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Title: History of the 2/6th (Rifle) Battn.
Author: Wurtzburg, Capt. C. E.
Language: English
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THE HISTORY

OF THE

2/6th (RIFLE) BATTALION "THE KING'S"

(LIVERPOOL REGIMENT)

1914-1919

[Illustration: Photo by Houghton, Margate.

LIEUT.-COL. W. A. L. FLETCHER, D.S.O.]



THE HISTORY

_of the_

2/6th (Rifle) Battalion "The King's"

(Liverpool Regiment)

1914-1919


_BY_
CAPT. C. E. WURTZBURG, M.C.
_Adjutant, Nov. 1916-Nov. 1918_

WITH A FOREWORD BY
MAJOR-GENERAL SIR R. W. R. BARNES, K.C.B., D.S.O.
_Late G.O.C. 57th (West Lancs.) Division_

PRINTED FOR THE REGIMENTAL COMMITTEE

BY
GALE & POLDEN LIMITED
WELLINGTON WORKS, ALDERSHOT
1920

To the Memory

OF

LIEUT.-COL. W. A. L. FLETCHER, D.S.O.

THE OFFICERS

WARRANT OFFICERS

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

AND

RIFLEMEN

WHO LAID DOWN THEIR LIVES

FOR THEIR

COUNTRY

    _Not fearing death, nor shrinking for distress,
    But always resolute in most extremes._



FOREWORD


As I had the honour of commanding the 57th (West Lancashire) Division
during the greater part of the time that the Division was fighting in
France and Flanders in the Great War, included in which Division was
the 2/6th Battalion "The King's" (Liverpool Regiment), I am very glad
that the Author has given me the opportunity of recording in print
my appreciation of the gallant and soldierly conduct of this fine
battalion whilst under my command.

Captain Wurtzburg's work in writing this history of the battalion in
which he served is, I am sure, of great value: to the survivors of
the battalion, as a record of their achievements; to the relatives of
the fallen, as showing that their sacrifice was not in vain; and to
the historians of the future, who will obtain inspiration as to the
realities of war from the experiences of this fighting unit.

The 2/6th "The King's" (Liverpool Regiment) took part with distinction
in all the fighting of the Division from February, 1917, up to the
Armistice. The battalion showed its offensive spirit in the third
battle of Ypres, the breaking of the Drocourt-Quéant switch of the
Hindenburg Line, the battle of Cambrai, and the capture of Lille; and
its steadiness in defence during the long periods of trench warfare,
and especially in the terrible gas bombardment of Armentières.

The battalion was always to be depended upon, and its fine "tone" was,
I think, largely owing to that good Commanding Officer and sportsman,
the late Lieutenant-Colonel W. A. L. Fletcher, who imbued his battalion
with his own personality, and than whom no man in the war more truly
gave his life for his country.

In these present difficult times of peace we are all, I think, inclined
to forget the great lesson of the war--that it is only by "comradeship"
we can overcome these difficulties; and the records of the 2/6th
"The King's" (Liverpool Regiment) should help to remind us that this
battalion gained its name and achieved its object by the equal and
united efforts of its Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers, and Riflemen.

Personally, I feel I cannot end these few lines without expressing my
intense gratitude to all my old comrades of the battalion.

R. W. R. BARNES,
_Major-General_.

  LIVERPOOL,
      _July, 1920_.



PREFACE


Shortly after the Armistice Colonel Fletcher wrote to me asking if I
would undertake to write a history of the battalion. All through the
war I had cherished a vague idea of doing something of the kind, and
with this view had devoted considerable care to the War Diary and to
the preservation of other records. I was, therefore, only too pleased
to accede to my old Commanding Officer's request, though I felt that
I should experience--as, indeed, I have done--some considerable
difficulty in dealing with periods during which I was away from the
battalion. These cover the time from January, 1915, to March, 1916;
the action of the battalion in the third battle of Ypres; and the
major portion of the second battle of Cambrai, for which I have had to
rely on information which has been readily supplied by those who were
present.

The work of compilation has, I must admit, been arduous to a degree,
and an active business life has necessitated the whole work being
written in my evenings and at week-ends. To this fact, I think, the
unevenness of the book may fairly be attributed, written as it had to
be at odd times, bit by bit, and in the varying states of mind in which
I found myself after my day's work at the office. It has, however, been
a labour of love, and if the book does in any way fulfil the objects
for which I mainly wrote it--first, to perpetuate the memory of our
gallant comrades who laid down their lives for their country; and,
secondly, to aid those who survived to recall to their recollection our
days of service, and to hand down to their descendants some written
record of their lives during those great years--I shall feel that my
labours have been amply repaid.

I have received so much assistance in the preparation of the book
that I am afraid it is impossible to make any adequate individual
acknowledgments of my debt. My thanks, however, are particularly due
to the following:--For continuous advice and valuable suggestions, to
C. W. Wilson, J. L. Heyworth, T. Sutherland, and A. L. Reade (whose
diary, placed freely at my disposal, has proved invaluable); for
contributions, to R. Barker, N. L. and W. A. Corkill, W. M. Ewan, E. A.
Garrod, H. M. Griffiths, J. K. Harris, J. L. Henderson, J. B. Herbert,
F. C. Hildred, F. Hooper, V. J. Kneen, G. L. Lane, J. Longridge, R. E.
Noon, J. Payne, W. Penrice, K. V. Stevenson, H. Taggart, C. W. Walter,
and T. A. Williams; for compilation of addresses, to J. McCoy; for map
work, to A. S. Brown and J. T. Hazell; for photographs and drawings
(the reproduction of which, on grounds of economy, had drastically to
be curtailed), to W. T. Barrow, J. Beavan, W. A. Belk, C. S. Freeman,
E. Fryer, T. H. Louden, F. V. Smith, and A. E. Williams; and for
unfailing courtesy and ready assistance, to the War Office and No. 1
Infantry Record Office, Preston.

To my father, E. A. Wurtzburg, I owe a great debt for assistance of
every description, the value of which I cannot adequately express. He
has, further, revised all the proofs.

I should also like to record the help rendered by my publishers,
Messrs. Gale & Polden, Ltd.; throughout the long period that has
elapsed since the work was first commenced their interest and
assistance have never flagged.

In conclusion, I must add that financial responsibility for the
production of the book was generously accepted by a small body of
gentlemen who shall be nameless, but in the absence of whom it is
certain that the work could never have been undertaken.

C. E. W.

  3, LAWN ROAD,
      HAMPSTEAD, N.W. 3.
          _August, 1920_.



CONTENTS


  CHAPTER I                                                           PAGE

  FORMATION OF THE BATTALION--THE
  DEPOT--BLACKPOOL--CANTERBURY--MARGATE--UPSTREET CAMP--CANTERBURY--GORE
  STREET CAMP                                                            1


  CHAPTER II

  PREPARATION FOR OVERSEAS--BOURLEY CAMP--INKERMAN
  BARRACKS, WOKING                                                      17


  CHAPTER III

  OVERSEAS--STRAZEELE--FLEURBAIX--BAC ST. MAUR--RUE DU
  BOIS--RUE MARLE--RUE DORMOIRE                                         30


  CHAPTER IV

  ARMENTIÈRES UP TO GAS ATTACK                                          68


  CHAPTER V

  FROM GAS ATTACK TO ST. HILAIRE--PASSCHENDAELE (FIRST
  TIME)--LOUCHES                                                       126


  CHAPTER VI

  PASSCHENDAELE (SECOND TIME)--ARMENTIÈRES--ST. HILAIRE
  (SECOND TIME)--ARREWAGE--FLEURBAIX                                   148


  CHAPTER VII

  MERVILLE--PERIOD IN RESERVE--GOMMECOURT--FAMPOUX                     172


  CHAPTER VIII

  BATTLE OF CAMBRAI                                                    204


  CHAPTER IX      PAGE

  RUITZ--LILLE--FROYENNES                                              231


  CHAPTER X

  ARMISTICE--LILLE--ARRAS--FINALE                                      252



APPENDICES


  APPENDIX I

  BRIEF NOTES ON SPECIALISTS                                           269


  APPENDIX II

  ROLL OF COMMANDING OFFICERS, SECONDS IN COMMAND, ADJUTANTS,     }
  AND QUARTERMASTERS                                              }
                                                                  }    281
  ROLLS OF COMPANY COMMANDERS (OVERSEAS) AND WARRANT              }
  OFFICERS (OVERSEAS)                                             }


  APPENDIX III

  NOMINAL ROLL AND RECORD OF SERVICE OF ALL OFFICERS,
  WARRANT OFFICERS, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND
  MEN                                                                  286

  INDEX OF PERSONS AND PRINCIPAL PLACES                                361



ILLUSTRATIONS


  LIEUT.-COLONEL W. A. L. FLETCHER, D.S.O.                  _Frontispiece_

                                                             _Facing page_

  BATTALION CAP BADGE, TITLE, AND DISTINGUISHING PATCH                   1

  COLONEL G. A. WILSON, V.D.                                            16

  THE BATTALION--BLACKPOOL, 1914                                        33

  GROUP--CANTERBURY, 1916                                               33

  THE OFFICERS--MARGATE, 1915                                           48

  THE KING'S INSPECTION, REVIEW GROUND, LAFFAN'S PLAIN,
  1916                                                                  65

  THE OFFICERS--WOKING, FEBRUARY, 1917                                  80

  SERGEANTS' MESS--WOKING, FEBRUARY, 1917                               97

  THE BATTALION--WOKING, FEBRUARY, 1917                                104

  RUE DE LILLE, ARMENTIÈRES                                            112

  HOUPLINES ROAD, LOOKING TOWARDS ARMENTIÈRES                          129

  BOCHE FRONT LINE OPPOSITE LEFT SECTOR, HOUPLINES.
  FRELINGHIEN IN BACKGROUND, AND RIVER LYS IN FLOOD                    129

  HOUPLINES--BRITISH AND GERMAN TRENCHES ON LEFT COMPANY'S
  FRONT. RIVER LYS, HOBBS AND EDMEADS FARMS.
  AEROPLANE PHOTO DATED 1/1/18                                         144

  THE PONT BALLOT SALIENT HOUPLINES. BRITISH AND GERMAN
  TRENCH ON RIGHT AND RIGHT CENTRE COMPANIES' FRONT.
  AEROPLANE PHOTO DATED 28/12/17                                       144

  THE TRAIL TO PASSCHENDAELE                                           161

  NEAR LANGEMARCK                                                      161

  LIEUT.-COLONEL HON. N. C. GATHORNE-HARDY, D.S.O.                     176

  GOMMECOURT PARK                                                      193

  GENERAL VIEW OF FAMPOUX                                              193

  MŒUVRES, INCHY AND CANAL DU NORD. OBLIQUE AEROPLANE
  PHOTOGRAPH                                                           208

  QUÉANT                                                               225

  INCHY                                                                225

  PRONVILLE                                                            225

  "CHEERIO"                                                            232

  THE CANAL DU NORD                                                    240

  CANAL DE L'ESCAUT NEAR CAMBRAI                                       240

  THE CAMBRAI--BAPAUME ROAD, NEAR FONTAINE NOTRE DÂME                  240

  APPROACH TO CAMBRAI--RIFLE RANGE IN FOREGROUND.
  PHOTOGRAPHED BY AEROPLANE, 1/10/18                                   248

  HÔTEL DE VILLE, ARRAS                                                257

  LIEUT.-COLONEL C. L. MACDONALD, D.S.O.                               264

  LIEUT.-COLONEL C. C. STAPLEDON                                       264



MAPS


                                                             _Facing page_

  BOUTILLERIE SECTOR                                                    40

  RUE DU BOIS SECTOR                                                    58

  HOUPLINES                                                             72

  PONT BALLOT SALIENT HOUPLINES                                        106

  IN FRONT OF LANGEMARCK                                               140

  HOUTHULST FOREST SECTOR                                              150

  SITE OF RAID, MARCH, 1918                                            170

  GOMMECOURT                                                           188

  FAMPOUX                                                              200

  THE CAPTURE OF RIENCOURT                                             210

  THE ROAD TO CAMBRAI                                                  216

  OPERATIONS 21-23 OCTOBER, 1918, NORTH OF TOURNAI                     242

  HAZEBROUCK, 5A                             }                    _In_
  LENS 11                                    }                    _Pocket_
  CAMBRAI AREA                               }                    _at end_
  LILLE AND TOURNAI                          }

[Illustration: _Battalion Cap Badge, Title, and Distinguishing Patch_]

THE HISTORY
OF THE
2/6th (Rifle) Bn. "THE KING'S"
(Liverpool Regiment)



CHAPTER I

FORMATION OF THE BATTALION--THE
DEPOT--BLACKPOOL--CANTERBURY--MARGATE--UPSTREET CAMP--CANTERBURY--GORE
STREET CAMP


Owing to the rush in the early days of the war, when recruits were many
and records few, the actual date of the formation of the 2/6th (Rifle)
Battalion "The King's" (Liverpool Regiment) is obscure, but from
general evidence we can assume the date to have been September 10th,
1914. Certain it is that recruiting for the Second Line opened on that
date.

Before going further it may be worth setting forth the reasons which
prompted the War Office to create ours and similar battalions.

The Territorial Force was planned for Home Defence, and presumably
it was considered that there would be time and opportunity to train
recruits to replace the casualties and normal wastage of war. The
wholesale volunteering of battalions for Foreign Service altered
the situation completely, and it became necessary to create Reserve
Battalions. Their duty was twofold: first, to replace the battalion
that went abroad and relieve it of its function as a defensive force;
and, secondly, to supply it with the necessary drafts.

Consequently enlisting for the Reserve Battalion included both men
for Home and Foreign Service, and it was not until the following
spring that the success of the Territorial Battalions abroad prompted
the authorities to go one step further, and make the Second Line
Battalions, as they were then called, into Overseas Battalions. To make
this possible, Home Service men were transferred to Home Defence units,
known as Provisional Battalions, while Third Line Depots were created
for training drafts for the battalions on active service.

A clear understanding as to the position is necessary, so that the
reason why we remained in England till February, 1917, may be grasped.
Owing to the call on us for drafts throughout 1915 and early 1916,
our strength was much reduced. The Third Line Depots, however, owing
to the falling off in recruiting, were never strong enough to repair
the wastage of the First Line Battalion already overseas, much less
bring us up to strength. The necessary troops had, therefore, to be
raised from broken-up divisions in England, and it was from one of
these in 1916 that we were to receive the necessary men to complete our
strength. However, the terrible casualties of the Battle of the Somme
diverted to France as reinforcements the men that we were to have had
(some of them found their way to us in 1917 at St. Hilaire), and we
found ourselves with a couple of hundred "Derby men" in their place,
with a promise that we should go overseas as soon as these were trained.

However, to return to September, 1914, the early destinies of the
Reserve Battalion were placed in the hands of Captain J. Howard Temple,
who, with Captain H. K. Wilson and Captain Broad, had been sent back
to the Depot from the original 6th Battalion to organize the new unit,
and they could not have been placed in better hands. During the first
two days about 200 men were enlisted, and the work that devolved on
the head of Captain Temple may be better imagined than described. The
staff at his disposal were Colour-Sergeants Taggart, Firth, Ramsay,
Staff-Sergeant Miller, and Sergeants Blackburn, Cormack, Pender, Lee,
and Leask. In addition some budding officers with O.T.C. experience
helped to fill the gap, and the work of training and organization
proceeded apace, though most of the staff for a considerable period had
to sleep and eat at the Depot.

As the numbers increased the men were formed into eight companies,
and from the ranks men with some experience were picked out and
appointed Acting Lance-Corporals, amongst these being Heyworth, Batson,
Higginbottom, H. Lewis, Hockenhull, Hinde, C. E. Peck, Brunner, Pryce,
and Beeston.

Those early days are amusing to look back upon. We came daily to
the drill-shed for training in every form of costume that can be
imagined--some men in everyday clothes of a clerk, some in shooting
coats and grey trousers, others in khaki bought at their own expense,
and so on. Bowler hats were early discouraged, but except for that
there were no restrictions as to dress.

Little by little khaki began to appear and our regulation black
puttees, though the regimental "walking out" uniforms had for some time
to be used as a temporary arrangement, which made us look a motley
crowd.

"Bugles" were soon formed, and behind these we marched gaily to the Old
Farm Field in Sefton Park for drill, and to Allerton or Arrowe Hall for
field days. In those early irresponsible days life proceeded easily;
the "King's Regulations" and the "Manual of Military Law" were volumes
unknown except to a very few. Keenness and enthusiasm were the keynotes
of our life. Someone murmured the word "inoculation," and forthwith
we trooped in gay crowds to the Medical Officer to undergo that
much-discussed but very innocent operation. The 1/6th Battalion wanted
men to complete their numbers: the draft could have been made up ten
times over. How proudly we marched through the streets of Liverpool!
How we envied the New Army Battalions--the "blue-eyed boys" of the
War Office--who called themselves "Regulars," and on whom everything
seemed to be lavished. Beyond frequent inspections, we got no serious
assistance for two and a half years, and equipment was doled out but
sparingly up till the last moment. The reason of this apparent neglect
was probably sound and in accordance with policy, but it was none the
less heart-breaking at times.

With the beginning of November things began to move apace. Colonel G.
A. Wilson, V.D., was appointed Commanding Officer, and to this fact we
can attribute the smartness and _esprit de corps_ that distinguished
the battalion up till the end of its history. The sound principles on
which Colonel Wilson proceeded to train his battalion produced the best
and most lasting results, and, without wishing in any way to overstep
the mark, one may say that few, if any, battalions were brought from
the early chaotic state to a well-organized and self-contained machine
in such a short time as our own. It was not only, however, in his
scheme of training that Colonel Wilson was so successful, but also in
his choice of officers. He gathered round him officers of many kinds:
not only young and enthusiastic members of School and University
O.T.Cs., but older men also--some without military experience, it is
true, but with that broader outlook and ability that more mature years
bring with them; others, again, who had much military experience to
their credit, and--precious above all--experience of war itself. Of
the latter, Captain W. A. L. Fletcher, D.S.O., Captain C. W. Wilson,
Captain G. L. Fletcher, and Captain G. P. Rogers had all served with
distinction in the Boer War, and, be a war great or be it small, the
knowledge that comes from actual shells and bullets is worth the having.

Captain W. A. L. Fletcher, who came as Adjutant, requires further
mention. One of the greatest oarsmen Oxford ever produced, a great
traveller and big game shot, he represented the very finest type of
Englishman, and his presence with the battalion first as Adjutant and
later as Commanding Officer, was an asset impossible to estimate.
Strong and self-reliant, capable and far-seeing, he had a natural
genius for military science, while for personal gallantry the deed
that won him the D.S.O. when a subaltern in South Africa was more than
sufficient testimony. From the day he joined till the day of his death,
in 1919, his thoughts were centred on the success and the welfare of
the battalion with the most whole-hearted devotion.

The organization of the battalion into eight companies, which
had been roughly sketched out, was now completed, the Commanders
being respectively--Captains Wilson, G. L. Fletcher, W. R.
Clarke, Rogers, Lawrence, A. T. Miller, Herschell, and Wurtzburg.
Colour-Sergeant-Instructor Kelly was appointed regimental
sergeant-major provisionally, and Regimental Sergeant-Major Barnett, of
the 1/6th "The King's" (Liverpool Regiment), was gazetted Lieutenant
and Quartermaster.

Training proceeded on the normal lines of arms drill (with twenty old
D.P. rifles circulated in turn), outposts, guards, musketry (including
miniature range practice), route marching, and physical training. The
foundations were also laid of the scout and signal sections.

On November 4th a draft of 240 men left for Redhill to join the 1/6th
Battalion, and a very fine body of men they were. In addition, four
officers were dispatched--2nd-Lieutenants G. Hughes, T. E. Rome, E. H.
Tyson, and N. B. Ronald. We also received a draft of men in exchange,
composed of those too young or unfit for active service, with a
sprinkling of those unwilling to undertake foreign service obligations.

On November 10th the battalion proceeded to Blackpool with the
remaining reserve units of the Liverpool Regiment, under the command
of Colonel Wilson as Acting Brigadier. Captain Broad remained as O.C.
Depot. The route to Exchange Station was thronged with people to wish
us good-bye and God-speed. The battalion was now entering its first
real stage on the road to active service. We arrived at Blackpool to
find the sun shining brightly, and all were as cheerful as could be.
The men were billeted with subsistence, at a heavy cost, in streets at
North Shore, the officers being quartered at Stretton Private Hotel on
the front.

Military life now assumed a more stern aspect. Early morning parades on
the cold and breezy front, hours of drill on the sands or on the bleak
and wind-swept slopes of Norbreck Hill, were somewhat more severe than
our easy training at Liverpool. However, we meant to get efficient, and
though we worked all day and every day, including Saturday afternoons,
with lectures in the evening, life at Blackpool was happy enough, and
the local attractions all the more alluring by reason of our hard work
and fine condition.

We found ourselves forming, with the Reserve Battalions of the 5th,
7th, and 8th Liverpools, the Reserve Liverpool Infantry Brigade, under
the command of Colonel S. H. Harrison, an old "King's" officer--a
most courteous and kindly Irishman, and a very keen and enthusiastic
soldier. Our Divisional Commander, Brigadier-General F. A. Adam, C.B.,
lately commanding the British brigade at Malta, had been appointed to
command a division earmarked for immediate service in France, but had
most unluckily been injured in an accident while riding. A most capable
and efficient soldier he was, and his misfortune was the good fortune
of our division.

On November 28th we were inspected by our Brigadier at Singleton Hall,
the owner of which kindly lent his grounds for the purpose, and we
were complimented on our bearing and steadiness. This was our first
introduction to the intricacies of the "Manual of Ceremonial."

Christmas leave was our great anxiety at this time, and, after having
been at first disappointed, we were at length allowed to go in batches
to our homes. From Christmas till the move down south we were actively
employed--guards on the pierheads, piquets on the North and South
Shores, drill, and, later, musketry with real rifles at Fleetwood.
The battalion was now organized into four companies in accordance with
"Infantry Training, 1914," which were respectively commanded by Major
H. K. Wilson ("A" Company), Captain C. W. Wilson ("D" Company), Captain
G. L. Fletcher ("C" Company), and Captain Lawrence ("B" Company).
Colour-sergeants were divided into company sergeant-majors and company
quartermaster-sergeants to meet the new organization; and R. Smith
was appointed regimental sergeant-major, Kelly being made company
sergeant-major of "B" Company.

Many more officers meanwhile had joined--so many, in fact, that we were
for a time over strength. Captain Wurtzburg was attached as Acting
Staff Officer at Brigade, and was subsequently gazetted as a Brigade
Major.

On January 12th a draft of 210 men were dispatched to Canterbury, many
N.C.Os. gladly giving up their temporary stripes to join the draft.
That was ever the spirit. Two days later General Sir R. Pole Carew,
Inspector-General, Territorial Force, inspected us on the South Shore
field, and expressed himself much pleased with our steadiness on parade.

Transport, consisting of requisitioned civilian vehicles, had recently
arrived, and Lieutenant L. G. May was appointed as Transport Officer.
His men were not long in appearing clad in riding breeches and spurs,
and lent a slightly military aspect to their antique civilian carts.

Route marching formed a considerable part of the training programme,
and on January 20th the battalion marched to Garstang and back, a
distance of thirty-three and three-quarter miles. It was congratulated
by General Adam on being "so hard and fit that it can perform a long
march in such good order." On February 1st a more ambitious scheme of
marching to Liverpool and back was entered upon. Rifles had arrived
that morning, and were issued on parade, string being provided in lieu
of slings. The first day's march was to Preston, where we billeted for
the night. The next day it rained steadily, and we were glad enough
to reach Ormskirk, where the popular reception was such that the
orderly-room was deluged with requests from people asking if they could
not entertain at any rate one man. The spirit of Ormskirk was, indeed,
conspicuous all along the route, and the arrival on the Exchange flags
the next day produced a rousing reception. After breaking away for
the rest of the day, the battalion set off for the return march the
following day, and completed its 100-mile march in splendid form, only
a few men having become casualties, and these because of ill-fitting
boots. "Rip," the battalion dog, led by the Commanding Officer's groom,
attracted no little attention during the march.

Forms of recreation at Blackpool were manifold, the town going out of
its way to entertain the troops. The Salford Harriers put up a military
run of seven miles, and this was won by Rifleman J. N. C. Davies in 45
minutes 18 seconds.

On February 8th the battalion moved down to Canterbury to replace the
1/6th Battalion, and at Blackpool we left behind many friends and a
high reputation, of which the battalion may well be proud. Captain
Lawrence left us at this point, _anno domini_ having proved too much
even for his dauntless spirit.

At Canterbury we found the band and 170 details of the 1/6th, the
former being a great asset under the able direction of Sergeant
Hodgson. Billets were different from those at Blackpool. We now
had at the most two or three men to a billet, and we also had army
rations. However, the "occupiers" were most kindly and made us
very welcome, though they were apt to resent the rigorous daily
inspection--apparently a novelty to them. Our transport was further
augmented by some quaint vehicles and still quainter mules discarded
by our predecessors, also one or two pack ponies. The mules were
productive of considerable amusement. On March 15th, after this brief
stay in Canterbury--due to the congestion of troops--we marched down
to Margate, and were given billets in Cliftonville. We were the only
battalion of the Division in Margate, the rest of our Brigade being
at Canterbury. That we were popular at Margate, and that Margate was
popular with us, need hardly be added. The behaviour of the battalion
fully justified the continued and generous attention which we received
from the authorities and people of the town.

We had now left the reserve training area of the north, and were in the
zone of possible invasion. The First Line Division had gone overseas
piecemeal, and their Divisional and Brigade Staffs now took charge of
us. Major-General J. B. Forster, C.B., commanded our Division, which
was a unit of the Central Force, commanded by General Sir Ian Hamilton;
while our Brigade was commanded by Brigadier-General A. R. Gilbert,
D.S.O., with Major Fulton, of the Worcesters, as Brigade Major, and
Captain Beazley, of the 1/6th, as Staff Captain.

Soon after our arrival in Margate, Major Temple, to our great regret,
left us, being seconded to the Navy for special service, with the rank
of Commander. He had been the principal pioneer of our battalion, and
had done all that industry and money could do to further our interests.
Though detached from us, we are glad to think he followed our movements
and furthered our schemes by every means in his power.

We now entered on a series of inspections by many Generals, including
Lieutenant-General Hon. Sir Frederick Stopford, Commanding the Second
Army, Central Force, in Dane Park, when he was good enough to say that
we were one of the best units he had seen.

Equipment now began to arrive, and Japanese rifles, which we could
really fire, and we began to feel that we were becoming a fighting,
and not merely an ornamental, battalion. We were responsible for the
Margate defences, and alarms, practice or otherwise, occurred at
most inconvenient moments with most unpleasant frequency. Many are
the stories connected with these alarms, but lack of space prevents
their narration. Easter Monday morning, in particular, saw us marching
hurriedly to Broadstairs at 5.30 a.m., where the remainder of the
Brigade met us from Canterbury. This was believed to have been a
genuine alarm, but it ended in nothing. Zeppelins were the only form of
enemy we saw, and they dropped no bombs on Margate while we were there.

Musketry parties were now busy at Sandwich, where they were billeted
in the Golf Club-house; and a Vickers' machine-gun was received, which
enabled Lieutenant Bowring to teach his most efficient section with
something more satisfying than a wooden dummy.

In the middle of April those who had not signed the form in which the
obligation to serve overseas was accepted were separated, and formed,
with others, the 43rd Provisional Battalion for Home Defence. This left
us only 700 strong, but the defence of Margate and the entrenching in
connection with it passed from our hands, and left us more time for
training. It may be worth recalling that some of the men who elected to
join a Home Service Battalion actually proceeded overseas, by reason of
the Military Service Act, before we did.

On May 17th the Third Line Depots were formed, and a nucleus of
officers and N.C.Os. were dispatched to Weeton Camp, near Blackpool, to
organize our new unit. Amongst the former were Captain G. L. Fletcher
to command and Captain A. T. Miller to act as Adjutant. Captain Clarke
also left us to take command of the Depot at Liverpool. Captain Moon
soon after was appointed to command "B" Company, vacated by Captain
Miller, which had been temporarily commanded by Lieutenant R. L.
Dobell, who was attached to us for a short time. "C" Company was given
to Captain Parker on Captain G. L. Fletcher's departure.

About this time the Central Force was amalgamated with the Eastern
Command, and we came under the orders of that Command for operations.
General C. L. Woollcombe, C.B., lost little time in coming to inspect
us, and confirmed the good reports already made by inspecting officers.

Two serious changes now occurred in our Battalion Headquarters Staff.
Lieutenant Barnett, while acting as umpire at a big field day, was
knocked down and sustained a fracture of the skull. He was away for
some time, returning eventually as Captain and Adjutant; his place
as Quartermaster, after it had been held as a temporary measure by
Lieutenant Kelk, being taken by Sutherland, till then orderly-room
sergeant, who more than filled the post he took over. In addition,
Colonel Wilson on June 20th resigned command owing to pressure of
business which demanded his personal attention. As has already been
said, he had laid the best foundations that a battalion could wish for.
A keen "rifleman" himself, he had never been content with anything but
the best. If he worked us hard, if he was stern and exacting, he always
himself set the example, and the spirit of leadership with which he
inspired Officers and N.C.Os. remained with the battalion till its last
days.

Training at Margate was carried out with zeal and energy of no
mean order. As a rule the battalion formed up in companies in line
opposite Lancaster House, to the strains of the band. After that the
programme varied between route marches round Thanet, Minster and Sarre
generally figuring somewhere on the route; field days on Thanet Golf
Course; battalion drill--always a prominent and important feature in
our training; bayonet fighting, under Sergeant Bowling; bombing with
tiny bags filled with sand; or general training in a field at the
North Foreland end of Margate. A cold ration was usually taken, and
the battalion returned about 3 p.m., and, after marching past the
Commanding Officer by companies, dismissed for the day, and found its
way severally to "Bobbie's" or other popular cafés for tea. Night
operations occurred weekly, and resulted in many amusing contretemps.

Church parades were carried out with full military ceremonial, and the
sight of the battalion marching back on a gorgeous Sunday morning, with
the band playing at its head, was a sight to be remembered, and evoked
the unstinted admiration of the people and visitors of Margate. The
parade ended with "Officers, take post," after which the companies
moved off under their senior warrant officer or N.C.O.

Upstreet Camp, some miles along the Canterbury Road, was in the
meantime being prepared, and our advanced party was busy putting up
tents and other necessities.

If we had been worked hard at Margate, we had certainly had a good
time. Sea bathing, concerts, Sunday afternoons on the promenade
with our band playing in the Oval, and other pleasurable forms of
recreation abounded. Mention must also be made of two most successful
singing competitions organized under the auspices of the Mayor and
Corporation, for which the proprietors of the Winter Gardens very
generously provided their magnificent hall free of charge. Some 3,000
people were present, and the success of these concerts, not only for
the prizewinners, but for all present, was undoubted. The reports in
the local press are eloquent on the subject, as they were, in fact, on
the "unfailing kindness, courtesy, and general behaviour" of the 2/6th
(Rifle) Battalion (as we were now styled) of "The King's" (Liverpool
Regiment).

On July 13th we marched to Upstreet Camp, set close to the Thanet
Marshes, a pleasant spot in summer, but a quagmire in the autumn, as we
found out later to our cost.

While in camp at Upstreet, except for occasional field operations
towards Reculvers and one memorable Brigade field day at Whitstable,
the battalion was engaged practically continuously digging trenches,
wiring, and revetting in the vicinity of Upstreet and St. Nicholas.
The effect of the three months' hard manual labour on the physique
of the battalion was very marked, the men growing and broadening out
almost beyond recognition. There was considerable movement of men at
this period. On August 3rd Captain Wilson conducted 96 men overseas,
and on August 6th 112 men were received from the Third Line. Officers
were also proceeding at intervals overseas, and others recruiting
from hospital were also attached to us for varying periods of time. In
November our establishment was reduced to twenty-three officers, and
all the remainder were dispatched to the Third Line.

On August 8th Major W. A. L. Fletcher, D.S.O., was gazetted
Lieutenant-Colonel, and took over the command of the battalion. Captain
Gilling had meanwhile assumed command of "A" Company.

By October 10th we were more than pleased to vacate our camp, where we
were wellnigh drowned and frozen, and moved to billets at Canterbury
once more. Our move was made more dignified by the presence of
regulation transport, which had been received at Upstreet Camp, in
place of our miscellaneous collection of almost prehistoric civilian
vehicles.

Headquarters at Canterbury were at Dagmar House in Dane John, the men
being billeted in all the neighbouring streets, Wincheap, York, Oxford,
Guildford, and Martyrsfield Roads being the chief. A number of mules
were received, of varying dispositions, the most notorious rejoicing in
the name of "Lusitania."

The end of 1915 found us plodding steadily on with the now somewhat
monotonous round of general training, the only excitement being an
occasional Zeppelin scare or a more serious "stand to." The latter,
during the earlier days of 1916, kept us for nearly a week in a state
of readiness to move at half an hour's notice. Transport vehicles were
kept fully loaded, and meals were served from field kitchens, while
trains stood waiting with steam up in the station.

During the first three months of 1916 fourteen drafts of "Derby"
recruits were received, numbering in all 319 men. Some of these men
we thought were rather old at first, but they turned out splendidly.
These drafts were distributed into squads under specially selected
instructors, whence they were drafted as they became qualified into
the companies to which they had been posted. The care and attention
lavished on these men were productive of excellent results, as the
records of many of them can testify. A Brigade N.C.Os.' class was
also held during this period at Old Park, and was conducted by Captain
Barnett.

Training, owing to the weather, was apt to be confined to the "vicinity
of billets" or the Presbyterian Hall. Dane John was generally tenanted
by signallers or other specialists. We also had occasional field
days at Bridge, and withheld stoutly the attacking Germans who had
invariably landed at St. Margaret's Bay.

In February our first Lewis guns were received, and the number went
on increasing from that time till about the spring of 1918, when we
reached a total of twenty-eight. Rumours of the separation of machine
gunners into a new machine gun corps had been for some time afloat,
and on May 2nd twenty-two men of the battalion were discharged and
re-enlisted in the Machine Gun Corps. The quick promotion which
practically all these obtained is a proof of the good tone of the
battalion and of the magnificent instruction which the men had received
under Lieutenant Bowring. A draft of 150 men had been sent just prior
to this to the Third Line _en route_ for overseas, but the majority
reappeared shortly after. A party, under Captain Gilling, was detached
at Birchington for some time, working on the defences, and a small
observation post for hostile aircraft was stationed at Wootton, and a
party was also kept at the R.F.C. ground, Bekesbourne.

On April 19th the battalion was inspected at Sturry by General Right
Hon. Sir Arthur Paget, who expressed himself favourably impressed; and
on May 8th the Commanding Officer went to France for a tour in the
line, bringing back many valuable hints. He spent his time in front of
Gommecourt, a spot that was to be very familiar to us later on.

Musketry was now resumed at Sandwich in intensely hot weather, the
march--some sixteen miles--proving too much for some of the men who had
not experienced that training in march discipline with which the older
members of the battalion were acquainted. The balance of the battalion
not so employed were inspected, with the rest of the 57th Division (we
had ceased to be the 2/1st West Lancashire Division and 2/1st Liverpool
Infantry Brigade, the latter now being designated the 171st Infantry
Brigade), at Westbere by Sir John French, who had recently been
appointed Commander-in-Chief Home Forces. He endeavoured to explain
our continued presence in England, which was in no way connected with
inefficiency, but was due to the lack at the moment of any adequate
force of trained troops for Home Defence.

The continued rumours of early foreign service, however, still buoyed
us up, in spite of their failure to materialize, and it speaks wonders
for the battalion that they endured two and a half years of training in
England, with every kind of alteration in policy, without losing to any
extent their cheerfulness and their keenness.

Canterbury, with its church parades in the Cathedral, with its general
training at the Parsonage Farm, its company training and battalion
operations, its company concerts and its comfortable billets, was now
about to join Blackpool and Margate among the memories of the past.

Advanced parties were now at Gore Street, where a joint camp was being
constructed for the 2/5th K.L.R. and ourselves. Excellently situated on
a branch from the main road between Monkton and Minster, it was only
some four miles from our old camp at Upstreet. Standing, however, on
higher ground, it looked over the Thanet Marshes, and so escaped the
disadvantages of damp and mist which belong to such low-lying ground.
The tents were also particularly good. The only disadvantage was a lack
of space, the area, limited as it was, being further cramped by the
presence of the Wessex Field Ambulance, a pleasant party though they
were.

Digging operations now recommenced, in addition to the usual round of
general and specialist training. A visit by Sir Francis Howard with an
Ordnance inspector who murmured of "foreign service" filled us with the
highest hopes. Our equipment was condemned, and likewise our rifles,
which had replaced the Japanese weapons some months previously.
Apparently we were to have everything we wanted, proceed to Aldershot
for final training, and then to France. Before we left Gore Street some
very successful sports were organized in conjunction with the 2/5th
K.L.R. and many amusing sideshows were added. A practice night alarm
for hostile aircraft caused some merriment when Captain Moon was seen
hurrying to report attired in a service cap, nightshirt, British warm,
and a pair of gum-boots. One memorable field day must be recorded,
which was known for long after as the Battle of Pluck's Gutter, the
scene of operations.

The command of "C" Company passed to Captain Eccles about this time. He
had relieved Lieutenant May as Transport Officer when the latter joined
the Home Service unit, but had handed over this duty shortly after to
Lieutenant Hutchinson.

On July 15th, after vast preparations--we had made no considerable
move for eighteen months--we entrained at Canterbury, after a long and
tiring march, for Aldershot, getting a magnificent send off from our
Canterbury friends, not to mention ample supplies of fruit from the
manager of the Queen's Hotel, Margate.

With what high hopes we set off on our journey! Now at last we felt
that the final stage in our education had been reached. Aldershot and
Salisbury Plain were the universities of the military student, whence
he was launched into the vortex of war complete with all the necessary
knowledge. That we had now at last been admitted to this select academy
must mean that our days in England were strictly numbered. Alas for our
hopes!

[Illustration: Photo by Houghton, Margate.

COL. G. A. WILSON, V.D.]



CHAPTER II

PREPARATION FOR OVERSEAS--BOURLEY CAMP--INKERMAN BARRACKS, WOKING


On arrival at Aldershot we detrained at the military siding and marched
off over the switchback road across the edge of Laffan's Plain to
Bourley Bottom, some two miles from the town in the direction of Fleet.
The camp, which was on the site of one of the usual summer camping
grounds, was from the picturesque point of view delightfully situated.
It lay in the centre of a ring of low, wooded hills which sheltered
it from all wind, and the white tents stood out in pleasing contrast
to the surrounding browns and greens of the background. As a place of
habitation, however, it could not compare with Gore Street; the canvas
was poor, and the general arrangements by no means so modern. Moreover,
by its very situation the camp was damp, and in continued bad weather
would probably have proved unhealthy. However, we had come there with
a purpose--viz., to complete as quickly as possible our military
knowledge--and we were in no mood to cavil at details.

From the moment of our arrival we realized that every moment would
be precious. A musketry course had to be fired, and the outline of a
tactical training programme had already been issued. Musketry commenced
on July 17th, two days after arrival, and we fired on alternate days
on Cæsar's Camp ranges, hardly a mile away, and on Ash ranges, a
good six miles away. As firing was always to commence at 7 a.m. when
not prevented by an early morning mist, as frequently happened, we
used to rise very early for Ash ranges, and the "butt party" still
earlier. Away we would tramp over the rough road to Aldershot, through
the silent streets, past the many barracks when "Reveillé" was just
sounding, and so out of the town again towards the Fox Hills and our
destination at Ash ranges.

Throughout the musketry course the weather was brilliant, but the heat
tremendous. Home we would come after a cold ration for lunch, and
sing ourselves hoarse as we marched through Aldershot. Many were the
comments passed on our singing powers, and truly the men sang well, and
marched even better. Our musketry also proved good, and we came out top
of our Brigade and second in the Division.

On August 6th Lieutenant-Colonel H. D. Spencely, T.D., Honorary Colonel
of the battalion, came and paid us a visit, to our great delight, and
we think that he was more than satisfied with what he saw.

We were now embarked on a series of the field operations of which
brigade training mainly consists. Each day saw us marching off towards
the Long Valley, for ever famous in military annals, there to practise
attack formations, advance and rear guards, outposts, fire control,
and so forth. Some days we joined battle with the other battalions of
the Brigade, one against three or two against two. Norris and Eelmoor
Bridges frequently figured somewhere in the scheme of operations, or,
again, Cocked Hat Wood or Outridden Copse. Many of the battles were of
the most determined description, and casualties were caused, if not
by enemy action, at any rate by order of the supervising staff, which
consisted frequently of several distinguished soldiers, including
General Sir Archibald Hunter, G.O.C.-in-C. Aldershot Command, and Sir
Francis Howard, Inspector-General of Troops for overseas. The work was
hard and the conditions variable. Sometimes the dust stirred up seemed
almost too choking to be endured; at other times one waded through mud
and slush well over the boots, to the great detriment of black puttees.
Sandy Lane, the euphemistic name for the track to our camp, was
notorious for its depth of mud, which the constant passing of vehicles
churned up into a paste of most vile consistency.

Many were the amusing incidents of these training days, but one cannot
detail them here. Still, they helped us to carry through the long days
of strenuous physical exercise.

A pleasant respite, however, was ahead. On August 19th the whole
battalion, less a small party left to guard the camp, proceeded to
Liverpool for its "last leave," reassembling on August 24th on St.
George's Plateau for the return. Great was the enthusiasm that welcomed
the battalion and again sent it on its way.

On August 18th fifteen men, too young for foreign service, had been
dispatched to the 5th Territorial Force Reserve Battalion K.L.R. at
Oswestry, and on August 22nd we said good-bye to nine more machine
gunners who were transferred to Grantham. Moreover, a light trench
mortar battery was in course of formation in each brigade, and to this
we contributed Lieutenant H. E. Barrow to command, 2nd-Lieutenant D. G.
Leonard, and twenty-three men. The battery proceeded on September 3rd
to Pirbright, returning again after some range practice on September
10th, when they occupied a corner of our camp. Later in September they
finally left us for Pirbright, and we saw them no more till we met in
the trenches in France.

Another important part of our training took place in the trenches
constructed in the vicinity of the Foresters Public-House (or "P.H.,"
as the maps described it, and as, in fact, it was generally called),
which was situated about two miles north of our camp on the far side
of the race-course. Here an elaborate set of trenches had been dug,
and these the battalions occupied in turn for varying periods not
exceeding thirty-six hours, relieving each other in the approved
fashion, and carrying on in the trenches as far as possible as they
would do in France. An enemy was generally provided in the enemy front
line opposite, and silent raids occurred at uncertain intervals. Major
Geddes, the Brigade Major, and 2nd-Lieutenant Bevir, the Brigade
Bombing Officer, even worked a gas attack on us; but as the sentry
thought it was only smoke from an adjacent rubbish destructor the
efforts of our enthusiastic staff fell somewhat flat. That these
practices were valuable no one can doubt; added to which we learnt
something of night-working parties, ration carrying, patrolling, laying
of telephones, S.O.S. alarms, and so on; but it must be admitted that
nights in the Foresters P.H. Trenches were vastly more uncomfortable
than those in any trench sector we held in France in similar weather.
Apart from mere practice in trench routine, we carried out some
elaborate attacks across these trenches in the "wave" method then
in vogue, such an operation on September 19th being performed under
the eye of Sir John French, who made some flattering comments on the
Division.

Three days before this we had a practice alarm, followed by a
concentration of the whole Division in the Long Valley, where our
Divisional Commander, Major-General Forster, carried out his final
inspection before giving up command. On September 23rd the Division
had the honour of being inspected by His Majesty the King. It was a
brilliant day, and the scene was one that will long live in the memory
of those who took part in it. The Division was drawn up in review order
on the Review Ground facing the Pavilion, and after a Royal Salute the
King rode round the ranks. It was a pretty severe test of discipline
and steadiness, but, as a regular officer was heard to remark in the
Aldershot Club that evening, "the men were magnificent, and the march
past first rate. You would have thought it was a regular division."
The battalion gained great credit for their share in the march past,
though the pace set by the band was almost too quick even for riflemen.
After this Commanding Officers were introduced to His Majesty, and we
set off for home, feeling more than satisfied with our turn out, our
discipline, and our drill.

We had all this while been confident of our early departure for
overseas. We had had our last leave and been inspected by the King, we
had lent our rifles to a draft of men from the Home Counties Division
to enable them to complete their musketry before joining us, and we
had all been recently inoculated and vaccinated. How near we were
then to going abroad only those in the secret know, but gradually the
suspicion spread that our time had not yet come, and it proved only
too true. Our draft, or what we called "our draft," proceeded overseas
direct, and we learned to our dismay that we were shortly to proceed to
Woking for winter quarters. It was a terrible disappointment. Everyone
had felt that at last the promised day was come, and here were our
hopes dashed to the ground once more. The battalion behaved splendidly,
however, and only those who knew the men intimately realized how severe
was the blow. For two long years had we been training, and now, when
our hopes were all but realized, we found ourselves condemned once more
to the old grind and the old routine for an indefinite period. Men were
almost ashamed to go on leave and face the heartless gibes of those who
did not know the facts; but they settled down again to the old tasks
with grim determination, feeling that one day they would really be
allowed to go, and that the more efficient they made themselves, and
the quicker they trained the promised drafts of raw men, the sooner
would their ambition be realized.

Our stay at Aldershot, although it had not proved the final prelude
to our move overseas, had not been without its value. During the
long period of training in the different stations where we had been
quartered work had to a certain extent suffered either from lack of
facilities or from the special attention that had to be paid to drafts,
and also from the changes necessitated by the latters' departure.
Consequently an undue proportion of time had perforce been devoted to
certain special aspects of training, such as physical drill, rifle
exercises, bombing, and so forth; little scope being provided, except
occasionally, for the more practical side of training of which field
operations mainly consist. During the period at Aldershot we had for
the first time worked daily not only as a self-contained unit with all
the specialists cooperating according to their particular functions,
but also as part of an active field force, represented by not only the
whole Brigade, but by the various arms of the service, which nominally
work in unison during active operations. The experience gained was
therefore very valuable, and the instruction in trench routine gave
every man some inkling, at any rate, of what the real life in the line
was like.

On September 27th the battalion set off on a fine, sunny day to march
to Woking, a halt being made about 12.30 p.m. in a pleasant wood for
dinner, which had been cooking in field kitchens as we marched along.
We arrived at our destination in comfortable time for tea. Inkerman
Barracks in normal times must be a very pleasant spot. They stand well
on high ground above Woking and close to the hamlet of St. John's, and
are well laid out. Unfortunately, owing to a lack of space we shared
these barracks with the 2/5th K.L.R., and in addition a squadron of
Bedfordshire Yeomanry and a company of A.S.C. were also accommodated
in the outbuildings. We had half the barracks, together with the
guard-room and the orderly-room at the entrance to the barrack square,
while the officers had the officers' quarters. The 2/5th K.L.R. had the
other half of the barracks and most of the married quarters for their
officers. We had also one or two of these small cottages. The mess we
shared jointly.

For training there was a large field next the barracks, and some rough
ground behind, where final assault courses were constructed. There
were several pieces of common land in the near vicinity, and some four
miles away was the splendid piece of country known as Chobham Common.
On the whole, therefore, we were well off; while the barrack square was
admirably suited for close order drill, there being just room to move a
whole battalion _en masse_.

The barracks were very dirty when we took them over, but before long
they became spotless under the keen eye of the Commanding Officer at
his weekly inspection. The men were accommodated in large dormitories,
the majority on beds; and though the rooms were apt to be somewhat
cold and draughty, there was no real cause of complaint. There was a
Y.M.C.A. hut in the barrack square, and another one nearer Woking.

The morning after our arrival the Commanding Officer read out the
message from His Majesty the King, in which he expressed himself most
satisfied with the appearance of the Division at the review, and his
confidence that when the time came the men would fight as Lancashire
men always fought. He added, however, that he would reserve his final
message until definite orders were received to proceed overseas. On
October 3rd General Broadwood inspected the battalion in the barrack
square, and all officers were introduced to him. We now commenced a
further General Musketry Course at Pirbright Ranges, the weather being
on the whole good, though intensely cold.

The promised drafts now began to arrive, and between October 10th
and 23rd 229 men arrived, bringing the strength of the battalion up
to 1,116 men. On their first arrival the new-comers created no very
favourable impression, but by the time that we proceeded overseas
they had grown and broadened out almost beyond recognition. After
considerable discussion all the drafts of the Division were sent to
Training Reserve Battalions at Aldershot for six weeks--an arrangement
which certainly had some points in its favour, but in the light of
experience probably more against it.

On October 6th the Signal Section competed in an efficiency
competition, open to all battalions in the Aldershot Command, and
finished a good winner over a large number of competitors. This was
the prelude to further victories in similar competitions won by the
battalion, to which we shall refer later.

On October 14th an elaborate mine explosion took place at Frith Hill
under the most realistic conditions, including an occupation of the
crater by a large force from the adjoining model trench system. The
proceedings were admirably stage-managed, and were witnessed by a
most imposing display of General and other Officers from all parts
of the country. The detonation was expected to be such that even as
far as Woking all windows had to be left open for fear of damage from
concussion. However, so heavy was the charge, and apparently so light
the soil, that, so far from anything very spectacular occurring, a
small quantity of earth was flung almost silently into the air, and the
greater portion of it fell back into the place from which it had been
dislodged. In spite of this misfortune, the occupation party dashed
forward, and, regardless of the heavy fire from the enemy trenches,
consolidated the position and constructed wire entanglements with great
vigour and determination.

As another form of instruction suitable for men about to proceed
overseas, we commenced, under R.E. supervision, deep dug-outs on
Dawney's Hill. These were worked in the first instance by the 2/5th
K.L.R. and ourselves in continuous forty-eight hour shifts. Other men
were meantime engaged in such exercises as construction and capture
of a strong post, wiring and revetting, throwing live bombs (each man
throwing one by day and one by night), and instruction in gas-helmet
drill, including the standard tests; and in addition there was the
usual rapid loading, bayonet fighting, and drill.

On November 3rd Captain Barnett was examined by a Medical Board and
found to be permanently disabled by the injury to his head which
had been caused by the accident previously mentioned. He proceeded,
accordingly, the next day on leave, pending the _Gazette_ notifying the
relinquishment of his commission; and Captain Wurtzburg took over his
duties, being subsequently gazetted Adjutant.

To any battalion, however well trained, Captain Barnett, by reason of
his vast experience of every side of military training, would have
been invaluable. It is therefore quite impossible to over-estimate the
benefit that a young battalion like ours derived from his knowledge and
efficiency. The Commanding Officer had just previously left us for a
few weeks to undergo a slight surgical operation, and the Command had
devolved on Major C. W. Wilson, in the absence of Major H. K. Wilson,
who was attending the Senior Officers' Course at Aldershot.

On November 15th a draft of four officers--Lieutenant Ormrod,
2nd-Lieutenants McCormick, E. E. Paul, and Moseley--from the 6th
Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers arrived, and their arrival was most
timely. We were being absolutely swamped with courses of every possible
description; in addition, we had to maintain and relieve regularly
an officer with the deep dug-out party; there were numerous courts
of inquiry and courts-martial on foot, and the result, of course,
was that the shortage of officers had become acute. Moreover, to
stimulate efficiency, the Divisional Commander had devised four
competitions--route marching by a battalion; bayonet fighting and
physical training, each by a company; and wiring by a platoon.
Preliminary Brigade competitions were held, and we were selected to
compete in the Division for the first three events.

On November 21st the Division organized a concentration march and
billeting scheme for our Brigade, involving a march of some eight
miles to Chertsey. Coming as this did only two days before the final
of the Divisional Route Marching Competition it was rather a severe
handicap. However, on November 24th the whole battalion (except about
half a dozen men required to guard our quarters), accompanied by a full
regimental transport, set off on a fifteen mile march, which was to be
done in five hours. Marks were given for accurate timing in passing the
starting and finishing posts, for appearance of the men at the end of
the march, for march discipline, and for correct contents of vehicles
and packs. Hidden judges watched us at different parts of the march;
others checked our halts, ten minutes every hour; and the contents
of one platoon's packs were duly examined. The battalion marched
magnificently, and although a cooker horse dropped a shoe and had to
be shod by the cold shoer and regain the column without trotting, and
although during the latter part of the march the road was inches deep
in sand along a steep gradient, the last vehicle was clear of the
finishing point with five seconds to spare. Our casualties were only
two or three men, and but for the concentration march would never have
occurred. After some discussion over the case of another battalion,
who, contrary to the rules of the competition, had marched all the way
headed by a band who did not wear packs, we were declared the winners,
which we should have been in any case had we not forfeited a large
number of points. We lost these because one man had no boot-laces in
his pack; he remembered afterwards that they were in his pocket after
all; and another man was also apparently deficient of some small
article of kit. However, the battalion had every reason to be proud
of itself, and the result certainly served to remind the Divisional
Headquarters that other battalions existed besides the two Brigades
in their close vicinity at Blackdown. "B" Company trained for the
bayonet fighting, and, under Captain Moon, put up a display on November
29th, before the Chief Instructor of the London District School, which
astonished him, and in due course they were declared the winners. "D"
Company, under Captain Parker, also produced a splendid exhibition
of physical training, and were proclaimed joint winners with the
company of another battalion. In these last two competitions Company
Sergeant-Major-Instructor McLelland, A.G.S., deserved the very greatest
credit; he had been indefatigable in his exertions, and his methods
proved most efficient.

For the continued successes of the battalion we were awarded a richly
deserved twenty-four hours off parade.

All this time the specialists were receiving what may be described
as intensive training. Apart from the ordinary work under their own
instructors, they attended lectures and demonstrations of various
descriptions with the object of increasing their efficiency and
familiarizing them with the conditions under which they would have to
work. The snipers in particular received great attention, and were not
infrequently proceeding to Aldershot in connection with training. A
splendid model miniature range was also constructed by them in one of
the huts in the barrack square.

On December 11th Captain Moon left us to join the Portuguese
Expeditionary Force as an interpreter; and on Christmas Eve Major C.
W. Wilson proceeded overseas for a tour of instruction in the Ypres
Salient. On Boxing Day the battalion proceeded on a final three days'
last leave, receiving an even warmer welcome and send-off than before
from the good people of Liverpool, who realized that the departure of
the battalion for the front was imminent at last.

From Christmas till our actual departure was a period of intense
activity. Travelling Medical Boards came and examined our "Category
men," who were dispatched to various units according to their medical
fitness; others were earmarked, by reason of special knowledge, for
munition works, and so forth. Nominal rolls had to be completed
and checked, casualty forms filled up for every man, the N.C.O.
establishment completed, and a hundred other items of detail to be
foreseen and provided for.

On February 4th we had a further welcome addition of
officers--2nd-Lieutenants Royle, Goulding, Evans, and Rothwell, all of
whom had seen considerable active service with the 1/6th K.L.R., and
Lieutenant Parkinson and 2nd-Lieutenants Dugdale and Rule, from the
"King's Own." Of the latter, Lieutenant Parkinson was a fully qualified
R.F.C. pilot resting after a "crash."

On February 17th Major Turner, now convalescent after a serious wound
received while serving with the 1/6th K.L.R., arrived as O. i/c
Details, and began to take stock of everything; and on January 22nd
the battalion appeared for the first time in khaki puttees, a sure
sign that a real move overseas was intended. All the animals were
examined and "duds" replaced, and all vehicles completed in all items
of equipment. The distinguishing patch first approved at Aldershot, and
originally consisting of a small rectangle of black and green cloth in
two equal triangular sections (later divided by a thin red strip), was
now abolished, and we found our new mark was a green diamond worn on
each sleeve between the elbow and the shoulder.

In spite of our manifold activities, we managed to have some really
good entertainments, to which our newly formed orchestra, Rifleman
Kessen, the conjurer, and another rifleman, a superb banjo artiste
(unfortunately, in a low medical category), added talent of the highest
order; and the Divisional Band,--the old 6th it was--which had been
selected from all the bands to accompany the Division overseas, came
from time to time to give us the benefit of their music.

On February 3rd, 1917, we were inspected at Woking by H.R.H. the Duke
of Connaught, who in a short speech wished us all God-speed.

On February 12th the transport and Lewis gunners, with their respective
officers, under the command of Major H. K. Wilson, entrained at
Brookwood at 9.30 a.m. for Southampton. The Battalion was to proceed on
February 14th viâ Folkestone. The long years of training were over; the
memories of Blackpool, Margate, Canterbury, Bourley were fast fading
away. Only the future concerned us now. All that could be done by
training had been done, and it now rested with each individual whether
the battalion maintained its reputation and assisted the Division to
justify the confidence placed in it by His Majesty the King, who had
sent us the following most gracious message:--

       *       *       *       *       *

  "OFFICERS, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE 57TH DIVISION,

"On the eve of your departure for active service I send you my
heartfelt good wishes.

"West Lancashire Regiments have earned a high reputation on the field
of battle, and from the impression I formed on the occasion of my
inspection of your Division last September, I am confident that you,
too, will equally uphold the traditions of the fine regiments whose
names you bear.

"Your period of training has been long and arduous, but the time has
now come for you to prove at the front the results of your instruction,
and with your comrades now in the field to maintain the unceasing
efforts necessary to bring this war to a victorious ending.

"Good luck and God speed.

"GEORGE R.I."

  "_February 2nd, 1917._"



CHAPTER III

OVERSEAS--STRAZEELE--FLEURBAIX--BAC ST. MAUR--RUE DU BOIS--RUE
MARLE--RUE DORMOIRE


February 13th. It seems impossible to believe that to-morrow the
battalion really embarks for France; that the long period of training
and waiting has at last come to an end, and that to-morrow we embark
on the enterprise for which we all joined up, and for which some of
us have now been waiting two and a half years. The sceptics of the
battalion even now throw doubts on it. Admitted that the Transport and
Lewis gunners have gone; admitted that the entraining orders are issued
for to-night; admitted that everything is packed and ready. We have
been fooled before, and likely enough this is only a ruse of the War
Office to give another fillip to our flagging spirits, such as they
administered in the summer when the move seemed almost a certainty; so
much so, in fact, that we all enjoyed a "last leave" and returned ready
for the front, only to commence the dull round of general training once
more.

The barracks present an air of subdued excitement. Men stand about
in groups discussing soberly the prospect of active service, each
wondering in his innermost soul how he will acquit himself in the
unknown trials that are before him. After all, England is a comfortable
place. Life proceeds quietly and peacefully in spite of the bugle
calls, the shouts of N.C.Os., the almost inhuman activity of the
"physical jerks expert," and the endless exhortations of the officers.
May not one in a few days be looking back on all this with bitter
regret, and wondering sadly why we were so anxious to quit it and to
plunge into the dangers and discomforts of war; the real war, that is
to say, not the war of "blanks" and umpires, from which one returns
punctually for tea, and grouses if the battalion should be half an hour
late?

The only really active people are the O. i/c Details and his myrmidons.
Major Turner is seen hurrying across the barrack square, hot on the
trail of some deficient item of barrack equipment. The Quartermaster
smiles to himself as he looks forward to the day when "destroyed by
enemy action" will be the conclusive answer to all inquiries into
deficiencies.

Slowly the day drags on. For fear that anything should be late,
everything has been finished hours too soon. One last visit is paid to
our old haunts and our old friends, and now it is time to collect our
kit and get ready for the parade--"_the_ parade," we call it, because
it is different from all others. Never since the days of 1914 have we
paraded with such alacrity and "dressed" with such zeal. Weird rites
prescribed by King's Regulations for regiments proceeding on active
service are about to be performed. The moon shines brightly, as befits
this solemn ceremony. Two sergeants, not proceeding with the battalion,
are standing by while the roll is called, and woe betide the absentee
with such witnesses to proclaim his guilt! Surely no one, having waited
so long, will now miss the chance, but yet something seems to be wrong.
Company Sergeant-Majors and the Regimental Sergeant-Major are in solemn
conclave with the Orderly Sergeants. Two men are missing. Reference is
promptly made to the Adjutant, who is standing by, and more discussion
follows. It is all right, no one has missed his chance, but the
Commanding Officer's and Adjutant's servants are proceeding by taxi to
the station in charge of some kit.

And now it is time to move off. As companies in turn form fours and
move out of the barrack gate, it is odd to feel that we shall never
again execute this familiar movement on this well-remembered spot.
Quietly, in the dead of night, we move down on the frosty road to
Brookwood Station. The battalion is to go in two trains, with a short
interval between, the second train under the orders of Major C. W.
Wilson. At Brookwood the ladies of the district are dispensing hot
drinks and buns. Modern conditions have taken away the glamour of war.
No longer do we leave for the fight amid a crowd of cheering people,
with flags flying and bugles blowing. The ladies of Brookwood, and our
unlucky pals who could not bluff the doctor, are the only ones to see
us depart, but their send-off leaves nothing to be desired.

The run to Folkestone was only a matter of a couple of hours, and
the early morning light saw us detraining at the Jetty Station. Here
the arrangements were excellent. The R.T.O. was full of information,
and guides appeared to conduct the troops to the Rest Camp. This was
a crescent of pre-war lodging-houses and an hotel, all railed in.
As the companies marched through the gate, the guides took them to
their destined houses, where breakfast was served. The officers were
conducted to the hotel and similarly provided for. The hour of parade
for embarkation was simultaneously communicated to officers and men.

There were several hours to wait even after a shave and a breakfast,
but the time passed quickly enough. After all, it was our last sight
of England, perhaps for all time, and we were not in quite so much
of a hurry as a week before. At 12.30 p.m. we marched on board s.s.
_Victoria_, one of the regular cross-Channel boats. Besides ourselves
there were innumerable officers and men returning from leave, who
glanced with casual interest at the obviously new crowd going out for
the first time. The Commanding Officer was O.C. Ship, and consequently
entitled to a cabin, where wonderful instructions dealing with action
in event of submarine attack, etc., were to be found. There was also
an amusing notebook in which Os.C. Ships were asked to make their
comments on the ship. The names of many distinguished Generals were
to be found among the signatures, and some of the remarks were highly
entertaining.

[Illustration: THE BATTALION BLACKPOOL, 1914.]

[Illustration: GROUP--CANTERBURY, 1916.]

The day was fine and cold, with a strong wind blowing, and although it
was not exactly calm, few showed any serious signs of sea sickness. Two
other transports and a couple of torpedo-boat destroyers made up the
party. Boulogne was reached about 2 p.m., but owing to the speed of the
other vessels we were last in. A long wait followed, and eventually
we had to cross over another ship to get to the quay, a tiresome
process in full kit. We had intended to have a very orderly landing,
but the efforts of the Commanding Officer to get the men formed up
were frustrated by the Assistant Military Landing Officer, who would
not allow any halt until we were clear of all the quays and over the
bridges into the town. An unpleasant and fatiguing "follow my leader"
round trucks and over metals, dodging engines and motor lorries,
resulted, during which process the whole battalion got well mixed up.
Eventually, however, after considerable excitement, we formed up in
close column of companies, and proceeded to march to Ostrehove Camp.

No one who took part in that march will ever forget it. It was not
a long one, two or three miles at the most, but the last part of it
was up a hill of the very steepest description. This is bad enough in
itself at any time when you are carrying a heavy pack and all the rest
of the impedimenta that adorn the "P.B.I.," but when, owing to burst
water-pipes, the road is covered with very smooth ice for yards at a
stretch, the march becomes laborious and painful to a degree.

Arrived at the top of the hill, we looked round hopefully for the
promised rest camp. The sight was indeed depressing. A few dejected
and battered-looking tents, one or two marquees struggling with the
gale, and an odd hut or two, were the only signs of human habitation
on this bleak and wretched moor. The temperature was several degrees
below freezing, the wind swept over us in an icy gale, and daylight
was rapidly failing. So this was active service, and how warm and
comfortable those barracks at Woking were, and how strange that once we
thought them cold and bare!

Little time, however, was allowed for reflections. The Camp Warden was
there to introduce us to the amenities of the place, and companies
and platoons were soon struggling off to try to find shelter from the
wind. Blankets had to be drawn and rations issued, and as darkness fell
parties were still hurrying about in every direction, endeavouring
to get things straight for the night. Presently our indefatigable
Quartermaster arrived, having forced a lorry driver, apparently at the
point of his revolver, to bring the mechanical transport up to the
camp; but how it got up, and still more how it ever got back, are among
the unsolved mysteries of the war.

It now appeared that we had to entrain at Boulogne at 8 a.m. the next
morning, and an early rise and breakfast were arranged. Few were sorry
that our stay on this frozen mountain was to be short; most of us,
indeed, regretted that we had ever to come there at all. Very early
next morning all were astir. The misery of shaving with freezing water
on an icy cold morning was a new experience, and no more pleasant
on this than on the many subsequent occasions when it occurred. The
officers were more fortunate; they had luckily secured a wooden hut,
and also a good breakfast at the Church Army Hut, a veritable oasis in
the desert.

After some heated moments while the Commanding Officer inspected
the men, who looked rather different from the spotless battalion of
Woking--how distant, by the way, that place seemed!--the battalion
proceeded down the hill. The descent, if less arduous than the ascent,
was certainly more perilous. Even the "higher command" could not always
control its feet, and the battalion descended in various postures,
mostly in a sitting or prone position; while the clatter of equipment,
the crash of falling rifles, and the curses of the victims, aroused the
local inhabitants, who regarded us with unseemly mirth.

On arrival at the station we found, to our surprise, that our train was
in. It was of the usual kind, "Chevaux 8, Hommes 40," new to us then,
but familiar to all the world now. Into this the battalion was sorted,
the officers having a first-class carriage of an old-world aspect. Then
we began to wait, a practice in which we were all greatly skilled, and
about 9.30 a.m. we started off.

Before leaving England we had been issued with two wonderful pamphlets
on embarkation and landing, containing, amongst other details, some
remarkable returns of great length and complexity which had to be given
to various railway, embarkation, and landing officials. The compilation
of these returns had wellnigh deprived the Orderly-Room Sergeant of
his wits, and but for the fact that he was to join that mysterious
body called "3rd Echelon," we might have felt inclined to abandon the
returns in order to save his reason. However, done they were. The next
thing was to get rid of them. This proved even more difficult than
their compilation; in fact, in the end we had to admit defeat. Every
official wearing "tabs," a "brassard," or in any other way disclosing
an official capacity, was offered these returns. Persuasion, threats,
entreaties, demands were tried in turn without success. As a last
resource, just as the train was moving off, they were thrust into
the hands of the R.T.O. at Boulogne, who, however, hastily returned
them, muttering that they were as dead as the dodo, and retaliated by
presenting us with a Movement Order and a sheaf of papers dealing with
the manifold responsibilities of O.C. Train.

The journey up from the Base has been so often described that it
requires no particular notice here. It is a long and stately process.
The train, when it moves at all, which is only occasionally and for
short periods, makes a great deal of fuss about it; but if you should
happen to be wandering about on the permanent way, in spite of orders
to the contrary, you can always walk after it and climb on board once
more. For the new-comer there was much of interest. On the outskirts
of Boulogne the train passed huge dumps of war material of every
possible description--guns, ammunition, wagons, trucks, stores, etc.,
with which gangs of "P.B." men, "Chinks," and other miscellaneous
persons were coping in a leisurely fashion. As the train proceeded,
the scenery of Northern France began to unfold itself. It is not
very interesting--flat for the most part and agricultural, but full
of differences from our own English country. The lack of hedges, the
strange advertisements, the women at the level-crossings with their
quaint horns, all struck a fresh note, especially for those who had
never crossed the Channel before, even in the days of peace.

At 8.30 p.m., long after it was dark, the train drew into Bailleul
Station, where the Staff Captain, Captain Beazley, was awaiting our
arrival. Instantly everyone was galvanized into life. Huge flares
illumined the darkness, and officers and N.C.Os. rushed about rousing
their men, who were wildly searching in the dark recesses of their
cattle-trucks for missing articles of kit. As usual, in a short time
apparent chaos resolved itself into order, and the battalion moved off
on its eight-mile march to billets under the guidance of an Australian,
who was quite distressingly frank about his ignorance of the route.
It was a trying march. The experience of the last two days, including
twelve hours cramped up in trucks, had not been a very good preliminary
to a three hours' tramp. Never had one's kit weighed so heavily.
The "tin hat" between the pack straps seemed to increase the weight
terribly. The road through the silent streets of Bailleul was cobbled,
but as soon as the town was cleared a good country road with a pleasant
surface took its place. Slowly the column moved along, and it was
nearly midnight before we reached the forked roads where some of the
companies had to branch off to their billets. The guide went with them,
as the Quartermaster, who had passed us with the stores in a lorry,
knew about the billets in Strazeele village. The guide, however, proved
a broken reed, and much marching and counter-marching took place, and
many an angry conversation with irate householders, before the tired
companies at last got to rest in their respective billets--empty
barns of a draughty nature. Headquarters proceeded to Strazeele, and
eventually settled into billets where, in one case at any rate, a
kindly hostess was waiting up with ample supplies of excellent coffee.

About six o'clock the next morning Major Wilson awoke the Adjutant to
say that the transport had arrived, and where was it to go? On this
question the Adjutant was entirely devoid of information, having seen
nothing of the village in the blackness of the previous night. However,
on further inquiry the Major found the field that had been selected,
and soon the transport were settled in it, and the battalion was now
collected and ready for any emergency.

Strazeele is (or was) a typical little village, consisting of two
main streets forming a cross, a few straggling houses wandering off
from these, two chief avenues, a church, a mairie, and innumerable
estaminets. The surrounding country is slightly undulating arable land
dotted with small farms, in which the various companies were billeted.
The frost held for the first two days, but then the thaw set in with
the thin rain and thick mud so strongly identified with Northern France
and Flanders.

Beyond getting things straight, little training was attempted except
the fitting of small box respirators and instruction in their use,
which was duly carried out. Then each man had to pass through tear
gas to test his respirator. When the Commanding Officer's turn came,
Lieutenant James, the Gas Officer, to make assurance doubly sure,
produced such a powerful mixture that Colonel Fletcher suffered
severely, and his return to the orderly-room caused a rapid exodus of
the staff with streaming eyes. The only other item of interest was the
valiant attempt of a fatigue party, working night and day, to bury a
dead horse in ground which, owing to the recent frost, was as hard as
iron, which caused an interchange of very emphatic telegrams between
Brigade and Battalion Headquarters.

Orders were now received for the Brigade to move on February 20th to
the Sailly area, the battalion to pass the starting-point at 8.35
a.m. This meant early breakfasts and early preparations generally;
but this, our first move on active service, proved a severe test of
our training. However, after some vigorous criticisms from those in
authority, we managed to take our places to time in the Brigade column,
and set off for the new area in a steady drizzle. On the way we passed
the Corps Commander, Lieutenant-General Sir A. J. Godley, commanding
2nd Anzac Corps.

After leaving Merville we were warned against gas shelling. This,
together with the screens which now became conspicuous at all points
of the road open to observation from the enemy's positions, served to
remind us that we were now at last personally interested in the war,
and had ceased to be mere onlookers.

In due course we arrived at La Rue de la Lys, a little distance short
of Sailly, where we were to spend the night. Our billeting officer
had meantime got lost; we overshot the mark and nearly reached Sailly
itself, but fortunately discovered our error in time. We turned about
by the military cemetery, where the first name to catch the eye was
that of a sergeant who had been with us in Margate.

The billets consisted of a group of farmhouses, which with difficulty
accommodated the battalion. Intermittent rumbling of artillery could
now be heard quite distinctly, and you really felt that the war was
getting nearer, and that any day now you might be taking an active part
in it. That night we felt this still more keenly, as the New Zealand
Division, whom we were to relieve, were celebrating their departure by
a battalion raid, and the farmhouses shook and echoed to the roar of
the guns as the barrage opened on the Germans. At all times a barrage
is rather awe-inspiring, but when heard for the first time without
warning on a winter's night by raw troops, the effect produced is
distinctly sobering.

At 8.15 a.m. the next morning (February 17th, 1917) the battalion was
on the road again, this time for Fleurbaix, just behind the line. The
column was pursued by a Brigade motor-cyclist, demanding the names of
two nominees for commissions. The reply that none were suitable only
produced a further and more peremptory demand, and names had to be
supplied. This was the beginning of that inevitable process which, more
quickly even than the tax levied on the battalion by the enemy, robbed
you of your best N.C.Os. as fast as you trained them.

The final stages of the march revealed clearly that we were now in the
region where more than an occasional shell descended. The people of
Strazeele had proudly pointed to isolated bullet marks and so forth,
relics of the fighting of 1914, but here there were real shell holes
and houses that had been hit obviously by something more effective
than a bullet. Fleurbaix itself was a ruined village, though some of
the surrounding farms were intact and flourishing. The church was a
mere skeleton, and whole sides of some of the streets were in a state
of collapse. Windows were few and far between, and the spaces usually
covered with glass were now mostly filled with canvas, or in a few
privileged places with oil-silk, which lets in the light. According
to the local report, the enemy shelled the place heavily at regular
intervals, gas shell being particularly plentiful in the previous
bombardment. We hoped secretly that the next bombardment would be
deferred for a while, and inspected our box respirators carefully
before turning in that night.

As soon as the battalion reached the village the Commanding Officer and
Adjutant reported to the New Zealand Brigade Headquarters, under whose
orders we were to come for that night. There we met the Colonel of the
2nd Battalion Wellington Regiment, the battalion holding the line, who
had come down to meet Colonel Fletcher. After a few preliminaries it
was decided that the Commanding Officer and Adjutant should proceed
up the line forthwith (it was then about noon), and the Company
Commanders, for whom guides were provided, should come up after lunch.
We were somewhat surprised to hear that we could go up on horseback,
so after getting rid of spare kit and seizing tin helmets and box
respirators we set off.

As we cleared the village evidences of hostile activity became more
apparent, and our own 18-pounders were found in barns on either side of
the road, their front being screened with hangings painted to resemble
a brick house wall. The country looked depressing enough--flat as
could be, and intersected with sluggish ditches full of dirty water
and fringed with stunted willows. Remains of farms and flapping canvas
screens stood about, looking strangely gaunt in this empty wilderness.
The grass was rank and overgrown, while here and there lay remnants
of trenches and great strips of rusty barbed wire, the defences of
Fleurbaix. Suddenly our guide pointed to a notice, "Steel helmets
will be worn forward of this point," which served to remind one, if
a reminder had been necessary with shell-holes all around, that the
German was within a distance measurable in yards.

After a few minutes' ride a large farm, to which had been added huts
and also some defences, appeared in view. This, our guide informed us,
was Elbow Farm, where the reserve company was located; likewise the
best water supply and the gum-boot store. Still we went on till we came
to a forked road with a large sand-bag wall. This was Sand-bag Corner,
and here we left our horses. The enemy, it appeared, was a bit free
with overhead machine-gun fire at night, and this screen had been put
up to limit the flight of the bullets. A few minutes brought us to Wye
Farm, in front of which was a large pond, and round this we skirted
on duck-boards. On the right lay the military cemetery, where several
figures were lying wrapped in blankets. We had met the walking wounded
from the night's raid as we marched to Fleurbaix. These silent figures
were those whose luck had not brought a "Blighty," but a more permanent
rest in a foreign land.

