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Title: Craven's Part in the Great War
Author: Clayton, John T.
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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This Volume is presented to

Lieut. Walter Yates.

as a Memento of his having served his King and Country by joining His
Majesty’s Forces during the Great War of 1914-1919.



  CRAVEN’S PART IN THE

  GREAT WAR

  COMPILED AND EDITED BY

  JOHN T. CLAYTON

  (_Editor of the “Craven Herald,” Skipton_)

  ASSISTED BY THOS. BRAYSHAW, ESQ., J.P., SETTLE

  FOR WALTER MORRISON, ESQ., J.P., OF MALHAM TARN,
  AND PRESENTED TO EACH MEMBER OF HIS MAJESTY’S
  FORCES WHO JOINED UP FROM THE SKIPTON
  PARLIAMENTARY DIVISION, OR TO THEIR NEXT OF KIN,
  AS A MEMENTO OF THE NOBLE PART THAT
  CRAVEN PLAYED IN THE GREAT WAR, AND THE
  HEROIC SACRIFICES MADE IN UPHOLDING THE HONOUR
  AND PRESTIGE OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE

  THE WHOLE OF THE COST INVOLVED IN COMPILING, PUBLISHING AND
  DISTRIBUTING THIS SOUVENIR HAS BEEN BORNE BY MR. MORRISON

[Illustration: WALTER MORRISON, ESQ., J.P.

OF MALHAM TARN

WHO HAS GENEROUSLY DEFRAYED THE WHOLE COST OF THIS PUBLICATION.]



INTRODUCTORY NOTE.


This volume of “Craven’s Part in the Great War” is a humble but sincere
expression on the part of Mr. Walter Morrison, of Malham Tarn, of the
gallant, heroic and self-sacrificing spirit shown by the sons of Craven
in resisting the unscrupulous, malignant and prearranged design of
Germany and her dupes to crush the British Empire and the civilised
countries associated with her. Mr. Morrison’s anxiety to commemorate
the part that Craven has played in the Great War, and to perpetuate
the memory of those who have fallen or been otherwise stricken, found
its solution in October, 1916, when, at a meeting at Mr. Morrison’s
“mountain home” on Malham Moor, a board of trustees to see to the
carrying out of the work was formed, consisting of Mr. Morrison (who
has generously defrayed the entire cost), Col. John Birkbeck, J.P.,
Settle, and Mr. Thomas Brayshaw, J.P., solicitor, Settle. The task,
which has entailed three years’ hard work in compiling what may,
without egotism, be termed a unique record, was entrusted to Mr. John
T. Clayton, editor of the “_Craven Herald_,” who has had the valued
assistance of Mr. Brayshaw and his extensive local knowledge of the
Craven district.

Everything that assiduous care and attention to detail could suggest
has been done to make the record complete so far as the Skipton
Parliamentary Division is concerned, and we are confident that the
volume will be treasured as an honoured heirloom in every family whose
representative has done his share in freeing our beloved Empire from
the slavery of German hatred and military aggression.

  J. T. C.

SKIPTON, October, 1919.

[Illustration: _H.M. KING GEORGE V._]

[Illustration: _F.M. DOUGLAS HAIG_

_RT. HON. LLOYD-GEORGE_

_ADMIRAL BEATTY_]

[Illustration: _THE LATE EARL KITCHENER_

_ADMIRAL JELLICOE_

_F.M. Rt. Hon. VISCOUNT FRENCH_]

[Illustration: _M. CLEMENCEAU_

_MARSHALL FOCH_

_GENERAL JOFFRE_]

[Illustration: _M. VENIZELOS_

_GENERAL PERSHING_

_SIGNOR ORLANDO_]



AN EPITOME OF THE WAR.


Few people in these Islands knew in the early part of the summer of
1914 that Europe was on the verge of the greatest war in history. The
few men who had foresight and courage enough to warn us of the German
menace were ridiculed, and when the Archduke Franz Ferdinand (nephew
and heir to the Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria) and his wife were
assassinated at Sarajevo, it was not realized that we had reached the
opening stages of a long-drawn-out tragedy which would see Europe
converted into a vast battlefield and cast a shadow over the whole
world.

Austria, at the instigation of Germany, made the Sarajevo occurrence
the pretext for beginning a war they had already planned and organized.
Serbia was to be made a scapegoat, and Germany was to take advantage
of the international situation thus created to launch her schemes
for empire development. There was a month’s delay, probably to allow
Germany to complete her preparations. On July 25th, Austria sent a note
to Serbia charging her with complicity in the Sarajevo crime, demanding
the suppression of all Serbian propaganda in the Dual Monarchy, and
insisting that an investigation into the assassinations should be
conducted on Serbian soil with the assistance of Serbian officials.


GERMAN DASH TO PARIS.

Serbia refused, and this was followed by a declaration on the part of
Russia that she would permit no trifling in the Balkans. Meanwhile
England was doing her utmost to pour oil on the troubled waters. One
of her suggestions was a conference. This was turned down by Austria,
who, on July 28th, declared war on Serbia. Thus began the hostilities
which led to Armageddon. The challenge was taken up by Russia; in turn
Germany declared war on both Russia and France; and finally Great
Britain, determined not to tolerate the invasion of neutral Belgium,
and refusing to contemplate the harrying of the French north coast,
declared war on Germany. The fateful step was taken at 11 p.m. on
August 4th.

Germany’s preparedness for war gave her a tremendous advantage at the
outset. The first blow was aimed at Paris, and in attempting this coup
the Hun armies over-ran Belgium, destroying and plundering some of its
greatest treasures and committing crimes which horrified the world. For
a time the advancing army was irresistible, but eventually the forces
of Sir John French and General Joffre put a stop to the enemy progress
and at the first battle of the Marne, commenced on September 6th,
caused the Germans to retreat in disorder.

After the first onrush had been checked trench warfare was introduced,
the line extending through Belgium, the north-east corner of France,
Lorraine and Alsace, and thence to the Swiss frontier. Meanwhile, Lord
Kitchener, realizing that the war must of necessity be a long and
exhausting one, had commenced his great task of building up an army fit
to take its stand with those of Continental Powers. There was a noble
response and thousands of recruits were quickly trained and drafted
out to play their part in the great adventure.


AFTER THE MARNE.

The relative positions of the Armies in 1915 altered little from those
taken up after the battle of the Marne, but there were many historic
events during that trying year--the capture by the British of Neuve
Chapelle, the two battles of Ypres (in the second of which the Germans
introduced poison gas), the heavy campaigning in the Argonne, the
bombardment of Rheims, the French offensive in Champagne, and the
British offensive at Loos.

During the winter of 1915-1916 Germany’s initial hopes of success
began to grow less rosy. The British Army continued to grow; Italy
and Rumania joined the Allies; and on almost every side the Central
Powers began to feel pressure. The outstanding events during this
period included the smashing by the British of an onslaught from
Messines Ridge and the repulsing of an advance towards Albert. There
was terrific fighting at Verdun (where the French displayed heroic
qualities), and the great Allied offensive on the Somme. There was
also a British victory on the Ancre, and “tanks” made their initial
appearance.


ON THE WAY TO VICTORY.

One of the most tragic events of the war occurred on June 5th, 1916,
Lord Kitchener being drowned while on his way to Russia. Politically
there were happenings of great importance, one of the principal being
the resignation of Mr. Asquith as Prime Minister and the acceptance of
office by Mr. Lloyd George, whose work as Minister of Munitions had
brought him into much prominence in matters relative to the conduct of
the war.

Early in 1917 the United States, after long deliberation, threw in
her lot with the Allied cause, followed by Central and South America.
Later Greece, chiefly through the influence of Venezelos, compelled
King Constantine, the friend of Germany, to abdicate and enter the war
on the side of the Allies; while China and Siam followed the example
of Japan and protested practically against German lust for world
power. Throughout the year there was heavy fighting on the Western
front. In April the British captured Vimy Ridge, in June they annexed
Messines Ridge, and in November took part in a magnificent episode at
Passchendaele. By these operations they became masters of commanding
positions, and for the first time the feeling was encouraged that the
Allies were on the way to victory.


GERMANS’ LAST BID FOR VICTORY.

One of the most noted successes in 1917 was that at Cambrai on November
20th, while in October the French brought the famous ridge road, the
Chemin des Dames, within their lines. “Unrestricted” U-boat warfare
was commenced by the Germans early this year, and was a source of
considerable anxiety to the Allies. Internally Russia was in the
throes of revolution. The Czar abdicated on March 15th and a republic
was proclaimed on September 15th. This was followed by the Bolshevist
_coup d’état_ on November 8th, and an armistice on the Russian front on
December 6th.

The winter of 1917-1918 was in the nature of the calm which precedes
the storm. On March 21st, the Boche made his last desperate bid for
victory, attacking on a 50-mile front between the Scarpe and the Oise.
Results unlooked for by the Allies were the outcome. Peronne was
captured in three days, and on March 25th the Germans had reached their
original line of July, 1916, on this sector. This, for the Allies, was
the blackest moment of the war, inasmuch as it brought within the range
of possibility the achievement by the enemy of his original plan--the
capture of the Channel ports and the consequent domination of British
shores.

The Allies prepared for a great effort. In England the military age
was raised to 51; General Foch was appointed commander-in-chief of
the Allied armies; there were effective naval raids on Zeebrugge
and Ostend; a million Americans were shipped to France; and by the
beginning of June the German advance had been checked.


THE ARMISTICE.

The last German offensive began on July 15th on a 50-mile front
before Rheims. It failed and was converted into an Allied victory.
Thenceforward the Allies achieved victory after victory. At every point
the enemy was forced back, Flanders was evacuated, a wedge was driven
into the Boche line at Sedan, and along the whole line from Ostend to
Switzerland the German position was so desperate that the Kaiser, faced
with disaster in the field and naval mutiny and revolution at home,
asked for an Armistice on October 6th.

Austria sued for peace on October 20th and surrendered to the Allies on
November 3rd, while Turkey, having been granted an armistice on October
30th, threw down her arms subsequently. Following the proclamation
of Bavaria as a Republic, and the renunciation of his throne by the
Duke of Brunswick, and the suspension of payment by the Berlin banks,
the Kaiser sued for peace. On November 9th he and the Crown Prince
abdicated and the armistice terms of the Allies were accepted by the
Germans two days later.


BRITISH TROOPS IN OTHER THEATRES.

Apart from the operations on the Western Front British troops
figured in many historic battles in other theatres of war. In the
ill-fated expedition to Gallipoli the soldiers of the Empire showed
an undaunted spirit and came near achieving what was regarded by many
as an impossible task. Much the same spirit under even more trying
circumstances was displayed in Mesopotamia and other parts of the
Far East, as is evidenced by the recapture of Kut and the taking of
Baghdad. German influence in far waters was destroyed by the seizure of
German New Guinea and Samoa; while a great blow to German colonization
schemes was dealt by the conquest of East Africa and the Cameroons.


THE FALL OF RUSSIA.

The record of Russia during the war and since provides one of the most
tragic episodes of the great struggle. One of the first Powers to
accept the challenge, Russia accomplished much in the early days of
the war on the Eastern Front, and was of invaluable assistance to the
British and French armies by engaging the attention of large numbers
of German forces. Insidious treachery, however, brought about the
downfall of what had hitherto been regarded as a mighty empire. During
the winter of 1916-1917 the effect of this treachery began to be felt.
The civilian population had for long suffered many privations, and the
troops had been sent into battle badly armed and insufficiently fed.
Demands for representative government were ignored by the Emperor,
swayed by the pro-German Empress, who was under the influence of the
notorious monk Rasputin. In December, 1916, the monk was murdered; on
March 15th, 1917, the Emperor abdicated and was subsequently murdered;
and the Empress and her children are said to have shared a similar
fate. A new and democratic government with Kerensky at the head had a
short reign, and ultimately, in November, 1917, Russia, under Trotsky
and Lenin, who were, it is believed, in the pay of Germany, was given
over to the horrors of Bolshevism.


THE CAMPAIGN IN ITALY.

Serbia was invaded by the Austrians and Germans in October, 1915, and
the campaign was conducted by the Central Powers with characteristic
ruthlessness. Rumania fought gamely, but eventually had to yield under
the Treaty of Bucharest, and Montenegro was also quickly disposed of.
The Austrians were thus established in Northern Albania and were led
to take up an offensive in Trentino. This was begun in May, 1916,
and honours were first with one side and then with the other until
in October, 1917, with the help of the Germans, Austria forced the
Italians to retreat to the line of the Piave. British and French
troops were sent to the assistance of Italy, and the invaders were
disastrously defeated, being swept back across the Piave.

The morale of the Austrian troops, except when aided by the Germans,
was never satisfactory, and the condition of her home affairs became
worse as the war progressed. The Emperor Francis Joseph died in
November, 1916, and he was succeeded by the Emperor Karl, who was
suspected of having strong leanings in the direction of peace. The food
problem in Austria also became a very difficult one, and this, combined
with industrial and political unrest, tended to undermine the Empire’s
military efficiency until eventually the operations against Italy came
to be regarded as of secondary importance, and overtures were made for
peace.

The Allies recognised the Czeko-Slovaks as a separate nation; the
Croatians recognised themselves; and a promise was made that Bohemia
should be divided into national districts. Following unsuccessful
attempts to obtain peace through President Wilson, the Austrians
acknowledged the inevitable and asked for peace on October 27th, 1918.
Bulgaria had surrendered on September 29th.


TURKISH POWER BROKEN.

When war broke out the position of Turkey was an uncertain one, but
she eventually fell a victim to German machinations and threw in her
lot with the Kaiser. In the early days she gave shelter to the runaway
German cruisers, the Goeben and the Breslau--and later both these
vessels were used to bombard Sebastopol and Theodosia. The campaign
against Turkey was in three sections--the attack on the Dardanelles,
the expedition to Mesopotamia, and the preservation of Egypt and the
advance through Palestine. Although the Dardanelles attack was not
successful and we had a set-back at Kut, the British forces eventually
broke the Turkish power in Mesopotamia and Palestine, and on October
30th, 1918, the Turks were granted an armistice.


THE BARBARITY OF THE HUN.

One of the outstanding features of the war was the ruthlessness which
marked German methods throughout. In the invasion of Belgium and
Northern France no measure was too base to adopt in order that the
spirit of the invaded countries might be broken. Looting on the part of
officers and men was officially recognised, as also was the wholesale
destruction of property, machinery and valuable works of art.

Later, the barbarity of the Hun method was demonstrated by the
submarine campaign, in the course of which defenceless merchant and
passenger vessels, and even hospital ships were “sunk at sight” and the
survivors either shot or left to drown. German warships also bombarded
such “fortified” places as Scarborough, Whitby, Lowestoft and Margate;
while their Zeppelins, and subsequently their aeroplanes, visited
England again and again, causing many casualties--a large proportion of
them women and children--in a vain endeavour to create panic in this
country.

Other methods by which the Germans revealed their inhumanity in warfare
included the abominable treatment of prisoners of war; the deportation
of thousands of the civilian population of France and Belgium to serve
as slaves behind the German lines; and the execution of Nurse Cavell
and Capt. Fryatt.


THE BRITISH NAVY’S GREAT WORK.

The operations of the British Navy were undoubtedly one of the
dominating factors in the war. For more than four years the silent
service watched unceasingly and offered an effectual bar to such
naval enterprise as the Germans appeared capable of. The first naval
engagement was off the coast of Chili in November, 1914, in which the
_Good Hope_ and _Monmouth_ were sunk and Admiral Craddock lost his life.

This early disaster was retrieved on December 8th, when Admiral Sturdee
annihilated a German squadron under Admiral von Spee off the Falkland
Islands. For some time there was a good deal of activity on the part
of commerce raiders, principally by the _Emden_ and the _Appam_. On
January 24th, 1915, there was a naval battle off Dogger Bank in which
the _Blucher_ was sunk, and six months later the _Konigsberg_, a German
raider, which had taken refuge in the Rufigi River, was destroyed by
British monitors.

The most serious naval engagement of the war took place off Jutland on
May 31st, 1916. This proved to be the last attempt of the Germans to
defy British sea-power. The enemy lost eighteen ships, and the British
losses were by no means light, but the flight of the enemy fleet
to the shelter of their mine fields left no doubt as to the issue.
Probably the country will never know the extent of the navy’s work in
maintaining the blockade, safeguarding our food supply from all parts
of the world, and securing safe passage, not only for our own troops,
but also for thousands of American soldiers.

Perhaps the most daring enterprise of the war from a naval standpoint
was the raid on Ostend on April 22nd, 1918, which resulted in the
destruction of the enemy’s submarine depots. The last act in the naval
drama was the handing over of the German Fleet to Admiral Beatty, as
part of the Armistice conditions, and the subsequent scuttling of it by
the German crews while it was riding at anchor in Scapa Flow.


THE SIGNING OF PEACE.

The peace treaty was signed on Saturday, June 28th, in the Galerie des
Glaces, Versailles, by the German delegates and representatives of all
the Allied Powers except China. The German delegates, in a statement to
the Press, declared they had signed the Treaty without any reservations
and in the honest intention of carrying out its provisions to the best
of their ability. They hoped, however, that some of its provisions
would in time be modified.

The signing was received with great rejoicing throughout Britain, a
notable demonstration being made outside Buckingham Palace, where the
King, the Queen, their three sons and Princess Mary appeared on the
balcony and were enthusiastically greeted.

The Chinese refusal to sign was due to the fact that the Council of
Four could not see their way to reserve the question of Shantung for
future consideration instead of its being settled as provided for in
the Treaty.

The scene in the historic chamber was remarkable for the absence
of pomp or martial show. M. Clemenceau presided over the formal
proceedings, and with him were the French delegation, MM. Pichon,
Klotz, Tardieu and Cambon; President Wilson and the American
representatives, Mr. Lansing, Col. House and General Bliss; the
British delegation consisting of Mr. Lloyd George, Mr. Bonar Law, Mr.
A. J. Balfour, Lord Milner and Mr. G. N. Barnes; with the following
representatives of the Empire: Canada--Sir George Foster, Mr. Doherty
and Mr. Sefton; Australia--Mr. Hughes and Sir Joseph Cook; New
Zealand--Mr. Massey; South Africa--General Botha and General Smuts.

Subsequent to the signing the King issued a formal message in which he
stated that he shared the people’s joy and prayed that the years of
peace might bring to them ever-increasing happiness and prosperity.

[Illustration]



CRAVEN IN FLANDERS.

WAR RECORD OF THE ⅙TH BATTALION DUKE OF WELLINGTONS (WEST RIDING)
REGIMENT.


In these few pages it is only possible to give in the barest outline
the story of the part played by the Craven Territorials in the great
war of 1914-1919. Time must necessarily elapse before any definitive
history can be written, when events can be critically studied and full
credit be given to all. The present sketch aims simply at recording
how men of Skipton and Keighley, of Settle and Bingley, of Haworth,
Guiseley and Barnoldswick, from the dales of Ribble, Aire and Wharfe,
from the moors of Sedbergh and from the Forest of Bowland, left their
peaceful avocations and went to war at their country’s call, as their
fore-fathers had done before them. It will tell how their previous
military training enabled them to go overseas and bar the road to the
Channel while Britain was yet gathering her latent strength; of how
they faced the Salient in its darkest hour, and of the parts they
played in the great battle of the Somme, in the fighting among the
sand-swept dunes of Nieuport, and in the grim tragedy of Passchendaele;
and finally how, after foiling the last German onslaught in a quick
series of desperate encounters, they took their full share in the
swift, relentless attacks that ushered in the crowning victory.

No space can be given to the full list of honours won; they are already
written in the official records. And when, here and there, a few names
necessarily come into the story, it must be remembered that to every
name mentioned a dozen more could easily be added of men who deserved
equally well of their country.


FROM PEACE TO WAR.

On July 26th, 1914, the 6th Bn. Duke of Wellington’s Regt. went into
camp near the little village of Marske for its annual training, and it
was amid the peaceful moorlands of the Yorkshire coast that it heard
the first rumblings of the storm to come. When the camp was suddenly
broken up and the companies returned home on the fateful first Monday
of August, there was a general feeling of tense expectation. They had
not long to wait. At 6 p.m. the following day (Tuesday, August 4th),
the orders for mobilization were issued from Skipton Drill Hall, and
the Skipton men at once began to stream in. The outlying companies
arrived during the night, and at noon next day the complete battalion,
with a heterogeneous transport commandeered from willing neighbours,
entrained for Immingham Dock under the command of Lieut.-Col. John
Birkbeck, of Settle. The rapidity with which the change from peace
to war conditions was effected is abundant testimony to the keenness
of all ranks and to the practical character of the Territorial
organization; but the chief credit of the successful move must be
given to the sleepless labours of the three South African veterans,
Capt. Sidney Marriner (Adjutant), Lieut. John Churchman, D.C.M.
(Quartermaster), and Regimental Sergt.-Major Buckley.


COAST DEFENCE AND TRAINING.

Of Immingham, the Battalion has only confused memories of concrete
floors as sleeping places, of endless tours of sentry-go, of its first
experience of strict army rations, and of countless rumours to which
unnecessary credence was given, since the troops had not yet learnt the
tainted source from which such stories rise. Early one morning there
was a particularly strong report of a great battle in the North Sea,
and an officer asked a recruit just coming off duty if he had heard
any firing in the night. “I’m very sorry, sir, it was me!” was the
unexpected reply: “I let it off by accident.”

After about a week the battalion moved into billets at the pleasant
and hospitable village of Healing, near Grimsby. Here they spent a
happy and healthy month, and on Sept. 15th moved into camp in Riby
Park, about four miles further inland. The weather was glorious and
the physique of the battalion improved out of all knowledge. Faces and
arms turned brown, packs and equipment felt lighter, and the marches
over the Lincolnshire downs insensibly grew longer. During all this
time both officers and men had been continually welcoming friends
among the new recruits who came to take the places of those unfit for
active service, under age, or whose circumstances prevented them from
volunteering for work overseas. And when a cold wet spell at the end of
October brought on a welcome move from tents into the warmer shelter of
schools and other billets in Doncaster, it was a strong battalion of
fit men, ready to go anywhere, that marched to the station.

At Doncaster the battalion settled down for the winter and made a vast
number of firm friendships among the inhabitants, who had viewed the
arrival of troops with some apprehension. The Christmas dinner, served
in all the company billets, was a huge success, though there were
already many who were sore that they were not yet in the trenches and
feared that the war would be finished without them!

All this time progressive training had gone on. At Healing the
battalion was alone in the village, and battalion and company drill
were the usual order of the day. Riby was a Brigade camp, and the
presence of the 4th, 5th and 7th Duke of Wellington’s and a battery of
Artillery gave an added rivalry to the quest of military efficiency
and to endurance in long marches. The harvest was now in and field
manœuvres became possible, and the battalion received its initiation
in trench digging. There was a good deal of musketry instruction
and a little firing on an indifferent range. The signallers under
Lieut. A. Slingsby and the machine-gunners under Lieut. B. R. Brewin
improved enormously along their special lines; while the cyclists under
2nd Lieut. “Pedaller” Palmer tested their wind and muscles up the
gradients of Swallow Downs. The Brigade was inspected at Brocklesby by
Major-General Plumer, who was, in a few months’ time, to welcome them
to his own particular salient of Ypres.

At Doncaster musketry practice was more seriously undertaken and,
when the Cantley ranges overflowed, parties proceeded to all parts
of Yorkshire. The field days, under the eye of Major-Gen. Baldock,
commanding the Division, with an added force of Artillery, Royal
Engineers and Divisional Cavalry, were on a larger scale, and the
continual battles of Marr and Rossington Bridge taught officers to
handle men, men to acquire something of an eye for country, and
outposts to keep alert with eye and ear--particularly necessary if
Lieut. Anthony Slingsby and his Scouts were on the opposing side. And
if the night operations caused an annoying interference with more
romantic engagements, they taught lessons in finding the way at night
that proved valuable later on.

In the later stages trenches were dug, and one battalion relieved
another in their occupation by night; billeting schemes were carried
out in the surrounding villages, and the constant alarms of raids or
invasion, which on one occasion brought the brigade scurrying back to
billets from a field day, lent a feeling of reality to the training.
About the same time the Machine Gun Section acquired for a few weeks an
armoured motor-car of enormous dimensions, with which, after spreading
terror and confusion among the children of the neighbourhood, they
proceeded to patrol the East Coast from the Humber to Flamborough
Head, to reassure the inhabitants who had been startled by the raid
on Scarborough. As a fighting machine the vehicle might be open to
criticism, but it possessed two Vickers guns and thus enabled the
section to familiarize themselves with these weapons. It was a lucky
chance, for they next met this gun when a number were dumped upon them,
without further instruction, in the unspeakable trenches of Ypres,
to make of them what use they could. The machine was finally handed
over to a battalion of desolate cyclists, who, in their overflowing
gratitude, addressed the second-lieutenant in charge as “Major” and
took the whole outfit off his thankful hands without a murmur.

In December, 1914, the battalion had been reorganized upon a
four-company, instead of the old eight-company system. The two Skipton
companies (A and B) became A company: the two Keighley companies (D
and E) became D company: Guiseley and Settle (C and F) united to form
the new C company, and Bingley and Haworth (G and H) became B company.
About the same time the cyclists left the battalion to form part of the
new divisional cycling company. The battalion had got nicely settled
into its new dispositions when in April it received the long deferred
order to go overseas.


IN THE FRONT LINE.

The first portion of the battalion, consisting of the Transport and
Machine Gun section, left Doncaster on the night of April 12th, 1915,
and crossed from Southampton to Havre on the night of 13/14th April.
The remainder of the battalion crossed by a more direct route to
Boulogne on the following day, and after a long and weary march joined
the same train at Hesdigneul on the 15th. The re-united battalion
travelled on by the sleepy little branch line through Lumbres to St.
Omer and then forward to Merville where they detrained at 11-30 p.m.
After unloading horses, mules and waggons, the whole battalion set off
on a three-mile march to Neuf Berquin. What with the darkness and the
unfamiliar language, the task of billeting was no easy one, but all the
men were got under shelter before dawn and enjoyed a well-earned repose
in their first French billets.

The names of the officers who went overseas with the battalion, noting
the casualties which occurred among them, may be given here as some
indication of the severe fighting through which the battalion passed.
Many of the officers given as wounded were hit more than once: and the
casualties among the other ranks were in much the same proportion:--

Lieut.-Col. J. Birkbeck, of Settle, commanding officer; Major C.
P. Cass, of Keighley, second in command; Adjutant, Capt. S. F.
Marriner. Company commanders--Major C. M. Bateman (wounded) (A),
Capt. A. B. Clarkson (wounded) (B) Capt. N. B. Chaffers (C) and
Capt. T. K. Wright (D), with Capt. H. Dixon, Capt. C. H. Sarsby
(wounded), Capt. E. G. Whittaker and Capt. K. Nicholson as their
respective seconds-in-command. The platoon officers were Lieuts.
M. Law (killed), Supple (killed), H. Knowles (killed), C. H. Petty
(wounded), C. Horsfall (killed), 2nd Lieuts. F. L. Smith (wounded),
K. Ogston (killed), V. W. Greaves, T. S. Whitaker (killed), L. Jaques
(wounded), N. Geldard (wounded), R. C. Barrett, T. Brayshaw (wounded)
and Stuck (wounded). The quarter-master was Lieut. J. Churchman, D.C.M;
Signalling officer, Lieut. A. Slingsby (killed); Transport officer,
Lieut. S. H. Clough (wounded); Machine Gun officer, 2nd Lieut. R. M.
Robinson, and Medical Officer, Lieut. A. C. Haddow (wounded).

2nd Lieut. G. Buxton (wounded) and 2nd Lieut. Coulthurst (killed), who
were on the sick list at the time, followed the battalion a few weeks
later, and Capt. M. Wright, who was left behind to organize a nucleus
company to provide reinforcements, himself came out with a draft during
the early autumn.

Major General Baldock was in command of the Division and Brig.-General
E. F. Brereton of the brigade.

Arrived at Neuf Berquin the 6th Duke’s was not allowed to remain idle.
After three days’ rest the battalion was taken up by detachments for
trial trips to the trenches and on April 26th the brigade took over
from the London Regiment a portion of the line in front of Fleurbaix.
It was at this time that the First West Riding Division became the
49th; the 2nd West Riding Brigade, consisting of the 4th, 5th, 6th and
7th Duke of Wellington’s Regiments, became the 147th Infantry Brigade,
the whole being attached to the Indian Corps in the First Army.

In after days men commonly looked back on the Fleurbaix era as a time
of peace and plenty. It is true that the weather was good and the life
not too strenuous. But the sniping was unusually severe. Few reliefs
took place without a casualty and the shelling of billets was a far
from comfortable novelty. The way the battalion settled down to work in
its new surroundings augured well for the future.

On May 9th the men were spectators of one of those early attacks
which cost so much and gained so little. The limit of the main attack
was the right of the 6th Battalion; and if it had been successful
the battalion was also to advance and take a part. But backed by
insufficient artillery and faced by relentless machine gun fire, the
attack failed to reach the foot of the Aubers Ridge, and the battalion
was ordered to stand fast in its trenches. It was a day of tense
anxiety and the battalion was lucky to have so few casualties. The
signallers especially distinguished themselves, mending the lines back
to the brigade as soon as they were cut by shellfire; and few will
forget the picture of Lieut. Anthony Slingsby striding upright across
the open, while he sternly commanded some diminutive signaller beside
him to “keep his head down.”

Quieter days followed, and on June 26th the brigade left those
trenches for the last time, handing them over to their gallant
fellow-territorials of the 51st Division. The battalion was no longer
raw: it had seen its dead. One officer (Lieut. Knowles) had been killed
in a bombing accident, and two (Lieut. Petty and Capt. Sarsby) had been
severely wounded. About twenty other ranks were among the casualties.
And the old grey walls of the ruined abbey, with its little fishpond
and the stately remnants of its tower, will always be remembered by
those who helped to defend it.


THE YPRES SALIENT IN 1915.

On leaving Fleurbaix the 147th Brigade moved north by rapid marches,
and soon the whole Division found itself in the Second Army under
Major-General Plumer. The last march, from the neighbourhood of Meteren
to St. Jans-ter-biezen Wood, was particularly severe for troops that
had just come out of trenches. It was a good fifteen-miles tramp
over rough and hilly roads: it was undertaken at night when most men
had been on their legs all day, and everyone had to carry all his
belongings on his back. When the battalion finally halted in its
allotted position in the wood, the men had no difficulty in sleeping
where they lay.

Here the battalion bivouacked for a week and underwent inspection by
various generals, renewing their acquaintance with the Army commander.
On July 7th they moved forward and for the first time entered the
never-to-be-forgotten salient of Ypres.

Northward from Ypres runs the Yser canal, and in insecure shelters
scratched into the embankments the support battalions had their home.
The bridges crossing the canal were enfiladed by the enemy’s machine
guns and were constantly destroyed by shell fire: and the rain of
shrapnel whistling through the distorted trees caused men moving up
either bank to dodge like rabbits from shelter to shelter. But this
was a haven of rest compared to the front line. In front of the canal
was sheer desolation, with ridges sloping upwards towards the enemy.
Wet weather turned the whole country into a quagmire and many were
drowned in the mud. Across this waste stretched the trenches, formed of
sandbagged breastworks, with arms and legs of dead Frenchmen projecting
from them at intervals. The enemy was too close for rebuilding. The
line was curiously irregular, as one side or the other had bitten off a
piece of the opposing defences, and at more than one place our men were
only fifteen yards from the enemy. In some parts the bombing was worst,
in others the trench mortars, and in others again the shells: but
none were healthy and all smelt abominably. As for retaliation, a few
rounds of shrapnel were all the ammunition our artillery could spare in
those early days. No regular division had stopped in the line for more
than six weeks, even in summer, and the West Ridings looked hopefully
forward to an early move. They held that line against shelling and gas,
in deepening mud and rising water, for six long months.

The 49th Division had a stormy welcome. In the first few days the
Divisional commander, Major-General Baldock, was wounded by shrapnel
at the door of Trois Tours Chateau, and was succeeded by Major-General
Perceval; and a shell through his bedroom caused Brig.-General Brereton
to leave his cottage for safer quarters. Before the 6th Battalion had
finished its first turn in the line it had grievous losses to deplore.
Among them the gallant Lieut. Slingsby had been killed by a sniper;
Lieut. Supple mortally wounded by a shell, and 2nd Lieuts. Jaques and
Brayshaw severely wounded. It was then, too, that Pte. Bracewell,
a stretcher bearer, himself wounded, won the first D.C.M. for the
battalion.

As the autumn wore on and worse conditions supervened, the battalion
still stuck to its work, making its regular trips to the front line
and always leaving behind some of the best of comrades. At the end
of October, Lieut.-Col. Birkbeck, who had already suffered from
rheumatism, was invalided home. Of the battalion commanders who had
come out with the Brigade he was the last remaining, and there was
general regret that he had not had the chance of leading the battalion
in open warfare in which he had trained them and for which his
experience of African campaigns had peculiarly adapted him. “Honest
John” the men called him, and they were all sorry to lose one who had
always given them fair play. Major Bateman had already been wounded and
Lieut.-Col. J. Adlercron, of the Cameron Highlanders, took over the
command.

The men took a little time to understand their new commander and he
probably thought them a queer lot. But his wide military knowledge,
his boundless energy, and, above all, his absolute fearlessness, soon
won their admiration and respect and established a satisfactory mutual
understanding that lasted throughout his command. It has been said of
some leaders that they never sent their men where they would not go
themselves; if Col. Adlercron sent men to a particularly nasty post he
would commonly go twenty yards further himself and inspect the enemy’s
wire in front of them.

Conditions grew steadily worse. “Trench foot” made its appearance among
the troops, and though many precautions were taken there was much
painful suffering. The mud difficulty and the fall of the leaves made
the work of the Transport increasingly arduous, and Lieut. Churchman’s
stores at Hospital Farm became a favourite target for shells from
either side of the salient. The death of Lieut. T. S. Whitaker, always
most cheery when times were worst, was a serious loss to C company. But
through it all the spirits of the battalion never flagged. Sergt. Bury,
with a few fellow bombers, was holding a peculiarly noisome forward
post within bombing range of the enemy when he received word that he
was to go on leave. He protested indignantly. “Who’s to look after my
sap?” he cried. And it was only when Lieut. F. L. Smith promised to
give the sap his own special attention that the sergeant, with some
misgiving, consented to return for five days to civilization. And a
like feeling animated all.

At this time the ⅙th Duke’s had the French as their next-door
neighbours, and at the bridge over the Yperlys stream, where the two
Armies met, an international post was established, consisting of an
officer and a few men from each army, specially selected for their
knowledge of their allies’ language.


THE GREAT GAS ATTACK.

On December 19th, in the darkness of the early winter’s morning, the
Germans made another desperate attempt upon the line after discharging
the deadly phosgene gas from cylinders. It was the strongest
concentration of gas sent over by the enemy during the war: the ground
over which the cloud passed was covered with powdered crystals like
hoar frost, and Canadians on parade at Bailleul, twelve miles back,
felt the effects. The 4th Duke of Wellington’s was in the front line,
the 6th had B company and the machine gunners on the Canal Bank and the
remainder in ruined farms a short distance behind. At 6-30 a.m. the
battalion received orders to move forward through the clouds of gas to
support the 4th. All reached their positions in perfect order and the
men of the 4th were astonished at the speed with which the much-needed
succour had reached them. The Germans, though they inflicted heavy
losses on the 147th Brigade, reaped no tactical advantage from the
outrage. The 6th had many casualties both from gas and shelling. The
machine gunners, worn out by a particularly arduous time in the line,
suffered very heavily, and among the eight who succumbed to gas was
that excellent soldier Lance-Cpl. J. W. Willan, of Skipton, who had
refused a commission elsewhere to serve in the ranks of the 6th.

The battalion, sadly reduced in numbers, had a last turn in the line
and lost 2nd Lieut. T. Carson, mortally wounded on patrol, and Lieut.
Malcolm Law, an admirable bombing officer, who was killed in the act of
handing over to the incoming division.

Getting clear of the line by dawn on the last day of the year, the
battalion, now little more than 200 strong, travelled by motor-bus to
the neighbourhood of Herzeele and Wormhoudt for a month’s rest and
reorganization. The Machine Gun Corps had recently been formed as a
separate arm of the service, and the machine gunners under Sergts.
J. Watson and F. Stork, who had both done sterling work for the
battalion, were transferred to the brigade company under the new corps.
At the beginning of February, 1916, the battalion moved by train to
the neighbourhood of Amiens. It was a welcome change and the clean
fields and green hills were a grateful sight to Craven eyes after
the shellmarked flatness of the Salient. Though the Division was by
no means up to strength it had temporarily to take over the line at
Authuille, north of Albert, during a snowy spell at the end of the
month. The share of the 6th Battalion was limited to two or three
unpleasant days. Water up to the knees was no novelty, but the men have
vivid recollections of some lively trench-mortaring, and of the droves
of enormous rats that scampered over the snow at night like flocks of
sheep.


THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME.

The great attack on the Somme had already been planned, and the 6th
Duke’s were engaged for some months in digging assembly trenches,
laying railway tracks, carrying material to the line, and generally
assisting in the many preparations that had now become recognised as
necessary to a successful offensive. They were quartered at different
times in most of the villages from Toutencourt to the river Ancre, and
in April and May went farther back to the pleasant village of Naours
lying in a beautiful valley north of Amiens. Here vigorous training
was carried on for the coming offensive, and replicas of the famous
Thiepval defences were constructed and successfully attacked.

Conditions were now growing better. Expeditionary Force Canteens had
come into being; Y.M.C.A. huts at times were encountered; organized
entertainments were given. The general standard of living was much
improved and wire beds were occasionally found in billets. The old days
of scarceness had passed, and “rest areas” had become more worthy of
the name and were visited with greater regularity.

But before the battle opened another change came in the command of
the battalion. Lieut.-Col. Adlercron, D.S.O., received well-deserved
promotion to the command of the 148th Brigade (in the same division),
and Major C. M. Bateman, D.S.O., was appointed Lieut.-Colonel in his
place. No more popular choice could have been made. Colonel Bateman
had commanded the headquarters detachment of the Craven territorials
for many years before the war and had already won golden opinions in
France both as company commander and as second-in-command. Always cool
in danger, and naturally endowed with a fine military judgment, he had
a special asset in his intimate knowledge of his men, who would have
followed him anywhere.

The great battle of the Somme, which was to last into November, opened
at 7-30 a.m. on July 1st, 1916. On this day the 49th acted as reserve
to two other Divisions in the 10th Corps, ready to exploit any success
that might be won. The roar of the bombardment had been heard for some
days and shells were singing overhead on the evening of June 30th as
the 6th Battalion moved up from Warloy into the assembly trenches it
had previously dug in Aveluy Wood. At 7-25 a.m. the trenches rocked as
the mammoth mine went up at Beaumont Hamel. The roar of the heavies
ceased for a moment, giving place to the rattle of machine guns as the
British went over the top, to be succeeded by a terrific drumfire from
the 18-pounders and French 75’s whose shells came swishing over the
tree-tops.

Though the attack had been a success to the south, it made little
headway against the powerful fortresses of Thiepval and Beaumont Hamel.
The battalion crossed the river without loss and spent the night in
the Crucifix dug-outs near Aveluy village. Next afternoon it received
hurried orders to move to Thiepval Wood, prepared to attack at dawn
next morning. It was an unpleasant march up the river valley, for this
provided the only cover behind the line and the enemy’s artillery were
giving it particular attention. At the North Bluff, Capt. Haddow, the
popular medical officer, was wounded by a shell with some of D company,
and Cpl. E. Briggs was killed while bringing up machine gun ammunition.
In Thiepval Wood, reached in the darkness, there was little shelter
and the battalion spent the night under heavy shelling and machine gun
fire. What had been in the evening luxuriant woodland was found in the
morning to resemble a group of clothes props. The attack, however, was
postponed, and the battalion returned for a night of thunderstorms
into Aveluy Wood. Next day it moved forward again and took over the
line immediately facing Thiepval with headquarters at Johnson’s Post.
Here the Brigade remained for forty-eight days, never moving further
back than the support positions, some 800 yards from the German line.
The trenches had been practically obliterated and had to be re-dug in
close proximity to the enemy; there were many bodies to bury during
the short hours of darkness, and rations and water were brought up
with difficulty. In the first twenty-four hours the battalion, without
making any attack, suffered over sixty casualties, and losses continued
daily. At times the battalion had to make “Chinese attacks,” feints to
hold the reserves opposite in their positions while other divisions
were attacking to the south, and also threw out smoke bombs to obscure
from the view of the Germans in Thiepval the flanking movement against
them. This always drew a heavy bombardment. Meanwhile a good line was
dug, and saps were pushed forward ever nearer to the doomed fortress.

At last towards the end of August the battalion moved out to
Lealvillers for a week’s rest. Here Captain N. B. Chaffers, M.C., who
had been adjutant since December, 1915, when Capt. Marriner had been
promoted to a staff appointment, left the battalion to become second in
command of the 3rd Worcesters. He was succeeded by Capt. F. L. Smith,
M.C., who had won a great reputation as a company commander. Lieut.
Robinson, whose notes on Lewis gun tactics, originally written for the
6th Battalion, had been adopted for use throughout the British Army,
was ordered to G.H.Q., where he spent more than a year working at the
organization of Lewis gun training before returning to the battalion.

In less than a week the battalion was back in the Thiepval area, but it
did not take any active part in the attack on Sept. 3rd, in which the
49th Division was engaged. The 6th was in support, and suffered losses
from shell-fire; Lieut. Gill was killed, Lieut. Jaques badly wounded,
and a dug-out occupied by A company was knocked in. The 147th Brigade
managed after heavy losses to capture most of their first objective,
but their neighbours on either side made no headway and the attack was
abandoned before the 6th was drawn in.

After ten days’ rest the battalion again returned near Thiepval, but
this time it faced the village from the ridge to the south, instead of
looking up at it from the valley to the west. The West Ridings were
now in the old German lines in the “Leipzig salient,” which had been
penetrated on July 1st, and occupied an extremely strong system of
enemy trenches known as the “Wunderwerk” for the astonishing character
of the defences. Though much damaged by our shells, the deep dug-outs
and tunnels still remained to show how the enemy had been able to
hang on in Thiepval through all our bombardments. From these lines
the Division slowly crept forward, one battalion snatching a length
of German trench one night and another the next. The 6th had to pay
dearly for their successes. One night Capt. Cedric Horsfall was shot
while making a reconnaissance in front of the line, and his death was a
sad blow to all the battalion. As strong as a horse and a glutton for
work, he was always ready to lend a hand with pick and shovel, and on
a long march might be seen striding along carrying a couple of rifles
for two of his weaker brethren. His shrewd leadership and unfailing
kindness had endeared him to all ranks. Another gallant officer to fall
was Lieut. W. B. Naylor, who was acting as Brigade bombing officer,
and among other losses were Sergt. Marks, an excellent N.C.O., and
Private Bottomley, whose unfailing humour had lightened many dark days
for his comrades. Lieut. Clegg, who afterwards greatly distinguished
himself with the Independent Air Force that bombed the German towns,
was severely wounded.

After an attack in this sector a curious adventure occurred to that
cheerful fighter, Sergt. Cecil Rhodes. Seeing a waterproof sheet
stretched out upon the ground he stooped to pick it up, when to his
surprise an unwounded German sprang from under it and bolted. The
sergeant gave chase and soon had his man a prisoner.

The battalion was beginning to penetrate the inner defences of Thiepval
when it was relieved by the 18th Division, who, with the assistance of
tanks, finished off the task.

During September the battalion was sorry to lose its very popular
Brigadier, Brig.-General E. F. Brereton, C.B., D.S.O., who had
commanded them since the days of peace. When he returned home,
Brig.-General L. G. Lewes, D.S.O., of the Essex Regt., took his place.

On leaving Thiepval the battalion at once marched northwards and
took over the line near Fonquevillers, facing the German stronghold
of Gommecourt, and for the remainder of the winter kept moving on
from one bad line of trenches to another, working hard to drain and
improve them for the benefit of their successors. At Fonquevillers
the trench-mortaring was very heavy, and four N.C.O.’s in D Coy. were
killed one night by a single shell. Here too 2nd Lieut. Wilson was
mortally wounded by a chance bullet.

Shortly before Christmas the 6th moved out to rest at the little
villages of Halloy and Grenas, near Doullens, and though the billets
were not of the best the Duke’s were able to eat a good Christmas
dinner without interruption from the enemy.

Early in the New Year, still moving slowly northwards towards Arras,
the battalion went into a new line near Berles-au-Bois and then at last
found some really good trenches in the solid chalk of Wailly. During
this winter the game of “winkling” had come into vogue. The line on
both sides was commonly held by detached posts, and small parties of
resolute men would stalk one of these, surprise the sentry and then
pick prisoners out of the dug-out behind him as one picks winkles out
of shells. The 6th were never “winkled,” though they had to keep very
alert, but at Wailly a small party of D Coy., headed by Sergt. Bury,
D.C.M., took a hand in the game with great success. Raiding an enemy
sap they inflicted heavy losses on the enemy. Pte. Scott, of Keighley,
had the misfortune to lose his way when the signal was given to return
and was captured. After being severely cross-questioned, about an hour
later he took advantage of a moment’s inattention on the part of his
captors and escaped back to his own lines with some useful information
about the enemy’s dispositions. A raid on a grand scale was then
planned and practised, but the battalion was again moved on before it
could be brought off.


FROM NEUVE CHAPELLE TO NIEUPORT.

The next move was to a different area. The ⅙th (as it must now be
called) was packed on to the railway at Doullens and, after a lapse of
two eventful years, once again detrained at Merville, which it found in
deep snow. The following day it moved into trenches at Neuve Chapelle.
The historic redoubt of “Port Arthur,” so hotly contested in 1915, was
in the battalion sector, and the famous La Bassée road ran through
it. The Duke’s had an enormous stretch of line to look after and held
it lightly in the outpost system; but, except for the trench mortars,
which the enemy possessed in great numbers, their stay here was not an
unpleasant one and they remained in the line for nearly three months.

At the end of March a raid was carried out by the battalion. The
operation was carefully practised and on the night of March 28-29 the
raiding party set off under the command of Capt. S. H. Clough, who was
the first man to enter the enemy’s lines and the last to leave them.
Strong opposition was encountered and no prisoners could be taken, but
all ranks behaved with great gallantry. Capt. Clough and Lieut. J. W.
Denison (afterwards killed while serving with the 9th Batt.) were both
wounded; and 2nd Lieut. Butler and Pte. Pickup, D.C.M., were killed in
the operation.

Two interesting events occurred during the stay at Neuve Chapelle.
One was a visit from a special company of Royal Engineers, armed with
a number of the new gas projectors, which discharged many large gas
shells simultaneously into the enemy’s lines. To the great delight of
the men, who remembered their own experiences at Ypres, from 200 to 300
of these shells were concentrated upon one sector of the enemy’s line
and caused serious losses to the Germans. The other was the arrival of
the 1st Portuguese Division which first came into the line in small
parties to learn the art of war from the 49th, and finally, towards the
end of May, took over the line from them.

After their long spell of trench work the battalion thoroughly enjoyed
a fortnight’s rest at the aptly named village of Paradis. The quarters
were excellent, and it was here that an officer of the battalion made
his name famous throughout the B. E. F. by discovering a particular
variety of billet. Brigade sports and a horse show were organized, in
which the battalion more than held its own. In the latter it swept
the board in the heavy draught section: and in the former it won the
tug-of-war, and, largely thanks to the fine running of Pte. Carter,
also did well in the field events. From Paradis the men could clearly
hear the terrific shelling of the battle of Messines, when the new
“creeping barrage,” employed thereafter with such great success, was
first brought to perfection by our artillery.

The 147th Brigade was next lent for a fortnight to the 6th Division,
old friends of the Salient days, to take the place of a brigade
required elsewhere. The ⅙th Duke’s took over a sector opposite the
famous quarries of Hulluch, towards the northern end of the battlefield
of Loos. The defences occupied were of a remarkable character, for vast
underground tunnels, large enough to take a battalion, stretched all
along the line. In these secure quarters, fitted with electric light
and other conveniences, the bulk of the troops passed the day. But
on the surface the sniping was keen and the trench mortars, hidden in
deep emplacements, were exceptionally active. 2nd Lieut. Darragh, a
most intrepid officer who had lost two brothers earlier in the year,
was wounded and died a few days later; and Sergt. Bell, of Haworth,
was killed, again one of three gallant brothers who lost their lives
for their country. In this sector, too, the battalion was called upon
to assist an extensive raid carried out by the battalion on their
right. A magnificent smoke screen was put up to hide the preliminary
preparations from the enemy in Hulluch, while a plucky party under 2nd
Lieut. J. S. Spencer created a spectacular diversion by exploding a
Bangalore torpedo right under the German wire.

From Hulluch the ⅙th Battalion moved at once into quite a new type of
country, for in the middle of July the Craven men found themselves
encamped on the sandy dunes east of Dunkirk on the Channel Coast.
Originally sent north to take part in a contemplated attack, they found
on arrival that the situation had entirely changed. The Germans had
clearly got wind of the affair, and, concentrating much heavy artillery
and an unexpected division of sailors, had broken through the British
lines, reaching the banks of the Yser from its mouth nearly to Nieuport
and seriously threatening the important crossings about that town. To
the 49th Division once again fell the rôle of Salvation Army and they
threw themselves vigorously into their work, relieving the battered
troops in front, straightening out the line and remaking the defences.
The sector taken over by the ⅙th Duke’s was the ruined village of
Lombaertzyde, immediately in front of Nieuport. Of trench system in the
ordinary sense of the term they found none, and sheltered solely by
hollows in the shifting sand they had to face continual bombardment.
Here the ⅙th first made the acquaintance of shells filled with mustard
gas, which caused most painful blisters to many of the men. To reach
the front line was a matter of great danger and difficulty. The direct
route, through the town of Nieuport, was always heavily shelled, and
the three bridges across the river Yser were continually knocked in.
Apart from the shelling these bridges were something of an obstacle.
Formed of wooden frames filled with cork and lashed together they
sagged greatly at low tide and the roadway stood at an alarming angle
to the bank. Many gallant deeds were performed by the 49th Division
during their stay, but none was more dashing and dangerous than the
raid carried out by the ⅙th Duke’s on a pitch dark August night. Since
the German attack no prisoners had been taken, and the higher command
was anxious to know what forces the enemy had in the line against us.
In this object the raid was a complete success. Led by that amiable
desperado, Capt. Godfrey Buxton, a strong party of D company entered
the enemy’s trenches. When the alarm was given the Germans laid down
a terrific barrage on our lines and the ground in front, and there
was general anxiety as to the safety of the raiders. Their return
shortly after with five prisoners and a machine gun aroused great
enthusiasm. In this raid Capt. Buxton, Corporal Driver and Private
Bibby particularly distinguished themselves.

On August 17th the battalion was withdrawn for a very welcome month’s
rest at Coxyde Bains and La Panne, two watering-places much favoured
by wealthy Belgians in time of peace. At Coxyde Bains the men were
quartered in empty villas and thoroughly enjoyed the experience; and
the sea bathing was much appreciated, in spite of numerous casualties
from small stinging jelly fish. The enormous shells of “Big Bertha,”
the German long range gun, used to hum past on their way to Dunkirk,
and their bombing planes sailed overhead most nights, but neither
interfered seriously with the seaside holiday.

