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Title: Early American Poetry 1610-1820 - A List of Works in the New York Public Library
Author: New York Public Library
Language: English
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project.)



  EARLY AMERICAN POETRY

  1610-1820

  A LIST OF WORKS IN
  THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

  _COMPILED BY_
  JOHN C. FRANK

  NEW YORK
  1917


_NOTE_

_This list includes titles of works in The New York Public Library on
August 1, 1917. They are in the Reference Department of the Library,
in the Central Building at Fifth Avenue and Forty-second Street._

  REPRINTED OCTOBER 1917
  FROM THE
  BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY
  OF AUGUST 1917

  form p-100 [x-10-17 3c]



EARLY AMERICAN POETRY, 1610-1820

A LIST OF WORKS IN THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

       *       *       *       *       *

COMPILED BY JOHN C. FRANK

       *       *       *       *       *


=Adams=, John, 1704-40. Poems on several occasions, original and
translated. By the late reverend and learned John Adams, M.A. Boston:
Printed for D. Goodkin, in Marlborough-Street, over against the Old
South Meeting House. 1745. 4 p.l., 176 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Adams=, John Quincy, 1767-1848. On the discoveries of Captain Lewis.
(In: The Monthly anthology and Boston review. Boston, 1807. 8º. v. 4,
p. 143-144.)

                                                                =* DA=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck's _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 395, _NBB._


=Agricola=, pseud. _See_ The =Squabble=; a pastoral eclogue.


=Albany= Register. The humble address of the Carriers of the Albany
Register, to their generous customers, greeting them with a Happy New
Year. [Albany, N. Y.: Jan. 1, 1796.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=


=All= the world's a stage. A poem, in three parts. The stranger.
Newburyport: Printed by William Barrett. 1796. 15 [really 14] p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The name "I. Storey" is written on the title in a
    contemporary hand, in the place where the author's name is
    usually printed; the reference being undoubtedly to Isaac
    Story, who was born at Marblehead in 1774, and published his
    first poem, _An Epistle from Yarico to Inkle_, in 1792.


=Allen=, Benjamin, 1789-1829. Miscellaneous poems, on moral and
religious subjects: By Osander [pseud. of Benjamin Allen]. Hudson:
Printed by Wm. E. Norman No. 2, Warren Street. 1811. 2 p.l., 7(1) p.,
2 l., 11-180 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- New-York: Printed by J. Seymour, Sold by Griffin and Rudd,
agents for the publisher; 189, Greenwich-St. 1812. 4 p.l., 5-180
p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Published to aid the author to study for the ministry.


---- Urania, or The true use of poesy; a poem. By B. Allen, Jun.
New-York: Published by A. H. Inskeep, and Bradford & Inskeep.
Philadelphia. 1814. 3 p.l., (1)8-192 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Page 8 is wrongly numbered p. 5.


=Allen=, Mrs. Brasseya, 1760 or 1762-18--? Pastorals, elegies, odes,
epistles, and other poems. By Mrs. Allen. (Copy right secured.)
Abingdon, (Md.): Printed by Daniel P. Ruff. 1806. 5 p.l., (1)10-163 p.
16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Dedicated to Thomas Jefferson.


=Allen=, James, 1739-1808. An intended inscription written for the
monument on Beacon-Hill in Boston, and addressed to the passenger.
(In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º.
p. 199-201.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 146-147, _NBH_, and in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of
    American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 170-171, _NBH_.


---- Lines on the [Boston] massacre. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of
American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 162-165.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    Written in 1772 but not published till 1782.


---- [Poem] On Washington's visit to Boston, 1789. (In: Samuel
Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. p. 171-173.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Poem, written in Boston, at the commencement of the late
Revolution. (In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield,
1793. 12º. p. 193-199.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The retrospect. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American
poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 165-170.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Allen=, Paul, 1775-1826. Original poems, serious and entertaining. By
Paul Allen, A.M. Published according to act of Congress. Printed by
Joshua Cushing, Salem, 1801. 2 p.l., (i)vi-xi, 141 p. 16º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=


---- A poem, delivered in the Baptist Meeting House in Providence,
September 4th A. D. 1793, being the anniversary commencement of Rhode
Island College. By Paul Allen. (In: Massachusetts magazine. Boston,
1793. 8º. October, 1793, p. 594-599.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Allston=, Washington, 1779-1843. The sylphs of the seasons, with
other poems. By W. Allston. First American from the London edition.
Boston: Published by Cummings and Hilliard, No. 1, Cornhill.
Cambridge.... Hilliard & Metcalf. 1813. 2 p.l., (i)vi-vii p., 1 l.,
(1)12-168 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    The first edition was published in London, 1813.

    _Contents_: The sylphs of the seasons, a poet's
    dream, p. 11-43.--The two painters, a tale,
    p. 45-86.--Eccentricity, p. 87-113.--The paint-king,
    p. 115-129.--Myrtilla, p. 131-141.--To a lady, who
    spoke slightingly of poets, p. 143-147.--Sonnets,
    p. 149-154.--The mad lover at the grave of his mistress,
    155-158.--First love, a ballad, p. 159-161.--The complaint,
    p. p. 162-164.--Will, the maniac, a ballad, p. 165-168.


---- Lectures on art, and poems, by Washington Allston. Edited by
Richard Henry Dana, Jr. New York: Baker and Scribner, 1850. xi,
380 p. 8º.

                                                                 =NBI=

    In addition to the poems mentioned in the previous
    entry, includes _America to Great Britain_. This poem,
    written in 1810, was inserted by Coleridge in the first
    edition of his _Sibylline leaves_, London, 1817, p. 276-278,
    with the following note: "This poem, written by an American
    gentleman, a valued and dear friend, I communicate to the
    reader for its moral, no less than its poetic spirit."


=Alsop=, George, b. 1638. A character of the province of Maryland,
wherein is described in four distinct parts, (viz.) I. The situation,
and plenty of the province. II. The laws, customs, and natural
demeanor of the inhabitant. III. The worst and best usage of a
Maryland servant, opened in view. IV. The traffique, and vendable
commodities of the countrey. Also a small treatise on the wild and
naked Indians (or Susquehanokes) of Mary-Land, their customs, manners,
absurdities, & religion. Together with a collection of historical
letters. By George Alsop. London, Printed by T. J. for Peter Dring,
at the sign of the Sun in the Poultrey: 1666. 10 p.l., 118 p., 2 l.,
1 port. (8º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    1 facsimile portrait inserted.

    Poems on the following pages: p.l. 6-7; p. 26, 44-45,
    55, 75-80, 82-83, 103-104, 108-111.


---- ---- A new edition with an introduction and copious historical
notes. By John Gilmary Shea.... New York: William Gowans, 1869.
125 p., 1 map, 1 port. 8º. (Gowans' Bibliotheca Americana, no. 5.)

                                                       =ISG= and =IAG=

    Includes a type-facsimile title-page.

    Reissued as _Fund publication_, no. 15, of the Mary-land
    Historical Society, _IAA_.


---- ---- Reprinted from the original edition of 1666. With
introduction and notes by Newton D. Mereness.... Cleveland: The
Burrows Brothers Company, 1902. 113 p., 1 map, 1 pl., 1 port. 8º.

                                                                 =ISG=

    Includes a reduced photo-facsimile of original
    title-page.

    No. 145 of 250 copies printed.


=Alsop=, Richard, 1761-1815. The charms of fancy: a poem in four
cantos, with notes. By Richard Alsop. Edited from the original
manuscripts, with a biographical sketch of the author, by Theodore
Dwight. New York: D. Appleton and Company, M.DCCC.LVI. xii p., 1 l.,
(1)14-214 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    This poem was mostly written before 1788.


---- Elegy. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American
literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 497.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- An elegy written in February 1791. (In: American poems, selected
and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 251-255.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 190-194, _NBH_.

---- Extract from the Conquest of Scandinavia; being the introduction
to the fourth book. (In: American poems, selected and original.
Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 272-284.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Habakkuk, chap. III. (In: American poems, selected and original.
Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 263-264.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The incantation of Ulfo. From the Conquest of Scandinavia. (In:
Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2,
p. 61-67.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- A poem; sacred to the memory of George Washington, late president
of the United States, and commander in chief of the armies of the
United States. Adapted to the 22d of Feb. 1800. By Richard Alsop.
Hartford: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin. 1800. 23 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    This poem was delivered by Richard Alsop before the
    citizens of Middletown, Conn., at the memorial service of
    February 22, 1800.


---- Twilight of the Gods; or Destruction of the world, from the Edda,
a system of ancient Scandinavian mythology. (In: American poems,
selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 265-272.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Verses to the shearwater--on the morning after the storm at sea.
(In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º.
v. 2, p. 60-61.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Versification of a passage from the fifth book of Ossian's
Temora. (In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793.
12º. p. 255-262.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- _See also_ The =Echo=; The =Political= greenhouse for the year
1798.


An =American=, pseud. Crystalina; a fairy tale. _See_ Harney, John
Milton.


An =American=, pseud. _See_ =Oppression=, a poem.


An =American=, pseud. _See_ =Prime=, Benjamin Young.


=American= poems, selected and original. Vol. 1. Litchfield: Printed
by Collier and Buel. [1793.] (The copy right secured as the Act
directs.) viii, 304 p., 4 l. 12º.

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    No more published.

    "The first general collection of poetry ever attempted
    in this country."--C. W. Everest, _Poets of Connecticut_,
    Hartford, 1843, p. 103.

    The editorship is attributed by Everest to Dr. Elihu
    Hubbard Smith, but the postscript to the preface of the work
    p. [vi] refers to "the ill health of one of the editors."

    The Reserve copy contains the autographs of Daniel
    Crocker, Samuel Austin, and Samuel G. Drake.

    _Contents_: Elegy on the times; Elegy on the death of
    Mr. Buckingham St. John; Ambition; Prophecy of Balaam;
    Downfall of Babylon; Speech of Proteus to Aristæus; by John
    Trumbull.--Trial of faith; Address to genius of Columbia;
    Columbia; The seasons moralized; A hymn; A song; The
    critics; Epistle to Col. Humphreys; by Timothy Dwight.--The
    prospect of peace; A poem spoken at commencement at Yale
    College; Elegy on Titus Hosmer; by Joel Barlow.--Elegy
    on burning of Fairfield, Connecticut; Elegy on Lieut. De
    Hart; Mount Vernon; An ode addressed to Laura; Genius of
    America; Epistle to Dr. Dwight; A song translated from the
    French; by David Humphreys.--Epitaph on a patient killed by
    cancer quack; Hypocrite's hope; On general Ethan Allen; by
    Lemuel Hopkins.--An oration which might have been delivered
    to students in anatomy on the late rupture between two
    schools in Philadelphia, by Francis Hopkinson.--Philosophic
    solitude, by William Livingston.--Descriptive lines upon
    prospect from Beacon-Hill in Boston; Ode to the President
    on his visiting the Northern states; Invocation to Hope;
    Prayer to Patience; Lines addressed to Della Crusca; by
    Philenia, a lady of Boston.--Alfred to Philenia.--Philenia
    to Alfred.--Poem written in Boston at the commencement of
    the Revolution; An intended inscription for monument on
    Beacon-Hill in Boston; by James Allen.--Elegiac ode to
    General Greene, by George Richards. Country school.--Speech
    of Hesper.--[Poem on the distress of inhabitants of
    Guinea.]--New Year's wish; From a Gentleman to a lady who
    had presented him with a cake heart; by Dr....--Utrum
    horum mavis elige.--Ella, a Norwegian tale, by William
    Dunlap.--Eulogium on rum, by J. Smith.--Country meeting,
    by T. C. James.--Written at sea in a heavy gale, by Philip
    Freneau.--To Ella, from Bertha.--An elegy written in
    February 1791; Versification of passage from fifth book of
    Ossian's Temora; Habakkuk, chap. III; Twilight of the Gods;
    Extract from Conquest of Scandinavia; by Richard Alsop.--Ode
    to conscience, by Theodore Dwight.--Collolloo, an Indian
    tale, by William Dunlap.--An ode to Miss ****, by Joseph
    Howe.--Message from Mordecai to Esther, by Timothy Dwight.


The =American= poetical miscellany. Original and selected.
Philadelphia: Published by Robert Johnson, C. & A. Conrad & Co.
and Mathew Carey, booksellers and stationers. 1809. 1 p.l.,
(1)4-304 p. 16º.

                                                                 =NBH=

    John Binns, printer.

    Includes the following poems by American authors:

    The burning of Fairfield, by D. Humphreys.--Mercy, by
    Salleck Osborn.--Eulogium on rum, by Joseph Smith.--The
    country meeting, by T. C. James.--The house of sloth, by
    Timothy Dwight.--Extract from a dramatic manuscript, by
    Salleck Osborn.


=American= taxation [a poem], 1765. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck,
Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1,
p. 461-463.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    Attributed to Samuel St. John of New Canaan,
    Connecticut, and to Peter St. John of Norwalk, Connecticut.

    Also printed in Frank Moore, _Songs and ballads of the
    American Revolution_, New York, 1856, p. 1-17, _NBH_.


The =American= times, a satire, in three parts. _See_ =Odell=,
Jonathan.


An =American= youth, pseud. _See_ The =Spunkiad=: or Heroism improved.


=Ames=, Nathaniel, 1708-1764. An essay upon the microscope. (In his:
An astronomical diary, or An almanac for the year of our Lord Christ,
1741. Boston, 1741. 12º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 425-427,
    _NBB_.

    Additional poems without titles will be found in his
    _An astronomical diary, or An almanac ... for the years
    1731, 1733-35, 1737-50, 1752-75_, copies of which are in the
    _Reserve Room_ of the Library.


---- A poetical essay on happiness. (In his: Ames's almanac revived
and improved: or, An astronomical diary for the year of our Lord
Christ, 1766. Boston, 1766. 12º.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Victory implor'd for success against the French in America. (In
his: An astronomical diary, or An almanac for the year of our Lord
Christ, 1747. Boston, 1747. 12º.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The waking of sun. (In his: An astronomical diary, or An almanac
for the year of our Lord Christ, 1739. Boston, 1739. 12º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 424-425,
    _NBB_.


The =Anarchiard=: a New England poem. Written in concert by David
Humphreys, Joel Barlow, John Trumbull, and Dr. Lemuel Hopkins. Now
first published in book form. Edited, with notes and appendices, by
Luther G. Riggs. New Haven: Published by Thomas H. Pease, 323 Chapel
Street. 1861. viii, 120 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    The Library has another copy with the following
    portraits inserted: David Humphreys, Joel Barlow, John
    Trumbull, Nathanael Greene, Robert Morris.

    This poem was originally published in the following
    numbers of _The New Haven Gazette and Connecticut Magazine_:
    Oct. 26, Nov. 2, Dec. 28, 1786; Jan. 11, 25, Feb. 22, March
    15, 22, April 5, May 24, Aug. 16, Sept. 13, 1787. The
    Library possesses all the numbers of the _New Haven Gazette_
    in which this poem appeared, except the last one, Sept. 13,
    1787.

    Nos. 1-4 of _The Anarchiard_ were also printed in _The
    American museum_, Philadelphia, 1789, v. 5, p. 94-100,
    303-305.

    The projector of this poem was Colonel David Humphreys;
    and it was written in concert with Barlow, Trumbull, and
    Hopkins; but what particular installment or number was
    written by each has never been definitely ascertained.


=André=, John, 1751-1780. Cow-chace, in three cantos, published
on occasion of the Rebel General Wayne's attack of the Refugees
Block-House on Hudson's river, on Friday the 21st of July, 1780. [By
Major John André.] New-York: Printed by James Rivington, MDCCLXXX.
1 p.l., (1)4-69 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Included with the Cow-chace, are the following poems:
    Yankee Doodle's Expedition to Rhode Island, written at
    Philadelphia, p. 19-21; On the Affair between the Rebel
    Generals Howe and Gaddesden, written at Charlestown,
    p. 23-26; The American times, a satire. In three parts....
    By Camillo Querno, p. 27-69.

    Inserted, a portrait of André, engraved by Hapwood, from
    a drawing by Major André, ornamented by Shirt.

    The _Cow-chace_ appeared originally in _The Royal
    Gazette_, in the following numbers: Canto I, Aug. 16, 1780;
    Canto II, Aug. 30, 1780; Canto III, Sept. 23, 1780.

    Also printed in William Dunlap, _André; a tragedy_, New
    York, 1798, p. 75-84, _Reserve_, and in Winthrop Sargent,
    _The life of Major André_, Boston, 1861, and New York, 1871,
    p. 236-249, _IGM_.


=Andrews=, Edward W. An address before the Washington Benevolent
Society, in Newburyport, on the 22d. Feb. 1816. By Edward W. Andrews,
A.M. Published by request of the society. Newburyport: Published by
William B. Allen & Co. No. 13, Cornhill. 1816. 1 p.l., (1)4-15 p. 8º.

                                                 =NBHD p.v. 5, no. 14=


=Aquiline Nimble-Chops=, pseud. Democracy: an epic poem. _See_
=Livingston=, Henry Brockholst.


=Aristocracy.= An epic poem. Philadelphia: Printed for the editor.
1795. 2 v. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    In two parts issued separately.

    [Part] 1 has 16 p. and is dated on p. vii: Philadelphia,
    January 5, 1795.

    [Part] 2, without imprint, has 18 [really 17] p., pages
    numbered 1-16, 18, and dated, on p. [4]: Philadelphia, March
    26th, 1795.


=Armstrong=, William Clinton, 1855--, editor. Patriotic poems of New
Jersey. [Newark, N. J., 1906.] 3 p.l., ii-v, 248 p., 5 pl., 3 ports.
8º. (Sons of the American Revolution.--New Jersey Society. New Jersey
and the American Revolution.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Arnold=, Josias Lyndon, 1765-1796. Poems. By the late Josias Lyndon
Arnold, Esq; of St. Johnsbury (Vermont) formerly of Providence, and
a tutor in Rhode-Island College. Printed at Providence, by Carter
and Wilkinson, and sold at their bookstore, opposite the market.
M.DCC.XCVII. xii, (1)14-141 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Introduction by the editor, signed and dated: James
    Burrill, jun. Providence, April, 1797.

    "The last words of Sholum; or, The dying Indian,"
    p. 46-49, is not by Arnold, but by Philip Freneau.

    Several of Arnold's poems are printed in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 77-82, _NBH_; also in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck,
    _Cyclopædia of American literature_, New York, 1866,
    v. 1, p. 530, _NBB_.


=Arouet=, Poems of. _See_ =Ladd=, Joseph Brown.


The =Art= of domestic happiness and other poems: By the Recluse,
author of the Independency of the Mind, affirmed. Pittsburgh:
Published by Robert Patterson. 1817. 2 p.l., (i)vi p., 1 l.,
(1)10-316 p., 1 l. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Printed by Butler and Lambdin.


=Avalanche=, Sir Anthony, pseud. Fashion's analysis; or, The winter
in town. A satirical poem. By Sir Anthony Avalanche. With notes,
illustrations, etc. by Gregory Glacier, Gent. Part 1. New-York:
Printed for J. Osborn, No. 13 Park. 1807. 2 p.l., (1)6-84 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=B.=, B., Esq. Entertainment for a winter's evening. _See_ =Green=,
Joseph.


=Bacon's= epitaph, made by his man. (Massachusetts Historical Society.
Collections for 1814. Boston, 1838. 8º. series 2, v. 1, p. 58-59.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    This epitaph is in the manuscript account of Bacon and
    Ingram's rebellion found among the papers of Capt. Nathaniel
    Burwell, printed in this volume of the _Collections_.

    Also printed in Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 1, p. 456-457,
    _NBB_.


=Ballads= and poems relating to the Burgoyne campaign. Annotated by
William L. Stone.... Albany, N. Y.: Joel Munsell's Sons, 1893. 12,
359 p., 1 pl. (front.) 8º. (Munsell's historical series, no. 20.)

                                                      =IAG= and =NBHD=


=Ballston= Springs. _See_ =Law=, Thomas.


=Banks=, Louis Albert. Immortal songs of camp and field. The story
of their inspiration together with striking anecdotes connected with
their history.... Cleveland: The Burrows Brothers Company, 1899.
298 p., 25 pl., 25 ports. 8º.

                                                                 =NBH=

    Contains the following songs, written before 1820:

    The American flag, by J. R. Drake, p. 17-24; Adams and
    liberty, by R. T. Paine, p. 27-37; The Star-Spangled banner,
    by F. S. Key, p. 53-63; Hail Columbia, by J. Hopkinson,
    p. 67-77.


=Barlow=, Joel, 1754-1812. The Columbiad a poem. By Joel Barlow.
Printed by Fry and Kammerer for C. and A. Conrad and Co. Philadelphia;
Conrad, Lucas and Co. Baltimore. Philadelphia: 1807. 1 p.l.,
(i)iv-xvi, 454 p., front, (port.), 11 pl. 4º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=

    The Reserve copy is extra illustrated, having 22 plates
    and 58 portraits inserted.

    _The Columbiad_ is an amplification of the author's
    _Vision of Columbus_.

    This work, which is a fine example of early American
    bookmaking, was published at the expense of Robert Fulton,
    the inventor, who also "designated the subjects to be
    painted for engravings" at his own expense.


---- ---- Philadelphia: Published by C. and A. Conrad and Co.
Philadelphia; Conrad, Lucas and Co. Baltimore. Fry and Kammerer,
printers. 1809. 2 v. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    The Library has volume 2 only. v. 2. 2 p.l., (1)6-218 p.


---- ---- London: Printed for Richard Phillips, Bridge Street,
Blackfriars. 1809. 1 p.l., (i)iv-xxxiii p., 1 l., 428 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Frontispiece, portrait of author, inserted.


---- ---- With the last corrections of the author. By Joel Barlow.
Paris: Printed for F. Schoell, Bookseller. 1813. 3 p.l., (i)vi-xl, 448
p., 2 pl. (incl. front.), 2 ports. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The conspiracy of kings; a poem: addressed to the inhabitants
of Europe, from another quarter of the World. By Joel Barlow, author
of the Vision of Columbus, Advice to the Privileged Orders &c. &c.
Printed and sold by Robinson & Tucker: Newburyport--1794. 30 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Inserted, the portrait of the author engraved by Edwin.

    Also printed in _The New-York magazine_, New-York,
    1792, v. 3, p. 375-382, _Reserve_; the author's _A letter
    to the national convention of France, on the defects in
    the constitution of 1791_, New York [1793?], p. 73-87,
    _Reserve_; _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794, p. 1-10,
    _NBH_; and in _The political writings of Joel Barlow_, New
    York, 1796, p. 237-238. _Reserve._


---- Description of the first American congress; American Revolution;
American sages; American painters; American poets. (In: The Beauties
of poetry, British and American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 155-174.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 89-109, _NBH_.


---- An Elegy on the late honorable Titus Hosmer, Esq. one of the
Counsellors of the State of Connecticut, a Member of Congress, and
a Judge of the Maritime Court of Appeals for the United States of
America. (In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793.
12º. p. 108-117.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The hasty-pudding: a poem, in three cantos. Written at Chambery,
in Savoy, January 1793. [By Joel Barlow. New Haven: Tiebout & O'Brien,
1796.] 2 p.l., (1)6-15 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    First printed in _The New-York magazine_. New York,
    1796, new series, v. 1, p. 41-49, _Reserve_.

    Also printed in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_. Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 13-21, _NBH_; E. A. and G.
    L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of American literature_, New York,
    1866, v. 1, p. 400-403, _NBB_.


---- ---- Brooklyn: Published by Wm. Bigelow, 55 Fulton-Street. A.
Spooner, printer. 1833. 1 p.l., (i)iv-v, 6-22 p. 12º.

                                                 =* C p.v. 724, no. 8=


---- ---- New York: C. M. Saxton [1852?]. 12 p. 12º.

                                                                 =VPC=

    Bd. with: R. L. Allen. The American farm book. New York,
    1852. 12º.


---- A poem, spoken at the public commencement at Yale-college, in
New-Haven, Sept. 12, 1781. (In: American poems, selected and original.
Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 94-107.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The prospect of peace. (In: American poems, selected and
original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 85-93.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 10-16, _NBH_.


---- The vision of Columbus; a poem in nine books. By Joel Barlow,
Esquire. Hartford: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin, for the author.
M.DCC.LXXXVII. 258 p., 6 l. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    This is the original edition, with twelve pages
    containing the names of upwards of five hundred subscribers,
    leading men of the day, including Washington, Franklin,
    Burr, Gov. George Clinton, etc.


---- ---- Hartford, N. E. printed: London re-printed, for C. Dilly, in
the Poultry; and J. Stockdale, Piccadilly. M.DCC.LXXXVII. xx, 244
p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    2 portraits inserted. Frontispiece is portrait of Joel
    Barlow, painted by Robert Fulton, engraved by A. B. Durand.
    Facing p. 3, Portrait of Columbus painted by M. Macella,
    engraved by P. Maverick.


---- ---- The second edition. Hartford: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin,
for the author. M.DCC.LXXXVII. 258 p., 3 l. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The last three leaves contain the names of subscribers.


---- ---- The first edition, corrected.... To which is added, The
conspiracy of kings: a poem, by the same author. Paris: Printed at
the English Press, Rue de Vaugirard, No. 1214; and sold by Barrois,
Senior, Quai des Augustins; and R. Thomson, Rue de L'Anciene Comedie
Française, no. 42. 1793. 2 p.l., 304 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Lacks portrait.

    The conspiracy of kings, a poem, p. 277-304.


---- _See also_ The =Anarchiard=.


=Bartlett=, Joseph, 1762-1827. Physiognomy, a poem, delivered at the
request of the Society of Phi Beta Kappa, in the chapel of Harvard
University, on the day of their anniversary, July 18th, 1799. By
Joseph Bartlett. Boston, Printed by John Russell, 1799. 16 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Trimmed down from 4º, cropping text and margins.


The =Battle= of Bunkers Hill, a dramatic piece, in five acts. _See_
=Brackenridge=, Hugh Henry.


=Battle= of Niagara, a poem. _See_ =Neal=, John.


The =Battle= of the Thames, October 5, 1813; from an unpublished poem,
entitled Tecumseh. By a young American. New York: Published at the Log
Cabin Office, No. 30 Ann-Street. 1840. 1 p.l., (1)4-15 p. 12º.

                                                   =IIH p.v. 6, no. 1=


The =Bay= Psalm book. _See_ =Bible.= Old Testament: Psalms. English.
1640.


=Bayard.= Address to the robin redbreast. (In: The Beauties of poetry,
British and American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 201-204.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 177-181, _NBH_.


---- Woman's fate. Written in the character of a lady under the
influence of a strong, but unfortunate attachment. (In: The Beauties
of poetry, British and American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 127-130.)

                                                             =Reserve=


The =Beauties= of poetry, British and American: containing some of the
productions of Waller, Milton, Addison, Pope, Shirley, Parnell, Watts,
Thomson, Young, Shenstone, Akenside, Gray, Goldsmith, Johnson, Moore,
Garrick, Cowper, Beattie, Burns, Merry, Cowley, Wolcott, Palmerton,
Penrose, Evans, Barlow, Dwight, Freneau, Humphreys, Livingston, J.
Smith, W. M. Smith, Bayard, Hopkinson, James, Markoe, Prichard,
Fentham, Bradford, Dawes, Lathrop, Osborne. Philadelphia: From the
press of M. Carey. No. 118, Market-Street. M.DCC.XCI. 3 p.l. (incl.
leaf of adv.), vii, viii, 244 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    American contributions include:

    Columbia, by Dwight.--Benevolence, by Dawes.--Woman's
    fate, by Bayard.--Future state of the western territory;
    American winter; On love and the American fair; Depredations
    and destruction of the Algerines; by Humphreys.--Excellent
    logic; British favours to America; Extreme humanity;
    Omens; Nobility anticipated; by Trumbull.--Description
    of the first American Congress; American Revolution;
    American sages; American painters; American poets; by
    Barlow.--Eulogium on rum, by Jos. Smith.--Faith, an ode;
    Hope, an ode; Charity, an ode; by Markoe.--On a lady's
    birth day, by W. M. Smith.--Description of Jehovah, from
    the XVIIIth Psalm, by Ladd.--The Country meeting, by
    T. C. James.--On the birth-day of Gen. Washington, by
    Markoe.--Art and nature, by W. M. Smith.--The old soldier,
    by Fentham.--The war-horse, by Ladd.--On the migration to
    America and peopling the western country, by Freneau.--A
    pastoral song, by Bradford.--The seasons moralized, by
    Dwight.--Character of St. Tamany, by Pritchard.--A song,
    by Dwight.--The Federal Convention.--A fair bargain, by
    Hopkinson.--Song sung in St. Andrew's Society, New York, on
    Tuesday August 22, 1790, when Colonel Alexander M'Gillwray
    was present.--Address to the robin red-breast, by Bayard.--A
    winter piece, by Lathrop.--Elegiac epistle on the death of
    his sisters--and sent to another, by Osborn.--Hymn sung
    at the Universal meeting house in Boston, Easter Sunday,
    April 4, 1790.--The Deity, and his dispensations; Creation;
    Original state of man; Three fold state of man emblematized;
    Prospect of America; by Dwight.--Progress of science, by
    Evans.--Philosophic solitude, by Livingston.--Sketches of
    American history, by Freneau.--An Indian eclogue, by Jos.
    Smith.


=Belknap=, Jeremy, 1744-1798. An eclogue, occasioned by the death of
the Reverend Alexander Cummings, A.M., on the 25th of August A. D.
1763. Ætat. 37.... (By J. Belknap, B.A.) Boston: Printed by D. & J.
Kneeland, for J. Edwards, 1763. 8 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text cropped by trimming.


=Benedict=, David, 1779-1874. A poem delivered in Taunton, September
16th, A.D. 1807, at the anniversary election of the Philandrian
Society. By David Benedict. Boston: Belcher & Armstrong, printers, No.
70, State-Street. 1807. 1 p.l., (1)4-19 p. 8º.

                                                 =NBH p.v. 26, no. 17=


---- The watery war: or, A poetical description of the existing
controversy between the Pedobaptists and Baptists, on the subjects and
mode of baptism. By John of Enon. Boston: Printed and sold by Manning
& Loring, No. 2, Cornhill. 1808. 2 p.l., (1)6-34 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Bernard=, Francis. _See_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


=Beveridge=, John. Epistolae familiares et alia quædam miscellanea.
Familiar epistles, and other miscellaneous pieces, wrote originally
in Latin verse, by John Beveridge, A.M. Professor of languages in
the College and Academy of Philadelphia. To which are added several
translations into English verse, by different hands, &c. Philadelphia.
Printed for the author by William Bradford, at the London
Coffee-House, at the corner of Market and Front-Streets. M,DCC,LXV.
xi, 88 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Bible.= Old Testament: Psalms. English. 1640. The whole booke of
Psalmes faithfully translated into English metre. Whereunto is
prefixed a discourse declaring not only the lawfullness, but also the
necessity of the heavenly ordinance of singing Scripture Psalmes in
the Churches of God. Imprinted, 1640. [Cambridge: Stephen Daye.]
147 l. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


    Slightly imperfect.

    The first book printed in English in North America. The
    version of the Psalms was made about the year 1636, the
    principal divines of the country each translating a portion.
    The principal part of the work was committed to Mr. Richard
    Mather, minister of the church in Dorchester, who probably
    wrote the preface also, and to Mr. Thomas Weld and Mr. John
    Eliot, associate ministers of the church in Roxbury. The
    work of printing was completed in 1640, and the new Psalm
    book was adopted at once by nearly every congregation in the
    colony of Massachusetts Bay, and for that reason it came to
    be known as the Bay Psalm book. Of this famous book there
    are only ten copies known to be extant, of which only four
    are perfect.

    For detailed statement and description see the facsimile
    reprint with the introduction by Wilberforce Eames.


---- The Bay Psalm book; being a facsimile reprint of the first
edition, printed by Stephen Daye at Cambridge, in New England in 1640.
With an introduction by Wilberforce Eames. New York: Dodd, Mead &
Company, 1903. 1 p.l., v-xvii p., 147 l. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    One of 975 copies on plain paper.


---- ---- Prepared for the New England Society in the City of New York
[190-?]. 1 p.l., v-xvii p., 147 l. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    With an introduction by Wilberforce Eames. Introduction
    dated: October, 1903.


---- A literal reprint of the Bay Psalm book, being the earliest
New England version of the Psalms, and the first book printed in
America.... Cambridge: C. B. Richardson, 1862. vii p., 149 l. 8º.

                                                         =Stuart 4966=

    No. 40 of fifty copies printed.


=Bigelow=, Samuel, fl. 1776. A poem suitable for the present day, in
five parts, Worcester, 1776. New York: repr. for C. F. Heartman, 1915.
2 p.l., 7-26 p. 8º. (Heartman's historical series, no. 14.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Facsimile reprint, including title-page of original
    edition, Worcester, 1776.

    No. 8 of forty copies printed on Fabriano hand-made
    paper.


=Biglow=, William, 1773-1844. Commencement, a poem: or rather
commencement of a poem, recited before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, in
their dining hall, in Cambridge, Aug. 29, 1811. By a brother [i.e.,
William Biglow]. Salem: Printed by Thomas C. Cushing. 1811. 1 p.l.,
(1)4-8 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    With bookplate of Henry B. Anthony.


---- Education; a poem: spoken at Cambridge at the request of the Phi
Beta Kappa Society; July 18th 1799; By William Biglow. Salem: Joshua
Cushing. 1799. 2 p.l., (1)4-17 p. 8º.

                                                 =NBH p.v. 26, no. 16=

    First 2 l. and last leaf lacking. Title-page supplied in ms.


---- Re-re-commencement: a kind of a poem: calculated to be recited
before an "assemblage" of New-England divines, of all the various
denominations; but which never was so recited, and in all human
probability never will be. By a friend of every body and every soul.
Salem: Printed by Thomas C. Cushing. 1812. 1 p.l., (1)4-8 p. 8º.

                                                 =NBH p.v. 27, no. 13=


The =Bladensburg= races. Written shortly after the capture of
Washington City, August 24, 1814. [Probably it is not generally known,
that the flight of Mahomet, the flight of John Gilpin, and the flight
of Bladensburg, all occurred on the twenty-fourth of August.] Printed
for the purchaser. 1816. 1 p.l., 3-12 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Printed for the purchaser. 1816. 1 p.l., (1)4-16 p. 4º.

                                                               =* IIH=

    A reprint issued in 1865.

    No. 35 of seventy-five copies.


---- n.t.-p. n.p., n.d. 8 p. 8º.

                                                  =NBHD p.v. 5, no. 7=

    A reprint.


=Bland=, Theodoric, 1742-1790. [Patriotic poem on the battle of
Lexington.] (In: The Bland papers. Edited by Charles Campbell.
Petersburg, 1840. 8º. v. 1, p. xxi-xxiii.)

                                                                  =IG=


=Bleecker=, Mrs. Ann Eliza Schuyler, 1752-1783. An evening prospect.
(In: The New-York magazine. New-York. 1791. 8º. v. 2, p. 475-476.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Lines, written by the late Mrs. Ann E. Bleecker. (In: The
New-York magazine. New-York, 1791. 8º. v. 2, p. 294.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Lines, written by the late Mrs. Ann E. Bleecker. (In: The
New-York magazine. New-York, 1791. 8º. v. 2, p. 356.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- On reading Dryden's Virgil. [Written in 1778, by the late Mrs.
Ann E. Bleecker.] (In: The New-York magazine. New-York, 1791. 8º.
v. 2, p. 670.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The posthumous works of Ann Eliza Bleecker, in prose and verse.
To which is added, a collection of essays, prose and poetical, by
Margaretta V. Faugeres. New-York: Printed by T. and J. Swords, No. 27,
William-Street. 1793. 6 p.l., xviii, (1)20-375 p., front. (port.) 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Frontispiece, the portrait of Mrs. Bleecker engraved by
    Tiebout.

    "Poetics," p. 185-262.

    Several of these poems have been reprinted in Samuel
    Kettell, _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1,
    p. 213-219, _NBH_.


=Bonaparte=; with The storm at sea, Madaline, and other poems.
New-York: Published by Haly and Thomas, No. 142 Broadway. 1820.
1 p.l., (i)iv p., 1 l., (1)8-92 p. 8º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 28, no. 1=


=Boston Bard=, Poems of. _See_ =Coffin=, Robert Stevenson.


=Bosworth=, Benjamin. Signs of apostacy lamented. [By Benjamin
Bosworth.] n.t.-p. [Boston? 1693?] 4 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "A caution to prevent scandal," p. 4.

    Signed and dated at end: "Benjamin Bosworth of
    New-England. In the 81st year of my age, 1693."

    Photostat copy from an original in Brown University
    Library.


