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Title: The Dinner Year-Book
Author: Harland, Marion
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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_“COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD” SERIES._


THE

DINNER YEAR-BOOK

  BY
  MARION HARLAND,
  AUTHOR OF “COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD,”
  “BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON AND TEA,” ETC.


  NEW YORK:
  CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS,
  1883.



  COPYRIGHT BY

  CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS.

  1878.


  TROW’S
  PRINTING & BOOKBINDING CO.,
  _205-213 East 12th St._,
  NEW YORK.



Familiar Talk with the Reader.


“Do not laugh when I tell you that one of the most serious perplexities
of my every-day life is the daily recurring question, ‘What shall we
have for dinner?’” writes a correspondent.

I do not smile at the naïve confession. I feel more like sighing as
I recollect the years during the summers and winters of which the
same query advanced with me into the dignity of a problem. There were
several important ends to be compassed in the successful settlement
of the question. To accomplish an agreeable variety in the family
bill of fare; to accommodate appetites and individual preferences
to the season and state of the local market; to avoid incongruous
associations of meats, vegetables, sauces, _entrées_ and desserts; to
build fragments into a structure about which should linger no flavor
of staleness or sameness; so to manage a long succession of meals
that yesterday’s repast and the more frugal one of to-day should not
suggest the alternation of fat and lean in the Hibernian’s pork, or
the dutiful following of penance upon indulgence; to shun, with equal
care, the rock of parsimony and the whirlpool of extravagance;—but
why extend the list of dilemmas? Are they not written in the mental
chronicles of every housewife whose conscience—be her purse shallow or
deep—will not excuse her from a continual struggle with the left-overs?
Such uncompromising bits of facts do these same “left-overs” appear
in the next day’s survey of ways, means, and capabilities, that timid
mistresses are the less to blame for often winking at the Alexandrine
audacity with which the cook has disposed of the knotty subject by
emptying platters and tureens into the swill-pail,—which should stand
for the armorial bearings of her tribe wherever found,—or satisfied
indolence, and what goes with her for humanity, by tossing crusts,
bones, and “cold scraps” into the yawning basket of the beggar at the
basement door.

One of these days I mean to write an article, scientific and practical,
upon the genus, “basket-beggar.” For the present, take the word of one
who has studied the species in all its varieties,—who has suffered
long, and certainly not been _un_kind in the acquisition of experience
upon this head,—and prohibit their visits entirely, and at all seasons.
“Cold cuts” and the “heels” of loaves belong to you as certainly as do
hot joints and unmutilated pies. Issue your declaration of independence
to the effect that you choose to dispense charity in your own way,
and that, as an intelligent Christian woman, you can better judge by
what methods to relieve want and aid the really worthy poor, than
can the ignorant, irresponsible creature who lavishes what costs her
nothing upon every chance speculator whose lying whine excites her
pity. Sympathy which, by the way, would generally lie dormant, were the
listener to the piteous tale obliged to satisfy the petitioner from her
own purse or wardrobe.

Returning from what is not, although it may seem to be a digression,
let us talk together more briefly than is our wont in these familiar
conferences, of the considerations that have moved and sustained me
in the preparation of this volume, and which will, I hope, make it a
welcome and useful counsellor to you. First, then, the suggestion
and interrogation of sincere seekers for helpful advice pertaining to
that most important of the triad of daily meals—“THE FAMILY DINNER,”
superadded to my own observation and experience of the difficulties
that beset the subject. Secondly, the discovery, that so far as I have
been able to push my investigations—and my searching has been keen and
extensive—no directory upon this particular branch of culinary endeavor
has been published, at least none in the English language. We have
had books, some of them admirable helps to skilful, no less than to
inexperienced housekeepers, upon dinner-giving, and company dinners,
and “little dinner” parties, not to refer to the mighty mountain of
manuals upon cookery in general; but, up to the time of the present
writing, I have found nothing that, to my appreciation, meets the case
stated by the friend whose plaint heads this chapter.

My aim has been to write out, for seven days of four weeks in each
month, a _menu_ adapted, in all things, to the average American
market; giving meats, fish, vegetables, and fruits in their season,
and, so far as I could do so upon paper, rendering a satisfactory
account of every pound of meat, etc., brought, by my advice, into the
kitchen. I have taken the liberty accorded me by virtue of our long
and intimate acquaintanceship, of inspecting not only the contents
of your market-basket, but each morning the treasures of larder and
refrigerator; of offering counsel concerning crumbs, bones, and such
odds-and-ends as are held in contempt by many otherwise thrifty
managers—to wit, other cold vegetables than potatoes, and dry crusts of
bread and cake, while of gravy and dripping I have made specialties. I
have tried, moreover, to inspire such respect for made-over dinners,
as we feel for the pretty rugs made of the ravellings of Axminster
carpets. We do not attempt to impose them upon ourselves or our friends
as “pure Persian.” But neither do we blush for them because Mrs.
Million Aire across the way would scorn to give them house-room. Let
“CONSISTENCY” be stamped upon every appointment of your household,
and even the _parvenue_ opposite cannot despise you. Once learn the
truth that moderate, or even scanty means do not make meanness or
homeliness a necessity, and act upon the lesson, and you can set
criticism at defiance. Apropos to this point of consistency, let me
say, in explanation, not apology, for the small space devoted to
company-dinners, that I have dealt with them upon the principle that
ten times one makes ten. Having, in emulation of the Eastern beauty,
carried the calf with ease for four weeks, you will hardly appreciate
the difference in the weight of the cow you lift upon the fifth. In
plainer phrase, give John and the children good dinners, well-cooked,
and daintily served, every day, and the entertainment of half-a-dozen
friends in addition to the family party will cease to be a stupendous
undertaking. They have a saying in the Southern States that aptly
expresses the labor and excitement attendant upon such an event in
too many families; the straining after Mrs. Million Aire’s _diners à
la Russe_, which presuppose the despotism of a _chef_ in the kitchen,
and the solemn pomp of a Chief Butler in the _salle à manger_. The
Southern description of the frantic endeavor is—“Trying to put the big
pot into the little one,” and it is invariably used with reference to
preparations for company. Be content, my dear sister, to put into your
little pot only so much as it will decently hold, and be thankful that
you have in it a sure gauge of responsibility.

I have spoken of dinners for four weeks in each month. I have written
receipts for this number, not in forgetfulness of the fact that
there is but one February per annum, but because the need of adapting
the bills of fare to the days of the week, instead of the month, was
absolute, and if I wished the Dinner Year-Book to be a perpetual
calendar, I must say nothing of the broken week that sometimes ends and
sometimes begins the month. The difficulty of disposing satisfactorily
of the two or three odd days brought to my mind, while blocking out my
work, the summary manner in which one of my baby-girls once dismissed a
somewhat analogous difficulty.

“My dear,” I said to her one night as she concluded her prayer at my
knee, “you have forgotten to pray for your little cousins. How did that
happen? Don’t you want our Heavenly Father to take care of them?”

She made a motion of again bending her knees, yawned sleepily, and
tumbled into bed.

“Can’t help it, mamma! Baby is too tired! Horace and Eddie _must
scuffle for themselves_ just this one night!”

I have given you twenty-eight—nay, counting your possible
company-meal—twenty-nine dinners in succession to little purpose if you
cannot collate from previous receipts one or two for yourself, and be
the better for the practice. I need hardly say that I do not anticipate
or desire slavish adherence to the plan sketched for your day or week.
I _have_ sketched—that is all—not worked out a sum in which addition
or subtraction would materially affect the sum-total. The framework
is, I would fain hope, symmetrical. I expect you to build thereupon as
convenience or discretion may dictate.



Touching Saucepans.


WHILE it is true that the finest tools will not impart skill to the
untrained workman, it is equally a matter of fact that the best artisan
is he who cares most jealously for the quality and condition of his
instruments as well as for the finish of his workmanship.

A visitor once asked permission to witness the operation of cooking a
beefsteak in my kitchen, saying that her husband had spoken in terms
of commendation of those he had eaten at my table. Like the good wife
she was, she desired to “catch the trick,” whatever it might be, of
preparing them to his liking. I willingly acceded to her request, and
upon her return to the parlor her husband inquired eagerly: “Did you
learn the secret?”

“Yes,” was the smiling answer. “You must buy me a gridiron!”

Up to that time, she then explained, fried steaks had been the rule in
her house, and gridirons a thing unheard or unthought of.

A fried beefsteak being, as I have elsewhere stated, a culinary
solecism, I have, perhaps, selected an extreme case as the test of
my discourse upon the necessity of a supply of fitting utensils for
the proper prosecution of home-cookery. Mrs. Whitney’s idea of the
“art-kitchen,” so charmingly set forth in “We Girls,” may not be so
chimerical (with limitations) as most practical housewives—practised
in nothing more than in the exercise of patience—are apt to suppose.
They tell us the tale—known already too sadly well to each of us—of the
impossibility of inducing “girls” who are tractable and respectful in
most things, to accept labor-saving machines, and the thousand-and-one
ingenious contrivances for making cooking easier and even graceful;
of the hard usage to which expensive implements are subjected in rude
hands, the motive-power of which is the untilled brain, unrestrained
by the conscienceless will; of how innovations are openly flouted,
or secretly sneered at, “until,” say they, “we find it easier to let
the cook have her own way down-stairs, and reconcile ourselves, as
best we may, to obstinate stupidity and unmerciful breakages. As to
art-kitchens”—a shrug and a groan,—“we are thankful if our tenderest
care can keep the upper stories free from the vandalism that rages
below.”

Nevertheless, acknowledging, as I have, personally, reasons for
doing—the truth of all these things—I make answer, “Have an art-kitchen
for yourself!” First, give your cook, or maid-of-all-work, a fair
trial. It is a duty you owe to humanity and to her to prove,
conclusively, whether her careless or destructive habits be ingrain
and wilful, or merely the result of ignorance and bad training.
There are bad mistresses, let us remember,—and more still who are
indifferent or incompetent. If “our girl” has a heart or a conscience,
let us find it. Make her understand the value and usefulness of the
appliances you have furnished for her work, where and how they are to
be kept, and set her the example of always looking for and putting
them in their proper places. If they are misused, show your regret
decidedly, but still kindly. Should all means of civilizing her taste
up to your standard fail, make, as I have advised, an art-kitchen
for your own use. Appropriate one corner of the room, where cooking
is done, for your operations, and arrange there your pet tools. Have
your scoop flour-sifter; your patent pie-lifter and oyster-broiler;
your star-toaster; your pie-crimper, vegetable and nutmeg graters;
gravy-strainer, colander, biscuit-cutter, skimmers, larding needles,
wire, and perforated, and slit and fluted spoons; your weights and
measures, and the tidy, serviceable tinned and enamelled saucepans,
Scotch kettles, frying-pans, etc., that will retain tidiness and
serviceable qualities so long in your care, and so soon come to grief
in boorish clutches. Set all these, and as many others as you like
and can afford to buy—always including the Dover egg-beater and its
“Baby” (made for whipping one egg to more purpose than one egg, or
anything else as small was ever whipped before)—in array upon walls
and shelves,[A] and let the logic of daily events prove how far they
will deprive work of the wearing vexations attendant upon long searches
for the right article, and its wrong condition when found. Make your
helpers—one and all—comprehend that these are your especial property,
to be used—_and kept clean_—by no one else. Let them be looked down
upon as the toys of a would-be-busy woman by the superior intellects
about you, should they see fit thus to do, and provide such tools as
are suited to coarser fingers for them to use. The chances are many
to one that your dexterous manipulation of your instruments; the
excellence of the products achieved by yourself and them; even the
attractive neatness of the display and your corner, will win skeptics,
first, to indulgence, then, admiration, then, to imitation. If you
can afford the great luxury of a pastry or mixing-room, adjoining
the kitchen, so much the better for you and your pious undertaking.
But without regard to what may be the effect upon others, have
your saucepans, of whatever designs and in whatever quantities you
like—taking “saucepan” as a generic term for every description of mute
helpers in the task of elevating cookery into a fine art, or, at the
least, in redeeming it from the stigma of coarseness and vulgarity.

Have, also, as an indispensable adjunct of saucepans, appliances for
cleansing them. There is nothing inherently degrading in dish-washing.
Provide plenty of towels and hot water; a mop with a handle and a loop
by which to hang it up when it has been squeezed and shaken after use;
a soap-shaker—a neat wire cup, enclosing the soap, and furnished with
a handle of tinned wire, and a dish-pan, with a partition running
across the middle, that the soiled articles may be rinsed from grease
in one of the compartments before they are purified thoroughly in the
other. Have, also, at hand a can or box of washing soda, and a bottle
of ammonia for taking off the grease more effectually; a cake of
Indexical silver soap in a cup, with a brush, for restoring lustre to
tins, Britannia or plated, or silver ware. Thus armed, the cleansing of
your implements will be a matter of brief moment, and your work in the
kitchen be, in no sense, a hindrance to the stated duties of the day,
while your methods and occasional presence cannot fail to be a refining
influence upon all except the very common and spiritually unclean.
Ladyhood, _if thorough_, will assert itself, even behind a scullion’s
apron.



JANUARY.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Beef Soup.
  Chicken smothered with Oysters.      Celery Salad.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Cauliflower au gratin.
  Stewed Tomatoes.
  ——
  Blanc Mange and Cream.
  Sponge Cake.
  Cocoa.
  ——


BEEF SOUP.

  3 lbs. of lean beef, with a marrow-bone.
  ½ lb. lean ham (or a ham-bone, if you have it).
  1 turnip.
  1 onion.
  1 carrot.
  ¼ of a cabbage.
  3 stalks of celery.
  3 quarts of water—cold, of course.
  Salt and pepper to taste.

Cut the meat very fine, and crack the bones well. Put these on in a pot
with a close top; cover with a quart of water, and set where they will
come _very slowly_ to a boil. If they do not reach this point in less
than an hour, so much the better. When the contents of the pot begin
to bubble, add the remaining two quarts of cold water, and let all
boil slowly for three hours: for two hours with the top closed, during
the last with it slightly lifted. Wash and peel the turnip, carrot,
and onion, scrape the celery, and wash with the cabbage. Cut all into
dice and lay in cold water, a little salted, for half an hour. Put the
carrot on to stew in a small vessel by itself; the others all together,
with enough water to cover them. Some think the carrot keeps color
and shape better if hot, instead of cold water be used for it. Let it
stew until tender, then drain off the water and set it aside to cool.
The other vegetables should be boiled to pieces. Half an hour before
the soup is to be taken up, strain the water from the cabbage, etc.,
pressing them to a pulp to extract all the strength. Return this to
the saucepan, throw in a little salt, let it boil up once to clear it;
skim and add to the soup. Put in pepper, and salt—unless the ham has
salted it sufficiently—and boil, covered, twenty minutes. Strain into
an earthenware basin; let it get cool enough for the fat to arise to
the surface, when take off all that will come away. Return to the pot,
which should have been previously rinsed with hot water, boil briskly
for one minute, and throw in the carrot. Skim and serve.

This is a good, clear soup. If you like it thicker, dissolve a
tablespoonful of gelatine in enough cold water to cover it well—this
may be done by an hour’s soaking—and add to the soup after the latter
is strained and cleared of the fat.

When practicable, make Sunday’s soup on Saturday, so far as to prepare
the “stock,” or meat base. Set it away in an earthenware crock, adding
a little salt. This not only lessens Sunday’s work, but the unstrained
soup gathers the whole strength of the meat, and the fat can be removed
in a solid cake of excellent dripping. Indeed, it is a good rule
_always to prepare soup stock at least twenty-four hours before it is
to be used for the table_.

Try, likewise, to make enough soup for Sunday to last over Monday as
well. A little forethought on Saturday will lessen the labors and
increase the comfort of what has been somewhat profanely named “Job’s
birthday,” the anniversary which was to be accursed for evermore.


CHICKEN SMOTHERED WITH OYSTERS.

  1 full-grown, tender chicken.
  1 pint of oysters.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  3        “       “  cream.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch.
  Yolks of three hard-boiled eggs.
  1 scant cup bread-crumbs.
  Pepper, salt, and chopped parsley.

Prepare the chicken as for roasting. Stuff with a dressing of the
oysters chopped pretty fine, and mixed with the bread-crumbs, seasoned
to taste with pepper and salt. Tie up the neck securely. (This can be
done on Saturday, if the fowl be afterwards kept in a very cold place.)

Put the chicken thus stuffed and trussed, with legs and wings tied
close to the body with soft tape, into a tin pail with a _tight_ top.
Cover closely and set, with a weight on the top, in a pot of cold
water. Bring gradually to a boil, that the fowl may be heated evenly
and thoroughly. Stew steadily, never fast, for an hour and a half after
the water in the outer kettle begins to boil. Then open the pail and
test with a fork to see if the chicken be tender. If not, re-cover _at
once_, and stew for half or three-quarters of an hour longer. When the
chicken is tender throughout, take it out and lay upon a hot dish,
covering immediately. Turn the juices left in the pail into a saucepan,
thicken with the corn-starch, which should first be wet up with a
little cold milk, then the chopped parsley, butter, pepper and salt,
and the yolks of the hard-boiled eggs chopped fine. Boil up once, stir
in the cream, and take from the fire before it can boil again. Pour a
few spoonfuls over the chicken, and serve the rest in a sauce-tureen.


CELERY SALAD.

  2 bunches of celery.
  1 tablespoonful of salad oil.
  4 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
  1 small teaspoonful fine sugar.
  Pepper and salt to taste.

Wash and scrape the celery, lay in ice-cold water until dinner-time,
when cut into inch-lengths, season, tossing all well up together, and
serve in a salad bowl.


CAULIFLOWER _au gratin_.

  1 large cauliflower.
  4 tablespoonfuls grated cheese.
  1 cup drawn butter.
  Pepper and salt.
  A pinch of nutmeg.

Boil the cauliflower until tender (about twenty minutes), having first
tied it up in a bag of coarse lace or tarlatan. Have ready a cup of
good drawn butter, and pour over the cauliflower, when you have drained
and dished the latter. Sift the cheese thickly over the top, and brown
by holding a red-hot shovel so close to the cheese that it singes and
blazes. Blow out the fire on the instant, and send to the table.


MASHED POTATOES.

Pare the potatoes very thin, lay in cold water for an hour, and cover
well with boiling water. (“Peach-blows” are better put down in _cold_
water.) Boil quickly, and when done, drain off every drop of water;
throw in a little salt; set back on the range for two or three minutes.
Mash soft with a potato-beetle, or whip to a cream with a fork, adding
a little butter and enough milk to make a soft paste. Heap in a smooth
mound upon a vegetable dish.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Open a can of tomatoes an hour before cooking them. Leave out the cores
and unripe parts. Cook always in tin or porcelain saucepans. Iron
injures color and flavor. Stew gently for half an hour; season to taste
with salt, pepper, a little sugar, and a tablespoonful of butter. Cook
gently, uncovered, ten minutes longer, and turn into a deep dish.


BLANC MANGE.

  1 liberal quart of milk.
  1 oz. Cooper’s gelatine.
  ¾ of a cup of white sugar.
  2 teaspoonfuls vanilla.

Soak the gelatine for two hours in a breakfast-cup of cold water. Heat
the milk to boiling in a farina-kettle, or in a tin pail set in a pot
of hot water. Add the soaked gelatine and sugar, stir for ten minutes
over the fire, and strain through a thin muslin bag into a mould wet
with cold water. Flavor and set in a cold place to form. To loosen it,
dip the mould for one instant in hot water, detach the surface from
the sides by a light pressure of the fingers, and reverse over a glass
or china dish. Serve with powdered sugar and cream.

By all means have Sunday desserts prepared upon the preceding day. To
this end, I have endeavored to give such receipts for the blessed day
as can be easily made ready on Saturday.


COCOA.

  6 tablespoonfuls of cocoa to each pint of water.
  As much milk as you have water.
  Sugar to taste.

Rub the cocoa smooth in a little cold water. Have ready on the fire
the pint of boiling water. Stir in the grated cocoa-paste. Boil twenty
minutes; add the milk and boil five minutes more, stirring often.

Sweeten in the cups to suit different tastes.

There is a preparation of cocoa, already powdered, called “cocoatina,”
which needs no boiling. It is very good, and saves the trouble of
grating and cooking. I regret that, although I have used it frequently
and with great satisfaction, I have forgotten the name of the
manufacturer. It is put up in round boxes, like mustard, and is quite
as economical for family use as the cakes of cocoa.


SPONGE CAKE.

  6 eggs.
  The weight of the eggs in sugar.
  Half their weight in flour.
  1 lemon, juice and rind.

Beat yolks and whites very light, separately of course, the powdered
sugar into the yolks when they are smooth and thick; next, the juice
and grated peel of the lemon; then the whites with a few swift strokes;
at last, the flour, in great, loose handfuls. Stir in lightly, but
thoroughly. Too much beating after the flour goes in makes sponge cake
tough. Bake in round tin moulds, buttered. Your oven should be steady.
When the cakes begin to color on top, cover with paper to prevent
burning.

When cool, wrap in a thick cloth to keep fresh.


  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Soup à l’Italienne.
  Breaded Mutton Chops.    Baked Macaroni, with Tomato Sauce.
  Potato Puff.      Apple Sauce.
  ——
  Corn Starch Hasty Pudding.
  Coffee.
  ——

Said an irascible householder to a friend from another city, whom he
chanced to meet in the street one day, “Come and dine with me! But I
give you warning we shall have nothing for dinner but a confounded
dressmaker!” Few of the great middle class, who are the strength
and glory of our land, would dare take an unexpected guest home on
washing-day, although fewer still would dare reveal, as frankly as
did our blunt citizen, the cause of their reluctance to unveil the
penetralia of what are, upon all days save Black Monday and Blue
Tuesday, orderly and brightsome households.

Don’t interrupt me, please, my much-tried and much-trying sister, upon
whose brow the plaits of Monday’s tribulations have left enduring
traces! I know Bridget is always cross on wash-day, and that Katy
wears an aggrieved air from morning until night; that dusting,
china-washing, and divers other unaccustomed tasks are appointed
unto your already busy self; that John and the boys hate “pick-up
dinners;” that the modest bills of fare set down in this book for
the second and third days of the week will, at the first glance,
seem preposterous and unfeeling. You will survey them with very much
the same feeling as moved Pope to exclaim, with tears in his eyes,
“From an old friend I had not expected this!” when his host, having
allowed him to eat to repletion of less savory viands, had brought
on, without a note of preparation, the poet’s favorite dish, a fine
hare roasted with truffles. But the fact remains that people cannot
swallow enough on Sunday to support Nature through the two days’
journey into the wilderness of making-clean that follows the season
of rest and devotion. It is also true that your husband and yourself,
with school-children and servants, work harder on Monday than upon any
other one day of the seven, and that your food should be nourishing.
Should Bridget protest against “hot mate and soup” as unprecedented and
“onfaling,” Bridget’s mistress (by courtesy) must bring another unknown
commodity to the obstinate Celt, to bear upon the subject—to wit,
BRAINS. As I shall try to show, an hour given by yourself to the lower
regions—too often an inferno on that direful day—will put such a repast
before unexpectant John as shall have for his eye and taste none of the
characteristics of a “pick-up dinner.”


SOUP À L’ITALIENNE.

  The stock of Sunday’s soup strained from the carrots.
  Half a cup of grated cheese and a cup of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch wet up with water.
  2 eggs beaten light.

Put the soup on fifteen minutes before dinner, where it will heat
quickly. The moment it boils, draw it to one side, stir in the
corn-starch and milk and heat anew, stirring constantly until it begins
to thicken. Set it again upon the side of the range, and add the beaten
eggs. Cover and leave it where it will keep hot, but not cook, while
you scald the tureen and put the grated cheese in the bottom. In five
minutes pour the soup upon the cheese, stir all up well, and it is
ready for the table.

This is a delicious soup and easily made.


BREADED MUTTON CHOPS—BAKED.

Trim the chops neatly and put aside the bones and bits of skin for
the sauce for macaroni. Pour a little melted butter over the meat.
Do this as early in the day as convenient, cover them and let them
stand until an hour before they are to be served. Then, roll each in
beaten egg, next, in fine cracker-dust, (you can buy it ready powdered)
and lay them in your dripping-pan with a very little water in the
bottom—just enough to keep them from burning. Bake quickly—covering the
dripping-pan with another—for half an hour. Then remove the upper,
baste the chops with butter and hot water, and let them brown. When
done, lay them upon a hot dish and set in the open oven to keep warm.
Add to the gravy in the dripping-pan a little hot water, a teaspoonful
of browned flour, a tablespoonful of catsup, a _small_ quantity of
minced onion, pepper and salt. Boil up once, strain, and pour over the
chops.


MACARONI WITH TOMATO SAUCE.

Break the macaroni into short pieces and set over the fire with enough
boiling water to cover it well, as it swells to treble its original
dimensions. In twenty minutes it should be tender. Drain off the water
carefully, not to break the macaroni, and stir lightly into it pepper,
salt, and a tablespoonful of butter. Turn it into a deep dish and pour
over it a sauce made as follows: To the bones and refuse bits left from
trimming the chops, add a pint of cold water, and stew slowly upon the
back of the range, (lest Bridget should be inconvenienced thereby,)
until you have less than a cupful of good gravy. Strain out the bones,
etc., season to taste, and add what was left from the stewed tomatoes
of yesterday. Having had the provision for to-day’s dinner in mind,
you will have acted wisely in seeing for yourself that it did not go
into the swill-pail under the head of “scraps.” Cook tomatoes and
gravy together for three minutes after they begin to simmer, and pour,
smoking hot, over the macaroni. Let it stand covered a few minutes
before serving.


POTATO PUFF.

To two cupfuls of cold mashed potato (more of yesterday’s leavings),
add a tablespoonful of melted butter, and beat to a cream. Put with
this two eggs whipped light, and a cupful of milk, salting to taste.
Beat all well; pour into a greased baking-dish, and bake quickly to a
light brown. Serve in the dish in which it was cooked.


CORN-STARCH HASTY PUDDING.

  1 quart of fresh milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  4 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch wet up with water.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.

Heat the milk to scalding, and stir into it the corn-starch until it
has boiled ten minutes and is thick and smooth throughout. Add salt and
butter, let the pudding stand in the farina-kettle in which it has been
boiled—the hot water around it—for three minutes before turning it into
a deep _open_ dish.

Eat with butter and sugar, or with powdered sugar and cream, with
nutmeg grated over it.


COFFEE.

A French coffee-pot is a convenience on Monday. If you have one, you
know how to use it. If not, put a quart of boiling water into your
coffee-pot; wet up a cupful of ground coffee with the white of an
egg, adding the egg-shell, and a little cold water. Put this into the
boiling hot water, and boil fast ten minutes. Then, add half a cup of
cold water, and set it upon the hearth or table to “settle” for five
minutes. Pour it off carefully into your metal or china coffee-pot or
urn.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Scotch Broth.
  Rolled Beefsteaks.      Cabbage Salad.
  Browned Potatoes.      Baked Beans.
  ——
  Apple and Tapioca Pudding.
  Hard Sauce.
  ——


SCOTCH BROTH.

  3 lbs. of veal and bones from neck or knuckle.
  3 quarts of water.
  1 onion.
  1 turnip.
  3 stalks of celery.
  1 cupful pearl barley.
  Salt and pepper to taste.

Crack the bones and mince the meat early in the day, if you dine near
midday, and put on with the cold water. Soak the barley in lukewarm
water, after washing it well, and when it has lain in the tepid bath
for two hours, put it in the same over the fire to cook slowly, keeping
it covered fully by adding hot water from the kettle. Wash, scrape and
chop the vegetables; cover with cold water, and stew in a saucepan by
themselves. When they are very soft, rub them through a colander; add
the water in which they were cooked, and keep hot until the meat in the
soup-kettle has boiled to rags. For this purpose four hours are better
than three. Strain out bones and meat; put soup-stock, barley (with the
water in which it has boiled), vegetable broth, pepper, and salt, into
one kettle and boil slowly for thirty minutes. A little chopped parsley
is an improvement.


ROLLED BEEFSTEAKS.

  2 good sirloin steaks.
  Bread-crumbs.
  A slice of fat salt pork.
  Seasoning, a little minced onion, pepper and salt.

Take out the bones from the steak and throw them into the soup-pot. If
your butcher has not already done so, beat the meat flat with the broad
side of a hatchet, and cover it with a force-meat made of bread-crumbs,
minced pork, and half an onion. Moisten this slightly with water, and
season to taste. Roll each steak up, closely enclosing the stuffing;
bind with twine into two compact bundles and lay in a dripping-pan.
Dash a cupful of boiling water over each, cover with an inverted pan,
and bake about three-quarters of an hour, in their own steam. At the
end of this time remove the cover, baste with butter and dredge with
flour to brown the meat. When they are of a fine color, lay upon a hot
dish. Thicken the gravy with a little browned flour, boil up and send
to table in a boat. In removing the strings from the rolled beef prior
to serving, clip them in several places, that the form of the meat may
not be disturbed.


CABBAGE SALAD.

  1 small head of cabbage, chopped fine, or cut into shreds.
  1 cup of boiling milk.
  ¾ of a cup of vinegar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 tablespoonful of white sugar.
  2 eggs well beaten.
  1 teaspoonful essence of celery.
  Pepper and salt.

Heat milk and vinegar in separate vessels. To the boiling vinegar add
butter, sugar, and seasoning, lastly the chopped cabbage. Heat to
scalding, but do not let it boil. Stir the beaten eggs into the hot
milk. Cook one minute together after they begin to boil. Turn the hot
cabbage into a bowl; pour the custard over it; toss up and about with a
wooden or silver fork, until all the ingredients are well mixed. Cover
and set in a very cold place for some hours.

This is a very delightful salad, quite repaying the trouble of cooking
the dressing.


BROWNED POTATOES.

Boil large potatoes with their skins on; peel them, and, when you
uncover your beef for browning, lay the potatoes in the dripping-pan
about the meat. Dredge and baste them as well as the beef. If not quite
brown when the meat is ready, leave them in the gravy for awhile,
before thickening the latter. Drain in a hot colander, and arrange
neatly around the steaks in the dish.


BAKED BEANS.

Soak dried beans all night in soft water, exchanging this in the
morning for lukewarm, and this, two hours later, for still warmer. Let
them lie an hour in this, before putting them on to boil in cold water.
When they are soft, drain and turn them into a bake-dish. Season with
pepper and salt, with a liberal spoonful of butter. Add enough boiling
water to prevent them from scorching and bake, covered, until they
smoke and bubble. Remove the cover, and brown. Serve in the bake-dish.


APPLE AND TAPIOCA PUDDING.

  1 teacupful tapioca, soaked for five hours in 3 teacupfuls of warm
          (not hot) water.
  8 juicy pippins, pared and cored.
  3 tablespoonfuls of sugar and a saltspoonful of salt, with a few
          whole cloves.

Arrange the apples in a deep dish; add a cup of cold water; cover, and
steam in a moderate oven until tender all through, turning them once
or twice. Turn off half the liquid and pour the tapioca, which should
have been soaked in a warm place, over the apples, when you have filled
the hollows left by the cores with sugar and put a clove in each.
The tapioca should be _slightly_ salted. Bake one hour, or until the
tapioca is clear and crusted on top. Serve in pudding-dish.


HARD SAUCE.

To two cups of powdered sugar add half a cup of butter, slightly
warmed, so that the two can be worked up together. When they are well
mixed, beat in half a teaspoonful of nutmeg and the juice of a lemon.
Whip smooth and light, mound neatly upon a butter-plate, and set in the
cold to harden.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Split Pea Soup.
  Halibut Steaks.      Boiled Leg of Mutton.
  Caper Sauce.
  Spinach.      Stewed Potatoes.
  ——
  Cottage Pudding with Liquid Sauce.
  ——


SPLIT PEA SOUP.

  1 pint of split peas.
  4 quarts of water.
  2 lbs. of beef and some bones.
  ¼ lb. of lean bacon or ham.
  3 stalks of celery, the white part only, cut fine.
  Juice of a lemon.
  Stale bread cut into dice and fried.

Soak the peas all night in soft water, changing it in the morning for
warm—not hot. Throw this off after an hour and cover the peas with
four quarts of cold water. Boil in this—adding the meat, cut small,
the bones well cracked and the celery—four hours. _Always boil soups
slowly._ The neglect of this rule leaves in the kettle a mass of
toughened meat and an ocean of dish-water.

When you are ready to take up your soup, strain in a colander, picking
out and casting aside bits of bones and shreds of meat. Rub the peas
and celery through the holes of the strainer until nothing more will
pass. Season with pepper and salt; add the juice of a small lemon, and
return to the kettle, which must first be rinsed with hot water. Let
all boil together two minutes. Should it not seem so thick as you would
like, you can put in, while it is boiling, a little corn-starch wet up
with cold water. Put a couple of slices of stale bread, cut into dice
and fried crisp in dripping, in the heated tureen, and pour the soup
upon them.


HALIBUT STEAKS—FRIED.

Wash and wipe the steaks. Roll each in flour, and fry upon a buttered
griddle, turning carefully with a spatula, or cake-turner, when
the lower side is done. They should be of a nice brown, and tender
throughout. Remove to a hot dish and garnish with sliced lemon; in
carving, see that a bit of the lemon goes to each person, as many
prefer it to any other sauce for fish. Send around potatoes with the
steak. Worcestershire is a good store-sauce for fish and game. Anchovy
is pre-eminently a fish sauce, but many do not like it.


LEG OF MUTTON—BOILED.

Do not have the mutton too fat or too large. Cut off the shank, which
the butcher will have nicked for you, leaving about two inches beyond
the ham. Wash and wipe carefully and boil in hot water, with a little
salt, until a fork will readily pierce the thickest part. About ten
or twelve minutes to the pound is a good rule in boiling _fresh_ meat.
Serve with caper sauce. Since you intend to use the liquor in which the
meat is boiled for to-morrow’s soup, do not oversalt it. But sprinkle,
instead, salt over the leg of mutton after it is dished; rub it all
over with butter and set in a hot oven for a single minute.


CAPER SAUCE.

  1 cup of the liquor in which the meat has been boiled.
  2 teaspoonfuls of flour rubbed smooth in a little water. Salt to taste.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  About two dozen capers or green nasturtium-seed.

Heat the liquor to boiling, and skim before stirring in the flour,
which must be perfectly free from lumps, and rubbed smooth in cold
water. Stir until the sauce thickens evenly. It is best to cook all
sauces in a vessel set within a larger one of hot water. When it has
boiled about a minute, add the butter gradually, stirring each bit in
well before putting in more. Salt, and drop in the capers. Let it just
boil, and turn into a sauce-boat.


SPINACH.

Pull the spinach from the stalks, leaf by leaf; wash carefully, and
leave in cold water one hour. Boil in hot water fifteen minutes. Drain
very dry in a colander; chop extremely fine in a wooden bowl, then
return to the saucepan with a tablespoonful of butter, a little salt,
and a teaspoonful of white sugar. As it heats beat it up with a wooden
spoon until it is a soft paste. Let it bubble up once, and dish. Lay
a hard-boiled egg or two, cut in thin slices, upon the surface. Few
vegetables are more often ruined in the cooking than spinach. The above
receipt is simple and good.


STEWED POTATOES.

Pare and cut into large dice some good potatoes. Lay in cold water half
an hour. Stew in cold water, a little salted. There should be enough
water to cover them well. When they are tender and begin to crumble
at the edges, drain off half the water, and pour in as much milk. When
they are again scalding hot, stir in a lump of butter the size of
an egg (for a large dish) rolled in flour, salt, pepper and chopped
parsley to taste. Boil up once and serve in a covered dish.


COTTAGE PUDDING.

  1 cup of powdered sugar.
  1 cup of sweet milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  2 eggs, beaten light, yolks and whites separately.
  Saltspoonful of salt.
  _About_ 3 cups of Hecker’s prepared flour, enough for cake-batter.

Rub the butter well into the sugar; add beaten yolks; the milk, salt,
then whipped whites and yolks alternately. Bake in a buttered mould.
When you can bring out the testing-straw clean from the middle of the
loaf, turn it out upon a dish. Cut in slices while hot, as it is wanted.

One who has never tried it can hardly believe that the result of a
receipt which may be tried fearlessly by a novice in cookery, could be
the really elegant pudding just described.

It is also as economical as toothsome.


SAUCE FOR COTTAGE PUDDING.

  2 cups of powdered sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 cup of boiling water.
  1 glass sherry wine.
  Nutmeg or cinnamon to taste.

Rub the butter into the sugar; add hot water gradually; then spice and
wine. Cover tightly to keep in the strength of the wine, and set for
twenty minutes in a saucepan of boiling water. Stir up and send to
table.


  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Vermicelli Soup.
  Scalloped Oysters.      Mince of Mutton with Potato Frill.
  Baked Tomatoes.      Celery.
  ——
  Tipsy Trifle.
  Apples and Nuts.
  ——


VERMICELLI SOUP.

Take off all the fat from the broth in which your mutton was cooked
yesterday, and boil it down slowly to two-thirds of the original
quantity. Stew to pieces, in another vessel, a stalk of celery, one
small onion, a carrot, and a bunch of sweet herbs—all cut up fine. A
ham-bone, if you have it, or a couple of slices of lean ham, will be an
improvement to the broth. Strain the soup; rub the vegetables through a
fine colander with the water in which they were boiled; return to the
fire with a double handful of vermicelli broken into short pieces; boil
for ten minutes; add a tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour; boil up
and serve.

Send around a saucer of grated cheese with vermicelli and macaroni
soups. It is a great improvement to the flavor and consistency. Each
person may take as much or as little as he likes.


SCALLOPED OYSTERS.

  1 quart of fine oysters.
  1 coffee-cupful of pounded cracker.
  2 great spoonfuls of butter.
  ½ cupful of cream or rich milk.
  Pepper and salt to taste.

Butter a baking-dish and cover the bottom pretty thickly with pounded
cracker. Wet with oyster liquor and a few spoonfuls of cream. Next, lay
oysters, one deep, closely over these. Pepper and salt, and stick a
bit of butter upon each. Another layer of crumbs, wet as before; more
oysters, and proceed in like order until your dish is full, making the
top layer of crumbs with butter dotted over it. Set in the oven, invert
a plate or tin pan over the dish, and bake until the juice bubbles up
to the top. Uncover; set upon the upper grating of the oven to brown,
and send to table in the bake-dish. Pass around sliced lemon with it.

Oysters, like fish, follow immediately after soup, and are a course by
themselves.


MINCE OF MUTTON WITH POTATO FRILL.

  The remains of yesterday’s mutton, minced, but not very fine.
  1 cupful of drawn butter.
  2 tablespoonfuls of cream, or rich milk.
  Pepper, salt, and mace to taste, also chopped parsley.
  1 button onion.
  2 eggs, well beaten.

Heat the sauce to a boil, add the seasoning and the onion, chopped very
fine; then, the meat. Draw the saucepan to the side of the range, and
let it stand, closely covered, in _boiling_ water for ten minutes. Set
again over the fire and bring to boiling point. Add the eggs and milk
and set back at the side for five minutes, still covered. The mince
should never really boil after the meat goes in.


POTATO FRILL.

Boil and mash some potatoes; working in a little milk and butter, but
not so much as to make the paste very soft. Season with salt, and,
while still hot, knead in a beaten egg. Shape this paste into a fence,
on the inside round of a shallow dish; fluting it regularly with the
round handle of a knife. Set for one minute in a hot oven, but not long
enough to cause the fence to crack. Glaze quickly with butter, and pour
the meat carefully within the wall. The mince should not be so thin as
to wash away the “frill.” If well managed this is a pretty and a savory
dish.


BAKED TOMATOES.

  1 can of tomatoes.
  Stale bread, crumbed fine.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Pepper, salt, a little chopped parsley, and white sugar.

Drain off two-thirds of the liquor from the tomatoes; salt it and
set aside for another day’s soup. One has no excuse for waste whose
“stock-pot” is always near at hand. Little comes amiss to it. Cover the
bottom of a bake-dish with crumbs; lay the tomatoes evenly upon this
bed; season with pepper, salt, sugar, and parsley, with bits of butter
here and there. Strew bread-crumbs over all, a thicker layer than at
the bottom; put tiny pieces of butter upon this, and bake, covered,
about thirty-five minutes. Take off the cover and brown upon the upper
shelf of the oven. Do not let it stay there long enough to get dry.


CELERY—RAW.

Wash, trim, and scrape the stalks, selecting those that are white and
tender. Crisp by leaving them in very cold water until they are wanted
for the table. Arrange neatly in a celery-stand. Pass between the
oysters and meat.


TIPSY TRIFLE.

  1 quart of milk.
  3 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  1 stale sponge-cake.
  1 cup of sugar.
  Flavoring of vanilla.
  1 cup of sherry wine.
  A few spoonfuls of currant jelly.

Make a custard of the milk, sugar, the yolks of the eggs and the whites
of _two_. Put in the latter ingredients when the milk _almost_ boils,
and stir until it begins to thicken. Flavor when cold. Put a layer of
sliced cake in the bottom of a glass bowl. Wet with the wine and a few
spoonfuls of custard, and when it is quite soaked, put on more cake.
Proceed in this manner until the cake and wine are used up, when pour
on, a little at a time, the remainder of the custard; holding down
the cake with a bread spoon as you do this to keep it from floating.
Lay a heavy plate upon it, for the same purpose, while you prepare a
méringue by whipping stiff the rest of the whites, and then beating in
the currant jelly. Cover the trifle with this just before dinner-time.


APPLES AND NUTS.

Polish the apples, and crack the nuts, unless you have plenty of
nut-crackers. Give a knife to each apple-plate, and teach the children
to pare them neatly for themselves, instead of “munching” like rabbits
at family dinners, and being awkwardly ill at ease when “company” is
present. Silver or ivory knives are better for fruit than steel.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Soupe Maigre.
  Boiled Cod.      Roast Duck with Bread Sauce.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Rice Croquettes.
  Stewed Celery.
  ——
  Apple Pie.
  ——


SOUPE MAIGRE.

  1 quart of milk.
  3 pints of water.
  1 onion.
  1 turnip.
  3 stalks of celery.
  1 potato (large).
  Quarter of a small cabbage, sliced.
  ½ cup of bread-crumbs, very dry.
  2 eggs, beaten light.
  Parsley, pepper, and salt to taste.
  4 tablespoonfuls of butter.

Clean, scrape, and mince the vegetables, and put on to cook in cold
water, enough to cover them well. When they are scalding hot, drain,
and cover them with three pints of boiling water. Stew slowly in this
until they are reduced to pulp. Rub through a colander, season, and
heat again to boiling. Stir in the bread-crumbs; then the butter, very
gradually. Have the milk ready, heated in another vessel, and pour into
the soup-kettle at this juncture. Let the soup get very hot, but not
boil. Set upon the side of the range, and, dipping out a cupful, add
it, a little at a time, to the beaten eggs. When well mixed, return
eggs and liquor to the rest of the soup; stir over the fire for an
instant, but never to boiling, and serve in a hot tureen.

The eggs should not be allowed to curdle in the liquor; hence the need
of carefulness in following the directions above given. A little grated
cheese is a pleasant accompaniment to this soup, each person adding it
as pleases him.


BOILED COD.

Lay the fish in cold water, a little salt, for half an hour. Wipe dry,
and sew up in a linen cloth, coarse and clean, fitted to the shape
of the piece of cod. Have but one fold over each part. Lay in the
fish-kettle, cover with boiling water, salted at discretion. Allow
nearly an hour for a piece weighing four pounds.


SAUCE.

To one gill of boiling water allow as much milk; stir into this, while
boiling, two tablespoonfuls of butter, added gradually, a tablespoonful
of flour wet up with cold water, and, as it thickens, the chopped yolk
of a boiled egg and one raw egg, beaten light. Take directly from the
fire, season with pepper, salt, a little chopped parsley and the juice
of a lemon, and set, covered, in boiling water, but not over the fire,
for five minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour part of the sauce over
the fish when dished; the rest in a boat. Send around mashed potatoes
with it.


ROAST DUCK.

Clean the duck very carefully, rinsing it out with a little soda and
water, and afterwards with fresh water. Lay in cold, salted water
for an hour. Wipe dry, inside and out, and stuff with a dressing of
bread-crumbs, seasoned with pepper and salt, a _very_ little powdered
sage and a “suspicion” of minced onion. Sew up; dash a cup of boiling
water over them, as they lie in the dripping-pan, and roast, covered,
for the first half-hour. Remove the cover, and baste freely—three times
with butter and water, four or five times with the gravy from the pan.
Stew the giblets in a little salted water, and reserve to piece out
to-morrow’s salmi. Dish the ducks upon a hot platter.


BREAD SAUCE.

Skim the fat well from the gravy left in the dripping-pan; have ready
a handful of bread-crumbs (stale), wet up with hot water. Thicken the
gravy with these when it has come to a boil; season with pepper, salt,
and a pinch of mace. Boil all together once and serve.


MASHED POTATOES.

See receipt for _Sunday_.

While I would spare you all waste of time and pains in looking up
receipts in other parts of this volume, I yet deem it hardly worth
while to write out in full the same directions twice for the same
week—or month.


RICE CROQUETTES.

  1 cup of cold boiled rice.
  1 teaspoonful of sugar, and half as much salt.
  1 teaspoonful of melted butter.
  1 egg, beaten light.
  Enough milk to make the rice into stiff paste.
  Sweet lard for frying.

Work rice, butter, egg, etc., into an adhesive paste, beating each
ingredient thoroughly into the mixture. Flour your hands and make
the rice into oval balls. Dip each in beaten egg, then in flour, or
cracker-dust, and fry in boiling lard, a few at a time, turning each
with great care. When the croquettes are of a fine yellow-brown, take
out with a wire spoon and lay within a heated colander to drain off
every drop of fat. Serve hot, with sprigs of parsley laid about them,
in an uncovered dish.


STEWED CELERY.

Cut the celery into inch lengths; cover with cold water and stew until
tender. Turn off the water and supply its place with enough milk to
cover the celery. When this begins to boil stir in a good lump of
butter rolled in flour; pepper and salt to taste, and stew gently five
minutes.

You will like this vegetable thus prepared. Eat, if you like, with a
little lemon-juice or vinegar.


APPLE PIE.

  1 quart of flour, dried and sifted.
  ½ lb. of lard.
  ¼ lb. of butter.
  Ice-water to make stiff paste.

Chop the lard into the dry flour. Wet with ice-water into stiff paste,
touching as little as may be with your hands. Roll out very thin,
always _from_ you. Stick bits of butter all over the sheet; roll up
tightly as you would a sheet of paper. Beat flat with your rolling-pin,
roll out again, and again baste with butter. Repeat the operations of
rolling up, rolling out, and basting until your butter is used up. Set
the roll of pastry in a cold, dry place for at least one hour. All
night would not be too long. When it is crisp and firm, roll out and
line your buttered pie-plates. The bottom crust should be thinner than
the upper. And, as a rule, you would do well to give the roll of pastry
intended for the latter a “baste” or two more than that meant for the
lower.

Pare, core and slice juicy, tart apples; put a layer upon the inner
crust, sprinkle with sugar thickly—scatter a few cloves upon the sugar;
then another layer of apples, and so on, until the dish is full. Cover
with crust, pressed down firmly at the edges, and bake. Eat warm, or
cold, with white sugar sifted over the top.

Apple pie is very good with cream poured over each slice.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Macaroni Soup.
  Ham and Eggs.      Salmi of Duck.
  Fried Parsnips.      Stewed Salsify.
  Sweet Potatoes—in Jackets.
  ——
  Rosie’s Rice Custard.
  ——


MACARONI SOUP.

  4 quarts of cold water.
  3 lbs. of coarse, lean beef, cut into thin strips.
  2 or 3 lbs. of bones, broken small.
  4 onions, sliced.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs, chopped.
  Tomato juice or catsup.
  ¼ lb. of macaroni.
  A few salt pork bones.

Fry the meat until half done, in a very little dripping. Take it
out and fry the onions and bones in the same gravy. Put all into a
soup-kettle with the herbs, and cover with 4 quarts of water (cold).
Bring to a slow boil, and, at the end of four hours, strain into a
great bowl to cool, in order that the fat may rise and be taken off.
Meanwhile, make ready your macaroni by breaking it into short bits,
covering well with boiling water, a little salted, and stewing slowly
twenty minutes, or until tender. Add a lump of butter the size of a
walnut; let it stand, covered, for a few minutes, while you season the
soup, adding the tomato-juice or catsup. Boil, skim, and thicken with
a tablespoonful of corn-starch wet up with cold water. When it is again
on the boil, turn in the macaroni, taking care not to break it. Heat to
scalding, but do not boil; pour out, and serve.


HAM AND EGGS.

Cut your slices of ham of a uniform size and shape, cutting off the
rind. Fry quickly in their own fat. Remove from the pan with a wire
spoon so soon as they are done, and arrange upon a hot dish, setting
this within the open oven, or upon a pot of boiling water to keep
warm. Drop the eggs, as you break them, into the hot fat left in the
frying-pan. Do not put so many in as to crowd one another. Each egg
should preserve its individuality. Cook about three minutes, without
turning. Take up with a spatula, or cake-turner, and lay one upon each
slice of ham. Do not send the gravy to table. Strain, and use for
dripping.


SALMI OF DUCK.

From the cold ducks left after yesterday’s dinner cut all the meat in
as neat slices as you can, leaving the joints of legs and wings whole.
Take off the skin; break the carcass into pieces, and put these, with
the stuffing, into a saucepan with a fried onion, some sweet herbs,
pepper, salt, and a pinch of allspice. Cover with cold water and stew
gently, after it reaches the boil, for one hour. Cool, that the fat
may rise and be taken off. Strain the gravy when you have skimmed
it; return to the saucepan, boil and skim again, and stir in two
tablespoonfuls of browned flour, wet with cold water; lastly, stir in
a great spoonful of butter. Stew five minutes longer, and put in the
meat. Draw to one side of the range, and set, closely covered, in a pot
of boiling water for ten minutes. The meat must be thoroughly heated
and steeped in the gravy, _but not boil_. Take the meat out with a
perforated spoon, pile neatly upon a dish and pour the gravy over it.
Garnish with triangles of stale bread fried crisp, and send a piece to
each person who is helped to salmi.


FRIED PARSNIPS.

Boil, until tender, in hot water slightly salted; let them get almost
cold, scrape off the skin, and cut in thick, long slices. Dredge with
flour and fry in hot dripping, turning as they brown. Drain very dry in
a hot colander; pepper and salt and serve.


STEWED SALSIFY.

Scrape the roots, dropping each into cold water as you do this, that
they may not change color. Cut in pieces an inch long; cover with hot
water and stew until tender. Drain off two-thirds of the water and add
enough milk to cover the salsify. Stew ten minutes in this; put in a
good lump of butter rolled thickly in flour. Pepper and salt. Boil up
for one minute.


SWEET POTATOES—IN JACKETS.

Parboil in their skins when you have washed them, selecting such as
are of like size. Then put in a moderate oven and bake until soft all
through. You can ascertain this by pinching the largest. Wipe off and
serve in their skins.


ROSIE’S RICE CUSTARD.

  1 quart of milk.
  3 eggs, well beaten.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 cup _boiled_ rice.
  A little salt.
  Half the grated rind of a lemon.

Boil the rice, drain, and stir, while hot, into the milk. Beat the eggs
well; rub butter and sugar to a cream with lemon-peel and a little
salt, and stir into the warm milk. Mix well and bake in a buttered dish
in a brisk oven. Eat warm or cold. _We_ like it better warm, with a
little cream poured over it when served in saucers.


  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Soupe au Julienne.
  Roast Turkey.      Cranberry Sauce.
  Mashed Potatoes, Browned.      Stewed Corn.
  Celery.
  ——
  Tropical Snow.
  Light Cakes and Coffee.
  ——


SOUPE AU JULIENNE.

  6 lbs. of lean beef. If possible, get it from the shin and have
          the accompanying bones cracked to bits.
  6 quarts of water—cold.

Prepare the stock on Saturday. Put meat and bones into a pot with a
close cover, pour on the water, and set it where it will heat very
slowly. Boil, also very slowly, six hours, at the back of the range.
Should the water sink fast in the pot, replenish from the boiling
tea-kettle. At the end of six hours, turn the soup, meat, bones and
all, into an earthenware vessel; pepper and salt it and set on the
cellar floor, covered, until next day. Take off, then, the cake of
excellent dripping from the top; strain the soup and set over the fire,
about an hour before dinner, and heat gradually.

The vegetables should be—

  2 carrots.
  3 turnips.
  Half a head of cabbage.
  1 pint Shaker corn, soaked overnight.
  6 stalks of celery.
  1 quart of tomatoes.
  1 large onion.

Clean, scrape, and mince all these, except the corn and tomatoes. Cut
the carrot into dice and stew, by itself, in a little cold water. Boil
the corn in enough water to cover it, and add more hot water as it
swells. Cover the minced vegetables with cold water, and so soon as
it boils, turn it off, and replenish with boiling, from the kettle.
This will take away the rank taste from cabbage and onion. When they
are soft enough to pulp, strain well, but _without pressing_, into the
soup. It is needless to add the vegetables, as the strength is in the
liquor. Boil up and skim the soup before putting in the boiled corn and
the canned tomatoes, which should be cut up small, and the unripe parts
removed. Boil fifteen minutes, add the carrot, season to taste, and
serve.[B]


ROAST TURKEY.

Rinse out the turkey well with soda and water; then with salt, lastly
with fair water. Stuff with a dressing made of bread-crumbs, wet up
with butter and water and seasoned to your taste. Stuff the craw and
tie up the neck. Fill the body and sew up the vent. I need hardly
say that these strings are to be clipped and removed after the fowl
is roasted. Tie the legs to the lower part of the body that they may
not “sprawl,” as the sinews shrink. Put into the dripping-pan, pour a
teacupful of boiling water over it, and roast, basting often, allowing
about ten minutes’ time for every pound. Be careful not to have your
oven too hot—especially during the first half-hour or so. The turkey
would, otherwise, be dry and blackened on the outside and raw within.
And remember how much of the perfection of roasting meats and poultry
depends upon basting faithfully. Boil the giblets tender in a little
water. When the turkey is done, set it where it will keep warm; skim
the gravy left in the pan; add a little boiling water; thicken slightly
with browned flour; boil up once and add the giblets minced fine.
Season to taste; give another boil, and send to table in a gravy-boat.


CRANBERRY SAUCE.

Wash and pick over the cranberries; put on to cook in a tin or
porcelain vessel, allowing a teacupful of water to each quart. Stew
slowly, stirring often until they are as thick as marmalade. Take from
the fire in little over an hour, if they have cooked steadily, sweeten
plentifully with white sugar, and strain through coarse tarlatan, or
mosquito-net, into a mould wet with cold water.

Do this on Saturday. On Sunday, turn out into a glass dish.


MASHED POTATOES—BROWNED.

Having mashed them in the usual manner, mound them smoothly upon
a shallow earthenware dish and set them in a quick oven, glazing
them with butter as they color. They should be of a light brown.
Slip the mound from a coarser to a finer platter by the help of
your cake-turner. It is still better if you have one of the pretty
“enamelled” bake-dishes lined with porcelain, with silver stands for
the table. They are invaluable for puddings, scallops, etc.


STEWED CORN.

Stew one quart of canned corn in its own liquor, setting the
vessel containing it in an outer, of hot water. Should the corn be
exceptionally dry, add a little cold water. When tender, pour in enough
milk to cover the corn, bring to a boil, and put in a tablespoonful
of butter rolled in flour, and salt to taste. Stew gently, stirring
well, three or four minutes, and turn into a deep dish. Keep the vessel
containing the corn closely covered while it is cooking. The steam
facilitates the process and preserves the color of the corn.


CELERY

Is the usual accompaniment of roast turkey. Prepare by selecting
the blanched stalks, scraping off the rust, cutting off all but the
youngest and tenderest tops, and laying these in cold water to crisp
until wanted for the table. Garnish your turkey with alternate light
and dark green sprigs of celery.


TROPICAL SNOW.

  8 sweet oranges.
  1 grated cocoanut.
  1 glass of pale sherry.
  1 cup of powdered sugar.
  5 red bananas.

Peel and cut the oranges into small pieces by dividing each lobe
crosswise into thirds. Extract the seeds and put a layer of the fruit
in the bottom of a glass dish. Pour a little wine upon it, and strew
with powdered sugar. The cocoanut must have been prepared by removing
the rind and throwing it into cold water for some time before grating
it. Over the layer of oranges spread one of cocoanut; cut the bananas
into very thin, round slices, and lay these, one deep, upon the
cocoanut. Repeat the order just given until your dish is full and the
oranges and bananas used up. The top layer must be of cocoanut, heaped
high, sprinkled with powdered sugar and garnished about the base with
slices of banana. Eat soon, as the oranges toughen in the wine.

       *       *       *       *       *

Supplement this pretty, but not substantial dessert by a salver of
lady’s-fingers, and macaroons, and a good cup of coffee.



  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Next Day’s Soup.
  Turkey Scallop.      Panned Oysters.
  Roast Potatoes.      Tomato Sauce.
  ——
  Floating Island.
  Tea.
  ——


NEXT DAY’S SOUP.

Julienne soup, like most other soups the base of which is meat, is
better when warmed over the second day. Set it over the fire where it
will heat, not too quickly, _almost_ to a boil. It will not “put back”
the business of the day twenty minutes, and be a welcome addition to
your dinner.


TURKEY SCALLOP.

Cut the meat from yesterday’s turkey. Crack the carcass to pieces, and
put, with bits of skin, fat, and gristle, into a saucepan; cover with
cold water, and set on to stew slowly into gravy. Chop the meat very
fine; strew the bottom of a greased bake-dish with crumbs, and cover
this with a thick stratum of minced turkey, stuffing, and tiny bits of
butter. Pepper and salt, and put on more crumbs, then meat, and so on.
Stale bread is better for this scallop than cracker-dust. Having used
up all your meat and reserved enough crumbs for a thick upper crust,
cover the dish and put aside in a cool place until your gravy is ready.
It is economy of time, on Monday, to slip in such work as this between
the many “must be’s” of the season. Your scallop will be none the worse
for waiting some hours before, or after, the gravy is added, provided
you keep it covered. When the gravy has drawn all the substance from
bones, etc., strain it and return to the saucepan with what was left
in yesterday’s gravy-boat, having first skimmed the latter. Boil up,
thicken with browned flour wet up with cold water; bring to another
boil; pour over the scallop, saving a little to wet the top. Now comes
your layer of _fine_ bread-crumbs. Wet these with the gravy in a bowl,
season to taste, beat to a soft paste with a couple of eggs and spread
evenly over the scallop. Invert a plate over the bake-dish and set in
the oven. When, at the end of half an hour or so, the gravy bubbles up
at the sides, remove the cover and brown. Serve in the pudding-dish.


PANNED OYSTERS.

A four-course dinner is hardly in order in most households on Monday.
You can, if you like, and have an efficient table-waiter, bring
on oysters, as usual, between soup and meat. But there will be no
violation of the “unities of the drama” of a family dinner, if you
send around your oysters, scallop, and vegetables together.

  1 quart of oysters.
  Some thin slices of toast.
  Butter, salt, and pepper.

Have ready some “patty pans”—the more nearly upright the sides the
better. Cut stale bread in rounds to fit the bottoms of these. Toast,
and lay a piece in each. Wet with oyster liquor and put into each pan
as many oysters as it will conveniently hold. Pepper and salt; put a
bit of butter upon each; arrange all in a large dripping-pan; invert
another of the same size over it, and bake eight minutes, or until the
oysters “ruffle.” Send hot to table in the pans.

You can toast the bread at breakfast-time if you choose. The oysters
can go into the oven when the soup is poured out, and be in good season
on the table. By this arrangement they will not interfere with the
other “baked meats.” Panned oysters are always popular, and there is no
more simple manner of cooking this favorite shell-fish.


ROAST POTATOES.

Choose large, fair potatoes, wash and wipe, and bake until soft to the
grasp. Three-quarters of an hour should suffice. Take out, before the
oysters go in; wipe off dust and ashes, and serve in a heated napkin.
This will keep them hot a long time, yet prevent them from “sweating.”


TOMATO SAUCE.

Open a can of tomatoes at least one hour before it is to be used,
and empty into an earthenware basin, that no close or metallic taste
may linger about them. Cook in tin or porcelain. Stew half an hour,
gently; add salt, pepper, a teaspoonful of sugar, and three of butter,
a handful of dry bread-crumbs—or, if you have any stewed corn left from
yesterday, use that instead of bread. Cook ten minutes longer, and turn
out.


FLOATING ISLAND.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  4 tablespoonfuls (great ones) of sugar.
  2 teaspoonfuls extract of bitter almond or vanilla. (COLGATE’S
          extracts are the best in market, and _do not spoil_ within
          a few days after they are uncorked, as the manner of some
          is.)
  ½ cup of currant jelly.

Heat the milk to scalding, but not boiling. Beat the yolks, stir into
them the sugar, and pour upon them, gradually and mixing well, a cupful
of the hot milk. Return to the saucepan and boil until it begins to
thicken. You can do this while breakfast is cooking, before the Moloch
clothes-boiler goes on. When cool, flavor and pour into a glass dish.
Heap upon the top a _méringue_ of the whites whipped until you can cut
it, into which you have beaten the jelly, a teaspoonful at a time.


TEA.

“A comfortable cup of tea” never comes amiss to a fagged housewife, be
it served at breakfast, luncheon, or dinner. The best way to insure
its goodness—that is, that it be strong, hot and fresh—is to have your
own tea-urn or kettle on the table, with a spirit-lamp burning under
it. Scald the tea-pot, put in the tea; cover with boiling water; put
a “cosey” or a thick napkin about it, and let it stand five minutes
before filling with more _boiling_ water. Wait a minute longer and pour
out.


  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Mutton Soup with Tapioca.
  Salmon Pudding.      Beefsteak.
  Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.      Macaroni with Cheese.
  ——
  Susie’s Bread Pudding.
  ——


MUTTON SOUP WITH TAPIOCA.

  3 lbs. perfectly lean mutton. The scrag makes good soup and costs
          little.
  2 or 3 lbs. of bones, well pounded.
  1 onion.
  2 turnips.
  2 carrots.
  2 stalks of celery.
  A few sprigs of parsley. If you have any tomatoes left from yesterday,
          add them.
  4 tablespoonfuls of pearl or granulated tapioca (not heaping
          spoonfuls).
  4 quarts of water.

Put on the meat, cut in small pieces, with the bones, in two quarts
of cold water. Heat very slowly, and when it boils pour in two quarts
of hot water from the kettle. Chop the vegetables; cover with cold
water. So soon as they begin to simmer, throw off the first water,
replenishing with hot, and stew until they are boiled to pieces. The
meat should cook steadily, never fast, five hours, keeping the pot-lid
on. Strain into a great bowl; let it cool to throw the fat to the
surface; skim and return to the fire. Season with pepper and salt,
boil up, take off the scum; add the vegetables with their liquor. Heat
together ten minutes, strain again, and bring to a slow boil before
the tapioca goes in. This should have been soaked one hour in cold
water, then cooked in the same within another vessel of boiling water
until each grain is clear. It is necessary to stir up often from the
bottom while cooking. Stir gradually into the soup until the tapioca is
dissolved.

Send around grated cheese with this soup.


SALMON PUDDING.

  1 can preserved salmon.
  3 eggs.
  4 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
  ½ cup fine bread-crumbs.
  Pepper, salt, and minced parsley.

Mince the fish, draining off the liquor for the sauce. Rub in the
butter until thoroughly incorporated. Work in the crumbs, the
seasoning, at last the beaten eggs. Put into a buttered pudding-mould,
set in a dripping-pan full of hot water. Cover the mould, and steam in
the oven, keeping the water in the pan at a fast boil, filling up as it
evaporates, for one hour. Set it in cold water one minute when you have
taken it from the oven. This will make it shrink from the sides and
turn out easily upon a flat dish.


SAUCE FOR THE ABOVE.

  1 cupful of milk heated to a boil and thickened with a tablespoonful
          of corn-starch, previously wet up with cold water.
  The liquor from the salmon.
  1 great spoonful of butter.
  1 raw egg, beaten light.
  Juice of half a lemon.
  Mace and cayenne pepper to taste.

Put the egg into the thickened milk when you have stirred in the butter
and liquor; take from the fire, season, and let it stand in hot water
three minutes, covered. Lastly, put in the lemon-juice and turn out
immediately. Pour it all over and about the pudding. Cut the latter
into slices when helping it out.


BEEFSTEAK.

First of all, let me recommend the plan of broiling a steak under,
instead of over the grate. I have found so many and manifest
advantages in the former method that I have had a gridiron made to fit
beneath my range.

Wipe the steak dry, and broil upon a buttered gridiron, turning
frequently, whenever it begins to drip. When done, which should be in
twelve minutes, if your fire is clear and strong, lay upon a _hot_
dish—a chafing-dish is best—season with pepper and salt (not until
then), and butter very liberally. Put over it a hot cover, and wait
five minutes before sending to table, to draw the juices to the surface
and allow the seasoning to penetrate the steak.


POTATOES À LA LYONNAISE.

Parboil a dozen potatoes at breakfast-time, and set aside, when you
have peeled them, as they should get perfectly cold. When you are ready
to cook them, heat some butter, or good dripping, in a frying-pan;
fry in it one small onion, chopped fine, until it begins to change
color—say about one minute. Then put in the potatoes, cut into dice,
not too thick or broad. Stir well and cook five minutes, taking care
the potatoes do not break to pieces. _They must not brown._ Put in some
minced parsley just before taking them up. Drain dry by shaking in a
heated colander. Serve very hot.


MACARONI WITH CHEESE.

Cook half a pound of pipe macaroni, broken into inch lengths, in
boiling water until tender. Drain this off, and substitute a cupful
of cold milk. When the macaroni has again come to a boil, season with
pepper and salt and stir in a great spoonful of butter; lastly, two
tablespoonfuls of dry, grated cheese. Turn into a deep dish, strew more
cheese thickly over it, and it is ready for use.


SUSIE’S BREAD PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 eggs.
  3 cups very fine, dry bread-crumbs.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.
  1 teacupful white sugar.
  Juice and half the grated peel of a lemon.

Rub butter and sugar together. Beat the yolks of the four eggs and the
white of one very light; mix the butter and sugar with these. Soak the
crumbs in the milk, and beat in with the other ingredients, hard and
fast. Add the lemon last. Bake in a buttered dish. When nearly done and
fully “set,” even in the middle, spread with a _méringue_ made of the
reserved whites, beaten stiff with a little sugar. It is good eaten
warm—not really hot—or cold, especially if a little cream be poured
over each saucerful.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Bean Soup.
  Fillet of Veal, Stuffed.      Baked Corn.
  Potato Cakes.      Canned String-Beans.
  ——
  Baked Apple Dumplings.
  Brandy Sauce.
  ——


BEAN SOUP.

Soak a quart of dried beans all night in soft water. Throw this off
next morning, and cover the beans for two hours in water a little
more than lukewarm. Put over the fire with five quarts of cold water,
and one pound of salt pork. A bone of veal or beef may be added, if
you have it. Boil slowly for at least four hours; shred into it a
small onion, four stalks of celery, pepper—the pork _may_ salt it
sufficiently—simmer half an hour longer, rub through a colander until
only husks and fibres remain, and send to table. Pass sliced lemon with
it.


FILLET OF VEAL—STUFFED.

Make ready a force-meat of bread-crumbs, chopped thyme and parsley;
pepper, salt, and a pinch of nutmeg; a little dripping for shortening;
moisten with warm water and bind with a raw egg.

If your butcher has not “put up” the fillet, remove the bone, pin
the meat into a round with skewers; then bind firmly with a strip of
muslin passed two or three times about it. Fill the cavity left by
the bone with dressing, and thrust the same between the folds of the
meat, besides making cuts with a sharp knife to receive more. Tuck in a
strip of fat pork here and there. Baste three times with salt and water
while roasting, afterwards with its own gravy. At last, dredge once
with flour and baste with butter. Cut the bands, draw out the skewers
carefully, and serve.


BAKED CORN.

To one can of corn allow a pint of milk (more if the corn be dry),
three eggs, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one of white sugar,
pepper and salt to taste. Beat the eggs very light, rub butter and
sugar together and stir in hard; next, the corn and seasoning; finally,
the milk. Beat hard, and bake in a buttered dish for half an hour,
covered. Then brown by lifting the top. Send up in the bake-dish.


POTATO CAKES.

Boil and mash the potatoes, working in salt and butter and an egg or
two—beaten light. Let them get cold; make into cakes of size and shape
to suit yourself; roll in raw egg, then in flour, or cracker-dust, and
fry quickly in hot dripping. Take each up as soon as it is done, and
drain with a wire spoon, before laying upon a hot dish.


CANNED STRING-BEANS.

Cook in their own liquor half an hour, or until very tender. First,
however, cut them into neat lengths. The comeliness of the dish depends
upon this. When almost done, stir in a tablespoonful of butter, with
salt and pepper. Simmer ten minutes longer, and serve by draining off
the liquid and heaping the beans upon a hot dish, with a bit of butter
on the top. If the can does not contain liquor enough to cover the
beans, add a little cold water in cooking them.


BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS.

  1 quart prepared flour.
  1 tablespoonful of butter and the same of lard.
  1 pint of milk.
  1 saltspoonful of salt.
  Some ripe apples.

Chop the shortening into the flour when you have sifted and salted the
latter. Wet up with milk and roll out quickly in a sheet less than half
an inch thick. Cut into squares; lay in the centre of each a tart,
juicy apple, pared and cored. Bring the corners of the square together
and pinch to join them neatly. Lay in a baking-pan, the joined edges
downward, and bake to a fine brown. When done, brush over with butter
and shut the oven door for a minute more to glaze them. Sift powdered
sugar over them, and eat hot.

These are more wholesome and more easily prepared than boiled
dumplings. Eat with sweet sauce.


BRANDY SAUCE.

  2 cups of powdered sugar.
  ½ cup of butter.
  1 wineglass of brandy. That from brandied peaches—the _liqueur_,
          if you have it.
  1 teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and mace.

Warm the butter slightly, work in the sugar until they form a rich
cream, when add brandy and spice. Beat hard; shape by putting into
a mould made _very_ wet with cold water, and set in a cool place to
harden. Should it not turn out readily by shaking gently, dip for a
second in hot water.


  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Veal and Sago Soup.
  Jugged Rabbit.      Scalloped Potatoes.
  Sweet Potatoes, Fried.      Minced Celery with Egg Dressing.
  ——
  Macaroni and Almond Pudding.
  ——


VEAL AND SAGO SOUP.

  3 lbs. veal.
  ¼ lb. pearl sago.
  3 quarts of water.
  4 eggs.
  1 pint of milk.

Cut the meat into bits; put on with the water and boil very slowly,
with the pot-lid laid on loosely, four hours, until the meat is in
rags. Strain through coarse net, or a wire soup-strainer (which you
ought to possess), season with pepper and salt, and return to the
kettle when you have scalded it out.

Meanwhile, the sago should have been washed and soaked in lukewarm
water, for an hour. Stir it into the broth and let them simmer,
stirring often, half an hour. Heat the milk scalding hot in another
vessel, beat the yolks of the eggs light, reserving the whites for
your pudding; pour gradually over these a cupful of the hot milk, and
stir carefully into the soup with all the milk. Taste, to see if it
needs more seasoning; add a little chopped parsley, if you like; let it
almost boil and pour into the tureen. It should be about as thick as
boiled custard. Should the sago thicken it too much, add boiling water.

A relishful and wholesome soup.


JUGGED RABBIT.

  1 full-grown but tender rabbit or hare.
  ½ lb. corned ham.
  1 cup of good gravy, saved from yesterday’s roast.
  Dripping for frying.
  1 onion, sliced.
  Juice of 1 lemon.
  1 tablespoonful currant jelly.
  Parsley, pepper and salt, and browned flour.

Joint the rabbit, and lay for an hour in salted water. Wipe dry and fry
in the dripping, with the onion, until brown. Put in the bottom of a
tin pail, or farina-kettle, a layer of salt pork cut into strips; upon
this one of rabbit. Sprinkle with pepper and a little salt. Scatter
fried onion over the rabbit and proceed in this order until your meat
is used up. Pour in the gravy; cover the vessel, and set it in another
of cold water. Bring gradually to a boil and stew steadily one hour, or
until tender. Arrange the meat upon a dish; strain the gravy, thicken
with browned flour wet up with cold water; boil up once; stir in the
jelly and lemon-juice, heat to boiling, and pour over the rabbit. If
you have no gravy, use a little butter and water instead.


SCALLOPED POTATOES.

  3 cups mashed potato.
  3 tablespoonfuls of milk.
  3 hard-boiled eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 handful very dry bread-crumbs.
  Salt.

Work butter, milk, and salt into the hot mashed potatoes. Put a layer
in the bottom of a pudding-dish well greased; cover this with thin
slices of egg; salt and pepper; another stratum of potato, and so on,
until the dish is full. Strew bread-crumbs thickly over the uppermost
layer of potatoes. Stick bits of butter over this and bake, covered,
until hot throughout; then brown quickly. Send up in the pudding-dish.

A simple and nice side-dish.


SWEET POTATOES—FRIED.

Boil, peel, and when cold, slice the potatoes neatly. Fry in good
dripping until they are of a light brown. Drain from the fat and eat
hot.


MINCED CELERY WITH EGG DRESSING.

Scrape and wash the celery and cut into half-inch lengths, having first
crisped it in cold water. Rub the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs to a
paste with a tablespoonful of oil; add salt, pepper, a little powdered
sugar, vinegar to make the mixture liquid, and pour over the celery.
Serve in a salad-bowl and eat at once, lest the celery should toughen
in the vinegar.


MACARONI AND ALMOND PUDDING.

  ½ lb. macaroni.
  3 pints of milk.
  1 cup of white sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  5 eggs.
  ½ lb. sweet almonds, blanched and chopped.
  Rose-water and bitter almond flavoring.
  A little salt and nutmeg.

Simmer the macaroni half an hour in a pint of the milk. When tender,
but not broken, put in butter and salt. Take the saucepan from the fire
and turn out the contents to cool while you make a custard of the rest
of the milk, the eggs and sugar. Add the latter to the scalding milk,
but do not boil the custard. Chop the almonds when you have blanched
them, _i. e._, taken off the skins with boiling water. As you chop, put
in a few drops of rose-water from time to time, to prevent oiling. When
the macaroni is almost cold, mix it with the custard, breaking it as
little as may be. Season, and last of all, stir in the chopped almonds.
Bake in a well-buttered pudding-dish. Spread with the _méringue_ made
from the whites of the eggs reserved from the soup. Eat warm with
powdered sugar and cinnamon.


  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Fish Chowder.
  Fricasseed Chicken, White.      Potatoes à l’Italienne.
  Tomatoes Stewed with Onion.      Cheese Fondu.
  ——
  Sponge Gingerbread.
  Chocolate.
  ——


FISH CHOWDER.

  3 lbs. of cod, cut into strips an inch thick and four inches long,
          and freed from bone so far as is possible without breaking
          the fish.
  1 pint of oysters.
  2 large onions cut into thin slices.
  _About_ ½ lb. Boston crackers, split, and buttered thickly.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 cup of milk.
  Parsley.

Cover the bottom of your soup-kettle with the fish; pepper and salt;
strew with sliced onion, and this with the split crackers, buttered
sides down. Follow this order until your ingredients are all in the
pot, and cover them with cold water. Stew gently for an hour, keeping
the water at the original level by replenishing from the tea-kettle.
By this time the fish should be thoroughly done, if it has cooked
steadily. Take it up with a perforated skimmer, and cover in the
tureen to keep hot, while you strain the chowder to get out the bones,
returning the crackers with the liquor to the soup-kettle, when you
have rinsed it out. Thicken with two teaspoonfuls of corn-starch wet up
in a cup of milk, and when this has boiled, add the oysters, cut small,
two great spoonfuls of butter, and a little chopped parsley. Stew for
three minutes, pour slowly over the fish in the tureen. Send sliced
lemon around with it.

This is a most palatable chowder when properly prepared. You can use
fewer crackers, if you dislike a thick soup.


FRICASSEED CHICKEN—WHITE.

  One pair of full-grown fowls.
  ½ lb. salt pork cut into strips.
  2 eggs.
  1 cupful of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of flour and the same of butter.
  1 onion.
  Parsley, pepper and salt.

Joint the fowls neatly, and cut the back, neck, and breast apart from
each other, the latter into two pieces. Lay them in salt water for half
an hour. Put them into a pot with enough cold water to cover them,
and the pork cut into thin strips. Cover and heat _very_ slowly. Stew
constantly, but never fast, for one hour after it comes to a boil, or
until the chickens are tender. The time will depend upon their age. If
they are tough, put them on early and cook all the more slowly. Add now
the onion, parsley, and pepper, with salt, if needed. Heat again, and
stir in the flour wet up in the cup of milk. Beat the eggs and pour
upon them a cupful of hot gravy; mix well, and put back into the soup
with the butter. Just as the stew begins to simmer again, remove from
the fire. Take out and pile the chicken upon a dish; then pour the
gravy over all.


POTATOES À L’ITALIENNE.

Instead of mashing the potatoes with a beetle or spoon, whip them up
light with a silver fork. When they are fine and mealy, beat in a few
spoonfuls of milk, a tablespoonful of butter, the yolks of two eggs,
pepper and salt. Whip into a creamy heap before adding, with a few
dexterous strokes, the stiffly-frothed whites. Pile roughly up on a
buttered pie-dish; brown quickly in the oven, and transfer, with the
help of a cake-turner, to a flat dish.

Make a rather too abundant dish, according to this receipt, as the
residue will be found useful in to-morrow’s bill of fare.


TOMATOES STEWED WITH ONION.

Stew in the usual manner, adding a small onion minced fine. When they
have cooked half an hour, season with pepper, salt, a little sugar,
and a good spoonful of butter. Simmer ten minutes more, uncovered, and
turn out.


CHEESE FONDU.

  1 cup of bread-crumbs, dry and fine.
  2 scant cups of _fresh_ milk.
  ½ lb. dry, rich cheese, grated.
  3 eggs, whipped light.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.
  Pepper and salt.
  A pinch of soda, dissolved in hot water.

Soak the crumbs in the milk; beat in the eggs, the butter,
seasoning—lastly, the cheese. Pour into a neat pudding-dish, strew dry
bread-crumbs over the top, and bake in a quick oven until delicately
browned. Serve in the pudding-dish, and at once, as it _falls_ in
cooling.

Very good!


SPONGE GINGERBREAD.

  5 cups of flour, dried and sifted. Measure _after_ sifting.
  1 cup of molasses.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 cup of sugar.
  1 rather larger cup of sour, or buttermilk.
  2 teaspoonfuls of saleratus (not soda), dissolved in hot water.
  2 teaspoonfuls ginger.
  1 teaspoonful of cinnamon.

Mix molasses, sugar, butter, and spice together. Warm slightly, and
beat hard for five minutes. Add the milk, then the soda, lastly the
flour. Beat three minutes, and bake in a broad, shallow pan. Take heed
that it does not burn. Eat warm.


CHOCOLATE.

  6 tablespoonfuls of chocolate to each pint of boiling water.
  As much milk as you have chocolate.
  Sweeten to taste.

Rub the chocolate smooth in a little cold water, and stir into the hot.
Boil twenty minutes; put in the milk, and boil five minutes more,
stirring often. Sweeten at pleasure, while boiling, or in the cups.
Send around with the warm gingerbread and some slices of mild cheese.
You will not regret not having prepared a more pretentious dessert.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Clear Gravy Soup.
  Oyster Salad.      Calf’s Liver à la Mode.
  Salsify Fritters.      Potatoes à la Duchesse.
  ——
  Corn-meal Fruit Pudding.
  ——


CLEAR GRAVY SOUP.

  5 lbs. lean beef, the coarser parts, of course.
  Some bones.
  2 slices of lean corned ham.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  6 stalks of celery.
  ¼ package Coxe’s gelatine.
  Pepper and salt.
  A bunch of sweet herbs.
  Dripping.
  5 quarts of cold water.

Cut the meat into dice and slice the onions. Fry the latter brown in
some good dripping. Take them out, and fry the meat in the same fat,
turning often, until it has a thick brown coat. Put it, drained from
the fat, into the soup-kettle, with two quarts of cold water, and set
where it will come to a boil in about an hour. The bones should also
be fried, and put into the pot with the meat. When these fairly boil,
skim, add three quarts of cold water, and stew gently four hours. If
you dine early, the soup should go on before breakfast. Put herbs
and vegetables, including the fried onions, all chopped up, into a
saucepan, with enough cold water to cover them, and boil to pieces.
Strain the soup half an hour before dinner; season, return to the pot;
boil and skim. Strain the vegetable liquor into it, without squeezing
or rubbing. Boil up once more, skim well, and put in the gelatine,
which should have soaked one hour in a little cold water. Simmer five
minutes and pour out.

The soup should be of a clear, light brown. Should the color not suit
you, burn a tablespoonful of sugar in a tin cup, add three or four
spoonfuls of boiling water, stir until you get a deep color, and turn
off the water into the soup. It will not injure the flavor.

Please never lose sight of the cardinal principle that all the essence,
strength, and taste should be extracted from meat, vegetables, etc., in
soup-making, and that the _soup which boils fast is lost_. Take plenty
of time, and cast an eye into the kitchen from hour to hour until you
have educated your cook up to a glimmering appreciation of this law of
enlightened cookery.


OYSTER SALAD.

  1 quart of oysters, cut, not chopped, into small pieces.
  1 bunch of celery, also _cut_ small.
  1 tablespoonful best oil.
  1 small spoonful of salt, and the same of pepper, likewise of
          mustard (made).
  ⅛ cup cider vinegar.
  Saltspoonful of powdered sugar.

Drain the liquor from the oysters and cut them up. Add the minced
celery. Prepare the seasoning, putting in the vinegar last, and pour
the mixture over the celery and oysters. Toss up well with a silver
fork. Do this just before dinner, as the salad will be injured by lying
long in the dressing.


CALF’S LIVER À LA MODE.

  1 calf’s liver.
  ½ lb. fat salt pork.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, or dripping.
  2 small onions.
  1 tablespoonful chopped parsley and marjoram.
  2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
  1 teaspoonful mixed cloves, mace, and allspice.
  1 tablespoonful Worcestershire sauce.
  Pepper and salt to taste.

Wash the liver thoroughly, and soak half an hour in salted water.
Wipe, make incisions about an inch apart, and lard with strips of
pork, projecting slightly on each side. Fry the onions and herbs in
the dripping. Take them out, put in the liver, and fry both sides to
a light brown. Turn all into a saucepan, with the vinegar and water
to cover the liver—barely. Cover closely, and stew gently an hour and
a half. Lay the liver on a hot dish, strain the gravy, return to the
fire, thicken with a tablespoonful of browned flour, put in the sauce
and spice; boil up and pour some of it over the liver, the rest into a
gravy-boat. What is left from dinner will be nice for luncheon or tea,
cut horizontally in thin slices.


SALSIFY FRITTERS.

  1 bunch salsify.
  2 eggs.
  ½ cup milk.
  Flour for thin batter.
  Lard, or dripping.
  Salt to taste.

Scrape and grate the roots, and stir into a batter made of the beaten
eggs, the milk, and flour. Grate the salsify directly into this, that
it may not blacken by exposure to the air. Salt, and drop a spoonful
into the boiling fat to see if it is of the right consistency. As fast
as you fry the fritters, throw into a hot colander to drain. One great
spoonful of batter should make a fritter.


POTATOES À LA DUCHESSE.

Cut the remnants of yesterday’s potatoes _à l’Italienne_ into rounds
with a cake-cutter, dipped in cold water. Set like biscuits, but not
so near as to touch one another, in a greased pan, and bake quickly,
brushing top and sides with beaten egg when they begin to brown. Serve
upon a heated napkin folded flat, on a platter.


CORN-MEAL FRUIT PUDDING.

  1 _heaping_ cup white Indian meal.
  3 pints of milk.
  1 cup of flour.
  4 beaten eggs.
  1 cup of white sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  ½ lb. of raisins, seeded and cut in two.
  1 teaspoonful of salt, and same of mixed mace and cinnamon.
  1 teaspoonful of soda, and two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar,
          sifted _twice_ with the flour.

Scald a pint of milk and wet up the meal with it, stirring well. While
it is cooling, add the flour, wet into batter with a pint of cold
milk. Heat the remaining pint, and when scalding, add sugar and eggs.
Beat this gradually, _hard_ and long, into the cooled paste. When well
mixed, put in butter, spice, and the fruit dredged with flour. Beat
fast and deep for two minutes. Bake in a buttered dish, in a tolerably
brisk oven. Cover with paper as it browns. It ought to be done in
three-quarters of an hour. Eat hot, with butter and sugar.



  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Tomato Soup.
  Roast Beef, with Yorkshire Pudding.
  Macaroni al Napolitano.
  Potatoes au naturel.      French Beans, Sauté.
  Apple Sauce.      Made Mustard.
  ——
  Narcissus Blanc-mange.
  Coffee.
  ——


TOMATO SOUP.

Stew one can of tomatoes half an hour; strain and rub through a
colander into the soup left from yesterday. Heat to a slow boil, and
simmer together ten minutes before serving.


ROAST BEEF, WITH YORKSHIRE PUDDING.

Have your meat ready for roasting on Saturday, always. Roast upon a
grating or several clean sticks (not pine) laid over the dripping-pan.
Dash a cup of boiling water over the beef when it goes into the oven;
baste often, and see that the fat does not scorch. About three-quarters
of an hour before it is done, mix the pudding.


YORKSHIRE PUDDING.

  1 pint of milk.
  4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  2 cups of flour—prepared flour is best.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.

Use less flour if the batter grows too stiff. Mix quickly; pour off the
fat from the top of the gravy in the dripping-pan, leaving just enough
to prevent the pudding from sticking to the bottom. Pour in the batter
and continue to roast the beef, letting the dripping fall upon the
pudding below. The oven should be brisk by this time. Baste the meat
with the gravy you have taken out to make room for the batter.

In serving, cut the pudding into squares and lay about the meat in the
dish. It is very delicious.


MACARONI AL NAPOLITANO.

  ½ lb. of macaroni.
  2 nice sweetbreads.
  1 small onion, minced.
  Parsley, pepper, and salt.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.

Wash the sweetbreads; lay in salted water fifteen minutes, and stew
with the onion, in a pint of cold water, a little salt, until done,
as may be seen by cutting into the thickest part. Wash the macaroni
when you have broken it into small bits, and cook gently until tender,
but not to breaking, in the hot broth from which you have taken the
sweetbreads and strained the onion. Stew in a farina-kettle or tin
saucepan set in hot water. Chop the sweetbreads; stir the butter into
the macaroni, which should have absorbed all the broth; then the minced
sweetbreads. Season with parsley, pepper, and salt; cover closely and
leave in the hot water, but not over the fire, five minutes before
turning into a deep dish.


POTATOES AU NATUREL

Are, with all their high-sounding name, only the homely vegetables
boiled in their skins. Put on in cold water, bring to a slow boil, and
increase the heat until a fork will pierce the largest. Throw in salt;
turn off every drop of the water; set back on the range, without the
cover, for two minutes to dry, peel, and send to table in a napkin.


FRENCH BEANS, SAUTÉ.

Open a can of French or “string” beans; cut into inch lengths and
boil in the can liquor, adding a little cold water, if needed, for
twenty minutes. Drain, return to the saucepan with two tablespoonfuls
of butter and a little salt and pepper. Toss constantly with a fork
until they are hissing hot, but not until they scorch. Serve in a hot
vegetable dish.


APPLE SAUCE.

Pare, core, and slice tart apples, and stew in water enough to cover
them until they break to pieces. Beat to a pulp with a good lump of
butter and plenty of sugar. Eat cold. Make enough for several meals, as
it will keep a week at this season.


MADE MUSTARD.

  4 tablespoonfuls English mustard.
  2 teaspoonfuls of salt.
  The same quantity of salad oil and white sugar.
  1 teaspoonful of pepper.
  Vinegar to make a smooth paste—that from celery, or onion pickle,
          if you have it.

Rub mustard, oil, sugar, pepper, and salt together; wet, by degrees,
with vinegar, beating very hard at the last, when the proper
consistency has been gained.

This is far superior to mustard as usually mixed for the table.


NARCISSUS BLANC-MANGE.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 package of Cooper’s gelatine, soaked in two cups of cold water.
  Yolks of 4 eggs, beaten light.
  2 cups of white sugar.
  Vanilla and rose-water for flavoring.
  Less than 2 cups of rich cream.

Heat the milk to scalding; stir in gelatine and sugar. When these are
dissolved, take out a cupful and pour, by degrees, over the beaten
yolks. Return to the saucepan and stir together over the fire for two
minutes after the boiling point is reached. Take from the range, flavor
with rose-water, and pour into a mould with a cylinder in the centre,
previously wet with cold water. Next day, turn out upon a dish with a
broad bottom, and fill the hollow in the middle with the cream, whipped
light with a little powdered sugar and flavored with vanilla. Pile more
whipped cream about the base.

Send your coffee around after the blanc-mange has been eaten. A
spoonful of whipped cream, without the vanilla, will give a touch of
elegance to the beverage. Let this happy thought come to you while you
are preparing the cream, and before the flavoring goes in.


  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Variety Soup.
  Beef Pudding.      Scored Potatoes.
  Canned Peas.      Mixed Pickles.
  ——
  Apple Méringue.
  Crackers and Cheese.
  ——


VARIETY SOUP.

Chop a quarter of a small cabbage, a turnip, and some sweet herbs;
cover with cold water, and heat to boiling. Throw off the first water,
and add a quart more of cold. Put in the roast-beef bones, after you
have cut off the meat, with a slice or two, or bone, of ham. Stew all
two hours at the back of the range. Half an hour before dinner, warm
up what was left from Sunday’s soup. Strain the hot liquor in which
your cabbage, etc., have boiled, into this. Pick out bits of bones and
meat from the colander, mashing the vegetables as little as possible;
put these into the soup, with any macaroni or beans you may have left
over; season to your liking; simmer for ten minutes; thicken with a
tablespoonful of corn-starch, and pour out.

This will not be a “show-soup,” but it will be savory and nutritious.


BEEF PUDDING.

  1 pint of milk.
  3 eggs.
  A cupful of prepared flour.
  A little salt.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.

Cut the meat from yesterday’s roast into neat pieces; lay them in
the bottom of a buttered pudding-dish, season well, and pour a few
spoonfuls of cold gravy over them, letting it soak into the meat while
you prepare a batter according to the above directions, taking care not
to get it too stiff. Pour over the meat and bake in a quick oven. Eat
hot.


SCORED POTATOES.

Mash in the usual way, mixing rather soft; heap and round upon a
greased pie-plate; score deeply in triangles with the back of a carving
or butcher’s knife; brown in the oven, and slip carefully to another
dish.


CANNED PEAS.

Open a can of peas an hour before cooking them, that there may be no
musty, airless taste about them, and turn into a bowl. When ready for
them put on in a farina-kettle—or one saucepan within another—of hot
water. If dry, add cold water to cover them, and stew about twenty-five
minutes. Drain, stir in a generous lump of butter; pepper and salt.


APPLE MÉRINGUE.

Butter a neat pudding-dish, and nearly fill it with apple sauce. Cover
and leave in the oven until it is smoking hot. Draw to the oven door
and spread with a méringue made of the whites of three eggs, whipped
stiff with a little powdered sugar. (Your pudding will be much nicer,
by the way, if you have beaten the yolks into the stewed apple before
putting it into the dish.) Shut the oven door long enough to brown the
_méringue_ very lightly. Eat nearly or quite cold, with sugar and cream.

Send around crackers and cheese as an accompaniment.



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Celery Soup.
  Veal Cutlets with Ham.      Cauliflower with Cream Sauce.
  Stewed Potatoes.      Mixed Pickles.
  ——
  Jam Pudding.
  Tea, and Albert Biscuits.
  ——


CELERY SOUP.

  3 lbs. of veal, and some bones of the same.
  2 onions.
  2 bunches of celery, using the white parts only.
  3 quarts of cold water.
  1 pint of fresh milk.
  2 dessertspoonfuls of corn-starch.
  Pepper and salt.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Some fried bread.

Cut the veal up small, crack the bones, and put on in cold water. Boil
slowly four hours, replenishing with boiling water should the broth
sink to less than two-thirds of the original quantity. Strain, pressing
all the strength out of the meat. Cut the celery into bits, and stew
in the broth, with the minced onions, until so soft that you can rub
through a colander. Strain a second time, and return the soup, with the
pulped celery, to the fire. Season, and thicken with the corn-starch
wet up in the pint of milk. Stir until it boils, and lastly, put in,
carefully, the butter, after which take from the range. Have ready a
double handful of fried bread in the tureen, and pour the soup upon it.


VEAL CUTLETS AND HAM.

  2 lbs. of veal cutlets, neatly trimmed, and the same of sliced ham.
  Yolks of 2 eggs.
  Bread- or cracker-crumbs.
  Dripping for frying.

Divide each cutlet into pieces about two inches wide by three inches
long, and cut the ham into slices of corresponding size. Dip in the
egg, then roll in the bread-crumbs, and fry—the ham first, afterwards
the veal, until nicely browned on both sides. Sprinkle salt upon the
veal cutlets. Arrange upon the dish in alternate slices of veal and
ham, overlapping one another. Anoint the ham with butter mixed with a
little mustard; the veal with butter melted up with a spoonful of tart
jelly.


CAULIFLOWER WITH CREAM SAUCE.

Boil your cauliflower, when you have washed and trimmed it, and tied
it up in coarse net or tarletan. Cook in boiling water slightly
salted, keeping the stalk end uppermost. Prepare, in another saucepan,
the dressing, by adding to a cup of scalding milk a tablespoonful of
corn-starch wet up with cold water, two tablespoonfuls of butter,
pepper and salt at discretion. Drain the cauliflower, remove the net,
put into a deep dish, the flower up, and drench with the boiling sauce.


STEWED POTATOES.

Cut into slices, cook until tender, but not to breaking, in hot water.
Turn half of this off and replace by as much milk, in which some slices
of onion have been boiled and strained out. Add pepper and salt, a good
lump of butter rolled in flour, and some chopped parsley. Simmer three
minutes, and turn into a vegetable dish.


MIXED PICKLES,

Home-made or bought, should be passed with the cutlets.


JAM PUDDING.

  3 cups of milk.
  4 eggs.
  ¾ of a cup of sugar.
  Bread and butter.
  Sweet jam—berry, peach, or quince.

Spread slices of stale bread with butter, then with jam. Fit them
closely into a buttered pudding-dish until it is two-thirds full. Make
a custard by adding the beaten eggs and sugar to the scalding milk,
but do not let them boil. Lay a heavy saucer upon the bread and butter
to prevent floating, and moisten gradually with the hot custard. Let
all soak for fifteen minutes before the dish goes into the oven. When
it is hot throughout, take off the saucer, that the pudding may brown
equally. Eat cold.


TEA, AND ALBERT BISCUITS

May follow the pudding.


  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Sheep’s-head Soup.
  Roast Hare, with Currant Jelly.      Macaroni, with Ham.
  Stuffed Potatoes.      Turnips.
  ——
  Fig Pudding.
  ——


SHEEP’S-HEAD SOUP.

Get your butcher to clean a sheep’s head with the skin on, as he would
a calf’s head for soup. Let him also split it in half that you may get
at the brains. Take them out, with the tongue, and set aside. Break the
bone of the head, wash it well in several waters, and soak for half an
hour in salted water. Cover it with fresh water, and heat gradually to
a boil. Drain off the water, and thus remove any peculiar odor from
the wool or other causes, and add four quarts of cold water, with two
turnips, two roots of salsify, two carrots, two stalks of celery, and a
bunch of sweet herbs, all chopped fine. Boil slowly four hours. Strain
the soup into a bowl, pressing all the nourishment out of the meat,
and let it stand in a cool place until the fat rises thickly to the
surface to be taken off. The vegetables should be soft enough to pass
freely through a fine colander, or coarse strainer, when rubbed. While
the soup cools, prepare the force-meat balls. The tongue and brains
should have been cooked and chopped up, then rubbed to a paste together
and mixed with an equal quantity of bread-crumbs, salt, pepper, and
parsley, bound with a raw egg, and rolled into small balls, dipped in
flour. Set them, not so near as to touch one another, in a tin plate or
dripping-pan, and put in a quick oven until a crust is formed upon the
top, when they must be allowed to cool. Return the skimmed broth to the
fire; season; boil up once; take off the scum, and add a cup of milk in
which you have stirred a tablespoonful of corn-starch. Simmer, stirring
all the while, for two minutes after it boils. Put the force-meat balls
into the tureen and pour the soup gently over them so as not to break
them.

This is a good and cheap soup, and deserves to be better known.


ROAST HARE.

Have the hare skinned and well cleaned. Cooks are often careless
about the latter duty. Stuff, as you would a fowl, with a force-meat
of bread-crumbs, chopped fat pork, a little sweet marjoram, onion,
pepper, and salt, just moistened with hot water. Sew up the hare with
fine cotton; tie the legs close to the body in a kneeling position.
The English cook it with the head on, but we take it off as more
seemly in our eyes. Lay in the dripping-pan, back uppermost; pour
two cups of boiling water over it; cover with another pan and bake,
closely covered, except when you baste it with butter and water, for
three-quarters of an hour. Uncover, baste freely with the gravy until
nicely browned; dredge with flour and anoint with butter until a fine
froth appears on the surface. Take up the hare, put on a hot dish, and
keep covered while you make the gravy. Strain, and skim that left in
the pan; season, thicken with browned flour, stir in a good spoonful of
currant-jelly, and some chopped parsley; boil up; pour a few spoonfuls
of it over the hare; serve the rest in a gravy-boat. Clip, instead of
tearing hard at the cotton threads. Send currant-jelly around with it.


MACARONI AND HAM.

Break the macaroni into inch lengths, and stew ten minutes in boiling
water. Meanwhile, cut two slices of corned (not smoked) ham into
dice, wash well and put on to boil in a cup of cold water. Drain the
macaroni, and when the ham has cooked for ten minutes after coming to a
boil, pour it, with the liquor, over the macaroni. Season with pepper,
simmer in a closed farina-kettle for fifteen minutes; add a little
chopped parsley, cover, and let it stand a minute more, and serve in
a deep dish. The fatter the ham the better for this dish. Always pass
grated cheese with stewed macaroni.


STUFFED POTATOES.

Wash and wipe large, fair potatoes, and bake soft. Cut a round piece
from the top of each, and carefully preserve it. Scrape out the inside
with a spoon without breaking the skin, and set aside the empty cases
with the covers. Mash the potato which you have taken out, smoothly,
working into it butter, a raw egg, a little cream, pepper, and salt.
When soft, heat in a saucepan set over the fire in boiling water. Stir
until smoking hot, fill the skins with the mixture, put on the caps,
set in the oven for three minutes, and send to table wrapped in a
heated napkin.


TURNIPS.

Boil, sliced or quartered, until soft all through; drain well and mash
in a colander with a wooden spoon or beetle, very quickly, lest they
should cool. Cold turnips are detestable. Work in a little salt and a
good lump of butter; serve in a hot dish, smoothly rounded on top, with
a pat of pepper here and there.


FIG PUDDING.

  ½ lb. good dried figs, washed, wiped, and minced.
  2 cups fine, dry bread-crumbs.
  3 eggs.
  ½ cup beef suet, powdered.
  2 scant cups of milk.
  ½ cup of white sugar.
  A little salt.
  A pinch of soda, dissolved in hot water and stirred into the milk.

Soak the crumbs in the milk. Add the eggs, beaten light, with the
sugar, salt, suet, and figs. Beat three minutes, put in a buttered
mould with a tight top; set in boiling water with a weight on the
cover, to prevent the mould from upsetting, and boil three hours.

Eat hot, with hard sauce, or butter and powdered sugar, mixed with
nutmeg. It is very good.


  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Veal and Rice Broth.
  Stewed Mutton à la Jardinière.      Potato Puff.
  Pork and Beans.      Grape Jelly.
  ——
  Minced Pudding.
  Apples, Nuts, and Raisins.
  ——


VEAL AND RICE BROTH.

  4 lbs. knuckle of veal, well broken up.
  1 onion.
  2 stalks of celery.
  ½ cup of rice, washed and picked over.
  Chopped parsley, pepper, and salt.
  1 cup of milk.
  4 qts. of cold water.
  1 tablespoonful corn-starch.

Put on the veal and bones, with the onion and celery minced, in four
quarts of cold water. Boil gently after it begins to bubble, four
hours, keeping the pot-lid on. Soak the rice in lukewarm water, enough
to cover it well—adding warmer as it swells—for one hour. Cook in the
same water, never touching with a spoon, but _shaking_ up from the
bottom, now and then. Strain and press the soup into a bowl; cool to
throw up the fat for the skimmer, and return to the pot. Salt and
pepper; boil up and skim, and stir in the corn-starch wet up in the
milk. Simmer three minutes; put in the rice with the water in which it
was boiled, and the parsley. Simmer very gently five minutes, and pour
out.


MUTTON À LA JARDINIÈRE.

  5 lbs. of mutton, breast or neck, all in one piece.
  2 onions, peeled.
  1 carrot, peeled.
  2 turnips, peeled.
  1 pint canned tomatoes.
  A few sprigs of cauliflower.
  2 stalks of blanched celery.
  Pepper and salt.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch.
  Dripping for frying.

Fry the mutton (whole) in a large frying-pan, until it is lightly
browned on both sides. Put into a deep, broad saucepan with all the
vegetables (also whole) except the tomatoes; cover with cold water,
and stew, closely covered, for an hour after they begin to boil. Take
out the vegetables, and set aside; add boiling water to the meat, if
it is not covered, and simmer steadily, never fast, two hours longer.
The meat should be tender throughout, even the fibres. Turn off all the
gravy, except about half a cupful, fit the pot-lid on very tightly,
and leave the meat where it will keep just below the cooking-point.
Strain the gravy you have poured off; leave it to cool until the fat
rises. Skim, and return to the pot with the tomatoes. Season, and boil
_fast_, skimming two or three times, until it is reduced to one-half
the original quantity, or just enough to half cover the meat. Thicken
with corn-starch, and put in the meat, with its juices from the bottom
of the pot. Simmer, closely covered, half an hour. Cut the now cooled
vegetables into neat dice; put the butter into a saucepan, and when it
is hot, the vegetables. Shake all together until smoking hot, season,
add a little gravy from the meat, and leave them to keep hot in it
while you dish the mutton. Put it in the middle of a flat dish, and put
the vegetables around it in separate mounds, with sprigs of parsley or
celery between. Pour gravy over the mutton.

Try this dish. It is not difficult of preparation, diffuse as I have
made the directions. It is, if well managed and discreetly seasoned, a
family dinner of itself, and a very cheap one.


POTATO PUFF.

Mash the potatoes as usual; beat in more milk than is your custom, and
a couple of eggs, whipping all to a cream, and seasoning well. Pour
into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake quickly to a good brown.


PORK AND BEANS.

Soak a quart of dried beans overnight in soft water. Change this for
more and warmer in the morning, and, two hours later, put them on to
boil in cold. When they are soft, drain well, put into a deep dish;
and sink in the middle a pound of salt pork (the “middling” is best),
leaving only the top visible. The pork should have been previously
parboiled. Bake to a fine brown. It is well to score the pork in long
furrows to mark the slices, before baking.


MINCED PUDDING.

  4 large juicy pippins, pared, cored, and chopped.
  ¼ lb. of raisins, seeded and chopped.
  2 tablespoonfuls beef suet, freed from strings and rubbed to powder.
  12 almonds, blanched and minced.
  ½ cup of sugar for pudding, and three tablespoonfuls for custard.
  1 pint of milk.
  Stale bread.
  Butter to spread it.
  2 eggs.
  Nutmeg.

Cut the crust from the bread and slice evenly. Butter a shallow
pudding-dish, and line it with the slices, fitted neatly together, and
well buttered. Spread thickly with a mixture of the ingredients just
enumerated, to wit: apples, raisins, suet, and almonds, sweetened with
sugar, and spiced with nutmeg. They should form a paste and adhere to
the bread. Make a custard by scalding and sweetening the milk, then
pouring gradually over the eggs. Soak the bread, etc., with this by
pouring it on, a few spoonfuls at a time, until the dish is full. Bake
in a moderate oven, for a time covered, lest it should dry out. Eat
cold, with powdered sugar sifted over the top.


APPLES, NUTS, AND RAISINS

Should be served on clean plates after the pudding.


  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Purée of Peas.
  Fried Bass.      Roast Chicken.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Stewed Celery.
  Fried Salsify.      Crab-apple Jelly.
  ——
  Margherita Lemon Custard.
  ——


PURÉE OF PEAS.

  1 pint of split peas, soaked overnight in soft water.
  3 onions—small.
  3 stalks of celery.
  2 carrots—small.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs.
  1 pint of tomatoes.
  Season to taste.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in flour.
  3 quarts of water.

Put all on to cook together, except the tomatoes and butter. The
vegetables must be chopped fine. Stew steadily and gently three hours.
Rub to a purée through a sieve, and put in the tomatoes, freed of
bits of skin and cores, and cut into bits. Season, and return to the
fire to stew for twenty minutes longer, closely covered. Stir in the
butter—divided into teaspoonfuls, each rolled in flour. Boil up and
serve. Dice of fried bread should be put into the tureen.


FRIED BASS.

Clean, wipe dry, inside and out, dredge with flour, and season with
salt. Fry in hot butter, beef-dripping, or sweet lard. Half butter,
half lard is a good mixture for frying fish. The moment the fish
are done to a good brown, take them from the fat and drain in a hot
colander. Garnish with parsley.


MASHED POTATOES

Must accompany the fish.


ROAST CHICKEN.

Wash well in three waters, adding a little soda to the second. Stuff
with a mixture of bread-crumbs, butter, pepper, and salt. Fill the
crops and bodies of the fowls; sew them up with strong, not coarse
thread, and tie up the necks. Pour a cupful of boiling water over the
pair, and roast an hour—or more, if they are large. Baste three times
with butter and water, four or five times with their own gravy.

Stew the giblets, necks, and feet in water, enough to cover them well.
When you take up the fowls, add this liquor to the gravy left in the
dripping-pan, boil up once, thicken with browned flour; add the giblets
chopped fine; boil again, and send up in a gravy-boat.

Should there be more gravy than you need, set it away carefully. Each
day brings forth a need for such.


CRAB-APPLE JELLY

Is a pleasing sauce for roast fowls.


STEWED CELERY.

Select the best blanched stalks, and lay aside in cold water. Stew
three or four stalks of the coarser parts, minced, with a small onion,
a few sprigs of parsley, also chopped, and a bone of ham, or other
meat. Stew for an hour in enough water to cover them; strain, pressing
hard. Cut the choicer celery into pieces two inches long; pour over
them the “stock” from the strainer, season with pepper, and, if needed,
salt. Stew until very tender. Stir in a good tablespoonful of butter,
and a little corn-starch, wet up in cold water. Simmer gently three
minutes, and dish.


FRIED SALSIFY.

Scrape and lay in cold water ten minutes. Boil tender, drain, and when
cold, mash with a wooden spoon, picking out the fibrous parts. Wet to
a paste with milk, work in a little butter, and an egg and a half for
each cupful of salsify. Beat the eggs very light. Season to taste,
make into round, flat cakes, dredge with flour, and fry to a light
brown. Drain off the fat, and serve hot.


MARGHERITA LEMON CUSTARD.

  5 eggs.
  1 quart of milk.
  Half the grated peel of a lemon.
  5 tablespoonfuls of white sugar.

Beat the whites of two eggs and the yolks of five very light; add the
sugar and pour over these the milk, scalding hot. Lastly, put in the
grated peel, pour into a buttered pudding-dish, and set in a pan of hot
water. Put both into the oven, and bake the custard until it is well
“set.” Then spread with a _méringue_ made of the reserved whites beaten
stiff with a little powdered sugar. Shut the oven door, and cook the
_méringue_ until slightly tinged with yellow-brown. Eat cold.



  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  English Soup.
  Mutton Chops, Broiled.      Browned Potato.
  Stewed Tomatoes.      Sweet Pickles.
  ——
  Orange Fritters with Beehive Sauce.
  Coffee.
  ——


ENGLISH SOUP.

  6 lbs. brisket of beef, cut into thin strips.
  2 onions, sliced and fried in dripping.
  The bones of yesterday’s chickens.
  2 carrots.
  3 turnips.
  4 stalks of celery.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs.
  ¼ lb. of vermicelli.
  Pepper and salt at discretion.
  6 quarts of cold water.

Put the beef, cut into strips, the “carcasses” of the chickens broken
to pieces, and three quarts of cold water, into a large soup-pot, and
heat gradually. When it boils, skim well, and add the fried onion and
other vegetables, cut fine, and three quarts more of _cold_ water.
Stew, with the pot-lid on, five hours, after it again boils, giving
it no attention save to see that it never boils fast, and that the
liquid has not diminished to less than three-quarters of the original
quantity. Strain at the end of this time, first taking out the meat
that has not boiled to shreds, and the bones. Rub the vegetables
through the colander; afterwards strain the soup again through your
wire strainer or sieve, into the kettle when you have washed it out.
Season, and simmer ten minutes after the boil recommences, skimming
often. Break the vermicelli into short lengths, put into the soup when
you have taken out two quarts for Sunday’s “stock.” Cook gently twelve
minutes after the vermicelli goes in.

At first glance, the quantity of meat prescribed for this soup may seem
extravagant; but, apart from the fact that the coarser and cheaper
quality is used, you must note that you have now the foundation of
three days’ soups, and that you have saved time, no less than money,
by making this as I have directed. It is by the long, intelligent look
ahead that the mistress proves her right to the title.


MUTTON CHOPS—BROILED.

Next to beef, good mutton, properly cooked, deserves the most prominent
place among the meats upon your weekly bill of fare. It is digestible,
nutritious, and, as a rule, popular. I therefore offer no apology for
the regular and frequent appearance of these two standard articles
of diet upon these pages. They may well be named the two staves of
healthful existence—for civilized humanity, at least.

Trim your mutton chops, if your butcher has neglected to do it, leaving
a naked end of bone as a “handle” upon each. Lay them for fifteen
minutes in a little melted butter, turning them several times. Then
hold each up for a moment, to let all the butter drip off that will,
and broil over a clear fire, watching constantly and turning them often
when the falling fat threatens a blaze from below. If your gridiron is
beneath the grate, they can be cooked far more satisfactorily, and with
one-tenth of the trouble. Pepper and salt when they are laid upon a hot
dish, and put a bit of butter upon each.


SWEET PICKLES

“Go” well with broiled chops. For receipts for these and other pickles,
with preserves and fruit jellies, the reader is respectfully referred
to “COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD, NO. 1, GENERAL RECEIPTS.”


BROWNED POTATO.

Mash your potatoes with milk, butter, and salt; heap as irregularly as
possible in a vegetable dish, and hold a red-hot shovel close to them.
They will brown more quickly if you glaze them with butter so soon as
a crust is formed by the hot shovel, then heat it again and repeat the
browning.


STEWED TOMATOES.

To one can of tomatoes allow a saltspoonful of salt, half as much
pepper, a teaspoonful of sugar, and a great tablespoonful of butter.
Drain off half the liquor, season thus, and stew _fast_ for twenty
minutes, in a vessel set within another filled with water on the hard
boil. This receipt was given to me by a notable housewife. It is worth
trying for her sake—and variety’s.


ORANGE FRITTERS.

  3 cups of milk.
  2 cups of prepared flour.
  4 eggs.
  A little salt.
  Lard for frying.
  6 or 8 sweet oranges.
  A little powdered sugar.

Take the peel and thick white skin from the oranges. Slice, and take
out the seeds. Make a batter of the ingredients given above, taking
care not to get it too thin. Dip each slice in this dexterously and fry
in boiling lard. Drain in a hot colander, and eat with the sauce given
below.


BEEHIVE SAUCE.

  ½ cup of butter.
  2 cups of sugar.
  Juice and peel of a lemon.
  ½ teaspoonful of nutmeg.
  ¼ cup of currant jelly, or cranberry syrup.

Make hard sauce in the usual way by creaming the butter and sugar.
Before beating in the lemon-juice and nutmeg, set aside three
tablespoonfuls to be colored. Having added lemon and spice to the
larger quantity, color the less by whipping in currant jelly or
cranberry syrup, until it is of a rich pink. Shape the white sauce into
a conical mound. Roll a sheet of note paper into a long, narrow funnel,
tie a string about it to keep it in shape, and fill with colored sauce.
Squeeze it gently through the aperture at the small end, beginning at
the base, and winding round the cone to the top, guiding it so that the
white will show prettily between the pink ridges.

The effect is pleasing and costs little trouble to produce.


COFFEE

Is believed by some to aid digestion, and, since fritters are not
generally classed among very wholesome dainties, it may be as well to
give John and John’s wife—_not_ the children—a cup of the fragrant
elixir as a possible preventive against an attack of dyspepsia. It
always lends grace even to a homely dinner.


  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  German Sago Soup.
  Boiled Turkey with Oyster Sauce.      Savory Rice Pudding.
  Potatoes au Maître d’hôtel.      Celery.
  Grape Jelly.
  ——
  Mince Pie.
  Bananas and Oranges.
  ——


GERMAN SAGO SOUP.

Soak half a cup of German sago in enough water to cover it entirely
for two hours. Heat yesterday’s soup to boiling, with a little of the
reserved “stock,” should the supply be too small; stir in the sago with
a little salt, until dissolved, and serve.


BOILED TURKEY AND OYSTER SAUCE.

  15 oysters.
  A little milk, bread-crumbs, butter and seasoning.
  Wheat flour.

Chop about fifteen oysters and work up with them bread-crumbs, a
spoonful of butter, with pepper and salt. Stuff the turkey as for
roasting; sew it up, neatly, in a thin cloth fitted to every part,
having dredged the cloth well inside with flour. Boil slowly,
especially at first, allowing fifteen minutes to a pound. The water
should be lukewarm when the turkey goes in. Salt and save the liquor in
which the fowl was boiled.


OYSTER SAUCE.

  12 oysters, cut into thirds.
  1 cupful of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  2 teaspoonfuls rice, or wheat flour.
  Flavoring to taste.
  Chopped parsley.

Drain the liquor from the oysters before you cut them up. Boil the
liquor two minutes, and add the milk. When this is scalding hot, strain
and return to the saucepan. Wet the flour with cold water and stir into
the sauce. As it thickens, put in the butter, then pepper and salt,
with a very little parsley. The juice of a half a lemon is a pleasant
flavoring. Stir it in after taking the sauce from the fire. Before
this, and so soon as the flour is well incorporated with the other
ingredients, add the oysters, each cut into three pieces. Simmer five
minutes and pour into a gravy-tureen. Some also pour a little over the
turkey on the dish. Garnish with slices of boiled egg and celery tops.


SAVORY RICE PUDDING.

  1 teacupful of rice.
  Giblets of the turkey.
  A slice of fat salt pork, chopped very fine.
  Half a _small_ onion, also minced.
  1 small cup of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Pepper and salt.

Wash the rice thoroughly; clean the giblets; soak them an hour in
salted water, cut each into several pieces, and put on to stew with
the pork and rice in nearly a quart of cold water. Cook slowly until
the giblets are tender and the rice soft. The grains should be kept
as whole as possible, so do not use a spoon in stirring, but shake
up the saucepan, which should be set in another of boiling water.
The rice should, by this time, be nearly dry. Take out the giblets
and chop fine. Pour on the rice the milk, previously heated with the
minced onions, and then strained. When this is again scalding, stir in
the giblets, then the butter and seasoning. Cover and simmer for ten
minutes. Wet a round or oval pan with cold water; press the rice firmly
into it, so that it may take the shape, and turn out carefully upon a
flat dish. Set in the oven for two minutes before sending to table. It
should be stiff enough to take the mould, yet not dry.


POTATOES AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Slice cold boiled potatoes a quarter of an inch thick, and put into a
saucepan containing enough milk, already heated, to cover them—barely.
When all are smoking hot, add a tablespoonful or more of butter,
pepper, salt, and minced parsley. Add a teaspoonful of flour wet in
cold water; heat quickly to a boil; put in the juice of half a lemon;
pour into a deep dish without further cooking.


CELERY AND GRAPE JELLY

Should flank the castor, or _épergne_, or whatever may be your
centre-piece.


MINCE PIE.

A receipt for mince-meat will be found in the proper order in the
_menu_ for next December. I take it for granted that, like the wise
woman you are, you have laid up in the store-room enough from your
Christmas supply to last for some weeks to come. If not, let me advise
you to get a box of “ATMORE’S CELEBRATED MINCE-MEAT,” and fill your
pastry-crusts, instead of repeating so soon the tedious operation so
lately performed. It comes in neat, wooden cans, and is really _good_.
If you like, you can add more sugar and brandy. N. B.—_My_ John has a
sweet tooth. Has yours?

Make the paste by rubbing into a quart of your best flour one-third
of a pound of sweet lard. Chop it in with a broad knife, if you have
plenty of time. Wet up with ice-water, roll out very thin, and cover
with “dabs” of butter, also of the best. Fold into a tight roll,
flatten with a few strokes of the rolling-pin, and roll out into a
sheet as thin as the first; baste again with the butter; roll up and
out into a third sheet hardly thicker than drawing-paper; a third time
dot with butter, and fold up closely. Having used as much butter for
this purpose as you have lard, set aside your last roll for an hour in
a very cold place. Then roll out, line your pie-plates with the paste,
fill with mince-meat; put strips, cut with a jagging-iron, across them
in squares or triangles, and bake in a steady, never a dull, heat.

These pies, like all others, must be made on Saturday, and warmed up
for Sabbath—unless you prefer to line your plates on Saturday, and set
them aside until next day, then fill the raw, crisp paste with the
mince-meat, and bake. The paste will be the better, instead of worse,
for standing overnight, and the trouble of baking scarcely exceed that
of warming over.


BANANAS AND ORANGES

May solace the disappointment of the dyspeptic or very juvenile members
of the family party, who “dare not touch mince pie.”



  Fourth week.      Monday.
  ——
  Combination Soup.
  Mince of Fowl.      Turkey Salad.
  Sweet Potatoes, Baked.      Brussels Sprouts.
  ——
  Sweet Macaroni, with Brandied Fruit.
  Chocolate.
  ——


COMBINATION SOUP.

Put the remains of yesterday’s soup and of the stock reserved on
Saturday together, and heat almost to boiling. Split and toast crisp
half a dozen Boston crackers; butter while hot, set in the oven until
the butter has soaked in, when put on more. Lay in the bottom of your
soup-tureen, wet with a little boiling milk, and when they have soaked
this up, pour on the soup.


MINCE OF FOWL.

Set what was left of yesterday’s oyster-sauce over the fire to heat,
thinning, if necessary, with a little milk. Or, if you have no sauce,
substitute a cupful of drawn butter, made from the liquor in which the
turkey was boiled on Sunday, reserving the rest for another day’s
soup. Cut the meat closely from the bones of the turkey (saving these,
also). Set aside the white flesh for a nice little dish of salad. Cut
the rest, freed from skin and gristle, into pieces of nearly uniform
length, not more than an inch long. When your sauce boils, put in the
meat, simmer until smoking hot, then take off the saucepan, and pour
gradually over two beaten eggs. Cover the bottom of a pudding-dish with
bread-crumbs, when you have greased it well; season the mince to taste;
fill up the dish with it; put another layer of bread-crumbs, on top,
and stick bits of butter over these. Bake covered, until bubbling hot,
then brown lightly. This will be found very delightful.


TURKEY SALAD.

The white meat of the turkey cut up in small pieces. An equal quantity
of blanched celery, also cut into lengths. Salt slightly, and when
dinner is nearly ready pour over them a dressing made of the yolks of
three hard-boiled eggs rubbed to a powder with a teaspoonful of sugar,
half as much salt, pepper and made mustard, when worked into a paste
with two tablespoonfuls of oil, and six of vinegar. Toss up the salad
well with a silver fork, and garnish with white of egg cut into rings.


SWEET POTATOES—BAKED.

Select those which are nearly of a size, and not too large, or so small
as to shrivel into dry husks. Wash, wipe, and bake in a moderate oven
until, by pinching, you find that they are soft at heart.


BRUSSELS SPROUTS.

Wash carefully, cut off the lower part of the stems, and lay in cold
water, slightly salted, for half an hour. Cook quickly, in boiling
water, with a very little salt, for fifteen minutes, or until tender.
Drain thoroughly, heap neatly upon a dish, and put a few spoonfuls of
melted butter, peppered to taste, upon them. Eat hot.


