Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII | HTML | PDF ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: Journal of Entomology and Zoology, September 1917
Author: Various
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Journal of Entomology and Zoology, September 1917" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



Transcriber Note

Emphasized text is denoted as: _Italic_ and =Bold=.
The female symbol is displayed as [F].



  VOLUME NINE                                                 NUMBER THREE
  ========================================================================

                                 JOURNAL

                                   OF

                               ENTOMOLOGY

                                   AND

                                 ZOOLOGY


                            SEPTEMBER, 1917


                         PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY
                 POMONA COLLEGE DEPARTMENT _of_ ZOOLOGY
                     CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA, U. S. A.

  ========================================================================


                               CONTENTS

                                                                      Page

  List of Bees from Claremont-Laguna Region--_Henry Bray_               93

  A Partial List of the Mammals of the Claremont Region--_Leon L.
    Gardner_                                                           101

  A Preliminary List of Shells from Laguna Beach and Nearby            107

  A Reconstruction of the Nervous System of a Nemertian Worm--_W. A.
    Hilton_                                                            119


Entered at Claremont, Cal., Post-Office Oct. 1, 1910, as second-class
matter, under Act of Congress of March 9, 1879



Journal of Entomology and Zoology

EDITED BY POMONA COLLEGE, DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY


_Subscription_ $1.00 to domestic, $1.25 to foreign countries.

This journal is especially offered in exchange for zoological and
entomological journals, proceedings, transactions, reports of societies,
museums, laboratories and expeditions.

The pages of the journal are especially open to western entomologists
and zoologists. Notes and papers relating to western and Californian
forms and conditions are particularly desired, but short morphological,
systematic or economic studies from any locality will be considered for
publication.

Manuscripts submitted should be typewritten on one side of paper about 8
by 11 inches. Foot notes, tables, explanations of figures, etc., should
be written on separate sheets. Foot notes and figures should be numbered
consecutively throughout. The desired position of foot notes and figures
should be clearly indicated in the manuscript.

Figures should be drawn so that they may be reproduced as line cuts so
far as possible. An unusually large number of half tones must be paid
for in part by the author. Other more expensive illustrations will be
furnished at cost. Figures for cuts should be made to conform to the size
of the page when reduced, that is, 5 by 7½ inches or less. The lettering
should be by means of printed numbers and letters pasted on the drawings,
in most cases.

Authors of articles longer than a thousand words will receive fifty
reprints of their publications free of cost. If more than this are
desired, the order should be given with the return of the proof sheets.
Extra copies and special covers or special paper will be furnished at
cost. Authors of short contributions will receive a few extra copies of
the number containing their articles.

Manuscripts should be sent by express or registered mail.

Address all communications to

                  The Journal of Entomology and Zoology

                                                William A. Hilton, Editor

Claremont, California, U.S.A.



List of Bees from Claremont-Laguna Region

HENRY BRAY


Through the kindness of Prof. T. D. A. Cockerell and several others I
have been able to get large numbers of our local bees determined. The
basis of the work was the extensive Cook-Baker collection of the college
with additional material of my own and others. Many of the species here
listed have been collected by me and others, but unless not represented
in the original college collection it is not noted in the list. So far as
the relations of bees to plants has been noted by me it is given in the
list. Many other species remain to be determined and only a beginning has
been made in respect to the relation of the bees to plants.


BOMBIDÆ

_Bombus sonorous._ Say. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April, Fl.,
Nemophila.

_Bombus californicus._ Sm. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May, Fl.,
Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Bombus crotchii._ Vier. Det. Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May, Fl., Tar
weed.


ANTHOPHORIDÆ

_Anthophora anstrutheri._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April,
Fl., Lotus glaber.

_Anthophora curta._ Prov. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April, Fl., Lotus
glaber.

_Anthophora urbana._ Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April, Fl., Cactus and
poppy.

_Anthophora washingtoni._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Anthophora stanfordiana._ Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May, Fl.,
Amsinckia intermedia.

_Anthophora pacifica._ Vier. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.
April, Fl., Lotus glaber.

_Anthophora simillima._ Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April, Fl., Lotus
glaber.

_Anthophora edwardsii._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April,
Fl., Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Mellisodes pallidicineta._ Ckll. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal.,
Bray. April, Fl., Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Mellisodes maura._ Cr. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray. May,
Fl., Amsinckia intermedia.

_Mellisodes pullata._ Cr. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.
April, Fl., Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Mellisodes menuacha._ Cr. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.
May, Fl., Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Mellisodes beltragei._ Cr. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.
Fl., Amsinckia interm.

_Synhalonia atrientis._ Smith Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.
May, Fl., Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Diadasia crassicauda_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Laguna, Cal., R. La
Follette.

_Diadasia bituberculata._ Cr. Det. Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April,
Fl., Cactus.

_Diadasia australis rinconis._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.
May, Fl., Cactus.

_Diadasia australis opuntia._ Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May. Fl.,
Cactus.


EUCERIDÆ

_Tetralonia actuosa._ Det. Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Tetralonia fowleri._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Tetralonia pomonæ_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Tetralonia robertsoni._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.


MELECTIDÆ

_Bombomelecta thoracicia._ Cr. Det. Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April,
Nemophila.

_Pseudomelecta californica miranda._ Fox. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Bombomelecta thornica._ Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May, Fl., Nemophila.

_Zacosmia maculata._ Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Triepeolus ancoratus_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Triepeolus callopus._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Bombomelecta maculata._ Vier. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.


NOMADIDÆ

_Nomada edwardsii._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. June, no Fl.

_Nomada beulahensis._ Ckll. Det. Br. Claremont, Cal., Bray. From Coll.
April, no Fl.

_Nomada americana._ Kby. Det. Br. Claremont, Cal., Bray. From Coll.
April, no Fl.

_Nomada crotchii nigrior._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Nomada civilis._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Nomada pyrrha_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Nomada melanosoma_, sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Nomada subvicinalis._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Nomada erythrospila_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Nomada odontocera_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Exomalopsis velutinus._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Exomalopsis melanurus_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Exomalopsis nitens_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Laguna, Cal., R. La Follette.


XYLOCOPIDÆ

_Xylocopa varipuncta._ Patt. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April, no
Fl.

_Xylocopa orsifex._ Sm. Det. Vier. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.
April, Wood.

_Xylocopa californica._ Cr. Det. Friese. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April,
Nemophila.


MEGACHILIDÆ

_Megachile pruing._ Sm. Det. Friese. Claremont, Cal., Bray. May, Fl.,
Cactus.

_Megachile grindeliarum._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Bray. May,
Fl., Poppy.

_Megachile occidentalis._ Fox. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.