=Botsford=, Mrs. Margaret. Viola or The heiress of St. Valverde, an
original poem, in five cantos. To which is annexed, patriotic songs,
sonnets, &c. By a lady of Philadelphia, author of Adelaide [i.e., Mrs.
Margaret Botsford]. Louisville, Ky. Printed by S. Penn, jr. 1820.
1 p.l., (1)4-96 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Bowdoin=, James, 1727-1790. A paraphrase on part of the oeconomy of
human life. Inscribed to his excellency Thomas Pownall, Esq; Governor
of the province of the Massachusetts-Bay. [By James Bowdoin.]
Boston New-England: Printed and sold by Green and Russell, at their
printing-office, in Queen-Street. MDCCLIX. 4 p.l., 3-88 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Woman. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston,
1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 330-332.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- _See also_ =Pietas= et gratulatio.


=Boyd=, William, 1777-1800. Woman: a poem, delivered at a public
exhibition, April 19, at Harvard University, in The College Chapel. By
William Boyd. Boston: Printed by John W. Folsom. M,DCC,XCVI. 2 p.l.,
(1)6-15 p. 12º.

                                                 =NBH p.v. 26, no. 15=

    Also printed in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 83-86, _NBH_.


=Brackenridge=, Hugh Henry, 1748-1816. The Battle of Bunkers Hill.
A dramatic piece, of five acts, in heroic measure. By a gentleman
of Maryland ... [i.e., Hugh Henry Brackenridge.] Philadelphia:
Printed and sold by Robert Bell, in Third-Street, MDCCLXXVI. 3 p.l.,
(1)6-49(1) p., 1 pl. (front.) 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Title-page lacking; supplied by a photostat facsimile.
    Frontispiece imperfect.

    Contains the following poems: Prologue, p.l. 3;
    Epilogue, p. 37-38; An ode on the battle of Bunkers-Hill,
    p. 39-44; Speech by General Washington, on his entering
    the town of Boston, p. 45-46; A military song by the army:
    on General Washington's victorious entry into the town of
    Boston, p. 47-49.

    The prologue and epilogue were written by John Parke.


---- The death of General Montgomery, at the siege of Quebec. A
tragedy. With an ode, in honour of the Pennsylvania militia, and the
small band of regular Continental troops, who sustained the campaign,
in the depth of winter, January, 1777, and repulsed the British forces
from the banks of the Delaware. By the author of a dramatic piece on
the Battle of Bunker's-Hill [i.e., Hugh Henry Brackenridge]. To which
are added, elegiac pieces, commemorative of distinguished characters.
Philadelphia: Printed and sold by Robert Bell, in Third-Street, next
door to St. Paul's Church. M,DCC,LXXVII. 4 p.l., (1)10-79(1) p.,
2 l., front. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Contains the following poems: An ode in honour of
    Pennsylvania militia, p. 54-64; Elegiac pieces commemorative
    of distinguished characters, p. 65-68.

    The "Prologue on the death of General Montgomery" which
    is at the end, was written by John Parke.


---- ---- Norwich: Printed by J. Trumbull, for and sold by J. Douglass
M'Dougall, on the West side of the Great-Bridge, Providence, 1777.
5 p.l., 11-68 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Contains the following poems: An ode in honour of
    Pennsylvania militia, p. 50-58; Elegiac pieces commemorative
    of distinguished characters, p. 58-68.


=Bradford=, William, 1588-1657. Certain verses left by ... William
Bradford ... penned by his own hand, declaring the dispensation
of God's providence towards him in the time of his life, and his
preparation and fittedness for death. (In: N. Morton, New-Englands
Memoriall. Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 144-145.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Copy of verses left by him for his children. (In: William and
Mary College quarterly. Richmond, Va., 1895. 8º. v. 4, p. 63-64.)

                                                                 =IAA=


---- A descriptive and historical account of New England in verse;
from a ms. of William Bradford, Governour of Plymouth Colony.
(Massachusetts Historical Society. Collections. Boston, 1794. 8º.
series 1, v. 3, p. 77-84.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Of Boston in New England; A word to New England. (Massachusetts
Historical Society. Collections. Boston, 1838. 8º. series 3, v. 7,
p. 27-28.)

                                                                 =IAA=


---- A pastoral elegy on O****. R***. (In: The New-York magazine.
New-York, 1795. 8º. v. 6, p. 570-571.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A pastoral song. Ascribed to W. Bradford, esq. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6. p. 334-335.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Beauties of poetry, British and
    American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 193-195, _Reserve_; _The
    Columbian muse_, New York, 1794, p. 175-177, _NBH_; _The
    New-York magazine_, New York, 1795, v. 6, p. 569-570,
    _Reserve_.


---- Providence and the Pilgrim. (In: E. C. Stedman and E. M.
Hutchinson, A library of American literature. New York, 1889. 8º.
v. 1, p. 115-116.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- Some observations of God's merciful dealing with us in this
wilderness, and his gracious protection over us these many years.
(Massachusetts Historical Society. Proceedings, 1869-70. Boston, 1871.
8º. v. 11, p. 465-478.)

                                                                 =IAA=


---- A word to New Plymouth. (Massachusetts Historical Society.
Proceedings, 1869-70. Boston, 1871. 8º. v. 11, p. 478-482.)

                                                                 =IAA=


=Bradstreet=, Mrs. Anne Dudley, 1612-72. A dialogue between Old
England and New and other poems, by Mrs. Anne Dudley Bradstreet.
Boston [1905]. 20 p. 12º. (Old South leaflets. [General series.]
v. 7, no. 159.)

                                                        =* R-Room 300=

    _Contents_: A dialogue between Old England and New
    concerning their present troubles, anno 1642.--In honor
    of that high and mighty Princess Queen Elizabeth of happy
    memory.--To the memory of my dear and ever honored father
    Thomas Dudley, Esq., who deceased July 31, 1653, and of his
    age 77.--An epitaph on my dear and ever honored mother Mrs.
    Dorothy Dudley, who deceased December 27, 1643, and of her
    age 61.--The author to her book.--To my dear and loving
    husband.--In reference to her children 23 June, 1659.--In
    thankful remembrance for my dear husband's safe arrival,
    September 3, 1662.


---- The poems of Mrs. Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672). Together with her
prose remains. With an introduction by Charles Eliot Norton. [New
York:] The Duodecimos, MDCCCXCVII. 2 p.l., xliv p., 2 l., 347 p.,
1 l., 3 pl., 9 ports. 12º.

                                                                 =NBG=

    No. 132 of 132 copies on hand-made paper.

    Contains facsimiles of title-pages of the first three
    original editions, and of the 1867 edition edited by J. H.
    Ellis.


---- Several poems compiled with great variety of wit and learning,
full of delight; wherein especially is contained a compleat discourse,
and description of the four elements, constitutions, ages of man,
seasons of the year. Together with an exact epitome of the three first
monarchyes viz. The Assyrian, Persian, Grecian, and beginning of the
Romane Common-wealth to the end of their last king: with diverse other
pleasant & serious poems; By a Gentle-woman in New-England [i.e., Anne
Bradstreet]. The second edition, corrected by the author and enlarged
by an addition of several other poems found amongst her papers after
death. Boston, Printed by John Foster, 1678. 7 p.l., 255 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Title-page mutilated; pages 247-255 lacking.


---- Several poems compiled with great variety of wit and learning,
full of delight; wherein especially is contained, a compleat discourse
and description of the four elements, constitutions, ages of man,
seasons of the year. Together with an exact epitome of the three first
monarchies, viz. the Assyrian, Persian, Grecian, and Roman common
wealth, from its beginning to the end of their last king. With divers
other pleasant and serious poems. By a Gentle-woman in New-England
[i.e., Anne Bradstreet]. The third edition, corrected by the author,
and enlarged by an addition of several other poems found amongst her
papers after her death. Re-printed from the second edition, in the
year M.DCC.LVIII. 1 p.l., iii-xiii, 233 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    p. 223-224, 229-230, 233 lacking.


---- The tenth muse lately sprung up in America. Or severall poems,
compiled with great variety of wit and learning, full of delight.
Wherein especially is contained a compleat discourse and description
of the four: elements, constitutions, ages of man, seasons of the
year. Together with an exact epitomie of the four monarchies, viz. The
Assyrian, Persian, Grecian, Roman. Also a dialogue between Old England
and New, concerning the late troubles. With divers other pleasant and
serious poems. [By Anne Bradstreet.] Printed at London for Stephen
Bowtell at the signe of the Bible in Popes Head-Alley. 1650. 7 p.l.,
207 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The works of Anne Bradstreet in prose and verse. Edited by John
Harvard Ellis. Charlestown: Abram E. Cutter, 1867. 3 p.l., vii-lxxvi,
434 p., 1 pl., 1 port. 4º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    No. 192 of 250 copies printed.


=Branagan=, Thomas. Avenia, or A tragical poem, on the oppression
of the human species; and infringement on the rights of man. In
five books. With notes explanatory and miscellaneous. Written in
imitation of Homer's Iliad.--A new edition.--To which is added the
Constitution of the State of Pennsylvania. By Thomas Branagan. Author
of Preliminary essays, Serious remonstrance, Penitential tyrant,
&c. &c. Philadelphia: Printed, and sold by J. Cline, No. 125, South
Eleventh Street. 1810. 2 p.l., 5-324 p., front. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Branch=, William. Life, a poem in three books; descriptive of the
various characters in life; the different passions, with their moral
influence; the good and evil resulting from their sway; and of the
perfect man. Dedicated to the social and political welfare of the
people of the United States. By William Branch, junior, of Prince
Edward, Virginia. Richmond [Va.]: From the Franklin Press. W. W. Gray,
printer. 1819. 1 p.l., (i)iv-xii p., 1 l., 3-218 p., 1 l. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Breechiad=, a poem. Theresa. Boston: Printed by Belcher and
Armstrong. State Street. 1807. 1 p.l., 11-22 p., 1 l. 12º.

                                                 =NBH p.v. 24, no. 11=


=Brockway=, Thomas. The gospel tragedy: An epic poem. In four books.
[By Thomas Brockway.] Published according to act of Congress. Printed
at Worcester, Massachusetts, by James R. Hutchins, MDCCXCV. 1 p.l.,
(i)iii-iv p., 1 l., (1)8-119 p., front. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Frontispiece, an engraving of the Crucifixion, by Amos
    Doolittle.


A =Brother=, pseud. Commencement, a poem.... _See_ =Biglow=, William.


=Brown=, Charles Brockden, 1771-1810. Monody, on the death of Gen.
George Washington, delivered at the New-York Theatre [sic] on Monday
evening, Dec. 30, '99. [By Charles Brockden Brown.] (In: Commercial
advertiser, New York, Jan. 2, 1800. fº. no. 699, p. 3.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    A poem in ninety-six lines. Title from caption. With
    heading: For the Commercial advertiser. According to Dunlap,
    _History of the American theatre_, 1832, p. 274, this was
    written by C. B. Brown and delivered at the theatre by Mr.
    Cooper.

    Reprinted in _The Spectator_, New York, Jan. 4. 1800,
    no. 238, p. 1.


=Brown=, Solyman, 1790-1865. An essay on American poetry, with
several miscellaneous pieces on a variety of subjects, sentimental,
descriptive, moral, and patriotic. By Solyman Brown, A.M. New Haven:
Published by Hezekiah Howe, Flagg & Gray, printers. 1818. 1 p.l.,
(1)4-191 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    With bookplate of Henry B. Anthony.

    Several of these poems are reprinted in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 351-353, _NBH_.


=Bryan=, Daniel. The mountain muse: comprising The adventures of
Daniel Boone; and The power of virtuous and refined beauty. By Daniel
Bryan. Of Rockingham County, Virginia. Harrisonburg: Printed for the
author: By Davidson & Bourne. 1813. 7 p.l., (1)16-252, 12 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Bryant=, William Cullen, 1794-1878. The embargo; or, Sketches of the
times. A satire. The second edition, corrected and enlarged. Together
with the Spanish Revolution, and other poems. By William Cullen
Bryant. Boston: Printed for the author, by E. G. House, No. 5, Court
Street. 1809. 2 p.l., (1)6-35(1) p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Thanatopsis. (In: The North American review for 1817. Boston,
1825. Second edition. 8º. v. 5, p. 338-340.)

                                                                =* DA=

    Also in _Specimens of the American poets_, London, 1822,
    p. 215-218, _NBH_.


=Bulkley=, Edward. A threnodia upon our churches second dark eclipse,
happening July 20, 1663 by deaths interposition between us and that
great light and divine plant, Mr. Samuel Stone, late of Hartford in
New-England. (In: N. Morton, New-Englands memoriall. Cambridge, 1669.
12º. p. 168-169.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Upon the death of that truely Godly, reverend, and faithful
servant of Christ, Mr. Jonathan Mitchell, pastor of the church at
Cambridge, who deceased July 9, 1668. (In: N. Morton, New-Englands
memoriall. Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 192-193.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Bulkley=, Peter. A lamentation for the death of that precious and
worthy minister of Jesus Christ, Mr. Thomas Hooker, who died July 7,
1647, as the sun was setting: the same hour of the day died blessed
Calvin, that glorious light. (In: N. Morton, New Englands memoriall.
Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 127-129.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Burgoyne's= proclamation. _See_ =Livingston=, William.


=Burk=, John Daly, d. 1808. Bunker-Hill; or, The death of General
Warren: an historic tragedy, in five acts. By John Burk, late of
Trinity-College, Dublin. As performed at the theatres in America,
for fourteen nights, with unbounded applause. New-York: Published
by D. Longworth, at the Dramatic Repository, Shakespeare-Gallery.
July--1817. 44 p., 1 l. 16º.

                                                 =NCO p.v. 250, no. 4=

    First published in 1808.

    "Ode for the fourth March, 1817. Written for the
    occasion by Mr. Samuel Woodworth, and sung by Mr. Abraham
    Stage." 1 l. following p. 42.


=Byles=, Mather, 1706-1788. The comet: a poem. [By Mather Byles.]
Boston: Printed and sold by B. Green and Comp. in Newbury-Street, and
D. Goodkin, at the Corner of Water-street, Cornhil. 1744. 4 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Woodcut on title-page of a comet.

    Also printed in _The Massachusetts magazine_, Boston,
    1790, v. 2, p. 565, _Reserve_.


---- The conflagration. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American
poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 126-129.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- A full and true account of how the lamentable wicked French and
Indian pirates were taken by the valliant Englishmen. (In: E. A. and
G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866.
8º. v. 1, p. 118.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- The God of tempest and earthquake. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens
of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 129-131.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Hymn written during a voyage. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of
American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 132.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    First appeared in _A Collection of poems, by several
    hands_, Boston, 1744.

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 121,
    _NBB_; Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of American
    literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 432, _NBB_.


---- To His Excellency Governour Belcher, on the Death of His Lady.
An Epistle. By the Reverend Mr. Byles. [Boston, 1736.] 1 p.l., ii,
6 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 131-132, _NBH_.


=C.=, E., Gent. Sotweed redivivus. _See_ =Cook=, Ebenezer.


=C.=, G. A little looking-glass for the times; or, A brief
remembrancer for Pennsylvania. Containing some serious hints,
affectionately addressed to the people of every rank and station in
the province: with an appendix, by way of supplication to Almighty
God. By G. C. Wilmington, Printed and sold by James Adams, 1764.
24 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted with a type-facsimile title-page in _Magazine
    of history with notes and queries_, extra no. 22, p. 67-93,
    _IAG_.


=Caldwell=, Charles, 1772-1853. An elegiac poem on the death of
General Washington. By Charles Caldwell, A.M. M.D. Philadelphia:
Printed at the office of "The True American." 1800. 2 p.l., 12 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    With the statement on the second leaf that "part of the
    following poem has been already printed in a hand bill, and
    circulated, at the commencement of the present year, among
    patrons of _The True American_," a copy of which, upon
    satin, is described and quoted in _The Historical magazine_,
    Boston, 1857, v. 1, p. 233-234, _IAA_.


The =Camp= meeting. The extravagant zeal of religious fanatics and
the licentious rioting of unprincipled people who attend these
meetings, deserve the severest censure: but the truly pious of all
denominations, both in the camp and out of it, will ever be respected
and revered. By the Druid of the Lakes. The meeting here celebrated
was held in a deep forest of wild woods, five miles from the east bank
of the Cayuga lake, in the western district of New-York. Printed in
the Year 1810. To be had at No. 40 North Fourth-street. 2 p.l.,
5-12 p. 16º.

                                                 =NBH p.v. 23, no. 11=


=Capen=, Joseph, 1658-1725. Funeral elegy, upon the much to be
lamented death and most deplorable expiration of the pious, learned,
ingenious, and eminently usefull servant of God, Mr. John Foster, who
expired and breathed out his soul quietly into the arms of his blessed
Redeemer, at Dorchester, Sept. 9th, Anno Dom: 1681. Ætatis anno 33.
(In: T. C. Simonds, History of South Boston. Boston, 1857. 12º.
p. 38-39.)

                                                                 =IQH=


=Carey=, Mathew, 1760-1839. The porcupiniad: a hudibrastic poem.
In three cantos. Addressed to William Cobbett, by Mathew Carey.
Philadelphia: Printed and sold by the author. 1799. 2 v. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Issued separately.

    Title taken from canto II and III; canto I reads: In
    four cantos.

    Canto I dated: March 2, 1799; l. of adv., front., viii,
    (1)10-52 p.

    Canto II and III dated: April 15, 1799; front., iv,
    (1)6-44 p.


---- The prayer of an American citizen. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 2, p. 411-413.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Carpenter=, William. A poem on the execution of William Shaw, at
Springfield, December 13th, 1770, for the murder of Edward East in
Springfield gaol, by William Carpenter. [New York:] C. F. Heartman,
1916. 6 l., folded fac. 8º. (Heartman's historical series, no. 21.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Case=, Wheeler. Revolutionary memorials, embracing poems by the Rev.
Wheeler Case, published in 1778.... Edited by the Rev. Stephen Dodd.
New York: M. W. Dodd, 1852. iv p., 4 l., (1)14-69 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Includes reprint of original title-page (with author's
    name inserted): Poems, occasioned by several circumstances
    and occurrences in the present grand contest of America for
    liberty. New Haven: Printed by Tho. and Samuel Green. 1778.

    _Contents_: A contest between the eagle and the crane.
    Composed February, 1776.--A dialogue between Col. Paine
    and Miss Clorinda Fairchild, when taking leave of her to
    go on the northern expedition.--St. Clair's retreat, and
    Burgoyne's defeat.--The first chapter of the lamentations
    of General Burgoyne.--The fall of Burgoyne.--The vanity of
    trusting in an arm of flesh.--The tragical death of Miss
    Jane M'Crea, who was scalped and inhumanly butchered by
    a scouting party of Burgoyne's army, on his way towards
    Albany.--An answer for the messengers of the nation.


=Caustic=, Christopher, pseud. _See_ =Fessenden=, Thomas Green.


=Church=, Benjamin, 1734-1776. The choice: a poem, after the manner of
Pomfret. Written in the year 1757. By Dr. Benjamin Church, while at
college, and at the age of eighteen years. Printed at Worcester: By
Isaiah Thomas, jun. April--1802. 1 p.l., (1)4-16 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of
    American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 231-233,
    _NBB_.


---- Lines on the accession of George II. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1. p. 156-160.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- The times a poem. [By Benjamin Church. Boston, 1765.] 16 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Title-page lacking, supplied with a photostat facsimile.

    A satire on and against the Stamp Act.

    Reprinted in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 149-156, _NBH_.


---- _See also_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


=Church=, Edward. The dangerous vice ******* (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 343-347.)

                                                                 =NBH=


A =Citizen= of Baltimore, pseud. Original poems. _See_ =Townsend=,
Richard H.


A =Citizen= of Boston, pseud. The Declaration of Independence; a poem.
_See_ =Richards=, George.


The =Clerical= candidates. A poem. Washington City, Nov. 14, 1801.
32 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    This poem was written to point out "the advantages
    to society, of a clergy whose lives have been devoted to
    literature and a preparation for their profession, over any
    to be expected from upstart pretenders without any solid
    qualification, other than external effrontery."


=Cleveland=, Aaron, 1744-1815. The family blood. A burlesque. (In:
Charles W. Everest. The poets of Connecticut. New York, 1860. 8º.
p. 32-34.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    First published in C. W. Everest, _The poets of
    Connecticut_, Hartford, 1843.

    Also printed in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 3,
    p. 304-306, _NBB_.


---- The philosopher and boy. (In: Charles W. Everest, The poets of
Connecticut. New York, 1860. 8º. p. 25-32.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    Written when the author was nineteen years of age.

    First published in C. W. Everest, _The poets of
    Connecticut_, Hartford, 1843.


=Cliffton=, William, 1772-1799. The group: or An elegant
representation illustrated. Embellished with a beautiful head of S.
Verges, C.S. Philadelphia: Printed for Thomas Stevens, by Lang and
Ustick. M.DCC.XCVI. 3 p.l., (1)8-35(1) p., front. (port.) 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    A satire in support of Jay's treaty.


---- Poems, chiefly occasional, by the late Mr. Cliffton. To which are
prefixed, introductory notices of the life, character and writings,
of the author, and an engraved likeness. New-York: Printed for J. W.
Fenno, by G. & R. Waite. 1800. xviii, 119(1) p., front. (port.) 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The leaf preceding p. [71] is a special title reading:
    Some account of a manuscript, found among the papers of a
    French emigrant in London, entitled Talleyrand's descent
    into Hell. "From the Anchor Club."

    Frontispiece, the portrait of the author engraved by D.
    Edwin, after Field.

    Library has another copy in _NBHD_, lacking portrait.

    Some of Cliffton's poems are printed in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 87-93, _NBH_; also in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck.
    _Cyclopædia of American literature_, New York, 1866,
    v. 1, p. 604-609, _NBB_.


---- To William Gifford, esquire. (In: William Gifford, The Baviad,
and Mæviad. Philadelphia, 1799. 16º. p. v-xi.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Written for this edition of Gifford's _Baviad, and
    Maviad_, at the request of the publisher, William Cobbett.
    Signed and dated: C. Philadelphia 13th May, 1799.

    Reprinted in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of
    American literature_, v. 1, p. 606-607, _NBB_.


=Club= of Odd Volumes. Early American poetry [reprints]. v. 1-5.
Boston: The Club of Odd Volumes, 1894-98. 5 v. sq. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    [v.] I. Tompson, Benjamin. New-England's crisis.
    [v.] II. Morrell, William. New-England.
    [v.] III. Mather, Cotton. A poem and an elegy.
    [v.] IV. Elegies and epitaphs, 1677-1717.
    [v.] V. Wolcott, Roger. The poems of Roger Wolcott, Esq., 1725.


=Cobbett=, William, 1762-1835. French arrogance; or "The cat let out
of the bag"; a poetical dialogue between the envoys of America, and
X. Y. Z. and the lady. [By William Cobbett] Philadelphia: Published
by Peter Porcupine, opposite Christ-Church, and sold by the principal
booksellers. 1798. [Price 25 cents.] [Copyright secured according to
law.] 2 p.l., (1)6-31 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted with type-facsimile title-page in _Magazine of
    history with notes and queries_, extra no. 44, p. 383-408,
    _IAG_


=Cobby=, John. Poetic essays on the glory of Christ, and on the
divinity and work of the Holy Spirit. By John Cobby. Price eight
cents. New-York: Printed by John Tiebout, No. 358, Pearl-Street, for
the author. 1797. 1 p.l., (1)4-16 p. 8º.

                                                =NBH p. v. 26, no. 14=

    An hymn, composed for, and sung on New-Year's day, 1797,
    p. [15]-16.


=Cockloft=, Pindar, pseud. _See_ =Irving=, William.


=Coffin=, Robert Stevenson, 1797-1827. The miscellaneous poems of the
Boston Bard [i.e., Robert Stevenson Coffin]. Philadelphia: Printed for
the author, by J. H. Cunningham. 1818. 1 p.l., (i)iv-xv(i),
(1)18-156 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Cogswell=, Mason F. _See_ The =Echo=.


=Colman=, Benjamin, 1673-1747. On Elijah's translation, occasioned by
the death of the reverend and learned Mr. Samuel Willard. (In: Samuel
Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1,
p. 55-61.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- A quarrel with fortune. (In: Ebenezer Turell, The life and
character of the Reverend Benjamin Colman. Boston, 1729. 8º. p. 24-25.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 296, _NBB_.


---- To Urania on the death of her first child. (In: E. A. and G. L.
Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866. 8º.
v. 1, p. 74.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    First published in Ebenezer Turell, _The life and
    character of the Reverend Benjamin Colman_, Boston, 1729,
    p. 188-191, _Reserve_.


=Columbia's= naval triumphs. New-York: Published by Inskeep &
Bradford, No. 128 Broadway. J. Seymour, printer. No. 149 John-street.
1813. 3 p.l., (1)3-132 p. nar. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Columbiad=: Or a poem on the American war. _See_ =Snowden=,
Richard.


The =Columbian= muse. A selection of American poetry from various
authors of established reputation. New York: Printed by J. Carey, for
Mathew Carey, Philadelphia. 1794. 2 p.l., 224 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    _Contents_: Conspiracy of kings; Prospects of peace;
    by Joel Barlow.--Philosophic solitude, by William
    Livingston.--An oration which might have been delivered to
    students in anatomy on the late rupture between the two
    schools of Philadelphia, by Francis Hopkinson.--Address
    to the Genius of America; Columbia; Seasons moralized; by
    Timothy Dwight.--Elegy on the times; Elegy on the death
    of Mr. Buckingham St. John; Ambition; The critics; by
    John Trumbull.--Epistle to Col. Humphreys, by Timothy
    Dwight.--Sketches of American history, by Philip
    Freneau.--Description of the first American congress;
    American Revolution; American sages; American painters;
    American poets; by Joel Barlow.--Eulogium on rum, by Joseph
    Smith.--An elegy on the burning of Fairfield, Connecticut;
    Elegy on Lieut. De Hart; Mount Vernon; An ode to Laura;
    Genius of America; by David Humphreys.--The country
    meeting, by T. C. James.--Poem written at sea, by Philip
    Freneau.--The American warrior; Doctrine of consequences;
    Song; by a South Carolinian aged 17.--Stanzas on the
    President's birthday.--The fire fly.--The thunder storm.--An
    epistle to Dr. Dwight; A song translated from the French: by
    David Humphreys.--Epitaph on a patient killed by a cancer
    quack; Hypocrite's hope; by Lemuel Hopkins.--An intended
    inscription, by James Allen.--Depredations and destruction
    of the Algerines, by David Humphreys.--A winter piece,
    by Lathrop.--An Indian eclogue, by Joseph Smith.--Future
    state of the western territory; American winter; On love
    and the American fair; by David Humphreys.--Benevolence,
    by Dawes.--The old soldier, by Fentham.--The war-horse,
    by Doctor Ladd.--On the migration to America, by Philip
    Freneau.--A pastoral song, by Bradford.--Address to the
    robin red-breast, by Bayard.--Progress of science, by
    Evans.--On a lady's birthday, by W. M. Smith.--Description
    of Jehovah, by Doctor Ladd.--Nature and art, by W. M.
    Smith.--Cololoo, by William Dunlap.--An elegy, written in
    February 1791, by Richard Alsop.--The Deity; Creation;
    New England described; Picture of a New England village;
    House of sloth; A female worthy; Miseries of war; by
    Timothy Dwight.--Ella, a Norwegian tale, by William
    Dunlap.--The country school.--Invocation to Hope.--Prayer to
    Patience,--Character of St. Tamany, by William Pritchard.


The =Columbian= naval melody; a collection of songs and odes, composed
on the late naval victories and other occasions. Boston: Printed by
Hans Lund. 1813. 1 p.l., (1)3-94 p., 1 l. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Comet=: a poem. _See_ =Byles=, Mather.


=Commencement=, a poem. _See_ =Biglow=, William.


=Commercial= Advertiser, New York. The embassina; addressed to
the patrons of the Commercial Advertiser, by the carriers--with
the compliments of the season. January 1, 1800. (In: Commercial
Advertiser. New-York, Jan. 2, 1800. fº. no. 699, p. 1.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    A poem relating to the events of the preceding year, and
    Washington's death.

    Reprinted in _The Spectator_, New-York, Jan. 4, 1800,
    no. 238, p. 1.


=Cook=, Ebenezer. An elegy [on] the death of the Honourable Nicholas
Lowe, Esq: By E. Cooke. Laureat. (Maryland Historical Society. Fund
publication, no. 36, p. 53-56.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    This elegy appeared originally in the _Maryland
    Gazette_, December 24, 1728.


---- The sot-weed factor: or, A voyage to Maryland. A satyr. In which
is describ'd, the laws, government, courts and constitutions of the
country; and also the buildings, feasts, frolicks, entertainments
and drunken humours of the inhabitants of that part of America. In
burlesque verse. By Eben. Cook, Gent. London: Printed and sold by B.
Bragg, at the Raven in Pater-Noster-Row. 1708. (Price 6 d.) 1 p.l.,
21 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in 1731 in "The Maryland Muse. Containing
    the History of Colonel N. Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia.
    Done into Hudibrastic verse from an old ms. II. The Sotweed
    Factor or, Voyage to Maryland. Annapolis: Printed by
    William Parks. 1731. fº."

    Reprinted in 1865 in number two of Shea's _Early
    Southern tracts, ISG_.

    Third reprint, in modern type, with a photo-facsimile
    title-page in Maryland Historical Society, _Fund
    publication_, no. 36, _IAA_.


---- Sotweed redivivus: or the Planters looking-glass. In burlesque
verse. Calculated for the meridian of Maryland. By E. C. Gent, [i.e.,
Ebenezer Cook.] Annapolis: Printed by William Parks, for the Author.
M.DCC.XXX. vii, 28 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in modern type, with a photo-facsimile
    title-page in Maryland Historical Society, _Fund
    publication_, no. 36, p. 32-52, _IAA_.


=Cooper=, Samuel. _See_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


=Corlet=, Elijah. Epitaphium Thomas Hooker. (In: Cotton Mather,
Johannes in Eremo.... Boston, 1695. 8º. p. 44-45.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Cotton=, John, 1585-1652. [Elegy] On my reverend and dear brother,
Mr. Thomas Hooker, late pastor of the church at Hartford on
Conecticot. (In: N. Morton, New-Englands memoriall. Cambridge, 1669.
12º. p. 125-126.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- [An epitaph for Sara and Roland Cotton.] (In: Cotton Mather,
Magnalia Christi Americana. London, 1702. 4º. book 3, p. 31.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also in the Hartford, 1820, edition, v. 1, p. 260-261
    and Hartford, 1855, edition, v. 1, p. 285 of the _Magnalia
    Christi Americana_.

    Also reprinted in Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library
    of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 1, p. 253-254,
    _NBB_.


---- Upon the death of that aged, pious, sincere-hearted Christian
John Alden, Esq: late magistrate of New-Plimouth colony, who dyed Sept
12th. 1687. being about eighty nine years of age. [By] J. C. [i.e.,
John Cotton.] n.p., n.d. Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photo-facsimile. Text in two columns, enclosed in
    mourning borders.


A =Country= treat upon the second paragraph in His Excellency's
speech. _See_ =M.=, S.


=Cow-chace=, in three cantos. _See_ =André=, John.


=Crafts=, William, 1787-1826. A selection, in prose and poetry, from
the miscellaneous writings of the late William Crafts. Charleston: C.
C. Sebring and J. S. Burges, 1828. 1, 384 p. 8º.

                                                                 =NBG=

    Poetry, p. 229-384.


The =Croakers=. _See_ =Drake=, Joseph Rodman, and FITZ-GREENE HALLECK.


=Croswell=, Joseph. An ode to liberty. Composed by Mr. Joseph
Croswell, and sung at the Civic Feast at Plymouth, January 24, 1793.
(In: Chandler Robbins, An address delivered at Plymouth, on the 24th
day of January, 1793.... Boston, 1793. 8º. p. 19-20.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Crystalina=; a fairy tale. _See_ =Harney=, John Milton.


=Currie=, Helen. Poems, by Helen Currie. Philadelphia: Printed by
Thomas H. Palmer. 1818. 2 p.l., (i)vi-viii p., 1 l., (1)8-150 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Dabney=, Richard, 1787-1825. Poems, original and translated. By
Richard Dabney. Second edition. Philadelphia: Published by M. Carey,
No. 121, Chestnut Street. 1815. 1 p.l., (i)iv-viii p., 1 l.,
(1)8-172 p. nar. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Danforth=, John. Ad politum literaturæ, atque sacrarum literaturum
antistitem. Angliæque Americanæ antiquarium callentissimum, reverendum
dominum, D. Cottonum Matherum. (In: Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi
Americana. London, 1702. 4º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in Latin and English.

    Also in later editions of the _Magnalia Christi
    Americana_, as follows: Hartford, 1820, v. 1, p. 19;
    Hartford, 1855, v. 1, p. 21.


---- An elegy upon the much lamented decease of the reverend and
excellent Mr. Joseph Belcher. Late faithful pastor of the church of
Christ in Dedham, N. E. Qui obiit, April 27. Anno Dom. 1723. Ætat.
suæ 53. (In: Cotton Mather, A good character. Or, A walk with God
characterized. With some dues paid unto the memory of Mr. Joseph
Belcher.... Boston, 1723. 8º. p. [25-27.])

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Ebenezer Burgess, editor, _Dedham pulpit_,
    Boston, 1840, p. 217-218, _ZIY_.


---- Greatness & goodness elegized, in a poem, upon the much lamented
decease of the honourable & vertuous Madam Hannah Sewall, late
consort of the Honourable Judge Sewall, in Boston, in New-England.
She exchanged this life for a better, October, 19th. Anno Dom. 1717.
Ætatis suæ 60. [Boston? 1717.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in two columns, enclosed in mourning borders.


=Danforth=, Samuel, 1626-1674. An almanack for the year of our Lord
1647.... Cambridge by Mathew Day. Are to be solde by Hez. Usher at
Boston. 1647. 8 l. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photostat facsimile copy.

    Poems on leaves 2-7.


---- An almanack for the year of our Lord 1648.... Printed at
Cambridge, 1648. 8 l. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photostat facsimile copy.

    Poems on leaves 2-7.


---- An almanack for the year of our Lord 1649.... Printed at
Cambridge. 1649. 8 l. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Poems on leaves 2-7.


=Danforth=, Samuel, 1666-1727. An elegy in memory of the worshipful
Major Thomas Leonard Esq. of Taunton in New-England; who departed this
life on the 24th. day of November, Anno Domini 1713. In the 73d. year
of his age. [By] Samuel Danforth. [Boston: Printed by B. Green? 1713.]
Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photo-facsimile.

    Text in two columns, enclosed in mourning borders.


The =Dartmoor= massacre. _See_ =W.=, I. H.


=D'Aubigne=, Richard. _See_ =Dabney=, Richard.


=Davis=, Abijah. An oration, delivered at Port-Elizabeth, State of
New-Jersey, on the 21st day of March, 1801. By the Rev. Abijah Davis.
Philadelphia: Printed for Mathew Carey, No. 118, High-Street, Robert
Carr, printer. 1801. 1 p.l., (1)4-24 p. 12º.

                                              =IO(1801) p.v. 1, no. 4=

    p. 15-24 in verse.


=Davis=, John, 1721-1809? Coosohatchie. (In: The Monthly magazine and
American review for the year 1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 2, p. 80.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    The village of Coosohatchie is situated about half way
    between Charleston and Savannah.


---- Horace, Book 1, ode 5, imitated; The shipwreck, a wandering of
fancy. (In: The Monthly magazine and American review for the year
1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 2, p. 400.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Ode to Charleston College; Ode to a cricket; Horace imitated, ode
xi, b. 1; Swift imitated, to Lucus George. (In: The Monthly magazine
and American review for the year 1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 3,
p. 158-159.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Ode on home; Ode to a medical friend; Ode to the mocking-bird;
Plague at Philadelphia; In me-ipsum. (In: The Monthly magazine and
American review for the year 1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 2,
p. 239-240.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Ode to Lucus George, on his arrival at New-York from
South-Carolina; To Flavia; Ad puerum; Horace imitated, Book II
ode xxii; Ode to Lucus George written in South-Carolina; Sonnet
to Charlotte Smith, written at Savannah, in Georgia; Ode to the
Honourable Judge Grimke, of South-Carolina. (In: The Monthly magazine
and American review for the year 1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 2,
p. 319-320.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Ode to a medical friend. (In: The Monthly magazine and American
review for the year 1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 3, p. 397.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Sonnet to the chick-willow. (In: The Monthly magazine and
American review for the year 1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 2, p. 480.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- To the evening star; Paraphrase of Buchanan's Latin epigram from
the Greek; Ode on Ashley river; On my house at Sullivan's Island; Ode
to a cricket. (In: The Monthly magazine and American review for the
year 1800. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 2, p. 159-160.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Davis=, Richard Bingham, 1771-1799. Poems by Richard B. Davis; with
a sketch of his life. New York: Printed and sold by T. and J. Swords,
No. 160 Pearl-Street. 1807. 3 p.l., (i)viii-xxxi p., 1 l., 154 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Edited by John T. Irving.