SWEET MACARONI.

  ½ lb. of macaroni.
  1 pint of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  4 tablespoonfuls of cream.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Nutmeg and vanilla.
  A little salt.

Break the macaroni into short pieces, put into a farina-kettle, cover
with the milk, put on the lid of the kettle, and cook with boiling
water in the outer vessel, until the milk is soaked up and the macaroni
looks clear, but has not begun to break. Add the butter, sugar, and
flavoring, and, if you have it, a few spoonfuls of cream. If you have
not, thicken a little milk slightly with corn-starch, and use instead.
Cover, and set in the boiling water for ten minutes longer. Serve in a
deep dish, and send around canned or brandied peaches with it.


CHOCOLATE.

To one pint of boiling water allow six tablespoonfuls of grated
chocolate wet up to a paste in cold water. Boil twenty minutes, put in
one pint of milk and boil ten minutes more. Stir often. It saves time,
if you know the tastes of those who are to drink it, if you sweeten it
in the saucepan.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Mother’s Soup.
  Beefsteak and Onions.      Sweet and Irish Potatoes, Chopped.
  Mixed Pickles.      Corn and Tomatoes, Stewed.
  ——
  Crème du Thé, Café et Chocolat.
  ——


MOTHER’S SOUP.

  Bones of yesterday’s turkey, with the stuffing.
  A slice of lean ham.
  The bone from your steak, and half a can of sweet corn.
  1 onion, small.
  1 stalk of celery.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  Pepper and salt.
  3 quarts of water.

Put on bones, ham (chopped), and the vegetables, cut up with the sweet
herbs, but not the corn, in a soup-kettle; cover well with the liquor
in which the turkey was cooked, and boil slowly, untouched, two hours.
Take out the bones, and strain the soup, rubbing the vegetables through
the strainer, into a bowl. Return this to the fire and with it the corn
and turkey dressing. Bring to a gentle boil and keep it steady, for
fully half an hour. Season, and simmer a quarter of an hour longer. The
corn and dressing will thicken it sufficiently.


BEEFSTEAK WITH ONIONS.

While your steak is broiling, watched by some one else, fry three or
four sliced onions in a pan with some beef dripping or butter. Stir and
shake them until they begin to brown. Dish your steak, salt and pepper,
and lay the onions on top. Cover, and let all stand where they will
keep hot, for five minutes. Do not help onions to any one unless you
are sure that he likes them.

There is no dish so good for keeping a steak hot, yet juicy, as a
hot-water chafing-dish. No household can afford to be without one, if
no more.


MIXED PICKLES

Give the needed piquancy to steak. Home-made ones are best.


SWEET AND IRISH POTATOES—CHOPPED.

Chop cold boiled Irish potatoes and mix with them the cold sweet
ones left from Monday—in equal parts, if convenient—or, if you have
but two or three, make them do. There is philosophy, and religion,
too, sometimes, in “making things do.” Heating a little butter in a
saucepan, stir in the potatoes when it begins to “fizzle.” Shake and
toss them up with a wooden fork until they are very hot; season with
pepper and salt, and dish.


CORN AND TOMATOES STEWED.

To a can of tomatoes add the half can of corn left from your soup. Stew
together half an hour, with a little minced onion; then pepper and salt
to taste, and stir in a great spoonful of butter with a very little
sugar. Simmer ten minutes before turning out.


CRÈME DU THÉ, CAFÉ ET CHOCOLAT.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 package of Cooper’s gelatine.
  1 cup of sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls grated chocolate.
  1 cup _strong_ tea.
  1 cup of strong coffee.

Soak the gelatine for an hour in a cup of cold water. Heat the milk to
boiling and add the gelatine. So soon as this is dissolved, put in the
sugar, stir until melted, and take the saucepan from the fire. Strain
through thin muslin and divide into three parts. Into the largest stir
the chocolate, rubbed smooth in cold water; into another the tea, and
into a third equal to the second, the coffee. Return that containing
the chocolate to the farina-kettle, and heat scalding hot, stirring
all the while. Rinse out the kettle well with boiling water, and put
in, successively, those portions flavored with the tea and the coffee,
scalding the vessel between each. Wet several small cups or glasses
with cold water. Pour the chocolate into some, the tea into others,
and the coffee blanc-mange into the rest. When cold, turn out upon
a flat dish, and eat with sugar and sweet cream. It will “form” in
about six hours. This is a dessert by no means tedious or difficult of
preparation, and is worth trying, being both dainty and wholesome.


  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Lexington Soup.
  Boiled Chickens and Macaroni.      Whipped Potatoes.
  Chow-chow.      Parsnip Cakes.
  ——
  Jam Roley-Poley with Wine Sauce.
  Apples and Nuts.
  ——


LEXINGTON SOUP.

  2 lbs. of veal.
  1 lb. of mutton, with some bones.
  1 onion.
  1 carrot.
  ½ cup of rice.
  1 cup of split peas.
  4 quarts of water.
  Sweet herbs, pepper and salt.

Mince the meat and vegetables and crack the bones. The peas should
have been soaked overnight in soft water, the rice washed and picked
over. Put all together in your soup-kettle, pour in the water and stew
gently, covered, five hours. Should the water waste too much, put in
more from the tea-kettle. At the end of this time, strain, rubbing the
vegetables through a colander. Return to the fire, season, and boil
slowly ten minutes, skimming carefully. Put sliced lemon, from which
the yellow rind has been pared, into the tureen, and pour the soup upon
it. Serve a slice in each plateful.


BOILED CHICKENS AND MACARONI.

Clean, wash, and stuff your chickens as for roasting; sew each up in a
piece of new tarlatan, fitted snugly to the shape. Boil, putting them
down in pretty hot, but not scalding water, allowing twelve minutes to
the number of pounds in _one_ of the pair, and that the larger. About
half an hour before they are to be served take out a large cupful of
the liquor from the pot and put into a saucepan. Season it, and boil
for five minutes with a small chopped onion. Strain, and when again
hot, drop in a double handful of macaroni, broken into short lengths.
Cook until tender, by which time the liquor should be absorbed by
the macaroni. The saucepan should be set in another, holding boiling
water, that there may be no danger of scorching while stewing. Make a
flattened mound of the macaroni upon a hot dish; lay the chickens upon
it, and anoint them well with melted butter, made more salt than usual.
Serve them out together, and have grated cheese for such as wish it.


CHOW-CHOW,

Or “picklette,” in American store-rooms—is a keen appetizer and
especially harmonious with boiled fowls. For receipt for making in
winter or summer, see “General Receipts, No. 1, Common Sense Series,”
page 491.


PARSNIP CAKES.

Scrape, wash, boil, and mash the parsnips. When cold, season with salt
and pepper, and, flouring your hands, make them into small, flat cakes.
Roll in flour and fry in boiling dripping. Drain dry and send up on a
hot dish.


WHIPPED POTATOES.

Instead of mashing the potatoes in the ordinary way, whip with a fork
until light and dry. Then whip in a little melted butter and some milk
with salt to taste, beating up fast until you have a creamy compound,
almost like a _méringue_. Pile as lightly and irregularly as you can
upon a hot dish.


JAM ROLEY-POLEY.

  1 quart of _prepared_ flour.
  1 tablespoonful of butter and the same of lard.
  2 cups of milk, or enough to make soft dough.
  1 large cup of fruit or berry jam.

Rub lard and butter into the flour, with a little salt, and wet with
cold milk into a soft paste. Roll out into a pretty thick crust—say
about a quarter of an inch—and trim into an oblong sheet. Spread this
generously with jam, leaving a margin at each end. Roll up closely,
the fruit inside. Pinch the open ends together, and baste neatly in a
floured bag fitted to the roll, but not so tightly as to interfere with
the swelling of the pudding. Boil an hour and a half in hot water that,
from first to last, is not once off the boil. Dip the cloth into cold
water before attempting to turn the roley-poley out—but for one hasty
second only.


WINE SAUCE.

  3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  2 cupfuls of powdered sugar.
  ½ cup of wine.
  Grated peel of half a lemon.
  ½ cupful of boiling water.
  1 teaspoonful of corn-starch.
  Nutmeg.

Cream the butter and sugar, adding the boiling water, a little at a
time, until you have used the half cupful. Put on in a saucepan, and
stir in the corn-starch wet up with cold milk. When it has thickened,
put in the lemon-peel and nutmeg. Simmer one minute, add the wine, put
on the lid of the saucepan and set in hot water to keep warm until
wanted.


APPLES AND NUTS,

Being cheap and abundant at this season, should form the sequel of many
dinners.


  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  White Soup.
  Langue de Bœuf, or Beef’s Tongue.   Fried Brains and Green Peas.
  Sauce Piquante.      Hominy Croquettes.
  Cold Slaw.
  ——
  Brown Betty.
  ——


WHITE SOUP.

  Skeletons of yesterday’s chickens.
  3 or 4 lbs. of veal bones, cracked to pieces.
  1 lb. of lean veal, cut small.
  1 pint of milk.
  1 egg.
  1 small cup of _boiled_ farina.
  Salt, pepper, minced onion and parsley for seasoning.
  1 quart of water, and liquor in which chickens were boiled.

Cover the broken chicken and veal bones, the minced veal, parsley, and
onion with the cold water and chicken liquor and simmer three hours,
until the three quarts are reduced to two. Strain the liquor; put back
into the pot; salt and pepper; boil gently and skim for ten minutes
before adding the milk and boiled farina. Simmer another ten minutes;
take out a cupful and pour over the beaten egg. Mix well, and put with
the soup; let all stand covered, off the fire, two minutes, and serve.


LANGUE DE BŒUF, OR BEEF’S TONGUE.

Get your butcher to save you a fresh, large beef’s tongue, the finest
he can get. Soak, in cold water, a little salt, six hours—overnight,
if you choose—changing the water before you go to bed. Wipe it, trim
and scrape it, and plunging into boiling water, keep it at a slow boil
for an hour and a half. Take it up, pepper and salt; brush over with
beaten egg and coat thickly with bread-crumbs; lay in your dripping-pan
and bake, basting often with butter melted in a _little_ water. Half an
hour in a good oven should suffice. Put on a hot dish and cover while
you prepare the sauce.


SAUCE PIQUANTE.

  1 cupful of the liquor in which the tongue was boiled.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of made mustard.
  A little salt and pepper.
  1 heaping tablespoonful of browned flour.
  1 teaspoonful mixed parsley and sweet marjoram.
  1 tablespoonful of onion vinegar.

Brown the butter by shaking it over a clear fire in a saucepan. Heat
the cupful of liquor to a boil, skim and season it with salt and
pepper. Skim again before stirring in the flour wet up with cold water.
As it thickens, put in the butter, herbs, mustard, and vinegar. Boil
up, pour half over the tongue, the rest into a sauce-boat.


FRIED BRAINS AND GREEN PEAS.

Open a can of green peas an hour before cooking them, and turn into a
bowl. If there is not liquor in the can to cover them, add a little
water, slightly salted, and cook over twenty minutes after they boil.
Drain, pepper and salt; stir in a lump of butter nearly as large as an
egg, and put into a vegetable dish, the fried brains arranged along the
base of the mound.

Wash a calf’s brains in several waters; scald in boiling, then lay in
ice-cold water, for half an hour. Wipe, and beat them into a paste;
season, work in a little butter, a beaten egg, and enough flour to hold
the paste together. Fry upon a griddle in small cakes. Drain off every
drop of fat. Eat hot.

A nice and savory garnish.


HOMINY CROQUETTES.

  2 cups fine hominy, boiled and cold.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.
  Salt to taste.
  1 teaspoonful of sugar.

Work the butter into the hominy until the latter is smooth; then the
eggs, salt and sugar. Beat hard with a wooden spoon to get out lumps
and mix well. Make into oval balls with floured hands. Roll each in
flour, and fry in sweet dripping or lard, putting in a few at a time
and turning over with care as they brown. Drain in a hot colander.


COLD SLAW.

Chop or shred a small white cabbage. Prepare a dressing in the
proportion of one tablespoonful of oil to four of vinegar, a
teaspoonful of made mustard, the same quantity of salt and sugar, and
half as much pepper. Pour over the salad, adding, if you choose, three
tablespoonfuls of minced celery; toss up well and put into a glass bowl.


BROWN BETTY.

  2 cups chopped apples, tart ones.
  ½ cup of sugar.
  1 cup of bread-crumbs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of nutmeg.

Put a layer of chopped apple in the bottom of a buttered pudding-dish.
Sprinkle well with sugar, stick bits of butter here and there and add
a pinch or two of nutmeg. Cover with bread-crumbs, then more apple. In
this order of alternation fill the dish, spreading the surface with
bread-crumbs. Cover, steam nearly an hour in a moderate oven; then
brown quickly.

For sauce, mix a teaspoonful of cinnamon with a cup of powdered sugar.
Butter the hot “Betty” as you fill each saucer, and strew with this
mixture. Or it is excellent, eaten warm, not hot, with cream and sugar.


  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Potato Soup.
  Fried Oysters.      Roast Mutton.
  Spinach à la Crème.      Potatoes Stewed Whole.
  ——
  French Tapioca Custard.
  ——


POTATO SOUP.

  1 dozen mealy potatoes.
  1 can of tomatoes.
  2 onions.
  3 stalks of celery.
  4 tablespoonfuls of butter, cut into bits and rolled in flour.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs.
  1 lump of white sugar.
  Salt and pepper to taste.
  3 quarts of water.
  Fried bread.

Parboil the potatoes; then slice and put them into the soup-pot with
the tomatoes, the onions, minced, and the celery and herbs chopped
small. Pour on three quarts of water, and stew for one hour, or until
the vegetables can be rubbed easily through the colander. Strain,
return to the pot, drop in the sugar, pepper and salt judiciously, boil
up and skim. Stir in the butter, and simmer, covered, for ten minutes.
Have dice of fried bread in the tureen, upon which pour the soup.


FRIED OYSTERS.

Select for this the finest oysters. Drain, and wipe them by spreading
them upon a cloth, laying another over them, and pressing lightly. Roll
each in beaten egg, then in cracker-crumbs with which have been mixed
a little salt and less pepper, and fry in a mixture of equal parts of
lard and butter.

Drain each in a wire spoon, and eat them hot, with bread and butter.


ROAST MUTTON.

Wash the meat well and wipe with a clean cloth. Put into the
dripping-pan, pour a cup of boiling water over it, and roast, basting
often, for a while, with salt and water, afterwards with its own gravy.
Allow twelve minutes to each pound of meat, and keep the fire at a
steady, moderate heat. Should it brown too fast, cover with a sheet of
paper. Take up the meat, put it on a hot dish; thicken the gravy with
browned flour, having first taken off _all_ the fat you can—season with
pepper and salt, boil up, skim and serve. Pass currant jelly with it.


SPINACH À LA CRÈME.

Pick over and wash the spinach, and cut the leaves from the stalks.
Boil in hot water, a little salted, about twenty minutes. Drain,
put into a wooden tray, or upon a board; chop _very_ fine, and rub
through a colander. Put into a saucepan; stir until it begins to smoke
throughout. Add then two tablespoonfuls of butter for a good-sized
dish, a teaspoonful of white sugar, three tablespoonfuls of milk, salt
and pepper to liking. _Beat_, as it heats, with a silver fork or wire
spoon. Some put in a little nutmeg, and most people like it. Cook thus
until it begins to bubble up as you beat it. Pour into a deep dish,
surround with sliced egg, and serve.


POTATOES STEWED WHOLE.

Pare the potatoes and boil in water which was cold when they went
in. When they are done, as is proved by piercing the largest with a
fork, turn off the water, and cover them barely with milk already
heated. Stew in this five minutes; take the potatoes out, and put into
a covered deep dish. Add to the milk in the saucepan a good lump of
butter, rolled in flour, some chopped parsley, pepper and salt. Boil
up once. Crack each potato as it lies in the dish, by pressing with
the back of a spoon; pour the hot milk over them; let them stand three
minutes in it, and send to table.


FRENCH TAPIOCA CUSTARD.

  5 dessertspoonfuls of tapioca.
  1 quart of milk.
  1 pint of cold water.
  3 eggs.
  1 teaspoonful of vanilla.
  1 heaping cup of sugar.
  A pinch of salt.

Soak the tapioca in the water five hours. Heat the milk to scalding;
add the tapioca, the water in which it was soaked, and the salt. Stir
to boiling, and pour gradually upon the yolks and sugar, which should
have been beaten together. Boil again, stirring constantly, about five
minutes, or until it begins to thicken well. Turn into a bowl and stir
gently into the custard the frothed whites and the flavoring. Eat cold.



  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Old Hare Soup.
  Hot Pot.      Turnips with White Sauce.
  Boiled Rice, au Genève.      Cucumber Pickle.
  ——
  Cabinet Pudding.
  Cabinet Pudding Sauce.
  ——


OLD HARE SOUP.

  1 hare, or rabbit, full grown.
  The bones from yesterday’s mutton broken up well.
  A slice of corned ham, or some bones of salt pork.
  1 onion.
  Chopped parsley.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 tablespoonful of mushroom or walnut catsup.
  3 quarts of water.

Clean the hare carefully and cut to pieces, cracking all the bones.
Put into the soup-kettle with the mutton bones, the bacon, onion, and
parsley. Pour on three quarts of cold water; put on the lid tightly,
and stew four hours very slowly. By this time the meat should be in
shreds. Strain it, return to the fire, season it, stew and skim five
minutes. Slice three boiled eggs and put into the tureen and pour the
soup over them.


HOT POT.

Put into a deep bake-dish a layer of cold mutton left from your roast,
freed from fat and skin and cut into strips two inches long by one
wide. Overlay these with slices of _parboiled_ potatoes, a little
minced onion, an oyster or two chopped, some tiny bits of butter,
with salt and pepper. Repeat this process until your meat is used up.
The top layer should be potatoes. Add a cupful of gravy from Friday’s
dinner (or elsewhere), cover very closely and bake one hour before
lifting the lid. Peep in to see if the contents are done—they will be
if your fire is tolerably strong. Turn out into a deep dish.


CUCUMBER PICKLES

Are a better condiment for this dish than any others.


TURNIPS WITH WHITE SAUCE.

Peel and quarter your turnips. Leave in cold water half an hour.
Put on in hot water, and boil until tender. Drain and cover with a
sauce prepared by heating a cup of milk, thickening it with a heaping
teaspoonful of corn-starch, and stirring in a great spoonful of butter
with pepper and salt to season it well. Put this, when you have added
the turnips, into a vessel set within another of boiling water, and let
them stand covered, without cooking, ten minutes before serving.


BOILED RICE AU GENÈVE.

Pick over and wash the rice, and boil in a farina-kettle, with enough
cold water, a little salted, to cover it an inch deep. Shake now
and then as the rice swells. Take from your hare soup, when you
have strained it, a cupful of the liquor and about half as much of
the boiled shreds of meat. Chop these extremely fine, season with
salt and pepper. Heat the cup of liquor to a boil, stir into it a
scant tablespoonful of browned flour, then the chopped meat and a
tablespoonful of butter, and stew gently five minutes. Pile the boiled
rice, which should be almost dry, in a dish, and pour the gravy over
it. It is very savory, and makes a pleasant variety in the list of
winter vegetables.


CABINET PUDDING.

  ½ lb. of prepared flour.
  ¼ lb. of butter.
  5 eggs.
  ½ lb. of sugar.
  ¼ lb. of raisins seeded and cut into three pieces each.
  ¼ lb. of currants, washed and dried.
  ½ cup of milk.
  ½ lemon, grated peel and juice.

Cream the butter and sugar; add the beaten yolks; the milk and the
flour alternately with the whites. Lastly, stir in the fruit, well
dredged with flour; beat up thoroughly, pour into a buttered mould; put
into a pot of boiling water and do not let it relax its boil for two
hours and a half. Dip the mould into cold water for one moment before
turning it out.


CABINET PUDDING SAUCE.

  Yolks of 2 eggs, whipped very light.
  1 lemon, juice and half the grated peel.
  1 glass of wine.
  1 teaspoonful of cinnamon.
  1 cup of sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.

Rub the butter into the sugar; add the yolks, lemon, and spice. Beat
five minutes and put in the wine, stirring hard. Set within a saucepan
of boiling water, and stir until it is scalding hot. Do not let it
boil. Pour over the pudding.



FEBRUARY.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Clear Vermicelli Soup.
  Stewed Ducks.      Fried Apples and Bacon.
  Mashed Carrots.      Potatoes à la Reine.
  Potato Pie.
  ——
  Oranges and Bananas.
  ——


CLEAR VERMICELLI SOUP.

  6 lbs. of veal—the knuckle is best.
  1 lb. of lean ham, cut fine.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs.
  ¼ lb. of vermicelli.
  5 quarts of water.
  Pepper and salt with half a teaspoonful ground mace.

Cut the meat from the bones in thin shreds, and crack the bones to
splinters. Mince the ham and herbs. Put into a soup-kettle, add the
water, cover very tightly with a weight upon the lid, and stand where
it will slowly boil, for five hours. Then turn into a jar, salt and
pepper, and shut up while hot. Leave the jar all Saturday night upon
the side of the range, where it will keep warm until morning. Pour into
a bowl before breakfast and let it get cold. Take off the cake of fat
two hours before dinner, turn the soup-jelly, bones and all, into the
soup-pot, and when it is melted strain through your wire sieve. Put in
the mace, boil for an hour and a half, and skim. Put the vermicelli,
already broken into short bits and boiled tender, into the tureen (but
not the water in which it was boiled) and strain the soup over it
through double tarlatan. Let it stand ten minutes before serving. This
is a showy soup, and easily made, really requiring little attention.


STEWED DUCKS.

On Saturday, draw, wash, and stuff your ducks, adding a touch of
onion and sage to the dressing. On Saturday, also, make a gravy of
the giblets, cut small, an onion, sliced, with a pint of water. Stew,
closely covered, for two hours; take off, season, and set away with
the giblets in it still. Next day—on Sunday—lay the ducks in the
dripping-pan, put in the gravy, adding water if there is not enough
to half cover the fowls, at least. Invert another pan of the same
size over them, and let them stew, at a moderate heat, for two hours.
Or, you can put them into a large saucepan, pour in the gravy, fit on
the lid, and cook upon the range for the same time. In either case
they will take care of themselves, as will the soup, if Bridget be
reasonably obedient to orders, while you go to church. When the ducks
are done, lay them upon a hot dish, thicken the gravy with browned
flour, add a glass of brown sherry and the juice of a lemon. Lay
three-cornered bits of fried bread around the inside of the dish, and
pour the gravy over all.


FRIED APPLES AND BACON.

Pare, core, and slice round, some well-flavored pippins, or greenings.
Cut into thin slices some streaked middling of excellent bacon, and fry
in their own fat almost to crispness. Take out the meat and arrange it
upon a hot chafing-dish, while you fry the apples in the fat left in
the pan from the bacon. Drain and lay upon the slices of meat.

This is a Southern dish, and not so homely as it would seem from the
mere reading.


POTATOES À LA REINE.

Mash as usual, beating up light with butter and milk, but not so soft
as not to take any shape you like to give them. Make a rounded hillock,
or a four-sided pyramid of them upon a flat dish. Brush this all over
with beaten yolk of egg, set in the oven a few minutes to harden the
coating, and send to table.


MASHED CARROTS.

Scrape, wash, lay in cold water half an hour; then cook tender in
boiling water. Drain well, mash with a wooden spoon, or beetle, work in
a good piece of butter, and season with pepper and salt. Heap up in a
vegetable dish, and serve very hot.


POTATO PIE.

  1 lb. mashed potato, rubbed through a colander.
  ¼ lb. of butter, creamed with the sugar.
  6 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  1 lemon, squeezed into the potato while hot.
  1 teaspoonful of nutmeg and the same of mace.
  2 cups of white sugar.

Cream the butter and sugar; add the yolks, the spice, and beat in the
potato gradually until it is very light. At last, whip in the whites.
Bake in open shells of paste. Eat cold.

When making these pies on Saturday—forecasting Monday’s needs and
superabundance of cares—prepare more pastry than you need for the two
large pies which the above quantity of potato mixture will fill, and
set aside a trim roll of raw crust to be rolled out in due time—we
shall see to what end. I take it for granted (once more) that all of
Sunday’s receipts will be diligently conned on the day when the old
distich tells us, even “lazy people work the best.”

This potato pie will be pronounced delicious.


ORANGES AND BANANAS.

These will make a pretty finish to what I flatter myself with the hope
that you will find a good, and not inelegant repast.


  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Blanche’s Soup.
  Duck Paté.      Succotash.
  Sweet Potatoes, Boiled.      Crab-apple Jelly.
  ——
  Cup Custard, Boiled.
  Cut or Fancy Cake.
  ——


BLANCHE’S SOUP.

Strain out the vermicelli left in yesterday’s “stock.” Heat very hot,
and add two cups of milk in which has been stirred a tablespoonful of
rice-flour, or, if you cannot get that, corn-starch. Stir until it
thickens; take out a cupful and pour it over two beaten eggs. Return
to the soup, taste, and supply what seasoning is needed; lift from the
fire and leave covered five minutes before pouring into the tureen.


DUCK PATÉ.

Cut the meat from the bones of yesterday’s ducks, in season to make
gravy. Do this by breaking the skeletons to pieces, and putting
them, with the stuffing, into a saucepan, pouring in a quart of cold
water, and letting it in two hours boil down to half as much, or
even one-third. Boil slowly, with the lid slightly lifted after the
boiling begins. Let this get cold; skim and season. In the bottom of a
pudding-dish put some neat slices of duck; on this a layer of boiled
egg sliced thin; then, a few slices of corned tongue. (That of a calf
will do as well as beef, and be cheaper. It should be boiled and cold.)
Sprinkle each layer with pepper and a little salt, with a tiny pinch
of mace upon the tongue. When your materials are used up, pour in the
gravy, and, just before it goes into the oven, cover with a crust of
pastry kept over from Saturday. Bake about three-quarters of an hour
for a large dish—half an hour for one of medium size. There must be a
slit in the centre of the crust to let out the steam.

By proper foresight, the manufacture of this very palatable pie will
consume but little of a busy woman’s time on Monday. Do not forget that
with gravies and soups, after you have placed them over the fire in a
well-chosen location, they will need nothing more than a hasty glance
for, perhaps, several hours, during which much work in other parts of
the household can be done.


SWEET POTATOES, BOILED.

It is poor economy, in buying sweet or Irish potatoes, to get either
very large or very small ones. So, in cooking, select those of uniform
size. Put on in hot water; boil until a fork will go easily into the
largest. Peel quickly and set in the oven for a few minutes to dry. Eat
hot, with butter.


SUCCOTASH.

  1 can of sweet corn.
  1 can of string beans.
  1 great spoonful of butter.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 cup of milk.
  A little flour.

Cut the beans into inch lengths; put them into a saucepan with the
corn, and cover with cold water. Stew half an hour, after they begin
to cook, turn off most of the water and put in the milk—cold. When it
is hot, stir in the butter, rolled in flour. Season, simmer for five
minutes, and pour into a deep dish.

This will make a large quantity of succotash for a small family, but
what is not eaten will be nice warmed over for breakfast.


CUP CUSTARDS—BOILED.

  1 quart of milk.
  Yolks of 5 eggs and whites of 3 (reserving 2 for the _méringue_).
  6 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Vanilla flavoring, 1 teaspoonful to the pint.

Heat the milk almost to boiling. Take out a cupful and add, slowly, to
the beaten yolks and sugar, whipped up with three of the whites. Return
to the fire and stir until it begins to thicken, but not until it
curdles. Pour into a bowl and, when cold, flavor. Fill glass, or china
cups with it. Whip the reserved whites to a _méringue_ with a little
powdered sugar, and heap a spoonful upon the top of each cup.

Watch your opportunity for boiling the custard. I have often slipped
into the kitchen and made it while the coffee was boiling for
breakfast. This once off the fire, no more cooking is needed.


CUT, OR FANCY CAKE,

Of which every housewife keeps a supply in her pantry, for luncheon
and tea, makes, with these custards, a nice dessert, to which you need
never be ashamed to seat John and his friends.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Family Soup.
  Rolled Beef.      Baked Tomatoes.
  Browned Potatoes Whole.      Apple Sauce.
  ——
  Unity Pudding.
  Cream Sauce.
  ——


FAMILY SOUP.

  2 lbs. fresh beef bones, broken small.
  1 lb. calf’s liver, sliced.
  1 slice of ham, minced.
  1 lb. of coarse mutton, also minced.
  1 turnip.
  3 stalks of celery.
  1 onion.
  Bunch sweet herbs.
  ¼ cup of raw rice.
  Pepper and salt.
  4 quarts of cold water.

Put the cracked bones, the meat, and the chopped vegetables into the
soup-pot, and cover with the water. The liver should lie in salted
water one hour before it is sliced. Stew very slowly five hours. Then
strain, rubbing hard; cool enough to bring the fat to the top. Take it
off, season the soup, put over the fire, and when it boils stir in the
rice, previously cooked soft in a little salted water. Simmer together
half an hour, and pour out.


ROLLED BEEF.

Get a fillet of beef—that is, the tenderloin of several steaks cut in
one piece. It will not be cheap, but there will be no waste. Therefore,
as one weighing four or five pounds will make a roast for one day, your
dinner will not be really expensive. Roll it up round; pin tightly with
skewers not to be removed, except by the carver, and roast with care,
basting often that it may not dry up. Carve horizontally.


BROWNED POTATOES—WHOLE.

Peel and parboil some fine potatoes, and half an hour before your beef
is taken up, lay them in the dripping-pan. Baste with the meat and turn
several times. Drain off the grease when they are done to a fine brown,
and lay about the meat in the dish when it goes to table.


BAKED TOMATOES.

Open a can of tomatoes, and turn into a bowl. After an hour, season
them with a teaspoonful of sugar, half as much salt, a little pepper
and a tablespoonful of butter cut into bits, each bit rolled in flour
and all distributed evenly throughout the tomatoes. Cover with very dry
bread-crumbs. Bake in a pudding-dish, covered, about thirty minutes,
then brown on the upper grating of the oven.


APPLE SAUCE.

Make this on Saturday, by stewing sliced tart apples in a little water
until soft, draining and mashing them, adding a bit of butter while
doing this. Sweeten abundantly and season with nutmeg.


UNITY PUDDING.

  1 cup of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 egg.
  1 _generous_ pint of prepared flour.
  1 cup of sugar.
  1 saltspoonful of salt.

Rub butter and sugar together; beat in the egg, and whip up very light.
Then, milk and salt, finally the flour. Bake in a buttered mould, until
a straw thrust into the thickest part comes out clean. Turn out upon a
plate. Cut in slices and eat hot.

If for this and other receipts which prescribe prepared flour, you
cannot conveniently procure it, add one teaspoonful of soda and two of
cream of tartar to each quart of flour. Sift all several times through
a sieve. You can keep this for a week or two in a dry place.


CREAM SAUCE.

  2 cups rich milk—half cream, if you can get it.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Whites of 2 eggs whipped stiff.
  1 teaspoonful extract of bitter almonds.
  ½ teaspoonful of nutmeg.
  1 _even_ tablespoonful of corn-starch wet up with cold water.

Heat the milk to scalding; add the sugar, stir in the corn-starch. When
it thickens beat in the stiffened whites, then the seasoning. Take from
the fire, and set in boiling water to keep warm—but not cook—until
wanted.


  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Split Pea Soup.
  Fricasseed Chicken, Brown.      Ladies’ Cabbage.
  Baked Potatoes.      Stewed Salsify.
  ——
  Soft Gingerbread.
  Café au Lait.
  ——


SPLIT PEA SOUP.

  1 quart of split peas, soaked in soft water all night.
  1 lb. streaked salt pork, cut into thin strips.
  2 lbs. of beef bones, cracked well.
  3 stalks of celery, and 1 onion, chopped.
  Salt and pepper to taste.
  4 quarts of cold water.
  A sliced lemon.

Put soaked peas, pork, bones and vegetables over the fire, with the
water, and boil slowly for three hours, until the liquid is reduced
nearly one half. Strain through a colander, rubbing the peas into a
tolerably thick _purée_ into the vessel below. Season, simmer ten
minutes over the fire, and pour over the lemon, sliced and pared and
laid in the tureen.


FRICASSEED CHICKEN—BROWN.

  1 pair of chickens.
  ½ lb. salt pork, minced.
  1 small onion.
  Tablespoonful of chopped parsley.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Browned flour.
  Pepper, and a little salt.

Joint the chickens, cutting them with a sharp knife. Put, with the
pork, into a pot with a quart of water, and stew until tender. Do not
boil fast, especially at first. Strain off the liquor and cover the
chickens while you prepare the gravy. Put it into a large frying-pan.
There will not be too much after the chickens are taken out of it. Add
to it the parsley and chopped onion, with seasoning. Boil up, thicken
with browned flour; stir in the butter and cook rapidly, stirring
often, ten minutes. Arrange the chickens upon a hot dish and pour the
gravy over it. Let all stand for five minutes before sending to the
table.


LADIES’ CABBAGE.

  1 firm white cabbage, boiled and left to get cold.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  3 tablespoonfuls of rich milk.
  Pepper and salt.

Boil the cabbage in two waters. When it is cold, chop fine, and mix
with it the beaten eggs, butter, milk, pepper and salt to your liking.
Beat up well and bake in a buttered pudding-dish until brown. Serve in
the dish in which it was cooked, and eat hot.


BAKED POTATOES.

Select large, fair potatoes of equal size, wash, wipe and put into the
oven to bake until soft all through. Send to table wrapped in a napkin.


STEWED SALSIFY.

Scrape and drop into cold water as fast as you clean them. Cut into
inch lengths; cover with hot water and stew tender. Turn off the water;
put in a cupful of cold milk. Stew in this ten minutes after the boil
begins; add a lump of butter rolled thickly in flour; pepper and salt
as you fancy. Boil up once and pour into a deep dish.


SOFT GINGERBREAD.

  1 cup of butter.
  1 cup of molasses.
  1 cup of sugar.
  1 cup of sour or butter milk.
  ½ lb. of raisins, seeded and cut in half.
  1 teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in boiling water.
  1 teaspoonful of cinnamon.
  2 eggs.
  Nearly 5 cups of sifted flour, enough for tolerably thick batter.

Cream butter, sugar, molasses, and spice; set the mixture on the range
until lukewarm. Add the milk, then the beaten eggs, the soda, and at
last the flour. Beat _hard_ five minutes; put in the fruit dredged with
flour; beat three minutes, and bake in small round tins.

Eat warm all that is needed for dessert. The rest will keep well. This
gingerbread is uncommonly fine.


CAFÉ AU LAIT.

  2 cups strong _made_ coffee—fresh and hot.
  2 cups of boiling milk.

Strain the coffee from the boiler into the table coffee-pot, through
thin muslin. Add the boiling milk and set in a vessel of hot water, a
“cozey,” or a thick cloth wrapped about it, for five minutes. Then it
is ready for use. Pass with the gingerbread.



  First week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Dundee Broth.
  Baked Calf’s Head.      French Beans and Fried Brains.
  Stewed Tomatoes.      Potatoes in cases.
  ——
  Snowballs.
  Sweet Cream.
  ——


DUNDEE BROTH.

  3 lbs. of mutton cut into strips.
  2 lbs. of bones cracked.
  1 carrot.
  2 turnips.
  2 onions.
  Bunch of herbs.
  Handful of chopped cabbage.
  Pepper and salt.
  ¼ lb. of barley.
  4 quarts of cold water.

Put on the meat, bones, and sweet herbs, to stew in four quarts of
water. Do not disturb for four hours. Meanwhile, pare and cut the
vegetables into dice, and boil until tender in just enough water to
cover them. Drain this off and throw it away. Cover the vegetables with
cold water, a little salt, and let them stand until you have strained
the soup. This should be allowed to cool to throw up the fat. Skim it
with care; put back over the fire. Salt and pepper, boil up, and skim
again before putting in the vegetables, _without_ the water in which
they have been standing. The barley should, all this time, be soaking
in warm water, just deep enough to cover it. Turn it now, with the
water in which it has lain, into the soup. Let all simmer together one
hour, and serve the vegetables in the soup.


BAKED CALF’S HEAD.

Take out the brains and set aside. Wash the head carefully. It should,
of course, be cleaned with the skin on. Soak it in cold, salted water,
one hour, then in hot water ten minutes. Boil in three quarts of cold
water for about an hour after the water begins to bubble. Take it out,
saving the liquor when you have salted it, as stock for to-morrow’s
soup. Plunge the head into cold water for five minutes. Wipe carefully,
put into your dripping-pan, brush it over with beaten egg, sprinkle
with bread-crumbs, and bake until nicely browned, basting three times
with butter. Make a gravy of a cupful of the liquor, seasoned and
thickened. Fry strips of ham, about an inch wide by four inches long,
almost crisp in their own fat, and having laid the head upon a flat
dish, dispose these about it. Serve a piece with each plate of the
head.


FRENCH BEANS AND FRIED BRAINS.

Open a can of string-beans one hour at least before they are to be
cooked. Cut into short pieces, cover with hot water, and stew thirty
minutes, but not until they break. Drain well; stir into them two
tablespoonfuls of melted butter, in which have been mixed salt, pepper,
and a tablespoonful of lemon-juice. Heap within a deep dish, and
garnish with the brains.

Wash the brains and lay in cold salt and water for an hour, then boil
ten minutes. Leave in very cold water until firm—say a quarter of an
hour. Wipe, and chop fine, add a little parsley, pepper and salt; make
into small cakes by flouring your hands; dip in beaten egg, then in
cracker-crumbs, and fry in hot dripping. Drain thoroughly.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Season a can of tomatoes with salt, pepper, sugar, and a little chopped
onion. Stew for twenty-five minutes and stir in a large tablespoonful
of butter. Simmer ten minutes, and serve.


POTATOES IN CASES.

Roast large potatoes. Cut off a piece from the top of each, and lay it
aside. Empty the insides carefully by the help of a small spoon—not
tearing the skins. To this potato, when mashed, add butter, grated
cheese, pepper and salt, as suits your taste. Bind the mixture with a
beaten egg; heat in a saucepan, stirring to prevent scorching; refill
the cases, fit on the top of each, and set in a hot oven three minutes
before sending to table in a warm napkin.


SNOWBALLS.

  ¼ lb. raw rice.
  1 quart fresh milk.
  5 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  A little nutmeg.

Wash the rice in several waters, and boil in the milk (always in a
farina-kettle), adding a little salt and five tablespoonfuls of sugar,
with a pinch of nutmeg. Stew gently until the rice is soft and has
soaked up the milk. Fill small cups with the rice, pressing it down
firmly, and let it get cold. At dinner-time, turn it out upon a large
flat dish, or pile within a glass bowl. Eat with sweetened cream.


SWEET CREAM.

  2 cups of cream.
  3 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar.
  2 teaspoonfuls of rose-water.

Stir the sugar into the cream until it is dissolved; then the
rose-water.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Calf’s Feet Soup.
  Salt Mackerel with Cream Sauce.   Larded Sweetbreads, Stewed.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Stewed Celery.
  ——
  Omelette Soufflé.
  Tea and Toasted Crackers.
  ——


CALF’S FEET SOUP.

  4 calf’s feet.
  1 onion.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  2 stalks of celery.
  4 cloves.
  2 eggs.
  1 cup of milk.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 quart of cold water, and the liquor in which the calf’s head was
          boiled, yesterday.

In bespeaking your calf’s head from your butcher, ask also for four
nice feet, already cleaned. (You can secure your sweetbreads at the
same time.) Put on the feet in a quart of cold water. Cover closely
and heat gradually to a very gentle boil. Keep this up until the feet
begin to shrink from the bones—about two hours. Should the water fall
perceptibly, fill up from the tea-kettle. Have ready the vegetables,
herbs, and spice, the former cut up small. Put them into the liquor
left from yesterday’s head, and when you have heated this to a boil,
add the feet with the water in which they are cooking. Boil for another
hour, still slowly. Strain the soup, cool to make the grease rise.
Skim, season, and return to the fire. When again boiling, stir in the
milk, and the meat from the feet, cut into dice. Take out a cupful of
the soup and pour, by degrees, over the beaten eggs. Return to the pot,
stir two minutes, and serve.

A very nice soup, and nutritious. If you cannot get calf’s feet, use
those of a pig instead, cooking exactly in the same way.


SALT MACKEREL, WITH CREAM SAUCE.

Soak overnight in lukewarm water, changing this in the morning for
ice-cold. Rub all the salt off, and wipe dry. Grease your gridiron with
butter, and rub the fish on both sides with the same, melted. Then
broil quickly over a clear fire, turning with a cake-turner so as not
to break it. Lay upon a hot-water dish, and cover until the sauce is
ready.

Heat a small cup of milk to scalding. Stir into it a teaspoonful of
corn-starch, wet up with a little water. When this thickens, add two
tablespoonfuls of butter, pepper, salt, and chopped parsley. Beat an
egg light, pour the sauce gradually over it, put the mixture again over
the fire, and stir one minute, not more. Pour upon the fish, and let
all stand, covered, over the hot water in the chafing-dish. Put fresh
boiling water under the dish before sending to table.


MASHED POTATOES,

Beaten light with milk and butter, and smoothed into a mound, should be
served with the fish. If you have a pretty butter-print, wet it, and
stamp the top of the mound.

Remember that _everything tastes better for looking well_.


LARDED SWEETBREADS, STEWED.

  3 or 4 fine sweetbreads.
  ¼ lb. fat salt pork, cut into “lardoons,” or long narrow strips.
  1 cup of gravy (saved from the roast calf’s head of yesterday).
  1 tablespoonful of tomato or other catsup.
  Juice of half a lemon.
  Season with pepper.

Parboil the sweetbreads for five minutes. The water should boil when
they are dropped in. Take out and lay at once in ice-cold water. This
makes them firm. Leave in this five minutes, wipe dry, and set aside
to get cold. Then lard with the strips of pork, passing them quite
through, so as to project on both sides. If you have no larding-needle,
use a long-bladed penknife. Put them into a saucepan; cover with
the gravy. If there is not enough, put in a few spoonfuls from the
boiling soup. The gravy should be cold, however, when poured over the
sweetbreads. Stew about twenty-five minutes after the boil begins. Take
out the sweetbreads; thicken the gravy with browned flour, add catsup,
lemon, and pepper, the lardoons having salted it sufficiently. Lay the
sweetbreads upon a hot dish, pour the gravy over them, and serve; in
carving, cut perpendicularly.


STEWED CELERY.

  2 bunches of celery, the white stalks only, scraped and cut into
          short pieces.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 cup of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour.
  Pepper, salt, and a pinch of nutmeg.

Stew the celery in a little salted hot water until quite tender. Drain
off the water and put in the milk, cold. So soon as it boils, stir
in the butter, rolled in flour, pepper, salt, and nutmeg. Add a few
spoonfuls of the hot milk to the beaten eggs that they may not curdle
in the saucepan; put with the celery and sauce over the fire; boil up
once, and dish.


OMELETTE SOUFFLÉ.

  8 eggs.
  5 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Vanilla or rose-water flavoring.

Whip the whites to a very stiff froth, thick enough to be cut with a
knife. Beat the yolks smooth and long; add to these the sugar, whip
up well, and flavor. Grease a neat pudding-dish _abundantly_ with the
tablespoonful of butter. The last thing before you take your seat
at the table, do all this; stir whites and yolks together, and put
into a steady, not _too_ hot, oven. If you have a teachable cook, let
her learn how to put the prepared ingredients together after dinner
has gone in. The oven-door should be opened as seldom as possible,
certainly not under fifteen minutes. By this time the omelette should
have risen high, and be of a golden brown. Partly close the oven-door,
to keep it hot, and let it be served as soon as possible in the
bake-dish.

Never attempt this or any other nerve-trying dish, for the first time,
for others than a family party. Yet it is easy enough when you have
once learned for yourself how long to cook it, and how soon it will
fall.


TEA AND TOASTED CRACKERS.

Split Boston crackers, toast, butter; put where they will keep hot, and
pass with an after-dinner cup of tea.


  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Gravy and Sago Soup.
  Boiled Corned Beef.      Baked Macaroni.
  Cauliflower, with Sauce.      Mashed Turnips.
  ——
  Jelly Tartlets.
  Apples and Nuts.
  ——


GRAVY AND SAGO SOUP.

  4 lbs. coarse beef, cut into strips.
  3 lbs. of bones.
  1 slice of lean corned ham.
  4 onions.
  4 cloves.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs.
  ¼ lb. of German sago.
  Pepper and salt.
  5 quarts of water.
  2 stalks of celery, cut small.

Cut the beef into narrow strips, the onions into slices. Fry the latter
brown in dripping, strain them out, and set aside. Return the dripping
to the pan, and fry the meat until it is nicely browned, but not crisp.
Lastly, fry the bones in the same fat. They should be broken up small.
Put meat, bones, celery, spice, and onions into a pot with a quart of
cold water; cover closely, and put where it will not boil under an
hour, but will heat all the time. This is to draw out color and open
the pores (so to speak) of the meat. So soon as it boils add four
quarts more of cold water. Set where it will boil steadily, but never
fast, for five hours. Strain, and cool sufficiently to make the fat
rise. Take it off, put back over the fire, season, boil up and skim;
put in the sago, which should have been soaked two hours in a little
water, simmer fifteen minutes and serve.

Save all that is left from dinner, for Monday.


BOILED CORNED BEEF.

Wash well, and put over the fire in hot water—plenty of it—and boil
twenty minutes for each pound of meat. Turn three times while cooking.
Drain dry, and serve with drawn butter in a boat. “Draw” the butter in
liquor taken from the pot. Keep the rest of the liquor for the base of
Sunday’s soup.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Pare, quarter, and lay in cold water half an hour. Put on in boiling
water, and cook until tender. Drain, mash, and press to get out the
water, work in pepper, salt, and a generous lump of butter. Do all this
quickly not to cool the turnips, and pile smoothly in a hot, deep dish.


CAULIFLOWER, WITH SAUCE.

Pick off the leaves and cut the stem close. Do not cut the cauliflower
unless very large. Lay in cold water for thirty minutes, tie in coarse
bobbinet lace or mosquito net, and cook in boiling water, slightly
salted, until tender. Lay the cauliflower, flower upward, within a hot
dish, and pour the sauce over it.


SAUCE FOR THE ABOVE.

Stir into a cup of boiling water a tablespoonful of flour, wet up with
cold. When it has boiled two minutes, add two tablespoonfuls of butter,
the white of an egg whipped stiff, pepper and salt, and the juice of a
lemon. Boil one minute, and pour over the cauliflower.


BAKED MACARONI.

Break half a pound of macaroni into pieces an inch long, and cook
in boiling water, slightly salted, twenty minutes. Drain, and put a
layer in the bottom of a greased bake-dish, upon this some grated
cheese—Parmesan, if you can get it—and tiny bits of butter. Then more
macaroni, and so on, filling the dish, with grated cheese on top. Wet
with a little milk, and salt lightly. Bake, covered half an hour, then
brown. Serve in the bake-dish.


JELLY TARTLETS.

  1 lb. of flour.
  ½ lb. of butter.
  ¼ lb. of lard.
  Yolk of an egg.
  Ice-water.

Wash the butter in three waters, working it over well to get out the
salt. Melt it in a tin cup set in boiling water, take the scum from the
top, and let it get almost cold, when beat, little by little, into the
whipped egg. Work these into the flour, adding just enough ice-water
to make the paste soft enough to roll out. When you have rolled it
into a thin sheet, spread all over with the lard, put on with a knife.
Sprinkle lightly with flour, roll up, and flatten with three or four
strokes of the rolling-pin. Roll again into a yet thinner sheet; again
lubricate with the lard and sprinkle with flour, and, once more, make
into a tight roll. Set for an hour in a cold place. Cut in two. Set
aside enough for your Monday’s dessert; line small “patty-pans” with
the rest, pricking the paste on the bottom to keep it from puffing too
high. Bake in a quick oven, and when cold put a tablespoonful of sweet
jelly or jam in each.


APPLES AND NUTS,

Especially the former, are better for very young stomachs than pastry.


  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Mock Turtle Bean Soup.
  Haunch of Venison.      Moulded Potatoes.
  Lima Beans.      Sweet Potatoes, Browned.
  ——
  Wine Jelly with Whipped Cream.
  Coffee and Fancy Cakes.
  ——


MOCK TURTLE BEAN SOUP.

  1 quart of mock turtle soup beans.
  2 onions, chopped.
  4 stalks of celery, cut small.
  Liquor in which the corned beef of yesterday was boiled.
  Pepper.
  Dice of fried bread.
  1 quart of cold water.
  1 tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour.

Soak the beans overnight. In the morning, pour on a quart of cold
water, and set them where they will heat for an hour, without burning.
Stir up often from the bottom. At the end of this time add the beef
liquor (after taking off the fat), the onions, and celery. Cook gently
three hours, until the beans are boiled to pieces. Strain, season, put
back into the kettle, boil up, season with pepper, stir in the butter
rolled in flour. Simmer five minutes, and pour upon the fried bread in
the tureen.

If you cannot get the purple “mock turtle soup beans,” use the common
white ones.


HAUNCH OF VENISON.

Wash all over with lukewarm vinegar and water; then rub well with
butter or lard to soften the skin. Cover the top and sides with
foolscap paper, well greased, and coat it with a paste of flour
and water, half an inch thick. Lay over this a large sheet of thin
wrapping-paper, and over this another of stout foolscap. Tie all down
in place by greased pack-thread. The papers should also be thoroughly
greased.

Thus much on Saturday—and set the venison in a very cold place.
Next day, about three hours before it will be needed, put into the
dripping-pan, with two cups of boiling water in the bottom. Invert
another pan over it to keep in the steam; be sure that the fire is
good, and leave it to itself for an hour. Then see that the paper
is not scorching; wet it all over with hot water and a ladleful of
gravy; cover and let it alone for an hour and a half more. Remove
the papers and paste, and test with a skewer in the thickest part.
If it goes in readily, close the oven, and let it brown for half an
hour. Baste freely four times with claret and butter; at last dredge
with flour and rub over with butter to make a froth. Take it up, put
upon a hot dish. Skim the gravy left in the dripping pan, strain it,
thicken with browned flour; add two teaspoonfuls of currant-jelly, a
glass of claret, pepper and salt. Boil up for an instant, and serve
in a gravy-boat. Allow a quarter of an hour to the pound in roasting
venison. The neck can be roasted in the same way as the haunch.


MASHED POTATOES—MOULDED.

Having mashed and seasoned them as usual, grease _well_ the inside of
a fluted pudding or cake mould, put in the potato, cover, and set for
half an hour in a dripping-pan half full of boiling water, within a
moderate oven. Then remove the lid, dip, for a moment, the mould in
cold water, and turn the potato out upon a flat dish.


LIMA BEANS.

You can get them canned, but they are nearly, if not quite as good
dried. In this case soak them overnight in soft water. Change this in
the morning for fresh, and put them on to boil in hot water, a little
salted. Cook slowly until soft. Do not boil so fast as to break the
skins. Drain well, stir in a good piece of butter, a little pepper and
salt, and eat very hot.


SWEET POTATOES—BROWNED.

Boil in their skins, peel while hot, and set them in a quick oven.
Glaze presently with butter, repeating the process, several times, as
they brown.


WINE JELLY WITH WHIPPED CREAM.

  1 package of Coxe’s gelatine, soaked for two hours in a large cup of
          cold water.
  2 cups of white wine, or pale sherry.
  1 lemon, all the juice and half the grated peel.
  1 teaspoonful of bitter almond extract.
  2 cups of white sugar.
  2 cups of _boiling_ water.

Put soaked gelatine, lemon, sugar, and flavoring extract together, and
cover closely for half an hour. Pour on boiling water, stir and strain.
Add the wine, strain again through a flannel bag, without squeezing,
and leave in a mould wet with cold water, until just before the Sunday
dinner.

Whip a cup of rich cream to a thick froth in a syllabub-churn. The
jelly should have been formed in an open mould—one with cylinder in the
middle. Fill the hollow left by this with the whipped cream; or, if
your jelly be a solid mass, heap the cream about the base.


COFFEE AND MACAROONS

Should be the final course. I make no apology for hot and good Sunday
dinners. There is a vast deal of straining out infinitesimal gnats and
swallowing gigantic camels upon this, as upon most other questions of
conscience. We have neither time nor space for their discussion. I
have simply tried to deal with the fact that most husbands, brothers,
and fathers expect a better dinner on Sabbath, and enjoy it more, than
upon other days, by showing, to the best of my ability, how they can be
gratified without imposing heavy duties upon mistress and servants at a
season when both mind and body need comparative rest.


  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  “Second Thoughts” Soup.
  Larded Venison.      Scalloped Tomatoes.
  Grape Jelly.      Fried Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Raspberry and Currant Jelly Tart.
  ——


“SECOND THOUGHTS” SOUP.

Heat Saturday’s soup to a boil; add two cups of milk, and when this
heats, pour a little of it upon two beaten eggs. Return these to the
soup, add whatever seasoning is necessary; simmer all together for one
minute, and pour upon three or four tablespoonfuls of grated cheese
placed in the bottom of the tureen. Stir up well, and it is ready.


LARDED VENISON.

Trim the remains of the roast haunch into a neat shape, and lard
with strips of fat pork, making incisions to receive it with a thin,
sharp-edged knife. Pour what gravy you have over it, or should there
be none, use butter and water instead. Put into a dripping-pan, turn
another over it and roast—or steam—for one hour. Meantime, make a
gravy of the trimmings, bits of bone, etc., by covering them well with
cold water, and adding half an onion, sliced. Stew until the gravy
is reduced one-half. Strain, season with pepper; a tablespoonful of
currant-jelly, one of catsup and two of claret. Thicken slightly with
browned flour, boil up to mix well, and pour gradually over the meat.
Baste abundantly with this for half an hour if the piece of meat be
large. Less time may suffice for a small roast. Never let it dry for
an instant. When done, it should seem to have been stewed rather than
roasted. Serve the gravy in a sauce-boat.

Like some other “second thoughts,” this dish will be even better than
at its first appearance.


SCALLOPED TOMATOES.

Turn nearly all the juice off from a can of tomatoes. Salt and pepper
this, by the way, and put aside in a cool place for some other day’s
soup. Put a layer of bread-crumbs in the bottom of a buttered pie-dish;
on them one of tomatoes; sprinkle with salt, pepper, and some bits
of butter, also a little sugar. Another layer of crumbs, another of
tomatoes—seasoned—then a top layer of very fine, dry crumbs. Bake
covered until bubbling hot, and brown quickly.


FRIED SWEET POTATOES.

Slice cold ones left from yesterday, or boiled this fore-noon; roll in
flour and fry in dripping. Drain well.


RASPBERRY AND CURRANT JELLY TART.

Roll out the raw paste reserved for to-day from Saturday, and line two
pie-dishes. Fill them nearly full of canned raspberries, sweetened to
your liking. Spread a coating of currant jelly over the top, and cover
with a lattice-work of pastry, cut with a jagging-iron. Watch your
chance of putting them into the oven, as they are better when not hot.

You will like them, I think.



  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Clam Soup.
  Ragoût of Veal.      Rice and Cheese.
  Potato Puff.      Celery Salad.
  ——
  A Mere Trifle.
  ——


CLAM SOUP.

  50 clams, ready opened.
  1 quart of milk.
  1 pint of water.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  12 whole peppers.
  A few bits of red pepper pods.
  6 blades of mace.
  Salt to taste.
  1 stalk of celery, cut small.
  1 tablespoonful rice-flour or corn-starch.

Drain off the liquor from the clams and put it over the fire in a
large farina-kettle, with a pint of water, the peppers, mace, celery,
and salt. When it has boiled ten minutes, strain and put back into
the kettle with the clams. Shut the lid down closely, and boil, fast,
thirty minutes. Heat the milk in another vessel, stir into it the
rice-flour, wet up with cold water, and the butter. Pour into the
kettle with the clams, take at once from the fire, pour into the
tureen, in the bottom of which you have laid four or five Boston
crackers, split. Cover, and wait five minutes before serving.


RAGOÛT OF VEAL.

  5 lbs. of knuckle of veal.
  1 onion.
  2 stalks of celery.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  Juice of tomatoes set aside yesterday.
  Juice of half a lemon.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  2 tablespoonfuls of browned flour.
  ¼ lb. of streaked fat pork.
  Pepper and salt.

Crack the bones, when you have taken the meat off, and put them into
a saucepan with the minced onion, celery, and herbs, with a quart
of water. Stew slowly until the liquor has boiled down to a pint.
Meanwhile, cut the veal into neat slices, and fry until they begin to
brown, in some good dripping. Strain the gravy made from the bones and
vegetables over this, and put all on to stew, adding the tomato-juice,
pepper, and pork, the last cut up fine. Simmer, with the lid on, for
two hours. Then add the browned flour, wet up in cold water, salt, if
needed, the butter and lemon-juice. Boil up once, and dish.


RICE AND CHEESE.

Boil a cup of rice in a quart of water, slightly salted, and when
half-done add two tablespoonfuls of butter. By the time the rice is
soft, the water should have been soaked up entirely, and each grain
stand out whole in the mass. Never stir boiling rice, but shake
up the saucepan instead. Stir into the rice, at this point, three
tablespoonfuls of grated cheese, salt and pepper to taste. Toss up with
a fork until the cheese is dissolved, and pour into a deep dish.


POTATO PUFF.

Mash the potatoes while hot. Beat in butter, milk, and two whipped
eggs, with salt to your liking, until you have a light, soft paste.
Bake in a buttered pudding-dish in a quick oven.


CELERY SALAD.

Cut up blanched stalks of celery into short pieces. Mix a dressing of
one tablespoonful of oil to one teaspoonful of sugar, one of salt,
half as much pepper, and four tablespoonfuls of vinegar with half a
teaspoonful of made mustard. Heat the vinegar to scalding, and pour
over a beaten egg, a little at a time, and beating it in well. To this
add the oil and other ingredients, whipping up the mixture with an
egg-beater. When cold, pour over the salad, toss up with a silver fork,
and put into a glass bowl.


A MERE TRIFLE.

  1 quart of fresh milk.
  5 eggs.
  6 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Vanilla, or other essence, 2 teaspoonfuls.

Heat the milk to boiling, and pour, gradually, upon the beaten yolks
and sugar. Put again over the fire, stir steadily for about ten
minutes, or until it begins to thicken. Take it off, and while still
very hot, stir in with a few light strokes half of the frothed whites.
Let it get cold before flavoring it. Pour into a glass bowl. Whip the
remaining whites to a _méringue_ with a little powdered sugar. Heap
upon the custard. Put bits of bright jelly, or preserved strawberries,
here and there upon the snowy mass.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Hotch-Potch.
  Stewed Pigeons.      Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.
  Kidney Beans.      Mixed Pickles.
  ——
  English Tapioca Pudding.
  ——


HOTCH-POTCH.

  2 lbs. of lean beef, without bones, and cut into mince-meat.
  2 onions.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  2 stalks of celery.
  ½ small cabbage, cut fine.
  2 potatoes.
  1 cup of corn.
  Half a can of tomatoes.
  Bunch of sweet herbs, chopped.
  Pepper and salt.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.

Wash, scrape, and slice the vegetables, and put all except the tomatoes
into a pot; cover with hot water and boil gently ten minutes. Drain off
the water, put a handful of the mixed vegetables, including now the
tomatoes, in the bottom of a stone jar. Pepper and salt, strew thickly
with the minced raw beef, repeat the order until your materials are all
in the jar. Fit a top or a small plate over the mouth; tie down with
stout greased paper, set it within the oven, and let it alone for five
or six hours, except that you must look, now and then, to see that the
paper does not take fire. Prevent this by greasing it abundantly. At
the end of this time, turn out the hotch-potch; stir in the butter,
and, if needed, additional seasoning through it, and serve in a tureen.


STEWED PIGEONS.

Pick, clean, and wash the pigeons, and put into a pot with a cupful of
water to keep them from burning, and a tablespoonful of butter for each
one. Shut the lid down tightly, and subject to a slow heat until they
are of a nice brown—about nut-color. Once in a great while turn them,
and see that each is well wet with the liquor. Take them out and cover
in a warm place—a colander set over a pot of hot water is best—while
you make the gravy. Chop the giblets of the pigeon “exceeding small”
with a little onion and parsley. Put into the gravy, pepper and salt,
boil up and thicken with browned flour. Return the pigeons to the pot,
cover again tightly, and cook slowly until tender. If there should not
be liquor enough in the pot to make the gravy, add boiling water before
the giblets go in.

This is an admirable receipt.


POTATOES À LA LYONNAISE.

Cut parboiled potatoes into dice. Chop an onion and fry it, with a
little minced parsley, in good dripping or butter, for one minute. Then
put in the potatoes. Stir briskly until they have fried slowly for
five minutes. They must never stick to the bottom, nor brown. Sprinkle
with pepper and salt, drain free of fat by shaking them in a heated
colander, and send up hot.


KIDNEY BEANS.

Soak over night in soft water; next morning cover with lukewarm, and
cook slowly for one hour. Salt slightly and boil until tender, but
not to actual breaking. Drain very well, stir in a liberal spoonful of
butter, pepper, and serve.


ENGLISH TAPIOCA PUDDING.

  1 cup of tapioca.
  5 eggs.
  3 pints of milk.
  1 cup of sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  ½ lb. of raisins.
  Half the grated peel of a lemon.
  A _little_ salt.

Soak the tapioca for one hour in a pint of the milk; pour into a
farina-kettle, surround with warm water, salt very slightly, and bring
to a boil. When soft throughout, turn out to cool, while you make the
custard. Heat a quart of milk to scalding; pour over the beaten eggs
and sugar, this last having been rubbed to a cream with the butter. Mix
with the tapioca—lemon-peel and raisins last. Dredge the fruit lightly
with flour, and beat all up hard. Bake in a buttered dish one hour—at
first covered.

Eat warm, with powdered sugar. It is better for not being too hot.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Celery Soup.
  Mutton Cutlets—Fried.      Stewed Corn and Tomatoes.
  Brussels Sprouts.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Apple Méringue Pie.
  ——


CELERY SOUP.

  2 lbs. of veal.
  1 slice of corned ham, or a ham-bone.
  2 bunches of celery.
  2 cups of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch wet up in water.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of sugar.
  1 onion.
  Dice of fried bread.
  Pepper and salt.
  3 quarts of water.

Chop the meat, onion, and herbs; cover with the water and put on to
stew early in the day. When the meat has boiled to rags and the liquid
reduced one-half, strain, and put in the celery, cut into small pieces.
Use the best parts only. Stew soft; rub through a colander and return
with the broth to the saucepan. Season, add the sugar, boil up and
skim, and put in the milk. Heat, and add corn starch. When it again
boils, you stirring all the while, put in the butter.

Take off so soon as this has melted, and pour over the fried bread in
the tureen.


MUTTON CUTLETS—FRIED.

Beat them flat with the broad side of a hatchet; season with pepper and
salt, dip first in beaten egg, then in bread-crumbs, and fry in lard or
dripping. Drain perfectly free from the fat, and arrange them, standing
on end and touching one another, around a mound of mashed potatoes.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and shape with a knife into a smooth mound, with a
hedge of cutlets about the base.


STEWED CORN AND TOMATOES.

Take a half-can of tomatoes and the same of corn, the rest of that
which was opened for your “hotch-potch” yesterday, and, after mixing
them up well, season with pepper, salt, and a little sugar. Set on
where they will cook slowly. At the end of twenty-five minutes, stir in
a great spoonful of butter. Put on the lid and stew _very_ gently ten
minutes more. Serve in a deep dish.


BRUSSELS SPROUTS.

Pick over, trim, and lay in cold water for half an hour cook quickly in
boiling water, a little salt, for fifteen minutes. Drain carefully, put
upon a flat dish, and pour drawn butter over them.


APPLE MÉRINGUE PIE.

  1 quart of flour.
  ½ lb. of butter.
  ¼ lb. of lard.
  Ice-water.

Chop the lard in flour, wet up with ice-water to a stiff paste. Roll
thin, and baste with one-third of the butter, sprinkle lightly with
flour, and roll up. Again roll out, even thinner than before, baste
again with half the remaining butter, sprinkle with flour, and make a
second roll. Repeat this process yet a third time, and set in a cold
place for one hour.

Cut the roll of paste into two pieces, reserving one for to-morrow’s
oyster-pie. With the other, line two pie-dishes and fill with good
apple-sauce, well sweetened, and seasoned with nutmeg. Bake until
just done. Draw to the oven door, and spread with a méringue made by
whipping stiff the whites of three eggs for each pie, sweetening with
a tablespoonful of sugar for each egg. Flavor with a little rose-water
or lemon-essence, beat until you can make a clean cut in it, and spread
three-quarters of an inch thick upon each pie. Shut the oven door until
the méringue is well set. Do not let it scorch. Eat cold.


  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Friars’ Soup.
  Oyster Pie.      Calf’s Liver à l’Anglaise.
  Apple Sauce.      Stewed Parsnips.
  Potatoes au gratin.      Picklette.
  ——
  Chocolate Custard.
  ——


FRIARS’ SOUP.

  4 onions.
  3 stalks of celery.
  ¼ of a small cabbage.
  2 turnips.
  4 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  ½ cup raw rice.
  2 eggs.
  Pepper and salt to taste.
  1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley.
  3 quarts of water.

Boil the vegetables, all chopped fine (reserving the parsley for
seasoning), in three quarts of water until they can be pulped through a
colander. Return them, with the water in which they were cooked, to the
fire. Boil the rice, meantime, in a little water until it swells and
absorbs it all. Stir into the vegetable porridge, season, and simmer
for fifteen minutes. Add the butter, simmer ten minutes, dip out a
cupful and beat into the eggs. Stir this into the broth, and before it
begins to boil, take from the fire and pour out, lest the eggs should
curdle.


OYSTER PIE.

Roll out the raw paste made yesterday into a pretty thick sheet. Fill
a pudding-dish with crusts of stale bread, or light crackers. Butter
the edges of the dish that the crust may be easily removed. Cover the
mockpie with the pastry; lay a strip cut in scallops or points, around
the edge, to keep it in place, and bake.

To each pint of oyster-liquor allow a cup of milk, but heat them in
separate vessels. So soon as the liquor boils, put in the oysters and
cook five minutes more. Stir a tablespoonful of corn-starch into the
pint of hot milk, having, of course, first wet it up with cold water,
and, when it thickens, pour over the oysters and liquor. Season with
pepper and salt, and add two tablespoonfuls of butter, if there be a
quart of oysters. Lift the hot crust from the pudding-dish with great
care. Remove the stale bread, wipe out the inside; pour in the stewed
oysters with enough of the soup to cover them well; replace the pastry
and set in the oven for two or three minutes.


CALF’S LIVER À L’ANGLAISE.

  2 lbs. of fresh liver.
  ½ lb. fat salt pork.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  ½ of a small onion.
  1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
  Pepper.
  The pork should salt it sufficiently.

Put the butter into a warm—not hot saucepan. Cut the liver into slices
half an inch thick, and lay upon the butter. Mince the pork and cover
the liver. Sprinkle the parsley and onion, with pepper, on top. Cover
the saucepan closely and set in a kettle of hot water. Keep this water
below the boiling-point for an hour. Then let it boil another hour. The
liver should by this time be very tender and juicy, if the heat has
been properly managed. Take it out, and put it upon a chafing-dish to
keep warm. Boil up, and thicken the gravy with browned flour; pour over
the liver and serve. The inner saucepan should be made of tin.


POTATOES AU GRATIN.

Mash your potatoes soft with butter and milk; mould in a round pan
or tin jelly-mould, made very wet with cold water. Turn out upon a
flat plate—a sheet of tin is better—well-greased, strew with fine, dry
bread-crumbs; set upon the upper grating of the oven to brown quickly.
Slip dexterously from the plate to a hot dish.


STEWED PARSNIPS.

Boil tender and cut in long slices. Heat in a saucepan a cup of milk,
thicken it with a tablespoonful of butter cut into bits and rolled
in flour, season with pepper, salt, and a little nutmeg. Put in the
parsnips, boil up once gently, take from the fire, and leave covered in
the saucepan for five minutes before you serve.


PICKLETTE AND APPLE SAUCE.

Pass the first with the oyster pie, which is a course of itself; the
apple sauce with the meat.


CHOCOLATE CUSTARD.

  1 quart of milk.
  5 eggs.
  1 cup of sugar.
  4 heaping tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate.
  2 teaspoonfuls vanilla extract.

Scald the milk, rub the chocolate to a smooth paste in a little cold
milk. Stir into the milk and cook two minutes in it. Beat up the yolks
of the five eggs with the whites of two, and the sugar. Pour the hot
mixture, gradually, upon them, stirring deeply. Turn into a buttered
pudding-dish, and set in a dripping-pan of boiling water. Bake until
firm. When “set” in the middle, spread quickly, without taking from the
oven, with a _méringue_ made by whipping the reserved whites stiff with
a very little sugar. Bake until this is done. Eat cold.


  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Macaroni Soup.
  Baked Ham.      Cheese Fondu.
  Stewed Potatoes.      Spinach with Eggs.
  ——
  Seymour Pudding.
  ——


MACARONI SOUP.

  3 lbs. knuckle of veal.
  2 lbs. of lean beef.
  1 lb. lean ham.
  2 onions.
  1 carrot.
  2 turnips.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  ¼ lb. of macaroni cut into fancy shapes, usually known as “Italian
          Paste.”
  6 cloves.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  6 quarts of water.
  3 stalks of celery.

Mince the meat, crack the bones, and slice the vegetables. Mix all
together. Put the butter in the bottom of a soup-pot, next the meat,
then the vegetables and herbs; fit on a tight lid, and set the pot
where it will warm very slowly. At the end of an hour, open it, pour
off the gravy; increase the heat until the meat begins to brown on the
sides of the pot. Return the gravy to the rest of the ingredients;
cover with six quarts of cold water, and boil until the liquor has
fallen to four quarts. This should be in four hours. Strain the soup;
pressing out all the nourishment, and rubbing the vegetables through
the sieve. Add the paste, or, if you cannot obtain it, the same
quantity of pipe macaroni, boiled a few minutes in hot water, and left
to get cool. Then, with a sharp knife or scissors, clip it into very
short bits, and put into the soup. Season, boil up, skim well, and let
all cook gently together for ten minutes. Half of the above quantity of
stock will be enough for Saturday’s dinner. Therefore, before adding
the macaroni, take out about two quarts, season well, and set aside for
Sunday’s soup.


BAKED HAM.

Soak overnight in warm water. In the morning, scrub it hard; trim away
the rusty part of the under side and edges; wipe dry; cover the bottom
with a stiff paste of flour and water, and lay, upside down, in the
dripping-pan, with enough water to keep it from burning. Allow, in
baking, twenty-five minutes to the pound. Baste a few times, to prevent
the skin from cracking, and keep hot water in the pan. When a skewer
will pierce the thickest part, take it up, plunge for one minute into
cold water; skin carefully, brush all over with beaten egg, then strew
very thickly with cracker-crumbs, and set in a hot oven to brown. Eat
hot or cold, garnished with sprigs of celery or parsley.


CHEESE FONDU.

  1 pint of boiling milk.
  1 cup _very_ dry bread-crumbs. (Crush the crusts baked in yesterday’s
          oyster pie.)
  ½ lb. dry cheese, grated.
  3 eggs.
  Pepper and salt.

Soak the crumbs in the hot milk; beat in the cheese; then the yolks of
the eggs, pepper and salt. Have a buttered pudding-dish ready, and just
before the _fondu_ goes into the oven whip in the whites of the eggs,
already frothed. Pour into the dish, bake in a brisk oven, and send at
once to table, as it soon falls. This is a delightful accompaniment to
ham.


SPINACH WITH EGGS.

Pick the leaves from the stems, wash well, and boil in hot water,
a little salted, for twenty minutes. Chop and drain. Return to the
saucepan with a tablespoonful of butter, a teaspoonful of sugar, a
little pepper and salt. Have ready the yolks of three eggs, rubbed to
powder, then wet up with a little cream or milk. Stir all together in
the saucepan, beating with a wire spoon, until they are smooth and
thick. Turn into a deep dish and garnish with the whites of the eggs
cut into rings.


STEWED POTATOES.

Pare the potatoes; cut into quarters, and these into long, even strips.
Lay in cold water half an hour, and cook in boiling water until tender,
with half a minced onion. Drain off nearly all the water; pepper and
salt, and add a cup of cold milk with a tablespoonful of butter rolled
in flour. When it thickens, stir in a little chopped parsley. Simmer
five minutes and serve. The potatoes should not be allowed to break so
much as to lose their shape.


SEYMOUR PUDDING.

  ½ cup of molasses.
  1 scant cup of milk.
  ½ cup of raisins, seeded and cut in half.
  ½ cup of currants.
  ½ cup of suet, powdered.
  ½ teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water.
  1 egg.
  1 teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and mace.
  A little salt.
  1½ cups of Graham flour.

Stir molasses, suet, and milk together, add the egg, spice, flour,
fruit, well dredged with flour—at last, the soda. Beat hard five
minutes before putting it into a buttered pudding-mould. Boil two hours
and a half. Eat with butter and sugar.


  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Beef and Barley Soup.
  Steamed Turkey.      Naples Rice Pudding.
  Cranberry Sauce.      Boiled Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Pumpkin Pie.
  ——


BEEF AND BARLEY SOUP.

Use the two quarts of stock set aside yesterday. Soak five or six
tablespoonfuls of barley in cold water two hours. Boil half an hour or
until tender, in a little salted water. When you have taken the cake
of cold fat from the top of the soup, put in the barley and simmer
all together half an hour. Then stir in two tablespoonfuls of shred
gelatine previously soaked one hour in cold water. When this has
dissolved, the soup is ready for use.


STEAMED TURKEY.

Prepare the turkey as for roasting, and, if you have no steamer, put a
gridiron upon the top of a pot of boiling water; lay the fowl upon it,
invert a deep pan, as nearly as possible the size of the mouth of the
pot, over it, stuff wet cloths into whatever space may be left between
the pot and the pan, and keep the water at a hard boil, allowing twenty
minutes for each pound of turkey. Two or three times, replenish the
water by pulling away one of the cloths so as to leave an aperture
large enough to admit the nose of the boiling tea-kettle. When the
turkey is half done, lift the pan and turn it; replace the cloths and
steam again. When it is done, lay upon a hot dish and baste with a
mixture of melted butter and chopped parsley, anointing all parts of
it well. Serve drawn butter in a boat, with a couple of boiled eggs
chopped fine, stirred up in it. Save the giblets of the turkey for
Monday’s soup.


CRANBERRY SAUCE

In a mould, as strained jelly, or the plainer dish of stewed
cranberries, well-sweetened, must accompany this dish.


NAPLES RICE PUDDING.

Take a few tablespoonfuls of the meat boiled in yesterday’s soup,
mince fine, add half a chopped onion, a tablespoonful of dripping
from the top of the soup, and put on to warm with a very little hot
water. Simmer, but do not boil, fifteen minutes. Boil one cup of rice
in enough water, slightly salt, to cover it well. Shake up from time
to time, but do not stir. When the rice is soft and has soaked up the
water, add a cup of cold milk in which has been stirred a tablespoonful
of corn-starch, one raw egg, and a tablespoonful of butter. Take from
the fire before you do this and turn into a bowl. Stir in now the
minced meat and gravy (there should be very little of the latter),
season to taste, mix all up well, and put into a buttered cake-mould.
Set this in a dripping-pan of hot water and bake one hour, closely
covered. Turn out upon a hot dish. It is a very good _entrée_, and
easily made.


BOILED SWEET POTATOES.

Boil in their skins until soft to the touch; pare quickly, lay upon a
flat dish, butter each, and serve hot.


PUMPKIN PIE.

  1 quart of stewed pumpkin, rubbed through a fine colander.
  6 eggs.
  2 quarts of milk.
  1 teaspoonful of mace.
  1 teaspoonful of cinnamon and the same of nutmeg.
  1½ cups of sugar.

Beat the eggs light and whip in the sugar, then the pumpkin and spice.
At last, mix in the milk, stirring up well from the bottom.

Bake in open shells of paste made according to the receipt given last
Thursday. Eat cold, and send around a plate of cheese with it.


  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Giblet Soup.
  Turkey and Ham.      Corn Puddings.
  Peach Pickles.      Baked Potatoes.
  ——
  Farina Custard.
  ——


GIBLET SOUP.

Cut the giblets of your turkey into six pieces each, and stew, closely
covered, in a pint of water until tender. Strain out the barley from
the remains of yesterday’s soup and if you have any of Saturday’s in
the pantry, strain out the vermicelli and add that. Warm this to a
boil with the liquor in which the giblets were cooked. Boil up sharply
and skim; add the giblets, and while they simmer together, put two
tablespoonfuls of butter cut into bits, and rolled in _browned_ flour,
into a frying-pan. Stir until it is hissing hot. Add to the soup with a
handful of chopped parsley, and a tablespoonful of walnut or mushroom
catsup. Boil up once and serve.


TURKEY AND HAM.

Cover the uncarved side of your steamed turkey with rather thick and
fat slices of cooked ham. Three or four large ones will suffice. Bind
them to the body with greased packthread. Lay the turkey, cut side
downward, and the ham up, in the dripping-pan with a little boiling
water in the bottom. Bake about three-quarters of an hour, basting the
ham, when it begins to drip, with its own grease. Ten minutes before
taking it up, clip the strings, and remove the ham to a hot dish.
Dredge the upper side of the turkey with flour, and baste with butter
to make a brown froth. Dish, with the ham laid around it.


CORN PUDDINGS.

  Add to a can of sweet corn,
  1 cup of milk.
  3 eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 of sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of flour.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.

Beat up the eggs, add the sugar and butter, the milk, corn, and,
lastly, the flour. Bake in earthenware cups well buttered, or in neat
patty-pans. Turn out upon a dish, or eat from the cups. They are very
nice when hot.


BAKED POTATOES.

Wash, wipe, and bake in a moderate oven. When done, cut a round piece
of skin almost entirely from the top of each, leaving a “hinge” at
one side. With a small knife make an incision in the mealy part of
the potato, _i. e._, the heart, put in a pinch of salt, and a bit of
butter, replace the flap of skin, and send hot to table.


FARINA CUSTARD.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 tablespoonfuls of farina.
  3 eggs well beaten.
  1 cup of sugar.
  Vanilla essence—2 teaspoonfuls.
  1 saltspoonful of salt.

Heat the milk to scalding; stir in the farina, which should have
been previously soaked in a little cold water for an hour. Cook in a
farina-kettle fifteen minutes, stirring often. Take out a cupful and
beat into the eggs already whipped up with the sugar. Put into the
kettle, stir in salt and flavoring, boil two minutes, and pour into a
deep dish. Eat warm, putting a teaspoonful of sweet fruit jelly upon
the top of each saucerful in serving.


  Third Week.          Tuesday.
  ——
  Plain Calf’s Head Soup.
  Boiled Mutton.      Minced Cabbage.
  String-Beans.      Beet-root Salad.
  ——
  Corn Meal Puffs.
  ——


PLAIN CALF’S HEAD SOUP.

Wash a calf’s head (cleaned with the skin on), in three waters, and
soak one hour in salted water. Then put on to boil in five quarts of
cold water. Cook until the meat slips easily from the bones. Take out
the head, remove the bones, and throw back into the soup. Set aside
three-quarters of the meat—the best portions—for to-morrow’s dinner.
Chop the ears and other refuse parts fine; season with salt, pepper,
onion, sweet marjoram, a teaspoonful of ground cloves, and as much
allspice—even spoonfuls. Mix all up well, return to the soup and boil
down to three quarts. Mash the brains and make into force-meat balls
with raw egg, seasoning and enough flour to hold them together; roll
in flour and set in a cool place until wanted. Put two tablespoonfuls
of butter into a saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of browned flour wet
up with cold water, and stir together five minutes. Strain the soup,
put back two quarts over the fire, stir in the thickening of flour and
butter, boil up and put in the force-meat balls. Simmer ten minutes,
add the juice of a lemon, and a glass of brown sherry, and pour out.
The reserved quart of “stock” is for another day’s soup. Do not put the
calf’s tongue into the soup. It is indispensable in to-morrow’s ragoût.


BOILED MUTTON.

The best part for boiling is the leg. Put on in boiling water and cook,
allowing fifteen minutes to the pound. Make a sauce by taking out a
cupful of liquor when it is nearly done, cooling it until you can take
off the fat, then heating again in a saucepan and stirring into it
one tablespoonful of butter, two teaspoonfuls of flour, wet up with
cold water. Stir for five minutes, putting in a teaspoonful of chopped
parsley, and after another boil, take from the fire before you put in
the juice of a lemon.

In this, as in other cases where the liquor in which meat is boiled is
to be used for broth, salt slightly while cooking, sprinkling all over
lightly with salt the moment you take it from the fire. Serve the sauce
in a boat.


MINCED CABBAGE.

Boil a firm head of cabbage, quartered, in two waters, throwing the
first away after ten minutes’ cooking and putting in more as hot, and
a little salted. When it is tender all through, drain and chop quite
fine, seasoning with salt, pepper, and a liberal portion of butter.
Serve hot in a vegetable dish.


STRING BEANS.

Open a can of string beans an hour before they are to be used. Cut them
into short pieces when you are ready to cook them; turn off the liquor
and cover them with cold water. Put into a pot with a bit of salt pork
a little more than an inch square. Boil slowly until tender, strain,
season with pepper, and serve hot, with the pork on top of the pile of
beans.


BEET-ROOT SALAD.

Boil the beets until tender; scrape clean; drop into cold water for
three minutes. Slice, and pour over them a dressing of vinegar, salt,
sugar, made mustard, pepper, and one tablespoonful of oil to four of
vinegar. Cover, and let all stand together for two hours. This salad
will keep for a couple of days.


CORN-MEAL PUFFS.

  1 quart of boiling milk.
  2 scant cups of white “corn-flour.”
  ½ cup of wheat-flour.
  1 scant cup of powdered sugar.
  A little salt.
  4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  ½ teaspoonful of soda.
  1 teaspoonful of cream tartar.
  ½ teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and nutmeg.

Sift soda and cream tartar twice through the flour. Then, mix flour
and meal together, and sift a third time. Boil the milk and stir into
it the meal, flour, and salt. Boil ten minutes, stirring well up from
the bottom. Take it off, put into a bowl, add the butter and beat hard
for three minutes. Let it cool while you whip the eggs light, then the
yolks and sugar and spice together. Beat these into the cold mush, and
lastly the frothed whites. Whip all together faithfully, and bake in
greased cups or small “corn-bread moulds,” set within a steady oven.
When done, turn out and eat hot, breaking—not cutting—them open, and
after buttering sprinkling with white sugar.



  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Marie’s Soup.
  ——
  Ragoût of Calf’s Head and Mushrooms.   Mashed Turnips.
  Creamed Potatoes.      Tomato Soy.
  ——
  Sponge-cake Pudding.
  Nuts and Raisins.
  ——


MARIE’S SOUP.

  2 sweetbreads.
  1 quart of soup jelly, left from yesterday’s stock.
  1 quart of cold water.
  1 onion.
  Bunch of parsley.
  2 blades of mace.
  A dozen mushrooms.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch wet up in cold water.

Wash and scald the sweetbreads, and put on to stew in the cold water.
When they have boiled slowly half an hour, salt, boil up and skim. Take
all the fat from the top of the cold soup-stock, and stir into the
liquor already on the fire. Add the onion and parsley minced, and the
mace; season to taste, cover and stew gently for one hour. Take out the
sweetbreads and lay them where they will cool quickly. Strain the soup,
return to the fire; put in a dozen mushrooms (you can buy the French
_champignons_ in cans), stew fifteen minutes; cut the sweetbreads into
small squares, drop into the soup; thicken with the corn-starch wet
with cold water; boil up once and serve.

This soup is very fine.


RAGOÛT OF CALF’S HEAD AND MUSHROOMS.

  1 cold boiled calf’s head, cut into slices with the tongue.
  1 can French mushrooms, _minus_ those used for the soup.
  1 sliced onion.
  Pepper, salt, and sweet herbs.
  ½ teaspoonful mixed mace and allspice.
  Juice of a lemon.
  Butter or dripping for frying.

Cut three-quarters of the calf’s head—the best parts—into neat slices,
also the tongue. Chop the rest, season with the onion, pepper and
salt, cover with three cups of cold water, and stew gently down to one
cup of gravy. Meanwhile fry the slices of meat in good dripping. Take
them out with a wire spoon and put into the bottom of a tin vessel set
within another of warm—not boiling—water. Cover and set over the fire.
Drain, slice and fry the mushrooms in the fat left in the frying-pan.
Drain and lay these upon the meat in the inner vessel. Time the
cooking of the gravy so as to have it ready, spiced, and seasoned, to
be strained, hot over the meat and mushrooms. Put on a tight lid and
_simmer_ fifteen minutes, never boiling once. Strain off the gravy into
a saucepan. Thicken, and let it boil up once. Add the lemon-juice, put
the meat and mushrooms into a deep dish, and pour the hot gravy over
all.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Boil soft, drain and mash, pressing the water out well, return to
the saucepan, with a generous lump of butter; pepper and salt; stir
constantly until the butter is dissolved, and all smoking hot, and
serve in a covered dish.


CREAMED POTATOES.

In mashing them, add more milk than usual, whipping up hard with a
silver fork. While still very hot, beat in the white of an egg, already
frothed stiffly; pile in a deep dish and set, uncovered, within the
oven, until a light crust begins to form on the top, but not long
enough to injure the dish. Brush over with butter to glaze it, and
serve.


TOMATO SOY

Is an excellent “stock” pickle. For directions for making it, please
refer to page 488, “GENERAL RECEIPTS, NO. 1, OF COMMON-SENSE SERIES.”


SPONGE-CAKE PUDDING.

  1 stale sponge-cake.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  4 eggs, beaten light.
  2 cups of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch, wet up with cold milk.
  Juice of one lemon and half the grated peel.

Slice the cake and lay some of it in the bottom of a buttered
pudding-dish. Make a custard by scalding the milk, stirring into it
the corn-starch, then pouring it, by degrees, upon the beaten eggs and
sugar. Add the lemon; pour over the cake, put another layer of slices;
more custard, and so on, until the mould is full. Put a small, heavy
plate on top, and let all stand until the custard is soaked up. Cover
and bake, half an hour, or until done throughout. Turn out upon a flat
dish, sprinkle thickly with white sugar, and eat warm or cold.


NUTS AND RAISINS.

Crack the nuts, and select for table use fair bunches of plump, fresh
raisins.



  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Potage au Riz.
  English Pork Pie.      Mock Stewed Oysters.
  Potato Balls.      Mixed Pickles.
  ——
  Lemon Jelly and Light Cake.
  ——


POTAGE AU RIZ,

In plainer English, rice-broth, can be achieved for to-day, with
little trouble, by the help of the liquor in which your mutton was
boiled on Tuesday. Wash and soak a cup of rice in cold water. At the
end of half an hour, add it, with the water in which it has soaked, to
the mutton-broth, from which you must first take the fat. Boil very
slowly two hours, and should the water sink below the original level
more than an inch, replenish with boiling. In another saucepan heat a
cup of milk, thickened with a tablespoonful of rice-flour. Season the
mutton-broth with pepper and parsley—it will hardly need salt. (Boil
up and skim, before the parsley goes in.) Pour the hot milk over two
beaten eggs, stir in well; add to the soup in the kettle, and take
instantly from the fire.


ENGLISH PORK PIE.

  3 lbs. of _lean_ fresh pork, cut into strips as long as your finger.
  6 large juicy apples.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Pepper, salt, and mace to taste.
  1 cup of sweet cider.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Good pie-paste for an upper crust, made according to receipt given
          for Thursday of second week in this month.

Put a layer of pork within a pudding-dish; season with pepper, salt,
and nutmeg, or mace. Next a layer of sliced apples, strewed with sugar
and bits of butter. Go on in this order until you are ready for the
crust, having the last layer of apples. Pour in the cider, cover with
a thick crust of good pastry, ornamented around the edge; make a slit
in the middle, and bake in a moderate oven one hour and a half. Should
the crust threaten to brown too fast, cover with paper. When nicely
browned, brush over with butter and close the oven door for a moment;
then wash well with white of egg. Eat hot. You will find it very good,
odd as the receipt may seem.


MOCK STEWED OYSTERS.

Scrape and drop into cold water a bunch of salsify, or oyster-plant.
Cut into short pieces and stew tender in boiling water, a little
salted. Drain off nearly all the water, and pour into the saucepan a
cup of cold milk. When again hot, add a heaping tablespoonful of butter
and a handful of fine cracker-dust, with pepper and salt. Stir very
slowly for five minutes, and pour out. It should be about as thick as
oyster soup.


POTATO BALLS.

Mash potatoes with a little butter and salt, and let them get cold.
Then work in a beaten egg. Make into balls about twice the size
of a walnut, with floured hands, roll them well in flour, and fry
yellow-brown in good dripping or lard. Drain in a colander, and pile
upon a flat dish.


LEMON JELLY AND LIGHT CAKE.

  5 lemons—juice of all and grated peel of two.
  2 large cups of sugar.
  1 package of Coxe’s gelatine, soaked in two cups of cold water.
  2 glasses pale sherry.
  1 pint of boiling water.

Stir sugar, lemon-juice, peel, and soaked gelatine together, and leave,
covered, for an hour. Then pour over them the boiling water; stir
until the gelatine is dissolved; strain through a flannel bag, without
pressing. Add the wine, and let all drip, untouched, through double
flannel. Pour into a wet mould. In cold weather, or if set on ice, it
will be ready for use in six hours. Pass a basket of light cake with it.



  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Lobster Bisque.
  Stewed Chicken.      Rice Croquettes.
  Crab-apple Jelly.      Winter Squash.
  ——
  Apple Snow.
  Tea and Macaroons.
  ——


LOBSTER BISQUE.

  1 can of lobster.
  1 quart of milk.
  1 quart of cold water.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  ½ cup of pounded cracker.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  A little cayenne pepper.

Free the lobster from all bits of shell, and cut up small, tearing as
little as may be. Put the water into a saucepan, with the salt and
pepper. When boiling, stir in the lobster and stew half an hour. Heat
the milk in another vessel, and, when scalding, stir in the cracker and
set in hot water for ten minutes. The lobster having cooked for thirty
minutes, add the butter, and simmer five minutes longer. Then pour in
the milk; mix all up well; set for five minutes in hot water, and serve
in a tureen. Pass sliced lemon with it.

This _bisque_ is delicious.


STEWED CHICKEN.

Prepare a fine young fowl as for roasting, with the exception of the
dressing, which should be left out. Early in the day (if you have no
gravy already made) put on the feet and giblets to stew in two cups
of cold water, with a little minced onion. When the giblets are very
tender, and the liquid has boiled down to one cupful, strain it and set
aside the giblets to cool. Chop a quarter of a pound of pork, put it
in the bottom of a pot, lay the chicken upon it; pour the gravy over
it; cover _tightly_ and set where it will heat steadily, but not reach
the boil under an hour. Increase the heat, not allowing the steam to
escape, for an hour longer, but it should not stew fast at any time.
By this time the fowl should be thoroughly done. Remove carefully to a
hot dish; season the gravy, adding a little hot water if needful, and
strain out the pork. Add the giblets, chopped fine, stew fast for one
minute, pour over the chicken, and it is ready for the table.


RICE CROQUETTES.

  2 cups of cold boiled rice.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.
  2 eggs, well beaten.
  1 tablespoonful sugar.
  A little flour.
  Salt to taste.

Work butter and sugar to a cream, and these into the rice. Salt, and
stir up with the eggs to a smooth paste. Make into oval balls or rolls,
with well-floured hands. Roll in flour, and fry, a few at a time, in
sweet lard. Drain well and eat hot.


WINTER SQUASH.

Pare, take out the seeds, cut into strips, and lay in cold water, one
hour. Cook in boiling water, a little salt, until very soft. Drain off
every drop of water, and mash with a potato beetle, stirring in a large
spoonful of butter, and seasoning with pepper and salt. Mound up in a
vegetable dish and serve hot.


APPLE SNOW.

  6 fine pippins (raw).
  2 cups of milk.
  4 eggs.
  1 cup of powdered sugar.

Make a custard by stirring into the hot milk half the sugar, the yolks
of all the eggs, and the white of one, and cooking, stirring constantly
until it thickens. Let this cool while you whip the whites to a stiff
_méringue_ with the rest of the sugar. Peel the apples, and grate
directly into the _méringue_, stirring in at once that the coating
of egg may prevent them from changing color. Put the cold custard in
the bottom of a glass dish, and heap the snow upon it. Eat soon after
making it.


TEA AND MACAROONS.

Pass after dinner in the dining-room, or send into the parlor.



  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Ayrshire Soup.
  Mutton Chops and Tomato Purée.      Potato Strips.
  Sweet Pickles.      Boiled Beans.
  ——
  Macaroni Pudding.
  ——


AYRSHIRE SOUP.

  4 lbs. of lean beef.
  2 lbs. of marrow-bones well cracked.
  2 onions.
  2 turnips.
  3 stalks of celery.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  6 large potatoes.
  ½ cup of oatmeal.
  Pepper and salt.
  6 quarts of cold water.

Chop the vegetables and herbs; cut the meat fine, and break up the
bones. Put the oatmeal to soak in a pint of water. Slice the potatoes,
and parboil them in hot water for ten minutes. Add them then to the
other vegetables, and put them all, with the meat and bones, into a
soup-pot, with the water. Stew for four hours, until the liquor in the
pot has fallen one-third. Strain through a colander, set aside two
quarts of the stock until to-morrow, after seasoning it all, and return
the rest to the fire. Boil up and skim; add the oatmeal, and stew,
covered, forty minutes, stirring often, lest it should burn.


MUTTON CHOPS AND TOMATO PURÉE.

Broil the chops, after trimming them neatly; rub, as soon as they leave
the gridiron, with butter on both sides; pepper and salt, and cover,
for a few minutes, in a hot water dish, that they may take up the
seasoning.

Make the _purée_ by stewing a can of tomatoes until almost dry, then
seasoning, and stirring in a tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour.
Simmer three minutes, arrange the chops on their sides, overlapping
each other, inside of the curve of a flat dish, and pour the _purée_
within their enclosure.


POTATO STRIPS.

Pare and cut the potatoes in long strips, the length of the potato, and
not more than the sixteenth of an inch thick. Lay in ice-water for one
hour; dry by laying on one clean towel and pressing another upon it,
and fry, not too many at once, in _hot_ lard, a little salt. Take out
so soon as they are browned lightly, toss in a hot colander, and serve
in a deep dish lined with a napkin.


BOILED BEANS.

Soak all night, and in the morning change the cold water for lukewarm.
Leave in this two hours; drain it off and put them on to boil in cold
water, with a piece of fat salt pork two inches square. Cook slowly
until soft. Take out the pork, drain the beans well, season with
pepper, and dish.


MACARONI PUDDING.

  ½ lb. of macaroni broken into inch lengths.
  2 cups of boiling water.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 large cup of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Grated peel of half a lemon.
  A little cinnamon and salt.

Boil the macaroni in the water until it is tender, and has soaked up
the liquid. It must be cooked in a farina-kettle. Add the butter and
salt. Cover for five minutes without cooking. Put in the rest of the
ingredients. Simmer, after the boil begins, ten minutes longer, before
serving in a deep dish. Be careful, in stirring, not to break the
macaroni. Eat with butter and powdered sugar, or cream and sugar.



  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Potato Soup.
  Roast Beef.      Baked Hominy.
  Sweet Potatoes, baked.      Cabbage Salad.
  ——
  Arrow-Root Pudding, Cold.
  Coffee.
  ——


POTATO SOUP.

  3 pints of good stock.
  1 quart of cold water.
  12 mealy potatoes.
  1 onion.
  ½ cup of rice.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Seasoning to taste.

Slice the potatoes, cover with boiling water, and cook ten minutes.
Throw away this water, and add the quart of cold, slightly salted, and
the onion, to the potatoes. Boil to pieces, and pass, with the water
in which they were boiled, through a colander into the stock. Heat all
together, and cook gently half an hour, before adding the rice, which
should have been boiled soft in a very little water. When the rice is
nearly dry, stir in the butter, put into the soup, and simmer five
minutes.


ROAST BEEF.

A rib-roast is best for family use. Make your butcher saw off about
half of the bone, after cutting the ends of the ribs clear of the
meat; then fold the flap neatly around to the thick part, and secure
with skewers. The “trimmings” are yours—a fact housekeepers often fail
to insist upon. The meat is weighed before you buy it. Take all that
you pay for—and you will seldom be at a loss for a “base” for soup or
gravy. Between butchers and cooks, there is enough wasted in American
kitchens to supply a National Soup-house that might feed all the poor
in the land.

Put your beef in the dripping-pan; pour a cup of boiling water over it,
and roast ten minutes for every pound. Bake as soon as the juices begin
to flow—the oftener in reason the better. If your meat has much fat
on top, cover it—the fat—with a paste of flour and water. When nearly
done, remove this, dredge the beef with flour, baste well with gravy,
strew salt over the top, and serve. Pour the fat off from the gravy;
return to the fire, thicken with browned gravy, season, and boil up
once.


SWEET POTATOES—BAKED.

Parboil, take off the skins, and, half an hour before you take up your
beef, lay the potatoes in the dripping-pan to brown, basting them with
the meat. They should be of a fine brown. Drain off the grease, and lay
about the beef when dished.


BAKED HOMINY.

  1 cupful of cold boiled hominy (small grained).
  2 cups of milk.
  1 large teaspoonful of butter.
  The same of sugar.
  A little salt.
  2 eggs.

Work the melted butter well into the hominy, mashing all lumps. Then
come the beaten yolks; next, sugar and salt; then, gradually, the milk;
lastly the whites. Beat until perfectly smooth, and bake in a greased
pudding-dish until delicately browned. Serve in the bake-dish.


CABBAGE SALAD.

Chop a firm white cabbage with a sharp knife. A dull one bruises
it. Make a dressing of two tablespoonfuls of oil; six of vinegar; a
teaspoonful each of salt and sugar; half as much each of made mustard
and pepper. Work all in well, the vinegar going in last, and then beat
in a raw egg, whipped light. Pour over the salad, toss up with a fork,
and serve in a glass dish.


ARROW-ROOT PUDDING—(COLD).

  3 even tablespoonfuls of arrow-root. Get the Bermuda if you can, or
          you may require more.
  3 cups of fresh milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  ¼ lb. of crystallized peaches, chopped fine.

Heat the milk to scalding, and stir in the arrow-root wet up with cold
milk. Stir ten minutes, and add sugar and butter. Stir five minutes
more, and pour out. When nearly cold, beat in the fruit. Pour into a
wet mould. Make on Saturday, and on Sunday, turn out upon a dish, and
eat with sugar and cream. It is very good without the fruit, but needs
more sugar in making.


COFFEE

Should be served last of all.


  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Bread Soup.
  Cannelon of Beef.      Pork and Beans.
  Chow-chow.      Potato Stew.
  ——
  Peach Batter Pudding.
  ——


BREAD SOUP.

A few raw beef-bones and trimmings, spoken of yesterday. Bones, bits of
skin, gristle, etc., left from Sunday’s roast when you have cut off the
meat for the _cannelon_.

  1 pint of stock.
  1 onion.
  2 stalks of celery.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  4 quarts of cold water.
  1 lb. stale bread-crusts, the drier the better, provided they are
          not mouldy or sour.
  Salt and pepper.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.

Crack the bones, chop meat and vegetables; put on in the water, and
boil slowly down to two quarts. Strain the liquor; let it cool; take
off all the fat, season, and return to the pot with the stock. Boil up
and skim; put in the crusts; stew, covered, half an hour. Take it from
the range and _beat_ in the butter, taking out indissoluble bits. Then
simmer, in a vessel set within another of boiling water, half an hour.

As you will see, by a careful perusal of these directions, the
preparation of this soup requires little actual expenditure of time. I
beg, therefore, that you will “gather up the fragments” from larder and
bread-box, and give your family a hot, nourishing, “comforting” dish of
porridge, if it _is_ wash-day.


CANNELON OF BEEF.

Cut the meat from your cold roast, and chop it fine. Season well,
and beat into it the yolks of three eggs and the white of one. Add
one-third as much cold mashed potato as you have meat, wet up with
gravy, and make, with floured hands, into a long roll—three times as
long as it is broad. It should be just soft enough to handle. Dredge
thickly with flour, and lay in a greased baking-pan. Invert another
one over it, and bake until it is hissing hot on top and sides, when
uncover, and brown quickly. Brush over the outside with white of egg;
dredge again with flour, shut the oven-door to brown this, glaze again
with egg, and shut up the oven for one minute. Carefully, with the aid
of a cake-turner, slip the _cannelon_ to a hot dish and serve.


CHOW-CHOW

Should go around with the _cannelon_.


POTATO STEW.

Pare and cut the potatoes into dice. Stew in hot water, with a slice of
fat salt pork, cut very small, half a minced onion and a little chopped
parsley, until the pork is dissolved and the potatoes very tender.
Pepper, and if necessary, salt, and pour into a hot, deep dish. The
“stew” should not be too liquid, nor yet stiff.


PORK AND BEANS.

This is a good, nourishing dish for Monday, and easily managed, if
you have boiled the beans on Saturday. Fill a bake-dish nearly full
of them, and put in the middle a piece of fat salt pork, about three
inches wide, which you have parboiled in your soup. It will improve
the taste of the “stock” and be itself the better for the temporary
association. Pour in a little hot water to keep the beans from burning.
Pepper and bake, covered, for half an hour. Remove the cover and brown.


PEACH BATTER PUDDING.

Open a can of peaches—whole ones, if you have them—and pour into the
bottom of a buttered pudding-dish before you make your batter. There
should be just syrup enough to half cover the fruit.

For batter, take 1 quart of milk.

  10 tablespoonfuls of _prepared_ flour.
  5 eggs, beaten light.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.
  1 saltspoonful of salt.

Beat the yolks light, add the milk and salt, and pour slowly into a
hole made in the middle of the flour. Finally, stir in the whites
lightly, but not until you have beaten the batter smooth. Pour over the
peaches and bake quickly. You can put it in the oven after the beans
are done, setting the latter aside to keep warm. If you have not time
to make sauce, eat with butter and sugar. Do not let the pudding stand
after drawing from the oven, or it will fall.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Cream Soup.
  Roast Breast of Veal.      Stewed Tomatoes.
  Plain Boiled Potatoes.      Celery.
  ——
  Essex Pudding with Jelly Sauce.
  ——


CREAM SOUP.

  3 lbs. lean veal.
  3 beaten eggs.
  2 blades of mace.
  1 onion.
  2 quarts of water.
  2 cups of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of rice flour (or corn-starch).
  Pepper and salt.

Chop the meat and onion fine, cover with the water, and stew slowly
three hours. Strain, cool and skim. Season and set back on the fire.
Boil up and skim carefully; add the milk, and when hot, the corn-starch
wet with cold water. As it thickens, take out a cupful, pour upon the
eggs; stir into the soup, and take at once from the fire.


ROAST BREAST OF VEAL.

Make incisions between the ribs and the meat, and stuff with a
force-meat of dry bread-crumbs, chopped pork or ham, pepper, sweet
marjoram, and one beaten egg. Save a little to thicken the gravy. Roast
slowly, basting often and copiously. Dredge at the last with flour, and
baste well, when this has colored, with butter.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Stew a can of tomatoes twenty-five minutes; season with pepper, salt,
a little sugar, and a tablespoonful of butter. Cook five minutes and
serve.


PLAIN BOILED POTATOES.

Pare _very_ thin, and put on (after having lain half an hour in cold
water) in boiling water. Cook fast until a fork will go easily into the
largest; drain off every drop of water, and throw in salt. Set back,
uncovered, on the side of the range, or where they will dry quickly,
yet not scorch. Serve in an uncovered dish.


CELERY.

Wash, scrape, trim off the green tops, and throw aside for seasoning
soups, vinegar, etc., the rank green stalks. Lay the better parts
in cold water until wanted for the table. Put into a tall glass or
celery-stand.


ESSEX PUDDING.

  2 cups of fine bread-crumbs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sago, soaked three hours in a little water.
  ¾ of a cup of powdered suet.
  5 eggs, beaten light.
  1 cup of milk.
  1 cup of sugar.
  1 tablespoonful flour, wet in cold milk.
  ½ lb. of whole raisins, “plumped” by laying them in _boiling_ water
          for two minutes.
  A little salt.

Cook the sago in enough water to cover it until tender and nearly dry.
Heat the milk and pour upon the beaten eggs and sugar, add the crumbs,
beating into a good batter in a bowl; then suet, flour, sago, and salt.
Butter a mould _thickly_ and lay the raisins, dredged with flour, in
the bottom and sides, in whatever designs you fancy. Fill the mould
with the batter—well beaten up at the last—putting it in by cautious
spoonfuls not to dislodge the raisins, which should be imbedded in the
butter. Put on the lid of the pudding mould, and boil one hour, never
relaxing the heat. Dip in cold water and turn out upon a flat dish. Eat
with jelly sauce.


JELLY SAUCE.

  ½ cup of currant jelly.
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  1 lemon—juice and half the grated peel.
  ½ teaspoonful of nutmeg.
  1 tablespoonful of powdered sugar.
  1 glass of wine.
  1 cup of boiling water.
  1 teaspoonful flour.

Beat the hot water gradually into the jelly, and add the butter, lemon,
and nutmeg. Warm almost to a boil, put in the sugar, then the flour wet
up with cold water. Boil up once sharply; add the wine, and take from
the fire. Set, closely covered, in a vessel of hot water until wanted.
Stir well before pouring it out.



  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Julienne Soup.
  Veal and Ham Pie.      Halibut Steaks, Broiled.
  Scalloped Potatoes.      Stewed Cauliflower.
  ——
  Pancakes with Preserves.
  ——


JULIENNE SOUP.

  2 lbs. of mutton, and a like quantity of veal, with some beef-bones.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  Half a cabbage.
  3 onions.
  3 stalks of _blanched_ celery.
  ½ can of tomatoes.
  5 quarts of cold water.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  2 teaspoonfuls of sugar.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  Pepper and salt.

Cut the meat small, crack the bones, and put on to cook in five quarts
of water with the herbs. While it simmers, prepare the vegetables, with
the exception of the cabbage and tomatoes, by cleaning, paring, and
cutting them into narrow strips about two inches long, and as nearly as
possible of uniform size. Lay them in cold water for one hour. Drain
very dry, and put them into a frying-pan in which you have melted, but
not cooked, the butter, and dissolved the sugar. Toss them over a hot
fire until they are coated with the butter, but do not let them scorch.
Set aside in a clean vessel set within one of hot water. When the meat
has boiled to rags, and the liquid is reduced one-third, strain it and
set by until the fat rises and can be taken off. Return the soup to
the fire, season, boil up and skim; add the glazed vegetables, with
the chopped cabbage—which should have been parboiled, then drained—and
the tomatoes, cut up small. Stew gently for one hour. Serve with the
vegetables in it.

This will make enough soup for two days, unless your family be large.


HALIBUT STEAKS—BROILED.

Wash and wipe the steaks dry. Broil upon a buttered gridiron, turning
when the lower side is done. Remove carefully to a chafing-dish, and
anoint with a mixture of butter, salt, pepper, and a little lemon-juice.

Always serve fish upon hot plates. Pass potatoes, and no other
vegetable, with it.


SCALLOPED POTATOES.

  3 cups of mashed potatoes.
  3 tablespoonfuls of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Yolks of four hard-boiled eggs. (Cut the whites in rings to garnish
          your fish.)
  Handful of dry bread-crumbs.
  Salt and pepper.

Beat butter, milk, and seasoning into the potatoes while hot. Put a
layer in the bottom of a buttered pudding-dish; cover this with thin
slices of yolk; pepper and salt them; spread another layer of potato
over these, and proceed in this order until the dish is full, having
the top layer of potato. Strew thickly with bread-crumbs. Bake covered
until hot through, then brown quickly. Serve in the bake-dish.


VEAL AND HAM PIE.

Cut the meat from the cold roast of yesterday. Put the bones,
well-cracked, the refuse bits of meat and skin into a saucepan with
an onion, a few spoonfuls of tomatoes, and three cups of cold water,
and cook slowly until there remains but one cup of gravy. Strain and
season, thickening with a tablespoonful of browned flour. Cut the veal
into small, even slices. If you have no cold boiled ham, cook half a
pound on purpose by boiling in your gravy stock. Slice this also, and
lay upon the veal, with now and then a slice of hard-boiled egg. Fill
the dish with alternate layers of veal and ham; pour in the gravy, and
cover with a thick crust of good pastry, such as you made last Thursday
for your pork-pie. Bake one hour.


STEWED CAULIFLOWER.

When your soup is about half done, and before you strain it, take out
a cupful, strain through a thin cloth, and put into a saucepan, with
a little salt and a tablespoonful of butter. Cut a cauliflower into
small bunches, when you have washed and trimmed it, and lay these in
the cooled broth. Stew slowly, covered, twenty-five minutes, turning
the bunches now and then. When they are tender, take them out, lay in
a covered dish to keep warm, stir into the broth a tablespoonful of
butter, cut into bits and rolled in flour, with nearly half a cup of
milk. Pepper, boil up once, and pour over the cauliflower.


PANCAKES WITH PRESERVES.

  1 pint of prepared flour.
  _About_ a quart of milk.
  6 eggs.
  A little salt.

Beat the yolks light, add the salt and two cups of milk, then the flour
and beaten whites alternately, and thin with more milk until the batter
is of the right consistency. It should be quite thin. Have ready in a
small frying-pan a tablespoonful of butter or sweet lard, hissing hot,
but not discolored by too long heating. Pour in enough batter to cover
the bottom of the pan, and fry quickly, pouring off the fat so soon as
the cakes set. Turn it with a lift of your spatula and a skilful toss
of the pan at the same time. As fast as the pancakes are done—the same
lard will do for several—let an assistant spread each upon a _hot_
plate and cover with sweet jam or jelly, rolling up neatly so soon as
this is done. Sprinkle with powdered sugar, and set in a warm oven
until you are ready for dessert.



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Chicken Broth.
  Chickens and Rice.      Potato Croquettes.
  Boiled Sweet Potatoes.      Cold Slaw—Cream Dressing.
  ——
  Poor Man’s Plum Pudding.
  ——


CHICKEN BROTH.

Draw, stuff, and truss a pair of chickens, as for roasting; tie soft
pack-thread around their legs and wings, binding them close to their
bodies, and put on to boil in four quarts of cold water, a little
salted. They will require at least one hour’s boiling, if they are of
fair size. Do not cook fast, especially at first. Try with a fork if
they are tender, and if it pierces the breast easily, take them up,
butter well, and set in a warm place, covered. Take out a cupful of
liquor when they are three-quarters done, in which to cook your rice.
Strain the broth after taking out the fowls, season with pepper and
chopped parsley and put again over the fire. Take off the scum, as it
rises, and boil hard fifteen minutes. Then add a half cupful of rice,
previously stewed soft in a very little water. Simmer a quarter of an
hour; pour in a cup of milk in which has been stirred a tablespoonful
of rice-flour; bring to a slow boil, and pour a few spoonfuls upon two
beaten eggs. Return these to the soup, stir them in and take from the
fire. Have ready the giblets and one hard-boiled egg chopped fine in
the bottom of the tureen, and turn in the broth upon them.


CHICKENS AND RICE.

Parboil a cup of rice in a little water. When it has taken it up,
and is about half done, add the cupful of broth taken from the soup,
seasoned well. Cook the rice slowly in it until done. (Always cook
rice in a farina-kettle, and shake, instead of stirring.) It should
absorb all the gravy. At the last, stir in a beaten egg, mixed with a
tablespoonful of melted butter. It is best to do this with a fork, and
not a spoon. Make a low, flattened mound of the rice upon a hot dish;
remove the pack-threads from the chickens and lay them on the top. Pass
grated cheese with it.


POTATO CROQUETTES.

To each cupful of mashed potato, add half a raw egg, beaten light, a
little salt and pepper, and half a teaspoonful of butter. Beat well.
Make into oblong balls, or rolls, flour well and fry, a few at a time,
in boiling lard, or dripping. Drain off the fat and serve hot.


BOILED SWEET POTATOES.

Select those of uniform size, wash, wipe, and boil until a fork will
penetrate them easily. Skin, set in the oven a moment to dry, and send
to table.


COLD SLAW—CREAM DRESSING.

  1 small head of white cabbage, shred fine.
  1 cup of milk, scalding hot.
  ¾ of a cup of vinegar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 egg, beaten light.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  1 even tablespoonful of corn-starch.
  1 teaspoonful essence of celery.
  Pepper and salt to taste.

Rub butter and sugar together and pour over them the hot milk. Beat
into these the frothed egg. Put into a vessel set within another of hot
water, add the corn-starch wet up with cold water, boil slowly until
it thickens, and set aside. In another saucepan scald the vinegar; put
in the pepper and salt with essence of celery, and pour hot over the
cabbage. Mix up well; put back into the saucepan, and stir briskly over
the fire until it is smoking all through, but not until it boils. Turn
it into a bowl, stir into it the custard with a silver fork, until well
mixed; cover, to keep in the strength of the vinegar, and set it where
it will cool suddenly. It is very fine.


POOR MAN’S PLUM PUDDING.

  3 eggs.
  1 quart of milk.
  Small loaf of stale bread.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  ½ lb. seeded raisins, cut in two.
  Cinnamon to taste.
  A pinch of salt.
  Butter.

Slice the bread and cut off all the crust. Butter thinly and lay in
order in a _well_-greased pudding-dish, strewing each layer with
raisins. Heat the milk, put in sugar and salt, and pour over the beaten
eggs. Lay a heavy saucer upon the top of the bread and soak with the
custard. Let all stand half an hour, then set in a dripping-pan of
boiling water, cover closely, and cook one hour, keeping the pan full
of water at a hard boil. Turn out and eat with liquid sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Wednesday’s Soup.
  Boiled Cod.
  Chicken Patés.      Cheese Fingers.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Mashed Turnips.
  ——
  Sweet Potato Pudding.
  ——


WEDNESDAY’S SOUP.

The Julienne soup which, as I stated in the receipt for making it,
was sufficient for two days, will have kept perfectly well in the
refrigerator, or in any cold closet. You have now only to warm it
over—not quite to the boil, and it will be even better than upon the
first day. It is wise, sometimes, to skip a day with a _réchauffé_, for
fear of wearying those for whose comfort your bills-of-fare are made up.


BOILED COD.

Sew up the piece of fish in a thin cloth, fitted neatly to the shape,
and boil in salted water (boiling from the first), allowing about
fifteen minutes per pound. Unwrap carefully and pour over it a sauce
made thus:

Heat half a cup of milk and as much water together; stir in a
tablespoonful of butter, cut into bits and rolled in flour, and when
it has thickened, pour by degrees upon two beaten eggs. Put back into
the saucepan and stir for one minute; add salt, chopped parsley, and a
dozen capers or nasturtium seeds. Take at once from the fire.


CHICKEN PATÉS.

Line your paté-pans with a good paste, made according to either of the
receipts already given this month, and bake in a brisk oven.

Mince the chicken left from yesterday. Put the bones and stuffing into
a saucepan with two cups of cold water, and stew down to one cup of
gravy. Season this well, add three tablespoonfuls of milk when you
have strained out the bones, a tablespoonful of butter, and a very
little parsley. The stuffing should thicken it sufficiently. Stir
in the chicken, warm until hot, but do not let it boil, or it will
be spoiled. Fill the paste-shells, having taken them from the tins;
arrange upon a _hot_ dish and set within an open oven until they are
sent to table.


CHEESE FINGERS.

Cut good pastry, left from your patés, into strips three inches long
and two inches wide. Strew with grated cheese, season with pepper and
salt; double the paste upon this lengthwise, and bake in a quick oven.
Brush over with beaten egg just before taking them up, and sift a
little powdered cheese upon them.

Pile, log-cabin-wise, upon a folded napkin laid within a flat dish, and
eat without delay, as they are not good cold.


MASHED POTATOES AND MASHED TURNIPS.

The receipts for these standard dishes having been already given this
month, it is scarcely necessary to repeat them here. Bear in mind,
always, that they must be served hot, and the turnips be well drained.


SWEET POTATO PUDDING.

  1 lb. parboiled sweet potatoes.
  ½ cup of butter.
  ¾ cup of white sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of cinnamon.
  4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  1 teaspoonful of nutmeg.
  1 lemon, juice and grated rind.
  1 glass of brandy.

Let the potatoes get entirely cold, and grate them. Cream the butter
and sugar; add the yolks, spice and lemon. Beat the potato in by
degrees, to a light paste; then the brandy, lastly the whites. Bake in
a buttered dish, and eat cold.


  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Bean and Celery Soup.
  Jugged Pigeons.      Shred Macaroni.
  Currant Jelly.      Brussels-Sprouts.
  ——
  Sponge-Cake Fritters.
  ——


BEAN AND CELERY SOUP.

  1 quart of dried beans, soaked all night.
  1 bunch of celery—the blanched stalks only.
  1 lb. of salt pork, cut into strips.
  1 lb. of beef—lean, also cut up.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Pepper.
  5 quarts of water—cold.
  1 onion, minced.

Cover beans, meat, onions, and half the celery cut into bits, with the
water, and boil to pieces, and until the liquid is reduced one-third.
Rub the beans and celery through a fine colander into the soup. Return
to the fire, season with pepper, put in the rest of the celery, cut
into inch-lengths, and simmer half an hour, stirring often, that it may
not “catch” on the bottom. Set aside a quart of it, if you can spare as
much, for Monday’s soup.


JUGGED PIGEONS.

Clean and wash well, and stuff with a dressing made of the giblets
boiled and chopped, a slice of fat pork also minced fine; the yolks
of two hard eggs rubbed to powder, some bread-crumbs, pepper and
salt, bound with a beaten raw egg. Tie the legs and wings close to
their bodies, and pack the pigeons in a tin pail with a _tight_ top.
Plunge this into a pot of boiling water; put a weight on top to keep
it steady, and cook two hours and a half. The water should not boil
over the top. Drain off the gravy into a saucepan, thicken with a
tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour. Season, boil up, pour over
the pigeons. Cover again, and leave in the hot water ten minutes before
serving.


SHRED MACARONI.

Break half a pound of pipe macaroni into pieces two inches long, and
cook in boiling water, a little salted, ten minutes. Drain off the
water, and spread the macaroni out to cool upon a dish. When cold, take
a sharp knife or a pair of scissors, and split each piece in half,
lengthwise. Put on in a farina-kettle with a cup of hot milk and a
tablespoonful of butter, seasoning with pepper and salt. Cover and stew
tender, but not to breaking. Ten minutes after the boil should do this.
Then stir in three tablespoonfuls of grated cheese. Serve in a deep
dish.


BRUSSELS-SPROUTS.

Wash and pick over very carefully. Put on in plenty of boiling water
with a little salt, and cook fifteen minutes after the water begins to
boil anew. Drain well and pile upon a dish, with drawn butter poured
over them.


SPONGE-CAKE FRITTERS.

  8 penny sponge-cakes—very stale.
  1 cup of boiling milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in.
  4 eggs whipped light.
  1 tablespoonful of flour wet up in cold milk.
  ¼ lb. currants, washed and dried.

Roll the cakes into fine crumbs; pour over them the hot milk, with the
soda and flour stirred into it. Cover for fifteen minutes, then beat
until cold. Add the whipped eggs—the yolks first, then the whites;
finally, the currants dredged with flour. Beat all well. Drop in great
spoonfuls in boiling lard, trying one first to be sure that the batter
is of the right consistency; drain quickly in a hot colander; sprinkle
with powdered sugar mixed with nutmeg, and serve hot.



MARCH.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Mushroom Soup.
  Roast Ducks.      Savory Scotch Pudding.
  Spinach in a Mould.      Grape Jelly.
  Green Peas.
  ——
  Turret Cream.
  Coffee.
  ——


MUSHROOM SOUP.

  3 lbs. of knuckle of veal, well cracked.
  1 onion.
  Bunch of parsley.
  A slice of ham, or some ham or salt-pork bones.
  1 can of French mushrooms.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  2 tablespoonfuls of flour.
  2 beaten eggs.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 cup of milk.
  4 quarts of cold water.