[Illustration: Boutillerie Sector]

The Headquarters at Wye Farm were in a sense commodious, but hardly
of a description to inspire much confidence in a new arrival. Imagine
an ordinary block of farm buildings with barn and cowshed attached.
Knock holes in the roof till all the tiles and most of the beams are
down; put one layer of sand-bags to protect the ceiling of the first
floor in the house itself, and add sand-bag walls where walls of the
usual description have ceased to exist, and you will have a fair idea
of the Battalion Headquarters. There was one small sand-bag "bivvy"
leading out of the orderly-room, late a stable for a couple of horses;
and the regimental aid post was situated in a small brick outbuilding
beyond the cemetery. In front of the house was a double duck-board
track, which wandered round the corner into the farmyard behind. The
Officers' Mess consisted of a low room with a fine fireplace; and
the Commanding Officer's sleeping room was of reasonable size, and
contained R.E. bunks for the Commanding Officer and Second-in-Command.
Here we were introduced to the Second-in-Command, the Adjutant, and
other Headquarters' officers of the battalion we were relieving; and
then, under the guidance of the Adjutant, we set off to have a look at
the line. All the way from Fleurbaix, and, in fact, the whole time we
were going round the sector, the enemy preserved an entire and complete
silence, due perhaps to the inoffensive nature of our particular
opponents, or more probably to their rather harrowing and costly
experience of the night before.

City Avenue, the communication trench we were to use, had one branch,
which started from Wye Farm through a hole in the wall at the back of
the farm. As in most communication trenches in that part of the world,
the track rests on "A" frames to keep it above water level. Down this
track we moved, experiencing for the first time the impression of the
endless duck-board beneath one's feet and a few yards of trench, with
an occasional glimpse of bushes or rank weeds, as the only prospect
before the eye. The air was damp, and strange stale odours filled the
nostrils. Everything was symptomatic of death and decay. Water and mud
predominated, and everything looked dreary and unkempt to the last
degree.

The support line round Hudson Bay looked fairly bright, with quite
reasonable "bivvies," but the mud was there; and now empty tins and
refuse of every sort began to add to the wretched aspect of the place.

As we neared the front line in the left sector--we were now in Bay
Avenue--water and mud became still more plentiful, the ground even
more bare, and the general sense of desolation even more pronounced.
Suddenly we found ourselves in the front line--a sand-bag breastwork,
looking old and weather-beaten, with a duck-walk running along it and a
sudden descent of two or three feet to a continuous chain of pools of
green and stagnant water. A few sand-bag "bivvies" among the traverses,
an occasional roof consisting of a single sheet of corrugated
iron--here was "home" for the next eight days. Whichever way you looked
along the line you saw the same endless bays and traverses, most of
them more or less fallen in; the same pools of evil-smelling water; the
same stretches of shell-churned ground; the same old litter of tins and
débris. If you turned your gaze backwards towards Wye Farm, in search
of something less desolate and inhuman, the scene was hardly more
inspiring. Overgrown bushes, stunted willows and mud, ill concealed by
discoloured grass, were all that met the eye; and the landscape was
only broken by the irregular lines of trenches which showed up in the
distance like Brobdingnagian mole runs.

We visited the scene of the raiding party's exit from the line, and
the smears of recent blood on the duck-boards and the pieces of
field-dressing lying about similarly stained told their own story.
We also heard how our advance party, who left us in Woking, had been
initiated during the last few days into the mysteries of trench
warfare. We then returned to Battalion Headquarters, where all the
details of trench routine were gone into and explained with great
clearness and precision.

No one could have been more kind and helpful than those New Zealanders,
from the Commanding Officer downwards. They knew we were totally
inexperienced, and they did everything possible to instruct us in the
short time available. Their name became a synonym in the battalion for
gallantry and courtesy, both of which qualities we had full opportunity
of estimating.

As the weather was misty, and showed every sign of remaining so, it was
arranged that the relief should take place on the next day (February
22nd) in daylight, commencing at 7.30 a.m. In the afternoon Company
Commanders and selected N.C.Os. arrived to visit their areas, and their
New Zealand opposite numbers proved as helpful and instructive as the
Battalion Headquarters staff had been.

That night in Fleurbaix was quiet enough, and it was hard to realize
how close we were to the war. The village, in fact, was only a mile or
two from the British front line. As one looked from the windows, Véry
lights could be seen shooting up into the sky, while the rattle of
desultory machine-gun fire rang clear in the stillness of the night.
Billets, on the whole, were good, the houses we used being but slightly
damaged; but the draughts through the broken panes, and the subdued
light caused by opaque coverings, did not make for comfort, as that
word was understood by those whose idea of billets was a snug room in
Blackpool or Margate.

Next morning (February 22nd) revealed a scene of great activity. Relief
day is always a busy one, but when the process has not yet become
so familiar as to be almost a second nature there is considerable
excitement, and not a little confusion, before things begin to
straighten out. Our guides, one for each platoon, duly arrived, and at
7.30 a.m. Captain Gilling and his heavily laden company were moving
off. To the uninitiated it might seem that the Army Authorities had
given the infantry soldier under ordinary circumstances, as much
permanent equipment as one man could well carry. But it is a trifle
compared with the loads carried on a relief. It is true that greater
experience enabled one to devise means for reducing the distance over
which these extra items had to be borne; but on this occasion, owing
to the request of the New Zealanders to reduce horse transport as far
as possible in case visibility improved, the men struggled off under
fearful burdens. In the peaceful days of trench warfare a relief was
almost tantamount to a household removal. There were valises, mess
boxes, orderly-room boxes, Lewis guns, carriers for Lewis-gun drums,
Véry pistols, periscopes, gum-boots, wire-cutters, rations, fuel, and
a thousand and one other things to be taken up. The rate of movement
decreases in proportion to the load, and consequently one mile per hour
became the average pace. Companies proceeded in an order determined
by the distance each had to cover. "A" Company led off, as they were
bound for the right sector of the front line, viâ Elbow Farm and Tin
Barn Avenue. Captain Steward and "B" Company followed, heading for
the left sector of the front line past Wye Farm and up City Avenue
and Bay Avenue. Captain Eccles and "C" Company only had to go to
Jay Post, as the support line was in close proximity to Battalion
Headquarters; while Major Charles Wilson and "D" Company had to go no
farther than Elbow Farm, where life "in reserve" was comparatively
peaceful--"comparatively" only, because all the fatigues and working
parties generally fall to the lot of the reserve company, which means
that the night is spent in tramping about and toiling. Headquarters
proceeded last. They are not required till the relief is well advanced,
and the Headquarters of the battalion being relieved can begin to
dribble out and make room for them.

Reports of "relief complete" soon began to arrive, and the last company
was through in a remarkably short time, a fact which the New Zealanders
commented on with pleasure. Nothing is more annoying for an outgoing
unit than to be held up by a bad relief. The last words of wisdom were
spoken, trench stores signed for, and the other little formalities
completed. With a cheery "Good luck!" and a hearty handshake they were
off, and our Commanding Officer found himself for the first time in
sole charge of a sector. As soon as our friends were clear, he, with
his usual energy, was calling for his runner, and was off round the
line to see how "A" and "B" Companies were getting on. With their
wonted consideration, the New Zealanders had left an officer and N.C.O.
for the first twenty-four hours with each company, knowing that the
first night in the trenches is rather a strain, and the helping hand
of the experienced was a great asset. Many were the problems which
were exercising the minds of the Company Commanders as the Commanding
Officer visited them in turn. Endless questions of detail presented
themselves, which had first to be learnt and understood by oneself, and
the information then passed on to the company--a far more laborious and
difficult task.

Only a few hours of daylight remained, and there was still much to be
done. The lists of things contained in the Trench Standing Orders,
"What every Platoon Commander should know," "What every Section
Commander should know," and so forth, were enough to distract the most
phlegmatic mind, especially when nobody knew the answers to half the
questions. The ideal--that is, when everyone knows and understands
the answers to all these vital questions--is never attained except in
a sector in which every member of the battalion knows them by heart,
and at present no one had the requisite knowledge. To add to the
difficulties, you constantly lost your way and wandered aimlessly in
half derelict trenches, searching in vain for (say) No. 2 Post, where
Sergeant X., only recently promoted to that exalted rank, was certain
to be in need of advice and assistance. Eventually, giving up for the
time all hope of finding this elusive post, you decide to return to
Company Headquarters, where the Company Sergeant-Major is anxiously
working out patrols, ration parties, and duties of every description,
only to find your own Headquarters even more cunningly concealed than
the much-sought No. 2 Post. In vain you consult the elegant sketch map
of the trenches, that pretty but fallacious document which shows the
way so clearly, but omits any reference to _disused_ trenches, which
often look in such good condition as to lead you astray and lure you
by gradual stages into a forlorn wilderness of abandoned saps. It is
all very trying.

The sector itself--La Boutillerie, as it was called--requires little
description beyond what has already been given and what can be seen on
the map. Its two outstanding features were the Salient, a triangular
piece of trench said to have been dug in one night during the days
before trench warfare became stabilized, and Jay Post, a wonderful
deep dug-out of magnificent proportions, which was but slightly used,
as the enemy, in spite of our elaborate camouflage, had all its exits
accurately registered.

That night, and in fact all the time the battalion was in this sector,
the Germans were amazingly quiet. It is true that the vicinity of
Battalion Headquarters, the road leading up to it, and the principal
communication trenches, were liberally bespattered with machine-gun
bullets. This was apt to "put the wind up" those whose duties compelled
them to move about at night, and caused many curses to be heaped on
the head of "Parapet Joe," as the chief offender was called, from the
skill with which he could traverse along our front line parapet, with
its many variations in level, even on the darkest night. An occasional
"minnie" also descended on the front line with a loud report; and the
Brewery, where the pump was, and where the observers had an observation
post along with the gunners, received spasmodic attention from
"whizz-bangs." At first people in the front line talked in whispers,
although generally speaking the enemy was 400 yards away; but common
sense, and the war experience of some of the officers who had been out
with the 1/6th Battalion, soon put an end to that and many other little
absurdities. The main stumbling-block at night was the tendency of
people, contrary to orders, to take refuge in shelters and "bivvies."
The order forbidding this caused considerable heartburning, though its
sound sense was clear enough.

The weather, after being muggy and wet, had now turned bitterly cold
again, and nights in the trenches under arctic conditions are never
pleasant, and for the new-comer very trying. Accordingly, we were not
sorry to be informed that our time in the line was to be of only four
days' duration, and almost before we had realized we were in the line,
officers and N.C.Os. of the 2/7th K.L.R. were arriving on tours of
exploration. On the last night we had our first casualties, a "minnie"
falling right on to a post, killing three men and wounding two. The
fortune of war is very curious: some men go for months, and even years,
unscathed through dangers of every description; others, like these
three, are killed on their first tour of duty in one of the quietest
sectors in France. We buried them next day in the cemetery by Battalion
Headquarters, and it was melancholy to realize that the dissolution of
our happy band had now commenced in grim earnest, and was likely to
proceed more rapidly in the days to come.

At 7.30 a.m. (February 26th, 1917) the relief commenced, and in
due course the companies were finding their way back to billets at
Fleurbaix, feeling themselves twice the men they were but a few days
before. They knew now what the real trenches were; previously their
knowledge had been limited to those poor imitations at the Foresters
Public-House at Aldershot.

Before completing the impressions of our first tour in the line, we
cannot omit one thing from our account of this sector; not that the
phenomenon is peculiar to these trenches or any other particular
sector--in fact, till the more persistent use of gas sounded their
death knell, they were to be found everywhere, "they" being, of course,
rats. Now at home, in small numbers and well under the control enforced
by long-established civilization, rats present no particular terrors
or inconvenience except, perhaps, to a sensitive female. But in the
trenches, where food was abundant and engines of destruction, at least
as far as rats were concerned, few, they waxed plentiful, and their
audacity increased with their size and their numbers. Not content
with running all over the duck-boards, and all but refusing to step
aside and let you pass, they ran riot in your dug-out, gnawed your
clothes, devoured your food, scampered all over you as you slept, and
in one notorious case caused grave inconvenience to a Medical Officer
by removing bodily his set of false teeth. In the front line they
climbed on the sleeping soldier and gnawed through his haversack to
reach his iron ration. In the "bivvy" they nibbled holes in a man's
socks as he lay on the ground. In fact, so bold were they that you
could fire two or three rounds at a rat and hit all round him before
he would condescend to move at all, and then he would only twitch
his whiskers and remove himself in a leisurely fashion to some less
disturbed spot. The services of Mr. Browning's "Pied Piper" would have
been invaluable to us. There were, to be sure, various trench cats and
an occasional dog, but they had other and better means of subsistence
and took little heed of the rats. So the latter flourished, and, though
curious diseases broke out among them, their lot must have been a happy
one till the gas shells began to fall in every sector, and then their
numbers dwindled rapidly, and in many parts they "ceased to be," at any
rate for the moment.

Our second visit to Fleurbaix, for our first had been but a fleeting
one, enabled us to get a more comprehensive view of our surroundings.
The destruction in the village proved more considerable than had at
first been realized, and though civilians abounded, the place had a
weary and depressed air, which was hardly to be wondered at. Everything
looked so sadly out of repair; little attempt had been made, or was
indeed possible, to make good the ravages of war. Streets where there
was little traffic were grass grown, gardens were rank with weeds,
fences and railings were broken down, and débris of bricks and mortar
littered the ground. Work on improving billets was at once put in
hand, and things left unfinished by the 2/7th K.L.R. were completed
and improved, in accordance with one of the unwritten laws of trench
life--viz., "Always leave a place better than you find it." The 2/8th
K.L.R., working with the 2/5th K.L.R., occupied in turn billets
opposite ours; and in rear of the village in quite a decent house were
Brigade Headquarters, pleasantly adjacent to a couple of 60-pounders!

[Illustration: THE OFFICERS MARGATE, 1915.]

Being now Battalion in Brigade Reserve, we were initiated at once
into one of the special functions of that privileged position,
the reconnoitring of emergency routes. This necessary but tedious
performance is complicated by the very hazy details usually supplied,
and the tendency of the local inhabitants to remove guide posts and to
put wire fences across the tracks.

Although the battalion remained in Fleurbaix till March 6th as Brigade
and Divisional Reserve, it must not be imagined that the time was an
idle one. Even in so-called "rest periods" the infantry are never
allowed much peace, while in reserve in the vicinity of the front line
there is more than enough for all to do. To begin with, the troops
found, to their disgust, that general training was not confined to
England, and for those not otherwise employed the usual physical
training and bayonet fighting, rapid loading, wiring, and all the other
inventions of the training enthusiast, appeared once more on the scene.
All the same, the proximity of the enemy added interest to the bayonet
fighting and other exercises, for no one knew but that skill in those
arts, and of the very highest order, might be demanded of every man at
the shortest notice. The natural tendency to dirtiness and slovenly
appearance produced by a time in muddy trenches had also to be checked,
and the battalion soon realized that the best soldiers in action are
generally the best turned-out behind the line.

Apart from training in arms and discipline, the majority of the
battalion were heavily engaged, under R.E. supervision, in digging
or cleaning out drains and channels in rear of the line. This most
necessary but unpleasant and tedious work fills the soul of the
fighting man with burning indignation; and though warnings to that
effect had often been uttered, it took practical experience to prove
that more than half an infantryman's work consists of digging. It is
curious to note that, essential as is proficiency in the use of the
spade, no real instruction in the subject is ever given at Officers' or
N.C.Os'. Schools, though to watch an untrained digger and a trained one
working side by side is a revelation. In Major Bishop, R.E., we found
a man full of knowledge and withal of consideration and tact. Everyone
liked him, and while he commanded the Field Company with which we
worked, though misunderstandings sometimes arose and mistakes occurred,
as was inevitable, our relations with him were always most cordial, and
it was with deep regret that we heard of his death at Passchendaele
later in the year. His place was, luckily, filled by another good man.

There is nothing particularly amusing, still less heroic, about a night
working party. As soon as the light begins to fail the parties fall in,
wearing gum-boots and skeleton equipment, with the rifle slung across
the back. Each man carries a pick or shovel, or, if it is a wiring
party, rolls of wire slung on a stick between two men. Off they go,
their footsteps, owing to the rubber soles, sounding rather ghostly
as they tramp along the _pavé_. Rapidly darkness falls, and, except
for the subdued sound of their feet, the gentle "swish" of water in
the water-bottles, and the occasional "clang" as someone stumbles and
hits his spade against his rifle, there is little in their progress
to attract attention. Presently the party halts, and a voice from the
darkness inquires: "Is that 'A' working party, 2/6th K.L.R.?" The
answer is in the affirmative, and the party is allotted its task.

An occasional Véry light shows up the men in silhouette, their rifles
and equipment lying in a row out of the way of the earth they are
throwing up, but ready to hand in case of emergency. Presently a
machine gun begins to speak and slowly traverses in their direction.
The work continues, but attention is centred on the stream of bullets
which may suddenly spray right across the party. Here it comes, and
down they all go on their stomachs as the bullets hiss and crack above
them. It ceases as suddenly as it began, and work proceeds again.
Another moment and there is a swift, rushing sound, followed at once
by a loud report, then by another and yet another in quick succession.
Those nearest hastily take cover, for a "whizz-bang" at close quarters
can be very destructive. The stretcher-bearers accompanying the party
listen for the call, "Stretcher-bearers forward," but no one calls,
and work begins again. About midnight it is finished. Plastered with
mud--thick, stinking mud--the men collect their equipment, spades and
picks are checked (it is so easy to leave some behind, just put down
for a moment and forgotten) and off they go, listening eagerly for the
order, "Smoke if you like," back to Fleurbaix, where hot tea awaits
them; "and so to bed," as Mr. Pepys says.

Another interesting experience was our first visit to the Divisional
Baths. This entailed a pleasant march in light order to Sailly, where
bathing apparatus had been erected in a disused factory. The apparatus
consisted of showers and tubs. As each man passed in he handed over
all his personal effects and received a numbered disc in exchange. He
then proceeded to undress, and while he was bathing his uniform was
"stoved." As soon as the bather had dried himself he was presented
with a clean set of underclothing, and his soiled linen was removed.
This was really an excellent system, but it suffered from one serious
drawback. A man gave up a good shirt and perhaps his own home-knitted
socks. The quality, not to mention the size, of the articles issued
in return did not always correspond to those handed in. This was apt
to be a frequent source of complaint, but, taking all things into
consideration, it did not appear that any other system was feasible.
For the officers there were half a dozen hip-baths, surrounded by
duck-boards, with which, in fact, the whole floor of the baths
was covered; and though the Commanding Officer possessed a rubber
saucer-bath, which he lent freely to the other officers, a complete
immersion in hot water was a pleasure too keen to be resisted, and the
comfort of it almost indescribable.

One rather interesting little ceremony was performed at Fleurbaix.
This was the presentation by our billet lady at Headquarters to each
of the battalion runners of a rosary specially blessed by the priest.
She assured them that so long as they wore these rosaries no harm
could befall them, and it is interesting to note that only two out of
the ten died: one of them, Manick, was killed in 1918 while serving
with another battalion; the other, Turnock, died as a prisoner-of-war,
having been captured while serving with another unit. Manick, it is
said, had sent his rosary home a few days before he was killed.

At 7.30 a.m. on March 6th "Gipsy," the new code name for our battalion,
commenced to relieve "Giddy," the _nom de guerre_ of the 2/7th K.L.R.
The order of march this time was "C," "D," "B," "A"; "C" on the right
and "D" on the left in the front line, "B" in support, and "A" in
reserve. An innovation, always adopted in future, was made by the
dispatch of signallers into the line ahead of the battalion, thus
ensuring the proper take-over of signal stations throughout the sector
in the ample time at their disposal. Taking over a complicated exchange
at Headquarters and smaller switch-boards at the Company Headquarters,
involving as it does a clear understanding of which line is which and
where it is laid, where the test boxes are, and so forth, is a business
that requires care and takes time. The irritating and even disastrous
results that might arise from mistakes or erroneous information can
easily be imagined.

Nothing eventful happened during the relief, but Headquarters were
interested to learn that the Germans had shelled Wye Farm, putting one
shell, in fact, right through the roof just above where Colonel Slater
was sleeping. The New Zealanders had warned us that the place looked
like an empty ruin from the enemy's position, and that only charcoal
or coke should be used during the day, so as to prevent smoke. Whether
these precautions had been relaxed, or whether the enemy was merely
being spiteful, was not clear; but at any rate the work of making
shell-proof "bivvies" which had already commenced, was hurried on, and
"baby elephants," the smaller corrugated iron semi-circular shelters,
began to arrive and were inserted into some of the rooms, together with
a liberal supply of sand-bags.

The weather was again positively arctic, and everyone looked half
frozen. No one, therefore, was particularly displeased when orders
were issued at 11 p.m. on March 7th that "Gilt"--_i.e._, the 2/8th
K.L.R.--would relieve us, commencing at 8 a.m. the next morning. The
2/8th K.L.R. were in the trenches on our right, and the scheme was
that they should thin out their posts and with the surplus troops
take over the most vital positions in our sector. This thinning-out
process was taking place all up and down the line, men being drawn from
quiet sectors to increase the number available for the great offensive
planned for 1917. Profound secrecy was to be maintained, and strict
orders were issued that no troops should move in daylight along routes
where they might be detected. Nature, however, took the matter into her
own hands, and thoughtfully provided a blizzard throughout the whole
period of the relief.

The orders for the relief were somewhat complicated. Two platoons of
"C" Company were to move out at once, the other two to remain and be
relieved in the positions they held. "D" Company could release one
platoon and retain three; "B" Company released two platoons less one
section, and "A" Company the same. Plenty of guides were provided, each
supplied with a note as to the location and name of his post, and the
relief proceeded steadily and without a hitch. Wye Farm, from being a
Battalion Headquarters, sank to the more humble position of a telephone
exchange, with one section to guard it.

An interesting item in the orders was paragraph 9, which stated
that on March 9th the battalion would proceed to Bac St. Maur into
billets, and that 2nd-Lieutenant Clarke was to proceed there at once as
billeting officer. The battalion gradually percolated to Fleurbaix as
the relief proceeded, and the Quartermaster and his satellites were
busy there packing up and making ready for the move on the morrow. The
Quartermaster's Stores and transport lines were already quite close to
Bac St. Maur, and many were the inquiries as to the sort of billets we
were likely to get.

For the following morning orders were issued on the zero principle,
companies and platoons being ordered to fall in at so many minutes
after zero, which was 9.30 a.m. It was an experiment in timing, and
was not used again except for active operations. Intervals of 50 yards
between platoons and 200 yards between companies had to be observed,
while a space of 50 yards had also to be maintained between every group
of three vehicles. These precautions were valuable, not only in the
case of hostile artillery fire, but also to prevent congestion and
blocks on the narrow French roadways. Never, even in rest areas, did
a battalion move in that solid stream of which we used to be so proud
in England. Long distances between battalions and shorter distances
between companies was the invariable rule, though it gave a battalion a
somewhat disjointed appearance and, if horses for any reason were not
available, made communications between the companies rather a tedious
performance on the march.

The distance to Bac St. Maur was only a matter of two or three
miles, and we were soon there. The village consisted of two long
rows of ugly houses and factories on either side of the main
Lille--Armentières--Estaires road. Most of the houses were small and
poor-looking, such as you find in little industrial villages; and the
_pavé_ road, much in need of repair owing to the continuous stream
of lorries, by no means added to the beauty of the place, which
indeed looked dreary enough. However, it seemed pretty peaceful,
and the war seemed removed to a far greater distance than the few
miles traversed really warranted. After the usual discussion over
billets--for everyone thinks another company has done better than his
own in the allotment--the battalion settled down very comfortably,
and prepared to carry out the work usually assigned to a Brigade in
Divisional Reserve--viz., providing working parties. Of these there
were two distinct kinds: one was for the improvement of the line of
strong posts in front of Fleurbaix, which rejoiced in such names as
"Croix Marèchal," "Command Post," "Ferret Post," etc., where the
only excitement was an occasional shower of "whizz-bangs"; the other
was working on the dumps at Strazeele, which meant starting by motor
transport at 6 a.m.--or rather being ready to start then, as the lorry
was anything up to two hours late. For the rest of the men there was
general training, and the companies were changed about daily.

A pleasant addition to Bac St. Maur was the Divisional theatre bought
by our Division from the Australians. It was a large army hut, suitably
fitted with stage, etc., and here the Divisional Concert Party, "The
Dons," used to perform with great skill.

We were much worried at this time with anti-gas instructions. Not only
did the Divisional Gas Officer, whom we had not seen since our first
arrival at Strazeele, begin to realize our existence once more and come
to inspect respirators, but countless instructions came out containing
a perfect maze of directions. The whole of the front was divided into
zones--"Gas Alert," "Precautionary," etc.--and notice boards were
posted on the roads warning the wayfarer as to which zone he was
entering. Further, when the wind was "dangerous," boards revealed that
fact to all and sundry, and harrowing accounts were circulated as to
the swiftness with which the German gas penetrated into back areas.

The Quartermaster's stores and transport lines were quite pleasantly
situated on a side road about ten minutes' walk from the battalion.
The former consisted of two or three small Armstrong huts, where the
Quartermaster and Transport Officer lived in considerable comfort and
entertained freely. All the animals were in good covered standings, and
the billets for the drivers and the grooms were conveniently adjacent.
The transport section always distinguished themselves by their taste
for beautifying their surroundings, and in their spare moments
Lieutenant Hutchinson and Sergeant Lloyd had many an anxious discussion
as to the most suitable site for a row of whitewashed stones, collected
with great trouble from the neighbourhood.

One thing which impressed us during our stay in Bac St. Maur was the
very pronounced salient in which we were living. At night this was
very marked, as in whichever direction you turned Véry lights could be
seen in your rear. So striking, in fact, was this that a soldier of
another battalion, somewhat the worse for drink, came up to Lieutenant
Sutherland one evening, and, pointing to those Véry lights rising well
behind our backs, inquired in a confidential manner: "Can you tell me,
sir, if that is the same war as we are taking part in?"

On March 17th our first draft of officers, three in number,
arrived--2nd-Lieutenants McWilliam, Fell, and Hodgkinson. Of these
McWilliam had been badly wounded in 1915 while serving as a sergeant
in the 1/6th K.L.R. As against this access of strength we had to set
the loss of a sergeant and a number of men who had to be sent as
bridge guard to Estaires, and whose return, when we had ceased to be
in Divisional Reserve for some months, was only effected after a very
lengthy correspondence. Sergeant Webster was also dispatched on traffic
control duty, at which work he remained till the end.

We had thought in England that we knew something about men being
employed on extra-regimental duty, but the few we had so employed there
was a trifle to the host supplied by us in France. Corps, Divisional
and Brigade clerks, area sanitary men, Divisional Baths employees,
cooks and servants at Formation Headquarters, traffic control, A.S.C.
loaders, men loaned to trench-mortar and machine-gun companies,
gum-boot store-keepers, tramway men, men employed at Corps Rest Camps,
N.C.O. instructors at schools, and Heaven knows what else, continued
to be a steady drain on the battalion. Vacancies for courses, too,
came pouring in; and when you consider the number of cooks, transport
drivers, clerks, police, storemen, etc., who are required for every
battalion's own use, it will be clear enough that the number left in
platoons and sections for ordinary duty was very small.

Our time in reserve was now drawing to a close, and it appeared that
on March 29th we were due to relieve the 2/5th South Lancashire
Regiment in the Rue du Bois sector north of (and next but one to) La
Boutillerie, the Fleurbaix trenches. The usual procedure followed. We
(_i.e._, the Commanding Officer and Adjutant) set off one morning and
rode along the road to Erquinghem, where we turned off to the right and
called at La Rolanderie, a pleasant farmhouse with some extra Nissen
huts, the Headquarters of the 172nd Brigade, the present tenants of the
sector. From there, after the usual discussion about the enemy and the
disadvantages and peculiarities of our new sector, we proceeded viâ
Gris Pot and La Vesée to a junction of roads a few hundred yards south
of the latter place. Here the horses were left, and inadvertently our
tin helmets, which were hanging from our saddles, and we proceeded on
foot. The country was flat and depressing. Tattered screens stood here
and there masking the roads. An occasional section of guns hidden in
old houses; a runner or two riding along the _pavé_ on that invention
of the devil an army cycle; an artillery officer and his signallers
making for a forward observation post--those were the only signs of
life. All the houses were untenanted, which was to be regretted, as
piquant advertisements testified to the excellence of Pierre Les Cornez
beer!

In the background behind the German front line the slopes of the famous
Aubers Ridge, the barrier that blocked the road to Lille, rose steadily
to a height of more than fifty metres, almost a mountain-range in this
flat country, giving the enemy a very fine view of all our activities.
Passing Billet and Ration Farms, which bristled with R.E. material
and salvage, we crossed a duck-board bridge and struck the subsidiary
line of the Bois Grenier sector on the immediate right of the Rue du
Bois. We plodded steadily along the duck-board track till Desolanque
Farm (or Deplanque Farm, as its real name is: the official map is
wrong), the usual ruin surrounded by a rectangular moat, appeared in
view. The subsidiary line ran about fifty yards in front of this, and
close up against it, in a long concrete dug-out, were the Battalion
Headquarters that we were seeking. Down the steps into this dug-out
we descended with more haste than dignity, as the enemy selected this
particular moment to send a shower of "whizz-bangs" into the farm,
just skimming the top of the dug-out. In the narrow stairway we met
the Commanding Officer, full of wrath. "Whizz-bangs" generally meant
that too many people were wandering about in the vicinity of the farm,
and strict orders had been issued to prevent this. It is extraordinary
how insensible to danger the average man soon becomes, and the most
reasonable orders for the protection of life are ignored or disregarded
unless very strictly enforced.

The Headquarters consisted of a very long concrete passage with five
small rooms opening on to it--the mess, two sleeping rooms, a signal
office, and the Adjutant's office and sleeping room combined. All the
rooms were small and required artificial light, and a general feeling
of chilly damp prevailed everywhere. We arranged ourselves as best we
could in the mess; but we were all crowded together in a space far
too small for the number of occupants, and the table was covered with
maps, defence schemes, aeroplane photographs, and the usual litter of a
trench headquarters, not to mention box respirators, tin helmets, and
other impedimenta which are hastily doffed on entering a dug-out.

[Illustration: RUE DE BOIS SECTOR.]

It appeared that the artillery observers had decided that the Germans
were registering, and a sketch map that was produced showed the area
which it was presumed they intended to raid. Colonel Bates, of the
2/5th South Lancashire Regiment, was rather contemptuous of the whole
thing, and ascribed the apparent registration to mere casual shooting
on various targets. But, at any rate, the matter had to be attended
to, although the expected raid never took place. The line was held
with three companies in the front and support lines, and two in the
subsidiary line, the additional company being supplied by another
battalion. The total frontage was about 2,800 yards, and to cover this
a system of "gaps" and "localities" had been arranged--_i.e._, a series
of posts covering vital points of the line. The "gaps" were ordinary
but unoccupied trenches, often derelict; but they were usually wired
and made difficult to penetrate.

Before leaving the 2/5th South Lancashire Regiment we were introduced
to Major Brookes, M.C., A/286 Battery R.F.A., and from that moment
commenced a long and lasting friendship with a most gallant and
capable officer in whom every man (and all knew him) placed the
utmost confidence. In the trying days ahead in Houplines at its worst
Major Brookes was daily round the line; and though his battery was
continually shelled by guns of every calibre, he always managed to do
all we asked him, and never failed to let the enemy have even more than
his daily quota of 18-pounder shells.

At 8 p.m. on March 28th Lieutenant F. C. Bowring, Sergeant Machell,
and the company Lewis gunners set off for the trenches. In view of
a possible hostile raid, it was thought advisable that they should
relieve in daylight, and be in a position to make their presence really
felt on the relief night in the event of the Germans choosing that time
for a raid. The route to be taken was viâ Erquinghem, Armentières, and
Rue Marle Level Crossings, and then straight down past Crown Prince
House to the subsidiary line, where they were to spend the night,
taking over their posts at dawn the following day.

It was a long and tiring march of many miles from Bac St. Maur, and
one which was considered too long for the battalion to undertake at
one stretch on relief night, and it was therefore arranged that a
long tea halt should be made in Armentières. The Commanding Officer
decided to spend the afternoon of the relief day (March 29th) in the
trenches with the Company Commanders; while Major Wilson was to meet
the battalion in Armentières, where he and the Quartermaster were
making the necessary arrangements for housing and tea; and the Adjutant
brought up the battalion. Coming through Chapelle d'Armentières
on their way back from the trenches, a question arose between the
Commanding Officer and the Company Commanders as to the location of
some place on the map. As it was raining and they wanted to examine
the map, they adjourned to a ruined house for a few minutes. The point
at issue being settled, and time getting on, they hurried out of the
house and on down the street. They had not gone thirty yards when a
shell entered the house they had just vacated and blew the place to
smithereens. How often in this and in every other war a few minutes
have made the difference between life and death!

The school at 57, Rue de Lille, had been selected for the tea halt, a
place eminently suited for the purpose, and fairly safe from possible
interference by the enemy. It was a fine building built round a
playground, with the front facing the Rue de Lille, and one side of
the school facing the Rue Gambetta. It had obviously been repeatedly
hit by shells of various sizes, but the Germans had not shelled
Armentières itself for some time; and although the concentration of the
whole of the battalion in such a small space caused some misgivings,
the scheme worked excellently, and nothing untoward occurred. Field
kitchens arrived with the companies, and as soon as tea was well under
way the officers repaired in turns to the "Au Bœuf," an excellent
restaurant--one of the few still doing business in the town.

At 7 p.m. the head of the battalion arrived at Sand-bag Corner, a
junction of roads with a great sand-bag barricade on the way to
Chapelle d'Armentières, where guides awaited us. The companies were to
hold in the order "D," "A" (now commanded by Captain Wyatt), "C" from
the right, with "B" Company in reserve in the subsidiary line, which
"B" Company, 2/7th K.L.R., proceeding viâ Gris Pot and La Vesée, had
already taken over, as extra company in the subsidiary line, from a
company of the 2/4th South Lancashire Regiment. For the first time the
men wore their packs detached from their equipment on kicking-straps,
this again being due to the possibility of a raid; and in future this
was the order for all reliefs, the manifold advantages being very
obvious. The last part of the route up to the subsidiary line was along
a lane full of shell-holes, but the frequent illumination produced by
German Véry lights made the going fairly simple. Transport came right
up to Battalion Headquarters, and dumps were formed accordingly in
the subsidiary line for Headquarters and for each company. The relief
proceeded quietly and without incident, and its speed was naturally
increased by the possibility, owing to their number, of having "up" and
"down" communication trenches--Wine Avenue and Leith Walk the former;
Park Row, Wellington Avenue, and Cowgate the latter. At 12.40 a.m. on
March 30th relief was reported complete, and our friends of the 2/5th
South Lancashire Regiment proceeded joyfully to Crown Prince House and
the reserve billets in the Rue Marle.

The tour, in spite of the gloomy forebodings of the gunners, proved
quiet enough. For the first night or two strong fighting patrols lay up
in No Man's Land in the hope of catching the enemy raiding party. The
Germans, however, showed no signs of any hostile intent, and after a
day or two the various precautions that had been adopted were discarded.

The left sector came in for a considerable amount of shelling,
particularly in the vicinity of Captain Eccles's Headquarters and also
the Ferme de Biez in rear of it, which our observers used to haunt.
However, there was plenty of room in the sector for shells to fall
without doing any serious harm, and our casualties were, fortunately,
very low in consequence. In the right company's front a stream came
in under the front line and wandered across the sector. Strict orders
had been issued that the water was not to be used for drinking or
cooking, inasmuch as it came from the enemy's line. Walking round
one day, Captain McHugh, our newly arrived and most delightful Irish
Medical Officer, took a sample for analysis through curiosity. It was
interesting to learn that a strong arsenic result was obtained.

A small incident that occurred during this tour, while we were still
fresh and inexperienced, and which caused considerable merriment at the
time, may be worth recounting here. In the apex of the salient C.S.M.
Barker, of "D" Company, had found a rifle-grenade machine--simply
the barrel of a rifle mounted on a fixed stand, at a point within
comfortable range of the enemy trench. Now, Barker had in the training
days in England been Bombing Sergeant, and was anxious to give a
practical demonstration of the skill he had acquired in the handling
of these treacherous and dangerous weapons. Moreover, O.C. "D" Company
was determined to show his company that "live and let live" was not
to be their motto, so his support in the venture was assured. "I will
come down to-night, corporal, and send a few over," remarked Barker in
an off-hand manner to Corporal Wright, whose section held the post of
honour at the salient. Accordingly that same night Barker, with a small
host of supporters, including Lieutenant Ormrod, the Trench Officer, F.
G. Roberts, the Trench Sergeant, Riflemen Forster, Alpine, and Liderth
from the next post, and Moody and Heath (runners) was to be seen in
the vicinity of the lethal weapon. All took such cover as they could
while Barker loaded the machine with a "Newton Pippin" and prepared
to do his worst. "Look out!" Bang! With a thin whistling sound the
grenade wended its way towards the enemy. Tense silence. A second later
an uninteresting report over the way. Hardly had that noise subsided
than a sinister "pop" was heard. "What was that? Keep low!" A rushing,
hissing noise approached, becoming rapidly louder. Clang! Clang! as
"pineapple" after "pineapple" burst in and among the party, covering
the prostrate soldiers with mud as they flattened themselves against
the ground. A swift crawling, creeping, shuffling, and the party were
hurrying away blindly trying to escape from "those damned things!" For
the remainder of the night the shoot was "off."

However, O.C. "D" Company was reluctant to leave the initiative with
the enemy. It is true that we might have known that he had the spot
registered from his previous experience, and that we laughed heartily
over the whole thing. Still, something had to be done. Suddenly O.C.
"D" Company remembered that at 6 a.m. the next morning the Light
Trench Mortar Battery were to do a shoot, supported by 18-pounders
if required. Here was the chance of showing the Germans that "D"
Company were not easily worsted. It was arranged that a "Newton"
should be mounted once more. Watches were quietly synchronized with
the unsuspecting Light Trench Mortar Battery. At five seconds before 6
a.m. the "Newton" was fired. Instantly came the German retaliation as
before, but hardly had the "pineapples" started when our Light Trench
Mortar Battery opened with great vigour. This annoyed the enemy, who
were expecting another easy victory, and the aid of their artillery was
invoked. To this our 18-pounders replied, and before long a regular
artillery duel was in full swing. This was more than the Germans
bargained for, and they soon stopped. "D" Company were avenged!

At night we used to get magnificent views of distant barrages,
especially towards the south. It was a wonderful sight, like summer
lightning, only more vivid and impressive; while every now and again
the uniform colour of yellowish light would be shot with a sudden
streak of vivid red as a dump exploded or some conflagration broke
out. It was fascinating to watch the endless dance of flickering light
against the blackness of the sky. One minute the whole heaven was lit
up, the next moment all was dark; or perhaps a series of small flashes
appeared, darting up now here, now there. If the barrage was far away,
no sound would be heard, though if you entered a dug-out facing in
that direction you would be conscious of a dull rumbling that warned
you this was no mere pyrotechnic display, but the most nerve-wracking
feature of modern war, an intense bombardment.

During this time we learnt with regret that General Gilbert, who had
commanded in turn for many years first the original and then the Second
Line Liverpool Infantry Brigade, was returning to England on account of
age, being relieved by Brigadier-General R. N. Bray, C.M.G., D.S.O.,
of The Duke of Wellington's Regiment. General Gilbert's dignified
kindness had made him most popular with all ranks, and we would gladly
have continued under his leadership, come what might. He arrived one
morning with his successor, and after the usual introductions they were
proceeding round the line when a curious thing happened. Going along
the front line just short of Chard's Farm, they must have been spotted.
Fortunately, however, General Gilbert stopped a few moments in a part
of the trench hidden from observation to point out certain features of
the ground. As they resumed their walk along the trench to the farm,
it suddenly became the centre of a regular storm of "whizz-bangs,"
obviously timed to greet their arrival, which had so happily been
delayed.

Another visitor was Major Derry, D.S.O., of the Welch Regiment, who had
just succeeded the late Major Thompson as G.S.O.2. Major Thompson had
been practically cut in two by a "whizz-bang" while talking to Colonel
Cohen, of the 2/5th K.L.R., outside the latter's Headquarters in the
Bois Grenier sector. We had seen little of Major Thompson, but what
we had seen we liked. Major Derry, with his cheery laugh and complete
disregard of personal danger, soon became highly popular among us.

[Illustration: Photo by Gale & Polden. Ltd., Aldershot.

THE KING'S INSPECTION--REVIEW GROUND, LAFFAN'S PLAIN, 1916.]

On the evening of March 6th the 2/7th K.L.R. relieved us, commencing at
8 p.m. with the right front company. "B" Company in the subsidiary line
was to remain as extra company, merely moving along to the positions
held during our tour of duty by "B" Company 2/7th K.L.R. Soon after
midnight the battalion was clear of the trenches and heading for Rue
Marle, where the reserve billets were situated. At the top of the long
straight stretch past Crown Prince House "D" Company turned to the
right, and were billeted in houses on the left of the road; "A" and
"C" turned to the left, "A" Company being next to Rue Marle Church, a
bright red brick edifice with a brick spire, looking as if it had only
been finished the day before; while "C" Company were in houses several
hundred yards farther down the same road.

Nothing of much importance happened while the battalion was in reserve
at Rue Marle. One company was always detailed as inlying piquet, and
spent its time training in the vicinity of its billets. The other
companies were up nightly, carrying medium trench mortar ammunition
up into the trenches in preparation for the raid to be carried out by
the composite company of 172nd Brigade--"Paynter's party," as it was
called, after their Brigadier.

One morning the Corps and Divisional Commanders arrived at Crown Prince
House and immediately demanded a map showing the Fleury Switch. Every
conceivable map was produced, but in vain; nor had anyone the faintest
idea what the switch was to which they so repeatedly referred. In the
end the A.D.C. to the Corps Commander sped back to the car (left round
the corner out of sight), and in due course produced the precious map,
and the party proceeded on their way restored to a more amiable frame
of mind.

On the night of March 11th "D" Company relieved "B" Company in the
subsidiary line. A night or so before a German aeroplane had made a
determined effort to do them serious harm by dropping a number of heavy
bombs in their immediate vicinity. Oddly enough, that night, as the
Adjutant and Lewis Gun Officer were undressing in their bedroom, which
faced the line, they suddenly noticed that the shutters were not drawn.
A rush was made for the candle, which was hastily extinguished. At that
moment there was a deafening report, and we felt that here was the
reward for our carelessness. However, it was soon realized that the
noise was not shelling, but the above-mentioned bombing, the hum of
the aeroplane being clearly audible; but after depositing its load it
departed, and peace reigned once more. No casualties were caused, and
quite a number of "D" Company were sleeping so soundly that they knew
nothing of the matter till the following morning.

It was always a remarkable thing to us who lived there that Crown
Prince House was not shelled. It was a large house in full view of
the enemy, standing quite isolated at the side of a long straight
road. It must have been very tempting to the German gunners, who liked
to see the red dust rise from a direct hit on a house. There was no
sort of cellar accommodation worth mentioning. Signals had the only
cellar, and that was but half underground. We used to encourage one
another by saying that the Germans could not shell the house without
committing _lèse majesté_ (the Crown Prince was reputed once to have
made his Headquarters there), though some very recent shell-holes at
the entrance seemed to prove that they were prepared occasionally to
risk being guilty of that serious offence. As a matter of fact, the
Headquarters of a South Lancashire Battalion were soon afterwards
shelled out of the house, and a very unpleasant proceeding they found
it.

The only other excitement was the sudden arrival of a shell in
Armentières; not by the railway-station, a place not infrequently
shelled in retaliation for a 12-inch railway mounting gun which used to
come up there occasionally, but right into the town, and only just over
the Rue de Lille. This single shell caused quite a sensation, but as
nothing more happened we concluded that the enemy had let off a gun by
mistake.

On March 13th after dinner the battalion (less "D" Company) moved off
to billets in the Rue Dormoire, the 2/5th South Lancashire Regiment
moving in at the same moment. In spite of all precautions, the
congestion of traffic was very great for a short time, but was soon
straightened out. We crossed Rue Marle Level Crossing, then left-handed
up the Boulevard Faidherbe, and so round to the Armentières Level
Crossing. The route after that was the main road through Erquinghem,
about a mile beyond which lay our new area. Headquarters was situated
in a fine old seventeenth-century farmhouse, built round the usual
quadrangle, with its usual vast heap of manure. Two sides were flanked
by a moat which you crossed by a brick bridge, entering the farm
through an archway. Opposite the entrance, and on the other side of the
road, was a large open field with a duck-board track running across
it, which led to two blocks of Nissen huts, occupied by "C" and "D"
Companies, the latter not expected to arrive from the subsidiary line
before midnight; though, owing to confusion over the transport for
the Lewis gunners, this estimate proved highly optimistic. Continuing
down the lane past Battalion Headquarters--and an unpleasant lane it
was, full of the most appalling holes and ruts, and deep in liquid mud
which concealed many a sharp stone and pitfall--you eventually arrived
at a group of farms. Here "A" and "B" Companies were accommodated in
large barns in which great tiers of bunks had been erected. These were
promptly nicknamed the "birdcage."

Reconnoitring of emergency routes and schemes for the reinforcing of
divisions in front or on the flanks again came to the fore. Though all
was quiet in our neighbourhood, considerable activity was apparent at
night north of the Lys opposite the Messines Ridge, where bursting
shrapnel and coloured lights were eloquent of raids in progress.
Working parties (of a minimum strength of a platoon) and training
became once more the order of the day. Rifle-grenade practice with
"Newtons" was very popular, even after Lance-Corporal Cathels and a
rifleman had been injured by the bursting of the breech of a rifle.



CHAPTER IV

ARMENTIÈRES UP TO GAS ATTACK


On April 19th we received orders to reconnoitre the Boutillerie sector,
held by the 2/5th King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, with a view
to early relief; and the Commanding Officer, Adjutant, and Company
Commanders proceeded the same day to Foray House, the "King's Own"
Headquarters. This sector was a combination of the old Boutillerie
trenches, held by us in February, and the trenches on our immediate
right. There had been several British and enemy raids since then, and
the damage caused had been considerable. The difficulty of maintaining
2,800 yards of front in a decent state of repair throughout its whole
length had further impaired the condition of the trenches, and we were
not surprised to find serious signs of decay on every hand. Our first
experience, moreover, of walking quite considerable distances--_i.e._,
several hundred yards--without finding a trace of the defenders proved
very instructive, and showed us what to expect for the future. The next
day (April 20th, 1917) these orders were cancelled, and we were now
informed that on the 26th we were to take over the Houplines sector in
front of Armentières from the Australians. We set out once more on a
tour of exploration. We rode to the Australian Brigade Headquarters in
the Rue Jesuit, and thence on foot along the Houplines road to Tissage
Dump, where the trenches began.

Those who now saw Armentières for the first time might well be
impressed by the feeling of desolation which prevailed. The silent,
shuttered houses, the empty streets, the ruins and the débris were
familiar from the villages which had been already visited, but nowhere
hitherto had the picture been on so large a scale as here. Armentières
had been a bright and busy town before the war, with a population of
some 30,000 people. Large spinning factories, fine houses and handsome
shops abounded. Many of the streets, it is true, still contained
quite a number of inhabitants; but as you made your way down the Rue
Jesuit towards the line, fewer and fewer grew the signs of any civil
population, and more and more battered became the houses. It is a
long walk to Tissage Dump. On the left you soon passed Barbed-Wire
Square, then quite a pleasant grass-grown square with young trees just
beginning to bud. In the far corner a wonderful green and blue tiled
house had apparently been the residence of a lady fortune-teller. The
next landmark was the level-crossing, beside which a huge church bell
was suspended on a wooden frame to give warning against gas. The road
a little farther on swung round first to the right, past some very
dilapidated workmen's cottages of a curious blue tint; and then to the
left, where stood L'Octroi d'Houplines, the familiar little wooden
erection to be found on the outskirts of every French town. This had
been hit by a shell; it was a corner of ill repute, and the board
bearing its title hung at an acute angle, being only supported by a
fastening at one end. On the left of the road, next to the factory
belonging to an English firm, stood Von Kluck's house, alleged to have
been once the Headquarters of that famous General, and now used as the
A.D.S., which for many months escaped a direct hit, while neighbouring
houses were all but obliterated. A strip of open country followed;
on the left, a wilderness of ruins and marshland, with a glimpse of
18-pounders cleverly concealed; on the right, loop-holed screening with
a considerable view of the country beyond.

Nouvel Houplines (often thought to be Houplines itself, which was close
to the river) consisted of two main streets forming an acute angle. At
the junction stood Tissage Dump, where R.E. material for the line was
stored. In the adjoining houses were a pioneer workshop, an observation
post, the canteen, and the regimental aid post. The trench tram line (a
continuation of the ordinary tram line from Armentières) divided here,
one line running up alongside Gloucester Avenue to the trenches, the
other following round to Durham Castle and other dumps. Several tall
factory chimneys were grouped about this spot, all used as observation
posts, and rejoicing in colonial names difficult to pronounce. Most of
them bore signs of shell fire, one having been pierced right through
close to its base, another having a large piece taken right out of its
side.

The entrance to Gloucester Avenue--or "Gloster Ave," as the signboard
called it--was really very picturesque, the trench descending gradually
below ground level through what had once been a garden. On either side
was abundant foliage, which later became prettily covered with flowers
and presented a picture that might well have been the setting for the
opening scene of "The Arcadians."

We began our walk up Gloucester Avenue, noting the trench running off
to Spain Avenue, another fine communication trench. The way was up a
gradual incline. At the top a network of narrow trenches appeared, and
through these we made our way into the subsidiary line to Battalion
Headquarters, a group of "bivvies" and short trenches entered under a
small overhead traverse. On the immediate left stood a small elephant
back, which combined the dual functions of mess and Adjutant's office,
and opposite this was the cook-house. To the left was a double concrete
dug-out, where "Signals" dwelt, and up a little short trench a minute
concrete "bivvy" for the Commanding Officer.

In the mess we found the Commanding Officer of the 38th Battalion
A.I.F. awaiting us, and he explained that our present place of rest
was the old right Battalion Headquarters, while the left was in more
commodious but less conveniently situated quarters in the spacious
cellars of Cambridge House, some way along the subsidiary line. Half
the Australians' Headquarters lived in one place and half in the other,
and, though the two were connected by telephone, the disadvantages of
the separation were obvious.

The Company Commanders now proceeded to their respective areas, while
the Commanding Officer and Adjutant took a general survey of the line
under the guidance of the Australian Colonel. The first impression was
certainly most unfavourable. The principle of gaps and localities was
maintained here, and constant shell fire, combined with lack of any
means of repair, gave the sector a most dilapidated and depressing
appearance, which was intensified by a great superfluity of water and
a number of useless and derelict trenches running in all directions.
Lateral communication, too, as so often happens in a combined sector,
was extremely bad. After lunch at Cambridge House, the Commanding
Officer and Adjutant proceeded on a tour of the left sector. This was
notoriously the weak point, the left being bounded by the River Lys,
which in winter rendered an area of several hundred yards along the
bank quite impassable, though in summer this same area was perfectly
passable, and to a large extent undefended. From the support line an
excellent view could be obtained, the ground falling steeply away from
there to a flat stretch called the Cricket Field, and then sloping
upwards to a raised plateau on which Frelinghien stood, and on the
hither side of which was built our front line. The sector, we found,
was full of notices warning you that the spot you stood on was under
direct observation from the Germans, which caused you to move round
the traverses with alacrity. Most of these notices, we found, were
obsolete, but on the left company's front, parts of the front line
were certainly exposed, and till these spots were blinded casualties
occurred from snipers. Generally speaking, the line appeared fairly
quiet that afternoon, only intermittent shelling of a very desultory
nature occurring. To our disgust, however, we learnt that gas cylinders
were installed along practically the whole length of the front line,
and the absence of heavy shelling was accordingly noted with some
pleasure.

The relief took place on March 26th, the Lewis gunners entering the
line the previous evening, and, in addition, one signaller per station,
two battalion runners, all snipers, of whom one N.C.O. and three
men were to take over the observation post, and one officer and one
N.C.O. per platoon. On the morning of the 26th the Sniping Officer
and Sergeant, the Medical Officer's orderly, the Bombing Officer and
Corporal, all Company Sergeant-Majors, the Regimental Sergeant-Major,
and two runners, together with the balance of the signallers under the
Signalling Officer, made their way up to the trenches. This was the
usual advance party for a new sector, and the arrangement undoubtedly
quickened the relief, while in addition increased knowledge of a sector
was acquired from the extra length of time spent with members of the
outgoing unit.

Guides were to meet the companies at Houplines Level Crossing,
commencing at 7 p.m. The following were the dispositions and routes:
"D" Company, right front sector viâ Spain Avenue; "C" Company, right
centre viâ Gloucester Avenue; "B" Company, up Durham and Edmeads
Avenue to left centre; while "A" Company went up Durham and along
the subsidiary line to Irish Avenue and thence to left sector. Each
company was responsible for its own supports and reserves, the latter
consisting usually of a few cooks and ration carriers. Headquarters
were accommodated in "bivvies" in the subsidiary line round Battalion
Headquarters, and a few details at Cambridge House. The relief was
completed at 11.40 p.m., and the Australians moved off for a rest and
training preliminary to the Battle of Messines. They were a very cheery
crowd and extremely obliging, and rendered the relief a very agreeable
task. The code word was dispatched by telephone to Brigade, and we
commenced our first tour in a sector that we were destined to occupy,
turn and turn about with the 2/7th K.L.R., for four and a half months.

[Illustration: HOUPLINES.]

[Illustration]

As the period was such a long one, a more detailed description may
be attempted than has been thought necessary in regard to other
sectors held from time to time by the battalion. There were three main
communication trenches leading into the line, all previously referred
to. Spain and Gloucester Avenues, both starting from Tissage Dump,
cut the subsidiary line on the right and right centre respectively.
Durham Avenue started from Nouvel Houplines a few yards from Tissage
Dump and to the north of it, and joined the subsidiary line close to
Cambridge House. There was also the road from Nouvel Houplines to
Frelinghien which ran past the north end of the subsidiary and support
lines, but was under observation by day and unhealthy by night. On the
extreme right, and just beyond our boundary, was Buterne Avenue, a deep
traversed trench over which we had a right of way. It wandered about
distressingly, and eventually ended in a small side street near Barbed
Wire Square. Farther to the right and well on into the Epinette sector
was Lunatic Lane, which eventually became an open track and led into
the outskirts of Armentières by the Asylum.

The subsidiary line was marked on the right by a large civilian
cemetery, through which the trench passed. It was full of graves with
wooden crosses and artificial flowers such as are usually to be found
in a French burial-ground. From there to the Battalion Headquarters
the trench was traversed, but there was little parados. "Bivvies" of
small breadth and height abounded, and there were one or two concrete
dug-outs, usually full of water. A ditch, with a railing in front of
it, marked the approach to Battalion Headquarters, after which the
trench narrowed into two small alley-ways where Gloucester Avenue
joined the subsidiary line, and thence ran down steeply to a road from
Nouvel Houplines to Quesnoy. Here the tram line crossed the subsidiary
line and ran across country to the right company front. The open road
was masked by a big screen. At this point the subsidiary line was built
on a somewhat higher level, and contained big bays and long traverses,
protected in rear by a parados, behind which was a traffic trench, in
which a number of "bivvies" had been constructed.

Continuing your course, you came to Wessex Avenue, the finest
communication trench in the sector, though but little used. The
line now became a long, straight trench with a high parapet, with
duck-boards along the side of the bank and also at the bottom. Beside
the lower track was a green ditch. At the end of this stretch was a
bridge across the Panama Canal, which ran back in a south-easterly
direction to the support line in the right company sector. In design it
was merely a deep drain, but it was duck-boarded and a handy short-cut
diagonally across the sector. It was seldom used in daylight, in the
hope, which was probably justified, that the enemy would regard it
merely as a drain. Durham, Edmeads, and Sussex Avenues all met at
this point; and a few yards in the rear stood Cambridge House. The
last part of the line was full of "bivvies," and just before the end,
Irish Avenue, the left-hand communication trench of the sector, led
off to the front line. At the end the ground fell away steeply to
some marshland beside the banks of the Lys. The only other means of
communication with the front line, except the communication trenches
above mentioned and a few overland tracks, was the road which ran from
the junction of Wessex Avenue and the subsidiary line to Edmeads Farm.
This was only passable at night, but it was an excellent short-cut,
though subject to bursts of machine-gun fire and "whizz-bangs."

The description of the trenches forward of the subsidiary line is a
far more formidable undertaking. We will commence with the right, as
being the simplest and also, generally speaking, the most healthy.
The subsidiary line was followed to the right almost as far as the
cemetery. Just before reaching it a communication trench was found
leading off (if you were lucky and knew the way) to the left under an
overhead traverse, and guarded by a sentry. The latter in the early
days informed you, in a bored fashion, that the wind was dangerous or
the reverse, and criticized your box-respirator if not in the alert
position. Following the trench in its windings for a short distance,
Vancouver Avenue branched off to the left. This was only half finished,
though you could with much floundering get through it to Gloucester
Avenue; in reality, however, it was quite useless. A hundred yards or
so farther on you suddenly came on a corrugated iron sentry-box, with
a small weather-cock and a shell case suspended from a stick beside
it, where the gas sentry over the right company Headquarters was
stationed. Here in an open space you found two or three log huts of
small dimensions, with one or two orthodox "bivvies." You then passed
over a bridge, and, ducking your head to avoid a sheet of corrugated
iron, under which cooking operations were usually going on, you entered
a low edifice, which was lighted, it may be mentioned, with two small
windows of real glass. Here you might find O.C. "D" Company sitting
at the table, endeavouring to compose one of the innumerable reports
that the higher powers delighted to collect. Two or three bunks
adorned the walls; and a form on either side of the table, a Véry
pistol, a tin of cigarettes, some recent pamphlets, and odd pieces of
officers' equipment, made up the furniture. You could stand up more
or less erect, and the place was really quite comfortable, but hardly
shell-proof.

Beyond Company Headquarters the communication trench showed the
strongest inclination to close in. It was extremely narrow, and but for
the overhead struts would very soon have become impassable. Newburn
Lane led off to the left, certainly more of a lane than a trench,
through which you could reach the Orchard, a regular target for German
gunners, and a place to be avoided at certain times of the day. Farther
down the communication trench was a slit on the left where Light Trench
Mortar Battery men lived. Just below here the trench suddenly came to
an end, and you crossed a little stream running along a diminutive
valley. The tram line also came in sight, wandering away along an old
road through tangled bushes and weeds to the front line. It was badly
smashed in places, and was never used as far forward as this. The
trench began again up the far side of the tiny valley--London Road, as
it was now called--and here stood two graves marking the resting-place
of two unknown soldiers. The going was sticky and the trench much
battered. Later on grass and green things generally were conspicuous
on either side of the trench, but now everything looked bare and
muddy--just yellow clay, shell-holes, mud banks, and trenches more or
less derelict. Suddenly you heard voices, and without quite realizing
it you found you were in the front line.

A broad breastwork formed the means of defence, occasional bays being
held, but the majority being unoccupied and full of loose barbed
wire. Everything betokened the effects of shell fire where men were
too few to do more than just repair their own particular posts.
Derelict "bivvies," odd broken duck-boards half covered with slime,
sheets of corrugated iron riddled with holes, bits of old ground
sheets, and fragments of equipment, lay about in all directions.
Everything presented that damp, yellow aspect peculiar to clay soil.
The traverses, sodden with water, were bursting down the hurdles or
wire netting with which they were revetted, while the empty bays were
falling in of their own accord, or presented a crushed and crumbling
appearance, the result of the direct burst of a shell or "minnie."

As you rounded the traverse of an occupied bay the following picture
met your eye. Imagine a narrow trench about 12 feet long by 4 feet
wide, with a fire-step running along the entire length some 12 inches
from the ground. Near the centre of the trench stands a rifleman in
skeleton equipment, gazing into the bottom mirror of a box periscope
which is fastened by a spike to the parapet, its top covered by dirty
canvas to match the surrounding sand-bags. By the sentry's side is a
rifle, and close at hand are the empty shell-case gong and strombos
horn, in case of gas. Next to him sits his relief, similarly attired,
all men invariably wearing equipment in the front line. The relief
sentry is passing the time in cleaning some clips of ammunition from an
open small-arms ammunition box. The corporal and two men are filling
sand-bags, which will be required at dusk. Another rifleman sits at
the far end, sleeping peacefully and dreaming of something (we hope)
remote from the war. He was the last sentry. Two boxes let into the
parados contain Véry lights and bombs; the Véry pistol hangs from a peg
in the parapet. Five rifles with swords fixed stand in a row against
the side of the trench; while a shelf holds some mess-tin lids, two
water-bottles, some bread, and a tin of bully beef. Two sand-bags for
salvage and rubbish hang at the end of the bay. Round the corner two
"bivvies"--mere hovels about three foot high, wet and slimy--complete
the "home comforts" of this cheerful abode. From one of the "bivvies"
protrude two pairs of muddy boots and four legs covered with
clay-stained puttees. Their owners are enjoying a well-earned rest,
having spent most of the night prowling about in No Man's Land.

Taking the next communication trench, Gloucester Avenue, we could make
our way up to the front line to a point not far distant from the top
of London Road; or, better still, we could branch off along Pretoria
to the right-centre company's support line. Gloucester Avenue was a
good winding trench cut through what had once been cornfields. Pretoria
was even better, and brought you out close to the point where the
Panama Canal joined the support line. By the end of the canal were two
deep concrete dug-outs, both small and damp, and in one of these the
signallers and in the other the Company Commander were to be found. In
the latter, as you carefully descended the steps, you would have been
able at once to recognize, not only from the orderly appearance of
the spot, but from the number of parcels from Fortnum and Mason, that
Captain Eccles dwelt there; and, sure enough, there he was, looking as
if he had just stepped out of a band-box, with Company Sergeant-Major
Heyworth sitting by his side working at the company card index.

After making your way along the support line round interminable
traverses, you squeezed your way up Timaru to the front line.
Thence you went along past Wessex Avenue, which requires no further
description, to the end of Locality 12. From here a path led up to the
support line--Gap "M" being impassable--and from the support line by
another path to the left centre company's front line--quite a decent
stretch of bays and traverses with a wilderness of ruined trenches
in their rear. Half-way along this sector you turned up a miserable
ruin of a trench to Captain Steward's Headquarters, a concrete dug-out
set like an oasis in a desert of derelict trenches. In spite of the
neighbourhood, Captain Steward would appear perfectly groomed and with
a cheerful smile, though denouncing the Germans for making him so
uncomfortable. Another dug-out adjoining was used by his subalterns.

To visit the left sector it was now necessary to go right down Edmeads
Avenue and then up Sussex Avenue, whence you could go to Hobbs
Farm along Cambridge or along Fusilier Avenue to Captain Wyatt's
Headquarters at Goodwood. The latter was another of these concrete
dug-outs, and the owner, whether Captain Wyatt or any other Company
Commander, generally had some severe remarks to make about the enemy,
who gave the left sector but little rest. To reach "A" Company's front
line you went along the support line to Irish Avenue, which from there
back to the subsidiary line was good enough, but forward of the support
line was hardly better than a track, and, except for some canvas,
pretty well exposed to view from all points of the enemy front line.
The whole of the left front line, in fact, from Edmeads Farm past Hobbs
Farm, the ruins of which had almost been obliterated, was a maze of
battered and derelict trenches, only entered by the inquisitive or by
some luckless individual who had lost his way. The left company front
was built into the side of a small ridge, and possessed no general
parados, though most of the posts were self-contained. It ended some
two or three hundred yards from the Lys, though from the enemy point
of view it probably appeared to go much farther. It was very much
knocked about, and it was hard work to maintain even a semblance of
respectability.

Such is a brief outline of the Houplines sector. Its main features were
its size, its maze of useless and ruined trenches, and its lack of
lateral communication. There was not a single dug-out that would have
stood the direct hit of a 5·9, and only a few that one would have cared
to be in when hit by a "whizz-bang."

The day after relief (April 27th) was spent quietly enough. We had not
yet got used to the presence of so many gas cylinders in the front
line, and were not anxious to provoke unnecessary retaliation. The
Germans were also very quiet. Some shrapnel, a few "whizz-bangs," six
"pineapples," and two medium "minnies" made up his total expenditure
for the hours of daylight. Sniping from the Chicken Run on to "A"
Company's front line was, however, fairly persistent, but no casualties
occurred that day. "A" Company of the 2/7th K.L.R. moved into the
subsidiary line that evening as a more permanent garrison, and occupied
the line between Battalion Headquarters and Cambridge House.

At midnight a gas attack from the whole front of our Brigade and that
of the Brigade north of the Lys had been planned, but was cancelled at
the last minute, as the wind proved unfavourable. However, the right
battalion was not warned in time, and released their cylinders. We
much regretted that ours could not be released too, as the clearing
of the line had been arranged, and already several cylinders were
leaking badly. But on the night of March 29th, after many "alarums and
excursions," our two flank companies and the Brigade north of the Lys
let off their gas, while projectors were flung into Frelinghien at the
same time. It was a very bright night, and the whitish cloud could be
seen rolling across No Man's Land. The wind was rather light, and the
Germans must therefore have obtained sufficient warning. A number of
coloured lights shot up into the air, bells rang, and rapid rifle and
machine-gun fire commenced, which caused the inquisitive to expose as
little of their heads above the parapet as was feasible. "Whizz-bangs"
and "minnies" began to rain on the front line, where the special R.Es.
working the cylinders and the garrison of infantry had a somewhat
uneasy time. Our orders were to send an officers' patrol to inspect the
damage in the enemy's front line. Fortunately, however, this futile and
dangerous performance was countermanded, as No Man's Land was itself
full of the gas, which the wind hardly carried beyond our trenches, and
three of the R.Es. and four of our men were gassed, and a corporal was
killed. Otherwise no one was hit during the retaliation. In due course
the R.Es. withdrew in motor lorries and the rest of the men returned to
the front line, where the sickly smell of gas was strongly in evidence.

Now that most of the cylinders were empty we paid less regard to the
enemy, and determined to try to damp the ardour of the sniper, who had
already shot two of our men through the head. Every effort from the
front line to spot the fellow had failed, but the observation post in
the support line had detected him, though the distance from there to
the Germans made it futile to try a shot with a rifle. Major Brookes's
assistance was accordingly invoked. A telephone line was run out to the
observation post, and a trial round was fired with an 18-pounder. This
was sufficiently near for the purpose, but unfortunately was too much
for the sniper, who promptly retired. However, a few rounds of "battery
fire" were delivered, and the area in the immediate neighbourhood of
the sniper's lair was greatly disturbed. We knew he was not hit, but
_he_ knew that we had spotted him, and from that moment his activities
ceased.

[Illustration: Photo by Gale & Polden Ltd., Aldershot.

THE OFFICERS-WOKING, FEBRUARY, 1917.]

The next day, April 30th, a great aeroplane fight took place high over
our line. The day was perfect, and it was a wonderful sight to see the
aeroplanes twisting and doubling and hear the thin rattle of their
machine guns. Suddenly one of the enemy's machines commenced to fall,
with a tell-tale streak of smoke trailing behind him. In a moment the
grey smoke became a vivid red, and the burning machine came roaring
down, crackling and spluttering as the ammunition went off in the
flames. For a few minutes it seemed that it must come down right on
the top of Battalion Headquarters, but eventually it crashed about two
hundred yards away on the open stretch between Battalion Headquarters
and Spain Avenue. Both the occupants must have been dead before the
machine reached the ground; the pilot was burned beyond recognition
in the machine; the observer, an artillery officer, fell out about
fifty feet from the ground, and among his papers we found a secret
correction card for artillery shooting with aeroplane observation. All
attempts to salve anything from the machine proved fruitless. It burned
and smouldered for more than twenty-four hours, and its proximity was
rendered dangerous by the exploding ammunition.

The question of our billets now began to exercise our minds. The 2/7th
K.L.R., in spite of remonstrances, had been located at first in a row
of houses close to the Houplines Level Crossing. In that position
they had been continually shelled, and the powers that be had finally
decided to move them back to a more salubrious locality. This we were
very glad to hear, because, other things being equal, billets that are
not regular targets for enemy artillery are distinctly preferable.
Casualties in billets are always more trying than elsewhere, as they
generally seem so gratuitous.

In the Houplines sector more than in any other our snipers and
observers had found plenty of scope for the exercise of their special
talents. The battalion observation post was in an upper room of a small
house in the Rue Solferino, a narrow street which ran off the main road
close to Tissage Dump. The Germans had kindly put a "dud" 5·9 through
the gable end, thereby providing an excellent view point. The official
apparatus installed in this spot was a telescope working on a pivot
which was fixed to a quadrant. The observer sat on a chair raised on a
rough platform to the necessary height, while next to him sat another
man to make the necessary written notes of observations. In addition to
a blanket to screen the shell-hole, the observation post was supplied
with maps and compass, and also a telephone to Battalion Headquarters
and the battery immediately in rear. A fine view of the enemy trenches
and the ground in rear was obtainable from this observation post. In
addition, there were three sniping posts in the front line, from which
subsequently P. G. Jones, Maddocks, Matchett, and Corkill all secured
definite "hits"; while for additional observation purposes there was
a natural observation post half-way up Irish Avenue, about level with
the support line, from which much valuable information of a more local
description was obtained.

On May 1st the activity of the hostile artillery began to give evidence
of registration on the left half of the battalion front, and support
lines, important trench junctions, and communication trenches received
direct hits or bursts sufficiently near to be suggestive. That night,
as had been anticipated, it being the German Labour Day, sounds of
shouting were clearly heard from the enemy lines, while a regular
"Brock's benefit" was kept up for a considerable time. Next day the
registration was even more marked, so early on the morning of May 4th
2nd-Lieutenant Hodgkinson and a small party of stout-hearted men from
"D" Company (Walmsley, Mann, Moore, Evans, Woods, and Bissell) crept
out to try to kidnap a German sentry. They worked their way up to a
post in Centaur Trench opposite the Pont Ballot salient, and got right
under the parapet without being detected. Hodgkinson was, in fact, just
climbing into the trench to effect the capture when, most unluckily,
the relief arrived, and one of them spotted the blackened face of
Rifleman Mann peering over the parapet. Dawn had broken and the game
was up. Bombs were hurled in among the Germans, the fellow who had
spotted Mann receiving a back-hander from a Mills grenade in the face,
and the party raced for home under a hail of machine-gun bullets, rifle
grenades, and "pineapples." No casualties were sustained, and, as the
G.O.C. Division remarked, "it was a bold and useful bit of work," which
only failed through sheer bad luck.

At 10 p.m. the 2/7th K.L.R. began to arrive, and at 12.40 a.m., relief
being complete, the various companies and platoons were making for
Tissage Dump, where transport awaited the Lewis guns and trench stores.
"C" Company moved into the subsidiary line.

Two companies were billeted in large houses in the Rue Jesuit adjoining
Brigade Headquarters. These must have been fine residences once, and
even the ravages of war had not been able entirely to destroy their
architectural pretensions. What was of more importance, they were very
strongly built and had good cellar accommodation.

The other two companies were at 57, Rue de Lille, where the battalion
had spent the evening _en route_ for the Rue du Bois. Battalion
Headquarters were in a good house, No. 3, Rue Bayard, a turning
off the Rue de Lille. You entered through a gateway into a paved
courtyard, surrounded by various domestic offices, and thence up a
few steps into a roomy building with a delightful garden behind.
The dining-room contained a book-case full of beautifully bound
volumes. The Quartermaster's Stores were situated in a large house
in the Rue de Lille, opposite which the truck-lines for the trenches
started. Mule-drawn trolleys as far as Tissage Dump, and from there
smaller trucks man-handled, were the methods of transport employed.
The transport lines remained at Bac St. Maur. For the men there
were several good estaminets dotted about the town; while a good
meal for officers could be obtained at the "Au Bœuf," an ordinary
French provincial restaurant, while the more fastidious frequented
"Lucienne's," opposite the church of Notre Dâme. There was also
"Madame Burberry's" shop, where most items of clothing and field kit
were on sale.

The period in reserve was not without incident. To begin with, General
Headquarters' pamphlet S.S. 143, "The Training of Platoons for
Offensive Action," had just been issued. It contained a scheme for the
employment of a platoon as a small force of all arms--one section Lewis
gunners, one rifle grenadiers, one bombers, and one riflemen, with
a platoon headquarters consisting of the officer, platoon sergeant,
runner, and signaller. Each battalion was now ordered to tell off
one platoon for special instruction in this latest scheme. This was
not particularly difficult, except that the average strength of a
platoon and its four sections never approached the strength of the
"War Establishment" platoon for whose instruction these illuminating
pamphlets were always designed. The selection of ground proved far more
difficult, but an open space in the vicinity of the Nieppe Bridge,
where some old practice trenches stood, afforded reasonable facilities
at a moderate distance from the billets. The Second-in-Command, Major
H. K. Wilson, undertook to find a site, and ultimately decided upon
what seemed suitable for the purpose. Unfortunately, the site selected
had also been chosen as the position for certain silent batteries
and defensive machine-gun companies, who watched Major Wilson making
notes in his notebook and arrested him as a suspected person. Major
Wilson persuaded the machine gunners to accompany him to Battalion
Headquarters, whence, after he had been identified, they retired,
feeling no doubt that they had at least done their duty. The incident
caused considerable merriment, but to no one more than to the officer
chiefly concerned.

The shelling of Armentières by the enemy had recently become a daily
and nightly operation. Our gradual increase of guns of major calibre
hidden among the houses--there were two 8-inch howitzers in a garden in
the Rue Bayard--was quite sufficient to attract hostile notice. Apart
from Armentières itself, the enemy had also been busy shelling many
back areas, and in retaliation the Second Army decided on a general
back area shoot, commencing at 7.30 p.m. on April 7th, and all ranks
were warned to keep under cover.

The shoot duly commenced, but in spite of the din we heard what
sounded uncommonly like a barrage on the 2/7th K.L.R. front. However,
we imagined, as at first did they, that this was the anticipated
retaliation. At 7.45 p.m. a false gas alarm occurred, but at 8 p.m.
the order came for the battalion to stand-to. The raid for which we
thought the Germans had been registering had actually come off, and,
as ill-luck would have it, at the same moment as our area shoot. At
10.15 p.m. we were ordered to send up a company to reinforce the 2/7th
K.L.R., and "D" Company duly moved off, returning at dawn the next
morning without casualties. A further barrage at 10 p.m. caused a
second stand-to, but the fire died away in a short time, and normal
conditions were finally re-established.

On May 8th "A" Company relieved "C" Company in the subsidiary line,
and full particulars of the raids were obtainable. The enemy had
certainly put up a very fine barrage, but fortunately "C" Company had
escaped casualties, though Captain Eccles, returning from Battalion
Headquarters, had a narrow escape, and had been forced on one occasion
to make a somewhat hasty descent into a muddy ditch.