_Megachile frugalis._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia erythrosmia remotula._ Des. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia quadriceps._ Ckll. Det. Cr. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia atrocyanea._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May, Fl.,
Amsinckia intermedia.

_Osmia propinqua._ Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia kincaidii._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia bennettæ._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia integra._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia cobaltina._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May, Lotus
glaber.

_Osmia faceta._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia clarescens._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April, Fl.,
Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Osmia granulosa._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia regulina._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia ednæ_, female. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Mountains near Claremont, Cal.,
Baker.

_Osmia playtura._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. cotype. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia hypochrysea._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia pumila._ Frieze Det. Cr. Claremont, Cal., Bray. May, Fl. Mustard.

_Osmia cyanopoda_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia cyanosoma._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia nigrobarta_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Hoplitis sambuci._ Titus Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal. April, Poppy.

_Hoplitina pentamera._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia pogonigera._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Alcidamea hypocrita._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Osmia melanopleura_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Anthidium maculoscum._ Cr. Det. Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Dianthidium illustri._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Anthidium palliventre._ Cr. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Anthidium tricuspidum._ Prov. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Dianthidium consimile._ Ashmead Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Dianthidium robertsoni._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Mountains near Claremont,
Cal., Baker.

_Anthidium angelarum._ Titus Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Dianthidium provancheri._ Titus Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Dioxys producta._ Cr. Det. Ducke. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Dioxys pomonæ._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Coelioxys megatricha_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Coelioxys angulifera_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Xenoglossa angelica._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.


ANDRENIDÆ

_Andrena porteræ._ Vier. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena mustelicolor._ Vier. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena prunorum._ Vier. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker and Bray.
May, Phacelia tana. and Poppy.

_Andrena mimecta._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena texana._ Cr. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray. May,
Fl., Poppy.

_Andrena bipuntala._ Lovell Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.
April, Fl., Phacelia tan.

_Andrena cerasifolii._ Vier. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker. April,
Phacelia tanacætifolia.

_Andrena carlina_ Ckll. Ashmead Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal.,
Bray. May, Fl., Mustard.

_Andrene osmoides_ sp. n. Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena peratra_ sp. n. Prov. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena auricoma._ Sm. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena plana._ Vier. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena opaciventris_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena chlorura_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Agapostemon splendens._ Friese Des. Lange. Los Angeles, Cal.

_Agapostemon californicus._ Crawford. Claremont, Cal., Baker. May, Poppy.

_Agapostemon radiatus._ Say. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.
April, Fl., Daisy.

_Diandrena beatula_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Diandrena chalybæa._ Cr. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Diandrena cyanosoma_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Diandrena clarventris_ sp. n. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Diandrena scintilla_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Conanthalictus bakeri._ Crawford Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Conanthalictus macrops_ sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal. Baker.

_Augochlora pomoniella._ Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena candida._ Sm. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena angustitarsata._ Vier. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena huardi._ Vier. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena pallidifæva._ Vier. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena cyanosoma._ Ckll. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena nigripes._ Prov. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena scripta._ Vier. Det Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Andrena subtristis._ Ckll. Det. Vier. Claremont, Cal., Baker.


CERITINIDÆ

_Ceratina neomexicana punctigena_ sub. sp. n. Ckll. Det. Ckll. Claremont,
Cal., Baker.


HALICTIDÆ

_Halictus incompletus._ Craw. Det. Mountains near Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus punctatoventris._ Craw. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus nigrescens._ Craw. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus catalinensis._ Craw. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus ligatus._ Say. Det. Craw. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus robustus._ Craw. Det. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus mellipes._ Craw. Det. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus farinosus._ Sm. Det. Craw. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Halictus rhoptoides._ Craw. Det. Br. from Coll. Claremont, Cal., Bray.
April, Daisy.


COLLETIDÆ

_Colletes californicus._ Prov. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

_Colletes guadialis._ Sm. Det. Ckll. Claremont, Cal., Baker.


PROSOPIDÆ

_Prosopis episcopalis_, female. Ckll. Det. Metz. Claremont, Cal., Baker
(Rhus laurina).

_Prosopis coloradensis._ Ckll. Det. Metz. Mountains near Claremont, Cal.,
Baker.

_Prosopis polifolii_, female. Ckll. Det. Metz. Mountains near Claremont,
Cal., Baker.


PANURGIDÆ

_Panurginus atriceps._ Ckll. Det. Cr. Claremont, Cal., Baker.

(_Contribution from the Zoological Laboratory of Pomona College_)



A Partial List of the Mammals of the Claremont Region

LEON L. GARDNER


Since little or nothing has been published on mammals of this region
it was deemed advisable to print a list even though very incomplete
and based on preliminary and limited collecting in order to have some
definite forward step in this much neglected line. Some of the mammals
listed below have not been collected by us but are known to occur. Thanks
are due Mr. H. S. Swaith for his kind aid in identification of some of
the skins collected.

Bears of course have long since disappeared but still have left their
reputation among old mountaineers. The story goes that a bear, perhaps
the last one, was killed at Bear Flats on the trail to "Old Baldy," hence
the name.

_Odocoileus hemionus californicus._ (Caton.) California Mule Deer. Fairly
common through Upper Sonoran and Transition zones. They have been taken
as low as the mouth of San Dimas canyon. The recently established game
preserve assures an increase in the future. Already they seem to have
sensed the protection for on May 19, 1916, we were surprised to find just
75 feet before us a large doe on the auto road not far above the first
power house.

_Ovis canadensis nelsoni?_ C. M. Merriam. Merriam Desert Bighorn.
Mountain sheep have lived for years in the higher peaks above Claremont
but being very shy and in inaccessible and little frequented parts have
escaped attention very successfully. Rumor has it that Mountain Goats
are found with the sheep but I believe this to be unfounded, having been
originated probably by the sight of the smaller horned females and young.
The area occupied by the sheep is a very definite one and comprises the
peaks Ontario, Cucamonga, Telegraph, St. Antonio ("Old Baldy"), and
Iron Mountain with their high rocky intervening ridges. Of the points
mentioned the first three peaks are the favored ones. I found only a few
tracks on Iron Mountain and a rumor of a pair of horns found there some
five or eight years ago. "Old Baldy" being too often visited is not a
frequented spot for the sheep, serving only as a connecting link to Iron
Mountain. However signs around Ontario, Cucamonga and Telegraph peaks
are abundant and anyone with a little patience and diligent endeavor
can readily see the sheep themselves. They travel often in bands, as
many as fifty and in summer keep to the highest places. Where they go in
winter is as yet a mystery to me, probably lower into canyon heads for I
have never found them on the top during this season. This of course is
natural for these peaks practically become great ice mountains dangerous
for anything to travel over. Besides grass the food consists of twigs
and leaves of _Castonapsis sempewirens_, several species of _Ceanothus_,
_Rhammus croceus californicus_, _Rhus trilobata_ and a parsnip _Pastinaca
sativa_.