Crack the bones and mince the meat, onion, and parsley. Cover with the
water, and boil gently three hours, or until the stock has diminished
one-half. Strain, season, boil up and skim. Add the mushrooms, drained
from the can liquor, and sliced. Stew twenty minutes; put in the milk,
the flour, wet up in cold water, and when it thickens, beat a cupful
into the whipped eggs. Stir into this the butter, return to the soup,
let it almost boil, and pour out.

To the lovers of mushrooms this is a delicious soup.


ROAST DUCKS.

Draw, clean and wash a pair of ducks. Stuff _one_ only with a dressing
made of bread-crumbs, the hard-boiled yolk of an egg, a little minced
sage and onion. Rub the inside of the other with melted butter, pepper
and salt. Many do not like the taste of onion and sage, while others do
not enjoy roast duck without the flavor of these condiments. Put the
fowls into the dripping-pan, pour a cup of boiling water over them,
and roast about an hour, basting frequently. At the last, dredge with
flour, and baste with butter; then brown. Chop the giblets fine, pour
the fat from the top of the gravy in the dripping-pan, thicken with
browned flour that which is left, and stir in the giblets.


GREEN PEAS

Have, from time immemorial, been the adjunct of roast ducks. As the
best substitute to be had at this season, open a can of preserved green
peas—the French cans are best; let them stand an hour to get rid of the
airless taste that is apt to cling to canned vegetables; pour off the
liquor; cook twenty minutes in boiling water, a little salt; drain dry,
and stir up in them a teaspoonful of butter, with pepper to your liking.


SAVORY SCOTCH PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 cup of best oatmeal, soaked all night in cold water.
  1 cup of gravy.
  4 tablespoonfuls of bread-crumbs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  3 eggs.
  Pepper and salt.

When your soup is ready to strain, dip out a cupful and set by to cool.
Take off the fat and stir into the soaked oatmeal. Mix up well; put in
a farina-kettle with boiling water around it, and add by degrees, as it
thickens, the milk heated to scalding. When all is in, salt and pepper
to taste and cook fast, stirring often, ten minutes. Take from the
fire, and let it cool.

N.B. If you have the gravy, all this can be done on Saturday.

When cold, beat in the butter, melted, working out all the lumps and
taking the skin from the top. Beat in the whipped eggs, working up
fast and hard. Pour into a buttered pudding-dish; bake, covered, one
hour, then brown. Serve in the bake-dish.


SPINACH IN A MOULD.

Pick over carefully, clip off the stems and put on the leaves in
boiling water, with salt stirred in. Boil hard fifteen minutes. When
done, drain, pressing out all the water. Chop fine; put back into the
saucepan with a piece of butter—a large spoonful for a good dish—a
little powdered sugar, salt and pepper to taste. Stir and toss until
very hot; press hard into a mould wet with hot water, and turn out with
care upon a heated dish. Lay round slices of hard-boiled eggs on the
top.


TURRET CREAM.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 package Coxe’s gelatine.
  1 heaping cup of white sugar.
  3 eggs beaten light, whites and yolks separately.
  ½ lb. crystallized fruit.
  Vanilla flavoring.
  Juice of a lemon in which half the grated peel has been soaked,
          then strained out.

Soak the gelatine three hours in a large cup of cold water. Scald
the milk, stir in the sugar, and when this has melted, the gelatine.
Stir over the fire five minutes; pour out half of the mixture into a
bowl, and add the whipped yolks to that left in the saucepan. Stir
one minute, and take from the fire. Flavor the yellow gelatine with
lemon—the white with vanilla. As soon as the yellow begins to congeal,
whip one-half of the stiffened whites into it, a little at a time,
with a Dover egg-beater. Add the rest to the white gelatine, in the
same manner, whipping each in until it stiffens before adding more,
and not ceasing until both are heaps of “sponge.” Wet the inside of a
tall fluted mould with water, and arrange in the bottom, close to the
outside of the mould, a row of crystallized cherries. Then, put in a
layer of the white mixture; on this, close to the outside, strips of
apricots or peaches; then a layer of yellow mixture, another border
of cherries, and so on, until the materials are used up. Do this on
Saturday. Next day, dip for one instant in hot water, and invert upon a
flat dish.

Eat with brandied fruit. It will be a beautiful dessert.


COFFEE.

Pass with light cakes or sweet biscuits.



  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Tomato and Bean Soup.
  Ham and Eggs.      Fricassee of Duck.
  Stewed Corn.      Glazed Potatoes.
  ——
  Queen’s Pudding.
  ——


TOMATO AND BEAN SOUP.

Open a can of tomatoes; take out the hard and unripe portions, cut up
the rest in small pieces, and heat to a boil before adding the bean
soup set aside from Saturday. Simmer all together half an hour, season
to taste, and pour over the dice of fried bread you have put in the
bottom of the tureen.


HAM AND EGGS.

Pour a little hot water in a frying-pan, if you use smoked raw ham
for this dish, and cook the slices in it ten minutes. Let them get
perfectly cold. Fry in their own fat until tender throughout and crisp
at the edges. Drain the fat from them and arrange them upon a hot dish.
Strain the fat, return to the pan, and fry the eggs without turning.
Cut the ham in neat slices, lay an egg upon each, and serve.


FRICASSEE OF DUCK.

Cut the meat from the bones of yesterday’s ducks, dividing the joints
neatly, and slicing the breast, etc. Crack the skeleton to pieces, and
put it, with the skin, stuffing, and gristly bits, into a saucepan.
Cover with cold water, and stew until a cupful of good gravy is
extracted. Strain and season this; put in the sliced duck. Set within a
pot of hot water and bring the contents of the inner saucepan _almost
to_ a boil. Add a couple of beaten eggs; stir up well and set aside in
the hot water, covered, for five minutes. The meat must not actually
boil once.


STEWED CORN.

Open a can of corn, an hour before cooking it. Put it into a saucepan
when you are ready for it; cover with boiling water, and let it stand
without cooking, for ten minutes. Drain off the water; cover the corn
with hot milk, a little salted; set within a vessel of hot water, and
cook for half an hour, or until tender. Stir in a tablespoonful of
butter, cut into thirds, each rolled in flour; simmer ten minutes,
pepper, and turn into a deep covered dish.


GLAZED POTATOES.

Parboil them in their skins; peel quickly and lay in the dripping-pan
within a hot oven. As soon as they begin to “crust” over, baste with
good dripping or butter. Repeat this three times until they are of a
glossy brown. Eat hot.


QUEEN’S PUDDING.

  10 fine pippins, pared and cored.
  ½ lb. macaroons, pounded fine.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  ½ teaspoonful cinnamon.
  ½ cup crab-apple or quince jelly.
  1 tablespoonful of brandy.
  1 pint of milk.
  1 tablespoonful corn-starch.
  Whites of 3 eggs.
  A little salt.

Put the apples into a buttered pudding-dish. Fill this half full of
cold water; cover _closely_ and bake until a straw will pierce them.
Let them stand, covered, until cold. (Do this on Saturday.) Drain off
the water the day you mean to use them. Put a spoonful of jelly and
a few drops of brandy into each apple. Strew with cinnamon and sugar.
Cover and let them stand while you scald the milk, and stir in the
macaroons, the salt and the corn-starch wet up in cold milk. Boil for
one minute. Take from the fire, beat up well, and let it cool before
whipping in the frothed whites. Pour this mixture over the apples and
bake half an hour in a brisk oven. Eat warm with a sauce made of the
water in which the apples were stewed, well sweetened and spiced, a
tablespoonful of butter, rolled in flour and the beaten yolk of an egg.
Heat the liquor, sweeten and season; thicken with butter and flour;
boil up; pour gradually over the egg, and set in hot water until it is
needed.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  German Sago Broth.
  Beefsteak and Onions.   French Beans Garnis with Sausages.
  Hot Slaw.
  ——
  Hasty Farina Pudding.
  ——


GERMAN SAGO SOUP.

  3 lbs. knuckle of veal, well cracked.
  1 onion.
  2 stalks of celery.
  Some pork bones, if you have them.
  Bunch of sweet herbs, minced.
  4 quarts of cold water.
  Pepper and salt.
  ¾ of a cup of German sago, soaked two hours in cold water.

Chop the meat, celery, herbs, and onion, and crack the bones. Cover
with the water, and cook slowly three hours, or until the meat is
boiled to shreds. Strain, season, boil up and skim well, put in the
soaked sago and cook slowly half an hour. The sago should be entirely
dissolved.


BEEFSTEAK AND ONIONS.

Broil your steak as usual. Fry in a little butter one onion, sliced,
until brown. Strain it out, and when your steak is done, and laid upon
a hot dish, pour the butter in which the onion was fried over it. Add
pepper and salt, and the faintest suspicion of made mustard, turn over
it a hot cover and let it stand five minutes before serving.


FRENCH BEANS GARNIS WITH SAUSAGES.

Open a can of “string” beans, cut in short pieces, cover with boiling
water, slightly salted, and cook tender. Drain well, stir in a
tablespoonful of butter, a little pepper and salt, and heap upon a hot
dish. Surround with sausages, in cakes or in cases, fried in their own
fat, and drained from the grease. Serve hot.


HOT SLAW.

  1 small, firm head of cabbage, shred fine.
  1 cup of vinegar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sour cream.
  ½ teaspoonful of made mustard.
  1 saltspoonful of pepper and the same of salt.

Put the vinegar, and all the other ingredients for the dressing, except
the cream, in a saucepan, and heat to a boil. Pour scalding hot over
the cabbage; return to the saucepan, and stir and toss until all is
smoking again. Take from the fire, stir in the cream, turn into a
covered dish and set in hot water ten minutes before you send to the
table.


HASTY FARINA PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 tablespoonfuls (heaping) of farina, previously soaked in a little
          cold water for one hour.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  2 eggs, beaten.

Scald the milk; stir in the salt, then the soaked farina, and cook
steadily (always in a farina-kettle) three quarters of an hour. Add the
butter; take a cupful of the boiling mixture, and beat into the whipped
eggs. Put back into the saucepan, stir for two minutes and pour into a
deep, open dish. Eat with milk, or cream, and sugar.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Baked Soup.
  Devilled Lobster.      Calf’s Liver à la Mode.
  Baked Celery.      Potatoes au Gratin, with Vermicelli.
  ——
  Lemon Pudding.
  ——


BAKED SOUP.

  2 lbs. of lean beef, cut into dice.
  3 stalks of _blanched_ celery.
  2 turnips.
  Handful of chopped cabbage.
  1 onion.
  1 carrot.
  2 roots of salsify, cut small.
  Chopped parsley.
  ½ cup of rice, previously boiled for fifteen minutes.
  ½ can of tomatoes, cut up.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 quart cold water.

Prepare beef and vegetables early in the day; mix all up well, and put
into a strong earthenware jar, with a good cover of the same material.
Coat this top thickly with a stiff paste of flour and water to exclude
the air, and set in the oven for six hours. Once in a while, grease
the paste to prevent it from scorching or cracking. It is also well to
set the jar in a dripping or bake pan of boiling water. Serve without
straining.


DEVILLED LOBSTER.

  1 can of preserved lobster.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  4 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
  ½ teaspoonful of made mustard.
  A good pinch of cayenne pepper.
  Boiled eggs for garnishing.
  Salt.

Open the lobster-can and empty it into a bowl an hour before using it.
Mince evenly. Put vinegar, butter and seasoning into a saucepan, and
when it simmers, add the lobster. Cook slowly, covered, half an hour,
stirring occasionally. Turn into a deep dish, and garnish with slices
of egg. Eat hot with buttered Boston crackers.


CALF’S LIVER À LA MODE.

  1 fine, fresh liver.
  ½ lb. salt pork, cut into lardoons.
  3 tablespoonfuls good dripping.
  2 sliced onions, small ones.
  1 tablespoonful Harvey’s Sauce.
  2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
  1 teaspoonful mixed spices.
  1 tablespoonful sweet herbs, chopped.
  Pepper.

Wash the liver, and soak half an hour in cold, salted water. Wipe dry
and lard with the fat pork, allowing it to project on both sides. Heat
dripping, onion, herbs, and spice in a frying-pan. Put in the liver
and fry both sides to a light brown. Turn all into a saucepan, add the
vinegar, and water enough to cover it; put on a close lid and stew
gently one hour and a half. Lay the liver on a hot dish, add the sauce
to the gravy, strain it, thicken with browned flour, boil up; pour half
over the liver, and send the rest up in a sauce-boat.


BAKED CELERY.

Cut two bunches of celery, the best stalks only, into inch-lengths, and
stew in boiling water, a little salt, for ten minutes. Drain off the
water, and add a cup of milk, a tablespoonful of butter, rolled thickly
in flour, a little pepper and salt. Simmer three minutes after heating,
and pour into a shallow bowl to cool. Butter a bake-dish, strew the
bottom with fine bread-crumbs. When the celery is almost or quite
cold, beat into it two eggs, and pour into the dish. Strew bread-crumbs
thickly over the top, turn a tin plate over all, and bake twenty
minutes. Remove the cover and brown.


POTATOES AU GRATIN, WITH VERMICELLI.

Mash the potatoes as usual, with butter, milk, and salt. Smooth into
a hillock upon a pie-plate, and strew with a handful of vermicelli
broken small, cooked soft in boiling water, a little salt, then drained
perfectly dry and spread out to cool. Brown all in a quick oven, glaze
with butter, slip to a hot dish, and it is ready.


LEMON PUDDING.

  6 butter crackers, soaked in water, and beaten smooth.
  Juice of three lemons and half the grated peel.
  1 cup of molasses.
  A pinch of salt.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.
  Pie-paste for shells.

Chop the pulp of the lemons, leaving out the thick white peel, _very_
fine; stir into the crushed crackers, with the butter and salt. Beat
the molasses into this, gradually, with the grated peel. Line two
pie-dishes with good paste, fill with the mixture and bake, without
upper crusts. Eat warm, or cold. They are best fresh.



  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Beef Soup with Barley.
  Stuffed Loin of Veal.
  Baked Tomatoes.      Kidney Beans with Sauce.
  ——
  Plain Boiled Pudding.
  Hard Sauce.
  ——


BEEF SOUP WITH BARLEY.

  3 lbs. of beef from the shin.
  2 lbs. of bones.
  1 onion stuck with cloves.
  2 stalks of celery.
  The half can of tomatoes left from yesterday’s soup.
  2 turnips.
  Nearly a cup of pearl barley.
  4 quarts of water.
  Pepper and salt.

Cut up the meat and crack the bones. Cut up celery, turnips, and
tomatoes. Put all these, with the onion, into the soup-pot, with the
gallon of cold water, and boil gently three hours. The liquor should be
reduced one-third. Wash the barley and boil fifteen minutes in a very
little water. Strain the soup, pressing hard. Season; let it boil up
once, and skim before adding the barley and the water in which it has
boiled. Simmer half an hour, and serve.


STUFFED LOIN OF VEAL.

Prepare a dressing of bread-crumbs, a little chopped _corned_ ham,
parsley, pepper and salt, moistened with milk. Have the bones taken out
of the meat, and fill the holes thus left with the stuffing. Secure
the meat into a good shape with skewers, and cover the top and sides
with thick foolscap paper, binding it with strings. Grease paper and
strings, put the veal into your dripping-pan with a cup of hot water,
and bake, basting the paper now and then with dripping, to prevent
scorching. At the end of an hour, take out the meat and remove the
paper. Pour off the gravy, carefully setting it by; return the meat to
the oven with a cupful of _milk_ in the pan instead of the gravy. Baste
with butter, lavishly, once,—afterwards, and often with the milk as it
heats. Roast, not too fast, nearly an hour more, or until your meat is
tender. Should the milk evaporate too rapidly, add a little hot water.
Indeed, this is a wise precaution against scorching. Take up the veal,
thicken the gravy left in the oven, with a tablespoonful of butter
rolled in flour, salt, and pepper, heat carefully that the milk may not
“catch,” and pour some over the meat, serving the rest in a boat. Veal
cooked in this way is very nice, but requires much attention at the
last.


BAKED TOMATOES.

Strew the bottom of a pie-dish with fine crumbs, having greased it
first. Drain off much of the liquor from a can of tomatoes, add it to
the soup, pour the tomatoes upon the crumbs, season with pepper, salt,
and butter; strew more crumbs thickly over the top. Bake, covered,
twenty minutes; then brown.


KIDNEY BEANS WITH SAUCE.

Soak the beans overnight. The next day boil them until soft in
salted water. Drain this off. Strain the first gravy taken from the
roast veal—before the milk is substituted—into a saucepan; add a
tablespoonful of butter, and half a small onion, minced. Boil five
minutes, strain through a soup-sieve, pressing the onion hard; season
with pepper, salt, and a little chopped parsley; pour over the beans,
simmer fifteen minutes, closely covered, drain off half of the liquor,
and serve in a covered dish.


PLAIN BOILED PUDDING.

  3 cups—full ones—of good flour.
  2 cups of “loppered” milk or buttermilk; sour cream is best of all.
  1 _full_ teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water.
  A little salt.
  ½ cup finely-powdered suet.

Stir the milk and soda gradually into the flour, working it smooth. Put
suet and salt in, and beat all thoroughly. Boil in a buttered mould an
hour and a half.


HARD SAUCE.

  1 cup of sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  ½ glass of wine.
  Juice of a lemon and half of the grated peel.

Warm the butter, and rub into the sugar, working into a light cream.
Add lemon and wine. Mould as you like, and set aside to cool.


  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Oyster Soup.
  Brown Fricassee of Chicken.      Ladies’ Cabbage.
  Potatoes au naturel.      Grape Jelly.
  ——
  Sliced Apple Pie.
  ——


OYSTER SOUP.

Drain the liquor from the oysters through a colander. Put the liquor
over the fire with half as much water, salt, pepper, and a large
tablespoonful of butter for each quart of soup. Let it boil up well,
and put in the oysters. Heat slowly, and as soon as they “ruffle,”
which should be about five minutes after they reach the boil, strain
off the soup. Have in another vessel as much boiling milk as there was
oyster liquor. Pour the oysters into a hot tureen, put a large spoonful
of butter upon them; when it melts entirely, turn in the milk. Stir in
well, add the hot soup, cover, and serve with sliced lemon and crackers.


BROWN FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN.

Joint the chicken neatly, and lay in salted cold water half an hour.
Cut a quarter of a pound of salt pork into strips, and fry in good
dripping. Strain it out, skin the chicken as far as possible, and fry
in the same fat, with a sliced onion. Chop the pork fine and put into
a saucepan; next, the onion; at last, the fowl. Sprinkle a teaspoonful
of mixed allspice and cloves over all, pour on cold water to cover them
well, put on a tight lid, and stew gently for an hour or more, until
the meat is tender. Arrange the fowl upon a hot dish; strain the gravy;
season to taste with pepper, salt, and parsley; thicken with browned
flour; boil up once; pour over the chicken; cover, and let all stand
for five minutes before serving.


LADIES’ CABBAGE.

Boil a firm cabbage in two waters. Drain, then set aside to get cold.
Chop fine; add two beaten eggs, a tablespoonful of butter, pepper,
salt, and three tablespoonfuls of milk. Stir all well, and bake brown
in a buttered pudding-dish. Eat very hot.


POTATOES AU NATUREL.

Choose those of uniform size; put on in their skins, in boiling water.
When about half done, check the boil suddenly by a cupful of cold
water. This is said to make old potatoes mealy. Boil again until a fork
will pierce them. Drain off the water; sprinkle with salt to make the
skins crack, and dry out in the uncovered pot, on the range, for a few
minutes before peeling.


SLICED APPLE PIE.

  1 lb. of prepared flour.
  ¾ lb. of butter.
  Ice-water to make stiff dough.

Chop half of the butter into the flour. Work up with ice-water. Roll
out thin; baste all over with butter, and sprinkle lightly with flour;
fold closely into a long roll; flatten, and re-roll as thin as at
first; then baste again. Repeat this three times. Set the last roll
in a cold place for at least an hour. Roll out, and line two buttered
pie-plates, reserving enough for upper crusts.

Pare, core and slice juicy pippins; put a layer within the crust;
sprinkle sugar liberally over it, strew half a dozen whole cloves upon
this; then more apples, etc., until the dish is full. Cover with crust
and bake.

Eat barely warm, with sugar and cream.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  A Plain Soup.
  Breaded Mutton Chops.      Milanaise Potatoes.
  Currant Jelly.      Green Peas.
  ——
  Cocoanut Sponge Pudding.
  ——


A PLAIN SOUP.

  5 lbs. shin of beef.
  2 stalks of celery.
  2 carrots.
  2 onions.
  2 turnips.
  5 quarts of water.
  2 tablespoonfuls of tomato catsup.
  ½ cup coarse corn-meal.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 cup of boiling milk.

Slice the meat and crack the bones. Cut the vegetables into strips and
fry the onions in good dripping. Then put all, with meat and bones,
into a soup-pot with the water. Cover and cook gently five hours.
Strain the liquor from the shreds of meat and rub the vegetables
through the colander. Season and set aside half the stock for
to-morrow. Put that meant for to-day into a soup-kettle; season and
boil up for a minute, that you may skim it; then add the corn-meal,
previously scalded with a cup of boiling milk. Stir in well, and simmer
half an hour before adding the catsup and pouring into the tureen.


BREADED MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim the chops from fat and skin, leaving a bit of bone clean at the
end of each. Beat up a raw egg; dip the chops in this—having peppered
and salted them; roll in cracker-dust, and fry brown in good dripping
or sweet lard. Drain, and arrange in rows upon a hot dish, the large
end of each overlapping the small end of the next. Garnish with parsley.


MILANAISE POTATOES.

  12 boiled potatoes.
  ¾ cupful of gravy left from yesterday’s fricassee.
  Juice of half a lemon.
  Yolks of 2 raw eggs.
  4 tablespoonfuls of dry grated cheese.
  ½ cup stale bread-crumbs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Pepper and salt.

Heat and strain your gravy. Put into a saucepan with the seasoning,
butter, and lemon, bring to a boil, and stir it into the beaten egg.
Slice the potatoes; lay a row within the outer round of a neat
pie-plate. (I hope you have one with a silver stand for the table.)
Pour a few teaspoonfuls of sauce upon these; lay another and smaller
row inside of the first; more sauce, and so on, until you have a low
cone of sliced potato; pour sauce over all, coat with the bread-crumbs
and cheese, mixed together; pepper and salt, and bake twenty minutes in
a quick oven.


GREEN PEAS.

Open a can of green peas; turn off the liquor and cover with boiling
water, a little salt. Boil fast until tender; drain well; stir in a
tablespoonful of butter; pepper and salt, and serve in a deep dish.


COCOANUT SPONGE PUDDING.

  2 cups of stale sponge-cake crumbs.
  2 cups of milk.
  1 cup of grated cocoanut.
  Yolks of two eggs and whites of four.
  1 cup of white sugar.
  1 tablespoonful rose-water.
  A little nutmeg.

Scald the milk and beat into this the cake-crumbs. When nearly cold
add the eggs, sugar, rose-water, and lastly the cocoanut. Bake
three-quarters of an hour in a buttered pudding-dish. Should it brown
too fast, cover with white paper. Eat cold, with white sugar sifted
over it.



  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Tapioca Soup.
  Roast Beef and Potato Balls.      Sliced Sweet Potatoes.
  Gherkin Pickle.      Cauliflower au Gratin.
  ——
  Southern Rice Pudding, méringued.
  ——


TAPIOCA SOUP.

Take the fat from the stock reserved for to-day. Bring the soup to a
boil and stir in half a teacupful of “grained” tapioca, which has
been soaked three hours in a little cold water. Add also seasoning, if
needed; simmer half an hour and pour out. Send around grated cheese
with it.


ROAST BEEF AND POTATO BALLS.

When your beef is about three-quarters done, pour nearly all of the
gravy from the dripping-pan. Have ready some mashed potato worked
smooth with a beaten egg, pepper and salt, then made into balls and
rolled in flour. Place them in the pan around the meat and baste until
well browned. Serve in the same dish with the beef.


SLICED SWEET POTATOES.

Boil in their skins until a fork will go easily into them. Pare and
slice with a sharp knife lengthwise; fry lightly and quickly in good
dripping, or butter; drain off the grease, and serve hot.


CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN.

Wash the cauliflower, cut off green leaves and stalks, and divide into
neat bunches. Boil in hot water, salted, until tender. Drain well;
dip each piece in melted butter, and strew thickly with fine, dry
crumbs, mixed with pepper and salt. Arrange flower end uppermost, in a
pudding-dish, and brown the crumbs upon the upper grating of an oven.
Serve in a vegetable dish, and pass a boat of drawn butter with them.


SOUTHERN RICE PUDDING—MÉRINGUED.

  1 qt. of fresh milk.
  1 cup of raw rice.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 cup of sugar.
  4 eggs beaten light.
  1 teaspoonful grated lemon-peel.
  A pinch of cinnamon, and the same of mace.

Soak the rice two hours in the milk. Simmer in a farina-kettle until
tender. Rub butter and sugar to a cream. Beat up the eggs, and whip the
mixture into them while the rice is cooling. Stir all together; flavor,
and bake three-quarters of an hour in a buttered dish. If baked too
long, the custard will break. So soon as it is well set in the middle
of the dish, draw to the oven-door, and spread with a _méringue_ made
of the whites of three eggs whisked stiff with one tablespoonful of
powdered sugar and juice of half a lemon. Close the oven-door, and
brown delicately. Eat cold. Make it on Saturday.



  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Hasty Soup.
  Larded Beef.      Stewed Parsnips.
  Browned Potatoes.      Made Mustard.
  ——
  “Brown Betty.”
  Tea and Albert Biscuit.
  ——


HASTY SOUP.

The trimmings of your roast beef, and any other cold meat you may
have—about two and a half pounds in all, chopped very fine.

  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  2 tablespoonfuls of browned flour.
  2 quarts of water.
  2 handfuls of fried bread.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 tablespoonful of walnut catsup.

Put meat, butter, salt and pepper into a saucepan; add two quarts of
cold water, and bring slowly to a boil. Cook half an hour after the
boil fairly begins. Strain hard through a thin cloth; thicken with
browned flour; add the catsup; boil up once, and pour over the fried
bread in the tureen.


LARDED BEEF.

Trim yesterday’s roast on top, bottom, and sides, saving all the
fragments for your soup. Then make incisions quite through the meat,
and thrust in numerous lardoons of fat salt pork, projecting above
and below. Rub the meat all over with vinegar, and then with melted
butter, rubbing both in well. Put in a dripping-pan. Take the fat
from the top of yesterday’s gravy; thin it with a little hot water;
strain this into the dripping-pan, and baste the meat plentifully with
it, keeping another pan inverted over it between times. If your oven
be moderately good, the beef should be ready for table in forty-five
minutes. Pour a few spoonfuls of gravy over it when dished. Put the
rest into a sauce-boat.


STEWED PARSNIPS.

Scrape, slice lengthwise, and lay in cold water half an hour. Cook
tender in boiling water, a little salt. Drain off half the water, and
stir in a tablespoonful of butter rolled thickly in flour. Pepper and
salt to your taste, and stew gently five minutes before pouring into a
deep, covered dish.


BROWNED POTATOES.

Mash soft with butter, milk, and salt. Heap as irregularly as possible
upon a pie-dish, and set in a quick oven. Mem.: The dish should be well
greased. As the potato browns, glaze it with butter. Slip carefully to
a hot dish.


“BROWN BETTY.”

  1 cup bread-crumbs.
  2 cups chopped tart apples.
  ½ cup of sugar.
  1 teaspoonful of cinnamon.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.

Put a layer of chopped apple in a buttered pudding-dish; strew with
sugar, butter, and cinnamon. Cover with bread-crumbs; then more apple.
When your dish is full, cover with crumbs. Invert a tin plate over it,
and “steam” forty-five minutes in a good oven. Then, uncover and brown.
Eat warm, with sugar and butter, or cream.


TEA AND ALBERT BISCUIT.

Pass these after the pudding. Tea-drinking is restful as well as
refreshing on a busy day. Weary housekeepers can have no more innocent
nervine.


  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  White Soup.
  Boiled Shoulder of Mutton, with Oysters.
  Creamed Potatoes.
  Baked Beans.      Sweet Pickles.
  ——
  Cottage Puffs.
  ——


WHITE SOUP.

  Knuckle of veal—weight 5 or 6 pounds.
  ¼ lb. lean ham—raw or cooked.
  2 onions.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  4 blades of mace.
  2 cups of milk.
  2 eggs.
  ½ cup raw rice.
  5 qts. of cold water.
  ¼ lb. almonds, blanched and pounded.

Crack the veal-bones, and cut off the meat in small pieces. Put into
the soup-pot with the chopped ham; the onion sliced, the herbs and
spice. Pour on the water, and boil very slowly five hours. The water
should be reduced to three quarts. Strain off the liquor. Season three
pints, and pour back upon the bones, etc. Cover tightly in a stone
crock, and put away for to-morrow’s stock. To the remainder add the
rice and the pint of water in which it has been soaking for two hours.
Season, and cook gently, taking care it does not burn, while you blanch
the almonds by scalding off their skins, and pound them in a Wedgewood
mortar. When the rice is soft, put in these, and cook slowly ten
minutes. Scald the milk, pour it upon the beaten eggs by degrees, add
to the soup; stir one minute, but not to the boil, and pour into the
tureen.


BOILED SHOULDER OF MUTTON WITH OYSTERS.

Take the main bones out of a shoulder of mutton; fill the cavity with
oysters, and bind the meat firmly over the incision. Sew the shoulder
into a neat shape in a piece of stout tarlatan; put on in boiling
water, slightly salted, allowing eighteen minutes to each pound in
cooking. When done, unbind carefully upon the dish in which you are to
serve it. Pour over it a sauce made of equal parts of oyster liquor
and the broth from the boiling meat, seasoned, then thickened with a
generous lump of butter, cut into bits, and rolled in flour, and some
chopped parsley. Boil up once well, and put half upon the meat, the
rest in a sauce-boat.


CREAMED POTATOES.

Mash in the usual way, whipping very light with a fork, adding a cupful
of rich milk and two tablespoonfuls of softened butter, beating in
gradually. Return to the saucepan; stir constantly for three minutes;
turn into a bowl and whip with an egg-beater, hard, one minute. Pile in
a hot deep dish, and set in the open oven until you are ready to send
it to table.


BAKED BEANS.

Soak overnight. Next day, put on in cold water—salted—and cook soft.
Drain dry, turn into a greased bake-dish, stir in a great spoonful
of butter, and when this has melted, enough milk to fill the dish
one quarter full. Season with pepper and salt; cover and bake forty
minutes. Remove the top, and brown.


COTTAGE PUFFS.

  2 cups of rich milk—half cream if you can get it.
  4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  1 good tablespoonful of butter, chopped into the flour.
  A pinch of salt.
  Enough prepared flour for thick batter. Try two cups, and add, by
          degrees, as you need more.

Mix the beaten yolks with the milk; then the salt and whites; at last,
the flour. Bake in greased iron pans, such as are used for “gems” and
corn-bread. The oven should be quick. Turn out and eat with sweet
sauce.


  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Giblet Soup.
  Smothered Chickens.      Macaroni with Tomato Sauce.
  Peach Pickles.      Potato Chips.
  ——
  Apple Cake.
  Coffee.
  ——


GIBLET SOUP.

Clean and cut the giblets of your fowls into three pieces each. Stew
tender in a pint of water. Take the cake of fat from the broth set by
yesterday. Put a half cupful aside for your macaroni sauce. Warm the
rest and strain out the bones, etc. Return to the fire, boil up and
skim, chop the giblets fine and put them in with the water in which
they were boiled. Simmer a quarter of an hour; stir in half a cupful of
fine, dry bread-crumbs. Season, if necessary; boil ten minutes longer,
stirring often, and pour out.


SMOTHERED CHICKENS.

Prepare the chickens as for broiling, splitting each down the back.
Lay flat in a dripping-pan, pour a cupful of boiling water upon them;
set in the oven and invert another pan over them, so as to cover them
_tightly_. Roast half an hour, lift the cover and baste freely with
butter. In ten minutes more, baste with gravy from the dripping-pan.
In five more, with melted butter—abundantly—going all over the fowls.
Keeping the chickens covered except while basting them, increase the
heat, until you ascertain, by testing with a fork, that they are done.
They should be coffee-colored all over, rather than brown. Dish, salt
and pepper them; cover while you thicken the gravy with browned flour,
adding a little hot water, pepper, salt, and chopped parsley. Boil up;
put a few spoonfuls over the chickens—the rest in a gravy tureen.

They are extremely nice, if faithfully basted.


MACARONI WITH TOMATO SAUCE.

Break half a pound of macaroni into inch lengths. Cover with salted
boiling water, and cook twenty minutes, or until tender. Have ready a
sauce prepared as follows: open a can of tomatoes; take out half the
contents and cut up very small. Add, with pepper and salt, and a little
minced onion, to the half cup of broth reserved for this purpose, and
stew together twenty minutes. Put the macaroni into a deep dish, stir
well into it a large tablespoonful of butter. Add to the sauce two
great spoonfuls grated cheese; boil once and strain over the macaroni,
loosening the latter with a fork that the sauce may penetrate. Serve
hot.


POTATO CHIPS.

Peel and slice, round, some fine potatoes. Lay in cold water for one
hour. Dry by laying them upon a dry towel and pressing with another.
Fry in salted lard, quickly, to a delicate brown. Take out as soon as
they are done; shake briskly in a hot colander to free them from fat,
and send to table in a deep dish—uncovered—lined with a napkin.


APPLE CAKE.

  2 cups of powdered sugar.
  3 even cups of prepared flour.
  ½ cup of corn-starch, wet up with a little milk.
  ½ cup of butter, rubbed to a cream with the sugar.
  ½ cup of sweet milk.
  The whites of 6 eggs whipped stiff.

Add the milk to the creamed butter and sugar; then the corn-starch,
lastly the flour and whites alternately. Bake in greased jelly-cake
tins.


FILLING.

  3 tart pippins, grated.
  1 beaten egg.
  1 cup of sugar.
  Juice and grated peel of one lemon.

Beat sugar, egg, and lemon together. Grate the apples into this
mixture. Put into a farina-kettle and stir until it boils. Cool before
putting between the cakes.


COFFEE

May to-day be passed with the cake.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Chicken Broth.
  Rolled Beefsteak.      Salsify Fritters.
  Scalloped Tomatoes.      Cucumber Pickles.
  ——
  Fig Custard Pudding.
  ——


CHICKEN BROTH.

Cut an old fowl into quarters. Lay in salt and water an hour; put
on in a soup-kettle with an onion, and four quarts of water. Bring
_very_ slowly to a gentle boil, and keep this up until the liquid has
diminished one-third, and the meat shrinks from the bones. Take out the
chicken, salt it, and set aside with a cupful of the broth, in a bowl
(covered), until to-morrow. Season the rest of the broth and put back
over the fire. Boil up and skim, and add nearly a teacupful of rice,
previously soaked for two hours in a cup of water. Cook slowly until
the rice is tender. Stir a cup of hot milk into two beaten eggs, and
then into the soup. Let all come to the boil—barely—when you have added
a handful of finely-minced parsley, pour out into the tureen.


ROLLED BEEFSTEAK.

Beat a large sirloin steak flat with the broad side of a hatchet. Fry
a sliced onion in a little butter. Take it out with a skimmer, and put
the meat into the pan. Fry quickly on both sides, soaking up all the
butter and leaving a brown glaze upon the steak. Spread it upon a dish.
Chop the onion, mix with bread-crumbs, minced herbs and a few chopped
mushrooms, and lay this force-meat upon the steak. Roll the meat up
tightly upon the dressing. Fasten with soft packthread and skewers. Put
into a saucepan with a cupful of cold water. Set where it will heat
very slowly, keeping on a close lid. Simmer thus two hours, turning
now and then. Transfer the meat to a hot dish. Strain the gravy, add a
little hot water, if needed; thicken with browned flour; stir in some
minced mushrooms, a tablespoonful of catsup and another of butter. Boil
about three minutes, pour over the steak, when you have removed the
threads. The skewers are to be withdrawn by the carver.


SALSIFY FRITTERS.

Scrape, wash, and grate the roots into a mixture made of a beaten egg,
one cup of milk, and enough flour for a very thin batter. Thicken with
the grated salsify; salt and pepper, and drop, in large spoonfuls, into
boiling lard or dripping. Drain in a hot colander. Eat while fresh.


SCALLOPED TOMATOES.

Drain off the liquor from a can of tomatoes; salt it, and put aside for
another day’s soup. Strew the bottom of a bake-dish with fine crumbs;
cover with tomatoes, sliced thin. Scatter over these a little minced
onion and some bits of butter, with pepper, salt, and sugar. Proceed
thus until the tomatoes are used up. Cover thickly with crumbs, fit a
plate or tin lid over the scallop, and bake half an hour. Brown quickly
upon the upper grating of the oven.


FIG CUSTARD PUDDING.

  1 lb. best Naples figs.
  1 quart of milk.
  Yolks of five eggs and whites of two.
  ½ package of gelatine soaked in half cup of water.
  1 cup sweet fruit jelly, slightly warmed.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Flavor to taste.

Soak the figs in warm water until quite soft. Split them; dip each
piece in jelly, and line a buttered mould with them. Heat the milk,
stir into the beaten eggs and sugar, return to the farina-kettle,
and cook until it thickens well. Set by to cool. Beat the whites of
two eggs to a stiff froth. Melt the soaked gelatine by adding two
tablespoonfuls of boiling water, and setting it within a vessel of hot
water. Stir until melted, and let it cool. When it begins to congeal,
whip with the Dover egg-beater, gradually, into the whisked whites,
until all is white and thick. Beat into the cold custard rapidly and
thoroughly, and fill the fig-lined mould. Set on ice, or in a cold
place, until firm. Dip the mould in hot water to loosen the pudding
when you are ready for it. It is delicious.



  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Split Pea Soup, without Meat.
  Baked Halibut.      Chicken and Ham Pudding.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Mixed Pickles.
  ——
  Cottage Pudding.
  Wine Sauce.
  ——


SPLIT PEA SOUP, WITHOUT MEAT.

  1 pint of split peas.
  2 onions.
  2 stalks of celery.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  1 carrot.
  1 turnip.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter, cut into bits and rolled in flour.
  Tomato juice, saved from yesterday.
  Pepper, salt, and fried bread.
  3 quarts of water.

Soak the peas all night. In the morning, put them on, with the
vegetables and herbs cut small, and the tomato juice; cover with the
water, and cook slowly three hours, or until you can rub all to a pulp
through a colander. Season; simmer fifteen minutes, stir in the butter,
cook five minutes longer, and pour upon the fried bread in the tureen.


BAKED HALIBUT.

Lay a cut of halibut, weighing five pounds, in salt and water for
two hours. Wipe dry, and score on top. Bake an hour, basting often
with butter and water melted together. Test with a fork to see if
it be done, and transfer to a hot dish. Strain the gravy from the
dripping-pan to a saucepan. Stir in a tablespoonful of walnut catsup,
the juice of a lemon, and a tablespoonful of butter, cut up in three
tablespoonfuls of browned flour. Boil, and pour into a sauce-boat.


CHICKEN AND HAM PUDDING.

  The meat from yesterday’s chickens, minced fine.
  Half as much cooked ham, also minced.
  ½ lb. pipe macaroni, broken into inch lengths.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 cup of gravy.
  Pepper and salt.

Add a little hot water to the chicken broth reserved yesterday; strain,
heat, and cook the macaroni tender in it. Drain the latter; mix well
with the ham and chicken, beaten eggs, butter, and seasoning. Pour into
a greased pudding-mould with a tight top, and boil for two hours. Dip
the mould into cold water for half a minute; invert a hot dish, and
strike gently upon top and upon sides to turn it out.


MASHED POTATOES.

Pare and boil until a fork will pierce the largest. Drain off the
water, leaving the potatoes in the pot. Set back on the range, strew
with salt, and dry for three minutes. Whip up with a stout, four-tined
fork until they are a mass of meal. Add, then, a great spoonful of
butter, a cup of milk, salt, if necessary, whipping all in lightly.
Form into a smoothed mound in a vegetable-dish. Pass with the fish.


MIXED PICKLES

Should go around with both fish and meat, to-day.


COTTAGE PUDDING.

  1 cup of sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  2 eggs.
  1 cup of sweet milk.
  3 cups of prepared flour.
  1 teaspoonful of butter.

Cream the butter and sugar. Beat in the yolks, then the milk, salt,
and the beaten whites alternately with the flour. Bake in a buttered
mould until a straw will come out clean from the middle; turn out upon
a plate. Eat hot with wine sauce.


WINE SAUCE.

  ½ cup of butter.
  2½ cups of powdered sugar.
  2 glasses of pale sherry.
  ½ cup of boiling water.
  1 teaspoonful of nutmeg.

Cream butter and sugar, whipping up, by degrees, with the hot water.
Beat five minutes before adding, gradually, the wine and sugar. Heat in
a tin vessel set in boiling water, stirring often, but _not_ to a boil.
Leave in warm water until you are ready for it. Stir up from the bottom
as you serve.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Bone Soup.
  Pigeon Pie.      Roast Sweet Potatoes.
  Grape Jelly.      Baked Hominy.
  ——
  Willie’s Favorite Pudding.
  ——


BONE SOUP.

  6 or seven lbs. of uncooked bones, beef, mutton, veal, and salt
          pork, bought in market for a trifle, and pounded to pieces.
  2 minced carrots.
  2 turnips.
  2 onions.
  2 stalks of celery.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  Salt and pepper.
  ½ cup tapioca, soaked two hours in one cup of cold water.
  5 quarts of water.

Put on the bones and vegetables early in the day. _Purchase soup meat a
day beforehand, whenever you can._ Cover with half the water. When the
scum arises after the boil is reached, remove it, and pour in another
quart of cold water. This will bring up more scum. Skim, after boiling
again, and pour in the rest of the water. When no more scum comes up,
cover the pot, and cook _gently_ four hours, if you can give it so much
time. Divide the liquor into two parts. Set away half in a stone jar,
with the bones in the bottom, fit on the lid, having salted the liquor.
This is Sunday’s “stock.” Strain the rest through a fine soup-sieve,
without pressing the residuum in the bottom, season it, and having
skimmed it carefully after the boil, stir in the soaked tapioca. Simmer
twenty minutes, and it is ready.


PIGEON PIE.

Clean, wash, and cut the pigeons into quarters. Wipe dry and fry
lightly in butter or dripping. Sprinkle well with salt and pepper. Have
ready a greased pudding-dish and a good paste, made according to the
receipt given on Friday of last week. Lay some pieces of pigeon in the
bottom of the dish, and cover with a mixture of chopped eggs, and the
giblets, boiled tender in a little water, then minced. More pigeons,
and another layer of the force-meat. Stir two tablespoonfuls of butter,
rolled in flour, into the hot water in which the giblets were boiled;
season, and pour enough into the pie to half cover the birds. Cover
with a thick crust with a slit in the middle, and bake an hour if the
pie be of fair size. Glaze with beaten egg, just before you take it
from the oven.


ROAST SWEET POTATOES.

Parboil them, and lay in a moderate oven until soft to the touch. Wipe,
and serve with the skins on.


BAKED HOMINY.

  1 cupful cold boiled hominy (the small grained).
  2 cups of milk.
  1 large spoonful melted butter.
  2 teaspoonfuls of sugar.
  3 eggs.
  A little salt.

Rub the butter into the hominy until there are no lumps left. Work up
very thoroughly. Scald the milk; pour upon the beaten yolks and sugar,
add the salt, and beat, by degrees, into the hominy. At the last, whip
in the frothed whites, and pour into a buttered bake-dish. Put at once
into the oven and bake until lightly browned.


WILLIE’S FAVORITE PUDDING.

  1 loaf stale baker’s bread.
  ½ cup of powdered suet.
  ¼ lb. of citron, chopped fine.
  ½ lb. sweet almonds, blanched and cut in thin strips.
  5 pippins, also chopped.
  2 cups of milk.
  1 cup of powdered sugar.
  A little salt, stirred into the milk.

Cut the bread into thick slices, and pare off the crust. Cover the
bottom of a greased mould (with plain sides) with these, fitted in
nicely. Soak with milk, spread with the suet and fruit mixed together.
Sprinkle this with sugar, and strew almond shavings over it. Fit on
another stratum of bread, soaking it likewise with milk, more of the
suet and fruit mixture, sugar and almonds, and so on to the topmost
layer which must be bread, and _very_ moist with milk. Cover the mould,
set in a dripping-pan, which you must keep full of boiling water, and
cook in the oven one hour and a half. Pass a knife carefully between
the pudding and the sides of the mould; turn it out; sift white sugar
thickly over it and eat with sweet sauce. You may have enough left from
yesterday.


  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Macaroni Soup.
  Roast Mutton.      Potato Rissoles.
  Lettuce Salad.      Spinach à la Crême.
  ——
  Transparent Puddings.
  Coffee.
  ——


MACARONI SOUP.

  ¼ lb. macaroni, broken into short pieces.
  The stock set aside yesterday.
  A heaping tablespoonful of corn-starch, wet up with cold water.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 onion sliced.
  A little salt.

Boil the onion five minutes in a pint of salted water. Strain it out,
and when the water again boils, put in the macaroni with the butter.
Boil very gently until quite tender. Drain off the water, and spread
the macaroni out to cool somewhat. Meanwhile, take the fat from the
top of your cold soup; thin the latter with a cup of boiling water,
and strain into the soup pot. Heat to a boil, skim, season, stir in
the corn-starch, and when this has thickened it, put in the macaroni.
Simmer ten minutes, and it can be put into the tureen.


ROAST MUTTON.

The breast, fore leg, and saddle are best for this purpose. A nice way
of cooking the breast is to sew it up in stout tarlatan and boil it
_eight_ minutes for each pound. Then take it out (saving the liquor),
wipe as clean as possible, and put it into a dripping-pan; score the
skin with a sharp knife, rub in pepper and salt; wash with beaten egg,
strew thickly with bread-crumbs, and bake half an hour in a good oven.
Baste twice with melted butter. Make a gravy of a cupful of the broth,
thickened with a tablespoonful of butter, rolled in flour. When it has
boiled, stir into it a little chopped parsley; a teaspoonful of minced
onion, and three times as much chopped pickled cucumber, with the
pounded yolks of two hard-boiled eggs. Stew three minutes; pour part of
it over the mutton; the rest into a gravy-boat.

N. B.—Test your mutton with a skewer before taking it from the oven. If
not done, leave it in a while longer.


POTATO RISSOLES.

Work into cold mashed potato, a beaten egg, a little butter, pepper and
salt. Make into egg-shaped balls; roll in beaten egg, then in pounded
cracker, and fry in hot lard, or dripping, to a light brown. Drain
_well_ in a colander, and serve in a hot napkin-lined dish.


LETTUCE SALAD.

One-third as much oil as you have vinegar; pepper and salt at
discretion. Cut up the young lettuces with a sharp knife; pile in a
salad-bowl; sprinkle with powdered sugar, and pour the rest of the
ingredients mixed together over the salad. Toss up with a silver fork,
to mix all well.


SPINACH À LA REINE.

Boil the spinach in salted water twenty minutes. Drain very thoroughly.
Chop fine; return to the saucepan with a teaspoonful of sugar, two
tablespoonfuls of butter, three tablespoonfuls of cream, a little
nutmeg, pepper and salt. Stir constantly until almost dry. Have ready
an egg-cup dipped in boiling water. Fill it with spinach, press hard
and turn out upon a hot dish. Do this until all is moulded. Put a slice
of egg upon the top of each.


TRANSPARENT PUDDINGS.

  ½ lb. butter.
  1 lb. of sugar.
  6 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  Juice of 1 lemon and grated rind of two.
  ½ teaspoonful of nutmeg.
  ½ glass of brandy.

Cream butter and sugar, beat in all the yolks and the whites of three
eggs, the lemon, spice and brandy. Bake in open shells of good paste.
(Add another “baste” of butter to the crust made for your pigeon pie;
roll out and line paté-pans with it.) When nearly done, spread each
with a _méringue_ made of the reserved whites, whipped up with a little
powdered sugar. Color very lightly.

As they are to be eaten cold make them on Saturday.


COFFEE,

Hot and strong, should be handed at the close of dinner particularly if
you attend afternoon service!



  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Savory Porridge.
  Minced Mutton and Eggs.      Potatoes au Maître d’Hôtel.
  String-Beans, Sauté.      Sweet Pickles.
  ——
  Jaune Mange.
  ——


SAVORY PORRIDGE.

Cut the meat from yesterday’s roast, and take the least desirable
portions, with any remains of other meat you may have—veal, pork, or
poultry. Chop extremely fine; and rub them through a coarse sieve or
colander. Skim the fat from the liquor in which your mutton was boiled;
add a chopped onion, a bunch of sweet herbs and a stalk of celery,
chopped. Boil down to three pints; strain, season, and when it boils up
again, skim and stir in your chopped meat, with half a cupful of dry
bread-crumbs. Cook, covered, twenty minutes; put in a tablespoonful of
butter, rolled in flour, and a little minced parsley. Stew five minutes
before serving.


MINCED MUTTON AND EGGS.

Mince the cold mutton. Have ready warmed a cupful of gravy, left from
yesterday, or made from the bones of the roast. Season the meat well
and stir into this, but do not cook it as yet. Strew the bottom of a
buttered bake-dish thickly with dry crumbs; pour the mince upon it;
cover with crumbs, and set in the oven, covered, until bubbling hot.
Then break enough eggs over the top to cover the mince well; stick bits
of butter here and there, pepper and salt, and bake quickly until well
“set.” Serve in the bake-dish.


POTATOES AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Slice cold boiled potatoes a quarter of an inch thick, and put into
a saucepan with four or five tablespoonfuls of milk, two or three of
butter, pepper, salt, and chopped parsley. Heat quickly, stirring all
the time until ready to boil, when stir in a tablespoonful of flour,
and two minutes later, the juice of a lemon. Take instantly from the
fire so soon as this last ingredient goes in.


STRING-BEANS—SAUTÉ.

Open a can of string-beans and drain off the water. Cut them into inch
lengths; cook twenty minutes in salted boiling water. Drain them, put
them back into the saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of butter, a pinch
of salt and a little pepper. Toss them over a clear fire for three
minutes, until they are very hot; then turn out into a deep dish.


JAUNE MANGE.

  1 package Coxe’s gelatine, soaked in a cup of cold water.
  2 cups of boiling water.
  Yolks of 4 eggs, beaten light.
  1 orange—juice and one-half the grated rind.
  Juice of one lemon and one-third of the grated peel.
  1 cup sherry wine.
  1 cup of powdered sugar.
  A good pinch of cinnamon.

Put gelatine (soaked), sugar, juice, peels, and spice into a bowl and
pour the boiling water over them. Stir until dissolved; put over the
fire in a saucepan, and heat almost to boiling. Pour, very gradually,
upon the beaten yolks. Return to the fire—in a farina-kettle—and stir
_one minute_. It must not boil. Take it off, add the wine, and strain
through double tarlatan.

If you have ice, or if the weather be cold, set the mould containing
this in the refrigerator, or in a very cool closet from Saturday to
Monday. By making it on the former day, you can add to the excellence
of your _méringue_ on the transparent puddings by using the whites of
the four eggs required for the receipt. Pass light cakes with the jaune
mange.



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Quick Lobster Soup.
  Roast Tenderloin of Beef.      Mashed Potatoes.
  Made Mustard.      Canned Succotash.
  ——
  Apple Trifle.
  Lady’s-Fingers.
  ——


QUICK LOBSTER SOUP.

Three lbs. of fish—the less choice parts of halibut or cod will
do—those which are too bony for table use. Cover with three quarts of
cold water and boil down to less than two or until the fish is in rags.
Strain through a fine sieve and put on to boil. Season with salt and
pepper. When you have skimmed it well, stir in a cup of milk in which
has been mixed two tablespoonfuls of corn-starch. Boil up well; then
add two tablespoonfuls of butter. Stir it in, take out a cupful of soup
and beat it into two eggs. Return to the soup and leaving the saucepan
on the range, but not over the fire, stir in a can of preserved
lobster, freed from bones and cut up small. Cover and stand in a pot of
hot water ten minutes before pouring out.


ROAST TENDERLOIN OF BEEF.

As I have before stated, this is the best, and not the least economical
cut for the table, there being no waste and scarcely any bone. Put
in the dripping-pan, pour a cup of _boiling_ water over it, and roast
carefully, basting often with its own gravy. When nearly done, dredge
with flour and baste once with butter. Do not let it once get dry while
cooking. Allow about ten minutes per pound if you like it rare and
juicy—that is, if your oven be of moderate heat. Pour the fat from the
gravy, thicken what is left with browned flour, pepper, and salt, boil
up, and put into a gravy-boat. Pass made mustard with it.


MASHED POTATOES.

Please see receipt given last Friday.


CANNED SUCCOTASH.

Open the can an hour before it is to be cooked, and turn into a bowl.
Drain off the liquor, put the succotash into a saucepan, cover with
boiling water, and stew half an hour. Throw off half the water, and add
as much cold milk. When it boils, put in a tablespoonful of butter, cut
into quarters and rolled in flour; pepper and salt; simmer five minutes
and serve in a vegetable-dish.


APPLE TRIFLE.

  2 heaping cupfuls of good apple sauce, well sweetened and flavored
          with grated lemon peel.
  4 eggs.
  2 cups of milk.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.

Heat the milk, and pour over the beaten yolks and sugar. Put back in
a farina-kettle, and stir until it begins to thicken, say about eight
minutes. Set by in a shallow vessel to cool. Beat the whites very
stiff, then whip gradually into the apple. When all is in, and well
beaten, pile up in a glass dish, and pour the cold custard about the
base.


LADY’S-FINGERS,

Or small, fresh sponge-cakes, should be passed with the trifle.


  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Mock-Turtle Soup.
  Veal Cutlets and Brains.      Potatoes au Gratin.
  Lettuce.      Stewed Tomatoes and Onion.
  ——
  Steamed Bread Pudding.
  ——


MOCK-TURTLE SOUP.

  1 calf’s head, well-cleaned, with the skin on.
  2 onions.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  5 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  5 tablespoonfuls of browned flour.
  1 tablespoonful of allspice.
  ½ teaspoonful of mace.
  1 teaspoonful of pepper.
  2 teaspoonfuls, at least, of salt.
  2 raw eggs.
  A little flour.
  2 glasses of brown sherry.
  1 tablespoonful mushroom, or walnut catsup.
  5 quarts of water, cold, of course.
  1 sliced lemon.

Soak the calf’s head an hour in cold water, and boil in the five quarts
of water until the bones will slip easily from the flesh. Take out the
head, leaving the bones and broth in the pot. Take out the tongue and
brains, and put them in separate plates. Set aside, also, the cheeks
and the fleshy parts of the scalp to cool. Chop the rest, including the
ears, very fine. Reserve four spoonfuls of this for force-meat balls.
Season the rest with pepper, salt, onion, allspice, herbs, and mace,
and put back into the pot. Cover closely, and cook four hours. Should
the liquor sink to less than four quarts, replenish with boiling water.
Just before straining the soup, take out half a cupful; put into a
frying-pan; heat, and stir in the browned flour, wet up in cold water,
also the butter. Simmer these together ten minutes, stirring almost
constantly. Strain the soup; scald the pot and return the broth to
the fire. _Have ready_ the tongue and fleshy parts of the head cut,
after cooling, into small squares; also, about fifteen balls made of
the chopped meat, highly seasoned, worked into the proper consistency
with a little flour and bound with the raw eggs, beaten into the paste.
They should be as soft as can be handled. Grease a pie-plate, flour the
balls and set in a quick oven until a crust forms upon them, then cool.
Now, thicken the strained broth with the mixture in the frying-pan,
stirred in well. Should there not be enough to make it almost like
custard, add more flour. Then drop in the dice of tongue and fat meat.
Cook slowly five minutes. Put the force-meat balls and thin slices of a
peeled lemon into the tureen. Pour the soup upon them, add catsup and
wine; cover five minutes and serve.

This king of soups having, of right, received such a long and minute
notice, I shall not repeat the receipt in full in this work, but take
the liberty of referring you, from time to time, to that just given.


VEAL CUTLETS AND BRAINS.

Flatten the cutlets with the broad side of a hatchet; dip in beaten
egg, then in cracker-dust, and fry rather slowly in ham-dripping,
if you have it; if not, in salted lard. Drain off the fat; put into
a hot-water dish, pepper, and cover while you fry, in the same fat,
after straining it, the brains from the head of which your soup was
made. They should first have been boiled for ten minutes, drained, and
cooled; then beaten to a paste with egg, seasoned with pepper and salt,
and dropped by the spoonful into the scalding fat. Drain, and lay about
the cutlets as a garnish.


POTATOES AU GRATIN.

Mash as usual; put into a shallow pie-plate well greased; strew thickly
with dry crumbs, and brown upon the upper grating of the oven. Glaze
with butter, when the _gratin_ begins to brown well. Slip dexterously
to a flat dish.


STEWED TOMATOES AND ONION.

To one can of tomatoes add a small onion, minced fine. Season with
pepper, salt, a _little_ sugar, and stew twenty-five minutes. Stir in
a tablespoonful of butter; cook two minutes, and serve.


LETTUCE.

Treat as directed on last Sunday.


STEAMED BREAD PUDDING.

  2 cups of milk.
  2 cups fine bread-crumbs.
  ½ lb. suet, powdered.
  ½ lb. Sultana raisins, picked, washed, dried, and dredged with flour.
  3 eggs.
  1 even tablespoonful of corn-starch.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  A little salt.

Heat the milk; pour over the eggs and sugar, beaten together. Stir
in the corn-starch; cook one minute, and pour upon the bread-crumbs,
beating all to a batter. Put a layer of this in the bottom of a
buttered pudding-mould. Cover this with suet; then with raisins;
sprinkle with sugar; then more butter, and proceed in the foregoing
order until the mould is nearly full. Fit on the top, put into the
steamer over a pot of boiling water, and steam at least two hours. If
you have no steamer, boil one hour and a half. When done, dip the mould
into cold water for half a minute, and turn out, with care, upon a hot,
flat dish. Eat hot with wine sauce.



  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Curry Soup.
  Stewed Beef.      Bermuda Potatoes, au Naturel.
  Macaroni, Baked.      Gherkin Pickles.
  White Puffs.
  ——
  Custard Sauce.
  ——


CURRY SOUP.

You can, if you dislike the taste of curry, warm up what was left from
your mock-turtle soup, just as it is. But you can vary it, agreeably
to most palates, by stirring into it, when melted, and almost on the
boil, a tablespoonful of curry powder, if there be more than three
pints of soup—half as much, should there be but a quart. Wet the powder
up in cold water, add to the soup, and cook three minutes.


STEWED BEEF.

  3 lbs. of beef—not _too_ lean—coarse steak or brisket.
  1 chopped onion.
  Bunch of thyme, sweet marjoram, and summer savory.
  Pepper, salt, parsley.
  ½ teaspoonful of allspice.
  1 tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce.
  1 tablespoonful of browned flour.
  1 pint of cold water.
  ½ glass of wine.

Cut the meat into strips about an inch long. Cover with a pint of
water, and stew _gently_ two hours. The meat should be ready to fall
to pieces. Add the onion and herbs cut up fine, the spice, salt and
pepper, and stew half an hour, closely covered. Then stir in the
browned flour, and when it has thickened, the sauce and wine. Cover the
bottom of a deep dish with strips of fried bread, and pour the stew
over it. If cooked long and slowly enough, it will be a rich brown
mixture, with no hard lumps of meat in it. Save half a cupful of gravy
for to-morrow.


BERMUDA POTATOES—AU NATUREL.

Wash and boil in hot salted water, until a fork will easily pierce
them. Drain off the water, throw salt over them, and “dry off” upon the
range for a few minutes. Peel, and serve whole.


BAKED MACARONI.

Break half a pound of macaroni into short pieces; cook in boiling
water, salted, twenty minutes. Drain, put a layer into a greased
bake-dish; strew thickly with grated cheese, and stick bits of butter
over it. Go on in this order until the dish is full, strewing cheese
and butter on top. Pour in a cup of milk; bake, covered, thirty
minutes; then brown nicely. Serve in the pudding-dish.


WHITE PUFFS.

  2 cups of rich milk.
  Whites of 4 eggs whipped stiff.
  2 cups prepared flour.
  1 scant cup of powdered sugar.
  Grated peel of half a lemon.
  A little salt.

Whisk eggs, lemon, and sugar to a _méringue_, and add alternately with
the flour to the milk. The salt should be sifted with the flour. Beat
very light, and bake in small, well-buttered tins, or cups. Turn out,
sift powdered sugar over them, and eat with custard sauce.


CUSTARD SAUCE.

  2 beaten eggs.
  1 large cup of sugar.
  1 scant cup of scalding milk.
  ½ teaspoonful of arrowroot, wet with cold milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  ½ teaspoonful of nutmeg.

Rub the butter into the sugar, add the eggs, and beat light. Put in
corn-starch and spice; finally, pour upon this mixture, by degrees,
the boiling milk. Set within a saucepan of boiling water five minutes,
stirring all the while, but do not let it really boil.



  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Clam Chowder.
  Braised Duck.      Weak Fish, Fried.
  Grape Jelly.      Purée of Green Peas.
  Cauliflower à la Crème.
  ——
  Corn Meal Pudding without Eggs.
  ——


CLAM CHOWDER.

Fry five or six slices of fat salt pork crisp, and chop fine. Sprinkle
a layer in the bottom of a pot; cover with clams; sprinkle with
pepper, salt, and bits of butter, then with minced onion. Next, have
a stratum of small crackers, split and soaked in warm milk. When the
pot has been filled in this order, cover all with cold water, and
cook slowly (after the water is heated) three-quarters of an hour.
Strain the chowder, without pressing or shaking; put clams, etc., into
a covered tureen; return the liquor to the pot. Thicken with rolled
crackers; add a glass of wine, a tablespoonful of catsup; boil up, and
pour over the chowder. Pass sliced lemon with it.


FRIED WEAK FISH.

Clean, wash, and dry the fish. Lay in a broad pan or dish; salt, and
dredge with flour. Fry in hot lard or very nice dripping to a light
brown. In serving, lay the fish side by side, the head of each to the
tail of the one next him. Garnish with parsley.


BRAISED DUCK.

Clean and wash the duck. Stuff with a dressing of bread-crumbs seasoned
with pepper and salt, a little onion and sage. Sew up the vent, and
tie the neck to keep in the flavor. Fry the duck in a great spoonful
of butter until lightly browned, turning it often. Add the butter used
for frying to the gravy saved from yesterday; thin with boiling water,
and, having put the duck into a saucepan, strain this gravy over it. It
should half cover the fowl. Stew slowly forty-five minutes, or until
tender, keeping the lid on all the while. Take up the duck, cover to
keep it warm, strain the gravy, and if very oily, take off the top.
Boil sharply ten minutes in an open saucepan; thicken with browned
flour; put back the duck into it, and set the saucepan, again covered,
in boiling water for a quarter of an hour. Serve the gravy in a boat.


PURÉE OF GREEN PEAS.

Open a can of peas, drain off the liquor, and cook twenty minutes in
boiling water slightly salted. Strain off the water through a colander;
mash the peas with the back of a wooden spoon, and rub through the
colander into a bowl below. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a
saucepan, with pepper, salt, and a little sugar, and, if you fancy it,
three mint leaves finely chopped. Heat, but not to boiling, stir in the
pulped peas, and toss about with a silver fork or spoon until they are
a smoking mass. Pile in a hot dish, with triangles of fried bread laid
up around the base.


CAULIFLOWER À LA CRÈME.

Boil a fine cauliflower, tied up snugly in coarse tarlatan, in hot
water, a little salt. Drain and lay in a deep dish, flower uppermost.
Heat a cup of milk; thicken with two tablespoonfuls of butter, cut into
bits, and rolled in flour. Add pepper, salt, the beaten white of an
egg, and boil up one minute, stirring well. Take from the fire, squeeze
the juice of a lemon through a hair sieve into the sauce, and pour half
into a boat, the rest over the cauliflower.


CORN-MEAL PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS.

  2 cups Indian meal.
  1 cup of flour.
  2 tablespoonfuls of molasses.
  3 cups of sour milk—“loppered,” or “bonny-clabber,” if you can get it.
  1 great spoonful of melted butter.
  1 _full_ teaspoonful of soda.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  ½ teaspoonful of cinnamon.

Sift the salt with the flour, and mix up well with the meal. Make
a hole in the middle, and pour in the milk, stirring the meal and
flour down into it. Beat smooth. Mix molasses, spice, butter, and the
soda—this last dissolved in hot water—all together, and beat into the
batter—well and _hard_. Butter a tin mould with a cover; pour in the
pudding, and boil steadily an hour and a half. Eat hot with butter and
sugar.


  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Chicken Broth.
  Paté of Salt Cod.      Boiled Chicken and Rice.
  Mashed Turnips.      Egg Sauce.
  ——
  Ambrosia.
  Café au Lait and Sponge-Cake.
  ——


CHICKEN BROTH.

Clean, wash, and truss, but do not stuff, a full-grown fowl. Set aside
the giblets for another use. Bind the legs and wings of the fowl
closely to its sides. Put into a pot with four quarts of water (cold),
and cook gently until the liquor has fallen one-third. Then add a full
cup of rice, soaked for one hour in a very little water, and boil half
an hour more, or until the chicken is tender and the rice soft, but not
broken to pieces. Take out the chicken. Wipe off the adhering grains of
rice, wash over with butter, salt and pepper, and set, covered, upon a
pot of boiling water to keep hot. Season the soup with pepper and salt,
and simmer ten minutes more. Then strain out the rice, and cover _it_
to keep hot. Return the soup to the pot, stir in a cup of hot milk,
a tablespoonful of corn-starch wet with cold water, and a handful of
very finely minced parsley. Boil up, take from the fire, and pour by
degrees upon two beaten eggs. Cover for three minutes; then pour into
the tureen.


PATÉ OF SALT COD.

  1 cup of cold salt cod, soaked all night in soft water, boiled in
          the morning, left to cool, then “picked” into boneless
          flakes.
  1 cup of oyster-liquor.
  2 even tablespoonfuls of rice flour, or corn starch.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Chopped parsley and pepper.
  3 hard-boiled eggs, minced.
  Some rich paste. (See “French Puff Paste,” page 352, NO. 1, COMMON
          SENSE SERIES—GENERAL RECEIPTS.)

Boil the oyster-liquor, stir in the corn-starch wet up with cold milk.
When it thickens, add the butter and pepper; next the parsley and fish.
Heat almost to boiling, and stir in the chopped egg. Take from the
fire, and cover, over a pot of boiling water, ten minutes.

Make the shell by lining a profusely buttered cake-mould, or round pan
with nearly straight sides, with a thick sheet of puff-paste, pricking
it at the bottom to prevent too much puffing. Cut a round piece exactly
the size of the top, for a cover, and bake separately. Bake both in
a quick oven. Let them get almost cool, turn out the shell with the
utmost care; fill slowly with the prepared fish, that the sides may not
give way; fit on the top; hold an inverted hot plate firmly upon it and
reverse the paté skilfully, leaving the closed side uppermost. It is
easily done, if one is only fearless yet dexterous. Eat hot.


BOILED CHICKEN AND RICE.

Boil the giblets tender in a little salted water; chop fine, and when
the rice is strained from the soup, mix them well through it. Pile the
rice, when you are ready to serve it, upon a meat dish; lay the chicken
upon the top; pour a few spoonfuls of egg sauce over it, and send to
table.


EGG SAUCE.

One cup of the broth in which the chicken was boiled, heated; thickened
with a tablespoonful of butter rolled thickly in flour; poured over two
beaten eggs; boiled one minute, with a tablespoonful of parsley stirred
in; then seasoned and poured upon the pounded yolks of two boiled eggs
placed in the bottom of a bowl. Stir up well, and it is ready.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Boil in salted water, until tender; mash and drain in a hot colander,
working in butter, salt, and pepper. Mound up in a hot, deep dish,
covered.


AMBROSIA.

  8 fine oranges, peeled and sliced.
  ½ grated cocoanut.
  ½ cup of powdered sugar.

Arrange slices of orange in a glass dish; scatter grated cocoanut
thickly over them; sprinkle this lightly with sugar, and cover with
another layer of orange. Fill the dish in this order, having a double
quantity of cocoanut and sugar at top. Serve soon after it is prepared.


CAFÉ AU LAIT AND SPONGE-CAKE.

To one pint _strong_ made coffee, add the same quantity of boiling
milk. The coffee should be first strained through muslin into the
table-urn, then the milk poured in with it. Wrap the urn in a woollen
cloth, if you have no “cozy,” for five minutes before serving. Send
around sponge-cake, home-made or bought, with it.



  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  A Good Stock Soup.
  Beef à la Mode de Rome.      Potato Puff.
  Hominy Croquettes.      Spinach.
  Chow-chow.
  ——
  Snow Custard.
  Nuts and Raisins.
  ——


A GOOD STOCK SOUP.

  5 lbs. brisket of beef.
  2 lbs. mutton-bones.
  2 onions, sliced and fried.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  4 stalks of celery.
  Bones of chicken or duck, if you have them.
  6 cloves.
  ½ cup of sago or barley.
  6 quarts of cold water.
  Sweet herbs.
  Pepper and salt.

Slice the meat, crack the bones, chop the vegetables, and put all on
over the fire with the water. Boil slowly five or six hours; strain;
pick out the meat as well as you can, and set aside. Then, rub the
vegetables through a colander, prior to straining all through your
soup-sieve. Set aside half the stock for Monday. Do this much on
Saturday. Or, if you choose, do not strain the soup at all until
Sunday morning. It will be the richer for cooling with meat, etc., in
it. In either case, season before setting it away, or it may sour.
Put Sunday’s stock back into the pot; boil up and skim, before adding
the half cup of pearl sago, previously soaked for two hours in a very
little cold water. Simmer twenty minutes and pour out.


BEEF À LA MODE DE ROME.

Cut a quarter of a pound of streaked salt pork, and the same quantity
of lean beef into strips, and fry, with a sliced onion, in good
dripping. Put them in the bottom of a pot and lay a rib roast of beef,
rolled round, upon them. Add a pint of boiling water, cover, and cook
ten minutes to the pound, turning the beef three times meanwhile.
Transfer the meat to a dripping-pan, dredge the top with flour, then
baste with its own gravy, once. Keep hot, without cooking, while you
strain the gravy left in the pot, thicken it with browned flour (always
_after_ taking the fat from the top), season with pepper, and stir in a
teaspoonful of sugar, a handful of Sultana raisins, picked and washed,
and the same quantity of blanched almonds, cut into tiny strips. Boil
gently three minutes, dish the beef, and pour the sauce over it.

Odd as this receipt may seem to an American housewife, the result is
extremely palatable, and a good change of fare at this season.


POTATO PUFF.

Mash the potatoes soft with milk and butter, season and beat very light
with two raw eggs. Smooth and bake to a light brown in a greased
pudding-dish, in which, also, serve it.


HOMINY CROQUETTES.

  2 cups of fine-grained hominy, boiled and cold.
  2 beaten eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  Salt to taste.
  ¾ cup of finely chopped beef, left over from your soup, after
          straining the latter.
  Pepper.

Work hominy, butter, and salt to a smooth paste; beat in the eggs,
finally the chopped meat, after peppering and salting it. Stir up in
a farina-kettle until hot, and pour out to cool. When cold, make into
long rolls with floured hands, flour each well by rolling upon a dish,
and fry to a yellow-brown in sweet lard. Drain off the fat and pile
upon a hot dish.


SPINACH.

Boil in hot, salted water, twenty minutes, drain and press hard; chop
fine, and return to the saucepan with a large spoonful of butter,
pepper, salt, a little sugar and a pinch of mace. Stir, and beat until
very hot; then pour into a deep dish.


SNOW CUSTARD.

  ½ package of Coxe’s gelatine.
  3 eggs.
  1 pint of milk.
  2 cups of sugar.
  Juice of one lemon.
  1 large cup boiling water.

Soak the gelatine one hour in a teacupful of cold water, then stir in
two-thirds of the sugar, the lemon-juice and the _boiling_ water. Beat
the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and when the strained gelatine
is quite cold, whip it into the whites, a spoonful at a time for half
an hour, if you use the Dover egg-beater (at least one hour with any
other). When all is white and stiff, pour into a wet mould, and set in
a cold place. Make this on Saturday, and on Sunday dip the mould into
hot water, and turn out into a glass dish. Make a custard of the milk,
eggs, and the rest of the sugar, flavoring with vanilla; boil until it
begins to thicken. When the _méringue_ is turned into the dish, pour
this custard, cold, about the base.


NUTS AND RAISINS

Serve as another and a last course.



  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Vermicelli Soup.
  Browned Mince of Beef.      Stewed Potatoes, Creamed.
  Mixed Pickles.      Broccoli.
  ——
  Canned Peaches and Cream.
  Myrtle’s Cake.
  Tea.
  ——


VERMICELLI SOUP.

Boil a quarter of a pound of vermicelli in a little salted water
fifteen minutes. Heat the stock set aside for to-day, when you have
taken the fat from the top, and when scalding, add the vermicelli.

N. B.—Always break vermicelli and macaroni small before cooking. Add a
little chopped parsley; simmer fifteen minutes and pour out.


BROWNED MINCE OF BEEF.

Cut all the meat from the bones of yesterday’s roast, setting away
the bones for another day’s soup. Mince the beef fine; mix with it
one-fourth as much mashed potato, season highly with pepper, salt, a
little mustard and catsup; work soft with the remains of yesterday’s
gravy; heat in a saucepan, then heap upon a stone china dish, cover the
mound with fine crumbs, and brown upon the upper grating of your oven.
Put bits of butter thickly over the top as it begins to brown.


STEWED POTATOES—CREAMED.

Chop cold boiled potatoes _coarse_; put on in a saucepan with a cup of
milk, and heat in an outer vessel of hot water. When scalding, pepper
and salt; stir in a tablespoonful of butter, cut up and rolled in
flour, and when this has melted, a beaten egg, stirred in while the
potatoes are not boiling. Simmer one minute, and turn out.


BROCCOLI.

Wash, and let stand in salt and water one hour. Cook in boiling salted
water fifteen minutes. When tender, drain dry, and serve with melted
butter (peppered) poured over it.


CANNED PEACHES AND CREAM.

Open the can at least an hour before using, and turn into a glass dish;
sprinkle with sugar. Serve in saucers, sending around powdered sugar
and cream to each person.


MYRTLE’S CAKE,

Or any other good cup cake, made last week, may be sliced and passed
with the fruit and cream. If you desire a receipt for this particular
cake please consult “Breakfast, Luncheon and Tea,”—NO. 2, COMMON SENSE
SERIES, page 334.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Barley Broth.
  Boiled Leg of Mutton.      Kidney Beans.
  Oyster Sauce.      Bermuda Potatoes, Baked.
  ——
  Cocoanut Pudding.
  ——


BARLEY BROTH.

  2 lbs. knuckle of veal. Beef bones from yesterday.
  1 onion.
  1 turnip.
  1 stalk of celery.
  Chopped parsley.
  1 cup Scotch barley.
  3 quarts of water.

Break the bones to splinters and chop the meat. Mince the vegetables,
and put all into a soup-kettle, with the water. Boil slowly three
hours, until the liquor has fallen one-third. Meanwhile wash the barley
and boil half an hour in a little salted water. Strain your soup; cool
to let the fat arise, and take this off. Season with pepper and salt
and boil up. Skim, put in the barley, and cook gently half an hour
longer.


BOILED LEG OF MUTTON.

The mutton will be cleaner and in better shape if boiled tied up in
coarse net or tarlatan. Put on in boiling water, plenty of it, slightly
salt, and cook steadily fifteen minutes to the pound. Save the broth
for soup. Undo the net from the meat, rub the latter over with butter,
lay on a hot dish, and send the oyster sauce in a boat. Garnish the
mutton with sliced cucumber pickles.


OYSTER SAUCE.

  1 pint of oysters.
  Half a lemon.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, rolled well in flour.
  1 teacupful of milk.
  Cayenne and nutmeg to taste.

Heat the oyster liquor, and when it boils, skim, and put in the
oysters. So soon as they boil, stir in the butter, cut up and well
floured, the spice and lemon-juice. Boil five minutes, take from the
fire and put with the milk which has been heated in another vessel.
Stir up well, and pour out.


KIDNEY BEANS.

Soak all night. In the morning put on in warm—not hot—water slightly
salted, and cook tender. Drain dry, stir in a great lump of butter, a
little salt and pepper, and turn into a deep dish.


BERMUDA POTATOES—BAKED.

Select those of uniform size; wash, and bake in a moderate oven until
soft to the pinching fingers. Wipe clean, and serve in their skins,
wrapped in a napkin.


COCOANUT PUDDING.

  1 heaping cup fine bread-crumbs.
  1 cocoanut, pared and grated.
  1 tablespoonful corn-starch, wet in cold water.
  ½ cup of butter.
  1 cup of powdered sugar.
  2 cups of milk.
  5 eggs.
  Nutmeg and rose-water to taste.

Soak the crumbs in the milk. Rub butter and sugar to a cream, and whip
in the beaten yolks. Beat this into the soaked crumbs; stir in the
corn-starch, then the whisked whites—finally, the grated cocoanut. Beat
very hard, pour into a neat pudding-dish, well buttered, and bake in a
moderate oven forty-five minutes. Eat cold, with powdered sugar on top.



  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Tomato Soup.
  Swiss Turnovers.      Salmon Pudding.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Lettuce Salad with Cream Dressing.
  ——
  Wayne Pudding.
  ——


TOMATO SOUP.

Open a can of tomatoes, and cut them up small. Take the fat from the
top of the liquor in which your mutton was cooked yesterday; put
over the fire with the tomatoes and half a cup of raw rice, and cook
slowly one hour. Season to taste, adding a lump of loaf sugar and a
tablespoonful of butter, rolled in flour; simmer five minutes, and pour
into the tureen.


SALMON PUDDING.

  1 can preserved salmon.
  4 eggs, beaten light.
  4 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  ½ cup fine bread-crumbs.
  Pepper, salt, and minced parsley.

Chop the fish fine, rub to a paste with the butter. Beat the
bread-crumbs up with the eggs and seasoning; work all together; put
into a buttered mould, with a tight top, and boil one hour. Dip in cold
water; turn it out upon a hot dish. Have ready a cupful of drawn butter
with a raw egg beaten into it, and pour over the pudding.


SWISS TURNOVERS.

Mince the cold mutton left from yesterday. Put half a cupful of hot
water into a saucepan; stir in a great spoonful of butter, cut up in
flour; season with pepper, salt, and tomato catsup. Pour over a beaten
egg, mix well, and, returning to the saucepan, add the mince, well
seasoned with pepper, salt, a little grated lemon-peel and nutmeg.
Stir up until very hot, but not boiling. Set by to keep hot while you
make a batter of one pint of flour, four eggs, a little salt, and a
quarter spoonful of soda, dissolved in vinegar, and _about_ four cups
of milk—enough for _thin_ batter. Beat very light. Put a spoonful of
lard (a small one) into a hot frying-pan, run it over the bottom, turn
in a half cupful of batter, and fry quickly. Invert the pan upon a hot
plate, and this, in turn, upon another, to have the browned side of the
pancake downward; cover the lighter side with the mince; fold up neatly
and lay upon a hot dish in the open oven to keep warm, while you fry
and spread the rest.

They are very nice.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and pass with both fish and meat.


LETTUCE SALAD WITH CREAM DRESSING.

  ½ cupful of new milk, if you have no cream.
  1 teaspoonful of corn-starch.
  Whites of 2 eggs, beaten stiff.
  3 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
  2 tablespoonfuls best salad oil.
  2 teaspoonfuls powdered sugar.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  ½ teaspoonful of pepper.
  1 teaspoonful of made mustard.

Heat the milk (or cream) almost to boiling; stir in the corn-starch
wet up with cold milk. Boil up, add the sugar, and take from the fire.
Cool, beat in the frothed whites, oil, pepper, mustard and salt, and,
when the lettuce is shred fine, add the vinegar to the dressing, and
pour over it. Toss up with a silver fork. Eat very soon.


WAYNE PUDDING.

  2 full cups of prepared flour.
  ½ cup of butter.
  1 cup of powdered sugar.
  1 lemon, the juice and half the grated peel.
  ½ lb. of citron, cut into very thin strips.
  5 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.

Cream butter and sugar; add the beaten yolks; whip up light with the
lemon, then add the whites, alternately with the flour. Butter a mould
abundantly, line it with the strips of citron; put in the batter, a few
spoonfuls at a time; cover and set in a pan of boiling water, in a good
oven. Keep plenty of boiling water in the pan, and cook steadily one
hour and a half. Dip into cold water and turn out upon a hot plate. Eat
warm with wine or brandy sauce. Leave room in the mould for the pudding
to swell. _Never heat a pudding or cake mould before greasing it or the
batter will stick._



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Ox-tail Soup.
  Irish Stew.      Corn Pudding.
  Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.
  ——
  Queen’s Toast.
  ——


OX-TAIL SOUP.

  1 ox-tail.
  2 lbs. of lean beef.
  4 carrots.
  3 onions.
  Thyme and parsley.
  Pepper and salt.
  2 tablespoonfuls of browned flour.
  4 quarts of cold water.

Cut the tail into joints and fry brown in good dripping. Slice the
onions and two carrots, and fry in the same, when you have taken out
the pieces of tail. When done, tie them, with thyme and parsley, in a
lace bag, and drop into the soup-pot. Put in the tail, then the beef,
cut into strips. Grate over them the two whole carrots, pour over all
the water, and boil slowly four hours. Strain and season; thicken with
brown flour wet with cold water; boil fifteen minutes longer, and pour
out.


IRISH STEW.

  3 lbs. of lean beef—a sirloin steak is best.
  8 parboiled potatoes.
  2 onions, or one, if it be large, also parboiled.
  Browned flour for thickening.
  Thyme and sweet marjoram.
  Pepper and salt.
  A little pie-paste—not rich—for dumplings.

Cut the meat into pieces an inch wide by two long. Slice the parboiled
potatoes and onions. Put a layer of meat in a pot; then one of
potatoes, next one of onions. Pepper and salt each sparingly; scatter
the herbs upon the onions; put in more meat, and so on. When all are
in, cover—barely—with cold water, and stew _slowly_ two hours. Strain
out the meat, and put into a covered dish—a chafing-dish, if you have
one. Return the gravy to the saucepan; thicken with browned flour; cut
your paste into narrow strips two inches long, and drop, one by one,
into the boiling gravy. Stew about eight minutes, and pour over meat,
potatoes, etc., which await it in the dish.


CORN PUDDING.

  To one can of corn add
  3 beaten eggs.
  1 cupful of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  A little salt.

Rub butter and sugar together; beat in the eggs; salt the milk, and put
in next; lastly, the corn, drained of can liquor. Beat up well; pour
into a greased bake-dish, and set, covered, in the oven. At the end of
half an hour, take off the lid, and brown.


POTATOES À LA LYONNAISE.

Parboil double the quantity of potatoes required for your Irish stew,
and lay aside eight for this dish. Cut, when cold, into dice; fry a
small chopped onion in a heaping spoonful of butter, for one minute,
then put in the potatoes. Stir briskly to keep them from browning; cook
until very hot; add a tablespoonful of chopped parsley; stir a minute
longer; turn all into a heated colander; shake hard to get rid of the
grease, and serve hot in a vegetable-dish.


QUEEN’S TOAST.

Cut slices of stale baker’s bread round with a cake-cutter, taking
off all the crust. Fry in sweet lard to a light brown. Dip each round
quickly into _boiling_ water to remove the fat. Sprinkle thickly on
both sides with a mixture of powdered sugar and nutmeg, and pile upon
a hot plate. You may dispense with sauce if you will heat a glass of
wine, and put a teaspoonful, or less, upon each piece, after dipping it
into the water, and before sugaring it. Serve hot.



  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Réchauffé Soup.
  Chickens with Mushroom Sauce.      Lobster Croquettes.
  Cabbage Sprouts.      Boiled Macaroni.
  ——
  Nursery Plum Pudding.
  ——


RÉCHAUFFÉ SOUP.

An excellent a soup as ox-tail deserves repetition, and the probability
is that, since Friday is a fast day from meat with Roman Catholic
servants, you have enough soup left over for your family proper. Warm
it up, making very hot, but not to boiling. If you like, you can put
some dice of crisp fried bread in the tureen.


LOBSTER CROQUETTES.

To a can of preserved lobster, chopped fine, add pepper, salt, and
powdered mace. Mix with this one-fourth as much bread-crumbs as you
have meat, work in two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, and make into
egg-shaped rolls. Roll these in raw egg, then in cracker-dust, and fry
in butter or very sweet lard. Serve dry and hot with cresses or parsley
laid around them.


CHICKENS WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE.

Split a pair of chickens down the back as for broiling, and lay in
a dripping-pan, with two cups of _boiling_ water, a little salt,
poured over them. Cover very securely with another pan of the same
size—inverted—and cook an hour and a half if the fowls are of fair
size. Baste at least six times; twice with butter in which has been
mixed a little pepper; three times, copiously, with their own gravy,
and, just before they are done, again with butter. Boil half a can of
mushrooms ten minutes in clear, hot water. Drain and mince them very
fine. Take up the chickens and keep hot in a covered dish. Put the
gravy into a saucepan; add a little chopped onion; boil three minutes,
thicken with browned flour; and stir in the chopped mushrooms. Simmer,
covered, five minutes, and pour half over the chickens, the rest into a
sauce-boat. Save all the gravy left after dinner.


CABBAGE SPROUTS.

Wash, trim, and boil in hot, salted water, with a bit of streaked salt
pork, an inch square. When tender, drain, season, and chop fine. Stir
in a tablespoonful of melted butter and the juice of half a lemon. Eat
very hot.


BOILED MACARONI.

Break half a pound of pipe macaroni into short lengths. Cover well with
boiling water, salted, and boil—not too fast—about twenty minutes, or
until tender and clear at the edges. Drain well; pour a little into a
hot, deep dish, and butter it, then strew with grated cheese. Do this
three times in filling the dish, with cheese scattered over the top.


NURSERY PLUM PUDDING.

  1 scant cup of raw rice.
  3 pints of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  ½ lb. raisins, seeded, and cut in half.
  3 well-beaten eggs.

Soak the rice two hours in a farina-kettle, just covered with warm
water. When all the water is soaked up, shake the rice hard, to reach
that at the bottom, and add a pint of milk. Simmer gently, still in
the inner kettle, until the rice is again dry, and quite tender.
Shake up anew, and add another pint of milk. When this is hot, put in
the raisins, dredged with flour; cover the saucepan and cook twenty
minutes. Turn into a bowl; put with it the butter, rice-flour, the
remaining pint of milk, heated and mixed with the beaten eggs and
sugar, and stir all up thoroughly. Bake in a buttered pudding-dish,
about forty minutes. Eat warm with butter and sugar, or sugar and cream.



  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Dresden Soup.
  Boiled Blue Fish.      Baked Calf’s Head.
  Canned Succotash.
  Casserole of Rice with Tomato Sauce.
  ——
  Belle’s Dumplings.
  ——


DRESDEN SOUP.

  2 lbs. of lean beef, cut into strips.
  4 pig’s feet, cleaned well.
  4 lbs. of mutton and beef bones, cracked.
  2 onions.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs.
  2 carrots.
  2 blades of mace.
  4 tablespoonfuls of butter, and the same of rice-flour.
  Juice of a lemon.
  1 tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce.
  1 raw egg for force-meat.
  Salt and pepper.
  6 quarts of cold water.
  1 glass of claret.

Early in the day, put on the meat, pig’s feet and bones, and cook
slowly five hours in six quarts of water. Skim then, carefully, add the
onions, mace, and herbs, cut small, and the carrots, _grated_. Stew
half an hour; take out the meat and the feet, leaving the bones, etc.,
on the fire. Cut the flesh from the feet, and return the bones to the
pot. Set aside half this flesh, with a few pieces of beef, to get cold.
Chop the rest fine, and make up with pepper, salt, and a raw egg, into
small force-meat balls. Roll them in flour, lay upon a greased plate,
and set within the oven to “crust.” When quite firm, take out and cool.
Cut the reserved meat into small, square bits. When the soup has cooked
half an hour after the meat was taken out, strain and season it. Divide
into two portions. Into that designed for Sunday drop the dice of
meat, from the pig’s feet as well as the beef, and set away, covered,
in an earthenware vessel. Return the rest to the fire; thicken with
the butter, melted and worked up into the rice-flour; add the sauce,
lemon-juice, and a glass of claret. Put the force-meat balls into the
heated tureen; pour on the soup, cover five minutes, and serve.


BOILED BLUE FISH.

Sew up the fish neatly in a thin cloth, put on in scalding water with
a little salt, half a small cup of vinegar, a quarter of an onion, six
whole black peppers, and a blade of mace. Let it stand, _just_ below
boiling heat, half an hour; then increase the heat and boil thirty
minutes more. Take out, unwrap, lay upon a hot dish and pour over it a
cupful of drawn butter, with a little lemon-juice stirred in it.


BAKED CALF’S HEAD.

Put on, having removed the brains, in four quarts of cold water, and
boil gently one hour. Take out the head; salt and pepper the liquor and
set by as the foundation of Monday’s soup, keeping out a cupful for
gravy. Put the calf’s head in a dripping-pan, rub over with butter,
pour the gravy into the pan, and bake, covered—basting four times—for
half an hour. Uncover, wash over with a mixture of melted butter,
pepper, and salt, and a teaspoonful of catsup. Dredge with browned
flour, baste again, and when the surface is of a fine froth, dish the
head. Strain and thicken the gravy, and serve in a boat. The brains
should be washed well, boiled quickly, then cooled; mashed to a smooth
paste with pepper, salt, a dust of flour, and a raw egg, and fried, by
the spoonful, in hot lard. Drain, and lay about the head.


CANNED SUCCOTASH.

Drain from the liquor; cut the beans—if French or string beans—into
short pieces; cook half an hour in salted boiling water; drain this
off; add a cup of hot milk, thicken with a great spoonful of butter,
cut up in flour, pepper, and salt, and simmer ten minutes more.


CASSEROLE OF RICE WITH TOMATO SAUCE.

Boil one cup of rice tender in hot water, a little salt, shaking up
from time to time, but never stirring. Drain dry, add a very little
milk in which has been stirred a beaten egg, a teaspoonful of butter,
a little pepper and salt. Simmer for five minutes, and if the rice has
not absorbed all the milk, drain it again. Pile it around the inner
edge of a flat dish; smooth it neatly, rounding the top, into a sort of
fence; wash over carefully with the beaten yolks of two eggs, and set
it in the oven until firm.

Drain more than half the juice from a can of tomatoes; season with a
little chopped onion, pepper, salt, and sugar. Stew twenty minutes;
stir in a tablespoonful of butter, and two tablespoonfuls of fine
bread-crumbs; stew three or four minutes to thicken it well, and pour
within the hedge of rice.


BELLE’S DUMPLINGS.

  1 quart _prepared_ flour.
  2½ tablespoonfuls of mixed lard and butter.
  2 cups of milk, or enough for soft dough.

Roll out a quarter of an inch thick, cut into oblong pieces, rounded
at the corners. Put a great spoonful of damson, cherry, or other tart
preserve, in the middle, and roll into a dumpling. Bake about forty
minutes, brush over with beaten egg, while hot, and shut up in the oven
three minutes to glaze. Eat hot with brandy sauce. (_For receipt for
sauce see Wednesday, 2d Week in January._)



APRIL.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Clear Soup.
  Fricasseed Chickens, White.      Buttered Parsnips.
  Savory Potatoes.      Lettuce Salad, Plain.
  ——
  Pie-Plant (April) Fool.
  Coffee and Cake.
  ——


CLEAR SOUP.

Take the grease from the soup-jelly you will find in the crock into
which the stock was poured yesterday. Take it up by the ladleful,
leaving the meat and sediment at the bottom, and put on to heat in
a soup-kettle. When it boils, stir in the beaten white of an egg;
take off the scum as fast as it rises, and when quite clear add two
teaspoonfuls of Coxe’s gelatine, previously soaked in cold water. Add,
meanwhile, a little boiling water to the sediment and meat dice in the
pot; strain off the liquid; pick out the bits of meat, and see that
they are clean. Drop into the soup at the same time that you add four
tablespoonfuls of colored water, made by burning a tablespoonful or
two of sugar in a tin cup, pouring a little boiling water upon it, and
stirring until you get a clear brown liquor. After these go in, do not
let your soup really boil, but simmer a few minutes to throw up and
remove any remaining scum. Pass sliced lemon with the soup.


FRICASSEED CHICKENS—WHITE.

Clean, wash, and joint the fowls. Lay in cold salt and water for one
hour. Put them into a pot, with half a pound of salt pork cut into
strips, and cold water enough to cover them. Cover closely, and heat
very slowly to a gentle boil. The excellence of the fricassee depends
mainly upon care in this respect. If the fowls are full-grown and
reasonably tender, stew more than one hour after they begin to boil.
When done add half a chopped onion, parsley and pepper. Cover again for
ten minutes. Stir up two tablespoonfuls of flour in cold water, then
into a cup of hot milk, and this, in turn, into two beaten eggs. Then
put in a great spoonful of butter, and pour all into the saucepan; mix
well, boil fairly, and, having arranged the chickens upon a hot dish,
pour the gravy over them.


BUTTERED PARSNIPS.

Boil tender and scrape. Slice lengthwise. Put three tablespoonfuls of
butter into a saucepan with pepper, salt and a little chopped parsley.
When it heats, put in the parsnips, and shake and turn until the
mixture boils. Lay the parsnips in order upon a hot dish, and pour the
butter over them.


SAVORY POTATOES.

Pare and cut into squares some raw potatoes. Lay in cold water half an
hour, put into a saucepan, cover with boiling water, slightly salted,
and stew half an hour, not so fast as to break them. Then throw off
the water and add a cupful of sauce made from the gravy of Friday’s
chickens, thinned with a little hot water, and strained; seasoned to
taste, and again thickened with a tablespoonful of butter rolled in
flour. Simmer all for ten minutes, and turn into a deep dish.


LETTUCE SALAD—PLAIN.

Wash the lettuce; pull leaf from leaf, and pile over a lump of ice in a
salad-bowl. Pass the oil and vinegar, salt, pepper, and powdered sugar
to each person, with the lettuce, that he may season for himself.


PIE-PLANT (APRIL) FOOL.

  1 pint of stewed pie plant, rubbed through a colander.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 cup of sugar.
  Yolks of four eggs.
  _Méringue_ of the whites.
  3 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Juice of half a lemon.

Put the strained pie-plant into a saucepan; set it in boiling water,
and, when hot, beat in the butter, sugar, and beaten yolks. Stir two
minutes, and turn out to cool. This can be done on Saturday. On Sunday,
a few minutes’ whirl of your egg-beater will give you the _méringue_.
Beat in the powdered sugar with a few more, and when you have poured
the stewed fruit (or vegetable) into a glass bowl, pile the _méringue_
(the “fool”?) on the top.


COFFEE AND CAKE

Can be handed with, or after the sweets.



  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Milk and Bread Soup.
  Larded Mutton Chops.      Mashed Potatoes.
  Green Peas.      Tomato Catsup.
  ——
  Corn-meal Hasty Pudding.
  ——


MILK AND BREAD SOUP.

Boil down the liquor in which Saturday’s calf’s head was cooked, to
less than two quarts. Add a pint of milk previously heated, and mixed
with three beaten eggs. Thicken with two tablespoonfuls of butter
rolled in flour, and take at once from the fire. Salt and pepper, if
needed. Have ready in a tureen a cupful of fine, dry crumbs. Pour on
the soup, stir up for a moment, cover and send to table with a plate of
grated cheese.


LARDED MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim off superfluous fat and skin; beat flat with the broad side of a
hatchet, and lard each with four strips of fat, salt pork, drawn quite
through, so as to project on both sides. Put into a saucepan, sprinkle
with minced onion, pepper, and parsley, and barely cover with weak
broth. The gravy from yesterday’s chickens will do, or any other you
may chance to have. Put on the saucepan lid, set it where it will not
boil under an hour, and think no more about it until the time is up.
Then increase the heat and simmer half an hour, or until tender. Take
up the chops and keep hot. Thicken the gravy with browned flour; add
the juice of a lemon, a great spoonful of mushroom catsup, a glass of
sherry, and boil one minute. Put back the chops; cover, and heat just
to a feeble boil. Lay the chops in order upon a dish and pour the gravy
over them.


GREEN PEAS.

Open a can of peas; turn out into a bowl, and let alone for an hour.
Then, strain off the liquor, put the peas into a saucepan, and cover
with salted, boiling water. Cook twenty minutes; drain, pepper, stir in
a tablespoonful of butter, and dish.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and heap in a covered dish. Wet a pretty butter-print
and press firmly upon the top.


CORN-MEAL HASTY PUDDING.

  1 heaping cup of Indian meal.
  ½ cup of flour.
  1 quart of boiling _milk_.
  2 cups of boiling water.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 tablespoonful of brown sugar.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  ½ teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and mace.

Wet up meal and flour with the water and stir into the boiling milk.
Mem.—Cook all sorts of milk-puddings (boiled) in a farina-kettle. Boil
steadily half an hour, stirring very often from the bottom. Put in
salt, sugar, butter, and spice, and cook ten minutes more. Pour into a
bowl, or other uncovered dish. Eat hot with sugar and butter.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Bean and Corn Soup.
  Beefsteak Pudding.      Stewed Potatoes.
  Mashed Turnips.      Cold Slaw.
  ——
  Baked Chocolate Custards.
  Fancy Cakes.
  ——


BEAN AND CORN SOUP.

  1 quart of dried beans, soaked overnight in soft water.
  1 lb. of streaked salt pork, cut into shreds.
  1 lb. of lean beef also cut up.
  2 stalks of celery, minced.
  1 bunch of chopped parsley.
  1 small onion, sliced.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 can of corn.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in two of flour.
  5 quarts of water.

Put on the beans, pork, beef, and all the vegetables except the
corn, with the water, and boil slowly until the beans are thoroughly
broken, and the meat in rags. Meanwhile, cook the corn tender in just
enough boiling water to cover it. When done, stir in half the butter
and flour, salt and pepper, and cover to keep hot while you strain
the soup, rubbing the beans, onion, and celery to a pulp through a
colander. Set aside half for to-morrow. Return the rest to the fire;
pepper to taste; add the corn with the water in which it was cooked.
Simmer fifteen minutes; stir in the rest of the butter and flour; boil
up well, and serve.


BEEFSTEAK PUDDING.

  1 quart of prepared flour.
  ¼ lb. powdered suet.
  1 cup of ice-water.
  2 lbs. good steak without bone.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 tablespoonful of tomato catsup.

Rub the suet into the flour, salt slightly, and make, with the water,
into a paste just soft enough to roll out. Roll into a sheet nearly
half an inch thick. Butter well a round-bottomed pudding mould; line
with the paste, and leave in a cold place while you cut the steak
into small squares, seasoning with pepper, salt, and catsup. Fill the
paste-lined mould (or bowl) with this. Cut a piece of paste for the
top. Cover with this, pinching the two sheets of paste tightly together
at the edges. Let an assistant hold up the bowl while you cover with a
stout pudding-cloth and tie tightly under the bottom, not straining the
cloth so strongly over the top as to hinder the paste from swelling.
(Flour the cloth before tying it over the bowl.) Plunge into a gallon
of boiling water, and keep it at a fast boil for two hours, filling
up from the tea-kettle when the water sinks. Turn the bowl bottom
upward and dip in cold water; untie the cloth, invert a hot dish upon
the mould, and turn over carefully, to get the pudding out without
breaking. This is a favorite English dish.


STEWED POTATOES.

Old potatoes, by this time, need a little management to make them
acceptable at a season when appetites crave fresh vegetables. This is
a good way to cook them. Pare very thin, and leave in cold water one
hour. Put on to cook in _cold_ water, bringing it soon to a boil. When
a fork will run easily into the largest, strain off the water, throw in
a handful of salt, and dry, for a minute, on the stove. Then take out
the potatoes; crack each one by pressing with a wooden spoon; put into
a deep dish, and pour over them a cup of hot milk thickened with two
tablespoonfuls of butter, cut up in flour; cooked for a minute, then
seasoned with pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful _very_ finely-minced
parsley. Cover the dish; set in boiling water ten minutes, and serve.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Boil tender; press all the water out in a colander, as you mash them;
return to the fire with a good lump of butter, pepper, and salt, and
stir until smoking hot.


COLD SLAW.

Shred the heart of a white cabbage, and pour over it a dressing of two
tablespoonfuls of oil, four of vinegar, one teaspoonful each of salt
and sugar, and half as much pepper and mustard, beaten up well with the
whipped yolks of two eggs. The mixture should be quite thick. Use an
egg-beater in mixing.


BAKED CHOCOLATE CUSTARDS.

  1 quart of milk.
  6 eggs.
  1 cup of sugar.
  4 great spoonfuls grated chocolate.
  Vanilla flavoring.

Scald the milk; wet up the chocolate and stir in. Boil two minutes.
Beat the yolks into the sugar, and pour the hot mixture slowly upon
them, stirring constantly. Season and fill small cups, which should
be set ready in a dripping-pan of boiling water. See that there is no
danger of their boiling over the tops. Cook twenty minutes, or until
the custards are firm. While they cool whip the whites to a stiff
_méringue_ with a little powdered sugar. When the custards are cold,
heap this upon the tops.


FANCY CAKES,

Macaroons, lady’s-fingers, or jumbles, should go around with the
custards.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  “Red Pottage.”
  Boiled Cod with Caper Sauce.      Scalloped Chicken.
  Mashed Potatoes, Browned.      Split Pea Pancakes.
  ——
  Queen of Puddings.
  ——


“RED POTTAGE.”

To the bean-stock set by on yesterday add a can of red tomatoes, cut
small, and two lumps of sugar, and simmer, set in boiling water for
fear of burning, until they are one mass of pulp. Strain through a
colander, add seasoning, and stir in a generous glass of claret which
was poured, two hours before, upon a sliced, deep-colored _beet_, warm
from the boil. Strain the juice from the beet by squeezing in a cloth.
Put a double-handful of fried bread into a tureen, and pour the soup
upon it.

This, if not “that same red pottage” for which poor hungry Esau—who
certainly came honestly, by hereditary right, by his love of “good
eating”—bartered his birthright, is yet very pretty and savory.


BOILED COD WITH CAPER SAUCE.

Sew the fish up neatly in a thin cloth and cook in boiling water,
fifteen minutes to the pound. Unwrap, lay upon a hot dish, and pour
over it the following sauce:

Put a cupful of boiling water into a saucepan, and stir in two
tablespoonfuls of butter, cut up in a heaping teaspoonful of flour.
Beat in, when thick, the whipped yolk of an egg, the juice of a lemon,
and twenty-four capers. Stir up well, cook half a minute, and take from
the fire.


SCALLOPED CHICKEN.

Clean, wash, and cut an old fowl to pieces. Put into a pot with four
quarts of cold water and cook _very_ slowly until tender. Take it out,
salt and pepper the broth, and put by for to-morrow’s soup, reserving
one cupful for your gravy.

Let the chicken cool, and cut—cleanly—into pieces an inch long by one
fourth that width. Put the gravy, well-seasoned, over the fire, thicken
with a tablespoonful of butter, cut up and rolled in flour; stir in the
chicken, and just before it boils, take from the fire, and beat in two
whisked eggs, with a little finely minced parsley. Strew the bottom
of a bake-dish with crumbs; pour in the chicken; cover with a deeper
coating of bread-crumbs; stick bits of butter over this, and bake,
covered, until bubbling hot; then brown delicately.


MASHED POTATOES—BROWNED.

Mash soft with milk and butter, season, and round into a heap upon
a greased pie-dish. Brown in a quick oven; glaze with butter; slip
carefully to a hot dish.


SPLIT PEA PANCAKES.

Soak a pint of split peas all night. Put on, in the morning, in cold
water and cook soft. Rub through a fine colander. While hot, stir in a
tablespoonful of butter, and season with pepper and salt. When quite
cold, beat in two eggs, a cupful of milk, and half a cupful of flour
in which has been sifted—twice—a quarter teaspoonful of soda and twice
as much cream-of-tartar. Beat hard and long, and fry as you would
griddle-cakes.


QUEEN OF PUDDINGS.

  1½ cups of sugar.
  5 eggs.
  2 cups of dry bread-crumbs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  2 teaspoonfuls vanilla, or other extract—Colgate’s, if you can get it.
  1 quart of fresh milk.
  ½ cup sweet fruit-jelly, or jam.

Cream butter and sugar and whip in the yolks. Soak the crumbs in the
milk and add next—then flavor. Pour into a buttered pudding-dish,
filling it two-thirds of the way to the top, and bake until well “set”
in the middle. Draw to the oven door, spread quickly with the jelly,
and this with a _méringue_ of the whites and half a cup of sugar. Shut
the oven and bake quickly until the _méringue_ begins to color. Eat
cold with cream.



  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Chicken Soup.
  Mayonnaise of Fish.      Veal Chops with Tomato Sauce.
  Potato Strips.      Macaroni and Eggs.
  ——
  Jelly Cake Fritters.
  ——


CHICKEN SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of the liquor in which your chicken was
boiled yesterday, and put on the soup to heat. Meanwhile, boil half a
cupful of rice tender in a pint of salted milk, and when the rice is
soft, stir in a tablespoonful of butter worked up in flour to prevent
oiling. When the soup boils up clear, skim and add the rice and milk,
with two tablespoonfuls of minced parsley. Pepper and salt to taste;
simmer ten minutes. Chop up three hard-boiled eggs fine; put into the
tureen and pour the soup upon them.


MAYONNAISE OF FISH.

  Yolks of 3 boiled eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of best oil.
  2 teaspoonfuls of sugar.
  6 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
  1 teaspoonful of salt, and half as much each of pepper and made mustard.
  White of 1 raw egg.
  2 cupfuls of cold boiled fish (yesterday’s cod).
  2 heads of lettuce.

Rub the yolks smooth with the oil, add sugar, salt, pepper, and
mustard, and, when all are mixed, the vinegar, a little at a time. Set
by, covered, while you cut—not chop—the fish into strips an inch long,
and shred the lettuce. Mix these in a bowl. Whip the frothed white of
egg into the dressing, and pour upon the salad. Stir up with a silver
fork and put into a glass dish. Garnish with rings of the whites of
boiled eggs.


VEAL CHOPS WITH TOMATO SAUCE.

Trim and flatten the chops. Dip in raw egg, then in cracker dust, and
fry, rather slowly, in lard or dripping. Open a can of tomatoes, and
drain off the liquor. Salt the rest of the tomatoes and reserve for
Friday’s soup. Put the liquor into a saucepan with a sliced onion, and
stew ten minutes. Strain out the onion, return the juice to the fire;
thicken with a great spoonful of butter, worked up in a teaspoonful of
corn-starch; pepper and salt. Boil up sharply, and when you have laid
the chops upon a dish, pour the sauce over them.


MACARONI WITH EGGS.

Break half a pound of macaroni into short bits; cook tender in boiling,
salted water. Drain well; put into a deep dish and pour over it a
cupful of drawn butter in which have been stirred two beaten eggs, and
two tablespoonfuls of grated cheese, with salt and pepper. Loosen the
macaroni to allow the sauce to penetrate the mass. Pass more grated
cheese with it.


POTATO STRIPS.

Pare, cut in long, even strips; lay in cold water for one hour; dry by
spreading them upon a towel and pressing another upon them. Fry to a
light brown in salted lard. Shake off the fat in a hot colander. Line
a deep dish with a napkin and put in the strips. They should not be
crowded in frying, but each should be distinct and free from the rest.


JELLY-CAKE FRITTERS.

Cut stale sponge or very plain cup cake into rounds with a cake-cutter.
Fry to a nice brown in sweet lard. Dip each round in _boiling_ milk,
to soften it and get rid of the grease. Lay upon a hot dish and spread
with sweet jelly or jam. Pile neatly one upon another. Send around hot,
sweetened cream to pour over them.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Graham Soup.
  Scalloped Oysters.      Stewed Sweetbreads, Brown.
  Moulded Potato.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Quaking Custard.
  ——


GRAHAM SOUP.

  2 onions.
  2 carrots.
  4 turnips.
  ½ cabbage.
  A little celery-seed tied in a thin muslin bag.
  The tomatoes set by yesterday.
  ½ cup raw rice.
  ½ cup of cream (with a pinch of soda added to prevent curdling).
  2 lumps of white sugar.
  Pepper, salt, and parsley.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter cut up in flour.
  3 quarts of cold water.

Chop the cabbage and slice the onions; pare and _grate_ the other
vegetables, and put over the fire with the rice, the bag of
celery-seed, and the water. Stew one hour; add the tomatoes and stew
twenty minutes more. Rub all to a pulp through a colander; return to
the soup-pot, season, and when it boils, stir in the butter. Heat the
cream to scalding in a separate vessel, and pour into the tureen. Stir
the soup into it by degrees, and serve. Pass Boston crackers—split and
buttered—with it.


SCALLOPED OYSTERS.

Butter a pudding-dish, and strew the bottom with rolled cracker. Wet
this with oyster-liquor and milk, slightly warmed. Then lay on oysters,
set closely together. Sprinkle with pepper, salt, and bits of butter,
with a few drops of lemon-juice. Another stratum of moistened crumbs,
and so on, until the dish is full. Let the top layer be of crumbs, with
butter dots here and there. Bake, covered, half an hour, then brown
quickly.


STEWED SWEETBREADS—BROWN.

  4 sweetbreads.
  1 cup of gravy (yesterday’s broth will do).
  1 onion.
  ½ cup butter.
  ½ pint of mushrooms.
  Pepper and salt.

Boil the sweetbreads quickly—ten minutes are enough—blanch by throwing
them into cold water, then leaving them to cool. Slice them lengthwise.
Slice, also, the onion and mushrooms, and fry brown in half the butter.
Strain them out, return the fat to the pan, with the rest of the
butter. Heat, and fry the sweetbreads. When the latter are done, put
all into a tin pail, with a tight top; add the gravy; set, covered, in
boiling water, and stew gently, at the side of the range, half an hour.
Arrange the sweetbreads upon a hot dish; thicken the gravy with browned
flour, and pour over them. Garnish with triangles of fried bread.


MOULDED POTATO.

Mash soft with butter and hot milk in which has been stirred a beaten
egg. Salt and put into a buttered cake or pudding mould. Set in a pan
of hot water, put on the lid of the mould, and keep the water at a
hard boil half an hour. Dip the mould in cold water, and turn out the
potatoes upon a flat dish.


LETTUCE.

Treat as directed upon last Sunday.


QUAKING CUSTARD.

  3 cups of milk.
  Yolks of 4 eggs, reserving the whites for the _méringue_.
  ½ package Cooper’s gelatine.
  6 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Vanilla flavoring.
  Juice of 1 lemon for _méringue_.

Soak the gelatine two hours in a cup of the cold milk. Then add to the
rest of the milk, which must be boiling hot, and stir until dissolved.
Let it stand a few minutes, and strain through muslin over the beaten
yolks and sugar. Put over the fire and stir five minutes, or until you
can feel it thickening. Stir up well when nearly cold, flavor, and let
it alone until it congeals around the edges of the bowl into which you
have poured it; then stir again, and put into a wet mould. Set upon
ice, or in cold water until firm. Turn it, when you are ready for it,
into a glass bowl. Have ready a _méringue_ made by whipping the whites
stiff with three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, and the lemon-juice.
Heap irregularly about the base.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Vermicelli Soup.
  Glazed Ham.      Spinach à la Parisienne.
  Chow-chow.      Baked Potatoes.
  ——
  Rhubarb Tart.
  ——


VERMICELLI SOUP.

  4 lbs. knuckle of veal.
  2 lbs. of coarse, lean beef.
  2 slices of corned ham, or some bones of salt pork.
  2 onions.
  Thyme and parsley.
  ¼ lb. vermicelli.
  Pepper and salt.
  6 quarts of water.

Crack the bones into splinters; cut the meat into strips; slice the
onions and chop the herbs. Put on in six quarts of water, and cook
slowly five hours. Strain, pressing meat, etc., hard in the colander.
There should be about four quarts of soup. Set aside half, when you
have salted it, for Sunday. Return the rest to the clean kettle, season
and skim. The vermicelli should have been broken small, and boiled in
a little hot, salted water, three minutes. Strain, without squeezing;
butter and pepper; stir into the soup; simmer very gently five minutes,
and pour out.


GLAZED HAM.

Wash a fine _corned_—not smoked—ham; soak all night in cold water,
and boil about eighteen minutes to the pound. There should be plenty
of water in the pot, cold at first, and brought gradually to a boil.
Skim well from time to time. Let it get cold in the water in which it
was boiled, if you can spare the time. _We_ always boil a ham the day
before it is to be eaten. Take it out; remove the skin carefully, and
put the latter back into the cold liquor when you have skimmed all the
fat—which makes excellent dripping—from the surface of the liquid.
Press soft paper on the top of the ham, to take off the clinging drops
of grease. Brush all over with beaten egg. Work a cup of rolled cracker
into a paste with warm milk, butter, pepper, salt, and a beaten egg.
Coat the ham thickly with this, and set to brown in a moderate oven.
Twist frilled paper around the knuckle, and garnish with cresses.


SPINACH À LA PARISIENNE.

Pick off the leaves from the stalks; put on in boiling water, a little
salt, and cook twenty minutes. Drain hard and dry, chop fine, return to
the fire with a good piece of butter, a teaspoonful of sugar, a little
nutmeg, pepper and salt, and stir two minutes. Then, beat in two or
three tablespoonfuls of cream, or rich milk, and whip as you would a
custard. It should be smooth to taste and sight. Boil up—barely—and
dish.


CHOW-CHOW

“Goes well,” as the French say, with ham.


BAKED POTATOES.

Parboil, peel, and lay in a dripping-pan, with a bit of butter upon
each. As they brown, put on each a teaspoonful of warm milk mixed with
butter, salt, and pepper. They should be of a light brown. Butter again
just before you dish them.


RHUBARB TART.

Scrape the stalks, cut into small bits, and stew in a very little
water. When tender, take from the fire and sweeten. Have ready some
open shells of pastry, freshly baked. Fill with the fruit, and sift
sugar on top. Eat warm or cold—never _hot_. Make more paste than you
need, and keep—raw—in a cold place.



  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Pea and Rice Soup.
  Fillet of Veal with Ham.      Potato Balls.
  Stuffed Cabbage.      French Beans.
  ——
  Charlotte Cachée.
  Bird’s Nest in Jelly.
  ——


PEA AND RICE SOUP.

Open a can of green peas, and turn them into a bowl for an hour.
Boil half a cup of rice soft in a cup of milk. Skim the stock made
yesterday, and heat to a boil before adding the peas (drained) and
the rice, which should have absorbed all the milk. Stew slowly half
an hour; add what seasoning you like, and stir in a tablespoonful of
butter cut up in flour. Simmer five minutes and pour out.


FILLET OF VEAL WITH HAM.

Have the fillet rolled and skewered by your butcher. Stuff a good
force-meat of crumbs and minced fat ham between the folds of meat,
and lay sliced ham over the top and sides, binding it in place with
packthread. Put into a dripping-pan with a cup of boiling water, and
roast twelve minutes for each pound. Baste very often. Half an hour
before you take it up, remove the ham, and lay on one side of the pan;
dredge the meat with flour and baste abundantly and frequently until
well browned. Dish with the ham cut into strips and laid next the edge
of the dish—the potato balls close to the meat. Send around sweet
pickles with it. Strain the gravy, thicken with browned flour, add
pepper and a tablespoonful of tomato catsup; boil up and pour into a
boat.


POTATO BALLS.

To one cup of mashed potato add a beaten egg, pepper, and salt, and
work smooth. Make into balls; roll them in flour. When the veal is
half done, skim off the fat from the gravy, lay the balls in the pan,
basting, now and then, and turning until they are browned all over.
Drain well, and lay about the dished veal.


STUFFED CABBAGE.

Boil a large, firm cabbage, whole, on Saturday, tying coarse net over
it to keep it in shape. Do not remove the net until next day. Then,
bind a broad strip of muslin about it that it may not crack in the
stuffing. Extract the stalk with a thin, sharp knife. Without making a
wide external aperture, “dig out” the heart, until you have room for
nearly a cupful of force-meat. Chop the bits you have taken out, mix
with cooked sausage-meat, a very little onion, pepper, salt, a pinch of
thyme and bread-crumbs. Stuff the cabbage with this, remove the band,
tie up firmly again in a net bag, and put it into a pot, covering with
the liquor in which your ham was boiled yesterday, having first again
skimmed the latter. Stew gently one hour. Take out the cabbage, unbind,
with care, and pour a cup of drawn butter over it. Strain the useful
“pot liquor,” and put away heedfully.


FRENCH BEANS.

Cut into short lengths, when you have poured off the can liquor; cook
half an hour in boiling water, salted. Drain well, stir up with a
tablespoonful of butter, with pepper and salt to taste.


CHARLOTTE CACHÉE.

  1 thick loaf of sponge or plain cup cake.
  2 kinds of fruit-jelly, tart and sweet.
  Whites of 5 eggs.
  1 heaping cup of powdered sugar.
  Juice of 1 lemon.

Cut the cake into horizontal slices of uniform width. Spread each
with jelly—first, the tart, then the sweet, and fit into their former
places. Ice thickly with a frosting made of the whites, sugar, and
lemon-juice. Set in a sunny window, or slow oven, to harden. The former
is the better plan.


BIRD’S NEST IN JELLY.

  1 quart of wine jelly—not too thin.
  3 cups of white blanc-mange.
  9 empty egg-shells.
  Rind of 2 oranges cut into strips and stewed in water, until tender,
          then in syrup until clear, or, if you have it, use preserved
          orange-peel.

Empty the eggs carefully through a hole in the small end; wash them out
with cold water, and while wet inside set firmly in a pan of bran or
meal, to keep them steadily upright. Fill them with blanc-mange. Next
morning, fill a glass dish two-thirds full with clear jelly, reserving
a large cupful. So soon as the jelly is firm enough to bear their
weight, break the shells, with care, from the blanc-mange eggs, and
pile them upon the jelly. Lay the “straw”—_i. e._, the orange-peel—over
and about them; pour the rest of the half congealed jelly over all, and
set in a _very_ cold place.

A beautiful variation of this dessert can be made for Easter Sunday, by
coloring part of the blanc-mange brown with chocolate, part pink with
currant jelly or cranberry juice, part yellow with yolk of egg, and
leaving the rest white.


  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Ham and Egg Soup.
  Veal Patés.      Creamed Parsnips.
  Salad of Lettuce and Veal.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Corn-Starch Hasty Pudding.
  ——


HAM AND EGG SOUP.

Skim once more and re-heat the liquor in which your ham was cooked,
and, when boiling, take off the scum; stir in two tablespoonfuls of
corn-starch, wet in a half cup of milk. Take out a pint of the soup,
and pour slowly, stirring well, upon four beaten eggs. Return to the
soup, with a handful of very finely minced parsley. Stir one minute,
without letting it boil, and pour upon half a dozen split Boston
crackers, lining the tureen.


VEAL PATÉS.

Chop up the meat left from Sunday’s fillet—reserving some for
salad—also the crisped ham. Season well, warm up the gravy, when you
have removed the fat; mix a little oyster liquor with it, and stir in
the mince. Heat _almost_ to boiling, and set by, covered, where it will
keep warm. Line _paté_-pans with the paste reserved for this purpose
from Saturday. If kept in the refrigerator or cool cellar, it will be
perfectly good. Bake these “shells,” buttering the tins well; slip out
while hot; arrange on a warm dish; fill with the mince, sprinkling the
top of each with fine, dry crumbs; set upon the upper grating of your
oven for a minute or so, and send to table.


CREAMED PARSNIPS.

Boil, scrape, and slice lengthwise. Have ready in a saucepan a great
spoonful of butter, with pepper and salt. Put in the parsnips, shake
and turn until very hot; lay the parsnips upon a dish; add to the
sauce three tablespoonfuls of cream, or four of milk, in which has
been rubbed a teaspoonful of flour. Boil up briskly, and pour over the
sliced vegetable.


SALAD OF LETTUCE AND VEAL.

Cut half a pound of your cold veal into inch-long strips, and strew
with salt and pepper. Shred a head of lettuce, and chop two boiled
eggs—not too finely. Mix these together in a bowl. Prepare a dressing
thus: Beat the yolks of two eggs (add the whites to the soup); salt
lightly, and beat in, a few drops at a time, four tablespoonfuls of
oil; then, as gradually, three teaspoonfuls of best vinegar, and half a
teaspoonful of celery essence—Colgate’s, if you can get it. The mixture
should be thick as cream. Pour over the meat and lettuce, toss up with
a silver fork, and transfer to a glass dish.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as often before directed.