Preparations now commenced for the relief, an operation which became
easier every time the battalion returned to the old sector. On May 11th
the Lewis gunners moved in, and the trollies were soon busy trundling
up and down the Houplines road, which became more unhealthy every day.
Shelling was, in fact, much more frequent and general by day, though
our nights also were regularly disturbed by the scream and crash of
the shells landing in the houses. The area round the Pont de Nieppe
attracted special attention, and many civilians were killed or wounded.
The gas-works, where a number of guns were concentrated, the churches
of Notre Dâme and St. Vaast, the Rue Sadi Carnot, the railway station,
and other places, also came in for their share of attention, till
really one began to think that perhaps the trenches were preferable to
the billets.

On May 10th a Padre was attached to us, the Rev. M. T. Eland, and it
was arranged that he should share Captain McHugh's elegant quarters at
Tissage Dump. This was a reasonably intact house, containing, amongst
other choice bits of furniture collected from the neighbouring houses,
some beautiful plush-covered chairs. The area just beyond Tissage Dump
itself used to come in for a good deal of shelling, but McHugh slept
unconcernedly on the first floor, and paid little attention to the
noise of falling débris and the hum of flying splinters. It was a handy
place of call for visitors, often rather breathless in consequence
of having traversed the last part of the Houplines road in what the
text-books call "a series of short rushes."

Just before the relief the enemy expended more than his usual quantity
of ammunition on Armentières, and we were not sorry when he desisted
shortly before the march to the trenches was scheduled to commence. The
relief itself was carried out without any interference on the part of
the foe. The companies had been moved round, and the order from right
to left was "A," "B," "C," "D." To our disgust, we found that great
quantities of gas were in process of being installed in our sector,
projectors being located near the cemetery and on the extreme left.
Every night large carrying parties of the Irish came struggling up the
trenches; and for the benefit of those who have never had personal
experience, it may be stated that gas cylinders are no light weight
and are awkward things to handle, apart from the extremely unpleasant
nature of their contents should a flying piece of shell happen to
cause a leak. One very wet night, when the duck-boards, slippery with
the rain, made the task more than usually distressing, Captain Eccles
was passing down Wessex Avenue on his nightly tour of inspection.
Suddenly the sounds of highly-coloured language from the direction of
the Fry Pan attracted his attention. Now, it was quite easy to turn
into the Fry Pan unwittingly, and even in daylight very far from easy
to find your way out again. An unfortunate carrying party, loaded
with cylinders, were found by Captain Eccles just completing their
third tour round this circular redoubt--an occupation which, when the
frequent low overhead traverses were concealed by the blackness of the
night, would warrant the employment of any form of bad language. Great
apprehension existed in the minds of the authorities, and not without
reason, lest the enemy should detect what was going on. Cylinders and
gas were never allowed to be alluded to as such either in the front
line or on the telephone. They were called "eggs," and incidentally
by the men many other names not fit for publication. In addition to
this, companies had to send out covering parties into No Man's Land
to prevent the approach of any inquisitive German. Lying flat on your
stomach in wet mud and grass on a drenching night, and for two hours
at a stretch, is most dispiriting work, especially if you have to live
in your soaking garments for the next eight days, with the added joy
of expecting that you may be in the front line when the gas is being
released. Fortunately, during these operations the enemy remained
exceedingly quiet. Artillery destructive shoots drew no response; and
a rifle grenade and light trench mortar battery shoot on Cell Trench,
and wire-cutting in front of Centaur Trench by medium trench mortar
batteries, produced no effect on him whatever.

The damage done by the raid barrage was found to be considerable. A
trench which had been laboriously constructed from the left-centre
Company Headquarters to the detached post at Hobbs Farm, previously
only accessible viâ Cambridge Avenue, had been completely obliterated.
It appeared to have been in the 100 per cent. zone of the barrage
line, and though to save time one did go along it, one risked constant
exposure.

The observers now began to notice considerable movement in and behind
the enemy's line. Men were seen wearing packs, others popped their
heads over the parapet, and transport was heard at night. A relief was
suspected, and on May 17th the suspicion was more than confirmed by
the unusual activity of the Germans. Their attitude became suddenly
aggressive. "Pineapples" became unpleasantly frequent on the left
company sector, and a sniper reappeared in the old loophole in the
Chicken Run, which had not been used for fifteen days. Fortunately,
the larger "minnie," which commenced operations just before our last
tour ended, showed no signs of activity; it was probably part of a
"travelling circus" brought up for the raid. Anyhow, "pineapples,"
small though they may be, are noisy and destructive, and made the
left company sector very unpopular. There was also a long-range light
"minnie" which carried nearly to the subsidiary line. Artillery
activity, though spasmodic, was considerable on some days. The
left-hand communication trenches--Edmeads and, more particularly, Irish
Avenues--were heavily shelled, direct hits being not infrequent, and
parties were always being sent to clear away the fallen earth. On other
days a few rounds on Houplines and two or three bursts of shrapnel over
the cemetery were the only signs of activity.

On May 20th Colonel Fletcher went on leave, and Major H. K. Wilson
assumed command of the battalion.

On the night of May 20th we made an attempt to get into Centaur Trench,
but the party was detected, and had to retire hastily under a shower of
grenades. At 2 a.m. the next morning the enemy returned the compliment
by trying to cut off a bombing post situated between Edmeads and Hobbs
Farms. The operation commenced with a sudden shower of stick grenades,
and a couple of men were seen trying to get through the wire into
the derelict trenches in "N" Gap. Bombs were thrown and rapid fire
opened, and Rifleman "Gink" Bailey distinguished himself by standing
on the parapet and slanging the Germans to the full extent of his very
adequate Irish-American vocabulary. The Germans, disliking this, or at
any rate not appreciating their general reception, withdrew, and a
patrol was immediately dispatched, which located a dead German on the
wire. He proved to belong to the 14th Bavarian I.R. Shrapnel was called
for on the enemy's front line to welcome their return, after which the
night settled down to its normal state once more.

As the spring advanced the trenches lost a great deal of their barren
unloveliness. What had been mud or greyish-looking grass now became
a deep and luxuriant carpet of bright fresh green, with many a wild
flower peeping out here and there. The trees, which so far had been but
gaunt skeletons, began to cover their nakedness with fresh foliage.
The sides of Gloucester Avenue were gay with poppies and white
daisies; Sussex Avenue became an ideal country footpath, dotted with
may-trees; and even that forbidding-looking spot the Orchard assumed
quite a cheerful aspect. Round Cambridge House the lilacs blossomed
out, both purple and white. Roses bloomed in the old gardens near
Tissage Dump, and later on a small crop of strawberries and currants
was gathered there. A stroll round the line in the early morning was a
real pleasure. Just as the dawn was breaking you could wander anywhere.
Not a shot would be fired and the guns were silent. As the sun climbed
higher in the heavens, the pleasant smell of fresh, moist earth filled
the nostrils, instead of the stale stench of which one had grown so
sick. Dew-spangled grasses and fern overhanging the trench brushed
your face as you passed along. In the rapidly clearing mist that
heralded the hot day even the ugliest features of the line seemed to
take on a certain softening outline, a certain grace in harmony with
the countryside. High over No Man's Land you could see the fluttering
lark, and all the air was resonant with its trilling notes. The call
of the cuckoo sounded from the trees, and the chatter of sparrows and
finches in the overgrown hedges filled the air with a merry sound,
while but a few hours previously the nightingale had been pouring out
its full-throated melody. "Oh, to be in England now that April's here!"
How we re-echoed Browning's wish, with the substitution for "April"
of the month of June, at which we had now arrived! How true the words
seemed, how deep their significance! Beautiful as Nature was around us,
rejoiced as we were at this delightful contrast to the hideousness of
strife, yet it increased the bitterness and made one feel more keenly
than ever the loathsome misery of war. How one pictured to oneself the
peaceful beauty of the English countryside, so like this in outward
appearance, and yet so different in reality! How one longed for the war
to be over, to wander once more in the fields on a summer's morn, with
the black clouds of war cleared away for good, and not merely lifted
for a few precious moments!

Boom! The "morning hate" has begun. With a start we come back from
our pleasant dreams. Another stifling day is before us, and the
never-ending struggle with its monotony, its destruction, its every
detestable feature, claims us once more for its own.

One of the special delights of the Commanding Officer was crawling
about exposed parts of the sector by day. It was not only his anxiety
to acquire an accurate knowledge of his sector, though that was
certainly one reason; he wanted to find out where every derelict trench
led to, what secrets lay hidden in those areas of abandoned chaos in
which the sector abounded, and no one could ever have known his sector
better than did Colonel Fletcher. But apart from all this, his old
big-game hunting instincts were aroused. This time he was not tracking
the shy koodoo or the skulking lion, but matching his brains and his
woodcraft against the ever-watchful German. Major Geddes more than
once accompanied him on these excursions, as he crawled and wriggled
on his stomach from place to place, now lying up to use telescope and
field-glasses, now tracing out all the intricacies of our own or the
enemy trenches. Home the pair would come at last, with the perspiration
streaming down their faces. "Well, that is the best afternoon I have
had since the war started!" the Commanding Officer would exclaim, as
he sat mopping his face and drinking large cups of tea.

The gas attack had originally been fixed for the night of May
20th-21st. The targets selected for the projectors were Census
Support Line, Les 4 Hallots Farm, and Battalion Headquarters at
Census Farm. The inclusion of the latter target caused some people
certain misgivings, as they had a suspicion--afterwards confirmed
from a captured German map--that our own Headquarters were not
unknown to the enemy. The usual invasion of our sector by "N" and "L"
Special Companies, R.E., took place on the night in question. Extra
telephones had been rigged up, and in addition cryptic messages about
"presentations of medals" and "indents for bicycles" came frequently
over the 'phone. At the last moment the wind veered round, as it
frequently did at night. It was too late to cancel the orders by
message, so a special signal rocket was fired from Headquarters. It
was a red, green and red rocket. The first one lighted refused to
move at all; but the second, a parachute light, went up with a roar
for about twenty feet, and then sailed off along the subsidiary line.
Fortunately, it was successful in stopping the discharge of the gas.
We took a more than usual interest in this discharge, as it appeared
that we could not be relieved till it took place. However, in the end,
when we had been in ten days, the attack was definitely postponed for
twenty-four hours to allow the relief to be effected. On the early
morning of May 22nd 2nd-Lieutenants Hodgkinson and Little with patrols
attempted entries into the German line at Cell Trench, opposite Hobbs
Farm and at Centaur Trench respectively. Both were spotted and heavily
bombed, Little being slightly wounded, but not sufficiently for
evacuation. Lieutenant Alcock two days previously had been hit in the
eye by a splinter from a "pineapple," and had retired temporarily to a
Base hospital.

In spite of rather depressing accounts from the 2/7th K.L.R. as to
shelling in the vicinity of billets, we were glad to find, on May
22nd, that the relief, twice postponed, was really to take place.
Dug-outs or "bivvies" are not particularly comfortable--some, indeed,
very much the reverse. You get tired of stooping, of working by the
light of one miserable candle, of eating at odd times and of sleeping
at odd hours. The daily and nightly tours round the line become more
than usually wearisome. Duck-boards seem to get more treacherous, angle
irons and stray bits of barbed wire seem to project still farther from
the sides of trenches; while for the man in the post--and everyone
else's position is bliss compared with his--the time must have been
trying indeed. Not that it was particularly dangerous, though even in
quiet sectors most posts have their highly unpleasant periods; but it
was infinitely uncomfortable and trying to the last degree. Besides,
there was the pleasant hope that the wind would surely be favourable
for one night at least out of the next eight, and then the 2/7th
K.L.R., and not we, would experience the delights of a gas discharge,
to the accompaniment of the applause of the enemy, which was usually
of a vigorous nature. However, the relief took place at last without
any hitch, and the early hours of May 23rd found us back in our old
billets in Armentières. The routine was the same as last time--working
parties, one platoon for special training, and the remainder general
training. The new extension for the box-respirator was also fitted,
and in addition we received twenty horse respirators, to which even
the mules raised no violent objection. The opportunity was also taken
to have all the swords sharpened. Two officers at a time were attached
for instruction to A/286 Battery, R.F.A., and as the latter's quarters
were situated in a comfortable orchard, the two days allowed passed
pleasantly enough.

On May 26th "B" Company, who had remained in the subsidiary line, were
relieved by "D" Company. Early the next morning sounds were heard
suggestive of a gas attack. The great bell at Houplines Level Crossing
was tolling. Runners flew off to rouse the companies. Officers appeared
at doorways, clothed in pyjamas, gum-boots, and box-respirators;
while Lieutenant James, the Gas Officer, sniffed the early morning air
like a war-horse scenting battle. Each person in turn thought he smelt
chlorine--or was it phosgene? In every case it turned out to be the
smell of a stale cigar, the proximity of the refuse-bin, or something
else equally harmless. Gas there was none, and at length, after
conversation with the Brigade, it was discovered that a few gas shells
had fallen near the sentry at the level-crossing, and thus produced an
alarm. So back we all went, cursing, to bed, everyone feeling a bit
resentful that after we had been thus disturbed no gas had come after
all.

On May 29th the gas stored in Houplines was at length released. The
only part that we took in the proceedings was the posting of six
stretcher-bearers at the top of Irish Avenue, an unpleasant spot,
though fortunately they sustained no casualties.

During these days in billets the presence of the Battalion Orchestra
made itself felt, with excellent results. The instruments had been
brought over for us by the Division. It was a considerable item
for regimental baggage, consisting as it did of ten instruments.
Sergeant Lawton, battalion sanitary N.C.O., was in charge of the
orchestra, and played the trombone when his duties permitted. Rifleman
Garrod, the first violin, was a player of exceptional merit from the
Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. As a soloist he was particularly
fine. The remaining members of the party, all well above the average,
were--violins, Lewin, Hardacre, and Lance-Corporal Hume; viola,
Edmondson; 'cellos, Kaye and Kennedy; bass, Lance-Corporal Buckley;
trombone, Williams; drums, Burden; and librarian (self-styled and
self-appointed), Rifleman King. Lance-Corporal Bell, from the
Quartermaster's Stores, occasionally performed on the oboe. Rifleman
Collins, an excellent violinist, had been left behind, unfortunately,
in England suffering from influenza.

By arrangement with the other units of the Brigade, our contribution
to the recently formed Brigade Pioneer Company was reduced by the
strength of the orchestra. In return for this, the latter was always
loaned to another battalion while we were in the line, and also for
special occasions when we were out. In addition, it used to play for
our own mess on guest nights, and very delightful it was; and also
occasionally for the Divisional Concert Party's performances, and
for the Brigade and Divisional Commanders. It was in great demand
everywhere, and there can be no doubt that the results more than
justified the employment of the personnel thus utilized. Another
invaluable asset was Rifleman Kessen, a very prince of conjurers. He
seemed to have an infinity of excellent tricks, and he fooled you under
your very nose in the most baffling fashion.

On May 31st the battalion once more relieved the 2/7th K.L.R. The
arrangement of companies--"A," "B," "D," "C" from the right--was due
to the forthcoming raid, to be carried out by parties from "A" and
"B" Companies on Centaur Trench, opposite the Pont Ballot salient.
This necessitated "A" and "B" Companies being as near the proposed
area as possible. Colonel Fletcher arrived in the line from leave at
midnight, and with characteristic energy proceeded at once on a tour of
inspection.

This spell in the line was one of exceptional activity. To begin
with, there was the impending raid, which, being our first, occupied
nine-tenths of our thoughts. There were innumerable special patrols
to examine the wire and the approaches to the points of entry; the
artillery wire-cutting operations had to be settled; the incessant
visits to observation posts and the selection of forming-up places,
raid headquarters, regimental aid posts, etc., to be arranged for. In
addition to all this, the Battle of Messines took place during the
tour. Immediately after that came orders for following up the enemy, if
he voluntarily evacuated his trenches; and before we were half through
that came schemes for the defence of Armentières in the event of an
attack by the Germans. But we must take things in order.

The morning after relief (June 1st, 1917) the enemy dropped a
"pineapple" into a Lewis-gun post of "C" Company, killing three men
and wounding two. His activity in this direction was now so great that
steps had to be taken to cope with it. Two light trench mortars were
permanently established in the front line, and for every "pineapple" we
returned a number of Stokes shells. The teams did not have a pleasant
time of it, as the Germans made every endeavour to knock them out; but
they stuck to it gallantly, and by the end of the time their efforts
had become singularly effective, although the enemy later retaliated by
producing a medium "minnie."

A slight scare was caused by the alleged appearance of a German near
"C" Company's cook-house, at the left extremity of the subsidiary line,
and patrols spent several nights down by the river trying to catch the
supposed intruder. Whether there was anything in the rumour or not was
never satisfactorily settled, but it would have been perfectly simple
for him to get there. Between our left and the river there was a gap of
a couple of hundred yards, which after weeks of fine weather had become
dry and hard, and, as subsequent investigations after the Armistice
proved, there was ample cover for a whole battalion to come up unseen.
Moreover, the German raids on the left sector must have revealed to
them the absence of any serious opposition in that part of the line. In
fact, the liability of the battalion to be outflanked on the left was
the subject of a strong memorandum from Colonel Fletcher, but nothing
was done except that some wire was erected later, and a Lewis gun post
located in the cellar of a ruined house close to the river and in line
with our support line. The presence of fresh earth on a footbridge
crossing a branch of the Lys, which was discovered by the patrol,
certainly gave some colour to the story of "C" Company's cook.

June 4th, 5th, and 6th produced barrages on the Messines Ridge; they
took place each afternoon, and lasted for about an hour. It was
understood that barely half of the guns to be employed on the day were
in action, but it was a wonderfully awe-inspiring sight to watch the
effect of the mass of shells crashing down on the slopes of the ridge.
The heavies in Armentières and our own 18-pounders took part in these
preliminary barrages, with the result that the shelling of Armentières
by the enemy became intense, and particularly in the vicinity of
battery positions, which constant firing had now revealed to the enemy,
and produced the most severe counter-battery work on his part. Our
trenches, too, received marked attention. The enemy seems always to
have been suspicious of an attack on Frelinghien, and he set to work
on the left and left-centre company sectors with great determination.
Shells of a calibre not usually employed in ordinary trench warfare
began to plough up our communication trenches, Irish Avenue especially.
Cambridge House was frequently shelled intensely, and, in fact, there
was no part of our sector that did not receive considerable attention
daily. The wire-cutting on the right provoked the enemy terribly, and
each time it was carried out severe retaliation took place. Houplines
road was now shelled regularly with great bursts of 5·9's and heavy
shrapnel. One 4·2 battery kept up such an incessant fire into the
vicinity of Tissage Dump that we used to call it the "rising tide," the
noise of the stream of shells as they passed over sounding not unlike
the steady onrush of the sea.

Quesnoy, nearly opposite to us, we used to bombard heavily, and some
part of it was usually on fire. Frelinghien was frequently almost
hidden in red dust, while Wytschaete Ridge for long periods at a
stretch looked as if it were enveloped in a sandstorm. Every night
north of the Lys one or both sides were raiding, and the rumble of
barrages, the red bursts of shrapnel, and the stream of coloured
rockets continued well on into the daylight.

[Illustration: Photo by Gale & Polden, Ltd., Aldershot.

SERGEANTS' MESS--WOKING, FEBRUARY, 1917.]

At 3.10 a.m. on June 7th the Battle of Messines opened with the
most tremendous mine explosions and the most magnificent barrage
that can be imagined. It was a lovely morning, and there was not a
cloud in the sky. With a stupendous roar and upheaval that baffles
description the mines exploded. Simultaneously the whole weight of the
artillery gathered together for the occasion, and hidden away in every
conceivable place, opened on the enemy. From their trenches lights of
many colours shot into the air, mutely appealing for assistance from
their gunners. These were not long in replying, but our counter-battery
work, which had left them in false security during the preliminary
barrages, was dealing faithfully with them now. For a few moments the
ridge stood out clear and distinct. Then clouds of smoke and dust shut
out the view, and it was only by the alteration in the sound that we
knew that the barrage was creeping forward, and we waited anxiously for
the telegrams announcing the result.

During the first few hours we were unmolested. A 4·2 battery opened on
Houplines ten minutes before zero, but switched as soon as the barrage
opened. About 7 a.m., however, "whizz-bangs" came down in a regular
barrage on the front line, and then high explosives up and down the
subsidiary line for about a couple of hours. Between two and six in
the afternoon the enemy concentrated on Tissage Dump, putting over
300 high explosive shells into that locality during the four hours.
Aeroplanes were very busy, and a German machine dropped two bombs about
fifty yards from Battalion Headquarters. The enemy balloons were in a
state of great excitement, being hauled down whenever a plane appeared,
till at last one of them apparently got tired of this, broke away,
and sailed off out of sight. One thing that greatly interested us was
that both this day and the next the enemy shelled his own front line
opposite the Brewery. Up to the end of this tour the Germans continued
intensely active, the left sector and Irish Avenue receiving the lion's
share of the shelling.

One very necessary piece of work was completed before we quitted the
trenches--the cutting of the grass in front of the parapet. It was
now so high and so close to the parapet that it entirely obstructed
the view through the periscope, and made it quite possible for a man
to work his way unseen right up to the trenches. Sickles had to be
obtained and parties went out nightly to "cut the hay crop." To do this
just in front of the posts alone would, of course, have revealed their
exact position to any inquisitive airman, and a strip had therefore to
be cut along the whole length of the front line.

At 9.30 p.m. on June 9th the leading company of the 2/7th K.L.R. began
to arrive. At the last moment, owing to the continued harassing fire
of the Germans on to the Houplines road, we decided to proceed out by
Lunatic Lane in the right battalion sector. This was a long and winding
communication trench which so far had sustained little damage. It
brought you out by the Lunatic Asylum, and from there you went up the
Rue Gambetta and so on to the Rue de Lille. "C" Company remained in the
subsidiary line.

On arrival in billets we were somewhat astonished to learn that we
were under orders to move at one hour's notice, and that guides to
bring up reinforcing troops were always to be kept in readiness at
Battalion Headquarters. The retirement of the enemy, after the Battle
of Messines, from his remaining trenches north of the River Lys had
caused the Higher Command to think that a partial retirement might be
effected opposite our front also. Consequently some most elaborate
schemes to meet this emergency had been issued, and we were now in the
throes of trying to draw up, in conjunction with the 2/7th K.L.R., a
scheme of movement in the event of the enemy's voluntary withdrawal.
We were therefore not a little surprised to find signs that an attack
by the Germans might now be expected. The mental effort required
to concentrate your attention simultaneously on an advance and a
defence--and both had to be fully provided for--and at the same time
to attend to the all-absorbing orders and arrangements for the raid,
proved somewhat exhausting. For clearness' sake we will take them one
by one, but it should be remembered that three sets of orders, and in
addition a salvage scheme (a kind of corollary to the advance orders),
were all drawn up at the same time, and the difficulty of remembering
which you were working on at any particular moment was by no means
imaginary.

Operation Order No. 22, dated June 15th, 1917, began with the words:
"In the event of the enemy voluntarily evacuating his present front
line system opposite the battalion frontage, companies will be ready to
move forward and occupy the sectors of the enemy line with minimum of
delay." The orders ran into fifteen headings with seven appendices and,
it need hardly be added, three pages of subsequent amendments, dated
July 1st. As the orders, fortunately, were never put into operation, it
will be sufficient to deal with them quite briefly. Each company was
allotted an area in the enemy front line, and on the word "floreat"
fighting patrols, consisting of one officer and twenty-four men, were
expected to dash across No Man's Land "at ten minutes' notice." The
difficulty of this initial part of the proceedings did not at first
occur to the higher authorities, but some weeks later the time allowed
was suddenly increased to six hours!

A consolidating platoon, armed with picks, shovels, sand-bags, etc.,
followed as a carrying party; and, finally, Company Headquarters moved
into the German front line, and Battalion Headquarters moved up to
Edmeads Farm. The Brigade Pioneer Company, assisted by working parties
from the reserve battalion, were responsible for digging communication
trenches from Fiji Road on the right and Hobbs Farm on the left, to
the enemy's front line. The Reserve Battalion Headquarters and two
remaining companies moved up to the subsidiary line.

To assist in these operations advanced dumps, containing vast
quantities of R.E. stores and bombs and small-arms ammunition, were
gradually accumulated in the vicinity of the front line, to the great
delight of the Germans, who shelled them cheerfully. An elaborate
system of flags and identification marks was also evolved. In addition
to this, it being now presumed that we had to all intents and purposes
occupied the German trenches, the collection of salvage from our old
trenches became a matter of considerable moment, and comprehensive
orders were issued for that work also; but these we may pass over.

To change for a moment from the offensive to the defensive, it was
also considered possible that the enemy was likely to make an attack
on Armentières, in the hope of obtaining a good headline, "Capture
of Armentières," for his newspapers, which might divert attention
from the rumour that Messines had fallen. Moreover, his possession of
Armentières would have made our tenure of Messines Ridge extremely
uncomfortable, if not impossible. Consequently, an extensive system of
routes for reinforcing troops was worked out, and guides instructed
for this purpose. Men not required to carry bombs and R.E. material
to the front line dumps were now collecting similar material in
Armentières itself. Others were busily engaged wiring up the streets,
building machine-gun emplacements, and generally trying to make up in
a few weeks for the total neglect of the old defences, which during
the last two years had decayed to a degree almost beyond repair. A
Major was appointed O.C. Armentières Defences, and the place began to
hum with life and movement. Throughout the proceedings the foe kept
up continual shelling with every description of gun, and made life in
the town anything but comfortable. The swimming-baths, which had been
so acceptable, had to be abandoned owing to the fact that they only
had a glass roof, and shells came perilously near it. Training was
confined to the vicinity of billets, or more often to the cellars. The
destruction of the big brewery near Pont de Nieppe, whence came our
beer supply, so needed in those scorching hot days, helped to complete
our unhappiness. The baths near Erquinghem were also destroyed, thanks
to the action of the Heavy Artillery Commander, who had placed some
60-pounders just in front of them. The sight of the soldier bathers,
in every kind of dress or undress, running wildly across the fields in
the company of the French laundry-maids certainly produced considerable
merriment; but the price paid for this piece of humour, the entire
demolition of the only bathing-place reasonably handy, was thought to
be excessive.

The only people who really appreciated the spell out of the line were
the raiding party. Captain Steward, Captain Parker, Lieutenant Clarke,
2nd-Lieutenant Moseley, and 100 men were comfortably installed close to
Croix du Bac in the quarters of the old Divisional Reinforcement Camp,
which had recently been moved to Steenwerck, the present railhead.
Division Headquarters had removed from the White Chateau at Sailly,
and were now in Croix du Bac; and a field close to their offices was
secured for the training-ground. Here a replica of the enemy trenches
was made with tapes and turned sods, care being taken to add sufficient
"duds" to mislead the aerial photographer should he chance to wander
over. Aeroplane photos were studied till the head nearly swam to ensure
that the reproduced line corresponded as exactly as possible with the
original. Throughout these proceedings Captain Glyn, G.S.O.3, was most
helpful in procuring photographs and maps. The choice of the sector to
be raided was limited by the necessity of having reasonable approaches
to our own front line, and these the right sector alone provided.
Moreover, the old road passing through the Pont Ballot salient made
a fine natural guide, and was selected as such for the right flank.
Centaur Trench and support, with their two communication trenches,
Centaur Lane and Centaur Row, formed roughly speaking the area of
operations. There were three parties--Captain Parker and twenty men
of "D" Company, who were to enter on the right; Lieutenant Clarke and
sixteen men of "A" Company in the centre, though Clarke himself was to
remain on the parapet with a 'phone to our own front line to Captain
Steward, O.C. Raid; and 2nd-Lieutenant Moseley and thirty-one men of
"B" Company, who were to enter on the left. The route up to the gap in
the wire was to be indicated by tapes. Bridges were to be laid and the
parties formed up in No Man's Land between sign-boards by zero minus
three minutes. The barrage was to lift and the raid commence at zero
plus two minutes. The duty of the blocking parties, etc., was worked
out to the smallest detail and rehearsed again and again.

The co-operation of medium trench mortar batteries, light trench mortar
batteries, and machine guns was on a large scale both for barrage and
neutralizing purposes. The artillery consisted of 18-pounders and 4·5
howitzers, fourteen pieces in all. All this time the Quartermaster was
busy collecting revolvers, knobkerries, torches, and all the other
minor but necessary articles of equipment, and many were the alarums
and excursions.

During this period in billets the reorganized seniority of the
Territorial Force was published, all temporary rank being cancelled. We
suddenly found ourselves with no Majors and only four Captains, while
several of our Company Commanders fell to 2nd-Lieutenants. The system
of promotion to acting ranks was, however, at once instituted, and we
resumed most of our original ranks, though Major Charles Wilson lost
his majority, only one Major being allowed instead of two. About this
time Captain Bowring took over command of "A" Company.

On June 12th "A" Company relieved "C" Company in the subsidiary line,
and on the 15th the battalion relieved the 2/7th K.L.R. The route
chosen was Buterne Avenue, the common communication trench between
ourselves and the right battalion. Owing to the destructive shooting
of the enemy, Irish Avenue had more or less ceased to exist; and "C"
Company, who once more found themselves in this unhealthy sector, had
to use Cambridge Avenue and Regent Street, which made their relief a
slow and tedious process. "B" Company was on the right, and then came
"A" and "D" Companies. Owing to the raiding detachment being left out
of the line, "D" Company had to be assisted by a loan of men from "C"
Company; while "A" and "B" Companies were supplemented by various
employed men--buglers, grooms, etc.--normally left out of the line.

The sector was again full of gas, and the persistent efforts of the
R.Es. to discharge it seriously hampered the patrolling that had to
be carried out nightly in the vicinity of the area to be raided, and
which was of vital importance. The real nature of the bridge over the
ditches, which eventually proved to be a brick culvert, had long been
in dispute, and Lieutenant Royle, the Intelligence Officer, spent
every night while we were in Armentières with the Battalion scouts
in No Man's Land up to and including the night of the raid. In spite
of his multifarious duties as Intelligence Officer and his two daily
summaries, he never spared himself in his efforts to make certain that
the gaps were open and the routes beyond dispute. The enemy activity
had meanwhile still further increased. Irish Avenue was reduced to a
mere chain of shell-holes and débris, while every communication trench,
and in fact every part of the sector, was well hammered. We were
surprised and pleased to find how well the gas cylinders stood being
knocked about.

On June 20th a practice disconnection of all telephones was ordered
by the Division. The result as far as we were concerned was highly
satisfactory, Battalion Headquarters getting a brief respite from
those in authority. As regards the internal routine work it made no
difference, as telephone messages had been reduced, at any rate during
the daytime, to the lowest possible figure. The repeated warnings
that the enemy could pick up messages, and later the presence of
a Police Listening Set in the subsidiary line, had greatly cooled
our enthusiasm for this form of communication. The daily report of
conversations picked up by the Listening Set was, in fact, a source of
much merriment, the angry remarks of Major Brookes one day to someone
at his battery causing special amusement. We also received a rather
futile complaint from the authorities, so to prevent a repetition of
similar rebukes we made a suitable arrangement with the Listening Set
personnel, who were located in a dug-out they had long coveted; and
after that our conversations, when picked up, were treated with more
discretion.

The enemy evinced considerable nervousness at night, possibly owing
to our active patrolling. On more than one occasion he bombed his
own wire. His apparent unpreparedness when our raid took place was
therefore the more surprising.

On the morning of June 20th a serious loss was sustained by the
Division. Lieutenant-Colonel Short, C.M.G., the artillery Group
Commander, had arranged to visit our Headquarters to discuss certain
details in connection with the barrage for the raid. His departure from
our Brigade Headquarters happened to synchronize with the arrival of
General Broadwood, who decided to walk up with him. They stopped for
a few minutes on a rather exposed bridge in Houplines to examine the
lie of the land. Whether they were observed or whether it was simply
bad luck will never be known, but the bridge at this moment received
a direct hit from a 5·9, and both officers were badly wounded. Their
orderlies at once carried the General to a place of comparative safety,
but while this was being done a second shell arrived, killing the
Group Commander on the spot. General Broadwood was taken straight to
Estaires, but his wounds proved mortal, and he only lingered for a
few hours. He was buried in the cemetery at Sailly. The whole affair
was a most unhappy tragedy, and the loss of the General was keenly
felt throughout the Division. Colonel Short had been indefatigable in
his efforts to ensure adequate support to our raid, and his cheerful
disposition and amusing stories had made him very popular at Battalion
Headquarters.

[Illustration: Photo by Gale & Polden, Ltd., Aldershot.

THE BATTALION, WOKING, FEBRUARY, 1917.]

June 21st was a busy day for all. The final preparations for the raid,
which was to commence early in the morning of June 22nd, were now in
full swing. The bridges had been brought up overnight, and were duly
concealed in the front line. Raid Headquarters, the advanced regimental
aid post, and all the other details, were now being finally completed.
The raiding party were brought up in lorries to the Houplines Level
Crossing after dark, each man with his face blackened and his label,
bearing number and name, tied to the top button of his jacket. All
other traces of identification had been removed. About 11 p.m. the
party was moving down from the subsidiary line with many a handshake
and a "Good luck, boys!" The men were all as keen as could be. The
official report has been reproduced as it stands. It gives a faithful
account of what happened. That the raid was not so successful as we had
hoped--that is to say, that no identification was obtained--was due
to several causes. First, Captain Parker himself and several of his
party were knocked out at the very start by pressing too close on the
barrage and being caught in a short burst of shrapnel. Next, Lieutenant
Clarke's party ought to have had an officer actually in the trench
with them; the men were willing enough in all conscience, but lacked
the controlling influence of the officer's presence. Then Lieutenant
Moseley's party missed their way, owing to fresh guides having to be
substituted at the last moment. Although we did not claim it as a
successful raid, yet there is no doubt that the effect on the battalion
was good, and the men who had taken part in it were keen to make
another attempt. Colonel Fletcher's disappointment was great, as he
had slaved from morning till night to make the raid a success. Captain
Parker's wounds were more serious than had at first been realized, and
at one time nearly proved fatal. His reception at the Casualty Clearing
Station was typical of his luck. He was, of course, wearing a "Tommy's"
jacket, and so by mistake was put into a "Tommies'" ward, and was
welcomed on his arrival by the words: "Gawd, Bill, here comes a b----
nigger!"

P. G. Jones, a Battalion Scout, who fell on this occasion, was one of
our best and keenest young soldiers, and very popular with everyone.
His death was a real personal loss to all who knew him.

       *       *       *       *       *

REPORT ON MINOR OPERATION CARRIED OUT IN HOUPLINES
SUB-SECTOR ON THE NIGHT OF JUNE 21ST-22ND, 1917.

"_Strength of Party._--Three officers and 97 other ranks.

"_Point of Exit._--C.29.a.35.80--C.23.b.96.34.

"_Points of Entry._--C.29.a.48.17--C.29.a.62.41.

"_Time._--1.6 a.m. Entry reported by telephone.

"_Object._--(_a_) To continue a harassing policy and prevent the enemy
from withdrawing troops.

"(_b_) Killing and capturing as many of the enemy as possible.

"(_c_) Obtaining identification and gaining information regarding the
enemy's system of defence.

"_Narrative._--Minus five minutes zero: Bridges laid across ditch.

"Minus three minutes zero: All parties formed up across ditch.

"Zero: Barrage commenced exactly on time. All parties commenced moving
on objective.

"_Right (Parker's) Party._--This party was so keen to get into enemy's
trenches that they followed the barrage too closely, and in consequence
suffered the following casualties:--

"The leading scout was killed, and the officer who was close behind
him was wounded in the leg and neck and could not go on. The N.C.O. in
charge of the leading party was fatally wounded, and two of his men
were incapacitated. The N.C.O. in charge of the second party was hit,
and one of his men was killed and another wounded.

"The remainder of the party carried on and entered the enemy trench
as arranged. The party who were detailed to work along the trench to
the right found a concrete dug-out, fitted with iron doors, in the
front-line trench as anticipated, at about C.28.a.48.10. There was
a light in the dug-out, and three men were seen inside wearing blue
uniform with Red Cross brassards. They were summoned to come out, but
refused, and a bomb was therefore thrown into the dug-out just before
the men inside had time to slam the iron door. The bomb exploded, and
groans and cries were heard, and also a noise which sounded like a
trapdoor being shut. Our men tried to force the door open, but were
unable to do so. The muzzle of a revolver was then put through a
loophole in the iron door and six shots were fired.

[Illustration: PONT BALLOT SALIENT HOUPLINES.

AREA RAIDED 21·6·17.]

"Efforts were again made to open the door, but proved unsuccessful.
Whilst trying to force this door, fire was opened on our party from the
traverse next beyond; this was replied to, and the Huns ran away. Much
valuable time was spent trying to get into the dug-out for the purpose
of obtaining identification, and owing to this, and also the casualties
already suffered, this party were unable to get on to their farthest
objective.

"In the meantime the party working along the trench to the left were
bombed by the enemy, and when they retaliated the enemy climbed out of
the trench and disappeared to the rear.

"Progress was then continued along the trench, and a dug-out was found,
but on examination it proved to be empty. Shortly after this some of
the Centre Party were met and connection established.

"Just after the withdrawal signal had gone up--zero plus 22
minutes--two Germans were seen approaching the front line over the top
from the direction of their support line. Shots were fired at them and
they withdrew. It is not known whether either of them were shot.

"Parker's party then left the enemy trench, bringing with them a rifle
and bayonet which were found in the trench.

"On the way back those men who had been hit on crossing No Man's Land
were all brought in except one man, who could not be found. It is
believed that this man was killed. On reaching our trenches it was
found that another man was missing. He was last seen soon after leaving
the enemy's trench.

"At zero plus 33 minutes the N.C.O. i/c Right Party observed one green
light and one golden rain rocket fired apparently from the enemy's
subsidiary line in C.23 or C.24.

"The trench is very deep and narrow, and no duck-boards were found.

"_Centre (Clarke's) Party_.--This party crossed No Man's Land in the
order practised. They found the ground much torn up by shell-holes,
over which it was impossible to proceed quickly. They found the gaps
in the wire, but had to zig-zag a good deal to get through. There was
a considerable quantity of cut wire lying about, which further delayed
their progress. They entered the enemy's trench at about C.20.a.44.21
(_i.e._, about 30 yards farther to the right than had been intended).

"2nd-Lieutenant C. W. Clarke established telephone communication with
O.C. Raid at zero plus 7½ minutes, and sent a message to the effect
that his party 'had entered enemy's trench.'

"The trench was deep, and in getting in the leading man stumbled and
lost his rifle, which he was unable to find in the darkness. Thereupon
another bayonet man was brought up to take his place. The first party
then proceeded along the trench to the right, and immediately found
a dug-out, into which a bomb was thrown. After the bomb had exploded
the dug-out was entered and two dead Germans found. An effort was made
to tear a button off the tunic of one of those men, but it was on too
tight. At this moment a scuffle was going on outside the dug-out with
a Hun who had come running down the trench, shouting 'Surrender,' and
our man inside the dug-out hurried out to see what was happening, and
picked up a German rifle on his way. The Hun was placed in charge of
two men, to be passed out of the trench as soon as the two men waiting
on the parapet had been called to the spot. Whilst the two men were
holding the prisoner, one of them was wounded and let go. The prisoner
thereupon wrenched himself free from the other man and escaped to the
left. One of our men chased him along the trench, but, going over
strange ground, was unable to catch him; he came to a communication
trench (Centaur Lane), and, hearing footsteps, threw a bomb into this
trench. As by this time the withdrawal signal had gone up, he withdrew
and joined his own party.

"In the meantime the rest of this party had started working along the
trench to join up with the right party, which they did. This party was
followed by a small party which had been detailed to proceed along
Centaur Lane and block it. They expected to find this communication
trench to the right of where they entered the front line, but owing to
the fact that they had unconsciously entered the trench farther to the
right than had been intended, this trench was not found until too late.

"A bomb store was found and blown up as the party were leaving the
trench.

"This party had one casualty (referred to above), and he was brought
back to our trenches.

"No S.O.S. signal was seen and no artillery fire was opened until this
party were half-way back across No Man's Land.

"_Left (Moseley's) Party_.--Moseley's party failed to enter enemy's
trench. The two scouts who had reconnoitred the gaps and knew the
ground well were sick four days before the raid took place. The new
scouts did not know the ground as well, possibly, as some of the other
members of the raiding party; also their reconnaissance was made
difficult by enemy working at their gaps, and having covering parties
out; also they had not the same opportunity of rehearsal as they should
have had in laying tapes, etc. In consequence, after passing through
the first gap, a doubt arose as to direction owing to other members of
the raiding party thinking that they knew best, with the result that
several parties tried to get through impassable wire. The main party
moved to the left eventually, followed by other parties, and lost
direction. While this was going on one of the scouts found the proper
gaps, dashed after the party, who reorganized, and the leading men
reached enemy's trench when return signal went up. In this Rifleman
Bamber was wounded; he was found by Rifleman F. Taylor, who bound up
his wounds, and as he was not certain of his direction, he waited for
daylight, and brought the wounded man in the same morning at 10 a.m.
This party had three rows of wire to negotiate, the second and third
rows consisting of heavy knife rests, etc., and, the grass being very
long, gaps were not easy to find.

"_Casualties._--Two killed; Lieutenant Parker and six other ranks
wounded; one missing believed killed.

"_Action of the Enemy._--There is no doubt the enemy had no idea he was
going to be raided. His action was extremely weak and slow in beginning.

"It is very doubtful if he inflicted any casualties on us.

"His barrage did not start until about zero plus 10 minutes, and then
increased in intensity by degrees. His fire was directed chiefly on our
front line (the shells falling just short of and just over our trench)
and partly on our support line and subsidiary lines.

"The enemy's resistance in his trenches was very weak. Several men were
seen running away.

"_Summing up._--The raid, unfortunately, failed in its chief objects,
for no prisoners or identifications were obtained, though there is
little doubt that four, and probably several more, Germans were killed
or wounded. Had the left party succeeded in entering the enemy's
trench, there is every probability that more damage would have been
done, and identifications, if not prisoners, obtained.

"The support of the artillery was excellent, the wire had been well
cut, and the barrage started precisely at the time arranged.

"The medium and light trench mortar batteries were also most effective,
and completely stopped all enemy machine-gun fire.

"The machine-gun barrages were all that could be desired.

"The reconnaissance had been well done. Enemy posts were found where
they had been expected. Suspected machine-gun emplacements were
adequately dealt with either by artillery beforehand or by my trench
mortars during operations.

"Signal communication worked well. Three special lines had been
laid to Raid Headquarters. The raiding party established telephone
communication from near the enemy's trench with commendable speed.

                       (Sgd.) "W. A. L. FLETCHER, _Lieutenant-Colonel_,
                        "_Comdg. 2/6th (Rifle) Bn. Liverpool Regiment_.

  "_June 24th, 1917._"

       *       *       *       *       *

At 9.15 a.m. two men missing from the raid suddenly appeared in our
line, one of them wounded. This showed how easy it was to get into our
trenches unobserved. Artillery was very active against us all that day.
In the course of two hours and a half Hobbs Farm and the detached post
received over 120 rounds from a 4·2 battery, while at times it seemed
as if our wire in that vicinity was the real target. Spain Avenue, the
Orchard, Panama, Pretoria, were all singled out in turn; but probably
this was merely a cloak for the German activities on the left.

The following night the Brigade north of the Lys carried out a raid,
and the enemy seemed very uneasy opposite our left company front,
sending up innumerable Véry lights, letting off bursts of rifle fire,
and industriously bombing his own wire.

The early morning of June 23rd found the German 'planes extremely
active. There was a flight of scarlet machines, which performed various
evolutions for our benefit, and at intervals swooped down and fired
into our trenches. Rifle grenades were fired at one very low-flying
'plane, and at another a light trench mortar shell with a shortened
fuse and a full charge. The latter must certainly have surprised the
pilot when it exploded in the air.

Every part of the left sector, front line, support, subsidiary, and
communication trenches was heavily shelled for long periods throughout
the day, while a regular box barrage was put round the detached post.
Even the new drain between Irish and Cambridge was regularly bombarded.
The wire in front of our trenches, never very good, was now reduced to
a mass of shattered fragments, and the impression that a raid must be
expected in the near future grew apace. Down to the day of the relief
this extreme activity continued, and it was difficult to keep Edmeads,
Wessex, and Cambridge clear of blocks. Irish was still being heavily
hammered, but, except for occasional repairs to keep up appearances,
we had long since ceased to use Irish as an avenue. 2nd-Lieutenants
E. E. Paul and J. N. Blake were slightly wounded in Fry Pan. On the
evening of June 26th the relief took place. We were fully expecting
the raid, and precautions were taken accordingly to prevent any sort
of congestion in communication trenches, all of which had now been
accurately registered. However, it turned out a wet night and as black
as pitch, and the relief was completed viâ Buterne Avenue at 12.37 a.m.
without molestation. "B" Company remained in the subsidiary line.

We found Armentières, as indeed we had expected, hardly less noisy than
the trenches. The Rue de Lille had become more of a storm centre than
previously, and the Quartermaster's staff were frequently compelled to
make a hasty descent to the cellar. The battalion mess, which had been
held in a magnificent house opposite, its ceilings decorated with fat
cherubs flying in a bright blue sky, was abandoned, as it seemed too
risky to have all the officers congregated together in such a shelled
area. The usual working and wiring parties, made none the pleasanter by
the double journey up the Houplines road, and the same efforts to carry
out training under difficulties were resumed. On the 29th "D" Company
replaced "B" in the subsidiary line.

[Illustration: Official Photograph by permission of The Imperial War
Museum.

RUE DE LILLE, ARMENTIÈRES.]

June had seen an increase in our monthly total of casualties. Four
officers, of whom one was the Padre (at duty), had been wounded;
fourteen men had been killed and sixty-three wounded. In addition,
2nd-Lieutenants Dugdale and Rule were at the Base marked "T.B."
(_i.e._, Temporary Base). Captain Gilling, who had for several months
been attached to the R.E., had now been invalided to England. Our
"effective strength" was reduced from 33 Officers and 744 other ranks
to 28 officers and 656 other ranks; and from the latter numbers had to
be deducted Lieutenant Parkinson and a number of men with the Brigade
Pioneer Company, Lieutenant Huntley at Brigade, and several parties
of men otherwise employed, but whom we were not permitted to strike
off our effective strength. Our total strength in France on June 30th
was 36 officers and 800 other ranks, a disparity in totals which is
eloquent of the number of "employed" on extra-regimental duties or on
courses. Leave had not yet begun seriously to affect our numbers.

July 3rd found us back in the trenches in order "A," "D," "C" and "B"
from the right. Relief was complete at 2.25 a.m. on July 12th. We
found that the enemy was systematically destroying the left company
sector, especially the communication trenches and the support line. The
latter, standing as it did on the forward slope of a ridge, presented
a splendid target, and it was impossible to keep pace with the damage
being done. The constant bombardment of communication trenches
threatened to isolate the left company altogether, and work was
accordingly commenced on a new cut from Cambridge Avenue to the front
line, called "Peter's Cat." The Heavy Artillery were also persuaded
to do some serious shooting on the enemy main communication trenches,
Celia Row and Celt Drive; but though this may have annoyed him, it did
not damp his enthusiasm in the least.

At 1.30 a.m. on July 11th the gas cylinders were opened and the
projectors discharged simultaneously. The noise of the latter was
tremendous, just like a mine explosion, while a huge black cloud of
great density drifted away from the scene of discharge. Unfortunately,
these projectors had been so long in the ground that a large number
fell in No Man's Land; two fell almost on the top of a post in "A"
Company's front line, while one landed practically on the top of "A"
Company's Headquarters. In spite of precautions, a number of gas
casualties occurred, and the usual kind of correspondence followed
between ourselves and the Higher Command. Only a case of "trench foot"
could exceed a gas casualty in the excitement it caused.

The patrols which had again been ordered to follow the discharge were
once more countermanded. It was most unlikely that they would have
achieved anything but casualties, though it would have been interesting
to know something of the results. Certainly an inspection of the enemy
line after the Armistice revealed frequent remains of projectors.
These, and detonated but unexploded medium trench mortar bombs, were to
be found everywhere. The same day the enemy vented his wrath on us in
no small measure, so we hoped we had done him some harm.

To give an idea of what patrolling was like in this sector, the
following account may be quoted as an example. The narrative was
written by a member of the patrol who took part in it:--"The patrol,
which left our trenches shortly after midnight, was composed of
Riflemen Bolshaw, Matchett, and Corkill, with the section sleuth,
Rifleman Dixon, in charge. The front line to the left of the head of
Irish Avenue was only held to within about two hundred yards of the
River Lys, the remainder of the trench from that point up to the river
being rendered untenable by the marshy condition of the ground and
the enemy command. Judging the Boche lines opposite to be similarly
governed, it was obvious that this deserted area formed an excellent
approach to Frelinghien. About this time a Boche withdrawal was
expected opposite. The object of our patrol was to advance as far,
and learn as much, as possible. The music encountered _en route_ for
the front line speedily dispelled any idea as to a Boche retirement.
A relief was in progress at the time, and Fritz must have spotted it,
for we ran into a veritable nightmare inferno. Rifle and machine-gun
bullets whined and snipped, 'pineapples' cracked, shells crashed,
and 'minnies' crumped! Added attractions were a dense fog and the
choking fumes of the explosions. Through it all the fitful glare of
the Véry lights grew and waned, and the _tout ensemble_ created in me
a stronger desire to enter No Man's Land than I had ever experienced
before. There, at any rate, we would miss some of the 'hate' floating
around. With due caution we made our way along the deserted trenches
to the bank of the Lys. We then struck out sharply to the right some
distance and lay down to listen. Barely distinguishable amid the din,
we could hear a knocking, rattling, and clanking to our immediate
front. A surmise that a Boche wiring party was at work was confirmed
a few minutes later by the location of its covering party at no great
distance from us. Our batteries about then commenced to retaliate for
the "strafe," and a breeze, till then absent, commenced to carry the
fumes from the Boche shells back home. Fritz's nerves were evidently
not at their best that night, for almost immediately the musical tinkle
of his gas alarms rippled south down the sector, incidentally causing
us no little amusement. Having discovered that, far from being absent
from Frelinghien, the Boche was busy improving his position there, and
further progress on our part being impossible, we emptied our rifles
into the darkness in the direction of the wiring party and withdrew."

During this tour Captain Charles Wilson left us for the three months'
Senior Officers' Course at Aldershot. There were not a few who imagined
the war would be over before his return. Lieutenant Burton took over
command of "D" Company.

On July 11th the battalion was relieved, and proceeded once more (less
"B" Company) to Armentières. One company was now required nightly to
press on with the new Peter's Cat Trench; and as this meant a long
journey and a night in the trenches, it may be doubted whether the
men welcomed the change from the line to the billets. If anything,
the Germans were still more active with their artillery, and movement
within the town was limited to what was absolutely necessary. The one
pleasure of mounted officers was a gallop along the banks of the Lys
from Armentières to Bac St. Maur. If you were energetic you could
follow the towpath as far as Estaires. Between Armentières and Bac
St. Maur there were some fine shell-holes, and the farm at the wooden
bridge by the Jute Factory had been gutted. Bac St. Maur bridgehead
was not infrequently shelled, and our old Battalion Headquarters was
found to have received a direct hit. Shrapnel used to be put over the
Bac St. Maur road even beyond Erquinghem, and the latter place itself
used to be shelled intermittently. For the battalion as a whole there
was little recreation, except that afforded by the estaminets and an
occasional concert.

The morning after relief (July 12, 1917) a 12-inch shell landed in
the Rue Gambetta next to the school where "C" Company were billeted;
and before there was time to do anything another one, most unluckily,
crashed right in and down as far as the cellar, where it exploded with
a terrific detonation. It was followed by a third, which fortunately
missed the building, but produced a crater which filled the whole
width of the street. The shell which entered "C" Company's billet
unfortunately killed five men and wounded six. It was a pleasant
greeting for Lieutenant Penrice and a draft of thirty men who had
arrived the previous evening. "C" and "D" Companies were now moved more
to the back of the town to a less exposed position. This move had been
under consideration for some time, as the vicinity of the Rue de Lille
was far from ideal. It was also decided to bring "A" Company from the
Rue Jesuit into a more "salubrious" neighbourhood. Brigade Headquarters
had already moved to the Rue Sadi Carnot by order of the Corps
Commander, who visited them one day during a period of enemy activity;
and certainly their former situation was far from pleasant--a feature,
however, in which it resembled most other parts of the town.

The Quartermaster, going down to make some arrangements, was
unfortunately badly wounded by a 5·9 which burst just in front of the
entrance to "A" Company's billet. His left thigh was damaged, and two
pieces of shell entered his stomach, one lodging in the muscles of the
back near his spine. He was hurriedly taken to the regimental aid post,
where Captain McHugh did his best for him, and thence to the Advanced
Surgical Centre, Estaires. No one thought he could possibly live, but,
with his usual determination, he won through; and though his health
was badly impaired,[1] he became in due course an S.O.3 in the Air
Force after the Army had finally thrown him out. For his services with
the battalion he was Mentioned in Dispatches. His place was taken by
Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant Wallas, for whom we tried in vain to
obtain a Quartermaster's commission.

[1] He died in June 1920, to the great regret of all who knew him.

At 11 p.m. on July 14th the sound of a heavy barrage disturbed us,
and shortly after one company was ordered to stand-to. We thought the
German raid had come off, but except for the heavy barrage nothing
further happened. The next night "C" Company relieved "B" Company in
the subsidiary line, and were probably not sorry to leave the "peace"
of reserve billets for a while. The post of extra company in the
subsidiary line was undoubtedly very popular. The area they occupied
was seldom shelled, and work could only be done by them at night and in
the vicinity of their posts. In the early hours of the morning, just as
"B" Company had got clear of the line, the barrage fell once more, and
after rolling the length of the front line from right to left formed a
box barrage on the left company front. It was a really heavy barrage,
and two working parties from our "A" Company, who were just stopping
work in Peter's Cat and had begun to arrive in Cambridge Avenue,
suddenly found themselves in the centre of a tornado of exploding high
explosives. 2nd-Lieutenant McWilliam, who was in command of one of the
parties, was, however, equal to the occasion, and with great gallantry
got the parties under cover, and then proceeded to reinforce the front
line. A number of Germans were seen coming across towards Cambridge
Avenue, and were called on to surrender. This they seemed quite
prepared to do, but an N.C.O. suddenly appeared, and they all fled back
together. One prisoner, however, was captured by Rifleman Mills.

The 2/7th were not sorry to see the arrival of our men in the front
line. They had suffered heavy casualties, and their position had become
none too pleasant, as the Germans had come round the left flank and
they were being bombed from behind as well as in front. Colonel Slater
and Captain Drakeford, his Adjutant, were in the left post of all when
the raid commenced, and had a pretty lively experience. Our men and the
men in the posts got in some useful shooting at the enemy as he fled
back to Frelinghien by the river road, and a dozen dead Germans were
found, in addition to the live prisoner. It proved on the examination
of the latter to have been a big raid; and had the enemy shown a little
more enterprise, they might have made the position of that left company
extremely dangerous. There is no doubt that the accidental presence of
our working party, with McWilliam to make full use of it, proved of
great service to the 2/7th K.L.R. In connection with the operations
Rifleman Mills and Rifleman J. Bailey were awarded the M.M.

The Light Trench Mortar Battery suffered severely, their S.O.S.
positions having apparently been well registered by the enemy, with the
result that in more than one case the team was buried, together with
their gun. "C" Company dug them out, and spent over six hours cleaning
up this part of the line, so great was the damage done.

During this period in billets our new Divisional Commander,
Major-General R. W. R. Barnes, C.B., D.S.O., called at Headquarters,
and was introduced to the Commanding Officer and others present.

On July 19th the battalion once more relieved the 2/7th K.L.R., "C,"
"B," "D," "A" being now the order in the line. The repair of the damage
done by the raid, the erection of a complicated wire entanglement
on the left (which was carried out, under Major H. K. Wilson's
supervision, with some difficulty, owing to the heavy shelling and
machine-gun fire), and the preparations for a two-company raid to be
carried out under Captain Eccles, were quite sufficient to occupy
our attention. In addition, one company of Portuguese was attached
to us for instruction, forty men being handed over to each company.
The relief of these men by another company on the night of the 20th
produced rather an amusing scene. It had been arranged that the old
company should not leave till the new company had arrived; but some
time before the latter were due, the junction of Gloucester Avenue
and the subsidiary line was packed with Portuguese, about half of
whom went out on their own initiative. Suddenly the Germans opened a
regular barrage of gas shells on Houplines Level Crossing, and the
wind blew the gas back to our subsidiary line. The commencement of the
barrage divided the relieving company into two halves, and likewise
the old company, one half of whom, going back without orders, had just
passed the Level Crossing. All those on the far side, relieving and
relieved troops alike, hurried back to their billets in Armentières.
The relieving troops, and a few others who had been stopped by the
barrage, rushed into the trenches and mingled with those waiting to go
out, thus producing the most complete confusion, to which the necessity
of wearing small box-respirators added the finishing touch. It was a
matter of no small difficulty to get them sorted out, especially as our
only means of communication with the Portuguese was in bad French, and
they all talked at once. However, eventually we got things straightened
out somehow, and order was once more established.

On July 22nd, 1917, to keep up a pretence that we were going to attack
Frelinghien, a practice barrage was put down on that place at 5 p.m. At
5.30 p.m. the enemy replied with a far heavier bombardment of our left
company sector, which in a few moments was entirely concealed from view
by smoke and dust. A Portuguese Commanding Officer and Adjutant arrived
that day for instruction, and Battalion Headquarters was the centre
of quite a heavy gas shell bombardment. Fortunately, the next day all
the Portuguese were removed. It was not a sector calculated to give
new troops a very favourable impression of the line. During that night
the battalion north of the Lys dug dummy assembly trenches opposite
Frelinghien, and the following day another bombardment was carried out.
A second company of 2/7th K.L.R. was now brought into the subsidiary
line, partly to enable more work to be done, partly in view of the
continued threatening attitude of the Germans.

At 1.55 a.m. on the 26th we discharged two torpedoes in the enemy's
wire on the left, and a dummy barrage was put down to divert attention
from a 2/8th K.L.R. raid about to take place on our right. We ourselves
were scheduled to do a two-company raid, under the command of Captain
Eccles, in a short while, and took considerable interest in the
reception accorded to the "Irish" raiding party. Our barrage was thin,
and the enemy paid little attention to it, but his retaliation fell
heavily on the 2/8th K.L.R.

The next two days brought intense artillery fire all over the sector,
and on the 27th heavy "minnies" appeared and blew in Captain Burton's
Headquarters with two direct hits, though, fortunately, he was not
there at the time and no one was killed. The night of the 28th, the
original night for relief, produced continuous shrapnel from about 9
p.m. to 3 a.m. all over the subsidiary line and communication trenches.
About 3 a.m. an aeroplane bombed Houplines Level Crossing, and a deluge
of heavy "minnies" descended on the left-centre company's line; but
on the whole we congratulated ourselves on our luck, little dreaming
of what was to happen on the real relief night, July 29th. The 2/7th
K.L.R. came into the sector without a shell being fired. Colonel Slater
and his Headquarters had just arrived, and the relief was progressing
well, when, with a sudden rush and roar, a terrific bombardment of
Armentières commenced. A regular semicircle of flashes could be seen
running continuously round the rear of the enemy line. This was clearly
no ordinary shoot, but a specially arranged show with artillery in
proportion. The relief was promptly stopped, and all troops stood-to.
Suddenly the S.O.S. went up from the right battalion, and our guns
opened up. This, however, shortly afterwards proved to be a mistake,
and as the German infantry made no move the relief continued. The din
was terrific. Apart from the actual noise of the batteries firing
and the unbroken rush and scream of shells overhead, the uproar in
Armentières was tremendous as buildings were smashed and battered and
the broken débris hurled about in all directions by this unceasing rain
of shells. Lieutenant Evans rang up on the telephone from Rue Bayard,
where he had gone to take over billets, and told us that the town
was soaked with gas, and warned us not to come out at present. Fires
now began to appear all over the town, but still the barrage did not
slacken. At 12.15 a.m. it stopped, but began again with renewed firing
at 12.45 a.m., though about 1.15 a.m. this was reduced to one or two
areas and some general miscellaneous shooting, lasting until about 4
a.m., when it was further reduced to action by one or two heavy guns
alone.

About 3 a.m. "B" Company began to thread its way down Buterne Avenue
towards the town. They were caught by a heavy bombardment in the
Houplines road, and had to take temporary shelter in odd cellars. "C"
Company and Battalion Headquarters followed, but escaped with nothing
worse than casual shelling. "A" and "D" Companies remained in the
subsidiary line, and very glad they were to do so.

Our arrival in the area of our billets was anything but cheerful.
A large part of the Rue de Lille, including the Quartermaster's
Stores, was in flames. The house next to Battalion Headquarters was
practically gutted, and both the company billets were blazing merrily.
The streets were littered with gas shells and the grey powder which
they had scattered. The houses also were full of gas, nor were any
of the gas-proof cellars better off. The first casualties were being
loaded up into the ambulances, the men gasping, vomiting, choking,
and with bloodshot, streaming eyes. Lieutenant Wyatt, who gallantly
carried a wounded man across Armentières through the bombardment,
was especially bad; and Quartermaster-Sergeant Jackson, who had been
found wounded and unconscious in the street, was little better. Most
of our advance party were in various stages of collapse, and the road
to the advanced dressing station was already marked by a small stream
of casualties. The civilians were in a terrible state. Gas protection
for them consisted merely of one or two "P.H." helmets per family, and
many of the poor creatures were now in agony from the gas poisoning.
Efforts to rouse the Town Major proved of little use, and a search was
instituted to try and discover some part of the town where the gas was
less pronounced. It need hardly be said that the Commanding Officer
was tireless in his efforts to relieve the situation, and in company
with Major H. K. Wilson searched the town from one end to the other.
It was on occasions such as these that the ordinary man got a glimpse
of what the Commanding Officer really was. After a prolonged search,
the schools between St. Vaast Church and the Convent were found to be
clear, and thither the remains of the battalion were removed. The men,
utterly tired out, fell fast asleep, but only to wake up and find that
they were blind. This was "mustard gas," till then unheard of by us;
and processions of blind men, led by one who could still see, became
more and more frequent. We did contrive to make some tea, but the rest
of the food was splashed with gas and was unusable; otherwise there
was little to be done. The shelling of the Place de la Republique now
began from a heavy battery, and the shells came perilously near the
open courtyard where we sat under the cloisters that surround it. A
thunderstorm broke suddenly, and probably did more to clear away the
gas than anything else could have done. That night and the whole of
the next day the Germans shelled the town fiercely. Splendid work was
done by Lieutenant Penrice, who had just gone to the Transport in place
of Hutchinson; by Lieutenant Clarke, who had gone to join a Brigade
Training School in course of formation; and by the transport drivers,
who worked with unceasing energy and courage.

By July 31st the following had been evacuated: Colonel Fletcher,
Major H. K. Wilson, Captains Eccles and Steward, Lieutenants Alcock,
Collinge, Evans, Royle, Rothwell, J. R. Paul, 2nd-Lieutenants E. E.
Paul, Pegge, Little, and Wyatt, the new Padre, Weaver, and the new
Medical Officer, Robinson. The Adjutant, who went on leave on the
29th, before the far-reaching effects of the gas had fully revealed
themselves, went into hospital on his arrival in England. Company
Sergeant-Major Heyworth had started with him but had been compelled
to remain behind at the M.D.S., Fort Rompu, being quite blind and
delirious. The stream of ambulances, lorries, general service waggons,
and farm carts pouring into and out of Armentières, was a sight that
will long be remembered. The whole of "B" Company and the whole of "C"
Company, except 2nd-Lieutenant Fell and one man, became casualties.
Of Battalion Headquarters there remained only one policeman and one
store-keeper. The rest, including the Regimental Sergeant-Major,
Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant, orderly-room, medical, sanitary,
and Quartermaster's staff, the cooks, the tailors, the bootmakers, and
all the other details, were evacuated. The Battalion Orchestra, who
were playing when the barrage opened, were badly gassed to a man, and
their instruments destroyed. Captain Bowring suddenly found himself
Commanding Officer, and his command consisted simply of "A" and "D"
Companies and the transport. The total casualties, including the
gassed, for July were: 17 officers wounded, of whom Lieutenant Collinge
died from the effects of the gas, 12 men killed, and approximately 428
wounded. Of these a few died later, and more were invalided from the
service, but a good many rejoined us in due course.

Before proceeding any further it will be as well to discuss briefly
the cause of this disaster. In the first place, this was only the
second concentrated bombardment with mustard gas that had occurred. The
first had taken place at Ypres a month before, and caused extensive
casualties, but the report of these did not reach us till the night
of relief, when it came with the usual correspondence, which, owing
to pressure of work, was not opened till after the disaster had
happened. The significance of the new form of gas should certainly
have been circulated earlier. With the dangers of ordinary gas we were
familiar, and in any case no one could have lived for five minutes in
the area most strongly affected without a respirator. The slightest
breath of this new gas was like inhaling red-hot air and choked you
immediately. After the first density of the gas had dispersed, the area
became comparatively clear, and the insidious and silent evaporation,
practically free from smell, caused no one inconvenience, and in
some places was so slight as to be barely perceptible. It was this
that affected the eyes, an entirely new phenomenon to us; and the
comparatively small number that suffered from serious internal gassing
proves that the ordinary precautions were taken. Moreover, most of
those badly gassed were actually caught in Armentières itself by the
original barrage, which began at the rate of hundreds of shells in
a minute. When it is remembered that as late as the spring of 1918,
after mustard gas had long been recognized and widely advertised, and
every possible precaution taken against it, a concentrated bombardment
still produced casualties running into hundreds, it is not so very
surprising that on the second occasion when it was used, and the first
as far as we were concerned, only about fifty escaped out of the total
troops in Armentières, consisting of two half battalions, some field
and heavy batteries, and some Royal Engineer, Machine Gun Corps, and
Trench Mortar sections. Of the civilian population, it is probable that
scarcely one single person got off unscathed.

This bombardment was the climax of our long period in Houplines.
We had been instructed to be as offensive as possible, in order to
divert the attention of the enemy by our aggressive tactics from
the operations scheduled to commence on July 31st, and now known
as the Third Battle of Ypres. Little glory attaches to a "feint"
attack, whether it be stationary or by movement; but if successful
it brings down upon you severe hostile attention, which has to be
endured without any compensating chance of sharing in the glory of a
great victory. That we succeeded in our allotted task, and that the
171st Infantry Brigade bore the brunt of it, we know not only from
what our Army Commander said, but because the Intelligence showed
that the Division kept two German Divisions pinned down opposite to
it right till the end, and this notwithstanding the fact that the
hostile artillery was about ten times as great as our own. The steady
increase of destructive shooting on the area immediately north and
south of the Lys, the regular "crashing" of all lines of communication,
the intense shelling of Armentières, culminating in the great gas
bombardment, prove conclusively that the enemy was daily expecting an
attack on Frelinghien, for which he imagined a force was concentrating
in Armentières. That our casualties were not greater was due to the
scattered position of the posts holding such a large sector, and to
our constant efforts to provide such protection as could best be
constructed under the circumstances.



CHAPTER V

FROM THE GAS ATTACK TO ST. HILAIRE--PASSCHENDAELE (FIRST TIME)--LOUCHES


The disorganization in the Brigade resulting from the gas bombardment
was naturally very great. The 2/5th K.L.R. and ourselves were reduced
by 50 per cent, not including Battalion Headquarters, and the relief of
the battalion for reorganization was therefore imperative. Accordingly,
on the evening of July 31st Captain Bowring, the Acting Commanding
Officer, was instructed to move out to Bac St. Maur, the 2/5th King's
Own Royal Lancaster Regiment taking the place of "A" and "B" Companies
in the subsidiary line. The move was made by sections, owing to the
continued shelling and the state of the roads, which had not yet been
cleared of débris. It was effected without incident beyond a drenching
from the heavy rain which came steadily down.

The work of tracing the casualties now began. Most of the battalion
records were half buried in Armentières. These were unearthed, and
Lance-Corporal Longridge tackled his new duties as Orderly-Room
Sergeant with the greatest determination and ability. Salvage work
was also carried out, and such remnants of the battalion's equipment
as were left from the fires and the subsequent looting were collected
at Bac St. Maur. Little time was allowed, however, at the moment for
reorganization. On August 2nd "D" Company and one platoon of "A"
Company were ordered into the subsidiary line of La Boutillerie to
relieve a similar force of 4/5th Loyal North Lancashires. On August
4th "the Battalion (less garrison of subsidiary line)"--so reads
Operation Order No. 33--relieved the 2/7th K.L.R. The "Battalion," in
fact, consisted only of three platoons of "A" Company and a few odd men
who formed Battalion Headquarters. This same force was inspected next
day by General Barnes, the Divisional Commander, who paid a very warm
tribute to the work that the battalion had done during the past two
months.

By the time Major H. K. Wilson returned from hospital, August 6th,
Captain Bowring, in spite of the enormous difficulty of the task, had
got the reorganization of the battalion well under way, for which
he deserved the very greatest credit, and for which, in fact, he
eventually received a "Mention." In this work he had been greatly
assisted by the remaining officers of the battalion, who discharged
their various new duties with great zeal and ability.

About this time Lieutenant Freeman joined us as Transport Officer. For
many years he had been with the A.S.C., and we were lucky to secure an
officer with so much experience in the management of horse transport.

On August 7th the 2/7th K.L.R. relieved our small garrisons in Croix
Marèchal, Elbow Farm, Chapel Farm, Smith's Villa, and Command Post; and
the battalion went into billets at Fleurbaix, where Captain Plumley,
R.A.M.C., reported as Medical Officer.

About this time Captain Alexander, London Regiment, who had been
Brigade Major for about a month, relieving Major Geddes, was
unfortunately killed by a bomb splinter while sitting in the Brigade
Headquarters at Fleurbaix. He had been badly gassed in Armentières,
but refused to leave. His death was greatly lamented. Captain P. H.
Hansen, V.C., M.C., acted as Brigade Major for a time, being in a short
while relieved by Captain R. W. Patteson, M.C., Norfolk Regiment, who
remained with us to the very end, and whose ability outrivalled, if
possible, even his great personal popularity.

On the evening of August 8th "A" and "D" Companies were attached to
the 2/5th K.L.R., and took over the Cordonnerie sector on the right
of La Boutillerie, probably the most peaceful sector in all France.
The trenches were well constructed and dry, and hostile activity was
normally of a very mild description.

But the fear that the enemy might intend a limited offensive on this
front had not yet subsided, and elaborate orders dealing with this
situation were still being issued. Meanwhile Battalion Headquarters, on
August 15th, returned to Bac St. Maur, where they had more than enough
to keep them occupied, as the first draft, consisting of 111 men, had
arrived the previous day. On August 16th Lieutenant-General Sir R. C.
B. Haking, commanding XI. Corps, presented Riflemen Bailey and Mills
with the Military Medal which they had been awarded in Armentières.

On August 18th "A" and "D" Companies rejoined at Bac St. Maur; and the
Company of the 2/5th K.L.R., who had been attached to us to strengthen
the "battalion on Divisional Reserve," returned to their own unit.
Drafts now came in apace. On August 18th drafts of 192, 61, and 131 men
arrived. After these had been posted, the draft of 61 men proved to
have been intended for the 2/8th K.L.R., and had to be given up. All
these parties were inspected on August 21st by Brigadier-General Bray.

On the 24th the battalion moved into Fleurbaix, finding posts for the
subsidiary line; and during this period two more drafts, of 79 and 45
men respectively, joined the battalion. The end of August found our
effective strength 756 men, the highest figure that we had achieved
since the end of February.

[Illustration: HOUPLINES ROAD, LOOKING TOWARDS ARMENTIÈRES.]

[Illustration: BOCHE FRONT LINE OPPOSITE LEFT SECTOR, HOUPLINES.
FRELINGHIEN IN BACKGROUND AND RIVER LYS IN FLOOD.]

On September 2nd the battalion--and it was a complete battalion
now--relieved the 2/7th K.L.R. in La Boutillerie: "A" Company on the
right, "B" in the centre, "D" on the left, and "C" in the subsidiary
line. Headquarters were situated at Foray House. This latter spot
had been heavily shelled on August 21st when the Portuguese held
the line, the intention of the Germans, according to the Portuguese
official report, being "to disorganize the Battalion Staff for future
operations"; which laudable object, the report naively added, "was
attained by 10 a.m., at which time the orderly-room, kitchen mess,
and orderlies' dug-outs were damaged." However, as far as we were
concerned, the enemy took very little interest in us, and the time was
exceptionally quiet. Moreover, the weather had turned fine and warm
again, which made life pleasant as well as peaceful. The left sector
occasionally received attention in the form of trench mortar shooting,
which, we remembered, was characteristic of that corner of France, but
it was not sufficient to cause any serious results.

On September 5th, to the great delight of the overworked remnant
of officers, a draft of thirteen fresh ones arrived--Carr, Eupen,
Harper, T. W. Jones, Lever, Novelle, Profit, Broad, Roberts, Robinson,
Rycroft, Upward, and T. L. Williams. This was a great accession of
power, as in the matter of men the battalion was already up to a good
fighting strength. But there was still much to be done. Specialists
had to be trained, N.C.Os. to be selected, and the general process
of amalgamating and consolidating the new material so recently come
together to be perfected. A new Quartermaster, Lieutenant Jackson, also
reported for duty at this time.

The tour in the line ended on September 10th, when the 2/7th K.L.R.
once more took over from us, and one platoon per company took charge of
the four strong points in the subsidiary line. The only incident in the
latter part of the tour was the attempt of a strong patrol of the enemy
to round up a patrol of four men from our battalion. The effort was
made with determination, and eventually our patrol had to scatter. All
reached our line safely, but three of them were wounded in the fight.

On September 11th Colonel Fletcher returned from hospital, and the work
of organizing and training the battalion was renewed with the greatest
energy. Specialist classes both for officers and N.C.Os. were soon
hard at work; while for the companies, now so very much changed in
their personnel, general training, inspections, close order drill, and
all other approved methods for increasing knowledge and morale were in
full swing.

Meanwhile rumours of a move to a rest area had long been rife. The
Division had now been doing trench duty continuously for seven months,
and it was quite time that it was taken away for a general overhaul.
During all those months we had been kept more or less continuously in
the trenches, with no opportunity to improve on the lessons learnt,
and nothing to inspire our men to increase their efficiency, beyond
the regular round of eight days in reserve and eight days in the line.
Already the ordinary wastage of trench warfare, not to mention the
disaster of Armentières, had deprived us of many of our best N.C.Os.
and men. We had, in fact, lost as many men as if we had been in a
battle, but there was not that feeling of satisfaction, such as results
from a successful push, to animate the remainder. However that may be,
the theory that we were going out to rest grew steadily, and for once
proved correct. The idea of a "rest" was not in itself particularly
attractive, except that it meant freedom from shell fire, permission
to give up wearing the box-respirator, and other little relaxations of
that description. As a "rest" in the ordinarily accepted sense of the
word, it had long since been discovered to be a fraud, being, in fact,
a period of intense activity. Still, it was a change, and possibly
meant that the Division would thereafter be required for work a little
more stimulating than trench warfare.

