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Title: Index Expurgatorius Anglicanus
Author: Hart, W. H.
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index Expurgatorius Anglicanus" ***

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  TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE

  Italic text is denoted by _underscores_.

  A missing name or word is denoted by [   ], as in the original.

  A superscript is denoted by ^x or ^{xx}; for example, y^e and w^{th}.

  The format of some dates in the original text showed a year digit
  over another digit, similar to 167½ for example. These have been
  changed to the form 1671/2.

  The TABLE OF CONTENTS section has been created by the Transcriber.

  Obvious punctuation errors have been corrected after careful
  comparison with other occurrences within the text and consultation
  of external sources. The use of quotation marks in letters and other
  quotations is not consistent in the book; some adjustments have been
  made to have consistency within a particular letter or quotation.

  More detail can be found at the end of the book.



  INDEX
  EXPURGATORIUS
  ANGLICANUS:

  OR
  A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF THE PRINCIPAL BOOKS
  PRINTED OR PUBLISHED IN ENGLAND,
  WHICH HAVE BEEN SUPPRESSED,
  OR BURNT BY THE COMMON HANGMAN,
  OR CENSURED,
  OR FOR WHICH THE AUTHORS, PRINTERS, OR PUBLISHERS
  HAVE BEEN PROSECUTED.

  BY W. H. HART

  [Illustration: (Colophon)]

  BURT FRANKLIN
  NEW YORK



  Published by BURT FRANKLIN
  235 East 44th St., New York, N.Y. 10017
  Originally Published: 1872-1878
  Reprinted: 1969
  Printed in the U.S.A.
  This book is complete in five parts ending at numbered page 290.

  Library of Congress Card Catalog No.: 76-80250
  Burt Franklin: Bibliography & Reference Series 302



  TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                     Page
  Part I                                                3
  Part II                                              67
  Part III                                            131
  Part IV                                             195
  Part V                                              243



  PART I.]                       [TO BE CONTINUED.


  INDEX
  EXPURGATORIUS
  ANGLICANUS:

  OR
  A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF THE PRINCIPAL BOOKS
  PRINTED OR PUBLISHED IN ENGLAND,
  WHICH HAVE BEEN SUPPRESSED,
  OR BURNT BY THE COMMON HANGMAN,
  OR CENSURED,
  OR FOR WHICH THE AUTHORS, PRINTERS, OR PUBLISHERS
  HAVE BEEN PROSECUTED.

  BY W. H. HART, F.S.A.


  PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.


  LONDON:
  JOHN RUSSELL SMITH, 36, SOHO SQUARE.

  1872.



_The object of this work, which at present it is believed is
sufficiently indicated by the title, will be more fully explained
in the preface, which cannot as yet conveniently be printed. It is
not possible to estimate the exact extent of the work, but it will
be included in one moderately sized volume, published in parts of
similar size and price to that now issued._

  _W. H. HART._

_October, 1872._



INDEX EXPURGATORIUS ANGLICANUS.


1.

A SUPPLICACYON for the Beggers. (Compiled by Simon Fyshe, ANNO
MCCCCCXXIIII.)

  This book gave considerable uneasiness to Cardinal Wolsey, who was
  personally attacked in it, and sought by every means to discover
  and punish its author. It was prohibited by a proclamation issued
  in June, 1530. An account of Simon Fish, "a zealous man for the
  reformation of abuses in the church" will be found in Wood's Athenæ
  Oxonienses and Tanner's Biblioth. Britan.


2.

The Newe Testament, in Englysshe, (translated by William Tyndale.)

  Assumed to have been printed at Cologne in the Office of Peter
  Quentell and finished at Worms by Peter Schoeffer, 1525. It was
  inhibited by order of Bishop Tonstall and Archbishop Wareham and
  burnt. An imperfect copy is in the Grenville collection, British
  Museum.


3.

The Parable of the wicked Mammon. (By William Tyndale), 1528.

The Obedyence of a Christen Man, and how Christen Rulers ought to
governe. (By the same), 1528.

  These books were prohibited by the before mentioned proclamation of
  June, 1530.


4.

The Revelation of Antichrist. No date.

  This book was prohibited by the before mentioned proclamation of
  June, 1530.


5.

The Summary of Scripture. No date.

  This book was prohibited by the before mentioned proclamation of
  June, 1530. It is a translation by Simon Fish from the German.


6.

An exposition upon the fifth, sixth, and seventh chapters of Matthew.
No publisher or date.

  Printed for Tyndale while he was in Holland in 1537 by R. Grafton,
  for which he was thrown into the Fleet for six weeks.


7.

The historie of Italie, a boke excedyng profitable to be redde;
because it intreateth of the astate of many and divers common weales,
how thei have ben and now be governed, 1549. London.

  This book was suppressed and burnt by the Common Hangman, but a
  reprint was subsequently made in 1561. The original edition is very
  rare. "W. Thomas," says Holinshed, "who wrote the History of Italie
  and other thinges verie eloquentlie, was hanged and quartered at
  Tiburne, 18 May, 1554, for conspiring to murther Queen Mary." He
  had been Tutor to Edward VI, and some of his letters are preserved
  by Strype.


8.

The Union of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and
Yorke, beyng long in continuall discension for the Crowne of this
noble realme, with all the actes done in both the tymes of the
Princes, both of the one linage and of the other, beginnyng at the
tyme of Kyng Henry the fowerth, the first aucthor of this devision,
and so successively proceading to ye reigne of the high and prudent
Prince, Kyng Henry the eyght, the indubitate flower and very heire of
both the saied linages. Whereunto is added to every Kyng a severall
table. (By Edward Halle), 1550.

  This book was prohibited by a proclamation dated June 13, 1555.
  (Foxe's Acts and Monuments, vol. 7, p. 127, ed. 1847.)


9.

A declaration of the succession of the Crown Imperial of England. By
John Hales. London, 1563.

  This book was written in support of the marriage and the claims
  of Lord Hertford's children by the Lady Catherine Grey. The Queen
  was so angry at its appearance that the author was committed to
  the Tower, and Bacon himself, the Lord Keeper, who was suspected
  of having had a hand in its appearance, fell considerably in his
  mistress's favour.


10.

An admonition to Parliament. 1571.

  The authors of this tract were most probably the Puritan divines
  John Field and Thomas Wilcox. It was frequently reprinted, and in
  1572 Field and Wilcox presented a copy to the House of Commons, and
  were immediately committed to Newgate. By a proclamation dated June
  11th, 1573, the admonition itself, and "one other also in defence
  of the sayde admonition" were commanded to be delivered up on pain
  of imprisonment, "and her highness further displeasure."


11.

A Treatise of Schisme shewing, that al Catholikes ought in any wise
to abstaine altogether from heretical Conventicles, to witt, their
prayers, sermons, &c., devided into foure chapters. By Gregorie
Martin, Licenciate in Divinitie, Douay, 1578.

  This book gave great offence to the Queen and her ministers, for it
  invites the ladies about the Queen's person to imitate the example
  of Judith in ridding the world of Holofernes. Though printed in
  1578 it was not till 1584 that measures were taken concerning
  it. A copy had been sent by Cardinal Allen to William Carter,
  the printer for a new edition. That very copy, wanting the title
  page, is now in the Bodleian. The impression was seized, and on
  January 10th, at a Sessions held in the Old Bailey, for the gaol
  delivery of Newgate, Carter himself was there indicted, arraigned,
  and condemned of high treason for printing this book, and was for
  the same, on the next day drawn from Newgate to Tyburn, and there
  hanged, bowelled, and quartered. (Holinshed.)


12.

A Letter sent by F. A., touching the Proceedings in a private
Quarell and Unkindnesse, between Arthur Hall and Melchisidech
Mallerie, Gentlemen, to his very Friend L. B., being in Italy. With
an admonition by the Father of F. A. to him, being a Burgesse of
the Parliament, for his better Behaviour therein. London, by Henry
Bynneman, 1579-80.

  A book presenting a curious view of the habits and manners of the
  young men of family and fashion in the reign of Elizabeth. It is
  reprinted in the Miscellanea Antiqua Anglicana. Upon a motion made
  by Mr. Norton in the House of Commons on February 4th, 1580/81,
  stating that this book was "done and procured" by Mr. Arthur Hall,
  a member of that House: it was resolved that the Sergeant at Arms
  be forthwith sent to apprehend Mr. Hall, and the printer was also
  to be sent for; and accordingly on the 6th February Mr. Hall was
  brought to the bar and admitted the offence. On the 14th February
  it was resolved that he should be committed to the Tower for six
  months, and so much longer as until he should willingly make a
  retractation; that he be fined 500 marks, and be expelled the House
  of Commons. (Vide Commons' Journals, vol. 1, pp. 122, 124, 125,
  126, 132, 136.)


13.

The Discoverie of a Gaping Gulf whereinto England is like to be
swallowed by another French marriage, if the Lord forbid not the
banes, by letting her Majestie see the sin and punishment thereof.
Mense Augusti Anno 1579.

  According to Camden[1] the Queen was much incensed at this book, in
  which those of the Council who favoured the marriage are taxed as
  ungrateful to their Prince and Country; the Queen herself (in the
  midst of several flattering expressions) is glanced at as unlike
  herself; the Duke of Anjou slandered with unworthy reproaches; the
  French nation odiously defamed; and the marriage itself, in regard
  of the difference of religion, (as of the daughter of God with
  a son of Antichrist) with virulent words condemned, as profane,
  dangerous to the Church, and destructive to the Commonwealth; and
  this proved out of the Holy Scriptures, miserably wrested. Neither
  would the Queen be persuaded that the author of the book had any
  other intent but to procure the hatred of her subjects against her,
  (who had always no less regard of the love of her people than she
  had of her own authority, and as Princes use to do, made it her
  chief care to preserve her reputation) and privately to open a gap
  for some prodigious innovation; considering that the writer had
  not so much as mentioned the security of the Queen and realm, or
  prevention of dangers to either, and that the States of the Realm
  had before with all earnestness besought her to marry, as the most
  assured remedy against the threatening mischiefs. These things
  she declared by public proclamation,[2] wherein having condemned
  the author of the book as a publisher of sedition, she highly
  commended the Duke of Anjou's good affection towards her and the
  Protestant religion, and expressed her resentment that so great an
  injury should be offered to so noble a Prince, and one that had so
  well deserved, who had desired nothing to be altered either in the
  commonwealth or religion: and withal, she commended Simier, the
  Duke of Anjou's agent, for his wisdom and discretion, whom some
  had loaded with calumnies and slanders. She also advertised the
  people that the said book was nothing else but a fiction of some
  traitors, to raise envy abroad, and sedition at home; and commanded
  it to be burnt before the magistrate's face. From this time forward
  she began to be a little more incensed against the puritans, or
  innovators, from whom she easily believed these kind of things
  proceeded: and indeed, within a few days after, John Stubbs of
  Lincoln's Inn, a furious hot-headed professor of religion, (whose
  sister, Thomas Cartwright, a ringleader amongst the Puritans, had
  married) the author of this book, William Page, who dispersed the
  copies, and Singleton the printer, were apprehended; against whom
  sentence was given, that their right hands should be cut off,
  according to an Act of Philip and Mary, against the authors and
  publishers of seditious writings. Though some lawyers muttered that
  the sentence was erroneous and void by reason of the false noting
  of the time wherein the law was made; and that that Act was only
  temporary, and died with Queen Mary. Of this number was Dalton,
  who often bawled it out openly, and was committed to the Tower;
  and Monson, a judge in the Court of Common Pleas, was so sharply
  reprehended, that he resigned his place, forasmuch as Wray, Lord
  Chief Justice of England, made it appear that there was no mistake
  in noting the time; and proved by the words of the Act, that the
  Act was made against those who should abuse the King by seditious
  writings, and that the King of England never dieth; yea that that
  Act was renewed Anno primo Elizabethæ, to be in force during the
  life of her and the heirs of her body. Hereupon Stubbs and Page
  had their right hands cut off with a cleaver, driven through the
  wrist by the force of a mallet, upon a scaffold in the market place
  at Westminster. The printer was pardoned. I remember (being there
  present) that Stubbs, after his right hand was cut off, put off his
  hat with his left, and said with a loud voice "God save the Queen."
  The multitude standing about was deeply silent; either out of an
  horror of this new and unwonted kind of punishment, or else out of
  commiseration towards the man, as being of an honest and unblamable
  repute; or else out of hatred of the marriage, which most men
  presaged would be the overthrow of religion.

  On October 5th, 1579, a circular was prepared from the Council
  to the bishops, to give notice to the clergy and others that the
  seditious suggestions set forth in Stubbs's book were without
  foundation, and that special noted preachers should declare the
  same to the people.

  Eleven copies of this circular are in the Public Record Office
  unfinished, some signed, others not fully signed, and some not
  signed at all; from which it would appear that none were sent, and
  that the matter dropped.


14.

Henry or Harry Nicholas, The works of.

  These productions, which include a miscellaneous collection of
  books and tracts on the peculiar principles of the sect called
  _The Family of Love_, were by royal proclamation dated October
  13, 22 Elizabeth, ordered to be burnt, and all persons declared
  punishable for having them in their possession without the
  ordinary's permission.

  This _Family of Love_ or _House of Charity_ as they styled
  themselves, were sectaries out of Holland who persuaded their
  followers "That those only were elected and should be saved, who
  were admitted into that Family, and all the rest Reprobates, and
  to be damned; and that it was lawful for them to deny upon their
  oath before a magistrate whatsoever they pleased, or before any
  other who was not of their family." Of this fanatical vanity they
  dispersed books amongst their followers, translated out of the
  Dutch tongue into the English, they were entitled The Gospel of the
  Kingdom, Documental Sentences, The Prophecy of the Spirit of Love,
  The publishing of Peace upon Earth. The author, H. N., they could
  by no means be persuaded to reveal; yet was it found afterwards to
  be Henry Nicholas of Leyden, who with a blasphemous mouth gave out,
  that he did partake of God, and God of his humanity. (Camden's Life
  and Reign of Queen Elizabeth, p. 477.)


15.

The confession and execution of John Slade. The confession and
execution of John Bodye. (1583.)

  A black letter tract dedicated to "Maister H. S., by R. B., from
  Winchester." Slade and Bodye were sufferers under the oppressive
  laws of the time against the adherents of the Catholic religion,
  and were executed in the autumn of 1583. (See Challoner's Memoirs
  of Missionary Priests.) This tract was suppressed and the author
  punished.


16.

A book without title or date, but plainly of Catholic tendency.
(1584.)

  This book was alleged to have been published or dispersed on
  January 22nd, 1584, by one Robert Sutton, a yeoman, and Charles
  Ratclyffe, gentleman, both of Aylsham in Norfolk, for which they
  were prosecuted; but the indictment was held to be insufficient.[3]
  It charges that "Robertus Sutton nuper de Aylesham in comitatu
  Norfolciæ yoman vicesimo secundo die Januarii anno regni dominæ
  Elizabethæ Dei gratia Angliæ Franciæ et Hiberniæ Reginæ fidei
  defensoris &c., vicesimo sexto apud Aylesham prædictam in comitatu
  prædicto advisate _anglice advysedly_ et voluntarie publicavit
  ut veritati consentaneum quendam librum continentem in se hæc
  anglicana verba sequentia videlicet _not to be wyth the Pope is to
  be wyth antecryste_ Et sic prædictus Robertus Sutton tunc et ibidem
  assistebat _anglice stode wyth_ ad extollendam jurisdictionem
  Pontificis Romani præantea usurpatam infra hoc regnum Angliæ contra
  formam statuti in hujusmodi casu nuper editi et provisi et contra
  pacem dictæ dominæ Reginæ nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c.
  Item alias scilicet die et anno prædictis ad sessionem prædictam
  coram præfatis justiciariis per sacramentum juratorum prædictorum
  similiter extitit præsentatum quod Carolus Ratclyffe nuper de
  Aylesham in comitatu Norffolciæ generosus vicesimo secundo die
  Januarii anno regni dominæ Elizabethæ Dei gratia Angliæ Franciæ et
  Hiberniæ Reginæ Fidei Defensoris &c. vicesimo sexto apud Aylesham
  prædictam in comitatu Norffolciæ prædicto advisate _anglice
  advysedly_ et voluntarie publicavit ut veritati consentaneum
  quendam librum continentem in se hæc anglicana verba sequentia
  videlicet _not to be wyth the Pope is to be wyth antechryste_ Et
  sic prædictus Carolus Ratclyffe tunc et ibidem assistebat _anglice
  stode wyth_ ad extollendam jurisdictionem Pontificis Romani
  præantea usurpatam infra hoc regnum Angliæ contra formam statuti in
  hujusmodi casu nuper editi et provisi et contra pacem dictæ dominæ
  Reginæ nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c."


17.

Modest answer to the English Persecutors; or a defence of English
Catholics against a slanderous libel intituled "The execution of
justice in England." No publisher or date.

  This book was published anonymously, but is known to be the
  production of Cardinal Allen. Thomas Allfield, a priest, who had
  (says Dr. Challoner)[4] found means to import into the realm some
  copies thereof, "and had dispersed them by the help of one Thomas
  Webley, a dyer; was called to an account, as was also the said
  Webley, and both the one and the other were most cruelly tortured
  in prison; I suppose in order to make them discover the persons
  to whom they had distributed the said books. They were afterwards
  brought to their trial and condemned on the 5th of July, (1585),
  and suffered at Tyburn on the day following; where both the one
  and the other had their life offered them if they would renounce
  the pope, and acknowledge the queen's church headship; which they
  refusing to do were both executed."

  The indictment against Allfield is as follows, (Lansdowne M.S.
  British Museum 33, no. 58.)

  Londonia scilicet. Juratores pro domina Regina præsentant quod
  cum per quendam actum in Parliamento dominæ Reginæ nunc tento per
  prorogationem apud Westmonasterium sexto decimo die Januarii anno
  regni sui vicesimo tertio editum et provisum inter alia inactitatum
  et stabilitatum existit authoritate parliamenti illius quod si
  aliqua persona sive personæ post finem quadraginta dierum proximo
  sequentium post finem illius sessionis ejusdem parliamenti infra
  hoc regnum Angliæ vel in aliquo alio dominiorum dominæ Reginæ nunc
  vel in aliquo alio loco extra dominia dictæ dominæ Reginæ advisate
  et cum maliciosa intentione versus dictam dominam Reginam nunc
  devisarent et scriberent imprimerent vel exponerent devisaret et
  scriberet imprimeret vel exponeret _anglice sett forthe_ aliquem
  librum rythmum canticum vocatum _a ballade_ literam sive scriptum
  continentem aliquam falsam seditiosam et scandalosam materiam ad
  defamationem Regiæ Majestatis vel ad animandam excitandam vel
  movendam aliquam insurrectionem vel rebellionem infra hoc regnum
  aut aliquod dominiorum eidem regno spectantium vel si aliqua
  persona seu personæ post finem prædictorum quadraginta dierum
  sive infra hoc regnum aut alia dominia ipsius Reginae vel in
  aliquo alio loco extra dominia dictæ dominæ Reginæ advisate et cum
  maliciosa intentione versus dictam dominam nostram procurarent vel
  causarent procuraret vel causaret aliquem talem librum rythmum
  canticum vocatum _a ballade_ literam sive scriptum scribi imprimi
  publicari sive exponi _anglice sett forthe_ et offensione illa
  non existente punibili per statutum factum in anno vicesimo
  quinto regni nuper regis Edwardi tertii concernens proditionem
  sive declarationem proditionis vel per aliquod aliud statutum per
  quod aliqua offensio facta sive declarata fuit proditio quod tunc
  quælibet talis offensio reputaretur et adjudicaretur felonia et
  offensores in eodem inde convicti et attincti existentes paterentur
  tales pœnas mortis et forisfacturas prout in casu feloniæ usitatum
  fuit absque aliquo beneficio clericatus sive sanctuarii allocando
  offensori in ea parte prout per statutum prædictum inter alia
  plenius apparet. Cumque hoc non obstante quidam Willielmus Alleyn
  Theologiæ Professor desiderans dictam dominam Reginam supremam
  dominam nostram in odium et malevolentiam apud omnes subditos
  suos inducere et quantum in ipso fuit efficere ut omnes subditi
  ipsius dominæ Reginæ existimarent quod dicta domina Regina
  fuit heretica et elapsa a vera Christiana fide et quod fuit
  apostata princeps advisate et cum maliciosa intentione versus
  dictam dominam Reginam quendam librum in partibus transmarinis
  imprimi fecit continentem quamplurimas falsas seditiosas et
  scandalosas materias ad defamationem dictæ dominæ Reginæ nunc et
  ad excitationem insurrectionis et rebellionis infra hoc regnum
  Angliæ et ad subvertionem veræ et sinceræ Dei religionis in eodem
  regno recte et pie stabilitatæ videlicet in uno loco in eodem
  libro hæc Anglicana verba sequentia. _They_ (innuendo Edmundum
  Campion Radulphum Sherwin et alios falsos proditores nuper de alta
  proditione attinctos) _might have spoken theire minde boldely nowe
  at theyre passage and departure from this worlde as sythence that
  tyme we understande a worshipfull laye gentleman_ (innuendo quendam
  Jacobum Leyborne nuper similiter de alta proditione attinctum)
  _did, who protested both at his arraynement and at his death that
  her Majestie_ (innuendo dictam dominam Reginam nunc) _was not his
  lawfull Queene for two respectes, the one for her byrthe, thother
  for the excommunicacion; her Highenes havinge sought neyther
  dispensacion for the first nor absolucion for the seconde._ Et
  in alio loco in eodem libro hæc Anglicana verba sequentia. _By
  the fall of the kinge from the fayth the daunger is so evident
  and inevitable that God had not sufficiently provided for our
  salvacion and the preservacion of his Churche and holy lawes yf
  there were no waye to deprive or restrain apostate Princes_ (falso
  innuendo dictam dominam Reginam fore Principem apostatam.) _We
  see howe the whole worlde did runne from Christe after Julian to
  playne Paganisme, after Valens to Arrianisme, after Edward the
  Sixth with us into Zwynglianisme, and would doe into Turcisme yf
  any powrable Prince will leade his subjectes that waye. Yf our
  fayth or perdicion shoulde on this sorte passe by the pleasure of
  everie seculer prince and no remedie for yt in the state of the
  Newe Testament, but men must hold and obey him to what infidelitie
  soever he fall, then we were in worse case_ (innuendo cunctum
  populum hujus regni Angliæ) _then heathens and all other humayne
  commonwealthes which both before Christe and after have had meanes
  to deliver themselves from such tyrantes as were intollerable and
  evidently pernicious to humaine societie_ (falso prætendens per
  illud dictam dominam Reginam fore intollerabilem et perniciosum
  tyrannum societati subditorum suorum.) _The bonde and obligacion
  we have entred into for the service of Christe and the Churche far
  exceedeth all other duety which we owe to any humaine Creature. And
  therefore where the obedience to the inferior hindereth the service
  of the other which is superior, we must by lawe and order discharge
  ourselves of the inferior. The wyfe yf she cannot live with her
  owne husband (beinge an infidell or an heretique) without injurie
  and dishonor to God, she maye departe from him or contrariwise he
  from her for the like cause, neyther oweth the innocent partie
  nor the other can lawfullie clayme any conjugall dutie or debt
  in this case. The verie bond slave which is in another kinde no
  lesse bounde to his Lorde and Maister then the subjecte to his
  Soveraigne, maye also by the auncient imperiall lawes departe and
  refuse to obey or serve him yf he become an heretique, yea ipso
  facto he is made free. Finally the parentes that become heretiques
  lose the superioritie and dominion they have by lawe or nature
  over their owne children. Therefore lett no man marveile that
  in case of heresie the Soveraigne looseth his superiority over
  his people and kingedome_ (innuendo per illud quod dicta domina
  Regina nunc perderet superioritatem super subditos suos). Et in
  alio loco ejusdem libri hæc Anglicana verba sequentia. _And as for
  his holines accion in Ireland_ (innuendo invasionem per medium
  Romani episcopi in Hibernia factam) _we that are neyther so wise
  as to be worthie nor so mallaparte as to challenge to knowe his
  intencions, councell, and disposicions of those matters, can nor
  will neyther defend nor condemne, onely this is evidente that these
  small succors which were given by him_ (innuendo dictum Episcopum
  Romanum) _to the Irishe, or rather suffered at their owne adventure
  to goe into those warres came uppon the ymportunate sute of the
  sore afflicted Catholiques, and some of the chiefest nobilitie of
  that countrye, of whose continuall complaintes knowne calamities,
  and intollerable distresses of conscience and otherwyse yt maye
  be he was moved with compassion and did that in cause of religion
  against one_ (innuendo dictam dominam Reginam nunc) _whome he toke
  in his owne judgement rightly by his predecessor's sentence to be
  deposed, and in a quarrell in his sight most just and godly. And
  perhaps he_ (dictum episcopum Romanum innuendo) _was the rather
  readie to doe this for Irelande, for that the sea Apostolique
  hath an old clayme to the Soveraigntye of that countrie._ Et in
  alio loco in eodem libro hæc Anglicana verba sequentia. _And this
  our countrie's scourge_ (innuendo hoc regnum Angliæ) _proceedinge
  wholye of our notorious forsakinge the Catholicke Churche and
  sea apostolique_ (innuendo sedem Romani Episcopi) _began first
  in King Henrie the eight beinge Radex peccati of our dayes_ ubi
  revera Domina Regina nunc non fuit nec est heretica nec elapsa
  a vera Christiana fide nec fuit nec est apostata princeps nec
  incidit in heresim nec perdidit superioritatem et jus super
  cunctum populum et regnum suum et in quibus regnis revera nullus
  episcopus Romanus habet potestatem deprivandi sive deponendi
  aliquem principem. Quidam tamen Thomas Allfild nuper de Londonia
  clericus statutum prædictum minime ponderans felonice ut felo dictæ
  dominæ Reginæ nunc decimo die Septembris anno regni dictæ dominæ
  Reginæ nunc vicesimo sexto apud Londoniam videlicet in parochia
  Omnium Sanctorum in Breadstreate in warda de Breadstreate Londoniæ
  advisate et cum maliciosa intentione versus dictam dominam Reginam
  nunc prædictum librum prædicti Willielmi Alleyne continentem
  prædictas falsas seditiosas et scandalosas materias in Anglicanis
  verbis superius recitatas et quamplurima alia ad defamationem
  dictæ dominæ Reginæ nunc et ad excitationem insurrectionis et
  rebellionis infra hoc regnum Angliæ diversis subditis dictæ dominæ
  Reginæ publicari et exponi causavit _anglice, did cause to be
  published and sette forthe_ contra formam statuti prædicti in hoc
  casu provisi et contra pacem dictæ dominæ Reginæ nunc coronam et
  dignitatem suas.

  The following account of the trial of Allfield, which took place
  on Monday, July 6th, 1585, is taken from Lansdowne M. S., (British
  Museum) 45, no. 74.

  The effect and the substaunce of the matter that was done and
  spoken at the arraignement of Thomas Allfeild, a Jesuett Preiste,
  att Newgate, uppon Mondaie, the fifth Julie, 1585.

  First he and his ffellowes were brought from Newgate and placed at
  the barre. My Lord Maior, My Lord Buckhurste, the Master of the
  Rolls, My Lord Anderson, Mr. Sackforth, Sir Rowland Hayward, Mr.
  Owen, Mr. Younge, and the Recorder, sett downe uppon the Benche.
  Mr. Towne Clarke redd the Commyssion of Oire and determiner; after
  this, a substaunciall jurie of the best commoners to the nosmber of
  twentie or there-abowtes, were sworne to enquire, &c.

  Then the Recorder gave that speciall charge that belongeth to that
  commission; after that done, the enqueste of inquirie went upp
  into the Councell Chamber at the Sessions Hall: in which place
  Mr. Attorney and Mr. Solicitor did reade unto the enquest the
  three severall indictmentes, and there the offenders, uppon good
  evidence geven were indicted. Billa vera was sett uppon everye
  one of them. The enquest returned to the courte, and beinge called
  by name they presented the bylls to the courte; the Towne Clarke
  received them and delivered them to the Recorder, and he opened
  them and showed them to the rest of the Justices howe they were
  fownde. And thereuppon the Towne Clerke was willed to call them to
  the barr and soe to arraigne them, who begane first with Allfeilde,
  and the indictment redd, he was demaunded whether he were gyltie
  of the matter conteyned in that indictment, to the which he would
  make noe aunswere, and prayed that he might be hard speake, and
  thereuppon he used a certen ffrivolous speache conteyninge noe
  matter, the effect whereof was that the cause in question was such,
  that the same owght to be tryed before learned men in Divinitie,
  and not before layemen; and after with much adoe he pleded not
  gyltie. And being asked howe he would be tryed, and also beinge
  tolde that he owght to be tryed by God and the countrie, he made
  a longe staye, and saied that it was noe reason that xij ignorant
  men should trye a matter of religion, but that it owght to be
  tryed by learned men. And then was it told him, that a matter in
  ffact was laied to his charge, viz., for bringinge into the realme
  and utteringe of a certen slaunderous and lewed booke against her
  Majestie and the realme, devised by one Doctor Allen. To the which
  Allfeild aunswered and saied expresslie that the same booke was a
  loyall booke, a lawfull booke, a good and a true booke, and that
  the same was prynted in Parrys under the King's priviledge there;
  and was allowed for a good and a lawfull booke throwghowt all the
  universities in Christendome beyonde the seas, and that it towched
  nothing butt matters of religion. And beinge asked whether it were
  a matter of religion that the Pope had aucthoritie to depryve the
  Quene of England, and he aunswered that in generaltie it was a
  matter of Religion that the Pope had aucthoritie _to deprive any
  Kinge yf he sawe cause_, ffor that the Pope was a regall kinge
  and prince and that he might take armes in hand as well as other
  kinges might doe. Yt was aunswered him that the courte sate not to
  trye matters of religion, but a matter de facto, that whether he
  browght the said slaunderous bookes into the realme, and whether he
  had disparsed them. To the which he aunswered that he had brought
  ffyve or syx hundreth of the same bookes into the realme, and that
  he had disparced them as he sawe occasion. And further he affirmed
  expresslie, that the booke was a good booke and lawfull, and
  declared as he had before done, howe the same was allowed, &c. And
  after he was urged to put himselffe uppon his tryall, and was put
  in remembraunce what the punishment of the lawe was, yf judgement
  were geven against him, de payne fort et dure. And thereuppon yt
  was asked him howe he would be tryed, and he aunswered by God
  and the countrye; and then he was told by the courte, that uppon
  the evidence geven, he should be hard att large, and then was a
  jurye of verie sufficient commoners called, and he was especiallie
  warned by the Towne Clerke to take his challenges unto them as they
  should come to the booke to be sworne. The jurye beinge sworne,
  the indictment was redd, the which conteyned divers faulse, lewed,
  and slaunderous partes of Doctor Allen's booke, tendinge playnlye
  by expresse wordes, not onelie to treason, but most manifest and
  shamefull slaunders against her Majestie. Yet did Allfeild not
  sticke to saye, _that it towched not the Quene any moore then it
  did the Frenche Kinge or Spanish Kinge_. He travelled verie much
  to make the Commissioners to beleve that they understood _not
  the slaunderous booke, addinge, this withall the same booke was
  especiallie devised and wrytten by Doctor Allen to aunswere him who
  had wrytten the booke of Justice of Englande, and not to slaunder
  the Quene_. And after much speache used, and manye repeticions made
  all to one effecte, by Allfeilde, there was delivered to the jurye
  one of the bookes to compaire the wordes of the indictment with
  the booke and the examinacions, and they fyndinge them to agree,
  and hearinge him soe stowtlie to justifie the same to be a loyall
  booke. They retourned after a competent tyme, and beinge called by
  name and the prysoner beinge called to the barre, they were asked
  first of Allfeild, whether he were gyltye of the offence that was
  conteyned in the indictment. The fforeman sayed gyltie, &c.

  And after beinge asked what he could saye whye judgment of deathe
  should not be geven against him, he aunswered that the offence
  was pardoned, the pardone was redd, and yt was told him that his
  offence was excepted out of the pardone. And then did the Recorder
  call him fourthe, and recyted the effecte of the indictment and
  howe that he was fownd gyltie; and told him that he wondered that
  his ffather in Kinge Henrie's daies, beinge an usher of Eaton,
  and of a good religion, and had brought upp many learned devynes,
  and other that served the Quene in temporall causes, whereof
  hundrethes, the Recorder himselffe was one of the meanest, and
  that the same prisoner passed thorough the same Colledge, and
  so to the Kinges Colledge, beinge both of the Quene's highnes
  foundacion: and nowe had he so unnaturallie and beastlie behaved
  himselffe that he was become the first that ever was arraigned
  of ffelonye of any that ever passed those Colledges by the space
  of these fiftie yeres and moore. And then saied the Recorder, ye
  knowe that Christ paied trybute to Cesor, and commaunded that
  Cesor should be obeyed, and that eche man should yeld to Cesor his
  dewties. And that St. Paule in the end of the Actes was accused for
  Religion by the Jewes, and it was told him that he should be sent
  to Jerusalem to be tryed before the Preist there. And he aunswered
  that he stoode before the Tribunall or Judgement seat of Cesor,
  and there he owght to be tryed. And soe he appeled to Cesor, where
  his cause was hard, and he dismissed. Here, quoth the Recorder, ye
  see that Christe commaunded that Cesor should be obeyed, he saied
  not deposed. And St. Paule did appeell to Cesor and not to Peter,
  because he tooke Cesor to be his lawfull kinge. And all men knowe
  that Cesor was not of the faith of Christ, nor yet did he beleve as
  St. Paule did; and after a fewe wordes moore he gave judgement, and
  commaunded the Sheriffes to doe execucion. This Allfeild appered to
  have noe skill at all eyther in the old or newe Testament; there
  appeared noe manner of learninge in him; he was bolde, stowte, and
  arrogant,--he behaved himselffe more arrogantlie then any that ever
  the Commissioners had hard or seene in theire tymes; his wordes
  were such against her Majestie, that all the people fell into a
  murmer; he never used one worde of reverence towardes her highnes.
  And att his passage to execucion the people offered to praye with
  him and he refused theire offer, and saied that if there were any
  Catholickes there he would be glad to have theire assistaunce.


18.

The discoverie of witchcraft, wherein the lewde dealing of
witches and witchmongers is notablie detected; the knaverie of
conjurors, the impietie of inchantors, the follie of soothsaiers,
the impudent falshood of cousenors, the infidelitie of atheists,
the pestilent practises of Pythonists, the curiositie of figure
casters, the vanitie of dreamers, the beggerlie art of Alcumystrie,
the abhomination of idolatrie, the horrible art of poisoning, the
vertue and power of naturall magike, and all the conveiances of
Legierdemaine and iuggling, are deciphered, and many other things
opened which have long lien hidden, howbeit verie necessarie to be
knowne. Heereunto is added a treatise upon the nature and substance
of spirits and divels, &c.; all latelie written by Reginald Scot,
Esquire. 1584.

  Many copies of this book were burnt by order of King James I.


19.

A Lamentable Complaint of the Commonalty, by way of Supplication to
the High Court of Parliament for a learned ministry, 1585.

  For printing this tract Robert Waldegrave was kept prisoner in the
  White Lion for twenty weeks, as asserted by Martin Marprelate in
  "Hay any worke for a cooper."


20.

Martin Marprelate Tracts.

1.--The Epitome, 1588. 2.--Hay any worke for Cooper; penned and
compiled by Martin the Metropolitane; no date. 3.--Martyn Senior.
4.--Martyn Junior.

  For printing and publishing these books, Sir Richard Knightly, Mr.
  Hales, and Sir ---- Wickstone and his wife, were cited into the
  Court of Star Chamber on Friday, the 13th February, 31 Elizabeth,
  1588. Knightley was many times member of Parliament for the County
  of Northampton in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. He was a great
  favourer of the Puritan party, and at the expence of printing these
  libels, as was reported, being influenced by Snape and some other
  leading ministers of this County. These libels were printed by one
  Walgrave, who had a travelling press for this purpose, which was
  once brought down to Fawesley, and from thence by several stages
  removed to Manchester, where both the press and the workmen were
  seized by the Earl of Derby.

  Sir Richard and his confederates were cited into the Star Chamber,
  and received the following sentences: himself for allowing _The
  Epitome_ to be printed in his house, fined £2000; Mr. Hales for
  allowing _The Supplication to Parliament_ and _Hay any worke for
  Cooper_ to be printed in his house, 1000 marks; Sir ---- Wickstone,
  for obeying his wife and not discovering it, 500 marks; Lady
  Wickstone for allowing _Martyn Senior_ and _Martyn Junior_ to be
  printed in their house, £1000; and all of them imprisonment at her
  Majesty's pleasure. Upon the intercession however of Whitgift,
  Archbishop of Canterbury, whom they had most insulted, they were
  set at liberty, and had their fines remitted.


21.

A Dialogue wherein is plainly laide open the tyrannicall dealing of
L. Bishops against God's children; with certaine points of doctrine,
wherein they approove themselves (according to D. Bridges his
judgement) to be truely Bishops of the Divell. 1589.

  This book was burnt by order of the Bishops, and is alluded to in
  Udall's Demonstration. It is in the form of a dialogue between four
  speakers,--"a Puritan, a Papist, a Jacke of both sides, and an
  Idoll Minister." It was reprinted in the year 1640.


22.

A demonstration of the trueth of that discipline which Christ hath
prescribed in his worde for the government of his church, in all
times and places, untill the end of the world. No publisher or date.

  For writing and publishing this book John Udall, a Puritan
  minister, was brought before Lord Cobham and others on Tuesday, the
  13th January, 1589/90, and examined as to the authorship; but on
  his refusing to be sworn he was committed to the Gatehouse close
  prisoner. On the 24th July, 1590, he was arraigned at the assizes
  at Croydon and found guilty, and the next day was brought up for
  judgment, but after long arguing with the judges he was respited
  on condition of writing a humble submission or supplication to her
  Majesty for his offence. In February, 1590/1, he was again brought
  up at the assizes in Southwark, when he received sentence; soon
  afterwards her Majesty was moved to grant him a pardon, but it was
  never obtained. On March 3rd, 1593, he wrote a letter from the
  White Lion prison, Southwark, to Lord Burghley, beseeching release,
  having been in durance for three years. The Earl of Essex, he said,
  had the draft of a pardon ready for her Majesty to sign it, and he
  besought his lordship to solicit her to do so; but the appeal was
  of no avail, and he soon after died in prison quite heart-broken.

  There is a copy of this book in the King's Library, Brit. Mus., and
  on one of the fly leaves the following note is written in an early
  hand. "Mr. Udall.--For this booke he was questioned, arraygned, and
  condemned, at which time he sayd, 'The blood of Udall (as Abell's
  against Cayne) shall cry out against you;' but he was saved by
  means of Sir Walter Rawleigh's mediation to Queen Elizabeth, but
  imprisoned all his time. The chiefest things they tooke advantage
  at was that passage towards the end of the epistle to the Bishops.
  _If it come in by that means that it will make all your hearts ake,
  blame yourselves._"


23.

Certain discourses written by Sir John Smythe, Knight, concerning
the formes and effects of divers sorts of weapons, and other verie
important matters militarie, greatlie mistaken by divers of our men
of warre in these daies; and chiefly of the mosquet, the caliver,
and the long bow; as also of the great sufficiencie, excellencie,
and wonderful effects of archers: with many notable examples and
other particularities, by him presented to the nobilitie of this
Realme, and published for the benefite of this his native Countrie of
England. London, 1590.

  This work, according to Strype's Annals, 4, 46, was forbidden to be
  sold. In the Lansdowne M.S.S., Brit. Mus., (No. 64, art. 43) there
  is a letter from Sir T. Heneage to Lord Burghley, dated May 24th,
  1590, concerning the suppression by the Queen's command, of this
  book.


24.

A Conference about the next succession to the Crowne of Ingland,
divided into two partes. Whereof the first conteyneth the discourse
of a civill lawyer, how and in what manner propinquity of blood is
to be preferred. And the second, the speech of a temporall lawyer,
about the particuler titles of all such as do or may pretende within
Ingland or without, to be the next successior. Whereunto is also
added a new and perfect arbor or genealogie of the discents of all
the kinges and princes of Ingland, from the Conquest unto this day,
whereby each man's pretence is made more plaine. Directed to the
Right Honourable the earl of Essex, of her Majesties privy councell,
and of the noble order of the Garter. Published by R. Doleman.
Imprinted at N. with licence, MDXCIIII.

  The intention of this book was to support the title of the Infanta
  against that of King James, after the death of Queen Elizabeth. The
  real authors were Robert Parsons the Jesuit, Cardinal Allen, and
  Sir Francis Englefield; and the printer is said to have been hung,
  drawn, and quartered.

  It was rigorously suppressed, and by the Parliament of 35 Elizabeth
  it was enacted that "whosoever should be found to have it in his
  house should be guilty of high treason." It was also condemned by
  the University of Oxford on account of its dangerous positions,
  particularly that which says "Birthright and proximity of blood do
  give no title to rule or government;" and was burnt in the School
  Quadrangle there in July, 1683.

  According to Camden, in his Life and Reign of Queen Elizabeth, (p.
  576) the purport of this book, which quite laid aside the business
  of birthright, was: _That the ancient laws of the land relating
  to hereditary succession ought to be altered. That new laws ought
  to be made about the choice of a King, and that none but a Roma
  Catholick, how near akin soever to the Crown, ought to succeed to
  it._ Most of the Kings of England they traduced as mere usurpers,
  and all of the blood-royal in England as illegitimate, and so
  uncapable of succession. The King of Scots' title to the crown,
  though most certain and indisputable, they attempted to invalidate;
  and by sham tricks and devices endeavoured to set up the Infanta
  Isabella, the King of Spain's daughter, purely for being a Roman
  Catholic; a thing I am ashamed to mention, because _the Priest's
  lips ought to preserve knowledge, and they should stand having
  their loins girt about with truth_. Their first plea was, because,
  as this book pretends, she fetches her pedigree from Constance, the
  daughter of William the Conqueror, King of England, and wife to
  Alan Fergant, Earl of Bretagne; whereas notwithstanding Gulielmus
  Gemeticensis, who lived about that time, declares in his last book,
  that she died without issue, and he is followed by the consent of
  all the writers of the affairs of Bretagne. The next pretence was,
  because she had her descent from Eleanor, the eldest daughter of
  King Henry II, who was married to Alphonsus IX, King of Castile,
  whereas Pope Innocent III makes it out in Matthew Paris, (p. 381),
  that Maud, the wife of Henry Leo, Duke of Saxony, and mother of the
  Emperor Otho IV was his eldest daughter; and Robert, abbot of St.
  Michael's Mount, who christened her affirms that she was born 1162.
  A third argument was, because she was a descendant from Blanch, the
  eldest daughter of the said Eleanor, which was proved to be false
  both by Roderigo, Archbishop of Toledo, in his ninth book, and Pope
  Innocent, a writer of better credit, and both of them living in the
  same age. Another reason alleged was because she came originally
  from Beatrice, the daughter of Henry III, King of England, though
  'twas forgot, in the mean time, that she had two brethren, Edward
  I, King of England, and Edward, Earl of Lancaster, from whom a
  great part of the nobility of England were lineally descended,
  besides the Royal Family. Again they asserted the Infanta's claim
  by the House of Portugal, and maintained on the same bottom the
  title of the Dukes of Parma and Braganza, from Philippa, the
  daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, whom they make to be
  his eldest daughter by his wife Blanch; whereas Frosard, who was
  a courtier at that time, proves (fol. 169 of the second part of
  his history) that his eldest daughter was Elizabeth, wife to John
  Holland, afterwards Duke of Exeter, from whose loins proceeded a
  large race of nobility, all the kingdom over.

  Among the Domestic State Papers of the reign of Queen Elizabeth
  there is extant a copy of a letter from Robert Parsons to an
  unknown recipient, dated June 15th, 1599, concerning the book now
  under description. It is as follows:--

  Doctour Gifforde hath
  a lettere to prove this
  discourse is of Parsons'
  doinge.

      "The opinion and judgmente of
      C. A. before his death, concerninge
      the late printed booke of the Successyon,
      and certayne pointes
      therunto appertayninge.

  "For that you are desirous my lovinge Frennd to understande of
  certayntie whether C. A. before his death had reade the late
  publyshed booke aboute the Successyon, and what his opinyon,
  judgment, and censure was of the same, and of all that affaires;
  and for that you shewe in your lettere, that greate difference
  and varyetie in judgmentes, discourses, reasons, and affectyons
  doe beginne to discover themselves ther, where you are about
  this matter, I shall answere your whole demaunde as truly and
  perticulerly as the compasse of a lettere will give me leave;
  havinge had (as you knowe) noe small meanes (by reason of my
  intrinsicall familliarrytie with C. A. and in his most secrette
  affaires) to knowe his meaninge fully in the cause. First, when
  I did assure you that C. A. reade over the booke more then once,
  and that with much attention, and liked the same excedinge well
  for the whole subjecte and argumente therof, esteminge yt very
  necessary for all sortes of English people that such a booke
  should be written, to give them lighte in a matter importinge them
  soe highlye as doth the successyon of the Crowne, wherof _all
  dependeth, that is to say, (as he was wonte to saye), both life,
  honor, goodes, and a greate peace of the soule_; and he woulde
  often affirme _that noe lawe in the worlde_ could be more unjuste
  or more contrary to all reason or conscience then to forbide men
  to speake or treate of that which above all thinges concerneth
  them moste. Secondly, I can tell you also that C. A. had studyed
  much this matter of successyon before his death, and had gathered
  divers notes and observatyons together with intention as yt seemeth
  _to have written a discourse_ therof himselfe, if he had not bynne
  prevente by this other booke, which did soe much contente and
  satisfye him, as presently he lefte of that cogitation, and sente
  all his papers, or the most parte therof, unto Mr. Fra. Peter,
  with whome he had conferred largly not longe before his deathe,
  by letteres of this affayre, doubtinge somwhat whether the time
  for some circumstances were fitte or noe to let the booke goe
  abroade, thoughe on the other side he were full of opinion that if
  it founde free passage it coulde not chose but doe infinite good.
  And as for the firste parte therof, which treateth of matter more
  in generall, and _sheweth that propinquity and ancetry_ of bloude
  alone, althoughe it weare certaynely knowne, is not suffycyente
  to challenge admissyon to a crowne, excepte other conditions and
  circumstances requisite be founde alsoe in the person that doth
  pretende; as namely, _witte_, _reason_, and above all other thinges
  true religion; and that many nexte in bloude Royall have bynne
  justly barred and putt backe, and some alsoe deprived which were
  in posessyon, for these and lesser defectes, in all Christyan
  countryes throughout the worlde, and that this was allowed and
  ratifyed by God himselfe, and that all Christyan commonwealthes
  _had authoritye, yea obligation_, to doe and followe the same when
  just occasyon shoulde be offred.

  "All these pointes, I say, which are largly handled in the firste
  parte of this booke, C. A. did greately like and allowe of, and
  sayde that they were pointes both true and evidente in themselves,
  and substancyally proved by the auther of the booke; and for the
  sayde author not to exasperate any parte, houldeth himselfe in
  these generall tearmes and propositions onely, without descendinge
  to perticulers. C. A. was wonte to aply them to perticuler state
  and case of Englishe Catholiques in these our dayes, affirminge not
  onely they mighte use this libertye of admittinge or rejectinge
  the next pretender, whatsoever his tytle were by meanes of bloud,
  in respecte of his false religion. But moreover, that they _were
  bounde in conscynce_ soe to doe, and that none mighte without
  committynge grevous synne, favour, further, ayde, or give consente
  to the admissyon of any Prince when the place should be voyde,
  that was knowne or justly suspected to be enimye to the Catholique
  Romayne faythe, or undoubtedly affected towards the same; and
  whosoever for worldly or humayne respectes, as countryshippes,
  kindred, freindshippe, proper intereste, or the like, should beare
  a contrary minde to this, did greatly offende God therin, and
  oughte not to be accompted a true and zealous Catholique; moreover,
  that all such as in our dayes or former tymes have followed the
  contrary courses in chosinge or admittinge ther princes, not
  respectinge God and his cause in the firste place, accordinge to
  goode conscyence, but followinge those humayne respectes above
  mentioned, have alwayes _lightly receaved theire distructyon by
  those selfe same Princes_ whome soe corruptly they preferred;
  wherof C. A. would recounte often tymes more perticuler examples,
  and notable storyes both of our Country and of others round aboute
  us, and alwayes woulde conclude that whatsoever Englishman after
  soe longe a storme of heresye woulde not sticke onely and wholy
  to a knowne Catholique Prince for the next successyon, woulde
  adventure to followe other blinde, and broken hopes and respectes
  agayne was not worthy to have the name of opinion of a sounde
  Catholique, but either of a fonde or mallityous polliticke, and
  thus much for the firste parte of the booke.

  "Touchinge the seconde parte, wherin the severall and perticuller
  titles of five royall houses or lyneages are discussed,--to
  witte, of the house of Scotland, Suffolke, Clarence, Britaigne,
  and Portugall; and they by the pretencions of all such perticuler
  persons as in our dayes doe or may pretende to the nexte successyon
  of Englande, by reason of the sayde houses; as namely the Kinge
  of Scottes, the lady Arbella in the house of Scotland, the Earle
  of Hertford's children, and the Earle of Darby in the house of
  Suffolke, and the Earle of Huntingdon and the Pooles in the house
  of Clarence, the lady Isabella, the Infanta of Spaine in the house
  of Bretaigne, and the Kinge of Spaine with the Dd of Parma and
  Braganza in the house of Portugall; of all these pointes, after
  dilligente readinge over and wayinge the booke, C. A., his opinyon
  was as followeth.--First, that ther was soe much sayde in this
  booke for and agaynst everye one of these five houses and the
  different pretenders that are in eache one therof, as in a very
  wise and learned man's judgment and conscyence was sufficyente to
  brede greate doubte which house hath the best tytle by neerenes
  and lawfulnes of bloud onely, all and every parte havinge probable
  reasons for itselfe and againste his adversarye, wherof he did
  inferre, that if the adversitye of religion where not in all these
  competitors such and soe greate as it is, yet might a good man for
  other lesser respectes and considerations of the whole publicke,
  make choise of any one of these house, or at the leastewise of the
  principalleste, with sufficyente reason to secure his conscyence
  for not doinge againste the right of successyon, the sayde righte
  beinge soe doubtfull and ambiguous as this auther doth prove it
  to be. Secondly, his judgmente was, that in respecte of restoringe
  or establishinge of the Catholique religion in our countrye, with
  other pointes therunto belonginge, much lesse doubte or scruple
  may there be, to choose, admitte, or refuse any one of these
  competitors which may be presumed _woulde best performe the sayde
  establishmente of religion_, and with lesse danger, trouble, warre,
  bloudshed, or dangers of our Countrye and common wealthe, wherunto
  princypally and onely, he would alwayes say, that good and wise
  oughte to have theire eye more then to other lesser respectes of
  fleshe and bloude. And whether the partie was borne at home or
  abroade, weare of kindred or the like, for that the former points
  of religion, equitye, wisdome, couradge, and vertue in a Christian
  prince, maketh his people and common wealthe happye, and not
  whether he was borne amongst them or noe, and consequently are more
  to be respected in admissyon or conclusyon of any competytors. And
  as for the severall tytles of these five houses, C. A. was wonte
  to saye that he would have wished with all his harte the like I
  have heard Mr. J. P. say alsoe, that seinge K. H. 7th was once
  placed in the Crowne, and had shewed himselffe a good Catholicke
  kinge, his yssue might have enjoyed the same for ever without any
  change or further examination of theire righte; but now forasmuch
  as through the haynous synnes as may be supposed of K. H. the 8,
  his ofspringe are fallen from the sayde Catholique religion, yt
  semeth God's most just judgmentes that ther tytles are called in
  questyon; and forasmuch as the tytle of Kinge H. 7th, of whome
  descended the twoe houses of Scotland and Suffolke, cometh but
  from John, Duke of Somersette, bastard sonne to John of Gaunte,
  Duke of Lancaster, by his thirde wife; and then the tytle of the
  house of Portugall cometh from Ladye Phillippe, eldest and lawfull
  daughter of the sayde John of Gaunte. And that moreover C. A. had
  perticuler intelligence which the author of the booke seemeth
  not to have knowne when he wrotte yt, that yt apeareth to this
  daye by the recordes of England that when the aforesayde John,
  Duke of Somersett, (of whome Kinge Henry the Seventh and his line
  descendeth) was legittymate by parliamente, expresse exceptyon
  was made that noe pretention therby should be given to him or his
  posterytie for the Crowne of England; for these reasons and many
  others which the author aleadgeth in his booke, it semeth to C. A.
  that if the cause of Portugall should be put before equall judges,
  it woulde be very doubtfull which party woulde gette the better.
  And for the house of Clarence C. A. never made any accompte of
  the tytle in comparison of the yssue of Kinge Henry the Seventh,
  seinge that they of Clarence onely doe pretende by the daughter of
  George, Duke of Clarence, of the house of Yorke, yonger brother to
  King Edward the Fourth, and the house of Scotlande and other yssue
  of King Henry the Seventh, descended of Elyzabeth, eldest daughter
  of the same Kinge Edward the Fourth, whoe was eldeste brother
  to Duke George; soe as in the very house of Yorke the lynes of
  Scotland and Suffolke doe goe evydently before that of Clarence;
  and thus for the tytles of those foure houses. Touchinge the fifte
  house of Britagnye and Fraunce, whose heire is the lady Infanta of
  Spaine, C. A., his opinyon was that much was sayde and pithely in
  the booke, and that the quallitie and circumstance of the personne
  pretendente doe greatly comend the pretence, for that all thinges
  considered, he did see noe other person in the worlde soe fitte to
  ende all controversies, to breake all difficultyes, and to avoyde
  all dangers on every syde, as if this lady should be agreed on of
  all handes to have her title established. This C. A. would prove
  by manie arguments, utillityes, and commodyties which he sayde
  woulde ensue by this meanes more then by any other, as alsoe by
  the difficultyes and damages of all other wayes, whatsoever should
  be devised. For firste, he was wonte to saye, that if the house of
  Portugall should be preferred, many difficultyes would be aboute
  the admittinge of the Kinge of Spaine, both for that the English,
  of what stocke soever, would not willingly yelde to have ther
  Crowne subjected to any other, nor would other Christyan princes
  rounde aboute like of that increase of soe greate a monarchye,
  and consequently there woulde followe much warre and bloudshed;
  for the Dukes of Parma and Braganza, which alsoe are of this
  house of Portugall, though they be worthie Princes, yet greate
  difficultyes doe seeme woulde followe, both for that they wante
  forces sufficyently to gette and defende soe greate a Crowne;
  as alsoe for that theire tytles to the successyon of Englande
  may seeme in parte to be decyded against them alreadye in the
  controversye that is paste of the Crowne of Portugall, though some
  men will saye that there is a difference in the state of these
  twoe successyons. In the house of Suffolke, that conteyneth the
  Earles of Hertforde and Darbye there are partely alsoe the same,
  and partly farre greater difficultyes; the same for that the powers
  are not like to be sufficyente for soe difficulte an enterprise,
  and farre greater, for that the tytles doe seeme evidently behinde
  that of Scotlande, which cometh of the eldeste daughter of King
  Henry the Seventh, and ther is onely of the yonger syde the
  impedimente of the religion, wherof I shall speake presentlye.
  There remayneth then onely the house of Scotland, and namely the
  Kinge's tytle, for of Arbellae's pretention C. A. never made any
  accompte at all, she beinge as is knowne of a seconde marryadge,
  and that intangled with many difficultyes and doubtes as the booke
  declareth; about which tytle of the Kinge of Scottes, C. A. was
  wonte to saye that albeyt for the causes above mentyoned of the
  quiet posessyon of Henry the Seventh, he was longe desirous that
  noe mutation should be made in this yssue, espetyally as longe as
  the Queene of Scottes lived, which was a knowne Catholique, and soe
  longe after her death as there was any hope of the reduction and
  conformitye of her sonne (nowe Kinge) to the Catholique faithe;
  upon which hope both C. A. and Mr. Fr. P. and other the freindes
  labored earnestly for his prefermente divers yeares together, yet
  afterwardes seinge the perseverance of the Kinge in his professyon
  of herysie, and consyderinge that havinge bin broughte up and
  nourished in the same from his tender yeares, though otherwise as
  it is thoughte of noe evill nature, it would be hard to expecte any
  sure or firme reduction in a prince of his yeares and libertye,
  and that of this one pointe notwithstandinge depended the whole
  good or distruction of our whole country and realme, C. A. beganne
  seriously to thinke better of the matter, and findinge by searche
  that the small obligation that he or other of the English nation
  have to this Kinge in respecte of his neernes of bloud above the
  reste as abondantly is shewed in this booke; and that on the
  other syde, conscyence did forbyd him to faver a pretendor of his
  religyon, what tytle or nerenes in bloud soever he had. For these
  causes and considerations C. A. changed his whole opinion in that
  behalfe; espetyally after divers learned and grave men of the
  Kinge's owne natyon which for many yeares had labored to doe him
  good every way, gave testymonye upon theire conscyences, they had
  noe hope or probabillitye lefte of his conversyon. And matters
  standinge thus, and beinge once brought within differency into this
  ballance of due consideration, ther offred themselves alsoe above
  and beyonde this, divers other pointes alsoe not unworthye to be
  wayed,--as for example, the hard and bricke combination or joyninge
  together of English and Scottes natures, customes, enclinations,
  and wills, under one Kinge, the dislike and repugnance that all
  other princes rounde aboute us would have that these kingdomes
  should be joyned in one, from which twoe fountaynes onely (if noe
  other difficultye were there) woulde never wante in matter both
  of endlesse strife from the firste of the twoe, neither helpe
  to encourage, continue, and maintayne the same from the second
  fountayne, which twoe ga.. inconveniences beinge joyned with the
  former, which is the greateste and chefeste of all others, that
  may be to witte, the King beinge soe hartely affected to heresye
  and drowned in the same, and soe allyed and entrapped every waye
  with heritiques that if he should for a shewe or for any temporall
  respecte, upon the perswasyons of some pollitique or Athiste,
  make countenance to be a Catholicke, ther could never be any true
  assurance had therof, nor hope of any sincere reformation by his
  meanes. All these considerations layde together in the brest of C.
  A., (that desired nothinge but the true honor and service of God,
  assurance of religion, and good of his Countrye), made him very
  pensive before his deathe, and to write many longe letteres of his
  owne hand to Mr. F. P. whoe then lay sicke, and finally after much
  musinge, and espetyally after he had much vewed and waighed well
  the reasons and discourses of this booke, he wholy thoughte to have
  changed his minde and to thinke of another surer course for the
  remedy of Englande. And it seemed that this cogitation was that if
  all other pretenders mighte be broughte to yelde to the tytle of
  the lady and Infanta of Spaine, noe waye nor meanes in the worlde
  coulde bee thoughte of, more sweete, agreable, and convenyente
  for all partyes and for all effects, for these reasons following.
  First, that she beinge the daughter and sister of whome she is, and
  of soe rare worthynes in her owne person as all the worlde talketh
  of, she could not be but indifferente and amyable unto all, neither
  coulde she wante sufficyente forces for her establishment and
  defence afterwardes, and beinge maryed with some noble Catholique
  prince such as the Kinge her father should like before of, and
  England not mislike, albeit in theire owne personnes they woulde be
  strangers unto us for a tyme, yet would that quickly passe awaye,
  and then children would be Inglishe borne, and themselves entringe
  not by force, but by love and composition, would hould peace with
  all, and be in feare and jelosie of none, which in other pretendors
  cannot be soe effected; they would attende alsoe principally to
  the assurance of Catholique religion as the grounde of theire
  estate, wheras others must needes doe the contrarye for houldinge
  ther freindes and partyes contented, and finally by this meanes
  all subjectyon to forrayne countryes or natyons should be avoyded,
  and England should gayne the power, ritches, and freindship of
  Spaine to asiste it in all needes, without perill of subjectyon to
  the same. And if any would objecte that the lady Infanta or her
  ofspringe may come to live to inherite the kingdome of Spaine if
  the prince should have noe yssue, and consequently bringe England
  under that crowne, as alsoe the princypall, C. A. would saye that
  provisoe might be made alsoe thus,--to witte, that in such case
  the seconde childe or nexte of bloud might remayne with the Crowne
  of England, and soe avoyde that conjunctyon or subordination;
  moreover he sayde that noe composition could be soe profitable or
  sure as this, for our domesticall competitors, who otherwise of all
  liklyhood must needs extirpate and destroy the one the other, and
  all would joyne together to vex and weary the Scotts if they should
  come in, to which ende and effecte they should never want partyes,
  neither at home nor from abroade, as by reason is evidente, and
  soe our country therby would become a continuall feilde of warre
  and bloudshedde. And wheras of all other pretenders the Kinge of
  Spaine is knowne to be most powerable, and hath noe small title
  by the house of Lancaster as by this booke apeareth, noe way can
  be thought of, soe fytte and forceable to apease and ende that
  tytle, as if nowe by way of composytion he should be perswaded (as
  perhaps he might) to passe the same over to his daughter the lady
  Infanta, as by all likelyhood he might be induced to doe with good
  likinge alsoe of the Prince his sonne, for the affectyon that both
  of these must nedes beare to this lady, and for endinge of strife
  amonge our nation, and benefitinge our countrye, yf his Majestie by
  conveniente meanes were delte with herin, as C. A. greatly wisheth
  he mighte.

  "These were the prudente and godly cogitations of C. A. in
  his latter dayes, wherof much he conferred with divers of his
  confidente freindes, and namely with Mr. F. P. by letteres as
  before I have sayde, and was privie to the same, and doubt not but
  many of those letteres and discourses are forthcominge when tyme
  shall serve, and for that he understoode that some of our nation
  that live out of Ingland did take other courses and made a devision
  from the reste, either upon passyon or other perticuler respectes
  or humaine infirmityes, not entringe soe deply and sincearly
  into the true consideration what is beste for God's service, and
  assurance of Catholique religion, and for the perfecte reductyon
  of our countrye to peace, justice, and pietye, he was much greved
  therwith, and toke it for a dangerous and evidente deceipte of the
  divell to bring all therby to devisyon and dissolation, as alreadye
  we prove by the divisyon that was broughte in Queen Marie's tyme
  to certayne pernityous heades amonge the principall concerninge
  the successyon which some good people desired and labored to have
  established then. But yet his hope was that upon the sighte of this
  booke, such of our nation as are wise and truly Catholique, seinge
  by the libertye and disunion all wilbe destroyed, would joyne
  together and with him and his freindes, if he had layde in some
  good meanes for savinge themselves and ther countrye, which was his
  owne; but a finall ende with often and most earnest protestations
  to such as dealte with him in these affayres that he was led by
  noe jotte at all of affectyon or disaffectyon towardes any prince
  or pretender livinge, about this matter of the Crowne, but that
  absolutely and onely he desired that pretender to be preferred
  without all respectes of country, kindred, bloud, freindshippe, or
  other such circumstances, whoe mighte be presumed to be most fitte
  forr us, and by whome most assurance, hope, and probabillitye may
  be had of the former desired effectes of religion, justice, peace,
  good govermente, avoydinge of warre and bloudshed, sufficyente
  forces to defende us, union, love towards the people of our nation,
  meanes to help them, contentmente of princes rounde about us, and
  the like.

  "And this is all in effecte that I can write to you, ... mente and
  censure aboute the booke of successyon, and ... pious and prudente
  desires concerninge all that affayre. Our sinne permitted not to
  have such a man continue amongste us, for puttinge soe importante
  designments in execution. And soe I cannot tell whether ever
  any of them were broken by him to the Pope, Kinge of Spaine, or
  other Prince to whome they mighte apertayne. And with this I make
  an ende, biddinge you most hartely farewell, and besechinge our
  Saviour to preserve you, and directe all this greate affayre of
  our next successyon to his greatest glorye, and most good of our
  afflicted countrye.

  "Yours to commaunde,
  "R. P."[5]


25.

A New Discourse of a stale subject, called the Metamorphosis of Ajax.
Written by _Misacmos_ to his friend and cosin, _Philostilpnos_.
Printed 1596.

  This curious book was written by Sir John Harington, and for
  so doing he was forbidden the court by Queen Elizabeth, and a
  license was refused for printing the work. Watt, Lowndes, and all
  Bibliographers bear testimony to its great rarity. Dr. Johnson
  in his Lives of the Poets, devotes a page to a consideration
  and description of this curious work. He says, These tracts are
  perhaps the first specimens of the Rabelaisian satire our language
  has to boast. They are replete with that kind of humour which
  distinguishes the writings of the French Lucian, and partake of
  their grossness. The extreme rarity of these once popular trifles
  renders it doubtful whether Swift or Sterne were acquainted with
  them; yet there are passages in the works of both these eccentric
  writers so strongly resembling some of Harington's as almost to
  induce a suspicion that they had seen them; this resemblance
  however, may have arisen from the circumstance of their being, like
  our author, imitations of Rabelais and the other French writers of
  facetiæ.

  Of the Metamorphosis of Ajax, the avowed purport is the description
  of a species of watercloset which Sir John Harington had invented
  and erected at Kelston, his seat near Bath; but he has contrived
  to make it the vehicle of much diverting matter, evincing his
  extensive reading; he has also interspersed numerous satiric
  touches and allusions to contemporary persons and events, many of
  which are now necessarily obscure, and which were no doubt one of
  the causes of its great popularity at the time of publication.

  Elizabeth, however she might be diverted with the humour of this
  whimsical performance, is said to have conceived much disquiet on
  being told the author had aimed a shaft at Leicester. Its satiric
  tendency procured the writer many enemies; and it is supposed that
  he owed his good fortune in escaping a Star Chamber suit to the
  favour of the Queen, who yet affected to be much displeased, and
  forbade him the Court in consequence.

  It was reprinted at the Chiswick press in 1814, from which edition
  some of the previous remarks are derived.


26.

Virgidemiarum, Sixe Bookes. First three Bookes, of Toothlesse Satyrs.
1.--Poeticall. 2.--Academicall. 3.--Morall. London, printed by Thomas
Creede for Robert Dexter, 1597. (By Bishop Hall.)

Virgidemiarum. The three last bookes, of byting Satyres. Imprinted at
London by Richard Braddocke for Robert Dexter, at the signe of the
Brasen Serpent in Paule's Church Yard, 1598.

  These are among the earliest Satires written in the English
  language, and were much admired, but the publication was ordered
  to be stayed at the press by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the
  Bishop of London, and such copies as could be found were to "bee
  presentlye broughte to the Bishop of London to be burnte." They
  were reprinted in 1824, with the illustrations of Rev. Thomas
  Warton and additional notes by Samuel Weller Singer.


27.

A pithie exhortation to her Majestie for establishing her successor
to the Crowne. Whereunto is added a discourse containing the author's
opinion of the true and lawfull successor to her Majestie. Both
compiled by Peter Wentworth.

  Dolman's (i.e., Father Parsons) objections to the succession of
  James I were ably refuted in this volume, and the claims of the
  Scottish King set forth with sound argument; yet for daring to
  advise his sovereign the author was committed to the Tower, where
  he shortly after died, and his book was ordered to be burnt by the
  hangman.


28.

All Ovid's Elegies: 3 Bookes. By C(hristopher) M(arlow). Epigrams by
J(ohn) D(avis). At Middlebourgh. (1598.)

  This volume was condemned and burnt at Stationer's Hall by an order
  of the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of London, dated
  June 1st, 1599.


29.

The Metamorphosis of Pigmalion's Image. And certaine Satyres. At
London. Printed for Edmond Matts, and are to be sold at the signe of
the Hand and Plough in Fleet street. 1598.

  This book was written by John Marston. It is dedicated "To the
  World's mightie Monarch Good Opinion;" and the principal purpose
  of the author was to ridicule and to show the immorality and
  evil tendency of a class of poems then fashionable, and to which
  Shakespeare's "Venus and Adonis" belongs.

  The main production consists of thirty nine six-line stanzas. The
  "certain Satires," four in number, and all written in couplets,
  follow, but the versification is sometimes harsh, and the rhyme
  frequently careless and defective.

  Preceding the Satires is a Poem headed _Reactio_, wholly occupied
  by a vindication of the writers whom Hall had previously attacked
  in his "Virgidemiarum;" addressing that author, Marston exclaims:

    "Vaine envious detractor from the good,
    "What cynicke spirit stirreth in thy blood?
    "Cannot a poore mistaken title scape,
    "But thou must that unto thy Tumbrell scrape?"

  and he subsequently adds four of the smoothest lines in his volume:

    "So have I seene the March wind strive to fade
    "The fairest hewe that art or nature made:
    "So envy still doth barke at cleareste shine,
    "And strives to staine heroyick acts devine."

  The dedication to Good Opinion is subscribed W. K., the initials
  of William Kinsayder, the name under which Marston published his
  earlier productions.[6]

  From the licentious character of this book the prelates Whitgift
  and Bancroft ordered its suppression and destruction soon after its
  appearance.


30.

The first part of the Life and Raigne of King Henry the IIII.
Extending to the end of the first yeare of his raigne. Written by J.
H. Imprinted at London by John Wolfe, and are to be solde at his shop
in Pope's Head Alley, neere to the Exchange. 1599.

  This book was written by Sir John Haywarde, L.L.D. It was dedicated
  in very encomiastic terms to the Earl of Essex, but it so highly
  irritated Queen Elizabeth, that proceedings were taken against the
  author as appears from the following documents.

  Among the Domestic State Papers of the year 1600 are
  interrogatories by Lord Chief Justice Popham, to be administered to
  Dr. Hayward in these terms;

  "To examyn hym who made the preface to the Reader.

  "Wherein he conceaveth or ment that booke might be not onely
  patterns for pryvat dyreccion and for matters of state, to instruct
  young men more shortly and old men more fully?

  "Where he hadd any warrant to sett down that Kyng H. the 2. never
  taxed the subject, or left 900000 li. in his coffers?

  "In what poynt were the othes unlawful taken by R. the 2. of his
  subjects?

