elleswher, G 1130.

ELM, _s._ elm-tree, 5. 177; A 2922; Elmes, _pl._ R. 1383.

ELONGACIOUN, _s._ angular distance, A. ii. 25. 41.

ELOQUENCE, _s._ 3. 925; E 1203.

ELVES, _pl. of_ Elf.

ELVISH, _adj._ elvish, i.e. absent in demeanour, B 1893; mysterious (but
used in the sense of foolish), G 751, 842.

EMBASSADOUR, _s._ ambassador, C 603.

EMBASSADRYE, _s._ embassy, negociation, B 233.

EMBAUME, _v._ embalm, L. 676; Embawmed, _pp._ covered with balm, R. 1663.

EMBELIF, _adj._ oblique, A. i. 20. 2; (as applied to angles) acute, A. ii.
26. 24; _adv._ obliquely, A. ii. 26. 7. See the New E. Dict.

EMBELISSHEN, _v._ embellish; Embelisshed, _pp._ rendered more lovely, L.
1737; Embelised, beautified, B 2. p. 5. 47.

EMBOSED, _pp._ plunged into the thicket, 3. 353 (see note).

EMBRACE, _v._ embrace, 20. 7 (the final _e_ is suppressed); compass, H 160;
Embracest, _2 pr. s._ B 2. p 5. 50; Embraceth, _pr. s._ L. 2287; Embraseth,
B 4. p 6. 237; Embraceden, _pt. pl._ held fast, I 193. See ENBRACE.

EMBRACINGE, _s._ embrace, I 944.

EMBROUDED, _pp._ embroidered, adorned, A 89. See ENBROUDEN. Cf.
'_embrod['e]_, couvert de broderies;' Godefroy.

EMBROUDINGE, _s._ embroidery, I 417.

EMBUSSHEMENTS, _pl._ ambuscades, B 2509.

EMERAUDE, _s._ emerald, 5. 175; B 1799; Emeraudes, _pl._ R. 1118.

EMERLION, _s._ merlin, 5. 611 _n_.

EMES, _gen._ uncle's, T. ii. 466, 472. See EEM.

EMFORTH, _prep._ as far as extends, to the extent of, L. 2132; T. ii. 243,
997, iii. 999; A 2235. _Em-_ is from A.S. _emn_, for _efen_, even.

EMISPERIES, _s. pl._ hemispheres, A. i. 18. 6.

EMPEIRE, _v._ impair; Empeyre, _1 pr. s. subj._ impair, harm, E 2198;
Empeireden, _pt. pl._ made worse, B 2209. See ENPEIREN.

EMPERESSE, _s._ empress, R. 1266; 5. 319; B 4. p 1. 19; F 1048; B 4. p 1.
19; Emperice, 4. 285; 9. 55; L. 185; Emperyce, D 1246.

EMPERIE, _s._ rule, B 2. p 6. 8 _n_.

EMPEROURES, _s. pl._ emperors, B 3558. See THEMPEROUR.

EMPLASTRE, _2 pr. pl._ plaster over, bedaub, E 2207.

EMPOISONE, _v._ poison; Empoysone, I 514; Empoisoned, B 2519, 3850;
Empoysoned, D 751.

EMPOISONER, _s._ poisoner; Empoysoner, C 894.

EMPOISONING, _s._ poisoning, C 891; Empoysoning, A 2460; Enpoysoninge, B 1.
p 3. 38.

EMPRENTEN, _v._ imprint; Emprinteth, _imp. pl._ impress, E 1193;
Empreinted, _pp._ imprinted, B 5. m 4. 6; Emprented, _pp._ imprinted, F
831; taken an impression of, E 2117; Enprented, imprinted, E 2178.

EMPRENTING, _s._ imprinting, impression, F 834.

EMPRYSE, _s._ enterprise, undertaking, 3. 1093; L. 617, 1452; T. iii. 416;
A 2540, B 348, 3857, F 732, G 605, I 403; Emprise, B 2256.

EMPTE, _v._ empty, make empty, G 741; Empten, G 1404; Empted, _pp. as adj._
exhausted, B 1. p 1. 6; worn out, shrunken (Lat. _effeto_), B 1. m 1. 12.

EMPTY, _adj._ L. 888.

ENAMOURED, _pp._ enamoured, L. 1143, 1610.

ENBASSHINGE, _s._ bewilderment, amazement, B 4. p 1. 28.

ENBATAILLED, _adj._ embattled, R. 139.

ENBIBING, _s._ imbibition, absorption, G 814.

ENBRACE, _v._ embrace, hold firmly, 21. 11; Enbraceth, _pr. s._ 4. 90;
Enbraced, _pp._ surrounded, T. v. 1816. See EMBRACE.

ENBROUDEN, _v._ embroider, L. 2351; Enbrouded, _v._ L. 119, 227, 1199;
Enbrowded, _pp._ embroidered, HF. 1327. See EMBROUDED.

ENCENS, _s._ incense, T. v. 1466; A 2429.

ENCENSE, _v._ to offer incense, G 395, 413; Encensed, _pp._ censed, I 407.

ENCHANTOURS, _pl._ wizards, I 603.

ENCHARGED, _pp._ laid upon, imposed, B 5. p 6. 219.

ENCHAUFEN, _ger._ to grow hot (_or_ to burn), B 3. p 4. 47 _n_; Enchaufeth,
_pr. s._ burns, B 5. m 3. 12. See _Enchafe_ in the New E. Dict.

ENCHAUNTEMENT, _s._ enchantment, witchcraft, 3. 648; Enchantement, L. 1650;
Enchauntements, _pl._ B 4. m 3. 5.

ENCHAUNTEN, _v._ enchant, T. iv. 1395; Enchanted, _pp._ D 575.

ENCHAUNTERESSE, _s._ enchantress, B 4. m 3. 24.

ENCHESOUN, _s._ occasion, reason, T. i. 348; B 2783; cause, T. i. 681, v.
632 _n_; I 374; Encheson, F 456, I 458. O.F. _encheson_; see _Encheason_ in
the New E. Dict.

ENCLOSEN, _v._ enclose, R. 607; Enclos, _pp._ enclosed, R. 138, 1652;
Enclosed, _pp._ R. 480; B 4037.

ENCLYNE, _v._ induce to do, 5. 325; Enclyned, _pp._ inclined, 3. 991; 5.
414; Enclyninge, _pres. pt._ directing, B 3. m 11. 4.

ENCLYNING, _s._ inclination, HF. 734.

ENCOMBEROUS, _adj._ cumbersome, oppressive, burdensome, 18. 42; Encumbrous,
HF. 862.

ENCOMBRAUNCE, _s._ encumbrance, E 1960.

ENCOMBRE, _v._ encumber, L. 2006; Encombred, _pp._ endangered, stuck fast,
helpless, A 508; hampered, R. 889; hindered, I 687; embarrassed, weary, R.
1389; A 718.

ENCORPORING, _s._ incorporation, G 815.

ENCREES, _s._ increase, B 1. p 4. 202; A 2184, B 237, G 18; assistance, L.
1087.

ENCRESE, _v._ increase, 2. 103; Encrece, _v._ C 59; Encresse, B 1068;
Encresen, B 1654; Encressen, B 2776; Encreesseth, _pr. s._ increases, A
2744; Encresseth, A. i. 21. 46; E 50; Encreseth, 2. 29; T. ii. 1334;
Encresen, _pr. pl._ A 1338; Encressen, T. iv. 579; Encresed, _pt. s._ 5.
143; Encressed, _pp._ E 408; enriched, B 1271.

ENDAMAGEN, _v._ harm, B 1. p 4. 60; Endamaged, _pp._ imperilled,
compromised, B 1. p 1. 46.

ENDE, _s._ end, A 15, 197; purpose, B 481; point, R. 973; boundary, B 2. m
8. 7; Endes, _pl._ results, B 5. p 4. 29, 74.

ENDED, _pp._ finite, B 2. p 7. 69.

ENDELEES, _adj._ endless, I 153; infinite, H 322; Endeles, endless, T. ii.
1083; B 951; infinite, B 2. p 7. 73.

ENDELONG, _adv._ all along, HF. 1458; A 2678; lengthways, A 1991; Endlang,
A. ii. 40. 24, 47.

ENDELONG, _prep._ all along, L. 144 _a_; F 992; along, L. 1498; down along,
F 416.

ENDENTINGE, _s._ indentation, I 417. _Endented_ or _Indented_ is an
heraldic term, signifying notched with regular and equal indentations.

ENDERE, _s._ ender, cause of the end, A 2776; ender, T. iv. 501; i.e. who
dost end, C 218.

ENDETTED, _pp._ indebted, G 734.

ENDING-DAY, _s._ death-day, 18. 55.

ENDIRKEN, _v._ bedim, B 4. p 3. 36 _n_.

ENDITEMENTS, _s. pl._ indictments, I 800.

ENDLANG, _adv._ along, lengthways, A. ii. 40. 24, 47. See ENDELONG.

ENDOUTED, _pp._ feared (with _me_), R. 1664.

ENDURE, _v._ endure, last, 2. 81; B 3528; undergo, R. 1476; A 2396;
Enduren, _pr. pl._ endure, B 4171.

ENDYTE, _v._ write, dictate, A 95, 325; endite, compose, write, L. 414,
2356; F 1550; relate, A 1350, G 80; tell, L. 1678; indict, B 3858; Endyte,
_ger._ to compose, relate, 5. 119; HF. 381; Endyten, _v._ write, L. 371; B
781; Endyteth, _pr. s._ dictates (_dictat_), B 2. m 8. 16; endites,
composes, E 41, 1148; Endyte, _2 pr. pl._ dictate, T. ii. 1162; Endyten,
_pr. pl._ dictate, B 1. m 1. 3; Endyted, _pp._ related, B 3170.

ENDYTING, _s._ composing, 18. 77; style of composition, A. pr. 32;
Endytinges, _pl._ compositions, I 1085.

ENEMIT[`E], _s._ enmity, A. ii. 4. 24; Enmit[`e], 4. 236.

ENEMY, _s._ R. 1165; I. 47.

ENFAMYNED, _pp._ starved, L. 2429.

ENFECTE, _v._; Enfecteth, _pr. s._ infects, L. 2242.

ENFORCEN, _ger._ to enforce, B 2233; Enforcen, _v. refl._ endeavour, B 3. p
1. 33; strengthen (your position), D 340; Enforce, _1 pr. s. refl._ insist,
T. iv. 1016; Enforcest, _2 pr. s._ endeavourest, B 2. p 1. 80; Enforceth,
_pr. s._ fortifies, strengthens, I 730; strives, endeavours, B 2. p 1. 13,
B 4. p 7. 63; Enforcen, _pr. pl._ gain strength, B 2355; Enforcede him,
_pt. s. refl._ endeavoured, B 3. p 5. 39; Enforceden, _pt. pl. refl._
endeavoured, B 1. p 3. 24; Enforced, _pp._ compelled, constrained, B 4. p
4. 179; Enforce, _imp. s._ endeavour, B 2237.

ENFORMEN, _v._ inform, B 3. p 1. 34; Enformedest, _2 pt. s._ didst conform,
B 1. p 4. 15; Enformed, _pp._ E 738, F 335; instructed, I 658; Enfourmed,
_pp._ instructed, B 1. p 3. 43 (Lat. _instituti_).

ENFORT['U]NED, _pt. s._ endowed with powers, 4. 259.

ENGENDRE, _v._ procreate, B 3148; produce, B 2582; Engendren, _v._ beget, E
1272; Engendren, _pr. pl._ are produced, B 4113; Engendred, _pp._ produced,
5. 248; B 4. p 6. 28; A 4, 421, B 2581; begotten, E 158.

ENGENDRINGE, _s._ product, B 2580; Engendring, generation, L. 414a.

ENGENDRURE, _s._ procreation, B 3137; begetting, 5. 306; generation, D 128,
134; progeny, offspring, I 621; fraternity, I 375; Engendrures, _pl._
offspring, I 562.

ENGIN; see ENGYN.

ENGLISH, _s._ English, power of eloquent expression in English, L. 66.

ENGREGGEN, _pr. pl._ burden, I 979. O.F. _engregier_; Lat. _ingrauare_.

ENGYN, _s._. contrivance, T. iii. 274; device, R. 511; machine, F 184;
skill, HF. 528; G 339; ingenuity, T. ii. 565; Engin, skill, A. pr. 53;
genius, I 453.

ENGYNED, _pp._ tortured, racked, B 4250.

ENHABIT, _pp._ devoted, T. iv. 443; Enhabited, _pp._ inhabited, B 2. p 7.
22.

ENHAUNCEN, _v._ raise, A 1434; _ger._ to exalt, I 614; Enhaunsen, _v._
exalt, B 4. p 3. 67; Enhansest, _2 pr. s._ exaltest, B 3. m 9. 23;
Enhaunseth, _pr. s._ lifts, B 2. m 1. 6; Enhaunceth, elevates, I 730;
Enhaunced, _pt. s._ raised, B 2291; Enhaunced, _pp._ exalted, L. 386; B
3773, E 1374; Enhaunsed, promoted, L. 1411.

ENHAUSED, _pp._ exalted, elevated, lifted above (the horizon), A. ii. 26.
23. O. F. _enhaucer_, _enhaucier_, to elevate, from _haut_, high.

ENHAUSING, _s._ elevation, A. ii. 39. 17. See above.

ENHORTE, _ger._ to exhort, A 2851; _v._ L. 1440.

ENIOINE (Enjoine), _v._ enjoin; Enioyne, B 3041; Enioinen, _pr. pl._ I 105;
Enioyned, _pp._ I 109.

ENLACE, _v._; Enlaceth, _pr. s._ entangles, B 1. m 4. 15; Enlaced, _pp._
involved, made intricate, B 3. p 8. 4; involved, B 5. p 1. 5.

ENLUMINE, _v._ illumine, I 244; Enlumined, _pt. s._ E 33; _pp._ R. 1695; T.
v. 548; illuminated, 1. 73.

ENLUTING, _s._ securing with 'lute,' daubing with clay, &c., so as to
exclude air, G 766. Fr. _luter_, to secure with 'lute,' from Lat. _lutum_,
clay.

ENMIT[`E], _s._ enmity, 4. 236; Enemit[`e], A. ii. 4. 24.

ENOINTE, _v._ anoint; Enoynte, _pt. s._ I 502; Enoynt, _pp._ A 2961;
Enointed, _pp._ B 2. p 3. 7.

ENPEIREN, _v._ impair, injure, B 4. p 3. 35; Enpeyren, B 4. p 6. 170. See
EMPEIRE.

ENPOYSONINGE, _s._ poisoning, B 1. p 3. 38. See EMPOISONING.

ENPRENTED, _pp._ imprinted, E 2178. See EMPRENTEN.

ENPRESSE, _v._ make an impression on, 21. 8.

ENQUERE, _v._ enquire, T. i. 123; A 3166, E 769, I 81; search into, B 629;
Enqueren, _ger._ to enquire, T. iv. 1010; Enquered, _pp._ L. 1152;
Enquering, _pr. pt._ asking, D 1409.

ENQUERINGE, _s._ inquiry, B 888.

ENSAMPLE, _s._ example, 7. 197; T. v. 1590; A 496, 505, B 78, 3281, D 90;
L. 474; pattern, 3. 911; 4. 296; warning, R. 1539; instance, R. 1584;
Ensampul, A. ii. 45. 6; _in e._, to signify, A. i. 21. 26; Ensaumples,
_pl._ examples, T. i. 760; F 1419; Ensamples, L. 1850; C 435; cases, A
2842.

ENSAUMPLER, _s._ prototype, B 3. m 9. 11.

ENSEIGNE, _s._ ensign, standard, R. 1200.

ENSELED, _pp._ sealed up, T. v. 151; fully granted, T. iv. 559.

ENSPYRE, _v._ inspire, T. iv. 187; _imp. s._ T. iii. 712. See INSPIRED.

ENSURE, _ger._ to promise, engage, C 143; Ensuren, _v._ certify, HF. 2108.

ENTAILE, _s._ cutting, intaglio-work, R. 1081; Entayle, figure, shape,
description, R. 162.

ENTAILE, _v._ carve, R. 609; Entailled, _pp._ carved, R. 140. O. F.
_entailler_.

ENTALENTEN, _pr. pl._ stimulate, B 5. P 5. 4.

ENTAME, _v._ re-open (lit. cut into), 1. 79. O. F. _entamer_.

ENTECCHE, _v._; Enteccheth, _pr. s._ infects, B 4. p 3. 53; Entecched,
_pp._ stained, infected, B 4. p 3. 47, 48; Enteched, _pp._ endued with
(good) qualities, T. v. 832. O. F. _entechier_, _entachier_, from _teche_,
s., for which see Rom. Rose, 998 (French version); in vol. i. p. 135.

ENTENCIOUN, _s._ intent, HF. 93; C 408; attention, T. i. 52; purpose, E
703; design, T. i. 211, v. 767.

ENTENDE, _v._ attend, T. iii. 414, iv. 893; give attention to, D 1478;
dispose oneself, F 689; _ger._ to apply oneself, B 3498; to aim (after),
incline (to), T. ii. 853; Entende, _1 pr. s._ perceive, T. iv. 1649;
attend, R. 597; Entendeth, _pr. s._ attends, E 1900; wishes, T. iii. 27;
intends, D 1114; hopes (for), D 275; gives attention, F 1097; Entenden,
_pr. pl._ purpose, R. 82; Entended, _pt. s._ designed, T. v. 469;
Entendinge. _pres. part._ looking intently, B 1. p 2. 2.

ENTENDEMENT, _s._ perception, T. iv. 1696; HF. 983.

ENTENTE, _s._ intention, intent, 1. 11; L. 308, 471; A 958, 1000, B 40,
867, C 88, D 192, 1389, E 735, 874, G 998; design, T. i. 61; B 3835, C 432,
D 1389, F 521; wish, 18. 68; E 189; meaning, F 400, 959; L. 1149;
attention, D 1374; endeavour, G 6, H 164; feeling, 5. 532, 580; occupation,
B 4. p 4. 193; will, B 824; mind, B 1740; plan, B 147, 206; Entent,
intention, L. 85 _a_; _in good e._, with good will, B 1902; _do thyn e._,
give heed, 3. 752; _as to comun e._, in plain language, F 107; Ententes,
_pl._ endeavours, HF. 1267; purposes, designs, B 1. p 1. 46; intended
spells, HF. 1267. O.F. _entente_.

ENTENTE, _v._; Ententeden, _pl. pt._ gave their attention, L. 1155.

ENTENTIF, ENTENTYF, _adj._ attentive, B 2. p 1. 4; HF. 1120; B 2205; eager,
R. 685, 1156, B 1. p 3. 53; diligent, R. 436; devoted, R. 339; careful, E
1288.

ENTENTIFLY, _adv._ attentively, B 3. p 12. 62; HF. 616; Ententiflich, T. i.
332.

ENTERE; see ENTRE.

ENTERMEDLED, _pp._ intermixed, R. 906. See ENTREMEDLED.

ENTIERLY, _adv._ wholly, I 675.

ENTITLED, _pp._ named, 5. 30.

ENTRAILLE, _s._ entrails, B 1763; inside, E 1188; Entrailes, _pl._
entrails, B 3. p 8. 31; inner parts, B 5. m 2. 4.

ENTRE, _ger._ to enter, 5. 147, 153; _v._ 4. 53; Entren, _v._ R. 504;
Entred, _pp._ A 2583, E 10; Entringe, _pres. pt._ I 12; Entreth, _imp. pl._
enter, HF. 1109; Entere, _imp. s._ enter, A. ii. 44. 7. To 'enter with' is
to keep in mind and search for, as a help to finding something else.
'_Argument_, in astronomical tables, is the angle on which the tabulated
quantity depends, and with which, therefore, in technical language, the
table must be _entered_.'--Eng. Cycl. Arts and Sciences, s.v. _Argument_.
In A. ii. 44. 3, _entere hit_ = set down in writing.

ENTRECHAUNGE, _v._ interchange; Entrechaungen, _pr. pl._ confuse, B 3. p 2.
34; Entrechaungeden, _pt. pl._ interchanged, exchanged, T. iii. 1369;
Entrechaunged, _pp._ interchanged, T. iv. 1043; Entrechaunginge, _pres.
pt._ interchanging, mingling, B 5. m 1. 8.

ENTRECHAUNGEABLE, _adj._ interchangeable, B. 4. p 6. 103; alternate, B 4. m
6. 13.

ENTRECHAUNGINGE, _s._ interchange, B 4. m 4. 10; Entrechaunginges, _pl._
mutations, B 1. m 5. 25; vicissitudes (Lat. _uices_), B 2. m 3. 15.

ENTRECOMUNEN, _v._ intercommunicate, T. iv. 1354.

ENTRECOMUNINGE, _s._ interchange, communication, B 2. p 7. 38.

ENTREDITED, _pp._ interdicted, I 965.

ENTREE, entry, entrance, R. 517, 530, 538; B 2. p 1. 22 (see note, ii.
427); T. ii. 77; A 4243, B 2229; way of access, B 1. p 6. 55; Entrees,
_pl._ entrances, HF. 1945; entries, A. ii. 44. 27.

ENTRELACED, _pp._ intertangled, intricate, B 3. p 12. 118.

ENTREMEDLED, _pp._ intermingled, HF. 2124; mingled, B 2. p 6. 70;
Entermedled, R. 906.

ENTREMES, _s._ intervening course, 5. 665. '_Entremets_, certaine choice
dishes served in between the courses of a feast;' Cotgrave. And see _Mess_
in my Etym. Dict.

ENTREMETTE, _v. refl._ interfere, D 834; Entremeten (him) meddle with, 5.
515; Entremetteth, _pr. s._ interferes, B 2731; Entremeteth, _pr. s._
meddles, B 3. p 12. 95; Entremete, _imp. s._ take part (in), meddle (with),
T. i. 1026.

ENTREPARTEN, _ger._ to share, T. i. 592.

ENTRETE, _v._; Entreteden, _pt. pl._ treated of, discussed, B 2466.

ENTRYKETH, _pr. s._ holds fast in its subtle grasp, ensnares, 5. 403;
Entryked, _pp._ entrapped, R. 1642; '_Intriquer_, to intricate, perplex,
pester, insnare, involve;' Cotgrave.

ENTUNE, _v._ intone, tune, T. iv. 4; Entuned, _pp._ intoned, A 123.

ENTUNES, _s. pl._ tunes, 3. 309. See above.

ENTYCE, _v._ entice; Entyced, _pt. s._ I 584.

ENTYSINGE, _s._ allurement, I 353.

ENVENIMINGE, _s._ poisonous effect, E 2060; poison, I 854.

ENVEN['Y]ME, _v._ infect, 3. 641; D 474; Envenimeth, _pr. s._ poisons, B 4.
p 3. 53; Envenimed, _pp._ R. 979; B 3314.

ENVIRONINGE, _s._ circumference, surface, B 5. m 4. 106; Envyrouninge,
circumference, B 4. p 6. 85.

ENVIROUN, _adv._ roundabout, L. 300.

ENVIROUNE, _v._ encompass, B 3. m 9. 29; Envirouneth, _pr. s._ encompasses,
B 3. m 9. 21; Environeth, includes, B 5. p 4. 145; Envirounde, _1 pt. s._
surrounded, B 2. p 2. 15; Envirouned, _pp._ surrounded, B 4. m 2. 3;
Envyroning, _pres. part._ skirting, going round, R. 526.

ENV['O]LUPED, _pp._ wrapped up, enveloped, involved, C 942.

ENV['Y]E, _s._ envy, R. 297; B 3584, 3888, C 114; longing, R. 1653; _to
e._, in rivalry, 3. 173 (see note).

ENVYE, _v._ vie, strive, 3. 406; Envyen, vie (with), HF. 1231.

ENVYNED, _pp._ stored with wine, A 342.

ENV['Y]OUS, _adj._ envious, 4. 206; T. ii. 857, iii. 1454; _as s._, envious
person, T. ii. 666.

ENVYR-; see ENVIR-.

EPISICLE, _s._ epicycle, A. ii. 35. 18. A small circle, the centre of which
moves along the circumference of a larger one.

EPISTEL, _s._ letter, T. iii. 501; Epistels, _pl._ Epistles, L. 305 _a_;
Epistelles, _pl._ B 55.

EQUACION, _s._ equal partition, A. ii. 37. 9; Equacions, _pl._ equations, F
1279; Equaciouns, A. ii. 36 (rubric); calculations, A. i. 23. 3. By
'equations of houses' is meant the division of the sphere into twelve equal
portions (or 'houses'), for astrological purposes.

EQUALES, _adj. pl._ of equal length; _houres equales_, hours each
containing sixty minutes, A. ii. 8. 2; Equals, equal, A. i. 16. 10.

EQUINOXIAL, _s._ equinoxial circle, A. i. 17. 12; B 4046.

EQUINOXIES, _s. pl._ equinoxes, A. i. 17. 19.

EQUITEE, _s._ equity, justice, L. 398; C 181, E 439.

ER, _adv._ before, formerly, A 3789.

ER, _conj._ before, A 1040, 1155, B 119, 1667, 2015, D 1317, F 733, G 1273;
4. 14; L. 552; _er that_, before, 1. 16; 2. 35; A 36, B 2232, D 1856, E
178, G 375.

ER, _prep._ before, C 892; _er tho_, before then, L. 1062; _er now_, ere
now, F 460.

ERAND, _s._ errand, T. ii. 72; Erande, 3, 134.

ERBE, _s._ herb, L. 109 a.

ERBE YVE, _s._ herb ive, ground ivy, _Ajuga Chamaepitys_, B 4156.

ERBER, _s._ arbour, L. 97 a. See HERBER.

ERCHEBISSHOP, archbishop, D 1502.

ERCHEDEKEN, _s._ archdeacon, D 1300; Erchedeknes, _gen._ A 658, D 1318,
1588.

ERE ([`e][`e]r[*e]), _s._ ear, B 1. m 1. 15; D 636, E 727, F 196, 316;
Eres, _pl._ 5. 500; HF. 1389; A 556, 1522, B 2608, 3726, D 954, 976, E 629;
T. iii. 1388; L. 354; _at ere_, in (her) ear, T. i. 106.

ERE ([`e][`e]r[*e]), _s._ ear (of corn), L. 76; Eres, _pl._ B 3. m 1. 3.

ERE ([`e]r[*e]), _ger._ to plough, A 886; _do ere_, caused to be ploughed,
B 3. m 3. 4; Ered, _pp._ HF. 485. A.S. _erian_.

ERITAGE, _s._ heritage, B 1. p 3. 21 _n_.

ERL, _s._ earl, B 3597, 3646, D 1157, E 939; Erles, _pl._ R. 1204; B 3839.

ERLY, _adv._ early, L. 49; A 33, 809, F 379.

ERME, _v._ feel sad, grieve, 3. 80; C 312 (see note). A.S. _earmian_,
_yrman_.

ERNEST, _s._ earnest, seriousness, L. 1287; T. ii. 452, iii. 254, iv. 1465;
A 3186, 733; _in e._, in earnest, A 1125, D 1627, E 609.

ERNESTFUL, _adj._ serious, T. ii. 1727; E 1175.

ERRATIK, _adj._ wandering, T. v. 1812.

ERRAUNT, _adj._ arrant, H 224; errant, stray (because near the middle of
the chess-board), 3. 661.

ERRE, _ger._ to do wrong, T. iv. 549; Erren, to make a mistake, B 2215;
Errest, _2 pr. s._ wanderest, T. iv. 302; Erre, _pr. pl._ err, T. iii.
1774; Erren, transgress, T. i. 1003.

ERROUR, _s._ error, 1. 5, 67; T. i. 1008, iv. 200; A. ii. 5. 8;
waywardness, 10. 4; doubt, 5. 146, 156; perplexity, 16. 7.

ERS, _s._ buttocks, A 3734, 3755, D 1690, 1694. A.S. _ears_.

ERST, _adv._ first, at first, 1. 87; HF. 2075; A 776; before, 16. 21; HF.
1496; L. 271; D 2220, E 336, F 981, 1602; aforetime, R. 692; _at e._,
first, for the first time, 4. 240; B 4. p 3. 24; T. iv. 1321; B 1884, G
151, 264; at last, T. i. 842; _e. than_, before, A 1566; _long e. er_, long
first before, C 662.

ERTHE, _s._ earth, 1. 50; 5. 57; E 203; Erthes, _s. pl._ lands, countries,
B 1. m 5. 37.

ERTHELY, _adj._ earthly, R. 387, 648; L. 985; mortal, 3. 19; Erthly,
mortal, A 1166; Ertheliche, earthly, B 2. p 6. 20.

ESCAPE, _v._ 16. 10; Escaped, _pp._ freed, B 1. p 2. 5; escaped, 11. 27.

ESCHAUFEN, _ger._ to burn, B 3. p 4. 47; Eschaufeth, _pr. s._ grows hot, B
1. m 6. 1, B 4. m 1. 6; warms, B 1. m 5. 20; chafes, I 657; Eschaufede,
_pt. s._ burned, was hot, chafed, B 1. p 5. 43; Eschaufed, _pp._ kindled, B
4. p 6. 230; heated, I 546.

ESCHAUFINGE, _s._ heating, I 537; Eschaufinges, _pl._ enkindlings, I 916.

ESCHAUNGE, _s._ exchange, A 278; Eschaunges, _pl._ interchangings, HF. 697.

ESCHEW, _adj._ averse, I 971; Eschu (see note), E 1812.

ESCHEWE, _v._ escape, B 3. p 5. 21; Eschue, _v._ eschew, avoid, T. ii. 696;
A 3043, E 1451; shun, G 4; Eschuen, _v._ escape, be rid of, B 3. p 5. 46;
Eschueth, _pr. s._ eschews, B 3. p 11. 64; flees from, B 3. m 10. 17;
Escheweth, B 2510; Eschuwe, _2 pr. pl._ eschew, avoid, T. i. 344; Eschuen,
_pr. pl._ B 4. p 7. 32; Eschewe, _pr. s. subj._ avoid, I 632; Eschued,
_pp._ avoided, B 5. p 3. 71; Eschewed, T. iv. 1078; B 4528; Eschuwe, _imp.
s._ T. ii. 1018; Eschewe, T. i. 634.

ESCHUINGE, _s._ avoidance, B 3. p 11. 136.

ESE ([`e][`e]z[*e]), _s._ ease, E 217, 434, F 788, 1185; amusement,
delight, 4. 63; A 768, G 746; _do yow e._, give you pleasure, 6. 78; _wel
at e._, fully at ease, T. ii. 750.

ESE, _v._ ease, 3. 556; relieve, L. 1704; give ease (to), R. 316; Esen,
_ger._ to ease, to make at home, entertain, A 2194; Esed, _pp._ set at
ease, D 929; entertained, A 29.

ESEMENT, _s._ easement, benefit, A 4179, 4186.

ESIER, _adj._ easier, B 1. p 5. 54.

ESILY, _adv._ easily, A 469, F 115; softly, slowly, F 388; quietly, T. ii.
988; Esiliche, T. i. 317.

ESPACE, _s._ space of time, B 2219.

ESPECES, _s. pl._ kinds, varieties (of sin), I 448.

ESPECIAL; _in e._, in particular, 13. 25.

ESPIAILLE, _s._ sets of spies, B 2509 (see note), D 1323.

ESPIRITUEL, _adj._ spiritual, R. 650, 672; I 781; Espirituels, _pl._ I 79,
312, 784.

ESPYE, _s._ spy, T. ii. 1112; B 2216.

ESPYE, _ger._ to observe, R. 795; _v._ espy, see, perceive, HF. 706, 944;
7. 64; A 1112, G 291; enquire about, B 180; Espyen, _v._ B 3258; look
about, L. 858; _pr. s. subj._ see, 4. 105; _pr. pl. subj._ 4. 6; Espyed,
_pt. s._ B 3718; Espyde, _pt. pl. subj._ should espy, L. 771, 1422; Espyed,
_pp._ B 324.

ESSOYNE, _s._ excuse, I 164. Mod. E. _essoin_.

EST, _s._ east, B 297, 493, 3657; Eest, F 873.

EST, _adj._ east, T. v. 1109 (_read_ th' est); A. i. 5. 4; _adv._ in the
east, eastwards, B 949, C 396, F 459.

ESTABLE, _adj._ stable, B 2. m 3. 18 _n_.

ESTABLE, _v._ establish; Estableth, _pr. s._ settles, causes, B 4. p 4. 34.

ESTABLISSE, _v._; Establissed, _pp._ established, B 1. p 4. 65.

ESTAT, _s._ estate, state, condition, L. 125, 1981; 10. 79; R. 61; T. i.
432; A 203, 522; rank, 5. 550; 18. 58; T. v. 1025; position, E 1969;
Estaat, state, condition, rank, B 973, 3592, 3647, 3965, C 597, G 1388, I
1017; state, E 160, 767; way, E 610; term of office, D 2018; State, 2. 41;
Estate, state, condition, 7. 178 (_read_ estat, _and_ mat _in_ 176);
Estats, _pl._ ranks, HF. 1970.

ESTATLICH, _adj._ stately, dignified, A 140; Estatly, A 281; Estaatly,
suitable to one's estate, B 3902; Estatliche, stately, T. v. 823.

ESTATUTS, _s._ ordinances, B 2. p 1. 30.

ESTRAUNGE, _adj._ strange, T. i. 1084.

ESTRE-DAY, Easter-day, I 552.

ESTRES, _pl._ inward parts, recesses (of a building), L. 1715 (see note); A
1971; recesses, R. 1448, 1591; interior, A 4295.

EST-WARD, _adv._ to the east, A 1893, 1903; in the east, L. 718, 1426;
eastwards, E 50.

ESY, _adj._ easy, 3. 1008; L. 1116; A 223; moderate, A 441; pleasant,
gentle, 5. 382.

ETE, _v._ eat, 7. 134; A 947, B 4603, F 617; Eteth, _pr. s._ eats, T. ii.
373; Et, _pr. s._ eats, L. 1389; Eet, _pt. s._ ate, T. v. 1439; A 2048,
3421, B 3362, 3407, C 510; Eten, _pr. pl._ eat, 5. 325; Eete, _pt. pl._
ate, 9. 11; Ete, _pt. pl._ 3. 432; Eten, _pt. pl._ 9. 7; Eten, _pp._ eaten,
A 4351, E 1096, 1438; Eet, _imp. s._ eat, B 3640; Ete, _imp. s._ eat, B
2606 (_better form_ eet).

ETERNALLY, _adv._ 1. 96; L. 2230.

ETERNE, _adj._ eternal, 1. 56; 16. 8; B 5. p 6. 7; T. iii. 11; A 1109,
1990, D 5, F 865; Eterne, _s._ eternity, B 5. p 2. 32; T. iv. 978.

ETERNITEE, _s._ eternity, B 5. p 6. 8.

ETHE, _adj._ easy, T. v. 850.

ETIK, the Ethics of Aristotle, L. 166.

EVANGELIST, _s._ writer of a gospel, B 1772, 2133.

EVANGYLE, _s._ gospel, R. 445; Evaungelie, B 2269; Evangyles, _pl._ B 666.

EVE, _s._ evening, 3. 1105; A. ii. 12. 23; T. v. 1142; F 364, G 375. See
EVEN.

EVEL, _adv._ ill, 3. 501, 1204.

EVEN, _s._ evening, B 2. m 5. 4; Evenes, _pl._ HF. 4. See EVE.

EVEN, _adj._ even, equal, same, HF. 10; exact, R. 1350; Evene, _dat._ even,
moderate, usual, A 83; even, tranquil, E 811.

EVEN, _adv._ exactly, 3. 441, 451; evenly, D 2249; regularly, R. 526;
Evene, _adj._ evenly, calmly, A 1523; Evene, exactly, A. ii. 23. 6; Evene
ioynant, closely adjoining, A 1060; _ful even_, actually, 3. 1329.

EVENE-CRISTENE, _s._ fellow-Christian, I 395, 805.

EVENELICHE, _adv._ equally, alike, B 4. p 2. 87.

EVEN-LYK, _adj._ similar, B 5. p 2. 15; equable, B 4. m 6. 15; Evenelyke,
similar, B 3. m 9. 23.

EVEN-SONG, _s._ even-song, A 830; (pron. _e'ensong_), E 1966.

EVEN-TYDE, _s._ evening, L. 770; B 4262.

EVER, _adv._ ever, always, A 50, &c.; Evere, every time, I 148; Ever in
oon, always alike, continually, 2. 9; T. v. 451; incessantly, A 1771.

EVERICH, each, R. 1106; L. 719, 2381; A 1186, 1648, B 2203, F 762, 1608;
every, A 241; each one, 5. 401; A 371; every one, E 1017; Everech, every
one, A pr. 41; _e. of hem_, either of the two, B 1004; Everich other, each
other, 7. 53, 56.

EVERICHOON, every one, i.e. (of) the set, R. 449; every one, A 31, 747, G
960, I 15; Everichon, B 330, G 1365; each one, L. 2567; Everich on, every
one, B 1164; Everichone, _pl._ each one (of us), HF. 337; each of them all,
all of them, T. iii. 412; B 429; Everich a, each, A 733. (In B 3277 and
3279, it were better to read _everichone_ and _stone_).

EVER-MO, _adv._ for ever, always, continually, L. 1239, 2035, 2634; 3. 81,
604; A. i. 17. 12; B 1076, 1744, 4005, C 81, I 215; _for e._, for ever, 11.
36; continually, E 754.

EVERMORE, _adv._ continually, A 67, F 124; Evermor, A. i. 17. 3.

EVERY, _adj._ every, A 3, 6, &c.

EVERY-DAYES, _adv._ daily, B 2. p 2. 4.

EVERYDEEL, _adv._ every whit, A 368, D 162, F 1288; altogether, A 3303;
Everydel, 3. 222, 232, 698, 864; 3. 1014; R. 126, 896; HF. 880.

EVERYWHERE, _adv._ 2. 104.

EVE-STERRE, _s._ evening star, B 1. m 5. 8, B 2. m 8. 5.

EVIDENTLY, _adv._ by observation, A. ii. 23. _rubric_.

EW, _s._ yew-tree, 5. 180; A 2923; (_collectively_) yew-trees, R. 1385.

EXALTACIOUN, _s._ (astrological) exaltation, D 702, E 2224, I 10 (see
note).

EXALTAT, _as pp._ exalted, D 704.

EXAMETRON, _s._ a hexameter, B 3169.

EXAMINE, _v._; Examineth, _imp. pl._ examine, try, B 2456.

EXAMININGE, _s._ examining, B 2392.

EXCEDEN, _v._ exceed, surpass, B 5. p 5. 46; Excedeth, _pr. s._ exceeds, A.
ii. 23. 14; Exceded, _pp._ A. ii. 23. 15.

EXCELLENCE, _s._ excellence, 2. 59; A. ii. 26. 1; A 311.

EXCELLENT, _adj._ 18. 74; Excellente, _fem._ F 145.

EXCEPCIOUN, _s._ exception, L. 2653; A. ii. 34. 10.

EXCERCYSE, _s._ exercise, E 1156.

EXCES, _s._ excess of feeling, T. i. 626.

EXCITE, _v._ excite; Excitinge, _pres. pt._ B 5. m 4. 33; Excited, _pp._
exhorted, D 1716.

EXCUS['A]BLE, _adj._ excusable, T. iii. 1031.

EXCUSASCIOUN, _s._ false excuse, I 680; plea, I 164; Excusaciouns, _pl._
excuses, L. 362 a.

EXCUSE, _s._; _for myn e._, in my excuse, 7. 305.

EXCUSE, _v._ excuse, A 651; Excusen, _v._ T. iii. 810, 1025; Excused, _pp._
3. 678; A 1766.

EXECUCIOUN, _s._ execution, T. iii. 521, v. 4; E 522, H 287.

EXECUTE, _v._; Executeth, _pr. s._ performs, A 1664; Execut, _pp._
executed, T. iii. 622.

EXECUTOUR, _s._ executor, carrier out, executant, D 2010.

EXECUTRICE, _s._ causer, T. iii. 617.

EXEMPLE, _s._ example, A 568. See ENSAMPLE.

EXEMPT, _pp._ freed, B 2. p 7. 109.

EXERCEN, _v._ exercise, B 2. p 6. 30.

EXERCITACIOUN, _s._ exercise, B 4. p 6. 186.

EXERCYSE, _s._ exercise, B 4029.

EXERCYSED, _pp._ performed, B 4. p 6. 65.

EXIL, _s._ exile, place of exile, B 2. p 4. 78.

EXILINGE, _s._ exiling, banishment, B 1. p 3. 38; ['E]xiling, L. 1680.

EXISTENCE, _s._ reality, HF. 266.

EXORSISACIOUNS, _pl._ exorcisms, spells to raise spirits, HF. 1263.

EXPANS, _adj._ (calculated) separately, F 1275; Expanse, A. ii. 45. 12. See
ANNI EXPANSI.

EXPERIENCE, _s._ 17. 22; T. iii. 1283; A 2445; D 1, 124; experiment, HF.
788; understanding acquired by trial, A. ii. 1. 17.

['E]XPERT, _adj._ expert, T. i. 67; Exp['e]rt, A 577; experienced, T. ii.
1367; B 4; skilled, D 174; skilful in performing an experiment,
experienced, G 1251.

EXPOUNE, _v._ explain, B 3398, G 86; Expounde, _v._ B 3940; Expounden, _pr.
pl._ explain, T. v. 1278; Expouned, _pt. s._ B 3346, 3399, 4305.

EXPRES, _adj._, expressed, made clear, D 1169.

EXPRES, _adv._ expressly, C 182, D 719, I 795.

EXPRESSE, _ger._ to declare, 17. 5; Expresse, _v._ relate, C 105; _pr. pl._
T. v. 790; Expressed, _pp._ E 2362.

EXPULSIF, _adj._ expellent, A 2749.

EXTENDEN, _pr. pl._ are extended, B 461.

EXTORCIOUN, _s._ extortion, 15. 23; Extorcions, _pl._ D 1429.

EXTREE, _s._ axle-tree, A. i. 14. 1. A.S. _eax_, an axis, axle.

EX['Y]LE, _2 pr. pl._ exile, 22. 11; Ex['y]led, _pp._ A 1244, 1272, C 273.

EY, _s._ egg, B 4035, G 806. A.S. _aeg_.

EY, _interj._ eh! T. ii. 128, iii. 74; E 2291, 2419; alas! T. iv. 1087;
what! C 782.

EYE, _s._ eye; _at eye_, evidently, L. 100; Eyen, _pl._ eyes, 1. 88, 105;
3. 841; A 152, 267, B 2891; B 1. p 1. 4; Eyen sight, eye-sight, D 2060,
2071. See Y[:E].

EYED, _adj._ endowed with eyes, T. iv. 1459.

EYLE, _v._ ail, A 3424; Eyleth, _pr. s._ L. 311 _a_; A 1081, 3769, B 1171,
1975, 4080, E 2368, H 16; Eyled, _pt. s._ ailed, B 4290, F 501.

EYR, _s._ air, HF. 954; L. 1482; B 2. m 4. 13; T. v. 671; A 2992, I 174;
Eir, A 1246, 3473; Eyre, _dat._ air, gas, G 767.

EYR, _s._ heir, L. 1598, 1819, 2549; Eyres, _pl._ B 2. p 4. 65.

EYRISH, _adj._ of the air, a[:e]rial, HF. 932, 965.

EYSE, _s._ ease, D 2101. See ESE.

EYTHER, _adj._ either, 5. 125.



FABLE, _s._ story, description, R. 1439; I 31; Fables, _pl._ fables, 3. 52;
R. 2.

FACE, _s._ face, R. 323; A 199, 458; look, B 1. p 5. 25; a technical term
in astrology, signifying the third part of a sign (of the zodiac); a part
of the zodiac ten degrees in extent, F 50, 1288; A. ii. 4. 40.

FACOUND, _adj._ eloquent, fluent, 5. 521.

FACOUNDE, _s._ eloquence, fluency, 3. 926; 5. 558; Facound (_before a
vowel_), C 50. '_Faconde_, f. eloquence;' Cotgrave.

FACULTEE, _s._ capacity, authority, _or_ disposition, A 244; power, B 5. p
4. 109; branch of study, HF. 248.

FADE, _adj._ faded, R. 311.

FADEN, _v._ fade, B 4. p 3. 17; Fade, 7. 19; _ger._ 3. 564; Faded,_pp. as
adj._ R. 354.

FADER, _s._ father, 1. 52; L. 1828; A 100, B 274, 3622, G 1434, I 131;
Fader, _gen._ L. 1406; A 781, B 1178, 3121, 3127; _fader day_, father's
time, B 3374, E 1136; _fader kin_, father's race, ancestry, G 829; Fadres,
_gen._ 1. 130; L. 2608; B 3534, 3630, E 809; Faders, _gen._ L. 2449;
Fadres, _pl._ L. 730; C 93; ancestors, E 61; parents, originators, B 129;
Faderes, the Patres Conscripti, the Roman Senate, B 1. p 4. 150.

FADER-IN-LAWE, _s._ father-in-law, L. 2272; Fadres-in-lawe, _pl._
parents-in-law, B 2. p 3. 26. And see B 3870.

FADME, _pl._ fathoms, 3. 422; A 2916, F 1060; Fadome, _pl._ R. 1393.

FAILE, _s._ failure; _withouten f._, without fail, 2. 48; _sans faille_,
HF. 188; B 501; _withouten fayle_, R. 1572.

FAILEN, _v._ fail, grow dim, 5. 85; _ger._ 1. 64; Faille, _v._ A 2798, B
2642, 3955; cease, I 182; Faillen, _v._ A 2805; Failest, _2 pr. s._ 1. 112;
Failled, _1 pt. s._ failed, F 1577; _pt. s._ A 2806; Fayled, _pt. pl._ R.
775; Failling, _pres. part._ failing, remote, A. ii. 4. 19.

FAIN; see FAYN.

FAIR, _adj._ fair, lovely, desirable, B 2. p 1. 17; fine, D 2253; good,
excellent, A 154; _a fair_, a good one, A 165; Fayr, fair, seemly, L. 2548;
_as s._ a fair thing, excellent thing (sarcastically), T. iii. 850; Faire,
_def._ R. 1468; _def. as s._, the fair part, F 518; _voc._ F 485; O fair
one! HF. 518; _pl._ A 234; clean, R. 571; specious, R. 437.

FAIRE, _adv._ fairly, R. 774, 798; A 984; well, 5. 503; A 94, 124, 273;
honestyhonestly, A 539; courteously, R. 592; clearly, D 1142; prosperously,
L. 186, 277.

FAIRE, _s._ fair, market, B 1515; Fayre, _s._ fair, T. v. 1840; D 221.

FAIRE REWTHELEES, Fair Unpitying One, _La Belle Dame sans Merci_, 6. 31.

FAIRER, _adj. comp._ R. 555; 5. 301.

FAIRNESSE, _s._ beauty, A 1098; E 384; honesty of life, A 519; Fairnes, 4.
76; Fairenesse, _s._ beautiful appearance, B 2. m 3. 10.

FAIR-SEMBLAUNT, Fair-show, R. 963.

FAIRYE; see FAYERYE.

FAL, _s._ fall, in wrestling, 13. 16.

FALDING, _s._ a sort of coarse cloth, A 391 (see note), 3212.

FALLEN, _v._ happen, T. iv. 976; F 134; Falle, _v._ befall, happen, 2. 23;
A 585, B 2656, H 40; light, E 126; suit, E 259; prosper, L. 186; Falle,
_pr. s. subj._ befall, may befall, R. 798; B 4650; _impers._ may it befall,
L. 277; happen, L. 855; Falleth, _pr. s._ comes as by accident, 6. 4;
comes, 3. 706; suffers depression (an astrological term), D 702, 705;
Falles, _pr. s._ (Northern form), falls, A 4042; belongs, 3. 257; Fallen,
_pr. pl._ happen, come to pass, R. 20; Fel, _1 pt. s._ fell, 2. 15; Fil,
_pt. s._ fell, 3. 123; A 845, B 1865, 1962, 3275, C 245, 253, 804, G 204,
1198; befell, happened, 3. 1320; 4. 51; L. 589, 1162, 1423; E 449, 718; was
fitting, 3. 374; L. 2474; Fel, befell, B 141; _fil on slepe_, fell asleep,
HF. 114; _fil of his accord_, agreed with him, F 741; _as fer as reson
fil_, as far as reason extended, F 570; Fille, _1 pt. pl._ fell, became, D
812; Fillen, _pt. pl._ fell, T. ii. 1191; B 3183, 3620; Fille, _pt. pl._
HF. 1659; T. iii. 1052; A 2666, F 238, 1219; _fille in speche_ = fell to
talking, F 964; Fellen, _pt. pl._ happened, T. i. 134; Fille, _pt. s.
subj._ might fall, A 131; should happen, A 2110; Falle, _pp._ fallen, 5.
406; L. 1726, 1826; A 2930, 3451, B 303, 3196, 3268, I 136; happened, T.
iii. 841; A 324; accidentally placed, F 684; Falling, _pres. pt._ felling,
causing to fall, T. ii. 1382.

FALS, _adj._ false, 3. 618, 633; B 74; False, _def._ 3. 650; B 3727, D
1338; _false get_, cheating contrivance, G 1277; _voc._ B 4416, E 1785;
_pl._ 3. 653.

FALSEN, _v._ falsify, A 3175; deceive, L. 1640; T. iii. 784; betray, T. v.
1845; False, _v._ be untrue to, 3. 1234; Falsest, _2 pr. s._ L. 1377;
Falsen, _pr. pl._ L. 1377; Falsed, _pt. s._ was false to, 7. 147; T. v.
1053; _pp._ T. v. 1056; falsified, broken (faith), F 627.

FALSHEDE, _s._ falsehood, G 979, 1274.

FALTREN, _pr. pl._ falter, fail, B 772.

FALWE, _adj._ fallow, yellowish, HF. 1936; A 1364. A.S. _fealo_. (_Perhaps
read_ falwe _for_ salowe; R. 355.)

FALWES, _pl._ fallow-ground, D 656.

FAME, _s._ notoriety, A 3148; rumour, L. 1242; good report, E 418; Fames,
_pl._ rumours, HF. 1292; renown, HF. 1139, 1154.

FAMILER, _s._ familiar friend, B 4. p 6. 159; Familier, B 3. p 5. 20;
Famileres, _pl._ B 1. p 4. 143; Famuleres, B 1. p 3. 34.

FAMILIARITEE, _s._ friendship, B 2. p 1. 12; -tees, _pl._ B 3. p 5. 1.

FAMILIER, _adj._ intimate, B 3. p 5. 51; Famulier, familiar, at home, A
215, B 1221; of one's own household, E 1784; Famulere, familiar, affable,
L. 1606.

FAMOUS, _adj._ L. 1404; _pl._ famous people, HF. 1233.

FAN, _s._ vane, quintain, H 42. See the note.

FANNE, _s._ fan, A 3315.

FANTASTYK, _adj._ belonging to the fancy, A 1376.

FANTASYE, _s._ fancy, HF. 593; T. iii. 275, 1032, iv. 1470; F 844; delight,
A 3191; imagining, HF. 992; fancy, pleasure, D 190; imagination, T. ii.
482; A 3835, 3840; imaginary object, 9. 51; desire, will, B 3475;
Fantasyes, _pl._ fancies, 3. 28; T. iv. 193, 1615; F 205; wishes, B 3465.

FANT['O]ME, _s._ phantasm, delusion, B 1037; F['a]ntom, a kind of dream,
illusion, HF. 11, 493.

FARCE, _v._; Farced, _pp._ stuffed, L. 1373; Farsed, A 233. Fr. _farcer_.

FARE, _s._ behaviour, conduct, T. i. 551, 1025, ii. 1144; A 1809, B 1453;
condition, 2. 62; good speed, HF. 682; business, goings-on, T. iii. 1106,
iv. 1567; B 569; proceeding, stir, bustle, ado, HF. 1065; B 2. p 5. 82; T.
iii. 860, v. 335; A 3999; company, T. iii. 605; _evel fare_, ill hap, 2.
62; _yvel fare_, T. ii. 1001.

FAREN, _v._ behave, T. iv. 1087; Fare, _v._ fare; _doth fare_, causes to
behave or feel, T. i. 626; Fare, _ger._ to go, travel, T. v. 21, 279; to
proceed, A 2435; Fare, _1 pr. s._ go, L. 85 _a_; G 733; it is with me
(thus), 7. 320; am, B 1676, E 1461; Farest, _2 pr. s._ actest, 5. 599; art,
HF. 887; Fareth, _pr. s._ acts, D 1088, I 250; fares, is, 3. 113; 4. 263; E
1217; happens, HF. 271; Faren, _1 pr. pl._ live, G 662; Fare, _2 pr. pl._
behave, D 852; act, 21. 13; D 1094; Faren, _2 pr. pl._ act, D 1095;
proceed, T. ii. 1149; succeed, G 1417; Faren, _pr. pl._ seem, I 414; Fare,
_pr. s. subj._ may fare, F 1579; Ferde, _1 pt. s._ fared, T. ii. 1006;
felt, 3. 99, 785; R. 499; was placed, 5. 152; Ferde, _pt. s._ behaved, A
1372, 3457, E 1060, F 461, 621; happened, T. i. 225; was, R. 876; seemed,
R. 249; 3. 501, 967; HF. 1932; went on, HF. 1522; Ferde, _2 pt. pl._
behaved, T. iv. 918; Ferden, _pt. pl._ behaved, A 1647; Ferde, _pt. s.
subj._ should fare, R. 271; Faren, _pp._ fared, T. v. 466; D 1773; gone, B
4069; Fare, _pp._ fared, D 1782; gone, A 2436, B 512, B 1389, E 896, F
1169, 1546; walked, L. 2209; Ferd, _pp._ fared, T. iv. 1094; Faringe,
_pres. pt. as adj._; _best f._, best looking, fairest of behaviour, F 932;
Fare, _imp. s._ fare; _f. aright_, prosper, T. i. 878; _far wel_, farewell,
B 116, 3631, E 555; Fareth, _imp. pl._ fare, E 1688; _f. wel_, farewell, T.
v. 1412.

FARE-CART, _s._ travelling cart, T. v. 1162.

FARE-WEL, farewell, T. i. 1040; _as interj._ it is all over! F 1204, G 907;
Farwel, farewell to, L. 39; it is over, G 1380, 1384; _go farwel_, be let
alone, A. ii. 23. 8.

FARSED, _pp._ stuffed, A 233. See FARCE.

FART, _s._ breaking of wind, A 3806, D 2149.

FARTING, _s._ breaking of wind, A 3338.

FASOUN, _s._ fashion, appearance, R. 708, 885; shape, R. 551, 932;
construction, B 2. m 8. 13.

FAST, _s._ fasting, T. v. 370.

FAST, _adj._ firm, 7. 313.

FASTE, _adv._ closely, R. 1346; T. ii. 276; C 124; close, near, A 1478;
tight, R. 431; fast, quickly, T. i. 748; B 2017, C 259, G 245; _as f._,
very quickly, G 1235; hard, soundly, 5. 94; intently, eagerly, R. 793;
_faste by_, near to, A 1476; _faste by_, close at hand, 3. 369; HF. 497; R.
163, 1274; L. 2091; B 3116, D 1389, F 847; close to, A 719.

FASTE, _v._ fast, B 1405; Fasten, _v._ L. 1271; Faste, _1 pr. s._ fast, 7.
293; Fasteth, _pr. s._ F 819; Faste, _pt. s._ C 363; Fasting, _pres. part._
fasting, before eating, R. 1102; Fastinge, C 363.

FASTER, _adj. comp._ stronger, B 1. p 6. 71.

FASTER, _adv._ closer, B 3722.

FASTING, _s._ fasting, R. 440; 3. 612.

FASTNE, _v._ fix, plant, B 4. m 1. 26; Fastnede, _pt. s._ fixed, B 1. p 3.
3; B 3. p 2. 1. See FESTNE.

FAT, _adj._ fat, R. 439; 11. 27; T. i. 222; A 200, 206, 288, 349.

FATAL, _adj._ T. iii. 733.

FATE, _s._ T. v. 109.

FATTE, _v._ fatten, D 1880.

FATTISH, _adj._ plump, 3. 954.

FAUCON, _s._ falcon, R. 546; 5. 337; L. 1120; T. iii. 1784, iv. 413; F 411,
424.

FAUCONERS, _s. pl._ falconers, F 1196.

FAUGHT, _pt. s. of_ Fighten.

FAUNE, _v._; Fauned, _pt. s._ fawned on, 3. 389.

FAUNES, _pl._ Fauns, A 2928.

FAVORABLE, _adj._ favourable, 7. 15.

FAV['O]UR, _s._ favour, 5. 626; 10. 5; D 1210; F['a]vour, B 3914.

FAWE, _adj._ fain, glad, D 220.

FAWE, _adv._ fain, anxiously, T. iv. 887.

FAY, _s._; see FEY.

FAYERYE, _s._ troop of fairies, E 2039, 2227; troops of fairies, D 859;
enchantment, E 1743; Fairye, fairy-land, B 1992, 2004, F 96; magic,
enchantment, F 201; Fayeryes, _pl._ fairies (_or_ troops of fairies), D
872.

FAYLE; _withouten f._, without doubt, R. 1572. See FAILE.

FAYLED, _pt. pl._ failed, R. 775. See FAILEN.

FAYN, _adj._ glad, L. 130, 1137; T. iv. 1321; A 2437, H 92; fond, R. 1376;
Feyn, 7. 315.

FAYN, _adv._ gladly, 3. 1101; A 766, 1257, B 41, 173, 222, 3283; _wolde
f._, would be glad to, E 696.

FAYNER, _adj._ gladder, 6. 77; _adv_. more gladly, 6. 83.

FAYNTE; see FEYNTE.

FAYR; see FAIR.

FAYRE, _s._; see FAIRE.

FEBLE, _adj._ feeble, weak, L. 2590, E 1198.

FEBLENESSE, _s._ feebleness, HF. 24.

FEBLESSE, _s._ weakness, B 3. p 5. 32; T. ii. 863; I 1074.

FEBLY, _adv._ feebly, T. i. 518.

FECCHE, _s._; Fecches, _pl._ vetches, T. iii. 936.

FECCHEN, _ger._ to fetch, T. v. 485; E 276; _v._ fetch, B 1857, G 411;
_ger._ to reach, get, 7. 338; Fette, _ger._ to fetch, to be brought (i.e.
absent), T. iii. 609; Fette, _2 pt. s._ didst fetch, T. iii. 723; Fette,
_pt. s._ fetched, 9. 22; L. 676; D 2159, G 548, 1365; brought, T. v. 852;
Fette, _pt. pl._ B 2041; Fet, _pp._ fetched, A 2527, B 667, F 276; brought,
R. 603; A 819; brought home, D 217.

FECCHING, _s._ fetching, rape, T. v. 890.

FEDE, _v._ feed, R. 352; Fedde, _pt. s._ fed, A 146.

FEE, _s._ reward, pay, 7. 193; Fee simple, an absolute fee or fief, not
clogged with conditions, A 319; Fees, _pl._ fees, A 317, 1803; Fe[:e]s,
payments, 3. 266.

FEELD, _s._ field, A 886, 3032; (in an heraldic sense), B 3573; Feld,
_dat._ plain, B 3197; Feld, _dat._ 3. 359; Feeldes, _pl._ fields, plains, A
977, D 564; Feldes, _pl._ 9. 4; L. 782, 787.

FEEND, _s._ fiend, devil, A 4288, B 780, 1064, 2611, 3654, 4476, C 844;
evil spirit, B 454, F 522, G 861, I 137; Fend, fiend, foe, L. 1996.

FEENDLY, _adj._ fiendlike, devilish, 3. 594; B 751, 783, F 868, G 1071.

FEER; see FERE, fear.

FEESTE, _s._ feast, I 47; see FESTE.

FEET, _s._ performance, E 429. E. _feat_.

FEET, _pl._ feet, A 473, 495. See FETE.

FEFFE, _v._ enfeoff, endow, present, T. iii. 901; _ger._ to present, T. v.
1689; Feffedest, _2 pt. s._ didst enfeoff, endow, B 2. p 3. 44; Feffed,
_pp._ enfeoffed, put in possession, endowed, E 1698.

FEIGNE; see FEYNE.

FEINED, _pp. as adj._ feigned, L. 1257; see FEYNE.

FEITH, _s._ faith, A 62, B 4603, 4604; surety, B 2. p 3. 59; assurance, B
2997; promise, A 1622; confirmation (Lat. _fidem_), B 1. p 4. 195; Feyth,
3. 632.

FEITHFUL, _adj._ faithful, E 520.

FEL, _s._ skin, T. i. 91.

FEL, _adj._ cruel, dreadful, T. v. 50; cruel, R. 151; A 2630; deadly, D
2002; terrible, B 2019; Felle, _voc._ cruel, A 1559; _pl._ terrible, T. i.
470; B 3290; destructive, T. iv. 44. A.S. _fel_ (in _wael-fel_).

FEL, _pt. s. of_ Falle.

FELAWE, _s._ companion, comrade, R. 267; L. 895; T. i. 696, 709; A 395,
648, 650, 890, 1192, F 1125, 1153, H 7; partner, A 1624; equal, I 400;
Felaw, companion, B 1715, 2135; Felow, fellow, man, 3. 366; Felawes, _pl._
fellows, companions, B 1629, 2748, 3356, E 282, G 747; comrades, C 696.

FELAWESHIPE, _s._ partnership, A 1626; companionship, T. ii. 206; B 2749;
company, A 26, 32, 474; Felawship, company, 3. 978; Felawshippe, company,
men, L. 947, 965.

FELAWSHIPE, _v._; Felawshipeth, _pr. s._ accompanies, B 4. m 1. 8; B 4. p
3. 55; Felawshippeth, _pr. s._ associates, B 4. p 6. 88.

FELD, -ES; see FEELD.

FELD, _pp. of_ Felle.

FELDEFARE, _s._ field-fare, 5. 364; T. iii. 861 (see note).

FELDEN, _pt. pl. of_ Felle.

FELE, _adj._ many, R. 189; 3. 400; 5. 329; T. iv. 110; HF. 1137, 1381,
1946; E 917. A.S. _feola_.

FELE-FOLDE, _adj._ manifold, B 2. p 1. 11.

FELEN, _v._ feel, experience, L. 692; Fele, understand by experiment, HF.
826; try to find out, T. ii. 387; _ger._ to feel, R. 556; Fele, _1 pr. s._
experience, L. 520; Felestow, feelest thou, perceivest thou, B 1. p 4. 1;
Feleth, _pr. s._ feels, A 1220, F 727; Felte, _1 pt. s._ 4. 217; F 566;
Feltest, _2 pt. s._ L. 1379; Felede, _pt. s._ G 521; Feled, _pt. s._ 3,
492; Felten, _2 pt. pl._ L. 689; Feled, _pp._ felt, B 5. p 5. 1; perceived,
B 5. p 3. 15; T. iv. 984.

FELICITEE, _s._ happiness, 1. 13; L. 1588, 2588; A 338, E 2021; favorable
aspect, A. ii. 4. 26.

FELINGE, _s._ feeling, expression, B 4483; Feling, feeling, 3. 11; 18. 32;
affection, 3. 1172.

FELINGLY, _adv._ feelingly, A 2203.

FELLE, _pl. of_ Fel, _adj._

FELLE, _v._ fell, A 1702; Felden, _pt. pl._ caused to fall, R. 911; Feld,
_pp._ cut down, A 2924.

FELLEN, _pl. pl._ happened, T. i. 134. See FALLEN.

FELLICHE, _adj._ bitingly, severely, B 2. m 3. 9.

FELNESSE, _s._ fierceness, B 1. m 6. 7.

FELON, _adj._ angry, T. v. 199.

FELONOUS, _adj._ fierce, wicked, B 1. m 4. 10; B 3. p 10. 69; fierce, B 4.
p 3. 75; impious, B 5. p 3. 88; mischievous, I 438.

FELONYE, _s._ injustice, B 4. p 6. 174; crime, A 1996, B 643; impiety, B 5.
p 3. 18; treachery, R. 165, 978; Felonyes, _pl._ evil deeds, B 3. m 12. 24;
Felonies, iniquities, I 281.

FEMELE, _adj._ female, D 122, I 961.

FEMININITEE, _s._ feminine form, B 360.

FEMINYNE, _adj._ feminine, HF. 1365.

FEN, _s._ fen, bog, A 4065, 4080.

FEN, _s._ chapter or subdivision of Avicenna's book called the Canon, C
890. See the note.

FEND; see FEEND.

FENEL, _s._ fennel, R. 731.

FENIX, _s._ phoenix, 3. 982.

FER, _adj._ far, A 388, 491, B 508, 658, 1908, 2565, F 801; A. ii. 16. 1;
Ferre, _def._ A 3393.

FER, _adv._ far, 7. 338; L. 2714; B 1781, 3157, 3872; Fer ne ner, neither
farther nor nearer, neither later nor sooner, A 1850; _how f. so_, however
far, 5. 440.

FERD, _s. dat._ fear, T. iv. 607; Ferde, _dat._ 3. 1214; HF. 950; T. i.
557, 1411. (Always in phr. _for ferd_, or _for ferde_.)

FERD, _pp. of_ Fere, _v._

FERD, -E; see FAREN, _v._

FERE, (f[`e][`e]r[*e]), _s. dat._ fear, 3. 1209; T. ii. 303, 314; B 3369,
3394, 3728, F 860, 893, 1347; panic, HF. 174; _acc._ 5. 143; Feer, _acc._
(_before a vowel_), HF. 607.

FERE, (f['e]['e]r[*e]), _s._ companion, L. 969, T. i. 13, iii. 1496; mate,
5. 410, 416; wife, T. iv. 791; Feres, _pl._ companions, T. i. 224. A.S.
_gef[=e]ra_.

FERE (f['e]['e]r[*e]), _s. dat._ fire, T. iii. 978.

FERE, (f[`e][`e]r[*e]), _v._ frighten, T. iv. 1483; Fered, _pp._ B 4576;
afraid, G 924; Ferd, _pp._ afraid, T. ii. 124.

FERFORTH, _adv._ far; _as f. as_, as far as, T. iv. 891; L. 690; A. pr. 51;
HF. 328, 1882; B 19, 1099, 2164, D 56, I 319, 621; as long as, T. i. 121;
_so f._, to such a degree, 1. 170; 5. 377; 7. 90, 111, 132; L. 1598; B 572,
F 567, G 40, 1390; _thus f._, thus far, 7. 290; T. ii. 960.

FERFORTHLY, _adv._ thoroughly; _so f._, to such an extent, A 960; so far,
L. 682; _as f._, as completely, D 1545.

FERFULLESTE, most timid, T. ii. 450.

FERLY, _adj._ strange, A 4173.

FERMACIES, _pl._ remedies, A 2713. Cf. E. _pharmacy_.

FERME, _adj._ firm, lasting, B 3. p 6. 23; firm, R. 1500; E 663.

FERME, _imp. s._ make firm, B 1. m 5. 40 (Lat. _firma_).

FERME, _s._ rent, A 252 b.

FERMELY, _adv._ firmly, T. iii. 1488, 1543, v. 495; surely, B 5. p 3. 102.

FERMENTACIOUN, _s._ fermenting, G 817.

FERMERERE, _s._ friar in charge of an infirmary, D 1859.

FERMOUR, _s._ farmer of taxes, L. 378.

FERN, _s._ fern, B 3. m 1. 3; F 255.

FERN, _adv._ long ago; _so fern_ = so long ago, F 256. A.S. _fyrn_, old,
O.H.G. _firni_, old. Cf. prov. G. _firner wein_, last year's wine. See
FERNE.

FERN-ASSHEN, _s. pl._ fern-ashes, ashes produced by burning ferns, F 254.

FERNE, _pl. of_ Ferren, distant, remote, A 14; B 2. m 7. 8.

FERNE; _f. yere_, last year, T. v. 1176. Cf. A.S. _fyrng[=e]ar_. See FERN,
_adv._

FERRE, _adj. def._ distant, A 3393. See FER.

FERRE, _comp. adv._ farther, HF. 600; A 48, 2060; Ferrer, A 835. See FER.

FERRESTE, _superl. pl._ farthest, A 494. See FER.

FERS, _s._ queen (at chess), 3. 654, 655, 669, 681, 741; Ferses, _pl._ the
pieces at chess, 3. 723. See notes to 3. 654, 723.

FERS, _adj._ fierce, T. i. 225; Ferse, _def._ B 4. m 7. 14; _voc._ 7. 1.
See FIERS.

FERSLY, _adv._ fiercely, T. iii. 1760.

FERTHE, fourth, T. iv. 26, v. 476, 493; L. 287; HF. 1690; A. ii. 35. 4; B
823, D 364, G 531, 824, 927.

FERTHER, _adj._ further. B 1686, E 2226.

FERTHER, _adv._ further, 1. 148; 3. 1254; 5. 280; 7. 109; L. 662; A 36, F
1177; Forther, E 712.

FERTHER-OVER, _conj._ moreover, A. ii. 26. 8.

FERTHING, _s._ farthing, D 1967; a fourth part; hence, a very small
portion, A 134; a very small gift, A 255.

FERVENT, _adj._ hot, I 536.

FERVENTLICHE, _adv._ fervently, T. iv. 1384.

FERY, _adj._ fiery, T. iii. 1600.

FESAUNT, _s._ pheasant, 5. 357.

FEST, _s._ fist, A 4275, C 802, I 35; Festes, _pl._ fists, T. iv. 243. A
Kentish form; A.S. _f[=y]st_.

FESTE, _s._ feast, festival, 3. 974; L. 616; A 883, B 418, D 1076, E 191, F
61, 113, 1369; _to f._, to the feast, B 380, 1007, 1010; encouragement, T.
ii. 361; merriment, T. ii. 421; Maketh feste, pays court, flatters, 3. 638;
Fest, T. iii. 150 (but read _feste_, _requeste_); Feeste, I 47; Festes,
_pl._ feasts, 3. 433; D 1349; tokens of pleasure, T. v. 1429.

FESTE, _v._; Festeth, _pr. s._ feasts, A 2193; Festen, _pr. pl._ L. 2157.

FESTEYINGE, _pres. part._ feasting, entertaining, F. 345. Cf. Fr.
_festoyer_, _f['e]toyer_.

FESTEYINGE, _s._ feast-making, festivity, T. v. 455; Festeyinges, _pl._
feastings, feasts, T. iii. 1718.

FESTIVALY, _adv._ wittily, jocosely, B 2. p 7. 85.

FESTLICH, _adj._ festive, fond of feasts, F 281.

FESTNE, _ger._ to fasten, A 195. See FASTNE.

FET; see FECCHEN.

FETE, _dat. pl._ feet, 3. 199, 400, 502; 5. 213, HF. 1050; B 1104. See
FOOT, FEET. A.S. _f[=o]tum_.

FETERED, _pp._ fettered, L. 1950, 2722.

FETHER, _s._ wing, A 2144; Fetheres, _pl._ wings, HF. 974; B 4. p 1. 47;
feathers, R. 948; 9. 45; HF. 1382; T. v. 1546; A 107, B 3365; Fethres,
_pl._ feathers, 5. 334; wings, HF. 507.

FETHERBED, _s._ feather-bed, R. 1422; 3. 251.

FETHERED, _pt. s._ 'feathered,' B 4367.

FETHERED, _adj._ provided with feathers, R. 942; T. ii. 926; winged, R.
742.

FETIS, _adj._ neat, well-made, handsome, A 157; R. 776; Fetys, R. 532, 821,
829, 1017, 1241; splendid, R. 1133; graceful, C 478. O.F. _feitis_; Lat.
_factitius_. See FETYS.

FETISLY, _adv._ elegantly, A 124, 273; neatly, trimly, R. 570, 577; A 3205,
3319, 4369, D 1742; exquisitely, R. 837; Fetysly, R. 1235.

FETTE; see FECCHEN.

FETTRE, _v._ fetter; Fettred, _pt. s._ B 3547.

FETTRES, _pl._ fetters, A 1279.

FETURES, _pl._ features, H 121.

FETYS, _adj._ well-made, R. 532, 1017; handsome, R. 821, 829; splendid, R.
1133; graceful, C 478. See FETIS.

FETYSLY, _adv._ exquisitely, neatly, R. 1235. See FETISLY.

FEVERE, _s._ fever, B 3. p 8. 39; Fever, T. i. 491, ii. 1520; Fevre, T.
iii. 1213; _blaunche f._, white fever, T. i. 916 (see note).

FEWE, _pl._ few, 2. 56; A 639; _a f. welles_, a few wells, 3. 160.

FEY, _s._ faith, A 1126, 3284, C 762, D 203, 1057, E 9, 1032, H 13, I 23;
certainty, truth, B 4. p 2. 13; fidelity, L. 778, 1365, 1847, 2519; Fay,
faith, F 1474. A. F. _fei_.

FEYN, _adj._ glad, 7. 315. See FAYN.

FEYNE, _v._ feign, pretend, A 736, F 510; speak falsely, 2. 4; _feyne us_,
feign, pretend, B 351; _ger._ 11. 18; Feyned, _pt. s._ feigned, 7. 126;
Feyned her, pretended, L. 2375; Feyne, _imp. s._ feign, B 2501; Feigne,
who-so f. may, let him, who can, pretend, B 3. p 10. 62; Feyned, _pp._
feigned, L. 1749; A 705, C 62; _as adj._ pretended, false, 4. 173; D 1360,
F 524; Feined, _as adj._ L. 1257.

FEYNEST, _adv._ most gladly, 5. 480. See FAYN.

FEYNING, _s._ pretending, cajolery, F 556; pretence, feigning, 3. 1100; L.
1556.

FEYNT, _adj._ feigned, R. 433. See FEYNE.

FEYNTE, _1 pr. s._ faint, T. i. 410; Faynte, _v._ 3. 488; Feyntest, _2 pr.
s._ enfeeblest, B 926.

FEYNTING, _s._ fainting, failing, E 970.

FEYTH; _see_ FEITH.

FICCHEN, _ger._ to fix, B 5. m 4. 11; to found, B 2. m 4. 9; _v._ affix, B
4. p 1. 47; Fichen, _ger._ to fix, B 3. m 9. 30; Ficcheth, _pr. pl._ infix,
B 5. m 1. 3; Ficche, _pr. s. subj._ fix, B 3. m 12. 46; Ficched, _pp._
fastened, B 3. p 11. 161.

FIEBLE, _for_ Feble, B 306 _n_.

FIERS, _adj._ fierce, A 1598; B 300, 1790; proud, R. 1482; Fierse, T. iii.
22. See FERS.

FIFTE, fifth, R. 962, 982; 16. 9; T. v. 1205; HF. 1703; A. i. 21. 54.

FIFTENE, fifteen, A 61, B 4047.

FIGE-LEVES, _s. pl._ fig-leaves, I 330.

FIGES, _pl._ fig-trees, R. 1364.

FIGHTEN, _v._ fight, L. 1996; Fight, _pr. s._ fights, 5. 103; Faught, _pt.
s._ fought, A 399, B 3519; Foughten, _pp._ A 62.

FIG['U]RE, _s._ shape, 16. 27; form (as a man), B 3412; figure, 1. 94;
figure (of speech), A 499; F['i]gure, type, 1. 169; Fig['u]res, _pl._
forms, appearance, C 28; figures (of speech), E 16; shapes, B 5. m 5. 1;
markings, A. pr. 47.

FIGURED, _pp._ signified, I 922.

FIGURINGE, _s._ formation, form, L. 298; similitude, figure, G 96.

FIKELNESSE, _s._ fickleness, 15. 20.

FIL, _pt. s. of_ Fallen.

FILD, _pp. of_ Fille.

FILET, _s._ fillet, head-band, A 3243.

FILLE, _s._ fill, 6. 13; 7. 195; A 1528, B 2167, D 1700; sufficiency, L.
817, 2354.

FILLE, _v._ fill; Fild, _pp._ filled, 5. 610.

FILTHE, _s._ filth, 1. 157; T. iii. 381; D 1215; infamy, B 1. p 4. 100;
Filth, 3. 629; Filthes, _pl._ filthinesses, I 196.

FINAL, _adj._ ultimate, T. i. 682.

FINCH, _s._ finch (bird), R. 915; _pulle a finch_, pluck a dupe, A 652;
Finches, _pl._ R. 658.

FINDE, _v._ find, 1. 72; A 648; invent, A 736; _ger._ to provide for, C
537; _pr. s. subj._ can find, 5. 456; Fint, _pr. s._ finds, G 218; Fynt,
_pr. s._ L. 1499, 1798; A 4071; Fond, _1 pt. s._ found, 2. 14, 45; 3. 451,
1325; 5. 242; L. 446; A. ii. 1. 6; _pt. s._ 3. 1163; 4. 116; 7. 106; L.
832, 1881, 2178; A 653, B 514, 607, 1991, 3733, C 608, E 457, G 185;
discovered, A 2445; found out, T. i. 659; provided for, B 4019; Fonde, _pt.
pl._ B 3259; _pl. s. subj._ B 3521; Founde, _2 pt. s._ didst find, T. iii.
362; Fonde, _pt. s. subj._ could find, 5. 374; _pp._ found, 1. 38; 12. 23;
E 146; Founden, _pp._ found, 3. 73; T. ii. 289; L. 1212; B 612, E 520;
provided, B 243.

FINDER, _s._ discoverer, 3. 1168; Findere, T. ii. 844.

FINDING, _s._ provision, A 3220.

FINGER, _s._ R. 774; D 1890; Fingres, _pl._ fingers, A 129, E 380; T. ii.
1032.

FINGERINGE, _s._ fingering, L. 91.

FINNES, _pl._ fins, 5. 189.

FINT, _pr. s._ finds, G 218. See FYNT, FINDE.

FIRMAMENT, _s._ 3. 693; A. ii. 23. 1.

FIRRE, _s._ fir-tree, A 2921; Firr, 5. 179.

FIRST, _adv._ first of all, 1. 30; A 161.

FIRSTE, _adj. def._ first, 3. 1166, 1168; _my firste_, my first narration,
F 75; _with the firste_, very soon, T. iv. 63.

FISH, _s._ T. iv. 765; A 344; the sign Pisces, F 273.

FISSHE, _v._ fish up, T. iii. 1162; Fisshen, _ger._ to fish for, T. v. 777;
Fisshe, _1 pr. s._ fish for, D 1820; Fisshed, _pp._ fished, T. ii. 328.

FISSHER, _s._ fisherman, 4. 237.

FIT, _s._ a 'fyt' or 'passus,' a portion of a song, B 2078; bout, turn, A
4184, 4230, D 42.

FITHELE, _s._ fiddle, A 296.

FIXE, _pp. as adj._ fixed, T. i. 298; A. pr. 57; F 1282; solidified, G 779;
Fix, fixed, 1. 9; A. i. 21. 49; Fixes, _pl._ A. i. 21. 4.

FLAKES, _pl._ flakes, HF. 1192.

FLAMBE, _s._ flame, I 353; Flambes, _pl._ B 2. m 3. 3; B 3353, G 515. See
FLAUMBE.

FLANKES, _pl._ flanks, sides, B 1392.

FLAT, _adj._ 3. 942, 957; _as s._, the flat side, T. iv. 927.

FLATERE, _v._ flatter, I 618; Flater, _1 pr. s._ 4. 188; Flaterest, _2 pr.
s._ E 2059.

FLATERING, _adj._ flattering, 3. 637.

FLATERINGE, _s._ flattery, 3. 639; Flatering, 3. 933.

FLATERYE, _s._ flattery, R. 1064; L. 2540; I 613.

FLATOUR, _s._ flatterer, B 4515.

FLAUGH, _2 pt. s._ didst fly, B 4421 _n_. See FLEE (1).

FLAUMBE, _s._ flame, B 2. p 6. 5; HF. 769; T. iv. 118, v. 302; Flaume, 5.
250; Flaumes, _pl._ 1. 89. See FLAMBE.

FLAYN, _pp._ flayed, I 425. (Pp. of _fleen_.)

FLEDDE, _pt. s._ fled, avoided, 3. 396; 4. 119; B 3445, 3874; Fledde
herself, took refuge, L. 1225; Fled, _pp._ 3. 490; Fledde, _pp. pl._ T. i.
463. Cf. FLEE (1). See _Fleden_ in Stratmann.

FLEE (1), _v._ fly, F 503; _leet flee_, let fly, A 3806; _ger._ to fly, R.
951; Fleen, F 122; _v._ HF. 2118; Fleeth, _pr. s._ flies, E 119, F 149;
Flen, _pr. pl._ fly, T. iv. 1356; Fleigh, _pt. s._ flew, HF. 921, 2087; T.
ii. 194, 931; B 4529, 4607; Fley, _pt. s._ B 4362; Fleinge, _pres. pt._ HF.
543; Flyen, _pt. pl._ flew, R. 910, 911; Flough, _2 pt. s._ didst fly, B
4421; Flowen, _pt. pl._ flew, B 4581; _pp._ flown, HF. 905. A.S.
_fl[=e]ogan_.

FLEE (2), _v._ flee, 4. 98; Fleen, _v._ escape, A 1170; flee, 1. 148; 4.
105; L. 1307, 2020; Fleen, _v._ T. ii. 194; C 63; _ger._ to escape from, B
3. p 9. 72; Flee, _1 pr. s._ flee, 1. 5, 41; Fleeth, _pr. s._ 1. 2; Fleen,
_pr. pl._ B 121; Flee, _imp. s._ 13. 1; Fleeth, _imp. pl._ 4. 6; Fleigh,
_pt. s._ fled, B 3879; Fleeing, _pres. pt._ fleeing, 1. 41. A.S.
_fl[=e]on_. And see FLEDDE.

FLEEINGE, _s._ flight, B 5. m 5. 6.

FLEEN, _s. pl._ fleas, H 17. A.S. _fl[=e]an_, pl. of _fl[=e]a_.

FLEES, _s._ fleece, 9. 18; L. 1428, 1647; B 2187; Fleeses, _pl._ B 2. m 5.
7.

FLEET, _pr. s._ floats, B 463. See FLETE.

FLEIGH; see FLEE (1) and (2).

FLEINGE, _pres. pt. as adj._ scared, skulking, B 4. p 3. 80.

FLEKKED, _pp._ spotted, E 1848, G 565. Cf. Icel. _flekkr_, Du. _vlek_, a
spot.

FLEMEN, _ger._ to banish, T. ii. 852; Flemeth, _pr. s._ H 182; Fleme, _imp.
s._ put to flight, B 1. m 7. 12; Flemed, _pp._ banished, G. 58. A.S.
_fl[=y]man_, to banish.

FLEMER, _s._ banisher, driver away, B 460. See above.

FLEMINGE, _s._ banishment, flight, T. iii. 933.

FLEN, _pr. pl._ fly, T. iv. 1356. See FLEE (1).

FLESH, _s._ flesh, meat, A 147, 344, E 1335.

FLESHHOOK, _s._ flesh-hook, D 1730.

FLESHLY, _adj._ fleshy, T. iii. 1248.

FLESHLY, _adv._ carnally, B 1775, I 202; bodily, I 333.

FLESSHY, _adj._ fleshy, 3. 954.

FLETE, _v._ float, bathe, T. iii. 1671; Fleten, _v._ float, B 2. p 4. 45, B
5. m 1. 7; spread abroad, B 4. p 6. 90; range, B 4. p 6. 114; _ger._ to
drift, B 4. p 7. 65; Flete, _1 pr. s._ float, 2. 110; _1 pr. s. subj._ may
float, A 2397; Fleteth, _pr. s._ floats, B 901; flows, abounds (Lat.
_influat_), B 1. m 2. 17; (Lat. _fluens_), B 2. m 2. 14; Fleet, _pr. s._
floats, B 463; Flete, _pr. s. subj._ 7. 182; Flete, _pr. pl._ float, T.
iii. 1221; Fleten, _pr. pl._ drift, B 1. p 6. 62; Fletinge, _pres. pt._
floating, HF. 133; T. ii. 53; L. 2552; Fleting, _pres. pt._ floating, A
1956; Fletinge, _pres. pt._ flowing, B 1. p 3. 50 (Lat. _limphante_); B 3.
m 3. 1; swift flowing, B 1. m 7. 7; rushing, pouring, B 4. m 6. 22 (Lat.
_defluus_). A.S. _fl[=e]otan_.

FLEX, _s._ flax, A 676.

FLEY, _pt. s._ flew, B 4362. See FLEE (1).

FLIGHT, _s._ flight, 5. 694; A 190, 988; _put to fl._, T. ii. 613.

FLIKERE, _v._; Flikered, _pt. s._ fluttered, T. iv. 1221; Flikeringe,
_pres. pt. pl._ fluttering, A 1962.

FLINT, _s._ 9. 13; Flintes, _pl._ flints, I 548.

FLITTE, _v._ pass away, I 368; Flitteth, _pr. s._ shifts, B 3. m 2. 2;
Flitted, _pp._ removed, T. v. 1544; Flitte, _imp. s._ remove thou, B 3. p
9. 105; Flittinge, _pres. pt._ fleeting, transitory, B 2. m 3. 16, B 3. p
6. 25, B 3. p 8. 27; unimportant, 3. 801. Icel. _flytja_.

FLO, _s._ arrow, H 264. A.S. _fl[=a]_.

FLODE, -S; see FLOOD.

FLOK, _s._ flock, A 824; Flokkes, _pl._ R. 661.

FLOKMELE, _adv._ in a flock, in a great number, E 86. A.S. _floc_, a flock;
_m[=ae]l_, a portion; hence dat. pl. as adv. _m[=ae]lum_, in parts, and the
compound _flocm[=ae]lum_, by divisions or companies.

FLOOD, _s._ flood-tide, F 259, 1059, 1062; Flode, high water, A. ii. 46. 6;
Flood, river, B 4. m 7. 30; HF. 72; _on a fl._, in a state of flood, T.
iii. 640; Flodes, _pl._ floods, B 3777.

FLOOR, _s._ area, domain, B 2 p 1. 68; Flore, _dat._ floor, HF. 2033.

FLORIN, _s._ A 2088, I 749; Florins, _pl._ L. 1122; C 770, 774.

FLORISSHE, _v._ flourish; Florissheth, _pr. s._ flowers, I 636;
Florisching, _pres. pt._ flourishing, B 1. m 1. 2.

FLORISSHINGES, _pl._ florid ornaments, HF. 1301.

FLOROUNS, _s. pl._ florets, L. 217, 220.

FLOTERE, _v._ flutter; Floteren, _pr. pl._ fluctuate, waver, B 3. p 11.
156; Floteringe, _adj._ floating, moving, unstable, B 3. m 9. 6.

FLOTERY, _adj._ fluttering, wavy, A 2883.

FLOUGH, _2 pt. s._ didst fly, B 4421. See FLEE (1).

FLOUR, _s._ (1) flower, L. 48; A 4, B 1090, 2091, 3287, 3687, I 288; _of
alle floures flour_, flower of all flowers, 1. 4; flower, i.e. choice, A
4174; choice part, A 982; chief, 18. 82; prime vigour, 3. 630; chief time
of flourishing, A 3048; chief ornament, A 3059; choice pattern, E 919;
Floures, _pl._ flowers, L. 41; A 90, F 908; (2) flour, R. 356.

FLOUR-DE-LYS, _s._ fleur-de-lis, lily, A 238.

FLOUREN, _ger._ to flourish, prosper, B 4. p 5. 6; Floure, _pr. s. subj._
flower, flourish, E 120; Floureth, _pr. s._ flourishes, B 4. p 1. 19; T.
iv. 1577; blooms, 7. 306; Floured, _pt. s._ C 44.

FLOURETTES, _s. pl._ flowerets, buds, R. 891.

FLOURY, _adj._ flowery, 3. 398; B 4. m 6. 20.

FLOUTE, _s._ flute, HF. 1223.

FLOUTOURS, _pl._ flute-players, R. 763.

FLOWEN, _pt. pl. and pp. of_ Flee (1).

FLOWEN, _ger._ to flow, T. iii. 1758; _v._ flow (in), 10. 61.

FLOYTINGE, _pres. pt._ playing on the flute, A 91. See FLOUTE.

FLYE, _s._ fly, L. 392, 393, 395; A 4192, B 1361, D 835, F 1132, G 1150;
Flyes, _pl._ flies, B 2. p 6. 28; bees, 5. 353; B 3. m 7. 2.

FLYEN, _pt. pl. of_ Flee (1).

FNESETH, _pr. s._ breathes heavily, puffs, snorts, H 62. See the note. A.S.
_fn[=e]osan_, to puff, _fnaest_, a puff, blast; cf. Gk. [Greek: pneo], I
blow.

FO (f[`o][`o]), _s._ foe, enemy, B 1748, 3415, F 136; Foo, 1. 64; 5. 339; A
63, B 2331; Foon, _pl._ 5. 103; T. v. 1866; B 3896; Foos, _pl._ 2. 55; B
2160, 3219, 3519.

FODDER, _s._ food (as of a horse), A 3868; Foddre, fodder, B 4. m 7. 27.

FODE, _s._ food, D 1881, I 137.

FOISOUN, _s._ plenty, abundance, R. 1359; Foison, B 504; Foyson, A 3165. O.
F. _foison_; Lat. acc. _fusionem_.

FOLD; twenty thousand fold (i.e. times), H 169; a thousand fold, 5. 208.

FOLDE, _s._ fold, sheepfold, A 512; _dat._ A 1308.

FOLDE, _v._ fold, T. ii. 1085; Folden, _pp._ folded, T. iv. 359, 1247,
1689.

FOLE, -S; see FOOL.

FOLED, _pp._ foaled, born, D 1545.

FOLILY, _adv._ idly, at random, B 4. p 6. 114; foolishly, 4. 158; B 2639; G
428.

FOLK, _s._ folk, people, 2. 27, 48; A 12, 25; sort, company, 5. 524;
Folkes, _pl._ companies of people, 5. 278.

FOLWEN, _ger._ to follow, T. i. 259; _v._ D 1124; Folwe, _v._ F 749; Folwe,
_1 pr. s._ 3. 585; Folweth, _pr. s._ T. i. 899; B 3327, F 1051; Folwen,
_pr. pl._ follow, A. i. 11. 1; A 2682, C 514; Folwed, _pt. s._ A 528;
Folowed wel, followed as a matter of course, 3. 1012; Folwinge, _pres. pt._
following, A 2367; Folwing, L. 2018; Folweth, _imp. pl._ imitate, E 1189.

FOLY, _adv._ foolishly, 3. 874. Cf. FOLILY.

FOL['Y]E, _s._ folly, foolishness, A 3045, E 236, F 1131; silly thing, B
4628; F['o]ly, 3. 610, 737; F['o]lies, _pl._ F 1002.

FOLYE, _v._; Folyen, _pr. pl._ act foolishly, B 3. p 2. 62, 66.

FOME; see FOOM.

FOMEN, _pl._ foe-men, T. iv. 42; B 3255, 3507.

FOMY, _adj._ foaming, covered with foam, L. 1208; A 2506.

FOND; _pt. s. of_ Finde.

FONDE, _v._ endeavour, R. 1584; 3. 1020, 1259, 1332; 5. 257; T. ii. 273,
479; B 2080, D 479, G 951; _ger._ R. 432; T. iii. 1155; Fonde, _v._
attempt, try, E 283; try to persuade, B 347. A.S. _fandian_. See FOUNDE
(2).

FONDE, _pt. s. subj._ could find, 5. 374. See FINDE.

FONGE, _v._ receive, B 377. Icel. _fanga_; cf. A.S. _f['o]n_.

FONNE, _s._ fool (Northern), A 4089.

FONT-FUL WATER, fontful of water, B 357.

FONTSTOON, _s._ font, B 723.

FOO; see FO.

FOO, _s._ foo', _for_ foot (see note), A 3781.

FOOL, _adj._ foolish, silly, R. 1253; 5. 505; I 853; light, I 156; witless,
B 1. m 2. 22 (Lat. _stolidam_).

FOOL, _s._ fool, R. 14; A 3005; jester, T. ii. 400; B 3271; Fole, HF. 958;
Foles, _pl._ fools, L. 262 _a_, 315 _a_; B 2448; wicked persons, E 2278;
Folis, T. i. 635.

FOOL-HARDINESSE, _s._ fool-hardiness, A 1925; (personified), 5. 227.

FOOL-HARDY, _adj._ foolishly bold, B 3106.

FOOLISH, _adj._ unintelligent, B 1. p 6. 7, B 5. p 1. 24.