CORN-STARCH HASTY PUDDING.

  1 quart of fresh milk.
  3 full tablespoonfuls of corn-starch.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.

Scald the milk, and stir in the corn-starch, previously wet in cold
water to a white liquid. Boil steadily, stirring constantly, ten
minutes. Salt and butter. Let the pudding stand three minutes in hot
water, after you take it from the fire, and turn out into a deep, open
dish. Cook, of course, in a farina-kettle.



  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Mélange Soup.
  Ragoût of Mutton.      Canned Corn Pudding.
  Baked Tomatoes.      Damson, or Plum Pickles.
  ——
  Peach Batter Pudding.
  ——


MÉLANGE SOUP.

  1 cup of rice (scant).
  3 lbs. of coarse, lean beef.
  Some mutton bones.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  1 onion.
  Essence of celery, two teaspoonfuls.
  Pepper and salt.
  4 quarts of cold water.
  1 cup of tomato-juice.

Cut the meat into dice, and put on in the water. Boil gently two hours,
when add the rice, tomato-juice, and the vegetables cut into small
squares, and already cooked five minutes in hot water, to take off
the rank taste. Stew half an hour, or until the vegetables and rice
are tender, but not a pulp; season; boil up once and pour out—meat,
vegetables, and all—into the tureen.


Ragoût of Mutton.

  3 lbs. of mutton—lean and boneless—cut into strips four inches long
          by one inch wide.
  1 cup of gravy, made of bones, etc.
  A tablespoonful of walnut catsup.
  Browned flour.
  Salt and pepper.
  1 slice of lemon.
  Parsley.
  A slice of ham or fat pork, cut small.
  Dripping.

Fry the mutton to a nice brown, quickly, in the dripping. Lay in a
saucepan, the chopped ham upon it, and cover with the gravy, highly
seasoned. Stew slowly until very tender; take up, and keep hot, while
you add the lemon to the gravy, with the catsup. Boil five minutes;
strain, and return the gravy to the saucepan. Thicken, and put in the
parsley minced fine. Boil up, and pour over the meat in a flat dish.
Put sippets of fried bread around the edge of the dish.


CANNED CORN PUDDING.

  1 can of corn, drained.
  3 eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  A little salt.
  2 cupfuls of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch, wet up in the milk.

Beat eggs, sugar, and butter together; then add the corn. Salt the
milk, and dissolve the corn-starch well in it, and pour, by degrees,
upon the rest, mixing well. Bake in a greased bake-dish three-quarters
of an hour. Keep covered until nearly done; then, brown.


BAKED TOMATOES.

Drain off the liquor from a can of tomatoes, and put it into your soup.
Pare the crust from some slices of bread, cut them to fit the bottom
of a greased pie-dish, and fry to a light brown in dripping. Dip each
in boiling, salted milk, fit to their places in the dish, pour the
tomatoes upon them, season with pepper, salt, butter, and a little
sugar. Strew thickly with crumbs, and bake, covered, twenty minutes;
then, brown.


PEACH BATTER PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  2 cups of prepared flour, or enough for _soft_ batter.
  4 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter, slightly warmed.
  1 saltspoonful of salt.
  1 can of peaches, drained.

Lay the drained peaches in a buttered bake-dish. Salt the flour, and
sift into a pan. Beat eggs and butter together, stir in the milk, and
pour, by degrees, into a hole in the middle of the flour, until you
have a smooth batter. Pour upon the peaches, and bake in a brisk oven.
Add a glass of brandy to the peach syrup; sweeten to taste; stir in two
tablespoonfuls of butter, and set in boiling water until the butter is
melted. Serve the pudding in the bake-dish and eat with this sauce.


  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Eel Soup.
  Boiled Chicken.      Potatoes à la Crème.
  Egg Sauce.      Rice Croquettes.
  ——
  Steamed Corn-Meal Pudding.
  ——


EEL SOUP.

  4 lbs. of eels.
  1 onion.
  12 whole peppers.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Tablespoonful of chopped parsley.
  1 cup of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of flour, rubbed into the butter.
  2 quarts of water.
  2 slices of toast cut into strips.
  Dripping.

Clean the eels with care, removing all the fat; cut them into short
pieces, and fry for five minutes in dripping. Drain, put into a
saucepan with the water, onion, and pepper, and stew slowly one hour,
or until they are tender, without breaking. Strain through a colander;
pick out the eels and cover in a tureen, the bottom of which is lined
with strips of buttered toast. Strain the soup, through a soup-sieve,
back into the saucepan; heat, and stir in butter, flour, and parsley.
Boil up, add the milk, already heated, and pour over the eels and toast.


BOILED CHICKEN.

Clean and stuff as for roasting. Bind legs and wings to the sides; tie
in a net, and put on in boiling water—if tender. If doubtful, use cold
water, and cook very slowly. When the fork-test shows that it is done,
unwrap and lay on a dish. Salt, pepper, and butter well, and cover
while preparing the sauce. Take out a cup of the liquor, cool, and
skim, put on in a saucepan; put in a tablespoonful of butter, rolled
in flour, and stir to a boil. Take off, and pour gradually over two
beaten eggs. Return to the fire, with minced parsley, _almost_ boil,
and pour over the fowl.

Salt the liquor and set aside for soup.


POTATOES À LA CRÈME.

Mash thin, whip up with a fork, at first, with butter, salt, and milk;
at last, with the frothed white of an egg. Heap roughly upon a dish,
set upon the upper grating of the oven until they begin to color, and
serve.


RICE CROQUETTES.

  2 cups cold boiled rice.
  2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of flour.
  1 raw egg, and some cracker dust.
  2 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar.
  A pinch of grated lemon peel, and the same of nutmeg.
  Lard for frying.

Work the butter into the rice, then the seasoning, lastly, the beaten
eggs. Make into long balls, roll in egg, then in powdered cracker, and
fry, a few at a time, in hot lard.


STEAMED CORN-MEAL PUDDING.

  2 cups Indian meal.
  1 cup of flour.
  2 tablespoonfuls of white sugar.
  2½ cups of “loppered” milk, or buttermilk.
  1 teaspoonful of soda, sifted twice through the flour.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  1 heaping tablespoonful of butter, melted.

Put meal, flour, salt, sugar, and soda in a bowl; mix thoroughly; make
a hole in the middle and work in the milk and butter. Beat hard and
long when all are in; put into a buttered mould with a tight top, and
steam one hour and a half. If you have no regular steamer, fit the
mould in the top of a pot of boiling water, taking care it does not
hang into the water. Lay a thick wet towel, folded, over the top of
the mould to keep in all the heat. Or, you may simply boil it. Eat hot,
with butter and sugar.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Cream Almond Soup.
  Beefsteak.      Chopped Potatoes.
  Chicken Salad.      Moulded Spinach.
  ——
  Soft Gingerbread and Chocolate.
  ——


CREAM ALMOND SOUP.

  Broth in which yesterday’s chickens were boiled.
  ½ lb. of almonds.
  1 cup rich milk—half cream, if you can get it.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, rubbed up with two of flour.
  Pepper and salt.
  3 boiled eggs.
  2 blades of mace.

Skim and heat the soup. Meanwhile, blanch (that is, scald and skin)
the almonds, and pound in a mortar. Rub to a powder the yolks of three
hard-boiled eggs, and work up, with the butter, flour, and almonds, to
a paste. When the soup boils, pepper and salt, and put in the mace.
Skim clean, strain out the mace; return to the pot and stir in the
paste of almonds, etc. Boil up gently, have the milk scalding hot in
the tureen, and pour in the soup, mixing all up well. Serve at once.


BEEFSTEAK.

Flatten with the broad side of a hatchet; broil over (or under) a clear
fire upon a buttered gridiron—turning often. Lay upon a hot dish; salt,
pepper, and butter, plentifully. Cover with a hot dish or lid, and let
it stand five minutes to draw out the juices.


CHOPPED POTATOES.

Chop cold boiled potatoes into dice. Put some butter or nice dripping
into a frying-pan; heat, and stir in the potatoes. Shake to prevent
them from sticking to the pan, and when very hot, and glazed with the
butter, pepper and salt, and turn into a hot colander. Shake and toss
for a moment, and pour into a deep dish.


CHICKEN SALAD.

Cut the meat from the “carcasses” of yesterday’s chickens. If you have
but a little it may be worth while to give John a piquant side-dish.
Add an equal quantity of shred lettuce, when you have cut your chicken
into narrow strips, two inches long. Mix in a bowl; prepare a dressing
according to the receipt given on Monday; pour over it, mix well and
lightly; put into a salad-dish, and lay sections of two hard-boiled
eggs on top, with a chain of sliced whites—left from the yolks used for
the soup—around the outer edge.


MOULDED SPINACH.

Boil twenty minutes in hot, salted water; drain, pressing hard. Chop
_fine_, and put into a saucepan, with a good lump of butter, a little
pepper, salt and sugar. Beat and toss until nearly dry. Press hard into
an oblong pan or mould. Invert this upon a hot dish. Lay slices of egg
upon the top.


SOFT GINGERBREAD.

  1 cup of sugar.
  1 cup of molasses.
  1 cup of butter.
  1 cup of sweet milk.
  4 cups of flour.
  4 eggs.
  1 tablespoonful mixed ginger and mace.
  1 small teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk.

Beat molasses, butter, sugar, and spice to a cream; whip in the beaten
yolks, the milk, and lastly, the whites, alternately with the flour.
Bake in two loaves, or in round tins or cups.


CHOCOLATE.

  6 tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate.
  2 cups of boiling water and the same of milk.

Wet the chocolate in cold water; stir into the hot. Boil fifteen
minutes; add the milk, and simmer ten minutes longer. Sweeten upon the
fire, or as you pour it out.



  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Oyster Soup.
  Fillets of Halibut.      Potato Marbles.
  Paté of Sweetbreads.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Boston Cream Cakes.
  ——


OYSTER SOUP.

  2 quarts of oysters.
  1 quart of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 teacupful of water.
  2 eggs.
  Cayenne pepper, salt, mace.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch.

Strain the liquor from the oysters into a saucepan, mixing in the
water. Season and spice to taste. When the liquor boils, add a quarter
of the oysters chopped fine. Boil five minutes; strain through muslin
and put back into the saucepan. Thicken with the butter rubbed up in
a tablespoonful of corn-starch. When this boils, drop in the whole
oysters. Cook until they “ruffle.” Meanwhile, make a sugarless custard
by heating and salting the milk, adding the beaten eggs, and stirring
four minutes over the fire. Put some split crackers into the tureen;
pour on the custard, then the oyster-soup, stirring all up well. Send
around oyster crackers and sliced lemon with it.


FILLETS OF HALIBUT.

Cut a tolerably thick halibut steak into strips four inches long by
two wide. Put three tablespoonfuls of butter, with pepper and salt,
into a saucepan, and simmer gently—not frying—until tender. Then
drain, and put upon a hot water dish to keep hot. Cut some potatoes
into small balls. There is a little instrument for this purpose, like
a rounded gouge, which turns them out rapidly and neatly. A _small_
iron spoon will give you oval balls. Or, if you find it easier, cut
the potatoes into equal cubes; lay in cold water half an hour, then
cook fifteen minutes in boiling water. Drain and dry, and after taking
your fish from the butter, strain the latter, put in the potatoes, and
shake over a hot fire until they begin to brown. Drain, and lay about
the fish-fillets. Add a tablespoonful of butter to that in the pan
(previously cut up in flour), a teaspoonful of anchovy-sauce, and the
juice of a lemon, with a little minced parsley. Boil once, and pour
over fish and potatoes.


PATÉ OF SWEETBREADS.

Cut good puff-paste into rounds a quarter of an inch thick. Reserve one
of these for the bottom of each paté. With a smaller cutter take out
the centre of three others and pile upon this, making a deep well over
an inch across. Bake quickly, glazing with white of egg when nearly
done.

Boil three sweetbreads ten minutes, leave in cold water as long; cut
into dice, put into a saucepan with a great spoonful of butter, a
little pepper and salt, and a few spoonfuls of boiling water, and
stew twenty minutes. Stir, meanwhile, into half a cup of boiling
milk a tablespoonful of butter, cut up in as much flour. Add to the
sweetbreads with a little minced parsley. Boil up. Fill the patés, and
arrange upon a heated dish.


LIMA BEANS.

If dried, soak over night, put on next day in cold water, salted,
and cook gently until soft. Drain, stir in butter and pepper. If you
use the canned beans, put on in boiling water, then proceed as above
directed.


BOSTON CREAM CAKES.

  ½ lb. of butter.
  ¾ lb. of flour.
  6 eggs.
  1 pint water—warm—not scalding.

Stir the butter into the warm water, and heat slowly to a boil. Then
put in the flour, boil and stir one minute; empty into a dish to get
cold. Beat the eggs light, and whip, first the yolks, then the whites,
into the cooled paste. Drop in great spoonfuls, upon buttered paper,
not letting them touch each other, and bake, in a quick oven, ten
minutes. They should puff up to quadruple their original size. Pass a
sharp knife lightly around each, split, and fill with the following
mixture:

  1 quart of milk.
  4 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch.
  2 eggs.
  2 cups of sugar.
  1 teaspoonful butter.
  Vanilla.

Heat three cups of milk, and stir in the corn-starch wet with the other
cupful. Beat the eggs and sugar together, and add the boiling mixture,
by degrees. Put in the butter; mix well and cool before adding the
vanilla.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Soup Verte.
  Baked Mutton Cutlets.      Hominy Pudding.
  Potato Cakes.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Tapioca Pudding.
  ——


SOUP VERTE.

  2 lbs. coarse beef, chopped fine.
  1 turnip.
  1 onion.
  Celery-seed tied in a bag.
  1 grated carrot.
  Nearly a quart of spinach leaves.
  2 lumps of sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter, rubbed in flour.
  Bunch of parsley.
  Pepper and salt.
  A little of yesterday’s pastry, cut into strips—like “noodles.”
  2 quarts of cold water.

Stew the beef with the celery-seed in a quart of water for two hours,
or until the meat is in rags. Strain _hard_ in a bag. Add the other
quart of water in which have been simmering, for half an hour, the
grated carrot, the spinach cut small, and the other vegetables sliced.
Stew all together fifteen minutes; rub _entirely_ through a colander;
return to the fire, season; add sugar, chopped parsley, butter and
flour; boil up and drop in the noodles, one by one. Simmer ten minutes,
and pour out. It is a very good and wholesome soup for the spring-time.


BAKED MUTTON CUTLETS.

Trim neatly and put the bits of bone, skin, etc., on in a pint of cold
water to stew down into gravy. Pour a little melted butter upon the
cutlets and set over hot water, fifteen minutes. Then dip each in egg,
next in rolled cracker, and lay in your dripping-pan with a very little
water. Bake rapidly, basting with butter and water. When the gravy has
boiled down to one cupful, strain into a saucepan; season with pepper,
salt, and tomato catsup. Thicken with browned flour; strain into it the
gravy from the dripping-pan; lay the chops carefully in a frying-pan,
as being broad and easily managed. Pour over them the gravy, simmer ten
minutes; arrange the chops upon a dish, and serve the gravy in a boat.


HOMINY PUDDING.

  1 cupful cold boiled hominy—the small-grained kind.
  2 cups of milk.
  1 great spoonful of melted butter.
  1 teaspoonful of white sugar.
  3 eggs.
  A little salt.

Work the butter into the hominy; then the beaten yolks and sugar; then,
by degrees, the milk, and when all are smoothly mixed, the whites. Bake
in a buttered pudding-dish.


POTATO CAKES.

Make cold mashed potatoes into flat cakes, seasoning well, and flouring
all over. Fry to a good brown in dripping. Take up and drain as soon as
they are done, and serve hot.


LETTUCE.

Wash and pile the best parts in a salad-dish. Pass oil, vinegar,
pepper, salt, and powdered sugar to each one and let him season for
himself. It is well to do this, once in a while, that the children may
learn how to prepare their own salad.


TAPIOCA PUDDING.

  1 cup of tapioca.
  1 quart of milk.
  5 eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, and the same of sugar.

Soak the tapioca in cold water three hours; drain off the water, if
it be not all absorbed. Soak another hour in the warmed milk. Then,
beat eggs and sugar up with the butter, add the milk and tapioca, stir
up well from the bottom, after it goes into the oven, and bake in a
buttered pudding-dish until firm and nicely browned. Eat warm with
sweet sauce. It is also good cold, eaten with sugar and cream.


  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Calf’s Head Soup.
  Imitation Turtle.      Chopped Macaroni.
  Bermuda Potatoes.    String-Beans and Fried Brains.
  ——
  Alice’s Pudding.
  Coffee and Whipped Cream.
  ——


CALF’S HEAD SOUP.

  The liquor in which a calf’s head has been boiled.
  1 lb. of lean beef cut into dice and fried brown.
  3 sliced and fried onions.
  1 grated carrot.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter rubbed warm into the same quantity of
          browned flour.
  1 tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce.
  1 glass brown sherry.
  Dice of meat from the head.
  Pepper and salt.

Boil a calf’s head on Saturday until the flesh slips from the bones.
Salt and pepper the meat and set away, with the brains—also salted
and cooked—in a cool place. Return the bones to the liquor with the
vegetables and herbs cut small, the fried beef and onions, and boil
one hour. Season highly and put by in a cool cellar until Sunday. Take
off the fat, and melt the soup-jelly under it by heating all together
in a soup-kettle. When hot, strain, and set aside half the stock for
Monday. Boil up that meant for to-day, stir in the butter and flour,
and a cupful of dice made from one cheek of the cold head. Simmer ten
minutes, add sauce and wine, and pour out.


IMITATION TURTLE.

  The cold calf’s head, with the tongue.
  1 cup of good gravy. If you have nothing else, borrow a cupful from
          your soup-jelly.
  A dozen force-meat balls, made of the ears chopped fine, mixed with
          bread-crumbs, bound with beaten egg and rolled in flour.
  1 teaspoonful minced parsley and thyme.
  A little minced onion.
  Browned flour.
  4 hard-boiled eggs.
  Pepper and salt.

Slice the meat from the head neatly. Heat the gravy with seasoning,
herbs, and onion, and boil ten minutes. Strain; put the meat into the
saucepan; pour the gravy over it, and set all in boiling water fifteen
minutes. Put over the fire with the sliced eggs and force-meat balls.
Let them begin to boil, and take off. Lay the meat evenly upon a dish,
and the eggs upon it, the force-meat balls around all, and pour half
the gravy over it, sending up the rest in a boat.


CHOPPED MACARONI.

Boil half a pound of macaroni tender in hot salted water, and let it
cool. Then chop small. Have ready in a saucepan a cupful of hot milk in
which an onion has been boiled and strained out. Stir into this a great
spoonful of butter, pepper, salt, and two tablespoonfuls of grated
cheese. When these are well mixed, put in the macaroni, and shake—not
stir—until very hot. Turn into a deep dish, and grate more cheese on
the top. Pass a red-hot shovel over this until the cheese browns—or if
dry, takes fire. Blow it out, and serve.


STRING-BEANS AND FRIED BRAINS.

Cut the beans into short lengths and cook in boiling water salted.
Drain, stir in butter, pepper, and salt, and dish. Garnish with the
brains, rubbed smooth, seasoned, beaten up with a raw egg and a little
flour, and fried by the spoonful in hot fat.


BERMUDA POTATOES.

Put on in boiling water; cook until a fork will go in easily; dry off,
and serve in their skins.


ALICE’S PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 eggs.
  1 cup dry crumbs.
  ½ cup of strawberry or other sweet jam.
  ½ cup of sugar.

Sprinkle the bottom of a buttered bake-dish with crumbs. Pour in the
jam, and cover this with the rest of the crumbs, wet with a little
milk. Scald the remainder of the milk, and pour, gradually, upon the
beaten eggs and sugar. Heat and stir three minutes; put it, spoonful by
spoonful, upon the crumbs, so as not to displace them, and when all is
in, bake until well set and slightly colored by the heat. Eat cold—with
cream, if you can get it.


COFFEE AND WHIPPED CREAM.

Whip a little cream in a syllabub churn, and lay a spoonful upon the
surface of each cup of made coffee.



  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  A Good White Soup.
  Ham and Eggs.      Succotash.
  Oyster Salad.      Stewed Potatoes.
  ——
  Plain Macaroni Pudding.
  ——


A GOOD WHITE SOUP.

Skim the stock set aside yesterday; heat and season, then strain
through thin muslin, and return to the fire. Skim again; add a great
spoonful of butter, cut up in flour, and boil up. Have ready in your
tureen a cupful of hot milk, in which has been soaked half a cupful of
bread-crumbs; beat into these the whites of two eggs; pour in the soup,
by degrees, stirring in well, and serve.


HAM AND EGGS.

Cut slices of ham of equal size; cover with boiling water, and cook ten
minutes, then let them get cold. Cut off the rind and fry in their own
fat, until browned. Lay upon a hot dish; strain the fat, returning it
to the pan with a little butter, and when hot break in the eggs. Fry
upon one side; trim off the ragged edges, and lay upon the ham. Dust
with pepper, and serve.


SUCCOTASH.

Open a can of succotash; drain off the liquor, cut the beans into short
lengths, and put on in boiling water, salted. Cook twenty-five minutes;
drain off the water, and add as much cold milk. When this is hot, stir
in a great spoonful of butter, cut up in flour; pepper and salt, cook
three minutes more and serve.


OYSTER SALAD.

Cut the oysters into thirds; pull the hearts out of nice lettuce heads
and shred up one-third as much as you have oysters. Make a dressing in
the proportion of two tablespoonfuls of best oil to four of vinegar;
one teaspoonful of salt and the same of sugar; half as much pepper, and
made mustard. Rub all up well, and pour over oysters and lettuce just
before serving.


STEWED POTATOES.

Cut into small squares and put on in boiling water, slightly salted.
When tender, but not broken, throw off half the water, and proceed as
with the succotash, only adding a teaspoonful of finely minced parsley.


PLAIN MACARONI PUDDING.

  ½ lb. macaroni, broken in pieces an inch long, boiled tender (or
          about twenty minutes) in hot, salted water.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 large cup of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar.
  2 eggs.
  Grated peel of half a lemon.
  A little cinnamon and salt.

When the macaroni is tender, drain off the water and add the salt
and butter. Heat the milk and pour over the beaten eggs, sugar and
flavoring. Mix with the macaroni, and bake in a buttered pudding-dish,
covered, for half an hour; then brown. Eat with butter and sugar.



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Pot-au-feu.
  Boiled Leg of Mutton.      Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.
  Stewed Pie-Plant.      Caper Sauce.
  ——
  Peach Lèche Crèma.
  ——


POT-AU-FEU.

  3 lbs. of lean beef, cut into dice.
  1 sliced and fried onion.
  2 carrots, cut into small squares.
  2 turnips, ditto.
  1 bunch of sweet herbs, minced.
  2 potatoes, parboiled and sliced.
  Pepper and salt.
  3 quarts of water.

Put on the beef in two quarts of water and cook slowly until it is
tender, and the water reduced to one quart. Put the vegetables—except
the potatoes—on in boiling water. Cook ten minutes; throw away the
water and cover with a quart of cold. Add the potatoes; pepper and salt
and cook gently half an hour. Put in the meat and the quart of gravy
and simmer ten minutes more, with the minced herbs. Then pour out. This
is only a family soup, but is a good one when properly cooked.


BOILED LEG OF MUTTON.

Do not have the shank too long, nor cut it so short as to make the leg
“chunky.” The meat will look cleaner and less sodden if you boil it in
a piece of mosquito net or tarlatan, sewed about it somewhat tightly.
Put on in boiling salted water, plenty of it, and cook fifteen minutes
to the pound. Unwrap and lay upon a hot dish. Butter all over, and
sprinkle lightly with salt. Twist frilled paper about the end of the
shank.


CAPER SAUCE.

Take out a cupful of the liquor in which the mutton was boiled
(putting away the rest for soup), strain, heat, and skim; stir in two
tablespoonfuls of butter rubbed in a teaspoonful of flour; pepper, boil
up, pour upon a beaten egg; return to the fire and stir for a minute;
add two dozen capers or nasturtium-seed, and pour into a sauce-boat.
Pass, of course, with the mutton.


POTATOES À LA LYONNAISE.

Parboil the potatoes, and cut into dice. Chop a small onion and mince a
tablespoonful of parsley. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter or excellent
dripping into a frying-pan, and when hot, stir in potatoes, onion, and
parsley. Shake and toss until all are hissing hot, but do not let them
brown. Shake off the fat in a hot colander, and serve in a deep dish.


STEWED PIE-PLANT.

Skin and wash the stalks, and cut into half inch lengths. Stew tender
in a little water, with a handful of seedless raisins. Sweeten to
taste. Eat cold with meat.


PEACH LÈCHE CRÈMA.

  1 can of peaches.
  Yolks of 3 eggs and whites of four.
  3 cups of milk.
  ½ cup of powdered sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.

Scald the milk; stir in the corn-starch wet with cold milk, and cook,
still stirring, until it begins to thicken. Take from the fire, and
beat in the butter, then the whipped yolks, two whites and sugar.
Whisk to a light cream. Drain the syrup from the peaches; lay them in
the bottom of a bake-dish, and pour the mixture gently over them. Bake
in a quick oven ten minutes, then spread with a _méringue_ of four
whites whisked stiff with a little sugar. Shut up in the oven until
this is slightly tinged. Eat warm with sauce, or cold with cream.



  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Scotch Broth.
  Mutton Pie.      Stewed Tomatoes.
  Cabbage Salad.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Lemon Puffs.
  ——


SCOTCH BROTH.

Take the fat from the top of the broth in which the mutton was boiled
yesterday. Chop up an onion, a good sized one, and put in it. Boil half
an hour and strain. Add a cup of barley, previously soaked two hours
in cold water, and cook for two hours more. Chop up some parsley fine
and add. When the barley is very soft, and the broth has boiled down
one-half, pour out and serve, having peppered to taste.


MUTTON PIE.

Cut the meat from yesterday’s mutton, into strips two inches long by
half an inch wide. Chop a pickled cucumber to pieces, also two boiled
eggs. Put a layer of meat in a bake-dish, strew with pickle and egg;
salt and pepper and drop, pretty thickly, over it, bits of butter
rolled in flour. Go on in this order, until your meat is used up, when
pour in a cup of oyster-liquor or cold water. Cover with a good crust,
ornamented around the edges; make a slit in the middle, and bake one
hour.

N. B.—The bare bones will “help out” to-morrow’s soup.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Receipts for these, as also for plain mashed potatoes, have been given
so lately that repetition here is needless.


CABBAGE SALAD.

  1 small, firm white cabbage, shred fine.
  1 cup of boiling milk.
  1 smaller cup of vinegar, also hot.
  1 tablespoonful of butter, and the same of sugar.
  2 eggs, well beaten.
  1 teaspoonful essence of celery.
  Pepper and salt to taste.

When the vinegar boils, put in butter, sugar, and seasoning. Boil,
and add the shred cabbage. When this is scalding hot, take from the
fire. Pour the hot milk upon the eggs, and cook one minute, stirring
constantly. Turn the cabbage into a bowl, pour over it the smoking
custard, toss up and mix well, and set it, covered, in ice-cold water.
Eat perfectly cold.


LEMON PUFFS.

  1 cup of prepared flour.
  ½ cup of powdered sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  3 eggs—whites and yolks beaten separately.
  Grated peel of 1 lemon.
  3 tablespoonfuls of milk.
  A little salt.

Cream butter and sugar, whip in the yolks, milk, and lemon-peel; then,
the whisked whites and flour, alternately. Bake in small, buttered
tins, or in “gem” pans. Turn out while hot, and eat with sweet sauce.


  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Soup à la Bonne Femme.
  Corned Beef.      Mashed Turnips.
  Scalloped Cauliflower.      Fried Potatoes.
  ——
  Orange Cream Pie.
  ——


SOUP À LA BONNE FEMME.

  Bones of cold mutton, cracked.
  2 lbs. of lean veal from the knuckle, bones broken, and meat cut up.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, rubbed in flour.
  ½ cup of raw rice.
  ½ cup of milk.
  1 onion, chopped.
  3 eggs.
  Minced parsley.
  Salt and pepper.
  3 quarts of water.

Put bones, meat, onion, and rice on in the cold water, and cook slowly
three hours. Strain, rubbing the rice and onion to a pulp, through a
coarse sieve. Season, boil up, skim, and stir in parsley and butter.
Heat the milk, pour upon the beaten eggs, and add to the soup, stirring
in well. Let it _almost_ boil, and take from the fire. Pour out, and
serve at once.


CORNED BEEF.

Wash the beef well, put on in plenty of boiling water, and cook at
least eighteen minutes to the pound, if the piece be tolerably thick.
Put away the liquor for to-morrow. Dish the meat. Make a sauce as
directed on Tuesday, for mutton, but substituting pickled cucumber,
chopped, and a very little pickled onion, for the capers. Serve in a
boat.


MASHED TURNIPS.

At this season the yellow turnips are best. Put on, when you have pared
and quartered them, in cold water, salted, and cook tender. Mash, and
press out the water; stir in a good piece of butter; pepper and salt to
taste, and dish very hot.


SCALLOPED CAULIFLOWER.

The cauliflowers in market now are less nice than those to be had
earlier, or later in the year. Still, you can get them, now and then.
Boil, tied in a net, in hot water. Clip into neat clusters, and
set, stems downward, in a buttered bake-dish. Beat up a cupful of
bread-crumbs to a soft paste with two tablespoonfuls of melted butter,
and four of milk. Season with pepper and salt, and whip in a raw egg.
Butter, salt, and pepper the cauliflower, and pour the mixture over
it. Cover closely, and bake ten minutes, or until very hot, in a brisk
oven; then brown lightly and rapidly.


FRIED POTATOES.

Wash, pare, and slice round, very thin. Leave in cold water one hour;
wipe, by spreading upon one towel, and pressing another upon it, and
fry, not too many at a time, in boiling lard, salted. Cook quickly,
take out with a wire spoon, and shake in a hot colander. Serve in a
deep dish lined with a hot napkin.


ORANGE CREAM PIE.

  1 teacup of powdered sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 egg.
  1 orange—juice and half the grated peel soaked together, for half
          an hour, then squeezed in a muslin bag.
  1 teacupful boiling water.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch, dissolved in cold water.
  Pulp of half an orange.

Stir the corn-starch into the water; cream the butter and sugar, and
pour over them the hot mixture. Cool, and add the orange and beaten
egg. Take the inner rind from the half-orange, remove the seeds, and
chop _very_ fine. Bake in open shells.


  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  “Peas Porridge Hot.”
  Baked Shad.      Miroton of Beef.
  Spinach with Eggs.      Cresses.
  ——
  Ambushed Trifle.
  ——


“PEAS PORRIDGE HOT.”

Soak a quart of split peas all night. In the morning put on in the
liquor from your corned beef, with a sliced onion and a little
celery-seed, tied in thin muslin. The liquor should be skimmed and
poured cold upon the peas. Cook slowly, until these are soft enough
to pulp through a colander. Rub them; if the soup be very salt, add
hot water; pepper to taste; boil up, and stir in a cup of hot milk, in
which have been dissolved two tablespoonfuls of corn-starch, wet up in
water, and a tablespoonful of butter. Add minced parsley; simmer two
minutes; have a double handful of fried bread dice in the tureen, and
pour on the soup.


BAKED SHAD.

Clean, wash, and wipe a large shad. Stuff with a dressing of
bread-crumbs, butter, salt, and pepper, wet with milk, and sew up
carefully with fine cotton. Lay in the dripping-pan; pour over it a
cupful of hot water, and bake one hour, covered, except when you are
basting it with butter and water. Put into a hot dish, and keep warm,
while you add to the gravy a teaspoonful of anchovy sauce, the juice of
a lemon, a tablespoonful of browned flour, wet up with cold water, and
pepper. Boil up well, and serve in a boat. Garnish the fish with sliced
lemon, and pass the cress-salad with it.


MIROTON OF BEEF.

Chop your cold corned beef fine. Have ready in a saucepan a cup of
drawn butter, into which stir a teaspoonful of minced onion, the yolk
of a boiled egg, pounded, and a beaten raw egg. Boil gently three
minutes, and add the mince of beef. Stir until hot, but not boiling;
pour into a bake-dish; spread with a cover of mashed potatoes, into
which have been worked half a cup of milk and a great spoonful of
butter. Brown in a good oven, and glaze with butter, when it begins to
color well. Serve in the dish. It is very good.


CRESSES.

Pick over, wash, and cut into small pieces. Pile in a salad-bowl, and
season with vinegar, salt, pepper, and a little sugar, mixing in well.


SPINACH WITH EGGS.

Cut the leaves from the stems, and cook twenty minutes in boiling,
salted water. Drain and chop _very_ fine upon a board or chopping-tray.
Return to the fire with a good spoonful of butter, a teaspoonful of
sugar; salt and pepper to taste. Heat, stirring constantly and beat in
the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, rubbed to a fine powder. When well
mixed, turn the spinach into a deep dish and garnish with a chain of
sliced whites laid on top.


AN AMBUSHED TRIFLE.

  A round, stale sponge-cake.
  1 pint of milk.
  1 teaspoonful of corn-starch.
  1 cup of sweet jelly or jam.
  3 eggs.
  Vanilla flavoring.
  2 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar.
  A little salt.

Cut the top carefully from the cake in one piece. Scoop out the
inside of the loaf, leaving side-walls and bottom an inch thick. Coat
these with the jelly. Heat the milk; beat eggs and sugar, with the
cake-crumbs, and pour on the hot milk. Stir over the fire until thick,
and add the corn-starch wet up with cold milk. Cook one minute and turn
out. When cold, flavor and fill the cake with it. Coat the inside of
the lid with jelly, and fit into its place; brush the whole cake with
white of egg, sift powdered sugar over it, and set in a cool, dry place
until wanted.



  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Clam Soup.
  Beefsteak.      Scalloped Tomatoes and Corn.
  Whole Bermuda Potatoes.      Made Mustard.
  ——
  Boiled Custards.
  ——


CLAM SOUP.

Strain the liquor from the clams, add one-third as much water, bring
to a slow boil, skim and strain. Then put in the clams, chopped, with
pepper and salt. Stew half an hour, and stir in two great spoonfuls
of butter rolled in cracker-dust, one teaspoonful essence of celery
(Colgate’s), and the juice of a lemon. Simmer ten minutes, have ready
in your tureen a cup of scalding milk, slightly salted. Pour upon this
the soup, stirring up well.


BEEFSTEAK.

Cook according to receipt given on Thursday of Second Week in this
month. If you use the “Vertical Broiler,” manufactured by the Dover
Stamping Company, 88 North Street, Boston, you will save every drop of
gravy, and be spared the trouble of watching and turning the steak.—See
FAMILIAR TALK, “Touching Saucepans.”


SCALLOPED TOMATOES AND CORN.

Open a can of corn; drain, and cook twenty minutes in boiling water,
salted. Throw off the water; cover the bottom of a bake-dish with fine
crumbs; put in a layer of corn, butter, pepper, and salt; upon this
a layer of canned tomatoes; butter and pepper, and sprinkle with a
little sugar. Go on in this order until the dish is full. Cover with
bread-crumbs; stick bits of butter over them, and bake, covered, half
an hour. Brown and serve in the dish.


WHOLE BERMUDA POTATOES.

Pick out those of uniform size; put on in boiling water, salted
slightly, and cook until a fork will pierce the largest. Turn off the
water; set back on the range to “dry off;” lay a napkin, heated and
neatly folded, upon a dish. Pare the potatoes quickly by pulling off
their skins, and heap upon the napkin.


BOILED CUSTARDS.

  1 quart of milk.
  Yolks of 5 eggs and the whites of two—reserving three for the
          _méringue_.
  6 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  2 teaspoonfuls bitter almond or vanilla flavoring.

Heat the milk; beat yolks and two whites light, and pour the milk upon
them. Return to the fire and cook, stirring all the while, until the
custard begins to thicken. Let it cool. Season and put into glass cups.
Whip the whites to a _méringue_ with a little powdered sugar, and heap
upon the top of each.



  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Ox Head Soup.
  Roast Breast of Mutton.      Hominy Fritters.
  Currant Jelly.      Lettuce Salad.
  Browned Potatoes.
  ——
  Pine Apple Ambrosia.
  ——


OX HEAD SOUP.

  1 ox head, well cleaned.
  2 grated carrots.
  2 turnips.
  2 onions.
  1 dozen whole allspice, and the same of whole peppers.
  1 bunch sweet herbs, chopped.
  Browned flour.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 tablespoonful Worcestershire Sauce.
  1 glass of sherry.
  5 quarts of water.
  Small bag of celery seed.

Soak the head two hours in cold, salted water. Wash well, and put on
in cold water, with the vegetables and herbs. Cover, bring slowly to a
boil, and cook four hours. Then, take out the meat of the head; salt
well, and set away in a cool place. Salt and pepper the soup, and set
by in an earthenware crock, leaving in the bones and vegetables. Do
this on Saturday.

On Sunday, take off the fat and heat the soup. Strain, first through a
colander, rubbing the vegetables to a pulp, then through a sieve, back
into the kettle. Cut the meat into dice and drop in; season with sauce
and wine, and having let it barely boil, pour out.

There should be enough for two days. In setting aside Monday’s portion,
make an equal distribution of meat and broth.


ROAST BREAST OF MUTTON.

Sew up in a thin cloth and boil ten minutes to the pound. (Take care
of the broth for gravy.) When unwrapped, lay in a dripping-pan, wash
well with butter, dredge with flour, and set in the oven half an
hour, basting freely with its own broth, and lastly with butter. A
few minutes before taking it up, strew thickly with crumbs—fine and
dry—pepper these, and drop dots of butter over it. Brown, and dish.
Garnish with sliced beet-root and cresses.


HOMINY FRITTERS.

  2 cups cold boiled hominy—small-grained.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of cream.
  2 beaten eggs.
  ½ teaspoonful soda dissolved in vinegar.
  A little salt.

Rub the sugar and salt into the hominy; wet with the milk, and when
smooth beat in the whipped eggs. Drop by the spoonful into boiling
fat, and fry quickly. Drain in a hot colander. Everything depends upon
beating and cooking. The soda should go in last of all the ingredients,
and be whipped in hard.


BROWNED POTATOES.

Mash soft, with butter and milk; mound smoothly upon a greased plate
and brown in a quick oven, glazing with butter. Slip to a hot flat dish.


LETTUCE SALAD.

Pull out the hearts and pick them apart. Heap loosely in a salad-bowl,
and season, first sprinkling lightly with powdered sugar—with oil,
vinegar, salt and pepper. Toss up with a silver fork; lay cold-boiled
eggs, cut into sixths, lengthwise, upon the top.


PINE-APPLE AMBROSIA.

  1 pine-apple, pared and cut into small squares.
  1 cocoanut, pared and grated.
  1 cup powdered sugar.
  1 large glass good sherry or Marsala.

Put a layer of pine-apple in a glass bowl; strew with sugar, and wet
with wine. Next, put a stratum of cocoanut, and sprinkle more sparsely
with sugar. More pine-apple, sugar, and wine, and continue to add
layers in the order given. The top coating must be of cocoanut. Eat
soon, or the pine-apple will wither in the wine and become tough. Pass
light cake with it.


  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Next Day Soup.
  Pilau of Mutton.      Green Peas.
  Cheese Fondu.      Sweet Pickles.
  ——
  Farina Hasty Pudding with Sauce.
  ——


NEXT DAY SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of the cold soup set by on Sunday; heat it
almost to the boil, and pour out. It is better for the second and third
warming up. Save every drop that is left over.


PILAU OF MUTTON.

Cut your cold roast into neat strips an inch long. Make a gravy of the
cracked bones and skin, hard bits, etc., and a pint of water. While
it is stewing down one-half, skim the liquor in which the meat was
parboiled; put it over the fire with a cup of washed rice, and cook the
latter tender. When there is but one cup of gravy left upon the bones,
etc., strain, season highly with pepper, salt, and nearly a teaspoonful
of curry powder. Chop, also, a quarter of a pickled onion, and mix in.
Roll a tablespoonful of butter in a heaping spoonful of browned flour,
and when the gravy is hot stir it in; lastly, put in the mutton, and
when nearly on the boil, draw aside. Drain the rice, and season well.
Pile the meat upon a hot dish, and make a fence of rice about it.


GREEN PEAS.

Open a can of green peas, drain, and cook twenty minutes in boiling
water, a little salt. Strain off the water; dish the peas, stir in
butter, pepper, and if needed, salt.


CHEESE FONDU.

  1 cup of bread-crumbs, very dry.
  2 cups of fresh milk.
  ½ lb. of dry cheese, grated.
  3 eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Pepper and salt.
  A pinch of soda dissolved in boiling water, and stirred into the milk.

Soak the crumbs in the milk; beat in the eggs, butter, seasoning, and
at last, the cheese. Butter a bake-dish; pour in the _fondu_; cover
with crumbs, and bake in a brisk oven. Serve at once, as it soon falls.


FARINA HASTY PUDDING WITH SAUCE.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 tablespoonfuls of farina.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.

Heat the milk, when the farina has soaked two hours in just enough
water to cover it, and has absorbed it all. Salt the milk and stir in
the farina. Boil half an hour, steadily stirring now and then, from the
bottom. Add the butter; and let the pudding stand in hot water three
minutes after you cease to stir, before turning out into an open, deep
dish. Make a good sauce of butter, sugar, and nutmeg, and eat with it.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Crust Soup.
  Mock Pigeons with Mushroom Sauce.      Baked Potatoes.
  Cabbage Sprouts and Eggs.      Mixed Pickles.
  ——
  Bread and Raisin Pudding.
  ——


CRUST SOUP.

  1 quart of dry crusts, the more stale the better, if sweet.
  2 cups of yesterday’s soup.
  2 cups of boiling water.
  1 onion.
  3 great spoonfuls of butter.
  2 eggs.
  Salt and pepper.
  A little chopped parsley.

Pour the boiling water upon the crusts, which should be broken small.
Set in a pot of boiling water for one hour, with a small onion minced
fine, and the seasoning. Meanwhile skim the cold soup (or any good
gravy) and heat to a boil. At the end of the hour, add the butter to
the bread, and cover ten minutes longer. Then turn into the soup; beat
up the bread and stir in the parsley. Simmer fifteen minutes, beat the
eggs light, pour a little of the soup upon them to heat them before
stirring them well into the contents of the kettle. Take from the fire
at once, lest the eggs should curdle.


MOCK PIGEONS WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE.

  2 fillets of veal.
  Force-meat of crumbs and chopped salt pork, well seasoned.
  ½ cup of mushrooms and a little minced onion.
  1 sweetbread.
  12 oysters.
  Pepper and salt.

The fillets must be boneless. Sprinkle with pepper and spread with
force-meat. Roll up closely and wind with packthread. Put into a
dripping-pan with enough water to half cover them. Invert a pan over
them, and bake from forty-five minutes to one hour in proportion to
their size. Boil, then blanch the sweetbread, by dropping it into cold
water. Cut into dice, put into a cup of oyster liquor with a spoonful
of butter, and simmer fifteen minutes. Baste the “pigeons” four
times—twice with butter, and when tender, lay on a hot dish, clip and
carefully withdraw the threads, and cover to keep warm. Add the gravy
from the dripping-pan to the sweetbread; thicken with browned flour;
boil once; put in the oysters and mushrooms, chopped, and stew five
minutes quite fast. Pour a few large spoonfuls, taking up the thickest
part, over the “pigeons;” send the rest up in a sauce-boat. You will
find this a very nice dish.


BAKED POTATOES.

Parboil and skin while hot. Lay in a pan and anoint with beef-dripping
or butter, from time to time, as they brown. Drain off the grease and
serve hot, after peppering and salting.


CABBAGE SPROUTS AND EGGS.

Boil the sprouts tender, drain well, pepper and salt. Lay some slices
of crustless toast in a deep dish, and soak in boiling water; drain
them and cover with a soft omelette made of three or four eggs,
“stirred” up in a pan in which has been heated a spoonful of butter.
Lay the sprouts upon this, butter well and eat hot.


BREAD AND RAISIN PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 loaf of stale _light_ bread, pared and sliced.
  Butter to spread the bread.
  4 eggs.
  ½ cup of sugar.
  ¾ lb. of raisins, seeded and cut into thirds.

Butter the bread. Make a raw custard of eggs, sugar and milk. Line the
bottom of a buttered dish with the bread. Wet with custard; strew with
raisins, and lay in more bread. Go on in this order until the dish is
full. The uppermost layer should be of bread, well buttered and soaked.
Cover the dish; set in boiling water, and bake one hour, keeping the
water at a fast boil. Turn out carefully, and pour hot, sweet sauce
over it. The liquor from brandied peaches, made hot, with a little
butter, makes a delicious sauce for it.


  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Bouillon of Beef.
  Tomato Omelette with Cheese.      Savory Rice Pudding.
  ——
  Corn-Starch Custard Pie.
  ——


BOUILLON OF BEEF.

  6 lbs. of brisket or round of beef, all in one piece.
  4 turnips.
  3 carrots.
  2 Bermuda onions.
  A good handful of cabbage sprouts.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, cut up in flour.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  1 teaspoonful of made mustard.
  4 quarts of water.

Cover the beef with the water and cook slowly one hour. Meanwhile, cut
the vegetables into long strips—not too thin—leaving the sprouts whole.
Cook them all in boiling, salted water twenty minutes. Throw this water
away, and at the end of the hour, skim the soup well, and put in the
vegetables. Stew all very slowly two hours longer. There must never be
a fast boil. Take out the beef; put into a dripping-pan; pour a cup of
the soup (strained), seasoned well with pepper, salt, and mustard, over
it; dredge thickly with flour and brown in a good oven, basting every
few minutes. Take half the vegetables from the pot and keep hot. Rub
the rest through a colander; season the soup and pulp, add the herbs
and return to the saucepan; boil sharply five minutes; stir in butter
and flour; simmer five minutes, and the soup is ready for the tureen.
Season the reserved vegetables, and having dished your beef, lay them,
very hot, around it. Serve with each slice.


TOMATO OMELETTE WITH CHEESE.

Break six eggs into a bowl and give about a dozen whirls of the beater,
just enough to mingle whites and yolks well. Have ready in a frying-pan
a great spoonful of butter. When it begins to hiss, run it quickly
over the bottom of the pan, and pour in your eggs. Take the handle of
the pan in one hand, a cake-turner in the other, and with the latter,
loosen all around the edges of the omelette, while with the other hand
you shake the pan to keep the eggs free from the bottom. In about three
minutes, the eggs should be “set,” but still soft. Let an assistant
lay upon one-half of the omelette five or six slices of canned
tomatoes. Fold the other half over this by a dexterous motion of the
turner; invert a hot dish upon the pan; upset the latter, and dish the
omelette. Have at hand a handful of _dry_ cheese, grated and seasoned
with pepper and salt. Strew the omelette thickly, singe with a red-hot
shovel held very close to the cheese, and serve hot.

N. B.—Teach your cook the art of omelette-making at breakfasts, and she
will soon be capable of managing this very delightful _entrée_.


SAVORY RICE PUDDING.

  1 teacupful of raw rice.
  1 small onion.
  1 cup of weak broth. Steal from your soup before the vegetables
          go in, if you have no other.
  1 cup of milk.
  1 egg.
  Nearly a cupful of chopped cold meat—left from yesterday.
  Pepper and salt.

Boil the rice with the whole onion in the broth, adding more, or hot
water, as it swells. When the rice is soft and has soaked up the broth,
remove the onion and add a raw custard made of the milk, egg, pepper,
and salt. Mix well with the meat, put into a greased mould, set in a
pan of boiling water, and bake, covered, until firm. Keep the water
boiling hard. About forty-five minutes should be ample time. Turn out
and eat with meat.


CORN-STARCH CUSTARD PIE.

  6 eggs.
  3 pints of milk.
  6 tablespoonfuls of white sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch.
  2 teaspoonfuls essence bitter almonds.

Boil the milk, stir in the corn-starch wet with milk. Boil one minute
and cool. When cold, beat in the sugar, the yolks and _two_ whites.
Flavor, and bake in open shells of paste. When the custard is “set,”
draw to the door of the oven, and cover with a _méringue_ made of the
reserved whites whipped stiff with two tablespoonfuls of white sugar
and a teaspoonful of vanilla. Do this quickly and close the oven until
the whites begin to color. Eat cold.



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Frugal Soup.
  Calf’s Liver à l’Anglaise.      Potato Croquettes.
  Spinach and Eggs.      Cucumber Pickles.
  ——
  Cocoanut Pudding.
  ——


FRUGAL SOUP.

  3 lbs. of bones.
  ½ lb. of liver.
  1 slice of corned ham.
  2 turnips.
  2 carrots.
  Nearly a can of tomatoes.
  ½ cup of sago.
  Pepper and salt.
  Sweet herbs.
  3 quarts cold water.

Break the bones, chop the meat, vegetables, and herbs, and cook slowly
three hours in the water. Soak the sago, all this time, in a little
cold water. Strain the soup, rubbing the vegetables and liver through
the colander; season, boil, and skim; put in the sago and cook half an
hour more.


CALF’S LIVER À L’ANGLAISE.

  2 lbs. liver—sliced.
  ½ lb. fat salt pork.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  1 small onion, minced fine.
  1 teaspoonful chopped parsley.
  Pepper and browned flour.

Melt, but not heat the butter in a saucepan; lay in the liver, then
the pork, next the minced parsley and onion, with a little salt and
pepper. Cover closely, and set where it will heat very slowly _without
boiling_, for one hour and a half. Then increase the heat gradually
until the gravy begins to bubble. Remove from the fire; cover the liver
in a hot water dish, thicken the gravy in the saucepan and pour over it
when it has boiled one minute. Please obey these directions implicitly.


POTATO CROQUETTES.

  2 cups cold mashed potato, free from lumps.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful melted butter.
  Salt and pepper to taste.
  1 raw egg, beaten alone.
  Cracker-crumbs.

Mix soft, as for hominy croquettes, roll in egg and cracker, and fry
in hot lard or dripping. You can make into long rolls, or round balls.
Drain, and serve hot.


SPINACH AND EGGS.

Pick the leaves from the stems; cook twenty minutes in plenty of
boiling, salted water; drain, chop fine, return to the fire with
butter, a little sugar, pepper, and salt. Beat until nearly dry, and
very smooth; mould in a hot, oblong pan; turn out and garnish with
sliced egg.


COCOANUT PUDDING.

  1 large cup bread-crumbs.
  1 cocoanut, pared and grated.
  1 tablespoonful corn-starch, wet with cold water.
  ½ cup of butter.
  1 cup of sugar.
  2 cups of milk.
  5 eggs.
  Nutmeg and rose-water to taste.

Soak the crumbs in the milk; cream butter and sugar, and beat in the
yolks, then add to the soaked crumbs. Stir in corn-starch, beaten
whites and flavoring—at last, cocoanut. Beat hard and bake forty-five
minutes in a buttered pudding-dish. Eat cold.



  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Onion Soup.
  Salmon Croquettes.      Mutton Chops, Broiled.
  Parsnip Fritters.      Squeezed Potatoes.
  Almond Blanc-Mange.
  ——
  White Cake.
  ——


ONION SOUP.

  3 sliced onions.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, and twice as much flour.
  1 quart of milk.
  2 cups of boiling water.
  1 cup of mashed potato.
  Pepper, salt, and fried bread.
  1 teaspoonful essence of celery.
  Soda.

Fry the onions in the butter; strain the latter; return to the
frying-pan and stir in the flour gradually, cooking until it is a light
bistre color. Thin with boiling water, added slowly. Meanwhile, heat
the milk, and work by degrees, into the potato. Then strain through a
colander into a saucepan; add a piece of soda the size of a pea, and
set within a pot of boiling water. Cook ten minutes, season well, put
in the flour and butter. Then mince the onions _very_ fine, and stir
in. Let all stand in the hot water ten minutes; add celery. Flavor and
pour upon the fried bread, cut into dice and put into the tureen.


SALMON CROQUETTES.

  1 can preserved salmon.
  2 raw eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Yolks of 2 hard boiled eggs.
  1 teaspoonful anchovy sauce.
  Juice of ½ lemon.
  Season with salt, pepper, a little mace and nutmeg.
  ½ cup crumbs.

Mince the fish; work in the butter, slightly warmed; the _powdered_
yolks, the seasoning, raw eggs—finally, the crumbs. Make into rolls;
shape well by rolling in a dish covered thickly with flour. Fry quickly
in sweet lard. Roll each, when done, for one instant, upon a clean
cloth to take off the grease. Lay a square of treble tissue-paper, red,
green, and white, upon a dish (fringing the ends), and serve.


MUTTON CHOPS—BROILED.

If you have not a “vertical broiler,” lay upon a hot
gridiron—greased—and turn often over a clear fire, until nicely
browned. Butter, salt, and pepper each one as it is taken from the fire.


SQUEEZED POTATOES.

Put old potatoes on in cold water, and cook soft. Skin rapidly, set
over the fire for one minute; then, twist a soft, dry cloth around each
one until you feel it crush but not quite break open. Lay each, as you
squeeze it, within a hot dish, lined with a napkin. When all are in,
turn the four corners of the napkin over the top to keep in the heat.


PARSNIP FRITTERS.

Boil, scrape, and mash; take out fibres and hard bits. Work into four
large parsnips one beaten egg, a teaspoonful of flour, with pepper
and salt. Make into small, round cakes, roll in flour and fry in good
dripping. Drain well, and serve hot.


ALMOND BLANC-MANGE.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 oz. Cooper’s gelatine.
  ¼ lb. of almonds, blanched and pounded, with 1 tablespoonful of
          rose-water to prevent oiling.
  ¾ cup of sugar.

Soak the gelatine one hour in a cup of the milk. Heat the rest; add the
almond-paste, and stir over the fire three minutes, then put in the
sugar and gelatine, and stir five minutes more. Strain through thin
muslin, pressing hard. When cool, pour into a wet mould, and set upon
ice, or in cold water to form. Eat with cream and sugar. It is a good
plan to blanch the almonds the day before they are to be pounded.


WHITE CAKE.

Please see “COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD” Series No. 1., “General
Receipts,” page 334.



  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Okra and Tomato Soup.
  Beef’s Heart.      Ramakins.
  Potatoes à la Crème.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Newark Pudding.
  ——


OKRA AND TOMATO SOUP.

  6 lbs. of coarse beef.
  2 lbs. of mutton bones.
  Two slices of corned ham, or a ham bone, or bones of salt pork.
  1 can okra and tomatoes.
  6 quarts of cold water.
  Large bunch of sweet herbs.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 lump of white sugar.

Crack the bones into splinters. Cut the meat into strips and mince the
herbs. Put on in the water, and cook _slowly_, four hours. Strain off
the liquor, and divide into two portions. Season the meat, bones, etc.,
highly, put them back into that portion designed for Sunday, and set
aside in a cold place. Pour the stock for to-day’s soup back into the
pot; season with salt and pepper; boil up, and skim, and add the okra,
tomatoes, and sugar. Simmer half an hour, boil briskly one minute. Skim
and serve.


BEEF’S HEART.

Choose a fine, fresh one. Wash well, lay in salt and water an hour,
then wipe dry. Stuff with a force-meat of crumbs, minced salt pork,
pepper, salt, and chopped parsley with a little onion. Pack this in
tightly, sew the heart up in coarse net, fitted well to it, and stew
one hour and a half in weak broth. (A cupful can be taken from your
soup stock.) At the end of this time, take it out, undo the cloth, and
return the heart to the saucepan with enough gravy to half cover it.
Add to this a tablespoonful of butter cut up in as much flour; pepper
and salt to taste. Cover closely, and simmer half an hour, turning
the heart as it browns. Dish it; add the juice of half a lemon to the
gravy, boil once, and pour over the heart.


RAMAKINS.

  Rounds of lightly toasted bread.
  3 tablespoonfuls grated cheese.
  2 eggs, beaten light.
  1 tablespoonful melted butter.
  1 teaspoonful anchovy sauce.
  1 teaspoonful of flour, wet with cream.
  A little salt and cayenne.

Beat eggs, butter, and seasoning together; then the cheese, lastly,
the flour. Work all to a cream; spread thickly upon the bread, and
brown lightly.


POTATOES À LA CRÈME.

Heat a cupful of milk; stir in a heaping tablespoonful of butter cut up
in as much flour. Stir until smooth and thick; pepper and salt, and add
two cupfuls of cold boiled potatoes, sliced, and a little very finely
chopped parsley. Shake over the fire until the potatoes are hot all
through, and pour into a deep dish.


LIMA BEANS.

Open the can an hour before it is needed, and empty into a bowl. When
ready for the beans drain off the liquor and cook in boiling water
twenty-five minutes. Drain, butter, pepper and salt, and serve.


NEWARK PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  5 eggs.
  1 large cup fine crumbs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of rice-flour.
  ½ lb. of raisins cut in two, seeded and dredged with flour.
  2 teaspoonfuls vanilla, or other extract. (If possible get your
          flavoring extracts from COLGATE & CO., 53 AND 55 JOHN
          STREET, NEW YORK. They are good from first _to last_,
          which is more than I can say for many others.)
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  ½ teaspoonful of soda.

Beat the yolks. Add the crumbs soaked in a pint of the milk. Stir
in the rice-flour, wet in cold milk; the reserved pint of milk; the
butter, flavoring, the fruit, and lastly, the whisked whites. Bake one
hour in a well-greased mould; turn out and eat with hard sauce.



MAY.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Clear Soup.
  Roast Lamb.      Green Peas.
  Mint Sauce.      Asparagus on Toast.
  Potato Eggs.
  ——
  Rice and Tapioca Pudding.
  ——


CLEAR SOUP.

Take _all_ the fat from the stock reserved for to-day, and pour the
liquid carefully off from the meat and bones, not disturbing the
sediment in the bottom. (_Mem._ Take out a little of the meat, beef,
and ham, for a purpose of which we shall speak presently—add boiling
water—about a quart—to the rest of the residuum with more seasoning,
and the remains of your okra and tomato soup. Stew gently half an hour,
and set aside in a cool place for to-morrow. The growing heat of the
weather makes this a necessary precaution.) Put then the clear stock
upon the fire with a whole onion, and simmer thirty minutes. Skim
well, take out the onion, and stir in two tablespoonfuls of gelatine
previously soaked one hour in cold water, with a tablespoonful (scant)
of Harvey’s sauce. Cook five minutes and pour out.


ROAST LAMB.

Lay in the dripping-pan; dash a cupful of boiling water over it and
roast in a good oven, allowing about ten minutes—not more—to the pound.
Baste often and freely, and after half an hour, cover with a sheet of
thick paper. Five minutes before taking it up, remove this, dredge with
flour, and as this browns, bring to a froth with butter. Do not send
the gravy to table if you use mint sauce.


MINT SAUCE.

  2 tablespoonfuls green mint, chopped very fine.
  1 tablespoonful white sugar.
  About half a cupful best cider vinegar.

Put sugar and vinegar into a sauce-boat and stir in the mint. Let it
stand fifteen minutes before serving.


GREEN PEAS.

I have purposely avoided too early an introduction of green vegetables
and other spring dainties, through fear that the high prices demanded
for them might make this part of my work useless for housekeepers of
moderate means. By the first of May, however, even our Northern markets
should be well supplied at reasonable rates with many delightful
esculents which are, as yet, brought only from the South.

Shell the peas and wash well in cold water. Cook in boiling
water—salted—for twenty-five minutes. A lump of sugar will be an
addition, and a pleasant one, to market peas. Drain well, stir in a
great lump of butter, and pepper and salt. Serve hot.


ASPARAGUS UPON TOAST.

Cut the stalks of equal length, rejecting the woody portions and
scraping the whiter parts retained. Tie in a bunch with soft tape, and
cook _about_ thirty minutes, if of fair size. Have ready six or eight
slices of crustless bread, nicely toasted. Dip in the asparagus-liquor,
butter well and lay upon a very hot dish. Drain the asparagus, untie,
and arrange upon the toast, peppering and buttering to taste.


POTATO EGGS.

  2 cups mashed potato.
  ½ cup minced meat.
  2 beaten eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls hot milk.
  1 tablespoonful melted butter.
  3 tablespoonfuls gravy.
  Pepper, salt, and dripping.

Work the potato _smooth_ with butter, milk, gravy, and beaten eggs. Put
into a saucepan, and stir over the fire until smoking hot. Stir in the
meat; let it get cool enough to handle. Flour your hands and make the
mixture into egg-shaped balls. Roll in flour and fry in hot dripping.
Pile upon a hot dish.


RICE AND TAPIOCA PUDDING.

  ½ cup rice.
  ½ cup tapioca.
  ¾ cup sugar.
  3 pints of milk.
  Cinnamon to taste.

Soak the tapioca three hours in half of the milk. Wash the rice in
three waters and soak in the rest of the milk the same length of time.
Put them together, stir in the sugar by degrees, until all is melted;
season with cinnamon and a pinch of salt; mix up well, and bake in a
slow oven two hours. Make it on Saturday, and eat cold on Sunday with
sugar and cream.



  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Yesterday’s Soup.
  Cold Lamb.      Savory Macaroni.
  Sea Kale.      Potato Salad.
  ——
  Coffee and Sister Mag’s Cake.
  ——


YESTERDAY’S SOUP.

Strain the stock heated up on Sunday with the remains of Saturday’s
soup. Boil four tablespoonfuls of rice in a little water until soft.
Add, with the water, to the soup, with additional seasoning, if
necessary, and heat almost to a boil. If it has been kept in a cool
place you will find it very good. Never throw away a spoonful of any
soup. It will come into use if you can keep it from spoiling.


COLD LAMB.

Trim neatly, garnish with curled parsley, and pass mixed pickles with
it. Few methods of preparing lamb for the table by warming over can
compare with the easier way of setting it on cold, if it has been
nicely roasted at first.


SAVORY MACARONI.

To a cup of yesterday’s soup add another of boiling water. Let them
boil once; skim and put in half a pound of macaroni broken into inch
lengths. While it is cooking tender, boil one sweetbread fifteen
minutes; throw into cold water and let it cool, then cut into small
dice. When the macaroni is tender, but not broken, mix with it a
custard made of two eggs, one large cup of milk, and a little salt.
Stir into the macaroni a very little minced onion, pepper to taste;
add the chopped sweetbread; put into a greased mould, with a cover;
put this into a dripping-pan full of boiling water and cook in a good
oven a little over one hour. Turn out upon a hot dish, and send around
grated cheese with it.


SEA-KALE.

Pick over carefully, tie up in bunches, and lay for half an hour in
cold water. Put into salted boiling water and cook twenty-five minutes.
Put buttered toast in the bottom of a deep dish; clip the threads
binding the kale, and lay it upon the toast. Pepper, and pour a cupful
of drawn butter over it.


POTATO SALAD.

Slice cold boiled potatoes, and put a layer in a salad dish. Cover
with thin slices of hard boiled egg, and strew with bits of pickled
onion. When the dish is full pour over them a dressing made in the
proportion of one tablespoonful of vinegar to three of salad oil; one
spoonful of salt to half as much pepper, and the same quantity of made
mustard. Beat up well before pouring over the salad. Let all stand ten
minutes—or more—before serving.


COFFEE AND SISTER MAG’S CAKE.

Let your coffee be strong and hot, with plenty of boiling milk.

For receipt for the delightful cake mentioned please see “COMMON SENSE
IN THE HOUSEHOLD” Series No. 1, “General Receipts,” page 321. Friday is
a good cake-baking day.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Veal and Tapioca Broth.
  Baked Beefsteak.      Young Onions Stewed.
  Potatoes Baked with Steak.      Lettuce Salad.
  ——
  Oatmeal Pudding with Cream.
  ——


VEAL AND TAPIOCA BROTH.

  3 lbs. scrag of veal, well broken, and the meat cut small.
  1 onion.
  1 turnip.
  ½ cup of pearl tapioca.
  2 blades of mace.
  2 teaspoonfuls essence of celery.
  Pepper and salt.
  3 quarts of cold water.

Put meat, bones, and sliced vegetables on in the water, and cook slowly
three hours. Soak the tapioca during this time in a very little milk.
Strain the soup, rubbing the vegetables through the colander; cool to
throw up the fat. Skim and season. When hot again put in the tapioca
and stir until it melts. Simmer half an hour, add the celery essence
and serve.


BAKED BEEFSTEAK.

Take the bone from a large sirloin steak; flatten it with the side of a
hatchet, wash over the upper side with a beaten egg and spread thickly
with a force-meat of crumbs, minced ham, and any other cold meat you
may have, a teaspoonful of minced onion, a pinch of grated lemon peel,
with pepper and salt, a beaten egg and three tablespoonfuls of cream
or milk. Work these into a paste before spreading. Roll the steak upon
them, binding closely with soft pack-thread. Have ready some dripping
in a frying-pan, and cook the steak five minutes in this, turning as it
browns. Now lay it in a dripping-pan with a cupful of boiling water;
cover and bake forty minutes, basting and turning often. When done,
remove the strings; lay the beef upon a hot dish; thicken the gravy
with browned flour, boil up and pour half over it—the rest into a boat.


YOUNG ONIONS STEWED.

Skin, wash well, and cook in boiling water, salted, until half-done—say
fifteen minutes. Then, throw off nearly all the water and replenish
with scalding milk. Cook tender in this, stir in pepper, salt, a great
spoonful of butter cut up in a teaspoonful of flour. Simmer three
minutes, and pour out.


POTATOES BAKED WITH STEAK.

Parboil, skin, and quarter some large potatoes. About ten minutes
before you take up your steak, lay the potatoes around it in the pan,
and brown in the hot gravy. Serve in the dish with the meat, laid on
the outer edge.


LETTUCE SALAD.

Pull out the hearts and blanched leaves, heap them within a salad bowl;
strew with powdered sugar, and pour over them a dressing made according
to directions given yesterday. Toss up well with a silver fork.


OATMEAL PUDDING WITH CREAM.

  1 quart of boiling milk.
  4 tablespoonfuls best Irish oatmeal.
  4 tablespoonfuls of flour.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.

Wet up flour, oatmeal, and salt, with cold milk and stir into the
hot, which must be in a farina-kettle. Stir twenty minutes well from
the bottom, and let it stand ten minutes in the boiling water without
cooking before pouring into an uncovered deep dish. Eat with cream and
sugar.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Hot Pot.
  Stewed Breast of Veal with Mushrooms.
  Rhubarb Sauce.      Spinach à la Reine.
  Browned Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Burnt Custard.
  ——


HOT POT.

  4 lbs. coarse lean beef, cut up small.
  2 good-sized crabs.
  ½ lb. of streaked salt pork.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  1 onion.
  1 bunch of asparagus—the green tops only.
  8 Boston crackers.
  Cayenne pepper.
  Butter for crackers.
  6 quarts of water.
  Juice of 1 lemon.

Boil beef, herbs and onion together in the water—cooking slowly—three
hours. Cool, to throw up the fat, and skim well. Put away half of
the liquor with the meat, well-seasoned, for another day. Strain the
remainder back into the pot; add the meat of two boiled crabs nicely
cut—not chopped—up, and the pork, also boiled and cut into dice; the
asparagus-tops, with plenty of seasoning. Stew for half an hour,
gently. Have ready in your tureen eight Boston crackers split, laid for
five minutes in boiling water, then drained and buttered. Pour the
soup over these, cover, and serve, having added the lemon-juice at the
last. Send sliced lemon around with it.


STEWED BREAST OF VEAL WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE.

Trim neatly; take out the largest bone, and fill the cavity with a good
force-meat. Skewer into a compact shape. Lay in a frying-pan with three
tablespoonfuls of butter, and brown on both sides. Line the bottom of a
large saucepan with slices of pork, pepper them, and lay in the veal.
Cover _tightly_, and heat very slowly, one hour, without opening the
pot. Then turn the meat, add half a can of chopped mushrooms, and half
a Bermuda onion, sliced, with a cup of boiling water. Cover again, and
cook for another hour—never fast. The meat should be cooked almost
wholly in its own steam. Turn again, and simmer fifteen minutes. Take
up the meat, thicken the gravy with browned flour, wet with cold water,
adding a little boiling water, if needful; boil up, and pour over
the veal. If these directions be exactly followed, this dish will be
excellent.


SPINACH À LA REINE.

Wash well, pick off the leaves, and cook them twenty minutes in
salted, boiling water. Drain and press out all the water; chop very
fine. Return to the saucepan with a good lump of butter, pepper, salt,
a pinch of mace, a teaspoonful of sugar, and three spoonfuls—large
ones—of good gravy. Stir, beat, and toss, until nearly dry. Fill hot,
wet egg-cups with the mixture, and turn out upon a heated, flat dish.
Lay a slice of egg upon each.


RHUBARB (OR PIE-PLANT) SAUCE.

Skin, and cut up the stalks. Put into a saucepan, with just enough
water to keep them from burning, and stew slowly until soft. Sweeten
while hot, but not on the fire. Eat cold.


BROWNED POTATOES—MASHED.

Whip up boiled potatoes very light with a fork; beat in butter, milk,
and salt. Heat roughly upon a neat bake-dish (one with a silver stand
for the table, if you have it), and brown in a quick oven, glazing with
butter, when done.


BURNT CUSTARD.

  1 quart of milk.
  5 eggs.
  3 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Nutmeg and flavoring extract to taste.

Scald the milk, but not to boiling; beat eggs light with the sugar,
and pour upon them the hot milk. Mix well, and bake in a well-buttered
dish. Turn out when cold; strew very thickly with white sugar. Set the
plate containing the custard upon the upper grating of a hot oven. The
sugar will melt, and run in brown streams all over the moulded pudding.
Slip carefully to a dish, and eat cold.



  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Italian Minestra Soup.
  Chicken Pudding.      Boiled Potatoes.
  Asparagus and Eggs.      Crab-apple Jelly.
  ——
  German Puffs.
  ——


ITALIAN MINESTRA SOUP.

Strain the stock reserved for to-day from the bones, after taking the
fat from the top. Never neglect this. Greasy soups are not good, and
plenty of dripping may be thus obtained for kitchen use. Heat the
soup, season to taste, and add a little more than half a cupful of
_minestra_, by some known as Italian Paste. It can be had at the best
grocers in various shapes—like wheat-grains, in small squares, or in
stars, circles, letters, etc. Simmer twenty minutes, and pour out. The
_minestra_ should be tender, but not broken.


CHICKEN PUDDING.

Cut up a tender fowl into neat joints, and parboil, seasoning well,
ten minutes before you take it up, with pepper, salt, and a generous
spoonful of butter. It should cook slowly for half an hour. Take up and
cool, setting aside the liquor for your gravy.


BATTER FOR THE PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  3 cups of prepared flour, not heaping.
  3 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  4 well-whipped eggs.
  A little salt.

Make a hole in the flour, when you have sifted the salt through it.
Mix eggs, milk, and butter together, and pour in by degrees, beating
all up hard at the last. Put a layer of chicken in the bottom of a
bake-dish; pour a cupful of batter upon it; then more chicken, and so
on, until the dish is full, with batter for the upper crust. It will
require about one hour to bake in a moderate oven. Skim the cooled
gravy, and boil down one-half. Then, stir in a tablespoonful of butter,
cut up in flour. Boil once, and pour over a beaten egg. Season with
chopped parsley; return to the fire; let it almost boil, and serve in a
sauce-boat. Pass with the pudding.


BOILED POTATOES.

Put on in cold water, and bring to a rapid boil. When nearly done, pour
off all but a cupful of water. Cover closely, return to the fire, and
steam until the skins crack, and the potatoes are soft. They will need
about half an hour’s boiling in all. Uncover, strew with salt, leave
for a few moments for the moisture to evaporate, and serve at once. Old
potatoes, treated thus, can be made mealy.


ASPARAGUS AND EGGS.

Cut about two dozen stalks of asparagus—leaving out the hard parts—into
inch lengths, and boil tender. Drain; pour upon them a cupful of drawn
butter; stir until hot, then turn into a bake-dish. Break six eggs
upon the top; put a bit of butter upon each; salt and pepper, and put
into a quick oven until the eggs are “set.”


GERMAN PUFFS.

  3 cups of prepared flour.
  3 cups of milk.
  3 eggs—whites and yolks whipped separately, and very light.
  3 teaspoonfuls of melted butter.
  1 saltspoonful of salt.

Make a batter as directed for your chicken pudding, beat up hard, and
bake in nine cups, such as you used for measuring, to a fine brown.
The oven should be a quick one, and the puffs be served immediately in
their cups.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Canned Corn Soup.
  Boiled Shad.      Scalloped Roes.
  Potato Snow.      Green Peas.
  Cress Salad.
  ——
  Lemon Trifle.
  Tea and Cake.
  ——


CANNED CORN SOUP.

  1 can of sweet corn.
  1 quart of boiling water.
  1 quart of milk.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in one tablespoonful of flour.
  2 eggs.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 tablespoonful tomato catsup.

Drain the corn and chop it in a chopping-tray. Put on in the boiling
water and cook steadily one hour. Rub through a colander, leaving the
husks behind and return, with the water in which it has boiled, to the
fire. Season; boil gently three minutes and stir in the butter and
flour. Have ready the boiling milk, pour it upon the beaten eggs, and
these into the soup. Simmer one minute, stirring all the while; take
up, add the catsup and pour out.


BOILED SHAD.

Clean, wash and wipe a large roe shad. Set aside the roes for your
scallop. Sew up the fish in a thin cloth fitted to its shape; cover
well with boiling salted water, and cook from forty-five minutes to an
hour, according to its size. Unwrap and butter and pepper, after laying
it upon a hot dish. Pour over it a few spoonfuls of drawn butter in
which have been mixed the chopped yolks of two eggs, a little parsley,
and the juice of a lemon. Serve the same in a boat. Garnish the fish
with rings of the whites of the boiled eggs, with a sprig of parsley in
each.


SCALLOPED ROES.

  The roes of the shad.
  1 cup of drawn butter, and the yolks of three hard-boiled eggs.
  1 teaspoonful of anchovy paste.
  Juice of half a lemon.
  1 cup of bread-crumbs.
  Parsley, salt and pepper to taste.

Boil the roes in water with a little vinegar stirred in. Lay in cold
water five minutes and wipe dry. Break up with the back of a spoon, but
do not crush the eggs. Set by, and pound the boiled yolks to a powder.
Beat this into the drawn butter, then the parsley and other seasoning,
finally the roes. Strew the bottom of a bake-dish with crumbs; pour in
the mixture, and cover thickly with fine crumbs. Stick dots of butter
over the top, and bake, covered, until it begins to bubble, then brown
upon the upper grating of the oven.


POTATO SNOW.

Mash with a beetle very fine, working in salt only. Then rub hard and
fast through a colander into a hot dish. The potato should fall in
light spiral threads. Set in the oven three minutes to renew the heat,
but do not let it “crust” or brown.


GREEN PEAS.

See receipt given on Sunday.


CRESS SALAD.

Pull the sprigs to pieces and pour over them a dressing such as was
made for your potato salad on Monday.


LEMON TRIFLE.

  Juice of 2 lemons and grated peel of one.
  1 pint cream, well sweetened and whipped stiff.
  1 cup of sherry.
  A little nutmeg.

Let sugar, lemon-juice, and peel lie together two hours before you add
wine and nutmeg. Strain through double tarlatan, and whip gradually
into the frothed cream. Serve very soon, heaped in small glasses. Pass
cake with this as well as with the tea.


TEA AND CAKE.

Whereas pound, jelly, or cup-cake should accompany your trifle, small
sponge-cakes, or cookies—not too sweet—taste better with tea, and do
not detract so much from its flavor.


  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Minced Beef Soup.
  Ragoût of Mutton.      Boiled Potatoes.
  French Beans with Force-meat Balls.      Boiled Rice.
  ——
  Neapolitan Pudding.
  ——


MINCED BEEF SOUP.

  4 lbs. lean beef, minced fine, as for beef-tea.
  2 lbs. mutton-bones.
  2 carrots, grated.
  2 sliced onions.
  Bunch of sweet herbs, and small bunch of asparagus, also chopped.
  Pepper and salt.
  5 quarts of water.
  Strips of buttered toast.

Crack the bones to splinters, and put on with the vegetables in three
quarts of cold water and boil two hours. Strain, rubbing the vegetables
to a pulp, and add, with the rest of the water, also cold, to the
minced beef. Bring to a boil, cook gently one hour after it boils, and
strain, pressing hard. Reserve a little of the beef for force-meat, and
put away the rest well seasoned, after pouring back over it half the
soup, as stock for to-morrow. Keep in a cool place. Chop the herbs and
put into that meant for to-day, with pepper and salt. Boil and skim
fifteen minutes. Have ready some long strips of buttered crisp toast in
the tureen and pour on the soup.


RAGOÛT OF MUTTON.

  3 lbs. of mutton, without bone, cut into strips three inches long by
          one wide.
  2 lamb sweetbreads.
  1 cup of gravy made from bones, skin, etc.—the “trimmings” of the
          meat.
  2 eggs.
  ¼ lb. streaked salt pork.
  1 fried onion.
  1 cup of green peas.
  Pepper, salt, and parsley.
  Dripping for frying.
  Browned flour.

Fry the onion in plenty of dripping; then the meat for five minutes.
Parboil the sweetbreads, throw into cold water to blanch; wipe and
slice; then fry also in the fat. Lay sliced pork in the bottom of a
saucepan, upon this the mutton, then the sweetbreads, next the onion,
the green peas, then pepper and salt. Cover with the gravy; put on a
close lid and stew gently for an hour after the boil sets in. Take up
the meat and sweetbreads; thicken the gravy with browned flour; pour it
upon two beaten eggs, stir one minute over the fire and pour upon the
meat.


BROILED POTATOES.

Cut cold boiled potatoes lengthwise; cook over a clear fire upon a
greased gridiron, until they begin to brown. Lay upon a hot dish,
butter, pepper, and salt.


FRENCH BEANS WITH FORCE-MEAT BALLS.

Chop the beef taken from the soup when cold. Add one-third as much
bread-crumbs, and season well. Put a spoonful of butter into a
saucepan, and when it hisses, stir in the meat, then a little browned
flour wet up with cold water. Beat an egg light, pour the meat upon it,
and mix well. Make into floured balls and fry in hot dripping. Cook the
beans as usual and lay the balls about them when dished.


BOILED RICE.

Wash well and cook in hot salted water, shaking up from time to time
until the water is nearly all absorbed, and the rice soft, with every
grain distinct. Put a good piece of butter upon the top after it is
dished.


NEAPOLITAN PUDDING.

  1 large cup of bread-crumbs soaked in milk.
  ¾ cup of sugar.
  5 eggs.
  1 lemon, juice and grated rind.
  ½ lb. stale sponge-cake.
  ½ lb. almond maccaroons.
  ½ cup jelly or jam.
  1 small tumbler of sherry wine.
  ½ cup of milk for the crumbs.
  1 tablespoonful melted butter.

Cream butter and sugar. Beat in the whipped yolks; then the crumbs,
the lemon, and when this is a smooth paste, the whites. Butter a mould
thickly, and cover the bottom with dry bread-crumbs, and these with
maccaroons, laid evenly. Wet with wine, and pour on a layer of the
mixture just made; next, put sliced cake spread with jelly, then more
maccaroons wet with wine, more custard, cake and jam, until all the
materials are used up, with a layer of custard on top. Cover closely;
set in a pan of boiling water and cook three-quarters of an hour in
the oven, then remove the top and brown. Turn out carefully, and pour
over it a sauce made of currant-jelly warmed, and beaten up with two
tablespoonfuls of melted butter and a glass of wine. A plain round
mould is best for this pudding.



  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Soup à l’Italienne.
  Beef à la Mode.      Asparagus upon Toast.
  Green Peas.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Tropical Snow with Jelly Cake.
  ——


SOUP À L’ITALIENNE.

Take the fat from the top of the reserved stock, strain it and heat to
scalding. Heat in another vessel a pint of milk, pour it upon three
beaten eggs; return to the saucepan with a little salt and a pinch of
soda, and cook two minutes, stirring all the while. Have ready four
tablespoonfuls of grated cheese in the bottom of a tureen, pour in,
first, the milk and eggs, then the soup. Stir all up well, and serve.


BEEF À LA MODE.

Remove the bone from a round of beef, and trim away the gristle and
tough bits from the edges. (Cover these with water and boil down for
soup-stock. Season highly and put by in a cool place for Monday.)
Bind the beef into a good shape by sewing about it a broad band of
stout muslin, as wide as the round is high. Cut a pound of salt pork
into strips long enough to reach from top to bottom of the beef—make
incisions in it with a thin, long-bladed knife, and thrust these in
closely together. Fill the hole from which the bone was taken with a
force-meat of minced pork and crumbs, highly spiced. Put the meat thus
prepared in a deep earthenware dish, and rub well into it a mixture
of one cup of vinegar, a teaspoonful of mixed cloves and allspice, a
teaspoonful of salt, and the same of made mustard; a tablespoonful of
sugar and a bunch of sweet herbs minced, with as much pepper as salt.
Leave the beef in the pan with the spiced vinegar about the base from
Saturday until Sunday morning, turning several times. Early on Sunday,
put it into a large pot, with enough boiling water to half-cover it;
cover tightly with a weight upon the lid, and stew at least four
hours—or half an hour for each pound. Open once, when half-done,
to turn the meat. Dish the meat; cut the stitches in the band, and
withdraw it carefully. Keep hot while you prepare the gravy. Pour off
all but a cupful, and set aside for soup-stock. Thicken that reserved
with browned flour, and serve in a boat. Cut the beef in horizontal
slices.

When dinner is over, pin another band tightly about the meat; pour
gravy on the top, and set a plate with a heavy weight upon it, on the
round, before putting it away for Monday’s dinner.


ASPARAGUS UPON TOAST, AND GREEN PEAS.

Please see receipts given on last Sunday.


MASHED POTATOES.

Mash in the usual manner, working in milk, butter, and salt. Make into
a smooth mound in a deep dish, and score deeply on top with the back of
a knife.


TROPICAL SNOW.

  10 sweet oranges.
  1 cocoanut, pared and grated.
  2 glasses sherry.
  1 cup powdered sugar.
  6 bananas.

Peel and cut the oranges small, taking out the seeds. Put a layer in a
glass-bowl and wet with wine, then strew with sugar. Next, put a layer
of grated cocoanut, slice the bananas thin, and cover the cocoanut with
them. When the dish has been filled in this order, heap with cocoanut.
Eat soon, or the oranges will toughen.


JELLY CAKE,

In some of its pretty variations, and sliced in triangles, should go
around with the snow.



  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Macaroni Soup.
  Pressed Beef.      Spinach.
  Potato Puff.      Chow-chow.
  ——
  Southern Rice Pudding.
  ——


MACARONI SOUP.

Take the fat from both portions of stock set by for to-day; put them
together, and strain into a soup-kettle. Heat to a boil, skim well, and
after fifteen minutes’ cooking, add a quarter of a pound of macaroni,
boiled tender in salted hot water, and cut into pieces about an inch
long. Simmer ten minutes and pour out.


PRESSED BEEF.

Take the weight from your round of beef; undo the bandage, and set on
the table cold, garnished with cresses. Cut in thin horizontal slices.
It will be handsomely mottled with the pork. Many prefer to eat à la
mode beef cold, always.


SPINACH.

Cook as directed upon last Wednesday, but leaving out the gravy and not
drying out so much. Beat to a smooth cream, and turn into a deep dish,
with sippets of fried bread at the base.


POTATO PUFF.

  2 cupfuls of cold mashed potatoes.
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  2 beaten eggs.
  ½ cup of milk.
  Salt to taste.

Beat in butter, then milk and salt, finally the eggs. Whip all up to
a cream. Pile in a bake-dish and cook in a good oven until lightly
colored.


SOUTHERN RICE PUDDING.

  1 quart fresh milk.
  1 cup raw rice.
  2 tablespoonfuls butter.
  1 cup of sugar.
  4 eggs, beaten light.
  Grated peel of half a lemon.
  Pinch of cinnamon and the same of mace.

Soak the rice in the milk for two hours in a farina-kettle, surrounded
by warm water. Then increase the heat, and simmer until the rice is
tender. Cream butter and sugar, and whisk into the eggs, until very
light. When the rice is almost cold, stir all together, and bake in a
buttered dish three-quarters of an hour. Eat warm with sauce, or cold
with sugar and cream.


  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Green Pea Soup.
  Mutton Chops, Breaded.      Stewed Tomatoes.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Batter Pudding.
  ——


GREEN PEA SOUP.

  3 lbs. lean beef.
  3 quarts of water.
  ½ peck of green peas.
  Salt and pepper.
  4 tablespoonfuls of rice-flour.
  Chopped parsley.

Boil the empty pea-pods in the water one hour. Strain these out, put
in the beef, cut up fine, and cook gently one hour and a half longer,
or until the beef is in rags. Add the peas; boil half an hour, and rub
hard through a colander to pulp the peas. Return to the fire, season,
and stir in the rice-flour wet up in cold water, and the parsley. Stir
ten minutes, and serve.


BREADED MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim neatly, cutting off all the fat and skin. Roll in beaten egg, then
in cracker-crumbs, and fry in hot dripping, turning as the under-side
browns. Drain well and serve, standing upon the thick part around the
base of your potatoes.


MASHED POTATOES.

After mashing soft and smooth with butter, milk, and salt, mound upon a
flat, hot dish, with the chops laid up against them.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Empty a can of tomatoes an hour before you mean to use them, and leave
in a crockery bowl. Put on in a saucepan, and stew twenty minutes;
add salt, pepper, a little sugar, and a good spoonful of butter, and
simmer ten minutes more.


LETTUCE.

Cut up—not chop—and pour over them a dressing made of—

  2 tablespoonfuls of salad-oil.
  ½ teaspoonful of salt.
  5 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
  1 teaspoonful white sugar.
  ½ teaspoonful of made mustard.
  1 teaspoonful pepper.
  Yolks of 2 boiled eggs.

Rub the eggs to a powder, add all the ingredients except the vinegar,
and let alone five or ten minutes. Then beat in the vinegar with your
“Dover” egg-whisk until the mixture is smooth. Garnish with a chain of
the whites.


BATTER PUDDING.

  1 pint of milk.
  4 eggs—whites and yolks beaten separately.
  2 even cups of prepared flour.
  1 teaspoonful salt.

Beat up the eggs, and add the yolks to the milk. Salt the flour, and
stir in alternately with the whites. Beat hard and bake in a buttered
pudding-dish forty-five minutes. Eat with sweet sauce, at once, as it
soon falls.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Fine White Soup.
  Calf’s Liver, Larded.      Green Pea Pancakes.
  Asparagus in Ambush.
  Bermuda Potatoes _en robe de chamber_.
  ——
  Pine-Apple Pie.
  ——


FINE WHITE SOUP.

  3 lbs. veal knuckle, cracked to pieces.
  1 old chicken, cut up as for fricassee.
  1 onion.
  ¼ lb. of almonds blanched some hours before you use them, and when
          quite dry and brittle, pounded to a paste.
  Lump of white sugar.
  1 pint of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter, cut up in two tablespoonfuls of
          corn-starch.
  1 teaspoonful essence of celery.
  Pepper and salt.
  5 quarts cold water.
  Soda.

Cut the meat from the knuckle; put this, the chicken, bones and onion,
with the water, and boil slowly two hours. Take out the chicken, and
put into a deep jar or bowl, sprinkling well with salt. Cook the soup
an hour longer; strain back into the pot, pressing the meat hard. Take
out half of the liquid, season well, and pour upon the chicken, cover,
and set in a cold place for to-morrow’s “stock.” Season the soup in
the kettle with pepper and salt. Boil and skim. Chop the veal-shreds
very fine, and mix with the almonds. Have ready the milk, scalding hot,
with a pinch of soda stirred in, and pour upon the veal-and-almond
paste. Set over the fire in a saucepan, and stir in the butter and
corn-starch, simmering five minutes. Add the sugar, and turn into the
tureen, then pour in the soup. Stir all up well, and let them stand,
covered, in hot water, a few minutes. Stir up again and send to table.


CALF’S LIVER, LARDED.

Cut half a pound of fat salt pork into lardoons, and thrust them, about
half an inch apart, into a fresh liver, so that they will project on
both sides. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a saucepan, with a
small onion minced, pepper, and some sweet herbs chopped, also a few
spoonfuls of strained tomato (left over from yesterday). Cover closely,
and set in a frying-pan of boiling water for one hour, keeping the
outer pan full all the time, and turning the liver twice. Then, take
out the saucepan, and set over the fire, but cook _slowly_. When the
liver is nicely browned below, turn it. At the end of forty minutes,
boil up once sharply—and for the first time. Take out the liver, and
keep hot. Add a little boiling water to the gravy, strain, thicken with
browned flour, and pour over the liver.


GREEN PEA PANCAKES.

Two cups of green peas, boiled, and mashed when hot. Season with
butter, pepper, and salt, and when cold, beat in two eggs, a cupful of
milk, half a teaspoonful of soda, and twice as much cream of tartar,
sifted twice through half a cupful of flour. Beat well, and bake as you
would griddle-cakes. Eat very hot.


ASPARAGUS IN AMBUSH.

  The green tops of two bunches of asparagus.
  8 or 9 stale biscuits, or small, light rolls.
  2 cups of milk.
  4 eggs.
  1 great spoonful of butter, rolled in flour.
  Salt and pepper to taste.

Take out the crumb from the rolls, when you have cut off the tops to
serve as covers, and set them open in the oven to crisp, laying the
tops by them. Heat the milk, pour upon the beaten eggs; stir over
the fire until they begin to thicken, when add the butter and flour.
Lastly, put in the asparagus, boiled tender, and chopped fine. Fill the
rolls with this mixture, put on the tops, and serve hot. _Good!_


BERMUDA POTATOES _en robe de chambre_.

Put on in boiling water, and cook until a fork will pierce them. Throw
off the water and set back, uncovered, upon the range to dry off,
strewing with salt at the same time, Send to table in a dish lined with
a napkin, peeling as you eat them.


PINE-APPLE PIE.

  1 large pine-apple, pared and grated.
  1 cup of sugar.
  ½ cup of butter.
  5 beaten eggs.
  A little nutmeg.
  Some good pie-paste.

Cream, butter and sugar. Beat in the yolks for three minutes; add
pine-apple and spice; lastly, the whites. Bake in open shells of paste.
Eat cold.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Mulligatawny Soup.
  Chicken Patés.      Sea-Kale.
  Potatoes au Maître d’Hôtel.      Lettuce and Cress Salad.
  ——
  Queen of Puddings with Strawberry Méringue.
  ——


MULLIGATAWNY SOUP.

Skim the stock set aside yesterday, and strain from the chicken into a
soup-pot. Add a small onion and half a cupful of raw rice, and simmer
forty minutes, or until the rice is tender. Wet up a tablespoonful
of curry powder with the juice of a lemon, and stir in then a large
spoonful of butter rolled in flour. Boil once and serve.


CHICKEN PATÉS.

Chop the meat of your cold chicken fine, and season well. Make a
large cupful of rich drawn butter, and while it is on the fire, stir
in two eggs boiled hard and minced very fine, also a little chopped
parsley—then the chicken-meat. Let it almost boil. Have ready some
_paté_ pans of good paste, baked quickly to a light brown. Slip while
hot from the pans, fill with the mixture, and set in the oven to heat.
Arrange upon a dish and send up hot.


SEA-KALE.

Choose fresh, and pick over carefully; cook twenty-five minutes in
boiling, salted water; drain and press well. Chop fine; put back in
the saucepan with a great lump of butter, pepper, salt, and the juice
of half a lemon. Stir and beat, and heap upon slices of buttered
crustless toast laid upon a hot dish.


POTATOES AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Put a cup of milk into a saucepan, and when it heats, stir in two
tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in flour, with salt, pepper, and
chopped parsley; then about two cupfuls cold boiled potatoes, sliced
rather thick. Heat scalding hot, take from the fire and add a pinch of
grated lemon-peel with the juice of half a lemon. Serve in a deep dish.


LETTUCE AND CRESS SALAD.

Cut up lettuce and cresses, having washed both well, and pile in a
salad bowl; then pour over them a dressing made by beating together
four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, one teaspoonful each of salt and sugar,
half as much mustard, and when these are well mixed, adding, gradually,
two tablespoonfuls of best salad oil. Toss with a silver fork, and
serve.


QUEEN OF PUDDINGS WITH STRAWBERRY MÉRINGUE.

  1½ cups of sugar.
  5 eggs.
  2 cups fine bread-crumbs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Lemon flavoring.
  1 quart fresh milk.
  1 pint fresh strawberries.

Cream the butter, and a cup of sugar. Beat in the whipped yolks; the
crumbs, soaked in the milk; lastly, the seasoning. Fill a pudding-dish
two-thirds full and bake until the custard is “set.” Draw to the mouth
of the oven, and cover with the strawberries, rolled in sugar, then
with a _méringue_ made of the whipped whites and the half-cup of sugar.
Bake until the _méringue_ begins to color. Eat cold with cream.


  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  A Soup Maigre.
  Fried Shad.      Roe Croquettes.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Stewed Tomatoes with Onion and Bread.
  ——
  Cup Custards, Baked.
  Corn-Starch Cake.
  ——


A SOUP MAIGRE.

  2 carrots.
  2 onions.
  1 large potato.
  1 pint of green peas.
  ½ cup of raw rice.
  1 tablespoonful of white sugar.
  2 great spoonfuls of butter rolled in flour.
  Pepper and salt.
  4 quarts of cold water.
  Dripping for frying.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.

Slice the vegetables, with the exception of the peas, and fry them in
dripping until brown. Put with the herbs into a kettle and cover with
the water. Cook slowly two hours, reducing the liquid one-third. Pulp
the vegetables through a colander, return the soup to the fire with the
rice and peas, and stew half an hour. Season, stir in the butter and
flour with the sugar. Simmer five minutes and serve.


FRIED SHAD.

Clean, wash, and wipe a fine roe-shad. Split it and cut each side into
four or five pieces, leaving out the head and tail, and cutting off
the fins: Sprinkle with salt and pepper; roll in flour and fry to a
fine brown in plenty of lard or dripping, turning as each piece browns.
Drain well, and serve hot. Garnish with sliced cucumber, pickle and
parsley, and pass sliced lemon with it. Send around mashed potatoes
with this dish.


ROE CROQUETTES.

  The roes of your shad, parboiled, cooled, and rubbed into a loose,
          granulated mass.
  One fourth as much mashed potato as you have roes.
  ½ cup of drawn butter with a raw egg beaten in it.
  Chopped parsley, salt, pepper, and ½ teaspoonful of anchovy paste
          for seasoning.
  Beaten egg and cracker-crumbs.
  Dripping.

Work roes, potato, drawn butter, and seasoning together; put over the
fire in a saucepan and stir well until hot. When almost cold, make into
short rolls, dip in raw egg, then in rolled cracker, and fry to a nice
brown. Drain in a heated colander, and pile upon a hot dish.


MASHED POTATOES.

Proceed with this oft-repeated and ever-welcome dish as I have directed
upon other pages.


STEWED TOMATOES WITH ONION AND BREAD.

Empty a can of tomatoes into a saucepan, and when hot, add a small
onion, sliced, with pepper, salt, and a little sugar. Stew twenty
minutes, and add a tablespoonful of butter and a good handful of
bread-crumbs. Simmer five minutes more and pour out.


CUP CUSTARDS—BAKED.

  1 quart of milk.
  5 eggs.
  5 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Nutmeg and vanilla.
  Powdered sugar for _méringue_.

Scald the milk, and pour upon the beaten yolks and sugar. Add to
this, when you have flavored it, the whites of two eggs. Fill small
stone-ware cups and set in a dripping-pan of boiling water. Bake until
“set,” cover with a _méringue_ made of the whisked whites (reserved)
and a little powdered sugar. Bake until they begin to be tinged. Eat
cold from the cups.


CORN-STARCH CAKE.

Please see “COMMON-SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD” Series No. 1, “General
Receipts,” page 333.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Sweetbread Soup.
  Beefsteaks.      Green Peas.
  Baked Rice.      Roast Potatoes.
  ——
  Omelette aux Confitures.
  Tea and Albert Biscuits.
  ——


SWEETBREAD SOUP.

  4 lbs. of lean, coarse veal.
  ½ lb. corned ham.
  2 lbs. beef bones.
  2 fine sweetbreads.
  Bunch of parsley.
  1 onion.
  2 tablespoonfuls of tapioca, soaked in cold water one hour.
  Pepper and salt.
  5 quarts of cold water.

Cut the meat into strips; crack the bones; mince the onion and parsley,
and put on with the water. Cook slowly four hours. Strain; set aside
some bits of “ragged” veal and ham for your dish of rice. Put the rest
into a crock; season highly and pour on half your soup stock—setting
this by, as usual, in a cool place for Sunday. Season the remainder
of the broth; boil and skim; put in the sweetbreads, and cook half an
hour. Take them out and drop into cold water. Add the tapioca to the
soup; simmer ten minutes; chop the sweetbreads, and put them back; boil
one minute and serve.


BEEFSTEAKS.

Flatten your steaks with the side of an axe or hatchet, taking out the
bones for your soup. Butter a gridiron—if you have no “broiler”—and
cook the steaks quickly over a bright fire, turning often as they drip.
Lay upon a hot dish; butter abundantly and season. Cover with another
heated platter, and let them stand five minutes before serving.


BAKED RICE.

Wash a cup of rice well. Take a cupful of broth from your soup-pot;
strain through a thin cloth, and add twice as much boiling water, with
a little salt. Put in the rice and cook slowly until it has taken up
all the water and is soft. Pour in a large cup of hot milk in which
have been mixed two eggs (raw), two tablespoonfuls of grated cheese,
and a tablespoonful of butter. Stir up well; add about half a cupful of
minced veal and ham, taken from your soup; turn into a greased mould;
cover and bake one hour in a dripping-pan of hot water. Dip in cold
water, and invert upon a flat dish.


GREEN PEAS.

See receipts for last Sunday week.


ROAST POTATOES.

Roast in a moderate oven until soft. Cut a piece _nearly_ off the top
of each; thrust a thin-bladed knife into the heart, and slip in a bit
of butter. Replace the skin and send up hot.


OMELETTE AUX CONFITURES.

  7 eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  ½ cup of milk (or cream).
  Grated peel of ½ lemon.
  ½ cup of marmalade or jam.

Beat yolks and whites apart and very stiff. Add sugar, lemon, and
milk to the yolks; then, with a few rapid whirls of your “beater,”
the whites. Put the marmalade in the bottom of a neat bake-dish
(buttered), pour on the omelette, and bake until it has puffed up high
and begins to “crust” well. Serve at once, or it will fall. Eight
minutes should suffice to cook it—at the outside.


TEA AND ALBERT BISCUITS

May be partaken of at the same time with the omelette, or afterwards.



  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Sago Soup.
  Stuffed Shoulder of Mutton with Potato Edging.
  Boiled Asparagus.      Purée of Peas.
  ——
  Neapolitan Blanc-Mange.
  ——


SAGO SOUP.

  The stock made on yesterday.
  Little more than ½ cup of pearl sago.
  3 eggs.
  1 cup of milk.
  Pepper and salt.

Take the fat from your cold stock; pour off carefully from the sediment
and strain. Heat to boiling. Wash the sago well; soak in warm water
half an hour; put into the soup, and simmer twenty-five minutes.
Meanwhile, heat the milk in another vessel, and pour upon the eggs.
Heat this until it begins to thicken, pour into the tureen, season with
a little salt and pepper, and turn in the boiling soup. It should be
about as thick as hot custard when all the ingredients are in.


STUFFED SHOULDER OF MUTTON.

Get your butcher to take out the bone. (It will help out to-morrow’s
soup.) Fill the hole from which it was taken with a good force-meat
of crumbs, minced pork, sweet herbs, pepper, salt, and one raw egg.
Sew up the edges of the skin to keep in the stuffing, and roast about
fifteen minutes—not more—for each pound, basting often, at first with
the boiling water you have poured upon it, at the last twice with
butter. When done, brush with beaten egg; sift crumbs all over it; put
into a stout stone-ware dish—or one of block-tin—surround with the
potato-edging, and brown in a quick oven. Pour off the fat from the
gravy, strain, thicken with browned flour, and serve in a boat.


POTATO EDGING.

Mash the potatoes very soft with milk and butter; beat in two eggs;
return to the saucepan and stir until smoking hot all through. Let them
get quite cool; then, mould by pressing firmly into a wet egg-cup, and
turning out each form upon the mutton-dish. Arrange the little cones
side by side until you have a barricade about the meat. Set in the oven
and brown, glazing with butter just before you take the dish out. Serve
a cone with each slice of mutton.


BOILED ASPARAGUS.

See receipt on first Sunday in May.


PURÉE OF GREEN PEAS.

  Take for half a peck of peas—
  1 small onion.
  3 tablespoonfuls of cream.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter cut up in one tablespoonful of flour.
  1 lump of white sugar.
  Pepper and salt.

Boil the empty pods twenty minutes in hot, salted water. Strain these
out, and put in the peas with the sugar. Boil gently until they are
very soft. Rub through a fine colander. Add a cupful of the water in
which they were cooked, pepper and salt, and put over the fire. When
very hot, stir in the floured butter, and, when this is mixed, the
cream. Stir three minutes and pour out into a dish lined with strips of
fried bread.


NEAPOLITAN BLANC-MANGE.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 package Cooper’s gelatine, soaked two hours in a cup of cold water.
  ¾ of a cup of sugar.
  1 great spoonful grated chocolate, wet in a little boiling water.
  Beaten yolk of an egg.
  1 great spoonful currant jelly, or cranberry jam.
  Rose-water for flavoring.

Heat the milk to boiling, stir in the sugar, then the gelatine.
Cook about five minutes, and strain through thin muslin. Divide the
blanc-mange into four equal portions. Beat the chocolate well into one;
heat for one minute, and put by in a cup or bowl. Do the same with the
egg to a second, and the currant jelly for the third. This last must
be heated carefully, and a little sugar added, that the milk may not
curdle. Leave the fourth white, and flavor with rose-water. When cold
and a little stiff, pour into a wet mould—the white first; when this
is so firm as to bear the weight of the next without mixing, the pink;
then, the yellow; lastly, the brown. Do this on Saturday. On Sunday dip
the mould in warm water, work the surface free with your fingers, and
turn out upon a flat dish. Eat with cream and sugar, or brandied fruit.



  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Clam Soup.
  Cold Mutton.      Brussels-Sprouts.
  Raw Tomatoes.      Stewed Potatoes.
  ——
  Oranges and Bananas.
  Coffee and Cake.
  ——


CLAM SOUP.

Early in the morning crack your mutton-bone, and put on in a quart of
cold water, at the back of the range. When little more than a large
cupful of liquor remains, take it off and strain into a bowl to cool.
When perfectly cold take off the fat, put in a quart of clam liquor
and the hard parts of fifty clams. Season with a teaspoonful of minced
onion, as much chopped parsley, a pinch of mace, pepper and salt to
taste, and cook, covered, half an hour after the boil begins. Heat in
another vessel two cups of milk; when hot, stir in two tablespoonfuls
of butter, rolled in a heaping tablespoonful of flour, and set in
boiling water to keep hot, after it has boiled two minutes. Strain the
soup back into the pot, put in the soft parts of the clams—the only
digestible portions—and simmer five minutes. Pour the thickened milk
into the tureen, stir in the soup, and serve.

This is a delightful and nutritious soup, and since you are to have
cold meat for dinner, you need not grudge the care of preparing it,
even on Job’s birthday.


COLD MUTTON.

Your stuffed shoulder will be nearly as nice cold as hot. Garnish it
tastefully with curled parsley and bleached lettuce-leaves.


BRUSSELS SPROUTS.

Cook in boiling, salted water twenty-five minutes; drain well; add a
liberal lump of butter, with pepper and salt to taste, and put into a
deep dish.


RAW TOMATOES.

Peel with a sharp knife; slice, and lay in a salad-bowl. Season with a
dressing of oil, vinegar, salt and pepper in the proportions given on
last Thursday.


STEWED POTATOES.

Boil whole until a fork will pierce them. Peel quickly; crack, without
breaking, each, by pressing it, and drop into a saucepan containing
a large cup of milk, almost on the boil. When all the potatoes are
in, add two tablespoonfuls of butter, with salt and pepper. Cover and
heat—below the boiling point—until the potatoes begin to crumble. Pour
into a deep dish.


ORANGES AND BANANAS.

Serve whole, upon china plates, with a knife for each.


COFFEE AND CAKE.

You need not be ashamed of “cold meat on Monday,” even should John
have “picked up” his unexpected friend on the street, when your bright
coffee-urn, with the fragrant contents, flanked by a basket of sliced
home-made cake, comes in as a reserved force.



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Brown Beef Soup.
  Veal Cutlets with Ham.      String Beans.
  Chopped Potatoes.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Graham Hasty Pudding.
  ——


BROWN BEEF SOUP.

  3 lbs. of coarse, lean beef, cut into strips.
  3 onions—small ones.
  3 quarts of cold water.
  1 teaspoonful mixed allspice and mace.
  Bunch of sweet herbs chopped.
  1 teaspoonful Colgate’s essence of celery.
  Glass of brown sherry.
  Dripping.
  Toasted bread.

Fry the sliced onion brown in good dripping; then the beef, quickly.
Put into a soup-pot, cover with the water; put on a tight lid, and stew
four hours. Strain and press hard. Let the soup cool to throw up the
fat. Skim, and return to the pot, with the salt, pepper, herbs, and
spice. Simmer fifteen minutes; add wine and celery, and pour into a
tureen upon dice of crisp, buttered toast.


VEAL CUTLETS AND HAM.

  2 lbs. veal cutlets without bone.
  1½ lbs. of ham.
  Grated lemon-peel.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 raw, beaten egg.
  Rolled cracker.
  Dripping or lard.

Boil the slices of ham ten minutes; let them get cold, and cut of the
same size and shape as the strips of veal, viz., about three inches
long by one and a half wide. Salt and pepper the veal; sprinkle each
cutlet with a pinch of lemon-peel; roll in egg, then cracker, and fry
to a good brown. Fry the ham in its own fat in another pan, and lay
upon a hot dish, alternately with the cutlets.


STRING-BEANS.

If fresh, top and tail, and, with a sharp knife, take off the strings
on both sides. Cut into short pieces, and cook tender in boiling water,
and a little salt. Drain well, heap upon a hot dish; butter freely, and
season to taste.


CHOPPED POTATOES.

Chop cold boiled potatoes rather coarsely. Have ready a great spoonful
of butter in a saucepan, with a little grated lemon-peel, pepper and
salt. Stir in the potatoes until very hot, but do not let them brown.
Serve in a deep dish, after draining.


LETTUCE.

Pick out and pull apart the hearts and best blanched leaves. Pour over
it a dressing such as was directed on last Thursday.


GRAHAM HASTY PUDDING.

  2 eggs.
  1 quart of milk.
  2 even cups of Graham flour.
  ½ teaspoonful of salt.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.

Heat half the milk in a _greased_ saucepan or farina-kettle. Wet the
flour with the rest, and beat very light with the butter—melted—the
eggs and salt. Stir this into the hot milk—or, better still—pour the
milk upon it. When thoroughly mixed, return to the fire, and stir
fifteen minutes, surrounded by boiling water at its highest bubble.
Take from the range, leave in the water five minutes; stir up again,
and serve in a deep, uncovered dish. Eat with butter, sugar, and nutmeg.



  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Green Asparagus Soup.
  Stewed Chicken.      Scalloped Tomatoes.
  Corn Fritters.      Grape Jelly.
  Marmalade Roll.
  ——


GREEN ASPARAGUS SOUP.

  3 lbs. knuckle of veal.
  ½ lb. streaked salt pork.
  3 bunches of asparagus.
  4 quarts of water.
  1 pint of spinach leaves.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 small onion, sliced.
  Butter and sugar.

Put the veal, pork, onion, and the hard parts of the
asparagus-stalks—all cut up fine—on in the water, and boil gently four
hours. Meanwhile cook the spinach tender in a little water; chop and
squeeze it through double tarlatan back into the cupful of water in
which it was boiled. Add a lump of sugar to the green liquid. Strain
the soup; season, boil once, and skim; put in the green heads of
the asparagus (kept until now in cold water) and boil slowly twenty
minutes. Stir in two tablespoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour, and
when this has boiled a minute, the green water. Simmer five minutes
more, and pour out. Dip up from the bottom with each ladleful in
helping the soup.


STEWED CHICKEN.

Cut into joints, leaving none of the pieces large. Put the scrags,
feet (having scalded off the skin), and giblets into two cupfuls of
water, and stew until the meat is in rags. Put a quarter of a pound
of pork, cut as fine as shavings, in the bottom of a saucepan; lay on
this a teaspoonful of minced onion, and then the uncooked chicken.
Strain, and partly cool the gravy, which should have boiled down to one
cupful—setting by the giblets. Pour this over the chicken, pepper and
salt; put on a tight top, and cook very slowly one hour. Then increase
the heat, but still do not let it boil hard, for half an hour longer.
Open the saucepan at the end of the first hour to change the upper
pieces to lower places—and again when the half hour is up, to see if
they are all tender. If not, cover and cook until they are. Take out
the chicken, lay in order upon a hot-water dish, and add to the gravy
the giblets, minced fine, and a tablespoonful of butter rubbed into one
of flour. Boil one minute, and pour upon a half cup of milk in which
have been beaten two eggs. Set over the fire, and stir one minute, but
do not let the gravy boil. Pour upon the chicken.


SCALLOPED TOMATOES.

If raw tomatoes are dear still, drain off most of the liquor from a can
of the vegetable. Cover the bottom of a pie-dish with bread-crumbs, lay
in the tomatoes, well seasoned with butter, pepper, salt, and sugar;
cover thickly with fine, dry crumbs; put dots of butter, with pepper
and salt, over all, and bake, covered, half an hour—then, brown quickly.


CORN FRITTERS.

Drain the liquor from a can of corn, and chop the grains in a
chopping-tray. Beat into this paste three eggs, one cup of milk, a
heaping tablespoonful of sugar, and as much warmed butter, with two
tablespoonfuls of prepared flour. Beat thoroughly, season with pepper
and salt, and fry, by the spoonful, upon a greased griddle.


MARMALADE ROLL.

  1 quart prepared flour—Hecker’s _always_, when you can get it.
  1 tablespoonful of lard and two of butter.
  1 pint of milk, or enough for soft dough.
  1 cup of sweet marmalade.

Rub the lard into the flour; wet into a soft paste with the milk, and
roll out very thin. Baste thickly with the butter, sprinkle with flour
lightly, and roll up in close folds. Lay upon ice, or in a very cold
place, one hour. Roll out into a square sheet, a quarter of an inch
thick, spread with the marmalade, leaving a narrow margin all around,
and roll up neatly. Lay in a buttered baking-pan, the joined edge
downward, and bake three-quarters of an hour. Wash over with white of
egg, beaten with a little sugar, just before you take it up. Eat hot
with a good sauce.



  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Sheep’s Head Soup.
  Roast Beef.      Fried Potatoes.
  Asparagus with Eggs.      Spinach on Toast.
  ——
  Corn-Starch Blanc-Mange with Preserves.
  ——


SHEEP’S HEAD SOUP.

  1 sheep’s head, dressed with the skin on.
  2 onions.
  2 carrots.
  Bunch of parsley.
  Crumbs and egg for force-meat balls.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch.
  Pepper and salt.
  Dripping.
  4 quarts of cold water.

You will probably have to coax your butcher to dress the head properly,
but the head itself he will be willing to give you, as almost worthless
in his eyes. Be sure it is quite clean, even to the mouth. Soak it in
tepid water, one hour—then put into a pot with the vegetables, sliced,
the chopped herbs and the cold water. Cook gently four hours. Strain
off the soup, rubbing the vegetables through the sieve; let it get
almost cool, that you may remove the fat from the top, and put back
over the fire with pepper and salt. Chop the brains and mix them into a
paste with an equal quantity of crumbs; also pepper, salt, and raw egg,
with enough flour to enable you to roll into little balls. Fry these to
a nice brown, drain in a colander, and put into your tureen. Skim the
boiling soup and stir in the corn-starch wet with half a cup of milk,
then the tongue, skinned and cut into dice. Boil once and pour into the
tureen.


ROAST BEEF.

Put into your dripping-pan; pour a cupful of boiling water over it,
and roast, basting often, allowing a quarter of an hour to the pound.
Towards the last, pepper and salt, dredge with flour, and baste once
well with butter. If you send made gravy to the table, take off all the
“top-grease,” thicken the brown juice in the dripping-pan with browned
flour, boil up, and pour out into a boat.


FRIED POTATOES.

Cut peeled potatoes into long strips, not too thin. Lay in cold water
one hour, dry between two towels, and fry in boiling fat, a little
salt, to a light brown. Drain and dish upon a napkin.


SPINACH UPON TOAST.

Wash well. Cook twenty minutes in boiling, salted water. Drain and
chop very fine. Put a tablespoonful of butter into a saucepan with
a teaspoonful of sugar, a pinch of nutmeg, and pepper and salt. Stir
in the spinach, and beat smooth while it heats. At the last add a
tablespoonful of cream, or two of milk. Pour upon crustless slices of
buttered toast laid upon a flat dish.


ASPARAGUS WITH EGGS.

Boil a bunch of asparagus twenty minutes; cut off the tender tops and
lay in a deep pie-plate, buttering, salting, and peppering well. Beat
four eggs just enough to break up the yolks, add a tablespoonful of
melted butter, with pepper and salt, and pour upon the asparagus. Bake
eight minutes in a quick oven, and serve immediately.


CORN-STARCH BLANC-MANGE WITH PRESERVES.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch wet in cold water.
  3 beaten eggs.
  1 cup of sugar.
  Grated peel of half a lemon.
  1 saltspoonful of salt.

Scald the milk in a farina-kettle; stir in corn-starch, lemon, and
salt, and cook five minutes. Pour this upon the beaten eggs and sugar,
return to the fire and stir two minutes more. Pour into a wet mould and
set in a cold place for four or five hours. Turn out upon a broad glass
dish, and pour rich, sweet preserves about the base.

In helping it out, put a spoonful of preserve upon each share of
blanc-mange.


  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Purée of Tomatoes.
  Boiled Bass with Mushrooms.      Roast Sweetbreads.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Succotash.
  ——
  Strawberry Méringue.
  ——


PURÉE OF TOMATOES.

  1 can of tomatoes.
  2 cups boiling milk with half a teaspoonful of soda stirred in.
  1 heaping teaspoonful sugar.
  1 small minced onion.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter rubbed up with one of flour.
  Pepper and salt.
  Handful of dry bread-crumbs.
  1 cup of boiling water.

Put tomatoes and onion over the fire with the hot water. Boil half
an hour; strain and rub through a colander, working the tomatoes to
a pulp. Meanwhile, boil the milk, stir in soda, butter and flour,
and after one boil, keep hot. Put pepper, salt, and sugar with the
tomatoes; simmer five minutes; pour into the tureen; stir in the
crumbs, and one minute later the thickened milk. Serve at once. If the
milk be cooked with the _purée_, it will almost surely curdle.


BOILED BASS WITH MUSHROOMS.

Clean a fine bass, and sew up in a thin cloth. Put into boiling water
in which you have mixed four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, with six whole
black peppers, and a little salt. Cook about twelve minutes to the
pound. Prepare a cupful of drawn butter, boil half a can of mushrooms
twenty minutes; drain, chop up and stir, with the juice of half a lemon
and a little pepper, into the drawn butter. Simmer together three
minutes—put the fish upon a hot dish, and pour one-third of the sauce
over it, serving the rest in a boat.


ROAST SWEETBREADS.

  3 or 4 fine sweetbreads.
  1 raw egg.
  ½ cup rolled crackers.
  1 cup of gravy (saved from yesterday’s fricassee).
  2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
  1 tablespoonful mushroom or walnut catsup.
  Pepper and salt.
  Rounds of fried bread.

Parboil and blanch the sweetbreads. Dry, and dip, first, in egg, then,
in cracker-crumbs. Lay in a small dripping-pan; pour the butter over
them, set in the oven, and roast, covered, three-quarters of an hour,
basting often with the gravy. Dish upon fried bread. Add the catsup to
the gravy; boil up and strain over the sweetbreads.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and pass with the fish.


SUCCOTASH.

Drain off the can liquor; cook the succotash half an hour in boiling
water; drain, add a cup of hot milk, and stir in pepper, salt, and a
great spoonful of butter cut up in flour. Simmer three minutes and pour
out.


STRAWBERRY MÉRINGUE.

Make a good puff-paste, cut out large, and round as a dinner-plate,
and bake to a light brown in a quick oven. Draw to the oven door; lay
strawberries, rolled in sugar, over it, and cover these an inch deep
with a _méringue_ made of the whites of four eggs whisked stiff, with
three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. Bake until the _méringue_
is faintly tinged with yellow brown. Eat fresh, but not hot. It is
delicious.


  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Amber Soup.
  Ham and Omelette.      Ladies Cabbage.
  Buttered Rice.      Summer Salad.
  ——
  Irish Potato Pie.
  ——


AMBER SOUP.

This soup should be prepared very early in the day; therefore, have the
materials in the house overnight.

  4 lbs. lean beef.
  2 slices of _lean_ ham.
  2 lbs. of veal-bones.
  2 onions, sliced and fried.
  1 carrot.
  2 teaspoonfuls essence of celery.
  Pepper, and, if required, salt.
  ½ cup granulated tapioca.
  Whites and shell of an egg.
  5 quarts of cold water.
  Butter and dripping.
  Burnt sugar.

Cut the meat into strips; put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a
soup-pot, and lay the meat in it. Let it stand where it will heat
slowly for half an hour. Then set over the fire, and stir until the
meat is glazed with a brownish crust. Put a quart of water—cold—upon
it, and bring gradually to a boil. Fry the onion and carrot in dripping
to a fine brown, and drain off the fat, then put the vegetables into
the pot with the meat, as soon as the latter is boiling hot. Cook half
an hour; put in the rest of the cold water, the minced ham, and the
bones broken to bits. Boil slowly four hours, then strain. Put meat and
bones—highly seasoned—into a stone vessel, and pour half the soup over
them for to-morrow. Put the rest back into the soup-kettle; season and
boil up. Skim with care; put in the white and shell of an egg; boil
three minutes; take from the fire and pour into a broad pan to cool.
Burn two tablespoonfuls of sugar in a tin cup, on the hot range, and
while still liquid, pour in half a cupful of boiling water. Let it
stand thus until you are ready for it. The tapioca should have been
soaking two hours in a little cold water. When the soup is cold, take
off fat and scum—every particle; return to the scalded pot; boil up
once, put in tapioca, and strain the sugar-water upon it. Simmer ten
minutes, or until the tapioca is clear; skim once again, and pour out.

This is a fine company soup, but you should make it once or twice
for family dinners in order to manage it properly. It is really not
difficult.


HAM AND OMELETTE.

  3 lbs. of ham, cut in _very_ thin slices.
  7 eggs.
  4 tablespoonfuls of milk.
  Pepper and a little salt.
  1 large spoonful of butter.

Lay the ham in boiling water fifteen minutes, then let it get cold. Cut
off all the rind and trim each slice neatly; then broil upon a greased
gridiron. Pepper and keep hot while you prepare the omelette. Beat
whites and yolks together with a few whirls of the beater; put in the
milk and beat fast for one minute; season and pour into a frying-pan in
which the butter is heating—not hissing. Shake briskly over the fire,
slipping your cake-turner under it to prevent sticking, and in four
minutes, double it over in the middle and turn out into a hot dish by a
dexterous inversion of the pan. Lay the ham about it in the dish.


LADIES’ CABBAGE.

Boil a firm cabbage in two waters, and let it get perfectly cold.
Chop fine; add two beaten eggs, a tablespoonful of melted butter,
pepper, salt, and a few spoonfuls of milk. Stir all up well; put into
a buttered bake-dish, strew with fine crumbs; bake, covered, half an
hour, then brown quickly. Eat hot.


BUTTERED RICE.

Boil a cup of rice soft in hot, salted water. Drain, and heap in a
deep dish. Fry an onion (sliced) very lightly in two tablespoonfuls
of butter; add pepper, and strain the hot butter over the rice in the
dish. Pass grated cheese with it.


SUMMER SALAD.