On September 16th we were relieved by the 15th Welch, and proceeded to
Neuf Berquin viâ Estaires, a distance of seven or eight miles, under
a very hot sun. After a day's quiet training here, we handed over our
billets to the 4/5th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, and set off to
L'Ecleme on September 18th. The Brigade marched as such, the battalion
starting at 8.20 a.m., and passing the Brigade starting-point at 10
a.m. The route led round the southern outskirts of Merville, and
thence viâ Calonne and Robecq. Our billets were in L'Ecleme, a little
hamlet about a mile south-east of Busnes. The morning proved cloudy,
which made marching pleasant; and, thanks to our early start, we were
in by midday.

Next day we were on the move again for our final destination, St.
Hilaire. On the way we passed through the comparatively large town of
Lillers, and then the village of Bourecq. The country, from being as
flat as could be conceived, now became pleasantly undulating and very
pretty, especially to eyes tired of the lifeless monotony of Northern
France. St. Hilaire itself is a delightful little village, consisting
of one long winding street with several little side streets running
off it. Billets were, on the whole, good, and you felt at once the
relief of being able to move without a box-respirator and steel helmet.
Thoughts of war vanished for the moment; the mind was occupied with the
pleasant rural scenes and the air of quiet industry that pervaded the
spot, so different from the wear and tear of war, and so infinitely
refreshing.

At St. Hilaire the battalion spent a month, and from the first it
became apparent that the "rest" was only a preparation for a "push."
The first day was spent by the Commanding Officer in inspecting the
battalion. This is a far more lengthy process than might be supposed,
and it is surprising what a length of time can be spent on it without
the inspector realizing that he has taken more than a few minutes.

The next day training areas, which had been duly allotted, were covered
with the men performing various mysterious evolutions. Here you would
see a whole company endeavouring to perform a wheel in close column,
with the Company Sergeant-Major and Platoon Officers now urging on,
now checking, the onrush of what from a distance is apt to look like a
race crowd breaking on to the course. From another part of the field
a sudden series of unearthly shouts betokens the efforts of a final
assault party to inspire terror in the hearts of rows of disinterested
sacks. Here, again, stand a group of men solemnly waving their arms in
a slow and stately movement. There comes a sudden order, and in a trice
the whole crowd are off, like a pack of hounds, to some neighbouring
object and back again. "Physical jerks," if properly carried out, are
full of variety.

In an adjoining field two rows of men are standing opposite each
other, roaring orders to the full extent of their lungs. This is a
rough and ready form of instruction in voice production, technically
called "Communication" or "Shouting Drill." In retired corners little
groups of men may be seen examining the intricacies of a Lewis gun or
a field telephone. Theirs is a more peaceful form of existence during
training, and one that is apt to lapse into story-telling, or even
solo whist, if opportunity permits. But all the while the Commanding
Officer and Adjutant (Captain Wilson, recently returned from his course
in England), the Regimental Sergeant-Major, the Company Commanders,
the Specialist Officers, and frequently the Brigadier and the Brigade
Major, are hovering about, asking questions, correcting, suggesting,
and generally supervising. Their assistance, it must be confessed, is
often more readily given than desired; but still that is part of the
business. "Red hats" have little terror for us. We are not worried with
that type of Staff Officer so frequently upbraided. Our Brigadier and
Brigade Major, our Divisional Commander and General Staff, are in the
main helpful and sympathetic.

In the midst of all this activity markers are called for, and a general
sigh of relief goes up. Training continues, and everyone has an eye
for the four men facing the Regimental Sergeant-Major. Here comes the
Adjutant at last. "Get your company together, Captain X., and fall in
on your marker as soon as you are ready." Work may have been proceeding
languidly till now, and you might have thought the men were tired.
Perhaps they were, but there is little sign of it now. Everyone is
suddenly galvanized into intense activity. In a remarkably short time
the battalion is formed up in mass, a few short orders are given, and
the column winds its way back to St. Hilaire for dinner. The day's
work is over. The afternoon is devoted to football matches and other
forms of amusement; the evening to the estaminet. On Sundays the full
ceremonial of Church Parade would be gone through, the band of the 6th
(now the Divisional Band) supplying the music.

On September 21st a further draft of 130 men arrived, and the battalion
was now stronger than it had ever been previously in France. This last
draft came from the East Surreys, and a very fine lot of men they were.
About this time General Bray met with an accident while riding, and
Brigadier-General F. C. Longbourne, D.S.O., arrived to take over the
Brigade. He was somewhat younger than General Bray, and of the very
best type of officer--considerate, courteous, and capable. He was as
popular as he was respected.

Training now became of a more specialized type, and it was obvious
that we were destined in due course to take part in the Third Battle
of Ypres, which was still raging with great fierceness, in spite of
the almost insuperable difficulties of the ground and the weather.
Attacks on strong posts by platoons and companies figured prominently
in our training, and the general formations for attack by a battalion
were the subject of continual study. Unfortunately, which is the best
form of attack was (and probably still is) a matter of warm dispute on
the part of the Higher Command. Some advocated two companies in front
and two in support; others three in front and one behind. Others,
again, supported "blobs," and another school "worms"; while a third
body of opinion pronounced "leap-frogging" the only feasible scheme.
The training in the attack, therefore, if lacking in continuity, was
certainly not lacking in variety. Sheets of instructions poured in upon
us in the most bewildering fashion, till even the most careful student
was muddled beyond hope of recovery. Eventually all officers more or
less abandoned any hope that they may have cherished of solving the
higher mysteries of the attack, and devoted their whole attention to
musketry, bayonet fighting, bombing, and so forth, trusting to the
general efficiency obtained to solve the final problem as set by the
enemy.

The commands of companies had now been arranged as follows: "A"
Company, Captain McWilliam; "B" Company, Lieutenant Penrice; "C"
Company, Captain Ormrod; "D" Company, Captain Fell. Regimental
Sergeant-Major Smith had returned from hospital, and Company
Sergeant-Major Heyworth, who had been acting in his place, became
Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant.

On October 8th the Division had the honour of being inspected by the
Commander-in-Chief, Sir Douglas Haig. Great preparations were made
for this important event, but, unfortunately, the day proved of the
wettest. We started at 8 a.m. and marched for about two hours in
pouring rain along bad roads and worse field-tracks to some exposed
ground above Estrée Blanche, where the whole Division was assembled.
The position was swept by a biting wind, and there we stood for nearly
two hours waiting for the Field-Marshal to arrive. After a general
salute, he rode round the ranks, and then the usual march past took
place. Everyone was soaked to the skin and half frozen, and right glad
they were to get on the move again.

Field operations on a large scale now took place several times a week.
They were conducted with such realism as modern resources can provide,
and under the eyes of General Maxse, the Corps Commander, and other
important personages. The former had a bright and breezy manner in
dealing with the problems of training, and his presence generally
produced considerable animation among those participating in the
operations. From the point of view of the ordinary man in the ranks,
these "stunts" are apt to be laborious and tiresome; but at the same
time there is no doubt that only under these more or less realistic
conditions can officers and N.C.Os. appreciate the value of the lessons
learnt in theoretical training.

The scene of operations on October 7th for the Divisional attack
was the practice trenches behind Estrée Blanche, near Enguingatte.
The march to the assembly positions through very pretty country was
pleasant enough, although the weather was cold and dull. After forming
up, the attack proceeded by waves, one of the orthodox methods at the
time, preceded by a real trench mortar bombardment, and accompanied by
a real contact aeroplane, for which flares had to be lit at various
intervals. The operations ceased at four o'clock, and as the battle
ended the rain began. From then till we got home it poured in torrents.
We splashed along field-tracks and muddy lanes as darkness fell, and
still it came down. As we entered our billets, about 8 p.m., we most of
us felt that field days were a luxury we would willingly forego.

The period in rest was now fast drawing to a close. It had at its
commencement seen the battalion strong indeed in numbers, but lacking
in cohesion and unprepared for any continued action. The pleasant
weeks at St. Hilaire, in spite of the vigorous training that had taken
place, had proved restful to the old members of the battalion, and had
given the new-comers a full opportunity of acclimatizing themselves to
their new surroundings. Everyone was fit, and ready for anything that
might come. Equipment was complete, specialists were replaced, and all
gaps filled. It was well that it was so, as the change in store for
the battalion was to be severe. Real hardships and real danger were
ahead, which the battalion, as expected, proved itself fully capable of
enduring.

The move commenced on October 19th, the battalion leaving the village
about 8 a.m. to join the Brigade column. At St. Hilaire, as elsewhere
in France, as well as in England, the battalion had become very
popular with their hosts, and many a tear was shed and many a kindly
"God-speed" uttered as we moved off. It was a good long march, about
fifteen miles in all, and though the day was cool a few fell out. The
new drafts, good men though they were, had not all yet appreciated
the Commanding Officer's inflexible rules in the matter of march
discipline. Our destination was the Renescure area, east-south-east of
St. Omer, and the road lay through Wittes and Racquinghem. Lieutenant
Goulding and a billeting party went on ahead to the Proven area; but
the battalion halted for the night in a series of small farms standing
in a piece of country not unlike the ground round Inkerman Barracks
at Woking. The morning of the 20th saw us early afoot. At 8 a.m. we
were formed up on the Arques--Eblinghem--Hazebrouck road, ready to
embus. There is always a certain amount of amusement at embussing.
To begin with, the buses almost invariably face in the opposite
direction to what is expected. Moreover, they are frequently of all
sizes and shapes, and thereby upset your most careful calculations.
For a man wearing full marching order, plus a blanket wound round his
pack, it is no easy matter to scale a lorry. A bus--that is, a real
bus--presents less difficulty; but the stairs are awkward, and the
constructional expert of the General Omnibus Company did not design
his seats to accommodate people requiring at least twelve inches of
spare seat behind the traveller before he can hope to sit down. The
scene to the uninitiated would appear to be sheer chaos. Each vehicle
is surrounded by a heaving and struggling mass; and when this has been
dissipated, there are still men who have to be almost literally forced
into vehicles which look hopelessly overcrowded already. The operation
takes time, but eventually the long column moves off. With the violent
motion caused by the lack of springs and bad _pavé_ the human mass is
gradually shaken into a more or less solid condition; and it is really
rather remarkable that at the end of the journey anyone is sufficiently
mobile to begin the process of debussing.

The trip was quite a long one, and it was after two o'clock when
Poperinghe was passed and the column came to a final stop. Everywhere
the "push" in progress was very evident. Poperinghe itself was seething
with troops of all arms, and the general air of activity so conspicuous
behind an "active" front was very marked. After the whole battalion
had been extracted, like sardines from a tin, a march of two or three
miles--a very trying performance with cramped limbs--brought us to
Plurendon Camp, in the Proven area, recently vacated by the Welsh
Guards; and a cheerless and bleak-looking spot it was, covered with
old canvas tents. After the pleasant billets of St. Hilaire, we felt
already a bit discouraged, but it was a perfect paradise compared with
some of the places to which we were about to be introduced. The weather
was also very unsettled, and the mud that the rain produced was quite
up to the best traditions of Flanders. To add to our discomfort, the
tea ration, which had been put on the mechanical transport, arrived
very late owing to a breakdown. We did not move the next day, as we
had expected, but on October 23rd proceeded in the morning to Proven
Station. After despatching the "Life-boat Party," the nucleus of 33⅓
per cent. of officers and men always left out by a battalion going
into action, with a view to subsequent reorganization, and after
about an hour in the train, we arrived at Elverdinghe about 1.30 p.m.
A march of two miles followed, and then we entered Wolff Camp, in
the Malakoff area. A more wretched and inhospitable spot it would be
hard to find. Pitched in what had once been No Man's Land, it was an
admirable representation of the tangled and disreputable desolation
that one's imagination connects with such a place. The 2/5th Loyal
North Lancashire Regiment had, moreover, failed to vacate the camp, and
we had consequently to remain in the adjacent field for the time being,
though the difference was little enough. The ground was broken and
muddy beyond description. The only accommodation to be found consisted
of tattered tents, through which the rain and wind drove at will--and
there was no lack of either. A Y.M.C.A. tent, the sole refuge of the
area, struggled manfully all day with a queue, often fifty yards long,
of men waiting for tea and biscuits. Apart from this oasis, we were
surrounded by a desert of hideous misery, but in spite of it all our
spirits were high. Even for those not in the secret it was by now clear
that we were moving up to take our turn in the grim struggle in the
morass, into which a continual barrage had long since converted the
Passchendaele Ridge. At least we felt we had come for a purpose; and
if the usual routine were followed, we should be back in rest before
long--those of us, at least, who had not "collected a Blighty," or a
more permanent separation from the troubles of this world.

We were not allowed to be idle for very long. At 4.30 and 5 p.m.
respectively working parties, 100 strong, moved up to the line, and the
next morning a party of forty men went up to be similarly employed.
Other parties were detailed to reconnoitre routes, a most necessary but
difficult operation under the conditions. At 4 p.m. that day (October
26th) the battalion was suddenly ordered to move to Marsouin Farm, a
camp nearer the line. As so often happens, the order synchronized with
the approach of tea. The usual rush attended this sudden move, and
resulted in the majority of the men missing their tea, a regrettable
thing at ordinary times, but in view of the mental and physical strain
about to be encountered particularly unfortunate.

Our Quartermaster left us at this point, his work being efficiently
continued by Captain Bowring, summoned from the "nucleus party" for
the purpose. Marsouin Farm proved to be the lowest form of habitation
that can possibly be classified as a camp. "Bivvies" of the rudest
description, "leans-to" of ground sheets or odd bits of corrugated
iron, formed our quarters, all half immersed in mud of the thickest and
vilest consistency. The biting air and heavy rainstorms combined to
give the finishing touch to this execrable spot, which was calculated
to inspire all ranks with as profound a contempt for death as was ever
entertained by the most ardent believer in Valhalla. Similar "camps"
were dotted about in the vicinity; and an unending stream of guns,
men, pack transport, and so forth, poured by continually, struggling
and slipping on the crude roads or corduroy tracks which led up to the
battle zone. Trolley trams and light trains wound their way forward,
grunting and creaking under loads consisting of all the multifarious
stores required in modern warfare. The surrounding country, if
difficult to describe, was certainly of a uniform appearance. It
consisted simply of endless mud and water. As far as the eye could
reach there was the same yellowish waste of muddy misery, shell-hole
touching shell-hole with never a break, save where a splintered and
winding duck-board track, a primitive road of half-buried logs, or
the spidery lines of a light railway, relieved the hopeless monotony.
Across this wilderness of squalor and filth every fighting man had to
pass to reach the enemy. Ammunition, rations, R.E. material, Red Cross
stores, everything, in fact, had to be transported over this quagmire,
and woe betide the luckless man who fell from the slippery safety of
the duck-boards into its clutches! All the while the guns on either
side kept up their steady bombardment, now fierce and concentrated, now
desultory and scattered.

On the evening of the 27th, at the usual short notice, the battalion
was ordered forward to the reserve trenches. As has already been
remarked, these sudden moves are very trying, and this one proved to
be particularly so. The battalion was now leaving the last limits
of what in such an area might be called civilization. Consequently
rations, equipment, and ammunition had to be completed for the whole
period in the desolate country into which we were now to penetrate.
The scene that followed will not easily be forgotten. The march to
Eagle Trench, which brought us into close proximity with the trench
area, was made under considerable difficulties, owing to the large
number of gas shells which were falling in the area. At one point on
the duck-board track along which the battalion was winding its way in
single file, Colonel Fletcher at its head, a large working party of
another battalion was halted and blocking the way. This working party
was held up in front by heavy enemy shell fire, which was falling on a
road across which the track ran. After waiting some forty minutes, it
was observed that the shell fire, which covered about 200 yards of the
road, was being lifted at regular intervals of about fifteen minutes on
to a different sector of the road, and after another fifteen minutes
brought back to the former objective. Time was getting on, so Colonel
Fletcher decided to try to rush his battalion through next time the
bombardment lifted from the immediate neighbourhood of the track; and
with this end in view arranged with the officer commanding the working
party in front to get his men off the track to give the 2/6th K.L.R. a
clear run through. It was known from a reconnaissance made the previous
day that the track crossed the road and then the stream called the
Steenbeck on the far side of it. The Commanding Officer calculated that
he would just have time to get his battalion across the road and over
the Steenbeck before the barrage returned to the track. Word was passed
down the battalion from front to rear to be prepared to travel at the
fastest possible speed, and at a correctly judged moment a move forward
was ordered. The working party in front had meanwhile got off the
track, so good progress could be made over the 200 yards which remained
to be covered before the road was reached. When the head of the
battalion arrived at the road, the unpleasant discovery was made that
the bridge over the Steenbeck had been destroyed by the bombardment.
An officer succeeded in crossing the stream by the trunk of a fallen
tree, but on his return reported that the track on the other side had
also been destroyed for a considerable distance, and that the place
where it recommenced again could not be found in the darkness. The
Commanding Officer came to an instant decision and ordered the column
to turn to the left along the road in a north-easterly direction, with
the intention of reaching another road which ran north-west through the
village of Langemarck, from which place he expected to be able again
to pick up the track which had to be followed. Unfortunately, the road
on the side of the Steenbeck had been so churned up by shell fire that
only very slow progress was possible; in fact, one stretch of twenty
yards was thigh deep in a stiff porridge-like mud, which, for men
loaded with Lewis guns and large supplies of ammunition, was extremely
difficult to negotiate. It was a time of considerable anxiety, because
the barrage was still proceeding about 300 yards south-east, and might
come back at any moment, in which case the casualties could not fail
to be heavy. However, good luck prevailed, and the tail end of the
battalion had just got clear of the road before the bombardment lifted
back on the section we had quitted.

[Illustration: In front of Langemarck.

2/6th The King's (Liverpool Regiment)

_To face Page 140._]

Eagle Trench was reached and found to contain a good deal of gas,
so all ranks had to be continually on the alert to adjust their
box-respirators during the remainder of the night. Battalion
Headquarters was established in an old German concrete pill-box,
called "Double Cotts," in which the stench was almost unbearable. On
the following night (November 28th-29th), we relieved the battalion
in the front line and took over their positions, which consisted of
a series of shell-holes, order of companies from right to left being
as follows: "A" Company (Captain McWilliam), "B" Company less one
platoon (Lieutenant Penrice), "C" Company plus one platoon of "B"
Company (Captain Ormrod); support company, "D" Company (Captain Fell).
Battalion Headquarters in a German pill-box called Louis Farm. About
half-way between front line companies and Battalion Headquarters, on
an almost imperceptible rise of ground, called "19 Metre Hill," a
transmitting station for lamp signals and also a relay post for runners
were established.

The Higher Command had observed from aeroplane photographs that there
were some new erections, which they thought were concrete pill-boxes,
about 600 yards behind the enemy's front line; and the battalion was
instructed to send a patrol out as soon as the front line had been
taken over in order, if possible, to ascertain their nature. This
reconnoitring patrol, detailed from "A" Company, under command of
Lieutenant C. W. Clarke, and consisting of Sergeant Powell, Corporal
Stubbs, and three riflemen (C. C. Smith, P. McGinn, and W. McGrath),
succeeded in penetrating the enemy line as far as the objective they
had been ordered to examine. Valuable information was obtained, but,
unfortunately, on the return journey the patrol was observed by the
enemy, who opened machine-gun fire, and both Lieutenant Clarke and
Sergeant Powell were severely wounded, the former having his thigh
broken. The remainder of the patrol displayed great gallantry in
bringing in their wounded under heavy fire, for which act they were
each subsequently awarded the Military Medal. Lieutenant Clarke was
complimented by the Brigadier-General on his fine work, which was
later on rewarded with the Military Cross. Among other gallant deeds
performed this night was the recovery from No Man's Land of several
British wounded who had fallen in an abortive attack on this front five
days previously, and who had lain out in the shell-holes untended ever
since. 2nd-Lieutenant T. Lever, of "C" Company, was particularly active
in this good work, for which he also received the Military Cross.

At dawn on November 29th O.C. "B" Company despatched a message by
runner to Battalion Headquarters, with advice to the effect that with
daylight he had discovered that the company which he had relieved
during the night had not handed over to him the positions of which
they alleged they had been in occupation, but had in fact handed
over positions some 300 yards farther back, and called these rear
positions by the names of positions farther forward. The positions in
question went by the names of Memling Farm and Rubens Farm, but the
farm buildings had long since been utterly destroyed, and their places
had been taken by a few scattered pill-boxes. Immediately on receipt
of this message at Battalion Headquarters, Colonel Fletcher himself
hurried up to the front line, and after a careful reconnaissance on
the ground and study of the map confirmed the conclusions arrived at
by O.C. "B" Company. He accordingly ordered O.C. "B" Company to have
Memling and Rubens Farm reconnoitred, with the intention of occupying
them, if so desired by the Higher Command, as soon as darkness fell;
and then himself returned to Battalion Headquarters to report fully
by runner to Brigade Headquarters. The latter ordered that the
positions be captured without loss of time; but, owing to difficulties
of communication, this order did not reach Battalion Headquarters
until night, when O.C. "B" Company was ordered to take the farms with
two platoons. Meantime the reconnoitring party which had gone out by
daylight had found the positions unoccupied; and it is a matter of
opinion whether the enemy observed them and jumped to the conclusion
that the position might later be occupied, or whether they were held
by the enemy as defensive positions at night only. The latter seems
the most likely solution. Gallant attempts were immediately made by
the platoons detailed (Nos. 7 and 8 Platoons), but they were met by
heavy machine-gun fire, and found the pill-boxes were occupied in
strength by the enemy. No. 7 Platoon, under Lieutenant Vaughan, made
repeated attempts to reach the more distant objective (Rubens Farm),
but after suffering heavy casualties was compelled to desist. Dawn
was now approaching, and at 5.40 a.m. our artillery opened a barrage
along the front, preliminary to an attack by the 58th Division on
the immediate right of the battalion. This brought heavy retaliating
artillery fire on our front, and No. 7 Platoon, which was still in
the open attacking Rubens Farm, was practically wiped out, including
Lieutenant Vaughan. It is evident the enemy were expecting the 57th
Division also to attack, inasmuch as they maintained a heavy artillery
bombardment for several hours, causing many casualties to the companies
in the front line. The casualties, indeed, were so extensive that after
a reconnaissance of the front by Captain Wilson under heavy fire, two
platoons from the support company ("D" Company) were ordered up to
strengthen the much-thinned front line. As soon as the bombardment
had somewhat subsided, Lieutenant Penrice and Lieutenant Hodgkinson
attempted to reach Memling Farm to see if it was still occupied, but
they found that it was, and were very lucky to get back to our lines
unscathed.

Apart from these particular incidents, the situation of the remainder
of the battalion was far from comfortable. Sitting all day in a
shell-hole half filled with water, surrounded by all the most ghastly
features of war, and being shelled intensely the greater part of the
time, was an experience that few would wish to repeat. The men bore it
splendidly, and officers and N.C.Os. carried on their various duties
with the greatest coolness. Captain McWilliam was, as always under
trying conditions, most conspicuous, and, unfortunately, was very
seriously wounded. For his general gallantry on this and many previous
occasions he was awarded the Military Cross, which he had richly
deserved.

On the night of October 30th-31st the battalion was relieved by the
2/7th K.L.R., and made its way back to Huddlestone Camp, near the
canal, having suffered casualties to the extent of five officers and
122 other ranks.

Although our battalion did not actually participate in an attack
(another Brigade of our Division carried out the first part of the
projected operation; the rest was cancelled owing to the condition of
the ground), we had our share of the horrors of the Third Battle of
Ypres, confined though it was to an experience not new to us of taking
the gruelling while someone else did the fighting. As an experience
of the realities of war it was not without value, though it cost us
dear. The misery of the countryside has already been indicated, and
this was enhanced by the spectacle of the countless dead that littered
the ground. So many were they that in places it was almost impossible
to move without treading on them. Indeed, all that has been said and
written elsewhere as to the conditions of this battle does not appear
to have been exaggerated. The importance or necessity of the action in
the main scheme of operations does not concern us here.

[Illustration: HOUPLINES. BRITISH AND GERMAN TRENCHES ON LEFT COMPANY'S
FRONT. RIVER LYS, HOBBS AND EDMEADS FARMS.

Aeroplane Photograph dated 1st January, 1918.]

[Illustration: THE PONT BALLOT SALIENT, HOUPLINES. BRITISH AND GERMAN
TRENCH ON RIGHT AND RIGHT-CENTRE COMPANIES' FRONT.

Aeroplane Photograph dated 28th December, 1917.]

Those who took part in it will never erase from their minds its
many ghastly features, among which the mud and the multitude of the
dead will stand out pre-eminent. Of the former it must be said that
the sodden condition of the ground, though it stopped our advance,
certainly prevented many casualties from shell fire; but at the same
time many a wounded man was sucked down into the horrible quagmire, and
stretcher-bearers found their tasks in many cases quite beyond their
powers. The enemy, too, seemed to take a fiendish delight in adding
extra terrors to the work by sniping them with "whizz-bangs"; and
Lieutenant Clarke had several of his bearers hit before his journey to
the regimental aid post, which took some sixteen hours, was completed.
His great patrol and Lieutenant Vaughan's gallant attempt which cost
him his life are glorious memories of that grim period. If nothing else
was learnt, the value of personal bravery, for the display of which the
quiet routine of trench warfare had afforded but little scope, was now
made clear to all; and not only by the performances of Clarke, Vaughan,
and Lever and the gallant members of their parties, but also by the
steady bearing of the battalion generally during those trying times.
The courage and initiative displayed by the transport, and particularly
by the specially organized pack-mule section, were worthy of the
highest commendation.

Huddlestone Camp was just the ordinary collection of Nissen huts, but
it represented to the tired and weary all the comforts of civilization.
How long it seemed since we were last in any place that could be
remotely described as civilized! In point of fact it was four days,
but the battalion during that time had achieved another stage in its
education--and a big stage, too. We knew a good deal about trench
warfare, and we knew something about being shelled, but we had never
previously been at quite such close quarters with war in its fiercest
aspect as we were in front of Langemarck.

The next morning (November 1st, 1917) we moved back still farther to
Bridge Camp, arriving there at 11 a.m. We remained there till November
6th, cleaning up and making good deficiencies--of no inconsiderable
nature after such experiences--and generally restoring mind and body
by the normal routine of a soldier's training. The same day we left
our camp and marched to Boesinghe, where we entrained about 1 p.m. for
Audruicq, not far from Calais, arriving about 10 p.m. Thence we marched
to Nordasques, which was understood to be our area; but some confusion
was abroad--our billeting party had gone one way, we another, and so
on. However, the hour was late, so we made the best of it in Nordasques
for the night, and moved to our proper area, Louches, the following day
(November 7th), which we reached about 2.30 p.m.

This place proved a real "rest" area, and here we remained for a very
pleasant month reorganizing, refitting, and, above all, resting. The
day after our arrival the party in the "lifeboat," consisting of five
officers and 71 men, rejoined, and on November 13th a draft of 76 men
reported. At the end of November our "effective strength" was up to 38
officers and 867 other ranks.

This period at Louches requires little description, though it was
probably the most real "rest" the battalion ever enjoyed. Training
was of the more practical kind--"leap-frogging," counter-attack,
consolidation, intensive digging, attack on strong posts, and so forth.
Among these were judiciously inserted the usual drill, rifle exercises,
physical training, and the like. Musketry was practised on a large
scale at the Zouafques ranges. Baths at Nielles also played a salutary
if uninteresting part in the life of the battalion; while trips to
Calais proved a great attraction to officers and N.C.Os., that place
being within easy reach by means of a light railway. A Sergeants' Rest
Billet was instituted, and thither for short periods the sergeants
in turn betook themselves, free for the time being from all military
cares. It was a sign of the Commanding Officer's constant care for his
men, and the arrangement was strongly approved.

It was odd to find oneself once more living what was after all the old
life of home training areas. Here were no sudden alarms, but just the
ordinary regulation routine. Afternoons were free, and football and
musketry competitions soon blossomed into being.

While we were here Major H. K. Wilson, who had been long suffering
from an injury to his ankle, the result of a collision with a lorry,
proceeded to England on leave, and was there admitted to hospital. To
our great regret, we saw him no more; he had been with us since the
formation of the battalion. Another officer who left us at this time
was Lieutenant Hodgkinson, a most gallant and popular officer, whom we
were extremely sorry to lose. His venturous spirit led him to transfer
to the R.F.C., where his career, we may be sure, was, if short, full of
incident. He was, we understood, shot down near Valenciennes, and must
have been a great loss to his Corps.

All good things come to an end in time--a law which fortunately applies
also to their opposites--and 7.30 a.m. on December 8th found the
battalion climbing once more into buses on the Crezeques--Autingues
road to visit the area north of Ypres once more. After debussing we
proceeded, two companies each, to two adjacent camps in the Proven area
which rejoiced in the names of Privett and Portsdown, the latter being
also the home of Battalion Headquarters. They were the usual camps
of the area, no worse--possibly a little better--than the average.
They consisted of Nissen huts. Training continued here for a few days
prior to going into the line, which was visited by the Commanding
Officer, accompanied by five officers, on December 12th for two days'
instruction, from which they returned on December 14th.

The Adjutant, Captain Wurtzburg, reported from England for duty just
before the battalion went into the line, and Captain C. W. Wilson
in consequence gave up his duties as Adjutant and took over the
appointment of Second-in-Command, with the subsequent acting rank of
Major.



CHAPTER VI

PASSCHENDAELE (SECOND TIME)--ARMENTIÈRES--ST. HILAIRE (SECOND
TIME)--ARREWAGE--FLEURBAIX


On December 16th, at 8.45 in the morning, the battalion moved off
from camp to Proven Station, where we duly entrained for Boesinghe,
the transport moving to Birbeck Camp, near Elverdinghe. On arrival at
Boesinghe a dispute arose with the 2/5th K.L.R. as to the camp which
each of us was to occupy, the orders being conflicting. Eventually we
agreed to take Canal Bank Camp, and the 2/5th K.L.R. the more bleak and
exposed Baboon Camp, which from our point of view was a satisfactory
arrangement. As this was the second time the battalion had been in
this area, there is no need to describe it further. It looked almost
as inhospitable as ever, though certain traces of civilization had
begun to appear. The enemy put a few shells in to the camp that night,
but did no serious damage. The next day (December 17th) everyone was
busy with preparations for going into the line. Gum-boots and extra
water-bottles had to be drawn from Baboon Camp, and men had to be
issued with "Tommy cookers," two days' preserved rations, and spare
socks. The weather was now very cold, with occasional snow-storms,
and offered a very poor prospect of pleasant conditions in the line.
At 3.30 p.m. "D" Company moved, followed at quarter-hour intervals
by "A" (support) Company, and "B" and "C" in reserve. To Battalion
Headquarters the distance was about six miles, the whole route being
along a duck-board track, called Clarges Street. The scene on either
side of the track was the same--one unending chain of shell-holes,
as usual in this part of the world. It was a long and tedious march.
A whole battalion strung out on a tortuous and slippery track, with
countless short twists to avoid shell-holes and greater twists to
prevent accurate shelling, moves very slowly. There was also a long
footbridge over the Steenbeck to be negotiated, and the various side
tracks running off from the main one confused the guides.

Two companies were taken round by an alternative way along the remains
of the road from Koekuit to Les Cinque Chemins, our destination. This
proved our salvation, as on reaching the end of Clarges Street, near
Les Cinque Chemins, the leading guide of the two companies ahead of
Battalion Headquarters turned to the right along this same road,
and promptly collided with "D" and "A" Companies coming up. But for
this accident "B" and "C" with Battalion Headquarters, after many
hours marching, might have arrived at Canal Bank Camp once more.
The difficulty of finding one's way in the dark in these miserable
districts baffles description. All landmarks are obliterated, and main
roads are only recognizable under the most favourable conditions.
Tracks lead off from the main way at frequent intervals, and there is
nothing to show which is the correct way. The one thing usually certain
is that one leads nowhere and the other the way you want to go. To
discover which is which is rather a lengthy and tiresome business.

The sector was on the whole probably the most remarkable one ever held
by the battalion. Representing as it did the high-water mark of a push,
it was rather curiously organized. The front line (held by "D" Company)
consisted of a number of shell-hole positions, movement along which was
impossible in daylight, and three posts in the Houthulst Forest. These
latter, as will appear, were mere wooden barricades of a very rough
description and absolutely unbulletproof. No cover of any description,
either from the weather or from the enemy, existed in any of these
posts. There was one pill-box, Colombo House, in what was practically
the front-line, and, as usual, with its door facing the enemy. This
acted as a kind of advance headquarters for the front-line company.

The next thing in the rear of these scattered posts was a pair of
pill-boxes--Ajax House, Battalion Headquarters; and an unnamed
one adjoining, which was shared by the front and support company
headquarters, "D" and "A" Companies. Ajax House was a magnificent
pill-box with a side door; the other one was smaller, and with a door
facing the Germans.

Behind Battalion Headquarters came the main line of resistance,
Posts "D," "E," "H," and "J," small redoubts organized for all-round
resistance; while the counter-attack party of two platoons was
considerably farther back at Vee Bend. After about an hour's march back
along the duck-boards you came to the reserve company at Gruytezeele,
Craonne, and Montmirail Farms; while "C" Company were even more
distant, at Lapin Farm. As regards the latter, who were in rear of
Brigade Headquarters, it was only after great difficulty that any
accommodation could be found for them at all, the fact being that we
were much stronger than the 7th Buffs, whom we were relieving.

The relief march up to Battalion Headquarters passed without incident,
except for a sudden burst of "whizz-bangs" at Les Cinque Chemins,
where, but for the extreme muddiness of the surrounding country, we
might have sustained serious casualties. In point of fact, no one
was hit with anything worse than lumps of thick mud. The front line
company, having now to quit the duck-boards, found their task far from
easy. The only key to the situation was a tape line to the various
posts, and the going in the Houthulst Forest for those destined for
that point was extremely trying. In spite of the heavy shell fire, this
was still a large forest; but the number of fallen trees and branches,
together with deep pools of mud and water, not to mention miscellaneous
stretches of unexpected barbed wire, presented in the dark obstacles to
progress of no mean order. At midnight the relief was finally complete,
and the 7th Buffs made their way out.

[Illustration: Houthulst Forest Sector.

_To face Page 150._]

With the exception of the two days in the line in front of Langemarck,
the conditions for the men in the front line were probably as
unpleasant as at any time in France. The shell-hole posts were
literally shell-holes, with the very minimum done to improve them as
habitations for six or seven men. The exact locality of the respective
British and German front lines was to either side somewhat vague, and
we were anxious that the men should not give away their positions by
elaborating their shell-holes to such an extent that they would be
obviously artificial when examined on an aeroplane photograph. The
comfort of this form of abode will be better appreciated when one
realizes that the best pattern had been deepened to allow of a sump
pit in the centre, across which duck-boards had been fixed to keep the
inhabitants above water level. No movement was possible in daylight
even in the vicinity of Battalion Headquarters. "Tommy cookers" were
allowed in the front line by day, and one man at a time was allowed to
smoke.

In the forest itself conditions were slightly better, though the
wretched breastworks erected for the protection of the posts were only
hurdles of the flimsiest description. The proximity, or the reverse, of
the enemy was quite uncertain, and the surrounding mass of gloomy trees
and undergrowth was calculated to produce a feeling of considerable
uneasiness in the minds of the occupants, which was hardly to be
wondered at.

Colombo House was a small pill-box with a large door facing the enemy.
The atmosphere within baffles all description. So bad, indeed, was
it that the Regimental Sergeant-Major, immediately after entering
it, had hastily to withdraw for the purpose of being violently sick.
Ajax, on the other hand, never reached quite such a condition. It
was a large concrete erection, with walls and roof of reinforced
concrete about eight feet thick, much scarred with direct hits, but
quite sound. It was square, with a doorway at the side which was
protected by a sand-bag wall. In the centre was a huge concrete pillar
supporting the roof, and round this the occupants sat on forms. On
this occasion the party consisted of the Commanding Officer, Adjutant,
and the Intelligence Officer, the Regimental Sergeant-Major, a cook
and a servant, six signallers, three gunner signallers, two wireless
operators, and some runners. Here we sat from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. There
were two bunks in the corner which we shared in turn, and we had two
Primus stoves for cooking purposes. The Company Headquarters next door
was also a strong pill-box, but owing to the door facing the enemy it
had to be entered and quitted after dark with great caution, for fear
the light should shine towards the Germans.

In the early hours of the morning, after relief, it began to freeze.
In a short while everything was as hard as iron, and remained so all
the time we were in. Except for the acute cold, frost was perhaps
not an unmixed evil; one could move about with comparative ease,
and everything was hard and dry, instead of soft and sodden. Dry
cold is always less insidious than damp cold, and that there was so
little sickness caused by this tour was due to the frost. However,
it seriously interfered with the wiring programme and the elaborate
arrangements made for the improvement of the positions by the addition
of small elephants, etc., which we arranged to be sent up. Salvage
was abundant, thousands of pounds' worth of Lewis gun drums, machine
guns, and other material being scattered in every direction, but it was
frozen so hard that only a small quantity was eventually retrieved.
Hot tea and stew were brought up nightly on mules to Battalion
Headquarters. It was carried in petrol-tins placed in haversacks and
packed round with hay. In spite of the four hours which the party
took coming from the Quartermaster's stores, the system of packing
stood the test, and gave the men in the line the great benefit of warm
drinks and warm food. During the night everyone took the maximum amount
of exercise possible to restore the circulation. Even the stuffy
atmosphere of a pill-box did not keep one warm, and by day it was
necessary to wear two sand-bags over each foot to prevent them being
reduced to a frozen condition. Each morning, as so often happens during
a sharp frost, there was a heavy white mist till the sun got well up.
During this time movement about the sector was comparatively safe,
though very slippery, and tours of the line by Brigade and Battalion
Staffs generally took place about this time. On one occasion the
Commanding Officer and Lieutenant Huntley, going round, made so much
noise through merriment over the sudden fall of Captain Patteson on a
frozen shell-hole, that the Germans opened rapid fire with "minnies,"
fortunately without any damage being done. They shelled certain spots
regularly--Les Cinque Chemins, "J" Post, Battalion Headquarters, and a
few other localities.

Egypt House, the 2/5th K.L.R. Headquarters, dropped in for frequent
bursts; and the efforts of a siege gunner to range on the White Chateau
from our Headquarters produced such violent retaliation on Egypt House
that we had in common decency to request him to desist.

On December 19th "C" Company relieved "D" Company in the front line,
and "B" Company relieved "A" Company in support. This movement was
completed at 9.25 p.m. "A" Company had some gas casualties on the way
back, the track being twice shelled; and Captain Bowring, having to
put on his small box-respirator for the second time, was disgusted to
find that the valve was frozen solid. He tore it off and pulled on his
"P.H." helmet, only to find that he had got it back to front. Next
moment he fell into a shell-hole, so, pulling off the helmet, he ran
for all he was worth down the duck-boards, and escaped anything worse
than a slight touch of sickness. The next afternoon a carrying party of
"C" Company near Koekuit was caught in a "crash," and six men killed.
The destructive area of a shell striking frozen ground is, as may be
supposed, very considerable.

Lieutenant Freeman, the Transport Officer, and his mules had several
experiences in their nightly visit to the line, the most amusing being
the short cut over the Broembeek which he attempted one night. The
mules were got over the single plank bridge without difficulty, but
after the bridge had been duly crossed it was found that the party was
on an island from which there was no other exit. Time had been wasted
during this operation, and when the party once more reached the plank
bridge dawn was not very far distant. Gladly, however, as the mules
had crossed the bridge in the first instance, now they one and all
refused to venture on it. Everything was tried, but without success,
and Lieutenant Freeman began to see himself revealed to the attentive
gunner when daylight should disclose his unlucky situation. Eventually
recourse was had to one of our own batteries, and after long and
arduous efforts on the part of all concerned the mules were persuaded
to cross the bridge.

On December 21st the battalion was relieved by the 2/7th K.L.R. "D"
Company completed their relief at twelve noon, but the handing over of
the line was not effected till 9.30 p.m. The 2/7th K.L.R. took over
with a new scheme of defence, the main principle of which was that the
strength of the front line garrison was increased to six platoons.

It was a long and weary march back to Canal Bank, but the enemy left
Clarges Street alone, confining his attention to Hunter Street, the
next track, which he shelled persistently.

The next day, about 4 p.m., the Germans carried out a raid on Turenne
Crossing, in the right battalion area. We were suddenly startled by
the sight of the S.O.S. signals going up--two reds and a white--and
next moment our guns opened. The number of S.O.S. signals covered such
a front that a stand-to was ordered, but before long we discovered
that it was only a raid. However, the 2/5th K.L.R. had to send up two
companies, and our luck in having taken Canal Bank instead of Baboon
Camp stood us in good stead.

Our stay at Canal Bank was a short one, for which no one was
particularly sorry, for, if better than Baboon Camp, it was still a
miserable spot. On Christmas Day we were relieved by the 2/9th K.L.R.,
and moved to Emile Camp, near Elverdinghe, where we found some really
comfortable huts in which we happily installed ourselves. Christmas
Day, from the weather point of view, proved a model of all that it
should have been. Everything was covered with snow, and the sun shone
in a brilliant blue sky. Owing to our anticipation that we should be in
the line on Christmas Day, little preparation had been made for dinners
till the very last minute, when Captain Smith, the newly arrived
Quartermaster, by almost superhuman energy, succeeded at last in
buying a pig. This made on Boxing Day a pleasant, if somewhat limited,
addition to the rations, which, together with plum puddings, and a
large quantity of cigarettes and toffee sent by the generous donors
to our Comforts Fund, made quite a good Christmas dinner. Huts were
decorated, and good humour abounded.

We now discovered that we were leaving Flanders again and returning to
Armentières, a very unexpected piece of news. We also discovered that
we were to go by road, which, in fine cold weather, appeared quite a
pleasant prospect. However, a thaw, followed by a frost, rather altered
our opinion, and when we moved off at 8.30 a.m. on December 29th from
Canada area, close to Proven, we found it almost impossible to stand,
and even more impossible to march. We moved off, therefore, with
many a slip and fall; but the only serious disaster was an accident
to the officers' mess-cart, resulting in a broken shaft and a very
long delay to that most valuable portion, from the officers' point
of view, of the transport. Our camps, which we did not find without
considerable difficulty, were called Poodle and Pitchett, and were both
most wretched affairs, with indifferent tents set amid a wilderness of
snow. The Medical Officer, Lieutenant Gordon, a newly arrived American,
reached the camp in a state of considerable exhaustion. Imagining that
he was to ride, he had donned an immense fleece-lined overcoat which
reached to his ankles. Riding, of course, was an impossibility, and
being somewhat new to marching, he had suffered considerably, but he
bore his affliction with the utmost good humour.

The next day (December 30th) we moved on again. The weather, from being
bright and frosty, was now raw and damp, with a partial thaw. As our
road lay over the Mont des Cats and past Meteren, the conditions were
particularly trying, and everyone was thoroughly tired when we reached
billets at Berthen. Here companies were widely scattered, and the
billets of a very varying quality.

The next day we resumed our march, and this was the most trying of
all. The road was frozen again and intensely slippery. We moved as a
Brigade, and, owing to a misunderstanding, no proper halts occurred for
the first two hours, which was a thoroughly bad arrangement, especially
under the existing conditions. After passing through Bailleul we
eventually arrived at 1.45 p.m., at Hollebeque Camp, near Steenwerck,
just vacated by the Australians. It is worth recording that throughout
these three trying days not a single man fell out and not a single
vehicle failed to complete the journey. Hollebeque Camp, for a summer
camp, would have been quite pleasant. In winter it was very far from
comfortable. It was composed of one big block of Nissen huts for the
men, while on the other side of the field stood a row of similar huts
for the officers. A large number of the huts had been stripped of their
wooden linings for firewood; they were badly put together and draughty
beyond words; and there was an almost complete absence of any of the
normal furniture of camps, such as lamps, tables, etc., nor were these
readily procurable. However, beyond finding it extremely cold, we had
little time to worry, as next evening we relieved the 36th Battalion
A.I.F. in our old Houplines sector. As far as Erquinghem the route was
more or less new, but from then onward it was very familiar both to
officers and men. It was a queer sensation picking up the old landmarks
and noting the changes. Armentières looked very strange and ghostly in
the moonlight, and the silence of absolute desolation was accentuated
by the deep snow. Silently we passed through the deserted streets;
everything seemed uncannily quiet after the noise and excitement that
had been everyday features of our last spell in this city. Not a shot
was fired as we moved along that "unhealthy" stretch from Barbed Wire
Square to Tissage Dump, and we felt that the enemy must be saving up
for some tremendous show, as he was at the moment so inactive.

The moonlight and our knowledge of the ground together made short work
of the relief, which was complete at 8.30 p.m. The company sectors were
allotted as follows: "A" on the right from London Road to fifty yards
beyond Timaru, "B" from there to Edmeads Avenue, inclusive. "D" Company
occupied the left, and "C" was in the subsidiary line.

We found the sector in its essential features very much as we had left
it, except that considerable work had been expended on the subsidiary
line, which now formed a very fine trench, with really good traverses.
Except for that improvement, however, the sector generally had greatly
deteriorated. The principle of gaps and localities, which had always
tended to the neglect of the rest of the trenches, had now reduced the
latter to a lamentable state of disrepair. The number of posts in the
front line was only seven, and these of a very miserable description
from the defensive point of view. Such lateral connecting trenches as
had existed had been allowed to fall in, and in the case of the two
left posts communication even from the rear was difficult at night and
precarious by day. No wire worth speaking of had been erected to defend
these isolated spots, and altogether the sector presented no very
satisfactory appearance. The left area between No. 7 Post and the River
Lys, being frozen hard, presented a perfectly good concealed approach
for the enemy, and nothing had been done to deal with this exposed
flank.

The garrison of the subsidiary line consisted of three companies, two
being found by the battalion in support.

Our first tour in the line proved of the quietest. A few "pineapples"
from the enemy, a few 6-inch mortars from us, and an occasional shell,
made up the daily round. On January 6th we received urgent demands from
the authorities for an identification, and two patrols were sent out
to try and effect this. Of these, Lieutenant Burton's party got right
into the German wire opposite Hobbs Farm before they were spotted,
when they had to beat a hasty retreat under considerable fire from
machine guns and "pineapples." The other patrol was equally unlucky.
In the meantime a deserter had very considerately given himself up to
No. 1 Post ("A" Company). He was a Prussian, but recently transferred
to the division opposite us. He was understood to have complained that
he had considerable difficulty in finding anyone in the sector to whom
he might surrender. As he had brought the whole of his kit with him,
his solitary peregrination of our sector may well have been tiring.
However, Division sent a car to take him down, which rather tactlessly
ran into a ditch, nearly killing our valuable "find" and his escort as
well.

On January 7th we were relieved by the 2/7th K.L.R., and the battalion,
after a somewhat complicated shuffle, found themselves holding the
subsidiary line--"A" and "C" in Epinette, and "B" and "D" in Houplines
sectors respectively. Battalion Headquarters moved out to billets by
the Armentières Level Crossing on the Erquinghem road. One interesting
innovation that may be mentioned here was the Pioneer Platoon, recently
started under Lieutenant J. R. Paul, and then taken over by Lieutenant
Jones. This consisted of about twenty men, and included the original
pioneers and a number of other skilled men. It was their business to
attend to all the minor construction work that promoted the comfort of
the battalion, such as improving billets, making ovens, drying rooms,
etc.; and in the line to carry out any special defensive work which
required something more than ordinary care and skill. They were rather
a drain on our fighting strength, but they more than justified their
existence in a hundred different ways.

One or two changes had recently occurred also in officers. Lieutenant
Gordon had been relieved by Captain Kidston as Medical Officer;
Captain Eccles had returned from England and taken over "B" Company
from Acting-Captain Broad; Acting-Captain Fell had now command of "D"
Company; Lieutenant Burton was Battalion Scout Officer, Lieutenant
Hazell Intelligence Officer, 2nd-Lieutenant Novelle Signalling Officer;
2nd-Lieutenant Brighouse had been wounded; and Lieutenant Adam returned
to the 1/6th K.L.R., in exchange for Captain Eccles.

The period spent in the subsidiary line was very quiet, except for the
large wiring parties on the left, for which men were drawn from all the
reserve companies. Parties were also withdrawn from the trenches for
Lewis gun instruction, and others for baths. The Commanding Officer
proceeded on leave on January 8th, which left Captain C. W. Wilson in
command.

An amusing incident occurred while Headquarters was in billets by
the level-crossing. A guard was posted there to stop anyone not in
possession of a pass, and it so happened that they had red flashes
behind the cap badge not dissimilar to ours. One day we received
from Brigade a letter from Division complaining that the sentry at
the level-crossing had not turned out the guard to the G.O.C., but
merely sloped arms and tapped the sling. This amused us not a little,
and we respectfully replied, first, that we had no guard at the
level-crossing, and, secondly, that under no circumstances would a
rifleman slope arms!

A draft consisting of 2nd-Lieutenant Hicks and twenty men arrived
while we were here, most of the men being returned casualties. On
January 13th the battalion was relieved by the 2/10th K.L.R., and
moved back to Hollebeque Camp. The first three days in camp saw the
whole battalion out on wiring and working parties, day and night, in
the Houplines sector. This meant at least an hour and a half's march
each way, and it simply streamed with rain. The men were required to
complete an elaborate system of wiring in rear of the subsidiary line
and in front of some pill-boxes, and also to finish other defences
which were being constructed in Nouvel Houplines itself. The nights
were of the blackest, and the organization the most inefficient; with
the result that six hours were wasted nightly in the most torrential
rain. Fuel was indented for and drying-rooms hastily instituted, but
the men got so soaked that it was impossible to dry their garments.
Fortunately, after our share of working parties was finished, we had
three quiet days in which to get dry. We should have had more, only the
Lys proceeded to flood the trenches, and the Liverpool Scottish had a
bad time. The Scots were nearly drowned, and we were ordered in early
to relieve them.

The relief was to take place on January 21st, and that morning Captain
Wilson, who had been unwell for some days, was at last removed to
hospital seriously ill, and the Adjutant assumed command. The route to
the line was viâ Nieppe and Pont de Nieppe, as the Erquinghem Bridge
was under water. The battalion moved off at 2 p.m. and proceeded on
their long trek to the line. Passing up the road to Pont de Nieppe,
it was rather amusing to see some "silent" 6-inch batteries lying
like little islands in the sea, with their camouflage showing up
beyond any possible hope of concealment. Companies halted one by one
in Armentières to put on gum-boots, and an elaborate system of dumps
had been arranged in the vicinity of Tissage Dump. The latter, like
most complicated systems, proved a failure. Relief was complete at
8.30 p.m., and then one had an opportunity to appreciate the state of
the sector. The subsidiary line was dry in the main, but immediately
forward of it you got into water, which as you went forward got well
over the knees, and in places where the duck-boards were not nailed
down you sank up to the top of your thighs. The whole of the support
line was knee-deep in water, and so was a great part of the front
line; while the last stretch of communication trench in front of the
front line was flooded to a considerable depth. Posts Nos. 6 and 7
were completely flooded out and had to be abandoned. The "cricket
field" in front of the left company support line was converted into a
very fine lake, and it was impossible to see where the Lys began and
ended. Movement throughout the sector was most difficult. Many of the
duck-boards were floating about, and the mud at the bottom of the water
in the trenches was very difficult to negotiate.

[Illustration: Official Photograph by permission of The Imperial War
Museum.

THE TRAIL TO PASSCHENDAELE.]

[Illustration: Official Photograph by permission of The Imperial War
Museum.

THE BATTLE OF FLANDERS. GERMAN SHELLS SEARCHING THE NEWLY CAPTURED
GROUND NEAR LANGEMARCK.]

Active steps were taken to cope with the situation. Stringent orders
were issued as to care of feet, and a place for foot washing was
arranged at Tissage Dump. Each man came down daily, changed his
gum-boots and socks, washed his feet, and had some hot soup. Men in the
front line were, as far as possible, changed daily. Extra duck-boards
were taken up, so that raised platforms could be erected clear of the
water; and hot food was sent up as often as feasible. So successful
were our efforts, and so effective the support given to our schemes
by all ranks, that only two men were affected by foot trouble. The
position of companies in the line was "C," "A," "B" from the right;
"D" Company was in the subsidiary line. Work on drainage was commenced
with great activity, and snipers, who had been warned to be especially
on the alert, claimed several hits on Germans climbing over collapsed
portions of their trenches. On January 22nd the Divisional Commander
visited the sector to examine conditions for himself.

The only anxiety felt in regard to the enemy arose from our temporary
abandonment of our left company front. This was on the near side of a
plateau of which the enemy held the farther side; and it would have
seriously affected our hold on our sector if he had taken it into his
head to occupy our old posts. Patrols visited their locality almost
continuously at night and fired Véry lights and occasional rounds. By
day our absence was more conspicuous, as No. 7 Post at this time was
a regular rendezvous for wild duck, who used to swim in and out of it
with great nonchalance.

One problem that was raised during this tour was the question of the
holding of the brigade front when the forthcoming reduction of a
brigade to three battalions took effect; and the possibility of holding
the front with two companies instead of three had to be carefully
investigated.

On the 24th the battalion was relieved by the 2/7th K.L.R., and moved
into billets in Armentières, with Battalion Headquarters at the
Convent. Colonel Fletcher, having returned from leave, resumed command
of the battalion.

On February 1st the long-expected dissolution of the 2/5th K.L.R. took
place simultaneously with the reduction of the number of battalions on
the Western Front. A large number were posted to the 13th Battalion
K.L.R., but the 2/7th K.L.R. and ourselves shared the balance, our
share consisting of seven officers and 180 other ranks. This was a
considerable accession of strength, though a large portion of it was
paper strength and not actual. But at any rate Captain Williams,
2nd-Lieutenants Wilson, Hooper, Jacobs, and a little later Thomas,
actually materialized, together with a considerable number of men,
including certain specialists, in which, owing to the loss of our
Headquarters Staff at Armentières, we had long been deficient. Amongst
them were a sergeant-bootmaker, Sergeant Cox, of the 1st King's, and
a sergeant-cook, Sergeant Austin, from the London District School of
Cookery.

The presence of these two men was of very great value to the battalion,
because, though an army is said to "march on its stomach," it is
equally true that it marches on its boots, and both stomachs and boots
were now amply provided for. Wilson, Hooper, and Jacobs were posted
to "C" Company. The arrangements for the acclimatization and fitting
out of the draft had to be done quickly, as the next day we once more
relieved the Scottish in the front line.

This relief was duly carried out by 8.35 p.m. Two companies only
were to hold the front and support lines, "C" on the right, "D" on
the left; while "A" and "B" manned the subsidiary line. The sector,
though still very wet, had much improved since we were last in. All
the trenches forward of the subsidiary line were, it is true, to some
extent under water, but not to any depth, and dry standings were
available in every post.

The tour was quiet in all respects, with just the normal amount of
casual shelling on either side, but nothing more. A visit from seven
R.F.C. officers afforded a slight comic relief. Only one had ever been
in the trenches before, and most of them were unprovided with either
respirators or tin hats. One tall officer caused considerable amusement
by walking the whole length of the subsidiary line doubled up, till
he realized at last that inflicting such discomfort on himself was
entirely unnecessary. His fears, however, were probably mild compared
with those of an infantryman making a trial trip in an aeroplane over
German territory.

We were relieved on February 5th by the 2/7th K.L.R., and took over
new dispositions as reserve battalion to the Brigade. Two companies
remained in the subsidiary line of the 2/7th and 8th K.L.R., a third
being in Nouvel Houplines itself, and another at the Jute Factory in
Armentières. Headquarters were at the Convent as before. On February
7th "B" Company were relieved in the subsidiary line by a company of
the 2/7th K.L.R., who had just completed a successful raid on our
old spot at Centaur Trench, and moved to the Jute Factory. This was
a fine large building close to the wooden bridge over the Lys, with
massive walls and concrete floors. In the cellars tiers of bunks had
been erected, and there was excellent shell-proof cover for a whole
battalion.

The next day the 2/7th K.L.R. relieved us in reserve, and we went to
Pont de Nieppe in Divisional Reserve.

The main attraction at the time was a "demonstration platoon" of
another regiment which was on tour. All the officers and N.C.Os. were
required to go and see this performance, but the distance was great
and the display not above the average. However, it fired the Commanding
Officer with enthusiasm to produce something better, in order that
the battalion might have ocular proof how admirably drill and similar
things can be carried out if the requisite trouble is taken.

The billets in Pont de Nieppe were indescribably dirty, and a great
deal of work had to be done in cleaning and improving them. The Pioneer
Platoon were invaluable in making ovens and other even more necessary
conveniences; and their services were also required to repair and adapt
some dilapidated rifle ranges. Units of the 38th Division, too, were
in Pont de Nieppe, and the band of one of the battalions used to play
daily in the streets, whence it was quite audible in the front line.
However, the enemy was very good to us, and never put a shell into the
place, which, considering that most of the houses were cellar-less, was
on the whole, perhaps, as well for us. An attempt was made at this time
to force us to change our green diamond for the green square previously
used by the 2/5th K.L.R., but happily we were able to prevent this.

On February 11th we relieved the 8th K.L.R. in Houplines, and occupied
those trenches, so rich in memories for the battalion, for the last
time. "B" Company occupied the right sector, "A" the left sector, and
"C" and "D" the subsidiary line. We found the trenches much improved
as regards water, but still in need of most urgent attention to
prevent a complete collapse of all breastworks. Except for one or two
angry bursts on Tissage Dump, the enemy was exceedingly quiet; and at
8.45 p.m. on February 14th, the first anniversary of our departure
for France, we handed over to the 13th Welch and said good-bye to
Houplines. Of the many men who served with the battalion, few, if any,
will look back on Houplines without some feeling akin to affection.
Tissage Dump, the Cemetery, Edmeads or Hobbs Farm, Cambridge, Irish or
Spain Avenues--what memories these names conjure up! Some happy, some
tragic, but all happily tempered now by the softening touch of years.

We spent from February 15th to March 1st in reserve at Pont de Nieppe,
engaged in strengthening the defences of Armentières and the River Lys.
This work the 38th Division had already commenced, and we took it up
where they left off. About 260 men per day were employed in digging and
wiring, and a great deal was achieved against the day when the great
German offensive should commence. Unfortunately, we learnt afterwards
that no men were available to hold our trenches, which in the end
caused little, if any, inconvenience to the enemy, as perhaps was not
unnatural. These great working parties did not end without a certain
amount of friction developing with the R.E., and a memorable meeting
took place at Headquarters between the Commanding Officer, the C.R.E.,
and the G.S.O.1. So warm grew the discussion that a considerable
quantity of Benedictine had eventually to be consumed in order to
restore that feeling of harmonious co-operation on which the text-books
dwell so persistently.

The demonstration platoon composed of riflemen was trained during this
period, and really reached a very high pitch of efficiency by the time
it was called upon to exhibit its powers to the battalion.

On February 27th, about 9.30 p.m., we received a message from the 38th
Division, warning us that it was understood that a German offensive
was to start up north at dawn, and that a barrage was to be put down
on Pont de Nieppe as a feint. This encouraging piece of information
caused a considerable stir. Arrangements, of course, had to be made for
the speedy evacuation of billets, should it be found necessary; and
also for providing some cover for Battalion Headquarters, which would
have to remain in position, bombardment or no bombardment. Fortunately,
nothing happened, and the night proved as quiet as any other.

Captain Ormrod left us on the 20th for six months' home service in
England, whither Lieutenant Goulding had already preceded him, and
Lieutenant Royle was soon to follow. Everyone thought the war would be
over before they were due to return. As a matter of fact, Royle, the
last to go and the only one to return, did rejoin before the Armistice.

About 1.30 p.m., on a fine cold day, we embussed for St. Hilaire,
arriving there about 4.30 p.m. All were glad to find themselves back
in this pleasant area again after a good spell of trench warfare and
our fair share of digging. No one anticipated much of a rest; in point
of fact, everyone expected lots of work, as we were to be polished up
and trained in view of the impending German offensive. The Commanding
Officer was full of zeal for modern methods of training. His enthusiasm
had been fired by the training theories of the Inspector-General of
Training. The principle was to sustain interest by constant variety,
and also to sharpen the intellect by lightning changes from (say) close
order drill to bombing, or from rifle exercises to physical drill. With
really efficient instructors in sufficient numbers the scheme might
have had obvious advantages. For the average battalion, however, it
was hardly practicable, though it certainly did inspire our men with a
brisk and business-like air which they had been in danger of losing.
St. Hilaire presented very reasonable training areas and ranges.
Moreover, the Corps Staff Officer responsible for training combined
enthusiasm with efficiency, both qualities of some rarity. Things moved
apace under the personal supervision of the Commanding Officer, who
spared no one, least of all himself, in his efforts to increase the
efficiency of the battalion.

On March 8th General Harper, the Corps Commander, inspected the Brigade
and presented decorations. Luckily, it was a very fine day, and the
march past of the battalion in column of fours after the ceremony was
warmly praised by the General, who was good enough to say that "he had
never seen a regular battalion march better." Two days later a select
party of officers and N.C.Os. were conveyed a great distance by motor
lorry to Enguinegatte to see a tank demonstration, which was quite
instructive, and ended in a more amusing performance in the shape of
joy rides. It was arranged that the Brigade should participate the
following week in a counter-attack scheme in co-operation with tanks,
and a G.O.C.'s inspection was also scheduled for that week.

However, late on Sunday night--or, more accurately, early on Monday
morning--March 10th, a warning "chit" arrived from Brigade intimating
an early move by motor bus. Sudden moves are always tiresome; indeed,
when out in "rest" that adjective is hardly strong enough. Everything
conceivable had been unpacked, and in anticipation of a G.O.C.'s
inspection nine-tenths of the transport was dismantled and covered with
wet paint. Accordingly, word was sent round at once, and by a stroke
of luck orders for an emergency move had been drawn up and circulated
only the previous day, so in a short time everyone was astir. Transport
men with candles in their hands were hurrying about the transport
lines collecting nuts and screws; parties were streaming into the
Quartermaster's stores with blankets and other gear; while others were
carrying articles of various kinds to the Town Major's office.

Further orders were received during the early hours that we were
to move at 8 a.m. by motor buses, the transport to proceed by road
at 8.30 a.m. Looking back, one can but feel that we accomplished a
very creditable performance. Everything went like clockwork; the
Medical Officer, an American but recently arrived, and unused to
sudden changes, alone proving not ready at the appointed time. He had
forgotten to alter his watch to summer time, which started that day,
and was accordingly an hour late in his movements. He was pushed into
his clothes and helped into the last lorry just as the column moved
off. The Brigadier then appeared on the scene, and seized upon lorries
like a gentleman hailing taxis in London, with the result that all
our baggage went with us, though it is to be feared that the 2/7th
K.L.R. were in consequence grievously short of mechanical transport
legitimately theirs.

At 11.45 a.m. the battalion debussed at Arrewage, a small hamlet in
rear of Merville. The companies were widely scattered, but the billets
were not bad, and the weather fine and warm. We at once received orders
to be ready to move at two hours' notice. The 33⅓ per cent. battle
reserve were told off, evacuation parties for civilians detailed, and
we really felt that the day of the great battle was actually at hand.

The next day the G.O.C. inspected the battalion, which made a very
creditable turn-out, albeit the transport was entirely coated in thick
dust well embedded in what had been wet paint. In conversation with
the General Staff, one learnt that a German attack was reckoned to be
imminent; and arrangements for reinforcing the Portuguese, who were
holding the Laventie area, were pushed forward with even more than the
usual zeal. Additional Lewis guns had been issued, making the total
twenty per battalion, and Major C. W. Wilson had returned from hospital.

Heavy shelling of Merville was now a daily occurrence, and the
countryside, not to mention the billets, was thronged with unfortunate
civilians flying for safety, surely one of the saddest sights of war.
Meanwhile reconnoitring parties hurried round the Portuguese area,
usually to be arrested as spies, while others went off to examine the
Sailly bridgehead defences.

In spite of the prospect of early hostilities, an inter-battalion rifle
competition was commenced on the miniature range in a corner of the
great Forêt de Nieppe, and was finally won by No. 14 Platoon of "D"
Company. A Brigade inter-platoon football competition was also started.

An amusing incident of this rather trying period occurred at XI Corps
Headquarters, where our guard of riflemen relieved the old guard,
which had been formed from a Line Battalion. The Corps Sergeant-Major
expended considerable effort in trying to effect a formal relief
between the two, but got so involved over sloping arms and fixing
bayonets that he finally left the two guard commanders to come to some
natural and more satisfactory arrangement.

Meanwhile officers and N.C.Os. proceeded daily to Sailly area, not
only to explore the defences, but to seek out a suitable place for a
training ground for a raiding party, to be composed of "A" and "C"
Companies, under Captains Bowring and Williams.

On March 20th Regimental Sergeant-Major Smith left the battalion
to join an Officers' Cadet Battalion, and in due course Regimental
Quartermaster-Sergeant Heyworth took over the appointment.

The move to the Sailly area took place on the famous March 21st. We
were quite unaware of the stirring events taking place farther south,
though trouble was manifestly in the air. The route was viâ Neuf
Berquin and Estaires, and our main interest was whether the enemy would
or would not shell the road. Fortunately, he did not. We left at 8.15
a.m., and arrived in time for dinner. The 7th Royal Sussex Regiment
marched out as we marched in.

Immediately on arrival companies proceeded to occupy for instruction
their various defensive positions. In addition to this, the Brigade
might, as an alternative, be called upon to occupy a defensive
position in rear of the 2nd Portuguese Division, or the line Cockshy
House--Laventie Post, etc. Officers had to be despatched to these to
learn the emergency routes.

These posts, like the Sailly bridgehead defences, were mostly
incomplete, and much work would have been required from the occupants
in the short time that would have elapsed before an advancing enemy
had come to grips with them. The Sailly defences had a fair reserve of
ammunition, but no rations or water.

The next day a working party of 100 men was digging feverishly in the
neighbourhood of Fleurbaix, while "A" and "C" Companies were marking
out the trace of the practice trenches for their raid.

On March 23rd we received orders that we were to take over our old
Fleurbaix sector, and officers proceeded thither accordingly. In the
afternoon the final of the Inter-Battalion Football Competition took
place between No. 5 Platoon of "B" Company and a platoon of the 2/7th
K.L.R., which the former won by three goals to nil.

On March 25th "all leave and courses cancelled" was received, and
rumours of doings in the south became more persistent. The local
civilians were also becoming frightened, and carts full of refugees
streamed along the roads leading to the rear. The Germans shelled
Sailly at night occasionally, but did no real damage.

Word now came that the 12th Division, which had taken our place in
reserve, had been rushed south, and we found ourselves with the
possibility before us of not only reinforcing the Portuguese, but of
holding Sailly bridgehead at the same time. Nothing however, happened,
and on the evening of March 26th we relieved the 1/5th Loyal North
Lancashire Regiment in our old Fleurbaix sector. All maps and schemes,
we found, had been destroyed, and the imminence of an attack, though
less acute than a day or so previously, still appeared a matter for
serious consideration. Wye Farm we found transformed into a magnificent
and palatial pill-box, while others were dotted about the country. The
sector also extended farther north than it had done when we previously
held it.

It was arranged that "A" and "C" Companies should be in front and
support on the right, to enable their men to reconnoitre the area to be
raided; and that we should only hold the line for three days to begin
with, so as to enable the raiding party to get sufficient training. The
tour was not marked by anything of particular moment. "A" Company's
Headquarters were subjected to a very considerable bombardment, but
luckily without casualties. The efforts of a 6-inch howitzer battery to
cut our wire cost us our proposed raid headquarters, and very nearly
the lives of the Forward Observation Officer and Lieutenant Hazell, our
Intelligence Officer, as well. The enemy wore an air of quietness of
a suspicious character, although Intelligence said that the divisions
recently concentrated opposite this front had all gone down to the
Somme. We had no casualties.

[Illustration: AREA OF PROPOSED RAID, MARCH, 1918.

GERMAN FRONT AND SUPPORT LINES

OPPOSITE HUDSON BAY-BOUTILLERIE SECTOR.

_March 23ʳᵈ 18._

2/6 The King's (Liverpool Regᵗ) To face page 170.]

On March 29th the Irish took over from us, and our battalion moved
out--Headquarters and "B" Company to Fleurbaix, "D" Company to Canteen
Farm in reserve to the front line, and "A" and "C" to Sailly to
continue their training. A special telephone was laid to the latter in
case of emergency.

Battalion Headquarters and "B" Company were all congregated in a set
of farm buildings, which, had the enemy attacked, would certainly have
been blown to pieces at the very outset. In the absence, on leave, of
Major Charles Wilson, Captain Eccles, the next senior excepting the
Adjutant, was appointed O.C. Fleurbaix Defences, and included in his
command certain machine guns and trench mortars.

On March 29th the raiding party was reduced from two companies to
one, and the date was advanced to the 31st; and the next evening
the remaining company were also told they would not be required.
Two fighting patrols, under Lieutenant Burton and Corporal Corkill
respectively, were sent out to try and obtain identification, but the
enemy was evidently expecting a raid, as his front line was quite
unoccupied. It was probably, therefore, as well that the raid had been
cancelled, though we should have liked to carry it out.

Meantime all surplus stores were ordered to be sent to Estaires, and
we found ourselves ready to move without the great mass of transport
usually required on such occasions.

On March 31st the Second-in-Command of the 20th Middlesex Regiment
arrived to look round, and told us great stories of the retreat. The
next day (April 1st) they relieved us, and the battalion moved out at
10.30 p.m. on a long and weary march to Neuf Berquin. There we were
joined by the men who had formed the Brigade Pioneer Company, and the
battalion presented an appearance of unusual strength.



CHAPTER VII

MERVILLE--PERIOD IN RESERVE--GOMMECOURT--FAMPOUX


On April 2nd, as we had expected, we entrained for the south, but not
till our orders had been cancelled about three times. In fact, if
rumour is to be believed, we were very nearly dispatched post haste
to Ypres. At any rate, at 5 p.m. we received orders for one company
to entrain at Merville at once, and the remainder at 8.5 p.m. The
enemy very considerately refrained from shelling the station while we
entrained, though he was more attentive to some of the other units of
the Division.

At 5.30 a.m. we arrived at Doullens Station, which looked somewhat
dilapidated in consequence of an air raid. The station presented a
scene of the greatest activity, and it was not till 7.30 a.m. that we
were allowed to detrain and move out of the station. "C" Company formed
the unloading party. After moving clear of the town we fell out by the
roadside for breakfasts, for which, in the case of one company, a dear
old lady provided a large quantity of beautiful vegetables gratis. She
also gave the officers coffee and rolls, and was most indignant when
offered payment. All honour be to her!

The day was warming up when we set off to march to our destination,
Ivergny, and after a night in the train no one felt very energetic.
We arrived there for dinner after climbing some fairly steep hills,
which, coupled with the soft spring air, made everyone feel somewhat
tired. The men's billets were good, the officers' poor. In striking
contrast to our good lady of Doullens, we found the inhabitants very
inhospitable, and many of the houses were crammed with refugees. The
Commanding Officer was locked out by his occupier, and the Adjutant was
calmly informed that he could not enter his house. The services of De
Chauny, the Brigade Interpreter, were soon in request, and everything
was settled, though not very amicably. "C" Company were very late, and
it was long after dark before they rejoined us after their arduous
duties at the station.

We were told that the Division was in General Headquarters Reserve,
and likely to be called upon suddenly. The next day all were busied,
accordingly, with checking stores and ammunition, and generally seeing
that everything was up to concert pitch. The Adjutant seized the
occasion of a short spell of leisure to ride over to Bouque Maison,
where Colonel Harrison, our first Brigade Commander, was performing
nobly the duties of Town Major, and very pleased he seemed to have news
of his old Brigade.

At 5 p.m. we received orders to move at an hour's notice, and half
an hour later to move at 6.30 p.m. to Grenas viâ Lucheux. As the
light failed it began to rain, and at length down it came in a steady
torrent, and the night was as black as pitch. The road was hilly, and,
to add to our troubles, we got behind a pontoon section, which kept
on blocking us; and after we had passed that we got on the heels of
the Pioneer Battalion's transport, which was blessed with a jibbing
team, and caused various vexatious halts. Despite these, the greatest
cheerfulness and good humour prevailed, and the men sang lustily, as,
indeed, they always did in the rain. We reached Grenas, which was just
across the Arras--Doullens road, at 11.30 p.m., and eventually got the
men, wet and tired, into quite fair billets.

The Brigadier, with his usual kindness, invited several of the officers
in to supper about 1 a.m.; and it was on that occasion that the
Commanding Officer perpetrated on the Brigade Gas Officer his famous
joke about the new green container for the small box-respirator. It was
briefly this: Seeing the Brigade Gas Officer come in, the Commanding
Officer asked him when the new green container was being issued, for,
as he argued, no other container was proof against the new gas. The
Gas Officer, suspecting nothing, replied that it was due shortly, and
proceeded the next day to make inquiries from his senior at Division.
It is rumoured that the inquiry spread thence to the Corps and Army
Chemical Advisers, and from there to the highest authorities. It need
hardly be added that the quest was in vain!

Before we retired to rest we were told that we must always be ready
to move at one hour's notice between 6 a.m. and 12 noon, and at two
hours' notice at other times. At 8 a.m. on April 5th the Commanding
Officer and the four Company Commanders, exclusive of the two who were
to be left out with the surplus "battle personnel"--or "those in the
lifeboat" as the saying went--proceeded by motor lorry to reconnoitre
the Purple Line in the vicinity of Monchy au Bois, Ransart, and
Ficheux, south of Arras.

The battalion meantime was engaged in such training as could be done
in the immediate vicinity of billets, with everything kept constantly
packed for an immediate departure. On April 7th sixty men arrived as a
draft, and N.C.Os. were hastily told off to instruct them in the way
they should go; and on the following day Lieutenant Reed, M.O.R.C.,
U.S.A., relieved Lieutenant Sullo as Medical Officer. At 10 a.m. that
day we resumed our journey, passing through the outskirts of Doullens,
and going into billets at Beauval.

As usual, the next morning at 8 a.m. the Commanding Officer and
Company Commanders were sent off to reconnoitre the Red Line near
Authie; and while they were away the battalion was ordered to proceed
to Beauquesne, but this was cancelled. Next morning, at 8 a.m., a
lorry arrived once more to carry the Commanding Officer and his
Company Commanders, this time to the Purple Line, near Gommecourt and
Fonquevillers. All that day the Battalion was waiting to move off, but
nothing came of it.

April 11th was spent in schemes for the defence of a village, which
those in authority thought we should be more than likely to have to
put into real practice before very much longer. We heard this day, to
our wrath, that the Divisional Dump at Estaires had been captured by
the enemy. This included many of our records, innumerable gramophones,
including one expensive instrument received by Captain Eccles the day
we were ordered to send in our surplus stores, and many other articles
of priceless value. However, there was little time for lamentation, as
we were ordered back to Grenas once more. It was a bright, fine day,
and we had quite a pleasant march.

