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Title: English Translations from the Greek: A Bibliographical Survey
Author: Foster, Finley Melville Kendall
Language: English
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                   English Translations From The Greek

                         A Bibliographical Survey

                                    By

                      Finley Melville Kendall Foster

  Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of
 Doctor of Philosophy, in the Faculty of Philosophy, Columbia University

                                 New York

                        Columbia University Press

                                   1918



CONTENTS


Preface
Introduction
   I. The Growth of Translation
   II. The Translations
A Bibliographical Survey Of English And American Translations
Index
Vita



                               [Cover Art]

PREFACE


This book had its origin in a preliminary study of the attitude of the
first thirty years of the nineteenth century toward the classics. A list
of the translations which were published during those years seemed so
significant, if only from the point of view of quantity, that it was
deemed wise to extend that study backward and forward fifty years in order
to have the necessary material for a comparative study of the original
list. It soon became evident, however, that there were only two possible
termini for such a study: the establishment of Caxton’s printing press in
London in 1476 and the present year. The result of these searchings is
embodied in the list of translations which make up the contents of this
book.

Certain limitations have, of necessity, been put upon the scope of this
work. With a few exceptions, Musaeus for instance, the survey deals with
Greek literature to 200 A.D. Josephus, because the interest in his work is
mainly religious, has been omitted; and for the same reason the writings
of the early Christian fathers have not been listed. Moreover, in stating
the reappearances of a given translation, I have made no attempt to
distinguish between editions and reprints. To attempt to unravel the
tangled skein of second, third, fourth, fifth editions, and the like,
would in many cases be the work of a lifetime. I do not feel that the
value of this list would be increased by any such attempt. The fact that a
particular book was published at a particular time, with the notation of
any revision or correction which may have been made, is the matter of
prime importance.

Of the sources of this list I have little to say. The list of translations
published in England was gathered largely from the following books: Miss
Palmer’s bibliography of classical books published before 1640, _The
Stationers’ Register_, _The Term Catalogues_, _The British Museum
Catalogue of Printed Books_, _The London Catalogue_, _The English
Catalogue_, Watt’s _Bibliotheca Britannica_, Lowndes’ _Bibliographer’s
Manual of English Literature_, Moss’s _Classical Bibliography_,
Engelmann’s _Bibliotheca Scriptorum_, and the book lists published in the
_Gentleman’s Magazine_, and _The Edinburgh Review_.

The list of American translations has been gathered from Evans’ _American
Bibliography_, Roorbach’s _Bibliotheca Americana_, _The American
Catalogue_, and _The Publisher’s Weekly_. In two respects the American
section is not so complete as might be desired. In a number of cases it is
impossible to give the exact date of publication. Roorbach’s _Bibliotheca_
dates as many as possible and so do the first volumes of the _American
Catalogue_. Leypoldt in the preface to the first volume of the latter
publication regrets his inability to obtain from many of the publishers
the dates of their own publications. In all such cases I have given the
dates covered by each volume in which the translations occur. By this
means nearly all of them can be located within two or three years of the
exact date. The other defect I have found in dealing with American
bibliography is in the lack of differentiation between importations and
reprints. For this reason it is impossible to determine whether a given
English translation was reprinted in America or imported and sold by
certain publishers. So far as possible I have listed the American reprints
of English translations immediately after the original publication or
after the English reprints of it. By this arrangement all the available
facts concerning each translation are presented in one place.

A word, perhaps, is necessary in the way of definition of translation. In
this list I have aimed to include only such works as profess to be English
renderings of Greek writings. In some cases, chiefly before 1700, the
English translation was made from a French, Italian, or Latin version of
the Greek original. So far as possible, such instances have been noted. I
have not included adaptations, paraphrases, and the like; nor have I
attempted to record solitary translations of excerpts from Greek
literature. A book of translations in the literal sense of the word has
been my basis for entering a title in the following list.

The author would be the last one to claim infallibility for this list. One
has but to attempt to gather together any considerable number of titles on
a given subject to come to a realization of the difficulties of the work.
“Here a little and there a little” is a true text in any such undertaking;
and two translations in a bushel of books is no rare occurrence. I have
listed the facts as I have been able to gather them; but I dare not vouch
that in all cases they are complete. I hope some of the more elusive ones
will be added at some future time.

The contents of the two introductory sections sum up certain ideas which
have occurred to me as I have been working over this material. The
sections are intended to suggest rather than to solve the problems which
English translation from the Greek presents. A discussion of the
introduction of the literature of one nation into that of another by means
of translation is not new; but a discussion of such translations as
forming a continuous thread of influence is perhaps slightly different
from any hitherto set forth. A series of studies of translations into
English from various literatures might add something to our present
understanding of literary influences. If this book furnishes the basis for
some such study of the interrelations between Greek and English
literatures, the labor spent upon it will not have been expended in vain.

I am especially indebted to Professors Ashley H. Thorndike and William
Peterfield Trent of Columbia University, to whom I owe much for their
thoughtful advice and assistance. Their continual interest did much to
make a lonely task a pleasant one.

F.M.K.F.

DELAWARE COLLEGE
NEWARK, DELAWARE
February 28, 1918



INTRODUCTION



I. The Growth of Translation


                  [Illustration: Growth of translation]

The Growth of Greek Translation. The solid line is original and reprinted
       translations; the dashed line is original translations only.


The history of English translation from the Greek is almost coincident
with the history of English printing. In 1477 William Caxton set up his
press in London and from that press in 1484 he issued his own translation
of Aesop’s _Fables_. The real beginning of serious translation, as is very
evident from the chart accompanying this section, was made in the decade
1530‐1540. From that time until the time of the Civil War and the
Protectorate there was a steady output of translations, not many as
compared with our day, but a proportion consistent with the size of the
reading public of the time.

In the one hundred and thirty years between 1520 and 1650, one hundred and
seventy‐nine translations were published. Of these one hundred and
fourteen were new translations and sixty‐five were reprintings. That two‐
thirds of the total number are new translations is not surprising; for
with the awakening of interest in Greek which took place during these
years, men could not turn to translations made in former years. For this
reason they had to satisfy the demand for knowledge of Greek literature in
the English language by producing their own translations and reprinting
these as the demand required. That the reprints amounted to one‐half of
the production of original translations is interesting as showing that the
demand for translations was not equalled by a supply of new ones and that
translations must have been popular. Printers have never been inclined to
be sentimental in regard to publishing books and any over‐enthusiasm a
translator may have in regard to his author is sure to be checked by the
monetary standards of the publisher. For this reason I would suggest that
the publishers during the latter part of the sixteenth and the first part
of the seventeenth century evidently found Greek translations a paying
proposition; if they had not, they would not have ventured to place so
many translations before a very limited reading public. All this seems to
add one more evidence to the already established dictum that the
Renaissance readers in England were much interested in Greek literature.

During the one hundred and fifty years following the Civil War English
literature was partly under the domain of those principles which are
generally known as neo‐classical. For this reason the facts of Greek
translation are very interesting and to a certain degree provide an index
of the importance of Greek literature during these years. At least five
hundred and four translations of Greek authors were published, of which
two hundred and thirty‐nine were reprintings of those previously printed.
The average number published per annum between 1530 and 1650 was 1.30 +;
whereas for these one hundred and fifty years the annual average is 3.36
+. This increase may be due to the fact that the reading public of these
later years was larger than that of the preceding age; but I doubt if it
was almost three hundred per cent larger. I would much rather attribute
the increase to an equal growth of interest in Greek literature encouraged
by the principles of literary art which were flourishing at that time and
fostered by the steady development of Greek scholarship through those
years. Aristotle’s _Poetics_ was one of the sources of criticism during
these years and, as I shall show in the next section, the interest in
Greek philosophy was predominant throughout the period. The authority of
the classics and the classics themselves were uppermost in the current of
literary thought; hence it seems plausible that Greek translation should
show a positive reaction at this time.

Before leaving this period I desire to point out one or two matters which
have become evident upon a study of the chart at the beginning of this
section. The curve as it passes through the decades after 1650 rises
gradually to a peak in 1720. It is interesting to note that this was the
hey‐day of Pope: his _Iliad_ was published volume by volume between 1715
and 1720. Through the latter years of Pope’s life the curve declines,
reaching its lowest point four years before his death. Shortly after his
death Doctor Johnson began to exert his influence on English literature,
an influence which was powerfully classical. This continuation of the neo‐
classical principles raised the curve again; and Doctor Johnson himself
assisted in producing that result by reprinting a number of translations
in his _Works of the English Poets_, 1779‐81. The decline of the last
twenty years of this period, 1780‐1800, is synchronous with the fading of
the supreme authority of neo‐classical principles; for with the death of
Johnson in 1784 the last star of the first magnitude in the neo‐classical
firmament had set. The curve would go much lower but for the reprinting of
a number of translations in Anderson’s _Poets of Great Britain_, 1792‐94.
As appears from the chart Greek translation was waiting for the tide to
turn and come forth into the nineteenth century with renewed vigor.

The nineteenth century, quantitatively at least, is the most important
period in the history of Greek translation, for more than half of the
total number of translations printed between 1484 and 1916 were published
during these years. As the chart indicates the great numerical advance
came after 1860, although the preceding sixty years had been far ahead of
the previous centuries in the work produced. The reasons suggested for
this great advance in the nineteenth century are: first, a new interest in
Greece itself; secondly, the rise of classical libraries and the
subsequent cheapness of translations; and thirdly a large output, mainly
in the latter part of the nineteenth century, of schoolboy helps.

The early part of the nineteenth century was a time of much interest in
Greece on the part of the English public. The travels of Edward Dodwell,
H. W. Williams, and William Gell, to say nothing of Lord Byron, made the
Greece of that day well known in England. Through all this time, from 1784
to 1818, William Mitford’s _History of Greece_ was proceeding in leisurely
installments. The immediate popularity of the work is but another evidence
of the widespread interest in Greece. I need hardly mention the stress
which was laid upon the classics in the educational system of the time,
for it is a well known fact. The emphasis which was placed upon Greek was
at least equal to that upon Latin. The Classical scholars of the period
such as C. J. Bloomfield, J. H. Monk, P. P. Dobree, and P. Elmsley spent
the major portion of their lives in carrying on the work of Porson and
editing Greek texts rather than Latin. The _Reviews_ from time to time
published articles on new classical books; and that the emphasis was on
Greek rather than Latin is shown by a survey of the classical reviews in
the _Edinburgh Review_ between 1802 and 1836: of a total of thirty‐nine
articles, twenty‐nine were on Greek books. All of these forces encouraged
a new interest in Greece and Greek literature, an interest which was not
so much the purely literary attitude of the century and a half which had
just passed, as a general interest on the part of the whole reading
public.

Another agency of supreme importance in bringing Greece before the eyes of
the English public at this time was the removal of the marbles from the
Acropolis by Lord Elgin. These marbles, the last of which arrived in
England in 1812, were the center of much discussion in England. One has
but to call to mind the caustic remarks by Lord Byron on Elgin in _The
Curse of Minerva_ and _Childe Harold_ to realize the intenseness of the
opposition to taking away from Greece part of the last vestiges of her
ancient glory. The coldness of their reception was finally overcome by
Visconti and Canova, who pointed out their historical and artistic value.
Finally in 1816, after an extensive investigation of their merits,
Parliament appropriated £35,000 for their purchase by the government. From
that time until to‐day they have been preserved for public view in the
British Museum. After the Greek Revolution the service which Lord Elgin
had rendered not only to England, but to the world, was recognized; for
they alone of all the monuments of Greece escaped the ravages of the years
of warfare. The importation of these marbles, then, was another cord which
fastened English attention on Greece; for they provoked public discussion
of the merits of the action, and for those who had access to London,
furnished a physical bond of connection with Greece.

The Greek Revolution, which raged from 1821 to 1829, was another factor in
deepening the interest which the English public had in Greece. After the
outbreak of the revolution, although the government officially ignored the
revolt and added its name to those who refused to admit the Greeks to the
Congress of Verona, the people of England announced in no uncertain terms
their approval of the Greek cause. The grounds for this approval were two:
the Greeks were the people who had in the ages long gone by given
priceless literature and art to the world for which the world had done
nothing in return; secondly, the Greeks were Christians and were to be
encouraged to throw off the yoke of bondage imposed upon them by the
Mohammedan Turk. Such sentiments as these are to be found in the magazines
of the time and in the various pamphlets which appeared in behalf of the
Greeks in the early part of the war. Concretely the interest of the
English public was shown by meetings held in various parts of the country,
chiefly Edinburgh and London, and in the formation of the London Greek
Committee. This committee collected £7,000 by voluntary subscription from
the British public, with which to purchase military supplies for the
Greeks. At the suggestion of Lord Byron, whom the committee made one of
its agents in Greece, the committee assisted in the floating of two Greek
loans in England. The battle of Navarino (1827) which, though considered
as "untoward" by the government, was a brilliant naval success for the
English and French fleets, was heartily welcomed by the English public.
And finally at the conclusion of the revolution the English nation became
one of the guarantors of the constitutional monarchy established in
Greece. Thus through the political events of the decade 1820‐1830 Greece
was kept in the eye of the British public.

All of these factors, the literary interest in Greece and Greek, the Elgin
marbles, and the Greek Revolution, created a desire for things Greek on
the part of the English public. Of these three forces the third was of
course effective only on the generation then living; but the other two
lost none of their power as the century proceeded. In fact the interest in
Greek literature as literature, I do not say as a language, was much
stronger at the close of the century than at the beginning, largely, I
think, because of the efforts of such men as Matthew Arnold, Benjamin
Jowett, and Richard Claverhouse Jebb. The work of these men has been ably
carried on by Sir Gilbert Murray and J. P. Mahaffy into our own century.

Consequently when one turns to view the progress of Greek translation
through these years, one is not surprised to find an abundant and
increasingly large output. The demand for translations grew almost in
direct ratio as the study of the Greek language and the reading of the
literature in the original declined. The interest in Greece which had been
fostered and developed through the century could only be satisfied by an
abundance of translations whose range covered the whole of Greek
literature.

This interest in and demand for the works of these ancient authors
produced a form of publication which was new to the reading public,
namely, the classical library. The first of these was _The Works of the
Greek and Roman Poets, translated into English verse_. This work was
published in eighteen volumes between the years 1809 and 1812; the volumes
were then gathered together and given the uniform date of 1813. The next
library to follow this was _Valpy’s Family Classical Library_, published
between 1830 and 1834. The works, as was also the case with the _Greek and
Roman Poets_, were reprintings of translations already in existence. The
emphasis was placed on Greek rather than Latin literature; for of the
twenty‐seven authors represented in the collection, sixteen were Greek.
Another significant fact in regard to this _Library_ was its price; the
books were sold at four shillings and sixpence a volume, a price which
placed the translations within the reach of all possible purchasers. The
last and probably the most famous library before the turn of the century
was Bohn’s _Classical Library_. This collection of books, at five
shillings a volume, was published in great part between 1848 and 1863. The
aim of the _Classical Library_ was to furnish the British public with
cheap translations of all the important classical works. In the
accomplishment of this purpose the _Library_ was much extended in scope
beyond _Valpy’s_ and made more complete by the translation of all the
works of many of its authors. While in some cases the translations were
reprintings of those already popular, the majority were new translations
made for the _Classical Library_. Of the great popularity of this
_Library_ I do not need to speak; for the translations have been on the
shelves of almost every educated family in England and America for the
last sixty years.

Satisfied with the translations published by Bohn, the reading public of
the latter part of the century made little demand for any other similar
collection of books. The only series of translations of any importance
which was published during these years was _Ancient Classics for English
Readers_, and these contained only selections from the authors with a
great amount of introductory matter. These works, edited by the Reverend
W. Lucas Collins and published by Blackwoods, were sold at two shillings
and sixpence a volume. Of the twenty authors translated in this collection
twelve were Greek. The series was more educational in its nature than any
preceding one and the outlines and analyses in the books were intended for
those who had little or no classical knowledge. The next classical library
of interest to the general reader was _The New Classical Library_ in which
were published translations of Herodotus, Plutarch, and Theophrastus
between 1906 and 1909. The last library and one which bids fair to take
the place of the Bohn _Classical Library_ is the _Loeb Classical Library_,
which was begun in 1912. Once more an attempt is being made to supply the
English reading public with adequate translations of all the classics.
Inasmuch as it is at present incomplete little can be said of it at this
time; but it seems assured of success.

In addition to the translations published in purely Greek and Latin
collections many translations were included in the general collections of
books which became popular in the latter part of the nineteenth century
and are still in vogue. In such libraries as the following were published
translations from the more popular Greek authors, e.g., Aristotle,
Herodotus, Homer, Plato, Plutarch, and the dramatists: _Morley’s Universal
Library_ (1884), _Cassell’s National Library_ (1887), _Lubbock’s Hundred
Best Books_ (1891), _Temple Classics_ (1897), _Golden Treasury Series_
(1901), _World’s Classics_ (1902), _New Universal Library_ (1906), and
_Everyman’s Library_ (1906). There are a few other sporadic publications
in other libraries, which have been noted in the _Survey_ as they occur.

As the publication of “classical libraries” is a nineteenth century
development, so the introduction of schoolboy helps began with the early
years of the century. The work of T. W. C. Edwards in the twenties and
thirties was intended for schoolboy consumption. At the same time one or
more persons hid behind the all‐inclusive authorship of "Graduate of the
University of Oxford" to produce literal translations of the works of the
dramatists. In the middle of the century much of the work of Doctor J. A.
Giles was done to help the schoolboy over hard places. In 1870 and the
following years a new series of translations of the dramatists was brought
out by a “First‐Class Man of Balliol College.” Roscoe Mongan, whose
translations were to a large extent published in _Kelly’s Keys to the
Classics_, began his work in 1878. These translations went over the ground
covered by his predecessors, and spread out into history, epic and
philosophy. Evidently the schoolboys of his time found them very useful,
for many of them were reprinted within a few years.

During the early eighties the “First‐Class Man of Balliol College”
reappeared with a translation of Herodotus book by book. From this time
until the outbreak of the present war there was a steady output of these
utilitarian translations. G. F. H. Sykes, J. H. Haydon, A. H. Allcroft, J.
A. Prout, F. G. Plaistowe, E. S. Crooke, J. Thompson, B. J. Hayes, H.
Hailstone, T. R. Mills, W. H. Balgarnie, J. F. Stout, and others who did
only one or two books, made their translations with the student of the
language as their reading public. Some of these translations appeared in
the _University Tutorial Series_, a collection of books in which the text,
translations, notes, vocabulary, difficult parsings, and test papers were
published.

The work of these men, quantitatively at least, is an important factor in
the history of Greek translation. Between 1850 and 1870 only eleven
translations of this type were published; between the years 1870 and 1910,
however, at least two hundred and eleven schoolboy helps were published.
The following table gives the minimum figures for this kind of translation
during these years.

1870‐1879=26
1880‐1889=62
1890‐1899=86
1900‐1909=37

The falling off in the first decade of the twentieth century may be due to
two causes: first, the decrease in the number of students of Greek in the
schools, which was the result of the great opposition stirred up in the
latter part of the nineteenth century by the advocates of a more practical
education; and, secondly, the ample production of the decade preceding
filled the market and plentifully supplied the demand. I have set forth
here these figures in regard to the schoolboy translation because I doubt
whether the extent of that type of work has been realized by any except
the competing publishers. To no small degree has the total of translations
in the latter part of the nineteenth century been increased by this type
of publication.

In the preceding paragraphs I have tried to suggest the reasons for the
changing fortunes of English translation from the Greek. The quantity of
translations produced between 1484 and 1917 is somewhat larger than is
generally realized: the total number of translations is 2164, of which
1289 are original translations and 875 are reprintings. For those who wish
to see the progress numerically decade by decade I give the following
table upon which the chart at the opening of this section was based.



II. The Translations


I have no intention in the following paragraphs of discussing the ideals
or the criteria of a good translation; for the making of an English
version of a Greek original presents problems little different from those
of translation from any language into English. At this time I merely wish
to call attention to the various kinds of Greek literature which have been
popular at different times during the last four hundred and thirty years.
The extant literature of Greece lends itself in many respects better than
other literatures to a _genre_ classification. I have taken for my
guidance the tabular survey at the close of Professor Jebb’s excellent
_Primer of Greek Literature_ and in grouping my authors have used his
headings and classifications. Of the divisions which he presents in his
table thirteen are to be found in this bibliography. Many of these
headings, such as Philosophy, Drama, History, Fable, Oratory, Geography,
Biography, are self‐explanatory. Under the remaining divisions I have
classed the following authors: Bucolic Poetry contains only the work of
Theocritus, Bion and Moschus; Poetry contains all the other work in verse
except the epic; Romance embraces the work of Longus, Heliodorus, and
Apollonius Rhodius; Epic contains the works of Homer and Hesiod; Belles
Lettres, the work of Theophrastus, Longinus, and Lucian; Learning and
Science, the work of Hippocrates, and others of similar nature.

Date           New         Reprints    Total for   Total for   Total for
                                       ten years   preceding   preceding
                                                   fifty       hundred
                                                   years       years
1481‐1490      1           0           1
1491‐1500      0           1           1           2           2
1501‐1510      0           0           0
1511‐1520      0           0           0
1521‐1530      4           0           4
1531‐1540      8           5           13
1541‐1550      6           3           9           26
1551‐1560      5           4           9
1561‐1570      12          2           14
1571‐1580      11          6           17
1581‐1590      8           5           13
1591‐1600      14          6           20          73          99
1601‐1610      7           7           14
1611‐1620      10          9           19
1621‐1630      9           3           12
1631‐1640      13          13          26
1641‐1650      7           2           9           80
1651‐1660      12          5           17
1661‐1670      9           6           15
1671‐1680      11          10          21
1681‐1690      18          12          30
1691‐1700      16          15          31          114         194
1701‐1710      17          19          36
1711‐1720      26          15          41
1721‐1730      14          19          33
1731‐1740      11          18          29
1741‐1750      23          19          42          181
1751‐1760      23          19          42
1761‐1770      14          22          36
1771‐1780      29          24          53
1781‐1790      17          22          39
1791‐1800      25          14          39          209         390
1801‐1810      28          49          77
1811‐1820      18          44          62
1821‐1830      55          32          87
1831‐1840      40          22          62
1841‐1850      59          19          78          366
1851‐1860      41          16          57
1861‐1870      94          26          120
1871‐1880      101         55          156
1881‐1890      154         88          242
1891‐1900      142         98          240         815         1181
1901‐1910      114         93          207
1911‐1917      63          28          91          298         298
Total          1289        875         2164        2164        2165

(For 1591‐1600, the totals are for six years only.)

With this classification I have made a chronological survey of the
translations and summed up my results at the century and half‐century
marks. These results are embodied in the following table in which the
translations have been listed in order of importance from a numerical
point of view. Underneath each heading I have placed the number of that
type which were printed during the preceding fifty years. Where two or
more classes are equal I have placed them within the same rectangle to
emphasize such equality. At the bottom of each column I have indicated,
where necessary, the classes which are non‐existent for each fifty years.

1550           1600           1650           1700           1750
Phil. 16       Phil. 20       Hist. Fable    Phil. 34       Phil. 44
                              11
Hist. 2        Orat. 9        Phil. 10       Fable 26       Epic 31
Geog. 2                       Epic 10
Learn. 2
Orat. 1        Rom. 8         Poetry 7       Epic 13        Fable 27
Fable 1
               Fable 7        B. L. 5 Rom.   Hist. 11       Hist. 15 B.
                              5                             L. 15
               Hist. 6        Orat. 4        Biog. 9        Poetry 14
               Poetry 5       Biog. 3        B. L. 6        Drama 12
               Epic 4 Drama   Drama 2        Poetry 5       Biog. 7
               4
               Biog. 3        Learn. 1       Bucol. 4       Orat. 6
               Geog. 1                       Learn. 3       Bucol. 5
               Learn 1                       Rom. 3
               Bucol. 1 B.
               L. 1
                                             Drama 2        Rom. 4
                                                            Learn. 1

No Epic                       No Geog.       No Orat.       No Geog.
Poetry Drama                  Bucol.         Geog.
Biog Bucol.
B. L. Rom.

1800           1850           1900           1916
Phil. 48       Drama 115      Drama 244      Drama 92
Poetry 45      Hist. 59       Phil. 152      Phil. 84
Epic 37        Epic 52        Epic 141       Epic 34
Drama 22       Poetry 51      Hist. 90       Fable 21
Fable 16       Phil. 48       Biog. 60       Hist. 20
Bucol. 14      Bucol. 27      Poetry 39      Biog. 16
Orat. 12 B.    Orat. 13 B.    Fable 33       Poetry 13
L. 12          L. 13
Biog. 10       Rom. 8         Orat. 32       B. L. 9
Hist. 7        Biog. 7        Bucol. 22      Bucol. 7
Rom. 6         Fable 6        B. L. 19       Orat. 4 Rom.
                                             4
Geog. 2        Geog. 2        Geog. 7 Rom.   Learn. 2
                              7
               Learn. 1       Learn. 1
No Learn.                                    No Geog.

(B. L. are Belles Lettres, Learn. is Learning and Science, Biog. is
Biography,  Orat. is Oratory, Bucol. is Bucolic Poetry, Phil. is
Philosophy, Geog. is Geography, Poetry is Elegiac, Iambic, Lyric Poetry,
Hist. is History, Romance is Prose Romances.)

To a large extent the table speaks for itself, for the interests and
preferences of each generation are made self‐evident; nevertheless it may
be worth while to sum up a few of the outstanding facts. The Elizabethans
translated anything which appealed to them and in many cases added to or
at least embellished the translation as they saw fit. Some of their
translations were made from the French, as Caxton’s version of Aesop or
North’s version of Plutarch. One has but to compare Marlowe and Chapman’s
_Hero and Leander_ with Musaeus to realize how little is Musaeus and how
much is Marlowe and Chapman. The Elizabethan translators, moreover, were
indiscriminate in their tastes, largely because their stock of Greek
learning was small and consequently they had no perspective from which to
judge the comparative merits of the works which they translated. “It was
all Greek to them” and therefore proper to be translated. They enjoyed and
believed Artemidorus’ _Dreams_ as much as they did any of the works of
Aristotle. Finally I wish to point out the high place Romance holds in the
fifty years before 1600. This adds to the credibility of the theory of the
influence of the Greek Romance upon Elizabethan prose fiction. All things
considered, the translations of the Elizabethans are thoroughly in accord
with the temper of the times as exhibited in their literature.

It is interesting to note that in the one hundred and fifty years
immediately following the Civil War Philosophy is the chief interest. The
neo‐classicists, theoretically at least, went back to the classics for
their authority. Indeed Aristotle’s _Poetics_ was considered absolute in
all its dicta. Fable and Epic with varying success contend for second
place in their interest. The moralized fable was naturally popular with a
generation which loved the didactic; and the epic, as they often
acknowledged, was a model for their own poetry. The rise of Poetry, such
as Pindar’s _Odes_, Anacreon’s _Odes_, and Tyrtaeus’ _Elegies_, is to my
mind an evidence of the change in opinion and attitude toward literature
which was gradually increasing during the latter half of the eighteenth
century and which finally came to the foreground in the first part of the
next century. Pindar’s _Odes_ were placed directly in opposition to those
of Cowley’s and the lyrics of Sappho were certainly not in accord with the
ideas of the neo‐classicists. Whether these translations were wholly
correct or not, is aside from the point. Men were becoming more interested
in the lyrical side of Greek literature, and this interest exhibited a
taste foreign to sententious didacticism; for none of that is to be found
in the Elegiac, Iambic, or Lyric Poetry of the Greeks. Once again, then,
the kind of translation which the generations enjoyed was coincident with
the prevailing literary taste, and the rise of Poetry toward the close of
these one hundred and fifty years is at least evidence of a change in
public interest.

Perhaps catholicity of taste is the best phrase which may be used to
characterize the nineteenth century. Nothing shows this better than the
table of translations. The Drama, Epic, History, Oratory, Philosophy,
Biography, Poetry and the more minor divisions were all translated with an
abundance which shows a steady demand on the part of the reading public.
The Drama now assumed its place as one of the important elements of Greek
literature and possibly because it was a new found treasure, for the texts
of the dramatists were not edited until the middle of the eighteenth
century, was a little overemphasized. However, as was pointed out in the
latter part of the previous section, the aim of Bohn’s _Classical Library_
was the aim of the reading public, i.e., a complete survey of Greek
literature in English. The nineteenth century, moreover, in addition to
translating practically all Greek literature, insisted upon a certain
amount of literalness in the translation. It was to be the endeavor of the
translator to present his author to the public without any change or
adaptation on his part in bridging the gap between the two languages. Just
what the word literal meant and of how much consequence it was during the
century can be readily ascertained by reading Matthew Arnold’s lectures
_On Translating Homer_ and Newman’s _Reply_.

Whether the twentieth century will carry on the width of interest of the
nineteenth is hard to say. Until the war broke out the present century bid
fair to equal its predecessor. With the coming of the war, however,
translation from the Greek has been forced into the background and how
long it will remain there, is, at this time, a matter of conjecture.

If this table has done no more, it has at least furnished an interesting
thermometer of public taste through the centuries that are past. In all
generations where the public has had the opportunity of choosing what it
would have from Greek literature, the choice has been along lines very
similar in taste to the prevailing literary interest. What lies in the
future is hard to say, for practically everything of importance has been
translated. Probably we shall see repeated what we are witnessing to‐day:
the retranslation of Greek literature for each succeeding generation into
terms of its own conception. Bohn’s _Classical Library_ is now in the
process of being replaced by the _Loeb Classical Library_ and I dare say
sixty years hence some other “library” will replace this one. Greek
literature is no longer a hidden pearl, and, although the interest in the
language may vary with the generations, the people of England and America
have evidently found in it a worth which they desire to keep. If they had
not, the following list of translations would never have been possible.



A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SURVEY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN TRANSLATIONS


NOTE.—In all cases where no place of publication is mentioned London is to
be understood.



Achilles Tatius


1. The most delectable and pleasant historye of Clitophon and Leucippe,
written in Greeke, by Achilles Stacius an Alexandrian and nowe newlie
translated into Englishe by W. B[urton]. [1597?] 4o

2. The Loves of Clitophon and Leucippe. A most elegant History, written in
Greek by Achilles Tatius. And now Englished [by Anthony Hodges]. Oxford.
1638. 4o

3. The loves of Clitophon and Leucippe ... translated from the Greek, with
notes, by ... R. Smith. 1848. 8o [Bohn]

4. Achilles Tatius. With an English translation by S. Gasalee. 1917. 18o
[Loeb Classical Library]

_American Reprint_: [_Loeb_] _New York, 1917_.



Aelian (Claudius Aelianus)


1. A Registre of Hystories, containing Martiall exploites of worthy
warriours, Politique practises of Ciuil Magistrates, wise Sentences of
famous Philosophers, and other matters manifolde and memorable. Written in
Greeke, by Aelianus a Romane: and deliuered in Englishe (as well,
according to the truth of the greeke text, as of the Latine) by Abraham
Fleming. 1576. 4o BL

2. Aelianus Claudius; his Various History. Translated by Thomas Stanley.
1665. 8o

_Reprinted: 1670; 1677._



Aeneas The Tactician


1. The Tactics of Aelian Or art of embattailing an army after ye Grecian
manner Englished & illustrated wth figures throughout: & notes vpon ye
Chapters of ye ordinary notions of ye Phalange by I. B[ingham]. The
exercise military of ye English by ye order of that great Generall Maurice
of Nassau Prince of Orange & Gouernor & Generall of ye vnited Prouinces is
added. [1616] Fol.

2. The Art of Embattailing an Army. Or The Second Part of Aeslians
Tacticks. With notes upon every chapter. By Capt. Iohn Bingham. 1629. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1631._



Aeschines The Orator


1. The orations of Aeschines against Ctesiphon, and Demosthenes de Corona.
Translated from the original Greek, illustrated with notes, ... by A.
Portal. Oxford. 1755. 8o

2. A literal translation of the Oration of Aeschines against Ctesiphon. D.
Spillan. Dublin. 1823. 12o

3. The speech of Aeschines against Ctesiphon. Literally translated from
the Oxford text, and explained in short ... notes ... by a First Class Man
of Balliol College. Oxford. 1872. 8o



Aeschylus


1. The tragedies of Aeschylus translated [into English verse, with notes]
by R. Potter. Norwich. 1777. 4o

_Reprinted: 1779; Oxford, 1808; Weybridge, 1809; 1812; [Selections,
British Poets.] 1819; 1881; [With an essay on Grecian Drama and a
biography of A. by J. S. Harford.] 1833; [Introduction, Henry Morley]
1886._

_American Reprints: New York, 1872‐76; New York, 1820‐52._

2. The seven tragedies of Aeschylus literally translated into English
prose.... [Anon.] Oxford. 1822. 8o

3. Aeschyli Prometheus Vinctus, Graece, with literal translation....
[Anon.] 1822. 8o

4. Aeschylus’ Prometheus Chained. Translated by T. W. C. Edwards. 1823. 8o

_American Reprint: New Haven, 1872‐76._

5. Agamemnon. Translated by H. S. Boyd. 1824. 8o

6. A translation of the Agamemnon of Aeschylus. J. Symons. 1824. 8o

7. Aeschylus’ Persae. Translated by W. Palin. 1824. 8o

8. The tragedies of Aeschylus literally translated into English prose ...
with notes. [Anon.] Oxford. 1827. 8o

9. The Persians. Translated on a new plan ... with notes ... by W. Palin.
1829. [Gk.‐Eng.]

10. The Agamemnon of Aeschylus. Translated ... illustrated by dissertation
on Grecian tragedy ... by J. S. Harford. 1831.

11. Aeschylus’ Agamemnon translated into English verse. By Thomas Medwin.
1832. 8o

12. Aeschylus’ Prometheus Bound; a tragedy. Translated into English verse
by Thomas Medwin. 1832. 8o

13. Aeschylus’ Prometheus Bound. Translated by Elizabeth Barrett
[Browning]. 1833. 12o

_Reprinted: [With other poems] 1896._

14. Aeschylus’ Prometheus and Sophocles’ Electra. Translated by G. C. Fox.
1835. 8o

15. Agamemnon and Prometheus Bound. Translated by G. C. Fox. 1839. 8o

16. Tragedies. [Anon.] 1842.

17. Prometheus Bound. Translated by Pembroke. 1844.

18. Agamemnon. Translation by Sewell. 1846.

19. Prometheus Bound. Translation by G. S. Swayne. Oxford. 1846. 8o

20. The dramas of Aeschylus. Translated by Anna Swanwick. 1848. 8o [Bohn]

_Reprinted: 1873; 1881; 1886._

_American Reprints: New York, 1890 [Bohn]_

21. Tragedies. Translated by T. A. Buckley. 1849. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprints: New York, 1856; New York, 1872‐76 [Bohn]; New York,
1888 [Bohn]._

22. Agamemnon. Translated by H. W. Herbert. 1849.

23. Lyrical dramas of Aeschylus; translation by J. S. Blackie. With a life
of Aeschylus. 2 vol. 1850.

_Reprinted: [Everyman] 1906._

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1906._

24. Prometheus Vinctus. Translation by C. C. Clifford. [In verse] Oxford.
1852.

25. Aeschylus’ Agamemnon translated by William John Blew. 1855.

_Reprinted: 1865._

26. Persae. Translation by M. Wood. 1855. [Gk.‐Eng.]

27. The Prometheus and Suppliants of Aeschylus construed literally word
for word. By the Rev. Dr. [J. A.] Giles. Vol. 1. 1856. 16o [Kelly’s Keys]

28. Eumenides. Translated by G. C. Swayne. 1856. 8o

29. Tragedies. Translated by Dr. [J. A.] Giles. Vol. 1. 1860. [Gk.‐Eng.]

30. Works. Translated by F. A. Paley. [In prose] Cambridge. 1864.

_Reprinted: 1871._

31. Agamemnon of Aeschylus and Bacchanals of Euripides; with passages from
the lyric and later poets of Greece, translated by H. H. Milman, etc.
1865. 8o

32. The Agamemnon, Choephori, and Eumenides of Aeschylus, translated into
English verse, by Anna Swanwick. 1865. 8o

_Reprinted: [Agamemnon only] 1900._

33. Prometheus Vinctus, translated by Augusta Webster. Edit. by Thomas
Webster. [In verse] 1866.

_American Reprint: New York, 1866._

34. The Prometheus Bound of Aeschylus. Translated into the original metres
by C. B. Cayley, etc. 1867. 8o

35. Agamemnon, translated by J. F. Davies. 1868.

_Reprinted: 1874._

36. Orestes, translated by C. N. Dalton. 1869. 8o

37. Tragedies. Translated by E. H. Plumptre. 2 vol. 1869.

_Reprinted: [With biographical essay] 1873, 1890; 2 vol., 1901._

_American Reprints: New York, 2 vol., 1869; New York, 1873; New York,
1882._

38. Prometheus, translated by E. Lang. 1870. 8o

39. Prometheus Vinctus, translated by J. Perkins. Cambridge. 1871.

_Reprinted: 1878._

40. Plays: translated by R. S. Copleston. 1871. [Ancient Classics]

_Reprinted: 1897._

_American Reprint: Philadelphia, 1871._

41. Persae. Translated by William Gurney. [In verse] Cambridge. 1873.

42. The Persians. A popular version from the Greek ... by J. Staunton.
With photographs of Flaxman’s designs. Warwick. 1873. 4o

43. Agamemnon. Translation by Robert Browning. 1877.

_Reprinted: [In collected works] 1889._

44. Agamemnon. Translation by A. D. A. Morshead. [In verse] 1877. 8o

45. Septem contra Thebas. Translated by William Gurney. Cambridge. 1878.
8o

46. The Seven Against Thebes. Translated with notes by J. Davies. 1878.

47. Agamemnon. Translated by Brown Hall Kennedy. [In verse] Cambridge.
1878.

_Reprinted: Dublin, 1882._

48. Agamemnon. Translated by Henry Howard Molyneux, Earl of Carnavon.
1879. 8o

49. Prometheus Vinctus. Translated by James Davies. 1879.

50. Agamemnon. Translated by a Balliol Man. [In prose] Oxford. 1880. 8o

51. Agamemnon. Translated by F. A. Paley. 1880.

52. Seven Chiefs Against Thebes. Translated by R. Mongan. 1880.

53. The House of Atreus, being the Agamemnon, Libation‐Bearers and Furies
of Aeschylus. Translated into English verse by E. D. A. Morshead. 1881.