FOOL-LARGE, _adj._ foolishly liberal, B 2789, 2810; I 814; B 2. m 2. 8 (see
note).

FOOL-LARGESSE, _s._ foolish liberality, I 813.

FOOM, _s._ foam, A 1659, G 564; Fome, _dat._ G 565. A.S. _f[=a]m_.

FOO-MEN, _s. pl._ foes, B 3255, 3507. See FO-MEN.

FOON, FOOS; see FO.

FOOT, _as pl._ feet, 3. 420; A 4124. See FETE, FOTE.

FOOT-BREDE, _s._ foot-breadth, HF. 2042.

FOOT-HOT, _adv._ instantly, on the spot, B 438 (see note); Fot-hoot, 3.
375.

FOOT-MANTEL, _s._ foot-cloth, 'safe-guard' to cover the skirt, A 472.

FOR, _prep._ for, A 486, &c.; in respect of, 5. 336; by reason of, R. 1564;
for the sake of, B 4. p 6. 119; _for me_, by my means, T. ii. 134; _for
which_, wherefore, F 1525; against, to prevent, in order to avoid, L. 231
(see note); 5. 468; A. ii. 38. 1; B 4307; _for fayling_, to prevent
failure, T. i. 928; in spite of, C 129; _for al_, notwithstanding, 3. 535,
688, A 2020; _for my dethe_, were I to die for it, 4. 186; _to have for
excused_, to excuse, A. pr. 31; with respect to, as regards, B 13, E 474;
on account of, B 3321, C 504; as being, G 457.

FOR, _conj._ for, A 126, &c.; because, 3. 735, 789; 4. 93; 10. 58; B 1. P
3. 36, 43, B 1. p 6. 56; T. i. 802, ii. 663, v. 460; L. 2521; A 443, B
1705, F 74; in order that, B 3. p 10. 8; B 478; F 102.

FOR TO, _with infin._ in order to, to, 4. 94; A 13, 78, &c.

FOR['A]GE, _s._ provision of fodder, E 1422; food, B 1973; winter-food, as
hay, &c., A 3868.

FOR-AS-MUCHE, for-as-much, T. v. 1352; For-as-muchel, I 270.

FOR-BAR, _pt. s. of_ Forbere.

FOR-BEDE, _v._ forbid, T. iii. 467; Forbedeth, _pr. s._ B 2774, C 643, D
652; Forbet, _for_ Forbedeth, _pr. s._ forbids, T. ii. 717; Forbede, _imp.
s._ L. 736; D 519; Forbede, _pr. s. subj._ forbid, T. iii. 761; _in phr._
god f., _or_ Crist f. = God forbid, Christ forbid, T. ii. 113, 716; A 3508,
E 136, 1076, F 1610, G 996; Forbad, _pt. s._ 4. 36; E 570; Forbode, _pp._
forbidden, 16. 17; E 2206; Forboden, I 845.

FORBERE, _v._ forbear (to mention), A 885; leave (him) alone, D 665; spare,
A 3168; little consider, T. ii. 1660; Forbar, _pt. s._ forbare, T. i. 437;
_1 pt. s._ T. iii. 365; Forbereth, _imp. pl._ forgive, L. 80.

FORBERINGE, _s._ abstaining, I 1049.

FOR-BLAK, _adj._ extremely black, A 2144.

FORBODE, _s._ prohibition; _goddes forbode_, it is God's prohibition (i.e.
God forbid), L. 10 a.

FORBODE, -N, _pp. of_ Forbede.

FORBRAK, _1 pt. s._ broke off, interrupted, B 4. p 1. 5. Pt. t. of
_forbreken_.

FOR-BRUSED, _pp._ badly bruised, B 3804.

FORBY, _adv._ by, past, L. 2539; B 1759, 1792, C 125, 668; T. ii. 658. Cf.
G. _vorbei_.

FORBYSE, _ger._ to instruct by examples, T. ii. 1390. (A false form; for
_forbisne(n)_, the former _n_ being dropped by confusion with that in the
suffix.)

FORCE; see FORS.

FORCRACCHEN, _ger._ to scratch excessively, R. 323.

FORCUTTETH, _pr. s._ cuts to pieces, H 340.

FOR-DO, _v._ destroy, 'do for,' T. i. 238, iv. 1681; Fordoon, _v._ B 369;
_ger._ B 2. m 8. 13; Fordo, _2 pr. pl. subj._ destroy, B 1317; For-dide,
_pt. s._ slew, L. 2557; Fordoon, _pp._ overcome, vanquished, T. i. 525;
ruined, T. v. 1687; destroyed, H 290; slain, L. 939; Fordo, _pp._
destroyed, 2. 86; T. i. 74; A 1560; undone, F 1562.

FORDREYED, _pp._ dried up, F 409 _n_.

FORDRIVEN, _pp._ driven about, B 1. p 3. 46.

FOR-DRONKEN, _pp._ extremely drunk, A 3120, 4150; For-dronke, C 674.

FORDRYE, _adj._ very dry, exceedingly dry, withered up, F 409.

FORDWYNED, _adj._ shrunken, R. 366.

FORE, _s._ path, trace of steps, D 110; course, track, D 1935. A.S.
_f[=o]r_.

FOREHED, _s._ forehead, B 4. m 7. 18; Fore-heved, B 5. m 5. 15. See
FORHEED.

FOR['E]STE, _s._ forest, A 1975; F['o]rest, 3. 363; T. v. 1235, 1237; L.
2310; H 170; For['e]stes, _s. pl._ forests, F 1190.

FORESTERES, _s. pl._ foresters, 3. 361.

FOREST-SYDE, wood-side, edge of a forest, 3. 372; D 990, 1380.

FOREYNE, _adj._ extraneous, B 3. p 3. 48, 53; Foreine, outer, B 1. m 2. 3.

FOREYNE, _s._ outer chamber (_or_ courtyard?), L. 1962 (see note).

FORFERED, _pp._ exceedingly afraid; _forfered of_ = very afraid for, F 527.

FORFETE, _v._ forfeit; Forfeted, _pt. s._ did wrong, I 273.

FORGAF, _pt. s._ of Foryeve.

FORGAT, _pt. s. of_ Foryete.

FORGE, _v._ forge, fabricate, 5. 212; I 610; _ger._ C 17; Forgeth, _pr. s._
A 2026; Forgen, _pr. pl._ work, I 554: Forge, _pr. s. subj._ C 14; Forged,
_pp._ 4. 201.

FORGETE; see FORYETE.

FORGIFT, _s._ forgiveness, L. 1853.

FORGIVING, _s._ L. 1852.

FOR-GO, _pp._ overwalked, exhausted with walking, HF. 115.

FORGON, _ger._ to give up, forego, (_better_ forgo), T. iv. 195; _v._ E
171, G 610, H 295; Forgoon, _v._ HF. 1856; Forgo, _v._ forego, give up,
leave alone, L. 312 _a_; T. iii. 1384; D 315; lose, R. 1473; Forgoth, _pr.
s._ gives up, T. iv. 713, v. 63; For-gon, _pr. pl._ B 2. p 5. 23; Forgoon,
_pp._ lost, B 2183, I 945; Forgon, _pp._ lost, T. iii. 1442; Forgo, _pp._
4. 256.

FORHEED, _s._ forehead, R. 860, A 154, 3310; Forheved, B 1. p 4. 91. See
FOREHED.

FOR-HOOR, _adj._ very hoary, R. 356.

FORKED, _pp._ forked, divided into two points, A 270.

FORKERVE, _v._; Forkerveth, _pr. s._ hews in pieces, H 340.

FORKNOWINGE, _pres. pt._ foreknowing, T. i. 79.

FORKNOWINGE, _s._ foreknowledge, B 5. p 6. 194.

FORLEFTEN, _pt. pl._ forsook, B 1. m 3. 2; Forlaft, _pp._ abandoned, C 83.
From inf. _forleve_.

FORLESE, _v._; Forleseth, _pr. s._ loses, I 789. See FORLORN.

FOR-LETEN, _v._ leave, forsake, B 3. m 3. 5, B 4. m 1. 16; abandon, B 3. p
5. 46; give up, C 864; yield up, B 1848; let go, B 5. p 6. 145; Forleteth,
_pr. s._ leaves, B 1. m 5. 21; loses, B 1. m 2. 2; abandons, forsakes, B 3.
p 11. 57; I 119; ceases, B 1. p 5. 24, B 3. p 11. 39; deserts, B 1. m 6.
15; Forlete, _pr. pl._ forsake, I 93; Forlete, _2 pr. s. subj._ give up, B
2. p 3. 62; _pr. s. subj._ forsake, I 93; Forleten, _pp._ neglected, B 1. p
1. 18, B 2. p 4. 118; abandoned, given up, HF. 694.

FORLIVEN, _v._ degenerate, B 3. p 6. 37; Forlived, _pp. as adj._
degenerate, ignoble, B 3. m 6. 9.

FORLONG-; see FURLONG-.

FORLORN, _pp._ utterly lost, L. 2663; F 1557; Forlore, T. v. 23; A 3505.
See FORLESE.

FORLOST, _pp._ utterly lost, T. iii. 280, iv. 756.

FORLOYN, _s._ note on a horn for recall (see note), 3. 386.

FORME, _s._ form, R. 1521; L. 1582; A 305; form, lair (of a hare), B 1294;
Formes, _pl._ shapes, L. 2228; A 2313.

FORME, _v._ form, C 12; Formed to, _pt. s._ formed (you) so as to be, 3.
716; Fourmed, _pp._ shaped, R. 1189.

FORME-FADER, _s._ fore-father, first father, B 2293.

FORMEL, _s._ companion (said of birds), 5. 371, 373, 418, 445, 638. See
note on 5. 371.

FORMELY, _adv._ formally, B 5. p 4. 134 (Lat _formaliter_); T. iv. 497.

FORMER, _s._ Creator, C 19.

FORMER AGE, the Golden Age of old, 9. 2.

FORMEST, _adj. sup._ foremost, 3. 890.

FORN-CAST, _pp._ premeditated, T. iii. 521; B 4407; I 448.

FORNEYS, _s._ furnace, A 202, 559. See FOURNEYS.

FORNICACIOUN, _s._ fornication, D 1284, 1302, I 865.

FOR-OLD, _adj._ extremely old, A 2142.

FORPAMPRED, _pp._ exceedingly pampered, spoilt by pampering, 9. 5.

FOR-PYNED, _pp._ wasted away (by torment or _pine_), R. 365; A 205;
exceedingly distressed, A 1453; exhausted with suffering, L. 2428.

FORS, _s._ force, A 2723; _no fors_, no matter, no consequence, 3. 522; HF.
999; A 2723, B 285, C 303, E 1092, 2430, G 1019, 1357; _no force_, no
matter, 18. 53; _no fors is_, it is no matter, 5. 615; T. iv. 322; _no
force of_, no matter for, 10. 13; _no fors of me_, no matter about me, 4.
197; _therof no fors_, never mind that, 3. 1170; _make no fors_, pay no
heed, R. 1294; H 68; _I do no fors_, I care not, 11. 31; D 1254; _I do no
fors therof_, it is nothing to me, 3. 542; _doth no fors_, takes no
account, I 711; _what fors_, what matter, T. ii. 378; _what force_, E 1295.
'I gyve no force, I care nat for a thyng, _Il ne men chault_;' Palsgrave,
p. 566.

FORSAKE, _v._ deny, B 1. p 4. 106, B 3. p 2. 75; forsake, leave, B 3431;
Forsaken, _v._ deny, B 2. p 3. 51; Forsook, _pt. s._ forsook, R. 1538; T.
i. 56; L. 265 _a_; Forsaken, _pp._ R. 1498; L. 799; Forsaketh, _imp. pl._
give up, C 286.

FORSEID, _pp. as adj._ aforesaid, 5. 120; Forseide, _def._ A. ii. 12. 28;
Forseyde, _def._ B 2444.

FORSEINGE, _s._ seeing beforehand, foreseeing, prevision, T. iv. 989.

FORSHAPEN, _pp._ metamorphosed, T. ii. 66.

FOR-SHRIGHT, _pp._ exhausted with shrieking, T. iv. 1147.

FOR-SIGHT, _s._ foresight, T. iv. 961.

FOR-SLEUTHEN, _v._ waste in sloth, B 4286.

FORSLEWE, _v._; Forsleweth, _pr. s._ wastes idly, I 685.

FORSLUGGE, _v._; Forsluggeth, _pr. s._ spoils, allows (goods) to spoil, I
685.

FORSONGEN, _pp._ tired out with singing, R. 664.

FORSOOK, _pt. s. of_ Forsake.

FORSOTHE, _adv._ verily, T. ii. 883.

FORSTER, _s._ forester, A 117.

FORSTRAUGHT, _pp._ distracted, B 1295. Cf. DESTRAT.

FORSWERINGE, _s._ perjury, HF. 153; I 600; Forswering, C 657; Forsweringes,
_pl._ C 592.

FORSWOR HIM, _pt. s._ was forsworn, HF. 389; Forswore, _pp._ falsely sworn
by, L. 2522; Forsworn, forsworn, L. 927, 1259. From inf. _forsweren_.

FORTH, _adv._ forth, on, further, onward, 5. 27; D 1569, F 604, 605, 964;
forward, HF. 2061, A 856, B 294, C 660; out, 5. 352; continually, T. v. 6,
A 2820, F 1081; away, T. i. 118; still, 4. 148; _tho f._, thenceforth, T.
i. 1076; _forth to love_, i.e. they proceed to love, T. ii. 788; Furth,
forward, A. ii. 46. 5.

FORTHER, _adv._ more forward, A 4222; Further, A. ii. 43 _a._ 4; (go)
further, A 4117.

FORTHEREN, _ger._ to further, T. v. 1707. See FORTHREN.

FORTHERING, _s._ furtherance, aid, L. 69 a.

FORTHER-MOOR, _adv._ further on, A 2069; Forthermore, moreover, C 357, E
169; Forthermo, moreover, C 594, D 783.

FORTHER-OVER, _adv._ furthermore, moreover, C 648, I 196, 270, 758, 765;
Further-over, 2. 85.

FORTHEST, _adj. and adv._ furthest, B 4. p 6. 86, 91.

FOR-THINKE, _v._ seem amiss, (_or here_) seem serious, T. ii. 1414;
For-thinketh, _pr. s. impers._ seems a pity (to me), E 1906; Forthinke, _2
pr. s. subj._ regret, B 2. p 4. 49; Forthoughte, _pt. s. subj._ should
displease, R. 1671.

FORTHREN, _ger._ to further, help, assist, L. 71, 472, 1618; _v_. L. 440; A
1137; Fortheren, _ger._ to further, T. v. 1707; Forthred, _pp._ furthered,
L. 413. See FURTHEREN.

FORTH-RIGHT, _adv._ straightforwardly, straightforward, R. 295; F 1503.

FORTHWARD, _adv._ forward, forwards, A. ii. 35. 5; B 263, F 1169.

FORTHWITH, also, as well as, together with, I 419.

FOR-THY, _adv._ therefore, on that account, B 1. m 6. 15, B 1. p 6. 56; T.
i. 232; A 1841, 4031.

_Fortitudo_, _s._ fortitude, I 728.

FORTRODEN, _pp._ trodden down, trampled, B 4. p 1. 21; trodden under foot,
I 190. Pp. of _fortreden_.

FORTUIT, _adj._ fortuitous, B 5. p 1. 58.

_Fortuna maior_ (see note), T. iii. 1420.

FORTUNAT, _adj._ fortunate, T. ii. 280.

FORT['U]NE, _s._ Fortune, A 915; F['o]rtun[`e], T. iv. 1682;
F['o]rtun[`e]s, _gen._ fortune's, 7. 44; 10. 4.

FORTUNEL, _adj._ accidental, B 5. m 1. 10.

FORTUNEN, _v._ to give (good or bad) fortune to, A 417 (see note);
Fortunest, _2 pr. s._ renderest lucky or unlucky, A 2377; Fortuned, _pt.
pl._ happened, chanced, 3. 288; _pp._ endowed by fortune, 4. 180.

FORTUNOUS, _adj._ fortuitous, accidental, B 1. p. 6. 7, 10, B 2. p 3. 59, B
4. p 5. 20.

FORUH, _s._ furrow, B 5. m 5. 3; Forwes, _pl._ 9. 12.

FOR-WAKED, _pp._ tired out with watching, 3. 126; B 596. A.S. prefix _for_,
and _wacian_, to watch.

FORWARD, _adv._ foremost, B 3. p 3. 16; _first and f._, first of all, B
2431, E 2187.

FORWARD, _s._ agreement, covenant, L. 2500; T. v. 497; A 33, 829, 848, 852,
1209, B 34, 1167; promise, B 40. A.S. _foreweard_.

FORWELKED, _adj._ withered, wrinkled, deeply lined, R. 361.

FORWEPED, _pp._ weary, exhausted through weeping, 3. 126.

FORWERED, _pp._ worn out, R. 235.

FOR-WERY, _adj._ worn out with weariness, very tired, 5. 93.

FORWES, _pl._ furrows, 9. 12. See FORUH.

FOR-WHY, _conj._ for what reason, T. iii. 1009; wherefore, why, B 1. p 6.
56; T. iii. 477; HF. 20; because, 3. 461, 793, 841, 1257; T. iii. 635; HF.
553, 725, 1183; L. 140 _a_, 464; A. ii. 46. 21; C 847.

FOR-WITER, _s._ foreknower, B 5. p 6. 210.

FORWITING, _s._ foreknowledge, B 4433.

FOR-WOT, _pr. s._ foreknows, foresees, HF. 45; T. iv. 1071; Forwoot, B
4424.

FORWRAPPED, _pp._ wrapped up, C 718; concealed, I 320.

FORYAF, _pt. s._ of Foryeve.

FORYAT, _pt. s._ of Foryeten.

FOR-YEDE, _pt. s._ gave up, T. ii. 1330.

FORYELDE, _v._ yield in return, requite, E 831; _pr. s. subj._ may (he)
requite, reward, L. 457.

FORYETEN, _v._ forget, T. iii. 55; Foryete, 3. 1125; Foryete, _1 pr. s._ A
1882; For-yeteth, _pr. s._ forgets, T. ii. 375; Forget, _for_ Forgeteth,
_pr. s._ forgets, R. 61; Forgat, _1 pt. s._ forgot, 3. 790; C 919; For-yat,
_pt. s._ T. v. 1535; Forgete, _2 pt. s._ didst forget, L. 540; For-yeten,
_pp._ forgotten, B 1. p 5. 18, B 5. m 3. 31; A 2021; Forgeten, _pp._ 3.
413; L. 125, 1752; B 2602, E 469; Forgete, _pp._ 3. 410; Foryet, _imp. s._
forget, T. iv. 796; A 2797.

FORYETELNESSE, _s._ forgetfulness, I 827. From A.S. _forgitol_, forgetful.

FORYETFUL, _adj._ forgetful, E 472. The A.S. form is _forgitol_.

FORYETINGE, _s._ forgetfulness, B 2. p 7. 60; forgetting, B 3. m 11. 21.

FORYEVE, _v._ forgive, 3. 1284; B 994, E 526; _ger._ A 743; Foryive, _ger._
L. 458; Foryeve, _1 pr. s._ forgive, L. 450; A 1818; Foryiveth, _pr. s._ 1.
139; Foryaf, _pt. s._ forgave, T. iii. 1129, 1577; Forgaf, _pt. s._ L. 162;
Foryeve, _pt. pl._ L. 1848; Foryeven, _pp._ forgiven, T. ii. 595; (being)
forgiven, 5. 82; Foryeve, _pp._ (is) forgiven, T. iii. 1106; Foryive, _pp._
forgiven, 7. 280; given up, 3. 877; Foryeve, _3 imp. s._ may (He) forgive,
C 904; Foryeveth, _imp. pl._ H 206; Foryeve, _imp. pl._ G 79.

FORYIFNESSE, _s._ forgiveness, B 2963.

FOSTREN, _v._ foster; Fostreth, _pr. s._ cherishes, E 1387; Fostred, _pt.
s._ nourished, fed, kept, E 222, H 131; Fostred, _pp._ fostered, nourished,
R. 389; brought up, 10. 42; B 275, G 122; nurtured, nourished, C 219, E
1043, F 500, G 539; Fostre, _imp. s._ feed, H 175.

FOSTRING, _s._ nourishment, D 1845.

FOTE, _s._ foot, short distance, F 1177; _dat._ L. 2711; _him to f._, at
his foot, L. 1314; _on f._, on foot, 7. 35; F 390. See FETE, FOOT.

FOTHER, _s._ load, properly a cart-load, A 530; great quantity, A 1908.

FOT-HOOT, _adv._ hastily, immediately, 3. 375. See FOOT-HOT.

FOUDRE, _s._ thunderbolt, HF. 535. '_Foudre_, also _fouldre_, a
thunderbolt;' Cotgrave. From Lat. _fulgur_.

FOUGHTEN, _pp._ fought, A 62. See FIGHTEN.

FOUL, _s._ bird, 4. 13; 5. 306; L. 1390; F 149; Foules, _pl._ birds, 4. 1;
5. 323; T. i. 787; L. 37, 130; F 53, 398; _gen. pl._ 3. 295; R. 106. See
FOWEL.

FOUL, _adj._ vile, B 2. p 5. 5; filthy, I 137; vicious, A 501; ugly, R.
361; D 265, 1063, E 1209; Foule (_better_ Foul), I 147; Foule (_better_
Foul), wretched, B 4003; Foul, _as s._ foul weather, F 121; _for foul ne
fayr_, for foul means nor fair, B 525; Foule, _voc._ B 925; Foule, _pl._ R.
972, I 855; Foule, _def. adj._ disgraceful, L. 2239; dim, L. 2240; foul, D
1610.

FOULE, _adv._ vilely, D 1069, I 815; foully, 3. 623; 5. 517; evilly, A
4220, D 1312, H 278; shamefully, L. 1307; hideously, R. 155, D 1082;
meanly, R. 1061.

FOULER, _adj. comp._ uglier, D 999; fouler, I 139.

FOULER, _s._ fowler, L. 132.

FOULESTE, _adj. superl._ vilest, meanest, B 1. p 3. 57; foulest, I 147.

FOUNDE (1), _ger._ to found, T. i. 1065; Founded, _pp._ E 61.

FOUNDE (2), _v._ seek after, 7. 241; _1 pr. s._ try, endeavour, 7. 47. A.S.
_fundian_. See FONDE.

FOUNDE, -N; see FINDE.

FOUNDEMENT, _s._ foundation, B 3. p 11. 93, B 4. p 4. 155, B 5. p 1. 35;
HF. 1132.

FOUNDRE, _v._; Foundred, _pt. s._ foundered, stumbled, A 2687.

FOUNES, _s. pl._ fawns, 3. 429 (see note); Fownes (_metaphorically_), young
desires, T. i. 465 (see note).

FOURE, four, A 210, B 491, D 992, G 1460; L. 2504, 2506.

FOURMED, _pp._ formed, shaped, R. 1189. See FORME.

FOURNEYS, _s._ furnace, B 3353, G 804, I 384, 546; Forneys, A 202, 559.

FOURTENIGHT, fourteen nights, a fortnight, T. iv. 1327, v. 334; A 929, D
1783.

FOURTHE, fourth, R. 958, 981.

FOURTY, forty, 3. 422; B 3479.

FOWEL, _s._ bird, A 190, 2437, B 1228, 1241; Fowl, R. 1581; B 3. m 12. 28;
Fowles, _pl._ A 9. See FOUL.

FOX, _s._ L. 1389, 1393, 2448; T. iii. 1565; A 552, B 4465, 4473; Foxes,
_gen._ L. 2448; B 4595; _pl._ B 3221; _gen. pl._ B 3223.

FOX-WHELPES, _s. pl._ fox-cubs, B 4. p 3. 78.

FOYNE, _pr. s. imp._ let him thrust (see note), A 2550; Foyneth, _pr. s._ A
2615; Foynen, _pr. pl._ A 1654.

FOYSON, _s._ abundance, plenty, A 3165. See FOISOUN.

FRACCIONS, _pl._ fractions, A. pr. 53.

FRAKNES, _pl._ freckles, A 2169. The sing. form is _frakin_; see Prompt.
Parv.

FRAME, _ger._ to frame, put together, build, T. iii. 530.

FRANCHYSE, _s._ liberality, 18. 59; E 1987; nobleness, F 1524; privilege, I
452; Fraunchyse, B 3854; Frankness (personified), R. 955, 1211.

FRANK, _s._ frank (French coin); Frankes, _pl._ franks, B 1371, 1377, 1391,
1461.

FRANKELEYN, _s_. franklin, A 331; F 675; Frankeleyns, _pl._ A 216.

FRAPE, _s._ company, pack, T. iii. 410. O. F. _frape_, troop; see Godefroy.

FRATERNITEE, _s._ fraternity, A 364.

FRAUDE (_before a vowel_), _s._ fraud, D 2136.

FRAUGHT, _pp._ freighted, B 171. (For an account of the idiom, see the
note.) Cf. Swed. _frakta_, Dan. _fragte_, to freight, load; Swed. _frakt_,
Dan. _fragt_, Du. _vracht_, a load, burden.

FRAYNETH, _pr. s._ prays, beseeches, B 1790. A.S. _frignan_, Icel.
_fregna_. See FREYNE.

FREE, _adj._ free, A 852; liberal, generous, R. 633, 1226; B 1366, 1854,
3076, F 1622; bounteous, liberal, 3. 484; 4. 193; bountiful, 1. 12; noble,
beautiful, C 35; noble, L. 248; B 1911; profuse, lavish, A 4387, E 1209;
Fre, gracious, 3. 1055; _as s._ noble one, 6. 104.

FREEDOM, _s._ liberality, L. 1127, 1405, 1530; Fredom, 4. 175, 294; A 46, B
168, 3832; freedom, 17. 32.

FREELE, _adj._ frail, fragile, B 2. p 6. 27; I 1078; transitory, B 2. p 8.
16.

FREEND, _s._ friend, A 670; Freendes, _gen._ T. iii. 489; Freendes, _pl._.
A 299, B 121, 269.

FREENDLICH, _adj._ friendly, A 2680.

FREENDLIER, _adj. comp._ friendlier. T. i. 885.

FREENDLY, _adv._ like a friend, A 1652; kindly, T. iii. 130; Frendly, in a
friendly way, 3. 852.

FREENDSHIPE, _s._ friendship, B 2749; Frendschipe, A 428.

FRELENESSE, _s._ frailness, B 4. p 2. 12.

FRELETEE, _s._ frailty, C 78, D 92, E 1160, I 449, 477; Freeltee
(_dissyllabic_), D 93.

FRELY, _adv._ freely, E 352, F 1604, 1605.

FREMEDE, _adj._ foreign; Fremed (_before a vowel_), strange, wild; _fremed
and tame_, wild and tame, every one, T. iii. 529; Fremde, foreign, T. ii.
248; F 429; Fremd (_before a vowel_), strange, L. 1046. A.S. _fremede_.

FRENDLY, _adv._ in a friendly way, 3. 852. See FREENDLY.

FRENDLYESTE, friendliest, T. i. 1079.

FRENDSCHIPE, _s._ friendship, A 428. See FREENDSHIPE.

FRENESYE, _s._ madness, T. i. 727; D 2209.

FRENETYK, _adj._ frantic, T. v. 206. Cf. FRENTIK.

FRENGES, _pl._ fringes, D 1383; borderings, HF. 1318.

FRENTIK, _adj._ frantic, mad, D 2048_n_. (_In a spurious line._)

FRERE, _s._ friar, 19. 19; A. pr. 62; A 208, D 829, 832, 840, 844, 855,
1265; Freres, _pl._ A 232, D 847, E 12.

FRESE, _v._; Freseth, _pr. s._ freezes, I 722.

FRESH, _adj._ fresh, bright in manner, lively, R. 435; A 92; Fressh[:e], 2.
39; R. 1187; Fresshe, _def._ 5. 442; bold, F 1092; _voc._ 1. 159; _pl._ A
90, D 1259.

FRESHLY, _adv._; Freshly newe, without fail, 3. 1228.

FRESSHE, _adv._ newly, L. 204; Fresh (_for_ Fresshe, _before a vowel_),
freshly, A 365.

FRESSHE, _v._ refresh, R. 1513.

FRESSHER, _adj. comp._ fresher, F 927.

FRET, _s._ ornament, L. 215, 225, 228. A.S. _fraetwe_, pl.

FRETEN, _v._ eat (governed by _saugh_), A 2019; _ger._ to devour, B 4. m 7.
29; Frete, _v._ swallow up, 7. 12; _ger._ devour, B 3294; Fret, _pr. s._
devours, R. 387; Freten, _pr. pl._ devour, B 3. m 2. 14; Frete, _pt. pl._
consumed, D 561; Freten, _pp._ eaten, devoured, 7. 13; B 4. m 7. 15; A
2068; Frete, _pp._ T. v. 1470; B 475. A.S. _fretan_.

FRETTED, _pp._ adorned, set, L. 1117. A.S. _fraetwian_. See FRET.

FREYNE, _v._ ask, question, T. v. 1227; Freyned, _pt. s._ B 3022; _pp._ G
433. See FRAYNETH.

FRO, _prep._ from, 2. 116; 3. 420; 4. 26; T. i. 5; A 44, B 24, 121, F 464;
out of, 4. 254; _to and fro_, L. 2358, 2471; _fro usward_, away from us (to
express that the sun, having reached the point nearest our zenith, begins
to decline), A. i. 17. 10 (cf. i. 17. 40).

FROGGE, _s._; Frogges, _pl._ frogs, R. 1410.

FROM, _prep._ from, A 128, 324; apart from, T. iv. 766; from the time that,
R. 850. See FRO.

FROST, _s._ L. 2683; T. i. 524, v. 535.

FROSTY, _adj._ frosty, cold, A 268, 1973; 7. 2; L. 878; which comes in the
winter, 5. 364.

FROT, _error for_ FROIT = Fruit, HF. 2017_n_.

FROTE, _ger._ to rub, T. iii. 1115; Froteth, _pr. s._ A 3747. O.F.
_froter_.

FROTHEN, _pr. pl._ become covered with foam, A 1659.

FRO-THIS-FORTH, henceforward, T. iv. 314.

FROUNCE, _s._ wrinkle, B 1. p 2. 20.

FROUNCED, _adj._ wrinkled, R. 365.

FROUNCELES, _adj._ unwrinkled, R. 860.

FROUNT, _s._ true countenance, B 2. p 8. 5. F. _front_.

FROWNING, _pres. part. as adj._ E 356.

FRUCTEFYINGE, _adj._ fruitful, B 1. p 1. 39.

FRUCTIFYE, _v._ produce fruit, 16. 48.

FRUCTUOUS, _adj._ fruitful, I 73.

FRUIT, _s._ fruit, 1. 38; result, F 74; Fruyt, _s._ fruit, B 4633; result,
B 411; _first fr._, first-fruits, D 2277; Fruites, _pl._ 9. 3.

FRUYTESTERES, _s. pl. fem._ fruit-sellers, C 478.

FRYE, _v._ fry, A 383, D 487.

FUGITIF, _adj._, fleeing from (Lat. _profugus_), HF. 146.

FUL, _adj._ full, 1. 42, A 306, B 86; satiated, T. iii. 1661; Fulle, _def._
full, true, T. i. 1059; entire, 7. 116; T. i. 610; _atte fulle_, at the
full, completely, 3. 899; T. i. 209; A 651, 3936, 4305.

FUL, _adv._ fully, B 5. p 3. 138; T. i. 79; F 1230; very, quite, 1. 150; 2.
33; 4. 18; 5. 125; B 3506, F 52; _f. many_, very many, F 128.

FULFILLE, _v._ fulfil, 6. 17; Fulfelle (Kentish form), _ger._ T. iii. 510;
Fulfuldest, _2 pt. s._ didst satisfy, B 2. p 3. 41; Fulfilled, _pp._ quite
full, L. 54; R. 314, 640; Fulfild, _pp._ filled full, full, R. 1282; 5. 89;
7. 42; A 940, B 660, 3713, C 3, D 859; plentifully supplied, B 3. p. 3. 69;
completely satisfied, satiated, B 3. p 3. 70, m 12. 30; completed, fully
performed, E 596, I 17.

FULLICHE, _adv._ fully, HF. 428; E 706.

FULSOMNESSE, _s._ fulness, copiousness, excess, F 405.

FUME, _s._ vapour, B 4114.

FUMETERE, _s._ fumitory, _Fumaria officinalis_, B 4153.

FUMIGACIOUNS, _pl._ fumigations, HF. 1264.

FUMOSITEE, _s._ fumes arising from drunkenness, C 567, F 358.

FUNDACIOUN, _s._ foundation, L. 739.

FUNDEMENT (1), _s._ foundation, D 2103; Fundament, HF. 1132 _n_. (2)
fundament, C 950.

FUNERAL, _adj._ T. v. 302; funereal, 2864, 2912.

FURIAL, _adj._ tormenting, furious, F 448.

FURIE, _s._ Fury (see note), F 950; monster, A 2684; rage, T. v. 212; Fury,
rage, T. iv. 845; Furies, _pl._ T. v. 1498; L. 2252.

FURIOUS, _adj._ 4. 123; 7. 50.

FURLONG, _s._ distance for a race, race-course, B 4. p 3. 7; Furlongs,
_pl._ furlongs, A 4166; Furlong-wey, a short distance, B 557; Forlong-wey,
a brief time (lit. time of walking a furlong, 2-1/2 minutes), T. iv. 1237;
Furlong-wey, 7. 328; HF. 2064; L. 307 (see note), 841; A 3637, 4199, D
1692, E 516.

FURRE, _s._ fur, R. 228.

FURRED, _pp._ furred, trimmed with fur, R. 227, 408; T. iii. 738.

FURRINGE, _s._ fur-trimming, I 418.

FURTH, _adv._ forward, A. ii. 46. 5; Furthe, A. ii. 46. 17. See FORTH.

FURTHEREN, _v._ further, aid; Furthre, _ger._ to help, HF. 2023; Furthered,
_pp._ advanced, 7. 273. See FORTHREN.

FURTHERING, _s._ helping, 5. 384; Furtheringes, _pl._ help, HF. 636.

FURTHER-OVER, moreover, 2. 85. See FORTHER-OVER.

FURTHRE, _ger._ to help, HF. 2023. See FURTHEREN.

FURY, _s._ rage, T. iv. 845. See FURIE.

FUSIBLE, _adj._ fusible, capable of being fused, G 856.

FUSTIAN, _s._ fustian, A 75.

FUTUR, _adj._ future, T. v. 748; G 875.

FUTURES, _s. pl._ future events, B 5. p 6. 140; future times, p 6. 13.

FY, _interj._ fie! 3. 1115; 5. 596; T. i. 1038; HF. 1776; A 3552, B 80,
4081, F 686, 1227.

FYF, five, B 3602. See FYVE.

FYLE, _s._ file, A 2508.

FYLE, _v._ file, smoothe by filing, 5. 212; Fyled, _pp._ A 2152.

FYN, _s._ end, R. 1558; 4. 218; B 3. p 3. 4; T. i. 952, v. 1548, 1828; L.
2233; B 424; death, T. ii. 527; result, B 3348, 3884; aim, E 2106; object,
T. ii. 425, iii. 553; _for fyn_, finally, T. iv. 477.

FYN, _adj._ fine, strong, A 1472; fine, A 456; refined, R. 1557; Fyne,
_pl._ A 453; fine, good, F 640; _of fyne force_, of very need, T. v. 421.

FYNAL, _adj._ final, L. 2101; F 987; _as s._, final answer, T. iv. 145.

FYNALLY, _adv._ finally, 5. 92; A 1204, B 1072; in fine, 10. 8; at last, F
576.

FYNE, _adv._ finely, closely, particularly well, L. 1715.

FYNE, _v._ finish, T. iv. 26; cease, end, T. ii. 1460, v. 776; D 788, 1136.

FYNESTE, _adj. superl._ finest, A 194.

FYNT, _pr. s._ finds, L. 1499, 1798; A 4071; Fint, G 218. See FINDE.

FYR, _s._ fire, B 3734, I 137; Fyr of Seint Antony, erysipelas, I 427;
Fyre, _dat._ 3. 646; Fyres, _gen._ fire's, G 1408; Fyres, _pl._ sacrificial
fires, A 2253.

FYRBRAND, _s._ fire-brand, torch, 5. 114; E 1727.

FYR-MAKINGE, _s._ making of the fire, A 2914; Fyr-making, G 922.

FYR-REED, _adj._ red as fire, flaming, A 624.

FYRY, _adj._ fiery, 4. 27, 96; 6. 40; L. 235; A 1493, 1564.

FYSICIEN, _s._ physician, B 1. p 3. 3.

FYVE, five, T. ii. 126, 128, v. 889; A 460, B 12; Fyf (in phr. _fyf yeer_),
B 3602.



GABBE, _ger._ to boast, prate, A 3510; Gabbe, _1 pr. s._ lie, speak idly,
3. 1075; B 2. p 5. 121; B 4256; Gabbestow, liest thou, T. iv. 481; Gabbe,
_pr. pl._ boast, T. iii. 301. Icel. _gabba_.

GABBER, _s._ liar, idle talker, I 89.

GABLE, _s._ gable-end, A 3571.

GADELING, _s._ idle vagabond, gadabout, R. 938. A.S. _gaedeling_.

GADERE, _v._ gather; Gadereth, _pr. s._ A 1053; Gadrede, _pt. s._ A 824;
Gadered, _pt. s._ A 4381, E 2231. A.S. _gaderian_.

GADERINGE, _s._ gathering, B 2765.

GAILLARD, _adj._ joyous, merry, lively, A 4367; Gaylard, A 3336. F.
_gaillard_.

GALANTYNE, _s._ a kind of sauce, galantine, 9. 16; Galauntyne, 12. 17. O.F.
_galentine_.

GALAXYE, _s._ the Galaxy, Milky Way, 5. 56; HF. 936.

GALE, _v._ sing, cry out, D 832; _pr. s. subj._ exclaim, D 1336. A.S.
_galan_.

GALIANES, _s. pl._ medicines, C 306. So named after Galen; see the note.

GALINGALE, _s._ sweet cyperus, A 381. (A spice was prepared from the root
of the plant.)

GALLE (1), _s._ gall, 10. 35; T. iv. 1137, v. 732; B 3537, G 58, 797, I
195; Galles, _pl._ feelings of envy, 9. 47.

GALLE (2), _s._ sore place, D 940.

GALOCHE, _s._ a shoe, F 555.

GALOUN, _s._ gallon, H 24.

GALPE, _v._ gape; Galpeth, _pr. s._ H 62 _n_; Galping, _pres. pt._ F 350;
Galpinge, F 354.

GALWES, _s. pl._ gallows, B 3924, 3941, D 658.

GAME, _v._; Gamed, _pt. s. impers._ it pleased, A 534.

GAMEN, _s._ game, sport, T. ii. 38, iii. 250; Game, sport, 3. 539; 22. 61;
A 853, D 1275, G 703, H 100; joke, jest, 7. 279; E 733; amusement, fun,
merriment, T. v. 420; HF. 886; L. 33, 489; A 2286, 4354, B 2030, 3740,
3981, 4452; Games, _pl._ contests, B 4. p 11. 113. A.S. _gamen_.

GAN, _pt. s. of_ Ginne.

GANETH, _pr. s._ yawneth, H 35. A.S. _g[=a]nian_, to yawn, gape.

GAPE, _v._ gape, gasp, B 3924; Gapeth, _pr. s._ opens his mouth, L. 2004;
Gape (_also_ Cape), _pr. pl._ gape, stare, A 3841; Gaped, _pt. s._ gazed, A
3473; Gapeden, _pt. pl._ opened their mouths wide, B 1. p 4. 71; Gaping,
_pres. pt._ gaping, A 3444; with open mouth, B 4232; wide open, A 2008. See
CAPE.

GAPINGES, _s. pl._ greedy wishes, B 2. m 2. 11 (Lat. _hiatus_).

GAPPE, _s._ gap, A 1639, 1645.

GARDIN, _s._ garden, B 3732, D 759, 764, E 2029, F 902, 908; Garden, 5.
183; Gard['i]n, R. 481; Gard['y]n, R. 512.

GARDIN-WAL, _s._ garden-wall, A 1060.

GARDINWARD, _adv._ gardenward; _to the g._, towards the garden, F 1505;
_unto the g._, A 3572.

GARGAT, _s._ throat, B 4524. O.F. _gargate_.

GARLANDS, _pl._ L. 2614; Garlondes, 5. 259. See GERLAND.

GARLEEK, _s._ garlic, A 634.

GARNEMENT, _s._ garment, R. 896. O.F. _garnement_.

GARNERE, _s._ garner, granary, R. 1148. See GERNER.

GARNISOUN, _s._ garrison, B 2217; Garnison, B 2527. O.F. _garnison_.

GAS, _pr. s._ goes (Northern), A 4037.

GASTLY, _adv._ terrible, A 1984.

GASTNESSE, _s._ terror, B 3. p 5. 19.

GAT, _pt. s. of_ Geten.

GATE, _s._ gate, door, 4. 119; R. 442, 1279; A 1415, C 729, D 1581; Gates,
_pl._ 5. 154.

GAT-TOTHED, _adj._ having the teeth far apart, A 468 (see note); D 603.

GAUDE, _s._ gaud, toy, pretence, T. ii. 351; trick, course of trickery, C
389; Gaudes, _pl._ pranks, I 651.

GAUD[`E], _adj._ dyed with weld, A 2079. Cf. Fr. _gauder_, to dye with
weld. See WELD.

GAUDED, _pp._ furnished with beads called _gauds_, A 159. (The bead or
_gaud_ was formerly called _gaudee_, from Lat. imp. pl. _gaudete_; see
Cotgrave.)

GAURE, _v._ stare, T. ii. 1157, v. 1152; Gauren, _ger._ to stare, gaze, A
3827, B 912, F 190; Gaureth, _pr. s._ B 3559.

GAY, _adj._ gay, finely dressed, 5. 234; A 74, 111; T. ii. 922; joyous, R.
435; wanton, A 3769; Gaye, _def._ gay, I 411.

GAYE, _adv._ finely, G 1017.

GAYER, _adj. comp._ 3. 407.

GAYLARD, _adj._ lively, A 3336. See GAILLARD.

GAYLER, _s._ gaoler, A 1064, B 3615; Gaylere, L. 2051.

GAYNE, _v._; Gayneth, _pr. s._ avails, A 1176, 1787, 2755; Gayned, _pt. s._
profited, T. i. 352. Icel. _gegna_.

GAYTRES BERYIES, berries of the gay-tree or gait-tree (goat-tree), berries
of the _Rhamnus catharlicus_, or buckthorn, B 4155. See note.

GAZE, _v._ gaze; Gazed, _pt. s._ E 1003.

GEAUNT, _s._ giant, 5. 344; T. v. 838; B 1997, 3298; Giaunts, _pl._ B. 3. p
12. 98.

GEBET, _s._ gibbet, gallows, HF. 106.

GEEN, _pp._ gone (Northern), A 4078. See GON.

GEES, _pl._ geese, B 4581, E 2275. See GOOS.

GEET, _s._ jet, B 4051_n_. See IEET.

GEETH, _pr. s._ goeth, goes, L. 2145. A.S. _g[=ae]dh_, he goes, from
_g[=a]n_, to go. See GON.

GELDING, _s._ A 691.

GEMME, _s._ gem, T. ii. 344; C 223, H 274; Gemmes, _pl._ 9. 30; E 254, 779.

GENDRES, _pl._ kinds, HF. 18.

GENERACIOUN, _s._ engendrure, D 116.

GENERAL, _adj._ with wide sympathies, liberal, 3. 990; general, 1. 60; F
945; _in g._, generally, 10. 56; 13. 26; in a troop, T. i. 162.

GENERALLY, _adv._ everywhere, T. i. 86.

GENT, _adj._ refined, exquisite, noble, 5. 558; B 1905; slim, A 3254;
Gente, _fem._ graceful, R. 1032.

GENTERYE, _s._ nobility, magnanimity, L. 394; gentility, D 1146; Gentrye,
gentle birth, I 452; rank, I 461; Gentrie, sign of good birth, I 601.

GENTIL, _adj._ gentle, refined, 5. 196; 14. 2; A 72, B 2831, D 1170;
gentle, worthy, B 1627, F 452; excellent, A 718, B 3123; mild in manner,
compassionate, A 647, F 483; noble, B 3. p 6. 31; well-bred, D 1111;
beautiful, R. 1081; charming, R. 1016, 1216; Gentile, _fem. adj. as s._
gentle (woman), H 217.

GENTILLESSE, _s._ gentleness, noble kindness, courtesy, good breeding, 2.
68; 4. 279; 18. 8; L. 610, 1010, 1080; A 920, 3179, C 54, F 1524, I 154,
464; nobility, B 3. p 6. 24, B 3854; gentility, 14. 1; D 1109, 1117, 1130;
worth, E 96; kindness, G 1054; condescension, B 853; high birth, I 585;
slenderness, symmetry, F 426; delicate nurture, E 593.

GENTILLESTE, _adj. sup._ noblest, E 72, 131; Gentileste, gentlest, T. i.
1080; most delicate, 5. 373; Gentilest (_before a vowel_), noblest, 5. 635.

GENTILLY, _adv._ gently, honourably, A 3104, F 1608; courteously, B 1093;
frankly, F 674.

GENTIL-MAN, gentleman, L. 1264; D 1116.

GENTILS, _s. pl._ gentlefolk, 7. 67; A 3113, C 323, D 1209, E 480.

GENTIL-WOMAN, _s._ lady of gentle birth, L. 1306; Gentil-wommen, _pl._ L.
1370.

GENTRYE; see GENTERYE.

GEOMANCIE, _s._ divination by figures made on the earth, I 605. See note to
A 2045.

GEOMETRIE, _s._ geometry, A 1898.

GEOMETRIENS, _s. pl._ geometricians, B 3. p 10. 28.

GERDOUN, _s._ guerdon, B 2. p 3. 47 _n_.

GERE (g[`e][`e]r[*e]), _s._ gear, armour, T. ii. 635, 1012; A 2180;
equipment, A 4016; property, T. iv. 1523; B 800; utensils, A 352; apparel,
A 365, 1016, E 372; Geres, _pl_. contrivances, F 1276.

GERE (g[`e][`e]r[*e]), _s._ changeful manner, 3. 1257; A 1372; Geres, _pl._
changeful ways, A 1531. Cf. GERFUL.

GERFUL, _adj._ changeable, T. iv. 286; A 1538. Cf. GERY.

GERL, _s._ girl, wench, A 3769; Girles, _pl._ young people (of either sex),
A 664.

GERLAND, _s._ garland, R. 566; A 666, 1054, 1929, 1961, G 27; Gerl['a]nd,
R. 869; Gerlond, R. 871, 1689; Garlands, _pl_. L. 2614; Garlondes, 5. 259.

GERNER, _s._ garner, A 593; Garnere, R. 1148; Gerneres, _pl._ B 1. p 4. 54.

GERY, _adj._ changeable, A 1536 (see note); T. iv. 286 _n_.

GESSE, _v._ suppose, imagine, R. 1115; T. iii. 984, 1241, v. 1616; HF.
1080; B 622; Gessen, _ger._ to judge of, B 1. p 4. 119; Gesse, _1 pr. s._
suppose, 4. 195; 5. 160; T. i. 656; L. 419, 893, 986, 1665; A 82, 117, B
3435, 3960, D 1195, E 469, F 609, G 977, I 175; Gessing, _pres. pt._
intending, L. 363.

GESSINGE, _s._ opinion, B 1. p 4. 202, 212, 219.

GEST, _s._ guest, B 2. m 5. 13; L. 1158; HF. 288; E 338; Geste (_abnormal
form_), T. ii. 1111; Gestes, _pl._ L. 1126; A 3188, B 1214, E 339. A.S.
_gaest_.

GESTE, _s._ romance, tale, story, T. ii. 83, iii. 450; L. 87 _a_; _in
geste_, in romance-form, like the common stock-stories, B 2123; Gestes,
_pl._ stories, D 642, F 211; occurrences, T. i. 145; exploits, affairs, T.
ii. 1349; histories, history, B 1126, E 2284; doings, deeds, HF. 1434,
1515. O.F. _geste_.

GESTOURS, _s. pl._ story-tellers, B 2036; Gestiours, HF. 1198. Cf. mod. E.
_jester_; see above.

GET (jet), _s._ contrivance, G 1277. O.F. _get_.

GETEN, _v._ obtain, get, L. 2370; beget, E 1437; _ger._ L. 1358; Gete, _v._
7. 203; _ger._ 3. 888; L. 1595; E 1210; Gete, _1 pr. s._ 3. 476; Getest, _2
pr. s._ B 1669; Geteth, _pr. s._ gets, obtains, T. ii. 376; Get, _pr. s._
procures, I 828; Gete, _2 pr. pl._ (ye) get, (ye) obtain, H 102; _2 pr. pl.
as fut._ (ye) will get, 5. 651; Gat, _pt. s._ begat, B 715; got, 7. 206; L.
1649; procured for, L. 2160; A 703, B 647, F 654, G 373; Geten, _pp._
gotten, obtained, A 291, D 817; won, L. 1753, 2150; begotten, L. 1402;
Gete, _pp._ gotten, obtained, 4. 265; L. 1123; D 1236; _han geten hem_, to
have acquired for themselves, F 56.

GEVEN, _pp._ given, A. pr. 7. See YEVE.

GEYN, _s._ profit, 7. 206. Icel. _gagn_.

GEYNETH, _pr. s._ avails, B 647 _n_. See GAYNE.

GIAUNTS, _s. pl._ giants, B 3. p 12. 98. See GEAUNT.

GIF, _conj._ if (Northern), A 4181, 4190.

GIGGES, _pl._ rapid movements, HF. 1942. Cf. mod. E. _jig_.

GIGGINGE, _pres. pt. pl._ fitting with straps (see note), A 2504.

GILDEN, _adj._ of gold, golden, 3. 338. A.S. _gylden_.

GILT, _s._ guilt, offence, 1. 178; 6. 122; T. ii. 244; B 2695, D 1612, F
757, 1039, I 84; Giltes, _pl._ sins, B 3015, I 86.

GILTE, _adj. def._ gilt, golden, L. 230; _pl._ 5. 267; L. 249; B 3554.

GILTELEES, _adj._ guiltless, innocent, 6. 33; A 1312, B 1062, 1073, F 1318;
Giltlees, B 643; Giltles, 11. 17; L. 2092.

GILTIF, _adj._ guilty, T. iii. 1019, 1049.

GILTY, _adj._ guilty, A 660.

GIN, _s._ contrivance, snare, L. 1784; F 128, 322, G 1165; Ginnes, _pl._
traps, snares, R. 1620; B 3. m 8. 5. Short for O.F. _engin_.

GINGEBREED, _s._ gingerbread, B 2044.

GINGERE, _s._ ginger, R. 1369.

GINGLEN, _v._ jingle, A 170.

GINNE, _v._ begin, attempt, HF. 2004 (see note); _1 pr. s._ T. ii. 849;
Ginneth, _pr. s._ R. 53; L. 61; T. i. 218; Ginnen, _pr. pl._ L. 38; Gan, _1
pt. s._ began, T. i. 266; (_as auxiliary verb_), did, R. 734, 1129; _pt.
s._ began, 1. 133; 2. 19; 3. 70; 5. 144; L. 1699; B 3230, G 462; undertook,
F 789; did, 1. 92; 3. 865; 5. 247, &c.; Gonne, _pl._ did, E 1103; HF. 944,
1002; L. 148, 292; began, C 323; Gonnen, _pt. pl._ began, 5. 531; T. ii.
99; G 376; did, HF. 244, 2110; Gunne, _pt. pl._ began, HF. 1658; did, 5.
193, 257, 283; HF. 1384; Gunnen, _pt. pl._ did, T. ii. 150.

GINNINGE, _s._ beginning, T. i. 377; Ginning, 22. 80; T. ii. 671; HF. 66;
L. 1231.

GIPOUN, _s._ a short cassock or doublet, A 75, 2120. Cf. Fr. _jupon_.

GIPSER, _s._ pouch, purse, A 357. F. _gibeci[`e]re_, a game-bag.

GIRDEL, _s._ girdle, R. 1085; A 358, 3250, B 1921; central line, or great
circle, A. i. 17. 26; Girdles, _pl._ A 368.

GIRDEN, _ger._ to strike, B 3736. Properly to switch; from A.S. _gerd_, a
yard, a rod, switch.

GIRDILSTEDE, _s._ waist, lit. girdle-stead, R. 826.

GIRGOUN (jirguun), _s._ jargon, chatter, E 1848_n_.

GIRLES, _pl._ young people, whether male or female, A 664. See GERL.

GIRT, _pr. s._ girds, 4. 100; L. 1775; Girt, _pp._ girded, A 329. A.S.
_gyrt_, he girds; from _gyrdan_.

GISER (jizer), _s._ gizzard, liver, B 3. m 12. 29.

GITERNE, _s._ kind of guitar, cittern, A 3333, 3353, 4396, H 268; Giternes,
_pl._ C 466.

GITERNINGE, _s._ playing on the gittern, A 3363.

GLAD, _adj._ glad, A 846; Glade, _def._ 4. 12; Gladde, _pl._ D 1348; glad,
sparkling, R. 1217; Glade, _pl._ 3. 338, 601.

GLADDER, _adj. comp._ more glad, A 3051.

GLADDEST, _adj. sup._ 3. 1280.

GLADE, _ger._ to gladden, cheer, T. i. 734; E 1174; _v._ 3. 563; R. 498; B
4001, F 968, G 598; Gladen, _ger._ to console, A 2837; to rejoice, 5. 687;
Gladde, _v._ relieve, 3. 702; Gladeth, _pr. s._ pleases, cheers, E 1107, F
609; _pr. pl. refl._ delight, B 5. m 5. 6; Gladed, _pt. s._ cheered, T. i.
116; Gladded, _pt. s._ gladdened, HF. 962; Gladed, _pp._ cheered,
delighted, B 2. p 5. 42; T. i. 994; gladdened, B 2. p 4. 66; Glade, _imp.
s._ gladden, rejoice, T. i. 897; _3 p._ may he comfort, E 822; Gladeth,
_imp. pl._ rejoice, 4. 1.

GLADER, _s._ gladdener, one that cheers, A 2223.

GLADLY, _adv._ fitly, I 887; willingly, 3. 754; F 224; by preference, L.
770; _that been gl. wyse_, that would be thought wise, F 376.

GLADNES, _s._ Gladness, R. 746, 848.

GLADSOM, _adj._ pleasant, B 3968.

GLARE, _v._; Glareth, _pr. s._ glistens, shines, HF. 272; Glaringe, _pres.
pt._ staring, shining, A 684.

GLAS, _s._ glass, 3. 322, 336; B 1. m 7. 5; HF. 120; A 152, 198, 700, 1958,
F 254.

GLASE, _ger._ to glaze, furnish with glass (see note), T. v. 469.

GLASING, _s._ glazing, glass-work, 3. 327.

GLEDE, _s._ burning coal, glowing coal or ashes, T. iv. 337, v. 303; A
1997, 3379, B 111; _coloured as the glede_, of a bright red, B 3574;
Gledes, _pl._ glowing coals, L. 235; T. ii. 538; A 3883, I 548. See GLEED.

GLEDY, _adj._ glowing (as a coal), burning, L. 105 (see note).

GLEE, _s._ music, 1. 100; T. ii. 1036; entertainment, B 2030; Gle[:e]s,
_pl._ musical instruments, HF. 1209, 1252.

GLEED, _s._ glowing coal, L. 735. A.S. _gl[=e]d_. Usually Glede, q.v.

GLEEM, _s._ gleam, L. 164a.

GLENING, _pres. part._ gleaning, L. 75.

GLENTE, _pt. pl._ glanced, T. iv. 1223. From infin. _glenten_.

GLEWE, _v._ fasten, glue, HF. 1761.

GLEYRE, _s._ white (of an egg), G 806. '_Gleyre_ of eyryne [i.e. _eggs_] or
other lyke, _glarea_;' Prompt. Parv. Fr. _glaire_ (which in Ital. is
_chiara_), the white of an egg; corrupted from _claire_, from Lat.
_clarus_, clear.

GL[)I]DEN, _pp. of_ Glyde.

GLIMSING, _s._ glimpse, glimmer, imperfect sight, E 2383.

GLITEREN, _pr. pl._ glitter, A 977.

GLOOD, _pt. s. of_ Glyde.

GLORIFYE, _v._ glorify, praise, T. ii. 1593; _refl._ boast himself, HF.
1134; Glorifie, I 405.

GLORIOUS, _adj._ 1. 4, 49; excellent, E 1268.

GLORIOUS, _adv._ gloriously, 12. 3.

GLOSE, _s._ glosing, comment, L. 328; F 166; explanation, D 1792;
commentary, _hence_ margin (see note), 3. 333.

GLOSE, _ger._ to interpret, explain, T. iv. 1410; to flatter, B 3330; _v._
D 26; speak with circumlocution, E 2351; persuade cunningly, T. iv. 1471;
flatter, I 45; cajole, D 509; Glosen, _v._ comment upon, B 1180; Glosinge,
_pres. pt._ flattering, fawning, B 2. p 3. 45; Glose, _imp. s._ let him
explain, D 119.

GLOSINGE, _s._ explaining, D 1793.

GLOTONYE, _s._ gluttony, 5. 362; D 1916, I 388, 818; Glotonyes, _pl._
excesses, C 514.

GLOTOUN, _s._ glutton, 5. 610, 613.

GLOVE, _s._ T. v. 1013; Gloves, _pl._ R. 572; A 2874.

GLOWEN, _v._ glow, B 3. p 1. 23; Glowe, _v._ burn, T. ii. 1022; Gloweden,
_pt. pl._ glowed, A 2132; Glowinge, _pres. pt._ shining, B 4095.

GLYDE, _v._ glide, 4. 53; A 1575; ascend, G 402; slip, T. iv. 1215; _up
gl._, rise up gradually, F 373; _ger._ F 1415; Gl[`o][`o]d, _pt. s._
glided, went quickly, B 2094, F 393; Gl[)i]den, _pp._ glided, passed, E
1887.

GNAISTINGE, _s._ gnashing, I 208_n_.

GNAT, _s._ T. iv. 595; D 347, H 255.

GNAWEN, _v._ gnaw, eat, L. 844; Gnaweth, _pr. s._ 17. 10; Gnow, _pt. s._ B
3638; Gnawinge, _pres. pt._ champing, A 2507; Gnaw, _imp. s._ T. i. 509.
A.S. _gnagan_; pt. t. _gn[=o]h_.

GNIDEN, _pt. pl._ rubbed, 9. 11. From inf. _gn[=i]de_, _gnyde_; A.S.
_gn[=i]dan_; see note.

GNODDED, _pt. pl._ rubbed, 9. 11 (footnote). See note.

GNOF, _s._ churl (lit. thief), A 3188 (see note).

GNOW, _pt. s._ gnawed, B 3638. See GNAWEN.

GO; see GON.

GOBET, _s._ piece, morsel, fragment, A 696; lump, B 5. p 1. 51; Gobetes,
_pl._ lumps, B 2. m 5. 24.

GOD, _s._ A 769; God be with you, farewell, C 748; Goddes, God's, Christ's,
B 1166, 1169, 1175; (_pronounced_ god's), D 1096; Goddes, _pl._ gods, false
gods, 3. 1328; B 1. p 4. 187; gods (of the planets), 16. 3.

GODD['E]SSE, _s._ goddess, 3. 109; 10. 50; F 1046; G['o]ddes, 16. 15;
G['o]ddess[`e], 5. 303, 368.

GODE, _adj._ and _s._; see GOOD.

GODHEDE, _s._ godhead, divinity, A 2381.

GODLIHEDE, _s._ beauty, T. iii. 1730.

GODSIB, _s._ sponsor, I 909; Godsibbes, _pl._ sponsors, related in God, I
908. See GOSSIB.

GOFYSSHE, _old misprint for_ Gosysshe (see GOOSISH), T. iii. 584_n_.

GOINGS, _pl._ walking movements, B 5. m 5. 7.

GOLD, _s._ gold, L. 1118, 1200, 1208; A 160, 298, 443; G 826, 962; Golde,
_dat._ 3. 259.

GOLD, _adj._ made of gold, R. 1193.

GOLD-BETE, adorned with beaten gold, gilt, 7. 24. Cf. Y-BETE.

GOLDEN-TRESSED, _adj._ T. v. 8.

GOLDES, _pl._ marigolds, A 1929.

GOLDFINCH, _s._ A 4367.

GOLD-HEWEN, _pp._ hewn of gold, cut out of or made of gold, A 2500.

GOLDLEES, _adj._ moneyless, B 1480.

GOLDSMITH, _s._ G 1333.

GOLDSMITHRIE, _s._ goldsmiths' work, A 2498.

GOLD-THRED, _s._ gold thread, golden twine, B 3665.

GOLEE, _s._ gabble (lit. mouthful), 5. 566 (see note).

GOLET (gulet), _s._ throat, gullet, C 543. Dimin. of O.F. _gole_, the
throat, Lat. _gula_.

GOLIARDEYS, _s._ buffoon, scurrilous talker, A 560. See note.

GOMME (gumm[*e]), _s._ gum, L. 121.

GON, _v._ go, proceed, F 200, G 563; walk, L. 1399; Goon, _v._ B 373, E
847, F 327; move, A 2510; HF. 934; _lete it goon_, let it go, G 1475; Goon,
_ger._ to go, L. 34; A 12, F 809; to walk, I 105; Go, _v._ walk, B 3802, D
1593; move, F 921; roam, L. 2066; Goost, _2 pr. s._ goest, G 56; Gost, _2
pr. s._ goest, L. 926; walkest about, B 3123; Goth, _pr. s_. goes, 1. 68;
A. ii. 16. 5; B 1698, F 392; Gooth about, seeks for, T. i. 1091; Gooth,
goes, B 385, 704, 728; Geeth, L. 2145; Gas (Northern), A 4037; Goon, _2 pr.
pl._ A 771; Go, _2 pr. pl._ walk, go on foot, C 748; Gon, _pr. pl._ go
(i.e. is heard), B 4042; Goon, _pr. pl._ 5. 102; proceed, go along, E 898;
Goon, _pp._ gone, L. 792; B 17, E 774; Go, _pp._ gone, 3. 387; L. 1656; B
1006, G 907; Geen (Northern), A 4078; Go, _pr. s. subj._ may walk, L. 2069;
Go we, let us go, T. ii. 615, 1163; B 1413; Goth, _imp. pl._ go, B 3384, E
568, F 1488.

GONFANOUN, _s._ gonfanon, gonfalon, a sacred banner, R. 1201.

GONGE, _s._ privy, I 885. A.S. _gang_.

GONNE, _s._ missile, L. 637 (see note); gun, cannon, HF. 1643.

GONNE, -N; see GINNE, _v._

GOOD, _adj._ good, A 183; Gode, _def._ A 850, 3049; _fem._ 3. 948; _dat._ F
1443; _voc._ A 4247, B 1111, 4634, C 235, D 431; E 852; Goode, _nom. def._
B 3084; _voc._ 3. 522; good friend, T. i. 1017; good (man), T. iv. 1660;
Gode, _pl._ L. 484; A 74, D 835; Gode men, good people, E 2416.

GOOD, _adv._ well, T. i. 119.

GOOD, _s._ property, goods, 5. 462; 13. 2; T. iii. 1108; R. 204; A 581,
611, D 1575, G 831, 868, 949, 1289; Gode, _dat._ benefit, HF. 1, 58;
property, wealth, L. 2638; Godes, _pl._ goods, B 2605; good things, I 450.

GOODELY, _adv._ kindly, 3. 1283. See GOODLY.

GOODLICH, _adj._ kind, bountiful, G 1053; Goodliche, kindly, B 2923. See
GOODLY.

GOODLIESTE, _sup._ goodliest, 5. 375.

GOODLIHEED, _s._ seemliness, T. ii. 842; goodly seeming, HF. 330; a goodly
outside, HF. 274; Goodlihede, goodliness, beauty, 3. 829; Godlihede, T.
iii. 1730.

GOODLY, _adj._ kindly, B 2921; excellent, L. 77; pleasing, right, B 3969;
portly, B 4010. See GOODLICH.

GOODLY, _adv._ patiently, T. iii. 1035; well, B 2420; kindly, 3. 529; HF.
565; reasonably, T. iii. 990; favourably, T. iii. 654; rightly, B 2860.

GOOD-MAN, _s._ master of the house, C 361; householder, L. 1391.

GOODNESSE, _s._ goodness, 1. 111, 138; L. 511, 520.

GOON; see GON.

GOOS, _s._ goose, 5. 358; A 3317, 4137; Gooses, _gen._ 5. 586; Gees, _pl._.
B 4581, E 2275.

GOOSISH, _adj._ goose-like, foolish, T. iii. 584.

GOOST, _2 pr. s._ goest, B 2501. See GON.

GOOT, _s._ goat, A 688, G 886.

GOOTH, _pr. s. of_ Gon.

GORE, _s._ 'gore' of a garment, B 1979 (see note); a triangular piece cut
out, A 3237.

GORGE, _s._ throat, B 4525 _n_.

GOSHAUK, _s._ goshawk, 5. 335; B 1928.

GOSPEL, _s._ gospel, A 481, 498; L. 326 _a_; text from a gospel, B 1180.

GOSSIB, _s._ female companion, D 529; male (spiritual) relation, D 243;
Godsib, sponsor, I 909; Godsibbes, (spiritual) relatives, I 908.

GOSSOMER, _s._ gossamer, F 259.

G[=O]ST (g[`o][`o]st), _s._ spirit, ghost, HF. 185; B 404; soul, 1. 56; 13.
20; mind, L. 103; ghost (ironically), H 55; the Holy Spirit, 1. 93; G 328;
_yeldeth up the gost_, gives up the ghost, L. 886; Goost, spirit, A 205, B
803, C 43, D 97, 986; soul, B 2. p 4. 28; _yaf up the goost_, B 1862;
Goste, _dat._ 14. 10.

GOSTLY, GOOSTLY, _adj._ spiritual, I 392.

GOSTLY, _adv._ spiritually, mystically, G 109; Goostly, _adv._ spiritually,
_hence_ (_perhaps_) devoutly, truly, T. v. 1030.

GOTER (guter), _s._ gutter, channel for water, T. iii. 787; L. 2705.

GOTH, _pr. s._ goes, 1. 68, 75; see GON.

GOUNE, GOWNE, _s._ gown, A 93, 391, D 2293; Gounes, _pl._ I 419.

GOUNE-CLOOTH, _s._ cloth to make a gown, D 2247, 2252.

GOURDE, _s. dat._ gourd, H 82, 91.

GOUSFAUCOUN, _error for_ Gonfanoun, R. 1201 _n_.

GOUTE, _s._ gout, B 4030.

GOVERNAILLE, _s._ mastery, E 1192; Governailes, _pl._ government, rules, B
1. p 6. 22.

GOVERNAUNCE, _s._ management, control, rule, 4. 44, 110; 5. 387; HF. 945,
958; L. 1044; A 281, 1313, F 786, 866; providence, T. ii. 467; E 1161;
dominion, 10. 28; B 3541; working, manner of action, F 311; self-control,
2. 41; 3. 1008; 6. 30; 18. 9; T. ii. 1020; charge, care, 3. 1286; B 2460, C
73; demeanour, T. ii. 219; Governance, self-control, B 4624; direction, D
1231; government, B 287; regulation, A. pr. 57; subjection, A. i. 21. 52.

GOV['E]RNE, _v._ control, T. iii. 475; B 3587; Gov['e]rneth, _pr. s._
manages, L. 1209; Gov['e]rned, _pt. s._ governed, 3. 798; Gov['e]rneth,
_imp. pl._ arrange, regulate, B 1451, E 322.

GOV['E]RNEMENT, _s._ government, HF. 1975.

GOV['E]RNERESSE, _s. fem._ governor, ruler, mistress, 1. 141; 2. 80.

GOVERNING, _s._ control, A 599; rule, L. 1400; government, L. 581;
Governinges, _pl._ control, C 75.

GOVERNOUR, _s._ ruler, umpire, A 813; ruler, B 1. p 6. 62 (Lat. _rectore_);
governor, C 122; principal, B 3130; Governour, _s._ ruler, A 861; leader,
L. 1060.

GRACE, _s._ favour, 1. 46; B 3. p 6. 22; A 88, F 458, G 1348; grace, mercy,
F 999; pardon, B 647; sake, B 5. p 1. 47, p 4. 30; grace, honour,
distinction, 5. 45; favour, good opinion, R. 1169; virtue, R. 1099; _hir
grace_, her favour (i.e. that of the Virgin), B 980; _of grace_, out of
favour, in kindness, F 161; Gras (_monosyllabic_), grace, B 2021; _sory
grace_, an ill favour, HF. 1790; disfavour, D 746; _harde grace_,
displeasure, 5. 65; displeasure, disgust, D 2228; severity, HF. 1586;
disfavour, misfortune, T. i. 713; ill luck (i.e. a curse upon him), G 665,
1189; Graces, _pl._ thanks, B 2994.

GRACELEES, _adj._ void of grace, unfavoured by God, G 1078; out of favour,
T. i. 781.

GRACIOUS, _adj._ acceptable, A 3693.

GRACIOUSLY, _adv._ favourably, B 1534.

GRACIOUSNESSE, _s._ kindness, L. 1675.

GRAME, _s._ anger, grief, harm, 7. 276; T. i. 372, iii. 1028; G 1403. A.S.
_grama_.

GRAMMERE, _s._ grammar, B 1726.

GRANGE, _s._ (see note), barn, granary, A 3668; Graunges, _pl._ HF. 698; B
1256.

GRANT MERCY, best thanks, much thanks, T. ii. 239; G 1380; Graunt mercy, G
1156; Grantmercy, D 1403; Graunt mercy, 3. 560; HF. 1874; T. iii. 1305; E
1088. Tudor E. _gramercy_.

GRANTETH, _imp. pl._ grant, 6. 131. See GRAUNTEN.

GRAPENEL, _s._ grapnel, L. 640.

GRAPES, _s. pl._ F 1148.

GRAS (1), _s._ grass, R. 1419, 1425; 5. 206; F 153; Grasses, _pl._ blades
of grass, R. 1400. See GRES.

GRAS (2), _s._ grace, B 2021. See GRACE.

GRASPE, _v._ grope, T. v. 223; Graspeth, _pr. s._ L. 2186 _n_; A 4293.

GRAS-TYME, _s._ time of eating grass, time of youth, A 3868.

GRATE, _s._ grating (?); _or an error for_ gate (?); D 2012 _n_. (The
passage is spurious.)

GRAUNGES, _pl._ granges, barns, granaries; HF. 698; B 1256. See GRANGE.

GRAUNT, _s._ grant, R. 851; A 1306.

GRAUNT MERCY; see GRANT.

GRAUNTEN, _v._ grant, R. 1483; fix, name, E 179; Graunte, _1 pr. s._
consent, C 327; Graunteth, _pr. s._ 1. 137; Graunted, _pt. s._ assented to,
L. 2665; T. iii. 580; E 183; Graunted, _pt. pl._ consented to, A 786; _pp._
agreed to, A 810; Graunte, _imp. s._ (_3 p._), may he grant, E 842;
Graunteth, _imp. pl._ 5. 643; Granteth, 6. 131.

GRAUNTING, _s._ grant, A 2439.

GRAVAILES, _s. pl._ sands, B 3. m 10. 9. See GRAVEL.

GRAVE, _s._ A 2778; pit, L. 680.

GRAVEL, _s._ R. 127, 1556. See GRAVAILES.

GRAVEN, _v._ engrave, F 830; Grave, _v._ dig; _doth she gr._, she causes to
be dug, L. 678; bury, E 681; Grave, _ger._ to carve, carve out, 23. 5; to
engrave, C 17; to cut, impress, T. ii. 1241; Graven, _pr. pl._ engrave, T.
iii. 1462; Grave, _pr. s. subj._ engrave, C 15; Graven, _pp._ engraved,
graven, HF. 193; A. ii. 5. 7; buried, L. 785; Grave, _pp._ graven, HF. 157,
253, 256; I 751; buried, D 1065, F 976; T. iii. 103.

GRAY, _adj._ A 1492; see GREY.

GRAYN, _s._ dye; _in grayn_, in dye, i.e. dyed of a fast colour, B 1917.
See GREYN.

GRAYTHE, _ger._ to adorn, clothe, dress, R. 584. See GREITHE, GREYTHE.

GRECE, _s._ grease, A 135, C 60, D 487.

GREDY, _adj._ greedy, ready, T. iii. 1758.

GREE (1), _s._ favour, good part, R. 42; E 1151; favour, B 259; good will,
18. 73; _in gree_, favourably, T. ii. 529, iv. 321. O.F. _gre_, Lat.
_gratum_.

GREE (2), _s._ degree, rank, L. 1313; E 1375; superiority, A 2733. O.F.
_gre_, Lat. acc. _gradum_.

GREEF, _s._ grievance, D 2174.

GREET, _adj._ great, 3. 954; A 84, 137, 312, 559; Gret, B 3403, F 463;
Grete, _def._ 3. 140; chief, principal, T. iii. 505; L. 637; A 59, B 1181;
_voc._ B 1797; _pl._ L. 929; E 382; abundant, luxuriant, C 37; _a greet_, a
great one, A 339; Grete, _def. adj. as s._, the chief part, L. 574, 1693;
3. 1242; 5. 35; T. v. 1036.

GREHOUNDES, _s. pl._ greyhounds, A 190.

GREITHE, _v._ prepare, B 3784. See GRAYTHE, GREYTHE.

GR['E]NE, _adj._ green, D 861, E 120; of a green colour, F 646; fresh, 11.
5; moss-covered, 5. 122; flourishing, B 1. m 1. 8; pallid, T. ii. 60; _as
s._, green colour, R. 573; A 103, 116, 159, D 1382; green clothing (the
colour of inconstancy), 21. 7; a green thing, T. iv. 770; greenness, R. 57;
F 54; greenness, living evidence, G 90; green place, green space, 5. 328;
L. 282; D 1047, F 862.

GRENEHEDE, _s._ greenness, wantonness, B 163.

GRENISH, _adj._ greenish, HF. 1647.

GRENNING, _pres. part._ grinning, R. 156.

GRES, _s._ grass, T. ii. 515; Greses, _pl._ grasses, HF. 1353. See GRAS.

GRET, Grete, _adj._; see GREET.

GRETE, _v._ greet; _imp. s._ L. 2299; Grette, _1 pt. s._ 3. 503; L. 116;
_pt. s._ T. iii. 955, v. 293; L. 976, 1485, 1502; B 1051, C 714, E 952, F
1174. A.S. _gr[=e]tan_.

GRETNESSE, _s._ size, dimension, R. 552.

GRETTER, _adj. comp._ greater, A 197, E 1126, I 145.

GRETTESTE, _adj. sup._ greatest, A 120.

GREVAUNCE, _s._ grievance, trouble, hardship, B 2676, 3703, F 941;
complaint (against us), 1. 63; discomfort, 5. 205; affliction, 10. 47;
Grevance, grievance, I 666; Grevaunces, _pl._ distresses, T. i. 647.

GREVE, (gr[`e][`e]v[*e]), _s._ grove, T. v. 1144; Greves, _pl._ groves, 3.
417; A 1495; boughs, sprays, L. 227; A 1507.

GREVE, _ger._ to harm, R. 1042; _v._ grieve, trouble, vex, harm, 3. 1106;
T. ii. 228; B 1638, D 1490, F 1134, I 382; feel vexed, grumble, T. i. 343;
Greveth, _pr. s._ grieves, harms, T. v. 783; A 917; _impers._ it vexes, E
647; Greve, _pr. s. subj._ C 186; Greved, _pt. s. subj._ R. 1671; _pp._ L.
127.

GREVOUS, _adj._ grievous, painful, 1. 20, 82; T. v. 1604; I 130; dangerous,
mischievous, R. 964; I 641.

GREVOUSLICHE, _adv._ grievously, I 847; Grevously, L. 369.

GREY, _adj._ grey, A 616, D 269; Gray, A 1492; Greye, _pl._ A 152, 3974; 5.
335; R. 546; _def. adj. as s._ grey-beard, T. iv. 127.

GREYN, _s._ grain, corn, A 596, B 1852, 1855; T. iii. 1026; grain (dye), B
4649 (see note); Grayn (dye), B 1917; _in greyn_, of a fast colour, F 511;
Greyn de Paradys, grains of paradise, R. 1369; Greyn, grain (of paradise),
cardamom, A 3690 (see note); Greynes, _pl._ grains. HF. 691.

GREYTHE, _v._ prepare; Greithe, B 3784; Greythen, _pr. pl._ prepare
(themselves), get ready, A 4309; Graythe, _ger._ to adorn, clothe, dress,
R. 584; Greythed, _pp._ prepared, B 1. p 4. 170. Icel. _greidha_.

GRIFFON, _s._ griffin, A 2133.

GRILLE, _adj. pl._ horrible, R. 73. The sing. form is _gril_; see
Stratmann.

GRIM, _adj._ angry, A 2042; fierce, A 2519; Grimme, _pl._ HF. 541.

GRIMLY, _adv._ in an ugly way, R. 161.

GRIMNESSE, _s._ horror, I 864.

GRINDE, _v._ grind; Grint, _pr. s._ grinds, HF. 1798; D 389; Grond, _pt.
s._ 9. 15; Grounden, _pp._ G 760.

GRINDING, _s._ toll for grinding, A 4314.

GRINTE, _pt. s._ grinned, D 2161. For _grente_, from M.E. _grennien_; pt.
t. _grennede_, _grente_. And see A.S. _grennian_.

GRINTINGE, _s._ gnashing (of teeth), I 208. Cf. Grinte.

GRISEL, _s._ name given to an old man, whose hair is gray (lit. old horse),
16. 35. O.F. _gris_, gray. Godefroy gives O.F. _grisel_, gray; also, a gray
horse.

GRISLY, _adj._ horrible, terrible, awful, 7. 3; T. iv. 155; L. 637, 1219,
2238; A 1363, 1971, B 3299, C 473, D 735, E 2233, F 859, I 177, 623; very
serious, T. ii. 1700.

GROBBE, _v._ dig, grub (up), 9. 29.

GROME, _s._ man; _gr. and wenche_, man and woman, HF. 206; Gromes. _pl._
men, R. 200.

GROND, _s._; see GROUND.

GROND, _pt. s. of_ Grinde.

GRONE, _ger._ to groan, T. i. 360, 915; Gronen, v. B 4076; Groneth, _pr.
s._ A 3646, D 1829; Gronte, _pt. s._ B 3899.

GROPE, _v._ try, test, examine, A 644; _ger._ to search out, D 1817;
Gropeth, _pr. s._ gropes, L. 2186; Groped, _pt. s._ A 4217; Grope, _1 pr.
pl._ G 679; _imp. s._ D 2141, G 1236.

GR[)O]T, _s._ particle, atom, D 1292. A.S. _grot_, a particle.

GR[=O]TE, _s._ groat, (Dutch) coin, T. iv. 586, B 4148, C 945; Grotes,
_pl._ C 376, D 1964.

GROUND, _s._ ground, foundation, support, I. 87; 4. 160; T. ii. 842,
texture (of a garment), A 453; Grond, ground, A. ii. 29. 15.

GROUNDE, _v._; Grounded, _pp._ well instructed, A 414; founded, T. iv.
1672.

GROUNDEN, _pp. of_ Grinde.

GROVE, _s._ A 1505, 1514, B 4013, C 762. See GREVE.

GROWE, _v._; Growen, _pr. pl._ increase, T. iii. 1760; Growed, _weak pt.
s._ grew, D 759; Growe, _strong pp._ grown, T. ii. 403.

GROYN (1), _s._ (a swine's) snout, I 156. O.F. _groin_, 'extremite;'
Godefroy.

GROYN (2), _s._ murmur, T. i. 349. O.F. _groin_, 'gronderie, grognerie;'
Godefroy.

GROYNING, _s._ murmuring, A 2460. See above.

GRUCCHE, _v._ murmur, T. iii. 643; A 3863, E 170, I 1051; _ger._ to murmur
at, E 354; to grumble, D 443; Gruccheth, _pr. s._ murmurs, A 3045, I 500;
Grucchen, _1 pr. s._ murmur, A 3058; Grucched, _pt. s._ I 502.

GRUCCHING, _s._ grumbling, complaining, murmuring, D 406, I 499, 663.

GRUF, _adv._ on their faces, grovellingly, in a grovelling posture, T. iv.
912; A 949, B 1865. Cf. Icel. _[=a] gr[=u]fu_, face downwards.

GRUNTINGE, _for_ Grintinge, I 208 _n_.

GRUWEL, _s._ gruel, T. iii. 711.

GRYPEN, _ger._ to grasp, R. 204; Grype, R. 1156.

GRYS, _adj._ gray, G 559; _pomely grys_, i.e. dapple-gray.

GRYS, _s._ a gray fur, A 194. See note.

GUERDON, _s._ recompense, meed, reward, R. 1526; T. v. 594; L. 1662; B
3820, D 1878, F 973, 1220; rewarding, B 4. p 3. 43; _him to g._, as a
reward for him, L. 2052; Guerdoun, T. i. 818; HF. 619; service, B 3. p 4.
37; Guerdons, _pl._ B 2242.

GUERDONE, _v._ reward, I 283; Guerdon (_for_ Guerdone, _before a vowel_),
T. ii. 1295; Guerdoned, _pp._ B 4. p 3. 28; B 2462.

GUERDONING, _s._ reward-giving, reward, 5. 455; Guerdoninge, T. ii. 392.

GUNNE, -N; see GINNE, _v._

GUTTES, _pl._ entrails, B 3791, 3794.

GYDE, _s._ guide, L. 94, 969; A 804; ruler, G 45; guide, wielder, 5. 136,
153.

GYDE, _ger._ to direct, lead, T. i. 183, E 776; to guide, T. iii. 1811;
Gyden, _ger._ B 1670; Gydeth, _pr. pl._ conduct, T. ii. 1104; Gyde, _imp.
s._ conduct, T. v. 322; may (He) guide, B 245; Gydeth, _imp. pl._ direct, B
1677.

GYDERESSE, _s._ conductress, B 4. p 1. 6.

GYDING, _s._ guidance, T. v. 643.

GYE, _v._ guide, 7. 340; HF. 943; A 1950, E 1429; conduct (myself), L.
2045; govern, A 3046; rule, B 3587, E 75; instruct, control, B 1286; _ger._
to guide, T. v. 546; to regulate, I 13; _imp. s._ guide, direct, 7. 6; HF.
1093; G 136; Gye, _pr. s. subj._ may (he) guide, A 2786, 2815; _as wisly he
gye_, so verily may he guide, 25. 8.

GYLE, _s._ deceit, guile, 3. 620; R. 151; A 2596, H 196; trick, T. iii.
777.

GYLOUR, _s._ beguiler, trickster, A 4321.

GYSE, _s._ guise, way, R. 182; A 663; manner, 5. 399; R. 789, 1212; A 1208,
1789, F 332, 540; custom, A 993; way, plan, T. iv. 1370; way, L. 105 _a_;
Gyses, _pl._ ways, B 4. p 6. 35.

GYTE, _s._ dress, _perhaps_ skirt _or_ mantle, A 3954; Gytes, _pl._ D 559.
See note to A 3954; cf. _gyde_ in Jamieson's Dict., where the sense is
dress, skirt, or mantle. Gascoigne uses _gite_ in the sense of dress in his
Philomena, l. 117: 'A stately Nimph, a dame of heauenly kinde, Whose
glittering _gite_ so glimsed in mine eyes, As yet I not what proper hew it
bare.'



HA! HA! _interj._ B 4571.

HABERDASSHER, _s._ seller of hats, A 361. 'The _haberdasher_ heapeth wealth
by _hattes_;' Gascoigne, Fruites of Warre, st. 64.

HABERGEOUN, _s._ a hauberk or coat of mail, A 76, 2119, B 2051;
Haubergeons, _pl._ I 1052. O.F. _hauberjon_, small hauberk, dimin. of
_hauberc_, a hauberk.

HABIT, _s._ (1) habit, A 1378; Habite, disposition, mood, B 3. p 1. 16;
practice, B 4. p 4. 195; Habit (2), dress, L. 214; Habite (_better_ Habit),
T. i. 170.

HABITACIOUN, _s._ dwelling-place, A 2926.

HABITACLE, _s._ habitable space, B 2. p 7. 36; Habitacles, _pl._ niches,
HF. 1194.

HABOUNDAUNT, _pres. pt._ abounding, B 3. p 2. 19; superabundant, B 4. p 6.
253; Habundant, E 59.

HABOUNDE, _v._ abound, 12. 12; B 3938, E 1286; Haboundinge, _pres. pt._ 1.
135.

HABUNDANT, _adj._ abundant, E 59. See HABOUNDANT.

HABUNDANTLY, _adv._ abundantly, B 870.

HABUNDAUNCE, _s._ plenty, B 2322; Habundance, T. iii. 1042; E 203, I 627;
Haboundance, 10. 29; D 1723.

HAB['Y]TEN, _pr. pl._ inhabit, R. 660.

HACCHES, _pl._ hatches, L. 648.

HACKING, _a false reading_, HF. 1303 _n_.

HADE, HADDE, _pt. s. of_ Haven.

HAF, _pt. s. of_ Heve.

HAIL, _s._ L. 1220; Hayl, D 465; Hailes, _pl._ hail-storms, HF. 967.

HAINSELINS, _s. pl._ short jackets, I 422. See note.

HAIRE, _s._ hair-shirt, R. 438. See HEYRE.

HAKENEY, _s._ hackney, hack, old horse, R. 1137; G 559.

HAKKE, _ger._ to hack, A 2865; Hakketh, _pr. pl._ hew, T. ii. 1381.

HALDE, _pp._ held, esteemed (Northern), A 4208. See Holde.

HALE, _v._ draw, attract, 5. 151; Haleth, _pr. s._ draws back, 1. 68;
hauls, draws, B 2. p 8. 22; Haled, _pp._ pulled, B 3. p 2. 22.

HALF, _adj._ half, A 674; _def._ Halfe, A 8; _half word_, equivocation, 3.
1022; Halve, _pl._ (_my peynes halve_, half my troubles, lit. my half
troubles), 23. 2.

HALF, _s._ side, R. 163; HF. 1136; behalf, T. ii. 1734; Halfe, _dat._ 5.
125; _on my halfe_, from me, 3. 139; _a goddes halfe_, on God's side, in
God's name, 3. 370, 758; D 50; Halve, _dat._ side, part, T. iv. 945; _on
every halve_, on all sides, all over, B 2. m 6. 7; Halves, _pl._ sides, A
3481.

HALF-GODDES, _pl._ demi-gods, L. 387. See HALVE GODDES.

HALFPENY, _s._ halfpenny, D 1749.

HALF-YEER AGE, of the age of half a year, A 3971.

HALIDAY, _s._ holiday, A 3309, 3340; Halidayes, _pl._ A. i. 11. 1;
Haly-dayes, L. 422; A 3952, I 667.

HALKE, _s._ corner, R. 464; hiding-place, L. 1780; nook, F 1121; Halkes,
_pl._ hiding-places, G 311. A.S. _healoc_.

HALLE, _s._ hall, A 353, 752; dining-room, T. ii. 1170; sitting-room,
parlour, B 4022; Halle, _gen._, _hence_ Halle dore, door of the hall [_or_
Halle-dore, _compound s._], F 80; Halle, _dat._ F 86; Halles, _pl._ 5. 304,
9. 41; A 2463.

HALP, _pt. s. of_ Helpe.

HALS, _s._ neck, 5. 458; HF. 394; B 73, E 2379, G 1029; _cut the hals_, cut
in the throat, L. 292 a. A.S. _heals_.

HALSE, _1 pr. s._ I conjure, B 1835. See note. The proper meaning of A.S.
_healsian_ is to clasp round the neck (A.S. _heals_), and thence to
beseech, supplicate.

HALT, _pr. s. of_ Holde _and_ Halten.

HALTEN, _ger._ to go halt, to limp, T. iv. 1457; Halt, _pr. s._ goes lame,
is lame, 3. 622.

HALVE, Halves; see HALF.

HALVE GODDES, _pl._ demigods, T. iv. 1545. Cf. semide[^u]mque pecus;
Statius, Theb. vi. 122. See HALF-GODDES.

HALVENDEL, _s._ the half part (of), T. v. 335; half, T. iii. 707.

HALWEN, _ger._ to hallow, I 919; Halwed, _pp._ consecrated, G 551; held
sacred, T. iii. 268.

HALWES, _pl._ saints, L. 1310; B 1060; I 225; apostles, 3. 831; shrines of
saints, A 14, D 657; _gen. pl._ of (all) saints, G 1244.

HALY-DAYES, _pl._ holy-days, festivals, L. 422; A 3952, I 667; Halidayes,
A. i. 11. 1. See HALIDAY.

HAM, _s._ home (Northern), A 4032. See HOOM.

HAMELED, _pp._ cut off, T. ii. 964. (It refers to the mutilation of dogs
that were found to be pursuing game secretly. They were mutilated by
cutting off a foot.) A.S. _hamelian_, to mutilate.

HAMER, _s._ hammer, A 2508, G 1339; Hamers, _pl._ 3. 1164.

HAMPRED, _pp._ hampered, burdened, R. 1493.

HAN. See HAVE.

HAND, _s._ hand, A 108; _in his hande_, leading by his hand, L. 213 (see
241); Handes, _pl._ A 186. See HOND.

HANDEBREDE, _s._ hand's breadth (see note), A 3811.

HANDLE, _ger._ to handle, touch, E 376. A.S. _handlian_.

HANDWERK, _s._ creatures, things created, D 1562.

HANGE, _v._ hang; Hangeth, _pr. s. as fut._ will hang, R. 193; Heeng, _pt.
s._ hung, A 3250; Heng, _pt. s._ hung, R. 224, 240; 3. 122, 461, 729; 5.
282; HF. 394; T ii. 639; A 160, 358, 676, 3623, B 1824, G 574; (which)
hung, E 1883; hung down, T. ii. 689; _1 pt. s._ 3. 1216; Henge, _pt. pl._
3. 174; A 677; Hanging, _pres. pt._ hanging, A 392; being hung, L. 264;
Hanginge, lingering, T. iii. 1140; Hanged, _pp._ hung round, A 2568; hung,
T. ii. 353. And see HONGE.

HANSELINES, _the same as_ Hainselins, I 422 _n_.

HAP, _s_. chance, B 5. p 1. 7; L. 1773; E 2057; luck, success, 5. 402; T.
ii. 1454; B 3928, G 1209; good fortune, 3. 1039; _h. other grace_, a mere
chance or a special favour, 3. 810; Happes, _pl._ chances, B 1. p 6. 7; B
5. m 1. 10; occurrences, 3. 1279.

HAPPE, _v._ happen, befall, A 585; Happeth, _pr. s._ R. 264; 5. 10; B 2857,
F 592, G 649, H 201; Happed, _pt. s._ (it) happened, 3. 805; L. 634; D 989,
1379; F 960; chanced, befel, 4. 142; Happed me, (it) happened to me, 5. 18;
Happede, _pt. s._ C 606, 885; _h. how h. may_, happen what may, T. v. 796.

HAPPEN, _pr. s. subj._ (it) may happen, L. 78. From infin. _happenen_.

HAPPY, _adj._ lucky, T. ii. 621.

HARD, _adj._ hard, A 229; callous, B 2. m 1. 8; _of hard_, with difficulty,
T. ii. 1236; Harde, _def._ cruel, 6. 106; F 499; _pl._ strenuous, B 4. m 7.
20; _with h. grace_, with displeasure, severity, (see GRACE).

HARDE, _adv._ firmly, B 3. p. 11. 104; tightly, A 3279.

HARDELY, _adv._ boldly, R. 270; certainly, 3. 1043, T. ii. 304, v. 673;
unhesitatingly, 6. 118; scarcely, R. 4; Hardily, boldly, B 2. p 2. 23;
certainly, HF. 359; T. v. 1124; D 2285, E 25; unhesitatingly, 6. 118.

HARD-HERTED, _adj._ hard-hearted, B 2. m 6. 8.

HARDIMENT, _s._ boldness, T. iv. 533.