As we passed through Doullens for the third time, a German aeroplane
passed over very high up, and a rifleman was heard to remark that
all our marching and counter-marching must be intended to bluff the
enemy. Really it almost seemed like it at the time. Ever since we left
Fleurbaix we had been more or less continuously on the move, often
re-traversing old ground, and seldom staying more than a night or
two in one place. The real explanation was that another great German
offensive was thought to be imminent, and our Division, who were
the counter-attacking force, had to be placed where the situation,
which varied daily, demanded our presence. That kind of life very
soon becomes tedious, as everything you want is always packed up on a
waggon, and no one is allowed to go any distance from his billet.

The following day (April 13th) we moved off once more, this time nearer
the line, our destination being Authie. As we drew near the rain began
to descend, and on arrival we found, to our consternation, that French
troops were in possession, and that there were no billets for us.
After a considerable halt, during which time Lieutenant Freeman, the
Transport Officer, most prudently watered his horses, we were informed
that we were to bivouac in Authie Wood, a cheerless prospect, as the
rain continued to descend steadily. We passed through Authie and
turned up a steep hill on our right, and off that into a large forest
of small trees, clogged with undergrowth. Here we found the remainder
of our Brigade, and as night fell everyone was making elaborate efforts
with branches and bracken to form shelters for the night.

About 11 p.m. word was received that some tents had arrived, and
parties were collected with difficulty from the companies. The wood
was situated on the slope of a very steep hill, intersected by small
but precipitous gorges. Movement in the dark was therefore a matter
of considerable difficulty. The scene on the road at this time was
extraordinary. Three battalions, one field ambulance, and the Brigade
Headquarter transports were parked alongside a road of no great
width to begin with. In addition, the transport of the Machine Gun
Battalion--equal in volume to the whole of a Brigade transport--had
just arrived, and were trying to find room to park. Droves of animals
were proceeding up and down the hill for watering. Several lorries
containing the tents, and others passing through, not to mention motor
ambulances and dispatch riders, added considerably to the congestion;
while ration parties, fatigue parties, and miscellaneous details of
every description filled what little space was left, which was not
much. The babel of shouts and cries was almost deafening. One moment
you found yourself in the midst of a drove of kicking mules, the next
you were in imminent peril of destruction from a motor lorry, and all
this in inky darkness and a steady torrent of rain. Eventually the
situation cleared, and soon after midnight, except for a thousand dots
of light all over the countryside, you might have imagined that not a
man was about. Luckily, no inquisitive enemy airman came round.

The next day the Commanding Officer, Adjutant, and Company Commanders
visited the section of the Red Line for which the battalion was to
be responsible in the event of a hostile attack. The trenches were
only just on the far side of the road, and appeared well situated.
Gangs of Chinese were busy--after the leisurely fashion of British
workmen--deepening and continuing the trench system.

[Illustration: Photo by Gale & Polden, Ltd., Aldershot.

LIEUT.-COL. HON. N. C. GATHORNE HARDY, D.S.O.]

Time was, in the old Armentières days, when we thought the scheme for
occupying the enemy trenches, if he should retire, complicated and
changeable. Compared with the multifarious schemes that now began to
pour in on us in connection with the Red Line, that old operation
order, with all its amendments and cancellations, faded into complete
insignificance. Between this date and our going into the line at
Gommecourt on May 6th there were not only four distinct schemes, one of
which was a counter-attack in conjunction with tanks, but amendments
were issued almost daily, altering the original scheme in the most
drastic way. By way of encouragement, each set of orders was prefaced
by the words, "The enemy is expected to attack at an early date"; and,
indeed, the "powers that were" certainly had made up their minds that a
general offensive was to open against us at any moment on that part of
the front. However, that is rather a matter for the future.

After two damp and uncomfortable days at Authie we retraced our steps
for some distance, and then marched off to Pas. Our route lay for the
first part through villages packed with French soldiers--fine, big,
upstanding men in the prime of life--who gave us and our bugles a
rousing reception as we marched through.

Our billets--or rather bivouacs--we found were situated in Pas Wood,
and once more on the top of a precipitous hill, the transport being in
a field at the foot. The 2/7th K.L.R. and ourselves shared a section of
the wood on a narrow strip of the crest-line of the hill. A sandy lane
ran along the edge of the wood, giving access to our "bivvies," which
were strung out in twos and threes for a considerable distance, as the
wood descended below this strip very suddenly to the valley beneath
us. On the other side of the lane was an open field, but there were
considerable restrictions as to the erection of any tents, etc., in the
field, as our presence in the wood was supposed to be a secret.

Fortunately, the weather was fine and sunny when we took over our
bivouacs, and we were able to settle into our tents and ground-sheet
shelters pretty comfortably. In fine weather it was not bad, but on
cold wet days, of which we had a fair proportion, it was damp and
chilly beyond description; and the difficulties of obtaining exercise
apart from working parties--for we were still under the one hour's
notice to move--proved very disastrous to the health of the battalion;
and this was made worse by the quantity of vermin, occasioned by the
bad conditions of living and the lack of facilities for bathing for a
long period.

Our new situation brought out a fresh scheme for holding the Red Line,
but this did not cancel the old one, being merely an alternative.
Reconnoitring became the order of the day, and in addition the
battalion marched out daily _en masse_ to work on the defences in the
vicinity of Coigneux and Couin, where we were busy digging and wiring.

The addition of four more Lewis guns to the battalion about this time,
bringing the total up to twenty-four guns, meant the creation of large
classes for gunners, of which all companies had been getting short. The
packing of these guns was also a difficulty. An emergency transport
scheme was in existence, which limited the battalion transport
considerably, and worked out at half a limber per company. These
special vehicles with the battalion's essential battle equipment, were
kept loaded night and day. In addition, dumps of preserved rations were
formed, and water-bottles always had to be kept full.

On April 20th Captain Fell, who had been injured at St. Hilaire,
returned from England and resumed command of "D" Company, which had
temporarily been commanded by 2nd-Lieutenant Carr.

Some interesting tests as to the comparative merits in point of speed
of Lewis guns and rifle fire were carried out. A Lewis gun, with a
second gun to carry on if it had a stoppage, was matched against eight
rifles for five minutes' rapid fire, and it was found that, unless a
really good man was firing the gun, the total number of hits for the
riflemen exceeded the total for the Lewis gun. If the gunner was good,
the gun beat the rifle, but only by a small margin.

Each company was now organized into three ordinary platoons and a Lewis
gun platoon, the latter under a Company Lewis Gun Officer, and the
whole more or less under the supervision of the Battalion Lewis Gun
Officer. From the training point of view this plan has many advantages,
but whether these would be as great in action is open to question.

The working parties were now employed in the vicinity of Rossignol
Farm; and later, on a new switch line, which was the outcome of a
suggestion from the Commanding Officer, who had a very remarkable eye
for weakness in a trench system. Some of the ground was chalk and
flint, other parts consisted of excellent soft soil, with the result
that the work which composed the daily task varied exceedingly. Never
since the Margate days had the battalion been so good at digging as
they became at this time. Lieutenant Jones, our Pioneer Officer, being
an expert, proved invaluable in instructing the inexperienced.

A sudden outbreak of influenza, or some kindred ailment, swept over
the battalion at this time to a very alarming degree. We had a sick
parade daily of over 100, and admissions to hospital amounted to about
250 in a few days. Lieutenant Reed, our invaluable American Medical
Officer, did everything he could to check the disease. Rest stations
were established in Pas village to take the milder cases, isolation was
practised, changes of diet prescribed--everything, in short, was done
that was possible--but the complaint ran through the battalion like
wildfire. The consequence was that we lost a very serious proportion
of our best N.C.Os. and men, for those who go to hospital very seldom
rejoin their old battalion. The field ambulance tried to save what
they could, but, with the imminence of a battle, they dared not have
their dressing-stations full of sick. That the lice, coupled with the
bad conditions of living, were responsible there can be little doubt;
nor that, granted reasonable facilities for bathing and disinfecting
simultaneously, and not piecemeal, we might have stamped out the
lice. However, the Higher Command refused the special facilities, and
our losses were consequently great. It made things very difficult,
as N.C.Os. and warrant officers had to be replaced almost daily; and
the protective barrage that fell for an hour at dawn each day was a
sufficient reminder of possibilities ahead. So loud and emphatic was
this on some mornings that we were almost convinced that the threatened
offensive had opened, but on each occasion the barrage died away again
as suddenly as it had commenced.

During the period in Pas Wood we learnt that Colonel Fletcher had
been awarded the Legion of Honour. We were glad to think that he had
received this recognition of the splendid work he was doing.

On April 29th our manifold defence schemes were further complicated
by the issue of a counter-attack scheme, in conjunction with tanks,
for the recovery of Beer Trench, the old British front line in front
of Gommecourt, in the event of the German attack succeeding to that
extent. This necessitated the pegging-out of assembly positions in due
course in the vicinity of the Chateau de la Haie. Meanwhile the old
scheme for the manning of the Red Line was put into force on April
28th, the whole Brigade turning out for this practice, which was
carried out without incident.

Our early return to front line work was now indicated by instructions
to send an advance party into the Gommecourt sector for twenty-four
hours' attachment to the 8th Battalion Manchester Regiment. This was
done on May 1st, the party returning on May 2nd, but, unfortunately,
less Sergeant Roberts, of "C" Company, a most popular N.C.O., who was
shot through the head while going round the sector.

The actual relief was fixed for May 6th, and the interval was fully
occupied by practice attacks, first of the 8th K.L.R., and later by
the 172nd Infantry Brigade, assisted by contact aeroplanes.

The time had now arrived for us to leave our peaceful bivouacs and take
a more active part in the war. The lengthened stay and the improvement
in the weather had enabled us to make our temporary homes a little
less primitive than when we took them over, and we were quite sorry to
leave them. The surrounding country consisted of fine undulating downs,
rolling in long sweeps for miles in every direction. The villages were
mostly rustic and pretty, and the woods dotted about in all directions
were showing the first signs of young spring green.

May 6th proved fine and warm. The morning was busy with the final
preparations for the line and in sorting out the party which formed
the "lifeboat," which was destined for the Divisional Camp at Marieux.
Strict instructions had been issued that the full 33⅓ per cent. were
to be left out, and the party included Captains Eccles and Fell,
Lieutenants James and Burton, 2nd-Lieutenants Carr and Upward, and
eighty-two other ranks. These marched off at 2 p.m. Rear headquarters
were also arranged for at Couin, and consisted of Major C. W. Wilson,
the Adjutant (sick), and 2nd-Lieutenant Harris, who was in charge of
the Brigade relay stretcher-bearers--also kept out of the line for use
in the event of the "push."

The battalion moved off at 3 p.m. to Souastre, where teas were served,
and after dark the march into the line commenced. Souastre itself was
fairly intact, though the Germans occasionally shelled it with a heavy
gun, as certain houses mutely testified. After leaving Souastre the
road proceeded almost straight into Fonquevillers, cutting right across
open rolling country, and passing through most formidable lines of
guns. Endless shell-holes in all directions, both on the road and on
either side of it, revealed the fondness of the enemy for "crashing"
this main approach to the line, a practice which our gunners had taught
him to realize by bitter experience could be very effective. Just
before reaching Fonquevillers the road entered a wood, and that point
was particularly favoured by the attentions of the Germans.

After passing through this stretch of wood the miserable remains of
Fonquevillers village were reached--another very "unhealthy" spot--on
the far side of which the tramway to the trenches began. This most
important adjunct to trench life was a very favourite target of the
enemy. At the place where the tram-line started waggons and fatigue
parties used to congregate after dark, to deliver and collect those
various items of food and equipment which did so much to make life
tolerable. Knowing this full well, the enemy used to open at intervals
a concentrated fire on this spot, and woe betide the men that were
gathered there at the moment. A series of blinding flashes and terrific
explosions was the first warning that you got, and if the shelling was
accurate it was at once the beginning and the end. As a matter of fact,
however, we were extremely lucky. Not once did our rations get caught
at this danger point.

The track led along a glade through Gommecourt Park, once a fine wood
of noble trees, now a shattered skeleton of blackened stumps and
splintered branches looking gaunt and spectral. A wonderful place this
wood had been when the Germans held it. Huge dug-outs were concealed
beneath it, with many an underground passage and machine-gun posts
cunningly concealed in steel trees which counterfeited most cleverly
the surrounding trunks. No wonder the opening attack in 1916 found this
place wellnigh impregnable. No wonder the French Government had put up
huge notices that the park was preserved as a national memorial, albeit
the notices that no work was to be undertaken here without permission
of the French Government were now riddled with bullets and splintered
with shrapnel. The tide of war had flowed up to Gommecourt Park once
more.

On either side of the track were endless pieces of trench and dug-outs,
a very handy refuge in time of trouble; and it was with some slight
sense of loneliness that you left the protection of these on the far
side for a longish walk across the barest of bare open ground, heading
for a lone bush which marked the line of direction to the British
trenches. The frequent "whizz-bang" holes, some of very recent date,
showed that the track was well known to the enemy.

In every direction were compact woods of varying size and geometrical
pattern. Biez, Pigeon, the more famous Rossignol Wood, were all
distinctive features in the landscape; and by day one expected to see
those fleecy white puffs suddenly appearing above them and gradually
dissipating again into the air which marked the British shrapnel, or,
again, the blacker and more ominous clouds of the German fire.

It was dark when the battalion wound its way along the
Souastre--Fonquevillers road, and not only dark but raining. As the
night drew on it got blacker and blacker, while the rain increased to a
torrential downpour. The Commanding Officer of the Lancashire Fusiliers
had suffered severely during his own relief by the ignorance of the
guides supplied to him. To prevent a recurrence of this, because a late
relief hits both parties, his guides had been over the track nightly,
to make certain of the road; but this night the elements were against
them. They lost their way, and two companies were piloted into the
right battalion sector, and only achieved the relief of their opposite
numbers after wanderings comparable with those of the Lost Tribes
of Israel. On a drenching night, with an active enemy opposite you,
and with dawn approaching, such a trudge in the dark, stumbling over
obstacles and wading through mud and water, is no small task, and the
men's language, if free, was hardly to be criticized.

The relief was complete at 5 a.m., which left the remnants of the
Lancashire Fusiliers the minimum of time to get out of sight before
daylight broke--a proceeding that was most necessary where the enemy
had excellent observation, and usually considered a party exceeding
three or four a fair target. "C" and "D" Companies were in the front
line, which may roughly be described as running from Biez to Rossignol
Woods. "B" Company was in support, and "A" Company in reserve.

On the day after relief Captain Oliphant, of the United States
Army, and two N.C.Os. were attached to the battalion for two days'
instruction.

That night Colonel Fletcher, who had long been overworking, broke down
and came to the rear for a rest, and Major C. W. Wilson took over
command in the line. Colonel Fletcher was accommodated at Divisional
Headquarters at Couin. Captain Broad and 2nd-Lieutenant Waln also
retired to hospital, sick, the same day.

The next night (May 8th, 1918) a very determined effort was made by
Sergeant Corkill and three other scouts (Hill, Whelan, and Bradley)
to obtain identification. Leaving our line from our left post in Oak
Trench, they made their way across to a supposed enemy post at the
junction of the road and the German front-line trench; this they
rushed, killing two of its occupants. Before they had time to do
anything more, they were attacked by another post from the left flank.
Seizing the machine gun in the post, they made off; but owing to two of
the party being immediately wounded, and the check to their movements
caused by the weight of the gun, they had to abandon it, and made
the best of their way back to our line. For this very gallant little
enterprise Corkill received the Military Medal.

The question of the defence of the sector, which had been exercising
Colonel Fletcher's mind, and which, owing to his incessant
reconnaissances, had given the finishing touch to his weariness, was
now settled; and on the night of May 9th-10th the 6th Battalion of the
Bedfordshires, who belonged to the Division on our left, took over two
left posts of our "D" Company in Oak and Waac Trench, and established,
in addition, a joint post. This secured our left far more adequately
than before, and also enabled "D" Company to relieve two posts of "C"
Company and thus strengthen the line generally.

This scheme was further perfected on May 11th by the 2/7th K.L.R.
taking over a Lewis gun post of "C" Company, which was more properly
in their area; and on May 12th the defence line was based on Herring
Trench instead of Bass Trench, which involved some shifting of posts
and the taking over from the 9th K.L.R. of a small portion of their
line.

On the night of May 12th-13th the enemy put down a gas shell barrage
for two and a half hours on Fonquevillers, causing very heavy
casualties to the Division on our left. Most unfortunately, our rations
were coming through the village when the barrage opened, and we were
lucky to escape with only seven men wounded and gassed. The transport
stood the proceeding with the greatest fortitude, and after it was over
delivered the rations as if nothing had happened.

That night the Adjutant was evacuated to hospital, sick, and Captain F.
C. Bowring shortly after took over the duties.

The 1/5th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment relieved us on May 13th,
relief being complete at 1.30 a.m., and the battalion moved out to the
Chateau de la Haie switch, taking over the trenches occupied by the
2/5th King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment.

The time, on the whole, had been moderately quiet, though parts of the
line, more especially High Street, had dropped in for a good deal of
fairly heavy shelling. The trenches had been poor and wet, and, owing
to the extent of the front, only limited improvement had been possible.
By 5.30 a.m. the battalion had settled down in Chateau de la Haie. The
same afternoon officers were examining the trenches on the Sailly au
Bois--Fonquevillers road, and in the evening two and a half companies
were up in Beer and Rum Trenches, working on the defences. "B" Company,
on the way back, were unluckily shelled, and four men were wounded.

We also lost a valuable member of the battalion, Sergeant Lloyd, who
was injured by his horse falling on him. He had done excellent work as
Transport Sergeant.

At 9 p.m. on May 15th the battalion proceeded another stage from
the line, and relieved the 2/4th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment in
Rossignol Farm, the Brigade being now in Divisional Reserve. The men
were accommodated in barns, and the officers in a range of pigstyes,
which had concrete floors capable of being sluiced out with water; this
was necessary, as the styes were none too free of vermin. The farm
buildings were situated on the top of a steep hill, at the bottom of
which ran a road and a railway. Up this railway nearly every night a
15-inch railway gun was brought, named "Coppernob" by the troops, and
fired several rounds from a position just behind the farm, which was
shaken to its foundations at every discharge. This was not conducive to
rest, but a further annoyance was added when on two occasions flights
of German aeroplanes came over all night long, dropping their "eggs" in
the vicinity of the farm in their endeavours to destroy "Coppernob."
Ultimately success rewarded their efforts, but in the meantime a number
of bombs fell unpleasantly close to our "rest" billets. The time at
Rossignol Farm, like most other periods in reserve, was spent mainly
in working parties in the forward area. Apart from meaning practically
no sleep, and nothing but hard work throughout the hours of darkness,
these parties possess the added joy of long marches along roads not
infrequently shelled. That this work is necessary is beyond question;
that it was unpleasant is hardly less certain. Beer and Rum Trenches,
which might be considered the main line of resistance if the front-line
battalion were rushed, received most of our attention.

On May 17th Colonel Fletcher proceeded to Paris Plage Officers'
Rest Station, in the hope that a few days of quiet recreation would
compensate for the strain due to months of overwork, though the hope
was not fulfilled.

On May 18th the defence scheme for the reserve brigade of the centre
divisional front of the IV Corps was issued, and we plunged once more
into the perplexing variety of the probable and possible actions the
battalion could be called upon to undertake. From the very start these
were sufficiently multifarious, and were finally grouped under three
headings--first, to reinforce the right or left brigade in the line;
secondly, to counter-attack in one of four directions; or, third and
lastly, to form a defensive flank in one of two totally different
places. We also learnt that on the message, "Take precautions," the
battalion was to assemble at a given spot in "fighting order," and
there await news as to the particular part it was to play. This elastic
set of orders plunged everyone into a perfect fever of reconnaissance.
Before long, amendments and appendices began to arrive, which contained
reference to disposal of prisoners, extra stretcher-bearers, and so
forth, which certainly gave one the impression that the attack was due
shortly. Most people hoped devoutly that it would develop before we
entered the front line again, as the battalion holding the line when an
offensive starts has a poor time at the best.

On the 20th "C" and "D" Companies moved up to the trenches at the
Chateau de la Haie, taking with them the Lewis guns of "A" and "B"
Companies in addition, and relieved two companies of the 2/7th K.L.R.,
who were to occupy Beer Trench, previously not held.

Further orders then arrived, detailing the action if the battalion had
to occupy Beer Trench; but on May 21st, before any more of these orders
arrived, the battalion proceeded up the line, taking over this time the
right sector, and relieving the 2/4th South Lancashire Regiment.

The period behind the line, if not exactly restful, what with incessant
working parties and a general feeling of excitement produced by the
endless preparations to foil the Germans when they attacked, had yet
been distinctly refreshing after the wet and miserable trenches which
we had occupied in the line. The weather had been fine and warm, and
all the countryside was pleasant with the fresh smell and bright
colours of advancing spring. Baths and clean underclothing, better
food, the Divisional Band, together with practice on the range and
normal routine, had all helped to send the battalion back to the line
in splendid fettle once more.

The relief was complete at 2 a.m., but this time one cannot add
"without incident." The ration dump was heavily shelled, and, to the
great loss of the battalion, Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant Cousins,
but recently appointed to that important post, was killed, and another
man wounded. Cousins had been with the battalion from very early days,
and had risen steadily. It was indeed a tragedy that, on reaching a
post which one may call comparatively safe, he should then have been
killed.

[Illustration: SKETCH MAP OF GOMMECOURT.]

The sector in which the battalion now found itself was an awkward one
to hold, owing to inadequate lateral communications, and to the fact
that the front line companies were not in touch with each other. The
former defect was mainly due to the lie of the land, which sloped
down from the high ground occupied by the enemy towards our support
line in Gommecourt Trench, thus giving the enemy supervision of any
movement in that trench. Two companies occupied the front line for
four days, and were then relieved by the other two companies--one
company in support in Nameless Trench and Gommecourt Trench, and one
company in reserve in Rum Trench and in dug-outs in Gommecourt Park,
in which latter place Battalion Headquarters also was established.
The right front company was in rather a maze of trenches and saps off
Welcome and Warrior Streets, and held positions in which it was very
inadvisable to have any movement during the hours of daylight, else
the enemy artillery, owing to their excellent observation, quickly
located the movement, with unpleasant consequences. On our right were
the New Zealanders, based on Hebuterne, with whom we held a joint post
in front of Minnie Trench. In order to reach the right front company
from Battalion Headquarters, it was necessary to go a short distance
along Rum Trench, then climb out and dash across the road in full view
of the enemy, and drop again into Rum Trench. This dash across the road
was quite a sporting proceeding, because the enemy kept a machine gun
trained on the spot; the great activity of all whose duty took them
across the road was very noticeable. However, this dangerous place was
remedied by driving a tunnel under the road. Continuing the journey to
the right company, you proceeded along Rum Trench until you came to
Nameless Trench on your left, which you turned down and followed until
you struck Gommecourt Trench on your right. This trench, located at
the bottom of a valley, was necessarily rather shallow and wet; but it
was a long trench, and being for the greater part of its length under
enemy observation, was consequently unhealthy unless you negotiated it
at speed. Arrived at the far end, you turned up Richmond Trench, at
the head of which Company Headquarters was found in a deep dug-out.
The left front company occupied positions in saps leading off Nameless
Trench and Nameless Support, and were responsible for the front from
Nameless to the road which ran from Gommecourt Park to the enemy lines.
On their left was the 8th Battalion K.L.R. There was no communication
between the right and left companies during daylight, owing to the fact
that west of Nameless Trench the trench called Welcome Street had been
blown in for about sixty yards. The slope between Welcome Street and
Gommecourt Trench was well pocked with shell-holes, and examination of
an aeroplane photograph through a magnifying glass showed one curiously
shaped mark, which caused some speculation as to what it might be. It
was thought that it might be an old gun-pit, but when examined by a
patrol at night proved to be a bed of ox-eyed daisies in full bloom,
evidently a relic of a garden which had been there in the long ago. The
reserve company always had to find carrying parties at night to carry
water and rations up to the front line companies.

The tour opened quietly enough; the first two days the enemy devoted
considerable attention to back areas, but little to the trenches.
The night of May 25th-26th was made distinctly lively by a highly
successful raid carried out by a party of four officers and 112 men
of the 2/4th South Lancashire Regiment from our left company's front
line. The South Lancashires brought in twelve prisoners and one machine
gun. During the barrage we had two men killed and six wounded, while
2nd-Lieutenant Thomas was also slightly wounded by a sniper on this day.

On May 25th Colonel Fletcher rejoined rear headquarters.

The rest of the tour was quiet enough--the usual amount of
miscellaneous shelling, and the usual two or three casualties daily.
2nd-Lieutenant Thomas was evacuated sick on May 28th to No. 3 Canadian
Casualty Clearing Station, which was heavily bombed shortly after his
arrival, and caused him to retire to the United Kingdom wounded.

A draft of 126 men was posted to the battalion from the Divisional Wing
on May 29th, but remained at Marieux with the nucleus party.

Relief of the battalion took place by the 2/7th K.L.R. on May 29th, but
this only constituted the occupation of the reserve trenches instead
of the front line, and made very little difference to conditions of
existence.

The Transport Officer and Quartermaster, who were both suffering
from the effects of gas, had to be sent to the rear, the former to a
Casualty Clearing Station and the latter to Marieux. 2nd-Lieutenant
Harper took over the duties of Transport Officer. Lieutenant Burton,
the Scout Officer, also came up from Marieux, as a raid was looming
ahead, and he had to commence preliminary reconnaissances.

The end of the month found our effective strength 43 officers and 860
men. Captain Wurtzburg and 2nd-Lieutenant Jones had been evacuated
to England sick, and 2nd-Lieutenant A. E. Sutton for a transfer to
the Royal Air Force. 2nd-Lieutenants Jacobs and Anderson had rejoined
from a wild-goose chase to No. 2 Entrenching Battalion, whither they
had been dispatched some time previously, after a heated argument
over our paper strength, when we absorbed half the 2/5th K.L.R.
Lieutenant Tebbutt, previously with the 2/5th K.L.R., joined us also;
and 2nd-Lieutenant Lever, M.C., who was wounded at Langemarck, now
reappeared. Our casualties had been five men killed and forty-five
wounded.

June opened somewhat noisily in comparison with the peace and quiet of
the last few days of May. The enemy celebrated the "glorious First of
June" by attempting to raid a post of the 2/7th K.L.R., the attempt
being preceded by a violent barrage on a broad front, and resulting in
the capture by the 2/7th K.L.R. of one prisoner, who was understood
to make some very disparaging comments on the officers who were to
have accompanied the raiding party. The failure of the enterprise
was evidently vexatious to the Germans, who shelled the whole sector
vigorously all that day, and early the next morning treated us to two
hours' solid gas shelling. The small box-respirator, admirable as it
is as a protection, is not an ideal form of headgear, and two hours'
continual gassing is apt to provoke considerable resentment on the
part of the wearer. Luckily, the storm ceased at 4.20 a.m., when a
local relief of 95 men by a party of 121 from Marieux had been arranged
for, and was in fact achieved without loss, though at 5.40 a.m. a good
number of 4·2's were flung on to Rum Trench. That afternoon 25 more men
arrived from the rear, reinforcements from the Base, and were posted to
the various companies.

The night of June 3rd our artillery put down a heavy barrage for a
raid by the 1/5th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, but at the eleventh
hour the raid itself was postponed till the next night. The enemy took
little notice of it, probably imagining that it was retaliation for
the previous day's "strafe." Later in the day, however, he shelled
Battalion Headquarters with more zeal than was pleasant.

On June 5th and 6th more small reliefs of men were effected, and
Captain Eccles came up from rear headquarters and relieved Major
Wilson, who went back to Couin for a rest; while Colonel Fletcher
proceeded to England for fourteen days' leave as a last effort to
recover his former vitality.

On June 7th we were relieved by the 1/5th Loyal North Lancashire
Regiment, and divided our forces. "C" Company with "D" Company's Lewis
guns and Headquarters moved to Chateau de la Haie, where Major Charles
Wilson resumed command. "A," "B," and "D" Companies, with Headquarters
and Lewis guns, occupied Beer Trench and the defences of Fonquevillers,
under the command of Captain Eccles.

We remained doing working parties and some musketry and bathing till
June 9th, when we were relieved by the 8th K.L.R. and withdrew to
Couin, which we reached at 7.15 p.m.

After a short three days' rest in Couin Wood, we found ourselves
once more in the line, this time as left battalion of left brigade,
the sector being north-east of Gommecourt, the original sector first
occupied by the battalion. "D" Company, who were to carry out a raid
in the immediate future, were left out for training, and "B" Company,
8th K.L.R., were attached in their place. The dispositions in the line
were "C," "B," "A" in the front line, with "B" Company, 8th K.L.R., in
reserve.

The battalion left Couin at 7.30 p.m., and the relief of the 9th K.L.R.
was not completed till 2.40 a.m. on June 12th. Unluckily, the take-over
was harassed by considerable hostile artillery fire, causing two killed
and two wounded. We were fortunate indeed to escape so lightly. The
rest of the day was quiet enough, except for some light shelling.
Lieutenant Burton, Battalion Scout Officer, arrived the same evening
from rear headquarters to commence a reconnaissance of the area to be
raided.

[Illustration: Official Photograph by permission of The Imperial War
Museum.

GOMMECOURT PARK.]

[Illustration: Official Photograph by permission of The Imperial War
Museum.

GENERAL VIEW OF FAMPOUX.]

On the night of June 16th Lieutenant Burton, accompanied by Riflemen
Pennington and Leigh, proceeded into the German trenches. Coming
suddenly and unexpectedly on a German post, they found themselves
under a fierce fire at close range. Lieutenant Burton fell at once,
badly wounded in the chest, and in spite of the efforts of his two
companions to bring him back, they eventually had to leave him, being
both seriously wounded themselves. There can be little doubt that
Burton was mortally wounded, and could at the best have survived but a
short while. By his death the battalion lost one of its most devoted
and gallant officers. Entirely devoid of self-interest, he possessed a
striking sense of duty, and worked whole-heartedly for the common weal.
He was keenly mourned by all ranks. Pennington was awarded the Military
Medal.

That night the enemy shelled us pretty heavily, and we sustained
fourteen casualties. The next day, June 17th, on the other hand, was
exceptionally quiet. The patrolling was continued by Acting-Captain
Robinson and two more scouts sent up for the purpose.

On June 18th the enemy, no doubt encouraged by a previous success,
sent over another raiding patrol. This one, however, met with a warm
reception, and the patrol was forced to beat a hasty retreat, though
not till one of its members had been taken prisoner.

Our raid had been fixed for June 19th, but owing to torrential rain
it was decided to postpone it. At 11.30 p.m., however, on June 20th
it was duly carried out. The raiding party, under Captain Fell,
2nd-Lieutenants R. E. Noon and L. T. Profit, had been training for
six days at Rossignol Farm, where a set of dummy trenches had been
constructed from aeroplane photos. The raiders were divided into three
parties: Noon's party, fourteen N.C.Os. and men, were on the right;
Profit's party, about thirty N.C.Os. and men, on the left; and, lastly,
there were eight stretcher-bearers under a sergeant.

The plan of operations was as follows: The right party were to strike
across No Man's Land up from our No. 2 Post, using the old German
support line post "H" Trench, and up to a grave marked by a conspicuous
white cross. On arrival there they were to rush the two German posts
just beyond it in the present German front line, then turn left handed
to meet the left party. The latter, leaving our No. 3 Post, were to
proceed along the old German front line--_i.e._, parallel with the
right party--past the northern end of "H" Trench, after which they were
to extend and rush two posts in the German front line, and then move to
the right to join the right party.

It will be observed from the sketch map that the old system of trenches
during the confusion of the offensive had become, as it were, twisted
sideways, and instead of each side holding the original front and
support lines, these were now communication trenches, and the old
communication trenches had been fashioned into the fire trenches.

At 3 p.m., June 20th, the raiding party left Rossignol Farm for Chateau
de la Haie, where they arrived at 3.45 p.m. After tea and dinner the
party set off for the line with blackened faces, white armlets, and
plenty of bombs.

At 10.25 p.m. raid headquarters were reached, tin helmets were
abandoned, and the move to assembly positions carried out. Meanwhile
Robinson and the scouts were busy laying tapes and fixing sticks with
metal discs to guide the party, and all was ready at 11.15 p.m.

At 11.30 p.m. the 4·5 howitzers, 18-pounders, and machine guns opened
the barrage on the enemy front line, and the parties moved forward up
their respective saps.

The right party, having reached the white cross, remained in their
trench, which they shared with some thirty very dead Germans till
11.34 p.m., when they proceeded to extend and rush the enemy posts.
However, some recently erected wire and a volley of bombs somewhat
disorganized the movement; but Noon quickly collected four or five men
and made a second rush with great bravery and determination, this time
successfully, into the trench.

Two of the post showed fight and were killed; one bolted for a dug-out,
but was taken prisoner. The rest of the post were killed or escaped
over the top. Two of the raiders worked along to the right, the
remainder to the left towards the other party. Just at that moment the
recall signal went up, two green Véry lights, and the party only just
had time to evacuate the trench before our protective barrage returned
once more to the front line, whence it had temporarily lifted to the
support.

The left party, after reaching "H" Trench, extended and tried to rush
the enemy. They were met by steady machine-gun and rifle fire and a
large number of bombs, and could make no progress. Lieutenant Profit
and one or two others, with great determination, managed to reach
the parapet, but all were wounded and could do nought. After one or
two further efforts the raiders withdrew. On this occasion Rifleman
Donaldson and Rifleman Robert Smith showed the utmost gallantry. Having
penetrated with Lieutenant Profit as far as the German parapet, they
saw him fall wounded, and in spite of very heavy fire proceeded to
carry him back. By doing so they missed the gap in the wire. Nothing
daunted, they made their way back to the enemy post, took their
bearings again, and this time brought their casualty safely through.
The performance was one of great coolness and courage, and the heavy
rain which had begun to fall, coupled with the fact that Donaldson
himself was wounded, did not make their task any easier. They were both
awarded the Military Medal.

Others who for distinguished conduct during the raid received the
Military Medal were Lance-Corporal Winstanley, who worked with great
devotion in charge of the stretcher-bearers; Lance-Corporal Heyes,
Riflemen H. E. Harrison and A. Mellor for gallantry and initiative with
Noon's party; and Riflemen B. Clarke and W. Whelan, Battalion Scouts,
for continuous bold patrolling before the raid and disregard of danger
during its progress, while laying tapes in No Man's Land and leading
the raiding parties to and from their positions.

Captain Robinson and 2nd-Lieutenant Noon were both awarded the Military
Cross for their respective shares in the success of the operations.
Everything that could have been found out about the enemy's position
Robinson had, by persistent patrolling, discovered. Noon's action on
the night of the raid has already been described. The casualties were
twenty-one wounded, of whom 2nd-Lieutenant Profit subsequently died of
his wounds. This had been the first real chance this young officer had
had of showing of what stuff he was made. His performance on this night
was most gallant, and it was with universal regret that we heard that
he had succumbed to his wounds.

One prisoner and a machine gun were the trophies of the raid.

The party returned to the Chateau de la Haie for their breakfast, and
thence to Rossignol Farm for twenty-four hours' rest. Congratulations
from the B.G.C. and G.O.C. were received on the success of the raid.

On the evening of June 21st "D" Company came into the line, and "B"
Company, 8th K.L.R., was relieved after some local rearrangement of
the line. Subsequently "D" Company moved into the front line, changing
places with "A" Company.

On June 22nd the 62nd Division, on our left, put over a raid with
tanks, and we got well shelled in consequence, five men being wounded.

On June 24th there was a thick fog in the evening, and a German
wireless message was picked up: "Tell storm troops to stand-by till 6
a.m. opposite Hebuterne." As a result three heavy counter-shoots were
carried out by our artillery, though nothing more happened. We had been
reinforced by sixty-three men that day from rear headquarters.

On June 25th Colonel Fletcher, who had recently resumed command of the
battalion, while going round the right company front with Lieutenant
J. R. Paul, had a very narrow escape from a 5·9 which landed full on
the parados. Lieutenant Paul was seriously wounded in the back, and
two or three men of the post were also wounded. Beyond a few bits of
metal in his face and hands, Colonel Fletcher escaped injury. Paul was
evacuated, and never rejoined us--to our lasting regret.

Next day a twelve-hour continuous shoot of all available artillery was
delivered on to Rossignol Wood. To this the enemy retaliated on us
to some purpose, and we had two men killed and thirteen wounded. On
this occasion Rifleman P. Walsh, a stretcher-bearer, proved himself so
efficient and so regardless of danger that he was recommended for, and
was duly awarded, the Military Medal.

Advance parties from the 1/5th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, and
also a liaison party from the New Zealand Division, now began to
appear; and by 12.50 a.m. on June 30th the relief was over and we
were making our way back to Rossignol Farm, where we took over, as
"B" Battalion, Reserve Brigade, from the 2/4th Loyal North Lancashire
Regiment. By 4 a.m. all were in their "bivvies."

The casualties for June amounted to 1 officer killed and 2 wounded, 12
men killed and 83 wounded. During the month we had received 211 men as
reinforcements, and our ration strength was now 24 officers and 695 men.

The month of July was one of quiet and peace. We were still, it is
true, under the shadow of a coming German offensive. We wired and dug
unceasingly. We received orders of every description to meet every
emergency. We were also kept in a state of perpetual readiness to move,
and were liable to test movements at most inconvenient times. Corps
and Divisional Commanders revelled in staff rides to tactical features
of the ground; and the undoing of the foe, should he be bold enough to
attack, was our constant thought and care.

Notwithstanding all this, quiet training, baths, competitions, Brigade
and Divisional sports, went on almost as at home in England.

On July 1st Major Wilson, recently returned from Paris Plage
Rest-house, took over the command from Colonel Fletcher, who proceeded
to the Third Army School after presenting ribbons to those recently
decorated. Captain Eccles also left this day for the Senior Officers'
Course at Aldershot.

On July 2nd the 2nd Otago Regiment, New Zealand Division, relieved
us at Rossignol Farm, and we moved into Corps Reserve in the Bois de
Warnimont, between Authie and Bus Les Artois. Here we were on notice of
one hour between 9 p.m. and 9 a.m., and two hours for the remainder of
the day.

To test our readiness we received word at 7.50 a.m. on July 5th to move
to our battle position in the Bus Loop, a phrase reminiscent of, but
unconnected with, "strap hanging." We moved off at 8.10 a.m., and were
in position at 9.22 a.m.--quite a creditable performance.

On July 6th Major Charles Wilson attended a Corps Commander's Staff
ride, which involved hard riding over a good part of France with some
sixty or seventy other officers, during which most contingencies were
discussed and counter-measures devised. The possibilities of the
situation seemed endless. However, we somehow managed to keep pace with
Defence Schemes A, B, C, D, E, and F, with their various amendments
and appendices; and as the enemy never attacked, we may perhaps omit
further reference to them, in spite of the important part they played
in our lives at this time.

A more interesting event, perhaps, was the winning of the Light
Heavies in the Brigade Boxing Competition by Sergeant Cox, our
Sergeant-Bootmaker.

On July 15th we moved to a camp at Hénu, where Colonel Fletcher resumed
command. We were still under the same emergency orders.

On July 21st and 22nd the Divisional Sports were held at Couin. Owing
to the distance we had to come, we marched there and back in fighting
order. The sports were a great success, and a pleasant variation in the
usual routine.

On July 23rd Colonel Fletcher relinquished command of the battalion
at his own request, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hon. N. C. Gathorne-Hardy,
Rifle Brigade, took over. Since his breakdown during the first tour
in Gommecourt Colonel Fletcher had never been able fully to recover
his old vitality, and, ever mindful of his battalion, chose to give up
command rather than risk disaster to his "boys" by his breaking down
during active operations. Few beyond his intimate friends know what it
cost him to ask to be relieved, not from any sense of personal pride,
but from his intense love for his battalion. His whole heart and soul
were wrapped up in the 2/6th, and leaving it must have been painful
to him indeed. The loss to the battalion was very great, and Colonel
Fletcher's departure was keenly regretted by all ranks.

Colonel Gathorne-Hardy had for some time been commanding a battalion
of the Rifle Brigade in Salonika, and had volunteered, with other
Commanding Officers, to come to the Western Front after March 21st. He
had not been long with the battalion before he became highly popular
with all ranks, different as was his style of command from that to
which we had been accustomed. We were lucky to get a Rifleman for a
Commanding Officer, which was more than we had dared to hope.

On July 28th our spare kit was taken into store, and at 6.30 a.m. on
July 29th we moved to our old billets at Ivergny, and thence at 9 a.m.
the next morning to the Etrun area, which we reached at 5.15 p.m.
after one hour's halt _en route_ at Lattre St. Quentin for dinner. We
spent the night in a hutted camp. Here we entrained at 10.30 p.m. at
Artillery Corner, and moved up by light railway to the point where
the Arras--Lens railway joins the River Scarpe. Here we detrained,
and proceeded to the support trenches of the Fampoux South sector,
relieving the 72nd Canadian Infantry Battalion. The relief proceeded
without any interruption, and was completed by 1.30 a.m.

Before proceeding further, it will not be out of place to give a
general description of the area in which the battalion now found itself
situated.

Leaving Arras to the south, the River Scarpe takes its course westwards
along a plateau as far as the village of Athies, at which point it
enters a valley proper, with high ground on either side.

Slightly south-east from Athies a large re-entrant ran south from the
river; in the mouth of this re-entrant was the village of Feuchy.

Farther east down the stream, on the northern bank, the village of
Fampoux covered the lower slopes of the high ground which here turned
abruptly north. At this point a small triangular island, about 2,500
square yards in area, divided the Scarpe.

The British line, travelling south from Lens, followed the high ground
overlooking Douai to Fampoux. Here it bent sharply to the west along
the north slope of the valley, crossed the river at Feuchy, and took
the line of the re-entrant already referred to--a direction roughly
south-west.

The Brigade whilst on duty in this part of the line were responsible
for the portion of it immediately north of the river, an area generally
spoken of as the Fampoux sector.

The three battalions of the Brigade were disposed as follows: one
in the line, one in close support, and the third in reserve at Ste.
Catherine, north of Arras. The left flank of the battalion in the line
was marked by a communication trench, Camel Avenue, which travelled
straight from our rear through the sector over to No Man's Land to the
German rear. From Camel Avenue to Fampoux the front line, known as
Stoke Trench, with the exception of a very slight bulge towards the
enemy, ran north to south, crossing the Arras road; the front line
entered Fampoux, and, passing through it, reached the river bank at the
apex of the island.

[Illustration: SKETCH MAP OF

FAMPOUX]

Fampoux, a village of fair size, was held by both sides, and as a
result had few houses left standing, those to the south-west and on the
island appearing to have fared the best.

The main road coming from Arras passed in succession through St.
Nicolas, St. Laurent-Blangy, Athies, and Fampoux; at this point it
became sunken, and then carried on eastwards through the German lines
into Roeux.

From Fampoux a sunken road ran north to Gavrelle. Along this road,
heavily protected by wire, ran the German front line.

Two kilometres behind, and parallel to, this portion of the German line
ran the Roeux--Gavrelle road.

On the left of the sector behind this road rose Greenland Hill, flanked
on its left rear by the spires and roofs of Douai.

The island originally carried the Pelves and Monchy--Le Preux roads
over the Scarpe, but all the bridges being demolished, it was of little
importance, and was merely held by our patrols at night.

From Feuchy to the island was a belt of marshland, bounded on the south
by the Arras--Douai railway line, which roughly defined the German
positions. Over these we maintained a strict watch from the hill north
of the Scarpe.

The right flank of the battalion rested on Feuchy.

Several systems of support trenches ran from north to south down the
sector, the most important one, Stoke Support, running parallel to the
front line, and commanding it from an average distance of 400 yards.

The two main communication trenches were Camel Avenue in the north and
Cam Avenue in the south.

Battalion Headquarters were situated in Cam Valley, a small depression
about 400 yards long and 80 yards in width on the north side of the
Arras road, north-east of Athies.

Athies, in the hands of support troops, was the ration dump for the
sector, and also maintained communication over the river with Feuchy.

A battalion in reserve manned the Arras--Lens railway embankment
between the Scarpe and the Arras road, finding ample and comfortable
accommodation in the numerous "bivvies" and dug-outs covering its
western slope.

From the top of the embankment a fire trench had an excellent command
of the approach from Athies.

Between the embankment and St. Laurent Blangy, two kilometres farther
west, intervened the woods, lakes, and grounds of Blangy Park, giving
cover to our field batteries.

Brigade Headquarters was on the main road St. Laurent--Blangy; while
Quartermaster's Stores and Transport were at Ste. Catherine, north of
Arras.

Relieving troops, rations, and supplies were brought up to the sector
by means of a light narrow-gauge trench railway, which, leaving the
dump and railhead at Anzin St. Aubin, three kilometres north-west of
Arras, struck the Scarpe at St. Nicolas, and, travelling along its
north bank under the cover afforded by the trees with which it was
lined, came to an end just short of Feuchy.

The dispositions of the battalion were--"A" and "C" Companies in
Athies, "B" and "D" in Cam Valley. After being at first in the railway
cutting, Battalion Headquarters moved on the evening of August 1st to
the railway embankment, handing over their old Headquarters to the
Munsters, and taking over from the 85th Canadian Infantry Battalion.
The tour was very quiet, the only incident being some heavy bursts
carried out from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on August 6th by our "heavies" on
the enemy front line.

The same day a slight readjustment of the line took place between
ourselves, the Munsters, and the 8th K.L.R. 2nd-Lieutenant Paterson and
Rev. S. J. Hughes joined while we were here, and the Medical Officer
was temporarily relieved by Lieutenant Gherman, M.O.R.C., U.S.A.

On August 8th we were relieved by the 2/7th K.L.R., and then proceeded
to relieve the 8th K.L.R. in the front line. The operation was finally
completed by 1.10 a.m. "D" and "C" Companies held the front line, "A"
and "B" were in support.

The tour in the front line was hardly more eventful than when in
support. The Corps Commander visited us on two occasions; the
battalion on our right was unsuccessfully raided; "A" Company took a
prisoner after a patrol encounter; and on August 13th sixteen officers
and thirty-two other ranks of the American Army were attached for
instruction.

There is no doubt that this was the most "cushy" sector the battalion
ever occupied. The weather was fine and warm, the country pleasant, and
but for a little artillery and one or two active trench mortars the
enemy harmless. On August 15th we were relieved by the 2/7th K.L.R.,
with the exception of "D" Company, and moved back into reserve at
Victory Camp. Here we spent a quiet two days cleaning and training,
being joined by "D" Company on August 17th. On August 18th we moved
to Ste. Catherine Camp at Anzin, where 2nd-Lieutenant D. J. Williams
reported for duty.



CHAPTER VIII

BATTLE OF CAMBRAI


The move from the line to Ste. Catherine Camp was the beginning of
a series of movements, some leisurely, some hasty, which eventually
brought the battalion into position to take its part in the Battle
of Bapaume and the second Battle of Cambrai. The breaking of the
famous "Hindenburg Line," on which the enemy had lavished such skill
and pains, and on which it was evident he placed such firm reliance,
finally altered the method of warfare from the concentrated attack on
an organized trench system to the battle of movement in unfortified
areas.

But before briefly describing the systems of the Hindenburg Line,
and the general trend of the battle, the preceding movements of our
battalion must be sketched.

On the evening of August 18th we moved back from Ste. Catherine Camp
to the village of Anzin, two or three miles north-west of Arras,
with instructions to move again very early next morning. This we
certainly did, as we rose about 2 a.m., and had finished breakfast
by 3 a.m. About 6 a.m. we moved down to the railway line between
Anzin and St. Aubin--Artillery Point was the name of the spot--and
entrained. A pleasant journey in open trucks on the light railway,
which twisted and turned amid green woods and cornfields smiling in
the lovely summer weather, brought us to Monchy Breton, about twenty
miles west-north-west of Arras and some five miles north-east of St.
Pol. Here we detrained and marched on about three miles to Magnicourt,
another delightful little French village, which had escaped the
destroying hand of war and nestled peacefully amid pleasant rural
surroundings. Instead of the ordinary hutted camp that had formed
our home at Anzin, we were billeted in comfortable farmhouses. We
remained here for two days, doing a little quiet training; while some
of the more privileged attended, on August 21st, a Tank lecture and
demonstration at Monchy Breton. After settling down comfortably for the
night, we were suddenly roused up again and told to be ready to move
forthwith.

At 2.15 a.m. we were again on the march, and after passing through
Chelers and Tinques, arrived about 3.45 a.m. at Penin, some nine miles
due south of our starting-point. After breakfast all ranks turned into
bed for a good sleep, "Reveillé" being at noon. It was a gorgeous day,
but terribly hot, and the effect of the morning's sleep, coupled with
the heat, made everyone feel very lethargic. At 9.25 the same night we
set off once more, this time due south, passing Givenchy, Lignereuil,
Grand Rullecourt, and Sus St. Leger, and reaching Ivergny at 2.45 a.m.
on August 23rd. The march had been somewhat complicated by our having
to cut across a Canadian Division moving west-north-west. We expected
to renew our nocturnal rambles that night, but we were left in peace
for twenty-four hours, resuming our march at 2.15 p.m. on August 24th
in a north-easterly direction through Sombrin to Barly, some ten miles
away, which we reached at 6.45 p.m.

At Barly we remained two days, making final preparations for the
offensive. Seven officers and sixty men were detailed for the "nucleus
party," and Major C. W. Wilson was appointed to command the Brigade
"nucleus." At 11.30 p.m. we left Barly for Ficheux area, arriving at
Le Chat Maigre at 2.45 a.m. on August 27th. Here we made a halt, and
lay down to rest in the open fields. The march had been made in a fine,
clear night and under ideal conditions, and the bivouac was really
delightful.

The proximity of active hostilities was evidenced by (among other
things) a number of tanks, both large and small, which waddled up the
road near us. But the conditions were very different from those at
Passchendaele the previous year. There you saw only an interminable
stretch of mud and water, with never a living thing to vary the
monotony of the scene except soaked and muddy soldiers. Here, on the
contrary, we had fine rolling country, dry and firm, which even a spell
of wet weather did not convert into a muddy swamp. Ripe corn stood
ready for the cutting, birds sang, and save for the distant rumble of
the guns all was peaceful and still. The villages, it is true, were
razed to the ground and often half overgrown with grass and weeds--sad
reminders of the first Battle of Cambrai; the ground was scarred and
pocked with shell-holes, and the ravages of war were only too obvious
in many other ways. Yet even in the war zone itself the open, rolling
country was always pleasant to the eye, and the ground dry and firm
except during actual rain.

At 11 p.m. we moved off to another field a few miles away at Mercatel,
arriving soon after midnight. What might be described as our "circular
tour of France" was now drawing to a close. These night marches, with
all the comic incidents connected with night bivouacs, the confusion
of settling down or setting off in the profound darkness, which the
restless bombing 'planes made imperative, were soon to be but pleasing
memories. One march more was to bring us to the Hindenburg Line.

At 11.30 a.m. we moved off, and in due course arrived at St. Martin,
just in front of the redoubtable Line, and the Commanding Officer
proceeded to the place forthwith. Meanwhile the men settled down
in shell-holes amid the ruins, while Battalion Headquarters was
established deep down in a dug-out under the remains of the church.
Walking wounded and German prisoners were much in evidence. After a
short delay the battalion moved in for the night into the Hindenburg
front line, with all its mass of trenches, wire, and dug-outs--a truly
magnificent work, but looking somewhat forlorn now that the tide of war
had rolled eastward.

At 7 p.m. on August 29th we moved a little farther along the line,
which here bent back in an easterly direction. This brought us to a
point nearly due east of Fontaine Lez Croisilles, which was some 2,500
yards away and in close vicinity to the other two Brigades of our
Division, which were already in action.

At 10 a.m. the battalion was ordered to take up its position as Brigade
Reserve, the 2/7th and 8th Battalions K.L.R having moved up to form a
defensive flank during the attack of the Canadian Division on Upton
Wood, which was about a mile and a half west of Fontaine.

The companies took up ground positions on the south-west and south-east
of Fontaine respectively.

At 6.30 a.m. on August 30th the Brigade took over the front line from
the 170th Brigade, of our Division, and the battalion concentrated west
of Fontaine. We had now come into the fringe of the battle zone, and
had three men killed and four wounded. We remained in this area till
the next day, August 31st, when we received orders at 9.30 p.m. that we
were to attack on September 1st at 6.5 p.m.

Before describing the attack it should be stated that it was the final
stage of the Battle of Bapaume, which had opened on August 21st on the
whole front of the Third Army and the left wing of the Fourth Army. It
finally resulted in the capture of 3,400 prisoners and 270 guns, and
the advance of the line Roye (on the Amiens--Noyon road) to Arleux,
ten miles north-west of Arras, up to a line which ran west of Nesle,
Peronne, and Bullecourt. In other words, the enemy had been driven
right across the old Somme battlefield, and the northern portion of the
Hindenburg Line had been pierced. The action in which the battalion,
in conjunction with other troops, took part was intended to complete
the success which the previous day's fighting had won, and prepare the
way for the next great assault. The following extract from the _Morning
Post_ dated September 3rd, 1918, is worth quoting at this point.

       *       *       *       *       *

"THE LANCASHIRES' ACHIEVEMENT.

"The breaking of this line was an intricate operation, and a detailed
account of its accomplishment would be too technical for the average
reader. It is sufficient to say that the Drocourt Line is a series
of parallel trenches in two groups, known as the front and support
systems, running northward out of the Hindenburg system near Quéant,
and in front of the villages of Cagnicourt, Dury, and Etaing to the
River Scarpe. Against the greater part of the line--that is, from
Etaing on the Scarpe down to Cagnicourt--the English troops and
Canadians had only simple front and support trenches to cross. On
the right, however, the great triangle of closely woven ditches and
tunnels was a much harder obstacle, and our progress in this region
has been much slower in the preliminary stages of the advance. You
know the trouble caused by Bullecourt and Hendecourt, even more by
Riencourt, all of them lying fast in the meshes of the joined defensive
systems--Hindenburg and Drocourt--a solid mass of earthworks over three
miles deep, riddled with secret refuges and machine-gun emplacements.

"Before the main attack could be made it was essential that we held
Hendecourt and Riencourt. That was effected yesterday evening by
Lancashire troops. Bullecourt had already been prized loose from the
Hindenburg Line by Londoners after several sanguinary efforts and
severe counter-attacks. Riencourt had withstood all blows by reason of
its commanding position, a group of village walls on a slight crest
encircled by trench protected by outlying redoubts. The Lancashires
facing it knew its worth. Hendecourt, besides Riencourt, was hardly
less difficult a nut to crack. They had been fighting without rest in
their conquered portion of the maze. Two days running they delivered
attacks at noon, followed by one at four o'clock the next morning. The
same night--the night of Sunday--they went out to storm these citadels
of the Hun that the victory of to-day might be complete. They found
both village ruins full of Germans and machine guns. It was the usual
mixed experience, surrender in the open and resistance in the cellars.
Some of the Germans ran away, others rallied under their officers.

[Illustration: MŒUVRES, INCHY, AND CANAL DU NORD

Oblique Aeroplane Photograph.]

"Riencourt and Hendecourt contained many German bodies when they were
left quiet, deserted by the forward surge of the battle front, the
survivors of grim hand-to-hand encounters with the Lancashire men and
their bayonets. All night long the 'mopping up' continued. Hardly had
the secret places been declared clear when the Lancashires had to
attack again and take up their share of the greater advance at dawn.
The Canadians and their brother Britishers on their left know the
debt they owe these stout lads of the North, whose unflagging efforts
enabled them to attack with easy minds, knowing their flank would be
secure.

"Riencourt captured, the striking troops were within easy reach of the
Drocourt Line. At Riencourt itself the distance was not over half a
mile. Higher up the Canadians on both sides of the Cambrai road were
closer at some places. Their front was nearly straight. Before them
were unobstructed fields, little scarred by shell, with dull red banks
of tangled wire stretched taut in front of the white band of trenches,
the ground behind rising gently with the tips of broken roofs and the
Church towers of the villages laid against the rain-swept sky of grey.

       *       *       *       *       *

"It is now necessary to return to the Lancashire men who were on the
Canadian right. They had to attack and pass through the triangle I
have described, east of Riencourt. Some of them followed behind the
Canadians, then slipped south-east into the trenches and mopped them
up. By last accounts they were working satisfactorily down the line of
the triangle, and clearing out nests of machine guns. The drive through
to Buissy was a phase of the attack following this operation of the
Lancashire men.

"This despatch is necessarily very incomplete, for the battle is still
going on and news comes back slowly. Fresh German divisions are no
doubt coming up. The Canadians on Mont Dury at eight o'clock could see
masses of grey moving westwards at several places; and although some
of the German artillery had begun to drop back, the bombardment was
still very heavy. The intermixture of enemy troops is extraordinary.
In one narrow Canadian sector prisoners have been taken from seven
different divisions. Lancashires on the right have taken them from six
divisions. There are Saxons, fresh 1st Guards Reserve, battered 2nd
Guards Reserve, bits of the 30th from Bapaume, and the 12th Reserve
from Bullecourt; 7th Cavalry Division, fighting dismounted, and badly
at that, and apparently other relics of the fighting of the past three
weeks served up with fresh dressing, in the shape of a few rested
divisions from 'the back of beyond.' It is a most disorderly order of
battle. Something appears to have cracked besides the Drocourt Line."

       *       *       *       *       *

To return to actual details. At 4.40 a.m. on September 1st the 2/7th
and 8th K.L.R. attacked and captured Hendecourt, and advanced to a line
running from Terrier Alley (about 1,000 yards due west of Riencourt) up
Greyhound Trench to Hendecourt Chateau, about 1,000 yards due north of
Riencourt.

The 2/6th K.L.R., in conjunction with two companies of 2/7th K.L.R.
on our left and the 52nd Division on our right, were now to attack in
the evening and capture Riencourt Lez Cagnicourt, and consolidate a
line 500 yards east of the village. The formation was two companies
in front--"C" Company (Captain Williams) on the right and "B" Company
(Captain Robinson) on the left; "D" Company (Lieutenant Noon) was in
support, with "A" Company (Lieutenant Sage) in reserve.

After spending the night of August 31st-September 1st in an area just
west of Fontaine, the battalion moved forward by Crux Trench at 3.15
p.m. in the order "B," "C," "D," "A." The trench at this point was
extremely shallow, and there can be little doubt that the movement of
the battalion was observed.

[Illustration: THE CAPTURE OF RIENCOURT

2/6th The King's (Liverpool Regiment)

_To face Page 210._]

The forming-up positions were as follows: The front line companies
moved on a line running along the lower part of Terrier Alley, and
thence in a northerly direction across to Greyhound Avenue, on the
southern edge of Hendecourt, which positions had been captured by the
2/7th K.L.R. in the morning. "D" Company were some 300 yards in rear in
Morden Trench; "A" Company were some 1,200 yards farther back.

The orders were that the Hendecourt--Bullecourt road was not to be
crossed till 5.15 p.m. Just at this moment as the companies were
moving to cross this road an aeroplane came over, flying very low, and
immediately afterwards the enemy artillery opened out on Crux Trench
and the road with 5·9's and gas shells, causing many casualties to both
"B" and "C" Companies, including many N.C.Os. The aeroplane also fired
several belts of ammunition at the men as they lined up.

In spite of this bombardment, the companies moved steadily to their
appointed positions, and were ready at 6 p.m., and great credit is due
for this to their platoon commanders. Just before zero (6.5 p.m.) the
barrage of the right Division (52nd) opened, which caused the enemy to
drop a protective barrage on our front also. Luckily, this fell about
100 yards in rear of our companies, and no harm was done. At 6.5 p.m.
our artillery opened on the barrage line for three minutes, during
which period the two leading companies (with two platoons in front and
two in support) advanced through the 8th K.L.R. and moved forward with
sections in "worms" up to the barrage. This at zero plus three minutes
moved forward at the rate of 200 yards in eight minutes, settling down
finally for ninety minutes on the German side of our objective, Emu
Alley and Wolf Trench, the far side of Riencourt.

The moment the barrage lifted the enemy opened on our forming-up line,
shortening from time to time, but so well did our men keep up to our
own barrage that the enemy's was always behind us.

The first opposition was encountered by the right platoon of "C"
Company, who were held up by heavy machine-gun fire. The supporting
platoon at once commenced an enveloping movement, which apparently
disheartened the foe, as the post retired into a dug-out, out of which
they were bombed, and the survivors made prisoners. "B" Company then
advanced again with three platoons in front, though as progress was
made sections darted off to deal with individual posts. "C" Company
encountered little opposition till they approached the west edge of
the village, when our own barrage, unfortunately, came back 200 yards,
causing considerable casualties. A third platoon was accordingly
sent forward to reinforce, and just at this moment heavy machine-gun
fire was opened from the sunken road. No. 6 Section promptly dashed
forward and successfully dealt with this nest of machine guns, when the
company proceeded to deploy and move through the village, "B" Company
continuing the line from the southern part of the village to the
Brigade boundary.

The enemy now concentrated his artillery fire on the village, and both
companies sustained somewhat serious casualties. Moreover, some of the
enemy had gone to ground, and, reappearing after the leading wave had
passed through, came up and opened fire on them from behind. A section
was consequently detached to put a stop to this, and successfully drove
the enemy back into the arms of "D" Company, who were "mopping up,"
twenty-one Germans being taken prisoners.

During the passage of the village 2nd-Lieutenant Anderson (No. 5
Platoon) became a casualty, and Sergeant Adlington took over command;
while in "C" Company 2nd-Lieutenants Upward and Paterson were both
wounded. Corporal Stevenson, finding both his platoon officer and
sergeant out of action, assumed command of his platoon and led them
successfully to their final objective in a masterly fashion.

After passing through the village, where numerous prisoners had been
taken, the companies advanced steadily over difficult country to their
final objectives. These were reached by "B" and "C" Companies at 7.10
p.m. and 7.15 p.m. respectively.

Shortly before this 2nd-Lieutenant T. L. Williams (No. 11 Platoon)
was most unfortunately killed by a shell, and his place was taken by
Sergeant Warren, who took the men over to their objective, which he
consolidated with marked ability.

The enemy still held out with one very determined machine-gun party at
Wolf Alley, and the advance was slightly checked. Rifleman Dury, with
the utmost coolness, scored a direct hit on the gun at point-blank
range with a rifle grenade, and the whole gun team were taken prisoners.

At 7.25 p.m. the contact aeroplane passed over as prearranged, and
the flares were lit. By 9 p.m. both companies had completed the
consolidation of their objectives, and on the right were in touch with
the Scots Fusiliers. The left company, however, had not succeeded in
getting touch with the 2/7th K.L.R., so Captain Robinson and Corporal
Lee set out at 9.45 p.m. to try and find the right post of the left
battalion. Soon after starting they ran into a party of the enemy,
consisting of one officer and twenty-one men, which was apparently
working round our left flank. The enemy proceeded to get his machine
gun into action, but the officer and N.C.O. who were attending to it
were promptly shot dead by Robinson and Lee, while five men of the
party were killed as they tried to take cover, whereupon the remainder
at once surrendered. For this fine performance and his general conduct
throughout the operations, of which too much cannot be said, Captain
Robinson received a bar to his Military Cross, while Corporal Lee was
awarded the Military Medal.

The left battalion was located about 10 p.m., but being 500 yards away
two sections were moved up from "D" Company to fill the gap, the rest
of that company forming supporting posts. They had done their "mopping
up" well, and took fifty prisoners in Riencourt itself.

Such is a brief and bald account of the taking of Riencourt, a feat of
which the battalion may well be proud. The barrage that fell on them
as they were moving forward to their assembly positions might well
have disorganized the attack. As it was, the N.C.Os. and riflemen rose
to the occasion as their seniors became casualties, and carried on
admirably. Some names have already been mentioned, but some additions
must be made. Rifleman Lewis, after his Company Sergeant-Major and
the other N.C.O. at Company Headquarters were knocked out, took
charge of the Headquarters personnel and kept up communication with
all concerned. Rifleman Prior on liaison patrol tackled a German
party of eight men with such determination that two were killed and
the rest captured. Sergeant Haigh proved a skilful and bold platoon
commander; Rifleman Dodd an equally dashing section commander. Riflemen
Hatton, Fairclough, and Atkin ran backwards and forwards unceasingly
throughout the action, keeping up communication; while Rifleman
Mount, as stretcher-bearer, was untiring in his efforts, and entirely
regardless of danger. He organized enemy stretcher parties, and many
of the battalion wounded undoubtedly owe their lives to his energy and
resource.

The resistance offered varied. Generally speaking, from covered
positions it was determined. One or two groups certainly gave in rather
too readily. One party in particular of the 66th (Würtemberg) Regiment,
sixteen strong, issued from a dug-out, pushing in front of them the
usual Red Cross man. This fellow came along holding his medicine chest
at arm's length, with an expression on his face of "I am touching wood"
which was really comical.

The total prisoners captured by us that day amounted to 170, with 13
machine guns and a trench mortar. As against this, we had 1 officer
killed and 3 wounded, 19 men killed and 95 wounded.

The following criticism of a German Sergeant-Major, made to the
Divisional Intelligence Officer, may be quoted here in the form in
which it was passed on to us.

"57TH DIVISION P. OF W. CAGE,
"2-9-1918.

  "A.D.C. FOR G.O.C. 57TH DIVISION.

"In the course of a conversation with a Sergeant-Major of the 7th
Cavalry Division, this N.C.O. expressed warm admiration for the British
as soldiers, and particularly for the way in which the attack was
carried out when he was captured. He said he had not seen a finer
attack, and knew how an attack should be carried out, because he had
formerly belonged to a 'Sturm' Battalion.

"He said that the infantry were into the trenches the moment the
barrage 'lifted,' and this was confirmed by an artillery Observation
Officer, who also mentioned that the attack had been very smartly
carried out.

"The N.C.O., when asked what badges the attacking troops wore, said
they were green diamonds.

                                     (Sgd.) "S. A. SPALL, _Lieutenant_,
                                               "_Intelligence Officer,_
                                                      "_57th Division_.

  "_September 2nd, 1918._"

       *       *       *       *       *

Hearty congratulations on our success were received both from the
Commander-in-Chief and from our more immediate Commanders.

In this action, in addition to the rewards already mentioned, Captain
Williams and Lieutenant Harris were awarded the Military Cross, and
twelve men the Military Medal.

The next morning the Battle of Cambrai and the Hindenburg Line opened
with a general attack by the Third Army; and before nightfall we were
three miles behind the front line, the 172nd Brigade of our Division
and the 63rd Division having passed through us. We had a magnificent
view of the battle, and the sight of our artillery galloping up and
opening fire was a most welcome reminder of the new type of warfare
which was now taking the place of the old. After one peaceful day we
were ordered, on September 3rd, to concentrate in the vicinity of
Hendecourt, where the rear headquarters, transport, and "nucleus party"
joined us.

Here we remained quietly, cleaning up and training, till September 6th,
the only excitement being a high velocity gun which shelled us on that
day, wounding two men.

This day we received orders to move into the line in the vicinity of
Inchy the next day (September 7th), in order to relieve the 190th
Brigade, of the 63rd Division. Accordingly, at 10 a.m. our advance
party set off to the trenches, followed in the evening by the rest of
the battalion.

The Royal Fusiliers, from whom we took over, were in support, and the
relief was complete at 2 a.m. on September 9th. The rear headquarters
and transport meantime moved to Quéant. Nothing of any moment happened
this day in the line. We were issued with a defence scheme, from which
we learnt that the Guards Division were on our right and the 2nd
Canadian Division on our left; while we were to be responsible for the
main line of resistance, a section of the Hindenburg Support Line about
1,200 yards in extent running round the south-west outskirts of Inchy.
"A," "D," and "C" Companies were in front, and "B" in support. The
other two battalions were responsible for the temporary main line of
resistance, east of Inchy.

[Illustration: THE ROAD TO CAMBRAI.

2/6th The King's (Liverpool Regiment)

_To face Page 216._]

Later on during the day these orders were altered, but only in the
matter of exact frontages. At "stand-to" on September 10th "D"
Company dropped in for some attention, 2nd-Lieutenant Green, who had
but recently joined, being wounded, along with one or two others.
Otherwise little happened. On September 11th the 2/7th and 8th K.L.R.
attempted, at 6.15 p.m., to establish posts on the Canal du Nord.
This great canal stands roughly north and south about 1,000 yards
east of Inchy and about 500 yards east of Mœuvres, the latter place
being just over a mile south-south-east of Inchy. The ground had been
excavated to a great depth, and very large banks constructed, but the
canal had never been finished and contained no water (_see_ photo.).
It was, notwithstanding, a formidable obstacle, being 20 feet deep in
places, though the embankment had been pierced in places for roads and
tram-lines. Opposite Mœuvres the canal banks were in some places quite
low.

The attempt of the other two battalions to establish posts proved
unsuccessful, and at 10.15 p.m. our "C" Company was pushed forward to
replace "A" Company of the 8th K.L.R. in the Hindenburg Line.

At 12.55 a.m. on September 12th orders were received for our Battalion
Headquarters to join Headquarters of the 8th K.L.R.; and we were warned
that as many as three companies might be required to form a defensive
flank north-east of Mœuvres. At 3.30 a.m. "A" Company was ordered
forward for this purpose, with instructions to form platoon posts in
Cemetery Trench, just north of Mœuvres, and to gain touch with the
170th Brigade on the right. It was now nearly daylight, and the company
experienced the greatest difficulty in gaining its position, as there
was no cover, and touch was not obtained with the 170th Brigade. At 6
p.m. the enemy counter-attacked on the Inchy--Mœuvres line, and "A"
Company, finding itself being outflanked, after hard fighting was
obliged to withdraw. In the course of this movement Lieutenant Sage,
the Company Commander and a very gallant officer, and seven men were
killed, and twenty-one men wounded.

That night the battalion was relieved by the 2/4th South Lancashire
Regiment and one company of the Munster Fusiliers. This was completed
at 5.30 a.m. on September 13th. Our new dispositions were two companies
in the Buissy Switch and two in the Hindenburg Support north-east of
Pronville. After remaining here for two days we learnt, on September
15th, that we were to be relieved by the 52nd Division and go back
for a short rest. Taking everything into consideration, we had had a
pretty strenuous time since we left Anzin on our preliminary marches,
and after our first arrival in the battle area had had our share of
fighting and shelling. There was, of course, no cover from the weather
except in trenches. Villages had for the most part long since ceased to
exist, and were but grass-grown mounds with notice boards to indicate
what places they had once been. Our casualties had been fairly heavy,
and the reduction in officers and N.C.Os., of course, threw extra work
on the remainder, whose opportunities for sleep and rest, small as they
were likely to be in any case, were thus further curtailed. A few days'
rest and all would be well again, so we greeted the news that we were
going back for a while with no little pleasure.

The relief by the 7th Cameronians commenced at 1.30 p.m. on September
16th with Battalion Headquarters, "A" and "D" Companies. This was
finished by 4.30 p.m. "C" and "B" Companies could not be relieved
till after dark, but had finished by 11.30 p.m. There was very little
hostile activity during the relief, only two men being wounded, and the
companies made their way back to Croisilles for the night in their own
time.

Next day, September 17th, we moved to Boyelles, and entrained there at
4 p.m. for Saulty. Here we detrained and marched to Barly, arriving
there at 7.10 p.m. Our rest at Barly will live long in the memory of
the battalion. We had enjoyed periods out of the line before, but never
was any place so acceptable as Barly. Everyone arrived full of that
comfortable feeling which only hard work well done can produce. All
were pleasantly tired, but quite ready to make the most of the golden
hours so long as they should last. Even the senior officers of the
battalion became light-hearted and youthful. Were not the Commanding
Officer and the Padre seen hurrying up the main street with pockets
and arms filled with bottles of "bubbly," and in no way disconcerted
on reaching the Mess to find that a supply had already been obtained?
Our stay lasted till September 25th, and during that time we rested
and trained, cleared up and repaired, and generally made ready for the
resumption of the offensive.

The second instalment of "Cheerio," published by the "Whizzbang
Press," and edited by Rifleman Wheway, of "B" Company, duly made its
appearance, and was acclaimed as a great journalistic success. The
"Cheerios" Concert Party made its début here, and produced a really
first-class entertainment in the Cinema on September 22nd. As to the
doings of these artistes more will be said hereafter.

A number of officers joined us at Barly--2nd-Lieutenant Alty, D.C.M.,
and 2nd-Lieutenant Shirt on the 18th, 2nd-Lieutenant Hardy on the
21st, 2nd-Lieutenant D. R. Williams on the 22nd, and Lieutenant
Kissan on September 23rd. As against this, more than one officer was
now suffering from dysentery brought on by shell gas, and Lieutenant
Penrice, Captain Robinson, and 2nd-Lieutenant Lever had to be evacuated.

Captain Robinson in particular was a great loss. His command of men
was truly remarkable. Forceful and brave in the extreme, he had at
Riencourt the opportunity to show the stuff he was made of, and proved
himself a fine officer. Lieutenant Kissan took over command of "B"
Company.

On September 25th we learnt that our rest was over and that work was
before us once more. At 8.40 a.m. on September 26th we entrained at
Saulty and proceeded to Vaux Vraucourt, which was reached at 3 p.m. A
march took us thence to our concentration area near Quéant, which we
reached at 5 p.m. At 2.50 a.m. on September 27th the battalion moved
forward from the concentration area to the first assembly position,
which was in the Hindenburg front line about 500 yards south-west
of Pronville. This was reached at 4.30 a.m. At zero (5.20 a.m.) the
battalion moved forward to the second assembly position, which was
about 600 yards west of Mœuvres, arriving there at 12.30 p.m.

The battalion now opened up into artillery formation and advanced
across the Canal du Nord, through an arm of the Hindenburg Support
Line, and on to some high ground about a mile east of Mœuvres. Here we
settled down and waited for the attack to develop.

       *       *       *       *       *

The scheme of operations was on a large scale. The 52nd and 63rd
Divisions were to capture the first objective (Red Line), which ran
north and south just beyond the main system of the Hindenburg Support
Line; and then the second objective (Brown Line), which ran through
Anneux Chapel round Anneux to east of Graincourt. After this, the
171st and 172nd Brigades of the 57th Division were to pass through and
capture the third objective (Blue Line), which ran round the east side
of Fontaine, west of La Folie and east of Cantaing. The 170th Brigade
were then to seize the crossings of the Canal de L'Escaut if not
already taken, and carry the attack farther. The Canadians on the left
and the Guards on the right were continuing the line of attack north
and south with the same relative objectives. The 6th Dragoon Guards
and Corps cyclists were in reserve; and orders were issued to make
a swift advance possible if the conditions should prove favourable.
In consequence of these movements, the accumulation of troops behind
the front line was very considerable. The country was similar to what
had been covered in the previous attacks, though perhaps some of the
rolling slopes were bolder and the sunken roads deeper.

       *       *       *       *       *

Everywhere you looked were groups of men dotted about, and the enemy
proceeded to shell vigorously, as the force opposite his front was
only too conspicuous. At about 1.30 p.m. a message was received from
the 8th K.L.R. that the Sugar Factory beyond the Red Line on the
Cambrai--Bapaume road had not been captured, and that in consequence
the attack of the 57th Division could not take place.