_Reprinted: 1890; [Golden Treasury Series] 1901._

_American Reprints: [Golden Treasury Series] New York, 1901._

54. Scenes from Aeschylus translated into English verse by Lewis Campbell,
selected and arranged for the modern stage by F. Jenkin. Edinburgh. 1880.

55. Agamemnon. Translated by Arthur Sidgwick. Oxford. 1881.

_Reprinted: 1895._

56. The Suppliant Maidens of Aeschylus. Translated into English verse by
E. D. A. Morshead. 1883.

_American Reprint: New York, 1908._

57. Persae. Literally translated by T. Meyer‐Warlow. 1886.

58. Αἰσχύλου Ἑπτα ἐπὶ Θήβας. The Seven Against Thebes of Aeschylus edited
with an introduction, commentary and translation by Arthur Woolgar
Verrall. 1887.

_American Reprint: New York, 1887._

59. Agamemnon. Translated by a Gold Medallist in Classics. 1888. [Tutorial
Series]

60. Agamemnon; introduction, commentary and translation by A. W. Verrall.
1889. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1889._

61. Supplices; revised text, notes, commentary, introduction, and
translation by T. G. Tucker. 1889. 8o

62. Agamemnon, Choephoroe and Eumenides. Translated into English verse by
John D. Cooper. Wolverhampton and London. 1890.

63. Prometheus Vinctus. Translated by Herbert Hailstone. Cambridge. 1892.

_Reprinted: Cambridge, 1902._

64. Choephoroi; introduction, commentary and translation by A. W. Verrall.
1893. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1893._

65. Orestia. Translated into English prose by Lewis Campbell. 1893.

66. The Persians of Aeschylus. Translated into English prose by Samuel E.
Crooke. Cambridge. 1893.

67. Eumenides. [Anon.] 1894.

68. Prometheus Bound. Translated into English verse by E. A. D. Morshead.
1899. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1908._

69. Septem Contra Thebas. Translated by F. G. Plaistowe. 1899.

70. Agamemnon. Translated by the Upper Sixth Form Boys of Bradfield
College. [Gk.‐Eng.] 1900. 8o

71. Eumenides. Translated with notes, ... by F. G. Plaistowe. 1900.
[University Tutorial Series]

72. Oresteia. Translated and explained by George C. Warr. 1900. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1900._

73. Prometheus Vinctus. Edited by F. G. Plaistowe and T. R. Mills.
Introduction, text and notes. Translation. 1900. 8o [University Tutorial
Series]

74. Septem Contra Thebas. Edited by F. G. Plaistowe. Introduction, notes,
text. Translation. 1900. 8o

75. Choephori. Edited with notes. Translated ... by T. G. Tucker. 1901. 8o

76. Eumenides. Introduction, text, notes, translation.... [Anon.] 1901. 8o
[University Tutorial Series]

77. Prometheus Bound. Rendered into English verse by E. R. Brown. 1902. 4o

78. Prometheus Vinctus. Translated by E. S. Bouchier. 1903. 8o

79. Agamemnon. Translated by Walter Headlam. 1904. 8o [In verse]

_Reprinted: [With notes] Cambridge, 1910._

_American Reprint: New York, 1904; New York, 1909._

80. Agamemnon. Translated into English verse by E. Thring. 1904. 8o

81. Choephoroi. Translated by Walter Headlam. 1905. 12o

_American Reprint: New York, 1909._

82. Prometheus Bound. Edit. with introduction, translation, notes by Janet
Case. 1905. 16o [Temple Dramatists]

_American Reprint: [Temple Dramatists] New York, 1905_.

83. The Eumenides of Aeschylus as arranged for performance at Cambridge,
December, 1885, and November‐December, 1906, with an English version by
Arthur Woolgar Verrall. Cambridge. 1906.

_Reprinted: [With introduction, commentary, etc.] 1908._

_American Reprint: New York, 1908._

84. The Seven Plays in English verse. By Lewis Campbell. 1906. 12o
[World’s Classics].

85. Agamemnon. Translated by John Conington. Introduction and notes by J.
Churton Collins. 1907. 12o

86. Agamemnon. Rendered into English verse by W. R. Paton. 1907. 4o

87. Prometheus Bound. Translated by Robert Whitelaw. Introduction and
notes by J. Churton Collins. 1907. 12o

88. Aeschylus in English verse. In three parts. [Anon.] 1906‐08. 8o

89. Eumenides. Translated by Walter Headlam. 1908. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1909._

90. Prometheus Bound. Translated by Walter Headlam. 1908. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1909._

91. The Seven Against Thebes. With introduction, critical notes,
commentary, translation, etc., by T. G. Tucker. Cambridge. 1908. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1908._

92. The Suppliant Maidens, The Persians, The Seven Against Thebes,
Prometheus Bound. 1908. 8o [Golden Treasury Series]

93. The Persians. Translated by C. E. S. Headlam. 1909. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1909._

94. Agamemnon. Translated by the Sixth Form Boys of Bradfield College.
1911. 8o [Gk.‐Eng.]

95. Agamemnon. Freely translated by A. Pratt. 1911. 8o

96. Seven Against Thebes. Rendered into English verse by Edwyn Bevan.
Leeds. 1912. 8o



American Translations


1. Prometheus and Agamemnon of Aeschylus. Translated into English verse by
H. W. Herbert. Cambridge. 1849. 12o

2. Agamemnon of Aeschylus. Translated by William Peter. Philadelphia.
1852. 24o

3. Prometheus of Aeschylus, literally translated. Athens, Ga. 1852‐55.

4. Aeschylus’s Prometheus Bound, and fragments of Prometheus Unbound; with
introduction and notes by N. Wecklein; translation by F. D. Allen. New
York. 1891. [College Series of Greek Authors]

5. Aeschylus’ Prometheus Vinctus; translated with an introduction by Paul
E. More. Boston. 1899.

6. Aeschylus’ Agamemnon: text and translation. Boston. 1906. [Translation
by W. Watson Goodwin]

7. The Prometheus Bound of Aeschylus; translated by Marion Clyde Weir. New
York. 1916. 12o



Aesop


NOTE.—In the following list of translations of Aesop’s Fables I have tried
to avoid including those which were intended for young children when such
works were obviously not translations of any original text. I have not
attempted, however, to make any distinctions in regard to what is Aesop
and what is not.

1. Here begynneth the book of the historyes and Fables of Esope whiche
were translated out of Frennshe in to Englysshe by wylliam Caxton at
westmynstre In the yere of oure Lorde. M.cccc. lxxxiij. Colophon: And here
with I fynysshe this book translated by me William Caxton at westmynstre
in thabbey and fynysshed the xxvi daye of Marche the yere of oure Lord
Mcccc. xxxiiij And the fyrst yere of regne of kyng Rychard the thyrdde.
Fol. BL.

_Reprinted: [1500?]; n. d.; n. d.; c. 1550; 1551; [c. 156‐?]; n. d.;
[1570?]; [1590?]; 1634; n. d.; 1647; 1658; with those of Avian, Alfonso
and Poggio, edit. by Joseph Jacobs, 1889, [Bibliothèque de Carabas
Series.]_

2. The Morall Fabillis of Esope the Phrygian, Compylit in Eloquent, and
Ornate Scottis Meter, be Maister Robert Henrisone Scholemaister of
Dunfermeling. Edinburgh. 1570. 4o BL

_Reprinted: London, 1577; Licensed to Robert Smyth, Edinburgh in 1599;
Edinburgh, 1621._

3. AEsopz Fablz in tru Ortography with Grammar‐nótz. Hervntoo ar also
iooined the short sentenèz of the wyz Cato imprinted with lýk form and
order: bóth of which Autorz ar tránslated out of Latin intoo English By
William Bullokar 1585. 8o BL

4. The Etymologist of Aesops Fables, Containing The construing of His
Latin fables into English: Also the Etymologist of Phaedrus fables,
containing the construing of Phaedrus (a new foundyst auncient Author)
into English, verbatim. Both are very necessarye helps for young
schollers. Compiled by Simon Sturtevant. 1602. 8o

5. Esopi fabulae. Translated by John Bringsley [i.e. Brinsley?] Licensed
to Master Man and Jonas Man, September 7, 1617.

6. Aesops Fables in English verse by G. D. Licensed to James Boler and
Henry Gosson. November 30, 1630.

7. Aesop, the Fabulist metamorphosed and mythologyzed, or the Fables of
Esop translated out of Latine into English Verse, by R. A. gentleman.
1634. 8o

8. Licensed to Thomas Walkeley, January 28, 1638: Esops fables translated
out of Latyn into English. The fables in prose and the Morall in verse
with Pictures by H[enry] P[eacham] M. of A.

9. The Fables of Aesop; With his whole life: Translated into English
Verse, and Moralliz’d. As also Emblematically Illustrated with Pictures.
By W. B[arret]. 1639. 8o

10. Fables. Translated from the Latin. [Anon.] 1646. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1704; 1740; 1754; [edit. by Goldsmith] 1757; 1787;
[illustrated by Bennett] 1857._

11. The Phrygian Fabulist; or the Fables of Aesop extracted from the
Latine Copies and moralized. By Leon Willan. 1650. 8o

12. Fables, paraphrased in verse, by John Ogilby. 1651. 4o

_Reprinted: 1665; 1668; 1673; 1674; 1675; [edit. by W. D.] 1698;
[corrected by W. D.] 1721; 1741._

13. Fables, with their Moralls, in prose and verse, grammatically
translated. Illustrated. 1651. 12o

_Reprinted: 1670; 1673; 1696._

14. Fables. Translated by Thomas Philipot. 1665. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1666; 1687._

15. Fables with his life [by Maximus Planudes]: in English, French and
Latin. The English [Version of his Life] by T. Philipott, the French and
Latin by R. Codrington. [The English version of the Fables in verse by
Mrs. Aphara Behn.] 1666. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1687; 1703._

16. Aesop improved; or above three hundred and fifty Fables, mostly
Aesop’s; with their morals paraphrased in English verse. [Anon.] 1672. 8o

17. Fables in English, illustrated with 119 Sculptures by Francis Barlow.
1672. Fol.

18. The Fables of Aesop in English; with all his life and Fortune ...
[Anon.] 1676. 12o

_Reprinted: 1700._

19. Mythologica Ethica, or Three Centuries of Aesopian Fables in English
prose; done from Aesop, Phaedrus, Cammerarius, and all Ancient Authors on
this subject: illustrated with Moral, Philosophical, and Political
precepts.... By Philip Ayres. 1690. 8o

20. The Fables of Aesop, and other eminent mythologists; with Morals and
Reflections, by Sir Roger L’Estrange, Kt. First Part, 1691; Second Part,
1692. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1694; 1699; 2 vol., 1703; 1704; 2 vol., 1708; 2 vol., 1714; 2
vol., 1715; 2 vol., 1724; 2 vol., 1738; 1879; 1898._

_American Reprints: New York, 1853; New York, 1880; [G. T. Townsend and L.
Valentine (Chandos Classics)] New York, 1893; New York, 1899;
[introduction by Kenneth Grahame] New York, 1903; [introduction by Kenneth
Grahame edit. by J. W. McSpade] New York, 1903._

21. Fables in Prose and Verse. The Second Part. Collected from Aesop and
other ancient and Modern Authors, with Pictures and proper Morals to every
Fable. Several of them very applicable to the present Times. By R. B.
1695.

_Reprinted: 1696._

22. Esop’s Fables, English and Latin, by Charles Hoole. Licensed, April
29, 1695.

_Reprinted: 1700; 1731._

23. The Fables of Esop the Phrygian. Illustrated with morall and
philosophicall and politicall discourses. By J. Bandion. Made English from
the French. Licensed to Tho. Leigh and Danll Midwinter, January 13,
1701‐02.

_Reprinted: 1704._

24. Fables. Edited by John Locke. [Gk.‐Eng.] 1703. 8o

_Reprinted: 1723._

25. Two hundred and fifty select fables of Aesop and others. By E. Arwaker
[the Younger]. 1708. 8o

26. Fables. Translated by John Jackson. 1708. 8o

_Reprinted: 1715; 1734._

27. The Fables of Aesop and others. Translated by Samuel Croxall. 1722. 8o

_Reprinted: 1724; 1728; 1731; 1737; 1746; 1747; 1770; 1778; 1786; 1788;
1789; 1860; 1864; 1868; [edit. Townsend] 1874; 1875; 1879._

_American Reprints: Philadelphia, 1777; New York, 1853; Boston, 1864;
Philadelphia, 1869; New York, 1880; [G. T. Townsend and L. Valentine
(Chandos Classics)] New York, 1893._

28. Fables. Translated by Charles Draper. 1760. 12o

29. Select Fables of Aesop and other Fabulists. In three books.
[Collected, and partly translated, partly written, by R. Dodsley.] (The
Life of Esop collected from Ancient Writers by Mons. de Meziriac.
Translated into English with notes. An essay on Fable [by R. Dodsley].)
Birmingham. 1761. 8o

_Reprinted: Birmingham, 1764; 1765; 1784; 1786; 1797; 1814; 1878._

_American Reprints: Philadelphia, 1777; Philadelphia, 1790; Philadelphia,
1792._

30. Fables. Translated by Mr. Clarke. 1774. 12o

31. Fables, new versified from the last English editions, in three parts,
by H. Steers, Gent. 1804. 8o

32. Fifty Fables. Translated into English verse by Liardet. 1806. 8o

33. Fables; a new version, chiefly from original sources. By Rev. Thomas
James. 1848. 8o

_Reprinted: [Illustrated by Tenniel] 1851; 1858; 1873; 1911._

_American Reprints: Philadelphia, 1865; Philadelphia, 1872‐76; Boston,
1884; [Versified by T. W. Chesebrough] Syracuse, 1907._

34. Fables. Designs on Wood by Thomas Bewick. 1850. 4o

_Reprinted: 1871; 1903._

35. Fables. Translated by Edward Garrett. 1867.

_Reprinted: 1872._

36. Fables. Translated by G. Fyler Townsend. 1867.

_Reprinted: 1873; 1877; 1880; 1902; 1904; 1906; 1908._

_American Reprints: New York, 1876‐80; New York, 1880; [Introduction by
Elizabeth L. Cary] New York, 1905._

37. Fables. Illustrated by Harrison Weir. 1868. 8o

_Reprinted: 1903; 1908; 1911._

_American Reprints: New York, 1868; New York, 1871; New York, 1874._

38. Fables.... With the text based chiefly upon Croxall, La Fontaine, and
L’Estrange. Revised and rewritten by J. B. Rundell. 1869. 4o

_Reprinted: 1874; 1887._

39. Fables. With illustrations, etc. 1882. 4o [Routledge’s Sixpenny
Series]

40. Some of Aesop’s Fables with modern instances shewn in designs by
Randolphe Caldecott; from new translations by Alfred Caldecott; engravings
by J. D. Cooper. 1883.

_Reprinted: 1887._

_American Reprint: New York, 1883._

41. Selected Fables in verse, by G. H. Armitstead. 1889.

42. Favorite Fables. 1890.

43. Fables; selected and told anew and their history traced by Joseph
Jacobs. 1894.

_American Reprint: New York, 1894; 1917; 1917._

44. Fables. Illustrated by Charles Robinson. 1895.

45. Fables. 1898. 18o

46. Fables in verse. By E. Eyears. 1901. 8o

47. Fables. Illustrated by Maud U. Clarke. 1904. 8o

48. Fables. 1906. 8o [Arbour Library]

49. Fables. 1907. 8o Illustrated by Percy Billinghurst.

50. Fables. 1908. 4o Decorations by L. F. Perkins.

51. Fables. 1912. 4o Illustrated by E. J. Detmold.

52. Fables. 1912. 8o Illustrated by Charles Folkard.

_American Reprint: New York, 1913._

53. Fables. 1912. 4o Illustrated by Edwin Noble.

54. Fables: a new translation by V. S. Vernon Jones. With introduction by
G. K. Chesterton. 1912. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1912._

55. Fables from Aesop. 1913. 4o

56. Fables. An anthology of the fabulists of all countries. 1913. 12o
[Everyman]

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1914._

57. Fables. With Proverbs and Applications. 1913. 8o [Prize Series]

_American Reprint: [Prize Series.] New York, 1913._



American Translations


NOTE.—Doubtless many of the translations of Aesop which are listed here
are reprints of English translations or of other American ones; but there
is no way of ascertaining these facts because of the meagerness of the
American booklists.

1. Aesop’s Fables in verse, with the conversation of beasts and birds, at
their several meetings. By Woglog the great giant. New York. 1762.

2. The Fable of Aesop, with his life, to which are added morals and
remarks, accommodated to the youngest capacities. By Robert Burton.
Philadelphia. 1777.

3. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1820‐52. 18o

4. Aesop’s Fables. Philadelphia. 1820‐52. 18o

5. Aesop’s Fables. [No place] 1820‐52. 12o

6. Aesop’s Fables. Philadelphia. 1852‐55. 18o

7. Aesop’s Fables. Philadelphia. 1852‐55. 18o

8. Aesop in Rhyme; a new Version of Aesop’s Fables. Philadelphia. 1852‐55.
16o

9. Fables of Aesop, with Life of the Author. New York. 1862. 16o

10. Aesop’s Fables. Illustrated by H. W. Herrick. Boston. 1865. 8o

11. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1866. [People’s Edition]

_Reprinted: New York, 1880._

12. Fables of Aesop. Illustrated by H. L. Stephens. New York. 1867.

13. Aesop’s Fables. Philadelphia. 1872‐76. 16o

14. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1872‐76. 12o

15. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1872‐76. 18o

16. Aesop’s Fables. Cincinnati. 1872‐76. 32o

17. Aesop’s Fables. Illustrated by E. Griset. New York. 1872‐76. 8o

18. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1896. 12o [Illustrated Library of Famous
Books]

19. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1905. 4o

20. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1910. 4o

21. Aesop’s Fables. New York. 1913. 8o

22. Aesop’s Fables; with an introduction by Elizabeth L. Cary. New York.
1913. 8o

23. Aesop’s Fables; a version for young readers by J. H. Stickney. Boston.
1915.



Alcaeus


1. The Songs. Memoir and text, with literal and verse translation and
notes by J. S. Easby‐Smith. 1901. 8o

_American Reprint: Washington, 1901._



Alciphron


1. Alciphron’s Epistles, now first translated from the Greek. [With
annotations by T. Monro and W. Beloe] 1791. 8o



Anacreon


1. Odes. Done into English out of the original Greek by Wood, Cowley,
Oldham and Willis. Oxford. 1683. 8o

2. The Cup. Translated by John Oldham [in his poems]. 1683. 8o

3. Odes of Anacreon, Bion and Moschus. Translated by Thomas Stanley, with
notes. 1683. 8o

_Reprinted: 1815; 1893; [privately printed] 1906._

_American Reprints: New York, 1892; [Edit. A. H. Bullen] New York, 1894._

4. Anacreon and Sappho. Translated by Addison. 1735. 8o [Gk.‐Eng.]

5. Ode III. Translated by J. Hughes [in his Works]. 1739. 8o

6. Pastorals, Epistles, Odes, and other original poems, with translations
from Pindar, Anacreon, and Sappho. By Ambrose Philips. 1748. 12o

_Reprinted: 1765; [Johnson’s Poets] 1779‐81._

7. The works of Anacreon, Sappho, Bion, Moschus, and Musaeus. Translated
into English by a Gentleman of Cambridge [F. Fawkes]. 1760. 12o

_Reprinted: 1789; [Anderson’s Poets of Great Britain] 1792‐94; [Chalmer’s
English Poets] 1810; [Works of the Greek and Roman Poets] 1813; [Bion
only, published with Hesiod translated by C. A. Elton] 1832._

_American Reprint: [Antique gems from the Greek and Latin] Philadelphia,
1902._

8. Selections. Translated by Rev. W. Cooke in Poetical Essays on Several
Occasions. 1776.

9. Odes. Translated from the Greek by D. H. Urquhart. 1787. 8o

10. Αἱ το Ἀνακρεοντος ᾠδαι literally translated into English prose.
[Gk.‐Eng.] York. 1796. 8o

11. The Odes of Anacreon. Translated into English verse, with notes by
Thomas Moore. 1800. 4o

_Reprinted: 1802; Dublin, 1803; 2 vol., 1804; 2 vol., 1806; 2 vol., 1815;
2 vol., 1820; 1869; 1870; 1904._

_American Reprints: Philadelphia, 1804; New York, 1870; [Antique Gems from
the Greek and Latin] Philadelphia, 1902; New York, 1903._

12. Select Odes [translated in verse] with critical annotations. To which
are added translations and imitations of other ancient authors. By H.
Younge. 1802.

13. The Odes translated into English verse by Thomas Girdlestone.
Yarmouth. 1803. 8o

_Reprinted: 1804; 1809._

14. The Odes. Literally translated by Thomas Gilpin. 1806. 8o

15. Anacreon. Translated by Lord Thurlow. 1822. 12o

16. The Odes of Anacreon of Teos. Translated by William Richardson.
Oxford. 1824. 8o

17. The Odes of Anacreon. Translated by Thomas Orger. 1825. 12o

18. The First Twenty‐Eight Odes in Greek and English. By J. B. Roche.
1827. 12o

19. Works. Translated by T. Bourne. 1830. 16o

_American Reprint: [Antique Gems from the Greek and Latin] Philadelphia,
1902._

20. Odes with an English translation. By T. W. C. Edwards. 1830. 12o

21. Odes. [Translated by] J. Usher. 1833. 8o

22. The Odes of Anacreon rendered into English metre, with notes and
parallel passages. By F. J. Manning. 1869. 8o

23. Anacreon in English, attempted in the metres of the original. By T. J.
Arnold. 1869. 8o



American Translations


1. Anacreon. Odes; translated by S. C. Irving. Evanston, Ill. 1902.

2. The Anacreontea; translated by Judson France Davidson. New York. 1915.
12o



Anthology


1. Out of Greek Epigrammes [Sixty‐one Translations]. In Timothy Kendall’s
Flowers of Epigrammes. 1577. 8o

2. Translations, chiefly from the Greek Anthology; with Tales and
Miscellaneous Poems. [By R. Bland and J. H. Merivale] 1806. 12o

3. The Greek Anthology, ... Literally translated into English prose,
chiefly by G. Burges. To which are added metrical versions by Bland,
Merivale, etc. 1848. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprint: Boston, Philadelphia, 1872‐76._

4. Epitaphs from the Greek Anthology by R. G. McGregor. 1857. 8o

_Reprinted: [1864]._

5. Idylls and Epigrams chiefly from the Greek Anthology. By Edward
Garnett. 1869.

_Reprinted: 1871._

6. Greek Anthology. Translated by Lord Neaves. 1874. [Ancient Classics]

7. Selections from the Greek Anthology. Translated by Richard Garnett,
Andrew Lang, and others. Edit. by Graham R. Tomson [i. e., Mrs. Marriott
Watson]. 1889.

8. A chaplet from the Greek Anthology by Richard Garnett. 1892.

9. Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology, edited with translations and
notes. 1906. 8o

_Reprinted: [Translations only] 1907; [Translations only] 1908._

10. The Greek Anthology. English translation by W. R. Paton. 1916. 18o
[Loeb Classical Library.]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1916. 5 vol. vol. 1._



Apollonius Of Rhodes


1. The story of Talus, from the fourth book of Apollonius Rhodius; and the
loves of Jason and Medea, from the second book. By W. Broome, LL.D. [In
his Poems.] 1750. 8o

2. The loves of Medea and Jason, a poem in three books. Translated from
the Greek of Apollonius Rhodius, by J. Elkins. 1771. 4o

_Reprinted: 1772; [In Elkins’ Poems] 1810._

3. The Argonautic Expedition. Translated from Greek into English verse,
with notes [by E. B. Greene]. 2 vol. 1780. 8o

4. Works. Translated by F. Fawkes. [Anderson’s Poets of Great Britain.
Vol. 13] 1792‐94. 8o

_Reprinted: [In Chalmer’s English Poets] 1810._

5. The Argonautics. Translated ... by W. Preston. 3 vol. Dublin. 1803. 12o

_Reprinted: 4 vol., 1811; [In Works of the Greek and Roman Poets] 1813;
[In British Poets] 1822._

6. Argonautica. Translated into English prose by Edward P. Coleridge.
1889.

7. The Argonautica. With an English translation by R. C. Seaton.
[Gk.‐Eng.] 1912. 12o [Loeb]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1913._



Appian


1. An auncient Historie and exquisite Chronicle of the Romanes warres both
Ciuile and Foren. Written in Greeke by the noble Orator and
Historiographer, Appian of Alexandria, one of the learned Counsell to the
most mightie Emperoures, Traiane and Adriane. [In two parts: Part Two,
Translation by W. B.] 1578. 4o BL

2. The History of Appian, of Alexandria. In Two Parts. The First
consisting of the Punick, Syrian, Parthian, Mithridatick, Illyrian,
Spanish, and Hannibalick, Wars. The Second containing Five Books of the
Civil Wars of Rome. Englished by J. D. [John Davies] 1678. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1679; 1692; 1703._

3. Appian’s Civil Wars, Book I. Translated by Edward F. M. Benecke.
Oxford. 1894.

_Reprinted: Oxford, 1901._

4. Appian’s Roman History. Vol. I. with an English translation by Horace
White. 1912. 12o [Loeb]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1913, vol. 1._

5. Appian’s Roman History, Vols. II, III, IV, with an English translation
by Horace White. 1913. 12o [Loeb]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1913, Vols. II, III._



Aratus Of Soli


1. Phenomena and Diosemeia. Translated by Dr. Lamb. 1848.

2. The Skies and Weather. Forecasts of Aratus. Translated by Edward Poste.
1880.



Aristarchus Of Samos


1. Aristarchus of Samos, the ancient Copernicus: a history of Greek
astronomy to Aristarchus, together with Aristarchus’ treatise on the sizes
and distances of the moon. A new Greek translation and notes by Sir Thomas
Heath. 1913. 8o



Aristophanes


1. Hey for Honesty; down with Knavery. [Contains a translation from the
Plutus] [Thomas Randolph?] 1651. 4o

2. Plutus. Translated by H. B. 1659. 4o

3. Clouds. Translated by Thomas Stanley. [In his History of Philosophy]
1708. Fol.

4. Clouds. A comedy. Translated from the Greek by Mr. Theobald. 1715. 12o

5. Plutus; or the World’s idol; a comedy. Translated from the Greek of
Aristophanes by Mr. Theobald. 1715. 12o

6. Plutus, the God of riches: a comedy. Translated with notes ... by Henry
Fielding and Dr. Young. 1742. 8o [Gk.‐Eng.]

7. Clouds, a comedy. Translated [by J. White] with a principal scholia....
1759. 12o

8. The Frogs, a comedy. Translated by C. Dunster. Oxford. [1780?] 8o

9. The Clouds. Translated with notes. By R. Cumberland. 1797. 8o

_Reprinted: 1798._

10. Comedies. [Clouds by Cumberland; Plutus by Fielding and Young; Frogs
by Dunster; Clouds by A Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.] 1812. 8o

11. Acharnians, Knights, and Birds. Translated by J. H. Frere. 1816.

_Reprinted: with Sophocles and Euripides. 1894. [World’s Classics] 1907;
[New Universal Library] 1908._

_American Reprints: New York, 1908; [Everyman] New York, 1909._

12. Acharnians, Knights, Clouds, and Wasps. Translated by T. Mitchell and
R. Cumberland. 1819. 8o [Works of the British Poets.]

_Reprinted: 1820‐22._

13. Plutus and Frogs. Translated into English prose. 1822. 8o

14. Birds. Translated by H. Cary. 1824. 8o

15. Plutus. Translated by Carrington. 1825. 8o

16. Acharnians, Knights, Wasps, and Birds. Translated into English prose.
By a Graduate of the University of Oxford. Oxford. 1830.

17. Comedies, in English meter. Vol. 1. 1836. 8o [Acharnians, Knights, and
Clouds.]

18. The Comedies of Aristophanes. Translated into familiar blank verse,
with notes ... by C. A. Wheelwright. 2 vol. Oxford. 1837.

19. Clouds and Peace. Translated into English prose by a Graduate of the
University of Oxford. Oxford. 1840.

20. A literal translation of the Clouds of Aristophanes by C. P. Gerard.
1842. [Privately Printed] [Gk.‐Eng.]

21. The Knights of Aristophanes literally translated into English prose by
F. H. Williams. Dublin. 1844. 12o

22. Ranac. Translated by C. C. Clifford. Oxford. 1848. 8o

23. The Comedies of Aristophanes. Translated ... with notes ... by W. J.
Hickie. 2 vol. 1853. [Bohn]

_American Reprint: New York, 1872‐76; 2 vol. New York, 1889._

24. Eight Comedies. Translated into rhymed meters by L. H. Rudd. 1867. 8o

25. The Peace of Aristophanes. Translated into corresponding metres with
original notes. By B. B. Rogers. 1867. 4o [Gk.‐Eng.]

_Reprinted: 1913._

_American Reprint: New York, 1912._

26. Scenes from Aristophanes: The Frogs. By Arthur Sidgwick. 1871.

_Reprinted: 1887._

27. Comedies. Translated by W. Lucas Collins. 1872. [Ancient Classics]

_American Reprint: Philadelphia, 1872._

28. Scenes from Aristophanes: The Clouds. By Arthur Sidgwick. 1872.

_Reprinted: 1884._

29. Scenes from Aristophanes: The Knights. By Arthur Sidgwick. 1872.

_Reprinted: 1887._

30. Scenes from Aristophanes: The Plutus. By Arthur Sidgwick. 1872.

_Reprinted: 1887._

31. Birds. Translated with notes by B. H. Kennedy. 1874.

32. Revolt of the Women. Translated by Benjamin B. Rogers 1878.

_American Reprint: New York, 1902._

33. Clouds. Translated by W. C. Green. Cambridge. 1880.

_Reprinted: 1889._

34. Acharnians. Translated into English verse. By Charles J. Billson.
1882.

35. Acharnians. Translated into English verse by Robert Y. Tyrrell. Dublin
and London. 1883.

_Reprinted: Dublin and London, 1890; Oxford, 1904._

_American Reprint: New York, 1914._

36. Acharnians of Aristophanes. Literally translated by a First Class Man
of Balliol College. Oxford. 1883.

_Reprinted: 1898._

37. Birds. Translated by J. H. Frere [Edited by John W. Clark] [Trans, of
Parabasis ll. 685‐723 by A. C. Swinburne.] Cambridge. 1883.

_Reprinted: [Edit. William C. Green] 1889._

38. Clouds. Literally translated by a First Class Man of Balliol College.
1883.

39. Frogs. Literally translated by a First Class Man of Balliol College.
1883.

_Reprinted: [Revised by Edward L. Hawkins] 1895._

40. Clouds. Literally translated by Thomas J. Arnold. 1887.

41. Plutus. Translated by William C. Green. Cambridge and London. 1887.

42. Plutus. Translated by Herbert Hailstone. Cambridge. 1887.

43. Three Plays of Aristophanes; Politics of Aristotle; Virgil’s Aeneid.
1888.

44. Clouds. Translated by Herbert Hailstone. Cambridge. 1888.

45. The Frogs of Aristophanes adapted for performance by the Oxford
University Dramatic Society, 1892. With an English version partly written
for the occasion by David G. Hogarth and Alfred D. Godley. Oxford. 1892.

46. Peace. Literally translated. Glascow. 1893.

47. Vespae. Translated by Francis G. Plaistowe. 1893.

48. Birds. Translated into English rhyme by George S. Hodges. 1896.

49. Plutus. Translated by Michael T. Quinn. 1896.

50. Ranae. Closely translated by F. G. Plaistowe. Cambridge. 1896.

51. Ranae. Literally translated by J. A. Prout. 1896.

52. Vespae. Translated by Herbert Hailstone. Cambridge. 1896.

53. Vespae. Translated by J. A. Prout. 1896.

54. Wasps. Translated by John W. Rundall. Cambridge. 1896.

55. Acharnians. Translated by a First Class Man of Balliol College. Oxford
and London. 1898. 8o

56. Wasps, as performed at Cambridge, November 19‐24. 1897. Verse
translation by B. B. Rogers. Cambridge. 1898. 8o

_Reprinted: 1909, 1916._

_American Reprint: New York, 1916; New York, 1917._

57. Equites. Literally translated by J. A. Prout. 1899. [Kelly’s Keys]

58. Frogs. Translated by E. W. Huntingford. 1900.

59. Plutus. Literally translated by J. A. Prout. 1901. 12o [Kelly’s Keys]

60. Thesmophoriazusae, with a free translation. By B. B. Rogers. 1904. 4o
[Gk.‐Eng.]

_American Reprint: New York, 1904; New York, 1912._

61. The Frogs. Translated into rhyming verse by Gilbert Murray. 1908. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1915._

62. The Acharnians and two other plays. [Everyman] 1909. 12o

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1909._

63. The Acharnians with introduction, English prose translation ... by W.
J. M. Starkie. 1909. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1910._

64. Acharnians. Greek text revised with a translation. By B. B. Rogers.
1910. 4o

_American Reprint: New York, 1910._

65. The Knights. Greek text with a translation ... by B. B. Rogers. 1910.
16o

_American Reprint: New York, 1910._

66. Comedies. Edited, translated, and explained by B. B. Rogers. 4 vols.
1910‐1913. 16o

67. Clouds. With introduction, translation, and notes by W. J. M. Starkie.
1911. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1911._

68. The Frogs. Translated into kindred metres by Alfred Davies Cope.
Oxford. 1911. 8o

69. Frogs and three other plays. [Everyman] 1911. 12o

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1911._

70. Aristophanes. Translated into English verse, with an introduction and
notes, by the Rt. Hon. Sir William Kennedy. 1912. 4o

71. The Plutus of Aristophanes, Literally translated by C. H. Prichard.
1912. 8o

72. The Clouds. Greek text revised with a translation ... by B. B. Rogers.
1913. 4o

_Reprinted: 1916._

_American Reprint: New York, 1917._



American Translations


1. Aristophanes’ Acharnians; translated with an introduction and memoir,
by W. Covington. New York. 1894. 8o

2. Aristophanes’ Lysistrata; adapted and arranged by Winifred Ayres Hope.
New York. 1916. 12o [World’s Best Plays]



Aristotle


1. De curione Lune. Here begynneth the course and disposition of the dayes
of the Moone in laten and in Englysshe which be good; and which be badde
after the influentes of the Moone drawen out of a boke of Aristotiles de
Astronomiis. [1530?] 8o

2. Here begynneth the Nature, and Dysposycyon of the dayes in the Weke,
and sheweth what the Thondre in auery moneth in the yere, chaunsynge, doth
protende and sygnyfye with the course and dysposycion, of the dayes of the
Moone: which be good, and which be badde: after the influentes of the
Moone drawen out of a laten Boke of Aristotiles de Astronimis. [1535?] 12o

3. The Ethiques of Aristotlem that is to saye, preceptes of good behavoure
and perfighte honestie, now newly trālated into English [from the Italian,
By John Wilkinson] 1547. 16o BL

4. A briefe and most pleasat Epitomye of the whole art of Phisiognomie,
gathered out of Aristotle, Rasis, Formica, Loxius, Phylemo, Palemo,
Consiliator, Morbeth the Cardinal and others many moe, by that learned
chyrurgian Cocles: and englished by Thomas Hyll Londoner. [1550?] 8o

_Reprinted: [1613]._

5. The Logicke of the moste excellent philosopher P. Ramus Martyr, newly
translated, and in diuers places corrected, after the mynde of the Author.
Per M. Roll. Makymenæum Scotum, rogatu viri honestissimi, M. AEgidii
Hamlini. M.D. Lxxiiii. 8o

6. The Problemes of Aristotle, with other Philosophers and Phisitions.
Wherin are contained diuers questions, with their answers, touching the
estate of mans bodie. Edin. 1595. 8o

_Reprinted: 1597; 1607; 1679; 1680; 1684; 1690; 1696._

7. Aristotle’s Politiques; translated [by I. D.] 1597. Fol. [This is
probably No. 8.]

8. Aristotles Politiques, or Discourses of Government. Translated out of
Greek into French, with Expositions taken out of the best Authours,
specially out of Aristotle himself, and out of Plato, conferred together
where occasion of matter treated by them both doth offer itself.... By
Loys Le Roy, called Regius. Translated out of French into English [by I.
D.]. 1598. Fol.

9. The Art of Logike. Plainely taught in the English tongue, by M.
Blundeuile of Newton Flotman in Norfolke, as well according to the
doctrine of Aristotle, as of all other moderne and best accounted Authours
thereof.... 1599. 4o

_Reprinted: 1617._

10. The Art of Logick, Gathered out of Aristotle, and set in due forme,
according to his instructions, by Peter Ramus, Professor of Philosophy and
Rhetorick in Paris.... Published for the Instruction of the Vnlearned, by
Anthony Wotton. 1626. 8o

11. Peter Ramus, of Vermandois, The King’s Professor, his Dialectica in
two bookes.... By F[age] Gent. 1632. 8o

12. A briefe of the Art of Rhetorique, conteyning in substance, all that
Aristotle hath written in his three Bookes of that subiect by T. H.
[Thomas Hobbes]. Licensed to Andrew Crooke, February 1, 1636.