Here the Battalion lost the very valuable services of Regt.
Sergt.-Major O. Buckley, M.C., who received a commission as
quarter-master of the ⅐th Duke’s. He was succeeded by Coy. Sergt.-Major
T. Richardson, D.C.M., who had come out as a sergt. with the battalion.


PASSCHENDAELE.

Leaving La Panne on Sept. 23rd, 1917, the battalion spent the next
ten days in a most enjoyable march. Trekking by easy stages through
rich agricultural country in perfect harvest weather, the men usually
found good billets and good fare. St. Omer was passed on the 30th and
on Oct. 3rd the battalion found itself once more near Poperinghe on
the threshold of the Salient. The following day the battalion set off
for the line and had a long and trying march. Moving from Poperinghe
to Vlamertinghe in the morning, later in the day they again pushed
on across the Canal and bivouacked at what had once been Spree farm,
where the road came to an end in swamps that could only be crossed on
duckboards. Next day they took over the line north of Zonnebeke from
the New Zealanders.

The advance associated with the name of Passchendaele had been begun
most successfully in July and August, when British troops under
Major-General Rawlinson, with Belgians on their left, had attacked from
the old trenches by the Yser canal and gained possession of the lower
spurs in front of them. To complete the mastery of the topmost ridge
the attack was continued through the autumn, when rain had turned the
whole country into swamp. How far this perseverance and the enormous
loss of life it entailed were justified by the military exigencies
it must be left to later historians to decide, but certainly the
conditions of the front line were not fully realised by commanders
behind.

The high ground that separates Ypres from the main plain of Belgium
resembles an enormous sponge. Even in hot summer weather bogs and ponds
are found upon its summit, while numerous swampy streamlets wander
down its sides. In October many stretches were impassable except by
wooden tracks laid on brushwood which were only constructed with the
greatest danger and difficulty. Bombarded for three and a half long
years, over all this huge area the shell-craters nearly touched each
other. Whole villages were entirely wiped out; of fine chateaux not a
trace remained; roads were completely obliterated; and wide woodlands
were only marked by misshapen stumps two or three feet high. With the
enemy on higher ground, all preparations and movements of troops for an
attack had to be made in the darkness, and a single false step off the
prepared track meant loss of life or guns or rations.

Right in the centre of this desolation the ⅙th held the line for six
days, soaked with rain, standing in water and suffering all kinds of
discomfort, yet only two men went sick. A great attack had been planned
for October 9th in which the ⅙th Batt. was to support the 146th (West
Yorks.) Brigade. Late in the night a battery commander arrived at the
battalion headquarters dead beat. Moving at all possible speed he
had only just reached his position and half his guns had been bogged
on the way; and many infantry battalions, picking their way through
bottomless swamps in the dark, were quite unable to reach their
jumping-off lines at the allotted time. Under such circumstances a
sweeping success was impossible; many gallant deeds were done, a few
pill-boxes were taken, and a party under Captain Buxton, M.C., seized
and held some valuable ground; but it is doubtful if the results of
the day were worth the very heavy price. The ⅙th was relieved by the
Canadians the following day, and on coming out was highly congratulated
by the Army and Corps commanders on the part it had played. Whatever
may be the military verdict on the Passchendaele battle, it is certain
that no other incident in the war tested so thoroughly the grit and
fighting qualities of the British soldier and no victories were won
in the face of greater difficulties; the ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s is
justly proud of having taken a worthy part in this struggle.

The battalion went out for a short rest in the neighbourhood of
Winnezeele and during this period Major-General E. M. Perceval, C.B.,
D.S.O., relinquished the command of the Division, which he had held for
over three years and returned home to command the 68th Division on the
East Coast. He was succeeded by Major-General N. J. G. Cameron, C.B.,
D.S.O., of the Cameron Highlanders. General Perceval had been very
popular throughout the Division, but like General Baldock before him he
was a gunner, and the infantry thought it only fair that an infantryman
had now been selected for the command.

A fortnight later the battalion returned to the very tip of the
salient. This time its line lay more to the south where the summit
ridge had already been captured: and from their trenches at Broodseinde
could look far down into the Belgian plain. The approaches again were
very difficult and the men had to lay some miles of duckboards in the
deep mud before they could be said to possess any communications at
all. Soon after going in, the battalion lost a very promising young
officer in 2nd Lieut. Rupert Atkinson, of Settle.

Christmas was spent in these desolate surroundings; the battalion
was in the front line on that festive day, standing in deep mud and
subsisting on such rations as had not been bogged on the long journey
from Belgian Battery Corner. On Boxing Day the battalion had to deplore
the loss of Sergeant Cecil Rhodes, M.M., who was killed by a shell.
In the very early days he had made a great reputation as a fearless
bomber; always cheerful himself, his gift of humour in the most
disheartening circumstances was a real asset to the battalion, and he
had won the lasting affection of both officers and men.


THE LAST YEAR.

Relieved early in January by the 66th Division, the battalion was
employed for nearly a month in constructing a reserve line on Westhock
Ridge, a couple of miles in front of Ypres; but in January moved
back to billets in Hondeghem, near Hazebrouck. Here, in February,
the battalion had its Christmas dinner. There was one large room
in the village and there each company in turn was regaled on beef
and Yorkshire pudding, pork, cold ham, Christmas pudding and other
seasonable fare. About a fortnight was spent at Hondeghem, companies
going in rotation to Moulle, near St. Omer, for musketry practice.

At this time it was decided to reduce the number of battalions in an
infantry brigade from four to three throughout the British army; as
a result many battalions were disbanded and their men sent as drafts
to other units. The ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s received about a dozen
officers and 300 men from the 5th and 8th battalions of the Duke’s, and
were thus brought up to strength.

In the middle of February the battalion was back again in the
salient, taking over the Polygon Wood sector with headquarters in the
conspicuous mound known as the Butte, one of the few recognizable
landmarks in the area. The New Zealanders, whom the battalion
relieved, had worked hard at the line and bequeathed to our men quite
a respectable line of trenches and a light railway running to within
300 yards of battalion headquarters. In doing this they had suffered
heavily, and a subaltern was commanding their brigade; but the ⅙th was
very grateful for the shelter afforded, for the shelling all round
was fierce and the German artillery had got a very accurate range on
all the tracks. There was a good deal of raiding at this time and the
battalion had to repulse two attempts upon their lines; they were also
spectators of a most successful raid carried out by the 4th Duke’s at
Polderhoek.

In this neighbourhood the battalion had three tours of duty in the
front line and then moved back to Reninghelst, a village a short
distance south of the Ypres-Poperinghe main road.


STEMMING THE GERMAN ONSLAUGHT.

The Duke’s had already heard the news of the desperate German onslaught
on the Somme where much ground had been lost by the Third and Fifth
Armies, and as they marched to Reninghelst the rumbling of artillery
could be clearly heard from the direction of Armentieres, which lay
only some ten miles to the south, on the far side of the ridge running
from Mont des Cats to Kemmel Hill and dividing the plain of Ypres from
France. But no news of any offensive in that area had reached them, and
the men took off their clothes and went to bed in comfort for the first
time for several weeks.

But the battalion was not to enjoy an undisturbed night. Shortly after
midnight (April 9-10) everyone was awakened and dressed hurriedly.
Ammunition was made up to fighting scale, Lewis guns taken off the
limbers, and two days’ rations served out. By 2 a.m. the battalion was
on the road in motor buses. Crossing the ridge they descended at Trois
Rois cross roads, north of the town of Nieppe, where the whole of the
147th Brigade (¼th, ⅙th and ⅐th Duke of Wellington’s) was concentrated.
After a hasty breakfast the whole Brigade moved forward across the
open fields and took up a line in front of the town of Nieppe, facing
Armentieres and astride the main road leading from that city to St.
Omer and the Channel ports. After working some hours on defences, at 1
p.m. bullets began to enfilade the line from the south, and the brigade
fell back a short distance to an old trench line from which they could
more securely watch the threatened flank.

Only now did the battalion learn more or less what had happened. On
the morning of the 9th after a heavy bombardment the Germans had
attacked and driven back the Portuguese, who were still holding the
Neuve-Chapelle-Fleurbaix sector; following up their success they had
crossed the river Lys near Bac St. Maur and had thus turned the flank
of this valuable line of defence. When the 6th Battalion took up its
line at Nieppe, the Germans were at no great distance from their right
flank and later in the day captured Steenwerck, which was actually
behind them. So far as was known a British division still held
Armentieres but they were weak in numbers and hard pressed. The task of
the 147th Brigade was therefore twofold: (1) to check any advance of
new German forces from Armentieres; and (2) to prevent the enemy from
continuing his enveloping movement from the south and capturing the
valuable line of hills behind them.

The battalion remained in its new line all night, on the extreme
right of the Brigade. Troops kept coming back from Armentieres and
it was impossible to know whether there was any continuous line in
front. Next morning the question was answered, for the Germans were in
close touch all along our front and the trenches were subjected to a
terrific machine gun fire. A German aeroplane which came over dropping
stickbombs was successfully brought down; a few minutes later one of
our planes was also brought down close behind the 6th, but luckily the
pilot and observer escaped little hurt into the West Riding trenches.
The position of the brigade was now a difficult one for the enemy
was behind them on either flank--at Neuve Eglise to the north and at
Steenwerck to the south--and their line was assuming a horseshoe shape.
C company, on the extreme right, found Germans advancing against them
up a trench leading into their own. Lieut.-Col. Bateman, D.S.O., who
was making one of his frequent tours of inspection, at once gathered a
small party of B and C Coy. men with a few machine gunners, and himself
led a very successful little charge, accompanied by Captain Ogston,
Lieut. Baker and 2nd Lieut. Whitehead. Many Germans were killed and
one prisoner was taken. The ⅙th still stuck to their ground and barred
the main road, till at 7 p.m. the order came to retire. It was none
too soon, for the leading company had to bayonet Germans on the road
behind them, and Very lights from either side were falling in their
path. Passing through another division which was to take up the task of
defence, the battalion moved to La Creche and bivouacked.

At noon next day they were roused by shelling and at once moved out to
take up a new line a short distance in front of the town of Bailleul.
During this advance A Coy. had to drive off a party of some thirty
Germans with machine guns. In their new line they were attacked next
day from two sides; the 7th battalion facing down the Armentieres road
while the 6th faced south. C company, of the 6th, holding the angle,
bore the brunt of the attack and inflicted heavy losses on the baffled
enemy, but they suffered a serious loss in the death of the gallant
Capt. K. Ogston, who had commanded them for many months.

Early next morning (April 14th) another retirement was ordered and the
brigade fell back to a line on the outskirts of Bailleul. The Germans
continued their usual programme--a bombardment at 1-30 p.m. followed by
an attack from 3 p.m. till dark, and once again were driven off with
great loss. During this attack the British right flank was in the air,
and a party of Germans getting round it made straight for 6th Battalion
headquarters. They were soon driven off with considerable loss by
Lieut.-Col. Bateman, Lieut. A. S. Stewart and Regt. Sergeant-Major
Richardson, with the officers’ servants and orderly room staff. On this
day, too, Sergeant Whiteley, the medical sergeant, cycled to Steenmill,
a mile to the south, to fetch dressings from the transport, which had
been there the previous day. He found it occupied by Germans and had
some difficulty in escaping, leaving his bicycle in their hands.

That night the brigade was relieved by another division and, retiring
behind Bailleul, thought that their troubles were ended. But the
following day’s attack was too much for the troops in front, who
retired, and the 6th Battalion had to dig yet another line. On the
17th a fresh attack by strong forces was repulsed and in a gallant
counter-attack A company, under Major Tanner, captured three machine
guns and a few prisoners.

The following evening the brigade was relieved and retired slowly to
reorganise in Poperinghe.

After three quiet days the battalion passed a disturbed night on the
24th-25th April. Heavy shelling began about teatime, several billets
being hit, while all night long the town was bombed with gas bombs
by relays of aeroplanes. One fell right on the stores and inflicted
serious casualties, and several of the transport were killed and
wounded in stables near by. But at mid-day on the 25th, the ⅙th was
once more moving forward. Kemmel Hill, lately taken over by the French,
had been surprised in the early morning mist and captured, and upon the
new line running through Millekruise (which the 147th brigade now took
over from the battered 9th division) the safety of Ypres lay. Digging
their line under continual shell fire the battalion was not attacked
till the 29th, when the Germans made desperate efforts to break the
whole line from Dranoutre to Voormezeele. The shelling, mostly from big
guns, lasted incessantly from 3 a.m. till 4 p.m. and was the heaviest
ever experienced by the battalion. In the attack that followed, the
enemy forced their way into the lines of the 7th battalion on the left
and had to be driven out by bayonet charges; but the 6th had forward
posts commanding the valley in front and with accurate Lewis gun and
rifle fire stopped the attackers dead as they descended the lower
slopes of Kemmel Hill. The German onslaught had been stemmed, and the
⅙th Duke of Wellington’s, relieved by the 39th French Division, retired
to rest at Reninghelst, the village from which it had started on its
eventful journey twenty-four days before.

During all these operations the ⅙th had never once been driven back
by the enemy. All the retirements were made under orders from the
higher command and were carried out without confusion; enormous losses
had been inflicted on the enemy; and the whole brigade admitted that
Lieut.-Col. Bateman had been the life and soul of the defence. But a
sadly heavy toll had been paid for success. Besides Capt. Ogston, the
battalion had to mourn many of its best fighters who had come out in
the early days. Among these were Lieut. Norman Procter, M.C., who,
after a long spell of sterling work as battalion signalling officer,
had been promoted to the Brigade staff: Sergt. Bury, D.C.M., M.M., who
had signally distinguished himself in many a hard fight: Sergt. Gibson,
D.C.M., Sergt. Burrows and Sergt. Stott, of Skipton; Sergt. Harding,
M.M. of Keighley, Corporal Tillotson, M.M., of Oxenhope, and Corporal
Barton, M.M. of Hellifield, an admirable Lewis gun instructor. D
company had also lost their devoted commander, Capt. Buxton, M.C., who
was very seriously wounded.

The whole Division was now withdrawn from the line and spent some
weeks in the neighbourhood of Proven and St. Jans-ter-biezen, resting,
reorganizing, training, and working on reserve lines. It was at this
time that the 147th Brigade started its own particular concert party,
“The Ducks,” which became very popular. The general manager was Lieut.
J. S. Spencer, of Keighley, while Private Morgan, of B company, with
his wonderful soprano voice, made up into one of the most attractive
“leading ladies” in France.


THE GARRISON OF YPRES.

At the beginning of June the 49th Division once again staked out its
claim to the proud title of “Garrison of Ypres” by returning to the
line in front of that city. The trenches had now drawn very close to
the town and battalion headquarters were often in the ancient ramparts.
An attack was confidently expected and the order was that Ypres was
to be “held at all costs.” However for some reason the attack never
came off. Delayed by an epidemic of influenza, it was probably finally
abandoned owing to the need of troops to meet Marshal Foch in the
south. Here the battalion remained for the summer. Heavily shelled with
gas on its first arrival, its stay on the whole was not an unpleasant
one, in spite of shelling both on the front line and back areas, and
constant visits from bombing aeroplanes.

The Belgians were on the left and their soldiers created a very
favourable impression. Later the 1st American Division arrived and came
into the trenches with the ⅙th Battalion for instruction, before taking
over the line themselves in the latter half of August. They appeared to
be excellent material, and were very eager to learn all they could.

The outstanding feature of the stay was a very successful raid
undertaken one morning by a party of A company under Lieut. C. Lowther,
M.C. and Lieut. Farrer. Many Germans were killed and four captured.
The following day Company Sergt.-Major Wiseman, D.C.M., led another
successful foray, inflicting casualties on the enemy.

The ⅙th Duke’s left Ypres for the last time on August 19th, and with
the rest of the Division had gone back to a delightful rest area
between Calais and St. Omer. They had just settled down to training in
charming surroundings when they were suddenly ordered to move south.
The First Army had begun its final offensive and the 49th was required
to take a part.


THE ADVANCE FROM CAMBRAI.

After brief halts at Pierremont (near St. Pol), at Estrees-Cauchie,
and at Ecurie, the battalion arrived on September 23rd, 1918, at
Wilderness Camp, about two miles from Arras on the Cambrai road. During
this period Brig.-General C. G. Lewes, C.M.G., D.S.O., was transferred
to home service, and Brig.-General Morant, D.S.O., of the Durham Light
Infantry, was promoted to the command of the 147th Infantry Brigade.
At Wilderness Camp other changes occurred within the battalion. Major
Tanner, after a long spell of arduous work with the 6th Battalion,
returned to his original battalion (7th Duke’s) as second-in-command:
and Major Hugh Dixon, who had made a great reputation both as a skilled
instructor and a cheerful and tenacious leader, left the battalion on
promotion to be second-in-command of the 9th Essex Regt.

Here the battalion remained a fortnight while the situation developed.
The attack, as yet, had only been pushed forward south of the river
Scarpe, and the Germans were known to have reserves in Douai, to the
northward, which might be used against the flank of our advance. But
on October 6th the order was given to move forward; the north was now
secure. On the 9th, when Cambrai was captured, the 6th were close
behind, and on the 10th moved up to Escadoeuvres in front of that city,
and were in close support to the front line. The following day they
were once again at grips with the enemy.

The southern half of the First British Army (south of the Scarpe) was
at this time far in advance of the northern half, and the plan was
formed to push forward by surprise attacks towards Valenciennes on
the south, in order to cut off the German forces who were known to be
holding out in the strongly defended neighbourhood of Douai.

For this difficult and hazardous task the 49th Division was selected.
If a surprise was to be effected, no time was permissible in which to
move up a full complement of artillery, and it was with a scattered
barrage of 18-pounders that the 49th went over the top, over ground
which they had had no time to reconnoitre.

The 146th Brigade (West Yorks.) was on the left and the 147th (Duke
of Wellington’s) on the right. The 6th Duke’s, in support to the 4th
and 7th Duke’s, moved out of Escadoeuvres at 11-45 p.m. on the night
of Oct. 10-11th and dug in near the village of Naves. Advancing at
dawn through the German barrage of gas shells they crossed the Erclin
river without incident: but near the top of the ridge beyond found the
front line coming back and themselves met with heavy machine gun fire.
They were soon mingled with the front line on the top of the ridge and
there saw four enemy tanks advancing through the division, causing many
casualties. Lieut. H. Hopwood, with Corporal Ames and a party of D
company Lewis gunners, opened concentrated fire upon the leading tank
and caused them all to retire. The ridge was held, but the Division had
suffered heavy casualties. The 6th, who had suffered less than some
others, had lost three company commanders--Capt. Coulthurst, killed,
and Capt. Clifford and Lieut. Grey wounded.

This line was occupied for the night. By next morning the enemy had
retired, and the ⅙th led the way forward through the village of
Villers-en-Cauchies without interference except from the machine
guns of enemy aeroplanes. The next opposition was encountered at
Saulzoir, on the Selle river, which was found to be strongly held. By
vigorous patrolling the battalion gradually pushed their way into the
village, where they found many civilians in cellars, who welcomed them
affectionately and fed them with coffee, though themselves suffering
severely from the enemy’s mustard gas. A large number of French
civilians were removed to safety by night. By these advances, in which
Lieut. Hopwood, M.C., Lieut. Farrar, 2nd Lieut. Bilham, Sergts. Best,
M.M., Green, D.C.M., Calvert, D.C.M., Sykes, D.C.M., and Rosenthal,
D.C.M., in turn did valuable work, the battalion had fought its way
house by house practically up to the Selle river, where it was relieved
on the night of October 18th by the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., among whom the 6th Battalion found many friends.

In the week’s fighting the battalion had lost heavily. Besides Capt.
Coulthurst, 2nd Lieut. Ricroft, a most promising young officer, had
been killed; also Company Sergt.-Major McDermott, D.C.M., one of the
best N.C.O.’s the battalion ever turned out; Sergts. Godwin, M.M. and
Midgley, M.M., Corporals Haw and Stanley, and many other good fellows.
On the night before the relief, a gas shell, falling on the roof of the
cellar which served as orderly room, placed almost all our battalion
headquarters hors-de-combat. Lieut.-Col. C. M. Bateman, D.S.O., with
Lieuts. Stewart and Thrackray, was taken to hospital; Lieut. A. P.
Smith, M.C., the Acting Adjutant, left alone in the cellar, was just
able to hold on and give the necessary instructions before he, too, had
to be helped out of the line. Major A. B. Clarkson, M.C., took over
the command of the battalion and Major F. L. Smith, M.C., who had been
attached to the Divisional Staff, returned as second-in-command, with
Lieut. A. Lacy as adjutant.


THE FINAL VICTORY.

After a short rest at Naves and Hordain the Battalion found itself
again in the battle line on the night of Oct. 28th-29th, when it took
over the front near Famars, south of Valenciennes. The floods to the
west and north of Valenciennes prevented a direct attack upon that
city; and the task set the 49th Division with Canadians on their left
and the 4th Division on their right, was to break through the strong
series of defences on the hills and valleys to the south and so render
the city untenable.

The 49th Division attacked on a two battalion front. To the ⅙th Duke
of Wellington’s was assigned the honour of leading the attack on the
right, with the 7th Duke’s in support and the 4th Duke’s in reserve.
The 146th (West Yorks.) Brigade attacked on the left in similar
formation, and the 148th was held in reserve for a further push
northwards the following day. Within the ⅙th Batt. A and B companies
had to attack first; their task was to rush the German first line and
the posts in front of it, descend into the valley, cross the river
Rhonelle and ascend the opposite slope as far as a deeply sunken road
on the next ridge. C and D companies were then to push through them
and if possible reach the line of the Preseau-Marly road some 800
yards beyond. The whole arrangements were most carefully worked out
and explained by Lieut.-Col. Clarkson, M.C., and a splendid supporting
barrage was organized by Colonel Duncan, of Otley, who was in command
of the artillery brigade covering the ⅙th front and had one 18-pounder
gun for every twelve and a half yards of frontage, without counting
those of heavier calibre behind.

The attack, which opened at 5-15 a.m. was a most successful one. The
men were delighted to start a clean show of their own, planned by their
own officers, instead of their usual task of going in to retrieve
the fortunes of a day of failure: though they numbered little over
320, they captured about 600 unwounded prisoners (including twelve
officers), a great store of machine guns and trench mortars, and left
many hundred German dead upon the field.

A company on the left, under Capt. Farrar, M.C., went off with a rare
dash and rushed a number of hidden machine gun posts found unexpectedly
near their line; crossing the Rhonelle river by fallen trees and by
footbridges placed in position by parties of the 19th Lancashire
Fusiliers, they accomplished their task in spite of severe casualties,
and came unexpectedly upon the sunken road, which was found full of
surrendering Germans and of pack-horses which had just come up with
their rations. B company on the right had an even stiffer time; all
their officers had been put out of action within five minutes of the
start, and flanking machine gun fire raked them all the way. Company
Sergt.-Major T. Limmer, D.C.M., at once took charge and led the company
with the greatest skill and gallantry to its objective, thus winning
the only M.C. awarded to a Company Sergeant.-Major of the battalion
during the campaign.

After a short pause C company, under Lieut. W. Spratt, M.C., who had
taken command in place of Capt. Willink, wounded, moved forward from
the sunken road and after stubborn fighting reached their furthest
objective. D company under Capt. Hart, M.C., attacked on their right
but soon suffered very heavy casualties, for the 4th Division, on their
right again, had met with a severe check and had been driven back from
Preseau. At the critical moment Capt. Hart and practically all his
head-quarters staff were killed by a burst of machine gun fire, and
the company was forced to dig in a few hundred yards short of their
objective. As the West Yorks. were also unable to get quite to their
objective, this isolated Lieut. Spratt, who was still holding his
ground with Sergt. Woodhead, M.M., Sergt. Burns, M.M., Corporal Maude,
M.M., and a handful of other stalwarts; and Lieut.-Col. Clarkson, who
managed to visit the whole front line during the hottest fighting,
ordered him to retire a short distance to make the line more secure.
But the high ridge had been won and the enemy was forced to retire from
his cunningly constructed defences. The 7th Battalion advanced next day
with very little opposition and Valenciennes was restored to France.

The battalion had lost a big proportion of its small numbers. Besides
Capt. Hart, M.C., 2nd Lieuts. Cartwright and Oughton had been killed
and Capt. Willink succumbed to his wounds a few days later. Sergts.
Upton and Davies and Corporal Maude, M.M., all of whom had done gallant
work, were also among the fallen. Lieut. Claridge had been wounded
shortly before the battle, and Sergt. Fredericksen, M.M., commanded the
signallers most successfully throughout the attack.

On the night of November 2nd, the Battalion moved out of the line for
what proved to be the last time. Taken in motor ‘buses back to the
mining village of Auby, near Douai, they were engaged in reorganizing
and training new drafts when news of the Armistice arrived. There was
little material for any form of feasting, but a most successful concert
was held and the Battalion store of S.O.S. rockets and flares was found
to be lamentably deficient next morning.

There was plenty of good fare for the Christmas dinner, for which four
live pigs were obtained, regardless of expense, from the other side
of Arras. And shortly after, while football and education became main
topics of interest, the battalion began to dwindle. Demobilized men
began to go home and retainable men and volunteers were transferred to
the 13th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s Regt. at Dunkirk. The numbers
were already very small when the battalion moved into the city of
Douai, on March 20th, and on June 7th, the cadre, consisting of four
officers and twenty-three other ranks, left for Dunkirk, with colours
and stores, on its homeward way.

On June 16th, Lieut.-Col. Bateman, D.S.O., who had returned to the
Battalion early in the year, crossed the Channel with his small party,
and on June 19th the cadre enjoyed a civic reception from the town of
Skipton, before depositing in the ancient parish church the regimental
colours, which had been taken to France after the Armistice. Later in
the day the cadre, with Lieut.-Col. Birkbeck, Major Clarkson, D.S.O.,
M.C., and a number of other returned officers, was entertained at a
late luncheon by the Skipton Urban District Council, with Councillor
John Walker in the chair.


THE STORES AND TRANSPORT.

In this narrative of the fighting there has been little opportunity
to do full justice to the stiff work gallantly done by the
Transport Section and by the band of handy men collected under the
Quartermaster’s command and commonly known as “the Stores.” Upon their
efforts the comfort, well-being, and general fighting efficiency of a
battalion in the field largely depend, and in the case of the ⅙th the
companies in the line never lacked their hearty support.

When the cadre returned to Skipton it was only fitting that one of
the officers to carry the colours should be Capt. John Churchman,
D.C.M., for he holds a truly remarkable record. When he went to
France he was by many years the oldest officer in the battalion,
yet till the cadre was finally dispersed at Ripon, except for terms
of short leave, he had never been off duty for a day. To him the
battalion owes a deep debt of gratitude. He was well supported by
Quartermaster-Sergt. Norton, M.S.M., who, coming to France with the
147th Brigade headquarters, rejoined the 6th in the early days at Ypres
and also remained throughout the war. Much valuable work along various
lines was also done by Corporal Ward, Corporal Aspinal, Lance-Corporal
Jenkinson, Privates Newhouse, Walker and Maudsley in the Ration Dept.;
Shoemaker-Sergt. Bulcock and Corporal Busfield (tailor) in the Repairs
Dept.

The Transport section, ever most cheery when work was hardest, was
given a good start by Capt. S. H. Clough, M.C., who took them to France
and only left them on getting command of his company after a strenuous
winter in the muddy salient. Lieut. Morgan Bevan had charge for a time
and was then succeeded by Lieut. C. M. Perfect, who led them gallantly
through the bad times of Passchendaele and the fighting round Bailleul.
When he returned home after an accident, he was followed by Lieut.
Sidebotham. But all would willingly acknowledge how much they owed to
Sergt. Field, M.M., M.S.M., the transport sergeant. Sergt. Bryden,
M.M., early distinguished himself, and with that genial giant, Corporal
Kay, M.M., Privates Howard and Williamson, and a few more, was very
prominent in the difficult nightly marches to the Broodseinde ridge
with pack horses, when shells fell thickly all round and a single step
off the narrow wooden track spelled disaster. In the desperate fighting
at Nieppe, the 6th Batt. transport alone was able to get through the
shell-swept street of the town and kept its record for always taking
rations to the line. To the men of the Transport, too, belongs the main
credit for a wonderful performance at Merville Station, when the whole
battalion, complete with horses, mules, waggons, cookers, watercarts
and everything else, was loaded on a train ready to start eighteen
minutes after entering the station yard. Their genial kindliness always
attracted to their lines a curious and devoted collection of stray
dogs, goats, and children, and they will always be affectionately
remembered by “the lads” in the companies, for whom they would always
willingly undertake the most hazardous journey.

Of the Medical Section, largely recruited from the Barnoldswick branch
of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, it need only be said that it played
a prominent part in every action that has been mentioned, and the
long list of honours that fell to its share is ample testimony to the
excellence of its work. The standard set up by Capt. Haddow and Sergt.
Garrett, D.C.M., in the early days was maintained throughout. When
Capt. Haddow was wounded at the opening of the battle of the Somme,
he was succeeded by Capt. Glover, who did admirable work through the
Thiepval fighting, but was recalled soon after to an important post at
home. For the remainder of the war the battalion enjoyed the valuable
services of Capt. S. P. Stoker, M.C., who set his men a constant
example of cheeriness and kindheartedness through the many dark days
that followed. In addition to his skill as a doctor and assiduity as
sanitary inspector he possessed distinct gifts as an after-dinner
speaker, and when, after the Armistice, he was transferred to the Army
of the Rhine, he took with him the good wishes of all ranks in his old
battalion.

[Illustration]

[Illustration: COL. JOHN BIRKBECK.]

[Illustration: LIEUT.-COL. C. M. BATEMAN, D.S.O., T.D.]



FIRST 6th DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S WEST RIDING REGIMENT.


NOMINAL ROLL of Officers who embarked with the ⅙th Battalion Duke of
Wellington’s West Riding Regiment at Folkstone on 14th April, 1915.

  Lt.-Col. J. Birkbeck.
  Major C. P. Cass.
  Major C. M. Bateman.
  Capt. T. K. Wright.
  Capt. A. B. Clarkson.
  Capt. N. B. Chaffers.
  Capt. E. G. Whittaker.
  Capt. K. Nicholson.
  Capt. C. H. Sarsby.
  Capt. H. Dixon.

  Lieut. W. A. Mackenzie.
  Lieut. M. C. M. Law.
  Lieut. S. H. Clough.
  Lieut. C. H. Petty.
  Lieut. A. E. K. Slingsby.
  Lieut. H. Knowles.
  Lieut. E. J. C. Supple.
  Lieut. C. F. Horsfall.
  2nd. Lieut. F. L. Smith.
  2nd Lieut. R. M. Robinson.
  2nd Lieut. T. S. Whitaker.
  2nd Lieut. V. E. W. Greaves.
  2nd Lieut. L. Jaques.
  2nd Lieut. N. Geldard.
  2nd Lieut. T. Brayshaw.
  2nd Lieut. R. C. Barrett.
  2nd Lieut. K. Ogston.
  2nd Lieut. P. F. Stuck.
  Capt. & Adjt. S. F. Marriner.
  Lieut. & Qt.-Mstr. J. Churchman.

  Medical Officer--Lieut.
  A. C. Haddow (R.A.M.C. (T.)).


NOMINAL ROLL of Warrant Officers, N.C.O.’s and Men who embarked
with the ⅙th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment at
Folkestone on 14th April, 1915.

  Pte. C. Ackroyd.
  Pte. W. Addyman.
  Pte. E. V. Ainsworth.
  Pte. J. Ainsworth.
  Pte. O. Ainsworth.
  Pte. E. Alderson.
  Pte. H. Aldous.
  Pte. W. Alison.
  Pte. S. E. Allen.
  Pte. J. Allison.
  Sgt. G. Allsopp.
  Pte. T. Allsopp.
  Pte. W. Allsopp.
  Act./Cpl. T. Ambler.
  Pte. A. Anderson.
  Pte. R. Andrews.
  Pte. J. Appleby.
  Act./Sgt. H. Armitage.
  Pte. J. Armitage.
  Pte. W. R. Armstrong.
  Pte. E. Askew.
  Pte. F. Askey.
  Pte. J. Asquith.
  Dr. A. Atkinson.
  Pte. M. W. Atkinson.
  Pte. H. Atkinson.
  Pte. B. Ayres.
  Pte. A. Bailey.
  Pte. J. Bailey.
  Pte. G. C. Bailey.
  Pte. F. Baldwin.
  Pte. P. Baldwin.
  Pte. H. Balmforth.
  Pte. J. Balmforth.
  Pte. J. H. Bamford.
  Pte. A. Bamforth.
  Pte. J. Bamforth.
  Pte. F. Banbury.
  Pte. F. Bancroft.
  Pte. J. G. Bancroft.
  Pte. S. Bancroft.
  Pte. A. Banks.
  Pte. J. Banks.
  Pte. C. J. Barker.
  Pte. E. Barker.
  Pte. H. Barker.
  Pte. J. W. Barnes.
  Sgt. W. Barnes.
  Pte. H. Barraclough.
  Pte. A. Barrett.
  Pte. F. Barrett.
  L./Cpl. G. H. Barrett.
  Pte. J. Barrett.
  Pte. A. Barron.
  Pte. W. P. Barry.
  Pte. R. Barson.
  Pte. P. Barton.
  Sgt. F. Barwick.
  Pte. R. Bass.
  Cpl. J. Bateson.
  Pte. W. Bateson.
  Pte. M. Baxter.
  Pte. S. Beard.
  Pte. F. Beckett.
  Pte. J. Beckwith.
  Pte. J. E. Beecroft.
  Pte. A. C. Bell.
  L./Cpl. E. Bell.
  Pte. F. Bell.
  Pte. G. H. Bell.
  Sgt. J. W. Bell.
  Pte. J. W. Bell.
  Pte. S. H. Bell.
  Pte. A. Benson.
  Pte. E. Benson.
  Pte. J. Bentley.
  Pte. W. H. Best.
  Pte. R. Bibby.
  Pte. E. Billows.
  Cpl. C. T. Binns.
  Pte. A. Binns.
  Pte. E. Binns.
  Pte. U. Binns.
  Pte. W. Binns.
  Pte. S. Bishop.
  Pte. W. G. Blackwell.
  Pte. P. N. Blenkarn.
  Pte. W. H. Bolton.
  Pte. T. Bonnick.
  Cpl. A. M. Booth.
  Pte. J. Booth.
  Pte. S. Booth.
  Pte. C. P. Boothman.
  Pte. P. Boothman.
  Pte. R. Borrissow.
  Pte. C. Bottomley.
  Pte. W. Bottomley.
  Pte. C. Bolton.
  Pte. A. Bower.
  Pte. S. Bower.
  Pte. A. Bowker.
  Pte. W. Bowker.
  Pte. F. Bracewell.
  Pte. J. R. W. Bracewell.
  Pte. H. Bradbury.
  Pte. J. E. Bradbury.
  Pte. J. T. Bradley.
  Pte. W. G. Bradley.
  Pte. J. E. Bradley.
  Pte. A. Bradwell.
  Pte. F. Brady.
  Pte. W. H. Brassington.
  Sgt. J. Brennand.
  Pte. H. Brentley.
  Pte. E. Briggs.
  Pte. J. Briggs.
  Pte. W. G. Briggs.
  Sgt. T. P. Brighouse.
  Pte. W. Broadfoot.
  Pte. A. Brook.
  Pte. T. Brook.
  Pte. C. Brooks.
  Pte. G. Brooks.
  Pte. H. Brooks.
  Pte. J. Brooks.
  Pte. R. B. Broster.
  Pte. W. Broster.
  Dr. A. Brown.
  Pte. A. Brown.
  Coy. Sgt.-Major A. H. Brown.
  Pte. E. H. Brown.
  Pte. C. Brown.
  Pte. E. Brown.
  Pte. F. Brown.
  Pte. H. Brown.
  Pte. J. Brown.
  Pte. J. J. Brown.
  Pte. J. W. Brown.
  Pte. N. R. Brown.
  Pte. S. Brown.
  Pte. A. Bruce.
  L./Cpl. P. Brundrett.
  Pte. W. F. Bryant.
  L./Cpl. H. Bryden.
  Pte. H. Buck.
  Reg. Sgt.-Maj. O. Buckley.
  Pte. G. H. Buckley.
  Pte. C. Bulcock.
  Pte. F. Bulcock.
  Pte. J. H. Bulcock.
  Pte. W. Burgess.
  Pte. C. Bunnett.
  Pte. T. H. Burnett.
  L./Cpl. H. Burns.
  Pte. J. Burns.
  Pte. M. Burns.
  Pte. R. Burns.
  Pte. H. Burnley.
  Cpl. L. V. Burrows.
  Sgt. F. Burton.
  Pte. H. Burton.
  Cpl. J. Bury.
  Pte. C. Busfield.
  Pte. W. Butcher.
  Pte. M. Butler.
  Pte. E. Butterfield.
  Pte. J. Butterfield.
  Pte. W. Bygrave.
  Pte. C. Calvert.
  Pte. G. E. Calvert.
  Cpl. H. Calvert.
  Pte. H. J. Capstick.
  Pte. J. H. Capstick.
  Pte. J. T. Cardus.
  L/Cpl. C. V. Carr.
  Pte. R. Carr.
  Pte. S. Carr.
  Cpl. D. Carruthers.
  Pte. A. J. Carter.
  Pte. F. W. Cartman.
  Pte. J. Caulfield.
  Pte. W. Cawood.
  Pte. F. Chadwick.
  Pte. E. Champion.
  Pte. J. Chandler.
  Pte. S. Chandler.
  Pte. E. Chapman.
  L/Cpl. F. Chapman.
  Cpl. J. Chapman.
  Dr. T. Chapman.
  Pte. B. Chatburn.
  Pte. F. Chattaway.
  Pte. W. Chester.
  Pte. J. R. Chew.
  Pte. C. V. Child.
  Pte. W. Chisman.
  Dr. J. Churchman.
  Pte. J. W. Clapham.
  Pte. E. Clarke.
  Pte. R. Clark.
  Pte. H. Clarke.
  Pte. H. J. Clarke.
  Pte. W. Clarke.
  Pte. W. J. Clarke.
  Pte. L. Clarkson.
  Pte. H. Claughton.
  Pte. H. M. Claughton.
  Pte. A. Clayton.
  Pte. C. F. Clegg.
  Pte. A. H. Clegg.
  Pte. F. Close.
  Pte. J. Clough.
  Pte. C. Coe.
  Pte. P. Colley.
  L/Cpl. A. Collins.
  Pte. R. A. Collins.
  Pte. R. W. W. Collyer.
  Pte. T. Conner.
  Pte. T. Connolly.
  Pte. G. Cook.
  Pte. J. W. Cook.
  Pte. J. Cooke.
  Pte. T. Cooper.
  Pte. F. Coppack.
  Pte. F. Coppack.
  Pte. D. Corcoran.
  Cpl. R. Cordingley.
  Pte. G. Corker.
  Pte. E. Corley.
  Pte. J. Corson.
  Pte. P. Coulson.
  Pte. F. Coulton.
  Cpl. C. Cousins.
  Pte. G. Cousins.
  Pte. W. H. Cousins.
  Pte. E. Cowgill.
  Pte. E. Cowgill.
  Pte. H. Cox.
  Pte. R. Cox.
  Pte. J. Crabtree.
  Coy. Qt.-Mstr.-Sergt. A. E. Craven.
  Pte. H. Craven.
  Pte. W. Craven.
  Pte. C. Crawshaw.
  Pte. E. Crichlow.
  Pte. T. Critcherson.
  Pte. W. Cronheimer.
  L/Cpl. A. Crook.
  Pte. C. Crook.
  Pte. H. Crook.
  Pte. R. Crook.
  Sgt. B. Crosby.
  Pte. N. Crowther.
  Pte. F. Cryer.
  Pte. R. Cumberland.
  Pte. E. Cunningham.
  Sgt. A. Cutler.
  Pte. J. H. Dalby.
  Pte. H. Darnbrook.
  Pte. F. Davey.
  Pte. D. Davies.
  Pte. H. Dawson.
  Pte. H. Dawson.
  Pte. P. Dawson.
  Pte. S. Dean.
  Pte. C. Deighton.
  Pte. G. E. Deighton.
  Pte. H. C. Demaine.
  L/Cpl. F. R. Denison.
  L/Cpl. J. W. Denison.
  Pte. R. Dent.
  Pte. E. C. Dessent.
  Pte. E. Dickenson.
  Cpl. F. Dicken.
  Pte. A. Dinsdale.
  Pte. W. Dinsdale.
  L/Sgt. T. Dixon.
  Pte. T. Dixon.
  Pte. S. Dixon.
  Pte. T. Docksey.
  Pte. G. Docksey.
  Pte. J. R. Dodgson.
  Coy. Sergt.-Major F. Dodsworth.
  Pte. J. Donlan.
  Pte. E. Dove.
  Pte. H. Dove.
  Pte. W. Dove.
  Coy. Qt.-Mstr.-Sergt. R. Drake.
  Pte. H. Driver.
  Pte. G. Driver.
  Pte. T. A. Driver.
  Pte. W. S. Drummond.
  Pte. W. T. Duffy.
  Pte. H. Duncan.
  Pte. G. W. Dunhill.
  Pte. J. A. Dunlin.
  Pte. A. Duxbury.
  Pte. T. D. Eagles.
  Pte. W. Earnshaw.
  Pte. T. Earnshaw.
  Pte. W. Eccleston.
  Pte. H. Edmondson.
  Pte. E. Ellershaw.
  Pte. F. Elliott.
  Pte. H. Elliott.
  Sgt. A. Ellison.
  Pte. H. Ellison.
  Pte. J. W. Emmott.
  Pte. T. O. Emmott.
  Pte. W. Emmott.
  Pte. H. Exley.
  Pte. J. Falshaw.
  Pte. J. Farley.
  Pte. W. Farrer.
  Pte. F. Fawcett.
  Pte. S. Fawkes.
  Pte. W. J. Fearn.
  Pte. M. Fearnley.
  Pte. W. Feather.
  Pte. C. Fennerty.
  Pte. P. Ferrans.
  Pte. A. Field.
  Sgt. P. Field.
  Pte. G. Fielding.
  Pte. J. Filburn.
  Pte. P. Fletcher.
  Pte. T. J. Fletcher.
  Pte. J. R. Foster.
  Pte. T. Foster.
  Pte. T. Foster.
  Pte. T. Foster.
  Pte. W. Forster.
  Pte. R. Fowler.
  Pte. J. A. Fox.
  Pte. I. Foxcroft.
  Pte. K. Frame.
  L/Cpl. G. Frampton.
  L/Cpl. G. F. Frankcom.
  Cpl. G. Frankland.
  Pte. R. Frankland.
  Pte. T. L. Frankland.
  Pte. E. Fredrickson.
  Cpl. E. Friend.
  Pte. E. Frobisher.
  Pte. F. P. Furness.
  Pte. F. Gallagher.
  L/Cpl. F. J. Gallimore.
  Pte. S. Garnett.
  Pte. W. Garnett.
  Sgt. P. H. Garrett.
  Pte. J. H. Garwood.
  Pte. F. Gee.
  Pte. P. Gerrard.
  Pte. S. Gibson.
  Pte. W. D. Gibson.
  Pte. A. Gill.
  Pte. F. Gill.
  Pte. J. H. Gill.
  Pte. H. Gillibrand.
  Pte. J. Gilmour.
  Pte. A. Glasby.
  Pte. A. Godfrey.
  Pte. J. A. Goodall.
  Pte. W. Goodings.
  Pte. F. Goodwin.
  Pte. A. Gough.
  Pte. P. Goulden.
  Pte. J. Graham.
  Pte. K. Graham.
  Pte. C. E. Grainger.
  Pte. C. Grainger.
  Pte. H. Gray.
  Pte. W. Gray.
  Pte. T. A. Greaves.
  Pte. E. Green.
  Pte. R. W. Green.
  Pte. A. Greenbank.
  L/Cpl. T. Greehow.
  Pte. G. A. Greenwood.
  Pte. G. Greenwood.
  Pte. I. Gunning.
  Pte. A. Hailwood.
  Pte. J. W. Hainsworth.
  Pte. L. Hall.
  Pte. L. H. Hall.
  Pte. A. Hall.
  L/Cpl. S. Hallam.
  Pte. G. Halliday.
  Pte. W. Halliday.
  Pte. A. Halls.
  Pte. J. Halstead.
  Sgt. H. Hampton.
  Pte. B. Hancock.
  Pte. P. Happs.
  Cpl. H. Hardaker.
  Pte. C. Harding.
  Pte. C. Hardisty.
  Sgt. E. Hardman.
  Pte. S. Hargreaves.
  Pte. L. Hargreaves.
  Pte. G. Harrison.
  Pte. N. Harrison.
  Pte. A. Harper.
  Sgt. H. Hartley.
  Pte. J. H. Hartley.
  Pte. M. Hartley.
  Pte. R. Hartley.
  Pte. T. Hartley.
  Pte. W. Hartley.
  Pte. G. Harwood.
  Pte. C. Haslam.
  Pte. W. Hastings.
  L/Cpl. E. Hawley.
  Pte. W. E. Haxby.
  Pte. R. Healey.
  Pte. J. L. Heaps.
  Cpl. J. Heard.
  Pte. J. Heaton.
  Pte. H. Heaton.
  Pte. A. Hedges.
  Cpl. J. S. Hepworth.
  Pte. C. Hewlett.
  Pte. J. H. Hey.
  Pte. A. Hey.
  Pte. W. Hicks.
  Pte. A. Higgins.
  Pte. J. Hillary.
  Pte. G. Hinchcliffe.
  Pte. F. Hird.
  Pte. J. H. Hird.
  Pte. W. H. Hirst.
  Pte. H. Hodgson.
  Pte. H. Hodgson.
  Pte. J. Hodgson.
  Pte. J. Hodgson.
  Pte. M. Hodgson.
  Pte. W. A. Hodgson.
  Pte. J. Hogan.
  Pte. J. H. Holden.
  Pte. J. Hollingdrake.
  Pte. W. Hollings.
  Pte. F. Holmes.
  Pte. E. Holmes.
  Sgt. E. Hopkinson.
  Pte. H. Hopwood.
  L/Cpl. A. Horner.
  L/Cpl. G. E. Horner.
  Sgt. G. H. Horner.
  Pte. H. Horner.
  Pte. J. Horner.
  Sgt. W. Horner.
  Pte. H. Houldsworth.
  Pte. T. Howe.
  Pte. F. H. Howson.
  Pte. G. E. Hook.
  Pte. J. Hudson.
  Sgt. W. Hudson.
  Pte. J. Hudson.
  Pte. A. Hudson.
  Pte. J. Humphrey.
  Pte. S. Hunter.
  L/Cpl. J. W. Ideson.
  Pte. A. Ingham.
  Pte. H. Ingham.
  Pte. A. Ireland.
  Pte. T. Ireland.
  Pte. J. Ireland.
  Pte. W. Ireland.
  Pte. J. Irving.
  Pte. E. Isherwood.
  Pte. C. Ingleson.
  Pte. J. R. Jackman.
  Coy. Sergt.-Major A. Jackson.
  Pte. F. Jackson.
  Sgt. J. Jackson.
  L/Cpl. J. A. Jackson.
  Pte. W. Jackson.
  Pte. A. Jacques.
  Pte. H. Jarman.
  Pte. S. Jarvis.
  Pte. W. Jeffrey.
  Dr. E. Jenkinson.
  Pte. R. Jenkinson.
  Pte. J. Jennings.
  Pte. A. Johnson.
  Cpl. E. Johnson.
  Pte. G. Johnson.
  Pte. H. Johnson.
  Pte. W. Johnson.
  Dr. J. W. Jolly.
  Pte. H. E. Jones.
  Pte. A. Jowett.
  Pte. H. Jowett.
  Pte. W. Jowett.
  Pte. W. Joy.
  Pte. N. Judson.
  Pte. L. Kay.
  Pte. C. W. Kaye.
  Pte. H. G. Kaye.
  Pte. A. Kelly.
  Pte. E. Kelly.
  Coy. Qt.-Master Sergt. B. Kendall.
  Pte. J. G. Kendall.
  Pte. E. Kennedy.
  Pte. J. Kennedy.
  Pte. T. Kennedy.
  Pte. H. Kew.
  Pte. C. F. King.
  Pte. W. A. King.
  Pte. J. Kirkbright.
  Pte. A. Kirkbride.
  Pte. J. Kitts.
  Pte. J. W. Knipe.
  Pte. T. Knowles.
  Pte. J. H. Knowles.
  Pte. H. Lake.
  L/Cpl. S. Lake.
  Pte. A. Lambert.
  Pte. A. Lambert.
  Pte. G. Lambert.
  Coy. Qt.-Master Sergt. J. W. Lambert.
  Sgt. W. Lambert.
  Pte. C. Lane.
  Pte. A. Lang.
  Pte. H. Lawson.
  Cpl. W. Lawson.
  Pte. E. Laycock.
  Pte. J. Laycock.
  Pte. J. Laycock.
  Dr. W. Laycock.
  Pte. A. Leach.
  Pte. H. Leach.
  Pte. R. Leach.
  Pte. H. Leaf.
  Pte. E. Ledger.
  Pte. J. W. Lee.
  Pte. R. Lee.
  Pte. S. Lee.
  Pte. W. Lee.
  Cpl. J. H. Lemmon.
  Pte. T. W. Lemon.
  Pte. T. T. Levitt.
  Pte. W. Lilley.
  Dr. B. Limmer.
  L/Cpl. T. W. Limmer.
  Pte. A. Linfoot.
  Pte. C. W. Lister.
  Pte. J. H. Lister.
  Qt.-Master Sergt. J. W. Lister.
  Pte. W. Lister.
  Pte. H. Little.
  Pte. J. Lofthouse.
  Dr. J. Lofthouse.
  Cpl. J. T. Lomas.
  Pte. R. S. Long.
  Pte. E. Longfield.
  Pte. S. Lonsdale.
  Pte. W. Lonsdale.
  Pte. T. Lord.
  Pte. C. Lowndes.
  Pte. H. Lowcock.
  Pte. J. Lund.
  Pte. A. MacDonald.
  Pte. W. MacGregor.
  Pte. W. Mackey.
  Pte. W. Maddocks.
  Pte. W. Mann.
  L/Cpl. H. Marks.
  Pte. J. W. Maroney
  Cpl. H. Marriott.
  Pte. J. Marsden.
  Pte. T. Marsh.
  Pte. J. Marshall.
  Pte. S. Marshall.
  Pte. T. Marshall.
  Pte. H. Marshall.
  Pte. T. Marston. O. R.
  Sgt. F. Martin.
  Sgt. J. Martin.
  Pte. J. Martin.
  Pte. T. Martin.
  Pte. E. Mason.
  Pte. S. Matthews.
  Pte. G. Maude.
  Pte. G. Maudsley.
  Pte. J. Maudsley.
  Pte. W. Maunders.
  Pte. S. Mayes.
  Pte. L. McCann.
  Pte. C. McCann.
  Pte. J. McDermott.
  L/Cpl. O. McDermott.
  Cpl. J. McHugh.
  Pte. F. McKinley.
  Pte. D. McFarland.
  Pte. W. McShee.
  Pte. A. R. Metcalfe.
  Sgt. G. Metcalfe.
  Pte. J. Metcalfe.
  Pte. R. Metcalfe.
  Pte. W. Metcalfe.
  Pte. J. Middlebrook.
  Pte. J. Middleton.
  Pte. W. Middleton.
  Pte. J. Midgley.
  Pte. J. W. Midgley.
  Pte. C. Miles.
  Pte. R. H. Milne.
  Pte. G. Mitchell.
  Pte. F. Mitchell.
  Pte. A. Mitchell.
  Pte. T. Monk.
  Pte. J. H. Monk.
  L/Sgt. J. Moore.
  Pte. J. Moore.
  Pte. W. Moore.
  Pte. A. Moore.
  Pte. J. C. D. Moore.
  Pte. W. Moorhouse.
  Pte. P. Morgan.
  L/Cpl. J. M. Morphet.
  L/Cpl. E. Morrison.
  Pte. W. J. Morrison.
  Pte. J. Nash.
  Sgt. J. Nelson.
  Pte. C. E. Newhouse.
  Pte. E. Nicholls.
  Pte. H. Nicholson.
  Pte. R. Nicholson.
  Pte. R. Noble.
  Pte. E. Norfolk.
  Pte. H. Norman.
  Sgt. J. Norton.
  Pte. W. D. Ogden.
  Pte. R. Oldfield.
  Pte. B. O’Neill.
  L/Cpl. J. Ormerod.
  L/Sgt. H. Oxley.
  Pte. G. Page.
  Pte. A. Palmer.
  Pte. G. Palmer.
  L/Cpl. A. Parker.
  Pte. C. Parker.
  Pte. E. Parker.
  Pte. G. W. Parker.
  Cpl. T. R. Parker.
  Pte. W. R. Parker.
  Pte. H. Pakes.
  Pte. C. Pass.
  Sgt. W. Pass.
  Pte. S. Patchett.
  Pte. J. Paterson.
  Pte. N. Patterson.
  Pte. C. Peachey.
  Pte. J. L. Peacock.
  Pte. W. H. Pearson.
  Pte. J. Peddley.
  Pte. A. Pendle.
  Pte. J. A. Penny.
  Pte. J. Petty.
  Pte. J. Petty.
  Pte. G. W. Phillips.
  Pte. A. Pickard.
  Pte. F. Pichard.
  Pte. H. Pickering.
  Pte. E. Pickles.
  Pte. F. Pickles.
  Pte. F. Pickles.
  L/Cpl. H. Pickles.
  Pte. J. Pickles.
  Pte. J. E. Pickup.
  Pte. J. Pickup.
  Pte. J. Pike.
  Pte. C. Pinder.
  Pte. C. Pipe.
  Pte. G. Pooley.
  Pte. L. Potter.
  Pte. D. Powell.
  Pte. A. Preston.
  Pte. C. Preston.
  Pte. E. Preston.
  Pte. F. Preston.
  L/Cpl. J. A. Preston.
  Pte. R. Preston.
  Pte. W. Preston.
  Cpl. F. Procter.
  Pte. G. Procter.
  Pte. J. Procter.
  L/Sgt. A. W. Pryke.
  Cpl. G. Pullen.
  Pte. D. Quinn.
  Cpl. J. Quinn.
  Pte. S. Rainford.
  Pte. W. Raistrick.
  Pte. C. W. Ralph.
  Pte. T. Ralph.
  Pte. W. Rampling.
  Pte. J. Ramsden.
  Pte. H. Ratcliffe.
  Pte. J. Raw.
  Sgt. R. Rawdin.
  Cpl. D. Rawnsley.
  Pte. H. Rayner.
  Pte. C. H. Redhead.
  Pte. T. E. Redhead.
  Pte. H. Reed.
  Sgt. O. Rendell.
  Pte. T. Rencroft.
  Pte. C. Rhodes.
  Pte. J. Rhodes.
  Pte. J. W. Rhodes.
  Sgt. T. Richardson.
  Pte. W. Ridd.
  Pte. H. Ridding.
  Pte. B. Ridge.
  Pte. H. Riley.
  Pte. C. Riley.
  Pte. E. Riley.
  Pte. E. Rimmer.
  Pte. W. Rimmer.
  Pte. B. Roberts.
  Pte. H. Roberts.
  Pte. A. Robertshaw.
  Pte. A. Robinson.
  Pte. C. Robinson.
  Pte. C. P. Robinson.
  Pte. H. Robinson.
  Pte. H. Robinson.
  Pte. J. Robinson.
  Pte. J. W. Robinson.
  Sgt. W. J. Robinson.
  Pte. M. Rogers.
  Pte. A. Roe.
  L/Cpl. G. Roper.
  Pte. E. Rosenthal.
  Pte. C. Rothery.
  Cpl. W. L. Routledge.
  Pte. J. Rudd.
  Pte. J. L. Ruddock.
  Pte. S. Rushworth.
  Pte. H. Rushworth.
  Pte. D. Russell.
  Pte. T. D. Sadler.
  Pte. I. Sanders.
  Pte. O. Sanderson.
  Pte. A. Saxton.
  L/Cpl. H. Scratchard.
  Pte. E. Schofield.
  Pte. W. Schofield.
  Pte. A. H. Scott.
  Pte. W. Scott.
  Pte. C. Scott.
  Dr. A. E. Scully.
  Pte. C. R. Sears.
  Cpl. R. Seggar.
  Pte. G. Selwood.
  Pte. S. E. Senior.
  Pte. C. Shackleton.
  Pte. T. S. Shackleton.
  Pte. W. Shackleton.
  Pte. E. Sharpe.
  Pte. J. Sharpe.
  Pte. W. Sharpe.
  L/Cpl. J. Sheldon.
  Pte. T. Sheldon.
  Pte. H. Shepherd.
  Pte. W. R. Shepherd.
  Pte. H. Shinn.
  Dr. H. Shires.
  Pte. H. Simpson.
  Pte. H. Simpson.
  Pte. H. Simpson.
  Pte. A. Simpson.
  Pte. G. Slight.
  Pte. E. Slinger.
  Pte. S. R. Slinger.
  Pte. V. Slinger.
  Sgt. W. Slinger.
  Pte. A. Smith.
  Pte. E. Smith.
  Pte. E. Smith.
  Pte. E. A. Smith.
  Pte. F. Smith.
  Pte. H. Smith.
  Sgt. A. Smith.
  Pte. H. Smith.
  Pte. F. Smith.
  Pte. E. M. Smith.
  Pte. R. Smith.
  Pte. E. Smith.
  Pte. H. Smith.
  Pte. H. Smith.
  Pte. H. M. Smith.
  Pte. J. Smith.
  Pte. J. Smith.
  Pte. J. Smith.
  Pte. J. A. Smith.
  Pte. J. D. Smith.
  Pte. J. H. Smith.
  L/Cpl. J. H. Smith.
  Pte. J. J. Smith.
  Pte. J. W. Smith.
  Pte. M. Smith.
  Pte. N. Smith.
  Pte. W. Smith.
  Pte. W. Smith.
  Pte. W. Smith.
  Pte. W. Smith.
  Pte. R. Smith.
  Pte. F. Snowden.
  Pte. R. Snowden.
  Sgt. A. Southam.
  Pte. J. Southgate.
  Pte. R. Spence.
  Pte. J. E. Spencer.
  Pte. A. Spencer.
  L/Cpl. J. S. Spencer.
  Pte. P. Spencer.
  Pte. W. E. Staines.
  Pte. F. Standing.
  Pte. S. Stanley.
  Pte. H. Stansfield.
  Pte. W. Starkey.
  Pte. H. Stell.
  Pte. T. Stephenson.
  L/Cpl. A. Stephenson.
  Pte. J. H. Stewart.
  Pte. F. W. Stirk.
  Pte. T. Stone.
  Pte. W. F. Stoney.
  L/Cpl. F. Stork.
  Pte. M. Stork.
  Pte. A. Stott.
  Pte. E. Stott.
  Pte. R. Stott.
  L/Cpl. A. U. Strutt.
  Pte. G. Stubbs.
  Pte. E. Sturdy.
  Cpl. G. Sturdy.
  Dr. A. H. Styler.
  Pte. H. Sunderland.
  Pte. S. Sunderland.
  Pte. A. Sutcliffe.
  Pte. T. Sutcliffe.
  Pte. W. Sutcliffe.
  Pte. J. E. Sutcliffe.
  Pte. H. Swindon.
  Pte. J. Swindlehurst.
  Pte. A. Syers.
  Pte. S. Tanner.
  Pte. A. Tattersall.
  Pte. J. Tattersall.
  Pte. J. W. Tatton.
  Pte. F. Taylor.
  Pte. G. Taylor.
  Pte. G. H. Taylor.
  Pte. H. C. Taylor.
  Pte. J. M. Taylor.
  L/Cpl. S. Taylor.
  Cpl. W. Taylor.
  Pte. J. Terry.
  Pte. C. Thomas.
  Pte. H. Thomas.
  Pte. H. Thomas.
  Pte. B. Thompson.
  Pte. E. Thompson.
  L/Cpl. J. W. Thompson.
  Pte. J. Thompson.
  Pte. W. Thompson.
  L/Cpl. J. Thornborough.
  Pte. S. Thornborough.
  L/Sgt. T. Thornton.
  Pte. F. Thornton.
  Pte. G. Thornton.
  Pte. J. E. Tillotson.
  Pte. S. Tillotson.
  Pte. C. G. Tindall.
  Pte. C. E. Tomlinson.
  Pte. E. M. Tomlinson.
  Pte. J. Tomlinson.
  Pte. S. Tomlinson.
  Pte. K. Tomlinson.
  Pte. W. Toothill.
  Pte. A. E. Towler.
  Pte. J. Townson.
  Pte. A. Triffith.
  Pte. A. Turnbull.
  Pte. J. Turnbull.
  Pte. W. Turnbull.
  Coy. Sergt.-Major A. Turner.
  L/Cpl. F. Turner.
  Pte. J. W. Turner.
  Pte. R. Turner.
  Pte. S. Twine.
  Pte. W. Tyrer.
  L/Sgt. J. Upton.
  Pte. A. Uttley.
  Pte. C. Varley.
  Pte. J. Varley.
  Pte. J. Vickers.
  Pte. B. Vinnicombe.
  Pte. W. Waddington.
  Pte. J. Waddington.
  Pte. P. Wade.
  Pte. J. Wademan.
  Pte. S. Wademan.
  Pte. G. H. Wadeson.
  Pte. J. W. Wadeson.
  L/Cpl. J. Waggett.
  Cpl. D. Wagstaffe.
  Pte. W. Wainwright.
  Pte. E. Waite.
  Sgt. F. Waite.
  Pte. M. Waite.
  Sgt. R. Waite.
  Pte. R. Wakeley.
  Cpl. E. Wakeling.
  Pte. B. Walker.
  Pte. E. Walker.
  Pte. H. Walker.
  Pte. H. Walker.
  Cpl. T. Walker.
  Pte. H. Walker.
  Pte. T. W. Walker.
  Pte. W. Walker.
  Pte. R. Wallbank.
  Pte. W. Wallwork.
  Pte. A. Walmsley.
  Pte. C. Walmsley.
  Pte. E. Walsh.
  Pte. J. Walsh.
  Pte. T. A. Walton.
  Pte. J. Walton.
  Pte. C. J. Ward.
  Pte. M. Ward.
  Pte. J. Waring.
  Sgt. E. Waterhouse.
  Pte. J. Watmough.
  Pte. E. Watson.
  Pte. H. Watson.
  Pte. H. Watson.
  L/Cpl. J. Watson.
  Pte. J. H. Watson.
  L/Sgt. W. Watson.
  Pte. W. Watson.
  Pte. W. Watson.
  Pte. A. Wear.
  L/Cpl. J. H. Weatherill.
  Pte. G. Webster.
  Sgt. J. Webster.
  Pte. A. West.
  Pte. F. West.
  Pte. J. West.
  Pte. T. West.
  Pte. L. Western.
  Pte. C. Whittaker.
  Pte. C. Whittaker.
  L/Cpl. H. Whittaker.
  Pte. J. R. Whittaker.
  Pte. H. White.
  Pte. J. H. Whiteley.
  Sgt. W. Whiteoak.
  Pte. W. Whiteoak.
  Pte. C. Whiteoak.
  Pte. C. Whitham.
  Pte. F. Widdop.
  Pte. H. Widdop.
  Pte. H. Wimblett.
  Pte. J. Wiggan.
  Pte. F. Wilcock.
  Pte. H. Wiles.
  Pte. W. Wilkins.
  Pte. J. Wilkinson.
  Pte. N. Wilkinson.
  Cpl. F. Wilkinson.
  Pte. W. Wilkinson.
  Pte. C. E. Wilks.
  Pte. J. W. Willan.
  Pte. L. Williams.
  Pte. S. Williamson.
  Pte. J. Wilson.
  Pte. A. Wilson.
  Pte. A. Wilson.
  Pte. E. Wilson.
  Pte. G. W. Wilson.
  Pte. G. R. Windle.
  Sgt. E. Wiseman.
  Pte. J. Wiseman.
  Pte. J. Woffenden.
  Pte. J. Wood.
  Sgt. B. Woodcock.
  Pte. H. Woodhead.
  Cpl. W. Woods.
  Pte. A. Woodward.
  Pte. E. C. Wooff.
  Pte. G. F. Woollard.
  Pte. J. Wordley.
  Pte. S. Wright.
  Pte. W. Wright.
  Pte. W. Yates.
  Pte. F. Young.
  Pte. W. Young.
  Pte. J. H. Yoxall.