    Reviewed in _The monthly anthology and Boston review_,
    Boston, 1807, v. 4, p. 269-272, * _DA_.


=Dawes=, Thomas, 1757-1825. Benevolence. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1790. 8º. v. 7, appendix 1, p. 33-35.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Beauties of poetry, British and
    American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 126-127, _Reserve_ and in
    _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794, p. 169-170, _NBH_.


---- The law given at Sinai. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of
American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2, p. 35-37.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Ode on the opening of the bridge over Charles river, from Boston
to Charlestown, on the 17th day of June, 1786, being the eleventh
anniversary of the Battle of Bunker's-Hill. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1, p. 183-184.)

                                                             =Reserve=


The =Day= of doom. _See_ =Wigglesworth=, Michael.


=Deane=, Samuel. Pitchwood Hill. A poem. Written in the year 1780. By
Samuel Deane, D.D. Printed at Portland. 1806. 2 p.l., (1)6-11 p. 16º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 20, no. 8=

    "The following elegant little poem is now published
    without the knowledge of the author. It appeared originally
    in the _Cumberland Gazette_, March 5, 1785...."--_Editor_.


---- _See also_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


The =Death= of General Montgomery, at the siege of Quebec. _See_
=Brackenridge=, Hugh Henry.


The =Declaration= of Independence; a poem. _See_ =Richards=, George.


=Democracy=: an epic poem. _See_ =Livingston=, Henry Brockholst.


The =Democratiad=, a poem. _See_ =Hopkins=, Lemuel.


=Denison=, Edward. The lottery, a poem, in two parts. And an ode to
war. By St. Denis Le Cadet [pseud. of Edward Denison]. Baltimore:
Printed by J. Robinson, for the author. 1815. 1 p.l., (1)4-71(1) p.
12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Dennie=, Joseph, editor. _See_ The =Spirit= of the Farmers' museum,
and lay preacher's gazette.


=De Peyster=, Arent Schuyler, 1736-1799. Miscellanies, by an officer.
Volume 1. Dumfries. Printed at the Dumfries and Galloway Courier
Office, By C. Munro. 1813. 277 p. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    No more published.

    Reprinted, New York: A. E. Chasmar & Co. 1888. 80, ccii,
    6 p., 1 map, 2 ports. 4º., _HBC_.


=De Sillè=, Nicasius. Memoir and poems. (In: Henry C. Murphy,
Anthology of New Netherland. New York, 1865. 8º. p. 185-195.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Dexter=, Samuel, 1761-1816. The progress of science. (In: Samuel
Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2,
p. 40-42.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Diabolou= machia; or Battle of Dragon. _See_ =Hill=, George.


A =Dialogue= between a Southern delegate, and his spouse, on his
return from the grand Continental Congress. A fragment, inscribed to
the married ladies of America, by their most sincere, and affectionate
friend, and servant, Mary V. V. [New York:] Printed in the year
M,DCC,LXXIV. [By James Rivington?] 14 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Attributed to Thomas Jefferson, by J. Sabin.


=Dinsmore=, Robert, 1757-1836. A short view of Burgoyne's expedition.
(In: Ballads and poems relating to the Burgoyne campaign. Albany,
N. Y., 1893. 8º. p. 62-66.)

                                                                =NBHD=


=Dodge=, Paul. A poem: delivered at the commencement of Rhode-Island
College, September 6, A.D. 1797. By Paul Dodge, A.B. Published by
request. Providence: Printed by Carter and Wilkinson, and sold at
their Book-Store, opposite the Market. 1797. 8 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Drake=, Joseph Rodman, 1795-1820. The American flag. By Joseph
Rodman Drake. Illustrated from original drawings by F. O. C. Darley.
Illuminated cover by John A. Davis. Music from Bellini, by Geo.
Danskin. New York: James G. Gregory, 1861. 4 f., 2 l. 4º.

                                                 =NBH p.v. 29, no. 16=

    Written in 1819, and published in The New York _Evening
    Post_, May 29, 1819.

    Also printed in _The Croakers_.


---- The culprit fay and other poems. New-York: George Dearborn,
publisher. 1835. 3 p.l., 84 p., 1 port. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.

    Written in 1819.

---- ---- New-York: George Dearborn, publisher. 1836. 4 p.l.,
(1)10-92 p., 1 port. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Also has engraved title-page.


---- ---- New-York: Van Norden and King, 45 Wall Street. 1847. 4 p.l.,
(1)10-92 p., 1 port. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.


---- The culprit fay. New York: Rudd & Carleton, 1859. 5 p.l.,
(1)14-62 p., front. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- New York: Rudd & Carleton, 1860. 5 p.l., (1)14-62 p., front.
16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- New York: Rudd & Carleton, 1862. 5 p.l., (1)14-62 p., front.
16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- New York: Carleton, Publisher (Late Rudd & Carleton.) 1865.
5 p.l., (1)14-62 p., front. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- New York: Kilbourne Tompkins, 1875. 12 l. sq. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Drake=, Joseph Rodman, and FITZ-GREENE HALLECK. The croakers. First
complete edition. New York, MDCCCLX. 2 p.l., (i)vi-viii, 191 p.,
2 ports. 4º. (Bradford Club series. Number two.)

                                                                =NBHD=

    No. 15 of 100 club copies.

    The Library has a second copy, no. 122 of 150
    subscriber's copies, _NBHD_; also a third copy, no. 8 of 100
    club copies, which has inserted 1 pl., 10 ports., _IAG_;
    also a fourth copy with 12 ports. inserted, in _Reserve_.

    _The Croakers_ was published originally in the New York
    _Evening Post_, March 10-July 19, 1819; _New York Mirror_,
    Jan. 28, 1828; New York _Evening Post_, Nov. 16, 1830; _Home
    journal_, May 27, 1856. Some unpublished poems are also
    included in this edition.


---- Poems by Croaker, Croaker & Co. and Croaker, Jr. as published in
the Evening Post. 1 l., 499-506 p., 1 l.

                                                               =* NBI=

    Excerpt: Waldie's octavo library.


The =Druid= of the Lakes, pseud. _See_ The =Camp= meeting.


=Dudley=, Thomas, 1574-1653. [Epitaph.] (In: N. Morton, New-Englands
memoriall. Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 140.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    "These verses were found in his pocket after his death."

    Reprinted in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 1,
    p. 290-291, _NBB_.


=Dunlap=, William, 1766-1839. Cololoo,--an Indian tale, thrown into
English verse. (In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield,
1793. 12º. p. 287-296.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    "This poem was originally published, in an imperfect
    state, in no. 20 of the 3d volume of the _Gazette of the
    United States_, for July 6th, 1791...."

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 187-190, _NBH_.


---- Ella, a Norwegian tale. (In: American poems, selected and
original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 226-232.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 215-218, _NBH_


=Dutton=, Warren, 1774-1857. The present state of literature; a poem,
delivered in New-Haven, at the public commencement of Yale-College,
September 10, 1800. By Warren Dutton. Hartford: Printed by Hudson and
Goodwin. 1800. 1 p.l., (1)4-16 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Dwight=, Theodore, 1765-1846. Lines addressed to a mother, who had
been absent from home several weeks, on her seeing her infant child.
(In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º.
v. 2, p. 73-74.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Lines on the death of Washington. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens
of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2, p. 71-73.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Ode to conscience. (In: American poems, selected and original.
Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 284-287.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Picture of African distress. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6, p. 328.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 67-68. _NBH_.


---- _See also_ The =Echo=; The =Political= green-house for the year
1798.


=Dwight=, Timothy, 1752-1817. Address of the genius of Columbia to the
Continental convention. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1787.
8º. v. 1, p. 563-566.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _American poems, selected and original_,
    Litchfield, 1793, p. 55-62, _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_. New
    York, 1794, p. 43-48, _NBH_.


---- Columbia. [By Timothy Dwight.] (In: The Salem gazette. Thursday,
January 8, 1784. fº. p. 1.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The American museum_, Philadelphia, 1787,
    v. 1, p. 566, _Reserve_; _The Beauties of poetry, British
    and American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 125-126, _Reserve_;
    _American poems, selected and original_, Litchfield, 1793,
    p. 62-64, _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 48-49, _NBH_.


---- The conquest of Canäan; a poem, in eleven books. By Timothy
Dwight. Hartford: Printed by Elisha Babcock. M,DCC,LXXXV. 4 p.l.,
304 p., 1 l. 16º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=

    Dedicated to George Washington.


---- Creation. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794. 16º.
p. 196-199.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The critics, a fable. Written September 1785. (In: American
poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 70-75.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    This poem was first printed in _The Gazette of the
    United States_, July 13, 1791.


---- The Deity, and his dispensations. (In: The Columbian muse. New
York. 1794. 16º. p. 194-196.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The destruction of the Pequods; The farmer's advice to the
villagers; Columbia; The critics, a fable; The worship of the
Gibeonites; Battle before the walls of Ai; Evening after a battle;
Procession of Israelitish virgins to meet the returning army;
Lamentation of Selima for the death of Irad. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 232-259.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Epistle from Dr. Dwight to Col. Humphreys, Greenfield, 1785.
(In: David Humphreys, The miscellaneous works of Colonel Humphreys.
New-York, 1790. 8º. p. 102-110.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _American poems, selected and original_.
    Litchfield, 1793, p. 75-84, _NBH_, and in _The Columbian
    muse_, New York, 1794, p. 73-80. _NBH_.


---- A female worthy. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794. 16º.
p. 207-209.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Greenfield hill: a poem, in seven parts. I. The prospect.
II. The flourishing village. III. The burning of Fairfield. IV.
The destruction of the Pequods. V. The clergyman's advice to the
villagers. VI. The farmer's advice to the villagers. VII. The vision,
or Prospect of the future happiness of America. By Timothy Dwight,
D.D. New-York: Printed by Childs and Swaine. 1794. 183 [really 175]
(1) p. 8º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=

    Written mainly in 1787; introduction dated June 13, 1794.

    Dedicated to Vice-President Adams.

    Advertised in _New York Daily Advertiser_, October 14,
    1794, p. 2, col. 4.


---- The house of sloth. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794. 16º.
p. 205-207.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Reprinted in _The Port folio_, Philadelphia, 1804,
    v. 4, p. 327, * _DA_; _The American poetical miscellany_,
    Philadelphia, 1809, p. 176-178, _NBH_.


---- A hymn sung at the public exhibition of the scholars, belonging
to the academy in Greenfield, May 2, 1788. By Dr. Dwight. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6, p. 171-172.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Message of Mordecai to Esther. From a manuscript poem. (In:
American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º.
p. 299-304.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The miseries of war. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794.
16º. p. 209-214.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- New-England described. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794.
16º. p. 199-204.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Ode on the glory of Columbia. (In: David Humphreys, The
miscellaneous works of Colonel Humphreys. New-York, 1790. 8º.
p. 181-183.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Picture of a New-England village. (In: The Columbian muse. New
York, 1794. 16º. p. 204-205.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also in _The New-York magazine_, New-York, 1795, v. 6,
    p. 509-510, _Reserve_.


---- The seasons moralized. (In: The American magazine. New York,
1787. 12º. December, 1787, p. 58-59.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The American museum_. Philadelphia,
    1789, v. 5, p. 302-303, _Reserve_; _American poems, selected
    and original_. Litchfield, 1793, p. 64-66; _The Columbian
    muse_, New York, 1794, p. 50-51, _NBH_.


---- The seasons moralized; A song; The Deity, and his dispensations;
Creation; Original state of man; Three fold state of man emblematized;
Prospect of America. (In: The Beauties of poetry, British and
American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 195-198, 209-219.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The trial of faith. (In: American poems, selected and original.
Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 33-54.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    In three parts: Part I, Daniel, chap, I; Part II,
    Daniel, chap, II; Part III, Daniel, chap. III.

    This poem appeared originally in the following numbers
    of _The New-Haven Gazette, and Connecticut Magazine_: Part I.
    Sept. 21, 1786, v. 1, no. 32, p. 245-246; Part II. Oct. 12,
    1786, v. 1, no. 35, p. 269-270; Part III. Oct. 19, 1786,
    v. 1, no. 36, p. 277-278.


---- The triumph of infidelity: a poem. Supposed to be written by
Timothy Dwight, D.D. of Greenfield in Connecticut, in 1788. London:
Printed for J. Mathews, No. 18, Strand. MDCCXCI. 27 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Eastburn=, James Wallis, 1797-1819, and ROBERT CHARLES SANDS,
1799-1832. Yamoyden, a tale of the wars of King Philip: in six cantos.
By the late Rev. James Wallis Eastburn, A.M. and his Friend [i.e.,
Robert Charles Sands]. New York: Published by James Eastburn, Clayton
& Kingsland, printers. 1820. 2 p.l., (i)vi-xii, 339(1) p., front. 16º.

                                                      =NBHD= and =HBC=

    Engraved title-page.


=Eaton=, Theophilus. Review of New-York, or Rambles through the City.
Original poems. Moral, religious, sarcastic, and descriptive. By Th.
Eaton. Second edition. New-York: Printed and published by John Low,
No. 17 Chatham-Street. 1814. 1 p.l., (i)iv, (1)6-144 p. nar. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Echo=, with other poems. [Printed at the Porcupine press by
Pasquin Petronius.] 1807. 2 p.l., (i)iv-xv, 331 p., 5 l., 7 pl. 8º.

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    The Reserve copy has inserted, 33 plates (1 double).

    Contains poems by Theodore Dwight, Richard Alsop, Mason
    F. Cogswell, and L. Hopkins.

    "The first number of 'The Echo' appeared in 'The
    American Mercury,' at Hartford, in August, 1791. It was
    written at Middletown, by Richard Alsop and Theodore Dwight.
    The authors, at the time of writing it, had no expectation
    of its being published. Their sole object was to amuse
    themselves and a few of their personal friends. The general
    account of its origin and design is given in the preface to
    the volume, in which the numbers were afterward collected
    and published in New York. With the exception of a few lines
    written by Drs. Mason F. Cogswell and Elihu H. Smith, and a
    part of one or two numbers by Dr. Lemuel Hopkins, the entire
    work was the production of Messrs. Alsop and Dwight. Judge
    Trumbull never wrote a line in it."--C. W. Everest, _Poets
    of Connecticut_.


An =Eclogue=, occasioned by the death of the Rev. Alexander Cummings.
_See_ =Belknap=, Jeremy.


=Eggleston=, George Cary. American war ballads and lyrics. A
collection of the songs and ballads of the Colonial wars, the
Revolution, the War of 1812-15, the war with Mexico and the Civil war.
Edited by George Cary Eggleston. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1889.
xiv p., 1 l., 278 p., 1 pl. 16º.

                                                                 =NBI=


=Eleazar.= In obitum viri verè reverendi D. Thomæ Thacheri, qui ad
Dom. ex hac vitâ migravit, 18, 8, 1678. (In: Cotton Mather, Magnalia
Christi Americana. London, 1702. 4º. Book 3, p. 153.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Composed by Eleazar, an Indian youth who was then a
    student at Harvard.

    Reprinted in later editions of the _Magnalia Christi
    Americana_, as follows: Hartford, 1820, v. 1, p. 448;
    Hartford, 1855, v. 1, p. 496.

    Text in Latin and English.


=Elegiac= ode, sacred to the memory of General [Nathanael] Greene.
(In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1788. 8º. v. 4, p. 386-388.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Elegiac= verses on the decease of his late excellency ... General
George Washington. _See_ =Searson=, John.


An =Elegie= upon the death of the Reverend Mr. Thomas Shepard. _See_
=Oakes=, Urian.


=Elegies= and epitaphs, 1677-1717. [By Cotton Mather and Urian Oakes.]
Boston: The Club of Odd Volumes, 1896. 16 p., 3 l., 16 p., 3 l.,
43-46 p., 2 l., 29-35 p., 1 l., [26]-34 p., 2 l., 43-46 p. sq. 8º.
(The Club of Odd Volumes. Early American poetry. [Reprints. v.] 4.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    No. 81 of one hundred copies on hand-made paper.

    _Contents_: Elegie on the Reverend Thomas Shepard, 1677.
    By the Reverend Urian Oakes. Three elegies and an epitaph,
    by Cotton Mather: [1.] On the Rev. John Wilson. From
    _Johannes in Eremo_, 1695; [2.] On seven young ministers.
    From _Vigilantius_, 1705; [3.] On Ezekiel Cheever. From
    _Corderius Americanus_, 1708; [4.] On the Hon. Wait
    Winthrop. From _Hades look'd into_, 1717.


=Elegy= on the death of brigadier general [Hugh] Mercer, of Virginia,
slain in the action near Princeton, January 3, 1777. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1791. 8º. 1792, part 1, Appendix 1, p. 19-21.)

                                                             =Reserve=


An =Elegy= on the death of General George Washington. (Colonial
Society of Massachusetts. Publications. Boston, 1905. 8º. v. 7,
p. 196-198.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    A poem of eight stanzas of six lines each. Printed from
    a contemporary manuscript belonging to the Boston Athenæum.


=Elegy= on the death of General Washington. (In: The Port folio.
Philadelphia, 1805. 4º. v. 5, p. 136.)

                                                                =* DA=


An =Elegy= on the much-to-be-deplored death of ... Reverend Nathaniel
Collins. _See_ =Mather=, Cotton.


An =Elegy= on a Patriot. Occasioned by the awful and untimely death of
the honourable William Wimble, who by the coroner's inquest was found
to have come to his end by suffocation. (In: The New-Haven Gazette,
and the Connecticut magazine. New Haven, 1787. 4º. March 22, 1787,
v. 2, no. 5, p. 31.)

                                                             =Reserve=


An =Elegy= upon His Excellency William Burnet, Esq; who departed
this life Sept. 7th. 1729. Ætat. 42. Boston: Printed and Sold by T.
Fleet in Pudding-Lane, near the Town-House, where may be had His
Excellency's Character [1729]. Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Nine stanzas; text enclosed in mourning borders.


=Elisha=, Patrick N. I. Patent right oppression exposed; or, Knavery
detected. In an address, to unite all good people to obtain a repeal
of the patent laws. By Patrick N. I. Elisha, Esq. To which is added an
alarming law case; also, reflections on the patent laws. Illustrated
with notes and anecdotes by the author. Philadelphia: Published by R.
Folwell, 1813. xi(i), 189(1) p. 16º.

                                                         =Patent Room=


An =Emetic= for aristocrats! or A chapter, respecting Governor Jay,
and his treaty. Also, a history of the life and death of independence.
To which is added, a poem on the treaty. Boston. Printed, 1795.
23 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    A poem on Jay's treaty, p. 19-23.


=Entertainment= for a winter's evening. _See_ =Green=, Joseph.


=Epistle= to his excellency general Washington. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 2, p. 513-514.)

                                                             =Reserve=


An =Epistle= to the Hon. Arthur Dobbs, Esq; in Europe. From a
clergyman in America. [In three parts.] London: Printed for the
author, and sold by R. Dodsley, in Pall-mall, and M. Cooper, in
Pater-noster-row. 1752. 2 p.l., iii-v, 7-95 p., 1 l. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Epistle= from the Marquis de La Fayette, to General Washington.
Edinburgh: Printed by Mundell & Son, Royal Bank Close; for Mundell
& Son, Edinburgh; and Longman & Rees, and J. Wright, London. 1800.
2 p.l., 32 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    According to _Sabin_ 38570 "this exceedingly rare
    poetical piece was written during the lifetime of General
    Washington, but was not printed until after his death."

    Attributed to George Hamilton.


An =Epistle= to a member of the General Court of Massachusetts, for
1809. n.t.-p. [n.p., 181-?] 1 p.l., (1)4-32 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Half-title only.


An =Epistle= from Yarico to Inkle. _See_ =Story=, Isaac.


An =Epistle= to Zenas. _See_ =Gardiner=, John S. T.


=Estlake=, Restore, pseud. Ethick diversions. In four epistles to
Emphasian, R. T. To which is added, The Convent. By Restore Estlake.
New-York: Printed by T. and J. Swords, No. 160 Pearl-Street. 1807.
2 p.l., (1)6-70 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Evans=, Nathaniel, 1742-1767. Elegy to the memory of [Mr. Thomas
Godfrey]. (In: Thomas Godfrey, Juvenile poems on various subjects.
Philadelphia, 1765. 8º. p. 5-7.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Poems on several occasions with some other compositions. By
Nathaniel Evans, A.M. Late missionary (appointed by the Society
for Propagating the Gospel) for Gloucester County, in New Jersey;
and Chaplain to Lord Viscount Kilmorey, of the Kingdom of Ireland.
Philadelphia: Printed by John Dunlap, in Market-Street. M.DCC.LXXII.
xxviii, 160, 24 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Leaf of errata lacking.

    Some of these poems are reprinted in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 106-118, _NBH_.


---- Progress of science. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794.
16º. p. 181-182.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Not in his _Poems on several occasions_.

    Also in _The Beauties of poetry, British and American_,
    Philadelphia, 1791, p. 219-220, _Reserve_.


=Everett=, David, 1769-1813. A branch of maple. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2, p. 113-114.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Daranzel; or, The Persian patriot. An original drama. In five
acts. Boston: John Russell, 1800. 66 p., 1 l. 8º.

                                                  =NBL p.v. 13, no. 5=


=Ewing=, Samuel. Reflections in solitude. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 347-349.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Extracts= in prose and verse, by a lady of Maryland. Together with a
collection of original poetry, never before published, by citizens of
Maryland. In two volumes. Annapolis: Printed by Frederick Green. 1808.
2 v. 12º.

                                                                 =NBF=

    v. 1. 2 p.l., (1)6-364 p., 4 l.; v. 2. 1 p.l.,
    (1)4-359 p., 6 l.

    The last 3 leaves of v. 2 contain a list of 375
    subscribers.

    The poems by American authors include the following:

    v. 1. Epitaph on Mrs. Grove, of Litchfield, by William
    Grove, p. 41-42. A Similie, by J. L. B. Esq. of Md.,
    p. 248-249.--To Lady Harriet Ackland, on her coming into
    the American camp to attend her husband, by Miss Lee, of
    Md., p. 264-266.

    v. 2. Sonnet to Mr.--, in India, by Miss Lee, of Md.,
    p. 3-4.--Sonnet to the memory of her sisters, Mrs. F-nd-l
    and Mrs. Pl-t-r, by Miss Lee, of Md., p. 4-5.--The genius
    of America; Pyrocles to Lucinda; Impromptu; Epigram on
    a young gentleman; Chloe; To Monimia; An imitation of
    Horace, bk. iii, ode xxix; Epitaph on a miser; To Amanda;
    [Lines] written under a young lady's picture; Thoughts at
    Christmas; Absence; An ode to a friend; An ode, 1759; Song,
    to the tune of The Flowers of the Forest; On the taking
    of Louisburgh by Admiral Boscawen, 1758; Verses written
    at Mount Radnor, April, 1764; A hymn to Monimia; A song
    to the tune Wae's my heart that we should sunder; by John
    Thomas, of Md., p. 154-189.--Verses on presenting Mr. J. T.
    with a piece of work to wear in his watch, by Miss Lee, of
    Md., p. 189-190.--To a young lady, on receiving from her a
    watch-paper, by John Thomas, of Md., p. 190-192.--To a young
    lady, on the author's omitting to send her as promised, a
    present of flowers, on May-Day, 1762, by John Thomas, of
    Md., p. 245-247.--On the vicissitudes of human life, an
    elegy, addressed to a friend by Mr. Smith of Phila.,
    p. 276-281.--The enamour'd philosopher, by a maniac in the
    hospital at Philadelphia, p. 315-317.--Lampoon, by Mr.
    Smith, of Phila., p. 317-319.--The student's sigh; To Miss
    A. T.; Morning, a hymn; The student's resolve; Elegy on the
    death of Hon. J. Rogers; Despair, an elegy; A burlesque
    invitation; To Miss A. O., by ---- of Anne-Arundel county,
    p. 340-354.--To Miss H. Hill; On the death of Mrs.--'s
    humming bird; by Miss Lee, of Md., p. 355-358.--Sonnet by
    Charlotte Smith, p. 359.


A =Family= tablet: containing a selection of original poetry. Boston:
Printed and sold by William Spotswood. 1796. 6 p.l., 81 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Edited by Abiel Holmes.

    This collection was almost entirely composed by members
    of the family of President Stiles, and Dr. Holmes and his
    wife were the largest contributors.--Dexter, _Yale annals_.

    _Contents_: Elegy.--A dirge.--On the sudden death of
    a lovely child.--Lines addressed to Miss S. W. on the
    death of her brother who fell in battle at Miami Village,
    1790.--Lines occasioned by the war, 1777.--André's
    ghost.--Epistle to Myra.--Lines presented to the parents
    of Mr. J. F.--Lines to the memory of Mrs. T. H.--Elegy
    to memory of Mrs. T. W.--Elegiac sonnet.--Farewell.--The
    adieu.--Invocation to religion.--Hymn written at
    sea.--Invocation to piety.--Lines written in a gale
    at sea.--Birth-day reflection.--Hymn, My times are
    in Thy hand.--Conscience.--To Myra.--Origin of the
    fire-screen.--A fragment.--Inscription on a mall at
    C.--The flower-de-luce.--Reply.--To Myron with a
    purse.--Reply.--To Myra with a paper-basket.--Lines
    accompanying a needle-book.--To a gentleman, who presented
    Myra seven robins.--Address to a young robin.--To Myron,
    with a jonquil.--Reply.--On reading the above pieces.--The
    transformation of Eliza into a poplar.--The soldier.--The
    seasons.--To a gentleman, who presented Louisa with a
    pen.--Reply.--To Strephon.--To Amanda.--Lines occasioned
    by seeing a portrait of the Goddess of Liberty.--Elegiac
    fragment on the death of E. S.--Elegiac sonnet on Mrs. K. T.
    S.--Elegy on Doctor *******--Yaratildia: an epic poem.


=Fanny= [a poem]. _See_ =Halleck=, Fitz-Greene.


=Farmer=, Henry Tudor. The battle of the isle. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2, p. 174-179.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Imagination; The maniac's dream, and other poems; By Henry T.
Farmer, M.D. member of the Historical Society of New-York. New-York:
Published by Kirk & Mercein, and John Miller, Covent Garden, London.
William A. Mercein, printer. 1819. 2 p.l., (i)viii-xi, (1)14-163 p.
12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Fashion's= analysis; or, The winter in town. _See_ =Avalanche=, Sir
Anthony, pseud.


=Father= Abbey's will. _See_ =Seccomb=, John.


=Faugeres=, Margaretta V., 1771-1801. Essays, in prose and verse.
By Margaretta V. Faugeres. (In: The posthumous works of Ann Eliza
Bleecker. New-York, 1793. 16º. p. 263-375.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Poems, p. 275-375.


=Fenno=, Miss J. Original compositions, in prose and verse. On
subjects moral and religious. By Miss J. Fenno, of Boston. Printed
in Boston, by Joseph Bumstead, at his office, No. 20, Union-Street.
MDCCXCI. 1 p.l., iii, 125 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Fentham.= The old soldier. (In: The Beauties of poetry, British and
American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 190-191.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_. New York, 1794,
    p. 171-172, _NBH_.


=Fessenden=, Thomas Green, 1771-1837. Democracy unveiled; or, Tyranny
stripped of the garb of patriotism. By Christopher Caustic, L.L.D.
[pseud. of Thomas Green Fessenden.] Second edition. Boston: Printed by
David Carlisle, for the author. 1805. 2 p.l., (i)iv-viii, 220 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Canto I. The tocsin; II. Illuminism; III. Mobocracy; IV.
    The Jeffersoniad; V. The gibbet of satire; VI. Monition.


---- ---- In two volumes. Third edition, with large additions.
New-York: Printed for I. Riley & Co. 1806. 2 v. in 1. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    v. 1. xxiv, 179 p.; v. 2. 238 p., 1 l.

    The Library has another copy of this edition in which
    v. 1 is dated 1806; v. 2, dated 1805.


---- The modern philosopher; or Terrible tractoration! In four cantos,
most respectfully addressed to the Royal College of Physicians,
London. By Christopher Caustick [pseud. of Thomas Green Fessenden],
Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, Aberdeen and Honorary
member of no less than nineteen very learned societies. Second
American edition, revised, corrected, and much enlarged by the
author. Philadelphia: From the Lorenzo press of E. Bronson. 1806.
2 p.l., (i)vi-xxxii, 272 p., 2 pl. (incl. front.) 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Original poems. By Thomas Green Fessenden, Esq. Author of
Terrible Tractoration, or Caustic's petition to the Royal College
of Physicians, and Democracy unveiled. Philadelphia: Printed at the
Lorenzo press of E. Bronson. 1806. 2 p.l., (i)vi-xii, 203(1) p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Some of Fessenden's poems are printed in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 115-121, _NBH_.


---- Pills, poetical, political and philosophical. Prescribed for
the purpose of purging the publick of piddling philosophers, of
puny poetasters, of paltry politicians, and petty partisans. By
Peter Pepper-Box, poet and physician [i.e., Thomas Green Fessenden].
Philadelphia: Printed for the author. 1809. 1 p.l., (i)iv-xviii,
136 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Poetical dialogue between Lionel Lovelorn, Esq. and Geoffry
Ginger, Esq. (In: The Port folio. Philadelphia, 1805. 4º. v. 5,
p. 22-24.)

                                                                =* DA=


---- Terrible tractoration!! A poetical petition against galvanising
trumpery, and the Perkinistic institution. In four cantos. Most
respectfully addressed to the Royal College of Physicians, by
Christopher Caustic.... First American from the second London
edition.... New York: S. Stansbury, 1804. xxxv(i), 192 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    First published in London, 1803.


The =Field= of Orleans, a poem. _See_ =Hutton=, Joseph.


=First= Church of Universalists, Boston, Mass. Ode performed ... on
the day devoted to funeral testimonies of respect to the memory of ...
Washington. (In: The Independent Chronicle. Boston, Jan. 23, 1800.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    A poem of eight stanzas.


=Fitch=, Elijah, 1745-1788. The beauties of religion. (In: Samuel
Kettell, Specimens of American literature. Boston, 1829. 12º.
p. 300-301.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- The choice. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of
American literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 258-259.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    First published in Providence, 1789.


---- The true Christian. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of
American literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 258.)

                                                                 =NBB=


=Folger=, Peter, 1617-1690. A looking-glass for the times, or the
former spirit of New England revived in this generation. By Peter
Folger. April 23, 1676. 10 l. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "This was reprinted in 1763. Copies of it are very rare.
    We are indebted for the one from which we have reprinted, to
    a ms. copy in possession of Mr. Bancroft."

    Excerpt from: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck's _Cyclopædia of
    American literature_.

    Also printed in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 1,
    p. 479-485, _NBB_.


=Forrest=, Michael. Travels through America. A poem. By Michael
Forrest. Philadelphia: Printed by Johnston & Justice, at Franklin's
Head, No. 41, Chestnut-Street. M.DCC.XCIII. 3 p.l., (1)8-50 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Address to fortune (supposed to have been written by
    an old bachelor), p. 43-44; Verses addressed to a young
    gentleman at the Charleston College academy, in 1790,
    p. 44-45; A specimen of unlimited sublime poetry, p. 45-49;
    Man shall be free. A new song written February 25, 1793, p. 50.


=Franklin=, Benjamin, 1706-1790. The mechanic's song. (In: E. A. and
G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866.
8º. v. 1, p. 115.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- The mother country. (In his: Select works. By Epes Sargent.
Boston, 1854. 12º. p. 378.)

                                                                 =IAW=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 115, _NBB_.


---- My plain country Joan. (In his: Select works. By Epes Sargent.
Boston, 1854. 12º. p. 377.)

                                                                 =IAW=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 114-115,
    _NBB_.


---- Paper: a poem. (In his: Works. London, 1793. 8º. p. 101-104.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The Massachusetts magazine_, Boston,
    1794, v. 8, p. 501, _Reserve_; Samuel Kettell, _Specimens
    of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 173-174, _NBH_;
    and in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of American
    literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 114, _NBB_.

    Also printed in many editions of Franklin's _Works_.


=French= arrogance; or "The cat let out of the bag." _See_ =Cobbett=,
William.


=Freneau=, Philip, 1752-1832. The American village. A poem by Philip
Freneau. Reprinted in facsimile from the original edition published
at New York in 1772, with an introduction by Harry Lyman Koopman
and bibliographical data by Victor Hugo Paltsits. Providence, Rhode
Island, 1906. xxi p., 2 l., 69 p. 8º. (Club for Colonial Reprints of
Providence, Rhode Island. Third publication.)

                                                                 =IAG=

    No. 39 of 100 copies printed.


---- A collection of poems, on American affairs, and a variety of
other subjects, chiefly moral and political; written between the year
1797 and the present time. By Philip Freneau, author of Poems written
during the Revolutionary War, Miscellanies, &c. &c. In two volumes.
New-York: Published by David Longworth, at the Dramatic Repository,
Shakspeare-Gallery. 1815. 2 v. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    v. 1. 2 p.l., v-viii, (1)14-188 p., 2 l. of adv.; v. 2.
    2 p.l., (1)10-176 p.


---- The miscellaneous works of Mr. Philip Freneau. Containing his
essays, and additional poems. Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Bailey,
at Yorick's Head, in Market Street. MDCCLXXXVIII. xii, 429 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The poems of Philip Freneau. Written chiefly during the late war.
Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Bailey, at Yorick's Head, in Market
Street. MDCCLXXXVI. vii(i), 407 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The poems of Philip Freneau poet of the American Revolution.
Edited for the Princeton Historical Association by Fred Lewis
Pattee.... Princeton, N. J.: The University Library, 1902. 3 v. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Poems relating to the American Revolution by Philip Freneau. With
an introductory memoir and notes. By Evert A. Duyckinck. New York: W.
J. Middleton, publisher, 1865. 1 p.l., (i)vi-xxxviii, 288 p., 2 ports.
(incl. front.), 1 fac. 4º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    No. 73 of 100 copies printed.


---- Poems on various subjects, but chiefly illustrative of the events
and actors in the American War of Independence. By Philip Freneau.
Reprinted from the rare edition printed at Philadelphia in 1786. With
a preface. London: John Russell Smith, Soho Square. 1861. 2 p.l.,
(i)vi-xxii, 362 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Poems written between the years 1768 & 1794, by Philip
Freneau, of New Jersey. A new edition, revised and corrected by
the author; including a considerable number of pieces never before
published. Monmouth [N. J.] Printed at the press of the author, at
Mount-Pleasant, near Middletown-Point; M,DCC,XCV: and, of--American
Independence--XIX. 2 p.l., (i)x-xv, 455(1) p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Advertised by Freneau in his newspaper, _The Jersey
    Chronicle_, no. 12, July 18, 1795.

    The Library has a second copy of this edition; both were
    formerly owned by Evert A. Duyckinck, who annotated them,
    in pencil, for his edition of Freneau's poems published in
    1865. The annotations of the one supplement those of the
    other.


---- Poems written and published during the American Revolutionary
war, and now republished from original manuscripts; interspersed
with translations from the ancients, and other pieces not heretofore
in print. By Philip Freneau. The third edition in two volumes.
Philadelphia: From the press of Lydia R. Bailey, No. 10, North-Alley.
1809. 2 v. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    v. 1. 1 p.l., (1)4, iv, (1)6-280 p., front.; v. 2. 1
    p.l., (1)4-302, xii p., front.


=G.=, G. The Shunamite. _See_ =Green=, G.


=Gardiner=, John S. J., 1765-1830. An epistle to Zenas. [By John S. J.
Gardiner, Assistant Rector, Trinity Church, Boston.] Boston: Printed
by Peter Edes [1784?]. 1 p.l., ii, (1)6-15(1) p., 1 l. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Cerberus. Very curious and uncommon character, p. [16-17].


---- [Funeral poem on Fisher Ames.] (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck,
Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1,
p. 536-537.)

                                                                 =NBB=


A =Gentleman= of Connecticut, pseud. The democratiad, a poem. _See_
=Hopkins=, Lemuel.


A =Gentleman= of Maryland, pseud. _See_ =Brackenridge=, Hugh Henry.


A =Gentleman= of Rhode Island Colony, pseud. Verses on Doctor Mayhew's
book of observations on the charter and conduct of the Society for the
Propagation of the Gospel. _See_ =Goddard=, William.


The =Ghost= of Christopher Columbus, visiting the United States in the
year 1811. A poem. Cop. 1811. 1 p.l., 3-6 p. 8º.

                                                        =* C p.v. 988=

    Bd. with: M. L. Weems, The philanthropist or political
    peacemaker. Philadelphia, 1809.

    Page 1-2 lacking.