_Reprinted: 1681; 1759; 1832; 1847._

13. The true Fortune‐teller, or Guide to Knowledge; discovering the whole
Art of Chrymancy, Physiognomy, Metoposcopy, and Astrology. To which is
added, Aristotle’s Observations on the Heavens and their motions, of fiery
Meteor, Thunder, Lightening, Eclipses, Comets, Earthquakes, and
Whirlwinds. 1685. 12o

_Reprinted: 1686._

14. Rhetoric. Translated by the Authors of the Art of Thinking. 1686. 8o

_Reprinted: 1693; Oxford, 1816._

15. Aristotle’s Art of Poetry; translated ... with Mr. D’Acier’s notes
translated from the French. 1705. 8o

_Reprinted: 1709; 1713._

16. Ethics: Book I. Translated by Edmund Pargiter. 1745. 4o

17. Aristotle’s Poetics. Translated.... In two parts. [Anon.] 1775. 8o

18. The poetics of Aristotle. Translated with notes, by Henry James Pye.
1775. 8o

_Reprinted: 1778; 1788._

19. Treatise on Government. Translated ... by William Ellis. 1776. 4o

_Reprinted: 1778; 1888; [Everyman] 1915._

_American Reprint: New York, 1888; [Everyman] New York, 1915._

20. Aristotle’s Treatise on Poetry. Translated ... with notes ... by T.
Twining. 1789. 4o

_Reprinted: 1812._

21. Ethics and Politics. Translated ... by J. Gillies. 2 vol. 1797. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1804; 2 vol., 1813; 2 vol., 1823; [Lubbock] 1893._

22. Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Translated by Thomas Taylor. 1801. 4o

23. Aristotle’s Synopsis of the Virtues and Vices, in Translations from
the Greek, by William Bridgeman. 1804. 8o

24. The Paraphrase of an Anonymous Greek Writer, hitherto published under
the name of Andronicus Rhodius, on the Nichomachean Ethics of Aristotle.
Translated by W. Bridgeman. 1807. 4o

25. Works. Translated by Thomas Taylor. 9 vol. 1807‐1812. 4o

26. Rhetoric. Translated by Crimmin. Second Ed. 1812. 8o

_Reprinted: 1816._

27. Rhetoric, Poetics, and Ethics. Translated by Thomas Taylor. 2 vol.
1818. 8o

_Reprinted: [Rhetoric and Poetics only] 1821._

28. A new translation of the Nichomachean Ethics. 1819. 8o

29. Rhetoric. Translated by Parsons. 1836.

30. Ethics. Translated with notes. Oxford. 1846.

31. Rhetoric. Translated with notes by a graduate. Oxford. 1847.

32. The Nichomachean Ethics of Aristotle. Translated with notes ... by R.
W. Browne. 1850. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprint: [Bohn] New York, 1872‐76._

33. Posterior Analytics. Translated by Edward Poste. 1850. 8o [Bohn]

34. Rhetoric and Poetics. Translated by T. A. Buckley. 1850. 8o

_American Reprint: [Bohn] New York, 1872‐76._

35. The Organon ... with the Introduction of Porphyry. Literally
translated with notes by O. F. Owen. 2 vol. 1853. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprints: [Bohn] New York, 1872‐76; 2 vol. New York, 1885._

36. Politics and Economics. Translated with notes, to which are prefixed
an Introductory Essay and a Life of Aristotle by Dr. Gillies. By E.
Walford. 1853. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprints: [Bohn] New York, 1872‐76; New York, 1889._

37. Vital Principle. Translated by Collier. 1855.

38. The Metaphysics of Aristotle. Literally translated ... with notes ...
by J. H. McMahon. 1857. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprints: [Bohn] New York, 1872‐76; New York, 1887._

39. Ethics. Translated by D. P. Chase. 1861.

_Reprinted: 1866; 1877; [Revised by George H. Lewis] 1809; [New Universal
Library] 1906; [Books that Marked Epochs] 1910; [Everyman] 1911._

_American Reprints: [Everyman] New York, 1911._

40. History of Animals. Translated by R. Cresswell. 1862. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprint: [Bohn] New York, 1872‐76; New York, 1887._

41. Ethics. By Sir A. Grant. 2 vol. 1866.

42. On Fallacies. Translated with notes by Edward Poste. 1866.

_American Reprint: New York, 1866._

43. Rhetoric. Translated with introduction, analysis, and notes, by E. M.
Cope. 1867.

44. Ethics. Translated by Robert Williams. 1869.

_Reprinted: 1876; 1891._

45. Ethics. Translated by Dr. [J. A.] Giles. 1870.

46. Works. Translated by Sir A. Grant. 1877. [Ancient Classics]

47. Translations from the Organon by Walter Smith and Alan G. S. Gibson.
1877.

48. Aristotle’s Politics, Books I, III, IV, VII, with Essays by Andrew
Lang. By Bolland. 1877. 8o [Gk.‐Eng.]

49. The Moral Philosophy of Aristotle: consisting of a translation of the
Nichomachean Ethics, and of the paraphrase attributed to Andronicus of
Rhodes, with an introductory analysis of each book ... by W. M. Hatch ...
completed after his death by others. 1879.

50. Selections. Translated by F. A. Paley. (188‐?) 8o

_American Reprint: Jamaica Plain, Mass., 1905._

51. The Nichomachean Ethics of Aristotle. Translated by Frank H. Peters.
1881. 8o

52. Metaphysics, Book I. Translated by a Cambridge Graduate. 1881.

53. Parts of Animals. Translated with an introduction and notes by William
Ogle. 1882. 8o

54. Politics. Translated by James E. C. Welldon. 1883. 8o

_Reprinted: 1888; 1893._

_American Reprint: New York, 1883._

55. Ethics, Books I, IV, X. Translated by Basford de Wilson. 1884.

56. Politics. Translated by Benjamin Jowett. 2 vol. Oxford. 1885.

_Reprinted: [Edit. by H. W. C. Davis] 1905._

_American Reprints: New York, 1885; New York, 1905._

57. Ethics, Books I‐IV (Omitting I, 6 and X, 6‐9.) Translated by St.
George Stock. Oxford. 1886.

_Reprinted: 1897._

58. Rhetoric. Translated by J. E. C. Welldon. 1886.

_American Reprint: New York, 1886._

59. Politics. Three Plays of Aristophanes, 1888.

60. Poetics of Aristotle. Together with the treatise on the Sublime by
Longinus. Edit. by Henry Morley. 1889. [National Library]

61. Ethics, Books I, IV, X. Translated by Samuel H. Jayes. 1890.

62. On the Athenian Constitution. Translated by Thomas J. Dymes. 1891.

63. On the Athenian Constitution. Translated by Frederic G. Kenyon. 1891.

_American Reprint: New York, 1891._

64. Ethics. Translated by James E. C. Welldon. 1892.

65. The Poetics. Edited with notes and a translation by S. H. Butcher.
1895. 8o

_Reprinted: 1898; 1903._

_American Reprints: New York, 1895; New York, 1896; New York, 1898._

66. Nichomachean Ethics, Books I (Omitting Ch. 6), II, III, IV, X (Ch.
6‐9). Translated by Franklin Harvey. Oxford. 1897. 8o

67. On Youth and Old Age, Life and Death, and Respiration; Translated with
introduction and notes by W. Ogle. 1897.

_American Reprint: New York, 1897._

68. The Poetics. Edited with notes and a translation by S. H. Butcher.
1898. 8o

_Reprinted: 1903._

69. Posterior Analytics. Translated by E. S. Bouchier. 1901. 8o

70. Psychology: Treatise on Principle of Life. Translated with
Introduction and notes by William A. Hammond. 1902. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1902._

71. Aristotle on Education: Extracts from the Ethics and Politics.
Translated and edited by John Burnet. 1903. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1903._

72. De Sensu and De Memoria. Edited and translated with Introduction and
notes by G. R. T. Ross. Cambridge. 1906. 8o [Gk.‐Eng.]

73. De Anima. Edited with a translation and notes by R. D. Hicks.
Cambridge. 1907. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1908._

74. Poetics. Translated with notes by E. S. Bouchier. Oxford. 1907. 8o

75. Works. Translated into English under the editorship of J. A. Smith and
W. D. Ross.

Vol. I. Parva naturalia. Translated by J. I. Beare and G. T. R. Ross.
1908.

Vol. II. De Lineus insecabilibus. Translated by H. H. Joachim. 1908.

_American Reprint: New York, 1908._

76. Aristotle on the Art of Poetry. Text, Introduction, Translation, and
Commentary by Ingram Bywater. Oxford. 1909.

_American Reprint: New York, 1909._

77. Nichomachean Ethics, Book VI. Essays, notes and translation. By L. H.
Greenwood. Cambridge. 1909. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1909._

78. Works. Translated into English under the editorship of J. A. Smith and
W. D. Ross. Vol. III. Metaphysica, by W. D. Ross. Oxford. 1909. 8o

_American Reprints: New York, 1908; New York, 1911._

79. Rhetoric. Translated by Sir Richard C. Jebb. Edited with introduction
and notes by John E. Sandys. Cambridge. 1909. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1909._

80. De Mirabilibus Auscultionibus. Translated into English by L. D.
Dowdall. Oxford. 1910. 8o

_American Reprint: 1910._

81. Works. Translated into English: De Generatione Animalium by A. Platt.
Oxford. 1910. 8o

_American Reprint: 1910._

82. Historia Animalium. Translated into English by D’Arcy Wentworth
Thompson. 1910.

_American Reprint: New York, 1910._

83. Poetics. Translated Greek into English and Arabic into Latin, with
text, notes ... by D. S. Margoliouth. 1911. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1911._

84. Works. Translated under the editorship of J. A. Smith and W. D. Ross.
Vol. VI. Opuscula by T. Loveday and others. 1913. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1913._

85. The Works of Aristotle. Translated into English. Edited by J. A. A.
Smith and W. D. Ross.

De Mortu animalium and De incessu animalium by A. S. L. Farquharson. 1913.
8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1913._

86. Works. Translation into English under the editorship of W. D. Ross. De
Mundo by E. S. Forster; De Spiritu by J. F. Dobson; Magna Moralia by St G.
Stock; Ethica Endemia, De virtutibus et Vitiis by J. Solomon. 1915. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1915._



American Translations


1. Aristotle on his predecessors: being the first book of his Metaphysics;
translated from the text edition of W. Christ; introduction and notes by
A. E. Taylor. Chicago. 1907. 8o

_Reprinted: [Religion of Science Series] Chicago, 1910._

2. Aristotle on the art of poetry; an amplified version; with
supplementary illustrations for students of English by Lane Cooper.
Boston. 1913.



Aristoxenus Of Tarentum


1. Harmonics. Edited with a translation and notes by H. S. Macran. 1902.
8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1902._



Arrian


1. Arrian’s history of Alexander’s expedition. Translated from the Greek,
with notes ... by Mr. Rooke ... 2 vol. 1729. 8o

2. Voyage of Nearchus from the Indies to the Euphrates, collected from the
original journal preserved by Arrian and illustrated by authorities. By
William Vincent. To which are added three dissertations.... 1797.

_Reprinted: 1809._

3. Arrian’s voyage around the Euxine sea; translated and accompanied with
a geographical dissertation and maps; to which are added three discourses.
(By W. Falconer, edit. by T. Falconer.) Oxford. 1805. 4o

4. Arrian on Coursing. The Cynegeticies of the younger Xenophon (i.e.
Arrian) translated with annotations and a life of the author ... by a
Graduate of Medicine [W. Dancey]. 1831. 8o

5. The Periplus of Euthraeis, Arrian’s Voyage of Nearchus. Translated with
notes by J. W. McCrindle. Calcutta, Bombay, and London. 1879.

6. Anabasis of Alexander. Translated by Edward J. Chinnock. 1884.

_Reprinted: 1893._

7. The Invasion of India by Alexander the Great, as described by Arrian,
Quintus Curtius, Diodorus, Plutarch and Justin, being translation of such
portions of these and other classical authors as describe Alexander’s
campaign in Afghanistan, the Panjâb, Sindh Gedrosia, and Karmania, with an
introduction containing life, etc. By J. W. McCrindle. 1893.

_Reprinted: 1896._



Artemidorus Of Ephesus


1. Sertayne Dreames made by Artemedorus. Licensed to T. Marshe. 1558‐59.

2. A pleasant Treatise of the interpretation of sundrie dreames gathered
out of ... Ponzettus and Artemidorus. By Thomas Hill. 1563.

_Reprinted: 1571; 1576._

3. A breafe and pleasaunt treatise of the interpretation of dreames.
Licensed to W. Copeland. 1566‐67.

4. The Iudgement Or exposition of Dreames, Written by Artimodorus, an
Auncient and famous Author, first in Greeke, then Translated into Latin,
After into French, and now into English. 1606. 8o BL

5. The Interpretation of Dreames ... Rendered into English [by R. W.,
i.e., Robert Wood]. The fourth edition, newly corrected. 1644. 12o BL.

_Reprinted: 1656; 1679; 1701; 1722; [1740?]_



Athenaeus


1. Deipnosophists. Translated by H. Younge. 3 Vol. 1854. 8o



Babrius


1. The Fables of Babrius. Translated into English verse, by James Davies.
1860.



Bacchylides


1. Poems and Fragments. Edited with introduction, notes, and a prose
translation by Sir Richard C. Jebb. Cambridge. 1905. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1905._



Bion And Moschus


NOTE.—See also Anacreon, Nos. 3 and 7; and Theocritus, Nos. 5, 6, 7, 10,
12, 13.

1. The Idylls of Bion and Moschus. Translated by Thomas Stanley. 1651. 8o

_For reprintings see Anacreon No. 3._

2. Miscellaneous Translations from Bion, Ovid, Moschus, and Mr. Addison.
Oxford. 1716. 8o

3. Idylliums of Bion and Moschus [translated by T. Cooke]. 1724. 8o

4. Death of Adonis by Bion. Translated by Rev. John Langhorne. 1759. 4o

_Reprinted: 1766._

5. The Idyllia of Bion. Translated by R. Polwhele. 1813. 16o [Works of the
Greek and Roman Poets]

_Reprinted: [The British Poets] 1822._



Callimachus


1. Perthenissa the last part The history of Callimachus. Licensed to He.
Herringman. August 16, 1665.

2. Callimachus and six Hymns of Orpheus. Translated into English verse by
William Dodd. 1755. 4o

3. Works translated into English verse, with Coma Berenices from the Latin
of Catullus. With the original text and notes. By H. W. Tytler. [With a
preface by the Earl of Buchan] 1793. 4o

4. Hymn to Jupiter. Hymn to Apollo. [Translated by C. Pitt] 1779‐81.
[Johnson’s English Poets]

5. Callimachus, Hesiod and Theognis. Translated by James Banks. 1856. 8o

_Reprinted: 1886._



Cebes


1. The Table of Cebes the philosopher. How one may take profite of his
enemies, translated out of Plutarche. [By Sir Frances Poyntz] ... [1535?]
16o BL

_Reprinted: [1537?]; [1560?]._

2. Table of Cebes the philosopher. 1535‐39.

3. Table. Translated by Io. Healey. [Published with Epictetus’ Manuall and
Theophrastus’ Characters] 1610.

4. Cebes, the Theban Philosopher, his Tables; wherein is contained a
method for the well ordering the Life of a Man; with a description in
Latin and English. Published for the studious Youth. 1676.

5. The Tablet of Cebes ... or a true emblem of human life; done out of
Greek into English. With an additional treatise concerning Tranquillity of
mind, written by Hipparchus. And [all] translated by R. Warren. Cambridge.
1699. 12o

6. The Table of Cebes or the picture of human life. In English verse, with
notes, by T. Scott. 1754. 4o

7. The Circuit of Human Life, a vision; in which are allegorically
described the Virtues and Vices. Taken from the Tablature of Cebes. 1774.
12o

8. The Picture of Human Life, containing some excellent rules for a
virtuous and prudent conduct. Translated from the Greek of Cebes. Second
edition. By a Gentleman of the University. Cambridge. 1777. 12o



Chariton


1. The Loves of Chaereas and Callirrhoe. Translated into English.... 2
vol. 1764. 16o



Ctesias


1. Ancient India as described by Ktêsias the Knidian; being a translation
of the abridgement of his "Indika" by Phôtios, and of the fragments of
that work preserved in other writings. By J. W. McCrindle. With
introduction, notes ... Calcutta, Bombay, London. 1882.



Demosthenes


1. The three Orations of Demosthenes chiefe Orator among the Grecians, in
favour of the Olynthians, a people in Thracia, novv called Romania: vvith
those of his fovver Orations titled expressly & by name against King
Philip of Macedonie: most nedefull to be redde in these daungerous dayes,
of all of them that loue their Countries libertie, and desire to take
vvarning for their better auayle, by example of others. Englished out of
the Greek by Thomas Wylson Doctor of the ciuill lavves. After these
Orations ended Demosthenes lyfe is set foorth, and gathered out of
Plutarch, Lucian, Suidas, and others, with a large table, declaring all
the principall matters conteyned in euerye part of this booke. 1570. 4o

2. The first and most excellent oration of that renowned orator
Demosthenes, against Philip of Macedon, the Potent and Politicke enemy of
the State of Athens. Faithfully translated out of the Greeke [by T. G.]
1623. 4o

3. Several Orations of Demosthenes, to encourage the Athenians to oppose
the exorbitant power of Philip of Macedon. Englished from the Greek by
several hands. (The first Olynthian translation by the Earl of
Peterborough; the second, by Hon. G. Granvill; the third, by Dr. Morland;
the first Philippick, by Dr. Garth; the second, by K. C. [K. Chetwood];
the third, by the Hon. Col. Stanhope; the fourth, by Mr. Topham.) To which
is prefixed the historical preface of Monsr. Tourreil. 1702. 12o

_Reprinted: [Revised] 1744._

4. Orations of Demosthenes for the Crown. Translated by Mr. Dawson. 1732.
8o

5. Orations of Demosthenes on the Crown. Translated by Andrew Portal.
1755. 8o

6. All the orations of Demosthenes pronounced to excite the Athenians
against Philip, King of Macedon. (The Orations of Demosthenes on occasions
of public deliberation. The Orations of Dinarchus against Demosthenes. The
Orations of Aeschines and Demosthenes on the Crown.) Translated into
English with notes, by Thomas Leland, D.D. 3 vol. 1763. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1770; 3 pts., 1771; [corrected] 3 vol., 1777; 2 vol.,
1802; 2 vol., 1804; 2 vol., 1806; 2 vol., 1814; 2 vol., 1819; 2 vol.,
1824._

_American Reprints: New York, 1820‐52; 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76; New
York, 1880; [introduction by Epiphanius Wilson.] New York, 1908._

7. Orations of Demosthenes (and Aeschines). Translated by ... Rev. Philip
Francis, with notes. 2 vol. 1757‐58. 4o

8. Orations of Demosthenes. Translated by Fleintoff. 1840.

9. Oratio de Coronâ. Translation by Henry Lord Brougham. 1840. [Gk.‐Eng.]

_Reprinted: 1893._

_American Reprint: New York, 1893._

10. Translations of select speeches of Demosthenes, with notes, by C. R.
Kennedy. Cambridge. 1841. 8o

11. The Midian Oration of Demosthenes. Translated by G. Burges. Cambridge.
1842. 8o

12. The Philippic and Olynthian Orations. Translated by D. Spillan. 1846.

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1854._

_American Reprint: Beaver, Pa., 1852‐55._

13. Philippic and Olynthian Orations. Translated by C. R. Kennedy. 1852.
8o [Bohn]

_Reprinted: [Everyman] 1911._

_American Reprints: 2 vol., New York, 1857; 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76;
[Everyman] New York, 1911._

14. Philippic and Olynthian Orations. Translated by Henry Owgan. 1853.

_Reprinted: 1866._

_American Reprint: 5 vol., New York, 1889._

15. Orations against Leptines, ... translated by C. R. Kennedy. 1856. 8o
[Bohn]

_American Reprint: 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76._

16. Orations against Timocrates, Aristogiton and Aphobus... Translated
with notes by C. R. Kennedy. 1861. 8o [Bohn]

_American Reprint: 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76._

17. Key to Demosthenes. The Olynthiac Orations of Demosthenes ... with
text, literal translation ... by T. MacNally. Dublin. 1866. 8o

18. Oration in Answer to Aeschines upon the Crown. Translated by William
Brandt. 1870.

19. Orations on the Crown. Translated by G. A. and W. H. Simcox. 1873.

20. The Orations of Demosthenes on the Crown. Translated by the Right Hon.
Sir R. Collier. 1875. 8o

21. Works. Translated by W. J. Brodribb. 1877. [Ancient Classics]

22. Oration of Demosthenes against the law of Leptines. Translated by a
Graduate of Cambridge. Cambridge. 1879.

23. The Orations of Demosthenes on the Crown, with an English translation,
notes ... by Francis P. Simpson. Oxford. 1882. [Gk.‐Eng.]

24. Against Meidas. Translated with introduction, notes ... by Charles A.
M. Fennell. Cambridge. 1882.

25. Oration against Leptines. Translated with introduction, notes, and
analysis. Oxford and London. 1885.

26. The Philippic Orations. Translated with introduction, notes and
analysis. Oxford and London. 1885.

27. Androtion. Cambridge. 1888.

28. Orations on the Crown. Translated by Charles Rann Kennedy.
Biographical introduction by E. B[ell]. 1888.

_American Reprint: New York, 1888._

29. Against the law of Leptines. Translated by J. Harold Boardman. 1888.

_Reprinted: 1892._

30. Demosthenes adversus Leptinem. Translated by F. E. A. Trayes. 1893.

31. De Corona. Translated with test papers. By T. T. Jeffery. 1896.

32. Pro Phormio and Contra Cononem. Translated by J. A. Prout. 1896.

33. Meidas. Translation and test papers by W. J. Woodhouse. 1898. 8o
[University Tutorial Series]

34. Olynthiacs and Philippics, translated on a new principle by Otho
Holland. 1901. 8o

35. Public Orations. Trans. by Arthur Picard. 2 vol. Cambridge. 1912.

_American Reprint: 2 vol., New York, 1912._

36. The Olynthiac Speeches of Demosthenes. J. M. Macgregor. Cambridge.
1915. 8o



American Translations


1. Demosthenes On the Crown: a Literal Translation. By a Student of Dublin
University. Princeton, N. J. 1851. 8o

2. Aeschines and Demosthenes. Two Orations on the Crown. Translated by
George W. Biddle. Philadelphia. 1881. 8o

3. Demosthenes On the Crown. New York. 1889. [Handy Literal Translations]

4. Demosthenes On the Crown. New York. 1894. 8o [Interlinear Translations,
New Classical Series]



Dio Cassius


1. The History of Dion Cassius. Translated by Manning. 2 vol. 1704. 8o



Diodorus Siculus


1. A righte noble and pleasant History of the Successors of Alexander
surnamed the Great, taken out of Diodorus Siculus [Book XVIII]: and some
of their lives written by the wise Plutarch. Translated out of French into
English by Thomas Stocker. 1569. 4o BL

2. History of the World by Diodorus Siculus. Translated by Thomas Cogan.
1653. Fol.

3. Historical Library of Diodorus Siculus, in fifteen books ... to which
are added, the Fragments of Diodorus, that are found in the Bibliotheca of
Photius; together with those published by H. Valensius, L. Rhodomannus,
and F. Ausinus. Made English by G. Booth. 1700. Fol.

4. Two Fragments of the Twenty‐fourth Book. Translated by John Toland.
1726. 8o



Diogenes Laertius


1. The Lives, Opinions, and remarkable sayings of the most famous Ancient
Philosophers ... Made English by several hands. [T. Fetherstone, S. White,
E. Smith, J. Philips, R. Kippars, W. Baxter, R. M., and J. A.] 2 vol.
1688.

2. The Works of Diogenes; a literal translation. Vol. 1. Containing Every‐
Day Characters, A Comedy &c. 1805.

3. The Lives and Opinions of Ancient Philosophers. Translated by C. D.
Younge. 1853. 8o [Bohn]



Dionysius Of Halicarnassus


1. Works. Translated by Edward Spelman. 4 vol. 1758. 4o

2. Three Literary Letters (ad Ammaeum 1, 2, and ad Pompeium) Greek text
with an English translation, notes ... by W. Rhys Roberts. 1901. 8o

3. On Literary Composition. Greek text edited with introduction,
translation, notes ... by W. Rhys Roberts. 1910. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1910._



Dionysius, The Periegete


1. The Surveye of VVorld, or Situation of the Earth, so much as is
inhabited. Comprysing briefly the generall partes thereof, with the names
both new and olde, of the principal countries, Kingdoms, Peoples, Cities,
Towns, Portes, Promontories, Hils, Woods, Mountains, Valleyes, Rivers and
Fountains therin conteyned. Also of Seas, with their Clyffes, Reaches,
Turnings, Elbows, Quicksands, Rocks, Flattes, Shelues, and Shoares. A work
very necessary and delectable for students of Geographie, Saylers, and
others. First written in Greeke by Dionise Alexandrine and novv englished
by Thomas Twine, Gentl. 1572. 8o BL



Empedocles



American Translation


1. Fragments. Translated into English Verse. By William E. Leonard. New
York. 1909. 8o



Epictetus


1. The Manuell of Epictetus, Translated out of Greeke into French, and now
into English, conferred with two Latine Translations. Herevnto are annexed
Annotations, and also the Apothegs of the same Author. By Ia. Sanford.
1567. 8o BL

2. Epictetus his Manuell. And Cebes his Table. Out of the Greeke original,
by Io. Healey. 1610. 12o

_Reprinted: [With the addition of Theophrastus’ Characters] 1616; 1616;
1636._

3. The lives and philosophy of Epictetus with the embleme of human life by
Cebes. Rendred into English; by J. Davies [from the French of Boileau].
[The philosophy is a translation of the Enchiridion and the embleme of the
Tabula.] 1670. 12o

4. Epicteti Enchiridion, made English in a poetical paraphrase, by E.
Walker. 1692. 8o

_Reprinted: 1697; 1702; 1708; 1716; Dublin, 1724; 1737._

5. Epictetus his Morals, with Simplicius’s comment, made English from the
Greek by George Stanhope, late Fellow of King’s College in Cambridge.
1694. 8o

_Reprinted: 1700; 1721; 1741; Glasgow, 1750._

6. Epictetus his Morals, or the whole Duty of a Philosopher; done from the
Original Greek by a Dr. of Physick. 1702. 24o

_Reprinted: 1703._

7. The Porch and Academy Open’d or Epictetus’s Manual newly turn’d into
English Verse; with Notes. By J. W., late of Eton College in Oxon. To
which is added, Cebes’s Table; never before translated into English Verse.
By [Selina] a Lady. 1707.

8. Human Wisdom displayed: or, a guide to prudence and virtue, in two
parts. Containing ... II. A fragment on tranquility of mind, from
Pythagoras: together with a collection of choice morals from Epictetus ...
both newly translated from the original Greek.... By an old Gentleman of
Gray’s Inn, lately retired to a country‐life. 1731. 8o

9. All the works of Epictetus which are now extant; consisting of his
discourses, preserved by Arrian, in four books. The Enchiridion, and
fragments. Translated by Elizabeth Carter.... With introduction and notes
by the Translator. 1758.

_Reprinted: [Edit, by M. Pennington] 2 vol., 1807; [Edit, by W. H. D.
Rouse] 2 vol., [Temple Classics] 1899; [Edit. W. H. D. Rouse, Everyman]
1910._

_American Reprints: [Edit. By T. W. Higginson] Boston, 1865, 2 vol.;
Boston, 1890; [Handy Volume Classics] Boston, 1906; [Beacon Classics]
Boston, 1913 [Conniston Classics] New York, 1917._

10. Arrian’s Discourses with the Enchiridion and Fragments. Translated by
George Long. 1877.

_Reprinted: 1890; 1892; 2 vol., 1902; [Light and Life Books] 2 vol.,
1903._

_American Reprints: New York, [Bohn] 1888; [Library World’s Best Books]
New York, 1890; [Knickerbocker Nuggets] New York, 1892; [Elia Series] New
York, 1895; [Illustrated Library of Famous Books] New York, 1897._

11. The Encheiridion of Epictetus. Translated with a preface and notes by
Thomas W. Rolleston. 1881. 8o

_Reprinted: 1888._

_American Reprints: [Camelot Series] New York, 1888; [Breviary treasures]
Jamaica Plains, Mass. 1904._

12. The Encheiridion of Epictetus. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras.
Translated by Thomas Talbot. 1881.

13. Epictetus’ Sayings and Maxims. Selected by Rudolph Dircks. 1906. 32o

14. The Book of Epictetus. [Harrap Library] 1910. 8o

15. Epictetus: The Discourses and Manual, together with Fragments from his
Writings. Translated with an Introduction and Notes by P. E. Matheson. 2
vol. 1917. 8o

_American Reprint: 2 vol., New York, 1917._



American Translations


1. Epictetus his Morals, Done from the original Greek, and the words taken
from his own mouth by Arrian. The second edition. Philadelphia. 1729.

2. Epictetus. Selections from his Discourses; with the Encheiridion;
edited by B. E. Smith. New York. 1900.

3. Epictetus’ Discourses. New York. 1900. 8o [World’s Great Books]

4. Golden Sayings of Epictetus; with the Hymn of Cleanthes; translated and
arranged by Hastings Crossley. New York. 1903. [Golden Treasury Series]

5. Noble Thoughts of Epictetus; selected and edited by Dana Estes; with an
essay on The Discourses by Canon F. W. Farrar. Boston. 1909. 16o [Noble
Thoughts Series]

6. Discourses of Epictetus. Boston. 1914. [Berkeley Series]

7. Discourses of Epictetus. New York. 1916. 24o [Cloister Craft Books]



Epicurus


1. Epicurus’s Moralls, collected ptly out of his owne Greeke text in
Diogenes Laertius and ptly out of ye Rhapsodies of Marcus Antoninus,
Plutarch, Cicero and Seneca. And faithfully Englished by Dr. Charleston.
Licensed to He. Herringman, December 12, 1655.

_Reprinted: 1670._

2. Epicurus’s Morals, Translated from the Greek [or rather from the
French] by J. Digby. With comments and reflections taken out of several
authors [or rather by J. Parrain Baron des Contures translated from the
French.] Also Isocrates, his advise to Demonicus, done out of Greek by the
same hand. To which is added an essay on Epicurus’s Morals ... by ... St.
Evremont ... made English by Dr. Johnson. (The Life of Epicurus ... by Dr.
Rondell) 1712. 8o

_Reprinted: [Edit. by J. Tela.] 1822._



Euripides


1. Iocasta: A Tragedy vvritten in Greek by Euripides, translated and
digested into Actes by George Gascoigne, and Francis Kinvvelmershe of
Grayes Inne, and there by them presented, 1566. [In G. Gascoigne: A
Hundreth sundrie Floweres] [1572]. 4o

_Reprinted: [1575]; [In the Whole Workes] 1587; [In the pleasauntest
Workes of George Gascoigne] 1587._

2. The Hecuba. Translated by Mr. West. 1726. 4o

3. [Selections] Translated by Jabez Hughes. 1737. 8o [In Hughes’
Miscellanies]

4. Hecuba. Translated with annotations by Rev. T. Morrell. 1749. 8o

5. Iphigenia in Tauris. Translated by Dr. West. 1753. 8o [In his
translation of Pindar. _q.v._]

6. Hippolytus, Iphigenia in Aulis and in Tauris, Alcestis and Cyclops,
with extracts from other tragedies. Translated by Mrs. Charlotte Lenox,
from the French translation in Brummoy’s Theâtre des Grecs. 3 vol. 1759.
4o

7. Select tragedies of Euripides (Phoenissae; Iphigenia in Aulis; Troades;
Orestes) translated from the original Greek. [In verse; with notes.] By J.
Bannister. 1780. 8o

8. The Tragedies of Euripides. Translated [by R. Potter]. 2 vol. 1781‐83.
4o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1807; 2 vol., 1808; [Alcestis only] 1809; [Hecuba
only] 1827; 2 vol., 1814; 2 vol., 1882; 2 vol., 1835; [Alcestis, Electra,
Orestes, Iphigenia in Aulis, Iphigenia in Tauris, The Trojan Dames; with
an Introduction by Henry Morley. In Morley’s Universal Library] 1887._

_American Reprints: New York, 1820‐52; 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76; New
York, 1886; New York, 1887._

9. The nineteen tragedies and fragments of Euripides. Translated by
Michael Wodhull. 1782. 4 vol.

_Reprinted: [Hyppolytus and Iphigenia in Aulis only] Dublin, 1786; 4 vol.,
1809; [Hecuba, Hercules Distracted, the Children of Hercules, Rhesus, The
Trojan Captives, The Cyclops, Helen, Andromache; with an Introduction by
Henry Morley. In Morley’s Universal Library] 1888; [In Popular Poets]
1894; [Medea, only. In Plays of Aristophanes, Euripides, and Sophocles,
translated by Frere, Wodhull, and Francklin] 1894._

_American Reprints: New York, 1888._

10. A literal translation of Euripides’ Hippolytus and Iphigenia. [In
Aulis] By M. Toumy. Dublin. 1790. 12o

11. The Alcestis of Euripides acted at ... Reading School. Translation by
Mr. Potter. [In verse] Reading. [1809] 12o

_Reprinted: New York, 1886._

12. Hecuba, Orestes, Phoenician Virgins, and Medea. Translated by a Member
of the University of Oxford. Oxford. 1820. 8o

_Reprinted: 1837._

13. Euripidis Medea, Greek with a prose translation. By T. W. C. Edwards.
1821. 8o

_Reprinted: 1848._

14. Hippolytus and Alcestis. Translated by a Member of the University of
Oxford. Oxford. 1822. 8o

15. Euripidis Hecuba, Greek with a prose translation by T. W. C. Edwards.
1822.

_Reprinted: 1824; 1838._

16. Euripides’ Orestes with a translation by T. W. C. Edwards. 1823.

_Reprinted: 1845._

17. Euripides’ Phoenissae, Greek with a prose translation by T. W. C.
Edwards. 1823. 8o

_Reprinted: 1844._

18. Ευριπιδου Ἀλκηστις. The Alcestis of Euripides literally translated
into English prose ... with the original Greek ... by T. W. C. Edwards.
1824. 8o

_Reprinted: 1838._

19. Euripidis Tragoediae, with translation. By T. S. C. Edwards. 4 parts.
[1824?] 8o

_Reprinted: 1839._

20. Euripidis Bacchae and Heraclides in English. 1828. 8o

21. Euripides’ Tragedies. Translated by an Oxford M. A. 1839.

22. The Andromache ... literally translated into English prose, with notes
... Cambridge. 1840. 12o

23. Euripides’ Hippolytus. Translated by an Oxford M. A. 1841.

24. Euripides’ Cyclops. Translated into English verse. 1842.

25. The Bacchanals of Euripides. Translated into English [verse]. By Mons.
Glouton. Brighton. 1845. 8o

26. Euripides’ Alcestis and Hippolytus, literally translated into English
prose, with notes, by a Graduate in Honors of the University of Oxford.
1846.

27. The Bacchae and Heraclidae literally translated with notes. 1846. 12o

28. The Alcestis of Euripides. Translated by Rev. James Banks. 1849.

29. Euripides’ Tragedies. Translated by T. A. Buckley. 2 vol. 1850. [Bohn]

_American Reprints: New York, 1856; [Bohn] New York, 1872‐76 2 vol.; New
York, 1887; [Alcestis and Electra] Philadelphia, 1901._

30. The Hecuba of Euripides. Translated by Rev. A. B. Faussett. 1850.

31. The Medea of Euripides. Literally translated and explained ... by Rev.
A. B. Faussett. Dublin. 1851. 8o

32. Euripides’ Hecuba. Translated into English prose. By D. Spillan. 1861.

33. Euripides’ Medea. Translated into English prose. By D. Spillan. 1861.

34. Euripides’ Hecuba and Medea. Translated by Smith. 1862.

35. Hecuba, Medea and Phoenissae. Literally translated by Roscoe Mongan.
1865.

_Reprinted: [Phoenissae only. In Kelly’s Keys] 1865._

36. Phoenissae and Medea. Translated by Dr. [J. A.] Giles. 1865.

37. Hecuba and Orestes. Translated by Dr. [J. A.] Giles. 1866.

38. Ion. Translated with notes. By E. S. Crooke. 1866.

39. Translations from Euripides: Medea, Iphigenia in Aulis, Iphigenia in
Tauris. Translated by J. Cartwright. 1866.

40. The Crowned Hippolytus of Euripides, together with a selection from
the pastoral and lyric poets of Greece. Translated into English verse. By
M. P. Fitzgerald. 1867.

41. Iphigenia in Tauris. Translated with notes. By E. S. Crooke. 1867.

42. Euripides’ Medea. Translated by John R. Lee. 1867.

43. Euripides’ Medea. Translated into English verse by Augusta Webster.
1868.

44. Alcestis. Literally translated and explained ... by a First Class Man
of Balliol College. 1870.

_Reprinted: 1880._

45. The Alcestis of Euripides. Literally translated into English prose,
with notes. Cambridge. [1870] 8o

46. Euripides’ Alcestis. Translated into English verse. By W. F. Nevins.
1870. 8o

47. Euripides’ Hecuba. The text is closely rendered and the most difficult
words parsed and explained. By a First Class Man of Balliol College. 1870.

_Reprinted: 1880._

48. Euripides’ Medea. Literally translated and explained ... by a First
Class Man of Balliol College. 1870.

49. [Alcestis] Balaustion’s Adventure, including a transcript from
Euripides. By Robert Browning. Third Edition. 1871.