R.A.M.C. Attached--

  L/Sgt. F. Giles.
  Pte. J. Excell.
  Pte. W. O’Brien.
  Pte. J. Raistrick.
  Pte. J. W. Smith.


Army Ordnance Corps. Attached--

  A/Sgt. F. Harriman.


SECOND 6th DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S WEST RIDING REGIMENT.


NOMINAL ROLL.


=A= Coy.--

  Pte. A. Arundale.
  Pte. T. Anderton.
  Pte. G. H. Alton.
  Sgt. H. Ayrton.
  Pte. A. Ackroyd.
  Cpl. H. R. Ackroyd.
  Pte. G. Abra.
  Pte. S. Atkinson.
  Sgt. T. E. Bosworthick.
  Pte. A. Bell.
  Pte. W. Barrett.
  Pte. G. Bell.
  Pte. H. Bray.
  Pte. F. A. Britton.
  Pte. G. Best.
  Sgt. A. Branker.
  Sgt. J. B. Bushby.
  Pte. H. Banks.
  Pte. H. Bottomley.
  Pte. B. Booth.
  Pte. J. Bates.
  Pte. S. Berry.
  Pte. W. Blackburn.
  Pte. A. B. Brown.
  Pte. W. H. Barrett.
  Pte. J. Birtle.
  Pte. W. Brookes.
  Pte. W. Breen.
  Pte. A. Busfield.
  Pte. A. Batley.
  Pte. J. Broadbent.
  Pte. S. Boothman.
  Pte. E. Beales.
  Pte. G. Bowman.
  Pte. E. Bishop.
  Pte. A. Barlow.
  Pte. J. H. Blackah.
  Pte. W. H. Boothman.
  Pte. G. Birch.
  Pte. R. Bateson.
  Cpl. F. A. Barker.
  Pte. J. R. Bowley.
  Pte. F. Blackey.
  Pte. R. Barker.
  Coy. Qt.-Mstr. Sergt. F. W. Beard.
  Pte. A. Bridge.
  Pte. J. Bunting.
  Pte. A. D. Blackburn.
  Pte. W. T. Bentley.
  Pte. W. H. Beck.
  Pte. J. Birkett.
  Pte. J. H. Black.
  Pte. A. N. Clayton.
  L/Cpl. F. Curry.
  Pte. J. Cullam.
  Pte. R. Chapman.
  L/Cpl. W. Cockcroft.
  Pte. J. Cornall.
  Pte. A. Carey.
  Coy. Sergt.-Major A. Clarke.
  Pte. E. Calver.
  Pte. J. E. Crockford.
  Pte. G. E. Cousins.
  Pte. G. Cobb.
  Pte. W. Caton.
  Pte. J. E. Culbert.
  Pte. W. Cox.
  Pte. W. Chapman.
  Pte. W. Cook.
  Pte. T. A. Dobson.
  Pte. J. T. Deighton.
  Pte. E. Dawson.
  Pte. T. Downes.
  Pte. H. Davies.
  Pte. E. R. Dawson.
  Cpl. W. Dennard.
  Pte. A. Davey.
  Pte. J. W. Denton.
  Pte. E. Fawell.
  Pte. J. Fisher.
  Pte. S. E. Fern.
  Pte. T. Freeman.
  Pte. C. S. Fletcher.
  Pte. J. Foster.
  Pte. T. Foster.
  Pte. A. Flynn.
  Pte. H. Grimston.
  Pte. T. Geldard.
  Pte. J. Greenwood.
  Pte. J. Garrett.
  Sgt. J. Gibson.
  Pte. H. Graham.
  Pte. H. Green.
  Pte. J. Greenwood.
  Pte. E. Gothard.
  Pte. G. Guy.
  Pte. D. Gamble.
  Pte. J. Holdsworth.
  Pte. E. A. Hudson.
  Pte. F. Holmes.
  Pte. A. Hurst.
  Pte. G. W. Hirst.
  Pte. W. Harker.
  Pte. J. Hulme.
  L/Cpl. H. Hillary.
  Pte. T. Horner.
  Pte. H. Haworth.
  Pte. H. Horner.
  Pte. W. Haworth.
  Cpl. S. Hodgson.
  Pte. E. Hartley.
  Pte. E. Howarth.
  Pte. J. F. Hartley.
  L/Cpl. T. Hargreaves.
  Pte. B. Hawkins.
  Pte. S. J. Hargreaves.
  Pte. F. Ibbetson.
  Pte. A. Jacques.
  Cpl. P. W. Jolly.
  Pte. S. Jewitt.
  Pte. R. S. Johnson.
  Pte. R. Johnson.
  Pte. W. Jackson.
  Pte. W. Kelly.
  Sgt. R. E. King.
  Pte. G. Kendall.
  Pte. A. Key.
  Pte. C. F. King.
  Pte. J. Kirk.
  Pte. A. Lund.
  Pte. E. Laycock.
  Pte. G. T. Langford.
  Pte. E. Lund.
  Pte. J. Lynch.
  Pte. C. Lambert.
  Pte. M. Lund.
  Pte. E. T. Liggins.
  Pte. S. Lee.
  Pte. G. Morrell.
  Pte. A. Mitchell.
  Sgt. R. Mason.
  L/Sgt. H. Maudsley.
  L/Sgt. J. Maren.
  Pte. E. McLelland.
  Sgt. H. Morgan.
  L/Cpl. C. Metcalfe.
  Pte. T. Mellor.
  Pte. R. Metcalfe.
  Pte. W. Mudd.
  Pte. H. P. Moorhouse.
  Pte. R. Moore.
  Pte. A. Nutter.
  Pte. A. Norton.
  Pte. E. Overend.
  Pte. S. T. Oddie.
  L/Cpl. W. Oddie.
  Pte. A. Oddy.
  Pte. A. Preston.
  Pte. W. Park.
  Pte. J. Pateman.
  Dr. H. Pickles.
  Pte. J. L. Parker.
  Pte. T. Parrington.
  Pte. J. Parratt.
  Pte. J. T. Parker.
  Pte. J. B. Raynor.
  Pte. L. Riley.
  Sgt. T. J. Robinson.
  L/Cpl. S. Rhodes.
  Pte. J. Rayner.
  Pte. C. C. Robinson.
  Pte. E. Russell.
  Pte. W. Royston.
  Pte. W. Scott.
  Pte. F. Spencer.
  Pte. R. Smith.
  Pte. J. Stephenson.
  Pte. J. W. Sugden.
  Pte. W. Smith.
  Pte. C. Smith.
  Pte. A. Steele.
  Pte. T. A. Shorter.
  Pte. H. A. Saxton.
  Pte. J. Smith.
  Pte. A. Spencer.
  Pte. H. Stott.
  Pte. B. K. Simpson.
  Pte. A. Sunderland.
  Pte. V. Shuttleworth.
  Pte. H. H. Smith.
  Pte. G. R. Smith.
  Dr. J. Stork.
  Pte. W. Smith.
  Pte. R. Smith.
  Pte. W. Shuttleworth.
  Pte. A. Stopp.
  Pte. J. Sweeney. A.
  L/Cpl. J. Smith.
  Cpl. H. Sharp.
  Pte. R. Swainbank.
  Cpl. W. H. Spedding.
  Pte. J. A. Smith.
  Pte. G. R. Smith.
  Pte. W. Southwell.
  Pte. J. W. Spencer.
  Pte. W. Stutes.
  Pte. L. Shaw.
  Pte. F. M. Sharpe.
  Pte. F. Shaw.
  Pte. P. T. Tillotson.
  Pte. N. Taylor.
  Pte. W. Thompson.
  Pte. H. Thompson.
  Pte. A. Thompson.
  Cpl. C. Vollentine.
  Pte. H. Vaughan.
  Pte. T. H. White.
  Pte. L. W. Wood.
  Pte. H. Waddington.
  Pte. T. Whitehead.
  Sgt. M. B. Windle.
  L/Cpl. H. Wilkinson.
  Pte. R. West.
  L/Cpl. A. J. Watson.
  Pte. T. H. Watson.
  Pte. T. Wilkin.
  Pte. R. Wane.
  Pte. J. Walker.
  Pte. T. Walker.
  L/Cpl. A. Wear.
  Pte. F. Whittaker.
  Pte. J. S. Whitham.
  Pte. P. L. Windle.
  Cpl. H. Wilson.
  Dr. J. Wilson.
  Pte. E. Wilson.
  Pte. T. Wilkinson.
  Cpl. J. Woodhead.
  Pte. H. White.
  Pte. J. Yeadon.
  Sgt. F. Yates.


=B= Coy.--

  Cpl. A. F. Atkinson.
  Pte. A. E. Alton.
  Pte. E. Alton.
  Pte. G. Athorn.
  Pte. W. Brook.
  Pte. W. Banks.
  Pte. G. Barker.
  Pte. G. Barker.
  Pte. M. Barker.
  Pte. N. Barker.
  Pte. C. Beaumont.
  Pte. S. Bebb.
  Pte. C. H. Beevers.
  Pte. G. Belcher.
  Pte. J. Bennett.
  Pte. M. Benson.
  Pte. S. H. Bentley.
  Pte. D. Binns.
  Pte. F. Bracewell.
  Pte. J. Brooks.
  Pte. B. Brotherton.
  Pte. W. Broughton.
  Pte. C. E. Brown.
  Pte. C. W. Bryan.
  Pte. M. Buckley.
  Pte. J. Butterfield.
  Pte. G. Bygrave.
  Pte. F. M. Ball.
  L/Cpl. J. Churchman.
  Dr. W. Convine.
  Pte. F. Cardwell.
  Pte. T. Carter.
  Pte. I. Catherall.
  Pte. A. W. Chester.
  Pte. W. R. Child.
  Pte. I. A. Clarkson.
  Pte. W. Clough.
  Pte. A. Cocksedge.
  Pte. H. Cooke.
  Pte. R. Coulthard.
  Pte. J. H. Cowgill.
  Pte. G. E. Crook.
  Pte. W. Crossley.
  Sgt. A. E. Dawson.
  Pte. T. Dearden.
  Sgt. E. Driver.
  Pte. T. Dobson.
  Pte. H. Drake.
  Sgt. F. Eals.
  Pte. H. Edmondson.
  Pte. R. Edwards.
  Pte. G. Fawcett.
  Pte. E. Feather.
  Pte. T. W. Fenwick.
  Pte. H. Fortune.
  Pte. T. Fortune.
  Pte. H. Furness.
  Coy. Sergt.-Major C. H. Gartside.
  Cpl. G. Golding.
  Cpl. A. E. Green.
  L/Cpl. W. N. Groom.
  Pte. T. W. Garner.
  Pte. H. R. Gilman.
  Pte. W. Goodall.
  Pte. R. Greenwood.
  Coy. Qt.-Master Sergt. W. Horsfield.
  Cpl. W. Hudson.
  Pte. F. Hadfield.
  Pte. G. Hadfield.
  Pte. J. Haigh.
  Pte. W. Haigh.
  Pte. L. Hall.
  Pte. G. F. Hammond.
  Pte. A. Hanson.
  Pte. C. Harbinson.
  Pte. L. Hardwick.
  Pte. S. Hardwick.
  Pte. C. A. Hargreaves.
  Pte. R. W. Hargreaves.
  Pte. F. Harper.
  Pte. A. Harrison.
  Pte. J. Harrison.
  Pte. J. T. Harwood.
  Pte. T. Hawker.
  Pte. H. Haworth.
  Pte. H. Heaton.
  Pte. F. Hedges.
  Pte. A. Hey.
  Pte. J. Hickey.
  Pte. W. Hodgkinson.
  Pte. I. Higgs.
  Pte. B. Hill.
  Pte. J. H. Hiles.
  Pte. J. W. Hindle.
  Pte. C. E. Hirst.
  Pte. W. H. Hodkinson.
  L/Cpl. A. Hodkinson.
  Pte. A. Holdsworth.
  Pte. D. Hollingsworth.
  Pte. W. Hopkins.
  Pte. J. Howarth.
  Cpl. T. Johnson.
  L/Cpl. E. Ives.
  Pte. G. Inskip.
  Pte. J. H. Jackson.
  Pte. T. G. Jackson.
  Pte. H. Kempton.
  Pte. H. Kitson.
  Sgt. C. Lee.
  Cpl. S. R. Lane.
  Dr. F. Lyons.
  Pte. J. Lawson.
  Pte. A. H. Lovell.
  Pte. E. Lund.
  Pte. J. Lund.
  Pte. J. H. Lund.
  Sgt. J. T. McLeod.
  Cpl. G. Mason.
  Cpl. R. Mason.
  Cpl. S. Mitchell.
  Pte. G. Miller.
  Pte. H. W. Marshall.
  Pte. F. S. Mason.
  Pte. J. H. Mawson.
  Pte. W. R. McCall.
  Pte. E. Metcalfe.
  Pte. G. Metcalfe.
  Pte. W. Metcalfe.
  Pte. J. Midgley.
  L/Cpl. F. J. Miles.
  Pte. T. Miller.
  Pte. T. Moreland.
  Pte. G. Moore.
  Pte. H. Moulds.
  Pte. J. H. Mudd.
  Pte. C. Murphy.
  Sgt. C. W. Newns.
  L/Cpl. J. Nettleton.
  Pte. J. Nelson.
  Pte. R. Nutter.
  Sgt. W. Petty.
  Sgt. A. Pollard.
  Pte. H. Parker.
  Pte. T. Parkinson.
  Pte. J. Partridge.
  Pte. J. Pattison.
  Pte. F. Percival.
  Pte. N. Pilling.
  Pte. W. Pickup.
  Pte. T. Pitt.
  Pte. J. Plews.
  Pte. W. Powell.
  Pte. F. Pratt.
  Pte. A. Priestley.
  Pte. A. Pybus.
  Pte. W. Petty.
  L/Cpl. J. Rothwell.
  Pte. C. Rawlings.
  Pte. T. Read.
  Pte. A. Richardson.
  Pte. C. Ridehalgh.
  Pte. J. Riley.
  Pte. A. Robinson.
  Pte. J. Robinson.
  Pte. A. Rushton.
  Pte. E. Ryder.
  Sgt. A. Smith.
  L/Cpl. H. W. Stowell.
  L/Sgt. J. W. Scarborough.
  Pte. W. Saddington.
  Pte. H. Sargent.
  Pte. A. Saxton.
  Pte. T. L. Scott.
  Pte. H. Sedgewick.
  Pte. A. C. Sharpe.
  Pte. M. Sherlock.
  Pte. T. Sherlock.
  Pte. E. Simpson.
  Pte. W. Smales.
  Pte. A. Slater.
  Pte. A. Smith.
  Pte. F. Smith.
  Pte. J. W. Smith.
  Pte. L. Smith.
  Pte. M. Smith.
  Pte. F. Spencer.
  Pte. M. Spencer.
  Pte. J. T. Spencer.
  Pte. W. Stanley.
  Pte. J. Stead.
  Pte. E. Stell.
  Pte. J. Stephenson.
  Pte. A. Stoney.
  Pte. H. Storey.
  Pte. J. Sturdy.
  Pte. H. Sutcliffe.
  L/Cpl. A. P. Swann.
  Pte. E. Thompson.
  L/Cpl. J. W. Tate.
  Pte. H. Taylor.
  Pte. J. C. Taylor.
  Pte. T. Taylor.
  Pte. E. Teale.
  Pte. H. Tillotson.
  Pte. W. Toothill.
  Pte. D. Threlfall.
  Pte. E. Thwaites.
  Pte. W. Tuer.
  Pte. S. Turner.
  Pte. T. Turner.
  Pte. T. E. Vickers.
  Sgt. J. T. Walton.
  Cpl. A. West.
  Dr. F. Watkinson.
  Pte. D. Walkington.
  Pte. D. Walsh.
  Pte. R. J. Waterworth.
  Pte. E. Watson.
  Pte. F. Watson.
  Pte. J. A. West.
  Pte. D. Whittaker.
  Pte. W. Whittaker.
  Pte. R. Whiteley.
  Pte. H. J. Whiting.
  Pte. J. W. Wilkinson.
  Pte. W. Wilkinson.
  Pte. A. G. Wilson.
  Pte. C. B. Wilson.
  Pte. G. Wilson.
  Pte. H. Wilson.
  Pte. T. Willoughby.
  Pte. T. Wood.
  Pte. E. Woodhead.
  Pte. T. W. Woof.
  Pte. E. Wrathall.
  Pte. J. Wright.
  Pte. H. Wrigglesworth.
  Pte. H. Young.


=C= Coy.--

  Pte. M. Alderson.
  Pte. P. Allott.
  Pte. J. R. Atkins.
  Pte. E. C. Atkins.
  Pte. W. Atkinson.
  Pte. J. W. Bailey.
  Pte. W. Bailey.
  Cpl. A. N. Barrett.
  Pte. W. J. Branker.
  Pte. C. Bainbridge.
  Pte. H. Bancroft.
  Pte. J. H. Beard.
  Pte. T. F. Bellerby.
  Pte. S. Bentley.
  Pte. W. Binns.
  Pte. H. Boyd.
  Pte. H. Boocock.
  Pte. E. Bowker.
  Pte. J. C. Bowker.
  Pte. W. Bracewell.
  Pte. W. Bramall.
  Pte. J. H. Brayshaw.
  Pte. A. Briggs.
  Pte. H. Brotherton.
  Pte. C. S. Brooks.
  Pte. J. W. Brown.
  Pte. E. Brown.
  Pte. B. E. Brown.
  Pte. W. Bruce.
  Pte. H. Bulcock.
  Pte. W. C. Burnett.
  Cpl. G. Burrow.
  Pte. J. Breare.
  L/Cpl. H. Bilton.
  Cpl. T. Bownass.
  Pte. N. V. Capstick.
  Pte. H. Capstick.
  Pte. W. Cartledge.
  Pte. M. Cartwright.
  Pte. W. Cawdrey.
  Pte. H. Chester.
  Pte. R. Clapham.
  Pte. T. Clemmett.
  Pte. T. Coates.
  Pte. A. E. Crabtree.
  Pte. F. T. Crowe.
  L/Sgt. G. B. Creasey.
  L/Cpl. H. A. Clayton.
  O.R.-Sgt. E. Cooper.
  Pte. S. W. Dean.
  Pte. H. Dixon.
  Pte. H. Dobson.
  Pte. G. Downie.
  Pte. E. Drake.
  Pte. F. Dugdale.
  Sgt. E. Dewhirst.
  L/Cpl. P. Dransfield.
  Pte. M. Egan.
  Pte. H. Emmott.
  Pte. D. Everitt.
  L/Cpl. S. A. Exley.
  Pte. A. Exley.
  Pte. J. A. Fender.
  Pte. L. Fieldsend.
  Pte. S. G. Fisher.
  Pte. H. B. Forrest.
  Pte. A. Ford.
  Pte. T. Foster.
  Pte. L. W. Fox.
  Pte. R. J. Goodwin.
  Pte. F. Green.
  Pte. A. Greenwood.
  Pte. J. E. Greenwood.
  Pte. J. T. Gilbert.
  Pte. E. Gill.
  Pte. E. Gill.
  Pte. E. Gornall.
  Pte. W. Greenacre.
  Dr. J. Godfrey.
  Cpl. S. Gardiner.
  Sgt. R. V. Gee.
  Cpl. A. Hebden.
  Dr. J. Haworth.
  Cpl. A. Haworth.
  Pte. A. D. Hargreaves.
  Pte. J. Harper.
  Pte. W. Hall.
  Pte. E. Herrington.
  Pte. T. E. Hewitt.
  Pte. S. Hird.
  Pte. T. Hawxwell.
  Pte. A. Holgate.
  Pte. J. Horner.
  Pte. A. Horseman.
  Pte. L. W. Hopkins.
  Pte. J. Hobson.
  L/Cpl. F. Haworth.
  Pte. W. R. Hull.
  Pte. R. Howell.
  Pte. H. Huby.
  Pte. A. Ingham.
  Pte. J. Jowett.
  Sgt. J. B. Jackson.
  Pte. J. Kaye.
  Pte. J. A. Keay.
  Pte. W. Kew.
  Pte. W. Kershaw.
  Pte. A. Lawson.
  Pte. R. Lawson.
  Pte. R. Leadbetter.
  L/Sgt. D. Long.
  L/Cpl. J. W. Lister.
  Pte. W. J. C. Letheron.
  Pte. S. Little.
  Pte. T. Lobley.
  Pte. H. Lund.
  Pte. J. Lupton.
  Pte. I. Marshall.
  Pte. L. W. Marshall.
  Pte. W. A. Marshall.
  Pte. N. S. Metcalfe.
  Pte. A. E. Mills.
  Pte. F. Mitchell.
  Pte. L. P. Mitchell.
  Pte. M. MacDonnell.
  Pte. J. McGlynn.
  Pte. H. MacNulty.
  Pte. J. T. Moorby.
  Pte. E. Moorhouse.
  Pte. S. T. Moon.
  Pte. J. Mosley.
  Cpl. G. Mudd.
  Pte. J. Moran.
  Pte. C. H. Myers.
  Sgt. F. T. Metcalfe.
  Sgt. J. S. Mooney.
  Dr. W. Marshall.
  Pte. C. Neal.
  Pte. E. Nixon.
  Pte. C. Norfolk. Coy.
  Qt.-Master Sergt. E. J. Norton.
  L/Cpl. A. Nichols.
  Pte. W. Organ.
  Pte. H. Omerod.
  Pte. S. Ormondroyd.
  Pte. P. Overend.
  Pte. H. Pike.
  Pte. T. Parker.
  Pte. J. Parkinson.
  Pte. J. Pass.
  Pte. A. Pighills.
  Pte. T. Preston.
  Pte. H. Ralph.
  Sgt. H. Roo.
  Pte. E. R. Raine.
  Pte. J. Reynard.
  Pte. W. Ridge.
  Pte. A. Roberts.
  Pte. J. H. Robertshaw.
  Pte. A. Robinson.
  Pte. A. V. Robinson.
  Pte. C. Robinson.
  Pte. H. Ratcliffe.
  Pte. H. Rothwell.
  Coy. Sergt.-Major W. C. Rogers.
  Pte. A. Shackleton.
  Pte. H. Shackleton.
  Pte. M. Shannon.
  Pte. M. Sheriff.
  Pte. S. J. Siddall.
  Pte. H. Simpson.
  Pte. G. Singleton.
  Pte. A. Sherwin.
  Pte. T. M. Smales.
  Pte. A. V. Smith.
  Pte. A. Smith.
  Pte. E. Smith.
  Pte. H. Smith.
  Pte. I. G. Smith.
  Pte. Wm. Smith.
  Pte. Wa. Smith.
  Pte. R. Smith.
  Pte. W. H. Smith.
  Pte. W. B. Spencer.
  Pte. A. Stead.
  Pte. F. Stapleton.
  Pte. R. Stevens.
  Pte. R. W. Stewart.
  Pte. J. A. Stubbs.
  Pte. C. Sutcliffe.
  Pte. J. H. Swift.
  Pte. A. Sykes.
  Pte. C. Sugden.
  Sgt. A. C. Smith.
  Cpl. J. Smith.
  L/Cpl. W. H. Sutcliffe.
  Pte. G. Talbot.
  Pte. T. Thackeray.
  Pte. W. Thompson.
  Pte. L. Throup.
  Pte. F. Tillotson.
  Pte. W. Tillotson.
  Pte. A. Tiffany.
  Pte. L. Tomlinson.
  Pte. G. Town.
  Pte. H. Turner.
  Pte. J. W. Turner.
  Pte. F. Tyrer.
  Pte. A. Watson.
  Pte. F. Waite.
  Pte. H. B. Waite.
  Pte. S. Weavers.
  Pte. J. Walker.
  Pte. R. Walker.
  Pte. B. Walls.
  Pte. F. White.
  Pte. H. Whipp.
  Pte. P. Whitehead.
  Pte. H. Wilde.
  Pte. H. Wilkinson.
  Pte. R. Windle.
  Pte. A. Winn.
  Pte. C. Wilde.
  Pte. C. Wood.
  Pte. H. Wray.
  Pte. H. Wright.
  Pte. G. Wroe.
  Pte. J. T. Willmore.
  Dr. W. Walker.
  Cpl. J. W. Whitham.
  L/Cpl. E. H. Wilkinson.
  Cpl. W. Winterburn.
  L/Sgt. J. Wilson.
  Cpl. H. Wesson.
  Sgt. J. M. Walker.
  Sgt. R. E. Walker.
  Pte. H. Yeadon.


=D= Coy.

  Pte. H. Anderson.
  Pte. N. Ambler.
  Pte. J. W. Altoft.
  Pte. J. Armitage.
  Sgt. W. Butler.
  Cpl. E. W. Birchenough.
  L/Cpl. H. Blackburn.
  Cpl. J. Buckley.
  Pte. F. Beaver.
  Pte. H. Bell.
  Pte. S. E. Briggs.
  Pte. J. Brigg.
  Pte. H. Brown.
  Pte. H. Binns.
  Pte. J. H. Bailey.
  Pte. W. Barber.
  Pte. J. M. Bankcroft.
  Pte. J. Brown.
  Pte. G. Butler.
  Pte. E. Breekes.
  Pte. A. Burrill.
  Pte. W. L. Birch.
  Pte. E. Billinger.
  Pte. N. Brook.
  Pte. I. Bower.
  Pte. A. Beecroft.
  Pte. W. E. Burdett.
  Pte. W. Cason.
  L/Cpl. J. Chapman.
  Pte. H. Chester.
  Pte. G. Cook.
  Pte. T. W. Costello.
  Pte. J. Cowgill.
  Pte. J. Cowley.
  Pte. A. Crowther.
  Pte. B. Cockerill.
  Pte. W. Cathey.
  Pte. S. Catlow.
  Pte. W. Cook.
  Pte. T. Constantine.
  Pte. J. Cowling.
  Pte. J. Cookson.
  Pte. C. Cryer.
  Pte. G. Coy.
  Pte. P. Calligan.
  Pte. E. Clarke.
  Pte. H. Carr.
  L/Sgt. T. Dolphin.
  Pte. P. Doherty.
  Pte. A. Doyle.
  Pte. E. Drake.
  Pte. W. Duckworth.
  Pte. F. Dalton.
  Pte. W. Duckett.
  Pte. R. Duxbury.
  Pte. H. Driver.
  Pte. W. Dawson.
  Pte. W. Eccles.
  Pte. R. Ellison.
  Pte. J. Entwistle.
  Pte. J. F. Emsley.
  Pte. S. P. Earle.
  Pte. C. England.
  L/Cpl. A. P. Eccles.
  Regt. Sergt.-Major G. Finding.
  Pte. H. Fairclough.
  Pte. H. Faux.
  Pte. A. Foulds.
  Pte. J. W. Fozard.
  Pte. H. Flesher.
  Pte. C. Fairburn.
  Pte. A. Forman.
  L/Cpl. R. Grimshaw.
  L/Cpl. T. H. Garnett.
  Pte. P. Gath.
  Pte. N. Gledhill.
  Pte. J. Greenbank.
  Pte. W. Greenbank.
  Pte. L. Graham.
  Pte. H. Gowers.
  Pte. B. Graham.
  Pte. H. Green.
  Pte. N. Geldard.
  Pte. L. Greenwood.
  Sgt. J. W. Holmes.
  Sgt. N. Holmes.
  Sgt. T. R. Heaton.
  Cpl. A. Heaton.
  Cpl. G. Haywood.
  L/Cpl. J. Hutchinson.
  Pte. H. Haigh.
  Pte. Halliday.
  Pte. T. Hardy.
  Pte. T. W. Harris.
  Pte. A. Hartley.
  Pte. T. Hird.
  Pte. A. Hodgson.
  Pte. J. Hunter.
  Pte. J. Hindle.
  Pte. W. E. Heslop.
  Pte. J. Hayhurst.
  Pte. T. M. Horner.
  Pte. S. Hodges.
  Pte. E. Hardisty.
  Pte. H. Holmes.
  Pte. H. Hogan.
  Pte. F. Hargreaves.
  Pte. J. R. Hardwick.
  Pte. W. Henderson.
  Pte. J. Hudson.
  Pte. H. Herringshaw.
  Pte. B. Imeson.
  Pte. J. Inman.
  Pte. E. Ibbetson.
  Sgt. J. W. Jessop.
  Pte. G. Jeffries.
  Pte. M. Jones.
  Pte. C. Johnson.
  Pte. W. Knowles.
  Pte. H. Keighley.
  Pte. A. Kitson.
  Pte. H. Kearns.
  L/Cpl. C. Lake.
  Pte. J. Lang.
  Pte. W. Leach.
  Pte. E. Longbottom.
  Pte. A. H. Lupton.
  Pte. R. Lambert.
  Pte. H. Lambert.
  Pte. F. Lambert.
  Pte. P. Livesey.
  Sgt. J. Maude.
  Sgt. H. Mattison.
  Cpl. W. Mitchell.
  Pte. E. Marcham.
  Pte. G. A. Marshall.
  Pte. W. Masey.
  Pte. J. E. Midgley.
  Pte. M. Mortimer.
  Pte. C. Metcalfe.
  Pte. W. B. Mason.
  Pte. J. Metcalfe.
  Pte. G. Mounsey.
  Pte. F. McDermott.
  Pte. R. Morton.
  Pte. A. Murphy.
  Pte. T. Nichol.
  Pte. H. Nunn.
  Pte. J. Nicholson.
  Pte. J. T. Nussey.
  Pte. W. Oversby.
  Pte. H. Oldham.
  Pte. A. Ormerod.
  Sgt. E. Peacock.
  Cpl. J. Pickles.
  L/Cpl. J. A. Pennington.
  L/Cpl. S. Peacock.
  Pte. E. Parrington.
  Pte. J. Peel.
  Pte. A. Ponder.
  Pte. W. Petty.
  Pte. H. Phillips.
  Pte. R. Pearson.
  Pte. P. Pickering.
  Pte. G. Peacock.
  Pte. H. Pickles.
  Pte. V. W. Phillips.
  Pte. R. N. A. Payne.
  Pte. S. Peace.
  L/Sgt. J. Rowe.
  Cpl. J. R. Robinson.
  L/Cpl. J. W. Robinson.
  Pte. F. D. Ramsden.
  Dr. W. Redman.
  Pte. A. Robinson.
  Pte. W. Rodgers.
  Pte. C. Rowley.
  Pte. E. Riley.
  Pte. F. L. Richardson.
  Pte. G. Reynard.
  Pte. F. Rooke.
  Pte. J. R. Roll.
  Cpl. W. Simpson.
  Pte. H. Speight.
  Pte. C. Smith.
  Pte. G. R. Smith.
  Pte. H. Smith.
  Pte. J. W. Smith.
  Pte. W. Smith.
  Dr. W. Spencer.
  Pte. F. H. Stork.
  Pte. R. H. Steele.
  Pte. J. N. Slee.
  Pte. A. Shackleton.
  Pte. W. Sanderson.
  Pte. G. Sutcliffe.
  Pte. J. A. Smith.
  Pte. A. Stapleton.
  Pte. A. Smithson.
  Coy. Sergt.-Major H. Thrasher.
  Pte. J. Taylor.
  Pte. G. Terry.
  Pte. Y. Tuley.
  Pte. C. Turner.
  Pte. J. Thwaites.
  Pte. W. L. Tyson.
  Pte. A. Titchmarsh.
  Pte. J. C. Turner.
  Pte. N. Teal.
  Pte. J. Thompson.
  Pte. G. E. Trigg.
  Pte. F. H. Veale.
  Reg. Qt.-Mstr. Sergt. T. Wilkinson.
  Coy. Qt.-Mstr. Sergt. W. A. Winter.
  Cpl. W. Waite.
  Pte. C. Watson.
  Pte. H. E. Webster.
  Pte. F. Whitfield.
  Pte. J. Winterburn.
  Pte. J. Williams.
  Pte. J. Watson.
  Pte. H. Wilson.
  Pte. S. Widdup.
  Pte. G. Wright.
  Pte. H. Watson.
  Pte. A. Wood.
  Pte. H. Whiteoak.
  Pte. H. L. Wigglesworth.
  Pte. J. Whitehead.
  Pte. F. Wright.
  Pte. F. Williams.
  Pte. A. Wilcox.
  Pte. W. Wickwar.
  Pte. F. Wilkes.


Water Duty Men attached from 2/2nd W.R. Field Ambulance:--

  Pte. A. Kirk.
  Pte. T. Lamb.
  Pte. L. Porrit.
  Cpl. R. Topham.


Armourer Sergeant:

  S/Sgt. E. Campbell.


With 186th Infantry Brigade:--

  Qt.-Mstr. Sgt. J. Banks.
  Pte. J. Clapperton.
  Pte. J. R. Frankland.
  Pte. J. Town.


With 62nd Divisional Headquarters:--

  Pte. W. Hope.
  Pte. C. Stables.


With 186th Light Trench Mortar Battery.:--

  Pte. J. W. Bell.
  Pte. S. Brown.
  Pte. R. Charlton.
  Cpl. E. Crowther.
  Pte. B. B. Coates.
  Pte. H. Falkingham.
  Pte. L. Feather.
  Cpl. H. Green.
  Pte. H. Riley.
  Pte. N. Reedy.
  Pte. T. Wood.

[Illustration]

⅙th DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S WEST RIDING REGIMENT.

[Illustration: LEFT TO RIGHT. Back Row, standing--2nd Lieut.
V. E. W. Greaves, 2nd Lieut. (now Capt.) N. Geldard, D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieut. (now Capt.) S. H. Clough, M.C.

    SECOND ROW. Standing--Major E. G. Whittaker, 2nd
    Lieut (now Capt.) L. Jaques, 2nd Lieut. T. S. Whitaker (K.),
    2nd Lieut. E. J. C. Supple (K.), Lieut. H. Knowles (K.) Capt.
    M. Wright, 2nd Lieut. (Capt.) C. F. Horsfall (K.), Capt. (now
    Major) T. K. Wright, M.B.E., 2nd Lieut. P. F. Stuck, 2nd Lieut,
    (now Capt.) R. M. Robinson, Lieut. A. E. K. Slingsby (K.),
    Lieut. (now Capt.) C. H. Petty.

    Sitting.--Capt. (now Major) N. B. Chaffers, M.C., Lieut. (now
    Capt.) H. Dixon, Capt. (now Major) A. B. Clarkson, D.S.O.,
    M.C., Capt. S. F. Marriner (Adjt.), Lieut.-Col. Birbeck
    (C.O.), Major C. P. Cass, Lieut. (now Capt.) and Qt.-Master J.
    Churchman, D.C.M., Capt. K. Nicholson, Major (now Lieut.-Col.)
    C. M. Bateman, D.S.O., T.D.

    Front Row--2nd Lieut. (now Capt.) R. C. Barrett, 2nd Lieut. T.
    Brayshaw, 2nd Lieut. (now Capt.) F. L. Smith, M.C., 2nd Lieut.
    (A/Capt) K. Ogston (K.), 2nd Lieut. (A/Capt.) G. B. Buxton,
    M.C., 2nd Lieut. T. Taylor. #/ ]

2/6th DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S WEST RIDING REGIMENT.

[Illustration:

    LEFT TO RIGHT. Back Row, standing.--Capt. G. H. Ermen
    (deceased), 2nd Lieut. (now Capt.) N. Geldard, D.S.O., M.C.,
    2nd Lieut. (now Capt.) L. Jaques, 2nd Lieut. W. Woodhead,
    Lieut. N. Clapham, 2nd Lieut. W. K. Law, 2nd Lieut. G. L.
    Lupton, Lieut. (now Capt.) G. Broughton, 2nd Lieut. G. R.
    Armstrong, Lieut. (A/Capt.) C. D. Bennett (K.), Capt. C. P.
    Charlesworth.

    Sitting.--Capt. N. C. Prince (K.), Capt. (A/Lt.-Col.) N.
    A. England, D.S.O., Major W. Claughton (deceased), Major
    (A/Lt.-Col.) J. Mackillop, Col. R. E. Williamson, V.D. (C.O.),
    Major E. Dewhurst, Capt. Birbeck (Adjt.), Capt. J. Groves.

    Front row.--2nd Lieut. J. R. Walker, 2nd Lieut. (now Capt.)
    R. C. Barrett, 2nd Lieut. C. G. C. Kilner, Lieut. and
    Quarter-Master M. J. McDermott, 2nd Lieut. (now Capt.) G. C.
    Foulds. #/ ]

[Illustration: Sergt. Arthur Petty, 2, Bracewell St., Barnoldswick
married, one child.]

[Illustration: Pte. Tom Petty, 11, Coronation St., Barnoldswick,
married, three children.]

[Illustration: Pte. H. Barter, 41, Skipton Road, Barnoldswick, married.]

[Illustration: Pte. A. C. Elsworth, 32, Wellington St., Barnoldswick,
single.]

[Illustration: Pte. Walter Horsfield, 7, Essex Street, Barnoldswick,
single.]

[Illustration: Pte. F. Dunkley, 19, Glasgow St., Barnoldswick, married,
one child.]

[Illustration: Cpl. W. J. Daly, 32, Westgate, Barnoldswick, married,
six children.]

[Illustration: Pte. Tom Horsfield, 33, Heather View, Barnoldswick,
married, seven children.]

[Illustration: Pte. W. Anderson, 20, School Terrace, Barnoldswick,
single.]

[Illustration: Cpl. M. Birtwhistle, 19, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick,
married, one child.]

[Illustration: Pte. J. T. Pickles, Federation St., Barnoldswick,
married, one child.]

[Illustration: Pte. H. Hodkinson, 14, Bank St., Barnoldswick, single.]

    The above men lost their lives by the sinking of the
    “_Rohilla_” on the East Coast, off Whitby, 30th October, 1914,
    while on her way from Leith to Dunkirk, to bring soldiers from
    the Front.