  3 heads of lettuce.
  2 handfuls cresses.
  1 cucumber, pared and sliced.
  4 radishes, also pared and cut up.
  3 hard-boiled eggs cut lengthwise into sixths.

Cut lettuces and cresses with a sharp knife, and mix with the other
vegetables in a bowl. Pour over them a dressing made as directed on
Thursday of the second week in this month. Lay the sliced eggs on the
top of all.


IRISH POTATO PIE.

  1 lb. mashed potato, rubbed through a colander.
  ½ lb. butter, creamed with the sugar.
  6 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  1 lemon, squeezed into the hot potato.
  1 teaspoonful of nutmeg, and the same of mace.
  2 cups of sugar.

Mix as you would cake, putting the whites in last, and bake in open
shells of paste. Eat cold.



  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  German Sago Soup.
  Roast Lamb.      Green Peas.
  Young Onions, Stewed.      Potato Puff.
  ——
  Strawberries and Cream.
  Silver Cake.
  ——


GERMAN SAGO SOUP.

Soak half a cup of German sago in a little cold water for two hours.
Take the fat from the top of your soup stock, and pour off carefully
from the bones, etc. If you have any left from the “amber soup,” add
that, and a cupful of boiling water. Heat, season, and skim; put in the
sago, and simmer half an hour.


ROAST LAMB.

Cook as you did the mutton, last Sunday, leaving out the stuffing and
omitting the egg and crumb coating at the last. Roast about twelve
minutes to the pound.


GREEN PEAS.

See receipt for Saturday of second week in May.


YOUNG ONIONS—STEWED.

Cook ten minutes in boiling water; throw this off, and pour on a cup of
cold milk. Stew tender in this, add pepper, salt, a tablespoonful of
butter rolled in flour; simmer five minutes and turn out.


POTATO PUFF.

Mash the potatoes very soft, beating in butter, and milk, and finally,
the whipped white of an egg. Whisk to a cream; heap roughly in a neat
bake-dish and brown in a good oven.


STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM.

Cap and pile the strawberries in a glass dish. Send around powdered
sugar and a pitcher of cream with them.


SILVER CAKE.

This delicate and handsome cake should have been made on Friday or
Saturday. Please see “COMMON-SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD,” Series No. 1,
General Receipts, page 332.


  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Baked Hotch-Potch.
  Minced Lamb, with Poached Eggs.
  Potato Cakes.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Bread Pudding.
  ——


BAKED HOTCH-POTCH.

  2 lbs. of lean beef.
  1 lb. of good sausage-meat.
  1 sliced onion.
  1 sliced cucumber.
  3 raw tomatoes peeled and sliced.
  Handful of asparagus-tops.
  1 sliced carrot.
  ¼ of a cabbage-heart, chopped fine.
  ½ cup of raw rice.
  2 cups of green peas.
  Pepper and salt.
  Cold water.

Cut the meat small and put in alternate layers with the vegetables and
rice, into a stout stone jar. Pour in three quarts of water, when you
have seasoned the vegetables. Fit a close cover on the jar, sealing
around the edges with a paste of flour and water. Set in the oven early
in the day and do not open for six hours; then pour into the tureen.
This is a good soup for Monday, and almost a dinner in itself.


MINCED LAMB.

Cut the meat from the bone of your cold roast. Salt the bone and put
by for another day’s soup. Mince the meat fine, season highly; put the
gravy left from yesterday (or a cup of your Sunday’s soup would be
even better) in a saucepan, when you have taken off the fat, heat it,
and stir in the mince. Make it very hot; thicken with a little browned
flour if it is too thin, and pile up in a flat dish, with poached eggs
and toast about it.


POACHED EGGS.

Nearly fill a frying-pan with boiling water. Add a little salt and
vinegar. Break your eggs, one at a time, into a wet saucer, and slip
from this upon the surface of the water. Cook slowly three minutes;
take up with a perforated skimmer, and lay carefully upon rounds of
buttered toast laid around the minced lamb.


POTATO CAKES.

Work cold mashed potato—or the remains of your “puff,” soft with a
little melted butter and milk; knead into it enough prepared flour to
enable you to roll it out into a sheet half an inch thick. Cut into
rounds like biscuit, and bake in a floured pan rather quickly to a good
brown. Glaze with butter just before you take them out. Eat hot.


RAW TOMATOES.

Please see receipt for last Monday.


BREAD PUDDING.

  2 cups fine crumbs.
  1 quart of milk.
  ¼ lb. of citron cut into short shavings.
  4 eggs.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  ¼ teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and mace.
  2 tablespoonfuls of brandy.
  1 tablespoonful melted butter.

Soak the crumbs in the milk to a soft paste. Put a layer of this into
a buttered bake-dish. Sprinkle with citron, then spice, and cover with
more soaked crumbs. Having nearly filled the dish in this order, pour
over all the eggs whipped light with sugar, butter, and brandy. Bake
covered twenty-five minutes, then brown. Eat warm. It will need no
sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Cracker Soup.
  Beefsteak and Onion.      Green Peas.
  Baked Corn.      Cress-Salad.
  ——
  Jersey Puffs.
  ——


CRACKER SOUP.

  The cracked bone of the cold lamb.
  1 lb. lean mutton, chopped up.
  ½ lb. Boston crackers, split.
  2 quarts of cold water.
  2 cups boiling milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, cut up in one teaspoonful of flour.
  Pepper, salt, and a pinch of mace.
  1 sliced onion.
  A little chopped parsley.

Put meat, onion, and bones on in the water and cook slowly two hours.
Strain and cool, and take off every particle of fat. While the soup
is cooling, put your crackers into a bowl, or tin pail, salting and
peppering them. Pour on the milk, cover closely, and set for half an
hour in boiling water at one side of the range. Return the broth to
the fire, season and skim as it heats. Now strain the milk from the
crackers, if it be not all absorbed, and turn them, with care, into
your tureen. They should be like a jelly, yet retain their shape. Stir
into the soup the floured butter and parsley; boil one minute and pour
slowly upon the crackers. Set the tureen in hot water—covered—ten
minutes, before sending to the table.


BEEFSTEAK AND ONION.

Broil the steak in the usual manner and lay upon a hot dish. Pepper
and salt, and strain over it three tablespoonfuls of butter in which
a sliced Bermuda onion has simmered—not browned—for ten minutes.
Cover with a hot tin platter for five minutes, and make cuts in the
steak, here and there, to draw out the juices and enable the butter to
penetrate it. This is a nicer way of flavoring a steak than the usual
fashion of serving the onion with it.


GREEN PEAS.

Boil twenty minutes in hot, salted water, with a lump of white sugar,
unless the peas are newly gathered from the home garden. When tender,
drain well, pepper, and add a generous lump of butter. Serve hot.


BAKED CORN.

Open a can of sweet corn; drain and chop it fine. Beat up three eggs
with a tablespoonful of sugar, the same of butter, two cups of milk,
pepper and salt to taste. Stir in the corn and bake forty-five minutes
in a buttered pudding-dish.


CRESS-SALAD.

Cut up—not too small—pile in a salad-bowl, sprinkle with sugar, and
pour over it a dressing made by working up a saltspoonful each of salt,
pepper, and made mustard with two tablespoonfuls of oil, and when this
is well mixed, adding, a few drops at a time, and whipping these in
with an egg-beater, four tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Toss up with a
silver fork.


JERSEY PUFFS.

  1 quart Hecker’s prepared flour, sifted with a saltspoonful of salt.
  1 tablespoonful of butter melted in 2 cups of hot milk.
  5 eggs—very well whisked.

While milk and butter are cooling—a little above blood-heat—beat in
the yolks, then the flour, and let the batter get stone cold before
whipping in the frothed whites. Bake in greased muffin rings in a quick
oven. Serve as soon as they are baked. Tear open with your fingers, and
eat with liquid sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Scotch Broth.
  Roast Chickens and Pork.      Asparagus Pudding.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Tomato Salad.
  ——
  Chocolate Blanc-Mange.
  ——


SCOTCH BROTH.

  3 lbs. scrag of mutton, the meat sliced and bones broken.
  2 chopped carrots.
  2 young turnips, sliced.
  1 onion.
  Rather more than ½ cup of barley.
  3 quarts of water.
  1 quart of green peas.
  Pepper and salt.

Put on the mutton and all the vegetables, except the peas, in the
water, and cook slowly four hours. Meanwhile, soak the barley in a cup
of tepid water. Strain the broth, pulping the vegetables through the
colander. Let it cool, and take off the fat. Season, put over the fire,
skim when it reaches the boil, and add peas and barley. Simmer steadily
half an hour, and serve.


ROAST CHICKENS AND PORK.

Clean, wash, and stuff a pair of chickens. Slice half a pound of
fat salt pork very thin and bind with soft strings over the breasts
and upper parts of the bodies. Lay in a dripping-pan; pour in a cup
of boiling water, and roast one hour in a good oven, basting often.
Then clip the strings, lay the pork in the pan; dredge the chickens
with flour, and, as this colors, baste once with butter, and twice
afterwards with gravy. When the chickens are done to a fine brown, lay
upon a hot dish with the pork about them. Strain and skim the gravy,
pepper it, thicken with a little browned flour and serve in a boat.


ASPARAGUS PUDDING.

  The green tops of two bunches of asparagus, boiled tender, left to
          cool, and cut up small.
  4 eggs, well beaten.
  1 tablespoonful melted butter.
  3 tablespoonfuls prepared flour.
  1 scant cup of milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in.
  Pepper and salt.

Beat eggs, butter, pepper and salt together; add the flour; then, by
degrees, the milk, finally the asparagus. Put into a well-greased mould
with a top, and cook in a pot of boiling water nearly two hours. Turn
out upon a dish and pour a cup of drawn butter over it. It is very nice.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare in the customary way, taking care not to have them too stiff.


TOMATO SALAD.

Pare with a sharp knife; slice and lay in a salad-bowl. Make a dressing
such as was directed yesterday for your cresses, with the addition of
the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, _powdered_, and worked in with the
oil, pepper, etc. Pour over the tomatoes, and set upon ice for an hour.


CHOCOLATE BLANC-MANGE.

  1 quart milk.
  1 package Cooper’s gelatine, soaked for one hour in a cup of cold water.
  4 heaping tablespoonfuls of chocolate wet in a little milk.
  ¾ of a cup of sugar.
  2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla essence.

Boil the milk; stir in sugar and gelatine, and when these are
dissolved, the chocolate. Cook five minutes, stirring all the time, and
strain through double tarlatan, into a wet mould. Set upon ice to form.
When firm, turn out and eat with sweet cream.


  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Mock Turtle Soup.
  Boiled Corned Beef.      Young Turnips.
  Casserole of Rice with Calf’s Brains.      Green Pea Fritters.
  ——
  Bananas, Oranges, Nuts, and Raisins.
  Tea, Toasted Crackers, and Cheese.
  ——


MOCK TURTLE SOUP.

As I stated, after writing out the receipt in full for this soup (see
Wednesday—Third Week in March), I shall not repeat it in this volume.
Please, therefore, refer to the minute directions then given, and
follow them in preparing to-day’s soup—_only_ leaving out the brains in
the force-meat. You may make enough soup for two days, keeping that for
Friday upon the ice.


BOILED CORNED BEEF.

Select a piece not too salt. The brisket is a good cut for family
use, when not too fat. Boil in plenty of hot water, allowing fifteen
minutes per pound. Make a good cup of drawn butter, taking some of the
beef-liquor—strained—as a base. Chop up a little parsley and half a
pickled onion, and stir into the butter one minute before pouring it
out into a sauce-boat. Save the liquor for Saturday. For directions
for making drawn butter and other sauces, please consult “General
Receipts,” page 183.


YOUNG TURNIPS.

Peel and quarter. Cook in boiling water, a little salted, about half an
hour, or until tender. Drain, but do not mash. Pepper and salt, then
butter, after dishing them.


CASSEROLE OF RICE WITH CALF’S BRAINS.

Make a cupful of gravy from the bones and stuffing of yesterday’s
chickens. Cool and skim it. Soak a cup of rice two hours in two cups
of cold water; drain this off; put the rice into a farina-kettle with
the gravy, previously heated to a boil, and a cup of boiling water.
Season with salt and pepper, and cook tender, shaking up once in a
while, but not stirring. When the rice is nearly dry, make a rounded
hillock of it in the middle of a dish; strew with grated cheese, and
brown upon the upper grating of the oven.

Boil the calf’s brains ten minutes; lay in cold water twice as long.
Then dry well and beat up with an egg, pepper, salt, and a very little
flour. Fry, by the spoonful, in hot fat, drain, and lay around the rice.


GREEN PEA FRITTERS.

  1 pint boiled green peas, mashed while hot, with pepper, butter, and
          salt.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 cup of milk.
  Less than ½ cup prepared flour.

Beat eggs, milk, and mashed peas smooth, then add the flour and fry
upon a griddle as you would breakfast-cakes.


BANANAS, ORANGES, NUTS AND RAISINS.

Pile bananas and oranges together, garnishing with green leaves. Put
nuts and raisins upon two smaller dishes. Pass all at the same course.


TEA, TOASTED CRACKERS, AND CHEESE.

If you have a hot-water pot and a spirit-lamp, make the tea upon the
table a few minutes before it is needed, then cover the pot with a
“cozy.” This is a pretty English fashion which, I am glad to see, is
gaining ground in our country. Butter the split crackers while hot, and
send around with the tea and cheese.


  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Yesterday’s Soup.
  Lobster Fricassee.      Potato Pasty.
  String-Beans.      Boiled Asparagus.
  ——
  Strawberry Shortcake with Cream.
  ——


YESTERDAY’S SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of the cake of soup-jelly you will find in
the refrigerator, and warm the stock cautiously, lest it should scorch.
It should not quite boil.


LOBSTER FRICASSEE.

  Meat of one large lobster, boiled and cold.
  1 cup of your soup.
  ½ cup of milk.
  Juice of half a lemon.
  1 tablespoonful of butter, rolled in flour.
  Pepper and salt to liking.

Cut the lobster into dice. Put the gravy, pepper, and salt into a
saucepan, and, when hot, the lobster. Cook gently five minutes, and
put in the lemon. Heat the milk in another vessel, stir in the floured
butter; boil up; turn into a deep bowl. Pour the lobster in also, stir
up faithfully, and turn into a deep dish.


POTATO PASTY.

Chop your cold, boiled beef fine; season with pepper and add the
remains of yesterday’s drawn butter, or make more if you have none,
putting in parsley and onion pickle, chopped. Pour this mixture into a
greased bake-dish; cover with hard-boiled eggs, sliced. Work a large
cup of mashed potato soft with a cup of milk and two tablespoonfuls of
butter. Add prepared flour until you can just roll it out—the softer
the better, so long as you can handle it. Roll into a thick sheet;
spread upon the surface of your mince, printing the edges, and bake in
a moderate oven to a fine brown.


STRING-BEANS.

See Tuesday, Third Week in May.


BOILED ASPARAGUS.

Receipt given First Sunday in May.


STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE WITH CREAM.

  1 cup of powdered sugar, creamed with one tablespoonful of butter.
  3 eggs.
  1 cup of prepared flour, heaping.
  2 tablespoonfuls of cream.

Beat the yolks into the creamed butter and sugar; the cream, then the
whites, alternately with the flour. Bake in three jelly-cake tins. When
cold, lay between the cakes nearly a quart of fresh, ripe strawberries.
Sprinkle each layer with powdered sugar, and sift the same whitely over
the top. Eat fresh with cream poured upon each slice.



  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Pea and Potato Soup.
  Stewed Mutton Cutlets.      Green Peas.
  Raw Tomatoes.      Potato Scallops.
  ——
  Fig Pudding.
  ——


PEA AND POTATO SOUP.

  The liquor in which your beef was boiled on Thursday.
  10 parboiled potatoes.
  1 pint of green peas.
  1 sliced onion.
  ½ cup raw rice.
  Pepper and parsley.

Take the fat from the liquor, and put on with the onion and potatoes,
sliced. Cook one hour; strain, rubbing the vegetables through the
sieve. Pepper, and return to the fire with the rice, parsley, and peas.
Stew half an hour, or until the rice is tender. Pour out and serve. Dip
up from the bottom in helping it out.


STEWED MUTTON CUTLETS.

  3 lbs. of mutton cutlets.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  2 raw tomatoes, chopped.
  Pepper and salt.
  ½ cup of boiling water.
  Browned flour and currant jelly.

Put the butter into a saucepan, and lay in the cutlets, then the
tomatoes. Set where they will heat very slowly for one hour. Then turn
the meat, add the boiling water, and stew steadily—not fast—half an
hour, keeping the pan closely covered. Lay the cutlets upon a hot dish,
strain the gravy back into the saucepan, thicken with a little browned
flour, stir in a heaping teaspoonful of currant jelly, and when this
has melted, pour over the meat.


GREEN PEAS.

Cook as directed on Tuesday of this week.


RAW TOMATOES.

See “Tomato Salad” on Wednesday. Leave out the boiled eggs.


POTATO SCALLOPS.

Mash the potatoes light with a little milk, and an _even_ tablespoonful
of butter for every cupful. Salt and pepper to taste. Fill buttered
patty-pans, or scallop-shells with the mixture, sift fine crumbs over
the tops, and brown in a good oven. Serve in the shells.


FIG PUDDING.

  ½ lb. best white figs, washed, dried, and minced.
  2 cups of fine crumbs.
  3 eggs.
  ½ cup of beef-suet, powdered.
  2 scant cups of milk.
  ½ cup of white sugar.
  A little salt.
  A pinch of soda, dissolved in hot water, and stirred into the milk.

Soak the crumbs in the milk. Stir in the eggs beaten light with the
sugar, suet, salt, and figs. Beat hard three minutes; pour into a
buttered mould and boil two hours and a half. Eat hot with wine sauce.



JUNE.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  All-night Soup.
  Roast Beef and Round Potatoes.
  Boiled Macaroni.      Green Peas.
  ——
  Snow Custard.
  ——


ALL-NIGHT SOUP.

  4 lbs. of coarse lean beef.
  3 slices of lean ham.
  2 onions.
  2 turnips.
  2 carrots.
  2 blades of mace.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  6 tomatoes.
  Pepper and salt.
  ½ cupful of German sago.
  4 quarts of water.
  1 tablespoonful of walnut catsup.

Cut the meat into dice, and chop the vegetables. Season, as you put
them with sago and herbs in close layers, into a jar with a tight top.
About eight o’clock on Saturday night, set this in a pot of boiling
water (having tied a thick cloth over the lid of the jar) and cook
until bed-time. Leave pot and jar upon the range. When the fire is
built next day see that there is plenty of water in the pot, and pay no
more attention to your soup, except to replenish the water in the pot
with more, as hot from the tea-kettle, until half an hour before dinner
is served. Then strain the contents of the jar, pressing the vegetables
to a pulp. Divide the broth into two portions. Return one to the jar,
with the meat, and set, when cold, in the refrigerator for to-morrow.
Put the other into a saucepan, boil two minutes, skim, add the catsup,
and pour into the tureen. Mem.: _Never_ forget to let the soup stand in
a broad bowl after straining, long enough for the fat to rise and be
skimmed off.


ROAST BEEF AND ROUND POTATOES.

Roast the meat in the usual manner, and, about half an hour before
taking it out, pour off three-quarters of the gravy from the
dripping-pan and lay about the meat some balls of mashed potato, worked
smooth, with pepper, salt and a raw egg, moulded in your hands, and
rolled in flour. Turn as they brown, and, when done, drain off the
grease, and dish with the beef.


BOILED MACARONI.

Break half a pound of macaroni into short pieces; cook about twenty
minutes in salted boiling water. It should be clear at the edges, but
not ragged. Drain well, pepper and salt, and stir in a tablespoonful
of butter. Strew grated cheese over the top when dished, and pass more
with it at table.


GREEN PEAS.

Cook from twenty to twenty-five minutes in boiling water, a little
salt. Drain very well when tender, stir in a great lump of peppered
butter, and serve hot in a vegetable dish.


SNOW CUSTARD.

  ½ package of Coxe’s gelatine.
  3 eggs.
  2 cups of milk.
  2 cups of sugar.
  Juice of one lemon.
  2 cups of boiling water.
  Vanilla, or other essence.

Soak the gelatine one hour in a cup of cold water. Add then a pint
of boiling water, and stir until the gelatine is dissolved. Put in
two-thirds of the sugar and all the lemon-juice. Beat the whites of
the eggs stiff, and when the gelatine is quite cold, whip it in, a
spoonful at a time, for half an hour with the “Dover”—an hour, if you
use the common egg-whisk. When all is a white sponge, put into a wet
mould to form. Make a custard of the milk, yolks, and the reserved
sugar, flavor as you like, and when the “snow” is turned out into
a glass dish, pour this around the base. Prepare this dessert on
Saturday, and keep in the refrigerator. It is very nice.



  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Tomato Soup.
  Larded Beef.     Stewed Cream Potatoes.
  Spinach Dressed with Egg.      Green Pickles.
  ——
  Strawberries and Cream.
  Martha’s Cake.
  ——


TOMATO SOUP.

Peel, by pouring boiling water over them, a dozen fine tomatoes, cut
them up, throwing aside the hard cores and unripe portions. Take the
fat from the surface of your soup stock; pour it off from the meat
and sediment; add the tomatoes, and stew gently half an hour. Strain,
rubbing the tomatoes through the sieve; return to the pot; add a little
pepper and salt, a lump of sugar, and a tablespoonful of butter rolled
in flour. Boil one minute, and pour out. It will be a delicious soup.


LARDED BEEF.

Make perpendicular incisions in your cold roast, having trimmed the
top smoothly, and thrust in lardoons of fat salt pork, set closely
together. Take the fat from the cold gravy, and add to the latter a
little minced onion, a tablespoonful of catsup, and a large cup of
boiling water. Lay the meat in a dripping-pan, pour the gravy upon it,
invert another pan over it, and cook in a moderate oven about an hour.
Turn the meat once, and baste six times with the gravy. Dish the meat;
strain the gravy, thicken it with browned flour, boil up and pour into
a boat.


STEWED CREAM POTATOES.

Peel and cut into neat dice. Leave in cold water half an hour; then
cook as long in boiling water, salted. Drain this off before the
potatoes break; add half a cup of milk (or cream) with a pinch of
soda. When it heats, stir in a generous lump of butter cut up in a
teaspoonful of flour, and a mere pinch of finely-grated lemon-peel.
Stew one minute and pour into a deep dish.


SPINACH DRESSED WITH EGG.

Boil the spinach in plenty of hot water, salted, for twenty minutes.
Drain and press out the water. Chop fine; put back over the fire with
a large spoonful of butter, and a teaspoonful of sugar, with salt and
pepper to taste, also a little nutmeg. Beat until hot and smooth; turn
into a hot, deep dish, and cover with a dressing of the yolks of four
hard-boiled eggs, left to cool, then pounded in a Wedgewood mortar, and
rubbed to a paste with a teaspoonful of melted butter, one of cream,
and lastly, one of lemon-juice. Spread over the surface of the spinach
and garnish with a border of the sliced whites.


STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM.

Cap the berries, and pile in a glass bowl. Do _not_ sugar them, but
pass powdered sugar and cream with each saucerful.


MARTHA’S CAKE.

An economical and very nice variety of jelly-cake, easily made, and
which keeps well. Please see “COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD” Series No.
1, “General Receipts,” page 314.


  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Quick Beef Soup.
  Lamb Chops.      Purée of Potatoes.
  Asparagus Rolls.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Rosie’s Rice Custard.
  ——


QUICK BEEF SOUP.

  2 lbs. of lean beef, chopped _very_ fine.
  3 pints of water.
  1 grated carrot.
  1 onion, sliced.
  1 grated turnip.
  1 clove.
  1 tablespoonful of tomato catsup.
  Pepper and salt.

Put onion and other vegetables with spice on in two quarts of water,
and boil down to three pints. Strain and press over the beef. Season
with pepper, salt, and catsup; simmer half an hour, or until the meat
is nearly white and the soup brown, and serve with the meat in it. The
vegetable liquor must be boiling when it is poured upon the minced beef.


LAMB CHOPS.

Broil quickly over a clear fire; pepper and salt; butter on both sides,
and lay in a heap, symmetrically arranged, in the centre of a dish,
surrounded by the potato purée.


PURÉE OF POTATOES.

  2 cups of hot, mashed potatoes, rubbed through a colander.
  ½ cup of milk.
  1 large spoonful of butter.
  Pepper, salt, and a little nutmeg.

Mix all up well; put into a _greased_ saucepan, and stir until hot,
never allowing it to stick to the sides or scorch, and lay, in a white
hedge, about the chops.


ASPARAGUS ROLLS.

  8 or 10 stale French rolls.
  2 bunches of asparagus.
  Yolks of 2 raw eggs.
  1 cup of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of butter, rolled in a very little flour.
  Salt and pepper.

Cut off the top of each roll; pick out the crumb carefully, and set the
hollowed rolls, with their tops, in a slow oven to dry to crispness.
Boil the asparagus twenty minutes, cut off the green tops, and let
them get perfectly cold. Then heat the milk; stir in the butter; pour
upon the beaten yolks; beat one minute with your egg-whisk; return to
the fire; put in the asparagus-tops—minced—leaving out as many whole
tops as you have rolls—stir until very hot, but not until it boils.
Fill your rolls with the mixture; make a round hole in the top of each
crust-cover; fit in a bit of asparagus, as if it had sprouted from
below; fit each cover upon its roll, and the pretty and delightful dish
is ready.


LETTUCE.

Pick hearts and blanched leaves from the stems; pile in a salad-bowl,
and cover with a dressing made of two tablespoonfuls of oil, one
teaspoonful of white sugar, half as much each of salt, pepper, and made
mustard—all rubbed smooth together—then thickened, rather than thinned,
by whipping in a few drops at a time, four tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
Stir up with a silver fork after the dressing goes on.


ROSIE’S RICE CUSTARD.

  1 quart of milk.
  3 well-beaten eggs.
  4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  1 small cup of boiled and still warm rice.
  1 scant tablespoonful of butter.
  A little salt.

Cream butter and sugar; add the beaten eggs, salt, then, the rice
stirred warm into the milk. Bake in a buttered dish half an hour in a
quick oven. Eat warm.


  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Chicken Broth.
  Milanaise Pudding.      Fried Shad au Gratin.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Navy Beans.
  ——
  Cottage Pudding.
  ——


CHICKEN BROTH.

  1 large chicken, jointed as for fricassee.
  ½ cup of raw rice.
  5 quarts of cold water.
  Chopped parsley, pepper, and salt.
  1 cup of milk.
  2 beaten eggs.

Put water and chicken on quite early in the day, and cook slowly until
the water has boiled down to about three and a half quarts, and the
chicken slips easily from the bones. Take off all the meat, and return
the bones to the pot. Cook gently until an hour before dinner, when
strain, and let it cool. Take off the fat; return to the fire—with
the seasoning and rice—and simmer half an hour, or until the rice is
soft. Have the milk heated in a separate vessel, with a pinch of soda;
pour upon the beaten eggs; put back over the fire, and stir until it
begins to thicken. Turn into the tureen. Boil up the chicken broth once
sharply, and add to the milk in the soup-tureen, stirring up well.


FRIED SHAD AU GRATIN.

Clean, wash, and wipe a fine roe-shad. Take off head, tail, and fins,
and cut into eight pieces. Pepper and salt these; dip into beaten
egg, then in cracker-crumbs, and fry in hot dripping or lard. Drain,
and serve on a hot, flat dish. The roes should be parboiled, then
cooled—afterward dipped in egg and cracker, fried in the same manner as
the fish, and dished with it.


=Milanaise Pudding.=

  ½ lb. cold cooked ham.
  The meat of your soup-chicken.
  Nearly ½ lb. of macaroni.
  2 eggs.
  A cup of your soup, strained and skimmed before the rice is put in.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  Pepper and salt to taste.

Boil the macaroni in the broth until tender; then let it cool somewhat,
and, with a pair of old scissors, clip it into inch lengths. Chop
ham and chicken, and pepper. Mix with the macaroni—which should have
absorbed the broth—stir in the melted butter and eggs. Put into a
well-greased mould, and boil an hour and a half. Turn out; pour over it
a cup of drawn butter, and serve. Pass grated cheese with it.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual and pass with the fish course.


NAVY BEANS.

This is a variety of white kidney beans. Shell and lay them in cold
water half an hour, to take off the raw, rank taste. Cook about
twenty-five minutes in boiling water, a little salt. Drain well;
pepper, salt, and butter. Eat hot.


COTTAGE PUDDING.

  1 cup of sugar.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.
  2 eggs.
  1 cup of sweet milk.
  3 cups of flour, or enough for pretty stiff batter. (Use Hecker’s
          prepared flour.)
  ½ teaspoonful of salt.

Cream butter and sugar; beat in the yolks, then the salted flour,
alternately with the whites. Bake in a buttered cake-mould until a
straw will come up clean from the middle. Turn out and eat hot with
sweet sauce.


  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  White Asparagus Soup.
  Stuffed Fillet of Veal with Bacon.      Scooped Potatoes.
  Tomato Salad.      Hominy Pudding.
  ——
  Cocoanut Puddings.
  ——


WHITE ASPARAGUS SOUP.

  3 lbs. knuckle of veal.
  1 slice of corned ham.
  3 bunches of well-bleached asparagus, cut into short pieces.
  4 quarts of water.
  1 cup of milk.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-starch.
  Pepper, salt, chopped parsley, and dice of fried bread.

Crack the bones to splinters and chop the meat. Put on with all the
asparagus stalks and one-half of the heads. Cover with the water and
cook gently, covered, three hours. Strain; cool to let the grease
rise; skim and return to the pot with the seasoning and reserved heads
of asparagus. Boil slowly for twenty minutes longer. Heat the milk
separately, salt and pepper, and stir in the corn-starch, boiling one
minute to thicken it. Pour into the tureen upon the dice of fried
bread; stir into this the boiling soup, and send to table.


STUFFED FILLET OF VEAL WITH BACON.

Take out the bone from the meat, and pin into a round with skewers.
Bind securely with soft tapes. Fill the cavity left by the bone with a
force-meat of crumbs, chopped pork; thyme, and parsley, seasoned with
pepper, salt, nutmeg, and a pinch of lemon-peel. Cover the top of the
fillet with thin slices of cold, _cooked_, fat bacon or salt pork,
tying them in place with twines crossing the meat in all directions.
Put into a pot with two cups of boiling water, and cook slowly and
steadily two hours. Then take from the pot and put into a dripping-pan.
Undo the strings and tapes. Brush the meat all over with raw egg, sift
rolled cracker thickly over it, and set in the oven for half an hour,
basting often with gravy from the pot. When it is well browned, lay
upon a hot dish with the pork about it. Strain and thicken the gravy,
and serve in a boat.

If your fillet be large, cook twice as long in the pot. The time given
above is for one weighing five pounds.


SCOOPED POTATOES.

Pare and cut round with a potato-gouge—a neat little instrument that
costs but a trifle. The waste bits can be boiled, mashed, and set by
for to-morrow’s uses. Boil the scooped pellets in hot, salted water
twenty minutes; throw this off and put in a cup of cold milk. Simmer
gently until the potatoes are tender; stir in a good lump of butter
rolled in flour, and when this is melted, a little minced parsley, with
pepper and salt. Stew three minutes, and pour into a deep dish.


TOMATO SALAD.

Pare with a keen knife; arrange upon a glass dish and cover with a
dressing like that made on Tuesday for lettuce, but adding the beaten
yolks of two raw eggs, whipped in the last thing.


HOMINY PUDDING.

  1 cupful cold, boiled, small-grained hominy.
  2 cups of milk.
  1 heaping tablespoonful of melted butter.
  3 eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  A little salt.

Rub the hominy very smooth with the butter; then the yolks, beaten up
with the sugar. Beat well before thinning with the salted milk. Lastly,
add the frothed whites. Bake in a greased pudding-dish until nicely
browned.


COCOANUT PUDDINGS.

  1 lb. of cocoanut, grated.
  ½ lb. of powdered sugar.
  1 quart rich milk.
  5 beaten eggs.
  1 teaspoonful nutmeg.
  2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla.

Scald the milk and pour, gradually, upon the beaten eggs. Do not
return to the fire, but, when nearly cold, season, add the cocoanut;
stir up well; pour into buttered cups, and bake by setting in a pan of
boiling water, and stirring again as the custard begins to heat, that
the cocoanut may not settle to the bottom. Bake until well “set,” and
slightly browned. Eat cold.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Clam Chowder.
  Baked Pickerel.      Veal Scallop.
  Mashed Potatoes, Browned.      Green Peas.
  ——
  Strawberry Shortcake.
  Tea.
  ——


CLAM CHOWDER.

  100 clams.
  1 sliced onion.
  12 butter or other small crackers, that can be split.
  12 tomatoes, peeled and chopped.
  1 tablespoonful minced parsley and half the quantity of mixed
          thyme, summer savory and sweet marjoram.
  A large pinch of mace and the same of cayenne pepper.
  1 cup of milk—hot—for soaking the crackers, and butter for
          spreading them.
  3 tablespoonfuls butter for chowder.
  Salt.

Put a layer of clams in the bottom of a soup-pot, next one of sliced
tomatoes and onion. Sprinkle with seasoning, and drop bits of butter
upon them. More clams, more tomato, etc., until all are in. Pour on the
liquor—there should be at least three pints—cover, heat slowly for half
an hour, then boil quite briskly for twenty minutes. Meanwhile, soak
the split crackers—covered—in the boiling milk. When soft all through,
butter thickly, and keep warm over boiling water until the soup is
ready. Then line a hot tureen with them, and pour in the chowder. Pass
sliced lemon with it.


BAKED PICKEREL.

Select a couple of large, fresh fish; score the back-bones with a sharp
knife, and lay them in a baking-pan. Pour a cupful of boiling water
over them, cover, and bake slowly, basting with butter and water,
at least six times. The fish should be tender, yet firm when done.
Transfer them carefully to a hot-water dish. Have ready a cupful of
rich, drawn butter; strain the gravy from the dripping-pan into it,
with a little minced parsley. Heat almost to a boil and pour over the
fish. There is no better way of cooking large pickerel than this.


VEAL SCALLOP.

Chop the remains of your fillet fine, and season with pepper and salt.
Put a layer of dry crumbs in a buttered bake-dish; stick bits of butter
over it; cover with the meat and wet this with gravy and warm milk.
Repeat this order of strata until your dish is full, covering deep with
crumbs. Fit a tin cover on the top and bake half an hour; remove the
lid and brown nicely. Serve in the bake-dish.


MASHED POTATOES—BROWNED.

Mash soft with milk and butter; whip up to a cream; season, and make
into a four-sided pyramid upon a greased pie-dish. Brown in a good oven
and slip to a warm dish. Pass with the fish.


GREEN PEAS.

Please see receipt given on Sunday of this week.


STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE.

Please see receipt given on Friday of Fourth Week in May. The
strawberry season is so short that you can hardly give this popular
dessert often enough to weary your family while the scarlet, flavorous
beauties last.


TEA,

Hot and strong, will be the better for a little cream borrowed from the
supply meant for your shortcake.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Marlowe Soup.
  Beefs Tongue (Langue du Bœuf).      Squeezed Potatoes.
  French Beans, Sautés.      Young Beets.
  ——
  Cherry Pie.
  ——


MARLOWE SOUP.

  2 lbs. of lean veal and the same of lean beef.
  1 lb. of lean ham.
  2 onions.
  1 carrot.
  1 turnip.
  ¼ of a head of cabbage, chopped and parboiled.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  6 tomatoes, peeled and sliced.
  ½ cup of rice.
  Pepper and salt.
  5 quarts of cold water.

Cut up meat and vegetables fine, and put with the water into the
soup-kettle. Cook slowly four hours. Strain the soup, rubbing the
vegetables through the colander. Divide the liquor into two parts. Put
with the meat—all highly seasoned—into a stoneware vessel and set by
in the refrigerator. Let the other portion cool; take off the fat;
season; put over the fire; boil and skim for a few minutes, and put in
the rice. Simmer very gently half an hour, or until the rice is very
soft.


BEEF’S TONGUE—(LANGUE DU BŒUF).

Wash a large, perfectly fresh tongue in three waters. Then cover well
with boiling water, a little salt—plenty of it—and cook about twelve
minutes to the pound. Strip off the skin; dish, when you have trimmed
away the root, and pour over it the following sauce: Strain a cup of
the liquor in which the tongue was boiled; set over the fire, and stir
in two tablespoonfuls of butter cut up in flour, pepper to taste;
the juice of a lemon, and when this has thickened, two small pickled
cucumbers, chopped. This is a dish whose merits deserve to be better
known. (Save the liquor.)


SQUEEZED POTATOES.

Put on in cold water, and bring quickly to a boil. When soft enough
to be pierced by a fork, turn off the water; throw in a little salt,
and dry on the range. Tear off the skins quickly, and as soon as each
is bare, envelop it in the corner of a dry, hot towel and twist the
same tightly around it for a second, but not _quite_ breaking it. Pile
within a napkin-lined dish, and send up hot.


FRENCH BEANS—SAUTÉS.

Top, tail, and “string” with care. Cut into short pieces. Cook in
boiling water, a little salt, until tender—say thirty minutes, if they
are full-grown. Drain well; return to the saucepan with two great
spoonfuls of butter, salt, pepper, and a teaspoonful of vinegar. Toss
until very hot, and turn into a hot, deep dish.


YOUNG BEETS.

Boil in hot, salt water one hour. When done, rub off the skins; split
the beets lengthwise and lay upon a hot dish. Have ready a great
spoonful of melted butter, mixed with two of vinegar, a little salt
and pepper, heated to boiling, and pour over the beets. Be careful not
to break the skin of raw beets, or they will lose their color in the
hot water while cooking.


CHERRY PIE.

Line your pie-dish with a good paste; fill with a mixture of sour and
sweet cherries; sweeten plentifully; cover with paste printed at the
edge and slit in the middle, and bake until nicely colored. Eat fresh,
but not warm, with white sugar sifted over the top.



  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Tomato and Pea Soup.
  Stewed Lamb with Mushroom Sauce.      Lima Beans.
  Green Peas.      Stewed Turnips.
  ——
  Lemon Blanc-Mange.
  Coffee and Cake.
  ——


TOMATO AND PEA SOUP.

Take the fat from the liquor in which the tongue was boiled yesterday;
set it over the fire, and, when boiling, put in the empty pods of two
quarts of peas. Boil half an hour; take from the fire and strain out
the pods. About half an hour before dinner, take the fat from the
“stock” set aside yesterday, and pour off from the meat and sediment
into the soup-pot. While it is slowly heating, put on the water in
which the pods were boiled, with the peas and two quarts of peeled and
sliced tomatoes, in another pot, and bring more rapidly to the boil.
Cook twenty-five minutes, then stir in two lumps of white sugar, two
tablespoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour, pepper well, boil up, and
rub through a colander into the main soup-kettle. Simmer all together
three minutes, and it is fit for use. Pour half into the tureen; cool
the rest and remand to the refrigerator.


STEWED LAMB WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE.

Let your butcher take out the bones from the lower side of a shoulder
of lamb, leaving in the shank. Fill the cavity thus left with a good
force-meat of crumbs, chopped pork, and sweet herbs, and sew the meat
edges together to hold it in. If you have no gravy ready make a pint on
Saturday of the lamb trimmings and a few veal-bones, with seasoning.
It need not be strong. Put the lamb into a broad pot, with some thin
slices of fat pork laid in the bottom; pour in the gravy, cover
tightly, and stew gently one hour. Turn the meat then, and cook twenty
minutes longer. Lay the lamb upon a hot dish, and butter it all over.
Cover, and keep warm over hot water while you make the sauce. Have
ready half a can of mushrooms, boiled and chopped. Strain the gravy
left in the pot, add the mushrooms, and stew five minutes; thicken with
browned flour; boil up and pour over the lamb. Garnish with alternate
slices of green pickle and boiled beets.


LIMA BEANS.

Shell; lay in cold water twenty minutes, and cook in slightly salted
boiling water _about_ half an hour, or until tender. The time depends
much upon age and size. Drain well; pour into a deep dish; pepper,
salt, and butter.


GREEN PEAS.

Receipt given on Sunday of First Week in this month.


STEWED TURNIPS.

Peel and slice young turnips. Boil fifteen minutes in hot, salted
water; throw this off, and add half a cup of milk and as much boiling
fresh water. When this heats, stir in a generous lump of butter, rolled
in a teaspoonful of flour, with pepper and salt to taste. Simmer ten
minutes longer, or until tender, and pour into a deep dish. Eat very
hot.


LEMON BLANC-MANGE.

  1 large lemon, or two small ones—all the juice and half the grated peel.
  Whisked whites of 4 eggs.
  1 package of gelatine soaked two hours in one cup of cold water.
  1 pint and 1 cup of _boiling_ water.
  2 cups of powdered sugar—even ones.
  ½ teaspoonful of nutmeg.
  1 glass of good claret.

Add to the soaked gelatine the lemon-juice and peel, sugar and spice.
Leave standing one hour. Then pour on the boiling water. Stir until
clear, add the wine, and strain through double tarlatan. While it
is cooling, whip the whites very stiff. When the gelatine begins to
coagulate around the edge of the dish, whip it, little by little, into
the frothed whites until it is stiff. Put into a wet mould, and set
upon the ice. On Sunday turn it out, and pour a rich liqueur—that from
brandied peaches is best—about the base. Preserved strawberries are
also very nice with it if you have no liqueur.


COFFEE AND CAKE.

If you prefer, you can give the cake with the blanc-mange, and drink
the coffee afterwards.



  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  “Once-Again” Soup.
  Cold Lamb.      Cheese Fondu.
  Raw Tomatoes.      Potatoes en Robe de Chambre.
  ——
  Floating Island.
  ——


“ONCE-AGAIN” SOUP.

A good soup, founded upon such stock as you made on Saturday, is better
the third day than the first. Therefore, take off the fat from the
portion kept on the ice since yesterday’s providential division, and
warm it slowly, _almost_ to a boil. If you have time, cut some fried
bread into dice and put into the tureen before you pour in the soup.


COLD LAMB.

Do not murder the well-cooked, juicy innocent of yesterday by hashing
and reheating. A nice dish of cold lamb, trimmed and garnished with
cresses and cool, white lettuce, is goodly to the eyes—and taste—on a
sultry June day.


CHEESE FONDU.

  2 cups milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in.
  1 cup very dry, fine crumbs.
  ½ lb. of dry cheese, grated.
  4 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of melted butter.
  Pepper, salt, and a pinch of mace.

Soak the crumbs in the milk; beat in the eggs, butter,
seasoning—lastly, the cheese. Butter a pudding-dish; put in the
mixture; strew the top with fine crumbs, and bake, covered, half an
hour; then brown quickly. Eat soon, as it will fall in cooling.


RAW TOMATOES.

See receipt for Tuesday of first week in this month for dressing
lettuce, when you have peeled and sliced the tomatoes.


POTATOES EN ROBE DE CHAMBRE.

If you use Bermuda potatoes, cook in boiling water. If you take old
potatoes, put on in cold and bring rapidly to a boil. Throw off the
water when they are done, set back on the range, uncovered, to dry out,
and send to table with the skins on.


FLOATING ISLAND.

  1 quart of milk.
  4 beaten eggs.
  4 heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  2 teaspoonfuls extract of bitter almond.
  ½ cup of currant jelly.

Beat yolks and sugar light, and pour on, by degrees, the boiling milk.
Pour back into the farina-kettle, and heat, stirring constantly until
it begins to thicken. When cold, flavor, and pour into a glass dish.
Pile with a _méringue_ of the whites beaten up with half a cup of
currant jelly. Ornament with dots of jelly.



  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  A Summer Mélange Soup.
  Rolled Beef.      Boiled Onions.
  Stuffed Tomatoes.      Baked Omelettes aux Fines Herbes.
  ——
  Strawberries and Cream.
  Orange Cake.
  ——


A SUMMER MÉLANGE SOUP.

  2 lbs. lean beef, chopped fine.
  1 quart green peas.
  1 quart tomatoes, peeled and sliced.
  1 cucumber, sliced thin.
  1 sliced onion.
  1 pint of small string-beans, cut into pieces.
  3 great spoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour.
  Pepper and salt.
  4 quarts of cold water.

Put on the meat in the water, and cook, slowly, three hours, to extract
every particle of nourishment from the beef. Peel and slice the
vegetables, and lay all, except the tomatoes, in cold water for half
an hour. At the end of the three hours, strain the soup; return to the
pot and put in all the vegetables with salt and pepper. Stew for one
hour, covered; stir in the butter and simmer half an hour longer before
turning it out.


ROLLED BEEF.

Make your butcher take _all_ the bones out of a rib-roast. (Keep them
for to-morrow’s soup.) Make him also roll the meat into a round, and
skewer it securely. Wash it all over with vinegar, then rub with hot
butter mixed with minced onion and pepper, working this well between
the folds of meat. Put into the dripping-pan, pour a cup of gravy from
the boiling soup—before the vegetables are added—about the base, and a
few spoonfuls of butter and water upon the top. Roast twelve minutes
to the pound, basting freely and often. Towards the last, dredge with
flour, and rub over with butter to make a brown froth. Pour off the fat
from the gravy, strain what is left; add, if needed, a little boiling
water; thicken with browned flour, and serve in a boat.


BOILED ONIONS.

Top and tail; skin and cook fifteen minutes in boiling _fresh_ water.
Throw this off, add more from the boiling tea-kettle; salt slightly,
and boil until tender all through. Drain, butter well, and pepper and
salt.


STUFFED TOMATOES.

Select large, smooth tomatoes; cut a piece from the top of each, and
scoop out seeds and pulp. Chop fine what you have removed; season with
butter, pepper, salt and sugar; add one-third as much bread-crumbs;
work all well together, and fill the skins with the mixture. Replace
the tops; put the rest of the stuffing between the tomatoes when you
have set them close together in a bake-dish. Bake, covered, half an
hour, in a moderate oven; then uncover and cook ten minutes longer, or
until browned and soft.


BAKED OMELETTE AUX FINES HERBES.

Make this a course between soup and meat, passing bread and butter with
it.

  6 eggs.
  1 cup of boiling milk.
  1 teaspoonful of corn-starch, wet with cold milk.
  1 tablespoonful chopped parsley, thyme, and sweet marjoram, mixed.
  Pepper and salt.
  Butter for the dish.

Beat the yolks light, and pour upon them the hot milk. Stir in the
corn-starch, season, whip in the frothed whites, lastly, the herbs.
Have ready a nice pudding-dish, well buttered. Set in the oven until
hot; butter again, and pour in the omelette. Bake about twelve minutes,
or until “set” in the middle, but not longer, or it will be a leathery
puff. It should be very light. Send up—instantly.


STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM.


ORANGE CAKE.

Serve as directed on Monday of last week.

The orange cake, if made on Friday or Saturday, will have kept
perfectly well, if the cake-box—a tight one—containing it has been
set in the refrigerator. For directions for making it please consult
“BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON AND TEA,” page 318.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Broiled Bones Soup.
  Boiled Chickens.      Rice Croquettes.
  Asparagus upon Toast.      Potato and Beet Salad.
  ——
  Raspberry Shortcake, Hot.
  ——


BROILED BONES SOUP.

  3 lbs. of beef bones, not scraped _too_ clean.
  2 lbs. of veal, ditto.
  ½ lb. salt pork, fat, for frying.
  2 onions, sliced.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  ½ cup of granulated tapioca.
  3 quarts of water.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 tablespoonful walnut catsup.

Crack the bones well, and lay upon a gridiron above the coals until
they are hot, and the bits of meat adhering to them are frizzled.
Meanwhile, fry the pork and onions together in a frying-pan until the
latter are a fine brown. Strain out the pork and onions; put back the
fat into the pan and fry the bones five minutes. Lay the onions in the
soup-pot with the chopped herbs, then the bones. Cover with the water
and boil slowly three hours. Strain; cool, and take off the fat. Set
over the fire; season, boil once to throw up the scum; skim, and put in
the tapioca, which should have soaked two hours in a little cold water.
Simmer until the tapioca is clear; put in the catsup, and serve.


BOILED CHICKENS.

Clean, wash, and stuff as for roasting. Sew each up in thin muslin, or
tarlatan, fitted closely to the shape, and put on in plenty of boiling
water, a little salt. Boil twelve minutes to the pound (taking the
heavier chicken as the standard) if they are tender. If doubtful, take
a longer time, and cook more slowly. When done, lay upon a heated dish,
and pour over them a cupful of drawn butter, made from the pot liquor,
thickened with butter rolled in flour, and with an egg beaten up in it
with a little chopped parsley. See “Drawn Butter, No. 3,” in “General
Receipts,” page 184.


RICE CROQUETTES.

Boil a cup of rice soft in weak broth, made from a cupful of the
chicken pot-liquor, mixed with boiling water and salted. Drain, and
stir in a couple of beaten eggs; a teaspoonful of butter, a mere dust
of flour, pepper, and a pinch of grated lemon-peel. Stir up in a
saucepan until thick and hot, and spread out to cool. When cold, flour
your hands; make the paste into long balls; roll each in raw egg, then
in cracker-dust, and fry carefully to a yellow-brown.


ASPARAGUS UPON TOAST.

Tie the bunch of asparagus up with soft string, when you have cut
away the wood, and cook about twenty-five minutes in salted boiling
water. Have ready some slices of crustless toast; dip each in the
asparagus-liquor; butter well while hot and lay upon a heated dish.
Drain the asparagus, and arrange upon the toast. Pepper, salt, and
butter generously.


POTATO AND BEET SALAD.

Slice a cupful of cold boiled potatoes. Chop a red beet, also boiled,
but lukewarm, and pour over it four tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Let
it stand while you rub together a teaspoonful of salt, half as much
each of pepper, sugar and made mustard, with a full tablespoonful of
oil, and a very little green pickle, minced fine. When this is ready,
take out a tablespoonful of chopped beet, and strew among the sliced
potatoes. Put them into a salad-bowl. Squeeze beets and vinegar through
muslin into oil, etc. Beat up well, and pour over the cold potatoes.


RASPBERRY SHORTCAKE—HOT.

  1 quart of flour.
  2 tablespoonfuls of lard, and the same of butter, chopped up
          in the salted flour.
  2½ cups “loppered” milk, or of buttermilk.
  Yolks of 2 eggs, well beaten.
  1 teaspoonful of soda, sifted _three times_ through the flour.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  1 quart “black caps” or wild raspberries.

Make these ingredients into a soft paste. Roll lightly into two
sheets—that intended for the upper crust half an inch thick, the lower,
less. Lay the bottom crust in a greased square pan. Strew thickly with
the berries, sprinkle with sugar, and cover with the upper crust. Bake
about twenty-five minutes, until browned, but not dry. Cut in squares,
and send, piled upon a flat dish, to table. Split and eat with butter
and sugar. It is good.


  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Chicken Panada Soup.
  Larded Mutton Chops.      Green Pea Cakes.
  Stewed Tomatoes.      String-Beans.
  ——
  Strawberry Trifle.
  ——


CHICKEN PANADA SOUP.

  The liquor in which your chickens were boiled yesterday.
  1 large cup of minced cold chicken, _very_ fine.
  ½ cup fine crumbs.
  2 beaten eggs stirred into a cup of boiling milk.
  Pepper, salt, and a pinch of mace.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.

Take the fat from the cold “stock.” Heat the latter to boiling and add
the chicken, minced as finely as it can be cut. Pepper and salt to
taste, and simmer one hour. Make ready your hot milk, at the end of
that time, pour upon the beaten eggs; stir over the fire two minutes
and add the butter, and when this is melted, the crumbs. Take at once
from the fire; put into the tureen and pour in the soup through a
colander, rubbing into it all the meat that will pass the holes. Stir
well, and serve. This soup is very nice.


LARDED MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim off all the fat and skin, and lard closely with strips of fat salt
pork. Pepper, and put into a hot frying-pan. Fry them in the lardoon
fat as it flows out in heating, and turn several times to cook both
sides equally. Arrange upon a hot dish, one overlapping the next.


GREEN PEA CAKES.

  2 cups of green peas, mashed while hot, with butter, pepper, and salt.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 cup of milk.
  Half a cupful (a small cup) of prepared flour.

When the peas are cold beat in the eggs, milk, and, at last, the flour.
The batter should not be thick. Fry as you would griddle-cakes.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Pour boiling water over them to loosen the skins. When peeled, cut up
small, leaving out the unripe and hard parts. Put over the fire with
pepper, salt, and sugar to taste; at the end of twenty minutes’ stewing
add a good piece of butter, and simmer ten minutes more.


STRING-BEANS.

Cut off the stem and blossom ends; “string” with a sharp knife. Cut
into short pieces and cook tender in boiling salted water. Drain,
pepper, salt, and butter.


STRAWBERRY TRIFLE.

  1 quart of milk.
  5 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
  1 stale sponge-cake.
  1 cup of sugar.
  1 cup of sweet cream.
  Ripe strawberries.

Heat the milk; beat in yolks and sugar. Cook and stir until the
custard begins to thicken. Slice your cake, and put a layer in a glass
dish. Wet with the cream; cover with fresh, ripe berries, sprinkled
with sugar, then more cake, cream, and berries, until the dish is
three-quarters full. Pour the custard, gradually, over all. Beat the
whites stiff with a little sugar and strawberry-juice, and heap roundly
on the top. Lay rows of bright berries upon the _méringue_.


  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Purée of Potatoes.
  Salmon Scallops.      Fricassee of Sweetbreads.
  Raw Tomatoes.      Roasted Potatoes.
  ——
  Baked Cherry Dumplings.
  ——


PURÉE OF POTATOES.

  8 large potatoes, peeled, boiled, and rubbed through a colander.
  2 quarts of boiling water.
  1 cup of hot milk.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter, rubbed in flour.
  1 tablespoonful of minced parsley, with salt and pepper.

Pour the water upon the potato, season with pepper and salt, and boil
gently one hour, taking care that it does not burn. Then stir in the
butter, and when this is melted, the hot milk. Let it begin to boil,
and pour out.


SALMON SCALLOPS.

  1½ lbs. of cold salmon, left from steaks, or a can of preserved salmon.
  2 beaten eggs.
  ½ cup good drawn butter.
  ½ cup bread-crumbs.
  Pepper, salt, and minced parsley.

Chop the fish fine; rub the butter and seasoning into it, and stir into
the hot, drawn butter. Butter scallop-shells, or paté-pans, fill with
the mixture, and strew it with fine crumbs. Bake a few minutes in a
quick oven to brown them lightly. Serve in the shells.


FRICASSEE OF SWEETBREADS.

  3 fine sweetbreads.
  2 eggs.
  4 tablespoonfuls of cream.
  1 great spoonful of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
  A pinch of nutmeg.
  1 cup of gravy—a cup of yesterday’s soup, strained, will do.
  Pepper and salt to taste.

Wash the sweetbreads; boil five minutes; then lay in ice-cold water.
Slice and cover them with the gravy, and stew three-quarters of an
hour. Heat the cream—or milk—in another saucepan, putting in a pinch
of soda. Pour upon the eggs, and returning these to the fire, cook one
minute. Stir in the butter and the parsley. Take both saucepans from
the fire and empty one into the other. Stir all together well, and pour
into a hot deep dish.


RAW TOMATOES.

See receipt for last Monday.


ROASTED POTATOES.

Wash fair-sized potatoes and bake on the oven floor until soft to the
grasp of thumb and forefinger. Wipe and send to table wrapped in a
napkin.


BAKED CHERRY DUMPLINGS.

  1 quart prepared flour.
  2 heaping tablespoonfuls of lard.
  2 cups fresh milk.
  A little salt.
  2 cups of stoned cherries.
  ½ cupful of sugar.

Rub the lard into the salted flour, wet up with the milk; roll into
a sheet a quarter of an inch thick; and cut into squares about four
inches across. Put two great spoonfuls of cherries in the centre
of each; sugar them; turn up the edges of the paste and pinch them
together. Lay the joined edges downward, upon a floured baking-pan, and
bake half an hour or until browned. Eat hot with a good sauce.


  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Ox-head Soup.
  Corned Beef.      Mashed Turnips.
  Green Peas.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Raspberries and My Lady’s Cake.
  ——


OX-HEAD SOUP.

  1 well cleaned ox-head.
  2 turnips.
  1 carrot.
  2 onions.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  Salt and pepper.
  1 teaspoonful mixed allspice and mace.
  6 quarts cold water.

Wash the head in three waters; break the bones with a few smart blows
of a hammer. Put it on in the cold water; bring to a slow boil and skim
well. Then add the sliced vegetables, and stew gently three hours. The
liquor should be reduced to four quarts. Take out the head and set in
the open air to cool. Strain the liquor, rubbing the vegetables to a
pulp. Return half of it to the fire—season and skim as it boils, for
five minutes; then add three-fourths of the meat from the head, cut
into dice. Simmer half an hour, and serve. Put bones and the rest of
the meat, well seasoned, into a jar; season the reserved “stock,” and
pour it in, and keep in the refrigerator until to-morrow.


CORNED BEEF.

Boil in plenty of hot water, fifteen minutes—at least—to the
pound. Serve drawn butter (made from the pot-liquor), with chopped
cucumber-pickle stirred in it, in a sauce-boat. Save the liquor and set
in a cool place.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Boil tender in hot salted water. Drain, mash and press, and stir in
butter, salt and pepper.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and serve without browning.


GREEN PEAS.

See Sunday of First Week in this month.


RASPBERRIES AND MY LADY’S CAKE.

Send around powdered sugar with the berries. For directions for the
cake-making, I beg to refer to “BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON AND TEA,” page 329.



  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Rice and Tapioca Soup.
  Smothered Chickens.      Mashed Squash.
  String-Beans.      Beets Sautés.
  ——
  Cream Pudding.
  ——


RICE AND TAPIOCA SOUP.

Take the fat from your stock; pour it from the bones and meat, and
heat slowly. Have ready a cup of boiled rice—hot—and half a cup of
granulated tapioca, which has been soaked two hours in a little cold
water. When the soup boils, put them in, and simmer gently half an
hour. Should it be too thick, add a little boiling water.


SMOTHERED CHICKEN.

Clean and split a pair of young chickens down the back as for broiling.
Lay them in a dripping-pan; dash a cup of boiling water, in which have
been stirred two tablespoonfuls of butter, over them, and, covering
with another pan, cook until tender, and of an equal yellow-brownish
tint all over. Lift the pan, now and then, to baste freely—four times
with the gravy—twice, toward the last, with melted butter. Lay the
chickens in a hot-water dish; add pepper, salt, a chopped boiled egg,
_finely_ minced, and a little minced parsley, with browned flour, to
the gravy. Boil up, and pour half over the chicken, the rest into a
gravy-boat.


MASHED SQUASH.

Peel, seed, and slice fresh summer squashes. Lay in cold water ten
minutes; put into boiling water, a little salt, and cook tender. Twenty
minutes will suffice if the squash be young. Mash in a colander,
pressing out all the water; heap in a deep dish, seasoning with pepper,
salt and butter. Serve hot.


STRING-BEANS.

See Thursday of Second Week in this month.


BEETS SAUTÉS.

Boil young sweet beets until nearly done—say forty-five minutes. Skin
and slice them. Have ready in a saucepan two tablespoonfuls of melted
butter, one tablespoonful of vinegar, a _small_ onion minced, salt and
pepper. When this begins to simmer, put in the beets, and cook ten
minutes, shaking the saucepan frequently, to prevent scorching. Put the
beets into a root-dish, and pour the dressing upon them.


CREAM PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk.
  1 cup of hot boiled rice well cooked, but not broken.
  1 cupful of sugar.
  1 heaping tablespoonful of corn-starch.
  5 eggs.
  ¼ teaspoonful of cinnamon and the same of grated lemon peel.

Heat the milk, stir in the corn-starch wet up with cold milk; then the
beaten yolks and sugar. Add to these the heaping cup of boiled rice.
Stir until it begins to thicken, add the seasoning, and pour into a
buttered bake-dish. Bake until well “set”; spread with a _méringue_ of
the whites and a little sugar, made very stiff. When this has colored
lightly, take from the oven.

Make on Saturday, and set on ice until Sunday. The colder it is, the
better.



  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Green Pea Soup.
  Beef Miroton.      Asparagus Omelette.
  Tomato Salad.      Green Peas.
  ——
  Mountain Custard, or “Junket.”
  Tea and Fancy Biscuits.
  ——


GREEN PEA SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of the corned-beef liquor; add the beef-bones
and any others you may have. Boil gently one hour, skimming often.
Strain, and put in two quarts of green peas, a minced onion, and a
bunch of sweet herbs. Cook forty-five minutes and rub to a pulp through
a colander. Add pepper, heat to a boil and pour upon dice of fried
bread laid in the tureen.


BEEF MIROTON.

Mince the remains of your corned beef; season with pepper, salt, a
little chopped pickle, two boiled eggs chopped fine; wet with whatever
gravy you may have, and put into a greased pudding-dish. Cover
with mashed potatoes, made _very_ soft with milk and butter, sift
bread-crumbs over all, and bake, covered, half an hour, then brown.
This is a nice way of warming over cold meat.


ASPARAGUS OMELETTE.

  6 eggs beaten very light.
  1 bunch of asparagus, the green tops only. (The stalks will be
          an improvement to your soup.)
  2 tablespoonfuls of milk.

Beat whites and yolks together, add the milk, then the boiled
asparagus heads, _cold_ and chopped fine. Have ready a frying-pan with
a tablespoonful of butter in it, hot, but not frying. Pour in the
mixture; shake well from the bottom as it forms, loosen from the pan
with “spatula” or cake-turner; fold over in the middle, and turn the
pan upside down upon a hot dish.


TOMATO SALAD.

Peel and slice your tomatoes, put into a salad-dish, and pour over them
a dressing prepared as follows:

  3 yolks of hard-boiled eggs, pounded.
  1 beaten raw egg.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  A pinch of cayenne.
  1 teaspoonful white sugar.
  2 tablespoonfuls of salad oil.
  1 teaspoonful of made mustard.
  ½ teacupful of vinegar.

Rub yolks, mustard, pepper, salt, sugar and oil to a paste. Beat in the
raw egg with your whisk, finally, the oil, a little at a time. Stir
a great lump of ice into the dressing, whirling rapidly for half a
minute. Take it out and pour the mixture over the salad.


GREEN PEAS.

For Green Peas Receipt, see Sunday of First Week in this month.


MOUNTAIN CUSTARD, OR “JUNKET.”

  2 quarts of milk.
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  Vanilla, or other essence.
  2 teaspoonfuls of liquid rennet—to be had at most of the grocers
          and all the druggists.

Pour the milk, slightly warmed, into a glass bowl; sweeten, flavor, and
stir in the rennet. Set in a rather warm place until it is firm, like
“loppered” milk or blanc-mange; then put on ice. If at the end of an
hour it remains liquid, put in more rennet. Do not let it stand until
the whey separates from the curd. Two hours in warm weather should be
enough. Eat with cream and sugar.


TEA AND FANCY BISCUITS.

Peek & Freans, Mackenzie & Mackenzie, and Huntley & Palmer make the
best fancy biscuits that come to the American market.



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Vermicelli Soup.
  Beefsteak.      Young Onions.
  Potato Puffs.      Spinach.
  ——
  Strawberries and Cream.
  Mother’s Cup-Cake.
  ——


VERMICELLI SOUP.

  6 lbs. of beef-shin, meat chopped and bones cracked.
  2 onions.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  6 large tomatoes.
  Bunch of herbs.
  Pepper, salt, and 1 tablespoonful mushroom catsup.
  ¼ lb. vermicelli, broken small.
  6 quarts of water.

Put meat, bones, and sliced vegetables and herbs on in the water early
in the day, and stew gently five hours. Strain and season. Set aside
two quarts of stock, with the bones and meat, highly seasoned, until
to-morrow, keeping upon the ice. Boil and skim the rest; add the
vermicelli; simmer fifteen minutes, and pour out. Put in the catsup
after the soup goes into the tureen.


BEEFSTEAK.

Flatten with the broad side of a hatchet, and broil quickly about ten
minutes over a clear, hot fire. Lay between two hot dishes, with salt,
pepper, and a great lump of butter upon it to draw the juices to the
surface, for five minutes before serving.


YOUNG ONIONS.

Cut off stems and tops, skin and cook them in plenty of boiling water
for fifteen minutes. Have ready another saucepan with a large spoonful
of butter melted in it, but not hissing hot. Put in the onions, with
a little chopped parsley, and let them warm slowly ten minutes. Then
add a cup of milk in which have been stirred salt, pepper, and half
a teaspoonful of corn-starch. Simmer all for three minutes, stirring
several times, and pour out.


SPINACH.

Boil in hot, salted water twenty minutes. Drain well, and chop fine.
Put into a saucepan with a good spoonful of butter, a little sugar,
salt and pepper, a dust of nutmeg, and a few teaspoonfuls of milk, and
_beat_ until all resolve themselves into a smooth, soft paste.


POTATO PUFFS.

Mash and whip the potatoes very light with milk, butter, salt and
pepper; lastly, the frothed white of an egg. Pile irregularly within
a bake-dish, and set in the oven until light and delicately browned.
Glaze with butter before taking it from the oven.


STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM.

Cap, but do not wash the berries. Never put berries that need washing
upon the table as an uncooked dessert. Pile in a glass bowl, and pass
sugar and cream with them.


MOTHER’S CUP-CAKE.

Please see “BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON AND TEA,” page 322.


  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Julienne Soup.
  Lamb Cutlets.      Purée of Green Peas.
  Potato Strips.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Ristori Puffs.
  ——


JULIENNE SOUP.

Pare and cut into small dice,

  2 carrots.
  1 turnip.
  1 cup small string-beans.
  6 tomatoes.
  1 onion.
  ¼ of a cabbage-heart.

Cook ten minutes in salted boiling water, leaving out the tomatoes.
Drain away the water, and spread the vegetables upon a dish to cool,
while you take the fat from your cold soup-stock; strain the latter
from the bones and meat, and heat to a gentle boil. Continue this for
five minutes, skimming well; put in the parboiled vegetables, the
tomatoes, and a pint of green peas, and stew steadily, but not fast,
for half an hour. Pour out all together.


LAMB CUTLETS.

Trim carefully, lay in a little warmed butter for an hour, turning
several times. Then broil upon a greased gridiron, taking care they do
not drip. Butter, pepper, and salt each, and lay them in a circle about
the peas purée.


PURÉE OF GREEN PEAS.

Boil three pints of green peas until soft. Rub them, while hot, through
a fine colander. Work in a tablespoonful of butter, cut up in flour;
pepper and salt to taste; add three teaspoonfuls of milk, and stir in
a saucepan until very hot and smooth. Put in the centre of a hot, flat
dish, with the cutlets about it, and help out both at the same time.


POTATO STRIPS.

Pare large potatoes: cut into long strips; lay in ice-cold water one
hour; dry between two towels and fry in salted dripping to a light
brown. Drain _well_, and dish upon a folded napkin.


LETTUCE.

Pull out and tear apart the white hearts, and heap within a salad-bowl.
Rub together

  2 tablespoonfuls of salad oil.
  1 teaspoonful, each, of sugar and salt.
  Half as much made mustard and pepper, and whip in—a few drops a
          time—4 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.

Pour over the salad.


RISTORI PUFFS.

  5 eggs.
  The weight of the eggs in flour.
  Half their weight in sugar.
  One-quarter their weight in butter.
  Juice of one lemon and half the grated peel.
  Soda.

Use prepared flour always in this receipt. Cream butter and sugar,
and beat in the yolks. Add the lemon; a pinch of soda, dissolved in a
teaspoonful of hot water, then the beaten whites, alternately with the
flour. Bake in muffin rings in a quick oven. Eat hot, with jelly sauce.



  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Jelly Soup.
  Stewed Sheep’s Tongues.      Potatoes à la Louise.
  Spinach.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Raspberry Shortcake with Cream.
  ——


JELLY SOUP.

  4 calf’s feet, well cleaned.
  2 lbs. of lean veal, cut from the knuckles.
  1 onion stuck with three cloves.
  Teaspoonful of celery essence.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  1 blade of mace.
  Juice of half a lemon.
  Pepper and salt.
  5 quarts of cold water.
  ½ cup of German sago.

Boil the feet, onion, herbs, and the veal, cut into strips, in the
water for four hours, diminishing the liquid to three quarts. Strain,
and cool. Put two of the feet and the veal back into one quart of the
broth; season, and set by on the ice. Take the fat from the rest;
put the liquor, seasoned, over the fire, boil gently and skim, add
the sago, previously soaked two hours in a cup of cold water, simmer
tender, and pour out. You can, if you like, add a glass of pale sherry.


STEWED SHEEP’S TONGUES.

Speak for six sheep’s tongues several days before you want them, unless
you have access to a large market. Wash well in several waters. Boil in
hot, salted water half an hour, to loosen the skins. Take these off and
trim neatly. Put a cupful of your soup—before adding the tapioca—into
a saucepan, with a quarter-pound of sliced salt pork, a teaspoonful of
chopped onion, pepper, and a lump of white sugar. Lay in the tongues,
sliced lengthwise, and stew half an hour. Lay the slices in rows,
overlapping one another, upon a hot dish; thicken the gravy with
browned flour, add the juice of a lemon, boil once, and pour upon the
tongues.


POTATOES À LA LOUISE.

Mash the potatoes, and whip with a fork to a light cream, adding milk
and butter, salt and pepper. Heap upon a shallow pie-plate, well
greased, and set in the oven until a white crust has gathered over it.
Then, wash the mound well with beaten egg. Set in a moderate oven long
enough to harden this, but not until the yellow changes to brown. Slip,
without breaking, to another dish, by the help of the spatula.


SPINACH.

See receipt for Tuesday of this week.


LIMA BEANS.

See receipt for Sunday, Second Week in this month.


RASPBERRY SHORTCAKE WITH CREAM.

Substitute white or red raspberries for strawberries in the receipt for
shortcake, given on Friday of First Week in this month.



  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Halibut Chowder.
  Chicken Pot-pie, with Dumplings.      Sea-Kale.
  Baked Tomatoes.      Gherkin Pickles.
  ——
  Charlotte Russe.
  ——


HALIBUT CHOWDER.

  3 lbs. of halibut, freed from bones, and cut into strips two inches
          long.
  6 parboiled potatoes, sliced.
  2 cups of milk.
  1 good-sized onion, sliced.
  Chopped parsley.
  3 tablespoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour, with butter for 6 Boston
          crackers, split.
  Enough boiling water to cover fish and potatoes.
  Pepper and salt.

Put a layer of fish in the bottom of a pot; season, and sprinkle
with parsley. Hide this with sliced potato. More fish, and yet more
potatoes, until all are in, when cover with boiling water. Put on the
lid, and simmer half an hour after the boil recommences. Have ready
the hot milk in another saucepan; stir in the floured butter. Dip the
crackers in boiling water, butter and salt them, and line the bottom
of your tureen with them. Pour in the boiling milk; then the fish and
potatoes. Send around sliced lemon with it.


CHICKEN POT-PIE, WITH DUMPLINGS.

Clean and cut up the chicken as for fricassee. Put a good layer of salt
pork in the bottom of a broad, not too deep pot; then a small onion,
sliced, the chicken, peppered, and enough cold water to cover it well.
Over this lay a thick sheet of good “family” pie-crust. Stew one hour
and a half; then brown the crust by putting a red-hot stove-cover on
the top of the pot. Take off the crust with care, and set by. Take out
the chicken and arrange upon a hot-water dish. If the gravy has boiled
down too low, add a little hot water. Drop in while the liquor is
boiling hot, squares or rounds of raw pie-paste; cook ten minutes, and
lay upon the chicken. Stir into the gravy a large spoonful of butter
rolled in flour; boil up, and pour upon the dumplings and chicken. Lay
the crust on top.


SEA-KALE.

Boil fifteen minutes in hot, salted water. Drain well, and return
to the fire, with a spoonful of butter, pepper, salt, and a little
lemon-juice. Stir, or toss, five minutes, and heap upon rounds of
buttered toast in a hot dish.


BAKED TOMATOES.

Peel and slice large, ripe tomatoes. Chop fine a little streaked salt
pork, or ham. Butter a pudding-dish, and cover the bottom with slices
of tomato. Season with pepper and sugar, and strew with bread-crumbs.
Then scatter chopped pork over it. Fill the dish in this order, having
crumbs at the top. Cover closely, and bake half an hour, or until the
juice bubbles up at the sides. Brown nicely, and serve in the dish.


CHARLOTTE RUSSE.

  A large sponge-cake.
  1 pint of cream.
  ½ lb. of sugar, powdered.
  Whites of 2 eggs.

Line a tin mould with straight sides with slices of cake, having the
bottom in one piece, if possible. Whip the cream in a syllabub-churn,
and, with your egg-beater, whisk into this, gradually, the frothed
whites and the sugar, flavoring to taste. Fill the cake-lined mould
with this, cover with more slices, and set in ice for an hour or so.
Pass a knife around the inside of the mould to loosen the cake, and
invert upon a plate. Sift powdered sugar over it.



  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Cream Soup.
  Boiled Mutton.      Hot Slaw.
  Buttered Potatoes.      Mashed Squash.
  ——
  Cherry Roley-Poley.
  ——


CREAM SOUP.

If your jelly-soup stock has been kept upon the ice these two days, it
is as good now as on Thursday. Take off the fat, add a pint of boiling
water to the soup, and stew slowly for half an hour. Strain, add more
seasoning, and skim for a few minutes until quite clear in boiling.
Heat in another vessel a pint of milk; stir in a tablespoonful of
butter and the same of corn-starch wet up in cold milk, with a little
nutmeg. Pour this upon two beaten eggs, cook one minute, and put into
the tureen. Add the boiling soup, and stir all up well. It will be wise
to put a pinch of soda in the milk before boiling.


BOILED MUTTON.

Put on in plenty of boiling water, salted, and cook twelve minutes to
the pound. Take out, wipe carefully with a hot, wet cloth; butter all
over, and serve with a cup of drawn butter sent up in a sauce-boat.
Season the pot-liquor, and, when cool, put upon the ice.


HOT SLAW.

Shred a small white cabbage. Boil for fifteen minutes in hot water,
salted. Throw this away, and add four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, the
same quantity of your soup-stock, with pepper and salt. Simmer in this
ten minutes, stirring often. Turn out into a deep dish; pour over it
half a cupful of drawn butter; set in a pan of boiling water five or
six minutes, and serve.


BUTTERED POTATOES.

Slice cold boiled potatoes lengthwise. Put into a saucepan a good lump
of butler, with pepper and salt. Add the potatoes as the butter melts,
and shake over the fire until they are very hot and covered with a sort
of glaze, but not browned.


MASHED SQUASH.

Receipt given last Sunday.


CHERRY ROLEY-POLEY.

  1 quart of flour—Hecker’s prepared.
  1 heaping tablespoonful of lard, and the same of butter.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  2 cups of milk.
  2 cups of stoned cherries.
  1 cup of sugar.

Make a soft paste of flour, with the shortening chopped into it, and
the milk. Roll out, a quarter of an inch thick, into an oblong sheet.
Cover this with cherries; sprinkle with sugar, and roll up closely upon
the fruit. In spreading the cherries, leave a narrow margin on both
sides of the sheet. Baste the roll up in a bag floured well on the
inside, and make a “felled” seam at the open end to keep out the water.
Fit it exactly, but not tightly, to the shape of the pudding. Plunge
into a pot of boiling water and keep it at a steady boil for one hour
and a half. Dip the bag into cold water, rip the stitches, and turn out
upon a hot dish. Eat with hard sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Mutton, Rice, and Tomato Broth.
  Glazed Ham.      Green Peas.
  Potatoes au Gratin.      Stewed Lima Beans.
  Tomato Salad.
  ——
  Spanish Cream.
  Coffee and Macaroons.
  ——


MUTTON, RICE, AND TOMATO BROTH.

Take the fat from the surface of the liquor in which your mutton was
boiled yesterday. Add to this broth the bones of the cold mutton well
cracked, and let them boil slowly one hour and a half. Strain and cool
to throw up the fat; remove this, and put the soup over the fire with
one quart of ripe tomatoes, peeled and cut very fine, and half a cup
of raw rice. Stew forty minutes. Add a lump of sugar; more pepper and
salt, if needed, and a tablespoonful of corn-starch, wet in cold water.
Boil one minute, and pour out.


GLAZED HAM.

Boil a ham on Saturday, allowing twenty minutes to the pound, and let
it get cold in the liquor. Set by then, and, early Sunday morning,
skin it carefully, and trim away the rusty edges. Brush all over with
beaten egg, and cover with a paste of rolled cracker wet up with
milk, seasoned with pepper, and bound with beaten egg. It should be a
quarter of an inch thick. Set the ham in the oven until this is lightly
browned. Serve cold and slice thin. Garnish with frilled paper about
the shank.


GREEN PEAS.

Shell and lay in cold water fifteen minutes. Cook from twenty to
twenty-five minutes in boiling salted water. Drain, put into a deep
dish with a good lump of butter; pepper and salt to taste.


POTATOES AU GRATIN.

Mash with milk and butter, and press firmly into a pretty mould wet
with cold water. Turn out at once; sift fine _dry_ crumbs all over
the mould of potato; set in the oven five minutes to get it quite hot
again, and serve.


STEWED LIMA BEANS.

Shell; lay in cold water ten minutes. Boil tender in hot, salted water.
Drain this off, and add a scant cup of hot milk; a good spoonful of
butter, rolled in a very little flour, with pepper and salt. Simmer
three minutes and pour into a deep dish.


TOMATO SALAD.

Peel with a keen knife, and slice red, ripe tomatoes. Make a dressing
like that for lettuce on Wednesday.


SPANISH CREAM.

  ½ box of Coxe’s Gelatine.
  1 quart of milk.
  Beaten yolks of 3 eggs.
  1 small cup of sugar.
  2 teaspoonfuls flavoring extract—orange is very good in this cream.
  A little soda.

Soak the gelatine in the milk two hours. Stir in the soda, and heat,
stirring often. When scalding hot, pour upon the beaten yolks and
sugar, and return to the farina-kettle. Boil one minute, stirring
ceaselessly. Strain through tarlatan, and when cold, flavor and put
into a wet mould. Set on the ice until wanted, and eat with cream and
sugar. Make this, of course, on Saturday.


COFFEE AND MACAROONS.

Bring these on last of all.


  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Bisque of Lobster.
  A Good “Pick-up” Dish.      Baked Potato Balls.
  String-Beans.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Strawberries and Cream.
  Wine Cake.
  ——


BISQUE OF LOBSTER.

  Meat of one boiled lobster, or a can of preserved lobster.
  1 quart of milk.
  1 quart of boiling water.
  ½ cup rolled cracker.
  4 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  Pepper (cayenne) and salt.

Pound the coral and other soft parts of the lobster to a paste, and
simmer five minutes in the boiling water; then rub through a colander
back into the water. Cut the rest of the lobster-meat into dice, and
put into a saucepan with the cracker-crumbs. Pour the red water over
them, and heat to a boil, when add pepper, salt, and the butter.
Simmer, covered, half an hour, taking care it does not scorch. Heat the
milk, with a pinch of soda, in another vessel, and after the lobster is
in the tureen, pour this in, boiling hot. Pass sliced lemon with it.


A GOOD “PICK-UP” DISH.

  2 lbs. of calf s liver, boiled and cold.
  1 lb. cold cooked ham.
  A cup of gravy, saved from yesterday’s soup, and strained.
  ½ cup bread-crumbs.
  3 eggs, beaten light.
  Parsley.
  A very little minced onion, with pepper and a little salt.

Chop liver and ham; wet with the gravy; mix in seasoning and crumbs,
and beat the eggs in. Put the mixture into a well-greased mould; cover
this and put into a dripping-pan full of boiling water. Cook thus one
hour and a half, keeping plenty of water in the pan, and at a steady
boil. Turn out upon a dish; pour a cup of drawn butter over it, and
serve.


BAKED POTATO BALLS.

Rub cold mashed potato, left from yesterday, smooth with a spoonful of
warmed butter, and soft with warmed milk. Beat up an egg in it, and
stir, until hot, in a clean, greased frying-pan, not allowing it to
“catch” on the side. Then let it cool. When cold and stiff, make into
balls, roll these in flour, and bake upon a greased pan until well
browned. Pile upon a hot dish.


STRING-BEANS.

See Thursday of Second Week in this month.


LETTUCE.

See Wednesday of Third Week in this month.


STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM, AND WINE CAKE.

For Receipt for Cake please refer to “BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON AND TEA,”
page 341.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Bread-and-Cheese Soup.
  Breast of Lamb with Macaroni.      Whole Baked Tomatoes.
  Stewed Peas and French Beans.      Sweet Pickle.
  ——
  Corn Bread Pudding.
  ——


BREAD-AND-CHEESE SOUP.

  3 lbs. lean veal, cut into dice.
  A ham bone, cracked.
  1 sliced onion.
  1 cup of milk.
  2 beaten eggs.
  1 cupful fried bread-dice.
  ¼ lb. dry cheese, grated.
  Pepper and salt.
  Chopped parsley.
  3 quarts of cold water.
  1 tablespoonful of corn-flour.

Put meat, bone, onion, and water together, and cook slowly four hours.
Strain, pressing hard, cool, and take off the fat. Season, and heat to
a boil; put in the parsley and corn-starch—the latter wet with cold
water—and simmer five minutes. Heat the milk in a farina-kettle, pour
upon the eggs, and re-heat, stirring constantly until they begin to
thicken. Put bread-dice and cheese into the tureen; pour on the milk
and eggs; then the hot soup. Stir up and serve.


BREAST OF LAMB WITH MACARONI.

Cover the bottom of a broad pot with _very_ thin slices of fat salt
pork or ham. Lay the lamb upon them. Take all the peel from a small
lemon, and slice it, also very thin. Cover the lamb with this; then
with more sliced pork. Mince a small onion and a bunch of sweet herbs,
and scatter over these. Pour in a pint of boiling water. Put on a close
lid with a weight on top, and cook very slowly two hours, turning the
meat over at the end of the first hour. Meantime, boil half a pound of
macaroni, broken into short pieces, twenty minutes in a little broth,
borrowed from your soup; drain, pepper and salt, and arrange into a
flat bed, upon a hot meat-dish. Keep hot until the lamb is done, when
lay it upon the prepared mound, and set both in the oven while you
strain the gravy. Thicken it with a little browned flour, and boil up
once. Pour over the lamb and macaroni.


WHOLE BAKED TOMATOES.

Chop fine a half cupful of the veal left after straining off the
soup. Add half as much chopped ham, and one-third the quantity of
bread-crumbs. Pepper (and salt, if needed). Put a few spoonfuls of
gravy into a saucepan; stir in this force-meat, with a very little
onion, and the pulp and seeds you have scraped carefully from six
or eight fine smooth tomatoes. When all are smoking hot, add a
tablespoonful of butter, and when this has melted, take from the fire.
Set the tomatoes you have hollowed out in a pudding-dish. Fill with the
mixture; cover with the neat slices you took from the tops; fill the
interstices with what remains of the force-meat, and bake nearly an
hour, or until soft and brown. Keep the dish covered for the first half
hour.


STEWED PEAS AND FRENCH BEANS.

  1 quart of shelled green peas.
  1 pint of string-beans, carefully trimmed.
  1 small onion, sliced thin.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in flour.
  Pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful of tomato catsup.
  1 pint of boiling water.

Cover peas, beans, and onion with salted boiling water. Put on the
saucepan lid, and stew for half an hour. Then stir in the floured
butter, pepper, and catsup; cover again, and simmer fifteen minutes.
Turn out into a deep dish. The beans should be young, and cut into
small pieces.


CORN-BREAD PUDDING.

  2 heaping cups of white Indian meal.
  1 heaping cup of flour.
  3 beaten eggs.
  2½ cups of milk.
  1 large tablespoonful of melted butter, and twice as much white sugar.
  1 teaspoonful of soda, and two of cream of tartar, sifted _twice_
          through the flour.
  1 teaspoonful of salt.
  ½ teaspoonful mingled mace and cinnamon.

Rub butter and sugar together; beat in the yolks; then the milk; the
spice; the salted meal, previously mixed with the flour, cream of
tartar, and soda. Beat _hard_ for five minutes. Pour into a buttered
mould, with a top. Set in a pot of boiling water—the water not quite
reaching the top—and boil steadily two hours. Turn out, cut in slices,
and eat with butter and sugar.


  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  A Stew Soup.
  Stuffed Beef’s Heart with Horseradish Sauce.
  Beets.
  Scalloped Squash.      New Potatoes.
  ——
  Gooseberry Tart.
  ——


A STEW SOUP.

  3 lbs. of lean beef.
  1 lb. of lean ham.
  2 lbs. of lean veal.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  2 onions.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  Pepper, salt.
  2 blades of mace.
  ½ cup Scotch barley.
  6 quarts of water.
  4 tablespoonfuls good dripping—beef or ham.

Cut the meat into strips, and slice the vegetables. Put the dripping
into the soup-pot; next the beef; then a layer of vegetables; next one
of ham; more vegetables, the veal, the rest of the vegetables, and a
cup of cold water. Cover, and heat very slowly, then stew until the
meat is covered with a brown glaze, but not burned. Be very careful
on this latter point. Now, pour in your six quarts of water, and cook
steadily _at least_ three hours. Strain, take out the scraps of meat,
and pulp the vegetables into the soup. Take out two quarts of stock,
season, and put by, with the meat in it, for to-morrow. Let the rest
cool; take off the fat; season, boil up and skim, and put in the
barley, already soaked two hours in a little cold water. Simmer half an
hour, and pour out.


STUFFED BEEF’S HEART WITH HORSERADISH SAUCE.

Wash and soak the heart ten minutes in cold, salt water. Fill _full_
with a force-meat of fat salt pork, minced fine with an equal weight
of bread-crumbs, a little chopped parsley, with pepper, and a small
quantity of grated lemon-peel. Sew up the swollen heart trimly in
coarse net or tarlatan, and put on in a saucepan with two cups of weak
broth, made by taking a cupful from the soup and diluting it with
water, and half a minced onion. Boil two hours, turning twice. Keep
closely covered. Make ready a cup of drawn butter, and let it get
almost cold. Then whip in the frothed whites of two eggs, and when
stiff, two tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish. You can buy it in
any market. Add the juice of a lemon, unless your horseradish is put
up in vinegar. The mixture should look like whipped cream. Put into a
sauce-boat. When your heart is done, remove the cloth, and lay upon a
hot dish. Strain the gravy; thicken with browned flour, and pour over
the heart. Pass the white sauce with it.


SCALLOPED SQUASH.

Boil and mash the squash in the customary way, and let it cool. Beat
the yolks of the two eggs, the whites of which were used for the
horseradish sauce, and when the squash is nearly cold, whip these into
it, with three tablespoonfuls of milk, one of butter, rolled in flour
and melted in the milk; pepper and salt to taste. Pour into a buttered
bake-dish, cover with fine crumbs, and bake to a light brown in a quick
oven. Eat hot.


BEETS.

Wash and cut off the tops. Boil more than an hour if they are of a fair
size. Scrape, slice, and lay in a dish. Pour over them a tablespoonful
of butter, heated with one of vinegar, and seasoned with salt and
pepper. If any are left over, save them for salad, by pouring vinegar
upon them.


NEW POTATOES.

Rub the skins off, and cook until tender in boiling salted water. Serve
whole.


GOOSEBERRY TART.

Top and tail a quart of green gooseberries. Put into a tin or porcelain
saucepan with enough water to prevent burning, and stew slowly until
they break, stirring often. Sweeten abundantly, and set by to cool.
When cold, pour into a pie-dish lined with puff-paste, cover with a
top crust, and bake in a good oven. Eat cold, but fresh, with powdered
sugar sifted over the top.



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  String-Bean Soup.
  Breaded Mutton Chops.      Stewed Tomatoes with Onion.
  Green Corn Boiled Whole.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Cherries.
  Raspberries and Cream, and Light Cakes.
  ——


STRING-BEAN SOUP.

Boil three cups of string-beans—rid of all the fibres and cut small—in
hot salted water until very tender. Drain and chop them, rub them
through a colander to a pulp. Take the fat from the stock kept in the
ice-box since yesterday; pour off from the meat, and strain into a
soup pot. Bring to a boil; skim, and stir in the beans, with a great
spoonful of butter cut up in as much flour. Simmer fifteen minutes;
add seasoning, if necessary, and pour upon dice of fried bread in the
tureen.


BREADED MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim the chops well, leaving an inch of bare bone at the small end of
each. Dip in beaten egg, then in rolled cracker, and fry in hot lard or
dripping. Drain, and stand upon the large ends in a row about the base
of your hillock of potatoes.


STEWED TOMATOES WITH ONION.

Loosen the tomato-skins with boiling water. Peel and slice them, and
put into a saucepan with a sliced onion, a good piece of butter,
pepper, salt, and a little sugar. Stew gently half an hour.


GREEN CORN BOILED WHOLE.

Strip off the outer husks; turn down the innermost covering, and pull
off the silk with great care. Re-cover the ear with the thin inner
husk; tie at the top with a bit of thread, and cook in salted boiling
water from twenty-five to thirty minutes. Cut off the stalks close to
the cob, and send the corn to the table wrapped in a napkin.


MASHED POTATOES.

Mash, and mould into a shapely hillock, fenced about with a _chevaux de
frise_ of chops.


CHERRIES.

Wash, handling gingerly, and heap about a lump of ice in a glass bowl.


RASPBERRIES AND CREAM, WITH LIGHT CAKES.

Do not sugar the berries in the dish, but pass sugar and cream with
each saucerful.



  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Convent Soup.
  Boiled Salmon.      Chicken Fried Whole.
  Stewed Onions.      Green Peas.
  Potatoes à la Duchesse.
  ——
  Cherry Pie.
  ——


CONVENT SOUP.

  3 potatoes.
  2 onions.
  2 carrots.
  2 turnips.
  1 pint of green peas.
  1 cup of string-beans, cut into short lengths.
  ¼ of a small cabbage.
  6 tomatoes, peeled and sliced.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  ½ cup of good dripping.
  2 tablespoonfuls of flour.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour.
  2 qts. and 1 pint of boiling water.
  Pepper and salt.

Parboil, and leave to cool, turnips, carrots, and potatoes, sliced;
also the chopped cabbage. Slice the onions, and fry in the hot
dripping for five minutes. Then stir in the flour, and simmer until
well colored. Turn into a soup-kettle the contents of the frying-pan,
rinsing out the latter with two cups of boiling water, and pour this,
also, into the soup-pot. When it bubbles, add all the vegetables. Stir
a few minutes, and put in another pint of hot water. Cover, and simmer
until all are heated through and begin to boil, when put in the rest
of the water. Cook slowly for two hours, or until all are soft and
breaking. Strain, and pulp the vegetables through the colander. Season
the _purée_ with salt, pepper, and sweet herbs, chopped; stir in your
floured butter; simmer five minutes, stirring well, and serve.


BOILED SALMON.

The middle slice of salmon is the best. Sew up neatly in a mosquito-net
bag, and boil a quarter of an hour to the pound in hot, salted water.
When done, unwrap with care, and lay upon a hot dish, taking care not
to break it. Have ready a large cupful of drawn butter, very rich, in
which has been stirred a tablespoonful of minced parsley and the juice
of a lemon. Pour half upon the salmon, and serve the rest in a boat.
Garnish with parsley and sliced eggs.


FRIED CHICKEN—WHOLE.

Truss a young, tender chicken as for roasting, but do not stuff
it. Put into a steamer, or cover closely in a colander, over a pot
of fast-boiling water for half an hour. Have ready some very nice
dripping, or a mixture of one-third butter, two-thirds lard, in a deep
frying or saucepan. Flour the chicken all over, and put in when the fat
is hot. When the lower side is of a fine brown, turn the fowl. When
both are cooked, take it out, lay a few slices of onion in the bottom
of a tin pail, and put in the chicken. Fit on the top, and set in a
pot of water, which must be kept at a slow boil, half an hour. Rub the
chicken well with melted butter, in which have been stirred pepper,
salt, and chopped parsley, and serve.


STEWED ONIONS.

See Tuesday of Third Week in this month.


GREEN PEAS.

See Sunday of this week.


POTATOES À LA DUCHESSE.

Cut cold mashed potatoes, round or square, with a cake-cutter; flour
well, and bake in the oven, buttering as they begin to brown. If the
potatoes are too pliable to cut out well, mould by pressing firmly into
your cutter, which should first be wet with cold water. Serve with the
salmon.


CHERRY PIE.

Line a pie-dish with cold crust; fill with whole cherries—tart and
sweet, in equal proportions; sugar plentifully; put on a top crust, and
bake in a tolerably brisk oven. Eat cold, with powdered sugar sifted
over the top.



  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Gravy Soup.
  Lemon Veal.      Stewed Squash.
  String-Beans.      Raw Cucumbers.
  ——
  Bananas and Oranges.
  Cherries.
  ——


GRAVY SOUP.

  6 lbs. of lean beef.
  1 lb. of ham.
  1 carrot.
  1 turnip.
  6 tomatoes.
  Bunch of herbs.
  Pepper and salt.
  2 teaspoonfuls of celery essence.
  1 cucumber.
  2 onions.
  6 quarts of cold water.
  Toasted bread cut into dice.
  1 tablespoonful walnut catsup.
  Dripping for frying.

Cut the meat into strips; pare and slice the vegetables. Fry the
onions brown in dripping. Put all together into the soup-kettle, with
one quart of cold water, and bring _slowly_ to a boil. Then pour in a
quart of hot water. Cook an hour longer—still slowly—and pour in the
rest of the water—_cold_. Boil steadily three hours after the bubbling
recommences. The meat should be done to rags, the vegetables broken
to pieces. Strain, pulping the vegetables through a colander; then
strain a second time through a soup-sieve, or squeeze through a double
tarlatan or mosquito-net bag. Season the soup, and set aside your
Sunday portion, seasoning the rags of meat highly, and returning them
to it. (Keep on the ice.) Put to-day’s soup back into the pot; boil
and skim; add a tablespoonful of walnut catsup and pour upon dice of
well-buttered toast, laid in the tureen.


LEMON VEAL.

  3 lbs. of raw, lean veal, chopped fine.
  ½ lb. of fat salt pork, also minced.
  1 small onion, minced.
  A pinch of lemon peel.
  2 lemons peeled and sliced.
  3 eggs beaten light.
  1 cup well-seasoned and strained tomato sauce.
  Pepper and salt.
  Rolled cracker.

Work meat, eggs, onion and seasoning up soft with the tomato-sauce,
and stir in enough cracker to enable you to mould it with your hands.
Press firmly into a wet bowl, and invert upon a pie-dish, withdrawing
the bowl cautiously. Now, sift cracker-dust thickly all over it,
and cover the top and half-way down the sides with thin slices of
lemon. Bake one hour in a good oven; pick off the lemon with care and
dispatch, and brown nicely on the upper grating of the oven. Serve in
the pie-dish.


STEWED SQUASH.

Pare, slice, lay in cold water fifteen minutes. Cook tender in boiling
water, salted, drain well, and mash with pepper, salt and butter,
pressing out all the water.


STRING-BEANS.

See Receipt for Monday of this week.


RAW CUCUMBERS.

Pare and lay them in ice-water one hour, then slice and season to taste
with vinegar, pepper and salt. Never omit the soaking in ice-water.


BANANAS AND ORANGES.

Serve in the same fruit-basket or dish.


CHERRIES.

Pile upon a lump of ice in a glass dish.



JULY.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Clear Sago Soup.
  Larded Shoulder of Mutton.      Scalloped Tomatoes.
  Boiled Corn.      New Potatoes—Stewed.
  ——
  Raspberry and Currant Jelly with Whipped Cream.
  Coffee and Sponge-Cake.
  ——


CLEAR SAGO SOUP.

Remove the fat from the surface of your cold “stock,” pour off without
disturbing the sediment, and heat to a boil. Skim as long as the scum
rises; then stir in the beaten white of an egg, and simmer, skimming
well until it has brought up with it all the impurities, leaving the
soup clear. Add half a cup of German sago, previously soaked two hours
in a little water, and cook gently until this is melted; then serve.


LARDED SHOULDER OF MUTTON.

Cut half a pound of salt fat pork into narrow, long lardoons. Roll
them in a mixture of pepper, allspice and vinegar. If you have no
larding-needle, make incisions in the shoulder of mutton with a
thin, narrow-bladed knife, and thrust in the strips of pork, leaving
about a quarter of an inch projecting on the upper side. Put into a
dripping-pan, pour two cupfuls of boiling water over it, in which has
been mixed a glass of claret. Cover with another pan, and cook two
hours, if the shoulder be of full size. Baste frequently—for an hour
and a half with its own gravy—then three times with a mixture of melted
butter and currant jelly, leaving off the upper pan that the meat may
brown. Dish the meat; thicken the strained gravy with browned flour,
and after one boil, serve in a boat. To save labor and time on Sunday,
lard the meat over night.


SCALLOPED TOMATOES.

Skin and slice. Cover the bottom of a pie-dish (buttered) with dry
crumbs; lay tomatoes over them. Season with pepper, salt, sugar and
butter. Put alternate layers of crumbs and seasoned tomatoes until the
dish is full, having crumbs on top. Bake, covered, half an hour, and
brown slightly.


BOILED CORN.

Please see Thursday, Fourth Week in June.


NEW POTATOES—STEWED.

Rub or scrape off the skins; boil in hot salted water until done. Turn
off the water and dry out on the range. Then crack each one by steady
pressure with the back of a spoon, and drop into a saucepan containing
a cup of hot milk, pepper, salt, chopped parsley, and a great spoonful
of butter cut up in flour. Simmer five minutes, and pour into a
vegetable dish.


RASPBERRY AND CURRANT JELLY WITH WHIPPED CREAM.

  1 quart of red currants and the same of red raspberries.
  2 cups of white sugar.
  1 package Coxe’s gelatine, soaked in one cup of cold water.
  1 cup of boiling water.
  1 pint of whipped cream.

Crush the fruit and strain out every drop of juice through coarse
muslin. Stir sugar, soaked gelatine, and boiling water together. When
clear, strain into the fruit juice. Strain again through a flannel bag.
Pour into a wet mould that has a cylinder in the centre. Do this on
Saturday, and bury in the ice. On Sunday, turn out into a glass dish,
fill the open centre with whipped cream, and pile more about the base.


  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Jugged Soup.
  Potato Batter Pudding.      Mashed Squash.
  Chopped Corn and Potatoes.      Currant Jelly.
  Corn-starch Custard.
  ——


JUGGED SOUP.

Early in the day put on the cracked bones from which you have cut the
cold mutton, with refuse bits of skin, crisped meat, etc., into a
soup-pot with three quarts of water, and boil at the back of the range
down to two quarts. Strain; let the liquid cool to throw up the fat,
and remove this. Have ready in a stone jar, with a top, six parboiled
potatoes, sliced, laid upon slices of streaked pork, cut _very_ thin;
upon this a sliced onion; next, three sliced tomatoes; then a sliced
turnip; on this a cupful of green peas; three more tomatoes; then a
quarter-cup of raw rice; cover this with a grated carrot, and this with
another layer of sliced pork. Sprinkle a little salt and pepper, and
a few dots of butter upon each layer of vegetables, and put upon the
pork some chopped sweet herbs. Pour the cooled broth over all; put on
the jar lid, with a paste of flour and water around the edge to exclude
the air and keep in the steam, and set in a pan of boiling water in the
oven. Leave it there as long as possible—four hours at the least. Pour
into the tureen without further preparation.


POTATO BATTER PUDDING.

Mince and season your cold mutton, wet it with the remains of
yesterday’s gravy and put into a bake-dish. Mash six boiled potatoes
soft with butter; beat in two eggs; a heaping tablespoonful of prepared
flour, and a cup of milk. Mix well, and pour over the mutton. Bake to
a good brown in a moderate oven. One hour will be needed to cook it
properly.


MASHED SQUASH.

See Receipt for Saturday of Third Week in June.


CHOPPED CORN AND POTATOES.

Cut the corn from the cobs left cold from yesterday and chop the cold
new potatoes, also left over. Have ready in a frying pan a large
spoonful of good dripping, well seasoned, and hot. Stir in corn and
potatoes, and toss about until hot and glazed, but not browned. Serve
in a deep dish.


CORN-STARCH CUSTARD PUDDING.

  4 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch.
  1 quart of milk.
  4 beaten eggs.
  1 cup of sugar.
  Nutmeg and cinnamon.
  1 tablespoonful of butter.

Heat the milk; stir in the corn-starch wet up in cold milk, and cook in
a farina-kettle three minutes. Take from the fire; beat in the butter,
and let it cool. When cold, beat in the eggs and sugar, with the spice.
Whip two minutes, and bake in a buttered dish until lightly browned and
well set. Eat cold, with sugar sifted over it.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Veal Broth.
  Beefsteak.      Boiled Onions.
  Mashed Potatoes Moulded.      String-Beans Sautés.
  Raspberries, Cream, and Cake.
  ——


VEAL BROTH.

  3 lbs. scrag of veal—the meat chopped and bones splintered.
  1 onion.
  1 cup of raw rice.
  Chopped parsley, pepper and salt.
  Some salt-pork bones and rind, if convenient.
  1 turnip.
  3 quarts of water.

Put meat, bones, and vegetables, with the water, over the fire, and
cook slowly three hours. Strain the broth and pulp the vegetables. Take
off the fat; season the broth, add the rice, and stew gently until this
is soft.


BEEFSTEAK.

See Tuesday of Third Week in June.


BOILED ONIONS.

Top, tail, and skim. Cook fifteen minutes in boiling water. Drain this
off and throw it away. Replenish the pot with boiling water, put in a
little salt, and stew tender. Drain, dish, season well with pepper and
salt, and butter liberally.


MASHED POTATOES—MOULDED.

Mash smooth, but not too soft, with butter and milk. Wet a jelly-mould,
fill with the potatoes, pressed in firmly. Shake gently out upon a flat
dish, set one minute in the hot oven, and serve.


STRING-BEANS SAUTÉS.

Trim, cut in short pieces, and cook tender in boiling salted water.
Meanwhile, take half a cup of broth from your soup, season well, boil,
and skim for fifteen minutes; then add a tablespoonful of butter. While
these are boiling stir in the beans; shake and stir for three minutes,
add a teaspoonful of vinegar, and pour out.


RASPBERRIES, CREAM, AND CAKE.

When you can give an uncooked dessert, which is more palatable and
more wholesome than a cooked one, and that costs no more, it is wise
policy to avail yourself of the consequent lightening of your labors,
especially in hot weather. Except when it is necessary to deviate from
the rule in order to secure the requisite variety, let cold desserts
be the order of the day in your bills of fare, while the “heated term”
lasts.


  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  French Potage.
  Beef à la Mode.      Macaroni with Tomato Sauce.
  Lima Beans.      Fried Cucumbers.
  ——
  Lemon Trifle.
  ——


FRENCH POTAGE.

  2 lbs. lean beef.
  2 lbs. of lean veal.
  ¼ lb. of lean ham.
  1 sliced onion.
  Chopped sweet herbs.
  12 large prunes.
  Pepper and salt.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
  2 tablespoonfuls soaked granulated tapioca.
  5 quarts of water.

Put the veal, cut into strips, and the sliced onion, into a soup-pot
with the butter, and simmer, stirring constantly, until they are coated
with a brown glaze. _They must not scorch._ Now pour in one quart of
boiling water; cover, and stew half an hour. Check the boil suddenly
with a gallon of cold water, and put in beef, ham, and herbs. Cover
again, and boil gently three hours. Take out the strips of veal, beef,
and ham, when you have strained off the water, and pulp the onion.
Set aside half the stock, highly seasoned, with the meat in it, for
to-morrow. Skim the fat from the rest, season, and put back over the
fire with the prunes, stoned, and cut into thirds, after being well
washed. Simmer half an hour, put in the tapioca; cook until this is
clear, and pour out.


BEEF À LA MODE.

For full and explicit directions concerning this dish please refer—to
spare me work, time, and space—to Sunday, Second Week in May.


MACARONI WITH TOMATO SAUCE.

Break half a pound of macaroni into inch-lengths, and cook twenty
minutes in boiling salted water. Meantime, take a cup of broth from
your soup; strain, boil, and skim it, and slice into it four ripe
tomatoes. Stew tender, and strain through net or tarlatan, into a
saucepan. Season well; stir into it a great spoonful of butter rolled
in flour. Simmer five minutes; put the macaroni into a deep dish,
sprinkling grated cheese over each layer, and pour the hot sauce over
it, opening the mass with a fork, to let it reach the lower layers.


LIMA BEANS.

Shell, lay in cold water fifteen minutes, and cook from twenty-five to
thirty minutes in salt boiling water. Drain well; season with pepper,
salt, and butter.


FRIED CUCUMBERS.

Pare, cut into lengthwise slices, more than a quarter of an inch thick,
and lay for half an hour in ice-water. Wipe each piece dry; sprinkle
with pepper and salt, and dredge with flour. Fry to a light brown in
good dripping or butter. Drain well, and serve hot.


LEMON TRIFLE.

  1 large sliced sponge cake.
  1 quart of milk.
  3 eggs.
  5 heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  1 teaspoonful extract of lemon.
  1 lemon—all the juice and half the rind _finely_ grated.

Heat the milk, stir in four tablespoonfuls of sugar into the beaten
yolks and pour the hot milk upon it, by degrees, stirring well. Return
to the custard-kettle, and stir until it begins to thicken. Flavor,
and pour, quite hot, upon the sliced cake laid in the bottom of a deep
dish. If the dish be of glass, roll it in hot water before cake and
custard go in. Put a heavy saucer on the cake to keep it from rising,
and let it cool. When perfectly cold, heap upon it a _méringue_ of the
beaten whites, whipped up with the other tablespoonful of sugar, the
lemon-juice and rind. Set on ice until wanted.


  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Italian Paste Soup.
  Cold Beef à la Mode.      Broiled Spanish Mackerel.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Green Peas.
  Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Cream Raspberry Pie.
  ——


ITALIAN PASTE SOUP.

Take the fat from your cold soup-stock; pour off from the sediment;
boil and skim, adding a tablespoonful of walnut or mushroom catsup.
When the scum ceases to rise, put in a quarter of a pound of Italian
paste—_i. e._, something like macaroni cut into small figures, letters,
stars, and the like. Simmer twenty minutes and pour out.


BROILED SPANISH MACKEREL.

Clean, wash, and wipe dry. Split, so that when laid flat the backbone
will be in the middle. Sprinkle with salt and lay, inside down, upon a
buttered gridiron, over a clear fire, until it is nicely colored, then
turn. When done, put upon a hot dish, butter plentifully and pepper.
Put a hot cover over it and send to table.


COLD BEEF À LA MODE.

Smooth the round on the top and garnish with pickled beets and parsley.
_Shave_ off horizontal slices in carving.


MASHED POTATOES.

Pass with the fish, and, if you like, again when the meat comes on.


GREEN PEAS.

Shell, lay in cold water fifteen minutes; cook from twenty to
twenty-five minutes in boiling salt water, adding a lump of sugar
unless they are just gathered. Drain very well, dish, pepper, salt, and
butter.


RAW TOMATOES.

Pare and slice with a sharp knife. Lay in a glass dish and pour over
them a dressing made thus: Rub a teaspoonful of sugar, half as much
each of salt, pepper, and made mustard, into two tablespoonfuls of oil.
Beat into this the yolk of a raw egg, and then, a few drops at a time,
five tablespoonfuls of vinegar.


CREAM RASPBERRY PIE.

Line a pie-dish with puff paste, and fill with raspberries, sweetened
bountifully. Cover with a paste-crust, but do not pinch this down at
the edges. Also rub the edge of the lower crust with butter to prevent
adhesion. Bake in a good oven. While it is cooking, heat a small cup of
rich milk, putting in a pinch of soda—stir into it half a teaspoonful
of corn-starch, wet in cold milk, one tablespoonful of white sugar, and
cook three minutes. Take it off, and beat in the frothed whites of two
eggs. Whip to a cream, and let it get cold. When the pie comes out of
the oven, lift the top crust and pour in the mixture. Replace the crust
and set aside to cool. Sift sugar upon the top before serving.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Tomato Soup without Meat.
  Chicken, Stewed Whole.      Baked Squash.
  Rice Croquettes.      Potato Omelette.
  ——
  Cherry Bread Pudding.
  ——


TOMATO SOUP WITHOUT MEAT.

  12 large red tomatoes, peeled and sliced.
  1 small onion, sliced.
  2 tablespoonfuls nice dripping.
  1 tablespoonful chopped parsley.
  2 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in flour.
  Pepper and salt.
  1 teaspoonful of sugar.
  1 small cupful of hot boiled rice.
  1 quart of boiling water.

Fry the onion in the soup-pot in the dripping. When they are of a
reddish-brown, add the tomatoes and stir all up until very hot, when
put in the boiling water and parsley. Stew half an hour, and strain,
rubbing the tomato through a sieve into the hot liquid. Return to the
pot, season, and when boiling again, stir in the floured butter, and a
minute later the rice. Simmer ten minutes and pour out.


CHICKEN—STEWED WHOLE.

Truss as for roasting; but do not stuff it. Put a layer of fat salt
pork in the bottom of a saucepan; then, some sliced onion and parsley.
Lay in the chicken and put in a cupful of gravy made by boiling the
feet and giblets, and, when these are taken out, add a good spoonful
of butter to the weak broth. Cover the saucepan closely, and stew
one hour, _slowly_. Turn the fowl, and stew one hour more, keeping
it covered. Take it out of the pot; lay upon a dish, and thicken the
gravy, after straining it, with a little browned flour. Pepper, also,
to taste, and pour over the fowl, which should be so tender as to fall
apart under the carver’s knife.


BAKED SQUASH.

Boil, mash, and let it get cold. Then, beat up light with a
tablespoonful of melted butter, two raw eggs; three tablespoonfuls of
milk, with pepper and salt to liking. Put into a buttered bake-dish;
sift dry crumbs over the top, and bake in a quick oven.


RICE CROQUETTES.

Boil a cup of rice soft; work into it, while hot, a tablespoonful of
butter, one of grated cheese, pepper, salt, and a beaten egg. Spread
out to cool. Chop the boiled giblets of your chicken fine with a slice
or so of your cold beef, wet with a little gravy, but not too soft.
Make the cold rice into square, flat cakes. Lay in the centre of each
a teaspoonful of the mince. Close the cakes so as to have this in
the middle; mould into oval balls; dip in beaten egg; then, roll in
cracker-crumbs and grated cheese, and fry in good dripping, or lard.
Drain well, and heap upon a hot dish.


POTATO OMELETTE.

  6 eggs.
  ½ cup of milk.
  1 small cup mashed potato, seasoned with pepper and salt.
  Butter for frying.

Beat yolks and whites together. Thin the potato with the milk, and
strain through a colander. Stir into the eggs, have the butter warm
in the pan, pour in the mixture; shake, and loosen with a spatula,
and when nearly done, hold it under the red-hot grate to brown the
upper side. Invert the pan above a very hot dish, and turn out without
folding. Serve at once, as it soon falls.


CHERRY BREAD PUDDING.

  1 quart of milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in.
  Loaf of stale baker’s bread, pared and sliced.
  Butter to spread the bread.
  4 eggs.
  1 cup of sugar.
  1 full cup of stoned cherries.

Butter the bread on both sides. Put a layer into a buttered bake-dish;
pour upon it a little raw custard, made of the eggs, sugar, and milk.
Strew over this some of the cherries, and lay in more buttered bread.
Proceed in this order until the dish is full. The upper layer should be
bread particularly well-buttered and soaked. Cover the dish closely;
set in a dripping-pan full of boiling water, and cook one hour; then
uncover, and brown delicately. Turn out upon a plate, and eat hot with
sauce.


  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Consommé Soup.
  Braised Veal.      Cauliflower with Sauce.
  Raw Cucumbers.      Green Corn Pudding.
  ——
  Cottage Puffs.
  ——


CONSOMMÉ SOUP.

  1 old chicken.
  3 lbs. of lean beef.
  1 onion.
  1 turnip.
  2 carrots.
  Bunch of sweet herbs.
  7 quarts of cold water.
  ½ cup sago, soaked in cold water.
  Pepper and salt.

Cut the beef into strips, and joint the chicken. Slice the vegetables,
chop the herbs, and put on all with the water, to cook slowly for six
hours. Take out the chicken and beef; salt and pepper and put into a
jar. Strain the soup, pulping the vegetables through a colander. Season
and divide it; pouring half upon the meat in the jar, and setting in a
pot of hot water to cook, covered, two hours more. Heat the rest, and
skim; put in the sago, and simmer for half an hour; then pour out.

When the two hours have elapsed, pour out the stock into a bowl, and,
when cold, put upon ice.


BRAISED VEAL.

The breast is a good piece for this purpose. Put three or four
spoonfuls of sweet dripping in a broad saucepan, and when hot, lay in
the veal and fry on both sides. Pour over it two cupfuls of broth,
taken from your soup; a minced onion and a couple of sliced tomatoes.
Cover and stew forty-five minutes. Take out the veal and keep warm,
while you strain and skim the gravy, and return to the pot with pepper,
salt, and minced summer savory, also, a pinch of mace, a lump of
sugar, and a pinch of grated lemon-peel. Put back the meat, and stew
half an hour more. Lay on a dish, thicken the gravy, boil once, and
pour over the veal.


CAULIFLOWER, WITH SAUCE.

  1 head of cauliflower.
  1 cup of drawn butter.
  Juice of a lemon.

Tie the cauliflower in a net and boil in hot, salted water from
thirty-five to fifty minutes, in proportion to its size. Take up, undo
the net, lay in a deep dish, blossom upward, and pour over it a cup of
rich drawn butter, with the juice of a lemon stirred in.


RAW CUCUMBERS.

See Saturday, Fourth Week in June.


GREEN CORN PUDDING.

  Grated corn of 12 large ears.
  1 quart of milk.
  3 eggs.
  2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
  1 tablespoonful of sugar.
  A little salt.

Beat the yolks well; then add the corn, the butter and salt, and stir
up hard with your “beater.” Then comes the milk, next the sugar;
lastly, the whites. Bake in a greased pudding-dish, covered, one hour.
Then brown well. Serve hot in the bake-dish.


COTTAGE PUFFS.

  1 cup of milk and one of cream.
  4 beaten eggs.
  1 tablespoonful of butter, rubbed into the flour.
  A little salt.
  4 cups of prepared flour, or enough for cake batter.

Mix the whipped yolks with the milk and cream; then the salt and the
whites; lastly, the flour. Beat fast and well, and bake in “gem” pans.
The oven should be quick. Eat hot, with sauce.


  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Béchamel Soup.
  Boiled Mutton.      Chicken Rissoles.
  String Beans.      Green Peas.
  Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Self-freezing Ice-Cream.
  ——


BÉCHAMEL SOUP.

Take the fat from the jellied stock in your refrigerator; dip it out
carefully from the meat—taking care of the chicken—and heat in a
saucepan. Scald a quart of milk in another vessel, and stir into it a
large spoonful of corn-starch, wet with cold milk. Pepper and salt to
taste (the milk should have had a pinch of soda in it), and pour into
the tureen. Add the boiling soup, stir up well, and serve.


BOILED MUTTON.

The leg is best for this purpose, and will look much nicer when served,
if it has been tied up in very coarse, thin muslin, or in white
mosquito-netting. Put on in plenty of boiling salted water, and cook
a quarter of an hour to the pound. Unwrap when done, brush all over
with butter, and serve with a boat of drawn butter, in which have been
stirred two dozen capers or pickled nasturtium-seed. Take care of the
liquor.


CHICKEN RISSOLES.

Cut the chicken, boiled in your soup, from the bones, and chop fine.
Add to it a cupful of mashed potato, whipped to a cream, a beaten egg,
pepper and salt; wet soft with a little of the soup, and heat in a
frying-pan, in which has been melted a little butter. Stir until very
hot, and let it get perfectly cold. You can see that this is done
before morning service, if you have an early dinner on Sunday. When
cold, make into bails; roll in egg, then in cracker-crumbs, and fry to
a light brown in lard or nice dripping. Drain off the fat, and serve
hot upon a folded napkin.


STRING-BEANS.

See Monday of Fourth Week in June.


GREEN PEAS AND RAW TOMATOES.

See Thursday of First Week in July.


SELF-FREEZING ICE-CREAM.

  1 quart of rich milk.
  8 beaten eggs.
  3 pints of rich, sweet cream.
  4 cups of sugar.
  1 vanilla bean, broken in two, and boiled in the custard, or 5
          teaspoonfuls of vanilla essence.

Heat the milk; pour it upon the eggs and sugar. Cook, stirring steadily
fifteen minutes, or until it has thickened well. When perfectly cold,
add the cream. Make the custard on Saturday, and set on ice. Early
Sunday morning, beat in the cream, and put all in an old-fashioned
upright freezer, set in its pail. Put a block of ice within a stout
sack, or between the folds of a piece of carpeting, and beat _small_
with a hammer. Put a thick layer into the outer part, then one of
_rock-salt_. Fill the pail in this order, and, before covering the
freezer with ice, beat the custard for five minutes with a flat stick
or ladle. Shut tightly; pack pounded ice and salt over it, and put a
folded carpet over all. In an hour and a half, open the freezer, first
wiping off the salt from about the top. Dislodge the frozen custard
from sides and bottom with a long knife, and beat and stir with your
stick, faithfully, until the custard is a smooth paste. Replace the
cover; let off the water, and pack more pounded ice and salt about it,
completely concealing the freezer. Put back the folded carpet. The
cream will take care of itself for three hours, and more, and you can,
if you like, leave it all day, with a visit of three minutes every few
hours, to let off the water and pack in more salt and ice. Do not open
the freezer until you are ready for the cream. Then take it out, wipe
it off, wrap a towel wrung out in hot water about the lower part, and
invert it upon a flat dish. Should the weather be very hot, you may
have to let off the water oftener than once in three hours; but this
seldom happens if the freezer be set in a cool cellar.



  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Brown Soup.
  Ragoût of Mutton.      Squash à la Crême.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Lettuce Salad.
  ——
  Raspberries, Cream, and Cake.
  Iced Coffee.
  ——


BROWN SOUP.

½ lb. lean bacon; 2 onions; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 scant
teaspoonful mixed allspice and cloves; 2 tablespoonfuls browned flour;
liquor in which your mutton was boiled; pepper.

Cut the bacon into strips, and slice the onions. Put the butter into
your soup-pot with these, and simmer, stirring often, until they are
browned, but not scorched. Add the flour, wet up in cold water, and
stir until very hot. Then, having taken the fat from the top of your
mutton “pot-liquor,” pour it in, with pepper and parsley. Add by
degrees, stirring well, not to lump the flour. Cover, and set at the
back of the range to simmer for two hours—more would not hurt it. When
ready for it, strain into the tureen.


RAGOÛT OF MUTTON.

Slice even, rather thick slices, without skin or fat, from your boiled
mutton, and lay in a deep dish. Pour a good glass of claret wine over
them, and cover for an hour. Make a gravy of the bones and refuse
portions with a quart of cold water. When this has boiled down to a
pint, strain it off. Let it cool, and take off the fat. Put into a
saucepan with a little minced onion, pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful
of tomato catsup, and boil down to a large cupful. Then stir in a
tablespoonful of browned flour, wet up in cold water; simmer three
minutes; add the sliced meat and wine, with a little grated lemon-peel
and a teaspoonful of currant jelly. Let all get hot slowly, but the
meat must _not_ boil, or it will be tough. Set at one side of the range
to heat, until you are ready to pour it into a deep dish.


SQUASH À LA CRÊME.

Boil and mash in the customary manner; press out all the water, and
beat in a tablespoonful of melted butter, with two of cream, heated,
pepper and salt to taste; lastly, a beaten egg. Put the mixture into
a pail, and set in boiling water fifteen minutes, stirring often, and
keeping the water at a boil. It should look like rich custard. Serve in
a deep dish.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and serve without browning.


LETTUCE SALAD.

Pick out and pull apart the hearts; pile in a glass dish; sprinkle with
sugar, and season to taste with oil, vinegar, pepper, and salt.


RASPBERRIES, CREAM, AND CAKE.

Since your soup and ragoût have taken more time and labor than you like
to give to Monday’s dinner, make up for the loss by serving the dessert
given above, sure that nobody will murmur.


ICED COFFEE.

Make more coffee than usual at breakfast-time, and stronger. Add
one-third as much hot milk as you have coffee, and set away. When cold,
put upon ice. Serve at dessert, with cracked ice in each tumbler.