_Reprinted: 1881._

50. Ἐυριπιδου βακχαι. The Bacchae of Euripides, with a revision of the
text and a commentary by R. Y. Tyrrell. 1871. 8o

51. Euripides’ Medea, Alcestis and Hippolytus. Translated into blank
verse, by H. Williams. 1871.

52. Euripides’ Works. Translated by W. B. Donne. 1872. [Ancient Classics]

_American Reprint: Philadelphia, 1872._

53. Euripides’ Bacchae. Translated into English verse by J. E. Thorobold
Rogers. 1872.

54. Euripides’ Hecuba. Translated with notes ... 1875. [Analytical Series
of the Greek and Latin Classics]

_Reprinted: 1880; 1886._

55. Euripides’ Alcestis. 1876.

56. Euripides’ Bacchae. Translated by George O’Connor. 1876.

57. Euripides’ Hercules Furens. Translated with notes, by a Graduate.
Cambridge and London. 1876.

58. Euripides’ Hippolytus, with ... notes and a literal translation by a
Graduate [F. A. S. Freeland?]. Cambridge and London. 1876. 8o

59. Euripides’ Alcestis. Literally translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1879.

_Reprinted: 1881_.

60. Euripides’ Alcestis. Literally translated into English prose by James
Rice. 1879.

61. The Crowned Hippolytus. Translated from Euripides with new Poems by A.
Mary Robinson. 1881.

62. Ion of Euripides.... An entirely new and literal translation by Roscoe
Mongan. 1881.

63. The Troades of Euripides. Translated into literal English with notes.
By Henry J. Corbett Knight. 1882.

64. The Alcestis of Euripides. Translated from the Greek into English, now
for the first time in its original metres, with preface, explanatory
notes, and stage directions suggesting performance. By H. B. L. 1884.

65. Euripides’ Iphigenia in Aulis. Literally translated by Thomas J.
Arnold. 1884.

66. The Iphigeneia among the Tauri of Euripides. Translated into English
... by Herbert Hailstone. Cambridge. 1884.

67. Euripides’ The Troades. Literally translated by Thomas J. Arnold.
[1885?].

68. Euripides’ Hercules Furens. Literally translated by Thomas J. Arnold.
[1885?].

69. Euripides’ Alcestis. Translated with introduction, notes ... by the
Editors of the Analytical Series of Greek and Latin Classics. 1886.

70. Euripides’ Bacchae. Literally translated by William James Hickie.
1886.

71. Euripidis Heraclidae. Literally translated by W. J. Hickie. 1886.

72. How to pass. Edited by Augustus C. Maybury. No. 1. Hercules Furens of
Euripides. Translated into literal English with notes and life of the
author. Written for candidates preparing for the University of London
Examinations. By A. C. Maybury. [Published by the Author] 1886.

73. The Hippolytus of Euripides. Literally translated by Roscoe Mongan.
1886.

74. Euripides’ Andromache. Literally translated.... By William J. Hickie.
1887.

_Reprinted: 1893._

75. The Trojan Women. A translation into English verse from the Troades of
Euripides. By William D. Standfast. 1887.

76. Alcestis of Euripides rendered into English verse. By William
Cudworth. 1888. [Privately printed]

77. The Bacchanals and other plays [Ion, Medea, The Phoenician Damsels,
The Suppliants, Hippolytus] by Euripides. The Bacchanals translated by
Henry Hart Milman. The other plays translated by Michael Wodhull. With an
introduction by Henry Morley. 1888. [Morley’s Universal Library]

_American Reprint: New York, 1888._

78. Euripides’ Hecuba. Literally translated. 1888.

79. Euripides’ Hippolytus. Literally translated by a Graduate. Cambridge
and London. 1888.

80. The Hippolytus of Euripides. Translated into English ... by Herbert
Hailstone. Cambridge. 1888.

81. The Ion of Euripides now first translated into English in its original
metres, with an introduction, notes ... by H. B. L. 1889.

82. The Iphigeneia in Aulis of Euripides. Rendered into English verse by
William Cudworth. 1889. [Privately printed]

83. The Ion of Euripides. Translated into English ... by Herbert
Hailstone. Cambridge. 1890.

84. Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris. A literal translation by G. F. H.
Sykes and John H. Haydon. 1890.

85. Euripides’ plays. Translated into English prose by Edward F.
Coleridge. 2 vol. 1891.

_American Reprint: [Bell’s Classical Treasury] New York, 1893._

86. Euripides’ Alcestis. Translated by T. J. Arnold. 1892. [Gk.‐Eng.]

87. Euripides’ Bacchae. A new and accurate translation ... by Herbert
Hailstone. 1892.

88. A literal translation of the Hecuba of Euripides ... by Thomas Nash.
Oxford and London. 1892.

89. Euripides’ Heraclidae. A close translation by Richard M. Thomas. 1892.

90. Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris. Literally translated by J. A. Prout.
[1892?].

91. Euripides’ Alcestis. Text with a translation ... by Richard W.
Reynolds. 1893.

92. Euripides’ Tragedies. Translated into English verse, by Arthur
Saunders Way. 3 vol. 1894‐98.

_Reprinted: 3 vol., 1907; [Loeb] 4 vol., 1912‐13._

_American Reprints: vol. 1, New York, 1894; vols. 2, 3, New York, 1896;
vols. 1, 2, New York, 1912; vols. 3, 4, New York, 1913._

93. Euripides; Hercules Furens. A literal translation by Richard W.
Thomas. 1894.

94. Euripides’ Andromache. Edited by Henry Clarke. 1895. [Gk.‐Eng.]

95. Euripides’ Alcestis. Translated into English [prose] by Herbert
Hailstone. Cambridge. 1896.

96. Euripides’ Alcestis. Edited with a translation by John H. Haydon.
1896.

_Reprinted: 1902; 1905._

97. Euripides’ Alcestis. Literally translated ... with test papers by H.
Sharpley. Cambridge. 1896.

98. Euripides’ Bacchae, text edited with introduction, notes ... by John
Thompson and Bernard J. Hayes. A translation by W. H. Balgarvie and
Bernard J. Hayes. 1896.

99. Euripides’ Alkestis performed in Greek at the Edinburgh Academy....
Translated by G. B. Green and R. J. Mackensie. Edinburgh. 1898.

100. Euripides’ Hippolytus. Edited by John Thompson and B. J. Hayes. 1898.
[Gk.‐Eng.] [University Tutorial Series]

101. Euripides’ Medea. Literally translated and ... explained by T. Nash.
Third Edition revised by R. Broughton. 1898. 8o [Oxford Translations of
the Classics]

102. Euripides’ Medea. Edited with notes, and a translation by W. C.
Green. 1898. 12o

_Reprinted: 1910._

103. Euripides’ Hecuba. Translated by W. H. Balgarvie. 1899. 8o [U. T. S.]

104. Euripides’ Hippolytus. Translated by John Thompson and B. J. Hayes.
1899. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

105. The Medea of Euripides. The lyrical parts done into English. With
introduction, notes ... by P. B. Halcombe. 1899. 12o

106. Euripides’ Hecuba, with introduction, notes, text, and translation.
1900. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

107. Euripides’ Medea. Translated by J. F. Stout. 1901. 8o [University
Tutorial Series]

108. Euripides. Translated into English rhyming verse by Gilbert Murray.
1902. 8o [Athenian Drama for English Readers.]

_American Reprint: [English Drama Series] New York, 1902‐03; [English
Drama Series] New York, 1903; New York, 1908._

109. Euripides’ Alcestis. Literally translated ... by St. George Stock.
1902. 8o

110. Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris. With introduction, text, notes,
vocabulary, and translation. Edited by J. Thompson, A. F. Watt, G. F. H.
Sykes. 1903. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

111. The Alcestis of Euripides. Oxford text with an English verse
translation. By Sixth Form Boys of Bradfield College. 1904. 8o

112. Euripides’ Bacchae, translated into English rhyming verse with
explanatory notes by Gilbert Murray. 1904. 8o

_American Reprints: New York, 1908; New York, 1913._

113. Euripides’ Heracleidae. Translated by H. Sharpley. 1904. 8o

114. Euripides’ Hippolytus. Translated into English rhyming verse by
Gilbert Murray. 1904. 8o

_American Reprints: New York, 1908; New York, 1913._

115. Euripides’ Electra. Translated into English rhyming verse, with
explanatory notes by Gilbert Murray. 1905. 8o

_Reprinted: 1906._

_American Reprint: New York, 1907._

116. Euripides’ Trojan Women. Translated into English rhyming verse, with
explanatory notes by Gilbert Murray. 1905. 16o

_American Reprints: New York, 1907; New York, 1915._

117. Euripides’ Plays. Vol. I. 1906. Vol. II. 1908. 12o [Everyman]
[Translation by Shelley, Milman, Potter, and Wodhull.]

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1906, 1908._

118. Euripides’ Alcestis. Translated by H. Kynaston. Introduction by J.
Churton Collins. 1906. 12o

_American Reprint: New York, 1906._

119. Euripides’ Medea and Hippolytus, with an introduction, translation,
and notes, by Sidney Waterlow. 1906. 12o

120. Euripides’ Medea. Translated into English rhyming verse, with
explanatory notes, by Gilbert Murray. 1907. 8o

121. Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris. Translated into English verse, with
explanatory notes, by Gilbert Murray. 1910. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1910._

122. Euripides’ Plays. Translated into English rhyming verse, with
explanatory notes, by Gilbert Murray. 2 vol. 1911. 8o

123. Euripides’ Rhesus. Translated into English rhyming verse, with
explanatory notes, by Gilbert Murray. 1913. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1913._

124. The Alcestis of Euripides. The Greek text with English verse
translated parallel. By Sixth Form Boys of Bradfield College. 1914. 8o

125. Euripides’ Bacchae. A translation by F. A. Evelyn. 1914. 8o

126. Euripides’ Alcestis. Translated into English rhyming verse, with
explanatory notes, by Gilbert Murray. 1915. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1915._



American Translations


1. Euripides’ Alcestis. New York. 1852‐55.

2. Euripides’ Alcestis. Literally translated. Athens, Ga. 1852‐55. 12o

3. Euripides’ Bacchae; text and translation in English verse by A. Kerr.
New York. 1899.

4. The Revellers; the choruses of the Bacchai of Euripides, and the third
book of Lucretius; translated into English verse by Rev. R. E. McBridge.
New York. 1909. 12o

5. Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris; an English version by Witter Bynner.
New York. 1915.



Heliodorus


1. The amorous and tragical Tales of Plutarch, whereunto is annexed the
History of Cariclea and Theaginis and the Sayings of the Greeke
philosophers. Translated by Ja. Sanferd. 1567. 8o

2. An Aethiopian Historie written in Greek by Heliodorus: very vvittie and
pleasaunt, Englished by Thomas Vnderdoune. With the Argument of Euery
Booke, sette before the whole Worke. Licensed to Caldecocke, 1568/9. 4o BL

_Reprinted: Corrected and Augmented, 1577; 1587; 1605; 1606; 1622; [Tudor
Translations] 1895._

_American Reprint: [Introduction by C. Whibley] New York, 1895._

3. The beginning of Heliodorus his Aethiopical History. [In A. Fraunce,
The Countesse of Pembrokes Ynychurch] 1591. 4o

4. The Faire Aethiopian. Dedicated to the King and Queene. By their
Maiesties most humble Subiect and Seruant, William L’isle. 1631. 4o

_Reprinted: [__“__augumented__”__] 1638._

5. The Aethiopian History of Heliodorus in Ten Books. The first Five
translated by a Person of Quality; the last Five by N. Tate. To which are
prefixed, The Testimonies of Writers, both Ancient and Modern, concerning
this work. 1685. 8o

_Reprinted: 1687._

6. The Adventures of Theagenes and Chariclia. 2 vol. 1717.

7. The Ethiopics: or, adventures of Theagenes and Chariclea ... trans.
from the Greek, with notes, by R. Smith. [1848?]. 8o [Bohn]



Heraclitus Of Ephesus



American Translation


1. Fragments of the work on nature; translated from the Greek text of
Bywater; introduction by G. T. W. Patrick. Baltimore. 1889. 8o



Herodian


1. The History of Herodian, a Greeke Authour, treating of the Romayne
Emperors after Marcus, translated oute of Greeke into Latin, by Angelus
Politianus, and out of Latin into Englishe, by Nicholas Smyth. Whereunto
are annexed, the Argumentes of euery Booke, at the begynnyng thereof, with
Annotacions for the better vnderstandynge of the same Historye. [1550?] 4o
BL

2. Herodian in English. Licensed to T. Adams, by assignment of R. Walley.
October. 1591.

3. Herodian of Alexandria his History of twenty Roman Emperors (of his
time).... Interpreted out of the Greek Originall. Colophon: Augustan
Herodiani Historian vertebat I. M. [James Maxwell?] 1629.

_Reprinted: 1635._

4. Herodian’s History of the Roman Emperors; containing many strange and
wonderful Revolutions of State in Europe, Asia, and Africa ... done from
the Greek by a Gentleman at Oxford. 1698. 8o

5. Herodian’s History of his own Times, or of the Roman Empire after
Marcus. Translated with notes ... by J. Hart. 1749. 8o

6. The Heir Apparent; or, the Life of Commodus: the son and successor of
the good M. Aurelius Antoninus ... from the Greek of Herodian. With a
preface adapted to the present time. 1789. 8o



Herodotus


1. The Famous Hystory of Herodotus. Conteyning the Discourse of dyuers
Countreys, the succession of their Kyngs: the actes and exploytes
atchieued by them: the Lavves and customes of euery Nation: with the true
Description and Antiquitie of the same. Deuided into Nine Bookes,
entituled vvith the names of the nine Muses. [Books I, II] 1584. 4o BL
[Preface signed, B. R.]

_Reprinted: [Book II, Edit. by Andrew Lang] 1888._

2. History: Translated by Isaac Littlebury. 1709. 8o

_Reprinted: 1729; 1737; Oxford, 1818._

3. Herodotus. Translated with notes, by William Beloe. 4 vol. 1791. 8o

_Reprinted: 4 vol., 1806; 4 vol., 1812; 4 vol., 1821; 2 vol., 1825; 3
vol., 1830; [Book II and part of Book IV] 1886._

_American Reprints: New York, 1820‐52; 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76._

4. Herodotus. Literally translated into English. 2 vol. Oxford. 1824. 8o

5. Herodotus. Translated by P. E. Laurent. 2 vol. 1827. 8o

_Reprinted: 1837; 1846; 1849._

6. Translation of Herodotus by Isaac Taylor. 1829. 8o

7. A selection from the Histories of Herodotus, with a literal interlinear
translation ... notes. On the plan recommended by Mr. Locke. 1830. 12o

8. Herodotus’ History. Translated by H. Cary. 1843. 8o [Bohn]

_Reprinted: 1849; [Lubbock] 1891; 1897._

_American Reprints: Boston and New York, 1872‐76; Boston and New York,
1889._

9. History, Book I. 1846.

10. History, Book II. Translated by W. Lewers. 1849. [Kelly’s Keys]

11. History, Book I. Literally translated by Henry Owgan. 1851. [Kelly’s
Keys]

12. Herodotus’ History. Translated by George Rawlinson, Major‐General Sir
Henry Rawlinson, and Sir J. G. Wilkinson. 4 vol. 1858.

_Reprinted: 1862; [Everyman] 2 vol., 1910._

_American Reprints: 4 vol., New York, 1858‐60; 4 vol., New York, 1880; 2
vol., New York, 1897; [Historians of Greece] New York, 1909; [Everyman
Edited by E. H. Blakeney], 2 vol., New York, 1910._

13. The Tale of the Great Persian War, from the histories of Herodotus. By
G. W. Cox. 1861. 8o

_Reprinted: 1869._

14. History. Translated by G. S. Swayne. 1870.

15. Urania. Book VIII of Herodotus. Translated into English by John
Murray. 1882. 8o

16. Herodotus, Book I. With a literal critical translation. Glascow. 1883.
8o

17. Translation of Herodotus, Book V, with analysis and short notes. 1884.
8o

18. Erato: The Sixth Book of Herodotus’ Histories. Translated by Edmund S.
Cooke. Second Ed. Cambridge and London. 1884. 8o

19. Translation of Herodotus, Book VI, with analysis and short notes.
1884. 8o

20. Book VII literally translated with analysis and short notes. By a
First Class Man of Balliol. 1885. 8o

21. Herodotus. Literally translated with analysis and short notes. By a
First Class Man of Balliol. 1885. 8o

22. Book VIII. Translated by Peter John Gautillon. 1885. 8o

23. Book VI, translated into English by Herbert Hailstone. Cambridge.
1889. 8o

24. History. Translated by George Campbell Macaulay. 2 vol. 1890. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1904._

25. Books V and VI. Translated by John Gibson. 1890. 8o

26. Book IX. Translated by John Perkins. 1891. 8o

_Reprinted: 1917._

27. Book IX, Chapters 1‐89. Translated by Herbert Hailstone. 1891.

28. Book VI. Translated by John Thompson. 1892.

29. Book VIII, Chapters 1‐90. Translated ... by Herbert Hailstone.
Cambridge. 1893. 8o

30. Book III (Thalia). Translated by J. A. Prout. 1895. 8o

_Reprinted: 1897._

31. Book I. Literally translated by J. A. Prout. 1896. 8o

32. Book II. Translated with test papers, by J. F. Stout. 1900.
[University Tutorial Series]

33. History, Book II. Translated by J. A. Prout. 1901.

34. Book IV, Chapters 1‐144. Translated by W. J. Woodhouse. 1901. 8o

35. Histories, Books I‐III. Translated by G. W. Harris. 1906. 8o [New
Classical Library]

_American Reprint: New York, 1907._

36. Book VIII. Literally translated, with analysis, by a First Class Man
of Balliol College. 1907. 8o

37. Histories, Books IV‐VI. Translated by G. W. Harris. 1907. 8o [New
Classical Library]

38. Histories, Books VII‐IX. Translated by G. W. Harris. 1907. 8o [New
Classical Library]

39. Herodotus. Translated by George Robinson. 2 vol., 1910. 12o



Hesiod


1. The Georgicks of Hesiod, by George Chapman; translated out of the
greek: Containing Doctrine of Husbandrie, Moralitie, and Pietie; with a
perpetuall Calendar of Good and Bad Dates; Not superstitious, but
necessarie (as farre as naturall causes compell) for all men to observe,
and difference in following their affaires. 1618. 4o

2. The Works of Hesiod. Translated from the Greek [in verse] by Mr. Cooke.
2 vol. 1728. 4o

_Reprinted: 1740; 1743; [Anderson’s Poets of Great Britain] 1792‐94;
[Lee’s Grecian Authors] 1808; [Chalmer’s English Poets] 1810; [Works of
the Greek and Roman Poets] 1813; [British Poets] 1822._

3. Battle of the Gods and Titans; from the Theogony of Hesiod. Translated
by William Broome, LL.D. 1750. 8o

4. The Remains of Hesiod the Ascraean. Translated from the Greek into
English verse. With a preliminary dissertation, and notes. By Charles
Abraham Elton. 1809. 8o

_Reprinted: 1815; [Lubbock] 1894._

_American Reprint: New York, 1894._

5. Hesiod.... Translated by James Banks. 1856. [See Callimachus, No. 5.]

_American Reprints: Boston, Philadelphia, 1872‐76; [Bohn] New York, 1886._

6. Hesiod and Theognis. Translated by James Davies. 1873. [Ancient
Classics]

_American Reprint: Philadelphia, 1872‐76._

7. Poems and Fragments. Done into English prose, with an introduction and
appendix, by A. W. Mair. Oxford. 1908. 12o

8. Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns and Homerica, with translation by Hugh G.
Evelyn‐White. 1915. 16o [Loeb]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1915._



American Translation


1. Hints from the Works and Days, or, Moral, economical and agricultural
reflections of Hesiod. To which is added The Praises of Rural Life, from
Horace. “By an Officer of the U. S. Treasury Department.” New York. 1883.
8o



Hippocrates


1. Prognosticacion Drawen out of the Bookes of Ipocras, Awicen, and other
notable Auctours of Physycke, shewynge the daunger of dyuers sicknesses,
that is to say, whether peryll or death be in them or not, the pleasure of
almighty God reserved. [1530?] 8o BL

2. The aphorismes of Hippocrates; translated by Humfry Llody. In John XXI,
_Pope_, The Treasury of Healthe. [1550?] 8o

_Reprinted: 1585._

3. The Presages of Diuine Hippocrates; translated by Peter Lowe. 1597. 4o

_Reprinted: [In P. Lowe, A discourse of the whole art of Chyrurgerie.]
1612; 1634._

4. The whole Aphorismes of great Hippocrates Prince of Physicians. 1610.
12o

5. The Aphorismes of Hippocrates.... With an exactable shewing the
substance of every aphorism, and a short comment on each one.... 1655. 12o

6. The eight sections of Hippocrates’ Aphorismes ... rendered into
English: according to the translation of A. Foesius.... 1665. 8o

7. The Aphorismes of Hippocrates and the Sentences of Celsus, with
explanations ... C. J. Sprengell. 1708. 8o



American Translation


1. Genuine Works of Hippocrates. With a preliminary discourse and notes.
Francis Adams. 2 vol. New York. 1886.

_Reprinted: New York, 1891._



Homer


1. Ten books of Homers Iliades, translated out of French, by Arthur Hall
Esquire. 1581. 4o BL

2. Penelopes Complaint: Or, A Mirrour for wanton Minions. Taken out of
Homers Odissea, and written in English Verse, by Peter Colse. 1596. 4o

3. Seauen bookes of the Iliades of Homere, prince of poets, Translated
according to the Greeke, in judgement of his best Commentaries by George
Chapman Gent. 1598. 4o

4. Achilles Shield. Translated as the other seuen Bookes of Homer, out of
his eighteenth booke of Iliades. By George Chapman Gent. 1598. 4o

5. Homer, Prince of Poets: Translated according to the Greek, in twelue
Bookes of his Iliads, by Geo: Chapman. [1610?] Fol.

6. The Iliads of Homer Prince of Poets. Neuer before in any language
truely translated. With a Coment vppon some of his chiefe places; Donne
according to the Greeke By Geo: Chapman. [1611] Fol.

_Reprinted: 1612; [Notes by Taylor] 2 vol., 1843; [Intro. by Henry Morley.
In Morley’s Universal Library] 1884, 1887._

_American Reprints: [Introduction by Henry Morley] New York, 1887;
[Knickerbocker Nuggets] 3 vol., New York, 1893; [Ballads of the Nations]
New York, 3 vol., 1895; New York, 1905._

7. The Whole Works of Homer; Prince of Poetts. In his Iliads, and Odysses.
Translated according to the Greeke, By Geo. Chapman, [c. 1612]

_Reprinted: [1616?]; [Notes by Richard Hooper] 1857, 1865; 5 vol. 1874, 4
vol. 1897; [Notes by Richard Herne Shepherd] 1871, 1875, 1892; [Temple
Classics] 4 vol., 1897‐98; [Thin Paper Classics] 2 vol., 1904._

_American Reprints: [Temple Classics] 4 vol., New York, 1897‐8; [Caxton
Series] 2 vol., New York, 1912._

8. The strange, vvonderfull and bloudy Battell betweene Frogs and Mise:
... Paraphrastically done into English Heroycall verse by W. F. CCC. 1613.
4o

_Reprinted: 1634._

9. Homer’s Odysses Translated according to ye Greeke by Geo: Chapman.
[1614?] Fol. [Books I‐XII]

10. Homer’s Odysses Translated according to ye Greeke. By Geo: Chapman.
[1615?] Fol. [Books I‐XXIV]

_American Reprints: New York, 1905._

11. The Crowne of all Homers Workes Batrachomyomachia Or the Battaile of
Frogs and Mise. His Hymn’s—and—Epigrams Translated according to ye
Originall. By George Chapman. [1624?] Fol.

_Reprinted: [Introduction by S. W. Singer] 1818; [Edit. by Smith] 1858;
[Edit. by Richard Hooper] 1887._

12. Homers Iliads and Odisses, translated, adorned with sculptures and
illustrated with annotacions by John Ogelsby [Licensed to Master Thom.
Roycroft, April 18, 1656.]

_Reprinted: [Iliad only] 1660; [Odyssey only] 1665; 2 vol., 1669._

13. The Travels of Ulysses, as they were related by himself in Homer’s
ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth Books of his Odysses, to Alcinous,
king of Phæacia. Translated into English verse by Thomas Hobbes. 1673/74.
8o

14. Homer’s Iliads. Translated out of Greek into English by Tho. Hobbes of
Malmsbury. 1675. 12o

15. Homer’s Odysses. Translated by Thomas Hobbes of Malmsbury. 1675. 12o

_Reprints of Nos. 14 and 15: 1675; 1676; 1677; 1683; 1685; 1686._

16. Homer in a Nut‐shell, or his War between the Froggs and the Mice
Paraphrastically Translated in three Cantos by Samuel Parker, Gent. 1700.
8o

17. Iliad [Book I.] Translated by John Dryden. [Published with The
Fables.] 1700.

_Reprinted: 1713; 1721; 1734; 1745[?]; 1754; 1764; 1771; 1772; 1774._

18. Iliad. [Translated from the Greek to the French by Madame Dacier; from
the French to the English by Messrs. Ozel, Broome, and Oldisworth.] 5
vols. 1712. 12o

_Reprinted: 5 vol., 1734._

19. The Iliad of Homer. Translated by Mr. Pope. [With notes partly by W.
Broome.] (An Essay on the life, writings and learning of Homer. [By T.
Parnell.]) 6 vol., 1715‐20.

_Reprinted: 1720; 1720‐21; 1729; 1732; 1736; 1806; 1807; 1810; 1818; 1821;
1860; 1866; 1873; [Hector and Andromache] __ 1880; [Edit. by T. A.
Buckley] 1891; 2 vol., 1893; [Intro. and notes by J. S. Watson] [Books I‐
VIII] 1898; [Intro. and notes by H. L. Earl] [English Classics for
Schools] 3 vol., 1900; [People’s Library] 1909; 1912; [Books XXI‐XXII]
1915._

_American Reprints: Hartford, Conn., 1852‐55; [Edit. H. F. Cary] New York,
1872; [Edit. J. S. Watson. Bohn Library] New York and Philadelphia,
1872‐76; [Scribner’s Popular Poets] New York, 1872‐76; [Chandos Classics]
New York, 1872‐76; New York, 1872‐76; New York, 1875; [Lovell’s Library]
New York, 1880, 1884; [Seaside Library] New York, 1880; 2 vol., Chicago,
1893; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Edit. Warwick James Price. Student’s
Series of English Classics.] Boston, 1896; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Edit.
W. H. Maxwell and Percival Chubb. Longman’s English Classics.] New York,
1896; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Eclectic English Classics.] New York,
1896; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Notes. Riverside Literature Series.]
Boston, 1896; [Books I, VI, XII, XXIV. Edit. W. Tappan. Standard English
Classics.] New York, 1898; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Edit. P. Gentner.
Cambridge Literature Series.] Boston, 1899; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV.
Edit. W. W. Cressy and W. V. Moody. Lake English Classics] Chicago 1899;
[Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Edit. A. H. Smyth. Pocket English Classics.] New
York, 1899; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Edit. P. Storey. English Classics.]
Boston, 1899; [Books I, VI, XXII, XXIV. Edit. F. E. Shoup and I. Ball]
Baltimore, Md. 1901._

20. The First Book of Homer’s Iliad. Translated by Mr. [Thomas] Ticknell.
1715. 4o

_Reprinted: [In Johnson’s Works of the English Poets] 1779, 1790._

21. Batrachomyomachia. Translated by Dr. Thomas Parnell. 1717. 8o

_Reprinted: 1772._

_American Reprint: [The Minor Poems of Homer. Battle of the Frogs and
Mice; Hymns and Epigrams: translated by Parnell, Chapman, Shelley,
Congreve, and Hole. Introductions by H. N. __ Coleridge, and a translation
(by K. R. H. Mackenzie) of the life of Homer attributed to Herodotus.] New
York, 1872._

22. Odyssey. [Book XI] By Elijah Fenton. [In his Poetical Works] 1717. 8o

23. The Odyssey of Homer. [Translated into English verse by Pope, W.
Broome, and E. Fenton; with notes by W. Broome.] (A general view of the
Epic poem, and of the Iliad and Odyssey, extracted from Bossu. Postscript,
by Mr. Pope. Homer’s Battle of the Frogs and Mice [translated by T.
Parnell], corrected by Mr. Pope.) 5 vol. 1725‐26.

_Reprinted: 1725‐26; 1745; 1758; 1760; 1763; 1768; 1771; 1778; 1805; 1811;
1811; 1853; 1858; 1870; 1873._

_American Reprints: Hartford, Conn. 1852‐55; [Edit. J. S. Watson. Bohn
Library.] Boston and Philadelphia, 1872‐76; [Chandos Library] New York,
1872‐76; 3 vol., New York, 1872‐76; [Edit. H. F. Cary] New York, 1872;
[Lovell’s Library] New York, 1880, 1884._

_Reprints of Pope’s translation of the Iliad and Odyssey published
together: 1732; 1736; 1743; 1750; 1750‐52; Glasgow, 1753; 1759; 1760;
1763; Edinburgh, 1769; 1771; Glasgow, 1771‐72; [British Poets] 1773; 1774;
[Johnson’s Works of the English Poets] 1779‐81; 1780; 1783; [Notes by
Wakefield] 1796; 1800; 1801; 1801; 1802; 1805‐06; 1809‐10; [Chalmer’s
English Poets] 1810; [Works of the Greek and Roman Poets] 1813; 1817;
[British Poets] 1822; [Sandford’s Works of the British Poets] 1822; 1833;
[Edit. Henry Francis Cary] 1872, 1890, [Lubbock’s Books] 1891, 1897;
[Edit. Theodore Alois Buckley] 1874, 1875, 1890, 1894; 1896; [World’s
Classics] 2 vol., 1902‐03; [Edit. A. J. Church] 2 vol., 1906‐07._

_American Reprints of Pope’s translation of the Iliad and Odyssey
published together: [Notes by W. C. Armstrong] Philadelphia, 1880; [Edit.
T. A. Buckley. In Albion Poets.] New York, 1894; [Intro. A. J. Church] 2
vol., 1907; [Edit. (Odyssey) E. S. Shumway and Waldo Shumway, (Iliad) C.
Elbert Rhodes] New York, 1911‐12._

24. Batrachomyomachia. H. Price. 1736. 8o

25. Iliad, Book I. H. Fitz‐Cotton. 1749. 8o

26. Iliad, Parts of Books X and XI, in imitation of the style of Milton.
Dr. W. Broome. [In Poems on Several Occasions] 1750. 8o

27. Iliad, Book VIII. S. Ashwick. 1750. 4o

28. Iliad translated from the Greek into blank verse. With notes, pointing
out the peculiar beauties of the original and the imitations of it by
succeeding poets. With remarks on Mr. Pope’s admired version. Book I,
being a specimen of the whole, which is to follow. Samuel Langley. 1767.

29. The Iliad. Translated [in prose] by James Macpherson. 2 vol., 1773. 4o

30. Hymn to Venus. [Translated by W. Congreve] [In Johnson’s English
Poets]. 1779‐81.

31. Hymn to Ceres, translated into English verse. By Robert Lucas. 1781.

32. Hymn to Venus, translated from the Greek, with notes, by I. Rittson.
1788.

33. The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, translated into English blank verse,
by William Cowper. (The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice translated into
English blank verse by the same hand.) 2 vol., 1791. 4o

_Reprinted: 4 vol., 1802; 4 vol., 1810; 4 vol., 1836; [Edit. L. Howard]
1843; [Odyssey only.] [Everyman] 1910._

_American Reprints: New York, 1855‐58; 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76; [Iliad
only] New York, 1872‐76; [Odyssey only. Everyman.] 1910._

34. The First Book of the Iliad of Homer, verbally rendered into English
verse; being a specimen of a new translation of the poet: with critical
annotations. [By Alexander Geddes] 1792. 8o

35. Select translations from the works of Homer [Iliad] and Horace; with
original poems. By Gilbert Thompson. 1801. 8o

36. Homer’s Works in English. 12 vol., 1805‐06. 8o

37. The First Book of the Iliad; translated into blank verse by P.
Williams. 1806. 8o

38. Specimen of an English Homer in blank verse. [Being a translation of
Iliad I 1‐222 and VI 404‐496.] 1807.

39. The Iliad of Homer, Translated into English Blank Verse. By the Rev.
James Morrice, A.M. 2 vol., 1809.

40. A Translation of the Twenty‐Fourth Book of the Iliad of Homer. [By C.
Lloyd] Birmingham. 1807. 8o

41. Odyssey: [Translated into English verse.] 1811. 12o

42. The First Book of Homer’s Iliad. [Verses 1‐171 translated into English
verse by R. Morehead.] [Place?] 1814.

43. Iliad translated into English prose. By a Graduate of the University
of Oxford. 2 vol., Oxford. 1821. 8o

_Reprinted: 1825; 1833._

44. Odyssey translated into English prose, as literally as the different
idioms of the Greek and English languages will allow. With explanatory
notes. By a Member of the University of Oxford. 2 vol., 1823. 12o

45. Iliad: New translation with notes by Blank Blank, Esq., Pt. I [Books I
and II]. 1825. 12o

46. Iliad: Book I: with literal translation on the plan recommended by Mr.
Locke. 2 Parts. 1827‐28. 12o

47. The First Book of the Iliad; the parting of Hector and Andromache; and
the Shield of Achilles. Specimens of a new version of Homer by W. Sotheby.
1830. 8o

48. Homer’s Iliad, translated by William Sotheby. 2 vol., 1831. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1834._

49. The First Book of the Iliad, translated by [William John] Blew. 1831.

50. Iliad: First six books; with literal prose translation. Cambridge.
1833.

51. The Odyssey of Homer, translated by William Sotheby. 2 vol., 1834. 8o

52. Odyssey, Book XI, literally translated. Cambridge. 1834.

53. Homer’s Iliad. 1841.

54. Homer’s Iliad. 3 vols. 1846.

55. Homer’s Iliad, translated by Bryce. 1847.

56. Iliad, translated by T. S. Brandreth. 1849.

57. Homeric Ballads [from the Odyssey]; with Translation and notes by the
late W. Maginn. [Edit. by J. C., i.e., J. Conington?] 1850. 8o

_American Reprints: [With Lucian’s Comedies], Mass., 1855‐58._

58. Iliad and Odyssey, literally translated in prose by Theodore Alois
Buckley. 2 vol., 1851. 8o

_Reprinted: [Iliad only] 1909‐1913._

_American Reprints: [Iliad] New York, 1856; New York, 1884; [Books I‐IX,
Intro, by E. Brooks, Jr.] Philadelphia, 1896; [Odyssey] New York, 1861;
New York, 1872‐6; [Books I‐III, Intro. by E. Brooks, Jr.] Philadelphia,
1896._

59. Iliad, translated in unrhymed English metre by F. W. Newman. 1856.

_Reprinted: 1871._

60. The Iliad of Homer, literally rendered in Spenserian stanza by W. G.
T. Barter. 1857.

61. Iliad translated by J. C. Wright. Vol. I., 1858, Vol. II, 1865.

62. The Odyssey translated into Spenserian stanza by P. S. Worsley.
1861‐62.

_Reprinted: [Edit. by Conington] 2 vol., 1868; 2 vol., 1877; 1895._

63. Odyssey, Books I‐XII. H. Alford. 1861.

64. Odyssey, translated into blank verse by T. S. Norgate. 1862.

_Reprinted: 1865._

65. Iliad, Books XX‐XXII, with a literal translation and English notes.
1862. 8o

66. Iliad, translated by J. H. Dart. 1862‐65. [In hexameters]

67. Iliad. [Anonymous. In hexameters.] 1862.

68. The Iliad; or, Achilles’ Wrath at the siege of Ilion. Translated into
dramatic blank verse by T. S. Norgate. 1864. 8o

69. The Iliad rendered into English blank verse by Earl Derby. 2 vol.,
1864.

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1867; 2 vol., 1876; [New Universal Library] 1907;
[Everyman] 1910._

_American Reprints: 2 vol., New York, 1865; New York, 1870; Philadelphia,
1872‐76; Philadelphia, 1880; [New Universal Library] New York, 1907;
[Everyman] New York, 1910._

70. The Iliad translated in English hexameters by Edwin W. Simcox. 1865.
8o

71. Odyssey. Translated by G. Musgrave. 1865. [In blank verse]

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1869._

72. Iliad, Book I. Translated by C. S. Simms. 1866.

73. Iliad, translated by Sir J. F. W. Herschel. 1866.

74. Iliad, translated by Philip Stanhope Worsley. Edit. by Conington. 2
vol. 1868. [Spenserian Stanza]

75. Odyssey, Books V and IX. E. D. Witt. 1869.

76. Odyssey. Translated by G. W. Edgington. 2 vol., 1869. [Blank verse]

77. Iliad, translated by Charles Merivale. 2 vol., 1869. [Rhymed verse]

_American Reprint: 2 vol., New York, 1872‐76._

78. Odyssey. Translated by Lovelace Bigge‐Wither. 1869.

_Reprinted: 1877._

79. Iliad. W. L. Collins. 1869. [Ancient Classics]

_Reprinted: 1897._

_American Reprint: Philadelphia, 1870._

80. Odyssey. Translated by W. L. Collins. 1870. [Ancient Classics]

_Reprinted: 1870._

_American Reprints: Philadelphia, 1870, 1872‐76._

81. Iliad. Translated by John Graham Cordery. 2 vol., 1870. [Blank verse.
Greek‐English] 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1886; 2 vol., 1890._

82. Iliad. Book I. Rendered into English hexameters by T. F. Barham. 1871.
8o

83. Iliad, Book I. Translated into English hexameters by M. W. Adams.
[1873] 8o

84. Iliad, Books XXIII and XXIV. Translated with notes by E. S. Crooke.
1873.

85. Iliad [Six books] translated by C. S. Simms. 1873. [Fourteen syllable
verse]

86. Homer’s Iliad, Book I. Also passages from Virgil [and also
Aristophanes, Moschus and Catullus]. By M. P. W. Boulton. 1875.