THE WRECK OF THE “ROHILLA.”

A SAD DAY FOR BARNOLDSWICK.


Perhaps one of the most poignant tragedies of the early stages of the
War was the sinking of the hospital ship “_Rohilla_” on the East coast
near Whitby. It was a disaster which will long be remembered by the
Craven district generally and Barnoldswick in particular, inasmuch
as the splendidly appointed ship of 7,000 tons had on board fifteen
Barnoldswick members of the Naval Sick Berth Reserve. Of these only
three were saved, the remainder being reported dead or missing.

    The men concerned were:--


SAVED.

    Pte. W. Eastwood, married, two children, 8, Powell Street.

    Pte. F. Rediough, single, 13, Ribblesdale Terrace.

    Pte. Anthony Waterworth, single, North View Terrace.


MISSING OR DEAD.

    Sergt. A. Petty, married, one child, 2, Bracewell Street.

    Cpl. M. Birtwhistle, married, one child, 19, Clifford St.

    Cpl. W. J. Daly, married, six children, 32, Westgate.

    Pte. H. Barter, married, no children, 41, Skipton Road.

    Pte. T. Petty, married, three children, 11, Coronation Street.

    Pte. T. Horsfield, married, seven children, 33, Heather View.

    Pte. W. Horsfield, single, 7, Essex Street.

    Pte. Alfred Elsworth, single, 32, Wellington Street.

    Pte. J. T. Pickles, married, one child, Federation Street.

    Pte. H. Hodkinson, single, 14, Bank Street.

    Pte. W. Anderson, single, 20, School Terrace.

    Pte. F. Dunkley, married, one child, 9, Bairstow Street.

The “_Rohilla_” was on her way to Dunkirk to bring back the wounded,
and at ten minutes to four on the morning of October 30th, 1914, she
struck on submerged rocks in the vicinity of Whitby. Within half a mile
of land she broke in two, and was battered to pieces in the presence
of thousands of spectators, who, for the most part, were helpless. The
dangerous proximity of the vessel to land was first noticed by a sentry
on night duty on the pier head at Whitby, who was astonished to see a
large vessel loom up out of the darkness and pass silently within a few
yards of the pier.

Almost simultaneously a coastguard sighted the vessel and recognised
her peril as she skirted the submerged rocks which stretch from the
foot of the south cliff. Half a mile further on, within a few hundred
yards of a curious promontory known as Saltwick Nab, the vessel struck
the rocks with a grinding crash. Rockets were at once sent up and the
alarm raised. The vessel was about 500 yards from the cliff and in as
helpless a position for rescue as could be imagined. It was impossible
to launch the larger of the two lifeboats from Whitby Harbour or to
drag it under the lee of the cliffs to a more favourable position, and
all attempts of the Rocket Brigade to establish communication with the
vessel were unavailing.

The smaller lifeboat was, however, dragged along the beach towards
Saltwick Nab and a favourable position found for launching. Meanwhile
one of the “_Rohilla’s_” boats had been lowered, and after a severe
buffeting, reached the shore with the second officer and five of the
crew. The rescue of the remainder seemed assured as the boat had
brought a line from the steamer, but to the dismay of the onlookers
this snapped before any use could be made of it.

Then an attempt was made with the lesser of the Whitby lifeboats. In
spite of the very heavy sea they reached the wreck, and, thanks to
the admirable seamanship of the coxswain, took off seventeen of the
survivors, including the whole of the women on board--five. In this
boat were Privates Rediough and Waterworth. A second trip was made
and eighteen more were rescued and safely landed, but the boat was
found to have been so battered by the double journey as to render her
unseaworthy, and further attempts were impossible.

Word was sent for the Upgang lifeboat, but before this arrived it was
clear the “_Rohilla_” was breaking up. About 10 a.m. an unusually large
wave swept the wreck and when the foam had cleared away it was seen
that the stern had turned turtle, and there was no trace of a number of
men who, a few minutes before, had been clinging to that portion of the
ship. The bows were also settling down and all the men left alive on
the vessel were clustered on the bridge.

The Upgang lifeboat, which had been dragged through the town, was
lowered over the cliffs, but it was then deemed impossible to launch
her. Darkness fell at 5 o’clock. It was a night of horror. Saturday
morning saw the superstructure of the “_Rohilla_” still above water
with its tragic load. Attempts were made by several--among them, it
subsequently transpired, one or two of the Barnoldswick men--to swim
ashore, but few succeeded. An attempt by the Upgang lifeboat to reach
the wreck failed, and the continued inability of the Rocket Brigade to
do anything effective was most disheartening.

When it drew towards evening on Saturday scarcely a flicker of hope
remained. About 10 p.m., however, a message was sent to Capt. Neillson
urging him to hold on till morning, news having come through that the
Tynemouth motor lifeboat was coming down the coast during the night
and would attempt a rescue the following morning. Oil was poured on
the water near the wreck. The motor boat arrived in the early hours
and stayed in Whitby harbour until dawn, when it made towards the
wreck. Amid scenes that will never be forgotten by those watching from
the beach, all the survivors were taken off and landed safely.
  Pte.
Eastwood was the only Barnoldswick man to be taken off in the motor
boat; Pte. Waterworth and Pte. Rediough had previously been taken
ashore by the Whitby lifeboat.

There were few towns more sad than Barnoldswick when the news of the
disaster came through. Flags were hoisted half mast on the public
buildings, feeling references were made from the pulpits of the town,
an impressive memorial service was held, and letters of sympathy
received from the Admiralty, the Medical Department of the Admiralty,
and from many ambulance divisions and brigades in Yorkshire and
Lancashire. A fund was started for the erection of a memorial hall, but
this has since been merged in the Barnoldswick War Memorial.

A handsome monument has been erected in Whitby Cemetery by the owners
of the “_Rohilla_” (the British India Steam Navigation Co.). As the
outcome of the disaster a movement for equipping Whitby with a motor
lifeboat has been successfully carried through, with the assistance
of the Royal Lifeboat Institution. The new boat was launched in June,
1919.



TUNSTILL’S “CRAVEN LEGION.”


One of the outstanding features of recruiting in Craven in the early
days of the war was a unique and entirely successful effort by Mr. H.
G. Tunstill, of Otterburn, who at that time represented the Settle
district on the West Riding County Council.

Mr. Tunstill arrived home from Russia on August 20th, 1914, and very
shortly afterwards issued a stirring appeal for ninety-nine men to
join him in making a company of one hundred for enlistment in Lord
Kitchener’s army. The appeal was addressed more particularly to Mr.
Tunstill’s constituents in the neighbourhood of Settle, and a series
of meetings were arranged. At many of these enthusiastic scenes
were witnessed, and after a campaign extending from the 7th to the
18th of September close upon one hundred men had been obtained, and
they paraded at Settle on the 19th. After going through the usual
attestation formalities they were royally entertained at the Ashfield
and Golden Lion Hotels, Mr. W. Morrison presiding at the former place,
and Mr. W. Simpson, Catteral Hall, at the latter. Subsequently there
was an entertainment at the Victoria Hall where clothing, comforts and
fruit were distributed.

The men left for their depot at Halifax amid memorable scenes. They
assembled in Settle Market Place at 7 a.m., and, after a parting speech
by Mr. Morrison, were marched to the station headed by the Brass
Band and accompanied by a large crowd. The train steamed out of the
station amid cheering, the detonation of fog signals and much waving of
handkerchiefs.

At Silsden, Mr. Tunstill’s men were met by another batch of recruits
and marched into Keighley. It was something in the nature of a
triumphal progress, followed by an inspection on the Town Hall Square
by the Mayor (Mr. W. A. Brigg) and other local gentlemen. They departed
for Halifax in the afternoon by special train and were inspected by
Col. Thorold, the officer commanding the depot, who publicly thanked
Mr. Tunstill for his services in obtaining such a fine body of
men. Two days later they were drafted to Frensham, near Aldershot,
and ultimately became “A” Company of the 10th Battalion Duke of
Wellington’s Regiment. Then followed a period of rigorous training in
which the men acquitted themselves very creditably.

Meanwhile Mr. Tunstill had been offered and accepted a commission and
was gazetted Captain in November, 1914. The Battalion went to France
in August, 1915, and Captain Tunstill remained with the Company until
October, 1916, when he was sent to England with a damaged knee and
ankle. He became unfit for active service, but performed valuable
work in connection with the training of recruits in England. He was
mentioned in dispatches in December, 1916. The Company saw much
fighting in France and also served with distinction in Italy.

[Illustration]

[Illustration: Captain Preston.]

CAPTAIN THOMAS HOWARTH PRESTON, East Lancashire Regiment,
the only surviving son of the late John Preston and Mrs. Preston,
of Mearbeck, Longpreston. He served through the South African War,
receiving the Queen’s Medal with three clasps, and was mentioned in
despatches. He was awarded the Royal Geographical Society’s Diploma in
1913. His only brother, 2nd Lieut. J. S. Preston, 1st Bn. Royal Scots,
died at Dewetsdorp, during the South African War. Captain Preston was
killed in action in Flanders on November 17th, 1914, and was 34 years
of age.

[Illustration: Captain Stackhouse.]

CAPTAIN WILLIAM J. STACKHOUSE, eldest son of the late Major
Stackhouse, J.P., of Ingfield Hall, Settle, and Mrs. Stackhouse, of the
Grange, Casterton, Kirby Lonsdale, and husband of Theodora Charlotte
Stackhouse, of “Laguna,” Suffolk Rd., Bournemouth. This gallant
officer, the owner of a considerable estate in the Settle district,
was killed in action in France on March 12th, 1915, aged 32 years,
and his death plunged one of the oldest families in the neighbourhood
into mourning. Captain Stackhouse was born in 1883, educated at Harrow
and Sandhurst, whence he gained a commission in the 4th Lancashire
Fusiliers, and when the latter Regiment was disbanded in 1906, he was
offered a Lieutenancy in the 2nd Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby).
He received his captaincy in 1913. Prior to going to the front in
October, 1914, the deceased officer was Adjutant to the 10th Bn. Of a
cheery and kindly nature, he was extremely popular with his men, ever
ready to help and encourage them, and his delightful personality made
him a host of friends. He was a keen sportsman, polo, shooting and
motoring being his favourite recreations.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Kirk.]

2ND LIEUT. GERALD KIRK (The King’s Own Lancaster) Regiment
(Territorials) a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Kirk, of Greenwood
Leghe, Ingleton. When the war broke out, Gerald Kirk joined the King’s
Own Lancashire Territorials as a private. He was quickly marked out for
promotion, and a commission was offered to him before he had completed
his training and embarked for the front. He met his death in the fierce
fighting in France on April 24th, 1915, and the news was received
with general regret in the Ingleton district, where he was a popular
figure and a general favourite. He was a clean and clever sportsman. In
particular, he loved Association football, and was identified for many
years with the Ingleton Football Club as Captain, in which capacity he
frequently led his men to victory. At the invitation of the Bradford
City Club he played with that combination as an amateur at centre
half; later he played for Leeds City, after which he again threw in
his lot with the Ingleton Club and remained with them after taking up
his residence at Warton. The deceased officer was one of the original
promoters of the Ingleton Conservative Club, and acted as its first
Hon. Secretary until his removal to the Carnforth district. The same
qualities he exhibited on the football field were prominent on the
field of battle. On March 9th, 1916, at St. Mary’s Church, Ingleton, a
memorial tablet to the deceased officer’s memory was unveiled by the
Vicar (the Rev. J. Llewellyn). It bears the following inscription:--“In
loving memory of Gerald Kirk, 2nd Lieut., 5th Bttn. King’s Own Royal
Lancaster Regt., son of Alfred S. and Isabella Kirk, of Greenwood
Leghe, Ingleton. Born July 14th, 1883; died at Poperinghe, Belgium,
April 24th, 1915, of wounds received at St. Julien the previous day.
This tablet is erected by his wife.”

[Illustration: Captain Ellis.]

CAPTAIN T. M. ELLIS, son of Dr. W. H. Ellis, formerly of
Ravenshaw, Carleton, Skipton, was killed in action in France on April
18th, 1915. Captain Ellis, who was unmarried, saw service in the South
African War in the 33rd Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment.
In 1909, he returned to Bradford and acted as Adjutant to the 6th Bn.
West Yorkshire Regt. (T.). At the expiration of his term of office, he
rejoined the 2nd Bn. Duke of Wellington’s, then stationed at Dublin.
At the outbreak of war, the “Duke’s” had a rough experience, and at
the battle of Mons, Captain Ellis and a few others penetrated right
through the German lines and were unable to retrace their steps, being
posted by the military as missing. For days, Captain Ellis and his
companions were befriended by Belgian peasants, being disguised and
hidden in straw in barns. They were conducted across country by night,
and eventually reached the coast. Captain Ellis embarked at Ostend and
reached England in safety, subsequently enjoying a brief furlough at
his father’s house, Oak Avenue, Manningham. When next he crossed to
France, he was attached to the West Yorkshire Regiment, with which he
was serving when he met his death.

[Illustration: Captain Ermen.]

CAPTAIN G. H. ERMEN, of the 2/6th Bn. Duke of Wellington’s
(West Riding) Regiment, of Milton House, Gargrave, who, in civil life,
was general manager of the Belle Vue Mills of the English Sewing Cotton
Company at Skipton, died at his residence on May 4th, 1915, aged 38
years. At the outbreak of war, Captain Ermen relinquished his position
to take up military duties. He had previously held a commission in the
6th Bn. Manchesters, with which regiment he saw service in the South
African War. He was gazetted Captain in the first Reserve Bn. of the
6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, which was raised at Skipton under
Colonel R. E. Williamson, V.D., and remained at Headquarters until the
battalion was transferred to Derby. While stationed at Doncaster, Capt.
Ermen was appointed Adjutant to the Battalion, but had not long enjoyed
this distinction before he was compelled to return home on sick leave
and died, as stated, to the sincere regret of many sorrowing friends.
Capt. Ermen took a keen interest in the National Reserve Movement, and
was Officer Commanding the Skipton Companies, in the organization of
which he took a prominent and useful part.

[Illustration: Lieut. Knowles.]

LIEUT. HEDLEY KNOWLES, ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, the first Skipton officer to give his life for King and
Country. Lieut. Knowles was the son of Mr. and Mrs. M. R. Knowles,
The Arches, Skipton. The news of his death was received with very
deep regret, for he had, by his geniality of disposition, earned the
affection of a wide circle of friends. The deceased officer, who was
twenty-two years of age, was destined for the legal profession, and
had before him a career of much promise. The outbreak of war saw
him, with typical British patriotism, eager to take his part in the
momentous struggle. He had joined the 6th Bn. Duke of Wellington’s
Regiment in 1913, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. It was while training
in camp at Marske that the Territorial Force was ordered to mobilize,
and he went with his Bn. to Immingham, where they went into training,
and accompanied them later to Healing, Riby and Doncaster. Later
he accompanied his Battalion to France, where he proved himself a
thorough and capable officer. It was while acting as instructor to a
school of bomb throwing that he met his sad end, being killed by the
premature explosion of a rifle grenade on May 30th, 1915. Death was
instantaneous, and the whole regiment sincerely grieved the loss of one
who had made himself a general favourite with both officers and men. As
one of the officers, in communicating the painful news to his parents,
said, “He was an excellent soldier and a thorough sportsman. He had no
fear, his only wish being to serve his King and Country, for which he
has given his life.”

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Bargh.]

2ND LIEUT. GEORGE BARGH, the King’s Liverpool Regiment, son
of Mrs. Bargh, of Procter’s Farm, Wray, near Lancaster, reported
killed in action on May 10th, 1915. News reached Mrs. Bargh from Col.
Wallace, 1st Suffolk Regt., who was a prisoner of war in Germany, that
on that date her son was shot in the head, just before the Germans took
the trenches, as he was bandaging a wounded soldier, and was killed
instantly. Lieut. Bargh received his early education at Halifax, and
subsequently obtained his B.Sc. at University College, Reading. He
afterwards became a teacher at Hawes Council School. He accepted his
commission in the King’s Liverpool Regiment early in 1914.

[Illustration: Lieut. Morkill]

LIEUT. R. F. MORKILL, East Lancashire Regiment and Royal
Flying Corps, second son of Mr. J. W. Morkill, J.P., of Newfield
Hall, Bell Busk, met his death on June 22nd, 1915, following injuries
received in a flying accident at Gosport, and the sad event cast a
deep gloom over the Craven District, where the family is well known
and highly respected. Lieut. Morkill, who was attached to the East
Lancashire Regiment, went to the front in Sept. 1914, and was on active
service continuously up to February, 1915. On returning to England,
he was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps as a probationer and
qualified as an aviator only a week before he met his untimely end. Two
years previously, Lieut. Morkill had obtained a Pilot’s Certificate at
the Eastbourne Flying School. On June 22nd, he was ordered to make the
flight from Gosport to Shoreham and back. The machine was certified to
be in perfect order. According to the evidence at the inquest Lieut.
Morkill was preparing to start on the return journey from Shoreham. The
engine was running satisfactorily, but a leak was observed in the oil
cistern. After a new pipe had been fitted the journey was commenced.
When up about 200 feet, the engine missed once or twice and appeared to
stop, due, as was subsequently ascertained, to a mechanical fracture.
The aeroplane came to the ground and Lieut. Morkill was found to have
been crushed by the wreckage. He died as the result of his injuries in
his 23rd year. He married in Sept. 1914, Ellen Mary, youngest daughter
of the late Mr. T. L. Wilkinson, Neasham Abbey, Darlington.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Petty.]

2ND LIEUT. NELSON WIDDUP PETTY, Lancashire Fusiliers, brother
of Mr. James Petty, Gordon Street, Sutton. Lieut. Petty enlisted nearly
eleven years before the war as a private in the Lancashire Fusiliers,
and had seen service in Malta, Egypt, Aden, South Africa and India.
When war was declared, he returned from India as a sergeant, but was
promoted in January, 1915, to the rank of 2nd Lieut. After a short stay
in training he went out with the British Forces to the Dardanelles,
where he met his death on the 28th June, 1915.

[Illustration: Lieut. Slingsby.]

LIEUT. ANTHONY E. K. SLINGSBY, ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, son of Mr. J. A. Slingsby, J.P., and Mrs. Slingsby of
Carla Beck, Carleton, Skipton, was killed in action in France on July
14th, 1915. Lieut. Slingsby, who was well-known and very popular in the
Craven district, was first at School at St. Edmunds, Hindhead, Surrey,
and subsequently at St. Peter’s College, Radley, near Oxford. He then
won an Exhibition at Exeter College, Oxford, where he remained in
residence four years. During his stay, Lieut. Slingsby was Captain of
Boats and President of the College Committee. Returning to Carleton, he
interested himself in the Boy Scout movement; became, subsequently, a
District Scout Commissioner, and later was attached to the Headquarter
Staff. The interrupted manœuvres at Marske in July, 1914, were the
first Lieut. Slingsby attended as a Territorial Officer. Lieut.
Slingsby, who was 26 years of age, was one of five brothers serving
their King and Country in the great war, two of whom afterwards gave
their lives in the same great cause.

[Illustration: Second Lieut. Spencer.]

2ND LIEUT. J. A. C. SPENCER, 9th West Yorkshire Regiment, was
reported missing in August, 1915. He was 24 years of age and was the
only son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Spencer, of Lydget, Keighley. Before
joining the Army he was connected with the firm of P. W. Spencer,
Lothersdale. He obtained a commission early in September, 1914, and
in July, 1915, he left for Gallipoli, and took part in the landing at
Suvla Bay in the following August. All hope of his safety was soon
given up, as two brother officers, who were quite near him at the time,
stated that at dawn on the 9th August, after leading his men up to the
firing line, he was hit and fell without a sound and never moved again.
These officers were certain that he was killed instantaneously: half
an hour later the ground was given up and was never re-taken. Nothing
further could be heard of him, and in July, 1916, it was officially
reported that he was “killed in action.”

[Illustration: Lieut. Supple.]

LIEUT. E. J. C. SUPPLE, ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, youngest son of Mr. E. K. Supple, late of the Irish
Constabulary, was formerly a Master at Skipton Grammar School; he
died of wounds received in action. Lieut. Supple joined the 6th Bn.
in March, 1909, as a private. In 1911 he was promoted Lance Corporal
and took his discharge in 1913. After the outbreak of war he obtained
a commission and rejoined his old regiment. Lieut. Supple was a keen
sportsman, and for some seasons played half-back with the well-known
London Irish Team. Lieut. Supple was admitted to Wimbereux General
Hospital on August 22nd, 1915, suffering from gunshot wounds through
both thighs, and died the same day.

[Illustration: Lieut. Lister.]

LIEUT. THE HON. C. A. LISTER, Royal Marines, of the Hood
Battalion, was wounded in Gallipoli, August 24th, 1915, and succumbed
to his injuries on August 28th, 1915. Lieut. Lister was the only
surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale, of Gisburne Park. His
elder brother was killed in action at Vidballi in Somaliland in 1904.
Lieut. Lister went to the Dardanelles in the Spring of 1915 to take up
a post as interpreter on board one of the warships there. Formerly in
the Diplomatic Service, his first position was in the British Embassy
at Rome, whence he was transferred to Constantinople, where he was
stationed at the outbreak of war. He joined the Royal Naval Division
with which he went to the Dardanelles. His mother, the late Lady
Ribblesdale, was a daughter of the late Sir Charles Tennant, Bart., a
sister of Mrs. Asquith, wife of the Ex-Prime Minister.

[Illustration: Lieut. Sheffield.]

LIEUT. SURTEES SHEFFIELD, 2nd Hampshire Regiment, who was
reported missing on August 6th, 1915, was afterwards officially
reported to have been killed on that date. Lieut. Sheffield had only
left hospital at Alexandria five days before he met his death. At the
outbreak of war he was rubber planting in Malaga, and at once returned
to England to take up his commission, which he had resigned after the
South African War. For that campaign he held the Queen’s Medal with
three clasps, and the King’s Medal with two clasps, the former being
personally presented to him by King Edward at Buckingham Palace in
July, 1901, in recognition of his distinguished gallantry at Retief’s
Nek. Lieut. Sheffield was in his 38th year, and was the youngest son of
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Sheffield, and brother of Mrs. Wayte Hicks, of West
House, Dent.

[Illustration: Capt. Morrison.]

CAPTAIN MORRISON, 6th Bn. King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment,
formerly of Bentham, died of wounds received in the Dardanelles,
August, 1915. For over twenty years, Capt. Morrison was a Presbyterian,
but latterly became an earnest Churchman. He was studying for the
Church when war was declared, under the Vicar of St. Margaret’s,
Bentham, and he acted as Hon. Lay Reader for about five years at
Sacriston, Durham. For a few months he acted at Bentham in the same
capacity, and made many friends there. Capt. Morrison was 30 years of
age, and came from Sacriston with Mr. Bartley, when the latter was
appointed Vicar of St. Margaret’s Church.

[Illustration: Lieut. Brooks.]

LIEUT. LESLIE BROOKS, 2nd Lincolnshire Regiment, the youngest
son of Mr. J. B. Brooks, Finstall, Bromsgrove, who married, on November
14th, 1914, Blanche, elder daughter of Mr. A. J. Birley, J.P., of
Throstle Nest, Thornton-in-Craven, was killed in action in France on
September 25th, 1915. Lieut. Brooks was educated at Uppingham and Clare
College, Cambridge. He joined the 4th West Yorkshire Regiment, Special
Reserve, on the outbreak of war, was attached to the 2nd Lincolnshire
Regiment in May, 1915, and then went to the front.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. McIntyre.]

2ND LIEUT. J. C. MCINTYRE, 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, son of
Mr. A. McIntyre, of Ings Avenue, Skipton, was reported wounded and
missing on September 25th, 1915, and died a prisoner of war in Germany.
Lieut. McIntyre was a former Captain of Ermysted’s Grammar School,
Skipton, and St. John’s College, York. He enlisted as a private in
the Gordon Highlanders shortly after the outbreak of hostilities, and
was first stationed at Aberdeen. Subsequently he transferred to the
Argyle & Sutherland Highlanders, with which he trained at Stirling and
Salisbury Plain. He attained the rank of sergeant, and also held a
gymnastic instructor’s certificate, having passed through the school
at Aldershot. Early in April, 1915, he was gazetted to the 11th South
Lancashire Regiment, but was later transferred to the 2nd Yorkshire
Regiment, with which regiment he went to the front.

[Illustration: Captain Preston.]

CAPTAIN P. C. PRESTON, 7th Norfolk Regiment, of Shrublands,
Swaffham, Norfolk, second son of the late Captain John Norcliffe
Preston, Flasby Hall, Gargrave, was killed between the 12th and 15th
October, 1915. Captain Preston had seen previous service in Lumsden’s
Horse in the South African War and possessed two medals. He joined the
Forces soon after war broke out and proceeded to France. For several
years he lived in Swaffham, being head of the firm of Chamberlayne &
Co., merchants. He interested himself in many branches of sport, and
was an enthusiastic cricket and tennis player.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Jennings.]

2ND LIEUT. BASIL SPENCER JENNINGS, 14th West Yorkshire
Regiment, son of Mrs. J. S. Jennings, of Cononley Hall, died from
wounds received in action in Gallipoli, on the 7th November, 1915.
Lieut. Jennings, who was 25 years of age, was in Morocco when the
war broke out; he returned to England and enlisted in King Edward’s
Horse, and was afterwards given a commission in the 14th West Yorkshire
Regt. He went out to Suvla Bay in September, 1915, attached to the 6th
Yorkshire Regiment. He gave his life in a noble deed. On the night of
the 5th November, 1915, he went to the trenches to rescue a wounded
soldier; he was sniped and died from his wounds two days later. Lieut.
Jennings was for some years connected with the firm of P. W. Spencer,
quarry owners, Lothersdale. He was educated at Sedbergh, and for a few
seasons he played Rugby Union in the Skipton team. This officer and
his cousin, Lieut. J. A. C. Spencer, of whom we give a portrait and
biography in this book, were grandsons of the late Mr. Peter William
Spencer, of Raygill, Lothersdale.

[Illustration: Lieut. Whitaker.]

LIEUT. T. S. WHITAKER, ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, only son of the late Mr. Thomas Whitaker, J.P., and Mrs.
Whitaker, Walton House, Burley-in-Wharfedale, was killed in action
in France, on 7th November, 1915. Lieut. Whitaker, who was an old
Sedberghian, obtained his commission in the ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s
Regt. from the O.T.C. in August, 1914, and went to France with the
Batt. in April, 1915. Originally he was Machine Gun Officer, but
latterly had charge of the bombers.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Carson.]

2ND LIEUT. T. W. CARSON, ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, younger son of Mrs. Carson, Salisbury Street,
Skipton, who was reported missing since December, 28th, 1915, was
afterwards officially presumed killed. Lieut. Carson joined the 2/6th
Duke of Wellington’s Regiment in September, 1914, relinquishing an
appointment with a firm of solicitors in North Wales. He went to France
on November 1st, 1915, and for a time was attached to an Entrenching
Battn. He had only joined the ⅙th Battn. about a fortnight prior
to being reported missing. He was 31 years of age and educated at
Lancaster Grammar School and the Merchant Tailors’ School, Liverpool.
He was prominently identified with the Boy Scout movement.

[Illustration: Capt. Slingsby, M.C.]

CAPTAIN ARTHUR MORRIS SLINGSBY, M.C., 56th Punjaubi Rifles,
second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Slingsby, of Carla Beck, Carleton,
fell in action on March 8th, 1916, in Mesopotamia. Captain Slingsby
was with General Aylmer’s force proceeding to the relief of General
Townshend and his beleaguered army at Kut. Educated at Aysgarth School
and Wellington College, Sandhurst, Captain Slingsby, who was 30 years
of age, chose the Army as his profession, and passed into the Indian
Army in February, 1904. He was a noted climber and a member of the
Alpine Club, and did much survey work, particularly of virgin peaks in
India, under Government orders. He was in India when war broke out, and
his first experience of fighting was in Egypt, where he took part in
the battle of Ismaliu.

[Illustration: 2nd. Lieut. Pickles.]

2ND LIEUT. HARRY THORNTON PICKLES, 3rd Bn. Duke of
Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment (S.R.). second son of Mr. Stephen
Pickles, J.P., C.C., of Raysgill, Barnoldswick, was killed in action
on April 26th, 1916. He was 26 years of age. Lieut. Pickles joined
the army in September, 1914, enlisting as a private in the 10th Duke
of Wellington’s Regt. After a period of training at Frensham Camp,
he was promoted to the rank of 2nd Lieut. and transferred to the 3rd
Res. Bn. at North Shields. He was drafted out to France in January,
1916. Educated at Silcoates School, near Wakefield, where he spent
five years, leaving at the age of 17, he went to Victoria University,
Manchester, taking his B.A. degree with honours before the age of 20.
The M.A. degree was conferred upon him the following year. He was
married at Lewisham the week before leaving England, his bride being
Miss Ada Heuf, of New Eltham, Kent.

[Illustration: Lieut. Brown.]

LIEUT. CHRISTOPHER W. BROWN, Royal Scots Fusiliers, was killed
in action in France on April 30th, 1916. Lieut. Brown was the youngest
son of the Rev. C. V. and Mrs. Brown, of Embsay Vicarage, near Skipton,
and grandson of the late Mr. J. R. Wilkinson, of Burnside, Skipton.
He was born at Embsay on November 15th, 1892, and educated at Skipton
and Pocklington Grammar Schools. At Pocklington, he gained a Dolman
Exhibition tenable at St. John’s College, Cambridge. He entered St.
John’s College in October, 1911, and three years later took honours in
the Historical Tripos. On the outbreak of war, he at once volunteered
for service and was given a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the Special
Reserve of Officers, eventually being gazetted to the Royal Scots
Fusiliers. He was wounded at Neuve Chapelle in March 1915, and again at
Hooge in September, 1915. He was promoted Lieut. in the summer of 1915,
and at the time of his death was in command of a company.

[Illustration: Lieut. Brownsworth.]

LIEUT. EDMUND BROWNSWORTH, Leicestershire Regiment, youngest
son of the late Mr. David Brownsworth, artist, and Mrs. Brownsworth,
of Skipton, died in the 10th Casualty Clearing Station at Abule, on
May 29th, 1916. He received the first rudiments of education under
Mr. Alfred Hartley at the Skipton National School and, later, after a
period of training, was apprenticed to the Merchant Service. After many
extended cruises, he left the sea on account of ill-health. Later, he
joined the army and rose to the rank of Sergeant in the Leicestershire
Regiment, and in that capacity went out to France in November, 1914. He
so distinguished himself that the Brigadier-General recommended him for
a commission. He was gazetted to his old regiment in April, 1915, as a
2nd Lieut., being advanced in November to a Temporary Lieutenancy.

[Illustration: Lieut. Slingsby.]

LIEUT. STEPHEN SLINGSBY, H.M.S. “_Defence_,” fourth son of Mr.
J. A. Slingsby and Mrs. Slingsby, Carla Beck, Carleton, was killed in
action in the North Sea in June, 1916. The deceased officer was born on
the 20th June, 1892, and was educated at St. Edmund’s School, Hindhead,
and underwent training for his career in the Navy at the Royal Naval
College at Osborne and Dartmouth, and on H.M.S. “_Cornwall_.” His ships
included the “_Warrior_,” “_Cochrane_,” “_Comet_,” and the “_Defence_.”
At the outbreak of war he was Sub-Lieut. on the “_Comet_,” a destroyer,
and was posted to the “_Defence_” as Lieut. (E) in September, 1915. He
was the holder of the Medal of the Royal Life Saving Society, which he
won at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, in July, 1909.

[Illustration: Lieut. Gomersall.]

LIEUT. WILLIAM ELLIS GOMERSALL, 22nd Manchester Regiment,
eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Gomersall, of 69, Queen’s Road,
Urmston, Manchester, and nephew of the late Rev. W. J. Gomersall,
was killed in action on July 1st, 1916. Lieut. Gomersall was born at
Hellifield and was 21 years of age. He was educated at Manchester
Grammar School and passed his Classical Matriculation in 1911. He
was a member of the Grammar School O.T.C. and Lieut. in the Urmston
(Manchester) Company of the Church Lads’ Brigade. He also held the
certificate of the Royal Life Saving Society and St. John Ambulance
Society. Soon after outbreak of war, he enlisted as a private in the
Public Schools Brigade, Manchester Bn. After several months’ training
at Epsom, he was selected for a commission in the 23rd Bn. Manchester
Regiment, but was afterwards transferred to the 22nd Bn. After being
promoted to full Lieut. on May 11th, 1915, he entered a course at the
Royal Staff College, Camberley, and eventually accompanied his regiment
to France where he met his death.

[Illustration: Major Metcalfe.]

MAJOR JOHN CHAYTER METCALFE, Cheshire Regiment, killed in
action July 3rd, 1916. The deceased officer, who was 34 years of age,
was the only son of the late Major John A. Metcalfe, of Ings House,
Hawes, and resided at King Edward’s Place, Wanborough, Wilts. He served
with the 3rd West Yorkshire Regiment during the South African War,
where he was for some time temporary Aide-de-Camp to the late Lord
Cloughton. He afterwards received a commission in the 13th Hussars. He
left the army in 1906, took up racing, and was a successful amateur
steeplechase rider and breeder of thoroughbred horses. When the war
commenced, he enlisted in the Public Schools Corps, and in October,
1914, received a commission in the Cheshire Regiment, being gazetted
Temporary Major in September, 1915. His grandfather, who resided at
Hawes, was Chaplain to the Duke of Wellington, and his uncle, the late
Dr. Parker, was for years the vicar of Hawes.

[Illustration: Lieut. Fisher.]

LIEUT. HENRY BRYAN FISHER, 5th Northumberland Fusiliers, the
younger son of Dr. G. E. Fisher, of Skipton, died in hospital from
severe wounds in both thighs, in July, 1916. The deceased officer, who
was only 20 years of age, was educated at Colwall School and Winchester
College, and afterwards went to Canada, where he was engaged in farming
with his uncle, Mr. Arthur Fisher. After the outbreak of war, he
returned to England to enlist, and receiving a commission was gazetted
to the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Parsons.]

2ND LIEUT. ERNEST PARSONS, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment (attached 1st Welsh Regt.), died from fever in the Malaria
Hospital, at Salonica, on July 24th, 1916. Lieut. Parsons left Chili
in November, 1914, where he had an excellent railway appointment, with
twenty-eight other Englishmen, who had come along with him 11,000
miles to offer their services to the country. They drilled daily on
board ship, and on arrival in England enlisted early in 1915. Lieut.
Parsons received his commission, and after being stationed at Woolwich,
Aldershot and Basingstoke, he sailed for Egypt in November, 1915. In
May, 1916, he was transferred to Salonica. Lieut. Parsons was the
younger son of Mr. and Mrs. R. Parsons, School House, Rathmell, where
he was born. He was 25 years of age.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Dinsdale.]

2ND LIEUT. FRANK DINSDALE, York & Lancaster Regiment, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Jas. Dinsdale, Show Cote, Askrigg, was reported wounded and
missing on July 1st, 1916, and afterwards officially presumed killed
in action. Lieut. Dinsdale received his commission from the Leeds
University O.T.C. in Sept. 1915, and went to France in June 1916.

[Illustration: Lieut. Fryer.]

2ND LIEUT. JAMES W. FRYER, Northumberland Fusiliers, only
son of the late Major J. W. Fryer and Mrs. Fryer, now of “Kingarth,”
Fenham, Newcastle, and formerly of Hawes, killed in action on July
1st, 1916. He joined the Northumberland Fusiliers shortly after the
outbreak of war. Prior to joining the forces he was articled clerk to
Messrs. Dickinson, Millar & Turnbull, Solicitors, Newcastle, and had
successfully passed his first examinations, and was hoping to qualify
his final when he joined the Colours.

[Illustration: Major Maufe.]

MAJOR S. BROADBENT MAUFE, West Yorkshire Regt., died of wounds
on July 5th, 1916. The late Major Maufe was the eldest son of Frederick
Broadbent and Helen Mann Maufe, of Warlbeck, Ilkley, and husband of
Hilda Maufe, of Acomb, York. He was educated at Uppingham and Clare
College, joined the army in 1910, and was mentioned in despatches.

[Illustration: Capt. Horsfall.]

CAPTAIN CEDRIC F. HORSFALL, ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, eldest son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, of
Hayfield, Glusburn, was killed in action in France on September 18th,
1916. Captain Horsfall, who was a popular figure in Craven, joined
the Army at the outbreak of hostilities. Prior to doing so, he was in
partnership with his father at Hayfield Mills. When his regiment went
to the front, he was a 2nd Lieut., and a few months’ service gained him
his Captaincy, but not before he had been wounded twice. It was in May,
1916, that he returned to active service. Up to joining the forces he
had taken a deep interest in politics. He was a member of the Sutton
Baptist Church, and was 26 years of age.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Goodall.]

2ND LIEUT. ARTHUR C. GOODALL, Yorkshire Regiment (Green
Howards), nephew of Mr. and Mrs. J. Goodall, of “New Zealand,”
Crosshills, killed in action in France, November 6th, 1916.
Lieut. Goodall was a member of the Durham Light Infantry (T) when
hostilities broke out. Shortly after the outbreak, he was promoted
to non-commissioned rank and went to the Front in April, 1915. In
December, 1915, he received a well-earned commission, but in March,
1916, he was invalided home. Lieut. Goodall was well-known in the
Crosshills district, where he resided for some time.

[Illustration: Lieut. Cutliffe Hyne.]

LIEUT. G. C. H. CUTLIFFE HYNE, Irish Guards, only son of Mr.
C. J. Cutliffe Hyne, of Kettlewell, the well-known Yorkshire novelist,
died on November 21st, 1916, at the home of the Hon. Mrs. F. Guest,
used as a Military Hospital, in Park Lane, London. The interment took
place on November 25th, 1916, with military honours, at Kettlewell.
Lieut. Hyne, who was in his 19th year, figured in a notable deed of
gallantry, which resulted in the saving of all his guns, but seventeen
men out of twenty-five in his gun company became casualties. He was
wounded about the middle of September, 1916, and taken to the hospital
named above.

[Illustration: Lieut. Snowden.]

LIEUT. JASPER WHITFIELD SNOWDEN, Worcestershire Regiment, the
only son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Snowden, of the Garth, Embsay, and
grandson of the late Rev. John Snowden, Vicar of Ilkley, was born at
Bradford, in 1896. The deceased officer commenced his education at the
Bradford Grammar School, and in 1909 went to Rossall School. He took
a keen interest in sport and the study of natural history, and gained
several prizes from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.
From the very first he was an enthusiastic and active member of the
Officers’ Training Corps, and was in Camp at Tidworth when war broke
out. He volunteered for service and was given a commission in the above
regiment, was sent to France on February 17th, 1915, and was wounded
at St. Eloi, in May. In September he was sent to the Dardanelles
where, owing to an attack of dysentery, he went into hospital. He soon
rejoined his Bn. in Egypt, and later was drafted to Mesopotamia where
he was again wounded on April 5th, 1916. He was afterwards sent to
India where he was for some months on sick leave. He returned to the
Tigris Line at the end of January, and fell in action on February 25th,
1917.

[Illustration: Lieut. Wilson.]

LIEUT. ALEC. WILSON, 1st Herefordshire Regiment (T.F.), son
of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Wilson, J.P., of Lothersdale. Lieut. Wilson,
whose stay at Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton, extended from 1906
to 1913, and included the honoured position of Captain, was articled
in the estate office of the Marquis of Abergavenny. When war broke
out he at once joined the above regiment as 2nd Lieut. He went out
to the Dardanelles in August, 1915, and went through that trying and
devastating campaign. Following the evacuation, Lieut. Wilson was sent
to Egypt, where he was killed on March 26th, 1917.

[Illustration: Lieut. Whaley.]

LIEUT. FRANK WHALEY, Yorkshire Regiment, the youngest son
of the Rev. F. W. Whaley, Vicar of Horton-in-Ribblesdale, was killed
in action on March 31st, 1917. He joined the Royal Fusiliers (Public
Schools Battalion) as a private soon after the outbreak of war, and,
after serving at the Front in France for six months in 1915-1916, was
sent home to train for a commission, being gazetted 2nd Lieut. on 26th
September, 1916. He joined his regiment in France early in November,
1916.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Broughton.]

2ND LIEUT. THOMAS D. BROUGHTON, King’s Own Yorkshire Light
Infantry, son of the late Mr. Thomas Broughton and Mrs. Broughton, of
Park House, Highfield Terrace, Skipton, died in hospital in April,
1917, from wounds received in action. After leaving school, Lieut.
Broughton attended the Technical College, Bradford, for several years,
and subsequently joined the firm of Messrs. H. A. Gray & Co., Valley
Mills, Bradford. He joined the Artists’ Rifles in November, 1915,
and after the usual training at Camberley Staff College, was given a
commission in the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Goodman.]

2ND LIEUT. ERIC G. GOODMAN, Dorsetshire Regiment, who was
killed in action in France on April 12th, 1917, was a son of Dr. and
Mrs. T. H. Goodman, 39, High Street, Haverhill, Suffolk, and a relative
of Nurse Beresford, of Skipton. Twenty-two years of age, Lieut. Goodman
received his education at Epsom College and Skipton Grammar School,
being at the latter School Captain of the Rugby and Cricket teams and
sports champion in 1910. In 1913, he joined the Civil Service Rifles,
and on August 4th, 1914, he volunteered for service. He went to France
in March, 1915, and was twice wounded.

[Illustration: Lieut. Bellamy.]

LIEUT. T. B. BELLAMY, King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment,
son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Bellamy, Chapel Hill, Skipton, died from wounds
received in action in Mesopotamia on April 30th, 1917. Formerly a
traveller for Mr. John Mollet, ironmonger, Bradford, Lieut. Bellamy
enlisted as a private in the R.F.A. a month after the outbreak of
war, and in 1915 accepted the offer of a commission, and was posted
to the regiment named. After taking part in the opening operations
in Mesopotamia, he went to India on sick leave, but returned to the
Near East at Christmas, 1916, and, along with two other officers of an
advanced guard, was the first to enter Baghdad.

[Illustration: Capt. Hook.]

CAPTAIN CYRIL HOOK, Manchester Regiment, who was killed in
action on April 23rd, 1917, was the second son of Sergt.-Major and Mrs.
Hook (late of Bangalore), and grandson of the late Sergt.-Major Hook,
of Settle. He was 21 years of age, and joined the Manchester Regiment
as a 2nd Lieut. He went to the Front in November, 1915, being wounded
in the July advance, but returned to active service again in November,
1916. Before the outbreak of war he was with Messrs. Mather & Platt, of
Manchester, and a member of the Broughton Park Rugby Club.

[Illustration: Capt. Mackay.]

CAPTAIN JAMES BRUCE MACKAY, West Yorkshire Regiment, was the
elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mackay, 11, High Street, Skipton.
Thirty-two years of age, he enlisted as a private in the Hussars
during the month following the outbreak of war, and, after twelve
months’ training at Colchester, accepted a commission and was gazetted
2nd Lieut., being posted to the West Yorkshire Regt., proceeding to
France in July, 1916. He took part in the battle of the Somme, and his
promotion to the rank of Captain came on the battlefield. He was killed
in action on May 3rd, 1917. He was educated at the Skipton Grammar
School, and prior to enlisting was an Inspector in the London district
for Messrs. Freeman, Hardy & Willis, boot manufacturers.

[Illustration: Lieut. Marlor.]

2ND LIEUT. ERIC MARLOR, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, son of Mr. Frank Marlor, Close House, Settle. Joined the
Artists’ Rifles, December 15th, 1915, as a private. He afterwards
entered the Cadet School, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. of the 2/6th Duke
of Wellington’s Regt., in September, 1916. In December of the same year
he was attached to the 2/7th Duke of Wellington’s Regt., and went to
France in January, 1917. He was reported missing May 3rd, 1917, in the
attack on Bullecourt, and was last seen passing through the German wire
at the head of his men. Neither 2nd Lieut. Marlor nor any of his men
reported missing on that day have ever been traced or heard of, and the
War Office has officially presumed their deaths.

[Illustration: Capt. Bennett.]

CAPTAIN CLAUDE D. BENNETT, 2/6th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, was the son of the late Mr. John Bennett, of Airedale
Terrace, Skipton. The deceased officer was wounded in May, 1917, but he
made a good recovery and returned to France on Wednesday, July 11th,
1917, exactly a week before he received the wounds which resulted in
his death the same day. After leaving Skipton Grammar School, Captain
Bennett served an apprenticeship to the teaching profession with the
late Mr. W. H. Walker, of the Water Street Council School, Skipton, and
later went to Westminster College to complete his training. Afterwards,
for a time, he was a teacher at the Water Street School, where he
remained about twelve months. From this school he was transferred to
the staff of the Old British School at Skipton, and afterwards was for
four years assistant master at the Brougham Street Council School,
Skipton. Subsequently he was appointed headmaster of Langcliffe Council
School. Captain Bennett, who was 30 years of age, started service in
the Army as 2nd Lieut., and his promotion was rapid.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Gill.]

2ND LIEUT. FRANK HUBERT GILL, West Yorkshire Regiment, met
his death in action on August 16th, 1917. He was the youngest son of
Mr. and Mrs. John Gill, of Park Avenue, Skipton. Twenty-three years
of age, deceased was educated at the Water Street Wesleyan Higher
Grade School, and Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton. Before the war,
he held a commission in the local Cadet Corps, but on the outbreak
of hostilities, he joined the ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment as
a private, with which he served in France for twenty-three months.
Subsequently he was granted a commission, and returned home in the
early part of 1917 to undergo the necessary training for his new duties
in a school at Fleet. Afterwards he was attached to the West Yorkshire
Regiment, and again proceeded to the front about five weeks before he
met his death.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Lodge.]

2ND LIEUT. B. G. LODGE, Durham Light Infantry, was killed in
action on August 24th, 1917. Deceased, who was 23 years of age, joined
the Royal Fusiliers in December, 1914. After training at several camps,
he went to France with his regiment in November, 1915, returned to
England in April, 1916, and was gazetted on the 9th August, 1916, as
2nd Lieut. in the Special Reserve D.L.I. In September, 1916, he again
went out to France, and after acting as Company Bombing Officer, he was
Battn. Bombing Officer and Intelligence Officer until he was killed.
He was educated at the Minster Yard School, York, Yorebridge Grammar
School and Giggleswick School, where he was a member of the O.T.C.

[Illustration: Capt. M. D. W. Maude.]

CAPTAIN M. D. W. MAUDE, Yorkshire Regiment, younger son of
Lt.-Col. and Mrs. Maude, The Fleets, Rylstone-in-Craven, died in a
military hospital at Dover, on October 14th, 1917, from wounds received
in action. Captain Maude went to France in 1914 with the seventh
division, and was in the first battle of Ypres. He was mentioned in
despatches after the battle of the Somme. He was 27 years of age, and
was attached to the West Yorkshire Regiment (Special Reserve).

[Illustration: Capt. G. W. E. Maude.]

CAPT. G. W. E. MAUDE, died of pneumonia at Peshawar, India,
November 5th, 1919. Gerald William Edward Maude was the elder and only
surviving son of Lieut.-Colonel W. W. and Mrs. Maude, The Fleets,
Rylstone-in-Craven. Capt. Maude had served eight years in India with
his regiment, the 1st Battalion, A.P.W.O., Yorkshire Regiment (Green
Howards), and in the spring of 1919 he was badly wounded by a bullet
penetrating one of his lungs near Fort Dekka in Baluchistan. After
three months sick leave in Kashmir, he recovered sufficiently to resume
duty. On being granted a year’s leave he was hoping to embark for
England on November 7th, 1919, but unfortunately he contracted a cold,
which probably affected the injured lung. Pneumonia developed, and
Captain Maude died on November 5th at the Military Hospital, Peshawar.
He leaves a widow and one little son, and was 30 years of age.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Styles, M.C.]

2ND LIEUT. H. T. STYLES, M.C., Manchester Regiment, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Styles, Harden Cottage, Austwick, was killed on October 2nd,
1917, aged 23 years.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Rodwell, M.C.]

2ND LIEUT. WM. ALBERT RODWELL, M.C., Royal Engineers, younger
son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Rodwell, of West Ville, Skipton, was killed
in France on Nov. 9th, 1917. Twenty years of age, Lieut. Rodwell
was educated at the Skipton Wesleyan Higher School. He was offered
and accepted a commission in the army in October, 1915. He was then
attached to the 20th Bn. Durham Light Infantry, and went to France in
May, 1916.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Gladstone.]

2ND LIEUT. RALPH O. GLADSTONE, Royal Engineers, of Holme Road,
Crosshills, was killed in action on November 2nd, 1917, in France.
Shortly before the outbreak of war, he was working in Spain for the
British Thomson-Houston Co., of Rugby, and, immediately on the outbreak
of hostilities he joined the Royal Engineers as a private, and went to
France in 1914. He was wounded at the first battle of Ypres. He was 27
years of age.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Watson.]

2ND LIEUT. G. W. A. WATSON, Royal Air Force, eldest son of the
late Mr. James Watson, Conistone-with-Kilnsey, was killed in action on
March 7th, 1918. Lieut. Watson was only 20 years of age, and when war
broke out he enlisted as a seaman in the Royal Naval Division. Later he
joined the Royal Air Force, and went to France only a fortnight before
he died. The deceased officer, who had a genius for invention, was
formerly an engineering student at Leeds University, and a new fuse and
engine have been made to his designs.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Atkinson.]

2ND LIEUT. VICTOR R. ATKINSON, ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, was killed in action in France on November 23rd,
1917. He was the son of Dr. and Mrs. Atkinson, of “Bowerley,” Settle,
and grandson of the late Mr. Edward Atkinson, of Leeds and Harrogate.
He was educated at the Giggleswick Grammar School, where he was in the
O.T.C. He was 20 years of age.

[Illustration: Capt. Littledale.]

CAPTAIN WILLOUGHBY JOHN LITTLEDALE, Oxfordshire and
Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, only son of Mr. Willoughby Aston
Littledale, formerly of Bolton-by-Bowland, was killed in action on
March 23rd, 1918. Born in 1896, he was educated at Copthorne School and
Eton, and was accepted for entrance at Trinity College, Oxford, but
on the outbreak of war proceeded instead to Sandhurst, receiving his
commission in December, 1914. He went to France in May, 1915, and was
wounded in November, 1916. He afterwards rejoined his regiment and was
killed, as stated above, when commanding his company in the front line.

[Illustration: Flight Lieut. Brookes.]

FLIGHT LIEUT. R. B. BROOKES, Royal Air Force, son of Mr. John
Brooks, Greta Villas, Ingleton, officially presumed to have been killed
on March 13th, 1918.

[Illustration: Major Walling, M.C., C. de G.]

MAJOR E. WALLING, M.C., CROIX DE GUERRE, West Yorkshire
Regiment, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Walling, Ferncliffe, Ingleton,
was killed in action at Kemmel Hill on April 23rd, 1918. Major Walling,
who was twice Mentioned in Despatches, had a brilliant scholastic
career. Obtaining a County Minor Scholarship, he went to Giggleswick
Grammar School, and there passed his Matriculation, 1st division, and
took a County Major Scholarship and a Natural Science Exhibition at
Magdalen College, Oxford. He was at Oxford four years, and was in the
hockey and football teams. He was a keen golfer and a member of the
Leeds and Ingleton Clubs. Leaving college he went as master at Dulwich,
Oxford High School, Sheffield Grammar School, and Leeds Grammar
School, where he was Senior Science Master. Prior to the war he held a
commission in the Territorial Force (Leeds Rifles), and was in camp at
Scarborough when war broke out. He joined his regiment in France early
in 1915, and served there until he was killed.