  "When were any skattering forces sent in hys tyme into Ireland, and
  under whom, and what warrant hadd he to wryte so?

  "What moved hym to sett down that any were in dysgrace for their
  servys there?

  "What moved hym to sett down that the nobylyte were then hadd in
  contempt, or that they were but base that were culted about that
  Kyng?

  "What moved hym to sett down that the subjects were bound for their
  servys to the state, and not to the person of the Kyng?

  "What moved hym to maynteyn with arguments never mencyoned in the
  history, that yt myght be laweful for the subjects to depose the
  Kyng for any cause?

  "What moved hym to add unto yt so many presidentes off that kynd in
  alowans thereof?

  "What moved hym to alowe that ys well for comen weal that the Kyng
  is dead?

  "What was the true caws of settyng forth this symple story in this
  tyme, and thus fortefyed with arguments to the worst sens, omytt
  every princypal poynt that made agaynst the Traytors or Rebelles?

  "Myght he thynke that thys hystory, sett forth in sort as yt ys,
  wold not be very dangerous to come amongst the comon sort of people?

  "Whom he made prevy to hys purpos of wrytyng thys hystory, and what
  alowans gave they of it, where and when?

  "Who were the anymatters of you to sett forth thys story, and to
  what end?

  "When did you fyrst resolve to sett forth this hystory, and where
  and at what tyme did you begynne yt?

  "By what meanes came you to the records of these thyngs which you
  have sett down to have been done in that tyme?"[7]

  Then follows an Epistle to the reader, vindicating the book from
  intending any attack on the present times; thus,

  "Gentle Reader, thy frendly acceptance of these loose labors, the
  accompt of my idle howres, from exercises of greater profit and
  use, hath moved me, before I proceede any further, to overlooke
  and overlicke them once againe, as the beare is said to doe her
  unformed whelpes, and thereby both in portion and proportion to
  amend the same. I _have purposely passed_ over many imputations,
  and some secrete sences, which the deepe searchers of our time have
  rather framed then found: partly upon the science of myne owne
  conscience, and partly seeing no reason wherefore they should be
  more applied to this booke _then to the_ originall authors out of
  which it hath bene gathered, onely one offence I thought meete to
  meete with, and that is, concerning the rehearsall _of certaine
  oppressions both unusuall and intollerable_, and to no profitable
  purpose and end; which I heare to be hardly thought of and taken,
  not in regard of any moderate judgment, which may easily perceive
  how full it lyeth in the plaine path of the history, but _for
  feare_ of some quarrellous conceites, which may interpret it to be
  meant of an other tyme (although nothing like) then that whereof
  it was reported; which in one degree of melancholy further, would
  imagine the very belles to sound whatsoever hammereth within
  their heads. For my part _I am of opinion_, that no imposition
  at any time have bene either hurtfull to a prince or hatefull to
  the people, except two qualities do concurre: first, that it be
  excessive,--secondly, that it be wildly and wastfully expended:
  for if the one fayle, it never seemeth greevous; if the other, not
  odious. But if it be both moderate and also necessary; or great,
  joyned with greatnesse and importancy of neede: it standeth neither
  with reason nor with religion, for any subject to repine against
  it. _For the prince is a person of_ authority and trust, _to
  imploy_ the goods of the people, for their common good, _either_ in
  maintayning order among themselves, or in repelling the enterprises
  of their enemies: neyther can they possibly be preserved by the
  prince, if they withdraw theire owne endeavour and supply. And this
  the ancient wise men have endeavoured by a fable to make familiare;
  that all the parts of the body were once offended against the
  stomacke, for that they saw themselves vexed with perpetuall
  travayle and toyle, and the stomacke onely, not onely to be idle,
  but to consume all that they could provide. Hereupon they conspired
  together, that the hand should no more worke, nor the feete walke,
  nor the eye looke about, nor the mouth receyve, prepare, and send
  downe foode: so the stomacke not receyving nourishment, could
  not impart the same againe to every part of the body: whereby,
  first they languished and (being neere at the point to perish)
  at the last perceyved, that both their labour to get, and their
  liberality to geve, in appearance was for the stomacke, but in
  deede for themselves. This tale hath bene verified by many truthes,
  whereof I will rehearse one, and so not exceede the measure of an
  Epistle. When the Turke came against the city of Constantinople,
  the Emperour was not able to wage so many souldiers as might stand
  single upon the walles. Whereupon he often assembled the wealthy
  citizens, and sometymes went in person to their houses, leaving
  nothing undone or unsayd which might be of force to stirre in them
  either piety or pitty, both for the preservation of their country
  and frends, and for theire owne particuler safeties: but the
  miserable monymongers, being as loath to take benefit of their gold
  as if it had not bene their owne, buried it under the ground, and
  denyed that they were able to make contribution. So either for want
  or weakenes of resistance, the Turkes soone became masters of the
  city: who in their first fury set all the streetes on streame with
  bloud, and afterwards, covetousnes succeeding cruelty, they left no
  closet nor corner unransacked and unrifled, wherein missing their
  expected pray, they ripped the bellies and searched the bowels of
  their wretched captives: lastly they turned up the foundations of
  many thousand buildings, and there found such infinite masses of
  mony, as did strike them rather into a maze then into a merveylle,
  how so rich a city could possibly be taken. I would not wish the
  like mischance to our like dull and heavy conceyted repyners,
  which neyther see nor seeke any other thing but only the stuffing
  of their owne bags, because it cannot happen unto them without a
  greater and further mischiefe: but I could wish that they might be
  fitted as once were the Siracusans, upon whom when Dyonisius had
  imposed a contribution, they murmured and complayned, and denyed
  that they were able to beare that burthen; whereupon he encreased
  the imposition and they likewise their complaints, but Dyonisius
  ceased not to levy it upon them, untill he perceyved them eyther
  content by being reduced to their duety, or quiete by being drawne
  drye."[8]

  The folowing is the confession of Dr. Hayward, made July the 11th,
  1600.

  11th July, 1600,
  at the Courte.

      The confession of Doctor Heyward
      before the Lord Keper, the Lord
      Admirall, Mr. Secretary, and Mr.
      Chauncelor of the Eschequer.

  "1. He confessed that the stories mencioned in the Archbishop's
  oration, tendinge to prove that deposers of kings and princes have
  had good successe, were not taken out of any other cronicle, but
  inserted by himselfe, but said that after in the history the Bishop
  of Carlile confuteth the same, but for the confutation the Bishop
  was committed to the Marshalsea, and the whole parlement concluded
  against the Bishop's opinion; and in troth in 1. H. 4. the Bishop
  of Carlile was attainted of treason.

  "2. He confessed he had red of a Benevolence in the tyme of Richard
  3. and not before, and yet that he inserted the same in the raigne
  of Richard 2.

  "3. He said that as he toke it, the substaunce of the consultation
  for reducing the Irishe rebell, he had out of William of Malmesbury.

  "4. He affirmed that presently after the booke was printed, Woolfe
  the printer thereof caried the same to the Erle of Essex, and about
  a moneth after the epistle was taken out.

    "Edw. Coke."[9]

  On July 13th, 1600, Wolfe the stationer was examined before
  Attorney General Coke respecting the printing of the book in
  question. The examination is as follows:--

      "The examynacion of John Wolfe, Stacionour, taken before me, Edward
      Coke, Esquire, Her Majestie's Attorney Generall, this 13 of July,
      1600.

  "He sayth that Docter Hayward beinge a meere strainger to this
  examynant, cam to hym and requested hym to printe the booke intytuled
  "Henry the Fourth," which he did in Februarye, 1599. The booke
  havinge no epistell dedicatorye nor to the reader, when he brought
  yt firste unto hym, which this examynat desiringe to have, he this
  examynate requested hym to dedicatt the booke to some man of honour
  and reputacion; and uppon some conference hadd between them, this
  examynat praid hym yt might be dedicated to the Earle of Essex, for
  that he was a marciall man and was for to goe into Ireland, and the
  booke treated of Irishe causes. And this examynat sayth that within
  a day or twoe after, Docter Hayward delivered to this examynate the
  Epistelles to the Earle and to the reader; and the booke beinge
  fynished, Docter Hayward then beinge sicke, this examynate carryed
  the booke to the Earle of Essex, then preparinge to goe into Ireland:
  which the Earle receved, and givinge noe aunsweire, carryed the booke
  with hym into his chamber, which he taketh to be at Whytehall; and
  abought a fortnight or three weekes after, the wardens of the company
  receved order from my Lord of Caunterbury that the Epistell dedicated
  to the Earle should be cutt out.

  "And further sayth that fyve or sixe hundred of them weire sould
  before any suche comaundment was gyven; for he sayth that never any
  booke was better sould or more desired that ever he printed then this
  book was; and sayth that out of the residew, (beinge five or six
  hundred) this examynat cut out the said Epistell and sould them also
  within verry short tyme after. And abought Easter tearme followinge,
  the people callinge exsedinglie for yt, this examynate obtayned a new
  edition of the said Docter Hayward wherein many thinges weire altered
  from the former, and yet the vollume incresed.

  "And sayth further that Docter Hayward understandinge that many
  hade spoken agaynst this former edition hadd made an epistell
  apologeticall to sett to the second edition, as this examynate
  thinketh; and 15 hundred of these bookes beinge allmost fynished
  in the Whisson hollidayes, 1599, weire taken by the wardens of
  the Stacionours and delivered to the Lord Busshopp of London. And
  this examynate sayth that he dothe not remember the particuler
  allteracions which weire in the latter edition from the former, nor
  hathe not any of the said bookes, nor never finished nor sould any of
  the said bookes, nor cannot come by any of them. And this examynate
  sayth that the said appologie, as he thincketh, did tend to no other
  end then to satisfie the people of the author's meaninge in wrytinge
  the booke, and that the author said he ment not as some interprit
  yt. And this examynate sayth that the said Mr. Docter Hayward when
  he was tould by this examynate that some did fynde faulte with the
  former edition, he desired this examynate to intreat them that he
  might speak with them to knowe what they did mislike, to the intent
  that he might express his meaninge therein. And this examynate sayth
  that the people havinge dyvers tymes sythence called uppon hym for to
  procure the continewation of the same history by the same author, he
  hathe likewise intreated the same author to goe forward in wrytinge
  the said history, which he thincketh he hath don some parte of.

  "This examynate sayth further that after the deliverye of the book
  to the Earle as aforesaid, he went three or four tymes within one
  fortnight after, by the Docter's consent, to the Earle, being at
  courte at Richmont, to lerne what the Earle would say to yt, but
  allwayes this examynat was putt of by some of the Earle's men with
  aunsweire the Earle was much busied aboute his voyage to Ireland.
  And so this examynate never spake with the Earle after the first
  deliverye of the bookes, and further sayth that all of the laste
  eddition weire burnt in my Lord of London's house; and sayth that
  the coppie nowe delivered uppon his examynacion is a trew coppie of
  the epistell appolegetticall, the orygenall whereof this examynat
  delivered to my Lord of London under Docter Haywarde's owne hand. And
  sayth that the orygenall of the first edition beinge interlyned and
  altered accordinge to the second edition, for so much as was don this
  examynate delivered to Mr. Barker, Register of the Highe Commyssion.
  And sayth that sithence the last edition was supprest, a great number
  have beene with this examynate to have bought the same. And sayth
  that he hadd no recompence or composition at alle for the printinge
  of the said first and last edition, but of his owne free will he gave
  some halfe dosen of the said bookes, whereof one was to the Earle and
  the other to the author. And this examynate sayth further that he was
  commytted fourteen dayes for the printinge of the last edition, and
  lost all the books of that edition.

  "Examinatur per

    "Edw. Coke.      John Wolf."[10]

  On July 20th, 1600, Samuel Harsnett, examiner of the press,
  afterwards Bishop of Chichester, sent the following letter and
  petition to the Attorney General to excuse himself for having
  approved Hayward's book, thus:--

  "Right worshipfull, I have not yet received eny bookes from my Lord
  of London, and so am not able to performe my taske in comparing
  them according to my promise. This for griefe of hart and confusion
  of face I am skarce able to write, that I shold be behinde hand to
  your most graciouse divine kindnesse towards me. I have sent myne
  aunswer enclosed, the onlie part of my dutye that I cold performe,
  moste humblie beseeching your goodnes to accept it in good part,
  and to be a father unto me as you have begunne. The God of Heven
  sees and knowes I am innocent; at casus leso numine crimen habet, my
  poore estate, my credit, my selfe, and more then my selfe doe hang
  uppon your graisouse countenance, for I muste crave pardon to tell
  an unmannerlie secrett: I have a poore weake gentlewoman my wife
  in childbed, who since your messanger his being at myne house did
  neither eat, nor drinke, nor sleape for fear, and yet I have twentie
  tymes reade over your most graciouse lettars unto her. The Lord of
  Heven requite you, for I and my poore frends shall never be able,
  and so with teares I humblie take my leave. From my poore house at
  Chigwell, this XXti of July, 1600.

    "Your worship his bought
    "and bounden servaunt,

    "Sa. Harsnett."

  "In moste humble wise complaininge sheweth unto your Worship your
  dailie Orator, Samuel Harsnett, that whereas the Author of a Pamphlet
  published in print in anno 1599, intituled the 'Raigne of King Henry
  the Fourth,' hath endevored to excuse his publishinge the sayd
  pamphlett, as being allowed and approved by your sayd Orator, it may
  please your worship in your grave wisdome to consider that this his
  allegation can be no colour of excuse unto him, in regard of these
  reasons ensuynge.

  "Firste, for that it hath been custome and use for eny man that
  entended in good meaning to put a booke in print, the Author himselfe
  to present the booke unto the Examiner, and to acquaynt him with his
  scope and purpose in the same: the Author of this pamphlet concealed
  himselfe, and nether spake nor conferred with your Orator concerning
  this pamphlett, (notwithstanding we were both students togither in
  Pembroochall in Cambridge, and both of a tyme and standing in the
  colledge), but the Author delivered his pamphlet unto a gentleman in
  my Lord of London his house, who begged your Orator his approbation
  unto the same in the name of a cautel of our English chronicles
  phrased and flourished over onlie to shewe the Author his pretie witt.

  "Secondlie, that whereas your Orator his approbation of eny booke
  whatsoever is but a leading and inducement to my Lord of London, my
  master, to passe his Lordship his further approbation to the same,
  without which his Lordship his further approbation your Orator his
  allowance is no sufficient warrant for the Author to prynt his booke:
  the Author of this pamphlett published his pamphlett without my Lord
  and master his approbation at all, contrarie to warrant in that
  behalfe.

  "Thirdlie, the Author hath wronged your said Orator muche, and hath
  abused your Worship with false enformation, in alledging for himselfe
  that your Orator allowed his pamphlett as it was and is published
  in print; for that the Author knoweth in his conscience this is
  true, that when his pamphlett had mine approbation it was heddlesse,
  without epistle, preface, or dedication at all, which moved me to
  thinke it was a meer rhetorical exornation of a part of our Englishe
  historie to shewe the foyle of the Author his witt: and after myne
  approbation gotten thereunto, the Author foysted in an Epistle
  dedicatorie to the Earle of Essex, which I neither allowed nor sawe,
  and which if I had seen, I protest I shold never have allowed the
  rest of the pamphlett.

  "Fourthlie, it may please your grave wisdome graciouslie to consider
  your Orator his mean condition and capacitie; that your sayd Orator
  is a poore Divine, unacquainted with bookes and arguments of state,
  and with consequenceis of that nature; that your Orator for ten or
  twelve yeares past neither spake with nor saluted the Author of this
  pamphlett, and so is cleer from privitye with his entendementes and
  overtures in the same; that your Orator sett to his hand sodeinlie as
  mooved by his freind, never reading (uppon his salvation) more then
  one page of the hedlesse pamphlet; for which his unadvised negligence
  he humblie beggeth your moste graciouse milder censure, that it may
  be no imputation of bad meaninge unto him, who doth dailie in his
  poore calinge, moste hartelie and zealouslie pray for the happinesse
  of Her sacred Majestie and the state, and for the longe continuance
  of Her Highnes most graciouse, blessed, divine government over us,
  and doth from the bottom of his hart wishe shame and dreadfull
  confusion upon all calumniators and underminers of the same.

    "Your worship's moste humblie
    "bounden Orator,

    "Sa. Harsnett."[11]

  On January 22nd, 1600/1, Hayward was, while in confinement in the
  Tower, further examined before Sir John Peyton and the Attorney
  General, thus:--

        "The examination of John Heyward,
        Doctor at lawe, taken at the tower,
        this 22 of Jan., 1600.

  "He confesseth that the preface to the reader was of his oune
  indightinge, and saith that he intitled the same under the letteres
  of A. P., as divers other wrighters had done in such like cases.

  "He saith that he spake in his preface generally of histories; and
  being demaunded whether he intended not to applie the preface of his
  boke to his present historie, saith as before, he wrote his preface
  generally of all histories and intended no particular by itselfe.

  "He saith that he read in Foxe's booke of Actes and monuments that
  King H. 2 never demaunded subsidie of his subjects, which he sett
  forth towards the end of the raigne of that Kinge, and there he found
  also that H. 2 after his death left in treasure nine hundred thousand
  poundes besides his jewels and plate, and being demaunded wherfore he
  inserted the same into the historie of H. 4, saith he taketh that to
  be lawfull for any historiographer to insert any historie of former
  tyme ynto that historie he wright, albeit no other historian of that
  matter have mencioned the same, and that libertie is allowed by
  Dionisius Hallicarnasseus.

  "He sayth that the othe under hands and seales required and taken by
  R. 2, was to knowe what every particuler man was worthe, to thentent
  that they might be taxed thereafter; and no other othe was intended
  by this examinante.

  "He sayth he found in Walsingham (as he remembreth) that the forces
  that were sent into Ireland by R. 2 were scattering and droppinge,
  &c., though not in those termes, yet to the like sence; and that
  those that did good service there were not rewarded with countenance,
  &c.,: and sure he is that he had it there eyther in wordes or by
  actions; and also that he gathered out of the actions of that Kinge
  recorded by Walsingham, that matters of peace were managed by menne
  of weakest sufficiency, by whose councell eyther ignorant or corrupt,
  &c.

  "He sayth the complaynt of Hereford to Mowbrey, reported in other
  cronicles, do imply in sence that the kinge's councell accounted
  auncient nobilitie a vaine jest,--wealth and vertue the ready meanes
  to bring to destruction: which complaint is extant in Hall and
  Polidore Virgill and many other wrighters. He sayth that he read in
  Bodine and other authors that the subject was rather bounde to the
  state then to the person of the kinge, which he inserted as a matter
  spoken by the Earle of Derby and Duke Hereford to serve his owne
  tourne, which is a libertie used by all good wrighters of historie,
  and to invent reasons and speaches according to the matter; and
  saith that Bodin's distinction is that where the government is
  democraticall or aristocraticall, there the subject is bound to the
  state rather then to the person that beare the title of a prince,
  but where it is monarchicall, as in England, there the allegiance
  is to the person of the prince; and being demaunded wherfore he
  invented that the erle should speake so for that this government was
  monarchicall, sayth that he found but remembreth not where he spake
  to that purpose. And further saith that in the Bishops of Carlile's
  speache he hath sett down that distinction and confuted the error,
  and that he did of himselfe according to the example of the best
  historians; and being reprehended for mencioning of that matter at
  all, speciallie because the Erle that held the error prevailed, and
  the Bishop that confuted it was punished, sayth that he did it after
  the example of the best historians, that applie spechis according
  to the matter. He sayth he sett forth the oration of the B. of
  Caunterburie according to the matter he found in other authorities,
  but remember them not, and cannot affirme that he found those eight
  stories in any oration the archbishop made in any other cronicle, but
  saith as before that it is lawfull for an historian so to doe, and
  besides he confuteth the same, page 107 in the Bishop of Carlisle's
  speach, the last line of that page.

  "He confesseth that he bringeth in as his own speach that it was not
  amisse in regard of the comonwelth that he (meaning King R. 2) was
  deade, yet they who caused his death, &c., which he sayed of himselfe
  for preventing of civil warres in respect of 2 concurrents or
  competitors. Being demanded what was the reason why he sett forth the
  orations of the B. of Caunterbury and the erle of Derby, seing that
  they tend to greate ill and to thinges most unlawfull, sayth that
  there can be nothing done, be it never so ill or unlawfull, but must
  have a shadowe, and every councell must be according to the action.
  He sayth that he selected out this single historie for that Hall
  beginneth there, and Ascham his scoolemaster commende that historie
  if it were well penned, before any other; and being demanded wherfore
  then he followed not Hall in his historie, sayth that he followed him
  but suplied it out of other histories, and had an intention as he
  saith to have continued the historie.

  "And for the words spoken by King R. 2, that princes must not rule
  without limitation, &c., he affirmeth that to be a true opinion so
  it be rightlie understood, and that he intended that the same was
  not to be taken generally, but that princes were to be limitted by
  the lawe divine and the lawe of nature onlie; and being demaunded
  where he had the same, saith that it is about 3 yeres since the booke
  was written, and cannot remembere out of what author he toke it, but
  saith he fynd it in Bod. ... and in the body of the civill lawes, &c.

  "And being asked where he had this sentence, that othes are comonlie
  spurned aside when they ly in the way to honur or reveng, saith that
  the speach is of his own, as thinges done de facto et non de jure.
  Being demaunded wherfore he added that King Richard II borowed money
  by privy seales, sayth that he thinketh he had it out of Walsingham.

  "For benevolences he found the matter but doth not defende the woord.

  "Being asked where he found the description of the erle to be not
  negligent to uncover the heode, to bowe the body, to stretch forth
  the necke and arme, &c., he saith that he found in Hall and others
  that he was of popular behavior, but for the particulars he tooke the
  libertie of the best wrighters of histories of that kynd.

  "Also the descriptions of the erle in divers places of his historie
  he gathered out of his actions, and found the matter, not the
  verie forme of woordes, in any other, as farre as he can call to
  remembrance.[12]

  "Being demanded, seing he wrote of matters of state and historie,
  what menne of state or others he acquainted with his historie before
  he published it, aunswereth that he wrote of an historie about 300
  yeres past, and therfore he acquainted no person therwith before he
  brought it to the printer.

  "He sayth he began to wright this historie about a yere before it was
  published, as he remembreth, but had the intent above a dussen yeres
  before, but acquainted no man therewith. He sayth that he had the
  articles and causes of deposition, the instrument of resignation, the
  deposition, and other wordes out Hall and Walsingham; and sayth that
  he had nothing of the printer for printing of the booke.[13]

    "John Hayward.[14]

    "John Peyton.     Edw. Coke."


31.

The Letting Humor's Blood in the Head-vaine; with a new Morissco
daunced by Seven Satyres upon the bottome of Diogenes' Tubbe. (1600.)

The Knave of Clubbs. 'Tis merry when Knaves meete. (1600.)

  The author of these tracts was Samuel Rowlands, a prolific writer
  of the end of the sixteenth and early part of the succeeding
  century. He appears to have commenced his literary career in the
  year 1598 by the publication of a collection of sacred poems
  entitled "The Betraying of Christ, Judas in Despaire, the Seven
  Words of our Saviour on the Crosse, &c.," but soon found that
  humorous pieces were more saleable, and these being perhaps more
  suited to the bent of his mind, he changed his style accordingly.

  The Knave of Clubbs upon its appearance in the year 1600 gave
  such offence, on account of the severity of its satire and the
  obviousness of its allusions, that an order was made that it should
  be burnt, first publicly, and afterwards in the Hall Kitchen of
  the Stationers' Company. The order is dated October 26, 1600, and
  is worded as follows: "Yt is ordered that the next court-day two
  bookes lately printed, th'one called _The Letting of Humor's Blood
  in the Head Vayne_, th'other _A Mery Metinge, or 'tis mery when
  Knaves mete_, shal be publiquely burnt, for that they conteyne
  matters unfytt to be published; then to be burnd in the Hall
  Kytchen, with other Popish bookes and thinges that were lately
  taken."

  The first tract mentioned in the order as containing matters
  unfit to be published was one of the most popular of Rowlands'
  productions. It was originally printed under the title given
  above, but upon its condemnation by the Stationers' Company, the
  bookseller changed its title to "Humour's Ordinarie, where a man
  may be verie merrie and exceeding well used for his sixe-pence,"
  and published an edition of it without date; but after the feeling
  had subsided in 1611, it again appeared with its original title,
  although the printer thought it prudent not to put his name on the
  title page. The Knave of Clubbs was reprinted and edited for the
  Percy Society in 1843 by Dr. Rimbault, and I am indebted to that
  gentleman's introduction for the preceding account of this curious
  book.

  The Letting of Humor's Blood was reprinted in 1815 with an
  introduction and notes by Sir Walter Scott, who says of Rowland,

  "It has been remarked, that his muse is seldom found in the best
  company; and to have become so well acquainted with the bullies,
  drunkards, gamesters, and cheats, whom he describes, he must have
  frequented the haunts of dissipation in which such characters are
  to be found. But the humorous descriptions of low life exhibited in
  his satires are more precious to antiquaries than more grave works,
  and those who make the manners of Shakespeare's age the subject of
  their study may better spare a better author than Samuel Rowlands."


32.

A discourse plainely proving the evident utilitie and urgent
necessitie of the desired happie union of the two famous kingdomes of
England and Scotland: by way of answer to certaine objections against
the same. (By John Thornborough, Bishop of Bristol.) London, 1604.

The joiefull and blessed reuniting the two mighty and famous
kingdomes, England and Scotland into their ancient name of Great
Brittaine. By John Bristoll. Printed at Oxford. N. d.

  On May 26th, 1604, the attention of the House of Commons was
  called to these books as tending to the derogation and scandal of
  the proceedings of that House in the matter of the Union, and a
  Committee was appointed to consider the heads of a message to be
  sent to the Lords touching the same, and on June 1st the Committee
  was named.

  Shortly after this an inhibition from the Convocation House issued,
  and on June 21st, 1604, it was resolved "to pray conference
  touching the instrument read by the bishops at the late conference,
  taxing the intermeddling of this house in matters of religion."
  Also "to desire the submission of the Bishop in writing, to be
  delivered unto them publicly in the House, before the Lords; and
  that the books might be prohibited and suppressed."[15]

  These books were both reprinted in one volume in the year 1641.


33.

Eastward Hoe. As it was playd in the Black-friers by the children
of her Maiestie's Revels. Made by Geo. Chapman, Ben. Jonson, Joh.
Marston. London, 1605.

  It is said that for writing this comedy, wherein the authors were
  accused of reflecting on the Scots, they were committed to prison,
  and were in danger of losing their ears and noses. They however
  received pardons, and Jonson, on his release from prison, gave an
  entertainment to his friends, amongst whom were Camden and Selden.
  In the midst of the entertainment his mother drank to him, and
  showed him a paper of poison, which she intended to have given him
  in his liquor, having first taken a portion of it herself, if the
  sentence for his punishment had been executed.


34.

A relation of the state of religion, and with what hopes and policies
it hath beene framed and is maintained in the severall states of
these westerne parts of the world. (By Sir Edwin Sandys.) London,
1605.

  This book was printed without any author's name, and generally
  passed as the production of Sir Edwin Sandys; but it appears from
  a subsequent edition published at the Hague in 1629, that the
  first impression of 1605 (at least so it is alleged) "was but a
  spurious stolne copy, in part epitomized, in part amplified, and
  throughout most shamefully falsified and false printed from the
  author's original, in so much, that the same knight was infinitely
  wronged thereby, and as soon as it came to his knowledge that such
  a thing was printed and passed under his name, he caused it (though
  somewhat late, when it seemes two impressions were for the most
  part vented) to be prohibited by authority, and as many as could
  be recovered to be deservedly burnt, with power also to punish the
  printers." This is referred to in a letter from Chamberlain to
  Carleton, of November 7th, 1605, preserved among the Domestic State
  Papers, where the writer says, "Sir Edwin Sandys' books burnt."
  There were subsequent editions in 1632, 1638, and 1687.


35.

The Interpreter, or Booke containing the signification of words:
wherein is set foorth the true meaning of all, or the most part of
such words and termes, as are mentioned in the lawe writers, or
statutes of this victorious and renowned kingdome, requiring any
exposition or interpretation. Collected by John Cowell, Doctor, and
the King's Majestie's Professour of Civill Law in the Universitie of
Cambridge. Cambridge, (1607.)

  On February 24th, 1609, this book was referred to in the House of
  Commons by Sir Edwin Sandys, as "very unadvised and undiscreet;
  tending to the disreputation of the House, and power of the common
  laws;" and on the 27th of the same month a Committee was formed
  to consider the book and to report thereon to the Lords.[16] On
  March 25th, 1610, a proclamation was issued prohibiting the buying,
  uttering, or reading of this book, in these terms:--

  "This latter age and tymes of the world wherein wee are fallen, is
  soe much given to verball profession, as well of religion as of
  all comendable morall virtues, but wanting the actions and deedes
  agreable to soe specious a profession, as it hath bredd such an
  unsaciable curiosity in manye men's speritts, and such an itching
  in the tonges and penns of most men, as nothing is left unsearched
  to the bottome, both in talking and writing. For, from the verie
  highest misteries in the Godhead, and the most inscrutable
  councells in the Trinitye, to the verie lowest pitt of hell, and
  the confused actions of the divills there, there is nothing nowe
  unsearched into by the curiositie of men's braynes; men not being
  contented with the knowledg of soe much of the will of God as it
  hath pleased him to reveale, but they will needes sitt with him in
  his most privie closett, and become privye of his most inscrutable
  councells, and therefore it is noe wonder that men in theis our
  dayes doe not spare to wade in all the depest misteries that belong
  to the persons or state of kinges or princes that are Gods upon
  earth, since wee see (as wee have alreadye saide) that they spare
  not God himself; and this license that everie talker or writer nowe
  assumeth to himself is come to this abuse, that manye Phormios
  will give councell to Hanniball, and manye men that never went
  out of the compasse of cloysters or colleges will freelie wade by
  their writings in the depest misteries of monarchie and politique
  government. Whereuppon it cannot otherwise fale out but that when
  men goe out of their element and meddle with thinges above their
  capacitie, themselves shall not onlie goe astray and stumble in
  darknes, but will misleade alsoe divers others with themselves into
  manye mistakings and errors, the proofe whereof we have lately had
  by a booke written by Doctor Cowell, called the Interpreter. For
  he being onlie a civillian by profession, and uppon that large
  ground of a kynd of dictionarie as it were, following the alphabet,
  haveing all kynd of purposes belonging to goverment and monarchie
  in his waye, by meddleing in matters above his reach he hath fallen
  in manye thinges to mistake and deceave himself; in some thinges
  disputing soe nicely uppon the misteries of this our monarchie that
  it may receave dubtfull interpretations, yea in some poynts verie
  derogatorie to the supreame power of this crowne; in other cases
  mistakeing the true state of the parliament of this kingdome and
  the fundamentall constitutions and priviledges thereof, and in some
  other poynts speaking unreverently of the comon lawe of England
  and of the workes of some of the most famous and antient judges
  therein; yt being a thinge utterlie unlawfull to anye subject to
  speake or write against that lawe under which he liveth, and which
  wee are sworne and are resolved to mayntayne. Wherefore uppon just
  considerations moveing us hereunto for preventing of the said
  errors and inconveniences in all tymes to come, wee doe hereby
  not onlie prohibitt the buying, uttering, or reading of the said
  bookes, but doe alsoe will and straightlie comaund all and singuler
  persons whatsoever whoe have or shall have anye of them in their
  handes or custodie, that uppon payne of our high displeasure and
  the consequence thereof, they doe deliver the same presentlie uppon
  this publication to the Lord Maior of London, yf they or anye of
  them be dwelling in or neere the said cittie, or otherwise to the
  Sheriff of the county where they or anye of them shall reside, and
  in the twoe universities to the Chauncellor our Vicechauncellor
  there, to the intent that further order maye be given for the utter
  suppressing thereof. And because there shalbe better oversight
  of bookes of all sortes before they come to the presse, wee have
  resolved to make choice of commissioners that shall looke more
  narrowlie into the nature of all those thinges that shalbe putt to
  the presse either concerning our authoritie royall, or concerning
  our goverment or the lawes of our kingdome, from whom a more strict
  accompt shalbe yelded unto us then hath beene used heretofore.
  Witnes our selfe at Westminster, the fyve and twentith daye of
  March.

  "Per ipsum regem.[17]"


36.

The Lord Coke his speech and charge. With a discoverie of the abuses
and corruption of officers. London, 1607.

  This charge was given by Lord Coke at the Assizes held in Norwich
  on the fourth of August, 1606, and it was printed in the next year
  with an epistle dedicatory to the Earl of Exeter by R. P[ricket].
  It was suppressed the day after publication, as appears from a
  letter of John Chamberlain to Dudley Carleton, dated Feb. 13,
  1607.[18]


37.

The Argument of Master Nicholas Fuller, in the case of Thomas Lad
and Richard Maunsell his clients. Wherein it is plainely proved that
the Ecclesiasticall Commissioners have no power, by vertue of their
commission, to imprison, to put to the oath ex officio, or to fine
any of his Majestie's subjects. Imprinted 1607.

  For writing this book, Nicholas Fuller, a barrister of Gray's Inn,
  was imprisoned by Archbishop Bancroft, and several notices of him
  appear in the Domestic State Papers.

  In a letter from Carleton to Chamberlain of September 16th,
  1607, the writer says, "The king went to Lambeth to encourage the
  Archbishop to proceed against Nicholas Fuller." Chamberlain writing
  to Carleton on December 30th, 1607, says that "Mr. Fuller has paid
  his fine, but submissions are expected which he cannot digest;" and
  again in a letter of January 5th, 1608, he says that "Fuller the
  puritan is freed."[19] This scarcely tallies with another account
  of Fuller, which says that on his imprisonment by Archbishop
  Bancroft, he remained in durance, and so died on February 23rd,
  1619, aged 76 years.


38.

Conrad Vorst, The Works of.

  Vorst was a celebrated Arminian divine. He was born at Cologne in
  1569, and became Professor of Theology at Leyden in 1610; of which
  he was deprived in 1619 in consequence of a decision of the Synod
  of Dort. He died in 1622. In 1611 his books were publicly burnt
  in St. Paul's Churchyard and both the Universities by the King's
  order.[20]


39.

Francis Suarez, The Works of.

  Suarez was a Spanish Jesuit. On Sunday, November 21st, 1613, some
  books of this author derogatory to princes were publicly burnt at
  Paul's Cross.[21]


40.

A book without title or date, but plainly of Catholic tendency.
Written by John Cotton, 1613.

  I have not been able to meet with a copy of this book, but the
  following extract from a letter from Rev. Thomas Lorkin to Sir
  Thomas Puckering, dated June 24th, 1613[22] furnishes a brief
  notice of the author, and the proceedings against him for this
  publication.

  "There hath lately come forth a proclamation against one Cotton,
  a west country gentleman and a great recusant, charging him with
  high treason against the King and state for having published a very
  scandalous and railing book against his Majesty; and promising a
  very large reward to whosoever could apprehend him and bring him
  in. At the very self same time, this Cotton being to cross the
  Thames and enquiring of the watermen what news, they not knowing
  the man told him what was newly happened concerning himself.
  Whereupon being landed, he muffled himself in his cloak, thinking
  thereby to pass unknown to any of his acquaintance that he might
  haply meet. But he had not passed thence many paces when one
  Maine, a follower sometimes of the late Lord of Devonshire, and
  a sure friend of his, meeting him in the street and discovering
  well what he was, warned him likewise of danger, with protestation
  nevertheless not to make any benefit of the discovery of his
  friend, but wishing him to provide for his own safety. Thereupon
  Cotton demanding his opinion what he thought fittest to be done, he
  advised him to submit himself to the king's mercy: whose counsel he
  followed, and presently went and surrendered himself into my Lord
  of Southampton's hands, and so rests at his Majesty's mercy."

  And in another letter from Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering, of June
  30th, 1613,[23] the writer says "My last letters advertized you of
  what had lately happened concerning Cotton, who yielding himself to
  the king's clemency, doth nevertheless utterly disavow the book,
  and constantly denieth to be the author of it, Hereupon his study
  hath been searched, and there divers papers found, containing many
  several pieces of the said book, and (which renders the man more
  odious) certain relics of the late saints of the gunpowder treason,
  as one of Digby's fingers, Percy's toe, some other part either of
  Catesby or Rookwood (whether I well remember not) with the addition
  of a piece of one of Peter Lambert's ribs, to make up the full mess
  of them. If the proofs which are against him will not extend to the
  touching of his life, at least they will serve to work him either
  misery and affliction enough."

  The following is a copy of the proclamation for the apprehension of
  Cotton:--

      "By the King.

  "A proclamation for the search and apprehension of John Cotton,
  Esquire.

  "Whereas John Cotton of Warblington, otherwise of Subberton, in
  the Countie of Southhampton, Esquire, is by sundry strong and
  vehement presumptions, discovered to have committed matter full
  of very strange and execrable high treasons, against our person
  and state; and the same John Cotton (as it should appeare by all
  circumstances) hath, upon a guiltie conscience, and some privie
  intelligence of search intended for him, fled from his house and
  dwelling, and lurketh or wandreth in unknowen places; although
  it standeth not with the course of justice to condemne any man
  unheard, yet for that the presumptions and proofes appeare to be so
  forcible against him, as if after this publique notice, he shall
  not forthwith come in, and render himselfe, we shall have iust
  cause to conclude him guiltie; we have thought fit, (besides our
  more secret directions) to have recourse to the industrie and love
  of our people, which never failed us, in any case that concerned
  our safetie or honour, for his bringing forth or apprehension.

  "Wherefore wee doe charge and command all our Justices, Mayors,
  Sheriffes, Bayliffes, Headboroughs, and Constables, and also all
  officers of our ports, to doe their best and utmost endeavours,
  to search for, and apprehend the said John Cotton; (of whom, for
  the better informing of those that know not his person, wee have
  caused a description to be hereunto annexed.) And doe neverthelesse
  require all our loving subiects, not only to be aiding and
  assisting to our said officers therein, but likewise to use their
  owne particular diligence, care, and industrie, aswell for the
  finding out and apprehending of the said John Cotton, as for the
  giving intelligence and advertisement unto any of our justices or
  officers, where hee hath beene at any time lately seene or met, or
  otherwise where there is any likelyhood that he should harbour,
  repaire, or be received.

  "And for the better encouragement of our loving subiects to doe
  their duety in this case (which wee take so much to heart) wee
  doe hereby declare, signifie and promise, that whosoever shall
  apprehend and bring into the hands of any our officers of justice,
  the person of the said John Cotton living, shall have for his
  reward the summe of one thousand crownes.

  "And on the other side, if any of our subjects shall voluntarily
  receive, harbour, convey, favour, or conceale the said John Cotton,
  wee doe signifie unto them all, that we shall account them as
  partakers, and abettors of the said treasons: and if any of our
  officers, or others shall neglect or let passe any opportunitie,
  occasion, or meanes for the performance, or executing of their
  duety in this behalfe, we shall proceede against such persons to
  their condigne punishment with all severitie according to our lawes.

  "Given at our Palace of Westminster the eleventh day of June, in
  the eleventh yeere of our reigne of Great Britaine, France, and
  Ireland.

      "God save the King.

  "John Cotton is of the age of fourtie eight yeeres, or thereabouts,
  of a reasonable tall stature, slender of body, the haire of
  his head and beard flaxen, but now inclining to white, well
  complexioned, with somewhat a long and leane visage.

  "¶ Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the King's most
  excellent Maiestie.

      "M.DC.XIII."[24]


41.

Abuses stript and whipt, or Satirical Essayes. By George Wyther.
London, 1613.

  For this publication Wyther was committed to the Marshalsea, where
  he remained several months.


42.

A book without title or date, written by Edmund Peacham, containing a
libel on the Bishop of Bath and Wells, and other libels. Circa 1614.

  For writing this book Edmund Peacham, Rector of Hinton St. George,
  in the county of Somerset, was deprived of his living by the
  Ecclesiastical Commissioners on December 19th, 1614.[25] On the
  18th January, 1615, Mr. Secretary Winwood, the Master of the
  Rolls, the Lieutenant of the Tower, and others, were directed by
  the Council to examine Peacham, then imprisoned in the Tower,
  respecting his authorship of a treasonable book, and if he should
  be obstinate in refusing to give needful information, to use the
  manacles. In a letter from Chamberlain to Carleton of February
  9th, 1615, Peacham was said to have been racked, but nothing could
  be got from him; and the king was much incensed against him. Most
  of the judges concurred in finding his case treason. He was tried
  and condemned for high treason in the course of the year 1615,
  and sentenced to be hanged, drawn, and quartered, but he died in
  Taunton gaol in the early part of the year 1616, as appears in a
  letter from Chamberlain to Carleton of March 27, 1616.[26]


43.

History of the World. By Sir Walter Raleigh, 1614.

  This book was called in "for too free censuring of princes."[27]


44.

De Politia Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ. By Richard Mockett, D.D. London, 1616.

  This publication fell under censure because it favoured the
  Calvinists. Dr. Mockett's intention was to give foreign churches
  a fair notion of the doctrines of the English church; and for
  that purpose he had translated the Prayer Book into Latin, adding
  Jewel's Apology and Nowell's Catechism. But in his translation of
  the Articles he had omitted the latter part, which sets forth the
  power of the church in rites and ceremonies and in controversies of
  faith. Besides this, instead of printing the Homilies at length,
  he had given an abbreviation of them, not fairly representing the
  opinions of this church; and moreover, in a treatise of his own,
  he had not given the see of Winchester precedence over all others
  next to London, but only over those whose bishops were not privy
  councillors. Dr. Montagu, Bishop of Winchester, was at that time
  on bad terms with Archbishop Abbot, whose chaplain Dr. Mockett
  was; the king was appealed to; and the result was a public edict by
  which the book was ordered to be burnt.[28]


45.

A Bride Bush, or a Wedding Sermon, compendiously describing the
duties of married persons. By the Rev. William Whately. London, 1617.

  This sermon occasioned much controversy, and caused the preacher
  to be summoned before the Court of High Commission, but he finally
  submitted to the authority of the Court, and on May 4th, 1621,
  signed a formal recantation of the assertions in his book "that
  either adultery or long desertion dissolves marriage." This
  submission is preserved among the Domestic State Papers of the
  period, and is endorsed by Archbishop Laud.[29]


46.

A Book without title or date. By John Wraynham. Circa, 1618.

  This book, of which I have not been able to meet with a copy,
  appears to contain an attack on the Lord Chancellor, accusing him
  of injustice in a chancery suit, and also slanderous words towards
  the king. For its publication Mr. Wraynham was cited into the Star
  Chamber, and received a severe sentence, which was however, through
  the instrumentality of the Chancellor himself, reversed, as appears
  from the following pardon preserved among the State Papers, and
  dated July 16th, 1619. "Grant to John Wraynham, at intercession of
  the Lord Chancellor, of pardon of the sentence of imprisonment for
  life, fine of £1000, standing in the pillory, loss of his ears,
  &c., to which he was condemned by the Star Chamber, for presenting
  a slanderous petition to the King against the Lord Chancellor,
  who decided a cause against him; also of pardon for putting his
  case and proofs into a book, with an epistle to the King, and an
  epilogue, in which were slanders and insolencies both against His
  Majesty and the Chancellor."


47.

Balaam's Ass. Circa 1619.

Speculum Regale. Circa 1619.

  These two books were written by John Williams, Esquire, of Essex,
  barrister of the Middle Temple, who had been expelled the House of
  Commons on account of his being a Roman Catholic, and in them he
  affirmed that the king would die in the year 1621, grounded upon
  the prophecy of Daniel. These books Williams at his trial told the
  court were enclosed in a box sealed up, and thus secretly conveyed
  to the king; and were never printed or published. On May 3rd, 1619,
  he was arraigned at the King's Bench, Westminster, for this libel,
  and condemned to be hanged, drawn, and quartered, which sentence
  was carried out two days afterwards over against the Mews at
  Charing Cross.

  Two manuscript copies of _Balaam's Ass_ are extant, one in the
  University Library of Cambridge (Dd. III, 84, art. 2), and another
  in the Lansdowne M.S., No. 213, p. 59. It is entitled "Balaam's
  Asse, or a Free Discourse touching the Murmurs and Feared
  Discontents of the Time, and directed to his then Majestie King
  James, by way of Humble Advertisement."

  Among the manuscripts in the Cambridge University Library is
  a duodecimo (class mark Ii, vi. 51), written in a hand of the
  seventeenth century, containing "Notes of cases in the Star
  Chamber, 17-20 James I." On the last leaf is written the following,
  in the same hand:--

  "A parcel of a pamphlett cast in the courte by Williams, bearinge
  the title of Balaam's Ass, for which he were after executed.

    "4 letters doe the persoun shewe,
    "The place, the tymes, the tymes of woe.
                  H. E. E. I.
    "H. sheweth the churche's first deflection,
    "E. brought the churche to large protection,
    "E. gave a woman churche subjection,
    "I. shewes sinn ripe and at perfectione.
    "Now putt together, 3, they crie,
    "Alas, 'twas hee,--the 4th, 'twas I.
    "Thus these 4 letters shewe the fall
    "Of them and of their generall.
        "Advesperascit vita mea:
        "Domine, suscipe vitam meam:
        "Post has tenebas spero lucem."

  These four letters evidently designate Henry, Edward, Elizabeth,
  and James.

  The copy of Balaam's Ass in the Cambridge University Library
  consists of forty eight pages of small folio, neatly written in a
  hand of the seventeenth century.[30]

  The following account of Williams's execution is taken from the
  State Papers of the period.[31]

  "Immediatly upon his comming to the gybbett, hee ascended up the
  ladder, where, turning his face to the people, hee first began
  with a hearty prayre for the longe lyfe and prosperous raigne
  of the King, and then hee proceeded to the acknowledgment of
  his fault, saying that hee had bin too buisy and sawcy with his
  majesty, and that hee was heartily sory for that hee had so much
  offended and distasted the King in wryteing that booke, which hee
  was ledd to doe out of an inconsiderate love to his contry; then
  hee told Mr. Dean and Mr. Fanshaw who told him that confession
  was not answerable to his offence that hee wold gladly speak and
  express him self in any thing they doubted of, wherupon Mr. Fanshaw
  demaunded of him if there were noe more of them bookes abroad; to
  which hee protested that there was not an other booke nor a peece
  of itt in the world besydes that. Hee questioned him further why
  hee wrote an Epistle to his Contrymen; he said, because it might
  come the sooner to his majestie's veiwe: and why he wrote a Propesy
  in his booke of the desolation of Whytehall, wherin he tooke upon
  him to tell so precyzely the year, the month, and the day, when
  the sayd howse shold be ruyened; to which hee aunswered, that hee
  hoped they wold not thinke him so fond as to conceave himself to
  be illuminated with any divine or propheticall spiritt, but that
  which hee wrote was Ironiee. Then he fell to clear himself of an
  imputation ... upon him yesterday that hee was an Atheist, by
  reason of a passage in his booke, but hee professed himself to
  bee a right Romayne Catholicke, and that his fayth was, that he
  hoped to be saved cheifly and more effectually by the blood of
  our Saviour shed for his sins; to which Mr. Dean answered that
  hee ought absolutely to relye upon the death and passion of our
  Saviour, and alleadged a place in Saint John that noe man cold come
  to the Father but by the Son only, wherupon hee demanded that if
  they wold have him make repetition of his fayth againe ... was the
  same as before hee wold. Mr. Dean told him that they wold willingly
  joyne with him in his prayres to God, hee said hee had done his
  devotions ere he came to that place, and so gave the executioner a
  handkerchef, which hee tyed about his head, and whylst hee was so
  doeing hee prayed in Latin, and pulling the handkercheif over his
  eyes hee said, 'Post tenebras spero lucem,' and so dyed."


48.

David Paræus, D.D., The Works of.

  In June, 1622, the works of this writer were burnt at Paul's Cross
  by order of the Privy Council. They were also burnt at Oxford by
  order of the University, as seditious; and at a Senate of the
  University of Cambridge they were "condemned to eternal infamy,"
  and forbidden to be read.[32] Paræus was a celebrated Calvinistic
  divine of the Reformed Church. He was born in Silesia in 1548, and
  died in 1622, having been Professor in the University of Heidelberg.


49.

Mercurius Gallo Belgicus. 1623.

  A set of this publication is in the Library of the British Museum,
  but the volume containing the year 1623 is unfortunately missing.
  One of the numbers published in October, 1623, seems to have
  contained objectionable matter concerning the King, for on the 18th
  of that month the Lord Keeper addressed the following letter to Mr.
  Secretary Conway:

  "Mr. Secretarie,

  "Reading since supper this Mercurius Gallo Bellgicus which heere
  with all I send unto you, I finde a passage about the 35th page
  thereof soe full of falsehoodes and indignities towardes his
  Majestie, that (although I knowe what a despicable esteeme this
  author hath borne for manie yeares together), yet doe I hold yt,
  in my poore discretion, verie unfitt that this discourse should
  be borne in the handes and tost in the mouthes of his Majestie's
  subjectes.

  "I have therefore this night staied the further publishinge of this
  booke by my expresse warrant untill I shall receive your doome from
  thence, whether yt be to be contemned and past over or finallie
  to be suppressed; I shall desire you to write unto me two wordes
  heerein. And soe I bidd you hartelie farewell, and rest

  "Westminster Colledge,
  "18 October, 1623.

      "Your verie assured
      "Lovinge frend and servant,
      "Jo. Lincoln C(ustos) S(igilli)."[33]

  On the 25th October, Secretary Conway wrote in answer to the Lord
  Keeper to instruct him to restrain this publication. (See Domestic
  State Papers of the period.)


50.

A demonstration of the unlawful succession of the new Emperor,
Ferdinand. 1623.

  This was a tract sheet printed by William Stansby for Nathaniel
  Butter, bookseller, for which the Stationers' Company, by warrant
  from the Council, nailed up Stansby's printing house, and broke
  down his presses. He petitioned Secretary Calvert for pardon and
  restoration to his business, but the result does not appear.[34]


51.

Vox Cœli, or Newes from Heaven, of a Consultation there held by the
High and Mighty Princes, King Henry 8, King Edward 6, Prince Henry,
Queene Mary, Queene Elizabeth, and Queene Anne; wherein Spaine's
ambition and treacheries to most kingdomes and free estates of Europe
are unmask'd and truly repesented, but more particularly towards
England, and now more especially under the pretended match of Prince
Charles with the Infanta Dona Maria. Whereunto is annexed two letters
written by Queene Mary from Heaven, the one to Count Gondomar, the
ambassadour of Spaine, the other to all the Roman Catholiques of
England. Written by S. R. N. I. Printed in Elisium. 1624.

Votivæ Angliæ, or the desires and wishes of England. Contayned in a
patheticall discourse, presented to the King on New Yeares Day last.
Wherein are unfolded and represented manie strong reasons, and true
and solide motives, to perswade his Majestie to drawe his royall
sword, for the restoring of the Pallatynat and Electorat to his sonne
in lawe Prince Fredericke, to his onlie daughter the Ladie Elizabeth,
and theyr Princelie Issue, against the treacherous usurpation and
formidable ambition and power of the Emperour, the King of Spayne,
and the Duke of Bavaria, whoe unjustlie possesse and detayne the
same. Together with some aphorismes returned (with a large interest)
to the Pope, in answer of his. Written by S. R. N. I. Printed at
Utrecht, MDCXXIIII.

  These books were written by Mr. Reynolds, Viscount Fielding's
  tutor, and for so doing he was imprisoned. They displeased the king
  much.[35]

  In a letter from John Locke to Carleton, dated July 11th, 1624, the
  writer says "A poor man is in trouble for printing a book called
  Votiva Angliæ; the Commission Court were about to liberate him,
  when the king ordered him to be remanded and to pay £1000 fine, as
  he was said to have gained £1000 by the book."

  In or about the year 1626, Reynolds, who was then a prisoner in
  the Fleet, addressed a petition to the Council in which he stated
  that he was forced from France by order of the late king, and on
  his arrival in England was committed to prison for being the
  author of the "Votiva Angliæ," in which he deplored the loss of the
  Palatinate, and desired its restitution, which "every true hearted
  Englishman ought to wish and pray for;" and that he had been
  imprisoned full two years, during which time he incurred a debt of
  £300 for his maintenance; also that he owed sixty and odd pounds
  for which he was surety, and was threatened to be arrested for the
  same as soon as he was at liberty; and he concludes by praying for
  protection against arrest for one year.[36]


52.

A game at Chaess, as it was acted nine days together at the Globe on
the Banks side. (By Thomas Middleton.) 1624.

  The title is engraved, and contains figures of a fat bishop (the
  Bishop of Spalatro), a black knight (Count Gondomar), and a white
  knight (the Duke of Buckingham). For writing this play the author
  was committed to prison. In a letter written by Sir Francis
  Nethersole on August 14th, 1624, he refers to this play thus: "A
  new play, the plot of which is a game of chess, in which the whole
  Spanish business is taken up, and Gondomar brought on to the stage,
  is so popular that the players gain £100 a night."[37]

  This play gave great offence to the king, for the players were very
  speedily called before the Council and forbidden to play until they
  had appeared before his majesty;[38] and on August 21st the Council
  sent the following letter to Secretary Conway.

  "After our verie heartie comendacions according to his majesty's
  pleasure signified to this Board by your letter of the 12th of
  August, touching the suppressing of a scandalous comedie acted
  by the king's players, wee have called before us some of the
  principall Actors and demaunded of them by what lycence and
  authoritie they have presumed to act the same, in answer whereunto
  they produced a booke being an orriginall and perfect coppie
  thereof (as they affirmed) seene and allowed by Sir Henry Herbert,
  Knight, Master of the Revells, under his owne hand and subscribed
  in the last page of the said booke. We demaunding further whether
  there were no other partes or passages represented on the stage,
  then those expressely contained in the booke, they confidentlie
  protested they added or varied from the same nothing at all. The
  Poett they tell us is one Midleton, who shifting out of the way
  and not attending the Board with the rest as was expected, wee
  have given warrant to a messinger for the apprehending of him. To
  those that were before us, we gave a round and sharpe reprooffe,
  making them sensible of his Majesty's high displeasure herein,
  giving them strict charge and commaund that they presume not to
  act the said commedie any more, nor that they suffer any other
  play or enterlude whatsoever to be acted by them or any of their
  company untill his Majesty's pleasure be further knowne. Wee have
  caused them likewise to enter into bond for their attendance upon
  the Board whensoever they shalbe called; as for our certifieing to
  his Majestie (as was intimated by your letter) what passages in the
  said comedie we should finde to be offensive and scandalous, wee
  have thought it our duties for his Majesty's clearer informacion to
  send herewithall the booke it self, subscribed as aforesaid by the
  Master of the Revells, that so either your self or some other whom
  his Majestie shall appoint to peruse the same, may see the passages
  themselves out of the orriginall, and call Sir Henry Herbert before
  you to know a reason of his lycenceing thereof, who (as we are
  given to understand) is now attending at court. So having done as
  much as we conceived agreable with our duties in conformitie to
  his Majestie's royall commaundementes and that which we hope shall
  give him full satisfaction, we shall continue our humble praiers
  to Almightie God for his health and safetie, and bid yow verie
  heartilie farewell. From Whitehall the 21st of August, 1624.

  Your assured verie loving freindes,

  G. Cant.
  Th. Grandisone.
  Arundell and Surrey.
  Arthure Chichester.
  Geo. Calvert."[39]


53.

Appello Cæsarem. A just Appeale from two unjust Informers. By Richard
Mountagu. London. 1625.

  For writing this book, Mr. Richard Mountagu, Canon of Windsor,
  Fellow of Eton, Rector of Stamford Rivers, and Chaplain in ordinary
  to his Majesty was brought to the bar of the House of Commons
  on July 7th, 1625, and articles were exhibited against him, but
  proceedings were dropped.[40] On January 17th, 1628, the book was
  called in and suppressed by a proclamation of which the following
  is a copy:--

  A proclamation for the suppressing of a booke intituled _Appello
  Cæsarem_, or _An Appeale to Cæsar_.

  "Whereas Wee out of our care to conserve and maintaine the church
  committed to our charge in the unity of true religion and the bond
  of peace, and not to suffer unnecessary disputes, which may trouble
  the quiet both of Church and State, have lately caused the Articles
  of Religion to bee reprinted, as a rule for avoyding of diversities
  of opinion, and for the establishing of consent in true religion; we,
  continuing our desire to compasse this wished effect, and considering
  that the booke written by Richard Montague, now Bishop of Chichester,
  then but Batchelor of Divinitie, intituled (Appello Cæsarem or An
  Appeale to Cæsar) and published in the yeere (1625), was the first
  cause of those disputes and differences which have sithence much
  troubled the quiet of the church, have thought it fitting to take
  away the occasion by calling in the said booke; and therfore we
  doe hereby will and straightly command all and singular persons
  whatsoever, who have or shall have any of them in their hands or
  custodie, that upon paine of our high displeasure and the consequence
  thereof, they doe deliver the same presently upon this publication to
  the Lord Bishop of the diocesse, or his chancellor, if it bee out of
  the Universities, or if it be in either of the two Universities, to
  the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor there, whom wee straightly command
  to suppresse the same; hoping thereby, that men will no more trouble
  themselves with these unnecessary questions, the first occasion being
  taken away. But if wee shall bee deceived in this our expectation,
  and that by reading, preaching, or making bookes, either pro or
  contra, concerning these differences, men begin anew to dispute, wee
  shall take such order with them and those bookes, that they shall
  wish they had never thought upon these needlesse controversies.

  Given at our Court at White-Hall, the seventeenth day of January,
  in the fourth yeere of our reigne, of Great Britaine, France, and
  Ireland.

    God save the King.

  Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, printers to the
  King's most Excellent Majestie. MDCXXVIII."



  PART II.]                     [TO BE CONTINUED.


  INDEX
  EXPURGATORIUS
  ANGLICANUS:

  OR
  A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF THE PRINCIPAL BOOKS
  PRINTED OR PUBLISHED IN ENGLAND,
  WHICH HAVE BEEN SUPPRESSED,
  OR BURNT BY THE COMMON HANGMAN,
  OR CENSURED,
  OR FOR WHICH THE AUTHORS, PRINTERS, OR PUBLISHERS
  HAVE BEEN PROSECUTED.

  BY W. H. HART, F.S.A.


  PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.

  LONDON:
  JOHN RUSSELL SMITH, 36, SOHO SQUARE.

  1873.

  HART, PRINTER,]                 [SAFFRON WALDEN.


54.

A short view of the long life and raigne of Henry the Third, King
of England. Presented to King James. Printed 1627. 4to. Published
anonymously. (By Sir Robert Cotton.)

  This tract was reprinted in the first number of Morgan's Phœnix
  Britannicus, 1641, and also in the fourth volume of the Somers
  Collection of Tracts, 1651.

  The printers were threatened with proceedings in the Court of High
  Commission for printing the same without licence, and Sir Robert
  Cotton, who admitted the authorship, also ran some risk, as appears
  from the following letter of the Bishop of London (dated February
  15th, 1627) to Secretary Conway, and also the examinations of the
  stationers and printers.

  My very honorable good Lord,

  May it please your Lordship, I have found a booke intituled A view
  of ye long life and raigne of Henry ye third, King of England,
  which I send your Lordship with the examinations of all that I find
  guilty of ye setting of it forth under ye hand of ye Register by
  whom before me there examinacions were taken. The parties ar in
  custody and I meane to proceede against them by ye High Comission
  for printing ye booke without licence, leaving the matter of state
  to your Lordship's wisdome. Sir Robert Cotton acknowledgeth he
  writt the booke some 15 yeares agone, but denies that he hath
  any knowledg of or hand in ye now printing of it. Good my Lord,
  give me leave uppon such occasions as this to repayre to your
  Lordship, whose wisdome will mutch strenthen my poore endeavors
  to his Majestie's service in this kind, or any other that lies in
  my ability and power; and so with my most humble acknowledgment
  of all your noble favours, I pray to God hartily to bless your
  Lordship, and remayne

  Your Lordship's humble servant,
  Geo. London.

  From my House, February 15th, 1626.

  Februarii 15to,
  1626.

    A briefe of the severall examinations taken before the Lord Bishop
    of London thes weeke, touching the booke entituled A veiwe of the
    long life and raigne of Henry the third, King of England.

  Benjamin Fisher, a stationer of the City of London, acknowledgeth
  that he caused five hundred of those bookes to be printed, and no
  more; five sheets whereof were printed by one Okes a printer, and
  one other sheete whereof was printed by Breward Alsope and Thomas
  Fawcett, two other printers.

  Of these books Fisher saith they have vented four hundred and twenty
  or thereabouts, and names some of the parties unto whom they have
  vented them: viz.--one hundred of them to one Peter Horson, the rest
  to severall stationers in the country, and that he bought the copy
  thereof of one Alsope a printer, and saith it was printed without
  licence.

  This Alsope being examined where he had the copy saith he bought
  it of one Ferdinando Ely, a broker in bookes, and that the said
  Fisher sent Alsope to buy it of Ely, that he the said Alsope payd
  unto Ely xijd. for it, and having bought it delivered it presently
  unto Fisher, who caused it to be printed. Alsope he saith that he
  printed of that sheet delivered unto him as many as should make upp a
  thousand books of that sort, besides some waste sheets.

  Ferdinando Ely being examined, denieth upon his oath that he ever
  had the copy of the said book, or that he sold it to Alsope, but
  afterwards uppon better remembrance saith that about two yeares since
  he sold a copy of a small book to the said Alsope, but what was
  the contents of it, or for how much money he sold it, he doth not
  remember.

  Peter Horson being examined, confesseth that together with a letter
  he received an hundred of those books wanting two from the said
  Fisher, which letter importeth that they were printed at Dort, and
  that the author of them was Sir Robert Cotton, and saith it is a book
  well penned; he hath dispersed divers of them and nameth some of the
  parties unto whom.

  Okes the printer saith his sonn printed part of that book whilest he
  Okes the father was prisoner in the Compter, and saith that as his
  sonn told him he printed five hundred of them and no more, and saith
  they were printed for Benjamin Fisher aforesaid.[41]

  Ita Testor { Thomas     } deputatus Registrarii
             { Mottinshed } Regis.


55.

Religion and Allegiance. Two Sermons. By Roger Manwaring. 1627.

  These two sermons were preached by Roger Manwaring, D.D., before
  his Majesty on the 4th July and 29th July, 1627, and were
  afterwards published under the before mentioned title, for which
  Manwaring was brought to the bar of the House of Lords. On the 14th
  June, 1628, that House gave judgment thus:--

  1.--That Dr. Manwaring shall be imprisoned during the pleasure of
  the House. 2.--That he be fined £1000 to the King. 3.--That he
  shall make such submission and acknowledgment of his offences as
  shall be set down by a Committee in writing both at the bar and in
  the House of Commons. 4.--That he shall be suspended three years
  from the exercise of his ministry. 5.--That he shall hereafter be
  disabled from any ecclesiastical dignity. 6.--That he shall be for
  ever disabled to preach at the Court hereafter, and 7.--That his
  Majesty be moved to grant a proclamation for the calling in of his
  books, that they may be burnt in London and both Universities.

  The following is the proclamation:--

      A Proclamation for the calling in and suppressing of two Sermons,
      preached and printed by Roger Manwaring, Doctor in Divinity,
      intituled Religion and Allegiance.

  Whereas Roger Manwaring, Doctor in Divinity, hath lately preached
  two Sermons, the one upon the fourth, the other on the nine and
  twentieth of July last, and after caused them to bee printed,
  and bound up into one volume, and intituled by him Religion and
  Allegiance; in which sermons, although the grounds thereof were
  rightly laid to perswade obedience from the subjects to their
  sovereigne, and that for conscience sake; yet in divers passages,
  inferences, and applications thereof trenching upon the lawes of this
  land and proceedings of parliaments, whereof hee was ignorant, hee
  so farre erred, that hee hath drawen upon himselfe the just censure
  and sentence of the High Court of Parliament, by whose judgement
  also that booke stands condemned. Wee, taking this into our serious
  consideration, and beeing desirous to take away all occasions of
  scandall or offence, have thought fit that those sermons, in respect
  of those inferences and applications which hee made thereon, bee
  totally suppressed.

  And to that purpose, wee doe hereby straitly charge and command all
  and every person and persons whatsoever, in whose hands any of those
  bookes now are, or hereafter shall be, that they foorthwith deliver,
  or cause the same to be delivered, to the Bishop or other ordinary
  of that diocese or place where hee or they at any time are, if it
  be not within either of our Universities; and if it bee in either
  of the Universities, that then he or they deliver the same to the
  Vicechancellour of that Universitie, to whom wee doe heereby give
  speciall charge and command to cause them to be utterly suppressed.

  And wee doe further charge and command, that no man hereafter presume
  to print the sayd sermons or either of them againe, upon paine of
  our high displeasure, and of such further punishment, as for their
  presumption in that behalfe, may any way bee inflicted upon them.

  Given at our Court at Whitehall, the foure and twentieth day of June,
  in the fourth yeere of our reigne of Great Britaine, France, and
  Ireland.

    God save the King.

  Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, Printers to the
  King's most excellent Majestie. MDCXXVIII.

  On the 21st of June, Manwaring made a humble submission to the House
  of Lords, and after the session was over, the fine was remitted, the
  Doctor himself released from prison, two livings given him, and in
  1636 he became Bishop of St. Davids.


56.

An Appeal to the Parliament; or Sion's Plea against the Prelacie.
Printed the year and moneth wherein Rochell was lost. (1628.)

  This book was written by Alexander Leighton, a Scotch doctor of
  physic and divinity, father of the Archbishop. In this book the
  author calls bishops men of blood, ravens, and magpies; he declares
  the institution of episcopacy to be anti-christian and satanical;
  the Queen is a daughter of Heth, and the King is corrupted by
  bishops to the undoing of himself and people; and he approves of
  the murder of Buckingham. Language such as this could hardly have
  been passed over unnoticed. But it was not till June 4th, 1630,
  that the author was brought before the Star Chamber. There was no
  difficulty in pronouncing him guilty of seditious and scandalous
  writings; and he was sentenced to a terrible and barbarous
  punishment. Besides a fine of £10,000, and degradation from the
  ministry, he was publicly whipped in Palace Yard, made to stand
  two hours in the pillory, one ear was cut off, a nostril slit
  open, and one of his cheeks branded with the letters S.S. (Sower
  of Sedition.) After this he was sent off to the Fleet Prison.
  At the end of a week, "being not yet cured," he was brought out
  again, underwent a second whipping and repetition of the former
  atrocities, and was then consigned to prison to life, where he
  actually spent eleven years. In April, 1641, his sentence was
  reversed by the House of Commons, and he received such consolation
  as it could afford him, when it was decided that his former
  mutilation and imprisonment had been entirely illegal.


57.

A true relation of the unjust, cruel, and barbarous proceeding
against the English at Amboyna in the East Indies, by the
Neatherlandish Governour and Councel there. 1624.

  This book was ordered to be suppressed by a warrant from the
  Council, dated September 7th, 1631; but the prohibition was
  revoked, and all restraint upon the sale of the book removed in the
  following month.[42]


58.

An examination of those things wherein the Author of the late Appeale
holdeth the doctrines of the Pelagians and Arminians to be the
doctrines of the Church of England. By George Carleton, Doctor of
Divinitie and Bishop of Chichester. London, 1626.

  This book was suppressed as appears from a letter from Sir Francis
  Nethersole to Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia, dated February 14th,
  1629, wherein the writer says, "The printers have preferred a
  petition, alleging that of late books written against Arminians
  have been suppressed, especially one written by Bishop Carleton,
  but others written in their favour have been licensed."[43]


59.

The Reconciler.

Babel no Bethel, that is, the Church of Rome no true visible Church
of Christ. By H(enry) B(urton), Rector of St. Matthew's, Friday
Street. 1629.

Maschil unmasked, in a treatise defending this sentence of our
Church, viz., the present Romish Church hath not the nature of the
true Church. By Thomas Spencer. London. N. d.

The Church of England's old antithesis to new Arminianisme. By
William Prynne. London, 1629.

  On April 20th, 1629, articles were exhibited by the Ecclesiastical
  Commissioners against the printers and publishers of these books,
  among whom was Michael Sparkes, stationer, who had been committed
  to the Fleet "for printing and publishing offensive books without
  license or warrant." In his answer to the articles objected
  against him by the Commissioners, Sparkes denies the present
  binding authority of the decree in the Star Chamber for regulating
  printing, as directly intrenching on the hereditary liberty of the
  subjects' persons and goods, and being contrary to Magna Charta,
  the Petition of Right, and other statutes. He presumed that Court
  would no way infringe the liberties of his Majesty's subjects,
  which his Majesty professed in his late declaration that he would
  constantly maintain. He admits that he printed "Babel no Bethel,"
  but conceives that there was nothing contrary to the established
  doctrine of the Church of England therein, and that he had endured
  a hard imprisonment already for the same, which he hopes will
  excuse his further answer. He says that some part of Mr. Prynne's
  book was printed by Augustine Matthewes, and other part elsewhere.
  He conceives the book itself to be a just and necessary defence of
  the Church of England against the Arminians. He refuses to confess
  the printer that printed part of the book, and thinks the Court
  will not desire it, in regard that he (the printer) has done all to
  the glory of God, the honour of the King, the good of the Church,
  and the welfare of the doctrine of the Church of England and the
  religion established.[44]


60.

Rome's Ruin. 1631.

  Articles were exhibited by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners against
  Michael Sparke, James Bouler, Nicholas Bourne, and Henry Overton,
  servant of Mrs. Shefford, of London, stationers, charging them with
  having caused to be printed without license this "scandalous book,"
  wherein are passages taxing not only the whole state, but also some
  particular bishops and persons of eminent place in the church.[45]


61.

De regno Hiberniæ Sanctorum Insula Commentarius, Authore Illustriss,
ac Reverendiss. Domino D. _Petro Lombardo_ Hiberno, Archiepiscopo
Ardmachano, totius ejusdem Regni Primate, olim in Alma Universitate
Lovaniensi S. Theol. Doctore, & quondam Præposito Ecclesiæ
Cathedralis Camaracensis, &c. Lovanii, 1632.