HARDINESSE, _s._ boldness, T. ii. 634; A 1948, B 3210, 3440, E 93, I 460;
fool-hardiness, B 2508; insolence, I 438.

HARDING, _s._ hardening, tempering, F 243.

HARDN['E]SSE, _s._ cruelty, 4. 232; hardship, I 688; Hardnesses, _pl._
afflictions, B 4. p 5. 24.

HARDY, _adj._ bold, T. iv. 601; A 405; sturdy, F 19; rash, R. 1038.

HARE, _s._ hare, A 191, 684, 1810, B 1294, 1886, 1946, D 1327; B 3. m 12.
8.

HARIE, _ger._ to drag, I 171; Haried, _pp._ pulled forcibly, A 2726. O.F.
_harier._

HARKNING. _pres. pt._ listening to, R. 106. See HERKNEN.

HARLOT, _s._ a person of low birth, servant-lad, D 1754; ribald, A 647;
rogue, scoundrel, rascal, A 4268, I 624; Harlotes, _pl._ thieves,
pick-pockets, R. 191. (Used of both sexes.)

HARLOTRYE, _s._ ribaldry, A 3145, 3184; wickedness, D 1328; evil conduct, E
2262; Harlotryes, _pl._ ribald jests, A 561.

HARM, _s._ harm, 3. 492; A 385; _broken harm_, minute injury, petty
annoyance (see note), E 1425; Harme, _dat._ injury, suffering, F 632;
Harmes, _s. pl._ misfortunes, B 1. m 1. 10; sufferings, A 2229, 2232.

HARMED, _pp._ hurt, 3. 931.

HARMFUL, _adj._ 3. 995.

HARNEISED, _pp._ equipped (lit. harnessed), A 114.

HARNEYS, _s._ armour, A 1006, 1613; gear, arrangement, I 974; fittings, A
2896; harness, I 433; instrument, provision, D 136. See HERNEYS.

HARPE, _s._ harp, HF. 773; L. 90; B 1. p 4. 2; T. i. 731, ii. 1031; B 2005,
H 268; Harpes, _pl._ C 466.

HARPE, _v._ harp, T. ii. 1033.

HARPE-STRINGES, _pl._ harp-strings, HF. 777.

HARPING, _s._ playing on the harp, A 266.

HARPOUR, _s._ harper, T. ii. 1030.

HARRE, _s._ hinge (also spelt _herre_), A 550. A.S. _heorra_.

HARROW! _interj._ help! A 3286, 3825, 4072, 4307, B 4235, 4570, C 288, E
2366. O.F. _haro_.

HARWED, _pt. s._ harried, despoiled, A 3512, D 2107. (Alluding to the
harrying or harrowing of hell by Christ.) A.S. _hergian_.

HASARD, _s._ dice-play, the game of hazard, C 465, 591, 608.

HASARDOUR, _s._ gamester, C 596; _pl._ Hasardours, C 613, 618, I 580, 794.

HASARDRYE, _s._ gaming, playing at hazard, C 590, 599, 897, I 793.

HASEL, _s._ hazel-tree, A 2923.

HASEL-WODE, _s._ hazel-wood, i.e. no news (see note), T. v. 505; v. 1174;
Hasel-wodes, _pl._ hazel-bushes, T. iii. 890. (Hazel-woods shake, i.e. that
is no news, it is of no use to tell me that.)

HASPE, _s._ hasp, A 3470. A.S. _haepse_.

HAST, hast thou (so)? A 4268. See HAVEN.

HAST, _s._ haste, T. iii. 1438.

HASTE, _v._; Haste hir, _ger._ 4. 56; Hasteth, _pr. s._ hastes, T. i. 956;
Hasteth, _imp. pl._ make haste, I 72.

HASTIF, _adj._ hasty, A 3545, B 2551, E 349, I 541; T. iv. 1567 _n_. O.F.
_hastif_.

HASTIFNESSE, _s._ hastiness, B 2312.

HASTILY, _adv._, promptly, soon, F 839, I 675, 998, 1000; Hastilich, E 911.

HASTOW, _2 pr. s._ hast thou, A 3533, D 800, 801, F 1589; L. 510; A. i. 5.
6; A. i. 23. 24; Hastou, B 676.

HAT, _s._ hat, A 272, 470, 1388, 3122, D 1383, 1776; 5. 589; T. iii. 320.

HATE, _s._ hatred, malice, B 3778, 3783, I 125; an object of hatred, I 137.

HATEFUL, _adj._ hateful, D 366; odious (Lat. _odibile_), D 1195.

HATEN, _v._ hate, B 4. p 4. 207; T. v. 1079; I 121; Hatede, _pt. s._ E 731;
Hated, _pp._ R. 1665.

HATEREDES, _s. pl._ hatreds, B 4. p 4. 1.

HATH, _pr. s. of_ Haven.

HATTE; see HOTE.

HATTES, _error for_ Hottes, HF. 1940 _n_. See note.

HAUBERGEONS, _s. pl._ hauberks, I 1052, 1054. See HABERGEOUN.

HAUBERK, _s._ coat of mail, 4. 97; 9. 49; A 2431, B 2053; Hauberkes, _pl._
I 1054.

HAUK, _s._ hawk, T. i. 671; D 1340, 1938, F 446; Haukes, _gen._ F 632;
Hauke, _dat._ T. v. 65; Haukes, _pl._ A 2204, 4134, F 1197.

HAUKE, _ger._ to hawk, E 81.

HAUKINGE, _s._; _on h._, a-hawking, T. iii. 1779; _an hauking_, B 1927.

HAUNCHE-BON, _s._ thigh-bone, A 3803; Haunche-bones, _pl._ haunch-bones, A
3279.

HAUNT, _s_. abode, B 2001; 'limit,' usual resort, A 252 _c_; use, practice,
skill, 447.

HAUNTEN, _v._ employ, B 2. p 6. 31; practise, try to do, B 4. p 11. 189;
Haunteth, _pr. s._ habitually uses, T. v. 1556; is used to, A 4392;
practises, C 547; Haunten, _pr. pl._ resort to, I 885; practise, I 780,
847; Haunte, _pr. pl._ practise, I 794; Haunteden, _pt. pl._ practised, C
464; Haunted, _pp._ frequented, B 1. p 3. 5.

HAUTEYN, _adj._ proud, stately, 5. 262; loud, C 330; Hautein, haughty, I
614; high-flowing (see note), L. 1120.

HAVEN, _v._ have, T. iii. 1463; Have, _v._ B 114; Han, _v._ 3. 395; B 1176,
F 56; keep, retain, C 725; take away, C 727; obtain, G 234; possess (cf.
'to have and to hold'), B 208; Han, _ger._ to have, L. 698, 2040, 2048; D
814; Hast, _2 pr. s._ hast thou so? A 4268; Hath, _pr. s._ has, L. 2700;
Hath himself, is in proportion, A. ii. 41 b. 5; Han, _1 pr. pl._ have, 1.
100; L. 28; _2 pr. pl._ 3. 1127; 4. 16; A 849; Han, _pr. pl._ 1. 20; 4.
223; E 188, 381; possess, A. pr. 24; Hadde, _1 pt. s._ possessed, 2. 34;
Hadde, _pt. s._ had, L. 1859; had, possessed, E 438, F 29, 32, 251; took, E
303; Hade (used for the rime), _pt. s._ A 554, 617; Hadden, _pt. pl._ had,
kept, E 201; Hadde, _pt. pl._ L. 1841; _I hadde lever_, I would rather, B
3083 (see Lever); Have, _imp. s._ take, F 759; Have, _imp. s._ _3 p._ let
(him) take, T. i. 21; Have, _imp. pl._ take, F 998; Haveth, _imp. pl._
have, HF. 325; L. 2105; hold, F 700; Have doon, make an end, 5. 492. And
see HASTOW.

HAVEN, _s._ 1. 14; 7. 20; L. 963; Havenes, _pl._ havens, harbours, A 407.

HAVEN-SYDE, _s._ side of a haven, B 4261.

HAVINGE, _s._ possession (_habendi_), B 2. m 5. 22; possession, B 2. m 2.
15.

HAWE, (1), _s._ haw, yard, enclosure, C 855. A.S. _haga_, a hedge, a
garden.

HAWE (2), _s._ haw (fruit of dog-rose), D 659; T. iii. 854; _with hawe
bake_, with baked haws, (see note), B 95; Hawes, _pl._ haws, 9. 7; T. iv.
1398.

HAWETHORN-LEVES, _pl._ hawthorn-leaves, A 1508.

HAY, _s._ hedge, R. 54; Hayes, _pl._ T. iii. 351.

HAYL, _s._ hail, D 465. See HAIL.

HAYL, _interj._ hail! A 3579, D 1384.

HAYLE, _ger._ to hail, 10. 62.

HAYT, _interj._ come up! D 1543; HEYT, D 1561. See note.

HE, _pron._ he, A 44, &c.; _used for_ it, G 867, 868; _that he_, that man,
HF. 2069; He ... he, this one ... that one, 5. 166; He and he, one man and
another, T. ii. 1748; Him, _dat. and acc._ A 102, 291, 602, &c.; himself, A
87; Him or here, him or her, HF. 1003; _him semed_, it seemed to him, he
appeared, B 3361; Hem, _pl. dat. and acc._ them, A 11, 18, 148; 3. 1170, 4.
202; L. 31; A. i. 8. 7; &c.; _hem seemed_, it seemed to them, they
supposed, F 56. A.S. _h[=e]_; dat. _him_; acc. _hine_; dat. pl. _him_.

HED, _pp._ hidden, L. 208; (_perhaps read_ hed _for_ hid _in_ B 103). See
note. See HYDE.

HEDE, _s._ heed, A 303, B 3577, F 612; R. 418; T. i. 820; L. 1857; _tak
h._, take care, 1. 47.

HEDE, _v._ head, provide with a head, T. ii. 1042.

H[`E][`E]D, _s._ head, R. 356; 2. 24; 3. 628; 4. 205; T. ii. 844; A 198,
293, 455, 470, 1169, B 2060, 2073, F 411, 643, H 19; source, 16. 43;
beginning, F 1282; _on his h._, at the risk of his head, A 1725; _malgre
hir hede_, in spite of all they can do, 4. 220; _maugree hir heed_, in
spite of all she could do, D 887; _maugre thyn heed_, in spite of all thou
canst do, B 104; Hedes, _pl._ heads, 5. 215; G 398; L. 705; heads, or first
points of signs, A. i. 17. 12; Heedes, heads, F 203, 358; Hevedes, B 2032.
See HEVED.

HEEF, _pt. s. of_ Heve.

HEELD, _pt. s. of_ Holde.

HEELP, _pt. s. of_ Helpe.

HEENG, _pt. s. of_ Hange.

H[`E][`E]P, _s._ heap, i.e. crowd, host, A 575; great number, crowd, T. iv.
1281; A. ii. 3. 28; B 1687, E 2429, F 1493; H[`e]pe (_error for_ Heep),
quantity, R. 1656; H[`e]pe, _dat._ heap, number, crowd, 3. 295; HF. 2149;
_hence_ To hepe, _or_ To-hepe, all close together, A. i. 14. 5. See
TO-HEPE.

H[`E][`E]R, _s._ hair, R. 549; 3. 456, 855; HF. 1386; L. 215, 831, 870,
1672, 1747; A 589, 2834, 3314, 3691, 3976, G 812; Here, _dat._ R. 228; L.
1315; H[`e]res, _pl._ HF. 1390; L. 1829; 3. 394; 5. 267; T. v. 810, 999; A
555, 1388, 2134, 2883, 3870; &c.; Here (_error for_ Heer?), R. 327.

H['E]['E]R, _adv._ here, 5. 57, 63; B 1177, 1180, E 36; Heer and ther,
never long in one place, G 1174; _her and ther_, hither and thither, B 5. p
5. 20. See HERE.

HEER-AGAYNS, _prep._ against this, I 668.

HEER-BIFORN, _adv._ here-before, before this, 1. 34; L. 2454; B 613, 2452,
2906, F 1535.

HEER-FORTH, _adv._ in this direction, D 1001.

HEER-MELE, _s._ the thickness of a hair, a hair's breadth; lit. a
hair-part, A. ii. 38. 11. A.S. _m[=ae]l_, a portion.

HEER-TO, _adv._ hereto, B 2481.

HEER-UP-ON, _adv._ hereupon, hereon, E 190.

HEESTE, _s._ commandment, I 845. See HESTE.

HEET, _s._ heat, R. 1575. See HETE (the usual form).

HEET, _pt. s. of_ Hote.

H[`E][`E]TH, _s._ heath, A 6, 606; heather, A 3262.

HEGGE, _s._ hedge, R. 481, 1652; T. v. 1144; I 870; Hegges, _pl._ T. iii.
1236; B 4408.

HEIGH, _adj._ high, A 316, 522, 2167, B 162, 252, F 545; great, A 1798;
lofty, B 3192, F 36; learned, E 18; severe, B 795; Heighe, _def._ C 633, F
85, 98; (_def. form, therefore read_ the heighe), T. iii. 1027; _in h. and
lowe_, in both high and low things, i.e. in all things, wholly, A 817, B
993. See HY, HEYE.

HEIGHE, _adv._ high up, T. iv. 996; high, B 4607; _an heigh_, on high, F
849. See HYE.

HEIGHLY, _adv._ strongly, T. ii. 1733.

HEIGHTE, _s._ height, altitude, A. i. 1. 2; ii. 3. 13. See HEYGHTE.

HEIR, _s._ 14. 12, 15, 17, 20; T. v. 805; B 766, 3833; Heires, _pl._ B
3534. See HEYRE, EIR.

HELDE, _v._ hold, retain, D 272. See HOLDE (the usual form).

HELDE, _pt. pl._ poured out, HF. 1686. (Better than taking it as 'held').
See _helden_ in Stratmann; and see HIELDE.

HELE, _s._ health, L. 1159; T. i. 461, ii. 1750, iii. 321, v. 1415, 1416; B
3. p 10. 169; B 4. p 6. 144; A 1271, 3102, F 1087, I 153, 374; health,
healing, recovery, well-being, 1. 80; 3. 1039; 5. 128; prosperity, L. 296.
A.S. _h[=ae]lu_.

H['E]LE, _dat._ heel, T. iv. 728; Heles, _pl._ R. 1022, 1218.

HELE, (h[`e]l[*e]), _v._ conceal, B 2279, D 950; Heled, _pp._ hidden, B
4245. A.S. _helan_.

HELELEES, _adj._ out of health, T. v. 1593. See above.

HELEN, _v._ heal, 11. 4; _ger._ F 641; Hele, _v._ 3. 40, 571; F 240; _ger._
F 471; Heled, _pp._ T. i. 1089, iii. 1212; A 2706.

HELLE, _s._ hell, 4. 120; L. 2, 6; A 658; _gen._ 3. 171; _dat._ 1. 96; B
3193, 3292.

HELM, _s._ helmet, 4. 99; T. ii. 638; Helmes, _pl._ A 2500.

HELMED, _pp._ provided with a helmet, T. ii. 593; B 3560.

HELP, _s._ help, aid, succour, 1. 12; 2. 47; F 459; Helpes, _pl._ aid (lit.
helps), T. ii. 1455.

HELPE, _s._ helper, assistant, L. 1616. See _helpe_ in Stratmann.

HELPE, _v._ help, A 258; Helpen, _ger._ A 584; Helpen of, cure of, A 632;
Heelp, _1 pt. s._ helped, A 4246; Heelp, _pt. s._ B 920, 3236 (cf. A 1651
_n_); Halp, _pt. s._ A 1651; Help, _imp. s._ 1. 6, 16; Helpeth, _imp. pl._
L. 68; G 1328; Helpen, _2 pr. pl._ 1. 104; Helpe, _pr. s. subj._ 3. 550; 4.
141; Holpe, _pt. s. subj._ helped, R. 1230; Holpen, _pp._ helped, aided, T.
ii. 1319; L. 1984, 2222; F 666; healed, A 18; Holpe, _pp._ L. 461; F 1044;
cured, E 2370.

HELPING, _s._ aid, help, T. i. 857; B 2491; Help['i]nge, T. i. 853.

HELPLES, helpless, L. 2714; B 303.

HELPLY, _adj._ helpful, T. v. 128.

HEM; see HE.

HEM, _s._ hem, border, B 1. p 1. 20.

HEMI-SPERE, hemisphere, T. iii. 1439; Hemisperie (_error for_ Hemispere), E
1799.

HEMPEN, _adj._ hempen, made of hemp, R. 1233.

HEM-SELF, _pron. pl._ themselves, 5. 234; B 145; themselves, i.e. the
things, B 2. p 3. 17; Hem-selven, F 1420.

HEN, _s._ hen, A 177, B 4629; (as a thing of small value), D 1112; Hennes,
_pl._ B 4056.

HENDE, _adj._ courteous, polite, gentle, R. 285, 1306; A 3199, 3272, 3462,
D 628, 1286. A.S. _gehende_.

HENNE, _adv._ hence, T. i. 572; ii. 209, iii. 630, iv. 1246; A 2356, 3889,
C 687. A.S. _heonan_.

HENNES, hence, T. v. 402; now, HF. 1284.

HENNES-FORTH, _adv._ henceforth, R. 701; T. iv. 17; HF. 782; F 658.

HENNES-FORTHWARD, _adv._ henceforth, A. i. 1. 3.

HENTE, _v._ catch, I 355; seize, A 3347, C 710; acquire, get, A 299;
circumvent, T. iv. 1371; _dide her for to hente_, caused her to be seized,
L. 2715; Hent, _pr. s._ seizes, catches, T. iv. 5; Hente, _pr. s. subj._
may seize, G 7; Hente, _pt. s._ caught, took, 4. 97; 5. 120, 154; HF. 543,
2028; T. i. 1045; A 957, 1300, B 1760, 3895, G 370, 1325; caught away, B
1144; seized, caught hold of, T. ii. 924, iii. 21, 1187; A 698, 4212, B
4525, D 1252, 1639, F 1391; grasped, C 255; took forcibly, E 534; took in
hunting, B 3449; lifted, G 205; Henten, _pt. pl._ seized, A 904; caught, R.
773; Hent, _pp._ caught, L. 2322; T. i. 509, A 1581, B 4249, D 1311, G 12;
seized, R. 1657, E 676; Hent, _imp. s._ seize, take, D 1553. A.S. _hentan_.

HENTERES, _s. pl._ filchers, B 1. p 3. 57. See above.

H['E]PE, _s._ hip, the fruit of the dog-rose, B 1937. A.S. _h[=e]ope_.

HEPE (h[`e][`e]p[*e]); see HEEP.

HEPE, _v._ heap; Hepen, _pr. pl._ augment, B 5. p 2. 28; Heped, _pp._
accumulated, T. iv. 236.

HER, HIR, _pron. poss._ their, B. 136, 138, 140, 221, 373, C 892, G 363,
1387, &c. A.S. _heora_, _hira_, of them; gen. pl. of _h[=e]_, he.

HERAFTERWARD, _adj._ hereafter, G 1168.

HER AND THER, hither and thither, B 5. p 5. 20. See HEER.

HERAUD, _s._ herald, A 2533; Heraudes, _pl._ HF. 1321, A 1017.

HERAUDE, _ger._ to herald, proclaim as a herald does, HF. 1576.

HERBE, _s._ herb, T. ii. 345; Herbes, _pl._ T. i. 947; E 226, F 470, 640.

HERBER, _s._ garden, T. ii. 1705; arbour, L. 203 (see note).

HERBERGAGE, _s._ a lodging, abode, A 4329, B 147, E 201; lodgings, B 4179.
From O.F. _herberge_ (F. _auberge_).

HERBERGEOURS, _s. pl._ harbingers, providers of lodgings, B 997. See above.
Hence the modern _harbinger_, with excrescent (inserted) _n_.

HERBERWE _or_ HERBERW, _s._ harbour, A 403; inn, A 765; lodging, shelter, A
4119, I 1031; dwelling, position, F 1035. Icel. _herbergi_.

HERBERWE, _ger._ to shelter, R. 491; Herberweden, _pt. pl._ lodged, B 2. p
6. 48; Herberwed, _pp._ dwelt, B 536 _n_.

HERBERWING, _s._ lodging, sheltering, A 4332.

HER-BIFORN, _adv._ before this time, L. 73; Herbeforn, 3. 1304; Her-before,
previously, 3. 1302; a while ago, 1136.

HER-BY, _adv._ with respect to this matter, D 2204; hence, HF. 263.

HERD, Herde; see HERE, _v._

HERDE, _s._ shepherd, T. iii. 1235; G 192; herd, keeper of cattle, A 603.
A.S. _heorde_, _hyrde_.

HERDE-GROMES, _pl._ servants who look after the herds, herdsmen, HF. 1225.

HERDES, _pl._ coarse flax, 'hards,' R. 1233. A.S. _heorde_, pl. _heordan_.

HERDESSE, _s._ shepherdess, T. i. 653. See HIERDESSE.

HERD-HERTED, _adj._ hard-hearted, B 2885.

HERE (h[`e]r[*e]), _pron._ her, R. 1260; 7. 120; T. iii. 34, 267, 1642, iv.
612; A 1421, 2057, B 460, E 887, F 790; HF. 1003. (Dissyllabic and final.)

HERE, _poss. pron._ her, T. i. 285.

HERE (h['e]['e]r[*e]), _adv._ here, in this place, on this spot, 3. 93; T.
v. 478. (Dissyllabic.) See HEER.

HERE (hair), Heres; see HEER.

H[`E]RE, _rarely_ H['e]re, _v._ hear, 1. 31; 3. 94; 5. 467; 23. 20; R. 38;
HF. 1828; T. iii. 385; A 169, B 98, 133, 182, 1642, D 828; Heren, _v._ T.
iii. 679, HF. 879; _ger._ B 3963; Herestow, _2 pr. s._ hearest thou, A
3366, D 1552; HF. 1031, 1862; Herth, _pr. s._ hears, L. 327 _a_; Here, _pr.
s. subj._ may hear, A 3642; Heren, _2 pr. pl._ L. 1724; Herde, _pt. s._
heard, A 221, B 1708; 3. 180; 5. 200; _pt. s. subj._ might hear, D 1036;
Herden, _pt. pl._ L. 1970; B 4566; Herdestow, heardest thou, A 4170; Herd,
_pp._ heard, 3. 129; L. 1, 325 _a_; A 3533, B 613, 2146, 3823, C 230, G
372.

HERE-AGAYNS, against this, A 3039; Here-ayeins, in reply to that, T. ii.
1380.

HERE AND HOWNE, T. iv. 210; _perhaps_ gentle and savage, i.e. one and all
(doubtful). See note.

HERESYE, _s._ heresy, L. 330.

HERE-TOFORE, _adv._ hitherto, T. v. 26; before, 3. 189.

HERIE, _v._ praise, T. iii. 1672; _1 pr. s._ T. iii. 951; Heriest, _2 pr.
s._ worshippest, B 3419; Herieth, _pr. s._ B 1155, 1808; Herien, _pr. pl._
B 1868, G 47; Herie, _pr. pl._ E 616; Heried, _pt. pl._ worshipped, L. 786;
_pp._ B 4. p 1. 32; T. iii. 1256, 1757; HF. 1405; B 872. A.S. _herian_.

HER-INNE, _adv._ in this, A 3073; herein, G 1292.

HERITAGE, _s._ heritage, inheritance, R. 201; 2. 89; L. 2036; D 1119, F
1563; _gen._ of (your) inheritance, 2. 71.

HERKE, _imp. s._ hearken, E 1323; Herketh, _imp. pl._ hearken to, D 1656.
From infin. _herkien_, _herken_.

HERKNEN, _v._ hearken, listen, L. 343; I 81; _ger._ to listen to, A 1526, G
691; to hear, E 1699; Herkene, _ger._ to hearken to, listen to, 3. 752;
Herkne, _v._ G 1006; _ger._ B 3159; _1 pr. s._ hear, G 261; Herkned, _pt.
s._ listened to, A 4173, B 1711; Herkned, _pp._ listened, R. 630; _h.
after_, expected, F 403; Herkne, _imp. s._ B 113; Herkneth, _imp. pl._
hearken, listen to, A 788, 828, 855, 2674, 3136, B 1174, 2083, 2155, 2192,
3173, C 454, E 1141, 1163; hear, 5. 564; HF. 109; L. 1276; Herkning, _pres.
part._ listening, R. 535; Herkninge, F 78; Harkning, R. 106. A.S.
_heorcnian_.

HERMYTE, _s._ hermit, HF. 659.

HERNE, _s._ corner, F 1121; Hernes, _pl._ G 658. A.S. _hyrne_.

HERNEYS, _s._ armour, A 2496; _pl._ sets of armour, A 1630. See HARNEYS.

HER-OF, _adv._ concerning this matter, T. iii. 565.

HERON, _s._ heron, F 1197; Heroune, 5. 346.

HERONER, _s._ falcon for herons, T. iv. 413.

HERONERE, _adj._ used for flying at herons, L. 1120. See note.

HERONSEWES, _s. pl._ hernshaws, young herons, F 68. The form _hernshaw_ is
in Spenser, F. Q. vi. 7. 9; and is a later form of _heronsew_, due to
confusion with _shaw_, a wood. _Heronsew_ is derived, regularly, from A.F.
_herouncel_, later _herounceau_; a diminutive from _heroun_, like _lioncel_
from _lion_. 'Ardeola, an _hearnesew_' occurs in Elyot's Dictionary. See
HALLIWELL.

HERSE, _s._ hearse, 2. 15, 36. See note.

HERT, _s._ hart, 3. 351; 5. 195; B 4. P 3. 82; A 1689, B 2515; Hertes,
_gen._ hart's, B 3447; Hertes, _pl._ B 3. m 12. 6; L. 1212; F 1191. A.S.
_heort_.

HERTE, _s._ heart, 1. 12; 2. 14, 25, 57; 3. 80; L. 57; A 150, 229, 533, B
101, 167, 1056, 1661, 1745, E. 412, G 870; dear one, T. ii. 1096; courage,
3. 1222; Hertes, _gen._ heart's, 1. 164; 4. 57, 124; Herte, _gen._ T. ii.
445; I 154; Herte rote, root (bottom) of the heart, R. 1026; _myn hertes_,
of my heart, 4. 57; Hertes, _pl._ hearts, 3. 1289; L. 1841; B 1066; _gen.
pl._ hearts', E 112. A.S. _heorte_, gen. _heortan_.

HERTE, _pt. s._ hurt, 3. 883. For _hurte_; from infin. _hurten_. See HURTE.

HERTE-BLOOD, heart's blood, L. 2105; A 2006, C 902, D 718. Here _herte_ may
be taken as the gen. sing.; cf. I 154.

HERTELEES, _adj._ heartless, without heart, T. v. 1594; deficient in
courage, B 4098.

HERTELY, _adv._ heartily, A 762, B 3983; thoroughly, L. 33; earnestly, 3.
1226; truly, 3. 85.

HERTE-ROTE, _s._ root of the heart, depth of the heart, L. 1993.

HERTE-SPOON, _s._ 'the concave part of the breast, where the ribs unite to
form the _cartilago ensiformis_' (Tyrwhitt), A 2606. Lit. 'heart-spoon.'

HERT-HUNTING, _s._ hunting of the hart, 3. 1313.

HERTH, _pr. s._ heareth, L. 327 a. See HERE.

HERTLY, _adj._ heartfelt, honest, L. 2124; hearty, E 176, 502, F 5.

HER-TO, _adv._ for this purpose, B 243.

HERYINGE, _s._ praising, I 682; praise, B 1649; glory, T. iii. 48. See
HERIE.

HESTE, _s._ command, commandment, behest, 7. 119; B 382, 1013, 3754, C 490,
641, D 74, E 128, 568, F 114; promise, F 1064; Heeste, commandment, I 845;
Hest (put for _heste_ before a vowel), A 2532; Hestes, _pl._ commands, B
284, E 529; commandments, C 640. A.S. _h[=ae]s_.

H[`E]TE, _s._ heat, R. 1508; 4. 88; T. v. 1107; HF. 569, 921; L. 774; G
1408, I 120; passion, 4. 127; T. ii. 942; heat, _but put for_ surge, B 1. m
7. 3; boiling surge (Lat. _aestum_), B 1. m 4. 5. A.S. _h[=ae]to_. See
HEET.

HETE, _v._ promise, vow, 3. 1226; 6. 77; _pr. s. subj._ promise, A 2398; _1
pr. s._ B 334, 1132; Hette, _pt. s._ 4. 185 (see note). See HOTE.

HETERLY, _adv._ fiercely, L. 638. See note; and see _heter_ in Stratmann.

H[=E]THEN, _adj._ heathen, L. 299 _a_, 309 _a_; B 904, F 1293; _as s._ a
heathen, A 66. A.S. _h[=ae]dhen_.

H[)E]THEN, _adv._ hence (Northern), A 4033. Icel. _hedhan_.

HETHENESSE, _s._ parts inhabited by the heathen, heathen lands, A 49, B
1112.

H[=E]THING, _s._ contempt, A 4110. Icel. _haedhing_.

HETTE, _pt. s._ heated, inflamed, 5. 145. From infin. _h[`e]ten_, A.S.
_h[=ae]tan_.

HETTE, _pt. s._ was named, T. v. 319 _n_; promised, 4. 185. See HOTE.

HEVE, _v._ heave, lift, A 550, I 858; Heven, _ger._ to use exertion,
labour, T. ii. 1289; Hevest, _2 pr. s._ heavest, A 3466; Heveth, _pr. s._
lifts up, B 5. m 5. 11; Haf, _pt. s._ heaved, A 3470; Heef, _pt. s._
lifted, B 1. p 1. 12; Heved, _pt. s_ (_weak form_), B 1. p 1. 12 _n_; Heve,
_imp. s._ lift, T. v. 1159.

HEVED, _s._ head, B 1. p 1. 12; HF. 550; A. i. 21. 52; beginning, A. ii.
16. 2; Hevedes, _pl._ A. ii. 15. 1; B 2. m 7. 11; B 2032, I 191. A.S.
_h[=e]afod_. See HEED.

HEVEN, _s._ heaven, A 519; the celestial sphere, B 3300; supreme delight,
T. ii. 826, F 558; beautiful sight, T. ii. 637; Hevene, _gen._ of heaven,
heaven's, 1. 24, 149; 5. 72; T. iii. 704; D 1181, G 542; Heven, _gen._ B
3986; Hevenes, _gen._ sphere's, 4. 29; Hevene, _dat._ F 149.

HEVENISH, _adj._ heavenly, T. i. 104, v. 1813; HF. 1395; of the spheres, 4.
30; Hevenissh, A. i. 21. 37.

HEVENLY, _adj._ celestial, A 1055.

HEVIEN, _v._ make heavy; Hevieth, _pr. pl._ weigh down, B 5. m 5. 11.

HEVINESSE, _s._ sorrow, sadness, grief, R. 262, 1224; 3. 601; 4. 163; B
3959, E 432, 678; F 828; indolence, I 686.

HEVY, _adj._ heavy, R. 229, 959; 19. 7; I 130; sad, 4. 12; 19. 4; F 822;
difficult, A. pr. 33.

HEWE, (1) _s._ hue, colour, complexion, 3. 497; 5. 258; 7. 145; L. 55,
1761; A 394, 1364, B 137, F 1016, G 728; outward appearance, mien, D 1622,
E 377, F 508, 587, 640; pretence, C 421; Hew (_before unemphatic_ her), L.
1748; Hewes, hues, R. 66; T. iv. 1154; Hewis, colours, T. ii. 21.

HEWE, (2), _s._ (household)-servant, domestic, E 1785. A.S. _h[=i]wa_.

HEWE, _ger._ to hew down, A 2865; Hewen, _v._ hew, cut in pieces, A 1422.

HEWED, _adj._ coloured, hued, R. 213, 1030; 3. 905; B 4059, F 1245.

HEY, _s._ hay, A 3262, D 1539, 1547, H 14; grass, B 3407. Cf. A.S.
_gr[=e]ne h[=i]g_, green grass, Mk. vi. 39.

HEY! _interj._ hey! L. 1213.

HEYE, _adj. def._ high, A. i. 16. 7. See HEIGH, HY.

HEYER, _adj._ higher, A. ii. 5. 10; A. ii. 23. 27. See HYER.

HEYEST, _adj. as s._ highest place, A. ii. 14. 1. See HYESTE.

HEYGHE, _adv._ high, T. ii. 354. See HYE.

HEYGHTE, _s._ height, A. ii. 22. 5. See HEIGHTE.

HEYNE, _s._ wretch, G 1319. See note.

HEYNOUS, _adj._ heinous, hateful, odious, T. ii. 1617.

HEYRE, _s._ heir, 3. 168. See HEIR.

HEYRE, _adj._ hair, made of hair, C 736. The form is due to the sb. below.

HEYRE, _s._ hair-shirt, G 133, I 1053; Heyres, _pl._ I 1052, 1054. O.F.
_haire_, of Teut. origin. See HAIRE.

HEYSUGGE, _s._ hedge-sparrow, 5. 612. A.S. _heges-sugge_ (Voc.).

HEYT, _interj._ come up, D 1561 (see note); Hayt, D 1543.

HIDDE; _see_ HYDE.

HIDER, _adv._ hither, 4. 165; T. v. 484; A 672, B 4000. A.S. _hider_.

HIDERWARD, _adv._ hither, in this direction, B 3159. A.S. _hiderweard_.

HIDOUS, _adj._ hideous, A 3520; terrible, horrible, dreadful, 1. 132; A
1978, B 4583; ugly, R. 158, 987, 1353.

HIDOUSLY, _adv._ terribly, A 1701.

HIELDE, _pr. s. subj._ pour out, shed, B 2. m 2. 1 (Lat. _fundat_). See
HELDE.

HIERDESSE, _s._ shepherdess, T. i. 653 _n_; Hierdes, female guardian,
protectress, T. iii. 619. See HERDESSE.

HIGH, _adj._ highborn, distinguished, R. 1034; High and low, under all
circumstances, T. iii. 418. See HEIGH, HY.

HIGHT, HIGHTE; see HOTE.

HIGHTE, _v._; Highteth, _pr. s._ adorns, gladdens, B 1. m 2. 16. See
_hihten_ in Stratmann.

HIL, _s._ hill, T. i. 950; B 3772; Hille, _dat._ 5. 243; R. 114. A.S.
_hyll_.

HILD, _pt. s._ bent, inclined, 3. 393. A.S. _heldan_, _hyldan_, to incline;
pt. t. _helde_, _hylde_. Apparently confused with A.S. _healdan_, to hold,
pt. t. _h[=e]old_.

HIM; see HE.

HIMSELF, _pron._ himself, A 219; he himself, 10. 25; itself, T. i. 745;
(applied to the moon), A. ii. 34. 13; Him-selven, himself, 4. 98; A 184, B
44; for himself, A 528; Himselve, itself, 3. 419, HF. 797.

HIM-WARD, TO, towards him, B 5. p 6. 99.

HINDE, _s._ hind, 3. 427; 5. 195; Hindes, _pl._ B 3. m 12. 7.

HINDRE, _v._ hinder, R. 1039; _ger._ B 2386.

HINDRESTE, _superl._ hindmost, A 622. A double form; in _hind-r-est_, _-r-_
represents a comparative, and _-est_ a superlative form.

HIPES, _pl._ hips, A 472; Hippes, 3. 957; B 3904. A.S. _hype_.

HIR, (1), _pers. pron. dat. and acc._, to her, her, A 126, B 162, &c.; to
her, 3. 1226; 4. 39; for her, 4. 293; _acc._ (applied to a star), A. ii. 3.
30.

HIR, (2), _poss. pron._ her, 5. 304, 305, 371; A 120, B 164, F 835, &c. And
see HERE, HIRES.

HIR, (3), _gen. pl._ of them; Hir aller, of them all, A 586; Hir bothe, of
them both, of both of them, 4. 52; T. iii. 453; B 221. A.S. _hira_.

HIR, (4), _poss. pron._ their, R. 412; 3. 174, 175, 176, 404, 1086; 4. 205,
220, 221; 5. 9, 82, 191, 294, 308, 488, 530, 668; A 11, B 140, 221, 373,
&c.; Her, B 3536, &c.

HIR THANKES, with their good will, willingly, A 2114.

HIR[:E]S, hers, 5. 482, 588; T. i. 889, iii. 1608, iv. 444; B 227. See HIR
(1).

HIRNIA, _s._ hernia, I 423.

HIRS, _pron._ theirs, B 3. p 11. 97. See HIR (4).

HIRSELVEN, _acc._ herself, 4. 118; F 1415; Hirselve, F 384.

HIS, _gen. masc._ his, A 47, 50, &c.; _neut._ its, 1. 178; T. iii. 1088, v.
1379; A. i. 2. 3; D 350, 1128, 1149, 1845, E 263, F 405; _in phr._ Mars his
= of Mars, L. 2593. See HE, HIT.

HIS THANKES, with his good will, willingly, A 2107.

HISE, _poss. pron. pl._ his, A 527 _n_; I 86. (Common in MS. E. as a
_plural_ form.)

HISTORIAL, _adj._ historical, C 156.

HIT, _pron._ it, 2. 117; 3. 308, &c.; A. i. 2. 2; Hit am I, it is I, 3.
186, L. 314; Hit weren, they were, HF. 1323. See HIS.

HIT, _pr. s._ hides, F 512. _Hit_ is a contracted form, equivalent to
_hideth_. It also appears as _hut_; as in 'yef me _hut_ ant heled it,' if
one hides and conceals it; St. Marharete, p. 15. See HYDE.

HITTE, _v._ hit; Hitte, _1 pt. s._ D 808; _pt. s._ A 2647; Hit, _pp._ T. i.
867.

HO, _interj._ hold! stop! T. iii. 190, iv. 1242; B 3957. See Stratmann.

HO, _s._ exclamation commanding silence, A 2533; stop, cessation, T. ii.
1083.

HOCHEPOT, _s._ hotch-potch, mixture, B 2447.

HODE, _dat. of_ Hood.

HOGGES, _gen._ hog's, C 955; Hogges, _pl._ B 4575.

HOKE, _dat. of_ Hook.

HOKER, _s._ scorn, frowardness, A 3965. A.S. _h[=o]cor_.

HOKERLY, _adv._ scornfully, I 584.

HOLD, _s._ possession, B 4064, D 1607, E 1305; grasp F 167; keeping, D 599;
fort, castle, B 507; Holde _dat._ hold, possession, R. 401.

HOLDE, _v._ keep, preserve, D 1144; hold, keep, B 41; continue, go on with,
T. ii. 965; restrain, 7. 309, 310; keep to (see PROCES), F 658; Holden,
_v._ hold, keep, F 763; keep, B 1. m 7. 11; F 1163; think, consider, L.
857; _do than holde herto_, keep to it then, 3. 754; Holde up, hold up, 2.
24; Holde his pees, hold his peace, B 4625; Holde, _1 pr. s._ consider,
deem, G 739; hold the opinion, believe, 3. 540; I holde me stille, I keep
myself silent, pass over in silence, B 2. p 3. 20 (Lat. _praetereo_);
Holdest, _2 pr. s._ accountest, L. 326; Holdestow, deemest thou, B 2. p 1.
54; Halt, _pr. s._ holds, 11. 16; B 4. m 1. 19; T. v. 348; A. i. 14. 2; B
807, F 61, I 86; keeps, T. ii. 37; iii. 1007, 1747, 1764, B 721; holds
fast, T. iii. 1636; has, B 2. p 7. 18; considers, R. 8; HF. 630; G 921;
(with _men_) consider, B 4. m. 1. 33; esteems, D 1185; performs, 3. 621;
remains firm, 10. 38; Holt, _pr. s._ holds, T. iii. 1374; Holden, _2 pr.
pl._ keep, L. 2500; Holde, _2 pr. pl._ esteem, deem, T. v. 1339; _pr. s.
subj._ keep, take, E 287; Heeld, _1 pt. s._ considered, E 818; Heeld, _pt.
s._ held, A 175, 337, 2894, B 1760, 3374; took part, A 3847; esteemed, C
625; held, possessed, ruled, B 3518; Held, _pt. s._ considered, A 182;
Helde, _pt. pl._ held, B 3506; considered, E 426; Holden, _pp._ esteemed,
held, A 141; considered, E 205, 828; kept, observed, F 1587; esteemed, L.
1709, 1870; D 944, 946, F 934; accounted, B 2655; obliged, bound, T. ii.
241; B 2893, I 517; considered, made to be, C 958; Holde, _pp._ esteemed, A
1307; 15. 10; indebted, L. 763; bound, L. 1447; T. iii. 1259; D 135; held,
gone, F 1306; considered, R. 1008; kept, D 1024; accounted, D 523;
considered to be, F 70; _bet for thee have holde_, better for thee to have
held, 5. 572; Hold up, _imp. pl._ hold up, A 783; Holdeth, _imp. pl._ keep,
B 37. F 1064; consider, A 1868; Holdinge, _pres. pt._ lasting, B 3. m 7. 5.
See HALDE, HELDE.

HOLDERE, _s._ holder, T. ii. 644.

HOLDINGE IN HONDES, cajolery, HF. 692.

HOLE, _s._ hole, R. 516, 524; 3. 943; A 3440; (of the body), A 3732; Holes,
_pl._ HF. 2110.

HOLE; see HOOL.

HOLILY, _adv._ holily, D 2286.

HOLIN, _for_ Holm, 5. 178 _n_.

HOLLY, _adv._ wholly, T. iii. 145. See HOOLLY.

HOLM, _s._ holm-oak, evergreen oak, 5. 178, A 2921.

HOLOUR, _s._ lecher, fornicator, adulterer, D 254, I 626, 878; Holours,
_pl._ I 857. O.F. _holier_, 'd['e]bauch['e], libertin'; Godefroy.

HOLOWE, _pl._ HF. 1035. See HOLWE.

HOLOWNESSE, _s._ concavity, T. v. 1809.

HOLPE, -N; see HELPE.

HOLSOM, _adj._ wholesome, T. i. 947, iii. 1746; sound, B 1. p 6. 19;
healing, 5. 206.

HOLT, _s._ wood, plantation, A 6; Holtes, _pl._ T. iii. 351. A.S. _holt_.

HOLT, _pr. s._ holds, T. iii. 1374. See HOLDE.

HOLWE, _adj._ hollow, G 1265; Holwe, _pl._ L. 2193; A 1363; Holowe, _pl._
HF. 1035.

HOLWE, _adv._ hollow, A 289.

HOLY, _adj._ holy, A 17, 178, 479, 515; 1. 93, 114.

H[=O]M, _adv._ homewards, F 635. See HOOM.

HOM['A]GE, _s._ homage, 3. 770; Hommage, I 314.

HOM-COMINGE, _s._ return home, T. v. 503. See HOOM-COMINGE.

HOMICYDE (1), _s._ man-slayer, E 1994; assassin, murderer, B 1757, I 565;
Homicydes, _pl._ B 4414, C 893.

HOMICYDE (2), manslaughter, murder, C 644, I 564.

HOMLINESSE; see HOOMLINESSE.

HOMMAGE; see HOMAGE.

HOMWARD; see HOOMWARD.

HOND, _s._ hand, A 193, 399, B 3393, 3506; Honde, _dat._ G 13; hand, i.e.
oath, 3. 936; _on h._, in hand, B 348; Beren him on honde, make him
believe, T. iv. 1404; Bere on honde, accuse (of), D 226; Baron honde, made
(them) believe, D 380; Bar him on honde, assured him, T. iii. 1154; Holden
in honde, retain, cajole, T. ii. 477; Holde in honde, T. iii. 773; delude
with false hopes, 3. 1019; Han in honde, have in hand, 5. 545; Hondes,
_pl._ B 3214, 3542, C 398, G 189. The Americans are still among the 'savage
nations' who imply a solemn assent to an oath 'by holding up the hand';
Lowell, My Study Windows (Library of Old Authors). See HAND.

HONDRED, hundred, E 2111, F 1193. See HUNDRED.

HONDYWERK, _s._ handiwork, D 1562 _n_.

HONEST, _adj._ creditable, A. 246; honourable, worthy, B 1751, E 333;
seemly, decent, C 328; rich, luxurious, E 2028; Honeste, _pl._ H 75.

HONESTEE, _s._ honour, L. 1673, 1736; B 3902, 3908; goodness, B 3157;
honourableness, 2. 40; womanly virtue, C 77.

HONESTETEE, _s._ honourableness, honour, E 422, I 436; modesty, I 429;
neatness, I 431.

HONESTLY, _adv._ honourably, B 1434, G 549; nobly, richly, E 2026.

HONGE, _v._ hang, A 2410, D 2242; be hung, 5. 458; C 790; _do me h._, cause
me to be hanged, T. i. 833; Honge, _ger._ to hang, depend, T. v. 1199;
Honge, _2 pr. pl. subj._ hang, vacillate, hesitate, T. ii. 1242. See HANGE.

HONIEDE, _pp. pl._ sweetened with honey, B 3. m 2. 17.

H['O]NOR['A]BLE, _adj._ honourable, 4. 285; H['o]nur['a]ble, E 767;
H['o]nour['a]ble, R. 1151.

HON['O]UR, _s._ honour, A 46; H['o]nour, A 582; one who is an honour to
others, 4. 288.

HON['O]URE, _v._ honour, 18. 23; Hon['o]uren, T. iii. 1262; _ger._ 7. 28;
Hon['o]ureth, _pr. s._ honours, 18. 13; Hon['o]ured, _pp._ 7. 4; A 50, D
1719; worshipped, B 3753 _n_; Hon['o]ureth, _imp. pl._ 4. 3; E 370.

HONTEN; see HUNTEN.

HONY, _s._ honey, 5. 354; B 2. m 5. 6; A 2908, B 2600, 3537, F 614; beloved
one, A 3617; Honies, _pl._ stores of honey, B 3. m 7. 3.

HONY, _adj._ sweet, B 5. m 2. 1.

HONY-COMB, a term of endearment, sweet one, A 3698; Honycombes, _pl._
honey-combs, B 2303.

HONY-SWETE, sweet as honey, E 1396.

H['O]['O]D, _s._ hood, 3. 516; T. ii. 954; L. 507; A 103, 195, 564; Hode,
_dat._ HF. 1810; B 2101; Hood, _dat._ B 1630.

HOODLESS, _adj._ without a hood, 3. 1028.

H['O]['O]K, _s._ hook, T. v. 777; sickle, B 3. m 1. 2; crosier, D 1317;
Hoke, _dat._ 4. 243; Hooke, _dat._ B 2. p 8. 22.

H[`O][`O]L, _adj._ whole, T. i. 961, iv. 1374; A 3006, E 861; sound, D
1370; unwounded, F 1111; perfect, G 111, 117; whole, well, restored to
health, 3. 553; L. 2468; C 357, F 161; all, entire, 3. 554, 1224; Hole,
_def._ whole, A. ii. 9. 3; Hole, _dat._ A 533; Hole, _pl._ whole, B 4. p 1.
34; B 1150; healthy, B 4. p 6. 140. A.S. _h[=a]l_.

H[`O][`O]L, _adj. as adv._ wholly, 3. 991; 6. 60; 22. 87; T. i. 1053; _al
hool_, entirely, T. iii. 1013.

HOOLLY, _adv._ wholly, R. 1163; 3. 15, 115, 688; T. iii. 145; A 599, 1818;
B 2915, D 211; Holly, T. iii. 145.

HOOLNESSE, _s._ soundness, integrity, B 4. p 6. 127; completeness, B 5. P
4. 91.

HOOLSOME, _adj._ wholesome, B 2285.

HOOLSOMNESSE, _s._ health, B 2303.

H[`O][`O]M, _s. as adv._ home, homewards, 3. 1029; L. 1619; A 400, B 173,
385, 603, 3548; (went) home, T. i. 126. A.S. _h[=a]m_.

HOOM-COMINGE, _s._ coming home, return, A 884, B 765; Hoom-coming, return,
L. 2100.

HOOMLINESSE, _s._ homeliness, domesticity, E 429; Homlinesse, familiarity,
B 2876.

HOOMLY, _adj._ belonging to one's household, E 1785, 1792; homely, D 1843;
native, R. 1373.

HOOMLY, _adv._ in a homely way, A 328; Hoomlich, familiarly, B 3. p 12.
135.

HOOMWARD, _adv._ homeward, 3. 1315; T. iii. 621; Homward, A 2956, B 1739;
on the way home, A 794.

H[`O][`O]R, _adj._ hoary, white-haired, grey-headed, T. v. 1284; A 3878, C
743, E 1269, 1400; Hore, _pl._ 16. 31; B 1. m 1. 11. A.S. _h[=a]r_.

HOORS, _adj._; see HORS.

HOOST, _s._ army, A 874. O.F. _host_.

H[`O][`O]T, _adj._ hot, L. 914; A 420, 687, B 2226, D 1436, G 887; fervent,
I 117; _as s._ 5. 380; Hote, _def._ hot, 5. 266, 20. 2; A 394; voracious,
5. 362; (as epithet of Aries, which induced heat of blood), F 51; _pl._ 5.
246. A.S. _h[=a]t_.

HOPE, _s._ hope, 1. 33; 6. 132; A 88, D 994, F 488; expectation, G 870.
A.S. _hopa_.

HOPE, _v._; Hope, _1 pr. s._ fear (see note), A 4029.

HOPER, _s._ hopper, A 4036, 4039.

HOPPE, _v._ dance, A 4375; Hoppe, _1 pr. s._ T. ii. 1107; Hoppen, _1 pr.
pl._ A 3876.

HOPPESTERES, _pl._ dancers; _used as adj._, dancing, A 2017.

HORD, _s._ hoard, treasure, C 775; store (of apples), A 3262, 4406;
treasure-house, I 821; hoarding, avarice, 13. 3; Horde, 26. 28 (see vol.
iv. p. xxx). A.S. _hord_.

HORE, _pl._ of Hoor, _adj._

HORN, _s._ horn, 3. 182, 346; T. ii. 642; (musical instrument, used
metaphorically), H 90; Horne, _dat._ 3. 376; Hornes, _pl._ horns, T. i.
300, iii. 624; F 1191; drinking-horns, A 2279; horns (of the moon), B 3. m
6. 4; T. v. 652.

HORNED, _pp._ provided with horns, T. v. 650.

_Horoscopo_; _in horoscopo_, within that part of the sky considered as the
ascendent, A. ii. 4. 9; see note on p. 192. Gk. [Greek: horoskopos],
observing hours; also, as sb., a nativity, a horoscope.

_Horoscopum_, horoscope, A. ii. 4. 38. See above.

HOROWE, _adj. pl._ foul, scandalous, 4. 206. See note. Cf. A.S. _horig_,
filthy; _horu_ (gen. _horwes_), filth.

HORR['I]BLE, _adj._ horrible, L. 1838, 1868.

HORROUR, _s._ horror, I 223, 224.

HORS, _s._ horse, 7. 157; A 168, B 15, E 388; the 'horse,' a name for the
little wedge that passes through a hole in the end of the 'pyn,' A. i. 14.
4 (Arabic _alpheraz_, the horse); Horse, _dat._ T. v. 37; Hors (_for_
Horse, _before a vowel_), _dat._ A 94; Hors, _pl._ horses, B 2. m 1. 8; B
4. m 7. 28; 3. 349; HF. 952; A 74, 598, B 1823, 3294, D 285, 1559. A.S.
_hors_, pl. _hors_.

HORS, _adj._ hoarse, 3. 347; Hoors, T. iv. 1147. A.S. _h[=a]s_.

HORSLY, _adj._ horselike, like all that a horse should be, F 194.

HOSE, _s._ hose, covering for the feet and legs, A 3933, G 726; Hosen,
_pl._ A 456, 3955, B 1923; Hoses, _pl._ A 3319, I 423. A.S. _hose_.

HOSPITALIERS, _s. pl._ knights hospitallers, I 891.

HOSTE, _s._ host (of an inn), keeper of a lodging, A 747, 3501, B 1, 39,
1625, 3970, E 1; Host, H 56. Often spelt _oste_; see OSTE. O.F. _hoste_,
Lat. acc. _hospitem_.

HOSTEL, _s._ hostelry, HF. 1022.

HOSTELRYE, _s._ hostel, inn, A 23, 718, B 4184, D 1779, G 589;
lodging-house, A 3203; Hostelryes, _pl._ inns, A 2493; Hostelries, I 440.

H[`O]STESS[`E], _s._ hostess, L. 2496.

HOSTILER, _s._ innkeeper, A 241, B 4219; Hostileer, A 4360; Hostilers,
_pl._ servants at an inn, I 440.

HOTE, _adj._; see HOOT.

HOTE, _adv._ hotly, T. iii. 1650; L. 260 _a_; A 97, 1737.

HOTE, _v._ command, promise; _also_, be called, R. 38; Hoten, _v._ be
called, D 144; Hote, _1 pr. s._ command, HF. 1719; Hight, _pt. s. as pr.
s._ is called, L. 417; R. 7; 2. 70 (see note); 6. 27; HF. 663; Highte, B
3651, I 51; Highten, _pt. pl. as pr. pl._ are called, L. 423; A. i. 18. 2;
Hight, _pt. s._ was named, L. 725, 1245; A 1013, 4013; Highte, _pt. s._ was
called, was named, R. 588, 745, 1247; 3. 63, 65; A 860, 1428, 4014, B 3310,
3373, C 153, D 674, E 32, 210, 1772, F 30, 33, G 119, 550; L. 1705, 1397,
1398, 2248; _1 pt. s._ was called, A 4336; _1 pt. s._ promised, 17. 5;
Highte, _pt. s._ promised, T. v. 1636; Highte, _2 pt. pl._ promised, E 496;
Highten, _pt. pl._ promised, T. ii. 1623; Hatte, _pt. s. as pr. s._ is
called, is named, T. iii. 797; Hatte, _pt. pl._ were called, were named,
HF. 1303; Hette, _1 pt. s._ promised, 4. 185; Hette, _pt. s._ was called,
T. v. 319 _n_; Heet, _pt. s._ was named, HF. 1604; (who) was called, F
1388; Het[:e] (_for_ Heet), 3. 200, 948 (see note to 3. 199); Hoten, _pp._
called, A 3941; Hight, _pp._ promised, T. ii. 492, iv. 445; A 2472, D 1024,
F 1323, 1504, 1518; named, R. 1474; HF. 226. A.S. _h[=a]tan_. The parts of
the verb show great confusion; see _h[=a]ten_ in Stratmann.

HOTTES, _pl._ baskets carried on the back, HF. 1940. See note. O.F.
_hotte_.

HOUND, _s._ dog, T. iii. 764; L. 1121; I 138; Houndes, _pl._ 3. 349, 377;
L. 1194; A 146, 947, 2205, E 1095.

HOUNDFISH, _s._ dogfish, E 1825.

HOUPE, _v._; Houped, _pt. pl._ whooped, B 4590. O.F. _houper_.

HOURE, _s._ hour, A 2217, 2272; _h. after h._, A. ii. 40. 57; Houres, _pl._
A 416.

HOUS, _s._ house, A 252, 343; _to hous_, to a reception by, L. 1546; Hous
and hoom, house and home, H 229; Hous by hous, to each house in order, D
1765; a household, F 24; a 'mansion' of a planet (in astrology), F 672; a
'house' or portion of the sky (in astrology), A. ii. 36. 5; B 304; T. ii.
681 (see note); Houses, _pl._ houses, homes, E 1802; 'mansions,' L. 2593;
'houses,' A. pr. 76. The whole celestial sphere was divided into twelve
equal portions, called _houses_, by six great circles passing through the
north and south points of the horizon; two of these circles being the
meridian and the horizon.

H['O]USBONDE, _s._ husband, B 2241, 3502, F 742; I 329; Housb['o]nde, T.
ii. 754; H['o]usbond, B 863, E 698; H['u]sbond, L. 1828; Husb['a]nd, L.
1238; Housbondes, _pl._ A 460, 936, B 272, D 6, 17, 1259. A.S.
_h[=u]sbonda_.

HOUSBONDRYE, _s._ economy, A 4077, B 4018, E 1296; household goods, D 288.

HOUSHOLDERE, _s._ householder, A 339.

HOUSHOLDING, _s._ keeping a household, R. 1132.

HOUSINGE, _s._ dwelling, abode, house, E 2026.

HOUSLED, _pp._ made a recipient of holy communion, I 1027. A.S. _h[=u]sel_,
the eucharist.

HOVE, _v._; hover, dwell, T. iii. 1427; Hoven, _pr. pl._ wait in readiness,
hover, L. 1196 (see note); Hoved, _pt. s._ waited about, T. v. 33.

HOW, _adv._ how, A 284, 766, &c.

HOW, _interj._ ho! A 3437, 3577; B 1174.

HOWLE, _v._; Howleth, _pr. s._ howls, B 4. m 3. 10; A 2817.

HOWNE, savage (?), T. iv. 210 (see note). See HERE.

HOWVE, _s._ hood, T. iii. 775, v. 469; Sette his howve, set (awry) his
hood, A 3911 (see note). A.S. _h[=u]fe_.

HUGE, _adj._ great, 3. 421, 447; T. iii. 656; vast, 4. 99.

HUMANITEE, _s._ kindness, E 92.

HUMBELY, _adv._ humbly, T. v. 1354. See HUMBLELY.

HUMBLEHEDE, _s._ (_apparently_ humility, _but probably a spurious form_), B
3862 _n_.

HUMBLELY, _adv._ humbly, T. ii. 1719; L. 156; Humbely, T. v. 1354.
(Trisyllabic.)

HUMBLESSE, _s._ humility, meekness, 1. 108; 4. 178; 7. 248; L. 2269; A
1781, B 165, 1660, 2426, F 544, 753.

HUMBLEST, _adj. sup._ 2. 57.

HUMBLING, _s._ low growl (lit. humming), HF. 1039.

HUMILITEE, _s._ humility, D 2098, E 1143, 1184; humiliation, I 109.

HUMME, _ger._ to hum, T. ii. 1199.

HUM['O]UR, _s._ humour, A 421.

HUNDRED, _num._ 7. 222; B 1371, 1377, 1391; Hondred, E 2111, F 1193.

HUNTE, _s._ huntsman, 3. 345; A 2018, 2628; Huntes, _pl._ 3. 361, 541.

HUNTEN, _v._ hunt, 3. 366; T. iii. 1780; Hunte, _ger._ E 81; Honten, _ger._
A 1674; Hunteth, _pr. s._ chases, L. 2414; Hunted, _pp._ A 1640.

HUNTER, _s._ huntsman, 5. 99; A 1638; Hunters, _pl._ A 178.

HUNTERESSE, _s. fem._ female hunter, HF. 229; L 971; A 2347.

HUNTING, _s._ hunting, 3. 350, 355, 374; A 191, B 3496, 3995, E 234; _an_
(or _on_) _hunting_, a-hunting, L. 1191; A 1687, E 234.

HURLE, _v._ hurl; Hurlest, _2 pr. s._ dost hurl, dost whirl round, B 297.

HURTE, _v._; Hurt, _pr. s._ hurteth, hurts, T. v. 350, I 577; Hurteth, _pr.
s._ R. 953; Hurte, _pt. s._ T. ii. 199; Herte, _pt. s._ 3. 883.

HURTELEN, _ger._ to attack, to fly at, B 2. p 1. 19; Hurteleth, _pr. s._
strikes (against), B 5. m 4. 36; Hurtleth, _pr. s._ pushes, A 2616;
Hurtlen, _pr. pl._ dash together, L 638.

HURTES, _s. pl._ hurts, F 471.

HUSB['A]ND, _s._ L. 1238; H['u]sbond, L, 1828; see HOUSBONDE.

HUSHT, _pp._ hushed, silent, L. 2682; Hust, B 2. m 5. 16; T. ii. 915, iii.
1094; A 2981; Hust, _as imp. s._ be silent, A 3722.

HUTCHES, _error for_ Hottes, HF. 1940 _n_.

HY, _adj._ high, A 306; Hye, _dat._ HF. 1133; great, E 135; Hye weye,
_dat._ (the) high way, main road, A 897; Hye wey, _acc._ (the) high way,
13. 20; Hye, _def._ D 1173; _pl._ arrogant, B 4. p 4. 32; high, L. 2614; D
870, E 45, F 1191. See HEIGH, HEYE.

HYDE, _v._ hide, 4. 98; A 1477, 1481; lie concealed, F 141; _ger._ to hide,
1. 42; B 3732; Hyden, _v._ 7. 117; Hydestow, hidest thou, D 308; Hit, _pr.
s._ hides, F 512; Hydeth, _pr. s._ I 113; Hidde, _1 pt. s._ hid, F 595;
_pt. s._ D 955; Hed, _pp._ hidden, L. 208; Hid, _pp._ hidden, R. 1598;
Hidde, _pp. as def. adj. pl._ hidden, T. i. 530; Hyd, _imp. s._ L. 2655.
A.S. _h[=y]dan_.

HYDER, _s._ hider, one who conceals, B 5. p 1. 55.

HYE, _adv._ high, aloft, 4. 218; HF. 905; L. 1200; B 3592, F 411, 671;
loudly, 3. 305; 5. 499; proudly, T. ii. 401. See HEIGHE.

HYE, _v._ hasten, hie, T. iii. 621; L. 950, 1334; A 2274, G 1151; _h. me_,
hurry myself, make haste, G 1084; Hye, _ger._ to bring hastily, F 291; to
hasten, HF. 1658; Hyest, _2 pr. s._ hastenest, T. iii. 1441; Hyeth, _pr.
s._ T. iv. 320; Hye, _1 pr. pl._ T. v. 489; Hyen, _pr. pl._ hasten, B 3. p.
11. 158; Hyed, _pt. s._ T. iii. 157; Hyed hem, _pt. pl. refl._ 3. 363;
Hyed, _pp._ caused to hasten, T. iii. 655; Hye, _imp. s._ HF. 1592; Hy
thee, _imp. s. refl._ 3. 152; 5. 133; G 1295. A.S. _higian_.

HYE, _s._ haste; only in phr. _in hye_, in haste, T. ii. 88, 1712, iv.
1385; A 2979, B 209.

HYENE, _s._ hyaena, 10. 35.

HY[:E]R, _adj._ higher, upper, HF. 1117; A 399, B 2679, C 597, F 387, I
148; Heyer, A. ii. 5. 10, 23. 27.

HYEST, _adv. superl._ highest, 5. 324.

HYESTE, _adj. superl._ highest, F 1061. See HEYEST.

HYNE, _s._ hind, servant, peasant, A 603, C 688. A.S. _h[=i]na_.

HYNESSE, _s._ dignity, rank, I 336; Highness (as a title), 6. 76.

HYRE, _s._ hire, A 507, 538; reward, 1. 103; 5. 9; payment, D 1008; meed,
ransom, T. iv. 506.

HYRE, _v._ hire; Hyred, _pp._ B 1757.

HYVE, _s._ hive, HF. 1522; T. iv. 1356; A 4373, B 4582, D 1693.



I-, _common prefix of past participles_; See Y-.

I, _pron._ I, A 20, &c. See IK, ICH.

ICCHED, _pp._ itched, A 3682.

ICH, _pron._ I, T. i. 678, iii. 1818; B 39, &c. See I, IK.

I-COMEN, _pp._ come, T. iii. 1668. See Y-COMEN.

IDIOT, _s._ fool, T. i. 910; D 311.

IDUS, _s. pl._ ides, F 47. The _ides_ is a name given to the fifteenth day
of the months of March, May, July and October, and the thirteenth of other
months.

IF, _conj._ A 144, 500, 501, &c. See YIF.

IGNORAUNCE, _s._ ignorance, 10. 37; T. iii. 826, iv. 984, 1001.

_Ignotum_, _s._ an unknown thing (see note), G 1457. Lat. _ignotum_, an
unknown thing; comp. _ignotius_, a less known thing.

I-GRAUNTED, _pp._ granted, T. iv. 665; see YGRAUNTED.

I-HALOWED, _pp._ view-hallooed (of the hart), 3. 379.

IK, I, A 3867, 3888; I, A 20, &c.; Ich, T. i. 678; B 39; &c.

IL, _adj._ evil, A 4174, 4184. (A Northern word.)

IL-HAYL, bad luck (to you), A 4089. (A Northern form.)

ILKE, _adj._ same, very, 3. 265; 4. 66; 5. 433; T. iv. 1253; HF. 1169; L.
538; A 64, 175, 3033, D 651, G 80, 501, 1366; _that ilke_, that same, B
3663; _ilke same_, very same, L. 779.

ILLUSIOUN, _s._ illusion, HF. 493; T. iii. 1041; F 1264; Illusion, F 1134;
Illusiouns, _pl._ T. v. 368.

ILYKE, _pl._ equal, A. i. 17. 17. See YLYKE.

IM['A]GE, _s._ image, T. iv. 235; Im['a]ges, _pl._ HF. 121, 1269; T. ii.
373; carved images, R. 142; statues, B 1. p 1. 19; images, figures, A 418
(see note).

IMAGINABLE, _adj._ B 5. p 4. 136.

IMAGINACIOUN, _s._ imagination, 3. 14; L. 355, 1523; D 2218; thought, HF.
278; fancy, notion, A 1094, 3612.

IMAGINATYF, _adj._; No-thing list him to been imaginatyf = it did not at
all please him to imagine, he did not care to think, F 1094.

IMAGINEN, _v._ imagine, T. ii. 836, iv. 1626; Imagining, _pres. pt._ E.
598.

IMAGINING, _s._ plotting, A 1995; fancy, 18. 36.

IMMORT['A]L, _adj._ immortal, 5. 73; Inmortal, T. i. 103.

IMPACIENCE, _s._ impatience, I 391. See INPATIENCE.

IMPACIENT, _adj._ impatient, I 401; Inpacient, B 2730.

IMPERIAL, _adj._ HF. 1361.

IMPERIE, _s._ government, rank, B 2. p 6. 8.

IMPERTINENT, _adj._ not pertinent, irrelevant, E 54.

IMPES, _pl._ grafts, scions, B 3146. A.S. _imp_.

IMPETREN, _pr. pl._ impetrate, ask for, B 5. p 3. 142.

IMPLYETH, _pr. pl._ involve, enwrap, B 5. m 1. 10.

IMPORT['A]BLE, _adj._ insufferable, B 3792, E 1144.

IMPOSICIOUN, _s._ imposition, tax, B 1. p 4. 66.

IMPOSS['I]BLE, _adj._ impossible, T. i. 783; L. 1839; _as s._, thing
impossible, D 688; Inposs['i]ble, T. iii. 525; F 1009.

IMPRESSEN, _v._ imprint, T. iii. 1543; Impresse, _v._ 26. 26 (see vol. iv.
p. xxx); T. ii. 1371; imprint (themselves), find an impression, E 1578;
Impresse, _pr. pl._ force themselves (upon), make an impression (upon), G
1071; Impressed, _pp._ B 5. m 4. 31.

IMPRESSIOUN, _s._ impression, T. i. 298; A 3613; remembrance, F 371;
Impression, E 1978; Impressiouns, _pl._ impressions, T. v. 372; notions,
HF. 39; Impressiounes, T. ii. 1238.

IMPUDENCE, _s._ I 391.

IMPUDENT, _adj._ I 397.

IN, _s._ dwelling, house, A 3547, 3622; inn, B 4216; lodging, B 1097, 1632,
D 350; Inne, _dat._ A 2436.

IN, _prep._ in, A 3, &c.; into, B 119; A. i. 16. 3; = come within, 20. 6;
on, I 105, 107; among, A. i. 10. 5; against, I 695.

_In manus tuas_, into Thy hands (see note), A 4287.

_In principio_, in the beginning, B 4353. Part of St. John, i. 1.

IN-AS-MUCHE, inasmuch, B 4611.

INCEST, _s._ I 963.

INCHE, _s._ inch, 3. 425.

INCLYNED, _pp._ bent aside, B 5. p 3. 132.

IN-COMINGE, _s._ incoming, entrance, T. ii. 1308.

INCONSTANCE, _s._ inconstancy, D 1958.

INCONVENIENT, _s._ inconvenience, B 5. P 3. 121.

INCUBUS, _s._ D 880.

INCUR['A]BLE, _adj._ B 3790.

INDE, _adj._ indigo, dark blue, R. 67. O.F. _inde_; later applied to
_light_ blue. See Cotgrave.

INDETERMINAT, _adj._ not marked upon the Astrolabe, A. ii. 17. _rubric_.

INDIFFERENTLY, _adv._ impartially, B 5. p 3. 91.

INDIGNACION, _s._ insubordination, I 402.

INDULGENCE, _s._ D 84.

INDURACIOUN, _s._ hardening, G 855.

INEQUAL, _adj._ unequal, A 2271; A. ii. 10. 4; Inequales, _pl._ of varying
length; _houres inequales_, hours formed by dividing the _duration of
daylight_ by twelve, A. ii. 8. 1, 10. 1.

INESTIMABLE, _adj._ invaluable, B 5. p 3. 137.

INFECT, _adj._ invalid, of no effect, A 320; dimmed, B 4. m 5. 9.

INFECTE, _v._ infect, H 39; Infecteth, _pr. s._ B 4. p 3. 53.

IN-FERE, _adv._ together, 4. 290; 9. 250; 23. 6; L. 217 _a_; B 328, D 924.
Orig. _in fere_, in company; from A.S. _ge-f[=e]r_, company.

INFERMETEE, _s._ infirmity, I 913.

INFERNAL, _adj._ A 2684; Infern['a]l, T. iv. 1543; of the lower regions, L.
1886; Infern['a]ls, _pl._ T. v. 368.

INFINIT, _adj._ infinite, A. i. 8. 9; Inf['i]nite, A 1259, 2827.

INFINITEE, _s._ infinity, B 5. p 6. 22.

INFIRME, _adj._ insufficient, B 5. m 2. 3.

INFLUENCE, _s._ influence (of stars), A. i. 21. 44; E 1968; Influences,
_pl._ T. iii. 618.

INFORMACIOUNS, _s. pl._ instructions, B 3060.

INFORTUNAT, _adj._ unfortunate, unlucky, inauspicious, B 302; A. ii. 4. 21.

INFORT['U]NE, _s._ misfortune, ill fortune, T. iii. 1626, iv. 185; B 3. p
7. 19; A 2021, B 3591.

INFORT['U]NED, _pp._ ill-starred, T. iv. 744.

INFORTUNING, _s._ unlucky condition, A. ii. 4. 27.

INGOT, _s._ an ingot, a mould for pouring metal into, G 1206, 1209, 1223;
Ingottes, _pl._ G 818.

INHELDE, _imp. s._ pour in, infuse, T. iii. 44; Inhielde, T. iii. 44 _n_.
See HELDE.

INIQUITEE, _s._ injustice, A 940.

INIURE (Injyyr[*e]), _s._ injury, T. iii. 1018.

INKE, _s._ ink, T. iii. 1693; L. 2491; A. ii. 5. 12.

IN-KNETTE, _pt. s._ knit up, drew in, T. iii. 1088.

INLY, _adv._ inwardly, intimately, extremely, greatly, T. i. 140, iii.
1606; R. 397, HF. 31; wholly, exquisitely, 3. 276.

IN-MID, _prep._ into, amid, HF. 923.

INMOEVABLETEE, _s._ immobility, B 5. p 6. 51.

INMORTAL, _adj._ immortal, T. i. 103; Immortal, 5. 73.

INNE, _dat. of_ IN, _s._

INNE, _adv._ in, within, T. i. 387, 821, ii. 6, 851, iv. 906; A. ii. 46. 4;
A 41, 1618, 3907, B 3193, F 578, G 880.

INNED, _pp._ housed, lodged, A 2192.

INNEREST, _adj. superl._ innermost, B 4. p 6. 82, 134.

INNOCENT, _as s._, innocent one, B 1825, D 1983.

INOBEDIENCE, _s._ disobedience, I 391.

INOBEDIENT, _adj._ disobedient, I 392.

INORDINATE, _adj._ unusual, I 414.

INPACIENCE, _s._ impatience, B 2734, I 673; B 2. p 1. 72; Impacience, I
391.

INPACIENT, _adj._ impatient, B. 2730; Impacient, I 401.

INPARFIT, _adj._ imperfect, B 3. p 10. 12, 15, 18; Inperfit, incomplete, A.
i. 18. 3.

INPLITABLE, _adj._ intricate, impracticable, B 1. p 4. 59.

INPOSSIBLE, _s._ impossible thing, T. iii. 525; F 1009. See IMPOSSIBLE.

INQUISITIF, _adj._ inquisitive, A 3163.

INSET, _pp._ implanted, B 2. p 3. 13.

INSIGHTE, _s._ understanding, perception, B 1. p 6. 75; Insight, E 242.

INSOLENCE, _s._ I 391.

INSOLENT, _adj._ I 399.

INSPIRED, _pp._ quickened, A 6.

INSTABLE, _adj._ unstable, unconstant, E 2057.

INSTANCE, _s._ presence, B 5. p 6. 82; suggestion, T. ii. 1441; urgent
request, E 1611.

INSTRUMENT, _s._ A. pr. 13; (of music) T. v. 442; 3. 314; Instruments (of
music), _pl._ 5. 197; L. 1101; F 270; Instrumentz, T. v. 459.

INSUFFICIENT, _adj._ D 1960.

INTELLECT, _s._ understanding, A 2803, G 339.

INTELLIGENCE, _s._ the understanding, mind, B 5. p 4. 114; mode of
understanding, 4. 166.

INTENDESTOW, dost thou intend, T. v. 478.

INTERCEPT, _pp._ intercepted, A. ii. 39. 24.

INTERMINABLE, _adj._ endless, B 5. p 6. 11.

INTERROGACIOUNS, _pl._ questions; _by i._, with respect to questions, A
3194.

INTERVALLE, _s._ interval, B 2724.

IN-TIL, _prep._ unto, as far as, R. 624.

INTO, _prep._ into, A 23, &c.; unto, B 2423.

INTRESSE, _s._ interest, 10. 71. See note. Cf. 'The soyle enbrouded ful of
somer-floures There wedes wycke had none _interesse_': Lydgate, _Falls of
Princes_, bk. i. c. 1.

INTRODUCTORIE, _s._ introduction, A. pr. 73.

INVIS['I]BLE, _adj._ unseen, B 3790; invisible, L. 1021; T. v. 1866.

INVOCACIOUN, _s._ invocation, HF. 67.

INWARD, _adv._ in, T. ii. 1725; within, 1732; Inwarde, towards the inward
side, northward, A. ii. 40. 24.

INWARDE, _adj. pl._ inward, B 5. m 2. 4.

INWARDLY, _adv._ closely, T. ii. 264.

IN-WITH, _prep._ within, in, T. ii. 508, v. 1022; B 2. p 1. 67; R. 401; L.
86, 202, 228; B 1794, 2159, E 870, 1394, 1586, 1944.

IPOCRAS, _s._ a kind of cordial drink, E 1807. See YPOCRAS; and the note to
C 306.

IPOCRISYE, _s._ hypocrisy, C 410; Ipocrisie, I 391.

IPOCRITE, _s._ hypocrite, R. 414, I 394; Ypocryte, F 514, 520.

IRE, _s._ irritability, R. 314; quickness of temper, I 665; anger, T. v.
589; A 1659, 1997, B 3221, C 657, F 781. O.F. _ire_.

IREN, _s._ iron, R. 946; 5. 149; T. ii. 1276; A 500.

IROUS, _adj._ angry, B 2315, D 2014, 2016, I 619.

IRREGULER, _adj._ a sinner against his orders, I 782.

IRREVERENCE, _s._ I 391.

IS, _1 pr. s._ am (Northern), A 4031, 4045, 4202; _2 pr. s._ art
(Northern), A 4089; Is, _pr. s._ is, A 4, &c.; used with _two_ sbs., F 294.

ISSE, _v._; Issest, _2 pr. s._ issuest, B 3. p 12. 119. O.F. _issir_.
(Barbour has _isch_.)

ISSUE, _s._ outlet, vent, T. v. 205; Issues, _pl._ results, B 3. p 7. 8.

I-STABLED, _pp._ established, E 2405 _n_.

IT, _pron._ it, A 145, &c.; It am I, it is I, A 1736, 3766, B 1404. See
HIT.

IVY-LEEF, _s._ ivy-leaf, T. v. 1433; A 1838.

I-WIS, _adv._ certainly, truly, verily, 6. 48. See YWIS.



I (_consonant_); _for_ J.

IADE (Jaad[*e]), _s._ a jade, i.e. miserable hack, B 4002.

IAGOUNCES (Jaguunsez), _pl._ garnets (_or_ rubies), R. 1117. See Godefroy
and Roquefort; and the note on the line.

IALOUS (Jaluus), _adj._ jealous, 5. 342, 458; A 1329, 3224, C 367; Ielous,
4. 140; Ialouse, _pl._ F 286.

IALOUSYE (Jaluusii[*e]), _s._ jealousy, 5. 252; A 3294, C 366, E 1205, F
748; Ielousye, A 1299; Ielosye, 4. 7; Ielousyes, _pl._ HF. 685.

IAMBEUX (Jambeuz), _s. pl._ leggings, leg-armour, B 2065. From F. _jambe_,
the leg.

IANE (Jaan[*e]), _s._ a small coin of Genoa, B 1925, E 999. '_Janne_,
_Jannes_, G[^e]nes, ville d'Italie': Roquefort.

IANGLE (Jangl[*e]), _v._ chatter, prate, T. ii. 666; Iangleth, _pr. s._ B
4625; Ianglest, _2 pr. s._ B 774; Iangle, _pr. pl._ T. ii. 800; F 220, 261;
Iangelinge, _pres. pt._ chattering, B 3. m 2. 15; Iangling, 5. 345. O.F.
_jangler_.

IANGLERE (Jangler[*e]), _s._ story-teller, jester, babbler, A 560; Iangler,
talkative person, 5. 457; H 343.

IANGLERESSE (Jangleress[*e]), _s._ (female) chatterbox, prattler, D 638;
Iangleresses, _pl._ B 2275, E 2307.

IANGLERYE (Janglerii[*e]), _s._ gossip, T. v. 755; Ianglerie, _s._
jangling, talkativeness, B 2252, 2274.

IANGLES (Janglez), _s. pl._ idle pratings, HF. 1960, I 650; disputes,
arguments, D 1407, I 715. See above.

IANGLINGE (Jangling[*e]), _s._ chattering, idle talking, I 649; Iangling,
idle disputing, F 257.

IAPE (Jaap[*e]), _s._ jest, trick, R. 12; A 3390, 3799, 4201, 4207, 4338, B
1629, G 1312, H 84; jest, foolish conduct, D 1961; laughing-stock, HF. 414;
Iapes, _pl._ tricks, A 705, D 242, F 1271; jests, T. i. 911; HF. 1805; B
4281, C 319, 394.

IAPE (Jaap[*e]), _v._ jest, T. i. 929; _ger._ to jest, L. 1699; H 4; Iapen,
_v._ B 1883; Iape, _1 pr. s._ T. ii. 140; Iapedest, _2 pt. s._ didst jest,
T. i. 508, 924; Iaped, _pp._ tricked, A 1729.

IAPERE (Jaaper[*e]), _s._ jester, T. ii. 340; Iaper, mocker, I 89; Iaperes,
_pl._ I 651.

IAPERIE (Jaaperii[*e]), _s._ buffoonery, I 651; Iaperye, jesting mood, E
1656.

IAPE-WORTHY (Jaap[*e]-wurdhi), _adj._ ridiculous, B 5. p 3. 94.

IARGON (Jargon), _s._ talk, E 1848.

IARGONING (Jargoning), _s._ jargoning, chattering, R. 716.

IASPRE (Jaspre), _s._ jasper, T. ii. 1229; B 2297; Iasper, 5. 230.

IAUNYCE (Jauniis[*e]), _s._ jaundice, R. 305.

IAY (Jei), _s._ jay (bird), 5. 346; A 642, B 774, H 132; Iayes, _pl._ G
1397.

IEET (Jeet), _s._ jet, B 4051.

IELOUS (Jeluus), _adj._ jealous, suspicious, 4. 140; _as s._ jealous man,
18. 62. See IALOUS.

IELOUSYE; see IALOUSYE.

IET (Jet), s. fashion, mode, A 682; = Get, G 1277 _n_. From O.F. _geter_,
_jeter_ (F. _jeter_). See GET.

IEUPARDYES (Jeupardiiez), _s. pl._ problems (at chess), 3. 666. Lit.
'jeopardies.' See IUPARTYE.

IEWELES (Jeweelz), _pl._ jewels, A 2945. See IUWEL.

IEWERYE (Jewerii[*e]), _s._ Jewry, Jews' quarter, B 1679, 1741, 1782. See
the note to B 1679.

IO (Joo), _v._ take effect, come about, T. iii. 33 (see note). O.F. _joer_
(F. _jouer_).

IOCOUNDE (Jocuund[*e]), _adj._ jocund, 12. 5.

IOGELOUR (Jugeluur), _s._ juggler, D 1467; Iogelours, _pl._ jugglers, R.
764; HF. 1259; F 219. O.F. _jogeler_, _jougler_.

IOGELRYE (Jugelrii[*e]), _s._ jugglery, F 1265.

IOIE; see IOYE.

IOIGNED; see IOYNE.

IOLIF (Jolif), _adj._ joyful, merry, R. 109, A 3355, B 1399; in good
spirits, B 4264; Iolyf, jovial, R. 435; frisky, A 4154; pretty, R. 610.
O.F. _jolif_; see IOLY.

IOLILY (Jolili), _adv._ merrily, A 4370.

IOLITEE (Jolitee), _s._ sport, amusement, merriment, R. 1287, A 1807, B
2033, D 470; joviality, jollity, mirth, R. 616, C 780, F 278, I 1049;
enjoyment, F 344; comfort, A 680; passion, B 3. p 7. 12; excellence, H 197;
Iolytee, happiness, HF. 682; Iolyte, 5. 226; Iolitee, Joviality
(personified), 2. 39; Ioliftee, pleasure, C 780 _n_.

IOLY (Joli), _adj._ full of merriment, D 456; jolly, joyous, R. 620, 829;
pleasant, delightful, L. 176, 1192; T. ii. 1031, 1099, 1105; F 48; festive,
B 1185. See IOLIF.

IOLYER (Joli[:e]r), _adj. comp._ jollier, handsomer, F 927.

IOLYF; see IOLIF.

IOLYNESSE (Joliness[*e]), _s._ festivity, F 289; amusement, D 926.

IOLYTEE; see IOLITEE.

IOMPRE (Jumpr[*e]), _imp. s._ jumble, T. ii. 1037. Cf. E. _jumble_.

IORDANES (Jordaanez), _pl._ chamber-pots, C 305.

IOSSA (Jossa), down here, A 4101. See note.

IOUKEN (Juuk[*e]n), _v._ slumber, T. v. 409. O. F. _joquier_, _jouquier_,
[^e]tre en repos, jucher, en parlant d'un oiseau perch['e] sur le juchoir':
Godefroy.

IOURNEE (Juurnee), _s._ day's work, R. 579; day's march, A 2738; journey, E
783.

IOWES (J[`o]wez), _s. pl._ jaws, B 1. p 4. 71 (where the Latin text has
_faucibus_); jaws, jowls, HF. 1786 (riming with _clowes_, claws).

IOYE (Joi[*e]), _s._ joy, 4. 223; A 1271, 1871, 1873; F 368, I 120; Ioie, B
3964; Ioy, 5. 3.

IOYNE (Join[*e]), _v._; Ioyned, _pt. s._ joined, let (his ears) touch one
another, 3. 393; Ioigned, _pp._ joined, nearly or wholly in conjunction, A.
ii. 4. 35; Ioyneden, _pt. pl._ joined, T. v. 814; Ioyned, _pp._ joined, B
3683, G 95; in conjunction, T. iii. 625; Ioynant, _pres. pt._ adjoining, A
1060; Ioyning, _pres. pt. as adj._ adjoining, next, L. 1962.

IOYNTLY (Jointli), _adv._ conjointly, together, A. ii. 11. 9.

IOYNTURE (Jointyyr[*e]), _s._ union, B 2. p 5. 32.

IUBBE (Jubb[*e]), _s._ vessel for holding ale or wine, A 3628, B 1260.

IUBILEE (Jubilee), _s._ jubilee, D 1862.

IUDICIAL (Jydisial), _adj._ judicial, A. ii. 4. 37. _Judicial astrology_
pretended to forecast the destinies of men and nations; _natural astrology_
foretold natural events, such as the weather and seasons.

IUGE (Jyj[*e]), _s._ judge, 1. 134; 5. 101; L. 1886; A 814, B 814, 3266, C
123, G 462; umpire, A 1712, 1864; Iuges, _pl._ C 291.

IUGE, _s._ judge; but an error for _Jug_, a yoke, I 898. See note.

IUGE (Jyj[*e]), judge, _1 pr. s._ judge, decide, 5. 629; _2 pr. s. subj._ B
4. p 6. 4; Iuged, _pp._ HF. 357. See IUGGEN.

IUGEMENT (Jyj[*e]ment), _s._ judgement, decision, A 778, 805, 818, B 36; L.
406; judgement, B 688, C 198; opinion, B 1038, E 53; sentence, 5. 431;
justice, B 4. p 4. 190; distinction (Lat. _discretionis_), B 1. p 1. 9;
Iugements, _pl._ decisions, E 439; Iuggementz, _pl._ judgements, B 2596.

IUGGEN (Jyj[*e]n), _v._ judge, T. ii. 21; deem, T. v. 1203; Iuggeth, _imp.
pl._ judge ye, T. iii. 1312. See IUGE.

IUPARTE (Jypart[*e]), _v._; Iuparten, _2 pr. pl._ jeopard, imperil,
endanger, T. iv. 1566. See below.

IUPARTYE (Jypartii[*e]), _s._ jeopardy, peril, hazard, T. ii. 465, 772;
iii. 868, 877; v. 701,916; F 1495, G 743. O. F. _jeu parti_ (Lat. _iocus
partitus_), a divided game. See IEUPARDYES.

IURISDICCIOUN (Jyrisdiksiuun), _s._ jurisdiction, B 2569, D 1319, 1330.

IUST (Jyst), _adj._ just, exact, correct, D 2090; exact, A. ii. 3. 44;
Iuste (_for_ Iust, _before a vowel_), HF. 719; Iuste, _fem._ just, T. iii.
1227.

IUSTE (Jyst[*e]), _v._ joust, tourney, tilt, A 96, 2604; Iusten, _v._ L.
1274, H 42; Iusteth, _pr. s._ jousts, T. iii. 1718, F 1098; Iusten, _pr.
pl._ joust, A 2486; Iusting, _pres. part._ F 1198. O. F. _jouster_.

IUSTES (Jystez), _s. pl. as sing._ a jousting-match, A 2720. Usually in the
plural form; see P. Plowm. B. xvii. 74; Rob. of Glouc. p. 137; Rom. of
Partenay, 988.

IUSTING (Jysting), _s._ jousting, L. 1115.

IUSTLY (Jystli), _adv._ exactly, A. pr. 17. 14; i. 3. 45.

IUST['Y]SE (Jystiiz[*e]), _s._ judge, 1. 37; B 665, C 289, D 1028, G 497;
I['u]styce, A 314; I['u]stice, C 121. (In the form _Iust['y]se_ the _s_ is
pronounced as _z_.)

IUSTYSE, (Jystiiz[*e]), _s._ judgment, condemnation, 1. 142; administration
of justice, C 587; I['u]stice, 1. 30. (In the form _Iust['y]se_ the _s_ is
sounded as _z_.)

IUWEL (Jywel), _s._ jewel, jewelled ornament, L. 1117; Ieweles, _pl._ A
2945.

IUYSE (Jyiiz[*e]), _s._ justice, judgement, B 795; Iuwyse, sentence, A
1739. O.F. _juise_. (The word is _ju-y-se_, in three syllables.)



KALENDER, _s._ calendar, almanack, A. i. 11. 1; _hence_ a complete record
of examples, L. 542 (see note); Kalenderes, _pl._ 1. 73; Kalendres, A. pr.
61.

KALENDES, i.e. beginning, introduction, T. v. 1634. (Because the Kalends
fall on the _first_ of the month.)

KANKERDORT, _variant of_ Cankedort, T. ii. 1752 _n_.

KARF, _pt. s. of_ KERVE.

KAYNARD, _s._ dotard, D 235. O.F. _caignard_, _cagnard_, sluggard (term of
reproach); see _Cagnard_ in Littr['e]; and _Caynard_ in New E. Dict.

KECCHE, _v._ catch, clutch, T. iii. 1375. See CACCHE.

K[=E]CHIL, _s._ small cake, D 1747. O.E. _coecil_, small cake; see
Stratmann. 'With us it is called a Gods kichell, because Godfathers and
Godmothers used commonly to give one of them to their Godchildren, when
they asked blessing': Speght. On which Tyrwhitt remarks: 'But all this is
_gratis dictum_, I believe'; as is clearly the case. See note.

KEEN, _pl._ kine, cows, B 4021 _n_. See KYN.

KEEP, _s._ care, heed, notice (only in the phrase _take keep_); _tak keep_,
take notice, A. i. 1. 2; D 431; _take keep_, may pay heed, A 503; _taken
keep_, take heed, F 348; _took keep_, took heed, took notice, 3. 128, 7.
135; L. 1733; A 398, 1389, E 1058. See KEPE.

KEEP, _imp. s._ take care! mind! A 4101. See KEPE.

KEK! _interj._ (represents the cackle of a goose), 5. 499.

KEKED, _pp._ = Kyked, A 3445 _n_.

KEMBE, _ger._ to comb, R. 599; HF. 136; Kembeth, _pr. s._ E 2011; Kembde,
_pt. s. refl._ combed himself, B 3. m 4. 2; Kembde, _pt. s._ F 560; Kempte,
_pt. s._ A 3374; Kembd, _pp._ combed, trimmed, A 2143; combed, A 3691, E
379; smoothed over, decked (lit. combed), B 1. m 5. 31 (L. _compta_);
Kempt, _pp._ combed, R. 577, A 2289. A.S. _cemban_.

KEMPE, _adj. pl._ shaggy, rough (see note), A 2134. Cf. Icel. _kampr_,
beard, moustaches, whiskers of a cat; and see Camp, _s._ (4) in the New E.
Dict.

KEN, _s._ kin, kindred, men, 3. 438. See note. (A Kentish form.)

KENE (k['e]['e]n[*e]), _adj._ keen, eager, 21. 6; cruel, 10. 27; bold, B
3439; sharp, A 2876, F 57, 1112; _pl._ sharp, A 104, 1966; keen, D 1381.
A.S. _c[=e]ne_.

KENE, _adv._ keenly, 6. 63; 11. 3.

KENNE, _v._ perceive, discern, HF. 498. A.S. _cennan_.

KEPE, _v._ take care (of), A 130; keep, preserve, L. 384; _ger._ to keep
to, 3. 43; _1 pr. s._ care, L. 1032, A 2960; intend, T. i. 676; regard,
reck, A 2238; _I kepe han_, I care to have, G 1368; Kepeth, _pr. s._ keeps,
E 1133; observes, F 516; Kepen, _1 pr. pl._ care, HF. 1695; Kepe, _pr. pl._
care, pay regard (to), T. i. 763; Kepe, _pr. s. subj._ may (He) keep, F
889; Kepte, _pt. s._ E 223; retained, A 442; took care of, A 415, 512, B
269; Keped, _pt. pl._ kept, L. 294 _a_; Kept, _pp._ E 1098; kept safe, A
276; Keping, _pres. pt._ keeping, tending, F 651; Keep, _imp. s._ take
care! A 4101; Kepeth, _imp. pl._ keep ye, B 764, G 226.

KEPE, _s._ heed (only in the phrase _take kepe_); _I take kepe_, 3. 6; _tak
kepe_, C 352, 360; _taketh kepe_, C 90; _ytaken kepe_, B 2604. See KEEP.

KEPER, _s._ keeper, i.e. prior, A 172.

KERCHEF, _s._ kerchief, L. 2202; B 837; Kerchief, finely woven loose
covering, 5. 272.

KERS, _s._ cress; thing of small value, A 3756. A.S. _cerse_, _cresse_.