87. Iliad and Odyssey. Translated by M. Barnard. 2 vol., 1876.

88. The Iliad Homometrically translated by C. B. Cayley. 1876.

89. The Similies of Homer’s Iliad, translated with an Introduction and
Notes by W. C. Green. [With Greek text] 1877. 4o

90. Iliad, Books IX‐XXIV. Translated by Roscoe Mongan. 4 vol., 1879.

_Reprinted: [Books XIII‐XVIII] 1879; [Books XIX‐XXIV] 1879; [Book XXI]
1879._

91. Iliad, complete. Books I‐VIII translated by Charles William Bateman;
Books IX‐XXIV translated by Roscoe Mongan. [Mongan’s translation is a
reprint of No. 90.] 1881. 8o

92. Odyssey. Translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1879‐80.

_Reprinted: [Books I‐VI] 1886._

93. Odyssey, translated by George Augustus Schomberg. 2 vol. 1879‐82.
[Books I‐XII, 1879; Books XIII‐XXIV, 1882]

94. Odyssey, translated by Samuel Henry Butcher and Andrew Lang, with an
Introduction by Andrew Lang. 1879.

_Reprinted: 1887._

_American Reprints: New York, 1879; New York, 1900; [Abridged Edition.
Pocket English and American Classics] New York, 1905._

95. Iliad, Books XIII and XIV, translated by Herbert Hailstone. 2 vol.,
Cambridge. 1880.

96. Odyssey, translated with notes by Charles du Cane. Edinburgh and
London. 1880. [Books I‐XII]

97. The Odyssey translated by Avia. [Arthur Saunders Way] 1880.

_Reprinted: 1904._

_American Reprints: New York, 1904._

98. Iliad, translated by Herbert Hailstone. 1882. [Books XIII and XIV are
reprints of No. 95.]

99. Iliad, Books I‐V, translated by Thomas Allen Blyth. Oxford. 1883.

100. Iliad translated by Andrew Lang, Walter Leaf, and Ernest Myers. 1883.
8o

_American Reprints: New York, 1883; New York, 1892; New York, 1900;
[Abridged Edition. Pocket English and American Classics] New York, 1905;
New York, 1915._

101. Iliad [Books I‐XII] translated by William Charles Green. [Greek‐
English] 1884. 8o

102. Iliad translated by Arthur Saunders Way. 2 vol., 1885‐88. 4o [Books
I‐XII, 1885; Books XIII‐XXIV, 1888.]

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1890; 2 vol., 1894._

103. Iliad, Books I‐IV, translated by Henry Smith Wright. 1885. 8o [In
hexameters]

104. Iliad, Books XXI‐XXII, with notes and translation by a Graduate.
1885. [Greek‐English]

105. Odyssey, Books I‐XII, translated by the Earl of Carnarvon. 1886.
[Books V and XI were privately printed in 1880.]

_American Reprint: New York, 1886._

106. Iliad, Book XVI, with an introduction, notes, and translation by
Augustus Constable Maybury. 1886. 8o

107. Odyssey, translated by William Morris. 2 vol., 1887. 4o

_Reprinted: [In Poetical Works] 1896‐97._

108. Iliad, with plays of Aeschylus and Sophocles. Introduction by Henry
Morley. 1888. 8o

109. Iliad, Book XXII, with notes and translation by John Henry Freese.
1890.

_Reprinted: [With Book XXIV]. 1894._

110. Odyssey. Book IV, translated by A. F. Burnet and John Thompson. 1891.

111. Odyssey, Books IX‐XIV, translated by John Hampden Hyden and Arthur
Hadrian Allcroft. 1891. 8o

_Reprinted: 1916._

112. Homeric Hymns translated by John Edgar. Edinburgh. 1891.

113. Batrachomyomachia, or the Battle of the Frogs and the Mice.
Translated by H. Morgan‐Brown. North Finchley. 1891. 8o

114. Iliad, edited with an introduction by Evelyn Abbott. Translation by
John Purves. 1891.

115. Odyssey, Book IX, translated by Talbot Sydenham Peppin. 1893. [Greek‐
English]

116. Iliad, Book XXII, translated by Richard Williams Reynolds. 1893.
[Greek‐English]

117. Homer’s Odyssey, Books V‐VIII. William Cudworth. Darlington. 1893.
[Privately printed]

118. The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice. Translated by Jane Barlow.
1894. 4o

119. Sample passages from a new prose translation of the Odyssey by Samuel
Butler. Edinburgh. 1894. [Book I, ll. 1‐100; XXIV, ll. 19‐124]

120. Iliad, Book XXIV, translated by Richard Moody Thomas. 1894.

121. Iliad, Books XXII‐XXIII, translated by John Henry Freese. 1894. [Book
XXII is a reprint of No. 109.]

122. Iliad, Books I, VI, and IX, translated by William Cudworth.
Darlington. 1895. 8o

123. Odysseus in Phæacia [Odyssey VI] translated by John William Mackail.
1896.

124. Odyssey, translated by J. G. Cordery. 1897. 8o

125. The Iliad. Rendered into English Prose for the use of those who
cannot read the original, by Samuel Butler. 1898. 8o

_Reprinted: 1900._

_American Reprint: New York, 1900._

126. Iliad, Books XXII‐XXIV, translated with test papers, by W. J.
Woodhouse and R. M. Thomas. 1900. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

127. Odyssey translated into English verse by John William Mackail.
1903‐10. 8o [Books I‐VIII, 1903; Books IX‐XVI, 1905; Books XVII‐XXIV,
1910.]

128. Iliad, Book XXIV, literally translated with notes by E. S. Crooke.
1905. 8o

129. Iliad; translated into English prose by E. H. Blakeney. 1905‐13. 8o
[Books I and II, XXIV, 1905; Books II‐IV, 1906; Books V‐VI, VII‐VIII,
1908; Books IX‐X, XI‐XII, 1909; Books XIII‐XIV, 1911; Books XV‐XVI, XVII‐
XVIII, 1912; Books XIX‐XX, XXI‐XXII, 1913]

_American Reprint: 2 vol., New York, 1910‐1913 [Vol. I, Books I‐XII; Vol.
II, Books XIII‐XXIV.]_

130. Odyssey, Books IX‐X, translated by A. Jagger. 1908. 8o

131. Odyssey. A Line‐for‐line translation in the metre of the original. By
H. B. Cotterill. 1911. 4o

_American Reprint: Boston, 1912._

132. The Toils and Travels of Odysseus, [Odyssey] Translated by C. A.
Pease. 1916. 8o



American Translations


1. Homer’s Iliad, translated by William Mumford of Virginia. Boston. 1846.
8o

_Reprinted: Richmond, Va., 1852‐55._

2. Homer’s Iliad, with an interlinear translation by Hamilton and Clark.
Philadelphia. 1855‐58. 12o

_Reprinted: Philadelphia, 1888, 1896._

3. Diomede: From the Iliad of Homer. By W. R. Smith. New York. 1869. 8o

4. Iliad. Translated into English verse. By W. G. Calacleugh.
Philadelphia. 1870. 12o

5. Homer’s Iliad. Translated into English Blank Verse. By W. C. Bryant. 2
vol. Boston. 1870.

_Reprinted: Boston, 1883, 4 vol., 1905, [Abridged by Sarah E. Simmons]
1916, 1916._

6. Homer’s Odyssey translated by W. C. Bryant. 2 vol. Boston. 1871. 8o

_Reprinted: Boston, 1883, [Ulysses among the Phaeacians] 1889, [Student’s
Edition] 1898, 4 vol., 1905, [Riverside Literature Series, Books I, VI,
XXII, XXIV] 1899._

_Homer translated into English verse by W. C. Bryant. Boston. 1897._

7. Achilles’ Wrath: Composite translation of Book I of the Iliad; by P. R.
Johnson. Boston. 1872‐76.

8. Homer’s Odyssey; Books I‐XII: text and English version in rhythmic
prose, by George Herbert Palmer. Boston. 1884. 8o

9. Homer’s Odyssey translated into English rhythmic prose by George
Herbert Palmer. Boston. 1891. 8o

_Reprinted: Boston, 1893, [Abridged School Edition: Riverside Literature
Series] 1909._

10. Homer’s Iliad. Metrical translation by G. Howland. Boston. 1889. 8o

11. Homer’s Iliad, Books I‐VI. New York. 1889. [Handy Literal Translation]

12. Homer: Song of Demeter and her daughter Persephone: Peter’s
translation. Chicago. 1902. 32o

13. The Iliad of Homer; translated into English hexameter verse by
Prentiss Cummings; abridgment which includes all the main story and the
most celebrated passages. 2 vol. Boston. 1910. 12o

14. The Women of the Iliad; a metrical translation of the first book and
of other passages in which women appear, by Hugh Woodruff Taylor. New
York. 1912. 8o

15. The Iliad of Homer: translated into English blank verse, by Arthur
Gardner Lewis. 2 vol. New York. 1912. 2o

16. Homer’s Iliad. (Student’s Interlinear Translation) New York, 1917.



Hyperides


1. The Orations against Athenogenes and Philippides, edited with a
translation by Frederic G. Kenyon. 1893.



Isaeus


1. The Speeches of Isaeus in causes concerning the law of succession to
property at Athens. [Translated from the Greek.] With a prefatory
discourse, notes critical and historical, and a commentary, by W. Jones.
1779. 4o



Isocrates


1. Orations; translated from Greek into English by Richard Sadleir. [No
date] Fol.

2. The Doctrinal of Princes made by the Noble oratour Isocrates, and
translated out of Greke in to Englishe by syr Thomas Eliot knight. [Title
border dated 1534] 8o BL

_Reprinted: [There is another London edition but no date is given.]_

3. The Godly aduertisement or good counsell of the famous orator
Isocrates, intitled Parænesis to Demonicus: whereto is annexed Cato in
olde Englysh meter. Anno Do. M.D.LVII. Mense Decemb. 8o BL [Translated by
John Bury]

4. Esocrates to Demonicus. [Licensed to Owen Rogers, 30 May, 1560.]

5. The extract of Epistles, out of Isocrates. [In Abraham Fleming’s A
Panoplie of Epistles. 1576. 8o]

6. A perfite looking Glasse for all Estates: Most excellently and
eloquently set forth by the famous and learned Oratour Isocrates, as
contained in three Orations of Morall instructions, written by the Authour
himselfe at the first in the Greeke tongue, of late yeeres. Translated
into Lataine by that learned Clearke Hieronimus Wolfius. And now Englished
to the behalfe of the Reader, with sundrie examples and pithy sentences
both of Princes and Philosophers gathered and collected out of diuers
writers, coted in the margent approbating the Authours intent, no less
delectable then profitable. 1580. 8o BL [Epistle dedicatorie signed Thomas
Forrest, translator]

7. Oration intitled Evagoras by Jer. Wolfe. 1581. 8o

8. The good admonition of the Sage Isocrates, to young Demonicus;
translated from the Greek by Richard Nuttall. 1585. 8o

9. Archidamus, or, the Councell of Warre. Being 2000 yeares old, and
written by Isocrates the couragious Orator, translated by Tho: Barnes.
1624. 4o

10. Advice to a young Gentleman. Writ in Greek by Isocrates, the famous
Athenian Oratour; and lately made English for the use of schools. 1696. 8o

11. Epicurus’s Morals. Translated from the Greek [or rather from the
French] by J. Digby. With comments and reflections taken out of several
authors [or rather by J. Parrain] Also Isocrates, his advise to Demonicus,
done out of Greek by the same hand. To which is added an essay on
Epicurus’s Morals ... by ... St. Evremont ... made English by Mr. Johnson.
1712. 8o

_Reprinted: [Edited by J. Tela] 1822._

12. The Advice of Isocrates to Demonicus a Nobleman.—His discourse to a
Prince on Kingly Government.—Translated from the Greek. [In the Prince’s
Cabala; or Mysteries of State. Written by King James [I] 1715.] 12o

13. The Duty of a King and his People, being two Orations of Isocrates.
[Translated by J. Brown] 1735. 8o

14. Orations and Epistles of Isocrates translated from Greek by Joshua
Dinsdale. Revised by Rev. Mr. Young. 1752. 8o

15. Isocrates’s Oration to Demonicus. S. Toulmin, A.M. [Published with
Sermons principally addressed to Youth] 1770. 8o

16. Orations out of Lysias and Isocrates, translated from the Greek by
John Gillies, LL.D. 1778. 4o

17. The Panegyric of Isocrates translated by James Rice. 1882.

_Reprinted: 1898._

18. The Panegyric of Isocrates translated by George Wilkins. 1881.

19. The Orations of Isocrates, translated by John Henry Freese. 1894.

_Reprinted: [Panegyricus. University Tutorial Series] 1900._



Longinus


1. περι Υψους. Or, Dionysius Longinus of the Height of Eloquence, Rendered
out of the originall by J. H(all). 1662. 8o

2. A Treatise of Loftiness or Elegancy of Speech. Written originally in
Greek ... and now translated out of French by Mr. J[ohn] P[ulteney]. 1698.
8o

3. An Essay upon sublime Style, translated from the Greek of Longinus, the
Rhetoritian; compared with the French of Sieur Boileau‐Despréaux. 1698. 8o

4. A Treatise of the Sublime. [In a Translation of the works of Boileau.
Vol. II.] 1711. 8o

5. The Works of Dionysius Longinus On the Sublime: ... translated from the
Greek, with some remarks of the English Poets. By Mr. Welsted. 1712. 8o

_Reprinted: 1724._

6. Dionysius Longinus On the Sublime. Translated with notes ... by W.
Smith. 1743.

_Reprinted: 1751; 1756; 1770._

7. Longinus translated again. By a Graduate of Trinity College, Dublin.
Dublin. 1821. 12o

8. Longinus [translated by an] M. A. Of Oxford. 1830. 8o

9. A treatise of the sublime. Translated by Tim. Hathaway. 1835. 12o

10. On the Sublime, translated with notes by W. T. Spurdens. 1836. 4o

11. On the Sublime. Translated with notes by D. B. Hickie. 1838.

12. On the Sublime. 1864.

13. On the Sublime. Translated by Thomas R. R. Stebbing. Oxford. 1867.

14. On the Sublime. Translated by Dr. and H. A. Giles. 1873.

15. The Poetics of Aristotle. Together with the treatise on the Sublime by
Longinus. Edited by Henry Morley. 1889. [National Library.]

16. On the Sublime; translated by H. S. Havell, with introduction by
Andrew Lang. 1890.

_American Reprint: New York, 1890._

17. On the Sublime. Greek text ... Introduction, facsimile, translation,
... by W. Rhys Roberts. 1899. 8o

_Reprinted: 1907._

_American Reprint: New York, 1899._

18. On the Sublime. Translated by A. O. Prickard. With introduction, notes
and appendix. 1906. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1906._



Longus


1. Daphnis and Chloe excellently describing the weight of affection, the
simplicitie of love, the purport of honest meaning, the resolution of men,
and disposition of Fate, finished in a Pastorall, and interlaced with the
praises of a most peerlesse Princesse, wonderfull in maiestie, and rare in
perfection, celebrated within the same Pastoral, and therefore termed by
the name of the Shepheards Holidaie. By Angell Daye. 1587. 4o

_Reprinted: 1890._

_American Reprint: New Rochelle, N. Y., 1905._

2. Daphnis and Chloe. A most sweet and pleasant pastorall romance for
young ladies. [Translated] by G. Thornley. 1656. 8o

_Reprinted: 1893._

3. The Pastoral Amours of Daphnis and Chloe ... Translated into English.
1720. 12o

_Reprinted: 1733._

4. Daphnis and Chloe, a pastoral Novel, now first selectly translated into
English from the original Greek of Longus. (By the Rev. C. P. Le Grice)
1804. 12o

5. The Amours of Daphnis and Chloe.... Translated with notes by R. Smith.
1889. 8o

6. Daphnis and Chloe, a pastoral romance. 1890.

7. Daphnis and Chloe. [Translated from the French of J. Amyot] 1896.

8. The Story of Daphnis and Chloe. A Greek Pastoral. Edited with text,
introduction, translation and notes, by W. D. Lowe. 1908. 8o

9. Daphnis and Chloe. English translation by George Thornley, revised and
augmented by J. M. Edmonds. [Contains also] The Love Romances of
Parthenius, etc. English translation by S. Gaselee. 1916. 18o [Loeb
Classical Library]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1916._



Lucian


1. A Dialogue betweene Lucian and Diogenes of the life harde and sharpe,
and of the lyfe tendre and delicate. [Translated by Sir Thomas Eliot] [No
date] 8o BL

2. Necromantia. A dialog of the Poet Lucyan, for his fantesye faynyd for a
mery pastime, and furst by hym compylyd owt of the Greke into Latyn, and
now lately translaytyd owt of Laten into Englissh for the erudicion of
them, which be disposyd to lerne the tongis. [No date] [“Johannes Rastell
me fieri fecit” is on the margin of the title page.]

3. Toxaris, or the friendship of Lucian; [dedication to A. S. from A. O.].
1565. 8o

4. Certaine select Dialogues of Lucian; together with his true historie,
Translated from the Greeke into English By Mr. Francis Hickes. Whereunto
is added the life of Lucian gathered out of his owne Writings, with briefe
Notes and Illustrations upon each Dialogue and Booke, by T. H., Mr of Arts
of Christ‐Church in Oxford. Oxford. 1634. 4o

_Reprinted: [With additional dialogues translated by Dr. Mayne] 1663;
1664._

_American Reprint: [Introduction by C. Whibley] New York, 1894._

5. Pleasant Dialogues and Dramma’s, selected out of Lucian, Erasmus,
Texter, Ovid, &c. 1637. 8o

6. [Dialogus: Lovers of Lyes. Printed in Quest of Witch‐Craft Debated. By
John Wagstaffe. Translated by some one else. 1669.]

7. Lucian: Works. Translated out of Greek by Ferrand Spence. [4 vol.]
1684.

8. Selections translated by Walter Moyle. 1710. 4o

_Reprinted: 1727._

9. Works translated out of Greek by several eminent hands. [Life and
Discourse on Lucian by John Dryden.] 1711. 8o

_Reprinted: 1745._

10. Triumphs of the Gout and Gymnastic Exercises, translated from Lucian
by Gilbert West [In his Odes of Pindar]. 1753. 8o

11. Lucian’s Dialogues. From the Greek. [By J. Carr] 5 vol., 1774.

_Reprinted: 1798._

12. The Works of Lucian, from the Greek, by T. Francklin. 2 vol., 1780. 4o

_Reprinted: 4 vol., 1781; [Trips to the Moon] 1887._

_American Reprint: New York, 1887._

13. A new literal translation of Stock’s Lucian ... with a few notes by D.
B. Hickie, Dublin. 1818. 12o

14. Lucian from the Greek, with the comments and illustrations of Willand
and others. W. Tooke. 2 vol., 1820. 4o

15. A literal translation of Walker’s Lucian, with many useful notes ...
By D. B. Hickie. Dublin. 1829. 12o

16. Selections from Lucian: literal translation ... By a Graduate of the
University. [J. P. P.] Dublin. 1845. 8o

17. Selections. 1852.

18. Works. [Selections] W. Lucas Collins. 1873. [Ancient Classics]

_American Reprint: [Ancient Classics] Philadelphia, 1873._

19. Lucian’s Dialogues, translated by Howard Williams. 1888.

_American Reprints: New York, 1888; [Handy Literal Translations] 2 vol.,
New York, 1904._

20. Dialogues and Somnium, translated by Roscoe Mongan and J. A. Prout.
1890.

21. The Dream, Charon, The Fisher, Mourning. Literally translated. 1890.

22. Six Dialogues translated by Sidney Thomas Irwin. 1894.

23. Luciani Somnium et Piscator translated ... by W. Armour. 1895.

_Reprinted: 1905._

24. Lucian literally and completely translated for the first time from the
Greek text of C. Jacobitz. Athens [i.e. London]: Privately printed for the
Athenian Society. 1895.

25. Somnium and Piscator ... by Herbert Hailstone. Cambridge. 1895.

26. Menippus and Timon. Translated by J. A. Nicklin. 1899. 8o

27. Works. With an English translation by A. M. Harmon. 2 vol., 1913‐1915.
[Loeb Classical Library]

_American Reprint: [Loeb Classical Library] 2 vol., New York, 1913‐1915._



American Translations


1. Selections from Lucian; translated by E. J. Smith. New York. 1892.

2. Lucian, a second century satirist; or, dialogues and stories;
translated with introduction and notes by W. D. Sheldon. Philadelphia.
1901.



Lysias



American Translation


1. Lysias’ Orations. New York. 1889. [Handy Literal Translations]



Marcus Aurelius Antoninus


1. Marcus Aurelius Antoninus the Roman Emperor, his Meditations concerning
Himselfe: treating of a naturall Mans happinesse; Wherein it consisteth,
and of the meanes to attaine unto it. Translated out of the Originall
Greeke; with Notes: by Meric Casaubon, B. of D. and Prebendarie of Christ
Church, Canterbury. 1634. 4o

_Reprinted: 1635; 1664; 1673; [With Life from the French of Dacier, by W.
King] 1692, 1694, 1702._

_American Reprint: [Temple Classics] New York, 1898._

2. The Emperor Marcus Antoninus, his conversation with himself. Together
with the preliminary discourse of the learned Gataker, as also the
Emperor’s life written by M. D’Acier, and supported by the authorities
collected by Dr. Stanhope. To which is added, the mythological picture of
Cebes the Theban.... Translated into English from the respective originals
by Jeremy Collier. 1701. 8o

_Reprinted: 1708; 1726; [Revised by Alice Zimmern] 1887; 1905; [With The
Apology of Tertullian translated and annotated by W. Reeve.] 1889, 1894._

_American Reprint: [Edited by Alice Zimmern] 1887._

3. The Meditations of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus newly
translated from the Greek: with notes, and an account of his life.
Glasgow. 1742. 12o [Translated by Foulis?]

_Reprinted: 2 vol., Glasgow, 1749; Glasgow, 1752; Glasgow, 1764; [Revised
by George W. Chrystal] Edinburgh, 1902, 1904._

4. The Commentaries of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. Translated
by James Thomson. 1747. 8o

_Reprinted: Glasgow, 1747; 1766._

5. Meditations, translated by M’Cormac. 1844.

6. Thoughts. Translated by George Long. 1862.

_Reprinted: 1869; 1890; [Pocket Book Classics] 1901; [York Library] 1905;
[New Universal Library] 1906; [People’s Library] 1908; 1909; [Harrap
Library] 1909; 1910; [Red Letter Library] 1910; 1910; 1912; [Bohn’s
Popular Library] 1913._

_American Reprints: [Library of the World’s Best Books] New York, 1890;
New York, 1891; [Classics for Children] New York, 1893; [Elia Series] New
York, 1895; [Illustrated Library of Famous Books] New York, 1897; [York
Library] New York, 1905; [Bell’s Pocket Classics] New York, 1905; [New
Universal Library] New York, 1907; [Handy Volume Classics] New York, 1907;
[Bohn’s Popular Library] New York, 1914._

7. Marcus Aurelius Antoninus to Himself: English Translation with
Introduction, and a Study on Stoicism and the last of the Stoics. By
Gerald H. Rendall. 1898. 8o

_Reprinted: [Golden Treasury Series] 1901._

_American Reprint: New York, 1898._

8. Meditations, translated by R. Graves. 1905. 8o [Standard Library]

9. Thoughts. Translated by John Jackson. 1906. 12o [World’s Classics]

_American Reprint: New York, 1907._

10. Meditations. 1908. 12o [Illustrated Pocket Classics]

11. Thoughts. Selected by D. S. 1908. 32o

12. Thoughts. 1913. 18o [Langham Bibelots]

13. The Communings with himself together with his Speeches and Sayings.
1916. 16o [Loeb]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1916._

14. A Selection from the Meditations of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius
Antoninus. (Translated from the Greek and Annotated) By J. G. Jennings.
1917. 18o



American Translations


1. Thoughts. Boston. 1889.

2. Selections from the Meditations; translated from the original Greek
with an introduction by B. E. Smith. New York. 1899.

3. Thoughts of Comfort. New York. 1907.

4. Thoughts; edited by Dana Estes. New York. 1908. 12o [Noble Thought
Series]

5. Meditations of Marcus Aurelius. New York. 1908. 12o [Best Books Series]

6. Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus; edited and illustrated by J.
Russell Flint. New York. 1912. 8o



Meleager


1. Fifty Poems of Meleager, translated by Walter Headlam. 1890.

_American Reprint: New York, 1890._



Menander


1. The Lately Discovered Fragments of Menander. Edited with English
version, text, etc., by Unus Multorum. 1909.

_Reprinted: 1909._



Musaeus


1. “The historie of Leander and Hero, written by Musaeus, and Englished by
me a dozen yeares ago, and in print.” [So mentioned by Abraham Fleming in
his Virgil’s Georgics, 1589. Not otherwise known.]

2. Hero and Leander by Christopher Marlowe [Two Sestiads only] Licensed to
J. Wolfe. 1593. [Edition?]

_Reprinted: 1598; 1600; [The divine poem of Musaeus. First of All Bookes.
Translated According to the Originall, by Geo: Chapman.] 1616; [Hero and
Leander: Begun by Christopher Marloe; and finished by George Chapman]
1598, 1606, 1618, 1629, 1637, 1894._

_American Reprint: [Marlowe and Chapman] Philadelphia, 1904._

3. Hero and Leander. Translated into English verse, with annotations upon
the Original by Sir R. Stapylton. Oxford. 1645. 4o

_Reprinted: 1647._

4. Two Essays: the former, Ovid de arte amandi, or Art of Love: the first
Book. The latter, Hero and Leander of Musaeus, from the Greek, by Th. Hoy.
1682. 4o

5. The poem of Musaeus on the loves of Hero and Leander. Paraphras’d in
English heroick verse [by A. S. Catcott]. Oxford. 1715.

6. Hero and Leander translated in verse by Rev. Lawrence. Eusden. [In
Dryden’s Miscellaneous Poems] 1716.

_Reprinted: Edinburgh, 1750._

7. The Hero and Leander of Musaeus translated by Mr. Theobald. [In the
Grove; or a collection of original poems] 1721. 8o

8. Loves of Hero and Leander, from the Greek, by Mr. Stirling. To which
are added some new translations from various Greek authors, viz.,
Anacreon, Sappho, Julian, Theocritus, Bion, Moschus, and Homer. By another
hand. 1728. 12o

9. A miscellany of new Poems on several occasions; containing the Loves of
Hero and Leander, translated from Musaeus to which are added Poemata
quaedam Latina. By R. Luck, A.M. 1736. 8o

10. Loves of Hero and Leander. Translated from the Greek by G. Bally.
1747. 8o

11. Musaeus: a poetical translation by J. Slade. 1753. 4o

12. Hero and Leander [Translated by Francis Fawkes]. 1760.

_Reprinted: 1789; [Anderson’s Poets of Great Britain] 1792‐94; [Works of
the Greek and Roman Poets] 1813; [British Poets] 1822; Glasgow, 1893._

13. Hero and Leander, a poem. From the Greek of Musaeus. [By E. B. Greene]
1773.

14. Musaeus. Translated from the Greek. 1774. 4o

15. Hero and Leander. A poem translated from the Greek by E. Taylor [?].
1783.

16. Μουσαιου τα κασ᾽ Ἡρω και Λεανδρον. (Musaeus. The Loves of Hero and
Leander. [Translated by G. C. Bedford]) 1797. [Privately printed]

17. Hero and Leander, a Tale. Translated from the Greek of the ancient
poet Musaeus. With other poems. By Francis Adam, Surgeon. 1822. 8o

18. [Translated by C. A. Elton with his translation of Hesiod. See Hesiod
No. 4] 1832.

19. The Three Sons‐in‐Law. A. F. Frere. 1871.

20. Hero and Leander. From the Greek of Musaeus by E. Arnold. [1873] 4o



Pausanias


1. An account of the Statues, Pictures, and Temples in Greece; translated
from the Greek of Pausanias by U. Price. 1780. 8o

2. The Description of Greece, translated ... with notes. [T. Taylor] 3
vol. 1794. 8o

_Reprinted: 1824._

3. Itinerary of Greece, with a commentary on Pausanias and Strabo. 1810.
4o

4. Pausanias’s Description of Greece, translated by Arthur Richard
Shilleto. 2 vol., 1886.

_American Reprint: 2 vol., New York, 1886._

5. Mythology and Monuments of Ancient Athens being a translation of a
portion of the “Attica” of Pausanias by Margaret de G. Verrall.
Introductory essay by Jane Ellen Harrison. 1890.

_Reprinted: 1894._

_American Reprints: New York, 1890, 1894._

6. Pausanias’ Description of Greece. Translated with Commentary. 6 vol.,
1898. 8o

_Reprinted: [Abridged] 1900._



Phocylides



American Translation


1. Poem of Admonition. Introduction and commentaries by J. B. Feuling.
Translation by H. D. Goodwin. Andover, Mass. 1879.



Pindar


1. Second Olympic and First Nemean Odes of Pindar paraphrased, and
Pindaric Odes, written in imitation of the style and manner of the Odes of
Pindar. A. Cowley. 1656. Fol.

2. Pastorals, Epistle, Odes, and other original poems with translations
from Pindar, Anacreon, and Sappho. Ambrose Philips. 1748. 12o [First and
Second Olympic Odes]

_Reprinted: 1765; [Johnson’s English Poets] 1779‐81._

3. Odes of Pindar [Selected], with several other pieces in prose and verse
translated from the Greek. To which is added a dissertation on the
Olympick Games. By Gilbert West. 2 vol., 1749. 4o

_Reprinted: Dublin, 1751; 1753; 1766; [Johnson’s English Poets] 1779‐81;
[Johnson’s English Poets] 1790; [Anderson’s English Poets] 1792‐94._

4. Four Odes translated into English verse by Dr. W. Dodd. 1767.

5. The first Pythian Ode of Pindar. 1775. 4o

6. Six Olympic Odes, being those omitted by Mr. West. Translated into
English verse [by H. J. Pye] 1775. 8o

_Reprinted: [Anderson’s English Poets] 1792‐94._

7. The Pythian, Nemean and Isthmian Odes of Pindar. Translated into
English verse [by E. B. Greene] with critical remarks, observations on his
life and writings ... and an ode to the genius of Pindar. 1778. 4o

8. Select Odes of Pindar and Horace translated, and other original poems:
together with notes ... by W. Tasker. 3 vol., Exeter. 1780. 8o

_Reprinted: 3 vol., 1790‐93._

9. A new translation of select Odes of Pindar and Anacreon, and Epistles
of Horace, etc., with many passages from Shakespeare attempted in Latin.
[By W. Greene] Liverpool. [1783?]

10. A Translation of all the Pythian, Nemean and Isthmian Odes of Pindar,
except the fourth and fifth Pythian Odes, and those translated by G. West.
Rev. J. Banister. Salisbury. 1791.

11. All the Odes of Pindar, translated from the original Greek by ... J.
L. Girdleston. Norwich. [1810?]

12. The Odes of Pindar, translated from the Greek. By Francis Lee, A.M.
1810. 4o

13. The Odes of Pindar; translated ... with notes and illustrations, by
West, Greene, and Pye. Oxford. 1810. [Reprint of Nos. 3, 6, 9.]

_Reprinted: [British Poets] 1822._

14. The Odes of Pindar. Translated with notes by A. Moore. 1822.

15. The Odes of Pindar in English Prose with Explanatory Notes. [By E. P.
Laurent] To which is added West’s Dissertation on the Olympic Games. 2
vol., Oxford. 1824. 8o

16. Pindar translated by C. A. Wheelwright. 1839. 16o

17. Pindar in English verse by ... H. F. Cary. 1833. 12o

_Reprinted: 1838._

18. Selections from Pindar, according to the text of Boech, with English
Notes, by the Rev. W. G. Cookesley. Eton. 1838. 8o

19. Odes of Pindar in English prose. By D. W. Turner. To which is adjoined
a metrical version by A. Moore. [See No. 14] 1852. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1887._

20. Pindar and Themistocles: Aegina and Athens. [Eighth Nemean Ode: prose:
notes.] By W. W. Lloyd. 1862. 8o

21. The Odes of Pindar. Construed literally and word for word. J. A.
Giles. 2 parts. 1860‐63. 16o [Kelly’s Keys to the Classics]

22. Translations from Pindar in blank verse. Hugh Seymour Tremenheere.
1866. 4o

23. The Odes of Pindar. F. A. Paley. 1868.

24. Pindar’s Odes translated into English Prose by Ernest Myers. 1874.

_Reprinted: 1884._

25. Epicinian Odes and Fragments. Translated by Thomas Charles Baring.
1875.

26. Olympian and Pythian Odes, translated by Rev. Francis Davis Morice.
1876. 8o

_Reprinted: [Ancient Classics] 1878; 1893._

27. Pindar. Odes in English verse. Winchester. 1876.

28. Olympian Odes. Translated into English verse by C. Mayne. 1906. 8o

29. Pindar. Odes, including the principal fragments. With an introduction
and translation by Sir John Sandys. 1915. 16o [Loeb Classical Library]

_Reprinted: [Loeb] New York, 1915._



Plato


1. Axiochus, a Dialogue entreating of Death [In Philippe de Mornay. Six
excellent Treatises of Life and Death.] 1592. 8o

_Reprinted: 1607._

2. Plato his “Apology of Socrates” and Phaedo; or a Dialogue concerning
the Immortality of Man’s Soul, and manner of Socrates his Death: Carefully
Translated from the Greek, and illustrated with Reflections upon both. Of
the Athenian Laws; and antient Rites and Traditions concerning the Soul,
therein mentioned. 1675. 8o

3. The Works of Plato abridged, with an account of his life, philosophy
and politics together with a translation of his choicest dialogues....
Illustrated by notes. By M. Dacier. Translated from the French [by Several
Hands]. 2 vol., 1701. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1719‐20; 2 vol., 1739; 2 vol., 1749; 2 vol., 1761;
1772; 1839._

_American Reprint: New York, 1833._

4. Menexenus. [In Odes of Pindar, with several other pieces in prose and
verse translated from the Greek by Gilbert West.] 1753. 8o

5. Dialogue on the Immortality of the Soul. Translated by Lewis Theobald.
1713. 8o

6. Phedon; or a Dialogue of the Immortality of the Soul [1730?] 12o

7. Two Orations in Praise of the Athenians Slain in Battle. 1759. 8o

8. Dialogues translated by Fowler Sydenham. 1759‐80. [Published as
follows: Io, 1759; Greater Hippias, 1759; Banquet, Part I, 1761; Lesser
Hippias, 1761; Banquet, Part II, 1767; Meno, 1769; Rivals, 1769; First
Alcibiades, 1773; Second Alcibiades, 1776; Philebus, Part I, 1779;
Philebus, Part II, 1780.]

_Reprinted: [With translation of the remainder of Plato’s works, by Thomas
Taylor] 5 vol., 1804, 1892; [Republic, translated with Taylor, revised by
W. H. D. Rouse. Standard Library] 1908._

9. Phaedon. 1763. 12o

10. The Republic of Plato. Translated from the Greek by H. Spens. With a
preliminary discourse on the Philosophy of the Ancients by the translator.
Glascow. 1763. 4o

_Reprinted: [Everyman’s Library] 1906._

_American Reprint: [Everyman’s Library] New York, 1906._

11. Plato’s Apology of Socrates translated into English by ... J.
Mills.... With notes and appendix. Cambridge. 1775. 8o

12. The Republic of Plato, translated by Thomas Taylor, edited, with an
introduction, by Theodore Wratislaw. 1792‐93.

_Reprinted: 1894._

13. The Phaedrus of Plato; a dialogue concerning Beauty and Love.
Translated from the Greek [by Thomas Taylor]. 1792. 4o

14. The Cratylus, Phaedo, Parmenides, and Timaeus of Plato, translated
from the Greek by Thomas Taylor. 1793.

15. Phaedo, a dialogue on the Immortality of the Soul; newly translated
from the Greek of Plato by T. R. J. 1813. 8o

16. Apology of Socrates, Crito, and Phaedo. Translated by C. S. Stanford.
1835. 8o

_American Reprint: [Phaedo] New York, 1873._

17. Dialogues and Apology. 1845.

18. A Translation of the First Book of the Republic of Plato. A. R. Grant.
Cambridge. 1848. 16o

19. Works. Translated by Henry Cary and H. Davis. 6 vol. 1848‐54. 8o

_Reprinted: [Apology, Crito, Phaedo] 1888; [Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Sir
John Lubbock’s One Hundred Books] 1892, 1895; [Apology, Phaedo,
Protagoras] 1900; [Phaedo. Everyman] 1911._

_American Reprints: 6 vol., Boston and Philadelphia, 1872‐6; 6 vol. New
York, 1888; [Apology, Phaedo, Protagoras], New York, 1888; [Phaedo,
Everyman] 1911._

20. The Phaedrus, Lysias, and Protagoras of Plato. A new and literal
translation mainly from the text of Bekker by Josiah Wright. 1848.

_Reprinted: [Golden Treasury Series] 1888; [Phaedrus. Everyman] 1911._

_American Reprint: [Golden Treasury Series] 1888; [Phaedrus. Everyman]
1911._

21. Republic. Translated by John Llewellyn Davies and David James Vaughan.
1852.

_Reprinted: 1858; 1866; 1892; 1898._

_American Reprints: Philadelphia, 1866; [Home Library] New York, 1902._

22. Philebus. Translated by Edward Poste. Oxford. 1858.

23. The Platonic Dialogues for English Readers. By W. Whewell. 3 vol.
Cambridge. 1859‐61. 8o

_Reprinted: 1892._

_American Reprint: New York, 1892._

24. Apology of Socrates. Translated by Dr. [J. A.] Giles. 1860.

25. Selections. Translated by Lady Chatterton. 1862.

26. Gorgias. Literally translated with an introductory essay, containing a
summary of the argument by Edward Meredith Cope. 1864.