  This book was ordered to be suppressed and prosecuted by Lord
  Deputy Strafford, at the direction of the King.


62.

Histrio Mastix. The Player's Scourge, or Actor's Tragedie. By William
Prynne. London, 1633.

  In this remarkable book the author speaks in such unmeasured terms
  of "women actors" that it was considered to be a special attack
  on the Queen, who had herself taken part in the performance of a
  pastoral at Somerset House. Therefore on February 7th, 1632/3,
  Mr. William Prynne, utter barrister of Lincoln's Inn, was brought
  to the Court of Star Chamber on the information of the Attorney
  General for writing this book, and at the same time were brought
  up Michael Sparkes and William Buckner, the one for printing and
  the other for licensing the same book. The book was condemned to be
  burnt, and Mr. Prynne was adjudged to be put from the bar and to
  be for ever incapable of his profession, to be expelled from the
  Society of Lincoln's Inn, to stand in the pillory in Westminster
  and Cheapside, to lose both his ears, one in each place, and with
  a paper on his head denoting his offence; to pay a fine of £5000
  to the King, and be perpetually imprisoned. Buckner was sentenced
  to imprisonment according to the course of the Court, and to pay
  a fine of £50 to the King. Sparkes was sentenced to pay a fine of
  £500 to the King, and to stand in the pillory in Cheapside without
  touching his ears, with a paper on his head to declare his offence.
  The sentence against Prynne was executed the 7th and 10th days of
  May following.


63.

A Defence of the most ancient and sacred Ordinance of God, the
Sabbath Day. Second edition, corrected and amended. By Theophilus
Brabourne, Clerk. 1634, circa.

  I have not been able to meet with a copy of this book, but there
  is at the British Museum a volume by the same author, which may
  be the first edition of the one now under consideration. It is
  entitled "A discourse upon the Sabbath Day, wherein are handled
  these particulars ensuinge. 1.--That the Lord's Day is not Sabbath
  Day by divine institution. 2.--An exposition of the 4 commandement
  so farr forth as may give light unto the ensueinge discourse; and
  particularly here it is showne, at what time the Sabbath Day should
  begine and end, for the satisfaction of those who are doubtfull in
  this point. 3.--That the seaventh day Sabbath is not abolished.
  4.--That the seaventh day Sabbath is now still in force. 5.--The
  author's exhortation and reasones, that nevertheless there be no
  rente from our church as touchinge practise. Written by Theophilus
  Brabourne. Printed the 23rd of Decemb., Anno Dom., 1628."

  In 1634 Brabourne was cited before the Court of High Commission for
  writing this book, and in his answer he confessed to have composed
  and caused to be printed beyond sea five hundred copies of the
  same, in which he was alleged to have broached "erroneous heretical
  and judaical opinions." Being admonished to renounce his opinions,
  he acknowledged himself to be a Sabbatharian, and as much bound to
  keep the Saturday's Sabbath as the Jews were before the coming of
  Christ. The Court pronounced him a Jew, a heretic and schismatic,
  and adjudged him worthy to be severely punished. He was ordered to
  be deprived of all his ecclesiastical livings and dignities, and to
  be deposed and degraded from his holy orders and function in the
  university, pronounced excommunicate, fined £1000, condemned in
  expenses, ordered to make a public submission _conceptis verbis_
  at such times and places as the Court should appoint, and remanded
  back to prison until the Court advise on some other course for
  delivering him over to the secular power if he persisted in his
  opinions.


64.

Flagellum Pontificis et Episcoporum Latialium. Auctore Johanne
Bastwick. 1635.

  This book, "though professing to be directed against the Church of
  Rome, 'tis more than manifest," Laud says, "that it was purposely
  written and divulged against the Bishops and Church of England."
  For this Bastwick was cited before the High Commission Court, when
  thirty seven articles were charged against him. He was acquitted of
  all the charges except one, and that was his maintaining bishops
  and priests to be the same order of ministers, or, as he expressed
  it himself, "Impingitur horrendum crimen quod infulis et apicibus
  jus divinum negaverim, quod Episcopi et Presbyteri paritatem
  asseruerim." For this he was condemned to pay a fine of £1000,
  to be excommunicated, to be debarred from the practise of his
  profession, his book to be burnt, and he himself to pay the costs
  and remain in prison till he recanted; and "that is," he says,
  "till domesday in the afternoone."


65.

A divine tragedie lately acted: or a collection of sundry memorable
examples of God's judgments upon Sabbath breakers. By William Prynne.
London. 1636.

News from Ipswich, discovering certaine late detestable practises of
some domineering lordly prelates. By the same. Ipswich. 1636.

  The first mentioned book was directed against Noye, the Attorney
  General, who, it was made out, was visited with a judgment from
  heaven whilst laughing at Prynne as he stood in the pillory.
  For writing and publishing these books, the latter of which was
  styled "a pernicious damnable scurrilous invective and libel," an
  information was exhibited in the Star Chamber against the author,
  and on the 14th June, 1637, he was sentenced to lose his ears in
  the Palace Yard at Westminster, to be fined £5000 to the King, and
  to perpetual imprisonment. He was also condemned to be stigmatized
  in the cheeks with two letters, S. and L., for a seditious
  libeller; and on the 30th June, the sentence was carried out with
  barbarous cruelty, but at the beginning of the Long Parliament
  Prynne was liberated.


66.

The Lord's Day, the Sabbath Day, or a Brief Answer to some passages
in a late Treatise of the (Lord's) Day: digested dialogue-wise
betweene two Divines, A. and B. 1636.

  In March, 1637, articles were objected by the Commissioners for
  Causes Ecclesiastical against James Hannum, of St. Clement Danes,
  London, wax chandler, for selling this book, as well as Bastwick's
  Apologeticus. He was required, by virtue of his oath, to set down
  how many of the said books he had uttered, vented, or sold, and of
  whom he had them and to whom he sold them. He was also charged
  with knowing that these books were never licensed to be printed or
  sold, but were printed by stealth by some friend of his. Also that
  one or more of the said books was lately taken in his house.[46]


67.

ΠΡΑΞΕΙΣ ΤΩΝ ΕΠΙΣΚΟΠΩΝ, sive Apologeticus ad Præsules Anglicanos
criminum Ecclesiasticorum in Curia Celsæ Commissionis. Autore Johanne
Bastwick, M.D. 1636.

  This was written by Bastwick, while he was in confinement in
  the Gate House Prison, in answer to a book by Thomas Chowney, a
  Sussex gentleman, who maintained that the Church of Rome was a
  true church, and had not erred in fundamentals. For writing and
  publishing this book, as well as the Litany (presently described),
  an information was exhibited in the Star Chamber against Bastwick,
  and on June 14th, 1637, he was sentenced to lose his ears in the
  Palace Yard at Westminster, to be fined £5000 to his Majesty and to
  perpetual imprisonment. He was confined in the castle or fort of
  the Isles of Scilly, but was liberated by the Long Parliament.


68.

An Apology of an Appeale. Also an Epistle to the true-hearted
Nobility. By Henry Burton, Pastor of St. Matthewe's, Friday Street.
1636.

For God and the King. The summe of two Sermons preached on the fifth
of November last in St. Matthewe's, Friday Streete, 1636. By Henry
Burton, Minister of God's word there and then.

  Burton was born at Birsall in Yorkshire in 1579. He was educated at
  St. John's College, Cambridge, and became Rector of St. Matthew's,
  Friday Street about 1626. He had been Clerk of the Closet to Prince
  Henry, and afterwards to Prince Charles; a position in which
  he was not continued when Charles became King. In this bitter
  disappointment he produced the books now under consideration, for
  which he was prosecuted in the Star Chamber, and sentenced to lose
  his ears in the Palace Yard at Westminster, to be fined £5000 to
  the King, and to perpetual imprisonment. He was confined in the
  Isle of Guernsey, but was liberated at the beginning of the Long
  Parliament.


69.

The Letany of John Bastwick, Doctor of Phisicke, being now full of
devotion, as well in respect of the common calamities of plague
and pestilence, as also of his owne particular miserie, lying at
this instant in _Limbo Patrum_. Printed by the speciall procurement
and for the especiall use of our English Prelats, in the yeare of
remembrance, Anno 1637.

The answer of John Bastwick, _Doctor of Phisicke_, to the exceptions
made against his Letany by a learned Gentleman, which is annexed to
the Litany itselfe, as Articles superadditionall against the Prelats.
This is to follow the Letany as a second part thereof. Printed in the
yeare of remembrance, Anno 1637.

The Answer of John Bastwick, _Doctor of Phisicke_, to the information
of Sir John Bancks, Knight, Atturney universall. Printed in the yeare
1637.

XVI New Quæres proposed to our Lord Prælates. Printed in the yeare
M.DC.XXXVII.

  The first mentioned book, the "Letany" was at first only shown to
  a few friends in manuscript, but afterwards it came to be printed
  in this way. John Lilburne, afterwards a Lieutenant Colonel in the
  Parliamentary army, and who behaved with such gallantry at Marston
  Moor, was introduced to Dr. Bastwick in 1637, and was so much
  pleased at hearing the Letany, that having a little ready money at
  command, he undertook to get it printed in Holland. Bastwick was at
  first averse to this, as he distrusted a friend of Lilburne's who
  would have to assist in disposing of the impression. His scruples
  however were overcome, and the Letany, together with the "Answer
  to the Information of Sir John Bancks, Kt., Atturney Universalle,"
  committed to the press. The first edition realized a handsome
  profit; but Archbishop Laud got scent of the publication, laid
  hold upon the disperser, and made him confess who was the chief
  actor in the affair. Accordingly when Lilburne landed with another
  impression, he was seized along with his cargo, and the books burnt
  by the hands of the common hangman. Lilburne, and Wharton, (who
  dispersed the books) were further cited to the Star Chamber, and
  on February 13th, 1638, sentenced to be remanded to the Fleet,
  there to remain till they conformed themselves to the order of the
  Court, and to pay £500 apiece to his Majesty's use; and before
  their enlargements out of the Fleet, to become bound with good
  sureties for their good behaviour. Lilburne was to be whipped
  through the streets from the Fleet to the Pillory at Westminster,
  and together with Wharton to be set in the said Pillory, and from
  thence returned to the Fleet, there to remain. This sentence was
  carried into execution on April 18th, 1638, and the same day the
  Court passed the following further sentence upon Lilburne "for
  uttering sundry scandalous speeches, and scattering divers copies
  of seditious books among the people," while he was in the pillory,
  that he should be laid alone with irons on his hands and legs
  in the wards of the Fleet where the basest and meanest sort of
  prisoners were used to be put, and that the Warden of the Fleet
  take special care to hinder the resort of any persons whatsoever to
  him; and particularly that he be not supplied with money from any
  friend, and that all letters, writings, and books brought to him be
  seized and delivered to their Lordships; and all persons visiting
  him to be reported to the Board. However, in November, 1640, on
  petitioning Parliament he was liberated.


70.

Britannia Triumphans: a Masque presented at Whitehall by the King's
Majestie and his Lords on the Sunday after Twelfth Night, 1637. By
Inigo Jones, Surveyor of His Majestie's Workes, and William Davenant,
Her Majestie's Servant. London, 1637.

  This masque is said to have been suppressed from the statement on
  the title page of it being acted on a Sunday, and the clamour it
  excited.


71.

Sunday no Sabbath. A Sermon preached before the Lord Bishop of
Lincolne at his Lordship's visitation at Ampthill in the County of
Bedford, August 17th, 1635. By John Pocklington, Doctor of Divinitie,
late Fellow and President both of Pembroke Hall and Sidney College in
Cambridge, and Chaplaine to the Right Reverend Father in God the Lord
Bishop of Lincolne. London, 1636.

Altare Christianum, or the Dead Vicar's Plea. Wherein the Vicar of
Gr. being dead yet speaketh and pleadeth out of antiquity against him
that hath broken downe his altar. Presented and humbly submitted to
the consideration of his superiours, the governours of our Church. By
John Pocklington, D.D. London, 1637.

  For writing these books Pocklington was deprived of all his
  livings, dignities, and preferments, and prohibited the King's
  Court. These proceedings were instituted against him at the
  instigation of Archbishop Williams. On February 10th, 1641, the
  House of Lords ordered that these two books should be publicly
  burnt in the City of London and the two Universities by the
  common hangman; and on March 10th, the House ordered the Sheriffs
  of London and the Vice-Chancellors of both the Universities
  forthwith to take care and see the order of the house carried into
  execution.[47]


72.

An Introduction to a Devout Life, 1637.

  This is a translation of the "Praxis Spiritualis, sive Introductio
  ad vitam devotam," by the celebrated Catholic divine, St. Francis
  de Sales. Archbishop Laud in writing to his Vice-Chancellor in

  1637, speaks thus of the book, "There was an English translation
  of a book of devotion, written by Sales, Bishop of Geneva, and
  intitled Praxis Spiritualis, &c., licensed by Dr. Haywood, then
  my chaplain, about the latter end of November last; but before
  it passed his hands, he first struck out divers things wherein
  it varied from the doctrine of our Church, and so passed it.
  But by the practice of one Burrowes (who is now found to be a
  Roman Catholic) those passages struck out by Dr. Haywood were
  interlined afterwards, and were printed according to Burrowes's
  falsifications. The book being thus printed, gave great and just
  offence, especially to myself, who upon the first hearing of it,
  gave present order to seize upon all the copies, and to burn them
  publicly in Smithfield. Eleven or twelve hundred copies were seized
  and burnt accordingly."[48]

  The following is the proclamation for suppressing the book:--

    "By the King.

  "A proclamation for calling in a book entituled An Introduction to
  a Devout Life; and that the same be publikely burnt.

  "Whereas a book entituled An Introduction to a Devout Life, was
  lately printed by Nicholas Oakes of London, and many of them
  published and dispersed throughout the realme, the copy of which
  book being brought to the Chaplaine of the Lord Archbishop of
  Canterbury for licence and allowance, was by him, upon diligent
  perusall, in sundry places expunged and purged of divers passages
  therein tending to Popery. Neverthelesse, the same book, after
  it was so amended and allowed to be printed, was corrupted and
  falsified by the translator and stationer, who between them
  inserted again the same Popish and unsound passages; and the
  stationer is now apprehended, and the translator sought for, to
  be proceeded against according to justice. His Majesty, out of
  his pious and constant care to uphold and maintain the religion
  professed in the Church of England in its purity, without error
  or corruption, doth therefore hereby declare his royall will and
  pleasure to be, and doth straitly charge and command all persons,
  of what degree, quality, or condition soever, to whose hands any of
  the said bookes are or shall come, that without delay they deliver
  or send them to the Bishop or Chancellor of the Diocesse, whom
  his Majestie requireth to cause the same to be publikely burnt,
  as such of them as have beene already seized on have been by His
  Majestie's expresse command; and to this His Majestie's royall
  pleasure, he requireth all his loving subjects to yeeld all due
  conformity and obedience, as they will avoid the censure of high
  contempt.

  "Given at our Court at Whitehall, the fourteenth day of May in the
  thirteenth yeare of our reigne.

    "God save the King.

  "Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the King's most
  excellent Majestie; and by the Assignes of John Bill. 1637."


73.

The Jubilee of Jesuits. Circa, 1640.

  In this book it was contained that the Papists should fish in
  troubled waters while the King was at war with the Scots, with
  prayers in it for the holy martyrs that suffered in the Fleet sent
  against the heretics in England, 1639. It is undoubtedly the same
  work as is entitled "Jubileum sive speculum Jesuiticum opera et
  studio I.L.W.O.P.," of which there is a reprint in the British
  Museum dated 1643. On the 14th November, 1640, Thomas Chude and
  John Clay were called in before the House of Commons to testify
  touching this book, when Chude declared he had one in his custody;
  he had it from a woman at Redriffe, wife to H. Goodwell, a cobbler,
  whose wife was a Papist; he delivered the book the same day he had
  it to the Sheriff of London, Sheriff Warner.[49]


74.

Information from the Estaits of the Kingdome of Scotland to the
Kingdome of England. 1640.

  By a proclamation of March 30th, 1640, "against libellous and
  seditious pamphlets and discourses sent from Scotland," this
  tract was prohibited on account of its containing "many most
  notorious falsehoods and scandals to the dishonour of His Majesty's
  proceedings with his subjects in Scotland."


75.

Mr. Maynard's Speech before both Houses in Parliament, upon
Wednesday, the 24th of March, in reply upon the Earle of Strafford's
Answer to his Articles at the Barre. 1641.

  On April 6th, 1641, it was ordered by the House of Commons that
  enquiry should be made after the printer and venter of this speech,
  and that all diligence was to be used in suppressing the same.[50]
  A copy exists in the British Museum Library.


76.

The Anatomy of Et cætera. Or the unfolding of that dangerous Oath
in the close of the Sixth Canon, As it was contrived by the Bishops
and some of the Clergie in their late Oath Ex Officio, cunningly
obliging the Consciences of His Majestie's Subjects to observe and
obey whatsoever errours they would impose. Condemned and dissected
in a passionate Conference betwixt the two zealous Brothers Roger
and Ralph, penned at the first injunction of the new Canons, and
now publisht since their abolishment. By an Oxfordshire gentleman.
London, 1641.

  On August 24th, 1641, it was resolved by the House of Commons that
  Richard Heren should be sent for as a delinquent by the Sergeant at
  Arms for printing this pamphlet; and also that Thomas Bray, an Oxon
  scholar, who turned the pamphlet out of poetry into prose should
  also be sent for as a delinquent.[51]

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library. It commences
  thus:--

  "Two of the zealous Tribe being inspired, as they tearmed it, and
  having a greater parcell of the spirit than at other times, after a
  great deal of chat, now concerning this thing, and now concerning
  that thing, at last drew themselves as far as the _New Canons_,
  where they read, but yet you must not thinke that it was without
  rubbes and jarres, but comming to the _Sixth Canon_ that ended
  with _Et cætera_, at the very sight of which he swelled as much as
  _Goliah_ with his weaver's beam, and thus began to break forth in
  these or the like tearmes.

  "_Roger._ I that have behaved my selfe so well, that now I am in
  sincerity elected a Zealous Brother, I that having my worth seen
  am for it rewarded with twenty Nobles _per annum_, besides what
  I collect every year from our Female Charity, considering with
  myselfe what a vile and indiscreet thing these new Oathes and
  Canons are, I am even wrapt besides my selfe, and with this very
  word, or letter, or syllable, or whatsoever it is, I must and will
  dissect it.

  "_Ralph._ Why brother _Roger_? Art thou of so shallow capacity as
  thou makest thyselfe to be? Have patience pray, and rather finde
  fault with the Printer than with the thing printed, or rather with
  him which set the Printer on worke than with the Printer himselfe,
  these times are corrupted, for why? corrupt men have ruled us here
  in this Land.

  "Here could _Roger_ hold no longer, but like to a Beardog, he
  yawnes, and barkes, and bawles, saying,

  "_Roger._ In sincerity brother _Ralph_, thou doest not know what an
  urging this is to me, see what a vile mishapen monster it is, this
  _Et cætera_, God blesse us! is a Limbe of the Devill;" &c., &c.

  And it concludes thus:--

  "Well, these two Zealous Brothers had dranke so long together that
  they played the beasts, like a couple of drunken rogues, &c., and
  then they must needs quarrell, and make themselves and Religion
  in them to be scoffed egregiously, and indeed it is an ancient
  proverbe, _When theeves fall out, true men come by their goods_.

  "It chanced that Roger gave Ralph some words in his drinke, which
  did not very well please him, which made Ralph break out beyond the
  bounds of modesty, and told him that he was a dissembling knave,
  and that he could prove him so, for said Ralph, _Is it not the
  part of a knave to carry another man's wife so far as Banbury in
  Oxfordshire, and there to live with her, and keep her as your owne
  wife? fie, fie, for shame_.

  "_Nay_, said Roger, _hic-up, if you go to that, hic-up, you are as
  arrant a knave as my selfe, hic-up, for do you remember, you Slave
  you, how you wisht your wife in the Low Countries, to say, that
  you were her brother, because she was fair, and that it might be
  said that you imitated Abraham, when he was a good man, whereas
  thou art a stinking Rogue._

  "Thus they brawled, and scolded, and scolded, and brawled, till
  they fell asleep, in which pickle I left them."


77.

The order and course of passing Bills in Parliament. 1641.

  On June 3rd, 1641, the House of Commons referred to the Committee
  concerning printing, the consideration of the printing of this
  book, and they were to report to the House what they thought fit
  to be done therein; and to send for the printer thereof, and the
  parties who conceived themselves to be prejudiced by that false
  copy.[52]

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.


78.

The true relation of the French Ambassage. 1641.

  On July 12th, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that the printing
  of this pamphlet be referred to the Committee for printing,
  where Sir Edward Dering had the chair; and on the 18th November
  following, it was further ordered that Alsop the printer should be
  summoned to attend and answer such matters as should be objected
  against him concerning the printing of this pamphlet, and that some
  course was to be considered for preventing inordinate printing for
  the future.[53]


79.

The Copy of a Letter sent from the Earle of Holland to an Honourable
Lord at the Parliament. 1641.

  On August 20th, 1641, the House of Commons referred to the
  Committee concerning printing to enquire who printed this letter,
  and to take some course and propound it to the House for preventing
  the inordinate licence of printing. On enquiry it was found that
  Thomas Symonds was the printer, and it was resolved that he should
  be sent for as a delinquent for printing this letter without any
  order of Parliament, after that he was acquainted with the order
  of the House inhibiting the printing of anything concerning the
  proceedings of that House.[54]

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.


80.

Sir Kenelme Digbye's Honour Maintained by a most couragious Combat
which he fought with the Lord _Mount le Ros_, who by base and
slanderous words reviled our King. Also the true relation how he went
to the King of France, who kindly intreated him, and sent two hundred
men to guard him so far as Flanders. And now he is returned from
Banishment, and to his eternall honour lives in England. Printed at
London for T. B., 1641.

  A pamphlet of five pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On the title page is a rough woodcut representing
  two men fighting a duel.

  On November 24th, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that the
  Committee for printing should enquire after the printing of this
  book.[55]


81.

A terrible outcry against the loytering exalted prelates. By H.
Walker. 1641.

  On December 20th, 1641, the House of Commons resolved that Walker
  should be sent for as a delinquent by the Sergeant at Arms for
  being author of this pamphlet; and the printing of this and
  other books by the same author was referred to the Committee for
  printing.[56]


82.

Noli me tangere is a thinge to be thought on. Or Vox carnis sacræ
clamantis ab Altari ad Aquilam sacrilegam. Noli me tangere ne te
perdam. 1642.

  On January 31st, 1641/2, the House of Commons referred this book
  to the Committee for printing, to enquire out the author and the
  printer thereof.[57] It has an engraved frontispiece wherein is
  represented an "_Altare_," upon which an offering is consuming in
  fire, "_Ignis sacer_;" above the offering is "_Sancto nomini caro
  sacra_." An eagle grasps at part of the offering, "_offam rapit
  Aquila carbone adhærente_;" another eagle hovers above, with a
  second portion, "_Portat ad pullos in nido_," and flying towards
  a nest, "_Aquilæ nidus_," which is in the branches of a tree. On
  the trunk of the tree is "_Ardet carbone nidus quo perit soboles
  impiæ genitricis_." An Eye is visible in clouds, inscribed "_Vidit
  offensus Oculus supremi_;" also a clenched fist, above which is
  "_Percutit extensa manus supremi_." Rays proceed from the eye
  downwards over the altar and its adjuncts, and are respectively
  inscribed "_Advertit peccatorem in progrediendo_," "_Aspicit
  peccatorem in peccando_," "_Acceptat sacrificia peccatorem
  condonando_," and "_Accipit peccatorem sacrificia comburendo_."
  A ray is directed to the nest, and inscribed "_Animadvertit in
  peccatorem posteros plectendo_." The old British Museum Catalogue
  ascribes the authorship of this tract to Mr. Ephraim Udall.


83.

The Lord Digbies Speech in the House of Commons to the Bill of
Attainder of the Earle of Strafford, the 21 of April, 1641. Printed
in the yeare 1641.

  On July 13th, 1641, the House of Commons resolved that this speech
  contained untrue and scandalous matters concerning the proceedings
  of the Committees of the Lords and Commons, and that the publishing
  and printing of that speech by Lord Digby, after a vote passed in
  that House, was scandalous to the proceedings of that House, and a
  crime; and it was also ordered that all the books so printed should
  be publicly burnt on the following Friday, in various parts of
  London by the Common Hangman.[58]

  A copy exists in the British Museum Library.


84.

Master Glyn's Reply to the Earle of Strafford's defence of the
severall Articles objected against him by the House of Commons.
London. Printed for Lawrence Chapman, 1641.

  On May 11th, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that this speech,
  which was printed and went under Mr. Glynne's name, should be
  suppressed and the printer punished: and the Master and Wardens of
  the Stationers' Company were to attend the House to employ their
  best endeavours accordingly.[59]

  A copy exists in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and
  contains 56 pages.


85.

Verses lately written by Thomas, Earle of Strafford. 1641. A folio
broadside, containing nine seven-line stanzas.

  On May 14th, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that the
  consideration of printing these verses be referred to the Committee
  for printing of books.[60]

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library. The verses are
  as follows:--


  (I.)

    "Go, Empty Joyes,
    With all your noyse,
      And leave me here alone,
    In sweet sad silence to bemoane
      Your vaine and fleet delight,
    Whose danger none can see aright,
    Whilest your false splendor dimmes his sight.


  (II.)

    Goe and insnare
    With your false ware,
      Some other easie Wight,
    And cheat him with your flattering Light;
      Raine on his head a shower
    Of Honours, favor, wealth, and power;
    Then snatch it from him in an houre.


  (III.)

    Fill his big minde
    With gallant winde
      Of Insolent applause;
    Let him not fear all-curbing Lawes,
      Nor King nor People's frowne,
    But dreame of something like a Crowne,
    And climing towards it, tumble downe.


  (IV.)

    Let him appeare
    In his bright Sphere
      Like _Scynthia_ in her pride,
    With star-like troups on every side;
      Such for their number and their light,
    As may at last orewhelme him quite,
    And blend us both in one dead night.


  (V.)

    Welcome, sad Night,
    Griefe's sole delight,
      Your mourning best agrees
    With Honour's funerall Obsequies.
      In _Thetis'_ lap he lies,
    Mantled with soft securities,
    Whose too much Sunshine blinds his eyes.


  (VI.)

    Was he too bold,
    That needs would hold
      With curbing raines, the day,
    And make _Sol's_ fiery Steeds obay?
      Then sure as rash was I,
    Who with ambitious wings did fly
    In _Charles_ his Waine too loftily.


  (VII.)

    I fall, I fall;
    Whom shall I call?
      Alas, can he be heard,
    Who now is neither lov'd nor fear'd.
      You, who were wont to kisse the ground,
    Where e're my honor'd steps were found,
    Come catch me at my last rebound.


  (VIII.)

    How each admires
    Heav'n's twinkling fires,
      When from their glorious seat
    Their influence gives life and heat.
      But O! how few there ar',
    (Though danger from that act be far)
    Will stoop and catch a falling star.


  (IX.)

    Now 'tis too late
    To imitate
      Those Lights, whose pallidnesse
    Argues no inward guiltinesse:
      Their course one way is bent.
    The reason is, there's no dissent
    In Heaven's high Court of Parliament.

  London, printed 1641.


86.

The Saint's Beliefe. By John Turner. 1641. A folio broadside.

  On May 18th, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that this
  publication be referred to the Committee for printing as concerning
  the printer; and that the Stationers' Company be strictly required
  to use all their endeavours to suppress those copies; and that John
  Turner, who names himself the author, be sent for as a delinquent
  for his boldness in causing a new belief to be printed without
  authority, during the sitting of parliament.[61]

  The accompanying folding page contains an exact reprint, line
  for line, of this eccentric paper, of which a copy exists in the
  British Museum Library.


  THE
  SAINTS
  BELIEFE.

  [Sidenote: a Gen. 1, 1. Prov. 16, 4. b 1 Joh. 5, 7. c Joh. 10, 30. 1
  Joh. 5, 7. d Gen. 1, 2. Joh. 1, 1, 2, 3. e Ro. 3, 24. Ephe. 1, 7. f
  Psal. 97, 10. Phil. 4, 7. g Tit. 2, 11. Jo. 11, 25. h Col. 2, 9. Mat.
  1, 23. i 1 Tim. 2, 5. Act. 2, 22. Heb. 7, 24. k 1 Joh. 4, 9. Joh. 3,
  17. l Isay. 7, 14. Luk. 2, 7. m John 11, 48. John 19, 12, 15, 16. n
  Mat. 27, 35. o Joh. 19, 33. p Luk. 23, 43, 46. q Joh. 19, 41, 42. r 1
  Cor. 15, 4. s Act. 1, 9, 10, 11. Joh. 20, 17. t Heb. 1, 3. u Act. 3,
  21. w 1 Joh. 2, 12. Joh. 1, 29. x 1 Thes. 4, 16, 17. y Mat. 25, 32. z
  Mat. 1, 2, 36.]

  _I Beleeve in one Almighty_ God, [a] _Creator and maker of all
  things, [b] distinguished in three, Father, Sonne, and Holy Ghost:
  [c] but not divided, [d] all working together in the Creation, [e]
  Redemption, [f] preservation, [g] and salvation of Man_. _The Son
  our_ Lord Jesus Christ, [h] God [i] _and Man_; [k] _begotten and
  sent by the Father; [l] conceived and born of the Virgin Mary,
  [m] suffered under the Roman power_, Pilate _being Judge; [n]
  crucified [o] dead, [p] and his soule immediately received by_ God
  _his Father; [q] and his body buried; [r] rose againe the third
  day according to the Scriptures; [s] and ascended into heaven;
  [t] sits at the right hand of_ God; [u] _whom the heavens must
  contain for a time; [w] in whom all our sins are forgiven; [x] and
  from thence he shall come to judge the living and the dead; [y]
  before whom every one shall appeare, [z] to give an account [a] of
  every evill thought, [b] idle word, [c] vaine oath, and [d] wicked
  action_. _And I beleeve in the Holy Ghost, [e] sent by the Father
  and the Sonne to teach and leade [f] his Elect in all truth, [g]
  instituting by his Apostles particular Churches here on earth,
  and no other; [h] every ordinance of _God_ belonging to every one
  of them; [i] all of equall authority, no one being greater or
  lesser then other, either in power or priviledges; [k] who must
  serve him as he hath commanded in his holy Scriptures; [l] both
  in ordinances, [m] and order, [n] in their own Faith; [o] with a
  pure conscience; [p] all Beleevers being bound in duty to have and
  hold communion in some one of them; [q] and that every Church hath
  power from GOD to elect and ordaine their own Officers, [r] receive
  in Beleevers, [s] and Excommunicate any one of them that lives in
  transgression, without the helpe or assistance of any; [t] no one
  member being more free then another. [u]_

  _And I beleeve I am bound in conscience to GOD to honour and obey
  my Father, Mother, King, Master, and every Officer under him,
  whether they be Christians, irreligious, Idolaters, or Heathens.
  The Commandement requires obedience to every one of them of what
  Religion soever they be equall, and alike. [w] And I beleeve the
  bodies of the just shall rise to life everlasting, [x] and the
  wicked to everlasting perdition, &c._

  a Gen. 6, 5. 1 Cor. 3, 20. b Mat. 12, 36. c Exo. 20, 7. Mat. 5, 34,
  35, 36, 37. Jam. 1, 26. d Rev. 22, 12. Mat. 25, 41, 45, 46. e Joh.
  14, 26. Joh. 15, 26. Joh. 16, 13. f Col. 3, 12. 1 Pet. 1, 2. Rom.
  9, 11. g Mat. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20. Rev. 1, 11. Gal 1, 2. h 1 Cor.
  3, 21, 22, 23. Psal. 149, 7, 8, 9. i 2 Cor. 12, 13. 1 Cor. 5, 12,
  13. k Joh. 15, 10, 14. Joh. 5, 39. l Rev. 22, 18. Deut. 5, 32. Mat.
  28, 20. m Col. 2, 5. 1 Cor. 14, 40. 1 Cor. 15, 2. Levi. 10, 1, 2. 1
  Chro. 13, 9, 11. 1 Chro. 15, 13. Num. 15, 16. n 2 Tim. 1, 13, 14.
  Mat. 9, 22. Mark 16, 16. Heb. 11, 6. o 1 Tim. 19, 1. Joh. 3, 20. p
  Heb. 10, 25. Mat. 18, 17, 18, 19, 20. q Acts 6, 2, 3, 5. Act. 14,
  23. Act. 1, 15, 23, 26. Ezek. 33, 2. Numb. 8, 10. r 2 Cor. 2, 7, 8.
  Joh. 3, 10. s Mat. 18, 17, 18, 19, 20. 1 Cor. 5, 12, 13. Acts 11,
  2, 3, 4. t Ro. 2, 11. Deut. 1, 17. Jam. 2, 9. Acts 11, 2, 3, 4. u
  Ro. 13, 2, 3, 4, 5. Exo. 20, 12. Ephes. 6, 5, 10. 1 Cor. 15. Mat.
  25, 34. x Isay. 30, 33. Mat. 25, 41, 46.

  _Pro._ 22, 6. Teach a Child in the trade of his way, and when he is
  old he shall not depart from it.

  1 _Thes._ 5. Try all things, keep that which is good.

  _Acts_ 17, 11. These were also more noble men then they which were
  of Thessalonica, which received the Word with all readinesse, and
  searched the Scriptures dayly, whether these things were so.

  1 _Sam._ 15, 22. To obey is better then sacrifice, and to hearken
  then the fat of rammes.

  By me JOHN TURNER, Prisoner of our _Lord Jesus Christ_ (committed
  by the Bishops) neare 14 yeares; for affirming CHRIST JESUS _hath
  left in his written word sufficient direction to order his Church
  and Children in his worship: So that nothing may be done, over
  nor above, nor besides, what is commanded therein, by a Precept,
  an Example, or a true gathered consequence_; which I dare not but
  affirme, though I die for the same. And now delivered (as abusively
  Imprisoned all this time) by the most Honourable

  Lords in Parliament, 1641.

  1 _Cor._ 15, 57. Thanks be unto God which hath given us victory
  through our Lord Jesus Christ.


87.

The declaration of Colonel Goring to the House of Commons upon his
examination concerning the late conspiracie against the state and
kingdome. With the report of that worthy gentleman, Mr. Fynes, to the
House of Commons from the Committee upon the examination of severall
gentlemen concerning the same, 19th June, 1641.

  On June 28th, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that this book be
  referred to the Committee for printing, and they were to use their
  best diligence in enquiring as to the printer.[62]


88.

The Protestation protested, or a short remonstrance showing what is
principally required of all those that have or doe take the last
Parliamentary Protestation. 1641.

  On July 10th, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that the Committee
  for printing should take this book into consideration, and examine
  the printer thereof, and discover the author; and on August 24th
  following, it was further ordered that Gregory Dexter, printer,
  who printed this pamphlet and was therefore committed prisoner to
  the Gatehouse, should be bailed.[63] A copy of this book is at the
  British Museum, and a manuscript note on the title page ascribes
  its authorship to H. Burton, of whom mention has been previously
  made.


89.

The Brownists' Conventicle: or an assemble of Brownists, Separatists,
and Non-Conformists, as they met together at a private house to
heare a Sermon of a brother of theirs neere Algate, being a learned
Felt-maker. 1641.

  On the title page of this curious tract (of which there is a copy
  in the British Museum Library) there is a woodcut which represents
  four men seated at a table after a meal, and listening to one
  who appears half an idiot, and is named "_simple Robin_"; on the
  right is a man kissing a woman, and saying, "_A little in zeale
  good sister Ruth._" The tract refers to the numerous "Hereticks,
  Schismaticks, Novellists, Separatists," and other sects of
  this time, including Thraskites or Sabbatarians, Banisterians,
  Brownists, Anabaptists, Familists, Adamists, "who have their
  private meetings when they will not heare the Word preached nor
  have the Sacrament administered unto them but naked, not so much as
  fig-leave breeches upon them, thinking thereby to imitate our first
  parents in their innocency."

  On July 12th, 1641, this tract was referred by the House of Commons
  to the Committee for printing.[64]


90.

The order and form for Church Government by Bishops and the Clergy of
this kingdom. N. d.

  On July 23rd, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that this pamphlet
  be referred to the Committee for printing; and that the author and
  printer be enquired after.[65]


91.

The Heads of severall Petitions and complaints made against, 1.--Sir
John Connyers, Lieutenant Generall of the Horse in the Northerne
expedition. 2.--Dr. Heywood, of St. Gyles in the Fields. 3.--The
Parishioners of St. Mary Woolchurch. 4.--Dr. Fuller of St. Giles,
Cripplegate. 5.--Mr. Booth, of St. Botolph's, Aldersgate, Touching
the Rayles about the Communion Table, the Pictures in Glasse
windowes, and weekely Lectures; and read before the Committee,
October 16, 1641. London, Printed for John Thomas, 1641.

  On October 23rd, 1641, the House of Commons ordered that the
  Stationers' Company should enquire and inform the House who printed
  this "scandalous pamphlet."[66] A copy exists in the British Museum
  Library. It is in quarto, and contains four pages.


92.

A Petition directed to the House of Lords by the inhabitants of the
County of Herts. 1642.

  This is contained in a tract of which there is a copy in the
  British Museum Library, entitled: "Two Petitions of the Knights,
  Gentlemen, Freeholders, and others of the Inhabitants of the County
  of Hertford. The one to the Right Honourable House of Peeres, the
  other to the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the Honourable
  House of Commons assembled in Parliament. Delivered by at least
  4000 Knights, Gentlemen, Freeholders, and other Inhabitants of the
  County of Hertford, January 25, 1641. London." Printed by a perfect
  copy for John Wright, dwelling in the Old Bailey. 1642.

  On the title page of this tract is a small woodcut representing
  an old man standing under a tree, from which he is lopping some
  branches, with a scroll over his head inscribed "noli altvm sapere."

  On January 25th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that a
  Committee should examine who printed this petition, and who was
  the author of it, and brought it to be printed. Martin Eldred, of
  Jesus College in Cambridge, on being brought to the bar, said that
  he did not compose the petition, but one Thomas Herbert, once of
  Trinity College, did compose it; and that he was in the company of
  Herbert when he composed it, and that it was composed at the Sign
  of the Antelope, and afterwards sold it to John Greensmith for two
  shillings and sixpence. John Greensmith the stationer was called
  in, and confessed that Eldred and Herbert brought the petition
  unto him, and that one Barnaby Alsop, of Bread Street, printed it;
  he also confessed that he had printed sundry pamphlets of these
  men's composing: viz.--_Good News from Ireland_, and _Bloody News_,
  and the _Cambridge Petition_, and that he had two shillings and
  sixpence a piece for them. It was thereupon resolved that Eldred
  and Greensmith should be committed prisoners to the Gatehouse,
  and that Herbert and Alsop should be sent for as delinquents; but
  shortly afterwards Eldred and Greensmith were liberated.[67]

  The following is a copy of the petition complained of:--

  "To the Right Honovrable the
  Hovse of Peeres now assembled
  in Parliament.

  "The humble Petition of Knights, Gentlemen, Freeholders, and other
  inhabitants of the County of Hertford

  "Sheweth,

  "That the Petitioners having hitherto with much patience waited
  for, and with great confidence expected the happy progresse of
  this Parliament, and therein the removall of all those grievances
  under which they have a long time groaned, and the perfect
  Reformation of Church and Commonwealth, They are now constrained
  to represent unto this Honourable House, the manifold feares,
  troubles, and distractions wherewith they are incompassed, ariseing
  from that hellish and bloody rebellion in _Ireland_, acted by the
  Papists against our Bretheren by Nation and Religion, apparently
  threatning the losse of that Kingdome, the extirpation of the
  Protestants Religion there, and extreame prejudice, if not ruine
  of this Kingdome, From the want of timely and powerful supplies
  to suppresse those Rebells, the not granting ample Commissions
  to those who have bin ready to take up Armes against them, the
  not passing of the Acts for impressing Soldiers to that service,
  and the delayes in acceptance of the worthy offer of the South
  Nation to send 10,000 Soldiers thither, From the continuance of
  the Prelacy, and multitude of erronious and scandalous Ministers
  in this Kingdome; the Insolency of the Papists their being armed:
  the want of execution of Justice against Priests and Jesuits
  already condemned, and other notorious Delinquents; the many
  desperate plots and designes attempted against the Parliament
  and Kingdome by the Popish and Prelaticall party; the great
  and unparrelled breaches lately made upon the Priviledges of
  Parliament, endangering the overthrow of the very being thereof,
  and the destruction of divers of its Members, worthy Patriots of
  their Country; the not disclosing and punishing of those persons
  who counselled the same; The unpreparednesse of the sea Forts
  and other strengths of this Kingdome by Sea and Land against
  any Invasions, and the continuance of divers of them in unsafe
  hands, wherein the Parliament (and in them the whole Kingdome)
  cannot confide, the delay of putting the Kingdome into a posture
  of Warre, for their better defence; the misunderstanding between
  his Majesty and the Parliament, and the want of Compliance by
  this Honourable House with the House of Commons, in entertaining
  those many good Motions and passing those necessary Bils presented
  to you from that House for the Common good. All which springs
  and causes of your Petitioners' feares and distractions, having
  occasioned the totall decay of trade, and great scarcity of money,
  and thereby impoverishing and unsetlement of the whole Kingdome,
  and tending so exceedingly to the indangering of his Majestie's
  honour and dignity, and the peace and safety of this Kingdome:--the
  Petitioners doe verily beleeve, that as the same received their
  first being from the Popish and Prelaticall party, so have they
  hitherto beene continued, and will be (it is to be feared) daily
  increased by the Voting of the Popish Lords and Bishops in this
  Honourable House (whose interests in respect of Religion, their
  owne standings, or otherwise are at this time so contrary to the
  happinesse of this Kingdome) and by the continuance of wicked
  Councellors and evill Ministers of State about his Majestie.

  "The Petitioners therefore humbly pray, that all the foresaid
  Causes and springs of their feares and troubles may be speedily
  removed: And (for the effecting thereof) that the evill Councellors
  and others hindring the publike good may be taken from his
  Maiestie, and the voting of the Popish Lords and Bishops removed
  out of this Honourable House; And that the Petitioners (who shall
  be ever ready to hazard their lives and Estates for the deffence
  of the King and Parliament, the Priviledges of the same, and in
  speciall those noble Lords and Gentlemen in both Houses, whose
  endeavours are for the publike good) may have liberty to protest
  against all those as enemies to this Kingdome, who refuse to joyne
  with those Honourable Lords and the House of Commons for the
  putting of the Kingdome into a way of safety under the Command of
  such persons as the Parliament shall appoint.

  "And your Petitioners shall daily pray, &c."


93.

The Resolution of the Roundheads to pull downe Cheapside Crosse.
Being a zealous Declaration of the Grievances wherewith their
little Wits are consumed to destruction. And what things they
in their wisedome (yet left them) conceive fit to bee Reformed.
Also the Answer to the Rattle-Heads, Concerning their fictionate
Resolutions of the Round-Heads. Wherein is explained every particular
therein contained against them, with many godly Counsells to Doctor
_Little-wit_: the Composer of their former scurrilous and illiterate
Pamphlet. London, printed 1641.

  On February 1st, 1641/2, the House of Commons ordered that this
  pamphlet should be referred to the Committee for printing; and
  Stephen Buckle, in St. Martin's, London, who was said to be the
  printer, was ordered to attend the Committee.[68]

  A copy of this curious pamphlet is in the British Museum Library.
  It commences thus:--

  "Whereas we are through our great ignorance and obstinacy growne
  to a most seditious and malignant head, and the hornes of that
  head (though of a maine length) not able to support our arrogant
  faction, as appeares by our last being soundly slasht and
  bastinadoed by a mad crew called the Cavallery; and whereas a great
  part of us have shut up our shops because wee could no longer keepe
  them open, which kind of shutting up proceedeth commonly from
  our vast expence in White broths, Custards, and other luxurious
  Dishes provided for the Edification one of another. And whereas the
  multitude, called true Protestants, endeavour to hold up Bishops,
  to maintaine good Order, Discipline, and Orthodox preaching in the
  Church, Learning and Arts in the Universities, and peace in the
  Commonwealth; all which is nothing but Idolatry, superstition,
  prophanenesse, and plaine Popery: and further, whereas wee (who are
  nothing properly but _Roundheads_ and _Prickeares_) who are in most
  scandalous manner termed Puritans, Holy Brethren, the Zealots of
  the Land, and which in sincerity wee never were, or ever will be:--"

  And then after stating various grievances, not without a
  considerable spice of indecency, the pamphlet proceeds thus:--

  "All which grievances doe stand with much reason, and therefore are
  utterly against our tender Consciences, and never were allowed by
  any Synod of Moore-fields or Pimlico. That therefore which we doe
  now resolve to maintaine, and desire to have confirmed and never to
  be altered (till some new toy tickle us in the _Pericranium_, which
  will be very shortly) is:--

  "1.--That our religion, Tenents, and maners before mentioned be
  established and maintained against all reason, Learning, Divinity,
  Order, Discipline, Morality, Piety, or Humanity whatsoever.

  "2.--That the very names of Bishops shall be a sufficient Jury and
  judge to condemne any of them, without any further Evidence or
  circumstance.

  "3.--That if any man whatsoever having knowledge in the Latine
  Tongue (being a Popish Language) shall presume to think he can save
  a soule by preaching, he be excommunicated both in this world and
  in the World to come unlesse it be some certaine Lecturers of whose
  approved rayling and ignorance we are well assured, and have knowne
  to stand 6 houres on a fasting day.

  "4.--That the Felt-maker and the Cobler, two innocent cuckolds may
  be instituted Primats and Metropolitans of the two Arch Provinces,
  and the rest of the Sect preserved (preferred?) according to their
  imbecilities of spirit, to such Bishopricks and other Livings as
  will competently serve to procure fat poultry for the filling of
  their insatiate stomacks; in which regard, Church livings had more
  need to be encreased than diminished.

  "5.--That no man whatsoever who beares the name of Caviler, may
  be capable of making any of the Brethren a Cukold, unless he
  cut his hair and altar his Profession, but be excluded from the
  Conventicles as the King's friend and a Reprobate.

  "6.--Lastly, That there bee two whole daies set apart to Fast and
  pray, for the confusion of all that are not thus resolved.

    "I come to charge yee
    "That slight the Clergie,
    "And pull the Miter from the Prelate's head;
    "That you will bee wary,
    "Lest you miscarry,
    "In all these factious humours you have bred;
    "But as for Brownists wee'l have none,
    "But take them all; and hang them one by one.

    "Your wicked Actions,
    "Joyn'd in Factions,
    "Are all but aymes to rob the King of his due,
    "Then give this reason,
    "For your treason,
    "That you'l be rul'd if he'l be rul'd by you;
    "Then leave these Factions, zealous brother,
    "Least you be hang'd against each other.

    "Your wit abounded,
    "Gentle Roundhead,
    "When you abus'd the Bishops in a Dity;
    "When as you sanged,
    "They must be hanged,
    "A Tinpence of malice made you witty,
    "And though your hot zeale made you bold,
    "When you are hang'd your a--e will be a cold.

    "Then leave confounding,
    "And expounding,
    "The doctrine that you preach in Tubs;
    "You raise this warring,
    "And private jarring,
    "I doubt, in time will prove the knave of Clubs;
    "It's for your lying, and not for your Oathes,
    "You shall be hang'd, and Greg shall have your cloaths.

  "We further agree amonst ourselves that whosoever shall not be of
  our owne Schismaticall opinion, they shall receive from us the
  Apellation of Papists, though never so innocent and harmelesse;
  and whatsoever shall be enacted by them as adornment to their
  Church, wee will terme it superstitious and Popish Innovation, if
  not approved by our sect. But O! the famous and illustrious Crosse
  in Cheapside, the Enigmaticall Embleme of impiety, in respect it
  has bin an eye-sore unto us so long, We order further, that we not
  onely proceed, but also perfect those our zealous beginnings in
  the confusion therof; not only detracting armes and legges of the
  superstitious bodies, but also making it levell with the ground,
  to the utter abolishing of their Idoll, which they account the
  glory of this City; after which, we will in recompence of these
  our ignorant brethren's paines taken therein, infuse into them
  spiritual blessings, and endow them with gifts far exceeding the
  abilities of the learned stiffe-necked Protestants."


94.

A collection of speeches made by Sir Edward Dering, Knight and
Baronet, in matters of religion. London, 1642.

  This book was on February 2nd, 1641/2, voted by the House of
  Commons scandalous, and ordered to be burnt by the Common Hangman
  in Westminster, Cheapside, and Smithfield; the author disabled from
  sitting as a member, and ordered to be committed to the Tower; the
  printer was likewise prohibited from selling them. On February 5th
  it was also ordered that the Stationers' Company should have power
  to search the houses where they should be informed that Sir Edward
  Dering's books were printing, or to be sold, and seize them, and
  inform the House of the name of the printer.[69] Dr. Harris says
  that this book contains many curious particulars not elsewhere to
  be met with.


95.

Vox Hiberniæ.

  This is a false copy of a sermon preached by the Archbishop of
  Armagh before the House of Lords on the Fast day, December 22nd,
  1641. It was printed by one John Nicholson; but on the petition of
  the Archbishop it was ordered to be called in and suppressed by the
  House of Lords on February 11th, 1641.


96.

To your Tents, O Israel. By Henry Walker. 1642.

  A seditious pamphlet, for which Walker was tried at the Old Bailey
  in July, 1642. On the trial the Queen's Attorney and two Serjeants
  at law after causing the indictment to be read "began to show and
  did make it plain how odious the matter was, and how it was a
  fact of a high nature; first against his Majesty, to make him as
  it were odious to his people: _To your Tents, O Israel_; as if
  the King were a Tyrant, bidding as it were every man to take his
  Sword and Armor; and oppose all Authority whatsoever, obeying no
  Law but that of their owne humour and will; what can there be more
  said, but that it was very plaine, but that this _Walker_ did by
  those words labour to instigate and stir up the King's Subjects to
  a mutiny, and to cause tumults to arise in this Kingdome, nay, in
  the heart of this Kingdome, in the City of London too; not onely
  to teach these words, but to cause them at his owne charge to be
  printed, and to divulge the same through his Majestie's Kingdomes.
  Nor did this _Walker_ rest himselfe therewith satisfied, but in
  an audacious way, and in a bold manner, as the King's Majesty
  passed through the City of London riding in his Coach, threw one
  of them into the very Coach itselfe, and in the very face of the
  King; what an affront was this? can any age paralell it, or any
  Chronicle make mention of the like, and in a Civill Commonwealth,
  and in a well governed City; I think not: nor is this all, for
  this _Walker_ hath invented and writ divers Pamphlets and other
  scandalous Bookes, to the great disturbance of his Majesty, and
  of his Liege people; a meere sower of division, an upholder of a
  new Government, an inventer of a new Doctrine; nay, he is become a
  Preacher and a deliverer of this his humour even in the Church, and
  openly in the Pulpit too, and on the Sunday: drawing after him, and
  seducing poore ignorant people to the very ruine of their soules,
  if it were possible. This act of his, it was done with much venome,
  malice, bitternes, and rankor considering the time; because the
  King and his Parliament were then at some difference, who did as
  much as in him lay to set his Majesty and his Subjects together at
  discord; it was drawne with cunning, and at such a time published
  that if envy itself had plotted it, it could not have come forth
  in a more dangerous season. He confessed it was his owne worke,
  and done by night, and the next day by him exposed to sale. It was
  a foule misdemeanour, and it was published with an ill intent.
  Nay, what is this _Walker_ not, what wrong hee hath done let his
  owne conscience, his severall Bookes and Pamphlets, which hee hath
  both written, made, and printed them himselfe witnesse. Well, the
  Jury heares the information, the severall pleadings, the severall
  Witnesses that this _Walker_ was the onely framer, inventer,
  publisher, and disperser of that Booke, _To your Tents, O Israel_;
  upon which severall Evidences the Jury withdrawes themselves (being
  12 honest men, and of a good rank and quality) to consider of the
  matter; which being truely weighed, and a long time debated and
  scanned, agreed all in one mind, calleth for _Henry Walker_ to the
  Bar: who being come to deliver their Verdict, they all declared him
  by the voyce of their Foreman to be guilty both of the Trespasse
  and of the misdemenour. He was convicted, 1.--For writing of it.
  2.--For the composing of it. 3.--For the publishing of it himselfe
  at the Printer's house, and receiving money for them. Which done,
  he had nothing to say for himselfe, nor his Counsell neither, but
  onely he did it not with an ill intent to doe any harme. And now he
  is heartily sorrowfull for it, and begs the King's mercy, and the
  charitable censure of all men for his rashnesse and over hot zeale,
  especially of his sacred Majesty, whom he hath most offended; and
  for his Majestie's clemency to him, he will ever be bound to pray
  for him; because his Majesty did give Command that his Inditement
  should not be put against him for Treason, but onely for a
  misdemenor, which if it had bin preferred for Treason it might have
  bin as well found and have cost him his life, as for this fact of
  misdemenour; and so I, _H. Walker_, am heartily sorry, and desire
  God, his Majesty, and all his Majestie's Subjects to forgive me,
  and by my example to forsake these private and secret meetings, or
  rather conventicles; and so with teares I submit myselfe to the Law
  and the punishments whensoever it shall be denounced and inflicted
  upon me."

  This account of Walker's trial is taken from his life and
  recantation, collected and written by John Taylor, 1642.


97.

The Petition of Sir Philomy Oneale, Knight, Generall of the Rebels in
Ireland, and of the Lords, Nobility, and Commanders of the Army of
the Catholiques in that Kingdome. Presented to the Right Honourable
the Lords and Commons now assembled in the High Court of Parliament
in England. London. Printed by T. F. for John Thomas.

  On March 8th, 1641/2, the House of Commons ordered that the
  consideration of this pamphlet be referred to the Committee for
  printing, and that they take some speedy course for repairing the
  honour of the Earl of Ormond, much wounded by this pamphlet, and for
  the corporal punishment of the printer and the contriver.[70] A copy
  is in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains six
  pages.


98.

Message of the House of Commons, sent in reply to his Majesty's last
message. 1642.

  On March 28th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that John Franc
  the printer should be forthwith sent for as a delinquent by the
  Serjeant at Arms for causing this message to be printed without any
  licence.[71]


99.

The humble petition and declaration of both Houses of Parliament, of
23rd March, 1641/2.

  On March 28th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that John Wright
  the stationer and Gregory Dexter should be sent for as delinquents
  by the Serjeant at Arms for printing this petition without
  licence.[72]


100.

Two letters from the Hague. 1642.

  On March 28th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that William
  Humfreyvile should be sent for as a delinquent for feigning and
  making these two letters, and causing them to be printed.[73]


101.

Diurnal from March 14th to March 21st, 1642.

  On March 28th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that this
  Diurnal, printed by Robert Wood, was false and scandalous to the
  King and the parliament, and contained in it "divers seditious
  passages and of dangerous consequence," and that Wood should be
  sent for as a delinquent by the Serjeant at Arms for printing this
  Diurnal; and it was resolved that whoever should print or sell
  any act or passages of that house under the name of a Diurnal or
  otherwise without particular licence "should be reputed a high
  contemner and breaker of the privilege of parliament, and so
  punished accordingly."[74]

  A copy of this Diurnal is among the King's pamphlets in the British
  Museum.


102.

A short treatise of Baptisme: wherein is declared that only Christ's
disciples or beleevers are to be baptised; and that the baptising of
infants hath no footing in the word of God, but is a meere tradition
received from our forefathers. 1642.

  A little pamphlet of 13 pages, written by Thomas Kilcop, of which
  there is a copy in the British Museum Library.

  On April 28th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that the Lord
  Chief Justice should be required to proceed against Thomas Kilcop
  according to law "speedily and with effect" for the setting forth
  and publishing this "scandalous ignorant pamphlet."[75]


103.

A Letter sent by a Yorkshire Gentleman to a friend in London: Being
a full and true Relation of the proceedings betweene his Majesty and
the County of York, at _Heworth Moore_, upon _Friday_, June 3. Also
the most materiall passages of this weeke, from London, Westminster,
&c. N. d.

  A pamphlet of eight pages, but without title; of which a copy
  exists in the British Museum Library.

  On June 8th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that this pamphlet
  should be referred to the Committee for printing, and that the
  printer should be immediately sent for to attend that Committee.[76]


104.

A true relation of the proceedings of the Scotts and English forces
in the north of Ireland. 1642.

  On June 8th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that this pamphlet
  should be referred to the Committee for printing, and that the
  printers be sent for; and that Tobias Sedgewick, Francis Cowles,
  and Thomas Baites be forthwith sent for in safe custody. Cowles
  and Bates being called in before the Committee, confessed that
  one White, a printer, brought the copy thereof to them before
  it was printed, and offered to sell the impression thereof to
  them, and they accordingly bought it and published divers printed
  copies thereof. It was thereupon ordered that Cowles and Bates
  should be forthwith committed prisoners to the King's Bench, and
  that the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench be required to
  proceed against them as publishers of false news; and the book was
  ordered to be burnt by the Common Hangman in the new Palace Yard at
  Westminster.

  On the next day, White, the printer of the pamphlet was called in,
  and confessed that he had received the letter, which was directed
  from one Pike in Ireland to one Tobias Sedgwick, from Sedgwick, a
  barber in the Strand; and that he carried this letter to Baites and
  Cowles the stationers and read it to them, and they thereupon hired
  him to print three reams of paper, and gave him therefore eighteen
  shillings; he presented to the house the original letter. It was
  then resolved that White should be forthwith committed to the
  King's Bench prison for printing and publishing a scandalous libel
  to the dishonour of the Scott's nation, and that he be referred
  to the King's Bench, to be proceeded with there according to law;
  but on the 15th June following all concerned were ordered to be
  forthwith discharged from any farther imprisonment.[77]


105.

A picture of Sir John Hotham on horseback upon the walls of Hull, his
Majesty on foot before the walls. 1642.

  Whether this is an independent picture unaccompanied by
  letter-press, or whether it is the illustration on the title page
  of a pamphlet I have not been able to discover. On June 10th, 1642,
  the House of Commons ordered that "this scandalous picture" should
  be burnt by the Common Hangman in the Palace Yard, and that all
  further sale or publication of them be strictly forbidden, and
  enquiry was to be made for the printer and publisher. On June 13th,
  the printer and designer of the picture was brought to the door of
  the House in custody: but no further proceedings against him appear
  among the Records of the House.[78]


106.

A Collection of Sundry Petitions presented to the King's most
excellent Majestie. As also to the two most Honourable Houses, now
assembled in Parliament. And others, already signed, by most of
the _Gentry_, _Ministers_, and Freeholders of severall Counties,
in behalfe of _Episcopacie_, Liturgie, and supportation of
_Church-Revenues_, and suppression of _Schismaticks_. Collected by
a faithfull Lover of the _Church_, for the comfort of the dejected
_Clergy_, and all moderatly affected _Protestants_. Published by his
Majesties speciall Command. Printed for William Sheares, 1642.

  A pamphlet of 67 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library.

  On June 14th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that this book,
  which was printed for William Sheares, should be referred to the
  Committee for printing; and that Sheares the printer should be
  summoned to attend the Committee.[79]


107.

New Orders new agreed upon by a Parliament of Roundheads. Confirmed
by the Brethren of the New Separation. Assembled at Roundheads' Hall,
without Cripplegate. With the great discretion of Master Longbreath,
an upright new inspired Cobler, Speaker of the House. Avowed by
Ananias Dulman, alias Prick-eares. Cler. Parl. Round. London, printed
for T. U. 1642.

  A pamphlet of which there is a copy in the British Museum Library.
  It commences thus:--

  "In the spacious Theater of the Universe, the singular conditions
  of singular Persons are directly articulated in some expresse
  place. Wherefore the _Round-heads_, whose Pricke-eares are
  longer than their Haire, have erected an Image of their own
  Imaginations; a Synagogue, or a convenient place conduceably to the
  obscured secrecy of their Conventicles: and they gave a plausible
  appellation to it, calling it _Round-heads'_ Hall. Here did the
  Councell of _Fooles_ meet usually, and called themselves _The
  Simple Senate of the Times_. There are severall places for severall
  Men appointed, yet I did alwaies wonder that one should be so long
  wanting. There is _Newgate_ for Theeves, _Ludgate_ for Debters,
  the _Counter_ for Drunkards and misdemeanors, _Bridewell_ for Idle
  Persons, _Bedlam_ for Mad-Men; but I wondered extreamely there
  should be no place appointed for _Fooles_: but the _Round-heads_
  have taken that into their serious consideration, and least a place
  should be wanting for _Fooles_, they have built _Round-heads'
  Hall_, wherein they seeme to have done a great Act of Charity: for
  Charity begins at home."

  And it concludes thus:--

  "Thus being conveened in this _Round-heads' Hall_, in this manner
  without any Order: for they say Order is prophanesse, and where
  no Order is, there can be no transgression upon any, and where no
  transgression is found, there can be no prophanesse, _Ergo_, It
  is holinesse to be without Order: They began to shew their simple
  Opinions, each Man at least foure houres, and after the minds of
  them all were knowne, and uttered by the instinct of the Spirit,
  they unanimously agreed to Order these things following."

  "_Orders made by the Parliament of Round-heads,
  sitting at Round-heads' Hall, without Cripple-Gate._

  "Since the Lobs and Common Fooles assembled at _Round-heads'
  Hall_, have understood in sincerity the manifold distempers of
  Religion, the errors of People, and the malignity of some Popishly
  affected, and that they being sensible of the insolency of the
  Cavalleers, and what imminent danger that insolency may produce if
  not prevented in time, It is therefore by them ordered, 1.--Since a
  parity was first ordained by God himselfe, and that there needeth
  no Order or Degree of persons, because God is equall and no
  respecter of persons, Be it therefore ordered, that we have no King
  but _P_.

  "2.--That we have no Bishops, because they are the Pope's Sons, but
  that we send them either to the Tower or Tiburne.

  "3.--That we have no Churches, for they are of a Popish
  construction, and were derived first from Rome.

  "4.--That we have no Bels, Organs, or Babylonish Timpans, for they
  all tend to the prophanation of God's holy Word.

  "5.--That we have no Crosses, for they are meere Popery, and tend
  to the Confusion and Opposition of Scripture; especially let the
  sight of Cheapeside Crosse be a detestation unto you all: and let
  those streets that are called Crosses, as Red-Crosse Street, and
  White Crosse, &c., be turned otherwise and called after the Names
  of some of our owne Family, as _Greene_, _Spencer_, &c., and call
  it rather _Green Street_ then Red Crosse Street, &c., that thus
  all prophanesse being rooted and extirpated from our conventions,
  nothing but holinesse may remaine amongst us.

  "6.--That there be no tolleration of Surplices, because it was the
  defiled Smocke of Pope _Jone_; who being great with Childe, had her
  Smocke made the wider, which is now commonly called a Surplesse.

  "7.--That we assume no other Names to ourselves but _Round-heads_,
  and that this _Round-heads' Hall_ shall be our meeting place.

  "8.--That we have no pictures of Saints, Cherubims, &c., because
  they leade the way to Idolatry and Abomination.

  "9.--That any _Round-head_ (being God's anointed) may and shall
  have authority by Us, the Parliament of _Round-heads_, to Preach,
  teach, Pray, and Instruct in any place soever; whether it be in
  a Barne, Chamber, Stable, Loft, Garret, Field, Ditch, Saw-pit,
  in Woods, or under Hedges, either by Land or Sea, without the
  prohibition of any Place; provided onely, That it be not taught in
  a Pulpit, for that tends to the advancement of Popery, therefore it
  is more convenient in a Tub.

  "10.--That in our Prayers a singular caution be made, not to pray
  for the King, Queene, Prince, or State: but especially not for
  Bishops or Universities; and that it be no set forme of Prayer, but
  such as the Spirit doth suggest into the heart, yea, the Lord's
  Prayer is not to be used amongst us Holy ones as lawfull.

  "11.--That Salvation be Preacht to none but _Round-heads_, because
  we are the only Children of Grace, and to us belongeth the
  Kingdome: for at the latter day of judgment it shall be said, _Come
  ye Round-heads, &c._, but _Depart yee Rattle-heads and Cavaleers,
  &c._

  "12.--That instead of Matrimony, if any Brother taketh affection
  to any Sister, or if any Sister mutually reflects her love to any
  Brother, they may (if they agree in the affectionate community of
  the Spirit) take one another's word, without any other foolish
  circumstance as the Church of _England_ ignorantly useth.

  "13.--That in the Buriall of the Dead, Prayer is as needlesse as
  superfluous, and therefore no words are to be expressed, because it
  is Popery to pray for the Dead.

  "14.--That none ought to be Baptised before they be foureteen years
  of age, and have their names written in the Book of the Faithfull.

  "15.--That the _Common Prayer_ is _Porrage_, and made by the
  _Pope's_ Cook, being the Rubbish of Babilonish opinions, and
  therefore ought not to be used but as _Apocrypha_.

  "16.--That everything be common amongst the Brethren, one Man's
  Wife for another, when the candle of iniquity is extinguished, and
  the Spirit moves, as to the Exposition of that place in Scripture,
  _Increase and Multiply_.

  "17.--That no kneeling at the Sacrament be allowed of, but that
  it shall be received at Night in an upper Roome, only by twelve
  together sitting all round.

  "18.--That none shall weare long haire, for as Souldiers are
  known only by their Colours they weare, so we will be known to be
  _Round-heads_ onely by our long Eares.

  "19.--That our Diet be very provocative, and whatsoever is
  effectuall to the accomplishment of this purpose, that it be
  esteemed as a Soveraign Antidote to expell the contagious infection
  of despaire, and very co-operative to revive our dead and fainting
  Spirits, because they will be much weakened with such holy zeale,
  and will want some lively nourishment; therefore let our bodies be
  alwaies well tempered, that our pulses may beat hard when the flesh
  riseth.

  "20.--That all Learning, Order, Discipline, and the Universities be
  abrogated from all our Brethren as being Popery.

  "21.--That every Yeare there shall be the _Round-heads'_ Feast
  Celebrated, a well lung'd long-breathed Cobler shall preach a
  Sermon six houres, and his Prayers two houres long, and at every
  Messe in this Feast shall be presented a goodly Dish of _Turnips_,
  because it is very agreeable to our Natures; for a _Turnip_ hath a
  round head, and the anagram of _Puritan_ is A TURNIP.

  "22.--That whosoever shall not agree and condescend to the due
  observation of each particular Order by us here establisht, they
  shall be held as the malignant party, enemies to the State of
  the _Round-heads_, and worthy to be renounced, suspended, or
  excommunicated, and never to be re-admitted into the Society of the
  Brethren."

  On June 15th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that Stephen
  Buckley, dwelling in St. Martin's near Aldersgate, who printed
  "this scandalous pamphlet," should be sent for as a delinquent.[80]


108.

Three Speeches, being such Speeches as the like were never spoken
in the City. The first by Master Warden to the Fellowes of his
Company, touching the Affaires of the Kingdome. The second by
Mistriss Warden, being her observations on her Husband's Reverent
Speech, to certain Gentlewomen of Ratliffe and Wapping. The third by
Mistriss Warden's Chamber-maid, as she was dressing her Mistriss; the
Wisdome and Learning whereof will amaze your judgements. Published by
Antibrownistus Puritanomastix. London 1642.

  A tract with a woodcut on the title page which is divided
  horizontally, the lower part being unequally divided by a pillar,
  as of an arcade. In the upper portion ten men, in official civic
  robes, sit at a long table, and are addressed by another who is at
  the head of the table. "_Militia_" is printed near the head of the
  last man. What appear to be the balusters of a staircase are under
  an arch, on our left; under another arch, on our right, a window
  and a table appear.

  In the lower division on our left, six women sit at a round table;
  one of them addresses her companions in an animated manner; "_I am
  Mistris Warden_" is written at her side. The compartment on our
  right shows a woman adjusting her head-dress before a mirror, which
  hangs against a latticed window; near her stands a second woman,
  with reference to whom "_the Maid_" is printed over her head.

  Mr. Warden's speech commences thus:--

  "Brethren and fellow Counsellors, I begin with an acknowledgment
  of thanks for your election of me to wagge my beard amongst you
  this day for the good of the Common-wealth. I confesse myselfe as
  very a Woodcock as the best of you, yet (with your patience) I
  will express my simple affection to the Weale publick, to shew the
  spleene of my shallow capacity.

  "Be pleased first to consider the Liturgy of the Church, now
  generally spoken against by grave and Orthodox Coachmen, Weavers,
  and Brewers' Clarkes, and growne odious to our she divines, who
  looke asquint with the very thought of it, what this Liturgy is I
  know not, nor care not; yet as simple as I am, I beleeve it is a
  hard word, either Greeke or Latine or both: whence I conclude if
  no hard word, no Greeke or Latine nor any that know them ought to
  come within the Discipline of the Church, but plaine Hebrew and
  English. Let us then avoyd this Liturgy, and if it concerne the
  Common Prayer, (as my singular good wife saith) then questionlesse
  if the new Convocation be but as wise as himselfe they will doome
  it to be burnt, nay and consum'd as the loggs in Lincolne in
  Feilds were; for it hath caused the Gospell to prosper so slowly
  under Preaching Tradesmen and Lay Clergymen, who have coupled in
  laborious conjunction to procreate young Saints in this new faith,
  making Barnes, Stables, Woods, Saw-pits, old Ditches, Cellers,
  open houses of Office their private Synagogues, where unseene of
  the wicked they may doe what I will not speake, but speake I will
  againe of and against this Liturgy, the Heathen word Liturgy, which
  if blotted out of the Church, they would encrease and multiply
  spirituall Children, and make them swarme in Parishes. For having
  liberty and being strong of spirit, through high fare, they are so
  zealously impudent that they would go toot in the streetes; but I
  will conclude with good man Greene's Hebrew Exhortation, _Quicquid
  liber cuquodlibet_,--away with the Liturgy, and so say I."