[Illustration: Lieut. Pettitt.]

LIEUT. W. PETTITT, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, of Settle,
was killed during April, 1918.

[Illustration: Lieut. G. Procter.]

LIEUT. GEORGE PROCTER, Lancashire Fusiliers, only son of Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas Procter, Greystones, Gisburn, killed in action on April
7th, 1918, aged 24 years.

[Illustration: Lieut. Chorley, M.C.]

LIEUT. C. C. CHORLEY, M.C., Lancashire Fusiliers, of Sedbergh,
killed in France April 27th, 1918. Awarded the Military Cross for
conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.

[Illustration: Lieut. J. W. N. A. Procter, M.C.]

LIEUT. J. W. N. A. PROCTER, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s
(West Riding) Regiment, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Procter,
Manor House, Rylstone, died from wounds on May 2nd, 1918, aged 23
years. From a letter read by the bereaved family from Brigadier General
Lewes, commanding the 147th Brigade, it appears that Lieut. Procter,
who possessed a loveable and winning personality, was wounded in battle
on April 29th, 1918, and he died at one of the base hospitals to the
deep regret of his fellow officers and men. The Brigadier General
added: “Your son was a model of an English officer and gentleman. As
regards his work, I cannot speak too highly of him; he was most able
and devoted to his duty; he was of the greatest assistance to me and
my commanding officers, and I shall be quite unable to replace him....
Your son died doing his duty in a way that could not have been done
better. We sadly mourn his loss.”

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Stocks.]

2ND LIEUT. TOM D. STOCKS, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. James Stocks, of Airedale Villa,
Silsden, died from wounds received in action on April 16th, 1918.
Educated at the Bradford Grammar School, Lieut. Stocks, who was 21
years of age, was formerly an assistant scoutmaster of the Silsden
Parish Church Troop. Joining the Westmoreland and Cumberland Yeomanry
as a private in April, 1915, he afterwards successfully undertook a
course of training for higher rank.

[Illustration: Lieut. Illingworth, M.C.]

LIEUT. JOHN ILLINGWORTH, M.C., West Yorkshire Regiment, of
Skipton, formerly assistant to Mr. E. G. Whittaker, registration agent
for the Skipton Division Conservative and Unionist Association, was
killed on June 3rd, 1918, aged 26 years.

[Illustration: Lieut. Kidd.]

LIEUT. E. J. C. KIDD, Royal Air Force, son of Mr. W. Kidd,
head-master of the National School, Addingham, was fatally injured on
April 9th, 1917, while acting as observer.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Campbell.]

2ND LIEUT. J. G. CAMPBELL, Yorkshire Regiment, officially
reported missing since an engagement on May 7th and 8th, 1918, was the
elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Campbell, Town Head, Austwick. He
enlisted in May, 1915, in the West Yorkshire Regiment (Bradford Pals),
and went to Egypt in December the same year. He was transferred to
France the following March, where he joined the cyclist section, in
which he stayed up to about November, when he came home to take up a
commission. He had only returned to France three weeks when he met his
death. Prior to the war he was a clerk in the employ of the Midland
Railway Co. He was 24 years of age.

[Illustration: Capt. Muller.]

CAPTAIN NORMAN MULLER, West Yorkshire Regt., younger son
of Colonel G. H. Muller, of Park Grove, Frizinghall, Bradford, was
killed in action on the Western front, on July 28th, 1918. Capt.
Muller married in January, 1915, Miss Doris Spencer Jennings, only
surviving daughter of the late Mr. J. S. Jennings, formerly of Keighley
and Harrogate, and Mrs. Jennings, of Cononley Hall. At the outbreak
of war he was a Lieut. in the West Yorkshires, and went to France
shortly after his marriage in charge of the transport of the ⅙th West
Yorkshire Regt. After service on the Ypres front he was invalided home,
but returned to France, and for a time was acting Major of his Bn. In
August, 1916, he was again invalided home, and for a time was given
duty in England, but in the spring of 1918 he was once again given
orders for service abroad. He was killed while reconnoitring. He was 32
years of age.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Butler.]

2ND LIEUT. C. F. BUTLER, Royal Field Artillery, of
Huddersfield, a former three-quarter back for the Skipton Rugby
football team, and an “Old Boy” of Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton,
was killed in action during July, 1918.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Allen.]

2ND LIEUT. H. ALLEN, Royal Air Force, son of Mr. and Mrs. E.
Allen, Gayle, Hawes, missing since August 10th, 1918, after bombing the
German lines.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Lee.]

2ND LIEUT. J. V. LEE, Royal Air Force, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Lee, Belmont Bridge, Skipton, was killed in action in August,
1918, aged 22 years.

[Illustration: Lieut. Fattorini.]

LIEUT. THOMAS FATTORINI, Royal Air Force, second son of Mr.
T. Fattorini, “Rockwood,” Skipton, fell in action on August 13th,
1918, whilst flying over the enemy’s lines on a voluntary photographic
reconnaissance, aged 19 years.

[Illustration: Lieut. Barry.]

LIEUT. WILLIAM PATRICK BARRY, Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, only son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barry, 29, Bright
Street, Skipton, was killed on August 28th, 1918, aged 23 years. Had
been awarded the Certificate of Merit in recognition of conspicuous
gallantry and devotion to duty on the night of September 6th, 1917, and
had been recommended for the Military Cross. He was an “Old Boy” of
Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton.

[Illustration: Lieut. Jackman.]

LIEUT. J. R. JACKMAN, Royal Air Force, only son of Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Jackman, Hughenden, Long Preston, reported missing June
17th, 1918, since presumed killed. Educated at Sedbergh, he was in
business with his father as a wool merchant when the war broke out. He
volunteered and joined the Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment,
going to France in April, 1915. He was transferred to the R.F.C. in
1917.

[Illustration: Lieut. Brassington, M.M.]

LIEUT. W. H. BRASSINGTON, M.M., Tank Corps, eldest son of Mr.
and Mrs. T. W. Brassington, Ribble View, Settle, killed in action near
Bapaume on August 23rd, 1918.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Burrows.]

2ND LIEUT. L. V. BURROWS, Sherwood Foresters, was the first
to enlist from the office staff of Belle Vue Mills, Skipton. Killed in
action September 1st., 1918, aged 26 years.

[Illustration: Lieut. Thornton.]

2ND LIEUT. J. H. B. THORNTON, Labour Corps, of Keswick, who
was classical master at Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton, from
September, 1914, to March, 1917, was killed in action on the Western
front on September 28th, 1918. He frequently acted as instructor to the
Skipton V.T.C. in its early days.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Bentham.]

2ND LIEUT. HARLEY BENTHAM, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, of Hellifield, died in France from wounds received in action
on September 13th, 1918.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Bushby.]

2ND LIEUT. JOSEPH BRYAN BUSHBY, South Staffordshire Regiment,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm, Marton, died on
October 9th, 1918, from wounds received on the Western front on October
4th, 1918. He was 26 years of age, and an “Old Boy” of Ermysted’s
Grammar School, Skipton, and St. John’s College, York. He was a teacher
at the Brougham Street School, Skipton, at the time he joined the Duke
of Wellington’s Regiment as a private, in September, 1914.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Crowther.]

2ND LIEUT. NORMAN CROWTHER, Cheshire Regiment, only son of Mr.
and Mrs. A. Crowther, “Brooklyn,” Grassington, was killed in action
in France on October 14th, 1918, only two days after his return from
leave, aged 27 years. Educated at Pannal Ash College, Harrogate, he
left there to enter the banking profession, and when war broke out had
secured a good position in the chief office, at Leeds, of the National
and Provincial Bank of England. Enlisting in 1915, he joined the 5th
Bn. The Buffs, was granted a commission in June, 1917, and transferred
to the 3rd Cheshire Regiment, and afterwards sailed for Egypt, being
one of the expedition that went to Palestine. Had it not been for
sickness, he would have been with General Allenby at his entry to
Jerusalem. He was recalled to France in May, 1918, and saw much severe
fighting in the neighbourhood of Merville, being with the Division
which was mentioned for gallantry in action. At the time of his death
he was attached to the 15th Suffolk Yeomanry. He and one of his men
were sheltering in a shell hole when a shell buried them. When help
arrived both were dead. Lieut. Crowther was buried in a cemetery near
Chateau-de-la-Valee, about 12 miles from Lille.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Shuttleworth.]

2ND LIEUT. RICHARD WELBURY SHUTTLEWORTH, Royal Air Force, son
of Mrs. Shuttleworth, Beech Cliffe, Earby, was accidentally killed
whilst flying in England, on August 24th, 1918, aged 24 years.

[Illustration: Lieut. Lumb, M.C.]

LIEUT. J. W. LUMB, M.C., ¼th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, of Skipton formerly in practice as a solicitor in
Barnoldswick, died of wounds in France on October 30th, 1918, aged 34
years.

[Illustration: Lieut. Torney.]

LIEUT. T. F. H. TORNEY, son of Captain Hastings Torney,
R.A.M.C., was a nephew of Mrs. Sam H. Walton, Skipton, and was killed
in action September 3rd, 1918.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Matthaus.]

2ND LIEUT. LAWRENCE MATTHAUS, Royal Field Artillery, formerly
engaged in farming with Mr. Jas. Gill, Yarlsber Farm, Ingleton, was
killed in action on October 16th, 1918.

[Illustration: Lieut. Sanderson.]

LIEUT. GORDON SANDERSON, 2nd Gurkhas, Machine Gun Section,
only son of Mr. William Sanderson, of Rathmell, Settle, was killed
in action in France. The deceased officer was 28 years of age. At
the outbreak of war, he was offered an appointment as A.D.C., but
refused it, and took charge of the Machine Gun Section of the 2nd
Gurkhas. Lieut. Sanderson was a clever architectural draughtsman, being
formerly engaged in Government work in Egypt. He subsequently worked in
Edinburgh, and later was appointed superintendent of the Archæological
Survey of the North East Provinces of India. Prior to going to India,
Lieut. Sanderson was married to Miss Cowie, daughter of the late Mr. A.
Cowie, of Mentone Gardens, Edinburgh.

[Illustration: Lieut. Glibbon.]

LIEUT. JOHN BARTLEY GLIBBON, Canadian Mounted Rifles, died of
wounds in France. He was the only son of Mr. A. E. Glibbon, who was
manager of the Old Bentham Mills Spinning Co., and also manager at
Bentham Mills for the Hemp Yarn Cordage Combine before its liquidation,
and a well-known figure in Bentham. The late Lieut. Glibborn was born
at Bentham House in 1887. His mother was Miss Baldwin, a member of as
well-known Scotforth family. He emigrated to Canada, and married a
French Canadian lady who belonged to an old French Republican family.
The deceased officer obtained his early education at Miss Wilson’s
private school at Bentham, after which he went to Ackworth Friends’
Schools, near Wakefield.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Berry.]

2ND LIEUT. J. LESLIE BERRY, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Berry, 48, Broughton Road, Skipton, who
enlisted in September, 1914, at the age of seventeen, as a private,
fell in action on October 12th, 1918.

[Illustration: Lieut. Carruthers.]

LIEUT. GORDON CARRUTHERS, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Carruthers, of Skipton, died of wounds
received in action in France on November 20th, 1918. Lieut. Carruthers,
who had been in France about three years, was, prior to the war,
assistant master at Glusburn Council School.

[Illustration: Capt. Perks, D.S.O.]

CAPTAIN ROBERT CLEMENT PERKS, D.S.O., Duke of Wellington’s
(West Riding) Regiment, of Hebden, killed in action on October 27th,
1918, on the Italian front.

[Illustration: Dr. Pickles.]

DR. PHILLIP D. PICKLES, H.M.S. “_Russell_,” and formerly of
Earby, died in hospital at Malta as the result of injuries received
during the sinking of his ship in the Mediterranean. A son of Dr.
J. J. Pickles, Camp Road, Leeds, he was the eldest of six brothers,
all trained in the medical profession. Deceased was a member of the
Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, and was called up for duty on the
“_Russell_” on August 2nd, 1914. As Surgeon in the R.N.V.R., he took
part in the grand review at Spithead, and joined H.M.S. “_Russell_”
on August 2nd, 1914. Dr. Pickles was one of five brothers who joined
H.M. Forces--three in the Army and two in the Navy--four of them being
medical officers. He was 33 years of age and unmarried.

[Illustration: Lieut. Edwards.]

LIEUT. H. W. EDWARDS, West Yorkshire Regiment (Bradford Pals),
killed in action in France, resided at Manor Hill, Sutton, for a few
years, and was very well-known and popular in the village. He formed an
excellent troop of Boy Scouts in connection with St. Andrew’s Church,
Kildwick, devoted his spare time to furthering the Boy Scout movement
in the district, and for a time was District Commissioner. For over
ten years he was on the staff of the Bank of Liverpool at Keighley,
and was also manager of the Crosshills branch for a few years. At the
outbreak of hostilities he joined the ranks of the West Yorkshire
Regiment, rising to the rank of Sergeant. After about twelve months’
foreign service with the “Pals” in Egypt and France, he was promoted to
commissioned rank. His father was a Vicar of Nelson.

[Illustration: 2nd Lieut. Berry, M.C.]

2ND LIEUT. JOHN GRANVILLE BERRY, M.C., West Yorkshire
Regiment, officially reported missing on the 16th August, 1917, was
the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Berry, of Hawthorn House, Earby.
2nd Lieut. Berry was only 20 years of age, and was educated at Skipton
Grammar School. He was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry and
devotion to duty in taking command of his Company, when his company
commander had become a casualty, and leading them for two days, during
which time he displayed most remarkable initiative and determination.
He attained all his objectives in the face of heavy fire, and was
repeatedly to the fore in repelling counter-attacks. His personal
gallantry won the admiration of all ranks. Lieut.-Col. Jefferies wrote
to Lieut. Berry’s father as follows:--“He was one of my very best and
trustworthy officers. He was commanding a company and would have been
a Captain had he remained with the Bn. I always knew that when he
undertook a job it would be carried out to the letter, and this is one
of the very highest recommendations it is possible to give a soldier.
The Regiment could ill afford to lose him, as officers of his type are
far from being common.”


MAJOR MOSTYN E. COOKSON, of the Royal Sussex Regiment, was
the first Officer connected with the Skipton Parliamentary Division to
give his life for his country’s honour. His name was in the official
casualty list issued by the War Office on Sept. 18th, 1914, and he
was classed among those who were missing. It was hoped that he might
have become detached from his Regiment, but on the 23rd September, the
official intimation was that he had been killed in action in France on
September 14th, 1914. The son of the late Major Cookson, of Skipton and
Settle, who was for many years Adjutant of the 3rd Vol. Bn. Duke of
Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment, the deceased officer--a typical
Britisher in every sense of the word--was educated at the Skipton
Grammar School, and was one of a family held in deep respect in this
part of Craven. His youngest sister was the late Lady Holden, who,
previous to her marriage, resided with her sister at Gargrave. Major
Cookson was 46 years of age.


2ND LIEUT. HARRY RISHWORTH, 2/6th Duke of Wellington’s (West
Riding) Regiment, son of Mr. C. F. Rishworth, Moorfield, Utley,
Keighley, died on September 15th, 1918, from injuries received in a
motor accident in the Sheffield neighbourhood. Lieut. Rishworth was 22
years of age, and joined the 6th Duke of Wellington’s. He obtained a
commission in 1915, and was for some time attached to the 3/6th Duke of
Wellington’s Regt.


LIEUT.-COL. J. R. E. STANSFIELD, D.S.O., 2nd Gordon
Highlanders, died from wounds received in action in France, on
September 28th, 1915. He was the son of the late Rev. J. B. E.
Stansfield, Knightsbridge, London, a nephew of Captain Stansfield, of
Field House, Sowerby Bridge, near Halifax, and brother to Mrs. Yorke,
Halton Place, Hellifield, and was 35 years of age. In 1914, he returned
from Egypt with the 1st Gordon Highlanders, and was slightly wounded at
Ypres. He served through the South African War, was twice mentioned in
despatches, and received the D.S.O. and two medals, with eight clasps.
In 1904, he married a French lady, Yolande, daughter of the late
Major-General Marquess de Bourbel, R.E.

[Illustration: 2nd Lt. Hodgson.]

2ND LIEUT. J. HODGSON, 12th Bn. Durham Light Infantry, son
of Mr. and Mrs. R. Hodgson, Castleberg House, Settle, was killed by
machine gun-fire in 1918, whilst gallantly leading his men into action
at the crossing of the Piave on the Italian Front. Lieut. Hodgson was
on leave only a short time before his death, and had only rejoined his
Bn. a few days before, volunteering to go up the line when he could
have remained at the base. He was an “Old Boy” of Giggleswick Grammar
School.


CAPTAIN JOHN MAUGHAN, 4th Bn. The Yorkshire Regiment, T.F.,
killed in action near Ypres on February 17th, 1916, was the eldest son
of John Maughan, of Abbey Hill, Jervaulx, Middleham, Yorks. Educated at
Marlborough College, he joined the Regiment in 1909, and was gazetted
Captain in November, 1914. He went to France with his regiment in
April, 1915, and was in action at Ypres a few days after landing,
and took part in all the subsequent engagements. He was mentioned in
General French’s Despatches.


LIEUT. HARRY R. THELWELL, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, died in hospital in France from wounds on July 8th, 1916.
When war broke out Lieut. Thelwell joined the Queen Victoria Rifles, in
which regiment he had already served for four years as a private, and
went to France in October, 1914. He took part in the attack on Hill 60,
following which he was given a commission in the Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., and was again sent to France where he received his second star.
He was the only son of Mrs. Thelwell and the late Mr. Geo. Thelwell, of
Commercial Street, Leeds, and formerly of Long Preston. He was 23 years
of age, and was educated at St. Cuthbert’s College, Worksop.


2ND LIEUT. GILBERT W. WATERHOUSE, who fell in action on April
9th, 1917, was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Waterhouse,
of Huntsville, Canada, and grandson of the late Mr. Wm. Hartley, of
Catteral Hall, Settle. Aged 20 years, he was educated at Toronto,
Canada, and at Cranleigh School, Surrey. He joined the Artists’ Rifles
in November, 1915, and obtained his Commission early in 1917.


2ND LIEUT. BASIL TEMPEST, Manchester Regiment, died of wounds
received in action April 25th, 1917. He was the son of Dr. and Mrs.
Tempest, Whalley Range, Manchester, and nephew of Mr. A. Tempest, The
Grove, Ilkley (formerly in business in Keighley Road, Skipton), and
grandson of the late Mr. James Tempest, of Aireville, Cononley. Before
the war he was for four years a student apprentice with Messrs. Mather
& Platt, Ltd. In 1914 he gained a Manchester University Scholarship,
and on the outbreak of hostilities he joined the University O.T.C. He
was gazetted 2nd Lieut. in November, 1914, and served in France and
Macedonia.


2ND LIEUT. GEORGE CORK DALGOUTTE, Rifle Brigade, a son of
ex-P.C. Dalgoutte, at one time stationed at Skipton, was reported as
having been killed in action on May 3rd, 1917. He formerly lived at
Keighley and was an “Old Boy” of the Trade and Grammar School. He
enlisted in August, 1915, and obtained his commission about December,
1916.


COLONEL J. W. LODGE, Yorkshire Regiment, died at the Rookery,
Bishopdale, Aysgarth, on August 24th, 1917. Colonel Lodge had been
connected with the Yorkshire Regiment for over 43 years. He served with
the 3rd Bn. throughout the South African War, and was in possession
of the Queen’s Medal with three clasps, the King’s Medal with two
clasps, and the Coronation Medal. From June, 1906, to August, 1912, he
commanded the 3rd Bn. and then retired. At the outbreak of the present
war, he volunteered for service, and was appointed as second in command
of a Bn. of a Yorkshire Regiment, and afterwards was given the command
of a Special Reserve Bn., a post which he held until his death. He was
the only son of Mr. Robert Lodge, of Bishopdale, and was born in 1853.
He was educated at St. Peter’s, York, and took his M.A. at Cambridge,
and was called to the Bar of the Inner Temple in 1883.


2ND LIEUT. C. H. LEE, Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in
action on September 20th, 1917. Thirty-three years of age, deceased was
the son of the Rev. G. S. Lee, Rector of Benniworth, Lincolnshire, and
was formerly a mathematical master at the Skipton Grammar School. He
enlisted at the end of the summer term of 1916, and was in France about
six months. He was on the staff of the Skipton School about eighteen
months, and was previously mathematical master at Parkstone, Dorset.


CAPTAIN WM. HENRY POLLARD, died at sea on October 9th,
1917. Captain Pollard was an old Skipton Grammar School boy, and was
afterwards apprenticed with Messrs. T. & J. Harrison, ship owners,
Liverpool. He obtained his master’s certificate when twenty-four years
of age. During 1916, he was at Archangel, the ship being icebound. He
left there in May, and was on his way home when he died.


2ND LIEUT R. HALL WATT, Grenadier Guards, son of the late
Mr. E. R. B. Hall Watt, of Bishop Burton, Beverley, and of Carr Head,
Cowling, was killed in action on October 13th, 1917. Deceased was
educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and was posted to the Grenadier Guards
in the early part of 1917, leaving for France in August. He was 19
years of age.


CAPTAIN F. M. TWISLETON, M.C., New Zealand Forces, eldest son
of the late Mr. Twisleton, of Menstone, and formerly of Settle, died
on November 15th, 1917, from wounds received in action in Palestine.
Leaving England twenty years ago, he went to New Zealand. He served
through the South African War, and then returned to New Zealand. At the
outbreak of war, he came out with the Otago Mounted Rifles. He fought
through the Gallipoli campaign, where he won the M.C. He then went to
France, and afterwards to Palestine, where he met his death.


2ND LIEUT. WILLIAM H. COLES, Yorkshire Regiment, son of Mr.
Wm. Coles, Station Master, Skipton. Twenty-eight years of age, Lieut.
Coles was prior to the war attached to the West Riding Territorials,
and afterwards served for five years in the Yorkshire Hussars,
attaining the rank of Quarter-master Sergeant. In November, 1916, he
was offered and accepted a commission, and was posted to the Yorkshire
Regiment. He was killed in action on December 28th, 1917.


MAJOR LEES, President of the Bentham Agricultural Society, was
killed on July 31st, 1918.


LIEUT. B. RAMSBOTTOM, son of the Rev. W. H. Ramsbottom, a
former vicar of St. Margaret’s Church, Bentham, was killed in action on
August 19th, 1918.


2ND LIEUT. W. G. BARRACLOUGH, M.C., Duke of Wellington’s
(West Riding) Regiment, elder son of Supt. H. Barraclough, West Riding
Constabulary, formerly stationed at Ingleton, was killed in action on
September 29th, 1918, aged 23 years. Had been recommended for the M.C.


2ND LIEUT. S. A. F. PILGRIM, Tank Corps, who was mortally
wounded on September 24th, 1918, was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A.
Pilgrim, Noyna Mede, Foulridge, and was just 20 years of age.


THE REV. THEODORE BAILY HARDY, V.C., D.S.O., M.C., a former
headmaster of Bentham Grammar School and domestic chaplain to the King,
died in hospital in France in October, 1918, from gunshot wounds.


2ND LIEUT. NORMAN P. CLARK, Munster Fusiliers, killed in
action, was a nephew of Mr. Edgar Wood of Skipton. After being
invalided from Gallipoli, he spent a good deal of time with Mr. Wood
and his family at Skipton. Only 23 years of age deceased was the second
son of Councillor W. Clark, of Regent Square, Doncaster (a former Mayor
of the Borough), and was articled to a firm of accountants. When the
war broke out, he immediately joined the North Staffordshire Regiment
(T.F.), and afterwards received a commission in the West Yorkshire
Regt. Subsequently, he saw service with the Munster Fusiliers, and was
in the Gallipoli campaign where he was wounded and invalided home with
dysentery. Deceased’s forefathers were Quakers, and his grandfather,
the late Mr. R. E. Clark, was one of the first County Aldermen of the
West Riding.


LIEUT. R. FORREST, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, was the
son of Mr. T. Forrest, dental surgeon, of Clitheroe and Long Preston.
He was killed in action on the Western Front. He had been employed as
Intelligence Officer. His death was caused by being struck by a piece
of shell. He was 26 years of age.


LORD LUCAS, who was killed while on active service in
France, was an enthusiastic and generous supporter of the Ribblesdale
Buckhounds, and he gave his friend and neighbour, Lord Ribblesdale,
all the support and help in his power. In the times before the war,
of such days as he could spare from the duties of his office, which
he filled with such advantage to agriculture, many were spent in the
Ribble Valley. In the hunting season, whenever in residence at Sawley
or Wigglesworth, he was never absent from a meet. He was a noble,
chivalrous and courteous gentleman.


MAJOR VIVIAN NOVELL KIDD, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding)
Regiment, son of the late Mr. William Kidd, of Otley, and a grandson
of the late Rev. P. C. Kidd, who was Rector at Skipton for many years.
Major Kidd, who was well-known in Rugby Union Football circles at
Headingley and Otley, joined the army from Sandhurst, and entered the
Duke of Wellington’s Regt. He was second in command of a Service Battn.
of the Regiment, and was expecting his promotion to Lieut.-Colonel.
He was with the Battn. at the landing at Suvla Bay as Captain and
Adjutant, and when his superior officers became casualties, he took
command. At the commencement of the war, he was Adjutant at the
Regimental Depot at Halifax. He was a son-in-law of Major Cecil H.
Taylor, O.C., 13th Bn. West Riding Volunteers, and was in his 30th year.


CAPTAIN G. C. TURNER, West Yorkshire Regiment, younger son of
Mr. and Mrs. John Turner, Newlands, Ilkley, was killed in action on the
Western front. Captain Turner was 32 years of age, and was educated
at the Ilkley Grammar School, Sedbergh, and Leeds University. He was
a civil engineer by profession, and had spent three years in British
Columbia. On outbreak of war, he joined the Leeds University O.T.C.,
and obtained a commission in the West Yorkshire Regiment in February,
1915.

[Illustration]



CRAVEN’S ROLL OF HONOUR

THE RANK AND FILE

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER M. JOHNSTONE, Black Watch Regt.,
son of Mrs. Johnstone, formerly of Park Road, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 8th Sept., 1914. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. CROSSLEY, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., formerly of Bolton-by-Bowland, died in Camp at Frensham,
November, 1914.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BRYAN DALE, Essex Regt., formerly of
Skipton, killed in action 18th November, 1914. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. N. MAUDSLEY, West Yorks. Regt.,
nephew of Mr. & Mrs. R. Brooks, George St., Addingham, killed in action
between 25th October and 2nd November, 1914. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM OGDEN, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mrs. T. Barnes, Main St., Addingham, killed in action 26th Sept.,
1914. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR P. RYDER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
brother of Mrs. J. T. Robinson, Low Mill St., Addingham, killed in
action 23rd August, 1914. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD SNOWDEN, King’s Own Regt., son
of Mrs. Snowden, Chapel St., Silsden, killed on the Railway at Didcot
19th October, 1914. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: GEORGE EDWARD TURNER, Marconi Operator, H.M.S.
_Hogue_, son of Mr. R. Turner, Harrogate, formerly of Settle, drowned
in the North Sea 22nd Sept., 1914.]

[Illustration: FIRST-CLASS STOKER JOHN JAMES TWEEDALE, H.M.S.
_Hogue_, formerly of Skipton, drowned in the North Sea 22nd Sept.,
1914. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN A. W. VARLEY, King’s Royal Rifles, of
Skipton, killed in action November, 1914.]

[Illustration: ABLE-SEAMAN ROBERT G. HUTCHINSON, H.M.S.
_Good Hope_, of Lyndale in Cartmell, late of Dent, drowned at sea 1st
November, 1914.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE F. WILKINSON, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., nephew of Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Dalby, Cavendish St., Skipton,
officially presumed killed 11th November, 1914.]

[Illustration: SYDNEY W. RUDDERHAM, Wireless Telegraphist, of
Skipton, drowned by the sinking of H.M.S. _Cressy_ in the North Sea
September, 1914.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED COCKETT, Scot’s Guards Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. Moore, Hawes, presumed killed 29th October, 1914.]

[Illustration: STOKER P. FERGUSON, H.M.S. _Hawke_, nephew of
Mrs. Ferguson, Byron St., Skipton, drowned at sea 14th October, 1914.]

[Illustration: CHARLES GRANT, of The Bottom, Ingleton,
torpedoed 15th February, 1915, on board s.s. “_Menbard_.”]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BEN HODGSON, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., of 3, Bridge Street, Silsden, killed in action 23rd February,
1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. CLARKE, Yorkshire Regt., son of
Mr. T. H. Clarke, Byron Street, Skipton, died at Netley Hospital from
wounds received in action 11th March, 1915. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JNO. FAWCETT, Lancs. Fusiliers, of
Barnoldswick, killed in action 13th February, 1915. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL WALTER EMMOTT, Duke of
Wellington’s Regt., of Addingham, killed in action 20th March, 1915.
Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN SEWELL, Rifle Brigade, of Foredale
Cottage, Horton-in-Ribblesdale, killed in action 28th March, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES SEWELL, Rifle Brigade, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sewell, Riverplace, Gargrave, killed in action 10th March,
1915. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. THOMPSON, Royal Lancaster Regt.,
brother of Mrs. Nathan Potter, Ribble Bank, Langcliffe, Settle, killed
in action 25th March, 1915. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD BEEBEE, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., son of Mr. Walter Beebee, 8, Fairfax Street, Skipton, killed in
action 18th April, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAM CAMPBELL, Canadian Corps, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Campbell, 58, Gordon Street, Burnley, formerly of
Barnoldswick, presumed killed 22nd April, 1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN ROBERT HARGREAVES, Grenadier
Guards, son of Mr. S. Hargreaves, Keighley Road, Skipton, died from
pneumonia at Caterham, Surrey, 26th April, 1915. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM TOMLINSON, Australian Ex.
Force, formerly of Skipton, officially reported killed in action in
Gallipoli 25th April, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BLAND, 3rd West Riding Regt., son
of Mr. R. Bland, Halton West, killed in action 5th May, 1915. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED CARTMAN, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Cartman, Thornton Street, Skipton, died of
wounds 31st May, 1915. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER CHARLES ELLIS, Yorkshire Hussars, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Lister Ellis, Crag Farm, Addingham, killed in action 24th
May, 1915. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER HENRY EASTWOOD, 18th Hussars, of 1,
Emanuel Street, Skipton, killed in action 25th May, 1915. Aged 26
years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT THOMAS FOSTER, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., formerly of Skipton, and lately of Foulridge, killed in action
May, 1915. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. FLETCHER, East Lancs. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. G. Fletcher, Ings Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed in action 9th
May, 1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HIGGINS, Duke of Wellington’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Higgins, New Street, Carleton, killed in action 7th May,
1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM LANGMAN, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., of Broughton Road, Skipton, died from gas poisoning 5th May,
1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL EDWARD LEEMING, Canadian Corps, son
of the late Mr. Anthony Leeming, formerly of Hardacre Farm, Bentham,
killed in action 21st May, 1915. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. SCOTT, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Scott, Elm Tree Cottage, Embsay, died of wounds 2nd
May, 1915. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR WILSON, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Wilson, 21, Albion Street, Earby,
killed in action 16th May, 1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER B. PINCH, R.F.A., of Deepdale, Dent,
killed in action, 15th May, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ISAAC WADE, Duke of Wellington’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Wade, Albert Square, Silsden, died from gas
poisoning 5th May, 1915. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. T. MAUNDERS, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., of Barnoldswick, gassed at Hill 60, 5th May, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FAWCETT, East Lanes. Regt., grandson of
the late Mr. T. Myers and Mrs. Myers, Main Street, Addingham, killed in
action 9th May, 1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JACK CHAPMAN, A.S.C., grandson of Mrs.
C. Chapman, Skipton, died from illness whilst with the Mediterranean
Exp. Force, May 1915. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. SCOTT, 18th Hussars, a native of
Gargrave, where his father was employed as a gardener, killed in action
in France 13th May, 1915. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE V. ECCLESTONE, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. William Ecclestone, Barnoldswick, killed in action 22nd June,
1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE S. HARGREAVES, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Samuel Hargreaves, Skipton, killed in action June, 1915.
Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST ASKEW, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
40, Westmoreland Street, Skipton, died in France July, 1915. Aged 24
years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT WILLIAM H. MOORE, East Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mrs. Arthur Ingham, 1, West View, Kelbrook, killed in action 9th
June, 1915. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL BENJAMIN ORMEROD, R.A.M.C.
formerly of Barnoldswick, died from injuries 5th June, 1915. Aged 30
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE S. BISHOP, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Skipton, killed in action 18th July, 1915. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. BRAMMALL, East Lancs. Regt., of 7,
Queen Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 9th July, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM LISTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 7, King Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 18th July, 1915. Aged
27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM HENRY BOLTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Bolton, 58, Esp Lane, Barnoldswick, died of wounds
30th July, 1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. MARSHALL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of Thorn Tree Farm, Hetton, killed in action 15th July, 1915.
Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RHODES SPENCE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Spence, Millbanks, Keighley Road, Silsden, killed in
action 17th July, 1915. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. WIGGAN, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Wiggan, 28, Rowland Street, Skipton, killed in action
18th July, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIE BROOKSBANK, Australian Corps,
son of Mr. R. Brooksbank, 4, Elmsley Street, Steeton, killed in action
in the Dardanelles 7th August, 1915. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BENNETT BAILEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Bailey, 40, Langroyd Road, Earby, officially
presumed dead 17th August, 1915. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES W. BELL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. William Bell, Low Bentham, killed in action 28th August,
1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT BROOKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Brooks, Lane Bottom, Barnoldswick, officially
reported killed 2nd August, 1915, in Gallipoli. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK COUNTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Eli Counter, 12, Church Street, Skipton, officially
presumed dead 12th August, 1915. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GORDON S. CROSS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Water Street, Earby, presumed dead 12th August, 1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARTLEY DENT, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Barnoldswick, killed in action in Gallipoli 21st August, 1915. Aged 24
years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM GREAVES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 146, Keighley Road, Cowling, presumed dead 9th August, 1915.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM GILL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 9, St. John’s Square, Silsden, killed in action in the Dardanelles,
21st August, 1915. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL THOMAS L. TAYLOR, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., brother of Mrs. Ethel Shaw, 36, Commercial Street,
Skipton, died of wounds in Gallipoli 7th August, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST HUSTWICK, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 30, St. John’s Street, Silsden, killed in action in the Dardanelles
21st August, 1915. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: COY. SERGT.-MAJOR JOSEPH HARRISON, East Lancs.
Regt., formerly of Skipton, killed in action in the Dardanelles 11th
August, 1915.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT W. T. LUND, North Lancs. Regt., of
Austwick, killed in action in the Suvla Bay landing 10th August, 1915.]

[Illustration: GUNNER EDWARD LUND, R.F.A., of 67, Bolton Road,
Silsden, died of wounds in Egypt August, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD MAGOOLAGAN, King’s Own Regt.,
son of Mr. W. Magoolagan, Bentham, died of wounds in the Dardanelles
23rd August, 1915. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL J. M. MORPHET, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., formerly of Settle, killed in action August, 1915. Aged 38
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN NIXON, Royal Engineers, of Embsay,
died of wounds, in the Dardanelles, 26th August, 1915. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL T. W. RIGG, Yorks. Regt., of Sedbergh,
presumed killed 22nd August, 1915.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL G. PICKLES, East Lancs. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. James Pickles, 80, Rainhall Road, Barnoldswick, killed in
action in Gallipoli 9th August, 1915. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NORMAN SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. John Smith, 20, Greenfield Street, Skipton, killed in action
August, 1915. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES STODDARD, Lancs. Fusiliers, son
of the late Mr. Thomas Stoddard, Bay Horse Hotel, Cononley, killed in
action August, 1915. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SPENCER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. John Spencer, Bolton Road, Addingham, died of wounds August,
1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH H. STEWART, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Stewart, 24, Rowland Street, Skipton, killed in
action August, 1915. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Embsay, killed in action August, 1915. Aged 17 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. SMITH, King’s Own Regt., formerly of
Bank Top, Ingleton, killed in action 8th August, 1915. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER FRANCES D. TWISLETON, New Zealand
Mounted Rifles, son of Mr. Fred T. Twisleton, Palmerston North,
New Zealand, formerly of Winskill, Settle, killed in action in the
Dardanelles, 7th August, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED THORNTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. T. Thornton, Otley Street, Skipton, died of wounds 24th
August, 1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD WALLBANK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Wallbank, Clapham, died of wounds received in the
Dardanelles 23rd August, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. TILLS, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Barnoldswick, presumed killed in Gallipoli 9th August, 1915.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT. H. WALKER, Australian Corps, son of
the late Mr. W. H. Walker, School-Master, Skipton, killed in action in
the Dardanelles August, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT HARGREAVES, R.A.M.C., of Water
Street, Earby, killed in action in the Dardanelles 7th August, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH JOHNSON, 9th Bn. Lancashire
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Johnson, Sough Bridge, Kelbrook, killed in
action at the “Suvla Bay” landing 7th August, 1915. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. GEORGE BRADLEY, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Bradley, Upper Settle, died of wounds 9th Sept.,
1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER H. EVANS, Australian Artillery, formerly
of Long Preston, died of fever at Alexandria, September, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. FAULKNER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
brother of Miss H. Faulkner, Bridge Street, Silsden, killed in action
7th September, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR HARGREAVES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., formerly of Cowling, killed in action September, 1915.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL J. W. HAYGARTH, London Regt.,
son of Mr. Robert Haygarth, Dent, killed in action 25th Sept., 1915.
Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN W. M. JOWETT, New Zealand Exp. Force,
son of Mr. & Mrs. F. Jowett, Belmont Bridge, Skipton, died of wounds
17th Sept. 1915. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Earby, killed in action in Gallipoli 28th September, 1915. Aged 24
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of Farnhill, killed in action 19th September, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WEYMES, Loyal North Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mr. G. W. R. Weymes, Gisburn, died of wounds 17th September,
1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT BURROWS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Burrows, 3, Brook Street, Earby, died of wounds Sept.,
1915. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER B. HAYGARTH, R.F.A., of Dent, killed in
action 25th September, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. G. BANCROFT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Bancroft, Bridge Terrace, Sutton, killed in action 23rd
October, 1915. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. BAILEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
West Marton, died of dysentery at Malta, 23rd October, 1915. Aged 29
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. A. BRAYSHAY, West Yorks., of
Bradley, died in hospital 20th October, 1915. Aged 16 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ROMILLE HARKER, King’s Liverpool
Regt., son of the late Rev. B. J. Harker, Grassington, killed in action
October, 1915. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL CHRISTOPHER T. JENKINSON, York. and
Lancs. Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. George Jenkinson, Black Horse Hotel,
Giggleswick, killed in action October, 1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. E. SMITH, East Lancs. Regt., of
Back Water Street, Skipton, killed in action in the Dardanelles 21st
October, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM ROBSON, Scots Guards Regt., son of
Mrs. Robson, 20, Elmsley Street, Steeton, died of wounds 7th October,
1915. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES SCHOFIELD, Northumberland
Fusiliers, late of Ingleton, killed in action Oct., 1915.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL NOEL BENNETT, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Bennett, Station House, Sedbergh, killed in
action 19th November, 1915. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CYRIL CALVERT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Calvert, 24, Russell Street, Skipton, killed in
action November, 1915. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR GREENBANK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. John Greenbank, Stainforth, killed in action 6th
November, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY GILLIBRAND, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Earby, killed in action 23rd Nov., 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD HENRY OLDFIELD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. J. Oldfield, Castle View Terrace, Skipton, died of
wounds 7th November, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT TUNE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. William Tune, 2, York Street, Skipton, killed in action 5th
November, 1915. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL J. W. KILBURN, Gloucester Regt.,
of Bell Hill, Giggleswick, killed in action 24th November, 1915.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL FRANK BULLOCK, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Settle, died of wounds December, 1915. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BAXTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Salterforth, killed in action December, 1915.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL CLARENCE CRYER, East Lancs.
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. John Cryer, Sunny Bank, Earby, killed in
action in Gallipoli 18th December, 1915. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PRINCE DAWSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Dawson, High Street, Steeton, died of gas poisoning
19th December, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE C. FENNERTY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Skipton, died of wounds December, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM FITZSIMMONS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Fitzsimmons, Station View, Steeton, killed in action
3rd December, 1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED P. FURNESS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Furness, 28, Brougham Street, Skipton, died from
gas poisoning 19th December, 1915. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED GALLAGHER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. E. A. Gallagher, Sheep Street, Skipton, killed in action
19th December, 1915. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN HILLARY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
grandson of the late Mrs. Hillary, 26, Sackville Street, Skipton, died
of gas poisoning 21st December, 1915. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NELSON HOLMES, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Timothy Holmes, 67, Aire View, Silsden, killed in action
14th December, 1915. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT W. H. MAIR, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. A. Mair and Mrs. Hird, 3, Upper Sackville Street,
Skipton, died of wounds 22nd December, 1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT G. PHILLIP, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. G. W. Phillip, Skipton, killed in action December, 1915. Aged 20
years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL NORMAN RILEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Walter Riley, 14, Walton St., Sutton, died of wounds 21st
December, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN RAW, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
Mr. J. Raw, Millholme, Embsay, killed in action 27th December, 1915.
Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT READ, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. William Read, 32, Tufton Street, Silsden, died of wounds
19th December, 1915. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DAVID RUSSELL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Russell, 38, Clitheroe Street, Skipton, killed in
action December 1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. H. TAYLOR, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Nook Cottage, Long Preston, killed in action 4th December, 1915. Aged
19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CYRIL TOMLINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Ingleton, killed in action 17th Dec., 1915. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MAURICE SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. J. H. Smith, Skipton, killed in action 20th December, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WEST, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Langcliffe, Settle, killed in action December, 1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN W. WILLAN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Willan, Otley Street, Skipton, died from
gas poisoning 19th December, 1915. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD WILKINSON, West Yorks. Regt., of
Sutton, killed in action December, 1915.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED ELLISON, King’s Royal Rifles, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Ellison, Elmsley Street, Steeton, killed in action 22nd
January, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL GEORGE NAYLOR, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Gargrave, died in hospital 7th January, 1916. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR SWINDLEHURST, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. E. Swindlehurst, Airedale Terrace, Skipton,
killed in action 11th January, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM THOMPSON, K.O.S.B., of
Bolton-by-Bowland, killed in action January, 1916.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN COCKERILL, Canadian Corps, son
of the Rev. J. W. Cockerill, Kettlewell, died of wounds 20th February,
1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY IREDALE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Iredale, Colne Road, Earby, killed in action 8th February,
1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER REGGE V. KILLEEN, Dragoon Guards, son
of Inspector Killeen, late of Bolton-by-Bowland, killed in action
February, 1916. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EWART MYERS, New Zealand Corps., son of
Mr. Dan Myers, Elmsley Street, Steeton, reported killed at Gallipoli
February 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN TWEEDY, Coldstream Guards, of
Barnoldswick, officially reported killed February, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MAURACE R. BOLTON, Canadian Infantry,
son of Mr. William Bolton, Town Head Cottages, Low Bentham, killed in
action 8th March, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER LUKE ELLISON, Scottish Horse, son of
Mr. Walter Ellison, Ermysted Street, Skipton, died in training at
Aldershot 26th March, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ARTHUR HALE, Royal Berks. Regt., son
of Mr. S. P. Hale, 25, Pendle Street, Skipton, killed in action 31st
March, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. LEACH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Addingham, died of wounds 2nd March, 1916. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL CHARLES RUSSELL, West Yorks.
Regt., son of Mr. E. H. Russell, Station Master, Hellifield, killed in
action March, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT GEORGE SANDERSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Sanderson, Croft Head Terrace, Glusburn, killed in
action 2nd March, 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BEN TOWNSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Addingham, killed in action 2nd March, 1916. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CPL. H. MARSDEN WALTON, Coldstream
Guards, son of Mr. Charles Walton, Settle, presumed dead March, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JEROME BARRETT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Skipton, killed in action 26th April, 1916. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ERNEST BROWN, Cheshire Regt., of
Barnoldswick, killed in action 6th April, 1916. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALFRED BALDWIN, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mrs. Baldwin, 3, Bessie Street, Barnoldswick, officially presumed
killed in Mesopotamia 9th April, 1916. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR HUDSON, Canadian Corps, son of
the late Mr. Marmaduke Hudson, Brook St., Skipton, killed in action
April, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. HAWKINS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Broughton Road, Skipton, died of wounds 25th April, 1916. Aged 34
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT HEAPS, East Lancs. Regt., of 86,
Rainhall Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action with Indian Exp. Force
19th April, 1916. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH R. LORD, King’s Own Royal Lancs.
Regt., son of Mrs. Lord, 66, Reedley Avenue, Nelson, and a native of
Settle, presumed dead, April, 1916.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL CHARLES WILLIAM LUFF, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Gargrave, killed in action 26th April, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN LANG, Seaforth Highlanders, of
55, Red Lion Street, Earby, killed in action in the Persian Gulf 20th
April, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE LEATT, South African Corps, son
of Mr. George Leatt, Pendle Street, Skipton, died of Fever in South
Africa 28th April, 1916. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS LEATT, Berks. Regt., son of Mr.
& Mrs. George Leatt, Pendle Street, Skipton, killed in action April,
1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DENNIS J. NIXON, Dorset Regt., of King
St., Barnoldswick, killed in action in Mesopotamia 22nd April, 1916.
Aged 39 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAM NAYLOR, Indian Exp. Force, son of
Mr. George Naylor, formerly of Gargrave, killed in action with the
relief force to Kut, April, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. PICKOVER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Shuttleworth Street, Earby, killed in action April, 1916.]

[Illustration: REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR JOHN PARKER, D.C.M.,
Manchester Regt., son of the late Mr. James Parker, Ribble Terrace,
Settle, died at Farnborough April, 1916. Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK THOMPSON, York & Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Richmond Thompson, Harding House, Crosshills, died as
the result of a motor car accident in France 10th April, 1916.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN HARRY THORNTON, King’s Royal Rifles,
of Barnoldswick, died of wounds 30th April, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED FISHER, Duke of Well’s Regt., son
of Mr. T. Fisher, 20, Bolton Road. Addingham, died of wounds 5th May,
1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN FREDERICK RYDER, King’s Royal Rifles,
formerly of Addingham, presumed killed May, 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS W. SHUTTLEWORTH, West Yorks.
Regt., of Crosshills, killed in action 2nd May, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES WALSH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Thomas Walsh, 77, Colne Road, Earby, killed in action May,
1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. BELL, Canadian Exp. Force, son of
Mr. Thomas Bell, Castle Hill, Settle, killed in action 14th June, 1916.]

[Illustration: FIRST CLASS P.O. FRANK COLLINS, H.M.S.
“_Indefatigable_,” of Crosshills, killed in action in the Battle of
Jutland, 1st June, 1916.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN GEORGE EARNSHAW, H.M.S. “_Defence_,” son
of Mr. Tom Earnshaw, Church Street, Carleton, killed in action in the
Jutland battle 1st June, 1916. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT KAYLEY EARNSHAW, D.C.M., West Yorks.
Regt., of Scosthrop, Airton, killed in action June, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES EVANS, Seaforth Highlanders,
of Austwick, accidentally drowned in the Persian Gulf 29th June, 1916.
Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SMITH HARDACRE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Crosshills, killed in action 13th June, 1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ERNEST HOYLES, Canadian Highlanders,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hoyles, 14, Montgomery Street, Skipton, killed in
action June, 1916. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL C. H. HOPWOOD, Canadian Division, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Hopwood, L. & Y. Terrace, Hellifield, killed in action
3rd June, 1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN NICHOLAS HARRISON, King’s Royal
Rifles, son of Mr. Nicholas Harrison, Rathmell, Settle, killed in
action 19th June, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. D. KNIGHT, Australian Infantry, of
Skipton, killed in action June, 1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE CORPORAL ALBERT LISTER, Canadian Corps,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Lister, Low Bentham, killed in action 3rd June,
1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE L. PARKER, Canadian Exp. Force, brother
of Mr. James Parker, Ives Scarr, Ingleton, killed in action 7th June,
1916. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY R. TOFT, Royal Fusiliers, son of
the late Reverend J. Toft, formerly of Skipton, killed in action 7th
June, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN YOUNG, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of the late Mr. John Young, Burton-in-Lonsdale, died at Clipstone Camp,
30th June, 1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL E. C. BRIGGS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Regt. Quartermaster Sergt. Briggs, 22, Ermysted Street, Skipton,
killed in action July, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BURGESS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Burgess, 18, George Street, Skipton, killed in action
3rd July, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY BIRCH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Burnsall, died of wounds 7th July, 1916.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN BALDWIN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. William Baldwin, 93, Bolton Road, Silsden, killed
in action 7th July, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED BENSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. William Benson, 199, Crag View, Cowling, killed in action 11th
July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE F. BALDWIN, Canadian Exped. Force, son
of Mr. & Mrs. D. Baldwin, formerly of Settle, killed in action July,
1916.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT WILFRED BLACKBURN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of West Hall Farm, Addingham, killed in action July, 1916. Aged
23 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JOHN BENTHAM, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mrs. J. Bentham, 52, Esk Lane, Barnoldswick, died 30th July, 1916.
Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE A. W. BAILEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Otterburn, Bell Busk, killed in action 29th July, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES BANKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of the late Mr. W. Banks, Burtersett, Hawes, died of wounds 26th July,
1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BOOCOCK, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 15, Montrose Terrace, Barnoldswick, officially presumed killed 7th
July, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ERNEST COWGILL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. T. Cowgill, Primrose Hill, Skipton, killed in action 25th
July, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH CLAPHAM, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mrs. B. A. Clapham, Craven Heifer Inn, Ingleton, killed in action
7th July, 1916. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS B. CARTMAN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Rishworth, Moorside Farm, Silsden, died of wounds
12th July, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY CRANE, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. James Crane, 49, Rainhall Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action
25th July, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE S. CROSS, Royal Fusiliers, of Clapham,
killed in action 7th July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MAURICE ROBINSON CROWTHER, Leeds Pals
Regt., son of Mr. John Crowther, Ridley House, Grassington, officially
reported killed in action 1st July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT CLARKE, West Yorks. Regt. son
of Mr. Clarke, Kirkgate, Settle, officially presumed killed 14th July,
1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PARRINGTON DIXON, Prince of Wales
Yorks. Regt., only son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Dixon, Gawthrop, Dent, presumed
killed in action 1st July, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BRUCE DAVIDSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. Joseph Davidson, Dent, died of wounds 14th July,
1916, Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. ELLERSHAW, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Lord, Nelson, formerly of Settle, killed in action 7th
July, 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL T. F. ELLIS, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, of
63, Keighley Road, Cowling, killed in action 20th July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. EARNSHAW, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mrs. Earnshaw, Airton, Kirkby Malham, killed in action 1st July,
1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN EASTHAM, Yorks. Regt., of
Horton-in-Ribblesdale, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN EASTWOOD, East Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Eastwood, 1, Emanuel Street, Skipton, killed in action
15th July, 1916. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM FRANCIS, West Yorks. Regt., of
Barnoldswick, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: COY. SERGT.-MAJOR FRED GREEN, D.C.M., Duke of
Well.’s Regt., son of Mr. John Green, 13, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action July, 1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN GILL, West Yorks. Regt., of 4,
Highfield Lane, Silsden, killed in action 1st July, 1916. Aged 25
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY GREENWOOD, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr.
W. H. Greenwood, 94, Keighley Road, Skipton, killed in action July,
1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM GOODWIN, K.O.S.B., son of Mr. T.
Goodwin, Horton-in-Ribblesdale, killed in action 8th July, 1916. Aged
18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. GARNETT, Scottish Rifles, son of
Mr. Amos Garnett, Chapel Street, Carleton, killed in action 25th July,
1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN E. T. GORNALL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. John Gornall, Gisburne, died in France 29th July,
1916.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN HAROLD HARGREAVES, King’s Liverpool
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Harry Hargreaves, 5, Denton Street,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 2nd July, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HORACE HILLARY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. W. D. Hillary, Prospect Place, Skipton, died of wounds 13th
July, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT HARPER, Trench Mortar Battery,
son of the late Mr. Thomas Harper, 24, St. John Street, Silsden, killed
in action 1st July, 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY HUSTWICK, West. Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. J. Hustwick, Broughton, near Skipton, killed in action July,
1916. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN HENRY HOLDEN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., nephew of Mr. & Mrs. W. Holden, 19, Lower North Avenue,
Barnoldswick, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR HINDLE, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mrs. Hindle, Newmarket Street, Skipton, killed in action 14th
July, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH HALES, West. Yorks. Regt., of
Steeton, officially reported killed 14th July, 1916. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL W. N. ILLINGWORTH, Canadian Corps, son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Illingworth, Upper Sackville Street, Skipton, died
of wounds July, 1916.]