_Reprinted: 1884._

27. Apology, Crito, Phaedo. Dublin. 1865.

28. Sophistes: A dialogue on true and false teaching. Translated by R. W.
Mackay. 1868.

29. Meno: a dialogue on education. Translated with explanatory notes ...
by R. W. Mackay. 1869. 8o

30. Dialogues. Translated by Alfred Day. 1870.

31. Dialogues. Translated with an analysis and introduction by Benjamin
Jowett. 4 vol. 1871.

_Reprinted: [Revised by Evelyn Abbott] 5 vol., 1875; [Republic] 1881,
1888, 1908; 5 vol., 1892; [Selections] 1895; [Four Socratic Dialogues.
Preface by Edward Caird.] 1903; [Selections. Edited by C. S. Woodhouse.
Wayfaring Books] 1907._

_American Reprints: 4 vol., New York, 1872; 4 vol., New York, 1874;
[Republic] New York, 1882; [Selections by C. H. A. Bulkley] New York,
1883; [Republic] New York, 1889; 5 vol., New York, 1892; [Selections by M.
J. Knight] 2 vol., New York, 1895; [Four Socratic Dialogues. Preface by
Edward Caird.] New York, 1904; [Selections. Edited by C. S. Woodhouse.]
New York, 1907; [Dialogues. Edited by M. F. Egan. With Politics of
Aristotle translated by B. Jowett and edited by M. F. Egan.] New York,
1908; [Republic edited by W. C. Lawton] New York, 1908; [Apology, Crito,
Phaedo (Selection)] Portland, Me., 1910; [Introduction by Temple Scott] 4
vol., New York, 1914; [Republic] New York, 1916._

32. Philebus. Translated by F. A. Paley. 1873.

33. Plato by Clifton W. Collins. [Ancient Classic Selections] 1874.

34. Phaedo. Translated by Edward Meredith Cope. 1875.

35. Theaetetus. Translated with an introduction and notes by F. A. Paley.
1875.

36. An Analytical Paraphrase on the Republic of Plato. By Rev. C. H.
Hoole. Oxford. 1875.

37. Socrates. A translation of the Apology, Crito, and parts of the Phaedo
of Plato. 1879.

_Reprinted: 1887._

38. Apology of Socrates and Crito. Translated from the Greek text by
William Charles Green. 1879.

_Reprinted: 1903._

39. Eutyphro, Apology, Crito. Translated by F. J. Church. 1880.

_Reprinted: 1886; [Golden Treasury Series] 1891._

_American Reprint: [Golden Treasury Series] 1891._

40. The Meno of Plato. A new translation from the text of Baiter with an
introduction, a marginal analysis and short explanatory notes. 1880.

41. Plato’s Apology of Socrates. Literally translated from the text of
Baiter and Orelli. 1880.

42. Plato’s Defence of Socrates translated from the Greek. By George
Herbert Powell. 1882. 8o

43. Euthyphro. A literal translation with grammatical notes. Glascow.
1883.

44. The Apology, Crito and Meno of Plato translated by St. George Stock
and Charles Abdy Marcon. 1887.

_Reprinted: 1904; [Crito with Euthyphro] 1909._

45. The Banquet of Plato, and other pieces [Speculations on Metaphysics.
Speculations on Morals. Ion, Menexenus.] translations and original. By
Percy Bysshe Shelley. 1887. 8o [Cassell’s National Library]

_Reprinted: 1905; [Everyman] 1911._

_American Reprint: [Cassell’s National Library] New York, 1887; Chicago,
Ill., 1895; [Riverside Press Edition] Boston, 1908; [Everyman] New York,
1911._

46. A Day in Athens with Socrates. Translations from the Gorgias and the
Republic (Book VIII) of Plato. 1887.

47. Plato’s Crito and Phaedo. Dialogues of Socrates before his death.
1888. 8o [Cassell’s National Library]

_American Reprint: [Cassell’s National Library] New York, 1888._

48. Plato’s Phaedo. A translation. By A. E. Balgrave and Charles Scott
Fearenside. 1890.

_Reprinted: [University Tutorial Series] 1897._

49. Euthyphron and Laches. Literally translated by John Gibson. 1890.

50. Meno. Literally translated with English notes. By Reginald Broughton.
1891.

51. The Republic of Plato. Lib. I, II. Literally translated from the Greek
with grammatical notes. By a Graduate. Cambridge. 1894.

52. Gorgias. A translation with test papers. By Francis Giffard Plaistowe.
1894.

53. Plato: The Republic. Book I. Literally translated by J. A. Prout.
1896.

54. Apology of Socrates. Translated by J. A. Nicklin. 1898. 8o

55. Laches. Edited with text, notes, and translation by F. G. Plaistowe
and T. R. Mills. 1898. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

56. Apology of Socrates. Edited with introduction, text, notes, and
translation by T. R. Mills. 1899. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

_Reprinted: 1904._

57. Ion. Edited with introduction, text, notes, and translation by J.
Thompson and T. R. Mills. 1899. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

58. Plato’s Theaetetus. Translated with an introduction by S. W. Dyde.
Glascow. 1899. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1900._

59. Meno. Translated by J. A. Prout. 1900. 12o [University Tutorial
Series.]

60. Plato’s Euthyphro. Literally translated from the text in the Pitt
Press Series, with grammatical notes by E. T. Pegg. 1901. 8o

61. Republic [Books I, II.] Edited with notes by a Graduate. 1901. 8o

62. Euthyphro and Menexenus. Edited with introduction, notes, text, and
translation by T. R. Mills. 1902. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

63. Myths. Translated with an Introduction by J. A. Stewart. 1905. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1915._

64. Crito. Edited with introduction, text, notes, and translation by A. F.
Watt. 1905. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

65. Theaetetus and Philebus. Translated and explained by H. F. Carlill.
1906. 8o [New Classical Library]

_American Reprint: New York, 1906._

66. Republic. Translated into English with an introduction by A. D.
Lindsay. 1907. 8o

_Reprinted: 1908._

67. Euthyphro, Apology, Crito. With introduction, translation, and notes
by F. M. Stawell. 1908. 12o [Temple Greek and Latin Classics.]

_American Reprint: New York, 1908._

68. Plato’s Apology and Crito; or, The Defence of Socrates and the Drama
of Loyalty. A new translation with Greek text parallel, and introduction
and notes by Charles L. Marson. 1912. 8o

69. Euthyphro; Apology; Crito; Phaedo; Phaedrus. With an English
translation by H. N. Fowler. 1914. 8o [Loeb Classical Library]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1914._



American Translations


1. Plato’s Works. 6 vol. Boston. 1848‐52.

_Reprinted: 6 vol., Boston, 1888._

2. Plato’s Phaedo; or, the Immortality of the Soul. Translated by C. S.
Stanford. New York. 1854. 12o

3. The Divine and Moral Works of Plato. Translated from the original
Greek; with Introductory Dissertations and Notes. New York. 1858‐60. 12o

_Reprinted: Boston, 1872‐76._

4. Socrates. A translation of the Apology, Crito, and parts of the Phaedo.
[Introduction by W. W. Goodwin] New York. 1879. 8o

_Reprinted: New York, 1883._

5. The Phaedo of Plato. Boston. 1882.

6. Socrates. The Apology and Crito of Plato. Boston. 1882.

7. A Day in Athens with Socrates; translations from the Protagoras and the
Republic (Book VII) of Plato. New York. 1883.

8. Talks with Socrates about Life; translations from the Gorgias and
Republic of Plato. New York. 1886.

9. Talks with Athenian Youths; translations from the Charmides, Lysis,
Laches, Euthydemus and Theaetetus. New York. 1891.

10. Select Dialogues of Plato. 4 vol. New York. 1891. 12o

11. Judgment of Socrates: the Apology, Crito, and the closing scene of
Phaedo; with introduction by P. E. More. Boston. 1899. 16o [Riverside
Literature Series]

12. Education of the young in the “Republic”; translated into English by
B. Bosanquet. New York. 1900. 12o [Cambridge Series for Schools and
Training Colleges]

13. Plato’s Republic translated by A. Kerr. Chicago. 1901‐1907 [Book I,
1901; II, 1903; III, 1903; IV, 1904; V, 1907.]

14. Plato’s Republic; translated by T. M. Lindsay. New York. 1908. 12o

15. Plato’s Republic; translated by H. Speers. New York. 1908. 16o [Best
Books Series]



Plutarch


1. The Gouerauce of good helthe, by the moste excellent phylosopher
Plutarche, the moste eloquent Erasmus being interpretoure. Thou wylte
repent that this came not sooner to thy hande. [1530?] 8o BL

2. The Education or bringinge up of children, translated by T. Eliot
Esquire. [1530?] 4o BL

_Reprinted: [1531?]._

3. The Table of Cebes the philosopher. How one may take profite of his
enemies, translated out of Plutarche [translated by Sir Frances Poyntz]. A
treatise perswadyng a man paciently to suffer the death of his friend.
[1535?] 16o BL

_Reprinted: [1537?]; [1560?]._

4. Howe one may take profite of his enmyes, translated out of Plutarche
[by Sir Thomas Eliot?]. [1535?] 8o BL

_Reprinted: [with the Table of Cebes the philosopher] [1580?]._

5. Practica Plutarche the excellent Phylosopher. [1540?] 8o BL [Extracts]

6. The precepts of the excellent clerke & graue philosopher Plutarche for
the preseruation of good Healthe. 1543. 8o BL

7. Three Treatises. (a) The Learned Prince, (b) the Fruits of Foes, (c)
the Port of Rest; translated by Thomas Blundeville. 1561. 8o

_Reprinted: 1580._

8. The amorous and tragical Tales of Plutarch, whereunto is annexed the
History of Cariclea and Theaginis and the Sayings of the Greeke
philosophers, translated by Ja. Sanferd. 1567. 8o

9. A President for Parents, teaching the vertuous Training vp of Children,
and holesome Information of Young Men, translated and partly augmented by
Ed. Grant. 1571. 16o

10. The Lives of the noble Grecians and Romanes, compared together by that
graue learned Philosopher and Historiographer, Plutarch of Chaeronea:
Translated out of Greek into French by Iames Amyot, Abbot of Bellozane,
Bishop of Auxerre, one of the King’s priuy counsel, and great Amner of
Fraunce, and out of French into English, by Thomas North. 1579. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1595; [with the liues of Hannibal and Scipio African:
translated out of Latine into French by Charles de l’Escluse, and out of
French into English, By Sir Thomas North Knight. Hereunto are also added
the liues of Epaminandas, of Philip of Macedon, of Dionysius the elder,
tyrant of Sicilia; of Augustus Caesar, of Plutarche, and of Seneca: with
the liues of nine other excellent chieftans of warre: collected out of
Æmylius Probus, by S. G. S. and Englished by the aforesaid Translator]
1603; 1603; 1612; 1631; 1657; 1676; [Lives of Caius Marcius Coriolanus,
Julius Caesar, Marcus Antonius, and Marcus Brutus] 1878; [Introduction by
George Wyndham] 6 vol., 1895‐96; [Edited by W. H. D. Rouse] 10 vol., 1899;
[Oxford and Cambridge Edition] 1906; [Lives of Coriolanus, Caesar, Brutus,
and Antonius, edited by R. H. Carr] 1906; [Life of Julius Caesar. Oxford
and Cambridge Edition] 1907; [Life of Julius Caesar, edited by R. H. Carr]
1907; [English Literature for Schools] 1915._

_American Reprints: [Shakespeare’s Plutarch. Selected lives from North’s
translation. Edited by W. W. Skeat.] New York, 1875; [Edited by George
Wyndham] 6 vol., New York, 1895‐96; [Edited by W. H. D. Rouse.] 10 vol.,
New York, 1899; [Life of Julius Caesar, edited by R. H. Carr] New York,
1907; [English Literature for Schools] New York, 1915._

11. The Philosophie, commonlie called, the Morals written by the learned
Philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea. Translated out of Greeke into English,
and conferred with the Latine translations and the French, by Philemon
Holland of Coventrie, Doctor in Physicke. VVhereunto are annexed the
Summaries necessary to be read before every Treatise. 1603. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1657; [Edited by F. B. Jevons] 1892; [Everyman] 1912._

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1912._

12. Of the benefit we may get by our Ennemies, a Discourse written
originally in the Greek by Plutarchus, translated by Dr. Jo. Rainolds into
Latin; of the Diseases of the mind & body, written in Greek by the said
Plutarch, & put into Latin by the said Dr. Rainolds. Both treatises
translated from Latin into English by Henry Vaughan; in his Olor Iscanus.
1650. 8o

13. The Worthies of the World, or the Lives of the most heroic Greeks &
Romans compared: by that learned & great Historiographer Plutarch.
Englished & abridged according to the directions of Photius, by David
Lloyd. 1665. 8o

14. Plutarch’s Lives translated from the Greek by several hands. To which
is prefixt the life of Plutarch by John Dryden. 5 vol. 1683‐86. 8o

_Reprinted: 1688; 1693; 1700; 1703; 1710; 1714; 1724; 1758; 1763; [Edited
by Arthur Hugh Clough. Selections] 1859; [Edited by Arthur Hugh Clough] 5
vol., 1874; 1877, 1883, 1903, 1910; [Clough and William Godwin] 10 vol.,
1914._

_American Reprints: [Edited by Arthur Hugh Clough] 5 vol., Boston, 1876;
[Selections] 3 vol., New York, 1879; [Edited by Clough] New York, 1881;
[Edited by W. F. Allen] Boston, 1886; [Edited by Clough] 5 vol., Boston,
1888, 1902; [Clough, edited by __ Hamilton Wright Mabie. Ideal Classics] 4
vol., Philadelphia, 1908‐09; [Clough. Everyman] 3 vol., New York, 1910;
[Clough. With Dr. W. Smith’s historical notes] 5 vol., New York, 1913;
[Clough, Smith edition, with an Introduction by Temple Scott] 5 vol., New
York, 1914._

15. Plutarch’s Morals, translated from the Greek by Several Hands [M.
Morgan, S. Ford, W. Willingham, T. Hoy, and others]. 5 vol., 1683‐84.

_Reprinted: 1691; 5 vol., 1694; 5 vol., 1704; 5 vol., 1718; [Corrected and
revised by William Godwin. Introduction by R. W. Emerson] 1871._

_American Reprints: [Corrected and revised by William Godwin. Introduction
by R. W. Emerson.] 5 vol., Boston, 1870, 1874._

16. Plutarch’s Lives. [Abridged] Translated by Gildon. 1710.

_Reprinted: 1713; 1718._

17. Morals, by way of abstract, done from the Greek. 1707. 8o

18. Treatise of Isis and Osiris. Sam Squire, M. A. Cambridge. 1744. 8o

19. Lives, abridged. Illustrated with notes and reflections. 7 vol., 1762.
8o

20. Lives, translated from the original Greek, with notes, critical and
historical, and a new life of Plutarch. By John Langhorne and William
Langhorne. 6 vol., 1770. 8o

_Reprinted: 6 vol., 1774; 6 vol., 1780; 6 vol., 1792; 6 vol., 1801; 6
vol., 1805; 3 vol., 1812; 1819; 6 vol., 1826; 7 vol., 1831‐32; 2 vol.,
1851; 1862; 1868; 2 vol., 1875; [Grecian Section. With notes.] 1876;
[Standard Library] 1878; 1878; [Standard Library] 1879; 1881; [Lives of
Timoleon and the Gracchi. Intro. by Charles Badham.] Sidney, Australia,
1881; [Excelsior Series] 1884; 4 vol., 1884; [Lives of Aristides,
Themistocles, Pericles, Alcibiades, Demosthenes, Pyrrhus] 1886; [Lives of
Demetrius, Mark Antony, Themistocles] 1886; [Lives of Alexander the Great,
Julius Caesar, Pompey] 1886; [Lives of Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar]
1886; [Lives of Alcibiades, Coriolanus, Aristides, Cato the __ Censor]
1886; [Selections, edited by Bernard J. Snell] 1886; 1886; [Lives of
Timoleon, Paulus Aemilius, Lysander, Sylla] 1887; [Lives of Pericles,
Fabius Maximus, Demosthenes, Cicero] 1887; [Lives of Cato the Younger,
Agis, Cleomenes, the Gracchi] 1887; [Lives of Alexander the Great, Julius
Caesar] 1887; [Lives of Agesilaus, Pompey, Phocion] 1887, 1893; [Lives of
Solon, Publicola, Philopoemen, Titus Quinctus Flaminius, Caius Marius]
1888, 1892; [Lives of Pyrrhus, Camillus, Pelopides, Marcellus] 1888, 1893;
[Lives of Romulus, Cimon, Lucullus, Lycurgus] 1888, 1893; [Lives of
Nicias, Crassus, Aratus, Theseus] 1888, 1893; [Lives of Dion, Brutus,
Artaxerxes, Galba, Otho] 1888, 1893; [Lives of Numa, Sertorius, Eumenes.
Life of Plutarch by John Dryden] 1889, 1893; 1890; 1892; [Books for the
People] 1893; 1898._

_American Reprints: 4 vol., New York, 1820‐52; Boston, 1831; New York,
1855‐58; New York, 1872‐76; Cincinnati, Ohio, 1872‐76; [Lovell’s Library]
5 parts, New York, 1883; New York, 1884; [Lives of Demetrius, Mark Antony,
Themistocles] New York, 1886; [Lives of Alcibiades, Coriolanus, Aristides,
Cato the Censor] New York, 1886; [Lives of Alexander the Great, Julius
Caesar] New York, 1886; [Lives of Timoleon, Paulus Aemilius, Lysander,
Sylla] New York, 1887; [Lives of Pericles, Fabius Maximus, Demosthenes,
Cicero] New York, 1887; [Lives of Demosthenes, Cicero] New York, 1887;
[Lives of Cato the Younger, Agis, Cleomenes, the Gracchi] New York, 1887;
[Lives of Agesilaus, Pompey, Phocion] New York, 1887; [Lives of Romulus,
Cimon, Lucullus, Lycurgus] New York, 1888; [Lives of Solon, Publicola,
Philopoemen, Titus Quinctus Flaminius, Caius Marius] New York, 1888;
[Lives of Nicias, Crassus, Aratus, Theseus] New York, 1888; [Lives of
Dion, Brutus, Artaxerxes, Galba, Otho] New York, 1888; [Lives of Pyrrhus,
Camillus, Pelopidas, Marcellus] New York, 1888; [Lives of Numa, Sertorius,
Eumenes] New York, 1889._

21. Treatise upon the distinction between a Friend and a Flatterer. Thomas
Northmore, M. A., F. S. A. 1793. 8o

22. Plutarch’s Lives, abridged, by Elizabeth Hulme. 1794. 8o

23. Plutarch’s Lives, abridged. By the Author of the British Nepos. 1800.
12o

24. Περι Δεισιδαιμονιας. Plutarch and Theophrastus on Superstition; with
various appendices. [Edited by J. Hibbert] 10 parts. Kentish Town. 1828.
8o

25. A translation of Plutarch’s Banquet of the Seven Sages. Job Critannah
[i.e., Nathan Birch] 1833. [Published with Fifty‐one Original Fables.]

26. Plutarch’s Lives. Translated from the Greek. With notes and a life of
Plutarch. By Aubrey Stewart and George Long. 4 vol., 1880‐1888.

_Reprinted: [York Library] 4 vol., 1906‐09; [Bohn’s Popular Library] 2
vol., 1914._

_American Reprints: 4 vol., New York, 1889; [York Library] 4 vol.,
1906‐1909; [Bohn’s Popular Library] 2 vol., 1914._

27. Plutarch’s Lives of the Gracchi, translated from the text, of
Sintenio. With introduction, marginal notes, and appendices. By William
Wilkinson Marshall. Oxford. 1881.

28. Plutarch’s Lives. Containing the most interesting of the incidents in
the Lives of celebrated Greeks and Romans arranged for the use of everyday
readers. 1881.

29. Plutarch’s Life of Themistocles literally translated with notes. By
John William Rundall. 1883.

_Reprinted: 1891._

30. Plutarch’s Themistocles translated into English by Herbert Hailstone.
1884.

31. Ideal Commonwealths. Plutarch’s Lycurgus, More’s Utopia, Bacon’s New
Atlantis, Campanella’s City of the Sun, and a Fragment of Hall’s Mundus
alter et idem with an introduction by Henry Morley. 1885.

32. Plutarch’s Life of Nicias, literally translated with notes. By Arthur
Humble Evans. 1887.

33. Plutarch’s Nicias. Translated into English by Herbert Hailstone.
Cambridge. 1887.

34. Plutarch’s Morals. Theosophical essays translated by C. W. King.
Ethical essays translated with notes ... by A. R. Shilleto. 2 vol.,
1882‐1888.

_American Reprints: 2 vol., New York, 1888._

35. Plutarch’s Lives of Greek heroes. 1894.

36. Plutarch’s Life of Timoleon. J. A. Nicklin. 1898. 8o

37. Plutarch’s Lives translated by W. R. Frazer. 3 vol., 1906‐07. 8o [New
Classical Library]

_American Reprint: [New Classical Library] 3 vol., New York. 1906‐07._

38. Greek Lives from Plutarch. Translated by C. E. Byles, 1907. 8o

39. Plutarch’s Life of Timoleon. Translated ... by J. Clunes Wilson. 1907.
8o

40. On the face which appears on the orb of the moon. With notes and
appendix. 1911. 8o

41. Selected essays; translated with an introduction by T. G. Tucker.
Oxford. 1914. 8o [Oxford Library of Translations]

_American Reprint: [Oxford Library of Translations] New York, 1914._

42. Plutarch’s Lives. With an English translation by Bernadotte Perrin.
Vols. 1‐4. 1914‐1916. [Loeb Classical Library]

_American Reprints: [Loeb] Vols. 1‐4, New York, 1914‐1916._



American Translations


1. Plutarch’s Lives of Illustrious Men. New York. 1883.

_Reprinted: New York, 1917._

2. Plutarch On the Delay of Divine Justice; translated with an
introduction and notes by A. P. Peabody. Boston. 1885. 8o

3. The Youth’s Plutarch’s Lives, for boys and girls; edited with an
introduction and notes by E. S. Ellis. New York. 1895.

_Reprinted: Philadelphia, 1900._

4. Plutarch. Lives of Illustrious Men. New York. 1898. 12o [New Escutcheon
Series]

5. Plutarch’s Lives. New York. 1898. 12o [Illustrated Library of Famous
Books]

6. Plutarch’s Life of Alexander the Great. Boston. 1900. [Riverside
Literature Series]

7. Themistocles and Aristides: New Translation from the original with
introduction and notes by Bernadotte Perrin. New York. 1901. 8o

8. Greek lives from Plutarch; newly translated by C. E. Byles: Theseus,
Lycurgus, Aristides, Themistocles, Pericles, Alcibiades, Dion,
Demosthenes, Alexander. New York. 1907. 12o

9. Shakespeare’s Plutarch; edited by C. F. Tucker Brooke. 2 vol. New York.
1909. [Shakespeare Library]

10. Children’s Plutarch; tales of the Greeks translated by F. J. Gould;
introduction by W. D. Howells. New York. 1910. 12o

11. Plutarch’s Cimon and Pericles, with the funeral oration of Pericles
(Thucydides II 35‐46) newly translated, with introduction and notes by
Bernadotte Perrin. New York. 1910.

12. Plutarch’s Lives for boys and girls; being selected lives freely
retold by W. H. Weston, with 16 color drawings by W. Rainey. New York.
1911. 8o

13. Plutarch on Education; embracing the three treatises: The education of
boys; How a young man should hear lectures on poetry; The right way to
hear; by C. W. Super. Syracuse, N. Y. 1911.

14. Plutarch’s Nicias and Alcibiades; newly translated with an
introduction and notes. New York. 1912. 8o

15. Plutarch’s Lives. Boston. 1913. [Boys’ and girls’ bookshelf]



Polybius


1. The Hystories of the most famous and worthy Cronographer Polybius:
Discoursing of the warres betwixt the Romans & Carthaginenses a riche and
goodly Worke, conteining holsome counsels & wonderfull deuises against the
incombrances of fickle Fortune. Englished by C. W[atson]. 1568. 8o BL

2. The History of Polybius the Megalopolitan. The fiue first Bookes
entire: With all the parcels of the subsequent Bookes vnto the eighteenth,
according to the Greeke Originall. Also the manner of the Roman encamping,
extracted, from the discription of Polybius. Translated into English by
Edward Grimeston, Sergeant at Arms. 1633. Fol.

_Reprinted: 1634; 1634._

3. The Story of the War between the Carthaginians and their own
Mercenaries. Sir Walter Raleigh. 1647. 4o

4. Polybius’ History, [translated by] Sir H. S. [Henry Shears] [Preface on
Polybius and his writings by John Dryden] 2 vol., 1693. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1699._

5. A Fragment out of the Sixth Book of Polybius ... translated from the
Greek with notes. By a Gentleman. [Edward Spelman] 1743. 8o

6. A Parallel between the Roman and British Constitutions; comprehending
Polybius’s curious discourse of the Roman Senate. With a preface, wherein
his principles are applied to our government. 1747. 8o [Greek‐English]

7. History. Translated by C. W. [Christopher Watson] 1747.

8. The General History of Polybius ... Translated by Mr. Hampton. 1756.

_Reprinted: [Selections from Book VI] 1764; 2 vol., 1772; 3 vol., 1809;
1812; 2 vol., 1823._

9. Polybius. Translation of a fragment of the Eighteenth Book, discovered
at Mt. Athos. 1806. 8o

10. Histories of Polybius. Translated by Evelyn Shirley Shuckburgh. 2 vol.
1889. 8o



Prodicus


1. The Choice of Hercules. From the Greek of Prodicus by Bishop Lowth.
[Published in Roach’s Beauties of the Poets.] 1794.



Pythagoras


1. A Brefe and plesaunte Worke, and Sience, of the Philosopher,
Pictagoras, wherin is declared the Aunswer of Questyōs which there in be
cōtained after ye order of thys syence, both for sycknes, & helth, with
dyuers other pretye questions, uerye pleasent to pase the tyme whith,
Taken and getherd out of ye sayd Pictagoras werke. [1560?] 8o BL

2. Hierocles upon the Golden Verse of Pythagoras; teaching a vertuous and
worthy life. Englished by J. Hall. 1657. 8o

3. Hierocles upon the Golden Verses of the Pythagoreans; translated ...
out of the Greek into English. [By J. Norris]. 1682. 8o

4. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras. Translated from the Greek by Mr. Rowe.
1720. 12o [In his Poetical Works]

_Reprinted: Glasgow, 1756._

5. Human Wisdom displayed: or, a guide to prudence and virtue, in two
parts. Containing ... II A fragment on tranquility of mind, from
Pythagoras; together with a collection of choice morals from Epictetus ...
Both newly translated from the original Greek ... By an old Gentleman of
Gray’s Inn, lately retired to a country‐life. 1731. 8o

6. The Commentary of Hierocles upon the golden verses of the Pythagoreans;
now first translated into English from ... the Greek original published
... by Dr. Warren; with notes and illustrations by W. Rayner. [cum text]
Norwich. 1797.

7. The Pythagoric Symbols. W. Bridgman. 1804.

8. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras. John Povey. [Sine Loco] 1886.

9. Pythagoras’s Golden Verses, translated by E. A. E. Symbols translated
by Sapere Ande. [In Collectanea hermetica by W. W. Westcott.] 1894.



Sappho


1. Anacreon and Sappho. By John Addison. 1735. 12o [With Greek text]

2. Hymn to Venus. [Translated by Ambrose Philips in his Pastorals.] 1748.

_Reprinted: 1765; [Johnson’s Poets] 1779‐81._

3. Works. [Translated by Francis Fawkes] 1760.

_Reprinted: 1789; [Chalmers’ English Poets] 1810; [Works of the Greek
Roman Poets] 1813._

4. Works. [Translated by C. A. Elton and published with his Hesiod.] 1832.

5. Sappho. Memoir, text, selected readings and literal translation by
Henry Thornton Wharton. 1885.

_Reprinted: 1887; 1895; 1910._

_American Reprints: Chicago, 1885, 1887, 1895; New York, 1907._

6. Poems of Sappho. Poems, Epigrams, and Fragments, Translations and
Adaptations. Percy Osborn. 1909. 16o

7. Sappho, queen of song; a selection from her love poems by J. R. Tutin.
1914. [Friendship Books]

_American Reprint: Boston, 1914._

8. An entirely new version of the Poems and New Fragments, together with
the more important of the old fragments. Translated by Edward Storer.
1916. [Poets’ Translation Series]



American Translations


1. Songs of Sappho. James S. Easby‐Smith. Washington, D. C. 1891.
[Published for Georgetown University]

2. Sappho. Odes, bridal songs, epigrams; translated by Arnold, Moore,
Palgrave, Tennyson, and others. Philadelphia. 1902. 8o [Antique Gems from
the Greek and Latin]

3. Poems of Sappho: rendition into English by J. M. O’Hara. Portland, Me.
Between 1905‐1908. [Privately printed]

4. Sappho. One Hundred Lyrics. Bliss Carman. New York. 1906.

_English Reprint: London, 1910._



Simonides Of Ceos


1. A translation of a fragment of Simonides. By Nothus Cornelius
Scriblerus). 1779. 4o



Sophocles


1. Oedipus: Three Cantoes. Wherein is contained: 1. His unfortunate
Infancy. 2. His execrable Actions. 3. His lamentable End. By T[homas]
E[vans] Bach: Art, Cantab. 1615. 12o [Translation or adaptation?]

2. Electra of Sophocles [Translated into verse] ... with an epilogue
shewing the parallel in two poems, the Return and the Restoration. By
C[hristopher] W[ase]. 1649. 8o

3. Ajax of Sophocles translated [in verse] with notes by Lewis Theobald.
1714. 8o

4. Electra, a tragedy. Translated from Sophocles, with notes. By Mr.
[Lewis] Theobald. 1714. 12o

_Reprinted: 1780._

5. Oedipus, King of Thebes: a tragedy. Translated from Sophocles, with
notes, by Mr. [Lewis] Theobald. 1715. 12o

_Reprinted: 1765._

6. Sophocles [Philoctetes] translated by Thomas Sheridan. Dublin. 1725. 8o

7. Sophocles translated into English prose by George Adams. 2 vol. 1729.
8o

_Reprinted: 1818._

8. The Tragedies of Sophocles translated from the Greek by Thomas
Francklin, M. A. 2 vol. 1759. 4o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1766; 1788; 1806; [Oedipus Tyrannus only] 1806; 1809;
1832; [Introduction by Henry Morley] 1886; [With plays of Aristophanes and
Euripides] 1894; [Antigone] Allahabad, India, 1894._

_American Reprints: New York, 1820‐52; New York, 1872‐76; [Antigone]
Boston, 1887._

9. Oedipus tyrannus, Electra, Philoctetes, and extracts from others.
Tragedies of Sophocles in the Greek Theatre of Father Brumroy. Translated
into English by Mrs. Charlotte Lenox. 3 vol. 1759. 4o

10. A Free Translation [in Verse] of the Oedipus Tyrannus ... by T.
Maurice. 1779. [Published with his Poems.]

_Reprinted: 1813; 1822._

11. The Tragedies of Sophocles translated [in verse by R. Potter]. 1788.

_Reprinted: 1808._

12. Oedipus, King of Thebes; a tragedy translated from the Greek of
Sophocles into prose, with notes ... by G. S. Clark. Oxford. 1790. 8o

13. Electra [translated into English verse by W. Drennan]. Belfast. 1817.
8o

14. Sophocles’ Tragedies, in English Prose, with Notes. 1822. 8o

15. Sophocles’ Works. In English Prose from the text of Brunck. 2 vol.
1823. 8o

_Reprinted: 1828; 1842; [Bohn] 1849._

_American Reprints: Boston and Philadelphia, 1872‐76; New York, 1888._

16. Sophoclis Oedipus Rex, Græce, with Translation, ... by T. W. C.
Edwards. 1823. 8o

_Reprinted: 1846._

17. Sophocles. Works in English Verse. Translated by T. Dale. 2 vol. 1824.
8o

18. Sophoclis Antigone, Græce, with Translation, ... by T. W. C. Edwards.
1824. 8o

_Reprinted: 1846._

19. Sophoclis Philoctetes, Græce, with Translation, ... by T. W. C.
Edwards. 1830. 8o

20. Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus and Colonaeus. Hermann’s text with literal
translation and notes. 1834. 8o

21. Sophocles’ Electra and Aeschylus’ Prometheus Unbound, Translated by G.
C. Fox. 1835.

_Reprinted: 1839._

22. A Literal Translation of the Oedipus Tyrannus of Sophocles ... with
notes. By a Graduate of the University [of Dublin]. Dublin. 1837. 8o

23. Sophocles’ Oedipus Colonus. 1841.

24. Sophocles’ Oedipus Colonus, translated by T. W. C. Edwards. 1846.

25. Sophocles’ Philoctetes. 1846.

26. Sophocles’ Ajax. 1847.

27. Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus. 1847.

28. Σοφοκλευς Ἀντιγονη. The Antigone of Sophocles in Greek and English;
with introduction and notes: by J. W. Donaldson. 1848.

29. The Ajax of Sophocles. Translated from an improved text into English
Verse. By George Burgess. 1849.

30. Sophocles’ Tragedies translated by Yonge. 1849.

31. Oedipus, King of Thebes. Translated from the Oedipus Tyrannus of
Sophocles by Sir F. H. Doyle. 1849. 16o

32. Sophocles’ Tragedies. Translated by Edward Hayes Plumptre. 1865.

_Reprinted: 1867; 1872; 2 vol., 1902; [New Universal Library] 1908._

_American Reprints: 2 vol., New York, 1866; New York, 1872‐76; New York,
1882; [New Universal Library] 1908._

33. Oedipus Tyrannus, translated by a First‐Class Man of Balliol. Oxford.
1870.

34. Ajax, translated by a First‐Class Man of Balliol. Oxford. 1871.

_Reprinted: 1885._

35. Three plays of Sophocles: Antigone, Electra, Deianira, or the Death of
Hercules. Translated into English Verse by Lewis Campbell. 1873.

36. Oedipus Tyrannus and Philoctetes, translated by Lewis Campbell. 1874.

37. Death and Burial of Aias ... translated into English Verse by Lewis
Campbell. 1876.

38. Philoctetes, translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1880.

_Reprinted: 1881._

39. Ajax, translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1880.

40. Antigone, translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1880.

_Reprinted: Athens, 1896._

41. Ajax. Represented at Cambridge, November 29, 30, December 1, 2, 1882,
at St. Andrew’s Hall. With English translation by Richard Claverhouse
Jebb. Cambridge. 1882.

42. Oedipus Tyrannus, with introduction, text, translation, and notes by
Benjamin Hall Kennedy. Cambridge. 1882.

_Reprinted: 1885._

43. Sophocles translated into English verse by Robert Whitelaw. 1883.

_Reprinted: 1897; [Introduction by John Churton Collins] 1906._

_American Reprints: [Antigone] New York, 1907._

44. Sophocles’ Seven Plays in English Verse. Lewis Campbell. 1883. [See
Nos. 35, 36, 37.]

_Reprinted: 1896; [World’s Classics] 1906._

45. Philoctetes translated by Meaburn Talbot Tatham. 1883.

46. Oedipus the King; translated by Edmund Doidge Anderson Morshead. 1885.

_American Reprint: New York, 1885._

47. The Oedipus Tyrannus of Sophocles as performed at Cambridge, November
22‐26, 1887. With a translation in prose by Richard Claverhouse Jebb and a
translation of the songs of the chorus in verse adapted to the music of C.
Villiers Stanford by Arthur Woolgar Verrall. Cambridge. 1887.

48. Oedipus the King. The dialogue metrically rendered by Edward
Conybeare. With the songs of the chorus as written for the music of Dr.
Stanford by Arthur Woolgar Verrall. 1887.

49. Oedipus Tyrannus translated by George Young. 1887.

50. Oedipus Tyrannus translated by Thomas Nash and revised by Reginald
Broughton. 1887.

51. Antigone, translated with introduction and notes by Reginald
Broughton. 1887.

52. Dramas, translated into English Verse by Sir George Young. 1888. [See
no. 49.]

_Reprinted: [Everyman] 1906._

_American Reprint: [Everyman] 1907._

53. Electra. Cambridge. 1888.

54. Plays and Fragments with notes, commentary and translation in English
prose by Richard Claverhouse Jebb. 3 vol. 1885‐88.

_Reprinted: 1904._

_American Reprint: 1904._

55. Philoctetes. Translated by Francis Giffard Plaistowe. [Tutorial
Series] 1892. 8o

56. Electra, translated with an introduction by William John Hickie. 1892.

57. Tragedies; translated into English prose from the text of Jebb, by
Edward Philip Coleridge. 1893.

_American Reprint: 1893._

58. Oedipus at Colonus, closely translated from the Greek ... An
experiment in metre by A. C. Auchmuty. Hull. 1894. 4o

59. Electra, edited with an introduction, notes and translation by J.
Thompson and Bernard John Hayes. 1894.

60. Antigone, translated by William Hardie. Allahabad. 1894.

61. Ajax, translated with test papers by John Hampden Haydon. 1895.

_Reprinted: 1901; 1902._

62. Aiax and Electra, translated by Edmund Doidge Anderson Morshead. 1895.

63. Oedipus Coloneus. A translation with test papers by W. H. Balgarnie.
[University Tutorial Series] 1898. 8o

64. Antigone. A close translation in metrical English by C. E. Laurence.
1898. 8o

65. Plays translated and explained by John S. Phillimore. 1902.

66. Trachiniae, translated by J. A. Prout. [Kelly’s Keys] 1903. 12o

67. Oedipus Coloneus. Translated by J. A. Prout. [Kelly’s Keys] 1905. 8o
12o

68. Ajax. Translated by J. Clunes Wilson. 1906. 8o

69. The Trachinian Maidens. Translated into English Verse by H. Sharpley.
1909. 12o

70. Plays, with an English Translation by F. Storr. [Loeb] 2 vols.
1912‐1913. 12o

_American Reprint: [Loeb] 2 vol., New York, 1913._

71. Oedipus, King of Thebes; translated into English rhyming verse, with
explanatory notes by Gilbert Murray. Oxford. 1911.