  On June 15th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that Nicholas
  Vavasor, who dispersed this pamphlet, should be forthwith summoned
  and brought in safe custody to answer to the House; and the
  Stationers' Company were called in and were enjoined by the Speaker
  to be very careful and diligent in searching after anything that
  was printed which might reflect upon his Majesty; and it was
  resolved that an ordinance be drawn for preventing the printing or
  publishing any scandallous or libellous pamphlet that might reflect
  upon the King, the kingdom, or the parliament, or Scotland, and for
  suppressing such as already had been printed.[81]


109.

The Petition of the Nobilitie, Gentrie, Burrows, Ministers, and
Commons of the Kingdom of Scotland to The Lords of His Majestie's
most Honourable Privie Councell. London. Printed by Robert Barker.
1642.

  A pamphlet of five pages, of which a copy exists in the British
  Museum Library. On June 15th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered
  that Robert Barker, the King's Printer, be required to satisfy
  the House by what authority he printed this paper, and that he be
  farther enjoined to stay the sale thereof till the House should
  take further order.[82]


110.

A Declaration or Resolution of the County of Hereford. 1642.

  A printed paper, on a single sheet, commencing thus:--

  "Wheras the Kingdom for many yeers past hath groned under Taxes
  of Loans, Shipmoney, and the like dismall effects of an Arbitrary
  Government and a high stretcht _Prerogative_, for the cure of which
  distempers a _Parliament_ was held to be the onely good old way of
  _Physick_ to cleanse the Body Politique from oppressing Crudities
  (which was heartily desir'd) but not by overstrong Purgations
  to weaken it in the principall Part, charging it to receive a
  disposition to the like distemper, or a Relapse into the same, or
  a worse Disease, which instead of restoring it to its primitive
  vigour and health, must needs drive it to a fatall Period. Such is
  our misery, such the just judgment of God upon our Sins.

  "This wholsome _Physick_ hath not wrought in us that blessed
  effect, as was either believed by some or hoped for by all men:
  but as if God had answered our importunity for a Parliament, as
  hee did the old Israelites for a King in his anger; we drive
  on with much more haste then good speed to the other extream,
  which portends no lesse Symptomes of ruine and destruction than
  the former. So that having maturely considered what hath proved
  destructive to this or other Parliaments, we may the more easily
  avoid those Rocks upon which others have split themselves, _viz_.
  1. The venting of particular ends of Avarice and Ambition in the
  publike Cause. 2. Private Combinations or Chamber conventicles to
  resolve before-hand what shall be done in the House. 3. Hindring
  the freedom of speech by imprisonment of their persons. 4. Denying
  information by the humble way of Petitions from the County, as that
  most excellent Orthodox Petition of our Brethren of _Kent_, and of
  rejecting information of Letters to our Knights and Burgesses. 5.
  The ready swallowing of informations and jealous rumours against
  his Majesty, the styling them the malignant party and enemies to
  the State, which were onely, truely and conscionably his friends.
  6. The private if not publike mutinous rabble, which ill Spirit
  was ready at all times to be raised by a whisper from any of those
  worthy Members, Emphatically so called, if not exclusively, as if
  all Justice, Reformation, and Government were onely to be expected
  from them. 7. The now unheard of State-law and Logick to style and
  believe that a Parliament that is divided in itselfe, is severed
  from the King the Head thereof: if they may be remedied (as we
  hope they are not past cure) we shall rather desire to change some
  of our Physicians then Physick, there being no better way, nor
  more necessary to preserve the health of a Common-wealth, than a
  well temper'd Parliament. Wherefore we as faithfull Subjects to
  his Majesty, as free-born Englishmen, doe joyne in an unanimous
  resolution to maintain.

  1. _The Protestant Religion._
  2. _The King's just power._
  3. _The Laws of the Land._
  4. _The Liberty of the Subject._"

  After expatiating upon these four resolutions, the paper concludes
  thus:--

  "As wee conceive ourselves obliged by the Law of God, the Law
  of the Land, by the Dictates of Nature and reason to maintaine
  all these; so by God's grace assisting us, we hope we shall not
  be terrified or compelled to yeeld any active obedience to any
  dis-joyned part of _Parliament_ without the consent of the whole
  (which we heartily desire may be united) or to any uncertaine
  Debates, Votes or Ordinances, that are not digested or setled into
  Lawes; nay which seemes to contradict former Lawes, and yet are
  tender'd to us with so much earnestnes, as some dare hardly deny
  them with safety or obey with Conscience.

  "Nor shall we ever yeeld ourselves such Slaves, or so betray the
  liberty purchased by our Forefathers blood, and bequeathed unto us
  as to suffer our selves to be swayed by any Arbytrary Government
  whatsoever, or stand with too much contention of Spirit to cast off
  the yoake of our Tyrany to endure many worse.

  "_And seeing his Majestie is graciously pleased to maintaine the
  true_ Protestant _Religion; his owne just_ Power, _The Lawes of
  the_ Land, _The_ Liberty _of the_ Subjects _and that these waters
  of_ Reformation _having beene longe stirred; we want onely the
  favour of his Princely_ Majestie _to let us in and heale us; So
  we doe reciprocally declare that we conceive our selves bound to
  maintaine him in all the Premisses with our lives and Fortunes_."

  On July 8th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that this printed
  paper should be referred to the Committee for printing, and that
  Hammon the printer should be forthwith summoned to attend the
  House. Mr. Maddison was then called in, and averred that he being
  at a stationer's shop and reading this pamphlet, and saying that
  this was a foul scandal upon the Parliament, and that the author
  of it deserved to be whipt; one Sir William Boleter told him that
  he deserved to be whipt for saying so; and that he would justify
  every word of it; and that, by God he would slash him; and while
  he was talking with him one Mr. Dutton a minister came to him,
  and likewise said that he deserved to be whipt; and he asked him
  wherefore? And he replied, for speaking Nonsense, and for saying
  it was a Libel. It was then resolved that Mr. Dutton the Minister
  should be forthwith committed a prisoner to the Gatehouse, during
  the pleasure of the House for carrying himself in a scornful
  manner in the House, and for, as much as in him lay, justifying
  the foulest and most scandalous pamphlet that ever was raised or
  published against the Parliament.

  Sir Robert Harley reported from a conference had with the Lords,
  that the Lords had brought unto them a printed paper which is
  a scandalous and infamous libel in the name of the County of
  Hereford, and they desired that the Commons would join with them
  in desiring the Knights that serve for that County to send down to
  know who in that County would avow the same; and if any did, that
  they should be prosecuted to the utmost for setting forth such an
  infamous libel.[83]


111.

Animadversions upon those notes which the late Observator hath
published upon the seven doctrines and positions which the King by
way of Recapitulation (he saith) layes open so offensive. London.
1642.

  On July 22nd, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that this pamphlet
  should be referred to the Committee for printing.[84] A copy exists
  in the British Museum Library.


112.

King James, his judgment of a king and of a Tyrant. Extracted out of
his own speech at Whitehall, to the Lords and Commons in Parliament,
1609. With certaine notations anent the same. Also 28 questions,
worthy due consideration and solution in these dangerous times of
England. 1642.

  On September 12th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that this
  pamphlet should be referred to the Committee for printing, to
  enquire out the author, and the printer and publisher; and also
  that it should be burnt.[85] A copy is preserved in the British
  Museum Library.


113.

A pamphlet by Sir William Denny of Norwich. (1642.)

  I have not been able to meet with a copy of this pamphlet,
  neither can I give any idea of its title. The only book by Sir
  William Denny mentioned in Watts's Bibliotheca Britannica, is the
  "Pelecanicidium, or the Christian adviser against self-murder,
  together with a guide, and the Pilgrim's Passe to the Land of
  the Living. London, 1653,"--of which there are two copies in the
  British Museum Library.

  On September 16th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that Sir
  William Denny should be forthwith sent for as a delinquent by the
  Sergeant at Arms, for spreading and divulging this scandalous
  pamphlet and libel to the dishonour of both Houses of Parliament,
  and Thomas Hill, Sir William Denny's clerk, and Michael Philips,
  Mr. Corye's servant, were summoned to attend the House. On
  October 7th, Denny's examination was referred to the Committee
  for informations, but on the 19th December it was ordered that he
  should be released from the Sergeant's custody.[86]


114.

A most exact and true relation of the proceedings of His Majestie's
Armie at Shelborne. Written by a lover of truth. London. 1642.

  On September 16th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that the
  two Stationers, Badger and Marriott, who caused this "false and
  scandalous book" to be printed, should be forthwith summoned to
  attend that House to answer for the doing thereof.[87] A copy is
  preserved in the British Museum Library. It contains five pages.


115.

The King's Majestie's Desires and Propositions to all his subjects in
Scotland, declaring his royall intentions and determination to all
the Lords of his Privie Councell, concerning this Kingdome, signed
with his Royall Signett, and now published by authority. 1642.

  A pamphlet of six pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On September 16th, 1642, it was referred by the
  House of Commons to the Committee for printing to enquire who were
  the printers and authors of this book.[88]


116.

A speedy post from Heaven to the King of England. Never put out by
any before. Written by A. H. London. 1642.

  On October 5th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that this
  pamphlet should be forthwith publicly burnt, and the books all
  called in, and the booksellers charged not to publish or sell them;
  and it was referred to the Committee of printing to enquire who was
  the author or printer of it.[89] A copy of this pamphlet, which
  consists of six pages, exists in the British Museum Library.


117.

A Letter sent from the Lord Falkland, Principal Secretarie to His
Majestie, unto the Right Honourable Henry, Earle of Cumberland,
at York, September 30. 1642, concerning the late conflict before
Worcester, with the State of His Majestie's Armie now at Shrewsbury.
Printed at York, October 1st, and now reprinted at London for J. T.,
October 7. 1642.

  On October 8th, 1642, this pamphlet was brought before the notice
  of the House of Commons. John Thomas, who printed it, was called
  in, and confessed that he printed some 1300 copies of it; and that
  Browne, a bookseller by Christ Church, brought him the original
  thereof, and that the said Browne said he had it from the servant
  of a Parliament man as he said. It was thereupon resolved that
  Thomas should be committed a prisoner to Newgate, and that Browne
  should be sent for in safe custody; and that these pamphlets now
  in the custody of one Mr. Browne in Cheapside should be burnt, one
  half in Cheapside, and half in the Palace Yard.[90] A copy exists
  in the British Museum Library.


118.

The examination of Sir Ralph Hopton, Sir John Winter, Sir John
Stowell, and two other Knights upon their knees at the Barre in the
House of Commons the 14 day of this instant October. With articles of
High Treason exhibited against them by the House of Commons. London.
1642.

  On October 18th, 1642, the House of Commons ordered that this
  pamphlet should be referred to the Committee for printing to
  enquire out the author and the printer.[91] A copy exists in the
  British Museum Library.


119.

Some few and short considerations on the present distempers. By J. P.
1642.

  A pamphlet of eight pages written by Dr. John Price against the
  Parliament. On November 2nd, 1642, the House of Commons ordered
  that Sir Peter Wentworth, Mr. Rous, Mr. Rigby, and Mr. White should
  search the studies, libraries, and papers of Dr. John Price, and
  that they prepare an impeachment against him; also that he should
  be forthwith committed prisoner to Newgate during the pleasure
  of the House for composing and publishing this book "very much
  derogatory to the proceedings of Parliament."[92]


120.

The Resolving of Conscience, _upon this question_, whether upon such
a supposition or case, as is now usually made (the King will not
discharge his trust, but is bent or seduced to subvert Religion,
Laws and Liberties) Subjects may take Arms and resist? and whether
that case be now? Resolved, I.--_That no Conscience upon such a
Supposition or Case can finde a safe and cleare ground for such
resistance._ II.--_That no man in conscience can be truly perswaded,
that the resistance now made is such, as they themselves pretend to,
that plead for it in such a case._ III.--_That no man in Conscience
can be truly perswaded that such a case is now_, that is, _that the
King will not discharge his trust, but is bent to subvert, &c. Whence
it followeth_, That the resistance now made against the Higher Power
is unwarrantable, and according to the Apostle, Damnable, _Rom._ 13.
Also that the shedding of bloud in the pursuit of this resistance is
Murder. By H. Fern, D.D., &c. Cambridge. 1642.

  On December 24th, 1642, the House of Commons resolved that Dr.
  Fearne should be forthwith sent for as a Delinquent for composing
  and publishing this "seditious book," and on the 2nd February,
  1642/3, there was produced to the House the warrant under Dr.
  Holdsworth's hand for printing this book, whereupon it was resolved
  that Dr. Holdsworth should be forthwith sent for in safe custody.
  It appears that this book was printed by Roger Daniel, printer to
  the University of Cambridge.[93]


121.

A complaint to the House of Commons. 1642.

  On January 2nd, 1642/3, the House of Commons ordered that John
  Wright should be committed to the Compter in Wood Street, for
  publishing this "scandalous book against the Parliament;" and the
  book itself was ordered to be burnt by the Common Hangman in the
  new Palace at Westminster and in Smithfield. The Serjeant's man
  was also to search the shops in and about Westminster for the
  books, and to take into custody any persons having the same in
  their possession. On February the 3rd following it was also ordered
  that Luke Norton, printer, and Mr. Sheres, stationer, should be
  forthwith committed prisoners to Newgate for printing this book;
  and it was also referred to the Committee for informations to
  consider of some effectual course for the speedy suppressing the
  printing of scandalous pamphlets, and the inordinate licentiousness
  of printing.[94]


122.

Two Speeches made in the House of Peeres on Munday the 19 of
December, for and against accommodation. The one by the Earl of
Pembroke, the other by the Lord Brooke. The latter printed by order
of the House of Commons. Lond. 1642.

  A pamphlet of eight pages, of which a copy exists in the British
  Museum Library. On January 13th, 1642/3, the House of Commons
  ordered that the Committee for printing should enquire after the
  printer and publisher of this pamphlet.[95]


123.

The reasons of the Lords and Commons in Parliament, why they cannot
agree to the alteration and addition in the articles of cessation
offered by His Majesty: with His Majestie's gracious answer
thereunto, April 4, 1643. Printed by His Majestie's command at Oxford
by Leonard Lichfield, Printer to the University. 1643.

  On April 12th, 1643, the House of Commons ordered that Sir
  Frederick Cornewallis be forthwith sent for in safe custody for
  dispersing this book (which he brought with him from Oxford)
  printed without the order of the House; and the printers were
  enjoined not to proceed in the printing, publishing, or dispersing
  the said book. On the 19th April however, Sir Frederick Cornwallis
  was ordered to be discharged from custody.[96]

  This is a pamphlet of 25 pages, a copy of which is preserved in the
  British Museum Library, bound with others in a volume, on one of
  the fly leaves of which there is this interesting note:--

  "Memorandum y^t Col. Will. Legg and Mr. Arther Treavor wer imployed
  by his Ma^{tie} K. Charles to gett for his present use, a Pamphlet,
  w^{ch} his Ma^{tie} had then occasion to make use of, and not
  meetinge w^{th} it, they both came to me, havinge heard y^t I did
  imploy my selfe to take up all such thinges from y^e begininge of
  that Parlement. And findinge it w^{th} me, tould me it was for
  y^e kinges owne use, I tould them all I had were at his Ma^{ties}
  command and service, and w^{th}all tould them if I should part
  w^{th} it, and loose it presuminge y^t when his Ma^{tie} had
  done w^{th} it, y^t litle accompt would be made of it, and soe I
  should loose it by y^t losse a Limbe of my Collection, w^{ch} I
  should be very loth to doe, well knowinge it would be impossible
  to supplie it if it should happen to be lost, w^{th} w^{ch} answer
  they returned to his Majestie at Hampton Court, (as I take it)
  and tould him they had found y^t peece he soe much desired, and
  w^{th} all how loath he y^t had it was to part w^{th} it, he much
  fearinge its losse; whereuppon they were both sent to me againe by
  his Ma^{tie} to tell me y^t upon y^e word of A Kinge, (to use their
  owne expressions) he would safely returne it, thereuppon immediatly
  by them, I sent it to his Ma^{tie.}

  "Who havinge dun w^{th} it, and havinge it w^{th} him when he was
  goinge towardes y^e Isle of Wight let it fall in y^e durt; And
  then callinge for y^e two persons before mentioned (who attended
  him) delivered it to them, w^{th} a charge, as they would answer
  it another day, y^t they should both speedyly and safly returne it
  to him, from whom they had received it. And w^{th}all to desier
  y^t partie to goe on and continewe what had begun, w^{ch} Booke
  togeather w^{th} his Ma^{ties} signification to me, by those worthy
  and faithfull gent, I received both speedyly and safely.

  "W^{ch} volume hath y^t marke of Honor upon it, w^{ch} noe other
  volume in my Collection hath. And very dilligently and carefully
  I continewed y^e same, until y^e most happie restoration and
  Coronation of his most gratious Ma^{tie} Kinge Charles y^e Second,
  whom God Longe Preserve."

  "Geo. Thomason."


124.

A discourse, or Parley, continued between _Partricius_ and
_Peregrine_ (upon their landing in France) touching the Civill Wars
of England and Ireland. 1643.

  On August 11th, 1643, this pamphlet was referred by the House of
  Commons to the Committee for examinations.[97] It seems never to
  have been finished, for in the British Museum Library there is a
  portion of it extending to 24 pages, but with no title page; and a
  manuscript note on one of the fly leaves says that it was written
  by James Howell, and that it was taken while printing, when Howell
  was in prison in the Fleet, and that no more of it was printed.


125.

A discourse of a true hearted Englishman. 1644.

  On July 3rd, 1644, the House of Commons ordered that the author and
  printer of this pamphlet should be enquired for.[98]


126.

A book by one Williams, concerning the tolerating of all sorts of
Religion. 1643.

  Owing to the vagueness with which this book is mentioned in the
  Commons' Journals, I have not been able to identify it at all. On
  August 9th, 1644, the House of Commons ordered that all the copies
  should be publicly burnt.[99]


127.

Lex, Rex, the Law and the Prince. A dispute for the just Prerogative
of King and People. Containing the reasons and causes of the most
necessary defensive wars of the Kingdom of Scotland, and of their
Expedition for the ayd and help of their dear Brethren of England.
In which their Innocency is asserted, and a full answer is given
to a seditious pamphlet intituled _Sacro-sancta Regum Majestas_,
or the Sacred and Royall Prerogative of Christian Kings; Under
the name of J. A., but penned by Jo. Maxwell the Excommunicate P.
Prelat. With a scripturall confutation of the ruinous grounds of
W. Barclay, H. Grotius, H. Armisæus, Aut. de Domi. P. Bishop of
Spalato, and of other late Anti-Magistratical Royalists; as, The
Author of Ossorianum, D. Fern, E. Symmons, the Doctors of Aberdeen,
&c. In XLIV questions. Published by authority. London: Printed for
John Field, and are to be sold at his house upon Addle-Hill, near
Baynards-Castle. Octob. 7, 1644.

  This book was written by Mr. Samuel Rutherford. A copy is preserved
  in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains 467
  pages. It was ordered to be burnt by the hands of the Common
  Hangman.


128.

A True Relation of the most Chiefe Occurrences, at, and since the
late Battell at Newbery, untill the disjunction of the three Armies,
of the Lord Generall, the Earle of Manchester, and Sir William
Waller, together with the London Brigade, under the command of Sir
James Harrington. Published upon necessity, both to undeceive the
mistaken multitude, and to vindicate the Earle of Manchester from
many undeserved aspersions commonly cast upon him, either through
ignorance or prejudice. Penned by Simeon Ash, who as his Chaplaine
did waite upon his Lordship, in the Westerne Expedition. London,
Printed by G. M. for Edward Brewster, at the Signe of the Bible at
Fleete-Bridge. 1644.

  A pamphlet of 12 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On January 20th, 1644, the House of Commons ordered
  that enquiry should be made who was the author, printer, and
  divulger of this book.[100]


129.

The Speech of their Excellencies the Lords Ambassadours Extraordinary
from the High and Mighty States General of the United Provinces of
the Netherlands, taking their leave of both the Honourable Houses
of Parliament assembled at Westminster, 10 April, 1645. Translated
out of French into English, and printed by their Excellencies order.
Steph. Taylor, Secr. Together with a moderate answer by a private
Gentleman. Printed according to order. London. Printed by M. B. for
Robert Bostock at the King's Head in Paul's Church-yard, 16 April,
1645.

  A pamphlet of 6 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On April 15th, 1645, the House of Commons, on being
  informed of this printed paper, ordered that the consideration of
  its printing and publishing should be referred to the Committee
  of both Kingdoms, who were to give an account thereof the next
  morning.[101]


130.

The Scottish Dove. 1645.

  On May 23rd, 1645, the House of Commons ordered that the Committee
  of Examinations should send for the writer of this pamphlet to
  examine him touching some passages in one of his pamphlets "laying
  some aspersions upon the Prince of Orange, complained of by the
  States Ambassadors."[102]


131.

Various books and treatises by one Paul Best, alleged to be of a
blasphemous and irreligious nature.

  I have not been able to discover the titles or even the existence
  of these books. On June 10th, 1645, the Assembly of Divines
  attended the House of Commons, and being called in represented
  the blasphemies of one Paul Best against the Deity of our Saviour
  Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Ghost, contained in books, treatises,
  and notes of his, and in his answer to twelve Interrogatories
  drawn out of the writings of the said Paul Best; and they desired
  that the Parliament would use that authority they were intrusted
  with, for executing of condign punishment upon an offender of so
  high a nature; that, in reference to the crime, he might be made
  exemplary: "that all the world may know, how much you detest such
  prodigious blasphemies, and heresies of so fearful a nature." It
  was thereupon referred to the Committee of plundered ministers,
  to examine, with all diligence, the truth of the fact of the
  informations against Paul Best, of divers prodigious blasphemies
  against the Deity of our Saviour and the Holy Ghost, contained
  in notes and writings of the said Paul Best, and that they bring
  their opinions to the House with all speed, what they think fit
  to be done in the business, and it was resolved that Best should
  be forthwith committed close prisoner to the Gatehouse Prison. On
  January 28th, 1645/6, it was further resolved that an ordinance be
  prepared and forthwith brought in for punishing with death Paul
  Best for his "abominable, prodigious, horrid blasphemies."[103]


132.

Comfort for Beleevers about their Sinnes and Troubles, in a treatise
showing that true Beleevers, how weake soever in faith, should not
be opprest, or perplexed in heart by anything whatever befalls
them either in sin or afflictions. By John Archer, Master of Arts,
sometime Preacher of All Hallowes, Lumbard Street, London. London,
1645.

  On July 14th, 1645, this book was brought before the notice of
  the House of Commons by the Assembly of Divines, and its scope
  was stated to be, "that true believers, how weak soever in faith,
  should not be oppressed or perplexed in heart by anything whatever
  befals them either in sin or afflictions." The author's words were,
  "God is and hath an hand in, and is the author of the sinfulness of
  his people; and that God is more in their sins and their sorrows
  than they themselves," &c. The author, the Rev. John Archer, a
  minister, was said to be dead. The book was thereupon ordered to be
  publicly burnt by the Common Hangman; some of them in the Palace
  Yard, and other some in Cheapside, Smithfield, Paul's Church-yard,
  and the Exchange; and the Stationers' Company was to search for and
  seize upon the same, and deliver them to the Sheriffs of London
  and Middlesex, who were to see this order put in due execution.
  The Assembly of Divines were also to appoint some of their members
  to be present at the burning of these books; and to declare to
  the people the abominableness of it; and if there be cause, to
  vindicate the author. And it was referred to the Committee of
  Examinations to find out the author and printer of this book,
  and who brought the same to the press.[104] A copy exists in the
  British Museum Library.


133.

England's Birthright justified against all arbitrary usurpation,
whether regall or parliamentary, or under what vizor whatever. With
divers Queries, Observations, and Grievances of the People, declaring
this Parliaments present Proceedings to be directly contrary to
those fundamentall principles, whereby their actions at first were
justifyable against the King, in their present illegall dealings with
those that have been their best friends, advancers and preservers;
and in other things of high concernment to the Freedom of all the
Freeborn People of England; by a Well Wisher to the just cause for
which Lieutenant Col. John Lilburne is unjustly imprisoned in Newgate.

  A pamphlet of 49 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On November 8th, 1645, this pamphlet was referred
  by the House of Commons to a Committee to report their opinions
  thereupon to the House.[105]


134.

Divers papers presented to the Honourable Houses of Parliament by the
Commissioners of the Kingdome of Scotland. London, printed by M. B.
for Robert Bostock, at the Kings Head in Pauls Church Yard. 1645.

  On November 14th, 1645, the House of Commons ordered that the
  Committee of Examinations should send for the printer of this
  book, and examine him by what direction or authority the same was
  printed. On the 18th November the Committee reported that Robert
  Bostock, stationer, being examined, said that he caused the first
  impression of these papers to be made; that they were licensed by
  Mr. Crauford, minister; and were brought to him by Mr. Buchanan
  without any knowledge or consent of the Scotts Commissioners that
  he knew of.[106] A copy exists in the British Museum Library.


135.

A word to the wise. Displaying great augmented grievances, and heavie
pressures of dangerous consequence. Appearing by certain materiall
weighty passages of speciall concernment. Remonstrating the great
dangers which the Counties of Cumberland and Westmoreland are in
(though now in the hands of the Parliament) but like to be possessed
by the enemy, who aimeth at it, above all other landing places, from
foraign parts; the said Countries being most hazardable, sith that
Mr. Richard Barwis (a member of the House of Commons) hath (as is set
forth by the Commissioners for the well affected, in their charge)
betrayed his trust, and placed traytors, and disaffected officers in
the said Counties, tending to the ruine of the well affected, and to
the incouragement and upholding of the malignant party. All which
being certified by Mr. John Musgrave, Commissioner, for and in the
behalfe of those Countries aforesaid, who gave in the charge against
Mr. Richard Barwis. And the House having referred the same to a
Committee, instead of prosecuting the charge brought against the said
Mr. Barwis, Mr. Musgrave aforesaid was illegally committed to Fleet
Prison (although he still offereth, and is still able to prove his
charge by a cloud of sufficient competent witnesses) and although the
same day (in which he was committed by the House) certain and true
intelligence came to the Parliament that the enemy had entered the
said County, yet notwithstanding is this worthy gentleman, still most
unjustly and ungratefully retained in prison against all Law, and
Justice; and though he (the said Mr. John Musgrave) hath petitioned
the House in behalf of his Country, for redresse of the said
grievances, yet are not the grievances redressed, but the Traytors
and disaffected are still there retained in their offices. All which
is apparent by these following producements.

  A pamphlet of 20 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On January 27th, 1645/6, the House of Commons
  referred to the Committee of Examinations to make a strict enquiry
  after the author, printer, and divulger of this pamphlet, and to
  give a speedy account thereof to the House.[107]


136.

A Confession of Faith of seven Congregations or Churches of Christ
in London which are commonly but unjustly called Anabaptists.
Published for the vindication of the truth, and information of the
ignorant; likewise for the taking off of those aspersions which are
frequently both in Pulpit and Print unjustly cast upon them. The
second impression corrected and enlarged. Published according to
order. London, printed by Matthew Simmons, and are to be sold by John
Hancock in Pope's Head Alley. 1646.

  On January 29th, 1645/6 the House Of Commons resolved that the
  Serjeant should apprehend Benjamin Cox and Samuel Richardson, the
  parties who delivered this pamphlet at the door to the members of
  the House, and to take bail of them to appear from time to time at
  the Committee for plundered ministers; and that it be referred to
  that Committee to examine the book, and the parties whose names are
  subscribed; to send for the licenser and printer, and state the
  business to the House with all speed, and that the Committee of
  plundered ministers should have power to advise with such of the
  Assembly of Divines as they should think fit to send for upon this
  business. It was also ordered that the Stationers' Company should
  take diligent care to suppress the pamphlet, and the Serjeant at
  Arms was to send some of his servants immediately to seize and
  suppress the said books. The parties who delivered the pamphlet at
  the door were also ordered to be called in, and asked by what order
  and authority the pamphlet was published, and who licensed it.
  Whereupon Samuel Richardson and Benjamin Cox were called in, and
  being demanded who printed the said pamphlet, said, One Simonds;
  and that he got it licensed: and Richardson said, that the printer
  told him that Mr. Downeham licensed it: that this was a second
  edition: that they had meetings every first day of the week: that
  there were seven congregations of them English and one French: and
  that the subscribers were two of every congregation.[108] A copy of
  this book exists in the British Museum Library.


137.

Another word to the wise. 1646.

  On February 23rd, 1645/6, the House of Commons referred to the
  Committee of Examinations to find out the author, printer,
  and dispersers of this pamphlet, which was also ordered to be
  suppressed; and the author, printers, publishers, sellers, or
  dispersers of the same were to be committed to prison.[109]


138.

The last warning to all the Inhabitants of London.

  On March 21st, 1645/6, the House of Commons referred this pamphlet
  to the Committee for Examinations, to find out the author, printer,
  and publisher.[110] A copy exists in the British Museum Library. It
  is in quarto, and contains eight pages, but is without title page,
  date, or author's name.


139.

Justiciarius justificatus. The Justice justified. Being an
Apologeticall Remonstrance, delivered to the Honourable Commissioners
of the Great Seale, by George Wither Esquire and occasioned by Sir
Richard Onslow Knight with some others, who moved to have him put out
of the Commission of the Peace in Surrey. In which private defence
many things are expressed verie pertinent to publike consideration,
and to the vindication of the liberties of the subject, in generall,
and of Magistrates in particular.

  A tart and libellous remonstrance on being thrust out of the
  Commission for the peace and gaol delivery in Surrey, which act
  Wither ascribed to Sir Richard Onslow's malice. On April 10th,
  1646, the House of Commons being informed of this pamphlet,
  resolved that Wither should be forthwith sent for as a delinquent,
  and the book was referred to the consideration of the Committee of
  Examinations. On the 7th August following it was further resolved
  that the matters contained in this book which reflected upon Sir
  Richard Onslow were "false, scandalous, and injurious," and that
  Wither should pay him £500 for damages. The book was ordered to be
  burnt at Kingston upon Thames and at Guildford, upon the market
  days there.[111] A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.
  It is in quarto, and contains fifteen pages, but has no title page
  or date.


140.

Truth its manifest, or a short and true relation of divers main
passages of things (in some whereof the Scots are particularly
concerned) from the very first beginning of these unhappy troubles to
this day. London. 1645.

  This book was written by Mr. David Buchanan. On April 13th, 1646,
  the House of Commons resolved that Buchanan should be sent for as
  a delinquent by the Serjeant at Arms and brought to the bar of
  the House the next morning, for writing this book; also that the
  book itself contained in it many matters false and scandalous; and
  order was given that it should be forthwith burnt by the Common
  Hangman. On the 20th April the Lords were desired to concur in
  this order.[112] A copy of this book exists in the British Museum
  Library. It is in duodecimo and contains 142 pages.


141.

Some papers of the Commissioners of Scotland given in lately to the
Houses of Parliament concerning the Propositions of Peace. London,
printed for Robert Bostock, dwelling at the Sign of the King's Head
in Paul's Church-yard, April 11, 1646.

  On April 13th, 1646, the House of Commons resolved that this book
  contained matters "scandalous and false," and it was ordered to be
  burnt forthwith by the Common Hangman. It was also declared that
  "the author and publisher thereof was an Incendiary between the two
  kingdoms of England and Scotland," and search was to be made for
  him.

  It was also ordained by both Houses of Parliament that the
  Epistle and Tract intituled "The State of the Question concerning
  Propositions of Peace" comprised in the before mentioned book,
  contained in it matters scandalous and false, and that only the
  said Epistle and Tract should be forthwith burnt by the Common
  Hangman, and it was declared and ordained that the author was
  a person highly disaffected to the Parliament of England, and
  had endeavoured to raise sedition against the Parliament and
  kingdom.[113]

  A copy of this book exists in the British Museum Library. It is in
  quarto, and contains 26 pages. The "Epistle" before referred to was
  written by Mr. David Buchanan.



  PART III.]                     [TO BE CONTINUED.


  INDEX
  EXPURGATORIUS
  ANGLICANUS:

  OR
  A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF THE PRINCIPAL BOOKS
  PRINTED OR PUBLISHED IN ENGLAND,
  WHICH HAVE BEEN SUPPRESSED,
  OR BURNT BY THE COMMON HANGMAN,
  OR CENSURED,
  OR FOR WHICH THE AUTHORS, PRINTERS, OR PUBLISHERS
  HAVE BEEN PROSECUTED.

  BY W. H. HART, F.S.A.


  PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.


  LONDON:
  JOHN RUSSELL SMITH, 36, SOHO SQUARE.

  1874.

  HART, PRINTER,]                 [SAFFRON WALDEN.


142.

An open sheet containing a print entitled "Dictated thoughts upon
the Presbyterians late Petition for compleat and universal power (in
divine ordinances) as represented by a heart borne on the wings of
"Tender Conscience Religiously affected.""

  A copy of this curious print is preserved in the British Museum
  Library, with this M.S. note thereon. "London, 14 April, 1646."
  From the heart issue two labels inscribed

  "_The more_ {_ye wound my tender dear & pretious Heart_
            {_yo^r seered on's shall feel most bitter smart_.

  _All three to Injure me as mortall foe_  }
  _Encreaseth yo^r eternall woe, woe, woe_.} Reve., c. 8, v. 13."

  The "_Papa_" holding a book inscribed "_Latin Mass_," a "_Prelat_"
  holding another book, "_Liturgi_," and an "_Antichristian
  Presbiter_" holding a third book, "_Directorie_," have their legs
  fastened to one chain, and are piercing the heart with swords.
  The arm of "_Presbiter_" is kept down by a heavy weight; he is
  trampling upon the crown.

  On April 20th, 1646, the House of Commons referred to the
  Committee of Examinations to find out the author and printer of
  this "scandalous paper," and to report the same to the House on
  Wednesday morning next, but no further proceedings seem to have
  been taken.[114] A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.


143.

An Alarum to the House of Lords: against their insolent Usurpation of
the Common Liberties, and Rights of this Nation. Manifested by them
in their present Tyrannicall Attempts against that worthy Commoner,
Lieutenant Col. John Lilburne, Defendour of the Faith, And of his
Countries Freedoms, both by his Words, Deeds and Sufferings, against
all Tyrants in the Kingdome; whether Black-Coats, Papists, Kings,
Lords, &c. 1646.

  A pamphlet of 12 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On August 11th, 1646, Overton was summoned to
  the Bar of the House of Lords for being concerned in printing
  this book, and was committed to Newgate. On January 5th, 1646/7,
  his house was searched, when was found another treasonable work,
  entitled _Regal Tyranny Discovered_, &c. On his wife refusing to
  give any account of its author, she was committed to Bridewell for
  contempt.[115]


144.

The Scottish Dove. Number 146 from Wednesday 5^o Augusti till 12^o
Augusti, 1646.

  On September 10th, 1646, the House of Commons referred to the
  Committee for Foreign Affairs to examine who was the printer and
  publisher and likewise the author of this pamphlet, and to report
  their opinion to the House.[116]


145.

Yet another word to the wise: showing that the lamentable grievances
of the Parliament's friends in Cumberland and Westmerland presented
by their Commissioner Mr. John Musgrave to the House of Commons above
two yeares agoe, are so far yet from being redressed, that the House
of Commons not only protecteth Mr. Richard Barwis one of their owne
Members from the Law, being accused of High treason, as appeareth
by the great charge against him in this treatise contained. As also
against Sir Wilford Lawson, Commander in Chiefe of Cumberland,
who betrayed that County into the enemies hands. And after he was
Commissioner of array, carried Men and Arms out of the Countrey
for the King against the Parliament. But instead of doing justice
either against them or other accused Traytors to the Common-wealth,
they have most unjustly committed that worthy gentleman, Mr. John
Musgrave, (their Accuser and prosecuter) to the Fleet Prison above
these 12 moneths, without any kind of allowance to himselfe or
family, or so much as any appearance yet of any faire hearing,
triall, or deliverance. _Matters worthy all the freemen_ of Englands
serious observation. 1646.

  On October 3rd, 1646, the House of Commons ordered that this
  "scandalous pamphlet tending much to the breach of the privilege
  and the great scandal and contempt of this House" should be
  referred to the Committee formerly appointed for complaints
  concerning any breach of the Articles for surrender of Oxford, to
  examine and find out the author, printers, and publishers thereof,
  and to take care for the suppressing thereof.[117] A copy exists in
  the British Museum Library.


146.

Mercurius Rusticus. The Country's Complaint, recounting the sad
events of this unparalleled war. (1646.)

  The author was Bruno Ryves, of whom an account will be found in
  Wood's Athenæ Oxonienses, (ed. Bliss), Vol. 3, p. 1110. On October
  3rd, 1646, the House of Commons referred to the Committee formerly
  appointed for complaints concerning any breach of the Articles for
  surrender of Oxford to examine and find out the author, printer,
  and publisher of this "scandalous book," and to take care for the
  suppressing thereof.[118] A copy is preserved in the British Museum
  Library.


147.

An unhappy game at Scotch and English. Or a Full answer from England
to the Papers of Scotland. Wherein their Scotch Mists and their Fogs;
their sayings and gaine-sayings; their Juglings, their windings and
turnings; hither and thither, backwards and forwards, and forwards
and backwards again; Their breach of Covenant, Articles and Treaty,
their King-craft present design against the two Houses of Parliament
and People of England, their plots and intents for Usurpation and
Government over us and our children detected, discovered, and
presented to the view of the World, as a dreadfull Omen, All-arme,
and Warning to the Kingdome of England. Edinburgh, Printed (as truly
as the Scotch papers were at London) by Evan Tyler, Printer to the
Kings most excellent Majestie, and are to be sold at the most Solemn
Signe of the _Blew Bonnet_, right opposite to the two Houses of
Parliament. 1646.

  A pamphlet of 26 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On November 30th, 1646, the House of Commons
  ordered that all the copies of this "scandalous pamphlet" should
  be forthwith burned by the Common Hangman; some in the New Palace
  Yard at Westminster, and the remainder at the Royal Exchange; and
  the Committee of Complaints was to enquire and find out the author,
  printers, and publisher thereof.[119]


148.

A Protestation attested before Anthony Luther, Esquire, one of the
Justices of the Peace for the County of Essex, upon June 10, 1644,
as the causes why the Protestators could not hear in the publick
assemblies of the Church of England and so join in worship. N.d.

  On December 2nd, 1646, the House of Commons resolved that the party
  who distributed these papers be forthwith sent for as a delinquent
  by the Serjeant at Arms; and that the examination of the business
  be referred to the Committee of Complaints, to consider of the
  making of this Protestation and of the printing and dispersing the
  same.[120]


149.

The humble petition of many well affected freemen and covenant
engaged citizens of the City of London. 1646.

  On December 2nd, 1646, the House of Commons ordered that the
  examination of this business be referred to the Committee for
  complaints, to examine and enquire out the authors, dispersers,
  printers, and publishers, and to report their opinions what is
  fit to be done in this business; and in the meantime to suppress
  the dispersing of them.[121] A copy of this paper did exist in
  the British Museum Library; it is entered in the old seven-volume
  catalogue, but is now marked as missing.


150.

London's Account: or a Calculation of the Arbitrary and Tyranicall
Exactions, Taxations, Impositions, Excises, Contributions, Subsidies,
Twentieth Parts, and other Assessements, within the Lines of
Communication, during the foure yeers of this Unnaturall Warre. What
the totall summe amounts unto, what hath beene disbursed out of it,
and what remaines in the Accomptants hands. 1647.

  A pamphlet of 12 pages, of which a copy exists in the British
  Museum Library. On February 3rd, 1646/7, a Committee of the
  House of Commons was directed to examine and enquire who were
  the authors, publishers, and printers of this, as also of the
  three following pamphlets; and they were to have further power to
  "consider of an ordinance for the suppressing of these and all
  such like scandalous pamphlets, and to prevent the publishing and
  vending of the like for the future; and to suppress the publishing
  in the streets, by ballad singers, pamphlets and ballads scandalous
  to the Parliament; and to give order that the venders and singers
  of such might be punished according to law."[122]


151.

The Oppressed Man's Oppressions declared: or An Epistle written by
Lieut. Col. John Lilburn, Prerogative prisoner (by the illegall and
arbitrary Authority of the House of Lords) in the Tower of _London_,
to Col. _Francis West_, Lieutenant thereof: in which the oppressing
cruelty of all the Gaolers of _England_ is declared, and particularly
the Lieutenants of the Tower. As also, there is thrown unto _Tho.
Edwards_, the Author of the 3 _Ulcerous Gangrænes_, a bone or two to
pick: In which also, divers other things are handled, of speciall
Concernment to the present times.

  A pamphlet of 39 pages, but without title. A copy exists in the
  British Museum Library.


152.

_Bellum Hybernicale_: or IRELAND'S WARRE _Astrologically_
demonstrated from the late Celestiall-congresse of the two Malevolent
Planets, _Saturne_ and _Mars_, in _Taurus_, the Ascendent of that
Kingdome. Wherein likewise, their future _opposition_ in the signs
_Sagittary_ and _Gemini_, (most ominous to London, and many other
of the _South_ and _West_ parts of _England_) is _Mathematically_
handled. The _Ignorance_, _Malice_, _Mistakes_, _Errors_,
_Insolencies_, and _Impertinencies_, of JOHN BOOKER, (in his
_Astrologicall Observations_ upon the said _Conjunction_, in a late
Pamphlet of his, styled, _A Bloody Irish Almanack_, &c.) discovered,
corrected, refuted, and retorted. And the Author further vindicated,
from his, and Master _Lilly's_ former frivolous, false, and malicious
Aspersions, throughout the whole Discourse. _By Capt._ GEO. WHARTON,
_Student in Astronomy._ Printed in the yeere 1647.

  A tract of 36 pages, of which a copy is preserved in the British
  Museum Library.


153.

No _Merline_, nor _Mercurie_; but A new _Almanack_ after the old
fashion, for the year of our Redemption 1647. Delivering exactly the
Eclipses, Lunations, Quarterly ingresses, and other congresses and
configurations of the celestiall bodies, with their effects probably
to happen on this Planet (the Earth). Wherein likewise a few of
the many grosse errours and impertinences of Mr. William Lilly are
plainly discovered, modestly refuted, and the Author vindicated from
his former Aspersions. Calculated exactly for the Honourable Citie of
York.

Whose { Latitude is 54 degrees, 20 minutes.
      { Longitude is 23 degrees, 30 minutes.

By George Wharton, student in Astronomy. Printed Anno Dom. 1647.

  A copy of this pamphlet is preserved in the British Museum Library.


154.

The out-cryes of oppressed Commons. Directed to all the Rationall
and understanding men in the Kingdome of _England_ and Dominion
of _Wales_ (that have not resolved with themselves to be Vassells
and Slaves unto the lusts and wills of Tyrants). From Lieut. Col.
_John Lilburne_, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of _London_, and
_Richard Overton_, prerogative prisoner in the infamous Gaole of
_Newgate_. _Febr._, 1647.

  On March 9th, 1646/7, the House of Commons ordered that this
  pamphlet should be referred to the examination and consideration of
  Sir Robert Pye and others, to enquire out the authors, printers,
  and publishers thereof.[123] A copy exists in the British Museum
  Library. It consists of 20 pages.


155.

The Scots Apostacy.

  A folio broadside containing the following set of verses.

    "Is't come to this? what? shall the Cheekes of Fame
    "Stretch't with the breath of learned _Lowden's_ name
    "Be flagg'd againe, and that great peice of Sence
    "As rich in Loyaltie, as Eloquence,
    "Brought to the Test, be found a tricke of State?
    "Like Chimists tinctures prov'd Adulterate?
    "The Divell sure such language did atcheive,
    "To cheate our un-fore-warned Grandame _Eve_;
    "As this Impostor found out to besot
    "Th' experienc't _English_ to beleeve A _Scot_.
    "Who reconcil'd the Covenants doubtfull Sence?
    "The Commons Argument, or the Cities Pence?
    "Or did you doubt persistance in one good
    "Would spoyle the fabrick of your Brotherhood,
    "Projected first in such a forge of sinne,
    "Was fit for the grand Divel's hammering.
    "Or was't Ambition that this damned fact,
    "Should tell the world you know the sines you act.
    "The infamie this super-Treason brings,
    "Blasts more then Murders of your sixtie Kings.
    "A crime so blacke as being advis'dly done,
    "Those hold with this no Competition.
    "Kings only suffer'd then, in this doth lie,
    "Th' Assacination of Monarchye.
    "Beyond this sinne no one step can be Trod
    "If not t'attempt deposing of your God.
    "Oh were you so engag'd that we might see,
    "Heavens angry lightning 'bout your eares to flee;
    "Till you were shriveld into dust, and your cold land,
    "Parcht to a drought beyond the _Libian_ sand;
    "But 'tis reserv'd, and till heaven plague you worse
    "Be Objects of an Epidemick curse.
    "First may your Brethren to whose viler ends,
    "Your power hath banded cease to count you friends;
    "And prompted by the Dictate of their reason
    "Reproach the Traytors; though they hug the Treason.
    "And may their Iealousies encrease and breed,
    "Till they confine your Ships beyond the _Tweed_.
    "In forreigne Nations may your loath'd name be,
    "A stigmatizing brand of Infamie.
    "Till forc't by generall hate you cease to rome
    "The world, and for a plague goe live at home;
    "Till you resume your povertie, and bee
    "Reduc'd to begge where none can be so free,
    "To grant; and may your scabbie Land be all,
    "Translated to a generall Hospitall.
    "Let not the Sun afford one gentle ray,
    "To give you comfort of a Summers day.
    "But as a Guerdon for your Trayterous warre,
    "Live cherisht only by the Northerne Starre.
    "No stranger deigne to visite your rude Coast,
    "And be to all but banisht Men, as lost.
    "And such in Hightening of the infliction due,
    "Let provok't Princes send them all to you.
    "Your State a Chaos be, where not the Law;
    "But Power, your lives and liberties may awe.
    "No Subject 'mongst you keepe a quiet brest,
    "But each man strive through blood to be the best;
    "Till for those Miseries on us yo've brought,
    "By your own sword, our just revenge be wrought.
    "To summe up all--let your Religion be,
    "As your Allegiance, mask't hypocrisie.
    "Untill when _Charles_ shall be compos'd in dust,
    "Perfum'd with Epithites of good and just;
    "_He sav'd; Incensed Heaven may have forgot_,
    "_To afford one act of mercy to a Scot_.
        Finis."

  On March 9th, 1646/7, the House of Commons referred this paper to
  the examination and consideration of Sir Robert Pye and others, to
  enquire out the authors, printers, and publishers thereof.[124] A
  copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.


156.

A warning for all the Counties of England to awake spedily out
of their dreames and apply themselves to all just meanes for the
recoverie and preservation of their Liberties; because of a present
designe, to expell the most Faithfull out of their House of Commons,
and to frustrate all the Countries good Elections, that so the
Malignant party may bring the free Commons of England now (after all
their bloody sufferings) into cruel Thraldome, and make themselves
Lords over them.

  On March 25th, 1647, the House of Commons ordered that enquiry
  should be made who were the "authors, contrivers, designers,
  printers, publishers, and venders" of this "scandalous seditious
  pamphlet," and the Stationers' Company were forthwith to seize the
  same, and all other scandalous pamphlets of the like nature, and
  suppress them; and the Sergeant at Arms was to do the same.[125]

  A copy exists in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and
  contains 20 pages. It commences thus:--


      "JER. 5. 1. 2.

  "_Run to and fro thorough the streetes in_ Jerusalem, (_as it may
  be truly said of_ Westminster _and_ London) _and see now, and know,
  and seeke in the broad places thereof, if ye can finde a man, if
  there be any that executeth judgement, that seeketh the Truth, and
  I will pardon it_.

  "And though they say the Lord liveth, surely they sweare falsly.


      "HOSEA. 10. 4.

  "_They have spoken words swearing falsly, in making a Covenant._

  "Wee the free Commons of England, have been (for the general
  part) like Marchant Adventurers, who according to the Poet, _per
  varios casus_, _per tot discrimina rerum_, &c., through many great
  difficulties and dangers do saile into farr Countries, with great
  costs and charges to fetch home rich Treasures, the which when they
  have gotten, they do returne therewith joyfully: & yet upon their
  own Coasts, or in the very harbour at home, through the negligence,
  or ambition, pride, covetousnesse, falshood, or contention of the
  Ships-Master, or his Mariners, do suffer wrack, and loose the fruit
  of all their Costs, Adventures, and travells."


157.

A new found Stratagem framed in the old forge of Machivilisme, and
put upon the Inhabitants of the County of Essex. To destroy the
Army under his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax, and to inslave all
the Free-born of England on a Sudden, manifested and laid down,
in certain animadversions, upon a clandestine, illegall petition,
contrived, made, and privatly printed, by a destructive party in
London: and then by them sent down to the Ministers of the County
of Essex, to publish as on the last Lord's day, 4. April, to the
people, with directions to take their subscriptions in two sheets
of paper; which being done: So many of the Subscribers as can, are
to be desired to meet at Stratford Langton, the 18. instant Aprill,
and so to come and present the same to both Houses, as the Petition
and sense of the whole County: whereas it was never propounded to
the County, not even heard of among them, before it came down ready
in print, from London, to be published by their Ministers, in there
severall Parishes. With certain Observations and Cautions on the
same, conducing to the information, and publick good of the whole
Kingdome. Published principally for the Meridian of the County of
Essex, but may serve for all the Counties of England. 1647.

  A pamphlet of 15 pages, a copy of which exists in the British
  Museum Library. On April 23rd, 1647, the House of Commons referred
  the consideration of this paper, as also of the paper described
  in the next article, to a Committee, to examine and find out the
  "authors, inventors, contrivers, publishers, and dispersers"
  thereof, and how, and by what hands, and to what ends they were
  dispersed and sent down to the army.[126]


158.

An Apollogie of the Souldiers to all their Commission Officers in Sir
Thomas Fairfax his Armie. 1647.

  A sheet of two pages, quarto size, of which a copy exists in the
  British Museum Library. For its condemnation by the House of
  Commons see preceding article.


159.

The unlawfulnesse of subjects taking up armes against their
Soveraigne in what case so ever. Together with an answer to all
objections scattered in their severall Bookes. And a proofe that
notwithstanding such resistance as they plead for, were not damnable,
yet the present warre made upon the King is so, because those cases,
in which onely some men have dared to excuse it, are evidently not
now; His Majesty fighting onely to preserve himselfe, and the rights
of the subjects. Written by Dudley Diggs, Gentleman: late Fellow of
All-Soules Colledge in Oxford. Printed in the yeare of our Lord,
1647, Since the 25. day of March.

  On May 11th, 1647, this book was referred by the House of Commons
  to the Committee of Complaints, and the printer and publisher were
  ordered to be tried at the King's Bench.[127]

  A copy exists in the British Museum Library.


160.

Lex Terræ: or a briefe Discourse collected out of the Fundamentall
Lawes of the Land, wherein it is proved that the Supream power in
this Kingdome is in the KING onely, and not in the two Houses of
Parliament. The ignorance of which hath been the visible cause of the
late unnaturall warre, and all the sad calamities that now lye heavy
upon this realme. Whereunto are added divers other small tracts of
the same nature, (viz.) a Vindication, Declaration, Cordiall, The
Armies Indemnity, The inconvenience of long-continued Parliaments,
and an Apology for the Army. Written and published for the Common
Good, and recommended to the practise of the present times and
posterity. By David Jenkins, Prisoner in the Tower of London. London.
Printed for John Gyles, 1647.

  On May 11th, 1647, the "Vindication," which is contained in the
  Lex Terræ was referred by the House of Commons to the Committee
  of Complaints, and the printers and publishers thereof were to be
  tried at the King's Bench; but proceedings appear never to have
  been carried on, and Judge Jenkins was pardoned in 1651.[128] A
  copy of the Lex Terræ is preserved in the British Museum Library.


161.

A true impartiall Narration, concerning the Armies preservation of
the King; by which it doth appear, that the Army doth intend the
Good, Life, Propertie, and Libertie of all the Commons of England.

  A pamphlet of 12 pages, but without title. On June 26th, 1647,
  the House of Commons referred this pamphlet to the Committee of
  Complaints, to send for the printer and to enquire into and examine
  the business.[129]


162.

Twelve arguments drawn out of the Scripture, Wherein the commonly
received Opinion touching the Deity of the Holy Spirit is clearly
and fully refuted. To which is prefixed a Letter tending to the same
purpose, written to a Member of the Honourable House of Commons. And
to which is subjoyned an exposition of five principall Passages of
the Scripture, alleadged by the Adversaries to prove the Deity of
the Holy Spirit; together with an Answer to their grand Objection
touching the supposed Omnipresence of the Holy Spirit. By John Bidle,
Master of Arts. Printed in the yeare 1647.

  For writing this book John Biddle was summoned to appear at the bar
  of the House of Commons, and being asked whether he owned that book
  and the opinions therein, he answered yea, and that they were his;
  whereupon being remitted to his prison, they ordered on September
  6th, 1647, that the said book, blasphemous against the Deity of
  Christ, be called in and burnt by the Common Hangman in Cheapside
  and the New Palace Yard at Westminster. It was also referred to
  the Committee of Plundered Ministers to examine Biddle concerning
  this pamphlet, and to commit him if they saw cause, and they were
  to appoint divines to confer with him and to endeavour to remove
  him from his blasphemous and dangerous opinions. The Assembly of
  Divines sitting at Westminster made their endeavours to Parliament
  that he might suffer death in May, 1648; this however did not take
  place, and he was kept in close confinement. In February, 1651, a
  general act of oblivion was passed, by means of which Biddle was
  restored to liberty.[130] A copy is preserved in the British Museum
  Library.


163.

The Parliament's agreement for a personall treaty with the King, the
Conditions thereof, and his Majesties Reasons, that the said Treaty
may be at London to settle a firme peace in the three kingdomes. Also
a message to be sent, and 4. new Propositions to be first signed by
his Majestie. London. Printed by B. Alsop, and are to be sold at the
Royall Exchange. 1647.

  On November 27th, 1647, the House of Commons ordered that the
  debate concerning the printing of this pamphlet should be taken
  up.[131] A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.


164.

Mercurius Elenchicus and

Mercurius Pragmaticus.

  These were periodical pamphlets. No. 1 of the Elenchicus appeared
  on November 5th, 1647, and No. 1 of the Pragmaticus on September
  21st, 1647. On November 27th, 1647, the House of Commons ordered
  that a Committee should enquire after the licensers, authors,
  printers, and publishers of these pamphlets, or any other pamphlet
  of the like scandalous or seditious nature, and all unlicensed
  pamphlets, and to cause the licensers, authors, printers, and
  publishers thereof to be apprehended and imprisoned; and to seize
  all such seditious and scandalous pamphlets and cause them to be
  burnt; and to destroy and take away the presses and letters and
  all materials and instruments of printing.[132] The publication,
  however, of these periodicals was continued for some considerable
  time, notwithstanding the vote of censure passed on them by the
  House of Commons.


165.

The answer of the Commissioners of the Kingdome of Scotland, to both
Houses of Parliament, upon the New Propositions of Peace, and the
Foure Bills to be sent to his Majestie. London, Printed for Robert
Bostock, dwelling at the sign of the Kings Head in Pauls Church-yard.
1647.

  On December 21st, 1647, the House of Commons referred to the
  Committee for printing to send for Bostock and Walkeley and all
  others who had been concerned in printing this paper, and to know
  by what authority they printed the same, and to proceed with them
  in such manner as they should think fit according to the power
  granted to that Committee.[133] A copy is preserved in the British
  Museum Library.


166.

The People and Souldiers Observations on the Scotch Message to
the Parliament concerning the King; 5. of November, 1647. By the
scope whereof, all who will be satisfied with Reason, or with men's
practises more than their words, may have full resolution to this
more usuall then doubtfull question: Whether the King, Lords,
Commons, Scotts, City, Clergy, City, and Officers of the Army, have
sought more their own private ends then the publick weale of this
Nation?

  On December 25th, 1647, the House of Commons referred to the
  Committee of Complaints to enquire who was the author and printer
  of this "scandalous libellous pamphlet."[134] A copy exists in the
  British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains sixteen pages.


167.

The humble petition of Agnes Corbett, a most distressed widow from
Ireland. (1647.)

  On December 25th, 1647, the House of Commons referred to the
  Committee of Complaints to enquire who was the author and printer
  of this pamphlet.[135]


168.

A Just and Solemn Protestation of the Free born People of England,
and Free Citizens of London, against a Clause in the late Ordinance
to deprive them of their Free Elections, and enslave them.

  On January 12th, 1647/8, the House of Commons referred this
  broadside to the Committee for Complaints, to enquire after the
  printers, publishers, divulgers, and abettors of it, and of the
  affront done to an officer that pulled it down from a post or some
  other public place where it was fixed in Cheapside.[136] A copy is
  preserved in the British Museum Library.


169.

The Parliament's Ten Commandments; the Parliament's Pater-noster, and
the Articles of their Faith. (1647/8.)

  A single sheet containing a parody on the Commandments, commencing
  thus:--"1. Thou shalt have no other Gods but US the LORDS and
  COMMONS assembled at Westminster;" a parody on the Lord's
  Prayer commencing thus, "Our Fathers, which think your Houses of
  Parliament to be Heaven;" and a parody on the Apostles' Creed
  commencing thus, "I beleeve in CROMWELL, the Father of all Schisme,
  Sedition, Heresy, and Rebellion." A copy is preserved in the
  British Museum Library.

  On February 19th, 1647/8, the House of Commons resolved that a
  reward of £100 should be bestowed on the discoverer of the author
  or printer of this "vile blasphemous pamphlet;" and a few days
  afterwards it was further ordered that all the copies should be
  collected together and be burnt by the Common Hangman in three of
  the most public places of London and Westminster, upon a market
  day.[137]


170.

Ecce the New Testament of our Lords and Saviours, The House of
Commons at Westminster and the Supreame Councell at Windsor. Newly
translated out of their owne Heathenish Greek Ordinances, with their
former proceeding; diligently compared and revised and appointed to
be read in all Conventicles. Cum Privilegio. Printed in the yeare,
1648.

  A Parody upon the commencement of the Gospel of St. Matthew,
  commencing thus:--

  "The Booke of the Generation of JOHN PIM, the sonne of _Judas_, the
  sonne of _Belzebub_," &c.; and it concludes with this:--

  A Psalme, to be sung as the 15. of David.

    "_Good Lord confound King_ Oliver,
      _and all his holy Crew_,
    "_With_ Rainsborow _that Leveller_,
      _and_ Pride _that precious Jew_.

    "_Let_ Say _once more, we doe thee pray,
      into a Saw-pit fall_,
    "_Let_ Martin _purge his Pocks away
      within some Hospitall_.

    "_Let_ Hammon _have his brains knockt out
       with his owne bunch of Keyes_,
    "_Let_ Watson _and his zealous rout
       visit the_ Hebrides.

    "_Let the two Houses fight and scratch,
       like wives at Billingsgate_,
    "_And let them ne're a Peace up patch,
       untill it bee too late_.

    "_That so upon each House of clay
       King_ Charles _may mount his Throne_,
    "_Heare us (O Father) wee thee pray,
       our hope's in thee alone_."

  This pamphlet was condemned to be burnt under the vote of the House
  of Commons which consigned the Parliament's Ten Commandments to the
  flames. (See last article.) A copy exists in the British Museum
  Library.


171.

A motive to all loyal subjects to endeavour the preservation of his
Majesty's Royal person. 1648.

  On June 27th, 1648, the House of Commons resolved that this
  "scandalous and seditious paper" should be referred to the
  Committee for suppressing of libels, with power to examine who
  printed and published the same, and who set up the same, or advised
  the knocking down of Lieut. Col. Bellamy; and it was further
  ordered that the said Committee should draw up something and
  present to the house for vindication of the honour of Major General
  Skippon. On the 10th July, upon Mr. Challoner's report from the
  Committee, it was resolved that this paper, wherein Major General
  Skippon was slanderously charged with notorious falsities "was a
  malicious and scandalous Libel: and also this House doth declare,
  That it doth appear to them, that Captain Rolfe, charged by Mr.
  Osborne to conspire the Taking away of his Majesty's Life is not
  Son-in-law to Major General Skippon; neither hath any Relation
  unto him, as is falsly charged in the said Paper. Also, that it
  doth appear to this House, That Mr. Rolfe who is Son-in-Law to
  Major General Skippon, hath no Command in this Army, or hath, or
  ever had, any Command in the Isle of Wight. Also, that the foul
  aspersions in the said Libel, cast upon Major General Skippon,
  tended to blast him in his Reputation, to raise Mutiny and
  Sedition, and to stir up the Hatred of the People against him,
  thereby to render him useless in these distracted Times, he being
  a Person of such eminent Worth." And it was finally resolved that
  these Votes should be forthwith printed, and set up in the most
  publick Places of the City, "to discover to the People the wicked
  Designs of these Libels; and to vindicate Major General Skippon in
  his Honour, from the false Calumnies thereby cast upon him."[138]


172.

A treatise of Magistracy. N. d.

  On January 6th, 1647/8, the House of Commons ordered that this
  pamphlet should be referred to the Committee for printing
  unlicensed pamphlets.[139]


173.

A Salva Libertate, sent to Collonell Francis West, Lieutenant of
the Tower of London, on Fryday the fourteenth of September 1649.
by Lieutenant Collonell John Lilburne, unjustly, and illegally
imprisoned in the said Tower, ever since the 28. of March, 1649.
Occasioned by the receipt of a Verball Command (which in law is
nothing, nor signefies nothing) whereby the said Lieut. was seemingly
authorized, to carry the said John Lilburne before Mr. Prideaux the
nicknamed, and falsly so called Atturney Generall, on Fryday, 14.
Sept. 1649.

  A folio sheet, signed "As much a Christian and an Englishman as
  ever, JOHN LILBURNE. From my Chamber in the Tower of London, this
  14. of Sept., 1649." A copy is preserved in the British Museum
  Library.

  For writing and printing this and the four following pamphlets,
  Lilburne was prosecuted and tried in October, 1649, but was
  acquitted. The proceedings are given at great length in Howell's
  State Trials.


174.

An Impeachment of High Treason against _Oliver Cromwel_, and his
son-in-law _Henry Ireton_, Esquires, late Members of the late
forcibly dissolved House of Commons, presented to publique view; by
_Lieutenant Colonel John Lilburn_, close prisoner in the Tower of
London, for his real, true, and zealous affections to the Liberties
of his Native Country. In which following Discourse or Impeachment,
he engageth upon his life, either upon the principles of Law (_by
way of indictment, the only and alone legall way of all tryals in
England_) or upon the principles of Parliaments ancient proceedings,
or upon the principles of reason (_by pretence of which alone they
lately took away the King's life_) before a legal Magistracy, when
there shall be one again in _England_ (_which now in the least there
is not_) to prove the said _Oliver Cromwel_ guilty of the highest
Treason that ever was acted in England, and more deserving punishment
and death then the 44 Judges hanged for injustice by _King Alfred_
before the Conquest; or then the Lord _Chief Justice Wayland_ and his
associates tormented by Edw. I. Or, then Judge _Thorpe_, condemned to
dye for Bribery in Edw. 3. time; Or, then the _two dis-throned Kings_
Edw. 2. _and_ Rich. 2. Or, then the Lord Chief Justice _Tresillian_,
(_who had his throat cut at Tyburn as a Traitor in Rich. 2. time,
for subverting the Law_) and all his associates; Or, then those two
grand Traytorly subverters of the Laws and Liberties of England,
_Empson_ and _Dudley_, who therefore as Traytors lost their heads
upon Tower-hill, in the beginning of Henr. 8 raign; Or, then
trayterous Cardinal _Wolsey_, who after he was arrested of Treason,
poysoned himself; Or, then the late trayterous _Ship-Money Judges_,
who with one Verdict or Judgment destroyed all our propertie; Or,
then the late trayterous Bishop of _Canterbury_, Earl of _Strafford_,
Lord-Keeper _Finch_, Secretary _Windebanck_, or then Sir _George
Ratcliff_, or all his Associates; Or, then the two _Hothams_, who
lost their heads for corresponding with the Queen, &c.; Or, then
the late King _Charls_ whom themselves have beheaded for a _Tyrant_
and _Traytor_. In which are also some Hints of Cautions to the Lord
Fairfax, for absolutely _breaking his solemn Engagement with his
souldiers_, _&c._, to take head and to regain his lost Credit in
acting honestly in time to come; in helping to settle the Peace and
Liberties of the Nation, which truly, really, and lastingly can never
be done, but _by establishing the principles of the Agreement of the
Free People_; that being really the peoples interest, and all the
rest that went before, but particular and selvish. In which is also
the Authors late Proposition sent to Mr. Holland, June 26. 1649, to
justifie and make good at his utmost hazard (upon the principles
of _Scripture, Law, Reason, and the Parliaments and Armies ancient
Declarations_) his late actions or writings in any or all his Books.
London. 1649.

  A copy of this pamphlet is preserved in the British Museum Library.
  It is in quarto, and contains 66 pages.


175.

An outcry of the young men and Apprentices of London: or an
Inquisition after the lost Fundamentall Lawes and Liberties of
England. Directed (August 29. 1649) in an Epistle to the private
Souldiery of the Army, especially all those that signed the solemne
Ingagement at Newmarket-Heath, the fifth of June, 1647. But more
especially to the private souldiers of the Generalls Regiment
of Horse, that helped to plunder and destroy the honest, and
true-hearted Englishmen, trayterously defeated at Burford the 15. of
May, 1649. Signed by Charles Collins, Anthony Bristlebolt, William
Trabret, Stephen Smith, Edward Waldegrave, Thomas Frisby, Edward
Stanley, William White, Nicholas Blowd, John Floyd, in the name and
behalf of themselves, and the young-men and apprentices of the City
of London. Who are cordiall approvers of the Paper, called, The
Agreement of the Free People, dated May 1. 1649 and the defeated
Burford-mens late Vindication, dated the 20. of August 1649.

  A quarto pamphlet of 12 pages, of which there is a copy in the
  British Museum Library.


176.

The Legall Fundamentall Liberties of the People of England,
Revived, Asserted, and Vindicated. Or an Epistle written the eighth
day of June 1649, by Lieut. Colonel John Lilburn (Arbitrary and
Aristocratical prisoner in the Tower of London) to Mr. William
Lenthall, Speaker to the remainder of those few Knights, Citizens,
and Burgesses that Col. Thomas Pride at his late purge thought
convenient to leave sitting at Westminster (as most fit for his and
his Masters designes, to serve their ambitious and tyrannical ends,
to destroy the good old Laws, Liberties, and Customs of England,
the badges of our freedom (as the Declaration against the King, of
the 17. of March 1648, pag. 23. calls them) and by force of arms to
rob the people of their lives, estates, and properties, and subject
them to perfect vassalage and slavery, as he cleerly evinceth in his
present case &c. they have done) who (and in truth no otherwise)
pretendedly stile themselves (the Conservators of the peace of
England, or) the Parliament of England, intrusted and authorised
by the consent of all the people thereof, whose Representatives
by election (in their Declaration last mentioned, _pag._ 27. they
say) they are; although they are never able to produce one bit of
a Law, or any piece of a Commission to prove, that all the people
of _England_, or one quarter, tenth, hundred, or thousand part of
them authorised _Thomas Pride_, with his Regiment of Souldiers,
to chuse them a Parliament, as indeed he hath _de facto_ done by
this pretended mock-Parliament: And therefore it cannot properly be
called the Nations or Peoples Parliament, but Col. Pride's and his
associates, whose really it is; who although they have beheaded the
King for a Tyrant, yet walk in his oppressingest steps, if not worse
and higher. London, Printed in the grand yeer of hypocriticall and
abominable dissimulation. 1649.

  A tract of 75 pages, of which there is a copy in the British Museum
  Library. It was written by Lilburn, while he was imprisoned in the
  Tower of London, and is thus dated by him:--

  "From my close, unjust, and causelesse captivity without allowance
  (the legall right of all men in my case) in the Tower of London
  this 8. of June 1649. The first yeer of England's declared Freedom,
  by the lying and false pretended Conservators thereof, that never
  intended it." At the end is this note.

              "The Printer to the Reader.
    "Reader, As thou the faults herein dost spy,
      "I pray thee to correct them with thy Pen:
    "The Author in Close Prisonn, knows not why;
      "And shall have Liberty, he knows not when.
        "But if he falls; as he hath Liv'd, he Dies
        "A Faithfull Martyr for our LIBERTIES."


177.

A preparative to a Hue and Cry after Sir Arthur Haslerig, (_a late
Member of the_ forcibly _dissolved House of Commons, and now the
present wicked, bloody, and tyrannical Governor of Newcastle upon
Tine_) for his severall ways attempting to _murder_, and by _base
plots, conspiracies, and false Witnesse_ to take away the life of
Lieutenant Colonel _John Lilburn_ now _Prisoner_ in the _Tower_ of
London: As also for his _felonious Robbing_ the said Lieut. Col.
_John Lilburn_ of betwixt 24 and 2500._l._ by the _meer_ power of his
_own will_, without ever fixing any _reall_ or pretended _crime_ upon
the said _Lieutenant Col._ or so much as affording him any _formall_
proceedings, though upon a paper Petition. _In which action alone_,
he the said _Haslerig_ hath outstript the Earl of _Strafford_, _in
traiterously subverting_ the fundamentall _Liberties of England_,
and (in time of Peace) exercising _an arbitrary and tyrannicall
Government, over and above Law_, and better and more justly deserves
to die therefore, then ever the Earl of _Strafford_ did (especially,
considering he _was one_ of his Judges, that for such actions
condemned him to _lose his head as a Traytor_) by which _tyranicall_
actions the said Haslerig is become a _Polecat_, a _Fox_, and a
_Wolf_, (as a subverter and destroyer of humane society) _and may
and ought to be knockt on the head therefore_, by the very words
of Solicitor _S^t. John's_ own doctrine against the said Earl of
_Strafford_. All which the said Lieutenant Col. _John Lilburn_ hath
cleerly and evidently evinced _in his following Epistle of the 18 of
August 1649_, to his Uncle _George Lilburn Esquire_ of _Sunderland_,
in the County of _Durham_.