_Citellus beecheyi._ Richardson. California Ground Squirrel. Abundant in
all parts from brush land to 8,000 feet altitude in suitable localities.

_Sciurus griseus anthonyi._ Mearns. Anthony Gray Squirrel. Very common
in the transition zone. In early spring they start working on pine cones
on the mountain tops, gradually coming down to more abundant supplies of
food until fall finds them down in the oak belt feeding on acorns. They
winter as low as Palmers canyon in some cases.

_Entamias Sp._ Abundant in the pine belt and as high as the top of
"Baldy." They are good climbers, exceedingly active and bursting with
curiosity.

_Onychomys torridus ramona._ Rhoads. San Bernardino Grasshopper Mouse.
But two specimens of this carnivorous mouse were taken in a period of
trapping extending over three months. Both specimens were taken on bait
consisting of rolled oats and in the same place, east of Indian Hill in
the brush. A good many of my specimens were more or less devoured in the
traps in this locality, and I strongly suspect this mouse of the crime.
Nowhere else were my mice eaten or were any grasshopper mice taken.

_Peromyscus maniculatus gambeli._ Baird. Gambel White-footed Mouse. This
species was one of the most common forms taken, being abundant in the
brushy valley and foothills. There is a great deal of color variation in
the specimens taken.

_Peromyscus boylei rowleyi._ (Allen.) Rowley White-footed Mouse. No
specimens were trapped in the valley. However these mice were found
not uncommon at the mouth of Palmers canyon, just four miles north of
Claremont, in the dry brush land. Within the canyon they were common and
were taken as high as the top of Ontario peak along fallen logs. At Camp
Baldy they are very common especially along watercourses and fallen logs.
Indications are that they ignore zonal limits being taken well down in
Lower Sonoran zone and in high transition and not necessarily near water.

_Peromyscus californicus insignis._ Rhoads. Chemisal Mouse. Not common.
None were taken in the valley and few in the canyons. They were not found
along waterways but frequently brushy hillsides. This is a large species
of mouse and was almost too much for the little "gee whiz" traps to hold.

_Peromyscus eremicus fraterculus._ Miller. Dulzura Mouse. Common in the
brush land of both valley and foothill, being found in the canyons also.

_Reithrodontomys megalotis longicauda._ Baird. Long-tailed Harvest Mouse.
Common in valley and foothill. Although partial to grassy areas (I took
many in the grassy runways made by meadow mice--Microtus californicus). I
found them not uncommon in the dry brush land east of Indian Hill.

_Neotoma fuscipes macrotis._ Thomas. Southern Brush Rat. Common from
valley to 5,000 feet in the mountains in suitable localities. I took one
in the property house at the Greek theatre this June. The large nests are
seen very commonly in the canyons and hillsides.

_Neotoma intermedia intermedia._ Rhoads. Intermediate Brush Rat. There
seems to be a curious reversal of conditions between this and the former
species. Whereas this species is supposed to be taken only up to 3,000
feet, I took none _below_ 3,000, all being taken at 5,000 feet or more
along fallen logs near watercourses, and the former species was limited
more distinctly to the foothills which is not a typical condition.

_Microtus californicus californicus._ (Peale.) California Meadow Mouse.
Common in runways through the grass in damp canyons, at Palmers canyon
and in other suitable localities. One was taken as high as Kelly's
cabin--on Ontario peak, among fallen logs by a cold mountain stream.
While setting trap in the runways I more than once caught glimpses of
them darting along the aisles in the grass.

_Thomomys bottæ pallescens._ Rhoads. Southern Pocket Gopher. Abundant in
the valley, often doing much damage in lawns and orchards.

_Perodipus agilis agilis._ (Gambel.) Gambel Kangaroo Rats. Abundant from
valley to Transition zone. I found them abundant at Brown's Flats where
the evidences of their digging and their holes are on every side. I have
trapped them in brush country, rocky areas, open brushless places, and at
the mouth of ground squirrel holes.

_Lepus californicus._ (Gray.) Jack-Rabbit. Common in the valley and to a
certain extent in the foothills and higher.

_Sylvilagus auduboni sanctidiegi._ (Miller.) San Diego Cottontail.
Abundant in the Lower Sonoran zone. Increasing each year due to the
protection afforded by game laws. Considerable damage to young trees is
done by cottontails and they are a great pest to the farmer.

_Sylvilagus bachmani cinerascens._ (Allen.) Ashy Brush Rabbit. Fairly
common in the brush. They are not swift runners and rely on escaping by
hiding behind clumps of brush. This is more typically an Upper Sonoran
form.

_Felis oregonensis oregonensis._ (Rafinesque.) Pacific Cougar. Numberless
reports are always coming in of Mountain Lions and as usual most of them
prove to be unfounded. However authentic records of these beasts are
not lacking. I have personally inspected a specimen shot in Cold Water
Canyon not more than five years ago. Tradition has it that at one time
a mountaineer was actually besieged for two days in the little cabin at
Browns Flats. Lions have been seen at Browns Flats, Cattle Canyon and the
north of Telegraph peak. Mountaineers tell me that they are a great deal
more common in the San Gabriel drainage. The specimen which I saw was
from one of the tributary canyons to the San Gabriel river.

_Lynx eremicus californicus._ (Mearns.) California Wild Cat. Common in
the mountains and ranging over the valley. About once a year a specimen
is brought in to be skinned or identified and great stories are told
about them. One of the commonest fallacies is that there are two forms
in the mountains, one a "Bob cat" with short tail and ear tufts, and
the other a true "Link" or Lynx with longer tail and more prominent ear
tufts. It is little wonder, however, that such a notion exists in view
of the fact of the great range or variations found in these animals. As
for actual records of captures. In the summer of 1911 one was shot in
the brushy hillsides of Laguna Canyon (Orange Co.) and brought in to the
Marine Laboratory. In the spring of 1912 a [F] was shot at the mouth of
San Dimas canyon and brought to the college. In December 1914 a [F] in
very worn pelage was shot while crossing the Santa Ana river near Prado
Beach and brought to me to be skinned. Finally while trapping for foxes
in Palmers canyon in March of 1916 I took a male.

_Canis ochropus ochropus._ (Eschscholtz.) California Coyote. Common in
the brush land above Claremont and in the foothills. The yapping bark is
a very familiar cry to any who live near the outskirts of the town and
may be heard nearly any evening. Although having camped numerous times in
the mountains I have never heard Coyotes above the foothill region.