_American Reprint: New York, 1911._

72. Sophocles in English Verse by Arthur S. Way. 2 Parts. 1909‐1914.

_American Reprint: 2 Parts, New York, 1909‐1911._



American Translations


1. Sophocles’ Antigone. Literally translated. Athens, Ga. 1852‐55.

2. Sophocles’ Electra. Literally translated. New York. 1852‐55.

3. Sophocles’ Electra; literally translated. Athens, Ga. 1852‐55.

4. Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus; literally translated. Athens, Ga. 1852‐55.

5. Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus. Literally translated. Beaver Falls, Pa.
1852‐55.

6. Tragedies of Sophocles in English prose. New York. 1855. 12o

7. Sophocles’ Electra; translated by J. G. Brincklé. Philadelphia. 1873.
8o

8. Sophocles’ Electra. N. Longworth. Cincinnati. 1878.

9. Oedipus, King of Thebes, Translated into English verse. By G. Volney
Dorsey. Piqua, Ohio. 1880. 8o

10. Oedipus Tyrannus, translated by William Wells Newell. Cambridge, Mass.
1881.

11. Sophocles’ Antigone; translated with introduction and notes by G. H.
Palmer. Boston. 1899.

12. The Antigone of Sophocles; translated into English verse by Joseph E.
Harry. Cincinnati, Ohio. 1911.



Strabo


1. Strabo’s Geography translated by Falconer and Hamilton. 3 vol.,
1854‐1857.

2. Selections from Strabo. Introduction on Strabo’s life and works. Henry
Fanshawe Tozer. Oxford. 1893.



Theocritus


1. Sixe Idillia that is sixe small, or petty poems, or æglogues, chosen
out of the right famous Sicilian Poet Theocritus, and translated into
English Verse. Oxford. 1588. 8o

_Reprinted: Oxford, 1883._

2. The Shepherds Starre, Now of late scene, and at this hower to be
observed merueilous orient in the East: ... Described by a Gentleman late
of the Right worthie and honorable the Lord Burgh. [London] 1591. 4o [This
is a paraphrase upon “the third of the Canticles of Theocritus” by Thomas
Bradshaw.]

3. The Idylliums of Theocritus, with Rapius’ Discourse of Pastorals, done
into English. [By Thomas Creech] Oxford. 1684. 8o

_Reprinted: 1721._

4. The Idylliums of Theocritus. Translated from the Greek, with notes ...
by Francis Fawkes (some account of the life and writings of Theocritus—an
essay on pastoral poetry, by E. B. Greene.) 1767.

_Reprinted: [Anderson’s Poets of Great Britain] 1792‐94; [Chalmer’s
English Poets] 1810._

5. Theocritus and Bion with the Elegies of Tyrtaeus, translated by Rev. R.
Polwhele. 2 vol. 1786. 4o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1792; 2 vol., 1810; 2 vol., 1811; [Works of the Greek
and Roman Poets] 1813; [British Poets] 1822._

6. The Greek Pastoral Poets, Theocritus, Bion, and Moschus. Done into
English by M. J. Chapman. 1836. 8o

_Reprinted: 1848; 1865._

7. Bion, Moschus, Theocritus, Tyrtaeus. J. Banks. 1848.

_Reprinted: 1853; [Bohn’s Popular Library] 1913._

_American Reprint: Boston and Philadelphia, 1872‐76._

8. Idylls and Epigrams. Herbert Kynaston [i.e., Snow]. [Greek‐English]
Oxford. 1869.

_Reprinted: Oxford, 1892._

9. Theocritus, translated into English verse by Charles Stuart Calverley.
Cambridge. 1869.

_Reprinted: 1883; 1896; [York Library, with introduction by Robert
Yelverton Tyrrell] 1908._

_American Reprint: New York, 1913._

10. Theocritus, Bion, and Moschus, translated with an introductory essay
by Andrew Lang. 1880.

_Reprinted: 1889; 1892; [Golden Treasury Series] 1910._

_American Reprint: 1889; [Golden Treasury Series] 1910._

11. The Idylls of Theocritus, translated by James Henry Hallard. 1894.

_Reprinted: 1901._

_American Reprint: New York, 1894._

12. The Greek Bucolic Poets, with an English translation by J. M. Edmonds.
[Loeb Classical Library] 1912.

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1913._

13. Theocritus, Bion, and Moschus, translated into English verse by Arthur
S. Way. Cambridge. 1913. 4o

_American Reprint: New York, 1915._



American Translation


1. Sicilian Idyls; translated into English lyric measures, by M. M.
Miller. Boston. 1899. 16o



Theognis


1. Hesiod and Theognis. Translated by James Davies. 1873. [Ancient
Classics for English Readers]

_Reprinted: 1897._

2. Callimachus, Hesiod and Theognis, translated by James Banks. 1856.

_Reprinted: 1886._



Theophrastus


1. Epictetus his Manuall. And Cebes his Table. [Theophrastus’ Characters]
Out of the Greeke Original, by Io: Healey. 1616.

_Reprinted: 1636._

2. The Characters, or The Manners of the Age, by Monsieur de La Bruyére,
of the French Academy; made English by Several Hands: with the Characters
of Theophrastus, translated from the Greek; and a Prefatory Discourse to
them, by Mons. de La Bruyére. To which is added, A key to his Characters.
1699.

_Reprinted: 1700; 1702._

3. Characters, [translated by] Eustace Budgell. 1713. 8o

_Reprinted: 1714; 1715; 1718; 1743; Edinburgh, 1751._

4. The Moral Characters translated from the Greek by H. Gally, M.A. To
which is prefixed a critical essay with notes on characteristic‐writings.
1725. 8o

5. Θεοφραστου περι των Λιθων βιβλιον. Theophrastus’ History of Stones with
an English version, and critical and philological note.... By John Hill.
1746. 8o

_Reprinted: 1774._

6. The Moral Characters of Theophrastus, translated from the Greek. By W.
Rayner. Norwich. 1797.

7. Characters, Greek and English, with notes by F. Howell. 1824. 8o

_Reprinted: 1831._

8. The Characters of Theophrastus [translated and] Illustrated by
physiognomical sketches. To which are subjoined hints on the individual
varieties of human nature and general remarks. [By T., i.e., Isaac Taylor]
1866.

9. Θεοφραστου Χαρακτηρες. The Characters of Theophrastus. An English
translation by Richard Claverhouse Jebb. 1870. 8o

_American Reprint: New York, 1870._

10. On Winds and Weather Signs. Translated with introduction, notes, and
appendix by James George Wood. Edited by George James Symons. 1894.

11. The Characters of Theophrastus, The Mimes of Herodas, The Tablet of
Kebes. Translated with an Introduction by R. Thomson Clark. 1909. 12o [New
Universal Library]

_American Reprint: [New Universal Library] New York, 1913._

12. Characters. Translated by J. E. Sandys. 1909. 8o

13. Enquiry into plants, and minor works on odours and weather signs.
English translation by Sir Arthur Hart. 1916. 18o [Loeb Classical Library]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] New York, 1916._



American Translation


1. Characters of Theophrastus; translated by C. E. Bennett and W. A.
Hammond. New York. 1902.



Thucydides


1. The hystory writtone by Thucidides the Athenyan of the warre, whiche
was betwene the Peloponesians and the Athenyans, translated oute of
Frenche into the Englysh language by Thomas Nicholls Citezine and
Goldesmyth of London. [No place] 1550. Fol. BL

2. Eight Bookes Of the Peloponnesian warre Written by Thucydides the sonne
of Olorus. Interpreted with Faith and Diligence Immediately out of the
Greeke By Thomas Hobbes Secretary to ye late Earle of Deuonshire. 1629.
Fol.

_Reprinted: 1634; 1676; 1723; 1812; 1822; 1824; 1841; 2 vol., 1843._

3. The Plague of Athens which happened in the year of the Peloponesian
warr, First described in Greek by Thucidides, then in Latin by Lucretius,
Now attempted in English by Tho: Sprat. [Licensed to Master Henry Brown,
Oct. 2, 1679.]

_Reprinted: 1688; 1703._

4. The History of the Peloponnesian War, translated from the Greek of
Thucydides; to which are added, Three Preliminary Discourses; by William
Smith, D.D., Dean of Chester. 2 vol., 1753. 8o

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1805; 2 vol., 1812; 2 vol., 1815; 3 vol., 1831; 1
vol., 1831; [Sir John Lubbock’s Books] 1892; 1898._

_American Reprints: 2 vol., New York, 1820‐52; New York, 1849; 2 vol., New
York, 1872‐76._

5. Peloponnesian War, translated by Bloomfield. 3 vol., 1829. 8o

6. Literal translation of the first book of Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War.
By H. V. Hemmings. 1836.

_Reprinted: 1849._

7. The First Book of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War,
literally translated ... with notes, original and select, by R. A.
Billing. Dublin. 1836. 8o

8. The History of the Peloponnesian War, literally translated by Henry
Dale. 1848. 8o

_American Reprints: New York, 1855‐58; New York, 1872‐76; 2 vol., New
York, 1887._

9. History of the Plague of Athens. Translated by Collier. 1857.

10. History, Book I, translated by Richard Crawley. Oxford. 1867.

11. Speeches from Thucydides, translated into English. For the use of
students. With introduction and notes, by H. M. Wilkins. 1870. 8o

_Reprinted: 1875._

12. History of the Peloponnesian War, translated by Richard Crawley. 1874.
8o [Book I is a reprint of No. 10.]

_Reprinted: 1876; [Temple Classics] 2 vol., 1903; [Everyman] 1910._

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1910._

13. History of the Peloponnesian War, translated by W. L. Collins. 1878.

_Reprinted: 1898._

14. Thucydides translated into English with an essay on inscriptions and a
note on the geography of Thucydides, by Benjamin Jowett. 2 vol. 1881.

_Reprinted: 2 vol., Oxford, 1900._

_American Reprints: Boston, 1881; Boston, 1883; 2 vol., New York, 1900;
[Historians of Greece] 3 vol., New York, 1909._

15. History. Books I, II, III. Translated by Henry Owgan. 3 vol. 1885.

16. History, Book VII. Translated by Robert K. Rodwell. Cambridge. 1887.

17. History, Book IV, translated by George F. H. Sykes. 1890.

_Reprinted: 1904._

18. Peloponnesian War. Books IV, VII. J. A. Prout. 2 vol. 1892.

19. History, Book I. Translated by T. T. Jeffery. [University Tutorial
Series] 1895. 8o

20. History, Book II. Translated with test papers by J. F. Stout. 1899. 8o
[University Tutorial Series.]

21. Peloponnesian War, Book VIII. Literally translated. 1899. 8o [Kelly’s
Keys]

22. Peloponnesian War, Book VII, translated by E. C. Marchmont. 1900. 8o

23. Peloponnesian War, Books V, VI. Literally translated by J. A. Prout.
1900. 12o [Kelly’s Keys]

24. The Ideal of Citizenship (Memorabilia). Translated by Alice E.
Zimmern. 1916.



Xenophon


1. Xenophon’s treatise of householde. Translated from Greek into English
by Gentian Hervet. 1532. 8o BL

_Reprinted: 1532; 1537; 1544; 1547?; 1557; 1573; 1577._

2. The bookes of Xenophon contayning the discipline, schole, and education
of Cyrus the noble Kyng of Persie. Translated out of Greeke into Englyshe,
by M. William Barker. [1560?] 8o BL

_Reprinted: [With the addition of two books] 1567._

3. The Historie of Xenophon: containing the Ascent of Cyrus into the
higher countries. Wherein is described the admirable iourney of ten
thousand Grecians from Asia the Lesse into the Territories of Babylon, and
their retrait from thence into Greece, notwithstanding the opposition of
all their Enemies. Whereunto is added A Comparison of the Roman manner of
warres with this of our Time, out of Iustus Lipsius. Translated by Ioh.
Bingham. 1623. Fol.

4. Cyropaedia. The Institution and Life of Cyrus, the first of that name,
King of Persians. Eight Bookes.... Translated out of Greeke into English,
and conferred with the Latine and French Translations, by Philemon Holland
of the City of Coventry, Doctor in Physick. 1632. Fol.

5. Xenophon’s history of the affaires of Greece in seaven bookes, being a
continuacōn of the Pelopennesian warr, from the time when Thucydides end
to the battle of Mantinea. To wch is prefixed an abstract of Thucydides
and an account of the land and navall forces of the ancient Greeks.
Translated from the Greek by John Newman. [Licensed to Master Wm. Freeman,
Oct. 17, 1684.]

6. Κυρου Παιδεια: or, the Institution and Life of Cyrus the Great ... the
first four books by F. Digby ... the four last by J. Norris. 2 parts.
1685. 8o

7. Discourses on the publick Revenues and on the Trade, of England.... By
the Author of, The Essay on Ways and Means. To which is added, A discourse
upon improving the revenue of the state of Athens, written originally in
Greek by Xenophon; and now made English from the Original, with some
Historical notes, by another Hand. 1698. 8o

8. The Memorable Things of Socrates, written by Xenophon ... Translated
into English [by E. Bysshe]. To which are prefixed the Life of Socrates
from the French of Charpentier, and Life of Xenophon collected from
several authors. 1712. 8o

_Reprinted: Dublin, 1758; [Cassell’s National Library] 1889, 1904._

_American Reprints: [Cassell’s National Library] New York, 1889, 1901._

9. Hiero; or, the condition of a Tyrant. Translated from Xenophon, with
observations. 1713. 12o

_Reprinted: Glasgow, 1750._

10. The Science of Good Husbandry: or, the Oeconomics of Xenophon,
translated from the Greek by R. Bradley. 1727. 8o

11. Cyrus’ expedition into Persia and the retreat of the ten thousand.
Translated by E. Spelman. 2 vol., 1742.

_Reprinted: 2 vol., 1749; 1806; 1811; 1813; 1830; 1849; [With the
remainder of Xenophon’s Works translated by Ashley, Cooper, Smith,
Fielding, and others] 1849, 1875._

_American Reprints: [With the remainder of Xenophon’s Works translated by
Ashley, Cooper, Smith, Fielding, and others] New York, 1849, New York,
1852‐55, New York, 1872‐76._

12. Xenophon’s History of the Affairs of Greece by the translator of
Thucydides. [i.e. William Smith] 1770.

_Reprinted: 1812; 1816; and see No. 11 reprints._

13. The Socratic System of Morals, as delivered in Xenophon’s Memorabilia.
[By E. Edwards?] 1773.

14. Xenophon’s Memoirs of Socrates; with the Defence of Socrates before
his Judges. Translated ... by S. Fielding. 1788.

15. Xenophon on Hare Hunting. By W. Blane. 1788.

16. Hiero; on the condition of Royalty: a conversation from the Greek of
Xenophon. By the translator of Antoninus’ Meditations. [R. Graves] Bath.
1793.

17. The Thymbriad; (from Xenophon’s Cyropaedia) by Lady Burrell. [In
verse] 1794.

18. Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, translated by Maurice Ashley. 1770.

_Reprinted: 1803; 1811; 1816; 1830; 1841._

19. Xenophon’s Expedition of Cyrus. 1811.

20. Xenophon’s Minor Works. Translated by several hands. 1813.

21. Xenophon’s Expedition of Cyrus. 1817. 12o

22. Xenophon’s Anabasis, newly translated into English from the Greek....
By a Member of the University of Oxford. Oxford. 1822.

23. Xenophon’s Anabasis, translated into English by Smith. 1824. 8o

24. A literal translation of the first four books of Xenophon’s Anabasis,
with notes. By W. B. Maccabe. Dublin. 1824.

25. A literal translation of the first and second books of Xenophon’s
Memorabilia. By a Graduate of the University. Cambridge. 1827.

26. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Book I, Cap. 1‐6. Greek and English. 1833. 12o

27. Xenophon’s Agesilaus, &c. Translated into English. 1833. 12o

28. Xenophon’s Anabasis. 1840.

29. Xenophon’s Memorabilia, [translated by] Brine. 1841.

30. Xenophon’s Expedition of Cyrus. Books I‐III, translated ... with
notes. By T. W. Allpress. 1845. 12o

31. Xenophon’s Anabasis ... and Memorabilia of Socrates ... translated
from the Greek by J. S. Watson. With a geographical commentary by W. F.
Ainsworth. 1854. 8o

_Reprinted: 1867; [Sir John Lubbock’s Books] 1894; [Anabasis] 1894;
[Memorabilia. Temple Classics] 1905._

_American Reprints: New York, 1856; New York, 1872‐76; [Anabasis, Books I‐
V; with an introduction by E. Brooks, Jr. Pocket Literal Translations of
the Classics] Philadelphia, 1895; [Memorabilia. Temple Classics] New York,
1904._

32. Xenophon’s Cyropaedia and Hellenics ... literally translated from the
Greek ... by Rev. J. S. Watson and Rev. H. Dale. 1854. 8o

33. Xenophon’s Minor Works ... with notes and illustrations ... by J. S.
Watson. 3 vol., 1854. 8o

_Reprinted: 1857._

_American Reprints: 3 vol., Boston, 1872‐76; 3 vol., New York, 1887._

34. Xenophon’s Agesilaus, translated with notes by J. S. Watson. 1857.

35. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Books I, II. Translated by J. A. Giles. 1859.
[Greek‐English]

36. Xenophon’s Memorabilia translated by George B. Wheeler. 1862.

37. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Books I‐III, translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1864.

38. Xenophon’s Anabasis translated by George B. Wheeler. 1866.

_Reprinted: 1876._

39. Xenophon’s Anabasis, with a translation and notes by Sanderson. 1866.

40. Xenophon’s Memorabilia, translated by Percival Frost. 1867.

41. Xenophon’s Memorabilia, translated by Edward Levien. 1872.

42. The Economist of Xenophon. Translated by Alexander D. O. Wedderburn
and William G. Collingwood. Preface by John Ruskin. Orpington. 1876.

_Reprinted: Orpington, 1883._

43. Xenophon’s Anabasis of Cyrus ... with notes ... by R. W. Taylor. 1877.
8o

44. Xenophon’s Hellenics, Books I‐III, translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1878.

_Reprinted: 1884; 1898._

45. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Books I‐II. With text and notes. Cambridge. 1878.

46. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Books I‐II. Translated by Charles H. Crosse.
1879.

47. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Books I‐III. Translated by Thomas J. Arnold.
1879.

_Reprinted: 1880._

48. Xenophon’s Agesilaus, translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1879. [Kelley’s
Keys]

49. Xenophon’s Agesilaus translated into English prose by Herbert
Hailstone. 1879.

50. Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, Books VII‐VIII, translated by Charles Henry
Crosse. Cambridge. 1879.

51. The Oeconomicus of Xenophon. Translated by William James Hickie. 1879.

52. Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, translated by Roscoe Mongan. 1880‐81.

53. Xenophon’s Memorabilia, Books I, II, IV. 1881.

_Reprinted: 1885._

54. The First ten chapters of Xenophon’s Oeconomicus or Treatise on
Household Management. Translated by Aubrey Stewart. Cambridge. 1885.

55. Xenophon’s Hellenica, Book I. With an interlinear translation by
Thomas J. Arnold. 1888.

_Reprinted: 1892._

56. Xenophon’s Oeconomicus. Edited by John Thompson. Translation by B. J.
Hayes. 1888.

_Reprinted: 1895._

57. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Book IV. Translated by A. F. Burnet. 1891.

58. Xenophon’s Hellenica, Book III, edited with an introduction, text,
notes, index and translation by A. H. Allcroft and Fanny L. D. Richardson.
1893.

_Reprinted: 1902._

59. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Books I, II. Translated by E. S. Crooke.
Cambridge. 1893.

60. The Art of Horsemanship by Xenophon. Translated with chapters on the
Greek riding‐horse and notes. By Morris Hickey Morgan. 1894. [A reprint of
American translation of 1893.]

61. Xenophon’s Hellenica, Books III, IV. Book III translated by Arthur H.
Allcroft; Book IV translated by Alexander W. Young. 1894.

62. Xenophon’s Hellenica, Books I, II. Translated by Henry Dale. 1895.

63. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Book VII. Translated by W. H. Balgarnie. 1895.

64. Xenophon’s Hellenics, Books IV, V. Translated by J. A. Prout. 1896.

_Reprinted: [Kelley’s Keys] 1897._

65. Xenophon’s Works, translated by Henry Graham Dakyns. 4 vol., 1890‐97.

_American Reprints: 4 vol., New York, 1890‐97; [Historians of Greece] 5
vol., New York, 1910._

66. Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, Book I. Edited by T. T. Jeffrey. ...
Translation by W. H. Balgarnie. 1897. 8o [University Tutorial Series]

67. Xenophon’s Memorabilia, Book II. Translated by A. D. C. Amos. 1901. 8o

68. Xenophon’s Memorabilia. 1903. [University Tutorial Series]

69. Xenophon’s Memorabilia of Socrates. 1904. [Temple Classics]

70. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Book I, literally translated by J. H. Elston.
1905. 12o

71. Xenophon’s Hiero. Translated by J. H. Watson. 1906. 12o

72. Xenophon’s Oeconomicus, Chapters 1‐10. Translated by C. H. Prichard.
1909. 8o

73. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Book IV, literally translated with notes by Edgar
Sanderson. 1913. 8o

74. Xenophon’s Cyropaedia. Translation revised by Miss F. M. Stawell.
1914. 12o [Everyman]

_American Reprint: [Everyman] New York, 1914._

75. Xenophon’s Cyropaedia. With an English translation by Walter Miller.
Vols. 1‐2. 1914. [Loeb Classical Library]

_American Reprint: [Loeb] 2 vol., New York, 1914._

76. Xenophon’s Anabasis, Books III, IV, literally translated by Edgar
Sanderson. 1915. 8o [Book IV is a reprint of No. 73.]



American Translations


1. History of the Expedition of Cyrus. Translated. 2 vol. New York.
1820‐52.

2. Xenophon’s Anabasis. Interlinear translation by Hamilton and Clark. New
York. 1855‐58. 12o

_Reprinted: Philadelphia, 1887, 1896._

3. Xenophon’s Works. 3 vols. New York. 1887.

4. Xenophon’s Anabasis. New York. 1889. [Handy Literal Translations]

5. The Art of Horsemanship by Xenophon. Translated by M. H. Morgan.
Boston. 1893.

_English Reprint: London, 1894._

6. Xenophon’s Memorabilia. New York. 1894. 8o [International Translations,
New Classic Series]

7. Anabasis, Book I; containing the Greek text literally translated, with
full grammatical analysis and explanatory notes; with an introduction by
D. S. Elbon. New York. 1917. 8o [Fully Parsed Classics]



Xenophon Of Ephesus


1. Abradates and Panthea. A tale [in verse] extracted from Xenophon by W.
W. Beach. Salisbury. 1765.



INDEX


NOTE: The numbers refer to the number of the translations as listed under
the Greek Author. Those marked with an asterisk (*) are to be found in the
list of American translations which follows the list of English
translations of each Greek Author.

A., J.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

ADAMS, FRANCIS
  Hippocrates, 1*;
  Musaeus, 17

ADAMS, GEORGE
  Sophocles, 7

ADAMS, M. W.
  Homer, 83

ADDISON, JOHN
  Anacreon, 4;
  Sappho, 1

ALFORD, H.
  Homer, 63

ALLCROFT, ARTHUR HADRIAN
  Homer, 111;
  Xenophon, 58, 61

ALLEN, F. D.
  Aeschylus, 4

ALLPRESS, T. W.
  Xenophon, 30

AMOS, A. D. C.
  Xenophon, 67

ANONYMOUS
  Aeschylus, 2, 3, 3*, 8, 16, 67, 75, 87, 91;
  Aesop, 3*, 4*, 5*, 6*, 7*, 8*, 9*, 10, 11*, 13, 13*, 14*, 15*, 16, 16*,
              18, 18*, 19*, 20*, 21*, 39, 42, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51,
              52, 53, 55, 56, 57;
  Anacreon, 10;
  Anthology, 9;
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 1*, 3*, 5*, 11, 12, 13, 14;
  Aristophanes, 13, 17, 43, 46, 69;
  Aristotle, 1, 2, 5, 13, 15, 17, 28, 30, 31, 59, 60;
  Artemidorus 4;
  Bion, 2;
  Cebes, 2, 4, 7;
  Chariton, 1;
  Demosthenes 3*, 4*, 25, 26, 27;
  Diogenes Laertius, 2;
  Epictetus 1*, 3*, 6*, 7*, 14;
  Euripedes, 1*, 2*, 20, 22, 24, 27, 45, 54, 55, 78, 79, 106;
  Heliodorus, 3, 5, 6;
  Herodian, 2, 4, 6;
  Herodotus 4, 7, 9, 17, 19;
  Hesiod, 1;
  Hippocrates 1, 4, 5, 6;
  Homer, 11*, 16*, 36, 38, 41, 45, 46, 50, 52, 53, 54, 65, 67, 104, 109;
  Isocrates, 4, 10;
  Longinus, 3, 4, 12, 15;
  Longus, 3, 6, 7;
  Lucian, 3, 5, 6, 9, 17, 21, 24;
  Lysias, 1*;
  Musaeus, 14;
  Pausanias 3, 6;
  Pindar, 5, 27;
  Plato, 1*, 2, 3*, 4*, 5*, 6, 6*, 7, 7*, 8*, 9, 9*, 10*, 17, 27, 37, 40,
              41, 43, 46, 47;
  Plutarch, 1, 1*, 4*, 5, 5*, 6, 6*, 14*, 15*, 17, 19, 24, 28, 31, 35, 40;
  Polybius, 6, 9;
  Pythagoras, 1, 5;
  Sophocles 1*, 2*, 3*, 4*, 5*, 6*, 14, 15, 20, 23, 26, 27, 53;
  Theocritus, 1, 2;
  Theophrastus 2;
  Thucydides, 21;
  Xenophon 1*, 3*, 4*, 6*, 7, 9, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, 47, 53, 68, 69;

ARMITSTEAD, G. H.
  Aesop, 41

ARMOUR, J.
  Lucian, 23

ARNOLD, E.
  Musaeus, 20

ARNOLD, THOMAS J.
  Anacreon, 23;
  Aristophanes, 40;
  Euripides, 65, 67, 68, 86;
  Xenophon, 47, 55

ARWAKER, E. (The Younger)
  Aesop, 25

ASHLEY, MAURICE
  Xenophon, 18

ASHWICK, S.
  Homer, 27

AUCHMUTY, A. G.
  Sophocles, 58

AUTHOR OF BRITISH NEPOS
  Plutarch, 23

AUTHORS OF THE ART OF THINKING
  Aristotle, 14

AYRES, PHILIP
  Aesop, 19

B., H.
  Aristophanes, 2

B., R.
  Aesop, 21

B., W.
  Appian, 1

BALGARNIE, W. H.
  Euripides, 98, 103;
  Sophocles, 63;
  Xenophon, 63, 66

BALGRAVE, A. E.
  Plato, 48

BALLIOL MAN
  Aeschylus, 50

BALLY, G.
  Musaeus, 10

BANDION, J.
  Aesop, 23

BANNISTER, J.
  Euripides, 7;
  Pindar, 10

BANKS, JAMES
  Callimachus, 5;
  Euripides, 28;
  Hesiod, 5;
  Theocritus, 7;
  Theognis, 2

BARHAM, T. F.
  Homer, 82

BARING, THOMAS CHARLES
  Pindar, 25

BARKER, M. WILLIAM
  Xenophon, 2

BARLOW, FRANCIS
  Aesop, 17

BARLOW, JANE
  Homer, 118

BARNARD, M.
  Homer, 87

BARNES, THOMAS
  Isocrates, 9

BARRET, W.
  Aesop, 9

BARRETT, ELIZABETH
  Aeschylus, 13

BARTER, W. G. T.
  Homer, 60

BAXTER, W.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

BEACH, W. W.
  Xenophon of Ephesus, 1

BEDFORD, G. C.
  Musaeus, 16

BEHN, APHRA
  Aesop, 15

BELOE, WILLIAM
  Alciphron, 1;
  Herodotus, 3

BENECKE, EDWARD F. M.
  Appian, 3

BEVAN, EDWYN
  Aeschylus, 95

BEWICK, THOMAS
  Aesop, 34

BIDDLE, GEORGE W.
  Demosthenes, 2*

BIGGE‐WITHER, LOVELACE
  Homer, 78

BILLING, R. A.
  Thucydides, 7

BILLSON, CHARLES J.
  Aristophanes, 34

BINGHAM, JOHN
  Aeneas, 1, 2;
  Xenophon, 3

BIRCH, NATHAN
  Plutarch, 25

BIRMINGHAM, C. LLOYD
  Homer, 40

BLACKIE, JOHN STUART
  Aeschylus, 23

BLAKENEY, E. H.
  Homer, 129

BLAND, R.
  Anthology, 2

BLANE, W. W.
  Xenophon, 15

BLEW, WILLIAM JOHN
  Aeschylus, 25;
  Homer, 49

BLOOMFIELD
  Thucydides, 5

BLUNDEVILLE, M.
  Aristotle, 8;
  Plutarch, 7

BLYTH, THOMAS ALLEN
  Homer, 99

BOARDMAN, J. HAROLD
  Demosthenes, 29

BOLLAND
  Aristotle, 48

BOOTH G.
  Diodorus Siculus, 3

BOSANQUET, B.
  Plato, 12*

BOUCHIER, E. S.
  Aristotle, 69, 74;
  Aeschylus, 77

BOULTON, M. P. W.
  Homer, 86

BOURNE, T.
  Anacreon, 19

BOYD, H. S.
  Aeschylus, 5

BRADLEY, R.
  Xenophon, 10

BRANDRETH, T. S.
  Homer, 56

BRANDT, WILLIAM
  Demosthenes, 18

BRIDGEMAN, WILLIAM
  Aristotle, 23, 24;
  Pythagoras, 7

BRINE
  Xenophon, 29

BRINGSLEY, JOHN
  Aesop, 5

BRINKLÉ, J. G.
  Sophocles, 7*

BRODRIBB, W. J.
  Demosthenes, 21

BROOKE, C. F. TUCKER
  Plutarch, 9*

BROOME, WILLIAM
  Apollonius of Rhodes, 1;
  Hesiod, 3;
  Homer, 18, 19, 23, 26

BROUGHAM, HENRY, LORD
  Demosthenes, 9

BROUGHTON, REGINALD
  Plato, 50;
  Sophocles, 50

BROWN, E. R.
  Aeschylus, 76

BROWN, J.
  Isocrates, 13

BROWNE, R. W.
  Aristotle, 32

BROWNING, ROBERT
  Aeschylus, 43;
  Euripides, 49

BRYANT, WILLIAM CULLEN
  Homer, 5*, 6*

BRYCE
  Homer, 55

BUCKLEY, THEODORE ALOIS
  Aeschylus, 21;
  Aristotle, 34;
  Euripides, 29;
  Homer, 58

BUDGELL, EUSTICE
  Theophrastus, 3

BULLOKAR, WILLIAM
  Aesop, 3

BURGES, G.
  Anthology, 3;
  Demosthenes, 11;
  Sophocles, 29

BURNET, A. F.
  Homer, 110;
  Xenophon, 57

BURNET, JOHN
  Aristotle, 71

BURRELL, LADY
  Xenophon, 17

BURTON, ROBERT
  Aesop, 2*

BURTON, WILLIAM
  Achilles Tatius, 1

BURY, JOHN
  Isocrates, 3

BUTCHER, SAMUEL HENRY
  Aristotle, 65, 68;
  Homer, 94

BUTLER, SAMUEL
  Homer, 119, 125

BYLES, C. E.
  Plutarch, 8*, 38

BYNNER, WITTER
  Euripides, 5*

BYSSHE, EDWARD
  Xenophon, 8

BYWATER, INGRAM
  Aristotle, 76

CALACLEUGH, W. G.
  Homer, 4*

CALDECOTT, ALFRED
  Aesop, 40

CALVERLEY, CHARLES STUART
  Theocritus, 9

CAMBRIDGE GRADUATE
  Aristotle, 52

CAMPBELL, LEWIS
  Aeschylus, 54, 65, 83;
  Sophocles, 35, 36, 37, 44

CARLILL, H. F.
  Plato, 65

CARMAN, BLISS
  Sappho, 4*

CARNARVON, EARL OF
  Homer, 105

CARR, J.
  Lucian, 11

CARRINGTON
  Aristophanes, 15

CARTER, ELIZABETH
  Epictetus, 9

CARTWRIGHT, J.
  Euripides, 39

CARY, ELIZABETH L.
  Aesop, 22*

CARY, HENRY
  Aristophanes, 14;
  Herodotus, 8;
  Plato, 19;
  Pindar, 17

CASAUBON, MERIC
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 1

CASE, JANET
  Aeschylus, 81

CAXTON, WILLIAM
  Aesop, 1

CAYLEY, C. B.
  Aeschylus, 34;
  Homer, 88

CHAPMAN, GEORGE
  Homer, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11

CHAPMAN, M. J.
  Theocritus, 6

CHARLESTON, DR.
  Epicurus, 1

CHASE, D. P.
  Aristotle, 39

CHATTERTON, LADY
  Plato, 25

CHESTERTON, GILBERT K.
  Aesop, 54

CHETWOOD, K.
  Demosthenes, 3

CHURCH, F. J.
  Plato, 39

CLARK
  Homer, 2*;
  Xenophon, 2*

CLARK, G. S.
  Sophocles, 12

CLARK, R. THOMSON
  Theophrastus, 11

CLARKE, HENRY
  Euripides, 94

CLARKE
  Aesop, 30

CLIFFORD, C. C.
  Aeschylus, 24;
  Aristophanes, 22

COGAN, THOMAS
  Diodorus Siculus, 2

COLSE, PETER
  Homer, 2

COLERIDGE, EDWARD PHILIP
  Apollonius Rhodius, 6;
  Euripides, 85;
  Sophocles, 57

COLLIER
  Aristotle, 37;
  Thucydides, 9

COLLIER, JEREMY
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 2

COLLIER, RT. HON. SIR R.
  Demosthenes, 20

COLLINGWOOD, WILLIAM G.
  Xenophon, 42

COLLINS, CLIFTON W.
  Plato, 33

COLLINS, W. LUCAS
  Aristophanes, 27;
  Homer, 79, 80;
  Lucian, 18;
  Thucydides, 13

CONGREVE, W.
  Homer, 30

CONINGTON, JOHN
  Aeschylus, 84

COPE, ALFRED DAVIES
  Aristophanes, 68

COPE, EDWARD MEREDITH
  Aristotle, 43;
  Plato, 26, 34

COPELAND, W.
  Artemidorus of Ephesus, 3

COPESTON, R. S.
  Aeschylus, 46

COOKE
  Hesiod, 2

COOKE, T.
  Bion, 3

COOKE, REV. W.
  Anacreon, 8

COOKESLEY, W. G.
  Pindar, 18

COOPER, JOHN D.
  Aeschylus, 62

COOPER, LANE
  Aristotle, 2*

CORDERY, JOHN GRAHAM
  Homer, 81, 124

COTTERILL, H. B.
  Homer, 131

COVINGTON, W.
  Aristophanes, 1*

COWLEY, ABRAHAM
  Anacreon, 1;
  Pindar, 1

COWPER, WILLIAM
  Homer, 33

COX, G. W.
  Herodotus, 13

CRAWLEY, RICHARD
  Thucydides, 10, 12

CREECH, THOMAS
  Theocritus, 3

CRESSWELL, R.
  Aristotle, 40

CRIMMIN
  Aristotle, 26

CRITANNAH, JOB
  Plutarch, 25

CROOKE, EDMUND S.
  Euripides, 38, 41;
  Herodotus, 18;
  Homer, 84, 128;
  Xenophon, 59

CROOKE, SAMUEL E.
  Aeschylus, 66

CROSSE, CHARLES H.
  Xenophon, 46, 50

CROSSLEY, HASTINGS
  Epictetus, 4*

CROXALL, SAMUEL
  Aesop, 27

CUDWORTH, WILLIAM
  Euripides, 76, 82;
  Homer, 117, 122

CUMBERLAND, R.
  Aristophanes, 9, 12

CUMMINGS, PRENTISS
  Homer, 13*

D., I.
  Aristotle, 6, 7

DACIER, M.
  Plato, 3

DAKYNS, HENRY GRAHAM
  Xenophon, 65

DALE, HENRY
  Thucydides, 8;
  Xenophon, 32, 62

DALE, T.
  Sophocles, 17

DALTON, C. N.
  Aeschylus, 36

DANCEY, W.
  Arrian, 4

DART, J. H.
  Homer, 66

DAVIDSON, JUDSON FRANCE
  Anacreon, 2*

DAVIES, H.
  Plato, 19

DAVIES, JOHN LLEWELYN
  Appian, 2;
  Plato, 21

DAVIES, J. F.
  Aeschylus, 35

DAVIES, JAMES
  Aeschylus, 46, 49;
  Babrius, 1;
  Epictetus, 3;
  Hesiod, 6;
  Theognis, 1

DAWSON
  Demosthenes, 4

DAY, ALFRED
  Plato, 30

DAYE, ANGELL
  Longus, 1

DE MORNAY, PHILIPPE
  Plato, 1

DERBY, EARL
  Homer, 69

DE WILSON, BASFORD
  Aristotle, 55

DIGBY, J.
  Isocrates, 11;
  Xenophon, 6

DINSDALE, JOSHUA
  Isocrates, 14

DIRECKS, RUDOLPH
  Epictetus, 13

DOBSON, J. F.
  Aristotle, 86

DOCTOR OF PHYSICK
  Epictetus, 6

DODD, WILLIAM
  Callimachus, 2;
  Pindar, 4

DODSLEY, ROBERT
  Aesop, 29

DONALDSON, J. W.
  Sophocles, 28

DONNE, W. B.
  Euripides, 52

DORSEY, G. VOLNEY
  Sophocles, 9*

DOWDALL, L. D.
  Aristotle, 80

DOYLE, SIR F. H.
  Sophocles, 31

DRAPER, CHARLES
  Aesop, 28

DRENNAN, W.
  Sophocles, 13

DRYDEN, JOHN
  Homer, 17;
  Plutarch, 14

DU CANE, CHARLES
  Homer, 96

DUNSTER, C.
  Aristophanes, 8, 10

DYDE, S. W.
  Plato, 59

DYMES, THOMAS J.
  Aristotle, 62

E. E. A.
  Pythagoras, 9

EASBY‐SMITH, J. S.
  Alcaeus, 1;
  Sappho, 1*

EDGAR, JOHN
  Homer, 112

EDGINGTON, G. W.
  Homer, 76

EDITORS OF THE ANALYTICAL SERIES OF GREEK AND LATIN CLASSICS
  Euripides, 69

EDMONDS, J. M.
  Theocritus, 12

EDWARDS, E.
  Xenophon, 13

EDWARDS, T. W. C.
  Aeschylus, 4;
  Anacreon, 20;
  Euripides, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19;
  Sophocles, 16, 18, 19