=Goddard=, William, 1739-1817. Verses on Doctor Mayhew's Book of
observations on the charter and conduct of the Society for the
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts: with note, critical and
explanatory. By a gentleman of Rhode-Island Colony [i.e., William
Goddard]. Providence, in New-England: Printed and sold by William
Goddard, at the Signe of Shakespear's Head, 1763. 19 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Godfrey=, Thomas, 1736-1763. Juvenile poems on various subjects. With
the Prince of Parthia, a tragedy. By the late Mr. Thomas Godfrey,
Junr. of Philadelphia. To which is prefixed some account of the author
and his writings [by N. Evans]. Philadelphia, Printed by Henry Miller,
in Second-Street. MDCCLXV. xxvi p., 1 l., 223 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "Elegy to the memory of Mr. Thomas Godfrey," by J.
    Green, p. 1-4; "Elegy, to the memory of the same," by N.
    Evans, October 1, 1763, p. 5-7.


=Good= news from Nevv-England: with an exact relation of the first
planting that countrey: a description of the profits accruing by
the worke. Together with a briefe, but true discovery of their
order both in church and common-wealth, and maintenance allowed the
painfull labourers in that vineland of the Lord. With the names of
the severall towns, and who be preachers to them. London; Printed by
Mathew Simmons, 1648. 1 p.l., 25 p. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Pages 9, 19, 22, 23 wrongly numbered 19, 11, 14, 25.

    Reprinted with modern type-facsimile title-page in
    Massachusetts Historical Society, _Collections for 1852_,
    Boston, 1852, series 4, v. 1, p. 194-218, _IAA_.

    The identity of the author has been lost, except that he
    is known to have been a resident of Plymouth colony.


The =Gospel= tragedy: an epic poem. See =Brockway=, Thomas.


=Gratitude=, a poem spoken at the Boston Theatre, by Mrs. Whitlock.
(In: The Polyanthos. Boston, 1814. 8º. v. 4, p. 316-326.)

                                                                =* DA=

    This poem appeared in _The Mirror of taste_ in 1811.


=Green=, G. The shunamite. Recommended to the candid perusal of all
denominations of Christians. By G. G.--, [i.e., G. Green] M.M.M. New
York: Printed by Southwick and Pelsue. No. 3, New-Street. 1810.
1 p.l., (1)6-16 p. 12º.

                                                  =NBHD p.v. 4, no. 7=

    p. 1-2 lacking.


=Green=, Joseph, 1706-1780. Elegy to the memory of Mr. Thomas Godfrey.
(In: Thomas Godfrey, Juvenile poems on various subjects. Philadelphia,
1765. 8º. p. 1-4.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Entertainment for a winter's evening being a full and true
account of a very strange and wonderful sight seen in Boston on the
twenty-seventh of December at noon-day. The truth of which can be
attested by a great number of people, who actually saw the same with
their own eyes. By Me, the Hon^{ble} B. B. Esq. (Joseph Green)....
Boston: Printed and sold by G. Rogers, next to the Prison in
Queen-street. Tarrytown, New York. Reprinted William Abbatt, 1917.
13 p. 4º. (In: Magazine of history with notes and queries, extra
no. 57, p. 67-79.)

                                                                 =IAG=

    Modern type reprint with type facsimile of title-page.


---- A mournful lamentation for the death of Mr. Old Tenor. (In:
Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1,
p. 136-139.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    Also printed in Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 435-437,
    _NBB_.


---- A parody on Mather Byles's Stanzas written at sea. (In: E. A. and
G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866.
8º. v. 1, p. 121-122.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    Also printed in Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 433-434,
    _NBB_.


---- The poet's lamentation for the loss of his cat, which he used to
call his muse. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American
literature. New York. 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 122-123.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    Also printed in Stedman and Hutchinson. _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 434-435,
    _NBB_.


The =Group=: or An elegant representation illustrated. _See_
=Cliffton=, William.


=Guest=, Moses. Poems on several occasions. To which are annexed,
extracts from a journal kept by the author while he followed the sea,
and during a journey from New-Brunswick, in New-Jersey, to Montreal
and Quebec. By Moses Guest. Cincinnati: Looker & Reynolds, printers;
1824. 1 p.l., (i)iv, (1)8-160 p. 2. ed. 16º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=


The =Guillotina=, or a democratic dirge, a poem. _See_ =Hopkins=,
Lemuel.


=Haight=, Mrs. Sarah. A medley of joy and grief; being a selection of
original pieces in prose and verse, chiefly on religious subjects. By
a lady of New-York [i.e., Mrs. Sarah Haight]. New-York: Published by
W. B. Gilley, 92 Broadway. Gray & Bunce, printers. 1822. 298 p., 1 l.
12º.

                                                                 =NBF=

    Includes the following pieces written before 1820:

    A retrospect of past and present mercies, Jan.
    1st, 1819, p. 10-24.--Meditation, June, 1815,
    p. 29-31.--Meditation, a walk to Mount Olivet on a summer's
    eve, July, 1815, p. 59-80.--Complaint, etc. under pain
    and trouble, February, 1815, p. 90-91.--Complaint under
    great bodily pain, and darkness of mind, Greenwich, April,
    1815, p. 92-93.--On the death of Mrs. M. Wilkinson,
    1815, p. 93-94.--All is vanity but the Creator, 1814,
    p. 95-96.--Complaining of hardness of heart. Mount Pleasant,
    August, 1814, p. 96-97.--To Rosamond, on her departure for
    England, June, 1811, p. 125-127.--Reflections, May, 1816,
    p. 158-159.


=Halleck=, Fitz-Greene, 1790-1867. Fanny. [By Fitz-Greene Halleck.]
New-York: Published by C. Wiley & Co. No. 3 Wall-Street. Clayton &
Kingsland, printers. 1819. 1 p.l., (1)6-49 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Second edition. New-York: Published by Wiley & Halsted, No.
3, Wall-Street. William Grattan, printer. 1821. 1 p.l., (1)6-67 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- New York, 1866. 3 p.l., (1)8-84 p., 1 port. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    No. 16 of 70 copies printed for W. L. Andrews.

    Also printed in _Specimens of the American poets_.
    London, 1822, p. 110-156, _NBH_.


---- Fanny, with other poems. [By Fitz-Greene Halleck.] New-York.
Harper & Brothers. 1839. 2 p.l., (1)6-130 p., 1 l. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Engraved title-page.


---- The poetical writings of Fitz-Greene Halleck, with extracts
from those of Joseph Rodman Drake. Edited by James Grant Wilson. New
York: D. Appleton and Company, 1869. 2 p.l., (i)vi-xviii p., 1 l.,
(1)14-389 p., 5 pl., 5 ports. (incl. front.) 4º.

                                                               =* NBI=


=Hamilton=, George. _See_ =Epistle= from the Marquis de La Fayette to
General Washington.


=Hammon=, Jupiter, b. 1720? Jupiter Hammon, American negro poet;
selections from his writings and a bibliography, by Oscar Wegelin. New
York: C. F. Heartman, 1915. 2 p.l., 7-51 p., 5 facs. (incl. front.)
8º. (Heartman's historical series, no. 13.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    One of 91 copies printed on Alexandra Japan paper.

    Facing p. 18, facsimile of broadside: An address to Miss
    Philis Wheatley, Ethiopian poetess, in Boston, who came from
    Africa at eight years of age, and soon became acquainted
    with the gospel of Jesus Christ. Hartford, August 14, 1778.
    Text in two columns. Text also printed on p. 32-36.

    Facing p. 28 facsimile of broadside: An evening thought.
    Salvation by Christ, with penetential cries. Composed ...
    25th of December, 1760. Text in two columns. Text also
    printed on p. 29-31.

    A poem for children with thoughts on death, p. 37-40; A
    dialogue intitled the kind master and the dutiful servant
    [in verse], p. 41-46.


=Harney=, John Milton, 1789-1825. Crystalina; a fairy tale. By an
American [i.e., John Milton Harney]. New-York: Printed by George F.
Hopkins. 1816. 3 p.l., 112 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Harwood=, John Edmund, 1771-1809. Poems by John Edmund Harwood.
New-York: Published by M. & W. Ward, No. 4 City-Hotel, for Joseph
Osborn, 1809. 2 p.l., (1)4-107 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Elegies, p. 1-20; Odes, p. 21-48; Miscellaneous pieces,
    p. 49-105.


=Haslett=, Andrew. Original poems, by A. Haslett. Author of various
miscellaneous pieces. Baltimore: Printed by R. Gamble--No. 12
Light-Street. 1812. 2 p.l., ii(i), viii-ix, (1)14-95 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Hastings=, Sally. Poems, on different subjects. To which is added, a
descriptive account of a family tour to the West; in the year, 1800.
In a letter to a lady. By Sally Hastings. Lancaster, Printed and sold,
By William Dickson, for the benefit of the authoress. 1808. 1 p.l.,
(1)4-220 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Hasty-pudding=: a poem. _See_ =Barlow=, Joel.


=Haven=, Nathaniel Appleton, 1790-1826. The remains of Nathaniel
Appleton Haven. With a memoir of his life, by George Ticknor.
[Cambridge: Milliard, Metcalf & Company,] MDCCCXXVII. xl, 351 p. 8º.

                                                                 =NBG=

    Poems written during the years 1807-1815, p. 233-263.


---- ---- Second edition. Boston: Hilliard, Gray, Little, and Wilkins.
1828. viii, 368 p. 12º.

                                                                 =NBG=

    Poems written during the years 1807-1815, p. 257-273.


=Hazard=, Joseph. Poems, on various subjects. By Joseph Hazard.
Brooklyn, N. Y. Published by the author, [A. Spooner, printer.] 1814.
2 p.l., (1)6-187 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Heroes= of the lake. A poem, in two books. Written in the autumn
of 1813. New-York: Printed and published by S. Woodworth & Co. War
Office, 26 Chatham-street. 1814. 2 p.l., (1)5-108 p., front. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Hill=, George, 1796-1871. Diabolou machia; or Battle of dragon. [A
poem written at Yale College, 1815, by George Hill?]. n.t.-p. 1875.
2 l. 8º.

                                                   =SSX p.v. 1, no. 6=

    This poem describes an affair in which several students
    came to blows; it took place in a tavern on an evening of
    the fall term of 1815.


=Hillhouse=, James Abraham, 1789-1841. The judgment, a vision. By the
author of Percy's Masque [i.e., James Abraham Hillhouse]. New-York:
Published by James Eastburn, 1821. 46 p., 1 front. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    This poem was delivered at the Yale College commencement
    of 1812.


=Hine=, Benjamin. Miscellaneous poetry: or, The farmer's muse. By
Benjamin Hine. New-York: Printed for the author, by H. Ludwig, 72
Vesey-St. 1835. 1 p.l., (i)iv-x p., 1 l., (1)14-273 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Poems written between 1789-1820, p. 13-154.


=Hitchcock=, David, b. 1773. A poetical dictionary; or popular terms
illustrated in rhyme; with explanatory remarks. For the use of society
in general, and politicians in particular. Part first. By David
Hitchcock, author of the "Shade of Plato," &c. From Lewis's Press,
Lenox. Henry Starr, printer. 1808. 1 p.l., (i)iv-vi, (1)8-113 p., 1 l.
of errata. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The poetical works of David Hitchcock. Containing, the Shade of
Plato. Knight and quack, and the Subtlety of foxes. Boston: Published
by Etheridge and Bliss, No. 12, Cornhill. 1806. Oliver & Munroe,
printers. 1 p.l., (i)iv-xvi. (1)18-164 p., 1 l. of adv. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The social monitor; or, A series of poems, on some of the most
important and interesting subjects. By David Hitchcock, author of the
"Shade of Plato." Second edition. New-York: Printed for Gould, Banks &
Gould, Prior & Dunning, Isaac Riley, and Collins & Co. 1814. 1 p.l.,
(i)iv-v(i), (1)8-204 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Hoar=, Leonard, 1630-1675. [Verses in Latin.] (Massachusetts
Historical Society. Proceedings, 1864-1865. Boston, 1866. 8º. v. 8,
p. 14-15.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    The original verses are appended to the first triennial
    catalogue of Harvard University, published in 1674, and were
    undoubtedly prepared by Leonard Hoar.


=Holland=, Edwin C. The pillar of glory; Rise Columbia. (In: Samuel
Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston. 1829. 12º. v. 2,
p. 328-330.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    Originally published in the _Port folio_, Philadelphia,
    1813, series 3, v. 2, p. 552, * _DA_.


=Holme=, John. A true relation of the flourishing State of
Pennsylvania. (Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Bulletin.
Philadelphia, 1848. 8º. v. 1, 1845-47, p. 161-180.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    Written in 1686.

    Printed for the first time, from the original
    manuscript. This poem is believed to be the first metrical
    composition written in Pennsylvania.


=Holmes=, Abiel. _See_ A =Family= tablet: containing a selection of
original poetry.


=Holyoke=, Edward. _See_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


=Honeywood=, St. John, 1764-1798. A poem on reading the President's
Address; with a sketch of the character of a candidate for the
presidency. [By St. John Honeywood.] Philadelphia: Printed by Ormrod
& Conrad. No. 41 Chestnut-Street. 1796. 1 p.l., (1)4-7 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Poems by St. John Honeywood, A.M. With some pieces in prose.
Copyright secured. New-York: Printed by T. & J. Swords. No. 99
Pearl-Street. 1801. 3 p.l., (i)viii, 159(1) p. 16º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=

    Reviewed in _The American review, and literary journal_
    for the year 1801, New York, 1801, v. 1, p. 297-303.


=Hopkins=, Lemuel, 1750-1801. The Democratiad, a poem, in retaliation,
for the "Philadelphia Jockey Club." By a Gentleman of Connecticut
[i.e., Lemuel Hopkins]. Philadelphia: Published by Thomas Bradford,
printer, 1795. iv, (1)6-22 p., 1 l. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    At head of title: Second edition.

    Also ascribed to William Cobbett.

    Contains sarcastic references to the Democrats in the
    United States Senate who opposed Jay's treaty.


---- ---- Philadelphia: Published by Thomas Bradford, printer,
book-seller & stationer, No. 8 South Front Street. 1796. 1 p.l.,
(i)iv, (1)6-28 p. 8º.

                                   =Reserve= and =NBH p.v. 24, no. 15=

    At head of title: Third edition.


---- Epitaph on a patient killed by a cancer quack. (In: American
poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 137-139.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 3,
    p. 414-415, _NBB_.


---- The guillotina, or a Democratic dirge, a poem. By the author of
the "Democratiad" [i.e., Lemuel Hopkins]. Philadelphia: Sold at the
Political Book-Store [By Thomas Bradford], South Front-Street, No. 8.
[1796.] 1 p.l., (1)4-14 p. 8º.

                                   =Reserve= and =NBH p.v. 24, no. 16=

    A political satire, erroneously attributed to William
    Cobbett.


---- The hypocrite's hope. (In: American poems, selected and original.
Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 139-141.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 144-146, _NBH_; Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 283-284, _NBH_; and in E. A.
    and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of American literature_,
    New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 322, _NBB_.


---- On General Ethan Allen. (In: American poems, selected and
original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 142.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 3,
    p. 413-414, _NBB_.


---- A plea for union and the constitution. (In: E. A. and G. L.
Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866. 8º.
v. 1, p. 321-322.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- _See also_ The =Anarchiard=; The =Echo=; The =Political=
green-house for the year 1798.


=Hopkinson=, Francis, 1737-1791. The battle of the kegs. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1, p. 85-86.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 202-205, _NBH_; and in E. A.
    and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of American literature_,
    New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 218-219, _NBB_.


---- An exercise, containing a dialogue and ode on the accession
of his present gracious Majesty George III. Performed at the
public commencement in the College of Philadelphia, May 18th 1762.
[By Francis Hopkinson.] Philadelphia. Printed by W. Dunlap, in
Market-Street, M,DCC,LXII. 8 p. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A fair bargain. (In: The Beauties of poetry, British and
American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 198-199.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The miscellaneous essays and occasional writings of Francis
Hopkinson, Esq. Philadelphia: Printed by T. Dobson, at the
Stone-house, No. 41 Second-Street. M,DCC,XCII. 3 v. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    v. 3, after p. 215, "Poems on several subjects," 204 p.


---- The raising: a song for federal mechanics. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1788. 8º. v. 4, p. 95.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Howe=, Joseph. An ode, addressed to Miss ****. (In: American poems,
selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 297-298.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


=Humphreys=, David, 1752-1818. Address to the armies of the United
States of America. Written in the year 1782. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1, p. 266-272.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    First published in New Haven in 1782. Also in his _Life
    of ... Israel Putnam_, New York, 1810, p. 189-218, _AN_; and
    in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston,
    1829, v. 1, p. 261-271, _NBH_.


---- American winter. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794. 16º.
p. 165-166.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Depredations and destruction of the Algerines. (In: The Columbian
muse. New York, 1794. 16º. p. 147-158.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- An elegy on the burning of Fairfield, in Connecticut. Written on
the spot by Col. Humphreys. 1779. (In: The New-Haven gazette, and the
Connecticut magazine. New-Haven, 1786. 4º. June 29, 1786, v. 1,
no. 20, p. 159.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The American museum_, Philadelphia,
    1787, v. 1, p. 265, _Reserve_; _American poems, selected
    and original_, Litchfield, 1793, p. 117-119, _NBH_; _The
    Columbian muse_, New York, 1794, p. 112-114, _NBH_; and
    _American poetical miscellany_, Philadelphia, 1809,
    p. 63-65, _NBH_.


---- An elegy on Lieutenant De Hart, volunteer aid to Gen. Wayne.
(In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º.
p. 120-122.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 114-116, _NBH_.


---- An elegy, on Lieutenant De Hart, volunteer aid-de-camp to General
Wayne. An ode, to Laura. A song, translated from the French. An
epitaph written the day after the capitulation of Lord Cornwallis, at
York-town in Virginia. An impromptu, for the pocket-book of a young
lady who expected to embark soon for Europe. The genius of America,
a song. The monkey, who shaved himself and his friends. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1788. 8º. v. 3, p. 273-279.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- An epistle to Dr. Dwight. On board the Courier de l'Europe, July
30, 1784. (In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield,
1793. 12º. p. 129-134.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 136-140, _NBH_.


---- The farmers' harvest hymn. (In his: A discourse on the
agriculture of the state of Connecticut. New-Haven, 1816. 8º. p. 42.)

                                                                 =VPY=


---- Future state of the western territory. (In: The Columbian muse.
New York, 1794. 16º. p. 162-165.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Future state of the western territory; American winter; On love
and the American fair; Depredations and destruction of the Algerines.
(In: The Beauties of poetry, British and American. Philadelphia, 1793.
16º. p. 130-146.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The genius of America--an ode: inscribed to his excellency George
Washington, esq. on his return to Mount Vernon, December, 1783. (In:
The American museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 5, p. 101-104.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _American poems, selected and original_,
    Litchfield, 1793, p. 127-129. _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_,
    New York, 1794, p. 120-121, _NBH_.


---- The miscellaneous works of Colonel Humphreys. New-York:
Printed by Hodge, Allen, and Campbell, and sold at their respective
book-stores. M.DCC.XC. [With copy-right according to law.] 348 p. 8º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=

    Contains the following poems:

    Address to the armies of the United States of America,
    p. 12-29; A poem on the happiness of America, p. 30-66;
    Mount Vernon: an ode, p. 68-70; The genius of America,
    p. 70-72; An elegy on Lieutenant De Hart, p. 72-74; The monkey,
    who shaved himself and his friends, p. 75-76; A letter to a
    young lady in Boston, p. 90-97; An epistle to Dr. Dwight,
    p. 97-102; Elegy on the burning of Fairfield in Connecticut,
    p. 111-113.


---- The miscellaneous works of David Humphreys, late Minister
Plenipotentiary from the United States of America to the Court of
Madrid. New-York: Printed by T. and J. Swords, No. 160 Pearl-Street.
1804. xv, 394 p., 7 l., front. (port.) 8º.

                                                                 =NBG=


---- Mount Vernon, an ode, inscribed to General Washington. Written
at Mount Vernon, August 1786. (In: The New-Haven gazette, and the
Connecticut magazine. New-Haven, 1786. 4º. Nov. 16. 1786, v. 1,
no. 40, p. 314-315.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _American poems, selected and original_,
    Litchfield, 1793, p. 123-125, _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_.
    New York, 1794, p. 116-118, _NBH_; and E. A. and G. L.
    Duyckinck. _Cyclopædia of American literature_, v. 1,
    p. 377, _NBB_.


---- An ode, inscribed to General Washington. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1788. 8º. v. 3, p. 482-483.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A poem on the death of General Washington, pronounced at the
house of the American legation in Madrid, on the 4. day of July, 1800.
[Signed D. Humphreys.] n.p. [1804.] 1 p.l., 151-187 p. 8º.

                                                                  =AN=

    Excerpt: The miscellaneous works of David Humphreys.
    New-York: T. & J. Swords, 1804.


---- A poem, on the happiness of America; addressed to the citizens of
the United States. (In: The Boston magazine. Boston, 1786. 8º. July,
1786, p. 306-311; August, 1786, p. 348-352.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    The poem was continued in later numbers of the magazine,
    which the Library lacks.

    Also printed in _The American museum_, Philadelphia,
    1787, v. 1, p. 273-288, _Reserve_; and in the author's _Life
    of Israel Putnam_, New York, 1810, p. 219-285, _AN_.


---- A poem on the happiness of America. Addressed to the citizens of
the United States. By Col. David Humphreys, aid-de-camp to General
Washington during the American Revolutionary War. New York: The New
York Printing Company, 1871. 1 p.l., (1)4-67 p. 8º.

                                                                 =NBI=


---- A poem on industry. Addressed to the citizens of the United
States of America. By Colonel David Humphreys, Minister resident at
the Court of Lisbon. Philadelphia: Printed for Mathew Carey, No. 118,
Market-Street. October 14, 1794. 1 p.l., (i)iv p., 1 l., (1)8-22 p.,
1 l. of adv. 8º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=


---- Poems by Col. David Humphreys, late aid-de-camp to his Excellency
General Washington. Second edition:--with several additions.
Philadelphia: Printed by Mathew Carey. M,DCC,LXXXIX. 1 p.l., 90 p.,
1 l. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- _See also_ The =Anarchiard=.


=Hunn=, Anthony. Sin and redemption. A religious poem, by Anthony
Hunn. Lexington: Printed by W. W. Worsley ... "Reporter" Press. 1812.
2 p.l., (1)6-25 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "The following is an episode only of a much larger epic
    poem entitled 'The Columbiad,' which is formed out of most
    eminent scenes of the American Revolution and the hero of
    which is the immortal Washington."--_Preface._


=Huntley=, Lydia. _See_ =Sigourney=, Mrs. Lydia Howard Huntley.


=Hutton=, Joseph. The field of Orleans. A poem. By the author of
several fugitive pieces [i.e., Joseph Hutton].... Philadelphia:
Published by W. Anderson, 102, Cherry-Street. 1816. 31 p., 2 l. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Indian= songs of peace. _See_ =Smith=, William.


=Irving=, Washington, 1783-1859. [Lines spoken by Thomas A. Cooper,
on the night of the opening of the Park theatre. Sept. 9, 1807.] (In:
Washington Irving, Life and letters. New York, 1862. 8º. v. 1,
p. 204-208.)

                                                                  =AN=

    Also in the New York edition of the _Life and letters_
    of 1864, v. 1, p. 204-208.


=Irving=, William, 1766-1821. [Poems.] (In: Salmagundi. New York,
1807-08. 24º. v. 1. p. 35-37, 54-56, 70-80, 101-104, 136-140, 181-188;
v. 2, p. 250-254, 399-404.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    The poems were written under the pseud. of "Pindar
    Cockloft, Esq."

    The Library has many other editions of _Salmagundi_
    besides the one given here.


=Jacob=, Stephen. A poetical essay, delivered at Bennington, on the
anniversary of the 16th of August, 1777. By Stephen Jacob, A. B. 1778.
Hartford: Printed by Watson and Goodwin, M.DCC.LXXIX. 8 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=James=, T. C. The country meeting, or Friends' place of worship. (In:
The American museum. Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1, p. 93-95.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Beauties of poetry, British and
    American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 182-185, _Reserve_;
    _American poems, selected and original_, Litchfield, 1793,
    p. 234-238. _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 121-125, _NBH_; and _The American poetical miscellany_,
    Philadelphia, 1809, p. 172-176, _NBH_.


The =Jeffersoniad=; or, An echo to the groans of an expiring faction.
By Democraticus. March 4, 1801: First year of the triumph of
Republican principle. Price--18 cents. 1 p.l., (1)4-18 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "The author ... presents his best respects to his
    fellow-citizens, and congratulates them on the event of the
    late election [of Jefferson as president]...."

    "Theodore Dwight" is written in a contemporary hand on
    verso of title-page.


=John of Enon=, pseud. _See_ =Benedict=, David.


=Johnson=, Edward, 1599-1672. A history of New-England. From the
English planting in the yeere 1628. untill the yeere 1652. Declaring
the form of their government, civill, military, and ecclesiastique.
Their wars with the Indians, their troubles with the Gortonists,
and other heretiques. Their manner of gathering of churches, the
commodities of the country, and description of the principall towns
and havens, with the great encouragements to increase trade betwixt
them and Old England. With the names of all their governours,
magistrates, and eminent ministers.... London, Printed for Nath: Brook
at the Angel in Corn-hill, 1654. 236 p., 2 l. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Better known by the running title: Wonder-working
    providence of Sion's Saviour in New England.

    Contains many poems.


---- ---- (Massachusetts Historical Society. Collections. Boston,
1814-19. 8º. series 2, v. 2, p. 49-95; v. 3, p. 123-161; v. 4,
p. 1-51; v. 7, p. 1-58; v. 8, p. 1-39.)

                                                                 =IAA=


---- Johnson's Wonder-working Providence, 1628-1651. Edited by J.
Franklin Jameson.... New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1910. viii p.,
2 l., 3-285 p., 2 facs., 1 map. 8º. (Original narratives of early
American history.)

                                                             =* R-HAE=


---- Wonder-working Providence of Sion's Saviour in New England....
With an historical introduction and an index by William Frederick
Poole. Andover, Published by Warren F. Draper, 1867. 4 p.l., cliv l.,
265 p., 1 fac. 8º.

                                                                  =IQ=

    This is a modern type-facsimile reprint.

    No. 140 of 200 copies on small paper.


=Johnson=, William Martin, 1771-1797. Poems. (In: Gabriel Harrison,
The life and writings of John Howard Payne. Albany, N. Y., 1875. 4º.
p. 296-333.)

                                                                  =AN=

    The following poems: On a snow-flake falling on a
    lady's breast, Winter, Spring, Fame, Epitaph on a lady,
    are printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of
    American literature_. New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 586, _NBB_.


---- ---- (In: Gabriel Harrison, John Howard Payne ... his life and
writings. Philadelphia, 1885. 8º. p. 343-374.)

                                                                  =AN=


=Johnston=, Archibald. The mariner; a poem in two cantos. By Archibald
Johnston. Philadelphia: Published by Edward Earle, corner of Fourth
and Library streets. William Fry, printer. 1818. 3 p.l., (1)10-152 p.
16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.

    Miscellanea, p. [97]-126.


=Jones=, Elizabeth C. Poems on different subjects, original and
selected. By Elizabeth C. Jones. Providence: H. H. Brown, printer.
1819. 1 p.l., (1)4-48 p. 12º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 55, no. 5=


=Josselyn=, John, fl. 1630-1675. New-Englands rarities discovered: in
birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, and plants of that country. Together
with the physical and chyrurgical remedies wherewith the natives
constantly use to cure their distempers, wounds, and sores. Also a
perfect description of an Indian squa, in all her bravery; with a
poem not improperly conferr'd upon her. Lastly a chronological table
of the most remarkable passages in that country amongst the English.
Illustrated with cuts. By John Josselyn, gent. London. Printed for G.
Widdowes at the Green Dragon in St. Paul's church-yard, 1672. 2 p.l.,
114 p., 1 l., 1 pl. illus. (8º.) 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "The poem," p. 101-102.

    Reprinted in American Antiquarian Society, _Archæologia
    Americana. Transactions and collections_, [Worcester,] 1860,
    v. 4, p. 105-238, _IAA_. "The poem" appears on p. 232.


---- New-England's rarities discovered in birds, beasts, fishes,
serpents, and plants of that country. By John Josselyn, gent. With an
introduction and notes, by Edward Tuckerman. Boston: William Veazie,
1865. 2 p.l., (i)viii, 169 p. 8º.

                                                                  =IQ=

    One of 75 copies printed.

    "The poem," p. 158.


A =Journey= from Patapsco to Annapolis. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia. 1791. 8º. v. 9, appendix 1, p. 9-16.)

                                                             =Reserve=


The =Judgment=, a vision. _See_ =Hillhouse=, James Abraham.


=Keimer=, Samuel, fl. 1723-1728. An elegy on the much lamented death
of the ingenious and well-beloved Aquila Rose, clerk to the honourable
assembly at Philadelphia, who died the 24th of the 4th month, 1723.
Aged 28. (In: The Register of Pennsylvania, edited by Samuel Hazard.
Philadelphia, 1828. 4º. Nov., 1828, p. 262-263.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    The original was printed in 1723 as a hand-bill with
    imprint: Philadelphia: Printed, and sold by S. Keimer, in
    High-Street. (Price two-pence.)

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 98-99,
    _NBB_.


=Kettell=, Samuel. Specimens of American poetry, with critical and
biographical notices. Boston: S. G. Goodrich and Co., 1829. 3 v. 12º.

                                                                 =NBH=

    Contains selections from the works of the following
    authors, writing before 1820:

    J. Adams, v. 1, p. 67-74; J. Allen, v. 1, p. 160-173;
    W. Allston, v. 2, p. 149-155; R. Alsop, v. 2, p. 54-67; J.
    L. Arnold, v. 2, p. 77-82; J. Barlow, v. 2, p. 1-27; A. E.
    Bleecker, v. 1, p. 211-219; J. Bowdoin, v. 1, p. 330-332;
    M. Byles, v. 1, p. 124-133; B. Church, v. 1, p. 145-160;
    E. Church, v. 1, p. 343-347; W. Cliffton, v. 2, p. 86-93;
    B. Coleman, v. 1, p. 49-61; W. Crafts, v. 2, p. 144-145;
    R. Dabney, v. 2, p. 166-172; R. B. Davis, v. 1, p 351-353;
    T. Dawes, v. 2, p. 35-37; S. Deane, v. 2, p. 398-403; R.
    Devens, v. 2, p. 38-40; S. Dexter. v. 2, p. 40-42; Theodore
    Dwight, v. 2, p. 67-74; Timothy Dwight, v. 1, p. 223-259;
    N. Evans, v. 1, p. 104-118; D. Everett, v. 2, p. 113-114;
    S. Ewing, v. 1, p. 347-349; H. T. Farmer, v. 2, p. 174-179;
    M. V. Faugeres, v. 1, p. 220-223; T. G. Fessenden, v. 2,
    p. 114-121; E. Fitch, v. 1, p. 300-301; B. Franklin, v. 1,
    p. 173-174; P. Freneau, v. 1, p. 285-299; T. Godfrey,
    v. 1, p. 88-104; J. Green, v. 1, p. 133-138; S. H. Hale,
    v. 2, p. 296-302; J. A. Hillhouse, v. 2, p. 356-365; St. J.
    Honeywood, v. 2, p. 43-47; L. Hopkins, v. 1, p. 272-284;
    F. Hopkinson, v. 1, p. 201-210; J. Hopkinson, v. 1,
    p. 350-351; D. Humphreys, v. 1, p. 259-272; F. S. Key, v. 2,
    p. 288-289; H. C. Knight, v. 2, p. 285-289; J. B. Ladd,
    v. 1, p. 334-342; John Lathrop, v. 2, p. 101-108; Joseph
    Lathrop, v. 1, p. 326-357; E. Lincoln, v. 2, p. 303-314; J.
    B. Linn, v. 2, p. 121-126; W. Livingston, v. 1, p. 139-145;
    S. Low, v. 1, p. 318-324; J. Lowell, v. 1, p. 332-333; J.
    D. M'Kinnon, v. 1, p. 312-318; C. Mather, v. 1, p. 1-17;
    W. Maxwell, v. 2, p. 155-159; J. Maylem, v. 1, p. 83-88;
    S. W. Morton, v. 2, p. 75-76; P. Oliver, v. 1, p. 333-334;
    J. Osborn, v. 1, p. 118-124; S. Osborn, v. 2, p. 145-149;
    R. T. Paine, v. 2, p. 93-100; J. K. Paulding, v. 2,
    p. 179-184; H. Pickering, v. 2, p. 272-285; W. L. Pierce,
    v. 2, p. 130-133; J. Pierpont, v. 2, p. 246-272; S. Porter,
    v. 1, p. 301-305; B. Pratt, v. 1, p. 324-326; J. Ralph, v. 1,
    p. 74-83; W. Ray, v. 2, p. 137-144; G. Richards, v. 2,
    p. 27-31; R. C. Sands, v. 2, p. 228-241; L. M. Sargent, v. 2,
    p. 134-137; J. M. Sewall, v. 1, p. 198-200; S. Sewall, v. 1,
    p. 328-330; J. Shaw, v. 2, p. 126-130; L. H. Sigourney,
    v. 2, p. 204-227; W. M. Smith, v. 1, p. 305-312; J. Story,
    v. 2, p. 109-112; J. Trumbull, v. 1, p. 175-198; St. G. Tucker,
    v. 1, p. 349-350; J. Turrell, v. 1, p. 61-37; R. Tyler,
    v. 2, p. 47-54; W. B. Walter, v. 2, p. 161-166; K. A. Ware,
    v. 2, p. 290-295; M. Warren, v. 2, p. 31-35; M. Wigglesworth,
    v. 1, p. 35-49; R. Wolcott, v. 1, p. 19-35; S. Woodworth,
    v. 2, p. 241-246.


=Key=, Francis Scott, 1780-1843. The star spangled banner. (In his:
Poems of the late Francis S. Key. New York, 1857. 12º. p. 31-33.)

                                                                =NBHD=

    Also in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American poetry_,
    Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 288-289, _NBH_; E. A. and G. L.
    Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of American literature_, New York,
    1866, v. 1, p. 663-664, _NBB_; and E. C. Stedman and E. M.
    Hutchinson, _Library of American literature_. New York,
    1888, v. 1, p. 41. _NBD_.

    Written in 1814 during the bombardment of Fort McHenry
    by the English.


=Knight=, Henry Coggswell, b. 1788. The broken harp; poems. By H. C.
Knight. Philadelphia: Published by J. Conrad and Co. 1815. 2 p.l.,
(i)vi-x p., 1 l., (1)10-172 p., 2 l. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The cypriad in two cantos: with other poems and translations.
By Henry C. Knight. Boston: J. Belcher, printer. 1809. 3 p.l.,
(1)8-68 p. 8º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 25, no. 8=


=Knox=, Samuel. Ode to Education in seven stanzas. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 5, p. 405-408.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- An ode, most respectfully inscribed to his excellency, general
Washington, on being chosen president of the United States. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6, p. 85-86.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Dated: Bladensburgh, April 16, 1789.


=Ladd=, John. Lyric poems, chiefly in two books, never before
published. 1. A thought on man in paradise; his expulsion. A
compendium on his restoration by grace. The saints' travail through
time, and final state in glory. 2. Sacred to honor, virtue and
independence--and to the memory of the dead. The wild man and the
apes--a muthony. By John Ladd. Schenectady: Printed for the author.
1814. 1 p.l., (i)iv, (1)6-127(1) p., 2 l. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Ladd=, Joseph Brown, 1764-1786. Charlotte's soliloquy, to the manes
of Werter. Sweet Polly of Plymouth's lament. The wish. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1, p. 180-181.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Description of Jehovah, from the XVIIIth Psalm. (In: The
Columbian muse. New York, 1794. 16º. p. 183-184.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Description of Jehovah, from the XVIIIth Psalm. The war-horse,
paraphrased from Job. (In: The Beauties of poetry, British and
American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 181-182, 191.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The dove, a fragment. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia,
1787. 8º. v. 2, p. 203-204.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The incurable. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1787. 8º.
v. 1, p. 86.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The literary remains of Joseph Brown Ladd, M.D. Collected by his
sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Haskins, of Rhode Island. To which is prefixed,
a sketch of the author's life, by W. B. Chittenden. New York: H. C.
Sleight, Clinton Hall, 1832. xxiv, (1)14-228 p. 8º.

                                                                 =NBG=

    Poems, p. [13]-163.

    Some of these poems are reprinted in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1,
    p. 338-342, _NBH_, where they are credited to William
    Ladd, the father of Joseph Brown.


---- On the resignation of his excellency General Washington.
Retirement. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1,
p. 178-179.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The poems of Arouet [by Joseph Brown Ladd]. Charleston, South
Carolina: Printed by Bowen and Markland, No. 53, Church-Street, and
No. 11, Elliot-Street. 1786. 2 p.l, (i)viii-xvi, 128 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


    Half-title lacking.


---- The war-horse, paraphrased from Job. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1, p. 183.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 172-173, _NBH_.


A =Lady= of New-York, pseud. A medley of joy and grief. _See_
=Haight=, Mrs. Sarah.