  A copy of this pamphlet is preserved in the British Museum Library.
  It is in quarto, and contains 40 pages.


178.

A Breife Memento to the present Unparliamentary Junto Touching their
present Intentions and Proceedings to _Depose_ and _Execute_, CHARLES
STEWARD, their lawfull KING. By _William Prynne_ Esquire: _A Member
of the House of Commons_, and Prisoner under the Armies Tyranny; who,
it seemes, have _leavyed Warre_ against the Houses of _Parliament_,
their _quondam Masters_; whose _Members_ they now forcibly take and
detaine _Captives_, during their _lawlesse Pleasures_. London, 1648.

  On January 5th, 1648/49, the House of Commons ordered that Mr.
  Humphrey Edwards and Mr. Fry should repair to Mr. Prynne and show
  him this "scandalous book or pamphlet," and to know of him if he
  would own and avow the same book. The next day Mr. Edwards reported
  Mr. Prynne's answer touching his owning this pamphlet, which was
  a characteristic one, viz.: "I will give no answer until I am
  commanded by a lawful authority." On January 10th, it was resolved
  that Mr. Prynne by this answer had disowned the authority of that
  House, and that he should therefore be forthwith sent for in safe
  custody by the Serjeant at Arms. But Prynne refused his attendance,
  for the next day the servant to the Serjeant at Arms who was sent
  to take Mr. Prynne gave the following information to the House;
  that he repaired to Mr. Prynne, and served the warrant upon him,
  that Mr. Prynne thereupon gave him this answer, viz. that upon
  the sixth of December last as he was coming to do his duty in the
  House of Commons, he was taken by Colonel Pryde and Sir Hardres
  Waller, and by them imprisoned he knew not for what cause; that he
  yet remained under that restraint and was not yet discharged from
  that imprisonment; and that therefore he would not come upon that
  warrant.[140]

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto,
  and contains 16 pages.


179.

A vindication of the Ministers of the Gospel in, and about London,
from the unjust aspersions cast upon their former actings for the
Parliament, as if they had promoted the bringing of the King to
capitall punishment. With a short exhortation to their people to keep
close to their Covenant-Ingagement. London. 1648.

  On February 3rd, 1648/9, the House of Commons ordered that this
  book should be taken into consideration, and that the authors,
  publishers, printers, and subscribers to the same should be
  examined; and that a Committee should take information of such
  as had already preached, published, or printed seditiously the
  proceedings in bringing the King to justice; and also that they
  should prepare and bring in an ordinance to restrain public
  preaching and printing anything against the proceedings of the
  House of Commons and the High Court of Justice in relation to
  bringing the King to justice.[141] A copy is preserved in the
  British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains 11 pages.


180.

To the Right Honourable, the Supreme Authority of this Nation, the
Commons assembled in Parliament: An Appeal, in the humble claim of
justice, against Tho. Lord Fairfax General of the English Army,
raised and declared to be raised, for the propagation and defence of
impartial Justice, and just Liberty in the Nation; by Captain William
Bray. For, and on the behalf of himself, and all the Officers and
Souldiers, and other the free People of this Nation, that are for
Righteousnesse, Settlement, and Peace. London. 1649.

  On March 19th, 1648/9, Captain Bray appeared before the House of
  Commons, and being demanded whether this was his book or not, and
  whether it was an appeal of all those in whose name it was made, he
  answered that it was his book, but it was done without the consent
  or knowledge of any of the soldiery or people on their behalf, and
  he doubted not that they would justify and engage for it. Being
  again asked why he did it, and by whose licence it was printed, he
  answered that "although it be a declared principle by the army,
  that it is contrary to the privilege of the nation, to answer to
  any interrogatories at all; but he having formerly prepared an
  appeal, which he laid aside, expecting the proceedings of the
  army would have been according to justice and equity, he engaged
  himself freely for the public, and for execution of justice; but
  finding himself to be dealt with as he hath remonstrated, and the
  case being thus, he appealed to this supreme authority: wherein
  he expects relief according to justice and righteousness; and
  shall sit down in such sentence: and saith, it was printed by the
  authority of reason and justice; which is declared to be supreme
  to all men." And being demanded by whose commission he was made
  a captain; he answered, by the General's Commission in Colonel
  Lilburne's regiment, in one case remonstrated in the Petition, and
  in another case by the Committee of Kent; but that he had not the
  punctilio of a commission in the last business; but his engagement
  with Colonel Reynolds, for maintenance of truth and righteousness,
  far above any punctilio of commission "according to right, reason,
  justice, and righteousness."

  It was thereupon resolved that this book was "scandalous as to the
  General and Council of War; and tending to stir up sedition in the
  people and mutiny in the army," and that Captain Bray should be
  committed to Windsor Castle during the pleasure of the House.[142]
  A copy of this pamphlet is preserved in the British Museum Library.
  It is in quarto, and contains 19 pages.


181.

The Alcoran of Mahomet translated out of Arabique into French by the
Sieur Du Ryer, Lord of Malezair and Resident for the King of France
at Alexandria. London. 1649.

  On March 19th, 1648/9, the House of Commons ordered that this book,
  which was then in the press, should be seized, and the printer
  taken into custody, and subsequently the Council of State was
  directed to suppress all the books, and the further imprinting of
  the same.[143]


182.

The Paper called the Agreement of the People taken into
consideration, and the lawfulness of subscription to it examined, and
resolved in the negative by the Ministers of Christ in the Province
of Lancaster. Published by them especially for the satisfaction of
the Conscience, and guiding of the practise of our entirely honored
and beloved, the People of our several Churches committed to our
charge; and for the general good of this Church and Nation. London,
Printed for Luke Fawne, and are to be sold at his shop at the signe
of the Parrot in Pauls Church-yard. 1649.

  A pamphlet of 36 pages, of which there is a copy in the British
  Museum Library. On March 21st, 1648/9, the House of Commons
  referred to the Committee of plundered Ministers to consider of
  this book; to examine the business and to send for the printer, and
  to report it to the House.[144]


183.

The second Part of Englands New Chaines discovered: Or a sad
Representation of the uncertain and dangerous condition of the
Commonwealth: directed to the Supreme Authority of England, the
Representors of the People in Parliament assembled. By severall
wel-affected persons inhabiting the City of _London_, _Westminster_,
the Borough of _Southwark_, _Hamblets_, and places adjacent,
presenters and approvers of the late large Petition of the Eleventh
of _September_, 1648. London, 1649.

  On March 27th, 1649, the House of Commons resolved that this
  printed paper contained "much false, scandalous, and reproachful
  matter; and was highly seditious and destructive to the present
  Government; as it is now declared and settled by Parliament; tends
  to Division and mutiny in the army, and the raising of a new war
  in the Commonwealth, and to hinder the present relief of Ireland;
  and to the continuing of Free Quarter." And it was further declared
  that the authors, contrivers, and Framers of the said paper
  were guilty of High Treason; and should be proceeded against as
  Traitors: and that all persons assisting them should be esteemed as
  traitors to the Commonwealth; and be proceeded against accordingly.
  And it was referred to the Council of State to examine and find
  out the authors, contrivers, and framers, printers and publishers
  of the said paper; and to proceed therein as they should find just
  and necessary, for preventing tumults, and for preservation of the
  peace of the Commonwealth, and thereof to give an account speedily
  to the House. On April 11th, 1649, the House of Commons ordered
  that the Attorney General should prosecute Lieut. Col. Lilburne,
  Mr. William Walwyn, Mr. Richard Overton, and Mr. Thomas Prince, in
  the Upper Bench, touching the publication of this book.[145] A copy
  is preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and
  contains 18 pages.


184.

A Remonstrance and Declaration of the Generall Assembly of the Church
of Scotland, concerning present and imminent dangers and concerning
duties relating thereto. Edinburgh. Reprinted at London for Robert
Bostock, dwelling at the sign of the King's Head in Paul's Church
Yard. 1649.

  On August 14th, 1649, the House of Commons ordered that the
  printer of this pamphlet should be sent for, and, if necessary,
  committed.[146] A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.
  It is in quarto, and contains 16 pages.


185.

The Moderate: Impartially communicating Martial Affaires to the
Kingdom of England. From Tuesday August 7. to Tuesday August 14.
1649. Number 57.

  On August 14th, 1649, the House of Commons ordered that the author
  of this pamphlet, and the licenser of it should be sent for, and,
  if necessary, committed.[147] A copy is preserved in the British
  Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains 12 pages.


186.

Anarchia Anglicana: or the History of Independency. The second part.
By Theodorus Verax. 1649.

  On October 24th, 1649, the House of Commons ordered the Council
  of State to use all diligent endeavour to find out the authors,
  printers, and publishers of this book, and to examine the whole
  business, and report the same to the House.[148] The author was
  Clement Walker, who was born at Cliffe in Dorsetshire; he became
  M.P. for Wells in 1640, and was a zealous Covenanter. He was
  imprisoned in the Tower for writing the Anarchia, and died there in
  1651. "This work," says Bishop Warburton, "gives an admirable idea
  of the character of the times, parties, and persons."


187.

A Fiery Flying Roll: or Word from the Lord to all the Great Ones
of the Earth, whom this may concerne. Being the last Warning Piece
at the dreadfull day of _Judgement_. Imprinted at _London_, in the
beginning of that notable day, wherein the secrets of all hearts
are laid open; and wherein the worst and foulest of villanies, are
discovered, under the best and fairest outsides. 1649.

  On February 1st, 1649/50, the House of Commons resolved that this
  book contained "many horrid blasphemies and damnable and detestable
  opinions, to be abhorred by all good and godly people;" and that
  all the printed copies thereof should be burnt by the Hangman at
  the New Palace Yard, Westminster, the Exchange in Cheapside, and
  the Market Place in Southwark. On the 27th September following,
  it was also ordered that Abiezer Copp, the reputed author of this
  book, should be examined, and that the author and publisher thereof
  should be discovered.[149] A copy is preserved in the British
  Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains 15 pages.


188.

The doctrine of the Fourth Commandment deformed by Popery, reformed
and restored to its primitive purity. By James Okeford. 1649.

  On March 1st, 1649/50, a letter from the Mayor of Sarum, dated
  February 27th, enclosing one of these books, was read before the
  House of Commons, and it was referred to the Committee of plundered
  ministers to peruse the same, and report to the House thereon. On
  March 8th, the House resolved that this book "ascertaining the
  observation of the Jewish Sabbath, and condemning the observation
  of the Lord's Day as the Christian Sabbath," was "erroneous,
  scandalous, and profane, contrary to the practice of the apostles
  and of all the Christian Churches;" and all the printed copies of
  the same were to be burnt, and the author was to be apprehended and
  imprisoned.[150]


189.

An Act of the Commons assembled in Parliament for erecting an High
Court of Justice for trying and judging of Charles Stuart King of
England. 1649.

  This "traiterous cursed writing in parchment" was read by the
  House of Commons on May 27th, 1661, and ordered to be burnt on the
  following day in Westminster Hall by the Common Hangman.[151]


190.

An Act for subscribing the engagement. 1649.

  This "treasonable parchment in writing" was read by the House of
  Commons on May 27th, 1661, and was ordered to be burnt on the
  following day at the Old Exchange, London, by the Common Hangman,
  at full Exchange time, between the hours of twelve and one
  o'clock.[152] A printed copy is preserved in the British Museum
  Library. It is in folio.


191.

The Obstructours of Justice. Or a Defence of the Honourable Sentence
passed upon the late King, by the High Court of Justice. Opposed
chiefly to the serious and faithfull Representation and Vindication
of some of the Ministers of London. As also to the Humble Addresse
of Dr. Hamond to His Excellencie and Councel of Warre. Wherein
the Justice and Equitie of the said Sentence is demonstratively
asserted, as well upon clear texts of Scripture, as principles of
Reason, grounds of Law, Authorities, Presidents, as well Forreign as
Domestique. Together with a brief Reply to Mr. John Geree's Book,
intituled _Might overcoming Right_: wherein the Act of the Armie in
garbling the Parliament, is further cleared. As also, some further
Reckonings between the said Dr. Hamond, and the Authour, made
straight. By John Goodwin. London. 1649.

  After the Restoration of King Charles the Second, this book was
  called in by proclamation, and burnt by the Common Hangman. John
  Goodwin, the author, was chaplain to Oliver Cromwell, and a
  Nonconformist, but of a different stamp to the generality of them.
  He had a clear head, a fluent tongue, a penetrating spirit, and a
  marvellous faculty in descanting on scripture, and must be owned to
  have been a very considerable man.[153] A copy is preserved in the
  British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains 146 pages,
  and a postscript of one page.


192.

The Royal Charter granted unto Kings by God himself: and collected
out of his Holy Word in both Testaments. By T. B., Dr. in Divinitie.
London. 1649.

  Thomas Bayly was the author of this work, and for writing the same
  he was committed to Newgate. A copy is preserved in the British
  Museum Library. It is in octavo, and contains 144 pages.


193.

An Act declaring and constituting the people of England to be a
Commonwealth and Free State. 1649.

  This "traiterous writing in parchment" was read by the House of
  Commons on May 27th, 1661, and ordered to be burnt on the following
  day by the Common Hangman at the Old Exchange in London, at full
  Exchange time, between the hours of twelve and one o'clock.[154]
  The burning of this and other Acts was witnessed by Samuel Pepys,
  as appears from the following passage in his Diary: "1661.
  28th May. With Mr. Shipley to the Exchange, and there saw the
  hangman burn, by vote of Parliament, two old Acts; the one for
  constituting us a Commonwealth, and the other I have forgot; which
  still do make me think of the greatness of this late turne, and
  what people will do to-morrow, against what they all, through
  profit or fear, did promise and practise this day."[155] A printed
  copy is preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in folio.


194.

ἘΙΚΟΝΟΚΛΑΣΤΗΣ, in answer to a Book entitled ἘΙΚΩΝ ΒΑΣΙΛΙΚΗ, the
Portraiture of his Sacred Majesty in his solitudes and sufferings. By
John Milton. 1649.

Defensio pro populo Anglicano contra Claudii Salmasii Defensionem
Regiam. 1650. By the same.

  On June 16th, 1660, the House of Commons ordered that these books
  should be burnt by the Common Hangman; and a proclamation was
  issued for calling in and suppressing them.


195.

The Clergy in their colours or a brief character of them. Written
from a hearty desire of their Reformation, and great zeal to my
Countrymen, that they may no longer be deceived by such as call
themselves the Ministers of the Gospel, but are not. By John Fry, a
Member of the Parliament of England. London. 1650.

  An octavo pamphlet of 68 pages, of which there is a copy in the
  British Museum Library.


195a.

The Accuser sham'd; or a Pair of Bellows to blow off that dust cast
upon John Fry a Member of Parliament by Col. John Downs, likewise a
Member of Parliament, who by the confederacy and instigation of some,
charged the said John Fry of Blasphemy and Error to the Honorable
House of Commons. Whereunto is annexed a word to the Priests,
Lawyers, Royalists, Self-Seekers, and Rigid Presbyterians. Also a
brief Ventilation of that chaffie and absurd opinion, of _Three
Persons or Subsistences in the Godhead_. By the accused John Fry.
London. Febr. 1648.

  A quarto pamphlet of 23 pages, of which there is a copy in the
  British Museum Library.

  On January 31st, 1650/51, the House of Commons referred these books
  to the Committee of plundered ministers, to state the exceptions
  against them and to report the same to the House; and also ordered
  that their author, Mr. John Fry, a member of Parliament, should
  attend the House. On February 20th following, the Committee made
  their report to the House, in which are contained particulars of
  the various blasphemous and irreligious opinions contained in these
  books, and two days afterwards the House of Commons ordered that
  both the books should be burnt by the Common Hangman.[156]


196.

A single eye all _Light_ no Darkness; or _Light_ and _Darkness_ One:
In which you have it purely discussed, 1. The Original of Darkness.
2. What Darkness is. 3. Why it is called Darkness. As also what
_God_ is Within, and what _Without_; how he is said to be _One_,
yet _Two_; when _Two_ and not _One_, yet then _One_, and not Two.
Likewise a word from the Lord touching the onely Resurrection of the
Body, in, from, and to the Lord. With a certain parcel of Quæries to
be answered from Heaven or Hell. This Revealed in L. C., one of the
Universality. Imprinted at London, in the yeer that the Powers of
Heaven and Earth was, is, and shall be shaken, yea damned, till they
be no more for ever.

  On June 21st, 1650, the House of Commons ordered that search should
  be made for the author, printer, and publisher of this pamphlet,
  and on the 27th September following, the confession of Laurence
  Clarkson "touching the making and publishing of this impious and
  blasphemous book" was reported to the House; and it was resolved
  that Clarkson should be forthwith sent to the House of Correction
  for one month, and from that time "to be banished out of the
  Commonwealth and the territories thereof, and not to return upon
  pain of death."

  The book itself was to be burnt by the Common Hangman in the New
  Palace at Westminster, and upon the Exchange.[157] A copy is
  preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and
  contains 16 pages.


197.

A petition of Josiah Prymat. 1651.

  A folio broadside, of which the following is a copy:--

  "To the Supream Authority of this Nation, the Parliament of the
  Commonwealth of England.

  "The humble petition and appeal of Josiah Prymat of London,
  Leatherseller, sheweth,

  "That your Petitioner, by his under-tenants, George Lilburn
  Esquire, and George Gray the younger, Gentleman, both of the
  County of Durham, being in the years 1647, 1648, and 1649, in a
  just and quiet possession of the Collieries, or Seams of Cole, in
  Harraton, in the County aforesaid, called the Five-quarter and
  Nine-quarter Cole, (and having spent near £2000 to win the same),
  which lay drowned and lost, from 1642 to 1647; Sir Arthur Haslerig,
  in September, 1649, procuring Colonel Francis Wren, one of the
  Committee of that County, and Colonel George Fenwick, to joyn with
  him, made an Order, (against which the rest of the said Committee
  present protested) to sequester the said Collieries, under colour
  of an untrue suggestion that Sir Wm. Armyn had sequestred the same
  in 1644, as belonging to one Thomas Wray, a Papist Delinquent:
  and thereupon the said Sir Arthur violently dispossessed your
  Petitioner's tenants, and seized their goods; and lett the said
  Collieries to Colonel Francis Hacker, and several of the Officers
  of his own Regiment.

  "That your Petitioner hath petitioned to the Commissioners for
  compounding for relief; but, by the power and influence of the said
  Sir Arthur, upon most of the said Commissioners, your Petitioner
  hath been delayed, and denied the ordinary course of proceedings in
  all Courts of Justice: and at last, coming to hearing, the said Sir
  Arthur appeared every Day of the hearing; and took upon him, not
  only to plead against your Petitioner (which is humbly conceived
  to be contrary to Law, he being a Member of the Supream Authority)
  but also Authoritatively to prejudge your Petitioner's case, and
  to direct the said Commissioners what to judge therein; and by
  his power and influence upon the said Commissioners, he over-awed
  most of them, and after full hearing, judgment being respited from
  day to day, the said Sir Arthur kept private correspondence with
  some of the said Commissioners, about finding some new colour
  or pretences to detain your petitioner's possession from him,
  whereupon he produced new pretended evidence after full hearing;
  and thereupon the major part of the said Commissioners, not daring
  (as is humbly conceived) to oppose the will and pleasure of the
  said Sir Arthur, have contrary to clear evidence before them for
  your petitioner, refused to relieve him; and have punctually
  pursued in their Judgment, the directions publickly given by the
  said Sir Arthur.

  "That the said Commissioners being the onely persons authorized by
  the Parliament to hear and determine all cases about sequestred
  estates, your Petitioner cannot be relieved from the oppression and
  tyranny of the said Sir Arthur, save by the Parliament or their
  special Order and Directions: And your Petitioner hath been kept
  from his Possession above two years, and the said Sir Arthur hath
  declared the said Collieries to be worth, at least, £5000 per annum.

  "May it therefore please the Parliament, in respect
  to the Public Justice of the Commonwealth, to cause
  the truth of the Premises to be speedily examined,
  and to provide for your Petitioner's relief from the
  oppression and Tyranny of the said Sir Arthur Haslerigg,
  and for the dispensation of Justice, without fear
  or favour; as to your Wisdoms shall seem most just.

  "And your Petitioner shall pray, &c.

  "Joseph Primatt."

  On January 15th, 1651/52, the Parliament approved and affirmed
  the judgment and resolutions of the Commissioners for compounding
  in the case of Josiah Prymate, and after having proceeded with
  the matter of crime charged in the petition, it was resolved that
  this petition was false, malicious, and scandalous, and that the
  printing, publishing, and dispersing of the same was a high breach
  of privilege of Parliament; and also that all the printed copies
  should be burned by the Common Hangman at the Old Exchange, London,
  and in the New Palace, Westminster, on Tuesday and Wednesday next,
  also that Prymate should be fined £3000, to be paid to the use
  of the Commonwealth; also £2000 more, to be paid to Sir Arthur
  Haslerig; also £2000 more to be paid to James Russells, Edward
  Winslow, William Molins, and Arthur Squibb, Esquires, four of the
  Commissioners for compounding. It was then ordered that Prymat
  should be committed to the Fleet till the aforesaid sums were paid.
  The House then proceeded against Lieutenant Colonel John Lilburne,
  who confessed that he had dispersed several of the printed copies
  of this petition, and similar fines were imposed upon him, as well
  as perpetual banishment from the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and
  Ireland.[158]

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.


198.

A just reproof to Haberdasher's-Hall: or, An Epistle writ by Lieut.
Colonel John Lilburn, July 30. 1651. to four of the Commissioners
at Haberdasher's Hall, viz. Mr. James Russel, M. Edward Winsloe, M.
William Mollins, and M. Arthur Squib, wherein is set forth their
unjust and unrighteous dealing in severall cases; with the relations
of the said John Lilburn, and their captiving their understandings to
the Tyrannical will of Sir Arthur Haslerigge, who hath most unjustly
endeavoured a long time together, the extirpation of the Family of
the said John Lilburn.

  On January 16th, 1651/52, the House of Commons resolved that this
  book contained matters "false, scandalous, and malicious," and all
  the printed copies of the same were ordered to be burnt by the
  Common Hangman.[159] A copy is preserved in the British Museum
  Library. It is in quarto, and contains 40 pages.


199.

The Racovian Catechisme; wherein you have the substance of the
Confession of those Churches, which in the Kingdom of Poland, and
Great Dukedome of Lithuania, and other Provinces appertaining to
that Kingdom, do affirm, That no other save the Father of our Lord
Jesus Christ, is that one God of Israel, and that the man Jesus of
Nazareth, who was born of the Virgin, and no other besides, or before
him, is the onely begotten Sonne of God. Printed at Amsterledam for
Brooer Janz, 1652.

  On February 10th, 1651/52, this book was referred by the House of
  Commons to a Committee, who on the 2nd April reported to the House
  a collection of the principal blasphemous errors in the book, which
  are set out in the Journals. These errors consist of a denial of
  our Saviour's divinity, together with "many other gross errors
  concerning predestination, the fall of man, Christ adding to the
  Commandments, Free-will, the Priesthood and Sacrifice of Christ,
  Faith, Justification, Baptism, and the Lord's Supper." It was
  thereupon resolved that the book contained matters "blasphemous,
  erroneous, and scandalous," and that all the copies should be burnt
  at the Old Exchange, London, and in the New Palace at Westminster.

  On June 22nd, 1652, the House of Commons also referred to the
  Committee of plundered ministers to examine and find out the
  authors, printers, and publishers of this Catechism.[160] A copy
  is preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in octavo, and
  contains 176 pages.


200.

The three grand impostors. N.d.

  On June 22nd, 1652, the House of Commons referred to the Committee
  of plundered ministers to find out the authors, printers, and
  publishers of this book.[161] As far as the editor's opportunities
  have extended, no clue can be found to the full title or author of
  this book.


201.

An answer to the Declaration of the Imaginary Parliament of the
unknowne Commonwealth of England, concerning the Affaires past
betwixt them of England, and the High and Mighty Lords the States
Generall of the United Provinces: wherein their Frivolous Reasons are
cleerly refuted; and their unjust proceedings in the Treaty of the
aforesaid Affaires, as in all their Actions, manifestly discovered.
At Rotterdam, by John Pieterson. 1652.

  On October 26th, 1652, the House of Commons referred to the Council
  of State to examine and find out the authors, printers, and
  publishers of this pamphlet, and to peruse and consider thereof,
  and report the same to the Parliament.[162] A copy is preserved in
  the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains 16 pages.


202.

Merlini Anglici Ephemeris; or Astrologicall Predictions for the year
1653. By William Lilly, Student in Astrology. London. 1653.

  On October 26th, 1652, the House of Commons referred this book
  to the consideration of the Committee for plundered ministers;
  with power to send for the author and secure him.[163] A copy is
  preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in octavo.


203.

Mercurius Britannicus. 1652.

The Faithful Scout. 1652.

  On December 28th, 1652, the House of Commons referred to the
  Council of State to take care to suppress these pamphlets, or
  any other books that go out to the dishonour of the Parliament
  and prejudice of the Commonwealth; and to examine the authors,
  printers, and publishers of the Mercurius Britannicus and the Scout
  or any other books of that nature, with power to imprison the
  offenders.[164] These were weekly periodicals, of which there are
  several preserved among the King's pamphlets in the British Museum
  Library.


204.

Colonel Shapcott (Knight of Devonshire). His Speech in Parliament the
30 of October, 1654. With the case of the secluded members. 1654.

  On November 7th, 1654, it was resolved by Parliament that this
  printed pamphlet was "treasonable, false, scandalous, and
  seditious," and it was referred to the Committee for printing to
  enquire after the author, printers, and publishers of the same, and
  to suppress the same; and the Serjeant at Arms was to seize all
  the printed copies of this pamphlet, and all persons selling or
  publishing the same.[165] A copy of this pamphlet is preserved in
  the British Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains six pages.


205.

The apostolical and true opinion concerning the Holy Trinity
revived and asserted; partly by twelve arguments levyed against
the traditional and false opinion about the Godhead of the Holy
Spirit: partly by a Confession of faith touching the three persons.
Both which having been formerly set forth in those yeers which the
respective titles bear, are now so altered, so augmented, what with
explications of the Scripture, what with reasons, what finally with
testimonies of the Fathers, and of others, together with observations
thereupon, that they may justly seem new. 1653.

  The original work was published in 1647, and was condemned to be
  burnt; it is described in a previous part of this work, (see ante
  p. 144). This 1653 edition is a reissue. On December 12th, 1654,
  the House of Commons resolved that this book contained "impious
  and blasphemous opinions against the Deity of the Holy Ghost," and
  all the printed copies were to be burnt by the Common Hangman.
  On January 15th, 1654/55, the House of Commons further resolved
  that this book "is full of horrid, blasphemous, and execrable
  opinions; denying the Deity of Christ, and of the Holy Ghost; and
  particularly asserting

  "1. That God the Father only, separate from the Son and Holy Ghost,
  is the First Cause of all things that pertain to salvation, _Art._
  1, _p._ 1.

  "2. That God the Holy Ghost is a created Spirit, _p._ 3. and _p._
  2, not God: That Christ is a made Lord; and neither the Son, nor
  the Holy Spirit, the most High God, _p._ 4.

  "3. That Christ is the Second Cause of all Things pertaining to our
  Salvation, _Art._ 2. And that the Son is not equal with the Father,
  16.

  "4. That Christ hath no other than a human nature, _Art._ 3, _p._
  19.

  "5. That Christ is not the most High God, the same with the Father,
  but subordinate to him, _Art._ 4, _p._ 29.

  "6. That the Holy Ghost is the only principal Minister of God and
  of Christ, singled out of the number of other Heavenly Ministers,
  or Angels, _Art._ 6, 44.

  "7. That Christ is not the supreme and independent Monarch
  _Jehovah_, _p._ 44."[166]

  A copy of this book exists in the British Museum Library.


206.

A Twofold Catechism: the one simply called A Scripture Catechism; The
other, A brief Scripture Catechism for Children. Wherein the chiefest
points of the Christian Religion being Question wise proposed,
resolve themselves by pertinent Answers taken word for word out of
the Scripture, without either consequences or Comments. Composed for
their sakes that would fain be Meer Christians, and not of this or
that Sect, inasmuch as all the Sects of Christians, by what names
soever distinguished, have either more or less departed from the
simplicity and truth of the Scripture. By John Biddle, Master of Arts
of the University of Oxford. London. 1654.

A brief Scripture Catechisme for children. Wherein, notwithstanding
the brevity thereof all things necessary unto life and Godliness are
contained. By the same. London. 1654.

  These were originally printed as one book; but the brief Scripture
  Catechism was printed again by itself in a small octavo the same
  year. The British Museum Library contains copies in the twofold
  form, from which the preceding titles are taken.

  On December 12th, 1654, the House of Commons resolved that a
  Committee be appointed to consider of this book, with power to
  send for the author, and to restrain him, and to suppress his
  school. The next day Biddle was brought to the bar of the House,
  and on examination acknowledged the authorship, but denied that he
  kept a school, and also that he had a congregation. Being asked
  who printed the book, he said "Hitherto he hath answered as a
  Christian, to give an account of the hope that is in him: What the
  law of Christ doth warrant him to answer, he will do: but beyond
  that he will not: the Law of Christ enjoins him not to betray his
  brethren. Being asked, Whether the Law of Christ did enjoin him to
  believe the Holy Ghost is not God; saith, the Law of Christ doth
  no-where tell him, the Holy Ghost is God." And being demanded by
  Mr. Speaker

  "Whether the Holy Ghost be God? Saith, He hath examined the
  Scriptures; and doth nowhere find, in the Old or New Testament,
  that the Holy Spirit is God: He doth own the Books, and his opinion
  is sufficiently declared in them.

  "Being demanded whether Jesus Christ be God from Everlasting to
  Everlasting; answered, He doth own the Books, and therein hath
  declared his judgment; But saith, He doth not find, in Scripture,
  where Jesus Christ is called the Most High God, or God from
  Everlasting to Everlasting.

  "Being asked, Whether God be confined to a certain Place; saith,
  this is not to the Hope that is in a Christian: Therefore there is
  no necessity lying on him to answer.

  "Being asked, Whether God have a bodily Shape; saith, He hath
  answered sufficiently to that already."

  It was thereupon ordered that Biddle should be committed prisoner
  to the Gatehouse in Westminster. On January 15th, 1654/5, the House
  of Commons resolved that the whole drift and scope of this book
  was "to teach and to hold forth many blasphemous and heretical
  opinions," and that in the preface the author thereof did "maintain
  and assert many blasphemous and heretical opinions, and doth
  therein cast a reproach upon all the catechisms now extant;" also
  "that report be made to the House of the manner of the author's
  venting his said errors, together with several particular errors
  and blasphemies in the said book contained; that the manner is by
  proposing a blasphemous and dangerous opinion, by way of question,
  and by mis-applying of Scripture, by way of answer to the same."

  "The several particulars are as followeth:

  "1. That the Infinite God is confined to a certain Place. _Cat. p._
  5, 6.

  "2. That God hath a bodily shape; that God hath a Right Hand, and
  Left, in a proper Sense, 2. _Cat. p._ 6.

  "3. That there are Passions in God. 1. _Cat._ 11.

  "4. He denies the Omniscience and Immutability of God, 1. _Cat._
  from the 14 to the *.

  "5. He denies that all the Three Persons are to be loved with our
  whole Heart, 1. _Cat._ 21.

  "6. He denies that Jesus Christ hath the nature of God dwelling in
  him, _p._ 27, 28, 29, _ad_ 35, and _p._ 40 to the 60. That Christ
  hath only a divine Lordship, without a Divine Nature.

  "7. He denies the Godhead of the Holy Ghost, 1. _Cat._ _p._ 21. 2.
  _Cat._ _p._ 16.

  "8. He denies that Christ was a Priest, whilst he was on Earth,
  _p._ 64; or died to reconcile God to us, _p._ 68; or that God doth
  justify any because of the full Price that Christ paid to him in
  their stead, _p._ 83.

  "9. He affirms Justification by Works, _p._ 96.

  "10. He denies the Righteousness of Christ is imputed to Believers,
  _p._ 82.

  "11. He affirms that Works give Vigour to Faith, and so makes it
  able to justify, 2. _Cat._ 26; and affirms that Works give Right to
  Eternal Life, 1. _Cat._ _p._ 86, 87; 94, 95; 98.

  "He affirms that true Saints may turn Apostates finally, 1. _Cat._
  _p._ 99.

  "He denies that the Wicked do continue to live in Hell, under the
  sense of everlasting Torment; but saith, That they are destroyed,
  and cease to be, 1. _Cat._ _p._ 134, 135, 136, &c."

  It was then resolved that this book should be burnt by the Common
  Hangman.


207.

Dissertatio de Pace, &c. or a Discourse touching the peace and
concord of the church. Wherein is elegantly and acutely argued, that
not so much a bad opinion, as a bad life, excludes a Christian out
of the Kingdom of Heaven; and that the things necessary to be known
for the attainment of salvation, are very few and easie; and finally,
that those, who pass amongst us under the name of Hereticks, are
notwithstanding, to be tolerated. London. 1653.

  On December 21st, 1654, the House of Commons referred this book to
  a Committee, to examine the substance thereof, and who were the
  authors, printers, and publishers, and also that all the copies
  should be seized.[167] A copy is preserved in the British Museum
  Library.


208.

Thunder from the Throne of God against the Temples of Idols. 1652.

  A quarto pamphlet of 36 pages, of which there is a copy in the
  British Museum Library. This and the book described in the next
  article were written by one Samuel Chidley, who for so doing was
  summoned to the bar of the House of Commons on October 20th, 1656,
  and committed to the custody of the Serjeant at Arms; and the book
  was referred to a Committee.[168]


209.

An Epistle directed to the Parliament of the Commonwealth of England.

  A quarto pamphlet of 4 pages, but without title. A copy is
  preserved in the British Museum Library. For its condemnation see
  preceding article.


210.

A healing question propounded and resolved upon occasion of the late
publique and seasonable call to humiliation, in order to love and
union amongst the honest party, and with a desire to apply Balsome to
the wound before it become incurable. London. 1656.

  For writing this book, Sir Henry Vane was summoned before the
  Council at Whitehall, and having attended there on Thursday, August
  21st, 1656, it was ordered that if he should not give good security
  in £5000 bond by Thursday next, to do nothing to the prejudice
  of the present government and the peace of the Commonwealth, he
  should stand committed. This security he refused to give, and on
  the 4th September, he was ordered to be apprehended and taken in
  safe custody to the Isle of Wight, there to be delivered to the
  Governor of the Island, to be disposed of according to the order of
  the Council.[169] A copy of this book is preserved in the British
  Museum Library. It is in quarto, and contains 24 pages, and a
  postscript, but no title.


211.

An Act for renouncing and disannulling the pretended title of Charles
Stuart, etc. 1656.

  On May 27th, 1661, this "treasonable parchment writing" was ordered
  by the House of Commons to be burnt in Westminster Hall on the
  following Wednesday by the Common Hangman.[170] It is printed in
  Scobell, p. 371.


212.

Choice Drollery, with songs and sonnets. Printed by J. G. for Robert
Pollard. 1666.

  This book "giving great offence to the saints of that time, who
  esteem'd it a lewd and scandalous thing, it was order'd by the
  Protector's Council to be burnt on the 8th May the same year."
  _Ant._ à _Wood._


213.

An Act for the security of his Highness the Lord Protector his person
and continuance of the nation in peace and safety. 1656.

  On May 27th, 1661, this "treasonable parchment writing" was ordered
  by the House of Commons to be burnt in Westminster Hall on the
  following Wednesday by the Common Hangman.[171] It is printed in
  Scobell, p. 372.


214.

A Holy Commonwealth, or political aphorisms opening the true
principles of government: for the healing of the mistakes and
resolving the doubts that most endanger and trouble England at this
time: if yet there may be hope. And directing the desires of sober
Christians that long to see the kingdoms of this world become the
kingdoms of the Lord, and of his Christ. Written by Richard Baxter at
the invitation of James Harrington esquire. London. 1659.

  This book was burnt by the University of Oxford in the year
  1688.[172]


215.

The Lord's Loud Call to England: being a true Relation of some
late, various, and wonderful judgments, or Handy-works of God, by
Earthquake, Lightening, Whirlwind, great multitudes of Toads and
Flyes; and also the striking of divers persons with sudden death,
in several places; for what causes let the man of wisdome judge,
upon his serious perusal of the Book itself. Also of the strange
changes, and late alterations made in these three Nations. As also
of the odious Sin of Drinking Healths. With a Brief of Mr. Pryn's
solid arguments against it, and his Epistle to the late King Charles
to redress it. Published by H. J. a Servant of Jesus the Christ,
and Lover of Peace and Holiness. London, Printed for L. Chapman in
Popeshead Alley, and for Fr. Smith, at the Elephant and Castle neer
Temple-Bar. 1660.

  This book was the subject of proceedings against Francis Smith. He
  was imprisoned three times, according to his own account, for its
  publication.[173] It was written by Mr. H. Jessey, as appears from
  a pamphlet written in answer by one John Gadbury.

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto,
  and contains 44 pages.


216.

The Speeches and Prayers of some of the late King's Judges, viz.
Major General Harison, Octob. 13. Mr. John Carew, Octob. 15. Mr.
Justice Cooke, Mr. Hugh Peters, Octob. 16. Mr. Tho. Scott, Mr.
Gregory Clement, Col. Adrian Scroop, Col. John Jones, Octob. 17. Col.
Daniel Axtell, and Col. Fran. Hacker, Octob. 19, 1660, The times of
their Death. Together with severall occasionall speeches and passages
in their imprisonment till they came to the place of execution.
Faithfully and impartially collected for further satisfaction.
Printed Anno Dom. 1660.

  Simon Dover and Thomas Brewster were tried at the Old Bailey on
  Feb. 22, 1663/64, for printing and publishing this book, and were
  found guilty. They were fined, ordered to stand upon the pillory,
  and then imprisoned. The proceedings will be found in Howell's
  State Trials, vol. 6, p. 518. A copy is in the Editor's possession.
  It is in quarto, and contains 96 pages.


217.

Mercurius Veridicus. 1660.

  On June 25, 1660, on the House of Commons being informed of
  this printed paper, wherein this clause is printed, viz. "It
  was moved by Major Beake, that Sir Richard Temple might be one
  of the twenty excepted persons; and he gave several reasons for
  it; among others that Sir Richard had been a menial servant to
  Cromwell, and a great promoter of his Interest; but the House at
  length waived the further debate of it;" it was ordered that a
  Committee be appointed to examine this particular case; and in
  order thereunto they were to send for Maxwell the printer; and they
  were to consider of the great liberty taken by divers persons,
  in printing, without warrant, several votes and proceedings of
  this House; and to prepare an order for restraining all persons
  whatsoever from printing any of the votes or proceedings of the
  House without special order. And they were to send for Mr. William
  Saunderson, and to examine him, by what warrant he printed, in his
  History, a speech in the name of Sir Harbottle Grimston, Baronet,
  Speaker of the House, and several other speeches, as the speeches
  of Members of Parliament, and other passages reflecting on Members
  of Parliament; and they were to take into consideration any other
  books or pamphlets, reflecting on any Member of the House, or other
  persons; and to report to the House what was fit to be done in the
  several cases.[174]

  A copy of Mercurius Veridicus, No. 1, from Tuesday the 5th of June,
  to Tuesday the 12th, 1660, is in the British Museum Library, but it
  is not the number of which the House of Commons complained. There
  are no others, as far as the Editor can ascertain.


218.

The long Parliament revived; or an Act for continuation and the not
dissolving the long Parliament called by King Charles the First in
the year 1640 but by an Act of Parliament, with undeniable reasons
deduced from the said Act to prove that that Parliament is not yet
dissolved. Also Mr. William Prynne's five arguments fully answered,
whereby he endeavours to prove it to be dissolved by the King's
death, &c. By Thomas Phillips, Gentleman, a sincere Lover of the King
and Country. 1660.

  This pamphlet was written by William Drake under the assumed
  name of Thomas Phillips, and for the writing, printing, and
  publishing the same he was impeached by the House of Commons,
  and on the impeachment being carried up to the Lords on the 4th
  December, 1660, they ordered that Drake should be apprehended as
  a delinquent, and brought before them the next morning to answer
  to his charge; which being done, and he confessing his fault, the
  Lords, in consideration of the shortness of time for proceeding
  further in this business, left him to be prosecuted in the King's
  Bench by the Attorney General. No further proceedings however can
  be met with.

  The following is a copy of the impeachment:--[175]

  "The Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, the House of Commons, in
  the Name of themselves, and all the Commons of England, do hereby
  declare, complain, and shew, against William Drake Citizen and
  Merchant of London,

  "That whereas, this present Parliament, through the Blessing of
  God upon their Endeavours, and the incomparable Grace and Goodness
  of his Majesty's Royal Condescensions, have proved the happy
  Instruments of repairing the Breaches of this Kingdom; restoring
  the ancient Foundations; and passing many good and wholsome Laws,
  for the Safety and Quiet of the People; and are daily preparing
  such others, as may yet seem to be wanting:

  "Nevertheless the said William Drake, in contempt of his Majesty's
  Crown and Dignity, and of the Laws and Government of this kingdom;
  and out of a wicked and malicious intention, to scandalise and
  subvert the authority and being of this present Parliament, and
  to raise and stir up sedition and division in this Kingdom; and
  against the Peace of our Sovereign Lord the King; hath lately,
  that is to say, upon or before the eighteenth day of the month of
  November last, at Westminster in the County of Middlesex, written,
  printed, and published, in the name of one Thomas Phillips Gent. a
  certain, false, wicked, malicious and seditious Pamphlet intituled,
  _The Long Parliament revived &c._; in which said scandalous and
  seditious pamphlet, the said William Drake, amongst many other
  wicked expressions, clauses, and assertions therein contained, doth
  falsely, maliciously, and seditiously, affirm and declare,

  "Page 6. First, That all other Parliaments have no legal Capacity,
  till this (meaning the Long Parliament, called in the year 1640) be
  legally dissolved.

  "Page 14. Secondly, The Act (meaning the Act of Parliament to
  which the Title of the Pamphlet refers) is herein express, That by
  no other Way or means, but by an Act of Parliament, it shall be
  dissolved: Which, being it cannot be done by the dead King, but may
  be done by the Successor, it ought to be so dissolved; or else it
  must and doth, by virtue of this Act, still remain legally in full
  Being and Authority.

  "Page 17. Thirdly, How much it were to be wished, that the
  Legislative Authority might revert into that Channel, meaning the
  Long Parliament aforesaid; by which the Peace and Settlement of
  the Nation, through his Majesty's most gracious Influence, might
  durably, and without Question, be provided for and preserved.

  "Page 21. Fourthly, If That be a lawful Parliament, (speaking of
  the long Parliament aforesaid, which he elsewhere affirmed to be in
  being) then this can be none, nor no other, till this be legally
  dissolved.

  "All which practices for stirring up of sedition, the Commons are
  ready to prove, not only by the general Scope of the said Book, but
  likewise by several Clauses therein contained, besides these before
  mentioned, and such other Proofs as the Cause, according to the
  course of Parliament, shall require;

  "And do pray, that the said William Drake may be put to answer all
  and every of the Premises; and that such Proceeding, Examination,
  Trial, Judgment, and exemplary Punishment, may be thereupon had and
  executed, as is agreeable to Law and Justice."

  A copy of this book is in the British Museum Library.


219.

Mirabilis Annus, or the year of Prodigies and Wonders, being a
faithful and impartial collection of several signs that have been
seen in the Heavens, in the Earth, and in the Waters; together with
many remarkable accidents and judgments befalling divers persons,
according as they have been testified by very credible hands; all
which have happened within the space of one year last past, and are
now made publick for a seasonable warning to the people of these
three kingdoms speedily to repent and turn to the Lord, whose hand is
lifted up amongst us. 1661.

  Francis Smith, in his account of the injurious proceedings of Sir
  George Jeffreys before referred to, gives the following piteous
  account of the way he was treated for the publication of this
  book:--

  "In August, 1661, a certain book was printed and published,
  entitled, "Mirabilis Annus," or the year of Prodigies. Then did a
  person of quality yet living, give me great encouragement for its
  publication as a book grateful to the authority, and of general
  caution to the nation, both to behold and consider the works of
  God, and also to tremble for fear of his judgments; but it so
  happened contrary to my expectation, that the very day it was
  published, one of his Majesty's messengers came to my shop, with
  a warrant both to seize the book and my person, and carried me
  before the then Secretary of State, where after examination, I was
  committed to the Gatehouse Prison by this warrant inserted."

  "It is his Majesty's pleasure that you take into your custody the
  person of Francis Smith, Stationer, for having a hand in printing
  and compiling dangerous books, and that you keep him close prisoner
  till further order from his majesty, and for so doing this shall
  be your warrant. Dated at the court at Whitehall this 15th day of
  August, 1661.

    "Edw. Nicholas."

  "To the Keeper of the Gatehouse,
  "Westminster, or his deputy.

  "This word in my warrant 'close prisoner' proved a fatal word to
  me, as many still living can witness, for the keeper improved it
  to a tittle; there I was truly buried alive, it being a prison
  famous for oppression of poor prisoners, as many besides myself can
  notoriously witness.

  "For as soon as I was brought thither, a stern gaoler locked me up,
  and said, I must not see, nor have the liberty of any relations to
  visit me, without special order from the Secretary first obtained.
  This looked like cold entertainment to one unacquainted with such
  a condition. But this, and much more I found as truly performed
  as promised, being locked up in a room, where I had neither chair
  nor stool to rest on, and yet ten shillings per week must be the
  price, and before I had been there three nights £7. 15. 0 was
  demanded for present fees. That is to say, five pounds to excuse
  me from wearing irons, ten shillings for my entrance week lodging,
  five shillings sheets, five shillings garnish money, the rest
  for turnkey fees; upon which I gave this answer, that I did not
  understand any just cause for imprisonment, much less to pay such
  fees, and for wearing of irons I would not pay five groats to be
  excused, if he could by law impose irons on me, I would wear them.
  Upon this many cruel endeavours were used, whereby to exact consent
  of these fees from me; and my afflicted wife not suffered to speak
  with me but in the presence of the keeper, after chargeable orders,
  for so much privilege first obtained, nay many times orders denied
  for my friends admittance; in the presence of the keeper, and my
  window casements must be nailed up that I should not have the
  benefit of that common air which is every slave's birthright. And
  when provision was sent for my necessary support, yet was that many
  times kept back and frequent fasts imposed upon me, and what was
  sent for my dinner at 12 o'clock, must be given me four or five
  hours after, which I usually breakfasted with, and should be sure
  to want beer or bread, so I was forced to devise a way by a bag and
  a string to be let down in the night at a window, to convey some
  necessary food to me. Things continued thus several weeks, in which
  time for receiving a note at the keyhole by an open prisoner, sent
  from my poor wife then sick and weary with grief, and successless
  travels at my release, I was taken out of this room, and locked up
  in a trap-door room about 20 days, where I could hardly be heard
  with hallooing, it being a place for such as were condemned to die;
  to be usually secured in. At this time above thirty pound was spent
  to attempt my release but all ineffectual.

  "Then was application made to the judges of the King's Bench,
  Westminster, and I had three chargeable Habeas Corpus's before
  the cruel gaoler would obey to bring me to the bar, where upon my
  appearance, care was taken, that I carried in my hand the copy of
  my commitment, and presented it to the Lord Chief Justice Forster,
  who gave patient hearing to all my complaints, disdaining the usage
  I had met with, and told the keeper, if it should happen before
  my legal release I should die by such usage, the keeper should be
  indicted for his life.

  "At this time, to my great amazement, a new copy of commitment was
  produced in court, the contents whereof here followeth:--

  "The prison of the Gatehouse, Westminster.

  "I, Edward Broughton, knight, keeper of the prison of our lord the
  King of the Gatehouse, Westminster in the County of Middlesex, to
  the lord the king humbly certifieth, that before the coming of the
  writ to me directed to this schedule annexed, to wit, the fifteenth
  day of August in the year of the reign of our said lord the king
  that now is, the 13th, Francis Smith in the said writ named was
  taken at Westminster in the County of Middlesex and there in the
  prison of our said lord the king of the Gatehouse aforesaid, under
  my custody detained by virtue of a certain warrant to me directed.
  The tenor whereof followeth in these words:

  "These are to will and require you in his Majesty's name, to take
  into your custody, and safely keep the body of Francis Smith
  of London, Stationer, for that traitorously and seditiously he
  compiled, printed, and published a treasonable and seditious
  book, intitled Several prodigies and apparitions seen in the
  heavens from August 1st 1660, to the latter end of May 1661,
  containing a collection of several former prodigies, mischievous
  events thereupon to princes, and a forgery of divers late
  false and feigned prodigies and impostures of the same kind,
  prognosticating thereby the like events to his majesty, and thereby
  did traitorously and seditiously instil into the hearts of his
  majesty's good subjects, a superstitious belief thereof, and a
  dislike and hatred of his majesty's person and government, and
  prepared them to effect a damnable design for the destruction of
  his sacred majesty, and to introduce a change of the government
  established; and for so doing, this shall be your warrant.
  Given at our Court at Whitehall the 15th day of August 1661.
  Edward Nicholas, To the Keeper of the prison of the Gatehouse,
  Westminster, or his Deputy. And this is the cause of the taking and
  detaining of the said Francis Smith in the prison of our lord the
  king, under my custody, whose body at the day and place in the said
  writ contained, I have ready as by the said writ is commanded me.

    "Edward Broughton, knight.

  "My counsel pleaded they knew nothing of that copy till now, and
  gave evidence that the copy I produced was taken from the clerk
  of the prison for which he had five shillings, upon which I was
  remanded back again to prison till the next term following; and
  here it may be remembered as an addition to the habit of cruelty
  attending that prison; (the gaoler notwithstanding what the Lord
  Chief Justice Forster had said to him) forced me to go down into
  the dungeon for above 20 days because I could not raise him £7
  towards chamber rent at that instant. Then upon renewed complaints
  and counsel charge, obtained order to be taken out of the dungeon,
  and put upstairs into a chamber where I was again turned out within
  a week, at eight o'clock at night, while my poor wife and two of
  my children were eating, and they at that time of the night in the
  depth of winter, forced to seek their lodging amongst strangers in
  Tothill Street, Westminster, and myself constrained to lie upon
  the bare boards in an open entry, where I continued the rest of my
  time till bailed out, being several weeks, sometimes lying on the
  ground; the rest in a hammock.

  "In this time I was sent for to Whitehall, and in the presence of
  a gentleman of quality yet living and several others, was offered
  £100 and present discharge, but to declare my knowledge (upon an
  imprecation) of the authors or printers of the aforesaid book.
  Yet rather than occasion hurt to any, gave myself up to their
  utmost displeasure; and had recourse to many chargeable Habeas
  Corpus's before I could obtain bail. By this imprisonment, I lost
  my shop and trade for two years, to above £300 charge and damage,
  towards which I can truly say to this day, I never had directly
  or indirectly to the value of £20 reparation from any person or
  persons whatsoever; though it hath been often suggested both by
  persons in authority and others, that competitors bore me out,
  which occasioned my bonds to be aggravated."[176]

  On June 29th, 1661, Thomas Creake, of Little Britain, was examined
  before the Secretary of State, when he stated that he had in
  printing 2000 copies of this book; he had struck off the first
  sheet, and delivered 1000 copies to one George Thresher for
  binding.[177]

  Among the State Papers of July, 1661, there is preserved the draft
  of a warrant from the Secretary of State for the apprehension of
  one Cole, dwelling at the Sign of the Printing Press, near the Old
  Exchange, and for search in his house, shop, &c., for copies of the
  "Mirabilis Annus," or any other prohibited books.[178]

  On October 4th, 1661, a warrant was issued by the Secretary of
  State to the Keeper of the Gatehouse, to receive into custody
  Elizabeth, wife of Giles Calvert, bookseller, for printing and
  publishing a treasonable and seditious book called _Several
  Prodigies and Apparitions seen in the Heavens, from August 1. 1660
  to the latter end of May, 1661_, "being a forgery of false and
  feigned prodigies, prognosticating mischievous events to the King,
  and instilling into the hearts of subjects a superstitious belief
  thereof, and a dislike and hatred of His Majesty's person and
  government, and preparing them to effect a damnable design for his
  destruction, and a change of government."[179]

  In a communication from Mr. Ashmole to the Secretary of State,
  dated October 30th, 1661, the authorship of this book is attributed
  to Mr. George Cockain, a preacher, who had weekly meetings at an
  alehouse in Ivy Lane.[180]

  On December 8th, 1661, Mr. Jessey, a minister, was examined
  before the Secretary of State in relation to this book, when he
  stated that he had long been in the habit of collecting notes of
  remarkable events; one of which described the strange death of
  Major Orde in the Bishopric of Durham, which was in the Annus
  Mirabilis; he visited Mr. Cockain, and had written out prodigies
  for him, and heard them from him.[181]

  On December 19th, 1661, Francis Smith, the printer before referred
  to, was examined by the Secretary of State, when he denied any
  knowledge of the book, "never heard of it, contributed to it, read
  it, nor delivered it out."[182]

  A copy of this book is in the Editor's possession. It is in quarto,
  and contains 88 pages.


220.

The fastening of St. Peter's Fetters by seven links or propositions,
or the efficacy and extent of the solemn league and covenant
asserted and vindicated against the doubts and scruples of Dr. John
Gauden's anonymous Questionist. St. Peter's bonds not only loosed
but annihilated by Mr. John Russel, attested by John Gauden, D.D.
The league illegal falsely fathered on Dr. Daniel Featley; and the
reasons of the University of Oxford for not taking (now pleaded to
discharge the obligation of) the Solemn League and Covenant. By
Zechariah Crofton, Minister of the Gospel at S. Botolph's Algate,
London. Printed for Ralph Smith at the sign of the Bible in Cornhill,
near the Royal Exchange. 1660.

  A quarto pamphlet of 159 pages, of which a copy is preserved in the
  British Museum Library. For the condemnation of this book see next
  article.


221.

Berith Anti-Baal, or Zach. Crofton's appearance before the
Prelate-Justice of Peace, vainly pretending to bind the Covenant
and Covenanters to their good behaviour. By way of rejoynder to,
and animadversion on Dr. John Gauden's reply a vindication of his
analysis from the (by him reputed) pitiful cavils and objections;
but really proved powerful and convincing exceptions of Mr. Zach.
Crofton's Analepsis. By the author of the Analepsis, and (not by the
Dr. observed) Analepsis Anelephthe, to the continuing of S. Peter's
bonds, and fastening his fetters against Papal and Prelatical Power.
London. Printed by M. S. for Ralph Smith at the three Bibles in
Cornhil; and for Thomas Parkhurst at the three Crowns over against
the great Conduit in Cheapside. 1661.

  A quarto pamphlet of 68 pages, with long introductory matter. A
  copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.

  This, as well as the book mentioned in the preceding article, fell
  under the condemnation of the government; and on March 23rd, 1661,
  Crofton, having been imprisoned, was examined before the Secretary
  of State, when he admitted the authorship. Soon afterwards he
  addressed the following petition to the king.

  "To the Kings most Excellent Majestie.

  "The humble peticion of Zachariah Crofton, your Majesties
  prisoner in the Tower of London.

  "Most humbly sheweth

  "That your Petitioner hath (according to the duty of his
  allegiance) in the worst of times with constant and conscientious
  Loyalty to the frequent hazard of his life and all that is deare
  to him and with the actual losse and prejudice of his estate, by
  sequestracion and imprisonment asserted, adhœred unto, and in his
  place and capacity advanced your Majesties interest and undoubted
  right to the Crowne, Dignity, Rule, and Government of these your
  Kingdomes, and given publique testimonies as well since as before
  your Majesties happy retourne to the same.

  "That your Petitioner haveing by rashly publishing some
  inconsiderate expressions about matters out of his spheare, in his
  late writings fallen under your Majestie's displeasure Throweth
  himselfe down at your Royall feete, and most humbly craveth your
  Majesties leave to professe, hee hath not spoken or written
  anything of a malicious mind or intent, to obviate or disturbe the
  peace and settlement of these your kingdomes under your Royall
  Government. And that hee retaineth towards your Majestie a most
  Loyall heart and resolucion to acquiesse and submitt unto your
  Royall pleasure whenever it shalbee signified, published and made
  knowne.

    "The premisses considered, your Petitioner most humbly
    prayeth That the rayes of your Royall grace, favour and
    pardon may bee extended to him, and his numerous
    family to the enlargement of his liberty that they may
    not sitt alone in sadnes, butt pertake of that generall
    joy, by which your approaching happy Coronacion shall
    revive your Majestie's kingdome, whose subjection to,
    and happy settlement, under your Majestie's most
    righteous, gracious, long and prosperous Reigne shalbee
    the study and prayers of

      "Your most Loyall subiect,
      "ZECHARIAH CROFTON."[183]

  Ralph Smith, the printer of this book, was also imprisoned for being
  concerned in its publication, and he also petitioned the King in
  the following manner:

  "To the Kings most Excellent Majesty.

  "The humble petition of Ralph Smyth, stationer,

  "Humbly sheweth

  "That your Petitioner had the ill fortune to publishe a booke
  written by one Zachary Crofton for which hee hath suffered
  imprisonment but by your Majesty's gracious clemency is at present
  inlarged under bail.

  "That your Petitioner is and ever hath been a loyal subject to your
  Majesty and hath severall tymes adventured his life and fortune
  towards your Majesty's restoration particularly in Sir George
  Booth's buisnes.

  "That your Peticioner was not privy to the wryting of the said
  booke, and by reason of a long sicknes was not able to read the
  same many weekes after it was printed but in order to a small
  support for his wife and six small children in the way of his trade
  did ignorantly suffer the same to be printed in his name.

    "Your Peticioner being senceable that hee hath deserved
    your Majestie's displeasure for this his great crime
    most humbly submitteth to your mercy and implores
    your Majestie's most gracious pardon.

      "And hee as bound in duty shall pray
      "RALPH SMITH."[184]

  Whether Crofton received any specific punishment for writing these
  books, and when he was liberated from prison, does not at present
  appear. He was a Nonconformist divine, born and chiefly educated
  at Dublin. Being a zealous Royalist during the Commonwealth, and
  refusing the engagement, he was deprived. He afterwards obtained
  the living of St. Botolph, Aldgate, London. He was ejected for
  nonconformity, and died in 1672.


222.

A Phenix, or, The Solemn League and Covenant. Whereunto is annexed
I. The Form and manner of his Majestie's Coronation in Scotland.
With a sermon then preached on that occasion by Robert Douglas
of Edenburgh. II. A Declaration of the King's Majesty to all his
loving subjects of the Kingdomes of Scotland &c. in the yeare
1650. III. The great danger of Covenant-breaking &c., being the
substance of a sermon preached by Edm. Calamy the 14 of Jan. 1645
before the then Lord Mayor of the City of London, Sir Thomas Adams
together with the Sheriffs, Aldermen and Common-Councell of the said
City: being the day of their taking the Solemn League and Covenant
at Michael Basenshaw, London. Edinburgh. Printed in the year of
Covenant-breaking.

  On July 23rd, 1662, the Solemn League and Covenant of Scotland was
  torn and burnt by the heralds at the Cross of Edinburgh, by order
  of the Parliament then sitting there.

  Thomas Brewster was tried at the Old Bailey, London, on February
  22nd, 1663/4, for printing the Phenix, and found guilty. He was
  fined, ordered to stand on the pillory, and then imprisoned. The
  proceedings will be found in Howell's State Trials, Vol. 6, p. 514.


223.

A treatise of the execution of justice, wherein is clearly proved
that the execution of judgment and justice is as well the people's as
the magistrate's duty, and if the magistrates pervert judgment the
people are bound by the law of God to execute judgment without them
and upon them. 1663.

  For printing this book, John Twyn of London, stationer, was tried
  at the Old Bailey on February 20th, 1663, and being convicted
  received sentence as in cases of high treason, and was executed
  accordingly.[185] A portion of this pamphlet is preserved among the
  State Papers of the period. It is a sheet containing pp. 25 to 32,
  with a note attached that it was taken when printing by Twyn.[186]


224.

The Mayor of Northampton's case. 1663.

  On April 7th, 1663, the House of Commons ordered that this printed
  paper, containing "matter of scandal against several persons of
  quality," should be referred to the Committee of privileges and
  elections.[187]


225.

The Child's Instructor; or a new and easy Primmer.

  For writing and publishing this book, Benjamin Keach, of Winslow,
  in the County of Bucks., was tried at the Aylesbury Assizes on the
  8th of October, 1664, and found guilty; and the following sentence
  was passed on him by the Judge.

  "Benjamin Keach, you are here convicted of writing and publishing
  a seditious and scandalous Book, for which the Court's judgment
  is this, and the court doth award, That you shall go to gaol for
  a fortnight, without bail or mainprise; and the next Saturday to
  stand upon the pillory at Ailsbury for the space of two hours,
  from eleven o'clock to one, with a Paper upon your head with this
  inscription, _For writing, printing and publishing a schismatical
  book intitled, The Child's Instructor, or a new and easy Primmer_.
  And the next Thursday to stand in the same manner, and for the same
  time, in the market of Winslow; and there your Book shall be openly
  burnt before your face by the common hangman, in disgrace of you
  and your doctrine. And you shall forfeit to the King's Majesty the
  sum of £20 and shall remain in gaol until you find sureties for
  your good behaviour and appearance at the next assizes, there to
  renounce your doctrine, and make such public submission as shall be
  enjoined you."

  According to this sentence he was kept close prisoner till the
  Saturday following, and then about eleven o'clock was carried
  to the pillory at Aylesbury, where he stood full two hours to a
  minute, was denied the liberty of speaking to the spectators, and
  "had his hands as well as his head carefully kept in the pillory
  the whole time. On the Thursday following he stood in the same
  manner and for the same time at Winslow, the town where he lived,
  and had his book burnt before him. After this, upon paying his
  fine, and giving sufficient security for his good behaviour, he was
  set at liberty; but was never brought to make a recantation."[188]

  Among the State Papers of the period is preserved the following
  letter from Thomas Disney, apparently minister of Stoke Hamond,
  Bucks:--[189]

  "Honoured Sir,

  And loving Brother this Primer owned by Benjamin Keach as the
  Author and bought by my man George Chilton for five pence of
  Henry Keach of Stableford Mill neare me, a miller; who then sayd
  that his brother Benjamin Keach is author of it, and that there
  are fiveteene hundred of them printed. This Benjamin Keach is a
  Tayler, and one that is a teacher in this new fangled way, and
  lives at Winslow a market towne in Buckinghamshire. Pray take some
  speedie course to acquaint my Lord Archbishop his grace with it,
  whereby his authoritie may issue forth that ye impression may be
  seized upon before they be much more dispersed to ye poysoining of
  people; they contayning (as I conceive) factious, schismaticall,
  and hereticall matter. Some are scattered in my parish, and
  perchance in noe place sooner, because he hath a sister here and
  some others of his gang, two whereof I have bought up. Pray let
  me have your speedie account of it. I doubt not but it will be
  taken as acceptable service to God's Church, and beleeve it a very
  thankefull obligement to

  Stoke hamond in
  Bucks--64
  May 26th

      Honoured Sir
      Your truely loving Brother
      Thomas Disney.

  (_Addressed_)

    These for his honoured friend Luke Wilkes
    esqre. at Whitehall with speed pray present."


226.

A book entitled "That neither temporalities, nor tythes, is due to
the bishops, prelates, nor clergy, by any gospel rule, and that
kings, princes, and lords temporal may justly take the temporalities
and tythes from them, and dispose of them for the defence and benefit
of the kingdom, and the relief of the poor, proved by the laws and
practices of twenty kings of England, Judah, and France, and also by
120 authors besides, dedicated to the king's most excellent Majesty."
About 1671.

  The author of this book is unknown; but the printer, Mr. Francis
  Smith, before the book was finished was taken into custody under
  a general warrant, and carried to Lambeth House to appear before
  the then Bishop, but eventually all proceedings against him
  dropped.[190]



  PART IV.]                      [TO BE CONTINUED.


  INDEX
  EXPURGATORIUS
  ANGLICANUS:

  OR
  A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF THE PRINCIPAL BOOKS
  PRINTED OR PUBLISHED IN ENGLAND,
  WHICH HAVE BEEN SUPPRESSED,
  OR BURNT BY THE COMMON HANGMAN,
  OR CENSURED,
  OR FOR WHICH THE AUTHORS, PRINTERS, OR PUBLISHERS
  HAVE BEEN PROSECUTED.

  BY W. H. HART, F.S.A.


  PRICE ONE SHILLING AND SIXPENCE.


  LONDON:
  JOHN RUSSELL SMITH, 36, SOHO SQUARE.

  1877.

  HART AND SON, PRINTERS,]        [SAFFRON WALDEN.



NOTICE.


The progress of this Publication has been unavoidably delayed through
illness, domestic affliction, and other causes; but the Editor now
hopes to bring the entire work to a speedy conclusion; health and
other things permitting.

  W. H. HART, F.S.A.

  Campbell Lodge,
  Burch Road,
  Rosherville, Kent.

  May, 1877.


227.

England's Appeal from the Private Caballe at Whitehall to the great
Council of the Nation, the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled.
By a true lover of his country. 1673.

  A quarto pamphlet of 52 pages, a copy of which is in the editor's
  possession. For publishing the same, Francis Smith the bookseller
  was committed into the custody of five of the King's messengers by
  the Council Board, to about £50 charges and damages.[191]


228.

The Quaker and his maid. 1675.

  On June 26th, 1675, a warrant was issued by the Secretary of State
  to search for this pamphlet. The editor has not as yet been able
  to discover a copy. It was reprinted in the year 1739 under this
  title, "A merry conversation which lately passed between a very
  noted Quaker and his maid, upon a very merry occasion. To which is
  added, The Members to their Sovereign, By Hil--d Ja--bs, Esqre.
  Third edition." It is a grossly indecent production. A copy of this
  reprint is in the editor's possession, purchased from the library
  of the late George Daniel, Esq., Canonbury Square. It is in octavo,
  and contains 18 pages.


229.

Verses on the Death of Edward Coleman, who was executed for high
treason on December 3. 1678.[192]

  These verses were published by Henry Nevill, otherwise Henry Payne,
  of Medborne in Leicestershire, on January 10th, 1678/79, for which
  the following information was filed against him by the Attorney
  General.

  "Middlesexia scilicet. Memorandum quod Willielmus Jones miles
  attornatus domini regis nunc generalis qui pro eodem domino rege in
  hac parte sequitur in propria persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti
  domini regis coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium die Jovis proximo
  post octabas Sancti Hillarii isto eodem termino et pro eodem domino
  rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod Termino Sancti
  Michaelis anno regni domini nostri Caroli Secundi Dei gratia Angliæ
  Scotiæ Franciæ et Hiberniæ Regis fidei defensoris &c. tricesimo, in
  curia dicti domini regis coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium in
  comitatu Middlesexiæ (eadem curia apud Westmonasterium in comitatu
  Middlesexiæ tunc tenta existente) quidam Edwardus Coleman nuper de
  parochia Sancti Martini in Campis in comitatu Middlesexiæ generosus
  debito modo per sacramentum duodecim juratorum proborum et legalium
  hominum comitatus Middlesexiæ prædicti indictatus fuit pro diversis
  altis proditionibus in falso malitiose subdole et proditorie
  proposicon' compassacon' imaginacon' et intenden' seditionis et
  rebellionis infra hoc regnum Angliæ et dictum dominum regem nunc
  de regali statu titulo potestate et regimine regni sui penitus
  deprivandum deponendum dejiciendum et exhæretandum ac ipsum dominum
  regem ad mortem et finalem destructionem adducendum et ponendum et
  gubernationem ejusdem regni et sinceram Dei religionem in eodem
  regno recte et legibus ejusdem regni stabilitas pro voluntate
  et libito ejus mutandas et alterandas et statuta totius hujus
  regni Angliæ per universas ejus partes bene instituta et ordinata
  totaliter subvertenda et distruenda et guerram contra dictum
  dominum regem nunc infra hoc regnum Angliæ levandam et procurandam.
  Et quod prædictus Edwardus Coleman postea scilicet prædicto termino
  Sancti Michaelis anno regni dicti domini regis nunc tricesimo
  supradicto in curia dicti domini regis coram ipso rege apud
  Westmonasterium prædictum in dicto comitatu Middlesexiæ debito
  modo per sacramentum duodecim juratorum patriæ pro alta proditione
  prædicta convictus fuit et postea attinctus posteaque tractus
  suspensus et exartuatus fuit. Et quod quidam Henricus Nevill de
  Medborne in Comitatu Leicestriæ generosus alias dictus Henricus
  Payne de Medborne prædicta in dicto comitatu Leicestriæ generosus
  præmissa prædicta bene sciens sed existens homo pernitiosus et
  seditiosus et machinans et malitiose intendens prædicta crimen et
  offensam altæ proditionis minuere necnon veredictum et judicium
  prædicta versus præfatum Edwardum Coleman pro prædicta alta
  proditione ut præfertur legittimo modo obtenta habita et reddita in
  odium et vilipendium cum omnibus ligeis et subditis dicti domini
  regis inducere et inferre ac ad prædictum Edwardum Coleman qui
  pro proditione prædicta per ipsum ut præfertur commissa in forma
  prædicta rite et juste punitus fuit gloriosissimum Dei martyrem
  per pravos et superstitiosos homines Romanæ Religionis infra hoc
  regnum Angliæ reputandum et colendum procurare et causare decimo
  die Januarii anno regni domini Caroli Secundi nunc Regis Angliæ
  &c. tricesimo apud parochiam Sanctæ Margarettæ Westmonasterii in
  comitatu Middlesexiæ falso illicite injuste nequiter malitiose
  scandalose et seditiose fecit composuit et scripsit et fieri
  componi et scribi causavit quoddam falsum malitiosum scandalosum
  libellosum et seditiosum libellum intitulatum _To the Glorious
  Martyr E. C._ per quas duas literas E. C. prædictus Henricus
  inuit et intelligi designavit præfatum Edwardum Coleman qui pro
  alta proditione ut præfertur legittimo modo convictus attinctus
  posteaque tractus suspensus et exartuatus fuit cujus quidem falsi
  malitiosi scandalosi libellosi et seditiosi libelli tenor sequitur.