_Urocyon cinereoargenteus californicus._ (Mearns.) California Gray Fox.
Signs of foxes in the canyons and along mountain trails are always
quite common. Foeces containing seeds of manzanita berries are familiar
occurrences. They are fond of fruit and are readily trapped with such
bait. In March 1916 three were caught one night at the same place in Live
Oak canyon.

_Procyon psora psora._ (Gray.) California Coon. Coons are fairly common
in the larger canyons where there is an abundance of water. I have seen
their tracks in Palmers, Cucamonga and San Antonio canyons. Three were
trapped this winter (1916) just above Camp Baldy at an altitude of about
5400 feet.

_Mephitis occidentalis holzneri._ (Mearns.) Southern California Striped
Skunk. Not very common in this region, found mostly in the Upper Sonoran
zone in wooded districts.

_Spilogale phenax phenax._ (C. H. Merriam.) California Spotted Skunk.
Very common in valley, foothills and up to 6,000 feet in the mountains.
They are fearless little creatures and will readily enter cabins in the
mountains and keep the occupant awake by rattling pots and pans while
scrambling around in search of food, needless to say creating an awkward
situation for the host. They have been known to take up their abode
underneath houses in Claremont and take the liberty of scampering around
the parlor floor without regard to the presence of human beings. This
was a common occurrence in a certain family I have in mind and on such
occasions the unwelcome guest was gently ushered to the door without
hurting its feelings and peace of mind restored to the household. They
are the easiest of all animals to trap and made considerable trouble and
embarrassment for me by continually blundering into traps of mine set for
other game. I have found these little creatures as high as 6,000 feet in
the canyons.

_Mustela xanthogenys xanthogenys._ (Gray.) California Weasel. I had
always been interested in weasels as to their occurrence and until this
year had taken only one in town with a record of only two or three seen
along the railroad track. Then in one week four weasels were given me
and a record of seven others obtained, all these are from nearby orange
groves and from below town along the railroad track where for a long time
I have known they occurred.

_Scapanus latimanus occultus._ (Grinnell and Swartz.) Southern California
Mole. Moles are occasionally caught in orchards and lawns and the
characteristic workings are familiar sights in the mountains up to 8,000
feet. Our specimens were all from the valley.

_Antrozous pallidus pacificus._ (Merriam.) Pacific Pale Bat. I have
taken several of these bats from behind pictures and in the attics of
some of the college buildings. I do not know their relative abundance or
distribution but they are certainly common on the campus in spring and
summer.

_Myotis evotis._ (Allen.) Long-eared Bat. This form also occurs in the
college buildings and I believe to a certain extent in the mountains.

(_Contribution from the Zoological Laboratory of Pomona College_)



A Preliminary List of Shells from Laguna Beach and Nearby


For a number of years past students have collected shells from Laguna
Beach, these and the Bradshaw collection form the basis for this list,
which includes shells not farther than ten or twelve miles up and down
the coast. The earlier collections were by Mabel Guernsey and P. R.
Daggs. Practically all the shells drawn and photographed are from the
Bradshaw collection because the shells were in better condition. Some
of the earlier specimens were determined by the United States National
Museum. Suggestions and corrections were kindly made by Mrs. T. S.
Oldroyd. The photographs are by Robins and Cooper. Many of the drawings
are by Miss Margaret Cate. Doubtful specimens are largely omitted in this
list, but a few are included and marked by a question.

Plate I, reduced one-half; Plates II and III, natural size; Plate IV,
×10; Plate V, ×6.


BIVALVES

_Yoldia cooperi_ Sabb. Fig. 1.

_Mytilus californicus_ Conr. Fig. 2.

_M. stearnsii_ Pils and Raym. Fig. 3.

_Septifer bifurcatus_ Rve. Fig. 4.

_Modiolus modiolus_ Linn. Fig. 5.

_M. rectus_ Conr. Fig. 6.

_Lithophaga plumula_ Hanl. Rock borer. Fig. 7.

_Pectin (Chlamys) monotimeris_ Conr. Fig. 8.

_Pectin (Chlamys) æquisulcatus_ Cpr. Fig. 9.

_Pectin (Chlamys) pastatus_ Sby. Fig. 10.

_Pecten (Hinnites) giganteus_ Gray. Fig. 11.

_Lima dehiscens_ Conr. Fig. 12.

_Ostrea lurida_ Cpr. California oyster. Fig. 13.

_Chama Pellucida_ Sby. Fig. 14.

_Phacoides californicus_ Conr. Fig. 15.

_Phacoides (Lucina california) californicus_ Conr. Fig. 15.

_Phacoides nuttallii_ Conr. Fig. 16.

_Cardium quadrigenarium_ Conr. Fig. 17.

_Cardium (Livocardium) substriatum_ Conr. Fig. 18.

_Tivela (Pachydesma) crassatelloides_ Conrad. Fig. 19. small specimen.

_Chione fluctifrage_ Sby. Fig. 20.

_Chione succincta_ Val. Fig. 21.

_Chione undatella_ Sby. Fig. 22.

_Donax lævigata_ Desh. Fig. 23.

_Tagelus californicus_ Conr. Fig. 24.

_Macoma nasuata_ Conr. Bent-nosed Macoma. Fig. 25.

_Macoma indentata_ Cpr. Indented Macoma. Fig. 26.

_Macoma inflatula_ Dall. Inflated Macoma. Fig. 27.

_Samele rupium_ Sby. Semele-of-the-Rocks. Fig. 28.

_Cumingia californica_ Conr. California Cuming-shell. Fig. 29.

_Mya (Cryptomya) californica_ Conr. False Mya. Fig. 30.

_Spisula planulata_ Conr. Fig. 31.

_Spisula falcata_ Sld. (?). Falcate Mactra. Fig. 32.

_Paphia staminea_ Conrad. Ribbed Carpet-shell. Fig. 33.

_Paphia tenessima_ Cpr. Finest Carpet-shell. Fig. 34.

_Parapholas californica_ Conr. California Piddock. Fig. 35.

_Pholadidea penita_ Conr. Common Piddock. Fig. 36.

_Pholadidea subrostrata_ Sby. Little Borer. Fig. 37.

_Milneria minima_ Dall. Last Milner-shell. Fig. 38.

_Aula (Nucula) casternsis_ Hinds. Camp Nut-shell. Fig. 39.


FRESH-WATER AND LAND SHELLS UNIVALVES

_Physa heterostropha_ Say. Laguna stream. Fig. 40.

_Physa occidentalis_ Tryon. Aliso Lake. Fig. 41.

_Limnophysa palustris_ Mull. Fig. 42.

_Planorbis (Helisoma) trivolvis_ Say. Fig. 43.

_Helix aspera_ Mull. Fig. 44.