KERVE, _v._ carve, cut, T. ii. 325, F 158; _ger._ 5. 217; Kerven, _ger._ R.
945; Kerveth, _pr. s._ cuts, L. 2334; I 888; (it) cuts, R. 277; Kerve, _pr.
s. subj._ cut, pierce, 25. 31 (see vol. iv. p. xxviii); Karf, _pt. s._
carved, A 100, D 2244, E 1773; cut, B 3647, 3791; B 2. m 5. 13; 9. 21;
Corven, _pt. pl._ slashed, hacked, cut, B 1. p 3. 28; Corven, _pp._ cut, 5.
425; A 2696; cut away, B 1. p 1. 26; carved, HF. 1295; cut, slashed, A
3318; Corve, _pp._ cut, L. 2695; Kerving, _pres. pt._ cutting, T. i. 631.
A.S. _ceorfan_, pt. t. _cearf_, pp. _corfen_.

KERVER, _s._ carver, A 1899.

KERVING, _s._ carving, A 1925; cutting, crossing over, A. 1. 19. 3;
Kervinges, _pl._ carvings, HF. 1302.

KERVING-TOLES, _s. pl._ tools to cut with, T. i. 632.

KESSE, _v._ kiss, E 1057; Keste, _pt. s._ F 350. (A Kentish form.) See
KISSEN.

KEVERE, _ger._ to cover, B 2. p 2. 28 _n_; _v._ to recover, T. i. 917;
Kevered, _pp._ covered, 5. 271; HF. 275, 352.

KEYE, _s._ key, 7. 323; 10. 39; T. v. 460; L. 26; E 2044, G 1219; key (_in
place of_ rudder: see note), B 3. p 12. 55; Keyes, _pl._ keys, D 309.

KICHENES, _pl._ kitchens, D 869.

KICHIL, _for_ Kechil, D 1747 _n_.

KID, KIDDE; see KYTHEN.

KIDE, _s._ kid, A 3260; Kides, _gen._ kid's, E 1364.

KIKE, _v._ kick, D 941.

KILLE, _v._; _pr. pl._ kill, L. 1216.

KIMELIN, _s._ a large shallow tub, A 3548, 3621 (see note to 3548). Cf.
A.S. _cumb_, E _coomb_.

KIN, _s._ kindred, R. 268; L. 1864, 1980; B 3121; race, G 829; _som kin_,
of some kind, B 1137; Kinnes, _gen._ kind's; _alles kinnes_, of every kind,
HF. 1530.

KINDE, _s._ nature, R. 412, 1699; 3. 16, 56; 4. 282; 5. 672; 6. 2; 22. 56;
B 1. p 6. 30; L. 246, 2449; B 1840, 2973, G 41, 659, H 183, I 727; race,
lineage, stock, D 1101, G 121; seed, I 965; the natural world, HF. 584; T.
iii. 1437, F 469; natural bent, F 608, 619; natural disposition, 7. 149;
HF. 43; natural ordinance, 3. 494, 512; kind, species, 5. 174, 311, 360,
450; _of k._, by nature, naturally, T. ii. 370; F 768; Kindes, _pl._ sorts,
HF. 204. (Dissyllabic.)

KINDE, _adj._ kind, A 647; natural, T. ii. 970; HF. 834, 836.
(Dissyllabic.)

KINDE, _adv._ kindly, 7. 267.

KINDELY, _adj._ natural, HF. 842; Kindeliche, HF. 829; Kyndely, 3. 761;
Kindly, HF. 730.

KINDELY, _adv._ by nature, B 4. p 2. 69; D. 402; naturally, HF. 832, 852; I
491; Kindeliche, B 3. m 11. 16; Kyndely, by nature, 3. 778; Kyndly,
naturally, 2. 71.

KINDENESSE, _s._ kindness, 4. 298; love, devotion, L. 665.

KINDLED, _pp._ A 2295.

KING, _s._ A 324; (said of the queen bee) I 468; Kinges, _gen._ T. ii. 400;
3. 282; Kinges note, the name of a tune, A 3217; Kinges, _pl._ B 3558.

KINNES, _gen. of_ Kin.

KINREDE, _s._ kindred, T. v. 979; B 2558, F 735, 1565, I 201; relations, A
1286, 3967; birth, A 2790; family, L. 2094; Kinredes, _pl._ families, B 2.
m 7. 9. A.S. _cynr[=ae]den_.

KIRTEL, _s._. kirtle, A 3321; Kirtle (_dat._), F 1580; Kirtles, _pl._ R.
778; Kirtels, _pl._ 5. 235. A _kirtle_ usually means a short skirt with a
body. '_Kirtle_, jacket with petticoat attached to it': Schmidt, Shak.
Lexicon.

KISSEN, _v._ kiss, L. 761; Kisse, _v._ L. 768; Kesse, _v._ (Kentish), E
1057; Kisseth, _pr. s._ 4. 76; Kiste, _pt. s._ R. 1291; L. 2208; B 385,
3632, 3746, E 679; Keste, _pt. s._ (Kentish), F 350; Kiste, _pt. pl._ R.
788; Kist, _pp._ L. 1337; _kist they been_, they have kissed each other, B
1074. A.S. _cyssan_.

KISSING, _s._ kissing, R. 342.

KITTE, _pt. s._ cut, B 600, 1761, D 722. From infin. _cutte_ (C 954).

KNAKKES, _s. pl._ tricks, A 4051 _n_, I 652; contemptible ways, 3. 1033.
Cf. E. _knack_.

KNARRE, _s._ a knotted, thickset fellow, sturdy churl, A 549. Properly, a
knot in wood; see below.

KNARRY, _adj._ full of thick knots, gnarled, A 1977.

KNAVE, _s._ boy, servant-lad, page, R. 886; A 3431, B 474, 1500, C 666;
man-servant, servant, L. 1807, 2366, 2371; D 1779, E 1302; peasant, D 1190,
I 188; Knave child, male child, B 715, 722, E 444, 447, 612; Knaves, _pl._
lads, B 3087; servants, A 2728. A.S. _cnafa_.

KNAVISH, _adj._ rude, H 205.

KNEDE, _v._ knead, A 4094; Kneden, _pp._ kneaded, R. 217.

KNEDING-TROGH, _s._ kneading-trough, A 3548, 3620.

KNEDING-TUBBES, _pl._ kneading-tubs, A 3564, 3594.

KNEE, _s._ knee, L. 455; A 391; _sette him on his knee_, knelt down, D
2120; Kne[:e]s, _pl._ A 1103. See KNOWE.

KNELE, _v._ kneel, T. iii. 962; Knelest, _2 pr. s._ 16. 43; Kneled, _pt.
s._ kneeled, A 897; Kneled, _pt. pl._ knelt, L. 295; Kneling, _pres. pt._
L. 117; Kneleth, _imp. pl._ T. iii. 965.

KNELINGES, _s. pl._ kneelings, I 1055.

KNET, KNETTE; see KNITTE.

KNETTINGE, _s._ chain, B 5. p 1. 24. Lit. 'knitting.' See KNITTINGES.

KNEW, KNEWE; see KNOWE.

KNIGHT, _s._ knight, R. 1205; A 43; servant (of God), G 353.

KNIGHTHOD, _s._ knighthood, 4. 75; T. v. 1591; Knighthede, A 2789;
Knighthode, _dat._ B 3832.

KNIGHTLY, _adv._ bravely, L. 2085.

KNITTE, _ger._ to knit, I 47; Knette, _v._ (Kentish), join, 4. 183; 5. 438;
Knittest, _2 pr. s. refl._ joinest (thyself), art in conjunction, B 307; _2
pr. s._ B 3. m 9. 18; Knetteth, _pr. s._ (Kentish), knits together, T. iii.
1748; Knit, _pp._ L. 89, B 3224; conjoined, 5. 381; agreed, F 1230; wedded,
F 986; joined in love, 4. 50; Knet, _pp._ (Kentish), knit, R. 1397; fixed,
5. 628; Knit forth, _imp. s._ sum up, gather up, B 4. p 2. 84. A.S.
_cnyttan_.

KNITTINGES, _pl._ connections, B 3. m 3. 12. See KNETTINGE.

KNOBBES, _pl._ knobs, large pimples, A 633.

KNOK, _s._ knock, B 4504.

KNOKKE, _v._ knock; Knokketh, _pr. s._ B. 1403; Knokked, _1 pt. s._
knocked, R. 534; _pt. s._ B 3721; Knokkeden, _pt. pl._ knocked for
admission, beat, 4. 84; Knokke, _imp. s._ A 3432.

KNOKKINGE, _s._ knocking, I 1055.

KNOPPE, _s._ bud, R. 1702; Knoppes, _pl._ 1080, 1675, 1683, 1691.

KNOTTE, _s._ knot, difficulty, B 5. p 3. 22; gist of a tale, F 401, 407.
A.S. _cnotta_.

KNOTTELES, _adj._ without a knot, T. v. 769.

KNOTTY, _adj._ covered with knots, A 1977; full of knots, R. 927, 988.

KNOWE, _dat._ knee, T. ii. 1202; Knowes, _pl._ knees, T. iii. 1592 _n_; B
1719, F 1025. A.S. _cn[=e]ow_, dat. _cn[=e]owe_, pl. _cn[=e]owas_. See
KNEE.

KNOWE, _v._ know, A 382, I 115; Knowen, _v._ 3. 120, I 116; Knowestow, thou
knowest, A 3156, B 367; Knowen, _2 pr. pl._ B 128; Knowe, _2 pr. s. subj._
T. iii. 407; Knewe, _2 pt. s._ knewest, 10. 21; Knew, _pt. s._ A 240, F
131; Knewe, _1 pt. s. subj._ could know, F 466; Knewe, _pt. pl._ 9. 23; D
1341; Knewe, _pt. s. subj._ were to know, R. 282; L. 801; Knowen, _pp._
known, L. 421; HF. 1736; E 689; made known, shown, B 2702; Knowe, _pp._
known, L. 1382; B 890, 955, F 215.

KNOWELICHE, _s._ knowledge, B 1220. The correct spelling is _knowlech[`e]_,
which is trisyllabic; see _cnawleche_ in Stratmann.

KNOWER, _s._ one who has cognisance, B 4. p 4. 168 (L. _cognitor_).

KNOWING, _s._ knowledge, R. 1699, 3. 538, 960, 996; A. pr. 49; F 301;
consciousness, 6. 114; Knowinge, knowledge, B 2. p 8. 30; Know['i]nge,
_dat._ L. 558.

KNOWINGE, _adj._ conscious, B 3. p 11. 112; Knowinge with me, i.e. my
witnesses, B 1. p 4. 33.

KNOWLECHE, _v._; Knowlecheth, _pr. s._ acknowledges, B 2964; Knowlichen, _1
pr. pl._ B 2935; Knowlechinge, _pres. pt._ B 2961.

KNOWLECHING, _s._ knowing, knowledge, 3. 796; G 1432; Knowlechinge,
cognition, B 5. p 5. 2.

KNYF, _s._ knife, dagger, A 1999, 2003; knife, L. 1854, 2594; C 217, D
2091; Knyves, _pl._ (see note), A 233.

KONNING, _s._ cunning, skill, F 251. See CONNING, KUNNINGE.

KONNINGE, _adj._ skilful, T. i. 302.

KUKKOW! _int._ cuckoo! 5. 499.

KUNNINGE, _s._ skill, 5. 513; Konning, F 251.

KYKE, _v._; Kyken, _pr. pl._ peep, A 3841; Kyked, _pp._ gazed, A 3445.
Icel. _k['i]kja_, Swed. _kika_, Dan. _kige_, Du. _kijken_, to gaze, pry.

KYN, _pl._ kine, cows, B 4021.

KYNDE, _s._ nature, A 2451; Kynd (_before a vowel_), nature, disposition,
L. 391. See KINDE.

KYNDELY, _adj._ natural, 3. 761. See KINDELY.

KYNDELY, _adv._ naturally, by nature, 3. 778; Kyndly, 2. 71. See KINDELY.

KYTE, _s._ kite (bird), 5. 349; A 1179, F 624. A.S. _c[=y]ta_.

KYTHE, _v._ shew, shew plainly, display, L. 912; F 748; declare to be, 7.
228; Kythen, _v._ shew, 10. 63; Kytheth, _pr. s._ shews, L. 504; F 483;
Kidde, _pt. s._ shewed, T. i. 208; Kid, _pp._ made known, L. 1028; E 1943;
known, 9. 46; Kythed, _pp._ shewn, G 1054; Kythe, _pr. s. subj._ may shew,
B 636; Kyth, _imp. s._ shew, T. iv. 538; display, T. iv. 619; Kythe, _imp.
s._ shew forth, display, HF. 528; Kytheth, _imp. pl._ 4. 298; Kythe, _imp.
pl._ D 1609. A.S. _c[=y]dhan_.



LAAS; see LAS.

LABBE, _s._ blab, tell-tale, T. iii. 300; A 3509.

LABBING, _pres. part._ blabbing, babbling, E 2428. Cf. Du. _labben_, to
tell tales, _labbei_, gossip.

LABEL, _s._ the narrow revolving rod or rule on the front of the astrolabe,
A. i. 22. 1. See Fig. 6, in vol. iii.

LABORER, _s._ labourer, A 1409, 2025 _n_.

L['A]BOROUS, _adj._ laborious, D 1428.

LAB['O]UR, _s._ labour, T. iv. 422; B 381; L['a]bour, 1. 106.

LAB['O]URE, _ger._ to toil, A 186; L['a]bouren, _ger._ to take pains, E
1631; Lab['o]uren, _1 pr. pl._ toil, D 1482; _pr. pl._ T. iii. 1265;
L['a]boured, _1 pt. s. refl._ toiled, took pains, T. iv. 1009; Lab['o]ured,
_pp._ exercised, B 1298.

LACCHE, _s._ snare, springe, R. 1624. Cf. A.S. _gelaeccan_, to catch.

LACE; see LAS.

LACE, _v._; Laced, _pp._ laced up, A 3267.

LACERTE, _s._ a fleshy muscle, A 2753. O. F. _lacerte_, Lat. _lacerta_.

LACHE, _adj._ lazy, dull, B 4. p 3. 82. '_Lasche_, slack, ... weake,
faint': Cotgrave.

LACHESSE, _s._ laziness, I 720. O. F. _laschesse_, _lachesse_, indolence:
Godefroy.

LACINGE, _s._ lacing; _with layneres l._, with the fastening up of straps,
A 2504.

LAD, LADDE; see LEDE.

LADDRE, _s._ ladder, R. 485, 523; Laddres, _pl._ B 1. p 1. 24; A. 1. 12. 2;
A 3624, B 2160.

LADE, _ger._ to load, cover, T. ii. 1544.

LADEL, _s._ ladle, A 2020, H 51.

LADY, _s._ 1. 16, 17, 81; B 1637, D 2200; Lady, _gen._ lady's, 3. 949; T.
i. 99, 812, ii. 32; A 88, 695; _voc._ A 839; Ladyes, _pl._. B 254; Ladies,
A 898; The book of the nynetene Ladies, i.e. the Legend of Good Women, I
1086.

LADYSHIPPE, _dat._ ladyship, 7. 191.

LAFT, LAFTE; see LEVE.

LAK, _s._ want, defect, lack, 3. 958; 7. 110; 10. 5; 15. 7; L. 1534; B
4034; blame, dispraise, L. 298 _a_; Lakke, _dat._ lack, want, 5. 87, 615; D
1306, E 2271; loss, F 430, 443; _acc._ fault, E 2199.

LAKE, _s._ lake, pond, 5. 313; D 269.

LAKE, _s._ a kind of fine white linen cloth, B 2048. Halliwell notes that
shirts were formerly made of it, and quotes a passage containing the phrase
'white as _lake_.' The word probably was imported from the Low Countries,
as _laken_ is a common Dutch word for cloth; the Dutch for a sheet is also
_laken_ or _bedlaken_.

LAKKEN, _v._ find fault with, disparage, blame, R. 284; _ger._ to blame, T.
i. 189; Lakketh, _pr. s._ lacks, B 1437, G 498; _pr. s. impers._ lacks; _me
lakketh_, I lack, 2. 105; 3. 898; Lakke, _2 pr. pl._ lack, are in want of,
D 2109; Lakked, _pt. s._ was lacking, was wanting, A 2280, C 41; Lakkede,
_pt. s. impers._ A 756; Lakked, F 16, 1186.

LAKKING, _s._ lack, stint, R. 1147.

LAMB, _s._ 1. 172; L. 2318; A 3704, B 459, 1771, E 538; Lomb, L. 1798; B
617; Lambes, _pl._ I 792.

LAMBE-SKINNES, _pl._ lambskins, R. 229.

LAMBIK, _s._ limbeck; A lambik, _for_ Alambik, T. iv. 520 _n_.

LAMBISH, _adj._ gentle as lambs, 9. 50.

LAME, _adj._ lame, weak, T. ii. 17; halting, 1. 76.

LAMENTACIOUN, _s._ lamentation, A 935, B 4545.

LAMPE, _s._ lamina, thin plate, G 764. F. _lame_, a thin plate, Lat.
_lamina_. The insertion of excrescent _p_ occurs after _m_ in other words
in Chaucer; as in _solempne_, _dampne_.

LAMPES, _pl._ lamps, L. 2610; G 802.

LANG['A]GE, _s._ language, A 211, F 100.

LANGE, _adj._ long (Northern), A 4175. (Correctly _lang_, without e.) See
LONG.

LANG['O]UR, _s._ weakness, 1. 7; slow starvation, R. 214; B 3597;
languishing, R. 304; L['a]ngour, _s._ illness, sickness, R. 970; F 1101.

LANGUISSHE, _v._ fail, HF. 2018; Languissheth, _pr. s._ languishes, E 1867,
F 950; Languisshing, _pres. pt._ 5. 472; 7. 178.

LANGUISSHING, _s._ languishing, 7. 205.

LANGURETH, _pr. s._ languishes, E 1867 _n_.

LANTERNE, _s._ lantern, T. v. 543; D 334, I 1036; Lantern, lamp, guidance,
L. 926.

LAPIDAIRE, a treatise on precious stones, HF. 1352. See note.

LAPPE, _s._ flap, corner, B 1. p 2. 19; fold, lappet, or edge of a garment,
T. ii. 448, iii. 59, 742, F 441, G 12; lap, A 686, B 3644, F 475; a
wrapper, E 585. A.S. _laeppa_, lap, border, hem.

LAPPE, _v._; Lappeth, _pr. s._ enfolds, embraces, 4. 76. (For _wlappeth_.)

LAPWING, _s._ lapwing, peewit, 5. 347.

LARGE, _adj._ large, A 472, 753; great, I 705; wide, broad, R. 1351;
liberal, bounteous, R. 1168; B 3489, I 465; generous, B 1621, 2950; lavish,
B 2. p 5. 16; free, 3. 893; T. v. 804; _at thy l._, at large, free, A 1283;
_at his l._, free (to speak or to be silent), A 2288; free to move, HF.
745; _at our large_, free (to go anywhere), D 322.

LARGE, _adv._ liberally, 1. 174; freely, A 734.

LARGELY, _adv._ fully, A 1908, 2738; in a wide sense, I 804.

LARGENESSE, _s._ liberality, I 1051.

LARGER, _adj. comp._ wider, B 4. p 6. 86.

LARGESSE, _s._ liberality, R. 1150; 7. 42; B 2. p 5. 12; I 284; bounty, B
2465; liberal bestower, 1. 13; Larges, bounty, HF. 1309.

LARKE, _s._ lark, 5. 340; T. iii. 1191; L. 141 _a_; HF. 546; A 1491; Lark
(_before a vowel_), R. 915.

LAS, _s._ lace, snare, entanglement, L. 600; A 1817, 1951; net, A 2389;
Laas, lace, i.e. thick string, A 392; band, G 574; lace (i.e. laces), R.
843; Lace, snare, entanglement, 18. 50. Compare 'Ge qui estoie pris o[`u]
_laz_ O[`u] Amors les amans enlace': Rom. de la Rose, 15310.

LASH; see LASSHE.

LASSE, _adj. comp._ less, R. 118; A pr. 42; A 4409, C 602; lesser, A 1756;
smaller, B 2262; less (time), A 3519; _lasse and more_, smaller and
greater, i.e. all, E 67; _the lasse_, the lesser, R. 187. See LESSE.

LASSE, _adv._ less, 3. 927; 6. 105; L. 14, 333, 2256; _the las_, the less,
3. 675.

LASSHE, _s._ lash, 5. 178; Lash (_for_ Lasshe, _before_ have), stroke, T.
i. 220.

LAST, _s. pl._ lasts, i.e. burdens, loads, B 1628. See the note. A.S.
_hlaest_, a burden, load, a ship's freight; from _hladan_, to lade.

LASTE, _adj. def. perhaps_ lowest (see note), B 2. p 5. 35; last, 10. 71;
_atte l._, at last, 3. 364, 1194, 1221; lastly, B 2. p 6. 85; A. 707.

LASTE, _v._ last, endure, 4. 226; Last, _pr. s._ lasts, 5. 49; B 2. p 4.
58; T. iv. 588; L. 2241; E 266; Laste, _pt. s._ lasted, 2. 16; B 1826;
delayed, L. 791; _pt. pl._ 3. 177; B 3390, 3508; _pt. s. subj._ might last,
L. 1239.

LAT, let; see LETE.

LATE, _adj._ late, B 4. m 6. 11; tardy, B 4. p 4. 30; slowly revolving, B
4. m 5. 4; _bet than never is late_, G 1410; _til now late_, till it was
already late, 3. 45.

LATE, _adv._ lately, A 77, 690.

LATE, -N, let; see LETE.

LATHE, _s._ barn (Northern), HF. 2140; A 4088. Icel. _hladha_.

LATIN, _s._ Latin, B 519.

LATIS, _s._ lattice, T. ii. 615. (Many MSS. have _gates_; see note.)

LATITUDE, _s._ (1) breadth, A. i. 21. 27; (2) the breadth of a climate, or
a line along which such breadth is measured, A. ii. 39. 19; (3)
_astronomical_, the angular distance of any body from the ecliptic,
measured along a great circle at right angles to the ecliptic, A. pr. 71;
(4) _terrestrial_, the distance of a place N. or S. of the equator, A. ii.
39. 24; B 13, E 1797.

LATOUN, _s._ latten, a compound metal, like pinchbeck, containing chiefly
copper and zinc, A 699, 3251, C 351, F 1245; Laton, B 2067.

LATREDE, _adj._ tardy, dawdling, I 718. A.S. _latr[=ae]de_.

LATTER, _adv._ later, more slowly, I 971.

LAUDE, _s._ praise, honour, HF. 1575, 1673, 1795; B 1645, 3286, D 1353;
Laudes, _pl._ HF. 1322; lauds (see note), A 3655.

LAUGHE, _v._ laugh, A 474, E 353; Laughen, _v._ L. 1251; T. iii. 613;
_ger._ 18. 28; 22. 10; Laugheth, _pr. s._ 7. 234; Laugheth of, smiles on
account of, A 1494; Lough, _strong pt. s._ laughed, R. 248; T. i. 1037, ii.
1163, 1592, iii. 199, 561, v. 1172; A 3114, 3858, B 1300, 3740, C 476, 961,
D 672; Laughede, _weak pt. pl._ R. 863; Laughen, _pp._ laughed, A 3855;
Laughinge, _pres. pt._ 3. 633.

LAUGHTER, _s._ 3. 600; 5. 575; T. ii. 1169.

LAUNCE, _v._ fling themselves about, rear, HF. 946. See LAUNCHETH.

LAUNCEGAY, _s._ a kind of lance, B 1942, 2011. See note to B 1942.

LAUNCHETH, _pr. s._ pushes, lets slide, D 2145. See LAUNCE.

LAUNDE, _s._ a grassy clearing (called _dale_ in 5. 327), 5. 302; glade,
plain surrounded by trees, A 1691, 1696. O.F. _lande_; mod. E. _lawn_.

LAURE, _s._ laurel-tree, HF. 1107. Lat. _laurus_; O.F. _laure_. See LAURER.

LAUREAT, _adj._ laureate, crowned with laurel, B 3886, E 31.

LAURER, _s._ laurel, laurel-tree, 5. 182; 7. 19, 24; T. iii. 541, 727; A
1027, 2922, E 1466. O.F. _laurier_. See LAURE, LORER.

LAURER-CROUNED, laurel-crowned, 7. 43; T. v. 1107.

LAURIOL, _s._ spurge-laurel, _Daphne Laureola_, B 4153.

LAUS, _adj._ loose, B 4. p 6. 93; Lause, _pl._ B 2. m 4. 7. Icel. _lauss_.
See LOOS.

LAVEN, _ger._ to exhaust, B 4. p 6. 9; Laved, _pp._ drawn up (see note), B
3. m 12. 16. A.S. _lafian_.

LAVENDER, _s._ laundress, L. 358. See note.

LAVEROKKES, _pl._ larks, sky-larks, R. 662. See LARKE.

LAVOURS, _pl._ lavers, basins, D 287.

LAWE, _s._ law, 3. 632; A 577, 1164, B 1189, 3870, D 1889; Lawes, _pl._
customs, T. ii. 42.

LAXATIF, _adj. as s._ looseness, A 2736; Laxatyf, _s._ laxative, B 4133;
Laxatyves, _pl._ B 4152, 4344.

LAY (1), _s._ song, lay, 3. 471; 18. 71; T. ii. 921; L. 430; B 1959; E
1881; Layes, _pl._ songs, L. 140; R. 715; F. 710, 712, 947. O.F. _lai_.

LAY (2), _s._ law; _hence_ belief, faith, T. i. 340, 1001; creed, L. 336, B
376, 572, F 18. A.F. _lei_, law, creed.

LAY, _pt. s. of_ Lye (1).

LAYNERES, _pl._ straps, thongs, A 2504. O.F. _laniere_; mod. E. _lanyard_.
See LACINGE.

LAYSER, _s._ leisure, T. ii. 227; iii. 510, 516. See LEYSER.

LAZAR, _s._ leper, A 242; Lazars, _pl._ 245.

LECHE, _s._ physician, 1. 134; 3. 920; B 1. p 4. 3; T. i. 858, ii. 571; A
3904, C 916, D 1892, G 56; Leches, _pl._ T. v. 369, D 1957.

LECHECRAFT, _s._ art of medicine, T. iv. 436; skill of a physician, A 2745.

LECHER, _s._ healer, B 4. p 6. 148. From M.E. _lechen_, to heal.

LECHEROUS, _adj._ A 626; provoking to lechery, C 549; Lecherous folk,
answering to Dante's 'i peccator carnali,' 5. 79.

LECHERYE, _s._ lechery, lust, C 481; Lecherie, I 346.

LECHOUR, _s._ lecher, B 1935, D 242, 767, E 2257, 2298; Lechours, _pl._ D
1310. O.F. _lecheor_ (Godefroy).

LEDE, _v._ lead, T. i. 259; carry, T. iv. 1514; lead, take, L. 2021; draw,
R. 1608; govern, B 434; lead (his life), R. 1321; lead, R. 1129; Lede,
_ger._ to lead, spend, F 744; to guide, R. 400; Leden, _ger._ to carry, B
2. m 5. 15; Ledest, _2 pr. s._ leadest, 1. 154; guidest, F 866; Ledeth,
_pr. s._ produces, B 4. p 6. 59; guides, L. 85; Let, _pr. s._ leads, T. ii.
882; B 1496; Leden, _pr. pl._ lead, I 141; conduct, A. pr. 28; F 898; Lede,
_pr. s. subj._ lead (us) on, T. v. 897; may bring, B 357; Ladde, _pt. s._
led, R. 581; 3. 365; L. 276 _a_; T. iii. 1714; A 1446, B 976, G 370, 374;
brought, 7. 39; A 2275, B 1524; carried, L. 114; B 3338; conducted, B 3747;
continued, R. 216; Ladden, _pt. pl._ led, R. 1310; Ledden, _pt. pl._ 9. 2;
Ladde, _pt. pl._ B 3920, E 390; Lad, _pp._ led, L. 1108, 1948; T. i. 872; A
4232, B 646, 3552, 3570, E 2415, F 172; brought, A 2620; conducted, A 4402;
brought about, B 5. p 4. 52; carried, L. 74. A.S. _l[=ae]dan_.

LEDEN (l[`e][`e]d[*e]n), _adj._ leaden, G 728. A.S. _l[=e]aden_.

LEDENE, _s. (dat.)_ language, talk, F 435, 478. A.S. _leden_, a corruption
of the word _Latinus_, meaning (1) Latin; (2) any language or speech.

LED[`E]RE, _s._ leader, T. iv. 1454; Leder, B 1. p 3. 49, 52.

LEED (l[`e][`e]d), _s._ lead (metal), HF. 739, 1448, 1648; G 406, 828; a
copper, or caldron, A 202 (see note); Lede, _dat._ HF. 1431. A.S.
_l[=e]ad_.

LEEF (l['e]['e]f), _adj._ lief, 19. 5; A 1837; dear, R. 103, 206, 848; 3.
8; T. iii. 864, 869, 870; L. 2636; B 3468; dear, precious, G 1467; lief,
pleasing, T. v. 1738; pleasant, R. 1688; beloved, B 2. p 3. 23; _yow so
leef_, so desired by you, C 760; _that leef me were_, which I should like,
HF. 1999; Leve, _def._ dear (one), A 3393; _vocative_, HF. 816; L. 1978; T.
ii. 251; A 1136, 1184, 3151, 3848, B 51, C 731, D 365, 762, 1005, 1171,
1751, F 1607; beloved, G 257; Lefe, _adj. fem. voc._ HF. 1827; Leve, _pl._
dear, T. iv. 82, v. 592; G 383; dear, valued, F 341. A.S. _l[=e]of_. See
below.

LEEF, (l['e]['e]f), _adj. as s._, what is pleasant; _for l. ne looth_, for
weal nor for woe, L. 1639; what is dear (to him), T. iv. 1585; beloved one,
lover, lady-love, T. iii. 3; R. 845, 847, 875, 1302; L. 880, 1260, 1654.
See LIEF.

LEEF (l[`e][`e]f), _s._ leaf, L. 72, 189; B 1340, E 1211; leaf (of a book),
A 3177; Leves, _pl._ leaves, R. 56; L 219; 5. 137, 173, 202; F 908, I 114;
(of a book) D 790. A.S. _l[=e]af_.

LEEF, _imp. s. of_ Leve (leave).

LEEFER, dearer, L. 75 a. See LEVER.

LEEFFUL; see LEVEFUL.

LEEFSEL, _s._ the 'bush' at a tavern-door, I 411 (see note); Levesel,
arbour of leaves, A 4060 (see note).

LEEK (l[`e][`e]k), _s._ leek, R. 212; HF. 1708; A 3879, D 572, E 1350; a
thing of no value, G 795; Lekes, _pl._ A 634.

LEEN, _imp. s. of_ LENE.

LEEP (l['e]['e]p), _pt. s. of_ L[`e]pe.

LEES (l[`e][`e]s), _s._ leash, G 19, I 387; snare, 7. 233.

LEES (l[`e][`e]s), _adj._ untrue, R. 8. A.S. _l[=e]as_.

LEES (l[`e][`e]s), _s._ deceit, fraud; _a shrewed lees_, a wicked fraud, L.
1545; _withouten lees_, without deceit, verily, HF. 1464; L. 1022, 1128,
1518. See above; and see LESING.

LEES (l[`e][`e]s), _pt. s. of_ Lese.

LEESTE, _adj. sup._ least; B 2513, F 1060; _atte l. weye_, at the very
least, A 1121; Leest, I 147.

LEET (l['e]['e]t), _pt. s. of_ Lete.

LEF, _imp. s. of_ Leve (leave).

LEFE, _adj. fem. voc._ dear, HF. 1827. See L['E]['E]F.

LEFT, -E; see LEVE (leave), _v._

LEFT HAND, A 2953. See LIFT.

LEFUL; see LEVEFUL.

LEG, _s._ B 4505, D 1828; Legges, _pl._ legs, A 591.

LEGENDE, _s._ legend, L. 483, 2456; A 3141, B 4311; sad story (as of a
martyr), B 1335; Legendes of seintes, legends of saints, I 1088.

LEGGE, -N; see LEYE, _v._

LEGIOUNS, _s. pl._ legions, B 3544.

LEIDE, _1 pt. s. of_ Leye.

LEIGH, _pt. s. of_ Lye (2).

LEITH, _pr. s. of_ Leye.

LEKES, _pl._ leeks, A 634; see LEEK.

L[=E]MES (l['e]['e]mez), _pl._ flames, B 4120. A.S. _l[=e]oma_.

L[)E]MES, _pl._ limbs, A 3886. (_So_ E.; Hn. Cm. _limes_.)

LEMMAN, _s. masc._ (male) lover, sweetheart, A 4240, 4247, B 917, H 204;
_fem._ (female) lover, lady-love, R. 1209, 1272; A 3278, 3280, B 1978,
3253, D 722, H 220; Lemmans, _pl. fem._ sweethearts, D 1998; Lemmanes,
_pl._ concubines, I 903. A.S. _l[=e]of-man_, dear person; _man_ being of
either gender.

LENDES, _pl._ loins, A 3237, 3304. A.S. _lenden_, pl. _lendenu_.

LENE (l[`e][`e]ne), _adj._ lean, thin, R. 218, 444; 11. 28; T. i. 553, v.
709; A 287, 591, 1362, B 4003; weak, T. ii. 132. A.S. _hl[=ae]ne_.

LENE, _ger._ to lend, give, A 611; to lend, G 1024, 1037, I 810; _v._ give,
B 1209; Leneth, _pr. s._ lends, R. 186; gives, B 4. p 6. 151; Lene, _imp.
s._ lend, B 1376, 1377, G 1026; Leen, _imp. s._ give, A 3082. A.S.
_l[=ae]nan_.

LENE, _v._ lean, incline, B 2638; Leninge, _pres. pt._ leaning, L. 179;
Lening, 234 a. A.S. _hleonian_.

LENESSE, _s._ leanness, R. 307.

LENG, _adv._ longer; _ever l. the wers_, the worse, the longer it lasts, A
3872. See LENGER.

LENGER, _adj._ longer, L. 450, 2025; A 330, 821; B 262, D 205, 1020, E 300;
Lengere, _pl._ A. ii. 10. 2. A.S. _lengra_.

LENGER, _adv._ longer, 2. 95 (see note); 5. 453, 657; T. i. 1072; L. 671; B
374, 2122, 3709, C 200, F 381; _ever the l._, the longer, the more, 7. 129;
_ever l. the more_, E 687, F 404. See LENG.

LENGEST, _adv. sup._ longest, 5. 549.

LENGTHE, _s._ length, 2. 8; HF. 1979; height, A 83; _upon l._, after a long
run, 3. 352.

LENGTHE, _v._ lengthen; Lengthing, _pres. part._ extending, A ii. 25. 41.

LENTE, _s._ Lent-season, Lent, D 543, E 12, I 103. A.S. _lencten_.

LENVOY, _s._ l'envoy, i.e. the epilogue or postscript addressed to the
hearers or readers, E 1177 (_rubric_). F. _l'envoi_, lit. a sending, from
_envoyer_, to send.

LEONESSE, _s._ lioness, L. 805, 817, 861, D 637.

LEONYN, _adj._ lionlike, B 3836.

LEOPARD, _s._ leopard, A 2186 _n_. See LEPART.

LEOS, _s._ people, G 103, 106. Gk. [Greek: leos]; see the note.

LEOUN, _s._ lion, L. 627, 829, 1214, 1605; T. i. 1074; A 1598, B 3106,
3215, 3288, D 429, 692, F 491; Leouns, _pl._ B 3451; L['e]on, the sign Leo,
F 265. See LYOUN.

LEP['A]RT, _s._ leopard, A 2186; Lep['a]rdes, _pl._ B 3451; Libardes, R.
894.

LEPE (l[`e][`e]p[*e]) _v._ run, T. ii. 955; A 4378; leap, L. 2008; _ger._
to run, T. ii. 512; to run fast, HF. 946; Lepe up, _v._ leap up, HF. 2150;
Lepe, _pr. pl._ spring, G 915; L['e]['e]p, _pt. s._ leapt, L. 2709; A 2687,
4228, E 2411; Leping, _pres. pt._ running, T. ii. 939; HF. 1823; Lepinge,
_pres. pt._ running, D 2157; Leping, _pres. pt._ leaping, R. 1403. A.S.
_hl[=e]apan_.

LERE, _s._ flesh, skin, B 2047. This is quite a different word from O.E.
_ler_, the face, countenance, from A.S. _hl[=e]or_. Properly it means the
muscles, especially the muscles of the thigh, which special sense is
perfectly suitable here. It is the A.S. _lira_, flesh, muscle; Icel.
_laer_, the thigh, the leg above the knee, the ham; Danish _laar_, the
thigh. Halliwell gives: '_Lire_ (1), flesh, meat; _swynes lire_ [swine's
flesh], Ord. and Reg. p. 442; _lyery_, abounding with lean flesh; North of
England; (2) face, countenance'; &c.

LERE, _ger._ (1) to teach, 7. 98; _v._ teach, T. iv. 441; HF. 764; _ger._
(2) to learn, T. v. 161; B 181, 630, G 838, 1056, 1349; _v._ HF. 993, 1997,
2026; B 1702, C 325, 578, D 982; Lere, _ger._ to learn, find out, D 909;
Lere, _pr. pl._ (1) teach, 5. 25; (2) learn, F 104; Lere, _pr. s. subj._
may learn, G 607; Lere, _imp. pl._ (1) teach, T. ii. 97; Lered, _pp._ (2)
learnt, T. iii. 406; L. 1153. A.S. _l[=ae]ran_, to teach.

LERED, _adj._ instructed, learned, C 283; 5. 46. A.S. _l[=ae]red_. See
above.

LERNE, _v._ learn, A 308, D 994; _ger._ 3. 1091; 5. 1; Lernen, _ger._ HF.
1088; Lerne, _imp. s._ L. 477; Lerned, _pp._ learnt, 3. 786; A 613, 640;
Lerned of, taught by, G 748. (Chaucer here uses the word wrongly, as so
does mod. prov. English. The A.S. _leornian_ meant to _learn_, like mod. G.
_lernen_.)

LERNED, _pp. as adj._ learned, A 480, 575, B 1168.

LERNINGE, _s._ learning, A 300; instruction, G 184.

LESE (l[`e][`e]z[*e]), _s. dat._ pasture, T. ii. 752; HF. 1768. A.S.
_l[=ae]s_; dat. _l[=ae]swe_.

LESE (l['e]['e]z[*e]), _v._ lose, 5. 402; T. iv. 188; L. 1362, 1810, 2595,
2698; A 1215, 1290, 3521, B 4332, C 145, G 229, 833; _ger._ T. ii. 472,
iii. 832; L. 2389; E 508, F 691, G 321; Lesen, _v._ B 2. p 4. 100, 114; T.
v. 798; B 2266; Lese me, _v._ lose myself, be lost, 5. 147; Lese, _1 pr. s.
subj._ B 225; Leseth, _pr. s._ 3. 33; Leseth, _2 pr. pl._ 21. 19; Lesen,
_pr. pl._ R. 448; Lees, _pt. s._ lost, L. 945; HF. 1414; Leseth, _imp. pl._
B 19; Loren, _pp._ lost, T. iv. 957; L. 1048; Lorn, _pp._ lost, T. i. 373,
iii. 1076, iv. 1613; HF. 346; L. 659; A 3536, 4073, B 774, 843, 2183, 3230,
E 1071, F 629, 1037, I 224; forlorn, wasted, R. 366; Lore, 2. 77; 3. 748.
A.S. _l[=e]osan_, pt. t. _l[=e]as_, pp. _loren_.

LESING (l[`e][`e]zing), _s._ falsehood, lie, B 5. p 3. 80; HF. 2089; G 479;
Lesinge, HF. 154; I 593; Lesinges, _pl._ lies, deceits, R. 2; HF. 676; B 1.
p 4. 118; A 1927, C 591, I 608, 1020; lying reports, HF. 2123. A.S.
_l[=e]asung_.

LESINGE (l['e]['e]zing), _s._ loss, B 4. p 6. 214; I 1056; Lesing, A 1707;
_for lesinge_, for fear of losing, B 3750. See LESE.

LESSE, _adj._ less, R. 288; 3. 965; 7. 143. See LASSE.

LESSEN, _v._ grow less, T. v. 1438; Lesse, _v._ diminish, 25. 19 (see vol.
iv. p. xxviii).

LESSOUN, _s._ lesson, lection, A 709; lesson, 1. 179; Lessoun, 4. 33; T.
iii. 51. (Accented both as _l['e]sson_ and _less['o]un_.)

LEST, _s._ pleasure, 3. 908; T. 1. 330, ii. 787; delight, A 132; desire, E
619; inclination, HF. 287; Lestes, _pl._ desires, HF. 1738. See LIST, LUST.
A Kentish form; A.S. _lyst_.

LEST, _pr. s. impers._ (it) pleases, L. 1703; D 854, 1237, E 2396, F 1041,
I 36; A. ii. 25. 39; (it) pleases (me), D 360; Thee lest, it pleases thee,
5. 114; Lesteth, (it) pleases, L. 480 _a_; Leste, _pt. s. impers._ (it)
pleased, T. v. 517; L. 615, 1973, 2312, 2469, 2470; A 750, 787, 1004, 3421;
_pers._ was pleased, T. iii. 452; Leste, _pr. s. subj._ (it) may please, L.
1338; A 1848, B 742, E 105, F 125, 885; As yow leste, as it may please you,
L. 449; Leste, (it) might please, L. 1113; T. i. 189; HF. 282; E 111; (it)
would please, F 380; Her leste, it should please her, 5. 551. Kentish
forms; cf. A.S. _lystan_.

LEST THAT, _conj._ lest, B 2406.

LESTE, _adj. superl._ least, T. i. 281; L. 304 _a_; A. i. 17. 2; B 1012;
_at the l._, at least, 3. 973; 4. 19; T. ii. 362; _atte l._, at least, B
38, F 1164; Leste, _as s._, the least one, 3. 283; _at the leeste weye_, at
any rate, E 966; Leeste, _pl._ F 300.

LET, _pr. s. of_ LEDE.

LETE, _v._ let, B 3524; let, leave, A 1335; give up, let go, T. v. 1688;
forsake, T. iv. 1199; B 325; D 31; let alone, leave, D 1276; quit, 1. 72;
give up, lose, G 406, 523; omit, depart from, 5. 391; Lete of, _ger._ to
leave off, 18. 52; Leten, _v._ let, L. 2107; give up, R. 1690; forsake, T.
iv. 1556; cease, B 1. p 4. 109; Leten, _ger._ to leave, B 4. p 4. 102; to
let go, T. i. 262; to consider, to deem, B 2. p 3. 18; B 2. p 8. 23; Late,
_v._ let, T. iii. 693, v. 351; Laten, _v._ let, A 3326; Lete, _1 pr. s._
leave, 7. 45; L. 2382; A 1323, F 890; let, L. 1210; B 321, 410, 1119; Let,
_pr. s._ lets go, repels, 5. 151; Lat, _pr. s._ lets, permits, T. iv. 200;
Leteth, _pr. s._ abandons, B 1. p 5. 24; Lete, _2 pr. pl._ abandon, B 2505;
L['e]['e]t, _pt. s._. let, L. 813, 1734; A 128, 175, E 82, G 190; let go, A
1206; allowed, HF. 243; left off, A 3311, 4214; left, A 508; caused,
permitted, B 373; caused, B 2194; caused (to be), B 959; _leet ... fecche_,
commanded (men) to fetch, D 2064; _leet don cryen_, caused to be
proclaimed, F 45; _leet make_, caused to be made, B 3349; _leet binde_,
caused to be bound, B 1810; commanded, bade, C 208; considered, T. i. 302;
Let, _pt. s._ caused, L. 2624; _let calle_, caused to be called, L. 1864;
Leet, _1 pt. s._ made, pretended, T. ii. 543; let, 5. 279; Lete, _pt. pl._
let, B 3898; Lete, _pt. s. subj._ were to let, T. iii. 1762; Leet, _imp.
s._ let, C 731; Lat, _imp. s._ let, 1. 79, 84; L. 256, 568; A. ii. 29. 14;
A 188, B 2456, E 162, G 164; let alone, give up, T. ii. 1500; Lat be, let
be, do away with, A 840; let me alone, A 3285; give up, HF. 992; Lat do,
cause, C 173; Lat take, take, G 1254, H 175; Lat see, let us see, A 831;
Lat goon, let slip (the dogs), L. 1213; Lete, _imp. pl._ let, E 98; Lat,
_imp. pl._ B 2156; Leteth, _imp. pl._ cease from, L. 411; Leten, _pp._ let
(in), admitted, R. 700; Leten goon, let go, HF. 1934; Lete, _pp._ let, D
767; Laten blood, _pp._ let blood (see note), A 4346; Letinge, _pres. pt._
leaving, T. v. 1810. A.S. _l[=ae]tan_.

LETTE, _s._ hindrance, T. i. 361, iii. 699, 748; delay, T. iii. 235, iv.
41, v. 851; E 300.

LETTE, _v._ hinder, T. ii. 732; B 1276, 2116, D 154; prevent, L. 732;
oppose, stay, B 3306; cause delay, B 1117; wait, B 1440; tarry, B 4224;
stop, desist, B 4279; cease, R. 279; 4. 186; 5. 439; _ger._ HF. 1954;
Letten, _v._ hinder, delay, A 889; hinder, stop, T. iv. 529; give up, cease
from, T. i. 150; Letten, _ger._ to put obstacles in the way (of), to
decline (from), A 1317; Lettest, _2 pr. s._ hinderest, D 839; stoppest, L.
325, 757; Letteth, _pr. s._ hinders, E 1573; Let, _pr. s._ prevents, B 3. p
10. 110; Lette, _pr. s. subj._; _lette him no man, god forbede_, God forbid
that any should hinder him, T. iii. 545; Lette, _pr. pl. subj._ let,
hinder, F 994; Letted, _pt. s._ hindered, A 1891; was hindered, B 2591;
Lette, _pt. s._ hindered, B 4030; waited, HF. 2070; tarried, L. 2167;
ceased, T. ii. 1089; desisted, T. iii. 473; delayed, E 389; Let, _pp._
hindered, T. ii. 94, v. 1302; B 3788; thwarted, T. iii. 717; Lette, _imp.
s._ hinder, T. iii. 725; Letteth, _imp. pl._ hesitate, T. ii. 1136. A.S.
_lettan_.

LETTE-GAME, _s._ 'let-game,' one who hinders sport, T. iii. 527.

LETTER, _s._ letter, reading, 3. 788; Lettre, writing, B 3398; inscription,
R. 1543; Lettres, _pl._ letters, (_also as sing._ a letter), B 736; 5. 19.

LETTRURE, _s._ learning, B 3486; Letterure, literature, book-lore, B 3686;
G 846.

LETUARIE, _s._ electuary, remedy, T. v. 741; C 307; E 1809; Letuaries,
_pl._ electuaries, A 426. '_Letuaire_, ['e]lectuaire, sorte de
m['e]dicament, sirop': Godefroy. Lat. _electuarium_.

LEVE (l['e]['e]v[*e]), dear; see L['E]['E]F.

LEVE (l[`e][`e]v[*e]), _s._ leave, 3. 153; 4. 9, 153; 6. 11; T. i. 126; HF.
1089; B 1637, D 908, E 2194, F 363, 584; permission, L. 2281, B 3136, C
848, G 373; _bisyde hir leve_, without her leave, T. iii. 622.

LEVE (1) _v._ leave, E 250, F 828; let alone, G 714; let go, 3. 1111; go
away, 5. 153; leave alone, T. i. 688; _ger._ to leave off, T. i. 686; A
4414; to forsake, G 287; Leve, _1 pr. s._ leave, 2. 50; Leveth, _pr. s._
remains, 3. 701; A. ii. 10. 10, 44. 29; Lafte, _1 pt. s._ left, C 762;
Lefte, left off, F 670; Lafte, _pt. s._ left, L. 1332, 1657; left, ceased,
B 3496; Lefte, _pt. s._ left off, T. ii. 560; Lafte, _pt. pl._ left, L.
968; B 3388; Laften, _pt. pl._ L. 168; Left, _pp._ left off, B 1. p 6. 53;
omitted, I 231; Laft, _pp._ left, L. 1260, 1330; F 186, 263, G 883, 1321;
Leef, _imp. s._ leave, T. iv. 852, 896, 924; leave (it) alone, T. v. 1518;
Lef, _imp. s._ forego, D 2089; Leve, _imp. s._ leave, A 1614; Leveth, _imp.
pl._ leave, 6. 118; B 2650, C 659. A.S. _l[=ae]fan_.

LEVE (2) _v._ believe, 5. 496; L. 10; T. ii. 420; D 319; _ger._ to be
believed, HF. 708; Leve, _1 pr. s._ 3. 691; L. 1615; T. i. 342; G 213;
Levestow, believest thou, G 212; Leveth, _pr. s._ E 1001; Leve, _1 pr. pl._
B 1181; _2 pr. pl._ T. ii. 1141; _imp. s._ 3. 1047, 1148; Leveth, _imp.
pl._ believe, 6. 88; L. 88 _a_; A 3088, B 2944. A.S. _l[=e]fan_,
_l[=y]fan_.

LEVE (3) _ger._ to allow, L. 2280; _god leve_, God grant, L. 2083, 2086; T.
i. 597, ii. 1212, iii. 56, v. 959, B 1873 (see note), D 1644. A.S.
_l[=e]fan_, _l[=y]fan_.

LEVEFUL, _adj._ allowable, A 3912; B 4. p 4. 197; permissible, B 1. p 3.
13; D 37, E 1448, G 5, I 506, 777, 778; permitted, B 4. p 6. 243; Leefful,
allowable, I 41, 917; Leful, permissible, T. iii. 1020. See LEVE, _s._
(leave).

LEVEL, _s._ level (for ascertaining that a thing is level), A. ii. 38. 4.

LEVENE, _s._ flash of lightning, D 276. See Stratmann.

LEVER (l['e]['e]ver), _adj. comp._ liefer, rather, B 4. p 5. 4; _me were
lever_, I had rather, T. i. 1034, iii. 574; B 3628, C 615, H 23; _me nis
lever_, L. 191; _me wer l._, A 3751; _thee were l._, thou hadst rather, B
2339; _him was l._, A 293; _him were l._, L. 2413; _have I l._, I would
rather, T. ii. 471; F 1360; _hadde I l._, D 168, G 1376, H 78; _hath l._, F
692, H 170; 17. 13; _hadde l._, L. 1536; F 683; _had hir l._, she would
rather, E 444; _him had be l._ he would rather, A 3541. See LEEFER.

LEVES (l[`e][`e]vez), leaves; _pl. of_ L[`e][`e]f.

LEVESEL; see LEEFSEL.

LEVEST (l['e]['e]vest), _sup._ dearest, most desirable, HF. 87; liefest, T.
ii. 189.

LEWED, _adj._ ignorant, 5. 46, 616; HF. 866; L. 415; A 502, 574, 3145,
3455, B 315, C 392, D 1346, E 2275, F 221, G 497, 647, 787; unlearned, A.
pr. 43; C 283; unskilled, rude, HF. 1096; wicked, foolish, F 1494; wanton,
E 2129; Lewede, _pl._ ignorant, T. i. 198. A.S. _l[=ae]wed_.

LEWEDESTE, _adj. superl._ lewdest, H 184.

LEWEDLY, _adv._ in an unlearned manner, simply, HF. 866; ignorantly, B 47;
ill, G 430, H 59.

LEWEDNESSE, _s._ ignorance, ignorant behaviour, 11. 68; B 2111, D 1928;
Lewednes, 5. 520; F 223. See LEWED.

LEY, lied; _pt. s. of_ Lye.

LEYE, _v._ lay, 4. 205; T. ii. 994, v. 1846; B 713, D 2264; lay, cause to
lie, T. iii. 659; lay a wager, HF. 674, 2054; G 596; bet, pledge, T. iii.
1605; Leye a rekeninge, enter into a calculation (_calculum ponere_), B 2.
p 3. 48; _ger._ B 1955; Leyn, _ger._ to lay up, to hoard, R. 184; Leggen,
_ger._ to lay, A 3269; Legge, _v._ A 3937; Leye, _1 pr. s._ lay, T. i.
1053; lay a wager, bet, T. ii. 1505; Leyth, _pr. s._ A 4229; Leith, _pr.
s._ D 2138; Leye, _1 pr. pl._ lay out, expend, G 783; Leyn, _pr. pl._ lay,
H 222; Leide, _1 pt. s._ laid, A. ii. 1. 8; Leyde, _pt. s._ 3. 394; HF.
260; B 1971, 3289, 3827, D 973; Leyde, _2 pt. pl._ L. 2501; Leyden forth,
_pt. pl._ brought forward, B 213; Leyd, _pp._ laid, T. iii. 687; A 3262;
placed, R. 1184; overlaid, R. 1076; _I was leyd_, I had laid myself down,
L. 208; Leyd, _pp._ laid, A 81, B 3371, G 441; fixed, 3. 1146; set, 3.
1036; Ley, _imp. s._ T. ii. 1517; L. 250; A. ii. 1. 1; A 841; Ley on, lay
on, A 2558. A.S. _lecgan_.

LEYSER, _s._ leisure, R. 462; 3. 172; 5. 464, 487; 6. 11; 18. 3; A 1188, B
2219, 3498, D 551, 1646, E 286, F 493, 977; deliberation, B 2766;
opportunity, T. ii. 1369; A 3293. See LAYSER.

LEYT, _s._ flame (of a candle), I 954. A.S. _l[=e]get_, _l[=y]get_,
_l[=i]get_; M.E. _leit_, lightning.

LIBARDES, _pl._ leopards, R. 894. See LEPART.

LIBEL, _s._ written declaration, D 1595.

LIBERTEE, _s._ liberty, T. v. 285.

LIBRARIE, _s._ library, B 1. p 4. 10.

LICENCE, _s._ permission, D 855; leave, B 1253, 2254.

LICENTIAT, _adj._ one licensed by the pope to hear confessions and
administer penance in all places, independently of the local ordinaries, A
220.

LICHE, _adj._ like, R. 1073; L. 1529, 2290; similar, 7. 76; _it liche_,
like it, F 62.

LICHE, _adv._ alike, HF. 10.

LICHE-WAKE, _s._ watch over a corpse, A 2958. Cf. A.S. _l[=i]c_, body.

LICORYC[:E], _s._ liquorice, R. 1368; Licorys (_before a vowel, for_
Licoryce), A 3207.

LIC['O]UR, _s._ moisture, A 3; liquor, T. iv. 520; L['i]cour, juice, C 452.

LIEF, _adj._ dear, A 3501; Lief to, glad to, given to, A 3510; cherished, E
479; _goode lief my wyf_, my dear good wife, B 3084; _hadde as lief_, would
as soon, D 1574; _as s._ dear one, B 4069, D 431. See LEEF.

LIEGES; see LIGE.

LIFT, _adj._ left (said of the left hand or side); R. 163; A. ii. 2. 2; B
2502. See LEFT.

LIFTE, _v._; Lifteth, _pr. s._ lifts, 882.

LIFTINGE, _s._ lifting, H 67.

LIGE, _adj._ liege, C 337, E 310, F 111; _voc._ D 1037; Lige man, vassal,
L. 379; Liges, _s. pl._ vassals, L. 382; B 3584, E 67; Lieges, _s. pl._
subjects, B 240. F. _lige_, from O. H. G. _ledic_ (G. _ledig_), free. A
_liege_ lord was a _free_ lord; in course of time his subjects were called
_lieges_, no doubt from confusion with Lat. _ligare_, to bind.

LIGEAUNCE, _s._ allegiance, B 895.

LIGGEN, _v._ lie, B 2101; T. iii. 660; Liggen, _pr. pl._ lie, T. iii. 685;
A 2205, B 4415; _2 pr. pl._ T. iii. 669; Ligge, _2 pr. s. subj._ lie, T. v.
411; Liggeth, _imp. pl._ lie, T. iii. 948; remain, B 2. m 7. 17; Ligginge,
_pres. pt._ lying, B 4. m 7. 14; T. iv. 29; Ligging, T. i. 915; A 1011.
A.S. _licgan_. See LYE.

LIGHT, _s._ candle, T. iii. 979, 1136; light, shining, E 1124; Lighte,
_dat._ 3. 1; A 3396 (stood in his light).

LIGHT, _adj._ light-minded, B 4. p 3. 83; lightsome, joyous, R. 77; 3.
1175; undepressed (_leuis_), B 5. m 5. 12; active, nimble, R. 832; easy, 3.
526; 5. 553; wearing but few clothes (_also_, fickle), 21. 20; Lighte,
_dat. sing._ A. pr. 36; _def._ light, T. v. 1808; joyous, R. 746; Lighte,
_pl._ light (of weight), 5. 188; easy, A. pr. 36; transitory, B 1. m 1. 17
(Lat. _leuibus_); mild, B 4. p 6. 142; trivial, B 4. p 2. 112.

LIGHTE, _adv._ brilliantly, R. 1109.

LIGHTE, _ger._ (1) to make light, rejoice, T. v. 634; to render cheerful,
T. i. 293; Lighte, _v._ alleviate, T. iii. 1082; (2) _ger._ to feel light,
to be glad, F 396, 914; Lighte, _pt. s._ lighted; _either in the sense_ (1)
lightened, made light, made happy (see the note); _or_ (2) illuminated, B
1661.

LIGHTE, _v._ alight, descend, HF. 508; _pr. pt._ alight, L. 1713; Lighte,
_pt. s._ alighted, B 786, 1104, F 169, 1183, 1248; _in th' alighte,_
alighted in thee, B 1660.

LIGHTEN, _v._ shine, I 1037; shine out, B 3. m 11. 8; Lighted, _pp._
brightened, 1. 74; Light, _pp._ lighted, illuminated, L. 2506; Lighte,
_imp. s._ illumine, G 71.

LIGHTER, _adv. comp._ more easily, more readily; The lighter merciable,
more readily merciful on that account, L. 410.

LIGHTLES, _adj._ deprived of light, T. iii. 550.

LIGHTLY, _adv._ lightly, F 390; readily, 4. 205; quickly, I 534; easily, T.
ii. 289; A. ii. 14. 8; B 2229, G 1400, H 8, 77, I 1026, 1041; carelessly, I
1023; joyfully, A 1870; equably, B 2. p 7. 91.

LIGHTNE, _v._; Lightneth, _pr. s._ enlightens, clears, B 4. p 4. 132;
Lightned, _pp._ enlightened, illuminated, F 1050.

LIGHTNESSE (1), _s._ brightness, 5. 263.

LIGHTNESSE (2), _s._ agility, A 3383.

LIGHTSOM, _adj._ lightsome, gay, R. 936.

LIGNE, _s._ line, T. v. 1481.

LIGNE ALOES, wood of the aloe, T. iv. 1137. (Properly a compound, i.e.
_ligne-aloes_; where _aloes_ is a plural form.) See ALOES.

LIKEROUS, _adj._ lecherous, 9. 57; H 189; wanton, A 3244, 3345, E 214;
gluttonous, C 540; greedy after indulgence, D 466; desirous, eager, F 1119;
very vile (Lat. _nequissimi_), B 3. p 4. 19. Cf. O. F. _lekiere_, variant
of _lecheor_, a lecher.

LIKEROUSNESSE, _s._ lecherousness, D 611; licentiousness, I 430;
greediness, I 377; eagerness, I 741; appetite, C 84. See above.

LIKNED, _pp._ likened, B 2807.

LILIE, _s._ lily, R. 1015; A 1036, C 32, G 87, 220; _l. floures_,
lily-flowers, L. 161 a.

LILTING-HORNE, _s._ horn to be played for a lilt, HF. 1223.

LIMAILLE; see LYMAILLE.

L[)I]ME, _s._ limb, 3. 499; Limes, _pl._ limbs, R. 830; B 3. p 3. 64; T. i.
282, v. 709; A 2135, 2714, B 461, 772, 3802, C 35, E 682; members, I 136;
Limmes, _pl._ limbs, 3. 959; B 3284; Lemes, A 3886. A.S. _lim_.

LIMITACIOUN, _s._ limit, D 877.

LIMITOUR, _s._ limitor, a friar licensed to beg for alms within a certain
limit, A 209, D 874, 1265, 1711; Limitours, _pl._ D 866.

LINAGE, _s._ lineage, race, B 5. p 3. 146; A 1110, E 71, 795; family, D
1135; noble family, R. 258; descent, lineage, B 2751; noble family, R. 258;
high birth, B 3441, E 991; birth, descent, L. 1820, 2526; kinsfolk, B 2192;
kindred, B 999; consanguinity, L. 2602.

LIND, _s._ lime-tree, A 2922; Linde, _dat._ E 1211; Lindes, _pl._ R. 1385.
A.S. _lind_.

LIPPE, _s._ lip, A 133; Lippes, _pl._ A 128.

LIPSED, _pt. s._ lisped, A 264.

LISSE, _s._ comfort, T. v. 550; joy, T. iii. 343; assuaging, HF. 220;
solace, 3. 1040; alleviation, F 1238. A.S. _liss_.

LISSEN, _v._ alleviate, T. i. 702; Lisse, _v._ soothe, 6. 6; Lisse, _pr. s.
subj._ 3. 210; Lissed, _pp._ relieved, F 1170. A.S. _lissian_.

LIST (1), _s._ pleasure, T. iii. 1303; will, D 633. See LEST, LUST.

LIST (2), _s._ ear, D 634. A.S. _hlyst_, hearing; see _(h)l[:u]st_ in
Stratmann.

LIST, _pr. s. impers._ it pleases (_usually with dat._), 5. 441; 7. 231; L.
2042, 2179; A. ii. 3. 1; A 1201, B 521, 701, 766, C 13, D 153, E 647, 933,
F 118, 122, 161, 315, G 234, I 69; _me list right evel_, I was in no mind
to, 3. 239; _you list_, it pleases you, 11. 77; List, _pr. s. pers._ is
pleased, pleases, T. i. 518, 797; 1. 172; 16.35; L. 2249; wishes, A 3176; B
3185, 3330, 3509, 3709; Listeth, _pr. s. impers._ (it) pleases, T. ii. 700;
_pers_. pleases, is pleased, HF. 511; likes, F 689; Listen, _2 pr. pl._ are
pleased, T. iii. 1810; Listen, _pr. pl._ list, choose, B 2234; Listen
trete, choose to write, L. 575; Liste, _pt. s. impers._ (it) pleased, L.
332, 1244; 7. 190, 199; A 102, 1052, B 1048, G 1313; T. iii. 21; _her
liste_, it pleased her, she cared, 3. 878, 962; 7. 190; _him liste_, he
wanted, 4. 92; _hem liste_, (it) pleased them, F 851; Liste _pt. s. pers._
liked, L. 1407; Liste, _pr. s. subj._ may please, R. 14; A. ii. 27. 1; L.
2387; D 318, F 327. A.S. _lystan_. See LEST.

LISTES, _pl. in sing. sense_, lists, a place enclosed for tournaments, A
63; place of tournament, A 1713, 1862, 1884, F 668.

LISTES, _s. pl._ wiles; _in his l._, by means of his wiles, 1. 85.

LISTETH, _imp. pl._ listen ye, B 1902, 2023. A.S. _hlystan_, to hear.

LITARGE, _s._ litharge, ointment prepared from protoxide of lead, A 629;
protoxide of lead, G 775. See Webster.

LITARGIE, _s._ lethargy, B 1. p 2. 14; Lytargye, T. i. 730.

LITE, _adj._ little, I 295; _as s._, a little, T. i. 291; A. ii. 12. 8, 15.
5; _adv._ little, T. iv. 1330. See LYTE.

LITEL, _adj._ little, 1. 38; A 87, 438, 490, B 73, 1190; _l. of_, small in,
deficient in, 5. 513; _into l._, within a little, very nearly, T. iv. 884.

LITESTERE, _s._ dyer, 9. 17. From Icel. _litr_, colour, dye; _lita_, to
dye.

LITH, _s._ limb (viz. of herself), B 4065; limb, 3. 953. A.S. _lidh_.

LITHERLY, _adv._ ill, A 3299. A.S. _l[=y]dher_, evil.

LIVEN, _v._ live, A 506, E 109; _ger._ 3. 17; A 335; Livestow, livest thou,
C 719; Liveth, _pr. s._ A 1028; Liveden, _pt. pl._ lived, D 1877; Livinge,
_pres. pt._ living, 22. 2, 52.

LIVERE (1), _s._ liver, D 1839.

LIVERE (2), _s._ liver (one who lives), B 1024.

LIVEREE, _s._ livery, A 363.

LIVINGE, _s._ life-time, 7. 188; manner of life, C 107; state of life, G
322; Lyvinge, C 847.

LIXT, liest; see LYE (2).

LO, _interj._ lo! 1. 15, 18; A 3017; T. i. 302, 399, 469, 480, 514, 1049,
&c. (Very common).

LODE (l[`o][`o]d[*e]), _s._ load, A 2918.

LODEMENAGE, _s._ pilotage, A 403. '_Lodemanage_ is the hire of a pilot, for
conducting a ship from one place to another': Cowel, Law Dict.

LODESMEN, _s. pl._ pilots, L. 1488. See note.

LODE-STERRE, _s._ polar star, lodestar, T. v. 232, 1392; A 2059; 26. 12
(see vol. iv. p. xxix).

LOFTE, _dat._ loft, upper room, L. 2709; _on lofte_, in the air, HF. 1727;
aloft, B 277.

LOGGE, _s._ lodge, resting-place, B 4043.

LOGGING, _s._ lodging, B 4185.

LOGIK, _s._ logic, A 286.

LOKE, _s._; see LOOK.

LOKE, _v. (weak)_ lock up, D 317.

LOKEN, _pp._ enlocked, locked up, B 4065. Pp. of the strong verb _louken_,
A.S. _l[=u]can_.

LOKEN, _ger._ to look, R. 1640; A 1783; to see, B 3. p 12. 62; _v._ behold,
R. 812; Looketh, _pr. s._ considers, B 5. p 4. 135; Loke, _2 pr. s. subj._
regard, B 5. p 6. 171; _pr. s. subj._ looks, R. 1605; Loked, _pt. s._
looked, A 289, E 340; R. 291; 3. 558; Lokeden, _pt. pl._ L. 1972; Loked,
_pp._ contemplated, B 2. p 5. 6; discerned, B 4. p 6. 59; Loke, _imp. s._
see, HF. 893; T. i. 890; take heed, D 1587; Loke he, let him take heed, I
134; Loketh, _imp. pl._ L. 1883; look ye, behold, G 1329; search ye, C 578.
A.S. _l[=o]cian_.

LOKING, _s._ look, gaze, 3. 870; T. v. 1820; countenance, B 2332; look,
glance, 3. 874; L. 240; glance (of the eye), A 2171; aspect, 4. 51; A 2469,
E 514; examining, 5. 110; appearance, R. 290; glances, looks, F 285;
Lokinge, power of vision, B 4. p 4. 132; Lookinge, gaze, B 1. p 3. 4.

LOKKES, _pl._ locks of hair, A 81, 677; 8. 3. A.S. _locc_.

LOLLER, _s._ a loller, a lollard, B 1173. On the confusion of these terms,
see the note. Cf. Icel. _lulla_, to loll about; _lullari_, a sluggard.

LOMB, _s._ lamb, L. 1798; B 617. See LAMB.

LOND, _s._ land, A 194, 400, 579; B 127, 3225; country, B 3548; _upon
lond,_ in the country, A 702; Londe, _dat._ land, 7. 194; B 522, 2077, G
950.

LONE (l[`o][`o]n[*e]), _s. dat._ loan, B 1485; gift, grace, D 1861. The
nom. form is _l[`o][`o]n_.

LONG, _prep._; the phrase _wher-on ... long = long on wher_, along of what,
G 930; Long on, along of, because of, G 922. A.S. _gelang_, because of.

LONG, _adj. (before a vowel)_, tall, R. 817; Longe, 3. 380; A 784; _def._.
6. I; A 354, I 139; Longe, _adj. pl._ tall, high, R. 1384; long, A. i. 7.
6; A 93, D 953, 976; high, 5. 230.

LONGE, _adv._ long, 3. 217; 4. 172; T. ii. 402; HF. 1506; A 286, D 966, F
763; at great length, B 5. p 4. 5; for a long time, 3. 20; L. 2261; A 2084,
B 3300, D 9.

LONGE (1), _v._ desire, long for, L. 2260; yearn, T. ii. 546; Longeth, _pr.
s._ L. 2286; Longen, _pr. pl._ long, wish, A 12; Longed, _pt. s._ desired,
3. 83; Longen (2), _v._ belong, A 2278; Longeth, _pr. s._ belongs, R. 754;
14. 5; HF. 244; A 2791, C 109, E 285, F 16; (it) concerns, T. 11. 312;
Longen, _pr. pl._ belong, F 1131; Longeth, _pr. pl._ belong, L. 151;
Longed, _pt. s._ befitted, R. 1222; Longing, _pres. pt._ belonging (to), L.
1963; Longinge, A 3209; Longing for, i.e. belonging to, suitable for, F 39.

LONGES, _pl._ lungs, A 2752.

LONGITUDE, _s._ the distance between two given meridians, A ii. 39. 12; the
length or extent of a 'climate,' in a direction parallel to the equator, or
rather a line along which to measure this length; A. ii. 39. 18;
Longitudes, _pl._ longitudes, A. pr. 58. The longitude of a star is
measured along the zodiac; that of a town, from a fixed meridian.

LOOK, _s._ look, glance, 3. 840; A 3342; Loke, HF. 658; _dat._ L. 1605.

LOOKETH, _pr. s._ beholds, considers, B 5. p 4. 135. See LOKEN.

LOOKINGE, _s._ gaze, B 1. p 3. 4. See LOKING.

LOOS (l[`o][`o]s), _s._ praise, renown, R. 1161; HF. 1621, 1626, 1722,
1817, 1900; B 2834, 3036, G 1368. O. F. _los._ See LOS (2).

LOOS (l['o]['o]s), _adj._ loose, 5. 570; A 4064, 4138, 4352; Lous, free,
HF. 1286. See LAUS.

LOOTH (l[`o][`o]th), _adj._ loath, odious, A 486, 1837, F 1519, 1599, H
145; hateful, A 3393; T. iii. 732; full of dislike, B 2. p 4. 28; _me were
l._, it would displease me, B 91; _as s._, what is hateful, misery, L.
1639. See LOTH. A.S. _l[=a]dh_.

LOOTH, _adv._ with dislike, T. ii. 1234.

LOOTHLY, _adj._ hideous, D 1100.

LOPPE, _s._ a spider, A. i. 3. 4, 19. 2. A.S. _lobbe_, a spider.

LOPPEWEBBE, _s._ cobweb, A. i. 21. 2. See LOPPE.

LORD, _s._ lord, A 65, 172, 355, 580; Lordes, _gen._ A 47, D 1151; Lordes
sone, the son of the lord, R. 1250; Lord, sovereign; 'lord of the
assendent,' A. ii. 4. 20; _by our lord_, pronounced _by 'r lord_, 3. 651,
690; Lordes, _pl._ A 943, F 91.

LORDE, _v._; Lordeth, _pr. s._, rules over, 4. 166.

LORDINGS, _s. pl._ sirs, C 329, 573, I 15; Lordinges, sirs, my masters, A
761, B 16, 2143, 2212, 2228, 3429, E 1163.

LORDSHIPE, _s._ lordship, rank, R. 1176; E 797; power, authority, A 1625, F
743, I 439; rule, B 2706; patronage, T. iii. 76; Lordship, T. iii. 79;
Lordshipes, _pl._ control, B 3. p 4. 3; official powers, B 2666;
authorities, I 752, 754, 757; posts of authority, I 441.

LORE (l[`o][`o]r[*e]), _s._ teaching, 7. 244; 10. 47, 49; L. 2450;
instruction, advice, T. i. 1090; lesson, T. i. 645. 754; ii. 397; teaching,
instruction, B 342, G 414; learning, B 761; study, G 842; learning,
experience, knowledge, B 4, 1168, E 87, 788; experience, C 70; profit, 5.
15; doctrine, A 527. A.S. _l[=a]r._

LORE, _pp. of_ Lese.

LOREL, _s._ wretch, worthless man, abandoned wretch, B 1. p 4. 222; D 273.

LOREN, _pp. of_ Lese.

LORER, _s._ laurel, R. 1379; Loreres, _pl._ R. 1313. See LAURER.

LORN, _pp. of_ Lese.

LOS (1), _s._ loss, 3. 1302; T. iv. 89; L. 997; A 2543, 4186, B 27, 28, F
450; occasion of perdition, D 720.

LOS (2), _s._ praise, renown, fame, L. 1514; report, L. 1424; _til her
loses_, for their praises, in praise of them, HF. 1688. O.F. _los_. See
LOOS.

LOSENGERE, _s._ flatterer, R. 1050; Losengeour, L. 352, B 4516; Losengeres,
_pl._ R. 1056, 1064, 1069. O. F. _losengeur_.

LOSENGERIE, _s._ flattery, I 613. (Occurs in P. Plowman.)

LOSENGES, _pl._ lozenges, HF. 1317; small diamond-shaped shields, R. 893.

LOST, _s._ loss, B 2. p 4. 120. See _lost_ in Stratmann.

LOSTE, _pt. s._ lost, 3. 75; T. iv. 1151; F 1016; Loste, _1 pt. s._ should
lose, T. ii. 1749; Losten, _1 pr. pl._ lost, A 936; _pt. pl._ B 4562, G
398; Lost, _pp._ 1. 152; 3. 703; 15. 7; B 175. From infin. _losien_.

LOT, _s._ lot, L. 1933.

LOTH (l[`o][`o]th), _adj._ loath, 3. 8; displeasing, R. 233; Lothe, _pl._
loathsome, 3. 581. See LOOTH.

LOTHER, _adj. comp._ more hateful, L. 191.

LOTHEST, _adj. superl._ most loath, T. ii. 237; F 1313.

LOTINGE, _pres. part._ lurking, G 186 (see the note). A.S. _lutian_, to
lurk; as in Sweet's A.S. Reader, p. 9, l. 41; from A.S. _l[=u]tan_, to bow,
bend down.

LOUD, _adj._; Loude, _def._ loud, F 268.

LOUDE, _adv._ loudly, 3. 344, 518; A 171, 672, 714, B 1803, F 55.

LOUGH; _pt. s. of_ Laughe.

LOUKE, _s._ accomplice, A 4415. See note.

LOURE, _v._; Loured, _pp._ frowned, HF. 409; Louring, _pres. pt._ frowning,
D 1286.

LOUS, _adj._ loose, free, HF. 1286. See LOOS.

LOUSY, _adj._ full of lice, miserable, D 1467.

LOUTE, _v._ bow, do obeisance, T. iii. 683; bow, bend, HF. 1704; _ger._ to
bow down, B 3352; Louteth, _pr. s._ bows down, B 2377; Louted, _1 pt. s._
stooped, bent, R. 1554. A.S. _l[=u]tan_.

LOVE, _s._ love, A 475, B 18, 74; _fem._ lady-love, 4. 31; A 2306, D 1066,
F 1440; _voc._ O my love, A 672; _masc._ lover, 3. 91; L. 862; Loves, _pl._
lovers, R. 1317.

LOVEDAYES, _pl._ days for settling disputes by arbitration, A 258; HF. 695.

LOVE-DRINKE, _s._ love-potion, D 754.

LOVE-DRURY, _s._ affection, B 2085. The latter part of the word is O. F.
_drurie_, _druerie_, love, passion; from _drut_, a lover, which is O. H. G.
_tr['u]t_, G. _traut_, dear, beloved.

LOVEKNOTTE, _s._ love-knot, looped ornament, A 197.

LOVE-LONGINGE, _s._ desire, fond affection, A 3349, B 1962.

LOVE-LYKINGE, _s._ love-liking, loving affection, B 2040.

LOVEN, _ger._ to love, 4. 48; Lovedest, _2 pt. s._ didst love, T. iii. 720;
A 1162; Lovede, _pt. s._ loved, A 97, 166, E 413, 690; Loveden, _pt. pl._
L. 1812; Loveth, _imp. pl._ E 370.

LOVERE, _s._ lover, A 1339, F 546; Lovyere, A 80; Loveres, _pl._ lovers, B
3. m 12. 37; T. iv. 323, B 53, 59; Lovers, 4. 5 (accented both as
_l['o]vere_ and _lov['e]re_).

LOVES, _s. pl._ loaves, B 503. The _sing._ is _loof_.

LOVINGE, _s._ loving, L. 485, 544.

LOVYERE, _s._ lover, A 80. See LOVERE.

LOWE (l[`o][`o]w[*e]), _adj._ low, L. 1961; A 522; small, 2. 88;
contemptible, B 2655; _pl._ crushed down, A 107; Low, _sing._ humble, 7.
249. Icel. _l[=a]gr_.

LOWE, _adv._ in a low voice, R. 717; 3. 304; F 216; humbly, L. 2046, 2062;
_as l._, as low as possible, 3. 391.

LOWENESSE, _s._ lowliness, I 1080; Lownesse, low level, B 5. m 1. 11.

LOWEST, _adj. superl._ 5. 327.

LOWLY, _adj._ humble, 7. 142; A 99, 250.

LOWNESSE, _s._ low level, B 5. m 1. 11. See LOWENESSE.

LUCE (_before a vowel_), _s._ luce, pike, A 350. O. F. _lus_, _luz_; Lat.
_lucius_.

LUCRE, _s._ lucre, gain, G 1402; lucre of vilanye = villanous lucre, vile
gain, B 1681. F. _lucre_, Lat. _lucrum_.

LUFSOM, _adj._ lovely, T. v. 911; lovable, T. v. 465.

LULLE, _v._; Lulleth, _pr. s._ lulls, soothes, B 839; E 1823; Lulled, _pt.
s._ E 553.

LUNA, _s._ the moon, G 826; a name for silver, G 1440. Lat. _luna_.

LUN['A]RIE, _s._ lunary, moon-wort, G 800. See the note.

LURE, _s._ a hawk's lure, the bait that tempts them to return to the
fowler, D 1340, H 72; Lures, _pl._ enticements, L. 1371.

LURE, _v._ lure, entice, D 415.

LURKE, _v._; Lurked, _pt. s._ lay hid, R. 465; Lurkinge, _pres. pt._
lurking, lying hid, 9. 29; T. iv. 305; Lurking, B 4416.

LUSSHEBURGHES, _pl._ spurious coin, B 3152. See note.

LUST, _s._ desire, R. 1653; 3. 273; 21. 6; A 1318, B 1307; amusement, R.
1287; pleasure, R. 616; L. 32 _a_, 1588; A 192, B 3137, D 1876, F 812; joy,
A 1250; pleasure, joy, delight, I. 106; 2. 39; 3. 688, 1038; 4. 38; 15. 9;
will, desire, wish, 4. 63; B 188, 762, E 658, G 1398; interest in a story,
F 402; Luste, _dat._ pleasure, 5. 15; Lustes, _pl._ desires, wishes, T. v.
592; B 3667, C 833; things which usually give me pleasure, delights, 3.
581. A.S. _lust_. See LEST, LIST.

LUSTE, _v._ please; Lusteth, _pr. s. impers._ (it) pleases, L. 996; Lust,
_pr. s. pers._ pleases, E 1344; _impers._ (it) pleases, E 322, F 147, H
186; Luste, _pt. s. pers._ desired, G 1344; Luste, _pt. s. impers._ it
pleased, 3. 1019; G 1235. See LEST, LIST.

LUSTIER, _adj. comp._ more joyous, G 1345.

LUSTIESTE, _adj._ strongest, L. 716.

LUSTIHEDE, _s._ cheerfulness, 3. 27; delight, H 274; enjoyment, F 288;
vigour, L. 1530.

LUSTILY, _adv._ gaily, merrily, R. 1319; 2. 36; A 1529; joyously, heartily,
R. 747; happily, R. 674.

LUSTINESSE, _s._ pleasure, jollity, A 1939; vigour, R. 1282; joy, 26. 16
(see vol. iv. p. xxix).

LUSTY, _adj._ pleasant, gay, A 80; pleasant, R. 123, 636; 4. 151; 5. 130; B
1. m 2. 15; E 59, F 52, 142, 389, G 1402; jocund, F 272; lusty, H 41;
pleasant, joyous, R. 581; happy, R. 1303; L. 1541; joyful, A 1513;
vigorous, L. 1038, 1151, 1193; H 107.

LUTE, _s._ lute, B 2005 _n_; H 268; Lutes, _pl._ C 466.

LUXURES, _s. pl._ lusts, B 3. p 7. 7.

LUXURIE, _s._ lechery, B 925, C 484.

LY, _imp. s. of_ Lye (1).

LYARD, _adj._ grey, D 1563. O. F. _liard_.

LYCORYS, _s._ liquorice, A 3690, B 1951, 2045.

LYE, _s._ lie, contradiction, L. 1882; HF. 292, A 3015; Lyes, _pl._ T. iv.
1407; HF. 1477, 2129.

LYE (1), _v._ lie, remain, 10. 52; Lye, _ger._ to lodge, D 1780; Lye ...
by, _v._ lie beside, B 3470; Lye upright, lie on one's back, lie dead, R.
1604; Lyst, _2 pr. s._ T. ii. 991; Lystow, thou liest, T. iv. 394; H 276;
Lyest, _2 pr. s._ liest still, T. i. 797; Lye, _2 pr. pl._ recline, 4. 5;
Lyth, _pr. s._ lies, is, remains, R. 782, 1615, 1618; lies, 3. 146, 181,
589; 4. 184; 5. 573; A 1218, 3023, B 2847, F 1337; (he) lies, B 634; (that)
lies, D 1829; remains, resides, B 5. m 4. 17; B 3654, F 35, 322; lies
(dead), 3. 143; Lyth therto, belongs here, is needed, 3. 527; Lay, _1 pt.
s._ lodged, A 20; Lay, _pt. s._ remained, was, A 538; R. 1480; lay, B 3630,
F 467; Lay by, lay with, D 1357; Layen, _pt. pl._ lay, T. iii. 745; Laye,
_pt. pl._ 3. 166; Laye, _pt. s. subj._ would lie, T. iv. 1560; Ly, _imp.
s._ T. ii. 953. See LIGGEN.

LYE (2), _v._ tell lies, lie, L. 58; A 763; _ger._ 10. 22; Lyen, _v._ T.
ii. 324; D 228; _ger._ 3. 631, 812; Lye, _1 pr. s._ lie, tell lies, R.
1072; T. ii. 300; Lixt, _2 pr. s._ liest, D 1618, 1761; Ley, _strong pt.
s._ lied, T. ii. 1077; Leigh, T. ii. 1077 _n_; Lyed, _weak pt. s._ lied, A
659; T. ii. 1077 _n_; Lyeden, _pt. pl._ B 1. p 4. 180. A.S. _l[=e]ogan_.

LYE (3), _v._ blaze, D 1142. A.S. _l[=y]ge_, _l[=e]ge_, _s._ flame.

LYER, _s._ liar, B 2256; Lyere, T. iii. 309, 315; Lyeres, _pl._ B 2498.

LYES, _s. pl._ lees, dregs, HF. 2130. F. _lie_, 'the lees, dregs':
Cotgrave. See below.

LYES, _pl._ (1) lees; _or_ (2) lies, D 302. Perhaps a double meaning is
intended. See _Lye_ in Prompt. Parv.

LYF, _s._ life, 1. 72; A 71, 2776; Lyves, _gen._ life's, 6. 60; 19. 15; E
308; of my life, 3. 920; Our present worldes lyves space, the space of our
present life in the world, 5. 53; Lyves day, lifetime, L. 1624; Lyves
space, lifetime, 26. 47 (see vol. iv. p. xxxi); Lyve, _dat._ 3. 1278; L.
59; On lyve, alive, L. 1792; T. iv. 296; D 5; in his time, D 43; Upon lyve,
alive, T. ii. 1030; Of lyve, out of life, T. v. 1561; Bringe of lyve, cause
to die, T. ii. 1608; My lyve, in my life, T. ii. 205; Of my lyve, in my
life, 26. 48 (see vol. iv. p. xxxi); By thy lyf, during thy life, B 1621;
Thy lyf, during thy lifetime, 17. 19; His lyve, in his life, T. v. 165,
436; L. 1099; His lyf, during his life, B 3369, E 1731; Hir lyve, in their
life, D 392; Lyves, _pl._ B 3284, F 233; Lyves, _gen pl._ souls', lives', G
56. And see LYVES, _adv._

LYFLODE, _s._ means of living, I 685. Mod. E. _livelihood_.

LYFLY, _adj._ vivid, bright, B 1. p 5; lively, B 4. p 6. 15.

LYFLY, _adv._ in a lifelike way, A 2087; Lyvely, 3. 905.

LYK, _adj._ like, 4. 237; A 259, 590, 1301, B 3361, F 207; alike, 15. 5;
Lyke, _pl._ 12. 4.

LYKE, _v._ please, 22. 8; T. i. 431; _ger._ T. i. 289; HF. 860; to be
liked, R. 1357; Lyken, _v._ (to) please, 6. 127; B 2128, E 506; _ger._ T.
iii. 613; Lyketh, _pr. s._ pleases, E 1031; _impers._ (it) pleases, E 311,
845; _us l. yow_, it pleases us with respect to you, E 106; Lyke, _pr. s.
subj._ may please, D 1278; may be pleasing, 1. 139; please, L. 319; _thee
l. nat_, it may not please you, L. 490; Lyked, _pt. s. impers._ pleased, R.
1312; 7. 109, 112; T. ii. 1266; A. i. 10. 7; Lykede, _pt. s._ pleased, R.
27, 806; B 4. p 6. 160; Lykinge, _pres. pt._ T. i. 309.

LYKER, _adj._ more like, T. iii. 1028; D 1925.

LYKING, _s._ pleasure, R. 76; C 455; D 1256; delight, B 3499; Lykinge,
delight, 7. 75.

LYKING, _adj._ pleasing, R. 868; pleasant, R. 1416; thriving, R. 1564.

LYKLIHED, _s. dat._ likelihood, E 448; Lyklihede, _dat._ B 1786.

LYKLINESSE, _s._ probability, 22. 15; E 396.

LYKLY, _adj._ likely, like, 16. 32; T. iii. 1270; A 1172, C 64.

LYKNE, _1 pr. s._ compare, 3. 636; Lykned, _pp._ likened, A 180; compared,
B 1. p 4. 93 (see note); B 91. Cf. Swed. _likna_.

LYKNESSE, _s._ parable, A 2842.

LYM, _s._ lime, F 1149, G 806, 910; quicklime, L. 649; Lyme (_before a
vowel_), L. 765. A.S. _l[=i]m_.

LYMAILLE, _s._ filings of any metal, G 1162, 1197; Lymail, G 1164, 1267,
1269; Limaille, G 853.

LYME, _ger._ to lime, to cover with birdlime, T. i. 353.

LYMERE, _s._ hound held in leash, 3. 365; Lymeres, _pl._ 3. 362.

LYMROD, _s._ lime-rod, lime-twig, B 3574.

LYNE, _s._ line, T. i. 1068, ii. 1461; line, cord, A. ii. 23. 27;
fishing-line, 4. 242; T. v. 777; lineage, line of descent, 19. 23; D 1135;
_as lyne right_, straight as a line, T. iii. 228.

LYNED, _pp._ lined, A 440.

LYNE-RIGHT, _adj._ in an exact line, exactly in a line with, A. i. 21. 19;
A. ii. 23. 2. See LYNE.

LYNX, _s._ lynx, B 3. p 8. 30.

LYOUN, _s._ lion, T. iii. 1780; v. 830; Lyouns, _pl._ R. 894. See LEOUN.

LYST, _2 pr. s._ liest, reclinest, T. ii. 991; Lystow, liest thou, T. iv.
394; H 276. See LYE (1).

LYTARGYE, _s._ lethargy, T. i. 730; Litargie, B 1. p 2. 14.

LYTE, _adj._ small, little, R. 532; 5. 64; 7. 107; L. 495, 740, 2495; A.
pr. 20; B 109, 2153, D 1600, F 565; slight, I 689; Lyte, _s._ a little, T.
ii. 384; L. 29, 535; 3. 249; 5. 28; HF. 621; A 1334, B 352; Lyte, _pl._
little, A 494, 1193; 5. 350; L. 219; small, T. iii. 1250. See LITE.

LYTE, _adv._ little, 3. 884; 7. 200; L. 421; a little, E 935; in a small
degree, G 632, 699; _l. and l._, by little and little, D 2235.

LYTH, lies; see LYE (1).

LYTHE, _adj._ easy, soft, HF. 118. A.S. _l[=i]dhe_.

LYTHE, _ger._ to alleviate, cheer, T. iv. 754. See above.

LYVE; see LYF.

LYVELY, _adv._ in a lively way, 3. 905. See LYFLY.

LYVES; see LYF.

LYVES, _adv._ in life; hence, _as adj._ living, alive, T. iv. 252, 767; HF.
1063; A 2395, E 903, 1864; _no lyves creature_, no living creature, T. iii.
13. So in Havelok, 509; P. Plowm. B. xix. 154; C. xxii. 159; &c.

LYVINGE, _s._ manner of life, C 847; state of life, G 322. See LIVINGE.



M', _sometimes put for_ Me (before a vowel); _as in_ masterte, mathinketh,
mexcuse.

MA DAME, my lady, T. ii. 880. See MADAME.

MA FEY, my faith! T. iii. 52.

MAAD; _pp. of_ Make.

MAAT, _adj._ dejected, B 2. p 4. 29. (E. _mate_ in _check-mate_.) See MAT.

MACE, _s._ mace, club, A 2124; B 2003; Maces, _pl._ A 2559, 2611; T. ii.
44, 640.

MAD, _adj._ mad, T. ii. 113; iv. 393; A 4231, F 1511; Madde, _pl._ T. v.
206.

MAD, _pp._ made, L. 286. See MAKE.

MADAME, _s._ madam, 12. 1; 21. 1; A 121; F 378; _ma dame_, A 376; Ma dame,
T. ii. 880.

MADDE, _v._ go mad, 4. 253; _ger._ to be furious, T. i. 479; _1 pr. s._ am
mad, R. 1072; _2 pr. s. subj._ art mad, A 3156; _pr. s. subj._ A 5559.

MADE, _pt. s. of_ Make.

MADER, _s._ madder, 9. 17.

MAGESTEE, _s._ majesty, R. 1339; 14. 19; B 1082, 3334, 3505, 3862, D 824.
And see MAIESTEE.

MAGICIEN, _s._ magician, B 3397, F 1184; Magiciens, _pl._ HF. 1260.

MAGIK, _s._ magic, A 416, F 1202; M. naturel, natural magic, F 1125; Magyk,
F 218; Magyke (_read_ magyk?), HF. 1266.

MAGISTRAT, _s._ magistracy, B 3. p 4. 16.

MAGNANIMITEE, _s._ magnanimity, I 731.

MAGNESIA, _s._ magnesia, G 1455. Lat. _magnesia_, so called because found
in Magnesia, in Thessaly.

MAGNIFICENCE, _s._ great well-doing, I 736; grandeur, E 815.

MAGNIFYED, _pp._ magnified, I 408.

MAGNIFYING, _s._ HF. 306.

MAGYK, -E; see MAGIK.

MAHEYM, _s._ maim, maiming, I 625. Mod. E. _maim_.

MAIDENHEDE; see MAYDENHEED.

MAILLE, _s._ mail, ringed armour, E 1202; Mayle, T. v. 1559. F. _maille_, a
mesh, Lat. _macula_.

MAISTER, _s._ master, B 1627, F 1202; doctor, D 2184; doctor (of divinity),
D 1638; (as a term of address) 17. 1; one in authority, A 261; _maister
tour_, principal tower, F 226; Maistres, _gen._ master's, F 1220; _pl._ A
576, B 141; Maystres, _pl._ B 3. m 2. 8.

MAISTERFUL, _adj._ masterful, T. ii. 756.

MAISTER-STRETE, _s._ chief street, main street, L. 1965, 2305; A 2902.

MAISTER-TEMPLE, _s._ chief temple, L. 1016.

MAISTER-TOUN, _s._ capital, chief town, L. 1591.

MAISTER-TOUR, _s._ chief tower, F 226.

MAISTOW, mayest thou, HF. 699; A. ii. 2. 6; A 1236. See MOWEN.

MAISTRESSE, _s._ mistress, I. 109, 140; 3. 797; 4. 33; L. 88; T. ii. 98; F
374; governess, C 106; Maistresses, _pl._ governesses, C 72.