  _"To the Glorious Martyr E. C._

    "_Haile Glorious soul! to whome the Crown is given;
    "All hail thou mighty Favourite of Heaven!
    "Triumphant Martyr from that endless Throne
    "Where Thou must Raigne with Christ, disturb'd by none,
    "Looke down a while, and view upon his Knee
    "An undeserved Friend to Truth and Thee.
    "Pardon that boasted Title, since that Love
    "Which gave it here, must needs confirm't above:
    "For 'twas a flaming Charity, which sure
    "Since boundless here must endless there endure.
    "But ah, alasse great Saint, I owne with Shame,
    "That ill, I then, worse now, deserve the Name;
    "Whilst here on Earth, my troubles kept me still,
    "From Friendship's Laws, as now my Senses will;
    "But what you pardon'd once on Fortune's score,
    "Be pleas'd on Patience now to pity more;
    "And for that good which you did here designe,
    "Without Reward or least Desert of mine,
    "Obtain me now from Our Great Lord and Thine;
    "Not that I hope to equall you in Place,
    "Tho' I could wish it with the like Disgrace;
    "I only hope to view that holy Ring,
    "Where Crowned Saints doe Hallelujahs sing.
    "Prepare mee some low Place in that bright Quire,
    "Where tho' I may not Sing I may admire._

  "Et ulterius idem attornatus dicti domini regis nunc generalis
  pro eodem domino rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod
  Henricus Nevill alias dictus Henricus Payne postea scilicet dicto
  decimo die Januarii anno regni dicti domini regis nunc tricesimo
  supradicto apud parochiam Sanctæ Margarettæ Westmonasterii
  prædictum in dicto comitatu Middlesexiæ sciens prædictam falsum
  fictum malitiosum scandalosum libellosum et seditiosum libellum
  fore falsum malitiosum scandalosum et seditiosum libellum adtunc
  et ibidem falso illicite injuste nequiter malitiose scandalose et
  seditiose diversis ligeis subditis dicti domini regis publicavit
  et publicari causavit in contemptum legum hujus regni Angliæ
  manifestum In malum et pernitiosissimum exemplum omnium aliorum in
  tali casu delinquentium ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc
  coronam et dignitatem suas &c."[193]

  A manuscript copy of these verses is preserved in the British
  Museum Library, written on the back of a printed paper, entitled
  "The answer of Coleman's Ghost to H. N.'s Poetick Offering." Nevill
  is there called a Priest, but in the preceding information he is
  merely styled "Gentleman."


230.

An account of the growth of popery and arbitrary Government in
England; more particularly from the long prorogation of November,
1675, ending the 15th of February, 1676, till the last meeting of
Parliament the 16th of July, 1677. By Andrew Marvell. Amsterdam. 1677.

  This pamphlet which traces the intrigues of the Court of England
  with that of France, made a great impression on the nation. A
  reward was offered in the Gazette for the discovery of the author.


231.

A seasonable argument to persuade all the Grand juries in England,
to petition for a New Parliament; Or, a List of the Principal
Labourers in the Great Design of Popery and Arbitrary Power, who have
betrayed their Country to the Conspirators, and bargained with them
to maintain a standing army in England, under the Command of the
Bigotted Popish Duke; who, by the assistance of the Lord Lauderdale's
Scotch Army, the Forces in Ireland, and those in France, hopes to
bring all back to Rome. By Andrew Marvell. Amsterdam. 1677.

  A reward was offered by Proclamation to such as would discover
  the author of this book. It is printed at length in Marvell's
  Works (ed. Thompson, 1776, Vol. 2, p. 555), also in Cobbett's
  Parliamentary History, Vol. 4, Appendix, p. xxii.


232.

To all the Royalists that suffered for His Majesty: and to all the
rest of the good people of England, the Humble Apologie of the
English Catholicks.

  On November 28th, 1666, an order in Council was made for the
  Secretaries of State to cause the suppression of this "scandalous
  pamphlet," and to make strict enquiry after the author and
  printer.[194]

  The following are copies of informations and other documents
  preserved among the Domestic State Papers concerning the
  publication of this book. It appears to have been written by Lord
  Castlemaine. A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.

  "An account concerning the English Catholics Apology.

  "December 5th, 1666.

  "_Elizabeth Bud_ (a Hawker) sayes That _John Brereton_ (a Hawker)
  was the onely disposer of it; but shee knowes not perfectly his
  lodging.

  "One _Radcliffe_ (a Hawker) sayes as much and directed to his
  lodging.

  "_John Brereton_ sayes that hee had 200 coppyes on Munday last was
  sevenight from Two Gentlemen at the Bell and 3 Cranes-Tavern by the
  Savoy in a Room one pair of Staires next the street, but denyes to
  know the Persons, yet confesses to have seen one of them severall
  times since.

  "Hee sayes further that Hee was brought to them by One Fox (a
  Hawker) and disposed of the coppyes as follows:--

  "Two Quire to Anne Brache at the Parlt Stairs Foot.
  "One Quire to One Miller at Westminst^r-Hall door.
  "A Dozen to One Michel in Westminst^r-Hall.
  "The Residue Hee sold in the streets.

  "The Examinate further sayes, That on Tuesday (the day following)
  Hee had 100 more of a Gentleman in a house by Charing-Cross which
  Gentleman hee hath since seen and knows again upon sight.

  "Brache }
   Miller } acknowledge according to Brereton's confession.
   Michel }

  "_Francis Fox_ (a Hawker) sayes, That on Munday Nov: 26th a Porter
  called him to the Bell and 3 Cranes-Tavern in the Strand to Two
  Gentlemen, who sayd, They had a Parcell of Bookes to be disposed
  of. The Examinate demanded, what they were. They replyed, That
  they were _A Vindicacion of the Catholics that had suffer'd in his
  Majesty's Service_. The Examinate told them that Hee durst not
  meddle with them and soe went his way. After which acquainting
  Brereton with the business, Zwounds, sayes Brereton, why did you
  not take them? shew them me and I'l take them. Soe They went
  together and in Fox his presence, Brereton receaved 200 Bookes, as
  the Gentlemen sayd that delivered them in the Chamber one pair of
  stairs towards the Street.

  "_William Galhampton_ (Drawer in the Bell and 3 Cranes-Tavern)
  sayes, That Mathias Gateley in Company with another Gentleman came
  thither, upon a Munday Morning and tooke up a Chamber one pair of
  Stairs toward the Street, and that they were the first Company that
  came into that Room.

  "And Hee further sayes That M^r Gateley coming into the House,
  demanded if the news-bookes were out and that soon after This
  Examinate saw Fox and Brereton goe into M^r Gateley's Chamber and
  That Hee saw there upon the Table a large Deal-box; and that M^r
  Gateley called to the Drawer for a Hammer. Hee sayes moreover, that
  M^r Gateley and his Friend went out about 12 of the Clock, leaving
  a Waterman in the Chamber to looke to some Luggage and that M^r
  Gateley enquired of this Examinate for a backway to the Water-side.

  "_John Joyce_ (a Drawer in the Tavern above said) sayes That M^r
  Gateley with another Gentleman came upon Munday was sevenight
  in the morning into that House and took up the Chamber one pair
  of Stairs towards the Street, and kept it for themselves and a
  Waterman which They had to looke to some Goods from morning till 7
  at night: about which hour This Examinate sayes that Hee lighted
  M^r Gateley a backway to the Water-side: a Waterman carrying his
  Luggage. This Examinate sayes also that Hee saw Brereton (a Hawker)
  goe into M^r Gateley's Chamber in the morning.

  "_Mrs. Layton_ (Mistress of the s^d Tavern) sayes that M^r Gateley
  was there in the morning upon that day, when a Water-man was left
  in charge of some Goods in his Chamber and that Hee was in the
  Room, up One pair of Stairs next the street.

  "_Mathias Gateley_ sayes that Hee came not into that Tavern till
  about 4 of the Clock afternoon: but acknowledges that there he
  was and in the Chamber toward the Street in Company with one M^r
  Billingsley.

  "Hee denyes the having any Box upon the Table; The calling for a
  Hammer; The having seen any of the Hawkers there; And upon the
  whole matter, The having had anything to doe with the Catholicks
  Apology.

  "The Mistress of the Tavern, Two Drawers, and the Two Hawkers doe
  all agree upon the same person."

  (Indorsed).
  Dec. 66.
       M^r Lestranges
       report of his enquiry
       after the Ro. Cath.
       Apology.


       *       *       *       *       *

  "The Examination of [    ] Gately taken before [    ]

  "Sayth

  "That he was not at the Bell Taverne on Monday Fortnight in the
  morning.

  "That Friday month M^r Billingsley invited him to that Taverne, he
  being ready to goe to Roehampton to the E. of Aylesbury whom he
  serves, He had certaine Bundles of Cloathes, &c. which he called a
  Waterman to carry for him, denying to have been there on Monday.

  "That he was there only once in a morning, but went not up Staires,
  and that was Friday fortnight.

  "That on the day in question (Monday fortnight), He dranke his
  morning's draught with the page in a woman's house in St. John's
  Close about 10 where he parted not till about 11, then he dressed
  himselfe at home and dined at home, after that desiring leave to
  goe abroad 2 or 3 houres, in the afternoone he mett M^r Billingsley
  towards Charing Crosse, with whom he dranke 2 glasses of wine at
  the King's head Taverne at Charing Crosse. Then to Billingsley's
  House who showed him the Cath^{cke} Apology.

  "That a Porter came and enquired for him by his name when he was
  drinking his morning's draught from Gately and company. He came
  and found the Gentlemen in a foreroome and under the Table was
  a parcell of Bookes, which they called to him to sell, which he
  declined, and so left them, and having told A. B. another Hawker
  of Books, they both went up together and A. B. tooke 200 of them
  to sell, and relieves Gately from all Relacions and understands to
  have been one of the two.

  "He demanded no money for the coppyes, but gave them freely. That
  those 200 were all he then saw."

       *       *       *       *       *

  "To the Right Hono^{ble} the Lord Arlington,

  "The humble Peticion of Mathias Gateley now a Servant to
  the Earle of Alisbury

  "Sheweth

  "That whereas your Peticioner was comitted by your Lordshipp's
  Order into custody for the Distributing of the Bookes called the
  _Apologie of the English Catholiques_, although your Peticioner is
  innocent of any such fact comitted by him.

  "That in regard your Peticioner is still in custody, and thereby at
  a great charge, and for that hee maketh no question but to cleere
  himselfe of the said Accusation.

      "Your Peticioner therefore humbly praies your Lordshipp
      to graunt him Liberty upon Baile whereby he
      may bee in a capacity to bring his witnesses togeather
      for the cleereing of himselfe; And to that end your
      Lordshipp wil be alsoe pleased to appoint a speedy
      Day for hearing.

      "And your Peticioner shall pray.
      "&c."

       *       *       *       *       *

  December 20th, 1666.

  "The Examin^n of Thomas
  Osborn, of Westminster.

  "The Examinant saith

  "he thinkes it to bee near a monith agoe since he was at the
  Printer's house: (whose name is Milborne) with my Lord Castlemain
  on the Saturday he went up Staires and at my Ld. Castlemain's
  intreaty helped him to compare a written Paper with one halfe
  printed which hee supposes was the Roman Catholiqs Apology, but
  never read the whole piece.

  "Q.--What part hee had in the dispersing of them.

  "Sayes, hee had none but saw severall copies of them afterwards in
  My Lord Castlemain's hands.

  "Asked who was the Authour.

  "Sayes he supposes my Lord Castlemain the Authour and hee thinkes
  hee heard him say soe. Sayes moreover the written copy was in My
  Lord Castlemain's hand.

  "If he knowes who dispersed them.

  "Supposes dispersed by his Lordshipp's order for hee heard him say
  soe and saw him deliver some of them.

  "Askt if hee bee a Roman Catholique.

  "Sayes, Noe."

       *       *       *       *       *

  "The Examination of Tho: Milburn and his Wife.

  "These Examinates agree upon the sight of M^r Tho: Osborn that
  Hee is the Person who came in company with Another Gentleman
  low of Stature and appearing to be a Person of Quality to the
  Printing-house and that the lesser of the Two went up stairs
  leaving M^r Osborn below.

  "Milburn's wife sayes, that M^r Osborn stayd in the Room where
  shee was, while the other was above. That at last offering to goe
  up, The little Gentleman sayd to him Cozen, stay below, I'l come
  to you. That M^r Osborn spake nothing to her of anything to print;
  And that the Other coming down, They went away together. Shee says
  further, that they came a Second Time, upon a Saturday morning;
  and a third time in the Afternoon; at which time they stayd 3 or
  4 houres and as she believes for a Proof. And being demanded who
  managed the business, shee sayes, that the little Gentleman seem'd
  to her to doe all, and that the Other appear'd to her, onely to
  come for company.

  "Thomas Milburn sayes, That the little Gentleman appear'd first to
  him with One Scroop (or Pugh) in his company at the Crown Tavern in
  Smythfield, and the 2^{nd} time with the same Person at the Star
  in Holborn. He sayes further, That afterward the little Gentleman
  came to his house with M^r Osborn. And that the little Gentleman
  gave him the coppy of the English Catholics Apology; Order'd the
  printing of it and pay'd for the Impression, and that M^r Osborn
  sayd nothing to him concerning the business, onely, at last, this
  Examinate saw them reading over the Proof together. But who was the
  Author of it, Hee knowes not."


233.

Sighs for the Pitchers: breathed out in a personal Contribution
to the National Humiliation the last of May, 1666, in the cities
of London and Westminster, upon the near approaching engagement
then expected between the English and Dutch Navies. Wherewith are
Complicated such musings as were occasioned by a Report of their
actual engagement; and by observing the Publike Rejoycing whilst this
was preparing by the Author, George Wither. Imprinted in the sad year
expressed in this seasonable Chronogram.

  LorD haVe MerCIe Vpon Vs.
         MDCLXVI.

  On July 23rd, 1666, a warrant was issued by the Secretary of State
  to Lewis Dormay to apprehend George Wither, Henry Eversden, Sarah
  Anderton, Elizabeth Goslin, and Margaret Hicks for dispersing this
  "seditious pamphlet."[195] A copy of it is preserved in the British
  Museum Library.


234.

Nehushtan: or, a sober and peaceable discourse concerning the
abolishing of things abused to Superstition and Idolatry; which may
serve as one intire, and sufficient argument to evince that the
Liturgy, Ceremonies, and other things used at this Day in the Church
of England ought neither to be imposed, nor retained, but utterly
extirpated and laid aside: and to vindicate the Nonconformists in
their refusal to close with them. London. 1668.

  This book was written by John Wilson, a Nonconformist, of Chester.
  Elizabeth Calvert was imprisoned for helping the author to print
  it, as appears from a petition presented by her to the Secretary
  of State wherein she states that she was wholly ignorant of the
  sedition contained therein, and she promised never to be concerned
  in such books for the future.[196]


235.

An appeal from the Country to the City for the preservation of his
Majestie's Person, Liberty, Property, and the Protestant Religion.
London. 1679.

  This book was published by Benjamin Harris, Bookseller of Cornhill,
  and for so doing he was tried at the Guildhall, London, in 1680,
  and found guilty. He afterwards received sentence in the Court of
  King's Bench to pay a fine of £500; to stand on the Pillory an
  hour, and find sureties for his good behaviour for three years; and
  had it not been for Mr. Justice Pemberton, the Chief Justice would
  have added that he should be publicly whipped.[197] On December 21,
  1680, the House of Commons ordered an address for the remission
  of this fine to be presented to the King. The indictment is as
  follows:--

  London. Memorandum quod Creswell Levins miles attornatus domini
  regis nunc generalis qui pro eodem domino rege in hac parte
  sequitur in propria persona sua venit hic in curia dicti domini
  regis coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium die Jovis proxima post
  tres septimanas Sancti Michaelis isto eodem termino et pro eodem
  domino rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod Benjaminus
  Harris de parochia Sancti Michaelis Cornehill London Bookeseller
  machinans et malitiose intendens dominum nostrum Carolum Secundum
  nunc regem Angliæ &c. et gubernationem suam hujus regni Angliæ
  scandalizare et in contemptum ducere vicesimo secundo die Octobris
  anno regni dicti domini regis nunc Angliæ &c. tricesimo primo apud
  parochiam Sancti Michaelis Cornehill London prædictam quoddam
  scandalosum et seditiosum librum intitulatum _An Appeal from the
  Country to the City for the preservation of his Majestie's Person,
  Liberty, Property, and the Protestant Religion_ publicavit et
  venditioni exposuit in quoquidem libro inter alia continetur prout
  sequitur in hæc verba _We in the Country have done our parts, in
  choosing for the generality good members to serve in Parliament;
  but if (as our two last Parliaments were) they must be dissolv'd
  or prorogu'd, when ever they come to redress the Grievances of
  the Subject, we may be pitied, but not blam'd. If the Plot takes
  effect, (as in all probability it will) our Parliaments are not
  then to be condemn'd, for that their not being suffer'd to sit
  occasion'd it._ in magnum scandalum et contemptum dicti domini
  regis et gubernationis suæ hujus regni Angliæ in malum exemplum
  omnium aliorum in tali casu delinquentium ac contra pacem dicti
  domini regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c.

  A copy of this book is in the Editor's possession. It is in small
  quarto, and contains twenty-nine pages, but is without printer's
  name. Although printed anonymously, it is known to be the production
  of Charles Blount, and was reprinted in the year 1695, with other of
  his writings in a little volume entitled "The Miscellaneous Works
  of Charles Blount, Esq." The Editor of this collection was Charles
  Gildon, who ushers it into the world by a preface in defence of
  self-murder, Blount, having, as it appears destroyed himself. This
  unhappy man was son of Sir Henry Blount.


236.

A Letter from a person of quality to his friend in the Country,
giving an account of the debates and resolutions in the House of
Lords, in April and May, 1675, concerning a Bill entitled "A Bill to
prevent the dangers which may arise from persons disaffected to the
government." By John Locke.

  It was ordered by the Privy Council to be burnt. "Our author" say
  the Editors of the Biographia Britannica "drew up this letter at
  the desire of the Earl of Shaftesbury, and under his Lordship's
  inspection, only committing to writing what the Earl did in a
  manner dictate to him; and this indeed is evident with regard to
  that part which contains remarks upon the characters and conduct
  of several of the nobility, since these could be known only to
  his Lordship." It is printed at length in Cobbett's Parliamentary
  History, Vol. 4, Appendix, No. V.


237.

The Grand question Concerning the Judicature of the House of Peers
stated and argued. And the case of Thomas Skinner, Merchant,
Complaining of the East India Company, with the Proceedings
thereupon, which gave occasion to that question, faithfully related.
By a true well wisher to the Peace and good government of the
Kingdom, and to the Dignity and Authority of Parliaments. London.
1669.

  On October 22nd, 1669, Richard Chiswell, Bookseller, was sent for
  by the House of Commons to give an account of the printing and
  publishing of this book, and upon examination he confessed that he
  caused the book to be printed, and that he had no formal licence
  for it, but it was sent to him by a Privy Councillor, the Lord
  Hollis, with direction and order to print it, and that he had no
  hire or reward in money, but only the benefit of the copy for doing
  it. It was then ordered that the Attorney General should draw up
  an indictment in the King's Bench against Chiswell for his offence
  in causing the book to be printed and published without licence.
  The House being afterwards informed that the said book was printed
  by one John Darby, a printer, it was ordered that Darby should be
  summoned to attend the House to give an account of his printing the
  book.[198] A copy of the book is preserved in the British Museum
  Library.


238.

Speech of the Lord Cavendish. 1679.

  On April 25th, 1679, the House of Commons ordered that enquiry
  should be made as to the authors and publishers of this "false and
  scandalous pamphlet."[199]


239.

Sir Francis Winnington's speech. 1679.

  On April 1st, 1679, the House of Commons ordered that a Committee
  should be appointed to enquire as to the authors and publishers of
  this "false and scandalous pamphlet."[200]


240.

Two letters from Mr. Mountagu, to the Lord Treasurer; one of the
eleventh, the other of the eighteenth of January, 1677/8, which were
read in the House of Commons. Together with the Lord Treasurer's
speech in the House of Peers, upon an impeachment of High treason,
&c., brought up against his Lordship by the House of Commons,
December 23, 1678. London. 1679.

  For the condemnation of this book see next article. A copy exists
  in the British Museum Library. It is in quarto and contains 15
  pages.


241.

A Letter from a Jesuit in Paris to his correspondent in London
showing the most effectual way to ruin the government and the
Protestant Religion. 1679.

  On March 21st, 1678/9, it was ordered by the House of Commons that
  Jonathan Edwyn, living at the Three Roses, in Redcross Street, be
  immediately sent for to give the House an account by what authority
  he published this and the preceding pamphlet. The next day, on Mr.
  Hills being called in, he informed the House that he printed them
  by order of the Lord Treasurer; and a Committee was appointed to
  consider of these two pamphlets, and to report their opinions to
  the House. On the 26th, the House was informed that Doctor John
  Nelson was the author of the Letter from a Jesuit in Paris; he was
  therefore ordered to be sent for.[201]


242.

The long Parliament dissolved.

  For publishing this book, one J. Brown was brought to trial, and
  sentenced to pay a fine of 1000 marks, bound to good behaviour for
  seven years, and his name struck out of the roll of attorneys,
  without any offence alleged in his said vocation. Not being able
  to pay this fine, he lay in prison for three years till he was
  pardoned and restored to his place of attorney by royal warrant
  dated 15th December, 1679. The information does not appear to be
  entered on the Judgment Rolls, but Howell[202] extracts from the
  book the following words upon which the prosecution was founded:--

  _Nor let any man think it strange, that we account it treason
  for you to sit and act contrary to our laws; for if in the first
  parliament of Richard II, Grimes and Weston, for lack of courage
  only were adjudged guilty of high treason for surrendering the
  places committed to their trust; how much more you, if you turn
  renegadoes to the people that entrusted you, and as much as in you
  lie surrender not a little pitiful castle or two, but all the legal
  defence the people of England have for their lives, liberties, and
  properties at once! Neither let the vain persuasion delude you,
  that no precedent can be found, that one English Parliament hath
  hanged up another; though peradventure even that may be proved a
  mistake; for an unprecedented crime calls for an unprecedented
  punishment; and if you shall be so wicked to do the one, or rather
  endeavour to do, (for now you are no longer a parliament) what
  ground of confidence you can have that none will be found so worthy
  to do the other, we cannot understand: and do faithfully promise
  if your unworthines provoke us to it, that we will use our honest
  and utmost endeavours (whenever a new parliament shall be called)
  to chuse such as may convince you of your mistake: The old and
  infallible observation, That Parliaments are the Pulse of the
  People, shall lose its esteem; or you will find, that this your
  presumption was over-fond; however, it argues but a bad mind to
  sin, because it is believed it shall not be punished._


243.

The Compendium; or, a short view of the late Tryals, in relation
to the present plot against his Majesty and Government: with the
speeches of those that have been executed. As also an humble address
(at the close) to all the worthy Patriots of this once Flourishing
and happy Kingdom. London. 1679.

  For publishing this book an information was filed by the Attorney
  General against Matthew Turner, a Stationer, of the parish of St.
  Andrew, Holborn. Turner was tried in the summer of 1680, and was
  sentenced to pay a fine of 100 marks.[203]

  The information is as follows:--[204]

  Middlesexia. Memorandum quod Samuelis Astry Armiger, Coronator
  et Attornatus domini regis, in curia ipsius regis coram ipso
  rege qui pro eodem domino rege in hac parte sequitur in propria
  persona sua venit hic in curia dicti domini regis coram ipso
  rege apud Westmonasterium die Sabbati proximo post Crastinum
  Purificationis Beatæ Mariæ Virginis isto eodem Termino, et pro
  eodem domino rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari, quod cum
  quidam Edwardus Coleman et diversi alii proditores pro diversis
  separalibus proditionibus per debitam legis formam super
  testimonium diversorum credibilium testium convicti et attincti
  fuerunt, quidam tamen Matheus Turner de parochia Sancti Andreæ
  Holborne in Comitatu Middlesexiæ, Stationer, machinans et malitiose
  intendens gubernationem domini regis nunc hujus regni sui Angliæ
  et administrationem justitiæ in eodem regno et testes productos
  ex parte domini regis super triationem proditorum prædictorum
  scandalizare, et in odium et contemptum ducere, vicesimo primo
  die Januarii anno regni domini nostri Caroli Secundi, Dei gratia
  Angliæ, Scotiæ, Franciæ, et Hiberniæ Regis, Fidei Defensoris &c.,
  tricesimo primo, apud parochiam Sancti Andreæ Holborne prædictam
  in comitatu prædicto, quoddam falsum, scandalosum, seditiosum et
  malitiosum librum, intitulatum _The Compendium, or a short view
  of the late Trialls in relation to the present plott against his
  Majestie and Government with the speeches of those that have beene
  executed, as alsoe an humble addresse at the close to all the
  worthie patriots of this once flourishing and happy Kingdome._
  malitiose et seditiose publicavit et venditioni exposuit; in
  quoquidem libro continetur relatio evidentiarum datarum super
  triationem proditorum prædictorum, et post talem relationem in
  eodem libro inter alia continetur prout sequitur _An humble address
  to all worthy patriots, of what Rank soever they be. Having (my
  Lords and Gentlemen) given you this exact and short account of the
  late Judicial Proceedings; for when should I have ended, had I not
  (in spight of the continual follies that occurr'd) forc'd my self
  to Bounds? I say, having given you this short account, I know not
  whether you are now more surpris'd (for surpris'd I am sure you
  are) at the strange Incoherencies, nay, Impossibilities, in the
  charge all along, or at the mighty weight of the defence, though
  the accusers themselves had bin men of repute and probity. For,
  after a sober and close consideration (to which nothing can more
  conduce than an Abstract, or Compendium) what have they lay'd at
  the dores of Catholicks, that, by its monstrous and disagreeing
  parts, shows not it self to be wholly vain and chimerical?_ Et
  in alio loco ejusdem libri continetur prout sequitur, _There
  is not one Witness against us, who has not either bin a most
  Profligated Wretch, by the unanimous Consent of all that knew him,
  or given at least Prognosticks by his Poverty or Temper, that
  the first Opportunity would infallibly make him so._ In magnum
  vilipendium scandalum et contemptum testium dicti domini regis
  versus proditores prædictos in contemptum dicti domini regis et
  gubernationis suæ ac legum suarum, in malum exemplum omnium
  aliorum in tali casu delinquentium, ac contra pacem dicti domini
  regis nunc, coronam et dignitatem suas &c.


244.

The Weekly Packet of Advice from Rome, or the History of Popery.
August 1, 1679.

  For publishing this periodical Henry Carr was tried at the
  Guildhall, London, in 1680, and found guilty.

  The following is a copy of the information against him:--

  Londonia Scilicet--Memorandum quod Samuelis Astry armiger coronator
  et attornatus domini regis in curia ipsius domini regis coram ipso
  rege qui pro eodem domino rege in hac parte sequitur in propria
  persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti domini regis coram ipso apud
  Westmonasterium die Mercurii proximo post octabas Purificationis
  Beatæ Mariæ Virginis isto eodem termino et pro eodem domino rege
  dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod cum quædam designatio
  anglice _a plott_ proditoriæ conspirationis nuper habita fuit infra
  hoc regnum Angliæ inter diversos falsos proditores hujus regni
  Angliæ ad interficiendum et murdrandum dominum nostrum Carolum
  Secundum supremum dominum suum et gubernationem hujus regni Angliæ
  et sinceram Dei religionem infra hoc regnum Angliæ bene et pie
  stabilitatam subvertere et distruere et Romanam religionem infra
  hoc regnum Angliæ inducere cumque etiam diversi proditores pro alta
  proditione prædicta legittimo modo convicti et attincti fuerunt
  et aliæ personæ pro alta proditione prædicta per debitam legis
  formam triati et acquetati fuerunt quidam tamen Henricus Carre
  de parochia Sancti Sepulchri Londoniæ generosus præmissorum non
  ignarus sed machinans et malitiose intendens gubernationem dicti
  domini regis hujus regni sui Angliæ et administrationem justitiæ
  in eodem regno scandalizare et in odium et contemptum ducere primo
  die Augusti anno regni dicti domini regis nunc tricesimo primo
  apud parochiam Sancti Sepulchri Londoniæ prædictæ quoddam falsum
  scandalosum et malitiosum librum intitulatum _The weekly Pacquet of
  Advice from Rome or the History of Popery_ malitiose et illicite
  imprimi causavit et publicavit in quoquidem libro continetur inter
  alia prout sequitur _There is lately found out by an Experienc'd
  Physician, an Incomparable Medicament called, The Wonder-working
  Plaister, truely Catholick in Operation, somewhat of Kin to the
  Jesuites Powder, but more effectual. The Vertues of it are strange
  and various; it will make Justice deaf as well as blinde, take
  out spots of deepest Treasons more cleverly than Castle-soap does
  common Stains: It alters a man's Constitution in two or three days,
  more than the Virtuosi's Transfusion of Blood in seven years.
  'Tis a great Alexipharmick, and helps Poysons, and those that use
  them. It miraculously exalts and purifies the Eye sight, and makes
  people behold nothing but Innocence in the blackest Malefactors.
  'Tis a mighty Cordial for a declining Cause, and stifles a Plot as
  certainly as the Itch is destroy'd by Butter and Brimstone. In a
  word, it makes Fools wise men, and wise men Fools; and both of them
  Knaves. The colour of this precious Balm is bright and dazling;
  and being applied privately to the Fist in decent manner, and a
  competent Dose, infallibly performs all the said Cures, and many
  others, not fit here to be mentioned._ In magnum contemptum dicti
  domini regis nunc et legum suorum in magnum scandalum gubernationis
  dicti domini regis hujus regni Angliæ et administrationis
  justitiæ in eodem in malum exemplum omnium aliorum in tali casu
  delinquentium ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc coronam et
  dignitatem suas &c.[205]


245.

New year's gift for the Lord Chief Justice Scroggs, being some
remarks on his speech made the first day of Michaelmas, 1679.

  For the publication of this paper a prosecution was instituted
  against Francis Smith, but the result does not appear. The
  following is a copy of the Indictment.

  Londonia. Memorandum quod Samuel Astry armiger coronator et
  attornatus domini regis in curia ipsius regis coram ipso rege,
  qui pro eodem domino rege in hac parte sequitur, in propria
  persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti domini regis coram ipso
  rege apud Westmonasterium, die Veneris proxima post Octabas
  Sancti Hillarii isto eodem termino, et pro eodem domino rege dat
  curiæ hic intelligi et informari, quod Franciscus Smyth, junior,
  de parochia Sancti Stephani Wallbrooke, Londonia, Stationer,
  machinans et malitiose intendens Willielmum Scroggs militem,
  Capitalem Justiciarium domini regis ad placita coram ipso rege
  tenenda assignatum (quantum in eo est) scandalizare, et depravare,
  in hüs quæ officium suum judiciale tangunt et ipsum Capitalem
  Justiciarium in odium et contemptum ducere, sexto die Januarii
  anno regni domini nostri Caroli Secundi Dei gratia Angliæ, Scotiæ,
  Franciæ, et Hiberniæ Regis, Fidei Defensoris &c., tricesimo primo,
  apud parochiam Sancti Michaelis in Cornhill Londonia, quoddam
  falsum scandalosum, malitiosum, et odiosum libellum, intitulatum
  _A New year's guift for the Lord Chief in Justice Scgs beinge some
  remarkes on his speech made the first day of Michaelmas Terme_ 1679
  falso, malitiose, et seditiose publicavit et publicari causavit,
  in quoquidem falso et scandaloso libello (inter alia) continetur
  prout sequitur, in hæc verba, _When I heard his lordshipp_
  (dictum Capitalem Justiciarium innuendo) _after one so greate an
  aduenture of acquitting Sir George Wakeman_ (quendam Georgium
  Wakeman Barronettum, qui pro alta proditione nuper indictatus fuit,
  et superinde per quandam juratam patriæ inter dominum regem et
  præfatum Georgium captam debito modo acquietatus fuit, innuendo)
  _in soe capital a crime as beinge hired and receivinge part of
  the money to poysen his sacred Majesty_ (dominum Carolum Secundum
  nunc Regem Angliæ innuendo) _should make an other adventure of a
  Speech to Justifie it I stood amazed at his confidence, instead
  of admiring his Justice, and was apt to conclude that he vainely
  thought, wee never should have another Session of Parliament, as
  alsoe that his lordshipp forgott, or never read of Empson and
  Dudley_. Et in alio loco ejusdum falsi et scandalosi libelli
  continetur prout sequitur in hæc verba. _He_ (prædictum Capitalem
  Justiciarium innuendo) _sayes moreover that Justice should flow
  like a mighty Streame, we see he_ (prædictum Capitalem Justiciarium
  innuendo) _can speake some truth though hee acte but little, but
  let him tell us whether 10000 guinnyes will it make a mighty Dam
  to stopp this mighty streame, sometimes with some persons in some
  cases_. Et in alio loco ejusdum falsi et scandalosi libelli, (post
  mentionem factam de triatione cujusdam Edwardi Colman pro alta
  proditione) continetur prout sequitur, videlicet, _and if you doe
  but observe his lordshipps carriage in summing upp the evidence
  both at the one triall and the other_ (triationem prædicti Edwardi
  Coleman et triationem prædicti Georgii Wakeman innuendo) _you
  will assuredly find it as different and contrary as white is to
  black, or as the lord chiefe Justice is sometymes, to Sir William
  at others_. In magnum scandalum et contemptum dicti Capitalis
  Justiciarii, et authoritatis suæ depravationem, ad grave dampnum
  dicti Capitalis Justiciarii, in malum et pernitiosum exemplum
  omnium aliorum in tali casu delinquentium, ac contra pacem dicti
  domini regis nunc; coronam et dignitatem suas, &c.[206]

  A copy of this paper is preserved among the Nicholl's Collection of
  Newspapers, at the Bodleian Library, Oxford.


246.

A Satire against In-justice: or, Scroggs upon Scroggs. 1679. A folio
broadside containing 16 three line stanzas.

  Jane Curtis was prosecuted by direction of Chief Justice Scroggs,
  for selling this broadside--"Which his Lordship called a libel
  against him: and her friends tendering sufficient bail, and
  desiring him to have mercy upon her poverty and condition he swore
  by the name of God she should go to prison, and he would show her
  no more mercy than they could expect from a wolf that came to
  devour them; and she might bring her Habeas Corpus, and come out
  so; which she was forced to do; and after informed against and
  prosecuted to her utter ruin, four or five terms after."[207]

  A copy is preserved in the Guildhall Library. The entire production
  is as follows:--

  A
  SATYR
  AGAINST
  IN-JUSTICE:

  OR,

  Sc----gs upon Sc----gs.

    1. A Butcher's Son (Judge) Capital,
      Poor Protestants for to enthral,
        And _England_ to enslave, Sirs.

    2. Lose but our _Laws_ and _Lives_ (we must)
         When to do Justice, we intrust
           So known and errand Knaves, Sirs.

    3. Some hungry Priests he once did fell
         With mighty Stroaks, and them to Hell
           Sent furiously away, Sirs.

    4. Would you know why? The reason's plain;
         They had no English nor French Coyn
           To purchase longer Stay, Sirs.

    5. The Pope, to Purgatory sends
         Who neither Money have (nor Friends;)
          In this he's not alone, Sirs.

    6. Our Judge to Mercy's not inclin'd,
         Unless Gold change Conscience and Mind,
          You are infallibly gone, Sirs.

    7. His Father once exempted was
         Out of all Juries; Why? Because
           He was a man of Blood, Sirs.

    8. And why the Butcherly Son, forsooth,
         Should now be Judge and Jury both
           Can't well be understood, Sirs.

    9. The good old man, with Knife and Knocks,
         Made harmless Sheep and stubborn Ox
           Stoop to him in his fury.

    10. But the Brib'd Son, like greedy Auff,
         Kneels down and worships Golden Calf,
           And so did all the Jury.

    11. Better hadst been at Father's Trade,
         An honest Livelihood t'have made,
           In hampering Bulls with Collers.

    12. Than to thy Country prove unjust;
         First sell, and then betray thy Trust
           For so many hard Rix-dollers.

    13. Priest and Physician thou didst save
         From Gallows, Fire, and the Grave
           For which we can't endure thee.

    14. The one can ne'er absolve thy Sins,
          And th'other, though he now begins,
            Of Knavery ne're can cure thee.

    15. But lest we all should end thy Life,
          And with a keen-whet Chopping-knife,
            In a thousand pieces cleave thee.

    16. Let th' Parliament first him undertake,
          They'll make the Rascal stink at Stake;
            And so like a Knave let's leave thee.

    FINIS.


  The following is a copy of the information against the publisher.

  Londonia. Memorandum quod Creswell Levins miles attornatus domini
  regis nunc generalis qui pro eodem domino rege in hac parte
  sequitur, in propria persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti domini
  regis coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium, die Jovis proxima
  post tres septimanas Sancti Michaelis isto eodem termino, et pro
  eodem domino rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod Jana
  Curtice uxor Langley Curtice de parochia Sancti Martini Ludgate
  Londonia Stationer, machinans et malitiose intendens Willielmum
  Scroggs militem Capitalem Justiciarium domini regis ad placita
  coram ipso rege tenenda assignatum scandalizare et ipsum Capitalem
  Justiciarium in hüs quæ ipsum Capitalem Justiciarium et officium
  suum judicialem tangunt et authoritatem dicti domini regis in
  odium et contemptum ducere, vicesimo die Octobris anno regni
  domini nostri Caroli Secundi, Dei gratia Angliæ Scotiæ Franciæ et
  Hiberniæ Regis Fidei Defensoris &c. tricesimo primo, apud parochiam
  Sancti Martini Ludgate prædictam in Warda de Farringdon extra
  Londoniam, quoddam falsum malitiosum infamosum scandalosum et
  odiosum libellum intitulatum _A Satyr against In-justice: or Sc--gs
  upon Sc--gs._ in manibus suis obtinuit in quoquidem libello (inter
  alia) continetur prout sequitur in hac verba _Some hungry Priests
  he_ (prædictum Capitalem Justiciarium innuendo) _once did fell
  With mighty Stroaks, and them to Hell Sent furiously away, Sirs.
  Would you know why? The reason's plain; They had no English nor
  French Coyn To purchase longer Stay, Sirs. The Pope, to Purgatory
  sends Who neither Money have (nor Friends;) In this he's not alone,
  Sirs. Our Judge_ (prædictum Capitalem Justiciarium innuendo) _to
  Mercy's not inclin'd, Unless Gold change Conscience and Mind,
  You are infallibly gone, Sirs_. Et prædicta Jana Curtice sciens
  libellum prædictum fore scandalosum et infamosum libellum postea
  scilicet dicto vicesimo die Octobris anno supradicto apud Londoniam
  prædictam in parochia et warda prædictis idem libellum publicavit
  et venditioni exposuit in magnum scandalum et vilependium et
  contemptum dicti Capitalis Justiciarii et authoritatis dicti domini
  Regis, in malum exemplum omnium aliorum in tali casu delinquentium
  ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas
  &c.[208]


247.

Some observations upon the late Trials of Sir George Wakeman, Corker,
& Marshal, &c. By Tom Ticklefoot, the Tabourer, late Clerk to Justice
Clodpate. 1679.

  For publishing this book, Edward Berry, Stationer, of Gray's Inn,
  was committed by Chief Justice Scroggs; and though he tendered
  £1000 bail, yet the Chief Justice said he would take no bail; he
  should go to prison, and come out according to law. And after he,
  with much trouble and charge got out by a Habeas Corpus, he was
  forced by himself or his attorney to attend five terms before he
  could be discharged, though no information was exhibited against
  him in all that time.

  Francis Smith was also prosecuted for publishing this book. He was
  tried at the Guildhall, in 1680, and a small fine imposed on him.
  Jane Curtis was also tried for the same offence.[209] The book
  itself is printed at length in Howell's State Trials, Vol. 7, p.
  687.


248.

The Serious Queries against the Conventicle Act, proving it to be
against the laws of God, of Nature, and of Magna Charta. 1680.

  For the publication of this book, Francis Smith was committed into
  the custody of five of the King's messengers, by the Council-board
  to about £50 charge and damage.[210]


249.

The Protestant Domestic Intelligence, or News both from City and
Country. No. 57. Tuesday, January 20, 1679.

  For publishing this newspaper, a prosecution was instituted against
  Benjamin Harris. The information is as follows:--

  Memorandum quod Samuel Astry Armiger Coronator et Attornatus domini
  regis in curia ipsius regis coram ipso rege qui pro eodem domino
  rege in hac parte sequitur in propria persona sua venit hic in
  curiam dicti domini regis coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium
  die veneris post Octabas Sancti Hillarii isto eodem termino,
  et pro eodem domino rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari
  quod cum Willielmus Scroggs miles vicesimo die Januarii anno
  regni dicti domini regis nunc tricesimo primo, et diu antea et
  continue abinde huc usque fuit et adhuc est Capitalis Justiciarius
  domini regis ad placita coram ipso rege tenenda assignatus et
  officium illud capitalis Justiciarii bene et fideliter exercuit
  absque aliqua oppressione injuria sive malegestura quidam tamen
  Benjaminus Harris de parochia Sancti Michaelis in Cornhill Londonia
  Stationer machinans et malitiose intendens prædictum Willielmum
  Scroggs militem Capitalem Justiciarium domini regis ad placita
  coram ipso rege tenenda assignatum scandalizare ac in odium et
  contemptum ducere prædicto vicesimo die Januarii anno regni
  domini nostri Caroli Secundi Dei gratia Angliæ Scotiæ Franciæ
  et Hiberniæ Regis Fidei Defensoris &c. tricesimo primo, apud
  parochiam Sancti Michaelis Cornhill Londonia prædictam quoddam
  falsum malitiosum scandalosum et odiosum libellum intitulatum
  _The Protestant Domestick Intelligence or News both from City and
  Country. Published to prevent false reports_, falso malitiose et
  scandalose imprimi causavit et publicavit in quo quidem falso
  malitioso et scandaloso libello (inter alia) continetur prout
  sequitur _On Friday last, the 16 instant, Articles of high
  Misdemeanor were offered by way of Complaint to the Kings most
  Excellent Majestie, and the Right Honourable the Lords and others
  of His Majesties most Honorable Privie Council by Dr. Oates and
  Captain William Bedlow, against the Lord Chief Justice Scroggs_,
  (prædictum Capitalem Justiciarium innuendo) _therefore if any
  have been oppressed or injured by the said Lord Chief Justice,
  they will be speedilie Heard, if they in time come in; the Cause
  will its thought be heard the beginning of February_. In magnum
  scandalum ignominium et contemptum dicti Capitalis Justiciarii et
  authoritatis suæ in malum et pernitiosum exemplum omnium aliorum
  in tali casu delinquentium ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc
  coronam et dignitatem suas &c.[211]

  The result of the prosecution does not appear.

  A copy of this newspaper is preserved in the Library of the British
  Museum.


250.

A speech lately made by a noble Peer of the Realm. London. Printed
for F.S. at the Elephant and Castle near the Royal Exchange in
Cornhill. 1681.

  This was published by Francis Smith, the bookseller, and for so
  doing, a prosecution was instituted against him. He was tried and
  convicted, but his sentence does not appear.

  The information is as follows:--

  Memorandum quod Cresswell Levinz miles attornatus Domini Regis
  nunc generalis qui pro eodem domino rege in hac parte sequitur
  in propria persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti domini regis
  coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium die Sabbati proxima post
  crastinum Purificationis Beatæ Mariæ Virginis isto eodem termino
  et pro eodem domino rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari
  quod Franciscus Smith nuper de parochia Sancti Michaelis Cornhill
  Londonia Bibliopola vicesimo quarto die Decembris anno regni domini
  nostri Caroli Secundi nunc Regis Angliæ &c. tricesimo secundo apud
  parochiam prædictam infra civitatem Londoniæ prædictam vi et armis
  &c. falso et malitiose scripsit et publicavit et scribi imprimi et
  publicari causavit quendam fictum falsum seditiosum et scandalosum
  libellum intitulatum _A Speech lately made by a Noble Peere of
  the Realme_ in quo quidem libello continetur hæc falsa ficta et
  scandalosa verba sequentia _My lords 'tis a very hard thing to say
  that we cannot trust the King, and that wee have beene already
  deceived so often that wee see plainely the apprehensions of
  discontent in the people is no argument at Court And though our
  Prince be in himselfe an excellent person that the people have the
  greatest inclinations imaginable to love; yet we must say he is
  such an one as no story affords us a paralell of; howe plaine and
  how many are the profes of the designe to murder him, how little
  is he apprehensive of it._ Et in altera parte ejusdem libelli
  continetur hæc falsa ficta et scandalosa verba sequentia scilicet
  _My lords I here of a bargaine in the house of Commons and an
  addresse made to the King, but this I know and must boldly say it,
  and plainely, that the nation is betrayed if upon any termes we
  part with our money till wee are sure the King is ours, have what
  lawes you will, and what condicions you will they will be of no
  use but wast paper before Easter if the Court have money to set up
  for popery and arbitrary designe in the meane while on the other
  hand give me leave to tell you my lords the King hath no reason to
  distrust his people no man can goe home and say that If the King
  comply with his people they will doe nothing for him but teare all
  up from him we want a government and we want a Prince that we may
  trust even with the spending of half our annuall revenues for some
  time for the preservation of the Kingdome._ In malum et pernitiosum
  exemplum omnium aliorum in tali casu delinquentium ac contra pacem
  dicti domini regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c.[212]

  This speech was never spoken; and was, by order of the Lords, burnt
  by the hands of the hangman. A copy is preserved among the Chetham
  Collection of Broadsides, Manchester, No. 2628; and it is also
  printed in Cobbett's Parliamentary History, Vol. 4, App. No. X.


251.

An Act of Common Councill of the City of London, (made in the first
and second years of the reign of Philip and Mary) for retrenching of
the expenses of the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs, etc. Published, with
additional reasons for putting the said Act in present execution,
and now offered to the consideration of all good Citizens by some
Well-Wishers of the present and future prosperity of the said City.
Presented to my Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs. London: Printed
for F. Smith, at the Elephant and Castle in Cornhill, near the Royal
Exchange. 1680.

  For this book, an indictment was preferred against Francis Smith,
  the publisher, at the Guildhall, London, on September 16, 1680,
  but it was thrown out by the grand jury. The best account of this
  book, and the prosecution thereupon, will be found in a tract
  published by Smith, at the time, and entitled, "An Account of the
  injurious proceedings of Sir George Jeffreys, Knight, late Recorder
  of London, against Francis Smith, Bookseller, with his arbitrary
  carriage towards the grand jury at Guildhall, Sept. 16, 1680,
  upon an indictment exhibited against the said Francis Smith, for
  publishing a pretended libel; entitled, 'An Act of Common Council.'"

  The following is a copy of the indictment against Smith:--

  London, ss. The Jurors for our Lord the King upon their oaths
  present that Francis Smith, late of London, Bookseller, being a
  man seditious and pernicious, plotting and intending the peace
  and common tranquillity of this kingdom to disturb, and discord,
  differences and ill will, amongst the citizens and inhabitants
  of the city of London, to stir up, provoke and procure; also the
  Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs of the City of London, now in being,
  and the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs of the City of London, for
  the time past in great odium, contempt, and base accompt to bring;
  the same Francis Smith, the 17th day of August, in the reign of our
  Sovereign Lord Charles the Second, by the grace of God, of England,
  Scotland, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c. the
  two and thirtieth at London, viz. in the parish of St. Michael
  Cornhill in the ward of Cornhill London, aforesaid, with force
  and arms &c. unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously, scandalously, and
  seditiously printed, and caused to be printed, a certain malicious,
  scandalous, and seditious book, of and concerning the expences of
  the Lord Mayors, Aldermen, and Sheriffs of the City aforesaid, in
  their houses, in the time of their several offices; entituled _An
  Act of Common Council of the City of London, (made in the first
  and second years of the reign of Philip and Mary) for retrenching
  of the expences of the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs &c. Published with
  additional Reasons for putting the said Act in present Execution,
  and now offered to the Consideration of all good Citizens by some
  Well-wishers of the present and future prosperity of the said City.
  Presented to my Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs._ In which
  book by the said Francis Smith then so as aforesaid published,
  printed and caused to be printed, the same Francis Smith then and
  there, viz. the day and year before mentioned, at the parish and
  ward aforesaid, mischievously, unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously,
  scandalously, and seditiously printed, made known openly, and
  published, mischievously, malicious, scandalous, and seditious
  sentences, in these English words following, viz.:--

  _Reader_,

  _As by this Act you may observe, that our Predecessors taking
  notice, that the extravagancies of Mayors and Sheriffs caused (as
  they say) almost all good citizens to flie and refuse the service;
  so to prevent that mischief in the future, they limited them in
  their living to the method directed by this Act. And if when little
  was spent besides the growth of our own Country, Beer and Ale
  being then their drink, they thought it their wisdom to set bounds
  to Luxurious Profuseness, there is much more reason for it now,
  when Debauchery is come to that height, that the fifth part of the
  charge of a Shrievalty is in Wine, the growth of another Country.
  And when Feasts, hardly heard of in former times, are risen to
  that Excess, as would be scandalous to mention, as those called
  the Chequer and Spittle Feasts; the first costing in Wine betwixt
  Seventy and Eighty Pounds; and the latter, after the pretended
  Service of God in hearing a Sermon, costs above Three Hundred
  Pounds to each Sheriff. And though much after this rate is the rest
  of the year spent, yet when the Example of this Act is urged for
  laying aside these sinful Feasts, and reducing the rest unto this
  Pattern, which is a wholsom Law; some who should see to the putting
  it in execution, will not hear of it; and possibly, because they
  would have others be as profuse as themselves have been, though
  there are these Reasons for a Reformation herein._

  And these mischievous, malicious, and seditious sentences, in these
  English words following, viz.:--

  _Because nothing can tend more to the Advancement of any City or
  Country than the having wise and good Magistrates; and that so
  long as the great expence of Shrievalties continue, the City must
  (as this Act suggests) have an Eye to Wealth, more than Parts or
  Vertue, in the choice of their Sheriffs; and that such as their
  Sheriffs are, such will the Court of Aldermen be: and therefore as
  necessary for the good Government of this great City, the charge of
  Shrievalties ought to be reduced to such an Order and Method, as
  may be an Encouragement to Men of more Honesty than Riches to serve
  the Place._

  And these mischievous, malicious, scandalous, and seditious
  sentences, in these English words following, viz.

  _No man hath reason to be expensive in his Shrievalty; because
  though the Court of Aldermen hath a rule for supplying, as any die
  their vacant places out of those that have served Sheriffs, yet
  they make their Election to depend upon the uncertain humour of
  their Court, thereby frustrating when they please all Compensation
  for the Expence and Drudgery of a Shrievalty, as lately appeared
  in their Choice of Sir Simon Lewis, one of their present Sheriffs,
  rejecting Sir Thomas Stamp, who had served the Place several years
  before with good approbation, and was presented to them by the
  Ward he lives in as a deserving Person. And whereas each Ward when
  they want an Alderman, do present two Commoners to the Court, for
  them to chuse one; the Ward of Bassishaw, to the end that Sir
  Thomas might unavoidably be chosen, joyned the younger (and not
  the elder) Sheriff with him, not thinking that an old Sheriff
  would be baulked, to chuse one that had not served his year; and
  yet notwithstanding, the Court by their Prerogative passed by Sir
  Thomas, to the disappointing of the Ward that sent him. And this
  Example is, I suppose a good reason for Sheriffs in the future not
  to spend more in their Shrievalties, than is necessary, when their
  Reward is so uncertain._

  And these mischievous, malicious, scandalous, and seditious
  sentences, in these English words following, viz.

  _Debauchery in this Expence is a Sin before God, and were it known,
  would be a scandal in the sight of Man; as appears in that of Three
  thousand Pounds Expence in all manner of ways, above Five hundred
  Pounds is in Wine; when a Lord, or Gentleman that formerly lived at
  the rate of Ten or Twelve thousand Pounds per annum, did not, as is
  well known (but thirty years ago) spend an hundred Pounds in Wine._

  To the great Scandal and Contempt of our said Lord the King, to the
  great Reproach and Scandal of the Authority of the Mayor, Aldermen,
  and Sheriffs, of the City aforesaid; to the great Disturbance of
  the Peace of our said Lord the King, to the Evil Example of others
  in the like case offending, and against the Peace of the said Lord
  the King, his Crown and Dynasty, &c.

  A copy of this pamphlet is preserved in the Guildhall Library,
  London.


252.

Malice defeated: or a brief relation of the accusation and
deliverance of Elizabeth Cellier, wherein her proceedings, both
before and during her confinement, are particularly related, and the
mystery of the Meal Tub fully discovered. 1680.

  For writing, printing, and publishing this book, Mrs. Elizabeth
  Cellier, was tried at the Old Bailey, in September, 1680, and found
  guilty. She was sentenced to a fine of £1000, and to be imprisoned
  until payment; and also to stand on the pillory three times, the
  first time at the Maypole, in the Strand, the second time in Covent
  Garden, and the third time at Charing Cross; and her books were to
  be burnt by the Common Hangman.

  The indictment against her is as follows:--

  Juratores pro domino rege super sacramentum suum præsentant quod
  Elizabetha Cellier uxor ---- Cellier de parochia Sancti Clementis
  Dacorum in comitatu Middlesexiæ generosi, eadem Elizabetha
  existente religionis papalis, Deum præ oculis suis non habens
  sed instigatione diabolica mota et seducta et falso et malitiose
  machinans et intendens serenissimum Dominum nostrum Carolum
  Secundum Dei gratia Angliæ, Scotiæ, Franciæ et Hiberniæ Regem et
  gubernationem suam hujus regni Angliæ necnon veram religionem
  protestantem infra hoc regnum Angliæ lege stabilitatam, in
  odium, infamiam et contemptum inducere et inferre, et scandalum
  et infamiam imponere super quibusdam personis qui producti
  fuissent testes et testimonium dedissent ex parte dicti domini
  regis contra prædictam Elizabetham Cellier et alias personas de
  alta proditione indictatas primo die Augusti anno regni dicti
  domini regis tricesimo secundo apud prædictam parochiam Sancti
  Clementis Dacorum in Comitatu Middlesexiæ prædicto falso malitiose
  et seditiose scripsit et publicavit et scribi imprimi publicari
  causavit quendam fictum falsum et scandalosum libellum intitulatum
  _Malice defeated: or a brief relation of the accusation and
  deliverance of Elizabeth Cellier, wherein her proceedings both
  before and during her confinement are particularly related, and
  the mystery of the Meal-Tub fully discovered. Together with an
  abstract of her arraignment and tryal, written by herself, for
  the satisfaction of all lovers of undisguized truth._ In quo
  quidem libello continentur hæc falsa ficta et scandalosa verba
  et figuræ sequentia, scilicet. _I hope it will not seem strange
  to any honest and loyal person, of what way or religion soever,
  that I being born and bred up under Protestant Parents, should
  now openly profess myself of another Church._ (Ecclesiam Romanam
  innuendo). _For my education being in those times, when my own
  Parents and Relations, for their constant and faithful affection
  to the King and Royal Family, were Persecuted, the King himself
  Murthered, the Bishops and Church destroy'd, the whole Loyal party
  merely for being so, opprest and ruin'd; And all as was pretended
  by the Authors of these villanies, for their being Papists and
  Idolaters, the constant Character given by them, to the King and
  his friend, to make them odious, they assuming to themselves, only
  the Name of Protestants, making that the Glorious title by which
  they pretended right to all things. These sort of Proceedings, as
  I grew in understanding, produc'd in me more and more Horror of
  the party that committed them, and put me on Inquiry into that
  Religion, to which they pretended the greatest Antipathy, wherein
  I thank God, I found my Innate Loyalty, not only Confirm'd, but
  Incourag'd, and let Callumny say what it will; I never heard from
  any Papist as they call them, Priests nor lay-man, but that they
  and I, and all true Catholicks, owe our lives to the defence
  of our Lawful King, which our Present Soveraign, Charles the
  Second is, whom God long and happily preserve so. These sorts of
  Doctrines agreeing to my Publick Morralls, and no way as ever
  I was taught, contradicting my Private ones, Commending at the
  same time to me, Charity and Devotion, I without any scruple,
  have hitherto followed Glorying to myself to be in Communion with
  those_ (papistas innuendo) _who were the humble Instruments of his
  Majesties happy Preservation, from the fatall Battel at Worcester,
  and whom though poor, no Temptation could invite, to betray him
  to those, who, by a pretended Protestant principle, sought his
  Innocent blood. These truths I hope may satisfy any indifferent
  person in my first Change, nor can they wonder at my continuance
  therein, notwithstanding the Horrid Crimes of Treason and Murther
  laid to the charge of some persons considerable, for their quallity
  and fortunes in that party. For when I reflected who were the
  witnesses, and what unlikely things they deposed, and observ'd,
  that many of the chiefest Sticklers for the Plot, were those, or
  the Sons of those, that acted the principal parts in the last
  Tragedy, which History told me too, had the Prologue of a pretended
  Popish Plot. I say, these things made me doubtful of the whole;
  and the more I search'd for Truth, the more I doubted that the
  old Enemies of the Crown were again at work for its destruction.
  I being fully confirm'd in this, thought it my duty, through all
  sorts of hazards, to relieve the Poor Imprison'd Catholicks, who
  in great numbers were locked up in Gaoles, starving for want of
  bread, and this I did some months before I ever saw the Countess
  of Powis or any of those Honourable persons that were accused, or
  receiving one penny of their mony directly or indirectly, till
  about the latter end of January, (78) the Prisoners increasing very
  much._ Et in alia parte ejusdem libelli (inter alia) continentur
  hæc falsa ficta et scandalosa verba scilicet. _About this time I
  went daily to the prisons to perform those offices of Charity I
  was oblig'd to, And on Thursday, January the 9th, (78) I Din'd in
  Newgate in the Room called the Castle on the Master's side Debtors,
  and about four in the afternoon, I came down into the Lodge with
  five Women, of which three were Protestants, and we all heard
  Terrible Grones and Squeeks which came out of the Dungeon, called
  the Condemned Hole. I asked Harris the Turnkey, what Dole-full cry
  it was, he said, it was a Woman in Labour. I bid him put us into
  the Room to her, and we would help her, but he drove us away very
  rudely, both out of the Lodge, and from the door; we went behind
  the Gate, and there lissened, and soon found that it was the voice
  of a strong man in Torture, and heard, as we thought, between his
  grones, the winding up of some Engine: these cries stop'd the
  passengers under the Gate, and we six went to the Turner's shop
  without the Gate, and stood there amaized with the Horror, and
  dread of what we heard; when one of the officers of the Prison
  came out in great hast, seeming to run from the Noise. One of us
  catcht hold of him, saying, Oh! What are they doing in the Prison?
  Officer. I dare not tell you. Mistres. It's a Man upon the Rack,
  I'le lay my life on't. Officer. It is something like it. Cellier.
  Who is it Prance? Officer. Pray Madam do not ask me, for I dare not
  tell ye, but it is that I am not able to heare any longer: Pray let
  me go, with that he run away toward Holborn as fast as he could.
  We heard these grones perfectly to the end of the Old Bayly, they
  continued till near seven of the Clock, and then a person in the
  habit of a Minister, of middle stature, Gray hair'd, accompanied
  with two other Men, went into the Lodge, the Prisoners were locked
  up, and the outward door of the Lodge also, at which I set a person
  to stand, and observe what she could; and a Prisoner loaded with
  Irons, was brought into the Lodge, and examin'd a long time, and
  the Prisoners that came down as low as they could, heard the person
  Examined with great vehemency, say often, I know nothing of it,
  I'me innocent: he forc'd me to bely myself, What would you have
  me say? Will you murther me because I will not bely myself and
  others? Several other such like expressions they heard spoken as by
  one in great Agony. About four of the clock the next morning, the
  Prisoners that lay in a Place above the hole, heard the same cry
  again two houres, and on Saturday Morning again, and about Eight a
  Clock that morning a person I employ'd to spy out the truth of that
  affair, did see the Turn keys carrying a Bed into the hole, she
  asked whoe it was for, they told her, it was for Prance, who was
  gone Mad, and had tore his bed in pieces. That night the Examiners
  came again, and after an houres Conference Prance was led away to
  the Press-yard: This, and many things of the like nature, made me
  very Inquisitive to know what passed in the Prison. Soon after
  this Francis Corral a Coachman, that had been put into Newgate,
  upon suspicion of carrying away Sir Edmond-Bury-Godfrey's body,
  and lay there 13 weeks and three days in great missery, got out, I
  went to see him, and found him a sad spectacle, having the flesh
  worn away, and great holes in both his legs, by the weight of his
  Irons. And having been chain'd so long double, that he could not
  stand upright; he told me much of his hard and cruel usage, as
  that he had been squeez'd and hasped into a thing like a Trough,
  in a dungeon under ground; which put him to inexpressible torment,
  insomuch that he soonded, and that a Person in the habit of a
  Minister stood by all the time. That a Duke beat him, Pull'd him
  by the Hair, and set his drawn Sword to his breast three times,
  and swore he would run him through; and another great Lord, laid
  down a heap of Gold, and told him it was five hundred Pounds, and
  that he should have it all, and be taken into the aforesaid Duke's
  house, if he would confess what they would have him; and one F. a
  vintner, that lives at the sign of the Half Moon in Ch---- St----
  by whose contrivance he was accused, took him aside, and bid him
  name some person, and say, they Imploy'd him to take up the dead
  body in Somerset-yard, and gave him mony for so doing; that if
  he would do this, both F. and he, should have mony enough. He
  also told me, that he was kept from Thursday till Sunday without
  victualls or drink, having his hands every Night Chain'd behind
  him, and being all this time locked to a staple which was driven
  into the Floor, with a chain not above a yard long, that in this
  great extremity, was forc'd to drink his own water; and that the
  Jaylor beat his wife, because she brought victuals, and prayed
  that he might have it, and threw Milk on the ground, and bid her
  be gone, and not look at him._ Et in altera parte ejusdem libelli
  continentur (inter alia) hæc falsa ficta et scandalosa verba
  sequentia scilicet _My arraignment, which (in confidence of my own
  innocence) I continually prest for. Not but that I knew the danger,
  as to this Life, of encountering the Devil in the worst of his
  Instruments, which are PERJURERS INCOURAGED to that degree as that
  profligated Wretch_ quendam Thomam Dangerfield testem productum ex
  parte domini regis contra prædictam Elizabetham Cellier pro alta
  proditione innuendo _was, and has been since his being exposed
  to the World in his true colours both at mine, and at another's
  Tryal_. Et in altera parte ejusdem libelli continentur hæc falsa
  ficta et scandalosa verba sequentia scilicet _Nor have I since
  received anything towards my losses, or the least civility from any
  of them. Whilst Dangerfield_ (prædictam Thomam Dangerfield iterum
  innuendo) (_when made a Prisoner for apparent Recorded Rogueries_,)
  _was visited by and from Persons of Considerable Quality, with
  great Sums of Gold and Silver, to encourage him in the new
  Villanies he had undertaken, not against Me alone, but Persons in
  whose Safety all good Men (as well Protestants as others) in the
  three kingdoms are concerned._ Et in altera parte ejusdem libelli
  vocati _A Postscript to the impartial reader_ continente hæc falsa
  ficta et scandalosa verba sequentia scilicet _And whensoever his
  Majesty pleases to make it as safe and honourable to speak truth
  as it is apparent it hath been gainful and meritorious to do the
  contrary, there will not want witnesses to testify the truth of
  more than I have written and persons that are above being made the
  hangman's hounds for weekly pensions, or any other considerations
  whatsoever_. In malum et perniciosissimum exemplum omnium aliorum
  in tali casu delinquentium contra pacem dicti domini regis coronam
  et dignitatem suas. By a Treasury warrant, dated May 16th, 1687,
  Mrs. Cellier was discharged from the judgment which had been
  pronounced against her.[213]


253.

The two first books of Philostratus, concerning the life of
Apollonius Tyaneus; written originally in Greek, and now published
in English: together with philological notes upon each chapter; by
Charles Blount. London. 1680. Folio.

  According to Dr. Adam Clarke, "this piece was published with the
  design to invalidate the testimony of the evangelists concerning
  the miracles of our Blessed Lord." A few copies only were dispersed
  before the work was suppressed. Two copies exist in the British
  Museum Library.


254.

A Popish damnable Plot against our Religion and Liberties, fairly
laid open and discovered in the Breviats of Threescore and Four
Letters and Papers of Intelligence past betwixt the Pope, Duke of
York, Cardinal Norfolk, Cardinal Cibo, Cardinal Barbarina, Nuncio
and Internuncio for the Pope in Italy, France, and Flanders, and the
Lord Arundel, Mr. Coleman, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Coune. And also the said
Mr. Coleman, Albany, Sr. German, Lybourn, Sheldon, Throgmorton, and
several others. As they were drawn up by the Secret Committee of
the House of Commons, for the satisfaction of the House of Lords in
the Bill against the Duke of York and expected Tryals of the Lords.
Now published for the vindication of the House of Commons upon the
said Bill, and for satisfaction of all the faithful subjects of His
Majestie's Kingdom, with several animadversions and remarks made upon
the said letters. London. 1680.

  This was a pamphlet containing reflections upon Sir Edward Dering,
  a member of the House of Commons; and on November 15, 1680, upon
  a debate in that House, it was resolved that "all the reflective
  parts upon Sir Edward Dering were false, scandalous and libellous."
  Mr. Yarrington, who was summoned to the bar of the House with
  others, respecting the printing and publishing of this book, stated
  that all the animadversions contained therein were penned by Dr.
  Tonge, and that he received the abstract of the several letters
  therein mentioned, from a Scrivener in Essex Court, in the Temple.
  It was thereupon resolved that Dr. Tonge should have notice to
  attend the House the next day, and that Mr. Yarrington and the
  others concerned in the publication of the pamphlet, should be
  committed to the custody of the Serjeant at Arms for their breach
  of privilege; but they were all in a few days discharged from
  custody, after receiving the censure of the House.[214] A copy of
  this pamphlet is preserved in the British Museum Library. It is in
  folio, and contains 31 pages.


255.

A Dialogue betwixt the Devil and the Ignoramus Doctor.

  A set of verses printed and published by Nathaniel Thomson, a
  printer, living in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West. For this
  publication he was prosecuted. The following is a copy of the
  indictment:--

  Londonia. Juratores pro domino rege super sacramentum suum
  præsentant quod Nathaniel Thomson nuper de parochia Sancti Dunstani
  in Occidente in Warda de Farringdon exti Londoniam prædictam
  Typographus decimo die Octobris anno regni domini nostri Caroli
  Secundi Dei gratia Angliæ Scotiæ Franciæ et Hiberniæ regis Fidei
  Defensoris &c. tricesimo tertio illicite nequiter et malitiose
  machinans et intendens quietum statum et communem pacem et
  tranquillitatem ligeorum et subditorum dicti domini regis infra
  civitatem Londoniæ et alibi infra hoc regnum Angliæ inquietare
  et perturbare, et diversas differentias inter ligeos et subditos
  prædictos excitare movere et procurare, necnon quendam Titum
  Oates clericum unum divulgatorum anglice _discoverers_ et testium
  proditoriæ conspirationis papistarum dictum dominum regem nunc
  ad murdrandum et veram protestantem religionem infra hoc regnum
  Angliæ stabilitatam et professam ad destruendam in maximum odium
  contemptum infamiam et scandalum cum omnibus ligeis et subditis
  dicti domini regis nunc eundem Titum Oates adtunc cognoscentibus
  et tunc imposterum cognoscendis inducere, ac diversas lites et
  differentias inter præfatum Titum Oates ac omnes prædictos ligeos
  et subditos dicti domini regis eidem Tito Oates tunc cognitos
  et cognoscendos excitare movere et procurare, necnon bona nomen
  famam testimonium et reputationem ejusdem Titi Oates pejorare et
  auferre postea scilicet dicto decimo die Octobris anno supradicto
  apud Londoniam videlicet in parochiam et warda prædictis ad
  nefandissimas et malitiosas machinationes et intentiones suas
  prædictas celerius efficienda et exequenda quoddam falsum
  scandalosum et odiosum libellum de et concernentem præfato Tito
  Oates et ad defamationem opprobium et scandalum ejusdem Titi Oates
  intitulatum _A Dialogue betwixt the Devil and the Ignoramus Doctor_
  illicite nequiter et malitiose devisatum compositum et scriptum per
  quosdam homines quorum nomina juratoribus prædictis adhuc ignota
  sunt ipse prædictus Nathaniel Thomson adtunc et ibidem illicite
  nequiter libellose et malitiose impressit et publicavit et imprimi
  et publicari causavit tenor cujusdem libelli sequitur scilicet:--

  _A Dialogue betwixt the Devil and the Ignoramus [Salamanca][215]
  Doctor._

    _Devil._

    _Behold from the Infernal Lake I'm come,
    To fright thy Soul to its Eternal Doom:
    To tell thee, Villain, that thy Reign's expir'd,
    And now be sure thou shalt no longer hir'd
    Be by Me, nor any of the Damn'd,
    To drench in Innocent Blood this mournful Land.
    Hence then begone, and do no more pursue
    Villanies Hell could ne'er act, but by you:
    Now Heaven stops my Power and I thy Hand,
    And now I tell thee, Doctor, Thou art damn'd._

    _Doctor._

    _O Spectre! spare awhile my dreadful Doom!
    Go back and tell the Damn'd, I come, I come;
    Only let me compleat the Ills I've begun,
    Then Heaven farewel, and unto You I come._

    _Devil._

    _The Blood o' th' Innocent aloud does cry,
    Revenge, Revenge, on cursed Dr. Ti----
    No more o' th' Innocent shall bleed, nor die._

    _Doctor._

    _Well, the time's come, the fatal day's at hand,
    That I for ever, ever must be damn'd:
    O curs'd Revenge! what Mischiefs have I done?
    Abjur'd the Father, and blasphem'd the Son.
    The Sacred Spirit of Truth at once have I
    Banish'd; and that my vengeance I might buy,
    I've caus'd the best of Innocents to dye.
    See where their Ghosts appear in purple ray'd,
    Victims, by Perjury above betray'd:
    See how they shake their Heads, and bleed afresh;
    Their wounds gape wide in their new murder'd flesh;
    And these most frightful Visions come, 'cause I
    Th' bloody villanous Murderer stand by.
    'Tis true that I the cruel Murderer am,
    And thousands more by Perjury to trepan.
    I solemnly did vow, and often swear,
    And none t' escape, from the Peasant to the Peer;
    Nay Sacred Prelates, Princes, Queens, and Kings,
    Should have made up my Bloody Offerings.
    Ten thousand more of Innocents had dy'd,
    'Cause I King, Queen, and Duke had Sacrificed:
    Cities and Towns I'd Fir'd, if not withstood,
    And quench'd the flames with Innocent Blood.
    Let me but live in this world three years more,
    This Island then shall swim in Christian gore;
    I'le subvert Governments, and murder Kings,
    Sow discord among friends: I'll do such things
    Shall make the World believe there is not that
    Villanous thing I have not power to act;
    I'le make the World believe (let me but stay)
    That Light is Darkness, and that Night is Day;
    That I the Saviour of the Nation am,
    And that CHRIST was of no avail to man;
    Then I the Sacred Gospels will destroy,
    Swear they'r but fictious Stories, and a Lye,
    Perswade them that the Bible's but a Farce,
    No more to be esteemed than is my A----
    So I'le improve the Art of Perjury,
    That none who are not skill'd in Villany
    Shall live; thus will I fit this Isle for Hell,
    And then adieu the World, and Heaven farewel.
    Thus I a Learned Doctor will commence,
    And by the People be ador'd for Nonsence,
    And with Sedition I their Souls will influence._

    _Devil._

    _Peace thou prophane wretch, hold, villain, hold,
    For now with Heaven and Earth thou art too bold,
    And I must tell thee, another Winter old
    Thou shall not be, thy life and soul are sold:
    When flat on th' Altar Thou thyself didst lay,
    Remember that thou gav'st thy Soul away
    To me; and swor'st for ever thou'dst be mine,
    Might'st thou but compass thy Hellish Design,
    To imbrue thy Hands in Innocent Blood,
    And murder all who had the face of good:
    Devils and Hell thou hast in this outdone,
    By thy damn'd Perjury ith' face oth' Sun.
    Hence then begone to Hell, away, away,
    For in this place thou shalt no longer stay.