_Epiphragmophora_ Sp. Fig. 45.


MARINE UNIVALVES

_Acmaea persona_ Esch. Mask Limpet. Fig. 46.

_Acmaea spectrum_ Nutt. Ribbed Limpet. Fig. 47.

_Acmaea patina_ Esch. Pale Limpet. Fig. 48.

_Acmaea scabra_ Roe. Tile Limpet. Fig. 49.

_Acmaea incessa_ Hds. Seaweed Limpet. Fig. 50.

_Acmaea asmi_ Midd. Black Limpet. Fig. 51.

_Acmaea (Lottia) gigantea._ Owl Limpet. Fig. 52.

_Acmaea paleacea_ Gld. Chalf Limpet. Fig. 53.

_Tylodina fungina_ Gab. Fig. 54.

_Gadinia reticulata_ Sby. Netted Button-shell. Fig. 55.

_Crucibulum spinosum_ Sby. Cup and Saucer Limpet. Fig. 56.

_Crepidula dorsata_ Brod. Wrinkled Slipper-shell. Fig. 57.

_Crepidula aculeata_ Gmel. Prickly Slipper-shell. Fig. 58.

_Crepidula adunca_ Sby. Hooked Slipper-shell. Fig. 59.

_Crepidula nivea_ Gould. White Slipper-shell. Fig. 60.

_Crepidula onyx_ Sby. Onyx Slipper-shell. Pl. II. Fig. 19.

_Fissurella volcano_ Rve. Volcano Shell. Fig. 62.

_Fissuridea aspera_ Esch. Rough Key-hole Limpet. Fig. 63.

_Fissuridea murina_ Dall. White Key-hole Limpet. Fig. 64.

_Lucapina crenulata_ Sby. Great Key-hole Limpet. Fig. 65.

_Clypidella (Lucapinella) calliomarginata_ Cpr. Southern Key-hole Limpet.
Fig. 66.

_Megatebennus bimaculatus_ Dall. Spotted Key-hole Limpet. Fig. 67.

_Turris (Bathytoma) carpenteriana_ Gab. Carpenter Turret Shell. Fig. 68.
(Laguna Beach, Jahraus.)

_Trophon belcheri_ Hds. Belcher Trophon. Fig. 69. (Jahraus.)

_Trophon triangulatus_ Cpr. Three-cornered Trophon. Dredged off Laguna
Beach. Bean. Fig. 70.

_Australium undosus_ Wood. Wavy Topshell. Fig. 71.

_Bullaria gouldiana_ Pisb. Gold's Bubble-shell. Many collected at Balboa
much larger than the specimens shown. Fig. 72.

_Haminea vesicula_ Gld. White Bubble-shell. Fig. 73.

_Haminea virescens_ Sby. Green Bubble-shell. Fig. 74.

_Cypraea spadicea_ Gray. Nut-brown Cowry. Fig. 75.

_Trivia californica_ Gray. Little Coffee-bean. Fig. 76.

_Trivia solandri_ Gray. Solander Trivia. Fig. 77.

_Erato vitellina_ Hds. Veally Erato. Fig. 78. (Slightly enlarged.)

_Erato collumbella_ Mke. Dove Shell. Fig. 79.

_Marginella varia_ Sby. Colored Marginella. Fig. 80.

_Marginella jewetti._ California Rice shell. Much like the last but white.

_Olivella biplicata_ Sby. Purple Olive Shell. Fig. 81.

_Olivella pedroana_ Conr. Pedro Olive Shell. Fig. 82.

_Conus californicus_ Hds. California Cone. Fig. 83.

_Macron lividus_ A. Ad. Livid Macron. Fig. 84.

_Littorina scutulata_ Gld. Checkered Littorine. Fig. 85.

_Littorina planoxis_ Nutt. Gray Littorine. Fig. 86. Turned.

_Purpura (Cerostoma) nuttallii_ Conr. Nuttall's Hornmouth. Fig. 87.

_Tegula (Chlorostoma) gallina_ Fbs. Speckled Turban Shell. Fig. 88.

_Tegula (Chlorostoma) aureotincta_ Fbs. Gilded Turban Shell. Large
umbilicus with yellow. Fig. 89.

_Omphalus fuscecens_ Phil. Banded Turban Shell. Fig. 90.

_Tegula veridula ligulata_ Wke. Fig. 91.

_Norrisia norrisii_ Sby. Smooth Turban Shell. Fig. 92.

_Thais emarginata_ Desh. Rock Purple. Fig. 93.

_Acanthia lapilloides_ Conr. Pebbly Unicorn. Fig. 94.

_Acanthia elongata_ Conr. Angled Unicorn. Fig. 95.

_Acanthia spirata_ Blain. Fig. 96.

_Murex gemma_ Sby. Fig. 97.

_Murex (Tritonalia) lurida_ Cpr. Lurid. Fig. 98.

_Murex (Tritonalia) gracillima_ R. E. C. S. Fig. 99.

_Murex (Tritonalia) circumtexta_ R. E. C. S. Fig. 100.

_Murex (Tritonalia) poulsoni_ Nutt. Fig. 101.

_Epitonium hindsii_ Cpr. White Wentletrap. Fig. 102.

_Epitonium crenatoides_ Cpr. Fig. 103.

_Actæon puncticælatus_ Cpr. Barrel Shell. Fig. 104.

_Mitra idæ_ Melv. Ida's Miter Shell. Fig. 105.

_Mitra lowei_ Dall (?). Fig. 106.

_Alectrion (Nassa) perpinguis_ Gld. Fig. 107.

_Arcularia (Nassa) tegula_ Reeve. Cover-lip. Fig. 108.

_Turris ophioderma_ Dall. Pencilled Drill Shell. Fig. 109.

_Potomides (Certhidæ) californica_ Hold. California Horn Shell. Fig. 110.

_Myurella simplex_ Cpr. Simple Auger Shell. Fig. 111.

_Amphissa versicolor_ Dall. Joseph Coat. Fig. 112. Slightly enlarged.

_Calliostoma canliculatum_ Mart. Channeled Top Shell. Fig. 113.

_Polynices recluziana_ Desh (?). Southern Moon Shell. Fig. 114. under
side.

_Amalthea antiquata_ Linn. Ancient Hoof Shell. Fig. 115.

_Amalthea tumens_ Cpr. Sculptured Hoof Shell. Fig. 116.

_Fossarus fenestratus_ Cpr. Windowed Isapis. Fig. 117.

_Lacuna unifasciata_ Cpr. One-banded Chink Shell. Fig. 118.

_Melampus olivaceus_ Cpr. Olive Ear Shell. Fig. 119.

_Janthina trifida_ Nutt. Violet Snail. Shell violet. Jahraus collection.
Fig. 120.