MAISTRYE, _s._ mastery, great skill, R. 1208; A 3383; mastery, F 747, 764;
control, B 3689, C 58; superiority; _for the maistrye_, as regards
authority, A 165; victory, B 3582; specimen of skill, HF. 1074; art,
elegance, R. 842; Maistrie, mastery, B 2248, D 818; a masterly operation
(cf. F. _coup de m[^a]itre_), G 1060. O. F. _maistrie_. See MAYSTRIE.

MAIESTEE, _s._; _his real maiestee_ = his royal majesty, i.e. high treason,
B 1. p 4. 105, 156 (see note). See MAGESTEE.

MAKE, _s._ mate, 4. 17, 154; 5. 310, 371, 466, 587, 631, 657; L. 141; D
270, H 186; equal, match, HF. 1172; A 2556; wedded companion, wife, B 700,
1982, E 1289; bride, E 1882; husband, D 85, G 224; Makes, _pl._ mates, 5,
389; L. 158. A.S. _maca_, _gemaca_.

MAKE, _v._ make, A 184; compose, make up, write, 3. 782; L. 69, 364; B 96;
_ger._ to compose, to write (about), R. 41; Maken, _v._ L. 437; Make, _v._
pretend to, counterfeit, T. ii. 1522; Make, _1 pr. s._ write, L. 188; _pr.
s. subj._ may cause, L. 34 _a_; cause (it), T. ii. 959; Makestow, _2 pr.
s._ B 371; Maketh, _pr. s._ causes, A 3035; D 1833, 1884; Make, _pr. pl._
compose (poetry), 18. 82; Maken, _pr. pl._ make, utter, A 9; Maked, _pt.
s._ made, A 526, B 3318, 3690, D 1642, F 1000; Made, _1 pt. s._ made, A 33;
Made, _2 pr. s._ madest, L. 538; _pt. s._ composed, B 57; _hit m._, caused
it, HF. 1159; Made(n), _pt. pl._ made, 3. 510, B 3523; Makeden, _pt. pl._
T. iv. 121; Made, _pt. s. subj._ may have made, 4. 227; Made ... broght,
caused to be brought, HF. 155; Maked, _pp._ made, 3. 578; A 1247, B 1722,
1727, 2445, G 484, I 149; composed, 5. 677; Maad, _pp._ made, 9. 60; T. i.
251, 553; A 394, 668, B 3607, F 222, G 1459; Mad, _pp._ 3. 415; 4. 278.

MAKELEES, _adj._ peerless, T. i. 172. See MAKE, _s._

MAKER, _s._ author, composer, T. v. 1787.

MAKING, _s._ poetry, composition, 8. 4; T. v. 1789; L. 74, 413, 483.

MALADYE, _s._ malady, A 419, 1373; Maladie, I 423; Maladyes, _pl._ A 2467,
B 2467.

MALAPERT, _adj._ forward, T. iii. 87.

MALE (1), _s._ bag, wallet, A 694, 3115, C 920, G 566, I 26. O. F. _male_.

MALE (2), _s._ male, D 122.

MALEFICE, _s._ evil practices, unlawful arts, B 1. p 4. 196; evil
contrivance, I 341.

MAL['E]NCOLYE, _s._ melancholy, T. v. 360; B 4123; Mel['a]ncolye, 3. 23.

MAL['E]NCOLYK, _adj._ melancholy, A 1375.

MALGRE, _prep._ in spite of, 4. 220. See MAUGRE.

MALICE, _s._ malice, spite, 3. 794, 993; Malis, T. iii. 1155.

M['A]LICI['O]US, _adj._ evil, HF. 93.

MALIGNITEE, _s._ malignity, I 513.

MALISON, _s._ curse, I 443; Malisoun, G 1245; cursing, I 619.

MALLIABLE, _adj._ malleable, such as can be worked by the hammer, G 1130.

MALONE, _for_ Me alone, T. i. 1028 _n_, ii. 1401 _n_.

MALT, _s._ A 3988, 3991, D 1746.

MALT, _pt. s._ melted, T. i. 582; HF. 922. See MELTE.

MALTALENT, _s._ ill-will, ill-humour, resentment, R. 273, 330. O. F. _mal
talent_.

MAN, _s._ A 167, 209, 223; (used indefinitely) one, B 43, D 2002; hero, B
3331; servant, I 772; Mannes, _gen._ A 574, B 1630; of mankind, T. ii. 417;
Men, _pl._ men, people, 18. 26; A 178; _sing._ (_unemphatic form of_ man),
one (_with sing. verb_), A 149, 232, C 675, G 392; T. iv. 866; 5. 22 (see
note); Mennes, _gen. pl._ 3. 976; B 202.

MANACE, _s._ threat, menace, A 2003, B 3789, I 646; Manaces, _pl._ B 1. m
4. 4; B 2. p 1. 65.

MANACE, _ger._ to threaten, E 1752; Manaceth, _pr. s._ menaces, E 122, I
646; Manaced, _pt. s._ B 2694; Manasinge, _pres. pt._ threatening, B 2. m
4. 3; B 4. m 2. 4.

MANASINGE, _s._ threatening, A 2035.

MANDEMENT, _s._ summons, D 1346, 1360; Mandements, _pl._ D 1284.

MANER, _s._ manor, place to dwell in, 3. 1004.

MANERE (_accented_ man['e]r[*e]), _s._ manner, 1. 29; A 858, D 1229;
deportment, A 140; method, B 5. p 1. 21; disposition, L. 251; manner, way,
3. 1130; B 3706, E 781; ease of behaviour, 3. 1218; goodly courtesy of
manner, 4. 294; _of manere_, in his behaviour, F 546; Maner (_accented_
m['a]ner), way, 3. 433; method, B 5. p 6. 203; manner, kind, sort (_used
without_ of _following_), _as in_ maner doctrine, B 1689; _cf._ 3. 471,
840; 4. 116; 7. 114; A. i. 2. 1, 19. 1; A 71, B 519, 1689, 2386, 3951, C
627, D 1266, E 519, 605, F 329, G 424, 527, I 103; Maneres, _pl._ ways, B
1. p 4. 198; kinds, R. 1406; I 82, 103; kinds (of creatures), B 4. m 3. 7;
methods, disposition, B 2. p 2. 36; Maners, _pl._ manners, 3. 1014.

MANHEDE, _s._ manliness, A 1285; Manhod, A 756; manhood, 18. 4.

MANIFESTEN, _ger._ to display, B 2. P 7. 31.

MANKINDE, _s._ mankind, 1. 107, 168; 5. 70; the race of men, A 1307, F 876,
877.

MANLY, _adj._ manly, 7. 259; A 167; noble, B 3901.

MANLY, _adv._ in a manly way, boldly, A 987, T. iv. 622.

MANNES, _gen._ of mankind, T. ii. 417. See MAN.

MANNISH, _adj._ manlike, T. i. 284; human, B 2454; unwomanly, B 782.

MANNISH, _adv._ like a man, boisterously, E 1536.

MANSIOUN, _s._ dwelling, A 1974; (a term in astrology), F 50 (see note);
mansion (of the moon), F 1285; Mansiouns, _pl._ daily positions or
'stations' of the moon, F 1130.

MANSLAUHTRE, _s._ manslaughter, 9. 64; Manslaughtre, C 593, I 564.

MANSUETE, _adj._ courteous, T. v. 194.

MANSUETUDE, _s._ meekness, I 654.

MANTEL, _s._ mantle, cloak, R. 224, 459; T. ii. 380; A 378, B 3904.

MANTELET, _s._ short mantle, A 2163.

MANY, _adj._ many; Many a, A 168; Many oon, Many a one, A 317.

MANYE, _s._ mania, A 1374.

MANY-FOLD, numerous, 20. 1.

MAPPEMOUNDE, map of the world, 12. 2. F. _mappemonde_ (Cotgrave).

MAPUL, _s._ maple-tree, A 2923; Maples, _pl._ R. 1384.

MARBEL, _s._ marble, T. i. 700; A 1893; Marbul, F 500.

MARBLE-STOON, _s._ marble-stone, piece of marble, R. 1462; Marbul-stones,
_pl._ blocks of marble, B 1871.

MARCHAL, _s._ marshal, E 1930. See MARSHAL.

MARCHANDYSE, _s._ merchandise, barter, I 777.

MARCHANT, _s._ merchant, 9. 22; A 270, B 132, I 777; Marchaunts, _pl._ B
122.

MARCIAL, _adj._ warlike, T. iv. 1669.

MARCIEN, _adj._ devoted to Mars, D 610.

MARE, _s._; _see_ MERE.

MAREYS, _s._ marsh, D 970; Mareys, _pl._ marshes, B 2. p 7. 26; B 3. p 11.
76.

MARGARETES, _pl._ pearls, B 3. m 10. 12 _n_.

MARGIN, edge, A. i. 21. 6.

MARIAGE, _s._ marriage, A 212, 3095, D 3.

MARIE, _interj._ marry, i.e. by St. Mary, G 1062.

MARIED, _pt. s. trans._ (he) caused to be married, E 1130.

MARINEER, _s._ mariner, B 1627; Marineres, _pl._ B 4. m 3. 16; Mariners, L.
2169.

MARK (1), _s._ mark, fixed spot, L. 784; Marke (_read_ Mark), A. ii. 43
_a._ 3 (p. 231); sex, race, D 696; sign, I 98; Merk, image, F 880.

MARK (2), _s._ a piece of money, of the value of 13_s._ 4_d._ in England, G
1026; _pl._ Mark, i.e. marks, C 390. See note to C 390.

MARKE, _v._; Markede, _pt. s._ marked, B 4. m 7. 39.

MARKET, _s._ D 2188.

MARKET-BETER, _s._ swaggerer in a market (see note), A 3936.

MARKET-PLACE, _s._ E 1583.

MARKIS, _s._ a marquis, E 64; _gen. sing._ marquis's, 994. F. _marchis_,
Low Lat. _marchensis_, a governor of the _marches_ or frontiers.

MARKISESSE, _s._ a marchioness, E 283, 394, 942, 1014.

MARLE-PIT, _s._ marl-pit, A 3460. (Trisyllabic.)

MARSHAL, _s._ marshal of the hall, A 752; Marchal, marshal, E 1930.

MARTIR, _s._ martyr, A 17; T. iv. 623.

MARTIRDOM, _s._ martyrdom, E 2283; torment, A 1460.

MARTYRE, _s._ martyrdom, T. iv. 818.

MARTYRE, _v._; Mart['y]reth, _pr. s._ torments, A 1562.

MARY-BONES, _s. pl._ marrow-bones, A 380.

MARYE, _s._ marrow, pith, B 3. p 11. 86; Mary, C 542; Maryes, _s. pl._
marrows, pith, B 3. p 11. 84.

MASCULIN, _adj._ male, B 2. p 3. 28.

MASE, _s._ maze, labyrinth, L. 2014; bewilderment, T. v. 468; bewildering
position, B 4283.

MASED, _adj._ bewildered, 3. 12; B 526, 678; stunned with grief, 7. 322.
See MAZE.

MASEDNESSE, _s._ amaze, E 1061.

MASELYN, _s._ a bowl made of maple-wood, B 2042. O. F _maselin_, _maserin_,
_maderin_; from O. F. _madre_, _mazre_, a mazer, or bowl of maple-wood. See
Godefroy.

MASONRYE, _s._ masonry, R. 302; Masoneries, _pl._ HF. 1303.

MASSE, _s._ mass, 3. 928; T. iii. 88; D 1728, E 1894; Messe, B 1413.

MASSEDAYES, _pl._ massdays, B 4041.

MASSE-PENY, _s._ penny for a mass, D 1749.

MAST (1) _s._ mast (of a ship), 3. 71; 7. 314; L. 643; A 3264, 3532.

MAST (2), _s._ mast, i.e. the fruit of forest-trees, acorns and beech-nuts,
9. 7, 37.

MASTERTE, _for_ Me asterte, T. i. 1050 _n_; v. 1343 _n_.

MASTY, _adj._ fattened, sluggish, H F. 1777. Lit. 'fattened on mast'; see
MAST (2).

MAT, _adj._ dejected, A 955; exhausted, T. iv. 342; dead, L. 126; defeated
utterly, B 935. See below; and see MAAT.

MATE, _interj._ checkmate! 3. 660; _adj._ exhausted, 7. 176. O.F. _mat_,
Arab, _m[=a]t_, dead (in chess).

MAT['E]RE, _s._ matter, affair, subject, business, 3. 43; L. 365, 270 _a_;
A 727, 1259, B 322, 411, 581, 1703, 2148, D 910, E 90, 1175; theme, 5. 26;
material, B 1. p 1. 15; I 137; cause, B 4. p 7. 60; reason, B 3054;
M['a]tere, matter, L. 1582; Materes, _pl._ materials (of a solid
character), G 779; Matires, _gen. pl._ of the materials, G 770. See
MATIERE.

MATERIAL, _adj._ material, I 182; _as s._, material, matter, B 5. p 1. 35.

MATHINKETH, _for_ Me athinketh, _pr. s._ it repents me, I am sorry, A 3170
_n_.

MATIERE, _for_ Matere, B 2209 _n_, 2221 _n_; A. ii. 4. 37. See MATERE.

MATINS, _pl._ morning-prayers, D 876.

MATRIMOINE, _s._ matrimony, A 3095, E 1573; Matrimoyne, I 882.

MAUGRE, MAUGREE, in spite of; as in _maugre al thy might_, A 1607; _maugree
hir eyen two_, A 1796; _maugree thyne y[:e]n_, D 315; _m. hem_, B 3. p 3.
44, 47, 51; _m. her_, L. 1772; _m. Phil[`i]stiens_, B 3238; _m. my heed_,
in spite of all I can do, 3. 1201; _m. thyn heed_, B 104; _m. his heed_, A
1169; _m. her (hir) heed_, L. 2326, D 887; _m. your heed_, in spite of your
heads, in spite of all you can do, B 4602; Malgre, 4. 220.

MAUMET, _s._ idol, I 860; Mawmet, I 749. See below.

MAUMETRYE, _s._ Mahometanism, B 236; Mawmetrye, idolatry, I 750. _Maumet_
is a corruption of Mahomet or Muhammed.

MAUNCIPLE, _s._ manciple, A 544, 567, 3993; H 25, 69, 103, I 1. An officer
who purchases victuals for an inn or college.

MAVIS, _s._ song-thrush, R. 619; Mavys, _pl._ R. 665.

MAVISE, _for_ Me avyse, T. ii. 276 _n_.

MAWE, _s._ maw, stomach, B 486, 1190, 2013.

MAY, may; see MOWEN.

MAY, _s._ maiden, T. v. 1720; B 851. See _maei_ in Stratmann.

MAYDEN, _s._ maiden, R. 586; Mayde, maid, 1. 49; A 69, B 1636, 1932, D 886,
1026, E 257, 377, 446, 779; waiting-woman, F 1487; Mayde child, girl, B
1285; Maydens, _pl._ T. ii. 119. _Mayde_ is a shorter form of _mayden_.

MAYDENHEED, _s._ maidenhood, virginity, D 888; Maidenhed, L. 294 _a_;
Maydenhod, B 3459; Maydenhede, 1. 91; A 2329, B 30, D 64, 69, F 1376, G
126, I 868.

MAYLE, _s._ mail-armour, T. v. 1559. See MAILLE.

MAYME, _v._ injure, D 1132.

MAYNTENE, _v._ maintain, R. 1144; uphold, A 1778; _ger._ A 1441; _pr. s.
subj._ E 1171.

MAYST, mayest; see MOWEN.

MAYSTER-HUNTE, _s._ chief huntsman, _the_ huntsman, 3. 375. See HUNTE.

MAYSTOW; see MOWEN.

MAYSTRES, _s. pl._ masters, B 3. m 2. 8. See MAISTER.

MAYSTRIE, _s._ masterly act; No maystrie, an easy matter, L. 400; Maystrye,
_s._ mastery, 10. 14. See MAISTRYE.

MAZE, _2 pr. pl._ are in a state of bewilderment, E 2387. See MASED.

ME, _dat._ to me, A 39; _acc._ me, D 1360, &c. Sometimes elided, as in
_masterte_, for _me asterte_.

MECHEL, _adj._ much; _for as mechel_, for as much, A. pr, 4. See MOCHEL,
MUCHEL.

MEDE (1), _s._ mead (drink), A 2279 _n_, B 2042. See MEETH.

MEDE (m[`e][`e]d[*e]), _s._ (2), mead, meadow, R. 132, 1434; 5. 184; HF.
1353; T. ii. 53; L. 41, 47; A 89, D 861, F 724, 1147; Medew, L. 210.

MEDE, _s._; see MEED.

MEDELEN, _v._; Medeleth, _pr. s._ mingles, L. 874. See MEDLE.

MEDELING, _s._ admixture, B 1. p 4. 179.

MEDEWE, _s._ meadow, R. 128; Medew, L. 210.

MEDIACION, _s._ means, help, A. pr. 8, ii. 26. 18; Mediacioun, use, A. i.
13. 4.

MEDIATOURS, _s. pl._ go-betweens, I 967.

MEDICYNE, _s._ medicine, healing, i. 78; T. i. 659; Medecyne, remedy, 7.
244.

MEDLE, _v._ mingle, HF. 2102; meddle, take part in, G 1184; dye
(_miscere_), B 2. m 5. 7; Medly, _v_. mingle, mix, B 2. m 5. 5; Medleth,
_pr. s._ mixes, B 4. m 3. 4; stirs up, B 1. m 7. 3; mingles, B 3. m 10. 11;
Medeleth, _pr. s._ L. 874; Medled, _pp._ mingled, T. iv. 339; mixed, I 122;
Medleth, _imp. pl._ meddle, G 1424.

MEDLEE, _adj._ of a mixed colour, A 328.

MEDLERS, _pl._ medlars, R. 1375.

MEDLING, _s._ meddling, T. iv. 167; blending, R. 898; Medlinge, admixture,
B 4. p 4. 75.

MEED (m['e]['e]d), _s._ reward, L. 1662; M['e]de, meed, reward, 13. 27; A
770; a bribe, A 3380, B 3579, C 133, I 167; Bribery, 5. 228; 15. 6; Medes,
_pl._; _to medes_, for my meed, for my reward, T. ii. 1201.

MEEK, _adj._ meek, 7. 200; Meke (dissyllabic), A 3202, B 1432, D 434;
_def._ E 141; _pl._ 5. 341; D 1259.

MEEL, _s._ meal (repast), B 466, 4023, D 1774; Meles, _pl._ 3. 612.

MEEL-TYD, _s._ meal-time, T. ii. 1556.

MEETH (m[`e][`e]th), _s._ mead, A 3261, 3378; Meth, A 2279. See MEDE (1).

MEGRE, _adj._ meagre, thin, R. 218, 311.

MEIGNEE, MEINEE; see MEYNEE.

MEKE; see MEEK.

MEKE, _v._ make meek; Meke, _1 pr. s._ humble, B 2874.

MEKE, _adv._ meekly, 7. 267.

MEKELY, _adv._ meekly, C 714.

MEKENESSE, _s._ mildness, mercy, B 4. p 4. 108.

MEKER, _adj. comp._ meeker, L. 2198.

MEKESTE, _adj. superl._ meekest, E 1552.

MELANCOLIOUS (_accented_ m['e]lanc['o]lious), _adj._ melancholy, HF. 30. So
accented in O. F.; see examples in Godefroy.

MEL['A]NCOL['Y]E, _s._ melancholy, 3. 23. See MALENCOLYE.

MELE (m[`e]l[*e]), _s._ meal (of flour), A 3995, 4245, D 1739.

MELES, _pl. of_ Meel.

MELLE, _s._ mill, 9. 6, A 3923, 4242; Mille, E 1200.

MELODIOUS, _adj._ T. v. 577.

MELODYE, _s._ melody, 1. 100; 5. 60, 62; A 9, E 271.

MELTE, _v._ melt, T. iv. 367; Melteth, _pr. s._ (pron. _melt'th_ or
_melt_), R. 276; Malt, _pt. s._ T. i. 582; HF. 922; Molte, _pp._ T. v. 10;
HF. 1145, 1149.

MEMBRE, _s._ limb, R. 1028; member, 3. 495; Membres, _pl._ I 137; parts, A.
pr. 48.

MEMORIAL, _adj._ which serves to record events, 7. 18.

MEM['O]RIE, _s._ memory, 7. 14; L. 1889; G 339; remembrance, A 3112, B
3164; Mem['o]ire, recollection, 3. 945.

MEN, _pl. of_ Man; _also a weakened form of_ Man, _in the sense_ of 'one,'
_or_ 'some one'; used with a singular verb; A 149, 1524, &c.; see MAN.

MENA, _error for_ Mene, I 11 _n_.

MENCIOUN, _s._ mention, 5. 29; A 893, B 3311, H 106; _made of m._, made
mention of, B 54.

MENDE, _v._ mend, T. v. 1426; _2 pr. pl._ profit, gain, T. ii. 329.

MENDINANTS, _pl._ mendicant friars, D 1907, 1912. See note.

MENDITE, _for_ Me endyte, G 32 _n_.

MENE, _adj._ middle, B 3. m 9. 18; mean, A. ii. 44. 14 (see MOTE); _mene
whyle_, mean while, T. iii. 50; B 546, G 1262; of middle size, T. v. 806;
Mene, _adj. pl._ intermediate, 7. 286.

MENE (m[`e][`e]n[*e]), _s._ means, way, 11. 36; T. v. 104, 1551; middle
course, B 4. p 7. 69; T. i. 689; instrument, E 1671; mediator, 1. 125;
go-between, T. iii. 254; intermediary, I 990; the mean, L. 165; Menes,
_pl._ mediators, go-betweens, A 3375; means, B 480; means, instruments, D
1484, F 883, 884.

MENELICHE, _adj._ moderate, B 1. p 6. 77.

MENEN (m[`e][`e]n[*e]n), _ger._ to say, HF. 1104; Mene, _ger._ to signify,
B 3941; Mene, _1 pr. s._ intend, mean, 11. 31; L. 166, 558; A 793, 1673, B
93, 641, 1860, 2141, G 1424, I 11; Menest, _2 pr. s._ meanest, 3. 743,
1137, 1305; Menestow, meanest thou, G 309; Mente, _1 pt. s._ meant,
intended, B 4614, G 999, 1051; purposed, 18. 50; Mente, _pt. s._ R. 1285,
T. iii. 432; B 327, F 108, 522; L. 309; thought, 5. 581; declared, 7. 160;
_2 pt. pl._ meant, F 981; Meneden, _pt. pl._ B 5. p 1. 33; Ment, _pp._
intended, 5. 158.

MENE-WHYLE, mean time, D 1445. See MENE, _adj._

MENINGE, _s._ intention, T. i. 285; L. 474; Mening, intent, F 151.

MENIVERE, _s._ miniver, R. 227.

MENSTRALCIES, _pl._ mintrelsies, HF. 1217. See MINSTRALCYE.

MENTE, _pt. t. of_ Menen.

MENTES, _pl._ plants of mint, R. 731.

MERCENARIE, _s._ hireling, A 514.

MERCIABLE, _adj._ merciful, 1. 1, 182; 15. 17; L. 347, 410; B 1878, 3013,
3076, F 1036.

MERC['U]RIE, _s._ mercury, i.e. quicksilver, G 772, 774, 827, 1431, 1438.

MERCY, _s._ 1. 7; A 918, 2808; (have) mercy, 1. 36; _graunt mercy_, much
thanks, 10. 29; T. iii. 649.

MERE, _s._ mare, A 541; Mare, A 4055, H 78; Mares, _pl._ A 4065, 4081.

MERIDIAN, _adj._ meridional, at the moment of southing, exact southern, A.
pr. 60; southern, on the meridian, A. ii. 39. 6.

MERIDIAN, _s._ meridian, A. ii. 39. 16; Meridians, _pl._ A. ii. 39. 10.

MERIDIE, _s._ midday, A. ii. 44. 30.

MERIDIONAL, _adj._ southern, A. i. 4. 5; F 263 (see ANGLE); Miridional
lyne, the meridian, A. ii. 39. 1.

MERIE; see MERY.

MERIELY, _adv._ merrily, A 714; Merily, B 4462; R. 1329.

MERIER, _adj._ pleasanter, sweeter, B 2024, 4041.

MERINESSE, _s._ enjoyment, B 3. p 2. 38.

MERITE; see MERYTE.

MERITORIE, _adj._ meritorious, I 831.

MERK, _s._ mark, image, F 880. See MARK.

MERKEN, _v._ brand, B 1. p 4. 91.

MERLION, _s._ merlin, small hawk, 5. 339, 611.

MERMAYDE, _s._ mermaid, B 4460; Mermaidenes, _pl._ mermaids, sirens, B 1. p
1. 49; Mermaydens, sirens, R. 680, 682.

MERSSHY, _adj._ marshy, D 1710.

MERVEILLE, _s._ marvel, B 2736, E 248, F 1344; Mervaille, E 1186; Mervayle,
R. 1571; _m. of_, wonder at, F 87; Mervayles, _pl._ marvels, 3. 288;
Mervailles, F 660.

MERVEILLOUS, _adj._ marvellous, B 1643, F 1206; Merveyllous, A. ii. 19. 4;
Merveilous, R. 1579.

MERVELINGE, _pres. part._ wondering, B 1. m 3. 12.

MERY, _adj._ merry, gay, R. 580; pleasant, 3. 319; A 235, 757, B 4261;
pleasant to hear, B 1186; Merye, pleasant, B 2. m 4. 10; A 208; Merie,
glad, E 615; Murye, merry, A 1386; Merie, _pl._ merry, T. iii. 952, B 126
(= merrily); Meriemen, followers, B 2029.

MER['Y]TE, _s._ recompense, C 277; Merite, deserving, B 4. p 6. 201;
Mer['y]tes, _pl._ merits, T. iv. 965.

MES; _at good mes_, at a favourable distance, so as to have a fair shot, R.
1453. O. F. _mes_. See the note.

MESCHAUNCE, _s._ misfortune, 18. 47; A 2009, B 914, D 407; evil occurrence,
T. i. 92; a miserable condition, B 3204; unfortunate conduct, C 80; ill
luck, B 4623; ill luck (to him), B 896, D 2215, H 11; _with m._, with a
mischief, H 193; Meschance, misfortune, B 602, 610; Meschances, _pl._
misfortunes, evil things, D 367; Meschaunces, _pl._ evil doings, F 1292.

MESCHIEF, _s._ misfortune, A 493, B 3513, D 248, E 1454, G 713, 1072; I
810; trouble, mishap, A 2551; Mescheef, harm, L. 1655; H 233; tribulation,
trouble, H 76; misfortune, G 1378. See MISCHEEF.

MESEL, _s._ leper, I 624. O. F. _mesel_.

MESELRIE, _s._ leprosy, I 625.

MESS['A]GE, _s._ (1), message, T. iii. 401; errand, B 1087; (2) messenger,
B 144, 333; Mess['a]ges, _pl._ messengers, T. ii. 936; B 2986.

MESSAGER, messenger, 3. 153; T. iii. 1417; A 1491, B 6, 724, 785, 3247;
Messagere, 3. 133; Messanger, HF. 1568; Messagers, _pl._ B 2992, 2995, I
967; Messag['e]res, L. 1091. See MESSANGER.

MESSAGERYE, _s._ a sending of messages (personified), 5. 228.

MESSAILE, _for_ Me asaille, T. iv. 1595 _n_.

MESSANGER, _s._ messenger, HF. 1568, 1583, 1591; Messangeres, _pl._ 2128.
See MESSAGER.

MESSE, _s._ mass, B 1413. See MASSE.

MESSUAGE, _s._ messuage, dwelling-house, A 3979.

MESTE, _pl._ most, i.e. highest in rank, greatest, E 131; _at the m._, at
most, T. v. 947. A.S. _m[=ae]st_.

MESTER, _s._ service, office, occupation, A 1340. O. F. _mester_, from Lat.
_ministerium_. See MISTER.

MESURABLE, _adj._ moderate, A 435, C 515, F 362; modest, I 936.

MESURABLY, _adv._ moderately, B. 2795.

MESURE, _s._ moderation, 3. 881; T. ii. 418; E 622, I 465; measure, E 256;
measure, plan, 5. 305; _by m._, not too much, 3. 872; moderately, R. 543
(cf. 823); _over m._, immeasurably, 5. 300; _out of m._, immoderately, B
2607; _withoute m._, beyond measure, 3. 632.

MESUREN, _ger._ to trace out, B 5. p 1. 15; Mesured, _pt. s._ measured out,
1. 174.

MESURING, _s._ measure, R. 1349.

MET, _s._ measure of capacity, I 799. A.S. _gemet_.

METAL, _s._ 4. 201; 9. 29; B 4. m 7. 25; D 1064; Met['a]l, R. 386; F 243.

METAMORPHOSEOS, _gen. s._ (the book) of Metamorphosis; it should be pl.
_Metamorphoseon_; B 93.

METE (m['e]['e]t[*e]), _adj._ meet, befitting, 3. 316; fit, L. 1043; _pl._
meet, A 2291. A.S. _m[=ae]te_ (but Ch. has close _e_).

METE (m['e]['e]t[*e]), _s._ equal, 3. 486. See above.

METE (m[`e]t[*e]), _s._ meat, food, T. i. 485; A 136, 1900; meat, L. 1108;
F 173, 618; repast, T. ii. 1462; eating, A 127. A.S. _mete_.

METE (m['e]['e]t[*e]), _v._ meet, 4. 138; L. 148; find, 5. 698; Mete,
_ger._ to meet, L. 634; to meet together, B 1873; Meten, _ger._ L. 630;
Mete, _1 pr. s._ 4. 59; R. 1342; Meteth, _pr. s._ meets (_men_ being
singular = _one_), A 1524; Mette, _pt. s._ 5. 37; HF. 2069; L. 977; Mette,
_pt. pl._ met, E 390, F 1173, 1508; Metten, _pt. pl._ HF. 227; Met, _pp._
met; _wel met_, D 1443. A.S. _m[=e]tan_.

METE (m['e]['e]t[*e]), _v._ dream, T. iii. 1559, iv. 1396, v. 249; _ger._
3. 118; 5. 108, 115; M['e]te, _1 pr. s._ dream, T. iii. 1344; am dreaming,
3. 1234; Met, _pr. s._ 5. 104, 105; Mette, _1 pt. s._ dreamt, 5. 95; HF.
110; T. ii. 90; D 577; _pt. s._ R. 10; HF. 61; T. i. 362, v. 1238; B 3930,
4329; Me mette, _1 pt. s. refl._ I dreamt, R. 26; L. 210; _pt. s. impers._
3. 276, 442, 1320; HF. 119; _refl._ A 3684, B 4084; T. ii. 925; Met, _pp._
B 4445. A.S. _m[=ae]tan_ (but Ch. has close _e_).

METE, _1 pr. s._ (I) measure, A. ii. 41. 5; _imp. s._ A. ii. 43. 6. A.S.
_metan_.

METELY, _adj._ well-proportioned, R. 822.

METH, _s._ mead (drink), A 2279. See MEETH.

METING (1), _s._ meeting, L. 784.

METING (2), _s._ dream, 3. 282.

METRES, _pl._ metres, L. 562; B 48.

MEVE, _v._ move, stir, T. i. 472; Meve, _ger._ 5. 150; HF. 825; Meved,
_pp._ HF. 813; _to him meved_, urged against him, L. 344. See MOEVE.

ME-WARD, TO, towards me, B 1. m 1. 20; T. iv. 1666.

MEWE, _s._ mew, i.e. coop wherein fowls were fattened, A 349; properly, a
coop for hawks when moulting, F 643; hiding-place, T. iii. 602. See MUWE.

MEWET, _adj._ mute, T. v. 194. See note.

MEXCUSE, _for_ Me excuse, excuse myself, 16. 36.

MEYNEE, _s._ household, T. ii. 614; v. 526; B 1238, 1510, D 2045, I 894;
company, R. 1305; L. 1222, 1498; E 2436; followers, suite, retinue,
retainers, household-servants, R. 615, 634; L. 1059; B 2. p 5. 64; HF. 194;
D 2156; F 391; household, menials, A 1258; army, troop, B 3532, 4584;
assembly, HF. 933; Meinee, retinue, I 437, 438; troop, A 4381; Meiny, crew,
L. 2201; Meignee, household, I 894 _n_. O. F. _meisnee_, _maisnee_,
household (Lat. _mansionata_); cf. E. _menials_.

MEYNTENAUNCE, _s._ demeanour, 3. 834.

MICHEL, _adj._ much, A. ii. 23. 18. See MUCHEL.

MID, _adj._ middle, 3. 660.

MIDDAY, _s._ A ii. i. 5.

MIDDEL, _s._ middle, waist, R. 1032.

MIDEL, _adj._ middle, neither tall nor short, 7. 79.

MIDNIGHT, _s._ T. iii. 602.

MIGHT, _s._ power, 5. 149; 10. 62; B 2. p 5. 8; B 5. p 2. 18; A 538, F 467;
magic power, F 133; strength, R. 831.

MIGHTE, -N; see MOWEN.

MIGHTILY, _adv._ mightily, B 3517; strongly, B 921.

MIGHTY, _adj._ mighty, 1. 6; A 108.

MIKEL, _adj._ great, 7. 99; much, L. 1175, 1677.

MILDE, _adj. fem._ mild, T. v. 194.

MILE-WEY, _s._ a space of 5deg, which answers to twenty minutes of time,
the average time for walking a mile; hence the term, A. i. 7. 7; _pl._
Milewey, A. i. 16. 11.

MILK, _s._ R. 1196; A 147, 358, 2908, B 4034, F 614, H 175.

MILKSOP, _s._ a milk-sop, lit. a piece of bread sopped in milk; hence,
anything soft, esp. a weak, effeminate man, B 3100.

MILKY WEY, the milky way, HF. 937.

MILLE, _s._ mill, E 1200, I 406. See MELLE.

MILL[`E]RE, _s._ miller, A 542; Miller, 545, 3925.

MILLIOUN, _s._ million, D 1685.

MILNE-STONES, _pl._ mill-stones, T. ii. 1384. A.S. _myln_.

MINDE, _s._ remembrance, 3. 55; T. ii. 602; B 2. p 2. 46; L. 18, 557, 1366;
A 1402, 1906, B 908, 1127, F 878; memory, HF. 564, 823; B 527; right mind,
sane mind, B 3. p 12. 108; recollection, B 1. p 3. 2; _in m._, in
remembrance, T. iv. 18; B 1843, F 109, 607.

MINISTRE, _s._ minister, B 168; Ministres, _pl._ officers, B 4233.

MINISTRE, _v._; Ministreth, _pr. s._ administers, governs, B 3. m 6. 2.

MINNE, _imp. s._ remember, mention, 16. 48. A.S. _gemynnan_.

MINSTRALCYE, _s._ minstrelsy, L. 2615; A 2197, 2524, 4394, E 1718; musical
instrument, H 113; sound of music, F 268; musical instruments, H 267.

MINSTR['A]LES, _pl._ minstrels, R. 764; B 2035; Minstrall[`e]s, F 78;
Minstrals, I 814.

MINTINGE, _pres. pt._ intending, B 1. m 2. 2. A.S. _myntan_.

MINUTES, _s. pl._ (1) minutes of time, A. i. 7. 8; (2) Minute, i.e. a
sixtieth part of a degree, A. i. 8. 8; see A. i. 8. 10.

MIR['A]CLE, _s._ wonder, A 2675; Mir[`a]cle, legend, B 1881; Mir['a]cles,
_pl._ wonderful acts, 5. 11; A 1788; _pleyes of m._, miracle-plays, D 558.

MIRE, _s._ H 290; see MYRE.

MIROUR, _s._ mirror, R. 567, 1585; B 5. m 4. 8; 3. 974; 10. 10; 21. 8; T.
i. 365; A 1399, B 166, E 1582, 1585, F 82, 132, 143, 175, 1454, G 668;
Mirror (Lat. Speculum), L. 307 _a_; see note.

MIRRE, _s._ myrrh, A 2938.

MIRTHE, _s._ pleasure, amusement, R. 601; 3. 612; A 759, 766, 767; Mirthe,
Sir, Mirth (personified), R. 733; Murthe, joy, E 1123. A.S. _myrhdh_.

MIRTHELES, _adj._ without mirth, sad, 5. 592.

MIS, _adj._ wrong, amiss, 7. 279; T. iv. 1348; bad, HF. 1975; blameworthy,
G 999.

MIS, _s._ wrong, evil, L. 266 a.

MIS, _adv._ amiss, wrongly, B 4. p 5. 14; T. i. 934.

MIS, _1 pr. s._ lack, have not, 6. 47. See MISSE.

MISACOUNTED, _pp._ miscounted, T. v. 1185.

MISAUNTER, _s._ misadventure, misfortune, T 766. (_Aunter = aventure_; see
below.)

MISAVENTURE, _s._ misadventure, misfortune, mishap, R. 253; 4. 140, 229; B
616, 3540, D 1334; mischief, R. 422.

MISAVYSE, _pr. pl. refl._ advise themselves amiss, act unadvisedly, D 230.

MISBILEVE, _s._ belief of trickery, suspicion, G 1213.

MISBILEVED, _pp._ misbelieving ones, infidels, 1. 146.

MISBODEN, _pp._ offered (to do you) evil, insulted, A 909. Pp. of
_misb[=e]den_.

MISBORN, _pp._ misbehaved, B 3067 (lit. 'borne amiss').

MISCARIE, _v._ go amiss, A 513.

MISCHAUNCE, _s._ ill luck, R. 1548; 1. 85; T. i. 118; mischance, R. 251;
misfortune, L. 1826; Mischance, ill luck, D 1334; _to mischaunce_, i.e. to
the devil, T. ii. 222, v. 359; _how m._, how the mischief, T. iv. 1362.

MISCHEEF, _s._ misfortune, L. 1278; Mischef, misfortune, danger, 4. 58;
harm, R. 253. See MESCHIEF.

MISCONCEYVE, _v._; Misconceyveth, _pr. s._ misunderstands, E 2410.

MISCONSTRUE, _v._ misconstrue, T. i. 346.

MISCOUNTING, _s._ fraudulent reckoning, R. 196. See note.

MISDEDES, _pl._ misdeeds, D 1664.

MISDEME, _v._; Misdemeth, _pr. s._ misjudges, E 2410; Misdemen, _pr. pl._
HF. 92; Misdeme, _pr. s. subj._ HF. 97.

MISDEPARTETH, _pr. s._ parts or divides amiss, B 107.

MISDOERES, _pl._ misdoers, B 2631.

MISDOOTH, _pr. s._ doeth amiss to, illtreats, B 3112; Misdoon, _pp._ done
amiss, I 85.

MISDRAWINGES, _s. pl._ way of drawing aside, B 3. p 12. 74.

MISERICORDE, _s._ (there is) mercy, pity, T. iii. 1177; mercy, pity, 1. 25,
35; B 2608, D 1910, I 804, 805; Misericordes, _pl._ mercy, pity, B 3. m 12.
31.

MIS['E]RIE, _s._ misery, T. iv. 272; B 3167.

MISESE, _s._ trouble, I 806; discomfort, I 177; Miseise, discomfort, I 194;
Miseyses, _pl._ injuries, B 1. p 4. 48.

MISESED, _pp._ troubled, vexed, I 806.

MISFILLE, _pt. s. subj._ it went amiss (with), A 2388. From infin.
_misfalle_.

MISFORYAF, _pt. s._ misgave, T. iv. 1426. From infin. _misforyive_.

MISGOON, _pp._ gone astray, I 80; gone to the wrong place, A 4218; Misgon,
gone amiss, A 4252; Misgo, A 4255.

MISGOVERNAUNCE, _s._ misconduct, B 3202.

MISGYED, _pp._ misguided, misconducted, B 3723. See GYE.

MISHAP, _s._ ill luck, B. 3435.

MISHAPPE, _v._ meet with misfortune, B 2886; _pr. s. subj._ (it) may happen
ill for, A 1646.

MISHAPPY, _adj._ unhappy, B 2758.

MISKNOWINGE, _adj._ ignorant, B 2. p 8. 17.

MISKNOWINGE, _s._ ignorance, B 3. m 11. 18.

MISLAY, _pt. s._ lay in an uncomfortable position, A 3647. From infin.
_mislye_.

MISLEDDEN, _pt. pl._ misconducted, T. iv. 48. From infin. _mislede_.

MISLEDINGES, _pl._ misdirections, misguiding ways, B 3. p 8. 2.

MISLYKE, _v._; Mislyketh, _pr. s._ displeases, L. 1293.

MISLYVED, _pp._ of ill life, treacherous, T. iv. 330.

MISMETRE, _pr. s. subj._ scan amiss, T. v. 1796.

MIS-SAT, _pt. s._ was not where it should be, 3. 941; misbecame, R. 1194.

MISSE, _v._ fail, 5. 75; B 1542, D 1416; draw to an end, 5. 40; _ger._ T.
iii. 1624; Mis, _1 pr. s._ lack, have not, 6. 47; Missed, _pt. s._ was
wanting (to), T. iii. 445; _pp._ missed, missing, T. iii. 537. A.S.
_missan_.

MIS-SET, _pp._ ill-timed, misplaced, 3. 1210.

MISSEYE, _1 pr. s._ speak amiss, 7. 317; Misseyest, _2 pr. s._ speakest ill
of, L. 323; Misseyeth, _pr. s._ slanders, I 379; Misseyde, _pt. s._ said
amiss, L. 440; Misseyd, _pp._ said amiss, H 353; Misseid, _pp._ spoken evil
of, R. 1260; _missayd or do_, said or done wrong, 3. 528.

MISSPEKE, _1 pr. s. subj._ speak wrongly, A 3139.

MIST, _s._ mist, HF. 352; F 259; Mistes, _pl._ HF. 966.

MISTAKE, _v._; Mistaketh, _2 pr. pl._ transgress, trespass, R. 1540;
Mistake, _pp._ committed an error, 3. 525.

MISTER, _s._ trade, handicraft, occupation, A 613; need, R. 1426; Mester,
occupation, A 1340; _what m. men_, men of what occupation, what sort of
men, A 1710. See MESTER.

MISTERYE, _s._ ministry, profession, I 895; Misterie, ministry, I 900. From
Lat. _ministerium_.

MISTIHEDE, _s._ mystery, 4. 224. M.E. _misty_, mystical, from F.
_mystique_, 'mysticall': Cotgrave.

MIS-TORNETH, _pr. pl._ turn aside, B 3. p 3. 6; Mistorned, _pp._ misled, B
4. p 2. 130.

MISTRUST, _s._ T. ii. 780.

MISTRUSTEN, _v._ (to) mistrust, T. i. 688; Mistriste, _v._ C 369;
Mistrusten, _2 pr. pl._ mistrust, T. iv. 1606; Mistruste, _2 pr. pl._ E
2343; Mistrusted, _pp._ distrusted, T. ii. 431.

MISTY, _adj._ misty, T. iii. 1060.

MISTYDE, _v._ be unlucky, B 2886.

MISWANDERINGE, _adj._ erring, B 2. p 8. 20; straying (Lat. _deuius_), B 3.
p 2. 16.

MISWENT, _pp._ gone amiss, T. i. 633.

MIS-WEYES, _s. pl._ by-paths, B 3. m 11. 2; B 5. p 1. 14.

MISWRYTE, _pr. s. subj._ miswrite, T. v. 1795.

MITEYN, _s._ mitten, glove, C 372, 373. F. _mitaine_.

MIXEN, _s._ dunghill, I 911. A.S. _mixen_, _meoxen_.

MO (m[`o][`o]), _adj._ more, A. pr. 27; more (in number), 3. 266, 408; 5.
595; HF. 124, 125; A 576, 849, B 54, 419, 2358, 3742, 3838, C 6, 891, D
179, E 318, 1412, F 301, 702, G 207, 675, 693, 723, 818; more (in number),
besides, L. 917, 1227; others, T. i. 613; E 2113; others, another, T. iii.
1514; E 1039; (others) besides, E 2263; many others besides, D 663; others
besides, T. iv. 1125; more besides, D 992; besides, T. ii. 1481, v. 229; A
3183, D 894; _tymes mo_, at other times, E 449; _othere mo_, others
besides, G 1001; _na mo_, no more, none else, B 695. A.S. _m[=a]_.

MO, _adv._ more, any longer, D 864; _never the mo_, _never mo_, never, D
691, 1099.

MOCHEL (muchel), _adj._ great, B 4. p 1. 30; L. 1966; much, 20. 7; G 611;
Moche, great, 3. 904; HF. 971; A. ii. 7. 14; much, B 1169, 2152. See
MUCHEL.

MOCHEL, _adv._ much, 3. 1102; B 3959.

MOCHEL, _s._ size, 3. 454, 861. Cf. A.S. _mycelu_, magnitude.

MOCIOUN, _s._ motion, B 2429; proposal, T. iv. 1291.

MODER, _s._ mother, 1. 49, 99; 5. 292; L. 338, 1828; B 276, 696, 1657,
1696, I 117; the thickest plate forming the principal part of the astrolabe
(Lat. _mater_ or _rotula_), A. i. 3. 1; Modres, _gen._ mother's, B 1783; C
729, G 1243; Modres, _pl._ Mothers, C 93. A.S. _m[=o]dor_.

MOEBLE, _adj._ moveable, A. i. 21. 49.

MOEBLE, _s._ moveable goods, property, personal property, T. iv. 1380,
1460; v. 300; Moebles, _pl._ G 540.

MOEDES, _s. pl._ moods, strains (of music), B 2. p 1. 32.

MOEVABLE, _adj._ impressionable, fickle, B 4. m 5. 23; _as s._ The firste
m., the 'primum mobile,' A. i. 17. 29.

MOEVABLETEE, _s._ mobility, B 4. p 6. 80.

MOEVE, _ger._ to stir up, B 2218; _v._ move, I 133; stir up, begin, B 2839;
Moeved, _pt. s._ disturbed, B 1136; Moeved, _pp._ troubled, B 4. p 6. 175;
Moeving, _pres. pt._ B 295. See MEVE.

MOEVERE, _s._ mover, A 2987.

MOEVING, _s._ moving, motion, B 2. p 5. 32; A. pr. 66; Firste moeving, the
'primum mobile,' A. i. 17. 27; Moevyng, B 2429; Moevynges, _pl._ motions, I
655.

MOISTE, _adj._ moist, A 420; Moist (_for_ Moiste, _before a vowel_), 5.
380; Moiste, _pl._ supple, A 457. See MOYSTE. O. F. _moiste_.

MOISTE, _adj. as s._ moisture, R. 1564.

MOISTURE, _s._ R. 1424; I 220.

MOKERERES, _s. pl._ misers, B 2. p 5. 11. See above.

MOKRE (mukr[*e]), _v._ hoard up, T. iii. 1375; Mokeren, _pr. pl._ B 2. p 5.
11. See _muckren_ in Stratmann.

MOLESTE, _v._ molest, vex, T. iv. 880.

MOLESTIE, _s._ trouble, B 3. p 9. 77.

MOLLIFICACIOUN, _s._ mollifying, softening, G 854.

MOLTE, _pp._; see MELTE.

MOMENT, _s._ A 2584.

MONCHE (munch[*e]), _v._ munch, T. i. 914.

MONE (m['o]['o]n[*e]), _s._ moon, 3. 824; 4. 235; HF. 2116; T. i. 1024; A.
pr. 66; L. 1972, 2503; A 2077, 3352, C 23, F 1287; moon, i.e. position or
'quarter' of the moon, A 403; Mone, _gen._ B 2070; Mones, _gen._ F 1154; I
10. A.S. _m[=o]na_.

MONE (m[`o][`o]n[*e]), _s._ moan, complaint, 4. 143; T. i. 696, iv. 950; A
1366, F 920. See MOON.

MONE (m[`o][`o]n[*e]), _v. refl._ to lament, T. i. 98.

MONE-LIGHT, _s._ moon-light, R. 1010.

MONETH, _s._ month, A. i. 10. 13, ii. 44. 37; _pl._ Monethis, ii. 44. 35.
A.S. _m[=o]nadh_. See MONTH.

MON['E]YE, _s._ money, A 703, B 1528, G 1033; B 3. p 3. 9.

MONK (munk), _s._ monk, A 165, B 3114; Monkes, _pl._ B 1632.

MONSTRE, _s._ monster, B 2. p 1. 11; L. 1928, 1991; E 2062; prodigy, F
1344; horrible thing, B 1. p 4. 140; Monstres, _gen._ of a monster, 3. 628;
_pl._ B 3302.

MONSTROUS, _adj._ monstrous, B 4. m 3. 22.

MONTAIGNE, _s._ mountain, B 24; Montayne, B 3776; Monteyne, B 3817;
Mountain, D 1887; Montaignes, _pl._ B 3454.

MONTH, _s._ month, A 92; Monthes, _pl._ A 704; T. ii. 50; Monthes, _gen.
pl._ (after _twelf_), B 1674. See MONETH.

MOOD (m['o]['o]d), _s._ anger, A 1760; thought, C 126. A.S. _m[=o]d_.

MOON (m[`o][`o]n), _s._ moan, lamentation, complaint, L. 1169, 1799, 2379.
See MONE.

MOORNE, _v._; Morne, _ger._ D 848; Moorne, _1 pr. s._ mourn, A 3704;
Moorneth, _pr. s._ F 819; Moorne, _pr. pl._ B 1933.

MOORNINGE, _s._ mourning, plaint, A 3706; Moorning, A 2968, B 621.

MOOT (m[`o][`o]t), _s. pl._ notes on a horn, 3. 376. See note.

MOOT (m['o]['o]t), _1 pr. s._ must, shall, 5. 642; 6. 85; T. iii. 1195, B
1853, 3104, E 872, F 41; Moot, _pr. s._ must, ought to, A 232, 732, 735,
1169, B 3697, D 980; is to (go), B 294; Mot, _1 pr. s._ may, 4. 267; must,
have to, 5. 469; T. iii. 47; B 227, 737, C 327; Most, _2 pr. s._ B 104;
Mot, _pr. s._ must, has to, L. 388, 1945; Mote, _2 pr. pl._ may, T. ii.
402; Moten, must, 5. 546; L. 343; Mote, _pr. pl._ must, 4. 198; L. 1925;
Mote, _pr. pl._ must, A 742; Moten, B 2560; ought, D 589; Mote (_or_ Moot),
_pr. s. subj._ may, HF. 102; L. 843; G 634, H 80; is sure to, L. 1632; Moot
(_or_ Mote) I goon, may I still go, may I still retain the power to walk, F
777; So moot (_or_ mote) I thee, as I may thrive, as I hope to thrive, C
309, D 361; As ever mote I, A 832, D 194; Foule moot thee falle, ill may it
befall thee, H 40; Moot (_or_ Mote) thou, mayst thou, B 1626, E 557; Moste,
_1 pt. s._ must (go), B 282; Moste, _pt. s._ must, 4. 250; must (go), HF.
187; must, ought to, B 2031, 3232, F 442; had to, B 886, G 523; ought to
(be), F 38; was made to, B 3700; Mosten, _pt. pl._ must, should, L. 99;
Moste, _pt. s. subj._ might, L. 1573, 1574, 2264; B 380, E 550; _us moste_,
it must be for us, we must resolve to, G 946. A.S. _m[=o]t_; pt. t.
_m[=o]ste_. See further under MOST.

MORAL, _adj._ excellent in character, T. iv. 1672; moral, T. ii. 167, v.
1836; A 307, C 325, 460.

MORALITEE, _s._ morality, A 3180, B 3687; moral tale, I 38; moral writing,
I 1088; moral of a tale, B 4630.

MORDRE, _s._ murder, R. 1136; 9. 64; A 1256, B 1820; _m. wol out_, B 4242.

MORDRE, _ger._ to murder, kill, L. 1536; _1 pr. s._ 7. 291; Mordred, _2 pt.
pl. subj._ were to murder, 3. 724; Mordred, _pp._ B 4195, D 801, E 725,
728.

MORDRER, _s._ murderer, 5. 353, 612; E 732; Mordrour, L. 2390.

MORDRING, _s._ murdering, A 2001.

MORE (m['o]['o]r[*e]), _adj._ greater, 7. 240; B 4. p 2. 139; T. i. 643, v.
819; HF. 1495, 2067; B 2396, E 1231; larger, HF. 500; A. i. 13. 2; More and
lesse, all alike, every one, B 959, C 275, D 934, F 1054; More or lesse,
10. 61; More and more, HF. 532; _withouten more_, without further trouble,
T. iv. 133. A.S. _m[=a]ra_.

MORE (m[`o][`o]re), _adv._ more, A 219; further, in a greater degree, B
3745, 3842.

MORE (m[`o]r[*e]), _s._ root, T. v. 25. A.S. _moru_. (The _o_ is open and
not fully long.)

MORMAL, _s._ sore, gangrene, A 386. See note.

MORNE, _s._ morning; _morne milk_ = morne-milk (compound sb.),
morning-milk, A 358, 3236.

MORNE, _ger._ to mourn, D 848. See MOORNE.

MOROW; see MORWEN.

MORSEL, _s._ morsel, bit, A 128, 130, I 633; _m. breed_, morsel of bread, B
3624; Morsels, _pl._ portions to eat, I 195.

MORTAL, _adj._ mortal, deadly, 2. 61; 5. 135; A 61; T. iii. 376; Mortel,
fatal, L. 2252.

MORTALLY, _adv._ H 313.

MORTER, _s._ mortar, 9. 15; T. iv. 1245 (see the note).

MORTIFICACION, _s._ mortification, I 1080.

MORTIFYE, _v._ mortify; lit. kill; used of producing change by chemical
action, G 1431 (see note to the line); G 1126; Mortified, _pp._ deadened, I
233.

MORTREUX, _pl._ thickened soups or pottages, A 384. (Also spelt
_mortrewes_; thus _x_ is for _s_.) See the note.

MORWEN, _s._ morning, morrow, T. ii. 1555, iii. 389; Morwe, L. 49, 108; A.
ii. 12. 26; A 1034, D 1080, F 906, I 471; 3. 22, 595; fore part of a day,
T. iv. 1308; Morow, 4. 1; Morowe, _dat._ R. 94; _by the morwe_, early in
the morning, A 334, B 3586, H 16; Morwes, _pl._ 3. 411; HF. 4. A.S.
_morgen_.

MORWENINGE, _s._ morning, 4. 151; A 1062, B 4492, F 397; dawning, 4. 26;
Morwening, L. 1483; Morweninges, _pl._ mornings, D 875.

MORWE-SONG, _s._ morning-song, A 830.

MORWE-TYDE, _s._ morning-hour, E 2225; _in the m._, in the morning, B 4206,
F 901, G 588; the morning-time, I 708; Morow-tyde, morning, R. 130.

MOSEL (muzel), _s._ muzzle, A 2151. O. F. _musel_.

MOST, _2 pt. s._ oughtest (to), 8. 3; Moste, _pt. s._ must, ought (to), A
3088; must (go), HF. 187; had to go, T. v. 5; was obliged to, T. iii. 540;
must, might, E 2102; _pt. j. subj._ might, L. 1594; Mosten, _pt. pl._ must,
might, T. ii. 1507; could, HF. 2094. See further under MOOT.

MOST, _adv._ most, chiefly, A 561; most of all, F 1312.

MOSTE, _adj. sup._ greatest, 3. 1006; 5. 550; 10. 22; L. 482; A 895, F 199;
chief, 3. 630; D 1041; chiefest, F 361; Most, chiefest, B 1. p 3. 47; Moste
and leeste, greatest and least (see MORE), F 300.

MOT, -E, -EN; see MOOT.

MOTE (1) _s._ mote, atom, T. iii. 1603; Motes, _pl._ small particles,
specks of dust, D 868.

MOTE (2), _s._ motion (Lat. _motus_), A. ii. 44. 14. The 'mene mote' or
_mean motion_ is the average motion of a planet during a given period, as
ascertained by tables.

MOTRE (mutr[*e]), _ger._ to mutter, T. ii. 541.

MOTTELEE, _s._ motley, motley array, A 271.

MOTTHES, _s. pl._ moths, B 2187, D 560; Moughtes, B 2187 _n_.

MOT['Y]F, _s._ motive; _hence_ idea, notion, B 628, E 1491.

MOULEN, _v._ grow mouldy, B 32; Mowled, _pp._ decayed, A 3870. See _muwlen_
in Stratmann.

MOUNT, _s._ mountain, A 1936, D 1140, F 721.

MOUNTAIN, _s._ D 1887. See MONTAIGNE.

MOUNTANCE, _s._ amount, value, quantity, R. 1562; T. iii. 1732; A 1570, C
863; amount (of time), L. 307; length, T. ii. 1707; amount, value, H 255.
O. F. _montance_.

MOURDAUNT, _s._ chape, or metal tag, at the end of a girdle, R. 1094. (Not
'the tongue of a buckle,' as has been said.) See _mordant_ in Godefroy.

MOUS, _s._ mouse, A 144, 1261, 3346, D 246, H 177; Mouses, _gen._ T. iii.
736; D 572; Mys, _pl._ mice, B 2. p 6. 22.

MOUSTRE, _s._ pattern, 3. 912. O. F. _moustre_, mod. E. _muster_.

MOUTH, _s._ mouth, A 153; Mouthes, _pl._ R. 787.

MOVERESSE, _s._ a fomentress of quarrels, R. 149. See the French text, l.
141; and the note.

MOWE, _s._ grimace (see note), T. iv. 7; Mowes, _pl._ HF. 1806; I 258. O.
F. _moe_.

MOWEN, _v._ be able; _mowen shewen_, be able to appear, become evident, B
5. p 4. 100; Mowen, _ger._ to be able, to have power, T. ii. 1594; May, _1
pr. s._ may, B 89, 2014, E 304; can, B 231, D 1591; May, _pr. s._ may, A
737; has power, F 112; can do, B 4. p 2. 31; may (there be), T. i. 412;
Mayst, _2 pr. s._ mayest, 4. 106; canst, L. 327; Maystow, mayest thou, 10.
50; A. i. 21. 48; L. 1952; A 1918, B 3267, E 265, 1070, G 336; Maistow, HF.
699; A 1236; Mowen, _1 pr. pl._ can, B 5. p 5. 66; Mowe, _1 pr. pl._ can, B
2939, 3151; may, HF. 1735; Mowen, _2 pr. pl._ can, 19. 25; T. iv. 1330;
Mowe, _2 pr. pl._ may, L. 92; B 2575; can, 3. 552; Mowen, _pr. pl._ may do,
B 4. p 11. 159; have power, B 4. p 2. 151; are able to, D 1722; Mowe, _pr.
pl._ may, can, A 2999, 3066, E 530; Mowe, _1 pr. s. subj._ may, 3. 94;
Mowe, _2 pr. s. subj._ mayest, G 460; Mighte, _pt. s._ might, A 169, &c.;
_1 pt. s. subj._ could, E 638; Mighten, _pt. pl._ might, 5. 318. A.S.
_mugan_.

MOWINGE, _s._ ability, B 4. p 4. 19; p 11. 184. See above.

MOWLED, _pp._ decayed, A 3870. See MOULEN.

MOYSOUN, _s._ crop, growth, R. 1677. O. F. _moison_; from Lat. acc.
_mensionem_.

MOYSTE, _adj._. moist, B 2182; fresh, new, B 1954, C 315. See MOISTE.

MOYSTY, _adj._ new (applied to ale), H 60.

MUABLE, _adj._ mutable, B 4. p 6. 30; changeable, T. iii. 822.

MUCHEL, _adj._ much, great, A 2352, B 2582, 2601, D 1273, H 335; a great
deal of, F 349; _in so m._, in so much, B 2644; many, G 673; Muche, great,
A 494; much, A 211; Mochel, great, B 4. p 1. 30; L. 1966; much, 20. 7; G
611; Moche, great, 3. 904; HF. 971; A. ii. 7. 14; Michel, much, A. ii. 23.
18; _for as mechel_, for as much, A. pr. 4. A.S. _micel_; later, _mycel_.

MUCHEL, _adv._ greatly, A 258; much, T. i. 386; D 809, F 1129; Muche,
greatly, A 132.

_Mulier est hominis confusio_, woman is man's confusion, B 4354.

MULLOK, _s._ a heap of refuse, A 3873; confused heap of materials, G 938,
940. Cf. Gower, ii. 204.

MULTIPLICACIOUN, _s._ multiplication, HF. 784, 820; multiplying, i.e. the
art of alchemy, G 849.

MULTIPLYE, _v._ to make gold and silver by the arts of alchemy, G 669;
_ger_. G 731; _imp, s._. multiply, A. ii. 41 a. 3 (p. 230).

MULTIPLYING, _s._ increase, C 374.

MURMURACION, _s._ murmuring, I 499.

MURMURE, _s._ murmuring, A 2459; murmur, I 503; Murmur, E 628, 726;
Murmour, 5. 520; Murmurs, _pl._ HF. 686.

MURMUREN, _v._; Murmureden, _pt. pl._ murmured, talked continually in a low
voice, buzzed, F 204.

MURMURINGE, _s._ murmur, A 2432.

MURTHE, _s._ mirth, joy, E 1123. A.S. _myrhdh_. See MIRTHE.

MURYE, _adj._ merry, A 1386. See MERY.

MUSCLE, _s._ mussel, D 2100; Muscules, _pl._ mussels, B 5. p 5. 21.

MUSE, _s._ muse, poetic faculty, 16. 38; (Muse), HF. 1399.

MUSE, _ger._ to consider, T. iii. 563; Museth, _pr. s._ gazes into, R.
1592; Mused, _pt. s._ considered, B 1033; Musede, _pt. s._ gazed intently,
R. 1527; Mused, _pp._ gazed, R. 1645. O. F. _muser_.

MUSICE, music, B 2. p 1. 31.

MUSICIENS, _pl._ musicians, B 2. p 6. 68.

MUS['Y]KE, music, 5. 62; Musik, B 4483.

MUTABILITEE, _s._ changefulness, 10. 57; T. i. 851.

MUTABLE, _adj._ B 4. p 6. 110.

MUTACIOUN, _s._ transformation, B 4. m 3. 25; Mutaciouns, _pl._ changes, B
5. p 6. 196.

MUWE, _s._ mew, pen (for hawks), cage, T. i. 381; iii. 1784; iv. 1310; _in
muwe_, cooped up, T. iv. 496. See MEWE.

MUWE, _v._ change, T. ii. 1258. O. F. _muer_.

MUWET, _the same as_ Mewet, T. v. 194 _n_.

MY, my, A 763, &c.

MYLE, _s._ mile, HF. 1038; _fyve m._, five miles, G 555; Myles, _pl._ HF.
1979; G 561.

MYN, _poss._ mine, 5. 437; B 40; E 365; &c.

MYNDE, _s. dat._ mind, recollection, 3. 15; 5. 69; _acc._ reason, 2. 34; 3.
511; _have minde upon_, remember, 19. 26. See MINDE.

MYNE, _v._ undermine, T. iii. 767; _ger._ to mine, T. ii. 677.

MYNORESSE, _error for_ Moveresse, R. 149 _n_.

MYNOUR, _s._ miner, one who mines, A 2465.

MYRE, _s._ mire, A 508; D 972; Mire, H 290.

MYRIE, _adj._ merry, A 1499. See MERY.

MYRIE, _adv._ merrily, A 3575.

MYRIER, _adv. comp._ merrier, R. 876. See MERIER.

MYS, _pl._ mice, B 2. p 6. 22. See MOUS.

MYSCOUEITING, _error for_ Miscounting, R. 196 _n_.

MY-SELVEN, myself, A 803, F 1362; 3. 34; Myself, A 544.

MYTE (1), _s._ mite, thing of no value, 4. 126; 7. 269; T. iii. 832; iv.
684; L. 741; A 1558; G 511, 633, 698, 1421. O. F. _mite_, a copper coin of
Flanders.

MYTE (2), mite, insect; Mytes, _pl._ D 560. A.S. _m[=i]te_.

MYTRE, _s._ mitre, 14. 7.



N', _for_ ne, not; as in _nacheveth_ for _ne acheveth_, and the like.

NA, no (Northern), A 4175.

NA MO, i.e. no more, none else, B 695; Na-mo, G 543. See MO.

NACHEVETH, _for_ ne acheveth, achieves not, T. v. 784.

NACIOUNS, _pl._ nations, A 53.

NADDE, _pt. s._ (_for_ ne hadde), had not, R. 457; L. 278; H 51; _pt. pl._
G 879; Nad, 3. 224.

NADDRE, _s._ adder, E 1786, I 331; Nadres, _pl._ adders, B 5. m 5. 4. A.S.
_naedre_, _naeddre_. See NEDDRE.

NADIR, _s._ the point of the ecliptic exactly opposite to that in which the
sun is situate, A. ii. 6. 1; see l. 8. Arabic _nadh['i]r es-semt_, i.e.
opposite to the zenith, for which the term _nadh['i]r_ simply, signifying
'opposite,' was commonly used.

NADSTOW, _2 pt. s._ haddest thou not, didst thou not, A 4088.

NAIETH, _pr. s._ refuses, B 1. m 1. 16 _n_. (Incorrect; for Naiteth.)

NAILLE, _imp. s. 3 p._ let it nail, let it fasten, E 1184; Nailinge, _pres.
pt. pl._ nailing, A 2503; Nayled, _pp._ fastened, E 29.

NAITE, _v._; Naiteth, _pr. s._ refuses, B 1. m 1. 16. See NAYTE.

NAKE, _2 pr. pl._ make naked, B 4. m 7. 45; Naked, _pp. as adj._ naked, 3.
125; L. 126; A 1956, I 105; bare, 3. 978; HF. 133; destitute, void, weak, G
486; simple, plain, A. pr. 19. A.S. _nacod_, a pp. form.

NAKEDNESSE, _s._ nakedness, E 866.

NAKERS, _pl._ kettle-drums, A 2511. From the Arabic; see note.

NALE; _atte nale_, at the ale, at the ale-house, D 1349.

NAM (_for_ ne am), _1 pr. s._ am not, L. 47, 192; A. pr. 43; A 1122, B
2710; _nam but deed_, am only a dead man, 3. 204.

NAM, _pt. s._ took, G 1297. A.S. _niman_, to take; pt. t. _ic nam_; cf. G.
_nehmen_, to take.

NAME, _s._ name, 1. 74; A 854; good name, reputation, L. 1812, 1845; F
1362; title, B 3. p 6. 24. A.S. _nama_.

NAMELES, _adj._ without renown, B 4. p 5. 5.

NAMELY, _adv._ especially, R. 596, 1357; 7. 260; A 1268, 2709, C 402, D
407, 2050, E 484, 626, F 739, I 296; L. 595, 931, 1519, 2133.

NAMO (_for_ na mo), no more in number, A 101, 544; none other, no one else,
D 957, 975, F 573. See NA and MO.

NAMORE, _adv._ no more, A 98, B 1112, C 962, D 1296, F 289, 314, G 651,
1266, I 84.

NAPOPLEXYE, _for_ Ne apoplexye, nor apoplexy, B 4031.

NAPPE, _v._; Nappeth, _pr. s._ naps, slumbers, nods, H 9. A.S. _hnappian_.

NARCOTIKS, _pl._ narcotics, L. 2670; Nercotikes, A 1472.

NARETTE; see ARETTE.

NAROWE, _adv._ close, 7. 183.

NART (_for_ ne art), art not, 1. 26; B 1. p 5. 7; B 3. p 5. 45; G 499.

NARWE, _adj._ small, B 4012; _pl._ A 625; close, closely drawn, D 1803.

NARWE, _adv._ narrowly, closely, T. iii. 1734; A. pr. 51; A 3224; tightly,
L. 600; carefully, E 1988.

NARWEST, _superl. adj._ narrowest, smallest, A. i. 18. 4.

NAS (_for_ ne was), was not, 3. 854; 7. 97; A 251, 288, 1216, 1886, B 159,
209, &c.; _I nas but_, I was simply, 2. 21.

NASSAYETH, _for_ ne assayeth, attempts not, T. v. 784.

NAT, _adv._ not, A 74, 156, 428, B 124, &c.; Nat but, only, merely, L.
1899, 2040; C 403, F 391, 638; quite, L. 2091.

NAT (_for_ ne at), nor at, B 290; see note. Cf. NIN.

NAT FORTHY, _adv._ notwithstanding, B 2165.

NATAL, _adj._ who presides over nativities, T. iii. 150. Compare the
expression _Iouem Genethlium_ in Jerome, as quoted in the note to Cant.
Tales, D 677.

NATH (_for_ ne hath), _pr. s._ hath not, T. v. 1199; A 923.

NATHELEES, nevertheless, A 35, 1832, 2473, B 621, C 813, G 717, I 91;
Natheles, R. 1481; L. 4, 188; A. pr. 21; 2. 111; 5. 390.

NATIVITEE, _s._ nativity, birth, T. ii. 685; L. 2576; B 3206, F 45;
Nativite, A. ii. 4. 44; Nativ[`i]tez, _pl._ A. ii. 4. 1.

NATURE, _s._ nature, A 11; kind, race, 5. 615; seed, I 577; Nature of
resoun, rational being, B 5. p 2. 7.

NATUREL, _adj._ natural, A 416, F 116; 4. 122; L. 376. A 'day natural' is a
period of 24 hours, as distinct from the 'day artificial.'

NATURELLY, _adv._ by nature, F 1052; by natural causes, F 229.

NATYF, _adj._ native, T. i. 102.

NAUGHT, _s._ nothing, A 756.

NAUGHT, _adv._ not, A. pr. 37; B 1701; not so, G 269. See NAT, NOUGHT.

NAVE, _s._ nave (of a wheel), D 2266, 2270.

NAVELE, _s._ navel, A 1957.

NAVYE, _s._ navy, fleet, B 4. m 7. 7; HF. 216; L. 960, 1335.

NAXE (_for_ ne axe), ask not, T. v. 594.

NAY, _adv._ nay, no, 3. 1243; 18. 63; D 1098, E 177, G 1339; (_opposed to_
yea), E 355; (answers a direct question), B 740, B 1793; surely not! 3.
1309; _as s._ nay, untruth, 3. 147; It is no nay, there is no denying it, B
1956, E 817, 1139. Icel. _nei_.

NAYL, _s._ nail, A 2007; nail, i.e. hindrance, A 3877 (see note); Nayles,
_pl._ D 769; finger-nails, 3. 955; T. ii. 1034; B 3366, C 288; nails,
claws, A 2141; and see note to C 651.

NAYTE, _v._ withhold, deny, I 1013; Naiteth, _pr. s._ B 1. m 1. 16. Icel.
_neita_, to deny.

NE, _adv. and conj._ not, 1. 53; 5. 91; L. 1881, A 70; nor, 3. 2, 74; A
179, 526, B 2710, C 619; _ne ... ne_, neither ... nor, A 603; (when used
with a verb, a second negative is often added), as in _no--ne_, B 77;
_ne--noon_, B 89; _ne ... never_, never, 3. 1196; _ne ... thing_, nothing,
3. 1262; _ne doth_, do ye not, C 745.

NECE, _s._ niece, T. i. 975; B 1290; Neces, _gen._ niece's, T. ii. 76, 78;
Neces, _pl._ nieces (_or_ relatives), T. ii. 814.

NECESS['A]RIE, _adj._ necessary, H 95; Necessaries, _pl._ necessary, B 5. p
4. 84; Necessaire, necessary, T. iv. 1021; Necessaries, _pl._ necessities,
B 711.

NECESSEN, _v._; Necesseden, _pt. pl._ compelled, B 3. m 9. 5.

NECESSITEE, _s._ necessity, T. iv. 1012, 1014; A 3042, F 593.

NECLIGENCE, _s._ negligence, A 1881, B 22, C 98, E 661; Negligence, 8. 7;
L. 537.

NECLIGENT, _adj._ negligent, careless, B 2512, C 101, D 1816, I 362;
Negligent, 5. 429.

NEDDRE, _s._ adder, E 1786 _n_; Neddres, _pt._ L. 699. See NADDRE.

NEDE (n['e]['e]d[*e], _sometimes as_ n[`e][`e]d[*e]), _s._ need, extremity,
1. 44; T. i. 772, iii. 49; B 102, 658, 2360; extremity, difficult matter, B
2917; peril, B 3576 (see note); _at nede_, at need, 1. 112; _for nede_, if
needful, R. 1123; _s. as adj._ needful, A 304, B 2358; Nedes, _pl._ matters
of business, B 174, 1266; necessities, T. ii. 954; needs, G 178; _for
nedes_, for very need, 3. 1201. A.S. _n['y]d_, _n[=e]d_, _n[=e]ad_.

NEDE, _adv._ necessarily, of necessity, R. 1441, 1473; HF. 724; T. ii. 671;
3. 1074; needs, B 3697, E 531, G 1280. Pronounced as _n['e]de_, or rimes
with _drede_, _dede_.

NEDE, _v._ be necessary, B 871; Nedeth, _pr. s._ (it) is necessary, (it)
needs, 1. 118; A 462, 3028, D 2097, F 65, 298; _what n._, what is the need
of, A 849, 1029; Neded[`e], _pt. s. impers._ (there) needed, A 4020, 4161;
it was needful, T. v. 726; Neded, _pt. s._ E 457; Neded, _pt. s. subj._;
_us neded_, it would be necessary for us, we should need, T. iv. 1344.

NEDEFUL, _adj._ needy, I 805; _as s._ I 1032.

NEDELEES, _adv._ needlessly, I 600; Needles, E 621; Needless, E 455.

NEDELY, _adv._ of necessity, necessarily, T. iv. 970; B 4435, D 968;
Needly, B 3. p 9. 65.

NEDES, _adv._ needs, necessarily, of necessity, R. 1479; L. 1298, 2697 (see
COST); A 1290, D 1071, E 11, F 1163, 1563; HF. 1635.

NEDES-COST, _adv._ of necessity, A 1477, L. 2697. See COST.

NEDLE, _s._ needle, R. 97; Nedles, _gen._ G 440.

NEDY, _adj._ needy, B 2607.

NEED (n[`e][`e]d), _s._ need, 3. 1253. See NEDE.

NEEDLES, _adv._ needlessly, E 621; Needless, without a cause, E 455. See
NEDELES.

NEEDLY, _adv._ necessarily, B 3. p 9. 65. See NEDELY.

NEEN, no (Northern), A 4185, 4187.

NEER, _adv. comp._ nearer, T. ii. 562, v. 80; L. 314, 318, 832; A. ii. 42.
3; A 839, 968, B 4000; G 721; _neer and neer_, A 4304; _as pos. adv._ near,
A 1439; _fer or neer_, far or near, T. i. 451. See NER.

NEET, _pl._ neat, cattle, A 597. A.S. _n[=e]at_.

NEGARDYE, _s._ niggardliness, 10. 53. See NIGARDYE.

NEGH, _adv._ nearly, almost, 3. 907. A.S. _n[=e]ah_.

NEGHEN, _v._ draw nigh, L. 318.

NEGLIGENCE, _s._ 8. 7; L. 537. See NECLIGENCE.

NEGLIGENT, 5. 429. See NECLIGENT.

NEIGH, _adj._ near, nigh, B 2558, F 49; Ney, A. ii. 3. 47. See NY.

NEIGH, _adv._ nearly, T. i. 60; Negh, 3. 907. See NY.

NEIGHEBOUR, _s._ neighbour, A 535, B 108, 115, 3108; F 961. Neigheboures,
_gen._ D 239; Neighebores, _pl._ neighbours, dwellers near, L. 720;
Neyghebores, HF. 649.

NEIGHEN, _v._ draw near, T. ii. 1555.

NEITHER NOTHER, (in) neither the one nor the other (see note), B 5. m 3.
34.

NEKKE, _s._ neck, R. 551, 555; 3. 939; T. ii. 986; A 238, 393, 1218; B
3300, E 113; Nekkes, _pl._ necks, 5. 671. A.S. _hnecca_.

NEKKE-BOON, _s._ neck-bone, B 1839; neck, D 906; nape of the neck, B 669.

NEL, _1 pr. s._ will not, T. ii. 726.

NEMPNEN, _v._ name, B 507; Nempne, _v._ to name, tell, F 318; _pt. s._
Nempned, named, E 609. A.S. _nemnan_.

NENFORCE, _for_ Ne enforce, T. iv. 1016 _n_.

NENTENDEMENT, _for_ Ne entendement, T. iv. 1696 _n_.

NENVYE, _for_ ne envye, _imp. s._ envy not, T. v. 1789.

NER, _adv. comp._ nearer, 2. 19; 3. 888; B 1. p 1. 59; T. i. 448; Nere, 3.
38, 134, 450; _ner and ner_, B 1710; Ner the les, nevertheless, 4. 130. See
NEER.

NERCOTIKES, _pl._ narcotics, A 1472. See NARCOTIKS.

NERE (_for_ ne were), _2 pt. s._ wast not, 4. 112; _pt. pl._ were not, 3.
959; L. 348, 686, 792; A 875, D 1944; _1 pt. s._ subj. should not (I) be,
T. ii. 409; Nere, _pt. s. subj._ would not be, should not be, 4. 35; T. iv.
987; A 1129; were not, B 3984, G 1362; were it not, B 132; were it not
(for), 1. 24, 180; _pt. pl. subj._ B 547.

NERE, _adv._ nearer, R. 1454; 3. 38; 5. 619. See NER, NEER.

NERF, _s._ nerve, i.e. sinew, T. ii. 642.

NESCAPEST (_for_ Ne escapest), escapest not, L. 2643.

NEST, _s._ D 1691; _wikked nest_, i.e. _mau ni_, or Mauny (see note), B
3573; Nestes, _pl._ HF. 1516.

NET, _s._ R. 1471, 1624; L. 131; Nettes, _pl._ nets, L. 1190; T. iii. 1355;
B 3665.

NET-HERDES, _gen._ neat-herd's, B 2746.

NETHER, _adj._ lower, A. i. 12. 6; A 3852; Nethere, A. i. 5. 13.

NETHEREST, _adj. superl._ lowest, i.e. outermost, A. i. 18. 5; Nethereste,
lowest, A. i. 4. 2; nethermost, B 1. p 1. 20, 25.

NETLE, _s._ nettle, T. i. 948; iv. 461.

NEVENE, _s._ name, T. iii. 1723 _n_.

NEVENE, _v._ name, HF. 562, 1253; G 821; _herd hir name n._, heard (him)
name her name, T. i. 876; _ger._ HF. 1438; _pr. pl._ L. 2237; _pr. pl.
subj._ may mention, G 1473. Icel. _nefna_.

NEVER, _adv._ never, A 70, 734, B 87; _n. dide but_, never did aught that
was not, 4. 297; _n. the neer_, none the nearer, G 721.

NEVERADEL, _adv._ not a bit, C 670. See DEL.

NEVER-MO, _adv._ never oftener, never (with two exceptions), A. ii. 31. 3;
never, 3. 1125; never again, A 1346.

NEVER-THE-LES, _adv._ nevertheless, 6. 74; 7. 99, 236; Never-the-lasse, T.
iii. 86.

NEVEW, _s._ nephew, L. 1442; B 3594; grandson, L. 2659; HF. 617. Anglo-F.
_nevu_.

NEWE, _adj._ fresh, R. 856; new, 2. 29; A 176, D 1244, E 841, F 1015; _as
fem. s._ a new (love), HF. 302. A.S. _n[=e]owe_, _n[=i]we_.

NEWE, _adv._ newly, freshly, afresh, R. 540, 558, 1214; L. 103; T. i. 222;
A 365, 428, E 3, 378, I 767; _of newe_, new, fresh, T. ii. 20; Newe and
newe, again and again, T. iii. 116; afresh, continually, C 929.

NEWE, _v._ renew; Neweth, _pr. s._ B 4. p 6. 104; Newe, _2 pr. pl._ 23. 11;
Newed, _pt. s._ had something fresh in it, 3. 906; Newed, _pp._ renewed, B
3036.

NEWEFANGEL, _adj._ fond of novelty, F 618, H 193.

NEW-FANGELNESSE, _s._ fondness for novelty, 7. 141; L. 154; F 610;
Newe-fangelnesse, 21. 1.

NEWELICHE, _adv._ newly, recently, B 4. m 3. 10; Newely, R. 1205.

NEWE-THOUGHT, _s._ Inconstancy, R. 982.

NEXTE, _adj. sup._ nearest, 4. 54; HF. 1107; L. 2481; A 1413, B 807, 1814,
C 870; last, HF. 1775; next, D 1010; easiest, T. i. 697.

NEY, _adj._ nigh, A. ii. 3. 47. See NEIGH, NY.

NEYGHEBORES, _pl._ neighbours, HF. 649. See NEIGHEBOUR.

NIGARD, _adj._ niggardly, R. 1172.

NIGARD, _s._ miser, niggard, R. 1175; T. iii. 1379; B 4105; Nigardes, _pl._
D 1263.

NIGARDYE, _s._ miserliness, B 1362; Negardye, 10. 53.

NIGHT, _s._ night, A 23, 268; Nighte, _dat._ by night, 3. 2; _a night_, by
night, B 3758; Night, _as pl._ nights, B 4063, D 1885.

NIGHT-CAPPE, _s._ nightcap, E 1853.

NIGHTE, _ger._ to grow dark, become night, T. v. 515; _v._ 5. 209.

NIGHTER-TALE, _s._; _by n._, in the night-time, A 97. This expression seems
to have resulted from a confusion of Icel. _[=a] n[=a]ttar-theli_, in the
dead of night, with Icel. _n[=a]ttar-tal_, a tale or number of nights.

NIGHTINGALE, _s._ nightingale, R. 78, 913; 5. 351; T. ii. 918, iii. 1233; A
98, D 458, G 1343, H 136; Nightingales, _pl._ R. 657, 909.

NIGHT-SPEL, _s._ night-spell, night-incantation, A 3480.

NIGROMANCIENS, _s. pl._ necromancers, I 603.

NIL, _1 pr. s._ will not, 3. 92, 1125, 1235; 5. 222, 699; HF. 56; E 363;
will (I) not, shall (I) not, T. v. 40, 43, 44; desire not, dislike, E 646;
Nille, _1 pr. s._ will not, G 1463; Nil, _pr. s._ will not, B 972, E 119;
R. 55; L. 2095, 2653; will not (have), 3. 586; will (she) not, 3. 1140; _1
pr. pl._ D 941; Nilt, _2 pr. s._ wilt not, T. ii. 1024; L. 758; Niltow,
thou wilt not, T. i. 792; wilt thou not, T. iii. 1427. A.S. _nyllan_, to be
unwilling; cf. L. _nolle_.

NILLINGE, _s._ wishing not to be, B 5. p 2. 14; refusing, B 3. p 11. 60.
See above.

NIN, _for_ Ne in, nor in, E 1511, F 35; E 2089 _n_. Cf. Nat (Ne at).

NINTHE, F 1283; Nynthe, T. v. 681, 1103.

NIS, for _ne is_, is not, 2. 77; 3. 8; 5. 54; L. 5. 191, 670: A 901, 922, B
319, C 861, &c.; Ther nis no more but, all that remains is that, L. 847.

NISTE, _1 pt. s._ knew not, 3. 272, 777; 5. 152; HF. 128, 1901; F 502; _pt.
s._ knew not, 3. 1147; T. i. 494; L. 2262; A 3414, 4225, B 384, F 1028, G
216; _pt. pl._ F 634. A.S. _nytan_, not to know; pt. t. _nyste_.

NO, _adj._ no, A. 55, 71, &c. See Noon.

NO, _adv._ no (a strong negative), T. ii. 502; F 1590. Cf. Nay.

NOBLE, _adj._ noble, 1. 97; 18. 26; A 60, 214.

NOBLE, _s._ a gold coin, A 3256; Nobles, _pl._ HF. 1315; C 907, G 1365.
(Worth 6_s._ 8_d._)

NOBLEDEST, _pt. s. 2 p._ ennobledest, didst ennoble, G 40. A translation of
Dante's _nobilitasti_. See the note.

NOBLESSE, _s._ nobleness, 10. 78; R. 780; B 2. p 3. 28; noble cheer, T. v.
439; nobility, D 1167; (title of respect), B 2956; magnificence, B 3438, E
782; high honour, B 3208; nobility, rank, R. 1034, 1108; worthy behaviour,
B 185, 248; T. i. 287.

NOBLEY, _s._ nobility, dignity, B 2. p 2. 50; splendour, HF. 1416; noble
rank, T. iv. 1670; assembly of nobles, G 449; Nobleye, nobility, E 828;
state, F 77. A. F. _noblei_.

NODDE, _v._ nod, H. 47.

NOF (_for_ Ne of), nor of, T. v. 447 _n._; D 571, 660.

NOGHT, _adv._ not, 3. 572; 4. 277; A 107, 253, 1458; by no means, in no
respect, A 1226, B 94, 112, 400; Noght but for, only because, D 645.

NOGHT, _s._ nothing, 3. 567; C 542; Noght worth, worth nothing, H 200.

NOISE, _s._ noise, 5. 202; HF. 1058; Noyse, R. 1416; A 2492.

NOISE, _v._; Noisen, _2 pr. pl._ cry aloud, B 3. m 6. 7.

NOKKED, _pp._ notched, R. 942.

NOLDE, _1 pt. s._ would not, R. 501; 3. 311, 1109; D 1064; did not want, 5.
90; (I) should not desire, G 1334; Noldest, _2 pt. s._ wouldst not, 3. 482;
Noldestow, if thou wouldst not, T. iii. 1264; Nolde _pt. s._ would not, 1.
31; L. 730; B 87, 1821, 3664, D 962; would not (have), A 1024; _pt. pl._
would not, G 395. See NIL.

NOMBRE (numbr[*e]), _s._ number, A 716, 2596, D 25, 32; A. pr. 9; amount,
sum, A. ii. 24. 3; Noumbres, _pl._ A. pr. 2. See Noumbre.

NOMBRED, _pp._ numbered, counted in, T. iii. 1269. See Noumbre, v.

NOMEN (num[*e]n), _pp._ taken, R. 394; T. v. 514; put, R 408; Nome, _pp._
T. iii. 606, v. 190; L. 822, 1018, 1777. Pp. of _nimen_.

NONES, (n[`o][`o]nez), for the, for the nonce, for the occasion, for this
occasion, R. 709, 1111; T. iv. 185, 428; A 379, 523, 545, 879, 1423, 3126,
B 1165, 3132, 4523, D 14; L. 295, 1070, 1116; for the nonce, on the spur of
the moment, T. i. 561; for the time, T. ii. 1381; With the nones, on the
condition, HF. 2099, L. 1540. Originally _for then anes_, for the once;
where _then_ is the dat. of the def. article (A.S. _dh[=a]m_), and
_[=a]nes_ (once) is an adv. used as a sb.

NONNE (nunn[*e]), _s._ nun, A 118, 163; Nonnes, _gen. pl._ nuns', B 3999;
Nonnes Preest, Nun's Priest, B 4637.

NONNERYE, _s._ nunnery, A 3946.

NOON (n[`o][`o]n), none, no, 1. 25; 5. 159; A 318, 449, B 102, I 164; _pl._
B 89; Non, none, 3. 941; HF. 335; A 654; _or noon_, or not, or no, D 2069,
E 1741, F 778, I 962. A.S. _n[=a]n_.

NOON (n['o]['o]n), _s._ mid-day, T. v. 472, 1114; A. ii. 39. 7. A.S.
_n[=o]n_.

NOOT (n[`o][`o]t), _1 pr. s._ know not, L. 2660; A 284, 1039, 1101, B 892,
1019, 2191, 3596, 3973, C 816, F 342, H 23; Not, L. 193, 1967; 7. 319;
Nost, knowest not, 3. 1137; T. iv. 642; HF. 2047; Nostow, thou knowest not,
HF. 1010; Noot, _pr. s._ knows not, C 284; Not, 4. 214; B 3. p 2. 60; T. i.
800. A.S. _n[=a]t_.

NOR, nor, A 493, &c.

NORICE (nuris), _s._ nurse, B 1. p 3. 4; L. 1346; B 4305, D 299, E 561,
618, F 347, I 122; Norices, _pl._ I 613. O. F. _norice_.

NORICE (nuriss[*e], nurish[*e]), _v._ nourish, foment, B 2204; Norished,
_pp._ brought up, E 399.

NORISSING, _s._ nutriment, A 437; Norissinge, nourishment, I 338, 348;
Norisshinge, growth, A 3017; Norishinge, bringing up, E 1040; Norisshinges,
_pl._ refections, B 4. p 6. 25; sustenance, B 1. p 6. 65 (Lat. _fomitem_).

NORITURE (nurityyr), _s._ nourishment, T. iv. 768.

NORTELRYE (nurtelrii[*e]), _s._ education, A 3967.

NORTH, B 2. m 6. 16.

NORTH-NORTH-WEST, 5. 117.

NORTHREN, northern, A 1987.

NORTH-WARD, A 1909; A. ii. 20. 8.

NORTURE (nurtyyr), _s._ instruction, good manners, R. 179; Auctour of
norture, model of good breeding, 24. 28 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi).

NORY (nuri), _s._ pupil (lit. foster-child), B 3. p 11. 160; Norry, B 1. p
3. 10; Norie, B 3. p 9. 119. O.F. _nouri_.

NOSE, _s._ nose, A 123, 152, D 785, 2264; R. 157, 545.

NOSE-THIRLES, _pl._ nostrils, A 557, I 209.

NOSKINNES, _for_ Noneskinnes, of no kind, HF. 1794. From _nones_, gen. of
_noon_, none; and _kinnes_, gen. of _kin_.

NOST, Nostow, Not; see NOOT.

NOT, not (_see_ Nat); Not but, only, 4. 121; T. iii. 1636.

_Nota_, i.e. observe, A. ii. 26. 21. Lat. _nota_.

NOTABILITEE, _s._ notable fact, B 4399.

NOT['A]BLE, _adj._ notorious, remarkable, B 1875, C 156, E 2241;
noteworthy, A. pr. 61.

NOTARIES, _s. pl._ scribes, I 797.

NOTE (n[`o]t[*e]), _s._ (1) mark, B 5. m 4. 13; note (in music), 3. 472, A
235, B 1737; musical note, peal, HF. 1720; tune, 5. 677; _by n._, according
to musical notes, by note, R. 669; 3. 303; in concord, all at once, T. iv.
585; Notes, _pl._ marks, B 5. m 3. 13, m 4. 17; musical notes, R. 767.

NOTE (n[`o]t[*e]), _s._ (2), employment, business, task, job, A 4068. A.S.
_notu_.

NOTEFUL, _adj._ useful, B 1. p 1. 51; A. pr. 77. See above.

NOTEMUGE, _s._ nutmeg, B 1953; Notemigges, _pl._ nutmegs, R. 1361.

NOTES (nutez), _s. pl._ nuts, R. 1360, 1377.

NOT-HEED, _s._ crop-head, a head with hair cropped short, A 109. See note.

NOTHER, neither, 3. 342; 7. 253; neither (of them), L. 192.

NOTHING, _adv._ in no respect, in no degree, not at all, 1. 171; 5. 158; 7.
105; R. 398; HF. 2032; L. 88; A 2505, B 575, 971, 2178, 3402, C 764; &c.;
_for n._, in no wise, by no means, D 1121.

NOTIFICACIONS, _pl._ hints, B 5. m 3. 15.

NOTIFYE, _ger._ to take note of, T. ii. 1591; Notifie, _pr. pl._ indicate,
I 430; Notifyed, _pp._ made known, proclaimed, B 256.

NOT-WITHSTANDING, 18. 17.

NOUCHIS, _s. pl._ jewelled ornaments, jewels (properly, setting for
jewels), clasps, HF. 1350; Nowches, E 382. O.F. _nouche_, _nosche_, brooch,
bracelet; O.H.G. _nuscha_, a jewelled clasp, buckle, &c. E. _ouch_.

NOUGHT, _adv._ not, 3. 568; T. ii. 575, 673; not at all, 3. 3; B 2262. See
NOGHT.

NOUMBRE, _s._ number, 3. 440; 5. 381; Noumbres, _pl._ A. i. 7. 4. See
NOMBRE.

NOUMBRE, _v._ number, 3. 439; Nombred, _pp._ counted in, T. iii. 1269.

NOUN-CERTEYN, _s._ uncertainty, 18. 46; T. i. 337. See below.

NOUN-POWER, _s._ lack of power, impotence, B 3. p 5. 14. Also in P. Pl.

NOUTHE, now then, now, T. i. 985; _as nouthe_, just now, at present, A 462.
A.S. _nu dh[=a]_.

NOVELRYE, _s._ novelty, T. ii. 756; Novelryes, HF. 686; Novelries, F 619.
O.F. _novelerie_.