    [Spoken by an old Acquaintance.]

    Why how now Doctor, vanish'd fled and gone,
    What none but Monsieur Devil and You alone?
    Are all you Papists come to this damn'd end,
    Thus to be hamper'd and ridden by a Fiend?
    Unpitied ly; blaspheme and groan thy last,
    Belch forth thy unhallow'd Soul, and blast
    Hell itself, with thy unsanctified Breath,
    And groveling ith' shades of Eternal Death,
    I leave thee. Ha, ha, ha, ha, poor Doctor,
    Good Night little good Mr. Devil's Doctor._

  In contemptum dicti domini regis nunc, legumque suarum, ad magnum
  opprobium scandalum defamationem et infamiam præfati Titi Oates,
  in magnam perturbationem pacis dicti domini regis et populi sui
  inquietudinem, in malum exemplum omnium aliorum consimili casu
  delinquentium, ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc coronam et
  dignitatem suas &c.[216]

  The result of the prosecution does not appear.

  I have not been able to meet with a copy of the original verses,
  which, no doubt, would be printed in the form of a broadside; but
  they are reprinted in a little book entitled "A Collection of 86
  Loyal Poems, all of them written upon the two late plots, viz., The
  Horrid Salamanca Plot in 1678, and the present fanatical conspiracy
  in 1683." Collected by N[athaniel] T[hompson.] 1685.


256.

The true Domestic Intelligence, or News both from City and Country.
No. 83, From Friday, April 16, to Tuesday, April 20, 1680.

Ditto----No. 84, From Tuesday, April 20, to Friday, April 23, 1680.

  These periodicals, copies of which are preserved in the British
  Museum Library, were printed and published by Nathaniel Thompson
  and William Badcock, and a prosecution was thereupon instituted
  against them. They were tried and found guilty, and a fine of
  £3 6s. 8d. set on each of them. The following is a copy of the
  information:--

  Memorandum quod Creswell Levinz miles attornatus domini regis
  nunc generalis qui pro eodem domino rege in hac parte sequitur
  in propria persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti domini regis
  coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium, die Mercurii proximo post
  quindenam Paschæ isto eodem termino, et pro eodem domino rege
  dat curiam hic intelligi et informari, quod Nathaniel Thompson
  de parochia Sancti Dunstani in occidente Londoniæ Printer, et
  Willielmus Badcocke de parochia Sanctæ Bridgettæ alias Brides
  Londoniæ Wiredrawer, machinantes et malitiose intendentes agitare
  et procurare seditionem, litem, et discordiam inter diversos
  fideles subditos dicti domini regis nunc infra hoc regnum Angliæ,
  et præcipue inter gubernatores, inhabitantes, et parochianos
  parochiæ Sanctæ Bridgettæ alias Brides Londoniæ, et gubernationem,
  necnon gubernatores ejusdem parochiæ in contemptum, scandalum
  et infamiam cum prædictis parochianis prædictæ parochiæ Sanctæ
  Bridgettæ alias Brides inducere et inferre, decimo sexto die
  Aprilis, anno regni dicti domini regis nunc tricesimo secundo,
  apud parochiam Sancti Dunstani in occidente in warda de Farringdon
  extra Londoniam, quoddam odiosum, scandalosum, et diffamatorium
  libellum, intitulatum The _True Domestic Intelligence or News both
  from City and Country_ causaverunt, et uter eorum causavit imprimi,
  publicari, et dispergi in, per, et trans totam civitatem Londoniæ,
  et diversos alios comitatus et locos infra hoc regnum Angliæ, in
  quoquidem libello (inter alia) continetur quædam falsa, ficta,
  seditiosa, et scandalosa materia prout sequitur in hiis Anglicanis
  verbis, videlicet, _Several persons, Parishioners of St. Bride's,
  London, are going about in that Parish to get Subscriptions for
  destroying the Antient Annual Elective Vestry in that Parish, and
  to set up instead thereof a Rump Vestry for life; wherefore all the
  said Parishioners that are Rumpishly affected, may first consider
  the Act of Parliament, and his Majesties late Proclamation about
  tumultuous and factious Petitions for alteration of established
  Lawes and Customs, which will direct in this case. And note, the
  different effect of the said Vestries is this, That if any person
  of the Annual Elective Vestry do unlawfully, or against the good
  of the Parish, he may be turned out at the next Election, but the
  Rump Vestry are above that Interruption_. Et postea iidem Nathaniel
  et Willielmus ulterius machinantes et malitiose intendentes
  defamare et scandalizare prædictos gubernatores prædictæ parochiæ
  Sanctæ Bridgettæ alias Brides et gubernationem ejusdem parochiæ
  et seminare litem et discordiam inter prædictos gubernatores
  et parochianos ejusdem parochiæ Sanctæ Bridgettæ et eosdem in
  contemptum et ignominiam inferre et ducere postea scilicet
  vicesimo die Aprilis, anno regni dicti domini regis tricesimo
  secundo supradicto, apud parochiam Sancti Dunstani in occidente
  prædictam, in warda de Farringdon extra Londoniam prædicta, quoddam
  alium libellum scandalosum diffamatorium intitulatum _The True
  Domestic Intelligence or News both from City and Country_ similiter
  causaverunt, et quilibet eorum causavit imprimi, publicari, et
  dispergi, in, per, et trans totam civitatem Londoniæ, et diversos
  alios comitatus et locos infra hoc regnum Angliæ, in quoquidem
  libello ultimo mencionato (inter alia) continetur hæc alia falsa,
  ficta, seditiosa, et scandalosa materia, prout sequitur in hiis
  aliis Anglicanis verbis et figuris sequentibus videlicet _The
  great point now depending in St Bride's Parish, London, To advise
  how some persons may spend and waste the parish money and goods
  at pleasure, and how to secure the Officers from giving an honest
  account, and how some may lord it, and keep the rest of the
  parishioners in awe and incline them to give treats to be equally
  and lawfully dealt with. The opinion is summ'd up in short thus,
  That the crafty guilty ones should wheedle in the simple ones,
  about the eighth part of the Parishioners that do pay to the poor,
  and name themselves the majority, and subscribe their names for
  getting 15 or 20 persons composed into a Rump Vestry for life; And
  if 3 or 4 dissenting persons from the Church joyn with the rest
  7 or 800, call them all such; and it will operate effectually,
  as 'tis conceived, or else be sure at the choice of Vestrymen
  to wheedle, wrangle, evade, shuffle, and hector the people, if
  possible, into a belief, that they are not themselves, and that a
  Negative Vote is senseless, and was never used in a free choice,
  but that 10 hands in the affirmative shall carry it against 2 or
  300 that would be of the negative, else at the last shift allow
  onely the majority to be guess'd at without the distinction by Pole
  or Negative Vote with Hands. Note the Authority of St. Bride's
  Annual Elective Vestry is chiefly this, to honestly and prudently
  manage the Parish Moneys, Goods, Lands, and Tenements, and prevent
  the mis-applying, imbezeling, or wasting any of the same. Now,
  whether the antient Annual Elective Vestry, or an innovated
  select Rump Vestry for life, are the fittest for that purpose, it
  is referred to any indifferent honest man to judge._ In magnum
  scandalum et contemptum dicti domini regis, et magnum nocumentum
  ignominiam, litem, et discordiam prædictorum gubernatorum ac
  parochianorum, et inhabitantium parochiæ Sanctæ Bridgettæ, alias
  Bride's, prædictæ, in malum exemplum omnium aliorum in tali casu
  delinquentium, et contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc, coronam et
  dignitatem suas.[217]


257.

Directions to a Painter. 1680.

  On February 20th, 1680, a Warrant was issued by His Majesty in
  Council, to the Stationers' Company, for the seizing of this
  "scandalous and dangerous pamphlet," which was accordingly done,
  and about 1,200 copies were found, and burnt, by His Majesty's
  Order, at Whitehall-gate.


258.

The Observator in Question and Answer, No. 27, Saturday, June 25,
1681.

  This Periodical, a copy of which is preserved in the British
  Museum Library, was printed and published by Joan Broome, and a
  prosecution was therefore instituted against her. The indictment is
  as follows:--

  Londonia, Juratores pro domino rege super sacramentum suum
  præsentant quod Johanna Broome, nuper de parochia Sancti Gregorii
  in warda de Castlebaynard Londoniæ prædicta vidua, Deum præ oculis
  suis non habens, sed instigatione diabolica mota et seducta, et
  falso, et malitiose machinans et intendens pacem et communem
  tranquillitatem hujus regni Angliæ perturbare, ac diversas
  dissensiones et differentias inter diversos ligeos et subditos
  dicti domini regis Religionis Protestantis suscitare et movere
  et proditorie conspirationes Papistarum contra dictum dominum
  regem nunc supprimere, necnon machinans et contrivans discordiam
  inter dictum dominum regem et ligeos et subditos suos infra hoc
  regnum Angliæ suscitare et movere, et dictum dominum regem in
  displicentiam et suspicionem erga Communes hujus regni Angliæ nuper
  in Parliamento assemblatos excitare, vicesimo quinto die Junii
  anno regni domini nostri Caroli Secundi Dei gratia Angliæ, Scotiæ,
  Franciæ, et Hiberniæ regis, Fidei Defensoris &c. In tricesimo
  tertio et diversis aliis diebus et vicibus tunc antea vi et armis,
  &c., apud Londoniam videlicet in parochia et warda prædictis falso,
  nequiter, libellose, et malitiose impressit et publicavit, et
  imprimi et publicari causavit quendam fictum falsum et scandalosum
  libellum de et concernentem præfatos ligeos et subditos, necnon
  Communes hujus regni Angliæ nuper in Parliamento assemblatos,
  intitulatum _The Observator in Question and Answer_ devisatum
  scriptum et compositum per quosdam homines juratoribus prædictis
  adhuc ignotos, in quoquidem libello continentur hæc ficta, falsa,
  libellosa, et scandalosa verba sequentia: _Q. Why should not we
  Encounter those addresses now with Petitions? A. I'le dictate a
  petition to ye, If you'le write it; but do it faithfully, then and
  without Interruption; (and upon my Soul) I'le speak the sense of
  the Party as near as I can. Q. I'le be Just to ye: And now begin
  when you will, I'm ready for you. A. Your Majestse's most humble
  and obedient Subjects, having suffer'd many Disappointments,
  by reason both of Short and of Long Parliaments, and the late
  executing of the Law, against Dissenters: The Pretences of Tyranny
  and Popery being grown Stale; the Popish Plot drawn almost to the
  Dregs, and the Eyes of the People so far open'd, that they begin to
  see their Friends from their Enemies; to the Disheartening of All
  True Protestants, and the Encouraging of the sons of the Church,
  We your Majestie's Dissenting Subjects, being thereby brought
  unto so low a state, That without a timely Relief, we the Godly
  People of the Land must Inevitably perish; May it please your
  Majesty to grant the Right of Calling and Dissolving Parliaments,
  Entring into Associations, Leagues and Covenants; The Power of the
  Militia; War and Peace; Life and Death; The Authority of Enacting,
  suspending, and Repealing Laws, to be in your Liege People, the
  Commons of England, And these things being granted, (whereof your
  Petitioners stand in Great need) If your Majesty wants either Men,
  or Moneys for the support of your Royall Dignity and Government,
  your Majesty shall see what we your Loyall Petitioners will do for
  you. Q. What a Rogue are you to make me write such a Petition? A.
  And what a Fool were you to expect others? for all the Rest is Cant
  and Gibbrish, But this is English._ Ad magnam disturbationem pacis
  dicti domini regis, in malum exemplum omnium aliorum in consimili
  casu delinquentium, ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc coronam
  et dignitatem suas &c.[218]

  The result of the prosecution does not appear.


259.

The Impartial Protestant Mercury, April 28, 1681.

  For publishing this periodical a prosecution was instituted against
  Henry Carr. The information is as follows:--

  Memorandum quod Samuel Astry armiger coronator et attornatus domini
  regis in curia ipsius regis coram ipso rege qui pro eodem domino
  rege in hac parte sequitur in propria persona sua venit hic in
  curia dicti domini regis coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium die
  Sabbati proximo post Crastinum Animarum isto eodem termino, et
  pro eodem domino rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod
  Henricus Carr de parochia Sancti Sepulchri Londoniæ generosus
  existens perniciosa persona et machinans et malitiose intendens
  discordiam et scandalum inter dominum regem et populum suum et
  magnates hujus regni Angliæ incitare et movere vicesimo octavo
  die Aprilis anno regni domini nostri Caroli Secundi Dei gratia
  Angliæ, Scotiæ, Franciæ, et Hiberniæ regis, Fidei Defensoris,
  &c., tricesimo tertio apud Londoniam quoddam falsum scandalosum
  et malitiosum libellum intitulatum _The Impartiall Protestant
  Mercury_. In quoquidem libello inter alia continetur prout
  sequitur. _Hicks's Hall, Aprill the twenty seventh. Our Sessions
  for Middlesex began some days since, which 'tis said gave occasion
  to an old drudge at speechmaking most elegantly to exercise his
  talents; wherein (not to baulk the Common theme) the Dissenters
  and Whiggs were thrasht to atoms, and some were so unjust as to
  interpret it an insinuation that their Fines and Forfeitures must
  make up the extraordinary charges of the Government; but since
  'tis notorious that the Papists have generally the better_ [word
  illegible], _and are (at least) as obnoxious as other dissenters,
  others think the party (being an undoubted protestant as far as
  the law requires) intended that the laws should be briskly put in
  execution against them, though possibly he might mistake innocent
  and most useful sheep for Swine that root up the Government_
  publicavit, et publicari causavit, ad incitandum et movendum
  discordiam et scandalum inter dominum regem et populum suum, et
  magnates hujus regni Angliæ manifesta: in malum et perniciosum
  exemplum omnium aliorum in tali casu delinquentium, ac contra pacem
  dicti domini regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c.[219]

  The result of this prosecution does not appear.


260.

English Liberties, or the Freeborn Subject's inheritance. 1682.

  This was published by Henry Carr, for which a prosecution
  was instituted against him. The following is a copy of the
  information:--

  Memorandum quod Samuel Astry Armiger, coronator et attornatus
  domini regis, in curia ipsius regis coram ipso Rege, qui pro eodem
  domino rege in hac parte sequitur in propria persona sua venit hic
  in Curia dicti domini regis coram ipso rege apud Westmonasterium,
  die Martis proximo post crastinum Sancti Martini isto eodem termino
  et pro eodem domino rege dat Curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod
  Henricus Care nuper de parochia Sancti Sepulchri London generosus,
  machinans et malitiose intendens agitare et procurare discordiam
  et scandalum inter dominum regem et populum suum, et magnates
  hujus regni Angliæ incitare, et movere, et gubernationem ejusdem
  domini regis, et administrationem justitiæ in eodem regno stabilitæ
  scandalizare, et in odium et contemptum ducere, decimo septimo
  die Octobris anno regni domini nostri Caroli Secundi, Dei gratia
  Angliæ, Scotiæ, Franciæ, et Hiberniæ, regis Fidei Defensoris, &c.
  tricesimo quarto, vi et armis, &c., apud parochiam prædictam infra
  Civitatem Londoniæ prædictam quoddam falsum, scandalosum, odiosum,
  et malitiosum libellum, intitulatem _English liberties or the
  Freeborne Subjectes Inheritance._ In quoquidam libello inter alia
  continetur prout sequitur. _Some directions concerning the choice
  of members to serve in Parliament, And the Quallifications that
  render a Gentleman fit or unfitt, worthy or undeserving of your
  voices for so great a trust. 1. Avoid all such as hold any office
  of considerable value during pleasure they beeing subject to be
  overawed._ Et in alio loco ejusdem falsi et scandalosi libelli
  continetur prout sequitur. _2. Suspect all those (especially if
  they are men of ill repute) who in their profession are near
  relations have dependency upon the Court._ Et in alio loco ejusdem
  falsi et scandalosi libelli continetur prout sequitur in hæc
  verba. _3. Meddle not with such as have been or are like to prove
  pensioners or receive salaries for secret services_ publicavit,
  et publicari causavit, prout per prædictum falsum scandalosum
  et malitiosum libellum inter alia plenius liquet et apparet. In
  magnum scandalum et contemptum dicti domini regis, et authoritatis
  suæ deprivationem, necnon in contemptum legum et gubernationem
  hujus regni Angliæ, et administrationis justitiæ in eodem regno
  stabilitæ, in malum et pernitiosum exemplum omnium aliorum in tali
  casu delinquentium, ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc coronam
  et dignitatem suas &c.[220]

  The result of the prosecution does not appear.



  PART V.]                       [TO BE CONTINUED.


  INDEX
  EXPURGATORIUS
  ANGLICANUS:

  OR
  A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF THE PRINCIPAL BOOKS
  PRINTED OR PUBLISHED IN ENGLAND,
  WHICH HAVE BEEN SUPPRESSED,
  OR BURNT BY THE COMMON HANGMAN,
  OR CENSURED,
  OR FOR WHICH THE AUTHORS, PRINTERS, OR PUBLISHERS
  HAVE BEEN PROSECUTED.

  BY W. H. HART, F.S.A.


  PRICE ONE SHILLING AND SIXPENCE.


  LONDON:
  JOHN RUSSELL SMITH, 36, SOHO SQUARE.

  1878.

  HART AND SON, PRINTERS,]        [SAFFRON WALDEN.


261.

A letter to Mr. Miles Prance in relation to the murder of Sir
Edmundbury Godfrey.

  A copy of this publication is preserved in the British Museum
  Library. It is in folio, and contains three pages. For its
  condemnation see article 265.


262.

A second letter to Miles Prance in reply to the Ghost of Sir
Edmundbury Godfrey.

  A copy of this publication is preserved in the British Museum
  Library. It is in folio, and contains four pages. For its
  condemnation see article 265.


263.

The Loyal Protestant and True Domestic Intelligence, or News both
from City and Country. No. 125, Tuesday, March 7, 1682.

  A copy of this newspaper is preserved in the British Museum
  Library. For its condemnation see article 265.


264.

The Loyal Protestant and True Domestic Intelligence, or News both
from City and Country. No. 127, Saturday, March 11, 1682.

  A copy of this newspaper is preserved in the British Museum
  Library. For its condemnation see next article.


265.

The Loyal Protestant and True Domestic Intelligence, or News both
from City and Country. No. 136, April 1, 1682.

  For this, and the publications described in articles 261 to
  264 importing that Sir Edmundbury Godfrey murdered himself, a
  prosecution was instituted against Nathaniel Thompson, William
  Pain, and John Farwell, and on Tuesday, June 20th, 1682, they were
  tried at the Guildhall, London, and found guilty. Thompson and
  Farwell were sentenced to stand on the pillory in the Palace Yard,
  the last day of Term, between the hours of Ten and One o'clock,
  for the space of an hour, and each of them to pay a fine of £100,
  and to be imprisoned until they paid it. Pain was only to pay a
  fine of £100. Accordingly, on Wednesday, the 5th of July, 1682,
  Thompson and Farwell stood in the pillory, in the Old Palace Yard,
  at Westminster, with this writing over their heads--

  "For libelling the Justice of the Nation, by making the world
  believe that Sir Edmundbury Godfrey murdered himself."

  The following is a copy of the information:--

  Memorandum quod Robertus Sawyer miles, Attornatus domini Regis
  nunc Generalis, qui pro eodem domino Rege in hac parte sequitur,
  in propria persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti domini Regis,
  coram ipso Rege apud Westmonasterium, die Mercurii proximo post
  quindenam Paschæ isto eodem termino, et pro eodem domino Rege dat
  curiæ hic intelligi et informari, quod die Martis proximo post
  crastinum Purificationis Beatæ Mariæ Virginis, termino Sancti
  Hillarii annis regni domini Caroli Secundi nunc Regis Angliæ &c.
  tricesimo et tricesimo primo, in curia dicti domini Regis coram
  ipso Rege apud Westmonasterium, eadem curia apud Westmonasterium
  in comitatu Middlesexiæ tunc tenta existente, per sacramentum
  duodecim juratorum proborum et legalium hominum comitatus
  Middlesexiæ prædictæ tunc et ibidem juratorum et oneratorum ad
  inquirendum pro dicto domino Rege et corpore comitatus prædicti,
  extitit præsentatum quod Robertus Greene nuper de parochia Sanctæ
  Mariæ le Strond in comitatu Middlesexiæ Laborer, [ ] Gerrald nuper
  de parochia prædicta in comitatu prædicto clericus, Henricus
  Berry nuper de parochia prædicta in comitatu prædicto Laborer,
  Laurencius Hill nuper de parochia prædicta in comitatu prædicto
  Laborer, Dominicus Kelly nuper de parochia prædicta in comitatu
  prædicto clericus, et Philbert Vernat nuper de parochia prædicta
  in comitatu prædicto Laborer, Deum præ oculis suis non habentes,
  sed instigatione diabolica moti et seducti, duodecimo die Octobris
  anno regni domini Caroli Secundi Dei gratia Angliæ Scotiæ Franciæ
  et Hiberniæ Regis Fidei Defensoris &c. tricesimo, vi et armis
  &c. apud parochiam Sanctæ Mariæ le Strond prædictæ in comitatu
  Middlesexiæ prædictæ in et super quendam Edmundum Berry Godfrey
  militem, in pace Dei et dicti Domini Regis nunc adtunc et ibidem
  existentem, felonice, voluntarie, et ex malitia sua præcogitata,
  insultum fecerunt. Et quod prædictus Robertus Greene quoddam
  sudarium panni lini _anglice a linen handkerchiffe_, valoris sex
  denariorum, circa collum ipsius Edmundi Berry Godfrey adtunc
  et ibidem felonice, voluntarie, et ex malitia sua præcogitata,
  plicavit, et fixavit _anglice did fold, and fasten_. Et quod
  prædictus Robertus Greene cum prædicto sudario sic per ipsum
  Robertum Greene plicato et fixato circa collum ipsius prædicti
  Edmundi Berry adtunc ipsum prædictum Edmundum Berry Godfrey
  felonice, voluntarie, et ex malitia sua præcogitata, suffocavit
  et strangulavit _anglice, choake and strangle_, de quibusquidem
  suffocatione, et strangulatione ipsius Edmundi Berry Godfrey
  prædicti, per ipsum prædictum Robertum Greene in forma prædicta
  factis et perpetratis, ipse prædictus Edmundus Berry Godfrey adtunc
  et ibidem instanter obiit. Et quod prædicti [ ] Gerrald, Henricus
  Berry, Laurentius Hill, Dominicus Kelly, et Philbert Vernat, adtunc
  et ibidem felonice, voluntarie, et ex malitia sua præcogitata
  fuerunt præsentes, auxiliantes, abettantes, comfortantes,
  assistentes, et manutenentes præfatum Robertum Greene ad prædictum
  Edmundum Berry Godfrey in forma prædicta felonice, voluntarie, et
  ex malitia sua præcogitata, interficiendum et murdrandum. Et sic
  juratores prædicti adtunc dixerunt super sacramentum suum prædictum
  quod prædictus Robertus Greene, [ ] Gerrald, Henricus Berry,
  Laurencius Hill, Dominicus Kelly, et Philbert Vernat, modo et forma
  prædictis, præfatum Edmundum Berry Godfrey felonice, voluntarie, et
  ex malitia sua præcogitata, interfecerunt et murdraverunt, contra
  pacem dicti domini Regis nunc, coronam et dignitatem suas &c.,
  per quod præceptum fuit vicecomiti comitatus prædicti quod non
  omitteret &c. quin caperet eos si &c., ad respondendum &c. Quodque
  postea, scilicet die Mercurii proximo post crastinum Purificationis
  Beatæ Mariæ Virginis, termino Sancti Hillarii, anno regni domini
  Caroli Secundi nunc Regis Angliæ &c. tricesimo et tricesimo primo
  supradicto coram domino Rege apud Westmonasterium venerunt prædicti
  Robertus Greene, Henricus Berry, et Laurencius Hill sub custodia
  Willielmi Richardson generosi tunc custodis gaoli dicti domini
  Regis de Newgate virtute brevis dicti domini Regis de Habeas
  Corpus ad subjiciendum, recipiendum &c. in cujus custodia præantea
  ex causa predicta commissi fuerunt ad barram prædictæ curiæ dicti
  domini Regis tunc et ibidem ducti in propria persona sua, et adtunc
  et ibidem statim de præmissis prædictis eis superius impositis
  separatim allocuti qualiter se velint inde acquietari separatim,
  dixerunt quod ipsi in nullo fuerunt inde culpabiles et inde de
  bono et malo posuerunt se separatim super patriam. In quaquidem
  causa taliter processum fuit quod prædictus Robertus Greene,
  Henricus Berry, et Laurencius Hill postea scilicet die Lunæ proximo
  post octabas Purificationis Beatæ Mariæ Virginis termino Sancti
  Hillarii annis regni dicti domini Regis nunc tricesimo et tricesimo
  primo supradictis, in prædicta curia dicti domini Regis coram
  ipso Rege apud Westmonasterium prædictum in comitatu Middlesexiæ
  prædictæ, pro felonia et murdro prædictis in indictamento prædicto
  specificatis et contentis per quandam juratam patriæ debito modo
  triati fuerunt et adtunc et ibidem legitimo modo pro felonia et
  murdro prædictis convicti et attincti fuerunt, prout per recordum
  inde in prædicta curia dicti domini Regis coram ipso Rege apud
  Westmonasterium in comitatu Middlesexiæ prædictæ remanens filatum
  plenius liquet et apparet. Qui quidem Robertus Greene, Henricus
  Berry, et Laurencius Hill postea debito modo executi fuerunt,
  et pænam mortis subierunt juxta formam et effectum judicii et
  attincturæ prædictorum. Cumque etiam quidam Milo Prance, super
  triationem prædictum fuit testis productus et juratus ex parte
  dicti domini Regis nunc adtunc et ibidem legitimo modo dedisset
  materialem evidenciam versus prædictos Robertum Greene, Henricum
  Berry, et Laurencium Hill ad probandum ipsos fore culpabiles de
  felonia et murdro prædictis in indictamento prædicto specificatis.
  Et quidam Willielmus Bedlowe, Johannes Browne, Elizabetha Curtis,
  Zacharias Skillarne, et Nicholaus Cambridge super triationem
  prædictum fuerunt testes similiter producti et jurati ex parte
  dicti domini Regis, et diversas materiales evidentias versus
  prædictos Robertum Greene, Henricum Berry, Laurencium Hill, ad
  probandum ipsos fore culpabiles de felonia et murdro prædictis in
  eodem indictamento mentionatis dederunt. Cumque etiam prædicti
  [ ] Gerrald, Robertus Greene, Laurencius Hill, Dominicus Kelly
  et Philbert Vernat tempore feloniæ et murdri prædictorum fuerunt
  Papistæ et manutentores Romanæ superstitionis. Et prædicti [ ]
  Gerrald, Dominicus Kelly, et Philbert Vernat fugam fecerunt et ad
  indictamentum prædictum adhuc non comparuerunt nec aliquis eorum
  comparuit. Cumque etiam super visum corporis prædicti Edmundi Berry
  Godfrey mortui jacentis quædam inquisitio debito modo capta fuit
  coram Johanne Cooper generoso tunc uno coronatorum dicti domini
  Regis comitatus Middlesexiæ prædictæ per sacramentum proborum et
  legalium hominum comitatus Middlesexiæ ultra numerum duodecim
  personarum per quamquidem inquisitionem compertum fuit quod quidam
  malefactores ignoti felonice et ex malitia sua præpensa ipsum
  Edmundum Berry Godfrey strangulaverunt et suffocaverunt de qua
  obiit. Et quod quidam Nathaniel Thompson nuper de parochia Sancti
  Dunstani in Occidente Londoniæ Typhographus, Willielmus Payne
  nuper de parochia prædicta infra civitatem Londoniæ generosus, et
  Johannes Farwell nuper de Westmonasterio in comitatu Middlesexiæ
  generosus præmissa prædicta satis scientes, et existentes personæ
  diabolice effecti ac machinantes practicantes et totis viribus
  suis intendentes pacem et communem tranquillitatem hujus regni
  Angliæ perturbare et quantum in ipsis fuit debitum legis cursum
  corrumpere, subvertere, et evadere, et justitiam hujus regni Angliæ
  in ea parte defamare et scandalizare et tam præfatos Milonem
  Prance, Willielmum Bedlowe, Johannem Browne, Elizabetham Curtis,
  Zachariam Skillarne, et Nicholaum Cambridge quam prædictos Johannem
  Cooper et probos et legales homines super inquisitionem prædictam
  super visum corporis prædicti juratos in maximum odium contemptum
  et vilipendium cum omnibus ligeis subditis dicti domini Regis nunc
  inducere et inferre ac ad deterrendum subditos dicti domini Regis
  a comparendo detigendo et probando machinationes Papistorum contra
  dominum Regem nunc et veram religionem per legem nunc stabilitatam
  et impie et nefarie machinantes et intendentes ipsos prædictos
  [ ] Gerrald, Dominicum Kelly et prædictum Philbertum Vernat a
  subeundo pænas et sententias per legem super ipsos infligendas pro
  murdro prædicto ac ad auxiliandum et assistandum ipsos quamvis
  inde culpabiles fore compertos minime culpabiles ac ad decipiendum
  et fallandum subditos dicti domini Regis de et in præmissis cum
  falsis affirmantiis et agreamentis suis et causare et procurare
  quod creditum foret et estimaretur quod prædicti Robertus Greene,
  Henricus Berry, et Laurencius Hill personæ, sic ut præfertur, pro
  felonia et murdro prædictis prædicti Edmundi Berry convicti et
  executi minus rite convicti et executi fuissent, quodque prædictus
  Edmundus Berry Godfrey fuit felo de se et seipsum felonice
  murdrasset, ipsi prædicti Nathaniel Thompson, Willielmus Payne,
  et Johannes Farwell ad nequissimas, nefandissimas, et diabolicas
  intentiones suas prædictas perimplendas et proficiendas postea
  scilicet vicesimo tertio die Februarii anno regni domini Caroli
  Secundi nunc Regis Angliæ &c. tricesimo quarto apud parochiam
  Sanctæ Mariæ le Bow Londoniæ vi et armis &c. falso, illicite,
  injuste, nequiter, malitiose, scandalose, et diabolice, fecerunt,
  composuerunt et imprimi causaverunt quendam falsum, scandalosum,
  et defamatorium libellum intitulatum, _A Letter to Mr. Miles
  Prance, in relation to the murther of Sir Edmondbury Godfrey_,
  in quoquidem libello inter alia continetur prout sequitur. _And
  hearing that the Coroner's Jury or Inquest were first of opinion,
  and accordingly declared, he was felo de se; and that there was
  much art and skill used to procure their verdict to the contrary;
  more particularly, the refusing of the body, (at their instance and
  request) to be opened._ Ac in alio loco ejusdem libelli ulterius
  continetur prout sequitur. _They say, that if a man, or any other
  creature be strangled, or hanged, and his body cold, and the blood
  settled in the veins_ (_as he must needs be, if your evidence be
  true_) (evidentiam prædicti Milonis Prance innuendo) _run twenty
  swords through such a body, not one drop of blood will come out;
  but on the contrary, his body, when found, was full of blood, in so
  much that (over and above the cakes or great gobbets of congealed
  putrified blood found afterwards in his cloaths) the constable
  when he pulled the sword out of his body, it crashed against his
  back bone, and gobbets of blood and water gushed or gubbled out
  of that wound in abundance, not only in that very place where the
  sword was pulled out but in all his passage to the Whitehouse;
  especially there where his body was lifted over two high stumps;
  and also when he was laid upon the table, the blood and water so
  issued out of that wound, that it ran from off the table upon the
  floor, and from thence into the cellar. So that they do aver, that
  that wound that he received by that sword, must of necessity be
  the cause of his death._ Ac in alia parte ejusdem libelli ulterius
  continetur prout sequitur, _They observe, that Bedloe's, (before
  the Committee of Lords), and your evidence in relation to this
  gentleman's death, are as different as the East is from the West;
  for you dog him out of St. Clement's; the other decoys him from
  Charing Cross; you swear he was strangled with a handkerchief near
  the stables going to the water-side; Bedloe, that he was smothered
  with a pillow in a room in the great Court in Somerset-house.
  You say, he took horse at Soho; Bedlow says, he took Coach at
  Clarendon-house, with many more such like contradictions; and
  considering the old proverb, fore-warn'd, fore arm'd; a further
  and fuller account of the whole matter expect._ Quodque prædicti
  Nathaniel Thompson, Willielmus Payne et Johannes Farwell ad
  nequissimas nefandissimas et diabolicas intentiones suas prædictas
  perimplendas et proficiendas postea scilicet tertio die Marcii anno
  regni dicti domini Regis nunc tricesimo quarto [_word defaced_]
  apud parochiam Sanctæ Mariæ le Bow Londoniæ prædictæ vi et armis
  et falso, illicite, injuste, nequiter, malitiose, scandalose, et
  diabolice, fecerunt composuerunt et imprimi causaverunt quendam
  alium falsum scandalosum et defamatorium libellum intitulatum,
  _A Second Letter to Miles Prance, in reply to the Ghost of Sir
  Edmondbury Godfrey_, in quoquidem ultimo mencionato libello inter
  alia continetur prout sequitur. _Next, whereas my letter saith,
  (and that truly) that the Coroner's Jury were first of opinion
  and accordingly declared he was felo de se; and that much art and
  skill was used to procure their verdict to the contrary._ Ac in
  alio loco ejusdem ultimo mencionati libelli inter alia continetur
  prout sequitur. _And it would be very material, if the Coroner
  would declare, what he received for that job, and of whom, and what
  evidence he had to induce the Jury to find (as the inquisition
  imports) that he was strangled with a linen cloth, a matter of fact
  never so much as spoken of, until you came in with your evidence,
  which was not in some weeks after. And I do again aver, that the
  body was required by the jurors to be opened, and was refused; and
  if the body was in their and the Coroner's power (as the Ghost
  insinuates) such power was concealed from and denied the Jury._
  Et in alio loco ejusdem ultimo mentionati libelli inter alia
  continetur prout sequitur, _He is to understand that Mr. Brown,
  the two surgeons_ (prædictos Zachariam Skillarne, et Nicholam
  Cambridge innuendo) _and Mrs. Curtis are not competent (nor can be
  material) witnesses in this case._ Et in alio loco ejusdem ultimo
  mentionati libelli inter alia ulterius continetur prout sequitur,
  _But Mr. Prance, it will be fully proved, that the body was full
  of blood, and that there were cakes or gobbets of dry blood found
  in his cloaths, which (with his body) stunk extremely. And it
  will be also fully and effectually proved that his eyes, nostrils,
  and corners of his mouth were fly-blown._ Ac in alio loco ejusdem
  ultimo mentionati libelli inter alia continetur prout sequitur,
  _And as to the seventh and last paragraph, which relates only to
  the difference betwixt yours and Mr. Bedlow's evidence, I must take
  notice, that what you and he swear are very contradictory._ Et in
  alio loco ejusdem ultimo mentionati libelli inter alia ulterius
  continetur prout sequitur, _But I cannot omit to take further
  notice of Mrs. Curtis's affidavit in relation to the drops of wax
  found upon the cloaths, in which I cannot say but she may swear
  true: but this I do aver, that if it be so, those drops were put
  upon the cloaths long after he was found, and after the jury had
  sat on the body; for there was no such thing then on the cloaths.
  And I suppose this was some artifice used by those, who, either
  out of interest or design, were desirous to confirm his being
  murthered at Somerset-House._ Ac ulterius idem Attornatus dicti
  domini Regis nunc Generalis pro eodem domino Rege dat curiam hic
  intelligi et informari quod prædicti Nathaniel Thompson, Willielmus
  Payne, et Johannes Farwell in ulteriorem prosecutionem prædictæ
  falsæ nequissimæ et malitiosæ machinationis et intentionis suarum
  prædictarum postea scilicet septimo die Marcii anno regni dicti
  domini Regis nunc tricesimo quarto supradicto apud parochiam
  Sanctæ Mariæ le Bow Londoniæ prædictam vi et armis &c. falso,
  illicite, injuste, nequiter, malitiose, scandalose, et diabolice
  composuerunt, fecerunt, et imprimi causaverunt quendam alium falsum
  scandalosum et defamatorium libellum intitulatum, _The Loyal
  Protestant, and True Domestic Intelligence, or News both from City
  and Country_, in quoquidem ultimo mentionato libello continetur
  prout sequitur, _That there is not in the said letter_ (prædictum
  falsum scandalosum et defamatorium libellum intitulatum A Letter
  to Mr. Miles Prance, in relation to the murder of Sir Edmundbury
  Godfrey præantea primo mencionatum innuendo) _the least item or
  circumstance, but what will be by undeniable evidence made out to
  be the truth: So the said Mr. Prance, having not as yet vouchsafed
  an answer to that letter, he will speedily receive a further
  letter relating to that murther; wherein the further truth will
  not only be fully set forth, and other circumstances set out._
  Et ulterius idem Attornatus dicti domini Regis nunc Generalis
  pro eodem domino Rege dat curiam hic intelligi et informari quod
  prædictus Nathaniel Thompson, Willielmus Payne, et Johannes
  Farwell in ulteriorem prosecutionem prædictæ falsæ nequissimæ
  et malitiosæ machinationis et intentionis suarum prædictarum
  postea scilicet undecimo die Marcii anno regni dicti domini Regis
  nunc tricesimo quarto supradicto apud parochiam Sanctæ Mariæ le
  Bow Londoniæ prædictam vi et armis, falso, illicite, injuste,
  nequiter, malitiose, scandalose, et diabolice composuerunt,
  fecerunt, et imprimi causaverunt quendam alium falsum scandalosum
  et defamatorium libellum intitulatum, _The Loyal Protestant and
  True Domestick Intelligence, or News both from City and Country_,
  in quoquidem ultimo mentionato libello inter alia continetur prout
  sequitur, _Whereas Dick Janeway in this Day's Mercury, promises
  an answer to the late Letter to Mr. Prance, &c. This is to give
  him and all the world notice, that such an answer is impatiently
  expected by the author of that letter, who questions not but to
  prove every tittle of that letter to the satisfaction of all
  mankind: And besides he is very desirous that the Courantier
  (according to his last Pacquet of Advice from Rome) would go on,
  and use his interest, to procure the Lord Mayor, Court of Aldermen
  and Common Council of London, to inspect the Truth of that letter;
  whereby it will appear inevitably that there is not one Papist
  or popishly affected person concerned in that letter, or in the
  proof of the particulars thereof; but the same (with divers other
  material circumstances relating to the murther of Sir Edmundbury
  Godfrey, and the fraud and blind put upon the world in relation
  thereto) will be more fully, plainly and manifestly proved, without
  giving ill words, or scurrilous language, or reflections to any
  person that really are or supposed to be therein concerned in
  any circumstance whatsoever_. Et ulterius idem Attornatus dicti
  domini Regis nunc Generalis pro eodem domino Rege dat curiam hic
  intelligi et informari quod prædicti Nathaniel Thompson, Willielmus
  Payne et Johannes Farwell in ulteriorem prosecutionem prædictæ
  falsæ nequissimæ et malitiosæ machinationis et intentionis suarum
  prædictarum postea scilicet primo die Aprilis anno regni dicti
  domini Regis nunc tricesimo quarto supradicto vi et armis &c.
  apud parochiam Sanctæ Mariæ le Bow Londoniæ prædictam falso,
  illicite, injuste, nequiter, malitiose, scandalose, et diabolice
  fecerunt composuerunt, et imprimi causaverunt quendam alium falsum,
  scandalosum et defamatorium libellum intitulatum, _The Loyal
  Protestant, and True Domestic Intelligence, or News both from City
  and Country_, in quoquidem ultimo mentionato libello inter alia
  continetur prout sequitur, _Last Wednesday, Nathaniel Thompson,
  (upon summons) appeared before the Lords of his Majesty's most
  Honourable Privy Council, about the letters to Mr. Miles Prance,
  concerning the death of Sir Edmundbury Godfrey where he justified
  the matter, and produced the authors, who are ready to prove (by
  undeniable and substantial witnesses, not in the least accused,
  or suspected of Popery, as the malicious party do suggest) that
  every tittle and iota of those letters are true._ Quodque in alia
  parte ejusdem ultimo mentionati libelli inter alia continetur
  prout sequitur, _Mr. Thompson and the gentlemen his friends, are
  to attend the next Wednesday at Council where they do not doubt
  but that Honourable Board will put them into a method to prove the
  whole, or any particular which their Honours in their great wisdom
  shall think convenient to be brought to the test or examination_.
  Et ulterius idem Attornatus dicti domini Regis nunc Generalis
  pro eodem domino Rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod
  prædicti Nathaniel Thompson, Willielmus Payne, et Johannes Farwell
  vicesimo tertio die Februarii anno regni dicti domini Regis nunc
  tricesimo quarto supradicto diversis aliis diebus et vicibus inter
  prædictum vicesimum tertium diem Februarii anno tricesimo quarto
  supradicto et diem exhibitionis hujus informationis apud parochiam
  Sanctæ Mariæ le Bow Londoniæ prædictam scienter, et quilibet eorum
  scienter prædictos separales libellos fore falsos malitiosos et
  scandalosos et seditiosos vi et armis &c. falso illicite injuste
  nequiter malitiose scandalose et diabolice prædictos falsos
  malitiosos scandalosos et seditiosos libellos utteraverunt,
  publicaverunt et quilibet eorum utteravit et publicavit, in
  contemptum legum hujus regni Angliæ manifestum, ac scandalum et
  defamationem publicæ justitiæ ejusdem, in malum exemplum omnium
  aliorum in tali casu delinquentium, ac contra pacem dicti domini
  Regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c.


266.

The Memoirs of James Lord Audley Earl of Castlehaven, his engagement
and carriage in the Wars of Ireland, from the year 1642 to the year
1651. Written by himself. London. 1680.

  On August 3rd, 1682, Lord Castlehaven was summoned before the
  Council, the King being present, respecting the publication of
  this book, which he owned; and it was resolved that the book was
  a libel against the government.[221] A copy of this publication is
  preserved in the British Museum Library.


267.

The Loyal Protestant, and true Domestic Intelligence, or News both
from City and Country, No. 166, Saturday, June 10th, 1682.

  For publishing this periodical a prosecution was instituted against
  Nathaniel Thomson and Mary his wife. The following is a copy of the
  information:--

  Londonia. Memorandum quod Samuel Astry armiger Coronator et
  Attornatus domini Regis in curia ipsius Regis coram ipso Rege
  qui pro eodem domino Rege in hac parte sequitur in propria
  persona sua venit hic in curiam dicti domini Regis coram ipso
  Rege apud Westmonasterium die Lunæ proximo post tres septimanas
  Sancti Michaelis isto eodem termino, et pro eodem domino Rege dat
  curiæ his intelligi et informari quod Nathaniel Tompson nuper de
  parochia Sancti Dunstani in Occidente Londoniæ Yeoman et Maria
  Tompson uxor prædicti Nathanielis existentes personæ maledispositi
  ac machinantes practicantes et intendentes pacem et communem
  tranquillitatem hujus regni Angliæ perturbare et diversas personas
  infra hoc regnum Angliæ in odium et contemptum dicti domini
  Regis et subditorum ipsius domini Regis inducere et inferre, et
  ad nequissimas machinationes practicationes et intentiones suas
  prædictas perimplenda et perficienda prædicti Nathaniel Tompson
  et Maria Tompson decimo die Junii anno regni domini Caroli
  Secundi nunc Regis Angliæ &c. tricesimo quarto vi et armis &c.
  apud parochiam prædictam infra Civitatem Londoniæ prædictam
  falso, illicite, injuste, nequiter, seditiose et scandalose
  imprimi causaverunt et publicaverunt et uterque eorum tunc et
  ibidem imprimi causavit et publicavit quoddam falsum, malitiosum,
  scandalosum, et defamatorium libellum intitulatum _The Loyal
  Protestant and True Domestick Intelligence_, in quoquidem falso,
  scandaloso, et defamatorio libello inter alia contenta fuerunt
  hæ falsæ, scandalosæ, et defamatoriæ sententiæ in his Anglicanis
  verbis et figuris sequentibus _Windsor_. _June 7, 1682. This day
  the Court of Verge sate here, where the 2 Portugal Cooks came
  to their tryals, and were (upon hearing the whole matter) found
  guilty of poysoning Mr. Benning the Turnbroach; the Foreman of
  the Jury was one Mr. White, the King's Plummer, near this place.
  We cannot hear of any sentence given against them as yet Benning
  excepted against a House-Jury, by reason he had formerly disobliged
  some of the Servants; wherefore he thought Justice would not be
  done him; they having had a prejudice against him ever since._ Et
  ulterius idem Coronator et Attornatus dicti domini Regis pro eodem
  domino Rege dat curiæ hic intelligi et informari quod prædicti
  Nathaniel Tompson et Maria Tompson die et anno supradictis apud
  parochiam prædictam infra civitatem Londoniæ prædictam scientes
  prædictum falsum, scandalosum, et defamatorium libellum fore
  falsum et defamatorium libellum, falso, illicite, injuste,
  nequiter, malitiose, et seditiose vendiderunt, utteraverunt, et
  publicaverunt, et uterque eorum vendidit, utteravit, et publicavit,
  in malum exemplum omnium aliorum in tali casu delinquentium, ac
  contra pacem dicti domini Regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas
  &c.[222]

  The result of this prosecution does not appear. A copy of this
  publication is preserved in the British Museum Library.


268.

The True Protestant Mercury: or Occurrences Foreign and Domestic. No.
149. From Wednesday, June 7, to Saturday, June 10, 1682.

  For publishing this periodical a prosecution was instituted
  against Thomas Snowden, printer, of the parish of St. Andrew by
  the Wardrobe, and Jane Curtis, wife of Langley Curtis, of the
  parish of St. Bride's, Fleet Street. The following is a copy of the
  information:--

  Londonia. Memorandum quod Samuel Astry Armiger Coronator et
  Attornatus domini Regis in curia ipsius Regis coram ipso Rege qui
  pro eodem domino Rege in hac parte sequitur in propria persona
  sua venit hic in curia dicti domini Regis coram ipso Rege apud
  Westmonasterium die Lunæ proximo post tres septimanas Sancti
  Michaelis isto eodem termino et pro eodem domino Rege dat curiæ
  hic intelligi et informari quod Thomas Snowden de parochia
  Sancti Andreæ Wardrope Londoniæ Typographus et Jana Curtis uxor
  Langley Curtis nuper de parochia Sanctæ Bridgettæ Londoniæ Yeoman
  existentes personæ male dispositi ac machinantes practicantes
  et intendentes pacem et communem tranquillitatem hujus regni
  Angliæ perturbare et diversas personas infra hoc regnum Angliæ
  in maximum odium contemptum et vilipendium non solum cum dicto
  domino Rege, verum etiam cum aliis subditis ipsius domini Regis
  inducere et inferre et ad nequissimas machinationes practicationes
  et intentiones suas prædictas perimplenda et perficienda prædicti
  Thomas Snowden et Jana Curtis vicesimo die Junii anno regni
  domini Caroli Secundi nunc Regis Angliæ &c. tricesimo quarto vi
  et armis &c. apud parochiam Sanctæ Bridgettæ Londoniæ prædictam,
  falso, illicite, injuste, nequiter, seditiose et scandalose,
  imprimi causaverunt et publicaverunt, et uterque eorum adtunc et
  ibidem imprimi causavit et publicavit quoddam falsum malitiosum
  scandalosum et defamatorium libellum intitulatum _The true
  Protestant Mercury or occurrences foreign and domestic_, in
  quoquidem libello inter alia contenta fuerunt hæ falsæ, fictæ, et
  scandalosæ sententiæ in hiis Anglicanis verbis, _The two Portugal
  Cooks mentioned in our last had their tryals on Wednesday last at
  Windsor, and were found guilty of poysening Benning the Turnbroach.
  The foreman of the jury was Mr. W. the King's Plummer, who lives
  near Windsor, but we do not hear of any sentence given as yet
  against them. But we hear that his Majesty declared before the
  trial, that whosoever was found in the fault, should have no favour
  showed him. The reason that he had excepted against the Jury of the
  King's servants, was because he had formerly some quarrel with some
  of them, and had discovered something against them, and therefore
  thought they would not do him justice._ Et ulterius idem Coronator
  et Attornatus dicti domini Regis pro eodem domino Rege dicit quod
  prædicti Thomas Snowden et Jana Curtis dicto vicesimo die Junii
  anno supradicto apud parochiam Sanctæ Bridgettæ Londoniæ prædictam
  falsum et scandalosum libellum falso, illicite, injuste, nequiter
  et malitiose vendiderunt utteraverunt et publicaverunt et uterque
  eorum vendidit utteravit et publicavit, in malum exemplum omnium
  aliorum in tali casu delinquentium, ac contra pacem dicti domini
  Regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c.[223]

  A copy of this publication is preserved in the British Museum
  Library.


269.

A second letter from a person of quality to his friend about
abhorrers and addressors, &c. 1682.

  This was written by Thomas Stringer, who appears to have been
  Secretary or Steward to the Earl of Shaftesbury; and for writing
  the same, a prosecution was instituted against him. The following
  is a copy of the indictment:--

  Londonia. Juratores pro domino rege super sacramentum suum
  præsentant quod Thomas Stringer nuper de Londonia generosus
  machinans et intendens serenissimum dominum nostrum Carolum
  Secundum Dei gratia Angliæ Scotiæ Franciæ et Hiberniæ Regem Fidei
  Defensorem &c., et regimen suum in odium et infamiam inter subditos
  suas inferre, et pacem et communem tranquillitatem hujus regni
  Angliæ molestare et perturbare, et diversas differentias inter
  eosdem subditos excitare et procurare vicesimo die Junii anno regni
  dicti domini Regis nunc tricesimo quarto apud Londoniam videlicet
  in parochia Sancti Botulphi extra Aldersgate in Warda de Aldersgate
  Londoniæ prædicta vi et armis &c. falso seditiose et malitiose
  scripsit et publicavit et scribi imprimi et publicari causavit
  quendam scandalosum libellum intitulatum, _A Second letter from a
  person of quality to his friend about abhorrers and addressors,
  &c._ in quoquidem libello continentur hæc falsa ficta et scandalosa
  verba sequentia videlicet _Tis plain these men_ (ligeos et subditos
  dicti domini regis nunc innuendo) _mean and intend by this
  abhorrence_ (quandam detestationem versus associationem in papiris
  scriptam prætensam fore inventam inter quosdam papiros Anthonii
  Comitis Shaftesbury innuendo) _and under this notion to create an
  association for all the Tories to maintain a Popish Successor and
  to introduce arbitrary power. And whosoever joins with or doth not
  vigorously oppose such practices is guilty of these designs._ Et in
  altera parte ejusdem libelli continentur hæc falsa et scandalosa
  verba sequentia videlicet, _That which concerns the mercenary
  forces is no more than every man's duty as much as in him lies
  (which means as lawfully he may) to endeavour entirely to disband
  all such mercenary forces as we have reason to believe are raised
  to advance arbitrary power._ In malum et perniciosissimum exemplum
  omnium aliorum in consimili casu delinquentium ac contra pacem
  dicti domini regis nunc coronam et dignitatem suas &c.[224]


270.

The Addresses importing an abhorrence of an Association pretended to
have been seized in the Earl of Shaftesbury's closet, laid open and
detected. In a letter to a friend. 1682.

  This was the production of Mr. Robert Ferguson, and for writing,
  printing, and publishing the same he was prosecuted. The following
  is a copy of the indictment:

  Juratores pro domino Rege super sacramentum suum præsentant quod
  Robertus Ferguson nuper de Londonia generosus, Deum præ oculis
  suis non habens sed instigatione diabolica motus et seductus,
  machinansque et intendens serenissimum dominum nostrum Carolum
  Secundum Dei gratia Angliæ Scotiæ Franciæ et Hiberniæ Regem Fidei
  Defensorem, et regimen suum in odium et infamiam inter subditos
  suos inferre ac pacem et communem tranquillitatem hujus regni
  Angliæ perturbare et diversas differentias inter eosdem subditos
  procurare vicesimo die Junii anno regni dicti domini regis nunc
  tricesimo quarto apud Londoniam videlicet in parochia Sancti
  Martini Ludgate in warda de Farringdon extra Londoniam prædicta
  vi et armis &c. falso seditiose et malitiose scripsit, impressit,
  et publicavit et scribi, imprimi et publicari causavit quondam
  scandalosum libellum intitulatum, _The Addresses importing an
  abhorrence of an association pretended to have been seized in
  the Earl of Shaftesbury's closet, laid open and detected. In a
  letter to a friend_. In quoquidem libello continentur hæc falsa
  ficta et scandalosa verba sequentia, _And as all Addresses of this
  nature tend to render the King, who ought to reign in the hearts
  of all his people, the Head meerly of one party and that a very
  inconsiderable one if compared with the bulk of the Nation; so
  they only serve to publish to all the world the distractions of
  the Kingdom, and to proclaim in the face of the Sun the weakness
  of the Government. What do the foreigners say upon the perusal
  of our Gazets, but that either things are not managed in England
  according to the Laws of the Constitution, or that his Majesty
  of Great Britain reigns precariously, seeing his Ministers seek
  to support the Transactions of State, by courting the applause of
  a few little folk here and there through the Kingdom?_ In malum
  et perniciosissimum exemplum omnium aliorum in consimili casu
  delinquentium ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc coronam et
  dignitatem suas &c.[225]

  A copy of this publication is in the British Museum Library. It is
  in folio and occupies four pages.


271.

An Historical and Political Discourse of the Laws and Government
of England, from the first times to the end of the reign of Queen
Elizabeth. With a vindication of the ancient way of Parliaments in
England. Collected from some manuscript notes of John Selden, Esq.;
by Nathaniel Bacon, of Gray's Inn, Esquire. London. 1682.

  This is one of the reprints of the original edition of 1651. For
  publishing this reprint, a prosecution was instituted against John
  Starkey. The following is a copy of the indictment against him:--

  Londonia. Juratores pro domino Rege super sacramentum suum
  præsentant quod Johannes Starkey nuper de Londonia Stationer
  machinans et intendens Serenissimum Dominum nostrum Carolum
  Secundum Dei gratia Angliæ Scotiæ Franciæ et Hiberniæ Regem Fidei
  Defensorem &c. supremum et naturalem Dominum suum et regimen suum
  in odium infamiam et contemptum inter subditos suos inducere
  et inferre ac pacem et communem tranquillitatem hujus regni
  Angliæ perturbare vicesimo die Junii anno regni dicti domini
  Regis nunc tricesimo quarto apud Londoniam videlicet in parochia
  Sancti Dunstani in Occidente in Warda de Farringdon extra London
  prædicta vi et armis &c. falso seditiose et malitiose impressit
  et publicavit et imprimi et publicari causavit quendam librum
  scandalosum intitulatum _The continuation of the Historicall and
  Politicall Discourse of the Laws and Government of England until
  the end of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth with a vindication of
  the antient way of Parliaments in England_. In quo quidem libro
  de et concernente præfato domino Rege nunc continentur hæc falsa
  ficta et scandalosa verba sequentia videlicet, _I do easily grant
  that Kings have many Occasions and Opportunities to beguile their
  People, yet can they do nothing as Kings, but what of right they
  ought to doe: They may call Parliaments, but neither as often or
  seldome as they please, if the Statute-Laws of this Realme might
  take place._ Et in altera parte ejusdem libri continentur hæc falsa
  et scandalosa verba sequentia videlicet, _And though Kings may be
  chiefe Commanders, yet they are not the chiefe Rulers_. In malum
  et pernitiosissimum exemplum omnium aliorum in consimili casu
  delinquentium ac contra pacem dicti domini regis nunc coronam et
  dignitatem suas &c.[226]

  Upon this indictment Starkey was outlawed, but in the first year
  of Will. and Mary he brought a writ of error and the outlawry was
  reversed.


272.

Mr. Hunt's postscript for rectifying some mistakes in some of the
inferiour clergy, mischievous to our government and religion. With
two Discourses about the Succession, and Bill of Exclusion. In answer
to two Books affirming the unalterable right of Succession, and the
unlawfulness of the Bill of Exclusion. London. 1682.

  Thomas Hunt, Esq., of London, was prosecuted for publishing
  this. The information charges that Thomas Hunt, late of London,
  esquire, being a pernicious and seditious man, and contriving and
  maliciously intending to disturb the peace of England, and to
  create false opinions and suspicions among the king's subjects
  concerning the king and his government, and to cause them to think
  that the king was an abettor of Papists and most pernicious men
  conspiring to procure the subversion of the government of the
  kingdom and also the Protestant religion established by law, called
  _plotters_, and to excite rebellious seditions and discords between
  the king and his subjects, and to bring the king's government into
  contempt and hatred, did in order to carry out his most wicked
  and diabolical intentions, on the twentieth day of January in the
  thirty fourth year of the reign of King Charles the Second, at the
  parish of St. Michael Cornhill in London, unlawfully, wickedly,
  maliciously, scandalously, and seditiously make, compose and write,
  and cause to be printed, published and sold a certain false,
  scandalous, libellous, seditious, and defamatory book intituled _Mr
  Hunt's Postscript_, in which book in writing of and concerning the
  Papists and the _plots_ in the same book mentioned to have been
  perpetrated, among other things is contained as follows--_Nay,
  as if they_ [meaning Papists] _did not fear or care to loose the
  favour of their most indulgent Prince, which they have possest
  since he used Papists in making his Escape at Worcester; they have
  contrived these two last Plots with such Art, as to bring them
  under his Majesties Observation, and represented them as things
  fit for his encouragement. Sure if they were not urged with the
  fears of a real guilt, and a restless Conscience of the Plot, they
  would never have adventured thus to have interested the honor of
  the King, and to tempt him to abandon them to the publick Justice
  of the Nation: which begins to grow impatient by the delays of
  it against this hellish Plot. For we have had four Parliaments
  dissolved since the discovery of it, one a darling to the Crown.
  The bringing into question the Dissolution of that Parliament in
  the House of Peers, upon the reason of an unnatural Prorogation,
  was not long before censured, and some great Lords imprisoned
  therefore; proceedings so unwarrantable, that it was after thought
  fit by that House to obliterate the Memory of them; soe necessary
  was that Parliament then thought to the service of the Crown. The
  Dissolution of that Parliament, gave us reason to fear that the
  King had no more business for Parliaments. By these Dissolutions,
  no publick ends that are intelligible are served, no Interest but
  that of the Plot is gratified; no persons of any sort receive
  their satisfaction but the Plotters, who are respited thereby from
  publick Justice, and gain time to bring their Plot to effect._[227]

  The result of this prosecution does not appear. A copy of the book
  is preserved in the British Museum Library.


273.

The Presbyterian Paternoster; Creed, and Ten Commandments. 1681.

  This is a single sheet printed on both sides. A copy is preserved
  in the Library of the British Museum.

  In a newspaper of the period, The True Protestant Mercury of
  February 23, 1680-1, we find the following account of this
  production:--"Feb. 18, 1680-1. Complaint being made to the
  Bishop of London of a most vile and blasphemous pamphlet, lately
  published by one Hindmarsh, a bookseller in Cornhill, intituled
  _The Presbyterian's Paternoster, Creed, and Decalogue_, wherein
  the sacred form of prayer taught by our Blessed Saviour to his
  disciples, the Ten Commandments, written with the finger of the
  Almighty, and delivered with dreadful Majesty, together with that
  Brief Summary of our Holy Faith, commonly called _The Apostle's
  Creed_, were most impudently depraved and profaned, and to the
  horror of all pious ears, the scandal of Christianity, and
  indelible shame of the Nation, turned into ridicule and impiety;
  his Lordship detesting such abominations, presented the said
  pamphlet to the consideration of His Majesty's most Honourable
  Privy Council; and 'tis said, the said Bookseller will at the
  Sessions beginning to be holden this week for London be indicted
  (as he most justly deserves) for blasphemy; in the mean time all
  sober men of the Church of England (for which every true Protestant
  has a profound deference and respect, though dissenting from some
  superfluous ceremonies, so much perhaps the more eagerly contended
  for by domineering spirits, by how much the less necessary they
  are) will take notice what kind of persons these are, who so
  studiously make it their business to render Dissenters odious and
  suspected, with those swarms of seditious libels, daily spawned by
  _Th. Too. S. M._ this worthy gentleman in Cornhill, and others. And
  that the authors of such pamphlets, whatever they scribble, are no
  real sons of the Church of England, but a disparagement unto her,
  by shrouding themselves under her mantle, being in truth, either
  disguised Papists, or else mere Ruffians, debaucht rakehells and
  Atheists."

  Very soon afterwards at the Sessions of Peace held at Guildhall,
  the Grand Jury found a true bill against Hindmarsh, Thomson the
  printer and Parson Ashington the alleged writer of this "detestable
  blasphemous pamphlet." To quote the forcible words of the next
  number of The True Protestant Mercury--"The Secretary of Hell
  that contrived this horrid piece is confessed to be one Ashington,
  credibly reported to be a beneficed parson in Northamptonshire, but
  non-resident; and skulking here about town to practise more freely
  debauchery and do mischief. There are warrants issued forth against
  him; and some say, he was once seiz'd, and by negligence suffered
  to escape; at present we cannot hear that he is in custody."

  Hindmarsh brought a certiorari to remove the indictment into the
  King's Bench, but Mr. Justice Dolben forthwith granted a procedendo
  to try it immediately; and the indictment being read, Hindmarsh
  pleaded guilty, and was immediately ordered to be taken into
  custody, and was afterwards bailed, "the Court resenting so justly
  the heinousness of the offence, that they deferred giving sentence
  till next term, resolving to do it in a public manner at the King's
  Bench, all the Judges being present."[228]

  On the 24th June Hindmarsh appeared in the Court of King's Bench
  and moved to have his bail discharged; the Lord Chief Justice
  told him he deserved to be severely punished, and asked him what
  he had done to expect such a favour? His Counsel alleged, that
  he had discovered the author, who had already done penance for
  it. Notwithstanding which the Lord Chief Justice ordered him
  to prosecute the said author at common law by the first day of
  the next term, and then they would consider of discharging his
  bail.[229]

  The following is a copy of this curious paper.

  The Presbyterian PATERNOSTER; CREED, and TEN
  COMMANDMENTS.

  ---- ---- Manent veteris vestigia fraudis. _Virg._

  The Pater Noster.

  Our Father which art in Hell, magnify'd be thy name; thy Arbitrary
  Kingdom come, thy Tyranical will be done in _England_ now, as it
  was in _Forty One_; Give us in this our Day a holy occasion of
  Rebellion; and forgive us our shew of Godliness for thy sake, as we
  forgive others their holy Hypocrisy for our _good Cause_; and lead
  us not into an agreement of _King_ and _Parliament_; But Deliver
  us from _Monarchy_ and _Hierarchy_; and then thine shall be this
  Kingdom, its Power and Glory, for ever and ever, _Amen_.

  THE CREED.

  [Sidenote: {**} They the only Saints
  {*} Dominion is founded in Gr]

  I Believe in _John Calvin_, the Father of our Religion, disposer of
  {**} Heaven and {*} Earth; and in _Owen_, _Baxter_ and _Jenkins_
  &c. his dear Sons our Lords, who were Conceived by the _Spirit_
  of _Fanaticism_, born of _Schism_ and _Faction_, suffer'd under
  the _Act of Uniformity_; were Silenced, Dead and Buried; and had
  descended into Hell, but that they arose again in the year of
  _Toleration_; ascended into _Tub-Pulpits_, and now sit at the
  right hand of the Lord S---- from whence they are coming to judge
  both the _Church_ and the _State_. I Believe in the Holy _Assembly
  of Divines_, the Holy _National Synod_, the _Seperate Meetings_,
  the _Act of Oblivion_, the _Resurrection from Dead Rites_, and
  _Toleration Everlasting_. Amen.

  _The Ten Commandments._

  The same which _John Presbyter_ hath spoken in 20 Chapters of his
  _Works_; saying, _I am the Lord thy God, which brought thee out of
  the Land of Antichrist, out of the House of Ceremonious Bondage_.

  I.

  Thou shalt have no other Gods but Me.

  II.

  Thou shalt not make any Image, or likeness of any _Saint_ in
  Heaven above, (except _S. Oliver &c._) or bow down at the Adorable
  name of _Jesus_ here on Earth; nor use the Sign of the _Cross_ in
  the _Waters of Baptism_; For I the Lord thy God in my Jealousie
  murder'd the Father, and will visit his _Superstitious Iniquity_
  upon his Children, unto the third and fourth Generation of them
  that hate me; but shew Mercy unto thousands in them that love me,
  and keep my Damnable and Rebellious Commandments.

  III.

  Thou shalt not make the _Solemn League_ and _Covenant_ vain, nor
  subscribe the _Declaration;_ nor take the Oaths of _Allegiance_ and
  _Supremacy_, unless (with a Jesuitical _salvo_,) to obtain places
  of Honour and Power.

  IV.

  Remember that thou keep holy the Remembrance of Forty One. Many
  years didst thou labour, yet could'st not do all that thou hadst
  to do; But in _Forty One_ the Lord thy God sent thee a Sabbath of
  Deliverance; Thou shalt therefore now remember to do all manner of
  work that thou didst then, Thou, and thy Son, and thy Daughter, thy
  Man-Servant, and thy Maid-Servant, the Brutes and Proselytes that
  are within thy Conventicles; For in _Forty One_ the Lord thy God
  made ENGLAND and SCOTLAND Rebellious; thou shalt therefore Bless
  the year Forty One; and hallow it.

  V.

  Honour _Fanaticism_ thy Father, and _Schism_ thy Mother, that thy
  Days may be long in the Land which the Lord thy God will once more
  give thee.

  VI.

  Thou shalt do no Murder, but upon _Majesty_, _Episcopacy_ and
  _Loyalty_.

  VII.

  Thou shalt not commit Adultry, save with the _Holy Sisterhood_, to
  get Babes of Grace.

  VIII.

  Thou shalt not steal, unless by _Sequestration_, _Composition_, or
  _Publick Faith_.

  IX.

  Thou shalt not bear False witness against a _Brother_, but may'st
  swallow Perjury by a Popish Reservation for the good of Holy Cause.

  X.

  Thou shalt Covet nothing but _Crown-Lands_, _Bishops Lands_, and
  the Estates of _Malignants_.

  _POSTSCRIPT._

    _Thus is our_ New Religion
    _Model'd by that of_ Forty One;
    _And we must root up_ Monarchy
    _To stop the growth_ of Popery;
    _And undermining_ Church _and_ State,
    Rome's _Practices we'll Antedate_;
    _The better to prevent the_ PLOT,
    _Ourselves will do what they cou'd not_.
    _We'll cure all fear of_ French Invasion,
    _By ruining at home the Nation_.
    _And since_ Petitions _do no good,
    And all our Tricks are understood:
    Since He who never us'd to fail,
    Doth now, our little_ Matchiavel;
    _We'll to the World Proclaim aloud,

    The_ King _and_ Duke _thirst after_ Bloud.
    Curtis, Harris, Smith and Care,
    _Shall Thrice a Week the Kingdom scare_,
    As if the_ Devil, Turk, _or_ Pope,
    _Were just arrived in the_ Hope,
    _We'll authorize Men to Rebel,
    By Tales from_ Hatfield, _and from_ Hell:
    _And then perswade the silly Nation,
    That_ Treason _comes by_ Revelation:
    _And that_ Imaginary Ghosts
    _Are_ Envoys _from the Lord of_ Hosts.
    _Nor will We cease, till we pull down_
    Episcopacy _and the_ Crown.