ELBON, D. S.
  Xenophon, 7*

ELIOT, SIR THOMAS
  Isocrates, 2;
  Lucian, 1;
  Plutarch, 2, 4

ELKINS, J.
  Apollonius Rhodius, 2

ELLIS, E. S.
  Plutarch, 3*

ELLIS, WILLIAM
  Aristotle, 19

ELSTON, J. H.
  Xenophon, 70

ELTON, CHARLES ABRAHAM
  Hesiod, 4;
  Musaeus, 18;
  Sappho, 4

ESTES, DANA
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 4

EUSDEN, LAWRENCE
  Musaeus, 6

EVANS, ARTHUR HUMBLE
  Plutarch, 32

EVANS, THOMAS
  Sophocles, 1

EVELYN, F. A.
  Euripides, 125

EVELYN‐WHITE, HUGH G.
  Hesiod, 8

EYEARS, E.
  Aesop, 46

F., W.
  Homer, 8

FAGE
  Aristotle, 10

FALCONER, W.
  Arrian, 3;
  Strabo, 1

FARQUHARSON, A. S. L.
  Aristotle, 85

FARRAR, CANON F. W.
  Epictetus, 5*

FAUSSETT, REV. A.
  Euripides, 30

FAWKES, FRANCIS
  Anacreon, 7;
  Apollonius, 4;
  Longus, 3;
  Musaeus, 12;
  Theocritus, 4

FEARENSIDE, CHARLES SCOTT
  Plato, 48

FEATHERSTONE, T.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

FENNELL, CHARLES A. M.
  Demosthenes, 24

FENTON, ELIJAH
  Homer, 22, 23

FIELDING, HENRY
  Aristophanes, 6, 10

FIELDING, S.
  Xenophon, 14

FIRST‐CLASS MAN OF BALLIOL COLLEGE
  Aeschines, 3;
  Aristophanes, 36, 38, 39, 55;
  Herodotus, 20, 21, 36;
  Euripides, 44, 47, 48;
  Sophocles, 33, 34

FITZ‐COTTON, H.
  Homer, 25

FITZGERALD, M. P.
  Euripides, 40

FLEINTOFF
  Demosthenes, 8

FLEMING, ABRAHAM
  Aelian, 1;
  Isocrates, 5;
  Musaeus, 1

FLINT, J. RUSSELL
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 6

FORD, S.
  Plutarch, 15

FORREST, THOMAS
  Isocrates, 6

FORSTER, E. S.
  Aristotle, 86

FOULIS
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 3

FOWLER, H. N.
  Plato, 69

FOX, G. C.
  Aeschylus, 14, 15;
  Sophocles, 21

FRANCIS, REV. PHILIP
  Demosthenes, 7

FRANCKLIN, THOMAS
  Lucian, 12;
  Sophocles, 8

FRAZER, W. R.
  Plutarch, 37

FREELAND, F. A. S.
  Euripides, 58

FREESE, JOHN HENRY
  Homer, 109, 121;
  Isocrates, 19

FRERE, A. F.
  Musaeus, 19

FRERE, J. H.
  Aristophanes, 11, 37

FROST, PERCIVAL
  Xenophon, 40

G., T.
  Demosthenes, 2

GALLY, H.
  Theophrastus, 4

GARNETT, EDWARD
  Anthology, 5

GARNETT, RICHARD
  Anthology, 7, 8

GARRETT, EDWARD
  Aesop, 35

GARTH, DR.
  Demosthenes, 3

GASCOIGNE, GEORGE
  Euripides, 1

GASELEE, S.
  Longus, 9

GAUTILLON, PETER JOHN
  Herodotus, 22

GEDDES, ALEXANDER
  Homer, 34

GENTLEMAN OF THE UNIVERSITY
  Cebes, 8

GERARD, C. P.
  Aristophanes, 20

GIBSON, G. S.
  Aristotle, 47

GIBSON, JOHN
  Plato, 49;
  Herodotus, 25

GILDON
  Plutarch, 16

GILES, H. A.
  Longinus, 14

GILES, J. A.
  Aeschylus, 27, 29;
  Aristotle, 45;
  Euripides, 36, 37;
  Longinus, 14;
  Plato, 24;
  Pindar, 21;
  Xenophon, 35

GILLIES, JOHN
  Aristotle, 21;
  Isocrates, 16

GILPIN, THOMAS
  Anacreon, 14

GIRDLESTON, J. L.
  Pindar, 11

GIRDLESTONE, THOMAS
  Anacreon, 13

GLOUTON, MONS.
  Euripides, 25

GODLEY, ALFRED D.
  Aristophanes, 45

GOLD MEDALLIST IN THE CLASSICS
  Aeschylus, 59

GOODWIN, H. D.
  Phoclydes, 1

GOODWIN, W. WATSON
  Aeschylus, 6*

GOSSON, HENRY
  Aesop, 6

GOULD, F. J.
  Plutarch, 10*

GRADUATE
  Euripides, 57;
  Plato, 51, 61

GRADUATE IN HONORS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
  Euripides, 26

GRADUATE OF CAMBRIDGE
  Demosthenes, 22

GRADUATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  Xenophon, 25

GRADUATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DUBLIN
  Sophocles, 22

GRADUATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
  Aristophanes, 16, 19;
  Homer, 43

GRADUATE OF TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN
  Longinus, 7

GRANT, SIR A.
  Aristotle, 41, 46

GRANT, A. R.
  Plato, 18

GRANT, EDWARD
  Plutarch, 9

GRANVILL, HON. G.
  Demosthenes, 3

GRAVES, R.
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 8;
  Xenophon, 16

GREEN, G. B.
  Euripides, 99

GREEN, WILLIAM CHARLES
  Aristophanes, 41;
  Plato, 38;
  Euripides, 102;
  Homer, 89, 101

GREENE, E. B.
  Apollonius, 3;
  Musaeus, 13;
  Pindar, 7

GREENE, W.
  Pindar, 9, 13

GREENWOOD, L. H.
  Aristotle, 77

GRIMESTON, EDWARD
  Polybius, 2

GURNEY, WILLIAM
  Aeschylus, 41, 45

HAILSTONE, HERBERT
  Aeschylus, 63;
  Aristophanes, 42, 44, 52;
  Euripides, 66, 80, 83, 87, 95;
  Herodotus, 23, 27, 29;
  Homer, 95, 98;
  Lucian, 25;
  Plutarch, 30, 33;
  Xenophon, 49

HAINES, C. R.
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 16

HALCOMBE, P. B.
  Euripides, 105

HALL, ARTHUR
  Homer, 1

HALL, J.
  Longinus, 1;
  Pythagoras, 2

HALLARD, JAMES HENRY
  Theocritus, 11

HAMILTON
  Homer, 2*;
  Strabo, 1;
  Xenophon, 2*

HAMMOND, WILLIAM A.
  Aristotle, 70;
  Theophrastus, 1*

HAMPTON
  Polybius, 8

HARDIE, WILLIAM
  Sophocles, 60

HARFORD, J. S.
  Aeschylus, 10

HARMON, A. M.
  Lucian, 27

HARRIS, G. WOODRUFFE
  Herodotus, 35, 37, 38

HARRY, JOSEPH E.
  Sophocles, 12*

HART, SIR ARTHUR
  Theophrastus, 13

HART, J.
  Herodian, 5

HARVEY, FRANKLIN
  Aristotle, 66

HATCH, W. M.
  Aristotle, 49

HATHAWAY, TIMOTHY
  Longinus, 9

HAVELL, H. S.
  Longinus, 16

HAYDON, JOHN H.
  Euripides, 84, 96;
  Homer, 111;
  Sophocles, 61

HAYES, BERNARD JOHN
  Sophocles, 59;
  Euripides, 98, 100, 104;
  Xenophon, 56

HEADLAM, C. E. S.
  Aeschylus, 92

HEADLAM, WALTER
  Aeschylus, 78, 80, 88, 89;
  Meleager, 1

HEALEY, JOHN
  Cebes, 3;
  Epictetus, 2;
  Theophrastus, 1

HEATH, SIR THOMAS
  Aristarchus of Samos, 1

HEMMINGS, H. V.
  Thucydides, 6

HENRISONE, ROBERT
  Aesop, 2

HERBERT, H. W.
  Aeschylus, 1*

HERRICK, H. W.
  Aesop, 10

HERRINGMAN, HENRY
  Callimachus, 1

HERSCHEL, SIR J. F. W.
  Homer, 73

HERVET, GENTIAN
  Xenophon, 1

HICKES, FRANCIS
  Lucian, 4

HICKIE, D. B.
  Longinus, 11;
  Lucian, 13

HICKIE, WILLIAM JOHN
  Aristophanes, 23;
  Euripides, 70, 71, 74;
  Sophocles, 56;
  Xenophon, 51

HICKS, R. D.
  Aristotle, 73

HILL, JOHN
  Theophrastus, 5

HILL, THOMAS
  Aristotle, 4;
  Artemidoris of Ephesus, 2

HOBBES, THOMAS
  Aristotle, 11;
  Homer, 13, 14, 15;
  Thucydides, 2

HODGES, ANTHONY
  Achilles Tatius, 2

HODGES, GEORGE S.
  Aristophanes, 48

HOGARTH, DAVID G.
  Aristophanes, 45

HOLLAND, OTHO
  Demosthenes, 34

HOLLAND, PHILEMON
  Plutarch, 11;
  Xenophon, 4

HOOLE, CHARLES H.
  Aesop, 22;
  Plato, 36

HOPE, WINIFRED AYRES
  Aristophanes, 2*

HOWELL, F.
  Theophrastus, 7

HOWLAND, G.
  Homer, 10*

HOY, T.
  Plutarch, 15;
  Musaeus, 4

HUGHES, J.
  Anacreon, 5;
  Euripides, 3

HULME, ELIZABETH
  Plutarch, 22

HUNTINGFORD, E. W.
  Aristophanes, 58

I., H. B.
  Euripides, 81

IRVING, S. C.
  Anacreon, 1*

IRWIN, SIDNEY THOMAS
  Lucian, 22

J., T. R.
  Plato, 15

JACKSON, JOHN
  Aesop, 26;
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 10

JACOBS, JOSEPH
  Aesop, 43

JAGGER, A.
  Homer, 130

JAMES I, KING
  Isocrates, 12

JAMES, REV. THOMAS
  Aesop, 33

JAYES, SAMUEL H.
  Aristotle, 61

JEBB, SIR RICHARD CLAVERHOUSE
  Aristotle, 79;
  Bacchylides, 1;
  Sophocles, 41, 54;
  Theophrastus, 9

JEFFERY, T. T.
  Demosthenes, 31;
  Thucydides, 19

JENNINGS, J. G.
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 14

JOHNSON, DR.
  Epicurus, 2

JOHNSON, P. R.
  Homer, 7*

JONES, W.
  Isaeus, 1

JOWETT, BENJAMIN
  Aristotle, 56;
  Plato, 31;
  Thucydides, 14

KENDALL, TIMOTHY
  Anthology, 1

KENNEDY, BENJAMIN HALL
  Aristophanes, 31;
  Sophocles, 42

KENNEDY, BROWN HALL
  Aeschylus, 47

KENNEDY, CHARLES RANN
  Demosthenes, 10, 13, 15, 16, 28

KENNEDY, RT. HON. SIR
  William Aristophanes, 70

KENYON, FREDERIC G.
  Aristotle, 63;
  Hyperides, 1

KEPPAIS, R.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

KERR, A.
  Euripides, 3*
  Plato, 13*

KING, C W.
  Plutarch, 34

KNIGHT, HENRY J. CORBETT
  Euripides, 63

L., H. B.
  Euripides, 64

LAMB, DR.
  Aratus of Soli, 1

LANG, ANDREW
  Anthology, 7;
  Homer, 94, 100;
  Theocritus, 10

LANG, E.
  Aeschylus, 38

LANGHORNE, JOHN
  Bion, 3;
  Plutarch, 20

LANGHORNE, WILLIAM
  Plutarch, 20

LANGLEY, SAMUEL
  Homer, 28

LAURENCE, C. E.
  Sophocles, 64

LAURENT, E. P.
  Herodotus, 5;
  Pindar, 15

LEAF, WALTER
  Homer, 100

LEE, FRANCIS
  Pindar, 12

LEE, JOHN R.
  Euripides, 42

LE GRICE, C. P.
  Longus, 4

LELAND, THOMAS
  Demosthenes, 6

LENOX, MRS. CHARLOTTE
  Euripides, 6;
  Sophocles, 9

LEONARD, WILLIAM ELLERY
  Empedocles, 1*

L’ESTRANGE, SIR ROGER
  Aesop, 20

LEVIEN
  Xenophon, 41

LEWERS, W.
  Herodotus, 10

LEWIS, ARTHUR GARDNER
  Homer, 15*

LIARDET
  Aesop, 32

LINDSAY, A. D.
  Plato, 66

LINDSAY, T. M.
  Plato, 14*

LISLE, WILLIAM
  Heliodorus, 4

LITTLEBURY, ISAAC
  Herodotus, 2

LLODY, HUMFRY
  Hippocrates, 2

LLOYD, DAVID
  Plutarch, 13

LLOYD, W. W.
  Pindar, 20

LOCKE, JOHN
  Aesop, 24

LONG, GEORGE
  Epictetus, 10;
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 6;
  Plutarch, 26

LONGWORTH, N.
  Sophocles, 8*

LOVEDAY, T.
  Aristotle, 84

LOWE, PETER
  Hippocrates, 3

LOWE, W. D.
  Longus, 8

LOWTH, BISHOP
  Prodicus, 1

LUCAS, ROBERT
  Homer, 31

LUCK, R.
  Musaeus, 9

M., I. (JAMES MAXWELL?)
  Herodian, 3

M., R.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

M. A. OF OXFORD
  Longinus, 8

MACAULAY, GEORGE CAMPBELL
  Herodotus, 24

MACCABE, W. B.
  Xenophon, 24

MACGREGOR, J. M.
  Demosthenes, 36

MACKAIL, JOHN WILLIAM
  Homer, 123, 127

MACKAY, R. W.
  Plato, 28, 29

MACKENSIE, R. J.
  Euripides, 99

MACNALLY, T.
  Demosthenes, 17

MACPHERSON, JAMES
  Homer, 29

MACRAN, H. S.
  Aristoxenus of Tarentum, 1

MAGINN, WILLIAM
  Homer, 57

MAIR, A. W.
  Hesiod, 7

MANNING
  Dio Cassius, 1

MANNING, F. J.
  Anacreon, 22

MARCHMONT, E. C.
  Thucydides, 22

MARCON, CHARLES ABDY
  Plato, 44

MARGOLIOUTH, D. S.
  Aristotle, 83

MARLOWE, CHRISTOPHER
  Musaeus, 2

MARSHALL, WILLIAM WILKINSON
  Plutarch, 27

MARSHE, T.
  Artimidorus of Ephesus, 1

MARSON, CHARLES L.
  Plato, 68

MAURICE, T.
  Sophocles, 10

MAXWELL, JAMES (?)
  Herodian, 3

MAYBURY, AUGUSTUS CONSTABLE
  Euripides, 72;
  Homer, 106

MAYNE, C.
  Pindar, 28

MCBRIDGE, REV. R. E.
  Euripides, 4*

MCCRINDLE, J. W.
  Arrian, 1, 5, 7;
  Ctesias, 1

MCGREGOR, R. G.
  Anthology, 4

MCMAHAN, J. H.
  Aristotle, 38

M’CORMAC
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 5

MEDWIN, THOMAS
  Aeschylus, 11, 12

MEMBER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
  Euripides, 12, 14;
  Homer, 44;
  Xenophon, 22

MERIVALE, CHARLES
  Homer, 77

MERIVALE, J. H.
  Anthology, 2

MEYER‐WARLOW, T.
  Aeschylus, 57

MILLER, M. N.
  Theocritus, 1*

MILLER, WALTER
  Xenophon, 75

MILLS, J.
  Plato, 11

MILLS, T. R.
  Aeschylus, 73;
  Plato, 55, 56, 57, 62

MILMAN, HENRY HART
  Aeschylus, 31;
  Euripides, 77, 117

MITCHELL, T.
  Aristophanes, 12

MOLYNEUX, HENRY HOWARD
  Aeschylus, 48

MONGAN, ROSCOE
  Aeschylus, 52;
  Euripides, 35, 59, 62, 73;
  Homer, 90, 91, 92;
  Lucian, 20;
  Sophocles, 38, 39, 40;
  Xenophon, 37, 44, 48, 52

MONRO, T.
  Alciphron, 1

MOORE, A.
  Pindar, 14, 19

MOORE, THOMAS
  Anacreon, 11

MORE, PAUL ELMER
  Aeschylus, 5*;
  Plato, 11*

MOREHEAD, R.
  Homer, 42

MORGAN, M.
  Plutarch, 15

MORGAN, M. H.
  Xenophon, 5*

MORGAN, MORRIS, HICKIE
  Xenophon, 61

MORGAN‐BROWN, H.
  Homer, 113

MORICE, FRANCIS DAVIS
  Pindar, 26

MORLAND, DR.
  Demosthenes, 3

MORRELL, REV. T.
  Euripides, 4

MORRICE, JAMES
  Homer, 39

MORRIS, WILLIAM
  Homer, 107

MORSHEAD, EDMUND DOIDGE
  Anderson Aeschylus, 44, 53, 56, 68;
  Sophocles, 46, 62

MOYLE, WALTER
  Lucian, 8

MUMFORD, WILLIAM
  Homer, 1*

MURRAY, GILBERT
  Aristophanes, 61;
  Euripides, 108, 112, 114, 115, 116, 120, 121, 122, 123, 126;
  Sophocles, 71

MURRAY, JOHN
  Herodotus, 15

MUSGRAVE, GEORGE
  Homer, 71

MYERS, ERNEST
  Homer, 100;
  Pindar, 24

NASH, THOMAS
  Euripides, 88, 101

NEAVES, LORD
  Anthology, 6

NEVINS, W. F.
  Euripides, 46

NEWELL, WILLIAM WELLS
  Sophocles, 10*

NEWMAN, F. W.
  Homer, 59

NEWMAN, JOHN
  Xenophon, 5

NICHOLLS, THOMAS
  Thucydides, 1

NICKLIN, J. A.
  Lucian, 26;
  Plato, 54;
  Plutarch, 36

NORGATE, T. S.
  Homer, 64, 68

NORRIS, J.
  Pythagoras, 3;
  Xenophon, 6

NORTH, THOMAS
  Plutarch, 10

NORTHMORE, THOMAS
  Plutarch, 21

NOTHUS
  Simonides of Ceos, 1

NUTTALL, RICHARD
  Isocrates, 8

O’CONNOR, GEORGE
  Euripides, 56

OFFICER OF THE UNITED STATES TREASURY DEPARTMENT
  Hesiod, 1*

OGELSBY, JOHN
  Aesop, 12;
  Homer, 12

OGLE, WILLIAM
  Aristotle, 58, 67

O’HARA, J. M.
  Sappho, 3*

OLD GENTLEMAN OF GRAY’S INN
  Epictetus, 8

OLDHAM, JOHN
  Anacreon, 1, 2

OLDISWORTH
  Homer, 18

ORGER, THOMAS
  Anacreon, 17

OSBORNE, PERCY
  Sappho, 7

OWGAN, HENRY
  Demosthenes, 14;
  Herodotus, 11;
  Thucydides, 15

OWEN, O. F.
  Aeschylus, 35

OXFORD, M. A.
  Euripides, 21, 23

OZEL
  Homer, 18

P., J. P.
  Lucian, 16

PALEY, FREDERICK APTHORP
  Aeschylus, 30, 50, 51;
  Plato, 32, 35;
  Pindar, 23

PALIN, W.
  Aeschylus, 7, 9

PALMER, GEORGE HERBERT
  Homer, 8*, 9*;
  Sophocles, 11*

PARGITER, EDMUND
  Aeschylus, 16

PARKER, SAMUEL
  Homer, 16

PARNELL, THOMAS
  Homer, 19, 21

PARSONS
  Aeschylus, 29

PATON, W. R.
  Aeschylus, 85;
  Anthology, 10

PATRICK, G. T. W.
  Heraclitus of Ephesus, 1*

PEABODY, A. P.
  Plutarch, 2*

PEACHAM, HENRY
  Aesop, 8

PEASE, C. A.
  Homer, 132

PEGG, E. T.
  Plato, 60

PEMBROKE
  Aeschylus, 17

PEPPIN, TALBOT SYDENHAM
  Homer, 115

PERKINS, JOHN
  Aeschylus, 39;
  Herodotus, 26

PERRIN, BERNADOTTE
  Plutarch, 7*, 11*, 42

PETER, WILLIAM
  Aeschylus, 2*;
  Homer, 12*

PETERBOROUGH, EARL OF
  Demosthenes, 3

PETERS, F. H.
  Aeschylus, 51

PHILIPOT, THOMAS
  Aesop, 14

PHILIPS, AMBROSE
  Anacreon, 6;
  Pindar, 2;
  Sappho, 2

PHILIPS, J.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

PHILLIMORE, JOHN S.
  Sophocles, 65

PICARD, ARTHUR
  Demosthenes, 35

PITT, C.
  Callimachus, 4

PLAISTOWE, FRANCIS GIFFORD
  Aeschylus, 69, 71, 73;
  Aristophanes, 47, 50;
  Plato, 52, 55;
  Sophocles, 55

PLATT, A.
  Aeschylus, 81

PLUMPTRE, EDWARD HAYES
  Aeschylus, 37;
  Sophocles, 32

POLWHELE, R.
  Bion, 5;
  Theocritus, 5

POPE, ALEXANDER
  Homer, 19, 23

PORTAL, ANDREW
  Aeschines, 1;
  Demosthenes, 5

POSTE, EDWARD
  Aeschylus, 33, 42;
  Aratus of Soli, 2;
  Plato, 22

POTTER, ROBERT
  Aeschylus, 1;
  Euripides, 8, 11, 117;
  Sophocles, 11

POVEY, JOHN
  Pythagoras, 8

POWELL, GEORGE HERBERT
  Plato, 42

POYNTZ, SIR FRANCIS
  Cebes, 1;
  Plutarch, 3

PRATT, A.
  Aeschylus, 94

PRESTON, W.
  Apollonius, 5

PRICE, H.
  Homer, 24

PRICE, U.
  Pausanias, 1

PRICHARD, A. O.
  Longinus, 18

PRICHARD, C. H.
  Aristophanes, 71;
  Xenophon, 73

PROUT, J. A.
  Aristophanes, 51, 53, 57, 59;
  Demosthenes, 32;
  Euripides, 90;
  Herodotus, 30, 31, 33;
  Lucian, 20;
  Plato, 53, 58;
  Sophocles, 66, 67;
  Thucydides, 18, 23;
  Xenophon, 64

PULTENEY, JOHN
  Longinus, 2

PURVES, JOHN
  Homer, 114

PYE, HENRY JAMES
  Aeschylus, 18;
  Pindar, 6, 13

QUINN, MICHAEL T.
  Aristophanes, 49

R., B.
  Herodotus, 1

RALEIGH, SIR WALTER
  Polybius, 3

RANDOLPHE, THOMAS
  Aristophanes, 1

RASTELL, JOHN
  Lucian, 2

RAWLINSON, GEORGE
  Herodotus, 12

RAWLINSON, SIR HENRY
  Herodotus, 12

RAYNER, W.
  Pythagoras, 6;
  Theophrastus, 6

RENDALL, GERALD H.
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 7

REYNOLDS, RICHARD WILLIAMS
  Euripides, 91;
  Homer, 116

RICE, JAMES
  Euripides, 60;
  Isocrates, 17

RICHARDSON, FANNY L. D.
  Xenophon, 58

RICHARDSON, WILLIAM
  Anacreon, 16

RITTSON, ISAAC
  Homer, 32

ROBERTS, W. RHYS
  Dionysius of Halicarnassus, 2, 3;
  Longinus, 17

ROBINSON, A. MARY
  Euripides, 61

ROBINSON, GEORGE
  Herodotus, 39

ROCHE, J. B.
  Anacreon, 18

RODWELL, ROBERT K.
  Thucydides, 16

ROGERS, BENJAMIN B.
  Aristophanes, 25, 32, 56, 60, 64, 65, 66, 72

ROGERS, J. E. THOROBALD
  Euripides, 53

ROLL, M.
  Aristotle, 12

ROLLESTON, THOMAS W.
  Epictetus, 11

ROOK
  Arrian, 1

ROSS, G. T.
  Aeschylus, 72

ROSS, W. D.
  Aeschylus, 75, 78

ROWE, NICHOLAS
  Pythagoras, 4

RUDD, L. H.
  Aristophanes, 24

RUNDALL, JOHN WILLIAM
  Aristophanes, 54;
  Plutarch, 29

RUNDELL, J. B.
  Aesop, 38

SADLIER, RICHARD
  Isocrates, 1

SANDERSON, EDGAR
  Xenophon, 39, 73, 76

SANDYS, J. E.
  Theophrastus, 12

SANDYS, SIR JOHN
  Pindar, 29

SANFORD, JAMES
  Epictetus, 1;
  Heliodorus, 1;
  Plutarch, 8

SCHOMBERG, GEORGE AUGUSTUS
  Homer, 93

SCOTT, T.
  Cebes, 6

SEATON, R. C.
  Apollonius, 7

SELINA, A LADY
  Epictetus, 7

SEWELL
  Aeschylus, 18

SHARPLEY, H.
  Euripides, 97, 113;
  Sophocles, 69

SHEARS, SIR HENRY
  Polybius, 4

SHELDON, W. D.
  Lucian, 2*

SHELLEY, PERCY BYSSHE
  Euripides, 117;
  Plato, 45

SHERIDAN, THOMAS
  Sophocles, 6

SHILLETO, ARTHUR RICHARD
  Pausanias, 4;
  Plutarch, 34

SHUCKBURGH, EVELYN SHIRLEY
  Polybius, 10

SIDGWICK, ARTHUR
  Aeschylus, 55;
  Aristophanes, 26, 28, 29, 30

SIMCOX, EDWIN W.
  Homer, 70

SIMCOX, G. A.
  Demosthenes, 19

SIMCOX, W. H.
  Demosthenes, 19

SIMMS, C. S.
  Homer, 72, 85

SIMPSON, FRANCIS P.
  Demosthenes, 23

SIXTH FORM BOYS OF BRADFIELD COLLEGE
  Aeschylus, 70, 93;
  Euripides, 111, 124

SLADE, J.
  Musaeus, 11

SMITH
  Euripides, 34;
  Xenophon, 23

SMITH, B. E.
  Epictetus, 2*;
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 2*

SMITH, E.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

SMITH, E. J.
  Lucian, 1*

SMITH, J. A.
  Aeschylus, 75, 78

SMITH, R.
  Achilles Tatius, 3;
  Heliodorus, 7;
  Longus, 5

SMITH, W. R.
  Homer, 3*

SMITH, WALTER
  Aeschylus, 47;
  Longinus, 7

SMITH, WILLIAM
  Thucydides, 4;
  Xenophon, 12

SMYTH, NICHOLAS
  Herodian, 1

SNOW, HERBERT (Also KYNASTON, HERBERT)
  Euripides, 118;
  Theocritus, 8

SOLOMON, J.
  Aeschylus, 86

SOTHEBY, WILLIAM
  Homer, 47, 48, 51

SPEERS, H.
  Plato, 15*

SPELMAN, EDWARD
  Dionysius of Halicarnassus, 1;
  Polybius, 5;
  Xenophon, 11

SPENCE, FERRAND
  Lucian, 7

SPENS, H.
  Plato, 10

SPILLAN D.
  Aeschines, 2;
  Demosthenes, 12;
  Euripides, 32, 33

SPRAT, THOMAS
  Thucydides, 3

SPRENGELL, C. J.
  Hippocrates, 7

SPURDENS, W. T.
  Longinus, 10

SQUIRE, SAM
  Plutarch, 18

STANFORD, C. S.
  Plato, 2*, 16

STANDFAST, WILLIAM D.
  Euripides, 75

STANHOPE, HON. COL.
  Demosthenes, 3

STANHOPE, GEORGE
  Epictetus, 5

STANLEY, THOMAS
  Aelian, 2;
  Anacreon, 3;
  Aristophanes, 3;
  Bion, 1

STAPYLTON, SIR R.
  Musaeus, 3

STARKIE, W. J. M.
  Aristophanes, 63, 67

STAUNTON, J.
  Aeschylus, 42

STAWELL, MISS F. M.
  Plato, 67;
  Xenophon, 75

STEBBING, THOMAS R. R.
  Longinus, 13

STEERS, H.
  Aesop, 31

STEPHENS, H. L.
  Aesop, 12*

STEWART, AUBREY
  Plutarch, 26;
  Xenophon, 54

STEWART, J. A.
  Plato, 63

STICKER, THOMAS
  Diodorus Siculus, 1

STICKNEY, J. H.
  Aesop, 23*

STIRLING
  Musaeus, 8

STOCK, ST. GEORGE
  Aeschylus, 57, 86;
  Euripides, 108

STORER, EDWARD
  Sappho, 8

STORR, F.
  Sophocles, 70

STOUT, J. F.
  Euripides, 107;
  Herodotus, 32;
  Thucydides, 20

STUDENT OF DUBLIN UNIVERSITY
  Demosthenes, 1*

STURTEVANT, SIMON
  Aesop, 4

SUPER, C. W.
  Plutarch, 13*

SWANWICK, ANNA
  Aeschylus, 20, 32

SWAYNE, G. S.
  Aeschylus, 19, 28;
  Herodotus, 14

SYDENHAM, FOWLER
  Plato, 8

SYKES, G. F. H.
  Euripides, 84, 110;
  Thucydides, 17

SYMONS, J.
  Aeschylus, 6

TALBOT, THOMAS
  Epictetus, 12

TASKER, W.
  Pindar, 8

TATE, NAHUM
  Heliodorus, 5

TATHAM, MEABURN TALBOT
  Sophocles, 45

TAYLOR, A. E.
  Aristotle, 1*

TAYLOR, E.
  Musaeus, 15

TAYLOR, HUGH WOODRUFF
  Homer, 14*

TAYLOR, ISAAC
  Herodotus, 6;
  Theophrastus, 8

TAYLOR, R. W.
  Xenophon, 44

TAYLOR, THOMAS
  Aeschylus, 22, 25, 27;
  Pausanias, 2;
  Plato, 13, 14

THEOBALD, LEWIS
  Aristophanes, 4, 5;
  Musaeus, 7;
  Sophocles, 3, 4, 5;
  Plato, 5

THOMAS, RICHARD MOODY
  Euripides, 89, 93;
  Homer, 120, 126

THOMPSON, D’ARCY WENTWORTH
  Aristotle, 82

THOMPSON, GILBERT
  Homer, 35

THOMPSON, JOHN
  Euripides, 100, 104, 110;
  Herodotus, 28;
  Homer, 110;
  Plato, 57

THOMSON, JAMES
  Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 4

THORNLEY, G.
  Longus, 2

THRING, E.
  Aeschylus, 79

THURLOW, LORD
  Anacreon, 15

TICKNELL, THOMAS
  Homer, 20

TOLAND, JOHN
  Diodorus Siculus, 4

TOPHAM
  Demosthenes, 3

TOULMIN, S.
  Isocrates, 15

TOUMY, M.
  Euripides, 10

TOWNSEND, G. FYLER
  Aesop, 36

TOZER, HENRY FANSHAWE
  Strabo, 2

TRAYES, F. E. A.
  Demosthenes, 30

TREMENHEERE, HUGH SEYMOUR
  Pindar, 22

TUCKER, T. G.
  Aeschylus, 61, 74, 90;
  Plutarch, 41

TURNER, D. W.
  Pindar, 19

TUTIN, J. R.
  Sappho, 7

TWINE, THOMAS
  Dionysius the Perigete, 1

TWINING, T.
  Aristotle, 20

TYRRELL, ROBERT Y.
  Aristophanes, 35;
  Euripides, 50

TYTLER, H. W.
  Callimachus, 3

UNDERDONE, THOMAS
  Heliodorus, 2

UNUS MULTORUM
  Menander, 1

URQUHART, D. H.
  Anacreon, 9

USSHER, J.
  Anacreon, 21

VAUGHAN, DAVID JAMES
  Plato, 21;
  Plutarch, 12

VERRALL, ARTHUR WOOLGAR
  Aeschylus, 58, 60, 64, 82;
  Sophocles, 47, 48

VERRALL, MARGARET DE G.
  Pausanias, 5

VINCENT, WILLIAM
  Arrian, 2

WALFORD, E.
  Aristotle, 36

WALKER, E.
  Epictetus, 4

WARREN, R.
  Cebes, 5

WARR, GEORGE C.
  Aeschylus, 72

WASE, CHRISTOPHER
  Sophocles, 2

WATERLOW, SIDNEY
  Euripides, 119

WATSON, CHRISTOPHER
  Polybius, 1, 7

WATSON, J. H.
  Xenophon, 72

WATSON, J. S.
  Xenophon, 31, 32, 33, 34

WATT, A. F.
  Euripides, 110;
  Plato, 64

WAY, ARTHUR SAUNDERS
  Euripides, 92;
  Homer, 97, 102;
  Sophocles, 72;
  Theocritus, 13

WEBSTER, AUGUSTA
  Euripides, 43

WEBSTER, THOMAS
  Aeschylus, 33

WEDDERBURN, ALEXANDER D. O.
  Xenophon, 42

WEIR, CLYDE
  Aeschylus, 7*

WEIR, HARRISON
  Aesop, 37

WELLDON, JAMES E. C.
  Aristotle, 54, 58, 64

WELSTED
  Longinus, 5

WEST, GILBERT
  Euripides, 2, 5;
  Lucian, 10;
  Pindar, 3, 13;
  Plato, 4

WESTON, W. H.
  Plutarch, 12*

WHARTON, HENRY THORNTON
  Sappho, 5

WHEELER, GEORGE B.
  Xenophon, 36, 38

WHEELWRIGHT, C. A.
  Aristophanes, 18;
  Pindar, 16

WHEWELL, W.
  Plato, 23

WHITE, HORACE
  Appian, 4, 5

WHITE, J.
  Aristophanes, 7

WHITE, S.
  Diogenes Laertius, 1

WHITELAW, ROBERT
  Aeschylus, 86;
  Sophocles, 43

WILKINS, GEORGE
  Isocrates, 18

WILKINS, H. M.
  Thucydides, 11

WILKINSON, JOHN
  Aristotle, 3

WILKINSON, SIR J. G.
  Herodotus, 12

WILLAN, LEON
  Aesop, 11

WILLIAMS
  Lucian, 19

WILLIAMS, F. H.
  Aristophanes, 21

WILLIAMS, H.
  Euripides, 51

WILLIAMS, P.
  Homer, 37

WILLIAMS, ROBERT
  Aristotle, 44

WILLINGHAM, W.
  Plutarch, 15

WILLIS
  Anacreon, 1

WILSON, J. CLUNES
  Plutarch, 39;
  Sophocles, 68

WILSON, THOMAS
  Demosthenes, 1

WITT, E. D.
  Homer, 75

WODHULL, MICHAEL
  Euripides, 9, 77, 117

WOGLOG
  Aesop, 1*

WOLFE, JEREMIAH
  Isocrates, 7

WOOD
  Anacreon, 1

WOOD, JAMES GEORGE
  Theophrastus, 10

WOOD, M.
  Aeschylus, 26

WOOD, ROBERT
  Artemidorus, 5

WOODHOUSE, W. J.
  Demosthenes, 33;
  Herodotus, 34;
  Homer, 126

WORSLEY, PHILIP STANHOPE
  Homer, 62, 74

WOTTON, ANTHONY
  Aristotle, 9

WRATISLAW, THEODORE
  Plato, 12

WRIGHT, HENRY SMITH
  Homer, 103

WRIGHT, J. C.
  Homer, 61

WRIGHT, JOSHUA
  Plato, 20

YONGE
  Sophocles, 30

YOUNG, DR.
  Aristophanes, 6, 10

YOUNG, ALEXANDER W.
  Xenophon, 61

YOUNG, SIR GEORGE
  Sophocles, 49, 52

YOUNGE, C. D.
  Diogenes Laertius, 3

YOUNGE, H.
  Anacreon, 12
  Athenaeus, 1

ZIMMERN, ALICE E.
  Thucydides, 24



VITA


Finley Melville Kendall Foster was born in New York City, New York,
January 27, 1892. He was educated in the public schools of New York City,
and at New York University, where he was graduated A.B., in 1913, and
A.M., in 1914. He spent the years 1913‐15, including the Summer School
session of 1914, in graduate study at New York University. During the year
1913‐14 he was A. Ogden Butler Classical Fellow of New York University and
assistant in English. During the years 1914‐16 he was instructor in
English at New York University. During the year 1915‐16 he pursued certain
courses in graduate study in English at Columbia University. The year
1916‐17 he spent in full residence at Columbia University. In 1917 he was
appointed instructor in English at Delaware College; and in March, 1918,
assistant professor of English.





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