A =Lady= of Philadelphia, pseud. Viola or The heiress of St. Valverde.
_See_ =Botsford=, Mrs. Margaret.


=Lathrop=, John, the younger, 1772-1820. The influence of civil
institutions on society and the moral faculties, a poem. Delivered
at the university in Cambridge, on the day of public commencement,
July 18, 1792. By John Lathrop, jun. (In: The Massachusetts magazine.
Boston, 1792. 8º. v. 4, July, 1792, p. 452-454.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A monody, sacred to the memory of the Rev. John Lovejoy Abbot,
A.M. Pastor of the Church in Chauncey-Place, Boston; who died October
17, 1814, ætat. 31. By J. Lathrop, Jun.... Boston: Published by
Munroe, Francis & Parker, 1815. 16 p. 8º.

                                                                  =AN=


---- Ode for the twentieth anniversary of Massachusetts Charitable
Fire Society. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American
literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 613-614.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- Speech of Canonicus. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American
poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2, p. 102-108.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Lathrop=, Joseph, 1731-1821. The existence of a Deity. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 5, p. 101.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American
    poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 326-327, _NBH_.


---- The majesty and grace of God. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1791. 8º. v. 9, appendix 1, p. 36-37.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Reflexions of a libertine reclaimed by sickness. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6, p. 172-174.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A winter piece. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1790. 8º.
v. 8, appendix 1, p. 39-40.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Beauties of poetry, British and
    American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 204-206, _Reserve_; and in
    _The Columbian muse_. New York, 1794, p. 158-160. _NBH_.


=Law=, Thomas. Ballston springs. [By Thomas Law] New-York: Printed by
S. Gould, opposite the City-Hall. 1806. 3 p.l., 7-48 p. 16º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 22, no. 3=

    Last leaf mutilated.


=Lawson=, John. The maniac, with other poems. By John Lawson.
Philadelphia: Published by Hellings and Aitken. Dennis Heartt,
printer. 1811. 2 p.l., (i)vi-xiv p., 1 l., 101 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Le Cadet=, St. Denis, pseud. _See_ =Denison=, Edward.


=Lewis=, Mr. A description of Maryland, from Carmen Seculare, a poem,
addressed, anno 1732, to lord Baltimore, proprietor of that province.
By Mr. Lewis. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6,
p. 413-416.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Liberty=: a poem, on the independence of America. Dedicated to his
excellency the President of the United States. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1790. 8º. v. 7, appendix 1, p. 23-29.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Lincoln=, Enoch. The village; a poem. [By Enoch Lincoln.] With an
appendix. Portland: Published by Edward Little and Co. 1816. C. Norris
& Co. printers. 4 p.l., (1)10-180 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Extract reprinted in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of
    American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 303-314, _NBH_.


=Lines= on the death of Ebenezer Ball, who was executed at Castine,
October 31, 1811, for the murder of John Tileston Downs. Blue hill,
Nov. 1811. Printed, and for sale by A. H. Holland, Buckstown.
Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Linn=, John Blair, 1777-1804. The death of Washington. A poem. In
imitation of the manner of Ossian. By Rev. John Blair Linn, A.M.,
minister of the First Presbyterian Congregation of Philadelphia....
Philadelphia: Printed by John Ormrod, 1800. iv, (1)6-26 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Miscellaneous works, prose and poetical. By a Young Gentleman
of New-York [i.e., John Blair Linn]. New-York: Printed by Thomas
Greenleaf. 1795, 6 p.l., (1)8-353 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The powers of genius, a poem, in three parts. By John Blair
Linn, A.M. Co-pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in the city of
Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Published by Asbury Dickens, opposite
Christ-Church: H. Maxwell, printer, Columbia-House. 1801. 1 p.l.,
(1)6-127 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reviewed in _The American review, and literary journal_
    for the year 1801, New-York, 1801, v. 1, p. 201-209,
    _Reserve_.


---- ---- Second edition, corrected and enlarged. Published by John
Conrad. & Co., No. 30, Chestnut-Street, Philadelphia; and sold by M.
and J. Conrad & Co. No. 140, Market-Street, Baltimore; and Washington
City. H. Maxwell, printer. 1802. 1 p.l., (1)6-191 p. 6º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reviewed in _The American review, and literary journal_
    for the year 1802, New York, 1802, v. 2, p. 462-472.


---- ---- [London:] Albion Press: Printed by Cundee, Ivy Lane, for T.
Williams, Stationers'-Court, and T. Hurst, Paternoster-Row. 1804. 1
p.l., (i)iv-xv p., 1 l., 155(1) p., 2 l. of adv., 3 pl. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Valerian, a narrative poem: intended, in part, to describe the
early persecutions of Christians, and rapidly to illustrate the
influence of Christianity on the manners of nations. By John Blair
Linn, D.D. Late pastor of the First Presbyterian congregation, in
Philadelphia. With a sketch of the life and character of the author.
Philadelphia, Printed by Thomas and George Palmer, 116, High Street.
1805. 1 p.l., (i)iv-xxvi p., 1 l., 97 p., front. (port.) 4º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    The frontispiece, portrait silhouette of J. B. Linn
    engraved by B. Tanner.

    Reviewed in _The monthly anthology and Boston review_,
    Boston, 1807, v. 4, p. 319-322.


A =Little= looking-glass for the times. _See_ =C.=, G.


=Livingston=, Henry Brockholst, 1757-1823. Democracy: an epic poem, by
Aquiline Nimble-Chops, Democrat [i.e., Henry Brockholst Livingston].
Canto first. New-York: Printed for the author [1794]. 2 p.l.,
(1)6-20 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Extracts from the first and second cantos of this poem
    are reprinted in _The Echo_, New York, 1807, p. 195-207,
    with the following notice prefixed:

    "The following extracts are from a poem entitled
    _Democracy_, the first canto of which was printed in
    New-York, in March, 1794, and at the time excited no
    inconsiderable share of the public attention. This poem
    was written in consequence of a tumultuous meeting of
    the citizens of that place, instigated by a few popular
    demagogues, for the purpose of prescribing to Congress the
    adoption of hostile measures against Great Britain. The
    second canto, which was of much greater length, was prepared
    for the press immediately after the appearance of the first,
    but the timidity of the booksellers, and the peculiar
    circumstances of the times prevented its publication."


=Livingston=, William, 1723-1790. Address to his excellency general
Washington. By his excellency governor Livingston of New-Jersey. (In:
The American museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 5, p. 300-301.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- [Burgoyne's] Proclamation. (In: New York journal and the general
advertiser. Kingston, N. Y., 1777. fº. September 8, 1777, p. [4],
col. 1-2.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    "A burlesque ballad by Governor William Livingston, of
    New Jersey."

    Reprinted in _Ballads and poems relating to the Burgoyne
    campaign_, Albany, N. Y., 1893, p. 7-15, _NBHD_.

    Also printed in Frank Moore, _Songs and ballads of the
    American Revolution_, New York, 1856, p. 166-175, _NBH_.


---- A morning hymn. By his excellency William Livingston, esq.
governor of New-Jersey. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1789.
8º. v. 5, p. 100-101.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Philosophic solitude. (In: The Beauties of poetry, British and
American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 220-236.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    First published in New York in 1747.

    Also in _American poems, selected and original_,
    Litchfield, 1793, p. 154-176, _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_,
    New York, 1794, p. 16-33, _NBH_; Samuel Kettell, _Specimens
    of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 1, p. 140-145, _NBH_.


=Lomax=, Judith. The notes of an American lyre. By Judith Lomax,
a native of the State of Virginia. Richmond: Printed by Samuel
Pleasants, near the Market-Bridge. 1813. 4 p.l., 9-70 p. nar. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Inscribed to Thomas Jefferson. Page 54 misnumbered 34.


=Longstreet=, Augustus Baldwin. Patriotic effusions; by Bob Short
[pseud. of Augustus Baldwin Longstreet]. New-York: Published by L. and
F. Lockwood, No. 154 Broadway. J. & J. Harper, printers. 1819. 2 p.l.,
(1)6-46 p., 1 l. nar. 24º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 20, no. 7=


The =Lottery=, a poem. _See_ =Denison=, Edward.


=Love=, Charles. A poem on the death of General George Washington,
late president of the United States. In two books. By Charles Love.
[Copy-right secured according to law.] Alexandria, Virginia, A.D.
M,DCCC. 60 p. 16º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=

    Dedicated to John Adams.


=Lovell=, John. _See_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


=Lovett=, John. 1761-1818. A tribute to Washington, for February 22d,
1800. [By John Lovett.] Troy: Printed by R. Moffitt & Co. 1800. 15 p.
sm. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Washington's birth day: an historical poem, with notes and
appendix. By a Washingtonian [i.e., John Lovett]. Albany: Printed and
published by E. and E. Hosford. 1812. [Copy-right secured.] 1 p.l.,
(i)iv-viii, (1)10-55, 11 p., front. (port.) sq. 12º.

                                                                 =NBI=

    Frontispiece, the portrait of George Washington,
    engraved for the Washington Benevolent Society.

    Last 11 p. contain: "Odes for Washington's birth day."


=Low=, Samuel, b. 1765. Poems, by Samuel Low. New-York: Printed by T.
& J. Swords, No. 99 Pearl-Street. 1800. 2 v. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    v. 1. 4 p.l., (1)10-147 p.; v. 2. 6 p.l., (1)16-168 p.

    v. 1, p. 115-122 lacking, p. 147 mutilated; v. 2, one
    leaf, probably half-title, lacking, p. 97 and 103 mutilated,
    p. 159-160, lacking.


=Lowell=, John. _See_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


The =Loyalist= poetry of the Revolution. [Edited by Winthrop Sargent.]
Philadelphia: [Collins, printer,] 1857. xi, 218 p. 8º.

                                                                 =NBH=


The =Lyric= works of Horace, translated into English verse: to which
are added a number of original poems. _See_ =Parke=, John.


=M.=, S. A Country treat upon the second paragraph in His Excellency's
speech, Decemb. 17, 1730. [Boston, 1730?] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photostat facsimile.

    Text in two columns.


=M'Fingal=: a modern epic poem. _See_ =Trumbull=, John.


=M'Kinnon=, John D. Descriptive poems, by John D. M'Kinnon. Containing
picturesque views of the State of New-York. New-York: Printed by T. &
J. Swords, No. 99 Pearl-Street. 1802. 4 p.l., (1)4-79 p., 1 l. of adv.
16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Reviewed in _The American review and literary journal_
    for the year 1802, New-York, 1802, v. 2, p. 327-332,
    _Reserve_.


=Mansfield=, Joseph. Hope, a poem, delivered in the chapel of Harvard
University, at a public exhibition, July 8th, 1800. By Joseph
Mansfield, a junior sophister. Cambridge. Printed by William Milliard.
1800. 1 p.l., (1)4-15 p. sq. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Markoe=, Peter. Faith, an ode. Hope, an ode. Charity, an ode, sacred
to the memory of William Penn. (In: The Beauties of poetry, British
and American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 176-180.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Ode on the birth-day of General Washington. (In: The Beauties of
poetry, British and American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 185-187.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The Times; a poem. [By Peter Markoe.] Philadelphia: Printed by
William Spotswood. M.DCC.LXXXVIII. 2 p.l., 22 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "A considerable part of the following poem has already
    appeared in one of the public papers." Preface dated, Jan.,
    1788.


=Mather=, Cotton, 1663-1728. [Elegy on the death of seven young
ministers.] (In: Club of Odd Volumes. Early American poetry.
[Reprints.] Boston, 1896. 8º. [v.] 4, p. 29-35.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in type-facsimile, with facsimile of
    title-page.

    Appeared originally in his _Vigilantius_.


---- [Elegy] Upon the death of Sir William Phips, Knt. Late
Captain General and Governour in Chief, of the Province of the
Massachuset-Bay, New England, who expired in London, Feb. 18, 1694/5.
3 l. (In his: Pietas in patriam: The life of His Excellency Sir
William Phips, Knt.... London, 1697. 8º.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- An elegy on the much-to-be-deplored death of that
never-to-be-forgotten person, the Reverend Nathanael Collins; who
after he had been many years a faithful pastor to the church at
Middletown of Connecticut in New-England, about the forty third year
of his age expired; on 28th. 10. moneth 1684. [By Cotton Mather.]
Boston in New-England. Printed by Richard Pierce for Obadiah Gill.
Anno Christi, 1685. 2 p.l., 20 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The pages are numbered one to sixteen, eighteen to
    twenty. By an oversight of the printer, the number of page
    17 was omitted; the number 18 inserted on page 17, and
    continued consecutively, making but 19 pages of text.

    Reprinted in modern type, page for page, with a
    facsimile title-page and a biographical sketch of the Rev.
    N. Collins, in Club of Odd Volumes, _Early American poetry_
    [Reprints], Boston, 1896, v. 3, _Reserve_.


---- [Epitaph upon] The Excellent Wigglesworth, remembered by some
good tokens. (In his: A Faithful man, described and rewarded....
Boston, 1705. 8º. p. 48.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Epitaphium [on the Honourable Wait Winthrop]. (In: Club of Odd
Volumes. Early American poetry. [Reprints.] Boston, 1896. 8º. [v.] 4,
p. 43-46.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in type facsimile, with facsimile of
    title-page.

    Appeared originally in his _Hades look'd into_, Boston,
    1717.


---- Gratitudinis ergo. An essay on the memory of my venerable master;
Ezekiel Cheever. (In his: Corderius Americanus. Boston, 1708. 12º.
p. 26-34.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Epitaphium, p. 33-34.

    Reprinted in type facsimile, with facsimile of
    title-page, in Club of Odd Volumes, _Early American poetry_
    [Reprints, v.] 4, p. 26-34, _Reserve_.


---- Magnalia Christi Americana: or, The ecclesiastical history of
New-England, from its first planting in the year 1620 unto the year of
our Lord, 1698. In seven books.... By the reverend and learned Cotton
Mather.... London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the Bible and
Three Crowns in Cheapside, MDCCII. 16 p.l., 75 p., 1 l., 238 p., 1 l.,
125-222 p., 100, 88, 118 p., 1 l., 1 map. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Contains elegies and epitaphs by various authors; also
    the following three elegies by Cotton Mather: [Elegy] upon
    the death of Sir William Phips ... who expired in London,
    Feb. 18, 1694/5, Book 2, p. 74-75.--Some offers to embalm
    the memory of ... John Wilson, Book 3, p. 50-51.--Remarks
    on the bright and dark side of ... William Thompson ... who
    triumphed on Dec. 10, 1666, Book 3, p. 119-120.


---- ---- In two volumes. First American edition, from the London
edition of 1702. Hartford: Published by Silas Andrus, Roberts & Burr,
printers, 1820. 2 v. 8º.

                                                                  =IQ=


---- ---- With an introduction and occasional notes, by the Rev.
Thomas Robbins and translations of the Hebrew, Greek, and Latin
quotations by Lucius F. Robinson. To which is added, a memoir of
Cotton Mather, by Samuel G. Drake.... Also, a comprehensive index by
another hand. In two volumes. Hartford: Silas Andrus and Son, 1855.
2 v. 8º.

                                                                  =IQ=


---- A poem and an elegy. By Cotton Mather. Boston: The Club of Odd
Volumes, 1896. 13 p., 2 l., 16 p., 3 l., 20 p. sq. 8º. (The Club of
Odd Volumes. Early American poetry. [Reprints. v.] 3.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    No. 81 of one hundred copies on hand-made paper.

    Reprinted from copies in the Library of Brown University.

    Contains modern type reprints, page for page, with
    facsimile title-pages of:

    A poem dedicated to the memory of ... Mr. Urian
    Oakes.... Boston in New-England, Printed for John Ratcliff,
    1682.

    An elegy on the much-to-be-deplored death ... of ... the
    Reverend Mr. Nathanael Collins.... Boston in New-England.
    Printed by Richard Pierce for Obadiah Gill. 1685.


---- Some offers to embalm the memory of the truly reverend and
renowned, John Wilson [with] Epitaphium. (In his: Johannes in Eremo.
Boston, 1695. 24º. p. 42-46.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in The Club of Odd Volumes, _Early American
    poetry_ [Reprints, v.] 4, _Reserve_.

    Also in his _Magnalia Christi Americana_, London, 1702,
    book 3, p. 50-51, _Reserve_.


---- To the memory of the Reverend Jonathan Mitchel. (In his:
Ecclesiastes. The life of the reverend & excellent Jonathan Mitchel.
Boston, 1697. 8º. p. 109-111.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- _See_ also =Elegies= and epitaphs, 1677-1717.


=Maxwell=, William. Poems by William Maxwell, Esq. Philadelphia:
Published by M. Thomas, No. 52, Chestnut-Street. William Fry, printer.
1816. 2 p.l., (i)vi-vii p., 1 l., (1)4-168 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.

    Several of these poems are printed in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 155-159, _NBH_.


=Maylem=, John. The conquest of Louisburg. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 83-88.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Gallic perfidy: a poem. By John Maylem, philo-bellum. Boston:
New-England: Printed and sold by Benjamin Mecom, at the New
Printing-Office, July 13, 1758. Where may be had that noted little
book, called Father Abraham's Speech. 2 p.l., 7-15 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Lacks half-title.

    Has woodcut on title-page of Indian holding bow and
    arrow.


=Mead=, Charles. Mississippian scenery; a poem, descriptive of the
interior of North America. By Charles Mead. Philadelphia: Published
by S. Potter and Co. No. 55, Chestnut Street. W. Fry, printer. 1819.
1 p.l., (i)vi-ix p., 1 l., (1)14-113 p., front. 16º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 23, no. 8=


A =Medley= of joy and grief. _See_ =Haight=, Mrs. Sarah.


The =Mercies= of the Year, Commemorated: A song for Little Children in
New-England. December 13th 1720. 3 l. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Facsimile reprint.

    "Reprinted December 13, 1910 to convey this season's
    happier greetings to a few friends of George Parker Winship."


=Mills=, John Henry. Poetic trifles by John Henry Mills. Comedian.
Baltimore: Printed by G. Dobbin & Murphy, 10, Market-Street, for Cole
& I. Bonsal. 1808. 3 p.l., (1)8-116 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Mirror= of merit and beauty. _See_ =Smith=, Isaiah.


The =Miscellaneous= poems of the Boston Bard. _See_ =Coffin=, Robert
Stevenson.


=Miscellaneous= poems on moral and religious subjects. _See_ =Allen=,
Benjamin.


=Miscellaneous= works, prose and poetical. _See_ =Linn=, John Blair.


=Miscellanies=, moral and instructive, in prose and verse; collected
from various authors, for the use of schools, and improvement of young
persons of both sexes. Philadelphia: Printed by Joseph James, in
Chestnut-Street, between Front and Second-Street. M.DCC.LXXX.VII.
202 pl., 1 l. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Review by B. Franklin on p. iv.


=Mitchel=, John, d. 1750. [Poem] On the following work [The Day
of Doom] and it's author [Michael Wigglesworth]. (In: Michael
Wigglesworth. The Day of Doom. Boston, 1701. 24º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also in the Boston ed. of 1751, p. 10-12; and the
    Newburyport ed. of 1811, p. 16-17.


=Mitchel=, Jonathan, 1624-1668. [Elegy on Henry Dunster.] (In: Cotton
Mather, Ecclesiastes. The life of the reverend & excellent Jonathan
Mitchel. Boston, 1697. 8º. p. 70-71.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Cotton Mather, _Magnalia Christi
    Americana_, London, 1702, book 4, p. 175-176, _Reserve_.


---- Upon the death of that reverend, aged, ever-honoured, and
gracious servant of Christ, Mr. John Wilson, pastor of a church
in Boston: interred August 8, 1667. (In: N. Morton, New-Englands
memoriall. Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 185-188.)

                                                             =Reserve=


The =Modern= philosopher; or Terrible tractoration. _See_ =Fessenden=,
Thomas Green.


=Monody.= On the decease of His Excellency George Washington. (In:
Bache's Philadelphia Aurora. Monday, December 30 [1799].)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Signed and dated, R. N. Dec. 26, 1799.

    A poem in 15 stanzas.


=Monody=, on the death of Gen. George Washington. _See_ =Brown=,
Charles Brockden.


=Monody= on the death of George Washington. _See_ =Smith=, Elihu H.


A =Monumental= inscription on the first of March together with a few
lines on the enlargement of Ebenezer Richardson, convicted of murder.
[Worcester: Printed by Isaiah Thomas, 1771.] Broadside, fº. (In Emmet
Collection.)

                                                     =Manuscript Div.=

    Reprinted in facsimile in Woodrow Wilson, _A history of
    the American people_, New York, 1902, v. 2, p. 162. _IAE_.

    Known as "The Massacre Hand-Bill."


=Moore=, Frank, 1828-. Illustrated ballad history of the American
Revolution, 1765-1783. By Frank Moore. Volume 1. New York: Johnson,
Wilson & Company, 1876. 2 p.l., 384 p., 15 pl., 16 ports. (incl.
front.), 5 maps. 4º.

                                                                  =IG=

    This was to be completed in 30 parts.

    Parts 1-6 are all that were issued.

    Title on cover of part 1: Ballad history of the American
    Revolution. By contemporary poets and prose writers.
    Collected and arranged by Frank Moore.


---- Songs and ballads of the American Revolution. With notes and
illustrations by Frank Moore. New York: D. Appleton & Company, 1856.
2 p.l., (i)vi-xii, 394 p., front. 12º.

                                                                  =IG=

    Also has engraved title-page.


=Morrell=, William, fl. 1623. New-England or a briefe enarration
of the ayre, earth, water, fish and fowles of that country, with
a description of the natures, orders, habits, and religion of the
natiues; In Latine and English verse. [By William Morrell.] Boston:
The Club of Odd Volumes, 1895. 9 p.l., 24, 2 p. sq. 8º. (The Club of
Old Volumes. Early American poetry. [Reprints, v.] 2.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Originally published in London, 1625.

    This is a facsimile reprint of a copy in the British
    Museum.

    No. 81 of one hundred copies printed on hand-made paper.

    This poem is also printed in the _Collections_ of
    the Massachusetts Historical Society, v. 1, for 1792,
    p. 125-139, but without title, address to the reader,
    dedicatory epistle, postscript, or form, style, type, and
    arrangement of the original.


=Morton=, Nathaniel, 1613-1685. New-Englands memoriall: or, A
brief relation of the most memorable and remarkable passages of
the providence of God, manifested to the planters of New-England
in America; with special reference to the first colony thereof,
called New-Plymouth. As also a nomination of divers of the most
eminent instruments deceased, both of church and common-wealth,
improved in the first beginning and after progress of sundry of the
respective jurisdictions in those parts; in reference unto sundry
exemplary passages of their lives, and the time of their death.
Published for the use and benefit of present and future generations,
by Nathaniel Morton, Secretary to the Court for the jurisdiction of
New-Plimouth.... Cambridge: Printed by S. G. and M. J. for John Usher
of Boston. 1669. 6 p.l., 198 p., 51. (4º.) 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Contains the following poems, elegies and epitaphs:
    On ... Mr. Thomas Hooker ..., by J. C., p. 125-126.--A
    lamentation for the death of ... Mr. Thomas Hooker ..., by
    P. B., p. 127-129.--A funeral elegy upon the death of ...
    Mr. John Cotton ..., by J. N., p. 136-137.--Upon the tomb
    of ... Mr. John Cotton ..., by B. W., 137-139.--[Verses
    found in his pocket after his death], by William Bradford,
    p. 140.--Certain verses left by ... William Bradford ...,
    p. 144-145.--[Poem] On ... William Bradford, by Josias
    Winslow, p. 146-148.--A few verses ... on William Bradford,
    p. 149-150.--[Elegy] presented at the funerall of Ralph
    Partridge, p. 153-155.--[Elegy on Mr. William Paddy],
    p. 156.--An elegie on the death of ... John Norton ..., by T.
    S., p. 166-168.--A threnodia upon ... Samuel Stone ..., by
    E. B., p. 168-169.--Upon the death of ... John Wilson ...,
    by J. M., p. 185-188.--Upon the death of ... John Wilson
    ..., by T. S., p. 188-190.--Upon the death of ... Jonathan
    Mitchell ..., by E. B., p. 192-193.--To the memory of ...
    Jonathan Mitchell ..., by F. D., p. 193-196.--An epitaph
    upon the ... death of ... Jonathan Mitchell, by J. S.,
    p. 196.

---- ---- Boston, Reprinted for Nicholas Boone, at the Signe of the
Bible in Cornhill. 1721. 5 p.l., 248 p., 1 l. (8º.) 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Boston: printed. Newport: Reprinted, and sold by S.
Southwick. M,DCC,LXXII. viii, 208 p., 4 l. (8º.) 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Plymouth, Mass. Reprinted by Allen Danforth, 1826. 204 p.
16º.

                                                                  =IQ=


---- ---- Fifth edition. Containing besides the original work, and the
supplement, annexed to the second edition, large additions in marginal
notes, and an appendix; with a lithographic copy of an ancient map. By
John Davis.... Boston: Printed by Crocker and Brewster, 1826. 481(1)
p., 1 map. 8º.

                                                                  =IQ=


---- ---- Sixth edition. Also Governor Bradford's History of Plymouth
Colony; portions of Prince's Chronology; Governor Bradford's Dialogue;
Gov. Winslow's visits to Massasoit; with numerous marginal notes and
an appendix containing numerous articles relating to the labors,
principles, and character of the Puritans and Pilgrims. Boston:
Congregational Board of Publication, 1855. xxii p., 1 l., 515 p.,
1 pl. (front.), 1 port. 8º.

                                                                  =IQ=


---- ---- With an introduction by Arthur Lord. Boston: The Club of Odd
Volumes, 1903. 3 p.l., (1)6-21 p., 6 l., 198 p., 4 l. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    No. 62 of 150 copies printed.

    This is a facsimile reprint.


=Morton=, Sarah Wentworth Apthorp. The African chief. (In: Samuel
Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2,
p. 75-76.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Descriptive lines, written at the request of a friend, upon the
surrounding prospect from Beacon-Hill in Boston; Ode to the President
on his visiting the Northern states; Invocation to Hope; Prayer to
Patience; Lines, addressed to the inimitable author of the poems
under the signature of Delia Crusca; by Philenia, a lady of Boston.
(In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º.
p. 176-185.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Invocation to Hope. Prayer to Patience. (In: The Columbian muse.
New York, 1794. 16º. p. 221-223.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- Lines written, at the request of a friend, on the view from
Beacon-hill, near Boston, where a sumptuous monument has lately been
erected to perpetuate the principal events of the late revolution.
(In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1791. 8º. v. 9, appendix 1,
p. 3.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Ouâbi: or The virtues of nature. An Indian tale. In four cantos.
By Philenia, a lady of Boston [i.e., Mrs. Sarah Wentworth Morton].
Printed at Boston, by I. Thomas and E. T. Andrews, at Faust's Statue,
No. 45, Newbury Street. MDCCXC. 2 p.l., (i)iv-viii, (1)10-51(1) p.,
front. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The virtues of society. A tale founded on fact. By the author of
the Virtues of nature [i.e., Sarah Wentworth A. Morton]. Published
according to act of Congress. Boston. Printed by Manning & Loring, for
the author. 1799. 2 p.l., (1)6-46 p. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Based upon an occurrence in the American Revolution,
    contained in letters of General Burgoyne.

    Poem entitled "To Time," p. 39-46.


=Morton=, Thomas. New English Canaan, or New Canaan containing an
abstract of New England, composed in three bookes.... Written by
Thomas Morton.... Printed at Amsterdam, by Jacob Frederick Stam. In
the yeare 1637. 188 p., 2 l. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Poems on pages 101-102, 121, 130-131, 133, 134-135,
    146-148, 167, 185.

    Reprinted in Peter Force, _Tracts and other papers_,
    Washington, 1838, v. 2, no. 5, _IF_.


The =Mournfull= elegy of Mr. Jona. Frye, 1725. (New England historical
and genealogical register. Boston, 1861. 8º. v. 15, p. 91.)

                                                                =APGA=

    Jonathan Frye was mortally wounded in "Lovewell's
    Fight," at Fryeburg, Me., May 8th, 1725.

    These lines, tradition says, were written when the news
    of Mr. Frye's death reached Andover, by a young girl to whom
    he had engaged himself against the wishes of his parents
    whose objections were, want of property and education. Her
    name is lost.

    Reprinted in _Magazine of history with notes and
    queries_, extra no. 5, p. 99-101, _IAG_.


=Munford=, William, 1775-1825. Poems, and compositions in prose on
several occasions. By William Munford, of the County of Mecklenburg,
and State of Virginia. Richmond: Printed by Samuel Pleasants, Jun.
1798. 3 p.l., (1)6-189(1) p. 8º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=


=Murphy=, Henry C. Anthology of New Netherland or Translations from
the early Dutch poets of New York with memoirs of their lives. By
Henry C. Murphy. New York, 1865. 209(1) p., 2 facs., 1 pl., 1 port.
8º. (Bradford Club series. no. 4.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    No. 72 of 75 copies printed.

    Memoir and poems of Jacob Steendam, p. 21-75.--Memoir
    and poems of Henricus Selyns, p. 77-183.--Memoir and poems
    of Nicasius De Sillè. p. 185-195.


A =Native= of America, pseud. Lyric works of Horace, translated into
English verse: to which are added, a number of original poems. _See_
=Parke=, John.


=Neal=, John, 1793-1876. Battle of Niagara, a poem, without notes;
and Goldau, or The maniac harper. "Eagles and stars! and rainbows!"
By John O'Cataract, author of Keep cool, &c. [i.e., John Neal.]
Baltimore: Published by N. G. Maxwell. From the Portico press. Geo. W.
Grater, printer. 1818. 2 p.l., (i)vi-xiii, (1)16-143 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The battle of Niagara: second edition--enlarged: with other
poems. By John Neal. Baltimore: Published by N. G. Maxwell. B. Edes.
printer. 1819. 3 p.l., (i)viii-lxvii, (1)70-272 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.


A =Neighbour's= tears sprinkled on the dust of the amiable virgin,
Mrs. Rebekah Sewall. _See_ =Tompson=, Benjamin.


A =New= collection of verses applied to the first of November, A.D.
1765, &c. Including a prediction that the S---p A-t shall not take
place in North-America. Together with a poetical dream, concerning
stamped papers. New-Haven: Printed and sold by B. Mecom. [1765.]
24 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=New-England= or a briefe enarration of the ayre, earth, water, fish
and fowles of that country. _See_ =Morrell=, William.


A =New= history of a true book in verse. For sale at A. March's
Bookstore; price 6 cents single, and to those who buy to give away,
2 dols. pr. hundred. [Newburyport, 1800?] 12 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    A note on the title-page in a contemporary hand reads:
    "V. Shepherd of Salisbury Plain by Mrs. H. More, p. 14."

    Possibly imperfect; pages after p. 12 may be lacking.


=New York= Gazette. The news-boy's verses, for New-Year's Day, 1763.
Humbly address'd to his patrons, to whom he carries the Thursday's
New-York Gazette. [New York: John Holt, 1762.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Fifty stanzas in three columns.


=Niles=, Nathaniel, 1741-1828. The American hero. A Sapphic ode. By
Nat. Niles, A.M. Norwich (Connecticut), Oct. 1775. (In: Wheeler Case,
Revolutionary memorials.... Edited by Stephen Dodd, New York, 1852.
12º. p. 66-68.)

                                                                =NBHD=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 440,
    _NBB_; and in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A library
    of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 3, p. 263-264,
    _NBB_.


=Niles=, Samuel, 1674-1762. A brief and plain essay on God's
wonder-working providence for New-England, in the reduction of
Louisburg, and fortresses thereto belonging on Cape-Breton. With a
short hint in the beginning, on the French taking & plundering the
people of Canso, which led the several governments to unite and pursue
the expedition. With the names of the leading officers in the army
and the several regiments to which they belonged. By Samuel Niles. N.
London, Printed and sold by T. Green, 1747. 2 p.l., 34 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Nimble-Chops=, Aquiline, pseud. Democracy: an epic poem. _See_
=Livingston=, Henry Brockholst.


=Norton=, John, 1606-1663. A funeral elegie upon the death of the
truely reverend Mr. John Cotton, late teacher of the Church of Christ
at Boston in New England. (In: N. Morton, New-Englands memoriall.
Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 136-137.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in John Scottow, _A narrative of the
    planting of the Massachusetts Colony Anno 1628_. Boston,
    1694, p. 75-76, _Reserve_.


=Norton=, John, 1651-1716. A funeral elogy upon that pattern and
patron of virtue, the truely pious, peerless & matchless Gentlewoman
Mrs. Ann Bradstreet, right panaretes, mirror of her age, glory of
her sex, whose heaven-born-soul leaving its earthly shrine, chose
its native home, and was taken to its rest, upon 16th. Sept. 1672.
(In: Anne Bradstreet, The works of Ann Bradstreet in prose and verse.
Edited by John Harvard Ellis. Charlestown, 1867. 4º. p. 409-413.)

                                                                =NBHD=

    This "Elogy" appears on pages 252-255 of the Boston,
    1678 edition of Anne Bradstreet's poems. The Library's copy
    of this edition lacks these pages.

    Also reprinted under the title _Dirge for the Tenth
    Muse_, in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 46-48, _NBB_.


=Noyes=, Nicholas, 1647-1717. A consolatory poem dedicated unto Mr.
Cotton Mather, soon after the decease of his excellent and vertuous
wife, Mrs. Abigail Mather. (In: E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, A
library of American literature. New York, 1889. 8º. v. 2, p. 206-208.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    Originally published in Cotton Mather's _Meat out of the
    eater_, Boston, 1703, p. 187-190.


---- An elegy upon the death of the Reverend Mr. John Higginson,
pastor of the church of Christ in Salem, who dyed December, 9th. 1708.
In the ninety-third year of his age. [By Nicholas Noyes.] 8 p. (In:
Cotton Mather, Nunc dimittis, briefly descanted on.... Boston, 1709.
8º. 8 p. following p. 46.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _New England historical genealogical
    register_, Boston, 1853, v. 7, p. 237-240, _* R-Room 328_.


---- An elegy upon the much lamented death of the Reverend Mr. Joseph
Green, pastor of the church at Salem village, who departed this life
November 26, 1715, aged forty years and two days. (Essex Institute.
Historical collections. Salem, 1868. 8º. v. 8, p. 168-174.)

                                                        =* R-Room 328=

    Appeared originally in Joseph Capen, _A funeral sermon
    occasioned by the death of Mr. Joseph Green_, Boston, 1717,
    reprinted in the _Collections_ of the Topsfield Historical
    Society, v. 12, p. 5-47, Topsfield, Mass., 1907, _IQH_. The
    Elegy fills p. 32-46.


---- A prefatory poem, on that excellent book, entitled Magnalia
Christi Americana: Written by the Reverend Mr. Cotton Mather.... (In:
Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana. London, 1702. 4º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Printed in later editions of the _Magnalia_ as follows:
    Hartford, 1820, v. 1, p. 14-16; Hartford, 1855, v. 1,
    p. 19-20.


=Nugent=, Henry. The orphans of Wyoming, or, The fatal prayer. A moral
poem. By the late Henry Nugent. With memoirs of the author. First
edition. City of Washington, Apollo press, printed and published by H.
C. Lewis. 1814. 1 p.l., (1)6-54 p. 12º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 53, no. 4=

    No title-page; title from cover.


=Oakes=, Urian, 1631-1681. An elegie upon the death of the Reverend
Mr. Thomas Shepard, late teacher of the church at Charlstown in
New-England: By a great admirer of his worth, and true mourner for his
death [i.e., Urian Oakes]. Cambridge. Printed by Samuel Green. 1677.
16 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in modern type, page for page, with a
    facsimile title-page, in Club of Odd Volumes, _Early
    American poetry_ [Reprints], Boston, 1896, [v.] 4, _Reserve_.

    Also reprinted in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2,
    p. 36-42, _NBB_.


---- _See also_ =Elegies= and epitaphs, 1677-1717.


=O'Cataract=, John, pseud. Battle of Niagara, a poem. _See_ =Neal=,
John.


An =Occasional= ode, sung at the Baptist Meeting-House in Wrentham,
February 22, 1800. (In: Benjamin Gleason, An oration, pronounced at
the Baptist Meeting-House in Wrentham, February 22, 1800.... Wrentham,
Mass., 1800. 8º. p. [32.])

                                                             =Reserve=


=Ode=, distributed among the spectators, during the federal
procession, at New-York, July, 1788. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1788. 8º. v. 4. p. 572-574.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Odell=, Jonathan, 1737-1818. The American times, a satire, in three
parts. In which are delineated the characters of the leaders of the
American Rebellion. Amongst the principal are Franklin, Laurens,
Adams, Hancock, Jay, Duer, Duane, Wilson, Pulaski, Witherspoon, Reed,
M'Kean, Washington, Roberdeau, Morris, Chase, &c. By Camillo Querno,
poet-laureat to the Congress. [New-York: Printed by James Rivington,
MDCCLXXX.] (In: John André. Cowchace. New York, 1780. 8º. p. 27-69.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Attributed by Wegelin to Rev. Jonathan Boucher.