  Printed for _Tom Tell-troth_ at the Sign of the _Old King's Head_
  in _Axe Yard in King Street, Westminster_.


274.

An Apostrophe of the Loyal Party to his Majesty. 1681.

  At the Sessions for the City of London held on June 1, 1681, the
  Jury made a presentment against this "seditious pamphlet, contrived
  by Papists, and believed to be printed by the Popish Printer in
  Fetter Lane, the design of it being to overthrow the ancient
  constitution of this kingdom."[230] The Editor has not been able to
  discover a copy.


275.

The Vindication of the English Roman Catholics. 1681.

  On Monday October 10. 1681 a complaint was made by Justice Warcup
  of this "popish invective libel" dated from Antwerp. The publisher
  was had before the Council, and was to answer the same before
  the King and Council, on the following Friday.[231] No further
  proceedings can be found, neither can the Editor discover a copy of
  the book.


276.

Smith's Protestant Intelligence; Domestic and Forein. Numb. 21. From
Thursday April 7. to Monday April 11. 1681.

  For publishing this newspaper, a copy of which is preserved in
  the British Museum Library, a prosecution was instituted against
  Francis Smith. The information charges that Francis Smith, the
  elder, late of the parish of St. Christopher, London, Yeoman,
  being a pernicious and seditious man, contriving and maliciously
  intending to disturb the peace and common tranquillity of this
  kingdom, and to make, excite and procure discord between the King
  and his subjects did, on the first day of October, in the thirty
  third year of the reign of King Charles the Second, in the parish
  aforesaid, falsely, unlawfully, unjustly, wickedly, seditiously and
  scandalously cause to be printed, sold, uttered and published a
  certain false, malicious, scandalous, and seditious libel intituled
  _Smith's Protestant Intelligence, Domestick and Forein_ in which
  are contained these false, malicious, and scandalous sentences
  following, _April 9. Mr Everard having two Orders of Council sent
  him for to attend on his Majesty at the Board Yesterday, he there
  Appearing, constantly refused to give a Bond for to Prosecute
  Fitzharris; but, that the Reasons that made others (whose Office
  it was) to decline it, ought to make him much more shie to do it,
  It was thereupon granted to him that the King's Attorney General
  would prosecute. But it being insisted that he should give in his
  Evidence, as the law required (if what he had discovered were
  true). Everard, (as 'tis said) replied, that he would think of
  that, and return his Answer after some convenient time, if he were
  resolved as to some Difficulties and Quæries; viz.--Whether it was
  the Opinion of that Honourable Board, that Fitzharris could be
  tried elsewhere than in Parliament, and whether it were safe enough
  for Mr. Everard to give his Evidence elsewhere non obstante the
  Impeachment of the said Fitzharris by the Commons, especially after
  the Impeachment was lodged with the Lords, and entred in their
  Books, because the Lords might receive and reassume the Impeachment
  in another Parliament (as in case of the Lords of the Tower) and
  then the Commons might become Prosecutors themselves._[232]


277.

Del Teatro Brittanico o vero Historia dello Stato, Antico, e
Presente, Corte, Governo Spirituale, e Temporale, Leggi, Massime,
Religioni, et Euuenimenti della Grande Brettagna. By Gregorio Leti.
London. 1683.

  For writing this work the author was banished the kingdom, and
  seven hundred copies were seized. A copy exists in the British
  Museum Library. It is in two volumes, quarto size.


278.

The Impartial Protestant Mercury, N^o 89. From Friday Feb. 24 to
Tuesday February 28. 1681/2.

  At the Easter Sessions for Bristol in the year 1682 the Grand
  Jury presented this and the four following publications as being
  "infamous, scandalous, and seditious"; and the Court thereupon
  ordered that at its rising these libels be publicly burnt by the
  Beadle or Common Executioner.[233] A copy is preserved in the
  British Museum Library.


279.

The Impartial Protestant Mercury, N^o 96. From Tuesday March 21 to
Friday, March 24. 1681/2.

  A copy is preserved in the British Museum Library.


280.

The sad and lamentable cry of oppression and cruelty in the City of
Bristol. 1682.

  The editor has not met with a copy of this work.


281.

More sad and lamentable news from Bristol. 1682.

  The editor has not met with a copy of this work.


282.

The devouring informers of Bristol &c. Being an additional account
of some late proceedings of those ravenous beasts of prey, against
Dissenting Protestants. Bristol. April 22. 1682.

  A copy of this tract is preserved in the British Museum Library. It
  is in quarto, and contains four pages.


283.

Smith's Currant Intelligence, or an impartial account of transactions
both forraign and domestick. Published from Tuesday, March 23 to
Saturday March 27. (1680).

  For publishing this newspaper, a copy of which is preserved in
  the Library of the British Museum, a prosecution was instituted
  against John Smith of Queen Street, in the County of Middlesex,
  Printer. The information charges that the defendant being a
  pernicious person, and contriving and maliciously intending to
  excite discord and scandal between the King and his people and the
  nobles of the kingdom, did on the twenty seventh day of March, in
  the thirty second year of the reign of King Charles the Second,
  in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields, Co: Midd:, publish and
  cause to be published a certain false, scandalous, and malicious
  libel intituled _Smith's Currant Intelligence, or an impartial
  account of transactions both forraign and domestick_ containing
  among other things as follows:--_The Project for carrying and
  recarrying of Letters from place to place throughout all the
  Cities of London and Westminster, for a penny a Letter, so often
  mentioned in the Intelligences, is, as Dr. Oates says, a farther
  branch of the Popish Plot; for that he is credibly informed, it is
  the most dextrous Invention of Mr. Henry Nevill alias Pain, who is
  notoriously known to be a great asserter of the Catholick cause,
  and shrewdly suspected to be a promoter of this way of Treasonable
  Correspondencies; And it is to be feared, as that good Invention of
  Pipes hath wholly destroyed the Trade of Tankard Bearer, so this
  silly Invention will only serve to ruine the poor Porters._[234]


284.

England's Alarm: or, a most humble declaration, address, and fervent
petition to his most Excellent Majesty Charles the Second, King of
Great Britain and Ireland; and to his most honourable and grand
Council the Parliament of England; as also to the City of London,
and the whole nation in general. Concerning the great Overtures,
Catastrophes, and Grand Occurrences about to inundate and pour in
upon us, as the Judgments of Almighty God upon Antichrist and his
adherents, and the Pride, Nauseancy, and Errour of Professors, in the
years 1680 and 1681. Written by a true lover of the true Protestant
Religion, and of his Tottering poor Native Country of England
_Johannes Philangus_.

London. Printed for Thomas Pasham, in Fleet Lane. 1679.

  This book is ascribed by the compilers of the Catalogue of the
  Museum Library to William Petyt; and there are several other
  productions of Johannes Philangus; but it does not appear upon what
  authority Petyt is considered the author. A copy is preserved in
  the British Museum Library. It is in folio, and contains six pages.

  For printing this work a prosecution was instituted against James
  Cottrell, a printer of the parish of St. Sepulchre in London.
  The information charges that he, being a pernicious person, and
  contriving and maliciously intending to create discord and scandal
  between the King and his people, and the nobles of the kingdom, did
  on the twenty sixth day of March in the thirty second year of the
  reign of King Charles the Second, at the parish of St. Sepulchre
  in the City of London publish and cause to be published a false
  scandalous and malicious libel intituled _England's Alarm, &c._ (as
  in title), containing among other things as follows: _Remember,
  England, if thou art not mad drunk with the Whores Charms how that
  thy preaching Ministers are turn'd into dumb Dogs and ravening
  Wolves. And they bear rule by thy means, and thou lovest to have it
  so._[235]


285.

The Neck of the Quakers broken; or cut in sunder by the two-edged
sword of the Spirit which is put into my Mouth. First, in a Letter
to Edward Bourne a Quaker. Secondly, in answer to a letter to Samuel
Hooton and W. S. Thirdly, in a letter to Richard Farnsworth, Quaker.
Fourthly, in answer to a printed pamphlet of the said Richard
Farnsworth, entituled, Truth Ascended: or, The Anointed and Sealed
of the Lord defended, &c. Written by Lodowick Muggleton, one of the
two last Prophets and Witnesses unto the High and Mighty God, the Man
Christ Jesus in Glory. Amsterdam: Printed in the year of our Lord
God, 1663. And are to be had in Great Trinity Lane, over against the
Lyon and the Lamb.

  The author of this book was founder of the sect called
  Muggletonians. He was born in 1609, and was bred up to be a tailor.
  Abandoning his trade in 1651, he set up himself and his companion
  John Reeves as the "two last witnesses" mentioned in the apocalypse
  as having power to prophesy, and to smite mankind with plagues.
  They began to fulfil their "commission" by denouncing all religious
  sects, and especially the Ranters and the Quakers. An exposition
  of their doctrines, was published in "The Divine Looking-Glass."
  In this work, among other wild vagaries, were propounded the
  views that the Trinity are merely the three different names, and
  not the three distinct persons, of one God; that God has a real
  human body; and that he left Elias as his vicegerent in heaven
  when he came down to the earth to die on the cross. These profane
  heresies provoked much opposition. They were attacked by William
  Penn, the Quaker, in a book entitled _The New Witnesses proved Old
  Hereticks_. 1672.

  For writing this book Muggleton was prosecuted; and was tried at
  the Old Bailey on Wednesday, the 17th of January, 1676/7; he was
  found guilty, and sentenced by the Court to stand three days in
  the Pillory, one day in Cornhill near the Royal Exchange; the next
  day in Fleet Street near the end of Chancery Lane; and the third
  day in West Smithfield, from eleven to one o'clock each day, with
  a paper over his head describing his offence in large letters,
  and his books to be seized, and divided into three parts, to be
  burnt before his face near the Pillory by the Common Hangman; and
  besides, to be fined £500, and to continue in gaol till payment,
  and afterwards for his life, unless he procured good bail, "such
  as the Court should accept of, and not of his own gang, faction or
  sect," for being of good behaviour. Full particulars of his trial
  will be found in a little book, entituled, A true narrative of the
  Proceedings at the Sessions-house in the Old Baily, at a Sessions
  there held on Wednesday the 17th of January 1676/7, giving a full
  account of the true tryal and sentence of Lodowick Muggleton for
  blasphemous words and books. London. 1676/7.

  The indictment charges that Lodowick Muggleton, late of London,
  labourer, being a pernicious, blasphemous and heretical man in
  his opinions, pretending and affirming that he was one of the
  two last prophets of the New Testament, designing and intending
  to disseminate his pernicious, blasphemous, seditious, heretical
  and monstrous opinions, and to disturb the common peace and
  tranquillity of this kingdom, and to deprave the true religion
  rightly established and exercised within this kingdom, also to
  move, make, and excite discords between the king and his subjects,
  and to bring into great hatred and contempt the king and his royal
  government in ecclesiastical causes, did on the thirtieth day of
  August in the twenty eighth year of the reign of King Charles the
  Second, at the parish of St. Giles without Cripplegate, London,
  with force and arms, falsely, unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously,
  scandalously, blasphemously, seditiously, schismatically, and
  heretically write, cause to be printed, sold, uttered and published
  a certain malicious, scandalous, blasphemous, seditious, and
  heretical book intituled _The neck of the Quakers broken, &c._
  (setting out full title) in which book are contained these false,
  unlawful, blasphemous, seditious, schismatical, heretical, and
  scandalous sentences following, viz.:--_I write these lines unto
  you Edward Bourne, knowing you to be of the seed of the serpent,
  and appointed to eternal damnation before you were born, though
  you know it not, I do know it by your speaking evil of that
  Doctrine which is declared by us the Witnesses of the Spirit, by
  calling of it Deceit, Confusion, and Lies, with many more wicked
  speeches against the purest Truth that ever was declared by Prophet
  or Apostle, because this is the Commission of the Spirit, and
  the last Witness of God on earth. Therefore for these your hard
  sayings against the Doctrine of this Commission of the Spirit, in
  obedience unto my Commission, I do pronounce you cursed and damned
  soul and body from the presence of God, elect men and Angels, to
  eternity; neither shall that light within you, nor any God deliver
  you from this Curse, but according to my word it shall be upon
  you, because you shall know that God hath given power unto man to
  curse you to eternity, and that there is a Prophet of the Lord now
  in the Land. Written by Lodowick Muggleton, one of the two last
  Witnesses and Prophets unto the High and Mighty God the Man Christ
  Jesus in Glory._ Vale. And in another place of the same book are
  contained these false, feigned, malicious, scandalous, blasphemous,
  seditious and heretical sentences following, viz.:--_Now in this
  last age God hath given me power, and discerning to determine
  and give judgement upon men and women according as I do discern
  by their words, and I thereby also know what nature and seed
  they are of, and accordingly I give judgment upon them, for I do
  go by as certain a rule as the Judges of the Land do, when they
  give true Judgment according to the Law. For God hath ordained me
  the chief Judge in the world at this day to give sentence upon
  men and women's spiritual and eternal estate what will become of
  them after death. Full of this cursing I confess my mouth is, and
  I do rejoice in it too, I know that God is well pleased in the
  damnation of those that I have cursed, and I am wonderous well
  satisfied in giving judgement upon them, according to the tenor of
  my Commission; and this is that which you call swelling words._ And
  in another place of the same book are contained these other false,
  feigned, malicious, scandalous, blasphemous, unlawful, seditious
  and heretical sentences following, viz.:--_Therefore I shall speak
  a few words unto you two in particular, because you two have
  committed that unpardonable sin that never will be forgiven in this
  world, nor in the world to come; for you have done despite unto
  the Spirit of Truth, in speaking evil of things you do not know,
  for you have called the Doctrine and Declaration of the Spirit,
  Blasphemy, Deceit, and Lies, with many other railing speeches,
  with high impudency, from a light within you, and from the dead
  letter without you, and hath presumptuously lifted up your selves
  with that light within you, to speak evil of the Commission of
  the Spirit, which we received from the true personal God without
  us, even the Man Christ Jesus in Glory. Therefore in obedience to
  my Commission, I do pronounce Samuel Hooton and W. S., for this
  their Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit that sent me, cursed and
  damned soules and bodies from the presence of God, elect men and
  Angels, to eternity. Your light within you, nor God without you
  shall deliver you from this Sentence which I have declared upon
  you, because you shall know that there is a true Prophet now in
  the last Age, as well as there hath been in former times. And this
  Sentence shall be the mark of your Reprobation in your foreheads
  to eternity, even as your great Grandfather had in his forehead,
  and all the Seed of Faith that shall read this Epistle and see you,
  shall see the mark of Reprobation in your foreheads, neither shall
  you scrape it out, but it will be seen by the Elect as long as you
  live. And when you dye, you shall pass through this first death
  into the second death, and in the Resurrection you shall never
  see the face of God, nor man, nor Angels, nor your own faces, to
  eternity: but you shall be in utter darkness, where is weeping, and
  gnashing of teeth for evermore._ To the great scandal and contempt
  of the King, his Crown and Dignity, also of the religion rightly
  established in this kingdom, to the bad and pernicious example of
  all others in like case offending, and against the peace of the
  King, his Crown and Dignity.

  The indictment also further charges that--Nathaniel Powell late
  of the parish of St. Clement Danes, London, yeoman, being a
  pernicious, blasphemous, impious and profane person, and not
  having the fear of God in his heart, but moved and seduced by
  the instigation of the devil, and contriving and intending to
  deprave, scandalize and vilify the true Christian Religion rightly
  established and exercised within this kingdom; also to blaspheme
  the wisdom, omnipotence and majesty of the Holy Trinity, and the
  incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to strengthen, confirm
  and ratify the aforesaid pernicious, seditious, heretical and
  monstrous opinions of the said Lodowick Muggleton within the
  kingdom of England, did, on the first day of April, in the thirty
  third year of the reign of King Charles the Second, at the parish
  of St. Clement Danes, aforesaid, say, pronounce, and publish
  falsely, scandalously, maliciously, profanely, blasphemously,
  and heretically these false, scandalous, profane, blasphemous,
  and heretical words in the presence and hearing of divers liege
  subjects of the said lord the King, viz.--_I rather believe in
  Muggleton that stood on the Pillory, than in Jesus Christ, I have
  power to damn and to save, and if thou_ (meaning a certain Gilbert
  Soper then and there present) _art not damned I never desire to
  see the face of God. I do believe in that Muggleton, that stood
  on the Pillory, next to God Almighty. That Muggleton had power to
  damn whom he pleased, whom he damned were damned to eternity, and
  whom he saved, were saved. I have power to damn and to save, I
  believe more in Muggleton than in Jesus Christ. I thank God, never
  offended God in my life, I have no sin to ask God pardon for, I say
  drunkenness is no sin, I have had the knowledge of my own salvation
  these twelve months, I have the power of damning and saving, I damn
  thee_ (meaning a certain Richard Sharpe then and there present)
  _and God cannot save thy soul_. To the great scandal of the true
  profession of the Christian Religion, to the manifest contempt of
  the Holy Trinity, and blasphemy of the Deity of our Lord Jesus
  Christ, and to the bad and most pernicious example of all others in
  such case offending, and against the peace of the King his Crown
  and dignity.[236]


286.

No Protestant-Plot; or the present pretended Conspiracy of
Protestants against the King and Government discovered to be a
conspiracy of the Papists against the King and his Protestant
Subjects. London. 1681.

  For printing this book, a prosecution was instituted against
  Richard Baldwin of the parish of St. Sepulchre in London. The
  information charges that the defendant, being a malicious and a
  seditious man, and contriving and maliciously intending to disturb
  the peace and common tranquillity of this kingdom, and to excite,
  move, and procure discord between the king and his subjects, and to
  bring into hatred and contempt the king's government and the due
  course of law of this kingdom, did, on the twentieth day of October
  in the thirty-third year of the reign of King Charles the Second,
  in the parish of St. Sepulchre aforesaid, falsely, unlawfully,
  wickedly, maliciously, seditiously, and scandalously cause to be
  printed, sold and published, a certain false, malicious, scandalous
  and seditious libel, intituled _No Protestant Plot_, containing
  among other things as follows:--_The King is of too much goodness,
  and a Prince of Greater Wisdom and more unstained justice, than
  that any of his subjects should apprehend or fear anything illegal
  from him while he acts free and unconstrained; but how far his
  Ministers, especially those who have been exasperated by the
  proceedings of Parliaments, may render his Authority a cloak to
  their malice, and make the pretence of his preservation and safety
  subservient to their revenge, is what we are jealous of. And tho'
  we would fain persuade ourselves that they are persons of more
  honour and integrity than to make reprisals upon the Lives of
  Peers for the injury which they suppose was done them; yet the
  imprisoning my Lord Shaftsbury upon the credit of Witnesses whose
  testimony they refused to believe in the case of my Lord Stafford,
  doth not a little surprize the thinking part of mankind. Now
  nothing can be more disservicable to his Majesty, or lessening to
  the honour of his Government, than to have his Authority abused to
  countenance a personal quarrel, and his Laws applied to revenge
  a private offence. And in another part as follows:--Nor can men
  persuade themselves to believe, but that the Imprisonment of my
  Lord Shaftsbury is built upon something which will not abide the
  Test, when they consider the way and method according to which
  he hath been all along treated. Before either Coleman or the
  Jesuits were sent to prison, they were allowed both to know and
  see the persons who had deposed against them. And it is generally
  believed, that every Englishman may demand it as his right. And
  therefore, the refusing it to my Lord Shaftsbury, does seem to
  intimate either that the Witnesses are not of a credit sufficient
  to support the confinement of so great a Peer, or else that it
  was not convenient to trust their carriage in this matter, as
  well as the general course of their lives, to an early and exact
  scrutiny. But as if this were not enough to create a suspition of
  some undue and indirect dealing in this affair, the refusing to
  administer an oath to those that were ready to swear to Indictments
  of Subornation against the Witnesses, doth exceedingly heighten
  all men's jealousies. For not to debate about the legality or
  illegality of this procedure, being obliged till this business do
  either before this or a higher judicature come under a review, to
  acquiesce silently in the Judgement of the Court; I shall only say:
  That as it is the first president of this kind, so the reducing
  it into common practice, would prove a general obstruction of the
  justice of the Law. And to make the receiving of Indictments depend
  upon the pleasure of the Attorney General were to settle on him a
  more Arbitrary Power than the Laws of England have placed in the
  King himself._ And in another part as follows:--_And we are the
  more inclined to believe this whole Conspiracy wherein the Earl of
  Shaftsbury and other Protestants are said to be engaged against the
  King and the Government, is only a malicious piece of revenge upon
  the zealous patriots of our Religion; by considering that Justice
  Warcup, and Mr. David Fitzgerald, are employed to conduct and
  manage the detection and discovery of it._[237]

  A copy of the pamphlet is preserved in the British Museum Library.
  It is in quarto and contains 37 pages.


287.

A Satire, 1680.

  This is a set of verses satirizing the Lord Chief Justice Scroggs,
  apparently very similar to those printed on p. 216, for which Jane
  Curtis was prosecuted.

  For publishing them a prosecution was instituted against John Howe,
  of the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill, bookseller.

  The information charges that the defendant, contriving and
  maliciously intending to bring into hatred and contempt Sir
  William Scroggs, Lord Chief Justice, in those things which touch
  him and his judicial office and the King's authority, did, on the
  twenty-fourth day of May, in the thirty-second year of the reign of
  King Charles the Second, within the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill
  aforesaid, get into his hands a certain false, malicious, infamous,
  scandalous, and odious libel intituled _A Satire_, in which libel
  is contained among other things as follows:--_The Judge is a base
  butcher's sonne_ (meaning the Lord Chief Justice.) _Most sly of
  nocent blood. But for ten thousand pound has done The Pope a deal
  of good. 'Twas he that villaine Wakeman cleared, Who was to have
  poysened the King, As plaine to all but twelve appeared, For which
  he deserves to swing._ (meaning again the Lord Chief Justice.)
  And that the said John Howe, knowing the aforesaid libel to be a
  scandalous and infamous libel, did on the said twenty-fourth day
  of May, publish and expose to sale the same libel, to the great
  scandal and contempt of the said Lord Chief Justice and the King's
  authority.[238]

  There was also a prosecution against one Enoch Procer for
  publishing the same.[239]


288.

The Impartial Protestant Mercury. From Tuesday October 4 to Friday
October 7, 1681. N^o 48.

  For publishing this newspaper, a copy of which is preserved in
  the British Museum Library, a prosecution was instituted against
  Janeway the printer.

  The information charges that the defendant described as of London,
  yeoman, being a pernicious and seditious man, contriving and
  maliciously intending to disturb the peace and tranquillity of this
  kingdom, and to create, move, and excite discord between the king
  and his subjects, and to bring the king's government into contempt,
  did falsely, maliciously, and seditiously, with intent to persuade
  and induce the king's subjects to believe that this kingdom of
  England was governed by the advice of the king of France, and that
  the secrets of the government of this kingdom were notified to the
  king of France, and that to fulfil his most wicked intentions, on
  the twentieth day of October in the thirty-third year of the reign
  of King Charles the Second, in the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill,
  London, falsely, unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously, scandalously,
  and seditiously cause to be printed, sold, and published a
  certain, false, scandalous, and defamatory libel, intituled _The
  Impartial Protestant Mercury_, containing among other things as
  follows:--_There has been a fresh rumour of a Parliament like to
  be called to meet on the twenty-eighth of the next month, but we
  cannot find any foundation for that report, more than that a Person
  of Quality lately arrived from France relates, that he was told of
  such a thing at Paris._[240]

  On April 5, 1682, Janeway was called before the Council for
  printing and publishing false and seditious news, and he was
  thereupon ordered to give good security, to appear personally at
  the King's Bench Bar the first day of the next term, to answer such
  matters as should be exhibited against him on his majesty's behalf,
  and in the mean time to be of good behaviour; and he accordingly
  entered into recognizances for that purpose.[241]


289.

The Protestant Domestick Intelligence; or, News both from City and
Country. Published to prevent false reports. Friday, March 12th,
1679/80. No. 72.

  For publishing this newspaper, a copy of which is preserved in
  the British Museum Library, a prosecution was instituted against
  Nathaniel Crouch.

  The information charges that the defendant, who is described as
  of the parish of St. Margaret, Lothbury, London, gentleman, being
  a pernicious person, and contriving and maliciously intending
  to incite and move discord and scandal between the king and his
  people, and the magnates of this kingdom, did on the twelfth day
  of March, in the thirty-second year of the reign of King Charles
  the Second, at the parish of St. Margaret, Lothbury, publish and
  cause to be published a certain false, scandalous, and malicious
  libel entituled _The Protestant Domestick Intelligence; or, News
  both from City and Country_, containing (among other things) as
  follows:--_Yesterday we are informed that Mrs. Le-Mair, alias
  Loveland, the mother of Philip Le-Mair was taken into custody, and
  that she has declared there is a Person of Honour, as well as one
  of the Lords in the Tower, concerned with her in the conspiracy
  against the Life of the Duke of Buckingham._[242]


290.

Mercurius Civicus; or, a true account of affairs both foreign and
domestick. Monday, 29 March, 1680. N^o 3.

  For publishing this newspaper, a copy of which is preserved in the
  British Museum Library, a prosecution was instituted against James
  Astwood, of the parish of St. Christopher, London, printer.

  The information charges that the defendant, being a pernicious
  person, and contriving and maliciously intending to incite and
  move discord and scandal between the king and his people and the
  magnates of this kingdom, did on the thirtieth day of March, in the
  thirty-second year of the reign of King Charles the Second, at the
  parish of St. Christopher, London, print and cause to be printed, a
  certain false, scandalous, and malicious libel intituled _Mercurius
  Civicus: or, a True Account of affairs both foreign and Domestick_,
  containing (among other things) as follows:--_It is advised from
  the several places where the Lord Chief Justice North has been in
  circuit, that his Lordship hath been pleased to declare that the
  Act of Parliament for the Conviction of Popish Recusants ought
  to be put in force against none but Papists. And though several
  Protestants had been indicted hereon, he gave it as his Opinion.
  That the intention of that Act was purely to suppress Popery, and
  so directed the Jury not to find the Bill against Protestants as
  Popish Recusants but as Protestant Dissenters, which hath given a
  great deal of satisfaction to people, several protestants having
  been severely dealt withall by reason of that Act, which point the
  Parliament were in great consultation about rectifying._[243]


291.

A Faithful relation of the most remarkable transactions which have
happened at Tangier: since the Moors have lately made their attacques
upon the Forts and Fortifications of that Famous Garrison, likewise
the strength and good posture of defence it remains now in. With an
account of the Trenches, Lines and Works they have already drawn in
order to their besieging several of the said forts strongly guarded
by the English, and the advantageous success the English have
obtained over those infidels, in a late fight between them; burning
and demolishing their works, beating them out of their trenches,
killing them, and pursuing them even to their Camp.

  A pamphlet of four pages; a copy of which is preserved in the
  British Museum Library. For its publication David Mallett, of the
  parish of St. Martin, Ludgate, printer, was prosecuted.

  The information charges that the defendant published the same with
  the intent to create discord and scandal between the king and his
  people and the magnates of this kingdom; but it does not set out
  any of the alleged objectionable passages as is usually done.


292.

The Speech of the late Lord Russel to the Sheriffs; together with the
paper deliver'd by him to them, at the Place of Execution, on July
21, 1683. London. Printed by John Darby, by direction of the Lady
Russel. 1683.

  A copy of this speech is preserved in the Library of the British
  Museum. It is in folio and contains four pages.

  For publishing the same, a prosecution was instituted against John
  Darby, bookseller, of the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great,
  London.

  The information charges that the defendant being a pernicious and
  seditious man, and contriving and practising, and falsely, and
  maliciously, and wickedly and seditiously intending to disturb the
  peace of the king and the common tranquillity of this kingdom, and
  to weaken and bring into discredit and bad repute the laws and
  customs of this kingdom, and the ancient government and the common
  justice thereof, and to excite and procure discords and seditions
  between the king and his subjects, also to bring into discredit the
  trial and sentence of Lord William Russell, did, on the fourteenth
  day of August in the thirty-fifth year of the reign of King
  Charles the Second, at the parish of St. Bartholomew aforesaid,
  falsely, unlawfully, unjustly, wickedly, seditiously, maliciously,
  and scandalously, make, compose, and print and sell, utter, and
  publish a certain false, seditious, malicious, and scandalous libel
  intituled _The speech of the late Lord Russell to the Sheriffs,
  together with the paper delivered by him to them at the place of
  execution_, containing, among other things, these false, malicious,
  seditious and scandalous sentences, viz., _I wish with all my soul
  all our unhappy Differences were removed, and that all sincere
  Protestants would so far consider the danger of Popery, as to lay
  aside their Heats, and agree against the Common Enemy; and that the
  Churchmen would be less severe, and the Dissenters less scrupulous;
  For I think Bitterness and Persecution are at all times bad, but
  much more now. For Popery, I look on it as an Idolatrous and Bloody
  Religion, and therefore thought myself bound, in my Station, to do
  all I could against it. And by that, I foresaw I should procure
  such great Enemies to myself, and so powerful ones, that I have
  been now for some time expecting the worst. And blessed be God, I
  saw by the Axe, and not by the Fiery Tryal_, And in another part,
  these other false, seditious, scandalous and defamatory sentences,
  viz., _I did believe and do still, that Popery is breaking in upon
  the Nation; and that those who advance it, will stop at nothing, to
  carry on their Design: I am heartily sorry that so many Protestants
  give their helping hand to it._ And in another place are contained
  these other false, scandalous, seditious and defamatory sentences,
  following, _I cannot but give some touch about the Bill of
  Exclusion, and shew the Reasons of my appearing in that Business;
  which in short is this: That I thought the Nation was in such
  danger of Popery, and that the Expectation of a Popish Successor
  (as I have said in Parliament) put the King's life likewise in
  such danger, that I saw no way so effectual to secure both as such
  a Bill. As to the limitations which were proposed, if they were
  sincerely offered, and had pass'd into a Law, the Duke then would
  have been excluded from the Power of a King, and the Government
  quite altered, and little more than the Name of a King left. So I
  could not see either Sin or Fault in the one, when all People were
  willing to admit of t'other; but thought it better to have a King
  with his Prerogative, and the Nation easy and safe under him, than
  a King without it, which must have bred perpetual jealousies, and
  a Continual Struggle. All this I say, only to justify myself, and
  not to inflame others; Though I cannot but think my Earnestness in
  that matter has had no small Influence in my present Sufferings._
  And in another place are contained these other false, scandalous,
  and seditious sentences following:--_I pray God lay not this to the
  charge, neither of the King's Counsel, nor Judges, nor Sheriffs,
  nor Jury: And for the Witnesses, I pity them, and wish them well.
  I shall not reckon up the Particulars wherein they did me wrong: I
  had rather their own Consciences should do that, to which, and the
  Mercies of God I leave them._ And in another place are contained
  these other false, malicious, scandalous and seditious sentences
  following:--_From the Time of chusing Sheriffs, I concluded the
  Heat in that Matter would produce something of this kind; and I
  am not much surprised to find it fall upon me. And I wish what is
  done to me, may put a stop, and satiate some Peoples' Revenge, and
  that no more innocent Blood be shed, for I must, and do still look
  upon mine as such, since I know I was guilty of no Treason; and
  therefore I would not betray my Innocence by Flight._

  On November 20th, 1683, Darby was tried, and found guilty, and on
  February 1, 1683/4 he was brought to the Court of King's Bench
  to receive judgment, which, he humbly submitting himself to the
  Court, and begging pardon, with a promise never to commit the like
  offence, the Court ordered to be, That he should pay 20 marks for a
  fine to the king, and find securities for good behaviour for twelve
  months, and that till this be paid and done, he should be committed
  to prison.[244]


293.

The Night Walker of Bloomsbury.

  A single sheet in folio printed on both sides. A copy is preserved
  in the British Museum Library.

  Langley Curtis, the bookseller, was prosecuted for publishing this
  sheet. The indictment charges that the defendant, contriving and
  intending to disturb the peace and common tranquillity of this
  kingdom, and to bring the king into the greatest hatred, contempt,
  and infamy with all his subjects; and to cause, incite, and procure
  divers differences and false rumours concerning the pretended ghost
  of Lord William Russell, lately attainted and executed for high
  treason, did, on the twelfth day of October in the thirty-fifth
  year of the reign of King Charles the Second, at the parish of St.
  Bride aforesaid, unlawfully, seditiously, and maliciously print
  and publish, and cause to be printed and published, a certain
  feigned, false, seditious, and scandalous libel of and concerning
  the pretended ghost aforesaid, intituled _The Night Walker of
  Bloomsbury_, containing these false, feigned, and scandalous
  sentences following, viz., _Ralph: D'ye hear the newes. Will. What
  newes_, &c., &c., to _Caball of bigotted Papists_. And in another
  part as follows,--_Will_. _In this Meremaid's attire_, &c., &c.,
  _to quickly changed the colour of his ghostly habit_.

  Upon this indictment Curtis was tried on February 14, 1683/4, found
  guilty, and on April 21, 1684, sentenced to stand in and upon the
  Pillory in Bloomsbury Market between the hours of eleven and one
  o'clock, with a paper on his head denoting his offence in large
  letters, and at the same time the libel was to be burned by the
  Common Hangman. He was also sentenced to pay a fine of £500, to be
  committed to the Marshalsea until payment, and to find security for
  good behaviour during life.

  The following is a complete copy of this publication:--[245]


  THE NIGHT WALKER OF BLOOMSBURY:

  Being the Result of several late Consultations between a Vintner,
  Judge Tallow-chandler, a Brace of Fishmongers, and a Printer, &c.
  In a Dialogue between _Ralph_ and _Will_.

  _Entred according to Order._

  _Ralph._ D'ye hear the News?

  _Will._ What News?

  _Ralph._ Why, they say my Lord _Russel_ walks.

  _Will._ And do you believe it?

  _Ralph._ Why not? may not Lords walk as well as other people?

  _Will._ That's not the business--but I perceive you have heard but
  a piece of the Story--you have not heard how the Ghost came to be
  rais'd nor how he was laid.

  _Ralph._ Rais'd and Laid!--why then I warrant you take it to be
  nothing but a piece of Imposture.

  _Will._ Nothing more certain,--a meer silly, idle, foppish
  contrivance of a Cabal of bigotted _Papists_.

  _Ralph._ I must confess a Bigotted _Papist_ is a very sottish sort
  of Animal.--But what did this deep design drive at?

  _Will._ Why, Sir, a certain _Vintner_ not far from _Southampton
  Square_, a well-wisher, you may be sure, to any Religion he could
  get by, had a mind to draw custome to his empty House--For he had
  a vast prospect of gain from the success of the Action,--For, quo
  he to himself, the people will cry, whether shall we go? Go! says
  another, we'l go to the _Hobgoblin_ that counterfeited the Lord
  _Russel's_ Ghost--for, thought he, everybody will be glad to see a
  _Hobgoblin_.

  _Ralph._ Puh--this is some invention of yours to put a trick upon
  the poor _Papists_.

  _Will._ An Invention of mine! Tis all about the Town--and
  besides, there is nothing more common among the _Papists_ than to
  counterfeit Spirits and Ghosts--I find you never read the Story of
  the four Monks of _Bearn_ in _Switzerland_, that were hang'd for
  counterfeiting the _Virgin Mary_; nor of the Country Curate that
  lay with his Neece in the shape of _St. Barbara_. But the Fryer
  had not so good luck: For he living in a young widow's House,
  would fain have frighted the young Widow into his Lascivious
  Embraces--and to that purpose haunted her chamber every Night in a
  Winding Sheet: But she, being a Woman of mettle, hid a Friend of
  hers privately in her chamber, that gave the Spirit such a severe
  Cudgel-correction, as made him quickly beg Quarter for his bruised
  Bones.

  _Ralph._ But all this while, where was the Profundity of the
  design?

  _Will._ The profundity of the Design was to put the Lord Russel's
  Speech upon Dr. Burnett--And of this they were resolv'd to have an
  acknowledgment out of the Lord Russel's own Mouth.

  _Ralph._ That was hard to do, when his Head was cut off.

  _Will._ Oh--but though the Head of his body was cut off, the Head
  of his Ghost was still on.--However, tho' it be not to be deny'd,
  that a Spirit without a Head has a very brisk motion, yet the
  Committee were not so cunning as to know how to bring his Ghost
  out of _Buckinghamshire_ into _Bloomsbury Square_--and therefore
  another expedient was to be found out.--The Committee was extreamly
  puzl'd to find out this Expedient, till the _Vintner_, inspir'd no
  doubt with his own _Pipes_ and Tierces, had it presently in his
  Pate.--Quo he Ladies and Gentlemen, why may not I act a Ghost, as
  well as Matt. Medbourn?

  _Ralph._ Frolick for frolick now, it would be a very good humour
  to Indict this Vintner upon the Statute of 21 Jacob, 26, for
  endeavouring to personate the Lord _Russel's_ Ghost, on purpose to
  procure an acknowledgment contrary to his will and consent.

  _Will._ Faith, _Sir_, the very action itself procur'd him
  punishment enough, to be well drub'd, and two such lovely forehead
  marks of _Knave_ and _Fool_, that Ten Fountains, with all the Soap
  in the City, will never wash off.

  _Ralph._ Pardon me, _Sir_, I have a greater opinion of the
  _Vintner_, and that he acted what he did in the imitation of
  _Theseus_ and _Eneas_, who both went to visit _Pluto'_s Dominions;
  but this same _Vintner_ undertook to be even a tormented Inhabitant
  of the Lower Shades himself, to advance the Popish Interest, which
  was much a more daring deed then that of _Theseus._ The _Vintner_
  had Listed himself in Hell, which _Theseus_ never did.

  _Will._ Ay--but _Theseus_ was _Theseus_; Theseus kicked
  _Proserpina's_ Dog before her Face, in her own Dining-Room: But
  this Bugbear of a _Vintner_ suffer'd himself to be thrash'd
  like any mortal Coward, and yet the Fool had not the wit to
  _vanish_.--They say, had the Earth yielded never so little, the
  first blow the Beadle hit, had struck him down to the place from
  whence he pretended to come.

  _Ralph._ But can you tell who hatched this Chicken of a Design?

  _Will._ Politick Heads, _Sir_, Politick Heads,--very Politick
  Heads--and of both Sexes too I assure ye.

  _Ralph._ I must confess I admire neither of their ingenuities;
  and as for the Women, I find 'em much more famous for the
  crafty carrying on a Love intrigue, or concealing their private
  enjoyments, then in managing _Hobgoblin_ Plots.

  _Will._ Sir, I do tell ye, this Committee consisted of several
  Persons, Male and Female--_Imprimis_, The Man of the House, and his
  Wife, chief _Presidences_ of the Council. In the next place, two
  _Fishmongers_ in _Bloomsbury_, if you hunt after the name of the
  one, you may easily find it: the other a most rude and ungraceful
  acknowledger of the Lord _Russel's_ former favours, as who had all
  along serv'd his Table from his own Shop; his Grandfather seems to
  have bin the Son of _Tomlins_.

  _Ralph._ These _Fishmongers_, Sir, were notably drawn into this
  Conspiracy--twas emblematical--For as great undertakings require
  great silence, so none more likely then _Fishmongers_ to bear the
  Proverb always in mind, _As mute as a Fish_.

  _Will._ The next was a _Tallow-chandler_, who, tho' he live by the
  Night, takes his name from Noon-Day.

  _Ralph._ Why that was it that spoil'd the whole Plot, to engage a
  _Tallow-chandler_ in deeds of Darkness.

  _Will._ Oh, Sir, but he was to have been a Witness--and none so fit
  to be witness as a man of Light--besides, Sir, he was to attend
  the _Hobgoblin_, and none so fit as a _Tallow Chandler_ to hold
  a Candle to the Devil. But observe how the _Tallow Chandler_ was
  match'd; for the other witness was to be a _Papistical Printer_ in
  the Neighbourhood.

  _Ralph._ There y'are right again--for if the Truth should chance
  to slip out of the _Chandler's_ memory, the _Printer_ had always a
  _Register_ ready to refresh it.

  _Will._ By what I hear, theres no such need of rubbing up the
  _Tallow-chandler's_ memory. A my word Sir, y'are got into pleasant
  company--Here's a _Vintner_ acts the Devil--and a _Tallow-chandler_
  acts a Judge--and Judges, Sir, are no fools to have their memories
  rub'd.

  _Ralph._ Who the Devil made the _Tallow-chandler_ a Judge?

  _Will._ Wine and Fat Venson, Sir, at the _Crown-Tavern_, in
  _Bloomsbury_; For there it was that the _Tallow-chandler_ a Witty,
  Jocose, Droll of a _Tallow-chandler_, finding there was something
  to be done to gratify the Company (for it was at a public
  Venson-Feast) took upon him the Dignity of the Coife, and causing
  Mr. _Hamden_ to be arraign'd before him, Mercilesly condemn'd him
  to be hang'd.

  _Ralph._ What had the _Tallow-chandler_ to do with Mr.
  _Hamden_.--Surely he is to stand or fall by another sort of
  Judicature then six ith Pound.

  _Will._ Oh, Sir, 'twas done to please a brace of Reverend Justices
  that were Stewards of the Feast--and such frolicks as these, Lord
  Sir, you cannot imagin how they digest Venson, Pasty Pudding
  Crust--There are some people so hot, that you would admire they do
  not melt their Grease, and get the Scratches with Galloping after
  such fancies as these.

  _Ralph._ And yet when this _Tallow-chandler_ serv'd Mr. _Hamden_
  with Candles, he did not scruple to take his Money, notwithstanding
  he might not then be of his severe Judges present opinion: And
  therefore there is some hope yet left, that Mr. _Hamden_ may
  sweeten up his Judge into a Reprieve, upon a promise of laying in
  his _Winter_ store out of _Bloomsbury_.

  _Will._ There was an _Apothecary_ too, whose spleen was extreamly
  tickl'd at the conceit of their design. Repute makes him a person
  of a bulky stature, famous for the beauty of his Wainscot Lady, and
  the wit of his Son, whom he teaches to curse the D. of M.

  _Ralph._ Why truly, this _Pothecary_ is highly to be applauded for
  his Loyalty: for to shew the Exquisiteness of his Allegiance, he
  sends his child to the Devil to confirm it.

  _Will._ There were several others that met at two or three of these
  consults, that have open'd their Purses to save their Reputation.

  _Ralph._ I am not apt to believe that people who concerned
  themselves with such a ridiculous Sham as this, had much Reputation
  to lose; and therefore their _Peter-Pence_ were ill bestow'd. The
  Proverb is, _Discover, and shame the Devil_.

  _Will._ That never could be better don then by the Dress with which
  they disguis'd him: For certainly all the _Fools_ and _Zanies_ in
  _Bartholomew-Fair_ were never so quaintly rigg'd, as this same
  _Hob-thrush_ of a _Vintner_ was equipped to act his Tragick-Comedy.

  _Ralph._ As how?

  _Will._ First they hung about his Neck a large _Night-Rail_, which
  the Gentlewoman of the House lent him out of her Zeal.

  _Ralph._ Most Enigmatical, Problematical, Emphatical, and
  Emblematical--for a _Night-Rail_ being a kind of a Cloak, was most
  proper to cover a piece of Knavery.

  _Will._ To hide his lower parts, the _Fishmongers_ lent him their
  _Aprons_.

  _Ralph._ More Enigmatical still.--For _Fishmongers_ being men of
  Lent and Fasting days--the _Fishmongers' Aprons_ were to put the
  Ghost in mind of his sorrow, contrition, and repentance for owning
  a Speech that was none of own.

  _Will._ By your favour, Sir, here's a Breach of an Act of
  Parliament discovered, to bring a Spirit out of his Grave in
  _Linnen_, whereas he ought to have appear'd in _Crape_; and being a
  Lord in Lac't _Crape_ too.

  _Ralph._ Well! But what had the Goblin about his Head?

  _Will._ His head was muffl'd up in a White Diaper Napkin--to
  shew that the Letter was drapered with the Inventions of several
  Writers, and not of one plain Woofe.

  _Ralph._ Shame faw the Luggs on 'em for a Company of Dotards--as if
  the Devil were grown as fantastical as the _French_, to change his
  old fashions.--Now the old fashions of Ghosts, ever since I heard
  of Ghosts was always the same, a Winding-sheet with two Knots and a
  Taper in the Spirit's hands, with which the _Chandler_ might easily
  have furnished the Devil. Or if the Spirit must needs rise in the
  same Cloaths he was burr'd, the Cabal had much better ha' club'd
  for a new _Crape_ Funeral Suit--'Twould ha' serv'd the Goblin of
  a Vintner another time, when the juice of his own _Lime-Fats_ had
  burnt up his Liver. I'le undertake there's ne're a Booth in _Pork
  Fair_ but would have dressed up a Hobgoblin more artificially than
  such a consultation of Ninny Hammers--But when the Devil was thus
  betrumpery'd what did he do?

  _Will._ In this Mere-maid's Attire, he went attended with the two
  _Fishmongers_ for his Guard, and the _Chandler_ and _Printer_ were
  to be Witnesses they saw the Apparition.--At length when he came
  to his Posts, as the Contrivers had laid it, 'tis to be supposed,
  near the House where the Lord _Russel_ liv'd, he fell a groaning
  like an Oxe at the first sticking; nay, he groan'd even like the
  Groaning-board itself; and after a short preamble of Lamentations
  lewdly uttered, He cried out, _Oh--I have no rest because of the
  Speech that I never made, but_ Dr. Burnet.

  _Ralph._ There's no fear on't, but he'l be taught to groan better
  when he comes to groan for himself. One would have thought he
  should have practised the Art of Groaning more accurately before
  he went to groan upon such an Occasion as this--He should have
  groaned as if he had been groaning for his Life, that had taken
  such a part upon him--but it seems he rather fell a braying then a
  groaning, and so discover'd himself--for upon the noise, as some
  Report, or at least, as the Goblin deserv'd, one of the Watch
  coming up to him, and perceiving by his shoes, that he had no
  Cloven-Feet, _Can't ye be quiet_., quo he, _in your Grave_? _I'le
  make ye quiet_; and with that, gave him such a Palt o'th Pate and
  the Thigh, as quickly chang'd the colour of his Ghostly Habit.

  _Ralph._ I' good faith, the Watchmen did more then all the
  Committee could do--for they only strove to make him a faigned
  Goblin, but the Watchman made him a real _Raw-Head and
  Bloody-Bones_.--A Catastrophe that such an enterprize justly
  deserv'd.--But what became of poor Raw-Head and Bloody-Bones?

  _Will._ The now real Goblin was forc'd to confess his name, and the
  names of his Associates, and to chear up the Watch with Drink and
  Money for the fright he had put 'em in, and so they let him go, to
  groan forth his own Lamentations to the Gulls that set him at Work.

  _Ralph._ Well, I will say nothing of the Speech one way nor other,
  but sure it was an act neither generous nor christian-like, to
  raise up an Impostor to disturb the silence of a Gentleman's Grave
  that had paid his last debt to Justice.

  _Will._ Barbarous and papistical, which is as much as needs be said
  of it.

  FINIS.

  London: Printed by J. Grantham, MDCLXXXIII.


294.

The true Englishman speaking plain English. By Edward Fitzharris.
1681.

  There does not appear to be a copy of this book preserved in the
  British Museum Library: but it is printed in extenso in the fourth
  volume of Cobbett's Parliamentary History. For writing the same,
  a prosecution was instituted against Fitzharris. The indictment
  charges first, that the defendant, described as late of the parish
  of St. Martin in the Fields, Middlesex, gentleman, did, on the
  twenty-second day of February, in the thirty-third year of the
  reign of King Charles the Second, compass treason with one Edmund
  Everard against the king; and further, that the defendant as a
  false traitor did treasonably, maliciously and advisedly write
  and publish a certain most wicked and traitorous libel intituled
  _The true Englishman speaking plain English_, in which libel are
  expressed and declared the treasons and treasonable compassing,
  imaginations, and purposes of the defendant to excite and persuade
  the subjects of the King to rise up and rebel against the King
  and to deprive and depose the King from the style, honour, and
  royal name of the Imperial Crown of this kingdom, as follows: _If
  James_ (meaning James, Duke of York) _be conscious and guilty,
  Charles_ (meaning the King) _is so too, believe me, both these are
  brethren in iniquity, they are in confederacy with Pope and French
  to introduce Popery and Arbitrary Government as their actions
  demonstrate. The Parliament, Magna Charta, and liberty of the
  subject, are as heavy yokes they'd willingly cast off, for to make
  themselves as absolute as their Brother of France; and if this can
  be proved to be their aim and main endeavour, why should not every
  true Briton be a Quaker thus far? And let the English spirit be up
  and move all as one man to self defence, nay send if need be to
  open action and fling off those intolerable Riders._ (meaning the
  King and the Duke of York.) And in another part of the aforesaid
  most wicked and traitorous libel are contained among other things
  these false, seditious, and traitorous sentences following:--_J.
  and C._ (meaning James, Duke of York and the King) _both brethren
  in iniquity, corrupt both in root and branch as you have seen, they
  study but to enslave you to a Romish and French-like yoke. Is it
  not plain? Have you not eyes, sense, or feeling? Where is that old
  English noble spirit? Are you become French asses to suffer any
  load to be laid upon you? And if you can get no remedy from this
  next parliament, as certainly you will not, and that the K. repents
  not, complies not with their advice, then up, all as one man. O
  brave Englishmen, look to your_


      (HERE ENDS THE ORIGINAL WORK)


FOOTNOTES:

[1] Life and Reign of Queen Elizabeth, p. 486.

[2] Strype's Annals, Vol. 2, p. 562.

[3] Judgment Roll, Queen's Bench, Mich., 26 & 27 Eliz., roll 37.

[4] Missionary Priests, p. 84.

[5] Dom. Elizabeth, 1599, June, July, Bundle 271, No. 11.

[6] Collier's Bibliographical Catalogue, vol. 1, p. 526.

[7] Dom. Eliz., vol. 274, no. 58.

[8] Dom. Elizabeth, vol. 274, no. 59.

[9] Dom. Elizabeth, vol. 275, no. 25.

[10] Dom. Elizabeth, vol. 275, no. 28.

[11] Dom. Elizabeth, vol. 275, no. 31 and 31 I.

[12] Pag. 4, 5, 6, 11, 39, 41, 43, 53, 75, description of the
councell. Pag. 4, 25, 75, he describeth the erle.

[13] Pag. 54 of his owne.

[14] Dom. Elizabeth, vol. 278, no. 17.

[15] Commons' Journals, Vol. 1, pp. 226 and 244.

[16] Commons' Journals, Vol. 1, pp. 399, 400, 404, 407, 408, 415, 416.

[17] Pat. Roll, 8 James I, part 30 dorso. A printed copy of this
proclamation will be found among the Domestic State Papers, James I.

[18] Domestic State Papers, James I, Vol. 26, no. 48.

[19] Domestic, James I, Vol. 28, nos. 51 and 128, and Vol. 31, no. 2.

[20] Wilson's Life and Reign of James I, contained in Kennet's
History of England, vol. 2, p. 715, ed. 1706.

[21] Court and Times of James I, vol. 1, pp. 279, 280. Also Domestic
State Papers, James I, vol. 75, no. 28.

[22] Court and Times of James I, vol. 1, p. 248.

[23] Court and Times of James I, vol. 1, page 251.

[24] Proclam. Collection, Dom. State Papers, James I, no. 23.

[25] Domestic State Papers, James I, vol. 78, no. 78.

[26] Domestic State Papers, vol. 80, art. 6, 26, 38; vol. 81, art.
67; and vol. 86, art. 111.

[27] Court and Times of James I, vol. 1, p. 291; also Domestic State
Papers, James I, vol. 80, no. 1.

[28] See Edinburgh Review for July, 1871, page 179.

[29] Domestic, James I, vol. 121, art. 7.

[30] See Court and Times of James I, vol. 2, pp. 146, 157, 158, 160;
also Howell's State Trials.

[31] Domestic, James I, vol. 109, no. 14.

[32] Wood's History and Antiquities of the University of Oxford, ed.
Gutch, vol. 2, pp. 341-345; Cooper's Annals of Cambridge, vol. 3, pp.
143, 144; Domestic State Papers, James I, vol. 132, nos. 47 and 48.

[33] Dom. James I, vol. 153, no. 75.

[34] See Domestic State Papers, James I, vol. 157, nos. 40 and 41.

[35] Dom. James I, 1624, Aug. 14th.

[36] Dom. Charles I, vol. 44, no. 78.

[37] Dom. James I, vol. 171, no. 49.

[38] Ibid, art. 60.

[39] Domestic, James I, vol. 171, art. 64.

[40] Howell's State Trials; Commons' Journals, vol. 1, pp. 805, 806.

[41] Domestic State Papers; Charles I, vol. 54, nos. 4 and 5.

[42] Domestic State Papers, Charles I, vol. 205, no. 34.

[43] Domestic State Papers, Charles I, vol. 135, no. 40.

[44] Domestic State Papers, Charles I, vol. 142, no. 22.

[45] Ibid, Charles I, vol. 205, no. 102.

[46] Domestic State Papers, Charles I, vol. 351, no. 101.

[47] Lords' Journals, vol. 4, pp. 161, 180; Howell's State Trials,
vol. 5, p. 765.

[48] Laud's Chancellorship, fol. 1700, p. 129.

[49] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 29.

[50] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 116.

[51] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, pp. 268, 269.

[52] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 166.

[53] Ibid, pp. 206, 319, 324.

[54] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, pp. 266, 268, 269.

[55] Ibid, vol. 2, p. 324.

[56] Ibid, vol. 2, p. 349.

[57] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 404.

[58] Ibid, p. 208.

[59] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 142.

[60] Ibid, vol. 2, pp. 146, 148, 160.

[61] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 148.

[62] Commons' Journ., vol. 2, p. 190.

[63] Ibid, pp. 206, 269.

[64] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 206.

[65] Ibid, p. 221.

[66] Ibid, p. 293.

[67] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, pp. 393, 396, 408, 415.

[68] Commons' Journals, vol. 2, p. 408.

[69] Com. Journals, vol. 2, pp. 411, 414.

[70] Com. Journals, vol. 2, p. 472.

[71] Ibid, p. 500.

[72] Ibid, p. 500.

[73] Ibid, p. 501.

[74] Com. Journ., vol. 2, p. 501.

[75] Ibid, p. 546.

[76] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, p. 612.

[77] Ibid, pp. 612, 613, 615, 626.

[78] Com. Journ., Vol. 2, pp. 617, 622.

[79] Ibid, p. 623.

[80] Com. Journals, vol. 2, p. 624.

[81] Com. Journ., vol. 2, p. 624.

[82] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, p. 625.

[83] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, pp. 661, 662, 679, 683, 690, 691.

[84] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, p. 685.

[85] Ibid, p. 762.

[86] Ibid, pp. 769, 798, 894.

[87] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, p. 769.

[88] Ibid, p. 769.

[89] Ibid, p. 795.

[90] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, p. 801.

[91] Ibid, p. 12.

[92] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, p. 831.

[93] Commons' Journals, Vol. 2, pp. 900, 951.

[94] Ibid, pp. 910, 911, 953.

[95] Ibid, p. 925.

[96] Commons' Journals, Vol. 3, pp. 40, 52.

[97] Commons' Journal, Vol. 3, p. 202.

[98] Ibid, p. 549.

[99] Commons' Journals, Vol. 3, p. 585.

[100] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 25

[101] Ibid, p. 111.

[102] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 152.

[103] Ibid, pp. 170, 420.

[104] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 206.

[105] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 336.

[106] Ibid, pp. 342, 348.

[107] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 419.

[108] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 420.

[109] Ibid, p. 451.

[110] Ibid, pp. 483, 505, 516.

[111] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, pp. 505, 531, 639.

[112] Ibid, pp. 505, 507, 517.

[113] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, pp. 507, 508, 510, 511, 516, 517.

[114] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 517.

[115] Lords' Journals, Vol. 8, pp. 645-50, 657, 658.

[116] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 664.

[117] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 682.

[118] Commons' Journals, Vol. 4, p. 682.

[119] Commons' Journals, vol. 4, pp. 731, 732.

[120] Ibid, p. 735.

[121] Ibid.

[122] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, pp. 72, 73.

[123] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, p. 109.

[124] Commons' Journals, Vol. 5, p. 109.

[125] Commons' Journals, Vol. 5, pp. 123, 124.

[126] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, p. 153.

[127] Howell's State Trials, vol. 4, p. 926.

[128] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 4, p. 926.

[129] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, p. 224.

[130] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, p. 293. Wood's Athen. Oxon, (Bliss),
vol. 3, p. 594.

[131] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, p. 370.

[132] Commons' Journals, Vol. 5, p. 371.

[133] Ibid, p. 395.

[134] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, p. 405.

[135] Ibid.

[136] Ibid, p. 428.

[137] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, pp. 469, 471.

[138] Commons' Journals, vol. 5, pp. 614, 630.

[139] Ibid, p. 420.

[140] Commons' Journals, Vol. 6, pp. 111, 112, 115, 116.

[141] Ibid, p. 131.

[142] Commons' Journals, Vol. 6, p. 168.

[143] Ibid, pp. 168, 170.

[144] Ibid, p. 170.

[145] Commons' Journals, Vol. 6, pp. 174, 183.

[146] Commons' Journals, Vol. 6, p. 278.

[147] Ibid.

[148] Ibid, p. 312.

[149] Commons' Journals, Vol. 6, pp. 354, 475.

[150] Ibid, pp. 374, 378.

[151] Commons' Journals, Vol. 8, p. 259.

[152] Ibid.

[153] Timperley's Encyclopædia of Literary and Typographical
Anecdote, (second edition) p. 547.

[154] Commons' Journals, Vol. 8, p. 259.

[155] Pepys' Diary, Vol. 1, p. 236, (third edition).

[156] Commons' Journals, Vol. 6, pp. 529, 536, 539.

[157] Commons' Journals, Vol. 6, pp. 427, 444, 474, 475.

[158] Commons' Journals, Vol. 7, pp. 71, 72, 73.

[159] Commons' Journals, Vol. 7, p. 73.

[160] Ibid, pp. 86, 113, 144.

[161] Commons' Journals, Vol. 7, p. 144.

[162] Ibid, p. 195.

[163] Ibid.

[164] Commons' Journals, Vol. 7, p. 236.

[165] Ibid, p. 383.

[166] Commons' Journals, Vol. 7, pp. 400, 416.

[167] Commons' Journals, Vol. 7, p. 405.

[168] Commons' Journals, Vol. 7, p. 442.

[169] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 5, p. 791.

[170] Commons' Journals, Vol. 8, p. 259.

[171] Ibid.

[172] D'Israeli's Amenities of Literature, Vol. 3, p. 325.

[173] Howell's State Trials, vol. 7, p. 946. See also a Tract
published by Smith, entitled "An account of the injurious proceedings
of Sir George Jeffreys, Knight, late Recorder of London, against
Francis Smith, Bookseller."

[174] Commons' Journals, Vol. 8, p. 74.

[175] Commons' Journals, Vol. 8, pp. 183, 186, 192, 194, 198.
Howell's State Trials, Vol. 5, p. 1363.

[176] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 7, p. 946.

[177] Domestic State Papers, Charles II, Vol. 38, Nos. 56, 57, 58.

[178] Ibid, Vol. 39, No. 132.

[179] Domestic State Papers, Charles II, Entry Book 5, p. 39.

[180] Ibid, Vol. 43, No. 130.

[181] Ibid, Vol. 45, No. 28.

[182] Ibid, Nos. 74, 75.

[183] Domestic State Papers, Charles II, Vol. 33, No. 23.

[184] Domestic State Papers, Charles II, Vol. 34, No. 64.

[185] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 6, p. 513.

[186] Domestic State Papers, Charles II, Vol. 88, No. 76.

[187] Commons' Journals, Vol. 8, p. 467.

[188] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 6, p. 702.

[189] Domestic State Papers, Charles II, Vol. 98, No. 116.

[190] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 7, p. 950.

[191] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 7, p. 950.

[192] For a full account of Coleman's trial see Howell's State
Trials, Vol. 7, p. 1. Burnet, in his history of his own time, Vol.
1, p. 393, speaks thus of Coleman: "The Duchess of York had one
put about her to be her Secretary, Coleman; who became so active
in the affairs of the party, and ended his life so unfortunately,
that since I had much conversation with him, his circumstances may
deserve that his character should be given, though his person did
not. I was told he was a clergyman's son: but he was early catched by
the Jesuits, and bred many years among them. He understood the art
of managing controversies, chiefly that great one of the authority
of the church, better than any of their priests. He was a bold man,
resolved to raise himself, which he did by dedicating himself wholly
to the Jesuits: and so he was raised by them. He had a great easiness
in writing in several languages; and writ many long letters, and
was the chief correspondent the party had in England. He lived at
a vast expence. And talked in so positive a manner, that it looked
like one who knew he was well supported. I soon saw into his temper;
and I warned the Duke of it. For I looked on him as a man much liker
to spoil business than to carry it on dexterously. He got into the
confidence of P. Ferrier the king of France's confessor; and tried
to get into the same pitch of confidence with P. de la Chaise, who
succeeded him in that post. He went about everywhere, even to the
jails among the criminals, to make proselytes. He dealt much both in
the giving and taking of bribes."

[193] King's Bench Judgment Roll, Easter, 31 Car. 2, rot. 68.

[194] Domestic State Papers, Charles 2, Vol. 179, No. 114.

[195] Domestic State Papers, Charles 2.

[196] Domestic State Papers, Charles 2, Vol. 113, No. 128.

[197] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 7, p. 926. Indictments, London and
Middlesex. Mich. 31 Car. 2, No. 42.

[198] Commons' Journals, Vol. 9, p. 100.

[199] Commons' Journals, Vol. 9, p. 602.

[200] Commons' Journals, Vol. 9, p. 579.

[201] Commons' Journals, Vol. 9, pp. 572, 574, 576.

[202] State Trials, Vol. 8, p. 188.

[203] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 8, p. 189.

[204] Indictments, London and Midd., Hilary 31 and 32 Car. 2, No. 9.
King's Bench Judgment Roll, Easter 32 Car. 2, rot. 88 a.

[205] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Hil. 31 and 32 Charles 2,
No. 10.

[206] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Hilary, 31 and 32 Chas. 2,
No 1. King's Bench Judgment Roll, Easter 32 Car. 2, rot. 77.

[207] Howell's State Trials. Vol. 8, p. 191.

[208] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Mich. 31 Car. 2, No. 43.

[209] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 7, p. 931; Vol. 8, p. 191.

[210] Howell's State Trials, Vol. 7, p. 950.

[211] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Hil. 31 and 32 Car. 2, No. 2.

[212] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Hil. 32 and 33 Car. 2, No.
28.

[213] Treasury Records; King's Warrant Book, No. 5, p. 105.

[214] Commons' Journals, vol. 9, pp. 649, 651, 652, 654, 656.

[215] This word is in the printed book, but is omitted in the
indictment.

[216] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Hil. 33 Charles 2, No. 22.

[217] King's Bench Judgment Roll, Easter, 32 Charles 2, rot. 84.

[218] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Hilary 33 Charles II, No. 21.

[219] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Mich. 34 Charles 2, No. 85.

[220] Indictments, London and Middlesex, Mich. 34 Charles 2, No. 84.

[221] See London Mercury, No. 36, Aug. 8, 1682.

[222] Indictments. Lond. and Midd., Mich. 34 Car. 2, No. 81.

[223] Indictments. London and Midd., Mich. 34 Charles 2, No. 80.

[224] Indictments. Lond. and Midd., Hilary 34 and 35 Charles 2, No.
22.

[225] Indictments. Lond. and Midd., Hilary 34 and 35 Charles 2, No.
23.

[226] Indictments. Lond. and Midd., Hil. 34 and 35 Charles 2, No. 24.

[227] Indictments, London and Midd., Hil. 34 and 35 Charles 2, No. 95.

[228] The True Protestant Mercury, No. 32, April 13 to April 16, 1681.

[229] Ditto No. 49, June 22 to June 25, 1681.

[230] The Impartial Protestant Mercury, From Tuesday May 31, to
Friday June 3. 1681. No. 12.

[231] The Impartial Protestant Mercury, No. 50, From Tuesday October
11 to Friday October 14, 1681.

[232] King's Bench Judgment Roll, Trin. 35., Charles 2 rot., 81.

[233] London Gazette. No. 1717. From May 1 to May 4. 1682.

[234] King's Bench Judgment Roll, Easter 35, Charles 2. No. 310 rot.
23, 34 & 103.

[235] King's Bench Judgment Roll, Trinity 35, Charles 2., part 2, m.
89.

[236] King's Bench Judgment Roll, Mich. 33, Car. 2, part 2, m. 137.

[237] King's Bench Judgment Roll, Charles 2. No. 302, rot. 114.

[238] King's Bench Judgment Roll. Charles 2. No. 300, m. 88.

[239] King's Bench Judgment Roll. Charles 2. No. 298, m. 109.

[240] King's Bench Judgment Roll. Charles 2. No. 302, rot. 113.

[241] London Gazette. No. 1709. April 3 to April 6, 1682.

[242] King's Bench Judgment Roll. Charles 2. No. 298, rot. 106.

[243] King's Bench Judgment Roll. Charles 2. No. 298, rot. 107.

[244] London Gazette, No. 1900. King's Bench Judgment Roll. Charles
2. No. 314, rot. 100.

[245] King's Bench Judgment Roll. Charles 2. No. 316, rot. 88.



  TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE

  Italic text is denoted by _underscores_.

  A missing name or word is denoted by [   ], as in the original.

  A superscript is denoted by ^x or ^{xx}; for example, y^e and w^{th}.

  The format of some dates in the original text showed a year digit
  over another digit, similar to 167½ for example. These have been
  changed to the form 1671/2.

  The TABLE OF CONTENTS section has been created by the Transcriber.

  Obvious punctuation errors have been corrected after careful
  comparison with other occurrences within the text and consultation
  of external sources. The use of quotation marks in letters and other
  quotations is not consistent in the book; some adjustments have been
  made to have consistency within a particular letter or quotation.

  The first eight section numbers were missing a period. These have
  been added ('1' changed to '1.' etc).

  Anchors for Footnotes [189] [201] and [235] were missing and have been
  inserted.

  Except for those changes noted below, all misspelling in the text, and
  inconsistent or archaic usage, have been retained.

  Pg 6. 'Cartar' replaced by 'Carter'.
  Pg 16. 'fyndinge them them' replaced by 'fyndinge them'.
  Pg 16. 'fourthc' replaced by 'fourthe'.
  Pg 29. 'ga.. ' left unchanged; meaning not clear.
  Pg 32. 'of a a species' replaced by 'of a species'.
  Pg 38. 'honses' replaced by 'houses'.
  Pg 40. 'secoud' replaced by 'second'.
  Pg 49. 'genererally' replaced by 'generally'.
  Pg 55. 'justicc, the' replaced by 'justice, the'.
  Pg 57. 'ths power' replaced by 'the power'.
  Pg 60. 'Ironice' replaced by 'Ironiee'.
  Pg 62. 'Keper' replaced by 'Keeper'.
  Pg 63. 'Klng' replaced by 'King'.
  Pg 74. 'Saboath' replaced by 'Sabbath'.
  Pg 86. 'thovght' replaced by 'thought'.
  Pg 94. 'strenghts' replaced by 'strengths'.
  Pg 109. Paragraph header '18.--' inserted.
  Pg 113. 'against his Majcsty' replaced by 'against his Majesty'.
  Pg 141. 'Exeellency' replaced by 'Excellency'.
  Pg 146. 'Panls' replaced by 'Pauls'.
  Pg 146. 'prihting' replaced by 'printing'.
  Pg 153. 'Free People, People,' replaced by 'Free People,'.
  Pg 164. 'postcript' replaced by 'postscript'.
  Pg 165. 'ΒΑΣΙLΙΚΗ' replaced by 'ΒΑΣΙΛΙΚΗ'.
  Pg 165. Section header number missing; '195a' inserted.
  Pg 173. Paragraph header '7. ' inserted.
  Pg 176. 'Decmber' replaced by 'December'.
  Pg 177. 'postcript' replaced by 'postscript'.
  Pg 188. 'whch was' replaced by 'which was'.
  Pg 199. 'popery aud' replaced by 'popery and'.
  Pg 199. 'pamplet' replaced by 'pamphlet'.
  Pg 199 Footnote [193]. 'Kings's' replaced by 'King's'.
  Pg 203. 'believes' replaced by 'relieves'.
  Pg 205. 'Smythfield, aud' replaced by 'Smythfield, and'.
  Pg 209. 'licencc' replaced by 'licence'.
  Pg 210. 'a  properties' replaced by 'and properties'.
  Pg 220. 'hucusqne' replaced by 'huc usque'.
  Pg 224. 'is in in Wine' replaced by 'is in Wine'.
  Pg 229. 'Prsss-yard' replaced by 'Press-yard'.
  Pg 230. 'ejusdcm' replaced by 'ejusdem'.
  Pg 241. The phrase '[word illegible]' is part of the original text.
  Pg 242. 'such as haue' replaced by 'such as have'.
  Pg 250. 'die Martii' replaced by 'die Marcii'.
  Pg 251. 'proof of the of the' replaced by 'proof of the'.
  Pg 268. [1680] replaced by (1680) to avoid confusion with Footnotes.
  Pg 276. 'the Courl' replaced by 'the Court'.
  Pg 287. 'six ith Pound' left unchanged; meaning not clear.
  Pg 290. The book does indeed end in the middle of a sentence.





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