NOVELTEE, _s._ novelty, E 1004.

NOV['Y]S, _s._ novice, B 3129.

NOW, _adv._ now, A 715, 765; _for now_, for the present, 7. 343; _now and
now_, from time to time, occasionally, F. 430; _now or never_, T. iv. 101.

NOWCHES; see NOUCHIS.

NOWHER, _adv._ nowhere, 3. 315; A 251, 321, 360, 524.

NOYOUS, _adj._ troublesome, B 2235 _n_; HF. 574. Short for _anoyous_.

NOYSE, _s._ noise, A 2492; R. 1416; Noise, 5. 202; HF. 1058.

NY, _adj._ near, B 2562; Nye, _def._ the one who is near, A 3392. See
Neigh, Ney.

NY, _adv._ nigh, nearly, 18. 78; L. 2347; B 2735; _as ny as_, as close to,
A 588; _wel ny_, almost, A 1330, E 82, F 346; Nye (_for_ Ny, _before a
vowel_), closely, 19. 19.

NY, _prep._ nigh, B 550.

NY _for_ Ne I, nor I, T. iii. 173 _n_, 1299 _n_.

NYCE, _adj._ foolish, 4. 262; B 4. m 7. 45; T. i. 202, 1025; HF. 276, 920;
L. 362; B 3712, 4505, D 938, E 2434, F 525; ignorant, R. 1257; T. i. 625;
foolish, weak, B 1083, G 493, 647, 842, H 69; ludicrous, A 3855;
scrupulous, A 398. O.F. _nice_.

NYCELY, _adv._ foolishly, T. v. 1152.

NYCETEE, _s._ folly, R. 12; T. i. 913; G 463, 495, H 152; simplicity, A
4046; foolish behaviour, pleasure, D 412; scrupulousness, T. ii. 1288;
Nycete, folly, 3. 613; 5. 572.

NYE; see NY.

NYFLES, _pl._ mockeries, pretences, D 1760. Lit. 'sniffings'; O.F.
_nifler_, to sniff, to mock at (Godefroy).

NYMPHE, _s._ nymph, T. iv. 1543; Nymphes, _pl._ A 2928.

NYNE, nine, A 24; _n. night_, nine days, T. iv. 588.

NYNTENE, _num._ nineteen, L. 283.

NYNTHE, ninth, T. v. 681, 1103; Ninthe, F 1283.



O ([`o][`o]), one, A 304, 363, 738, B 52, 1135, 2122, &c.; a single, B 5. p
6. 101; one single, A. ii. 19. 12; one and the same, T. ii. 37; one
continuous and uniform, HF. 1100. See OON.

OBEDIENT, _adj._ obedient, A 851; A. ii. 28. 21. In A. ii. 28. 21, it is a
technical term; applied to the six eastern signs of the zodiac, as being
'subject' to the corresponding western ones.

OBEISANT, _adj._ obedient, E 66, I 264.

OBEISAUNCE, _s._ obedience, 4. 47; T. iii. 478; L. 1375; A 2974, E 24, 502;
obedient act, E 230; obedient farewell, L. 2479; Obeysaunce, F 739; _in
your o._, in obedience to you, 2. 84; _unto her o._, in obedience to her,
L. 587; Obeisaunces, _pl._ acts of obedience, acts signifying dutiful
attention, L. 149; F 515; duties, observances, L. 1268.

OBEISING, _adj._ obedient, yielding, L. 1266.

OBEYE, _v._ obey, I. 170; _ger._ F 489; _1 pr. s._ 6. 124; submit, B 2874;
Obeyeth, _pr. s._ is subject to, A ii. 28. 25; Obeyde, _pt. s._ 7. 119; L.
681; Obeyed, F 569.

OBIECTE (object[*e]), _adj._ presented, B 5. p 5. 3.

OBLIGACIOUN, _s._ bond, 15. 2; Obligaciouns, _pl._ sureties, B 3018.

OBLIGE, _v._; _o. to you_, lay an obligation on you (to make me), T. iv.
1414; Oblygeth, _pr. s._ compels, I 847.

OBS['E]QUIES, _pl._ funeral rites, A 993.

OBSERVAUNCE, _s._ respect, A 1045, 1500; homage, 7. 218; observance, L.
1608; ceremony, T. ii. 112; Observance, attention, heed, I 747;
Observaunces, _pl._ customary attentions, F 956; respectful attentions, 7.
249; duties, L. 150; Observauncez, _pl._ observances, A. ii. 4. 37;
Observances, set duties, E 1548; attentions, F 516.

OBSERVE, _v._ favour, B 1821; Observeth, _pr. s._ takes heed, I 303.

OBST['A]CLE, _s._ obstacle, E 1659; Obst['a]cles, _pl._ A 1787.

OBSTINAT, _adj._ obstinate, A 521.

OCCASIOUN, _s._ cause, L. 994.

OCCIAN, _s._ ocean, B 4. m 6. 9.

OCCIDENT, _s._ west, B 297.

OCCIDENTALE, _adj._ western, A. i. 5. 6.

OCCUPYE, _v._ take up, F 64; Occupyeth, _pr. s._ follows close upon (see
note), T. iv. 836; Occupieth, _pr. s._ occupies, 2. 90; dwells in, B 424;
Occupye, _imp. s._ hold to, B 4. p 7. 69.

OCTOGAMYE, _s._ marrying eight times, D 33.

ODIOUS, _adj._ hateful, D 2190.

OD['O]UR, _s._ L. 120; F 913; Od['o]ures, _pl._ odours, L. 123.

OF, _prep._ of, A 2, &c.; by, R. 1260; B 4. m 1. 8; T. iv. 57; A. pr. 43; B
2132, 2751, 3782, D 661, E 70, 2436; concerning, about, F 1179; during, B
510; for, 13. 19 (see note); T. i. 1063, ii. 849, iv. 131, v. 184; A. i.
12. 3; D 895, 1861, 1868; off, from, 3. 964; A. i. 17. 29; F 1183, I 286;
on account of, B 2208; I 98; in, A 87; as to, as regards, in respect of, 2.
57; 5. 317; B 90, F 425; with reference to, as to, 3. 966; 5. 299; as the
result of, upon, 5. 555; over, B 1. p 3. 20; B 2947; with, A 2055, G 626;
some A 146; _of a purpos_, on purpose, deliberately, B 2273; _of al my
lif_, in all my life, 5. 484; _of grace_, by his favour, out of his favour,
E 178; _fulfild of_, filled with, 7. 42.

OF, _adv._ off, away, 5. 494; (come) off, T. iv. 1106; off, A 2676; away, B
3748, 3762; _com of_, come off, be quick, have done, A 3728.

OF-CASTE, _imp. s._ cast off, 5. 132.

OFFENCE, _s._ injury, A 1083; harm, wound, 9. 19; giving offence to, B 3. p
4. 17; hindrance, difficulty, T. iv. 199; guilt, 16. 13.

OFFENCIOUN, _s._ offence, crime, B 1. p 4. 200; Offensioun, damage, A 2416.

OFFENDE, _v._ offend, 6. 129; Offenden, _v._ assail, E 1756; Offendeth,
_pr. s._ assails, T. i. 605; Offende, _pr. pl._ injure, A 3065; Offended,
_pt. s._ 7. 262; Offended, _pp._ attacked, A 2393; injured, A 909.

OFFERTORIE, _s._ offertory, sentences of scripture said or sung after the
Nicene Creed, whilst offerings were collected, A 710.

OFFICE, _s._ office, employment of a secular character, A 292; employment,
B 3446 (see note); function, operation, B 4. p 2. 76; duty, 5. 236; L. 383;
a duty, 5. 518; property, D 1144; Offyce, office, place of office, D 1577;
_with o._, by the use of (Lat. _officio_), B 1. p 1. 2; _houses of o._,
servants' offices, E 264; Offices, _pl._ duties, B 1. m 6. 13.

OFFICERE, _s._ officer, A 1712; Officer, B 1255; Officeres, _pl._ L. 1551;
servants, C 480.

OFFRETH, _imp. pl._ offer ye, C 910. From infin. _offren_.

OFFRING, _s._ offering, the act of going up to the altar to present alms, A
450; offering at mass, I 407.

OF-NEWE, _adv._ newly, again, R. 1613; lately, E 938, G 1043; of late, D
1342. E. _anew_.

OF-SHOWVE, _v._ repel (lit. shove off), A 3912.

OF-SPRING, _s._ offspring, A 1550, H 299.

OF-TAKEN, _pp._ taken off, taken away, B 1855. Cf. l. 1858.

OFTE, _adj. pl._ many; Ofte sythes, oftentimes, A 485; Ofte tyme, often, 3.
1158; 18. 44; A 52, D 928, I 138; Tymes ofte, E 226.

OFTE, _adv._ oft, 1. 34; D 861, E 722; Often, often, A 310.

OFTER, _adv. comp._ oftener, E 215, 620, I 1026, 1041; T. i. 125.

OF THAT, _conj._ because, L. 815.

OFTHINKETH, _pr. s. impers._ it repents, T. i. 1050 _n_.

OF-THOWED, _pp._ thawed away, HF. 1143.

OGHT, _s._ aught, anything, F 1469; anything of value, G 1333; _as adv._
ought, at all, 3. 1141; 7. 294; B 1792.

OGHTE; see OWEN.

OILE, _s._ oil, C 60; Oille, A 630, 2961; Oiles, _pl._ G 856.

OISTRE, _s._ oyster, A 182, D 2100; Oystres, _pl._ B 5. p 5. 21.

OKE, OKES; see OOK.

OLD, _adj._ old, A 174; Olde, _def._ 5. 110; A 429, D 1000, 1046, 1086;
_voc._ D 1630; _pl._ 5. 19, 22, 24, A 175, D 1004, F 69.

OLIFAUNTS, _s. pl._ elephants, B 3. p 8. 19.

OLIVERES, _s. pl._ olive-trees, R. 1314, 1381; olive-yards, B 3226. The O.
F. _oliver_ is used to translate Lat. _oliueta_ (Burguy).

OLYVE, _s._ olive-tree, 5. 181.

OMELIES, _s. pl._ homilies, I 1088.

_Omnia_, all things, A 162.

OMNIPOTENT, _adj._ almighty, C 576, D 423.

ON, _prep._ on, A 12, 21, 113, &c.; in, T. v. 274; F 921; at, T. iii. 32;
of, T. iii. 18; as regards, E 1424; against, T. ii. 865; towards, 4. 298;
binding on, 10. 43; _hir on_, upon her, 3. 1217; _on eve_, in the evening,
E 1214; _on reste_, at rest, F 379.

ON, ONE; see OON.

ONDE, _s._ envy, R. 148. A.S. _anda_.

ONEN, _v._; Oneden, _pt. pl._ united, I 193; Oned, _pp._ united, complete,
D 1968; Ooned, united, B 4. p 6. 51.

ONES ([`o][`o]nes), _adv._ once, 3. 665, 979; L. 2301; A. pr. 35; B 588,
861, 3476, 3480, G 748; of one mind, united in design, C 696; _at ones_, at
once, R. 710; A 765, H 10. A.S. _[=a]nes_.

ON-FIRE, on fire, D 2122.

ON-LOFTE, _adv._ aloft, up in the air, in the sky, 5. 203, 683; on high, T.
i. 138, iv. 1221; above, T. iii. 670; above ground, E 229.

ON-LYVE, _adv._ alive, 6. 94; T. ii. 138, iv. 1237; F 932. Lit. 'in life.'

ONWARD, _adv._ forward, A 970.

ONYTHING, A. ii. 38. 13. See ANYTHING.

OO, ONE; see OON.

OOK ([`o][`o]k), _s._ oak, 5. 176; T. ii. 1335, 1380, 1389; A 1702, 2290,
3017, C 765, F 159; Oke, _dat._ 3. 447; 5. 223; Ook (_collectively_), oaks,
R. 1384; Okes, _pl._ oaks, B 1. m 6. 5. A.S. _[=a]c_.

OON ([`o][`o]n), one, R. 624; 3. 39; 5. 512; A 148, B 271, 334, 2034, 3880,
I 16; always the same, the same, one and the same, 3. 649; B 2142, C 333, B
2142, E 711; one o'clock, A. ii. 3. 52; united, agreed, T. ii. 1740; alone,
unwedded, D 66; the same, i.e. of small consequence, 3. 1295; the same
thing, alike, F 537; _oon the faireste_, one of the fairest, E 212; _in
oon_, in the same state, unchangeably, A. ii. 2. 8; _ever in oon,_ ever
alike, always in the same manner, E 602, 677, F 417; continually, D 209;
_oon and oon_, one by one, A 679; _after oon_, equally good, A 341; _that
oon_, one thing, T. iv. 1453; the one, C 666; _many oon_, many a one, A
317, E 775; _felle at oon_, came to one agreement, T. iii. 565; _many on_,
many a one, D 680; _everich on_, every one, B 1164; Oo, one, 3. 261, 546;
HF. 2109; G 207; one, a single, R. 1236; one and the same, 3. 1293.

OONED, _pp._ united, B 4. p 6. 51. See ONEN.

OONINGE, _s._ uniting, B 4. p 6. 53. See above.

OONLY, _adv._ only, R. 583.

OOTH ([`o][`o]th), _s._ oath, T. iii. 1046; L. 1638, 1644; A 120; Othes,
_pl._ T. ii. 299; A 810, B 3018, C 472, 636, F 528.

OPEN, _adj._ open, 1. 177; A 10, B 1684.

OPENEN, _v._; Opened, _pt. s._ R. 538; Openeden, _pt. pl._ were opened, I
329. see OPNEN.

OPEN-ERS, _s._ fruit of the medlar, A 3871.

OPEN-HEEDED, with head uncovered, D 645.

OPENING, _s._ R. 544.

OPENLY, _adv._ R. 20, 502.

OPERACIOUNS, _s. pl._ operations, effects, F 1129; A. i. 21. 44.

OPIE, _s._ opium, A 1472; Opies, _pl._ opiates, L. 2670.

OPINIOUN, _s._ opinion, A 183, 337; notion, A 1269; belief, A 1093.

OPNEN, _v._; Opned, _pp._ opened, T. iii. 469. See OPENEN.

OPORTUNITEE, _s._ good fortune, B 2. p 3. 27.

OPPOSEN, _v._ oppose; _o. me_, lay to my charge, D 1597; Opposed, _pt. s._
examined, G 363 _n_; _pp._ objected, B 1. p 5. 34 _n_ (a good reading).

OPPOSICIOUN, _s._ opposition, F 1057.

OPPOSIT, _s._ opposite point, A 1894.

OPPRESSE, _v._ interfere with, suppress, 10. 60; violate, F 1411; _ger._ to
put down, G 4; Oppressed, _pp._ oppressed, T. iii. 1089; violated, F 1385,
1406, 1435.

OPPRESSIOUN, _s._ oppression, wrong, 15. 12; L. 2592; tyranny, 10. 19;
violation, L. 1868.

OR, _conj._ ere, before, 3. 128, 228, 1032; T. i. 832, 1071, ii. 571; HF.
101, 110; L. 1353, 1741, 2009, 2230, G 314.

OR, _prep._ before, R. 864; 3. 234; B 1. p 2. 17; A. ii. 23. 21.

OR, _conj._ or, A 91, &c.; Or ... or, either ... or, R. 261. Short for
_other_. See OTHER.

OR['A]CLES, _pl._ oracles, HF. 11.

ORATORIE, _s._ closet set apart for prayers, A 1905; Oratories, _pl._ D
694.

ORATOURS, _s. pl._ orators, pleaders, B 4. p 4. 183.

ORD, _s._ point; Orde, _dat._ L. 645. A.S. _ord_. And see WORD.

ORDAL, _s._ ordeal, T. iii. 1046.

ORDENAUNCE, _s._ ordinance, provision, T. iii. 535, iv. 964; regulation, 5.
390; plan, T. ii. 510; rule, 24. 17 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi); _by o._, in
order, T. iii. 688. See ORDINAUNCE.

ORDENEE, _adj._ well-ordered, B 4. p 1. 30; symmetrical, B 3. p 12. 30;
Ordeyn[`e], regulated, T. i. 892.

ORDEN['E]LY, _adv._ conformably, in order, B 4. p 6. 195.

ORDENOUR, _s._ ruler, B 3. p 12. 71; B 4. p 1. 31.

ORDEYNE, _1 pr. s._ determine, B 5. p 2. 14; Ordeyneth, _pr. s._ disposes,
overrules, B 4. p 6. 236; Ordeyned, _pp._ provided, A 2553; appointed, F
177; prepared, G 1277; ordered, I 336; Ordeyne (= ordeynee), _pp._
regulated, T. i. 892.

ORDINAT, _adj._ ordered, regulated, B 1. m 4. 1; Ordinaat, orderly, E 1284.

ORDINATLY, _adv._ methodically, I 1045.

ORDINAUNCE, _s._ arrangement, A 3012, B 763, 805, I 177; provision, B 250,
F 903; orderly arrangement, A 2567; circumstance, B 1. p 4. 121;
consideration, 18. 38; order, B 2303; resolve, B 2258; command, 10. 44. See
ORDENAUNCE.

ORDRE, _s._ order, law, 4. 155; A 214, 220, I 177; order, class, set, G
995; (religious or nunlike) order, T. iv. 782; I 891; _by o._, in order, L.
2514; B 2975; Ordres, _pl._ orders, A 210.

ORDRED, _pp. as adj._ ordained, I 782, 894, 961.

ORDURE, _s._ filthiness, I 841; mire, mud, B 1. m 7. 6; I 157; rubbish, T.
v. 385.

ORE ([`o][`o]r[*e]), _s._ grace; _thyn o._, (I pray for) thy grace (see
note), A 3726. A.S. _[=a]r_.

ORE (['o]['o]r[*e]), _s._ ore (of metal), D 1064. A.S. _[=o]r_.

ORES, _s. pl._ oars, B 2. m 5. 14; L. 2308. A.S. _[=a]r_.

ORFRAYS, _s._ gold embroidery, gold braid, fringe with golden threads, R.
462, 869, 1076. A. F. _orfreis_, O. F. _orfrois_ (Godefroy); Low Lat.
_aurifrisium_ (Gloss. to Matt. Paris).

ORGANS, _s. pl._ 'organs,' the old equivalent of organ, G 134; see the
note. Or it may mean 'musical instruments.'

ORGELS, _for_ Organs, G 134 _n_.

ORGON, _pl. as sing._ organ (Lat. _organa_), B 4041.

ORIENT, _s._ east, A 1494, B 3504. See THORIENT.

ORIENTAL, _adj._ eastern; (hence) of superior quality, L. 221 (see note);
Orientale, _adj._ Eastern, A. i. 5. 4.

ORIGINAL, _s._ cause, C 500.

ORISONTE, _s._ horizon, T. v. 276; Orizonte, A. pr. 7; A. i. 18. 4; F 1017
_n_.

ORISOUN, _s._ prayer, A 2372, D 1786, F 1026; Orison, A 2261 _n_; Orisouns,
_pl._ B 596, I 1038; Orisons, B 537, E 1706.

_Orizon rectum_, or right horizon, A. ii. 26. 21. This means the horizon of
any place situate on the equator, which could be represented by a
_straight_ line upon a disc or 'table' of the astrolabe.

ORLOGE, _s._ clock, 5. 350; Orlogge, B 4044. F. _horloge_.

ORNAMENTS, _pl._ L. 1107; Ornamentes, E 258.

ORPHELIN, _adj._ orphaned, B 2. p 3. 21. F. _orphelin_.

ORPIMENT, _s._ orpiment, G 759, 774, 823. '_Orpiment_, trisulphide of
arsenic; it occurs in nature as an ore of arsenic, and is usually in
combination with realgar, or red sulphuret of arsenic'; Webster.

_Oruscupum_, i.e. horoscope, A. ii. 3. _rub._

OSANNE, i.e. Hosannah, B 642. A Hebrew phrase; meaning 'save, we pray.'

OST, _s._ host, army, 9. 40; B 1. p. 3. 48; T. iv. 29; HF. 186; L. 1906;
Ostes, _pl._ armies, B 4. m 4. 9.

OSTELMENTS, _s. pl._ furniture, household goods, B 2. p 5. 85 (L.
_supellectilis_). O. F. _ostillement_, _ostilement_ (Godefroy); E.
_hustlement_; cf. F. _outil_.

OSTESSE, _s._ hostess, B 4. m 3. 16. See HOSTESSE.

OTES, _s. pl._ oats, C 375; (of) oats, D 1963.

OTHER, _adj._ second, R. 953, 976; the other, A 427; Other, A 113; _what
o._, what else, T. i. 799; _that o._, the other, F 496; Other, _pl._
others, 3. 891; 5. 228; R. 1304; Othere, _pl._ other, A 794, D 866; others,
HF. 2151; B 3344, 3510; _gen. pl._ others', HF. 2153; Otheres, _gen.
sing._, each other's (lit. of the other), C 476. A.S. _[=o]dher_.

OTHER, _conj._ or, 3. 810; 4. 219; either, L. 35 _a_; Other ... or, either
... or, G 1149. See OR.

OTHER-WEYS, _adv._ diversely, in one way (or other), B 5. p 4. 101;
Otherweyes, otherwise, B 2255, E 1072.

OTHER-WHYLE, _adv._ sometimes, B 2. p 1. 78. Occurs in P. Pl. See
Outherwhyle.

OTHERWYSE, _adv._ on any other condition, F 534.

OTHES; see OOTH.

OUCHE, _s._ nouch, clasp, D 743. Put for Nouche; see NOUCHIS.

OUGHT, _s._ anything, 3. 459; _as adv._ at all, 3. 537, 549; T. ii. 268;
_in ought that_, in as far as, T. iii. 1241. See OGHT.

OUGHTESTOW, oughtest thou, T. v. 545; L. 1957. See OWEN.

OULE, _s._ owl, 5. 343; D 1081; Owle, T. v. 319; L. 2253; Oules, _pl._ 5.
599; T. v. 382; F. 648; Owles, _pl._ B 4282. A.S. _[=u]le_.

OULES, _pl._ awls; hence, spiked irons for tormenting men, D 1730. A.S.
_awel_.

OUNCES, _pl._ small portions, A 677; ounces, G 756; R. 1118.

OUNDED, _pp._ wavy, T. iv. 736. See below.

OUNDINGE, _s._ adornment with waved lines, I 417. Cf. _oundy_ as an
heraldic term. See below.

OUNDY, _adj._ wavy, HF. 1386. F. _ond['e]_, 'waved'; Cotgrave.

OURE, _pron._ ours, 5. 545; T. iv. 539; our, L. 900; Our, our, A 34, &c.;
Oures, ours, C 786. A.S. _[=u]re_.

OUT, _adv._ out, A 45, &c.; _used for_ come out, HF. 2139; B 1350; go out,
T. iv. 210; fully, T. iii. 417; _mordre wil out_, murder will out, B 1766;
Out and out, entirely, T. ii. 739.

OUT, _interj._ alas! A 3825, E 2366; Out! harrow! B 4570.

OUT OF, _prep._ without, C 157; out of, A 452.

OUT-BREKE, _v._ break out, break silence, 2. 12.

OUT-BRESTE, _v._ burst out, T. iv. 237.

OUT-BRINGE, _v._ utter, L. 1835; utter (something), T. iii. 99, 107.

OUTCAST, _pp._ cast out, rejected, B 3. p. 4. 30 _n_; cast out, T. v. 615;
abject, B 3. p 4. 60.

OUT-CAUGHTE, _pt. s._ caught out, drew out, B 1861.

OUT-DRAWE, _pp._ drawn out, T. iv. 1226.

OUTE, _adv._ away, T. v. 553; out, i.e. uttered, D 977.

OUTEN, _v._ put out, utter, display, exhibit, G 834; utter, E 2438; Oute,
_1 pr. s._ utter, offer, D 521. A.S. _[=u]tian_.

OUTER, _adj._ outer, T. iii. 664.

OUTERESTE, _adj. superl._ uttermost, farthest, B 2. m 6. 11. See
OUTTERESTE.

OUTERLY, _adv._ utterly, entirely, E 335, 639, 768, 953.

OUTFLEYINGE, _s._ flying out, HF. 1523.

OUT-HEES, _s._ outcry, hue and cry, alarm, A 2012. Cf. Owl and Nightingale,
1683, 1698; hence Low Lat. _hutesium_, _uthesium_ (Matt. Paris).

OUTHER, _conj._ either, R. 250; 22. 79; T. ii. 857; iv. 510, 531; A 1485,
1593, B 2286; or, 3. 1100; T. ii. 1351; Outher ... or, either ... or, B
1136, 1137, C 213. See OTHER.

OUTHERWHYLE, _adv._ sometimes, B. 2733, 2857. See OTHERWHYLE.

OUTLANDISH, _adj._ foreign, 9. 22.

OUTLAWE, _s._ outlaw, H 224.

OUTRAGE, _s._ excess (_luxu_), B 2. m 5. 3; 9. 5; inordinateness, B 2. p 5.
88; cruelty, injustice, R. 1229; A 2012.

OUTRAGEOUS, _adj._ excessive, 5. 336; B 2180, C 650, E 2087, I 430;
superfluous, B 4. p 6. 253; immoderate, I 743; violent, rampant, R. 174;
excessively bold, R. 1257.

OUTRAGEOUSLY, _adv._ excessively, A 3998.

OUTRANCE, _s._ great hurt, excessive injury, 24. 26 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi).

OUTRAYEN, _v._ be outrageous, incur disgrace, B 3. p 6. 37; Outraye, _v._
lose temper, E 643. O.F. _outreer_, to surpass (Godefroy).

OUTRELY, _adj._ utterly, T. ii. 1004; B 4419, C 849, D 664, I 234, 247;
entirely, T. iii. 1486; B 2943, 3072; thoroughly, B 5. p 4. 5; absolutely,
B 5. p 4. 13; decidedly, B 2210. Cf. O.F. _outrement_.

OUT-RINGE, _v._ ring out, T. iii. 1237.

OUT-ROOD, _pt. s._ rode out, T. v. 604.

OUT-RYDERE, _s._ rider abroad, A 166. The name of a monk who rode to
inspect granges, &c.; see note.

OUT-SPRINGE, _v._ come to light, T. i. 745; Out-sprong, _pt. s._ spread
abroad, C 111.

OUT-STERTE, _pt. pl._ started out, B 4237.

OUT-STRAUGHTE, _pt. s._ stretched out, R. 1515. From infin. _outstrecche_.

OUT-TAKEN, _pp._ excepted (lit. taken out), B 277; Out-take, (being)
excepted, R. 948.

OUTTERESTE, _adj._ final, ultimate, B 4. p 4. 39; outermost, A. i. 21. 22;
Outterest, outermost, B 3. p 10. 21; B 4. p 6. 85; extrinsic, B 3. p 12.
142.

OUT-TWYNE, _2 pr. pl._ twist out, utter, 12. 11.

OUTWARD, _adv._ outwardly, R. 419.

OUT-WENDE, _v._ come out, proceed, HF. 1645.

OVEN, _s._ oven; Ovene, _dat._ I 856. A.S. _ofen_.

OVER, _prep._ above, R. 1475; 3. 891; A ii. 23. 10; B 277, 2487; beyond, D
1661; besides, F 137; Over hir might, to excess, C 468; Over that, beyond
that, B 3. p 2. 7.

OVER, _adv._ very, exceedingly, B 2655; over, on, B 1633.

OVER, _adj._ upper, A 133; Overest, _superl._ uppermost, A 290.

OVER-AL, _adv._ everywhere, R 1580; 3. 171, 426; 5. 172, 284; 13. 4; L.
120, 1024, 1424; B 2. p 5. 17; A 216, 249, 1207, D 237, G 507; everywhere,
in all directions, T. i. 928; on all sides, D 264; Overal, in every way, E
2129; in every respect, throughout, E 1048; Over al and al, beyond every
other, 3. 1003.

OVER-BLOWE, _pp._ blown over, past, L. 1287.

OVER-BORD, _adv._ over-board, HF. 438; Over-borde, L. 644.

OVERBYDE, _ger._ to survive, D 1260 _n_.

OVERCASTE, _v._ overcast, sadden, A 1536.

OVERCOMEN, _v._ overcome, R. 393; Overcom, _pt. s._ overcame, L. 2147;
Overcomen, _pp._ defeated, B 4. p 6. 160; Overcome, overcome, L. 2019; A
3135; come to pass, T. iv. 1069.

OVERCOMER, _s._ conqueror, B 1. m 2. 10; B 4. m 7. 27.

OVERDOON, _pp._ overdone, carried to excess, G 645.

OVER-GILT, _adj._ worked over with gold, R. 873.

OVER-GOON, _v._ pass away, T. i. 846; overspread, B 2. p 7. 26; Overgo,
_v._ pass away, T. iv. 424.

OVER-GREET, _adj._ too great, G 648.

OVER-HASTE, _s._ too much haste, T. i. 972.

OVERKERVETH, _pr. s._ cuts across, crosses, A. i. 21. 56, ii. 26. 23.

OVERLAD, _pp._ put upon, B 3101. Lit. _led over_. See P. Plowm. B. iii.
314; and Prompt. Parv.

OVERLADE, _v._ overload, L. 621.

OVERLIGHT, _adj._ too light, too feeble, B 4. m 3. 23.

OVER-LOKED, _pp._ looked over, perused, 3. 232.

OVERLONGE, _adv._ too long, B 3. m 7. 5.

OVER-LOWE, _adv._ too low, B 3. m 9. 17.

OVERLYETH, _pr. s._ overlies, lies upon, I 575.

OVERMACCHE, _v._ to overmatch, overreach, conquer, E 1220.

OVER-OLDE, _adj._ out of date, B 1. p 3. 41.

OVER-PASSETH, _pr. s._ surpasses, B 5. p 6. 74; exceeds, oversteps, B 4. p
7. 70.

OVER-RAUGHTE, _pt. s._ reached over, _hence_, urged on, T. v. 1018.

OVER-RIDEN, _pp._ ridden over, A 2022.

OVER-SHAKE, _pp._ caused to pass away, shaken off, 5. 681.

OVERSHOTE, _pp._; _had overshote hem_, had over-run the scent, 3. 383. From
infin. _oversheten_.

OVER-SKIPTE, _1 pt. s._ skipped over, omitted, 3. 1208.

OVERSLOPPE, _s._ upper-garment, G 633. See note. Cf. Icel. _yfir-sloppr_,
an upper or over-garment; cf. E. _slop_, in the compound '_slop_-shop.' See
SLOPPES.

OVERSPREDE, _v._ spread over, cover, E 1799; Over-sprat, _pr. s._
overspreadeth, T. ii. 767; Over-spradde, _pt. s._ covered, A 2871;
overspread, T. ii. 769; spread over, A 678.

OVERSPRINGE, _pr. s. subj._ overpass, F 1060.

OVERSTRECCHETH, _pr. s._ extends over, B 2. p 7. 27.

OVER-SWIFTE, _adj. pl._ over-swift, very swift, B 4. m 5. 6.

OVER-SWIMMEN, _pr. pl._ fly through, B 5. m 5. 5.

OVERTAKE, _v._ overtake, attain to, G 682; Overtook, _1 pt. s._ caught up,
3. 360.

OVERTE, _adj._ open, HF. 718.

OVERTHROWE, _v._ be overturned, be ruined, HF. 1640; Overthrowe, _pp._
overthrown, T. iv. 385, v. 1460; ruined, B 2. m 1. 12 (Lat. _stratus_).

OVER-THROWINGE, _adj._ overwhelming, B 1. m 2. 1; headlong (Lat.
_praecipiti_), B 2. m 7. 1; headstrong (Lat. _praecipiti_), B 1. m 6. 15;
headlong, pre-inclined, B 4. p 6. 207; revolving, B 3. m 12. 26.

OVERTHROWINGE, _s._ falling down, B 2755; Overthrowinges, _pl._ destruction
(Lat. _ruinis_), B 2. m 4. 11.

OVERTHWART, _adv._ across, A. i. 5. 1; A. ii. 38. 19; A 1991; opposite, T.
iii. 685; askance, R. 292; Overthwert, across, 3. 863.

OVERTYMELICHE, _adv._ untimely, B 1. m 1. 11.

OVER-WHELVETH, _pr. s._ overturns, turns over, agitates, B 2. m 3. 13. (See
note.)

OWEN, _v._ owe, own, possess; Oweth, _pr. s._ owns, possesses, C 361;
Oweth, _pr. s. refl._ it is incumbent (on him), L 360 _a_; Owen, _1 pr.
pl._ owe, D 2106; Owen, _pr. pl._ ought, B 2. p 5. 53; Oghte, _1 pt. s._
ought, 4. 216; Oughtestow, _2 pt. s._ oughtest thou, T. v. 545; L. 1957;
Oghte, _pt. s. impers._ it were necessary, B 2188; _him oghte_, he ought,
L. 377; I 84; it became him, B 1097; _hir oghte_, became her, E 1120; _us
oughte_, it behoved us, we ought, 1. 119; _hem oghte_, they ought, G 1340;
_us oghte_ (subj.), it should behove us, we ought, E 1150; Oghte, _pt. s._
owed, L. 589, 1609; ought, 3. 678; A 505, 660, I 142; Oughten, _1 pt. pl._
G 6; Oghte, _2 pt. pl._ L. 70; Oghten, _2 pt. pl._ 4. 282; Oghten, _pt.
pl._ B 1833; Oughten, _pt. pl._ B 3567; Oghte, _pt. pl._ I 133; Owed, _pp._
due, B 4. p 5. 11. See _[=a][gh]en_ and _[=a]h_ in Stratmann. [In B 2253, I
employ the phrase _I ne owe nat_ to supply a gap, meaning 'I ought not.' A
better spelling is _ow_, as representing the A.S. _[=a]h_.]

OWENE, _adj. def._ own, C 834, D 1091, E 504, 652, G 1091; _myn owene
woman_, independent, T. ii. 750; Owne, _def._ B 1058; Owene, _dat._ B 3198,
3571; _his owne hand_, with his own hand, A 3624; Owene, _pl._ B 3584, G
1154.

OWH, _interj._ alas, B 1. p 6. 17; B 4. p 2. 1. Cf. E. _ugh!_

OWHER, _adv._ anywhere, 3. 776; L. 1540; A 653, G 858; Owhere (with _e_
added), R. 516. A.S. _[=a]hw[=ae]r_.

OWLE; see OULE.

OWNE; see OWENE.

OXE, _s._ ox, C 354; T. v. 1469; Oxes, _gen._ E 207, 291; Oxen, _pl._ A
887.

OXE-STALLE, _s._ ox-stall, E 398. (Four syllables.)

OYNEMENT, _s._ ointment, unguent, 12. 7; A 631, I 502.

OYNONS, _pl._ onions, A 634.

OYSTRES, _s. pl._ oysters, B 5. p 5. 21. See OISTRE.



PAAS, _s._ pace, step, L. 284; footpace, G 575 (see note); _goon a paas_,
go at a footpace, C 866. See PAS.

PACE, _v._ pass, go, L. 746; A 1602; pass, T. i. 371; go away, 15. 9; 21.
9; A 4409; pass away, A 175; surpass, go beyond, T. iii. 1272; walk, T. v.
1791; overstep, HF. 392; come, HF. 720; _p. of_, pass over, T. ii. 1568;
Pace, _ger._ to go, walk, T. v. 537; to go, B 1759, F 120; to pass, L.
1914; HF. 841; _of this thing to p._, to pass this over in review, HF. 239;
_to pace of_, to pass from, B 205; Pace, _1 pr. s._ pass over (it), go on,
HF. 1355; proceed, go on, A 36; _1 pr. s. subj._ depart, F 494; _2 pr. s.
subj._ go, D 911; _pr. s. subj._ may depart, E 1092; Passed, _pt. s._
surpassed, A 448; _pp._ crossed, A 464. See PASSEN.

PACIENCE, _s._ patience, A 1084, F 773; _took pacience_, kept his patience,
B 2. p 7. 93; _took in p._, took patiently, B 3155; was perfectly resigned,
4. 40.

PACIENT, _adj._ patient, T. iii. 142; A 484.

PACIENT, _s._ patient, T. i. 1090; A 415.

PACIENTLY, _adv._ patiently, 4. 21.

PAGE, _s._ page (boy), L. 2037; A 3972, B 1236, D 2178, E 1444, F 692.

PAILLET, _s._ pallet, T. iii. 229.

PAIRE, _s._ pair, A 473, 4386; set, 159; _as pl._ pairs, 5. 238. (_Pair_,
in the sense of 'set,' is applied to many things of the same size.)

PAISIBLE, _adj._ peaceable, 9. 1.

PAK, _s._ pack, set, L. 299 a.

PALAIS, _s._ palace, 1. 183; Palays, B 1. p 4. 69. See PALEYS.

PALASYE, _s._ palsy, R. 1098.

PALE, _s._ perpendicular stripe, HF. 1840. Still used in heraldry; see
note.

PALE, _adj._ pale, R. 306; A 205; T. iii. 624.

PALE, _v._; Paleth, _pr. s._ renders pale, B 2. m 3. 2.

PALESTRAL, _adj._ athletic, pertaining to wrestling, T. v. 304. From Lat.
_palaestra_.

PALEYS, _s._ palace, T. v. 540; HF. 713; L. 1096, 2406; A 2199, 2494, 2513,
E 197, F 60; mansion (in astrology), 4. 54, 145; Palais, 1. 183; Palays, B
1. p 4. 69.

PALEYS-, _or_ PALEIS-CHAUMBRES, _pl._ palace-chambers, 9. 41.

PALEYS-GARDYN, palace-garden, T. ii. 508.

PALEYS-WARD, TO, toward the palace, T. ii. 1252.

PALEYS-YATES, _pl._ gates of the palace, 4. 82.

PALFREY, _s._ palfrey, horse, A 207, 4074; L. 1116, 1198.

PALINGE, _s._ adorning with (heraldic) pales, or upright stripes, I 417.
See PALE, _s._, above.

PALIS, _s._ palisade, stockade, B 1. p 6. 28; paling, rampart, B 1. p 3. 56
(see note), p 5. 22; B 2. m 4. 12. O.F. _palis_, _paleis_; whence
_palisser_, v.

PALLED, _pp._ pale, languid, H 55. See APPALLED.

PALM, _s._ palm-tree, 5. 182; palm-branch, G 240.

PALMERS, _pl._ palmers, A 13.

PALPABLE, _adj._ capable of being felt, HF. 869.

PALUDE, _s._ marsh, B 4. m 7. 23 _n_.

PAMENT, _s._ pavement, F 1374 _n_.

PAN, _s._ brain-pan, skull, A 1165, B 3142.

PANADE, _s._ kind of knife (see note), A 3929, 3960.

PANIER, _s._ pannier, E 1568; Paniers, _pl._ panniers, baskets for bread,
HF. 1939.

PANNE, _s._ pan, A 3944, D 1614, 1623, G 1210. A.S. _panna_.

PANS, _pl._ pence, T. iii. 1375 _n_. See PENY.

PANTER, _s._ bag-net for birds, L. 131 (see note); Panteres, _pl._ nets, R.
1621. O.F. _pantiere_.

PAPEIAY (papejei), _s._ popinjay, B 1559, 1957, E 2332; Papingay
(papinjei), R. 81. Properly a parrot; applied in England to the green
wood-pecker (_Gecinus viridis_). See POPINIAY.

PAPER, _s._ account-book, A 4404; Papeer, paper, G 762; Papir, paper, T. v.
1597; I 445.

PAPER-WHYT, _adj._ white as paper, L. 1198.

PAPINGAY, _s._ popinjay, R. 81. See PAPEIAY.

PAR, by (in _par consequence_), A. ii. 38. 21. See _Per_.

_Par amour_; see PARAMOUR.

_Par cas_, by chance, C 885; _per cas_, L. 1967.

_Par companye_, for company, A 3839, 4167.

_Par dieux!_, T. ii. 759. See PARDEE.

PAR['A]BLES, _pl._ parables, D 369.

PARADYS, _s._ paradise, R. 443; 1. 155; T. iv. 864; HF. 918; L. 564, 1103;
B 2695, 3200, D 1915, F 912, I 325.

PAR['A]GE, _s._ kindred, birth, D 250; rank, D 1120. '_Parage_, famille,
parent['e], noble naissance'; Godefroy.

PARAMENTS, _pl._ mantles, splendid clothing, A 2501. '_Parement_,
_Parament_, parure, v[^e]tement, et, en particulier, habit, long et riche
manteau en forme de dalmatique que l'on posait sur l'armure dans les
grandes solennit['e]s ou dans les combats'; Godefroy. See PAREMENTS.

PARAMOUR (for _par amour_), _adv._ for love, B 2033; longingly, B 1933;
with devotion, A 1155; Paramours, passionately, T. v. 332; A 2112; with
excessive devotion, L 260 _a_ (see note); by way of passionate love, T. v.
158; _for p._, for the sake of passion, E 1450; _for paramours_, for love's
sake, A 3354. The O.F. _paramor_ or _paramors_ was used rather vaguely; we
even find, from an example in Godefroy (s.v. _Amor_), that it could be used
to mean 'if you please.'

PARAMOUR, _s._ (1) concubine, wench, D 454, 1372; Paramours, _pl._ A 3756,
3758, B 4057; lovers, paramours, T. ii. 236; Paramour (2), love-making, A
4372, 4392.

PARAUNTER, perhaps, 3. 779, 788; T. i. 619, iii. 491; L. 362. See below.

PARAVENTURE, peradventure, perhaps, 3. 556; HF. 792; B 190, D 1003, 1073, E
284, F 955. See above; and see PERAVENTURE.

PARCEL, _s._ part, F 852, I 1006; small part, 2. 106; Parcelle, A. i. 21.
51.

PARCHEMIN, _s._ parchment, B 5. m 4. 9.

PARDEE (F. _par Dieu_), a common oath, A 563, 3084, B 1977, C 240, E 1234,
F 696; L. 508; Parde, 3. 721; 5. 509, 571; L. 16; B 3974, C 672; Pardieux,
T. i. 197; Par dieux, T. ii. 759. _Dieux_ is from Lat. _Deus_, nom.;
_dieu_, from _Deum_, acc.

PARDONER, _s._ pardoner, seller of indulgences, A 543, 669; C 318;
Pardoneer, C 932.

PARDOUN, _s._ pardon, A 687, C 906; Pardon, C 927.

PAREGAL, _adj._ fully equal, T. v. 840. '_Parivel_, _Parigal_, _Paregal_,
tout [`a] fait ['e]gal'; Godefroy.

PAREMENTS, _s. pl._ rich hangings or ornaments, (applied to a chamber), L.
1106; F 269. '_Chambre de parements_, chambre de parade'; Godefroy. See
PARAMENTS.

PARENTELE, _s._ kinship, I 908. '_Parentel_, parent['e], lign['e]e,
parent'; Godefroy.

PARFEY, by my faith, in faith, HF. 938; I 497; Parfay, B 110, 849. A.F.
_par fei_.

PARFIT, _adj._ perfect, 2. 38; 5. 568; B 3. p 10. 2, 13, 16; HF. 44; A 72,
422, 532, 3072, B 2710, D 92, F 871, G 353, I 50, 107; Parf['y]t, A 338.

PARFITLY, _adv._ perfectly, R. 771; E 690; fully, I 1007; wholly, B 2381;
in a perfect way, D 111.

PARFOURNE, _v._ perform, B 2402; Parfourne, _ger._ to fulfil, B 3137, H
190; _p. up_, complete, D 2261; P['a]rfournest, _2 pr. s._ performest, B
1797; Parfourned (p['a]rfourn'd), _pt. s._ performed, completed, E 2052;
Parf['o]urned, _pp._ B 1646, C 151; completed, D 2104, E 1795; Parforme,
_imp. s._ perform, T. iii. 417. '_Parfournir_, to perform, consummate';
Cotgrave. See Perfourne.

PARFOURNINGE, _s._ performance, I 807.

PARISH-CHIRCHE, _s._ parish-church, A 3307.

PARISH-CLERK, _s._ A 3312, 3348.

PARISSHE, _s._ parish, A 449, 491.

PARISSHENS, _pl._ parishioners, A 482. '_Paroissien_, a parishioner';
Cotgrave.

PARITORIE, _s._ pellitory, _Parietaria officinalis_, G 581. 'In rural
districts an infusion of this plant is a favourite medicine'; Flowers of
the Field, by C. A. Johns. '_Paritoire_, pellitory of the wall'; Cotgrave.
From Lat. _paries_, a wall.

PARK, _s._ F 392; Parke, _dat._ park, 5. 122; Parkes, _pl._ F 1190.

PARLEMENT, _s._ (1) deliberation, decision due to consultation, A 1306; (2)
parliament, T. iv. 143, 211, 217; _p. of Briddes_, Parliament of Birds, I
1086.

PARLOUR, _s._ T. ii. 82.

PARODIE, _s._ period, duration (see note), T. v. 1548.

PARSONERES, _s. pl._ partners, partakers, B 5. p 5. 62. '_Parconier_,
_parsonier_, _parsoner_, qui participe'; Godefroy.

PART, _s._ party, side, B 1. p 3. 25; share, T. v. 1318; 6. 38; 25. 1 (see
vol. iv. p. xxvii); Parte, _dat._ A 2582.

PARTEN, _v._ share, T. i. 589; _ger._ To p. with, participate in, L. 465;
Parte, _1 pr. s._ part, depart, T. i. 5; Parteth, _pr. s._ departs, L. 359;
Parted, _pp._ dispersed, T. i. 960; gone away, taken away, L. 1110.

PARTENERS, _s. pl._ partners, partakers, I 968. (For _parceners_.) See
PARSONERES.

PARTICIPACIOUN, _s._ participation, B 3. p 10. 110.

PARTICULER, _adj._ special, E 34.

PARTIE; see PARTYE.

PARTING-FELAWES, _s. pl._ fellow-partakers, I 637.

PART-LES, _adj._ without his share, B 4. p 3. 27.

PARTRICH, _s._ partridge, A 349; Partriches, _gen. pl._ HF. 1392.

PARTY, _adv._ partly, A 1053. O.F. _parti_, pp. masc.

PARTYE, _s._ portion, A 3008; part, side, B 5. p 3. 27; partial umpire,
taker of a side, A 2657; Partie, part, A. i. 18. 7; share (Lat. _partem_),
B 1. p 3. 27; Party, part, portion, B 2. p 4. 77; portion, T. ii. 394;
part, B 17; Parties, _pl._ parts, A. pr. 19; B 2560; parties, B 2204. O. F.
_partie_, fem.

PARVYS, church-porch, A 310. '_Parvis_, the porch of a church'; Cotgrave.
See note.

PAS (paas), _s._ pace, B 399, C 164; step, D 2162; distance, R. 525;
foot-pace, A 825; grade, degree, 4. 134; grade, I 532; passage, B 2635; _a
pas_, at a footpace, T. ii. 627, v. 60; F 388; Pas, _pl._ paces, yards, A
1890; _thousand pas_, a mile, B 1. p 4. 173; movements, B 306; degrees, 4.
121. See PAAS.

PASSAGE, _s._ way, R. 502; stage, period, R. 406.

PASSANT, _pres. pt. as adj._ surpassing, A 2107. See below.

PASSEN, _ger._ to surpass, exceed, conquer, A 3089; _v._ surpass, L. 1127;
overcome, L. 162; outdo, G 857; pass away, B 2. p 1. 55; Passe, _v._
surpass, B 4501; Passe of, _1 pr. s._ pass by, F 288; Passeth, _pr. s._
passes away, F 404; exceeds, A. ii. 42. 15; surpasses, L. 275; Passen, _pr.
pl._ move over, B 5. m 5. 1; Passed, _pt. s._ surpassed, A 448; Paste, _pt.
s._ passed, T. ii. 658; passed by, T. ii. 398; Passing, _pres. pt._
surpassing, A 2885, E 240; Passed, _pp._ past, spent, E 610; past, T. i.
24; surpassed, 7. 82; passed by, 5. 81; overblown, gone off, R. 1682. See
PACE. And see below.

PASSING, _adj._ surpassing, excellent, F 929, G 614; extreme, E 1225. See
above.

PASSIOUN, _s._ suffering, 16. 4; B 1175; passion, 1. 162; passive feeling,
B 5. p 5. 5; passive feeling, impression, B 5. m 4. 32.

PASTEE, _s._ pasty, A 4346.

PASTURE, _s._ B 3123, E 1313, I 792.

PATENTE, _s._ patent, A 315, C 337. A letter of privilege, so called
because _open_ to all men's inspection.

PATERNOSTER, the Lord's prayer, A 3485; (the devil's), I 507; _as interj._
i.e. say a paternoster, A 3638.

PATH, _s._ B 3. p 2. 60; T. ii. 37; L. 2463; Pathes, _pl._ A. pr. 28; I 77.

PATRIARKES, _pl._ patriarchs, C 343.

PATRIMOINE, _s._ patrimony, I 790.

PATROUN, _s._ patron, 4. 275; protector, 7. 4; Patron, pattern, 3. 910. F.
_patron_, 'a patron, ... also a pattern'; Cot.

PAUNCHE, _s._ paunch, belly, 5. 610.

PAVE, _v._ pave, G 626; Paved, _pp._ R. 126; T. ii. 82.

PAV[:E]MENT, _s._ B 85, 1867, D 2104; (pav'ment), F 1374.

PAWES, _s. pl._ paws, HF. 541.

PAWMES, _pl._ palms (of the hand), T. iii. 1114.

PAX, _s._ the 'osculatorium,' or 'pax-brede,' a disk of metal or other
substance, used at Mass for the 'kiss of peace,' I 407.

PAY, _s._ pleasure, 5. 271; 18. 70; _more to pay_, so as to give more
satisfaction, 5. 474. See below.

PAYE, _v._ pay, A 806; Payed, _pt. s._ A 539; _pp._ satisfied, pleased, 9.
3; _holde her payd_, think herself satisfied, 3. 269; Payed, rendered
favourable, T. ii. 682; Payd, satisfied, D 1185.

PAYEMENT, _s._ payment, D 131; Payements, _pl._ B 3151.

PAYEN, _adj._ pagan, A 2370.

PAYENS, _s. pl._ pagans, L. 786, 1688; T. v. 1849; A. ii. 4. 37; B 534.

PAYNDEMAYN, _s._ bread of a peculiar whiteness, B 1915. See note. From Lat.
_panis Dominicus_.

PAYNE, _s._ pain; _dide his payne_, took pains, F 730. See PEYNE.

PAYRE, _s._ a pair, R. 1386; 3. 1289; Paire, _pl._ pairs, R. 1698; Payr,
_pl._ R. 66. See PEYRE.

PECE, _s._ piece, 5. 149; Peces, _pl._ parts, B 5. p 4. 114; pieces, T. i.
833; I 356.

PECHES, _pl._ peaches, R. 1374.

PECOK, _s._ peacock, 5. 356; T. i. 210; A 3926.

PECOK-ARWES, _pl._ arrows with peacocks' feathers, A 104.

PECUNIAL, _adj._ pecuniary, D 1314.

PEER (p['e]['e]r), _s._ equal, A 4026, B 1930, 4040. See PERE.

PEES (p[`e][`e]s), _s._ peace, 1. 69; 3. 615; A 532, 1447, B 130, 2479,
3524, 3826, G 44; _in p._, in silence, B 228.

PEES (p[`e][`e]s), peace! hush! be still! T. i. 753, B 836, D 838, 850, G
951.

PEKKE, _s._ peck (quarter of a bushel), A 4010.

PEKKE, _imp. s._ peck, pick, B 4157.

PEL, _s._ peel, small castle, HF. 1310. Lowland Sc. _peil_; O.F. _pel_;
from Lat. acc. _p[=a]lum_.

PELET, _s._ pellet, stone cannon-ball, HF. 1643. See Gloss. to P. Plowman.

PENAUNCE, _s._ penance, A 223, F 942, I 104; sorrow, 7. 347; suffering,
grief, torment, 1. 82; A 1315, F 740; trouble, 18. 79; self-abasement, L.
2077; pain, 12. 14; weakness (of sight), 10. 36; Penance, L. 479; I 103;
Penaunces, _pl._ miseries, T. i. 201.

PENAUNT, _s._ a penitent, one who does penance, B 3124. O.F. _peneant_,
_penant_, penitent; Godefroy.

PENCEL (1), _s._ pencil, brush, A 2049. O.F. _pincel_, F. _pinceau_.

PENCEL (2), _s._ small banner, sleeve worn as a token. Short for
_penoncel_. See PENOUN.

P['E]NIBLE, _adj._ painstaking, B 3490; Pen['i]ble, painstaking, careful to
please, E 714; Pen['y]ble, inured, D 1846. O.F. _penible_, 'en parlant des
personnes, dur [`a] la peine, infatigable'; Godefroy. '_Penible_, painful,
laborious'; Cotgrave.

PENITAUNCER, _s._ confessor who assigns a penance, I 1008.

PENITENCE, _s._ 1. 120; penance, I 101, 126; repentance, I 107, 109.

PENITENT, _adj._ 1. 147.

PENITENT, _s._ 1. 61; Penitents, _pl._ 1. 184.

PENNE, _s._ pen, quill, T. iv. 13; L. 2357, 2491, E 1736. '_Penne_, a
quill'; Cotgrave.

PENNER, _s._ pen-case, E 1879.

PENOUN, _s._ pennon, ensign or small flag borne at the end of a lance, A
978. O.F. _penon_.

PENS; see PENY.

PENSIF, _adj._ pensive, F 914 _n_.

PENY, _s._ penny, R. 451; D 1575, F 1616; money, A 4119; Penyes, _pl._
pence, R. 189; Pens, _pl._ pence, T. iii. 1375, C 376, D 1573, 1599.

PENYBLE; see PENIBLE.

PEPLE, _s._ people, C 260; Peples, _gen. sing._ E 412; Peples, _pl._
nations, 9. 2; people, A 2513; Peples, _gen. pl._ of the nations, 7. 52.

_Per cas_, by chance, L. 1967; _par cas_, C 885.

_Per consequens_, consequently, D 2192; _par c._, A. ii. 38. 21.

PERAVENTURE, _adv._ perhaps, HF. 304; C 935, H 71, I 105. See PARAVENTURE.

PERCEN, _v._ pierce, B 2014, F 237; Perce, _v._ E 1204; Perceth, _pr. s._
pierces with his gaze, 5. 331; Percen, _pr. pl._ G 111; Perced, _pt. s._
pierced, T. i. 272; _pp._ A. i. 3. 1, 13. 2; A 2, B 1745.

PERCHAUNCE, _adv._ by chance, hence, probably, doubtless, A 475.

PERCHE, _s._ perch (for birds to rest on), A 2204, B 4074; wooden bar (as
of a clothes-horse), R. 225; a rod placed high up in a horizontal position,
A. ii. 23. 27. Lat. _pertica_.

PERCHED, _pp._ perched, HF. 1991.

PERCHER, _s._ mortar, T. iv. 1245 _n_. (A kind of large wax-candle; see
Nares and Halliwell.)

PERCINGE, _s._ piercing; for percinge = to prevent any piercing, B 2052.

PERDURABLE, _adj._ imperishable, B 1. p 1. 15; everlasting, eternal, B 1. m
5. 2; B 3. m 9. 2; B 2699, I 75, 119, 124; Perdurables, _adj. pl._
everlasting, I 811.

PERDURABLETEE, _s._ immortality, B 2. p 7. 63, 73.

PERDURABLY, _adv._ permanently, B 3. p 6. 23; eternally, B 5. p 4. 117.

PERE (p['e]['e]r[*e]), _s._ peer, equal, 1. 97; 19. 11; R. 1300; T. v.
1803; B 3244, F 678. See PEER.

PEREGRYN, _adj._ peregrine, i.e. foreign, F 428. Lat. _peregrinus_.

PERE-IONETTE (peer-jonett[*e]), _s._ a kind of early-ripe pear, A 3248. See
note.

PERES, _pl._ pears, R. 1375, E 2331.

PERFECCIOUN, _s._ B 2709.

PERFIT, _adj._ perfect, complete, A. i. 18. 2. See PARFIT.

PERFITLY, _adv._ perfectly, A. pr. 14. See PARFITLY.

PERFOURNE, _ger._ to perform, B 2256; Performe, _v._ achieve, B 3. p 2. 64;
shew, be equivalent to, A. ii. 10. 10; Perfourmed, _pp._ performed, R.
1178; Performed, L. 2138. See PARFOURNE.

PERIL, _s._ T. ii. 606, B 2672; _in p._, in danger, 4. 108; _upon my p._,
(I say it) at my peril, D 561.

PERILOUS, _adj._ dangerous, 1. 7; 4. 199; A 3961, B 1999, 3109;
Per['i]lous, 2. 83.

PERISSE, _v._ perish, I 254; _pr. pl._ C 99.

PERLE, _s._ pearl, L. 221; Perles, _pl._ B 3. m 8. 10; A 2161, B 3658, D
345.

PERLED, _pp._ fitted with pearl-like drops, A 3251.

PERMUTACIOUN, _s._ change, 15. 19; T. v. 1541.

PERPENDICULER, _adj._ perpendicular, A. ii. 23. 3.

PERPETUEL, _adj._ perpetual, I 137.

PERPETUELY, perpetually, 4. 20; T. iii. 1754; permanently, B 3. p 5. 3;
Perpetuelly, A 1024, 1342.

PERR['E]['E], _s._ jewellery, precious stones, gems, B 3495, 3550, 3556, D
344; Perr['e], HF. 124; L. 1201. (Variant of Perrye.)

PERR['Y][:E], _s._ jewellery, A 2936; Perrie, HF. 1393. O.F. _pierrie_,
short form of _pierrerie_: Godefroy.

PERS, _adj._ of Persian dye, light-blue, R. 67. '_Pers_, skie-coloured':
Cotgrave.

PERS, _s._ stuff of a sky-blue colour, A 439, 617. 'Robes de _pers_,' Rom.
de la Rose, 9118.

PERSECUCION, _s._ persecution, D 1909.

PERS['E]VERAUNCE, _s._ endurance, T. i. 44; constancy, 3. 1007; 24. 8 (see
vol. iv. p. xxvi); continuance, G 443.

PERS['E]VERE, _v._ continue, D 148; Pers['e]vereth, _pr. s._ lasts, C 497;
Pers['e]vere, _imp. s._ continue, T. i. 958.

PERS['E]VERINGE, _s._ perseverance, G 117.

PERSLY, _s._ parsley, A 4350.

PERS['O]NE, _s._ person, figure, T. ii. 701; person, D 1161, E 73;
P['e]rsone, A 521; P['e]rsoun, parson, A 478; Person, parson, A 3943, 3977,
I 23; P['e]rsone, B 1170.

PERSUASIOUN, _s._ persuasion, belief, HF. 872.

PERT, _adj._ forward, frisky, A 3950. Short for _apert_.

PERTINACIE, _s._ pertinaciousness, I 391.

PERTINENT, _adj._ fitting, B 2204.

PERTOURBE, _ger._ to perturb, T. iv. 561; Perturben, _2 pr. pl._ disturb, A
906.

PERTURBACIOUN, _s._ trouble, B 1. p 1. 62; Perturbaciouns, _pl._ B 1. p 5.
51.

PERTURBINGE, _s._ perturbation, D 2254.

PERVENKE, _s._ periwinkle, R. 903; Pervinke, R. 1432. '_Pervenche_,
periwinkle, or peruinckle': Cotgrave.

PERVERS, _adj._ perverse, self-willed, 3. 813.

PERVERTEN, _v._ pervert, B 2379.

PERVINKE, _s._ periwinkle, R. 1432. See PERVENKE.

PESEN, _pl._ peas, L. 648. A.S. _piosan_, pl. of _piose_.

PESIBLE, _adj._ calm (lit. peaceable), B 1. p 5. 2. See PEYSIBLE.

PESTILENCE, _s._ the (great) pestilence, A 442, C 679; pestilence, 16. 14;
harm, C 91; plague, curse, B 4600, D 1264; mischief, plague, B 4. m 3. 15.

PETER, _interj._ by St. Peter, B 1404, G 665 (see note); HF. 1034.

PETICIOUNS, _pl._ petitions, L. 363 a.

PEYNE, _s._ pain of torture, A 1133; T. i. 674; _in the p._, under torture,
T. iii. 1502; pain, grief, distress, torment, 3. 587; 4. 96; 11. 23, B
2134, F 737, 1318, I 86; trouble, care, F 509; toil, G 1398; penalty, B 4.
p 1. 38; B 3041, D 1314, H 86; endeavour, R. 765; penance, B 2939, I 109;
Peynes, _gen._ F 480; _upon p._, under a penalty, E 586; Peynes, _pl._
penalties, I 837; pains, 23. 2, 11; I 132. See PAYNE.

PEYNE, _v. refl._ take pains, endeavour, B 4495; put (myself) to trouble,
HF. 246; Peyne, _1 pr. s. refl._ take pains, C 330, 395; Peynest thee, HF.
627; Peyneth, _pr. s. refl._ takes pains, endeavours, 5. 339; T. v. 1524; B
320; Peynen, _pr. pl. refl._ endeavour, L. 636; Peyned hir, _pt. s. refl._
took pains, A 139, E 976; Peyned hem, _pt. pl. refl._ R. 107; Peyne thee,
_imp. s._ take pains, endeavour, 13. 8 _n_.

PEYNTE, _v._ paint, 3. 783; T. ii. 1041; C 12, I 1022; colour highly, HF.
246; smear, L. 875; _ger._ C 17; _do p._, cause to be painted, 3. 259;
Peynte, _pr. pl._ paint, F 725; _pr. s. subj._ C 15; Peynted[`e], _pt. s._
D 692; Peynted, _pt. s._ F 560; Peynted, _pp._ painted, L. 1029, 2536; 5.
284; A 1934, F 907; highly coloured, T. ii. 424; Peynt, _pp._ R. 248, 1436.

PEYNTING, _s._ painting, R. 210.

PEYNTOUR, _s._ painter, T. ii. 1041.

PEYNTURE, _s._ painting, C 33; Peyntures, _pl._ R. 142.

PEYRE, _s._ pair, A 2121; a set (of similar things), A. ii. 40. 18; D 1741;
Payre, R. 1386; 3. 1289; Paire, _pl._ pairs, R. 1698.

PEYSIBLE, _adj._ tranquil, B 3. m 9. 33 (L. _tranquilla_); Pesible, calm, B
1. p 5. 2.

PEYTREL, _s._ poitrel, breast-piece of a horse's harness; properly, the
breast-plate of a horse in armour, G 564; Peytrels, _pl._ I 433. A.F.
_peitrel_, O.F. _poitrel_, Lat. _pectorale_.

PHISICIEN, _s._ physician, doctor, 3. 39, 571. (Pron. f['i]zish['e]n.)

PH['I]SIK, physic, A 413; Phis['y]k, A 411, B 4028; T. ii. 1038.

PHILOS['O]PHICAL, _adj._ fond of philosophy, T. v. 1857.

PH['I]LOS['O]PHRE, _s._ philosopher, didactic writer, A 297, B 25, F 1561,
G 490; B 2. p 7. 89; L. 381; Philos['o]phres, _pl._ G 1427.

PHILOSOPHYE, _s._ philosophy, L. 1898; A 295, 645.

PHISLIAS (Phislyas, Phillyas), _error for_ Physices, B 1189 _n_.

PHITONESSES, _pl._ pythonesses, witches, HF. 1261. See note.

[PHYSICES, _gen._ of physics, _or_ natural philosophy, B 1189. Lat.
_physices_, gen. of _physic[=e]_, natural philosophy; see note.]

PICH, _s._ pitch, A 3731, I 854.

PIECES, _for_ Peces, B 1326 _n_.

PI[:E]TEE, _s._ pity, T. iii. 1033, v. 1598.

PI[:E]TOUS, _adj._ piteous, sad, T. iii. 1444; sorrowful, T. v. 451;
pitiful, F 20 _n_. Cf. Ital. _pietoso_.

PIGGES, _gen._ pig's, D 1841; _pl._ pigs, A 4278; _gen. pl._ A 700.

PIGGES-NYE (lit. pig's eye), a dear little thing, A 3268. See note.

PIGHTE, _pt. s. refl._ pitched, fell, A 2689; _pt. s. subj._ should pierce,
should stab, 1. 163 (but this is almost certainly an error for _prighte_,
pt. s. subj. of _prikke_. There is absolutely no authority for assigning to
_pighte_ the sense of 'piercing,' beyond a similar error (in several MSS.)
in F 418). See PRIKEN.

PIKEN, _v._ pick; Piked, _pt. s._ picked, stole, L. 2467.

PIKEREL, _s._ a young pike (fish), E 1419. See Prompt. Parv.

PILCHE, _s._ a warm furred outer garment, 20. 4. A.S. _pylce_; from Lat.
_pellicea_, made of fur.

PILE, _ger._ to pillage, plunder, I 769; _v._ rob, despoil, D 1362; Pilen,
_pr. pl._ plunder, pillage, I 767. See PILED, PILLED; cf. E _peel_,
_pillage_.

PILED, _pp._ deprived of hair, very thin, A 627; bare, bald (lit. peeled),
A 3935.

PILEER (pil['e]['e]r), _s._ pillar, HF. 1421, 1443, 1465; P['i]ler, HF.
1428, 1430, 1457, 1486, 1491, 1497, 1507; B 3308; Pil['e]r, pillar, column,
A 1993, 2466; Pil['e]re, 3. 739; P['i]ler, _as adj._ serving as a prop, 5.
177; Pilers, _pl._ 5. 230; B 3274. O.F. _piler_.

PILGRIM, _s._ 13. 18; T. v. 1577; A 4349; Pilgrims, _pl._ A 26;
P['i]lgrimes, A 2848; Pilgr['y]mes, HF. 2122.

PILGRIM['A]GE, _s._ pilgrimage, A 21, 78, B 1424; Pilgrimages, _pl._ A 12,
D 557, I 105.

PILLED, _pp._ robbed, L. 1262. See PILE.

PILOURS, _pl._ robbers, spoilers, pillagers, A 1007, 1020, I 769. See PILE.

PILWE, _s._ pillow, E 2004; Pilowe, T. v. 224; Pilow, 3. 254; Pilwes, _pl._
T. iii. 444.

PILWE-BEER, _s._ pillow-case, A 694. See BERE, and see note.

PIMENT, _s._ sweetened wine (see note), B 2. m 5. 6; A 3378.

PIN, _s._ pin, small peg, F 127, 316; fastening, brooch, A 196; thin wire,
A. ii. 38. 5; Pinnes, _pl._ pins, _or_ brooches, A 234; Hangeth on a ioly
pin, is in a merry place, is merry, E 1516. See PYN.

PINACLES, _pl._ pinnacles, HF. 124, 1189.

PINCHE, _v._ find fault (with), pick a hole (in), A 326; Pinchen, _ger._ to
find fault, H 74; Pinchest at, _2 pr. s._ blamest, 10. 57; Pinched, _pp._
closely pleated, A 151.

PIPER, _s. as adj._ suitable for pipes or horns, 5. 178.

PIRRY, _for_ Pyrie, E 2217 _n_.

PISSE, _s._ piss, D 729, G 807.

PISSE, _ger._ to make water, A 3798, 4215; Pissed, _pp._ D 534.

PISSEMYRE, _s._ pismire, ant, D 1825.

PISTEL, _s._ epistle, E 1154; _hence_ message, sentence, D 1021.

PIT, _s._ pit, L. 678, 697; Pittes, _gen._ of the grave, E 1401. See PUT.

PIT, _pp._ put (Northern), A 4088.

PITAUNCE, _s._ pittance, A 224. Properly, an additional allowance served
out to the inmates of religious houses at festivals; hence an allowance.

PITEE, _s._ pity, I. 68; B 292, 660, 2811, 3231, F 479; Pit['e], 2. 1; 5.
10, 22; Pite were, it would be a pity (if), 3. 1266.

PITH, _s._ strength, R. 401; D 475.

PIT['O]US, P['I]TOUS, _adj._ compassionate, A 143, F 20; merciful, B 4. p
4. 189; T. i. 113; C 226; pitiful, 1. 88; A 953; plaintive, R. 89, 497;
mournful, R. 420; piteous, sad, sorrowful, 3. 84, 470; 7. 9; A 955, B 449,
2140, 3567, C 166, E 1121, I 1039; pitiable, B 3673; Pitous[:e], _fem._
full of compassion, L. 2582 (cf. Dispitous[:e], _fem._ 3. 264). See
PIETOUS.

PITOUSLY, _adv._ piteously, 3. 711; B 1059, C 298, F 863; pitiably, B 3729,
D 202, F 414, 461; sadly, A 1117; full of pity, 2. 18.

PLACE, _s._ place, 3. 806; A 623, 800; manor-house (residence of a chief
person in a small town or village), B 1910, D 1768. See note to B 1910.

_Placebo_, vespers of the dead, so called from the initial word of the
antiphon to the first psalm of the office (see Ps. cxiv. 9 in the Vulgate
version), I 617; a song of flattery, D 2075.

PLAGES, _s. pl._ regions, B 543; quarters of the compass, A. i. 5. 8, ii.
31. 11. Lat. _plaga_.

PLAIN, _adj._; see PLAYN.

PLAIN, _adv._ plainly, clearly, B 990; Plein, B 886. See PLAYN.

PLANE, _s._ plane-tree, A 2922; Planes, _pl._ R. 1384.

PLANE, _v._; Planed, _pt. s._ planed, made smooth, D 1758.

PLANETE (plan['e]te, pl['a]net), _s._ planet, 3. 693, 823; T. iii. 1257; A.
ii. 4. 9; Planetes, _pl._ A. pr. 77. The seven planets are the Moon,
Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn.

PLANTAIN, _s._ G 581.

PLANTE, _s._ slip, cutting, D 763; piece of cut wood, R. 929. See PLAUNTE.

PLASTRES, _s. pl._ plaisters, or plasters, F 636.

PLAT, _adj._ flat, certain, A 1845; Platte, _dat._ flat (side of a sword),
F 162, 164. F. _plat_.

PLAT, _adv._ flat, B 1865; flatly, straight out, bluntly, T. i. 681; B 886,
3947, C 648; fully, T. ii. 579. See PLATLY.

PLATE, _s._ plate-armour, 9. 49; stiff iron defence for a hauberk, B 2055;
the 'sight' on the 'rewle,' A. i. 13. 2; Plates, _pl._ iron plates for
defensive armour, A 2121.

PLATED, _pp._ plated, covered with metal in plates, HF. 1345.

PLATLY, _adv._ flatly, plainly, T. iii. 786, 881, iv. 924; I 485. See PLAT.

PLAUNTE, _s._ plant, T. iv. 767; F 1032; Plante, slip, cutting, D 763;
piece of cut wood, R. 929.

PLAUNTE, _imp. s._ plant, T. i. 964; Plaunted, _pp._ B 1. p 4. 182.

PLAY, _s._ play, amusement, 3. 50; Playes, _pl._ contrivances (see note),
3. 570. See PLEY.

PLAYEN ME, _v. refl._ to play, amuse myself, R. 113. See PLEYE.

PLAYING, _s._ sport, R. 112.

PLAYN, _adj._ smooth, even, R. 860; _in short and pl._, in brief, plain
terms, E 577; Plain, flat, even with the ground, H 229.

PLAYN, _s._ plain, B 24, F 1198; Playne (_for_ Playn, _before a vowel_), E
59; Playnes, _pl._ plains, R. 1506.

PLEDE, _ger._ to dispute, B 2559. See PLETE.

PLEDING, _s._ pleading, 3. 615; 5. 495; Pledinge, I 166. See PLETING.

PLEDOURES, _pl._ pleaders, lawyers, R. 198.

PLEE, _s._ plea, pleading, 5. 485; Plees, _pl._ suits, 5. 101.

PLEGGES, _s. pl._ pledges, B 3018.

PLEIN; see PLEYN.

PLEINEDEST, _2 pt. s._ didst complain, B 4. p 4. 112. See PLEYNE.

PLEINNESSE, _s._ flatness, plain surface, B 5. m 4. 12.

PLEINTE, _s._ complaint, lament, B 66; Pleintes, _pl._ B 1068.

PLEN['E]RE, _adj._ plenary, full, L. 1607. O.F. _plenier_, _plener_:
Godefroy.

PLENTEE, _s._ (plent['e]['e], pl['e]nt[=e]), plenitude, fulness, B 5. p 6.
29; I 1080; abundance, R. 1434; E 264, F 300; _gret pl._, in great
abundance, B 3665; Plente, R 1429.

PLENTEVOUS, _adj._ plentiful, A 344; plenteous, B 1. p 1. 40; B 2. p 1. 78;
Plentevouse (_for_ Plentevous, _before a vowel_), B 1. m 2. 17; Plentivous,
_adj._ fruitful, B 3. m 1. 1. '_Plentivos_, _plentevous_, habondant,
fertile, riche': Godefroy.

PLENTEVOUSLY, _adv._ plenteously, B 2. p 2. 56; Plentivousely, fully, B 1.
p 5. 38.

PLESAUNCE, _s._ pleasure, 12. 22; 18. 1; L. 1446, 1769, 1770; C 219, D 408,
F 1199, I 546; good pleasure, B 5. p 6. 34; delight, 3. 767; 4. 46; 5. 676;
T. iii. 4; A 2409; (personified), 5. 218; 6. 30; pleasant thing, 3. 773; 4.
238; pleasure, will, A 1571, E 501, 658, 663, 672, 959, 964; kindness, E
1111; pleasing behaviour, F 509; pleasantness, L. 1373; happiness, L. 1150;
amusement, F 713; Plesance, pleasure, delight, 3. 704; D 1232; will,
delight, B 149, 276, 762, 1140. O.F. _plaisance_.

PLESAUNT, _adj._ pleasant, satisfactory, pleasing, A 138, 222, 254, B.
2909; agreeable, R. 1264.

PLESEN, _v._ please, A 610, F 707; Plese, _v._ 5. 478; F. 1186.

PLESINGES, _adj. pl._ pleasing, B 711.

PLESURE, _s._ pleasure, 6. 126.

PLETEN, _v._ plead, argue, reason, B 2. p 2. 1; Pl[`e]te, _ger._ to plead,
bring a law-suit, T. ii. 1468. See PLEDE.

PLETING, _s._ pleading, argument, 5. 495 _n_; Pletinges, _pl._ law-suits, B
3. p 3. 49. See above, and see PLEDING.

PLEY, _s._ play, sport, 5. 193; A 1125, 4357, E 10, 11, 1030, I 644;
dalliance, 4. 178; jesting, I 539; delusion, 3. 648; Play, amusement, 3.
50; Pleyes, _pl._ games, T. v. 304; plays, D 558; funeral games, T. v.
1499; Playes, contrivances, 3. 570.

PLEYE, _v._ amuse oneself, B 3524, 3666; _hence_ use, apply, A. ii. 40. 54;
Pleye, _ger._ to play, be playful, be amused, A 772; to amuse (myself), HF.
2132; B 3996; to amuse (ourselves), L. 1495; to amuse (herself), take a
holiday, L. 2300; to amuse (himself), B 2158; Pleyen, _v._ to play, A 758;
play (on an instrument), A 236; _ger._ to amuse (themselves), F 897; Pleye,
_1 pr. s._ jest, B 3153; _1 pr. pl._ play, B 1423; Pleyen, _pr. pl._ F 900;
Pleye, _pr. pl._ amuse (themselves), F 905; Pleyde, _pt. s._ played,
rejoiced, T. i. 1013; was in play, 3. 875; Pleyd, _pp._ 3. 618; Pleying,
_pres. part._ amusing (myself), R. 1329; amusing (herself), F 410. See
PLAYEN.

PLEYING, _s._ amusement, sport, R. 133, 341, 598; 3. 605; Pleyinge, A 1061.

PLEYINGE, _adj._ cheery, playful, B 3. m 2. 17.

PLEYN (1), _adj._ full, 1. 13; 5. 126; A 2461, G 346; full, complete, A
315, 337. F. _plein_, Lat. _pl[=e]nus_.

PLEYN (2), _adj._ plain, clear, L. 328; B 324, F 720; plain, honest, 5.
528; 7. 87, 116, 278; plain, i.e. open, A 987; _as s._ plain (fact), A
1091; Pleyne, _pl._ smooth, 5. 180. F. _plain_, L. _pl[=a]nus_.

PLEYN (1), _adv._ full, T. v. 1818; fully, entirely, A. 327.

PLEYN (2), _adv._ plainly, R. 295; A 790, B 3947, E 19, G 360; openly, E
637; Plein, clearly, B 886.

PLEYNE, _v._ complain, lament, 2. 108; 4. 156; 11. 15; B 1067, C 512, D
387, I 84; L. 93, 1236; _refl._ 6. 50; D 336; _v._ to whinny (as a horse),
7. 157; _ger._ 4. 286; 5. 179; R. 1472; _pl. upon_, cry out against, L.
2525; Pleyne, _1 pr. s._ make complaint, L. 2512; C 167; Pleyneth, _pr. s._
laments, F 819; complains, 4. 158; A 4114; Pleyne, _1 pr. pl. subj._ E 97;
Pleynen, _pr. pl._ complain, A 1251; Pleyned, _pp._ said by way of
complaint, L. 326 _a_; Pleyne, _imp. s._ complain, B 2. p 1. 45, p 8. 31;
_imp. pl._ L. 222 a. F. _plaindre_.

PLEYNING, _s._ complaining, lamenting, 3. 599; Pleyninge, I 84; Pleyninges,
_pl._ laments, B 2. p 2. 4.

PLEYNLY, _adv._ plainly, openly (_or_, fully), A 1733; plainly, L. 64; A
727.

PLEYNTE, _s._ plaint, complaint, 2. 47; Pleynt (_for_ Pleynte, _before_
hath), F 1029; Pl. of Kynde, Complaint of Nature, 5. 316. O.F. _plainte_.

PLIGHTE (1), _pt. s._ plucked, drew, T. ii. 1120; pulled, B 15; Plight,
_pp._ plucked, torn, D 790. The infin. would be _plicchen_, variant of
_plukkien_ (A.S. _pluccian_) or _plukken_; cf. _shrighte_, _prighte_,
_twighte_ (all in Chaucer).

PLIGHTE (2), _1 pr. s._ plight, pledge, F 1537; Plighte, _pt. s._ L. 2466;
D 1051; Plighten, _pt. pl._ L. 778; Plight, _pp._ plighted, pledged, 7.
227; T. iv. 1610; C 702; Plighte, _imp. s._ D 1009. A.S. _plihtan_.

PLOMET, _s._ plummet, heavy weight, A. ii. 23. 26.

PLOM-REWLE, _s._ plummet-rule, A. ii. 38. 6.

PLOUGH, _s._ 9. 9; A 887; Plogh, B 1478.

PLOUGH-HARNEYS, _s._ harness for a plough, i.e. parts of a plough, as the
share and coulter, A 3762.

PLOUMES, _s. pl._ plums, R. 1375.

PLOUNGEN, _ger._ to plunge, bathe, B 2. p 2. 29; Plounged, _pp._ B 1. p 1.
55.

PLOUNGY, _adj._ stormy, rainy, B 1. m 3. 6; B 3. m 1. 6.

PLOWMAN, _s._ ploughman, A 529, E 799.

PLUKKE, _v._ pluck, pull, T. iv. 1403.

PLUMAGE, _s._ plumage, F 426.

PLYE, _v._ ply, mould, E 1430; bend, E 1169; _pr. pl._ T. i. 732.

PLYGHT, _pp._ plighted, T. iii. 782. See PLIGHTE (2).

PLYT, _s._ plight, T. ii. 712, 1731, 1738; iii. 246, 1039, 1139; condition,
B 2338, I 762; position, T. ii. 74; Plyte, _dat._ mishap, wretched
condition, 5. 294; 7. 297; plight, 23. 19; state, G 952; Plyt, _dat._
condition, E 2335. The mod. E. _plight_ is misspelt; cf. O.F. _ploit_.

PLYTE, _ger._ to fold, T. ii. 1204; Plyted, _pt. s._ folded, turned
backwards and forwards, T. ii. 697.

POCOK, _s._ peacock, A 104 (Harl. MS.). See PECOK. A.S. _p[=a]_.

POEPLE, _s._ populace, ignorant folk, B 4. m 5. 23. See PEPLE.

POEPLISH, popular, T. iv. 1677.

POESYE, _s._ poetry, T. v. 1790.

POETICAL, HF. 1094.

POETRYE, _s._ poetry, T. v. 1855; HF. 858; E 33; Poetryes, _pl._ poems, HF.
1478; F 206.

POETS, _pl._ 3. 54.

POINANT, _adj._ poignant, I 130, 131, 132.

POINT, POYNT, _s._ point, A 114, 790; L. 1630; position, I 921; Pointe,
_dat._ place, 3. 660; _in point_, on the point of, about to, 3. 13; HF.
2018; B 331, 910; _at point_, ready, T. iv. 1638; _in good p._, in good
case, B 2. p 4. 19; A 200; _fro p. to p._, from beginning to end, B 3652;
_p. for p._, in every detail, E 577. See POYNT.

POINT-DEVYS, _at p._, with great neatness, exactly, carefully, HF. 917; A
3689, F 560.

POINTEL, _s._ style, i.e. stylus, writing implement, B 1. p 1. 2; B 5. m 4.
11; Poyntel, D 1742.

POISON, _s._ L. 2180; B 3857; Poysoun, 9. 64.

POKE, _s._ bag, A 3780, 4278.

POKED, _pt. s._ incited, T. iii. 116; poked, nudged, A 4169.

POKETS, _s. pl._ pockets, i.e. little bags, G 808.

POKKES, _s. pl._ pocks, pustules, C 358. A.S. _poc_; Du. _pok_, a pock,
pustule. _Small pox_ is a corrupt form of 'the small pocks.'

POL (1), _s._ pole, long stick; Pole, _dat._ L. 2202.

POL (2), _s._ pole (of the heavens), A. i. 14. 6; Pool, A. i. 18. 13; B 4.
m 5. 3.

POLAX, _s._ pole-axe, L. 642; Pollax, A 2544.

POLCAT, _s._ polecat, C 855.

POLICYE, _s._ public business, C 600.

POLISHED, _pp._ E 1582; Polisshed, D 1742.

POLLAX, _s._ pole-axe, A 2544; Polax, L. 642.

POLLUCIOUN, _s._ pollution, I 912.

POLUT, _pp._ polluted, B 1. p 4. 180.

POL['Y]VE, _s._ pulley, F 184. Cf. F. _poulie_.

POMEL, _s._ round part, top, A 2689.

POMELY, _adj._ marked with round spots like an apple, dappled, A 616;
Pomely-gris, dapple-gray, G 559. Cotgrave has '_Gris pommel['e]_, a dapple
gray.' Also '_Pommel['e]_, daple, or dapled; also round, or plump, as an
apple.' Also '_Pommeler_, to grow round or plump like an apple; also, to
daple.'

POMGARNETTES, _s. pl._ pomegranates, R. 1356.

POMPE, _s._ pomp, A 525; T. iv. 1670.

POMPOUS, _adj._ stately, magnificent, B 3745.

POOL, _s._ pole (of the heavens), B 4. m 5. 3; A. i. 18. 13; Pol, A. 1. 14.
6.

POPE, _s._ pope, A 261, E 741, I 773; 3. 929; Popes, _gen._ E 746; _pl._ B
2039.

POPE-HOLY, i.e. Hypocrisy, R. 415.

POPELOTE, _s._ poppet, darling, A 3254. Cf. O.F. _poupelet_, 'petit
poupon': Godefroy.

POPET, _s._ poppet, puppet, doll; spoken ironically, and therefore really
applied to a corpulent person, B 1891.

POPINIAY, _s._ popinjay, R. 913; 5. 359; B 1559 _n_. See PAPEIAY.

POPL['E]R, _s._ poplar-tree, A 2921; (collectively) poplar-trees, R. 1385.

POPLEXYE, _s._ apoplexy, B 4031 _n_.

POPPED, _pt. s. refl._ tricked herself out, R. 1019. '_Poupiner_,
_popiner_, s'attifer, se parer': Godefroy.

POPPER, _s._ small dagger, A 3931 (see note).

PORAILLE, _s._ poor people, A 247. O.F. _povraille_: Godefroy.

PORCHE, _s._ Porch, B 5. m 4. 1.

PORE, _adj._ poor, L. 388, 390, 1981; D 109, 1063. _For_ Povre, q. v.

PORPH['U]RIE, _s._ porphyry; i.e. a slab of porphyry used as a mortar, G
775.

PORISME, _s._ corollary, B 3. p 10. 113; Porismes, _pl._ B 3. p 10. 100.

PORT (1), _s._ port, carriage, behaviour, A 69, 138; bearing, mien, R.
1307; 3. 384; T. i. 1084; L. 2453. Porte, _dat._ 5. 262.

PORT (2), _s._ haven, T. i. 526, 969.

PORTATIF, _adj._ portable, 3. 53; A. pr. 52.

PORTER, _s._ A 1940; HF. 1954; L. 1717; Portours, _pl._ porters, T. v.
1139.

PORTHORS, _s._ portesse, breviary, B 1321. See note.

PORTREITOUR, _s._ draughtsman, A 1899 _n_.

PORTREITURE, s. drawing, picture, R. 827; set of drawings, A 1968;
Portraiture, 3. 626; Portreyture, picturing, HF. 131; Portreitures, _pl._
drawings, A 1915; Portraitures, paintings, R. 141; Portreytures, pictures,
HF. 125.

PORTREYE, _v._ pourtray, depict, 1. 81; draw, sketch, 3. 783; Portrayed,
_pp._ painted in fresco, R. 140; full of pictures, R. 1077; Portrayinge,
_pres. pt._ pourtraying, T. v. 716. See Purtreye.

PORTREYING, _s._ a picture, A 1938.

POSE, _s._ a cold in the head, A 4152, H 62. A.S. _ge-pose_, a stuffing or
cold in the head.

POSE, _1 pr. s._ put the case, (will) suppose, B 4. p 6. 132; B 5. p 4. 31;
T. iii. 310, 571; A 1162.

POSITIF, _adj._ positive, fixed, A 1167.

POSITIOUN, _s._ supposition, hypothesis, B 5. p 4. 30.

POSSE, _v._; Posseth, _pr. s._ pusheth, tosseth, L. 2420; Possed, _pp._ T.
i. 415. F. _pousser_; Lat. _pulsare_.

POSSESSIONERS, _s. pl._ men who are endowed, D 1722.

POSSESSIOUN, _s._ possession, D 1200; large property, great possessions,
wealth, F 686; endowments, D 1926.

POSS['I]BLE, _adj._ possible, 3. 988; _as p. is me_, it is as possible for
me, 5. 471.

POSSIBILITEE, _s._ possibility, A 1291, F 1343; T. ii. 607, iii. 448; L.
288.

POST, _s._ post, prop, support, A 214; T. i. 1000; post, pillar, A 800.

POSTUM, _s._ imposthume, abscess, B 3. P 4. 9.

POT, _s._ I 951; Pottes, _pl._ pots, L. 649; D 289.

POT['A]GE, _s._ broth, B 3623, C 368.

POTENTE, _s._ crutch, R. 368; T. v. 1222; staff, D 1776. Cf. _cross
potent_, in heraldry.

POTESTAT, _s._ potentate, D 2017. See note.

POT-FUL, _s._ pot-ful, HF. 1686.

POTHEC['A]RIE, _s._ apothecary, C 852. See APOTECARIE.

POUCHE, _s._ pouch, pocket, HF. 1349; A 3931; Pouches, _pl._ pouches,
money-bags, A 368.

POUDRE, _s._ dust, T. v. 309; HF. 536; powder, G 760; gunpowder, HF. 1644;
Poudres, _pl._ G 807.

POUDRED, _pp._ powdered, besprinkled, R. 1436.

POUDRE-MARCHAUNT, _s._ the name of a kind of spice, A 381. See note.

POUNAGE, _s._ pannage, swine's food, 9. 7. Cf. F. _panage_, 'pawnage,
mastage for swyne': Cotgrave.

POUND, _pl._ pounds, A 454, F 683, 1560, 1573, G 1364; R. 501. A.S. _pund_,
pl. _pund_; cf. 'five-pound note.'

POUNE, _s._ pawn at chess, 3. 661. O.F. _peon_, _paon_; late Lat.
_pedonem_, foot-soldier. See _peon_, in Godefroy.

POUNSONED, _pp. as adj._ stamped, pierced, I 421. '_Poisonner_, to prick or
pierce with a bodkin; to stamp, or mark with a puncheon': Cotgrave.

POUNSONINGE, _s._ punching of holes in garments, I 418. See above.

POUPED, _pt. pl._ blew hard, puffed, B 4589; _pp._ blown, H 90. An
imitative word; cf. _pop_.

POURE, _ger._ to pore, look closely, A 185, D 1738; to pore over (it), R.
1640; Poure, _v._ to pore, T. ii. 1708; E 2112; Pouren, _ger._ HF. 1121;
Pouren, _1 pr. pl._ (we) pore, gaze steadily, G 670; Poure, _2 pr. s.
subj._ pore, D 295; Poured, _pp._ T. i. 299.

POURED, _pp._ poured, R. 1148.

POURING, _s._ pouring (in), T. iii. 1460.

POUS, _s._ pulse, T. iii. 1114. O.F. _pouls_, _pous_: Godefroy.

POUSTEE, _s._ power, B 4. p 5. 9. O.F. _poeste_, from Lat. acc.
_potestatem_.

POVERTEE, _s._ poverty, 3. 410; Pov['e]rte, _s._ poverty, T. iv. 1520; B
99, D 1185, E 816; Pov['e]rt, poverty, R. 450; L. 2065; D 1167, 1177, 1179,
1183, 1873; Pov['e]rt, C 441, D 1191, 1195, 1199, 1201; HF. 88.

POVRE, _adj._ poor, R. 466, A 225, 478, 1409, B 116, 120, 2607, 4011, C
179, D 1187, 1193, 1608, I 199. O.F. _povre_.

POVRE, _adj. as s._ poor, _hence_ poverty, 10. 2. See note.

POVRE, _adv._ poorly, E 1043. See above.

POVRELICHE, _adj._ poorly, in poverty, E 213, 1055.

POVRELY, _adv._ poorly, R. 219; in poor array, A 1412.

POVREST, _adj. superl._ poorest, C 449, E 205.

POWER, _s._ power, authority, A 218; might, 3. 544.

POYNAUNT, _adj._ pungent, A 352, B 4024.

POYNT, _s._ sharp point, 7. 211; very object, aim, A 1501; point, bit (of
it), part, R. 1236; a stop, G 1480; _up p._, on the point, T. iv. 1153; _in
p. is_, is on the point, is ready, 1. 48; _fro p. to p._, in every point,
5. 461; _to the p._, to the point, 5. 372; _at p. devys_, exact at all
points, R. 830; to perfection, exquisitely, R. 1215; Poyntes, _pl._ laces
furnished with tags at the ends, tags, A 3322. See POINT.

POYNTE, _ger._ to describe, T. iii. 497; Poynten, _pr. pl._ stab, R. 1058;
Poynted, _pp._ pointed, R. 944; T. ii. 1034.

POYNTEL, _s._ style for writing, D 1742. See POINTEL.

POYSOUN, _s._ poison, 9. 64. See POISON.

PRACTIK, _s._ practice, B 1. p 1. 21 _n_; practical working, A. pr. 51;
Praktike, practice, D 187.

PRACTISOUR, _s._ practitioner, A 422.

PRAUNCE, _ger._ to prance about, run about, T. iii. 690 _n_; Praunce, _1
pr. s._ T. i. 221.

PRAYE, _s._ prey, 1. 64. See PREYE.

PRAYE, _pr. pl._ petition, make suit, I 785; _imp. s._ pray, 1. 62. See
PREYE.

PRAYERE, (prey['e]['e]r[*e]), _s._ prayer, A 1205; L. 2268; Pray['e]res,
_pl._ D 865. See PREYERE.

PRAYING, _s._ request, prayer, R. 1484.

PREAMBLE, _s._ D 831.

PREAMBULACIOUN, _s._ preambling, D 837.

PRECEDENT, _adj._ preceding, A. ii. 32. 3.

PRECEPT, _s._ commandment, D 65.

PRECHE, _v._ preach, T. ii. 59; A 481, 712, B 1179; Preche, _ger._ to
preach (to), counsel, T. ii. 569; Prechen, _v._ B 1177; Prechestow, thou
preachest, D 366; Prechen, _pr. pl._ preach (to), F 284; Precheth, _imp.
pl._ E 12.