    Reprinted in _The Loyalist poetry of the Revolution_,
    Philadelphia, 1857, p. 1-37, _NBH_.


---- The congratulation. A poem. (In: The Royal gazette. New-York,
1779. fº. November 6, 1779, p. [2].)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in supplement to the _Royal Gazette_, November
    24, 1779, _Reserve_.

    Also reprinted in _The Loyal verses of Joseph Stansbury
    and Doctor Jonathan Odell.... Edited by Winthrop Sargent_,
    Albany, 1860, p. 45-50, _NBHD_.


---- The Feu de joie. A poem. (In: The Royal gazette. New-York, 1779.
fº. November 24, 1779, p. [2].)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The Loyal verses of Joseph Stansbury and
    Doctor Jonathan Odell.... Edited by Winthrop Sargent_,
    Albany, 1860, p. 51-58, _NBHD_.


---- The loyal verses of Joseph Stansbury and Doctor Jonathan Odell;
relating to the American Revolution. _See_ =Stansbury=, Joseph.


---- To Sir James Wallace, on sending in the Dutch prize. (In: The
Royal Pennsylvania gazette. Philadelphia, 1778. fº. March 24, 1778,
p. [3].)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The Loyal verses of Joseph Stansbury and
    Doctor Jonathan Odell.... Edited by Winthrop Sargent_,
    Albany, 1860, p. 35, _NBHD_.


---- The word of Congress, a poem. (In: The Royal gazette. New-York,
1779. fº. September 18, 1779, p. [2.])

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The Loyalist poetry of the Revolution_,
    Philadelphia, 1857, p. 38-55, _NBH_.


=Odiorne=, Thomas, 1769-1851. The progress of refinement, a poem, in
three books. To which are added, a poem on fame, and miscellanies.
By Thomas Odiorne. Boston: Printed by Young and Etheridge, opposite
the entrance of the Branch-Bank, State-Street. MDCCXCII. x p., 1 l.,
(1)14-176 p., front. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Half-title probably lacking.

    Reviewed in _The Massachusetts magazine_, Boston, 1793,
    v. 5, no. 4, p. 238-240, _Reserve_.


=Olio=; or, Satirical poetic-hodge-podge, with an illustrative or
explanatory dialogue, in vindication of the motive. Addressed to good
nature, humour, and fancy. Philadelphia, printed. 1801. 1 p.l., (i)iv.
(1)4-46 p. 8º.

                                                   =ii p.v. 34, no. 6=

    With copy-right notice on title-page.

    Parody, p. 25-43. Dialogue between the author and his
    friend, upon the subject of Olio, p. 44-46.


=Oliver=, Andrew. Elegy upon John Winthrop. (In: E. A. and G. L.
Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866. 8º.
v. 1, p. 136.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    Written in 1779.


=Oliver=, Isabella. Poems, on various subjects. By Isabella Oliver,
of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. Carlisle: From the press of A.
Loudon, (Whitehall.) 1805. 1 p.l., (1)4-5, (i)vii-ix, (1)11-220 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Oliver=, Thomas. _See_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


=On= the death of the very learned, pious and excelling Gershom
Bulkley Esq. M.D. who had his mortality swallowed up of life, December
the second 1713. Ætatis suæ 78. New-London: Printed by T. Green, 1714.
Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photo-facsimile. Text in two columns, enclosed in
    mourning borders.


=One= year in Savannah; a poem. _See_ =Young=, Edward R.


=Oppression.= A poem. By an American. With notes, by a North Briton.
London: Printed for the author; and sold by C. Moran, in the Great
Piazza, Covent Garden. MDCCLXV. 1 p.l., 34 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Original= poems, by a citizen of Baltimore. _See_ =Townsend=, Richard
H.


=Osander=, pseud. Miscellaneous poems. _See_ =Allen=, Benjamin.


=Osborn=, John, 1713-1753. An elegiac epistle, written by John Osborn,
at college, in the year 1735, upon the death of a sister, aged 13,
and sent to another sister at Eastham. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6, p. 486-487.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The beauties of poetry, British and
    American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 206-208, _Reserve_; and
    in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston,
    1829, v. 1, p. 122-124, _NBH_.


---- A whaling song. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of
American literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 132-133.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    Also printed in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2,
    p. 364-365, _NBB_.


=Osborn=, Salleck, 1783-1826. Extract from an unfinished manuscript.
(In: The American poetical miscellany. Philadelphia. 1809. 12º.
p. 243-245.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Mercy. (In: The American poetical miscellany. Philadelphia, 1809.
12º. p. 109-110.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Poems by Salleck Osborn. Boston, I. P. Orcutt, printer [1823].
1 p.l., x, 200 p., 1 l. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has engraved title-page.

    The greater number of these poems were written before
    1820.

    Several of the poems are printed in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 147-149, _NBH_.


=Paine=, Robert Treat, 1773-1811. Adams and liberty. (In: The
Philadelphia monthly magazine. Philadelphia, 1798. 8º. v. 1,
p. 286-288.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The invention of letters: a poem, written at the request of the
president of Harvard University, and delivered, in Cambridge, on the
day of annual commencement, July 15, 1795. By Thomas Paine. Boston:
Printed for the subscribers. July 27, 1795. 15 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A monody on the death of Lieut. General Sir John Moore. With
notes, historical and political. By R. T. Paine, Jun. Esq. To which is
prefixed, a sketch of the life of General Moore.... Boston, Published
by J. Belcher. 1811. 32 p. 8º.

                                                                  =AN=


---- The ruling passion: an occasional poem. Written by the
appointment of the Society the [Greek: =PhBK=], and spoken, on their
anniversary, in the chapel of the University, Cambridge, July 20,
1797. By Thomas Paine, A.M. Published according to act of Congress.
Boston: Printed by Manning & Loring, for the author. 1797. 2 p.l.,
(1)6-32 p. sq. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- A second copy.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 14, no 8.=


---- The works, in verse and prose, of the late Robert Treat Paine,
Jun. Esq. With notes. To which are prefixed, sketches of his life,
character and writings. Boston: Printed and published by J. Belcher.
1812. 1 p.l., (i)vi-lxxxviii p., 3 l., (1)6-464 p., 1 l., 1 port. 8º.

                                                                 =NBG=

    _Contents_: Sketches of the life, character and writings
    of the late R. T. Paine, by Charles Prentiss.--Tributary
    lines, to the memory of the late R. T. Paine.--Part
    1, Juvenile poems, consisting chiefly of college
    exercises.--Part 2, Miscellaneous poems.--Part 3, Odes and
    songs.--Part 4, Prose writings.--Notes.

    Part 2 includes the following: The prize prologue;
    The invention of letters, a poem; The ruling passion, an
    occasional poem; Dedicatory address spoken at the New
    Federal Theatre; Monody on the death of Lieutenant General
    Sir John Moore.


=Paine=, Thomas, 1737-1809. Miscellaneous poems. By Thomas Paine.
London: Printed and published by R. Carlile, 55, Fleet Street. 1819.
2 p.l., 24 p. 8º.

                                                =* C p.v. 403, no. 22=

    _Contents_: The Farmer's dog. Song on the death of
    General Wolfe. The snow-drop and critic. Account of the
    burning of Bachelor's Hall. Liberty tree. Verses on war.
    Song to the tune of Rule Britannia. Lines occasioned by the
    question--"What is love?" Epigram on a long-nosed friend.
    On the British constitution. Story of Korah, Dathan, and
    Abiram. A commentary on the eastern wise men. Lines from
    "The castle in the air" to "The little corner of the world."

    Reprinted in _The writings of Thomas Paine_, edited by
    M. D. Conway, New York, 1896, v. 4, p. 477-498, _IAW_, with
    the addition of the following poems: The monk and the Jew,
    The Boston patriotic song, Columbia, Contentment, Federalist
    feast, and Lines extempore.

    The "Verses on war," which is printed in Conway's
    edition under the title "An address to Lord Howe," is
    printed under the title "To the king of England" in _The
    Columbian museum_, Philadelphia, 1793, part 1, January to
    June, p. 4-5, _Reserve_. "The Liberty tree" is also in _The
    Pennsylvania magazine_, Philadelphia, May, 1775, p. 328-329,
    _Reserve_, and in Stedman and Hutchinson's _A library of
    American literature_. New York, 1889, v. 3, p. 234, _NBB_.


A =Paraphrase= on part of the oeconomy of human life. _See_ =Bowdoin=,
James.


=Parke=, John, 1750-1789. The lyric works of Horace, translated into
English verse: to which are added, a number of original poems. By a
Native of America [i.e., John Parke]. Philadelphia: Printed by Eleazer
Oswald, at the Coffee-House. M,DCC,LXXXVI. xli, 334 p., 8 l. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Prologue on the death of General Montgomery. By Colonel J. P.
[i.e. John Parke.] (In: H. H. Brackenridge, The death of General
Montgomery at the siege of Quebec. Philadelphia, 1777. 12º. 2 l. at
end.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Prologue and epilogue to the Battle of Bunkers-Hill. (In: H. H.
Brackenridge, The Battle of Bunkers-Hill. Philadelphia, 1776. 8º.
p.l. 3, p. 37-38.)

                                                             =Reserve=


A =Parnassian= shop. _See_ =Story=, Isaac.


=Pasquin=, Anthony, pseud. _See_ =Williams=, John.


=Patriotic= effusions. _See_ =Longstreet=, Augustus Baldwin.


The =Patriots= of North-America: a sketch. With explanatory notes.
New-York: Printed in the Year M,DCC,LXXV. New York: Reprinted, William
Abbatt, 1914. 46 p. 8º. (Magazine of history with notes and queries,
extra no. 27.)

                                                      =IAG (Magazine)=

    Only two copies of the original are known to exist in
    the United States.


=Paulding=, James Kirke, 1779-1860. The backwoodsman. A poem. By J. K.
Paulding. Philadelphia: Published by M. Thomas, 52, Chestnut St. J.
Maxwell, printer. 1818. 5 p.l., (1)8-198 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Extract printed in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of
    American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 180-184, _NBH_.


---- The lay of the Scottish fiddle: a tale of Havre De Grace.
Supposed to be written by Walter Scott, Esq. [By James Kirke
Paulding.] First American from the fourth Edinburgh edition.
New-York: Published by Inskeep & Bradford, and Bradford & Inskeep,
Philadelphia. 1813. 1 p.l., (1)4-262 p. 32º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Reviewed in the _London quarterly_, v. 10, p. 463-467,
    Jan., 1814.


---- The lay of the Scottish fiddle. A poem. In five cantos. Supposed
to be written by W--S--, Esq. [By James Kirke Paulding.] First
American from the fourth Edinburgh edition. London: Printed for James
Cawthorn, Cockspur-Street. 1814. 1 p.l., (i)iv-xvi, 222 p., 1 l. of
adv. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    "A free parody of the _Lay of the last minstrel_....
    The production is principally devoted to satirizing the
    predatory warfare of the British on Chesapeake Bay, and,
    what is somewhat remarkable, was published in a very
    handsome style in London with a preface highly complimentary
    to the author. The hero is Admiral Cockburn, and the
    principal incident the burning and sacking of the little
    town of Havre de Grace on the coast of Maryland. It had at
    that time what might be called the distinction of provoking
    a fierce review from the London Quarterly. It is clever as
    a parody, and contains many passages entirely original and
    of no inconsiderable beauty."--Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia of
    American literature_, New-York, 1866, v. 2, p. 10.


=Payne=, John Howard, 1791-1852. The life and writings of John
Howard Payne, the author of Home, Sweet Home; The Tragedy of Brutus;
and other dramatic works. By Gabriel Harrison. Albany, N. Y.: Joel
Munsell, 1875. ix, 408 p., 1 l., 1 port. 4º.

                                                                  =AN=

    Lispings of the Muse: a selection of juvenile poems,
    chiefly written at and before the age of sixteen,
    p. 247-267.--Poems of later days, p. 269-292.


---- John Howard Payne, dramatist, poet, actor, and author of
Home, Sweet Home! His life and writings. By Gabriel Harrison. With
illustrations. Revised edition. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co.,
1885. 404 p., front. (port.), 1 fac., 1 pl. 8º.

                                                                  =AN=

    Lispings of the Muse. Juvenile poems, p. 295-314.--Poems
    of later days, p. 315-338.


=Payson=, Edward, 1657-1732. A small contribution to the memorial of
that truely worthy, and worthily man of God, Mr. Samuel Phillips,
pastor to the church of Christ in Rowley; who deceased, April 22d,
1696, ætatis 71. (In: Thomas Gage, The history of Rowley. Boston,
1840. 12º. p. 79-84.)

                                                                 =IQH=


=Peck=, John. A short poem, containing a descant on the universal
plan: also, lines on the happy end of the righteous, and the
prosperity and death of the rich man, spoken of in St. Luke's Gospel
... Chap. XVI. By John Peck. Boston: Printed for Nath'l Coverly. 1818.
1 p.l., 3-24 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Pennsylvania= Gazette. The New-Year verses of the Printers Lads, who
carry the Pennsylvania Gazette to the Customers. January 1, 1780.
[Philadelphia, 1779.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in two columns.


---- ---- January 1, 1781. [Philadelphia, 1780.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in one column.


---- ---- January 1, 1782. [Philadelphia, 1781.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in one column.


---- The New-Year verses of the Printers Lads, who carry about the
Pennsylvania Gazette to the Customers. January 1, 1783. [Philadelphia,
1782.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in one column enclosed in a border.


---- New-Year verses, for those who carry the Pennsylvania Gazette to
the Customers. January 1, 1785. [Philadelphia. 1784.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in one column enclosed in a border.


=Pepper-Box=, Peter, pseud. _See_ =Fessenden=, Thomas Green.


=Philenia=, a lady of Boston, pseud. _See_ =Morton=, Mrs. Sarah
Wentworth Apthorp.


=Phillis=, a servant girl, pseud. An elegiac poem on the death of ...
reverend and learned Mr. George Whitefield. _See_ =Wheatley=, Phillis.


=Pierce=, William. An epitaph--intended for the monument of major
general Greene. By William Pierce, esq. of Savannah. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1789. 8º. v. 6, p. 86.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Pierce=, William Leigh. The year: a poem, in three cantos. By William
Leigh Pierce, Esq. New-York: Published by David Longworth. At the
Shakspeare-Gallery. 1813. 3 p.l., (1)8-191 p., 1 l., (1)4-75 p., 1 l.
of adv. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Extract printed in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of
    American poetry_. Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 130-133, _NBH_.


=Pierpont=, John, 1785-1866. Airs of Palestine; a poem: by John
Pierpont. Esq.... Baltimore: Published for the author. B. Edes,
printer. 1816. xxvi, 56 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.

    Reprinted in _Specimens of the American poets_, London,
    1822, p. 25-69, _NBH_.


---- ---- Second edition. Boston: Published by Wells and Lilly, 1817.
58 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.


---- ---- Third edition--revised. Boston: Published by Wells and
Lilly, 1817. 2 p.l., (i)iv-vii, (1)14-66 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Has also an engraved title-page.


---- The portrait. A poem delivered before the Washington Benevolent
Society, of Newburyport, on the evening of October 27, 1812. By John
Pierpont, Esq. Boston: Published by Bradford and Read. T. B. Wait &
Co., printers. 1812. 36 p. 8º.

                                                 =NBHD p.v. 1, no. 13=


=Pietas= et gratulatio Collegii Cantabrigiensis apud Novanglos.
Bostoni--Massachusettensium: Typis J. Green & J. Russell. MDCCLXI.
xiv p., 1 l., 106 p. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    These are poems addressed to His Majesty King George
    III., on his accession to the throne, by the president and
    fellows of Harvard College.

    There are thirty-one papers by the following
    contributors: 1. By President Edward Holyoke; 2. By John
    Lovell; 3. By Stephen Sewall; 4. By Benjamin Church; 5. By
    Stephen Sewall; 6. By Francis Bernard; 7. By John Lowell;
    8-9. By James Bowdoin; 10. By Samuel Deane; 11. By Benjamin
    Church; 12. By Stephen Sewall; 13. By Samuel Cooper; 14-16.
    By Stephen Sewall; 17. By James Bowdoin; 18-20. By Francis
    Bernard; 21-22. By John Lovell or Stephen Sewall; 23. By
    Stephen Sewall; 24. By John Lovell or Stephen Sewall; 25. By
    John Lovell; 26-27. By Samuel Deane; 28. By Samuel Cooper;
    29. By Thomas Oliver; 30. By James Bowdoin; 31. By Francis
    Bernard.

    For fuller details about this work and its contributors
    consult Duyckinck's _Cyclopædia of American literature_, New
    York, 1866, v. 1, p. 11-14, _NBB_.

    Reviewed in _The Critical review_, London, 1763, v. 16,
    p. 289-291, _NAA_; _The Monthly review_, London. 1763,
    v. 29, p. 22-28, _NAA_.


=Pills=, poetical, political and philosophical. _See_ =Fessenden=,
Thomas Green.


=Pindar=, Jonathan, pseud. The probationary odes. _See_ =Tucker=,
Saint George.


A =Poem=, addressed to the people of Virginia, on New-Year's day,
1788. Alexandria, January 10, 1788. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1788. 8º. v. 3, p. 92-93.)

                                                             =Reserve=


A =Poem= dedicated to the memory of the reverend and excellent Mr.
Urian Oakes. _See_ =Mather=, Cotton.


[=Poem=] On the death of Gen. George Washington. (In: The Monthly
magazine and American review for the year 1799. New-York, 1800. 8º.
v. 1, p. 477-478.)

                                                             =Reserve=


A =Poem= on reading the President's address. _See_ =Honeywood=, St.
John.


A =Poem= presented to His Excellency William Burnet Esq; on his
arrival at Boston, n.p. [1728?] 1 p.l., 5 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    One of "Fifty copies reprinted from the edition of 1728."

    "The only known copy of this poem in America, so far
    as the writer has been able to ascertain, is in the Boston
    Public Library, where it was acquired a few years ago. The
    British Museum has also a copy. The author is unknown. It
    is quite inferior to the verses of Mather Byles on the same
    occasion, and its publication lacks the Governor's sanction,
    which was given to the former. Both poems are printed in
    similar type, and probably were from the same press. The
    rarity of this publication has induced the present reprint,
    which is approximately in fac-simile of the original.
    Paterson, N. J., July 1, 1897. William Nelson."


A =Poem=, upon the present times, with a brief [and] humble address
to the Almighty, in behalf of the [case] of our cause. Composed by
Philoleuthers Americanus. [1776?] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in three columns.


=Poem=, written in Boston, at the commencement of the late Revolution.
(In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1788. 8º. v. 4, p. 380-382.)

                                                             =Reserve=


The =Poems= of Arouet. _See_ =Ladd=, Joseph Brown.


=Poems= moral and divine, on the following subjects: I. Man's fall
and exhaltation: or, The Christian triumph. In seven cantos, II.
Modern infidelity: or, The principles of atheism exposed and refuted.
Inscrib'd to a friend. III. A paraphrase on the following Psalms:
CXIX, CXLIII, CXLII, CXX, XIII, CXLIV and CXXX. IV. The prince and
the patriot. In three dialogues. By an American gentleman. To which
is added, some account of the author. London: Printed by Charles
Rivington, for John and James Rivington in St. Paul's Churchyard.
MDCCLVI. 3 p.l., 105(1) p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Poems=, occasioned by several circumstances and occurrences in the
present grand contest for liberty. _See_ =Case=, Wheeler.


=Poetic= testimonials of respect for the virtues and character of our
illustrious chief, Gen. George Washington, who died December 14, 1799.
The following Hymn and Ode were sung on the 9th of January, 1800, in
the Old South Meeting-House, in Boston, before a numerous concourse
of citizens. Hymn, by the Rev. John S. J. Gardner.--Ode, by Thomas
Paine. A.M.--A Monody, by John Lathrop, Esq.--Ode to Content.--Ode to
Science.--New-Year's Address.--Lines extracted from title-page of Mr.
Thomas Paine's Eulogy on Gen. Washington. (In: The Columbian phenix
and Boston review. Boston. 1800. 8º. v. 1 for 1800, p. 50-54.)

                                                             =Reserve=


A =Poetical= description of song birds: interspersed with entertaining
songs, fables, and tales, adapted to each subject: for the amusement
of children. The first Worcester edition. Printed at Worcester,
Massachusetts, by Isaiah Thomas, sold at his bookstore in Worcester,
and by him and company in Boston. MDCCLXXXVIII. 88 p. illus. 32º.

                                                             =Reserve=


A =Poetical= epistle to His Excellency George Washington ... from an
inhabitant of the State of Maryland. _See_ =Wharton=, Charles Henry.


The =Poetical= nosegay; or The swindler James Geo. Semple revived in
the person of Hugh Workman, a native of Ireland. Price for single
copy, 30 cents viz: for original--10 cents. Notes part 1 and 2 ditto.
Per dozen--two cents each copy--viz: for original 8 cents--notes 1
and 2, 8 cents each. Copy-right secured, according to law. 1800. 5
p.l., 20 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Lines on verso of title-page and dedication signed: D. W.

    A satire on the duel between Mathew Lyon and Roger
    Griswold in Congress, Jan. 30 and Feb. 15, 1798. For a full
    account of this affair see the _Historical magazine_, Jan.,
    1864.

    All leaves after p. 20 lacking.


A =Poetical= picture of America. _See_ =Ritson=, Mrs. Anne.


The =Poetical= vagaries of a Knight of the Folding-Stick, of
Paste-Castle. To which is annexed, the History of the Garret, &c. &c.
translated from the hieroglyphics of the society. By a member of the
order of the Blue-String. Gotham. Printed for the author. 1815.
143 p., 2 pl. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Attributed to John Bradford by Wegelin.


The =Political= green-house, for the year 1798. Addressed to the
readers of the Connecticut Courant, January 1st, 1799. Published
according to act of Congress. Hartford: Printed by Hudson & Goodwin.
[1799.] 1 p.l., (1)4-24 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Written by Richard Alsop, Lemuel Hopkins, and Theodore
    Dwight, in unequal proportions.

    Reprinted in _The Echo_, New York, 1807, p. 233-266,
    _Reserve_ and _NBH_.


The =Political= nursery, for the year eighteen hundred two.
Packet-Office, Norwich, January 1st, 1802. 16 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Bd. with: The Jeffersoniad. 1801. 16º.


The =Political= passing bell. _See_ =Richards=, George.


The =Poor= man's advice to his poor neighbours: a ballad, to the tune
of Chevy-Chase. New York: Printed in the year M.DCC.LXXIV. 19 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Porter=, Jacob. Poems, by Jacob Porter. Hartford: Printed by Peter
Gleason and Co., 1818. 2 p.l., (1)6-27 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Porter=, Sarah. The royal penitent. Part II. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 301-305.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Pownall=, Mary A. Mrs. Pownall's address, in behalf of the French
musicians, delivered on her benefit concert night, at Oeller's
hotel, Chestnut-street, Philadelphia. To which are added, Pastoral
songs, written by herself at an early period of life. Also the songs
performed at the concerts ... New Theatre. Philadelphia: Printed and
sold at Story's office, (No. 36) Fourth-street nearly opposite the
Indian Queen tavern. [1793.] 1 p.l., (1)4-28 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The "Pastoral songs," p. [5]-15, have a special
    title-page, with imprint reading: Philadelphia, MDCCXIII
    [i.e., 1793].

    "New songs sung at the concerts. New Theatre,
    Philadelphia," p. [17]-28.


=Pratt=, Benjamin, 1710-1763. Death. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of
American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 324-326.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Prentiss=, Charles, 1774-1820. Child of Pallas: Devoted mostly to the
belles-lettres. By Charles Prentiss.--Baltimore--Printed weekly, By
Warner & Hanna. 1800. 288 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- New England freedom: a poem delivered before the Washington
Benevolent Society, in Brimfield, February 22d, 1813. By Charles
Prentiss. Brookfield: Printed by E. Merriam & Co. March, 1813. 1 p.l.,
(1)4-28 p. 8º.

                                                  =NBHD p.v. 1, no. 3=


---- A poem delivered at Brookfield, July 5th, 1813, before the
Washington Benevolent Societies of that and adjacent towns. By Charles
Prentiss. Published at the request of the audience. Brookfield:
Printed by E. Merriam & Co. 1813. 1 p.l., (1)4-14 p. 8º.

                                                  =NBHD p.v. 1, no. 1=

    p. 14 wrongly printed 44.


=Prichard=, William. Character of St. Tamany. (In: The Beauties of
poetry, British and American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 196-197.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 223-224, _NBH_.


=Prime=, Benjamin Young, 1733-1791. Muscipula sive cambromyomachia:
The mouse-trap, or The battle of the Welsh and the mice; in Latin and
English: with other poems, in different languages. By an American
[i.e., Benjamin Young Prime]. New-York: Published by M. W. Dodd
[1840]. 96 p., 1 map. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    _Contents_: Preface.--Muscipula, The mouse-trap.--Dr.
    Watts' Latin ode, English translation; English ode,
    Latin translation.--Ode of Sappho in English; The same
    in French.--Horatii, od. 22, lib. 1; same in Greek;
    same in English.--Meditation over a dying patient.--A
    Pindaric ode.--An elegy and palinody.--The desperate
    wish.--A song for the Sons of Liberty.--To a certain brave
    officer.--Appendix.


The =Probationary= odes of Jonathan Pindar. _See_ =Tucker=, Saint
George.


The =Progress= of dulness. _See_ =Trumbull=, John.


The =Progress= of society. A poem. In three parts. New-York: Published
by D. Longworth, 11 Park. Clayton & Kingsland, printers. 1817. 2 p.l.,
(i)vi-vii p., 2 l., (1)14-62 p., 1 l. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Querno=, Camillo, pseud. _See_ =Odell=, Jonathan.


=Quince=, Peter, pseud. A parnassian shop. _See_ =Story=, Isaac.


=Quincey=, Vernon H. A parody on some of the most striking passages
in a late pamphlet, entitled "A Letter to a Federalist," with large
additions & improvements, by Vernon H. Quincey, Esq. Portsmouth, N. H.
Printed at the Oracle Press, 1805. 1 p.l., (i)vi-viii, (1)10-47 p. 8º.

                                              =IO(1805) p.v. 1, no. 4=

    A satire on democracy and its abettors.


=Ralph=, James, d. 1762. Clarinda: or The fair libertine. A poem. In
four cantos. London: Printed for John Gray, at the Cross-Keys in the
Poultry. 1729. 4 p.l., 43 p. 8º. (In his: Miscellaneous poems. London,
1779.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    The author was a native of Pennsylvania.


---- Night: a poem. In four books.... By J. Ralph. The second edition.
London: Printed by C. Ackers, for W. Meadows at the Angel in Cornhill;
and S. Billingsley at the Judge's Head in Chancery-Lane. MDCCXXIX.
3 p.l., xi(i) p., 2 l., 68 p., 1 l. 8º. (In his: Miscellaneous poems.
London, 1729.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The tempest: or The terrors of death. A poem in blank verse. By
James Ralph. London: Printed for W. Meadows, at the Angel in Cornhill.
M.DCC.XXVII. ii, 27 p. 8º. (In his: Miscellaneous poems. London, 1729.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Zeuma: or The love of liberty. A poem. In three books. By James
Ralph. London: Printed by C. Ackers, for S. Billingsley at the
Judge's-Head in Chancery-Lane. 1729. 6 p.l., vi p., 1 l., 136 p. 8º.
(In his: Miscellaneous poems. London, 1729.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Ray=, William, 1771-1827. Horrors of slavery: or, The American
tars in Tripoli. Containing an account of the loss and capture of
the United States frigate Philadelphia; treatment and suffering
of the prisoners; description of the place; manners, customs, &c.
of the Tripolitans; public transactions of the United States with
that regency, including Gen. Eaton's expedition, interspersed with
interesting remarks, anecdotes, and poetry, on various subjects.
Written during upwards of nineteen months' imprisonment and vassalage
among the Turks. By William Ray. Troy: Printed by Oliver Lyon, for the
author. 1808. New York. Reprinted. William Abbatt, 1911. 295 p. 8º.
(The Magazine of history with notes and queries, extra number 14.)

                                                                 =IAG=

    The poetical pieces are the following:

    The American tars in Tripolitan slavery. Exordium,
    p. 9-21.--Invocation to Neptune, p. 64.--The loaf,
    p. 104-105.--Elegy on the death of John Hilliard, who died
    Jan. 3d, 1804, in the prison of Tripoli, p. 112-113.--Elegy
    on the death of Lieutenant James Decatur, who fell August
    3d, 1804, in an action with the Tripolitan gun-boats,
    p. 148-149.--Song, p. 153-154.--Lines addressed to Gen.
    Eaton, on reading the Congressional debate respecting his
    Golden Medal, written on board the U. States frigate Essex,
    p. 253-254.--Poetry, published in The Albany Register, during
    the summer of 1807, p. 281-293.--Spring [published in the
    Northern Budget, Troy, May 3, 1808], p. 294-295.

    Contains also many other poems without titles.


---- Tripoli; The way to be happy; Village greatness. (In: Samuel
Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2,
p. 140-144.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Re-re-commencement=: a kind of a poem: calculated to be recited
before an "assemblage" of New-England divines.... _See_ =Biglow=,
William.


The =Recluse=, pseud. _See_ The =Art= of domestic happiness.


The =Revelation= of nature, with the prophecy of reason. _See_
=Stewart=, John.


=Rich=. R., fl. 1610. Newes from Virginia (1610). A tract in verse
by R. Rich, soldier. Reprinted after the only existing copy of the
original edition. London: Printed for private circulation, 1874.
19 p. 4º.

                                                                 =ITC=

    One of twenty-five copies printed.

    The first published metrical effusion relating to
    America, by one who had lived in America.

    Original title-page reads: Nevves from Virginia. The
    lost flocke triumphant. With the happy arriual of that
    famous and worthy knight Sr. Thomas Gates: and the well
    reputed and valiant captaine Mr. Christopher Newporte, and
    others, into England. With the maner of their distresse in
    the Iland of Deuils (otherwise called Bemoothawes) where
    they remayned 42. weekes, and builded two pynaces, in which
    they returned into Virginia. By R. Rich, gent., one of the
    voyage. London Printed by Edw: Allde, and are to be solde by
    Iohn Wright, at Christ-Church dore. 1610.

    Also printed in Stedman and Hutchinson, _Library of
    American literature_. New York, 1889, v. 1, p. 22-24, _NBB_.


=Richards=, George, d. 1814. The Declaration of Independence; a poem:
accompanied by odes, songs, &c. Adapted to the day. By a citizen of
Boston [i.e., George Richards]. Printed at Boston [by Isaiah Thomas
and E. T. Andrews]. Faust's Statue, No. 45, Newbury Street, MDCCXCIII.
2 p.l, (1)6-24 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Library also has one of 50 copies reprinted, New York,
    1870, in _NBH p.v. 26, no. 5_.

    The Declaration of Independence is reprinted in Samuel
    Kettell, _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 28-31, _NBH_.


---- Elegiac ode, sacred to the memory of General Greene. (In:
American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º.
p. 201-205.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The political passing bell; an elegy. Written in a country
meeting house, April, 1789. Parodized from Gray; and accompanied
with a correct copy of the sublime original. For the entertainment
of those, who laugh at all parties. [By George Richards].... Boston:
Printed by Isaiah Thomas and company, 1789. Tarrytown, N. Y.,
Reprinted, W. Abbatt, 1916. 19 p. 8º. (The Magazine of history with
notes and queries, extra number 48.)

                                                      =IAG (Magazine)=

    Original edition published anonymously. In the present
    reprint the facsimile of t.-p. of original has author's name
    inserted in brackets.

    Gray's Elegy (including three verses usually omitted)
    appears on alternate pages with the parody.


=Richmond=, William Ebenezer, 1786-1873. Mount Hope, an evening
excursion. By William E. Richmond, barrister at law. Providence:
Printed by Miller & Hutchens, 1818. 2 p.l., (1)6-69(1) p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The poem was read, in an unfinished state, before the
    Federal Adelphi Society, September, 1816.


=Ritson=, Mrs. Anne. A poetical picture of America, being observations
made, during a residence of several years, at Alexandria, and
Norfolk, in Virginia; illustrative of the manners and customs of the
inhabitants: and interspersed with anecdotes, arising from a general
intercourse with society in that country, from the year 1799 to 1807.
By a lady [i.e., Mrs. Anne Ritson]. London: Printed for the author;
and sold by Vernor, Hood, and Sharpe, 31, Poultry. 1809. 8 p.l.,
(1)4-177 p. 16º.

                                                                 =NBI=

    _Contents_: A voyage across the Atlantic.--Passage up
    the Patomak.--Alexandria.--Norfolk.--Manners and customs of
    Norfolk.--Customs general in Virginia.


=Rivington's= New-York Gazetteer. Ode on the New Year 1774. Delivered
by Hugh Duncan, one of the Carriers of Rivington's New-York Gazetteer.
[New York, 1773.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Eight stanzas of four lines each. Text in one column.


=Rogers=, John, 1630-1684. [A poem.] Upon Mrs. Ann Bradstreet her
poems, &c. (In: Anne Bradstreet, Several poems compiled with great
variety of wit and learning.... Boston: John Foster, 1678. 24º.
p.l. 6-7.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in the _New England historical and
    genealogical register_, Boston, 1851, v. 5, p. 138-139, _*
    R-Room 328_ and in Stedman and Hutchinson's _A library of
    American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 44-45, _NBB_.


=Rogers=, Robert, 1731-1795. Ponteach: or The savages of America. A
tragedy [by Major Robert Rogers]. London: Printed for the author; and
sold by J. Millan, opposite the Admiralty, Whitehall. M.DCC.LXVI.
[Price 2s. 6d.] 110 p. 8º.

                                          =Reserve= and =NCO p.v. 222=

    Reviewed in _The Monthly review or literary journal_,
    London, 1766, v. 34, p. 242, _NAA_.


---- ---- With an introduction and a biography of the author by Allen
Nevins. Chicago: The Caxton Club, 1914. 261 p., front. (port.) 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    One of 175 copies on Old Stratford paper.


=Rose=, Robert H. Sketches in verse. [By Robert H. Rose.] Printed for
C. & A. Conrad & Co., Philadelphia, by Smith & Maxwell. 1810. 1 p.l.,
(i)vi-viii, (1)10-184 p., 2 pl. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Also has an engraved title-page.


=Rowson=, Mrs. Susanna Haswell, 1762-1824. Miscellaneous poems; by
Susanna Rowson, preceptress of the Ladies' Academy, Newton, Mass.
Author of Charlotte, Inquisitor, Reuben and Rachel, &c &c. Printed for
the author, by Gilbert and Dean, State-Street, sold by them, and by W.
P. and L. Blake, Cornhill, Boston.--1804. 1 p.l., (i)iv-x p., 1 l.,
(1)14-227 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Contains bookplate of Thomas Jefferson McKee.


=Rugeley=, Rowland. The story of Æneas and Dido burlesqued. [By
Rowland Rugeley.] Charlestown [i.e., Charleston, S. C.]. Printed and
sold by Robert Wells, 1774. xvi, 94 p. sm. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The above copy has the author's name written in ink on
    the title-page by a former owner. The preface, which is
    dated "South-Carolina, 1774" shows by its contents that the
    work is undoubtedly an American production.


=S.=, J. To the Rev^{end} Mr. William Hubbard on his most exact
History of New-Englands troubles. (In: William Hubbard, The present
state of New-England. London, 1677. 4º. p.l. 6.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also in reprint of Hubbard's work, with notes by S. G.
    Drake, Roxbury, 1865, v. 1, p. 21-22, _HBC_.

    Attributed to John Sherman by S. G. Drake and to
    Jeremiah Shepard by J. L. Sibley.


=S.=, T. An almanack for the year of our lord 1656.... By T. S....
Cambridg Printed by Samuel Green. 1656. 8 l. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photostat facsimile of a copy in the library of the
    American Antiquarian Society.

    Poems on leaves 2-7.

    Probably by Thomas Shepard of Charlestown.


---- An elegie on the death of that eminent minister of the Gospel,
Mr. John Norton, the reverend teacher of the church of Christ at
Boston, who exchanged this life for a better April 5, 1663. (In: N.
Morton, New Englands memoriall. Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 166-168.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=St. Denis Le Cadet=, pseud. The lottery, a poem. _See_ =Denison=,
Edward.


=St. John=, Peter. American taxation, 1765. _See_ =American= taxation.


=St. John=, Samuel. American taxation, 1765. _See_ =American= taxation.


=Sands=, Robert Charles, joint author. _See_ =Eastburn=, James Wallis.