  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Cabbage Soup.
  Mock Pigeons.      Green Peas.
  Cucumber Salad.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Farina Pudding, Cold.
  ——


CABBAGE SOUP.

2 lbs. of lean beef, chopped, and the same of mutton-bones, well
cracked; 1 small, firm white cabbage; 1 onion; bunch of sweet herbs; 1
cup of milk, heated, with a pinch of soda; 1 tablespoonful of butter,
rubbed in one of flour; pepper and salt; 3 quarts of water.

Cook beef, onion, and bones in the water four hours, boiling slowly.
Boil the cabbage in two waters; let it get cold, and shred only the
white parts into rather coarse dice. Cool the soup, and take off the
fat. Put over the fire with pepper and salt and the chopped herbs.
Having boiled it one minute, skim, and put in the cabbage. Heat the
milk in a separate vessel; stir in the floured butter; boil until it
thickens, and pour into the tureen. When the cabbage-soup reaches the
boil, pour it upon the milk, and stir up well.


MOCK PIGEONS.

Take the bone from two nice fillets of veal; flatten them with the
broad side of a hatchet, and spread with a good force-meat of crumbs
and chopped ham, seasoned well. Roll the meat up on this; bind into
oblong rolls with soft string; lay in a dripping-pan, and pour over
them two cups of your boiling soup before the cabbage goes in—or any
other hot broth will do as well. Turn a pan over them and bake nearly
two hours, basting well with the gravy. When done, lay upon a hot dish,
while you thicken the gravy with browned flour, and season well with
pepper, salt, and tomato catsup. Boil one minute, and pour part over
the pigeons, the rest into a boat. Clip the strings carefully, and do
not pull them hard in removing them, lest you spoil the shape of the
meat.


GREEN PEAS.

See Wednesday, First Week in this month.


LIMA BEANS.

See Thursday of First Week in July.


CUCUMBER SALAD.

See Saturday of First Week in July.


FARINA PUDDING—COLD.

1 quart fresh milk; 3 tablespoonfuls of farina, soaked one hour in a
little cold water; 3 eggs; 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar; a little salt;
flavoring essence.

Heat three-quarters of the milk, salt it, and stir in the farina.
Cook half an hour, stirring often; take it off, and pour upon the
eggs, sugar, and the other cup of milk, beaten together. Return to
the farina-kettle, and stir ten minutes longer. Pour out, beat in the
flavoring, and put into a wet mould. Set on the ice, when cool. It will
soon form. Eat with cream, or fruit syrup.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Crab Soup.
  Savory Calf’s Head.      Stewed Tomatoes.
  Potato Puff.      Boiled Corn.
  ——
  Cherry Soufflé.
  ——


CRAB SOUP.

Two pounds of lean veal chopped, covered with two quarts of cold water,
boiled down one-half, strained, cooled, skimmed and seasoned with
pepper and salt. Meat of three large crabs, boiled and cold. One pint
milk, and a pinch of soda stirred into it. Pepper, salt, nutmeg, one
teaspoonful of anchovy paste. One cup of boiled rice—soft and hot.
Tablespoonful of floured butter. Return the broth—prepared as directed
above—to the fire, with the rice, and simmer until the latter is broken
to pieces. Strain, rubbing the rice through the sieve; set over the
fire, adding the nutmeg and anchovy; then the crab meat, cut into small
dice. Simmer ten minutes longer—it must not actually _boil_—and pour
into the tureen. Add the boiling milk, which has been thickened with
the floured butter; stir up well and serve. Pass sliced lemon, crackers
and butter with it.


SAVORY CALF’S HEAD.

Wash the head well—it should of course have been cleaned with the skin
on; take out the tongue and brains; boil them in a separate vessel, and
keep on ice for to-morrow’s soup. Put on the head (the two sides tied
into the original shape by a band of tape) in plenty of cold water,
slightly salt, and cook gently one hour and a half. Take out, wipe dry,
score the cheeks in squares, and wash the head on top and sides, with
beaten egg. Sift over it a mixture of rolled cracker, pepper and salt;
and set in a quick oven. In ten minutes, baste with melted butter; five
minutes later, with a cupful of broth from the pot poured gradually
over it. Cover with thick white paper and cook ten minutes longer,
then dish, with thin slices of crisped ham laid about it. Thicken the
gravy in the pan with browned flour, and send up in a boat. Save the
pot-liquor for soup, seasoning it, and keeping in a cold place.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Loosen the skins by pouring boiling water upon them. Peel, slice, and
put into a saucepan with a little minced onion, pepper, salt and sugar,
and stew from twenty-five to thirty minutes. Just before taking them
up, add a good lump of butter.


POTATO PUFF.

Mash the potatoes very light and soft; whipping in milk, butter, salt,
and two beaten eggs. Heap within a greased bake-dish, and set in a good
oven until well browned. Serve in the bake-dish.


BOILED CORN.

See Thursday, Fourth Week in June.


CHERRY SOUFFLÉ.

2 cups of milk; 1 cup of prepared flour; 5 eggs; 4 tablespoonfuls
sugar; 1 teaspoonful bitter almond flavoring; 1 cup of stoned cherries,
dredged with flour; a pinch of salt.

Scald the milk and pour it—a little at a time—upon the flour, stirring
constantly, to a smooth batter. Return to the custard kettle, and stir
until thick as hasty pudding. Pour, still hot, upon the yolks beaten up
with the sugar. Whip up thoroughly and let it cool. Whisk the whites
very stiff and beat rapidly into the cold paste. Butter a mould, line
thickly with the dredged cherries, and put in the mixture, carefully,
not to disturb the cherries, which should stick to the buttered sides.
Allow room for swelling in the mould. Put on the top, set in a pot of
boiling water, and cook for an hour and a half. Dip into cold water,
and turn out upon a hot dish. Eat soon, with a good pudding sauce.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Plain Calf’s Head Soup.
  Fried Chickens.      Fried Kidney-Beans.
  New Potatoes.      Lettuce Salad.
  Beets, Sautés.
  ——
  Blackcap Shortcake, Hot.
  ——


PLAIN CALF’S HEAD SOUP.

1 lb. of lean beef cut into strips and fried brown, with a sliced
onion, in dripping; 1 grated carrot; 1 sliced turnip; bunch of herbs
chopped; pot-liquor from yesterday’s calf’s head.

Skim the cold broth, and put on with the fried meat and onions, the
herbs and vegetables. Cook gently three hours, and strain. Add a
tablespoonful—heaping—of browned flour wet in cold water; simmer a
minute, and put in the cold tongue and brains—kept from yesterday—cut
into dice. Cook gently three minutes, and pour out.


FRIED CHICKENS.

Cut up a pair of young chickens, as for fricassee. Lay in cold water
for one minute, and, without wiping them, pepper and salt each piece;
roll in flour and fry in hot lard to a fine brown. Pile upon a
hot-water dish; fry some whole bunches of green parsley in the lard,
and lay over and about them. This is the famous fried chicken of the
South.


FRIED KIDNEY-BEANS.

Boil tender in hot salted water, drain, and when nearly cold, mash
them, partially, leaving here and there a whole grain. Have ready in
a frying-pan some strips of fat salt pork fried crisp in their own
grease. Season this with pepper, and stir in the beans. Cook, stirring
briskly, until smoking hot. Dish with the crisped pork on top.


NEW POTATOES.

Rub, or scrape off the skins; cook until tender, in hot salted water;
dry in the open pot on the range, after draining them, and serve.


BEETS SAUTÉS.

Boil and slice as for plain boiled beets. Put into a saucepan with a
great spoonful of butter, the same of vinegar, with pepper and salt.
Shake and toss until they are glazed with the hot butter; then dish.


LETTUCE SALAD.

See Monday of this Week.


BLACKCAP SHORTCAKE—HOT.

Please see Wednesday of Second Week in June.


  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Soup à la Bonne Femme.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Roast Ducks.
  Raw Tomatoes.      Green Peas.
  ——
  Currant and Raspberry Tart.
  ——


SOUP À LA BONNE FEMME.

2 lbs. of good white fish—halibut, bass, or pickerel will do; 3 eggs; 1
cup of milk; 1 onion; bunch of sweet herbs; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter
rubbed in flour; cayenne and salt to taste; a little nutmeg; 3 quarts
of water.

Boil together fish, herbs, and onion in cold water for two hours.
Strain; pick the fish from the bones, and chop so fine that you can rub
it through the colander into the soup. Season, and put back into the
soup-pot. Simmer ten minutes and stir in the butter. Heat the milk in
a farina-kettle; pour it upon the beaten eggs, and stir over the fire
until it _begins_ to thicken. Pour into the tureen, add the soup, stir
up well, and serve. It is well to add a pinch of soda to the milk in
heating.


ROAST DUCKS.

Clean, wash, and stuff the ducks; adding sage and onion to the
force-meat for _one_. Fill the other with the ordinary poultry
dressing. Lay in the dripping-pan; pour a cup of boiling water over
them, and roast, basting often, about twelve minutes to the pound,
unless they are very young and tender. Take them up; strain the gravy,
and take off the fat. Season; thicken with browned flour, and pour into
a boat.


MASHED POTATOES.

Whip boiled mealy potatoes to pieces with a fork, and, when they are a
powdery pile, whip in butter, milk, and salt. They should be light and
creamy. Pile roughly upon a hot dish.


GREEN PEAS.

Shell; lay in cold water fifteen minutes; put on in boiling salted
water, with a lump of loaf-sugar, if they are market peas. Boil twenty
minutes, if young; drain very dry; dish, and season with pepper, salt
and plenty of butter.


RAW TOMATOES.

Peel with a keen knife. Slice, and lay in a glass bowl, and pour on a
dressing made by rubbing together half a teaspoonful each of pepper,
salt, sugar, and made mustard, with two tablespoonfuls of best oil,
beating into this, a few drops at a time, five tablespoonfuls of
vinegar, and at last the yolk of a raw egg. Set the salad upon the ice
for half an hour.


CURRANT AND RASPBERRY TART.

Mix together three cups of currants and one of raspberries. Sweeten
abundantly; fill shells of good pie-paste with them; cover with crust,
and bake. Eat cold, with powdered sugar sifted over them.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Pea and Tomato Soup.
  Salmi of Ducks.      Mashed Squash.
  String-Beans.      Cucumbers.
  ——
  Almond Corn-Starch Blanc-Mange.
  ——


PEA AND TOMATO SOUP.

1 lb. of lean ham; 2 lbs. of lean beef; 2 lbs. of lean veal; 2 onions;
bunch of sweet herbs; 12 tomatoes; 1 quart of green peas; 5 quarts of
water; pepper and salt to taste; corn-starch; sugar.

Cook the meat, cut into strips, and the herbs and onions in the cold
water four hours. Strain; put the meat and half the stock on the
ice—after seasoning well—for Sunday. Season the rest, when you have
cooled and skimmed it, and put over the fire with the sliced tomatoes
and peas. Boil slowly half an hour. Pulp through a colander; stir in a
tablespoonful of corn-starch wet with cold water, and a tablespoonful
of white sugar. Simmer five minutes, and pour out.


SALMI OF DUCKS.

Cut the meat neatly from the bones, having the slices as nearly as
possible of uniform size. Make a gravy of the bones, stuffing, skin,
etc., and a quart of water, boiling gently down to one large cupful.
Skim and strain this into a saucepan. Add the juice of a lemon, and
browned flour for thickening; stir smooth, and lay in the sliced duck.
Warm slowly at one side of the range, but do not let it boil. When very
hot, pour upon oblong slices of fried toast covering the bottom of a
hot dish.


MASHED SQUASH.

Peel, quarter, and boil soft. Mash in a hot colander, pressing hard.
Serve in a deep dish, with butter, pepper, and salt beaten in.


STRING-BEANS.

Cut off the strings from both sides; cut into short lengths, and cook
tender in boiling salt water. They require twice as much time as
peas. Drain, season with pepper, salt, and butter. Set aside half for
to-morrow’s salad.


CUCUMBERS.

Peel and lay in ice-water one hour. Slice; put upon a lump of ice in a
salad-dish, and season to taste upon saucers after they are helped out.


ALMOND CORN-STARCH BLANC-MANGE.

1 quart of milk; 4 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch; 3 eggs; ¼ lb.
almonds, blanched, dried, and pounded; rose-water and bitter almond; ¾
cup of powdered sugar.

Scald the milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in. Have the almonds
beaten to a paste with a teaspoonful of rose-water, and stir into
the hot milk. Simmer five minutes; then strain through thin muslin,
pressing hard upon the almonds. Add this, hot, to the beaten eggs and
sugar; put upon the fire, and stir in, with the eggs, the corn-starch
wet up in cold milk, never taking the spoon out until it is thick. Take
off; flavor, and pour into a wet mould. Set in ice, and it will soon
form. Eat with sugar and cream.


  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Rice Soup.
  Stuffed Veal with Garnish of Green Peas.
  Boiled Corn.      New Potatoes.
  Bean Salad.
  ——
  Orange Snow.
  Iced Tea and Cake.
  ——


RICE SOUP.

Take the fat from your cold stock, and strain it from the meat. Boil up
once and skim. Add half a cup of rice, and simmer until this is very
tender. Add the water in which have been soaked two tablespoonfuls of
burnt sugar, and pour out.


STUFFED VEAL WITH GARNISH OF GREEN PEAS.

Take the large bones from a piece of loin of veal; stuff the cavities
thus made with a good force-meat of chopped pork crumbs and seasoning—a
few chopped mushrooms are an improvement—cover the sides with greased
sheets of thick writing-paper; put a cupful of soup stock or other
gravy in the dripping-pan, and baste well, for one hour with butter
and water, afterwards with the gravy. Cook fully twelve minutes to
the pound. Take off the paper during the last half hour; dredge with
flour, baste with butter, and brown nicely. Take up and keep hot while
you skim the fat from the gravy, stir into it half a cupful of chopped
mushrooms and a little browned flour. Serve this—having cooked it three
minutes—in a boat. Have ready some green peas, boiled and seasoned, and
make a fence of them about the veal when dished.


NEW POTATOES.

Refer to Thursday, Second Week in July.


BOILED CORN.

See Thursday, Fourth Week in June.


BEAN SALAD.

Cut the beans into inch-lengths, pile in a salad-dish and pour upon
them such a dressing as you compounded for the raw tomatoes on Friday
of Second Week in July. Garnish with curled lettuce.


ORANGE SNOW.

4 large sweet oranges, all the juice, and the grated peel of one; juice
and half the grated peel of 1 lemon; 1 package of Coxe’s gelatine
soaked in a cup of cold water; whites of 4 eggs, whipped stiff; 1 large
cup of white sugar; 3 cups of boiling water.

Mix the juice, and peel of the fruit with the soaked gelatine, also the
sugar. Leave them covered for one hour, then pour on the boiling water
and stir clear. Strain through flannel, wringing hard. When quite cold,
whip in the frothed whites very gradually until the mixture is a white
sponge. Put into a wet mould on Saturday, and set on the ice.


ICED TEA AND CAKE.

Set the tea aside after breakfast in a pitcher, or bottle, which you
can keep in ice. When you serve it, half fill each glass with ice, put
in more sugar than you would use for hot tea, and pour on the cold
liquid.



  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Summer Squash, or “Cymbling” Soup.
  Scalloped Veal.      Mashed Turnips.
  Stewed Tomatoes.      Potatoes, Boiled Whole.
  ——
  Bananas, Oranges, and Cherries.
  Iced Coffee and Fancy Biscuits.
  ——


SUMMER SQUASH, OR CYMBLING SOUP.

The bones from your cold veal; 2 lbs. lean, raw veal, chopped fine;
1 onion; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter rubbed in flour; 1 cup of milk,
with a pinch of soda; 1 tablespoonful of white sugar; 2 beaten eggs;
2 good-sized white squash pared and quartered; pepper and salt; fried
bread; 4 quarts of water.

Boil bones, meat, and onions in four quarts of water until this is
reduced to two. Strain, cool, and take off the fat. Cook the squash
in one pint of the stock until soft enough to rub through a colander;
pulp, and put this, with its liquor, in the remaining three pints of
broth; also the sugar, seasoning, and floured butter, and cook slowly
without boiling, five minutes. Heat the milk, pour upon the eggs, stir
over the fire until it begins to thicken. Put dice of fried bread into
the tureen; pour on the milk and eggs, then the soup, and stir up well.


SCALLOPED VEAL.

Chop the cold veal and stuffing; put a layer into a greased bake-dish;
season, and wet with the cold gravy. Lay chopped mushrooms upon
this; then bread-crumbs, with butter scattered over them. More meat
seasoning, mushrooms and crumbs should fill the dish, with plenty of
crumbs, profusely buttered, on top. Wet each layer of meat with gravy.
Cover the dish, and bake until it bubbles on top. Brown lightly, and
send to table in the dish in which it was cooked.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Peel, slice, and cook soft in boiling salted water. Mash in a hot
colander, pressing well. Season with salt, pepper and butter; smooth
into a heap in a root-dish, and put pats of pepper on top.


STEWED TOMATOES.

See Wednesday of Second Week in July.


POTATOES, BOILED WHOLE.

Peel as thin as possible. Put on in boiling water, a little salt, and
cook fifteen minutes. Then, pour in a pint of cold water. This checks
the boil and throws the meal, or starch, to the surface. Increase the
heat, and boil until a fork will pierce the largest. Throw off the
water; set the pot on the range, and let the moisture evaporate. Put
the potatoes in a deep dish; pour upon them a few spoonfuls of melted
butter mixed with chopped parsley, and serve.


BANANAS, ORANGES, AND CHERRIES.

Put bananas and oranges in one dish; the cherries, bestrewed with
cracked ice, in another.


ICED COFFEE AND FANCY BISCUITS.

See Monday of Second Week in July.



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Bread-and-Cheese Porridge.
  Lamb Chops.
  Purée of Peas and Onion.      Lima Beans.
  Moulded Potato.      Currant Jelly.
  ——
  Currants and Raspberries.
  Unity Cake.
  ——


BREAD-AND-CHEESE PORRIDGE.

2 lbs. of beef-bones cracked; 2 lbs. coarse mutton—lean and chopped;
1 lb. stale bread-crusts, dried to crispness in the oven; 4 quarts of
water; 4 tablespoonfuls fine grated cheese; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter,
rolled in flour; pepper, salt, and chopped parsley; 1 onion.

Put on the bones, meat, and onion in the water, and boil three hours.
Cool, and take off the fat. Season, and re-heat. Put in the crusts;
cook very slowly until they are like a jelly. Take them from the fire;
beat in a bowl until smooth; put back into the soup, and simmer fifteen
minutes. Stir in the butter; cook five minutes, and pour upon the
cheese in the tureen. Stir up well.


LAMB CHOPS.

Trim very neatly, and broil upon a buttered gridiron over a clear fire,
turning often. Wind a strip of frilled tissue-paper about the bit of
bare bone left upon each one.


PURÉE OF PEAS AND ONION.

Take a cupful of broth from your soup-pot, before adding the bread.
Cool, and take off the fat, and return to the fire with two quarts
of green peas and a sliced onion. Set the vessel containing it in a
saucepan of boiling water, and cook, closely covered, until the peas
begin to break. Put into a bowl; bruise the peas with a potato pestle,
and return to the fire with the liquor in which they were stewed. Add
a little parsley and a lump of sugar, with pepper, salt, and butter.
Simmer five minutes, and turn out into a deep dish.


LIMA BEANS.

Shell, and cook in boiling, salted water twenty-five minutes. Drain,
season, and serve.


MOULDED POTATO.

Mash—or rather, beat up lightly with a fork. Work in butter and milk,
but do not get it too soft. Fill small cups—wet with cold water—with
the potato, pack down firmly and turn out upon a greased bake-pan.
Brown in a quick oven until they are of a russet hue; glazing with
butter, as they color. Transfer to a flat, hot dish.


CURRANTS AND RASPBERRIES.

Slightly mash the currants, leaving as many whole ones as you break.
Sweeten plentifully, and, just before serving, mix with them an equal
quantity of red or white raspberries, fresh and whole.


UNITY CAKE.

Make fresh for the day, according to directions given in “BREAKFAST,
LUNCHEON, AND TEA,” page 333.


  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Ox-tail Soup.
  Beefsteak with Wine Sauce.      Cream Onions.
  Baked Squash.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Ambrosia Custard.
  ——


OX-TAIL SOUP.

2 ox-tails; bunch of thyme and parsley; 1 large onion, sliced; 2 grated
carrots; ½ lb. fat salt pork; 6 quarts of water; 1 small onion stuck
with six cloves; browned flour; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter.

Slice the pork, and fry. When the fat has covered the bottom of the
pan, put in the large sliced onion and fry to a good brown. Then add
the tails, cut at each joint. When they have been in five minutes, take
them out and put into the soup-pot with the fried onion and water.
Cover and cook slowly two hours. Then put in the carrots, herbs, and
clove onion, and stew two hours more. Strain, pulping the vegetables;
cool, take off the fat, and season the soup. Put over the fire, and
when it again simmers, stir in the butter _melted_ and rubbed into the
browned flour to form a paste. Boil up once and it is ready. Put the
remnants of the tails into a jar, or bowl, and add to them half the
soup. When cold put on ice for to-morrow.


BEEFSTEAK WITH WINE SAUCE.

Flatten and broil your steak as usual, but when you lay it upon the
hot-water dish, have ready this sauce: 1 glass of brown sherry; 1 large
spoonful of mushroom or walnut catsup; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter,
rolled in a mere dust of flour; pepper and salt to taste. Heat to
boiling—quickly—in a saucepan, and when it has been poured upon the
steak, cover and let stand a few minutes before you serve.


CREAM ONIONS.

Boil in two waters. Drain, and if they are large, cut into quarters,
and pour over them a cup of scalding milk—in which a pinch of soda has
been stirred. Set over the fire, add a tablespoonful of butter, half
a teaspoonful of corn-starch, wet with milk, a little minced parsley,
with pepper and salt. Simmer three minutes, and pour out.


BAKED SQUASH.

See Friday, First Week in July.


RAW TOMATOES.

See Friday, Second Week in July.


AMBROSIA CUSTARD.

1 quart of milk; 5 eggs; 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar for custard and 2
for _méringue_; 1 grated cocoanut; bitter almond flavoring.

Heat the milk; pour upon the sugar beaten up with the yolks of all
the eggs and the whites of two. Cook, stirring all the time, until it
begins to thicken. Pour it hot upon one-third of the grated cocoanut.
Stir up well; flavor, and when cold put into a glass dish. Cover it
with grated cocoanut, and heap high upon this a _méringue_ made of the
reserved whites and sugar.



  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Yesterday’s Soup.
  Roast Chickens.      Stewed Potatoes.
  Stuffed Tomatoes.      Green Corn Pudding.
  ——
  Lemon Méringue Pie.
  ——


YESTERDAY’S SOUP.

Take every particle of fat from the cake of soup jelly you will find in
your refrigerator; add a cup of boiling water to thin it sufficiently
to pour off from the meat; strain it into the soup-pot, boil gently
once and skim; add seasoning if you find it needed, also a glass of
wine and the juice of a lemon, and pour out.


ROAST CHICKENS.

Clean, wash out in several waters, and stuff with crumbs mixed in tepid
water, then drained and put over the fire in a saucepan with a little
hot butter in the bottom. Stir the crumbs until hot and almost dry, add
chopped parsley, salt and pepper; take it off and beat in two frothed
eggs. Fill the chickens, sew up the vents, and tie up the necks. Cover
the breasts with very greasy writing-paper. Put a cup of boiling water
into the dripping-pan and roast one hour, basting freely. Ten minutes
before taking up the fowls, remove the papers and baste the breasts
three times with butter while browning. Pour off the fat from the
gravy; add the chopped yolks of two eggs, a little browned flour, with
pepper and salt. Boil up and serve in a boat.

Salt the giblets slightly and keep upon ice for to-morrow’s soup.


STEWED POTATOES.

Pare and cut in rather large dice. Stew twenty minutes in boiling
salted water. Pour nearly all of this off and put on as much cold milk.
Stew ten minutes more; stir in a tablespoonful of butter rolled in
flour; a little minced parsley, pepper and salt. Simmer five minutes
and pour out.


STUFFED TOMATOES.

Select enough large, smooth tomatoes to fill a bake-dish. Cut a piece
from the top of each to serve as a cover. Scoop out the pulp, taking
care not to injure the skin. Chop up a few spoonfuls of the meat from
the soup; mix with it a little chopped pork and bread-crumbs. Add the
tomato-pulp, pepper and sugar, and fill the skins. Put on the tops, and
bake, covered, half an hour. Uncover and brown.


GREEN CORN PUDDING.

See Saturday, First Week in July.


LEMON MÉRINGUE PIE.

3 eggs; 1 great spoonful of butter; ¾ cup of white sugar. Juice and
grated peel of 1 lemon.

Cream butter and sugar; beat in yolks and lemon, and fill one large
open shell of paste, or two small ones. Beat the whites to a stiff
_méringue_, with three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, and a little
rose-water. When the pies are done, draw to the door of the oven,
spread quickly with this mixture, and shut them in again for three
minutes. Eat cold.



  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Giblet Soup.
  Halibut à la Royale.      Chicken Cutlets.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Lettuce Salad.
  Green Peas.
  ——
  Coffee Cream.
  ——


GIBLET SOUP.

Break up the skeletons of your roast chicken. Put bones, stuffing, and
giblets into a soup-pot with four quarts of water. Boil one hour, and
take out the giblets. Boil the rest an hour more; strain, cool, and
skim. Then put back over the fire to simmer. Meanwhile, you should have
fried an onion—sliced—in two tablespoonfuls of butter; then taking out
the onion, have stirred in a _great_ spoonful of browned flour, and
cooked it, stirring incessantly five minutes. Now thin this mixture
with a few spoonfuls of your soup, and strain it into the soup-kettle.
Lastly, add the chopped giblets; season well, and pour out.


HALIBUT À LA ROYALE.

6 lbs. of halibut in one piece; ½ cup of bread-crumbs; 2 tablespoonfuls
chopped fat salt pork; 2 teaspoonfuls essence of anchovy; ¼ cup of
melted butter; 1 cup of boiling water. Juice of 1 lemon. Pepper and
salt.

Lay the halibut in salt and water two hours. Wipe it; make incisions on
each side of the back-bone, and put in a dressing made of bread-crumbs,
chopped pork, pepper, salt and a little anchovy. Pour into the bottom
of a neat bake-dish the butter, hot water, lemon and anchovy essence.
Lay in the fish; cover, and bake one hour, basting often. Send to table
in the dish.


CHICKEN CUTLETS.

The meat of your cold fowls chopped very fine; 1 cupful of drawn butter
or gravy; 4 eggs; ½ cupful of bread-crumbs; pepper and salt; beaten egg
and rolled cracker.

Put the gravy into a saucepan, and when hot, stir in the meat, well
seasoned, and the bread-crumbs. As they heat, add the beaten eggs, and
mix all well together, stirring constantly for three minutes; then pour
out upon a broad dish to cool. When cold and stiff, cut into oblong
cakes, three inches long by two wide; dip in egg, then in cracker, and
fry in hot lard. Drain, and pile upon a flat dish, log-cabin-wise, and
serve.


MASHED POTATOES.

Serve with the fish.


GREEN PEAS.

See Friday of Second Week in July.


LETTUCE SALAD.

See Monday, Second Week in July.


COFFEE CREAM.

1 quart of rich milk; 1 cup of strong, made coffee; 1 pint of sweet
cream, whipped in a syllabub churn; yolks of 3 beaten eggs; 1 cup of
sugar; 1 package of Cooper’s Gelatine, soaked one hour in a little cold
water.

Scald the milk; add a pinch of soda; put in the hot coffee, and pour
upon the beaten yolks and sugar. Return to the fire, and stir until it
begins to thicken; when, add the gelatine, and take off. Stir until the
gelatine has dissolved. When perfectly cold, whip in, by degrees, the
frothed cream, and put in a wet mould to form. Keep upon the ice until
wanted.


  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Julienne Soup.
  Mutton Stew with Peas.      Potato Croquettes.
  Boiled Corn.      Cucumbers.
  ——
  Cream Cake and Chocolate.
  ——


JULIENNE SOUP.

2 lbs. of beef, and the same of lean veal; 1 lb. of lean ham; 2
carrots; 2 turnips; 2 onions; 1 cup of Lima beans; 3 tablespoonfuls of
butter; sweet herbs; pepper and salt; 6 quarts of water.

Cut the meat small, and cook with herbs in the water four hours.
Strain. Put the meat and half of the stock, well seasoned, upon the
ice. Cool the rest, skim, season, and put back into the pot. Prepare
your vegetables in the following manner: Put the butter into a
frying-pan, and when hot, fry the onion, sliced, in it; then, carrots
and turnips cut into strips less than an inch long. When they have
cooked five minutes, put them into the soup. Simmer half an hour; skim,
and put in the beans. Cook gently half an hour more, and pour out.


MUTTON STEW WITH PEAS.

Take three pounds from the breast, and cut it into inch-square pieces.
Dredge these with flour, and fry brown in good dripping; add a small,
sliced onion, and a tablespoonful of chopped herbs. Cover well with
cold water, put on the saucepan-lid, and stew gently until very tender.
Take out the meat, and keep hot over boiling water; strain and season
the gravy; put in a quart of young peas, and stew slowly until the peas
are done. Put back the meat, boil up once, and serve.


POTATO CROQUETTES.

Mash two cups of potatoes light and smooth; season with pepper, salt,
and a little nutmeg, and beat in two eggs. Put a spoonful of dripping
into a frying-pan, and when it hisses, stir in the potato mixture.
Keep stirring until it is very hot. Spread upon a dish to cool. When
cold, mould into croquettes; dip in beaten egg, then in rolled cracker,
and fry to a fine yellow-brown. Drain well, and heap upon a dish.


BOILED CORN.

See Thursday, Fourth Week in June.


RAW CUCUMBERS.

See Saturday, Second Week in July.


CREAM-CAKE AND CHOCOLATE.

2 cups of powdered sugar; ⅔ cupful of butter; 4 eggs; ½ cupful of milk;
3 cups of prepared flour.

Cream butter and sugar; add the beaten yolks, the milk, finally the
frothed whites, alternately with the flour. Bake in jelly-cake tins.
When cold, spread the following mixture between them:

1 cup of milk; 2 small teaspoonfuls of corn-starch; 1 egg; 1
teaspoonful of vanilla; ½ cup of sugar.

Scald the milk; add the corn-starch, wet with a little cold milk; pour
upon the beaten eggs and sugar. Return to the fire, and stir until
quite thick. Flavor when cold. Make a good cup of chocolate, and pass
with this delicious cake.



  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Chicken Soup with Eggs.
  Braised Beef.      Stewed Onions.
  Whipped Potatoes.      Cream Squash.
  Tomato Salad.
  ——
  Claret Jelly and Cake.
  ——


CHICKEN SOUP WITH EGGS.

1 large chicken; 4 quarts of water; 1 cup of milk; 1 cup of raw rice;
pepper, salt, and chopped parsley; 6 eggs.

Put on the chicken, trussed, but not stuffed, in the water with the
rice. Boil three hours, or until the bones are ready to slip from
the meat. Take out the chicken, salt it and put by in a cool place
for to-morrow. Cool and skim the soup; season it, and rub through a
soup-sieve back into the pot, rice and all. The rice should be boiled
to pieces, and pass freely through the sieve. Put in the parsley, and
simmer, while you heat the milk in a separate vessel, and poach an egg
for each person who is to partake of the soup. Trim each egg round when
you have taken it from the water, and lay carefully upon a flat dish.
Pour the hot milk into the tureen; then the soup. Stir well, and lay
the eggs upon the top, one by one, taking pains not to break them.


BRAISED BEEF.

Lay a piece of beef-fillet, without bone, weighing five or six pounds,
in a broad pot. Scatter sliced onion over it, salt slightly, and, if
you have any good gravy, add this to the cupful of boiling water you
pour over the meat. Cover tightly, and cook slowly an hour and a half,
adding boiling water should the gravy sink too low. When done, dredge
with flour, set in a hot oven, and, as the flour browns, baste with
butter, to glaze. It should not remain longer than ten minutes in the
oven. Strain the gravy; pour off the top fat; put into a saucepan
with a little browned flour and a tablespoonful of catsup. Boil until
thickened; pour a few spoonfuls over the meat, the rest into a boat.


STEWED ONIONS.

Cook as on Wednesday, Third Week in July.


WHIPPED POTATOES.

Pare, boil, and dry out the potatoes, and whip, first into powder,
then, adding milk and butter, to a cream; at last, beat in the
stiffened white of an egg. Pile roughly in a deep dish, and set in the
oven to warm up, but not to “crust” or brown, and send to table.


CREAM SQUASH.

Pare, quarter, boil in hot, salted water, and mash. Put into a saucepan
a half-cup of hot milk, a tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour, and
a little salt and pepper. Stir in the squash until well mixed and ready
to boil. Turn out into a deep dish.


TOMATO SALAD.

Refer to Friday, Second Week in July.


CLARET JELLY AND CAKE.

1 package Coxe’s gelatine, soaked in a large cup of water; 2 cups of
sugar; 2 cups fine claret; 1 pint of boiling water; the juice of one
lemon; a pinch of mace.

Put soaked gelatine, sugar, and lemon together, and cover for half an
hour. Pour on the boiling water; stir until melted, and strain through
a flannel bag. Add the wine, and strain, without squeezing, through
double flannel. Put in a wet mould, and set in ice. Turn out upon a
cold glass dish, and pass cake with it. Make it on Saturday.



  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  A Baked Soup.
  Chicken Scallop.      Green Peas.
  New Potatoes.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Huckleberries, Cream, and Cake.
  ——


A BAKED SOUP.

3 lbs. of lean mutton, boneless, and cut into strips, 1 carrot; 1
turnip; 1 onion—all cut into dice; 6 ripe tomatoes, sliced thin; 1
pint young green peas; 1 cup of green corn cut from the cob; bunch
of sweet herbs, chopped; 2 quarts of cold water; pepper and salt; 1
tablespoonful of sugar; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, cut into bits and
rolled in flour.

Put all these into a stout stone jar early in the day. Fit on a tight
top, putting a paste of flour and water over the crack between the
mouth of the jar and the cover, and set within a dripping-pan of
boiling water in the oven. Do nothing more to it until dinner-time,
except to add more boiling water as that in the pan evaporates. When
ready for the soup, pour into the tureen without straining.


CHICKEN SCALLOP.

Cut cold boiled chicken into pieces less than an inch long. Have ready
a cup of yesterday’s soup in a saucepan—or some drawn butter—and, when
hot, stir in the meat. Just boil, and pour upon a beaten egg. Cover the
bottom of a bake-dish with fine crumbs; pour in the mixture, rather
highly seasoned; strew with more crumbs; put drops of butter over the
surface, and bake, covered, half an hour; then brown quickly.


GREEN PEAS.

Shell, and boil in hot salted water from twenty to twenty-five minutes,
adding a lump of sugar, if they are not freshly gathered. Drain well;
dish, and season with pepper, salt, and butter.


NEW POTATOES.

Scrape off the skins, and cook in boiling salted water, until a fork
will go in easily. Turn off all the water. Set the uncovered pot for a
moment upon the range, throwing in a little fine salt. Then send up in
a dish, with a napkin thrown lightly over it.


LETTUCE.

Do not trouble yourself to-day with making salad-dressing. Pick apart
the lettuce leaves, put into a salad-bowl with cracked ice below and
among them, and pass the oil, pepper, salt, and vinegar with it.


HUCKLEBERRIES, CREAM, AND CAKE.

Pick over and wash the berries. Drain, and serve in a glass dish. Send
around sugar and cream with them, and follow with the cake-basket.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Potage aux Croûtons.
  Devilled Crab.      Corned Beef and Turnips.
  Lima Beans.      Beets.
  ——
  Plain Boiled Pudding.
  ——


POTAGE AUX CROÛTONS.

3 lbs. of lean beef; fried bread; 1 onion, sliced; 3 quarts of water;
chopped herbs; 1 carrot, cut up; pepper, salt, and 1 great spoonful of
clear catsup—walnut or mushroom; dripping.

Fry meat and vegetables ten minutes in plenty of hot dripping. Drain
this off, and set by in the pan while you put meat, vegetables, and
herbs on in the water, and set where they will heat slowly to a boil.
Prepare the _croûtons_ by cutting out, with the top of a pepper-box,
small rounds of stale bread, and frying them in the dripping used for
the beef, etc. Drain, and set these in an open oven, that they may get
very dry. Boil the soup three hours. Strain; cool, skim, season; boil
and skim five minutes, and put in the _croûtons_. Heat three minutes,
but do not boil, and pour out.


DEVILLED CRAB.

1 cup of crab-meat, picked from the shells of well-boiled crabs; 2
tablespoonfuls of fine bread-crumbs or rolled cracker; yolks of two
hard-boiled eggs, chopped; juice of a lemon; ½ teaspoonful of made
mustard; a little Cayenne pepper and salt; 1 cup of good drawn butter.

Mix one spoonful of the crumbs with the chopped crab-meat, yolks,
seasoning, and drawn butter. Fill scallop-shells—large clam-shells will
do, or small paté-pans—with the mixture; sift crumbs over the top, and
heat to slight browning in a quick oven.


CORNED BEEF AND TURNIPS.

Cook the beef in plenty of cold water, bringing slowly to the boil.
Cook fifteen minutes to the pound after it begins to simmer. When about
three-quarters done put in a dozen turnips, peeled and quartered. When
you dish the beef, lay these—unmashed—about it. Serve the meat with
drawn butter, having as a base the pot-liquor. Save the rest of the
liquor for to-morrow’s soup.


LIMA BEANS.

Shell, and cook in boiling salted water about twenty-five minutes. Then
drain, pour over them a little drawn butter, well peppered, and serve.


BEETS.

Be careful, in cutting off the tops and washing them, not to break
the skins, or they will bleed away their color in the water. Cook in
boiling water one hour. Scrape; slice; salt, pepper, and butter, and
pour a few spoonfuls of boiling vinegar upon them after they are dished.


PLAIN BOILED PUDDING.

3 heaping cups of flour; 2 cups of buttermilk or “loppered” milk; 1
_full_ teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in boiling water; ½ cupful of
powdered suet; 1 teaspoonful of salt.

Stir the sour milk into the flour gradually until it is free from
lumps. Put in salt and suet; lastly, beat in the soda water quickly and
faithfully. Put into a buttered mould, and boil an hour and a half. Eat
hot with sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Butter (or Lima) Bean Soup.
  Breaded Veal Cutlets.      Mashed Potatoes.
  Succotash.      Devilled Tomatoes.
  ——
  Baked Huckleberry Pudding.
  ——


BUTTER (OR LIMA) BEAN SOUP.

The pot-liquor from your beef; 1 quart of butter (or Lima) beans; ½
cup corn-meal, scalded and left to cool; 1 onion; bunch of parsley; 2
teaspoonfuls essence of celery; 2 beaten eggs; pepper.

Take the fat from the pot-liquor and put over the fire with the beans,
onion, and scalded meal. The latter should be soft as thin mush. Stir
until this is well mixed with the soup, and boil gently, stirring
now and then, until the beans are broken to pieces. Rub to a _purée_
through a colander; put in pepper and chopped parsley. Simmer five
minutes, and pour a cupful upon the beaten eggs. Stir this back into
the soup; cook one minute, without quite boiling, and serve. Pass
sliced lemon with it.


BREADED VEAL CUTLETS.

Trim and flatten the cutlets; pepper and salt, and roll in beaten egg;
then in pounded cracker. Fry rather slowly in good dripping; turning
when the lower side is brown. Drain off the fat; squeeze a little
lemon-juice upon each, and serve in a hot, flat dish.


MASHED POTATOES.

Mash very soft with butter and milk; season and heap irregularly upon a
dish.


SUCCOTASH.

6 ears of corn; 1 pint of string-beans, trimmed and cut into short
pieces; 1 tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour; 1 cup of milk;
pepper and salt.

Cut the corn from the cob, bruising as little as possible. Put over
the fire with the beans in enough hot water, salted, to cover them,
and stew gently half an hour. Turn off nearly all the water, and add
a cupful of milk. Simmer in this, stirring to prevent burning, twenty
minutes; add the floured butter, the pepper and salt, and stew ten
minutes. Serve in a deep dish.


DEVILLED TOMATOES.

12 fine, firm tomatoes, pared and sliced nearly half an inch thick;
yolks of 3 hard-boiled eggs, pounded; 3 tablespoonfuls of melted
butter, and same of vinegar; 2 raw eggs, beaten light; 1 teaspoonful
sugar, and half as much, each, of made mustard and salt; a pinch of
Cayenne.

Rub butter, pounded yolks, pepper, salt, mustard and sugar together.
Beat hard, add vinegar, and heat to a boil. Put this upon the beaten
eggs and whip to a smooth cream. Set in hot water while you broil the
tomatoes in an oyster-broiler, over clear coals. Lay this upon a hot
chafing-dish, and pour the scalding dressing upon them.


BAKED HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING.

1 pint of milk; 2 eggs; 1 quart of flour (sifted); 1 gill yeast; 1
saltspoonful of salt; 1 teaspoonful of boiling water; nearly a quart of
berries, dredged with flour.

Make a batter of these ingredients—leaving out the berries—and set in
a warm place to rise, for about four hours. If light then, stir in the
dredged berries; pour into a buttered cake-mould, and bake one hour in
a moderate oven. Turn out, and eat with hard sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Bean and Tomato Soup.
  Fricasseed Chickens.      Boiled Onions with Sauce.
  Green Pea Cakes.      Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.
  ——
  Baked Cup Custards.
  ——


BEAN AND TOMATO SOUP.

Cut up a quart of ripe tomatoes; season with pepper, salt and sugar,
and stew until broken to pieces. Rub through a colander; add what was
left of yesterday’s bean soup; heat together almost to boiling, and
pour upon dice of fried bread in the tureen.


FRICASSEED CHICKEN.

Clean, wash, and cut the fowls into joints. Put a layer of fat salt
pork in the bottom of a pot; lay the chicken upon this; pepper and
salt. Cover with more pork, and pour in three tablespoonfuls of hot
water mixed with as much butter. Finally, drop in a little minced
onion. Cover tightly, and heat very slowly. After the chickens begin
to stew, cook steadily one hour, if they are tender. If not, increase
the time at discretion. When they are done, take up and keep hot. Add a
little boiling water to the gravy; strain, thicken with browned flour,
boil up and pour upon the fowls.


BOILED ONIONS WITH SAUCE.

Boil fifteen minutes in hot salted water. Throw this off; add a little
gravy (made, if you have none ready, by boiling a chicken-scrag and
feet in a pint of water, until there is less than a cupful of broth,
then seasoning and thickening this), with chopped parsley. Stew five
minutes longer, or until tender, and dish.


GREEN PEA CAKES.

2 cups of boiled green peas, mashed hot with pepper, salt, and butter;
2 beaten eggs; 1 cup of milk; ½ cup of prepared flour.

Mix and beat hard. Fry as you would griddle-cakes.


POTATOES À LA LYONNAISE.

Chop cold parboiled potatoes into coarse dice. Put some butter in a
frying-pan, and, when hot, throw in a tablespoonful of chopped onion
and a little parsley. Cook one minute; add the potatoes, and stir until
very hot and glazed with the butter, but not until colored. Serve hot.


BAKED CUP CUSTARDS.

1 quart of milk; 5 eggs; 1 cup of sugar; lemon flavoring for custard,
and lemon-juice for the _méringue_.

Heat the milk, add all but two tablespoonfuls of sugar to the beaten
yolks of all the eggs and the whites of two, and pour the scalding milk
upon them, mixing in well. Fill buttered stone-china cups with this
custard; set in a dripping-pan of hot water, and bake until “set.”
Then pile upon them roughly a _méringue_ made of the reserved whites,
whipped stiff with the rest of the powdered sugar and the lemon-juice.
Shut the oven until these begin to be tinged. Eat cold from the cups.



  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Corn Soup.
  Mayonnaise of Lobster.      Beefsteak au Maître d’Hôtel.
  Stewed Lima Beans.      Fried Cucumbers.
  Boiled Potatoes.
  ——
  Blackberry Pie.
  Iced Tea.
  ——


CORN SOUP.

1 pint of grated corn just from the cob; 3 pints of boiling water; 1
pint of hot milk; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 heaping tablespoonful
of flour; pepper; salt; yolks of 2 eggs.

Put on the cobs, after you have grated off the corn, in the boiling
water, and cook half an hour. Take them out and put in the corn. Boil
one hour or until very soft. Pulp through the colander back into the
water. Season, and set over the fire to simmer. Put the butter into a
saucepan, and, when hot, stir in the flour. Cook ten minutes, stirring
all the while. Add a little of the soup to thin it, and empty the
saucepan into the soup-pot, stirring the contents until smooth. Heat
the milk in another saucepan, pour upon the beaten yolks, cook one
minute, and pour into the tureen. Season with pepper and salt, and stir
the soup into it. This is a remarkably nice soup.


MAYONNAISE OF LOBSTER.

Meat of one large boiled lobster, cold and cut into dice. Lay aside the
coral for the dressing. Make this of these ingredients: 4 hard boiled
eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls best salad-oil; 1 teaspoonful, each, of made
mustard, salt, white sugar, and anchovy sauce; vinegar and cayenne to
taste.

Pound the yolks perfectly smooth, and rub in the coral and other
ingredients with great care, moistening with vinegar as they stiffen,
until a smooth cream is the result. Pour this over the minced lobster,
and toss up well with a silver fork. Heap in the centre of your
salad-bowl, and lay cool, white lettuce-hearts around it, helping out
these with the lobster. Inside of the lettuce lay a chain of the sliced
boiled whites.


BEEFSTEAK AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Broil your beefsteak in the usual manner. Lay upon the chafing-dish
and pour upon it a sauce made of 1 great spoonful of butter; 1
teaspoonful very finely minced parsley; pepper, salt and the juice of a
lemon—heated _almost_ to boiling in a clean saucepan. Put a hot cover
over the steak, and let it stand five minutes before serving.


STEWED LIMA BEANS.

Boil in hot salted water fifteen minutes. Drain half of this off and
stir in—for a quart of beans—a tablespoonful of _very_ finely chopped
sweet salt pork—the whitest fat slice you can get—a teaspoonful of
minced onion, a little chopped parsley; pepper and a cupful of hot
milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in to prevent curdling. Stew slowly
fifteen minutes more; stir in a scant tablespoonful of butter rolled in
flour; cook ten minutes and pour out.


FRIED CUCUMBERS.

See Wednesday, First Week in July.


BOILED POTATOES.

See Monday of this week.


BLACKBERRY PIE.

Line a pie-dish with good crust, and fill with ripe berries, sweetening
plentifully. Cover with another crust and bake in a moderate oven. Eat
cold with white sugar sifted over it.


ICED TEA.

See Sunday, Third Week in July.



  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Kilkenny Soup.
  Mutton Chops.      Ragoût of Vegetables.
  Stewed Tomatoes.
  ——
  Indian Pudding.
  ——


KILKENNY SOUP.

3 lbs. of lean beef; 2 lbs. scrag of mutton, cut up small; 1 lb. lean
ham; 3 sliced onions; 3 carrots; 2 turnips; bunch of sweet herbs; ⅔ of
a cup of Irish oatmeal, previously soaked four hours in a little tepid
water; 6 quarts of cold water; pepper and salt; 6 parboiled potatoes,
sliced.

Crack the bones, and cut the meat into strips. Cover with the water,
and bring slowly to the boil. When this has lasted one hour, skim off
the top of the pot, and put in the onions fried brown in dripping, the
other vegetables sliced, and the herbs; cook three hours longer, and
strain the soup. Season the meat pretty highly and pour upon it—in a
jar or bowl—half the clear stock. Set upon the ice for Sunday, when
cold. Rub the vegetables through the colander into the rest of the
stock; cool, take off the fat, season, add the sliced potatoes and the
oatmeal, and cook one hour more. Strain into the tureen.


MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim, leaving a bit of bare bone at the end of each. Pepper, and broil
over a clear fire. Lay upon a hot dish; salt and butter both sides of
each chop, and lay outside of your stewed tomatoes.


RAGOÛT OF VEGETABLES.

Parboil 1 carrot, 1 turnip, 2 potatoes, 2 ears of corn, 1 cup of Lima
beans, and the same of peas, 1 onion, and with them ¼ lb. of fat salt
pork. Drain off the water, and lay aside the pork. Slice carrots,
turnips, potatoes and onion. Put into a saucepan with a cup of your
soup taken out before thickening; season well; cut the corn from the
cob and add with the peas, beans, and a sliced tomato as soon as the
rest are hot. Stew all together half an hour. Stir in a great lump of
butter rolled in flour; stew five minutes and pour into a deep dish.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Loosen the skins with hot water, peel and slice. Stew until broken to
pieces. Pulp through a coarse sieve, rubbing out all that will pass.
Return to the fire with a little sugar, pepper and salt, and boil
briskly fifteen minutes. Stir in, then, enough fine crumbs to make it
like a tolerably thick batter; add a great spoonful of butter; stew,
stirring well, five minutes; pour in the middle of a flat dish, and
arrange the chops around it.


INDIAN PUDDING.

1 quart of milk; 4 cups white Indian meal; 3 eggs; 4 tablespoonfuls of
sugar; 1 teaspoonful of salt; ¼ lb. powdered suet; 1 teaspoonful of
cinnamon; ¼ teaspoonful of soda in the milk.

Scald the milk, and, while hot, stir in meal, suet, and salt. When
cold, beat in the yolks and sugar, the spice—at last the whites.
Beat long and hard; pour into a buttered mould, leaving room for
swelling—and plenty of it—put into a pot of boiling water almost up to
the top, and boil _four_ hours. Turn out, and eat hot with sauce.



AUGUST.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Macaroni Soup.
  Stewed Ducks.      Green Peas.
  Boiled Corn.      Fried Egg-plant.
  Potato Salad.
  ——
  Almond Custard with Cocoanut Frost.
  ——


MACARONI SOUP.

Take the fat from your cold soup; pour the latter carefully from the
meat, and heat to a slow boil. Having removed all the scum that will
rise, add a quarter pound of macaroni, broken into short pieces, boiled
twenty minutes in hot salted water, and left to get cold. Simmer
fifteen minutes, and serve.


STEWED DUCKS.

Clean, wash, and truss neatly, but do not stuff the ducks. Put into a
broad saucepan, such as is generally known as a braising-pan. Strew
with a little onion; pour over them a cupful of weak broth made by
boiling the giblets in a pint of water and reducing one-half. Season
this well, and when you have poured it upon the ducks, cover the
saucepan and cook gently an hour and a half or until the ducks are
tender. Turn them when half done. Take up when ready; keep hot while
you strain and thicken the gravy with browned flour. Pour a little over
the ducks, the rest into a boat.


GREEN PEAS.

See Monday, Fourth Week in July.


BOILED CORN.

Strip off all except the inner thin husk. Turn this down, and pick off
the silk. Put back the husk, tie with a bit of thread, and cook in
boiling water from twenty-five to thirty minutes. Break off the stalks
and husks, and send to table wrapped in a napkin.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

Cut in slices half an inch thick; pare each carefully, and lay for one
hour in salt and water, to remove the bitter taste. Then slightly salt
and pepper each piece, and dip in a batter made of two eggs, half a cup
of milk, and _about_ a cup of flour, or enough for thin batter. Fry in
hot lard or dripping to a fine brown; drain well, and serve hot.


POTATO SALAD.

Slice six or eight cold boiled potatoes; put them into a salad-dish,
and season as follows: To two tablespoonfuls of salad-oil add one
teaspoonful of sugar, half as much, each, of made mustard, salt, and
pepper, and nearly as much essence of celery. Rub to a smooth paste,
and whip in, a teaspoonful at a time, five tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
When well mixed, pour upon the salad.


ALMOND CUSTARD, WITH COCOANUT FROST.

2 cups fresh milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in; ½ lb. almonds,
blanched, dried, and pounded; 3 beaten eggs; ½ cup powdered sugar;
rose-water; 1 cocoanut, pared, thrown into cold water, and grated.

Scald the milk; stir in the almond-paste, which should have been mixed
with rose-water, to prevent oiling. Boil one minute, and pour upon the
beaten eggs and sugar. Return to the fire, and stir until the mixture
begins to thicken. Take off, and pour into a bowl. When cold, put on
ice until Sunday. Then turn the custard into a glass dish, and heap
high with the grated cocoanut. Strew powdered sugar over all.


  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Clam Soup.
  Ragoût of Duck and Green Peas.      Onions.
  Potatoes, with Cheese Sauce.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Blackberries, Huckleberries, and Cream.
  Sliced Cake.
  ——


CLAM SOUP.

50 clams; 1 quart of hot water; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1
tablespoonful of flour; 1 teaspoonful chopped onion, and same of mixed
thyme and parsley; 2 cups of hot milk; salt and cayenne; 2 blades of
mace.

Cut the hard parts off from the clams, putting the soft halves on ice.
Strain off all the liquor, and put with the hard bits over the fire,
with a quart of hot water, the onion, herbs, and mace. Simmer forty
minutes. Heat the milk in another vessel—not forgetting the pinch of
soda; stir in the butter, cut up in the flour, and set in hot water
until the soup is ready. At the end of the forty minutes, strain the
clam broth, leaving out the hard parts. Put in the soft, season with
salt and cayenne, and let them _just_ boil. Pour into the tureen, add
the milk and butter, and set the tureen in hot water five minutes
before serving.


RAGOÛT OF DUCK AND GREEN PEAS.

Cut the meat from the carcasses left since yesterday, making the slices
as neat as you can. If you have not a _large_ cupful of gravy left,
make it by stewing down the bones and stuffing in a quart of water,
cooling, skimming, and seasoning it. Put this in a saucepan with the
pieces of duck, and set where it will get very hot, but _not_ boil.
Cook a quart of tender green peas in boiling water twenty minutes;
drain, and season them with pepper, salt, and butter. Take out the
duck and pile in the centre of a dish; put the peas around it like a
green hedge. Boil up the gravy once when you have stirred in a little
browned flour, wet with cold water, and pour upon the meat.


ONIONS.

Boil in two waters, and after draining off the last, cover, barely,
with boiling milk; stir in a good piece of butter rolled in flour;
season with salt and pepper; boil once, and pour into a deep dish.


POTATOES, WITH CHEESE SAUCE.

12 boiled potatoes, mashed soft with milk and butter; 4 tablespoonfuls
of dry, grated cheese; 1 cup of rich drawn butter; 2 beaten eggs;
pepper, salt, and nutmeg; triangles of fried bread; cracker-dust.

Stir into the hot drawn butter the pepper, salt, nutmeg, beaten
eggs, and half the cheese, and heat, stirring constantly, until it
thickens. Put a layer of potato upon a flat stone-china dish—or a
block-tin one—round it to suit the shape of the dish, and cover with
the sauce; this, in turn, with a narrowing round of potatoes, but of
equal thickness, and this with sauce, and so on, until you have a mound
rounded on top. Coat with sauce, then with the rest of the cheese and
some pounded cracker. Lay the sippets of fried bread up against it at
the base, and heat to browning in a quick oven.


BLACKBERRIES, HUCKLEBERRIES, AND CREAM.

CAKE.

Put the blackberries in a dish of their own. Some persons like them
with cream, but more prefer to eat them simply strewed with sugar. Wash
the huckleberries, and pass cream and sugar with them; then a basket of
simple cake.


  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  A Summer Soup.
  Veal Collops.      Tomato Sauce.
  Raw Cucumbers.      String Beans.
  ——
  Apple Compote au Gratin.
  ——


A SUMMER SOUP.

3 lbs. coarse, lean beef, cut into strips; 1 lb. ham or salt-pork
bones; 4 quarts of water; 2 carrots; 2 turnips; 12 very small and young
onions, minus the stalks; 1 cup of strained tomato sauce; 1 cup of
green peas; ½ cup of green corn, cut from the cob; pepper and salt.

Cook the beef and bones in the water down to two quarts of liquid.
Strain, cool, and skim. Meanwhile cut carrots and turnips into neat
dice or strips, and parboil with the onions five minutes in boiling
water. Return your skimmed and seasoned stock to the fire, and when
almost on the boil, put in the parboiled and drained vegetables, with
peas and corn. Simmer half an hour, add the tomato sauce, and cook ten
minutes more, then pour out.


VEAL COLLOPS.

3 lbs. of lean veal, cut into square bits, two inches across, and more
than half an inch thick; ¼ lb. fat salt pork, cut into lardoons; 1 cup
of gravy taken from your soup before adding the vegetables; 1 cup of
drawn butter; yolks of 2 eggs; juice of half a lemon; pepper, salt,
nutmeg, and a pinch of mace.

Lard the veal with the pork, and lay in a pan of boiling water three
minutes. Have ready a cup of gravy seasoned with nutmeg, pepper, salt,
and lemon-peel. Put in the meat, and simmer half an hour very gently.
Beat the yolks into the drawn butter; stir in the lemon-juice; add to
the contents of the saucepan, and stir, carefully, not to break the
lardoons, five minutes. Heap the collops into a block upon a dish, and
pour on the gravy.


TOMATO SAUCE.

Peel, slice, and stew twenty minutes; then season with pepper, salt,
butter rolled in flour, and sugar. Simmer five minutes, and pour out.


STRING-BEANS.

Cut off the ends; “string” well, paring both sides with a keen knife;
cut into short pieces, and cook in boiling salt water forty minutes.
Drain; salt, pepper, and stir in a tablespoonful of butter, heated with
a teaspoonful of vinegar.


RAW CUCUMBERS.

Pare, lay in ice-water one hour; slice, and mix with pounded ice, in a
glass bowl. Pass vinegar, salt, pepper, and oil with them.


APPLE COMPOTE AU GRATIN.

Make a quart of good apple sauce; rubbing it very smooth, and beating
in, while hot, sugar to make it quite sweet, nutmeg, and a great
spoonful of butter. Make a heap of it (it should be rather stiff when
cold) upon a deep plate, or pie-dish. Wash all over with beaten egg,
and sift rolled cracker thickly upon it. Bake half an hour, and eat hot
with butter and sugar.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Beef Noodle Soup.
  Boiled Chickens and Tongue.      Fried Egg-plant.
  Lima Beans.      Potato Puffs.
  ——
  Peaches and Cream.
  ——


BEEF NOODLE SOUP.

First—to borrow an idea from worthy Mrs. Glass—make the noodles.

Take 4 eggs, beaten one minute; 3 tablespoonfuls of water; enough flour
(prepared) for stiff dough, and a saltspoonful of salt. Make up, and
knead fifteen minutes. Roll into a thin sheet, and cut half of it into
long strips, less than half an inch wide, and these, again, across at
intervals of four inches. Now, roll the other half of the sheet up very
closely, making a long scroll like a quill. Cut this across, with a
keen knife, into little wheels less than a quarter of an inch wide. Lay
all in a sunny window to dry. Those intended for to-day will be fit to
use in two hours. The rest will keep in a dry, cool place several days,
and can be used as a vegetable, or in soups.

Make a stock of 2 lbs. of beef bones, the same of mutton bones and a
slice of lean ham boiled in three quarts of water, with 1 onion, 1
carrot, and a bunch of herbs chopped. Boil down to two quarts, strain;
cool, skim and season, and put in a good handful of the noodles—a few
at a time—so soon as it boils. Simmer twenty minutes.


BOILED CHICKENS AND TONGUE.

Clean, wash, and truss the chickens; bind legs and wings down closely
by tying up the fowls in white, perfectly clean bobbinet lace, or
mosquito net. Put on in plenty of boiling salted water and cook one
hour, unless they are large and tough. In that case cook _very_ slowly
and long. Have ready a tongue, which has soaked several hours in warm
water—boiled, skimmed, and trimmed. Lay upon a dish with a chicken on
each side. Pour a few spoonfuls of melted butter, heated, with a little
chopped parsley, over all three; set in a quick oven three minutes;
anoint again with the butter and parsley, and send to table upon a hot,
clean dish. Pass a boat of drawn butter with them. Save the chicken
liquor, well seasoned, for to-morrow’s soup, also the water in which
the tongue was boiled. If it is a smoked tongue, you can use the fat
from the top for dripping. If corned, the liquor can be added to soups
and gravies.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

Please refer to Sunday of this week.


LIMA BEANS.

Shell and cook in boiling salted water about thirty minutes. Drain,
dish, and stir in salt, pepper, and a good lump of butter.


POTATO PUFFS.

6 boiled potatoes, mashed soft, with a tablespoonful of milk, and as
much butter; 3 beaten eggs; 6 tablespoonfuls of prepared flour, or
enough to enable you to make into soft dough. Make into balls like
doughnuts; roll these in flour, and fry to a fine brown in hot lard.


PEACHES AND CREAM.

Pare and slice the peaches just before dinner, and cover the glass
dish containing them to exclude the air as much as may be, since they
soon change color. Do not sugar them in the dish. They then become
preserves—not fresh fruit. Pass “fruit sugar” and cream with them.



  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Chickens and Corn Soup.
  Game Mutton.      Green Peas.
  Beets.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Huckleberry Shortcake.
  ——


CHICKEN AND CORN SOUP.

The pot-liquor from yesterday’s chickens; 12 ears of corn, grated from
the cob; 1 cup of milk; 1 tablespoonful of butter, rolled in flour;
pepper, salt, and parsley.

Take the fat from the top of your liquor, and save in the dripping-pot.
Heat the broth to a boil; put in the cobs from which the corn has been
cut, and cook half an hour. Strain the soup; put again over the fire
and put in the cut corn. N. B.—It is well to split each row of grains
before cutting them off. Cook forty minutes, stir in butter and flour,
with the parsley. Simmer five minutes, and serve.


GAME MUTTON.

Cut away the under-side of a nice leg of mutton, to make it as flat as
may be without exposing the bone. Put the pieces thus trimmed off over
the fire, with a quart of water, and stew down one-half. Cool, skim,
season, and re-heat. Meantime, lard the upper side of the meat with
slender lardoons. If you have not a larding-needle—which is a pity—use
a long-bladed jack-knife to make diagonal incisions in the mutton;
then thrust in the lardoons with your fingers, bringing both ends to
the surface. Now rub the meat all over with hot butter and vinegar,
letting the surplus trickle into the dripping-pan. Pour the boiling
pint of gravy over the leg, and roast twelve minutes to the pound,
basting every ten minutes, copiously. Just before taking it up, pour
off the fat from the gravy; dip up a few spoonfuls of the brown juice,
and, mixing with as much currant jelly, beat in a little browned flour,
wet up with cold water. Baste the meat with this until a fine brown
glaze covers it. Serve the gravy, well skimmed, in a boat. This is a
delightful dish. Carve judiciously, so as to leave a seemly joint cold
for to-morrow.


GREEN PEAS.

See Sunday of this week.


BEETS.

See Tuesday, Fourth Week in July.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and serve without browning.


HUCKLEBERRY SHORTCAKE.

Please see Wednesday, Second Week in June.


  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Sister Anne’s Soup.
  Boiled Bass.      Cold Mutton.
  Boiled Potatoes.      Tomato Salad.
  Green Corn Pudding.
  ——
  Apple Custard Pie.
  ——


SISTER ANNE’S SOUP.

12 potatoes, pared and quartered; 1 onion, sliced; tablespoonful of
minced parsley; 1 cup of unskimmed milk (cream is still better); 2
tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 tablespoonful of corn-starch, wet with cold
milk; 1 teaspoonful of sugar; 2 quarts of boiling water; pinch of soda
in the milk.

Parboil the potatoes ten minutes; throw off the water, and put on
two quarts of boiling water. Cook in this one hour with the onion,
replenishing from the kettle as it boils away. Then rub through a fine
colander, season with pepper, salt, and parsley, and re-heat. When it
bubbles up, stir in the butter and corn-starch; boil up, add the hot
milk, and serve.


BOILED BASS.

Put enough water in the pot for the fish to swim in, easily. Add half a
cup of vinegar, a teaspoonful of salt, an onion, a dozen black peppers,
and a blade of mace. Sew up the fish in a piece of clean net, fitted
to its shape. Heat slowly for the first half hour, then boil eight
minutes, at least, to the pound, quite fast. Unwrap, and pour over it
a cup of drawn butter, based upon the liquor in which the fish was
boiled, with the juice of half a lemon stirred into it. Garnish with
sliced lemon.


COLD MUTTON.

Put on the larded joint, cold, garnished with nasturtium flowers and
curled parsley.


BOILED POTATOES.

Pass with the fish. Please see Monday of Fourth Week in July.


TOMATO SALAD.

Peel with a sharp knife. Slice, arrange in a salad-dish, and pour over
it a dressing such as you made for potato salad on Sunday of this week.


GREEN CORN PUDDING.

12 ears of sweet corn, each row of grains split lengthwise, then cut
close to the cob; 4 eggs; 2 cups of milk; 1 tablespoonful of sugar,
rubbed up with one of butter; 1 teaspoonful of salt; 2 tablespoonfuls
of flour.

Mix as you would a rice pudding, and bake one hour in a buttered dish.
Serve in the bake-dish, hot.


APPLE CUSTARD PIE.

Make a _very_ sweet apple sauce in which not a lump remains. To each
cupful add two eggs beaten light and half a cupful of perfectly fresh
milk. Have ready some paste-shells in pie-plates, fill with the custard
and bake at once without an upper crust.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Pot au Feu.
  Ham and Eggs.      Casserole of Potato.
  String-Beans.      Cream Squash.
  ——
  Jelly Omelette.
  ——


POT AU FEU.

5 lbs. of brisket of beef—bones cracked, and meat sliced; the broken
bones of your cold mutton, after you have sliced off the meat; 2
grated carrots; 2 grated turnips; 1 large fried onion; bunch of sweet
herbs; 1 whole carrot; 1 whole turnip, cut into dice; 1 very small
cauliflower, the bunches clipped apart; 6 quarts of water; pepper and
salt.

Put on the meat, bones, onion, grated vegetables and herbs in the
soup-pot with the water; cover closely and cook slowly five hours.
Then strain; take out the meat and set aside with half the stock, well
seasoned, for Sunday. Put on the ice when cold. Cool and skim the
rest; season; put back in the pot with a parboiled turnip, carrot, and
cauliflower, the latter clipped into small clusters; the others cut
into dice. Simmer half an hour, and serve.


BROILED HAM AND EGGS.

Cut slices of cooked ham of equal size; broil upon a gridiron over a
clear fire. Lay upon a hot dish; pepper, and spread each slice with a
mixture of melted butter and a very little made mustard. Lay on each a
poached egg, trimmed neatly.


CASSEROLE OF POTATO.

Mash eight or ten potatoes smooth with butter, salt, and work in the
beaten whites of two eggs. Then fill a greased jelly-mould with it,
pressing down firmly. Set aside to harden. When cold, scoop out about
a teacupful, or less, from the middle, leaving firm, thick walls. Fill
the cavity with a mince of cold mutton, highly seasoned, mixed with
crumbs and moistened with gravy, and not too soft. Fit a piece of
fried bread in the mouth of the filled cavity; turn out the casserole
carefully upon a stone-china or block-tin dish; wash all over with
beaten egg and set in a hot oven ten minutes to heat and glaze. The
mince should be very hot when it goes in and stiff enough to keep its
shape.


STRING-BEANS.

See Tuesday of this week.


CREAM SQUASH.

Boil and mash as usual; then return to the saucepan with half a cup of
milk to a quart of mashed squash; and when this simmers, stir in a
tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour; pepper and salt to taste. Stir
three minutes and pour out.


JELLY OMELETTE.

Beat six eggs light—yolks and whites separately; then mix them and stir
in lightly a tablespoonful of powdered sugar. Put a tablespoonful of
butter into a frying-pan, and, when it boils, pour in the omelette.
Lift at the edges and bottom with your spatula, as it cooks, and
when “set” in the middle, put on one side of it a few spoonfuls of
fruit-jelly; fold over, and turn out upon a hot dish. Strew powdered
sugar over it.



  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Noodle Soup.
  Braised Chicken.      Green Corn Sauté.
  Fried Egg-plant.      Baked Tomatoes.
  ——
  Ice Cream and Cake.
  ——


NOODLE SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of your cold stock; put the latter in a
soup-pot; heat to a gentle boil. Strain through thin muslin; set again
over the fire; boil and skim one minute; add nearly a cupful of dried
noodles and simmer twenty minutes. If you have no noodles made, break a
handful of vermicelli small, and cook the same length of time.


BRAISED CHICKEN.

Clean, wash, and stuff a pair of fowls. Lay slices of fat salt pork
in a broad saucepan, and upon these the chickens with thin slices of
pork tied over their breasts. Put two cupfuls of hot water in the pan,
cover very securely and cook slowly an hour and a half—longer should
the chickens be tough—and this is a good way to cook such. At the end
of that time remove the chicken to the hot-water dish; cover to keep
hot; strain the gravy and return half to a small saucepan. Add a little
browned flour wet with cold water, and boil fast to a bright brown
glaze. Put the fowls in a quick oven; take off the pork; brush all over
with the glaze, and when brown, serve. Take the fat from the reserved
gravy, add the water in which the giblets were boiled; the chopped
giblets themselves, and a little browned flour, also pepper. Boil up
and serve in a boat.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

Please see Sunday of First Week in August.


GREEN CORN SAUTÉ.

Boil; then cut from the cob; have ready in a saucepan a little butter,
seasoned with salt and pepper. Stir in the corn and shake and toss
until hot and glazed with the butter.


BAKED TOMATOES.

Pare with a sharp knife; cut in thick slices. Put a layer of crumbs in
the bottom of a bake-dish; wet them with a little of your soup-stock,
or other gravy; cover with tomatoes, seasoned with butter, salt, pepper
and sugar, more crumbs moistened with gravy, and so on, to the top
of the dish, having well-moistened crumbs for the last layer. Cover,
and bake half an hour; then uncover and brown quickly. Serve in the
bake-dish.


ICE CREAM AND CAKE.

For directions, too full and explicit to need repetition, please see
Sunday, Second Week in July.


  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  A Monday Soup.
  Scallop with Baked Eggs.      Mashed Potatoes.
  Green Peas.      Raw Cucumbers.
  ——
  Huckleberry Cake and Iced Coffee.
  ——


A MONDAY SOUP.

Strip all the meat from your chicken-bones, and set in a cool place,
while you break the skeletons to pieces, and put in a soup-pot at the
back of the range, with the dressing, skin, and gristly bits. Pour on
three quarts of water and leave it to simmer—always covered—for three
hours. Strain, rubbing the stuffing through the colander; cool and
skim; return to the fire with a cupful of yesterday’s soup (there is
always a _little_ left over, if it is only saved from the swill-pail),
also strained. Have ready six Boston crackers split and dried in the
oven for half an hour, but not scorched. Butter these; lay in the
heated tureen; pour upon them two cups of boiling milk, and let soak,
covered, while you salt and pepper your soup, and add a little minced
parsley. Should there not be dressing enough to thicken it well, stir
in a little corn-starch, wet with milk. Boil up, and pour upon the
crackers. This soup need not consume fifteen minutes of your time, and
is very savory.


SCALLOP AND BAKED EGGS.

Mince your chicken, but not small; cover the bottom of a pudding-dish
with fine crumbs; put in the chicken, wet with gravy and seasoned
to taste; strew a good coating of crumbs on top, and this with
butter-bits. Set, covered, in the oven. When the gravy bubbles to the
surface remove the lid and break upon the scallop enough eggs to cover
it well. Pepper and salt; lay a piece of butter on each, and bake until
well “set.”


MASHED POTATOES.

Boil, mash, and whip to a cream with a fork, mixing in butter, milk,
salt and a dust of pepper, as you go on. Serve in a deep dish.


GREEN PEAS.

See Sunday of First Week in August.


RAW CUCUMBERS.

Pare; lay in ice-water one hour; slice and pile upon pounded ice in a
glass dish, sending around condiments with them.


HUCKLEBERRY CAKE.

This cake should have been made on Saturday. It keeps well, and is much
better the second day than the first.

5 eggs; 3 cups of powdered sugar; 1 cup of butter; 1 cup of sweet milk;
4 cups of prepared flour; 1 teaspoonful mixed nutmeg and cinnamon; 2
cups of huckleberries dredged with flour; ¼ teaspoonful of soda stirred
in boiling water and mixed with the milk.

Cream butter and sugar; add the beaten yolks, the milk, the flour,
alternately, with the whipped whites, and, lastly, the dredged berries.
Bake in small loaves, or in patty-pans, in a moderate oven, covering as
it begins to brown. It takes a longer time to bake than plain cake.


ICED COFFEE.

Make more coffee than needed for breakfast. Set by three or four cups
of strong coffee, adding nearly one-third as much boiled milk, while
both are hot. Set in ice, and, in serving, put a lump of ice in each
glass.


  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Tapioca Soup.
  Beefsteak.      Tomatoes and Corn, Stewed.
  Potatoes in Jackets.      Mashed Squash.
  ——
  Peaches and Cream.
  ——


TAPIOCA SOUP.

2 lbs. lean veal; 2 lbs. beef-bones, cracked; 1 slice of corned ham; 1
carrot; bunch of herbs; 1 onion; 8 large tomatoes; 1 tablespoonful of
sugar; pepper and salt; ¼ cup granulated tapioca, previously soaked two
hours in a little cold water; 3 quarts of water.

Slice the meat and vegetables, and put on—leaving out the tomatoes—in
the water, to boil slowly four hours. At the end of the second hour,
skim well, and add the tomatoes. When the time is up, strain the soup,
take out the meat, and rub the vegetables through the colander. Cool
and skim; season with sugar, pepper, salt, and minced herbs, and heat
up anew. When it boils, add the tapioca; stir clear, and serve.


BEEFSTEAK.

Flatten with the broad side of a hatchet, and broil upon a buttered
gridiron over a clear fire. Lay upon a hot dish, pepper, salt, and put
a bountiful spoonful of butter, cut into bits, upon it. Cover with a
hot dish or lid for five minutes before it is to be carved.


TOMATOES AND CORN, STEWED.

Slice eight large tomatoes, when you have skinned them. Add the corn
cut from six ears; put into a saucepan and stew twenty minutes; season
with pepper, salt, and sugar. Add a great lump of butter rolled in
flour, and cook ten minutes longer.


POTATOES IN JACKETS.

Put on in boiling salt water, and cook twenty minutes; then throw in a
cup of cold water. Bring rapidly to the second boil, and, when a fork
pierces the largest easily, turn off the water, and set the uncovered
pot upon the range, to dry off the moisture. Serve in a dish lined with
a napkin.


MASHED SQUASH.

Pare, quarter, lay in cold water ten minutes, and cook soft in hot,
salted water. Mash in a hot colander very quickly; season with butter,
pepper, and salt, and dish very hot.


PEACHES AND CREAM.

See Wednesday of First Week in August.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Cream Soup.
  Baked Calf’s Head, with Mushrooms.      Spinach.
  Succotash.      Lettuce.
  ——
  Apple Pudding.
  ——


CREAM SOUP.

The liquor in which your calf’s head was boiled; 1 onion; bunch of
parsley; 1 blade of mace; 1 cup of milk; yolks of 2 eggs; pepper and
salt; 1 teaspoonful corn-starch, rubbed in cold water.

Boil your calf’s head early in the day, until you can just handle it
without breaking it to pieces. It will be firmer for baking if left
to get cold at this juncture. Skim the pot-liquor, put in the sliced
onion, parsley, and mace, and boil slowly two hours. Strain, cool,
skim, season, and thicken slightly with the corn-starch. Beat the yolks
in a bowl, add the boiling milk, and pour into the heated tureen. Add
the soup, stir up well, and serve.


BAKED CALF’S HEAD, WITH MUSHROOMS.

Set the cold boiled calf’s head in the oven; pour a cup of pot-liquor,
boiling hot, over it, and bake half an hour, basting very often. Then
dredge well with flour and baste twice with butter. Now coat thickly
with a paste made of the brains, boiled, cooled and beaten smooth with
an egg, and seasoned with pepper and salt. When this has browned, dish
the head. Strain the gravy, add half a cupful of mushrooms, boiled and
chopped, a very little browned flour, the juice of a lemon, and, if
needed, a little boiling water. Stew one minute and send up in a boat.


SPINACH.

Boil in hot water, a little salt, about twenty minutes. Drain and
press; then chop very fine and return to the fire with a good lump of
butter, salt, pepper, sugar, a few tablespoonfuls of cream, and beat to
a smooth mixture like custard. Pour into a deep dish and serve.


SUCCOTASH.

Cut the corn from six or seven cobs; mix with it one-third the quantity
of Lima beans; just cover with water, and stew gently half an hour.
Turn off most of the water, add a cup of milk, and when this heats, a
great lump of butter rolled in flour, with pepper and salt. Simmer half
an hour longer, stirring up often.


LETTUCE.

Pick apart the heads and pile upon pounded ice, on a glass dish. Pass
vinegar, pepper, salt, and powdered sugar with it.


APPLE PUDDING.

Sliced tart apples; bread-crumbs; butter; sugar; cinnamon.

Butter a pudding-dish very well, and put in a layer of crumbs;
then dots of butter; next, sliced apples strewed with sugar and
cinnamon—more buttered crumbs. Repeat the layers in this order until
your dish is full, with crumbs on top. Bake, covered, half an hour—or
forty minutes for a large dish. Turn out, pour liquid sauce over it,
and eat hot with more.


  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Beef Bouillon.
  Boiled Beef and Vegetables.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Peach Pie.
  ——


BEEF BOUILLON.

6 lbs. of round of beef, bound into a good shape with tape; 3 small
carrots; 3 turnips; 8 very small young onions, and one large one stuck
with four cloves. Bunch of herbs; 1 pint of string-beans and same of
green peas; 1 small head of cauliflower; 4 quarts of water; pepper and
salt; noodles, rice or sago.

Put the beef whole into the water, and heat slowly to a boil. When you
have taken off the scum, dip out a pint of the liquor, and put by for
cooking the vegetables. Add to the liquor left with the beef one sliced
carrot, one turnip, also sliced, the large onion and the herbs. Stew
slowly four hours; take out the beef and keep hot over boiling water.
Strain the soup, pulping the vegetables; cool and skim, return to the
fire, and, when it heats, add noodles, boiled rice or soaked German
sago. Simmer five minutes and pour into the tureen.


THE BEEF AND VEGETABLES.

Pare the two turnips and two carrots; string the beans; top, tail and
skin the onions, and cook these, with the cauliflower, half an hour in
the pint of hot broth, slightly salted. Then add the peas, and cook
twenty minutes more. Serve the beef upon a hot dish; slice the turnips
and carrots and clip the cauliflower into bunches, and lay, each kind
of vegetable by itself, about the meat. Make a sauce by heating and
skimming a cupful of the soup-broth, stirring into it a great spoonful
of butter rolled in a heaping teaspoonful of flour, and, when it has
thickened, seasoning with pepper, salt, a little French mustard, and
the juice of half a lemon. Serve in a boat.


MASHED POTATOES.

Treat as directed on Monday of this week.


RAW TOMATOES.

See Friday of First Week in August.


PEACH PIE.

Pare, but do not stone ripe, rich peaches. Have ready your pie-plates
lined with a good paste; put in the fruit; sweeten well; cover with
pastry, and bake. Eat fresh—not warm—with powdered sugar sifted over
them.



  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Eel Soup.
  Broiled Chickens.      Broiled Tomatoes.
  Scalloped Squash.      Grape Jelly.
  ——
  Watermelons and Nutmeg Melons.
  ——


EEL SOUP.

4 lbs. of eels; 3 quarts of water; 1 chopped onion; minced parsley;
a blade of mace; pepper, salt, and lemon-juice; 2 tablespoonfuls of
butter rolled in flour; dripping.

Clean the eels, removing all the fat, and cut into short pieces. Fry a
chopped onion brown in plenty of dripping; wipe the eels dry and fry
them in the same. Put into a pot with the onion and mace; cover with
three quarts of cold water, and stew slowly two hours. Then season;
stir in the floured butter; simmer three minutes, add the lemon-juice,
and pour out.


BROILED CHICKENS.

Clean, wash off the blood, but do not soak; split down the backs, and
lay upon a gridiron, or sticks laid over a dripping-pan of boiling
water. Cover with another pan and steam half an hour, in the oven or
upon the range. Wipe off the moisture lightly, and cook upon a buttered
gridiron over hot coals, turning when it drips. Let it get tender and
brown without scorching. When done, lay upon a hot dish; butter well,
pepper and salt, and send up at once.


BROILED TOMATOES.

Slice fine ripe tomatoes without peeling them, and cook, held between
the wires of an oyster-broiler, until hissing hot and slightly browned.
Lay upon a hot dish, and dress with a mixture of butter heated almost
to boiling, with a little vinegar, salt, pepper, and mustard.


SCALLOPED SQUASH.

Mash in the usual way; put upon a layer of crumbs laid in the bottom
of a pudding-dish, having seasoned the squash with butter, pepper, and
salt. Pour a little cream on top, and strew with buttered crumbs. Bake,
covered, half an hour, then brown.


NUTMEG AND WATER MELONS.

Keep both on ice for several hours. Serve, by wiping the watermelon
and laying it whole upon a long dish, to be carved at table. If cut up
too long before it is to be eaten, it becomes insipid. Cut the nutmeg
melons in two; take out the seeds, and put a lump of ice in each half.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Vegetable Soup with Eggs.
  Larded Mutton Chops.      Green Peas.
  Boiled Green Corn.      Whole Boiled Potatoes.
  ——
  Blackberry Roley-Poley.
  ——


VEGETABLE SOUP WITH EGGS.

3 lbs. of beef—coarse and cut into strips; 2 lbs. veal, from the scrag;
2 lbs. marrow-bones of any kind; 2 carrots; 1 turnip; 1 large onion;
6 tomatoes; corn from three ears, _grated_ off; 1 pint of green peas;
sweet herbs; pepper and salt; 6 quarts of water; 6 or 8 eggs.

Put the meat, bones, and all the vegetables on in the water, early in
the day, and boil slowly five or six hours. Should the liquid sink more
than one-third, add boiling water. The meat should be in rags, and the
vegetables broken to pieces. Strain; pulp the vegetables through the
colander; cool, and skim the stock, and season well. Divide, and set
aside a goodly portion for Sunday, keeping it on ice. Boil up, skim
again, pour into the tureen, and lay on the surface the poached _yolks_
of as many eggs as there are people to be served. Use the whites for
white, silver, or lady cake.


LARDED MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim off all the fat and skin, leaving a bare piece of bone at the
end of each. Lard closely with fat salt pork, passing the lardoons
quite through the meat. Put on in a saucepan, with enough gravy to
cover them, and what remains of your can of mushrooms from day before
yesterday. They will have kept well on ice. Cut each mushroom in two.
Cover, and simmer gently until the chops are tender. (The gravy should
be cold when it is poured upon them.) Take up the chops; arrange upon a
dish. Add a heaping teaspoonful of currant jelly and a little browned
flour to the gravy, boil once, and pour over the meat. Garnish with
sliced lemon.


GREEN PEAS.

See Sunday of First Week in August.


BOILED GREEN CORN.

See Sunday of First Week in August.


POTATOES BOILED WHOLE.

Treat as directed on Tuesday of this week, only stripping off the skins
after they are boiled, and, when they are dished, dressing them with
hot butter mixed with minced parsley and pepper and salt. Serve very
hot.


BLACKBERRY ROLEY POLEY.

1 quart of prepared flour; 1 heaping tablespoonful of lard; and the
same of butter, rubbed with a little salt, into the flour; enough
milk—about two cups—to make soft dough.

Roll out into a sheet a quarter of an inch thick. Strew, leaving a
narrow margin at the sides, with sound blackberries, sprinkled with
sugar. Roll tightly. Sew up with a “felled” seam, in a cloth, leaving
room for swelling. Put into a pot of boiling water, and keep at the
boil an hour and a quarter. Dip the cloth in cold water to loosen it,
and turn out. Eat cold with hard sauce.



  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Tomato Soup.
  Fillet of Veal.      Chopped Potatoes.
  Green Corn Pudding.      String-Beans.
  ——
  Peach Lèche-Crêma.
  Marbled Cake.
  ——


TOMATO SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of your soup-stock; heat, and add a pint of
strained tomato sauce well seasoned. Simmer ten minutes, and it is
ready.


FILLET OF VEAL.

Boil, blanch, and chop two sweetbreads; mix with them a slice of cooked
corned ham, minced, and some fine bread-crumbs; season with pepper,
salt, a pinch of lemon-peel, and bind with a beaten egg. Stuff a fillet
of veal with this mixture. Bind a broad strip of muslin about it, as
wide as the meat is high; set in a dripping-pan, and pour a cup of
hot water around it. Cover the top with milk in which has been mixed
a tablespoonful of melted butter. Pour on carefully so as not to run
down the sides. Bake, basting for one hour with milk and butter, for
another hour with _cream_, in which has been stirred a pinch of soda.
Unbind the muslin from the fillet, dish it; add to the gravy a little
hot water and a teaspoonful of corn-starch wet in cold water; boil up,
and pour half upon the veal, the rest into a boat.


CHOPPED POTATOES.

Chop cold, boiled potatoes into rather coarse dice; cover with warm
milk in which a pinch of soda has been dropped; when very hot, stir in
a lump of floured butter and a little minced parsley and onion. Simmer
five minutes and serve.


GREEN CORN PUDDING.

See Friday of First Week in August.


STRING-BEANS.

See Tuesday of First Week in August.


PEACH LÈCHE-CRÊMA.

12 ripe peaches, pared, stoned and cut in halves; 3 eggs, and the
whites of 2 more; ½ cup of powdered sugar; 2 tablespoonfuls of
corn-starch wet in cold milk; 1 tablespoonful melted butter; 1 pint of
milk.

Scald the milk, stir in the corn-starch, and, when it begins to
thicken, take from the fire and put in the butter. When lukewarm, whip
in the beaten yolks until all are very light. Put a thick substratum
of peaches into a dish; strew with sugar, and pour the creamy
compound over them. Bake in a quick oven ten minutes and spread with
a _méringue_ made of five whites whipped stiff with a little powdered
sugar. Shut the oven-door until this is firm. Eat cold with cream.


  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Quick Soup.
  Dijon Paté.      Lima Beans.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Pears, Peaches, and Bananas.
  Iced Coffee, Crackers and Cheese.
  ——


QUICK SOUP.

2 lbs. of raw lean beef, chopped _very_ fine; 3 pints of boiling water
in which an onion, a turnip, and a carrot—all pared and sliced—have
been boiled twenty minutes; pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful of tomato
catsup.

Put the beef into a tin pail and set in cold water. Bring this slowly
to a boil, then pour in the boiling water upon the smoking hot meat
inside. Cover closely, boil for half an hour in the hot water; turn
into a saucepan; season, simmer ten minutes, strain, pressing and
wringing the meat, and pour into the tureen.


DIJON PATÉ.

1 large cup of cold boiled rice; 2 raw eggs; ½ cup of milk; 2 cups of
minced veal; ½ cupful of gravy or drawn butter; 4 hard boiled eggs,
sliced; pepper and salt.

Butter a pudding-mould—one without a cylinder—and line it with a thick
coating of the rice worked to a paste with the milk and beaten eggs,
and seasoned with pepper and salt. The paste should be quite stiff.
Line the inside of this in turn with the sliced eggs, and within
this pack the minced veal, wet with gravy and seasoned to taste. The
stuffing of the fillet of veal should be chopped with the meat. Cover
with rice; put on the lid of the mould; set it in boiling water and
cook one hour. Turn out carefully, and serve with a good gravy in a
boat. The gravy, if you have no other, can be made of odds-and-ends
of the veal boiled down in water. Or a cup of your tomato soup of
yesterday will make a good sauce.


LIMA BEANS.

See Wednesday, First Week in August.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and do not brown.


RAW TOMATOES.

See Friday of First Week in August.


PEARS, PEACHES, AND BANANAS.

Arrange tastefully in fruit dishes or baskets, with green leaves about
them.


ICED COFFEE, CRACKERS, AND CHEESE.

See Monday of Second Week in August.



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Mutton Broth.
  Brunswick Stew.      Onions Stewed Brown.
  Potatoes à la Duchesse.      Cucumbers.
  ——
  Peaches and Cream.
  Sponge-Cake.
  ——


MUTTON BROTH.

3 lbs. of lean mutton; 2 turnips; 1 carrot; 2 onions; bunch of parsley;
1 cup of milk; 1 tablespoonful of corn-starch; 3 quarts of water.

Boil meat, cut into strips, and the vegetables, sliced, in the water
two hours and a half. The water should be reduced one-third. Strain,
taking out the meat, and rubbing the vegetables to a pulp through the
colander. Cool, skim, season, and return to the fire. Heat, stir in
the corn-starch wet up with water, and pour into the tureen. Add the
milk, boiling hot, stir well, and serve.


BRUNSWICK STEW.

3 fine gray squirrels, skinned and cleaned—joint as you would chickens
for a fricassee; ½ lb. of fat salt pork; 1 onion, sliced; 12 ears
of corn cut from the cob; 6 large tomatoes, pared and sliced; 3
tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in flour; parsley; enough water to
cover the squirrels.

Put on squirrels, pork—cut up small—onion, and parsley in the water,
and bring to a boil. When this has lasted ten minutes, put in the corn,
and stew until the squirrels are tender. Then add the tomatoes, cut up
thin. Twenty minutes later, stir in the butter and flour. Simmer ten
minutes, and pour into a large, deep dish.


ONIONS STEWED BROWN.

10 or 12 small onions; 1 cup of gravy from your soup, before it is
strained; seasoning.

Top, tail, and skin the onions. Parboil for ten minutes; throw off the
water, and cover with the cooled and skimmed gravy. Season, and stew
until the onions are tender. Then stir in a tablespoonful of butter
rubbed up with browned flour. Simmer five minutes.


POTATOES À LA DUCHESSE.

Work a beaten egg and a little butter into each cup of mashed potatoes;
put a tablespoonful of butter into a saucepan, and stir and turn the
potato in it until very hot. Do not let it “catch” on the sides. Turn
out, and mould in greased muffin-rings. Leave it to cool in these; then
loosen gently upon a greased baking-pan, and bake until delicately
browned.


CUCUMBERS.

See Monday of Second Week in August.


PEACHES AND CREAM, WITH SPONGE-CAKE.

See Wednesday of First Week in August.


  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Ox-cheek Soup.
  Roast Beef.      Mashed Squash.
  Green Corn cut from the Cob.      Fried Egg-plant.
  ——
  Open Apple Custard Tart.
  ——


OX-CHEEK SOUP.

The meat from the cheeks of an ox-head; 2 sliced onions, fried brown;
sweet herbs; 1 small cup of rice; 1 teaspoonful of curry-powder; 3
quarts of water; pepper and salt; bones of the head.

Cut the meat very small; put with the fried onions and bones into a
pot, and pour on the water. Stew slowly three hours. Strain, cool,
skim; put in seasoning, herbs, and the rice, previously soaked two
hours. Stew half an hour; add the curry-powder, wet in cold water; boil
up, and pour out.


ROAST BEEF.

Lay a neat cut of rib-roast, trimmed and skewered, in a dripping-pan;
dash a cupful of boiling water all over it, and roast ten minutes to
the pound, if you like it rare. Just before taking it up, baste it with
butter—the previous and abundant bastings should have been with its own
gravy—dredge with flour, and, as it browns, again with butter. Pour off
the fat from the gravy before thickening and seasoning it. Much of the
so-called beef gravy is only fit for the dripping-pot.


MASHED SQUASH.

Pare, quarter, seed, and boil in hot, salted water. Drain, and mash in
a hot colander; season with pepper, salt, and butter, and dish hot.


GREEN CORN CUT FROM THE COB.

After boiling, cut the corn, with a sharp knife, from the cob, into a
hot dish; stir in butter, pepper, and salt, and cover to keep hot until
eaten.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

Please see Sunday, First Week in August.


OPEN APPLE CUSTARD TART.

12 juicy, tart apples; 1 cup of sugar; grated peel of a lemon; 1 pint
of milk; 3 eggs, and 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar, for the custard; good
pie-paste.

Put a border of pie-crust around the flat brim of a pie-plate, without
lining the bottom. Fill the plate with sliced apple, sugared, with
lemon-peel scattered here and there. Put in a _little_ water. Cover
with a crust, in the centre of which you have marked a circle with a
cake-cutter, or large tumbler. Bake the pie; with a sharp knife, cut
out the marked circle, lift the centre-piece, and fill the inside of
the pie with a warm custard made of the milk, eggs, and sugar, boiled
until it begins to thicken. Eat cold.



  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Mrs. B.’s Corn Soup.
  Smothered Chicken.      Stuffed Tomatoes.
  Scalloped Potatoes.      Beets.
  ——
  Cottage Pudding.
  ——


MRS. B.’S CORN SOUP.

15 ears of corn, grated from the cob as close as the grater will take
off the grains; the bones and other “trimmings” of yesterday’s roast
beef, both raw and cooked; 1 onion; 1 cup of milk; 2 great spoonfuls of
butter, rolled in flour; pepper and salt; 3 quarts of water.

Put the empty cobs, the bones, etc., with the onion, on in the water,
and stew two hours. Strain off the water, and put the grated corn into
it with pepper and salt. Stew gently one hour; add the floured butter;
simmer ten minutes, and pour into the tureen. Add the milk, boiling
hot; stir up and serve.


SMOTHERED CHICKEN.

Split a pair of young, but well-grown chickens down the back, as for
broiling. Lay flat in a dripping-pan; pour a cup of boiling water over
them, and invert another pan over them so as to cover closely. Roast
half an hour, and baste very freely with butter and water. Ten minutes
later baste with gravy from the pan. In five more, with melted butter,
profusely. Bake until the fowls are tender and well colored. Dish,
salt and pepper them; thicken and season the gravy; pour some over the
chickens and send up the rest in a boat.


STUFFED TOMATOES.

Choose large, smooth tomatoes; cut a piece from the top of each;
take out the inside, taking care not to cut the skin. Chop up
the tomato-pulp with a little cold beef; add one-fourth as much
bread-crumbs as you have pulp, and wet all with beef-gravy, seasoning
with a little sugar, pepper, and salt. Fill the tomatoes with this
force-meat; put on the top slices; pack the stuffing that remains
between the tomatoes, and pour gravy upon this; cover and bake from
forty to forty-five minutes.


SCALLOPED POTATOES.

2 cups of mashed potatoes; 3 tablespoonfuls of cream; 2 tablespoonfuls
of butter; yolks of 4 hard-boiled eggs, 1 raw beaten egg; handful fine
crumbs; pepper and salt.

Beat up the hot potatoes light with butter, cream, raw egg and
seasoning. Put a layer in the bottom of a bake-dish; cover with thin
slices of yolk; salt and pepper; put on more potato, and go on thus
until the dish is full. Cover the top layer of potato with crumbs, and
bake, covered, half an hour, then brown quickly. Serve in the bake-dish.


BEETS.

Cut off the tops, taking care not to scratch the skins. Boil at least
one hour in hot salted water; scrape and slice. Put into a deep dish
and season with a few spoonfuls of hot water mixed with as much vinegar
and a little pepper and salt.


COTTAGE PUDDING.

1 cup of milk; 1 tablespoonful of butter rubbed in a cup of sugar; 2
eggs; 3 cups of prepared flour; a little salt.

Beat the yolks into the butter and sugar; add the milk, then the flour,
alternately with the whisked whites. Bake in a cake-mould; turn out hot
upon a plate, cut in slices, and eat with sweet sauce.



  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Fish Chowder.
  Omelette with Gravy.      Boiled Corn.
  Potato Salad.
  ——
  Peach Batter Pudding.
  ——


FISH CHOWDER.

3 lbs. of cod, or halibut, or any other firm white fish; 8 potatoes,
sliced and parboiled; 1 sliced onion, large; ½ lb. fat salt pork, cut
into dice; 2 cups of boiling milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in; 6
Boston crackers, split and buttered thickly; chopped parsley, pepper,
and salt to taste; 1 lemon, pared and cut into thin slices; claret.

Fry the pork in its own fat; add the onions, and, when they are brown,
drain from the fat. Put a layer of pork into the soup pot; then, one of
potatoes, peppered; next, fish, onions, more pork, and so on. Pour in
a glass of claret, then just enough boiling water to cover all. Stew
gently half an hour. Line the tureen with buttered crackers; pour on
the boiling milk, and set the tureen in boiling water until the chowder
is done. Just before taking it up add the parsley. Boil one minute, and
pour out.


OMELETTE WITH GRAVY.

6 or 8 eggs; 1 tablespoonful of cream; 1 scant cup of gravy left from
or made of the remains of yesterday’s chickens; butter for frying.

Put a good piece of butter in a frying-pan, and when it hisses, pour
in the beaten eggs. Shake and loosen them as they form; fold over in
the middle; invert the pan over a hot dish, and pour hot, savory gravy
around it.


BOILED CORN.

See Sunday of First Week in August.


POTATO SALAD.

See Sunday of First Week in August.


PEACH BATTER PUDDING.

12 rich ripe peaches, pared, but not stoned; 1 quart of milk; about 10
tablespoonfuls of prepared flour; 5 beaten eggs; 1 tablespoonful melted
butter; 1 saltspoonful of salt.

Set the peaches closely together in a buttered pudding-dish; strew with
sugar, and pour over them a batter made of the ingredients above named.



  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  White Mock Turtle Soup.
  Calf’s Liver and Bacon.      Breaded Egg-plant.
  Corn and Tomatoes.      Made Mustard.
  String-Beans.
  ——
  Nutmeg Melons and Peaches.
  ——


WHITE MOCK TURTLE SOUP.

1 calf’s head, cleaned with the skin on; ½ lb. lean ham, cut into
strips; 1 carrot; 1 onion; 1 turnip; bunch of sweet herbs; 4
tablespoonfuls of flour and the same of butter; 1 cup of milk; 6 quarts
of water; pepper and salt.

Boil the head in the water with the ham, onion, turnip, and carrot
sliced, and the chopped herbs. Cover, and stew slowly until the bones
fall from the meat. Take out the head; return the bones to the soup.
Divide the meat into two portions; set by one to cool for present use;
put the other, highly seasoned, into a large bowl, and strain half the
stock over it. When cool, set on the ice for to-morrow. Chop the calf’s
ears, and the less desirable parts of the meat reserved for to-day,
fine, and put back upon the bones in the soup. Boil gently half an
hour. Meantime, put the butter into a frying-pan, and when hot, stir
in the flour. It must not get at all brown. When it is again bubbling
hot, stir in a cupful of the soup; boil one minute, and pour it out to
cool. Strain your soup; stir in the cooled mixture; boil up and skim,
when you have seasoned quite highly; put in three or four handfuls
of meat-dice cut up from the fat, gelatinous parts of the cold head;
simmer to a boil; pour into the tureen, add the milk, boiling hot, and
send to table.


CALF’S LIVER AND BACON.

3 lbs. of fresh liver; 1 lb. of streaked bacon; juice of a lemon; 1
tablespoonful of flour, and same of butter; pepper, salt, and onion.

Soak the liver in cold water fifteen minutes; wipe dry, and cut in
strips an inch wide, and three long. Cut as many thinner strips of
bacon, and fry these three minutes in their own fat; take out and keep
hot while you fry an onion—sliced—with the liver in the same fat. Salt,
pepper, and dredge the liver in flour before it goes in. When it is
done lay in two rows, the length of the dish, with a strip of bacon
between each piece and the next. Strain the fat, and return to the pan
with a cupful of hot water, the butter rubbed into the flour, and,
when it has boiled up, the juice of a lemon. Pour over the liver. Pass
mustard with this dish.


BREADED EGG-PLANT.

Slice half an inch thick, and lay in salt and water one hour, with a
heavy plate on top to keep them under. Then wipe dry, dip in beaten
egg, roll in cracker-crumbs, and fry in hot lard or dripping. Drain,
pepper and salt them, and serve.


STRING-BEANS.

Be doubly careful, as the season advances, to pare off the toughening
fibres on both sides. Cut in short pieces; boil in hot salted water
forty minutes, drain, pepper, salt, and butter.


CORN AND TOMATOES.

8 large tomatoes, pared and sliced thin; 6 ears of corn, the grains
_shaved_ from the cob by successive strokes of a keen knife; sugar,
pepper, salt, and butter.

Put corn and tomatoes together, and cook forty minutes. Season, and
simmer ten minutes more. Pour out.


NUTMEG MELONS AND PEACHES.

Halve the melons, take out the seeds, and put a piece of ice in each
half. Pile the peaches in a fruit-dish, or basket, with green leaves
between.



  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Clear Soup.
  Larded Ducks.      Succotash.
  Stewed Squash.      Boiled Potatoes.
  ——
  Peach Ice-Cream.
  Cake.
  ——


CLEAR SOUP.

Take the fat from your soup-jelly; pour into a pot and heat until you
can strain it off from the meat. Cut up the latter; season with salt
and a little spice, and put back on the ice. There is still gelatine
enough in it to make it valuable. Boil and skim your soup two or three
minutes, and add a small cup of German sago which has been soaked in a
little water one hour. When clear, serve.


LARDED DUCKS.

After cleaning and washing, lard the breasts of a pair of ducks with
narrow strips of bacon. You _must_ have a larding-needle for this,
since both ends of the lardoons must project upon the same surface.
Half roast the ducks; put on in a saucepan, with two cups of broth made
by abstracting a cup of jelly from your soup-stock, thinning it with
boiling water and seasoning it. Add a chopped onion and a glass of
claret. Stew half an hour, or until tender; dish; take the fat from the
gravy, thicken, boil and pour half over the ducks, the rest into a boat.


SUCCOTASH.

8 ears of corn—the grains cut off; about a pint of Lima beans; 1
tablespoonful of floured butter; pepper and salt; 1 cup of milk.

Boil corn and beans for nearly an hour in enough boiling water to cover
them. Turn this off, add the milk; when this heats, butter, pepper and
salt. Simmer ten minutes.


STEWED SQUASH.

Pare, seed, quarter, and cook soft in boiling salted water. Pour this
off, and add a few tablespoonfuls of strained gravy from your ducks—or
any other you may have. Beat the squash to pieces in this, in the
saucepan; season well and stir until as stiff and smooth as apple
sauce; then dish upon crustless slices of fried bread.


BOILED POTATOES.

See Saturday, Second Week in August.


PEACH ICE-CREAM.

1 quart of rich milk and as much sweet cream; 4 cups of sugar; 6 eggs;
1 quart of very ripe peaches pared and cut small.

Make as directed in full on Sunday of Second Week in July; but stir
in the peaches just before closing the freezer for the second time,
beating them well into the congealing cream. Unless they are very
sweet, you would do well to dredge them in sugar before they go in.



  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  A Medley Soup.
  Casserole of Ducks, and Macaroni.
  Broiled Ham.      Stewed Onions.
  Chopped Potatoes.
  ——
  Watermelons and Pears.
  ——


A MEDLEY SOUP.

Cut up the cold calf’s head—or the remains of it set by for the second
time on yesterday—into dice. Save half to be added as a final touch
to your soup. Put the rest with the skeleton of your ducks into the
soup-pot, and cover with three quarts of water. When it has simmered
three hours and boiled down one-third, strain and return to the fire,
with half a cup of green peas, and the same of tomato-sauce—or you can
put in, if more convenient, the remnants of the succotash and squash
left from Sunday’s dinner. If you use the raw peas, simmer half an
hour; if the cooked vegetables, but ten minutes. Add the meat-dice,
boil up once, and serve.


CASSEROLE OF DUCKS AND MACARONI.

Make according to directions given for “Dijon Paté,” on Monday of Third
Week in August, substituting macaroni boiled twenty minutes in hot
salted water, then cut into quarter-inch lengths, for the boiled rice,
and minced duck for the veal.


BROILED HAM.

Cut smooth slices of cooked ham, and broil five minutes over—or
under—clear coals. Pepper and butter each, and give also a mere touch
of French mustard.


STEWED ONIONS.

Top, tail, and skin the onions. Cook twenty minutes in boiling water;
throw this off, and cover with milk. Simmer ten minutes, or until
tender; stir in a lump of floured butter, season with pepper and salt;
cook two minutes, and dish.


CHOPPED POTATOES.

Chop coarsely cold boiled potatoes. Have ready in a saucepan a little
good dripping, well flavored. As it heats, put in the potatoes, and
stir until smoking hot all through.


WATERMELONS AND PEARS.

Keep the watermelons on ice for some hours before you send them to
table. Lay upon a large flat dish, and serve the pears in a fruit-dish
or basket.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Farina Soup.
  Haricot of Mutton.      Moulded Potato.
  Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Baked Berry Dumplings.
  Iced Tea.
  ——


FARINA SOUP.

2 lbs. of lean coarse beef; 2 lbs. of mutton-bones; 1 onion; 1 grated
carrot, and 1 grated turnip; bunch of herbs; pepper and salt; ½ cup of
farina, soaked two hours in a cup of milk; 3 qts. of water.

Crack the bones and chop the meat and onion. Put these on with the
other vegetables, the herbs, and water, and boil slowly three or four
hours. Strain, cool, skim and season. Put in the farina with a pinch of
soda, and simmer half an hour.


HARICOT OF MUTTON.

3 lbs. of lean mutton; 1 onion; 1 cup of gravy taken from your soup;
1 dessertspoonful of tomato catsup; 1 carrot; 1 cup of green peas; 1
glass of sherry; 2 spoonfuls of butter; browned flour for thickening
the gravy; pepper and salt.

Cut the mutton into strips three inches long by one wide, and fry
these, with the sliced onion, in the butter. Have ready the gravy in
a saucepan, and put in the meat. Stew slowly nearly an hour. Then add
the carrot, parboiled and sliced, and the peas. Stew twenty minutes;
thicken the butter used for frying with browned flour, add pepper,
salt, and the catsup; pour into the stew, and cook three minutes. Add
the wine; boil up, and serve in a deep dish.


MOULDED POTATO.

Mash the potato smooth, working in a little milk, butter, and salt.
Grease a pudding-mould; press the potato in firmly, and turn out upon a
hot dish.


RAW TOMATOES.

See Friday of First Week in August.


BAKED BERRY DUMPLINGS.

1 quart of prepared flour; 2½ tablespoonfuls of lard and butter mixed;
2 cups of milk, or enough to make a soft dough.

Roll out a quarter of an inch thick; cut into oblong pieces, rounded at
the corners. Put blackberries or huckleberries in the middle, sprinkle
with sugar, and bring the edges together, pinching them to keep them
from parting. Put into the oven with the joined edges downward, and
bake forty minutes. Glaze with butter just before taking them up.


  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Squirrel Soup.
  Fricasseed Chicken.      Boiled Rice.
  Scalloped Tomatoes.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Fruit.
  Iced Coffee and Ellie’s Cake.
  ——


SQUIRREL SOUP.

2 large fine gray squirrels, skinned, cleaned and cut up, 1 lb. lean
corned ham, cut into dice; 1 onion; 2 blades of mace; a little cayenne;
juice of a lemon; browned flour; 3 quarts of cold water; dripping; 2
tablespoonfuls of butter.

Fry squirrel and onion in the dripping to a light brown. Drain off the
fat and put them into the soup-pot with the water, ham, and mace. Cover
closely, and stew until the meat is in rags, and the water reduced
one-third. Strain, cool, and skim; season and put over the fire. When
it boils, skim well, and stir in the butter, cut up in browned flour.
When it has thickened, add the lemon-juice and serve.


FRICASSEED CHICKEN.

Clean, wash and cut up a pair of full-grown chickens. Wash, but do not
soak. Put into a pot with half a pound of fat salt pork, cut very thin,
and enough cold water to cover them. Heat very slowly, and cook until
tender. When done add a chopped onion, with chopped parsley and pepper.
Cover again, and five minutes later, stir in a great tablespoonful of
butter rolled in flour. Heat in another saucepan a cup of milk; add two
beaten eggs; boil one minute. Arrange the chickens upon a dish; strain
the gravy; stir in the milk and eggs, and without putting again over
the fire, pour over the fowls.


BOILED RICE.

Wash well in several waters. Strain a half cupful of your chicken gravy
with an equal quantity of soup; add a little boiling water, and put
on with the rice in a farina-kettle. When it is quite soft, and has
absorbed all the broth, salt it, and stir in a little boiling milk in
which has been melted a teaspoonful of butter, and a little minced
parsley. Turn into a hot dish, when it has soaked up the milk, and pass
grated cheese with it.


SCALLOPED TOMATOES.

Pare and slice fine ripe tomatoes. Put into a bake-dish with alternate
layers of buttered bread-crumbs. Season each stratum of tomato with
pepper, salt and sugar. Bake covered, until very hot—then, brown. The
uppermost layer should be of crumbs.


LIMA BEANS.

See Wednesday, First Week in August.


FRUIT.

Dispose to the best advantage in baskets or dishes, with a garnishing
of green leaves.


ICED COFFEE AND ELLIE’S CAKE.

See Monday, Second Week in August, for Iced Coffee. For Ellie’s Cake,
please consult “GENERAL RECEIPTS, NO. 1, OF COMMON SENSE IN THE
HOUSEHOLD SERIES,” page 326.



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Ham and Veal Soup.
  Beefsteak Pudding.      Stuffed Egg-plant.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Summer Salad.
  ——
  Peach Trifle.
  ——


HAM AND VEAL SOUP.

2 lbs. of lean ham—that near the hock will do—cut into strips; 2 lbs.
of lean veal; 2 carrots; 2 onions; 1 blade of mace; ¼ of a cabbage
heart, minced and parboiled; 2 lemons; pepper; 4 quarts of water; 1
tablespoonful of flour wet up in cold water.

Put on meat, chopped vegetables, and water, and cook for four hours.
Strain, cool, and take off the fat. The vegetables should be pulped
through the colander. Return to the fire, boil and skim for five
minutes; having seasoned with pepper, stir in the flour; boil three
minutes, and pour out.


BEEFSTEAK PUDDING.

2½ lbs. of rumpsteak; 1 quart of prepared flour; ¼ lb. powdered suet,
chopped with the flour; pepper; salt; a very little minced parsley; 1
small pickled onion, chopped; nearly a cupful of broth, taken from the
soup, cooled and skimmed.

Make a paste of the suet and salted flour mixed with a little
ice-water. Roll it out and line a round bowl with it. Cut the meat into
dice; pepper and salt each piece, and roll in flour. Put them inside
of the paste; strew over them the parsley and pickle, and pour in the
_cold_ gravy. Cover the top with a paste-crust, overlapping the greased
edges of the bowl; press this down firmly all around; envelop all in
a stout cloth, tied tightly under the bottom of the bowl; plunge into
boiling water and cook, at a steady boil, two hours and a quarter.
Untie the cloth, invert the bowl with care over a hot dish; turn out
the pudding, and serve at once.


STUFFED EGG-PLANT.

Parboil for ten minutes. Slit down the side, and take out the seeds.
Prop open the cut with a bit of clean wood, and lay in salt and water
for one hour. Stuff with a force-meat of crumbs, fat salt pork, salt,
pepper, nutmeg, parsley, and a bit of onion, all chopped. Moisten with
a good gravy. Wind soft string about the egg-plant, to keep the cut
closed, and bake, putting a cupful of weak broth in the dripping pan.
Baste frequently; at first, with butter and water, then with the gravy.
Baste twice with butter at the last. Lay the egg-plant in a deep dish;
add to the gravy a tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour, and, when
this boils, two or three spoonfuls of milk or cream. Just boil, and
pour upon the egg-plant.


MASHED POTATOES.

Whip boiled potatoes light with a fork; beat in milk, butter, and salt,
and heap like rock-work upon a hot dish.


SUMMER SALAD.

2 heads of lettuce; a handful of water-cresses; 5 very tender radishes,
scraped and cut up; 1 cucumber, pared, laid in ice-water for an hour,
then sliced; 3 hard-boiled eggs; 2 teaspoonfuls of white sugar, and 1,
each, of salt, pepper, and made mustard; 2 tablespoonfuls of salad oil,
and 6 of vinegar.

Rub sugar, salt, pepper, and mustard, to a paste with the oil. Pound
the yolks fine, and work in. Then whip in, very gradually, the vinegar.
Arrange the vegetables, all cut up neatly, in a salad-bowl, and
_strain_ the dressing over it. Garnish with the whites, sliced, laid
around in a chain, with a nasturtium flower in every two or three links.


PEACH TRIFLE.

12 fine peaches, pared and sliced very thin; 1 package Coxe’s gelatine;
2 cups white sugar; 1 pint of boiling and 1 cup of cold, water; 1
cup of rich, sweet cream, with a pinch of soda dissolved in it, then
whipped light in a syllabub-churn.

Soak the gelatine two hours in the cup of cold water. Put it, with
peaches and sugar, into a bowl; cover, and let stand an hour. Then pour
on the boiling water; stir and mash the peaches, and strain through
muslin. When cold and slightly congealed, beat in quickly, a spoonful
at a time, the whipped cream. It should be thick and white, or faintly
colored. Form in a wet mould set an ice. Eat with cake.


  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Cauliflower Soup, without Meat.     Fillets of Halibut, with Potatoes.
  Beef’s Tongue, with Peas.
  Green Corn Pudding.      Raw Cucumbers.
  ——
  Melons, Peaches, and Pears.
  ——


CAULIFLOWER SOUP, WITHOUT MEAT.

1 fine cauliflower; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in 1 of flour; 1
onion; bunch of parsley; 2 blades of mace; 2 quarts of water; 2 cups of
milk; pepper and salt; a pinch of soda in the milk.

Cut the cauliflower into bunches, reserving about a cupful of small
clusters to put whole into the soup. Chop the rest, also the onion and
herbs, and put on in the water, with the mace. Cook an hour, and rub
through a colander. Return the _purée_, thus obtained, to the pot, and
season with pepper and salt. As it boils, stir in the whole clusters,
previously boiled tender in hot, salted water, and left to cool. When
the soup is again hot, put in the floured butter; stir until this has
thickened; pour into the tureen, and add the boiling milk. Pass sliced
lemon and cream crackers with it.


FILLETS OF HALIBUT, WITH POTATOES.

3 lbs. of halibut, cut into strips three inches long, one wide, and
three-quarters of an inch thick; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter; pepper;
salt; 1 teaspoonful of anchovy paste; a pinch of cayenne; a little
boiling water; juice of a lemon.

Lay the slices of fish in salt and water for half an hour. Wipe them
dry. Have ready the butter in a saucepan, with pepper and salt. When it
is hot, put in the pieces of fish, and cook gently, without browning,
until tender.

Meanwhile, cut some potatoes round with your “gouge,” or, if you
have none, into neat squares; parboil and drain them, and simmer
ten minutes in enough hot milk to cover them; then stir in a lump of
butter; season with pepper and salt. Cook five minutes; drain the
liquid into another saucepan, and keep the potatoes hot. Lay the fish
in order upon a hot dish, the potatoes around it, and set over hot
water, while you thicken the milk in which the potatoes were boiled
(never omitting the pinch of soda), with a little flour. Boil up, add
the butter used for cooking the fish, and the anchovy sauce. Squeeze a
small lemon over the fish, and pour on the hot sauce.


BEEF’S TONGUE WITH GREEN PEAS.

Parboil a corned tongue. Take it from the water, trim off the root and
pare away the skin. Put into a broad saucepan with a cup of yesterday’s
soup, half a minced onion, a teaspoonful of sugar, a little parsley and
pepper. Cover, and cook slowly one hour, or until tender. Slice round,
and lay upon a hot dish. Heap each slice with a great spoonful of
green peas boiled in hot salted water, drained well, and seasoned with
butter, salt, and pepper. Strain the gravy, add a little of the water
in which the tongue was boiled, a small spoonful of made mustard—French
mustard if you have it—the juice of half a lemon, and thicken with
browned flour. Boil up and serve in a boat.


GREEN CORN PUDDING.

See Friday of First Week in August.


RAW CUCUMBERS.

Pare, lay in ice-water one hour; slice, and pile upon pounded ice in a
glass dish, passing the condiments with them.


MELONS, PEACHES, AND PEARS.

Serve the melons upon flat dishes; the peaches and pears in
fruit-salvers or in fancy baskets, with green leaves and flowers
disposed tastefully among them. All would be the more refreshing for
having lain in the ice-box or refrigerator awhile.


  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Beef Stock Soup.
  Boiled Ham.      Onion Tomato Sauce.
  Squash au Gratin.      Stripped Potatoes.
  ——
  Whole Peach Pie.
  ——


BEEF STOCK SOUP.

5 lbs. of beef, and as many of bones; 2 carrots; 2 onions, sliced
and fried in dripping; 2 turnips; bunch of herbs; 7 quarts of water;
2 teaspoonfuls essence of celery, or 3 stalks of the green plant,
with the tops cut off; pepper and salt; dice of fried bread; 1 large
spoonful of tomato catsup.

Cut up the meat, and chop the vegetables. Put with the herbs and
cracked bones into a pot, and pour on two quarts of water. Heat
slowly, and after it has boiled one hour, skim well, and add the other
five quarts—also cold. Cook steadily four or five hours longer, then
strain, rubbing the vegetables to pieces. There should be at least five
quarts of liquid. If, in the boiling, it has lost too much, you should
have replenished the pot with boiling water. Take out two quarts for
to-day’s soup. Return meat and bones to the fire, and pour the rest of
the soup over them with another quart of cold water. Cover very closely
and simmer at the back of the range two hours longer. Then set away in
an earthenware vessel, having seasoned it, and when cold, put on ice.
You will now have made soup-stock for three days.

Cool the portion kept out for to-day; take off all the fat, season and
re-heat it. Boil gently and skim well. Stir in the catsup, and pour
upon the fried bread already put into the tureen.


BOILED HAM.

Wash a ham thoroughly, scrubbing off all the rusty parts with the dust.
Put on in plenty of cold water, and boil twenty minutes to the pound.
Let it get almost cold in the water. If possible, do this on Friday,
and do not skin until perfectly cold on Saturday. The fat will then be
white and prettily pitted, and the skin leave it easily. Twist frilled
paper about the shank, and lay in a bed of curled fresh parsley. Carve
in thin slices.


ONION TOMATO SAUCE.

2 quarts of ripe tomatoes; 1 onion, chopped; 1 tablespoonful of
chopped parsley; 2 teaspoonfuls sugar; pepper and salt to taste; 1
tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour.

Pare the tomatoes, and slice thin. Stew with the onion half an
hour; then pulp through a colander; return to the saucepan with the
seasoning, and when again hot, stir in the parsley and floured butter.
Boil gently three minutes.


SQUASH AU GRATIN.

Boil and mash, as usual, pressing out the water. Beat up with a good
bit of butter, season with pepper and salt; finally whip in two or
three tablespoonfuls of milk and a raw egg. Pour into a buttered
pudding dish; strew thickly with fine crumbs and bake in a quick oven
to a light brown.


STRIPPED POTATOES.

Peel and cut potatoes lengthwise into strips. Lay in ice-water half an
hour. Dry between two clean towels, and fry to a pale brown in hot,
salted lard. Shake in a heated colander to clear them of the fat, and
turn into a dish lined with a napkin.


WHOLE PEACH PIE.

Pare ripe peaches without removing the stones. Have your pie-dishes
ready lined with a good paste, fill with the peaches; strew these with
sugar, and cover with crust. Bake in a steady oven. Sift sugar over it,
and eat fresh, with cream poured upon each slice.



SEPTEMBER.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Vermicelli Soup.
  Roast Beef and Browned Potatoes.      Fried Egg-plant.
  Boiled Green Corn.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Narcissus Blanc-Mange.
  Iced Coffee and Sliced Cake.
  ——


VERMICELLI SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of your soup-stock; dip out rather more than
half. Add a little seasoning to that which remains, and return to
the ice. Should the weather be very warm it will be wise to heat all
together, and then divide, returning the smaller portion to the ice.
Warm the stock designed for to-day with the remains of yesterday’s
tomato sauce; and when it begins to boil, strain through thin, coarse
muslin. Put back over the fire, and take off all the scum that rises
in ten minutes’ boil. Then put in a scant cupful of vermicelli, which
has been broken up small, boiled five minutes in very hot water, and
drained. Simmer five minutes, and pour out.


ROAST BEEF AND BROWNED POTATOES.

Have all gristly parts of the beef cut away, and such bones removed as
will injure the shape, or embarrass the carver. Put the beef into a
dripping-pan, throw a cupful of boiling water over it, and roast ten
minutes per pound, basting _very_ often and copiously. Just before
taking it up, dredge with flour and baste once with butter. After
dishing the meat, pour the top from the gravy; add a little boiling
water; put it into a saucepan, and thicken with browned flour. Pepper,
and serve after a brief boil.