PRECHOUR, _s._ preacher, D 165.

PRECIOUS, _adj._ estimable, R. 419; precious, 1. 59; prudish, E 1962;
scrupulous, very dainty, D 148.

PRECIOUSNESSE, _s._ costliness, I 446.

PREDESTINACIOUN, _s._ predestination, B 4. p 6. 19.

PREDESTINAT, _pp._ foreordained, B 5. p 2. 33.

PREDESTINEE, _s._ predestination, T. iv. 966.

PREDICACIOUN, _s._ preaching, sermon, B 1179, C 345, 407, D 2109.

PREEF, _s._ proof, assertion, D 247; experience, L. 528 _a_; test, proof, G
968, 1379; the test, H 75. See PROEF, PREVE.

PREES (pr[`e][`e]s), _s._ press, crowd, 13. 1; 16. 40; T. ii. 1649; HF.
1359; B 393, 646, 677, 3327, F 189; the throng of courtiers, 13. 4; Pres,
T. ii. 1643; press of battle, 9. 33; Presse, _dat._ throng, company, 10.
52; _in p._, in the crowd, 5. 603. See PRESSE.

PREESSETH, _pr. s._ throngs, A 2580 (cf. 2530). See PRESE, PRESSEN.

PREEST, _s._ priest, A 501, B 4000; Prest, B 1166; Preestes, _pl._ A 164, I
105.

PREESTHODE, _s._ priesthood, I 900.

PREFECTES, _gen._ prefect's, G 369. Lit. 'an officer of the prefect's
(officers).'

PREFERRE, _pr. s. subj._ precede, take precedence of, D 96.

PREIGNANT, _pres. pt._ plain, convincing, T. iv. 1179. '_Pregnant_,
pregnant, pithy, forcible; _Raisons pregnantes_, plain, apparent, important
or pressing reasons': Cotgrave.

PREISEN, _ger._ to praise, (worthy) of being praised, R. 70; to appraise,
judge of, B 1. p 4. 120; Preyse, _v._ appraise, estimate, R. 1115; _ger._
to praise, L. 67; to be praised, B 2706; Preysen, _v._ appraise, B 3. p 11.
3; B 4. p 3. 49; Preyse, _1 pr. s._ praise, 5. 586; prize, esteem, R. 1693;
Preise, _1 pr. s._ praise, F 674; Preised, _pp._ praised, R. 1252; Preysed,
_pp._ L. 536.

PREISERES, _s. pl._ praisers, B 2367.

PREISINGE, _s._ honour, glory, I 949; Preysing, praise, L. 189, 248, 416.

PREL['A]T, _s._ prelate, A 204.

PREMISSES, _pl._ statements laid down, B 3. p 10. 83; B 4. p 4. 48.

PRENOSTIK, _s._ prognostic, prognostication, 10. 54.

PRENTE, _s._ print, D 604.

PRENTEN, _ger._ to imprint, T. ii. 900.

PR['E]NTIS, _s._ apprentice, A 4365, 4391; B 1490; Prent['y]s, A 4385.

PRENTISHOOD, _s._ apprenticeship, A 4400.

PRESCIENCE, _s._ foreknowledge, B 5. p 3. 17; A 1313, E 659; foreknowing,
T. iv. 987, 998.

PRESE, _ger._ to press forward, T. i. 446; _v._ hasten, 2. 19. See PRESSEN.

PRES['E]NCE, _s._ 1. 19; T. ii. 460; _in pr._, in company, in a large
assembly, E 1207.

PRESENT, _adj._ being present, present, R. 377; B 1. p 4. 171; E 470;
Pres['e]nt, E 80.

PR['E]SENT, _s._ gift, L. 1935; Pres['e]nt, gift, R. 1192; present time, B
5. p 6. 77; _in present_, at that time, then, R. 1191.

PRESENT, _adv._ immediately, 5. 424.

PRESENTARIE, _adj._ ever-present, B 5. p 6. 49, 73, 202.

PRESENTE, _ger._ to present, L. 1095, 1132; Presented, _pp._ brought, L.
1297.

PRESENTING, _s._ offering, L. 1135.

PRESENTLY, _adv._ at the present moment, B 5. p 6. 78.

PRESIDENT, _s._ the one who presided in parliament, T. iv. 213.

PRES['O]UN, _s._ prison, T. iii. 380; Pr['e]son, T. v. 884. See PRISON.

PRESS, _s._ throng, T. i. 173; Presse, _dat._ instrument exercising
pressure, A 81; mould, A 263; _on presse_, under a press, in a suppressed
state, down, T. i. 559; Presse (_for_ Press, _before a vowel?_), press,
i.e. a kind of cupboard with shelves (for linen, &c.), A 3212.

PRESSEN, _v._ press forward, B 4. m 1. 17; Preesseth, _pr. s._ throngs, A
2580; Presse, _imp. s._ constrain, 25. 23 (see vol. iv. p. xxviii). See
PRESE.

PREST, _s._ priest, B 1166; Preest, A 501, B 4000; Preestes, _pl._ A 164, I
105.

PREST, _adj._ ready, prepared, prompt, 5. 307; T. ii. 785, iii. 485, 917,
v. 800; Preste, _pl._ prompt, T. iv. 661. O.F. _prest_.

PRESUME, _v._ E 1503; Presumed, _pt. pl._ C 18.

PRESUMPCIOUN, _s._ presumption, HF. 94; T. i. 213; B 2505, 3745;
Presumpcion, I 391; Presumpcions, _pl._ presumptions, suppositions, B 2598.

PRETENDE, _v._ attempt to reach, seek (after), T. iv. 922.

PRETERIT, _s._ past time, B 5. p 6. 30; Preterits, _pl._ past times, B 5. p
6. 13.

PRETORIE, _s._ the Roman imperial body-guard, the Pretorian cohort, B 1. p
4. 61.

PREVE, _s._ proof, 5. 497; T. i. 690; HF. 878, 989; B 4173; L. 28, 1113;
_dat._ T. iii. 307; experimental proof, A. ii. 23, _rub._; D 2272, E 787;
_at p._, at the proof, (when it comes) to the proof, T. iii. 1002; _at p._,
in the proof, T. iv. 1659; _armes preve_, the proof of arms, proof of
fighting power, T. i. 470. See PREEF, PROEF.

PREVE, _v._ prove, 3. 552; HF. 707; L. 9, 100; C 169; bide the test, G 645;
succeed when tested, G 1212; _1 pr. s._ prove, HF. 787, 826; _pr. s. subj._
may test, may try, E 1152; Preveth, _pr. s._ E 1000, 2238; tries, tests, E
1155; shews, E 2425; Preved, _pp._ HF. 814; A 3001, B 2263, C 193; proved
to be so, T. i. 239; tested, G 1336; approved, E 28; exemplified, E 826;
shewn, F 481. See PROEVE, PROVE.

PREVETEE, _s._ secret place, recess, T. iv. 1111. See PRIVETEE.

PREVEY, _adj._ secret, B 4. p 3. 77. See PRIVEE.

PREVIDENCE, _s._ seeing beforehand, B 5. p 6. 83.

PREVY, _adj._ privy, secret, unobserved, 3. 382; close, not confidential,
HF. 285. See PRIVEE.

PREYE, _s._ prey, T. i. 201; D 1455; Praye, 1. 64; Preyes, _pl._ D 1472.
A.F. _preie_.

PREYE, _ger._ to beseech, T. ii. 1369; A 1483; to pray, 2. 20; Preyen,
_ger._ 2. 11; Preye, _v._ A 301, I 179; Preye, _1 pr. s._ 1. 83; A 725, D
1261; Preyen, _1 pr. pl._ A 1260; Preyde, _pt. s._ L. 2294; B 391, 3729, E
548, 765, I 178; Preyede, F 311; Preyden, _1 pt. pl._ A 811; Preyeden, _pt.
pl._ D 895; Preyed, _pp._ E 773; Preyeth, _imp. pl._ 10. 78; T. i. 29. See
PRAYE.

PREYERE, _s._ prayer, A 3587, B 1669; Pr['e]yere, L. 1141; E 141; H 6;
Prey['e]res, _pl._ prayers, A 231. See PRAYERE.

PREYNETH, _for_ Proyneth, E 2011 _n_.

PREYS, _s._ praise, B 3837.

PREYSE; see PREISE.

PREYSING; see PREISINGE.

PRICASOUR, _s._ a hard rider, A 189. See PRIKEN.

PRIGHTE, _pt. s._ pricked, F 418 (_inferior_ MSS. _have_ pighte). No doubt,
the reading _pighte_ in 1. 163 should also be _prighte_. See below.

PRIKEN, _v._ incite, urge, T. iv. 633; Prik, _1 pr. s._ spur, rouse, 5.
389; Priketh, _pr. s._ incites, excites, T. i. 219; L. 1192; A 11, 1043;
spurs, D 656; spurs, rides, B 1944; pricks, pains, aches, D 1594; Prikke,
_pr. pl._ prick, pierce, R. 1058; Prighte, _pt. s._ F 418 (see above);
Priked, _pt. s._ spurred, B 1964; Prike, _2 pr. s. subj._ B 2001; Prikke,
_2 pr. pl. subj._ goad, torment, E 1038; Priked, _pp._ spurred, G 561;
Prik, _imp. s._ spur, L. 1213; Prikinge, _pres. pt. pl._ spurring, A 2508.

PRIKING, _s._ hard riding, A 191; quick riding, A 2599; Prikinge, B 1965.

PRIKKE, _s._ point, HF. 907; B 1029; pin's point, B 2. p 7. 18; central
point, B 3. p 11. 162; sting, I 468; a small mark, such as a little stick
stuck in the ground, A. ii. 42. 3; a dot, A. ii. 5. 12; stab, piercing
stroke, A 2606; point, critical condition, B 119.

PRILL, _pr. pl._, _error for_ PRIKKE, prick, R. 1058 _n_.

PRINCE, _s._ lord, A 2994, 3036; prince, C 599; Princes, _pl._ 10. 73.

PRINCESSE, _s._ princess, 1. 97; A 1830; Princess, 18. 73.

PRINCIPAL, _adj._ 3. 495; chief, I 515; Principals, _pl._ chief, A. i. 5.
8; Principalx, _pl._ cardinal, A. ii. 31. 11.

_Principio, in_, in the beginning (S. John, i. 1), A 254.

PRINCIPLES, _s. pl._ principles, deep feelings, natural disposition, F 487.

PRIORESSE, _s._ prioress, A 118, B 1637.

PRIS, _s._ prize, A 2241. See PRYS.

PRISON, 5. 139; 11. 28; 17. 14. See PRESOUN.

PRISONER, _s._ A 1063, 1070; Prisoneres, _pl._ T. iv. 59.

PRIVEE, _adj._ secret, A 3295, B 204, 1991, 2911, C 675, I 106; private, I
102; intimate, R. 600; privy, closely attendant, E 192; Prive, friendly,
intimate, R. 1066; Privy, secret, L. 1267, 1780, G 1452; _privee man_,
private individual, B 2. p 3. 48. See PREVEY, PREVY.

PRIVEE, _adv._ secretly, F 531; Privee and apert, secretly and openly, D
1114; _pr. ne ap._, neither secretly nor openly, 1136.

PRIVEE, _s._ privy, C 527, E 1954.

PRIVELY, _adv._ secretly, R. 371; A 652, B 21, 3889, E 641, I 106;
unperceived, R. 784.

PRIVETEE, _s._ privacy, R. 1294; secrecy, T. iii. 283; B 548, E 249, G 701,
1052, 1138; secrets, secret, D 531, 542, 1637; privacy, secret counsel, A
3164; secret, private affairs, A 1411; private apartment, A 4334; privy
parts, B 3905.

PRIVY, _adj._ secret, L. 1267, 1780. See PRIVEE.

PROBLEME, _s._ problem, D 2219.

PROCEDE, _v._ proceed, T. iii. 455; 16. 6; advance, go forward, 16. 30;
Proceden, _pr. pl._ proceed, T. v. 370.

PROCES, _s._ process, B 2665; proceeding, F 1345; process of time, 5. 430;
F 829; argument, B 3. p 10. 40; matter, T. ii. 485; L. 1914; story, HF.
251; T. ii. 268, 292; iii. 470; F 658; occurrence of events, B 3511;
Proc['e]sse, _dat._ course (of time), 3. 1331.

PROCESSIOUNS, _pl._ processions, D 556.

PROCHE, _1 pr. s._ approach, B 4. p 7. 20 _n_.

PROCREACIOUN, _s._ procreation, E 1448.

PROCURATOUR, _s._ proctor, D 1596 _n_.

PROCUTOUR, _used for_ Procurator, proctor, D 1596.

PROEF, _s._ proof, D 2272 _n_; Profe, Prof, L. 2113 _n_; Proeve, B 5. p 4.
51; Proeves, _pl._ B 3. p 12. 135. See PREEF.

PROEVE, _1 pr. s._ approve, B 5. p 3. 19; Proeveth, _pr. s._ proves, shews,
B 2. m 1. 11. See PREVE, PROVE.

PROFESSIOUN, _s._ profession of religion, D 1925, 2135; oath of profession
(as a monk), B 1345.

PROFIT, _s._ profit, 9. 26; A 249.

PROFRE, _s._ offer, L. 2079.

PROFRE, _v._; Proferestow, dost thou offer, T. iii. 1461; Profre, _2 pr. s.
subj._ mayst offer, G 489; Profreth, _pr. s._ proffers, A 1415; offers, L.
405; Profre, _2 pr. pl._ proffer, F 755; Profred, _pp._ offered, E 152.

PROGENIE, _s._ progeny, I 324.

PROGRESSIOUNS, _pl._ progressions, B 4. p 6. 105; processes, developments,
A 3013.

PROHEME, _s._ proem, prologue, E 43. F. _pro[:e]me_ (Cotgrave).

PROLACIOUNS, _s. pl._ utterances, B 2. p 1. 32.

PROLIXITEE, _s._ prolixity, tediousness, T. ii. 1564; F 405.

PROLLE, _2 pr. pl._ prowl about, search widely, G 1412. See _Prollyn_, and
_Prollynge_, in Prompt. Parv.

PROLOGE, _s._ prologue, _after_ A 3186; D 1708; Prol['o]ge, prelude, T. iv.
893.

PRONOUNCED, _pp._ announced, T. iv. 213.

PRONOUNCERE, _s._ pronouncer, speaker, B 2. p 3. 39.

PROPHESYE, _s._ prophecy, T. v. 1521; Prophecyes, _pl._ T. v. 1494.

PROPHET, _s._ L. 2254; Prophete, I 125.

PROPINQUITEE, _s._ propinquity, B 2. p 3. 24.

PROPORCIONABLES, _adj. pl._ proportional, B 3. m 9. 13.

PROPORCIONED, _pp._ made in proportion, F 192.

PROPORCIONELS, _s. pl._ proportional parts, F 1278.

PROPORCIOUN, _s._ proportion, R. 545; T. v. 828; A. i. 16. 3; F 1286;
Proporciouns, _pl._ ratios, A. pr. 3.

PROPOSICIOUN, _s._ proposition, B 2465; Proposiciouns, _pl._ propositions,
B 3. p 10. 99.

PROPRE, _adj._ own, T. iv. 83; A. ii. 7. 15; A 581, 3037, B 3518, D 159;
own, especial, B 2175; peculiar, L. 259 _a_; D 103; well-grown, A 3972;
well-made, A 3345; comely, A 4368; handsome, C 309; Propres, _pl._ own, B
1. m 6. 13; _in propre_, as his own, B 2. p 2. 9; _of propre kinde_, by
their own natural bent, F 610.

PROPRELY, _adv._ fitly, A 1459, 3320; properly, literally, I 285; of its
own accord, naturally, D 1191; Properly, appropriately, in character, A
729.

PROPRETEE, _s._ peculiarity, speciality, individuality, B 2. p 6. 70;
peculiarity, 10. 69; characteristic, B 2364; quality, B 5. p 6. 48;
peculiar possession, T. iv. 392; property, A. i. 21. 41; Propretees, _pl._
properties, A. i. 10. 5.

PROSCRIPCIOUN, _s._ proscription, B 1. p 4. 174.

PROSE, _s._ prose, L. 66, 425; B 96, I 46.

PROSE, _v._ write in prose, 16. 41.

PROSPECTYVES, _s. pl._ perspective-glasses, lenses, F 234. No doubt Chaucer
here makes the usual distinction between reflecting mirrors and refracting
lenses. Milton (Vacation Exerc. l. 71) seems to apply the word to a
combination of lenses, or telescope.

PROSPERITEE, _s._ prosperity, L. 590, 906.

PROSPRE, _adj._ prosperous; _prospre fortunes_, success, well-being, B 1. p
4. 41.

PROTECCIOUN, _s._ protection, A 2363; Protecciouns, _pl._ F 56.

PROTESTACIOUN, _s._ protest, T. ii. 484, iv. 1289; A 3137, I 59; L. 2640.

PROUD, _adj._ R. 63; T. i. 210.

PROUDE-HERTED, _adj._ proud-hearted, R. 1491.

PROUDER, _adj. comp._ T. ii. 138.

PROUDLY, _adv._ A 1152, G 473.

PROVE, _v._ test, A. ii. 23, _rub._; Proveth, _pr. s._ proves, F 455;
Proved, _pt. s._ proved to be true, A 547. See PREVE, PROEVE.

PROV['E]RBE, _s._ proverb, T. ii. 397; A 3391, 4405; Pr['o]verbe, B 3436;
Prov['e]rbes, _pl._ T. i. 756, iii. 299; set of proverbs, 17. 25;
Pr['o]verb[`e]s, proverbial sayings, saws, B 2146.

PROV['E]RBED, _pp._ said in proverbs, T. iii. 293.

PROVINCE, _s._ B 1. p 4. 61.

PROVOST, _s._ provost, prefect, B 1. p 4. 43; chief magistrate, B 1806.

PROVOSTRIE, _s._ praetorship, B 3. p 4. 56, 61.

PROW, _s._ profit, advantage, HF. 579; T. i. 333; ii. 1664; v. 789; B 1598,
4140, C 300, G 609. O.F. _preu_, _prou_, profit: Godefroy.

PROWESSE, _s._ prowess, T. i. 438; v. 436; valour, T. ii. 632; bravery, R.
261; excellence, D 1129; profit, B 4. p 3. 45, 67.

PROYNETH, _pr. s._ prunes, i.e. trims, makes (himself) neat, E 2011;
Pruneth, E 2011 _n_. O.F. _proigner_, provigner: Godefroy.

PRYDE, _s._ Pride, R. 975; pride, G 476, I 388.

PRYDELEES, _adj._ without pride, 6. 29; Prydeles, E 930.

PRYE, _ger._ to pry, peer, T. ii. 404; iii. 1571; D 1738, G 668; to gaze, A
3458; _v._ spy, T. ii. 1710; pry, E 2112.

PRYME, _s._ prime (of day), usually 9 a.m., T. i. 157; ii. 992, 1095; v.
15, 472; A 2189, 2576, 3554, B 1278, 1396, 4368, 4388, C 662, E 1857, F 73;
_fully pr._, the end of the first period of the day (from 6 a.m. to 9
a.m.), B 2015; _pr. large_, past 9 o'clock, F 360; _passed pr._, past 9
o'clock, D 1476; _half way pryme_, half way between 6 and 9 a.m., half-past
seven, A 3906.

PRYME FACE, _s._ the first look, first glance, T. iii. 919.

PRYMER, _s._ primer, elementary reading-book, B 1707.

PRYMEROLE, _s._ primrose, A 3268.

PRYS, _s._ price, value, R. 1134; B 2. p 4. 22; B 5. p 3. 135; A 815, B
2087; worth, excellence, R. 45, 47, 286; F 911; praise, R. 446; B 3. p 6.
22; T. ii. 181, 188; E 1026; esteem, R. 300; T. i. 375; ii. 24; F 934;
glory, L. 2534; reputation, D 1152; renown, R. 666, 1198; A 67, 237; prize,
reward, B 4. m 7. 43; a prize, B 4. p 4. 137; Pryse, prize, I 355.

PRYSE, _ger._ to esteem, to be esteemed, R. 887.

PRYVED, _pp._ deprived, exiled, 1. 146.

PRYVEE, _adj._ secret, A 2460. See PRIVEE.

PSALMES, _pl._ psalms, H 345.

PUBLISSHED, _pp._ proclaimed, T. v. 1095; published, B 2. p 7. 36;
Publiced, spread abroad, E 415, 749.

PUFFEN, _ger._ to puff, blow hard, HF. 1866.

PUKED, _for_ Poked, T. iii. 116 _n_.

PULLE, _s._ a bout at wrestling, a throw, 5. 164.

PULLE, _v._ pluck, T. i. 210; v. 1546; _ger._ R. 1667; to draw, T. ii. 657;
_pulle a finche_, pluck a finch, cheat a novice, A 652; Pulleth, _pr. pl._
pull, L. 2308; Pulled, _pt. s._ pulled, drew, D 2067; _a pulled hen_, a
plucked hen, A 177.

PULPET, _s._ pulpit, C 391. Pulpit, D 2282.

PULTRYE, _s._ poultry, A 598.

PUNISSEMENT, _s._ punishment, B 3005.

PUNISSHINGE, _s._ punishment, B 4. p 1. 15; D 1302; Punissinge, B 2622.

PUNYCE, _ger._ to punish, T. v. 1707.

PUPLISSHEN, _pr. pl. refl._ repeople themselves, are propagated, B 3. p 11.
91. Cf. O.F. _peuploier_, _pueplier_, _puplier_, peupler: Godefroy.

PURCHACEN, _ger._ to procure, acquire, I 742, 1066; Purchace, _v._ merit,
gain, I 1080; obtain, win, 21. 19; buy, A 608; Purchasen, _ger._ to
acquire, G 1405; Purchacen, _pr. pl._ promote, B 2870; Purchased, _pt. s._
contrived, procured, 3. 1112; Purchaced, _pp._ procured, brought about, 11.
17; Purchace, _imp. s. 3 p._ may (He) provide, B 873; Purchace, _imp. pl._
provide (for yourself), T. ii. 1125.

PURCHAS, _s._ proceeds of begging, gifts acquired, A 256; gain, D 1451,
1530.

PURCHASINGE, _s._ acquiring, B 4. p 7. 50; Purchasing, conveyancing, A 320;
acquisition of property, D 1449.

PURCHASOUR, _s._ conveyancer, A 318.

PURE, _adj._ very (lit. pure), 3. 490; HF. 280; A 1279; utter, 3. 1209;
_the p. deth_, death itself, 3. 583.

PURE, _adv._ purely, 3. 1010.

PURED, _pp. as adj._ pure, F 1560; rendered pure, very fine, D 143.

PURELY, _adv._ merely, only, 3. 5, 843, 934; HF. 39.

PURFILED, _pp._ ornamented at the edge, trimmed, A 193. '_Porfiler_,
borner, garder le contour de, parer, orner': Godefroy. '_Porfil_, bordure':
id.

PURGACIOUN, _s._ discharge, D 120.

PURGAT['O]RIE, _s._ purgatory, A 1226, D 489, E 1670, I 716.

PURGEN, _ger._ to purge, B 4143; to discharge, D 134; Purgen, _pr. pl._ B
1763, I 428; Purgede, _pt. s._ expiated, B 4. m 7. 2 (Lat. _piauit_);
Purged, _pp._ absolved, cleansed (by baptism), G 181.

PURPOS, _s._ purpose, R. 1140; 1. 113; 2. 5; T. i. 5; B 170, E 573, F 965,
I 129, 310; proposal, design, A 1684; _to purpos_, to the subject, 5. 26;
_it cam him to p._, he purposed, F 606.

PURPOSEN, _v._ purpose, I 87; Purp['o]sen, _pr. pl._ propose, T. iv. 1350;
propound, B 5. p 6. 207; Purp['o]sed, _pp._ E 706, 1067; set before, put
before, B 4. p 2. 87, p 3. 10; aimed at, B 3. p 2. 52; Purposinge, _pr.
pt._ intending, F 1458.

PURPRE, _adj._ purple, T. iv. 869; L. 654; Purpur, B 1. m 6. 6.

PURPRE, _s._ purple, R. 1071; B 3. m 8. 11; purple raiment, I 933; Purpur,
R. 1188; B 2. m 5. 11; Purpres, _pl._ purple robes, B 3. m 4. 2.

PURS, _s._ purse, 19. 15; A 656, B 2794, D 1348, E 1883, F 148; Purse, 19.
1; Purses, _pl._ D 1350, G 1404.

PURSEVAUNTES, _s. pl._ pursuivants, HF. 1321.

P['U]RSUIT, _s._ continuance, perseverance, T. ii. 959; P['u]rsuite,
continuance in pursuit, T. ii. 1744; Purs['u]te, _s._ appeal to prosecute,
D 890. '_Porsuit_, effort, recherche': Godefroy.

PURTREYE, _v._ draw, A 96; Purtreyed, _pt. s._ pourtrayed, E 1600. See
PORTREYE.

PURTREYOUR, _s._ draughtsman, A 1899.

PURVEYABLE, _adj._ with provident care, B 3. m 2. 3.

PURVEYAUNCE, _s._ providence, T. ii. 527; iv. 961, 977, 982, 1000; A 1252,
1665, 3011, F 865; Purviaunce, providence, B 3. p 11. 130; B 4. p 6. 17;
prescience, B 5. p 3. 26; Purveyance, providence, B 483; foresight, D 566,
570; equipment, B 247; Purveyaunce, provision, A 3566, F 904;
pre-arrangement, T. iii. 533; Purveaunce, provision, I 685; _unto his p._,
to provide himself with necessaries, L. 1561.

PURVEYEN, _v._ provide, B 2532; Purveye, _v._ D 917, E 191; take
precautions, T. ii. 504; Purveyth, _pr. s._ foresees, T. iv. 1066;
Purveyeth, _pr. s._ foresees, foreordains, 10. 66; Purveyed, _pp._
foreseen, B 5. p 3. 16; T. iv. 1006, 1008; thought over beforehand, I 1003;
_p. of_, provided with, D 591; Purveye, _imp. s._ provide, T. ii. 426,
1160.

PURVEYINGE, _s._ providence, T. iv. 986.

PUT, _s._ pit, T. iv. 1540; I 170; Putte, _dat._ B 3. m 12. 46. A.S. _pyt_.
See PIT.

PUTERIE, _s._ prostitution, I 886; Putrie, I 886. O.F. _puterie_, _putrie_:
Godefroy and Cotgrave.

PUTOURS, _s. pl._ pimps, procurers, I 886. See above.

PUTTEN, _v._ put, lay, 7. 344; Putte, _v._ suppose, B 2667; _ger._ to put,
3. 1332; Putteth, _pr. s._ 4. 229; imposes, B 5. p 4. 37; Put, _pr. s._
puts, I 142; Put him, puts himself, L. 652; Putte, _pt. s._ 4. 268; B 1630,
3742; set, L. 675; _1 pt. s._ 3. 769; Puttest, _2 pt. s._ didst put, B
3875; Put, _pp._ E 471; placed, B 4. p 7. 64; settled, established, B 1. p
6. 19 (L. _locatus_); _p. of_, checked, B 1. p 4. 42; _p. up_, put away, 2.
54 (see note).

PUTTING TO, i.e. adding, A. ii. 43 a. 12 (vol. iii. p. 232, l. 2).

PYE, _s._ magpie, 5. 345; T. iii. 527; A 3950, B 1399, D 456, E 1848, G
565; Pyes, _pl._ HF. 703, F 650. F. _pie_.

PYE, _s._ pie, pasty, A 384.

PYK, _s._ pike (fish), 12. 17; T. ii. 1041; E 1419.

PYKE, _v._ (1) peep, T. iii. 60; _ger._ (2), to pick at, T. ii. 1274;
Pyketh, _pr. s._ (3) makes (himself) tidy or smooth, E 2011. F. _piquer_,
'to prick, pierce, or thrust into [hence, peep into], ... to stiffen a
coller': Cotgrave.

PYKEPURS, _s._ pick-purse, A 1998.

PYLED, _pp._ peeled, bare, bald, A 4306. See PILED.

PYN (pin), the pin which passes through the central hole in the Astrolabe
and its plates, A. i. 14. 1. See PIN.

PYN (piin), _s._ pine-tree, R. 1379, 1457.

PYN-TREE, _s._ pine-tree, R. 1464; Pyn-trees, _pl._ R. 1314; B 2. m 5. 13.

PYNE, _s._ pain, torment, T. v. 6; D 787, I 171; hurt, 5. 335; toil, HF.
147; place of torment, HF. 1512; suffering, T. ii. 676; A 1324, 2382, B
1080, D 385; woe, torment, B 3420, F 448; the passion, B 2126. A.S.
_p[=i]n?_.

PYNE, _ger._ to torture, A 1746; Pyneth, _pr. s._ pines away, 7. 205;
grieves, bemoans, I 85; Pyned, _pp._ examined by torture, B 4249. A.S.
_p[=i]nian_.

PYPE, _s._ pipe, musical instrument, HF. 773, 1219; B 2005; Pypes, _pl._
pipes, tubes, A 2752; musical instruments, A 2511.

PYPEN, _v._ pipe, whistle, A 1838; play on the bagpipe, A 3927; Pype, make
a piping noise, T. v. 1433; pipe, play upon a pipe, A 3876; pipe, play
music, HF. 1220; Pyped, _pp._ faintly uttered, HF. 785; Pyping, _pres. pt._
piping (hot), hissing, A 3379.

PYPERS, _pl._ pipers, HF. 1234.

PYRIE, _s._ pear-tree, E 2217, 2325. A.S. _pyrige_; from Lat. _pyrus_.



QUAAD, _adj._ evil (Flemish), A 4357; Quad, bad, B 1628. Du. _kwaad_; M.
Du. _quad_. 'Een quade boom brengt voort _quade_ vruchten,' a corrupt tree
bringeth forth evil fruit; Matt. vii. 17; in Dutch New Test., A. D. 1700.
'_Quaet jaer_; Ger. _schwarz jahr_; Ital. _mat anno_; Fr. _maitvaise
ann['e]e_. "Wat _quaet jaer_! hoe zuldi hu ghelaten?"--Het Spel van de V
vroede en van de V dwaesen Maegden. "Ein _schwarz jahr_, rief der alte ...
komme [:u]ber euch!"--Qu'une mauvaise ann['e]e vous accable, s'['e]cria le
vieux juif (Contes fastastiques d'Hoffmann: Le choix d'une
fianc['e]e).'--Delfortrie; Analogies des Langues Flamande, Allemande, et
Anglaise; p. 308.

QUAILLE, _s._ quail, E 1206; Quayles, _gen. pl._ 5. 339.

QUAKE, _v._ tremble, shiver, R. 462; quake, A 3614, F 860; shake, T. iii.
542; Quake, _1 pr. s._ I 159; tremble, 6. 55; Quaketh, _pr. s._ quakes, L.
2680; trembles, T. iv. 14; Quook, _pt. s._ quaked, T. v. 36, 926; L. 2317,
2648; A 1576, 1762, B 3394; Quaked, _pp._ B 3831; Quaketh, _imp. pl._
quake, fear, T. ii. 302; Quaking, _pres. pt._ shaking, 3. 1212; E 317, 358;
Quakinge, heaving, B 4. m 5. 18. (Lat. _frementi_, perhaps misread as
_trementi_). A.S. _cwacian_.

QUAKING, _s._ trembling, fear, 7. 214.

QUAKKE, _s._ a state of hoarseness, A 4152. Cf. E. Friesic _kwak_, applied
to the croaking of frogs; Low G. _quakken_, to croak; to groan like a sick
man (Bremen W[:o]rterbuch).

QUALITEE, _s._ quality, T. iii. 31.

QUALM, _s._ pestilence, A 2014; evil, plague, R. 357; foreboding of death,
T. v. 382; Qualme, _dat._ HF. 1968. A.S. _cwealm_.

QUANTITE, _s._ quantity, vastness, 5. 58; size, A. i. 18. 10, 21. 25.

QUAPPE, _v._ heave, toss (lit. shake, palpitate), L. 1767; beat repeatedly,
L. 865; palpitate, T. iii. 57. Cf. Norweg. _kveppa_ (pt. t. _kvapp_), to
slip suddenly, to rock (Aasen); and see _kwabbe_, _kwabben_ in Koolman's E.
Friesic Dictionary.

QUARELE, _s._ complaint, 25. 11 (see vol. iv. p. xxvii). See QUERELE.

QUART, _s._ quart, A 649, 3497.

QUARTER, _s._ quarter, T. v. 1698; fourth part (of the night), 3. 198;
Quarters, _pl._ quarters of the heavens, A. i. 5. 8.

QUARTER-NIGHT, the time when a fourth part of the night is gone, 9 P. M., A
3516.

QUAYLES, _gen. pl._ quails, 5. 339. See QUAILLE.

QUEINTE, _adj._ curious, B 1426; _pl._ L. 2013. See QUEYNT.

QUEK! _int._ quack! 5. 499, 594.

QUELLE, _v._ kill, B 4580, C 854; _pr. pl._ strike, T. iv. 46; _3 imp. s._
may (he) kill, G 705. A.S. _cwellan_.

QUEME, _v._ please, 14. 20; T. 695; Quemen, _pr. pl._ subserve, T. ii. 803.
A.S. _cw[=e]man_.

QUENCHE, _v._ put a stop to, T. iii. 846; be quenched, I 341; Quenchen,
_ger._ to put an end to, T. iii. 1058; Queynte, _pt. s._ became extinct,
was quenched, A 2334, 2337; Queynt, _pp._ quenched, extinguished, T. iv.
313, 1430; v. 543; A 2321, 2336.

QUENE (kw['e]['e]n[*e]), _s._ queen, R. 1266; 1. 1, 24; 11. 9; A 882, B
161, 1671, D 1048, F 1046, G 1089; Queen, 1. 25. A.S. _cw[=e]n_.

QUERELE, _s._ quarrel, I 618; Quereles, _pl._ complaints, B 3. p 3. 49.
O.F. _querele_, dispute, plainte; Godefroy.

QUERN, _s._ hand-mill, 9. 6; Querne, _dat._ HF. 1798, B 3264. A.S.
_cweorn_; Icel. _kvern_.

QUESTEMONGERES, _s. pl._ questmen, jurymen, I 797.

_Questio, quid iuris_, the question is, how stands the law, A 647.

QUESTIOUN, _s._ dispute, A 2514; problem, D 2223.

QUEYNT, -E; see QUENCHE.

QUEYNT, _adj._ strange, 3. 1330; curious, dainty, R. 65; adorned, R. 1435;
curious, well-devised, HF. 228; neat, R. 98; Queynte, strange, curious, HF.
1925, L. 353; T. i. 411; A 1531, 2333, 3605, D 516, E 2061, F 726, G 752;
curious, artful, sly, T. iv. 1629; A 3275; quaint, curious, B 1189, F 239,
369; curiously contrived, HF. 126; F 234; hard to understand, 3. 531;
graceful, R. 610. O.F. _cointe_, _queinte_: Godefroy. See QUEINTE.

QUEYNTE, _adv._ artfully, HF. 245.

QUEYNTE, _s._ pudendum, A 3276, D 332, 444; D 608 _n_.

QUEYNTELICHE, _adv._ curiously, cunningly, HF. 1923; Queyntely, daintily,
R. 569; strangely, R. 783.

QUEYNTISE, _s._ finery, I 932; art, I 733; Queyntyse, ornament, R. 840.
O.F. _cointise_, _queintise_.

_Qui cum patre_ (see note), D 1734, I 1092.

_Qui la_, who's there? B 1404.

QUIETE, _s._ quiet, repose, 1. 14; F 760; Qui['e]te, 9. 44; T. iii. 506.

QUIK, _adj._ alive, 3. 121; T. iii. 79; F 1336; lively, A 306; intelligent,
ready, I 658; Quike, _def._ living, B 5. m 4. 33; _voc._ T. i. 411; _pl._
alive, T. ii. 52; A 1015.

QUIKEN, _v._ quicken, revive, T. i. 443; iv. 631; I 235, 628; _ger._ to
grow, T. i. 295; to make alive, quicken, G 481; revive, T. iii. 484;
Quikke, _ger._ to quicken, take life, burst forth, HF. 2078; Quiked, _pt.
s._ became alive, burst into flame, A 2335; _pp._ endowed with life, F
1050. A.S. _cwician_.

QUIKKEST, _adj. superl._ liveliest, busiest, F 1502.

QUIKNESSE, _s._ liveliness, life, 3. 26.

QUIKSILVER, _s._ quicksilver, A 629, G 822.

QUINIBLE, _s._ shrill treble, A 3332 (see note).

QUIRBOILLY, _s._ boiled leather, B 2065. F. _cuir bouilli_; see note.

QUISSHIN, _s._ cushion, T. ii. 1229; Quisshen, T. iii. 964. O.F. _coissin_,
_cuissin_; see _Cushion_ in New E. Dict.

QUISTROUN, _s._ scullion, kitchen-drudge, R. 886. O.F. _coistron_,
_quistron_, 'marmiton': Godefroy.

QUIT, -TE; see QUYTE.

QUITLY, _adv._ freely, wholly, A 1792.

QUOD, _pt. s._ said, 3. 370, 1112; L. 1708; A 1234, B 16, 28, 1166, F 967;
Quoth, 3. 90. A.S. _cwaedh_, pt. t. of _cwedhan_.

QUONIAM, pudendum, D 608. Cf. QUEYNTE. (MS. Cp. has the reading _queynte_.)

QUOOK, _pt. s. of_ Quake.

QUYTE, _v._ requite, reward, repay, recompense, give in return, R. 1542; 5.
112; 10. 75; HF. 670; T. i. 808; L. 494, 1447; A 3127, D 1008, H 293; free,
ransom, A 1032; _ger._ to remove, free, 7. 263; _quyte with_, to requite
with, A 3119; _hir cost for to quyte_, to pay for her expenses, B 3564;
_quyte hir whyle_, repay her time, i.e. her trouble, B 584; Quyten, _v._
repay, D 1292; _ger._ to requite, B 2243; Quyte, _1 pr. s._ requite, C 420;
Quyteth, _pr. s._ pays, 5. 9; Quyten, _pr. pl._ requite, I 154; Quyte, _pr.
s. subj._ repay, L. 2227; Quyte yow, repay you, A 770; Quitte, _pt. s._
requited, L. 1918; repaid, R. 1526; Quitte, _pt. pl._ released, T. iv. 205;
Quit, _pp._ rewarded, requited, HF. 1614; L. 523; T. ii. 242; A. 4324; set
free, L. 1992; G 66; discharged, quit, F 1578; _as adj._ free, 5. 663; B 5.
p 4. 74; T. iii. 1019; F 1534.



RAA, _s._ roe (Northern), A 4086.

RABY, Rabbi, D 2187.

RACE, _for_ Arace, T. iii. 1015 _n_.

RAD, -DE; see REDE.

RADEVORE, _s._ piece of tapestry, L. 2352; see note.

RAFLES, _s. pl._ raffles, I 793.

RAFT, -E; see REVE.

RAFTER, _s._ A 990.

RAGE, _s._ passion, R. 1613; craving, 1657; madness, 3. 731; L. 599;
violent grief, F 836; violent rush, fierce blast, A 1985.

RAGE, _v._ romp, toy wantonly, A 257, 3273, 3958.

RAGERYE, _s._ wantonness, E 1847; passion, D 455. O.F. _ragerie_.

RAGOUNCES, _error for_ Iagounces, R. 1117 _n_.

RAKE, _s._ rake, A 287.

RAKED, _pp._ raked, B 3323. Literally, the sentence is--'Amongst hot coals
he hath raked himself'; the sense is, of course, 'he hath raked hot coals
around himself.' A.S. _racian_, to rake together; Icel. _raka_.

RAKEL, _adj._ rash, T. i. 1067; iii. 429, 1630; H 278; hasty, T. iii. 1437.
Icel. _reikull_, wandering.

RAKELNESSE, _s._ rashness, 16. 16; H 283.

RAKE-STELE, (st[`e]le), _s._ handle of a rake, D 949. See STELE.

RAKET, _s._ the game of rackets, T. iv. 460.

RAKLE, _v._ behave rashly, T. iii. 1642. See RAKEL.

RAM, _s._ ram, L. 1427; (as prize at a wrestling-match), A 548; Aries, the
first sign in the zodiac, A 8, F 386.

RAMMISH, _adj._ ramlike, strong-scented, G 887. Cf. Icel. _ramr_, strong,
fetid; which is probably related to A.S. _ramm_, a ram.

RAMPETH, _pr. s._ (lit. ramps, romps, rears, but here) rages, acts with
violence, B 3094. We should now say--'She _flies_ in my face.' The
following quotation, in which _rampe_ means an ill-conditioned woman, a
_romp_, is much to the purpose. 'A woman ought not to striue with her
husbonde, nor yeue him no displeasaunce nor ansuere her husbonde afore
straungers like a _rampe_, with gret uelonis [_felon's_] wordes,
dispraising him and setting hym atte not [_at naught_].'--The Knight of la
Tour-Landry, ed. Wright, p. 25.

RANCOUR, _s._ ill-feeling, ill-will, malice, R. 1261; A 2732, E 432, 747,
802, H 97, I 550, 552.

RANKE, _adj. pl._ rank, I 913.

RANSAKE, _ger._ to ransack, search thoroughly, A 1005; Ransaked, _pt. s._
ransacked, came searching out, 4, 28.

RAPE, _s._ haste, 8. 7. Icel. _hrap_, a falling down.

RAPE, _v._; in phrase _rape and renne_, corrupted from an older phrase
_repen_ and _r[=i]nen_ (A.S. _hrepian and hr[=i]nan_), i.e. handle and
touch, clutch and seize (see note), G 1422.

RASCAILLE, _s._ mob, T. v. 1853. A.F. _rascaille_; see _Rascal_ in my Etym.
Dict. and in the Supplement.

RASOUR, _s._ razor, A 2417, B 3246; HF. 690; L. 2654.

RATED, _pp._ reproved, scolded, A 3463. Short for _arated_, variant of
_aretted_; see ARETTE.

RATHE, _adv._ soon, HF. 2139; T. ii. 1088; iv. 205; v. 937; early, A 3768,
B 1289. A.S. _hraedh_.

RATHER, _adj. comp._ former, B 2. p 1. 8; B 2. p 7. 89; T. iii. 1337; v.
1799.

RATHER, _adv._ sooner, 3. 562, 868; B 5. p 3. 141; T. i. 865; A. i. 21. 14;
A 1153, B 225, 335, 2265, C 643, E 1169, 1413, 1992; more willingly, A 487;
_the r._, the sooner, 2. 82.

RATTES, _pl._ rats, C 854, I 605.

RAUGHTE; see RECHE.

RAUNSON, _s._ ransom, A 1024, 1176, D 411, I 225.

RAVE, _2 pr. pl._ are mad, T. ii. 116; _1 pr. pl._ rave, speak madly, G
959.

RAVEN, _s._ raven, 5. 363; the constellation Corvus, HF. 1004; Ravenes,
_gen._ raven's, A 2144; _gen. pl._ of ravens, T. v. 382.

RAVINES, _s. pl._ rapines, thefts, I. 793. See RAVYNE.

RAVING, _s._ madness, F 1026.

RAVINOUR, _s._ plunderer, B 4. p 3. 73; Ravineres, _pl._ B 1. p 3. 57.

RAVISSHE, _v._ snatch away, B 2. m 7. 20; seize, appropriate, B 1. p 3. 25;
_go r._, go and ravish, T. iv. 530; _ger._ T. v. 895; Ravisshen, _pr. pl._
seize upon, B 4. p 5. 16; Ravisshedest, _2 pt. s._ didst greedily receive,
B 3. p 1. 15; Ravysedest, _2 pt. s._ didst draw (down), B 1659; Ravisshede,
_pt. s._ carried off, B 4. m 7. 24; Ravisshed, _pp._ carried away, B 1. p
3. 50; D 1676; ravished, B 4514; rapt, E 1750; overjoyed, F 547;
Ravisshinge, _part. pres._ ravishing, snatching away, B 4. m 6. 25 (Lat.
_rapiens_).

RAVISSHING, _s._ ravishing, T. i. 62; iv. 548.

RAVISSHING, _adj._ swift, violent, B 1. m 5. 3; enchanting, 5. 198;
Ravisshinge, violent, B 2. m 2. 4; rapid, swift, B 4. m 6. 7; destroying
(Lat. _rapidos_), B 1. m 5. 40.

RAVYNE, _s._ ravening, greediness, 5. 336; B 2. m 2. 10; ravin, prey, 5.
323; Ravynes, _pl._ plunderings, B 1. p 4. 51; Ravines, thefts, I 793. O.F.
_ravine_, L. _rapina_.

RAVYSEDEST, _2 p. s. pt._ didst ravish, didst draw (down), B 1659. See
RAVISSHE.

RAWE, _adj._ raw, I 900.

RAYED, _pp._ striped, 3. 252. Cf. _ray['e]_, 'streaked'; Cotgrave; from
O.F. _raie_, Low Lat. _radia_. See _Radiatus_ in Ducange, and Catholicon
Anglicum, p. 299, note 1.

RAYHING, _pres. pt._ arraying, furbishing, A 2503 _n_. (Bad spelling;
_read_ raying.)

RAYLED, _pp._ railed, T. ii. 820.

RAYNETH, _pr. s._ rains, T. iii. 562.

R[:E]AL, _adj._ royal, regal, B 1. p 4. 105 (see note to 1. 156); T. iii.
1534, 1800 _n_; v. 1830; L. 214, 284, 1605; B 4366 _n_; Reales, _for_
Royales, _pl._ B 2038 _n_. O.F. _real_, _roial_.

R[:E]ALTEE, _s._ royalty, sovereign power, 10. 60. O.F. _reialte_.

R[:E]ALME, _s._ realm, kingdom, B 4. p 6. 240 _n_; R[:e]aume, L. 2091; B
3305; R[:e]ame, B 4. p 6. 240; L. 1281; R[:e]aumes, _pl._ realms, B 3. p 5.
7, 10. See REME. O.F. _reialme_.

REBATING, _s._ abatement, 24. 24 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi).

REBEKKE, _s._ old woman, dame, D 1573. From the name Rebekah.

REBEL, _adj._ rebellious, A 833, 3046; B 3415; B 2. p 3. 16; 5. 457; 16.
23; Reb['e]l, T. ii. 524; L. 591.

REBELLE, _v._; Rebelleth, _pr. s._ rebels, I 265.

REBELLING, _s._ rebellion, A 2459.

REBOUNDE, _v._ rebound, return, T. iv. 1666.

REBUKED, _pp._ snubbed, I 444.

RECCHE, (1), _v._ reck, care, heed, 5. 593; B 2. p 3. 62; T. i. 797; iv.
1588; D 319; _ger._ T. ii. 338; care for, T. iv. 1447; _is nought to r._,
no matter for, T. ii. 434; Recche, _1 pr. s._ reck, 5. 606; T. iii. 112; A
1398, 2245, B 94, G 489; Reccheth, _pr. s._ recks, cares, A 2397; 6. 52;
Recche, _2 pr. pl._ 7. 269, 335; Recche of it, care for it, _pr. pl._ F 71;
_it recche_, _pr. s. subj._ may care for it, T. iv. 630; Roghte, _pt. s._
recked, cared, regarded, 3. 887; 4. 126; 5. 111; A 3772; B 4530; _impers._
he cared, L. 605; E 685; _1 pt. s. subj._ 3. 244; Roughte, _pt. s._ recked,
cared, T. i. 496; iv. 667; v. 450; _impers._ 1. 171; R. 341; _2 pt. pl._
HF. 1781; Roughte, _1 pt. s. subj._ would not care, T. i. 1039; _pt. s.
subj._ T. ii. 1428. A.S. _r[=e]can_, _r[=e]ccan_.

RECCHE (2), _pr. s. subj._ interpret, expound, B 4086. A.S. _reccan_,
_reccean_.

RECCHELEES, _adj._ careless, reckless, R. 340; 5. 593; HF. 397; B 229,
4297, 4626, E 488, H 279; careless of duty, A 179 _n_; regardless, HF. 668.

RECCHELESNESSE, _s._ recklessness, I 111, 611.

RECEIT, _s._ receipt, i.e. recipe for making a mixture, G 1353, 1366.

RECEYVEN, _v._ receive, E 1151; Receyved, _pp._ 1. 35; accepted, _hence_,
acceptable, B 307; Receyveth, _imp. pl._ receive, C 926.

RECHASED, _pp._ headed back, 3. 379. Lit. 'chased back.'

RECHE, _v._ reach, give, hand over, 3. 47; Raughte, _pt. s._ reached, A
3696, B 1921; reached up to, A 2915; reached (out, _or_ forward), A 136;
proceeded, T. ii. 446; Reighte, _pt. s._ reached, touched, HF. 1374;
Raughten, _pt. pl._ R. 1022. See _reken_ and _recchen_ in Stratmann.

RECKE, _v._ reck, B 2. p 3. 62 _n_. See RECCHE (1).

RECLAIMING, _s._ enticement, L. 1371. See below.

RECLAYME, _v._ reclaim (as a hawk by a lure), i.e. check, H 72.

RECOMAUNDE, _v._ recommend, T. ii. 1070, iv. 1693, v. 1414; _1 pr. s._ T.
v. 1323; commend, 25. 27 (see vol. iv. p. xxviii); _2 pr. s. subj._ mayest
recommend, T. i. 1056; Recomandeth, _pr. s. refl._ commends (herself), B
278.

RECOMENDE, _ger._ to commend, commit, G 544.

RECOMFORTE, _ger._ to comfort again, T. ii. 1672; _2 pr. pl. subj._ comfort
again, T. v. 1395. See RECONFORTE.

RECOMPENSACIOUN, _s._ recompense, B 4. p 4. 200; HF. 665, 1557.

RECONCILED, _pp._ re-consecrated, I 965. See RECONSILED.

RECONCILIACIOUN, _s._ reconciliation, B 2880.

RECONFORTE, _v._ comfort again, A 2852, B 2168; Reconforted, _pt. s._
encouraged, B 2850. See RECOMFORTE.

RECONISSAUNCE, _s._ recognizance, B 1520.

RECONSILED, _pp._ reconciled, B 2208.

RECORD, _s._ record, report, D 2049; Recorde, testimony, 3. 934.

RECORDE, _v._ witness, bear in mind, A 1745; remember, T. v. 445; (to)
record, recording, 5. 609; Recorde, _1 pr. s._ bring (it) to your
remembrance, A 829; Recordest, _2 pr. s._ callest to mind, B 3. p 12. 2;
Recordeth, _pr. s._ remembers, B 3. m 11. 34; Recorde, _pr. pl._ record,
tell, L. 2484; Recordedest, _2 pt. s. subj._ wouldst remind, B 3. p 10.
126; Recordinge, _pres. pt._ remembering, T. v. 718; recalling, pondering
on, T. iii. 51; L. 1760; Recorde, _imp. pl. refl._ remember, T. iii. 1179.

RECOURS, _s._ recourse, B 2632; resort, T. ii. 1352; _wol have my r._, will
return, F 75; Recourses, _s. pl._ orbits, B 1. m 2. 9.

RECOVERE, _v._ regain, get, T. iv. 406; Recoveren, _pr. pl._ recover, R.
57; Recovered, _pp._ gained, won, got, 5. 688; regained, HF. 1258; B 27;
healed, T. i. 37.

RECOVERER, _s._ recovery, 22. 3 (see note). O.F. _recovrier_, _recoverer_,
'ressource, secours, rem[`e]de': Godefroy.

RECREANT, _adj._ recreant, cowardly, I 698; Recr['e]aunt, T. i. 814. O.F.
_recreant_.

REDDOUR, _s._ violence, sway, vehemence, 10. 13. O. F. _rador_, _radour_,
'rapidit['e], imp['e]tuosit['e], vigueur, violence': Godefroy.

REDE, _v._ read, 5. 10; 22. 67; A. 709, C 107; advise, counsel, L. 2217;
interpret, 3. 279; _ger._ to read, B 1690, G 206; L. 30; to advise, T. i.
83; Reden, _v._ interpret, divine, T. ii. 129; _go r._, go and read, L.
1457; _ger._ to read, F 1429; to study, F 1120; Rede, _1 pr. s._ advise,
counsel, R. 38; 4. 15; 5. 566; A 3068, B 2329, C 285, E 811, 1205; read,
HF. 77; B 1095, C 508; _pr. s. subj._ may (He) advise, HF. 1067; Ret, _pr.
s._ advises, T. ii. 413; Redeth, _pr. s._ advises, T. iv. 573; Rede, _2 pr.
pl._ L. 1178; Redde, _pt. s._ read, D 714, 721; interpreted, 3. 281; Radde,
_pt. s._ read, T. ii. 1085; D 791; advised, 5. 579; Radde, _2 pt. pl._
advised, T. v. 737; Redden, _pt. pl._ read, B 1. p 1. 20; T. ii. 1706; F
713; Red, _pp._ read, 3. 224, 1326; 5. 107; HF. 347; T. iii. 192, v. 1797;
D 765; Rad, _pp._ read, B 4311, C 176, G 211; read over, A 2595; Reed,
_imp. s._ read, H 344; Redeth, _imp. pl._ read, B 3650, D 982, 1168.

REDE, _dat._ counsel, T. iv. 679; see REED.

REDE, _adj._ red; see REED.

REDE, _adj._ made of reed; referring to a musical instrument in which the
sound was produced by the vibration of a reed, HF. 1221.

REDE (r[`e][`e]d[*e]), _s._ red (i.e. gold), T. iii. 1384; the blood, B
356; red wine, C 526, 562. See REED, _adj._

REDELEES, _adj._ without reed or counsel; not knowing which way to turn, 2.
27.

REDELY, _adv._ soon, HF. 1392; readily, truly, HF. 1127, 2137. See REDILY.

REDEMPCIOUN, _s._ ransom, T. iv. 108.

REDERE, _s._ reader, T. v. 270; Reder, 5. 132.

REDILY, _adv._ quickly, promptly, R. 379; C 667.

REDOUTABLE, _adj._ renowned, B 4. p 5. 6.

REDOUTE, _v._ fear, B 1. p 3. 15; Redouted, _pp._ feared, B 2. p 7. 44; B
3. p 4. 44.

REDOUTINGE, _s._ reverence, A 2050. See above.

REDRESSE, _s._ redress, 4. 162.

REDRESSE, _v._ redress, 4. 192; set right, T. v. 1381; E 431; redeem, D
696; _ger._ to redress, redress, set right, 13. 8; T. iii. 1008;
Redresseth, _pr. s._ amends, I 1039; Redressen, _pr. pl. refl._ erect
(themselves) again, rise again, T. ii. 969; Redressed, _pt. s._ reasserted,
vindicated, F. 1436; Redresse, _imp. s._ reform, 1. 129; Redressed, _pp._
roused, B 4. p 2. 99. O. F. _redresser_.

REDUCEN, _v._ sum up, B 3. p 8. 40.

REDY, _adj._ ready, A 21, 352; D 1321, 1339, E 299, F 114, 1210; dressed,
T. v. 57; F 387; at hand, 2. 104; 3. 1256.

REED, _s._ reed, T. ii. 1387.

REED, _s._ counsel, advice, plan, 3. 105; 5. 586; R. 1615, 1618; T. i. 661;
ii. 389; L. 631, 1987, 2024; A 1216, 3527, B 3739, C 146, 744, E 653;
profit, help, remedy, 3. 203; counsel, adviser, A 665; _I can no r._, I
know not what to do, 3. 1187; _without reed_, helpless, 3. 587; _to rede_,
for a counsel; _best to rede_, best for a counsel, best to do, T. iv. 679
(_not_ a verb).

REED (r[`e][`e]d), _adj._ red, 5. 583; L. 535; A 153, 294, 456, 458, 1910,
3317, B 2059, 3734, E 317; (of the complexion), 3. 470; Rede,
(r[`e][`e]d[*e]), _adj. def._ red, 5. 442; 7. 1; A 957, 1747, B 4118, F
415; _indef._ (_rare_), 3. 856; L. 2589; Rede, _pl._ 1. 89; 3. 955; 4. 2,
27; 5. 186; A 90, 3319, F 1148. A.S. _r[=e]ad_. See below.

REED, _s._ red colour, redness, L. 533. See REDE.

REED, _imp. s._ read, H. 344. See REDE.

REEDNESSE, _s._ redness, G 1097, 1100.

REES, _s._ race, great haste, T. iv. 350. A.S. _r[=ae]s_.

REFECT, _pp._ refected, restored, B 4. p 6. 257.

REFERREN, _ger._ to refer, B 3. p 2. 42; Refere, _v._ return, T. i. 266;
Referred, _pp._ brought back, B 3. p 10. 123; reduced, B 3. p 11. 155;
referred, B 5. p 3. 127.

REFET, _pp._ recreated, B 4. p 6. 257 _n_.

REFIGURINGE, _pres. pt._ reproducing, T. v. 473.

REFLEXIONS, _s. pl._ reflexions by means of mirrors, F 230; Reflexiouns,
reflections, thoughts, HF. 22.

REFREININGE, _s._ refrain, burden, R. 749.

REFREYDEN, _v._ grow cold, T. v. 507; Refreyde, _v._ T. ii. 1343;
Refreyded, _pp._ cooled, I 341; Refreyd, cooled down, 12. 21.

REFREYN, _s._ refrain, T. ii. 1571.

REFREYNE, _v._ bridle, curb, I 385; Refreyneth, _pr. s._ curbs, I 294.

REFRESSHE, _ger._ to refresh, recreate, A 2622; Refresshed, _pp._
refreshed, L. 1081; solaced, D 38; encouraged, D 1767.

REFRESSHINGE, _s._ renewing, I 78.

REFT, -E; see REVE.

REFUGE, _s._ place of flight, escape, A 1720.

REFUS, (refyys), _pp. as adj._ refused, rejected, T. i. 570. See below.

REFUSE, _v._; Refuseden, _pt. pl._ refused, E 128; Refused, _pp._ 10. 41;
Refuseth, _imp. pl._ T. ii. 1211.

REFUT, _s._ place of refuge, refuge, 1. 14; B 3. m 10. 5; T. iii. 1014; B
546, 852, G 75; safety, 1. 33. O. F. _refuit_.

REGAL, _adj._ royal, B 1. p 4. 85.

REGALS, _pl._ royalties, royal attributes, L. 2128.

REGALYE, _s._ rule, authority, 2. 65.

REGARD, _to the r. of_, in comparison with, B 2. p 7. 77; _at r. of_, in
regard to, in comparison to, 5. 58; I 1059.

REGIOUN, _s._ region, realm, A 2082; 15. 25; L. 995.

REGISTRE, _s._ story, narrative, A 2812.

REGNE, _s._ kingdom, dominion, realm, 10. 45; L. 1413; T. iii. 29; A 866,
1638, B 389, 392, 735, 3401, 3404, 3432, F 135, I 79, 136, 867; dominion,
rule, A 1624; Regnes, _pl._ kingdoms, T. v. 1544; L. 22, 585; A 2373, B
181, 3518; governments, B 3954. O.F. _regne_.

REGNEN, _ger._ to reign, B 3. p 2. 24; Regnest, _2 pr. s._ reignest, T. v.
1864; Regneth, _pr. s._ 4. 43; L. 1008; has dominion, B 776; prevails
throughout, reigns in, T. ii. 379; Regnen, _pr. pl._ 4. 50; B 1. m 7. 15;
Regned, _pt. s._ reigned, B 3845; L. 582.

REHERCE, _v._ rehearse, repeat with exactitude, A 732, 3170; rehearse, F
1466; Rehercen, _v._ rehearse, repeat, L. 78; D 1308; F 298; _ger._ to
enumerate, I 239; Reherse, _v._ rehearse, enumerate, A. _pr._ 47; repeat,
tell, 3. 474; recount, B 89, E 1221, G 786; Rehersen, _v._ rehearse,
repeat, 3. 1204; T. ii. 572; Reherce, _imp. s._ repeat, T. ii. 1029;
Rehersed, _pp._ told, L. 1464; Rehersinge, _pres. pt._ relating, F 206.

REHERSAILLE, _s._ rehearsal, enumeration, G 852. See above.

REHERSING, _s._ rehearsal, A 1650; recital, L. 1185; Rehersinges, _pl._
repetitions, L. 24.

REIGHTE, _pt. s._ reached, touched, HF. 1374. Pt. t. of _reche_.

REINE, _s._ kingdom, R. 448. See REGNE.

REINES, _s. pl._ rain-storms, HF. 967.

REIOISINGE (rejoising), source of rejoicing, H 246.

REIOYE (rejoi[*e]), _v._ rejoice, T. v. 395.

REIOYSE, (rejois[*e]), _ger._ to make rejoice, 1. 101; Reioyse, _1 pr. s._
feel glad, T. v. 1165; Reioysen, _pr. pl._ rejoice, E 1993; Reioysed, _1
pt. s. refl._ E 145.

REKE, _v._; Reketh, _pr. s._ smokes, reeks, L. 2612.

REKENE, _ger._ to reckon, A 401; Rekenen, _v._ E 2433; Rekened, _1 pt. s._
3. 20; Rekene, _imp. s._ A. ii. 1. 1. See REKNE.

REKENING, _s._ reckoning, account, 3. 699; A 600; Rekeninge, judgement, 1.
132; reckoning, I 166; Rekeninges, _pl._ accounts, HF. 653; A 760, B 1408,
H 74.

REKEVER, _1 pr. s._ (for _future_), (I) shall retrieve, do away, HF. 354.

REKKE, _1 pr. s._ care, C 405, E 1090; Rekkest, _2 pr. s._ carest, D 1453;
Rekketh, _pr. s._ recks, cares, B 2837, G 632; _pr. s. impers._ (it) recks
(him), he cares, 7. 182; L. 365; _yow r._, you reck, 7. 303; _what r. me_,
what do I care, D 53; Rekke, _2 pr. pl._ reck, 2. 110; _imp. s._ care, B
4004, G 698.

REKNE, _v._ reckon (_also 1 pr. s._), A 1933; _v._ L. 2510; B 110; _ger._ B
158. See REKENE.

RELAYES, _s. pl._ fresh sets of hounds, reserve packs, 3. 362.

RELEES, _s._ release, 1. 3; ceasing; _out of relees_, without ceasing, G
46. O. F. _relais_, _releis_, _reles_.

RELENTE, _v._ melt, G 1278. From prefix _re-_, again; and Lat. _lentare_,
to bend; from Lat. _lentus_, pliant.

RELESING, _s._ remission, I 1026.

RELESINGE, _s._ release, B 3. m 12. 21.

RELESSE, _v._ release, I 810; _ger._ to relieve, release, B 1069; Relesse,
_1 pr. s._ release, E 153, F 1533, 1613; Relesedest, _2 pt. s._ forgavest,
I 309; Relessed, _pt. s._ released, I 809; forgave, B 3367.

RELEVE, _ger._ to raise up, relieve, T. v. 1042; v. 10. 77; B 2680;
Releeved, _pp._ restored, I 945; Releved, _pp._ revived, L. 128;
recompensed, A 4182; made rich again, G 872; Releve, _imp. s._ relieve, 1.
6.

RELEVINGE, _s._ remedy, I 804.

RELIGIOUN, _s._ religion, A 477; state of religion, life of a nun, R. 429;
a religious order, B 3134; the religious orders, B 3144.

RELIGIOUS, _adj._ belonging to a religious order, B 3150; devoted to a
religious order, T. ii. 759; _as s._, a monk or nun, I 891.

RELIK, _s._ relic, L. 321; Relikes, _pl._ A 701.

REME, _s._ realm, B 1306; Remes, _pl._ B 4326. See REALME.

REMEDE, _s._ remedy, T. i. 661, iv. 889, 1272. See below.

REM['E]DIE, _s._ remedy, B 3974; Remedye, 5. 140; Remedyes, _pl._ remedies,
A 475; Remedies, _pl._ (Ovid's) Remedia Amoris, 3. 568. See above.

R['E]MEMBR['A]UNCE, _s._ memory, 7. 211, 350; 24. 1 (see vol. iv. p. xxv);
Remembrance, I 134.

REMEMBRE, _v._ remember, I 135; Remembre, _pr. pl._ remind, F 1243;
Remembreth, _pr. s._ recurs to the mind, 4. 150; Remembringe him, calling
to remembrance, T. ii. 72; Remembreth, _imper. pl._ remember, F 1542, I
136; Remembre yow of, remember, 3. 717.

REMENANT, _s._ remainder, rest, 5. 271; L. 304, 623; A. i. 4. 5; A 888,
2277, 3166, C 275, E 869, F 1286, G 1004; Remenaunt, rest, remnant,
remainder, R. 1024, 1596, 1692; A 724, F 1575.

REMEVE, _v._ remove, T. i. 691; Remoeve, _3 pr. pl. subj._ F 993; Remewed,
_pp._ removed, B 1. p 4. 172; F 181; Remeve, _imp. s._ move, A. ii. 2. 2;
Remewe, A. ii. 5. 14; Remeveth, _imp. pl._ remove ye, G 1008. See REMUEN.

REMORDE, _pr. s. subj._ cause (you) remorse, T. iv. 1491; fill with
remorse, T. v. 1386 _n_; Remordeth, _pr. s._ vexes, plagues, troubles, B 4.
p 6 182. O. F. _remordre_, 'causer du remords [`a], tourmenter': Godefroy.

REMORS, _s._ remorse, T. i. 554.

REMOUNTED, _pp._ strengthened, comforted, B 3. p 1. 6.

REMUABLE (1), _adj._ changeable, variable, T. iv. 1682. O. F. _remuable_;
where _muable_ is from Lat. _mutabilis_: see Godefroy. (See below.)

REMUABLE (2), _adj._ capable of motion (Lat. _mobilibus_), B 5. p 5. 23.
Formed, apparently, from _remuen_, to remove (see below), but confused with
the above.

REMUEN, _v._ remove, B 2. p 6. 34 (Lat. _amouebis_). See REMEVE.

REN, _s._ run, A 4079.

RENABLY, _adv._ reasonably, D 1509. O. F. _raisnable_, _resnable_,
reasonable; the _s_ is lost before _n_ in A. F. and M.E.

RENDE, _v._ rend, T. iv. 1493; Rent, _pr. s._ rends, tears, L. 646 _a_;
Renden, _pr. pl._ rend in pieces, destroy, B 3. p 12. 91; Rente, _pt. s._
tore, T. ii. 928, iii. 1099; A 990; Rendinge, _pres. pl._ tearing, B 2163;
tearing, B 1. m 1. 3 (see note); Rent, _pp._ torn, HF. 776. See RENTEN.

RENDING, _s._ tearing, A 2834.

RENEGAT, _s._ renegade, apostate, L. 401 _a_; B 932.

RENEWE, _v._ renew, 8. 5.

RENEYE, _v._ deny, renounce, abjure, B 376, 3751, G 268, 448, 459; _1 pr.
s. subj._ may renounce, G 464; Reneyed, _1 pt. pl._ B 340; _pp._ L. 336; B
915. O. F. _reneier_.

RENEYINGE, _s._ denying, I 793.

RENGED, _pp._ ranged, placed in rows, R. 1380.

RENGES, _pl._ ranks, A 2594. O. F. _renge_, 'rang, file': Godefroy.

RENNE (1), _v._ run, 5. 247; HF. 202; R. 111; I 721; _ger._ 1. 164; A 3890,
C 796, G 1415; Rennen, _v._ B 3454; Renne, _1 pr. s._ L. 60; Renneth, _pr.
s._ runs, D 76, F 479, G 905; is current, E 1986; approaches quickly, T.
ii. 1754; goes easily, A. i. 2. 1; continues, A. ii. 3. 48; runs, finds
way, A 1761; arises, L. 503; spreads, L. 1423; _renneth for_, runs in
favour of, B 125 (see note); Renne, _pr. pl._ run, A 2868, 4065; Rennen,
_pr. pl._ A 4100; concur, B 5. p 1. 68; Ronnen, _pt. pl._ ran, 3. 163; T.
iv. 130; A 2925, 3827; Ronne, _pt. pl._ B 4578; Ronnen, _pp._ advanced,
lit. run, R. 320; Ronne, _pp._ run, T. ii. 1464; B 2; _is r._, has run, has
found its way (into), HF. 1644; Renninge, _pres. pt._ HF. 2145; Renning,
flowing, 3. 161. A.S. _irnan_; Icel. _renna_.

RENNE (2), _v._; _only in the phrase_ rape and renne, G 1422. See RAPE.

RENNER, _s._ runner, D 1283.

RENNING, _s._ running, A 551.

RENOMED, _pp._ renowned, B 3. p 2. 76; B 3. p 4. 14.

RENOMEE, _s._ renown, L. 1513; D 1159. O. F. _renommee_, 'bruit': Godefroy.

RENOUN, _s._ renown, fame, 2. 88; L. 260, 522; A 316; R['e]noun, 2. 63, 86;
HF. 1406.

RENOVELANCES, _s. pl._ renewals, HF. 693. O. F. _renovelance_.

RENOVELLE, _v._ renew, B 3035; Renovellen, _v._ renew, are renewed, I 1027;
Renovele, _1 pr. s._ 25. 9 (see vol. iv. p. xxvii); Renovelen, _pr. pl._
renew themselves, B 3. p 11. 91; Renovelled, _pp._ B 3036; Renoveleth,
_imp. pl._ 4. 19. O. F. _renoveler_.

RENT, -E; see RENDE.

RENTE, _s._ revenue, income, A 256, 373, 1443, B 1142, 3401, 3572, D 1373,
1451; stipend, B 3. p 4. 57; payment, tribute, 3. 765; _to r._, as a
tribute, T. ii. 830; Rentes, _pl._ rents, E 1313.

RENTEN, _v._ rend, L. 843 _n_; Rentinge, _pres. pt._ rending, B 2163 _n_.

RENTINGE, _s._ rending, A 2834 _n_.

REPAIR, _s._ resort, repairing, B 1211, D 1224.

REPAIRE, _ger._ to go home, B 1516; to repair, find a home, T. iii. 5; to
go back (to), HF. 755; Repaire, _v._ return, F 589; Repaireth, _pr. s._
returns, B 967; goes, B 3885; Repeirede, _pt. s._ returned, B 1. m 3. 2;
Repaired, _pp._ L. 1136. See REPEYRE.

REPARACIOUNS, _pl._ reparations, making up, HF. 688.

REPELED, _pp._ repealed, T. iv. 294, 560.

REPENTAUNCE, _s._ penitence, 3. 1114; A 1776; I 94.

REPENTAUNT, _adj._ repentant, penitent, A 228; Repentant, B 3075.

REPENTE, _ger._ to repent, R. 1670; _v._ 18. 56; _v. reflex._ 3. 1116; E
1846; Repenten, _v._ L. 339.

R['E]PENTING, _s._ repentance, L. 147; R['e]pentinge, L. 156; _without r._,
free from after-regret, 4. 17.

REPEYRE, _v._ repair, return, T. v. 1571; Repeireth, _pr. s._ F 339;
Repeyreth, _imp. pl._ T. v. 1837; Repeiring, _pres. pt._ returning, F 608.
See REPAIRE.

REPLECCIOUN, _s._ repletion, B 4027; Replecciouns, _pl._ B 4113.

REPLEET, _adj._ replete, full, B 4147; Replet, C 489.

REPLENISSED, _pp._ filled, I 1079.

REPLICACIOUN, _s._ reply, A 1846; repartee, 5. 536; replication,
involution, B 3. p 12. 120.

REPLYE, _v._ object, E 1609; reply, L. 343.

REPORT, _s._ T. i. 593; R['e]port, rumour, L. 726.

REPORTE, _v._ report, relate, tell, C 438; Reporten, _v._ F 72; Reported,
_pp._ E 2435.

REPORTOUR, _s._ reporter, A 814. (The host is so called because he receives
and remembers the tales; they were all addressed to him in particular. Thus
'reporter' has here almost the sense of 'umpire.')

REPREHENCIOUN, _s._ reproval, reproof, T. i. 684.

REPREHENDE, _v._ reproach, T. i. 510; Reprehenden, _pr. pl._ reproach,
blame, criticise, B 3. p 12. 93.

REPRESENTE, _v._ represent, 18. 58.

REPRESSETH, _pr. s._ 1. 142; Repressed, _pp._ T. iii. 1033; kept under, L.
2591.

REPRESSIOUN, _s._ repression, T. iii. 1038.

R['E]PREV['A]BLE, _adj._ reprehensible, C 632, I 431; _r. to_, likely to
cast a slur on, 15. 24.

REPREVE, _s._ reproof, B 2413, D 16, E 2204; shame, C 595; reproach, T. ii.
419, 1140; E 2206, I 625; Repreves, _pl._ I 258.

REPREVE, _v._ reproach, F 1537; reprove, H 70; Repreveth, _pr. s._ L. 1566;
I 33; Repreve, _2 pr. pl._ D 1177; _pr. s. subj._ D 937; Repreve, _imp. s._
reproach, T. i. 669; _imp. pl._ D 1206; Repreved, _pp._ B 2544.

REPROVED, _pp. as adj._ blamed, accused, R. 1135; Reproeved, _pp._
stultified, B 2. p 6. 80. See above.

REPUGNEN, _ger._ to be repugnant (to), B 5. p 3. 5.

REPUTACIOUN, _s._ repute, C 602, 626; reputation, H 185, 199.

REQUERABLE, _adj._ desirable, B 2. p 6. 20.

REQUEREN, _ger._ to be sought after, B 3. p 10. 166; _v._ entreat, seek, B
2927; Requere, _v._ ask, D 1052; Requere, _1 pr. s._ require, demand, T.
ii. 358; ask, D 1010; Requerest, _2 pr. s._ seekest, B 4. m 1. 25;
Requireth, _pr. s._ 4. 155; Requeren, _2 pr. pl._ ask, T. v. 1600; Requere,
_2 pr. pl._ T. ii. 473; Requeren, _pr. pl._ ask (for), B 2873; Requere, _2
pr. s. subj._ require, T. i. 902; Requered, _pp._ sought after, B 3. p 10.
155, p 11. 22; required, necessitated, T. iii. 405.

REQUESTE, _s._ request, 10. 76; T. iv. 57; L. 448; D 1060; R['e]queste, A
1819, 2685.

RESALGAR, _s._ realgar, G 814. '_Realgar_, a combination of sulphur and
arsenic, of a brilliant red colour as existing in nature; red orpiment':
Webster. F. _r['e]algar_, answering to an O. F. _resalgar_, Low Lat.
_risigallum_.

RESCEIVED, _pp._ received; wel resceived, favourably situated with respect
to other planets, &c.; A. ii. 4. 32. See RECEYVE.

RESCOUS, _s._ a rescue, help, T. iii. 1242; rescue, T. i. 478; A 2643. O.
F. _rescous_.

RESCOWE, _v._ (to) rescue, save, T. iii. 857; rescue, T. v. 231; Rescowede,
_pt. s._ rescued, B 2. p 2. 45; Rescowed, _pt. s._ L. 515. O. F.
_rescorre_.

RESCOWINGE, _s._ rescuing, I 805.

RESE, _ger._ to shake, A 1986. A.S. _hrisian_, _hrysian_.

R['E]SEMBL['A]BLE, _adj._ alike, R. 985.

RESEMBLE, _v._ D 90.

RESERVED, _pp._ kept, A 188.

RESIDUE, remainder, A. ii. 44. 29.

RESIGNE, _1 pr. s._ resign, 1. 80; T. i. 432; _pr. pl._ abandon, T. iii.
25.

R['E]SIST['E]NCE, _s._ resistance, T. iii. 990; G 909.

RESOLVEN, _pr. pl._ flow out, B 5. m 1. 1; Resolved, _pp._ dissolved,
melted, B 2. p 7. 101; B 4. m 5. 20; held in solution, B 1. m 7. 6.

RESONABLE, _adj._ reasonable, R. 1499; B 3793; rational, B 1. p 6. 47;
endowed with reason, B 5. p 4. 138; talkative, 3. 534; Resonables, _adj.
pl._ reasoning, B 5. p 6. 7.

RESONINGE, _s._ reasoning, T. iv. 1046.

RESORT, _s._ resource, T. iii. 134.

RESOUN, _s._ reason, right, A 37, 847; Res['o]un, B 3408; argument, B 4. p
6. 256; value, B 2. p 7. 18; speech, sentence, T. i. 796; Reson, reason, E
25; Resons, _pl._ reasons, A 274.

RESOUNE, _v._; Res['o]uneth, _pr. s._ resounds, A 1278; Res['o]uned, _pt.
s._ F 413; Resowninge, _pres. pt._ resounding, B 3. m 12. 14.

RESPECTE (_better_ Respect), _s._ regard, A. i. 21. 51; _to respect_, in
respect, T. iv. 86; v. 1818.

RESPORT, _s._ regard, T. iv. 86, 850. Godefroy gives: '_Report_, _resport_,
sentence arbitrale, rapport.'

RESPYT, _s._ delay, B 948; respite, delay, reprieve, 5. 648; R. 1612; G
543; _withoute more respyt_, without delay, forthwith, R. 1488; _out of
more respyt_, without any delay, without any hesitation, T. v. 137. O. F.
_respit_.

RESPYTE, _ger._ to refuse to do, hesitate, 7. 259; Respyten, _ger._ to
respite, F 1582.

RESSEYVETH, _pr. s._ receives, A. i. 3. 2. See RECEYVE.

RESTE, _s._ rest, repose, 1. 14; L. 198, 201; F 355; Rest (_once only?_),
5. 94; _at reste_, at rest, fixed, T. ii. 760; _at his reste_, as in its
home, 5. 376; _to reste_, (gone) to rest, A 30; Restes, _pl._ times of
repose, T. ii. 1722.

RESTE, _v._ remain (with), T. iii. 1435; rest, repose, T. ii. 1326; _ger._
to rest, 5. 265; F 606; _2 pr. pl. subj._ may rest, F 126.

RESTELEES, _adv._ restlessly, R. 370.

RESTELES, _adj._ restless, 10. 70; T. iii. 1584; Restelees, C 728.

RESTING-PLACE, _s._ 3. 1005.

RESTING-WHYLES, _pl._ times of repose, leisure, B 1. p 4. 31.

RESTORE, _v._ T. iv. 1347; Restored, _pt. s._ A 991.

RESTREYNE, _v._ restrain, 7. 235; T. i. 676; B 3796; Restrayne, B 3777;
Restreinest, _2 pr. s._ shortenest, B 1. m 5. 11.

RESURRECCIOUN, _s._ resurrection, i.e. re-opening (of the daisy), L. 110.

RET, _for_ Redeth, _pr. s._ advises, T. ii. 413. See REDE.

RETENTIF, _adj._ retentive, I 913.

RETENUE, _s._ retinue, troop of retainers, suite, A 2502; E 270; _at his
r._, among those retained by him, D 1355.

RETHOR, _s._ orator, B 4397, F 38.

RETHORIEN, _adj._ rhetorical, B 2. p 1. 29. O. F. _rethorien_ (Godefroy).

RETHORIEN (_written_ Retorien), _s._ orator, B 2. p 3. 39; Rethoriens,
_pl._ rhetoricians, B 2. p 6. 69. _Rethorien_, 'rh['e]teur': Godefroy.

RETHORIKE, _s._ rhetoric, B 2. p 3. 7; Rethoryke, HF. 859, E 32; Rethoryk,
rhetoric, F 719, 726.

RETORIEN; see RETHORIEN.

RETOURNE, _v._ return, R. 382, 384; Retorne, _v._ L. 2477; Retorneth, _pr.
s._ brings back, B 5. p 6. 192; Retourneth, _pr. s._ returns, I 138;
Retourned, _pp._ returned, B 2163; Retorning, _pres. pt._ revolving, T. v.
1023; Retourneth, _imp. pl._ E 809.

RETOURNINGE, _s._ return, A 2095.

RETRACCIOUNS, _s. pl._ retractions, things which I withdraw, I 1085.
'_Retraction_, action de se retirer'; Godefroy. (Not so strong as
_revocation_.)

RETRETETH, _pr. s._ reconsiders, B 5. m 3. 36. Lit. 'treats again.'

RETROGRAD, _adj._ moving in a direction contrary to that of the sun's
motion in the ecliptic, A. ii. 4. 33, 35. 12. Spoken with reference to a
planet's _apparent_ motion.

RETTE, _2 pr. pl._ repute, A 726 _n_. See ARETTE.

REULE, _s._ rule, 10. 56; A 173. See REWLE.

REULEN, _v._ rule, B 4234; Reule hir, guide her conduct, E 327; Reuleth,
_pr. s._ rules, T. ii. 1377; Reuled, _pp._ ruled, A 816. See REWLEN.

REUTHE, _s._ ruth, 1. 127. See ROUTHE, REWTHE.

REVE (r['e]['e]v[*e]), _s._ reeve, steward, bailiff, A 542, 3860; Reves,
_gen._ A 599. A.S. _ger[=e]fa_.

REVE (r[`e][`e]v[*e]), _ger._ to rob (from), T. iv. 285; to take away, G
376; _to r. no man fro his lyf_, to take away no man's life, L. 2693;
Reven, _ger._ to reave, plunder, I 758; to bereave, T. i. 188; Reven, _v._
take away, 10. 50; Reve, _v._ bereave, T. ii. 1659; Reveth, _pr. s._ forces
away, 5. 86; Rafte, _pt. s._ bereft, L. 1855; D 888; reft, B 3288, 3291;
took from, B 4. m 7. 23; Refte, _pt. s._ bereft, HF. 457; Raft, _pp._ torn,
reft, T. v. 1258; taken from, L. 2590; bereaved, F 1017; bereft, L. 2325.
A.S. _r[=e]afian_.

REVEL, _s._ revelry, sport, A 2717, 4397, E 392, 1123, F 278, 339, 1015;
12. 6; L. 2255, 2674; minstrelsy, A 4402; Revels, _pl._ revels, C 65.

REVELACIOUN, _s._ revelation, HF. 8; D 1854; Revelaciouns, _pl._ T. v. 366.

REVELOUR, _s._ (the) Reveller, A 4371; a reveller, A 4391, D 443.

REVELOUS, _adj._ fond of revelry, B 1194. O. F. _revelous_.

REVERBERACIOUN, _s._ reverberation, vibration, D 2234.

REVERDYE, _s._ rejoicing, R. 720. O. F. _reverdie_, 'feuill['e]e, verdure;
chant de May; joie, all['e]gresse': Godefroy.

REVERENCE, _s._ respect, A 141; respectful manner, A 305; reverence, A 312,
H 142; L. 32, 52, 98; fear, I 294; respect, honour, E 196; _thy r._, the
respect shewn to thee, B 116.

REVERENT, _adj._ worthy of reverence, B 3. p 4. 2; reverend, A. pr. 61;
Reverents, _adj. pl._ reverend, B 3. m 4. 6.

REVERENTLY, _adv._ E 187.

REVERS, _s._ reverse, contrary, 18. 32; R['e]vers, 14. 6; B 4167, D 2056.

REVERYE, _for_ Revelrye, A 4005 _n_.

REVESTEN, _pr. pl._ clothe again, T. iii. 353.

REVOKEN, _ger._ to recall, T. iii. 1118; Revoke, _1 pr. s._ withdraw,
recall, I 1085.

REVOLUCIOUN, _s._ complete circuit, A. ii. 7. 13; revolving course (orbit),
4. 30.

REVYLED, _pp._ reviled, I 623.

REWARD, _s._ regard, attention, T. ii. 1133, v. 1736; B 2449, I 151, 435;
L. 1622; R['e]ward, consideration, L. 375, 399; _having reward to_,
considering, 5. 426; _take r. of_, have regard, I 151.

REWDE, _adj._ rude, plain, unadorned, A. pr. 31.

REWE, _s._ row, line, HF. 1692; L. 285 _a_, A 2866; _by rewe_, in order, D
506. A.S. _r[=ae]w_.

REWE, _ger._ to have pity, A 2382; Rewe, _v._ rue, have pity, 4. 203; 6.
101; L. 158, 1842; T. i. 460, 462; be sorry, T. ii. 455; do penance for, G
447; Rewen, _ger._ to have pity, E 1050; Rewest, _2 pr. s._ hast pity, B
854; Reweth, _pr. s. impers._ makes (me) sorry, I am sorry, A 3462, B 4287,
E 2432; Rewe, _pr. s. subj._ may (He) have pity, 7. 287; A 1863; Rewed,
_pt. s._ had pity, L. 1237; Rewe, _imp. s._ B 853; Reweth, _imp. pl._ F
974.

REWEL-BOON, _s._ (probably) ivory made from the teeth of whales, B 2068.
See note.

REWFUL, _adj._ lamentable, sad, L. 1838; sad (one), B 854.

REWFULLESTE, _adj. sup._ most sorrowful, A 2886.

REWFULLY, _adv._ sadly, T. iii. 65.

REWLE, _s._ the revolving long and narrow plate or rod used for measuring
and taking altitudes, A. i. 1. 4, 13. 1 (see fig. 3); it revolves at the
_back_ of the Astrolabe; Rewles, _pl._ rules, A. pr. 19. See REULE.

REWLEN, _v._ rule, T. v. 758; Rewledest, _2 pr. s._ didst control, B 1. p
4. 153. See REULEN.

REWLICHE, _adj._ pitiable, B 2. p 2. 43.

REWME, _s._ realm, R. 495. See REALME.

REWTHE, _s._ ruth, pity, E 579, 893, F 438; a pitiful sight, E 562. See
REUTHE.

REWTHELEES, _adj._ ruthless, unpitying, 5. 613; 6. 31.

REYE, _s._ rye, D 1746.

REYES, _pl._ round dances, HF. 1236. See note. Mid. Du _reye_, 'a round
daunce': Hexham.

REYN, _s._ rain, A 492, 595, B 1864, 3363, 3921; F 1250; rain-shower, storm
of rain, A 3517, D 732.

REYNE, _s._ rein, A 4083, F 313; bridle, 26. 32 (see vol. iv. p. xxx);
Reynes, _pl._ reins, HF. 951; A 904. O.F. _resne_, F. _r[^e]ne_.

REYNE, _s._ reign, F 755. See REGNE.

REYNE, _v._ rain down, T. v. 1336; rain, 4. 287; _ger._ to rain, 10. 62; T.
iii. 551; Reyneth, _pr. s._ rains, A 1535; Reyned, _pt. s._ rained, T. iii.
1557. See RON.

REYNEN, _ger._ to reign, rule, 9. 60.

REYNES, _s. pl._ reins (of the body), loins, I 863.

REYSE, _ger._ to raise, T. ii. 1585; G 861; to build up, D 2102; _r. up_,
to exact, 'realise,' D 1390; Reysed, _pp._ raised, 3. 1278; T. v. 1471.
Icel. _reisa_.

REYSED, _pp._ gone on a military expedition, A 54. O.F. _reise_,
'exp['e]dition militaire, incursion sur une terre ennemie': Godefroy. From
O.H.G. _reisa_.

RHETORICE, Rhetoric, B 2. p 1. 31.

RIB, _s._ I 928; Ribbes, _pl._ ribs, D 506.

RIBAN, _s._ ribbon, _used as pl._ ribbons, HF. 1318.

RIBANINGES, _pl._ silk trimmings, borders, R. 1077.

RIBAUDYE, _s._ ribaldry, ribald jesting, A 3866, C 324, I 464.

RIBIBLE, _s._ rebeck, lute with two strings, A 4396. O.F. _rebebe_,
'rebec': Godefroy. From Arab. _rab[=a]b_.

RIBYBE, _s._ term of reproach for an old woman, D 1377 (see note).

RICHE, _adj._ rich, A 311; _pl._ A 296, B 122; rich people, A 248.

RICHELY, _adv._ richly, 2. 38; F 90.

RICHESSE, _s._ riches, wealth, 18. 12; L. 1253; B 107, 3432, 3750, D 1110,
1118; Wealth (personified), R. 1033; 5. 261; Richesses, _pl._ wealth,
riches, B 1. p 4. 68; B 2. m 2. 2; B 2560, I 186. O.F. _richesse_.

RIDELED, _pp._ plaited, gathered in (at the neck, or waist), R. 1235, 1243.
'_Ridel['e]_, pliss['e]'; Godefroy.

R[)I]DEN, _pt. pl. and pp._ rode, ridden; see RYDE.

RIET, 'rete,' A. i. 3. 3, 9. 3, 21. 1. The 'rete' or 'net' is the circular
plate with many openings which revolves within the 'mother.' See fig. 2.

RIGHT, _adj._ straight, upright, R. 1701; Righte, _def._ right, 1. 75; own,
T. ii. 1065; F 1311; Right assencioun, right ascension, A. ii. 28. 21; see
note (iii. 363).

RIGHT, _adv._ just, exactly, R. 1301; A 257, 535, F 193, 492; precisely, T.
ii. 286; wholly, C 58; even, B 2173, F 1614, I 113; Right as, just as if, B
5. p 1. 50; Right that, that very thing, 3. 1307.

RIGHT, _s._ 1. 21; _by right_, justly, 1. 22; B 44; _by alle r._, in all
justice, T. ii. 763; Rightes, _pl._ rights, true reasons, B 3. m 11. 26;
_at alle rightes_, in all respects, fully, A 1100, 1852.

RIGHTFUL, _adj._ perfect; _rightful age_, (in) her prime, R. 405; just, 1.
31, 132; righteous, 5. 55; B 1. m 5. 29; I 236, 700; just, lawful, I 744.

RIGHTFULLY, _adv._ justly, L. 324 a.

RIGHTWIS, _adj._ righteous, just, L. 905; Rightwys, L. 373.

RIGHTWISNESSE, _s._ righteousness, B 5. p 3. 135; B 2599, C 637, D 1909;
justice, 10. 66; 14. 8.

RIGOUR, _s._ severity, harshness, F 775.

RIKNE, _imp. s._ reckon, compute, A. ii. 27. 6; Rikened, _1 pt. s._
counted, A. ii. 3. 36. See REKENE.

RINDE, _s._ rind, bark, T. iv. 1139; hard skin, T. ii. 642.

RING, _s._ ring, 7. 131; T. ii. 585, iii. 885, 890; F 83, 143, 247;
concourse, L. 1887; Ringes, _pl._ rings, C 908, E 255; _lyk r._, i.e. in
ringlets, A 2165.

RINGE, _v._ make to resound, A 2431; ring, resound, T. ii. 233; _pr. pl._ A
2359; Rong, _pt. s._ rang, 5. 492; T. ii. 1615; C 662; Ronge, _pt. pl._ 3.
1164; Ronge, _pp._ rung, T. ii. 805, v. 1062. A.S. _hringan_.

RIOT, _s._ riotous conduct, gaming, A 4395; Ri['o]t, gambling, A 4392.

RIOTE, _v._ riot, gamble, A 4414.

RIOTOUS, _adj._ given to rioting, A 4408.

RISEN, _pp. of_ Ryse.

RISSHE, _s._ rush, R. 1701; T. iii. 1161. A.S. _risce_.

RIST, _pr. s. of_ Ryse.

RIT, _pr. s. of_ Ryde.

RIVEER (riv['e]['e]r), _s._ river, B 1927; River, 5. 184; Riv['e]re, T. iv.
413; Riveres, F 898; R['i]ver[`e]s, 9. 30; Riv['e]res, HF. 901.

ROBBOUR, _s._ robber, B 3818.

ROBES, _pl._ robes, A 296, 317.

ROCHE, _s._ rock, B 1. m 7. 9; B 5. m 1. 2; T. iii. 1497; HF. 1116; F 500;
Roches, _pl._ B 5. p 5. 22; HF. 1035; 3. 156. F. _roche_.

RODE (rud[*e]), _s._ complexion, A 3317, B 1917. A.S. _rudu_, redness.

RODE (r['o]['o]d[*e]), _s. nom._ rood, cross, HF. 57; _dat._ HF. 2; 3. 924,
992.

RODE-BEEM, _s._ rood-beam, D 496. (A beam across the entrance to the choir
of a church, supporting a rood or cross.)

RODY (rudi), _adj._ ruddy, R. 820; 3. 143, 905; B 2. m 3. 7; F 385, 394.

ROES, _pl. of_ Roo.

ROGGETH (ruggeth), _pr. s._ shaketh, shakes, L. 2708. Icel. _rugga_.

ROGH, _adj._ rough, G 861 _n_; see ROUGH.

ROGHTE; see REECHE.

ROIALTEE; see ROYALTEE.