There was nothing, therefore, to do but for the battalion to dig in,
which they proceeded to do under heavy machine-gun and artillery fire,
a none too pleasant task.

At 4.30 p.m. news was received that the 63rd Division had captured the
Sugar Factory; and at 5.30 p.m. General Longbourne, our Brigadier,
arrived at Battalion Headquarters. It now appeared that the attacking
divisions had made progress towards their second objective, and that it
was our turn to continue the operation.

Our instructions were to capture Cantaing Trench and Support. This
was a double line of trenches which ran in a south-south-easterly
direction from the south side of Bourlon Wood round the south-east side
of Anneux down to Cantaing. To reach this line we were to move down to
our objective from the north, using the section of Cantaing Trench and
Support that ran along the west and south sides of Bourlon Wood, and
obtaining cover from the wood itself.

It was decided to attack on a two company front--"D" on the right, "C"
on the left, with "B" in support and "A" in reserve. "C" Company was
responsible for the clearance of Cantaing Trench. Zero was 6.20 p.m.,
at which hour a twenty minutes' barrage was to begin. The companies
moved over at 6 p.m., but the barrage never came off. However, at
about 9.30 p.m. word was received from Captain Fell that, as neither
Cantaing Trench nor Support was half dug or continuous, he thought it
inadvisable to continue before daylight. This was approved.

At 4.30 a.m. on September 28th Captain Patteson, the Brigade Major,
arrived with fresh orders. The battalion were now to capture a trench
just west of Fontaine and round the southern edge of that place to the
east end of Cantaing, the attack to commence at 6.20 a.m.

The formation for the attack was the same as had already been detailed,
except that "B" and "A" Companies were given objectives on the left of
the attack.

Companies moved off at 6.15 a.m. and at 9.30 a.m. Captain Fell and
Captain Williams reported that they had gained their objectives and
were moving through Fontaine--where a Divisional Headquarters, complete
with maps and papers, was occupied--to take up positions on the east
side.

While proceeding to attack Anneux, Lieutenant James, commanding "A"
Company, was severely wounded. Notwithstanding, he carried on for
eighteen hours, and was only evacuated at length by the direct orders
of the Commanding Officer. For his gallantry on this occasion he was
awarded the Military Cross.

Platoon posts were established by the three companies, "B," "C" and
"D," east of Fontaine, "A" Company being on the western outskirts of
the village. The casualties were 2nd-Lieutenant Shirt and ten men
wounded. The same morning the 170th Infantry Brigade passed through us
to capture the Marcoing Line, which runs north and south about 1,400
yards east of Fontaine, but, having failed to do so, were withdrawn
through us early in the morning of September 29th. At 7.30 a.m.
on September 29th information was received that the Canadians had
captured the Marcoing Line as far south as the trenches just north
of the railway embankment which cuts the Cambrai--Bapaume road. Two
patrols from "D" and "B" companies were despatched in consequence at
9.30 a.m. to "mop up" the balance of this line north of the Canal De
l'Escaut. "D" Company's patrol reached the sunken road which runs from
the north end of La Folie Wood towards Cambrai, but were there held
up by machine-gun fire. 2nd-Lieutenant Waln and "B" Company's patrol
worked along the north side of the railway embankment, which runs from
about 100 yards north of Fontaine due east, till they got in touch with
the southernmost post of the Canadians in the Marcoing Line. Turning
south, he proceeded to clear the Marcoing Line, fighting his way with
the utmost coolness and gallantry. At the very outset several of his
men were knocked out by artillery and machine-gun fire, but he worked
his way doggedly along. Being presently reinforced by another platoon,
he completed the clearing of this section of the line, joining hands
finally with "D" Company's patrol at the southern end of this section
of the line. He finished his task at 6.30 p.m., and brought in one
machine gun and sixteen prisoners. For this very gallant performance,
which was highly complimented by the Canadians, 2nd-Lieutenant Waln
was recommended for the Military Cross, but was awarded a Divisional
Commander's Card of Congratulations only. Lance-Corporal Chambers was
awarded the Military Medal in the same connection.

At 3 p.m. news was received that the enemy was falling back, and an
attack on Proville Trench, on the east side of the Canal De l'Escaut,
was ordered. The same formation was prescribed as before, and the
advance began at 6.30 p.m. About 7.10 p.m. Captain Fell reported that
his company ("D") were across the Canal de l'Escaut, little opposition
being encountered. Shortly afterwards "C" and "B" Companies reported
to the same effect. "A" Company were remaining in reserve on our side
of the canal and La Folie Wood. But at this point our difficulties
began. "C" Company, as darkness fell, found themselves floundering in
a swamp, and could make no headway. "D" Company's left platoon reached
Proville Trench, but came under heavy machine-gun fire and were forced
back to the lock. The rest of that company were similarly checked by
the fusilade, and the company established itself in the vicinity of the
lock, about 400 yards west of Proville. Reference was made to Battalion
Headquarters, and instructions were issued to wait for the dawn to
renew the attack.

At 10 p.m. Battalion Headquarters moved up into La Folie Wood and
occupied some huts close to the canal, where they were shelled
continuously throughout the night with the utmost vigour. At 12.20
a.m. "A" Company was sent over the canal, and a further attack by the
leading companies was attempted. However, the enemy machine guns,
which had a perfect field of fire, were too much for the attackers,
and caused severe casualties. All that could be done was done,
Sergeant Bibby in particular distinguishing himself on this occasion,
but it became evident that a mere frontal attack was useless. It was
accordingly decided that "D" Company should renew the frontal attack
while "A" Company supported by "C" Company was to work round the sunken
road which ran from our right towards Proville. However, before this
order could take effect we were informed that the 2/7th K.L.R. would
take over and carry out this attack, which they did successfully, our
battalion being concentrated west of the canal by 4 p.m.

At 6 p.m. the 2/5th King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment relieved us,
and the battalion withdrew to bivouac in an open field just west of
Fontaine and on the south side of the Cambrai--Bapaume road. This
completed an awkward period of desultory but difficult fighting.
We took twenty-one prisoners, with one machine gun and one trench
mortar, but had two officers killed and two wounded, while among
the men there were fifty-nine casualties. The officers killed were
2nd-Lieutenant Purdie, a most popular and gallant Scotsman who had
been with us for a long while, and had seen active service during the
greater part of the war; and 2nd-Lieutenant Alty, D.C.M., who had only
joined us at Barly, but whose worth we knew, as he won his D.C.M. when
serving at Houplines in the ranks of the 2/7th K.L.R. Of the officers
wounded, Lieutenant James has been already mentioned; the other was
2nd-Lieutenant Shirt, who, like Alty, had joined us at Barly, and we
regretted his swift departure to "Blighty." Among the men the loss of
Company Sergeant-Major Woodward, of "C" Company, who was wounded during
the concentration in front of the Canal du Nord, was the most serious.
He was one of the very old members of the battalion who had risen
steadily to warrant rank. He was badly wounded and his subsequent death
in hospital was universally deplored. Company Quartermaster-Sergeant G.
Lane was promoted to fill the vacancy that had occurred.

[Illustration: Official Photograph by permission of The Imperial War
Museum.]

For the whole of September, during a good part of which the battalion
had been engaged in active operations, our casualties had totalled
as follows:--Four officers killed and 10 wounded; 47 men killed and
188 wounded; 13 men missing. Our "effective strength" was 34 officers
and 708 men, as against 42 officers and 919 men on September 1st.
Our "trench strength" was, as always, considerably lower than our
"effective strength," as the latter included everyone detached, whether
on duty or leave, who was not counted in the war establishment of
another unit. Moreover, the Transport, rear headquarters, and the 33⅓
per cent. forming the "nucleus party" have to be further deducted to
show the number of "rifles" available for fighting purposes.

The battalion remained in its present position till October 4th.
Our habitation consisted of the remnants of old enemy trenches and
shell-holes in an open field. To the west of this, at a distance of
some 200 yards from the nearest "bivvies," was a line of six 6-inch
howitzers, which was continued by six 60-pounders. These two batteries
were almost continuously in action, and were frequently engaged in
firing salvos for barrages, and the effects of their presence had to
be experienced to be properly appreciated. Except for these--and it is
a very big exception--we were quiet enough. On October 1st some shells
fell among our most eastern "bivvies" and wounded three men. Apart from
this we were not troubled; but the hum of aeroplanes filled the air
all night, while the detonations from bombs were sufficiently close to
remind one of the unpleasant possibility of our turn coming next.

The weather was fine and mild, but beyond cleaning up and repairing the
damage of war very little training was attempted, except some useful
demonstrations of the best method of coping with hostile machine guns.
On October 1st 2nd-Lieutenant Simpson and a draft of sixty men arrived,
which was a welcome reinforcement. The Adjutant had also returned from
the United Kingdom and resumed his duties, Captain Bowring departing
shortly after to England for a well-earned leave.

Rear headquarters and the transport remained in the field on the north
side of the Cambrai--Bapaume road close up to the south-west edge of
Bourlon Wood, where they had moved on the evening of September 29th.

Bourlon Wood showed little signs outwardly of the hurricane fire to
which it had been treated both in 1917 and again recently. It covers
a large area, but is chiefly composed of small bushy trees with but
few of the large and stately boles which show the effect of shell
fire so markedly. Inside the wood the scent of gas was still fairly
strong; while derelict tanks and endless fragments of foreign and
British equipment served to show what hard fighting had taken place
in its green glades. Forward of Fontaine the country to our immediate
front was far less bold in its hills and valleys than the ground that
we had traversed. It still consisted of rolling downs, but the slopes
were gradual and less pronounced; and whole areas, especially in the
vicinity of the canal, were dead flat right up to Cambrai itself,
of which one could obtain a good view from the high ground on which
Bourlon Wood itself stands. Columns of smoke could be seen rising from
the town, and not infrequent explosions showed that the enemy was
preparing for his departure.

An unpleasant incident had occurred with a "booby trap" at Riencourt,
which caused the death of a rifleman and hurled Quartermaster Smith to
a considerable distance. Consequently, when the fire by the Battalion
Headquarters tent suddenly blew up, lodging a considerable quantity of
hot potato in the eyes of the cook, we were somewhat alarmed. It turned
out, however, to be only a small bomb detonator that the heat had
exploded.

While we were in bivouac here word came that the Commanding Officer had
been awarded the D.S.O. Although he modestly referred to it as being
a recognition of the merit of the battalion, all ranks felt that it
was richly deserved. His unofficial exploits in rallying and taking
forward stragglers from other units had been noted with approval by the
men, and throughout the operations he had been conspicuous by his total
disregard of personal safety.

On October 4th we moved up from reserve into support with two companies
("A" and "B") in the Marcoing Line and "C" and "D" Company in support.
Battalion Headquarters were to have occupied the Chateau Pill-box at
the corner of La Folie Wood, but this was already in occupation, and
eventually they were accommodated for the night in a deep dug-out in
the sunken road some two or three hundred yards farther back and next
door to Brigade Headquarters.

Next morning (October 5th), most unfortunately, Brigadier-General
Longbourne was wounded while patrolling in front of the advanced posts.
Though his wounds were not at first thought serious, they proved worse
than had been suspected, and we saw him no more. He was a fine leader
of men, a most gallant gentleman, and as popular with the men as with
the officers. No one could wish for a better Brigadier.

The Commanding Officer assumed command of the Brigade, and Major C. W.
Wilson of the battalion.

The same morning Battalion Headquarters moved up to the Chateau
Pill-box. This was a small concrete erection, of no strength, and
the inside was literally covered with flies. Besides this there were
various wooden "bivvies" and slit trenches for the men, into which all
soon settled. A large number of demolition charges littered the ground
in wooden cases about the size of a box that would contain a dozen
bottles of beer. These charges seemed to have an unholy attraction
for some people. A pioneer was found hacking the casing off one for
firewood; the cooks made a screen round their fire with others; while
a signaller was found carrying one into the pill-box to put his candle
on. They may have been safe enough, but you can never tell.

It was certainly a most unpleasant corner that we were in. There were
8-inch howitzers just behind us which fired at frequent intervals,
while the enemy kept us pretty occupied with shells. We had several
wounded, two cooks in one instance, bending over their fire, being
simultaneously disabled by a "whizz-bang," and the breakfast
spoilt. All night long revised orders as to defensive positions to
be maintained along the canal bank kept coming in, which kept the
companies always on the move.

       *       *       *       *       *

At 6.45 p.m. on October 6th we relieved the 8th K.L.R. in the front
line--"D," "A," "B" Companies in front and from the right, and "C"
Company in support. The line ran from a point in the Marcoing Line
about 300 yards north-north-east of Proville across the Canal de
l'Escaut, and right across an old German aerodrome almost to the
Cambrai--Bapaume road, where the Canadians carried on the line. "D"
Company were south of the canal, "B" and "A" Companies north of it.
Posts were for the most part in old houses and cellars. "A" Company
had an enormous covered concrete rifle range (_see_ aeroplane photo)
on their front. Their posts were at one end, and Company Headquarters
at the other--a most convenient arrangement, affording protection from
weather or hostilities for the Company Commander when visiting his
posts.

       *       *       *       *       *

During this night rear headquarters and transport lines by Bourlon
Wood, to which the Padre and Lieutenant Hazell had been sent sick, and
Captain Bowring for a rest prior to going on leave, were visited by an
aeroplane and heavily bombed. The destruction caused by these terrific
explosions was very considerable. One man was killed and seven wounded;
while among the transport itself, which received the brunt of the
bombing, eighteen animals were either blown to pieces or so maimed that
they had to be shot. It was a horrible business digging out the wounded
men and putting the mutilated and screaming animals out of their pain,
and in the morning the place looked like a shambles.

October 7th passed off quietly with only intermittent shelling; but
next day there was a general attack by the Third Army on limited
objectives, which was connected with the turning of Cambrai from the
flanks, though but mild retaliation occurred on our front.

It was now expected that the enemy might fall back at any moment.
Active patrolling for the night of October 7th-8th was arranged by
the battalion scouts working in relief. As had been anticipated, no
enemy were located in the area bounded by the Cambrai--Bapaume road,
the Cambrai embankment, and the canal; but up to 4 a.m. machine guns
were still firing across the open country from the south bank of the
canal. By this time the general attack of the Canadians, which had
commenced at 1.30 a.m., had carried them up to the canal bridgeheads
without serious opposition. Accordingly all companies in the front
line were instructed to push forward small patrols, to be followed by
strong fighting patrols, to keep abreast with the Canadians. At 7.30
a.m. a general advance was ordered, and, after consultation with the
8th K.L.R., who had relieved the 2/7th K.L.R. on our right, we made
the following moves: "D" Company worked along the south of the canal
up to the railway embankment in front of Cambrai; "B" Company worked
along south of the Cambrai--Bapaume road, crossed the canal in front of
Cambrai by a footbridge; "A" followed "B" Company, to form the left of
our front line, which was now the railway embankment; while "D" Company
occupied "B" Company's old position as support.

By twelve o'clock our new line was established with three companies on
the line of the railway embankment running along the western outskirts
of the town, and piquets placed over all entrances to Cambrai.
Battalion Headquarters had moved from the canal bank up to the rifle
range.

At 2 p.m., the pursuit having swept through and past Cambrai, we were
concentrated for the night with "A" and "B" Companies in the rifle
range, "C," "D," and Headquarters in houses some few hundred yards
nearer the town itself. Our casualties from shell and machine-gun fire
for three days were three killed and twenty-eight wounded.

The capture of Cambrai was the end of our share in the battles of
Bapaume and Cambrai. The month of September and the early days of
October saw the final initiation of the battalion, and, in fact, of the
whole Division, into the mysteries of a great offensive. Looking back,
we have reason to feel that we acquitted ourselves with credit. The
following letter from General Sir Julian Byng, commanding Third Army,
to our Divisional Commander, is reproduced here by special permission:--

"I cannot allow the 57th Division to leave the Third Army without
expressing my sincerest appreciation of its services during the Battle
of Cambrai.

"The success that has crowned its efforts has been brought about by
careful preparation by the Staff, by skilful tactical handling by all
leaders, and by determined resolve of all ranks to beat the enemy.

"The Third Army's record of ground gained, of prisoners and guns
captured, is a fine one, and I owe my deepest thanks to all ranks of
the 57th Division for their fine share in the achievement."



CHAPTER IX

RUITZ--LILLE--FROYENNES


On the evening of October 9th orders were received from Brigade that
the Division was to "pull out of the line" the next day for a rest.
This had been anticipated by all ranks, and the wildest speculations
had been rife. "Three weeks at Calais," "A fortnight in the South of
France," and other even more ridiculous prophecies had been uttered,
each, of course, based on "inside information." After all, when the war
really seemed to be nearing its end, any rumours, whether of a "rest"
or of a fallen Monarchy, met with ready acceptance.

At 10.30 a.m. on October 10th we commenced our move, so as to strike
the Brigade starting-point at Anneux Chapel at 11.15 a.m. Considerable
difficulty was experienced in collecting the companies, owing to the
barrier produced by the canal. The battalion, however, eventually was
joined together, and we tramped along the Bapaume--Cambrai road in high
spirits, albeit the recent battle was still in evidence by reason of
the dead Germans and slain horses seen lying about.

As we reached Fontaine we met a Scottish Division marching up, and
throughout its length the road was very congested. Our Divisional
Commander watched us pass, and we picked up our rear headquarters by
Bourlon Wood _en route_. As we marched along the switchback road H.R.H.
the Prince of Wales and General Byng passed us, motoring up to Cambrai.

The battle area, now that the struggle had gone ahead, looked forlorn
and desolate; and we were not sorry when, about two o'clock, we
reached the bare hillside at Boursies, where we were to spend the
night. Bivouacs were soon constructed, and though it threatened to
rain, and in fact did so at intervals, our spirits were in no way
damped.

Soon after our arrival we were conscious of a terrific detonation--it
would be untrue to say we "heard" it--and, looking back towards
Cambrai, we saw a tall pillar of smoke, with a large mushroom top,
rising from the town. We wondered whether our Army Commander and the
Prince of Wales had left the town in time to avoid the explosion.
The next day Brigadier-General Meynell, C.M.G., arrived to take over
command of our Brigade, and Colonel Gathorne-Hardy returned to our
Headquarters once more. The same day a proportion of our transport
moved off to Ruitz, near Bethune, our ultimate destination.

The morning of October 12th proved wet and chilly. As the balance
of the transport had to entrain at 7.30 a.m. at Fremicourt, early
breakfasts and earlier rising were essential; and by 7 a.m. we found
ourselves standing about with nothing to do and nowhere to sit and two
hours to pass before we could move. However, in due course the time
arrived, and the battalion moved off, the new Brigadier taking the
salute.

It took us two and a quarter hours to reach Slag Heap Station, Hermies,
and when we did arrive there was no apparent prospect of a train. We
sat down accordingly in a field and had some food, and about 12.30 p.m.
a train meandered into the station and we set off. There seemed to be
more than the usual doubt as to where and when we should arrive, but
by the time we had passed Bapaume, Arras, and St. Pol we had a fair
inkling that the journey would not be a very short one. Eventually at
4.30 a.m. on October 14th we arrived at Fouquereuil, where we were told
to get out. A tiring march of two and a half hours on wet and slippery
roads, and with empty stomachs, brought us at last to the little mining
town of Ruitz. "A," "C," and "D" Companies were in billets in the
village, while Headquarters and "B" Company had to climb a precipitous
hill to a small hutted camp in a wood. This spot had been a Corps
Headquarters, and consequently had an unusually pleasant aspect. The
rest of that day was spent mainly in sleep; the next day mainly in
washing.

[Illustration:

                  THE FINEST OF FINE TRENCH JOURNALS

                             CHEERIO! ½ᶠʳ·

                    NO 1 AUGUST 18TH 1918 12 PAGES

                        EDITED BY JOHN W WHEWAY

               ILLUSTRATED BY A. R. INGHAM AND A RUNNER

                THE JOURNAL OF "B" COY LIVERPOOL RIFLES

  EDITORIAL ADDRESS "CHEERIO" 7 MINE SHAFT Aᵛᵉ FIFTEEN INCH LANE DUG
                               OUT CITY

                         A SOUVENIR FOR FRITZ]

Our idea of a long "rest" had become suddenly dispelled by the news
that in a day or two at the latest we were to go into the line
somewhere north of Bethune. To be frank, no one was particularly elated
by this intelligence. If we were to be in the line, we preferred the
clear, open country of the Cambrai area. It was impossible to be very
enthusiastic at the prospect of floundering once again through mud and
water in the dismal country of Northern France, with which we were
already only too familiar and had no wish to renew our acquaintance. A
conference for Commanding Officers at Barlin the next day revealed our
new destination as Fromelles, and on the morning of October 15th the
Quartermaster and other details proceeded thither at an early hour.

The battalion followed in busses at 6.45 a.m., and the transport set
off at 10 a.m. Our route lay through the outskirts of Bethune and
Locon--the former badly damaged, the latter, once a part of Corps
Headquarters, the most completely demolished place it is possible to
imagine. The mass of shell-holes in every direction testified to the
severity of the shelling to which the country had been subjected during
the recent push and counter-push.

At 11.30 a.m. the column halted at Pont du Hem; the men debussed and
the vehicles drove off. Hardly had they gone when the Corps Commander,
General Haking, drove up in a car and informed us that we were now
to make for Laventie. This was some way off, and meanwhile our
Quartermaster and billeting party were at Fromelles with the "cookers,"
while the transport were somewhere on the road between there and Ruitz.
Needless to say, our bicycles were with the transport--an error never
committed again--and two luckless runners had to be dispatched on foot
with maps and hosts of directions to collect our details. We in the
meantime set off for Laventie, where we arrived at 12.15. Few houses,
if any, we found had any roofs worth speaking of; billeting, therefore,
was not easy. The Irish and 2/7th K.L.R. were each given streets, and
ourselves another; and into the forlorn and draughty houses we settled
as best we could, waiting hungrily for our dinners, while the rain
steadily descended. At 4.15 p.m., when hope had nearly been abandoned,
the "cookers" were sighted, and the prospect of a hot meal soon
restored us to our normal spirits.

After a very damp night--the orderly-room staff, who were installed in
an old caravan, were the only people who kept really dry--we set off
soon after 9 a.m. to march to Le Maisnil. The road wound along through
the usual scenery of these parts, the beauty of which was by no means
enhanced by the fact that our route lay through the old British and
German trenches and across No Man's Land. As we climbed the hill which
led to our destination, the thoroughness of the enemy was made very
apparent by the remains of great pill-boxes, which he had blown to
pieces in a most efficient fashion before his departure.

Our Headquarters were some old wooden huts, standing adjacent to what
must have been a magnificent pill-box, to judge by the huge masses
of concrete that lay about, some of these hurled to a considerable
distance from the original site. The companies were a few hundred yards
away in some old trenches, which possessed one pill-box still intact.
As we moved in, the Munsters moved out.

At 2 p.m. the Commanding Officer, Adjutant, and Company Commanders rode
up to the Headquarters of the Brigade in the line at Le Chateau de la
Flandre, near Radinghem. After a short discussion the party proceeded
on foot, accompanied by the Major-General commanding 47th Division,
the Brigadier, and an Intelligence Officer. The route lay across open
fields to the railway line by Erquinghem le Sec Railway Station,
till recently the front line, and thence up a road to a small group
of houses at a place prophetically called (from the war of 1870) Le
Fin de la Guerre. Here a conference took place in a somewhat crowded
cellar, the Headquarters of the 22nd Londons, while the enemy shelled
the place with gas. It was arranged that we should arrive the next day,
so as to begin the advance from the present front line at 9.30 a.m.,
those on the spot to supply us with the local position by means of
fighting patrols to be sent out just before dawn.

We then retraced our steps to the Chateau, but did not delay there, as
the enemy was using 5·9's freely, one of which shortly afterwards came
within an ace of annihilating the Commanding Officer and Adjutant, and
their groom.

On our return the arrangements for the morrow were completed. "C"
and "D" Companies were to lead the advance, with "A" in support and
"B" in reserve. Captain Eccles rejoined this day and took over "B"
Company from Captain Kissan, who now assumed the duties of Intelligence
Officer. This post had been vacant since Lieutenant Hazell had been
sent to hospital with dysentery during the last days of the Battle of
Cambrai, though his place had been temporarily filled by Lieutenant
Lever.

At 7.30 a.m. on October 17th the battalion began to move off by
platoons at 100-yard intervals. The 22nd Londons had nothing of
particular interest to tell us on our arrival, except that all was
quiet. The 47th Division were expecting to go to Italy, and the thought
of that fair country loomed large on their horizon.

At 10.45 a.m. the Commanding Officer, with the Brigade Major, visited
the front line, where they found that the companies had successfully
grasped the situation, and were in touch on their flanks. Scouts
had been sent forward to ascertain how things were going in front.
Nothing could be seen of the Germans, so the line proceeded cautiously
forward in the direction of Lille. On went the scouts, and on went
the battalion. It was a queer, uncanny sensation, and not a few
expected a sudden crash of shells or the rattle of machine guns.
Soon, however, the pace became so fast that, from extended order,
the leading companies formed into lines of sections in column, while
the support and reserve companies assumed ordinary column of fours.
Battalion Headquarters kept incessantly moving, and had hardly time
to report their new location before they were on the move again. All
this while the Commanding Officer was marching ahead, steering the
battalion with whistle and arm signals after the most approved form
of open order drill, as laid down in "Infantry Training." La Petite
Coutre was passed, and on the flanks could be seen Fort Englos and
Premesques, once the strongholds of German heavy artillery in the old
Houplines days. Le Marais, just short of Lille, was reached without
incident, though the huge craters in the roads showed that the enemy
were determined to make our advance as difficult as possible. Mines
were still going up, and the efforts of some sappers to remove a "booby
trap" from a house resulted in an explosion which only missed Battalion
Headquarters by a few minutes.

Shortly before midday the battalion found itself marching along the
tram lines in the suburbs of Lille. As the men tramped down the empty
road to Pont de Canteleu, two children appeared, timid and round-eyed.
"Where is everybody?" asked the Commanding Officer, in his best French.
Apparently, our noble opponents had spread it abroad that we should
kill everyone we saw, and all had been warned to remain in their
cellars. The children retired, and shortly after one or two women and
one or two old men appeared. Finding us friendly, their relations were
summoned in shrill tones, and before long the street was thronged with
people. Never was such a scene! Everyone cheered and sang, laughed and
wept. Flags of the Allies, sold to the French by the Germans ere their
departure, soon adorned every window. "Vivent les Anglais!" went up
from hundreds of throats. Everyone embraced everyone else; officers and
men alike were kissed and kissed again by the enthusiastic people;
while horses and equipment were soon half smothered in flags and
flowers. Progress became very difficult, so dense was the crowd and
so anxious to express their joy and gratitude. Of all the sights of
the war there were few, if any, half so moving as the picture of this
almost miraculous awakening of these unhappy folk from their long and
cruel nightmare. How they laughed and cried! With what intense feeling
they sang "The Marseillaise"! Not a man was there who did not feel
that here at last was a reward worth all the misery and dangers of our
campaigning.

At last we reached the Pont de Canteleu, the entrance to the famous
City of Lille. The bridge, like all other bridges, was, of course,
in ruins; but there was sufficient of it left standing for civilians
to cross one at a time. Guards were posted at all these bridges, and
no one crossed into the town, the Corps Commander's orders being
very strict on this point. About 5 p.m. the 172nd Brigade, which had
been detailed to take charge of Lille, began to arrive, and the men
were passed over one at a time. As soon as this long performance was
completed our piquets were withdrawn. Billets were now selected for the
battalion in the vicinity of the bridgehead, and very good they were.
Battalion Headquarters secured a magnificent chateau, where everything
looked so suspiciously arranged for our comfort that, in spite of the
inspection carried out by the special R.Es., we were quite prepared to
discover some large-sized "booby trap." An old French gentleman dug up
from the garden two bottles of excellent claret and one of old brandy,
which he gave to us, and it need hardly be said that the present was
most acceptable.

At 6.30 p.m. the transport and rear headquarters arrived, and
Lieutenant Drewsen was dispatched to reconnoitre the bridges to
the north. He returned with a full description of the destructive
thoroughness of the enemy. About three bridges out of some fourteen
could be crossed by one man at a time with difficulty; the rest were
beyond hope.

At 7.15 a.m. the next morning orders were issued for the Brigade to
support the right and left flanks of the 74th and 59th Divisions, who
had moved round Lille from the north and south respectively, and whose
inner flanks were not yet in touch. It appeared that the enemy, who
had evacuated Lille in the early hours of the previous morning, was
retiring on the Scheldt, and fighting a rearguard action as he went.

The 8th K.L.R., who had followed behind the 2/7th K.L.R. and ourselves
in our joint march on Lille, were now to lead the Brigade; and about
8 a.m. they crossed the remains of the Pont de Canteleu and set off
round the southern outskirts of Lille. Fearing that it might be
difficult to recross the moat on the other side of Lille, we moved down
towards Haubourdin, where there was rumoured to be a pontoon bridge.
The transport was to follow. The route, which lay through endless
wrecked factories, derelict railway lines, and narrow back streets,
was somewhat confusing, but in the end the bridge was found and the
battalion passed over.

After crossing at Haubourdin we moved round towards Ronchin, viâ the
Faubourg des Postes, receiving everywhere a most enthusiastic greeting
from the populace. From the neighbourhood of Ronchin we proceeded to
Hallemes, where we settled down on a German aerodrome for a good halt
for dinner. The day was fine and warm, but the quantity of _pavé_ made
marching hard work.

After a dinner halt we pushed on again towards Flers, there being a
distressing lack of either orders or information. On another aerodrome
just south of the village we found the Acting Commanding Officer
of the Irish, also suffering from the same lack of instructions as
ourselves. The Germans took this opportunity to send over some stray
"whizz-bangs," but they did no damage, though as a precaution we spread
out the battalion into artillery formation. A council of war was held,
and the Irish decided to move on to Annappes, and we to billet in
Flers, which after a march of thirteen miles we were quite ready to
do. We noticed that the enemy shelled the former place quite stiffly
as the Irish moved in, but the firing soon subsided. Runners were now
sent to collect the transport, which in due course arrived, as also the
Brigadier.

The inhabitants of Flers were most friendly, and regaled us with
stories of their late masters; and one heard with some misgiving that
the bed allotted to "Monsieur le Capitaine" had been occupied by a
German as late as 7 a.m. that morning. However, a bed is a bed, when
all is said and done, and not a thing to be sneezed at when you are
campaigning.

It was here that we first discovered that the German soldiers had
used all the beds for themselves and left the inhabitants to sleep on
the floor. Our first efforts at billeting, therefore, became rather
complicated till the difference in custom was cleared up. There is
little doubt that by our novel methods of proceeding we distinctly lost
caste among people accustomed to the haughty ways of the Prussian. The
local inhabitants were inclined to think, as we did not order them
about like dogs, that we were rather poor creatures.

The orders for the next day (October 19th) were a repetition of those
of the day before, and at 9.15 a.m. we pushed on to Annappes. Here
we found the Irish still in possession, and a joint Headquarters was
formed, and the transport was instructed to follow us up. A thriving
trade was done by the inhabitants by the sale of paper ten-centime
pieces and other relics of the German occupation.

About midday the Irish got orders to move on, and ourselves to follow
at 3 p.m., to Willems. The Irish were to throw out an outpost line in
front of the place, and we were in support in billets in the town.
It was dark and raining when we reached the town, and a brigade of
the 74th Division had already got the best billets. The Mayor, we
found, was the keeper of the principal public-house, and thither the
Commanding Officer, Adjutant, Regimental-Sergeant-Major, and other
French scholars repaired to try and arrange for billets. The estaminet
was much like any other, and was already full of soldiers and
civilians trying to swallow a pale yellow liquid, which had sufficient
smell to suggest that it had been poured once (not oftener) into a
recently emptied beer bottle. Into this mass of chattering people we
pushed our way, and tried to get into conversation with the proprietor.
As he appeared to find our French difficult to follow, and was busy
serving out the so-called beer, our efforts were productive of very
little result. Eventually the situation began to dawn on him, and the
entirely fallacious services of a girl reputed to speak English were
called into requisition. All the French in the place at once joined
in, and not a few of the Tommies. The confusion and din soon became
appalling, and all this time the battalion were seated, patiently or
impatiently, by the roadside in the rain. The situation really seemed
hopeless, but after quieting the friends and supporters of the Mayor,
we eventually succeeded, and billets--which our Billeting Officer had
wisely been searching for on his own account--were duly approved and
the battalion moved in.

At 7.10 the following morning (October 20th) we received orders that
the Brigade was to seize the bridgeheads over the Scheldt north of
Froyennes--_i.e._, just above Tournai--the 8th K.L.R., as before,
leading the way. We moved off at 9 a.m., and shortly after crossing
the Belgian frontier received word from the 8th K.L.R. that they were
completely held up in front of Blondain, where they had established
their Headquarters. We were ordered not to advance any farther, and
were billeted for the night in a little hamlet called Les Empires.

Blondain was shelled freely, and our own vicinity slightly,
consequently our arrival in this part of the world was hardly welcome.
The inhabitants had seen but little of the actualities of war, and,
much as some of them disliked the Germans, they could hardly be
expected to watch with much pleasure their houses being shattered. Some
18-pounders arrived about this time and settled down near our transport
lines, which resulted in the latter being shelled out soon after.

[Illustration: Official Photographs by permission of The Imperial War
Museum and Canadian War Memorial Fund.

THE CANAL DU NORD.

CANAL DE L'ÉSCAUT NEAR CAMBRAI

THE CAMBRAI--BAPAUME ROAD, NEAR FONTAINE NOTRE DÂME.]

For the next day (October 21st) we received orders that we were to
pass through the 8th K.L.R. at 8.30 a.m., seize the bridgeheads, and,
passing the Scheldt, capture the high ground on the other side. To
assist us in this somewhat ambitious scheme, we received one battery
R.F.A., two sections M.G.C., one mobile medium trench mortar battery,
and two bridging sections, R.E.

The action which followed will be described in some detail, as it
proved a very interesting operation, and the only one of its kind in
which the battalion took part. It was real open warfare, as distinct
from the miscellaneous fighting which followed a "set piece" attack
during the recent battles.

The country between us and the River Scheldt was flat in the main,
dotted with houses and small woods, and rising slightly towards
Froyennes, whence it fell away to an open stretch of grassland up
to the near bank of the river. It was an excellent position for a
rearguard to hold; and in addition, on the Tournai--Courtrai road,
about one mile north of Froyennes, the enemy enjoyed magnificent
observation from the Convent, and also for his guns from Mont St.
Aubers, a conspicuous eminence on the far side of the river. He had
a considerable number of guns, and evidently an ample supply of
ammunition.

We, on the other hand, suffered the usual disadvantages of an attacking
force in open warfare. We had no knowledge of the strength or location
of the enemy, while our own movements could not be concealed. Moreover,
the hasty advance and the interruption of communications due to the
complete demolition of all bridges, the damage to roads by mines, and
the absolute destruction of all railways--every single metal on the
lines having had a piece blown out--had effectually prevented the
advance of any heavy artillery, and the 18-pounders which we had were
but scantily provided with ammunition.

We moved off at 8 a.m. to take over from the Irish--"A" Company on the
right, "B" on the left, "C" in support, and "D" in reserve. The front
line, which was some 2,000 yards in extent, ran north and south about
1,500 yards east of the hamlet of Honnevain. This was taken over by 10
a.m., the 8th K.L.R. being collected into groups near that place, with
"C" Company and Battalion Headquarters just in front. The two front
line companies now endeavoured to advance.

In this and subsequent similar attempts we were heavily handicapped
by being the only battalion of the Division in the line. On our left
was the 59th Division, and on our right the 74th Division, which
belonged to another Corps. The isolated attempts that resulted from
this position of affairs enabled the enemy to concentrate his attention
on our unfortunate companies, there being no time for our request for
flanking support to reach all the authorities concerned.

"A" Company, moving forward on a four platoon frontage, came at once
under intense machine-gun and trench-mortar fire from woods and houses
opposite their front, and sustained various casualties. The Lewis gun
team of No. 2 Platoon spotted one of the enemy machine-gun posts, and
dealt with it successfully. The advance was thereby able to proceed a
little farther, but at no point was the amount of ground gained very
considerable--about 500 yards in all. About 1 p.m. the advance was
compelled to cease, owing to the determined and accurate fire of the
enemy and the heavy shelling which had also commenced. The situation
was further complicated by the death of the Company Commander, Captain
Carr, who was shot through the head while moving forward to make a
personal reconnaissance. The death of this able and gallant young
officer was felt as a great loss, and the delay in getting hold of
Lieutenant Blake, the next senior officer, who, owing to the grave
shortage of officers, was with a platoon, for some time made it hard
for this company to operate collectively.

[Illustration: OPERATIONS 21/23 OCT. 1918. N. OF TOURNAI.]

In the meantime, on the left, Captain Eccles sent forward patrols to
ascertain the position. No. 7 Platoon, hearing from their patrol of
certain hostile positions, including a machine gun firing from a window
in the Convent, advanced at 11.30 a.m., but after proceeding a short
distance came under intense machine-gun fire, 2nd-Lieutenant Waln and
one man, unhappily, being killed and eight men wounded. The remainder
of the platoon were forced to fall back. Riflemen O'Sullivan and R. O.
Jones, who were with the platoon as stretcher-bearers, endeavoured to
go forward to bring in the wounded. The enemy, however, opened fire
on them, and they were compelled to lie down. As they lay watching
they observed some of the wounded sitting up applying field dressings.
Seeing that the enemy took no notice of this, they proceeded to bandage
each other for imaginary wounds. They then rose to their feet and
limped towards the wounded, whom they were able materially to assist in
tying up their wounds and eventually crawling to the rear. For their
gallantry and initiative they were both awarded the Military Medal.

The loss of 2nd-Lieutenant Waln was very great. He had won the
Divisional Commander's Card for his gallantry in the Battle of Cambrai,
and on this occasion he proved himself no less regardless of danger. He
had gained the respect and admiration of all ranks.

Second-Lieutenant Bardgett and the reserve platoon were sent up and
formed a post, the remnant of No. 7 Platoon being sent into reserve.
No. 6 Platoon, after waiting for some while for their patrol to return,
sent out a further party, which was followed by the platoon itself.
Crossing the railway, they forced their way into one of a small
group of houses, of one of which the door was barricaded, and were
almost immediately fired on from the doorway of an adjoining house.
The fire was returned, and two of the enemy were seen to fall; but
further hostile activity developing, they withdrew to the railway and
established a post there. Their original patrol joined them at dusk,
having been held up by hostile fire and unable to move. No. 5 Platoon
could make no move owing to the open nature of the ground in front of
them, each attempt being met with heavy fire.

At midday two platoons of "C" Company were sent up to each of the front
line companies, as their advance, short as it was, was leaving their
flanks in an exposed position. One half company under 2nd-Lieutenant
Simpson took up a position in the right rear of "A" Company; the other
half company was located near "B" Company Headquarters as reserve.

At 1.30 p.m. "D" Company was ordered forward from reserve to work down
the railway line, which ran through the centre of "B" Company's front,
and endeavour to get round the east side of the wood on the south of
the railway line. In spite of heavy fire, the company moved up without
casualties, cleared the wood, and by 5 p.m. had established posts on
the far edge.

About 7 p.m. the advance of both companies was once more attempted. "A"
Company, on the right, advanced some 200 yards, which brought it more
into line with "B" Company, but could make no farther headway. Captain
Eccles then issued orders for the advance to the Tournai--Cambrai road,
and No. 8 Platoon managed to get within about 400 yards of the Convent,
where they were absolutely stopped. No. 6 Platoon could make no headway
at all; and No. 8 Platoon, which was isolated, was consequently
withdrawn for a short distance to preserve the general front. Company
Headquarters, which had moved forward, and incidentally were all but
demolished by a shell of very large dimensions, withdrew to their
previous location, and all posts prepared for the night. "D" Company in
the meantime, having been passed by "B" Company, were concentrated at
Mont Garnis in reserve. Machine guns were posted at important tactical
posts for the night.

Throughout the day, in addition to intense machine-gun fire, the enemy
had kept up a heavy and more or less continuous bombardment with every
class of shell up to 8-inch. The slightest movement produced great
hostile activity, and it was simply owing to the small number of
men engaged on a comparatively large front that saved us from heavy
casualties. Trench-mortar and artillery support was available, and
was employed as far as the conditions of moving warfare and lack of
observation permitted.

At 4.30 a.m., October 22nd, patrols from "A" Company reported Froyennes
clear of the enemy, but that they were fired on from the east bank of
the river after passing through the village. "A" Company accordingly
moved forward, occupied the village, and established posts along the
Tournai--Cambrai road.

"B" Company's patrols were fired on from the Convent, but after a few
rounds the enemy withdrew. The company followed, and continued the
line of posts on the Tournai--Cambrai road. Patrols were at once sent
forward, in spite of a brisk fire from the far bank of the river, to
try and discover a bridge, but without success. Meanwhile touch was
gained with the 74th Division on the right and the 170th Brigade (who
had relieved the right brigade of the 59th Division) on the left. No
enemy were located on our side of the river except on the extreme
right, where contact was gained and two enemy prisoners (91st I.R., 2nd
Prussian Division) were captured.

The G.S.O.2 of the Corps visited Captain Eccles during the course of
the morning, and agreed that any attempt to cross the river would be
absurd. The Commanding Officer, after reconnoitring the line, came to
the same conclusion, and the general line of the road was consolidated.
"B" Company established their headquarters in the Convent, but made
a speedy evacuation on being informed that it was mined. "D" Company
were moved up to Trieu de Loquet; and Battalion Headquarters would
have moved up to Froyennes but for the information that we were to be
relieved early next morning. The enemy kept up a continual harassing
fire all day, distributed generally over the front, but causing few
casualties.

The weather, after being wet and disagreeable, had now cleared, but it
was distinctly cold. It was somewhat strange to be living in houses
during active operations; and, indeed, the civilians got rather mixed
up with the firing line, as they kept coming along with coffee for
the men in the posts. This well-meant but mistaken kindness was very
inconvenient, and, in addition, refugees kept coming in from the German
line. There were many minor spy scares, some of the civilians, out of
friendliness to us or enmity towards their neighbours, being rather
inclined to point out people as acting in that capacity. Battalion
Headquarters, which was a small isolated house not shown on the map,
was in fact destroyed by shell fire the very day after we left it,
which rather looked as if the enemy had received information as to its
position.

During the night, which was extremely cold, though very fine and with a
full moon, an R.E. officer made a complete reconnaissance of the river,
but failed to locate any kind of bridge. As a matter of fact, the line
on our section of the front remained just as we had established it
until the Armistice.

At 8.30 a.m. on October 23rd the 2/7th K.L.R. arrived, and proceeded
to take over our line, establishing their headquarters in the house
selected by us in Froyennes for the purpose. The battalion moved out to
Le Cornet, where an unfortunate incident occurred, owing to the efforts
of another Commanding Officer, whose battalion had not been in action,
to take forcible possession of our billets, in spite of the presence
of our Billeting Officer, who had with full authority taken over from
the 2/7th K.L.R. As a result our men had to sit by the roadside, tired
and weary after two days' hard fighting, till Divisional Headquarters
could be communicated with. The reply from there was as prompt as it
was satisfactory, and the offending battalion, who themselves appeared
none too pleased with the action of their Commanding Officer, at once
withdrew.

The billets were good all round, Headquarters itself being established
in a lovely old farm called Hardy Planq, evidently the ancestral
residence of some old French family. All were glad of a good rest and a
"clean up," as the strain and, for most people, the discomfort of the
last two days had been considerable. Our casualties during that time,
besides Captain Carr and 2nd-Lieutenant Waln, were seven men killed and
twenty-five wounded. In connection with these operations Captain Eccles
was shortly after awarded the Military Cross.

Just before we came out of the line Major C. W. Wilson left us for
England at his own request. He had not been in good health for
some time, and the wound in his foot--a relic of the South African
War--bothered him. He was a great loss to the battalion, with which
he had served since its formation. His grit and determination, his
enthusiasm and energy, were an inspiration to all ranks. His position
as Second-in-Command was filled by the Adjutant, Captain Bowring
reassuming the latter's duties.

At 2.30 p.m. on October 24th we moved off from our pleasant quarters at
Le Cornet and marched back to Willems into Divisional Reserve. We found
Willems quite a pleasant little town, and our billets were on the whole
good. Battalion Headquarters were situated nearly opposite Divisional
Headquarters, and we were thus enabled to renew our acquaintance with
the Divisional Staff.

We stayed at Willems till October 30th, and very pleasant it was. We
had been on the move almost without a stop since we left Ruitz, and
the stay at that place had been no more than a brief pause in our
continuous movements which commenced when we left the Scarpe on August
17th, more than two months before. During the two advances--the one
on Cambrai, the other on Tournai--dumps had been left at all kinds of
places, and we now had to set to work to collect our material and our
guards from widely separated spots. This was successfully accomplished
in the end, nor was anything of any consequence lost or overlooked in
the process.

We spent the first part of our time at Willems resting and cleaning
up; the latter part in training and reorganizing, as it was clear that
before long we should be required to follow up the retiring enemy
once more. Considerable attention was paid to the bugle band, which
practised from morning to night, and sounded the recognized calls
throughout the day. It was during the days in reserve on the Somme that
attention became centred on our bugles. Extra cornets were purchased,
and a pair of cymbals was presented by Lieutenant Huntley. Whenever
conditions were favourable the bugles were given every opportunity of
practising, and, under the skilful handling of Sergeant Cadman and
Lance-Corporal Frost, the cornet soloist, they proved a most efficient
and excellent addition to the battalion.

The difficulty of keeping pace with the bewildering rapidity of the
Allied advance suggested the advantage of a battle map, and accordingly
the necessary sheets of the 1: 250,000 map were fastened on a board and
the situation shown by cotton on pins. This was placed in a prominent
position outside Battalion Headquarters; and here, too, were pinned
the telegrams announcing the different stages of the advance. The
arrangement proved very satisfactory, enabling as it did not only
the troops, but also the civilians, to see at a glance how the war
was progressing. The crowd around the board at once testified to its
popularity.

For (as it proved) the last time in our history we were now ordered to
reconnoitre defensive positions and emergency routes in the event of a
German counter-attack. This was a most unlikely event, as we were on
one side and they on the other of a wide river. It was, however, quite
fitting that our active service should end, as it had begun, with this
necessary but illusive form of military exercise.

At 10 a.m. on October 30th we left Willems for the Hallemes area,
passing our relieving battalion, the 19th Londons, _en route_. The
hopes of a trip to Italy, so strongly entertained by the 47th Division,
had apparently been dashed to the ground once more.

[Illustration: APPROACH TO CAMBRAI. RIFLE RANGE IN FOREGROUND.

Photographed by Aeroplane, 1st October, 1918.]

Owing to a sudden attack of influenza, an ambulance had to be
requisitioned to remove Captain Fell, the Quartermaster, Lieutenant
F. E. Evans, Captain Noon, now in command of "A" Company, and
2nd-Lieutenant D. R. Williams. The Commanding Officer was on a
course, and the Headquarters Staff now consisted of the Adjutant, the
Intelligence Officer, and the Transport Officer. After a short march
along the side-roads we came on to the great highway between Lille
and Tournai, and at 1.30 p.m. arrived at the Faubourg de Fives, one
of the suburbs of Lille, where billets were awaiting us. Battalion
Headquarters, including all the details, were accommodated in a
house and a series of factory buildings on the main road, Rue Pierre
le Grand. The companies were in two or three roads to the rear of
Headquarters, and were billeted after the fashion of 1914--two or three
men to a house. For the sick officers another house in the main street
was taken over, and here they were kept isolated, except Fell and
Williams, who had to go to hospital.

Several new officers now began to arrive. Lieutenant Belk had joined us
in Willems, and 2nd-Lieutenants Bethell and Forshaw, A.S.C., arrived at
Fives on our second day. Captain Bowring returned that day also from
United Kingdom leave, and took over the duties of Adjutant, the latter
acting as Second-in-Command. The following day 2nd-Lieutenants Cufflin
and Woodworth, M.M., reported for duty.

From our arrival at Fives till the Armistice we were busy enough. First
of all there were the billets to be seen to, which, good as they were,
still required much attention. Then the general question of refitting
and training had to be considered. It was still quite uncertain whether
the enemy would come to terms or not; and it was understood that if he
did not we should certainly be required before long. Meanwhile a sudden
passion for lecturing took possession of the Higher Command, including
General Haking, our Corps Commander, who addressed us at some length.

On November 5th we had the first of a series of battalion concerts.
There was a most convenient little hall not far from our billets, and
here "The Cheerios" gave their performance--and an excellent one it
was. It was at Barly, during the rest in the Cambrai Battle, that the
concert party were first got together, and now they were to exhibit
their powers once more. They worked very hard, under the kindly eye
of the Padre, and the resulting success more than justified their
efforts. Without wishing to make invidious distinctions, it may be
said that Corporal Henderson was the heart and soul of the party,
while his singing of Chevalier's songs was absolutely first-rate. The
introduction of local talent, in the form of an _enfant prodigue_ who
played the violin, and a French girl who sang with great vigour proved
highly popular.

On November 6th our American Medical Officer, Lieutenant Reed, left
us, to our infinite regret. Dour and silent as he was, he had won a
very warm place in our hearts; and it is pleasant to think that he was
sorry enough to leave us after more than six months' active campaigning
together. Captain Bullock took his place, and proved in his turn a most
popular Medical Officer.

Football now began to figure prominently in our lives. The great
aerodrome, where we halted outside Flers the day after Lille was taken,
had been converted into one vast football field, with some seven or
eight pitches. Incidentally, it was also our training ground, and a
little friction was occasionally caused when other battalions used to
allow their battalion teams to practise all the morning in our vicinity
while we were drilling.

The last few days before the Armistice were somewhat trying. It was
impossible to keep your thoughts away from the possible termination
of hostilities and all that that involved. The authorities, with what
seemed a rather unnecessary lack of confidence in their troops, deluged
us with advice to maintain our morale. In point of fact, there appeared
no shred of evidence that anyone was in danger of losing his morale,
or, for the matter of that, any particular reason why he should, even
though one might be glad if the war was really over.

When the telegram reached us on November 11th there was no excitement,
no wild cheering or parading of the streets. It was too big a thing to
treat in that fashion. Men became silent and thoughtful--thankful for
their own escape, reminiscent of those less fortunate. Lille itself,
unlike London, did not become a scene of rowdy rejoicings. Thankfulness
for deliverance from the infernal horrors of the war, with its all too
recent and sad memories, was too deep for a form of celebration more
properly associated with Boat Race night in Leicester Square or a "rag"
in a 'Varsity town.



CHAPTER X

ARMISTICE--LILLE--ARRAS--FINALE


With the cessation of hostilities began what was really the most
difficult period of the war. Training, always irksome, had now lost
its one stimulus--the prospect of battle. No one supposed for a moment
that hostilities could ever be resumed. The question of demobilization
immediately sprang to the front; and though most men realized clearly
enough that the delay would necessarily be long, yet it was impossible
not to chafe a little, and to feel that at the best you were merely
killing time. It was evident from the outset that everything possible
must be done to prevent boredom and stagnation. Training could
clearly be reduced to a minimum, and that only retained which would
insure fresh air and exercise. Athletics and amusements could now be
freely cultivated, as men could be spared more generously than during
hostilities. Education was also likely to be of great assistance
in occupying the men's minds and assisting them to restore their
thinking powers, which in many cases soldiering had greatly weakened.
Unfortunately, no preparations for the commencement of this form of
occupation had been possible, and it was not till the battalion reached
Arras that our arrangements were sufficiently advanced to commence
operations.

In the meantime the daily routine consisted of a march with the
"bugles" to the Divisional Football Ground, some battalion drill,
physical training, musketry, and rifle bombing. These were varied by
an occasional route march to Roubaix, Mons en Baroeuil (an outwork of
the defences of Lille, where British prisoners had been confined under
appalling conditions), and a weekly field day, often interfered with by
a heavy mist. The afternoons were taken up with football and visits to
Lille, which, after first being guarded like some sacred shrine, was
soon accessible to all.

Considerable attention was devoted to messing arrangements, and before
long a fine Central Mess was provided in the covered yard of a large
brewery. Here the whole battalion, except Headquarters, sat down
together for meals. Cookers and field kitchens were installed in the
yard, and the whole staff of cooks worked under the eye of Sergeant
Austin, the Sergeant-Cook. Similar quarters were arranged for Battalion
Headquarters.

Except for the factories, where millions of pounds' worth of machinery
had been stolen or wrecked, Fives had suffered structurally very little
damage from the Germans. It is true none of our beds had brass knobs,
and similar articles of that metal had been everywhere removed, but
that, after all, was not a very serious matter. The treatment of the
inhabitants is a very different story, but that is rather beyond the
scope of this book. Anyhow, we were most hospitably received, and it is
doubtful whether in all the history of the battalion the men had better
billets.

The concert party took on their self-appointed tasks with great
vigour and success. Costumes of brown canvas, with ruffs of "four
by two," made an excellent show; and the party contrived to make
their performances regular and varied, which speaks well for their
industry. They were composed of Riflemen Brookes (piano), Evans
(baritone), Beesley, Frith, and Lance-Corporal Snowden (comedians),
and Lance-Corporal Henderson. The latter was the life and soul of the
party, and a host in himself. Later Rifleman McConnell (ragtime),
Lance-Corporal Hassall (comedian), and Company Sergeant-Major Lane
(baritone) were added to the party, Sergeant Stevenson taking over
the duties of pianist. Lieutenant Drewsen and the Padre gave active
assistance, while Rifleman Cooper proved a great attraction as a
Chinese Magician on one occasion, and variety was also introduced in
the form of local French talent. There can be no question but that the
"Cheerios" were a great success.

In addition, the Divisional Concert Party, "The Dons"--a very efficient
and amusing company--established themselves close to us. This was a
great convenience, and enabled many, who had had no chance of seeing
them during the war, to attend their performances.

The "bugles" improved daily, and proved a great attraction in the
streets of Fives during "Retreat" and "First Post." A small party of
children became very attached to the drummers, and accompanied the
battalion on one route march, which proved so long and so wet that the
poor little mites had to be dragged along by the hand, till a passing
lorry could be obtained to take them home.

Further additions were made to our strength during this month. Major
D. Grant-Dalton, C.M.G., D.S.O., West Yorkshire Regiment, came as
Second-in-Command, the Adjutant, who was performing that duty, taking
over the work of P.R.I, and O.C. Amusements; and the following other
officers also joined--viz., Lieutenant Lutz, M.C., who had fought
for the Boers against us at Spion Kop, Lieutenants Beavan and Fry,
2nd-Lieutenant Bardsley, and Lieutenant Royle, who returned after
six months in England. This sudden influx of officers--ten in one
month--was rather overwhelming, and was less valuable than it would
have been a month previously, when we were very short-handed.

Our stay in Lille was all too short. We felt we were far too
comfortable to be left alone, and before the month was out rumours of a
move, either forward or back, filled the air. Eventually we found that
Arras was to be our destination, and as there were reputed to be only
fifty houses or so intact in that ill-used town, the prospect was none
of the brightest, especially as there was every indication of a wet
winter.

At 8.30 a.m. on December 2nd the battalion moved off to join the
Brigade group, Major Grant-Dalton in command. Colonel Gathorne-Hardy
had proceeded to England on November 24th, whence, to our very great
regret, he never returned, having while on leave been transferred to
the Home Establishment. He had been a most popular Commanding Officer,
and during his command of the battalion during many days of fighting
had won the respect and confidence of all ranks.

The route was viâ Lezennes, Ronchin, Lesquin, Templemars, and Seclin.
Carvin, our destination, was reached at 1.30 p.m., and we found
ourselves accommodated in huts for the night. Most of these were of
German construction, and sunk in the ground by the roadside with
wonderful skill from the point of view of concealment. Carvin itself is
a dismal and depressing spot.

We were off again the next day (December 3rd, 1918) at 7.45 a.m.,
and in spite of the weather the march was interesting enough, as the
route lay past Lens and the Vimy Ridge. The former place is probably
the largest ruined town in France. Without being absolutely levelled
to the ground, it yet possesses no building that can be described as
anything but a ruin. Shattered masonry and woodwork are heaped in the
wildest chaos in every direction, mingled with broken machinery and all
kinds of interior fittings. There is not one single roof in position,
not a wall that is not pierced or shattered. Standing as the place
does on the slope of a hill, the effect of the annihilation which has
visited the town is very striking. The Vimy Ridge is a bold, upstanding
piece of ground, bare as bare can be, and dotted now with graves and
monuments. In this part of the country it forms a very marked eminence,
though in reality of no great height.

It rained steadily as we tramped along the slippery _pavé_, and the
aspect of our billets, with the rain pouring through the rents in roof
and wall, was enough to dismay the boldest heart. As may be imagined,
after the comforts of Lille these quarters were hardly popular, but the
men accepted the situation nobly. It was 4.15 p.m. when we got in, and
there was little enough time to make their billets habitable. The next
and subsequent days the job was tackled with the utmost energy, while
caustic reports were forwarded to the Higher Command.

Company route marches accompanied by limbers--"scrounging parades,"
we called them--were instituted, and the material was soon collected
from derelict huts and trenches to repair the most serious damage. So
strong were our protests that we were informed that we were to move
to Warlus Camp, a few miles away, at an early date. This was out of
the frying-pan into the fire. Warlus Camp had not been used for some
time. Most of the fittings had been removed to another camp, and what
little was left had been "borrowed" by the civilians. There was not a
duck-board or a stove in the camp. All the huts were Nissen, and from
these most of the lining had already vanished.

In the meanwhile our houses in Arras were assuming quite a habitable
appearance, and the change was viewed with considerable dismay.
Fortunately, there was no water at the camp--or, rather, there was
no drinking water; in the huts themselves there was enough and to
spare--so the move was postponed till after Christmas; though an
advance party, under Lieutenant Beavan, composed mainly of pioneers,
moved over there to begin the work of rebuilding the camp.

The question of education now began to excite more attention. Letters
from the Higher Command were full of schemes and exhortations, and in
view of the eminently desirable results which our educational programme
might be hoped to achieve, the problem was carefully considered.

The results hoped for were--first, a new, and therefore to a certain
extent an attractive, form of employment for the men during the
mornings; and, secondly, the sharpening of their thinking powers,
which, as has been mentioned above, had become somewhat blunted. The
difficulties of the task became apparent at the outset. We had to begin
in profound ignorance as to the educational standards of the men, who,
of course, were drawn from every rank of life. Then we had no qualified
teachers, no educational books, no note-books or paper, no class-rooms,
and no syllabus of work. These were the initial difficulties; there
were others to follow later.

[Illustration: Official Photograph by permission of The Imperial War
Museum.

HÔTEL DE VILLE, ARRAS.]

To overcome the first difficulty, each company in turn was set a
simple examination paper, which consisted of a short précis, a short
piece of dictation, the interpretation and correct use of half a
dozen four-syllable words, and some simple questions in arithmetic.
From the results obtained--and it should be stated that but for the
cordial co-operation of all ranks the results would have been nil--we
were able to grade the battalion into three classes in English and
arithmetic, "N," "Y" and "Z." From this, again, we were able to divide
the battalion into three main groups: the General Education Group,
subdivided into elementary and intermediate classes for English
subjects and arithmetic respectively; the Commercial Group, who did
book-keeping, commercial correspondence, shorthand, and languages,
in addition to a restricted programme of general subjects; and the
Preliminary Group, who were instructed in reading and writing.

The organization required to work this rather ambitious scheme was
not inconsiderable. Large supplies of note-books and text-books were
ordered from England, and many books were sent for by members of the
battalion and loaned to the educational staff. Volunteer instructors
were called for, and stepped nobly into the breach. Syllabuses for all
the subjects were drawn up and timetables prepared, which had to be
reconciled with parades, guards, leave, etc., both as regards teachers
and pupils. Our Battalion Comforts Fund in Liverpool and other friends
of the battalion subscribed generously to the considerable expense
of the venture, which but for the sudden rapidity of demobilization
that soon set in would have proved valuable in its results.
Regimental Sergeant-Major Heyworth, Company Sergeant-Major Griffiths,
Sergeant-Major Lane, and many other N.C.Os. and men, not to mention
some of the officers, worked very hard to make the scheme a success.

It should in passing be noted that, apart from technical classes, which
were well organized by the Higher Command, the assistance received from
the Army Authorities was negligible. The Director of Education for
Liverpool, on the other hand, to whom application was made for advice,
proved most helpful in the selection of suitable text-books and in
drawing up of syllabuses.

Throughout this last chapter of the battalion's history the work of
education was carried on under the most bewildering and irritating
difficulties, and the results cannot be really appraised, but it must
be admitted that at the worst they cannot have been harmful, and in
some cases were distinctly beneficial.

On December 12th Lieutenant-Colonel C. C. Stapledon, of the Manchester
Regiment, arrived and took over the command of the battalion.

From this time till Christmas the daily life of the battalion varied
but little. A certain number of parades and route marches, frequent
football matches, latterly education classes in the Y.M.C.A. hut, an
occasional concert in the same place, varied by motor-lorry trips to
Lille, Cambrai, Armentières, and other places of interest, made up
our daily round. The fact that we were in a town, dilapidated though
it might be, helped to relieve the monotony, as there were some
shops open, and a certain number of things to be seen. The departure
of thirty-five coal-miners for demobilization about this time also
stimulated the hope of early dissolution, albeit some feeling was
caused by the fact that the total war service of some of these men
amounted to about as many days as the war had lasted years.

Preparations for Christmas were an important part of our work at
this period. Our unexpected rest at Christmas, 1917, had caught us
unprepared, and we could do but little; but this time the funds
received from home, which included a handsome contribution from the 5th
(Territorial Force) Reserve Battalion Private Fund, made it possible
for us to arrange an entertainment almost regardless of expense. The
Army provided us with excellent plum-puddings, and we took care to
have these delivered early. Enormous quantities of turkeys were ordered
from the Expeditionary Force Canteen, and the country was scoured for
fruit, vegetables, and beer. The "Cheerios" set to work on a most
excellent programme for Christmas night, and the prospect of a really
good Christmas seemed assured. But, alas! for the hopes of the men.
The Expeditionary Force Canteen, on whom we had relied, were lavish
in their promises, and that was all. Up till 10 p.m. on Christmas Eve
they assured us that the turkeys, like John Gilpin's hat and wig,
were "upon the road," and, indeed, expected every moment. They never
came. A number of pheasants, however, which arrived at the eleventh
hour and fifty-ninth minute, were purchased, and the town was scoured
in every direction for pork. In the end, two companies only had their
Christmas dinner on Christmas Day, the other two on Boxing Day. It was
a great disappointment, especially after the valiant exertions of our
Quartermaster's staff and others.

However, that Christmas Day was a success few will deny, and the
"Cheerios," filled with the good food and (possibly) drinks suitable to
the day, produced an excellent programme, which was highly appreciated.

On the following day the Officers played the Sergeants at football; but
the Sergeants were so overcome, apparently, by the proceedings of the
previous day that the Officers won by five goals to nil. The rest of
the day was occupied with the usual activities connected with a move
which had to be made on December 27th to Warlus Camp, a distance of
about five miles.

At 10.30 a.m. on December 27th we set off for Warlus Camp. The prospect
of our new abode was not enhanced by the cold wind and steady drizzle
which we encountered _en route_. We arrived at 12.30 p.m. and proceeded
to settle in. All things considered, the camp was far better than we
had anticipated in our most sanguine moments a week ago. Lieutenants
Beavan and Hooper, with the most able support of Sergeant Patterson
and the pioneers and company working parties, had wrought wonders.
Duck-board paths were installed nearly everywhere in place of lanes
of thick mud; huts had windows, most had stoves and floor-boards, and
generally the camp was now in a state which made one feel considerably
less hopeless as to its possible amenities.

The scheme of operations which had to be worked out now fell under
three headings--camp improvement, salvage, and education. To this end
companies were allotted time during mornings in succession to put their
own huts in order, with the assistance of one or two experts from
the Pioneer Platoon. As regards salvage, a very large area--covering
ground till recently in our close vicinity at Arras, and now several
miles away--had been allotted to us, and for this two companies and a
great deal of transport was required daily. Their task was to clear
ammunition dumps and convey the material either to a central dump or
to a light railway siding for removal, or else to clear barbed-wire
defences. Education had to be fitted in with these two demands for
men, and very difficult was the problem how to arrange for the right
instructors to be available for the right classes.

In recreation some ambitious schemes had been formulated at Arras,
but the scarcity of suitable ground put a very effective damper on
these. We had one football field just behind the camp, but wet weather
and frequent use very soon reduced it to a quagmire. There was a fine
hospital hut for a general recreation-room, but it had very little
flooring, was very draughty, and impossible to keep warm and too big to
light with the means at our disposal. However, some flooring was put in
and some stoves obtained. The stage which had been removed from Warlus
to Dainville, where French troops were billeted, was boldly removed
without opposition, and in due course, through the kindness of an
Australian Special Works Company, the whole place was lit by acetylene
light, including footlights for the stage.

Thanks again to the great generosity of our Comforts Fund, and also
to Mr. A. Percy Eccles, we had a lot of money to spend on newspapers,
novels, and games. A good supply of these was put in the recreation
hut, in the Sergeants' Mess--two Nissen huts fixed end on with great
skill by Sergeant Patterson--and also the Corporals' hut.

The main event of importance at this time was the Divisional Race
Meeting, held on the Arras Race Course on January 1st and 2nd. A large
and varied programme had been arranged for both these days, and in
addition various sideshows to while away the intervals between the
races had been devised. The weather was cold and grey, but there was
little rain, and the great crowd of officers and men who assembled
pointed clearly to the success of the venture. Lord Derby was present,
and many other distinguished people; but the event that interested us
most was the winning of the Divisional Commander's Cup (three furlongs
flat race) by Colonel Stapledon on his horse Zloazel. Captain Bowring,
on Bean, was third. The Commanding Officer, with a red football jersey
over his tunic, looked a fine sight; but the amusing thing was that
neither he nor anyone else had backed him on the Totalizator for a
penny. However, he got a silver cup, and everyone in the battalion was
highly pleased. The horse in question had been exchanged by Colonel
Gathorne-Hardy with the Brigade Signalling Officer for a pack-pony!

For the next two months there is little enough to say. Salvage went
on slowly and unenthusiastically; education, which the arrival of
text-books, etc., should have made easier, was made more complicated by
departures; the camp got steadily better, and the weather got steadily
colder.

Boxing, cross-country running, and football were the mainstay of those
athletically inclined. Once each week our Concert Party, now attired in
real costumes, performed with great _éclat_, and an interchange with
other units' parties was effected.

Company whist drives were organized under considerable difficulty in
the darkness of the recreation hut before the acetylene arrived; and in
every way all ranks tried their best to fill in those rather irksome
days which had to be gone through before each man left for civilian
life once more. Demobilization was proceeding, in fact, faster than had
been expected. Drafts departed two or three times a week, and several
officers and men on leave in the United Kingdom had benefited by that
unfortunate order allowing of demobilization from leave.

All horses and mules were carefully examined and checked, with the
result that Divisional, Corps and Army Orders became full of notices
as to animals "found." Spare animals are excellent things on active
service, but awkward at official inspections.

Motor-lorry trips were organized to different places, of which Lille
was by far the most popular; and once a week a full load of cheery
people would drive off from Warlus at 8 a.m. in the morning for several
hours' journey through a land covered with frozen snow. The weather was
like at our first initiation into active service--bitterly cold with
heavy snow and hard frost, but generally a bright sun, though a biting
wind.

On January 19th, like a bolt from the blue, Lieutenant-Colonel
Macdonald, D.S.O., Manchester Regiment, arrived to take over command.
Needless to say, no one had heard any tidings of his impending arrival,
but a few days later Colonel Stapledon was ordered off to the 2nd
Manchesters, and Colonel Macdonald assumed command. We were sorry to
lose Colonel Stapledon. He had been with us but a short while, but he
was universally popular, as, indeed, his successor became in a very
short time.

During the month of January 7 officers and 148 men were demobilized,
and our ration strength was down to 20 officers and 382 men, enabling
two company cook-houses to be closed.

The month of February saw even further reduction, as, in addition to
demobilization, 1 officer and 96 men were sent on February 26th up to
the Army of Occupation. This rapid disintegration of the battalion
brought most activities to a standstill. The railway piquets which
we had had to maintain at Arras to keep order and stop looting were
recalled; education died for want of instructors; football teams,
concert parties faded in their time away. The battalion was rapidly
approaching its cadre strength, and its days as a unit were numbered.

There is one event that occurred during this month that cannot be
passed over in silence. On February 14th, the second anniversary of
the departure of the battalion to France, our old Commanding Officer,
Colonel Fletcher, died from pneumonia following upon a sudden attack
of influenza. It is difficult for one who knew him so intimately, and
worked in such close touch with him for so many months, to write of
him with becoming restraint. As a Commanding Officer many found him
hard and exacting, but he was even more exacting and hard on himself.
His whole mind and his whole energy were devoted to his battalion
to a degree that only those who saw most of him could ever realize.
Wonderfully strong himself, he impressed others with his own strength;
lofty in ideals, he led others to a higher plane. Nothing that was mean
or selfish, that was not strictly true and honest, would he tolerate
for a moment; and never was a man more outspoken in his condemnation of
anything that was not right in the highest sense. By his devotion to
his battalion he worked himself beyond the measure of human endurance,
and there can be no doubt that his death was due to the havoc wrought
on his frame by the endless work, physical and mental, which he
accomplished for his battalion even after the gassing at Armentières,
the severe physical effects of which he refused to recognize. Colonel
Fletcher represented the highest type of British gentleman, and it was
with thoughts of pride as well as sorrow that we learnt that in his
last hours his mind ran unceasingly on the comfort and safety of "his
boys."

The last days of the battalion require but a brief telling. More drafts
left for the Army of Occupation; more officers and men went off to
complete the tour of rest camps, "delousing camps," demobilization
camps, and finally dispersal camps _en route_ for civilian life. From
Christmas onwards the melancholy break-up of our old battalion, of
which we had been such proud and happy members, had been proceeding
apace. Friendships that had seemed the normal part of our existence
were now rudely rent asunder. Men whom we had grown to admire and love
vanished one by one, perhaps never to be seen again. The memories of
the past grew daily more distant and more unreal as the prospect of
civilian life came steadily nearer.

On March 18th the fragments of the battalion, now one company strong,
moved to the Brigade Concentration Camp at Maroeuil; and here the
gradually diminishing force remained till May 11th, ever expecting to
move, only to be disappointed again.

At last, after one or two false alarms, the party, having handed over
all its animals, proceeded at 9.5 p.m. on May 11th, with all its
transport vehicles, by train for the Base.

At 10.45 p.m. the engine did its best still further to delay matters
by leaving the train on a downward slope and coming back to meet it
when the train had gathered a good speed. Several vehicles of ours were
destroyed, and several men of other cadres injured. A bridge party,
consisting of the Commanding Officer, Adjutant, Quartermaster, and
Lieutenant Wilson, seated on plush chairs in a cattle truck, was indeed
slightly disarranged, but beyond the destruction of the whisky bottle
only slight injuries were inflicted.

At 2.35 p.m. on May 12th Havre was reached, and Harfleur Reception
Camp was the home for the night. Thence next day the cadre joined No.
2 Wing Despatch Division, and after many formalities embarked on May
15th for Southampton in s.s. _Lydia_. From Southampton to Felixstowe,
and thence to Prees Heath, took a few days more, and much man-handling
of vehicles and stores; but by 12 noon on May 22nd, 1919, the 2/6th
(Rifle) Battalion "The King's" Liverpool Regiment had ceased to exist.

[Illustration: LT.-COL. C. L. MACDONALD, D.S.O. LT.-COL. C.C.
STAPLEDON.]

But in the hearts of those who were numbered among its members the
memory of it, and of those who lie buried in the cemeteries of France,
will live for ever; and when in years to come, in the different
quarters of the world, men meet each other, how gladly will they cast
back their minds to the good old days in the "Second Sixth"!

FINIS.



APPENDICES



APPENDIX I

BRIEF NOTES ON SPECIALISTS


1. _Scouts._--The origin of the Scout Section can be traced from the
earliest days at Liverpool, where the provision of civilian bicycles
and the varied nature of their duties made that branch of training
popular. With the move to Blackpool they came under the direction of
2nd-Lieutenant G. C. T. Giles, who served with us ungazetted for a
time, but was subsequently gazetted to the Divisional Cyclist Company.

From then onwards till the Upstreet days they still continued to
exist in an unostentatious fashion; but at Upstreet the scouts and
snipers were properly organized under Lieutenant F. O. J. Huntley
and Sergeant Fenner. From then onwards till the battalion proceeded
overseas their efficiency grew apace, the last few weeks of their
training being under Lieutenant Alcock, when Lieutenant Huntley joined
Brigade Headquarters Staff. Colonel Fletcher always took the greatest
interest in their work, buying them all kinds of snipers' rifle sights,
telescopic periscopes, and other valuable aids to their special work.
Overseas, under the successive leaderships of Lieutenants Alcock and
Royle, 2nd-Lieutenants Little, Noon, and Upward, Lieutenant Burton,
and Lieutenant Hazell, the scouts, snipers, and observers more than
justified their existence. In addition to Sergeant Fenner, there was
Lance-Corporal Peterson and seventeen men in the original contingent,
while at Brigade were Corporal Stirrup and three more. After the
Armentières gas attack reorganization became necessary, and first
Corporal Harper, and later Sergeant Corkill and Lance-Corporal Darcy,
were the leading scouts. It is invidious to pick out individuals from
such a highly trained and enthusiastic party, but there can be no doubt
that, taken all round, Sergeant Corkill was the best of a very good
collection of men. The duties of these men varied from patrolling,
either collectively or individually with company patrols, leading
raiding parties, sniping, manning observation posts, and so forth, in
the trenches, to blocking side roads during relief nights, exploring
emergency routes, or reconnoitring ordinary routes when the battalion
was out of the line.

2. _Runners._--It is doubtful if any collection of individuals had to
work so consistently hard and under such trying conditions, and managed
withal to be so invariably cheerful, as the Battalion and Company
Runners. Organized at Woking, and recruited largely from the buglers,
they first really came into active existence at Strazeele. Throughout
the history of the battalion there appears to have been no occasion
when a runner failed to reach his destination, except through being
incapacitated by wounds. Always on the move, they were the first in the
line and the last out of it, with endless messages going day and night;
one day cycling along the ominous Houplines road, another day leaving
the safety of a pill-box to make their way across mud and shell-holes
in the blackness of the night; or, again, dashing (not once, but again
and again) through a barrage. Such were some of the duties of which a
runner's life was composed.

Before the gas bombardment the Battalion Runners had no actual
N.C.O. in charge of them, but later Lance-Corporal Brown, one of the
originals, was appointed to take charge of them.