_Leptothyra carpenteri_ Pilsb. Red Turban Shell. Fig. 121.

_Leptothyra baccula_ Cpr. Berry Turban. Fig. 122.

_Calliostoma tricolor_ Gabb. Three-colored top shell. Fig. 123.

_Haliotis rufescens_ Swains. Red Abalone. Quite common near Laguna.

_Haliotis cracherodii_ Leach. Black Abalone. More common than the red.


TOOTH SHELLS

_Dentalium neohexagnum_ S. and P. Hexagonal Tusk Shell. Dredged off
Laguna.


CHITONS

_Mophia hindsii_ Sby. Hind's Chiton. Fig. 124.

_Mophia mucosa_ Gld. Mossy Chiton. Fig. 125.

_Ischnochiton clathratus_ Rve. Fig. 126.

_Ischnochiton magdalensis_ Hinds. Gray Chiton. Fig. 127.

_Nuttallina scabra_ Rve. Scaly Chiton. Fig. 128.

_Nuttallina californica_ Nutt. California Chiton. Fig. 129.

_Trachydermon dentiens_ Gld. (Pseudodenturus). Fig. 130.

_Lepidopleurus rugatus_ Cpr. Fig. 131.

_Callistochiton crassicostatus_ Pilsb. Thick-ribbed Chiton. Fig. 132.

_Tonicella hartwegii_ Cpr. Hartweg's Chiton. Fig. 133.


SMALL SHELLS Wash Drawings by Miss M. Cate

_Caecum californicum_ Dall. Common at Laguna Beach. Pl. IV. Fig. 1 ×10.

_Vitrinella williamsoni_ Dall (?). Pl. IV. Fig. 2 ×10. (This specimen in
the Bradshaw collection was so determined, probably at Washington.) Arch
Beach, Cal., near Laguna.

_Columbella chrysalloidea_ Cpr. Shell white. Pl. IV. Fig. 3 ×10.

_Columbella pencillata_ Cpr. White shell, cross lines brown. Pl. V. Fig.
1 ×6.

_Columbella gausapata_ Gould. Common Dove-shell. Brown mottled. Pl. V.
Fig. 2 ×6.

_Liotia acuticostata_ Cpr. Sharp-ribbed Liotia. Pure white. Pl. V. Fig. 3
×6.

_Seila assimilata_ Cpr. Dark brown. Pl. V. Fig. 4 ×6.

_Turbonilla lammata_ Cpr. Pl. IV. Fig. 4 ×10. Light brown. (Dunkeria).

_Tinostoma supravalata_ Cpr. (?). Pl. V. Fig. 5 ×6. Clear white.
(Ethalia).

_Callistoma tricolor_ Gabb. Pl. V. Fig. 5 ×10.

_Phasianella pulloides_ Gld. Pl. V. Fig. 6 ×6. Mottled red and white.

_Tritonalia barberensis_ Gabb. Pl. V. Fig. 7.

_Leptothyra baccula_ Cpr. Pink to gray. Pl. V. Fig. 8 ×6.

_Leptothyra carpenteriana_ Pilsb. Red Turban-shell. Pl. V. Fig. 9 ×6.

_Leptothyra paucicosta_ Dall. White. Pl. V. Fig. 10 ×6.

_Jeffreysia translucens_ Cpr. (?). Pl. V. Fig. 11 ×6.

_Pedipes unisulcata_ J. G. Cooper. Light brown. Pl. V. Fig. 12 ×6.

_Mitromorpha aspera_ Cpr. Brown. Pl. V. Fig. 13 ×6.

_Vermetus anellum_ Morch. White. Pl. IV. Fig. 6 ×10. This specimen is
more coiled than some others.

_Cerithiopus convexa_ Cpr. Dark brown. Pl. V. Fig. 14.

_Cerithiopus columna_ Cpr. Light brown. Pl. V. Fig. 15.

_Turritella mesalia lacteola_ Cpr. Pure white. (No figure.)

_Bithium aspera_ Gabb. Brown. Pl. IV. Fig. 7 ×10.

_Turbonilla stylina_ Cpr. (?). Pl. IV. Fig. 8 ×10.

_Turbonilla costanea_ Cpr. (?). Pl. IV. Fig. 9 ×10.

_Anachis subturiata_ Cpr. (?). Pl. IV. Fig. 10 ×10.

_Amphissa versicolor_ Dall. Pink, white, brown. Pl. V. Fig. 16 ×6.

_Corbila luteola_ Cpr. Small bivalve.

_Philobrya setosa_ Cpr. Small bivalve. Pl. V. Fig. 17 ×6.

_Acila castrensis_ Hds. Brownish. Pl. V. Fig. 18 ×6.

_Carditanera minima_ Dall. Brownish-yellow. Pl. IV. Fig. 11 ×10.

_Crassatella marginata_ Cpr. Pl. IV. Fig. 12 ×10.

_Lasea rubra_ Mort. Tinged with red. Pl. V. Fig. 19 ×10.

_Arca solida_ Br. & Sby. (?). Pl. V. Fig. 20 ×10.


(_Contribution from the Zoological Laboratory of Pomona College_)

[Illustration: Plate I]

[Illustration: Plate II]

[Illustration: Plate III]

[Illustration: Plate IV]

[Illustration: Plate V]



A Reconstruction of the Nervous System of a Nemertian Worm

WILLIAM A. HILTON


Small specimens of _Carinella cingulata_ Cole were fixed in Mercuric
chloride and cut in series. A general hematoxylin stain was very
satisfactory for general anatomy. For a study of the finer structure
other preparations will be necessary.

No attempt will be made to give a complete review of the literature
relating to this group. Almost every systematic paper has something,
because of the importance of the nervous system in classification
and because in many cases the nervous system may be seen through the
body-wall without dissection.

One of the first extensive accounts of these animals which also included
quite a consideration of the nervous system was McIntosh in 1874. Several
of the genus Nemestes were studied and the general form of the nervous
system shown. Amphipheris is shown in a similar manner with a single
lobe of the brain and with the two brain commissures. Tetrastemma is
shown in a similar manner. Hubrecht in 1887 has an extensive paper in
which the details of several nervous systems are shown as they show in
reconstructions from sections. _Eupolia girardi_ is especially well shown
with its small dorsal and large ventral commissure and with three brain
lobes. It is in this paper that Hubrecht makes his interesting comparison
between the nemertians and cordates. In his paper of 1880 he has shown
the structure and position of different parts of the nervous system of
nemertians, especially of Cerebratulus of which he gives a very good
figure. In this he shows a reconstruction of the brain with its chief
nerves, ventral and dorsal commissures, general position of the cells,
the two lobes of the brain on each side and the chief nerves. He also
treats of nemertian nervous systems of many other forms, but not in so
much detail.