[Illustration: LANCE CORPORAL J. JACKSON, King’s Own Lancs.
Regt., son of Mr. Matthew Jackson, Bentham, killed in action 4th July,
1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. A. HODGSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Railway View, Ingleton, killed in action 6th July, 1916. Aged 20
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES H. JONES, Lancs. Fusiliers, son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. Jones, Goschen Street, Skipton, died of wounds July,
1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY JEEVES, Royal Warwicks Regt., of
Hawes, killed in action 23rd July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE A. P. HALLOWS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Barnoldswick, died of wounds 30th July, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES KETTLEWELL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Kettlewell, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in action
28th July, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN T. LIMMER, Yorks. Regt., of
Grassington, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ALBERT LEACH, R.F.A., son of Mr. and
Mrs. Leach, Hawes, killed in action July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. K. LEIGH, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mrs. Leigh, 8, Ashgrove, Barnoldswick, killed in action 28th July,
1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. H. LEEMING, Cheshire Regt., son of
the late Mr. Richard Leeming, Huntworth Farm, Giggleswick, killed in
action 28th July, 1916.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL J. E. LEIGHTON, Border Regt., of
Sedbergh, killed in action 14th July, 1916. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM MOORE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 11, Brook Street, Earby, killed in action 7th July, 1916. Aged 39
years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL A. METCALFE, Durham Light
Infantry, son of the late Mr. Stephen Metcalfe, Carleton, killed in
action 27th July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of 5, Prospect Place, Skipton, officially reported killed
July, 1916.]

[Illustration: DRIVER WILLIAM ROBINSON, R.F.A., son of the
late Mr. Robert Robinson, West Lane Farm, Downham, killed in action
July, 1916. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DENNIS PECK, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. John Peck, 20, Arthur Street, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 24th
July, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS RIGBY, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. Thomas Rigby, Lawson’s House Farm, Sawley, died of wounds 21st
July, 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HEDLEY RICHARDSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Richardson, formerly of Addingham, killed in action
July, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ERNEST RICHARDSON, King’s
Own Yorks. Light Infantry, son of Mrs. John Slinger, Albion House,
Ingleton, killed in action 1st July, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PETER SWALE, East Lancs. Regt., son of
Mrs. Swale, 32, East Hill Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 1st
July, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT FRED STORK, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. Frank Stork, 11, Russell Street, Skipton, killed in action 25th
July, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HUGH STRICKLAND, Royal Warwick Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh Strickland, High Street, Burton-in-Lonsdale,
killed in action 30th July, 1916.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT W. D. STOCKDALE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. R. Stockdale, Thornton-in-Craven, killed in
action 29th July, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY TAYLOR, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Duckett Taylor, Streaker Farm, Bentham, killed in action 5th
July, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES TOWNSEND, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Townsend, Southfield Terrace, Addingham, killed in action
3rd July, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ANTHONY THOMPSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. J. Thompson, Holme Farm, Halton West, killed in
action 7th July, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CLIFFORD G. UNWIN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. Samuel Unwin, formerly of Skipton, died of wounds
July, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES M. VARLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 19, Bennett Street, Skipton, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 30
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS S. WIGGLESWORTH, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. J. T. Wigglesworth, 1, South View Terrace,
Silsden, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST T. WOOFE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. T. Woofe, Settle, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 32
years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER G. A. WILSON, R.E., son of Mrs. Wilson,
4, Duckett Street, Skipton, died of wounds 19th July, 1916. Aged 35
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CLARENCE WILSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson, Ashgrove, Steeton, died of wounds 6th
July, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH C. BATEMAN, Border Regt., of
Settlebeck, Sedbergh, killed in action 1st July, 1916.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL J. L. WOODHOUSE, King’s Own
Regt., of Dent, killed in action 30th July, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN ROBINSON, West Yorks. Regt.,
formerly of Hen Houses, Gisburne, died at Folkestone. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. E. SEDDON, Border Regt., son of Mr.
J. B. Seddon, Mount Pleasant, Sedbergh, killed in action 1st July,
1916.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER JOHN BRUCE DAVIDSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Laneing, Dent, died of wounds at Rouen, 15th July, 1916. Aged
20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE BAILEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. T. Bailey, Addingham, died of wounds August, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MILES CAPSTICK, Border Regt., of
Howgill, Sedbergh, died of wounds 5th August, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWIN STOREY, South Wales Borderers, of
Sedbergh, accidentally drowned in Mesopotamia 31st July, 1916. Aged 21
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES BARKER, Somerset Light Infantry,
son of Mr. Mrs. Barker, 30, Beech Street, Barnoldswick, officially
presumed killed 18th August, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. CORK, K.O.L. Scottish, son of Mr. F.
Cork, Skipton, presumed dead 16th August 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM NELSON, King’s Liverpool Regt.,
of Rose Cottage, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in action 9th August, 1916.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ROWLAND HILL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Joseph Hill, 32, South View Terrace, Silsden, killed in
action 9th August, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES DOVE, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mrs. Dove, High Street, Steeton, killed in action 4th August,
1916.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN CLAUD HURST, King’s Royal Rifles, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Hurst, Water Street, Skipton, killed in action 8th
August, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER JOHN NIXON, Royal Engineers, of 19,
George Street, Skipton, died of wounds 26th August, 1916. Aged 26
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM MARKLEW, King’s Own Regt., son
of Mr. Able Marklew, Oakroyd, Ingleton, died of wounds August, 1916.
Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN NELSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Richard Nelson, Low Fold, Steeton, killed in action 29th
August, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH OVERSBY, King’s Own Regt., son
of Mrs. Elizabeth Oversby, Hall Bank, Dent, killed in action 16th
August, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. WALKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
East View, Barnoldswick, killed in action 14th August, 1916. Aged 21
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. ROBSON, Australian Exp. Force, son
of Mrs. E. Robson, Elmsley Street, Steeton, died of wounds August,
1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN W. STEWARD RIGBY, King’s Liverpool
Regt., son of Mr. J. Rigby, 40, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 11th August, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE D. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Job Smith, 71, Water Street, Earby, died of wounds 18th
August, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL FRED TAYLOR, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
nephew of Mrs. Maurice Sugden, Elliott Street, Silsden, accidentally
killed in France 29th August, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WIDDUP, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Widdup, 118, Keighley Road, Skipton, killed in action 2nd
August, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL T. W. WALKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
nephew of Mrs. Urquhart, 5, Garden Terrace, Carleton, killed in action
10th August, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE BOND, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. George Thomas Bond, Rodger’s Yard, Skipton, killed in
action 3rd September, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER GEORGE BUTT, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Butt, Mason Street, Long Preston, killed in action 7th September, 1916.
Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE F. A. BARNES, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Barnes, 14, George Street, Coates, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 3rd September, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BIRKETT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Birkett, 24, Greenfield Street, Skipton, killed in
action 16th Sept., 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL LEWIS BINNS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Green Lane, Glusburn, killed in action 15th September, 1916.
Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT BINNS, West Yorks. Regt., of
Hartley Street, Glusburn, died of wounds September, 1916. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRISON MILTON BAILEY, London Regt.,
son of the late Mr. Christopher Bailey, Skipton, died of wounds 25th
September, 1916.]

[Illustration: GUNNER THOMAS M. BIRTLE, R.F.A., son of Mr.
& Mrs. Richard Birtle, Brookhouse Farm, Stainforth, Settle, died in
Salonika 28th Sept., 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE BLAND, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Main Street, Crosshills, killed in action 29th September, 1916. Aged 28
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FREDERICK WILLIAM BELL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Bell, Chapel Street, Addingham, officially
presumed killed in action 3rd September, 1916.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL A. E. BROADHEAD, K.O.Y.L.I., son
of Mr. & Mrs. E. Broadhead, Daisy Hill, Silsden, officially presumed
killed 25th Sept., 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ROBERT CORLESS, Canadian Field
Artillery, of Victoria Terrace, Hellifield, died of wounds 27th
September, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WENNIS BROWN CLARKE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. J. W. Clarke, 60, Water Street, Earby, killed in
action 30th Sept., 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WRIGHT COCKSHOTT, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Cockshott, Keighley Road, Steeton, presumed
killed in action 3rd September, 1916. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY CLEMENT, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr.
& Mrs. J. Clement, Guldrey Terrace, Sedbergh, killed in action 22nd
September, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL G. H. EASTWOOD, Coldstream Guards,
son of Mr. & Mrs. A. Eastwood, Sussex Street, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 15th September, 1916. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. H. FAWCETT, Royal Scots Fusiliers,
son of Mrs. Fawcett, Sutton, formerly of Skipton, officially reported
killed September, 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT J. W. GLUE, R.F.A., of Silsden, died
of wounds September, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. HEWITT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Hewitt, 189, Keighley Road, Cowling, killed in action
September, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT HUDSON, K.R.R., of 32, Melbourne
Mount, Barnoldswick, officially reported killed in action 15th
September, 1916. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ERNEST JACKSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Jackson, Rockwood Lodge, Skipton, killed in action
14th September, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE A. T. LUTY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. W. Luty, Skipton, officially reported killed 16th
September, 1916.]

[Illustration: GUNNER J. E. LAMBERT, R.F.A., son of the late
Mr. John Lambert, Salford, formerly of Threshfield, killed in action
25th September, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN GARNETT LONGBOTTOM, King’s Royal
Rifles, son of Mr. & Mrs. Cyrus Longbottom, 33, South View Terrace,
Silsden, killed in action 15th September, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CARL S. MOULDING, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Moulding, School House, Lazenby, killed in
action September, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY MOORHOUSE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. H. Moorhouse, Rostle Top Road, Earby, killed in action 3rd
September, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL T. MONK, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Monk, Chapel House, Langcliffe, Settle, killed in action
15th September, 1916. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JAMES METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Sylvester Metcalfe, Paradise Row, Ingleton, died of
wounds 3rd September, 1916.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN JAMES HENRY MILNER, King’s Royal
Rifles, son of the late Mr. T. Milner, Hawes Junction, killed in action
15th September, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY MILLER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Miller, Carleton, killed in action 18th September,
1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL T. R. PARKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Parker, 17, Devonshire Terrace, Skipton, killed
in action 2nd September, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN ROBIN C. PEFFER, City of London
Rifles, son of the late Sergt.-Major Peffer, late of the Duke of
Well.’s Regt., Skipton, killed in action 15th September, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. ROBINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Robinson, Back Gate, Ingleton, killed in action 3rd
September, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT A. F. RYDER, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. &
Mrs. T. B. Ryder, Brougham Street, Skipton, officially reported killed
15th Sept., 1916. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALVIN SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. Edmund Smith, Burlington Farm, Lothersdale, killed in action
17th September, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EZRA STEPHENSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of High Bentham, officially presumed killed September, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR SMALES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Smales, Ribble Bank, Langcliffe, Settle,
officially reported killed 3rd September, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN TURNBULL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Turnbull, Oughtershaw, Buckden, killed in action
3rd September, 1916.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT G. SCHOLEY, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of Ingleton, killed in action 3rd September, 1916.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN HARRY TINDALL, King’s Royal Rifles,
son of Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Tindall, 20, Standroyd Road, Colne, formerly of
Skipton, killed in action 15th September, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER C. P. TOWNSON, Royal Field Artillery,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Townson, 45, Castle Street, Skipton, died of
wounds September, 1916. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MATTHEW TOWERS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Towers, Campbell Street, Crosshills, officially
presumed killed 3rd September, 1916.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL TOM WALTON, Yorks. Regt., of Hawes,
killed in action 14th September, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES A. WHITTAKER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 59, Brougham Street, Skipton, killed in action 16th
September, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH WALKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. D. Walker, Hewitt House, Long Preston, killed in
action 25th September, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. F. M. WATTS, Canadian Exp. Force,
son of Dr. Watts, Giggleswick School, officially reported killed 26th
September, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEOFFREY W. WEST, West Yorks. Regt.,
brother of Mr. John West, Elm Tree Square, Embsay, killed in action 3rd
September, 1916. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD WILLIAMS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Lister, 24, Butts, Barnoldswick, officially presumed killed
in action 3rd September, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CLIFFORD WHITEOAK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Whiteoak, North View, Cononley, officially presumed
killed 3rd Sept., 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED BRUNSKILL, London Regt., of
Dent, presumed killed May 3rd, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY WHARTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. M. Wharton, 8, George Street, Earby, officially
presumed killed 3rd September, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MILES HARPER, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. John Harper Garsdale, Sedbergh, reported missing 3rd September,
1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM J. AIREY, Canadian Corps,
son-in-law of Mr. H. Walker, Rathmell, Settle, died of wounds 14th
October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT WILLIAM BELL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. Joseph Bell, Settle, killed in action 5th October,
1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLIE BRANSTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Branston, 27, Brook Street, Skipton, killed in
action 12th October, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL EDWARD WALTON BRISCOE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of the late Mr. Edward Briscoe, Bentham, reported killed in
action October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN HENRY BANKS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 21, Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 12th
October, 1916. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH BURKE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Burke, 15, Bold Venture Street, Skipton, killed in action
12th October, 1916. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SMITH BAILEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. R. Bailey, 11, Alder Street, Earby, presumed killed
in the Dardanelles October, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER FRED T. BUSHBY, Royal Engineers, son of
Mrs. Bushby, Motar Pits, Sedbergh, died in hospital 22nd October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANCIS CROSSLEY, West Yorks. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Crossley, 15, Denton Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 25th October, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NATHIAS DOVE, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mrs. Dove, High Street, Steeton, killed in action 4th October,
1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LANCELOT DOWBIGGIN, Royal Fusiliers,
son of Mr. Lawrence Dowbiggin, Summer Hill, Bentham, reported killed
7th October, 1916. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE OSCAR DAWSON, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Dawson, 5, Albion Road, Earby, killed in action 23rd
October, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN HARTLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
only son of Mr. & Mrs. Watson Hartley, Sunny Mount, Cowling, killed in
action 4th October, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN THOMAS HEYWOOD, Lancashire
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. R. Heywood, Greenland Villas, Earby,
killed in action 12th October, 1916. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM E. LAYCOCK, South Wales
Borderers Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Laycock, Winterburn Street,
Keighley, killed in action 1st October, 1916. Aged 26 years (Formerly
on the reporting staff of the “Craven Herald.”)]

[Illustration: CORPORAL GEORGE EDWARD HIRST, K.O.Y.L.I.,
son-in-law of Mr. Morton, Sewerage Farm, Earby, killed in action
October, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. H. MAWSON, Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Mawson, Valley View House, Bradley, died of wounds
October, 1916. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT HENRY L. MASON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Mason, Main Street, Sedbergh, killed in
action 18th October, 1916. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED R. OATES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Oates, 46, Victoria Road, Earby, killed
in action 4th October, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES MOLES, West Yorks. Regt., of Mill
Brow, Earby, reported killed 13th October, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH PRESTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Hellifield, killed in action October, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SYLVESTER PETTY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Sutton, killed in action 7th October, 1916. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. A. PLUMBLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. H. Plumbley, 9, Powell St., Barnoldswick, reported
killed 12th October, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN T. B. PEEL, King’s Royal Rifles, son
of Mr. & Mrs. R. Peel, 24, Upper Sackville Street, Skipton, killed in
action 7th October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DAVID RUSSELL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Albert Street, Skipton, died of wounds 14th October, 1916. Aged 28
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHRISTOPHER RALPH, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of the late Mr. John Ralph, Main Road, Hellifield, killed in
action 6th October, 1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED STOCKDALE, M.M., Canadian
Infantry, son of the late Mr. W. Stockdale, Austwick, killed in action
15th October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN E. SMITH, West Yorks. Regt., of
14, Back Water Street, Skipton, died of wounds 7th October, 1916. Aged
26 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL FRANK SAGAR, East Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Sagar, Ribblesdale Terrace, Barnoldswick, died of
wounds 17th October, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EMMOTT SNOWDEN, Canadian Corps, of
Cowling, killed in action October, 1916. Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN LEWIS SEDGWICK, King’s Royal Rifles,
of 41, Neville Street, Skipton, officially reported killed 16th
October, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RUFUS THOMPSON, R.F.A., of 72, Park
Road, Barnoldswick, died at Woolwich, October, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HARRY SEDGWICK, Indian Exp. Force,
son of the late Mr. William Sedgwick, Skipton, died of dysentery 7th
October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. J. STANDING, West Yorks. Regt.,
second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Standing, Butts Top, Barnoldswick,
officially presumed killed 26th October, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. WAGGITT, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. J. J. Waggitt, Addingham, killed in action October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR WHITAKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Whitaker, Brookland Terrace, Grassington, killed in
action 4th October, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT W. TOBIN, Royal Engineers, son-in-law
of Mrs. Bateson, Ivy Cottage, Bentham, killed in action 12th October,
1916.]

[Illustration: QUARTER-MASTER-SERGEANT BERTIE WALLBANK, New
Zealand Corps, eldest son of Mrs. Wallbank, 19, John Street, Earby,
killed in action October, 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL THOMAS WILCOCK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of the late Mr. James Wilcock, Wenning Bridge, Bentham,
killed in action 23rd October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY WILSON, Highland Light Infantry,
of Howgill, Sedbergh, died at Basra, Persian Gulf, 10th October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HUBERT WOOD, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Wood, Grassington, killed in action October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY HODGSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hodgson, Tosside, Long Preston, died of wounds 13th
October, 1916. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL TOM ALLSOPP, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Allsopp, Beech Street, Crosshills, killed in action
November, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERTIE JAMES ADAMS, East Lanes. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Adams, Main Street, Kelbrook, reported killed
in action 14th Nov., 1916. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BELL, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Joseph Bell, 12, Denton Street, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 3rd
November, 1916. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BENTHAM, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Nun House, Dent, presumed killed 12th October, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SYDNEY E. CARTER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Carter, 16, Raikes Road, Skipton, died of
wounds 17th Nov. 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM E. HOLMES, King’s Own Yorks.
Light Infantry, of Buckden, died of wounds, 16th November, 1916. Aged
18 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JOSEPH GREEN, Royal Engineers, son
of Mr. Charles Green, Starkey Lane, Farnhill, died in France 13th
November, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. H. HOOSON, North Staffs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Hooson, 54, Broughton Road, Skipton, presumed killed in
action 18th Nov., 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FREDERICK JACKSON, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 49, Red Lion Street, Earby, officially presumed killed
November, 1916. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERNARD LOCKER, East Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. H. Locker, 27, Elliott Street, Silsden, presumed killed
7th November, 1916. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER KING, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mr. Albert King, Tubber Hill, Barnoldswick, officially presumed
killed 23rd November, 1916. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS MCNAMARA, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. McNamara, 13, Lincoln Road, Earby, died at Clipstone
Camp 8th November, 1916. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL SIMON MOORE, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
William Moore, Appersett, Hawes, killed in action 5th November, 1916.
Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SERGT.-MAJOR SAMUEL WORMWELL, Australian Corps,
son of the late Mr. James Wormwell, Kelbrook, killed in action 5th
November, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR PULLEN, West Yorks. Regt., of
Sutton, killed in action November, 1916. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER W. H. SUTCLIFFE, Trench Mortar Battery,
son of Mrs. Lorimer Sutcliffe, 13, Crag View, Silsden, killed in action
17th November, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN JAMES SMITH, Royal Irish Rifles,
formerly of Kelbrook, killed in action 25th November, 1916. Aged 32
years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN E. WILSON, King’s Royal
Rifles, son of Mrs. J. Wilson, 4, Halsteads, Settle, died of wounds 6th
November, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. HORN, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
and Mrs. J. Horn, Burtersett, Hawes, officially presumed dead about
November, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HUBERT WOOD, ⅐th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
second son of Mr. & Mrs. Hubert Wood, of Grassington, killed in action
in France, 14th November, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT BATESON, King’s Own Royal Lancs.
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Bateson, 64, Russell Street, Skipton, died of
wounds 23rd December, 1916. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD CAREY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Alfred Carey, Copy Nook Hotel, Bolton-by-Bowland, killed in
action 27th Dec., 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DANIEL FAULKNER, Royal Irish Rifles,
son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Richard Faulkner, 71, Oakworth Road,
Keighley, and formerly of Silsden, killed in action December, 1916.
Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN FAWCETT, Trench Mortar Battery,
son of the late Mr. Henry Fawcett, Fountain Hotel, Hawes, killed in
action December, 1916. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR LAMBERT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. A. Lambert, 12, Cooper Street, Skipton, killed in
action Dec., 1916. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JAMES H. PRESTON, New Zealand Corps,
son of Mr. Robert Preston, Park House, Gargrave, accidentally killed
27th December, 1916. Aged 55 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. TURNER, Surrey Regt., of 2, Court
Lane, Skipton, killed in action 12th December, 1916.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED THORNTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 8, Commercial Street, Skipton, died of wounds 20th December, 1916.
Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY WALMSLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Seth Walmsley, Hanover Street, Farnhill, died of
wounds 13th December, 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER RICHARD WISEMAN, R.F.A., son of Mrs.
Wiseman, 24, River Place, Gargrave, died in Turkey, 3rd December, 1916.
Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES BANKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Banks, Buckden, killed in action 11th January, 1917. Aged
38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES EDWARD BACON, West Yorks.
Regt., son of the late Sergeant Bacon, Leyburn, died of pneumonia in
France 26th January, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED CHESTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. William Chester, Millhill, Gargrave, killed in action
January, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: BOMBARDIER SAMUEL CAIRNS, R.G.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. James Cairns, Otley Street, Skipton, died of wounds 3rd January,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FREDERICK T. CIRCUS, Durham Light
Infantry, of 17, Wellhouse Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 23rd
January, 1917. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL GEORGE GELLINGS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Gellings, Union Square, Skipton, killed in action
January, 1917. Aged 39 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED HARRISON, Devonshire Regt., of
5, Orchard Street, Barnoldswick, killed in Salonika 2nd January, 1917.
Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR M. HARRISON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. J. W. Harrison, Stoneybank, Earby, killed in action
20th January, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL PHILLIP F. HOLMES, Australian
Exp. Force, son of Mr. & Mrs. F. Holmes, Grassington, killed in action
in Palestine 9th January, 1917.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT THOMAS MOYLE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Edward Moyle, Elmsley Street, Steeton, killed
in action Jan., 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHRISTOPHER NEWSHOLME, R.A.M.C., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Allan Newsholme, Laurel Cottage, Ingleton, died of
appendicitis at Woking Hospital, Surrey 6th January, 1917. Aged 26
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM PARKER, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. Stephen Parker, East View, Barnoldswick, died from heart
failure in France 28th January, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL HERBERT PARK, Highland Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Park, Folly, Sedbergh, drowned at sea 1st January,
1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER THOMAS STOREY, Royal Engineers, son of
the late Mr. & Mrs. Robert Storey, 8, Chancery Lane, Skipton, died of
pneumonia at Clipstone Camp 4th January, 1917. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE SCORAH BELLAS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. George Bellas, 53, High Street, Skipton,
killed in action 12th February, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR BRADLEY, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. Edward Bradley, Old Hall Gardens, Gargrave, killed in action
26th Feb., 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT CARTER, Royal Fusiliers,
youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Carter, Oysterber Cottage, Low
Bentham, killed in action 17th February, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MICHAEL CURTIS, Royal Marines, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Curtis, L. & Y. Terrace, Hellifield, killed in action 17th
February, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN WALTER DAWSON, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.
Dawson, Farnhill, died of wounds 4th February, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BURTON, South Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. R. Burton, New Street, Sedbergh, presumed killed 7th February,
1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES E. HOLDSWORTH, Durham Light
Infantry, son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Henry Holdsworth, Chapel Street,
Silsden, died in Keighley Hospital 10th February, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALFRED HARPER, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
& Mrs. E. Harper, Carleton House, Barnoldswick, killed in action 10th
February, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAM LAKEN, Border Regt., of Millthrop,
Sedbergh, killed in action 11th February, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PETER HODGSON, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of Hill Top Farm, Wennington, died of wounds 17th February,
1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR LEE, Durham Light Infantry,
eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. James Lee, 18, Longroyd Road, Earby, killed in
action 23rd Feb., 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR MITCHELL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 5, Edith Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 27th February, 1917.
Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER J. METCALFE, R.F.A., formerly of Linton,
died of pneumonia in France 27th February, 1917.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN J. W. MOORBY, King’s Royal Rifles, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Moorby, 27, George Street, Skipton, presumed killed 15th
February, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWIN J. PRIESTLEY, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Edmund Priestley, 10, Stoney Bank Road, Earby,
officially reported killed 21st February, 1917. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. H. WILSON, K.O.Y.L.I., of Whitton
Cottage, Ingleton, killed in action 17th Feb., 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT SPENCER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Peter Spencer, 29, Commercial Street, Skipton, died
of an operation in hospital at York 12th February, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD SHORROCK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Shorrock, L. & Y. Terrace, Hellifield, died of
wounds 21st Feb., 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LEONARD THROUP, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Throup, High Fold Farm, High Bradley, killed
in action 20th February, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER W. H. WIGNALL, R.G.A., only son of Mr. &
Mrs. J. Wignall, Mason’s Arms, Ingleton, died in hospital in France 1st
February, 1917. Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DAVID WALLING, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. Francis Walling, 20, Clifford Street,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 11th February, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER STANLEY ANDERSON, Royal Engineers, son
of Mr. Albert Anderson, 10, Riverside Terrace, Earby, believed drowned
in Mesopotamia 9th March, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SHEPHERD ATKINSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of High Street, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in action 4th March,
1917.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN HENRY BROWN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. T. Brown, 42, Main Street, Addingham, killed in
action 13th March, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE B. BAKER, King’s Liverpool Regt., of
49, Longroyd Road, Earby, killed in action 24th March, 1917. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIE COOK, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. H. Cook, 141, Station View, Earby, died in hospital in
France 14th March, 1917. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN DEAN, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mr. & Mrs. A. Dean, Brook Cottage, Earby, died of wounds 7th
March, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR BRUCE, West Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Bruce, 3, Ermysted Street, Skipton, killed in action 25th
March, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM THOMAS DAVIS, West Yorks.
Regt., son of Mrs. Davis, 8, Railway Street, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 7th March, 1917. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. ELLIS, Canadian Corps, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ellis, Old Vicarage, Gisburn, killed in action 26th March,
1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: QUARTER-MASTER BENJAMIN S. GREAVES, R.N., son
of Mrs. Greaves, Skipton, killed in action 17th March, 1917. Aged 20
years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL GEORGE HOYLES, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 37, Duckett Street, Skipton, died of wounds 23rd March, 1917. Aged
34 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ENNIE CLARKE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. H. Clarke, 20, Byron Street, Skipton,
killed in action 1st March, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN IVESON, Coldstream Guards, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Edward Iveson, Gayle, Hawes, died of wounds 19th March,
1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT PICKERING, Royal Scots Regt.,
eldest son of Mr. W. H. Pickering, 13, Clayton Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 19th March, 1917. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN EDWARD PICKUP, D.C.M., Duke of
Well.’s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 29th March, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ELLIS SUTCLIFFE, Loyal North Lancs.
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. A. Sutcliffe, 8, Arthur Street, Barnoldswick,
died of wounds in Palestine 15th March, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY TOWN, A.S.C., son of Mr. Edward
Town, Low Mill Lane, Addingham, died of pneumonia in Netley Hospital
19th March, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM TROUGHTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., only son of Mr. & Mrs. Troughton, East View, Settle, killed in
action 12th March, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LAWRENCE WESTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. James Weston, 28, Gladstone Street, Skipton, killed
in action 12th March, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HERBERT WATSON, R.G.A., son of Mrs.
Watson, Long Preston, died of pneumonia at Birmingham 25th March, 1917.
Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PETER WILSON, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson, Edmondson St., Barnoldswick, killed in
Mesopotamia 7th March, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT WALTON, Somerset Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Walton, Hawes, died of pneumonia on board a
troopship 7th March, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE CORPORAL ARTHUR WATSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Watson, Victoria Terrace, Bradley, killed in action
13th March, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM MILLWARD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
late of Cononley, died of septic poisoning in France, March, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES ANDREWS, Devonshire Regt., of
55, Manchester Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action 2nd April, 1917.
Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR BLADES, West Yorks. Regt., only
son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Blades, Prospect Terrace, Bradley, killed in
action 14th April, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE REUBEN BARNES, East Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. John Barnes, 243, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 11th April, 1917. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN JAMES BROUGHTON. West Yorks.
Regt., son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Broughton, 50, Essex Street,
Barnoldswick, died of wounds 12th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY BROUGHTON, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr.
& Mrs. James Broughton, 9, West Avenue, Barnoldswick, died of asthma
23rd April, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK C. BILLOWS, Devonshire Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Billows, 8, Granville Street, Skipton, officially
presumed killed 24th April, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER ALFRED BRISCOE, Canadian Exped. Force,
son of Mrs. Briscoe, Bridge End Cottages, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in
action 12th April, 1917. Aged 39 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BARRACLOUGH, Royal Scots
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Barraclough, 55, Keighley Road, Skipton,
officially presumed killed in action 11th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL BACKHOUSE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Police-Constable Backhouse, Sandylands, Crosshills,
presumed killed 25th April, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. C. BRADFORD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Model Village, Ingleton, killed in action 25th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT W. G. COLE, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
13, Wellington Street, Skipton, died in hospital in France 20th April,
1917. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HUDSON CLOUGH, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 25, Dawson Street, Skipton, killed in action 23rd April,
1917. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. CHADWICK, King’s Liverpool Regt., of
10, Leonard Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 13th April, 1917.
Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. DIXON, York and Lancs. Regt., of
Horton-in-Ribblesdale, killed in action 21st April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR WILLIAM DUCKWORTH, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., of Riverside Terrace, Earby. officially presumed dead
25th April, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. DENT, Prince of Wales Regt., only
son of Mr. & Mrs. Dent, Cowgill, died of wounds 1st April, 1917. Aged
22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERTIE EDMONDSON, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. Allan Edmondson, 22, Westgate,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 21st April, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD FAWCETT, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of Gargrave, killed in action 28th April, 1917. Aged 28
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROWLAND FISHWICK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. Fishwick, 16, School Terrace, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 10th April, 1917. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL EDWARD GEORGE GRAHAM, West
Yorks. Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Robert Graham, Brook Street,
Hellifield, died of wounds 21st April, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE GREENWOOD, R.F.A., son of Mr.
& Mrs. Robert Greenwood, 17, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick, killed in
action in Mesopotamia 14th April, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. H. GILL, East Yorks. Regt., son of
Mrs. A. Chapman, 67, Victoria Road, Earby, died of wounds 11th April,
1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAWORTH R. GREEN, East Yorks. Regt.,
of 33, Chapel Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 29th April, 1917.
Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES GROVES, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Groves, Nelson, killed in action 23rd April, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL HAROLD HILLARY, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Hillary, Prospect Place, Skipton, died of
pneumonia in France, 9th April, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED HARDING, Canadian Mounted Rifles,
of Midland Street, Broughton Road, Skipton, killed in action 9th April,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED HALL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Hall, 30, Sawley Street, Skipton, died of wounds
16th April, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE F. HARDY, Lancashire Fusiliers, of 20,
Skipton Road, Silsden, died of wounds 28th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR HARGREAVES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Hargreaves, Scots House Farm, Glusburn, died
of wounds 9th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CYRIL HARDCASTLE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. H. Hardcastle, Swartha, Silsden, killed in
action 9th April, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS W. HARDIMAN, K.O.Y.L.I., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Hardiman, Lothersdale, killed in action 9th April, 1917.
Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED HOLMES, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. William Holmes, Addingham, killed in action 27th April,
1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PIONEER S. M. HARTLEY, Labour Corps., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Hartley, Storiths, Bolton Abbey, died of wounds 28th April,
1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT H. HEYES, East Lancs. Regt., of
Bank Street, Barnoldswick, presumed killed 28th April, 1917. Aged 40
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY INGHAM, York. & Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. A. Ingham, 12, Brookside, Skipton, killed in action 9th
April, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. INGLEBY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Ingleby, Halton Gill, died of wounds 13th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN S. MATTOCK, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. J. S. Mattock, Main Street, Bradley, killed in
action 2nd April, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: SERGT.-MAJOR ROBERT MUDD, West Yorks. Regt., of
Askrigg, killed in action 12th April 1917.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN RICHARD MONK, King’s Royal Rifles, son
of Mrs. Monk, Albert Hill, Settle, killed in action 11th April, 1917.
Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN MITTON, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Mitton, Hawes, killed in action 9th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM NORTHY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Clarrick Terrace, Ingleton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Northy, Westhouse,
killed in action 23rd April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HOLGATE NORCROSS, Manchester Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Norcross, 67, Park Road, Barnoldswick, died of
wounds 17th April, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES H. PEEL, K.O.Y.L.I., of 3,
Railway Terrace, Skipton, died of shell shock in France 14th April,
1917. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. POWLEY, R.A.M.C., formerly of Dent,
killed in action 28th April, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NORMAN PHILLIPS, Lincoln Regt., son
of Mrs. Phillips, 22, Hothfield Street, Silsden, officially reported
killed 26th April, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST RAW, Yorks. Hussars, son of Mr.
& Mrs. Tom Raw, 9, Tillotson Street, Silsden, killed in action 11th
April, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. R. RODWELL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Joseph Rodwell, 25, Castle Street, Skipton, killed in
action 22nd April, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER JAMES RILEY, R.E., of 13, Ethel Street,
Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in France 17th April, 1917. Aged 34
years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL THOMAS RENNARD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. William Rennard, Moor End Farm, Langbar, killed in
action 25th April, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. RODGERS, Tyneside Scottish, of
Cononley, presumed killed 9th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GODFREY SEDGWICK, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Sedgwick, Clapham, killed in action, 9th April,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS SANDERSON, Shropshire Light
Infantry, youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. John Sanderson, 13, Butts,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 8th April, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HAROLD SCOTT, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Fred Scott, 10, Castle View Terrace, Skipton, killed in action 30th
April, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. SAUL, East Yorks. Regt., of 8,
Clarrick Terrace, Ingleton, killed in action 9th April, 1917. Aged 22
years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ERNEST SEAL, East Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. James Seal, 17, Havre Park, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 28th April, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. W. SOUTHERN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. H. Southern, Back Lane, Sedbergh, killed in action 11th
April, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK STOTT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Stott, Sough Bridge, Kelbrook, reported missing since 11th
April, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SERGT. R. E. WALKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
late landlord of the Three Horse Shoes Inn, Ingleton, officially
presumed killed April, 1917.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER ELLIS RICHMOND, Canadian Corps, son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. Richmond, Linton Falls, Grassington, killed in action
10th April, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS A. WADDICOR, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. Arthur Waddicor, 17, Rushton Street, Earby, died of
wounds 27th April, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOE WHITHAM, Canadian Corps, son of Mr.
& Mrs. J. Whitham, Wood Cottage, Skipton, killed in action 9th April,
1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY WIGGAN, West Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Wiggan, 16, Brougham Street, Skipton, killed in action
12th April, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES WORMWELL, East Lancs. Regt.,
nephew of Mr. William Wormwell, Struntley Bank, Kelbrook, died of
wounds 25th April, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CAMERON WILSON, Seaforth Highlanders,
son of Mr. Wilson, Steeton, officially presumed killed 11th April,
1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE EDWARD WHITE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. J. White, Low Ground, Elslack, officially
presumed killed 25th April, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SYDNEY G. WILLIAMSON, K.O.Y.L.I., son
of Mrs. Williamson, 42, Skipton Road, Earby, presumed killed 9th April,
1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER GEORGE W. FLETCHER, R.G.A., son of Mr.
& Mrs. B. Fletcher, 32, George Street, Skipton, killed in action 15th
March, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT HEBDEN, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 41, Church Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 2nd
April, 1917. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES LISTER, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
James Lister, 8, Cragg View, Addingham, killed in action 2nd April,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BEN BROTHERTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Brotherton, Bolton-by-Bowland, presumed killed 3rd
May, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAMUEL PINDER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of Holden, Bolton-by-Bowland, presumed killed 3rd May, 1917.
Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: SERGT. CHARLES W. NEWNES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 3, Clock View Street, Keighley, officially presumed killed
3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: AIR MECHANIC ALBERT BRADLEY, R.N.A.S., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Albert Bradley, Carr Farm, Silsden Moor, died of
appendicitis at Plymouth 1st March, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT ASHWORTH, South Staffs. Regt.,
of 24, Water Street, Earby, killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 24
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR BRIDGE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. F. Bridge, 4, Sunny Bank, Carleton, officially
presumed killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BURTON, Durham Light Infantry,
formerly of Silsden, killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN JAMES R. BARNES, Scottish Rifles, of
Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia at Clipstone Camp 1st May, 1917. Aged
38 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ARTHUR HEBDEN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of 30, Bennett Street, Skipton, killed in action 3rd May,
1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD D. WHITTAKER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. E. Whittaker, 28, Devonshire Street, Skipton,
died of wounds, aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER BRANKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Branker, Devonshire Street, Skipton, killed in
action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER PHILLIP BROWN, R.F.A., son of Mr. T.
Brown, 42, Main Street, Addingham, died from burns in France 11th May,
1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL FRANCIS A. BARKER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Francis Barker, 1, Pembroke Street, Skipton,
killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WILLIAM BALDWIN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., formerly of Chapel Lane, Silsden, died of wounds 28th May, 1917.
Aged 44 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS BALDWIN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Frank Baldwin, Harewood Cottages, Steeton, presumed to have
died of wounds May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. BARKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. T. Barker, 5, Wellington Street, Skipton, killed in action 3rd
May, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL J. CHAPMAN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Chapman, 46, Broughton Road, Skipton, presumed
killed in action 3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR CHATTERTON, East Yorks. Regt.,
formerly of Glusburn, died of wounds 8th May, 1917. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY CAPSTICK, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Howgill, Sedbergh, killed in action 3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR CORE, West Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. J. E. Core, Queen Street, Skipton, killed in action 5th May,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES W. GARWOOD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. J. Garwood, 73, Keighley Road, Skipton, killed in
action 12th May, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES GREENBANK, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Town Head Road, Stainforth, died of wounds 1st May, 1917. Aged 30
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD JACOB FIRTH, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 31, Harrison Street, Barnoldswick, officially presumed killed
3rd May, 1917. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR GILL, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. I. Gill, Newmarket Street, Skipton, died of wounds 22nd
May, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE C. H. GILL, York and Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Amos Gill, 49, St. John Street, Silsden, killed in action
25th May, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JOSEPH GRIFFITHS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Griffiths, Chester, killed in action
4th May, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NORMAN HAWKINS, son of Mrs. H. Moorby,
Dent, killed in action 5th May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JACOB C. GREEN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Green, 10, Greenfield Street, Skipton, died of wounds 29th
May, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER D. HOLGATE, R.F.A., son of Mr. J.
Holgate, Main Street, Addingham, died of wounds 17th May, 1917. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN HUDSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Hudson, Pear Tree Terrace, Bradley, killed in action 22nd
May, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY HARGREAVES, K.O.Y.L.I., stepson
of Mrs. Hargreaves, Bolton-by-Bowland, died of wounds 28th May, 1917.
Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT HAWORTH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 84, Manchester Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 20th May, 1917.
Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: DRUMMER EDGAR HEALD, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. John Heald, 50, Wellhouse Road, Barnoldswick, presumed
killed 3rd May, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE STEPHEN HANDLEY, South Staffs Regt.,
son of Mr. S. Handley, Bainbridge Road, Sedbergh, killed in action 3rd
May, 1917.]

[Illustration: SERGT. WILLIAM HODGSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Bailey Cottage, Skipton, died of wounds 30th May, 1917. Aged 27
years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT CYRIL LEE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of Cononley, died of wounds 15th May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS LOBLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Charles Lobley, 19, Thornton Street, Skipton, died of
wounds 6th May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Metcalfe, Clapdale Hall, Clapham, officially
presumed killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM MOORE, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
& Mrs. S. Moore, Litherskew, Hawes, killed in action May, 1917. Aged 24
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN NICHOLSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Nicholson, 23, Midland Street, Skipton, presumed
killed 3rd May, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH RODGERS, West Yorks. Regt., only
son of Mr. & Mrs. Peter Rodgers, 53, Westmoreland Street, Skipton, died
of wounds 2nd May, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE B. PUNCH, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs. T.
Punch, Deepdale, Dent, killed in action 2nd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM PHILLIPS, East Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mrs. S. A. Phillips, 20, Hartley Street, Earby, killed in action
12th May, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. ROBINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. T. Robinson, 2, Storrs Cottages, Ingleton, presumed killed 3rd
May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN PICKLES, East Yorks. Regt., of 8,
Stewart Street, Barnoldswick, presumed killed in action 3rd May, 1917.
Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN W. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
stepson of Mrs. Smith, 19, Neville Street, Skipton, officially presumed
killed 3rd May, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALONZA J. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 3, Sunny Bank, Carleton, died of wounds 5th May, 1917. Aged 35
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALFRED SHERWIN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Ingleton, killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH SUTCLIFFE, Notts. & Derby Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Abraham Sutcliffe, 8, Arthur Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action May, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM SMITH, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 9, Collin Street, Barnoldswick, died in France 5th May,
1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BLAKE SPENCER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Spencer, Sutton, killed in action 3rd May,
1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. SEDDINGTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Seddington, Howden Road, Silsden, died of
wounds 12th May, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR SHACKLETON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 12, Green Street, Cowling, reported missing 3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS SPENCER, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. James Spencer, Lower Close Farm, Eastburn, killed in
action 19th May, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL T. H. SIMPSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Simpson, Croft House, Hebden, officially
presumed killed 3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GORDON SMITH, Leicester Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. William Smith, North View, Sutton, reported missing 3rd May,
1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED TYRER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Richard Tyrer, Raikes Road, Skipton, killed in action 3rd
May, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. WINN, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
Mrs. R. Winn, Long Lane, Sedbergh, presumed killed 3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED TULLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son-in-law of Mr. & Mrs. William Spence, 31, Green End Avenue, Earby,
killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL HAROLD WILSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Walter Wilson, Sutton, presumed killed 3rd May, 1917.
Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY WADE, West Yorks Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Wade, 14, Norton Street, Silsden, died of wounds 4th
May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. GORNALL, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Dent, presumed killed 3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE WILKINSON, K.O.S.B., son of
Mr. & Mrs. William Wilkinson, 51, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, died in
Germany 18th May, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HERBERT STOTT, R.F.A., son of the late
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Stott, High Street, Steeton, killed in action 26th
May, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN THORNBER, York & Lancs. Regt., son
of Mrs. Thornber, Victoria Cottage, Low Bentham, presumed killed in
action 7th June, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER PERCY JONES, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. Noah Jones, Glusburn, killed in action April, 1918. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: SERGT. EDGAR GREEN, D.C.M., West Yorks. Regt.,
of Sutton, killed in action May, 1918.]

[Illustration: DRIVER ESHTON HAYWOOD, R.F.A., son of Mrs.
Lund, Sun Street, Cowling, killed in action 16th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST BOOTH, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mr. Robert Booth, Owlet Hall, Austwick, killed in action 26th
June, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE COLING JAMES BERESFORD, Notts & Derby
Regt., of 6, Carleton Street, Skipton, killed in action 7th June, 1917.
Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BURTON, York & Lancs. Regt., of
42, Walmsgate, Barnoldswick, killed in action 7th June, 1917. Aged 24
years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL G. A. BRIDGE, York & Lancs.
Regt., son of Mrs. Bridge, 10, Island Square, Earby, reported killed
7th June, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS CLAPHAM, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 4, North Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed in action 2nd June,
1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN GUNNER HARTLEY DEAN, R.N., son of Mr. &
Mrs. John Dean, 2, Harper Street, Barnoldswick, presumed drowned in the
Mediterranean Sea 29th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY COWPER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 17, Brook Street, Skipton, killed in action 7th June, 1917. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM GREENWOOD, son of Mr. & Mrs.
William Greenwood, Rostle Top Road, Earby, killed in action 7th June,
1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL WILLIE HARGREAVES, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., of Holmfield, Sutton, killed in action 24th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROWLAND HARPER, Yorks. Regt., of
Westhill, Garsdale, Hawes, killed in action 7th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL C. JONES, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. &
Mrs. C. Jones, Crown Hotel, Hawes, killed in action June, 1917. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILLIAM KNOX, R.G.A., of 10, Southey
Street, Skipton, died of wounds 4th June, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM LINFORD, York & Lancs. Regt.,
formerly of Bradford, died of wounds 11th June, 1917. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER W. MOSELEY, R.F.A., formerly of Buckles
Hill, Farnhill, killed in action 2nd June, 1917. Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH MOON, Worcester Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Moon, Holder Green Farm, Bolton-by-Bowland, died of wounds
June, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS PICKARD OUTHWAITE, Yorks. Regt.,
of Raydale Grange, Raydaleside, died of wounds 9th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY ORMEROD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Sutcliffe Ormerod, Middle Hague, Kelbrook, died a
prisoner in Germany 9th June, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ISAAC RUECASTLE, South Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mr. Ruecastle, The Terrace, Low Bentham, killed in action 10th
June, 1917. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDMUND STAVELEY, Yorks. Regt., of
Simonstone, Hawes, died of wounds 9th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES A. STOTT, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 14, Bennett Street, Skipton, killed in action 10th June,
1917. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. F. Smith, Addingham, died of wounds 11th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL W. HENRY SCOTT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Gisburne, died of wounds 11th June, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER MAURACE SMITH, R.F.A., son of Mrs.
Smith, 13, Pendle Street, Skipton, died in hospital in France 24th
June, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DAVID SMITH, West Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. Heaton Smith, Glusburn, killed in action 25th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: DRIVER RICHARD D. TENNANT, R.F.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Tennant, Bushley Lodge, Starbotton, died of wounds 8th June, 1917.
Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALFRED TURNER, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
& Mrs. J. T. Turner, 58, Red Lion Street, Earby, killed in action 7th
June, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES SMITH, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of 7, Rowland Street, Skipton, killed in action 16th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAMUEL WOODHEAD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of Calf Hall Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 9th June,
1917. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ERNEST WILCOCK, R.F.A., formerly of
Leeds City Constabulary, killed in action 7th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: AIRMAN FRANK WADDINGTON, R.F.C., son of Mrs.
Greenwood, 11, School Lane, Earby, died in Scotland of consumption 17th
June, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ROBERT J. WOOFF, Durham Light
Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. Wooff, Cheapside, Settle, killed in action
17th June, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. D. WRIGHT, Tyneside Scottish, of 4,
Back Park Road, Barnoldswick, presumed killed 7th June, 1917. Aged 28
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM HENRY BANKS, Gloucester Regt.,
of Tems Street, Giggleswick, officially presumed killed 10th July,
1917. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOE BANKS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Tems Street, Giggleswick, officially presumed killed 3rd May,
1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER PATRICK MCSHEE, Royal Engineers, of
Addingham, killed in action March, 1918.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT HERBERT W. VARLEY, West Yorks. Regt.,
son of Mr. Herbert Varley, Architect, formerly of Skipton, died of
wounds 17th June, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINSON, M.T., formerly of 15,
Commercial Terrace, Barnoldswick, killed in action 6th July, 1917. Aged
33 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JAMES BRIGHT, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Bright, formerly of Skipton, died of
pneumonia in France, July, 1917. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER MAURICE CHESTER ATKINSON, Canadian
Artillery, son of Mr. Edgar Atkinson, formerly of Church Street,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 16th July, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT J. BOWKER, West Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. T. Bowker, Bridge End, Settle, died at Rugeley Camp 16th
July, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL STEPHEN BELL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Bell, Lothersdale, killed in action 28th July, 1917.
Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER W. CLARKSON, H.M.S. _Vanguard_, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Walter Clarkson, 26, North Street, Silsden, killed by the
blowing up of his ship 9th July, 1917. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER R. CHEW, R.G.A., of Swinden Moor Head,
Hellifield, and son of Mr. & Mrs. Chew, Gargrave, killed in action 14th
July, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN CARROL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
formerly of Skipton, died in hospital at Skipton 9th July, 1917. Aged
30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS COLLYER, Durham Light Infantry,
of Barnoldswick, killed in action 12th July, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBINSON EDWARD DUCKWORTH, Grenadier
Guards, only son of Mr. & Mrs. John Duckworth, Edge Farm, Barnoldswick,
died of wounds 22nd July, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL E. FORD, Lancs. Fusiliers, of
Ickornshaw, Cowling, killed in action 18th July, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES H. HEMMINGWAY, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Hemmingway, Kirkgate, Silsden, died from
bronchitis in hospital at Baghdad 15th July, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK HALPIN, Labour Battn., of Settle,
died in hospital at Paisley, Scotland, 17th July, 1917. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HERBERT HEALEY, Machine Gun Corps, son
of Mr. & Mrs. John Healey, 12, Mill Brow, Earby, died of wounds 24th
July, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM HODGSON, Grenadier Guards, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Hodgson, Stephen Moor Lodge, Tosside, Settle, killed in
action 31st July, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM MITCHELL, Northumberland
Fusiliers, formerly of 5, James Street, Salterforth, died at Leicester
Hospital 17th July, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MATTHEW HOLMES, Grenadier Guards, late
of High Greenfield, Buckden, killed in action 31st July, 1917.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT H. MAUDSLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
37, Rowland Street, Skipton, presumed killed about July, 1917. Aged 33
years.]