=Sargent=, Lucius Manlius, 1786-1867. Caelii symposii ænigmata. Hanc
novam editionem, juxta lectiones optimas diligenter congestam, curavit
Lucius M. Sargent. Bostoniae. Nov-Angl: Prelo Belcher et Armstrong.
MDCCCVII. 1 p.l., (i)iv, 5-35 p. 12º.

                                                   =NBH p.v. 2, no. 6=


---- Hubert and Ellen. With other poems. The trial of the harp....
Billowy water.... The plunderer's grave.... The tear-drop.... The
billow. By Lucius M. Sargent. Boston: Published by Chester Stebbins.
1813. 1 p.l., (1)4-135 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    "The plunderer's grave" is also printed in Samuel
    Kettell, _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 134-137, _NBH_.


=Sargent=, Winthrop, 1753-1820. Boston. A poem. By Winthrop Sargent.
Second edition. Corrected and enlarged. Boston: Printed by Hosea
Sprague, sold at no 49, Marlboro' Street. 1803. 2 p.l., (i)vi,
(1)8-23 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Schoolcraft=, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864. Transallegania, or The groans of
Missouri. A poem. [By Henry Howe Schoolcraft.] New-York: Printed for
the author, by J. Seymour. 1820. 1 p.l., (1)4-24 p. 16º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 20, no. 2=

    Autograph inscription on cover reads: To E. A. Duyckinck
    Esq. with the respects of the author H. R. Schoolcraft.
    Washington, 9th May, 1854.


=Scott=, Jonathan M. Blue lights, or The convention. A poem, in four
cantos. By Jonathan M. Scott, Esq. New-York: Printed and published by
Charles N. Baldwin, Bookseller, Chatham, corner of Chamber-street.
1817. 3 p.l., (i)vi-xi p., 1 l., (1)16-150 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The sorceress, or Salem delivered. A poem, in four cantos. By
Jonathan M. Scott, Esq. New-York: Printed and published by Charles N.
Baldwin, Bookseller, corner of Chamber and Chatham Street. 1817.
xii p., 1 l., (1)16-120 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Scott=, Moses Y. Fatal jest, a tale: and other poems. By Moses Y.
Scott. New-York: Published by Elam Bliss, 208 Broadway. J. Seymour,
printer. 1819. 2 p.l., (i)iv-vi p., 1 l., (1)10-142 p. 24º.

                                                                 =NBH=


=Sears=, Reuben. A poem on the mineral waters of Ballston and
Saratoga, with notes illustrating the history of the springs and
adjacent country. By Reuben Sears, A.M. Ballston Spa: Published by the
author, J. Comstock, printer. 1819. 3 p.l., (1)8-108 p. 24º.

                                                                 =IRM=

    p. [37]-95 contain: Notes illustrating the history of
    the springs and adjacent country.

    p. 96-102 contain poem entitled: Philosoph; p. 103-108,
    one entitled Immortality.


=Searson=, John. Elegiac verses on the decease of his late Excellency,
the illustrious and ever-memorable, great and good General George
Washington, of immortal memory. [By John Searson. Philadelphia, 1800?]
4 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Title from caption.

    Bound with and usually appended to, the author's _Mount
    Vernon, a poem_.... Philadelphia [1799?].


---- Mount Vernon, a poem: being the seat of his excellency George
Washington, in the state of Virginia; lieutenant-general and
commander in chief of the land forces of the United States of America.
This rural, romantic and descriptive poem of the seat of so great a
character, it is hoped may please, with a copper-plate likeness of the
General. It was taken from an actual view on the spot by the author,
15th May, 1799. Also a cursory view of Georgetown, city of Washington,
and the capitol. By John Searson, formerly of Philadelphia, merchant.
Philadelphia: Printed for the author by Folwell [1799]. vi p., 1 l.,
(1)10-83, 4 p., front. (port.) 8º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=

    The last 4 p. contain: Elegiac verses on the decease
    of his late Excellency the illustrious and ever-memorable,
    great and good General George Washington, of immortal
    memory. [Philadelphia, 1800?]

    Also contains the following poems: Thoughts in
    Mount-Vernon garden, p. 28-29; Poetic address to the Deity,
    p. 31-32; Spring hymn, in praise of the Creator, p. 32-36:
    Poetic description of a grand parade, at Baltimore, on
    the 7th of November, 1798: occasioned by his excellency
    general Washington's passing through Baltimore, in his
    way to the northward, on some public business, p. 36-37;
    Acrostic on Mount-Vernon, the seat of his excellency George
    Washington, p. 37-38; Alexandria, p. 38-39; George-Town,
    p. 39; City Washington, p. 40-42; Lines on St. Tammany's Day,
    p. 42-43; Ode to Liberty, p. 43-44; Advice to every member
    of Congress, p. 44-45; On a rural life, p. 45-46; On the
    dissolution of the world, p. 46; An evening hymn, p. 47; A
    hymn of praise, or solemn address, to the God of seasons,
    by James Thomson, p. 47-52; Paraphrase of part of the Book
    of Job, p. 52-67; In imitation of Pope's Universal prayer,
    p. 68-69; On the decease of his excellency general Anthony
    Wayne, p. 69-70; On the return of the epidemic fever to
    Philadelphia, in 1799, p. 80-82; Valedictory, p. 83.


---- Poems on various subjects and different occasions, chiefly
adapted to rural entertainment in the United States of America. By
John Searson, formerly of Philadelphia, merchant. Philadelphia:
Printed by Snowden & M'Corkle, No. 47 North Fourth-street. 1797.
vi, 7-94 p., 5 l. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Seccomb=, John, 1708-1792. Father Abbey's will; to which is added
a letter of courtship to his virtuous and amiable widow. [By John
Seccomb.] With historical and biographical notes [by John Langdon
Sibley]. Privately printed. Cambridge, 1854. 14 p. 8º.

                                                   =AGZ p.v. 1, no. 1=

    The poem was first published in _The Gentleman's
    magazine_, London, 1732, v. 2, p. 770, under the following
    title: The last will of Mr. Mathew A ...y, late bed-maker
    and sweeper in Cambridge.

    Reprinted in _The Massachusetts magazine_, Boston, 1794,
    v. 6, no. 11, p. 696-697, _Reserve_.

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 127-128,
    _NBB_; Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of American
    literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 352-356, _NBB_.


=Selyns=, Henricus, 1636-1701. In Jesu Christi Magnalia Americana,
digesta in septem libros, per magnum, doctissimumque virum, D.
Cottonum Matherum. (In: Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana.
London, 1702. 4º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    In Latin.

    Also in later editions of the _Magnalia_, as follows:
    Hartford, 1820, v. 1, p. 20-21; Hartford, 1855, v. 1, p. 22,
    with English translation on p. 23.


---- Memoir and poems. (In: Henry C. Murphy, Anthology of New
Netherland. New York, 1865. 8º. p. 77-183.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Several= poems compiled with great variety of wit and learning. _See_
=Bradstreet=, Mrs. Anne Dudley.


=Sewall=, Jonathan Mitchell, 1748-1808. Miscellaneous poems, with
several specimens from the author's manuscript version of the poems
of Ossian. By J. M. Sewall, Esq. Published agreeably to an act of
Congress. Portsmouth: Printed by William Treadwell, & Co for the
author. 1801. 2 p.l., (1)6-304 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Versification of President Washington's excellent
Farewell-Address to the citizens of the United States. By a gentleman
of Portsmouth, N. H. [i.e., Jonathan Mitchell Sewall.] Published
according to act of Congress. Portsmouth, New-Hampshire: Printed
and sold by Charles Peirce, at the Columbian Bookstore, No. 5.
Daniel-Street. 1798. 54 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Sewall=, Stephen, 1734-1804. [Poem.] On the death of George II. (In:
Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º.
p. 328-330.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- _See also_ =Pietas= et gratulatio....


=Shaw.= John, 1778-1809. Poems by the late Doctor John Shaw. To which
is prefixed a biographical sketch of the author. [By John E. Hall.]
Published by Edward Earle, Philadelphia, and by Edward J. Coale,
Baltimore. Fry and Kammerer, printers. 1810. 1 p.l., (i)vi-viii,
252 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Some of Shaw's poems are printed in Samuel Kettell,
    _Specimens of American poetry_, Boston, 1829, v. 2,
    p. 128-130, _NBH_.


=Shaw-Standish=, Thomas. A mournful song, occasioned by the shipwreck
of the schooner Armistice, Captain Douglass, on Cohasset rocks, August
31, 1815 ... bound from Portland for Baltimore ... on which occasion
five persons perished. By Thomas Shaw-Standish. n. p. [1815?] 11 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    At head of title: No. 1. [Cut of 5 coffins.]

    Cut of a ship on title-page.


---- Peace. [Verses, n.p., 1815?] Broadside. fº.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Shepard=, Jeremiah. _See_ =S.=, J.


=Shepard=, Thomas, 1605-1649. [Extract from an Elegy on the death of
John Wilson.] (In: Cotton Mather, Johannes in Eremo. Boston, 1695.
24º. p. 36.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in The Club of Odd Volumes, _Early American
    poetry_ [_Reprints_, v.] 4, _Reserve_.


=Sherman=, John. _See_ =S.=, J.


=Short=, Bob, pseud. Patriotic effusions. _See_ =Longstreet=, Augustus
Baldwin.


The =Shunamite=. _See_ =Green=, G.


=Shurtleff=, James, 1745-1832. The substance of a late remarkable
dream, in which were presented the celestial worlds and the infernal
regions, with the arch enemy of mankind, with his legions paraded,
together with his instructions to them, in which was discovered,
his deep-laid plot against the United States of America. [By James
Shurtleff.] Hallowell (District of Maine) Printed by Peter Edes. 1800.
16 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Introduction signed: James Shurtleff. Litchfield [Me.],
    February, 1800.


=Signs= of apostacy lamented. _See_ =Bosworth=, Benjamin.


=Sigourney=, Mrs. Lydia Howard Huntley, 1791-1865. Moral pieces in
prose and verse. By Lydia Huntley. Hartford: Sheldon & Goodwin, 1815.
xii, 267(1) p., 4 l. 12º.

                                                                 =NBY=


The =Simple= cobler of Aggawam in America. _See_ =Ward=, Nathaniel.


=Sketches= in verse. _See_ =Rose=, Robert H.


=Smith=, Eaglesfield. William and Ellen: a poem in three cantos;
with other poetical works of an American [i.e., Eaglesfield Smith].
Published for the benefit of a helpless child. New-York: Printed by
J. Seymour, No. 49, John-Street. 1811. 1 p.l. (i)vi-xii,
(1)14-158 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Smith=, Elihu Hubbard, 1771-1798. Epistle to the author of the
Botanic garden [Erasmus Darwin]. New York, March, 1798. (In: Erasmus
Darwin, The Botanic garden. A poem. New-York, 1798. 8º. p.l. 4-6.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 600-601,
    _NBB_.


---- Monody on the death of George Washington. Delivered at the
New-York Theatre, on Monday evening, December 30, 1799. [By Elihu H.
Smith.] (In: The Monthly magazine and American review for the year
1799. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 1, p. 478-480.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Occasional address. Spoken by Mr. Hodgkinson, on the opening
of the New Theatre, in New-York, Monday, the 29th of January, 1798.
Written by the late Dr. E. H. Smith. (In: The Monthly magazine and
American review for the year 1799. New-York, 1800. 8º. v. 1.
p. 239-240.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- _See also_ The =Echo; American= poems, selected and original.


=Smith=, Isaiah. The mirror of merit and beauty: fifty female
sketches, drawn from nature. By a friend to the fair, I. S. M. D.
[i.e., Isaiah Smith.] New-York: Printed for the author, by D. & G.
Bruce. 1808. 79(1) p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Smith=, John, 1580-1631. The generall historie of Virginia,
New-England, and the Summer Isles: with the names of the adventurers,
planters, and governours from their first beginning an: 1584. to this
present 1624. With the proceedings of those severall colonies and the
accidents that befell them in all their journyes and discoveries. Also
the maps and descriptions of all those countryes, their commodities,
people, government, customes, and religion yet knowne. Divided into
six bookes. By Captaine John Smith sometymes Governour in those
countryes & admirall of New England. London. Printed by I. D. for
Michael Sparkes. 1624. 7 p.l., 248 p. fº.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Poems on pages 9, 12, 13, 16, 18, 20, 25, 34, 35, 36,
    37, 43, 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 66, 69, 78, 87, 90, 92, 93, 107,
    150, 151, 157, 159, 176, 193, 200, 227, 229, 230, 239.

    Reprinted in Capt. John Smith, _Works, 1608-1631. Edited
    by Edward Arber_. Birmingham, 1884. 2 v. 12º. _* R-Room 300_.


---- ---- Richmond: Republished at the Franklin Press, William W. Gray
printer. 1819. 2 v. 8º.

                                                                 =ITC=


---- ---- Glasgow: James MacLehose and Sons, 1907. 2 v. 8º.

                                                                 =ITC=


---- The sea marke. (In his: Advertisements for the planters of
New-England, or anywhere. London, 1631. 4º. p.l. 3.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Massachusetts Historical Society,
    _Collections_, Cambridge, 1833, series 3, v. 3, p. 4, _IAA_.

    Also reprinted in Capt. John Smith, _Works. Edited by
    Edward Arber_, Birmingham, 1884, v. 2, p. 922. _* R-Room
    300_.

=Smith=, Joseph. Eulogium on rum. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1790. 8º. v. 7, appendix 1, p. 1-2.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Beauties of poetry, British and
    American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 174-176, _Reserve_;
    _American poems, selected and original_, Litchfield, 1793,
    p. 231-234, _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 109-112. _NBH_; and _American poetical miscellany_,
    Philadelphia, 1809, p. 169-172, _NBH_.


---- An Indian eclogue. Scene, the banks of the Ohio. (In: The
Beauties of poetry, British and American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º.
p. 244.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 160-161, _NBH_.


=Smith=, William, 1727-1803. Art and nature. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 1, p. 181-182.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The Beauties of poetry, British and
    American_, Philadelphia, 1791, p. 187-189, _Reserve_; _The
    Columbian muse_, New York, 1794, p. 184-186, _NBH_.


---- Indian songs of peace: with a proposal, in a prefatory epistle,
for erecting Indian schools. And a postscript by the editor,
introducing Yariza, an Indian maid's letter, to the principal ladies
of the Province and City of New-York. By the author of the American
fables [i.e., William Smith]. New-York: Printed by J. Parker, and W.
Wayman, at the New Printing-Office in Beaver-Street, MDCCLII.
27 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Smith=, William Moore, 1759-1821. The fall of Zampor, a Peruvian ode;
Ode to meditation; Lampoon. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American
poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 306-312.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- The man of sorrow. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1787.
8º. v. 2, p. 517-518.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- On a lady's birthday. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794.
16º. p. 183.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


=Snowden=, Richard. The Columbiad: or, A poem on the American war, in
thirteen cantoes. [By Richard Snowden.] Philadelphia: Printed by Jacob
Johnson & Co. 147, Market-Street. 1795. iv, 46 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Baltimore: Printed by W. Pechin, No. 10, Second-street.
[1800?] 44 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Bd. with his: The American Revolution. Baltimore.
    [1800?]. 16º.


=Some= excellent verses on Admiral Vernon's taking the forts and
castles of Carthagena in the month of March last. Sold at the Heart
and Crown in Cornhill. [Boston, 1741.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Eighteen stanzas in two columns.


A =Song= made upon the election of new magistrates for this city....
A song made upon the foregoing occasion. [New York. 1734.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The two scandalous songs that figured in the
    Zenger-Cosby affair, 1734.


A =Song=, on the surrendery of General Burgoyne, who gave up his whole
army to the brave General Gates, of glorious memory, October 17, 1777.
[1777.] Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Forty-six stanzas in three columns.


=Sotweed= redivivus: or the planters looking-glass. _See_ =Cook=,
Ebenezer.


=Specimens= of the American poets; with critical notices and a
preface. London: Printed for T. and J. Allman, 1822. iv, 283 p. 12º.

                                                                 =NBH=

    W. C. Bryant. Poems, p. 189-218.--R. Dabney. Poems,
    p. 157-172.--J. W. Eastburn. Yamoyden, proem and canto II,
    p. 219-249.--F. G. Halleck. Fanny, p. 109-156.--W. Maxwell.
    Poems, p. 173-187.--J. K. Paulding. The Backwoodsman,
    p. 71-108.--J. Pierpont. Airs of Palestine, p. 25-69.


The =Spirit= of the Farmers' museum, and lay preacher's gazette. Being
a judicious selection of the fugitive and valuable productions, which
have occasionally appeared in that paper, since the commencement of
its establishment. Consisting of a part of the essays of the Lay
Preacher, Colon and Spondee, American biography, the choicest efforts
of the American muse, pieces of chaste humour, the early essays of
the Hermit, the most valuable part of the weekly summaries, nuts,
epigrams, and epitaphs, sonnets, criticism, &c. &c. Walpole, (N. H.)
Printed, for Thomas & Thomas, by D. & T. Carlisle. 1801. 2 p.l.,
(1)6-318 p., 2 l. of adv. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    p. 5-11 contain list of 199 subscribers.

    Edited by Joseph Dennie.


The =Spunkiad=: or Heroism improved. A congressional display of spit
and cudge. A poem, in four cantoes. By an American youth. Newburgh:
Printed and sold by D. Denniston. M,DCC,XCVIII. 1 p.l., (1)4-23 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    A satire on the duel between Mathew Lyon and Roger
    Griswold in Congress, Jan. 30 and Feb. 15, 1798. For a full
    account of this affair see the _Historical magazine_, Jan.,
    1864.


The =Squabble=; a pastoral eclogue. By Agricola. With a curious and
well-design'd frontispiece. Printed [from the first edition] by Andrew
Steuart, in Second-street Philadelphia. [1764.] 8 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The frontispiece, which is on page 4, is a crude woodcut
    representing "Thyrsis with a Pr*sb*t*rian Nose. Conn, with
    a Q**k*ronian Nose."


=Standish=, Miles, the younger, pseud.? The times; a poem, addressed
to the inhabitants of New-England, and of the state of New-York,
particularly on the subject of the present anti-commercial system of
the national administration. By Miles Standish, jun. Plymouth: Printed
for the author, 1809. 2 p.l., (1)6-27 p. 8º.

                                                                  =II=

    At head of title: No. 1.

    A poem on "the exterminating war, now carrying on by the
    National Administration against commerce" of New York and
    New England.

    Copyright notice on verso of title-page.


=Stansbury=, Joseph, and JONATHAN ODELL, 1737-1818. The loyal verses
of Joseph Stansbury and Doctor Jonathan Odell; relating to the
American Revolution. Now first edited by Winthrop Sargent. Albany: J.
Munsell, 78 State Street. 1860. 3 p.l., (i)x-xxi p., 1 l., 199 p. 8º.
(Munsell's historical series, no. 6.)

                                                                =NBHD=

    Poems by Odell, p. 5-6, 7-9, 11-12, 35, 45-60.


The =State= triumvirate, a political tale. _See_ =Verplanck=, Gulian
Crommelin.


=Stearns=, Charles, 1753-1826. The ladies' philosophy of love. A poem,
in four cantos. Written in 1774. By Charles Stearns. A.B. Since
pastor of the Church, and preceptor of the Liberal School in Lincoln.
Now first published--according to act of Congress. Leominster, for the
author. 1797. 1 p.l., (i)iv, (1)6-76 p. sq. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Steendam=, Jacob, b. 1616. A memoir of the first poet in New
Netherland [i.e., Jacob Steendam] with his poems descriptive of the
colony. [By Henry C. Murphy.] The Hague, The Brothers Giunta D'Albani,
1861. 59 p., front, (port.) 8º.

                                                                  =AN=

    Poems in Dutch and English on opposite pages; the
    "Complaint of New Amsterdam" and "The praise of New
    Netherland" include reproductions of the original
    title-pages.

    _Contents_: Memoir.--Poems on New Netherland: Complaint
    of New Amsterdam in New Netherland, to her mother, 1659. The
    praise of New Netherland, 1661.--Spurring-verses.


---- Memoir and poems. (In: Henry C. Murphy, Anthology of New
Netherland. New York, 1865. 8º. p. 21-75.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Stewart=, John. The revelation of nature, with the prophesy of
reason. [By John Stewart.] New York: Printed by Mott & Lyon, for
the author. In the fifth year of intellectual existance, or the
publication of the apocalypse of nature, 3000 years from the Grecian
olympiads, and 4800 from recorded knowledge in the Chinese tables of
eclipses, beyond which chronology is lost in fable. [1796.] xxxix,
104 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Stiles=, Ezra. _See_ A =Family= tablet: containing a selection of
original poetry.


=Stoddard=, Amos, 1762-1813. The president's birth day ode. Performed
at Taunton, at the Civick Festival, February, 1793. Written by A.
Stoddard. (In: The Massachusetts magazine. Boston. 1793. 8º. v. 5,
no. 3, p. 178-179.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Stoddard=, Lavina, 1787-1820. The soul's defiance. (In: R. W.
Griswold, The female poets of America. Philadelphia, 1849. 8º. p. 44.)

                                                                 =NBH=


=Story=, Isaac, 1774-1803. An epistle from Yarico to Inkle, together
with their characters, as related in the Spectator. [By Isaac
Story.] Marblehead: Printed for the sons and daughters of Columbia.
M.DCC.XCII. 2 p.l., (1)6-31 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Printed at Salem. The monogram "I. S." appears above the
    imprint.


---- A parnassian shop, opened in the Pindaric stile; By Peter Quince,
Esq. [pseud. of Isaac Story.] Copy right secured. Boston: Printed by
Russell and Cutler. 1801. 3 p.l., (i)viii, (1)10-155 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reviewed in _The American review, and literary journal_
    for the year 1801, New York, 1801, v. 1, p. 460-465,
    _Reserve_.


---- _See also_ =All= the world's a stage. A poem.


=Story=, Joseph, 1779-1845. Elegy to the memory of General George
Washington. (In his: An eulogy on General George Washington. Salem: J.
Cushing, 1800. 8º. p. [17]-24.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    "The subsequent Elegy, added by advice of some friends,
    was originally designed for newspaporial currency. As some
    sentiments of it are perhaps enlarged on in the Eulogy, it
    is necessary to observe, that it was written previous to the
    suggestion of the other, and could not be altered without
    impairing its structure."


---- The power of solitude. A poem. In two parts. By Joseph Story. A
new and improved edition. Salem: Published by Barnard P. Macanulty.
1804. 2 p.l., 260 p., front. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Extract printed in Samuel Kettell, _Specimens of
    American poetry_. Boston, 1829, v. 2, p. 109-112, _NBH_.


The =Story= of Æneas and Dido burlesqued. _See_ =Rugeley=, Rowland.


The =Substance= of a late remarkable dream. _See_ =Shurtleff=, James.


=Sumner=, Charles Pinckney, 1766-1839. The compass. A poetical
performance at the Literary Exhibition in September. M,DCC,XCV, at
Harvard University. By Charles P. Sumner. Boston: Printed by William
Spotswood for the subscribers. [1795.] 1 p.l., (1)4-12 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- An ode for the sixth anniversary of the Massachusetts Charitable
Fire Society. Boston, May, 1800. (In: The Columbian phenix and Boston
review. Boston, 1800. 8º. v. 1 for 1800, p. 380.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Swanwick=, John. Poems on several occasions. By John Swanwick, Esq.
One of the Representatives in the Congress of the United States, from
the State of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: Printed by F. and R. Bailey,
at Yorick's Head, No. 116. High-Street. MDCCXCVII. 2 p.l., 174 p. 32º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Sympson=, J. Science revived or The vision of Alfred. A poem in
eight cantos. With biographical notes. By the Rev. J. Sympson, B.D.
Philadelphia: Printed by John Bouvier, for John Wilson. 1810. 2 p.l.,
(1)6-207 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=T.=, B. _See_ =Tompson=, Benjamin.


The =Tenth= Muse lately sprung up in America. Or several poems. _See_
=Bradstreet=, Mrs. Anne Dudley.


=Terrible= tractoration!! A poetical petition against galvanising
trumpery.... _See_ =Fessenden=, Thomas Green.


=Theresa=, pseud. _See_ The =Breechiad=, a poem.


=Thomas=, Daniel. A poem, delivered in Middleborough, September 8th,
A.D. 1802. At the anniversary election of the Philandrian Society.
By Daniel Thomas, student of Rhode-Island College. Wrentham, (Mass.)
Printed by Nathaniel Heaton, Jun. 1802. 12 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Thomas=, John. The genius of America. Inscribed to his Excellency
General George Washington, on his return to Mount Vernon in December,
1783. [And other poems.] (In: Extracts in prose and verse, by a lady
of Maryland. Annapolis, 1808. 12º. v. 2, p. 154-189.)

                                                                 =NBB=


=Thomas=, Joseph. A poetical descant on the primeval and present
state of mankind; or, The pilgrim's muse. By Joseph Thomas, minister
of the Gospel. Winchester, Va. J. Foster, printer. 1816. 1 p.l.,
(i)iv-vii(i), 9-219(1) p. 32º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Tileston=, Thomas. Funeral elegy, dedicated to the memory of his
worthy friend, the learned and religious Mr. John Foster, who deceased
in Dorchester the 9 of Septr. 1661. (In: T. C. Simonds, History of
South Boston. Boston, 1857. 12º. p. 34-37.)

                                                                 =IQH=


The =Times=, a poem. _See_ =Church=, Benjamin.


The =Times=; a poem. _See_ =Markoe=, Peter.


=Tompson=, Benjamin, 1642-1714. Celeberrimi Cottoni Matheri,
celebratio.... (In: Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana. London,
1702. 4º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in Latin and English.

    Also in later editions of the _Magnalia_, as follows:
    Hartford, 1820, v. 1, p. 17, and Hartford, 1855, v. 1, p. 20.

    Reprinted in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2,
    p. 35-36, _NBB_.


---- [Elegy] Upon the very Reverend Samuel Whiting. (In: Cotton
Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana. London, 1702. 4º. book III,
p. 160-161.)

    Also in later editions as follows: Hartford, 1820, v. 1,
    p. 459-461; Hartford, 1855, v. 1, p. 510-511.


---- The grammarians funeral, or An elegy composed upon the death
of Mr. John Woodmancy, formerly a school-master in Boston: but now
published upon the death of the venerable Mr. Ezekiel Chevers, the
late and famous school-master of Boston in New-England; who departed
this life the twenty-first of August 1708. Early in the morning. In
the ninety-fourth year of his age. [By] Benj. Tompson. Broadside. (In:
S. A. Green, Ten fac-simile reproductions relating to New England.
Boston, 1902. fº.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Enclosed in mourning borders.

    Photo-facsimile, exact size.


---- A neighbour's tears sprinkled on the dust of the amiable
virgin, Mrs. Rebekah Sewall, who was born December 30. 1704. and
dyed suddenly, August 3. 1710. Ætatis 6. [By] B. T. [i.e., Benjamin
Tompson.] Broadside. (In: S. A. Green, Ten fac-simile reproductions
relating to New England. Boston, 1902. fº.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Thirty-two lines, enclosed in mourning border.

    Photo-facsimile, exact size.


---- New-England's crisis. By Benjamin Tompson. Boston: The Club of
Odd Volumes, 1894. 28 p., 1 l., (1)6-31 p. sq. 8º. (The Club of Odd
Volumes. Early American poetry [Reprints, v.] 1.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    No. 81 of one hundred copies printed on hand-made paper.

    This is a modern type reprint, without title-page, of a
    copy of the original, Boston, 1676, in the Boston Athenæum.

    The Boston _Evening Transcript_, July 13, 1910, records
    the sale of the only known perfect copy, which was disposed
    of at the sale of Thomas Gray's library, at Sotheby's on
    June 25, 1910.


---- [Poem] Upon the elaborate survey of New-Englands passions from
the natives, by the imperial pen of that worthy divine Mr. William
Hubbard. 2 p. (In: William Hubbard, The present state of New-England.
Being a narrative of the troubles with the Indians.... London. 1677.
4º. p.l. 7.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also in reprint of Hubbard's work, with notes by S. G.
    Drake, Roxbury, 1865, v. 1, p. 23-26, _HBC_.


=Touchstone=, Geoffry, pseud. The house of wisdom in a bustle. A poem,
descriptive of the noted battle lately fought in C--ng--ss. By Geoffry
Touchstone. New-York: Printed for the purchasers. 1798. [Price 25
cents.] 24 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    A satire on the duel between Mathew Lyon and Roger
    Griswold in Congress, Jan. 30 and Feb. 15, 1798. For a full
    account of this affair see the _Historical magazine_, Jan.,
    1864.

    First published at Philadelphia, in 1798.


=Townsend=, Eliza. 1789-1854. An occasional ode. (In: The monthly
anthology, and Boston review. Boston, 1809. 8º. v. 7, p. 180-186.)

                                                                =* DA=

    Also printed in R. W. Griswold, _The female poets of
    America_, Philadelphia, 1849, p. 39-41, _NBH_.


=Townsend=, Richard? H. Original poems, by a citizen of Baltimore
[i.e., Richard? H. Townsend]. Published by Samuel Jefferis, 212,
Baltimore-Street. Robinson, printer. 1809. 2 p.l., (i)vi-x, 139(1)
p. 1 l. of adv. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Transallegania=, or The groans of Missouri. A poem. _See_
=Schoolcraft=, Henry Rowe.


A =Tribute= to Washington, for February 22d, 1800. _See_ =Lovett=,
John.


The =True= American, Tom Tackle, Fair Kate of Portsmouth, Had Neptune,
Roger and Kate. New-York: Printed and sold at No. 38, and 64,
Maiden-Lane. 1811. 8 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Trumbull=, John, 1750-1831. Ambition, an elegy. (In: American poems,
selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º. p. 17-20.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 65-68, _NBH_; and, under the title An elegy, in _The
    American museum_, Philadelphia, 1787, v. 2, p. 206-207,
    _Reserve_.


---- The critics, a fable. (In: The Columbian muse. New York, 1794.
16º. p. 69-73.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=


---- The downfall of Babylon.--An imitation of sundry passages in the
13th and 14th chapters of the prophecy of Isaiah, and the 18th chapter
of the Revelations of St. John. Written, anno 1775. (In: The American
museum. Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 2, p. 97-99.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _American poems, selected and original_,
    Litchfield, 1793, p. 25-29, _NBH_.


---- An elegy on the death of Mr. Buckingham St. John, tutor of Yale
College, who was drowned in his passage from New Haven to Norwalk, May
the 5th, 1771. New York: C. F. Heartman, 1915. 2 p.l., 9-19 p., front,
(fold. fac.) 8º. (Heartman's historical series, no. 12.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Contains facsimile of original broadside.

    One of 31 copies printed on Fabriano hand-made paper.

    Also printed in _The American museum_, Philadelphia,
    1787, v. 2, p. 101-103, _Reserve_; _The Massachusetts
    magazine_, Boston, April, 1791, p. 243-245, _Reserve_;
    _American poems, selected and original_, Litchfield, 1793,
    p. 13-17, _NBH_; _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 61-65, _NBH_.


---- Elegy on the times. First printed at Boston, Sept. 20th, 1774.
(In: American poems, selected and original. Litchfield, 1793. 12º.
p. 1-12.)

                                                   =Reserve= and =NBH=

    Also printed in _The Columbian muse_, New York, 1794,
    p. 51-61, _NBH_.


---- Excellent logic; British favours to America; Extreme humanity;
Nobility anticipated. (In: The Beauties of poetry, British and
American. Philadelphia, 1791. 16º. p. 146-155.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- McFingal: a modern epic poem. Or, The town meeting. [By John
Trumbull.] Philadelphia, printed: London, reprinted for J. Almon,
opposite Burlington-House, Piccadilly. MDCCLXXVI. [Price one
shilling.] 44 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The first part was written in 1775 at the request of
    some members of the American Congress, with a view to
    influence public opinion in favor of the war then beginning
    against the mother country.


---- M'Fingal: a modern epic poem, in four cantos. [By John Trumbull.]
Hartford: Printed and sold by Byail Webster, a few Rods South-East of
the Court-House, 1782. 96 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Hartford: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin, near the Great
Bridge, 1782. 100 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Boston: Printed by Peter Edes, in State-Street. MDCCLXXXV.
2 p.l., (1)6-110 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Philadelphia: From the Press of Mathew Carey. M.DCC.XCI.
95(1) p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    This is the first edition in which the author's name
    appears on the title-page.


---- ---- The fifth edition, with explanatory notes. London: Printed
for J. S. Jordan, No. 166, Fleet-Street. M,DCC,XCII. xv, 142 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- The sixth edition, with explanatory notes. London: Printed
for Chapman and Co. No. 161, Fleet-Street. M,DCC,XCIII. 2 p.l.,
(i)vi-xv, 142 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Embellished with nine copper plates; designed and engraved
by E. Tisdale. The first edition with plates, and explanatory notes.
New-York: Printed by John Duel, No. 132. Fly-Market. M,DCC,XCV. vii,
136 p., front. (port.), 8 pl. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Frontispiece, the portrait of the author.


---- ---- With explanatory notes. Boston: Printed by Manning & Loring,
for Ebenezer Larking, No. 47, Cornhill. 1799. 141(1) p., 1 l. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Embellished with plates. With explanatory notes. Baltimore.
Printed and sold by A. Miltenberger, No. 10, North Howard-street.
1812. 1 p.l., (i)iv-vi, (1)8-146 p., 3 pl. (incl. front.) 32º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- With explanatory notes. Albany: Printed by E. & E. Hosford.
1813. 1 p.l., (i)iv, (1)6-112 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- With explanatory notes. Published and sold by Ezekiel Goodale, at
the Hallowell Bookstore. 1813. vi, (1)8-138 p., 2 l. (one l. of adv.)
16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Peter Edes, printer, Augusta.


---- ---- With explanatory notes and plates. Hudson: Published by W.
E. Norman. 1816. vi, (1)8-146 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Ashbel Stoddard, printer.

    The Library has another copy of this edition, ending
    with p. 145. The publisher probably had a number of copies
    lacking the last leaf, and in order to sell them had the
    missing part reprinted on one page, and inserted it. This
    must have been done some years after the printing of the
    original. This copy also has an engraved frontispiece.


---- ---- With explanatory notes. Boston: Printed by John G. Scobie,
1826. 1 p.l., (1)4-184 p. nar. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- With explanatory notes. Fine edition. Philadelphia:
Published by C. P. Fessenden. 1839. iv, (1)6-120 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- M'Fingal, a modern epic poem, revised and corrected, with copious
and explanatory notes, by John Trumbull, LL.D. With a memoir of the
author. Hartford: S. Andrus and Son, 1856. 1 p.l., (1)6-183 p., 3 l.
of adv., front. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- M'Fingal: an epic poem. By John Trumbull. With introduction
and notes, by Benson J. Lossing. New York: G. P. Putnam, 115 Nassau
Street, 1860. 322 p., front. (port.) 4º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Large paper copy.


---- ---- New York: G. P. Putnam: Hurd and Houghton, 1864. 322 p.,
front. (port.) 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- New York: American Book Exchange, 1881. 322 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Also printed in _The American museum_, Philadelphia,
    1787, v. 1, p. 353-382, _Reserve_.


---- Poems: The speech of Proteus to Aristæus, translated from the
fourth book of Virgil's Georgics, 1700; The downfall of Babylon,
written 1775; The prophecy of Balaam, written 1773; An elegy, on the
death of Mr. Buckingham St. John, who was drowned in his passage
from New-haven to Norwalk, May 5th, 1771. (In: The American museum.
Philadelphia, 1787. 8º. v. 2, p. 95-103.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The poetical works of John Trumbull, LL.D. Containing M'Fingal,
a modern epic poem, revised and corrected, with copious explanatory
notes; The Progress of dulness; and a collection of poems on various
subjects, written before and during the Revolutionary War. In two
volumes. Hartford: Printed for Samuel G. Goodrich, by Lincoln & Stone.
MDCCCXX. 2 v. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    v. 1. 3 p.l., (1)8-177 p., front, (port.), eng. t.-p.;
    v. 2. 4 p.l., (1)9-235 p., 4 pl., eng. t.-p.

    _Contents_: v. 1. Memoir of the life and writings of
    John Trumbull.--M'Fingal. v. 2. Progress of dulness.--Genius
    of America.--Lines to Messrs. Dwight and Barlow.--Ode to
    Sleep.--To a young lady, a fable.--Speech of Proteus,
    translation.--Prophecy of Balaam.--Owl and sparrow, a
    fable.--Prospect of the future glory of America.--On
    the vanity of youthful expectations.--Advice to ladies
    of a certain age.--Characters.--Elegy on the death of
    Mr. St. John.--Destruction of Babylon.--Elegy on the
    times.--Appendix.


---- The progress of dulness, part first, or The rare adventures of
Tom Brainless; shewing what his father and mother said of him; how he
went to college, and what he learned there; how he took his degree,
and went to keeping school; how afterwards he became a great man and
wore a wig; and how any body else may do the same. The like never
before published. Very proper to be kept in all families. [By John
Trumbull.] The second edition, corrected. Re-printed in the Year
M,DCC,LXXIII. vi, (1)8-20 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _The American magazine_, Dec., 1787,
    p. 59-61, Jan., 1788, p. 117-119, _Reserve_.