Burger in 1890, '91, has extensive papers on the nervous system of the
group. He discusses not only the general form, but also the minute
structure of the nervous system of a number of different types. In 1895
Burger has another important paper on this group of animals. In it he
shows in some forms a marked dorsal ganglion and a ventral ganglion with
the typical nerves. Burger showed that all ganglion cells are unipolar,
without membranes. Montgomery, 1897, discusses the minute anatomy of the
nerve cells. Coe, 1895 and 1910, considers the general anatomy of the
nervous system, but nerve details are for the most part not shown.

In a young _Carinella cingulata_ Cole which I have studied by means
of reconstructions, I find no unusual features. The nervous system is
typical of the group. The brain, however, is not very clearly made up of
two lobes on each side. This may be because the specimen used was a young
one. This may also be the reason why the brain is not sharply marked off
from the lateral nerve cords.

Figure 1 shows the brain and part of the lateral cords from the ventral
side. From the two halves of the brain come the nerves to forward parts.
The small dorsal commissure is shown with its usual median extension.
From the larger ventral commissure come the two nerves to the proboscis,
lateral to these are the nerves to the intestine, while from the ridge of
the lateral cords the lateral nerves are shown.

Figure 2 in the larger drawing at the right shows the nervous system as
viewed from the side with the dorsal side to the left. The central core
of the ganglion and cord is to indicate the position of the fiber area.
The small drawings at the left show various levels of the nervous system
as seen in cross section. The ventral side is up. The drawing at the top
is through the brain before the commissures are reached, the next lower
is through the thickest part of the brain and the lower two drawings are
through one of the lateral cords.

  _Burger, O._                                                        1891
    Beitrage zur kenntnis des Nervensystems der Wirbellosen. Neue
      Unter. über das Nervensystem der Nemertinen. Inst. a. d. Zool.
      Sta. Neah. 10.

  _Burger, O._                                                        1890
    Beitrage zur Kenntnis des Nervensystems der Nemertinen. Zeit.
      Wiss. Zool. Bd. L.

  ----                                                                1895
    Die Nemertinen.
    Fauna u. Flora d. Golfes v. Neapel.

  _Coe, W. R._                                                        1895
    On the Anatomy of a Species of Nemertean (Cerebratulus).
      Trans. Conn. oc. ix.

  _Coe, W. R._                                                        1910
    Nemerteans.
    Haniman Alaska Series, vol. xi.

  _Delage et Herouard_                                                1897
    Trait de zoologie concrete. Les vermidinens. Vol. v. Paris.

  _Haller, B._                                                        1889
    Beitrage zur kenntnis der textur des Central-nervensystems.
      Heherer Wurmer.
    Arb. des Zoolog. Inst. Wien. T. viii, Heft. 2.

  _Hubrecht, A. A. W._                                                1887
    Relation of the Nemertea to the Vertebrata. Quart. jour. mic.
      Sc. XXVII.

  _Hubrecht, A. A. W._                                                1880
    Zur Anatomy und Physiology des Nervensystems der Nemertinen
      Nat. Ver. der k. Akad. Decl. xx.

  ----                                                                1887
    Report on the Nemertia collected by H. M. S. Challenger.
    Rep. Sc. results H. M. S. Challenger. Zool., vol. xix.

  _Kemnel, J. V._                                                     1877
    Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Nemertinen. Arb. a. d. Zool. Inst.
      Würzburg IV.

  _McIntosh, W. C._                                                   1874
    A monograph of British annelids. Part I, Nemertineans. Ray. soc.

  _Montgomery, T. H., Jr._                                            1897
    Studies on the elements of the central nervous system of the
      Heteronemertini. Jour. morph., vol. xxx, No. 3.

  _Mosley, H. N._                                                     1875
    On Pelagonemertes rollestoni. Ann. mag. nat. hist., vol. xv.



EXPLANATION OF PLATE

    Figure 1. Reconstruction of the nervous system of Carinella
                shown from the ventral side. Explanation in text. ×75.

    Figure 2. Figure at the left side view of a reconstruction of
                the upper portion of the central nervous system of
                Carinella.

              The figures at the right are from cross sections taken at
                various levels. The upper and the two lower figures are
                from one side only. Further explanations in the text.
                ×75.

[Illustration]

[Illustration]

   ===================================================================

                       The KA Binocular Microscope

[Illustration]

Is of great value in all biological work where low and medium powers
are employed. In embryology the true stereoscopic image shows the
relative position of important details. This feature is of great
assistance to the student and makes the instructor's work easy.

                           _Write for booklet_

                 Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. of California

                   154 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal.

   ===================================================================


                     _The_ Journal _of_
                          Zoological Research

                           _Edited by_
         _WALTER E. COLLINGE, M. Sc., F. L. S., F. E. S._
                  _The Gatty Marine Laboratory_
             _The University, St. Andrews, Scotland_

    The subject matter is strictly confined to original zoological
      research--systematic and anatomical. Fully illustrated by
                 lithographic plates and text figures.

            Each volume will consist of 4 parts, price $5.


            _All subscriptions should be forwarded to_

                       Messrs. Dulau & Co., Ltd.
                  37 Soho Square, London, W., England

                      ---------------------------

                               GRIFFITH

                              Incubators

                            [Illustration]

              A simple, well constructed bacteriological
                               incubator

                      ---------------------------

                            The Journal of
                             Parasitology

                    A Quarterly devoted to Medical
                                Zoology

                  This journal will be a medium for
                  the prompt publication of briefer
                  papers and research notes on animal
                  parasites. Emphasis laid on the
                  morphology, life history and biology
                  of zooparasites and the relations of
                  animals to disease.

                     Subscription, $2.00 a volume

                           Managing Editor,

                            HENRY B. WARD,

                     Univ. Illinois, Urbana, Ill.

   ===================================================================


=GAGE--The Microscope=

An Introduction to Microscopic Methods and to Histology

    By SIMON H. GAGE.

       Twelfth edition in press. Entirely rewritten, and with many new
       illustrations. Price $2.00.

This work aims to give help to everyone who uses the microscope, whether
he is a beginner or an advanced worker.


=COMSTOCK--A Manual for the Study of Insects=

    By JOHN HENRY COMSTOCK, Professor of Entomology in Cornell
       University, and ANNA BOTSFORD COMSTOCK, member of the Society
       of American Wood-Engravers. 8vo. cloth, IX. + 701 pages, 797
       figures in the text, and six full page plates. Nearly all of the
       figures were engraved especially for this work. Postpaid $4.07;
       net $3.75.