3. _Lewis Gunners._--In training Lewis Gunners at home we were more
than fortunate in possessing Lieutenant Bowring and Sergeant Machell,
with the result that we went overseas with gunners possessed of an
efficiency of which any battalion might be proud. From then onwards
was one unceasing struggle to keep up the numbers. Holding as they
often did the dangerous posts, the casualties were not few, and as
our numbers dwindled the supply of guns grew steadily greater. The
teams generally had to go into the line twenty-four hours before
the remainder of the battalion, and, in addition to the ordinary
impedimenta of a relief, they had to carry, at any rate along the
trenches, their guns and ammunition, which, when conditions were bad,
often proved an almost overwhelming burden. Out of the line they
had to be cleaning their guns and ammunition unceasingly, while the
care of innumerable spare parts was enough to drive anyone crazy.
After Lieutenant Bowring, 2nd-Lieutenants Rothwell, Dwyer, Hicks, and
Lieutenants Wilson and Drewsen, in turn took charge of their destinies;
while Sergeants Bond, Simpson, and Rowlandson acted in succession as
Battalion Lewis Gun Sergeants.

4. _Battalion Orderly-Room._--After the first days of chaos we soon
settled down to a continued period of great efficiency, broken only
by one temporary interruption caused by the gas bombardment. At home,
the records and administration of the battalion passed successfully
through the hands of Colour-Sergeants Robinson, Sutherland, and Evans,
and the completeness of their work can be seen at once by anyone who
has to deal with the old battalion orders. Overseas we were no less
fortunate in our orderly-room sergeants--Ewan, Longridge, Llewellyn,
and Myers. It is one thing to keep files complete and records accurate
in the comfortable security of a properly organized orderly-room in
England. To maintain no less efficiency and accuracy in France is a
very different proposition. Space and stationery are limited; half
your records are always packed and inaccessible; the orderly-room may
be represented by a small "bivvy," a tent lit by one guttering candle,
a "lean-to" composed of an old ground sheet, or other commodious
habitation. Work under such conditions is trying and difficult, but it
always went on; the orders were always issued, the records always kept,
no matter what the obstacles. The amount of work which had to be done
may be estimated by the fact that two typewriters were fully employed.

5. _Quartermaster's Department._--The comprehensive activities of the
Quartermaster and his staff would, if adequately dealt with, require a
volume in themselves. A few notes on some aspects of their work will
only be given.

In England the principal task was, first, to obtain equipment, and,
secondly, to account for deficiencies. These difficulties rested in the
able hands of Lieutenant Barnett and, latterly, Lieutenant Sutherland.
Overseas the responsibilities of an efficient Quartermaster widen out
indefinitely. The provision of rations and equipment, no small work
in itself, is obviously his main concern; but, apart from that, a
zealous Quartermaster regards himself as responsible for everything
that conduces to the comfort and welfare of his battalion. He arranges
for billets and baths; he acts as commission agent for all kinds
of purchases for messes and individuals; he looks after the postal
arrangements, obtains money from the field cashier, drinks, cigarettes,
and so forth from the Expeditionary Force Canteen; he mends your boots
and clothes; he "scrounges" tar felting and oil silk--in a word, he
represents to the battalion all the resources of a town, with its shops
and its general conveniences of civilization. Lieutenant Sutherland's
services to the battalion were beyond all reckoning. He literally
slaved day and night to ensure that no battalion was better fed, better
clothed, better equipped, and generally better looked after than ours.
Captain Smith, who later became Quartermaster, followed in the same
tradition, and it is doubtful if we were ever in lack of anything
that we seriously wanted. In this work it will be realized that the
Quartermaster must have received the whole-hearted support of his
staff. Wallas, Heyworth, Cousins, and Benson each in their turn proved
most able Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeants. They further controlled
an expert staff, each in their different periods supremely efficient in
their own particular line--Blackburn, rations; Cooper, coal (he could
always "win" an extra hundredweight); Yates, ordnance stores; Handley,
mobilization stores; Kessen as a cheese-cutter; and Corporal Bell as
understudy to the Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant; and there were
many others who at varying times had their place in "Q" Department.
For bootmaking, we had first Sergeant Mottram and later Sergeant Cox,
a powerful representative of the 1st King's, who was as fine a boxer
as bootmaker. For tailoring, we had originally Sergeant Jewers, and
then Greenham, under whom worked an efficient band with strange Russian
names.

Another most important branch was represented by the cooks, a most
hard-working and efficient body of men, who proved their worth again
and again, not only in the ordered cook-houses of England and the
better billets of France, but still more in the rough and shelled
shanties in the line, in the crude trench fires during a battle, or
with their field kitchens on the march. Under Sergeant Lane, who had
a curious passion for strolling in No Man's Land at night, and later
under Sergeant Austin, the cooks attained a high degree of excellence;
and in spite of the dwindling scale of rations and of the curious
articles of food which used to be issued "in lieu of" ordinary items
which the war had made scarce, they provided, in spite of their
predilection for stew, a diet of which no one, however fastidious,
could seriously complain. Rifleman Anderson probably enjoys the record
for length of service as a cook, while Rifleman Frith earned the title
of "Rissole King."

In this connection one cannot pass over without mention the
self-sacrificing service of the men who went on the nightly pilgrimage
of the trenches, carrying the awkward and weighty burden of "hot food
containers." As you met them struggling in the dark along the narrow
and tortuous ways, now stopping to pass beneath an overhead traverse,
now forcing their way through a trench whose sides were almost closed
in, you could not but admire the persistence and energy which these
men exhibited, and on which the chances of hot tea or hot soup for the
front line posts entirely depended.

Of the Pioneers mention has already been made in the narrative of
the book. Prior to the formation of the Pioneer Platoon the original
establishment of battalion pioneers worked as efficiently and
energetically for their limited numbers as their more numerous party
did under the later organization.

Two other duties connected with "the Stores" are deserving of mention.
The Canteen Corporals--Corporal Hobden for the greater period of our
service abroad, and at the latter part Corporal Trapnell--carried out a
difficult and arduous task with great ability. Long tramps to distant
canteens, and uncomfortable quarters in the line in which to exhibit
their wares, constituted their life. The difficulty of reconciling the
strict rationing enforced by the Expeditionary Force Canteen with the
demands of the battalion made their office no sinecure.

The other duty referred to is that of Post Corporal, the leading
exponent being Lance-Corporal A. L. Reade. Endless walking to distant
Field Post Offices, long waits for the mail, a long trek home, and
innumerable letters to sort--all this was merely a preliminary
to the nightly journey up to the line. With all the letters to
be re-addressed, and all the registered letters to be handed to
their recipients, the task of Post Corporal was full of hard work,
responsibility, and often danger.

In conclusion, it must be realized that the Quartermaster's Department
enjoyed no immunity from shell fire, with which people are only too
apt to connect the lives of those not dwelling in the line itself.
Their stores and billets were frequently and--in Armentières, for
instance--very heavily shelled. The nightly trip to the line was no
sinecure, but often enough a most dangerous performance. Apart from
this, their labours were unending. The battalion came out from the line
for spells in reserve, or even in rest; the work of the Quartermaster's
Department only varied, it did not decrease.

6. _Transport._--During the early days at Blackpool, when we first
received a few horses and some old civilian waggons, and from the time
at Upstreet, when we became possessed of the regulation transport,
the tradition of smartness and efficiency never wavered. Lieutenant
Hutchinson had a genius for mules and horse management in general, and
was able to complete and consolidate the work begun by 2nd-Lieutenant
Eccles. After his transfer to the R.F.C. in 1917, Lieutenant Freeman
took over, with all the experience he had enjoyed during many years
with the A.S.C. Consequently one expected not only well-groomed animals
and spotless vehicles, but also a sound and efficient organization. The
latter was always in evidence, and the former only varied in degree
according to the situation presented by circumstances. In England
Sergeant Walker and Sergeant Lloyd, and overseas Lloyd and latterly
Sergeant McGowan, were the successive Transport Sergeants; while in
France mention should also be made of Corporals Davis, Tweddle, Steele,
and Raws.

The task of a regimental transport on active service is hard. The
hours of work and mileage covered by the vehicles daily were often
almost incredible. The transfer of the A.S.C. waggons to duties for
which the pre-war regulations had not provided put an enormous strain
on battalion transport. The increase in material and equipment also
produced a legitimate quantity of stuff far in excess of the capacity
of the vehicles, and on occasions when M.T. or G.S. waggons were not
forthcoming meant heavy work for our horses.

The supply of rations and water to the battalion, when in the trenches
or in a battle, always presented a problem requiring bravery and
initiative. Never did our transport fail us, whether limbers or pack
mules, no matter the difficulties, no matter the shelling.

7. _Signallers._--The first beginning of the Signal Section can be
traced to Liverpool; and though there was a section at Blackpool, under
2nd-Lieutenant E. C. Adam, regular training can hardly be said to have
begun before the battalion reached Canterbury, when instruction of a
very sound nature commenced under Sergeant Bowman, of the 1/6th K.L.R.
2nd-Lieutenant Rathbone was here made responsible for the section.

When the 43rd Provisional Battalion was formed, Sergeant Haydon became
Signal Sergeant, and a large part of the success and efficiency of
the section from then up till November, 1917, was due to his efforts.
Lieutenant Wyatt had meanwhile followed 2nd-Lieutenant Rathbone as
Signalling Officer. Flag wagging had by now been more than mastered;
and the intricacies of the "D III" telephone were now being absorbed,
and a limited amount of practical work done with this instrument. At
Upstreet the first battalion line was laid, connecting Battalion and
Brigade Headquarters. A further step in instruction was taken in the
systematic and careful schooling of linemen, and the efficiency thereby
obtained proved of the utmost value later. Corporal Gillison was
particularly conspicuous in this direction.

The Signal Section soon after this came under the command of Lieutenant
J. T. Hazell, a really brilliant exponent of the signaller's art. From
the time the battalion went to Aldershot till it left for France, the
training went on with fewer and fewer interruptions; and the high
standard attained may be realized from the fact that at the official
tests, held late in 1916, we produced twenty-nine first-class and
four second-class signallers out of thirty-three candidates entered,
thereby bringing our total up to about fifty first-class signallers,
and, further, won easily the signalling in the Aldershot Command
Efficiency Competitions, in spite of powerful rivals. The names of the
competitors, all of whom received bronze medals, were as follows:--

  Officer in charge        Lieut. J. T. Hazell.
  N.C.O. in charge         Sergt. H. J. Haydon.
  Visual sender            L./Cpl. S. H. Bell.
  Visual caller            Rfn. A. C. Cowie.
  Visual reader            Rfn. W. Whitehead.
  Visual writer            Rfn. G. Potter.
  First line layer         Rfn. W. A. Tomlinson.
  Second line layer        Rfn. A. W. Hassall.
  Third line layer         Rfn. E. Fryer.
  Buzzer sender            Rfn. W. Harrocks.
  Buzzer reader            Rfn. W. O. Copland.
  Runner                   Rfn. A. Wood.

During the time the battalion was in France the section not only
fulfilled all calls upon its activities in a most efficient manner,
but it was continually improving on its methods, learning the latest
instruments--fuller-phones, power buzzers, Lucas lamps, and so forth.
Not only was the system of telephones in every sector we occupied
improved and simplified, and communication kept up no matter how often
the enemy or wandering individuals smashed the wire, but in raids and
periods of fighting, the section, both individually and collectively,
showed itself as brave as it was resourceful. In Sergeant Payne was
found a worthy successor to Sergeant Haydon. 2nd-Lieutenants Novelle
and Thomas in turn acted as Signalling Officers, though the inspiration
of Lieutenant Hazell, until he was evacuated shortly before the
Armistice, was always present.

_Esprit de corps_, evident though it was in all ranks, was, if
possible, more marked in the case of the signallers; and for their
work, of which little can be said here, and of which, by reason of
their success, much often passed unnoticed, the battalion owes a great
debt.

8. _Medical._--The hygienic and medical side of a battalion, whether
at home or abroad, is of first-rate importance. As Medical Officer's
Orderly, Corporal Lawton, Corporal Stubbs, and Corporal Henderson, each
in their turn proved their worth again and again. On the sanitary side
Sergeant Lawton and, latterly, Corporal Barwise were regular wizards in
detecting anything wrong and providing the means to set things right.

Stretcher-bearers have been referred to in several places already.
The work of self-sacrifice of stretcher-bearers has been testified
by every unit of the British Army, and our own lived up to the
highest traditions of their calling; and our Medical Officers one and
all set them an example which they might well be proud to follow.
Lance-Corporal Winstanley, who during the latter part of the campaign
was in charge of all stretcher-bearers, deserves a special mention for
his admirable work.

The "water duty men," originally R.A.M.C. and later Riflemen, performed
a thankless and arduous task with perseverance, often under conditions
of great danger.

9. _Miscellaneous Instructors._--The branches of knowledge with which
the ordinary soldier has to be familiar are so diverse and so manifold
that a host of instructors have to be equipped with special knowledge,
in order that each may receive at any rate some instruction in special
subjects.

In addition, therefore, to Musketry and Physical Instructors--of the
latter, Sergeants Taylor, Jones, Hoskyn, and Ashcroft, and of the
former Sergeants Beaumont, Griffiths, Kernighan, and Farrington were
the principal exponents--we have Gas N.C.Os. (Sergeant Nicholls,
Corporals Harvey and Roles) and Bombing Instructors (Corporal
Cathrell, Sergeant Kerr, and Sergeant Grahl). The important duties
performed by these N.C.Os. and by the officers who were similarly
trained--Lieutenant Wyatt (physical drill), 2nd-Lieutenant Clarke and
Lieutenant Burton (bombers), and Lieutenant James (Gas Officer)--are
often hardly appreciated, and those who hold those special appointments
are not infrequently thought to be in "cushy" jobs. That is as it may
be; the fact remains that invaluable work was performed, and efficiency
and protection obtained in vital branches of warfare.

10. _Bugles._--From the earliest days at Blackpool the Bugles commenced
to flourish, and throughout our long training in England they were
an established part of our unit. In the early days of France they
languished, but after the first "rest" their important position was
recovered. In England Sergeant Kernighan was Sergeant-Bugler. During
the latter part of the time in France Sergeant Cadman filled that
office, while Lance-Corporal Frost proved a splendid cornet-player.
The addition of five cornets was a great success, and latterly whenever
out of the line the bugles sounded the recognized calls and carried out
the normal routine of barrack life in England. In Lille the mere sight
of the buglers produced an enthusiastic crowd, and there can be no
question that their performance was well worth watching.

11. _Machine Gunners._--The origin of this section dates from Blackpool
in 1914, when the first beginnings were made under 2nd-Lieutenant
Royston. After he proceeded overseas it passed under the care of
2nd-Lieutenant Rathbone, and from him again to Lieutenant Bowring.
Under the latter, with the able assistance of Sergeant Machell, the
section achieved the highest efficiency, and the arrival of a Vickers
gun at Margate enabled the men to give practical demonstrations of
their skill.

With the formation of the new Machine Gun Corps, instructions came
to us, as to other units, for all our trained machine gunners to be
transferred. Accordingly, in May, 1916, twenty-two men were discharged
from the Territorial Force and were re-enlisted into the Machine
Gun Corps, and formed No. 1 Section of "I" Machine Gun Company, at
Grantham. After the normal period at Grantham, the major portion of
these men proceeded to Mesopotamia in October, 1916, and fought in the
principal action connected with the attempted recovery of Kut and the
subsequent advance to Baghdad. The following spring they proceeded
to Palestine, and took part in the chief operations there, which
constituted the final obliteration of the Turk in that country. A
further party of five were transferred to the Machine Gun Corps from
Bourley Camp in July, 1916. Of these some proceeded to France, and
thence to Salonika.

The various experiences of these men would cover many pages, but it is
rather beyond the scope of this work. It may, however, be added that
the extremely rapid promotion of our drafts speaks not only for their
own merit, but also for that of the battalion in which they obtained
their training as soldiers. Out of twenty-seven men, eighteen received
promotion, including two warrant officers and three sergeants, while
two men received commissions.

12. _Light Trench Mortar Battery._--In July, 1916, the authorities
decided that a Light Trench Mortar Battery should be formed in each
of our Brigades, and in due course contingents from each battalion
assembled in a corner of our camp to commence instruction in the Stokes
trench mortar. Our contribution consisted of Lieutenant D. G. Leonard,
one sergeant, two corporals, and nine men, with Lieutenant (later
Captain) H. E. Barrow to command the Brigade Battery. The majority
of the personnel had previously been sent to a preliminary course at
Aldershot. Training accordingly proceeded apace, and the battery was
soon firing live ammunition at Pirbright, where it subsequently took up
its quarters permanently.

During the various vicissitudes of the Brigade our Trench Mortar
Battery took its share of our pleasures and sorrows in full measure.
At Houplines it proved more than a match for the German "pineapples."
During raids of our own or the enemy's the men proved themselves worthy
of the best traditions, while in open warfare they revealed surprising
mobility. From time to time many other men were drafted from every
battalion to the battery to replace casualties and to form reserves,
and several of the men earned distinctions; while Captain Barrow,
shortly before his transfer in 1917 to the W.A.F.F., was awarded the
Military Cross.



APPENDIX II


COMMANDING OFFICERS.

  Colonel G. A. Wilson, V.D.

  Lieutenant-Colonel W. A. L. Fletcher, D.S.O.

  Lieutenant-Colonel Hon. N. C. Gathorne-Hardy, D.S.O., Rifle
  Brigade.

  Lieutenant-Colonel C. C. Stapledon, Manchester Regiment.

  Lieutenant-Colonel C. L. Macdonald, D.S.O., Manchester
  Regiment.


SECONDS-IN-COMMAND.

  Major J. Howard Temple.

  Major H. K. Wilson.

  Major C. W. Wilson, M.C.

  Major D. Grant-Dalton, C.M.G., D.S.O.


ADJUTANTS.

  Captain W. A. L. Fletcher, D.S.O.

  Captain J. Barnett.

  Captain C. E. Wurtzburg, M.C.

  Captain C. W. Wilson, M.C.

  Captain F. C. Bowring.

  Captain F. E. Evans.


QUARTERMASTERS.

  Lieutenant J. Barnett.

  Lieutenant T. Sutherland.

  Lieutenant T. Jackson.

  Captain F. V. Smith.


COMPANY COMMANDERS (OVERSEAS).


_"A" Company._

  Captain F. G. Gilling.

  Captain C. T. A. Wyatt.

  Captain F. C. Bowring.

  Captain J. McWilliam, M.C.

  Lieutenant S. E. B. Sage.

  Lieutenant C. James, M.C.

  Captain J. C. Carr.

  Captain R. E. Noon, M.C.


_"B" Company._

  Captain C. T. Steward.

  Lieutenant W. Penrice.

  Lieutenant E. C. Adam.

  Captain A. H. Broad.

  Captain A. G. Eccles, M.C.

  Captain T. Robinson, M.C.

  Captain E. D. Kissan.


_"C" Company._

  Captain A. G. Eccles, M.C.

  Captain H. Ormrod.

  Captain T. A. Williams, M.C.


_"D" Company._

  Captain C. W. Wilson, M.C.

  Captain K. H. Burton.

  Captain T. K. Fell.

  Captain J. Beavan.


WARRANT OFFICERS (OVERSEAS).

  Regimental Sergeant-Majors          {R. Smith.
                                      {J. L. Heyworth, M.C.

                                      {T. Wallas.
  Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeants  {J. L. Heyworth, M.C.
                                      {G. Cousins.
                                      {J. A. Benson.


_"A" Company._

                                      {W. C. Bowman.
  Company Sergeant-Majors             {J. A. Benson.
                                      {H. Morrall, M.M.

                                      {N. E. Jenner.
  Company Quartermaster-Sergeants     {H. M. Griffiths.
                                      {A. L. Beaumont.
                                      {F. J. Fenner.


_"B" Company._

                                      {A. Kelly.
  Company Sergeant-Majors             {C. J. Pennington.
                                      {T. R. Machell.
                                      {H. Gedd.

                                      {C. J. Pennington.
  Company Quartermaster-Sergeants     {C. W. Walter.
                                      {J. L. Tipping.
                                      {R. Batson.


_"C" Company._

                                      {J. L. Heyworth, M.C.
  Company Sergeant-Majors             {R. J. Woodward.
                                      {G. Lane.

                                      {R. D. Jackson.
  Company Quartermaster-Sergeants     {G. Cousins.
                                      {J. T. Pollitt.


_"D" Company._

  Company Sergeant-Majors             {R. Barker, D.C.M.
                                      {H. M. Griffiths.

                                      {R. Batson.
  Company Quartermaster-Sergeants     {G. Lane.
                                      {R. F. Farrington.



APPENDIX III.

NOMINAL ROLL.


NOTE.--This Roll has been compiled from the battalion's Part II Orders,
and though every effort has been taken to make it accurate, the author
feels that for various reasons--in particular the somewhat scanty
records of the early period of 1914-15--some errors of fact and date
may be present. It is hoped that, as some 4,000 names are recorded,
those who suffer from inaccuracies will accept in extenuation the
magnitude of the task.

It had been intended to give, where applicable, some record of service
done with other units, but it has been found impossible to obtain
a complete record of this, and the Roll in consequence is confined
to details of service, distinctions, etc., in the battalion. This
restriction is the more to be regretted as so many members of the
battalion gained high rank and honours with other units, among them
being Rifleman G. G. Coury, who shortly after obtaining his commission
won the Victoria Cross.

   A ✠ has been placed against the name of every officer and man who
          was killed in action or died of wounds or disease.

                             ROLL OF OFFICERS.

   |NAME.        |PERIOD SERVED WITH   |HIGHEST    |APPOINT-  |HONOURS
   |             |BATTALION.           |RANK.      |MENTS.    |OR
   |             |                     |           |          |AWARDS.
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ADAM, E. C.  |13/11/14--11/5/15,   |Lieut      |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |11/8/17--9/1/18,     |           |          |
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ALCOCK, P. F.|5/2/15--30/7/17,     |Lieut.     |Int.      |--
   |             |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ALLEN, L. S. |28/4/15--14/1/17,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |trsfd. Tank Corps    |(T./Lieut.)|          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|ALTY, H.,    |18/9/18--30/9/18,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |D.C.M. (9th  |died of wounds       |           |          |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ANDERSON,    |8/11/17--6/9/18,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |W. R.        |wounded              |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BARDGETT, J. |17/6/18--29/3/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |V.           |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BARDSLEY,    |26/11/18--10/4/19,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |J. P. (7th   |trsfd. Base          |           |          |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BARNETT, J.  |1/11/14--3/11/16,    |Captain    |Q.M.,     |--
   |             |invalided            |           |Adjutant  |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BARROW, H. E.|16/10/14--19/1/18,   |Lieut.     |Comd. 171 |M.C.
   |             |trsfd. K. African R. |(A./Capt.) |L.T.M.B.  |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BEAVAN, J.   |29/11/18--24/3/19,   |T./Lieut.  |Company   |--
   |(14th K.L.R. |demobilized          |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BELK, W. A.  |23/10/18--21/3/19,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(7th K.L.R.  |trsfd. A. of O.      |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BILSLAND, J. |28/5/15--2/3/16,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(15th K.L.R. |trsfd. R.E.          |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BIRKETT, G.  |1/10/14--11/5/15,    |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BLAKE, J. N. |25/4/17--24/3/19,    |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BOULT, R. H. |13/11/14--16/2/15,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |S.           |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BOWRING, F.  |2/3/15--26/2/19,     |Lieut.     |M.G.O.,   |Twice M.
   |C.           |demobilized          |(A./Capt.) |L.G.O.,   |in D.
   |             |                     |           |Coy.      |
   |             |                     |           |Comdr.,   |
   |             |                     |           |Adjutant  |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BRETTEL, I.  |11/11/18--10/4/19,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |P. (R.A.S.C. |trsfd. Base          |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BRIGGS, H.   |31/3/17--15/4/17,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |sick                 |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BRIGHOUSE,   |23/8/17--14/1/18,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |T. J.        |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BROAD, A. H. |5/8/15--8/11/15,     |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |(A./Capt)  |Comdr.    |
   |             |5/8/17--10/7/18, sick|           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BROCKLEBANK, |27/11/14--17/6/15,   |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |R. E. R.     |posted 3/6 K.L.R.    |(T./Capt.) |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BUCKLEY, E.  |20/11/14--11/5/15,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |K.           |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |BURTON, G. B.|12/3/15--11/7/15,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|BURTON, K. H.|14/5/15--16/6/18,    |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |             |killed in action     |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |Scout     |
   |CAMERON, C.  |18/2/15--23/5/15,    |2/Lieut.   |Officer   |--
   |W.           |posted 3/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|CARR, J. C.  |15/9/17--21/10/18,   |2/Lieut.   |Company   |--
   |(Liverpool   |killed in action     |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |CLARKE, C. W.|20/8/15--4/2/18,     |Lieut.     |--        |M.C.
   |             |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|COLLINGE, W. |21/6/15--7/8/17,     |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |R.           |died of wounds       |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |CUFFLIN,     |2/11/18--21/3/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |C. A.        |trsfd. A. of O.      |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |DAVIDSON, W. |13/11/14--30/4/15,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |H. H.        |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |DREWSEN,     |17/6/18--18/2/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |J. B. R.     |demobilized          |           |          |
   |(Lancs.      |                     |           |          |
   |Hussars      |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |DUGDALE,     |4/2/17----/6/17, sick|Lieut.     |--        |--
   |D. (4th      |                     |           |          |
   |K.O.R.L.     |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |DWYER, W. J. |22/10/17--29/4/18,   |2/Lieut    |L.G.      |--
   |(Liverpool   |sick                 |           |Officer   |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |EASTWOOD, D. |19/8/15--8/11/15,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ECCLES, A. G.|5/10/14--30/7/17,    |Captain    |Transport |M.C.
   |             |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |             |5/1/18--5/1/19,      |           |Company   |
   |             |demobilized          |           |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |EUPEN, C. F. |5/9/17--21/1/18, sick|2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |EVANS, F. E. |4/2/17--30/7/17,     |Lieut.     |Assistant |--
   |             |wounded              |(A./Capt.) |Adjutant  |
   |             |3/10/18--22/5/19,    |           |Adjutant  |
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |FELL, T. K.  |17/3/17--22/11/18,   |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |             |sick                 |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |FLETCHER, G. |13/11/14--17/6/15,   |Captain    |Company   |--
   |L.           |posted as C.O. 3/6   |           |Comdr.    |
   |             |K.L.R.               |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |FLETCHER, W. |10/11/14--30/7/17,   |Major      |Adjutant, |Twice M.
   |A. L., D.S.O.|wounded              |(T./Lt./   |          |in D.,
   |             |10/9/17--23/7/18,    |Col.)      |C.O.      |Brevet
   |             |resigned command     |           |          |Major,
   |             |                     |           |          |Chev. L.
   |             |                     |           |          |d'Honneur
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |FORSHAW,     |1/11/18--9/4/19,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |A. F.        |demobilized          |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |FREEMAN, C.  |28/8/17--14/2/19,    |Lieut.     |Transport |M.C.
   |S.           |demobilized          |           |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |FRY, A. J.   |29/11/18--8/4/19,    |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |(Liverpool   |demobilized          |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |GATHORNE-    |23/7/18--24/11/18,   |Major      |C.O.      |D.S.O.,
   |HARDY,       |trsfd.               |(A./Lt./   |          |Twice M.
   |Hon. N. C.   |                     |Col.)      |          |in D.
   |(Rifle Bde.  |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |GRANT-       |21/11/18--22/2/19,   |Major      |2nd-in-   |--
   |DALTON, D.,  |trsfd.               |           |Command   |
   |C.M.G.,      |                     |           |          |
   |D.S.O. (W.   |                     |           |          |
   |Yorks R.     |                     |           |          |
   |attd.)       |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |GILLING, F.  |13/11/14--2/6/17,    |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |G.           |sick                 |(T./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |GOFFEY, W.   |29/4/15--23/5/15,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |posted 3/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |GOULDING, E. |14/2/17--6/2/18,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |A.           |tour of duty in Eng. |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |GREEN, H. G. |17/6/18--13/9/18,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |GROOME, A.   |28/5/15--20/7/16,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |C. H. (14th  |trsfd. R.F.C.        |           |          |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HARDY, F.    |21/9/18--8/3/19,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(Liverpool   |trsfd. A. of O.      |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HARPER,      |5/9/17--15/9/18,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |C. R.        |trsfd. R.A.F.        |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HARRIS, J. K.|23/4/18--13/2/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |M.C.
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HAZELL, J. T.|3/7/15--1/11/18, sick|Lieut.     |Sig. O.,  |--
   |             |                     |           |Int. O.   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HERSCHELL, E.|13/11/14--22/3/15,   |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |(T./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HICKS, J. E. |7/12/17--5/9/18,     |2/Lieut.   |L.G.      |--
   |             |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HODGKINSON,  |17/3/17--5/11/17,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |W.           |trsfd. R.F.C.        |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HOLLAND, L.  |31/10/14--24/8/16,   |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |M.           |trsfd.               |(T./Capt.) |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HOOPER, F.   |1/2/18--24/3/19,     |2/Lieut.   |Pioneer   |--
   |(5th K.L.R.  |demobilized          |           |Officer   |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HOWARD, W. R.|13/11/14--15/8/15,   |Lieut. --  |          |--
   |             |trsfd. 43 Prov. Bn.  |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HUGHES, E. V.|23/11/14--11/7/15,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HUNTLEY, F.  |26/6/15----/12/18    |Lieut.     |Brigade   |M. in D.
   |O. J.        |                     |           |Int. O.   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |HUTCHINSON,  |7/6/15--22/7/17,     |Lieut.     |Transport |--
   |A.           |attached R.F.C.      |           |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |JACKSON, T.  |9/9/17--4/11/17, sick|Lieut. and |--        |--
   |R.           |                     |Q.M.       |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |JACOBS, A.   |1/2/18--25/8/18,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |trsfd. R.A.F.        |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |JAMES, C.    |21/5/16--30/9/18,    |Lieut.     |Bn. Gas   |M.C.
   |             |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |Company   |
   |             |                     |           |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |JOHNSON, F.  |5/6/15--1/5/16,      |2/Lieut.   |--        |
   |J. (15th     |trsfd.               |           |          |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |JONES, T. W. |5/9/17--28/4/18, sick|2/Lieut.   |Pioneer   |--
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |Officer   |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |JONES, W. J. |13/11/14--11/5/15,   |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |KELK, A. E.  |14/5/15--18/10/15,   |Lieut. and |--        |--
   |(attached)   |relinquished comn.   |Q.M.       |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |KISSAN, E.   |16/9/18--29/12/18,   |T./Lieut.  |Company   |--
   |D. (14th     |demobilized          |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.,   |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |Int.      |
   |attached)    |                     |           |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |LAWRENCE, E. |13/11/14--14/3/15,   |Captain    |Company   |--
   |             |T.F.Res.             |           |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |LEONARD, D.  |27/5/16--17/11/17,   |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |G.           |attd. 171 L.T.M.B.   |(A./Capt.) |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |LEVER, T.    |5/9/17--25/1/19,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |M.C.
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |LITTLE, J.   |15/10/15--30/7/17,   |2/Lieut.   |Int.      |--
   |H. M.        |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |LOUDEN, T. H.|8/7/17--2/4/19,      |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |LUTZ,        |15/11/18--16/2/19,   |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |F., M.C.     |demobilized          |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MCCORMICK,   |15/11/16--14/2/17    |Lieut.     |Empl.     |--
   |P. C. (6th   |                     |           |Div. H.Q. |
   |Lancs. Fus.  |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MACDONALD,   |20/1/19--22/5/19,    |T./Lieut./ |C.O.      |--
   |C. L.,       |demobilized          |Col.       |          |
   |D.S.O.       |                     |           |          |
   |(Manchester  |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MCWILLIAM, J.|17/3/17--12/11/17,   |2/Lieut.   |Company   |M.C.
   |             |wounded              |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MATHER, P. D.|4/6/15--23/8/15,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MAY, L. G.   |22/9/14--15/8/15,    |2/Lieut.   |Transport |--
   |             |trsfd. Home Service  |(T./Lieut.)|Officer   |
   |             |unit                 |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MILLER, A. T.|13/11/14--16/6/15,   |Captain    |Company   |--
   |             |posted 3/6 K.L.R.    |           |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MOON, J.     |27/11/14--18/12/16,  |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |             |attd. Portugese E.F. |(T./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |MOSELEY,     |15/11/16--30/7/17,   |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |O. V. (6th   |attd. 57 H.T.M.B.    |           |          |
   |Lancs. Fus.  |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |NOON, R. E.  |14/4/17--24/3/19,    |Lieut.     |Company   |M.C.
   |             |demobilized          |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |NOVELLE, F.  |5/9/17--6/2/19,      |2/Lieut.   |Sig.      |--
   |(Liverpool   |demobilized          |           |Officer   |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ORMROD, H.   |16/11/16--22/2/18,   |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |(6th Bn.     |tour of duty in Eng. |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |Lancs. F.    |                     |           |          |
   |attd.)       |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |PARKER, P.   |7/11/14--28/6/17,    |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |G. F.        |wounded              |(T./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |PARKINSON,   |4/2/17--30/7/17,     |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |J. A. (5th   |wounded              |           |          |
   |K.O.R.L.     |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |PATERSON,    |3/8/18--5/9/18,      |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |J. (N.F.     |wounded              |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |PAUL, E. E.  |15/11/16--24/6/17,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(6th Bn.     |wounded 30/7/17,     |           |          |
   |Lancs. F.    |wounded              |           |          |
   |attd.)       |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |PAUL, J. R.  |12/6/15--29/7/17,    |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |             |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |7/12/17--4/7/18,     |           |          |
   |             |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |PEGGE, W. J. |25/4/17--30/7/17,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |PENRICE, W.  |13/7/17--5/10/18,    |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |             |sick                 |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|PROFIT, L.   |5/9/17--3/11/17,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |T. (3rd      |wounded              |           |          |
   |K.L.R.       |6/4/18--20/6/18,     |           |          |
   |attached)    |died of wounds       |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|PURDIE, D.   |3/12/17--30/9/18,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |S. (9th      |died of wounds       |           |          |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |RATHBONE, R. |15/10/14--15/8/15,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |R.           |trsfd.               |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |REID, W.     |24/12/14--6/2/15,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |RIGBY, A. W. |23/11/17--23/3/18,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(9th K.L.R.  |sick                 |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ROBERTS,     |5/9/17--6/6/18, sick |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |H. J.        |                     |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ROBINSON, T. |5/9/17--28/9/18, sick|2/Lieut.   |Asst.     |M.C. &
   |(Liverpool   |                     |(A./Capt.) |Adjt.     |bar.
   |R. attached) |                     |           |Company   |
   |             |                     |           |Comdr.    |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ROGERS, G. P.|13/11/14--15/8/15,   |Capt.      |--        |--
   |             |trsfd. 43rd Prov. Bn.|           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ROTHWELL, G. |7/2/17--30/7/17,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ROYLE, H. H. |7/2/17--30/7/17,     |Lieut.     |Int.      |
   |E.           |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |             |17/10/17--13/3/18,   |           |          |
   |             |tour of duty in Eng. |           |          |
   |             |15/11/18--25/1/19,   |           |          |
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |ROYSTON, J.  |13/11/14--11/5/15,   |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |W.           |posted 1/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |RULE,        |4/2/17--2/7/17,      |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |R. (4th      |trsfd.               |           |          |
   |K.O.R.L.     |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |RYCROFT,     |5/9/17--22/1/18,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |J. A.        |trsfd.               |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|SAGE, S. E.  |1/2/18--13/9/18,     |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |B. (4th Bn.  |died of wounds       |           |Comdr.    |
   |Glouc. R.    |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |SHIRT, R.    |18/9/18--1/10/18,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(9th K.L.R.  |wounded              |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |SIMPSON, H.  |1/10/18--24/3/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |SMITH, F.    |13/12/17--22/5/19,   |Capt. and  |--        |--
   |V. (4th Bn.  |demobilized          |Q.M.       |          |
   |Ches. R.     |                     |           |          |
   |attd.)       |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |STAPLEDON,   |13/12/18--26/1/19,   |Major      |C.O.      |--
   |C. C.        |trsfd.               |(A./Lt./   |          |
   |(Manch. R.   |                     |Col.)      |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |STEWARD, C.  |30/4/15--30/7/17,    |Lieut.     |Company   |--
   |T.           |wounded              |(A./Capt.) |Comdr.    |
   |             |14/10/17----/1/19    |--         |Attd.     |
   |             |                     |           |H.Q. 171  |
   |             |                     |           |Bde.      |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |SUTHERLAND,  |20/10/15--14/7/17,   |Lieut and  |--        |M. in D.
   |T.           |wounded              |Q. M.      |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |SUTTON, A.   |7/12/17--14/5/18,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |E. B.        |trsfd.               |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |TEBBUT, J.   |19/2/18--25/9/18,    |Lieut.     |--        |--
   |L. (5th      |sick                 |           |          |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |TEMPLE, J. H.|8/10/14--31/3/15,    |Major      |2nd-in-   |--
   |             |trsfd. R.N.V.R.      |           |Command   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |THOMAS,      |1/2/18--4/6/18,      |2/Lieut.   |Signalling|--
   |I. T. B.     |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |(5th K.L.R.  |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |UPWARD,      |5/9/17--10/9/18,     |2/Lieut.   |Scout     |--
   |S. P. G.     |wounded              |           |Officer   |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|VAUGHAN, D.  |5/9/17--30/10/17,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(3rd K.L.R.  |killed in action     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|WALN, E. A.  |7/12/17--21/10/18,   |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |             |killed in action     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILLIAMS,    |15/8/18--26/2/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |D. J.        |trsfd. A. of O.      |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILLIAMS,    |22/9/18--27/2/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |D. R.        |demobilized          |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILLIAMS,    |1/2/18--5/2/19,      |Lieut.     |Company   |M.C.
   |T. A. (5th   |demobilized          |(A./Capt.) |Commdr.   |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
  ✠|WILLIAMS,    |5/9/17--1/9/18,      |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |T. L.        |killed in action     |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILSON, C. W.|31/10/14--21/10/18,  |Capt.      |Company   |M.C.,
   |             |trsfd. to U.K.       |(A./Major) |Comdr.    |Belgian
   |             |                     |           |Adjt.,    |C. de G.
   |             |                     |           |2nd-in-   |
   |             |                     |           |Comd.     |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILSON, D.   |31/8/18--24/1/19,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |(3rd N.F.    |demobilized          |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILSON, G.   |25/9/14--6/8/15,     |Colonel    |C.O.      |--
   |A., V.D.     |resigned command     |           |          |
   |             |31/10/14--30/7/17,   |           |          |
   |             |wounded              |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILSON, H. K.|27/12/17, sick       |Capt.      |2nd-in-   |M. in D.
   |             |                     |(A./Major) |Command   |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WILSON, S.   |1/2/18--22/5/19,     |Lieutenant |Assist.   |--
   |M. (5th      |demobilized          |           |Adjt.     |
   |K.L.R.       |                     |           |          |
   |attached)    |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WITHERS, H.  |21/5/15--8/11/15,    |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |R.           |posted 3/6 K.L.R.    |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WOODWORTH,   |2/11/18--8/3/19,     |2/Lieut.   |--        |--
   |T. W., M.M.  |trsfd. A. of O.      |           |          |
   |(Liverpool   |                     |           |          |
   |R. attached) |                     |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WURTZBURG,   |22/9/14--3/9/17,     |Capt.      |Adjt.     |M.C.
   |C. E.        |sick.                |           |          |
   |             |7/12/17--16/5/18,    |           |          |
   |             |sick                 |           |          |
   |             |26/9/18--20/2/19,    |           |          |
   |             |demobilized          |           |          |
   |             |                     |           |          |
   |WYATT, C. T. |14/5/15--26/9/17,    |Lieut.     |Sig.      |--
   |A.           |wounded              |(A./Capt.) |Officer   |
   |             |                     |           |Company   |
   |             |                     |           |Comdr.    |


MEDICAL OFFICERS.

UNITED KINGDOM.

  LIEUT. T. ATKINS, R.A.M.C.
  CAPT. R. J. ROGERS, R.A.M.C.
  CAPT. J. LIVINGSTON, R.A.M.C.
  LIEUT. L. A. WILSON, R.A.M.C.

OVERSEAS.

  LIEUT. L. A. WILSON, R.A.M.C.
  CAPT. T. MCHUGH, R.A.M.C.
  CAPT. H. ROBINSON, R.A.M.C.
  CAPT. A. G. G. PLUMLEY, R.A.M.C.
  LIEUT. W. H. GORDON, M.O.R.C., U.S.A.
  MAJOR N. W. KIDSTON, R.A.M.C.
  LIEUT. N. A. SULLO, M.O.R.C., U.S.A.
  LIEUT. N. S. REED, M.O.R.C., U.S.A.
  CAPT. O. H. BULLOCK, R.A.M.C.


CHAPLAINS--OVERSEAS.

  REV.  M. J. ELAND.
  REV. S. WEAVER.
  REV.  F. H. SIMMS.
  REV. S. J. HUGHES.

                         ROLL OF WARRANT OFFICERS,
                    NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS, AND MEN.

     A † after date of leaving indicates that service in battalion was
                              not continuous.