---- The progress of dulness, part second: or An essay on the life and
character of Dick Hairbrain, of finical memory; being an astronomical
calendar, calculated for the meridian of New-York, north latitude,
41°. west longitude 72°: 30'; but which may serve without material
error, for any of the neighboring climates: containing, among other
curious and surprizing particulars, Dick's soliloquy on a college-life
... a description of a country-fop ... receipt to make a gentleman,
with the fop's creed and exposition, of the Scriptures.... Dick's
gradual progress from a clown to a coxcomb ... his travels, gallantry,
and opinion of the ladies ... his peripætia and catastrophe, with the
moral and application of the whole. [By John Trumbull.] Published for
the universal benefit of mankind. Printed in the Year M,DCC,LXXIII. x,
(1)12-27(1) p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The progress of dulness, or The rare adventures of Tom Brainles.
By the celebrated author of McFingall [i.e., John Trumbull]. Printed
at Exeter, by Henry Ranlet, and sold at his office, also, by most of
the booksellers in Boston. MDCCXCIV. 72 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Lacks p. 3-4 (the preface), and 27-28.


---- The prophecy of Balaam. Numbers: Chap. XVIII, XIV. An irregular
ode. Written anno 1773. (In: The American museum. Philadelphia, 1787.
8º. v. 2, p. 99-101.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in _American poems, selected and original_,
    Litchfield, 1793, p. 21-24, _NBH_.


---- _See also_ The =Anarchiard=.


=Tucker=, Saint George, 1752-1827. The probationary odes of Jonathan
Pindar, Esq. [pseud. of Saint George Tucker.] A cousin of Peter's,
and candidate for the post of Poet Laureat to the C. U. S. In two
parts. Philadelphia: Printed for Benj. Franklin Bache, M.DCC.XCVI.
[Copy-right secured.] viii, (1)10-103 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Erroneously attributed to Philip Freneau. Part 1
    originally published in his _Gazette_, 1793.

    Page 47 is a special title reading: The probationary
    odes of Jonathan Pindar.... Part second. With notes,
    critical and explanatory by Christopher Clearsight, Esq.


---- Stanzas. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry.
Boston. 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 349-350.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 236,
    _NBB_, and E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A library
    of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 3, p. 444-445,
    _NBB_.


=Turell=, Jane, 1708-1735. An invitation into the country, in
imitation of Horace. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American
poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 65-67.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 125, _NBB_.

    This and the following poems appeared originally in
    _Memoirs of the life and death of Mrs. Jane Turell_, by
    Ebenezer Turell, Boston, 1735.


---- A paraphrase of the one hundred and thirty-fourth Psalm. (In:
Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1,
p. 62-63.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- On the poems of Sir Richard Blackmore. (In: Samuel Kettell,
Specimens of American poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 64-65.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- On reading the warning by Mrs. Singer. On the incomparable Mr.
Waller. (In: E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, A library of American
literature. New York, 1889. 8º. v. 2, p. 359, 361.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- To my muse. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American poetry.
Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 1, p. 63-64.)

                                                                 =NBH=

    Also printed in E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, _Cyclopædia
    of American literature_, New York, 1866, v. 1, p. 125,
    _NBB_; Stedman and Hutchinson, _A library of American
    literature_, New York, 1889, v. 2, p. 359, _NBB_.


=Two= New England poems. [The Mercies of the year, commemorated: a
song for little children in New-England. December 13th 1720, and Psalm
CVII, last part. Translated by the Reverend Mr. Isaac Watts and by
him intitled, A Psalm for New England.] Boston: The Merrymount Press,
1910. 2 l. fº.

                                                             =Reserve=

    "One hundred copies reprinted in facsimile from the
    original in the John Carter Brown Library for the patrons of
    the Club for Colonial Reprints, Providence, Rhode Island,
    December 13, 1910."


=Tyler=, Royal, 1756?-1825. Address to Della Crusca, humbly attempted
in the sublime style of that fashionable author. (In: E. A. and G. L.
Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1861. 8º.
v. 1, p. 417.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    Some of Tyler's poems appeared originally in _Spirit of
    the Farmer's museum_, 1801, and _Columbian Centinel_, 1804.


---- Country ode for the fourth of July; My mistresses; Address to
Della Crusca; Choice of a wife; On a ruined house in a romantic
country; The town eclogue. (In: Samuel Kettell, Specimens of American
poetry. Boston, 1829. 12º. v. 2, p. 48-54.)

                                                                 =NBH=


---- Love and liberty. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of
American literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 418.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- Ode composed for the fourth of July, calculated for the meridian
of some country towns in Massachusetts, and Rye in New Hampshire. (In:
E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New
York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 417-418.)

                                                                 =NBB=


---- Spondee's mistresses. (In: E. A. and G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia
of American literature. New York, 1866. 8º. v. 1, p. 417.)

                                                                 =NBB=


=Umphraville=, Angus, pseud.? The siege of Baltimore, and the battle
of La Tranche; with other original poems. By Angus Umphraville. Aged
nineteen. Baltimore: Printed by Schaeffer and Maund. 1817. 6 p.l., 144
p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


The =Untaught= bard. An original work. New-York: Deare and Andrews,
printers. 1804. 260 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Upham=, Thomas Cogswell, 1799-1872. American sketches. By
Thomas C. Upham. New-York: Published by David Longworth, at the
Shakspeare-Gallery, for the author. Feb.--1819. vii, (1)6-120
p. illus. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- [Poem written on visiting the scene of Lovewell's fate.] (In:
Magazine of history with notes and queries. New York, 1909. 4º. extra
no. 5, p. 101-102.)

                                                      =IAG (Magazine)=


=Upon= the death of G. B. [i.e., General Bacon.] (Massachusetts
Historical Society. Collections for 1814. Boston, 1838. 8º. series 2,
v. 1, p. 59-60.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    This elegy is in the manuscript copy of an account of
    Bacon and Ingram's rebellion found among the papers of
    Capt. Nathaniel Burwell, printed in this volume of the
    _Collections_.

    Also printed in Stedman and Hutchinson, _Library of
    American literature_. New York, 1889, v. 1, p. 457-458,
    _NBB_.


=Verplanck=, Gulian Crommelin, 1786-1870. The state triumvirate, a
political tale: and the epistles of Brevet Major Pindar Puff. [By
Gulian Crommelin Verplanck.] New-York: Printed for the author, and
sold by W. B. Gilley, No. 92 Broadway, and other booksellers. J.
Seymour, printer. 1819. 215 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Verses=, composed and sung at Trenton, on the delivery of the funeral
eulogium in honor of the memory of General George Washington. [1800?]
Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Text in two columns, enclosed in mourning borders.

    Facsimile.


=Verses= on Doctor Mayhew's Book of observations on the charter and
conduct of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign
Parts. _See_ =Goddard=, William.


=Verses=, sacred to the memory of Benjamin Franklin, L.L.D. (In: The
American museum. Philadelphia, 1790. 8º. v. 7, appendix 1, p. 35-38.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Versification= of President Washington's excellent Farewell-Address.
_See_ =Sewall=, Jonathan Mitchell.


The =Village=; a poem. _See_ =Lincoln=, Enoch.


=Viola= or The heiress of St. Valverde, an original poem. _See_
=Botsford=, Mrs. Margaret.


=Virtues= of society. _See_ =Morton=, Mrs. Sarah Wentworth Apthorp.


=W.=, I. H. The Dartmoor massacre. By I. H. W. 1815. (In: Magazine of
history with notes and queries, extra no. 15, p. 61-71.)

                                                      =IAG (Magazine)=

    Reprint with type-facsimile title-page of original.

    "Transposed in verse from the New York Commercial
    Advertiser of the 6th June last and Boston papers of the
    same month."

    "Being an authentic and particular account of the tragic
    massacre at Dartmoor prison in England on the 6th of April,
    last, 1815, in which sixty-seven American prisoners there
    fell the victims of the jailor's revenge, for obtaining
    their due allowance of bread which had been withheld from
    them by the jailor's orders."


The =Wages= of sin; or, Robbery justly rewarded: a poem; occasioned by
the untimely death of Richard Wilson, who was executed on Boston Neck,
for burglary, on Thursday the 19th of October, 1732. Boston: Printed
and Sold at the Heart and Crown in Cornhill. n. d. Broadside.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Photostat facsimile.

    Nineteen stanzas in two columns.


=Ward=, Nathaniel, c. 1580-1652. The simple cobler of Aggawam in
America. Willing to help 'mend his native country, lamentably
tattered, both in the upper-leather and sole, with all the honest
stitches he can take. And as willing never to bee paid for his work,
by old English wonted pay. It is his trade to patch all year long,
gratis. Therefore I pray gentlemen keep your purses. By Theodore de la
Guard [i.e., Nathaniel Ward]. London, Printed by John Dever & Robert
Ibbitson, for Stephen Bowtell, at the signe of the Bible in Popes
Head-Alley, 1647. 2 p.l., 80 p. sq. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- [Second edition.] London, Printed by J. D. & R. I. for
Stephen Bowtell, at the signe of the Bible in Popes Head-Alley, 1647.
2 p.l., 80 p. sq. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- The third edition, with some additions. London, Printed by
J. D. & R. I. for Stephen Bowtell, at the signe of the Bible in Popes
Head-Alley, 1647. 2 p.l., 80 p. sq. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- The fourth edition, with some amendments. London, Printed by
J. D. & R. I. for Stephen Bowtell, at the signe of the Bible in Popes
Head-Alley, 1647. 2 p.l., 89 p. sq. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Warren=, John, 1753-1815. An eulogy on the honourable Thomas Russell,
Esq. ... who died at Boston, April 8, 1796. Delivered, May 4, 1796....
By John Warren. Boston: Printed by Benjamin Sweetser, corner of
Wings-lane. M,DCC,XCVI. 2 p.l., (1)6-31, 3 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Last three pages contain: A monody on the death of the
    honourable Thomas Russell, Esq. sung after the eulogy of
    Doctor John Warren ... May 4, 1796.


=Warren=, Mrs. Mercy Otis, 1728-1814. Poems, dramatic and
miscellaneous. By Mrs. M. Warren. Printed at Boston, by I. Thomas and
E. T. Andrews. At Faust's Statue, No. 45, Newbury Street. MDCCXC.
viii, (1)10-252 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=


=Washington's= birthday: an historical poem. _See_ =Lovett=, John.


A =Washingtonian=, pseud. Washington's birthday: an historical poem.
_See_ =Lovett=, John.


The =Washingtoniana=: containing a sketch of the life and death of the
late Gen. George Washington; with a collection of elegant eulogies,
orations, poems, &c. sacred to his memory. Also, an appendix,
comprising all his most valuable public papers, and his last will and
testament. Lancaster: Printed and Sold by William Hamilton, Franklin's
Head, in West King-Street. 1802. viii, (1)10-411 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Edited by F. Johnston and W. Hamilton.

    Frontispiece, the portrait of Washington, engraved by
    David Edwin, after Stuart.

    p. 321-398 misnumbered 1-78, but total correct.

    Tribute by Doctor Aiken, p. 25; Elegiac ode, p. 154-155;
    Extract from elegiac poem on the death of General George
    Washington, by Charles Caldwell, p. 312-315; Extract from
    a poem, sacred to the memory of General George Washington,
    by Richard Alsop, p. 316-318; Tribute, by Mr. Paine, of
    Massachusetts, p. 319; On the death of Washington from a
    London newspaper, p. 319-320.


The =Watery= war: or A poetical description of the existing
controversy between the Pedobaptists and Baptists.... _See_
=Benedict=, David.


=Webb=, George, fl. 1730-36. Batchelors' Hall: a poem. (In: E. A. and
G. L. Duyckinck, Cyclopædia of American literature. New York, 1866.
8º. v. 1, p. 101-102.)

                                                                 =NBB=

    First published in 1731.


=Webster=, Noah, 1758-1843. To the author of the Conquest of Canaan.
(In: The American magazine. New York, 1788. 12º. March, 1788,
p. 265-266.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- To a lady on the approach of spring. (In: The American magazine.
New York, 1788. 12º. March, 1788, p. 266.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The triumph of infidelity. A poem. 1788. Addressed to Mon. de
Voltaire. (In: The American magazine. New York, 1788. 12º. July, 1788,
p. 588-590.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Verses on the New Year, January 1, 1788. (In: The American
magazine. New York, 1787. 12º. December, 1787, p. 56.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Weekes=, Refine. Poems, on religious and historical subjects. By
Refine Weekes. New-York: Printed for the author, by James Oram, No. 5
Burling-Slip. 1820. 3 p.l., (1)4-388 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- ---- Second edition, corrected and enlarged. New-York: Printed
for the author, by Mahlon Day, No. 372, Pearl-Street. 1823. 2 p.l.,
(i)vi, (1)8-418 p., 1 l. of adv. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Weems=, Mason Locke, 1760-1825. Hymen's recruiting sergeant; or, The
new matrimonial tattoo for old bachelors. Philadelphia: the author,
1821. 40 p., 1 pl. 7. ed. 8º.

                                                        =* C p.v. 979=

    First published in 1805.


---- ---- Hartford, Ct.: Published by Andrus & Judd, 1833. 52 p. 16º.

                                                  =SNV p.v. 33, no. 2=


---- ---- Hartford: S. Andrus and Son. 1845. 52 p. 16º.

                                                                 =NBY=


---- ---- Hartford: Silas Andrus and Son, 1851. 52 p., 2 l. 16º.

                                                  =SNV p.v. 33, no. 3=


=Weller=, Catharine. The medley. By Catharine Weller. New-York:
Printed by T. & J. Swords, No. 160 Pearl-Street. 1810. 1 p.l.,
(1)3-192 p. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    p. 135-142 lacking.

    Contains poems and prose selections.


=Wharton=, Charles Henry, 1748-1833. An elegy to the memory of
Mrs. Mary Wharton, who died at Philadelphia, on the second day of
June, 1798. By her husband. [Colophon:] Printed by John Ormrod, 41
Chestnut-Street [1798]. 7 p. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    No title-page; title from caption.

    Signed C. H. W.

    Reprinted in _The remains of the Rev. Charles Henry
    Wharton, D.D. With a memoir of his life by George Washington
    Doane_, Philadelphia, 1834, v. 1, p. lxxix-lxxxi, _ZEP_.

    Also reprinted in George C. Perine, _The poets and verse
    writers of Maryland_, Cincinnati, 1898, p. 7-12. _NBB_.


---- A poetical epistle to His excellency George Washington, Esq.
commander in chief of the armies of the United States of America, from
an inhabitant of the state of Maryland. [By Charles Henry Wharton.]
To which is annexed, a short sketch of General Washington's life
and character. [By John Bell of Md.] Annapolis printed 1779: London
reprinted for C. Dilly, in the Poultry; J. Almon, Piccadilly, W.
Tesseyman, York; T. and J. Merrill, Cambridge; R. Cruttwell, Bath; and
T. Becket, Bristol. MDCCLXXX. [Price half a crown.] 1 p.l., (i)iv,
(1)6-24 p., front. (port.) sq. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Frontispiece, the portrait of George Washington,
    engraved by W. Sharp, from an original picture.

    Reprinted, New York, 1865, by J. Munsell, in an edition
    of seventy-five copies, of which five were printed on
    Whatman's drawing paper. No. 2 of five copies on Whatman's
    drawing paper, _Reserve_; No. 4 of five copies on Whatman's
    drawing paper, _AN_ (_Washington_) _p.v. 11, no. 3_.

    Also printed in George C. Perine, _The poets and
    verse-writers of Maryland_. Cincinnati, 1898, p. 7-12, _NBB_.


---- ---- From the original manuscript belonging to David Pulsifer....
With an appendix. Boston: Printed for David Pulsifer, 1881. 2 p.l.,
(1)4-106 p. 12º.

                                                                  =AN=


=Wheatley=, Phillis, 1754-1784. An elegiac poem on the death of that
celebrated divine, and eminent servant of Jesus Christ, the reverend
and learned Mr. George Whitefield.... By Phillis, a servant girl of
seventeen years of age, belonging to Mr. J. Wheatley of Boston....
(In: E. Pemberton, Heaven the residence of the saints. A sermon....
Boston, printed: London, reprinted, 1771. 8º. p. [29]-31.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- The following thoughts on his Excellency Major General Lee being
betray'd into the hands of the enemy by the treachery of a pretended
friend; to the Honourable James Bowdoin Esq. are most respectfully
inscrib'd, by his most obedient and devoted humble servant, Phillis
Wheatley. Boston, Decr. 30, 1776. (Massachusetts Historical Society.
Proceedings, 1863-64. Boston, 1864. 8º. p. 166-167.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    Printed from original manuscript, found among the
    Bowdoin Papers.


---- Memoir and poems of Phillis Wheatley, a native African and a
slave. Dedicated to the friends of the Africans. Second edition.
Boston: Light & Horton, 1 & 3 Cornhill. Samuel Harris, printer. 1835.
viii, (1)10-112 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Phillis Wheatley (Phillis Peters), poems and letters. First
collected edition. Edited by Chas. Fred. Heartman. With an
appreciation by Arthur A. Schomburg. New York: C. F. Heartman [1915].
2 p.l., 7-111 p., front. (port.) 8º. (Heartman's historical series,
no. 8.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    No. 97 of 350 copies printed on Ben Day paper.

    Poems, p. 31-108.


---- The poems of Phillis Wheatley as they were originally published
in London, 1773. Re-published by R. R. and C. C. Wright. Philadelphia,
Pa. 1909. 1 p.l., 3-88 p., front. (port.) 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Poems on various subjects, religious and moral. By Phillis
Wheatley, negro servant to Mr. John Wheatley, of Boston, in New
England. London: Printed for A. Bell, Bookseller, Aldgate; and sold by
Messrs. Cox and Berry, King-Street, Boston. MDCCLXXIII. 124 p., 2 l.,
front. (port.) 12º.

                                                  =Reserve= and =NBHD=


---- ---- Albany: Re-Printed, from the London edition,
by Barber & Southwick, for Thomas Spencer, Book-Seller,
Market-Street,--1793--viii, (1)10-89(1) p., 1 l. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- Dedicated to the Countess of Huntingdon. Philadelphia:
Printed by and for William B. Woodward, No. 17, Chestnut Street. 1801.
1 p.l., 169-244 p. 16º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    The Library has a second copy bound in Joseph Lavallée,
    _The negro equalled by few Europeans_, Philadelphia, 1801.
    16º. v. 2, p. [167]-244. Also in _Reserve_.


---- Six broadsides relating to Phillis Wheatley (Phillis Peters) with
portrait and facsimile of her handwriting. New York: C. F. Heartman,
1915. 2 p.l., front. (port.), 7 pl. fº.

                                                             =Reserve=

    One of twenty-five copies printed.

    No. 1. An elegiac poem on the death of ... George
    Whitefield.... By Phillis.... Sold by Ezekiel Russell, in
    Queen-Street, and John Boyles, in Marlboro-Street. [1770?]

    No. 2. Phillis's poem on the death of Mr. Whitefield.

    No. 3. To Mrs. Leonard, on the death of her husband.

    No. 4. To the Rev. Mr. Pitkin, on the death of his lady.
    Boston, June 16th, 1772.

    No. 5. To the Hon'ble Thomas Hubbard, Esq; on the death
    of Mrs. Thankfull Leonard. Boston, January 2, 1773.

    No. 6. An address to Miss Phillis Wheatley.... Composed
    by Jupiter Hammon. Hartford, August 4, 1778.

    No. 7. Facsimile of manuscript of "To the University of
    Cambridge wrote in 1767."

    Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 are also in C. F. Heartman, _Phillis
    Wheatley_, New York, 1915. 8º. (Heartman's historical
    series, no. 7.)


---- Verses presented to his Excellency Gen. Washington, Providence,
Oct. 26, 1775. (In: The Pennsylvania magazine: or American monthly
museum. April, 1776, p. 193.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Whitman=, Benjamin, the younger. Hero of the North--or Battle of Lake
Erie. By Mr. Benjamin Whitman, jun. of Boston. (In: B. Badger, The
Naval temple. Boston, 1816. 2. ed. 8º. p. 313-317.)

                                                                 =VYE=


---- The heroes of the North, or The battles of Lake Erie, and
Champlain. Two poems. By Benjamin Whitman, Jr. Esq. Boston: Published
by Barber Badger, 1816. 4 p.l., (1)12-24 p., 3 pl. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Two portraits inserted.


---- Victory on Lake Champlain. By Benjamin Whitman, jun. Esq. (In: B.
Badger, The Naval temple. Boston, 1816. 2. ed. 8º. p. 318-322.)

                                                                 =VYE=


=Whitwell=, Benjamin. Experience, or, Folly as it flies. A poem,
delivered at Cambridge, on the anniversary of the [Greek: PhBK]
Society. Aug. 28, 1806. By Benjamin Whitwell. Boston: Printed at the
Anthology Office, by Munroe & Francis. 1806. 2 p.l., (1)6-23 p. 8º.

                                                   =NBH p.v. 5, no. 9=


=Wigglesworth=, Michael, 1631-1705. The day of doom: or, A description
of the great and last judgement. With a short discourse about
eternity. [By Michael Wigglesworth.] London, Printed by W. G. for John
Sims, at the Kings-Head at Sweetings-Alley-end in Cornhill, next House
to the Royal-Exchange, 1673. 2 p.l., 92 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    First edition was printed in 1662.

    _Contents_: The day of doom, p. 1-71.--A short discourse
    on eternity, p. 72-77.--A postscript unto the reader,
    p. 77-88.--Vanity of vanities, p. 89-91.


---- The day of doom: or, A poetical description of the great and
last judgement. With a short discourse about eternity. By Michael
Wigglesworth, teacher of the church at Maldon in N. E. The fifth
edition, enlarged with Scripture and marginal notes. Boston: Printed
by B. Green, and J. Allen, for Benjamin Eliot at his Shop under the
West End of the Town-House. 1701. 6 p.l., 80 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Bd. with his: Meat out of the eater.... Boston, 1689. 4.
    ed. 24º.

    Contents same as previous entry.


---- ---- By Michael Wigglesworth, A.M. teacher of the church
in Maldon, New-England. The seventh edition, enlarged. With a
recommendatory epistle (in verse) by the Rev. Mr. John Mitchel: also
Mr. Wigglesworth's character, by Dr. Cotton Mather. Boston: Printed
and sold by Thomas Fleet, at the Heart and Crown in Cornhill, 1751.
104 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    _Contents_: The day of doom, p. 1-72.--A short discourse
    on eternity, p. 73-79.--A postscript to the reader,
    p. 79-92.--Vanity of vanities, p. 92-96.--Death expected, and
    welcomed, p. 96-97.--A farewell to the world, p. 97-99.--Mr.
    Wigglesworth's character, by the Reverend Dr. Cotton Mather,
    p. 99-104.--Epitaph, p. 104.


---- ---- By Michael Wigglesworth, A.M. teacher of the church at
Malden, N. E. To which is prefixed a biographical sketch of the
character of the author. From the sixth Boston edition, printed in
1715. Newburyport: Published by E. Little and Company, 1811. C. Norris
& Co. printers. 90 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- ---- By Michael Wigglesworth, A.M. teacher of the church at
Malden in N. E. From the sixth edition, 1715. Boston: Charles Ewer,
141 Washington Street. 1828. 95(1) p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- The day of doom; or, A poetical description of the great and last
judgement: with other poems. By Michael Wigglesworth, A.M. teacher
of the church at Malden in New England, 1662. Also a memoir of the
author, autobiography, and a sketch of his funeral sermon by Rev.
Cotton Mather. From the sixth edition, 1715. New York: American News
Company. 1867. 118 p., 1 l. 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=


---- Death expected and welcome. (In: Cotton Mather, A faithful man,
described and rewarded. Boston, 1705. 8º. p. 45.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A farewell to the world. (In: Cotton Mather, A faithful man,
described and rewarded. Boston, 1705. 8º. p. 46-48.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Meat out of the eater or Meditations concerning the necessity,
end, and usefulness of afflictions unto Gods children. All tending
to prepare them for, and comfort them under the cross. By Michael
Wigglesworth. The fourth edition. Boston: Printed by R. P. for John
Usher. 1689. 208 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Page 51 is a special title reading: Riddles unriddled,
    or Christian paradoxes broke open....

    Pages 7-10 mutilated; p. 23-24, 35-36, 55-56 lacking.

    Meat out of the eater, p. 3-50; Riddles unriddled, or
    Christian paradoxes, p. 52-208.

    The first edition was probably published in 1669 or
    early in 1670.


---- ---- Corrected and amended by the author in the year 1703. The
fifth edition. Boston, Printed by J. Allen, for N. Boone, at the sign
of the Bible in Cornhill. 1717. 143 p. 24º.

                                                             =Reserve=


---- Upon the much lamented death of that precious servant of Christ,
Mr. Benjamin Buncker, pastor of the church at Maldon, who deceased
on the 3d of ye 12th moneth 1669. (New-England historical and
genealogical register.... Boston, 1872. 8º. v. 26, p. 11-12.)

                                                        =* R-Room 328=

    "The original in the author's handwriting, is among
    the Ewer Manuscripts, 1, 8-9 of the New England Historic
    Genealogical Society."


=William= and Ellen: a poem. _See_ =Smith=, Eaglesfield.


=Williams=, John, 1761-1818. A bachelor's prayer. By Anthony Pasquin
[pseud.]. (In: The Columbian phenix and Boston review. Boston, 1800.
8º. v. 1 for 1800, p. 179-180.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- A dirge, or sepulchral service, commemorating the sublime virtues
and distinguished talents of General George Washington. Composed
at the request of the Mechanics Association of Boston. Words by
Anthony Pasquin [pseud.]. 4 p. (In: [Oliver Holden], Sacred dirges,
commemorative of the death of Washington. Boston [1800]. ob. 8º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in _The Columbian phenix and Boston review_,
    Boston, 1800, v. 1 for 1800, p. 178-179, _Reserve_.


---- The Hamiltoniad. By John Williams, (Anthony Pasquin.) New York:
Printed for the Hamilton Club, 1865. 5 p.l., 122 p., 1 port. 8º.
(Hamilton Club series, no. 3.)

                                                       =AN (Hamilton)=

    One of 40 octavo copies printed.

    Includes type-facsimile title-page of original which was
    published in Boston, 1804.

    The Library has another copy which is one of 20 quarto
    copies printed, * _AN_.


---- An ode to the Union, as recited by the American Roscius, [Mr.
Hopkinson] at various theatres on the continent. By Anthony Pasquin
[pseud.]. (In: The Columbian phenix and Boston review. Boston, 1800.
8º. v. 1 for 1800, p. 115-120.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Williams=, Roger, 1607-1683. A key into the language of America: or,
An help to the language of the natives in that part of America, called
New-England. Together, with briefe observations of the customes,
manners and worships, &c of the aforesaid natives, in peace and warre,
in life and death. On all which are added spirituall observations,
general and particular by the authour, of chiefe and speciall use
(upon all occasions) to all the English inhabiting those parts; yet
pleasant and profitable to the view of all men: By Roger Williams of
Providence in New-England. London, Printed by Gregory Dexter, 1643.
8 p.l., 197(1) [correctly 207(1)] p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    p. 96 and 97 wrongly numbered 92 and 93; p. 115-207
    wrongly numbered 105-197.

    Poems on p. 10, 17, 21, 30-31, 48, 53, 61-62, 64, 67-68,
    78, 81, 84-85, 87-88, 95-96, 104, 108, 109, 113, 114,
    131-132, 137, 143, 150, 159, 162, 168-169, 173-174, 182-183,
    185, 192, 196.

    Reprinted in _Collections_ of the Rhode Island
    Historical Society, Providence, 1827, v. 1, _IAA_.


=Wilson=, Alexander, 1766-1813. The foresters: a poem, descriptive of
a pedestrian journey to the Falls of Niagara, in the autumn of 1804.
By Alexander Wilson, author of American ornithology. West Chester, Pa.
Printed by Joseph Painter.--1838.--2 p.l., (1)6-104 p. 24º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Wilson=, John, 1588-1667. A copy of verses made by that reverend man
of God Mr. John Wilson, pastor to the First Church in Boston; on the
sudden death of Mr. Joseph Brisco, who was translated from earth to
Heaven Jan. 1. 1657. [Cambridge? Samuel Green? 1657?] Broadside. (In:
S. A. Green, Ten fac-simile reproductions relating to New England.
Boston, 1902. fº.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Enclosed in mourning borders. Photo-facsimile, exact
    size.


---- [Extract from] A poem upon the death of the first and only child
of his daughter Mrs. Danforth. (In: Cotton Mather, Johannes in Eremo.
Boston, 1695. 24º. p. 30.)

                                                             =Reserve=


---- In pientissimum, reverendissimumque virum, Johannem Harvardum,
è suggesto sacro Caroloensi ad coelos evectum, ad alumnos
Cantabrienses literatos, poëma. (In: Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi
Americana. London, 1702. 4º. book iv, p. 139.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in later editions of the _Magnalia_ as
    follows: Hartford, 1820, v. 2, p. 28, and Hartford, 1855,
    v. 2, p. 33.


---- A song of deliverance for the lasting remembrance of Gods
wonderful works never to be forgotten. Containing in it the wonderful
defeat of the Spanish-Armado, Anno, 1588. the woful plague, Anno,
1603. soon upon the entrance of King James of famous memory, unto the
Crown of England. With the discovery of the Powder Plot, Anno, 1605.
and down fall of Black Fryers, when an hellish crew of Papists met
to hear Drury a Popish priest, an 1623. Also the grievous plague,
Anno 1625. with poems both Latin and English, and the verses of that
learned Theodore Beza. By that reverend, and eminent man of God, Mr.
John Wilson, formerly Christs faithful shepherd in Sudbury, in Suffolk
in great Brittain, where these heavenly poems and spiritual songs were
compiled, and at London printed, Anno, 1626. since pastor to the First
church of Christ in Boston in New-England. For the sake of several
who have much desired to see and read this work it is reprinted....
Boston; Printed in the year, 1680. 4 p.l. 1-36 p. 8º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    All pages after p. 36 lacking.


=Winchester=, Elhanan, 1751-1797. The process and empire of Christ;
from his birth to the end of the mediatorial kingdom; a poem, in
twelve books. By Elhanan Winchester. Brattleboro. Printed by William
Fessenden. 1805. iv, (1)6-352 p. 16º.

                                                                =NBHD=


=Winslow=, Josias. [Elegy] On the said William Bradford. (In: N.
Morton, New-Englands memoriall. Cambridge, 1669. 12º. p. 146-147.)

                                                             =Reserve=


=Wolcott=, Roger, 1679-1767. A brief account of the agency of the
honourable John Winthrop, Esq. in the Court of King Charles the
Second, Anno Dom. 1662; when he obtained a charter for the colony
of Connecticut. Written by Roger Wolcott, Esq. his successor in the
government of Connecticut, from 1751-1754. (Massachusetts Historical
Society. Collections. Boston, 1795. 8º. series 1, v. 1, p. 262-298.)

                                                                 =IAA=

    Reprinted from his _Poetical meditations, being the
    improvement of some vacant hours_, New-London, 1725,
    p. 19-78, _Reserve_.


---- The poems of Roger Wolcott, Esq., 1725. Boston: The Club of Odd
Volumes, 1898. 14 p., 1 l., ii, 78 p., 1 l. sq. 8º. (The Club of Odd
Volumes. Early American poetry. [Reprints, v.] 5.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    No. 81 of one hundred copies on hand-made paper.

    This is a modern type reprint, page for page, with
    facsimile title-page, of the next entry.


---- Poetical meditations, being the improvement of some vacant hours.
By Roger Wolcott, Esq; with a preface by the Reverend Mr. Bulkley of
Colchester. New-London: Printed and sold by T. Green, 1725. 2 p.l.,
lvi, ii, 78 p., 2 l. 12º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    For a modern reprint see previous entry.


=Wood=, William. New Englands prospect. A true, lively, and
experimentall description of that part of America, commonly called
New England: discovering the state of that countrie both as it stands
to our new-come English planters; and to the old native inhabitants.
Laying downe that which may both enrich the knowledge of the
mind-travelling reader, or benefit the future voyager. By William
Wood. Printed at London by Tho. Cotes, for John Bellamie, and are to
be sold at his shop, at the three Golden Lyons in Cornehill, neere the
Royall Exchange. 1635. 4 p.l., 83(1) p., 2 l., 1 map. 4º.

                                                             =Reserve=

    Poems on p. 14, 16, 23, 28.


=Woodbridge=, Benjamin, 1622-1684. Upon the tomb of the most reverend
Mr. John Cotton, late teacher of the church of Boston in New-England.
(In: N. Morton, New-Englands memoriall. Cambridge, 1669. 12º.
p. 137-139.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Reprinted in Cotton Mather, _Magnalia Christi
    Americana_, London, 1702, book 3, p. 30-31, _Reserve_,
    Hartford, 1820, v. 1, p. 258-259, and Hartford, 1855, v. 1,
    p. 284.

    Also printed in E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson, _A
    library of American literature_, New York, 1889, v. 1,
    p. 359-361, _NBB_.


=Woodbridge=, Timothy. To the Reverend Cotton Mather on his History of
New England. (In: Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana. London,
1702. 4º.)

                                                             =Reserve=

    Also printed in later editions as follows: Hartford,
    1820, v. 1, p. 18, and Hartford, 1855, v. 1, p. 21.


=Woodworth=, Samuel, 1785-1842. The poems, odes, songs, and other
metrical effusions, of Samuel Woodworth, author of "The Champions of
freedom," &c. New-York: Published by Abraham Asten and Mathias Lopez.
1818. xii, (1)14-288 p., front. (port.) 12º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    Several of Woodworth's poems first appeared in _The
    complete coiffeur_, by J. B. M. D. Lafoy, New York, 1817.


=Wright=, Judah. Poems on various subjects. By Judah Wright. Boston:
Printed by Samuel Avery, No. 91 Newbury Street. 1812. 48 p. 12º.

                                                  =NBH p.v. 24, no. 8=

    Leaf of errata mounted on verso of title-page.


=Wright=, N. Hill. Monody, on the death of Brigadier General Zebulon
Montgomery Pike: and other poems. By N. Hill Wright. Middlebury, (Vt.)
Printed by Slade & Ferguson. 1814. 79 p. 8º.

                                                                =NBHD=

    _Contents_: Monody, p. 9-24.--Lines on the battle
    of the Enterprise and Boxer, p. 25-29.--The sailor's
    dying hour, p. 30-32.--Ode on the capture of the British
    frigate Java, by the United States' frigate Constitution,
    December 29, 1812, p. 33-36.--Henry and Julia, a tale
    of real life, p. 37-42.--Hymn for the anniversary of a
    charitable institution, p. 43-44.--The slanderer's tomb,
    p. 45-47.--The power of sympathy, p. 48-49.--The faded rose,
    p. 50-52.--The hour of rest, p. 53-55.--Appeal to the
    affluent, p. 56-58.--Lines addressed to a lady, p. 59-60.--To
    misfortune, p. 61-63.--Lines on seeing a beautiful infant
    expire in the arms of her mother, p. 64-65.--Tribute to
    the memory of Mrs. Juliet R*****, p. 66-67.--Pity's tear,
    p. 68-70.--Retrospection, p. 71-73.--Ode, written for the
    Fourth of July, 1814, p. 74-76.--Freedom's natal day, an
    ode, written for the Fourth of July, 1814, p. 77-79.


=Young=, Edward R. One year in Savannah; a poem in five parts. [By
Edward R. Young.] Providence: Printed by Brown & Danforth. 1820.
16 p. 8º.

                                                   =NBH p.v. 2, no. 3=


A =Young= American. _See_ The =Battle= of the Thames.


A =Young= gentleman of New York, pseud. Miscellaneous works, prose and
poetical. _See_ =Linn=, John Blair.

       *       *       *       *       *

  Transcriber's Notes


  Punctuation has been standardized.

  Italic text has been denoted by _underscores_ and bold
      text by =equal signs=.

  Characters in small caps have been replaced by all caps.

  Non-printable superscripts are represented by a
      caret followed by the character, i.e. x^n.
      If the superscript is more than one character,
      they will be placed in {}, i.e. x^{23}.

  The non-printable characters have been replaced as shown
      below:
          'oe' ligature --> oe
          'ue' ligature --> ue

  Names, words, and copyright dates are presented in many
      styles and spellings, apparently as copied from the
      individual volumes that were printed at different times
      and places. These variations have been left unchanged
      except noted below:
          Alsop     - George
                      Replaced 'scituation' with 'situation'
          Copyright - inconsistent use of spaces following punctuation
                      in Roman numerals has been standardized without
                      spaces for this ebook.
          Fessenden - Thomas (---- Original poems.)
                      Replaced 'Authur' with 'Author'





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