[Illustration: BOY FIRST-CLASS FRANK R. POLLARD, H.M.S.
_Vanguard_, son of Mr. & Mrs. Frank Pollard, Skipton, killed by the
blowing up of his ship 9th July, 1917. Aged 17 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST PLATT, A.S.C., son of Councillor
Joseph Platt. Highfield Terrace, Skipton, died in Salonika 20th July,
1917. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR ROBINSON, Yorks Regt., son of Mr.
& Mrs. Robinson, Austwick, killed in action July, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: DRUMMER JOHN STORK, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Stork, Alexandra Buildings, Skipton, killed in
action 2nd July, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL HARRY SYKES, Border Regt., son
of Mr. Henry Sykes, 57, Aire View, Silsden, killed in action 18th July,
1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER W. TEMPEST, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. James Tempest, 33, Brook Street, Skipton, killed in
action 11th July, 1917. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER T. WHITHAM, R.G.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Joseph Whitham, Oak Terrace, Coates, Barnoldswick, killed in action
11th July, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. PACKARD, Sherwood Foresters, of
Castle Hill, Settle, killed in action 26th July, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE BULLOCK, Machine Gun Corps, son
of Mr. Robert Bullock, Castle Hill, Settle, died of heat stroke in
Mesopotamia 18th July, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY GOSS, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of Chapel Street, Settle, killed in action 4th July, 1917. Aged 38
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. OGDEN, York & Lancs. Regt., of 8,
Boot Street, Earby, killed in action 14th July, 1917. Aged 39 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE WILSON, West Yorks Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson, 8, Edmondson Street, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 16th August, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: BOMBARDIER JOHN EDWARD LOVICK, R.F.A., son of
Mrs. H. Lovick, 207, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 26th
March, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS GILBERT PITCHFORD, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., of New Houses, Brogden, killed in action 28th March,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE MASON, M.T. A.S.C., of Slack,
Dent., killed in action July, 1917.]

[Illustration: DRIVER MAURICE RISHWORTH, R.F.A., son of Mr.
& Mrs. Noah Rishworth, Ickornshaw, Cowling, died from heat stroke in
Mesopotamia 11th July, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MOSES BAXTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. Thomas Baxter, plasterer, Skipton, died of wounds
11th August, 1917. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES AUTON, Yorks. Light Infantry, son
of the late Samuel and Mrs. Auton, Bentham, died of wounds 5th August,
1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT BELL, Staffs Regt., oldest son
of Mr. & Mrs. John Bell, Seedhill Terrace, Steeton, killed in action
8th August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BROOKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 3, Croft Street, Earby, killed in action August, 1917. Aged 26
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY BROWN, York & Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. William Brown, 53, Keighley Road, Skipton, killed in
action 15th August, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PARKER BATESON, North Stafford Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Bateson, Stud Fold, Horton-in-Ribblesdale, died in
Mesopotamia 3rd August 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT A. M. BOOTH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Booth, Sunny Bank, Austwick, presumed killed 27th
August, 1917. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH COATES, East Surrey Regt., of
Tufton Street, Silsden, son of Councillor and Mrs. H. Coates, died in
hospital at Canterbury 3rd August, 1917. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT VICTOR CHILD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 14, Clitheroe Street, Skipton, killed in action 12th August, 1917.
Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN CORK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. Fred Cork, Sheep Street, Skipton, killed in action
9th August, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER JOHN COKELL, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Samuel Cokell, Castle Hill, Settle, killed in action 13th August, 1917.
Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN CAPSTICK, South Staffs Regt., of
Howgill, Sedbergh, died in hospital at Bombay, India 4th August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NATHIAS DIXON, Coldstream Guards, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Edmund Dixon, Grange Farm, Buckden, killed in action 1st
August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM DEWHURST, Royal Scots, of 16, Far
East View, Barnoldswick, killed in action 28th August, 1917. Aged 41
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE FISHER, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Fisher, 19, Tufton Street, Silsden, killed in action
29th August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE C. H. GELDARD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 22, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 28th August,
1917. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT WILLIAM IRELAND, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 36, Westmoreland Street, Skipton, killed in action August,
1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILLIAM JACKSON, Machine Gun Corps,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hammond Jackson, Rockwood Lodge, Skipton, died in
Mesopotamia from enteric fever 10th August, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE C. H. JACKSON, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mrs. Jackson, Rock Villa, Westhouse, Ingleton, killed in action 9th
August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR KAY, York & Lancs. Regt., of 11,
New Road, Earby, killed in action 16th August, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HAROLD E. LEWTHWAITE, R.F.A., son of Mr.
& Mrs. Isaac Lewthwaite, Brougham Street, Skipton, killed in action
24th August, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BASIL GILL NEWALL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Newall, Deerstones, Beamsley, died of wounds 8th
August, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LEONARD NELSON, Border Regt., formerly
of Bentham, son of Mrs. Nelson, Walton Farm, Cantsfield, died of wounds
24th August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HUBERT PICKERING, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Vicarage Road, Kelbrook, killed in action 3rd August, 1917.
Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILFRED RUSHWORTH, R.F.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Rushworth, Station Road, Steeton, killed in action August, 1917.
Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM THORNBER, Sherwood Foresters,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Briggs, Bolton-by-Bowland, killed in action August,
1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. THACKERAY, West Yorks. Regt., of
Crag Row, Salterforth, killed in action 28th August, 1917. Aged 36
years.]

[Illustration: BOMBARDIER G. A. THOMPSON, M.M., Royal Field
Artillery, son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Thompson, Main Street, Sedbergh, killed
in action August, 1917. Aged 44 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE WILSON, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson, 8, Edmondson Street, Barnoldswick, killed
in action 15th August, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE WEBSTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Webster, Fairfax Street, Skipton, killed in action 1st
August, 1917.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HARTLEY WILSON, R. N. Merchant Service,
son of Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson, 20, Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick,
died of typhoid fever at Lagos, West Africa, 8th August, 1917. Aged 25
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. PEARSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Sedbergh, killed in action 27th August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERTIE WILKIN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 35, Phillip Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 13th August,
1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILLIAM WEBSTER, R.F.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Webster, Nappa Scar, Askrigg, died in hospital in France from
pneumonia 5th August, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ALFRED WOODHOUSE, Royal Berks.
Regt., son of Mr. James Woodhouse, 9, Alder Hill Street, Earby, died of
wounds 11th August, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBINSON WATERWORTH, East Yorks. Regt.,
of 26, Melbourne Mount, Barnoldswick, killed in action 25th August,
1917. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL FOSTER YERKISS, Royal Berks.
Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Yerkiss, 25, James Street, Earby,
died of wounds 11th August, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BAILEY, South Staffs. Regt., of
35, Long Ing Lane, Barnoldswick, killed in action 26th September, 1917.
Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERT COWGILL, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mr. Bryant Cowgill, Spring Terrace, Earby, killed in action 16th
August, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILLIE ATKINSON, s.s. _Hockwood_, son
of Mrs. Atkinson, 30, Skipton Road, Silsden, drowned at sea 10th
September, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. CAPSTICK, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of Cowgill, killed in action September, 1917. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BEN BEAUMONT, Sherwood Foresters, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Beaumont, Hebden, officially presumed killed 17th Sept.,
1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN JOHN CLARK, R.N., son of Mrs. Clark, 4,
Chapel Street, Silsden, drowned at sea 17th September, 1917. Aged 26
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY COCKETT, South African Regt., son
of Mr. H. Cockett, Hawes, killed in action 20th September, 1917. Aged
18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES CRAGG, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mrs. Cragg, Settlebeck, Sedbergh, presumed killed 9th September,
1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL A. C. C. DUTTON, South African Regt.,
son of the late Reverend C. A. Dutton, Rector of Lothersdale, and Mrs.
Dutton, Gargrave, killed in action 20th September, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NICHOLAS GELDARD, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Geldard, Strop Lane,
Bolton-by-Bowland, killed in action 17th September, 1917. Aged 22
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM GROVES, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 5, Chapel Square, Earby, died of wounds 26th September,
1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES HOOD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Isaac Hood, 4, Bolton Street, Addingham, presumed killed 3rd
September, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT HARDISTY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. Robert Hardisty, Blacksmith, Skipton, died of
wounds 2nd September, 1917. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER JOSEPH HALSTEAD, R.E., of 16, Red Lion
Street, Earby, killed in action 23rd September, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST HARDCASTLE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. H. Hardcastle, Swartha, Silsden, killed in
action 21st September, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. H. HORSMAN, Royal Scots Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. A. Horsman, Southfield Terrace, Addingham, killed in
action 26th September, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER WILLIAM W. JACKSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs., William Jackson, Dub Cote, Horton, killed in
action 20th September, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED P. HERD, South Staffs. Regt., of
Howgill, Sedbergh, killed in action 26th Sept., 1917.]

[Illustration: GUNNER R. G. METCALFE, R.G.A., of 1, Watkinson
Street, Skipton, killed in action 4th Sept., 1917.]

[Illustration: GUNNER LAPEDGE MONKS, R.F.A., of 42, Willow
Bank, Barnoldswick, killed in action 25th Sept., 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER DAVID MASON, Australian Corps, son of
Mr. Tom Mason, Chapel Street, Silsden, died of wounds 30th September,
1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ERNEST NUSSEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Nussey, 77, Colne Road, Earby, killed in action
September, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER EDGAR PARKER, R.G.A., son of Mr. D.
Parker, Stoops Farm, Kelbrook, died of wounds 25th September, 1917.
Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE C. T. RAINFORD, Surrey Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Henry Rainford, Stone Trough Inn, Kelbrook, killed in action
21st September, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN M. RAW, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. R. Raw, Gawthrop, Dent, killed in action 20th September,
1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES SEYMOUR, West Yorks Regt., of 18,
Green End Avenue, Earby, died of wounds 1st September, 1917. Aged 39
years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ARTHUR SNEATH, R.F.A., of Barnoldswick,
died from gas poisoning in France 30th September, 1917. Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ARTHUR SLATER, Machine Gun
Corps, son of Mr. & Mrs. Slater, 39, Skipton Road, Barnoldswick, killed
in action 30th September, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES L. TRANTER, West Yorks Regt.,
son of Mr. Charles Tranter, Byron Street, Skipton, killed in action
September, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERNARD TENNANT, Manchester Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. Tennant, Manor House, Buckden, killed in action 9th
September, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MICHAEL TAYLOR, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Taylor, 239, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 20th Sept., 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES WALKER, Tyneside Scottish, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Walker, 14, Lower West Avenue, Barnoldswick, died in
hospital in France 1st September, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: BOMBARDIER H. WHITTAKER, R.F.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Whittaker, 54, Skipton Road, Earby, died of wounds 1st September,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAYDON WOOD, West Yorks Regt., of 17,
East View, Barnoldswick, killed in action 13th September, 1917. Aged 37
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. E. WALKER, Australian Exped. Force,
son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Walker, Water Street, Skipton, killed in action
27th September, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT WALKER, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. C. Walker, Beech Mount, Cononley, killed
in action 14th Sept., 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM ARNER, Border Regt., son of Mr.
& Mrs. G. Arner, Sedbergh, killed in action 12th October, 1917. Aged 23
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM WATERS, East Lancs. Regt., son of
Mrs. Waters, Grassington, died of wounds 24th September, 1917. Aged 22
years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER J. W. WHITFIELD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
only son of Mr. & Mrs. T. W. Whitfield, Linton, killed in action 9th
October, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ARTHUR NEWBOULD, Loyal North
Lancs. Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Newbould, Hebden, died of wounds
30th July, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE H. D. COWMAN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
grandson of the late Mr. Henry Cowman, Skipton, died of wounds 7th
September, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM ASHTON, Border Regt., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Ashton, 14, James Street, Earby killed in action October, 1917.
Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: REGT. QUARTER-MASTER SERGT. BRIGGS, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., of 22, Ermysted Street, Skipton, died at his home
October, 1917. Aged 45 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JAMES BOLTON, Border Regt., of 40,
Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, officially presumed killed 26th
October, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE B. BLAND, Machine Gun Corps, formerly
of Skipton, died of gas poisoning 21st October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY BLAKEY, T. Reserve, son of Mr. &
Mrs. Blakey, Grassington, died from septic poisoning at Cannock Chase
Hospital, Rugeley, October, 1917. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER CHARLES BATLEY, R.G.A., formerly a
Police Constable at Skipton, killed in action 26th October, 1917. Aged
26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT BROOKS, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of Millthrop, Sedbergh, killed in action 26th October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAM BUTLER, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of 31, Highfield Road, Earby, killed in action 14th October, 1917. Aged
35 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JACK COLES, Yorks. Hussars, son of Mr.
William Coles, Station Master, Skipton, killed in action 9th October,
1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. C. DAWSON, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of Coldcotes, Ingleton, killed in action 26th October, 1917. Aged 26
years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ALEC. CLARK, Devonshire Regt., of 2,
King Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 2nd October, 1917. Aged 27
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM CARR, York & Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Carr, Whitehill House, Dale Head, killed in action
October, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN CARR, Grenadier Guards, son of Mr.
& Mrs. Carr, Whitehill House, Dale Head, died of wounds 14th October,
1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN DINSDALE, Yorks. Regt., of Hawes,
killed in action October, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BEN DOBBY, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
Thomas Dobby, North Street, Gargrave, killed in action October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT EDMONDSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. J. T. Edmondson, Strandridge Farm,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 16th October, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CLIFTON EMMOTT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
only son of Mr. & Mrs. Tom Emmott, Glenview, Grassington, killed in
action 9th October, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY ELLIOTT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
brother of Mrs. J. S. Mooney, 16, Back Water Street, Skipton, died in
France 14th October, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY FLETCHER, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. Fletcher, Laburnum Cottages, Ingleton, died of wounds
October, 1917. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ALDER FRIEND, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Arthur Friend, Ryland Street, Crosshills, died from gas poisoning in
France 9th October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST MAURICE GARRETT, South Staffs.
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Garrett, Craven House, Newtown,
Barnoldswick, presumed killed 25th October, 1917. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER COULSON FRYER, R.F.A., of 11, Sun
Street, Cowling, killed in action 22nd October, 1917.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN W. H. GARNETT, King’s Royal Rifles,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Ashton Garnett, 1, Chapel Street, Carleton, killed in
action October, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ORLANDO GARNETT, Manchester Regt., son
of Mr. J. W. Garnett, Burn Mill, Sedbergh, died of wounds 4th October,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM GARNER, Loyal North Lancs.
Regt., of Park Lane, Cowling, killed in action October. 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED GARDINER, West Yorks Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Gardiner, 2, East View, Kelbrook, killed in action 9th
October, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ARTHUR A. HARDISTY, New Zealand
(Otago) Regt., son of the late Police Inspector Hardisty, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 12th October, 1917. Aged 45 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL W. P. HARRAGAN, Machine Gun Corps, of
Skipton, died of appendicitis at Whalley hospital 4th October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRISON HEYWORTH, Labour Battn.,
formerly of 26, Denton Street, Barnoldswick, died from syncope in
France 6th October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES H. HANDBY, Canadian Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Handby, Leak House, Austwick, killed in action 2nd
October, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER HARTLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. W. Hartley, Langcliffe, died of wounds October, 1917. Aged
22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE S. K. HADLEY, Canadian Regt., son
of Mr. S. C. Hadley, Station Master, Addingham, died of wounds 18th
October, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GILBERT HAWORTH, Lancs. Fusiliers, son
of Mr. & Mrs. John Haworth, 19, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, killed
in action 13th October, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS HEALEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. E. Healey, School Terrace, Salterforth, killed in
action 9th October, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD HOYLES, East Lancs. Regt., of
Dawson Street, Skipton, killed in action 5th October, 1917. Aged 37
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM C. HARTLEY, Machine Gun Corps,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Hartley, Belgravia, Skipton, killed in action
30th October, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NATHAN B. IVESON, Yorks Regt., son of
the late Mr. & Mrs. Iveson, Gayle, Hawes, killed in action October,
1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT W. JENKINS, West Yorks Regt., of 22,
Hallam’s Yard, Skipton, killed in action 9th October, 1917. Aged 22
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST JOWETT, Royal Fusiliers, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Squire Jowett, 14, South Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 26th October, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES KNIGHT, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Knight, 33, Albert Street, Earby, died of wounds
13th October, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES LEATT, New Zealand Forces, son of
Mrs. Leatt, Pendle Street, Skipton, killed in action 4th October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM MOORHOUSE, Machine Gun Corps,
son of Mrs. Moorhouse, Primrose Hill, Skipton, killed in action 6th
October, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY MACEFIELD, Manchester Regt., of
11, Otley Street, Skipton, killed in action 7th October, 1917. Aged 35
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN T. METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 8, Russell Street, Skipton, killed in action 9th October,
1917. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM MASON, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr.
William Mason, Birkrigg, Garsdale, died in hospital in France 12th
October, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL A. V. METCALFE, M.M., R.F.A., son of
Mr. Robert Metcalfe, Barrow, formerly of Skipton, died of wounds 13th
October, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY NUTTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Levi Nutter, Rook Street, Barnoldswick, died of
wounds 17th October, 1917. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD ROWLEY, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. J. S. Rowley, The Square, Snedhill, Salop,
died of wounds, 6th October, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM G. RAMPLING, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. A. Rampling, 40, Russell Street, Skipton,
killed in action 9th October, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN READ, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. William Read, Wheatlands House, Crosshills, killed in action
October, 1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM ROBINSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. H. Robinson, Main Street, Bentham, killed in action
9th October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS G. ROBERTS, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. W. G. Roberts, Roseberry Terrace,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 16th October, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PIONEER ANGUS ROSS, R.E., late of Hellifield,
died of dysentery in East Africa, 19th October, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. R. ROBERTS, Royal Fusiliers, late of
9, Havre Park, Barnoldswick, killed in action 30th October, 1917. Aged
19 years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER J. W. SHUTTLEWORTH, R.G.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. R. Shuttleworth, 6, East View, Carleton, killed in action October,
1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HASLAM SMITH, R.A.M.C., son of Mrs. C.
Smith, North Street, Sutton, died from gas poisoning in France 17th
October, 1917. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL TOM HARRY SMITH, Grenadier Guards, of
Bentham, killed in action 11th October, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE SANDERSON, Somerset Light
Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. John Sanderson, 13, Butts, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 19th October, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER WALTER SNOWDEN, Royal Engineers, of
Garden Terrace, Cowling, died of pneumonia 30th October, 1917, at
Weymouth.]

[Illustration: GUNNER THOMAS SIMPSON, R.F.A., son of Mr. and
Mrs. G. Simpson, Sheepwash Farm, Rathmell, died of wounds 24th October,
1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. G. STAINTON, Dorset Regt., son of
Mr. T. Stainton, Kendall’s Square, Sedbergh, killed in action 16th
October, 1917. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY SHARPLES, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Sharpies, 29, West Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed
in action 28th October, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER THOMAS TOWNSON, Royal Field Artillery,
son of Mrs. Townson, 5, Waddington Street, Earby, killed in action 7th
October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD TOWNSON, Royal Scots Fusiliers,
of 9, Brook Street, Earby, presumed killed 22nd October, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE TOWLER, Canadian Infantry, son
of Mrs. Towler, Stainforth, Settle, killed in action 26th October,
1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CARROL WILSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Thomas Wilson, 5, Co-operative Street, Barnoldswick, killed
in action 9th October, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT WARING, Manchester Regt., of 2,
Bolland Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 1st October, 1917. Aged
28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM WATSON, York & Lancs. Regt., of
Main Street, Embsay, died of wounds October, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WADESON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Private J. H. Wadeson, Bank End, Ingleton, killed in action
October, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY P. WHITFIELD, Canterbury Infantry
Regt., son of Mr. Frank Whitfield, Hazeldene, Bentham, killed in action
9th October, 1917. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES WARD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Ward, 24, Pembroke Street, Skipton, killed in action 9th
October, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES M. WILKINSON, Training Reserve,
son of Mrs. Fred Wilkinson, 31, Wellhouse Road, Barnoldswick, died of
pneumonia at Rugeley Camp, 29th October, 1917. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERTIE PHILIP EMSLEY, City of London
Royal Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. M. W. Emsley, High Street, Skipton,
reported missing 26th October, 1917; death officially presumed to have
taken place on or since that date.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK WARD, Royal Fusiliers, son of Mr.
& Mrs. John Ward, Clapham, killed in action October, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ERNEST WOODHEAD, Royal
Engineers, son of Mr. & Mrs. Woodhead, formerly a constable at Settle,
died in France 27th October, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE P. J. HEBDEN, York & Lancs. Regt., son
of Mrs. Hebden, Castle Street, Skipton, missing since 9th October,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. J. WILLIAMSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 42, Skipton Road, Earby, killed in action 1st October, 1917.
Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS BRADLEY, Machine Gun Corps, son
of Mr. & Mrs. T. Bradley, Wards Garth, Austwick, died of wounds 3rd
November, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE S. ATKINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Cross Close, Sedbergh, presumed killed in action 27th November, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM O. EMMOTT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Edward Emmott, Castle Street, Skipton, killed in
action 26th November, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM HILTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
grandson of Mrs. Hilton, Langcliffe, Settle, killed in action 19th
April, 1918.]

[Illustration: REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR S. BROWNSWORTH, Leicester
Regt., son of Mrs. Brownsworth, Southport, and the late Mr.
Brownsworth, of Skipton, killed in action November, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD BOWKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 35, Denton Street, Barnoldswick, officially presumed dead 27th
November, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST BREEKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Brennand, 20, Rostle Top Road, Earby, killed in action 27th
November, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN FRANCIS BELL, H.M.S. _Glasgow_, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Bell, Addingham, died 22nd November, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL FRED BARRETT, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 65, Newmarket Street, Skipton, killed in action 23rd
November, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT BATESON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Bateson, Station Cottage, Bell Busk, died of
wounds 28th Nov., 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER HENRY BANKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
brother of Mrs. Adams, 18, River Place, Gargrave, died of wounds 28th
November, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER JAMES CATLOW, R.G.A., son of Mrs.
Catlow, 148, Keighley Road, Cowling, died of wounds 24th November,
1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WALLACE CASON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Cason, 22, Dam Side Cottages, Skipton, killed in action
20th November, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE-SERGEANT HAROLD DAVIS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 13, Milton Street, Skipton, presumed killed 26th November,
1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED CHAPMAN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
late of Bradley, died of wounds 24th November, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT EIDSON, North Staffs. Regt., of
34, Westgate, Barnoldswick, killed in action 27th November, 1917. Aged
33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS W. FENWICK, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 18, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 27th
November, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT WILLIAM NORMAN HOLMES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 5, West Bradley Street, Skipton, officially presumed killed
27th November, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOSEPH GIBSON, West Yorks Regt.,
formerly on the Police Force at Barnoldswick, died of wounds 22nd
November, 1917. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY HAWKSWELL, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. W. H. Hawkswell, 24, Water Street, Skipton,
killed in action 18th November, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE S. HARGREAVES, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hargreaves, 124, Keighley Road, Skipton, presumed
killed 27th November, 1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL MAURICE HARGREAVES, Seaforth
Highlanders, formerly of Sun Street, Eastburn, killed in action
November, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH HOOLE, King’s Own Lancs. Regt.,
son of Mrs. Hoole, Preston, and formerly of Barnoldswick, died of
wounds 23rd November, 1917. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT HOLMES, Liverpool Regt., son
of Mr. Harry Holmes, Hazlewood, Bolton Abbey, killed in action 4th
November, 1917. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL THOMAS HANDLEY, of Wandra Garth
Cottage, Garsdale, killed in action 27th November, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR INGHAM, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Mason Ingham, 30, Devonshire Street, Skipton, killed
in action 3rd November, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE INSKIP, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. R. Inskip, Farnhill, killed in action 27th November, 1917.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL HARRY KIRKLEY, M.T., formerly of
Grassington, killed in action November, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAMUEL K. LAMBERT, Yorks Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. W. Kirk, Cotterdale, died of wounds 12th November, 1917.
Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. K. MASON, Highland Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. T. K. Mason, Upper Sackville Street, Skipton, killed
in action 18th November, 1917. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ARTHUR MOULE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. H. Moule, 9, Beech Street, Steeton, died in
hospital in France November, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL GEORGE MELDRUM, Royal Engineers,
of Shuttleworth Street, Earby, died from smallpox at Baghdad 10th
November, 1917. Aged 48 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., late of Long Preston, died of wounds November, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. PETTY, M.M., son of Mrs. Petty,
Bishops House, Dunsop Bridge, Clitheroe, killed in action 20th
November, 1917. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT METCALFE, Royal Irish Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. William Metcalfe, Countersett, Askrigg, killed in
action 20th November, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES G. PRESTON, Lancs. Fusiliers,
son of Mr. & Mrs. James Preston, Askrigg, died of wounds 2nd November,
1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT SHIERS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Brown, 30, Lower North Avenue, Barnoldswick, presumed
killed 27th November, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT RALPH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Ralph, 9, Lower Croft Street, Settle, died of wounds 21st
November, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM THOMPSON, South Wales Borderers, of
Crosshills, killed in action 6th Nov., 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY RILEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of the late Mr. Sam Riley, 6, Bennett Street, Skipton, killed in action
27th November, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH TOWNEND, Canadian Field
Ambulance, son of Mr. E. Townend, Lower Bentham, died of wounds 18th
November, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL HARRY TILLOTSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. John Tillotson, 4, Stirling Street, Silsden,
died of wounds 23rd November, 1917. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH WILLIAMS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Williams, 3, Sagar Terrace, Barnoldswick, died
of wounds 16th November, 1917. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. R. WISEMAN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. F. Wiseman, 39, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, killed in
action November, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM WALLBANK, Lincoln Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. R. Wallbank, Chapman Bank, Eldroth, Austwick, died of wounds
24th November, 1917. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILLIE WALTON, R.F.A., son of Mrs. John
Walton, Main Street, Kelbrook, died of wounds 28th November, 1917. Aged
19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS B. STOCKDALE, Border Regt. son
of Mrs. T. Stockdale, Mount Pleasant, Sedbergh, killed in action 27th
November, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JACK WATERWORTH, Highland Light
Infantry, son of Mrs. Waterworth, 22, East Hill Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 26th November, 1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK CARTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Carter, 49, Tufton Street, Silsden, killed in action
27th November, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE WILSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Richard Wilson, Bank House Farm, Steeton, presumed
killed December, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD LAMBERT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Richard Lambert, High Street, Steeton, killed in action
September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RALPH HODGSON, K.O.Y.L.I., of Queen
Street, Steeton, died of wounds, September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE A. MCLAUGHLIN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Bank Top, Ingleton, killed in action 22nd August, 1918. Aged 25
years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL WILLIAM DEWHURST, Machine Gun
Corps, of 3, Federation Street, Barnoldswick, reported missing since
30th November, 1917. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN F. BERRY, King’s Own Royal Lancs.
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Berry, 115, Euston Road, Morecambe, and
formerly of Barnoldswick, died of wounds 19th December, 1917. Aged 21
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER JACKSON, Inniskilling Dragoons,
son of Mrs. Jackson, Rose Terrace, Embsay, died of wounds 10th
December, 1917. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ALBERT DONALD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. S. Donald, Brayside, Skipton, killed in action
26th March 1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR HARGREAVES, Manchester Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. James Hargreaves, 78, Keighley Road, Skipton, killed in
action March, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS C. BENTHAM, of 8, Earl Street,
Colne, and formerly of Gargrave, died of wounds 3rd December, 1917.
Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN GEORGE WILLIAM BURTON, London Regt.,
son of Mr. R. Burton, New Street, Sedbergh, died of wounds 6th
December, 1917. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HARRY DAVEY, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
C. Davey, Smithy House Farm, Cowling, killed in action 1st December,
1917. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN DENT, Border Regt., son of Mr.
and Mrs. R. Dent, Burton House, Rylstone, died of wounds 4th December,
1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR FOSTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Foster, Addingham, died of wounds 30th December, 1917. Aged
37 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN HITCHIN, Argyll and
Sutherland Highlanders, son of Mr. & Mrs. John Hitchin, Prospect House,
Long Preston, torpedoed on board H.M.S. Aragon, off the coast of Egypt,
30th December, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES E. HYMAS, Northumberland
Fusiliers, formerly of Rylstone, died in France 13th December, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE M. KNIGHT, Coldstream Guards,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Knight, 11, Alma Terrace, Skipton, died of wounds 2nd
Dec., 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN METCALFE, West Yorks Regt., son
of Mr. Joseph Metcalfe, East Parade, Steeton, killed in action 5th
December, 1917. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. MIDDLETON, East Lancs. Regt.,
son-in-law of Mr. & Mrs. Driver, 7, Nelson Street, Skipton, killed in
action 2nd December, 1917. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL E. METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Metcalfe, Glenroyd, Park Avenue, Skipton, died of
wounds 3rd December, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER TOM NICHOLLS, R.F.A., formerly of
Grassington, died in hospital at Ilkley, Dec. 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT CHARLES PEACHY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., formerly of 1, Whelpstone Grove, Settle, killed in action 12th
December, 1917. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS B. RENTON, Machine Gun Corps,
son of Mr. Joseph Renton, Hetton, died of wounds 1st December, 1917.
Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER ROBINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Albert Robinson, Ivy Mount, Thornton, killed in
action 11th December, 1917. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES SHUTTLEWORTH, A.S.C., of
Hardcastle’s Yard, Skipton, died of dysentery in Egypt 7th December,
1917. Aged 39 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIE SIMONS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Simons, Wighill Street, Sutton, died in
Germany 12th December, 1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL W. SANDERSON, M.M., King’s Royal
Rifles, formerly of High Bentham, killed in action 6th December, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES O. TATTERSALL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. James Tattersall, 11, Leonard Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 14th December, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL H. WILKINSON, A.S.C., of
Bolton-by-Bowland, drowned on board the _Aragon_, 30th December, 1917.
Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS WHITEHEAD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Moor View, Hebden, killed in action 2nd December, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY VINTNER, West Yorks Regt., of
Steeton, presumed killed 12th December, 1917. Aged 39 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHRISTOPHER CHAPMAN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., formerly of Grassington, died of wounds 5th December, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN SUGDEN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. William Sugden, Bolton Road, Silsden, died of wounds
December, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES METCALFE, New Zealand Corps,
formerly of Kettlewell, died of wounds December, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. H. RICHARDSON, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Richardson, The Green, Settle, died in hospital
in France 23rd December, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD WILLIAM BEARD, R.F.C., son of
Private Samson Beard, Skipton, died in hospital in France 22nd January,
1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM EGGLESTONE, Coldstream Guards,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Egglestone, Aireville Grange, Skipton, died of
wounds 26th January, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER WILLIAM BALDERSTONE, R.E.. of 19,
Midland Street, Skipton, died of dysentery in Egypt 2nd January, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER LEEMING, West Yorks Regt.,
formerly of Giggleswick, killed in action 7th January, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE DAWSON PARKINSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., formerly of Nook Cottage, Bolton-by-Bowland, died a prisoner of
war in Germany January, 1918. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. H. PERRETT, West Yorks Regt., son of
Mr. Perrett, Station Master, Bell Busk, killed in action 31st January,
1918.]

[Illustration: SAPPER W. G. HAGGAS, Royal Engineers, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Haggas, formerly of Sutton, died in Newark War Hospital,
January, 1918.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN ERNEST SPEIGHT, H.M.S. _Victory_, of
Cononley, lost on board a Mine Sweeper 18th January, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES SPENCER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Spencer, George Street, Carleton, died of wounds
10th January, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. M. TOPLEY, R.G.A., son-in-law of the
late Mr. & Mrs. Frank Whitaker, Bolton Abbey, died in hospital at Dover
18th January, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS HENRY RILEY, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Riley, 33, Russell Street, Skipton, killed in action
28th February, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HEATON BAILEY, R.A.M.C., son of Mr.
and Mrs. J. Bailey, Bolton Road, Silsden, died of pneumonia at Tring
Military Hospital, 6th March, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES HENRY RALPH, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Ralph, 19, King Street, Barnoldswick,
officially presumed killed 3rd May, 1917. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: ABLE SEAMAN CHRISTOPHER WANE, H.M.S. Opal, son
of Mrs. Wane, Marton Road, Gargrave, drowned at sea 12th January, 1918.
Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY PARRINGTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Parrington, 26, Rowland Street, Skipton,
killed in action 27th February, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SYDNEY PLUMB, Royal Scots Fusiliers,
son of Mrs. Plumb, Aireview, Silsden, killed in action December, 1917.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN JOHN BARLOW, R.N., son of Mr. & Mrs. T.
Barlow, Calf Head Road, Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia at Scapa Flow,
8th February, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD HODGSON, Australian A.S.C.,
a native of Settle, died of pneumonia at Fovant Camp, Wiltshire,
February, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER GEORGE THISTLETHWAITE, Royal Field
Artillery, second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Thistlethwaite, Main Street,
Austwick, died of wounds 25th February, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. WILSON, A.S.C., of Lower Bentham,
died at Hursley Military Hospital 3rd February, 1918. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES VARLEY, Royal Fusiliers, son of
Mrs. Varley, West Marton, accidentally killed in France 8th February,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NORMAN WATSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
grandson of Mrs. William Greenwood, Falcon Cliffe, Steeton, died of
wounds 12th February, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN JAMES BROWN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 51, Eastgate, Skipton, killed by a sniper in France 31st
March, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HERBERT AIREY, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Frank Airey, 53, Otley Street, Skipton, killed in action 30th March,
1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WARD, Yorks Regt., son of the late
John and Mrs. Ward, 24, Pembroke Street, Skipton, killed in action 21st
March, 1918. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. ASTIN, East Yorks Regt., of Fair
View, Skipton, died of wounds 8th April, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HEBDEN WALKER, Prince of Wales Yorks.
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Edwin Walker, 37, Longroyd Road, Earby, died
of pneumonia in France 5th February, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST EDWARD CARTER, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. Edward Carter, 5, Neville Street, Skipton,
died of wounds 27th March, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN HARRY BIRCH, King’s Royal Rifles, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Birch, 4, Ermysted Street, Skipton, officially presumed
killed 17th August, 1917.]

[Illustration: GUNNER JOHN W. WHITTAKER, R.F.A., of Cowling,
died of wounds 23rd March, 1918.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT TOM HEAPS, M.M., Canadian Trench
Battery, of Model Village, Ingleton, killed in action 30th March, 1918.
Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN MAURICE COWGILL, West Yorks Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Cowgill, Sunset Café, Colne Road, Earby, killed in action
27th March, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HERBERT EWART WHIPP, R.F.A., grandson of
the late Mr. Wm. Baxter, Brook Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action
26th March, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE COLIN ASHTON, Royal Warwick Regt.,
eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Ashton, 41, Harrison Street,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 24th March, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RALPH ALDERSON, Grenadier Guards, son
of Mr. T. Alderson, Gayle, Hawes, killed in action 27th March, 1918. He
was awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE REUBEN FRYERS, Labour Corps, of 47,
Collin Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 21st March, 1918. Aged 20
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR WALTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 20, Gladstone Terrace, Earby, officially presumed killed 27th
November, 1917. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BERRY, New Zealand Rifles, eldest
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Berry, Daisy Mount, Airton, killed in action 26th
March, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ERNEST SHERWOOD, R.F.A., of 56, Russell
Street, Skipton, killed in action 23rd March, 1918. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE L. BLACKWELL, South Staffs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. W. Blackwell, Higher Clough, Dale Head, Clitheroe, killed
in action 10th March, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RATCLIFFE BRIDGE, Lancashire Fusiliers,
son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Bridge, Lower West Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 17th March, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT G. CATON, M.M., K.O.Y.L.I., of Kirkby
Malham, killed in action 27th March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR PERCY SMITH, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Newmarket Street, Skipton, killed in action 14th March, 1918.
Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SYDNEY WHITAKER, West Yorks Regt., son
of Mr. William Whitaker, Brooklyn, Grassington, officially presumed
killed in action 3rd May, 1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MAURACE LUND, Duke of Well.’s Regt. son
of Mr. & Mrs. J. Lund, 14, Dawson Street, Skipton, killed in action
27th November, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE HENRY METCALFE, Trench Mortar
Battery, of 60, Tufton Street, Silsden, killed in action 10th March,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CYRUS COCKSHOTT, West Yorks Regt., son
of Mr. Wilcock Cockshott, Seed Hill Terrace, Steeton, killed in action
21st March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY CLOUGH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Steeton, killed in action 31st March, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS CORE, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mr. J. E. Core, Spring Gardens, Skipton, officially presumed
killed 21st March, 1918. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR CLARK, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Clark, 12, Hardcastle’s Yard, Skipton, reported killed 22nd March,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH EMMOTT, Leicester Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. William Emmott, 8, Bennett Street, Skipton, killed in action
23rd March, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE AMBROSE EMMOTT, Royal Marines, son of
Mrs. Emmott, School Lane, Addingham, killed in action 21st March, 1918.
Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JOSEPH FLETCHER, Royal Engineers, son
of Mr. James Fletcher, Ingleton, killed in action March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALFRED MAROONEY, Coldstream Guards,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Marooney, 2, Bradley Street, Skipton, killed in
action 27th March, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD FORREST, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 17, Shuttleworth Street, Earby, presumed killed 21st
March, 1918.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL GREENHALGH, R.F.A., of 23, Bolland
Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 21st March, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JAMES HODKINSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Hodkinson, Crosshills, killed in action March, 1918.
Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT J. JEFFREY, M.M., R.F.A., son of the
late Mr. Jeffrey, printer, Skipton, reported missing 21st March, 1918;
presumed killed on that date.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM M. METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of the late John & Mrs. Metcalfe, Weathercote, Ingleton,
killed in action 30th March, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT WILLIAM A. MURGATROYD, D.C.M., Royal
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Murgatroyd, Rock Villa, Skipton, killed
in action 20th March, 1918. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. T. MIDDLETON, Australian Pioneer
Battn., son of Mrs. Middleton, Dent, died of pneumonia March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM NICHOLSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. John Nicholson, Midland Street, Skipton,
killed in action 28th March, 1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. H. PEARCE, King’s Own Yorks. Light
Infantry, of Giggleswick, died a prisoner of war in Germany 22nd March,
1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED SUTCLIFFE, Leicestershire Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Abraham Sutcliffe, 8, Arthur Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 21st March, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER JOHN SLINGER, R.F.A., son of Mr. James
Slinger, Clapham, killed in action 21st March, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. SWALES, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. T. Swales, Rylstone, reported missing 16th March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES SIMMS, M.M., K.O.Y.L.I., son
of Mrs. Simms, 3, West Bradley Street, Skipton, killed in action 31st
March, 1918. Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RENNIE THORNTON, Royal Highlanders
Regt., of 24, Lower East Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed in action 8th
March, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: AIR MECHANIC T. H. STEPHENS, son of Mr.
Stephens, Newby Road, Farnhill, accidentally killed in France 26th
March, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RALPH SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. James Smith, 3, Garden Terrace, Cowling, killed in action
27th March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. SMITH, Leicester Regt., of Turner
Ford, Clapham Station, presumed killed in action 22nd March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES S. WILLIAMSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Williamson, 42, Skipton Road, Earby, died of wounds
17th March, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL WILLIE WEBSTER, Enniskillen
Fusiliers, son of Mr. H. Webster, Moor Top Farm, Cononley, died of gas
poisoning in France 23rd March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ELI WATERWORTH, M.M., Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. W. R. Waterworth, 8, West Avenue,
Barnoldswick, died of wounds 23rd March, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL FRED WOOD, Manchester Regt., of
Burton-in-Lonsdale, reported to have died in Germany, 26th March,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD HANDLEY, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of Dent, died 22nd March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE INMAN WHITTAKER, North Staffs. Regt.,
of Bank Buildings, Barnoldswick, presumed killed 21st March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WATERWORTH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Waterworth, Rook Street, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 13th April, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL HARRY HAWORTH, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. John Haworth, 15, Clifford Street,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 9th April, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. William Smith, 47, Leonard Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 13th April, 1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MAURICE WROE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Wroe, 22, Romille Street, Skipton, presumed killed 21st
March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR ALDRIDGE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. David Aldridge, Victoria Road, Earby, killed in
action 17th April, 1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS SIMPSON, Leicestershire Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Simpson, Old Greenwoods Farm, Bolton-by-Bowland,
killed in action 18th April, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE I. ADAMTHWAITE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. I. Adamthwaite, Stone Gate, Low Bentham, killed in
action 11th April, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JOHN THOMAS MOORE, Royal Scots
Fusiliers, of Burtersett, Hawes, killed in action 19th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS HACKSTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Hackston, Sutton, died May, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT P. CASSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. William Casson, Hammond Head Farm, Keasden, Clapham,
killed in action 13th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL PETER FRED BERESFORD,
King’s Royal Rifles, son of Mrs. J. Beresford, Old Ings Farms,
Horton-in-Ribblesdale, died of wounds, 30th March, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS W. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Smith, Rose Cottage, Lothersdale, died of wounds 16th
April, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER MILES CALVERT, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Thomas Calvert, Burtersett, Hawes, died of wounds 24th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN EDWIN SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Smith, High Bentham, officially presumed killed 12th May,
1917.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE CREIGHTON (Baines), Duke of
Well.’s Regt., of Settle, killed in action 15th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ERNEST DEWHURST, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 7, Chancery Lane, Skipton, killed in action 18th May, 1918.
Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER RICHARD AYRTON, R.F.A., of Carleton,
died of wounds 29th April, 1918. Aged 41 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE BINNS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Binns, Park Cottage, Barden, killed in action
14th April, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT PARSONS, North Staffs. Regt.,
son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Robert Parsons, Stories House, Elslack, died
of wounds 24th April, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY LAMBERT, Yorks. Regt., son of
Mrs. T. Lambert, 17, Elliott Street, Silsden, killed in action 10th
April, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER HARRY BARRETT, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of Norton Street, Silsden, died of wounds in France 12th
April, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER JOHN WILLIAM WILSON, R.F.A., son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Green, Skipton Road, Steeton, killed in action 29th
April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN HARTLEY BARRETT, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Barrett, Elmsley Street, Steeton,
killed in action 13th April, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS H. BAILEY, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Bailey, Longroyd Road, Earby,
killed in action 14th April, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. LEEPER, Highland Light Infantry, son
of Mr. & Mrs. George Leeper, Monkroyd, Barnoldswick, killed in action
13th April, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ABRAM HUNTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of North Avenue, Barnoldswick, died from gas poisoning in France 29th
April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM C. BORROWDALE, K.O.Y.L.I., son
of Mrs. Borrowdale, Burton-in-Lonsdale, died of wounds 22nd April,
1918. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER STANLEY DERBYSHIRE, Royal Engineers, of
3, Park Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action 26th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN R. PARKER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. Fred Parker, 17, Queen Street, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 14th April, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM NUTTER, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of 9, Wellington Street, Skipton, died of wounds 12th April,
1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY MAUDSLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Stephen Maudsley, 17, Pendle Street, Skipton, died of
wounds 16th April, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE M. THOMPSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Carr House Farm, Barnoldswick, killed in action 28th April, 1918. Aged
29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS BRIDGE, East Lancs. Regt., of
18, Lower West Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 16th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT GEORGE WILLIAM BURROWS, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., formerly a Police Constable, East Staincliffe Division,
11, Milton Street, Skipton, killed in action 11th April, 1918. Aged 32
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR CLAYTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 44, Russell Street, Skipton, killed in action 12th April, 1918. Aged
32.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM R. ARMSTRONG, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. George Armstrong, George Street,
Skipton, died of wounds May, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT BOWNASS, East Yorks. Regt.,
eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. George Bownass, Grassington, officially
presumed killed 10th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: DRIVER ORMEROD CLARKSON, Royal Engineers, son
of Mr. William Clarkson, Reservoir House, Silsden, accidentally drowned
in the Persian Gulf 24th April, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT BRAY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. H. Bray, 2, Sandholme Terrace, Earby, killed in action
26th April, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY BALDWIN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 8, Colne Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 29th April, 1918. Aged
29 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER W. G. BRIGGS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Eshton, killed in action 11th April, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER CORK, K.O.S.B., of 15, Turner
Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 20th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS CRAGG, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
South View, Sedbergh, killed in action 13th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: GUNNER FRED DACRE, R.G.A., son of Mr. and Mrs.
John Dacre, 40, School Terrace, Barnoldswick, killed in action 20th
April, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. DICKINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. S. Dickinson, 3, Bell Hill, Settle, presumed killed 29th
April, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL CHARLES R. EARL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Earl, 25, Elliott Street, Silsden, killed in action
29th April, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT WALTER GIBSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 28, Brook Street, Skipton, killed in action 30th April, 1918. Aged
28 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT J. BURY, D.C.M., M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. James Bury, East Parade, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 13th April, 1918. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE NORMAN HYDE, Worcestershire Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Hyde, 5, Bennett Street, Skipton, killed in action
20th April, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT HAILWOOD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. R. Hailwood, L. & Y. Terrace, Hellifield, killed in
action 30th April, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER M. A. HOYLE, Royal Engineers, of
Barnoldswick, killed in action 13th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSHUA INMAN, South Staffs. Regt., son
of Mrs. Inman, North Street, Silsden, died in Germany, 3rd April, 1918.
Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN KAY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. William Kay, 59, Gargrave Road, Skipton, killed in action
23rd April, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER BERNARD KIRKBRIDE, Royal Engineers, son
of Mrs. Kirkbride, Rose Cottage, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in action
10th April, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JESSE LAWSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Lawson, Crow Tree Farm, Tosside, killed in action
28th April, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER DEAN LISTER, R.G.A., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Alec Lister, 54, Otley Street, Skipton, killed in action 20th April,
1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. LAWSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. R. Lawson, Vicarage Road, Kelbrook, killed in action 7th
April, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN JOHN EASTERBY, King’s Liverpool Regt.,
of 4, Sheep Street, Skipton, died of wounds 19th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED S. NELSON, South Staffs. Regt.,
son of Mrs. Nelson, 20, Castle Street, Skipton, killed in action 11th
April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN NICHOLSON, Lancs. Fusiliers, of
Howgill, Sedbergh, killed in action 11th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE S. READ, Loyal North Lancs. Regt., son
of Mrs. Read, Roseville, Embsay, died of wounds 18th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LAWRENCE E. REDHEAD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Redhead, Laburnum Terrace, Ingleton,
killed in action 12th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. ROBINSON, Northumberland Fusiliers,
son of Mr. T. Robinson, 2, Storrs Cottages, Ingleton, presumed killed
11th April, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ALFRED SUTCLIFFE, R.F.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Robert Sutcliffe, 57, Park Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action
April, 1918. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK SPENCER, Machine Gun Corps, son
of Mrs. Spencer, Spring Bank, Cononley, killed in action 9th April,
1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CLIFFORD STOCKDALE, Liverpool Scottish,
son of the late Mr. Richard Stockdale and Mrs. Cole, of Blundell Sands,
Liverpool, killed in action 10th April, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT A. STOTT, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Stott, Star Inn Yard, Skipton, killed in action 18th
April, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL H. SHACKLETON, Durham Light
Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. William Shackleton, Elmsley Street,
Steeton, killed in action 26th April, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT CLAUDE HARDING, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 5, Bradley Street, Skipton, killed in action 12th April,
1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM THROUP, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mrs. Throup, Dunkirk, Low Bentham, died of wounds 27th April, 1918.
Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN TOMLINSON, Dragoon Guards, son of
Mr. John Tomlinson, Bolton-by-Bowland, died at Aldershot 26th April,
1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES TUDDENHAM, Duke of Well.’s Reg.,
of Earby, killed in action 30th April, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES W. THWAITES, West Yorks. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. R. Thwaites, Raikes Beck, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 22nd April, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER E. O. TURNBULL, R.F.A., stepson of
Mrs. Turnbull, Carleton, killed in action 5th April, 1918. Aged 25
years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ROBERT WILSON, Royal Engineers, son
of Mrs. Wilson, Bull Farm, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in action 21st
April, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: WHEELER JAMES WADE, A.S.C., son of Mr. Robert
Wade, Silsden, died in Salonika, 30th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED H. WILSON, Coldstream Guards,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Wilson, Commercial Street, Barnoldswick,
officially presumed killed 13th April, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS HURST, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hurst, Holly Bank, Tubber Hill, Barnoldswick, missing
since 12th April, 1918; since officially presumed dead. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. F. BENSON, K.O.Y.L.I., of Dent
presumed killed 14th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN SCOTT, Worcestershire Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Scott, 15, Devonshire Terrace, Skipton, reported missing
since 10th April, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM EDMONDSON, Labour Battn., of 6,
Bennett Street, Skipton, missing since 9th April, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED SMITH, Royal Warwick Regt., of
140, Keighley Road, Skipton, died of wounds April, 1918. Aged 35
years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER GEORGE EASTWOOD, R.F.A., son of Mrs. T.
Sutcliffe, 12, East Hill Street, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 5th May,
1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE COUSINS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Cousins, 4, Hartley Street, Earby, presumed killed 27th
November, 1917. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL HERBERT SMITH, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Back Water Street, Skipton, died of wounds 1st May, 1918.
Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER LEWIS HULL PHILLIP, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., youngest son of Mr. John Phillip, Greenfield House Farm, Embsay,
died of wounds 28th April, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER LORD, South Staffs. Regt., of 5,
East View, Barnoldswick, missing 10th April, 1918; afterwards presumed
dead. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOE BANCROFT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Bancroft, Walker’s Place, Silsden, killed
in action 4th May, 1918. Aged 25 years. He was awarded the M.M. and
recommended for the D.C.M.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED SHIERS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. William Shiers, Wennington, and Mrs. Brown, Lower
North Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed in action 3rd May, 1918. Aged 20
years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER WALTER MIDGLEY, R.F.A., son of Mr.
Midgley, Gillians, Barnoldswick, killed in action 21st March, 1918.
Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK MYERS, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Skipton, died of wounds 30th May, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: TRUMPETER JOHNNIE WHITAKER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Addingham, died of wounds 12th May, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PRESTON COULSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 3, Ivy Mount, Ingleton, killed in action May, 1918. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES W. WHITTAKER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Edward Whittaker, 28, Devonshire Street,
Skipton, killed in action 3rd May, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN WILLIAM RUSSELL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Skipton, died of wounds 7th May, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANCIS KAY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Lothersdale, killed in action May, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER MATTHEW HENRY LUND, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. H. Lund, Halton West, killed in action 25th April,
1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL PERCY BARTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. C. Barton, Midland Terrace, Hellifield, died of
wounds 4th May, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL CHARLES HORNER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Horner, 54, Park Road, Morecambe,
killed in action 29th April, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD WILCOCK CARR, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. Thomas Carr, Bank Head, Bentham, killed in action
May, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL A. CONSTANTINE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. C. Constantine, Manor View, Clapham, reported killed
in action 5th May, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS DAVEY, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of Sutton, killed in action May, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ROBERT DAWSON, K.O.R.R., of
Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in action 2nd May, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL T. M. DRUMMOND, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. George Drummond, 7, Cavendish Street, Skipton,
died of wounds 19th May, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ERNEST FOSTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Skipton, died of wounds 4th May, 1918.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT J. GREGSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 11, Castle Street, Skipton, died of wounds at Lichfield Military
Hospital 15th May, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY GRIMSTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Grimston, Aireside, Cononley, killed in action 24th May,
1918. Aged 34 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES HARRISON, South Staffs. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Harrison, Austwick, died in Bombay 3rd May,
1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ANTHONY NOBLE, King’s Royal Rifles, of
Model Village, Ingleton, died of wounds 20th May, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: STRETCHER-BEARER JOSEPH HIRD, formerly landlord
of Swan Hotel, Gargrave, killed in action 27th May, 1918. Aged 35
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD M. LINDSAY, West Yorks. Regt.,
of 7, Leonard Street, Barnoldswick, presumed killed 29th May, 1918.]