BROWNED POTATOES.

Boil, and strip off the skins of large, fair potatoes. Half an hour
before you take up the meat pour off the fat from the gravy; lay your
potatoes in the dripping-pan, and cook brown, basting frequently. Lay
about the meat when dished.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

Slice half an inch thick, and lay in salt water one hour, with a heavy
plate on top to keep under the water. Pare each slice. Make a batter of
two eggs, a cup of milk, a little salt, and flour for thin batter. Wipe
the egg-plant perfectly dry; dip each slice in the batter, and fry in
hot dripping. Drain well, and serve on a heated flat dish.


BOILED GREEN CORN.

Strip off all but the thin husk next the corn. Turn this down, and pick
off the silk from the grains. Replace the husk, tie a thread about it
to keep it smooth, and cook the corn from thirty to forty minutes,
according to size and age. Pull off the husk; break the stalk close to
the ear, and serve, wrapped in a napkin.


RAW TOMATOES.

Pare and slice; put into a salad dish, and dress as follows: Rub one
teaspoonful of sugar, and half as much each of pepper, salt, and French
or other made mustard, smooth with two tablespoonfuls of salad-oil.
Beat in, a little at a time, five tablespoonfuls of vinegar, and half a
teaspoonful extract of celery. Pour over the tomatoes, and set on ice
until wanted.


NARCISSUS BLANC-MANGE.

1 quart of milk; 1 package Cooper’s gelatine, soaked in 2 cups of cold
water; yolks of 4 eggs, beaten light; 2 cups white sugar; 1 large cup
of sweet cream, whipped with a little powdered sugar, and flavored with
vanilla; rose-water for the blanc-mange.

Heat the milk to scalding. Stir in the sugar and gelatine, and when
these are dissolved, beat in the yolks, and cook two minutes. Turn
out into a shallow dish to cool. When it begins to form, put, a few
spoonfuls at a time, into a bowl, and whip vigorously, flavoring with
rose-water. When it is a yellow sponge, put into a wet mould, with a
cylinder in the centre. Do this on Saturday. On Sunday turn into a
dish, and fill the hole in the middle with whipped cream, just churned.
Lay more whipped cream about the base. Like all other preparations of
gelatine, this should be kept upon ice until you are ready to use it.


ICED COFFEE AND SLICED CAKE.

Make the coffee at breakfast-time. It should be very strong. While hot
add one-fourth as much boiling milk. When cool put on ice, and serve
with more ice in the tumblers. Send around a basket of cake with it.



  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Ham and Egg Soup.
  Braised Larded Beef.      Chopped Potatoes and Corn.
  Cucumbers and Onion Salad.      Stewed Squash.
  ——
  Peaches and Cream.
  ——


HAM AND EGG SOUP.

A ham-bone broken to bits; 1 quart of cold water; 3 pints of good
stock; as many poached eggs as you have people at table; a little
pepper; ½ cup of rice.

Boil your ham-bone in a quart of water until the liquid is reduced
one-half. Strain off the stock from the meat and bones in the jar or
bowl; add the ham broth and half a cup of well-soaked rice. Simmer
until this is soft, skimming often, and pour into the tureen. Lay the
poached eggs, neatly trimmed, round upon the top.


BRAISED LARDED BEEF.

Lard yesterday’s cold roast with strips of fat salt pork; lay in a
broad saucepan; half cover with gravy, and strew minced onion over it.
Cover closely and stew slowly at back of the range one hour. Dish the
meat; boil down the gravy fast for a few minutes, and pour over it.


CHOPPED POTATOES AND CORN.

Split each row of grain upon cobs of cold boiled corn, and cut them off
clean. Add twice as much chopped cold boiled potatoes. Have a little
good dripping hot in a frying-pan. Put in potatoes and corn and stir
until very hot, but do not let them brown. Serve in a deep dish.


CUCUMBER AND ONION SALAD.

Pare the cucumbers and lay in ice-water one hour. Do the same with the
onions in another bowl. Then slice them in the proportion of one onion
to three large cucumbers, and arrange in a salad-bowl, and season with
vinegar, pepper, and salt.


STEWED SQUASH.

Pare, quarter and boil the squash in hot salted water. Drain, mash
very smooth, and put back over the fire with a few spoonfuls of milk,
a little chopped parsley, and a good lump of butter, rolled in flour.
Stew five minutes, after the boil begins, stirring well from the bottom
most of the time. Pour into a deep dish.


PEACHES AND CREAM.

See Wednesday of First Week in August.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  A Hash Soup.
  Kidneys Sautés with Wine.    Baked Omelette aux Fines Herbes.
  String-Beans.      Cauliflower au Gratin.
  ——
  Syllabub and May’s Cake.
  ——


A HASH SOUP.

The remains of your roast beef—bones cracked, and meat, skin, etc.,
chopped; 6 potatoes, boiled and mashed; bunch of herbs, chopped; 1
sliced onion; salt and pepper; 3 quarts of water; 2 tablespoonfuls of
butter, rolled in flour; 1 tablespoonful of walnut catsup.

Put on meat, bones, herbs, onion, and water, and simmer two hours,
until the nourishment is all drawn from them. Strain, cool, take off
the fat; rub in the potatoes through a colander, and season. When it is
again hot, stir in the floured butter, and after boiling one minute,
the catsup. Pour into the tureen. If you have any soup left from
yesterday, you may add it to this, when the potatoes go in.


KIDNEYS SAUTÉS WITH WINE.

Cut the kidneys into thin slices, and cook ten minutes in a little
dripping in a frying-pan. Take out and lay upon a hot-water dish,
covering closely. Add to the dripping in the pan a little gravy—beef
will do, or a little of your soup; season with a chopped onion,
parsley, salt and pepper, and thicken with browned flour. Boil up;
add a glass of good wine and the juice of half a lemon. Pour upon the
kidneys, and set in boiling water five minutes. If kidneys are cooked
too long they toughen.


BAKED OMELETTE AUX FINES HERBES.

7 eggs; ½ cup of milk in which has been dissolved a quarter teaspoonful
of corn-starch; 1 tablespoonful minced herbs; pepper and salt; butter
and onion.

Beat the yolks very smooth, and whip in the milk; then stir in the
frothed whites. Put a tablespoonful of butter in a round, rather
shallow bake-pan; add the chopped herbs and a little finely minced
onion. Set upon the upper grating of the oven until it begins to
simmer. Pour in the omelette and bake quickly until high, and
delicately browned. Run a sharp knife quickly around the edge
and invert the dish upon a hot platter. Or, if your bake-dish is
presentable, serve in it. Eat at once, as it soon falls.


STRING-BEANS.

Cut off both ends, and pare the strings from both sides. Cut into short
pieces, and cook thirty minutes, or until tender, in boiling salt
water. Drain, season with pepper, salt and butter, and serve in a deep
dish.


CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN.

Cook a cauliflower—tied up in a net—in boiling salt water, fifteen
minutes. Drain, clip into small clusters, and lay in a stone-china or
block-tin dish. Pour a cup of drawn butter over it; strew thickly with
fine crumbs, and brown upon the upper grating of a brisk oven.


SYLLABUB AND MAY’S CAKE.

Whip a pint of cream to a stiff froth in your syllabub-churn,
sweetening as you go on, with half a cup of powdered sugar. When it is
a snowy mass upon the sieve upon which you have laid it as it rises,
beat in a glass of wine. Set upon ice until wanted, then fill into
glasses.


MAY’S CAKE.

Please consult “BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON AND TEA,” page 338.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Ayrshire Broth.
  Chickens à la Française.      Succotash.
  Sweet Potatoes.      Apple Sauce.
  ——
  Blackberry Shortcake, Hot.
  ——


AYRSHIRE BROTH.

Knuckle of veal—well cracked—about 4 lbs.; 3 onions; ½ lb. of lean ham;
2 turnips; bunch of parsley; 1 scant cup of barley soaked two hours in
a little milk.

Put on meat, bones, and barley, and stew slowly in a gallon of water
three hours. Then add the vegetables, cut into neat dice, parboiled,
and left to cool. Cook gently one hour and a half. Strain without
pressing. Pick out the meat and bones, and return to the soup-pot with
three pints of broth. Add a quart of cold water; cook, covered, one
hour more, and season well. Turn into a jar or bowl, and when cold, set
on ice for to-morrow’s soup. Cool that meant for to-day; skim, season,
and put over the fire with the barley and vegetables. When it begins to
boil, pour into the tureen.


CHICKENS À LA FRANÇAISE.

Boil, and then blanch a sweetbread by dropping it into cold water.
Then chop, mix with the pounded boiled livers of the chickens, and
one-sixth as much bread-crumbs as you have meat. Season. Have ready,
cleaned and washed, a pair of nice chickens. Fill with this force-meat.
Cover the breasts and sides with thin slices of fat salt pork; put
into a dripping-pan; pour about them a large cupful of boiling water,
and roast—basting often—one hour. Take off the pork; lay it in the
gravy, and dredge the fowls with flour. As this browns, baste well,
with butter once, three times with gravy. Take up and keep hot while
you strain; cool, skim and thicken the gravy. Have ready cooked a cup
of rice measured when raw—which has been boiled in the water used
for cooking the sweetbread and livers, then seasoned. Make a broad,
flat-topped mound of it upon a dish; lay the chickens on it, and pour a
little of the gravy over them. Serve the rest in a boat.


SUCCOTASH.

Cut the corn from eight or ten cobs; mix this with one third the
quantity of Lima beans, and cook one hour in just enough water to cover
them. Drain off most of the water; add a cupful of milk, with a pinch
of soda stirred in. When this boils, stir in a great spoonful of butter
rolled in flour; season with pepper and salt, and simmer ten minutes
longer.


SWEET POTATOES.

Select those of uniform size; parboil them, with the skins on. Peel and
lay in a baking-pan. Bake until soft to the grasp, glazing with butter
just before you take them up.


APPLE SAUCE.

Peel and slice juicy tart apples, and stew with just enough water
to keep them from burning, until broken to pieces. Stir deeply and
well, often. Beat a good lump of butter into them while hot, sweeten
abundantly, and season with nutmeg. Mash and beat all the lumps to
smoothness, or take them out.


BLACKBERRY SHORTCAKE—HOT.

2 quarts of sifted flour; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter, and 2 of lard; 2½
cups of buttermilk, or sour, thick milk; yolks of 2 eggs, beaten light;
1 teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in hot water, and the same quantity of
salt.

Rub the shortening into the salted flour. Add beaten yolks and soda to
the milk, and make out the paste quickly. Roll into two sheets—that
intended for the upper crust half an inch thick, the lower, rather
thinner. Lay the batter in a well greased baking-pan; cover _thickly_
with the berries; sugar them; put on the top crust, and bake about
twenty-five minutes to a nice brown. Cut into squares and eat—splitting
these open—with sugar and butter.



  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Tomato Soup.
  Boiled Leg of Mutton with Caper Sauce.    Mashed Potatoes.
  Stewed Egg-plant.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Peach Fritters.
  ——


TOMATO SOUP.

Peel and slice twelve large tomatoes, and stew twenty minutes. Rub
through a colander to a pulp; season this with pepper, salt, and
sugar. Take the fat from the top of your cold soup-stock, and put the
latter over the fire. Simmer half an hour; strain out meat and bones.
Boil and skim three minutes, and add the tomato sauce. Cook gently ten
minutes; stir in a tablespoonful (even) of corn-starch wet with cold
water. Boil up and pour out.


BOILED LEG OF MUTTON.

Cook in plenty of hot salted water, allowing twelve minutes to the
pound. Take out when done, wipe carefully; dish, and rub all over with
butter. Serve with caper sauce.


CAPER SAUCE.

Take a cupful of the liquor in which the meat has been boiled. Put on
in a saucepan; boil and skim for a moment; stir in two tablespoonfuls
of butter rubbed into a heaping teaspoonful of flour. Stir over the
fire five minutes, add the juice of a lemon, pepper, and two dozen
pickled capers—or, if you have not these, pickled nasturtium seed. Send
to table in a boat. Save the rest of the pot-liquor for soup.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, whipping light with a fork, and heaping upon a hot
dish.


STEWED EGG-PLANT.

Soak and stuff as directed on Thursday, Fourth Week in August, but
instead of baking it, put on in a cupful of your soup-stock, and stew,
closely covered, one hour, or until very tender. Take up and keep hot
in a deep dish. Stir a lump of butter rolled in flour into the gravy;
boil up and pour over the egg-plant.


LIMA BEANS.

Shell, and cook about forty minutes in boiling, salted water. Drain,
pepper, salt and stir in a good lump of butter when dished.


PEACH FRITTERS.

1 quart of flour; 1 cup of milk; ⅓ cup of yeast; 2 tablespoonfuls
of sugar; 4 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter; a little salt; ripe,
freestone peaches, pared and stoned.

Sift the flour into a bowl; work in milk and yeast, and let it rise
five or six hours. Then, beat eggs and sugar light with butter, salt,
and stir into the risen dough. Knead faithfully with your hands. Pull
off bits nearly as large as an egg. Flatten and put in the centre of
each a peach (pared), from which the stone has been slipped out through
a slit in one side. Close the dough over it; make into a round ball,
and lay upon a floured pan for the second rising. The balls must not
touch each other. In an hour they should be light. Fry as you would
doughnuts, but more slowly. Drain in a colander, and eat hot with
brandy-sauce.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Fish Soup.
  Mutton Batter Pudding.      Stewed Tomatoes and Corn.
  Cream Potatoes.      Picklette.
  ——
  Apple Cake with Cream.
  Iced Coffee.
  ——


FISH SOUP.

2 quarts of broth; 2 lbs. of halibut, rock, or other white fish; 2
onions; salt and cayenne; juice of half a lemon; dripping for frying.

Cut the fish into neat strips; take out the bones. Remove the fat from
the cold pot-liquor set by yesterday, put in the fish-bones, and put
on to stew down. Fry the sliced onions; drain from the fat; lay in the
bottom of your soup-pot; put the fish upon them; put in a little broth,
and simmer gently one hour. Take out the fish, dredge each piece with
flour, and return to the kettle. Cover with two quarts of the strained
stock, and cook, slowly, half an hour. Add cayenne and lemon, and pour
out.


MUTTON BATTER PUDDING.

2 cups of milk; 1 large cupful of flour; 2 eggs; neat squares of cold
mutton, freed from skin and fat; pepper and salt; some melted butter,
heated with tomato catsup.

Make a batter of the milk, eggs and flour. Lay the meat in the melted
butter, pepper and salt; butter a pudding-dish; pour in a little of the
batter; then add the meat soaked well in the butter; pour in the rest
of the batter, and bake one hour in a steady oven. Serve at once.


STEWED TOMATOES AND CORN.

Pare and slice six large tomatoes and one small onion. Cut the corn
from four cobs, mix up well together, and stew half an hour. Season
with pepper, salt and butter, stew again ten minutes, and pour out.


CREAM POTATOES.

Pare and cut the potatoes into small squares or rounds. Cook twenty
minutes in boiling water, a little salt. Turn this off; add a cupful
of milk; and when this bubbles up a tablespoonful of butter with a
teaspoonful of water wet up with cold milk, also, a little chopped
parsley. Simmer five minutes and pour out.


APPLE CAKE WITH CREAM.

2 cups of powdered sugar; 3 cups of prepared flour; ½ cup of
corn-starch, wet with a little milk; ½ cup of butter creamed with the
sugar; ½ cup of sweet milk; the whites of six eggs, whipped stiff.

Add the milk to the creamed butter and sugar; the corn-starch, then the
flour and whites alternately. Bake in jelly-cake tins.


FILLING.

3 tart, well-flavored apples, grated; yolks of 2 beaten eggs; 1 cup of
sugar; 1 lemon, juice, and half the grated rind.

Beat yolks, sugar, and lemon together. Grate the apples directly into
this mixture. Put into a custard-kettle, with boiling water outside of
it, and stir to a boil. When cold, put between the cakes. Eat fresh
with cream.


ICED COFFEE.

See Sunday of this Week.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  White Stock Soup.
  Mock Quails.      Kidney-Beans.
  Corn Fritters.      Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.
  ——
  Cabinet Pudding.
  ——


WHITE STOCK SOUP.

6 lbs. knuckle of veal; ½ lb. lean bacon; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter
rubbed in 1 of flour; 2 onions; 2 carrots; 2 turnips; 3 cloves stuck in
an onion; 1 blade of mace; bunch of herbs; 6 quarts of water; pepper
and salt; 1 cup of boiling milk.

Cut up the meat and crack the bones. Slice carrots, turnips, and one
onion, leaving that with the cloves whole. Put on with mace, and all
the herbs except the parsley, in two quarts of cold water. Bring to a
slow boil; take off the scum, as it rises, and at the end of an hour’s
stewing, add the rest of the cold water—one gallon. Cover and cook
steadily, always gently, four hours. Strain off the liquor, of which
there should be about five quarts; rub the vegetables through the
colander, and pick out bones and meat. Season these highly, and put,
as is your Saturday custom, into a wide-mouthed jar, or a large bowl.
Add to them three quarts of stock, well salted, and, when cold, keep
on ice. Cool to-day’s stock; remove the fat; season, put in chopped
parsley, and put over the fire. Heat in a saucepan a cup of milk, stir
in the floured butter; cook three minutes. When the soup has simmered
ten minutes after the last boil, and been carefully skimmed, pour into
the tureen, and stir in the hot, thickened milk.


MOCK QUAILS.

Cut slices about four inches square, and half an inch thick, from a leg
of veal; flatten with the side of a hatchet, and dip in beaten egg.
Make a force-meat of a cold boiled sweetbread, chopped fine, a little
minced fat pork or ham, a few oysters, also minced, and a seasoning
of pepper, cloves, nutmeg, and a pinch of grated lemon-peel. Wet with
oyster-liquor, and the juice of half a lemon. Spread the slices with
this, and roll each up tightly. Bind with soft thread, and lay in a
broad saucepan. Half cover with broth borrowed from your soup, cooled
and skimmed. Cover and stew slowly nearly one hour. Make the remnants
of the force-meat—adding a few bread crumbs—into small balls. Roll in
flour and set in the oven until browned. Five minutes before you take
up the meat, roll these in beaten yolk of egg, once and again, until
thickly coated. Let them stand to cool while you take up the “quails.”
Lay them upon a hot dish; clip and gently withdraw the threads. Strain
the gravy; add a little boiling water; thicken with browned flour; stir
in a spoonful of butter, and when it boils, drop in the “quail eggs.”
Simmer just one minute, and pour over the meat.


KIDNEY-BEANS.

Shell; cook in boiling salted water thirty minutes, or until tender;
drain, dish, and season with pepper, butter and salt.


CORN FRITTERS.

2 cups of grated corn; 2 eggs; 1 cup of milk; flour for thin batter; a
pinch of soda; salt; 1 tablespoonful melted butter.

Mix and fry as you would griddle-cakes.


POTATOES À LA LYONNAISE.

Parboil and chop some potatoes; heat a little good dripping or butter
in a frying-pan. Stir in half a minced onion, for every eight
potatoes, with a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. When they have cooked
one minute, add the potatoes, and stir until all are tender, but not
browned. Drain, pepper, salt and dish.


CABINET PUDDING.

2 cups of prepared flour; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter, creamed with the
sugar; 5 eggs; 1 cup of sugar; ½ lb. raisins, seeded, and cut in three
pieces each; ½ cup of milk; ½ lemon—juice and grated peel.

Add the beaten yolks to the creamed butter and sugar; then the milk and
flour, alternately with the whites. Lastly, stir in the fruit, dredged
with flour; pour into a buttered mould, and boil two hours and a half.

Eat hot with liquid sauce.



  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Tapioca Soup.
  Roast Ducks.      Stuffed Tomatoes.
  Cauliflower with Sauce Tartare.      Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Melons, Peaches, and Pears.
  Black Coffee, Crackers and Cheese.
  ——


TAPIOCA SOUP.

Take the fat from your soup-stock. Dip out two quarts, add one large
cup of boiling water, and strain into the soup-kettle. Heat to a slow
boil; skim carefully; add half a cup of grained tapioca, soaked two
hours in a little cold water; cook until this is clear; put in what
additional seasoning your taste demands, with a glass of wine, and a
teaspoonful of celery essence, and pour out.


ROAST DUCKS.

Put sage and onion in the stuffing for one; make that intended for the
other, of bread-crumbs, seasoned with pepper and salt, and wet up
slightly with milk. Lay the ducks in the dripping-pan; pour boiling
water over them, and roast, basting often, until tender and brown.
Dish; take the fat from the gravy; season, thicken with browned flour
and boil up. Serve in a gravy-boat.


STUFFED TOMATOES.

Choose enough large, smooth tomatoes to fill a shallow pudding-dish.
Cut a slice from the top of each, scoop out the inside. Chop the pulp
with a little cold meat, taken from your soup, a sprinkling of minced
onion, and the grated corn from two cobs. Season with pepper, salt and
butter; fill the tomatoes, put on the top slices; fill the interstices
with the force-meat, pour on a little gravy, cover and bake forty
minutes—then brown.


CAULIFLOWER WITH SAUCE TARTARE.

Boil a large cauliflower—tied in netting—in hot salted water, from
twenty-five to thirty minutes. Drain; serve in a deep dish with the
flower upwards, and pour over it a cup of drawn butter, in which has
been stirred the juice of a lemon, and a half teaspoonful of French
mustard, mixed up well with the sauce.


SWEET POTATOES.

Please see Wednesday of First Week in September.


MELONS, PEACHES, AND PEARS.

Serve the melons upon a flat dish; the other fruit in baskets, or upon
fruit-stands, garnished with leaves.


BLACK COFFEE, CRACKERS AND CHEESE.

Pass very strong hot coffee without cream, in small cups of clear
china, and fancy crackers with grated cheese.


  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Vegetable Consommé.
  Stewed Lamb à la Jardinière.      French Beans, Sautés.
  Mashed Potatoes au Gratin.      Currant Jelly.
  ——
  Peaches, Cream, and Cake.
  ——


VEGETABLE CONSOMMÉ.

Cut into thin, short strips, 1 carrot, 1 turnip, and 1 onion; peel and
slice 6 fine tomatoes; corn cut from 2 cobs; ½ cup boiled rice; 3 pints
of soup-stock; 1 pint of boiling water; seasoning at discretion.

Boil the vegetables tender in a little hot salted water. Drain, butter,
and keep them hot. The tomatoes and corn should be stewed in another
vessel, twenty-five minutes, and seasoned. Add to your soup-stock a
pint of boiling water, and simmer half an hour, then strain. Return to
the fire with the cooked vegetables and the boiled rice. Stew gently
ten minutes and turn out.


STEWED LAMB À LA JARDINIÈRE.

Lay a breast of lamb, or two scrags, in a broad pot, meat downward.
Scatter over this a sliced turnip, a sliced onion, and two sliced
tomatoes, with a little pepper and salt. Add less than a cupful of
broth from your soup; cover, and cook slowly one hour. Turn the meat
then, and cook one hour longer, very slowly. When tender, but not
ragged, dish, and keep hot. Strain the gravy; thicken with browned
flour; season; boil up, and pour over the meat.


FRENCH BEANS SAUTÉS.

Cut off the fibres from both sides of the (string) beans, and clip
into short pieces. Boil tender in hot salted water; drain dry, and put
into a saucepan in which you have melted a great spoonful of butter,
seasoned with pepper, a little French mustard, and a tablespoonful of
vinegar. Toss and stir until the beans are very hot, and glazed with
the butter. Serve in a deep dish.


MASHED POTATOES AU GRATIN.

Mash in the customary manner, and heap upon a greased pie-dish. Strew
thickly with dry crumbs, and brown upon the upper grating of the oven.
Slip carefully to a hot, flat dish.


PEACHES, CREAM, AND CAKE.

See Monday of First Week in September.



  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Beef Gravy Soup.
  Paté de Foie de Veau.      Stuffed Squash.
  Succotash.      Baked Potatoes.
  ——
  Baked Blackberry Pudding.
  ——


BEEF GRAVY SOUP.

4 lbs. of lean, coarse beef, cut into strips; 2 lbs. mutton or beef
bones, broken small; 2 onions, sliced and fried; bunch of sweet herbs;
3 carrots; 2 turnips; 5 quarts of cold water; pepper and salt; dripping.

Fry the meat and onions in the dripping to a light brown. Put on in two
quarts of water, and having cooked one hour, add the other vegetables
chopped, and the remaining three quarts of water, cold. Boil slowly
four hours, skimming often. Strain, pulping the vegetables. Put meat
and bones into the stock-pot, season well; divide the broth into two
portions; salt one, and pour into the stock-pot. When cold, set on ice
for to-morrow. Cool and skim the rest; heat and skim until quite clear.
Put dice of fried bread into the tureen.


PATÉ DE FOIE DE VEAU.

3 lbs. of calf’s liver—parboiled and cold; ½ lb. of cold cooked ham;
3 eggs; 1 tablespoonful of butter, and same of fine crumbs; 1 scant
cup of milk; a little minced onion and parsley; nutmeg, cayenne, and a
pinch of grated lemon-peel; some good pie-paste.

Mince the ham, and pound the boiled liver. Make into a sort of paste
with the butter, beaten eggs, bread-crumbs, milk, and seasoning. It
should be just soft enough to pour. Butter a bake-dish profusely; line
with a good paste, rolled out thicker than for most pies. Fill this
with the liver mixture; cover with crust, which must not overlap the
edge of the dish, but be pinched down firmly upon the lower crust; set
in a pan, containing a cupful of boiling water, just enough to keep
the bottom crust from burning, and bake one hour and a quarter in a
moderate oven. Pass a knife around the edges of the crust to detach the
paté; invert upon a deep dish. Pass with it drawn butter in which have
been beaten two raw eggs, and these thickened by two minutes’ boiling.


STUFFED SQUASH.

Pare a “turban” squash, and cut off a slice from the top. Extract the
seeds, and lay one hour in salt water. Then fill with a good stuffing
of crumbs, chopped fat salt pork, parsley, etc., wet with gravy. Put on
the top slice; set the squash in a pudding-dish. Put a few spoonfuls of
melted butter and twice as much hot water in the bottom; cover the dish
_very_ closely, and set in the oven two hours, or until tender. Lay
within a deep dish, and pour the gravy over it.


SUCCOTASH.

See Wednesday, First Week in September.


BAKED POTATOES.

Wash, wipe, and lay in a moderate oven. Bake until soft to the grasp.
Send to table in their skins, wrapped in a napkin.


BAKED BLACKBERRY PUDDING.

1 pint of milk; 2 eggs; 1 quart flour, or enough for thick batter;
1 gill bakers’ yeast; 1 saltspoonful of salt; 1 teaspoonful of soda
dissolved in boiling water; nearly a quart of berries, dredged with
flour.

Make the batter and let it rise in a warm place four hours. When very
light, stir in the dredged fruit lightly and quickly; pour into a
buttered dish and bake one hour, covering with white paper should it
“crust” over too fast. Turn out, and eat with sweet sauce.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Soup à la Bonne Femme.
  Roast Tenderloin of Beef.      Beets Sautés.
  Lima Beans.      Fried Egg-plant.
  ——
  Velvet Blanc-Mange.
  ——


SOUP À LA BONNE FEMME.

3 lbs. of lean veal; ½ lb. lean ham; 2 carrots, grated; 1 chopped
onion; thyme and parsley; 1 cup of chopped mushrooms; pepper and salt;
1 cup of milk; floured butter; 4 quarts water.

Cut the meat small and put on with herbs and vegetables in the water.
Bring to a slow boil, and keep at this, taking off the scum as it
rises, for three hours, or until the liquid is reduced one-half.
Strain, cool, skim, season and return to the fire with the chopped
mushrooms. Stew slowly half an hour; stir in a tablespoonful of butter
cut up in one of flour. Boil two minutes and pour into the tureen. Add
the boiling milk, and pour out.


ROAST TENDERLOIN OF BEEF.

See Sunday of First Week in September.


BEETS SAUTÉS.

Wash and cut off the tops, but do not touch the roots with a knife.
Boil one hour; scrape and slice them, and stew ten minutes in a little
butter, mixed with pepper, and a good spoonful of vinegar. Toss and
stir lest they should brown.


LIMA BEANS.

See Thursday, First Week in September.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

See Sunday, First Week in September.


VELVET BLANC-MANGE.

1 pint sweet cream, whipped stiff; ½ package Cooper’s gelatine soaked
in 2 cups of cold water; 2 glasses white wine; juice of one large
lemon; bitter almond flavoring; 1 cup sugar.

Put sugar, soaked gelatine, lemon and wine into a covered vessel for
one hour. Stir well, and set the covered jar or bowl into a saucepan
of boiling water until the gelatine is dissolved. Strain and cool
before flavoring it. When it begins to congeal, beat gradually into the
whipped cream. Put into a wet mould, and bury in the ice until wanted.
Pass cake with it.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Egg Soup.
  Smothered Chickens with Mushrooms.
  Stewed Tomatoes.
  Scalloped Cauliflower.      Beet-root Salad.
  ——
  Peaches and Cream.
  ——


EGG SOUP.

1 quart of broth in which the feet and giblets of the chickens have
been boiled; all that you have left of yesterday’s soup, strained; 4
beaten eggs; parsley, salt and pepper; dice of stale bread.

Cool and skim the quart of water in which have been boiled for one
hour the cleaned feet and giblets of your chickens. (Salt the giblets
and put them in the refrigerator.) Set this broth over the fire, and
season. When it boils, take it off, pour it upon the beaten eggs; put
all into a jar and set in boiling water, stirring until it thickens.
Heat in another saucepan the remains of yesterday’s soup—or, if you
have none, a scant quantity of milk, thickened with floured butter;
pour into a tureen, add the egg-broth, and throw in a good handful of
stale bread-dice. Stir well and serve.


SMOTHERED CHICKENS WITH MUSHROOMS.

Split a pair of young, full-grown chickens down the back. Lay them,
breasts upward, in a dripping-pan; pour over them a great cupful of
boiling water in which have been melted two tablespoonfuls of butter.
Invert another pan over them, covering closely, and cook in a steady
oven until they are tender and of a mellow russet hue. An hour is
generally sufficient. Baste very often, twice at the last with butter.
Keep the fowls hot upon a chafing-dish while you add the rest of the
can of mushrooms opened yesterday—each mushroom sliced into thirds—to
the gravy, with browned flour and pepper. Simmer ten minutes; pour a
little upon the chickens, the rest into a boat.


SCALLOPED CAULIFLOWER.

Small, and therefore cheap, cauliflowers will do for this purpose. Boil
them in hot salted water twenty minutes. Drain, cool, and chop. Beat
into them a couple of eggs, a spoonful of melted butter, a half cup
of milk, and season. Pour into a buttered bake-dish; cover with drawn
butter, then with fine crumbs, and bake half an hour.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Loosen the skins with boiling water; peel, slice, and stew twenty
minutes. Season with sugar, pepper, salt, a good piece of butter cut up
in flour, and stew five minutes more.


BEET-ROOT SALAD.

Arrange the cold beets left from yesterday in a salad-dish. Pour a
little salad-oil over them, season with sifted sugar, salt, a little
cayenne, and vinegar at discretion.


PEACHES AND CREAM.

See Monday of First Week in September.


  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Oberlin Soup.
  Cream Pickerel.      Giblet Omelette.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Boiled Corn.
  Cucumbers.
  ——
  Diplomatic Pudding.
  ——


OBERLIN SOUP.

3 onions; 3 turnips; 3 carrots; ½ cabbage; bunch of herbs; 8 tomatoes,
sliced; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 teaspoonful of corn-starch;
pepper, sugar, and salt; 1 cup of boiling milk; 3 quarts of cold water.

Chop the vegetables, and put all except the tomatoes and cabbage over
the fire, with the water. Simmer one hour. Then add the cabbage,
previously parboiled. Ten minutes later, put in the tomatoes and herbs.
Stew rather fast for half an hour. Rub through a colander; put over the
fire; stir in the butter and corn-starch. Cook five minutes; season
well. Let all stand together at the side of the range, covered, five
minutes, and pour out. Stir in the boiling milk (with a pinch of soda
in it) after the soup is in the tureen.


CREAM PICKEREL.

If you cannot get pickerel, pike, or salmon-trout, use rock-fish or
bass for this dish. Clean the fish, and, if large, score the back-bone
in several places. Bake slowly, pouring a cup of boiling water over him
at first, afterward basting often with butter and water. When done,
lay upon a hot-water dish; add to the gravy in the dripping-pan a cup
of milk (with a pinch of soda stirred in), and, when this heats, stir
in two tablespoonfuls of butter, one teaspoonful of corn-starch, wet
in water, and a little chopped parsley. Boil up once, to thicken, add
pepper and salt to taste, and pour over the fish.


GIBLET OMELETTE.

7 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of cream; yesterday’s giblets, chopped very
fine and seasoned; 1 good spoonful of butter.

Beat yolks and whites together; then add the cream. Heat the butter in
the frying-pan; put in the giblets; shake hard for a moment, and pour
in the eggs. Keep them free from the bottom by shaking, and loosening
with a cake-turner; and, when quite “set,” fold in the middle. Invert a
hot dish over the pan, turn out, and serve at once.


MASHED POTATOES.

Mash soft, heap upon a hot dish, and serve without browning.


BOILED CORN.

See Sunday, First Week in September.


CUCUMBERS.

Pare; lay in ice-water an hour; slice, and dish, with pounded ice
strewed over and among them. Pass condiments with them.


DIPLOMATIC PUDDING.

1 quart of milk; 4 eggs; 1 cup _very_ fine bread-crumbs; 1
tablespoonful of corn-starch, wet with cold milk; ¼ lb. of currants,
washed, dried, and dredged; 1 cup of sugar.

Soak the bread-crumbs in the milk, setting the vessel containing them
in one of hot water, and heating milk and crumbs to scalding. Pour
upon the beaten eggs and sugar; add corn-starch; lastly, the dredged
currants. Pour into a buttered mould, and boil an hour and a quarter.
Turn out, and pour a cup of hot custard over it for sauce, flavored
with vanilla, or other essence.


  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Mutton Noodle Soup.
  Baked Sheep’s Head à la Russe.      Sweet Potatoes.
  Squash.      Tomatoes Stuffed with Corn.
  ——
  Cream Peach Pie.
  ——


MUTTON NOODLE SOUP.

1 perfectly clean sheep’s head, cleaned with the skin left on; 3 lbs.
scrag of mutton, broken to pieces; 2 onions; 2 carrots; bunch of herbs;
pepper and salt; a large handful of noodles (see Receipt, Wednesday,
First Week in August); 7 quarts water.

Slice the vegetables, put with the head and scrag into a soup-kettle,
add four quarts of water, and simmer two hours, or until the sheep’s
head is so tender that the bones will slip out. Skim well, pour in
three quarts of cold water, and after three minutes take out the head
carefully. Lay in a greased bake-dish; as carefully, pull out the bones
through the under side, and put these back into the soup-kettle. Add
the vegetables and herbs; bring again to a slow boil, and cook three
hours longer. Take out meat and bones; salt highly; put into your
stock-jar, and pour half the broth over them. Season this also, and put
by for another day. Rub the vegetables through the sieve into the broth
left for to-day. Cool, skim; season, and set over the fire. Boil and
skim for two minutes; add the noodles; simmer twenty minutes, and pour
out.


BAKED SHEEP’S HEAD À LA RUSSE.

Let the boiled and boned sheep’s head get cold in the bake-dish. Then
brush over with raw egg, and sift over it a mixture of fine crumbs, a
dust of flour and some minced parsley (dried and powdered is better),
seasoned with pepper and salt. Set in the oven; baste well with butter,
as it browns. Serve in the dish, and send with it a boat of drawn
butter, based upon a cupful of the soup and seasoned with French
mustard, the juice of half a lemon, and some onion pickle minced very
fine.


SWEET POTATOES.

See Wednesday of First Week in September.


SQUASH.

Pare, slice, cook soft in boiling salt water. Drain and mash smooth in
a hot colander. Season with butter, salt, and pepper.


TOMATOES STUFFED WITH CORN.

Set large, smooth tomatoes in a greased pudding-dish. Cut a slice
from the top of each. Scoop out the seeds, leaving the walls thickly
lined with pulp. Have ready a cupful of corn grated from the cob, and
seasoned with butter, pepper, and salt. Fill the tomatoes with this;
put on the upper slices, and pour a little gravy over all. Bake,
covered, in a moderate oven, one hour. Serve in the dish.


CREAM PEACH PIE.

Make as directed in Saturday, Fourth Week in August; but lay the upper
crust on lightly, slightly buttering the lower at the point of contact.
When the pie is done, lift the cover and pour in a cream made thus: 1
cup (small) of rich milk, heated; whites of 2 eggs, whipped and stirred
into the milk; 1 tablespoonful of sugar; ½ teaspoonful of corn-starch
wet up in milk. Boil three minutes. The cream must be cold when it goes
into the hot pie. Replace the crust, and set by to cool. Eat fresh.


  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Rice and Tomato Soup.
  Boiled Chickens and Tongue.      Breaded Egg-plant.
  Boiled Cauliflower.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Frozen Custard and Cake.
  ——


RICE AND TOMATO SOUP.

Skim the soup in your stock-pot. Strain from the meat and bones; heat
and add a pint of tomatoes, stewed, strained, and seasoned, and a cup
of boiled rice with the cup of water in which it has been cooked.
Season to taste; simmer fifteen or twenty minutes after it begins to
boil, and turn out.


BOILED CHICKENS AND TONGUE.

Tie the stuffed and trussed chickens in netting, fitted to their shape,
and cook in plenty of boiling water, a little salt. An hour and a
quarter should suffice, if the fowls are tender. Soak a tongue over
night. In the morning, wash it well and boil eighteen minutes to the
pound. Trim and skin it. Lay in the middle of the dish, with a chicken
on each side, and pour over them drawn butter, based upon a cupful
of the liquor in which the chickens were boiled, mixed with a little
minced parsley. Save the rest of the liquor.


BREADED EGG-PLANT.

Slice, and pare each slice. Lay in salt and water one hour, with a
plate on top, to keep the slices under water. Wipe dry; salt and
pepper; dip in beaten egg, then in cracker-dust, and fry to a fine
brown in lard or dripping. Drain, and serve.


BOILED CAULIFLOWER.

Cook in boiling salted water twenty-five minutes, having tied the
cauliflower up in white netting. Drain; untie; lay in a deep dish, the
blossom upward, and deluge with a white sauce made of drawn butter,
with the juice of a lemon squeezed in.


LIMA BEANS.

See Thursday, First Week in September.


FROZEN CUSTARD AND CAKE.

Please refer to Sunday, Second Week in July.



  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Chicken and Corn Soup.
  Casserole of Rice, Chicken, and Tongue.     Onions Stewed Brown.
  Baked Sweet Potatoes.      Cold Slaw.
  ——
  Corn-starch Hasty Pudding.
  Tea and Fancy Crackers.
  ——


CHICKEN AND CORN SOUP.

Skim the liquor in which the chickens were boiled yesterday. Put over
the fire, with the grated corn from twelve ears. Boil one hour; rub
through a colander; season, heat, and stir in a tablespoonful of butter
rolled in flour, a little finely cut parsley, and a teaspoonful essence
of celery. Simmer five minutes; add a cup of boiling milk, and pour out.


CASSEROLE OF RICE, WITH CHICKENS AND TONGUE.

Chop the remains of yesterday’s chickens and tongue fine, with the
giblets. Season, and put over the fire, with a cup of yesterday’s soup,
and, when almost on the boil, add two beaten eggs. Boil a cup of rice
in a little of the chicken-liquor used for your soup, until the rice
is soft, and the liquor absorbed. Beat two eggs into half a cup of
milk, in which a tablespoonful of butter has been melted. Stir and beat
this into the rice. Let it get cold, and then line a greased mould with
it—one with a cylinder in the middle will not do. Make the walls of
rice-paste an inch thick; then fill with the mince, which should not
be too soft. Cover with the rice; put the top on the mould; set in a
pot of boiling water, and cook one hour and a half. Turn out with great
care, and pour a little of the pot-liquor, thickened and seasoned, over
it.


ONIONS STEWED BROWN.

Top and tail them; skin, and dredge them with flour. Then fry to a good
brown in dripping. Put into a pot, cover with a little of the liquor
in which the tongue was boiled, and stew slowly two hours, or until
tender. Take up the onions; thicken the sauce with browned flour, add a
tablespoonful of butter, with pepper; boil up, and pour over the onions.


BAKED SWEET POTATOES.

Wash, wipe, and lay in a moderate oven. Bake until the largest is soft
between your testing fingers. Wipe off, and serve in their jackets.


COLD SLAW.

Shred the heart of a firm white cabbage. Put into a salad-bowl, and
season with sugar, salt, pepper, oil, and vinegar. Stir up and toss
thoroughly.


CORN-STARCH HASTY PUDDING.

1 quart fresh milk; 3 tablespoonfuls corn-starch, wet up in cold milk;
1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 teaspoonful of salt.

Scald and salt the milk, and stir into it the corn-starch. Boil
steadily, stirring now and then, for fifteen minutes. Add the butter;
let the pudding stand in hot water, uncovered, after you have ceased to
stir, until you are ready for it; then serve in an open, deep dish. Eat
with cream and sugar.


TEA AND FANCY BISCUITS.

If the weather be hot, have iced tea; if cool, and suggestive of early
frosts, or equinoctial storms, introduce the bright tea-pot and pretty
“cozy.”



  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  St. Rémo Broth.
  Beefsteak.      Potatoes au Naturel.
  Kidney-Beans.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Fruit Dessert.
  Coffee and Cake.
  ——


ST. RÉMO BROTH.

3 lbs. of veal—lean and cut into strips; 2 onions, sliced and fried;
3 quarts of water; 1 tablespoonful of minced parsley; ½ cupful of raw
rice; 2 tablespoonfuls of grated cheese; salt and pepper.

Fry the onions in dripping; put in the meat, and fry to a light brown.
Put into the soup-pot with the water, and boil slowly three hours, or
until brought down to two quarts. The meat should be in rags. Strain;
cool, skim, and season. Put back into the kettle with the rice, which
must have soaked one hour in a little water. This water, also, must
go into the soup. Simmer half an hour. Put the grated cheese into the
tureen, and when the rice has boiled soft, pour upon the cheese, stir
up and serve.


BEEFSTEAK.

Flatten with the broad side of a hatchet, and broil quickly upon a
greased gridiron. Ten minutes should be enough if you like it rare. Lay
upon a hot dish, turn another over it, having salted, buttered, and
peppered it, and let it stand five minutes before sending to table.


POTATOES AU NATUREL.

Cook, without paring, in boiling salted water, until a fork will enter
easily the largest. Pour off the water; set the pot, uncovered, upon
the range for a moment, to dry off the moisture; peel rapidly, and dish.


KIDNEY-BEANS.

Shell; cook in boiling water, a little salt, half an hour, or until
tender. Drain, salt, pepper, and butter, and serve in a deep dish.


RAW TOMATOES.

Pare and slice. Put into a salad-dish, and pour over them a dressing
made of two tablespoonfuls of oil rubbed with one teaspoonful of sugar,
and half as much, each, of made mustard, salt, and pepper; then with
five tablespoonfuls of vinegar, whipped in, a little at a time.


FRUIT DESSERT.

Use your own discretion and consult your own convenience in devising a
tasteful and acceptable dessert of fruits, such as should now be plenty
and cheap. Late peaches, melons, bananas, pears, and apples, are, some
or all of them, within reach of housekeepers of moderate means. Arrange
in dishes or baskets decorated with green sprays and flowers.


COFFEE AND CAKE.

Consult, also, your discretion and the weather in the question of hot
or iced coffee.


  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Ox-Cheek Soup.
  Stewed Calf’s Hearts.      Lima Beans.
  Potatoes au Maître d’Hôtel.
  Stewed Tomatoes with Onion.
  ——
  Stewed Pears with Rice.
  ——


OX-CHEEK SOUP.

2 ox-cheeks; 3 onions; 2 carrots; 2 turnips; 12 whole black peppers; 6
cloves; salt; 5 quarts of water; ½ cup of German sago.

Break the bones of the cheeks, and wash well with salt and water.
Cover with cold water; bring to a boil, and throw off the water. Fry
the sliced onions, and put into the pot with the meat, also the sliced
carrots, onions, and spice. Cover with a gallon and a quart of water.
Bring to a slow boil, and keep this up, skimming often, for four hours.
Strain off the liquor; pick out the meat and bones; salt highly; put
into your stock-pot with nearly half the broth. Set in a cold place for
to-morrow. Pulp the vegetables into that meant for to-day; let it cool;
take off the fat, and put back over the fire. Season to your liking;
add the sago, which should have been soaking for two hours in a little
water, and simmer until it is clear.


STEWED CALF’S HEARTS.

Wash two fresh calf’s hearts; stuff with a force-meat of crumbs,
chopped salt pork, a little thyme, sage and onion. Tie up snugly in
clean mosquito-netting; put into a broad saucepan; half cover with
broth from your soup from yesterday or to-day. Cover and stew an hour
and three-quarters gently, turning several times. Take out the hearts,
and keep them hot, while you thicken the gravy with a tablespoonful
of butter cut up in flour. Boil up, add pepper, salt, a little grated
lemon-peel, and the juice of half a lemon, with a small glass of wine.
Pour over the hearts.


LIMA BEANS.

See Thursday, First Week in September.


POTATOES AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Slice cold boiled potatoes rather thick. Have ready in a saucepan four
or five tablespoonfuls of milk, a good lump of butter, with salt,
pepper and minced parsley. Heat quickly; put in the potatoes, and stir
until almost boiling. Stir in a little flour, wet with cold milk; cook
a moment to thicken it; add the juice of half a lemon, and pour out
into a deep dish.


STEWED TOMATOES AND ONION.

Peel, slice, and stew a dozen tomatoes ten minutes. Then add a small
parboiled onion, cut up small; cook twenty minutes; stir in sugar, salt
and pepper, with a good spoonful of butter rolled in flour. Simmer five
minutes, and pour out.


STEWED PEARS WITH RICE.

Pare and halve eight large pears. Put into a saucepan with eight
tablespoonfuls of sugar and a cup of claret—or if you prefer, clear
water. Stew slowly until tender and clear. Take out the pears and boil
down the syrup to one-half, flavoring, then, with essence of bitter
almond. Have ready two cupfuls of boiled rice, cooked in milk, and
sweetened. Spread upon a flat dish; lay the pears upon it, and pour on
the syrup. Eat very cold.



  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Rissole Soup.
  Lamb Chops.      Potato Mound.
  Fried Egg-Plant.      Ladies’ Cabbage.
  ——
  Damson Tart.
  ——


RISSOLE SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of your cold stock. Pick out some of the best
pieces of meat—about a cupful—and set aside. Add a pint of boiling
water to the stock, and boil slowly, with the bones and the rest of
the meat, for nearly an hour. Chop the meat reserved from the stock;
make into force-meat with fine crumbs, seasoning with onion, parsley,
pepper, salt, nutmeg, and binding with beaten egg. Flour your hands
and make this into round balls. Roll them in flour; set in a floured
pie-dish, not touching each other, and leave in a quick oven until
crusted over. Let them cool. Strain your soup; add such seasoning as
you desire; heat to a boil; drop in the force-meat rissoles, and heat,
without boiling, three minutes.


LAMB CHOPS.

Trim off fat and skin, leaving a bare bit of bone at the end of each.
Broil quickly over a clear fire; butter, salt, and pepper each, and
stand them on the larger ends, just touching each other, around your
mound of potato.


POTATO MOUND.

Mash smooth, with butter, milk, salt, and pepper; make into a smooth
mound upon a hot dish, and arrange the chops around it.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

See Sunday, First Week in September.


LADIES’ CABBAGE.

Boil a firm cabbage in two waters. When done, quarter it and let it
get perfectly cold. Chop fine; add two beaten eggs, a tablespoonful of
butter, pepper, salt, and three tablespoonfuls of milk. Stir all well;
pour into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake, covered, until very hot,
then brown. If your dish has been well buttered, turn the cabbage upon
a hot dish, and pour over it a cupful of drawn butter.


DAMSON TART.

Fill a pie-dish, lined with good paste, with ripe, sound damsons;
sweeten very plentifully; cover with crust and bake. Brush with beaten
egg when done, and return to the oven one moment, to glaze.


  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Potato Porridge.
  Devilled Crab.      Roasted Sweetbreads.
  Potato Croquettes.      Boiled Green Corn.
  ——
  Apple Soufflé Pudding.
  ——


POTATO PORRIDGE.

12 potatoes, peeled and sliced; 1 large onion, also pared and
sliced; 2 quarts of boiling water; 1 cup of hot milk; 3 beaten eggs;
3 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in flour; salt, pepper, and 1
teaspoonful celery essence; chopped parsley.

Fry potatoes and onions light brown in a little butter. Put into a
soup-pot with the boiling water, and cook gently until soft. Rub
through a colander to a smooth _purée_. Add the water in which they
were boiled, and return to the fire. When the _purée_ begins to
bubble, stir in the buttered flour, pepper, salt, and chopped parsley,
and simmer five minutes. Heat the milk in another vessel; pour upon
the beaten eggs; cook one minute, and pour into the tureen. Add the
_purée_; stir in the celery-essence, and it is ready.


DEVILLED CRABS.

Boil the crabs; cool; break the shells and pick out the meat. To eight
tablespoonfuls of meat, add three of fine crumbs, the yolks (chopped)
of three boiled eggs, the juice of a lemon, with salt and cayenne to
taste. Work up to a soft mixture with drawn butter; fill scallop or
clam shells, or paté-pans with it, sift cracker-dust over the top, and
brown delicately in a quick oven.


ROASTED SWEETBREADS.

3 fine sweetbreads; 1 cup of gravy—a cup of your soup will do; 1 beaten
egg; cracker-dust; 1 tablespoonful mushroom catsup; 1 small glass wine;
a very little minced onion put into the gravy; 2 tablespoonfuls melted
butter; fried bread.

Boil and blanch the sweetbreads. Wipe perfectly dry, roll in egg, then
in the pounded cracker. Lay in a baking-pan; pour the melted butter
slowly over them, that it may soak into the crumbs. Set in the oven,
cover, and bake forty-five minutes, basting freely, from the time they
begin to brown, with the gravy. Dish upon crustless slices of fried
bread. Strain the gravy; add catsup and wine; boil up, and pour over
the sweetbreads.


POTATO CROQUETTES.

Mash the potatoes, and beat in a raw egg, butter, milk, nutmeg, a
little grated lemon-peel, with pepper and salt. Heat in a saucepan,
stirring constantly, for three minutes. The saucepan should be buttered
first. When cool enough to handle with comfort, make into croquettes,
roll in flour, or dip in egg and cracker-crumbs, and fry—not putting
too many into the pan at once—in boiling lard, or dripping. Drain in a
hot colander, and serve.


BOILED GREEN CORN.

See Sunday, First Week in September.


APPLE SOUFFLÉ PUDDING.

7 or 8 juicy apples; 4 eggs; 1 cup fine crumbs; 1 cup of sugar; 2
tablespoonfuls of butter; nutmeg, and a little grated lemon-peel.

Pare, core, and slice the apples, and cook tender in a covered
farina-kettle without adding water to them. Beat to a smooth pulp, and
stir in butter, sugar, and seasoning. When cold, whip in the yolks of
the eggs; then the frothed whites, alternately with the crumbs. Beat to
a creamy batter; put into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake, covered,
fifty minutes. Then brown quickly. Eat hot with custard sauce, or cold,
with cream and sugar.


  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Rule of Three Soup.
  Veal and Ham Cutlets à la Polonaise.      Stewed Potatoes.
  Cream Squash.      Scalloped Tomatoes.
  ——
  Bavarian Cream.
  ——


RULE OF THREE SOUP.

3 lbs. of lean beef; 3 lbs. of marrow bones; 3 lbs. coarse mutton; 3
onions; 3 carrots; 3 turnips; 3 sprigs of parsley, and same of thyme
and marjoram; 6 quarts of water; 3 blades of mace; 3 tomatoes; 3 ears
of corn; 3 tablespoonfuls of rice; pepper and salt.

Chop the vegetables; cut up the meat and crack the bones. Put onions,
carrots, turnips, herbs and mace into the soup-pot; cover with three
quarts of water; stew gently three hours; strain off the broth into a
bowl; pour the remaining three quarts of water, boiling hot, upon the
meat, bones, and vegetables in the pot, and put back over the fire.
Cool that which you have strained; take off the fat, and put on in
another kettle, with the tomatoes, the corn cut from the cob, and the
rice. Season, and cook gently for another hour, then pour out.

Boil the soup left in the pot, three hours longer at the back of
the range; add boiling water as the liquid shrinks. At the end of
that time, season well; pour, without straining, into the stock-pot,
and keep in a cold place. You have now stock for three days—a good
investment of time, materials, and labor.


VEAL AND HAM CUTLETS, À LA POLONAISE.

Slice cutlets of veal, of equal size, with as many slices of corned
ham, previously cooked. Flatten the cutlets with a hatchet; dip in
beaten egg, then in cracker-dust, mixed with minced parsley, pepper,
salt, and nutmeg. Fry in dripping; drain, and lay upon a dish, with
alternate slices of the ham, broiled, and spread with a dressing of
butter and a little French mustard.


STEWED POTATOES.

Pare, and cut the potatoes into dice. Stew, with a small onion, in
enough hot water to cover them. Turn off most of the water; take out
the onion; pour in a cup of cold milk, and, when this boils, stir in
a little chopped parsley, pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful of butter
rolled in flour. Boil up once, and serve.


CREAM SQUASH.

Mash, and press in a hot colander. Return to the fire, with a good
spoonful of butter, three or four spoonfuls of milk, and a quarter
spoonful of flour, wet up in the milk. Stir for five minutes; season
with pepper and salt, and dish.


SCALLOPED TOMATOES.

Pare and slice. Scatter fine crumbs in the bottom of a bake-dish; cover
with slices of tomatoes, seasoned with sugar, pepper, salt, and butter.
Cover with crumbs, and these with tomatoes. Fill the dish in this
order, covering all with crumbs, with bits of butter sprinkled upon
them. Bake, covered, half an hour, and brown.


BAVARIAN CREAM.

1 pint rich milk, and the same of sweet cream; yolks of 4 eggs; ½ oz.
gelatine; 1 small cup of sugar; 2 teaspoonfuls vanilla or other extract.

Soak the gelatine two hours in enough cold water to cover it. Heat the
milk, and stir in the gelatine until melted. Pour this upon the beaten
yolks and sugar, and heat until it begins to thicken. It should not
boil. Take from the fire, flavor, and let it cool somewhat. The cream
should have been whipped stiff in a syllabub-churn. Beat, a spoonful at
a time, into the lukewarm custard, until it is like sponge-cake batter.
Pour into a wet mould, and set on ice to form. It will be formed in a
few hours, if buried in the ice.


  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Fancy Macaroni Soup.
  Fricasseed Chicken.      Spinach à la Crême.
  Devilled Tomatoes.      Sweet Potatoes, Browned.
  ——
  Baked Pears and Cream.
  Orange Cake.
  ——


FANCY MACARONI SOUP.

Take the fat from your soup-stock, add a pint of boiling water, and
bring to a slow boil. Strain all through a colander. Pour off two
quarts, through a soup-sieve, into your soup-kettle, and set over the
fire to simmer clear. Pulp the vegetables left in the colander, and
press the juice out of the meat into the rest of the broth. Remand this
to the stock-pot. When that in the soup-kettle has boiled ten minutes,
and been skimmed carefully, add a half cup of what is known as “fancy
macaroni,” cut into fantastic shapes, expressly for soups. It should
have been boiled twenty minutes, or until tender, in hot salted water.
Simmer one minute in the soup; add seasoning, if needed, and serve.


FRICASSEED CHICKENS.

Clean, wash, and joint a pair of chickens. (Salt the giblets slightly,
and keep on ice until Monday; or, should the weather be warm, boil
them in a pint of water; salt it well, and set away with the giblets
in it.) Scald the pieces of chicken in boiling water, leaving them in
it four minutes. Lay in ice-water ten minutes, to blanch them. Add to
the quart of boiling water used for scalding them, the skimmed fat, the
necks, and the heads, cleaned by scalding, picking off the feathers and
cutting off the beaks. Stew for one hour, or until there is but a pint
of gravy. Strain, cool, and take off the fat. Put two tablespoonfuls
of butter into a saucepan, with a very finely minced onion and a
dessertspoonful of flour. When they begin to simmer, put in the joints
of chicken; turn several times in the butter, and, after they begin to
color, add enough gravy to keep them from scorching, and stew, covered,
at least an hour. Keep the chicken hot; strain the gravy; add parsley,
pepper, and salt. Have in another saucepan a half cup of hot milk. Pour
upon two beaten eggs, make very hot, and add to the gravy when you have
taken the latter from the fire. Stir up, and pour over the chickens.


SPINACH À LA CRÊME.

Boil in plenty of hot salted water; drain, and chop fine upon a board
or in a wooden tray. Return to the saucepan with a tablespoonful of
butter, and when hot, add a little sugar, pepper, salt, nutmeg, and two
tablespoonfuls of cream. Stir until very hot, and serve in a deep dish,
with sippets of fried bread laid over it.


DEVILLED TOMATOES.

1 quart fine ripe tomatoes, pared and cut in thick slices; yolks of 3
boiled eggs, pounded; 3 tablespoonfuls melted butter; 4 tablespoonfuls
vinegar; 1 raw egg, beaten light; 1 teaspoonful powdered sugar; 1
saltspoonful salt, and same of made mustard; a _soupçon_ of cayenne.

Rub a tablespoonful of butter into the pounded yolks; add the
seasoning, then the vinegar, and put into a tin or porcelain saucepan.
Heat, and stir in the beaten egg. Set in boiling water while you heat
the rest of the butter in a frying-pan, and put in the sliced tomatoes.
Shake over the fire eight minutes, turning several times. Lay the
tomatoes upon a hot dish. Strain the butter in which they were fried
into the dressing, stir well, and pour over the tomatoes.


SWEET POTATOES—BROWNED.

Parboil, peel, and lay in a baking-pan. Baste with a little of your
soup stock, then with butter, until they are baked to a nice brown.


BAKED PEARS AND CREAM.

Peel ripe pears, and cut them in half, without removing the seeds. Pack
in layers in a stoneware jar. Strew each layer with sugar, and drop a
pinch of nutmeg in, now and then. Put a small cupful of water in the
bottom to prevent burning. Fit on a close cover, and set in a moderate
oven. Bake three hours on Saturday, and leave, unopened, in the oven
all night. Set upon ice for some hours before you use them. Pour into a
glass dish, and eat with cream. They are delicious if the pears are of
fair quality.


ORANGE CAKE.

Please see “BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON, AND TEA,” page 318.



  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Giblet Soup.
  Brown Beef Stew.      Mashed Potatoes.
  Lima Beans.      Cucumbers and Onion Salad.
  ——
  Bananas, Oranges, and Apples.
  Coffee and Albert Biscuit.
  ——


GIBLET SOUP.

Again skim the contents of your stock-pot. Pour into the soup-kettle
with the water in which the giblets were boiled. Add seasoning at
discretion, and simmer, after the boil is reached, fifteen minutes.
Chop the gizzards very fine, and put into the soup. Pound the livers
to a paste, with a heaping tablespoonful of butter, and half as much
flour; thin with a little of the boiling soup; stir into the soup; boil
one minute, and serve.


BROWN BEEF STEW.

3 lbs. lean beef; 1 onion; a tablespoonful of powdered marjoram; thyme
and parsley, mixed; 1 tablespoonful of browned flour; 1 teaspoonful
of Worcestershire sauce; 1 tablespoonful of tomato catsup; 1 glass of
wine; juice of half a lemon, and a pinch of the peel; 1 cup of chopped
mushrooms; dice of fried bread.

Cut the beef into strips two inches long; add the minced onion; just
cover with water, and cook, at the back of the range, two hours. Add
the rest of the ingredients, with the exception of the flour, catsup,
sauce, lemon-juice, and wine, and let it simmer one hour longer. Then
add the condiments just named, and the flour. Boil up; line a deep dish
with small squares of fried bread, and pour the stew upon them.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and send up without browning.


LIMA BEANS.

See Thursday, First Week in September.


CUCUMBER AND ONION SALAD.

See Monday, First Week in September.


BANANAS, ORANGES, AND APPLES.

Rub clean; arrange effectively as to color and size, put green leaves
among them, and give a doily, clean plate, and fruit-knife to each
person.


COFFEE AND ALBERT BISCUIT.

Have the coffee hot and strong, and be sure the biscuits are fresh.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Quick Lobster Soup.
  Roast Lamb.      Baked Squash.
  Green Corn cut from the Cob.      Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Rock-work.
  ——


QUICK LOBSTER SOUP.

1 quart of stock, made by adding a little water to the strained remnant
of yesterday’s soup. Or, if you have nothing of this sort, make a
broth of coarse bits of veal and any bones you may have; 1 can of
preserved lobster; 1 cup of milk, with a pinch of soda stirred in; 2
tablespoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour; yolks of 2 eggs; minced
parsley, cayenne, and salt.

Heat your broth; skim and season. Put in the lobster, picked to pieces;
simmer ten minutes, then boil up sharply, once. Heat the milk in a
saucepan; stir in the floured butter; pour upon the beaten yolks. Cook
one minute. Pour the lobster into the tureen; stir in the thickened
milk, and send to table. Pass oyster crackers and butter with it.


ROAST LAMB.

Lay in the dripping-pan. Dash boiling water over it, and cook fifteen
minutes for each pound. Baste often with the gravy. Ten minutes before
taking it up, dredge with flour, and baste with butter. Pour the fat
from the top of the gravy; thicken with browned flour, and stir in a
tablespoonful of currant jelly. Boil, and send up in a boat—salting and
peppering to taste.


BAKED SQUASH.

Boil, drain, and mash in a hot colander. Season with pepper, salt, and
butter; add a few spoonfuls of milk and two beaten eggs. Pour into a
buttered dish, and bake to a light brown in a quick oven.


GREEN CORN CUT FROM THE COB.

Boil the corn until tender. Split each row of grains, then shave them
close to the cob. Butter, pepper, and salt, and serve hot in a deep
dish.


SWEET POTATOES.

Boil with the skins on; peel quickly, and lay in a baking-pan, within a
hot oven, a few minutes, to dry, before piling them upon a flat dish.


ROCK-WORK.

1 quart of milk; 5 eggs; 6 tablespoonfuls of sugar; vanilla, or other
essence.

Heat the milk: pour upon the beaten yolks and sugar. Cook until the
custard begins to thicken. Pour out, and, when cold, flavor, and pour
into a glass bowl. Whip the whites stiff with two spoonfuls of the
sugar, flavor, and poach by laying, a spoonful at a time, upon boiling
milk, and, carefully withdrawing the spoon from underneath, leaving the
oval mass of _méringue_ floating upon the surface. Turn it over when
one side is done, and, presently, take it up, and lay upon the custard.
Heap them irregularly on the top, and let all get cold before serving.
Pass light cakes with this custard.



  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Julienne Soup.
  Cold Lamb.      Tomato Sauce.
  Eggs and Mushrooms.      Breaded Egg-plant.
  ——
  Potato Fritters.
  ——


JULIENNE SOUP.

4 lbs. of beef; 2 carrots; 3 turnips; ½ head of cabbage; 1 pint green
corn; 1 quart tomatoes; bunch of herbs; 4 quarts of water; pepper and
salt.

Put on the beef, herbs, and water early in the morning, with some
well-cracked bones, if you have them, and let it boil at the back of
the range, very slowly, for five or six hours. Should the water sink
below two-thirds of the original quantity, replenish from the boiling
tea-kettle. An hour before dinner, strain the soup; put meat and bones
into the stock-pot, and season well. Pour upon them all that you can
spare from the liquor, and leave enough for to-day. Set this in a cool
place. Cool, and remove the fat from that meant for to-day; return
to the soup-kettle, and put in the vegetables, cut into shreds, and
parboiled for ten minutes. The cabbage should have been cooked in two
waters. The corn must be cut from the cob, and the tomatoes pared and
sliced. Simmer gently half an hour; season; cook one minute, and pour
out.


COLD LAMB.

Trim the remains of your roast into a presentable shape; garnish with
parsley and nasturtium-blooms.


TOMATO SAUCE.

Pare, slice, and stew the tomatoes for twenty minutes. Strain, and rub
through a colander, leaving the hard and tough parts behind. Put into a
saucepan with a little minced onion, parsley, pepper, salt, and sugar.
Bring to a boil; stir in a good spoonful of butter rolled in flour.
Boil up, and serve.


EGGS AND MUSHROOMS.

Slice the rest of the can of mushrooms, opened for Monday’s stew, into
halves. Stew ten minutes in a little butter, seasoned with pepper
and salt, and a very little water. Drain; put the mushrooms into a
pie-dish; break enough eggs to cover them over the top; pepper, salt,
and scatter bits of butter over them; strew with bread-crumbs, and bake
until the eggs are “set.” Serve in the dish.


BREADED EGG-PLANT.

Slice nearly half an inch thick; pare each slice and lay in salt and
water one hour. Wipe dry, dip in beaten egg, then in rolled cracker,
and fry to a fine brown in salted lard or dripping.


POTATO FRITTERS.

6 tablespoonfuls mashed potato rubbed through a colander; ½ cup rich
milk, or cream; 5 eggs, beaten light; 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; 2
tablespoonfuls prepared flour; juice of 1 lemon, and half the grated
peel; ½ grated nutmeg.

Work the cream into the potato; add beaten yolks and sugar, and whip to
a froth. Put in lemon, flour, nutmeg, and beat three minutes before
stirring in the whites. Drop, by the spoonful, into hot sweet lard, and
fry to a light brown. Drain upon clean, heated paper, sift white sugar
thickly over them and serve at once. Eat if you like with wine sauce,
or with powdered sugar only.



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Bread-and-Meat Soup.
  Braised Breast of Veal.      Cauliflower with Sauce.
  Stewed Squash.      Fried Potatoes.
  ——
  Boiled Apple Dumplings.
  ——


BREAD-AND-MEAT SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of your cold stock. Add a pint of boiling
water to it, with a sliced onion, and cook slowly, with the meat in,
for forty minutes. Strain, pressing all the strength out of the meat;
stir in a tablespoonful of catsup, and as much browned flour wet up in
cold water. Have ready a sweetbread, boiled and blanched, then cut into
neat dice. Put these into the soup, and boil one minute; add a great
handful of fried bread, cut into dice, and pour out. If you have any
soup left from your “Julienne,” heat, strain, and add to this.


BRAISED BREAST OF VEAL.

Make a deep incision between the ribs and meat: stuff with a good
force-meat made of crumbs, chopped salt pork, seasoning and a little
onion. Skewer the flap of meat back into its place; put a layer of
thin fat salt pork into a broad saucepan; lay the veal upon it. Pour
in a cup of gravy—from the soup, if you have no other—cover with more
fat pork, or ham, put on a close lid, and cook fifteen minutes to
the pound. Take out the meat; set in a very quick oven, dredge with
flour, and, as it browns, baste well with butter once. Keep hot upon a
dish, while you strain the gravy in the braising-pan; thicken it with
browned flour, season to taste, and stir in the juice of half a lemon,
and a glass of claret. Boil up and pour a little upon the veal, the
rest into a boat.


CAULIFLOWER WITH SAUCE.

See Sunday, Third Week in September.


STEWED SQUASH.

Pare, seed and quarter. Cook in boiling water salted, until soft. Mash
in a colander; rub through it, and put back into a saucepan, with a
tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour; a few teaspoonfuls of milk,
pepper and salt to taste. Stir until it begins to bubble; then pour
into a deep dish.


FRIED POTATOES.

Pare, slice thin, and lay in ice-water half an hour. Dry between two
towels, and fry to a pale brown in hot lard, a little salt. Drain by
shaking in a colander, and serve in a dish lined with a napkin.


BOILED APPLE DUMPLINGS.

1 quart prepared flour; ¼ lb. suet, powdered; 1 teaspoonful salt; cold
water to make a pretty stiff paste; fine juicy apples, pared and cored.

Make the paste; roll into a sheet a quarter of an inch thick; cut
into squares; put in the centre of each an apple; bring the corners
together, and pinch the edges. Have ready some small square cloths,
dipped in hot water, and floured on the inside. Enclose each dumpling
in one of these, leaving room to swell, and tie it up, bag-wise, with
a stout string. Boil one hour; turn out and serve with plenty of sweet
sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Onion Soup Maigre.
  Baked Blue Fish.      Imitation Oyster Scallops.
  Potato Puff à la Genève.      Raw Cucumbers.
  ——
  Cream Cakes.
  ——


ONION SOUP MAIGRE.

3 _large_ onions, sliced; 3 boiled potatoes rubbed through a colander;
3 tablespoonfuls of rice boiled in 1 quart of milk; 2 quarts of cold
water; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in one of flour; chopped
parsley; pepper and salt to taste.

Parboil the onions ten minutes; throw off the water and let them
cool. Then slice, and put over the fire with the cold water, and boil
down to three pints. The onions should be reduced to a pulp. Strain;
rub through the colander, and set over the fire. When it boils, add
the mashed potatoes, the butter, seasoning, parsley, and simmer ten
minutes. Have the rice boiled soft in the milk with a pinch of soda;
strain it out and add to the soup in the kettle. Cook gently five
minutes, and turn into the tureen. Pour in the boiling milk, and it is
ready.


BAKED BLUE FISH.

Score the fish down the back, and lay in a dripping-pan. Pour over it
a cup of hot water in which have been melted two tablespoonfuls of
butter. Bake one hour, basting every ten minutes; twice with butter,
twice with the gravy, and again twice with butter. Take up the fish
and keep hot, while you strain the gravy into a saucepan; thicken
with flour; add a teaspoonful of anchovy paste, the juice of half a
lemon with a little of the grated peel, pepper and salt. Boil up, pour
half over the fish, the rest into a boat. Garnish the fish with eggs,
quartered lengthwise, lettuce hearts, and quartered lemons.


IMITATION OYSTER SCALLOPS.

Cut the best pieces from your cold roast veal, in squares about an inch
long and half as thick and wide. Make a cup of rich drawn butter, and
put these into it. Set over the fire in a saucepan, and add a _very_
little minced onion and parsley. Heat for ten minutes, but do not boil.
Chop a pickled cucumber quite fine, stir into the mixture, season with
salt and cayenne; fill scallop, or clam shells, or _paté_-pans lined
with baked paste, with the scallop; cover with fine crumbs, and brown
in a brisk oven.


POTATO PUFF À LA GENÈVE.

Whip mashed potatoes light and soft with milk, butter, and two raw
eggs; season with pepper and salt, and beat in a few spoonfuls of
powdered cheese. Pile upon a neat bake-dish, and brown nicely. Serve in
the dish.


RAW CUCUMBERS.

See Friday, Second Week in September.


CREAM CAKES.

Some good puff-paste; whites of 2 eggs; ½ cup of sweet jelly; 1 cup of
cream, whipped to a froth; 3 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar; vanilla, or
other flavoring.

Roll out the paste as for pies. Cut into squares five inches across.
Have ready well-greased muffin-rings, three inches in diameter. Lay one
in the centre of each square; turn up the four corners so as to make
a cup of the paste; pinch the tips upon the upper edge of the ring to
keep it in place, and having prepared all, bake in a quick oven. When
done, pull out the rings with care; brush the paste, outside and in,
with the white of egg, and set back to brown. When cold, wash on the
inside with the jelly, and fill with the whipped cream, sweetened and
flavored.


  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Vegetable Soup à la Crécy.
  Glazed Ham.      Lettuce Salad.
  Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.      Cabbage au Gratin.
  ——
  Peach Pudding.
  ——


VEGETABLE SOUP À LA CRÉCY.

2 lbs. of coarse, lean beef, cut into strips; 2 lbs. of knuckle of
veal, chopped to pieces; 2 lbs. of mutton bones, and the bones left
from your cold veal, cracked to splinters; 1 lb. of lean ham; 4 large
carrots; 2 turnips; 2 onions; bunch of herbs; 3 tablespoonfuls of
butter, and 2 of flour; 1 tablespoonful of sugar; salt and pepper; 7
quarts of water.

Put on meat, bones, herbs and water, and cook slowly five hours. Strain
the soup, of which there should be five quarts. Season meat and bones,
and put into the stock-pot with three quarts of the liquor. Save this
for days to come. While the soup for to-day is cooling that you may
take off the fat, put the butter into a frying-pan with the sliced
carrots, turnips, and onions, and fry to a light brown. Now, add a
pint of the skimmed stock, and stew the vegetables tender; stir in the
flour wet with water; and put all, with your cooled stock, over the
fire in the soup-kettle. Season with sugar, cayenne and salt; boil five
minutes; rub through a colander, then a soup-sieve, heat almost to
boiling, and serve.


GLAZED HAM.

Soak and boil a ham twenty minutes to the pound, and let it get almost
cold in the water. Skin it neatly, and coat with a paste made of a
cup of cracker-crumbs, one of milk, two beaten eggs, and seasoned
with pepper. Set the ham in the oven until the glazing is browned,
moistening, now and then, with a few spoonfuls of cream. Wind frilled
paper about the shank, and garnish with parsley.


LETTUCE SALAD.

Pull out and tear to pieces the hearts of lettuce; pile in a
salad-bowl; sprinkle with white sugar, and season with oil, pepper,
salt, and vinegar, in the proportions so often given. Toss up with a
silver fork.


POTATOES À LA LYONNAISE.

See Saturday, First Week in September.


CABBAGE AU GRATIN.

Quarter a small white cabbage, and boil tender in pot-liquor taken from
your ham. Let it get cold; chop and season with pepper, salt, a good
spoonful of butter, three or four of milk, and beat smooth with two raw
eggs. Put into a buttered dish; strew thickly with crumbs; wet these
with pot-liquor, and bake, covered, forty-five minutes,—then brown.


PEACH PUDDING.

12 ripe peaches, pared, stoned, and stewed in a little water; 1 cup
bread-crumbs; 2 cups of boiling milk; 5 tablespoonfuls of sugar; 5
beaten eggs; tablespoonful of butter.

Soak the crumbs in the hot milk; stir in the butter, the beaten eggs
and sugar, at last the cooled and mashed peaches. Beat up light; put
into a buttered pudding-mould; set in a pan of boiling water; cover,
and cook one hour in a good oven. Turn out, and eat with sweetened
cream.



OCTOBER.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Tapioca Soup.
  Fricassee of Ducks.      Tomatoes in a Mould.
  Sweet Potatoes.      Potato Rissoles.
  ——
  Ruby’s Pudding.
  ——


TAPIOCA SOUP.

Remove the fat from your soup-stock; pour off two quarts; heat, and
strain through coarse muslin back into the pot. Stir in half a cup of
soaked tapioca—the fine-grained—simmer until clear; add half a glass of
brown sherry, and serve.


FRICASSEE OF DUCKS.

Clean, wash, and cut the ducks into four pieces each. Flour, and fry
them to a light brown. Drain; put into a saucepan, with a cup of gravy
(a little of your soup-stock will do), a glass of claret, some chopped
parsley, a small onion, minced, salt and pepper. Cover closely, and
stew half an hour, or until the ducks are tender. Take them out;
strain, and set the gravy in cold water to throw up the fat. Take it
off; thicken with browned flour wet with water; boil up, and, having
laid the ducks upon a flat dish, pour the gravy over them. This is a
very fine fricassee.


TOMATOES IN A MOULD.

Peel and slice eight tomatoes. Put them in a coarse cloth, and press
out most of the juice into a bowl. Save this carefully. Chop the
tomatoes; mix in two tablespoonfuls of fine crumbs, pepper, salt,
sugar, and a tablespoonful of melted butter. Stir up well, and put into
a buttered mould. Fit on the top, and set in a pot of boiling water.
Keep at a fast boil for one hour. When done, turn out upon a flat
dish, and pour over them this sauce: Heat the tomato-juice; stir in a
tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour, season with pepper, sugar, and
salt; boil one minute.


SWEET POTATOES.

See Tuesday, Fourth Week in September.


POTATO RISSOLES.

Mash the potatoes fine, and whip with a fork, adding pepper, butter,
and milk, lastly, a beaten egg. Have ready one-third as much chopped
ham as you have potato; mix all together; make into round balls a
little larger than an English walnut; dip in egg, then in cracker-dust,
and fry quickly in plenty of good dripping. Drain upon paper, and serve
hot.


RUBY’S PUDDING.

Some good puff-paste; ¼ lb. of stale sponge-cakes, pounded; 1 cup of
milk; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 teaspoonful corn-starch wet in milk;
yolks of 2 eggs; 1 heaping spoonful of sugar; a little nutmeg; whites
of 3 eggs; strawberry, or other sweet jam.

Line a pie-dish with the paste. Put a layer of jam at the bottom, then
one, half an inch thick, of the pounded cakes. Heat the milk; stir in
the butter and corn-starch; boil one minute. When cold, whip in the
yolks and sugar, with nutmeg, and beat light. Fill the dish with this
mixture, and bake about half an hour. Then cover with a _méringue_ made
of the three whites, a little sugar, and the juice of half a lemon.
Spread quickly, and shut the oven-door until it has “set” well. Do this
on Saturday, and you will have a delightful Sunday pudding. It is also
good warm.


  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Curry Soup.
  Breaded Mutton Chops, Baked.      Spinach.
  Whipped Potatoes.      Boiled Rice, with Sauce.
  ——
  Apple Charlotte.
  Coffee.
  ——


CURRY SOUP.

Add a pint of boiling water to your soup-stock, and cook, with the meat
in, half an hour, at the back of the range. Strain, squeezing the meat
to a tasteless mass in a coarse cloth. Return the soup to the fire,
stir in a cup of rice, boiled as I shall presently direct, and season
to taste. Finally, put in a teaspoonful of curry-powder, wet up with
water, and bring to a boil; then pour out. If you do not like curry,
you will find the soup very good without it.


BREADED MUTTON CHOPS—BAKED.

Trim off fat and skin; dip in egg, then in rolled cracker, mixed with
pepper, salt, nutmeg, and powdered parsley. Lay upon a dripping-pan.
Pour over each a teaspoonful of melted butter, and set in the oven.
When they begin to hiss, baste with hot water, in which has been boiled
a little onion, mixed with butter. If the oven be good, half an hour
should be enough for them. They should be tender, juicy, and brown.
Baste six or seven times. Strain the gravy, and thicken with browned
flour. Add a little lemon-juice and tomato catsup, and send up in a
boat. Lay the chops around your spinach.


SPINACH.

Boil twenty minutes in plenty of boiling salt water. Drain, and chop
very fine. Return to the saucepan, with a little sugar, pepper, salt,
and a tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour. Stir until hot, and dry
enough to be moulded. Turn out; shape into a flat-topped ridge upon a
hot dish, and lay the chops at the base.


WHIPPED POTATOES.

Whip boiled potatoes to creamy lightness with a fork; beat in butter,
milk, pepper, and salt; at last, the frothed white of an egg. Toss
irregularly upon a dish; set in the oven two minutes, to re-heat, but
do not let it color.


BOILED RICE, WITH SAUCE.

Dilute what gravy you have left from your duck fricassee with water,
or make a weak broth of the duck bones, boiled with a little lean ham
in a quart of water, until you have less than a pint left. Or, add hot
water to the remains of yesterday’s soup, and strain it. But get a
pint of weak gravy from _somewhere_, and, having soaked a cup of rice
in just enough water to cover it, for an hour, put it over the fire in
a farina-kettle, pour in the gravy, and cook until the rice is soft,
shaking up from the bottom, now and then, but never stirring. Take out
some for your soup. Heap the rest in a deep dish, and pour over it a
cup of drawn butter, in which have been stirred a beaten egg and two
tablespoonfuls of tomato sauce. N. B.—The gravy should be well seasoned.


APPLE CHARLOTTE.

Beat two cups of nice apple sauce, well sweetened and flavored, to
a high froth, with the whipped whites of three eggs. Make into a
mound in a glass dish, and cover with lady’s-fingers, or other small
sponge-cakes, fitted neatly together. Send around sugar and cream with
it.


COFFEE.

Pass, while you are still at table, or afterward, in the library or
sitting-room.


  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Barley Broth.
  Stewed Beef, with Macaroni.
  Mashed Turnips.      Kidney Beans.
  ——
  Southern Rice Pudding.
  ——


BARLEY BROTH.

2 lbs. of lean mutton, cut into strips; ½ lb. lean ham, or a cracked
ham-bone; 1 onion; 1 turnip; ½ cup of barley, soaked two hours in a
little tepid water; 3 quarts of cold water; pepper, salt, and chopped
parsley.

Cook meat, bones, and the sliced vegetables together in the water three
hours. Strain, cool, and skim the broth; season; put back over the
fire, with the barley, and stew gently half an hour.


STEWED BEEF.

Have a piece of beef cut from what is known as the “roll” of the
shin. It should weigh between three and four pounds. Put into a large
saucepan, with a minced onion, and cover completely with water, in
which pour a cup of your soup, so as to make a weak broth. Pepper and
salt the meat all over before it goes in. Cover, and cook very slowly
an hour and a half. Turn the beef, and cook as long again, making three
hours in all. It should have been so slowly cooked as to be tender as
butter, yet not broken at the edges. Dish, wash all over with melted
butter, and set in the oven three minutes. Then arrange the macaroni
about it.


MACARONI.

Boil half a pound of macaroni, broken into short pieces, in hot salted
water, ten minutes; drain, pepper and salt, and lay about the beef.
Cool and skim the gravy after taking out the beef; strain into a
saucepan, thicken with browned flour, add a little French mustard; boil
once, pour half over the beef, the rest into a boat.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Pare, quarter, and cook tender, in boiling salted water. Mash in a
colander, pressing hard. Stir in butter, pepper and salt, and turn into
a deep dish.


KIDNEY BEANS.

Shell; put on in boiling water with an inch or so of fat salt pork, and
cook tender. Drain well, salt, pepper, and butter.


SOUTHERN RICE PUDDING.

1 quart fresh, sweet milk; 1 cup of raw rice; 2 tablespoonfuls of
butter; 1 cup of sugar; 5 beaten eggs; 1 teaspoonful of grated
lemon-peel; a pinch of cinnamon and same of mace.

Soak the rice in the milk two hours. Heat in a farina-kettle until
the rice is soft. Cream butter and sugar; stir in the beaten eggs and
whip hard. When the rice is lukewarm, put all together, and bake in a
buttered mould about forty-five minutes. Eat warm with sauce, or cold
with sugar and cream.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Squirrel Soup.
  Fricassee of Calf’s Tongues.      Fried Egg-plant.
  Squash.      Stripped Potatoes, Stewed.
  ——
  Jelly Custards and Cake.
  ——


SQUIRREL SOUP.

Skin, clean, and cut into quarters a pair of fine gray squirrels. Fry
a large onion, sliced, in dripping; take it out, and fry the squirrels
in the same fat. Put them then into a soup-pot with the onion, a sliced
turnip, a sliced carrot, a slice—thick—of lean ham, some parsley, and
two blades of mace; add three quarts of water; cover closely and boil
gently three hours; take out the pieces of squirrel, and put away for a
breakfast dish. A tolerable fricassee can be made by warming it up in
drawn butter, then adding a beaten egg.

_Revenons à nos moutons_—in this case, our soup. Rub the vegetables
through the colander; cool, skim and season the broth. Heat again; add
a tablespoonful of butter cut up in flour, a tablespoonful of catsup,
the juice of half a lemon, a glass of claret, boil up and pour into the
tureen.


FRICASSEE OF CALF’S TONGUES.

Boil the tongues one hour. Pare, and cut into thick slices. Roll these
in flour, and fry in dripping five minutes. Put the tongues into a
saucepan; add sliced onion, thyme and parsley. Cover with a cupful of
your soup or other gravy. Simmer half an hour, covered tightly. Take up
the tongues and keep them warm; strain the gravy; thicken, put in four
or five _thin_ slices of lemon, from which the peel has been taken;
boil one minute, and pour over the fricassee.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

1 fine egg-plant; 2 eggs; ½ cup of milk; flour for thin batter, salt,
and fat for frying.

Slice, and pare each slice. Lay in salt and water one hour; dry between
two towels and dip each slice in a batter made of the materials above
given. Fry in hot fat to a good brown. Drain well.


SQUASH.

Pare, quarter, and cook soft in boiling salted water. Drain, mash
smooth in a heated colander, work in butter, pepper and salt, and serve
in a deep dish.


STRIPPED POTATOES, STEWED.

Pare, and cut into lengthwise strips; cover with boiling water, and
stew twenty minutes. Turn off nearly all the water; put in a cupful of
cold milk, with salt and pepper. When this boils, stir in a spoonful
of butter, rolled in flour, with a little chopped parsley. Cook two
minutes, and serve.


JELLY CUSTARDS AND CAKE.

1 quart of milk; 5 eggs; 1 cup of sugar; vanilla or other flavoring;
crab-apple and currant jelly.

Heat the milk; pour upon the beaten eggs and sugar. Heat and stir until
it begins to thicken. When cold, flavor; fill your custard-cups nearly
to the tops, and lay a slice of firm, bright jelly upon each—tart upon
some, sweet upon the rest. Eat with cake.



  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Marrow-bone Soup.
  Roast Chickens.      Lima Beans.
  Broiled Potatoes.      Raw Tomatoes.
  ——
  Squash Pie.
  ——


MARROW-BONE SOUP.

4 lbs. of marrow-bones, broken to pieces, and the marrow left in
(beef-bones are best, but others may be used); 1 lb. salt pork, or
ham-bones; 2 onions; 2 stalks of celery; 3 tomatoes; 4 parboiled
potatoes, sliced; bunch of herbs; pepper and salt; 5 quarts of water.

Put on the bones in the water, and cook slowly four hours, leaving
three quarts of water. Strain into a bowl; surround this with cold
water, to make the fat rise; take this off, and return the soup to
the fire, with the parboiled potatoes and the sliced onions—which
should have lain ten minutes in scalding water, to take off their
strong taste—the tomatoes, and herbs. Boil slowly until you can rub
the vegetables through a colander. Add them to the soup; season; heat
almost to the third boil, and pour out.


ROAST CHICKENS.

Draw, wash, and stuff a pair of full-grown chickens. Truss, and lay
in a dripping-pan. Dash a cup of boiling water over them, and roast
one hour, or until tender and brown. Baste very often—twice, after
they begin to brown, with butter. Sprinkle the giblets with salt, and
set away for to-morrow. Pour the gravy, after the chickens are taken
up, into a bowl, set in cold water, and take off the fat. Put into a
saucepan, thicken with browned flour; season; boil once, and serve in a
boat.


LIMA BEANS.

Shell; cook forty minutes in boiling salted water; drain, pepper, salt,
and butter, and serve in a vegetable-dish.


BROILED POTATOES.

Slice cold boiled potatoes lengthwise, and rather thick. Lay between
the wires of an oyster-broiler, and cook at a hot fire to a light brown
on both sides. Sprinkle with pepper and salt; lay a bit of butter upon
each, and eat hot.


RAW TOMATOES.

Pare, slice, and put into a salad-dish. Mix in a bowl a teaspoonful
of sugar, half as much, each, of made mustard, pepper, and salt; add,
gradually, two tablespoonfuls of salad-oil, and the yolk of an egg.
Beat to a cream, and whip in, a little at a time, five tablespoonfuls
of vinegar. Pour over the tomatoes, and set the salad upon ice until
needed.


SQUASH PIE.

1 pint of boiled, mashed, and strained squash; 2 cups of milk; 1 cup of
sugar; 4 eggs, beaten light; ½ teaspoonful of ginger, and 1 teaspoonful
mixed mace and cinnamon.

Beat all well together, and bake in open shells.


  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Cat-fish Soup.
  Scalloped Oysters.      Roulettes of Chicken.
  Beets.      Fried Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Amber Pudding.
  ——


CAT-FISH SOUP.

6 fresh-water cat-fish, in weight about half a pound each; 1 pint of
milk; 4 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 tablespoonful corn-starch, wet
with cold milk; 1 onion; 1 teaspoonful essence of celery, and same of
anchovy sauce; 2 tablespoonfuls chopped celery; 2 beaten eggs; 3 quarts
of cold water.

Cut up the fish, when you have skinned them and removed the heads. Put
into a pot, with the onion and water, and boil until the fish are in
rags. Strain, return to the pot, add the corn-starch, and, when this
has thickened, the butter, a teaspoonful at a time. Season with pepper,
salt, celery, and anchovy, and pour into the tureen. Have ready the hot
milk, mixed and cooked one minute with the beaten eggs and parsley.
Add this to the hot soup; stir well, and serve. Pass sliced lemon and
oyster crackers with it.


SCALLOPED OYSTERS.

3 pints of oysters; 1 cup of rolled cracker; 2 tablespoonfuls of
butter; pepper; salt; juice of a lemon. (Cayenne pepper is best for
this purpose.)

Butter a neat pudding-dish. Strain the oysters from their liquor;
spread upon a cloth; take up, one by one, and put on a drop or so of
lemon-juice; roll in cracker-dust, pepper, and salt, and lay in the
dish. When the bottom is covered, drop bits of butter here and there,
and proceed to put on another layer of crumbs and seasoned oysters.
Having filled your dish, strew cracker-dust over all; stick bits of
butter upon it, and wet well with a cup of oyster-liquor. Bake,
covered, half an hour, or until the juice bubbles up at the edges; then
brown upon the upper grating of the oven.


ROULETTES OF CHICKEN.

Cut off the meat from the skeletons of your roast chickens. Put on the
bones and stuffing in a quart of water, and stew down to one pint.
Meantime, chop the chicken meat fine; mix with one-fourth as much
fine crumbs, wet with yesterday’s gravy; add the gizzards, boiled
and minced, and the boiled livers pounded; season to taste; bind
all with beaten egg; make into balls, and dip into a batter made of
three-quarters of a cup of milk, two eggs, about one scant cup of
prepared flour, or just enough to make rather thin batter, salted to
taste. Fry, as you dip each roulette, in hot lard, or dripping; drain
off the fat, and pile them upon a dish. Cool, strain, and season the
gravy from the bones; thicken, should it need it; boil once, and serve
in a boat to go around with the roulettes. They are a nice _entrée_.


BEETS.

Cut off the tops and wash. Boil one hour in hot, salted water; scrape
and slice. Dish and pour over them a mixture of one tablespoonful of
melted butter heated, with one of vinegar, and seasoned with pepper and
salt.


FRIED SWEET POTATOES.

Boil, and let them get cold. Then, scrape off the skins; slice
lengthwise, and fry to a light brown in good dripping or salted lard.


AMBER PUDDING.

6 eggs beaten light; 1 cup of sugar, creamed with ½ cup of butter;
juice of a lemon, and half the grated peel; a good pinch of nutmeg;
puff paste.

Mix sugar, butter, eggs, together; put into a custard-kettle, set in
hot water, and stir until it thickens. Stir in lemon and nutmeg, and
let it get cold. Put a strip of paste around the edge of a pie-plate;
print it prettily; pour in the cold mixture, and bake in a steady, not
too hot oven. Eat cold.


  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Ox-tail Soup.
  Corned Beef.      Boiled Turnips.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Horseradish Sauce.
  ——
  Bubble Pudding.
  ——


OX-TAIL SOUP.

2 ox-tails; 3 lbs. lean beef; 4 carrots; 3 onions; thyme and parsley;
8 quarts of cold water; 4 tablespoonfuls of butter for frying; pepper,
salt, and browned flour.

Cut the tails into short pieces, and fry to a good brown. Take them
from the pan, and fry two sliced carrots and two sliced onions in
the same butter. Lay the meat, cut into strips, in the bottom of a
soup-pot; upon them the fried onions and carrots, upon these the
ox-tails. Grate the two whole carrots, and slice the whole onion; cover
the tails with them. Put in the herbs, and pour in the water. It is a
good plan to fry the tails, onions, and carrots overnight, as the soup
should have at least six hours’ boil. There should be six quarts of
soup. Strain it off. Put meat and tails into your stock-pot, season
well, and pour on four quarts of the soup. Keep in a cold place for
future use.

Rub the vegetables through the colander into the portion reserved for
to-day; cool and skim; put back over the fire; bring to a boil; season
and skim; then thicken with browned flour—about two tablespoonfuls—wet
up with cold water. Simmer five minutes and pour out.


CORNED BEEF.

Cook in plenty of cold water at the back of the range. Fast boiling
toughens meat. Boil eighteen or twenty minutes to the pound. Take out,
wipe quickly, and rub all over with butter. Send horseradish sauce
around with it. Save the pot-liquor.


BOILED TURNIPS.

Peel and quarter the turnips. Dip out a pint of pot-liquor from your
boiling beef; strain, heat, and skim it, and while boiling hot, put in
the turnips. Cook soft, but not to breaking; drain, and lay about the
beef in its dish, with parsley sprigs or cresses, as an edging.


MASHED POTATOES.

Whip light with a fork until dry and mealy; then beat in butter, milk,
and salt.


HORSERADISH SAUCE.

Heat and strain a cupful of the beef pot-liquor. Stir into it a
tablespoonful of butter, rolled in a teaspoonful of flour. When it
thickens, take from the fire and whip in the whisked white of an egg;
then two tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish, and the juice of a
lemon. Set in boiling water until wanted.


BUBBLE PUDDING.

1 quart of fresh milk; 5 eggs, well beaten; 3 tablespoonfuls of
corn-starch; 1 tablespoonful of sugar; nutmeg to taste; pinch of soda
in the milk.

Scald the milk; stir in the corn-starch; cook one minute, and pour
upon the beaten eggs and sugar. Season, whip up well; pour into a
round-bottomed mould, well buttered; fit on the top; set in a pot of
boiling water; boil three-quarters of an hour; turn out upon a dish,
and eat with wine sauce. It will almost certainly break in two on the
way to table, hence the name.



  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Clear Soup.
  Chickens and Mushrooms.      Squash au Gratin.
  Creamed Potatoes.      Breaded Egg-plant.
  ——
  Spanish Cream.
  ——


CLEAR SOUP.

Take the fat from your soup stock; dip out two quarts, or more, as you
may need, warm it over the fire with an onion, simmer and skim until
clear; strain; add two tablespoonfuls of sparkling gelatine soaked in
a very little water; put in, also, a teaspoonful of essence of celery,
the juice of a lemon, and a glass of good wine. Boil up once, take off
the film from the top, and pour out.


CHICKENS AND MUSHROOMS.

Clean and wash a pair of fine fowls, and stuff their bodies with
chopped mushrooms, in which a teaspoonful of onion has been mixed. Fill
the craws with the usual dressing of seasoned crumbs with the addition
of the pounded yolk of an egg. Lay the trussed chickens in a pot, and
pour over them a large cupful of your soup-stock diluted with as much
boiling water. Simmer until tender. Take up and keep the chickens
hot. Strain the gravy; season to taste, skim off the fat; stir in a
tablespoonful of flour wet with milk; boil and stir two minutes to
thicken; add half a cup of hot milk; stir in well, and pour some over
the chickens; the rest into a boat. Save the giblets for to-morrow.


SQUASH AU GRATIN.

Pare, quarter, and boil the squash; mash and press to get out the
water; beat in a good spoonful of butter with pepper, salt, and a
little cream. Pour into a bake-dish; strew with fine crumbs, and bake
in a quick oven until these are slightly browned.


CREAMED POTATOES.

Put into a saucepan two tablespoonfuls of butter, a little minced
parsley, salt and pepper to taste. Stir to hissing, add a small cup of
milk (with a pinch of soda), and, when hot, a teaspoonful of flour.
Stir until it boils; chop cold boiled potatoes, put into the cream, and
serve so soon as they begin to boil.


BREADED EGG-PLANT.

Slice, and pare the slices. Lay in strong salt water one hour; wipe
dry; dip in beaten egg, and roll in pounded cracker. Fry to a good
brown; drain well, and dish hot.


SPANISH CREAM.

½ box of gelatine; 1 quart of milk; yolks of 3 eggs; 1 small cup of
sugar; flavor with vanilla, or other essence.

Soak the gelatine one hour in the milk. Put into a farina-kettle, and
stir as it warms. When hot, pour over the beaten yolks and sugar; put
back into the kettle, and heat to scalding. Strain through tarlatan;
flavor and pour into a wet mould. Do this on Saturday, and set in a
cold place. Eat with cream, or without.



  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Vermicelli Soup.
  Mutton Chops.      Baked Sweet Potatoes.
  Tomato Sauce.      Savory Rice Pudding.
  ——
  Oranges, Bananas, and Pears.
  ——


VERMICELLI SOUP.

Add the remains of yesterday’s soup to what remains in your stock-pot.
Dilute with a little boiling water, and heat all to a boil. Strain out
the ox-tails, etc., which have done such good service. Although it _is_
Monday, make time to put them into a pot, by and by, with the skeletons
of yesterday’s chickens. Cover them with the skimmed liquor in which
the corned beef was cooked on Saturday, and warm slowly to a boil,
then, put back into the stock-pot for to-morrow’s soup. As to to-day’s
soup, add seasoning to taste; boil up and skim, and, ten minutes before
serving, drop in a handful of vermicelli, broken small, and cooked ten
minutes in boiling water. Boil up once and serve.


MUTTON CHOPS.

Trim off fat and skin; leave a bare piece of bone at the top of each;
broil over or under a bright fire; salt, pepper, and butter each one,
and lay upon a hot dish, the large end of each overlapping the small
end of that beyond it.


BAKED SWEET POTATOES.

Wash, and lay in a moderate oven. When they are soft between the
fingers, they are done. Serve in the skins.


TOMATO SAUCE.

Pare, slice, and stew twenty minutes. Then season with pepper, salt,
and sugar; stir in a good lump of butter rolled in flour; simmer ten
minutes, and serve.


SAVORY RICE PUDDING.

1 cup of boiled rice; ½ cup of gravy from yesterday’s chickens; the
giblets, boiled and chopped; 2 eggs; 3 tablespoonfuls of milk; 1
teaspoonful of flour; pepper and salt.

Beat the eggs into the rice; add gravy, milk, seasonings, giblets;
lastly, the flour wet up in milk. Beat well; pour into a mould; set in
a dripping-pan of hot water, and cook one hour. Turn out, and eat hot.


ORANGES, BANANAS, AND PEARS.

Atone to the so-by-herself-considered queen of the lower realms for
such a “quare lot of mussing on a washin’ day,” by serving a pretty
fruit dessert, and seeing to it that it _is_ pretty and good.



  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Green Bean Soup.
  Beef à la Reine.      Purée of Turnips.
  Potato Cakes.      Lettuce Salad.
  ——
  Custard Bread Pudding.
  ——


GREEN BEAN SOUP.

Take the fat from your soup-stock; add a quart of boiling water, and
strain from the _débris_. Put over the fire; boil, and take off the
scum; then put in a scant quart of fresh kidney or Lima beans. Boil
slowly at the back of the range until the beans break to pieces. Rub
through a colander; season as required; put in a teaspoonful of essence
of celery, and pour upon dice of fried bread already in the tureen.


BEEF À LA REINE.

Have a small round of beef, or a piece weighing six or seven pounds
cut from the round, bound into a compact shape by a broad strip of
muslin, as wide as it is high. Make holes clear through it by passing a
keen knife perpendicularly through the round—about an inch apart. Fill
one-third of these with chopped fat bacon; one-third with a mixture of
crumbs, onion, and herbs; the other with minced oysters. Rub the top of
the round with allspice, nutmeg, salt, and pepper, working the mixture
well into the incisions, as well as into the flesh. Set the stuffed
round in a dripping-pan; pour over it a cup of your soup-stock (before
the beans are added), mixed with a glass of claret. Dredge the top with
flour when the gravy has soaked in, and cook, in a moderate oven, two
hours or more, basting very often. Undo the bandage; dish the beef;
strain the gravy; thicken with browned flour, and serve in a boat.


PURÉE OF TURNIPS.

Peel, slice, and boil in hot salted water. Rub through a colander;
return to the fire; mix in a great spoonful of butter rolled in a
little flour, two tablespoonfuls of cream, and season with pepper and
salt. Stir ten minutes, and pour out.


POTATO CAKES.

Stir into a cup of mashed potatoes a tablespoonful of butter (heaping),
a beaten egg, two tablespoonfuls of milk, salt, and a tablespoonful
of prepared flour. Roll out, half an inch thick; cut round or square;
prick with a fork, and bake to a nice brown. Eat hot.


LETTUCE SALAD.

Pull the best leaves to pieces; heap in a salad-bowl, and pour over it
a dressing made according to the receipt given on Thursday of First
Week in October, but leaving out the raw egg.


CUSTARD BREAD PUDDING.

2 cups fine dry crumbs; 1 quart of milk; 5 eggs, beaten light; 1
tablespoonful corn-starch; 1 teaspoonful of salt, and ½ teaspoonful of
soda, dissolved in the milk; flavor to taste.

Soak the crumbs in the milk, and heat in a custard-kettle to a boil.
Add the corn-starch wet with cold milk, cook one minute, turn out
and beat hard. When smooth and almost cold, whip in the yolks, the
flavoring, lastly, the whites. Boil in a buttered mould an hour and a
half. Eat hot with sweet sauce. It is excellent.



  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  A Cheap Soup.
  Cannelon of Beef.      Browned Sweet Potatoes.
  Hominy Croquettes.      Cauliflower.
  ——
  Claret Jelly and Mrs. M.’s Sponge-Cake.
  ——


A CHEAP SOUP.

1 lb. of lean beef, cut into strips; 2 onions; 2 turnips; ½ cup
of rice; 6 tomatoes; 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar; pepper, salt; 2
teaspoonfuls essence of celery; dripping for frying; 3 quarts of water;
bunch of herbs.

Put dripping and sugar into a soup-pot; when they heat, add the meat
and sliced onions. Stir until nicely browned. Add the water, the
turnips, and herbs. Cook one hour; take off the fat; put in tomatoes
and rice, and simmer two hours. Season to taste, cook ten minutes, and
pour out.


CANNELON OF BEEF.

Chop the remains of yesterday’s beef; mix with quarter of a pound of
minced ham; season with pepper, salt grated lemon-peel, and a little
onion. Moisten with yesterday’s gravy, with a little flour stirred in,
and bind with a beaten egg or two. Make some pie-paste, or such as you
would use for dumplings; roll into an oblong sheet; put the beef-mince
in the middle, and make the pastry into a long roll, enclosing the
meat. Close at the ends with round caps of pastry, the edges pinched
well together. Lay in a dripping-pan—the joined side of the roll
downward, and bake to a good brown.


BROWNED SWEET POTATOES.

Boil, and peel neatly. Lay in a dripping-pan, and baste often with good
dripping, or butter, until glossy and delicately browned.


HOMINY CROQUETTES.

2 cups of boiled, fine-grained hominy; 2 beaten eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls
melted butter; salt to taste.

Work the hominy smooth with the butter; beat in the eggs with a wooden
spoon; salt, and make into long balls, with floured hands. Flatten at
the ends, roll in flour, and fry to a golden brown in lard or dripping.
Drain, and pile upon a flat dish.


CAULIFLOWER.

Boil a fine cauliflower in hot salted water. Drain, put into a deep
dish, blossom upward, and pour over it a cup of rich drawn butter, with
the juice of half a lemon stirred in.


CLARET JELLY.

1 package Coxe’s gelatine, soaked one hour in a large cup of water; 2
cups of sugar; 2 cups of claret; 1 pint of boiling water; juice of 1
lemon; a pinch of mace.

Put gelatine, lemon, sugar, and mace together, and cover half an hour.
Pour on the boiling water; stir until the gelatine is melted, and
strain through a flannel bag. Add the wine, and strain through double
flannel into a wet mould. Set in ice.


MRS. M.’S SPONGE-CAKE.

See “GENERAL RECEIPTS NO. 1, COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD SERIES,”
page 326.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Egg Soup.
  Larded Steak, Broiled.      Purée of Potatoes.
  Baked Macaroni.      Bavarian Salad.
  ——
  Lemon Cream Pie.
  ——


EGG SOUP.

2 lbs. lean ham; 1 lb. lean veal, cut into dice; 1 carrot; 1 onion; 1
grated turnip; 1 boiled potato, mashed; chopped parsley; 3 quarts of
water; 6 or 8 eggs.

Cut up the meat, onion, and carrot, and put on with herbs and water
to come to a slow boil. Keep this up for three hours and a half. The
water should not lose more than one-third. Strain off the liquor; cool
and skim. Put over the fire, with the grated turnip and mashed potato.
Season, and simmer half an hour. Pour into the tureen, and lay upon
the top of the soup as many poached eggs, trimmed round, as there are
persons to be served.


LARDED STEAK, BROILED.

Flatten a large steak, and lard it with thin strips of fat salt pork,
bringing all the ends out on one side of the steak. You can do this
with a knife and your fingers, by making two holes for each lardoon,
and making a loop of it under the steak; but it is better to have a
larding-needle. Broil upon a greased gridiron; lay upon a hot dish; put
upon it a little warmed butter, seasoned with pepper, salt, and French
mustard.


PURÉE OF POTATOES.

Mash boiled potatoes; rub through a colander; add a few spoonfuls
of milk, one of butter rolled in flour, and stir over the fire five
minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Pour into a deep dish.


BAKED MACARONI.

Break half a pound of macaroni into inch lengths, and cook twenty
minutes in boiling salt water. Drain; cover the bottom of a buttered
dish with it; strew with grated cheese and butter-bits, pepper and salt
lightly, and put in another layer of macaroni. Fill the dish in this
way; strew cheese and butter on top; pour in half a cup of milk, and
bake, covered, half an hour—then, brown quickly.


BAVARIAN SALAD.

2 _small_ onions; 2 heads of lettuce, pulled to pieces; 1 boiled beet,
cold and sliced; 3 tablespoonfuls salad-oil; 2 of vinegar; yolk of 1
raw egg; 1 saltspoonful of salt, and same of made mustard.

Chop the onions exceedingly small, and beat into the whipped egg the
salt, mustard, the oil, last of all, the vinegar. Put the lettuce into
a dish; cover with the beet-root, and pour on the dressing.


LEMON CREAM PIE.

1 cup of sugar; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 egg; 1 lemon, pared
carefully, even to the white rind, and the seeds removed; 1
tablespoonful corn-starch, wet in cold water; 1 cup of boiling water.

Stir the corn-starch into the water, and pour over the creamed butter
and sugar. When cold, add the minced lemon and grated peel, with the
egg. Beat hard and bake in open shells of paste. Eat cold.


  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Turnip Soup.
  Oyster Patés.      Rissoles of Sweetbreads.
  Chopped Cabbage.      Mashed Potatoes Browned.
  ——
  Quince Soufflé.
  ——


TURNIP SOUP.

12 turnips; 4 tablespoonfuls of butter; 2 tablespoonfuls of flour; 1
quart of milk; 2 quarts of water; 1 onion; chopped parsley; salt and
cayenne.

Pare, slice, and put the turnips on with the onion in the water. Cook
soft, pulp through a colander, and return, with the water, to the fire.
Melt the butter in a saucepan, stir in the flour, and cook ten minutes,
stirring all the time in one direction. Add the milk, stirring it in
gradually; take from the fire. Simmer the turnip _purée_ five minutes
after adding seasoning and chopped parsley; pour in the thickened milk,
boil up once, and serve.


OYSTER PATÉS.

1 quart of oysters, minced fine with a sharp knife; 1 cup of rich drawn
butter, based upon milk; cayenne and pepper to taste.

Stir the minced oysters into the drawn butter and cook five minutes
in a farina-kettle. Have ready some shapes of pastry, baked in
_paté_-pans, then slipped out. Fill these with the mixture; set in the
oven two minutes to heat, and send to table.


RISSOLES OF SWEETBREADS.

Boil and blanch three fine sweetbreads. Mince, and add one-third the
quantity of fine crumbs. Season with pepper and salt, a little nutmeg,
and two beaten eggs. Work and beat smooth; roll into long balls; flour
these well. Have ready a little gravy in a saucepan, well-seasoned;
add as much drawn butter. When it boils, put in the rissoles, a few
at a time, and cook ten minutes. Drain off the gravy; transfer the
sweetbreads carefully to a hot dish; pour the gravy upon a beaten egg;
heat to thickening, and pour over the rissoles.


CHOPPED CABBAGE.

Boil a firm cabbage in two waters—having taken off the outer leaves and
quartered it. Chop very fine; put into a saucepan two tablespoonfuls
of butter and the same of vinegar, with pepper and salt. Stir in the
cabbage, and when very hot, dish.


MASHED POTATOES—BROWNED.

Mash in the usual way; heap roughly upon a greased pie-plate; set in a
quick oven, and when delicately browned, slip to another dish.


QUINCE SOUFFLÉ.

Pare, slice, and stew the fruit soft. Sweeten well, and rub through
a colander. Put into a glass dish. Make a custard of 1 pint of milk,
3 yolks, and half a cup of sugar. When cold, pour, two inches deep,
upon the quince. Whip the whites of the eggs light with sugar and
lemon-juice, and heap upon the custard.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Mock Turtle Soup.
  Hot Pot.      Cauliflower à la Crême.
  Mashed Parsnips.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Cocoanut Pudding.
  ——


MOCK TURTLE SOUP.

Please consult receipt for Wednesday, Third Week in March. There should
be enough for two days at least.


HOT POT.

2 lbs. of lean veal; calf’s brains from your boiled head; 1 pint of
oysters; pepper—cayenne is best; a _little_ minced onion; salt; a
tablespoonful of butter; ¼ lb. of oyster crackers, buttered and split;
minced parsley and lemon-peel.

Cut the veal into squares, and parboil for twenty minutes. Put a layer
in the bottom of a buttered bake-dish; season well; sprinkle on a
little onion, and put a layer of split crackers next. The brains should
be beaten up with a raw egg, and seasoned. Drop in small spoonfuls upon
the crackers; next, put a few oysters, strewed with pepper, salt and
butter-bits; more veal, and so on to the top, which should be crackers.
Fill the dish with the water in which the veal was boiled, seasoned,
and an equal quantity of oyster liquor. Cover closely, and bake in a
moderate oven an hour and a half. Serve in the dish. It should not be
uncovered for browning.


CAULIFLOWER À LA CRÊME.

Boil a fine cauliflower in plenty of hot salted water, having tied it
up in a bit of mosquito-net. When done, put into a deep dish, blossom
upward, and pour over it a cupful of drawn butter in which has been
beaten, and then cooked, a raw egg.


MASHED PARSNIPS.

Scrape, slice lengthwise, and put on to boil in hot salted water. They
will take more than an hour to cook. When tender, drain and press in a
colander. Mash smooth; put into a clean saucepan with a little butter,
pepper and salt. Stir until very hot, then dish.


LIMA BEANS.

See Thursday of First Week in October.


COCOANUT PUDDING.

1 heaping cup _fine_ crumbs; ½ cup of butter; 1 cup powdered sugar; 1
grated cocoanut; 2 cups milk; tablespoonful corn-starch wet with cold
water; 5 eggs, nutmeg and rose-water to taste.

Soak the crumbs in the milk, and add to the creamed butter and sugar,
and the beaten yolks. Beat well; put in the corn-starch; the whisked
white; at last the grated cocoanut. Beat one minute; pour into a
buttered pudding dish, and bake in a moderate oven forty-five minutes.
Eat cold, with sugar sifted on top.



  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Yesterday’s Soup.
  Roast Leg of Lamb.      Potato Croquettes.
  Sweet Potatoes.      Fried Egg-plant.
  Currant Jelly.
  ——
  Rice Snow.
  White Mountain Cake.
  ——


YESTERDAY’S SOUP.

Your mock-turtle soup will be even better the second day than on the
first. Take off the fat; dip out enough of the stock for your family,
and bring slowly to a boil. You can make a little variety in it by
serving the force-meat balls the first day; the meat dice the second,
or _vice versa_.


ROAST LEG OF LAMB.

Lay in the dripping-pan; pour a cup of boiling water over it, and
roast steadily, twelve minutes to the pound, basting very often. Ten
minutes before taking it up, dredge with flour, and baste well with
butter to make a brown froth. Lay on a dish, and keep hot. Pour the
gravy into a basin set in very cold water. This will send the grease to
the top. Remove it all; pour the brown gravy into a saucepan; thicken
with browned flour; season, boil once, and serve in a boat. Pass
currant-jelly with lamb.


POTATO CROQUETTES.

2 cups mashed potatoes, free from lumps; 2 beaten eggs; 1 tablespoonful
melted butter; salt and pepper to taste; a little flour.

Mix all well together; heat, and stir over the fire until smoking hot.
Let it get cold, and make into small rolls flattened at the ends. Roll
in flour and fry to a good brown. Drain off upon paper and eat hot.


SWEET POTATOES.

Boil until a fork will go easily into the largest. Skin, and lay in a
bake-pan in the oven a few minutes to dry—then serve.


FRIED EGG-PLANT.

See Wednesday, First Week in October.


RICE SNOW.

1 quart of milk; 5 tablespoonfuls of rice flour; the whites of 4
eggs; 1 great spoonful of butter; 1 cup of powdered sugar; a pinch of
cinnamon, and same of nutmeg; vanilla, or other extract; a little salt.

Scald the milk, and stir in the flour wet up to a thin paste with cold
milk. Cook until it begins to thicken; add sugar and spice; simmer five
minutes, stirring all the while; pour out, and beat in the butter.
Let it get cold; flavor, and whip, a spoonful at a time, into the
whisked whites. Set to form in a wet mould. Prepare on Saturday. Turn
out on Sunday, and eat with sweet cream. If more convenient, you can
substitute corn-starch for the rice flour.


WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE.

See “GENERAL RECEIPTS NO. 1, COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD SERIES,”
page 319.


  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Sago Soup.
  Lamb Pudding.      Stewed Corn.
  Potatoes au Naturel.      Cabbage Salad.
  ——
  Grapes, Pears, and Bananas.
  Tea à la Russe, Crackers and Cheese.
  ——


SAGO SOUP.

Cut all the meat from your cold leg of lamb; crack the bone to
splinters; put on, with gristly bits of meat, skin, etc., in three
quarts of water, with an onion, and boil slowly, at the back of the
range, down to one quart. Strain, cool, and skim. Add to what has been
saved from the mock-turtle stock made on Saturday. Heat, and stir in
half a cup of pearl sago, previously soaked three hours in a very
little water. Season, and simmer half an hour.


LAMB PUDDING.

The cold meat from yesterday’s joint; bread-crumbs; 1 tablespoonful of
butter; 2 eggs; a little gravy; pepper, salt, and a pinch of nutmeg.

Chop the cold lamb fine, season, and wet up with a little good gravy.
Mix in one-fourth as much crumbs as you have meat; beat in the melted
butter, the eggs, and pour into a buttered mould. Set in a pan of hot
water, and cook, covered, in a good oven for one hour. Turn out, and
pour a little gravy over it.


STEWED CORN.

Green corn, even in city markets, is both indifferent and dear at this
season. We do better, therefore, to fall back upon the invaluable
canned vegetables that have made American housewives almost independent
of changing seasons. Open a can of corn one hour before it is to be
cooked. When ready for it turn into a farina-kettle; pour on just
enough hot water to cover it, and cook half an hour. Then, add a
little milk, a good lump of butter cut up in flour, pepper and salt to
taste, and cook fifteen minutes longer.


POTATOES AU NATUREL.

Put over the fire in cold water; bring to a boil, and, fifteen minutes
thereafter, pour in a cup of cold water to arrest the boil suddenly.
After the beginning of the second bubble, cook quite fast until a fork
will enter the largest potato without forcing. Turn off the water,
set the uncovered pot upon the fire for a minute; strip off the skins
quickly, and serve.


CABBAGE SALAD.

Shred a white cabbage fine; and pour over it a dressing such as you
made on Thursday, Second Week in October, but without the chopped onion.


GRAPES, PEARS, AND BANANAS.

Heap the grapes in one salver or basket, with a spray of some climbing
or clinging vine thrown around it. Group pears and bananas together,
and garnish with autumn leaves.


TEA À LA RUSSE.

Slice a fresh lemon; take off all the skin; lay the slices, with
powdered sugar strewed over them, in a plate, pour out the tea, hot
and strong, with plenty of sugar, and pass the lemon with it. _Serve
without cream._ I shall never forget a surprise that was startling as
well as a disappointment, that came to me one day, when, sinking under
the depression of an incipient headache, brought on by miles of picture
galleries, I called for a cup of hot tea in a foreign restaurant, and
was served with what I instantly pronounced to be “poison!” “_Molto
buono_,” protested the waiter, opening the tea-urn to show me a whole
lemon, skin and all, swimming upon the steaming decoction of leaves.
The combination of rind and the cream with which I had “trimmed”
my share of the too-fragrant beverage, was indescribable. Still,
I—rather—like tea _à la Russe_ without lemon-peel and cream.


  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Soup and Bouilli.
  Stewed Potatoes.      Mixed Pickles.
  ——
  Alice’s Pudding.
  ——


SOUP AND BOUILLI.

6 lbs. brisket of beef, all in one neat cut, with as little bone as
possible; 3 carrots; 1 small head of cauliflower cut into clusters; 4
turnips; 6 _small_ onions; bunch of sweet herbs; 2 blades of mace; 1
tablespoonful of butter cut up in flour; dice of fried bread; pepper,
salt, and French mustard.

Cover the meat well with water; bring to a very slow boil, and continue
this for four hours, skimming often and filling up with boiling
water as that in the pot sinks. At the end of that time, put in the
vegetables, cut into neat squares. Season, and simmer about forty-five
minutes, or until the carrots are tender. Take up the meat; rub over
with butter and cover upon a heated dish. Strain the soup from the
vegetables without breaking them, and set the colander in which they
are left over boiling water until after the soup is served. Strain
this again through a soup-sieve, and pour upon plenty of fried bread
in the tureen. If you like a thicker soup, return it after the second
straining, to the fire with a handful of tapioca, or of German sago,
ready-soaked, and simmer until clear. When the soup is out of the way,
arrange the vegetables in little heaps around the beef, all of a kind
together. Put a cupful of the soup over the fire, stir in the floured
butter, mustard, pepper, and salt, to your liking; boil up and pour
over the beef.


STEWED POTATOES.

See Wednesday, First Week in October.


ALICE’S PUDDING.

1 quart of milk; 5 eggs; 1 cup dry crumbs; ½ cup strawberry, or other
sweet jam; ½ cup of sugar.

Butter a pudding-dish; strew crumbs on the bottom; pour in the jam;
cover this with the rest of the crumbs, wet with milk. Heat the quart
of milk to scalding; take from the fire and pour upon the beaten yolks
and sugar. Then, whip in the frothed whites. Heat this three minutes,
and put upon the layer of crumbs in the dish, spoonful by spoonful,
letting each soak in well before adding more. Bake in a steady oven
until “set,” and slightly colored. Eat cold with cream.



  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Poor Roger’s Soup.
  Beefsteak and Onions.      Canned Succotash.
  Potatoes à la Parisienne.      Spinach.
  ——
  Baked Apple Dumpling.
  ——


POOR ROGER’S SOUP.

The bones of yesterday’s roast boiled down in 3 pints of water to 1
pint; 1 pint of stock left from yesterday’s soup; 6 parboiled potatoes
sliced thin; ¼ cabbage sliced small; 1 tablespoonful of butter rolled
in flour; 1 sliced and fried onion; 1 quart of hot water.

Parboil the cabbage; then put it on, with the potatoes and fried onion,
in the hot water; cook until the cabbage is tender, and the potatoes
broken to pieces. Take the fat from the top of your stock; add the
latter to the cabbage-soup; season to taste; stir in the floured
butter; cook five minutes, and pour out.


BEEFSTEAK AND ONIONS.

Flatten the steak with the broad side of a hatchet; broil over clear
coals; lay upon a chafing-dish, and pour over it a little melted butter
in which has been stewed a quarter of an onion sliced. Strain out the
onion; pepper and salt the butter; squeeze in the juice of half a
lemon. After it is poured over the steak, put a hot cover over it, and
let it stand five minutes before serving. Steak thus treated has a
delicious flavor.


CANNED SUCCOTASH.

Put on in enough boiling water to cover it. Salt slightly; stew half an
hour; turn off most of the water, and put in as much cold milk. Heat
to boiling; stir in a good lump of butter rolled in flour; pepper and
salt; simmer ten minutes, and pour out.


POTATOES À LA PARISIENNE.

Pare, and cut into small balls with your potato-gouge. (The scraps
should be boiled and mashed.) Boil in hot salted water, until tender;
drain, and drop into a saucepan containing a cupful of drawn butter
seasoned with pepper and parsley. Stew three minutes.