   |NAME.         |REGTL.| DATE OF|DATE OF       |HIGHEST     |HONOURS
   |              |   NO.|JOINING.|LEAVING WITH  |RANK.       |OR
   |              |      |        |CAUSE.        |            |AWARDS.
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Abbey, H.     |  2407| 11/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ackroyd, E.   |  2954|12/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ackroyd, E.   |  1600| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Acton, E.     |  3037|16/11/14|16/2/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, A. R.  |241017|11/11/14|3/10/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, B. C.  |  2097| 31/8/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, C.     |  2732| 2/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, C.     |243663| 6/10/16|21/1/19,†     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, E. C.  |  2116| 31/8/14|13/11/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, H.     |  2481| 11/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, J. H.  |242348|  8/3/16|30/11/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adams, S.     | 47467| 24/2/18|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adamson, J. H.|  3136| 4/12/14|25/2/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adamson, T. C.|  1680|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Addison, J.   |  2983|12/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adlington, T. | 17264|  6/6/18|30/1/19,      |Sergeant.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Adshead, R.   | 50703| 18/8/17|16/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Agar, W.      | 50179|  7/3/18|10/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ainscough, J. |242531| 24/5/16|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ainslie, K.   |  1873|23/10/14|12/1/15,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ainsworth, J. | 16501| 27/6/18|11/1/19, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aird, W.      |  5002| 18/3/16|18/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aitchison, T. |  3185|  4/1/15|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |H. G.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Albin, D.     | 57386| 14/6/18|28/8/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alcock, E. G. |  3144| 7/12/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alcock, J.    |242415| 21/3/16|16/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alcock, S.    | 27519| 27/6/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aldecocea, G. |  2724|30/10/14|1/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aldous, S.    |241274| 29/3/15|5/9/18, sick  |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aldridge, H.  |105557| 12/7/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alexander, J. |  2763| 6/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alexander, L. |  2281|  2/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alexander, P. |  2636| 7/10/14|16/2/15,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |V.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alexander, R. |  1627|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alldridge, D. |  1705| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allen, J.     |  2759| 6/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allen, J. A.  |  2963|12/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allen, R.     |380275| 27/5/18|10/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allen, W.     |240991|10/11/14|16/9/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allen, W.     | 88182| 8/11/17|9/4/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allen, W. H.  | 80300| 24/8/17|7/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allen, W. J.  |202196| 14/3/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allenby, A. G.| 72508| 13/8/17|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allenby, C.   |  2676|19/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allford, B.   | 88112| 5/10/17|19/11/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allinson, F.  |  3274| 18/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allinson, J.  | 50704| 18/8/17|22/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allinson, W.  |202406| 22/6/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allman, S.    | 88107| 5/10/17|14/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Allsopp, W.   |  3386|  3/7/15|22/7/16,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alpine, G.    |242409| 20/3/16|23/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alty, H.      | 30062|  1/2/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Alty, H.      |243763|10/10/16|17/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Amery, E. S.  |241265| 19/3/15|18/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Amos, A. H.   |241350|  3/7/15|6/3/19,†      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Anderson, J.  |241275| 29/3/15|1/9/18,       |Corporal.   |
   |H.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anderson, J.  |  5221| 14/5/16|18/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anderson, L.  |   451|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anderson, P.  |240644| 10/9/14|10/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anderson, R.  |  2252|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |S.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anderton, F.  |  6536|10/10/16|12/11/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anderton, W.  | 40114|  1/2/18|18/1/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Andrews, A. G.|  2423| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Angell, A.    |241279| 28/3/15|12/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anglesey, J.  |241235|  9/2/15|12/9/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Annison, --.  |  2408| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Anslow, F. P. |241375| 27/5/15|17/7/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Antrobus, G.  |  3704|  6/8/15|6/9/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Applebee, W.  | 50930| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Appleton, T.  |331670| 27/8/17|19/1/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Apsimmon, G.  |  1473| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arbery, W. J. |  2656|13/10/14|10/9/16,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arden, E.     | 88213| 8/11/17|26/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arden, T.     | 22003| 30/5/18|26/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Argue, T. C.  |  2233|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arkwright, F. | 50702| 18/8/17|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Armitage, W.  | 72530| 13/8/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Armstrong, G. |200925|25/11/18|2/3/19,       |Corporal.   |
   |T.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Armstrong, T. |  1282| 27/2/15|2/4/15,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |H.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Armstrong, W. |243774|10/10/16|24/2/18, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arnold, E.    | 49683| 24/2/18|16/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arnold, F. J. | 95737| 17/4/18|6/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arnold, T. G. |  2814| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Arrowsmith, H.|  3170|28/12/14|21/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashall, T.    | 90759|  7/3/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashbridge, J. |243826|13/10/16|28/3/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Ashcroft, J.  |240830| 5/10/14|23/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashcroft, L.  | 22604|  6/6/18|21/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashford, F.   |  5050| 21/3/16|31/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashley, G. A. |242261| 26/1/16|21/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashton, T.    |240760| 18/9/14|11/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashurst, T. R.|242125| 11/1/18|17/1/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashworth, F.  |108754| 28/9/18|20/11/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashworth, R.  |240496| 31/8/14|13/3/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Ashworth, T.  | 50705| 18/8/17|31/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashworth, W.  |243734| 9/10/16|20/5/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashworth, W.  |300464| 27/5/18|29/1/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |J.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ashworth, W.  |241277| 29/3/15|6/7/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |L.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Askew, R.     |202951| 22/6/18|1/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aspell, S. G. |  3063|19/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aspinall, A.  |235424|  1/2/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Astley, H. C. |  1363| 27/2/15|20/11/15,     |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Astley, W.    | 88682| 11/3/18|7/1/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atcheson, W.  |  3193|  8/1/15|2/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |T.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atherton, J.  |  1598| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atherton, R.  |202408|  1/2/18|7/3/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atherton, W.  |242192| 21/1/16|21/3/19,† sick|Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atkin, J.     | 51742| 14/6/18|15/10/18,     |Rifleman    |M.M.
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atkin, P. M.  |241396|  3/7/15|29/12/17,     |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Atkinson, J.  |243656| 6/10/16|8/8/17, died  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atkinson, J.  | 56918| 13/8/17|28/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atkinson, J.  | 95735| 17/4/18|4/6/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atkinson, J.  |381190|  1/2/18|26/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |P.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Atkinson, R.  |  3197|  8/1/15|9/4/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Atkinson, R.  |243773|10/10/16|4/6/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Audley, S.    |240972| 9/11/14|4/9/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aughton, M.   | 88105| 5/10/17|10/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Auster, N. C. |  2496| 16/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |L.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Austin, J. B. |240504| 31/8/14|13/3/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Austin, R.    |300579|  1/2/18|7/2/19,       |Sergeant    |M. in D.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Austin, T. H. |  2660|13/10/14|17/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Austin, W. H. |  1571| 27/2/15|12/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Avery, H.     |  2711|29/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Avery, J.     |243728| 9/10/16|16/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Aynsley, W. H.|  2551| 23/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Axson, H.     |200579|  8/7/17|6/8/17, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Babut, A.     |243686| 7/10/16|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bacon, F. H.  |  2664|14/10/14|2/1/16,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baddley, J.   | 49629|  1/2/18|8/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bagshaw, R.   | 88248| 8/11/17|14/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, A.    | 26665|  1/2/18|9/12/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, A.    | 50901|  1/2/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, G.    |  2389| 10/9/14|1/5/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, G.    |242258| 25/1/16|17/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, G. F. |240719| 14/9/14|18/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, H.    | 21239|  2/7/18|20/1 /19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, J.    |241469|  6/8/15|17/4/18,†     |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, J.    |243756|10/10/16|15/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bailey, W.    |240135| 27/2/15|20/9/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bain, C. J.   |  2297| 10/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Bain, R.      | 29156| 27/5/18|1/9/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baines, G.    | 88201| 8/11/17|26/2/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baines, H.    |  2746| 4/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baines, H.    | 29962| 18/3/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baines, --    |  2393| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, A.     |241135|26/11/14|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, G.     | 88595|  1/2/18|29/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, G. H.  | 88683|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, S.     |  2832| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, S. R.  |  2831| 9/11/14|17/5/15,      |A./L./      |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, Thos.  |  2921|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, T. B.  |241461|  6/8/15|28/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, W.     | 88539| 19/9/17|29/8/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, W. S.  |  2392| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baker, W. H.  |241997|  5/5/17|20/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Balfour, A.   |  2796| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ball, E.      |243748| 9/10/16|9/9/17†       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/9th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ball, R. H.   |  2226|  1/9/14|23/12/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ball, R. H.   |  2455| 12/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ball, T. S.   |  3027|16/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ball, W.      | 50297|  2/7/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ball, W.      |241703| 11/1/18|17/1/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ball, W. T.   |  4821| 26/1/16|6/2/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Balloch, W. T.|  3219| 18/1/15|5/8/15,       |A./L./      |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ballsdon, H.  |241083|16/11/14|5/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Balmforth, C. |  2501| 11/9/14|7/10/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Balshaw, T. J.|242078|  5/5/17|20/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bamber, C.    | 88243| 8/11/17|12/2/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bamber, T.    |243838|13/10/16|30/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Bamber, T.    | 50718| 18/8/17|29/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Bandell, H.   |241547|  6/8/15|1/9/18,        |Rifleman.  |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action or     |            |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Banks, A. F.  |  2087| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Banks, E.     |202404|  1/2/18|--/--/19,     |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Banks, F. R.  |241686|  5/5/17|20/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Banks, G.     | 63660| 13/8/17|31/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Banner, J. H. |  2777| 7/11/14|2/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Banning, J.   |  2838| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bannister, J. |266779| 27/5/18|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barber, E. C. |  2902|10/11/14|7/3/15,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barclay, W.   |  3502| 31/5/15|17/5/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barford, V. E.|  2559| 22/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barker, H.    |243821|12/10/16|15/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barker, H. A. |  3177|--/12/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barker, J. W. |  2606| 29/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barker, R.    |240961| 9/11/14|29/9/18,      |C.S.M.      |D.C.M.
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barkley, B. G.|242450| 24/3/16|15/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barlow, F.    |243764|10/10/16|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 8th    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barlow, G.    |381296| 10/7/18|10/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barlow, W.    |405976| 16/1/18|17/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Barned, L.    |242249| 25/1/16|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barnes, F.    | 88246| 8/11/17|11/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barnes, G.    |  2286|  2/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barnes, H.    | 50712| 18/8/17|21/4/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barnes, P. B. |   597| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barnett, H.   |202356|  1/2/18|18/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barnett, J.   |  2943|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Barnham, W.   | 88596|  1/2/18|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baron, G.     | 56411| 13/8/17|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 8th    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baron, T.     |108815| 28/9/18|11/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barrett, A.   | 39113| 27/5/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barrett, H.   |300574| 8/11/17|10/12/18,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barrett, J. W.|243747| 9/10/16|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barrow, W. T. |  2699|27/10/14|3/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bartle, F. B. | 50711| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barton, A. C. |  2756| 5/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barton, E.    |267306| 27/5/18|22/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barton, G. A. |  3106|26/11/14|22/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barton, P.    |204169| 27/5/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barton, W.    |243765|10/10/16|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Barwise, W.   | 84587|  1/2/18|26/4/19,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Basnett, W. A.|242544| 29/5/16|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |prisoner of   |            |
   |              |      |        |war           |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baster, F. E. |241287|  9/4/15|28/11/17,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Batchelor, F. | 25603| 27/5/18|28/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Batchelor, W. | 51252|  2/7/18|12/11/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bate, R.      |241408|  3/7/15|22/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bateman, H.   | 53037| 24/2/18|12/9/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Batson, R.    |240057|23/10/14|11/2/19,      |C.Q.M.S.    |M. in D.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Batson, F. S. |  1447| 27/2/15|16/8/15,      |A./L./      |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Batty, J. H.  |  2195|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Batty, J. S.  |  2271|  1/9/14|16/9/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baxendale, J. |265903| 27/6/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |disembodied   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Baxter, R.    | 50721| 18/8/17|9/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bean, A. G.   |  3151| 8/12/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bear, G. A.   | 88118| 5/10/17|16/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beatham, J.   | 88540| 19/9/17|5/6/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beaumont, A.  |241079|14/11/14|3/6/18,       |C.Q.M.S.    |
   |L.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beaumont, H.  |242447| 24/3/16|6/9/17, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beausire, P.  |  2198|  1/9/14|5/11/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Becalick, C.  |  2828| 9/11/14|22/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beckwith, D.  |  1558|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beer, L.      |108757| 28/9/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beesley, A.   | 16286| 27/5/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beeston, E.   |  2295| 10/9/14|--/--/15,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Begley, J.    |241304| 20/4/15|13/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beisley, F. E.|243786| 6/10/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, A.      |  1459| 27/2/15|1/12/15,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, A.      |243784|10/10/16|30/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, C. T.   |242342|  7/3/16|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, D. H.   |242185| 21/1/16|3/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, G. H.   |  3237| 25/1/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, J. H.   |  2703|28/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, J. R.   |241052|12/11/14|6/8/17, sick  |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, P.      |  1309| 23/2/15|20/1/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, S.      |  3160|21/12/14|9/4/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, S. H.   |241305| 20/4/15|14/4/18, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bell, T.      |  2438| 15/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bellion, A. J.|240912| 6/11/14|18/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bellion, H.   |331457| 22/6/18|20/9/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bellion, H. G.|  2657|13/10/14|7/9/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bellis, B.    | 88244| 8/11/17|24/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bellringer,   |242318|  1/3/16|13/6/18, sick |Sergeant.   |
   |E. A.         |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bellwood, P.  |241048|12/11/14|6/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Benardo, M.   | 90717|  7/3/18|27/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bendle, E. J. |204269| 16/5/18|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bennett, A. T.|  3335| 19/4/15|10/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bennett, J.   | 90751|  7/3/18|22/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bennett, R. G.|  3471|  6/8/15|5/10/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Benson, J. A. |241286|  8/4/15|22/5/19,      |A./R.Q.M.S. |M.S.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Benson, J. B. |241062|12/11/14|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Benson, J.,   |  2572| 24/9/14|17/2/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Benson, W.    | 50710| 18/8/17|29/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bentham, J.   |  2740| 3/11/14|23/11/15,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bentley, C.   |  3139| 7/12/14|21/5/16,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bentley, E.   | 88106| 5/10/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted K.L.R. |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bentley, F.   |  2721|30/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bentley, T.   |242220| 22/1/16|17/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Benzie, J.    |243817|12/10/16|12/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beresford, P. |241095|16/11/14|10/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bernstein, J. |  3271| 18/2/15|16/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bernstein, J. | 51679|  1/2/18|7/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bernstein, R. | 16507| 28/2/18|3/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Berry, F. P.  |109001| 28/9/18|14/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Betham, H.    |265241|  8/7/17|20/7/17, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Beveridge, W. |242381| 18/3/16|26/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bewley, E. R. |  3141| 7/12/14|28/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bibby, A.     | 59521| 27/5/18|25/1/19,      |Sergeant.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bibby, T.     |242148| 20/1/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bickerton, A. |242190| 21/1/16|19/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Biggs, J.     |242448| 24/3/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bill, H.      |267864| 27/8/17|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Billington, W.|203988|  1/2/18|8/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bingham, P. R.|  2146| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Birch, H.     |200628|  8/7/17|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Birch, H.     |200700| 14/9/18|3/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Birch, F.     |  2183| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Birchall, H.  |  2966|12/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Birchall, S.  |406269| 16/1/18|16/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bird, A. A.   |  3046|17/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bird, W. H.   |  1866|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Birkett, G. R.|  2249|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Biss, G. A.   |235563| 14/4/18|20/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Bissell, T. J.|241395|  3/7/15|1/7/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Black, D. S.  |  2167| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Black, J. H.  | 59412|  1/2/18|11/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Black, T.     |241487|  6/8/15|3/8/17,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Black, W.     |241442|  6/8/15|5/3/19,†      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Blackburn, A. |  2836| 9/11/14|19/3/15, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackburn, C. |  1289| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackburn, F. |242398| 20/3/16|--/--/19,     |A./L./      |
   |G.            |      |        |transferred   |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackburn, G. |  2083| 31/8/14|25/9/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Blackburn, J. |235598| 12/7/18|4/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackburn, J. |241011|10/11/14|4/7/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackburn, W. |242378| 18/3/16|28/3/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |H.            |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackburn, --.|    10|--/--/14|31/3/15,      |Col./Sergt. |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackey, J. W.|  4692| 20/1/16|18/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackham, C.  |242257| 25/1/16|14/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blackley, H.  |201260|  1/2/18|19/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blain, R.     |  3739|  6/8/15|28/10/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Blakely, G.   |243684| 7/10/16|7/9/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blakemore, J. | 88315| 27/6/18|6/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |M.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blakey, J. W. |241121|23/11/14|11/7/17,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bland, A.     |  1423| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bleakley, G.  | 50713| 18/8/17|14/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blenkhorn, A. | 88503| 19/9/17|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blenkinsop, A.|202350|  1/2/18|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blount, C.    | 88226| 8/11/17|28/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blower, F. D. |  1646| 23/2/15|1/12/15,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blower, J. A. |  2922|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blundell, E.  |240913| 6/11/14|23/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blundell, G.  | 52336| 27/5/18|9/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blundell, J.  | 58587| 27/6/18|3/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blundell, J.  |  2947|11/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |W.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blyde, J.     |  2375| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Blythe, F. J. |  2548| 23/9/14|5/8/15,       |A./L./      |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boardman, B.  |266461|  8/7/17|8/10/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/9th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boardman, H.  | 50722| 18/8/17|17/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boardman, R.  | 14919| 13/8/17|5/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boast, J. H.  |243711| 9/10/16|26/2/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boddy, T.     |  3163|21/12/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boileau, R.   |242368| 15/3/16|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bolshaw, A.   |242149| 20/1/16|14/2/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bolton, E.    | 88144|11/10/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bolton, F. C. |  1380| 27/2/15|23/9/16,†     |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bolton, H. G. |  1173| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bolton, W.    |  2390| 10/9/14|5/8/15,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bond, D.      |  2583| 25/9/14|11/3/15,      |A./L./      |
   |              |      |        |commission    |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bond, G.      |241327|  3/7/15|30/8/17,      |Corporal.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bond, J.      |202171| 15/2/18|--/--/19,     |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bond, R.      |242353| 13/3/16|27/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Booth, J.     | 88532| 19/9/17|9/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Booth, W. H.  | 88279| 27/6/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bordessa, G.  | 17279| 27/5/18|30/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boschen, R. T.|240981|10/11/14|19/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bosomworth, E.|  1214|23/10/14|1/6/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bott, C. H.   |243730| 9/10/16|24/4/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bott, G. G. R.|  2391| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |A./L./      |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Botting, O.   |380347| 26/9/18|26/1/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bottom, J.    | 48613| 24/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bottrill, S.  |  2115| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |N.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boullin, R. G.|260230| 20/9/17|29/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boumphrey, N. |240869|22/10/14|22/8/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bourne, W. H. |  3310| 22/3/15|19/8/16,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Bowen, A.     |380792|  3/4/18|7/10/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowen, R.     |  6646|16/10/16|7/11/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bower, F. H.  |242552| 30/5/16|17/1/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowes, T.     | 50931| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowker, J. R. | 88093| 29/9/17|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowler, F.    |241102|17/11/14|9/7/18,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowman, H. R. |    14| 27/2/15|28/6/15,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowman, C.    |240692| 11/9/14|15/7/18,      |C.S.M.      |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowman, F. H. |242402| 20/3/16|4/9/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bowsher, A.   |242468|19/10/16|15/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boyd, G. S.   |  2739| 2/11/14|29/1/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Boyd, W.      | 57395| 27/5/18|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action or     |            |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boyd, W.      |242361| 15/3/16|1/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Boyd, W. A.   |241307| 22/4/15|22/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boydell, E.   |  2680|20/10/14|5/8/15,       |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boyden, W. H. | 50716| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boyland, J.   |201576|  1/2/18|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Boynton, H.   | 60992| 27/6/18|16/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bracegirdle,  |269404| 27/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradbury, H.  | 88541| 19/9/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradbury, W.  |300468|  6/6/18|24/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brade, H.     |242335|  2/3/16|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brading, C. F.| 26710| 27/6/18|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Bradley, B. V.|240801| 25/9/14|15/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradley, F.   | 27341|  1/2/18|28/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradley, G. H.|  2446| 14/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradley, H.   | 88185| 8/11/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradshaw, C.  |  2126| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradshaw, E.  |243723| 9/10/16|11/11/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradshaw, H.  | 88542| 19/9/17|14/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bradshaw, J.  | 50706| 18/8/17|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Braithwaite,  |202361|  1/2/18|28/3/19,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |H.            |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Braithwaite,  |  2144| 31/8/14|27/11/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |J. N.         |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brakell, G. V.|  1337|23/10/14|28/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bramwell, W.  |241133|24/11/14|19/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |M.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Branagan, R.  | 88247| 8/11/17|19/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brand, H.     |  1584| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brandon, P. T.|260181| 20/9/17|15/1/18,      |L./Sgt.     |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brebner, J.   | 50932| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Breese, T.    |  2315| 10/9/14|16/8/15,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Breeze, F. W. |  2650|10/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brennan, M.   |  8328|  7/3/18|14/3/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 4th    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brennan, P. C.|242523| 22/5/16|16/10/17,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brenton, R. A.|243796|11/10/16|22/9/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brereton, A.  |202391|  1/2/18|3/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bretherton, R.|242705| 11/1/18|17/1/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bretherwick,  |  2686|20/10/14|12/1/15,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brew, L. S.   |  2610| 26/9/14|8/5/16,       |A./C.S.M.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brewerton, R. |  3635|  6/8/15|23/9/16,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brice, H.     |240910| 5/11/14|3/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bricknell, J. |242363| 15/3/16|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bride, F.     | 12799| 13/8/17|7/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brides, T.    | 25947| 22/6/18|2/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bridge, A.    | 88543| 19/9/17|14/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brierley, A.  |203942|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brierley, H.  |406068| 16/1/18|11/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brierley, J.  |242267| 26/1/16|26/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brierley, T.  |203915|  1/2/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Briers, J.    |108947| 28/9/18|17/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Briggs, A. A. | 50709| 18/8/17|6/5/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Briggs, L.    |242210| 21/1/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brindle, W.   | 50720| 18/8/17|13/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Brindley, T.  |242214| 22/1/16|22/6/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |W.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brindley, W.  | 88245| 8/11/17|16/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Briscoe, W. J.|240112| 27/2/15|15/7/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Broadbent, F. | 95742| 17/4/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Broadbent, G. |  2161| 31/8/14|1/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Broadbent, G. |  3095|24/11/14|23/9/16,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brockless, H. | 88043| 28/9/17|4/5/18, sick  |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brodrick, H.  | 50714| 18/8/17|24/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bromilow, T.  |202310|  1/2/18|14/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brook, G.     |202185|  1/2/18|29/8/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brook, H.     | 36351| 27/5/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brooke, W.    |241271| 25/3/15|7/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brookhouse,   | 50708| 18/8/17|25/8/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |E. F.         |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brooks, G. C. |242199| 21/1/16|2/8/17, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brooks, R. H. | 50708| 18/8/17|26/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Broom, J.     |  2459| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Broster, W. C.|  2061| 31/8/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Browitt, J.   | 48667|  1/2/18|5/2/19,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, A.     |405920| 16/1/18|22/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, A. S.  |242344|  8/3/16|14/5/18, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, A.     |  2785| 7/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, E.     |240271| 23/2/15|3/2/19,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, E. H.  |200714|  1/2/18|18/10/18,     |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, F.     |243732| 9/10/16|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, F. J.  |241242| 16/2/15|1/2/19,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, G.     |  2430| 12/9/14|20/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, H. R.  |  2804| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, J.     | 88241| 8/11/17|22/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, J.     |243719| 9/10/16|30/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, J. F.  |  3120|30/11/14|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, R.     |241118|20/11/14|1/8/18,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 12th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, S. J.  |240518| 31/8/14|13/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, W.     | 26312| 27/6/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Brown, W. D.  | 50715| 18/8/17|18/12/17,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, W. E.  |  2545| 22/9/14|22/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brown, W. G.  |201403|  1/2/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brownhill, H. | 50717| 18/8/17|7/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brownhill, R. |308470|  8/7/17|10/2/19,      |L./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brownrigg, A. |  2558| 22/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |T.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brundrett, F. |235425|  1/2/18|15/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Brunner, E.   |  2416| 11/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |W. D.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bryning, A. C.|  1641|23/10/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bryson, T. W. |  2410| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Buck, S. G.   |  3707|  6/8/15|9/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Buck, R.      |  3350| 21/4/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Buckley, A.   |269633|10/10/17|18/2/19, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Buckley, W. S.|242345|  8/3/16|5/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bucknall, A.  |240632| 10/9/14|6/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |W.            |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Buffel, J. R. |242181| 21/1/16|13/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bullen, F. R. |  5871| 27/2/15|10/5/15,      |Sgt./Instr. |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bulmer, W.    |269339| 22/6/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burbage, --.  |  2413| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burch, G.     |  2778| 7/11/14|19/8/16,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burden, A.    |240863|20/10/14|24/2/19, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Burden, J. E. |241216| 19/1/15|28/10/17,     |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |missing,      |            |
   |              |      |        |assumed dead  |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burge, A.     |  2850| 9/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burgess, J.   | 52529|  1/2/18|18/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burgess, J.   |268051| 27/8/17|4/3/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burgess, R.   | 46628| 13/8/17|5/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burgess, S.   | 29668|  7/3/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burke, J.     |  3647|  6/8/15|28/10/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burke, J.     | 50707| 18/8/17|29/12/18,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burke, J. E.  |  2378| 10/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burke, W.     |266803| 27/8/17|21/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/7th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burke, W. H.  |241045|12/11/14|27/6/17,      |Corporal.   |
   |D.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burl, G.      |405914| 16/1/18|29/11/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burn, G. H.   |201419|  1/2/18|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burn, G. J.   |240775| 23/9/14|1/7/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burn, P. J.   |  3490|  3/7/15|22/11/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burns, J.     | 26214| 13/8/17|27/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burns, J. T.  |242696| 25/5/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burrell, L.   | 88544| 19/9/17|26/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Burrow, J.    |243809|12/10/16|2/5/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Burrows, A.   |243725| 9/10/16|22/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burstall, L.  |242164| 20/1/16|14/10/17,     |Corporal.   |
   |G.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burtinshaw,   |  2535| 22/9/14|5/8/15,       |A./L./      |
   |J. A.         |      |        |transferred   |Corpl.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burton, F.    |  6454| 6/10/16|12/11/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burton, G. B. |  1856|23/10/14|11/3/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission.   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burton, J.    | 53050| 13/8/17|14/10/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Burton, K. H. |  3365|  3/5/15|13/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bury, E. D.   | 88528| 19/9/17|31/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Busby, E. F.  | 31548| 27/6/18|27/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Butler, H. A. |  4979| 14/3/16|22/7/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Butler, N.    | 50847|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Butler, R. W. |  2132| 31/8/14|18/1/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Butler, W.    |242606|  2/4/18|19/4/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Butler, W. G. |  1508| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Butterfield,  |243692| 7/10/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |W.            |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Bygrove, C. E.|241553|  6/8/15|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Byng, W.      |243837|13/10/16|7/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Byrn, E.      |243827|13/10/16|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Caddy, W. J.  |  3293|  8/3/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cadman, B.    | 17562| 14/6/18|21/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cain, G. H.   |241570|  6/8/15|9/4/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cain, J.      |268035| 27/8/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cain, J. S.   |241561|  6/8/15|31/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cairns, J.    | 51116| 27/5/18|22/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cairns, --.   |  2159| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Caldecott, A. |  1568|23/10/14|2/3/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Calderley, J. | 50835| 18/8/17|14/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |A.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Caldwell, J.  | 47218|  1/2/18|22/4/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Callaghan, D. |  2837| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Calvey, G.    |267921| 27/8/17|10/11/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Calvey, T.    |  1162| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Calvey, W. R. |  1385| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cama, V.      |  2692|23/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Campbell, A.  |330920| 28/9/18|31/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 9th    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Campbell, D.  |  2674|17/10/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Campbell, J.  | 50859|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Campbell, V.  |241172|28/12/14|12/7/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Campey, --.   |  2474| 10/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Candy, G.     | 50306| 27/5/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Canham, W.    | 50607| 24/2/18|5/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cann, J.      | 88545| 19/9/17|27/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cannon, R.    | 22340| 22/6/18|29/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cantrell, H.  |  2600| 28/9/14|--/--/15,     |A./Sergt.   |
   |G.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cardwell, R.  |306142| 27/8/17|22/11/17,     |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carefull, H.  |  1932|23/10/14|5/6/17,       |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carnegie, C.  | 17559| 27/6/18|10/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carney, E.    |241495|  6/8/15|2/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Carney, J. W. | 72494|  2/7/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carr, J. H.   |  2882|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carr, W. H.   | 50727| 18/8/17|28/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carr, W. J.   |243860|16/10/16|26/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carradus, A.  |243818|12/10/16|9/2/19,       |Rifleman    |M. in D.
   |D.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carrick, J.   |243701| 9/10/16|3/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |G. W.         |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carroll, A. G.|  3175|--/12/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carter, E. C. |242351|  9/3/16|11/4/18, sick |L./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carter, F. H. |  3661|  6/8/15|15/11/16,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carter, H.    |243789|10/10/16|21/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carter, J. H. |243795|11/10/16|7/3/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carter, S.    |241643|  8/7/17|12/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carter, W.    |110538|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cartledge, G. | 88534| 19/9/17|27/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cartmell, G.  |305655| 27/8/17|21/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carver, H.    | 88116| 5/10/17|26/12/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Carvey, L. G. | 50726| 18/8/17|25/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Case, W.      |202924| 27/5/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cass, E.      | 88546| 19/9/17|26/2/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cassidy, W. H.|241153| 3/12/14|4/12/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cassofski, J. |203268|  1/2/18|12/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Casson, J.    |  5020| 18/3/16|31/1/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Casson, T. L. |243830|13/10/16|25/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |B.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Castle, W.    | 88417|  2/7/18|22/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cathels, H.   |242175| 20/1/16|11/3/18, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Catherall, R. |  3278| 22/2/15|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cathrell, T.  |241434|  6/8/15|5/8/17,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Catterall, W. | 50728| 18/8/17|30/10/17, died|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cazes, H.     |  2550| 23/9/14|3/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cederberg, E. |  2859|10/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chadwick, A.  |243726| 9/10/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chadwick, G.  | 88179| 8/11/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chadwick, H.  | 40133| 13/8/17|13/6/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chadwick, H.  | 40366| 13/8/17|25/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chadwick, W.  |243841|13/10/16|23/4/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |H.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chambers, J.  |330677| 27/5/18|20/1/19,      |L./Sergt.   |M.M.
   |W.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chant, F.     | 88549| 19/9/17|24/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chappell, C.  |  2238|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Charles, G. T.|  2896|10/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Charlton, T.  |  2298| 10/9/14|27/1/17,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |H.            |      |        |released for  |            |
   |              |      |        |munitions     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Charters, J.  |242336|  2/3/16|30/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Checkland, F. |  3042|17/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cheney, J.    | 52063| 22/6/18|14/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chevaux, A. E.|242174| 20/1/16|8/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Child, W. J.  | 43780| 30/5/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chisholm, G.  |241044|12/11/14|9/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |O.            |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Chisholm, R.  |241348|  3/7/15|11/1/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Christall, J. |200067| 13/3/18|18/5/18, sick |Sergeant.   |
   |R.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Christian, J. |241496|  6/8/15|9/10/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Christian, J. |202313| 11/3/18|26/1/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |A.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Christian, P. |241552|  6/8/15|30/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Church, A. E. |241370|  3/7/15|29/3/19,      |A./Sergt.   |M. in D.
   |V.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clague, A. T. |  2377| 10/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clague, H.    |108745| 28/9/18|25/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clague, W. H. |203304|  6/6/18|28/3/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clampitt, A.  |267285| 27/5/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clancey, J. S.|242377| 18/3/16|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clare, J.     | 52880| 14/6/18|6/9/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, A.     | 57637| 30/5/18|11/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, A. G.  |235287| 27/5/18|18/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, E.     |  4882| 25/2/16|2/12/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, F.     |  3210| 13/1/15|6/9/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Clark, J.     |243777|10/10/16|16/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, N.     | 72444| 13/8/17|5/6/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, R.     |  3041|17/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, T.     |241572|  6/8/15|26/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, T. C.  |243819|12/10/16|5/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clark, W. E.  |240482|23/10/14|8/3/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, A. E. |265359|  8/7/17|1/8/18,† sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, A. H. |  2820| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, A. J. |  2021|23/10/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, B.    | 50731| 18/8/17|14/2/19,      |Sergeant    |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, E.    |  2470| 15/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Clarke, F.    | 12892| 14/9/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, F.    | 88547| 19/9/17|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, G. W. | 50736| 18/8/17|--/--/19,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, J. A. |243713| 9/10/16|1/9/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, J. W. |108833| 28/9/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, R.    | 88129| 27/6/18|30/8/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarke, T. A. |  2157| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clarkson, J.  |  2203|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |A.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clausen, H. J.|  3236| 25/1/15|23/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clawley, C.   |242556|19/10/16|11/4/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clawson, A.   |242206| 21/1/16|23/3/19, sick |L./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clayton, A. H.|  1291| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clayton, J. E.|241384|  3/7/15|4/9/17,       |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cleasby, T. W.|242460| 25/3/16|24/11/17, sick|L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cleaver, E.   |  3073|20/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clegg, H.     |241546|  6/8/15|9/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clegg, J. J.  |243722| 9/10/16|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clemenson, J. |380328| 10/7/18|26/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 12th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clements, G.  |200717|  1/2/18|21/1/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clements, W.  | 88969|17/12/17|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cliffe, A. H. |  3049|17/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clift, J.     |200508|  1/2/18|27/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clifton, F.   | 88535| 19/9/17|5/1/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clinch, E.    |  2085| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clough, F.    | 50897| 14/9/18|17/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clough, H.    |110854|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clough, J.    | 50918| 14/9/18|25/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clough, J.    | 88180| 8/11/17|1/11/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |injured       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clough, S.    | 88143|11/10/17|14/11/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clowes, E.    |  3128| 1/12/14|16/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Clydesdale, C.|240970| 9/11/14|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coates, J. J. |269313| 27/8/17|2/12/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cobbledick,   | 12316| 14/9/18|3/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J. D.         |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cocker, A.    | 29422| 6/11/18|7/2/19, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cocker, F.    | 50730| 18/8/17|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cockerill, J. |241494|  6/8/15|5/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cockersol, W. |201346|  1/2/18|11/8/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cody, E.      | 64812| 13/8/17|4/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coggin, G.    | 49223| 27/6/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coghill, A.   |110848|27/11/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cohen, J.     |240790| 22/9/14|10/2/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coker, G. A.  | 88609|  1/2/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Colclough, J. | 40371| 13/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coleman, G. M.|240249|23/10/14|17/6/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coleman, J. F.| 50723| 18/8/17|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coles, C.     | 50733| 18/8/17|18/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coley, G. H.  | 88611|  1/2/18|26/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Colley, H.    | 95763| 17/4/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Collier, H.   | 19199| 13/8/17|19/11/17, sick|Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Colligan, R.  |  1761|23/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Collin, K. G. |  1744| 27/2/15|1/4/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Collins, F. G.|242559|  2/6/16|12/10/17,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Collins, W.   | 12301| 27/6/18|10/12/18,     |A./Sergt    |M.M.
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Collins, --   |  2417| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Collison, O.  |240842| 25/9/14|31/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Collister, T. |202413|  1/2/18|23/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Colquhoun, A. |  2094| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |S.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Commons, P.   |242527| 22/5/16|30/4/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |J. E.         |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Connerton, H. | 88231| 8/11/17|14/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/7th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Connolly, F.  |241383|  3/7/15|9/11/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Connor, J. F. | 16645| 27/5/18|21/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Conway, B.    |  5224| 19/5/16|18/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Conway, C.    |  2387| 10/9/14|16/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cook, J.      |242816| 25/6/18|29/8/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cook, J. J. G.| 50920|  2/7/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cook, W.      |242565|  6/6/16|12/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cook, G. W.   |  2090| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooke, H.     |  1421| 27/4/15|26/7/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Cooke, J. A.  |235270|  6/6/18|21/10/18,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooke, S.     |235428| 10/3/18|8/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cookson, T. M.|   172| 23/2/15|28/6/15,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coope, R.     | 85753|  7/3/18|15/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, A.    |241501|  6/8/15|30/8/17,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, A. E. |242256| 25/1/16|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, E.    | 88551| 19/9/17|12/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, E.    |110504|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, F.    | 88550| 19/9/17|8/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, J.    |240481|  5/5/17|20/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Cooper, J.    |381131| 27/5/18|30/8/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, R. E. | 88552| 19/9/17|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, T. E. |  2944|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, W.    |  1917|23/10/14|1/6/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cooper, W.    | 50729| 18/8/17|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Copland, W. O.|241123|23/11/14|18/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corcoran, J.  |202321|  1/2/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cordon, W. J. |300211| 30/5/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cordon, R.    |  2228|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corfe, A.     |  2456| 12/9/14|14/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cork, J.      | 17300|  7/3/18|23/1/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corkill, N. L.|241259| 11/3/15|24/10/18,     |Sergeant    |M.M.,
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |M.S.M.
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corkill, W. A.|  2528| 19/9/14|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corkish, R. N.|110535|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corlett, A. G.| 50724| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corlett, J. A.|241321|  3/7/15|21/8/17,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corlett, W.   |108829| 28/9/18|3/11/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cormack, F. J.|     9|--/--/14|26/6/15,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cornes, W.    |  2399| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cornish, H. R.|  5227| 23/5/16|16/6/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cornock, J. N.| 50735| 18/8/17|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cornwell, W.  | 88553| 19/9/17|22/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corran, R. D. |  2289|  2/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corrigall, J. |  2182| 31/8/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corrigall, J. |  2527| 10/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corrigan, J.  |204017|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corrin, C.    |242235| 22/1/16|29/8/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Corry, T. W.  |243814|12/10/16|14/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Costello, R.  |242225| 22/1/16|15/10/18, sick|Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Costello, T.  | 17113| 14/6/18|15/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cottam, J.    |243864|17/10/16|15/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cottle, T.    |  1960|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cotton, C.    |  2405| 11/9/14|21/9/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cottrell, H.  |240934| 9/11/14|7/7/18,† sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cottrell, H.  |381100|  1/2/18|23/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |A.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coulthard, A. | 39035| 27/6/18|2/10/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Courtney, J.  |110740|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coury, G. G.  |  2482| 12/9/14|24/4/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coury, --.    |  2662|13/10/14|9/11/14,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Cousins, G. H.|240779| 23/9/14|21/5/18,      |A./R.Q.M.S. |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowan, H.     |  2066| 31/8/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Coward, H.    | 50933| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowdroy, E.   |235480|  1/2/18|28/4/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |G. J. B.      |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowell, A.    | 88194| 8/11/17|8/12/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowie, A. B.  |241115|19/11/14|15/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowley, F. H. |  3617|  6/8/15|27/3/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowley, G.    |202490| 14/3/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowley, T.    |241089|16/11/14|29/11/17,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowman, F. G. |  2908|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cowpe, F.     | 88208| 8/11/17|14/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cox, A.       |  2374| 10/9/14|28/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |civil         |            |
   |              |      |        |employment    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cox, A. H.    |  2386| 10/9/14|20/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cox, H. B.    |  2073| 31/8/14|20/2/15,       |Rifleman.  |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cox, J.       |  8482|  1/2/18|12/1/19, sick |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cox, L. H.    |  1050| 23/2/15|29/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cox, R. F.    |  2815| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crabb, A. F.  | 53471| 19/9/17|28/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cracknell, A. | 88612|  1/2/18|27/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |F.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crafter, H.   |  2521| 18/9/14|12/1/15,      |A./Col./    |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |Sgt.        |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Craig, J.     |242456| 25/3/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Craig, T. R.  |  2934|11/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Craine, J.    | 48878|  1/2/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Craine, W.    |242147| 20/1/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crane, C.     |  3729|  6/8/15|6/9/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crank, T. S.  |110543|27/11/18|23/12/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crawford, J.  |242299| 17/2/16|24/5/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crean, --.    |  2278|  2/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cregeen, A. H.|241190|  8/1/15|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cribb, J.     |  3240| 29/1/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crippin, W.   |  2806| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crisp, J.     |242162| 20/1/16|21/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crocker, L. N.|  2089| 31/8/14|20/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crone, A. A.  |   956| 27/2/15|9/3/15,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crockford, W. | 88195| 8/11/17|14/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crompton, T.  |306590| 30/5/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |P.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crook, J.     | 58582|  7/3/18|11/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crook, W.     | 40568| 13/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crookall, J.  |203903|  1/2/18|18/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cropper, R.   |202710|  8/7/17|5/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crosby, F. C. |268053| 27/8/17|11/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crosby, H. E. |  2705|28/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crosby, J. C. |  3107|26/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crosby, R. S. | 16509| 30/5/18|17/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cross, C.     |  2388| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cross, C.     |  3035|16/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cross, G. R.  |268041| 27/8/17|14/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cross, J. A.  | 50889|  2/7/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cross, P.     |  3682|  6/8/15|21/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crouchley, J. |  2483| 16/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crow, H.      | 57781|  6/6/18|10/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crowley, W. J.| 50904|  1/2/18|13/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Croxton, D. S.|  2591| 1/10/14|9/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crugman, S.   |242306| 25/2/16|3/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cruise, W. J. | 49348| 13/9/18|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Crumbie, J.   | 34505| 13/8/17|2/12/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cuddy, F.     | 50734| --/8/17|11/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cuddy, --.    |  2428| 11/9/14|20/10/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Culcannon, H. | 50725| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Cullen, F.    | 88230| 8/11/17|11/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cummings, H.  |  3277| 22/2/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cummins, F.   |240786| 22/9/14|4/9/17,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cummins, R.   |242414| 21/3/16|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cunane, J. T. |243687| 7/10/16|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cunliffe, G.  |  2961|12/11/14|1/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cunningham, J.|108949| 28/9/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cunningham,   | 59055|  1/2/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |J. J.         |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cunnington, J.|202706|  8/7/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Curnock, C.   | 91882| 27/6/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Curran, F.    | 88113| 5/10/17|16/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Curran, R.    |  2898|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Currie, J.    |  2441| 15/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Currie, T.    |  2202|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cursi, F.     |241021|11/11/14|7/2/19,†      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Curtis, W. H. |  3260| 11/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Curwen, C. W. |241539|  6/8/15|7/2/19,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Curwen, R.    |  2063| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Curwen, W. H. |  2937|11/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cuthbert, G.  |  3147| 7/12/14|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cuthbert, R.  |240879|28/10/14|9/10/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cuthbertson,  |241040|11/11/14|15/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W. A.         |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Cutts, E.     | 50732| 18/8/17|29/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dagnall, W. J.|242201| 21/1/16|19/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dale, T.      | 22971| 13/8/17|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 8th    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Daley, M.     | 12933| 14/9/18|15/10/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Daley, W. E.  |  2652|12/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Dalrymple, J. | 57372|  6/6/18|17/9/18, died |Sergeant    |M.M.
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dalrymple, W. |242168| 20/1/16|12/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Daniels, A.   | 57918|  1/2/18|1/8/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 12th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Daniels, F. C.|  3209| 12/1/15|5/8/15,       |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Daniels, G. L.|240844|10/10/14|30/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Danily, J.    |  2166| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Darcy, H.     |241376|  3/7/15|12/8/18,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |prisoner of   |            |
   |              |      |        |war           |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Darcy, J.     |204009|  1/2/18|8/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davey, A. E.  |  2109| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davey, H.     |240939| 9/11/14|13/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davey, S. F.  |242561| 31/5/16|6/8/17,       |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Davidson, A.  |242446| 24/3/16|29/4/17,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |E.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davidson, W.  |  2084| 31/8/14|13/11/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |H. H.         |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davie, W. L.  |  1538| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, A.    |  3026|16/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, A.    | 20183| 24/2/18|5/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, B.    |241355|  3/7/15|12/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies C. H.  |  2383| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, E. R. |242297| 17/2/16|27/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Davies, F.    |242195| 21/1/16|4/9/18, died  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, F. A. |  2092| 31/8/14|20/1/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, G.    |  2956|12/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, G. A. | 50743| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, G. J. |  2086| 31/8/14|11/7/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, G. N. |381003|21/11/17|29/8/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, H.    |241421|  8/7/17|19/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, H.    | 50740| 18/8/17|20/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, H. L. |  2125| 31/8/14|24/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Davies, H. S. |240688| 10/9/14|30/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, J.    |  2651|12/10/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, J.    |  2914|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, J.    | 57783| 27/6/18|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, J.    |240794| 24/9/14|7/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, J. E. |108951| 28/9/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, J. H. |  1310| 23/2/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, J. P. |242150| 20/1/16|17/1/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, N.    |  2138| 31/8/14|--/--/--15,   |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, R.    | 51900| 22/6/18|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, R. E. |  2057| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, T.    | 22360| 24/2/18|29/5/18, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, T.    | 88554| 19/9/17|7/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, T. G. |242437| 23/3/16|28/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, T. J. |241136|26/11/14|10/2/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, T. J. |242397| 20/3/16|11/5/18, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, W.    |200695|  1/2/18|3/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, W. E. |  3145| 7/12/14|4/10/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, W. H. |  2642| 9/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davies, W. S. |  2104| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davis, F.     | 88676|  1/2/18|15/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davis, H.     | 53095| 30/5/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Davis, H.     |201183|  1/2/18|9/1/19, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dawes, A. W.  | 53099| 30/5/18|20/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dawson, A. B. | 40149|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dawson, E.    |243657| 6/10/16|18/7/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dawson, F.    |242430| 22/3/16|5/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dawson, G.    | 22361| 13/8/17|1/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dawson, J.    |  2621| 5/10/14|23/8/15,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dawson, W. J. |241202| 13/1/15|17/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Day, J. D.    |243770|10/10/16|25/12/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Deacon, G.    |241752|  1/2/18|12/9/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Deakin, W.    |  9087| 27/6/18|7/1/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dean, C. H.   | 50742| 18/8/17|17/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dean, E.      | 88555| 19/9/17|14/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dean, E. V.   |  2869|10/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dearing, P.   |  2833| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dean, H. E.   |  2928|11/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dean, L.      |  3031|16/11/14|9/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Deane, E. N.  |  1487|23/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Deans, E. D.  |242186| 21/1/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Deans, R. H.  |243876| 28/1/17|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dearden, H.   |  6441| 6/10/16|7/1/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |De Courcy, H. |  2946|11/11/14|28/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |De Courcy, H. |  2242|  1/9/14|29/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dee, A.       |   225| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Delan, V. S.  |  1975|23/10/14|28/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Delaney, T. B.|243815|12/10/16|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dempsey, T. E.|  2924|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Denholme, E.  |235429| 25/2/18|14/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |F.            |      |        |posted 1/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dennett, F. G.|  2114| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dennett, W.   |  5093| 25/3/16|15/7/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged.   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dennison, J.  | 72489| 13/8/17|26/1/19,†     |L./Corpl.   |M.M.
   |R.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Depattie, W.  | 30310| 13/8/17|9/6/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Derbyshire,   | 22670| 27/6/18|21/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |T. S.         |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Devereux, T.  |242166| 20/1/16|28/9/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Devoy, J.     | 13036| 27/6/18|1/9/18,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dewar, A.     |  3443|  6/8/15|23/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dewett, F.    | 50741| 18/8/17|26/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dexter, R. H. |  2515| 15/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Deyes, T. G.  |241176|31/12/14|2/3/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dick, J.      |  3043|17/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dick, --      |  2385| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dickenson, C. | 57791| 30/5/18|1/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |V.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dickenson, E. |202868| 27/5/18|3/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dickenson, H. | 51757| 30/5/18|14/2/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dickenson, J. |  6503| 9/10/16|2/2/17, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Diggle, J. H. |  2510| 17/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Disley, H.    |242571|  8/6/16|11/2/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ditchfield,   |  2993|12/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |C. P.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, A.     |  2299| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, C. L.  |  2156| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, G.     |265346|  8/7/17|8/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, G. F.  |  1290| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, G. H.  |241157| 5/12/14|21/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |K.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, H.     |  2900|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, H. S.  |  2382| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, R.     | 72477| 13/8/17|28/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, T.     |242156| 20/1/16|27/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dixon, R. D.  |  2731| 2/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dobbie, T.    |  2505| 12/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dobson, C.    | 35476| 22/6/18|22/5/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dobson, J. G. |  2858|10/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dodd, E.      |242387| 18/3/16|21/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dodd, H. E.   |  3024|16/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dodd, H. S.   | 22673| 30/5/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dodd, R.      |241491|  6/8/15|1/9/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/7th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dodd, T. S.   |  5250| 29/5/16|18/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dodd, W. A.   |  3084|23/11/14|17/12/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dolby, C. N.  |  2280|  1/9/14|13/10/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doleman, G. S |241195| 11/1/15|25/5/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |(accid.)      |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Donaldson, T. |300573| 8/11/17|24/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Donkin, V.    |241403|  3/7/15|7/3/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doodson, G.   |242275| 28/1/16|3/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doonan, T.    |300240|  6/6/18|6/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dosser, --    |  2414| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dossett, D.   | 50745| 18/8/17|29/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Douglas, W.   |  2475| 11/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doughty, G. C.|202349|  1/2/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dow, H. V.    |242600|  8/7/16|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doward, S.    |  2757| 5/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dowd, F.      | 50738| 18/8/17|30/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dowell, S.    |  3341| 19/4/15|29/4/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dowling, J.   |204069|  1/2/18|25/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Downer, A. C. | 51384| 27/5/18|30/1/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Downes, F.    |243727| 9/10/16|4/5/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Downey, J.    | 16964|  6/6/18|19/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Downey, T. J. |202251|  8/7/17|5/3/19,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Downing, W.   |242145|  5/5/17|20/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dowsett, F. H.|242522| 17/5/16|15/7/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dowson, F. J. |243862|16/10/16|15/9/17,† sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doyle, H. P.  |  2596| 2/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doyle, J.     | 88556| 19/9/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doyle, J. S.  |  2679|19/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Doyle, S. P.  |  1396| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dransfield, J.|241061|13/11/14|28/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Draper, J.    | 88242| 8/11/17|5/5/18, sick  |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Draper, R. E. |241453| 14/4/17|30/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Draycott, J.  |  2234|  1/9/14|7/1/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |N.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Drew, W. R.   |242558|19/10/16|24/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Drewitt, E. C.|242417| 21/3/16|30/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Drinkwater,   | 50744| 18/8/17|14/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H. O.         |      |        |posted 1/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dron, G. M.   |242405| 20/3/16|31/8/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Druce, P. C.  | 88615|  1/2/18|16/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Drury, J.     |331939| 27/8/17|11/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Drury, J. W.  |266664| 22/6/18|7/2/19,       |Corporal.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dubois, T. B. |  2012| 23/2/15|6/3/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ducker, W.    | 22061| 22/6/18|14/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Duckett, --   |  2170| 31/8/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Duddy, J. M.  |  8816| 27/6/18|21/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dudson, J. A. |240714| 15/9/14|12/9/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Duerden, E. F.|241284|  6/4/15|17/8/17,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Duffell, A. W.| 53094| 30/5/18|20/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Duffy, C.     |  1520|23/10/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dugdale, W. F.| 50739| 18/8/17|31/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunbar, A. J. |   990| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunbar, J.    | 57511| 30/5/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Duncan, J.    |  3671|  6/8/15|11/9/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunkerley, H. | 52577| 30/5/18|17/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunn, A. H.   |  4828| 27/1/16|5/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunn, J.      |  3015|14/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Dunn, S.      |  4992| 16/3/16|10/2/17, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunn, W.      |243752|10/10/16|2/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunning, T.   |  2133| 31/8/14|7/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dunwell, G.   |  2216|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Durham, T.    | 50737| 18/8/17|15/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Durrance, S.  |  1234| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W. W.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dutton, G.    |241313|  3/7/15|30/9/17, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dutton, H.    | 88256|17/12/17|15/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dutton, T.    | 95705| 17/4/18|6/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dutton, --    |  2661|13/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dwyer, E. J.  |  3324|  6/4/15|20/1/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Dyson, W. H.  |266722|  8/7/17|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Earle, C. H.  |241393|  3/7/15|28/12/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Earle, J.     |  2178| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Earle, W.     |  1541|23/10/14|23/9/16,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eastman, R. H.|  1851|23/10/14|28/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Eastwood, H.  |243685| 7/10/16|3/8/17, died  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eastwood, R.  |  2145| 31/8/14|31/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eaton, R.     |240693| 11/9/14|22/2/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ebbels, E.    |241538|  6/8/15|9/9/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/9th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Eccles, J.    |  6437| 6/10/16|28/10/16, died|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Eccles, R.    |241510|  6/8/15|8/6/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eccles, W.    | 50747| 18/8/17|22/4/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eccleston, H. |202318|  1/2/18|15/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eccleston, R. |  2102| 31/8/14|27/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |D.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eckett, H. S. |241484|  6/8/15|27/2/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eckersall, E. | 88150| 4/10/17|26/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edgar, J.     |243778| 9/10/16|30/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Egerton, N.   |243761|10/10/16|30/4/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edge, T. H.   |240213|23/10/14|15/7/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Edgeley, S.   | 88874|  2/7/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edinborough,  | 58568| 30/5/18|25/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Edmonds, J. P.| 47460| 5/10/17|1/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edmondson, A. |242423| 21/3/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edmondson, C. |300572| 8/11/17|17/4/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, A.   | 88102| 29/9/17|10/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, A. M.|  2775| 6/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, E. S.|  3068|19/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Edwards, F.   |242524| 23/5/16|2/11/17, died |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, J.   |241092|16/11/14|11/8/17,†     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, J.   |241489|  6/8/15|30/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, P.   |241351|  6/8/15|5/3/19,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, R.   | 31568| 27/5/18|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |prisoner of   |            |
   |              |      |        |war           |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, S.   | 88110| 5/10/17|7/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Edwards, V. S.|240854|14/10/14|29/3/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Egerton, A.   |241152| 2/12/14|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eglin, T.     |200727|  1/2/18|19/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eilbeck, C. F.|  2485| 16/9/14|20/5/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elder, W.     | 92021|  7/3/18|12/1/19,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eldridge, E.  |  2300| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |J.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Eley, J.      |243769| 9/10/16|17/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elias, C. V.  |242906| 21/9/14|6/3/18,† sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elleray, F. R.|  3156|11/12/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellicott, A.  |242365| 15/3/16|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |S.            |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elliott, R.   |241571|  6/8/15|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elliott, J.   |  2529| 19/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellis, C. S.  |241168|21/12/14|17/6/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Ellis, F. G.  | 27184| 27/5/18|21/10/18,     |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellis, J.     | 50746| 18/8/17|17/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellis, R.     |235552| 14/3/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellis, T. E.  |  2123| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellison, A.   | 15762| 27/6/18|11/2/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Ellison, J.   | 53248| 24/8/17|25/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellison, J.   |202807| 30/5/18|30/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ellwand, R. H.|200439|  8/7/17|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elms, S.      | 47387| 30/5/18|25/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elsworth, F.  |240189| 27/2/15|16/5/17,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |J.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elsworth, F.  |  2758| 5/11/14|26/6/15,      |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |L.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elsworth, W.  |  2991|12/11/14|23/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Elvin, T. E.  |  3238| 26/1/15|27/3/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Emmett, A.    |240708| 11/9/14|3/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Entwistle, W. |108729| 28/9/18|17/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Epstein, J.   |  2231|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ervine, W.    |202717| 27/5/18|28/3/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Essery, J. H. |  2128| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Etheridge, E. | 50934| 18/8/17|30/1/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, C. L.  |201949|  1/3/18|23/4/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, D. S.  |242183| 21/1/16|30/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, E. H.  |  2784| 7/11/14|20/11/15,     |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, F. A.  |  3206| 11/1/15|9/1/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, F. M.  |  2554| 23/9/14|28/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, F. W.  |240803| 26/9/14|31/1/18, sick |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, H.     |  3619|  6/8/15|7/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, H.     | 50748| 18/8/17|23/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, J. A.  | 39217|  1/2/18|29/9/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, J. G.  |241316|  3/7/15|2/11/17,      |L./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, J. H.  | 17769| 27/6/18|24/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Evans, J. H.  |306190| 16/4/18|20/10/18, died|Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Evans, T.     | 88050| 28/9/17|10/9/18, died |L./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, R. E.  |242540| 29/5/16|6/7/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, T.     |241155| 7/12/14|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, T. F.  |240684| 10/9/14|3/3/19,       |Col./Sergt. |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, W.     |242560|  3/6/16|12/9/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, W.     |331315| 28/9/18|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, W. D.  |  2782| 7/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evans, W.     |  2449| 14/9/14|28/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Evening, H.   | 94899|  2/4/18|28/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ewan, W. M.   |240897| 2/11/14|5/8/17,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ewen, W.      | 50935| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Exton, F. A.  |240956| 9/11/14|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fagan, J.     | 30351|  7/3/18|3/2/19,       |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fairbairn, D. | 22373| 27/5/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fairbridge,   |  3263| 15/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |C. M. F.      |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fairclough, H.| 16450| 30/5/18|3/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fairclough, H.| 38277| 14/6/18|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Fairclough, R.| 50751| 18/8/17|29/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fairclough, R.|204079|  1/2/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fairclough, W.|  2220|  1/9/14|15/12/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fairhurst, J. |  3181|  4/1/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |D.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fallows, H. W.|  2760| 6/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Falls, W. W.  |  2873|10/11/14|16/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fargher, J. E.|269787|  3/8/17|26/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farmer, J. B. |  2667|15/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farmer, W.    | 31649| 14/6/18|3/1/19,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Farmeroy, G.  | 53467| 28/9/17|18/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farnham, H. C.|  2768| 6/11/14|5/8/15,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farquhar, J.  | 57352|  2/7/18|7/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farragher, D. |240783| 23/9/14|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farrant, T.   | 72561| 13/8/17|14/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |E. J.         |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farrell, J.   | 86649| 25/4/18|26/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farrell, P.   |  2646|10/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farrell, W. G.|  2139| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farrington, R.| 48645| 24/8/17|12/2/19,      |A./C.Q.M.S. |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Farrington, T.| 84866|  1/2/18|11/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fawcett, J. H.|  2118| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fawkes, T.    |  3717|  6/8/15|9/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fazakerley,   |  2218|  1/9/14|18/5/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H. D.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fazakerley,   |  5032| 20/3/16|22/7/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J. P.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fearon, T.    |  3028|16/11/14|1/5/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fell, W. R.   |  2134| 31/8/14|24/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fellows, J. A.| 22074| 22/6/18|5/10/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Felstead, A.  |242343|  7/3/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Felton, H.    | 90721|  7/3/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fenner, F. J. |241175|--/12/14|8/3/19,       |C.Q.M.S.    |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fenton, H. M. |243848|16/10/16|20/9/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fenton, R.    | 88235| 8/11/17|2/6/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferguson, C.  |  2189|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferguson, C.  |  2802| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferguson, M.  |  2317| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferguson, P.  |  2864|10/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferguson, S.  |242337|  3/3/16|16/10/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferguson, T.  |241132|24/11/14|17/6/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferley, J. E. | 64822| 24/8/17|13/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferrick, J.   | 24729| 27/6/18|29/3/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ferro, H. F.  |241229|  8/2/15|5/11/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ffoulkes, J.  | 50936| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Filkin, G.    | 72517| 13/8/17|16/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Findley, A.   |242157| 20/1/16|13/12/17, sick|L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Findlow, T. G.|  2381| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fineberg, M.  |  3340| 15/4/15|18/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Finigan, A. L.|  2519| 18/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Finney, A. H. |  3390|  3/7/15|25/2/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Firth, F.     | 88100| 29/9/17|--/4/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Firth, J.     |   153|--/--/15|26/6/15,      |A./C.Q.M.S. |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fisher, B.    | 59288| 24/8/17|2/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fisher, G. L. |  2190|  1/9/14|23/2/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fisher, M.    |  1314| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fisher, R. H. |  2121| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fisher, W. H. | 94900|  2/4/18|23/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fitzgerald, J.| 88625|  1/2/18|24/3/20,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fitzpatrick,  |241568|  6/8/15|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |P.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fitzsimons, J.|  3290|  5/3/15|15/2/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |physically    |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Flahety, --   | 94905|  2/4/18|4/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Flannery, J.  |201319|  1/2/18|27/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fleming, R. G.|  1612| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fletcher, G.  |  2578| 25/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fletcher, H.  |242373| 16/3/16|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Fletcher, R.  | 88209| 8/11/17|17/5/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fletcher, W.  |110516|27/11/18|21/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fletcher, W.  | 16812| 27/5/18|10/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |T.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Flynn, F.     |  2004|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Flitcroft, R. |307890|  8/7/17|7/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Flood, J. L.  |   164| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foden, H. H.  |  2201|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foggett, W.   |242240| 22/1/16|23/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Foley, T.     |242383| 18/3/16|21/6/18, died |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fontenay, A.  |  2282|  2/9/14|27/12/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forber, W. T. |  2440| 15/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ford, G. W.   | 16452| 30/5/18|11/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ford J. E.    |266314| 27/8/17|22/5/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ford, L.      |242233| 22/1/16|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Ford, S. T.   | 88530| 19/9/17|30/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ford, W. F.   |  2598| 26/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forfar, G.    |242193| 21/1/16|21/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forrester, T. |200782|  5/4/18|22/6/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forryan, A. F.| 88056| 27/5/18|20/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forshaw, C.   |201048|  1/2/18|31/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forshaw, H.   |243737| 9/10/16|26/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forster, A.   |  2597| 2/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forster, F.   | 57861| 30/5/18|1/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forster, S.   |242401| 20/3/16|2/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Forster, S.   | 94904|  2/4/18|13/11/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fortune, J.   |241124|23/11/14|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fosbrooke, E. |  1640|23/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |L.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foster, A. E. |203262| 23/9/17|27/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foster, D.    |241105|17/11/14|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Foster, J.    |243798|11/10/16|9/4/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foster, J.    | 64858| 24/2/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foster, R.    | 94903|  2/4/18|30/12/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foster, T.    |241507|  6/8/15|9/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foster, W.    |243772|10/10/16|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foulds, T.    | 88206| 8/11/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foulkes, C. H.|  2380| 10/9/14|3/12/15,      |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foulkes, H.   |241057|13/11/14|29/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foulkes, J.   |  1458| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |A./L./Cpl.  |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foulkes, W. F.|110568|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fowler, A.    |  2316| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fowler, H. R. |  3217| 18/1/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fowler, J.    |242517| 18/5/16|1/9/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/7th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fowler, W.    |  2881|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fox, J.       |  1721| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fox, J. S.    |240870|26/10/14|29/3/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fox, L.       |  3358| 26/4/15|1/5/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fox, W.       |108907| 28/9/18|12/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foxe, V. J.   |  1521|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Foxley, F.    |240751| 16/9/14|19/6/18,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Foy, J. H.    | 50750| 18/8/17|1/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Francis, J. R.|  5218| 19/5/16|28/12/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Frankland, H. |260182| 20/9/17|3/3/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |J.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Fraser, F. J. |241219| 25/1/15|7/1/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fraser, F.    |  2268|  1/9/14|2/5/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fraser, J.    | 50937| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Frazer, W. M. |  2629| 5/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Freedman, J.  |242284| 17/2/16|26/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Freegard, A.  |201117| 12/4/18|30/11/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |B.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Freeman, W.   |  2728| 2/11/14|16/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Freeman, W.   |260205| 20/9/17|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Freeney, A.   | 94902|  2/4/18|6/5/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Frith, D.     |240885|29/10/14|2/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Frost, F.     | 57646| 30/5/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Frost, R. H.  |200012|  1/2/18|30/1 /19,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Fry, F. W.    | 88164|16/10/17|18/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fry, J.       |  2152| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fryer, E.     |240856|16/10/14|3/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fullagar, F.  |  3022|16/11/14|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fullalove, J. | 50749| 18/8/17|7/10/18,      |Corporal.   |
   |H.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Fuller, J. B. |240100| 27/2/15|20/9/17,† died|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Fuller, T.    |240947| 9/11/14|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Furber, G.    |242292| 17/2/16|6/3/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Furniss, T. M.|  2127| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gabie, H.     |  2320| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gabriel, W. O.|241100|17/11/14|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gadsden, G. C.|241357| 23/5/15|15/9/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gagg, C.      | 88225| 8/11/17|30/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gallagher, W. |406734| 10/7/18|26/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 12th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Galloway, W.  |  1847| 23/2/15|5/8/15,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |T.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Galvin, J.    | 88557| 19/9/17|22/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Galway, S. J. |240821| 28/9/14|11/5/18, sick |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gamble, R. H. |242303| 25/2/16|25/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gandy, H.     | 52269| 30/5/18|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gardiner, C.  | 57536|  1/2/18|4/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gardiner, D.  | 50938| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Gardner, A. H.|300252| 30/5/18|27/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gardner, A. J.| 72497| 13/8/17|12/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gardner, R.   | 88211| 8/11/17|12/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gardner, W.   |241548|  6/8/15|9/8/17,†      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Garland, W. J.| 42838| 13/8/17|26/2/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Garrod, E. A. |242449| 24/3/16|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Garrod, G. W. |  2812| 9/11/14|22/8/16,      |A./L./Sgt.  |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Garside, L.   |243673| 6/10/16|9/4/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Garton, W. N. |  2734| 2/11/14|10/4/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Garvin, M.    | 94911| 16/5/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gaskin, H.    |242177| 20/1/16|4/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gates, A.     |201255|  1/2/18|28/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gattrell, A.  |  2465| 14/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gaunt, W.     |  5217| 18/5/16|18/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gedd, H.      | 24546| 27/5/18|20/1/19,      |C.S.M.      |M. in D.
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Geddes, J. T. |109879|24/12/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Geelan, F.    | 94920|  2/4/18|13/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Geldart, F. J.|  2862|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Geoghegan, J. |242151| 20/1/16|18/4/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |George, C. H. |  2967|12/11/14|10/9/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |George, R.    | 99512| 27/6/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |George, T.    |242255| 25/1/16|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Georgeson, W. |331943| 27/8/17|27/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gerken, E.    |241335|  3/7/15|13/11/17,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |sick          |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gerrard, H.   |242445| 23/3/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gerrard, H.   | 30524| 13/9/18|17/1/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gerrard, W.   | 65237| 13/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Getty, --     |  2180| 31/8/14|21/9/14,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibbings, W.  |  2225|  1/9/14|4/2/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibbons, A. P.| 50755| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Gibbons, J.   | 94915|  2/4/18|29/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibbons, R. E.| 88629|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibbs, J.     | 88558| 19/9/17|11/10/18,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |injured       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, A. A. |  2212|  1/9/14|28/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, A. M. |  2524| 15/9/14|1/5/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, A. N. |  2981|14/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, F. G. |  1582|23/10/14|14/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, G. H. |  2112| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, H.    | 61017| 24/8/17|3/5/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, S.    | 88115| 5/10/17|--/3/19, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gibson, W. H. |  1435| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gifford, J. W.| 94912|  2/4/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gilbert, A.   |242557|19/10/16|15/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gilbert, T.   | 94916|  2/4/18|9/7/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Gilbertson, R.|241425|  1/2/18|11/10/18,     |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gill, C. H. E.|  3590|  6/8/15|9/4/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gill, C. S.   |  3261| 11/2/15|21/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gill, J. C.   |  2488| 16/9/14|30/8/15,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gill, S.      |  1496| 27/2/15|23/11/15,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gill, V.      | 94913|  2/4/18|21/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gillespie, J. | 57413| 24/8/17|18/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gillibrand, J.| 88255|17/12/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gillison, W.  |240864|20/10/14|10/8/17,      |Corporal.   |
   |J.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gilmore, A. V.|242528| 24/5/16|30/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Girdlestone,  |  2395| 10/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W. C.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gladwinfield, |  2129| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Glendinning,  |243771|10/10/16|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |P. R.         |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Glickman, D.  |269497| 22/6/18|17/10/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Glover, J. V. |  2404| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Glover, J.    |108928| 28/9/18|11/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Glover, W. C. |  2265|  1/9/14|8/1/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Glynn, T.     | 88146|11/10/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goadby, L. H. |  2433| 15/9/14|5/8/15,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goddard, A.   | 95038|  2/4/18|8/10/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Godfrey, R. J.|  3227| 19/1/15|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Godfrey, S.   |  3189|  5/1/15|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Golder, C. G. |  3025|16/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Golding, A.   | 88237| 8/11/17|7/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Golds, F.     | 26342| 30/5/18|17/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goldstone, L. |242176| 20/1/16|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goodall, H. A.|  4706| 20/1/16|3/6/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Goodger, E.   |243832|13/10/16|19/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goodier, F.   |  3080|19/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goodier, P.   | 88559| 19/9/17|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goodman, L.   |  1905|  3/4/15|26/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goodrich, G.  |405279| 22/6/18|1/2/19,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goodwin, G.   |  2793| 7/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goodwin, --   |  1630|23/10/14|9/3/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gordon, T.    | 56375| 24/8/17|10/9/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gore, C.      |  2561| 22/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gore, S.      | 88527| 19/9/17|27/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gorst, T.     |243836|13/10/16|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gough, C. B.  |242563|  5/6/16|4/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gough, T.     |  5049| 21/3/16|18/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Goulding, P.  |300257| 30/5/18|10/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grace, A. E.  |  5064| 22/3/16|5/6/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grace, J.     |  1404| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grace, S. F.  | 21504| 14/6/18|9/7/18,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, C.    |243704| 9/10/16|30/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, G. G. | 72480| 13/8/17|24/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, J.    |243717| 5/10/16|17/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, J.    |243812|12/10/16|16/10/17,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, J. H. |240964| 9/11/14|3/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, N. R. |  2318| 10/9/14|30/9/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, W.    |  4722| 20/1/16|22/2/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graham, W.    |  6615|13/10/16|31/1/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grahl, F. W.  |380995| 13/9/18|21/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grainger, J.  | 88560| 19/9/17|7/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grantham, H.  |  2910|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grassby, T. H.|  3697|  6/8/15|6/9/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grattan, C. E.|241303| 20/4/15|22/3/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |disembodied   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gratton, J. W.|  2321| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Graves, H.    |242266| 26/1/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gray, A.      |242237| 22/1/16|7/10/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gray, C.      |243715| 9/10/16|19/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gray, H. J.   | 50753| 18/8/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gray, W. H.   |  2257|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greaves, A.   | 94919|  2/4/18|17/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greaves, A. E.|243681| 6/10/16|19/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, A.     | 50754| 18/8/17|2/1/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, E.     |  3239| 29/1/15|15/12/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, G.     | 16177| 30/5/18|3/11/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, H.     |  8679| 24/2/18|14/7/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, H. G.  | 88470| 19/9/17|10/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, J.     |200641|  1/2/18|13/5/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, J. E.  | 94917|  2/4/18|19/11/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, P. C.  |  2319| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, R.     | 50939| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, S.     | 53649| 24/8/17|11/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, T.     |242424| 21/3/16|28/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Green, T. H.  | 88060| 27/5/18|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greene, C. T. |  1537|23/10/14|5/12/14,      |Rifleman.   |
   |F.            |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenhalgh, A.| 94908|  2/4/18|15/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenhalgh, G.| 94907|  2/4/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenhalgh, H.|267886| 24/8/17|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenhalgh, J.| 94906|  2/4/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenhall, J. | 86832| 13/9/18|10/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenham, C.  |240886|29/10/14|21/2/19,      |L./Sergt.   |
   |G.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenland, R. |  2110| 31/8/14|22/11/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenlee, W.  |203024| 27/6/18|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenlees, F. |243859|16/10/16|3/4/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenwood, H. | 94909|  2/4/18|16/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Greenwood, T. |  6511| 9/10/16|12/11/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregory, J.   |110557|27/11/18|14/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregory, T. C.|  2603| 29/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregory, W.   |243658| 5/10/16|14/9/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregory, W.   |  2245|  1/9/14|14/3/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregory, J.   |  2638| 7/10/14|1/6/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregson, A. G.| 88228| 8/11/17|4/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregson, J. W.| 50242| 27/5/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gregson, R.   |204046|  1/2/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grew, A.      |109007| 28/9/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gribbon, H. V.|240244| 27/2/15|15/3/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grierson, W.  |  2613| 28/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |B.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffen, A.   |300033| 30/5/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffies, F.  |  2929|11/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |V. K.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffin, E. S.|  2411| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, A. |202210| 18/2/18|23/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, E. |  2753| 5/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Griffiths, G. |241238| 11/2/15|8/7/17,       |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, G. |  4972| 13/3/16|17/1/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |L.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, H. |  6468| 7/10/16|8/12/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |physically    |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, H. | 41086| 24/8/17|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, H. |308583| 27/8/17|22/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, H. |241573|  6/8/15|10/2/19,      |C.S.M.      |
   |M.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, J. | 64939| 24/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |M.            |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Griffiths, M. |381387| 13/9/18|27/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, R. |  3002|14/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, R. | 23023|  6/6/18|29/1/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, R. | 88258|17/12/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, R. |202316|  1/2/18|29/8/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |O.            |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, T. |306066| 27/8/17|22/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, W. | 80105|  1/5/19|11/6/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |disembodied   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, W. |242137|  1/2/18|20/10/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Griffiths, W. |  2276|  1/9/14|22/8/16,†     |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grimes, T.    |269546|10/10/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grimes, T. A. | 15653| 27/6/18|24/8/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grinton, J.   |  2322| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gripton, S.   | 88561| 19/9/17|12/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grisdale, T.  | 94918|  2/4/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grogan, J.    | 50752| 18/8/17|25/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grossmith, H. |242461| 27/3/16|25/1/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Grundill, J.  | 94910|  2/4/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Guest, A.     |110651| 6/11/18|11/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gunderson, F. |  1968| 27/2/15|5/6/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Gyte, A. D.   |  2422| 11/9/14|5/3/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hackett, E.   | 94934|  2/4/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hadden, J.    |269684| 27/8/17|8/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haddock, T. E.| 94926|  2/4/18|27/6/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haddrill, C.  |242239| 22/1/16|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |M.            |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hadley, T.    | 50849|  1/2/18|2/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hague, C. H.  |  6458| 6/10/16|30/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haigh. J. E.  |  2776| 7/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hale, G.      |202447| 14/3/18|8/5/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Halewood, G.  |242586|  4/8/17|15/7/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Halford, S.   | 11961| 24/2/18|11/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Halfpenny, W. |  3059|18/11/14|11/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, A.      | 88203| 8/11/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, A. B.   |  2518| 18/9/14|19/10/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |medically     |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, E.      |  2292|  3/9/14|2/3/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, F.      |243759|10/10/16|30/4/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, F. R.   | 17844| 27/5/18|5/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, G.      |  1703|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, G. C.   |308324|  8/7/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, H.      | 84850|  1/2/18|6/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, H. C.   |  1387| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, J.      | 94924|  2/4/18|18/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, J. A.   |  3052|17/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, J. H.   | 94922|  2/4/18|15/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, N.      | 94921|  2/4/18|6/11/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, R.      |270021| 27/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hall, W.      |241273| 29/3/15|3/5/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hall, W. G.   |406625| 13/9/18|3/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hallam, J.    |  2301| 10/9/14|23/2/15,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hallam, W.    | 88471| 19/9/17|10/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Halligan, R.  | 50940| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Halliwell, H. |110510|27/11/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Halsall, A. R.|  2508| 17/9/14|12/1/15,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Halsall, H.   | 72506| 24/8/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ham, F. J.    | 88568| 19/9/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hamer, J. H.  |300435| 27/5/18|18/1/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hamer, P.     |243767|10/10/16|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hamill, H.    |241344|  3/7/15|9/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hamill, P.    | 88119| 5/10/17|12/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hamilton, B.  | 31514| 13/8/17|27/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hammond, G.   | 50764| 18/8/17|20/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hamnett, T. H.|  2327| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hampson, R.   |  2707|28/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hampson, W. H.| 88562| 19/9/17|30/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hancock, H. D.|241156| 7/12/14|22/6/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Handley, J.   |  2445| 14/9/14|12/1/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Handley, J. A.|242454| 24/3/16|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hands, J.     | 88563| 19/9/17|4/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hankey, J. R. |   170| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hannah, S. B. |  1994|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harbour, H. G.| 88474| 19/9/17|15/11/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harcourt, J.  |240837| 7/10/14|5/12/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |D.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hardacre, J.  |243787| 9/10/16|8/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hardacre, R.  | 59470| 13/8/17|24/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |prisoner of   |            |
   |              |      |        |war           |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harding, A.   | 50941| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harding, H. G.|  3728|  6/8/15|7/9/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harding, L.   |  2107| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hardman, H.   |243678| 6/10/16|14/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hardman, H.   |243688| 7/10/16|22/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hare, R. K.   |  2894|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hargreaves, A.| 50758| 18/8/17|26/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hargreaves, E.| 88101| 29/9/17|1/2/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hargreaves, J.| 36705|  7/3/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hargreaves,   |  6634|16/10/16|3/2/17, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |J. D.         |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hargreaves, R.|240186|23/10/14|16/10/17,†    |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hargreaves, W.| 39486| 27/5/18|1/11/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hargrove, H.  |242316|  1/3/16|3/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harold, J.    |110526|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harper, C.    |  3311| 22/3/15|28/10/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harper, H.    | 50765| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harper, T.    |  2148| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harper, W.    | 57710| 24/8/17|11/5/18, sick |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrall, H. V.|242372| 16/3/16|2/1/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harries, S.   |241502|  6/8/15|12/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harris, F. D. |  2607| 29/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harris, G.    |305745|  8/7/17|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harris, H.    |  3362| 26/4/15|1/5/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harris, J.    |203039| 27/6/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harris, J. E. | 50768| 18/8/17|23/7/18,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harris, J.    |  3044|17/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Harris, S.    | 26735|  1/2/18|15/5/18, died |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harris, W.    |241463|  6/8/15|10/11/17,†    |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, A.  |241268| 20/3/15|15/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, C.  |  1841| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, H.  |241269| 20/3/15|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |E.            |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, S.  |242410| 21/3/16|14/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, T.  |242230| 22/1/16|15/5/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, W.  |  3718|  6/8/15|8/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, W.  |405116|  1/2/18|18/3/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrison, W.  |  2403| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrocks, W.  |241005|10/11/14|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harrop, E. B. |  2168| 31/8/14|18/12/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Harrop, J. E. | 88564| 19/9/17|27/1/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hart, C. E.   |240892|30/10/14|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hart, D. C.   |  5096| 25/3/16|15/11/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hart, F. E.   | 88472| 19/9/17|26/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hart, J. J.   |  2722|30/10/14|16/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hart, W. M.   |240812| 28/9/14|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hartley, A.   | 88473| 19/9/17|1/4/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hartley, R. H.|  2211|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harton, A.    |  3425|  6/8/15|11/11/16,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harton, J. C. |240734| 14/9/14|5/3/19,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harvey, E.    |242362| 15/3/16|3/2/19,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harvey, J. H. |   264|  5/8/14|13/8/14,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harvey, J.    | 88631|  1/2/18|25/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harvey, R. A. |  2805| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Harwood, P. H.|  2250|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haslam, E.    |243845|16/10/16|27/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haslam, F.    |243733| 9/10/16|30/4/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haslam, J. B. |242315|  1/3/16|27/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haslam, J. T. | 50763| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hassall, A. W.|241251| 25/2/15|5/3/19,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haswell, C.   |  2710|29/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hatch, C. J.  |  2328| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hatch, J. F.  |  2330| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hatch, M.     |201386| 14/9/18|21/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hatte, F. S.  |  2149| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hatton, E.    | 50767| 18/8/17|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawitt, T. H. |  2323| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawitt, A.    |  2787| 7/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawkes, R.    |241120|21/11/14|26/8/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawkins, W. G.|242187| 21/1/16|6/4/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawkins, W.   |  2113| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |H. P.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawksley, H.  |  2187|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawksworth, M.|  2593| 1/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hawksworth, S.|  2970|12/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haworth, R. S.|  3083|23/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haworth, R.   |  2174| 31/8/14|30/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hay, D.       |200692| 25/6/18|27/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hay, J. B.    |243699| 9/10/16|28/2/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haydon, H. J. |240029| 23/2/15|15/12/17, sick|Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hayes, A.     | 17590|  7/3/18|18/1/19,      |Corporal.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hayes, J.     |  2920|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hayes, R. W.  |110842|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hayhurst, H.  |243800|11/10/16|21/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hayhurst, J.  |  1733|23/10/14|16/8/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hayhurst, R.  |243670| 6/10/16|17/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Haynes, F. A. |242115|  1/2/18|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hayston, H.   |260020| 25/5/18|19/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Head, J. G.   |  4698| 20/1/16|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heald, V.     | 52123|  7/3/18|29/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Healing, A.   |242290| 17/2/16|30/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Healy, W.     | 64836| 13/8/17|6/1/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heap, G.      |267357| 27/8/17|7/7/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heap, H.      | 88097| 29/9/17|30/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heap, J. B.   |   129| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heaps, J.     | 50760| 18/8/17|13/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hearn, H.     |268073| 27/8/17|8/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heath, J.     |240728| 12/9/14|18/2/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heath, T.     |  4968|  8/3/16|11/7/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heathcote, F. | 50942| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heathcote, J. | 88565| 19/9/17|10/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heathcote, T. |243738| 9/10/16|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heaton, G.    | 32637|  7/3/18|11/1/19, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heaton, G. A. | 84811|  1/2/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heaton, J.    |108748| 28/9/18|17/11/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heaton, J. R. |108834| 28/9/18|13/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heaton, T.    |  3103|23/11/14|21/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hedgecock, T. |268077| 27/8/17|8/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hedgecock, W. |  2290|  2/9/14|6/9/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heilbron, G.  |  2755| 5/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hemmings, F.  |  2227|  1/9/14|22/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Henderson, A. |  2895|10/11/14|30/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |N.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Henderson, J. | 72459| 13/8/17|3/2/19,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Henderson, J. |  3001|12/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |L.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Henderson, W. |  2893|10/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |F.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hendry, J.    |242406| 20/3/16|8/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Henry, H. S.  |108002|16/12/18|23/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Henshaw, A.   |201389| 27/6/18|18/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Henshaw, B.   |241482|  6/8/15|12/7/17,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Henshaw, E. R.|240709| 11/9/14|8/1/19, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hepworth, W.  |243660| 6/10/16|21/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Herbert, J. B.| 24995| 27/6/18|5/3/19,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hesketh, F. O.|  1839| 23/2/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hesketh, J.   | 84588|  1/2/18|14/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hesmondhalgh, | 50766| 18/8/17|29/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hetherington, | 39107|  2/7/18|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hetherington, |  2618| 6/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |T.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hetherington, |241250| 25/2/15|24/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |W. S.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hewitt, F.    | 50942| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hewitt, J.    |  2700|27/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hewitt, J. E. | 64782| 13/8/17|21/7/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hewlett, T. C.|242428| 22/3/16|20/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hey, W.       | 80867| 24/8/17|5/5/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heyes, G.     |203995|  1/2/18|18/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heyes, W.     | 50769| 18/8/17|10/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heys, J.      | 88198| 8/11/17|24/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heys, T. H.   |  6477| 7/10/16|4/12/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heywood, J.   |109644| 6/11/18|24/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Heyworth, J.  |240749| 16/9/14|31/1/19,      |A./R.S.M.   |M.C.,
   |L.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |M.S.M.
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hibbert, J.   |  2799| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hickey, A.    |  2876|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hickey, F. H. |  2717|29/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hickey, P. B. | 24125| 13/9/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hicks, H. W.  | 88476| 19/9/17|28/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hicky, J. J.  | 22113| 22/6/18|26/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higginbottom, |  1671|23/10/14|11/9/15,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |C.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higgins, A.   | 47356| 27/6/18|29/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higgins, G.   |  5072| 23/3/16|15/3/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higgins, J.   | 88177| 8/11/17|24/11/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higgins, J. P.|  2076| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higgins, W.   | 46022| 13/8/17|13/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higgins, W. S.|  2067| 31/8/14|2/11/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Higginson, W. |242350|  8/3/16|1/7/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Highfield, A. | 88475| 19/9/17|30/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Highton, J. H.|  5087| 24/3/16|10/12/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higson, P. J. |  2497| 16/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Higson, G. J. |  2500| 16/9/14|20/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hildred, F. C.|241226|  1/2/15|17/8/17,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hill, C. R.   |241518|  6/8/15|28/10/17,     |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, E. B.   |  1770|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, E. W.   | 88566| 19/9/17|22/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, F.      | 50756| 18/8/17|19/12/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, F.      | 50944| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hill, G.      | 88217| 8/11/17|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, G. E.   |  2324| 10/9/14|22/8/16,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, H.      | 88477| 19/9/17|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, H. T.   |241480|  6/8/15|11/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, R.      |242180| 21/1/16|17/1/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, R. W.   | 13347| 24/8/17|15/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, T. J.   | 57789| 24/8/17|15/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, T. R.   |  2421| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, R.      |240171| 27/2/15|17/6/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, W.      | 11558| 27/6/18|10/12/18,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hill, W.      |241385|  3/7/15|21/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hillman, L.   | 41202| 27/5/18|29/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hills, S.     |240495|23/10/14|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hilton, J.    | 41310| 13/8/17|26/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hinchcliffe,  |109008| 28/9/18|24/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |S.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hinchcliffe,  |  6643|16/10/16|8/1/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |W.            |      |        |physically    |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hind, C. E.   |260216| 20/9/17|1/9/18,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hind, J.      |242229| 22/1/16|18/4/18,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hinde, A. S.  |  2205|  1/9/14|21/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hinde, H. E.  |  2397| 10/9/14|26/6/15,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hindley, J.   | 41299| 27/5/18|4/10/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hinds, W.     |201730| 27/5/18|3/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hinks, L. H.  |241173|28/12/14|22/5/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hinmars, C. E.|241500|  5/5/17|20/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hipkins, T. A.|242314|  1/3/16|14/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/5th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hirons, G.    | 49944| 27/5/18|28/3/19,      |L./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hirst, R.     |  3264| 15/2/15|28/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hitchin, H.   |269378|10/10/17|9/11/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hitchmough, W.| 65076| 13/8/17|29/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hoare, E.     |  3200| 11/1/15|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hoare, F.     |242360| 14/3/16|20/4/17,      |L./         |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hoare, R.     |  1510| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hobden, C. R. |240941| 9/11/14|7/2/19,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hockenhull, W.|  2473| 10/9/14|17/6/15,      |A./C.S.M.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodge, A.     | 94925|  2/4/18|19/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodgett, W.   | 94930|  2/4/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodgkins, W.  | 16909| 27/6/18|6/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodgkinson, J.| 88147|11/10/17|3/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodgman, S.   |307803|  8/7/17|21/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodgson, F.   | 88181| 8/11/17|14/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodgson, J.   |240053| 23/2/15|2/4/19,†      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodgson, J. J.|243779|10/10/16|15/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hodson, E. W. |  2262|  1/9/14|18/12/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hogarth, T.   | 94923|  2/4/18|1/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hogg, A.      |241300| 20/4/15|15/8/17,† sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hogg, F. A.   |  3298| 15/3/15|31/5/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holbrook, F.  | 88478| 19/9/17|9/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holding, B.   | 32850| 13/8/17|9/11/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holden, W.    |110509|27/11/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holding, R.   |242534| 24/5/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holford, J.   |260114| 20/9/17|21/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holgate, T.   |243822|12/10/16|15/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holgate, G.   |  2096| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holland, A. M.|  3338| 13/4/15|10/12/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |physically    |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holland, J.   | 20968|  1/2/18|28/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holland, J. E.|243846|16/10/16|23/11/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holland, W. L.|241576|  6/8/15|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hollinghurst. |240580|  1/9/14|12/7/18,†     |L./Corpl.   |
   |H.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holmes, H.    |110717| 6/11/18|16/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holmes, J. S. |243707| 9/10/16|17/1/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holmes, M.    | 35705| 24/8/17|7/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holmes, P.    |242247| 25/1/16|8/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holmes, W.    |  2530| 19/9/14|26/6/15,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holmes, W.    |  6444| 6/10/16|30/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holmes, W.    |200321|  8/7/17|29/3/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Holt, B.      | 50759| 18/8/17|20/2/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holt, C. N.   |240736| 15/9/14|30/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holt, E.      |  6457| 6/10/16|12/11/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holt, E. T.   |  5080| 24/3/16|18/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holt, J.      |  6459| 6/10/16|25/1/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Holt, L.      |  2029| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Holt, N.      | 94927|  2/4/18|11/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Homer, H. G.  |  3013|14/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Honderwood,   |  2490| 16/9/14|12/1/15,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |R. S.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Honeybourne,  |242393| 18/3/16|17/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E. H.         |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hooper, E. J. |  2098| 31/8/14|28/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hope, A. J.   | 74367| 24/8/17|27/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hopkins, J. W.| 88479| 19/9/17|1/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hopkins, W. E.|241185|  6/1/15|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hopley, --    |  2332| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horabin, L. J.| 88172|28/10/17|26/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horan, J.     |  2326| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horgan, M.    | 72473| 13/8/17|14/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hornby, A.    |  3006|14/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hornby, D.    |  1688| 23/2/15|10/3/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hornby, J. E. |111240|27/11/18|21/12/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horner, A. O. |  2171| 31/8/14|31/12/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horniblow, G. |  5014| 18/3/16|5/6/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horrocks, J.  |  2478| 11/9/14|23/9/16,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |C.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horsfall, J.  |241212| 18/1/15|15/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Horton, J.    |202939| 27/5/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hosker, F.    |204052|  1/2/18|1/11/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hoskinson, F. |268056| 27/8/17|28/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hoskyn, J. H. |  2325| 10/9/14|12/2/17,      |A./C.S.M.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hotchkiss, E. |    77| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |G.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hough, J. H.  |  6520| 9/10/16|30/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hough, R. S.  |300278|  6/6/18|24/10/18,     |Sergeant.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houghton, B.  |  2887|10/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houghton, A.  |  2940|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houghton, F.  |  2200|  1/9/14|6/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houghton, J.  |241231|  8/2/15|5/9/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |R.            |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houghton, W.  |  3254|  8/2/15|20/9/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houghton, W.  |  3499|  3/7/15|2/8/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houghton, W.  |243691| 7/10/16|31/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Houston, J.   |  2741| 3/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Howard, A.    | 94935|  2/4/18|4/9/18, died  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howard, H.    |243689| 7/10/16|28/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howard, J.    |242184| 21/1/16|26/2/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howard, J.    |307529| 22/6/18|21/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howard, J. W. | 47141| 13/8/17|12/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howard, P.    | 88632|  1/2/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Howard, T.    | 41592| 13/8/17|18/12/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howard, W.    | 88215| 8/11/17|26/2/19,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howard, W.    | 94929|  2/4/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howarth, A.   | 50757| 18/8/17|9/11/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Howarth, E.   |243749| 9/10/16|31/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |missing,      |            |
   |              |      |        |assumed dead  |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howarth, H.   | 94932|  2/4/18|8/2/19, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howarth, J.   |243755|10/10/16|20/5/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Howarth, R.   |243762|10/10/16|22/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howarth, T.   |  3218| 18/1/15|14/8/16,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howarth, T.   | 88219| 8/11/17|23/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howarth, V.   |307746|  8/7/17|17/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howarth, W.   |243766|10/10/16|15/3/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howat, R. H.  |  1580| 23/2/15|23/12/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howcroft, A.  | 50762| 18/8/17|21/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howe, G.      |241041|12/11/14|5/7/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howell, H. L. | 88480| 19/9/17|23/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howell, W.    | 50761| 18/8/17|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Howson, R. N. |240080| 23/2/15|15/3/19,†     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hoyle, J.     | 90763|  7/3/18|30/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hubbard, C. W.|260180| 20/9/17|28/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hubbard, H.   |  2821| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hudson, A.    |  2798| 9/11/14|10/11/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hudson, A. M. |  5256|  1/6/16|18/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hudson, D.    | 52396| 24/8/17|5/3/19,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hudson, E.    |  3355| 22/4/15|3/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hudson, F. G. | 88567| 19/9/17|1/11/17, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Huggett, T. E.|260218| 20/9/17|15/6/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, A.    |  2827| 9/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, A.    | 88481| 19/9/17|25/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, C. W. |  2942|11/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, D. J. |  1699| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, D. L. |  2331| 10/9/14|18/8/15,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, E. C. |241530|  6/8/15|5/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, E. F. | 53468| 28/9/17|18/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, F.    |241207| 18/1/15|18/2/19,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, G. S. |242525| 23/5/16|15/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, H.    |241066|13/11/14|27/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, H. D. |  1400| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, J.    |  4784| 22/1/16|13/5/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, J.    | 20285|  1/2/18|6/11/18, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, J.    |241208| 18/1/15|15/9/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, J.    |243870|19/10/16|2/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, J. T. |200993|  1/2/18|22/5/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Hughes, R.    | 16819| 27/6/18|12/9/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, R. A. |    93| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, R. E. |  1833|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, R. J. |  5067| 22/3/16|22/6/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, T.    |108818| 28/9/18|14/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, T. A. |  2751| 5/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, W.    |241294| 12/4/15|11/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hughes, W.    | 53061| 13/8/17|4/11/18,      |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hulatt, J. B. |200516|  1/2/18|10/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hulbert, H. F.|241317|  3/7/15|16/10/17,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hulme, J.     |242416| 21/3/16|6/3/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hulme, J.     |306739| 27/6/18|27/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hulme, J. A.  |  1766|23/10/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hulme, J. A.  |240929| 7/11/14|5/8/17,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hulme, W.     |240994|10/11/14|17/6/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Humphrey, J.  |  2412| 11/9/14|3/12/14,      |Rifleman.   |
   |B.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hunt, D. C.   |331921| 27/8/17|22/11/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hunt, G.      | 50664| 27/5/18|3/7/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hunt, G.      | 52633| 24/8/17|14/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hunt, R. W. F.|  2409| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hunt, W.      | 94931|  2/4/18|28/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hunter, T.    |  1972|23/10/14|21/11/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hurst, B.     | 94933|  2/4/18|27/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hurstfield, J.| 94928|  2/4/18|19/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Huston, F.    |  2406| 11/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hutchinson, B.| 72454| 13/8/17|22/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hutchinson, J.|108811| 28/9/18|21/7/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hutchinson,   |243696| 7/10/16|11/11/17, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |J. E.         |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hutchinson,   |243866|18/10/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |J. T.         |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Huxham, J.    |241161| 8/12/14|30/6/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hyde, E. C.   |  2001|23/10/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hyde, H. E.   |  2813| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hyde, H. K.   |  2916|10/11/14|15/6/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hyde, J. W.   |  6652|16/10/16|7/11/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hyde, S.      | 22735| 27/5/18|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |prisoner of   |            |
   |              |      |        |war           |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hydes, W.     |  2329| 10/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hyland, J.    | 72528|  1/2/18|14/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Hyndman, R.   |241551|  6/8/15|8/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ingham, H.    |407033| 30/5/18|11/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ingleby, E.   |241291| 12/4/15|17/4/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 9th    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ingledew, L.  | 50141| 27/6/18|19/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Inglis, D.    |241091|16/11/14|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ion, J.       |  3279| 25/2/15|28/12/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ion, J. E.    |  3257| 11/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ireland, A. P.|242443| 23/3/16|28/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Irving, S.    |200256| 28/3/18|29/3/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Isaacs, A.    |240849|13/10/14|28/5/18, sick |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Isherwood, A. | 50770| 18/8/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Isherwood, H. |240718| 14/9/14|16/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jack, R.      | 50945| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jack, W.      |  3058|18/11/14|25/2/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, C.   |  2334| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, C.   |260235| 19/9/17|6/9/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, F.   | 50774| 18/8/17|17/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, G.   |  4834| 28/1/16|30/6/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, G.   |243851|16/10/16|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, H.   |  4835| 28/1/16|20/6/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, J.   |  1604| 23/2/15|22/12/16,     |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, J.   |  2861|10/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, J.   |202187|  1/2/18|27/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, J. B.|240568|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, R. D.|240872|26/10/14|22/8/17,      |A./C.Q.M.S. |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, L.   | 95041|  2/4/18|8/10/18,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |injured       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, T. W.| 72434| 13/8/17|6/5/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, W. A.|240724| 14/9/14|8/6/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jackson, W. E.|240569|  1/9/14|26/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jackson, W. H.|  1504| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jacobs, A.    |  2738| 2/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jaeger, J. K. |241237| 11/2/15|9/7/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |James, A. H.  | 72471| 13/8/17|29/1/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |James, E.     |  2817| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |James, E. G.  |  2702|28/10/14|22/1/15,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |James, G. W.  |242668|14/10/17|1/10/18,† sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |James, J.     | 94937|  2/4/18|30/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |James, J. H.  | 50772| 18/8/17|2/5/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |James, R. R.  |  2269|  1/9/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |C.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jarrett, T. W.| 50771| 18/8/17|28/10/17, sick|L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jarvis, J.    |243735| 9/10/16|24/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jeffs, H. C.  |241233|  8/2/15|29/5/18,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenion, C.    |242294| 17/2/16|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenkins, J.   |242458| 25/3/16|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenkins, J. A.|242535| 24/5/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenkins, W.   |200605|  8/7/17|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenkins, W. T.|406591|  1/2/18|30/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenkinson, B. | 88193| 8/11/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenkinson, R. |243825|13/10/16|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jenner, N. E. |240654| 10/9/14|7/8/17,       |A./C.Q.M.S. |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jennings, E.  |   491| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |T.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jennings, H.  |201358| 14/3/18|14/9/18,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jennings, T.  |  3351| 21/4/15|30/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |L.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jennings, W.  | 49950|  7/3/18|22/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jenvey, J. A. |235548| 14/3/18|21/10/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jepson, E.    | 24508| 27/6/18|24/2/19,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jepson, W.    | 88233| 8/11/17|13/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jervis, J.    | 88117| 5/10/17|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jervis, R. J. | 64907| 24/8/17|3/11/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jevons, L. B. |268067| 27/8/17|8/3/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |S.            |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jewers, W.    |240949| 9/11/14|6/8/17,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johns, D.     |202480| 10/3/18|3/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, A.   |241633|  5/5/17|20/5/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, A. J.|241127|23/11/14|29/3/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, C.   |  2009| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, F.   | 94939|  2/4/18|28/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, H.   |268046| 27/8/17|11/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, H. G.|241543|  6/8/15|3/6/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, J.   |  3077|20/11/14|18/3/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, J.   | 94938|  2/4/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, J. W.|    42|23/10/14|2/11/16,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, R. A.|110567|27/11/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, R. H.|  2729| 2/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, S.   |380171| 27/6/18|22/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, T.   | 95168| 27/6/18|10/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, W.   | 23069|24/10/18|1/1/19,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnson, W.   | 64914| 13/8/17|4/8/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnston, H.  | 52045| 27/5/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |E.            |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnston, H.  |  6581|11/10/16|1/12/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |J.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnston, J.  |241525|  6/8/15|14/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnston, L.  |  5280| 12/6/16|27/7/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnstone, F. |243829|13/10/16|16/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnstone, H. |241246| 18/2/15|5/4/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |H.            |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Johnstone, J. |  1603| 23/2/15|23/1/18,† sick|Rifleman.   |
   |F.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jolley, R.    | 21743| 27/5/18|17/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jolly, T.     |  2477| 11/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, A.     |  2162| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, A.     |  3056|18/11/14|23/2/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, A.     |240272| 23/2/15|4/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, A.     |242442| 23/3/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, A. E.  |  3245|  2/2/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, A. G.  |  2957|11/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, A. W.  |  1410| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, B. S.  |  1419| 23/2/15|12/2/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, C.     |  1957|23/10/14|24/2/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, C.     |  4778| 22/1/16|22/2/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, D. G.  | 94936|  2/4/18|13/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, D. L.  |  2907|10/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, D. T.  |240796| 24/9/14|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, E.     | 88265|  4/1/18|21/9/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jones, E.     |242198| 21/1/16|1/6/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, E. A.  |  1882|23/10/14|23/2/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, E. C.  |200513|  1/2/18|27/2/19,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, E. H.  |  2236|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, E. L.  |  2247|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, E. L.  |242539| 25/5/16|30/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, E. O.  | 22744| 27/5/18|30/7/18,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jones, F.     | 87952|  7/3/18|30/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, F. E.  |  2644| 9/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, F. H.  | 88569| 19/9/17|3/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, G.     |  2192|  1/9/14|--/--/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, G. D.  |  2716|29/10/14|17/5/15,      |A./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, G. E.  |  2333| 10/9/14|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, G. F.  |268036| 27/8/17|2/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, G. M.  |  2955|12/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, G. R.  |241191| 11/1/15|13/8/17,      |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H.     |  4792| 22/1/16|13/3/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H.     |240817| 26/9/14|26/6/17,      |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H. A.  |  2587| 26/9/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H. G.  | 48424| 27/5/18|9/1/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H. G.  |242152| 20/1/16|10/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H. S.  |241280| 30/3/15|16/3/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H. W.  | 88089| 29/9/17|21/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, H. W.  |242465| 11/1/18|17/1/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 13th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, I. H.  | 49514| 27/5/18|12/11/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J.     |  1509| 27/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J.     |  2062| 31/8/14|12/5/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jones, J.     | 50773| 18/8/17|30/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J.     | 51910|  1/2/18|29/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J.     |241278| 29/3/15|7/8/17,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J. A.  |  2619| 5/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J. L.  |  2665|14/10/14|1/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J. R.  |  2853| 9/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, J. S.  |332043| 22/6/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, L.     |242313|  1/3/16|10/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, L.     |241822|  1/2/18|30/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, L.     |243760|10/10/16|9/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, M.     | 20434| 24/2/18|27/4/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, O.     |108825| 28/9/18|13/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, O. J.  |240084| 27/2/15|17/6/17,†     |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, O. Y.  |  3283| 25/2/15|22/6/17,† sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, P.     |  2056| 31/8/14|31/3/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jones, P. G.  |240833| 5/10/14|22/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, P. N.  |  1133| 23/2/15|18/2/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |physically    |            |
   |              |      |        |unfit         |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, R.     | 88570| 19/9/17|2/11/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, R. H.  |  2533| 21/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, R. H.  |  2825| 9/11/14|9/4/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, R. O.  |380205|  1/2/18|11/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |M.M.
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, S.     |  2165| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, S.     |242433| 22/3/16|26/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jones, S.     | 65024| 13/8/17|27/6/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, S.     |300486| 27/5/18|25/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, S. N.  |  2273|  1/9/14|10/12/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, S. W.  |  2079| 31/8/14|29/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, T.     |  2532| 21/9/14|14/8/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, T.     |  2860|10/11/14|28/6/15,      |A./L./      |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |Sergt.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, T. E.  |  2489| 16/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, T. H.  | 50839|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, V. H.  |  1926| 23/2/15|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W.     |242155| 20/1/16|17/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 12th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W. F.  |242400| 20/3/16|18/10/17,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W. G.  |105558| 12/7/18|13/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W. H.  |  3491|  3/7/15|18/1/17, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jones, W. H.  |242269| 25/1/16|4/8/17, died  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W. H.  |405125|  1/2/18|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W. J.  |  2176| 31/8/14|13/11/14,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W. J.  |  2469| 14/9/14|15/3/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Jones, W. M.  |242236| 22/1/16|28/4/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jones, W. R.  |  2210|  1/9/14|8/8/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jory, H.      | 88571| 19/9/17|18/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Joughin, H. J.|  2960|12/11/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Jowett, R. H. |  2745| 4/11/14|16/8/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Joyce, A. N.  | 21732| 22/6/18|1/9/18,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Joyce, J. J.  | 72446| 13/8/17|30/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Joynson, A. J.|  2863|10/11/14|12/1/17, sick |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Joynson, H.   | 17395| 13/8/17|5/6/19,       |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Joynson, J. R.|240492| 27/2/15|5/8/17,       |A./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Judd, A.      | 35915| 27/5/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kadansky, K.  |243868|18/10/16|17/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |V.            |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kane, F. P.   |  3435|  3/7/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kay, E.       |200644|  1/2/18|21/5/18, sick |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kay, J.       |241574|  6/8/15|28/9/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kay, R.       |241166|14/12/14|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kay, T.       |  2135| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1/6th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kay, W.       |109004| 28/9/18|11/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kaye, H. N.   |242389| 18/3/16|7/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kearns, M.    |242234| 22/1/16|18/5/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keates, G. H. |  3004|13/11/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Keedwell, G.  | 24780| 24/8/17|16/5/18, died |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keefe, J.     | 88197| 8/11/17|17/4/18, sick |Corporal.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keegan, H. R. |  2091| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keeling, F. G.| 88572| 19/9/17|22/12/18,†    |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keepence, H.  |  1631|23/10/14|25/2/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keggan, J.    | 46600| 27/5/18|4/10/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kehoe, J. M.  |  2336| 10/9/14|5/8/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keill, A. W.  |  3248|  5/2/15|2/1/17,† sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kellett, R.   | 88224| 8/11/17|25/5/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, A.     | 10564| 31/8/14|28/2/18, sick |R.S.M.      |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, C.     |  2436| 15/9/14|26/7/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Kelly, C.     | 88573| 19/9/17|12/9/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action or     |            |
   |              |      |        |died of wounds|            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, J. H.  |  3715|  6/8/15|4/5/16,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, J. H.  |268042| 27/8/17|13/1/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, L.     |  2761| 6/11/14|6/9/15,       |L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, R. D.  | 94940|  2/4/18|28/6/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, T.     |  2562| 22/9/14|18/3/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kelly, W.     | 56915| 27/5/18|5/9/18,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kempe, R. A.  |  2070| 31/8/14|25/7/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |S.            |      |        |discharged    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kempsey, E.   |242197| 21/1/16|6/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Kendal, J.    |242741|  1/2/18|26/10/18, died|L./Corpl.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kendrick, G.  |242189| 21/1/16|4/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |F.            |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kendrick, S.  |  3149| 8/12/14|27/5/16,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kennedy, A.   |242161| 20/1/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kennedy, J.   | 94941|  2/4/18|--/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kennedy, J.   |243783|10/10/16|19/5/18,† sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kent, J.      |  2337| 10/9/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kenyon, J.    |242499|19/10/16|26/3/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kenyon, J. A. |242457| 25/3/16|28/6/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kenyon, T. W. |  2620| 5/10/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Ker, W. E.    |  2534| 21/9/14|2/7/15,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kerfoot, E.   |204039|  1/2/18|7/9/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |wounded       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kermack, W.   | 50946| 18/8/17|20/8/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 2/8th  |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kermode, J. H.|  3123|27/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kermode, W. H.| 72526| 13/8/17|29/8/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kernighan, A. |240986|10/11/14|5/6/18,       |Sergeant.   |
   |E.            |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kerr, J. H.   |  3114|30/11/14|26/6/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kerr, G.      |240851|13/10/14|30/4/17,†     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 1st    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kerr, H. S.   | 17403| 27/5/18|5/2/19,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kerr, J. B.   |200781|  1/2/18|11/7/18,      |Sergeant.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kerr, N. M.   |  3003|14/11/14|3/12/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kerr, R.      |332375| 27/5/18|26/6/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 9th    |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kersey, W.    |241429|  6/8/15|9/8/17,†      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kershaw, J.   |243669| 6/10/16|17/9/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 12th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kershaw, J. A.|332832| 22/6/18|15/12/18, sick|Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kessen, H. E. |242399| 20/3/16|5/8/17,       |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |invalided to  |            |
   |              |      |        |England       |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kewish, E.    |240546| 31/8/14|--/--/15,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Kewley, J.    |240304| 27/2/15|9/6/17, died  |L./Sergt.   |
   |              |      |        |of wounds     |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Key, T.       | 49318| 13/8/17|15/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Key, J. L.    |  2287|  2/9/14|24/10/16,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |commission    |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Keyworth, W.  |  6504| 9/10/16|1/1/17, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Kidd, M.      | 88094| 29/9/17|26/7/18,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
  ✠|Kiggins, T. E.|242223| 22/1/16|12/7/17,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |killed in     |            |
   |              |      |        |action        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Killard, J.   |266986| 22/6/18|--/--/19,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |disembodied   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |Killey, S. B. | 72461| 24/8/17|17/2/18, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |G.            |      |        |              |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |King, B.      |200861|  1/2/18|19/3/19, sick |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |King, E.      | 57652| 27/5/18|31/12/18,     |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |demobilized   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |King, E. S.   | 88640|  1/2/18|26/2/19,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |posted 25th   |            |
   |              |      |        |K.L.R.        |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |King, J. H.   |  3130| 1/12/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |King, M.      | 88204| 8/11/17|7/1/18, sick  |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |King, R. H.   |  3129| 1/12/14|12/1/15,      |Rifleman.   |
   |              |      |        |transferred   |            |
   |              |      |        |              |            |
   |King, W.      |242455| 25/3/16|3/8/17,       |Rifleman.