This handbook is designed to meet the needs of teachers in the public
schools and of students in high schools and colleges.


=NEEDHAM--General Biology=

A book of outlines and practical studies for the general student

    By JAMES G. NEEDHAM, Professor of Limnology and General Biology in
       Cornell University. Cloth 8vo. XIV. + 542 pages; 288 figures,
       mostly original. Postpaid $2.00.

This book is expressly designed to help the general student obtain a
comprehensive grasp of the principles of biology.


=COMSTOCK--Handbook of Nature-Study=

    By ANNA BOTSFORD COMSTOCK, Lecturer in Nature-Study in Cornell
       University. Cloth 8vo. XVIII. + 938 pages, more than 1,000
       illustrations. Prices, postpaid: Bound in one volume, $3.65;
       bound in two volumes, $4.50; Volume I., including Animal Life,
       $2.25; Volume II., including Plant Life, $2.25. Sample pages
       sent on application.

A handbook of Nature-Study for teachers and parents, based on the Cornell
Nature-Study Leaflets, with much additional material and many new
illustrations.


=GAGE--Optic Projection=

    By SIMON HENRY GAGE, Professor Emeritus of Histology and Embryology
       in Cornell University, and Henry Phelps Gage, Ph. D.

This work of over 700 pages and with over 400 figures is of especial
interest to workers in all fields of Biology in that it deals
especially with the use of the Projection Microscope for demonstrations
and for drawing. It also gives the fundamental principles of all the
forms of projection. A 16-page circular will be sent on request.
Postpaid, $3.00.


=RILEY--Handbook of Medical Entomology=

    By WM. A. RILEY, Ph. D., Professor of Insect Morphology and
       Parasitology in Cornell University and O. A. JOHANNSEN, Ph. D.,
       Professor of Biology in Cornell University.

A concise account of poisonous, and disease-carrying insects and their
allies, including descriptions and illustrations of the principal
species, with keys for their determination, and method of control.
Bound Library Buckram, medium 8vo. Nearly 375 pages. Price $2.00 net.


                    The Comstock Publishing Company
                    Cornell Heights, Ithaca, N. Y.

   ===================================================================


                        Choice Mineral Specimens

It affords this establishment pleasure to state that though we are over
fifty years old we are still seeking with youthful energy new finds of
choice mineral specimens.

A few of our recent additions will show from what widely distributed
areas we draw:

  =Japan=:       =Chalcopyrite= in groups of sharp crystals, some of them
                     beautifully iridescent.

                 =Stibnite=, brilliant crystals, 5 to 8 inches long.

                 =Hokutolite=, a new radio-active barium-lead silicate.

                 =Reinite=, in large, sharp crystals.

                 =Quartz Twins=, fine, large crystals.


  =Rhodesia=:    =Malachite=, beautiful polished specimens showing
                     concentric banding.

                 =Hopeite=, in small groups of excellent crystals.


  =Madagascar=:  =Betafite=, a new uranium niobate, in good crystals.

                 =Euxenite=, good crystals.

                 =Beryl=, in large brown crystals with pyramidal faces.


  =California=:  =Tourmaline=, polished transverse sections of large
                     crystals of rich red and green colors.

                 =Kunzite=, superb gem crystals.

                 =Benitoite= and =Neptunite= in fine crystals and groups.

                 =Greenockite= on =Magnetite=, uncommonly good.


  =Utah=:        =Willemite=, drusy masses of colorless and red crystals.

                 =Aurichalcite=, singularly beautiful robin's-egg blue,
                     crystallized coatings.


  =Nova Scotia=: =Magnesite= in groups of small distinct hexagonal
                     crystals.

New lots of fine specimens are constantly arriving. Ask for price-list
No. 160.

Cheap minerals are described in No. 158.

Circular No. 170 enumerates all of our many catalogues and price-lists.


                  Ward's Natural Science Establishment
                          84-102 College Avenue
                            Rochester, N. Y.

   ===================================================================


                          Entomological News

  A forty-eight page illustrated magazine, published monthly except August
   and September, devoted to the study of INSECT LIFE. It contains a list
    of the titles of the current Entomological Literature, and also
          articles by the leading Entomologists in the United
                States and Canada. Valuable information
                    for the beginner, the economic
                         entomologist and the
                             systematist.

    To new subscribers, $1.90; Renewals, $2.00; payable in advance.
                    Single copies 25 cents. Address

                          ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS
             1900 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

   ===================================================================
                          CLASS WORK MATERIAL

                    CAN BE PROCURED AT ANY TIME OF
                             THE YEAR FROM

                       C. S. BRIMLEY, Zoologist

                         1135 Newberne Avenue
                       RALEIGH, N. C., U. S. A.

      Twenty-one years' experience           Price List on Application

   ===================================================================

                           To Entomologists

  I can supply Entomologists with all orders of insects from all parts of
  the world, as I am continually receiving fresh consignments from my own
  collectors.

  General lists of Lepidoptera and Coleoptera on application; also special
  lists of Sphingidæ, over 300 species, of Pieridæ in papers, over 100
  species. Collections just received from Natal, Madagascar, Peru, Ivory
  Coast, French Guiana, Java and Argentine; selections of these at low
  rates. Particulars on application.

                              E. LE MOULT
                   4 Rue Duméril, Paris XIII, France

   ===================================================================

                          Do Business by Mail

   It's profitable, with accurate lists of prospects. Our catalogue
  contains vital information on Mail Advertising. Also prices and
  quantity on 6,000 national mailing lists, 99% guaranteed. Such as:

              War Material Mfrs.      Axle Grease Mfrs.
              Cheese Box Mfrs.        Railroad Employees
              Shoe Retailers          Contractors
              Tin Can Mfrs.           Fly Paper Mfrs.
              Druggists               Foundries
              Auto Owners             Farmers
              Wealthy Men             Fish Hook Mfrs.
              Ice Mfrs.               Feather Duster Mfrs.
              Doctors                 Hotels

                Write for this valuable reference book.
              Ross-Gould, 1027A Olive Street, St. Louis.

                              Ross-Gould
              Mailing
              Lists                               St. Louis

   ===================================================================


                             Pomona College

Located in one of the most healthful and beautiful parts of the
west coast. The mountains reach an elevation of ten thousand feet
within a few miles of the college and these with the nearby ocean
afford many special advantages for the study of things not in books.
Special advantages are afforded by the fact that the college limits
its attendance, the freshman class being restricted to two hundred
applicants. The success of the college is particularly indicated by the
large proportion of the graduates who proceed to advanced work in the
large universities. In addition, well-manned departments of music and
art afford exceptional advantages.

For further information, address

                       Secretary of Pomona College
                          Claremont, California





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Journal of Entomology and Zoology, September 1917" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home