ROK, rock; see ROKKE.

ROKES (r['o]['o]kez), _gen. pl._ of rooks, HF. 1516.

ROKET, _s._ rochet, tunic, R. 1240, 1242, 1243. An outer garment, usually
of fine white linen. O.F. _roquet_, _rochet_.

ROKKE, _s._ rock, L. 2195; 3. 164; F 1061; (_written_ Rok _before a
vowel_), F 1073; Rokkes, _pl._ T. ii. 1384; L. 2193; F 859, 993, 996, 1158,
1296, 1338.

ROKKEN, _ger._ to rock, A 4157.

ROLLE, _s._ roll, C 911.

ROLLEN, _ger._ to roll, revolve, T. ii. 659; Rolleth, _pr. s._ rolls, turns
over, revolves, T. v. 1313; A 2614, C 838; Rolled, _pt. s._ revolved, D
2217; Rolled, _pp._ much talked of, T. v. 1061; Rollinge, _pres. pt._
rolling, A 201.

ROMAUNCE, _s._ romance, 3. 48 (see note); T. iii. 980; R['o]maunce, T. ii.
100; R['o]manc[`e]s, _pl._ B 2038, 2087.

ROMBLED, _pt. s._ fumbled, moved about with his hands, groped about, G
1322. '_Rommelen_ (inquit Becanus) robust[`e] et celeriter sursum deorsum,
vltro citroque se mouere': Kilian's Du. Dict. (1777), p. 537.

ROMBLED, _pt. s._ buzzed, muttered, B 3725. See RUMBLE.

ROMEN (r[`o][`o]men), _v._ roam, wander, A 1099; _v. refl._ roam about, F
843; _ger._ B 558, F 896; Rome, _v._ HF. 2035; Rometh, _pr. s._ roams, L.
1497; Rome, _pr. pl._ B 1487; _1 pr. pl._ E 118; Romed, _1 pt. s._ roamed,
HF. 140; L. 105 a; _pt. s._ A 1065, 1069; _pt. pl._ 3. 443; Romeden, _pt.
pl._ F 1013; Rominge, _pr. part._ roaming, F 1173; Roming[`e], E 2218;
Roming, T. ii. 555; L. 1470; Romed, _pp._ gone, L. 1589.

R[=O]N (r[`o][`o]n), _pt. s._ rained, T. iii. 640, 677. A.S. _r[=a]n_, _pt.
s._ rained; see _reinin_ in Stratmann.

ROND, _adj._ round, circular, A. ii. 38. 1; Ronde, _def._ A. ii. 38. 3. See
ROUND.

RONG, -E; see RINGE.

RONGES (rungez), _pl._ rungs, rounds of a ladder, A 3625. A.S. _hrung_.

RONNE, -N; see RENNE.

ROO, _s._ roe, 5. 195; Roes, _pl._ roes, R. 1401; 3. 430; B 3. m 8. 6. A.S.
_r[=a]_.

ROOD, _pt. s. of_ Ryde.

ROOF, _s._ roof, HF. 1948 (MSS. F., B. have the form _roue_ = _rove_.)

ROOF, _pt. s. of_ Ryve.

ROON, _s._ rose-bush (see note), R. 1674. The vowel-sound, viz. open _o_
([`o][`o]), presents a difficulty, as the Lowl. Sc. word seems to be (run),
allied to Icel. _runnr_; but Halliwell gives _roan_, a clump of whins, as a
Northumberland word, and this points to open long _o_. And further, we find
the spelling _ranes_ in the allit. Morte Arthure, 923 ('in ranes and in
rosers'), which likewise points to the same sound.

ROOS, _pt. s. of_ Ryse.

ROOST, _s._ roast meat, A 206.

ROPEN, _pp._ reaped, L. 74. See note.

RORE, _s._ uproar, T. v. 45.

RORE, _ger._ to roar, T. iv. 373; _v._ HF. 1589; B 4078; Roreth, _pr. s._
T. iv. 241; resounds, A 2881; Roren, _pr. pl._ roar, B 3. m 2. 11; Rored.
_pt. s._ L. 1219; Roringe, _pres. pt._ I 568.

RORING, _s._ loud lament, E 2364.

ROSE, _s._ rose, R. 1700; T. i. 949; L. 112; C 33; _gen._ of the rose, A
1038; Roses, _pl._ R. 1651.

ROSE-LEEF, _s._ rose-leaf, R. 905; Rose-leves, _pl._ L. 228.

ROSE-GARLOND, _s._ garland of roses, HF. 135.

ROSEN, _adj._ made of roses, R. 845; Rosene, _adj. def._ rosy, B 2. m 8. 4;
_pl._ rosy, B 1. m 2. 16; B 2. m 3. 2, 7; B 3. m 1. 8.

ROSER, _s._ rose-bush, R. 1651, 1659; I 858. F. _rosier_.

ROS[:E]-REED, _adj._ red as a rose, G 254.

ROSTE, _v._ roast, A 383; Rosted, _pp._ A 147, 4137, D 1841.

ROSY, _adj._ T. iii. 1755, v. 278; Rosy hewed, of rosy hue, T. ii. 1198.

ROTE (r['o]['o]t[*e]), _s._ (1) root, A 2, 423, B 2320; L. 1368; principle,
B 4. p 4. 179; the radix, the fundamental principle, G 1461; root, source,
B 358, 1655, G 1069, 1301; root, i.e. foot, E 58; _dat._ L. 2613; F 153;
_on rote_, firmly rooted, T. ii. 1378; _herte rote_, bottom of the heart,
R. 1026, 1662; D 471; (2) root, the tabulated number written opposite a
given fixed date, from which corresponding quantities for other dates can
be calculated by addition or subtraction, A. ii. 44. 1; an astrological
term for the 'epoch' of a nativity, B 314; Rotes, _pl._ 'roots,' epochs, A.
ii. 44. 21; F 1276. Icel. _r[=o]t_.

ROTE (r[`o][`o]t[*e]), _s._ rote; _byrote_, by rote, by heart, A 327, B
1712, C 332. O.F. _rote_; see _route_ in Stratmann.

ROTE (r[`o][`o]t[*e]), _s._ a musical stringed instrument, a kind of
fiddle, of Celtic origin; said to be a fiddle with three strings, A 236.
O.F. _rote_, from O.H.G. _hrotta_, _rotta_, Low Lat. _chrotta_; of Celtic
origin, from O. Irish _crot_ (Gael, _cruit_, W. _crwth_); whence also E.
_crowd_. In the Century Dictionary the old fiction is repeated, that it was
perhaps 'played by a wheel, like a hurdy-gurdy.' It is clear that this
notion arose from a popular etymology, viz. from Lat. _rota_, a wheel!

ROTELEES, _adj._ rootless, T. iv. 770.

ROTEN, _adj._ rotten, 7. 314; A 3873, G 17, 228; corrupt, filthy, I 139,
419.

ROTEN-HERTED, _adj._ rotten-hearted, I 689.

ROTIE, (r[)o]ti[*e]), _pr. s. subj._ rot, render rotten, A 4407. A.S.
_rotian_.

ROUGH, _adj._ rough, D 1622; Rogh, G 861 _n_. See ROWE.

ROUGHTE; see RECCHE.

ROUKETH, _pr. s._ cowers, crouches, is huddled up, A 1308. Cf. Icel.
_hr[=u]ga_, a heap; _hr[=u]ga_, to pile up; Dan. _ruge_, to brood. See
_r[=u]ken_, in Stratmann.

ROULE, _v._ gad (lit. roll), D 653. Cf. F. _rouler_.

ROUM, _adj._ roomy, spacious, A 4126; Rowm, large, wide, A. i. 2. 2. A.S.
_r[=u]m_.

ROUM, _s._ room, space, L. 1999. A.S. _r[=u]m_.

ROUMER, _adj._ roomier, larger, A 4145.

ROUNCY, _s._ a hackney, nag, A 390. O.F. _roncin_; cf. Span. _rocin_.

ROUND, _adj._ round; Rounde, _pl._ 9. 24; 12. 4. See ROND.

ROUNDE, _adv._ roundly, i.e. easily, with an easy (not jerky) motion, B
2076; Round (_for_ Rounde _before a vowel_), round, A. 589; fully,
melodiously, C 331.

ROUNDED, _pt. s._ stood out in a rounded form, A 263.

ROUNDEL, _s._ roundel, roundelay, a kind of poem, 5. 675 (see note); A
1529; a small circle, HF. 791, 798; Roundels, _pl._ roundels, L. 423 (see
note); F 948.

ROUNDNESSE, _s._ roundness, B 5. p 4. 101; Roundnesses, _pl._ orbs, orbits,
B 4. m 6. 33.

ROUNE, _v._ whisper, T. iv. 587; B 2025; _ger._ D 1572; Rouned, _pt. s._
HF. 2044; D 1021, 1550; Rowned, _pt. s._ F 216; Rouned, _pp._ HF. 722,
1030; Rouninge, _pres. part._ whispering, E 2130. See ROWNE. A.S.
_r[=u]nian_.

ROUTE, _s._ company, rout, troop, band, train, R. 627; 3. 360; 5. 245; 7.
34; B 2. p 5. 64; HF. 1703, 1771, 2119; T. iv. 403; A 622, 889, 2153, B 16,
1634, F 303, 382; number, R. 1667; flock, R. 909; Routes, _pl._ T. ii. 620.
F. _route_.

ROUTE (1), _v._ roar, T. iii. 743; murmur, HF. 1038; _ger._ to snore, 3.
172; Routeth, _pr. s._ snores, A 3647, 4167. A.S. _hr[=u]tan_.

ROUTE (2), _v._ assemble in a company, B 540. See ROUTE, _s._

ROUTHE, _s._ pity, ruth, compassion, mercy, 3. 592; 7. 337; T. ii. 349; L.
1034, 1861; C 261, F 1261, 1349; lamentation, L. 669; a pity, a sad thing,
R. 192; 3. 1000, 1310; A 914. See REWTHE.

ROUTHELEES, _adj._ ruthless, pitiless, T. ii. 346; B 863; Routheles, 7.
230. See REWTHELEES.

ROUTING, _s._ snoring, A 4166, 4214; whizzing noise, HF. 1933.

ROVE, _dat._ roof, HF. 1948 _n_.

ROWE, _s._ row, 3. 975; line, HF. 448; _by r._, in a row, T. ii. 970;
Rowes, _pl._ rays, beams (of light), 4. 2. See REWE.

ROWE, _adv._ roughly, angrily, T. i. 206; G 861. From A.S. _r[=u]h_. See
ROUGH.

ROWED, _pp._ rowed, T. i. 969.

ROWEL-BOON, see REWEL-BOON; B 2068 _n_.

ROWERES, _s. pl._ rowers, B 4. m 3. 16.

ROWM, _adj._ roomy, large, wide, A. i. 2. 2. See ROUM.

ROWNE, _ger._ to whisper, T. iii. 568; Rownen, _v._ G 894; Rowne, _2 pr.
pl._ whisper, D 241. See ROUNE.

ROWTHE, _s._ ruth, pity, 3. 465; sorrow, 3. 97. See REWTHE, ROUTHE.

ROYAL, _adj._ royal, F 59; Roy['a]l, T. i. 432, 435, iv. 1667; A 1018;
Roy['a]les, _pl._ B 2038. See REAL.

ROYALLICHE, _adv._ royally, A 378; Royally, A 1713, E 955; with pomp, F
174.

ROYALTEE, _s._ royalty, E 928; Roialtee, B 418. See REALTEE.

ROYLETH, _pr. s._ meanders, wanders, B 1. m 7. 7. O.F. _roeler_, to roll.
See my note on P. Plowman, B. x. 297 (C. vi. 151).

ROYNE, _s._ roughness, R. 553. Cotgrave gives F. _roigne_, scurf,
scabbiness.

ROYNOUS, _adj._ rough, R. 988. See above.

RUBBE, _v._ rub out, 8. 6.

RUBEE, _s._ ruby, HF. 1362. See RUBY.

RUBIBLE, _s._ ribibe, rebeck, A 3331, 4396 _n_. See RIBIBLE.

RUBIFYING, _s._ rubefaction, reddening, G 797.

RUBRICHE, _s._ rubric, D 346.

RUBY, _s._ ruby, 12. 4; T. ii. 585, iii. 1371, v. 549; L. 1119; B 1800;
Rubee, HF. 1362; Rubies, _pl._ 4. 246, L. 534, 673; A 2147, 2164, B 3658;
Rubyes, R. 1117.

RUDDOK, _s._ redbreast, robin, 5. 349. A.S. _rudduc_.

RUDE, _adj._ rough, harsh, R. 752; rough, poor, E 916; inhospitable, H 170;
of humble birth, D 1172. See REWDE.

RUDELICHE, _adv._ rudely, A 734; Rudely, roughly, E 380.

RUDENESSE, _s._ boorishness, T. iv. 1677; rusticity, E 397.

RUEL-BOON, _for_ Rewel-boon, B 2068 _n_.

RUGGED, _adj._ rugged, rough, A 2883 _n_.

RUGGY, _adj._ rough, A 2883. '_Ruggig_, rugged, rough, shaggy'; Widegren,
Swed. Dict.

RUINE; see RUYNE.

RULE, _imp. pl._ regulate, order, I 592; Ruled, _pp. as adj._
well-mannered, L. 163. See REULEN.

RUM, RAM, RUF; nonsense words, to imitate alliteration (see note), I 43.

RUMBEL, _s._ rumbling noise, A 1979; rumour, E 997.

RUMBLE, _v._; Rumbleth, _pr. s._ moves to and fro with an indistinct
murmuring noise, HF. 1026.

RUMBLINGE, _s._ noise, D 2133.

RUMOUR, _s._ T. v. 53; Rumours, _pl._ fame, plaudits, B 2. p 7. 81.

RUSED, _pt. s._ roused herself, rushed away, 3. 381. See _Rouse_ in my
Etym. Dict.

RUSSHING, _pres. pt._ rushing, A 1641.

RUSTE, _ger._ to rust, A 502; _pr. s. subj._ rust, A 500; Rusteth, _pr. s._
16. 39.

RUSTY, _adj._ rusty, A 618; besmirched as with rust, R. 159.

R['U]YNE, _s._ ruin, T. iv. 387; HF. 1974; Ruine, A 2463, B 2754.

RYAL, _adj._ royal, I. 144; L. 146_a_; Rial, 2. 59. See REAL, ROYAL.

RYDE, _v._ ride, A 27, 94, 102; ride at anchor, L. 968; Ryden, _ger._
(_with_ out), to go on expeditions, A 45; Ryde, _ger._ (_with_ out), to
ride abroad to inspect, B 1255 (see OUTRYDERE); Rydestow, ridest thou, D
1386; Rit, _pr. s._ rides, T. ii. 1284, v. 60; L. 1776; A 974, G 608, H 79;
Ryden, _2 pr. pl._ A 780; Ryden, _pr. pl._ E 784; R[`o][`o]d, _pt. s._
rode, A 169, E 234, I 435; R[)i]den, _1 pt. pl._ (we) rode, A 825; _pt.
pl._ C 968, D 2019; T. i. 473; R[)i]den, _pp._ ridden, T. v. 68; B 1990;
Rydinge, _pres. pt._ 7. 46; Ryding, G 623. A.S. _r[=i]dan_.

RYDING, _s._ jousting, _or_ riding in procession, A 4377.

RYM, _s._ rime (usually misspelt rhyme), 16. 37; 18. 80; B 2115, 2118, I
44; Ryme (_for_ Rym, _before a vowel_), L. 66; Ryme, _dat._ 3. 54, 463,
1332, HF. 623; L. 102, 2516; a tale in verse, B 1899; Rym (_for_ Ryme,
_before a vowel_), verse, D 1127; Rymes, _pl._ T. iii. 90; B 96. A.S.
_r[=i]m_; cf. Icel. _r[=i]ma_, Swed. _rim_, Du. _rijm_, G. _reim_, F.
_rime_, Ital., Span., Port. _rima_. The spelling _rhyme_ is rare before
A.D. 1600.

RYME, _v._ describe in verse, put into rime (_or_ rhyme), R. 31; HF. 1255;
L. 570; A 1459, B 2122; _ger._ 5. 119; 16. 35; HF. 520; L. 996; T. ii. 10;
G 1093; _pr. pl._ 16. 41.

RYMEYED, _pp._ rimed, _or_ rhymed, F 711; see above. A.F. _rimeier_ O.F.
_rimoier_ (Godefroy).

RYMING, _s._ riming, _or_ rhyming, versemaking, B 2120; the art of riming,
B 48.

RYOT, _s._ riotous living, C 465.

RYOTOUR, _s._ roysterer, lit. rioter, C 692; Ryotoures, _pl._ C 661.

RYPE, _adj._ ripe, mature, B 2389, E 220; _pl._ seasonable, E 438.

RYS, _s._ spray, branch, twig, R. 1015; A 3324. A.S. _hr[=i]s_.

RYSE, _ger._ to rise, A 33; to arise, get up, F 375; Rist, _pr. s._ rises,
T. iv. 232; L. 887, 2208; A 3688, 4193, B 864; arises, T. i. 944; _pr. s.
refl._ rises, T. ii. 812, iv. 1163; L. 810, 2680, 2687; Rysen, _pr. pl._ F
383; R[`o][`o]s, _1 pt. s._ rose, 2. 17; _pt. s._ A 823, 2273, B 3717,
3863, F 267; L. 112, 1743; Risen, _pp._ 4. 2; A 1065; Riseth, _imp. pl._ I
161. A.S. _r[=i]san_.

RYTE, _s._ rite, A 1902, 2284; Rytes, _pl._ rites, T. v. 1849; observances,
A. ii. 4. 37.

RYVE, _ger._ to pierce, T. v. 1560; _v._ thrust, L. 1793; pierce, C 828;
tear, E 1236; R[`o][`o]f, _pt. s._ rove, rived, pierced, HF. 373; L. 661,
1351. Icel. _r[=i]fa_.



SABLE, _s._ sable, black, 4. 284.

SACHELS, _s. pl._ bags, B 1. p 3. 53.

SACREMENT, _s._ sacrament, E 1319, 1702; the eucharist, I 582; Sacrement of
mariages, holy estate of matrimony, B 2. m 8. 16; Sacraments, _pl._ D 1306.

SACRIFYE, _v._ do sacrifice, L. 1348.

SACRIFYINGE, _s._ sacrifice, B 4. m 7. 9.

SACRIFYSE, _s._ sacrifice, 3. 114; L. 1310; Sacrifices, _pl._ L. 2611.

SACRILEGE, _s._ I 801; sorcery, B 1. p 4. 181.

SAD, _adj._ stable, firm, B 1. m 4. 1; B 2. p 4. 54; I 129, 310; staid, A
2985; sober, B 3. p 10. 25; B 5. p 6. 119; E 220, 237; fixed, constant,
unmoved, settled, E 693, 754; sad, R. 211; devoted, 23. 9; trusty, H 275;
serious, grave, 3. 918; calm, settled, G 397; staid, L. 1581, 1876;
earnest, HF. 2089; Sadde, _pl._ grave, 5. 578; E 1002; staid, steady, 3.
860; discreet, B 135; sure, H 258.

SADEL, _s._ saddle, L. 1199; A 2646; H 52; Sadeles, _pl._ I 433.

SADEL-BOWE, _s._ saddle-bow, A 2691.

SADLY, _adv._ firmly, A 2602; discreetly, B 1266, 2412; steadfastly, I 124;
carefully, A. ii. 29. 13; D 2164; firmly, tightly, E 1100; in a settled
way, i.e. deeply, unstintingly, B 743.

SADNESSE, _s._ soberness, staidness, 6. 29; E 1591; calmness, B 4. p 1. 42;
patience, E 452.

SAF-CUNDWYT, _s._ safe-conduct, T. iv. 139 _n_.

SAFFRON WITH, _ger._ to tinge with saffron, to colour, C 345.

SAFFROUN, _s._ saffron; like saffron = of a bright yellowish colour, B
1920.

SAIL, _s._ L. 654. See SAYL.

SAILE, _v._ sail, L. 628; Sayle, _v._ B 1626; _ger._ T. ii. 1; Saileth,
_pr. s._ L. 951; Sayleth, sails, is bound, T. i. 606; Sailed, _pt. s._ L.
958; Seilinge, _pres. pt._ F 851.

SAK, _s._ sack, R. 457; A 4017; D 1755; Sakke, _dat._ E 2200; Sakkes, _pl._
bags, L. 1118.

SAKE, _s._ sake, A 537, 1317, 1800, D 1363, 1717, 1732, E 255, 2165.

SAKKED, _pp._ put in a sack, A 4070.

SAL, _pr. s._ shall (Northern), A 4043, 4087.

SAL ARMONIAK, _s._ sal ammoniac, G 798, 824. Lat. _sal armeniacum_,
Armenian salt. '_Sal ammoniac_, chloride of ammonium, a salt of a sharp,
acrid taste; ... also called hydrochlorate or muriate of ammonia'; Webster.
The word _armoniac_ certainly answers to the Lat. _Armeniacum_ in the old
treatises. Yet the right spelling is, perhaps, _ammoniac_; [Greek:
ammoniakon, to], _sal ammoniac_, _rock-salt_, Dioscorides'; Liddell and
Scott.

SAL PETER, _s._ saltpetre, G 808. Lat. _sal petrae_, rock-salt; 'so called
because it exudes from rocks or walls; nitrate of potassa;--called also
nitre'; Webster.

SAL PREPARAT, _s._ prepared salt, G 810. See the note.

SAL TARTRE, _s._ salt of tartar, G 810. '_Salt of tartar_, carbonate of
potash; ... first prepared from cream of tartar'; Webster.

SALEWE, _v._ salute, I 407; Saleweth, _pr. s._ B 1284, F 1509; Salewed,
_pp._ F 1310, I 407. See SALUWE.

SALOWE, _adj._ sallow, R. 355. (But read _falowe_.)

SALT, _s._ D 2196.

SALTE, _adj. def._ salt, L. 1462, 1510; _pl._ E 1084.

SALUING, _s._ salutation, A 1649; Saluinges, _pl._ T. ii. 1568.

SALUTACIOUNS, _pl._ salutations, B 1198.

SALUWE (salyyw[*e]), _ger._ to salute, T. iii. 1785; _v_. T. ii. 1016,
1668; Salue, _ger._ to greet, B 1723; Salu[:e]th, _pr. s._ salutes, 4. 146;
A 1492, B 731, F 91, 112; Salued, _1 pt. s._ L. 315.

SALVACIOUN, _s._ salvation, 1. 165; 4. 213; security, B 2361.

SALVE, _s._ salve, cure, T. iv. 944; Salves, _pl._ healing remedies, A
2712, F 639; Saves, F 639 _n_.

SALWES, _pl._ willow-twigs, osiers, D 655. A.S. _sealh_, _salig_, a willow;
pl. _salhas_. Cf. Shropsh. _sally_, a name applied to every species of
osier.

SAME, _adj._ 1. 77; B 4333, 4408.

SAMIT, _s._ samite, a rich and glossy silk material, T. i. 109; Sam['y]t,
robe made of samite, R. 836, 873. 'Le _samit_ ['e]tait plus riche que
l'['e]toffe de soie appel['e]e _sendal_. On le tirait de la Syrie et de
l'Asie Mineure'; Godefroy.

SAMPLES _s. pl._ examples, A. i. 40. 4.

SANG, _s._ song (Northern), A. 4170.

SANGWIN, _s._ stuff of a blood-red colour, A 439.

SANGWYN, _adj._ very ruddy, A 2168; sanguine (of complexion), i.e.
blood-red, A 333.

SANS, _prep._ without, B 501. F. _sans_. See SAUNS.

SAPHIRES, _s. pl._ sapphires, B 3658; Saphyres, R. 1117.

SAPIENCE, wisdom, T. 1. 515; B 2184, D 1197, E 1481, G 101, 111; Wisdom, B
1662; Sapiences, _pl._ kinds of intelligence (see note), G. 338.

SARGE, _s._ serge, A 2568.

SARLYNYSH, _error for_ Sarsinesshe, R. 1188 _n_. See note.

SARPULERS, _s. pl._ sacks made of coarse canvas, B 1. p 3. 53. See note;
vol. ii. p. 422.

SARSINESSHE, _adj._ Saracenic, R. 1188. (See the French text.) If
_sarsinesshe_ can be taken as a sb., it may refer to _sarsnet_.

SAT; _pt. s. of_ Sitte.

SATIN, _s_. satin, 3. 253; Sat['y]ne, R. 1104; Satins, _pl._ B 137.

SATISFACCIOUN, _s._ satisfaction, penance, I 87; restitution, I 108.

SAUCE, _s._ sauce, A 129, 351, B 4024; Sause, 9. 16.

SAUF, _adj._ safe, safely kept, I. 27, 57; T. ii. 480; B 343, D 1015, G
950; in safety, 4. 197. See VOUCHE.

SAUF, _prep._ save, except, 2. 50; 6. 6; A 2180. See SAVE.

SAUFLY, _adv._ safely, with safety, 14. 6; HF. 291; B 2373, 4398, D 878, E
870, F 761.

SAUGH, _pt. s. of_ See.

SAULE, _s._ soul (Northern), A 4187, 4263.

SAUNS, _prep._ without; _sauns faille_, without fail, certainly, HF. 188,
429. See SANS.

SAUSE, _s._ sauce, 9. 16. See SAUCE.

SAUTER, _s._ psalter, R. 431.

SAUTRYE, _s._ psaltery, a kind of harp, A 296, 3213, 3305, H 268. In the
12th century it sometimes had eight strings (Ogilvie).

SAVACIOUN, _s._ salvation, T. ii. 381, 563; B 283 (_in_ MS. E.), D 1785, H
58, I 93; saving, safety, preservation, B 3. p 11. 64; safety, T. i. 464,
iv. 1382; protection, B 1. p 4. 38; saving from death; _withoute any
savacioun_, without saving any, HF. 208.

SAVE, _s._ sage (the plant), A 2713. Usually _sauge_; from Lat. _saluia_.

SAVE, _prep. and conj._ save, except, A 683, B 217, 3214, 3628, E 76, 508,
F 1042, G 1355; 7. 267; Save your grace, by your leave, B 2260. See SAUF.

SAVE-GARDE, _s._ safe-conduct, T. iv. 139.

SAVEN, _ger._ to save, keep, 1. 117; 3. 1230; L. 1917; E 683; _v._ C 200;
Saveth, _pr. s._ A 661; Savedst, _2 pt. s._ B 639; Save, _pr. s. subj._ may
(He) save, A 3108, E 505, 1064, G 1361; Saved, _pp._ T. ii. 1503; kept
inviolate, F 531; Saveth, _imp. pl._ B 229.

SAVEOUR, _s._ saviour, 19. 16.

SAVEREN, _pr. pl._ mind, care for, I 820. See SAVOURE.

SAVES, _pl._ salves, F 639 _n_. See SALVE.

SAVINGE, _prep._ except, A 2838, B 1486; Saving, B 3200.

SAVORINGE, _s._ taste, I 207; Savoring, I 209; Savouringe, tasting, I 959.

SAVOROUS, _adj._ sweet, pleasant, R. 84.

SAVORY, _adj._ savoury, pleasant, T. i. 405.

SAVOUR, _s._ savour, D 2196; pleasantness, F 204; pleasant taste, liking,
pleasure, 10. 20; smell, G 887; scent, R. 925, 1661; interest, T. ii. 269;
Savoures, _pl._ tastes, B 3. m 1. 4; Savours, odours, 5. 274.

SAVOURE, _v._ taste, D 171; Savoureth, _pr. s._ I 122; Saveren, _pr. pl._
mind, care for, I 820; Savour, _imp. s._ have relish for, 13. 5.

SAV['O]URED, _adj._ perfumed, R. 547.

SAVOURINGE, _s._ tasting, I 959. See SAVORINGE.

SAVOURLY, _adj._ enjoyably, A 3735.

SAWCEFLEEM, _adj._ covered with pimples (due to an excess of humour called
_salsa phlegma_), A 625. See note.

SAWE, _s._ saying, speech, T. v. 38; A 1163, 1526, B 2671, D 660, G 1441;
word, B 2925; discourse, G 691; Sawes, _pl._ sayings, T. ii. 41; words, T.
iv. 1395. And see SOTH.

SAWE, SAY; see SEE.

SAYDE, said; see SEYE.

SAYL, _s._ sail, D 1688; Sail, L. 654; Sayles, _pl._ B 4. m 7. 6. See SEYL.

SAYLE; see SAILE.

SAYLOURS, _pl._ dancers (who leap in dancing), R. 770. '_Sailleor_,
_Sailleur_, sauteur, danseur'; Godefroy.

SCABBE, _s._ scab, R. 553; a disease of sheep, C 358.

SCAFFOLD, _s._ A 2533, 3384.

SCALDED, _pp._ burnt, A 3853.

SCALE, _s._ scale, or rather, double scale, for measuring both by _umbra
recta_ and _umbra versa_, A. i. 12. 2.

SCALES, _pl._ scales of fish, 5. 189.

SCALLE, _s._ scab, 8. 3. See _scalle_ in Stratmann.

SCALLED, _pp._ having the scall, scaly, scabby, scurfy, A 627.

SCANTITEE, _s._ scantiness, I 431.

SCANTNESSE, _s._ scarcity, I 420; scantiness, I 414.

SCAPEN, _v._ escape, T. v. 908; A 1107; Scape, A 4087; Scaped, _pp._ L.
131; B 1151.

SCAPINGE, _s._ escaping, B 4. p 4. 135.

SCARLET, _adj._ scarlet, B 1917, D 559.

SCARLET, _s._ scarlet stuff, A 456.

SCARLET-REED, _adj._ scarlet-red, B 4351.

SCARMISHING, _s._ skirmish, L. 1910.

SCARMYCHE, _s._ skirmish, T. v. 1508; Scarmuch, T. ii. 934.

SCARS, _adj._ parsimonious, B 2789.

SCARSETEE, _s._ scarcity, B 2790, G 1393; Scarsitee, 18. 80.

SCARSLY, _adv._ parsimoniously, A 583; scarcely, B 3602.

SCATERED, _pp._ scattered, G 914. A.S. _scateran_.

SCATHE, _s._ scathe, harm, misfortune, 'a pity,' A 446, E 1172; _Polymites
to sc._, to the harm of P., T. v. 938.

SCATHELES, _adv._ scatheless, harmlessly, R. 1550.

SCHRIVEN, _pp._ shriven, T. ii. 579.

SCIENCE, _s._ science, knowledge, 5. 25; A 316, B 2929; B 2. p 7. 106; B 5.
p 3. 73; T. i. 67; HF. 1091; learned writing, B 1666; wisdom, I 229.

SCLAT, _s._ slate, 11. 34.

SCLAUNDRE, _s._ slander, HF. 1580; ill-fame, disgrace, 7. 275; E 722;
scandal, I 137.

SCLAUNDRE, _1 pr. s._ slander, G 993; _2 p._ Sclaundrest, G 695.

SCLAVE, _s._ slave, T. iii. 391.

SCLENDRE, _adj._ slender, slight in make, A 587; slender, E 1198, 1602;
thin, B 3147; poor, B 4023.

SCOCHOUNS, _pl._ escutcheons, painted shields, R. 893.

SCOLE, _s._ school, L. 1896; B 1685, 1694; manner, fashion, A 125, 3329;
discipline, T. i. 634; 'the schools,' D 2186; Scoles, _pl._ schools, E
1427.

SCOLE-MAT['E]RE, _s._ subject for disputation in the schools, D 1272.

SCOLER, _s._ scholar, A 260.

SCOLERING, _s._ young scholar, note to D 44 (vol. v. p. 293).

SCOLE-TERMES, _pl._ school-terms, E 1569.

SCOLEWARD; to scoleward = toward school, B 1739.

SCOLEYE, _ger._ to attend school, to study, A 302.

SCOMES, _s. pl._ foam, lather, B 4. m 7. 39. Lit. 'scums.'

SCORCHITH, _pr. s._ scorches, B 2. m 6. 18 _n_.

SCORE, _imp. s._ score, notch, cut, mark, B 1606.

SCORKLETH, _pr. s._ scorches, shrivels, B 2. m 6. 18. For *_scorknen_,
variant of _scorpnen_, answering to Icel. _skorpna_.

SCORN, _s._ a mock, 7. 305; show of contempt, A 3388.

SCORNEN, _v._ treat with rudeness, T. v. 982; Scorneth, _pr. s._ scorns, 3.
625; Scorned, _pt. s._ 3. 927; jested at, B 4277; Scorning, _pres. pt._ 5.
346.

SCORNER, _s._ 5. 357; Scorners, _pl._ B 2519.

SCORNING, _s._ scorn, T. i. 105.

SCORPION, _s._ E 2058; Scorpioun, 3. 636; B 404, I 854; sign of Scorpio,
HF. 948; Scorpio, A. i. 8. 3.

SCOT, horse's name, A 616, D 1543.

SCOURE, _for_ Scourge, I 670 _n_.

SCOURED, _pp._ scoured, R. 540.

SCOURGE, _ger._ to scourge, I 670.

SCOURGES, _s. pl._ scourges, whips, plagues, E 1157.

SCOURGING, _s._ correction, 4. 42; Scourginge, scourging, I 1055.

SCRAPE, _v._ scrape, 8. 6.

SCRIPPE, _s._ scrip, bag, D 1737, 1777; Scrippes, _pl._ bags, HF. 2123.

SCRIPTURE, _s._ writing, inscription, (on a ring), T. iii. 1369; writing, B
1. p 4. 123; passage of writing, L. 1144; Scriptures, _pl._ writings,
manuscripts, A 2044.

SCRIT, _s._ writing, deed, E 1697; writing, T. ii. 1130. F. _['e]crit_
(O.F. _escrit_).

SCRIVENISH, _adv._ like a scrivener, T. ii. 1026.

SCRIVEYN, _s._ scribe, 8. 1. O.F. _escrivain_.

SECHE, _ger._ to seek, i.e. to be sought for (it was easily had), A 784; to
seek, 3. 1255; to seek out, D 909; _1 pr. s._ 1. 78; Seche, _pr. pl._ seek
after, T. ii. 1068. See SEKE.

SECONDES, _s. pl._ seconds, A. i. 8. 8.

SECOUNDE, second, 12. 20; T. v. 836.

SECOUNDELY, _adv._ secondly, B 2315; Secoundeliche, T. ii. 1741.

SECREE, _adj._ secret, trusty, 5. 395; secret, B 2251, 4105, G 178, 643;
able to keep secrets, D 946.

SECREE, _adv._ secretly, F 1109.

SECREE, _s._ a secret, B 3211; Secree of secrees, secret of secrets, Lat.
Secreta Secretorum (the name of a book), G 1447.

SECREENESSE, _s._ secrecy, B 773.

SECRELY, _adv._ secretly, E 763.

SECTE, _s._ sect, company, HF. 1432; E 1171; religion, faith (lit.
'following'), F 17.

SECULEER, _adj._ secular, E 1251; Seculer, E 1322.

SECULER, _s._ a secular man, a layman, B 4640.

SEDE (s[`e][`e]d[*e]), _v._ bear seed, 7. 306.

SEE (s[`e][`e]), _s._ sea, 1. 50; 3. 1028; L. 2163, 2178, 2196; A 59, 276,
1956, B 68, 127, F 1046; _fulle see_, high tide, A. ii. 46. 3.

SEE (s['e]['e]), _s._ seat, HF. 1361; T. iv. 1023; seat of empire, B 3339;
Sees, _pl._ seats, HF. 1210, 1251. O.F. _si['e]_, _see_.

SEE, _v._ see, L. 2560; _ger._ to see, look, F 366; to look (upon), 3.
1177; Seen, _v._ see, 5. 538; A. ii. 23. 29; B 62, 182; _ger._ F 203, 623;
See, _1 pr. s._ 3. 913; B 1168; _as fut._ shall see, 4. 190; Seestow, seest
thou, HF. 911; Say, _1 pt. s._ saw, 3. 806; 5. 211; B 1. p 5. 3; HF. 1283;
T. v. 992; Say, _pt. s._ saw, T. i. 351, ii. 1265; B 4304, C 227, D 645, F
1124; Sey, _pt. s._ T. ii. 548; B 1, 7; Seigh, _1 pt. s._ saw, A 193;
Seigh, _pt. s._ L. 13 _a_; L. 795, 812; A 1066, F 850; Saugh, _1 pt. s._
saw, A 764, G 589; _pt. s._ 1. 89; L. 16; A 850, 1400, B 583, 615, 1051, C
961, G 355, 402, I 126; Sy, _pt. s._ G 1381; Sawe, _2 pt. s._ sawest, R.
832; B 848; Saye, _2 pt. s._ sawest, B 2. p 3. 38; _2 pt. pl._ 3. 1129;
Saugh, _2 pt. pl._ G 1106 (with _ye_); Sawe, _pt. pl._ B 218; Seye, _pt.
pl._ saw, T. iv. 720; Seyen, _pt. pl._ G 110; Syen, _pt. pl._ T. v. 816; B
2879, 4568; Sye, _pt. pl._ E 1804; See, _pr. s. subj._ behold, regard, T.
ii. 85; may (he) behold or protect, B 156, C 715, D 2169; Sawe, _pt. s.
subj._ were to see, A 144; Seyn, _pp._ seen, B 1863; Seye, _pp._ D 552.
A.S. _s[=e]on_. See SENE.

SEED, _s._ seed, A 596; R. 1617, 1625; 5. 328; race, 1. 182.

SEED-FOUL, _s._ bird living on seeds, 5. 512.

SEEK, _adj._ sick, ill, 5. 161, 207; L. 2409, 2436; Seke, 3. 557; _def._ A
424; Seke, _def. as s._ man in a fever, 5. 104; Seke, _pl._ L. 1203; A 18,
245.

SEEL (1), _s._ bliss, A 4239. A.S. _s[=ae]l_.

SEEL (2), _s._ seal, B 882, C 337, D 604, 2128, F 131; Seles, _pl._ T. iii.
1462. O. F. _seel_.

SEEMLINESSE, _s._ dignity of bearing, L. 1041.

SEEMLY, _adj._ delicate, pleasing, 12. 11; seemly, L. 2074.

SEEN; see SEE.

SEESTOW, seest thou, 10. 37; HF. 911.

SEET, _pt. s._ sat (false form, due to pl. _s[=e]ten_), A 2075. See SITTE.

SEETES, _pl._ seats, A 2580.

SEETH, _pt. s._ seethed, boiled, E 227. Pt. s. of _s[=e]then_, A.S.
_s[=e]odhan_. See SETHE.

SEGE, _s._ seat, B 1. p 4. 11 _n_; throne, B 1. p 4. 183; siege, L. 1696,
1725, 1730; A 56, 937, B 3569, F 306. A. F. _sege_.

SEGGEN, _1 pr. pl._ say, T. iv. 194. See SEYE.

SEIGH, _pt. s. of_ See.

SEILINGE, _pres. pt._ sailing, F 851. See SAILE.

SEIN, _ger._; That is to sein, that is to say, A. pr. 26. See SEYE.

SEINT, _s._ saint, A 173, 340, B 1631; Seintes, _gen. pl._ B 61. See SEYNT.

SEINTE, _adj. fem._ holy, D 1824. See SEYNT.

SEINTUARIE, _s._ sanctuary, I 781; a consecrated object, C 953;
Seintuaries, _pl._ sanctuaries, B 1. p 4. 88.

SEISTOW, sayest thou, A 1125, G 260.

SEITH, _pr. s._ says, 5. 22; A 178. See SEYE.

SEKE; see SEEK, _adj._

SEKE, _v._ search through, B 60, 3492; seek, B 1633; _ger._ to seek, A 17;
to seek for, 3. 89; Seken, _v._ seek, T. i. 763; _ger._ A 13, 510; to seek,
i.e. a matter for search, G 874; Sekestow, seekest thou, T. iii. 1455;
Seken to, _1 pr. pl._ press towards, 2. 91; _2 pr. pl._ search through, B
127; Sek, _imp. s._ seek, A. ii. 14. 1; Soghte, _1 pt. s._ sought, A. ii.
45. 11; _pt. s. subj._ were to search, were to examine, C 488; Soughte,
_pt. s._ sought, 1. 114; _pt. s. subj._ were to seek, R. 624; Sought, _pp._
2. 1, 33.

SEKERNES, _s._ security, 7. 345.

SEKIRLY, _adv._ certainly, L. 163 a. See SIKER.

SELDE, _adj. pl._ few, E 146.

SELDE, _adv._ seldom, R. 470; B 2. p 3. 59; B 4. m 5. 24; T. ii. 377, iv.
423; A 1539, B 2343, 2594, D 1128, E 427; Selden, B 2594; Seld, B 2343.

SELED, _pp._ sealed, T. iv. 293; B 736.

SELES, _pl._ seals, T. iii. 1462. See SEEL.

SELF, _adj._ self-same, B 2. p 2. 48; Selfe, 5. 96; Selve, same, selfsame,
T. iv. 1240; HF. 1157; A 2584, 2860, F 1394; very, B 5. p 3. 67; HF. 1157;
B 115; _us selven_, ourselves, D 812.

SELILY, _adv._ happily, B 2. p 4. 64. See SELY.

SELINESSE, _s._ happiness, T. iii. 813, 825, 831.

SELLE, _s. dat._ boarding, flooring, A 3822. A Kentish form; M.E. _sulle_,
_sille_; A.S. _syll_. See note.

SELLE, _v._ sell, F 1563; offer, barter, A 278; _for to selle_, for sale, D
414; _to selle_, for sale, A 3821; Solde, _pt. s. subj._ should sell, were
to sell, R. 452.

SELLERS, _pl._ sellers, A 248.

SELLY, _adj._ wonderful (MSS. sely), HF. 513. A.S. _sell[=i]c_,
_seldl[=i]c_, strange.

SELVE, -N; see SELF.

SELY, _adj._ happy, T. iv. 503; kind, 4. 89; good, B 1702, D 730, E 948;
holy, B 682; innocent, simple, 4. 141; T. i. 338, iii. 1191; L. 2339, 2346,
2532; A 3404, C 292, D 132, 370, 1906, 1983; poor, pitiable, T. i. 871, ii.
683; E 1869; poor, B 4565; wretched, A 3896; foolish, hapless, L. 1254,
1336, 2713. A.S. _s[=ae]lig_.

SEMBLABLE, _adj._ similar, B 5. p 3. 52; E 1500; like, B 2294, I 408, 417.

SEMBLAUNCE, _s._ likeness, R. 425; appearance, R. 145.

SEMBLAUNT, _s._ appearance, semblance, look, R. 152; B 1. p 1. 4; L. 1735,
2691; B 2194, E 928, F 516; _in hir s._, apparently, R. 863.

SEMBLEN, _pr. pl._ assemble, i.e. rush together, A 2613 _n_.

SEME (s['e]['e]m[*e]), _v._ appear, seem, B 3. m 11. 18; E 132, F 102;
_ger._ to seem (to), T. i. 747; Semeth, _pr. s. impers._ it seems (to me),
A. pr. 34; Semen, _pr. pl._ R. 1011; F 869; Semed, _pt. s._ (there) seemed,
A 2970; seemed, A 313; _impers._ (it) seemed, A 39, E 296; _him semed_, it
seemed to them, they supposed, F 56; _the peple semed_ = it seemed to the
people, the people supposed, F 201; Semede, _pt. s._ seemed, R. 414; Seme,
_pr. s. subj._ 14. 13.

SEMELIHEDE, _s._ seemliness, comeliness, R. 1130; gracefulness, R. 777.

SEMELY, _adj._ seemly, comely, R. 1271; 3. 1177; A 751, B 1919.

SEMELY, _adv._ becomingly, R. 748; A 123, 136, 151.

SEMES, _s. pl._ seams, I 622.

SEMICOPE, _s._ half-cope, short cope, A 262.

SEMING, _s._ appearance, 3. 944; _to my s._, as it appears to me, B 1838.

SEMISOUN, _s._ half sound, i.e. suppressed sound, A 3697.

SEMLIESTE, _adj._ seemliest, H 119.

SENATORIE, _s._ senatorial rank, B 3. p 4. 57.

SENATOUR, senator, L. 584, 596; Senatours, _pl._ B 3670; Senatoures, _gen.
pl._ B 4561.

SENCER, _s._ censer, A 3340.

SENCINGE, _pres. pt._ censing, perfuming with incense, A 3341.

SENDAL, _s._ a thin silk, A 440. O. F. _cendal_, _sendal_.

SENDE, _v._ send, B 144; Sent, _pr. s._ 7. 194; E 1151; Sende, _pt. s._
sent, R. 1158; T. ii. 1734; A 4136; Sente, _pt. s._ B 3927; Sendeth, _imp.
pl._ send ye, C 614; Sente, _pt. s. subj._ would send, B 1091; Sent, _pp._
B 960.

SENE, _adj._ visible, manifest, apparent, R. 1517, 1582; 2. 94, 112; 3.
413, 498, 941; 11. 10; 21. 13; L. 340, 694, 741; A 134, 924, F 645. See
note to L. 694. And see _y-sene_. A.S. _ges[=e]ne_, _ges[=y]ne_, adj.
evident, visible.

SENE, _ger._ to behold, to see, 5. 329; T. i. 454; L. 1034; to look at, L.
2649; to look on, D 1245; to seem, L. 224; _on to sene_, to look on, L.
2425. A.S. _s[=e]onne_. See SEE.

SENGE, _v._ singe, D 349; Seynd, _pp._ broiled, B 4035.

SENGLE, _adj._ single, unmarried, E 1667; single, I 961. A. F. _sengle_.

SENGLELY, _adv._ singly, only, B 3. p 9. 101.

SENITH, _s._ (1) the zenith, A. i. 18. 4, 22. 2; (2) the point where a
given azimuth-circle meets the horizon, A. i. 19. 7; the point of sunrise,
A. ii. 31. 8.

SENSIBILITEES, _s. pl._ perceptions, B 5. m 4. 5.

SENSIBLE, _adj._ perceptible by the senses, B 5. p 4. 137.

SENSUALITEE, _s._ the bodily nature, sense, I 261, 262.

SENT, -E; see SENDE.

SENTEMENT, _s._ feeling, fancy, T. ii. 13; feeling, T. iii. 1797; sense of
feeling, T. iv. 1177; susceptibility, T. iii. 43; passion, L. 69.

SENTENCE, _s._ meaning, drift, B 1. p 6. 24; B 2. p 8. 7; B 2136, 4355, E
2288; contents, B 1. p. 5. 30; C 190; subject, B 1753; judgement,
definition, B 4. p 2. 13; opinion, B 1. p 6. 13; B 113, 3992; L. 381;
decision, 5. 530; sense, meaning, sentiment, instruction, A 306, 798;
sense, tenor, theme, 4. 24; 5. 126; HF. 1100; decision, speech, 5. 383;
judgement, order, I 17; verdict, G 366; Sentens, general meaning, I 58.

SEPTEMTRIOUN, _s._ north, B 3657.

SEPTENTRIONAL, _adj._ northern, A. ii. 40. 31; _pl._ Septentrionalis, A.
ii. 40. 29.

SEPULCRE, _s._ tomb, D 498.

SEPULTURE, _s._ mode of burial, T. v. 299; burial, L. 2553; I 822; tomb, T.
iv. 327; A 2854, C 558.

SERCHEN, _v._ search, B 2597; _pr. pl._ go about, haunt, D 867.

SEREYNS, _s. pl._ sirens, R. 684. '_Sereine_, a Mermaide'; Cotgrave.

SERGEAUNT OF THE LAWE, sergeant-at-law, A 309; Sergeaunt, officer, E 519;
Seriaunts, _pl._ Sergeants, (Lat. _satellite_), B 3. p 5. 27; Sergeants, G
361.

SERIE, _s._ process, argument, A 3067.

SERMON; see SERMOUN.

SERMONE, _ger._ to preach, speak, C 879.

SERMONING, _s._ preaching, argument, A 3091; talk, A 3597; talking, L.
1184.

SERMOUN, _s._ discourse, L. 2025; Sermon, sermon, D 1789; talk, T. ii. 965;
Serm['o]un, discourse, 4. 208; tale, T. ii. 1115; Sermouns, _pl._ writings,
B 87.

SERPENT, _s._ T. iii. 837, v. 1497; A 1325, D 1994, H 109; Serpents, _pl._
L. 679, 697.

SERVAGE, _s._ servitude, thraldom, B 5. p 2. 23, 29; A 1946, B 368, E 482,
F 794, I 276, 821; service, 3. 769; E 147.

SERVANT, _s._ lover, A 1814; L. 1957, 2120; servant, D 1501; Servaunt,
lover, 2. 60; 21. 2; Servants, _pl._ lovers, 6. 72; Servaunts, servants, A
101, I 152.

SERVEN, _v._ serve, B 4004; accompany, B 4. p 6. 206; Serveth of, _pr. s._
serves for, A. i. 23. 3; Served, _pt. s._ employed himself, R. 703; did
well by, R. 696; served, A 749; preserved, kept hid, F 521; Served[`e], _1
pt. s._ E 640; Served, _pp._ served, A 187; Serveth, _imp. pl._ 5. 660.

SERVISABLE, _adj._ willing to serve, A 99; serviceable, E 1911; useful, E
979, G 1014.

SERVITOUR, _s._ servant, D 2185.

SERVITUTE, _s._ servitude, E 798, I 147.

SERV['Y]SE, _s._ service, serving, 4. 19; A 250, E 603, 958, F 66, 280,
628; religious service, T. i. 315; musical performance, 3. 302; Servyce,
musical service (as in a church), R. 669, 713; S['e]rvise, service, 4. 167,
189; S['e]rvice, A 122.

SESE, _pr. s. subj._ seize, 5. 481; Sesed, _pp._ caught, 4. 240; seised,
possessed, T. iii. 445.

SESOUN, _s._ season, A. ii. 14. 8; F 1034, G 1343; prime, R. 1678;
S['e]son, A 19, F 54, 389; Sesons, _pl._ A 347.

SESSIOUNS, _pl._ sessions, A 355.

SESTOW, seest thou, T. iii. 46.

SETE, _s._ seat, throne, B 1. p 3. 7; B 3. m 6. 6; seat, B 3715, I 162;
dwelling-place, B 2. m 4. 2; heart, inmost part, B 3. p 11. 86.

SETE, -N; see SITTE.

SETEWALE, _s._ zedoary, setwall, R. 1370. See CETEWALE.

SETHE, _v._ seethe, boil, A 383; Seeth, _pt. s._ E 227.

SETTE, _ger._ to set, place, L. 540; to set, E 975; _setten a myte_, care a
mite, T. iii. 900; Sette, _1 pr. s._ suppose, T. ii. 367; B 2681; Sette
cas, imagine the case, B 3041; Sette, _2 pr. pl._, esteem, T. ii. 432;
Sette, _1 pr. s. subj._ set, A 3911 (see note); Set, _pr. s._ setteth,
sets, 2. 101; D 1982; cares, T. iii. 832; puts, 3. 635; Sette, _1 pt. s._
counted, reckoned, regarded, D 659; Sette me, placed myself, L. 115; Sette,
_pt. s._ set, A 507, B 1053; placed, B 3932; cast, E 233; arrayed, E 382;
accounted, A 4000; _sette nat a kers_, accounted not worth a cress, A 3756;
Sette at nought, counted as nothing, F 821; Sette him, sat down, C 207;
Sette hir, sat, B 329; Sette her on knees, knelt down, B 638; Sette, _pt.
pl._ set, T. iii. 608; Sette hem, seated themselves, L. 301; C 775; Setten
hem adoun, set themselves, G 396; Set, _pp._ placed, A 132, 2528; put, B
440; set, R. 846; appointed, 4. 52; E 774; wholly devoted, 6. 100; _wel
set_, seemly, 3. 828; _set the wrightes cappe_ = made a fool of him, A
3143; Set, _imp. s._ stake (as at dice), T. iv. 622.

SEUR, _adj._ sure, B 2642, 2953. O. F. _s[:e]ur_.

SEUR, _adv._ surely, T. iii. 1633.

SEURLY, _adv._ surely, B 2913.

SEURTEE, _s._ surety, A 1604, B 243, C 937; security, 9. 46; T. ii. 833; F
1581; S[:e]urtee, HF. 723; Seurte, T. iii. 1678; Seuretee, security, I 735;
trustworthiness, F 528. O. F. _s[:e]urtee_.

SEVENE, seven, I 224; Seven, 1. 15.

SEVENTENE, seventeen, B 4644.

SEVENTHE, seventh, A 1462; T. ii. 681.

SEWE, _v._ follow, 25. 12; _ger._ 14. 4; ensue, B 2619, 2692; Seweth, _pr.
s._ follows, B. 2728; follows as a consequence, HF. 840; Sewed, _pt. s._
followed, pursued, B 4527. A. F. _suire_; O. F. _sivir_.

SEWES, _s. pl._ lit. juices, gravies; used here for seasoned dishes,
delicacies, F 67. A.S. _s[=e]aw_, juice, moisture. The Prompt. Parv. has
'_Sew_, cepulatum'; _cepulatum_ means broth seasoned with onions.

SEWING, _adj._ conformable, in proportion, similar, 3. 959. Lit.
'following'; cf. prov. E. _suant_, _sewant_. See SEWE.

SEXE, six, A ii. 42. 7.

SEXTE, sixth, HF. 1727.

SEXTEYN, _s._ sacristan, B 3126, D 1859. A. F. _secrestein_.

SEY, _1 pt. s._ saw, 3. 1089; _pt. s._ saw, B 809, 1128; Seyen, _pt. pl._
saw, G 110; 3. 842; Seyn, _pp._ seen, 3. 854; B 172, 624. See SEE.

SEYE, _v._ say, A 738, 787, F 4, 1267; _ger._ T. iv. 1171; to be told, B
706; _to seyn_, A 284; _for to seye_, to say, A 468; Seyn, _v._ say, 2. 51;
3. 1031; 5. 35; Seyn, _ger._ to tell, L. 715; Seyen, _ger._ A. i. 10. 2;
Seyne, _ger._ 2. 77; 5. 78; 7. 281; F 314; _this is to seyn_, A 181; _that
is to seyn_, A 797; Seyne, _1 pr. s._ B 1139, F 107; Seist, _2 pr. s._ B
109; Seistow, sayest thou, B 110; _as who seyth_, like one who says, i.e.
so to speak, T. v. 883; Seggen, _1 pr. pl._ say, T. iv. 194; Seyn, _2 pr.
pl._ B 2260; Seydestow, saidest thou, T. i. 919, 924; G 334; Seyde, _pt.
s._ said, B 1179; Sayde, _pt. s._ A 70, B 1635; Seyden, _pt. pl._ B 211, F
207; Seyd, _pp._ B 49, 51, 52; Sey, _imp. s._ tell, B 3995, F 2; Seyeth,
_imp. pl._ say ye, A 1868.

SEYL, _s._ sail, A 696, 3532. See SAIL.

SEYN, _pp._ seen, B 1863, 4471, E 280. See SEE.

SEYND, _pp._ singed, i.e. broiled, B 4035. See SENGE.

SEYNT, _s._ saint, 3. 1319; S[:e]ynt (_dissyllabic_), A 120, 509, 687, D
1564; Seynte, saint (_or_ holy), A 1721; Seyntes, _gen. pl._ T. ii. 118.
See SEINT.

SEYST, _2 pr. s._ sayest, B 109; Seystow, _2 pr. s._ sayest thou, 10. 27; A
3490, B 110. See SEYE.

SHAAR, _s._ a plough-share, A 3763.

SHABREYDE, _for_ She abreyde, she awoke, T. iv. 1212 _n_.

SHAD, -DE; see SHEDE.

SHADE, _dat._ 7. 18.

SHADEWY, _adj._ shadowy, B 3. p 4. 40.

SHADOWING, _s._ shadow, shady place, R. 1503.

SHADWE, _s._ shadow; R. 1411; B 7, 10, E 1315, I 7, 177, 1068; shade, 3.
426; scene (see note), B 2. p 3. 55; Shadowe, reflection, R. 1529; Shadwes,
_pl._ shadows, times of twilight, A ii. 16. 10.

SHADWED, _pp._ shadowed, shaded, T. ii. 821; A 607; R. 1511.

SHAFT, _s._ wooden part of an arrow, A 1362; Shaftes, _pl._ shafts of
spears, A 2605; arrows, 5. 180.

SHAKE, _v._ E 978; Shaken, _pr. pl._ quiver, T. iii. 890; Shoken, _pt. pl._
R. 363; Shake, _pp._ shaken, A 406.

SHAL, _1 pr. s._ owe, T. iii. 1649; owe (to), T. iii. 791; shall (do so), F
688; must, A 853, D 1353; am to be, 2. 53; am to (go), G 303; Shalt, _2 pr.
s._ must go, D 1636; Shaltow, _2 pr. s._ shalt thou, A 3575, B 2511, E 560,
I 107; A. pr. 76; Shal, _pr. s._ shall be, T. v. 833; is to be, HF. 82;
must, is to, L. 12; A 187, B 268, 665, F 603; must (come), T. iv. 1106;
will, L. 1276; must (do so), R. 387; owes, F 750; Sholde, _1 pt. s._
should, B 56; ought (to have done so), 3. 1200; Sholdestow, shouldst thou,
10. 60; wouldst thou, D 1944; Sholde, _pt. s._ should, A 184, 249, 450; L.
1951; ought to, B 44, E 247, 261; had to, E 515, F 40; was to, B 3891;
would, B 3627; Sholden, _1 pt. pl._ (we) ought, T. v. 1825; Sholde, _pt.
pl._ had to, D 1896; Shul, _1 pr. pl._ must, have to, B 351; must, B 1900,
E 38; Shullen, _2 pr. pl._ shall, B 4652; shall, G 241; Shuln, _2 pr. pl._
must, B 2545; Shullen, _pr. pl._ must, A 3014; shall, D 1331; Shuln, _pr.
pl._ shall, I 141; Shul, _pr. pl._ shall, 5. 658; must, 5. 80; shall, may,
E 733; Shulde, _1 pt. s._ should, ought to, B 247; _pt. s._ had to, 4. 251,
253.

SHALE, _s._ shell, HF. 1281. A.S. _scealu_, a husk.

SHALIGHTE, _for_ She alighte, T. v. 189 _n_.

SHALMYES, _pl._ shawms, HF. 1218. O. F. _chalemie_, 'a little pipe made of
a reed'; Cotgrave.

SHALT, SHALTOW; see SHAL.

SHAME, _s._ R. 980; A 503, D 964; Shame of his degree, i.e. lest it should
shame his condition (as husband), F 752; Shames, _gen._ of shame, T. i.
180; L. 2064, 2072; Shames deth, death of shame, shameful death, B 819, E
2377.

SHAMEN, _v._ put to shame, F 1565; _thee shameth_, it shames thee, thou art
ashamed, B 101; Shamed, _pp._ ashamed, T. v. 1727.

SHAMFAST, _adj._ modest, shy, L. 1535; A 2055, C 55; shamefaced, ashamed,
R. 467; B 4. m 7. 31; B 2236, I 984.

SHAMFASTNESSE, _s._ modesty, A 840, C 55; sense of shame, I 985.

SHAMFUL, _adj._ shameful, C 290.

SHAP, _s._ shape, form, R. 813; 5. 373, 398; T. v. 473; L. 1747; A 1889, F
427, G 44; privy member, 1423; Shape, _dat._ shape, 16. 31.

SHAPEN, _v._ plan, devise, A 3403; _ger._ to contrive, devise, A 2541, B
210; Shape, _v._ make, devise, 5. 502; find means (to do), A 809; Shapeth
him, _pr. s._ intends, L. 1289; Shapen, _2 pr. pl. refl._ intend, purpose,
A 772; Shape, _pr. pl._ dispose, B 2989; Shapen hem, intend, F 214;
Sh['o]['o]p, _pt. s._ befel, T. ii. 61; devised, planned, T. i. 207; made,
gave, L. 2569; prepared for, E 198; plotted, B 2543; created, E 903;
contrived, E 946; Shoop me, _1 pt. s. refl._ adressed myself, 2. 20;
prepared myself, L. 180; Shoop him, _pt. s. refl._ got ready, L. 625;
disposed himself, B 2241; prepared himself, E 2025; intended, C 874, D
1780; determined, F 809; prepared itself, was about, T. iii. 551; Shopen,
_pt. pl._ made ready, B 2995; arranged, F 897; Shapen, _pp._ determined, A
1108; destined, 7. 243; A 1392; shaped, L. 2014; A. i. 21. 1; D 139;
planned, B 951, C 149; prepared, B 249; appointed, B 253; disposed
(themselves), B 142; built, 7. 357; cut out, T. iii. 734; Shape, _pp._
destined, ordained, 16. 8; A 1225; allotted, T. ii. 282; shaped, B 1890;
created, B 3099; Shapeth, _imp. pl._ provide, E 1408; _refl._, dispose
yourself, B 2307.

SHAPLY, _adj._ shapely, fit, A 372; likely, T. iv. 1452.

SHARP, _adj._ 5. 2; A 114, 352; Sharpe (_for_ Sharp, _before a vowel_), I
130; _def._ keen, 5. 331; _pl._ R. 945; A 473

SHARPE, _adv._ sharply, B 2073; shrilly, T. i. 729; HF. 1202.

SHARPLY, _adv._ A 523.

SHAVE, _v._ shave, A 3326; Shaven, _pp._ shaved, cut smooth, R. 941; Shave,
_pp._ shaven, A 588, E 1826; bare of money, 19. 19.

SHAVING, _s._ a thin slice, G 1239.

SHAWE, _s._ wood, T. iii. 720; A 4367, D 1386. A.S. _sceaga_.

SHE, she, A 446, 447; She ... she, one woman and another, T. ii. 1747.

SHE-APE, _s._ female ape, I 424.

SHEDE, _v._; Shedeth, _pr. s._ sheds, I 577; Sheden, _pr. pl._ diffuse, B
3. p ii. 84 (Lat. _diffundunt_); Shedde, _pt. s._ shed, B 3447; Shadde,
_pt. s._ poured, B 3921; Shad, _pp._ shed, B 3. m 7. 3; divided, B 4. p 6.
90; distributed (Lat. _funduntur_), B 1. m 1. 11.

SHEEF, _s._ sheaf, L. 190; A 104; Shefe, _dat._ L. 2579; Sheves, _pl._ HF.
2140.

SHEEP, _s._ a sheep, A 506; a meek person, D 432; Shepe, _dat._ C 351;
_pl._ flock, A 496, 506.

SHELD, _s._ shield, T. ii. 201, 532, iii. 480; A 2122; Sheeldes, _pl._
shields, A 2499, 2504; French crowns (coins worth 3_s._ 4_d._), A 278;
Sheeld, _pl._ B 1521, 1542.

SHELDE, _pr. s. subj._ may he shield, HF. 88. See SHILDE. (A Kentish form.)

SHELFISSHE, _s._ shell-fish, B 2. m 5. 10; Shelle-fish, B 5. p 5. 21.

SHELVES, _s. pl._ A 3211.

SHENDE, _v._ disgrace, T. iv. 1577; ruin, 5, 494; T. iv. 1496; B 927;
render contemptible, T. v. 893; reproach, T. v. 1060; destroy, HF. 1016;
_ger._ to disgrace, T. iv. 79; Shende, _1 pr. s._ destroy, T. v. 1274;
Shendeth, _pr. s._ ruins, spoils, I 688; confounds, B 28; Shent, _pr. s._
ruins, I 848; defiles, I 854; Shende, _2 pr. pl._ spoil, T. ii. 590; _pr.
pl._ destroy, D 376; Shende, _pr. s. subj._ spoil, harm, R. 1400; T. i.
972; A 4410; Shente, _pt. s._ harmed, injured, B 4031; put to confusion, 5.
255; Shente, _pt. s. subj._ should destroy, T. ii. 357; Shent, _pp._
spoilt, T. ii. 37; disgraced, T. iii. 1459; E 1320; H 328; corrupted, A
2754; ruined, R. 1658; defeated, L. 652; scolded, B 1731; Shente, _pp. pl._
ruined, B 931. A.S. _scendan_.

SHENDSHIPE, _s._ shame, I 273. See above.

SHENE, _adj._ bright, A 115, 160, F 53; glistening, R. 127, 1512, 1518;
fair, L. 49 _a_; E 2528; beautiful, 5. 299; 7. 38, 73; HF. 1536; L. 1467; A
972, 1068, B 692, F 1045. A.S. _sc[=e]ne_, _sc[=y]ne_.

SHENE, _adv._ brightly, 4. 87.

SHEPE, _s._ hire, I 568. See SHIPE.

SHEPHERDE, _s._ shepherd, R. 482; A 504, C 101.

SHEPNE, _s._ stable, shed, A 2000; Shipnes, _pl._ D 871. A.S. _scypen_.

SHERE, _s._ shears, pair of shears, A 2417, B 3246; Sheres, _pl._. D 722, I
418.

SHERE, _ger._ to shear, cut, B 3257; Shorn, _pp._ shaven, B 3142. A.S.
_sceran_.

SHERING-HOKES, _pl._ shearing-hooks, contrivances for severing ropes in a
sea-fight, L. 641.

SHERTE, _s._ shirt, T. iii. 738, 1099; HF. 1414; L. 405, 2629; A 1566, B
2049, 3312, D 1186; chemise, T. iv. 96; Shertes, _pl._. I 197.

SHET, _pp. of_ Shette.

SHETE, _s._ sheet, 9. 45; T. iii. 1056, 1570, G 879; Shetes, _pl._ A 4140,
G 536, I 197.

SHETEN, _v._ shoot, I 714; _ger._ R. 959; Shete, _v._ R. 1341; A 3928;
_ger._ R. 989, 1453; L. 635; Sheteth, _pr. s._ shoots, R. 960; Shete, _pr.
s. subj._ shoot, I 574. A.S. _sc[=e]otan_.

SHETER, _s. as adj._ fit for shooting, (lit. shooter), 5. 180. See above.

SHETHE, _s._ sheath, 16. 39; T. iv. 1185; L. 888; B 2066.

SHETTE, _v._ shut, enclose, T. iii. 1549; shut, close, D 1141; Shetten, G
517; Shette, _pt. s._ shut, R. 296; T. ii. 1226, iii. 726, 749, 1086; HF.
524; L. 677; A 3499, B 1275, 3615, G 1142; closed, fastened up, T. ii.
1090; Shetten, _pt. pl._ shut up, enclosed, T. i. 148; Shette, _pt. pl._ B
3722, G 1218; Shet, _pp._ shut, R. 529; 3. 335; T. v. 534; A 2597, B 1056,
G 1137; clasped, R. 1082. A.S. _scyttan_. (A Kentish form.)

SHEVES, _pl._ sheaves, HF. 2140. See SHEEF.

SHEWEN, _v._ shew, 5. 168; Sheweth, _pr. s._ pretends, appears, B 2386;
appears as, is shewn, A. i. 7. 5; A. ii. 25. 4, 30. 6, 32. 3; Shewed, _pt.
s._ 5. 56; Shewed, _pp._ (have) shewn, 5. 572.

SHEWINGE, _pres. pt. as adj._ evident, B 2. m 7. 3 (see note); B 4. p 1. 8,
p 2. 93.

SHE-WOLF, _s._ H 183.

SHIFTE, _v._ provide, distribute, ordain, D 104; assign, G 278. A.S.
_sciftan_.

SHILDE, _pr. s. subj._ shield, T. ii. 1019, iv. 1561; defend, B 2098, E
1232; forbid, L. 2082; A 3427, B 1356, 1476; Shelde, shield, HF. 88. A.S.
_scyldan_.

SHILLE, _adj. pl._ shrill, B 4585 _n_. See _schil_ in Stratmann.

SHIMERING, _s._ glimmer, A 4297.

SHINE (sh[)i]n[*e]), _s._ shin, A 386; Shines, _pl._ A 1279.

SHINED, _pt. s._ shone, L. 2194. See SHYNE.

SHIP, _s._ 1. 16; 9. 21; Shipe, _dat._ (into the) ship, (into the) ark, A
3540; Shippe, _dat._ 7. 194; Shippes, _pl._ A 2017.

SHIPE, _s._ hire, pay, reward, 7. 193 (see note); Shepe, hire, I 568. A.S.
_scipe_, stipendium; in Wright's Vocab. p. 20.

SHIPMAN, _s._ sailor, skipper, A 388, B 1179; Shipmen, _pl._ HF. 2122; A.
ii. 31. 6.

SHIPNES, _pl._ stables, sheds, D 871. See SHEPNE.

SHIPPE, -S; see SHIP.

SHIRE, _s._ shire, A 356, 584; Shires, _gen._ A 15.

SHIRREVE, _s._ sheriff, A 359. Lit. 'Shire-reeve.' See REVE.

SHITEN, _pp._ defiled, dirty, A 504.

SHITTING, _s._ shutting, R. 1598. See SHETTE.

SHIVERE, _s._ thin slice, D 1840. See _schivere_ and _schive_ in Stratmann.

SHIVEREN, _pr. pl._ shiver, break, A 2605.

SHO, shoe; see SHOO.

SHOD, _pp._ provided with shoes, R. 427, 842; HF. 98.

SHODE, _s._ parting of the hair, A 3316; hence, the temple of the head, A
2007. See _sche[=a]de_ in Stratmann.

SHOF, _pt. s._ pushed, T. iii. 487; see SHOOF.

SHOKEN, _pt. pl._ shook, R. 363; see SHAKE.

SHOLDE, should; see SHAL.

SHOLDER-BONE, _s._ shoulder-blade-bone, C 350; Shulder-boon, I 603.

SHONDE, _s._ shame, disgrace, HF. 88; B 2098. A.S. _scond_, _scand_.

SHOO (sh['o]['o]), _s._ shoe, D 492; Sho, A 253, D 708, E 1553; Shoos,
_pl._ A 457, 3318; Shoon, _pl._ R. 843; B 1922.

SHOOF, _pt. s. 1 p._ shoved, pushed, R. 534; Shoof, _pt. s._ 5. 154; drove,
L. 2412; Shof, pushed, T. iii. 487; Shoven, _pp._ driven, B 2. p 1. 75;
Shove, _pp._ pushed forward, advanced, F 1281; laid, T. iii. 1026; brought
into notice, L. 1381.

SHOON (sh['o]['o]n), _pl. of_ Shoo.

SHOON (sh[`o][`o]n), _pt. s. of_ Shyne.

SHOPPE, _s._ shop, A 4352, 4376.

SHORN, _pp._ shaven, B 3142. See SHERE.

SHORT, _adj._ short, 5. 1; A 93, 1743, 2544, D 624; small, A 746.

SHORTE, _v._ shorten, T. v. 96; D 1261; _to shorte with your weye_, to
shorten your way with, A 791; Shorteth, _pr. s._ shortens, I 727; Shorte,
_pr. s. subj._ D 365.

SHORTLY, _adv._ briefly, A 30, 1485; in short, 3. 830.

SHORT-SHOLDRED, _adj._ short in the upper arm, A 549.

SHOT, _s._ a missile, B 4539; arrow, A 2544; Shottes, _pl._ shots, T. ii.
58.

SHOT-WINDOWE, _s._ a window containing a square division which opens on a
hinge, A 3358, 3695. See the note.

SHOUR, _s._ shower, T. iv. 751; onset, conflict, T. iv. 47; Shoures, _pl._
showers, A 1, F 118, 907; conflicts, T. iii. 1064; assaults, T. i. 470. Cf.
E. 'a _shower_ of darts.'

SHOUTE, _ger._ to shout, T. ii. 614; L. 635.

SHOUTES, _s. pl._ shouts, B 4585.

SHOUTINGE, _s._ shouting, A 2953; Shouting, B 4577; Showting, 5. 693.

SHOVE, -N; see SHOOF.

SHOWVING, _s._ shoving, pushing, H 53. A.S. _sc[=u]fan_, to push, shove.

SHREDDE, _pt. s._ shred, cut, E 227. A.S. _scr[=e]adian_, to cut.

SHREWE, _s._ scoundrel, accursed wretch, B 3. p 4. 19; D 284; shrew,
peevish woman, E 1222, 2428; planet having an evil influence, A. ii. 4. 33;
evil one, G 917; an ill-tempered (male) person, C 496; Shrewes, _s. pl._
wicked persons, rascals, B 1. p 3. 48; HF. 1830, B 2388, C 835, G 746, I
500, 554.

SHREWE, _adj._ evil, wicked, G 995. 'Schrewe, _pravus_'; Prompt. Parv.

SHREWE, _1 pr. s._ beshrew, curse, B 4616, D 446, 1062, 1442, 2227.

SHREWED, _adj._ evil, wicked, bad, HF. 275, 1619; L. 1545; accursed, D 54;
Shrewede, B 2. p 6. 76.

SHREWEDLY, _adv._ cursedly, D 2238.

SHREWEDNESSE, _s._ wickedness, evil, HF. 1627, 1853; T. ii. 858; B 2721;
cursedness, D 734; Shrewednesses, _s. pl._ wickednesses, evil deeds, B 4. p
2. 158; I 44 2.

SHRIFT, _s._ shrift, confession, 3. 1114; I 87, 109; Shrifte, L. 745.

SHRIFTE-FADRES, _pl._ father-confessors, D 1442.

SHRIGHTE, _pt. s._ shrieked, A 2817, B 4552, F 417, 422, 472; Shright,
_pp._ T. v. 320. From infin. _shriken_.

SHRILLE, _adj. pl._ shrill, B 4585.

SHRIMPES, _pl._ small creatures, dwarfs, B 3145.

SHRINKE, _ger._ to shrink, draw (in), T. i. 300.

SHRIVEN, _pp._ D 2095. See SHRYVE.

SHROUD, _s._ robe, R. 64.

SHROUDED, _pp._ clad, R. 55.

SHRYKED, _pt. pl._ shrieked, B 4590. See SHRIGHTE.

SHRYKING, _s._ shrieking, T. v. 382.

SHRYNE, _s._ shrine, 12. 1; T. v. 553; L. 672.

SHRYNED, _pp._ enshrined, C 955; canonised (ironically), 21. 15.

SHRYVE, _ger._ to confess, I 129; Shryve, _1 pr. s._ shrive, T. ii. 440; _1
pr. pl._ confess, I 106; Shryven, _pr. pl._ I 298; Shriven, _pp._ D 2095.

SHUL, SHULLEN, SHULDE; see SHAL.

SHULDER-BOON, _s._ blade-bone, I 603; Sholder-bone, C 350.

SHULDRES, _pl._ shoulders, R. 328, 825; 3. 952; A 678, 1964.

SHYNE, _ger._ to shine, 10. 62; _2 pr. pl._ 12. 3; _pr. s. subj._ T. iii.
768; Sh[`o][`o]n, _strong pt. s._ shone, R. 1109, 1126; 4. 87; HF. 503,
530; L. 1428; A 198, B 11, 2034, E 1124, F 170, 1247, 1249; Shynede, _weak
pt. s._ shone, L. 1119; Shined, _weak pt. s._ L. 2194.

SHYNINGE, _s._ renown, splendour, B 3. p 4. 63, 67.

SHYRE, _s._ district, D 1401. See SHIRE.

SIB, _adj._ related, of kin, akin, R. 1199; B 2565.

SICAMOUR, _s._ sycamore, HF. 1278.

SICER, _s._ strong drink, B 3245. Lat. _sicera_, Gk. [Greek: sikera],
strong drink; from the Hebrew.

SIGH, _1 pt. s._ saw, R. 818. See SEE.

SIGHTE, _s._ sight, R. 606, 1459; HF. 468, 504; L. 50; A 3395, D 956, F
343, 913, 1158; look, L. 1832; foresight, A 1672; Sight (_but read_ sighte,
knighte), D 2071, E 2260.

SIGHTE, _pt. s. of_ Syke.

SIGNALS, _pl._ signs, tokens, HF. 459.

SIGNE, _s._ sign, proof, A 226; sign, 1. 91; L. 2223; Signes, _pl._ L.
2367, 2369, C 891.

SIGNET, _s._ signet-ring, T. ii. 1087.

SIGNIFIAUNCE, _s._ signification, R. 995; T. v. 362; significance, HF. 17;
prediction, R. 16. O. F. _segnefiance_, _signifiance_ (Godefroy).

_Significavit_ (see note), A 662.

SIGNIFYED, _pt. s._ meant, A 2343; Signifyde, B 3939.

SIK, _adj._ sick, ill, A 1600. See SYK.

SIKER, _adj._ sure, B 2. p 1. 49; 3. 1020, 1149; HF. 1978; A 3049, B 4353,
D 465, F 1139, 1548; safe, R. 1100; G 864; certain, G 1047; secure, B 2. p
1. 52; L. 2660; B 2511, I 93; sure, steady, D 2069; in security, 17. 28. O.
Friesic _siker_; from Lat. _securus_.

SIKER, _adv._ securely, uninterruptedly, T. iii. 1237; surely, T. ii. 991.

SIKERED, _pp._ assured, L. 2128.

SIKERER, _adj._ surer, more to be trusted, B 4043.

SIKERLY, _adv._ certainly, surely, truly, 4. 59; R. 372; HF. 1930; A 137,
154, 2101, 3244, B 1344, 3984, E 184, F 180, 1578.

SIKERNESSE, _s._ security, safety, confidence, 3. 608; 10. 69; 18. 21; 21.
17; B 1. p 2. 8; T. iii. 982; B 425, 3430, I 117; state of security, T. ii.
773.

SIKLY, _adv._ ill, with ill will, E 625. See note.

SIKNESSE, _s._ sickness, illness, 3. 36; A 1256, 1311, E 651, F 781, 915;
Siknes, A 493.

SILK, _s._ R. 890, 1195; A 329, 3235, 3240, 3243; F 613, H 176.

SILLABLE, _s._ syllable, HF. 1098; F 101.

SILVER, _s._ silver, A 115, G 826; money, A 232, 713.

SILVER, _adj._ silvery, A 1496.

SILVER-BRIGHTE, _pl._ bright as silver, 5. 189.

SIMILITUDE, _s._ comparison; _hence_, proposition, statement, G 431;
sympathy, likeness, F 480; one like himself, A 3228.

SIMPHONYE, _s._ a kind of tabor, B 2005. Explained in Batman upon
Bartholom[`e]; cf. _symphangle_ in Halliwell, which is probably an error
for _symphonye_. O. F. _cifonie_, _symphonie_, 'une esp[`e]ce ... de
tambour perc['e] dans le milieu comme un crible, et qu'on frappait des deux
c[^o]t['e]s avec des baguettes'; Godefroy.

SIMPLE, _adj._ simple, A 119; modest, R. 1014; innocent, 3. 861, 918.

SIMPLELY, _adv._ simply, B 4. p 2. 147.

SIMPLESSE, _s._ simplicity, 24. 16 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi); unity, B 4. p 6.
83; Simplicity (personified), R. 954.

SIMPLICITEE, _s._ simplicity, unity, B 4. p 6. 17.

SIN, _conj. and adv._ since, 4. 273; 5. 64, 435, 654; B 3. m 9. 3; L. 81,
229, 904, 2023, 2550; A. ii. 4. 3; A 601, 853, B 56, 282, 1115, E 448, &c.

SINFUL, _adj._ sinful, A 516.

SINFULLY, _adv._ B 79.

SINGE, _v._ sing, A 236; Singinge, _pres. pt._ A 91; Singestow, singest
thou, H 244; Song, _1 pt. s._ sang, 3. 1158; Songe, _2 pt. s._ didst sing,
B 1. p 6. 14; B 5. p 3. 147; H 294; Song, _pt. s._ T. ii. 1309; A 1055, B
1736, 1831; Songen, _pt. pl._ sang, 3. 301; R. 666; L. 139, 145; F 55;
Songe, _pt. pl._ F 712; Songe, _pt. s. subj._ were to sing, 3. 929; Songen,
_pp._ sung, T. v. 645; Songe, _pp._ A 266, 711, B 1851; HF. 347; recited,
T. v. 1797.

SINGING, _s._ a singing, song, B 1747; R. 681; Singinges, _pl._ singing of
songs, T. iii. 1716.

SINGULARITEES, _s. pl._ separate parts, particulars, B 5. m 3. 28, 33.

SINGULER, _adj._ particular, B 2. p 7. 39; separate, B 5. m 3. 5; single, I
300; a single, G 997; private, B 2625; Singular, peculiar; _singular
profyte_, special advantage, HF. 310.

SINGULERLY, _adv._ singly, B 4. p 6. 49, 61.

SINKE, _ger._ to sink, 1. 123; Sinken, to cause to sink, F 1073; _v._ sink,
A 951; Sinke, _1 pr. s._ 2. 110; Sonken, _pp._ sunk, 7. 8; F 892.

SINNE, _s._ sin, 1. 3, 18; 7. 103; A 561, B 590, D 944, 1176. A.S. _synn_.

SINWES, _s. pl._ sinews, I 690.

SIPPE, _v._ sip, taste, D 176.

SIRE, sir, my master, A 355; Sir (a title of address), B 33, 1166, 1627;
Sir, B 3957, D 1474; Sires, _gen._ sire's, father's, E 2265 (see note).

SIS CINK, i.e. six-five, a throw with two dice, being the highest throw
with the exception of double sixes, B 125. See note.

SISOURES, _pl._ scissors, HF. 690.

SIT, _pr. s._ sits; see SITTE.

SITE, _s._ situation, B 2. p 4. 10, m 7. 3; HF. 1114 (see note); A. ii. 17.
25; E 199.

SITH, _conj._ since, 1. 77; 2. 34; 3. 759; A 930, 1292, 1403, B 484, 814,
3268, &c.; Sith that, since, 22. 37; B 1838, 2362, 3301, F 930, H 120.

SITH, _adv._ afterwards, R. 1604; C 869; then, 7. 354; L. 302. See SITHEN,
SIN.

SITHEN, _conj._ since, B 2947; Sithen that, since, 22. 60; A 2102.

SITHEN, _adv._ since, ago, A 1521; since then, R. 1641; since, T. iii. 244;
afterwards, 1. 117; T. i. 833; A 2617, B 58, 1121, 3913, F 536; then, next,
L. 304; Sitthe, B 3867; _goon s. a greet-whyl_, a great while ago, L. 427;
_gon s. longe whyle_, long ago, T. i. 718. A.S. _s[=i]dhdhan_. See SIN.

SITHES, _pl._ times, A. ii. 42. 6. A.S. _s[=i]dh_.

SITTE, _v._ sit, 3. 451; A 94; Sitten, _v._ be situate, A. ii. 1. 3;
Sitten, _ger._ to sit, A 370; Sit, _pr. s._ sits, dwells, 3. 1108; 4. 218;
T. ii. 935; iv. 1023, 1026; L. 816, 1201, 1206, 1832, 2028 (see note), A
1599, 3641, D 709, F 1252; is situate, A. ii. 7. 4; A. ii. 37. 3; remains,
A. i. 23. 2; befits, suits, T. i. 12, 983; B 1353; is fitting, T. i. 246;
_yvel it sit_, it is unbecoming, E 460; Sitten, _pr. pl._ are situate, A.
ii. 12. 15; Sitte, are set, A. i. 21. 6; Sitte, _pr. s. subj._ A. ii. 27.
5; Sat, _pt. s._ sat, A 469; affected, T. iv. 231; suited, L. 1735; became,
R. 750; _sat on knees_, knelt, 3. 106; _hit sat me sore_, it was very
painful for me, 3. 1220; T. iii. 240; Seet, _pt. s._ sat (false form, due
to pl. _s[=e]ten_), A 2075; S[=e]ten, _pt. pl._ sat, A 2893, B 3734, F 92;
T. ii. 1192; S[=e]te, _pt. pl._ R. 714; T. ii. 81; Sete, _pt. s. subj._
would befit, T. i. 985, ii. 117; were to sit, 3. 436; was sitting, 3. 501;
S[)e]ten, _pp._ sat, L. 1109 (see note); D 420; dwelt, A 1452; Sittinge,
_pres. pt._ situate, A. i. 21. 8; sitting, 5. 328; remaining, appearing, A
633; fitting, seemly, B 1. p 3. 13; Sitting, _pres. pt._ suitable, fitting,
T. iv. 437; _wel s._, well suited, R. 986.

SITTINGEST, _sup. adj._ most fitting, 5. 551.

SIVE, _s._ sieve, G 940. A.S. _sife_.

SIXE, six, B 1364; Sixe and sevene, six and seven, in dice-play, T. iv.
622.

SIXTE, sixth, T. v. 1205; D 45, F 906.

SIXTY, A 1890; L. 273 a.

SK-; see also SC-.

SKANT, _adj._ scanty, sparing, niggardly, 1. 175.

SKARMISH, _s._ skirmish, T. ii. 611.

SKARS, _adj._ scarce, 9. 36.

SKATHE, _s._ harm, T. iv. 207.

SKILE, _s._ reason, cause, HF. 726; T. ii. 365, iii. 646; B 708, 3000, I
764; _gret sk._, good reason, E 1152; Skille, reasonable claim, L. 1392;
Skiles, _s. pl._ reasons, arguments, B 5. p 3. 52; HF. 867; B 3060, F 205;
Skilles, 5. 537; HF. 750.

SKILFUL, _adj._ reasonable, 3. 894; 7. 128; T. ii. 392, iii. 287, 938; L.
385; discerning, B 1038, G 327.

SKILFULLY, _adv._ reasonably, with reason, 5. 634; T. iv. 1265; G 320;
particularly, 4. 155.

SKILINGE, _s._ reason, B 4. p 6. 97.

SKIN, HF. 1229; B 3801.

SKINKETH, _pt. s._ pours out, E 1722. A.S. _scencan_.

SKIPPE, _ger._ to skip, jump, T. i. 218; _v._ dance, A 3259; leap, E 1672;
pass over, L. 622; Skippen, _ger._ to run about, T. iii. 690; Skippeth,
_pr. s._ passes, I 361; Skippe, _pr. pl._ leap, I 655; Skipte, _pt. s._
leapt, F 1402; Skippinge, _pres. pt._ hopping, B 3. m 2. 18.

SKRYKED, _pt. pl._ shrieked, B 4590 _n_.

SKULLE, _s._ skull, A 3935, 4306.

SKYE, _s._ cloud, HF. 1600.

SLAKE, _adj._ slack, loose, B 1. m 1. 12. See SLAKKE.

SLAKE, _v._ assuage, R. 317; appease, B 2. m 5. 4; slacken, abate, F 841;
desist (from), E 705; cease, E 137; end, E 802; Slake of, omit, L. 619;
_ger._ to assuage, L. 2006; Slaken, _pr. pl._ loosen, B 3. m 2. 12; Slake,
_pr. s. subj._ grow slack, wane, T. ii. 291; Slake, _2 pr. pl. subj._
slacken, cease, C 82; Slakede, _pt. s. subj._ should relax, B 2. m 8. 11;
Slaked, _pp._ slack, loosened, B 5. m 1. 13.

SLAKKE, _adj._ slack, loose, soft, B 3. m 2. 1; slow, A 2901; _def._ slack,
E 1849; Slake, loose, B 1. m 1. 12.

SLAKKER, _adj. pl._ slacker, more tardy, B 1603.

SLATE, _s._ a slate for writing upon, A. ii. 44. 3. See SCLAT.

SLAUGHTRE, _s._ murder, A 2051, I 103; destruction, I 154.

SLAUNDRE, _s._ discredit, L. 2231; imputation, L. 1416.

SLEDES, _s. pl._ sledges, vehicles, B 4. p 1. 50. Pl. of _sled_.

SLEE, _v._ slay, 3. 351; 6. I; A 661; G 168, 896; Sleen, _ger._ to slay, 2.
26; L. 1321, 2085; A. pr. 46; A 1222, B 3736, G 481; Sleen, _v._ C 846;
Slen, _v._ B 3531; Slee, _1 pr. s. as fut._ shall slay, B 2002; Sleeth,
_pr. s._ slays, 6. 33; A 1118, C 676, 754, D 1794, E 628, F 825; Sleen, _2
pr. pl._ slay, 2. 84; 7. 288; F 1322; Slee, _2 pr. pl._ 2. 114; F 462;
Sleen, _pr. pl._ B 964; F 893; Slee, _pr. s. subj._ slay, T. ii. 459; _imp.
s._ HF. 317; B 3089; Sleeth, _imp. pl._ 6. 118; Slowe, _2 pt. s._ didst
slay, T. iv. 506; Slow, _pt. s._ slew, 3. 727; HF. 268, 956; B 627, 664,
894, 3212, 3293, 3297, 3571, &c.; extinguished, B 3922; Slough, _pt. s._ 7.
56; Slowh, _pt. s._ B 4. m 7. 29; Slawe, _pp._ slain, T. iii. 721; iv. 884,
1228; A 943, B 1874, 3586, 3929, 4204; Slawen, _pp._ E 544; Slayn, _pp._
slain, A 63, B 3708, E 536, F 878; Sleyn, _pp._ 4. 108. A.S. _sl[=e]an_.

SLEEP, _pt. s. of_ Slepe.

SLEEP, _s._ A 1044, 4163, B 4198, 4199; 3. 127. See SLEPE.

SLE[:E]RE, _s._ slayer, A 2005.

SLEET, _s._ sleet, L. 1220; F 1250.

SLEIGH, _adj._ sly, artful, A 3201. See SLEY.

SLEIGHLY, _adv._ cunningly, T. v. 83. See SLEYLY.

SLEIGHTE, _s._ trickery, T. iv. 1459; trick, B 2386; sleight, T. ii. 1512;
contrivance, F. 1102; plan, E 2131; sleight, dexterity, A 1948; cunning, L.
1382, 2084; A 604, I 166, 733; skill, G 867; Sleight (_for_ Sleighte,
_before a vowel_), 7. 125; L. 1650; Sleightes, _pl._ plans, T. iv. 1451;
devices, tricks, E 2421, G 773, 976. See SLIGHTE.

SLELY, _adv._ slily, i.e. with great sleight or skill, skilfully, A. ii.
29. 13. See SLEYLY.

SLENDRE, _adj._ slender, R. 858. See SCLENDRE.

SLEPE, _s._ sleep, F 347; _on slepe_, asleep, L. 209. See SLEEP.

SLEPE, _v._ sleep, 3. 3, 23; _ger._ 5. 94; Slepen, _v._ B 2100, F 1472;
Slepestow, sleepest thou, A 4169; Slepeth, _pr. s._ sleeps, D 1993; Slepen,
_pr. pl._ sleep, A 10, F 360; Sleep, _1 pt. s._ slept, HF. 119; R. 25; F
721; Sleep, _pt. s._ 7. 137; A 98, 397, 3421; Slepte, _weak pt. s._ E 224,
F 367; Slepe, _pt. pl._ 3. 166, 177; Slepten, _weak pt. pl._ 9. 43; Slepte,
9. 46.

SLEPING, _s._ sleep, 3. 230; L. 1333; B 4202; Slepinge, I 193.

SLEPING-TYME, _s._ time to sleep, 6. 54.

SLEPY, _adj._ sleepy, HF. 1783 _n_; sleep-bestowing, A 1387.

SLEVE, _s._ sleeve, T. iv. 1403, v. 1043; G 1224, 1231; Sleves, _pl._ R.
570; A 93, 193; Slevis, R. 104.

SLEWTHE, _s._ sloth, I 388. See SLOUTHE.

SLEY, _adj._; Sleigh, A 3201; Sleye, _pl._ sly, subtle, T. iv. 972;
deceitful, T. v. 898 _n_. See SLY.

SLEYLY, _adv._ slily, T. ii. 1185; subtly, T. ii. 462; skilfully, A. ii.
29. 14; Slely, A. ii. 29. 13.

SLIDER, _adj._ slippery, L. 648; A 1264. A.S. _slidor_.

SLIGHTE, _s._ sleight, cunning, C 131; Slight (_before a vowel_), R. 1286.
See SLEIGHTE.

SLIKE, _adj._ sleek, R. 542. See _slike_ in Stratmann. And see SLYK.

SLINGE-STONES, _pl._ stones from a sling, T. ii. 941.

SLINKE, _ger._ to slink, T. iii. 1535.

SLIPPE, _v._ slip, L. 623.

SLIT, _pr. s. of_ Slyde.

SLITTEN, _v._ slit, B 2. m 6. 5; Slitte, _v._ pierce, F 1260; Slitte, _pt.
s._ B 3674.

SLIVERE, _s._ a sliver, slice, portion, T. iii. 1013.

SLO, _s._ sloe, R. 928. See SLOO.

SLOGARDYE, _s._ sluggishness, sloth, l