SPINACH.

Pick off the leaves, and boil in plenty of hot salted water. Drain;
chop upon a board, or in a tray; put into a saucepan, with a
tablespoonful of butter, a little sugar, pepper and salt, nutmeg, and a
few spoonfuls of milk or cream. Stir, and heat until bubbling hot; pour
out upon small squares of fried bread.


BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS.

1 quart of prepared flour; 2 tablespoonfuls of lard, and 1 of butter; 1
saltspoonful of salt; 2 cups of milk.

Mix into a paste, rubbing shortening and salt into the flour, then
wetting with the milk. Roll out less than half an inch thick; cut into
squares; lay a pared and cored apple in the centre of each; bring the
corners together, and join neatly. Lay in a buttered baking-pan, the
joined edges down, and bake to a nice brown. Glaze with white of egg
just before you take them up. Sift powdered sugar over them, and eat
with hot, sweet sauce.


  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Dieppe Soup.
  Stewed Chickens.      Boiled Beans.
  Browned Potatoes.      Stewed Tomatoes.
  ——
  Tapioca Pudding.
  ——


DIEPPE SOUP.

2 lbs. of beef, cut from the shin, and sliced; 2 sliced onions; 2
carrots; 1 teaspoonful of sugar; dripping for frying; 3 stalks of
celery; 5 quarts of water; ½ cup of farina, soaked two hours in a
little milk. Pepper and salt.

Flour, and fry the beef with the onion, sugar, pepper, and salt, to a
good brown in the dripping. Put into a soup-pot, with five quarts of
water, the carrots, and celery, and cook slowly four hours, _at least_.
Strain, cool, and skim; season; add the farina, and simmer half an hour
longer, stirring faithfully.


STEWED CHICKENS.

Truss and stuff the fowls as for roasting. Cover the bottom of the pot
with thin slices of salt pork or corned ham; strew a little onion,
a bunch of sweet herbs, chopped, three blades of mace, a pinch of
lemon-peel, a little salt and pepper, upon this. Put in the chickens;
cover with weak broth—water will do, but is not so good—cover closely
and stew tender. The time will depend upon the size and age of the
chickens. When done, take up and keep hot. Strain and skim the gravy;
thicken with browned flour, and pour over the fowls.


BOILED BEANS.

If you use dried beans, soak over night. Put on in cold water, and cook
slowly until soft. Drain, pepper, salt, and butter; then dish hot.


BROWNED POTATOES.

Work cold mashed potatoes soft with milk and butter; season with pepper
and salt. Make into round, flat cakes; flour well, and bake brown in a
quick oven.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Pare, slice, and stew twenty minutes. Season with pepper, salt, sugar,
a lump of butter rolled in flour; put in a tablespoonful of fine
bread-crumbs, and simmer ten minutes longer.


TAPIOCA PUDDING.

1 cup tapioca, soaked six hours in a little cold water; 1 quart of
milk; 1 large cup of sugar; 5 eggs; grated peel of ½ lemon; a little
salt.

Scald the milk, and pour upon the yolks and sugar; beat the soaked
tapioca into this custard; salt; whip in the frothed whites. Pour into
a buttered mould; put on the top, and set in a pan of boiling water,
and this into a moderate oven. Cook three-quarters of an hour, or until
firm. Turn out carefully, and eat with sauce.



  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Clam Soup.
  Boiled Cod.      Purée of Eggs.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Cauliflower au Gratin.
  ——
  Coffee Méringue Custard.
  ——


CLAM SOUP.

50 clams; 1 quart of milk; 1 pint of water; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter;
12 whole peppers; a few bits of cayenne-pods; 6 blades of mace; salt to
taste; 1 tablespoonful of corn-starch.

Cut the hard parts from the clams, and set by the soft portions. Put
the hard bits into the soup-pot, with the clam-liquor, the water, and
spices. Boil half an hour; strain, salt, and return to the fire, with
the soft parts. When the soup begins to simmer, stir in the butter and
corn-starch. Stew five minutes, and pour into the tureen. Stir in the
boiling milk, and serve. Send oyster-crackers and sliced lemon around
with it.


BOILED COD.

Sew up the fish in a clean bit of mosquito-net, and cook in boiling
salted water, fifteen minutes to the pound. Unwrap, and pour over it a
few spoonfuls of sauce, putting the rest into a boat.


SAUCE.

A cupful of the liquor in which your fish is cooking, strained and
skimmed. Put into a saucepan; heat, and stir in a great spoonful
of butter rolled in a teaspoonful of flour. When this boils, add
the pounded yolks of two boiled eggs, and a tablespoonful of minced
cucumber pickle. Boil once, and serve. Garnish the fish with rings of
whites of eggs, and pickles, sliced.


PURÉE OF EGGS.

8 hard-boiled eggs; 3 raw eggs; 1 cup of gravy saved from yesterday’s
chickens; 1 tablespoonful of butter; chopped parsley; pepper, salt, and
nutmeg; some fine crumbs; fried bread.

Pound the boiled yolks, and work in butter, parsley, seasoning, and
the raw eggs. Beat stiff, and rub through a colander. Mince the whites
until they are like coarse snow, and stir over the fire in the hot
gravy five minutes, with a tablespoonful of crumbs. Make a mound of the
yolks in the middle of a stone-china dish; form a ring of the whites
around them, with an outer wall of triangles of fried bread. Sift fine
crumbs over all, and brown nicely upon the upper grating of the oven.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual, and send in with the fish-course.


CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN.

Boil, tied up in a net, in plenty of hot salted water, forty minutes,
if large. Put into a buttered bake-dish, blossom upward; cover with
drawn butter; sift fine crumbs over it, and set in the oven ten minutes
to color the crumbs.


COFFEE CUSTARD MÉRINGUE.

6 eggs—whites and yolks separated; 1 quart of milk; 1 cup of sugar; 1
cup of strong made coffee.

Whip the whites to a stiff froth with a little powdered sugar. Heat the
milk—with a pinch of soda in it; lay the _méringue_ upon it in great
spoonfuls, turning when the lower side is poached. Lift with a skimmer,
as each spoonful is done, and lay upon a sieve to cool and drain. When
all are out of the milk, pour it upon the beaten yolks and sugar.
Return to the farina-kettle, and stir until it begins to thicken. Take
from the fire, and stir in the hot coffee. When all are cold put the
_méringues_ into a glass bowl, and pour the custard over them. The
_méringues_ will at once rise to the surface, coated with the custard.



  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Excellent Stock Soup.      Veal Collops with Tomato Sauce.
  Rice Croquettes à la Princesse.
  Boiled Potatoes.      Squash.
  ——
  Lausanne Pudding.
  ——


EXCELLENT STOCK SOUP.

1 knuckle of veal, all the bones well cracked, and all the meat, except
what is taken off your collops; 4 pig’s feet, cleaned and cracked; 3
lbs. of beef marrow-bones; bunch of herbs; 3 onions; 3 carrots, sliced;
6 blades of mace; 4 stalks of celery; 9 quarts of water; pepper and
salt; ½ cup of rice.

Put the meat, bones, and feet on in the water overnight, cooking two
hours before the fire goes down, and leaving on the range in the pot
(which must be scrupulously clean) all night, salting it a little. In
the morning, add the herbs and vegetables, and simmer gently six hours.
Take from the fire, and strain, picking out the meat and bones, and
rubbing the vegetables through the colander. Put meat and bones into
the stock-pot; salt and pepper highly, and pour on them all the soup,
except two quarts. There should be at least six quarts of strong broth,
the extra waste in boiling having been made up by adding hot water from
time to time. Season the stock well, and put away in a cold place. Cool
and skim to-day’s soup, season, and put over the fire with the rice.
Simmer until the rice is tender.


VEAL COLLOPS WITH TOMATO SAUCE.

Cut three pounds of meat from your veal knuckle, and this into pieces
two inches long and one wide. Flatten with the side of a hatchet; flour
well, and fry in dripping, with half of a sliced onion. Put a cup of
your soup-stock into a saucepan, season well, and lay in the collops.
Have ready a cup of tomato sauce, rubbed smooth through a colander, and
seasoned. When the collops have stewed ten minutes in the broth, add a
tablespoonful of the sauce, and the same quantity, at intervals of five
minutes, until all is used up. Be careful to follow these directions
implicitly. When the sauce is all in, put in a tablespoonful of butter
rolled thickly in browned flour. Simmer five minutes, and serve in a
deep dish.


RICE CROQUETTES À LA PRINCESSE.

2 cups boiled rice; 2 eggs; ½ cup of milk; pepper and salt; a boiled
sweetbread, minced fine, or boiled fowl-giblets, or any cold meat
minced, and worked to a paste with the pounded yolks of two boiled
eggs, and well seasoned with butter, salt, cayenne and a pinch of
lemon; lard for frying.

Mix beaten eggs and milk with salt into the hot rice, and stir in a
saucepan until stiff. Let it get cold; make into thin round cakes;
enclose a spoonful of the meat-paste in the centre of each, and roll
the rice-ball round. Dip in beaten egg, then in cracker-dust, and fry
carefully in plenty of hot lard. Drain and serve hot.


BOILED POTATOES.

See Monday of this week.


SQUASH.

Pare, slice and cook soft in boiling water. Drain, mash, and press in
a hot colander; season with pepper, salt, and butter, and smooth in a
mound within a deep dish.


LAUSANNE PUDDING.

1 pint of milk; 3 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch; ½ cup of
sugar; 1 teaspoonful of vanilla or other essence; sweet jam or jelly.

Heat the milk, and stir in the corn-starch wet up with cold milk.
Stir until thick. Take from the fire, and beat in sugar and egg,
with flavoring. Melt a tablespoonful of butter in a square, shallow
baking-pan; pour in the pudding and bake half an hour. Take it up;
spread, while hot, with the sweetmeats; roll up closely, lay upon a
dish, and sift sugar over it. Cut in slices an inch and a half wide.



  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  White Broth.
  Roast Beef.      Yorkshire Pudding.
  Browned Sweet Potatoes.
  Fried Parsnips.      Made Mustard.
  ——
  Potato Pudding.
  Grated Cheese.
  ——


WHITE BROTH.

Remove the fat from your jelly-stock. Take out enough for to-day’s
use; also, two of the pig’s feet. Cut the best part of the meat from
these into as neat squares as you can contrive, and lay aside. Heat
the stock, with the addition of a cup of boiling water, and put,
meantime, two tablespoonfuls of butter into a clean saucepan. When it
heats, stir in two tablespoonfuls of flour. Stir fast, and, to keep it
from browning, put in, now and then, a few spoonfuls of soup. Cook five
minutes; add gradually to the soup; put in the pieces of meat, with
more seasoning, if required; boil once, pour into the tureen, and add a
cup of boiling milk.


ROAST BEEF.

Lay in a dripping-pan, pour a cupful of boiling water over it, and
cook, basting often, _about_ ten minutes per pound. If there is much
fat on it, cover these parts with a paste of flour and water, until
the meat is nearly done. Ten minutes before taking it up, dredge with
flour, then baste once with butter. If you like made gravy with beef,
pour off the fat from the top; thicken with browned flour, season and
boil once.


YORKSHIRE PUDDING.

10 tablespoonfuls prepared flour; 1 cup of cold water; 2 cups of milk;
3 eggs; salt.

Rub the flour smooth in the water and milk; salt, beat in the yolks,
and, just before putting into the oven, whip in the beaten whites. Put
two tablespoonfuls from the fat “top” of your beef gravy into a square
baking-pan; pour in the batter, and put into the other oven until
“set.” Baste then, every few minutes, with the hot dripping until it
is of a rich brown. Cut in squares, and lay about the meat. Some much
prefer this Yorkshire Pudding to that cooked with the meat.


BROWNED SWEET POTATOES.

Boil with their skins on about twenty minutes. Peel carefully. Pour off
nearly all the fat from the top of the beef-dripping. Lay the potatoes
in the pan around the meat, and baste when you baste the beef. Drain
well in a colander.


FRIED PARSNIPS.

Boil tender in hot, salted water; scrape, slice lengthwise when they
are nearly cold; flour all over, and fry in salted lard or dripping.
Drain well.


POTATO PUDDING.

1 lb. mashed potato, rubbed through a colander; ½ lb. butter, creamed
with the sugar; 6 eggs—whites and yolks beaten separately; 1 lemon,
squeezed into the hot potato; 1 teaspoonful of nutmeg, and the same of
mace; 2 cups white sugar.

Beat the yolks into the creamed butter and sugar; add the potato. Beat
very hard, and whip in the whisked whites, with the spice. Bake in open
shells of paste on Saturday. Send grated cheese around with it.



  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Macaroni Soup.
  Réchauffée of Beef.      Potatoes au Gratin.
  Kidney Beans, Fricasseed.      Grated Horseradish.
  ——
  Grapes, Boiled Chestnuts, Apples.
  ——


MACARONI SOUP.

Heat the contents of your stock-pot to boiling, after adding a pint of
hot water. Cook a few minutes; strain off as much broth as you want for
to-day, and return the rest to the jar when you have scalded it well.
Put in more pepper and salt, and put by for future soups.

Heat and season the soup left out for to-day; add a handful of
macaroni, broken short, and cooked twenty minutes in hot, salted water.
Simmer five minutes.


RÉCHAUFFÉE OF BEEF.

Trim your cold roast neatly. Make incisions at short distances apart,
and thrust strips of fat salt pork quite through it. Set in a round,
deep baking-pan. Sprinkle with minced onion, and pour over it a pint of
gravy—the remains of that which accompanied the roast, mixed with some
from the stock-pot. Season the gravy well with pepper, salt, minced
herbs, and a suspicion of French mustard. It should be cold, and the
oven slow, for the first hour—never fast. Cover _very_ tightly; open
the dish at the end of one hour, and turn the meat, but pay it no
further attention until two hours have passed. Then dish it; strain the
gravy; thicken as much as you want for your meat with browned flour;
boil up, and pour over the beef. The rest can be set by for other uses.
If the beef has been cooked slowly and steadily, it will be tender and
most savory.


POTATOES AU GRATIN.

Boil and mash the potatoes; press firmly in a greased bowl; turn out
upon a shallow pie-plate, also greased; wash all over with raw egg;
sift fine crumbs upon it, and brown in a quick oven. Slip to a hot,
flat dish.


KIDNEY BEANS—FRICASSEED.

Soak all night. Next day, put on in cold water, at the back of the
range, and cook tender. When you turn your beef, after an hour’s
cooking, dip out half a cupful of the gravy. Cool and skim it; add a
little minced parsley and onion, and, when your beans are soft, pour
off nearly all the water, and add this gravy. There should be just
enough to keep them from getting dry. Simmer ten minutes, and dish
without draining.


GRAPES, BOILED CHESTNUTS, APPLES.

Arrange the grapes in a fruit-dish, ornamented with leaves. Put on the
chestnuts in warm (not hot) water, slightly salted. Bring to a boil,
and cook fast fifteen minutes. Drain in a colander; stir a spoonful of
butter into the chestnuts, tossing in the colander until dry. Serve in
a deep dish, lined with a napkin.

Polish the apples, and lay a fruit-knife at each place.


  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Beef-olives Soup.
  Mutton Stew, with Dumplings.       Baked Potatoes.
  Stewed Tomatoes.      Beets Sautés.
  ——
  Omelette Méringue.
  ——


BEEF-OLIVES SOUP.

Chop a few slices of the twice-served cold beef very fine; mix with
one-third as much cold mashed potato, wet with gravy; season well; bind
with a beaten egg, and stir in a greased saucepan until quite stiff.
Let it get cold; make into small olive-shaped balls; flour, and lay
aside. Strain off the liquid from your stock-pot; bring to a boil,
adding hot water or seasoning, as the case may require; boil, and skim
for five minutes, and drop in the beef-olives carefully. Simmer one
minute—fast boiling would break them—and pour out. If you have any
pickled olives in the house, add a dozen to the soup when you put in
the beef-balls.


MUTTON STEW, WITH DUMPLINGS.

3 lbs. of lean mutton, cut into short strips; ½ lb. of salt pork,
chopped; ½ onion, minced; chopped parsley and thyme; 1 cup of milk; 1
tablespoonful of flour wet up with the milk; pepper and salt.

Put on the mutton in enough cold water to cover it, and cook very
slowly one hour. Then add the pork, onion, pepper, and herbs, and stew
an hour longer. Make out a little paste, in the proportion used for the
apple dumplings on Wednesday, Third Week in October; cut into strips,
and drop into the stew. Cook ten minutes; take out meat and dumplings
with a skimmer; lay upon a dish; add milk and flour to the gravy; stir
until thickened, and pour over the contents of the dish.


BAKED POTATOES.

Wash well; lay in a good oven, and bake until soft. Wrap in a napkin,
and dish.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Open the can an hour before cooking, and pour out. Put into a saucepan
with a little minced onion, and stew twenty minutes. Season with sugar,
pepper, salt, and a good piece of butter rolled in flour, and cook ten
minutes more.


BEETS SAUTÉS.

Wash, cut off the tops, and boil more than an hour. Scrape, cut into
round slices, and put into a saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of
butter, one of vinegar, and pepper and salt to taste. Heat, toss, and
stir ten minutes.


OMELETTE MÉRINGUE.

8 eggs; juice of a lemon, and half the grated peel; 4 tablespoonfuls of
powdered sugar; a little sweet jam or jelly; a pinch of salt; butter.

Beat eight yolks and four whites light; add salt, lemon-juice, and a
tablespoonful of powdered sugar. Put a tablespoonful of butter in a
frying-pan, and when it heats, run it all over the bottom. Pour in
the omelette, shaking and loosening from the sides with a spatula.
So soon as it is done at the edges sufficiently to be folded, lay a
great spoonful of jam or jelly upon it; fold over, and turn out upon
a stone-china dish. The _méringue_, made of the remaining whites and
sugar, should be ready—beaten with the lemon-peel. Heap upon the
omelette, and set upon the upper grating of the oven to “set” and brown.



  Fourth Week.     Wednesday.
  ——
  Barley Cream Soup.
  Boiled Ham.      Chopped Cabbage.
  Corn Pudding.      Beet-root Salad.
  ——
  Drunken Dominie.
  ——


BARLEY CREAM SOUP.

3 lbs. lean veal; 1 onion; ½ lb. pearl barley; 4 quarts of water; salt,
pepper, and a cup of milk.

Cut the veal and onion very small; put on with the barley. Boil slowly
until reduced to two quarts. Strain, rubbing the barley through a
sieve. Season with pepper and salt; simmer three minutes. It should be
white and thick as cream, when you have added the cup of boiling milk,
after which it must not boil.


BOILED HAM.

Soak a ham four or five hours. Scrub it well, and put on to boil in
plenty of cold water. Cook eighteen or twenty minutes to the pound.
When done, leave in the water one hour in the open air, or where it
will cool rapidly. Take off the skin carefully; rub all over with
flour; sift fine crumbs over the top and sides, and set ten minutes in
a quick oven. Wind frilled paper about the shank, and where the paper
joins the body of the ham, twine a wreath of parsley.


CHOPPED CABBAGE.

Cut off stalks and green leaves, and quarter a cabbage. Boil fifteen
minutes in hot salted water; pour this off, and cover the cabbage
with pot-liquor, taken from the ham-kettle, and the fat skimmed off.
Cook tender; drain, pressing hard; chop, and again drain; season with
pepper, salt, and a little vinegar, and dish very hot.


CORN PUDDING.

Drain a can of corn. Chop the grains fine with a chopping-knife. Add
a cup of milk, three eggs, a tablespoonful of melted butter, pepper
and salt to taste. Beat all together, and bake, covered, forty-five
minutes, in a good oven; then brown.


BEET-ROOT SALAD.

Chop the cold beets left from yesterday into rather coarse dice. Mix
with an equal quantity of cold chopped potatoes, and pour over them
such a dressing as was used for Bavarian Salad, Thursday, Second Week
in October.


DRUNKEN DOMINIE.

1 long or square stale sponge-cake; ¼ lb. of citron; 1 glass of brandy;
1 cup of sherry wine; 1 pint of milk; 3 eggs; ½ cup of sugar.

Cut the citron into strips, and stick in regular rows in the top of the
cake. Six hours before you will want to use it, pour over it, a little
at a time, the liquor. It should absorb it all, and hold it with Dutch
perseverance. Heat the milk; pour upon the beaten yolks and sugar. Stir
and cook until it thickens. When cold, pour around the cake, as it lies
upon a long dish, and cover the dominie and his bed with a _méringue_
of the whites, beaten up with a little sugar. The citron spikes should
be just visible through the snowy blanket.



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  A Western Soup.
  Roast Chickens and Cresses.      Polenta.
  Stewed Salsify.      Mashed Potatoes.
  ——
  Apricot Trifle.
  ——


A WESTERN SOUP.

1 sheep’s head, cleaned, with the skin on; 4 cleaned pig’s feet; 2
onions; 2 carrots; 2 turnips; bunch of sweet herbs; 6 quarts of water;
12 whole peppers; salt to taste.

Put the head and feet into the soup-pot, and pour over them the water.
When they have boiled slowly two hours, and been often skimmed, put
in the sliced vegetables and herbs, and cook three hours longer,
replenishing with boiling water as the liquid sinks. There should be
five quarts of soup. Strain; lay aside the sheep’s tongue to cool,
with the meat from one of the feet. Season the rest of the meat and
bones; put into the stock-pot; pour over it all the soup not needed for
to-day, also the skimmed pot-liquor from your ham, if it was corned—not
smoked. Season, and set in a cold place. Cool and skim the soup meant
for to-day; season, and put in the sliced tongue and dice of pig’s
feet. Boil one minute.


ROAST CHICKENS AND CRESSES.

Roast as directed on Thursday, First Week in October, and lay a thick
border of fresh water-cresses around them on the dish, with a bunch
under—or over—each wing.


POLENTA.

1 pint of boiling water; 1 cup of coarse yellow meal, or enough for
thick mush; a little salt.

Put the water over the fire; add the salted meal, and stir constantly
until it has cooked twenty minutes, and bubbles up in the middle. Turn
upon a flat dish, and, when cold and stiff, cut into squares; dip these
into flour, and fry to a yellow-brown. Drain off the fat. This is a
favorite dish with the Italian peasantry, who generally, however, eat
it without frying.


STEWED SALSIFY.

Scrape; clean, without cutting the roots; drop into cold water as you
clean them. Put on in boiling water, a little salt; when tender, take
out a cupful of the water, thicken with two tablespoonfuls of butter
rolled thickly in flour; boil up and pepper. Dish the salsify, pour the
sauce over it, and cover over hot water five minutes, to let it soak in.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual.


APRICOT TRIFLE.

1 can of California apricots; 1 quart of milk; 4 eggs; 1 cup of
sugar; ½ package of Cooper’s gelatine; 2 tablespoonfuls—even ones—of
corn-starch, wet up with milk.

Sweeten the apricots with half the sugar, and set aside in a bowl. Heat
the milk; stir in the corn-starch; pour over the beaten eggs and sugar.
Cook until it begins to thicken, and pour hot upon the gelatine, which
should have been soaked in a little cold water, and then dissolved in
a very little hot milk. Beat all up well, and let them get cold. Wet a
mould; put in a cupful of the custard; cover with apricots, drained
from the syrup; wait fifteen minutes, and pour on more cream; in a few
minutes, more apricots, and so on until all are used up. Set in ice to
form, and, when firm, turn out, and pour the apricot-syrup over the
trifle. If the apricots are large, you would do well to cut them up.



  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Peas Porridge.
  Fried Pickerel.      Chicken Croquettes.
  Purée of Potatoes.      Baked Squash.
  ——
  Apple Fritters.
  ——


PEAS PORRIDGE.

Soak a quart of split peas overnight. Next morning put them on to boil
in enough cold water to cover them well. When this has fairly begun
to boil, pour it off, and add stock from your store in the stock-jar.
Cook slowly, taking care it does not burn, until the peas are very
soft. Rub through a colander and serve. Save a pint as a foundation for
to-morrow’s soup—more than a pint, if you can. Never forget that soup
makes soup.


FRIED PICKEREL.

Clean and wash the fish. Wipe carefully inside and out. Dredge with
flour all over the outside, and fry to a nice brown—_never_ to a
crisp—in lard or dripping. Drain off the fat; lay upon a hot dish—the
head of one fish to the tail of the other—and garnish with curled
parsley and quartered lemon.


CHICKEN CROQUETTES.

Chop the meat from your roast chickens, and mix with one-third as much
mashed potato. Season; moisten well with a gravy made by boiling down
the bones and stuffing in water, then straining and seasoning it. Beat
into the mixture one or two whipped eggs; heat and stir over the fire
until quite stiff. Turn out and cool; then roll into croquettes, dip in
egg and pounded cracker, and fry to a golden brown.


PURÉE OF POTATOES.

Mash the potatoes with butter and milk, working them smooth and soft.
Season, put over the fire and stir until almost stiff. Mound upon a
flat dish, and strain over them a little of yesterday’s gravy, skimmed
and heated.


BAKED SQUASH.

Pare, quarter, boil, and mash the squash. Season with pepper, salt,
butter, and whip in two beaten eggs. When you have a light cream, turn
into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake in a quick oven.


APPLE FRITTERS.

About 10 fine apples, pared, cored, and sliced half an inch thick;
juice of 1 lemon; sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg; 3 cups of prepared flour;
nearly 4 cups of milk; 5 eggs; a little salt.

Spread the slices of apple upon a dish, and sprinkle with lemon-juice
and sugar. Beat the yolks light; add milk, then the whisked whites and
salted flour by turns. Dip the slices of apple into the batter, turning
over and over until thoroughly coated, and fry in hot lard, a few at a
time. Drain upon a hot sieve, and sift powdered sugar, cinnamon, and
nutmeg upon them. Eat with wine sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Tomato and Pea Soup.
  Calf’s Liver and Bacon.      Parsnip Fritters.
  Spinach.      Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Bread-and-Raisin Pudding.
  ——


TOMATO AND PEA SOUP.

Empty a can of tomatoes. Put them over the fire with three pints of
stock and stew one hour. Strain, rubbing the pulp through the colander;
add what was left yesterday of the pea porridge; season to taste,
simmer fifteen minutes, and pour upon dice of fried bread into the
tureen.


CALF’S LIVER AND BACON.

Wash a fresh liver well, and, when quite ready to cook it, cut into
long, narrow slices. Dip each in flour highly seasoned with pepper and
salt. Melt a tablespoonful of good dripping in a saucepan; lay in the
liver, the slices fitting neatly to one another; strew with sliced
onion, and cover entirely with very thin slices of fat salt pork, or
bacon. Fit a close top on the saucepan; cook _very_ slowly, never
allowing it to bubble, for one hour. The liver should be steamed, not
stewed, much less fried. When very tender, take it out and lay upon a
dish. Add a tablespoonful of tomato sauce to the gravy, thicken with
browned flour wet with water; boil once, and pour over the liver.


PARSNIP FRITTERS.

Scrape, and boil in hot salted water until tender. Mash them very
smooth, picking out all the fibres. Add to four large parsnips one
beaten egg, a teaspoonful of prepared flour, with pepper and salt, and
a teaspoonful of milk. Make into cakes; flour, and fry in dripping.
Drain well.


SPINACH.

See Wednesday, Third Week in October.


SWEET POTATOES.

See Sunday, Third Week in October.


BREAD-AND-RAISIN PUDDING.

1 quart of milk; loaf of stale baker’s bread, the crust all pared off,
and cut into slices half an inch thick; butter to spread the bread; 4
eggs; ½ cup of sugar; ½ lb. of raisins, seeded and cut into thirds.

Make a raw custard of eggs, sugar, and milk. Fit slices of buttered
bread into the bottom of a buttered bake-dish. Pour on custard, and
strew with raisins. Lay in more buttered slices, and so on, until
the dish is full. The last layer should be well-soaked bread. Cover
closely; set in a baking-pan of hot water, and bake an hour and a
quarter. Turn out; pour hot, sweet sauce over it, and send more around
with it.



NOVEMBER.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Baked Soup.
  Fillet of Veal.      Cannelon of Potatoes.
  French Beans à la Crême.      Tomato Sauce.
  ——
  Neapolitainoes.
  Coffee and Whipped Cream.
  ——


BAKED SOUP.

3 lbs. of beef; 2 lbs. of veal; ½ lb. of lean ham; 1 onion; 2 carrots;
2 tablespoonfuls of farina; 1 can of corn, drained and chopped; 2
stalks of celery; pepper and salt; 6 quarts of water.

Cut the meat into long strips, the vegetables into dice, and pack, in
alternate layers, in a broad, low jar, that will go into the oven.
Strew the layers with farina and corn, fill up with the water; cover
the jar closely, putting a paste of flour and water over the top or
about the edges, to exclude the air and keep in the steam. Do this on
Saturday night. At bed-time, set in the oven in a pan of cold water,
that it may heat gradually as the range warms in the morning. Let it
bake until dinner-time. Pour into a bowl, take out the meat, season,
and put it into the stock-pot. Pour over it as much as you can spare of
the soup, season, and set by for to-morrow. Add pepper and salt to that
left for to-day, and serve.


FILLET OF VEAL.

Take out the bone of the joint (you can add it on Saturday to your
baked soup); make a deep incision between the meat and the “flap,”
which your butcher will skewer around the fillet. Fill this and the
hole left by taking out the bone with a force-meat of crumbs, chopped
salt pork, chopped thyme and parsley, grated lemon-peel, pepper, salt,
and the juice of a lemon. Bind the fillet into shape with tapes; cover
the top with a paste of flour and water, and bake twelve minutes to the
pound, putting a cup of boiling water into the pan. When done, pull
off the paste; dredge with flour, and baste well with butter. The meat
should have been very freely basted while cooking. Dish the meat when
browned; season, and thicken the gravy; boil up, and pour into a boat.


CANNELON OF POTATOES.

Mash the potatoes thoroughly; beat light with butter, milk, and two raw
eggs. Heat in a greased frying pan, stirring constantly, until stiff
enough to handle. Make into a long roll; brush over with beaten eggs,
and sift crumbs over it. Lay in a buttered baking-pan, and brown nicely
in a quick oven. Dish, and pour over it a cup of good drawn butter.


FRENCH BEANS À LA CRÊME.

Open a can of string-beans; clip them into short pieces, and cook
twenty minutes in hot salted water. Drain. Have ready, in a saucepan,
two tablespoonfuls of cream, and as much butter, heated together; pour
upon a beaten egg; return to the saucepan; season with pepper and salt;
stir in a tablespoonful of hot vinegar; take from the fire; dish the
beans, and pour the sauce over them.


TOMATO SAUCE.

Stew the contents of a can of tomatoes twenty minutes. Strain and pulp
through a colander. Add butter, rolled in flour; a little sugar; salt
and pepper; cook ten minutes and pour out.


NEAPOLITAINOES.

Make enough puff-paste for a pie; roll out into a sheet half an inch
thick, and cut into strips three inches long and half as wide. Bake in
a quick oven. When cold, spread half of them with sweet jam or jelly,
and stick the others over them in pairs—the jelly being, of course, in
the middle. Ice with a frosting made of the whites of two eggs, whipped
stiff with half a pound of sugar.

Make these on Saturday. Pass with them strong, hot coffee, with a great
spoonful of whipped cream on the surface of each cupful.



  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Sago Soup.
  Veal and Oyster Pie.      Boiled Potatoes.
  Cold Slaw.      Stewed Celery.
  ——
  Dessert of Fruit and Nuts.
  ——


SAGO SOUP.

Strain off two quarts of soup from your stock-pot, when you have
removed the cake of fat from the top; heat, and stir into it half a cup
of German sago previously soaked in a little cold water. Simmer until
the sago is dissolved.


VEAL AND OYSTER PIE.

Cut the best parts of your cold roast fillet into thin dominoes. Put
a layer in the bottom of a pudding-dish; sprinkle with the dressing,
chopped fine, or with minced ham; cover with oysters; strew these with
pepper, salt, butter-bits, a pinch of grated lemon-peel, and squeeze a
few drops of lemon-juice over them. More veal, etc., and, when the dish
is full, pour in yesterday’s gravy, skimmed, and mixed with as much
oyster-liquor. Cover with a good paste, and bake one hour. Wash over
with white of egg just before you take it up. The pastry can, in cold
weather, be made on Saturday, and kept in a cool place.


BOILED POTATOES.

Put on in cold water and bring to a boil. At the end of twenty minutes
throw in a cup of cold water to arrest the boil. Heat up again quickly,
and when a fork will pierce the large potatoes easily, pour off the
water. Put in a little salt, and set the uncovered pot upon the range
for one minute. Take each potato in a towel, and hold in your hand
while you strip off the peel. The fashion of sticking a fork through
them, in order to pare them, breaks and cools them.


COLD SLAW.

Shred a white cabbage and pour over it the following


_Dressing._

2 beaten eggs; 2 teaspoonfuls of sugar; 6 tablespoonfuls of vinegar; ½
teaspoonful of made mustard and same of pepper and salt; ½ teaspoonful
of celery essence; 1 tablespoonful of butter.

Mix well, stir over the fire until scalding hot. When cold, add to the
cabbage. Toss and stir, and set in a cold place until wanted.


STEWED CELERY.

Scrape and cut the blanched stalks into short pieces. Cook tender
in boiling water, a little salt. Drain this off, add a cup of drawn
butter; simmer five minutes, and serve.


DESSERT OF FRUIT AND NUTS.

Arrange in accordance with your taste and convenience. You may add
dried figs to the dish of nuts.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Strong Broth.
  Beefsteak.      Omelette with Tomatoes.
  Mashed Potatoes.      French Mustard.
  ——
  Lemon Puffs.
  ——


STRONG BROTH.

Heat the contents of your stock-pot, adding a quart or more of boiling
water. Let all simmer together one hour. Strain and press out the
nourishment from the meat. Cool; skim, add seasoning, and half a cup of
soaked rice. Cook gently until this is soft.

N. B.—Whenever the stock-pot is empty, scald it with soda and water,
and set in the sun.


BEEFSTEAK.

Flatten a steak; broil upon a greased gridiron over a clear fire. Lay
upon a hot dish; pepper and salt; lay bits of butter over it, and cover
three or four times before sending to table.


OMELETTE, WITH TOMATOES.

Beat seven eggs just enough to break up the yolks. Put a piece of
butter as large as an egg in the frying-pan, and, when it heats, pour
in the eggs. Loosen from the sides and bottom of the pan, from the
first, by shaking the pan, and using your cake-turner. When “set” in
the middle, cover one half with hot stewed tomatoes; fold over the
other half so as to enclose it, and invert the pan upon a hot dish.


MASHED POTATOES.

Whip up soft with butter, milk, and salt, and heap roughly upon a deep
dish.


LEMON PUFFS.

1 cup of prepared flour; ½ cup of powdered sugar; 1 tablespoonful
of butter; 3 beaten eggs; juice and grated peel of half a lemon; 3
tablespoonfuls of milk, with a _tiny_ pinch of soda.

Rub butter and sugar together; beat in the yolks, the milk, whites,
flour; at last, and quickly, the lemon. Bake in buttered corn-bread
pans, or in paté-pans. The oven should be quick. Turn out, and eat hot
with sauce.


  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Beef Tea, with Noodles.
  Smothered Chickens.      Salsify Sauté.
  Macaroni au Gratin.      Brussels Sprouts.
  ——
  English Tapioca Pudding.
  ——


BEEF TEA, WITH NOODLES.

3 lbs. of lean beef; 2 onions; 2 turnips; 2 carrots; 2 cloves; 2 quarts
and 1 pint of water; a good handful of noodles (made according to
receipt given on Wednesday, First Week in August).

Mince the vegetables. Put on in the water, and boil down to two quarts.
Drain off, and pour upon the beef, minced _very_ fine. Simmer one hour;
strain, season, and put in the noodles. Cook gently twenty minutes.


SMOTHERED CHICKENS.

Split a pair of tender chickens down the back, as for broiling. Lay in
a dripping-pan; pour over them a cup of boiling water, in which has
been dissolved a great spoonful of butter. Invert another pan over this
one, to keep in the steam, and cook, basting often, until the chickens
are russet-colored all over, and very tender. Baste twice with butter
at the last. Dish the chickens; thicken, season, and boil up; then pour
part over the chickens, the rest into a boat.


SALSIFY SAUTÉ.

Scrape and cut the salsify-roots into pieces two inches long; cook
tender in boiling water, slightly salt. Shake and drain in a colander,
to get rid of all the water. Have in a frying- or saucepan two or
three spoonfuls of butter, with a little pepper. When hot, put in the
salsify. Heat and toss five minutes, but do not let it brown. Serve
very hot. It is exceedingly nice.


MACARONI AU GRATIN.

Break half a pound of macaroni into inch lengths. Make a weak broth by
diluting the remains of yesterday’s soup with hot water, and straining
it. When it boils, season well, and put in the macaroni. Cook until
tender, but not broken. Drain off the liquor; put the hot macaroni upon
a stone-china dish; stir a good piece of butter through it; sift over
it a mixture of grated cheese and fine bread-crumbs. Set upon the upper
grating of the oven to brown.


BRUSSELS SPROUTS.

Cook about twenty-five minutes in boiling salt water. Drain; season
with pepper, salt, and butter; stir these in well, and dish.


ENGLISH TAPIOCA PUDDING.

1 cup of tapioca, soaked two hours in a pint of the milk; 3 pints
of milk; 5 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 cup of sugar; ½ lb.
raisins, seeded, and cut in half; grated peel of half a lemon.

Put the soaked tapioca in a farina-kettle, and surround with lukewarm
water. Bring to a boil, and, when soft all through, add the creamed
butter and sugar; then the eggs; next, the tapioca; finally, the fruit.
Bake one hour in a buttered dish. Eat hot, with sauce.



  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Mutton Soup.
  Roast Rabbits.      Cheese Custards.
  Stewed Corn.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Cocoa Pudding.
  ——


MUTTON SOUP.

3 lbs. scrag of mutton—bones cracked and meat chopped; 2 turnips; 2
onions; chopped parsley; pepper and salt; 3 quarts of water; ½ cup of
barley, soaked two hours in a little water.

Put on meat and vegetables with the bones in the water, and simmer
three hours and a half. There should be two quarts of soup. Strain,
cool, and season; add the barley, and cook gently until this is soft.


ROAST RABBITS.

Skin, clean with great care, and wash a pair of fat rabbits—or
hares—stuff with a force-meat of crumbs and chopped fat salt pork,
seasoned with onion, thyme, pepper and salt. Sew up with fine thread;
bind the legs to the body in a kneeling posture, and lay in the
dripping-pan. Pour over them a cupful of boiling water, and cover as
you did the chickens yesterday. Baste with butter twice, with their own
gravy twice, and twice, at last, with butter. Just before you take them
up, dredge with flour and give a final baste with butter. Dish when you
have clipped and drawn out the threads. Thicken and season the gravy,
and pour into a gravy-boat.


CHEESE CUSTARDS.

6 tablespoonfuls of finely grated cheese; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter; 4
eggs; 1 cup of milk, with a teaspoonful of corn-starch stirred in it;
salt and pepper; soda.

Beat the eggs very light, and pour upon them the milk heated (with a
pinch of soda) and thickened with the corn-starch. While still warm,
add pepper, salt, butter, and cheese. Beat up well and pour into
greased custard-cups. Bake in a quick oven about fifteen minutes, or
until high and brown. Serve at once, as a separate course, passing
bread and butter with them. They should follow the soup directly, or be
served just before the dessert.


STEWED CORN.

Empty a can of corn into a saucepan and cover with hot-salted water.
Cook half an hour, drain off the water, add a cup of milk, and, when
this boils, a tablespoonful of butter rolled in flour. Pepper and salt
to taste; simmer five minutes and serve.


LIMA BEANS.

Soak the dried beans overnight, changing the water twice. In the
morning put on to cook in cold water, with a clean piece of streaked
fat pork or bacon, an inch or so square. When the beans are soft,
drain; take out the pork and dish; seasoning with butter, pepper and
salt.


COCOA PUDDING.

1 cup of fine crumbs; 1 quart of milk; 4 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of
butter; 1 scant cup of sugar; 2 tablespoonfuls of grated cocoa, or of
cocoatina; 1 teaspoonful of Colgate’s vanilla.

Soak the bread in the milk; put over the fire in a farina-kettle, and
stir to a boil. When thick and smooth, stir in the butter, the sugar,
and the cocoa. Take from the fire, pour out; beat two minutes and whip
in the beaten yolks, then the whites, which should have been beaten
stiff. Put into a buttered mould, set in a pan of hot water and bake
forty-five minutes in a moderate oven. Turn out and eat with powdered
sugar.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Milk Soup.
  Ragoût of Duck.      Canned Green Peas.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Celery Salad.
  ——
  Sponge Gingerbread, with Chocolate.
  ——


MILK SOUP.

1 quart of milk and the same of water; 2 onions; 2 turnips; 2 stalks
of celery; 1 teaspoonful of sugar—a pinch of soda in the milk; 2
tablespoonfuls of corn-starch wet up in cold water; pepper and salt;
dice of fried bread; two tablespoonfuls of butter.

Boil chopped onions, turnips and celery in the water until soft enough
to be pulped through the colander. Do this, season, add the water
in which they were cooked, the milk, and when the soup boils, the
corn-starch. At last, stir in the butter a little at a time, to prevent
oiling. Simmer five minutes, and pour upon the fried bread in the
tureen.


RAGOÛT OF DUCK.

Clean and wash a duck; put into the dripping-pan, with a large cupful
of boiling water, and roast, basting often, half an hour. Meanwhile,
boil the giblets in a pint of water. Take up the duck and joint as for
fricassee. Put into a saucepan with the gravy from the dripping-pan
and the water in which the giblets were boiled; add an onion stuck
with cloves; a little salt and pepper. Cover and stew gently an hour
and a half. Take up the duck and keep hot upon a chafing-dish. Strain
the gravy; stir in a tablespoonful of butter rubbed in one of browned
flour, the juice of a lemon, and a glass of wine. Boil up and pour over
the duck.


CANNED GREEN PEAS.

Turn the peas into a saucepan; cover with boiling water, and cook
twenty-five minutes. Drain well; add pepper, salt and butter, and dish.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as on Tuesday of this Week.


CELERY SALAD.

Scrape and cut the best stalks into short lengths. Put into a
salad-bowl, and season with a dressing of two tablespoonfuls of oil to
five of vinegar, one teaspoonful of sugar, and a saltspoonful, each, of
salt and pepper.


SPONGE GINGERBREAD AND CHOCOLATE.

5 cups of flour; 1 heaping tablespoonful of butter; 1 cup of molasses;
1 cup of sugar; 1 cup of sour milk; 2 tablespoonfuls of saleratus,
dissolved in hot water; 2 teaspoonfuls of ginger; 1 teaspoonful of
cinnamon.

Mix molasses, sugar, butter, and spice together. Warm slightly, and
beat five minutes. Add milk, saleratus, lastly the flour. Beat hard
five minutes, and bake in a broad, shallow pan; or in small tins. Eat
warm with a cup of good chocolate, made by stirring six tablespoonfuls
of chocolate, wet with cold water, into a pint of boiling water,
boiling twenty minutes, adding the milk, and cooking ten minutes
longer, stirring often.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Family Soup.
  Killarney Stew.      Baked Tomatoes.
  Fried Sweet Potatoes.      Stewed Carrots.
  ——
  Boiled Pudding.
  ——


FAMILY SOUP.

4 lbs. of lean beef; 2 lbs. of cracked bones, of any kind; 4 turnips;
3 carrots; 2 onions; 4 stalks of celery; 7 quarts of water; pepper and
salt.

Cut the meat into strips, and fry with a sliced onion, in dripping,
until brown, but not dry. Slice the carrots, turnips, and onion; chop
the celery, and put these with meat, fried onion, bones, and gravy from
the frying-pan, into the soup-pot. Add the water, and cook slowly four
hours after the boil begins. Pour off the liquor—there should be at
least five quarts; take out meat and bones, season highly, and consign
to the stock-pot, with all of the liquor except that needed for to-day.
Salt and pepper, and set away in a cold place. Pulp the vegetables into
the soup kept out for to-day; cool, skim, season, and bring to a gentle
boil; then pour out.


KILLARNEY STEW.

3 lbs. of lean mutton—that from the scrag is best, and you can use the
bones for your soup; 8 sliced potatoes; 1 sliced onion; salt, pepper,
and chopped parsley.

Put on the mutton, cut into small pieces, with the sliced onion, and
enough cold water to cover it, and stew very slowly two hours, or
until tender. Strain the gravy into a bowl, and set in cold water to
throw up the fat. Put a layer of potatoes, sliced thin, in the bottom
of a saucepan; cover with meat, peppered and salted; sprinkle with
parsley—more potatoes, and more meat until all are in. Take all the fat
from the top of the gravy and strain it over the meat. Cover closely,
and simmer until the potatoes are broken to pieces. Half an hour after
the boil begins should suffice.


BAKED TOMATOES.

Drain the superfluous juice from a can of tomatoes into your boiling
soup. Lay the tomatoes in a buttered pie-dish; season with pepper,
salt, butter and sugar; strew bread-crumbs over the top; add a little
gravy saved from yesterday’s ragoût; cover, and bake half an hour; then
brown.


FRIED SWEET POTATOES.

Boil, and, when cold, scrape off the skins; slice lengthwise, and fry
to a light brown in nice dripping, or butter. Drain, salt, pepper, and
serve hot.


STEWED CARROTS.

Scrape, and boil whole forty-five minutes. Drain, and cut into round
slices a quarter of an inch thick. Put on in a cupful of weak broth—a
little of your soup will do—and cook gently half an hour. Then add
three or four tablespoonfuls of milk, a lump of butter rolled in flour,
with seasoning to taste. Boil up and dish.


BOILED PUDDING.

3 cupfuls of flour; 2 cupfuls of sour milk; 1 teaspoonful of soda
dissolved in hot water; ½ cupful powdered suet; a little salt.

Stir the milk gradually into the flour until a smooth batter is the
result. Put in suet and salt; lastly, beat in the soda-water thoroughly
and quickly. Pour into a buttered mould and boil one hour and a half.
Turn out and eat hot with sauce.


  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Tapioca Soup.
  Roast Saddle of Mutton.      Potato Puff.
  Salsify Fritters.      Kidney Beans à l’Anglaise.
  Currant Jelly.
  ——
  Almond Blanc-Mange.
  Cream Rose Cake.
  ——


TAPIOCA SOUP.

Take the fat from the top of your stock-pot, dip out as much as you
need for to-day; add a large cupful of boiling water and strain into
the soup-kettle. Bring to a boil, skim, and put in half a cup of
grained tapioca, which has been soaked for two hours in a little water.
Simmer until clear.


ROAST SADDLE OF MUTTON.

Lay in the dripping-pan, pour a large cup of boiling water over it,
and roast twelve minutes to the pound, basting often. As it begins to
brown, cover with white paper, lifting this when you baste the meat.
Ten minutes before serving, take off the paper, dredge the mutton with
flour; baste with butter, and brown. Skim the fat from the gravy;
thicken with browned flour, season, and boil once, then serve in a
boat. Pass currant jelly with the mutton.


POTATO PUFF.

Whip boiled potatoes light with a fork; beat in butter, salt, and milk,
at last, two frothed eggs. Whisk to a cream; make into a smooth mound
in a greased bake-dish, and set in a quick oven to brown.


SALSIFY FRITTERS.

1 bunch of salsify; 2 beaten eggs; ½ cup of milk; flour for thin
batter; salt.

Wash, scrape, and grate the salsify into the batter, made of the
ingredients given above. It should be as thick when the salsify is in,
as pound-cake batter. Drop by the spoonful into hot fat. Fry quickly,
drain in a hot colander, and serve dry and hot.


KIDNEY BEANS À L’ANGLAISE.

Soak dried white beans all night in cold water. Exchange in the morning
for tepid, and finally put on to boil in cold. Heat and cook slowly,
and when, after two hours, the skin begins to crack, strain off the
water, adding it to your soup-stock if you like, after salting it
sufficiently to warrant its keeping. Put a folded towel upon the beans
left in the saucepan, and set at the side of the range, where they will
keep hot, without scorching, for half an hour. Sprinkle with salt and
pepper; stir in a small bit of butter, and dish. Beans thus cooked will
be very mealy.


ALMOND BLANC-MANGE.

1 quart of milk; 1 package Cooper’s gelatine, soaked one hour in a
little cold water; 3 oz. of almonds, blanched, dried, and pounded in
a mortar, with a little rose-water to prevent oiling; ¾ cup of sugar;
extract bitter almonds.

Heat the milk to scalding; add the gelatine, the pounded almonds, and,
when you have stirred these over the fire ten minutes, the sugar.
Strain through thin muslin, wringing and squeezing to get out the
flavor of the almonds. Flavor, and set in a wet mould to form. Do this
on Saturday. On Sunday, turn it out, and eat with powdered sugar and
cream.


CREAM ROSE CAKE.

Please consult “BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON AND TEA,” page 327.


  Second Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Irish Broth.
  Cotelettes à la Reine.      Stewed Potatoes.
  Savory Bread Pudding.      Bean Salad.
  ——
  Stewed Apples, with Cream and Cake.
  ——


IRISH BROTH.

Strain off as much soup from the stock-pot as you need for to-day. Heat
and skim; stir in a large cupful of mashed potato, rubbed through a
colander; season to taste; simmer ten minutes, and add a great spoonful
of butter rolled in flour. Boil up fairly, and serve.


COTELETTES À LA REINE.

Cut thick slices of the most nearly underdone portions of your roast
mutton. Divide into neat squares about three inches across; dip each in
thick drawn butter, in which the yolks of two eggs have been cooked.
Lay the cutlets to cool upon a broad dish. When the creamy coating
is cold and firm, roll each in pounded cracker, and fry—a few at a
time—in hot lard or dripping. As each is lightly browned, take up with
a skimmer, and drain off the fat. Arrange in a dish, overlapping one
another.


STEWED POTATOES.

Pare; cut into dice; throw into cold water, and leave there half an
hour. Put on to cook in boiling salted water; stew twenty minutes.
Drain off most of the water, and fill up with cold milk. When this
boils, stir in a lump of butter rolled in flour, with chopped parsley.
Cook gently five minutes longer.


SAVORY BREAD PUDDING.

Soak two cups of bread-crumbs in a cupful of yesterday’s gravy, diluted
with a little of your soup-stock. Add a cup of boiling milk, in which
a pinch of soda has been stirred; beat to a smooth batter; add half
a cupful of minced cold meat, three eggs, pepper, and salt. Pour into
a buttered bake-dish, after beating all up light, and bake in a quick
oven. Serve in the dish, and pass a little good gravy, or drawn butter,
with it.


BEAN SALAD.

Put cold beans left from yesterday into a salad-bowl, and pour over it
such a dressing as you prepared for Cold Slaw, on Monday, First Week in
November.


STEWED APPLES, CREAM, AND CAKE.

Pare and core juicy pippins. Put a cupful of water, and one of sugar,
into a bake-dish. Lay in the pippins; cover, and cook slowly until
clear and tender. They should be turned once while cooking. Set away,
still covered, in the bake-dish, to cool, on Saturday. On Monday, put
them into a glass dish, and send cream and cake to table with them.



  Second Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Mutton and Oyster Soup.
  Beefsteak au Maître d’Hôtel.      Baked Sweet Potatoes.
  Stewed Onions.      Mashed Squash.
  ——
  Orange Pudding.
  ——


MUTTON AND OYSTER SOUP.

Crack the bone of your cold mutton, and chop the refuse bits left from
the roast. Put on in two quarts of water, and boil down to one. Strain,
cool, skim, and add to it a quart of stock. If no liquor is left in the
stock-pot for this purpose, add two quarts of water to the meat, bones,
etc., in the bottom, and boil down to one; then strain. Heat the two
quarts of broth to boiling; add two dozen oysters, with their liquor;
season with pepper, salt, and a little mace. Boil one minute. Stir in a
great spoonful of butter rubbed in flour; simmer, and stir two minutes,
and pour out.


BEEFSTEAK AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Treat as directed on Tuesday of First Week in November; but, when
laid upon the hot dish, put over it, and on both sides, two or three
tablespoonfuls of butter, in which have been mixed pepper, salt,
a little French mustard, and the juice of half a lemon, with a
teaspoonful of very finely minced parsley.


BAKED SWEET POTATOES.

Wash, and bake in a moderate oven until soft. Serve in their skins.


STEWED ONIONS.

Top, tail, and skin. Boil in two waters, throwing both away. When the
onions are tender, have ready in a saucepan a cup of drawn butter. Lay
the onions in it; simmer ten minutes, and serve in the sauce.


MASHED SQUASH.

Pare, quarter, and cook soft in boiling salt water. Strain, press, and
mash in a colander. Season with pepper, salt, and butter, and turn into
a deep dish.


ORANGE PUDDING.

2 cups of milk; 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar; 1 heaping cup of prepared
flour; yolks of 4 eggs, and whites of two; pulp of 2 oranges, chopped
very fine; grated peel of ½ an orange; 1 tablespoonful of melted butter.

Cream butter and sugar, and whip in the yolks, then the yellow pulp and
the grated peel of the oranges. Beat three minutes; add the milk, then
flour and whites, alternately. Pour into a buttered mould, and boil one
hour. Eat hot, with jelly sauce.


  Second Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Barley Cream Soup.
  Roast Chine of Pork.      Peas Pudding.
  Mashed Potatoes.      Apple Sauce.
  ——
  Apple Pudding.
  ——


BARLEY CREAM SOUP.

2 lbs. of veal—cut from the knuckle; 1 cupful of barley; 3 quarts of
water; salt and pepper; chopped parsley.

Put the meat, cut into strips, into a pot with the water and barley,
and cook slowly four hours. Pick out the meat, having strained off the
liquor into a bowl; then rub the barley through a soup-sieve. Season
with pepper, salt, and parsley; boil up once, and serve. It should be
of a creamy consistency.


ROAST CHINE OF PORK.

Boil half an hour in hot salted water. Take out and lay upon a dish
to cool somewhat. (Put the pot liquor into the stock-pot.) Rub the
warm chine all over with a little pepper and powdered sage; then, with
beaten egg; strew with bread-crumbs, and set in a good oven until
tender. Should it brown too fast, cover it. Pass apple sauce with it.


PEAS PUDDING.

4 cups of split peas; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 3 eggs; pepper and
salt; 1 small onion.

Soak the peas all night. In the morning put them and the onion into a
farina-kettle with just enough water to cover them. Boil two hours, or
until soft. Drain, and pulp through a colander. Beat in butter, pepper,
salt, and eggs, and boil in a buttered mould or floured cloth one hour.
Turn out, and cut in slices on the table.


MASHED POTATOES.

Prepare as usual.


APPLE SAUCE.

Pare, slice, and stew juicy apples with just enough water to keep them
from burning. Mash when soft and broken to pieces, and beat smooth with
a good lump of butter and plenty of sugar. Serve cold.


APPLE PUDDING.

2 cupfuls of fine crumbs; 2 cupfuls of chopped apples; 1 cupful of
sugar; 1 teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and mace; half as much grated
lemon-peel; juice of a lemon; 1 tablespoonful of brandy; ¼ lb. raisins,
seeded and chopped; 4 eggs; 1 cup of milk; pinch of soda in the milk.

Scald the milk; pour upon the crumbs, and beat light. Add beaten yolks,
sugar, fruit, and spice—at last, the whites. Bake in a buttered dish,
covered, half an hour; then uncover and drain. Eat hot with sweet
sauce. It is very good.



  Second Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Game Soup.
  Fricassee of Grouse.      Buttered Parsnips.
  Potatoes with Vermicelli.      Stewed Tomatoes.
  ——
  Quaking Custard.
  ——


GAME SOUP.

2 grouse or partridges, or, if you have neither, use a pair of rabbits;
½ lb. of lean ham; 2 medium-sized onions; 1 lb. of lean beef; fried
bread; butter for frying; pepper, salt, and 2 stalks of white celery
cut into inch lengths; 3 quarts of water.

Joint your game neatly; cut the ham and onions into small pieces, and
fry all in butter to a light brown. Put into a soup-pot with the beef,
cut into strips, and a little pepper. Pour on the water; heat slowly,
and stew gently two hours. Take out the pieces of bird, and cover in a
bowl; cook the soup an hour longer; strain; cool; drop in the celery,
and simmer ten minutes. Pour upon fried bread in the tureen.


FRICASSEE OF GROUSE.

Make a cup of drawn butter by heating a cup of strained broth from your
boiling soup in a saucepan; stirring into it two tablespoonfuls of
butter cut up in a teaspoonful of flour; season well, and put in the
pieces of grouse, or rabbit. Simmer until very hot; take out the meat
and arrange upon buttered toast in a dish. Add to the gravy a couple of
beaten yolks; heat one minute, and pour over the birds.


POTATOES WITH VERMICELLI.

Mash and whip the potatoes light with butter and milk. Season with
salt, and mound smoothly within a stone-china dish, or a bake-dish that
has a silver stand for the table. Wash over with white of egg, and
strew with vermicelli that has been broken small, boiled a few minutes
in hot water, then spread out to drain upon a sieve. Brown in a quick
oven.


BUTTERED PARSNIPS.

Boil tender, and scrape. Slice a quarter of an inch thick, lengthwise.
Put into a saucepan with a great spoonful of melted butter, pepper and
salt, and a little chopped parsley. Shake over the fire until it boils.
Lay the parsnips upon a dish, and pour the sauce over them.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Empty a can of tomatoes into a saucepan. Stew twenty-five minutes;
season with pepper, salt, sugar, and stir in a lump of butter rolled in
flour. Simmer ten minutes, and serve.


QUAKING CUSTARD.

3 cups of milk; yolks of 3 eggs, using the whites for the _méringue_; ½
package Cooper’s gelatine; 6 tablespoonfuls of sugar; juice of 1 lemon
for _méringue_; flavoring extract for custard.

Soak the gelatine two hours in a cup of the milk. Heat the rest of the
milk; add that in which the gelatine is, and stir over the fire until
the gelatine is melted. Take from the fire and pour upon the beaten
yolks and sugar. Heat slowly, and stir until it thickens well. Cool,
stirring every quarter of an hour. When cold, flavor and pour into a
wet mould. Set in ice, or in a cold place. When it is firm, turn out
and surround with a _méringue_ made by whipping the whites stiff with a
little powdered sugar, and the lemon-juice.



  Second Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Turnip Soup.
  Boiled Cod.      Mashed Potatoes.
  Fricasseed Eggs.      Canned Succotash.
  ——
  Chocolate Tartlets.
  Tea and Albert Biscuits.
  ——


TURNIP SOUP.

12 turnips; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 onion; 2 stalks of celery;
bunch of herbs; 2 cups of milk; pepper and salt; 2 quarts of water; 1
tablespoonful—even—of flour.

Pare and lay the turnips in cold water half an hour. Slice into the
soup-pot, with the onion and celery; also the chopped herbs. Pour on
two quarts of cold water, and boil until the vegetables are broken to
pieces. Rub, with their liquor, through a sieve. Season, and return to
the fire. When it boils, stir in the butter cut up in the flour; cook
five minutes; pour into the tureen, and add the boiling milk.


BOILED COD.

Sew the fish up in a piece of mosquito-netting. Put on in plenty of
boiling water, a little salt, allowing _about_ twelve minutes per
pound. Unwrap; lay upon a hot dish, and pour over it—serving some in
a boat—a cupful of drawn butter made from the fish pot-liquor, and
containing, besides butter and flour, the pounded yolks of two boiled
eggs, and a tablespoonful of chopped green pickle.


MASHED POTATOES.

Mash, and pass with the fish.


FRICASSEED EGGS.

7 or 8 hard-boiled eggs, laid in cold water so soon as they are done;
a cup of gravy left from yesterday’s soup; a little cold chopped meat;
melted butter, pepper, salt, and French mustard; three tablespoonfuls
of cream.

Cut the cold eggs, crosswise; take out the yolks; slice a bit from the
bottom of each white “cup” thus made, and stand them closely together
in a flat dish. Rub the yolks to a paste with the butter; mix with the
chopped meat and seasoning, and make into round balls, with which fill
your “cups.” Heat, and add the cream to the gravy, and pour over the
eggs. Set in the oven three minutes to heat; stick a bit of parsley in
the top of each ball, and send to table.


CANNED SUCCOTASH.

Turn out a can of succotash into a saucepan; barely cover with hot
water, and cook half an hour. Pour off the water; put on, instead, a
cup of cold milk. Bring to a boil; pepper, salt, and put in a lump of
butter, rolled in flour. Simmer five minutes.


CHOCOLATE TARTLETS.

4 eggs; ½ cake Baker’s chocolate, grated; 1 tablespoonful corn-starch,
dissolved in milk; 3 tablespoonfuls of milk; 4 tablespoonfuls of white
sugar; 2 tablespoonfuls of vanilla; ½ teaspoonful cinnamon, and a
little salt; 1 heaping teaspoonful of melted butter.

Rub the chocolate smooth in the milk; heat over the fire, and add the
corn-starch wet in more milk. Stir until thickened, and pour out. When
cold, beat in the yolks and sugar, with the flavoring. Bake in open
shells lining paté-pans. Cover with a _méringue_ made of the whites and
a little powdered sugar, when they are nearly done, and let them color
slightly. Eat cold.



  Second Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Winter Pea Soup.
  Ham and Eggs.      Macaroni with Cod.
  Fried Beans.      Cold Slaw, with Cream Dressing.
  ——
  Squash Pie.
  ——


WINTER PEA SOUP.

3 lbs. of beef, cut into strips; 1 lb. of lean ham; 2 lbs. of cracked
bones; 5 quarts of water; 1 turnip, sliced; 2 onions, chopped; pepper;
salt; 3 stalks of celery; 1 pint of split peas.

Soak the peas all night. In the morning, put them on in a farina-kettle
covered with a quart of warm water, and cook soft. Put into a
soup-kettle the beef, ham, and vegetables, with five quarts of water,
and cook slowly four hours, filling up with hot water should the water
sink below four quarts. Strain off the liquor; pick out meat and bones
from the colander; put into the stock-jar, and season well. Pour over
them all but three pints of the soup, and set away. Pulp the vegetables
through the colander into to-day’s broth; season, and add the peas,
also rubbed through a colander. Cook slowly, stirring often, half an
hour, and pour upon dice of fried bread into the tureen.


HAM AND EGGS.

Boil slices of ham fifteen minutes, and let them get cold. Trim and
cut into pieces of uniform size; put a small piece of butter in a
frying-pan, and cook the ham, not too quickly, turning when the under
side is done. Strain the fat when the ham has been taken out and put
upon a hot-water dish; return to the fire, and fry the eggs. Cut off
the ragged edges and lay one upon each slice of ham.


MACARONI WITH COD.

Break a quarter of a pound of macaroni into short pieces; boil twenty
minutes in hot salted water; drain; stir in a tablespoonful of butter
and three tablespoonfuls of grated cheese; mix up with one-third
as much chopped cod as you have macaroni, and put into a buttered
bake-dish. Wet with a little milk; scatter bread-crumbs on the top, and
bake, covered, half an hour, then brown.


FRIED BEANS.

Boil as directed on Sunday of this week; put a little dripping in a
frying-pan with a little powdered, or chopped parsley; heat, put in
the beans, and stir until they are a pale yellow; pepper and salt, and
serve hot.


COLD SLAW, WITH CREAM DRESSING.

1 small head of white cabbage, chopped fine; 1 cup scalding milk;
rather less than a cup of vinegar; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 2 beaten
eggs; 1 tablespoonful of white sugar; 1 teaspoonful essence of celery;
pepper and salt to taste.

Heat milk and vinegar in separate vessels. Put butter, sugar, and
seasoning into the hot vinegar. Boil up once, and put in the cabbage.
Heat to scalding and take off. Add the beaten eggs to the hot milk;
cook until they begin to thicken. Put the hot cabbage into a bowl; pour
the custard over it; toss and stir with a silver fork; cover to keep in
the strength of the vinegar, and cool suddenly.


SQUASH PIE.

1 pint of stewed and strained squash; 1 pint of milk; ¾ cup of sugar;
3 eggs, beaten light; ½ teaspoonful of ginger, and same of mace and
cinnamon mixed.

Beat all well together, and bake in open shells of paste


  Third Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Potage au Riz.
  Roast Turkey.      Cranberry Sauce.
  Mashed Potatoes, Browned.      Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Queen’s Pudding.
  ——


POTAGE AU RIZ.

Take the fat from the top of the soup-stock. Pour off and strain what
is needed for to-day. Heat and skim; add half a cup of rice which has
been cooked soft in a little milk—also the milk which has not been
soaked up; put in what seasoning is needed; simmer fifteen minutes, and
serve.


ROAST TURKEY.

Clean, and wash out the crop and body of the turkey with soda and
water, rinsing it out afterwards. Stuff with a force-meat made of
crumbs, a little cooked sausage, pepper, salt, and a little butter.
Truss the turkey neatly. (Salt the giblets, and set by for to-morrow’s
soup.) Lay it in the dripping-pan; pour boiling water over it, and
roast about ten minutes to the pound, after the cooking actually
commences. Cook slowly at first, or it will be dry without and raw
within. Baste often and freely. Ten minutes before taking it up, dredge
with flour, and baste with butter. Pour off the fat from the top of the
gravy, thicken with browned flour, and season; boil once and serve in a
boat.


CRANBERRY SAUCE.

Put a quart of clean cranberries into a saucepan, with a cupful of
cold water. Stew slowly, stirring often, for an hour and a half. Take
from the fire, and sweeten abundantly with sugar; rub through a fine
colander and set to form in a wet mould. Do this on Saturday.


MASHED POTATOES—BROWNED.

Whip light with milk, butter, and salt; pile upon a greased pie-dish,
and brown in a good oven. Slip to a hot dish by the aid of your
cake-turner.


SWEET POTATOES.

Boil until tender; strip off the skins; lay in an oven to dry for some
minutes and serve.


QUEEN’S PUDDING.

2 cups of milk; 4 eggs; ½ package of gelatine; ½ cup of sugar; vanilla
or other essence; 1 sponge-cake; 2 glasses of wine; raspberry or other
jelly.

Soak the gelatine in the milk for one hour. Put into a farina-kettle
and heat to boiling, stirring until the gelatine is dissolved. Pour
upon the beaten eggs and sugar; return to the fire and cook one minute.
Pour half, when cold, into a wet mould. After half an hour, cover this
with slices of sponge cake with jelly spread between them. Wet these
well with wine. Add the rest of the custard, and set the mould upon
ice, or in a cold place.

Make this pudding on Saturday.



  Third Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Giblet Soup.
  Turkey Scallop.      Boiled Rice.
  Stewed Tomatoes.      Baked Potatoes.
  ——
  Apple Méringue Pie.
  ——


GIBLET SOUP.

Boil the turkey-giblets in a quart of water. Take them out; add the
water to the entire contents of your stock-pot, and simmer at the
back of the range for one hour, adding water if it should boil down.
Strain and season. Have ready the giblets—the gizzard chopped fine, the
liver pounded with half a cupful of turkey-stuffing. Cook all together
fifteen minutes, and pour out.


TURKEY SCALLOP.

Cut the meat from your cold turkey. Break the bones, cover them with
two quarts of cold water; boil one hour, season and put into a bowl.
Chop the meat and season with pepper and salt. Put a layer of buttered
crumbs in the bottom of a bake-dish; cover with the mince; moisten
with gravy; more crumbs buttered and wet with milk. Having filled
the dish in this way, cover with cracker-crumbs, seasoned, wet with
oyster-liquor (or milk) and beaten light with two eggs. Strew butter on
top; bake, covered, half an hour; then brown.


BOILED RICE.

Skim the fat from the cooled broth made by boiling your turkey-bones.
Put into a saucepan with a cup of soaked rice, and cook until the
latter is soft, shaking the pot from time to time. Drain off the
liquor, and put into your stock-pot; serve the boiled rice in a deep
dish, and pass grated cheese with it.


STEWED TOMATOES.

See Thursday, Second Week in November.


BAKED POTATOES.

Wash, and bake soft in a moderate oven. Wipe, and serve wrapped in a
napkin.


APPLE MÉRINGUE PIE.

Beat into some good, sweet apple-sauce a little melted butter, and
season to taste with nutmeg. Fill a shell of pie-paste with this; bake,
and when done, spread with a _méringue_ made of the whites of three
beaten eggs and a little sugar. Shut up in the oven a few minutes, to
“set.” You can keep raw paste in a cold place from Saturday to Monday,
and spare yourself the trouble of making it to-day.


  Third Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Veal and Oyster Soup.
  Beefsteak Pie.      Ladies’ Cabbage au Maître d’Hôtel.
  Purée of Potatoes.      Canned French Beans.
  ——
  Flour Hasty Pudding.
  ——


VEAL AND OYSTER SOUP.

Knuckle of veal—meat sliced and bones cracked; 1 qt. of oysters; 1 cup
of milk; 2 teaspoonfuls of flour; 1 tablespoonful of butter cut up in
the flour; 2 stalks of celery; pepper and salt; 6 quarts of water.

Put meat, bones, celery, and water over the fire and cook slowly four
hours. Strain; put meat and bones, highly seasoned, into your stock-jar
with all the soup except two quarts, and set away. Cool and take the
fat from that kept out for to-day; return to the fire with seasoning.
When it boils, add the oysters. Cook five minutes; pour out and add the
boiling milk thickened with the floured butter.


BEEFSTEAK PIE.

3 lbs. of steak; 1 chopped onion; 1 tablespoonful of mushroom catsup;
a little water; 1 tablespoonful of butter cut up into floured bits;
pepper and salt; some good plain paste.

Cut the steaks into small squares; beat each flat, and leave out bone,
fat, and gristle. Strew a little onion in the bottom of a bake-dish;
put in a layer of meat, peppered and salted; scatter bits of floured
butter over it; then more onion. When all are in, pour in the catsup
and a little water—or gravy is better—cover with crust, and bake nearly
two hours.


LADIES’ CABBAGE AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Boil a cabbage in two waters. (Salt the second, and put into your
stock-pot.) Let it get perfectly cold; chop fine; mix with two beaten
eggs, a few spoonfuls of your soup-stock, a great spoonful of
butter, the juice of a lemon, pepper and salt. Pour into a buttered
pudding-dish, bake covered, forty minutes, brown, and serve in the dish.


PURÉE OF POTATOES.

Whip boiled potatoes light, and rub through a colander. Add milk
and butter, salt to taste, and when very soft, pour into a buttered
saucepan. Stir until hot and stiff; pour into a deep dish.


CANNED FRENCH BEANS.

Clip the beans into short and equal lengths. Put into a saucepan, cover
with hot salted water, and stew half an hour. Drain, stir in a lump of
butter, with pepper and salt, and dish.


FLOUR HASTY PUDDING.

Heat to boiling a quart of milk. Salt, and stir in three tablespoonfuls
of flour, rubbed smooth in a little cold milk. Boil and stir fifteen
minutes, and add a tablespoonful of butter. Cook two minutes; turn into
an uncovered deep dish, and eat with butter and sugar, or cream and
sugar. Sprinkle each saucerful with nutmeg.



  Third Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Cauliflower Soup.
  Pork Chops, with Tomato Gravy.      Beets.
  Potato Croquettes.      Apple Sauce.
  ——
  Batter Pudding.
  ——


CAULIFLOWER SOUP.

Skim your soup-stock. Heat and boil it for ten minutes. Strain off
two quarts, and return the rest to the stock-jar. Parboil a small
cauliflower; clip it into small clusters, and drop into the soup when
you have brought it again to a boil. Cook slowly fifteen minutes. Stir
in a tablespoonful of butter cut up in half as much flour. Season to
taste; boil up fairly, and serve.


PORK CHOPS, WITH TOMATO GRAVY.

Trim off skin and fat; rub all over with a mixture of powdered sage and
onion. Put a small piece of butter into a frying-pan; put in the chops,
and cook rather slowly, as they should be well done. Lay the chops upon
a hot dish; add a little hot water to the gravy in the pan; a great
spoonful of butter rolled in flour; pepper, salt, and sugar, and half
a cup of juice drained from a can of tomatoes—keeping the tomatoes
themselves for a tomato omelette for breakfast. Stew five minutes, and
pour over the chops.


BEETS.

Wash; cut off the tops; boil more than an hour; scrape. Cut into round
slices, and put into a root-dish. Pour over them a tablespoonful of
butter, heated with as much vinegar, and seasoned with pepper and salt.


POTATO CROQUETTES.

Mash soft with butter, salt, and milk. Beat light with two eggs (for a
large dish). Heat in a greased saucepan, stirring all the while, until
quite stiff. Let it get cold; make into croquettes; roll in raw egg,
then in cracker-crumbs, and fry to a nice brown in plenty of dripping.
Drain off the fat, and serve.


APPLE SAUCE.

See Wednesday, Second Week in November.


BATTER PUDDING.

1 liberal pint of milk; 4 eggs; 2 even cups of flour—_prepared_; 1
teaspoonful of salt.

Beat the yolks; add milk and salt; then the flour; lastly, the whites.
Bake at once in a buttered dish, forty-five minutes. Eat hot, with a
good sauce.


  Third Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Chicken Cream Soup.
  Ragoût of Rabbits.      Parsnip Fritters.
  Stewed Celery.      Glazed Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Orange Tartlets.
  ——


CHICKEN CREAM SOUP.

Boil an old fowl, with an onion, in four quarts of cold water, until
there remain but two quarts. Take it out, and let it get cold. Cut
off the whole of the breast, and chop very fine. Mix with the pounded
yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, and rub through a colander. Cool, skim,
and strain the soup into a soup-pot. Season; add the chicken-and-egg
mixture; simmer ten minutes, and pour into the tureen. Then add a small
cup of boiling milk.


RAGOÛT OF RABBITS.

Pair of rabbits; ½ lb. of fat salt pork; 1 large onion; 1 tablespoonful
of butter, and same of browned flour; pepper and salt; ½ lemon, peeled
and sliced _thin_; glass of sherry; ½ cup of gravy.

Slice the onion; dredge with flour, and fry brown in the butter. Add
half a cupful of gravy, and, when well mixed, turn all into a saucepan.
Put in the rabbits, jointed as for fricassee, the sliced bacon, and
lemon. Season; cover closely, and stew an hour, or until the meat is
tender. Thicken with browned flour; boil once, and pour out.


PARSNIP FRITTERS.

Scrape and halve the parsnips. Boil tender in hot salted water. Mash
smooth, picking out the woody bits. Add a beaten egg to every four
parsnips, a teaspoonful of flour—pepper and salt at your discretion,
and enough milk to make into a thick batter. Drop, by the spoonful,
into hot lard, and fry brown. Drain in a hot colander, and dish.


STEWED CELERY.

Scrape, and cut into short bits. Cook tender in hot salted water. Pour
this off; add enough cold milk to cover the celery. Heat to a boil;
stir in a good spoonful of butter rolled in flour, pepper and salt.
Stew five minutes longer.


GLAZED SWEET POTATOES.

Boil soft, peel carefully, and lay in a greased dripping-pan in a
good oven. As they begin to crust over, baste with a little butter,
repeating this several times, as they brown. When glossy, and of a
golden russet, dish.


ORANGE TARTLETS.

2 fine oranges, juice of both, and grated peel of one; ¾ cup of sugar;
2 tablespoonfuls of butter; juice of ½ a lemon; 1 teaspoonful of
corn-starch, wet up with lemon-juice and a little cold water.

Beat all to a smooth cream, and bake in small paste shells.



  Third Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Egg Soup.
  Panned Oysters.      Fowl and Rice Croquettes.
  Potatoes à l’Italienne.      Canned Corn Pudding.
  ——
  Boiled Custards and Cake.
  ——


EGG SOUP.

Heat all your soup-stock, adding hot water, should there not be two
quarts. Cook gently half an hour; strain, pressing all the strength
out of the meat; cool, skim off the fat; season; return to the fire,
and when it boils, pour upon six beaten raw eggs. Put back into the
soup-kettle, and stir until it _begins_ to thicken. It must not boil.
Put strips of crisp toast into the tureen, and pour on the soup.


PANNED OYSTERS.

Butter a number of small tins with upright sides, like those of
muffin-rings. Cut rounds of bread to fit the bottoms; toast these,
butter well, and fit each into its place. Wet with oyster-liquor;
then lay in as many oysters as the tins will hold; dust with pepper
and salt; put a bit of butter upon each, arrange the tins in a large
dripping-pan; cover with another to keep in steam, and flavor, and cook
eight minutes, or until the oysters “ruffle.” Send up in the tins—“hot
and hot.”


FOWL AND RICE CROQUETTES.

Cut the meat from the skeleton of your cold chicken. Break up the
bones, and cover with a quart of cold water, adding skin and gristle.
Boil down to a pint, cool, take off the fat; return to the fire; salt,
and put in half a cupful of raw rice. Cook in a farina-kettle until the
rice is soft and dry; stir in, then, a tablespoonful of butter, and
turn upon a flat dish, to cool. Meanwhile, put the minced chicken into
a saucepan with a little of yesterday’s soup; season, and stir over
the fire until very hot. Beat a raw egg into the cold rice; flour your
hands, and make into oblong flat cakes. Put a great spoonful of mince
in the hollowed centre of each; enclose by folding the rice upon it;
roll each in flour; then in raw egg; lastly in pounded cracker, and fry
to a fine yellow brown.


POTATOES À L’ITALIENNE.

Whip the boiled potatoes to a dry meal with a fork; still using the
fork, beat in butter, salt, pepper, and two tablespoonfuls of cream.
Pile, like rock-work, upon a stone-china dish, or within a pudding-dish
that has a silver stand for the table, and brown delicately and quickly
upon the upper grating of the oven.


CANNED CORN PUDDING.

Drain and chop the corn; add a cupful of milk, 2 tablespoonfuls of
melted butter, and 1 of sugar; pepper, salt, and 2 beaten eggs. Beat
all light; pour in a greased bake-dish; bake, covered, half an hour;
then brown.


BOILED CUSTARDS AND CAKE.

1 quart of milk; yolks of 5 eggs and the whites of 2, reserving 3
for the _méringue_; 6 tablespoonfuls of sugar; flavoring extract, 1
teaspoonful to the pint.

Heat the milk to scalding; pour gradually, upon the beaten yolks and
two whites, whipped light with the sugar. Return to the custard-kettle,
and stir until it begins to thicken. When cold, flavor; pour into glass
or china cups; whip the whites to a froth with a little sugar, and pile
upon the top. Lay a preserved berry, or a bit of bright jelly, upon the
top of each snowy heap. Eat with cake.



  Third Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Good Beef Soup.
  Breaded Lamb Chops.      Fried Potatoes.
  Scalloped Tomatoes.      Baked Onions.
  ——
  Suet Dumplings.
  ——


GOOD BEEF SOUP.

6 lbs. of shin beef, cut in strips; 2 lbs. of bones, cracked; 4 stalks
of celery; 1 onion; 3 carrots; 2 turnips; bunch of sweet herbs; pepper
and salt; 7 quarts of water.

Put on the meat and bones in the water, and cook slowly, skimming
often, for two hours. Add the herbs and all the sliced vegetables
except one carrot, and cook two hours more. Strain off the liquor;
put bones and meat, well seasoned, into your stock-pot; add the soup
(there should be at least five quarts in all) except what is needed for
to-day, and put away for future use. Pulp the vegetables into to-day’s
soup; cool, take off the fat; season; put back over the fire; add the
reserved carrot, which should have been cut into dice and cooked by
itself in a little water; simmer ten minutes, and pour out.


BREADED LAMB CHOPS.

Trim neatly; flatten with the side of a hatchet; pepper and salt;
dip into beaten egg, then in cracker-dust, and fry in good dripping,
turning when the lower side is done. Drain off the fat, and lay upon a
dish, overlapping each other, with a wall of fried potatoes around them.


FRIED POTATOES.

Pare; slice thin; lay in cold water half an hour; dry between two
towels, and fry to a light brown in nice dripping or salted lard. Shake
off all the fat in a hot colander, and pile around the chops.


SCALLOPED TOMATOES.

Drain off most of the liquid from a can of tomatoes into the boiling
soup-kettle. Put a layer of crumbs in the bottom of a buttered
bake-dish; butter them, and lay in the tomatoes, seasoned with pepper,
salt, and sugar. Cover with buttered crumbs, and bake, covered, half an
hour—then brown.


BAKED ONIONS.

Cook in two waters—the second, salted and boiling. When tender,
drain; set closely together in a bake-dish. Pepper, salt, and butter
liberally; pour over them a little of your soup-stock, strained through
a cloth; brown in a good oven; lay in a deep dish, and pour over them
the gravy thickened with browned flour, and cooked one minute.


SUET DUMPLINGS.

2 cups fine crumbs soaked in a cup of hot milk; 1 cup powdered suet; 4
beaten eggs; 1 tablespoonful of sugar; 1 teaspoonful cream-tartar mixed
with 1 tablespoonful of flour; ½ teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the
milk; a little salt.

Beat the eggs into the soaked crumbs; add salt, suet, sugar, lastly,
the flour. Beat and knead hard, make into balls; put into floured
cloths; leave room to swell; tie tightly, and boil one hour. Eat hot,
with sauce.


  Fourth Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Macaroni Soup.
  Roast Goose.      Apple Sauce.
  Sweet Potatoes.      Canned String-Beans.
  Cauliflower.
  ——
  Chocolate and Cocoanut Blanc-Mange.
  White Cake.
  Coffee.
  ——


MACARONI SOUP.

Skim your stock; pour off and strain two quarts; heat to a slow boil;
add a tablespoonful of walnut catsup; skim well, and drop in half a
cupful of fancy macaroni, which has been cooked ten minutes in a little
boiling water. Simmer five minutes, and serve.


ROAST GOOSE.

Be wary in the selection of even what the poulterer assures you is a
“green goose,” and should you be “sold,” as well as the bird, take
the disappointment good-naturedly. Wash out and wipe dry the body of
the goose; add to the usual dressing of crumbs, pepper, salt, etc., a
tablespoonful of melted butter; a tablespoonful of minced onion; half
as much powdered sage, some bits of fat pork, and the yolks of two
eggs. Put into the dripping-pan with two cupfuls of boiling water, and
roast, if of fair size, two hours, basting often and very copiously.
When half done, cover the breast with a stiff paste of flour and water,
removing when you are ready to brown it. Take the fat from the gravy;
thicken with browned flour, add a glass of sherry, salt, and pepper;
boil and serve in a boat.


APPLE SAUCE.

See Wednesday, Second Week in November.


SWEET POTATOES.

Cook as directed on Sunday, Third Week in November.


CANNED STRING-BEANS.

See “French Beans,” Tuesday, Third Week in November.


CAULIFLOWER.

Tie in a net, and cook about forty-five minutes in boiling, salted
water. Drain; lay in a deep dish, blossom upward, and pour on a cupful
of rich drawn butter, with the juice of a lemon stirred in.


CHOCOLATE AND COCOANUT BLANC-MANGE.

1 quart of milk; 3 tablespoonfuls of corn-starch—heaping; 1 cup of
sugar; whites of 4 eggs; vanilla flavoring; 3 tablespoonfuls of grated
chocolate; 1 grated cocoanut.

Heat the milk; rub the corn-starch smooth with a little cold milk; stir
into the hot milk, first the sugar, then the corn-starch. When it is a
smooth paste, whip in the frothed whites; cook one minute, and pour off
half of the mixture into a bowl upon half the grated cocoanut. Beat in
well. Add to that on the fire the chocolate, rubbed smooth in a little
milk, and stir until the blanc-mange is colored. Wet a mould; when the
chocolate-mixture is cold, pour half into the mould, and set where it
will get cold fast. After half an hour, or so soon as it will bear the
weight, put the cocoanut in carefully, and when this is quite firm, add
the rest of the chocolate. Next day turn it out upon a dish, and heap
the other half of the cocoanut—newly grated—over it. Send around a good
boiled custard cold with it. Do this on Saturday.


WHITE CAKE.

Please refer to “General Receipts,” Series No. 1, of “COMMON SENSE IN
THE HOUSEHOLD,” page 334.


  Fourth Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Medley Soup.
  Réchauffé of Goose.      Stewed Salsify.
  Potato Cones, Baked.      Cranberry Sauce.
  ——
  Apple Méringue.
  ——


MEDLEY SOUP.

When you have cut the meat from the carcass of the goose, break up the
bones; put on with the stuffing in two quarts of water, and boil down
to one. Strain; skim; add what stock remains in your stock-jar, and
simmer half an hour. The stuffing should thicken the soup sufficiently,
and almost season it. Pour out into the tureen.


RÉCHAUFFÉ OF GOOSE.

Cut the meat into neat slices, and lay in a saucepan with minced ham,
and a little onion between the slices. Cover with gravy, and heat
slowly until near the boiling-point. Take up the meat; lay upon a dish;
thicken the gravy with browned flour; add a spoonful of currant jelly;
boil up, and pour over the meat.


STEWED SALSIFY.

Scrape, and cut each root in two, dropping into water as you scrape
them. Stew in boiling water, a little salt, until tender; pour off the
water; add enough milk to cover the roots; when it boils, stir in a
piece of butter rolled in flour; pepper and salt; simmer five minutes,
and pour out.


POTATO CONES—BAKED.

Mash or whip boiled potatoes light; mix with a little very finely
minced parsley a little butter, a great spoonful of cream, and the
yolks of two beaten eggs. Make into cone-shaped loaves, about as large
as an egg; set in a greased baking-pan; wash over with beaten egg, and
brown in a quick oven.


CRANBERRY SAUCE.

See Sunday, Third Week in November.


APPLE MÉRINGUE.

Sweeten and spice some nice apple sauce; beat in two or three eggs.
Pour into a pudding-dish, and bake quickly. When well crusted over,
cover with a _méringue_ made by whipping stiff the whites of three eggs
with a little sugar. Shut the oven-door, and tinge slightly.



  Fourth Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Baked Bean Soup.
  Veal Cutlets.      Fried Parsnips.
  Sausage and Cabbage.      Celery Salad.
  ——
  Macaroni Pudding.
  ——


BAKED BEAN SOUP.

On Monday morning put a quart of beans in soak. By evening, put them
to boil at the back of the range, and cook until soft. Early on
Tuesday morning put them into a pudding-dish with a pound of parboiled
streaked pork, and bake brown. Cut the bacon into strips; put into a
soup-pot with the beans, a sliced onion, and three stalks of celery.
Pour on three quarts of cold water, and boil down to two. Rub through
a colander; return to the fire; season to taste; add a teaspoonful of
flour into which a tablespoonful of butter has been rubbed. Simmer ten
minutes, and pour upon dice of fried bread placed in the tureen.


VEAL CUTLETS.

Flatten with side of a hatchet; pepper, salt, dip in raw egg, then in
cracker-dust; fry in a little butter, turning as they brown. Dish,
and pour over them some drawn butter in which has been cooked a great
spoonful of tomato catsup.


FRIED PARSNIPS.

Boil tender in a little hot water, salted. Scrape, cut into long
slices; dredge with flour and fry in hot lard or dripping. Drain off
the fat, and serve.


SAUSAGE AND CABBAGE.

Quarter and parboil a fine, white cabbage, and put on to boil in hot
water with six or eight “link” sausages, having previously pricked
these slightly. When the cabbage is tender, drain and chop, adding
pepper, salt, a little butter and vinegar heated together. Pile upon a
hot dish, laying the sausages about the cabbage.


CELERY SALAD.

Scrape and cut blanched celery into inch lengths. Put into a glass
dish, and pour over it a dressing made by rubbing a teaspoonful of
sugar with half as much, each, of pepper, salt, and made mustard, with
two tablespoonfuls of oil, and twice the quantity of vinegar, added
gradually.


MACARONI PUDDING.

1 cup macaroni broken into equal lengths; 1 quart of milk; 4 eggs; ½
lemon; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter; ¾ cup of sugar, a little mace.

Simmer the macaroni in half the milk until tender. Heat and add the
other pint. While hot stir in the butter, the yolks beaten up with
sugar, the mace, lemon-juice and peel—finally the whisked whites. Bake
half an hour in a buttered mould—covered—then brown.



  Fourth Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  Venison Soup.
  Boiled Leg of Mutton.      Mashed Turnips.
  Stewed Tomatoes.      Stuffed Potatoes.
  ——
  Pancakes.
  ——


VENISON SOUP.

3 lbs. of venison, the coarser parts of the meat will do; 1 lb. lean
ham; 1 onion sliced; 3 stalks of celery; 5 quarts of water; 1 can of
corn, drained and chopped, pepper and salt; butter and flour.

Cut up the meat and put on with the onion, celery, and water. Stew
slowly three and a half hours. Strain, pressing hard; cool, skim, and
return the soup to the fire with the chopped corn. Stew half an hour;
add the seasoning, a lump of butter rolled in flour, a half-cup of
tomato-juice, and simmer ten minutes more.

If you cannot get venison use mutton for this soup.


BOILED LEG OF MUTTON.

Put on in plenty of boiling water, a little salt. Cook fifteen minutes
to the pound. When done, wipe dry and rub all over with butter. Make a
boat of drawn butter, using as a base a cup of the strained pot-liquor,
and, when made, add a great spoonful of chopped cucumber pickle.

Of course you will pour the pot-liquor into the stock-jar.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Pare, quarter, and cook the turnips tender in boiling salted water.
Mash in a hot colander; add butter, pepper, and salt, and serve in a
hot dish.


STEWED TOMATOES.

See Thursday, Second Week in November.


STUFFED POTATOES.

Bake large potatoes soft, and cut a round piece from the top of each.
Scrape out the insides carefully and mash smooth with butter, cream,
and a little grated cheese.

Beat soft with milk, season with pepper and salt, and heat in a greased
saucepan, stirring all the time. Fill the skins with the mixture, put
on the caps and set in the oven for three minutes. Serve upon a dish
lined with a napkin.


PANCAKES.

2 cups of prepared flour; 6 eggs; 1 saltspoonful of salt; milk to make
a _thin_ batter.

Beat the eggs light; add salt, two cups of milk, then, the whites
and flour alternately with milk, until the batter is of the right
consistency. Run a teaspoonful of lard over the bottom of a hot
frying-pan, pour in a large ladleful of batter, and fry quickly. Roll
the pancake up like a sheet of paper; lay upon a hot dish; put in more
lard, and fry another pancake. Keep hot over boiling water, sending
half a dozen to the table at a time. Eat with sauce.



  Fourth Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Mutton and Rice Soup.
  Chickens à la Viennoise.      Hominy Croquettes.
  Spinach.      Lima Beans.
  ——
  Bread and Custard Pudding.
  ——


MUTTON AND RICE SOUP.

Take all the fat from the liquor in which your mutton was boiled;
put it over the fire with a cup of raw rice, and cook slowly until
the latter is boiled to pieces. Strain through the soup-sieve, add
seasoning to taste, and some finely minced parsley. Heat to boiling,
and pour into the tureen. Add a cup of hot milk, in which have been
beaten two raw eggs—the milk having cooked for a minute to thicken them.


CHICKENS À LA VIENNOISE.

Clean, wash, and wipe a pair of chickens. Parboil the giblets;
chop them fine, with a very little onion, the pounded yolks of two
hard-boiled eggs, and seasoning to your taste. Add a handful of crumbs,
and stuff the chickens with this force-meat. Boil in plenty of hot
water, slightly salt, three-quarters of an hour, having sewed up each
in coarse netting. Put them into a broad saucepan, in which have been
melted two tablespoonfuls of nice dripping, and the same of butter.
The fowls should have been wiped dry, and the fat be hot when you put
them in. Turn twice while you brown them over a quick fire. When
russet-colored all over, dish, and pour over them a few spoonfuls of
butter, heated with a tablespoonful of tomato catsup. Save the liquor
in which the fowls were boiled.


HOMINY CROQUETTES.

2 cups of fine-grained hominy, boiled, and cold; 2 beaten eggs; 2
tablespoonfuls melted butter; 1 tablespoonful of sugar; salt to taste.

Rub butter and sugar into the hominy until the latter is smooth; then
beat in the eggs. Make into rolls with floured hands; roll in flour,
and fry to a good color. Drain well.


SPINACH.

Pick off the leaves. Boil in hot salted water twenty minutes. Drain,
chop fine, and return to the saucepan, with a piece of butter, salt,
sugar, pepper, and a pinch of mace. Beat in two tablespoonfuls of
cream, and, when smooth and hot, turn out.


LIMA BEANS.

Soak the dried beans all night; then proceed as with “Kidney Beans à
l’Anglaise,” on Sunday, Second Week in November. Cook enough for a hot
dish to-day, and bean salad to-morrow.


BREAD AND CUSTARD PUDDING.

1 quart of milk; 2 even cups of dried crumbs; 4 eggs; 5 tablespoonfuls
of sugar; cinnamon; ½ lb. raisins, seeded and chopped; 2 tablespoonfuls
melted butter.

Soak the crumbs in a pint of the milk, and heat to scalding in a
custard-kettle. Beat to a mush; put in the butter, and beat again one
minute. Butter a pudding-dish; pour a half-cupful of the mush in the
bottom; sprinkle with cinnamon, and strew with raisins, more batter,
spice, and fruit, until all are in. Heat the other pint of milk; pour
upon the beaten yolks and sugar; pour this custard, without boiling,
over the pudding. Bake, covered, half an hour. Uncover, spread upon the
custard—if fully “set”—a _méringue_ of the whites, whipped stiff with a
little powdered sugar. Eat warm—not hot—with cream and sugar, or butter
and sugar.


  Fourth Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Graham Soup.
  Fricassee of Canned Salmon.      Chicken Dumplings.
  Salsify Sauté.      Macaroni, with Bacon.
  Bean Salad.
  ——
  Pumpkin Pie.
  ——


GRAHAM SOUP.

3 onions; 3 carrots; 3 turnips; ½ cabbage; 6 stalks of celery; ½ can
of tomatoes; 3 tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in flour; ½ cup of milk
(cream is better); pepper and salt; 3 quarts of water; a little sugar;
sweet herbs.

Chop the vegetables, and put all over the fire in the water, excepting
the cabbage and tomatoes. Parboil the cabbage, and add at the end
of half an hour’s boil. Half an hour later, put in the tomatoes and
chopped herbs. Boil sharply twenty minutes; add sugar, pepper, and
salt. Rub the soup through a colander. Return to the fire; stir in the
floured butter; simmer five minutes, turn into the tureen, and stir in
the hot milk or cream.


FRICASSEE OF SALMON.

1 can fresh salmon; 2 beaten eggs; 1 cup of drawn butter; 1 teaspoonful
anchovy sauce; 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped fine; cayenne and salt to
taste; capers, or minced green pickles.

Stew the fish—broken into rather coarse bits—in the can-liquor ten
minutes. If there is not enough liquor, cook in a little water. Add the
drawn butter, and, when these are well mixed, the beaten eggs. Stir
five minutes; put in the chopped eggs and pickles. Heat one minute, and
pour into a deep dish.


CHICKEN DUMPLINGS.

Meat from your cold fowls, minced fine; ½ cup of gravy; yolks of 3 raw
eggs; 1 tablespoonful of flour; pepper and salt; batter made of 1 egg;
½ cup of milk, and a little flour; cracker-crumbs.

Put chopped meat and seasoning, with a little of the liquor in which
the chickens were boiled, into a saucepan, and heat to a gentle boil.
Stir in the flour wet in a little cold water, and a minute later the
beaten yolks. Stir to thickening; pour out, and let it get cold and
stiff. Flour your hands, and make the paste into flattened balls. Roll
in cracker-dust, dip in the batter, again in the cracker, and fry in
hot lard. Drain, and serve hot.

N.B.—Boil the skeletons and stuffing of the chickens in the rest of the
pot-liquor, and put by, well seasoned, in the stock-jar.


SALSIFY SAUTÉ.

See Thursday, First Week in November.


MACARONI WITH BACON.

Boil half a pound of macaroni, broken up small, in a little weak
“stock,” salted, twenty minutes. Drain; stir in a quarter of a pound
of streaked bacon, boiled and minced _very_ fine; put into a buttered
bake-dish; pour on a very little soup-stock; cover with rolled
crackers, seasoned well; put bits of butter on top; bake, covered, half
an hour—then brown.


BEAN SALAD.

Put the cold Lima beans into a salad-dish; and pour on such a dressing
as was made for cold slaw on Monday, First Week in November.


PUMPKIN PIE.

1 quart milk; 1 pint stewed pumpkin, rubbed through a colander; 4 eggs;
1 teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and mace, and half as much nutmeg; 1 scant
cup of sugar; a little salt. Beat all well together, and bake in open
crust. Eat cold.


  Fourth Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Ox-head Soup.
  Pork Steaks.      Apple Sauce.
  Mashed Turnips.      Potatoes Scalloped with Eggs.
  ——
  Apple Pie and Cream.
  ——


OX-HEAD SOUP.

½ an ox’s head, well cleaned, including the fresh tongue; 6 potatoes,
boiled and mashed; 3 turnips; 3 onions; 4 carrots; 4 stalks of celery;
pepper, salt, and mace; bunch of sweet herbs; 8 quarts of water; the
stock already in your jar.

Put the head, tongue, and vegetables (leaving out the potatoes) over
the fire, with the water, early in the day. Bring slowly to boiling,
and keep this up five hours. At the end of three hours take out the
tongue with enough liquor to cover it, and let it get cold. When the
five hours have passed, strain off the liquor; take out bones and
meat; season highly, and put into your emptied and scalded stock-jar.
Pulp the vegetables into the soup; season it, and pour all not needed
for to-day into the stock-pot. Add to that kept out the skimmed and
strained broth made yesterday from the chicken-bones; the potatoes,
boiled and rubbed hot through the colander. Boil slowly ten minutes,
and pour out. When tongue and the stock in the jar are both cold, add
the one to the other.


PORK STEAKS.

Cook precisely as you do beefsteak, only for a much longer time, and
turn oftener. When you have laid them upon a hot dish, anoint on both
sides with butter mixed and heated with pepper, salt, powdered sage,
and a little minced onion. Cover, and let them stand for a few minutes
before serving.


APPLE SAUCE.

See Wednesday, Second Week in November.


MASHED TURNIPS.

See Wednesday of this week.


POTATOES SCALLOPED WITH EGGS.

2 cups of mashed potatoes; 3 tablespoonfuls of milk, and 2 of butter;
yolks of 4 hard-boiled eggs; 1 beaten raw egg; handful fine crumbs;
salt and pepper.

Beat the hot potatoes smooth with milk, butter, and raw egg, and season
well. Put a layer in the bottom of a buttered bake-dish; then one of
sliced yolks, peppered and salted. Fill the dish in this order, having
potatoes on top. Strew with crumbs; cover; bake half an hour, and brown.


APPLE PIE AND CREAM.

Pare, core, and slice juicy, well-flavored apples; line pie-dishes with
a good crust; put in a layer of fruit; strew well with sugar; scatter
half a dozen whole cloves upon these; lay on more apples, and so on,
until the dish is full. Cover with crust, and bake. Sift powdered sugar
upon the top and eat, just warm, with—or without—cream.



DECEMBER.



  First Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  Soup à la Langue.
  Roast Haunch of Venison.      Sweet Potatoes.
  Moulded Potatoes.      Stewed Celery.
  Currant Jelly.
  ——
  Martha’s Cake.      Barley Custard.
  ——


SOUP À LA LANGUE.

Take fat from your soup-stock. Pour out two quarts into the
soup-kettle; heat slowly and skim carefully. Meanwhile, take out the
beef’s tongue from the jar; skin, and cut up the best parts of it into
small dice. There should be a large cupful of these. Drop into the
soup, add a tablespoonful of catsup, and nearly a teaspoonful of French
mustard. When the soup begins to boil again, pour it out.

Return the refuse parts of the tongue to the stock-jar.


ROAST HAUNCH OF VENISON.

Wash well in lukewarm water; then, rub all over with butter. Cover on
all sides with a stiff paste of flour and water, and put down to roast,
pouring a little water into the baking-pan. Now and then, wet the paste
to keep it from cracking. Roast from three to four hours. Half an hour
before taking it up, remove the paste, and test with a skewer to see if
it is done. Set down again to roast, and baste every five minutes, with
claret and melted butter. At the last, dredge with flour, baste with
butter, and brown. For gravy, add to the liquid in the dripping-pan a
thickening of browned flour, a teaspoonful of currant jelly, a glass of
claret, pepper and salt to taste. Boil up, and serve in a boat.


SWEET POTATOES.

Boil in hot water until a fork will enter the largest easily; peel; lay
in a dripping-pan, and set in a good oven a few minutes to dry out.


MOULDED POTATOES.

Mash boiled potatoes with milk, butter, and salt—not too soft; press
hard into a greased mould, and turn out upon a hot dish.


STEWED CELERY.

Scrape and cut into equal lengths the best stalks of a bunch of celery.
Cook tender in boiling water, a little salt; drain, pepper and salt,
and when dished pour on a cupful of drawn butter in which has been
stirred the juice of half a lemon.


BARLEY CUSTARD.

½ cup of pearl barley; 1 quart of milk; 5 eggs; 1 dessertspoonful of
corn-starch wet up in a little cold milk; nearly a cupful of sugar; a
pinch of salt; vanilla, or other flavoring.

Boil the barley tender in just enough water to cover it, with a pinch
of salt. Drain, and put into a custard-kettle with the milk. Heat
slowly, and when it fairly boils, pour upon the beaten eggs and sugar.
Return to the fire; stir until thick; turn into a bowl, and, when
cold, flavor. On Sunday, pour into custard-cups, with, if you like, a
spoonful of whipped cream upon the top of each.


MARTHA’S CAKE.

Please consult “COMMON SENSE IN THE HOUSEHOLD,” Series No. 1, General
Receipts, page 314.


  First Week.      Monday.
  ——
  Tapioca Soup.
  Venison Pasty.      Stewed Tomatoes.
  Kidney Beans au Maître d’Hôtel.      Potato Cakes.
  ——
  Apple Jelly.
  Fruit, Nuts, and Raisins.
  ——


TAPIOCA SOUP.

Pour off as much stock as will suffice for the wants of your family
to-day. Strain, and heat it. Take off the scum, and add a generous
handful of tapioca, soaked two hours in a little cold water. Simmer
until clear.


VENISON PASTY.

Cut off slices of the least-done part of your roast venison; divide
into neat squares, season with pepper and salt. Make a gravy by cooking
bits of skin and refuse pieces of meat in a little water; boiling the
liquid down one-half; cooling; taking off the top and seasoning well.
Cut the best parts of the tongue left from yesterday’s soup very small.
Put a layer of venison into a deep dish; sprinkle with butter-bits
rolled in flour, and cover with the minced tongue. Upon this drop a few
bits of currant jelly. Fill the dish thus; pour on the gravy, and put
a thick crust of paste (kept over from Saturday’s pastry-making) above
all. Bake to a pale brown; wash over with white of egg, and, when this
hardens, with butter, and shut the oven-door to glaze it.


STEWED TOMATOES.

Empty a can of tomatoes into a saucepan. Cook twenty-five minutes;
season with sugar, pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful of butter rolled
in pounded cracker. Simmer ten minutes longer.


KIDNEY BEANS AU MAÎTRE D’HÔTEL.

Soak the beans all night. Boil soft in water, slightly salt. Drain, and
put hot into a saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of butter, a little
parsley, chopped fine, pepper, salt, and a little minced onion. Shake
over the fire until hissing hot, add the juice of half a lemon, and
dish.


POTATO CAKES.

Make the cold mashed potato left from yesterday into flat, round cakes;
flour abundantly; lay in a floured baking-pan and set in a hot oven to
brown. Serve upon a hot flat dish.


APPLE JELLY.

12 fine pippins; 2 cups of powdered sugar; juice of 2 lemons; grated
peel of one; ½ package Coxe’s gelatine soaked in 1 cup of cold water.

Pack the apples, when pared and cored, into a stoneware or glass jar
with a cup of cold water; put on the top loosely to allow the escape
of the steam; set in a pot of warm water, heat slowly, and boil until
the apples are very soft. Have ready in a bowl the soaked gelatine,
sugar, lemon-juice and grated peel. Strain and squeeze the hot apples
over them; stir until the gelatine is dissolved, strain again through a
flannel bag. Wet a mould and pour it in. This can be made on Saturday
and kept in a cold place.


FRUIT, NUTS, AND RAISINS.

Put apples, pears, and oranges upon one dish; nuts and raisins together.



  First Week.      Tuesday.
  ——
  Canned Pea Soup.
  Beefsteak.      Graham Savory Pudding.
  Baked Potatoes.      Cream Parsnips.
  ——
  Susie’s Bread Pudding.
  ——


CANNED PEA SOUP.

As your stock must be running low, add a quart of boiling water to the
contents of the jar, and boil slowly at the back of the stove for an
hour and a half. Strain, cool, skim, and add a can of green peas. Cook
until these are tender; pulp through a colander into the soup, season
with pepper and salt, also a lump of white sugar, stir in a lump of
floured butter, and when it has boiled once more, pour upon dice of
fried bread placed in the tureen.


BEEFSTEAK.

Flatten and broil upon a greased gridiron over a clear fire. Turn as it
drips. It should be done in ten or twelve minutes. Lay upon a hot-water
dish; pepper, salt, and butter liberally. Cover with another hot dish,
or a heated cover of block-tin.


GRAHAM SAVORY PUDDING.

2 heaping tablespoonfuls of Irish oatmeal, soaked two hours in a
little cold water; 2 cups of boiling milk; handful of fine crumbs; 2
tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 tablespoonful minced onion; 1 teaspoonful
mixed sweet marjoram and parsley; 3 eggs.

Pour the hot milk upon the soaked oatmeal, and stir over the fire for
fifteen minutes. Add the bread-crumbs, beat up well; put in the onion,
herbs, butter, pepper, and salt, lastly the whipped eggs. When very
light, butter a mould, pour in the pudding, set in a pan of boiling
water, and this in a moderate oven. Bake one hour, turn out, and send
around a boat of drawn butter with it.


BAKED POTATOES.

Bake in a steady oven until soft; wipe, and send to table without
peeling them.


CREAMED PARSNIPS.

Boil tender, scrape and slice lengthwise. Put over the fire with
two tablespoonfuls of butter, pepper, and salt, and a little minced
parsley. Shake until the mixture boils. Dish the parsnips, add to
the sauce three tablespoonfuls of cream in which has been stirred a
quarterspoonful of flour. Boil once, and pour over the parsnips.


SUSIE’S BREAD PUDDING.

1 quart of milk; 4 eggs; the whites of three, more for _méringue_; 2
cups fine dry crumbs; 1 tablespoonful melted butter; 1 cup of sugar;
juice and half the grated peel of 1 lemon.

Beat eggs, sugar, and butter light. Soak the crumbs in the milk,
and mix well, beating long and hard. When nearly done spread with
a _méringue_ made of the whipped whites of three eggs and a little
powdered sugar. Eat cold.



  First Week.      Wednesday.
  ——
  A Plain Soup.
  Jugged Rabbits.      Macaroni with Cheese.
  Cauliflower.      Beets.
  ——
  Rusk Fritters.
  ——


A PLAIN SOUP.

5 lbs. shin of beef—meat sliced and bones cracked; 4 turnips; 4
carrots; 3 stalks of celery; 1 large onion stuck with 6 cloves; bunch
of herbs; pepper and salt; 6 quarts of water.

Put meat, bones and sliced vegetables on with the water, and cook
slowly four hours. At the end of two hours take out a cupful of the
meat, and spread out to cool. When the four hours are up, strain the
soup, rubbing the vegetables through a colander; cool, skim, and
season; add the cooled meat cut into dice, heat to boiling, and serve.
Put the meat and bones left in the colander into the stock-jar, with
all of the soup not used to-day.


JUGGED RABBITS.

Skin, clean with care, and joint the rabbits as for fricassee. Lay thin
slices of fat salt pork in the bottom of a stoneware jar; lay upon them
pieces of rabbits; strew with minced onion and parsley; put in more
pork and more rabbit, etc. Add a cup of your soup or other gravy. When
all are in put on the cover of the jar, fitting closely, and set in a
pot of warm water. Tie a piece of thick paper over the top of the jar
to keep in the steam. Cook steadily two hours—longer should you find,
upon opening the jar, that the meat is not tender. When it is done,
dish the meat, strain the gravy into a saucepan, and set in cold water
to throw up the fat. Take this off; add a little currant jelly, browned
flour, wet with water, and a glass of claret. Boil one minute and pour
over the meat.


MACARONI WITH CHEESE.

Break half a pound of macaroni into short pieces, and cook tender in
hot salted water. When nearly done, stir in a tablespoonful of butter.
When tender, drain; stir in two great spoonfuls of grated cheese, salt
to taste, and a little cayenne. Stir over the fire until the cheese is
melted; put in a spoonful of butter, and dish.


CAULIFLOWER.

Boil the cauliflower in plenty of hot salted water. When done, which
should be in about twenty minutes, drain and dish, the flower upward.
Pour over it a cup of drawn butter, seasoned with pepper, salt, and the
juice of half a lemon.


BEETS.

Boil more than an hour, scrape and slice round. Dish, and pour upon
them a little butter heated with a like quantity of vinegar, and
seasoned with pepper and salt.


RUSK FRITTERS.

12 stale rusks; 5 eggs; 4 tablespoonfuls of white sugar; 2 glasses of
sherry.

Cut all the crust from the rusks and divide each into two or three
pieces of equal size. The slices should be an inch thick. Pour the wine
over them; let them lie in it five minutes, then drain upon a sieve.
Beat eggs and sugar together. Lay the soaked rusks in these for a
minute, turning over and over, so as to coat them well. Fry in boiling
lard to a golden brown. Drain well and sprinkle with powdered sugar
mixed with cinnamon, and serve hot with or without sauce.


  First Week.      Thursday.
  ——
  Celery Soup.
  Boiled Beef Tongue with Sauce Piquante.
  Baked Beans.
  Baked Tomatoes.      Chopped Potatoes.
  ——
  Lemon Puddings.
  ——


CELERY SOUP.

12 stalks of celery; 3 pints of soup-stock; 1 cup of milk; pepper and
salt; 1 teaspoonful of sugar; ½ onion; 1 teaspoonful of flour wet up in
cold milk.

Scrape and cut up the celery into inch lengths. Cook fifteen minutes in
a little hot water; drain and add three pints of stock with the onion;
stew gently until the celery is very soft. Pulp through a colander into
the soup; season and return to the fire. Boil up; put in the sugar and
pour into the tureen. Add a cup of boiling milk thickened with the
flour.


BOILED BEEF’S TONGUE WITH SAUCE PIQUANTE.

Soak the tongue—a corned one—three hours; wash well and cook in plenty
of boiling water, fifteen minutes per pound. Trim off the root; skin
and dish, pouring over it a cupful of rich drawn butter in which has
been stirred a great spoonful of capers, pickled nasturtium-seed, or of
green pickle chopped.


BAKED BEANS.

Soak a quart of navy or kidney-beans all night. In the morning put on
to boil in cold water, and cook soft. Half an hour before taking them
up, put in a piece of streaked salt pork, three or four inches square.
When the beans are soft, drain; put into a bake-dish with the pork half
browned in the middle. Score the rind of the parboiled pork; cover the
dish, and bake one hour—then brown.


BAKED TOMATOES.

Drain off most of the juice from a can of tomatoes (Add to the tongue
pot-liquor, by and by; boil together ten minutes, and pour into the
stock-jar.) Put the tomatoes into a pudding-dish; season with pepper,
salt, sugar, and butter; strew fine crumbs over all; bake, covered,
half an hour, and brown quickly.


CHOPPED POTATOES.

Boil potatoes, and let them get cold. Chop rather coarsely; put into
a saucepan, with a couple of spoonfuls of butter, a little pepper and
salt, and shake and stir until very hot.


LEMON PUDDINGS.

6 butter crackers, soaked in water, and crushed to a pulp; 3 lemons;
half the grated peel; 1 cup of molasses; 1 tablespoonful melted butter;
a pinch of salt; good pie-paste.

Pare away all the skin of the lemons, when you have grated off half
the yellow peel. Chop the pulp very fine, and remove the seeds. Stir
this into the crushed crackers with the butter and salt. Beat in the
molasses gradually, then the lemon-peel. Have ready small paté-pans
lined with paste; fill with the mixture, and cook. Eat cold, but fresh.



  First Week.      Friday.
  ——
  Bread Soup.
  Lobster Croquettes.      Braised Grouse.
  Salsify Fritters.      Sweet Potatoes.
  ——
  Indian Meal Puffs.
  ——


BREAD SOUP.

Save your crusts for several days for this soup. Break about half
a pound of them into small pieces, and lay in an open oven to dry,
while you skim your soup-stock; add an onion, and put over the fire to
boil. Cook gently half an hour; strain; return to the kettle, and when
it boils again put in the crusts. Cook slowly twenty minutes, stir,
and beat the bread to a porridge, add seasoning and a little minced
parsley, and boil one minute.


LOBSTER CROQUETTES.

1 can of preserved lobster; 2 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of butter; ½ cup
fine crumbs; yolks of two hard-boiled eggs—pounded, then worked into
the butter; juice of half a lemon; salt, cayenne pepper, a pinch of
mace, and one of lemon-peel; beaten yolks of 2 raw eggs.

Mince the meat; work in the warmed butter and pounded yolks, the
seasoning, raw eggs—at last, the crumbs. Make into oblong balls or
rolls; roll in flour, and fry in sweet lard. Drain upon clean paper,
rolling each croquette lightly upon it, and dish. Pass cream crackers
and sliced lemon with these excellent croquettes, and make a separate
course of them.


BRAISED GROUSE.

Clean thoroughly, washing out the inside in soda and water, and then
rinsing and wiping. Truss, but do not stuff the birds; tie them in
shape. Cover the bottom of a saucepan with slices of fat salt pork; lay
the grouse upon these; sprinkle minced onion and parsley over them with
pepper, salt, and a little sugar. Cover with more pork, and pour in a
large cupful of soup-stock, or other broth. If you cannot spare this,
put butter and water, although it is not so good. Cover very closely;
simmer one hour; turn the birds, and cook—always covered—until tender.
Dish the grouse; strain the gravy; thicken with browned flour; boil up,
and pour into a boat. Partridges, wild pigeons, and tough chickens may
be cooked in this way—also ducks.


SALSIFY FRITTERS.

Wash, scrape, and grate the roots, letting them fall from the grater
into a batter made of two eggs, half a cup of milk, flour enough for
thin batter, and a little salt and pepper. It should be like raw
fritters when mixed. Drop, by the spoonful, into the hot fat. As fast
as they are fried throw into a hot colander, set over a bowl in the
oven. Eat _hot_.


SWEET POTATOES.

See Sunday of this week.


INDIAN MEAL PUDDING.

4 beaten eggs; 1 quart of boiling milk; 2 scant cups white
“corn-flour,” or very fine meal; ½ cup of wheat flour; 1 scant cup
powdered sugar; 1 tablespoonful butter; a little salt; 1 tablespoonful
of cream of tartar, and half as much soda sifted twice through the
flour; ½ teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and nutmeg.

Boil the milk; stir in the meal, flour, and salt. Boil fifteen minutes,
stirring up well from the bottom. Put into a bowl, and beat hard for
three minutes. When cold add beaten eggs and sugar, with the spice.
Whip long and thoroughly. Bake in greased cups or muffin-tins, in a
steady oven. When done, turn out, and eat with butter and powdered
sugar.



  First Week.      Saturday.
  ——
  Mock Turtle Soup.
  Baked Mutton Chops.      Macaroni Pudding.
  Winter Squash.      Cold Slaw.
  ——
  Cracker and Jam Pudding.
  ——


MOCK TURTLE SOUP.

Please refer to Wednesday, Third Week in March, for a long and minute
receipt for this soup. Make enough for three days.


BAKED MUTTON CHOPS.

3 lbs. of mutton chops; 5 fine potatoes; 1 onion; 1 kidney; 1 pint of
oyster-liquor; pepper, salt, and parsley; 1 tablespoonful of butter.

Lay one-third of the chops—rid of all the fat and skin—in a
baking-dish; cover with potatoes and onions, sliced very thin; sprinkle
with salt and pepper. Put on another layer of chops, more potatoes
and onions, then the sliced kidney. Cover with potatoes; season; put
in the rest of the chops; cover with onion and potatoes. Pour in the
oyster-liquor and melted butter, with parsley, pepper, and salt. Cover
very closely, and bake in a moderate oven three hours. Turn out upon a
heated flat dish.


MACARONI PUDDING.

Break half a pound of macaroni into short pieces, and boil twenty
minutes in hot, salted water. Drain; add two tablespoonfuls of grated
cheese, the minced remains of yesterday’s game, or some other cold
meat, a little chopped ham, and four beaten eggs. Mix all well, wetting
with a little soup-stock—adding, finally, a cup of milk, in which has
been stirred a pinch of soda. Pour into a greased mould, and boil one
hour. Turn out, and serve with a gravy made of cold gravy left from
yesterday, mixed with a little hot stock, strained, thickened, and
boiled for one minute.


WINTER SQUASH.

Pare, cut up, and cook soft in boiling water, a little salt. Drain;
mash smooth, pressing out all the water; work in butter, pepper, and
salt, and mound in a deep dish.


COLD SLAW.

Shred a firm cabbage, and pour over it a dressing made in these
proportions: One teaspoonful of sugar, half as much salt, pepper, and
made mustard, rubbed smooth in two tablespoonfuls of oil, and then
beaten up very gradually with five tablespoonfuls of vinegar, and a
teaspoonful Colgate’s essence of celery.


CRACKER AND JAM PUDDING.

3 eggs; ½ cup cracker-crumbs; ½ cup sugar; i tablespoonful of butter; 1
cup of milk; ½ lemon—juice and grated peel; 3 tablespoonfuls of jam.

Heat milk and crumbs together until scalding. Turn out to cool, while
you rub butter and sugar to a cream—adding the lemon. Stir in the
beaten yolks, the soaked cracker and milk—at last, the whites. Butter
a bake-dish; put the jam at the bottom; fill up with the mixture, and
bake, covered, half an hour; then brown. Eat cold, with sifted sugar on
top. Or, if you like, you can put a _méringue_ over it before taking
from the oven.


  Second Week.      Sunday.
  ——
  “That Soup” Again.
  Roast Turkey, Garnished with Sausages.     Mashed Turnips.
  Canned Corn Pudding.      Sweet Potatoes.
  Cranberry Sauce.
  ——
  Orange Snow and Snowdrift Cake.
  Hot Coffee.
  ——


“THAT SOUP” AGAIN.

Remove every particle of fat from the top of your stock. Take out what
is needed for to-day, and heat to boiling—slowly.


ROAST TURKEY, GARNISHED WITH SAUSAGES.

Wash out the turkey carefully. Stuff as usual, adding a little cooked
sausage to the dressing. (Salt the giblets, and keep for to-morrow.)
Lay the turkey in the dripping-pan, pour a great cupful of boiling
water over it, and roast _about_ ten minutes per pound—slowly for
the first hour. Baste faithfully and often, dredging with flour, and
basting with butter at the last. Dish the turkey, laying _boiled_
sausages around it. Pour the fat from the gravy; thicken with browned
flour; salt, and pepper. Boil once, and serve in a boat.


MASHED TURNIPS.

Pare, quarter, and cook tender in boiling water, a little salt. Mash
and press in a heated colander; work in butter, pepper, and salt; heap
smoothly in a deep dish, and put “dabs” of pepper on top.


CANNED CORN PUDDING.

Drain, and chop the corn fine, add a tablespoonful of melted butter,
four beaten eggs; a large cup of milk, with an even teaspoonful of
corn-starch stirred in it, with salt and pepper to taste. Bake,
covered, in a greased pudding-dish one hour; then brown quickly.


SWEET POTATOES.

See Sunday of First Week in December.


CRANBERRY SAUCE.

Cook a quart of cranberries with a _very_ little water, slowly, in a
porcelain or tinned saucepan. Stir often, and when they are broken all
to pieces, and thick as marmalade, take off, sweeten liberally, and rub
through a colander. Wet a mould, and put them in to form.


ORANGE SNOW AND SNOWDRIFT CAKE.

4 large sweet oranges, juice of all, and grated peel of one; juice and
half the grated peel of 1 lemon; 1 package of gelatine soaked in 1 cup
of cold water; whites of 4 eggs, whipped stiff; 1 large cup of powdered
sugar; 2 cups of boiling water.

Mix the juice and peel of the fruit with the soaked gelatine, add the
sugar, stir well, and leave them for one hour. Pour on boiling water,
and stir until clear. Strain, and press through a coarse cloth. When
cold, and beginning