[Illustration: GUNNER JOHN MOORE, Trench Mortar Battery, son
of Mr. & Mrs. John Moore, Hawes, died of wounds 22nd May, 1918. Aged 23
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT PICKUP, Highland Light
Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. James Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 26th May, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER THOMAS SKINNER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Fred Skinner, 18, Castle View, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 3rd May, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: BOMBARDIER WILLIE SPENCER, R.F.A., son of Mr.
Ernest Spencer, Kirkgate, Silsden, died of wounds 8th May, 1918. Aged
23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT THOMPSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Carleton, killed in action 25th May, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS WADE, South Lancs. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Wade, 20, Newmarket Street, Skipton, killed in action 7th
May 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM SIMPSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of 11, Star Inn Yard, Skipton, died of wounds 2nd May, 1918. Aged 29
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE C. J. SISSON, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mr. J. Sisson, Ingmire Hall, Sedbergh, died of wounds 27th May,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM HENRY GRANT, East Yorks. Regt.,
of 12, The Butts, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 7th June, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK AYRTON, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. &
Mrs. John Thomas Ayrton, 63, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds
12th August, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. H. B. WHITEHEAD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Dawson Street, Skipton, killed in action 7th June, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE F. J. MASON, Lancs. Fusiliers, of
Skipton, officially presumed killed 16th August, 1917. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. PICKERING, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of Essex Street, Barnoldswick, missing 27th May, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST BALDOCK, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Baldock, 12, Sackville Street, Skipton, died of
wounds 14th June, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST BISHOP, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of the late Mr. & Mrs. William Bishop, Skipton, killed in action
16th June, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL THOMAS CLEMMETT, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Sedbergh, killed in action 20th June, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWIN FIRTH, Artists’ Rifles, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Squire Firth, Earby, killed in action 1st June, 1918. Aged
29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDGAR FORTUNE, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mrs. Fortune, 13, Tillotson Street, Silsden, died of wounds in
Germany June, 1918. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ALFRED GUNN, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. Alfred Gunn, Balshaw, Tatham Fells, Bentham, killed in action
8th June, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. L. HALL, Northumberland Fusiliers,
of Sedbergh, killed in action 23rd June, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL A. G. PERCY, Royal Berks. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. William Percy, Tems Street, Giggleswick, died of
wounds 24th June, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN JOSHUA ROBERTS, H.M.S. _Resolution_, of
Silsden, died on hospital ship of appendicitis 28th June, 1918. Aged 33
years.]

[Illustration: TRUMPETER T. K. ROUTLEDGE, Queen’s Own Dorset
Yeomanry, son of Mr. & Mrs. Routledge, Hollin Tree, Ingleton, killed in
action near Jericho 9th June, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT SIMPSON, Labour Battn., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Simpson, 56, Westmoreland Street, Skipton, died of wounds
18th June, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. TOWLER, East Lancs. Regt., son
of Mrs. Whinray, Bank House, Lawkland, Austwick, died in Germany 14th
June, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL WILLIAM WARD, West Yorks.,
Headmaster of Long Preston Endowed School, killed in action 27th June,
1918.]

[Illustration: FIREMAN BRUCE BRADLEY, of the Hospital Ship
Llandevery Castle, son of Mr. J. Bradley, Gargrave, drowned at sea 27th
June, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT E. WALKER, Durham Light
Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. Walker, Glenside, Carleton, died a prisoner
of war in Germany July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED BUTT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. F. Butt, Main Street, Long Preston, died in hospital
in France 1st August, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE HARRISON, West Yorks Regt., of
Bolton-by-Bowland, officially presumed killed 9th October, 1917.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM ASTLE, West Yorks. Regt., of
Skipton, killed in action 19th July, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROWLAND ANDERSON, A.S.C., M.T., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Fred Anderson, 28, Lower North Avenue, Barnoldswick, died in
hospital in France from injuries received by being accidentally knocked
down by an ambulance July, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD OLDFIELD, West Yorks Regt., of
34, Ermysted Street, Skipton, killed in action 20th July, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN SNELL INGHAM, Royal
Fusiliers Regt., son of the late Mr. H. Ingham, Settle, killed in
action July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE OSCAR BROWN, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Glusburn, killed in action July, 1918.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HARRISON BROUSE, R.F.A., son of Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Brouse, High Street, Steeton, died of pneumonia in France
19th July, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN EMMOTT, M.M., East Lancs. Regt.,
of Mewith, Bentham, died a prisoner of war in Germany, July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS FREEMAN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. George Freeman, Skipton, died of pneumonia in France
8th July, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN W. H. GREENBANK, formerly of Lea Gate,
Dent, drowned at sea 2nd July, 1918. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL H. COWGILL, West Yorks. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. William Cowgill, Nelson, formerly of Glusburn, died
of wounds 2nd July, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN HUTCHINSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. William Hutchinson, Batty Farm, Bentham, killed in
action 24th July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY HARGREAVES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. Alfred Hargreaves, North Street, Sutton Mill, died of
wounds 20th July, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL A. HEY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Hey, Orchard Hills Terrace, Carleton, killed in
action 20th July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN THOMAS IDESON, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of High Gamsworth, Barden, died in Germany 28th July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. JOHNSON, South Staffs Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Spencer Johnson, Wharf View, Beamsley, died in Germany 31st
July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. JONES, Labour Corps, of Sutton, died
in hospital at Catterick 2nd July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROWLAND LOVICK, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mrs.
Lovick, 207, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action 2nd July,
1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN GERALD MITCHELL, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., son of Mr. W. Mitchell, Station Master, Long Preston,
killed in action 20th July, 1918.]

[Illustration: SAPPER GEORGE H. MASON, Royal Engineers, of 22,
Ermysted Street, Skipton, died of wounds July, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES NORCROSS, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr.
& Mrs. William Norcross, 23, Wellhouse Square, Barnoldswick, died in
hospital in Staffordshire 22nd July, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. E. OVERSBY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. E. Oversby, Hobsons, Cowgill, Dent, killed in action
23rd July, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES PARKER, Border Regt., of Settle,
died in Salonika 6th July, 1918. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ROBERT B. REDMAYNE, West Yorks Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Redmayne, South House, Horton-in-Ribblesdale, killed
in action 14th July, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN ROBINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Chapel Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 20th July, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN REDFERN, A.S.C., son of Mr. John
Redfern, Kirkby Malham, died of pneumonia in France 13th July, 1918.
Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE E. STOREY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Skipton, killed in action 18th July, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN WILLIAM SPENCER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Earby, killed in action 20th July, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN SOUTHERN, Argyll & Sutherland
Highlanders, of Barnoldswick, killed in action 25th July, 1918. Aged 30
years.]

[Illustration: SEAMAN JAMES SWALES, R.N., son of Mr. & Mrs.
Fred Swales, Threapland, Cracoe, died of pneumonia 3rd July, 1918. Aged
19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD TOWNSON, K.O.Y.L.I., of
Dunkirk, Low Bentham, died a prisoner of war in Germany 27th July,
1918.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILFRED ANKER, R.F.A., of Barnoldswick,
died in Keighley hospital August, 1918, from the effect of gas
poisoning. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE HERBERT ALTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Alton, 3, Huntley Street, Barnoldswick, accidentally
drowned while bathing in France 14th August, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. E. FAWCETT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. G. Fawcett, Lea Gate, Dent, killed in action 31st August,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIE WIGGAN, West Yorks. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Wiggan, 86, John Street, Nelson, formerly of
Skipton, officially presumed killed 31st August, 1917. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JAMES BINNS, Grenadier Guards, son of
Mrs. John Binns, 16, Middleton, Cowling, killed in action 25th August,
1918.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER ALBERT BENSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 2, Green Street, Cowling, killed in action on the Italian
Front 11th Sept., 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL CARL DUGDALE MILNER, London
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. C. Milner, Hawes, late of Barnoldswick, killed
in action 22nd August, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAM BRADLEY, Durham Light Infantry, son
of Mr. & Mrs. William Bradley, West View, Cowling, died of wounds 18th
September, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. T. THWAITES, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Settle, killed in action 9th August, 1918.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ROBERT RIGG, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Grassington, killed in action 7th August, 1918; formerly Police
Constable at Grassington.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FREDERICK BRACEWELL, Dorset Regt., son
of Mr. R. Bracewell, Calf Hall Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action
11th August, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BARRETT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Barrett, 23, Birtwhistle’s Yard, Skipton, killed in action
31st August, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN ARTHUR BUTTERFIELD,
K.O.S.B., son of Mr. & Mrs. Fred Butterfield, late of Steeton, now of
New Zealand, killed in action 26th August, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER BIRCH, son of Mr. & Mrs. Birch,
Burnley, and formerly of Skipton, killed in action 26th August, 1918.
Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ARTHUR BLACKBURN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Private Thomas Blackburn, late of Wray and recently of
Bentham, killed in action 30th August, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR BAILEY, Royal Fusiliers, son of
Mrs. Bailey, 12, Duckett Street, Skipton, died of wounds 26th August,
1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ARTHUR D. BLACKBURN, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Blackburn, 9, Rushton Avenue, Earby,
killed in action 20th August, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RONALD BENSON, Scots Guards, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Benson, Skipton Road, Silsden, killed in action 24th
August, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS CHARLES CHEW, K.O.R.L., son of
Mrs. A. Chew, 10, Union Terrace, Skipton, killed in action 22nd August,
1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERTRAM CLOUGH, Northumberland
Fusiliers, of Crosshills, killed in action 18th August, 1918. Aged 23
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE BERNARD FLETCHER, M.M., East Yorks.
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. William Fletcher, 5, Clifford Street, Skipton,
killed in action 16th August, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE MAURICE HARGREAVES, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Hargreaves, 70, Otley Street, Skipton, killed
in action 5th August, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN ARTHUR HOWARD, Seaforth
Highlanders, son of Corporal and Mrs. Howard, 47, Westmoreland Street,
Skipton, died of wounds 9th August, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD HOYLE, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Albert Hoyle, Hodge Syke, Earby, killed in action
25th August, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER W. H. JOHNSON, Machine Gun Corps, of 17,
Upper Sackville Street, Skipton, killed in action August, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD KENYON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kenyon, 54, Willow Bank, Barnoldswick, killed
in action 28th August, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LEWIS HARTLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. P. Hartley, 237, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, killed
in action 31st August, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN THOMAS HODGE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mrs. Hodge, 82, Wesley Place, Earby, killed in action
31st August, 1918.]

[Illustration: TROOPER DAVID WILLIAM HARKER, Dragoon Guards,
son of Mrs. Harker, 14, Redehall Avenue, Nelson, late of Widdale, near
Hawes, killed in action 8th August, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. F. JONES, Grenadier Guards, son of
Mrs. Jones and grandson of Mr. J. Winskill, Malham Tarn, killed in
action 23rd August, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE STEPHEN LAWSON, Royal Scots Regt., son
of Mr. James Lawson, Fourlands Farm, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in
action 11th August, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN LISTER, East Yorks. Regt., son of
Mrs. Lister, The Green, Addingham, killed in action 26th August, 1918.
Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE IRVING METCALFE, Highland Light
Infantry, of 20, Beech Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 31st
August, 1918. Aged 43 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE MILLER, East Yorks. Regt., of
Settle, killed in action 23rd August, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN MCIVOR, Yorks. & Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas McIvor, 49, Albert Street, Earby, killed in action
25th August, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST NUTTER, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Levi Nutter, 29, Rook Street, Barnoldswick, died of
wounds in Germany, 12th August, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE PERCY OVEREND, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Main Street, Sutton, killed in action 31st August, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED PENDLE, Durham Light Infantry,
son of Mrs. Pendle, 8, Alexandra Terrace, Skipton, killed in action
25th August, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD WAITE, King’s Own Regt., second
son of the late Mr. James Waite, Moor Hall Farm, Earby, killed in
action 24th August 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT THOMPSON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Skipton, killed in action 30th August, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JOHN WHITE, Grenadier Guards, son of
Mr. & Mrs. A. White, Glen Farm, Carleton, died of wounds 13th August,
1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN SIMPSON, West Yorks. Regt.,
of Barnoldswick, killed in action 24th August, 1918. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER CHARLES V. THORNTON, D.C.M., Dragoon
Guards, son of Mr. Charles Thornton, Barnoldswick, killed in action
14th August, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIE MITCHELL, Scots Guards Regt.,
son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, Bolton Abbey, died
of wounds 20th September, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-SERGEANT J. MITCHELL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, Bolton
Abbey, killed by a sniper 21st September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER LIMMER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Limmer, Grassington, killed in action in Italy 13th
September, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL L. C. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Keasden, Clapham, killed in action 14th September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ERNEST ALDERSLEY, son of Mr. & Mrs. J.
Aldersley, West Street, Gargrave, killed in action 3rd September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CECIL BROOK, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mrs. Brook, 32, Kirkgate, Silsden, died of wounds 20th September,
1918.]

[Illustration: GUNNER FRANK BARTLETT BOOTH, R.G.A., son of the
late Mr. & Mrs. Booth, 44, Browfield Terrace, Silsden, died of wounds
4th September, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIE BARKER, East Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. Barker, Farnhill, killed in action 24th September, 1918.
Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT BURTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Ingleton, killed in action September, 1918. Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. BROWN, Durham Light Infantry, son
of Mr. T. Brown, 35, George Street, Skipton, killed in action 30th
September, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER J. T. BAKER, R.F.A., of 25, Ings Avenue,
Skipton, killed in action 5th September, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK BOTTOMLEY, Notts. & Derby Regt.,
of 51, Colne Road, Glusburn, killed in action 18th September, 1918.
Aged 20 years. He was awarded a Certificate of Merit for bravery in the
field.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. CATON, A.S.C., of Kirkby Malham,
died at Rouen of pneumonia 20th Sept., 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. CROSSLEY, R.F.A., of 25,
Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 22nd Sept., 1918. Aged
39 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL TOM COCKSHOTT, Machine Gun Corps, son
of Mrs. Cockshott, 49, Otley Street, Skipton, killed in action 18th
September, 1918. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM EMMOTT, Lincolnshire Regt., only
son of Mr. & Mrs. Emmott, 18, Walton Street, Skipton, died of wounds
27th Sept., 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALEX. WILFRED GILL, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Crosshills, killed in action 1st September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER HOLMES, R.A.M.C., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Matthew Holmes, 10, Colne Road, Kelbrook, killed in action 18th
Sept., 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE G. HARGREAVES, Tank Corps, son of Mrs.
S. Hargreaves, Cumberland Street, Skipton, killed in action 22nd Sept.,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN HARRISON, Lancs. Fusiliers, of
Duke Street, Burton-in-Lonsdale, killed in action 28th Sept., 1918.
Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT HOPKINSON, Munster Fusiliers,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hopkinson, 45, Bank St., Barnoldswick, died in France
5th Sept., 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ARTHUR HAWKSWELL, R.F.A., son of Mr. &
Mrs. Hawkswell, 33, Castle Street, Skipton, died of wounds 10th Sept.,
1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: NAVAL MOTOR MECHANIC W. HOWSON, son of Mr. &
Mrs. Thomas Howson, Hellifield, killed whilst motoring 23rd September,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. INMAN, West Yorks. Regt., of 15,
Keighley Road, Skipton, killed in action 17th September, 1918. Aged 27
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HERBERT W. JEFFORD, A.S.C., only son
of Mr. & Mrs. Jefford, Gap, Dent, died in Mesopotamia 25th September,
1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. LISTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mrs. Lister, School Lane, Addingham, died of wounds 1st Sept., 1918.
Aged 38 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER S. LAWSON, R.G.A., of Tosside, Long
Preston, died of wounds, 26th Sept., 1916. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK LEE, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. E. Lee, Belmont Bridge, Skipton, died of wounds 2nd
Sept., 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: STAFF-SERGT. L. MCRINK, R.F.A., son of Mr.
Stephen McRink, Addingham, died of wounds 8th September, 1918. Aged 32
years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT JOHN WILLIAM MYERS, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 13, Bethel Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 12th Sept.,
1918. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL RICHARD C. MACK, Machine Gun Corps,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Denis Mack, 33, Louvain Street, Barnoldswick, died of
wounds 27th September, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD NUTTER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. W. Nutter, Gisburn, killed in action 2nd September, 1918.
Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: ABLE SEAMAN SYDNEY JAMES PROCTER, R.N., son of
Mr. James Procter, Settle, died of wounds September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN REEDY, Highland Light Infantry,
son of Mrs. E. Reedy, 22, Grove Street, Earby, killed in action 20th
September, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. SMITH, Yorks. & Lancs. Regt., son
of Mr. & Mrs. F. Smith, Church Street, Addingham, killed in action 2nd
September, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JACK SMITH, West Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. James Smith, Institute Street, Glusburn, killed in action 19th
September, 1918. Aged 41 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL ALFRED SPENCER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of 13, Cowgill Street, Earby, presumed killed in action 20th
September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM W. WHITELEY, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Whiteley, Craven Terrace, Settle, died
of wounds 28th September, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK WHARTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Barnoldswick, killed in action 1st September, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL T. E. WALKER, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Walker, 3, Thornton Street, Skipton, died
of wounds 26th Sept., 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE TOM WILSON, East Lancs. Regt., son of
Mr. & Mrs. Tom Wilson, The Green, Stainforth, Settle, killed in action
18th Sept., 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HENRY WAKEFIELD, Canadian Mounted
Rifles, only son of Mr. & Mrs. William Wakefield, 18, Railway Street,
Barnoldswick, killed in action 29th September, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT WADE, Duke of Well.’s Regt. son
of Mr. & Mrs. William Wade, Skipton Road, Silsden, killed in action
21st September, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES WOOLLER, Royal Fusiliers, son of
Mrs. Whitehead, Long Preston, killed in action 14th September, 1918.
Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY WOOD, eldest son of Mr. &
Mrs. William Wood, formerly of 9, Chapel Street, Steeton, died of
appendicitis in France 4th September, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT WILSON, Loyal North Lancs.
Regt., of The Green, Stainforth, Settle, officially presumed killed
13th September, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LEO ANSLOW, King’s Liverpool Regt., son
of Sergeant W. Anslow, 1, Raikes Road, Skipton, died of pneumonia in
France 21st October, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. P. ANDERSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Barnoldswick, killed in action 12th October, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN ATKINSON, R.F.A., of
Burton-in-Lonsdale, died of pneumonia in Devonport hospital 19th
October, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL WILLIAM ARNOLD, M.M., Machine
Gun Corps, of 7, Shuttleworth Street, Earby, died of wounds 25th
October, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN WILLIAM BEASLEY,
K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Beasley, 18, Ermysted Street, Skipton,
killed in action 1st October, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER SAM BANCROFT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Bolton Road, Silsden, died of wounds 14th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD BATESON, Royal Dublin Fusiliers,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Harry Bateson, Blaeberry House, Burton-in-Lonsdale,
killed in action 4th October, 1918. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED BOTTOMLEY, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mr. H. Bottomley, Croft Street, Glusburn, killed in action 12th
October, 1918.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER WALTER BANNISTER, East Lancs. Regt.,
of 6, Esholt Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 27th October, 1918.
Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM BARBER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Barber, 42, Westgate Street, Skipton, died of wounds 31st
October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLIE BERRY, M.G.C., of Crosshills,
killed in action 7th October, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: ABLE SEAMAN HARRY BROOKS, R.N., son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robinson Brooks, Westfield, Barnoldswick, died at sea from
influenza 21st Oct., 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM ARTHUR BEEBEE, London Regt., of
112, Keighley Road, Skipton, died of dysentery at Cairo 10th October,
1918. Aged 39 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS CHAPMAN, West Yorks. Regt., son
of the late Mr. William Chapman, Crag View, Embsay, died of wounds 9th
October, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE C. E. I. CALVERT, K.O.Y.L.I., son of
Mrs. Calvert, 5, Gibraltar Terrace, Sutton, died of wounds 4th October,
1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALLACE CLOUGH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Barnoldswick, killed in action 12th October, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. J. CRADDOCK, West Yorks. Regt., of
Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in France 26th October, 1918. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL HARRY CROSSLEY, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Earby, killed in action 11th October, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL TOM CONSTANTINE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Charles Constantine, Clapham, killed in action
20th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWIN CLAPHAM, Lancashire Fusiliers, of
Clapham, killed in action October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM COWGILL, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Earby, died of wounds in Italy 17th October, 1918. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL DAVID PERCIVAL DIXON, West
Yorks. Regt., son of Mrs. Dixon, Main Street, Low Bentham, killed in
action 22nd October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE THOMAS DOWNS, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
85, Newmarket Street, Skipton, died of wounds 28th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL W. DIXON, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Dixon, Addingham, died of wounds in Italy 27th
October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LESLIE FORREST, son of Mr. & Mrs. S. T.
Forrest, Bradford, formerly of Steeton, killed in action October, 1918.
Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JAMES CLARENCE FLETCHER, M.M., Scots
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. James Fletcher, 58, Westgate, Skipton,
killed in action 25th October, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SIGNALLER T. FRANKLAND, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Frankland, Dub Garth, Clapham Station, died of wounds
21st October, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: STAFF-SERGEANT WILLIE GALE, R.F.A., of
Addingham, killed in action 1st October, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT G. E. GODWIN, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., of Skipton, killed in action 11th October, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HEDLEY GOODWIN, Leicestershire
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Tom Goodwin, Bransghyll Terrace,
Horton-in-Ribblesdale, killed in action 8th October, 1918. Aged 19
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES GELDARD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Geldard, Cow House Hill Farm, Bolton-by-Bowland, died
of wounds 23rd October, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE B. HAYGARTH, R.F.A., son of Mrs. R.
Haygarth, Dent, died of pneumonia in India 5th October, 1918. Aged 27
years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN WALTER HYDE, King’s Liverpool Regt.,
of Sutton, killed in action 17th October, 1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. S. HOLMES, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
Silsden, died of influenza in Italy 25th Oct., 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM IRELAND, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mrs. Ireland, 23, Station Road, Steeton, died of wounds 23rd
October, 1918. Aged 28 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES JEFFRIES, Cyclist Corps, son of
Mrs. Brooks, 7, Brook Street, Kelbrook, killed in action 27th October,
1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: TROOPER FRANK KENDALL, Royal Hussars, son of
Mr. & Mrs. George Kendall, Buckden, killed in action 8th October, 1918.
Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HARRY KAY, R.G.A., son of Mr. and Mrs.
Edward D. Kay, 9, Park Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 5th
October, 1918. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE A. H. LANG, Yorks. & Lancs. Regt., of
Barnoldswick, died of wounds 22nd October, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN JULIUS LEVI, Royal Irish Rifles, son
of Mr. & Mrs. Isaac Levi, 14, Wellhouse Road, Barnoldswick, died of
wounds 3rd October, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN G. LOWCOCK, Yorks. & Lancs. Regt.,
of Rowland Street, Skipton, killed in action 13th October, 1918. Aged
29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN METCALFE, R.F.A., grandson of Mr.
& Mrs. John Metcalfe, Hawes, killed in action 3rd October, 1918.]

[Illustration: COY. SERGT.-MAJOR OWEN MCDERMOTT, Duke of
Well.’s Regt., of Skipton, killed in action 11th October, 1918. He was
awarded the French Croix de Guerre for gallantry on the field.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL MORPHETT, Royal Munster Fusiliers, of
Moslyn Street, Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in Italy 18th October,
1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN ARTHUR MOTTERSHEAD, Scottish Rifles,
of 4, Grove Street, Earby, killed in action 3rd October, 1918. Aged 20
years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ROBERT H. MILNE, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Robert Milne, 40, Aspin Lane, Earby, died on
29th October, 1918 as the result of an accident. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HAROLD MOORE, Yorks. Regt., son of Mr.
& Mrs. R. Moore, Catriggs, Hawes, died of wounds 20th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL W. MITTON, Grenadier Guards, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Mitton, Hawes, died of wounds 15th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JACK PRESTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt. son
of Mr. Thomas Preston, 29, Belgrave Street, Skipton, killed in action
October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JEREMIAH PLUMBLEY, North Staffs. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. James Plumbley, 18, Federation Street, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 3rd October, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN H. RILEY, Lancs. Fusiliers, of
Main Street, Crosshills, died in Germany 8th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL EDWARD RAMSKILL, Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Ramskill, Highfield Terrace, Low Bentham, killed
in action 24th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. RAWLINGS, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
51, Aire View, Silsden, killed in action 11th October, 1918. Aged 24
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOSEPH T. SCOTT, Royal Berks. Regt.,
son of Mrs. Scott, 163, Burnley Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action
3rd October, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER COOPER SHUTTLEWORTH, R.F.A., only son of
Mr. & Mrs. John Shuttleworth, Stoney Bank Farm, Earby, died of wounds
29th October, 1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of 10,
Union Terrace, Skipton, died of wounds 18th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. R. STEPHENS, West Riding Yeomanry,
of 38, St. John’s Street, Silsden, torpedoed on board s.s. _Leinster_
10th October, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER HERBERT STRETCH, Royal Field Artillery,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Richard Stretch, 18, Turner Street, Barnoldswick,
died of wounds 10th October, 1918. Aged 24 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN HAROLD SHINGLER, King’s Royal Rifles,
of Cononley, killed in action 12th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. H. TOWNSON, Northumberland
Fusiliers, formerly landlord of the Blue Bell Inn, Kettlewell, presumed
to have died in Germany 11th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE GEORGE THOMPSON, Royal North Lancs.
Regt., of Skipton, died of wounds 9th October, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT WILLIAM WHITE, West Yorks. Regt., only
son of Mr. & Mrs. William White, Grange Farm, Carleton, died in Ireland
6th October, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT RICHARD WHARTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Michael Wharton, 8, George Street, Earby,
killed in action 12th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: GUNNER CHARLES WARD, R.G.A., of Skipton, killed
in action 17th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL FRED WHITAKER, West Yorks. Regt., son
of Mrs. George Whitaker, 9, Cobden Street, Barnoldswick, died of wounds
25th October, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD WARING, Gordon Highlanders, of
Bentham, killed in action 27th October, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED WISEMAN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. William Wiseman, 9, Montrose Terrace, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 11th October, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER MAJOR WALLACE, R.G.A., second son of Mr.
& Mrs. Wallace, Kettlewell, died of wounds 27th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: GUNNER R. M. FOTHERGILL, R.F.A., son of Mr. T.
Fothergill, Main Street, Sedbergh, died a prisoner of war in Germany
5th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE REGINALD SMITH, son of Mr. & Mrs.
Alfred Smith, Holmfield, Sutton, died of pneumonia in France 27th
October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN NELSON, Royal Scots, son of Mr.
William Nelson, Garsdale, Sedbergh, reported to have died in Germany
9th October, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY BANKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Banks, Rimington Mill, Rimington, killed in action
November, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD BROTHERTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Brotherton, Bolton-by-Bowland, died of
pneumonia in France 23rd November, 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT ROBERT BROWN, North Staffs. Regt., of
Skipton, died of influenza in India 13th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL WALTER BOLTON, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Bolton, Long Preston, died of pneumonia in
India, 23rd November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE A. BANKS, Duke of Well.’s Regt., late
of Barnoldswick, killed in action 1st November, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED CHEW, R.F.A., son of Mr. Charles
Chew, Nelson, nephew of Mr. Kendal Chew, Skipton, killed in action 4th
November, 1918.]

[Illustration: SAPPER A. PERCY COOPER, R.E., of Long Preston,
died in hospital in Alexandria from dysentery 6th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM CARR, Queen’s Bays, son of Mr.
& Mrs. Thomas Carr, Banks Head, Bentham killed in action 7th November,
1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PERCY T. H. COPE, WEST YORKS. Regt., of
Skipton, killed in action 6th November, 1918. Aged 35 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL JOHN CHURCHMAN, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Captain and Mrs. J. Churchman, 29, Brougham Street, Skipton,
died of wounds 25th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CLARENCE CLARK, Essex Regt., of 8,
Cromwell Street, Skipton, died of pneumonia in Palestine 26th November,
1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT CHESTER, 4th East Yorks. Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Robert Chester, Masker Row, Waddington, died of
pneumonia at Hull, 11th November, 1918. Aged 18 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL ALFRED CAREY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Carey, Copy Nook Hotel, Bolton-by-Bowland,
killed in action 7th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK DAWSON, A.S.C., son of Mr.
William Dawson, 33, Tufton Street, Silsden, died of pneumonia in France
November, 1918. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL TOM DUCKETT, son of the late Mr.
Thomas Duckett, Grassington, died of wounds 24th November, 1918. Aged
20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILLIAM JAMES ELLIS, Durham Light
Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. L. Ellis, Crag House Farm, Addingham, died
of wounds 9th November, 1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ARTHUR EDMONDSON, Machine Gun Corps, of
Cowling, died of pneumonia in hospital at Alnwick, 16th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE LEONARD FOSTER, Machine Gun Corps, of
Long Preston, killed in action 21st November, 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: DRIVER TOM GILL, R.G.A., son of Mrs. L. Gill,
Bridge House, Gargrave, died of pneumonia in France 6th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALBERT P. GILL, R.A.M.C., of
Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in France 13th November, 1918. Aged 25
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE T. H. HUTCHINSON, K.O.Y.L.I., son
of Mr. H. Hutchinson, George Street, Carleton, killed in action 2nd
November, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILSON HORSFIELD, Duke of Well.’s
Regt., son of the late Mrs. Horsfield, Craven View Farm, Barnoldswick,
killed in action 4th November, 1918. Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARGREAVES, West Yorks. Regt., son of
Mr. T. Hargreaves, Appletreewick, died of gas poisoning in France 19th
November, 1918. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT SAM LISTER, M.M., West Yorks. Regt.,
of Barden, killed in action November, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER W. RICHARDSON, R.G.A., of Trees Cottage,
Gargrave, died of pneumonia in Liverpool 17th November, 1918. Aged 25
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. REDDIHOUGH, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. R. Reddihough, Chapel Street, Barnoldswick, killed in
action 4th November, 1918. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED SMITH, Leicestershire Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. A. Smith, 1, Albion Road, Earby, died of dysentery in
France 13th Nov., 1918. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE VINCENT SLINGER, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. John Slinger, Albion House, Ingleton, died of pneumonia in
France 22nd November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE ALFRED J. TRAYFORD, Durham Light
Infantry, of Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in France 12th November,
1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN LEWIS VARLEY, Rifle Brigade, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Amos Varley, 9, Victoria Road, Earby, killed in action 6th
November, 1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER T. WOOD, R.F.A., son of Mr. M. Wood,
Ling Park, Nessfield, died of wounds at Whalley hospital 11th November,
1918. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WILLIAM WALLACE, R.G.A., of Kettlewell,
died of influenza in France 1st November, 1918. Aged 33 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CARL R. WATSON, Labour Battn., of
Barnoldswick, died of influenza at Ludlow, Shropshire, 1st November,
1918. Aged 29 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WATSON, A.S.C., son of Mr. and
Mrs. William Watson, 8, Fairfax Street, Silsden, died of pneumonia in
Salonika 11th November, 1918. Aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL WILLIAM WILD, Machine Gun Corps, son
of Mrs. Wild, Lambert Street, Skipton, died of pneumonia at Grantham
25th November, 1918. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER ROBERT WINDLE, R.F.A., of 34, York
Street, Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in France 29th November, 1918.
Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRED WINDLE, Coldstream Guards, of 19,
Clayton Street, Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia 11th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE R. WEBSTER, A.S.C., M.T., of Skipton,
died in East Africa 20th November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. WALLING, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. F. Walling, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, died a
prisoner in Germany 17th November, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
of the late Mr. William Smith, Castle Street, Skipton, killed in action
November, 1918. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: BOMBARDIER CYRIL HINDSON, R.F.A., of Weavers
Yard, Sedbergh, died in Hospital November, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE SAMUEL BRADLEY, R.A.M.C., son of Mr. &
Mrs. George Bradley, Colne Road, Earby, died of pneumonia in Salonika,
15th December, 1918. Aged 27 years.]

[Illustration: ABLE SEAMAN B. H. CREED, R.N.D., of Ingleton,
died a prisoner of war in Germany 24th Dec., 1918. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL L. C. MARSDEN, Coldstream
Guards, son of Mr. & Mrs. John Marsden, Park View, Salterforth, died of
pneumonia 7th December, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE P. MIDGLEY, South Notts. Hussars, son
of Mr. Midgley, Sutton, died of pneumonia in Russia 15th December,
1918.]

[Illustration: NURSE DORIS J. PROCTOR, V.A.D., daughter of Mr.
James Proctor, Duke Street, Settle, died of pneumonia at Leicester 17th
December, 1918.]

[Illustration: FIRST-CLASS AIR MECHANIC HARRY TILLOTSON,
son of the late Mr. J. Tillotson, Silsden, died from shell shock at
Paisley, N.B., 21st December, 1918. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN BENTHAM, of Aynham Farm,
Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in India. Aged 30 years.]

[Illustration: SAPPER J. INMAN, R.E., of Main Street, Embsay,
died of pneumonia in Salonika 16th January, 1919. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL H. D. ROUTLEDGE, West Yorks
Regt., son of Mr. W. Routledge, Hollin Tree, Ingleton, died from gas
poisoning 2nd January, 1919. Aged 31 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RAYMOND CHAPMAN, Notts. & Derby Regt.,
son of the late Mr. John Chapman, Grassington, died of pneumonia at
Catterick Camp February, 1919. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY GREGSON, R.F.A., of Eshton,
Gargrave, died of bronchitis in France 13th February, 1919. Aged 38
years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. W. SMITH, Machine Gun Corps, son of
Mrs. Smith, Cowling, died in hospital of pneumonia at Manchester 19th
February, 1919.]

[Illustration: DRIVER JAMES HALSTEAD, A.S.C., of 50, Mosley
Street, Barnoldswick, accidentally killed at Clipstone Camp 7th
February, 1919. Aged 37 years.]

[Illustration: SERGEANT C. E. HARRIS, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
of Barnoldswick, died 10th February, 1919. Aged 49 years.]

[Illustration: BOMBARDIER ARTHUR SMITH, R.G.A., of Ash Street,
Crosshills, died at Shrewsbury 13th February, 1919. Aged 32 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL J. A. SMITH, Royal Air Force, of Aire
Street, Crosshills, died 4th February, 1919.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE W. WOODS, Royal Fusiliers, son of Mr. &
Mrs. J. Woods, Green Close, Clapham, died of wounds 7th February, 1919.
Aged 23 years.]

[Illustration: STEWART PERCIVAL JOHN SCOTT, Royal Naval Sick
Berth Reserve, of Cononley, died of appendicitis at Harwich 31st March,
1919.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE EDWARD BENTHAM, Loyal North Lancs.
Regt., of Dent, died 11th March, 1919.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLIE WOOD, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
son of Mr. & Mrs. Hubert Wood, Grassington, died of pneumonia in France
2nd April, 1919.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE CHARLES CLARKSON, Durham Light
Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. Clarkson, Emsley Street, Steeton, died in
hospital at Epsom 23rd June, 1919. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WALTER STRICKLAND, R.A.M.C., son of Mr.
& Mrs. Alfred Strickland, 50, Mosley Street, Barnoldswick, died at Dean
Head Sanatorium, near Leeds, 1st July, 1919. Aged 36 years.]

[Illustration: GUNNER WM. J. JACKSON, R.F.A., 5, Bairstow
Street, Barnoldswick, son of the late Mr. James Jackson, Commercial
Hotel, Barnoldswick, died at the Royal Herbert Hospital, Woolwich, July
26th, 1919. Aged 41 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN JAMES PITCHFORD, West Yorkshire Regt.,
8, Foresters Buildings, Barnoldswick, reported missing April 25th,
1918; death presumed July, 1919. Aged 40 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRID CLOUGH, 12th Northumberland
Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. Chas. Clough, Bridge Road, Sutton Mill;
died a prisoner of war at Mons-en-Chaussee, July 25th, 1918, and buried
at Peronne Military Cemetery. Aged 21 years.]

[Illustration: RIFLEMAN ROBERT DUXBURY, West Yorkshire Regt.,
formerly of 75, Colne Road, Earby, missing May 12th, 1917, since
presumed to be dead.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN WILLIAM WELLOCK, 9th Duke of
Well.’s Regt., killed by a German sniper 8th September, 1918. Brother
of Mrs. M. Clark, Valley View, Burnsall. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE STANLEY SPENCE DUFFILL, 6th Leicester
Regt., son of Mr. Wm. Duffill, Holmfield, Sutton-in-Craven, died a
prisoner of war in hospital at Namur, November, 1918, and buried in
Namur Cemetary, November 13th, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE FRANK MAYOH, Worcestershire Yeomanry,
son of Mr. & Mrs. John Mayoh, 8, Victoria Road, Barnoldswick,
accidentally killed in Egypt 5th July, 1919. Aged 20 years.]

[Illustration: CORPORAL THOMAS BATTERSBY, Machine Gun Corps,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Battersby, late of Rimington, formerly of Chatburn;
reported missing March 22nd, 1918 and since presumed dead.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE OSCAR BROWN, West Riding Regt., of
Glusburn, killed at La Holanderie, near Fleurbaix, July, 1919.]

[Illustration: LANCE-CORPORAL THOMAS KIRK, Durham Light
Infantry, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kirk, 24, East Hill Street, Barnoldswick,
accidentally killed in Cologne January 1st, 1920. Aged 19 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE WILFRED HENRY HEAP, M.G.C., son-in-law
of the late Mr. Robert Wilcock, 16, Stuart Street, Barnoldswick; died
January 9th, 1920 from tuberculosis, following upon wounds received in
action in France. Aged 22 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY WILSON, Duke of Wellington’s
Regt., son of Mr. Nathan Wilson, Cononley, died from valvular disease
of the heart Dec. 1st, 1919, aged 25 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE RICHARD FOSTER, son of Mr. & Mrs. James
Foster, Bank End, Lawkland, Settle, wounded and taken prisoner April
10th, 1918, and officially presumed dead by the War Office on Jan.
19th, 1920. Aged 26 years.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. H. POYNTON, 26 Warwick Regt., for
five years foreman at Gisburne Park, Gisburne, died of wounds March
26th, 1918.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE JOHN HY. SIMPSON, Duke of Wellington’s
West Riding Regiment, 17, Raikes Beck, Barnoldswick, and a native of
Carleton, missing since April 14th, 1918, since presumed killed.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE J. J. METCALFE, Duke of Wellington’s
West Riding Regiment, eldest of sixteen children of Mrs. Mary A.
Metcalfe, Gills Farm, Tosside. Reported wounded and missing April 19th,
1918, since presumed dead.]

[Illustration: PRIVATE HARRY BULLOCK, East View, Settle,
missing since March 28th, 1918, since presumed killed.]

    PRIVATE HAROLD ARMSTRONG, of Brook Street, Skipton,
    died of wounds in France. Aged 32 years.

    PRIVATE JOHN BROWN, Scottish Fusiliers, brother of
    Miss Annie Brown, Westmoreland Street, Skipton, killed in
    action. Aged 43 years.

    SIGNALLER HENRY CLAPHAM, East Lancs. Regt., son of
    Mr. and Mrs. R. Clapham, High Parrock Farm, Barrowford, and
    formerly of Gargrave, killed in action. Aged 22 years.

    PRIVATE CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, R.A.F., of 63, Water
    Street, Earby, died of pneumonia, at Bradford, Dorset. Aged 30
    years.

    PRIVATE JOHN PERCIVAL, Duke of Well.’s Regt., formerly
    of Skipton, killed in action, 24th March, 1915. Aged 45 years.

    LANCE-CORPORAL H. S. SPRINGTHORPE, Lincoln Regt.,
    formerly of Skipton, killed in action, 12th April, 1915.

    PRIVATE WALTER TURNBULL, East Lancs. Regt., of
    Broughton Road, Skipton, killed in action, April, 1915.

    PRIVATE ROBERT FAY, East Lancs. Regt., grandson of
    Mr. Robert Whalley, 16, Arthur Street Barnoldswick, killed in
    action in the Dardanelles, August, 1915.

    SERGT. FRED SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., formerly of
    Silsden, died of wounds in the Dardanelles, 25th October, 1915.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM AUSTIN, Labour Corps, of 9, Keighley
    Road, Skipton, accidentally killed on the railway in France,
    7th November, 1915. Aged 52 years.

    PRIVATE HARRY GAMBLE, Duke of Well.’s Regt., formerly
    of Kelbrook, died of gas poisoning, January, 1916. Aged 19
    years.

    PRIVATE T. J. TREVERTON, East Lancs. Regt., of Back
    Waterloo Road, Kelbrook, died of wounds 12th July, 1916.

    PRIVATE A. W. P. TUNE, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
    Mrs. Tune, Main Street, Sutton, killed in action, 29th August,
    1916. Aged 27 years.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM TOMLINSON, Loyal North Lancs. Regt.,
    son of Mr. William Tomlinson, Ribblesdale View, Chatburn,
    killed in action, 21st October, 1916. Aged 25 years.

    PRIVATE PERCY LAW, Highland Light Infantry, of 23,
    Moslyn Avenue, Earby, died of pneumonia at Curragh Camp,
    Ireland, 22nd Feb., 1917. Aged 40 years.

    PRIVATE JAMES HARTLEY, West Yorks. Regt., of 19,
    Arthur Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action, 22nd March,
    1917. Aged 36 years.

    PRIVATE STEPHEN METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
    of the late Mr. Stephen Metcalfe, Carleton, died of wounds,
    25th April, 1917. Aged 22 years.

    PRIVATE JOHN GILL, East Yorks. Regt., son of the
    late Mr. Thomas Gill, Skipton, died from injuries received in
    France, 11th April, 1917. Aged 24 years.

    PRIVATE THOMAS MORELAND, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    King Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action, 3rd May, 1917.
    Aged 35 years.

    PRIVATE WALTER STENSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
    the late Mr. and Mrs. Stenson, Watson’s Houses, Skipton, killed
    in action, 8th October, 1917. Aged 39 years.

    CORPORAL WILLIAM SLATER, West Yorks. Regt., late of
    Skipton, died of wounds, 20th November, 1917. Aged 21 years.

    PRIVATE JAMES BELL, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Stalling
    Busk, Askrigg, died of wounds, 11th April, 1918.

    PRIVATE ABRAHAM COOPER, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of 5,
    North Avenue, Barnoldswick, died of gas poisoning in France,
    29th April, 1918. Aged 28 years.

    PRIVATE ARTHUR CLEGG, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of 44,
    Russell Street, Skipton, killed in action, 12th April, 1918.
    Aged 32 years.

    CORPORAL JAMES T. THOMPSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son
    of Mrs. J. Thompson, 28, Pembroke Street, Skipton, killed in
    action, April, 1918. Aged 24 years.

    SAPPER ARTHUR COLES, Royal Engineers, son of Mr.
    William Coles, Station Master, Skipton, killed in action on the
    Italian front, 15th June, 1918. Aged 35 years.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM BURTON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
    Mr. and Mrs. W. Burton, Elslack, died in hospital at Cannock
    Chase, 14th July, 1918. Aged 19 years.

    SERGEANT G. WILKINSON, M.M., of Kilnsey, died of
    wounds, 27th July, 1918.

    PRIVATE EDGAR HANCOCK, Guards M. G. Corps, formerly
    of the “Craven Herald” Staff, killed in action, 5th September,
    1918.

    PRIVATE JACK PARKINSON, Australian Corps, son of Mrs.
    Parkinson, Rimington, died of wounds, 1st September, 1918.

    PRIVATE JOHN GILL, Yorks. & Lancs. Regt., of Skipton,
    killed in action, 13th October, 1918.

    PRIVATE EDWARD FAULKNER, Scottish Rifles, son of the
    late Mr. and Mrs. Richard Faulkner, Silsden, died of wounds,
    Feb., 1917. Aged 19 years.

    PRIVATE JONAS GILL, West Yorks. Regt., son of Mrs.
    Gill, St. John’s Square, Silsden, killed in action, 9th July,
    1917. Aged 29 years.

    LANCE-CORPORAL STANLEY RICHMOND, Canadian Corps, son
    of Mr. Tom Richmond, formerly of Skipton, killed in action,
    29th November, 1917. Aged 23 years.

    PRIVATE H. E. WATSON, Northumberland Fusiliers, of
    Lane End, Cowling, died of gas poisoning, 11th October, 1918.
    Aged 39 years.

    PRIVATE ARTHUR SMITH, Duke of Well.’s Regt., son of
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Steeton, killed in action at Mons, 24th
    August, 1914. Aged 25 years.

    PRIVATE WALKER PARKER, West Yorks Regt., of Haw Grove,
    Hellifield, died of wounds, 9th May, 1918.

    PRIVATE F. DRIVER, East Lancs. Regt., of 14, Castle
    Street, Skipton, killed in action, 23rd September, 1918.



HONOURS AND AWARDS.


SUMMARY.

  V.C.’s.   C.M.G.  C.B.E.  D.S.O. & Bar.  D.S.O.  O.B.E.  R.R.C.
  --------  ------  ------  ------------   ------  ------  ------
     2        5       1           1          14      3       1

  M.C. & Bar.  M.C.  Brevet.  Higher Pay.  D.C.M.  M.M. & 2 bars.
  ----------   ----  ------   ----------   ------  --------------
       2        57     2           1         53         1

  M.M. & 1 Bar.  M.M.  M.S.M.  French.  Belgian.  Italian.  Russian.
  ------------   ----  ------  ------   --------  --------  --------
       7         199     17      13        10        4         2

  Serbian.  Mentions.  D.S.Cer.  Gallantry Cards.
  --------  --------   --------  ----------------
      2        44         1            20          Total 462.


HONOURS AND AWARDS TO CRAVEN’S SONS.

VICTORIA CROSS.

    REV. T. B. HARDY, V.C., D.S.O., M.C. (since killed),
    Chaplain to the Forces, late of Bentham.

    2ND LIEUT. THOMAS HAROLD BROADBENT MAUFE, V.C., Royal
    Garrison Artillery, of Ilkley.

ORDER OF ST. MICHAEL AND ST. GEORGE.

    COLONEL L. M. WILSON, C.M.G., D.S.O., Royal Artillery,
    Bolton-by-Bowland.

    COLONEL HENRY CARR MAUDSLEY, of Settle.

    MAJOR & BT. LT.-COL. (Temp. Brig.-General) RODGER
    STEPHEN TEMPEST, C.M.G., D.S.O., Scots Guards. Croix de
    Guerre with palms, of Broughton Hall, Skipton.

ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE.

    COLONEL HENRY CARR MAUDSLEY, C.B.E., Australian
    Forces, formerly of Settle.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER AND BAR.

    LT.-COL. C. M. BATEMAN, D.S.O., T.D., Commanding ⅙th
    Duke of Well.’s (West Riding) Regiment, of the firm of Messrs.
    T. & M. Bairstow, manufacturers, Sutton.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER.

    2ND LIEUT. ALFRED J. BEST, D.S.O., Royal Engineers, of
    Baildon.

    REV. P. E. BROWN, D.S.O., Chaplain to the Forces, of
    Earby.

    MAJOR A. B. CLARKSON, D.S.O., M.C., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Keighley.

    LIEUT. (A/Lt.-Col.) ARTHUR DRIVER, D.S.O.,
    M.C., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Silsden.

    CAPT. & BT. MAJOR (T/Lt.-Col.) NORMAN A.
    ENGLAND, D.S.O., Duke of Well.’s Regt. (commanded 8th West
    Yorks Regt.) of Gargrave, Skipton.

    CAPT. N. GELDARD, D.S.O., M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Rathmell.

    CAPT. ROBERT CLEMENT PERKS, D.S.O. (since killed),
    Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Hebden.

    LIEUT. JAMES SHORROCKS, D.S.O., Australian Contingent,
    of Hellifield.

    MAJOR & BT. LT.-COL. (Temp. Brig. General) RODGER
    STEPHEN TEMPEST, C.M.G., D.S.O., Scots Guards, of
    Broughton Hall, Skipton.

    LT.-COL. J. WARD, D.S.O., R.A.M.C., of Crosshills.

    LT.-COL. SIR MATHEW R. H. WILSON, C.S.I., D.S.O., of
    Eshton Hall.

    COMDR. R. A. WILSON, D.S.O., H.M.S. “_Mersey_,” son of
    the late Sir Mathew Wilson, of Eshton Hall.

    CAPT. W. P. WRATHALL, D.S.O., M.C., 6th Black Watch,
    of Farnhill.


ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE.

    MAJOR SIMON TATE, O.B.E., Canadian Expeditionary
    Force, formerly of Ingleton.

    MAJOR M. R. DOBSON, O.B.E., R.A.M.C., of Ilkley.

    LT.-COL. J. H. HASTINGS, O.B.E., West Yorkshire Regt.,
    of Ilkley.


ORDER OF THE ROYAL RED CROSS.

    NURSE MARGARET ELLAN TIPLADY, of Askrigg.


MILITARY CROSS AND BAR.

    MAJOR T. S. CARR, M.C., Royal Field Artillery, of
    Barnoldswick.

    2ND LIEUT. H. HARDAKER, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Keighley.


MILITARY CROSS.

    TEMP. CHAPLAIN W. A. ALDERTON, M.C., R.A.M.C., of
    Barnoldswick.

    CAPTAIN W. D. ANDERTON, M.C., R.A.M.C., formerly of
    Skipton.

    2ND LIEUT. G. W. BARRACLOUGH, M.C., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Ingleton. (since killed.)

    CAPTAIN JACK BEECROFT, M.C., Tank Corps, of Long
    Preston.

    2ND LIEUT. J. G. BERRY, M.C., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Earby (missing 16th August, 1917).

    CAPTAIN JOHN BREWIN, M.C., Northamptonshire Regt., of
    Long Preston.

    CAPTAIN W. E. BROWNSWORTH, M.C., Australian
    Contingent, of Skipton.

    REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR (now Qt.-Master and Lieut., ⅐th
    Duke of Well.’s Regt.) O. BUCKLEY, M.C., of Skipton.

    A/CAPTAIN R. J. CAVAN, M.C., King’s Own Scottish
    Borderers, of Settle.

    CAPTAIN (now Major) N. B. CHAFFERS, M.C., ⅙th
    Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Crosshills.

    LIEUT. C. C. CHORLEY, M.C., Lancashire Fusiliers, of
    Sedbergh (since killed in action).

    MAJOR A. B. CLARKSON, D.S.O., M.C., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Keighley.

    CAPTAIN AMOS CLARKSON, M.C., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Silsden.

    CAPTAIN S. H. CLOUGH, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Steeton.

    MAJOR C. P. COATES, M.C., Royal Anglesey Engineers, of
    Bentham.

    CAPTAIN T. B. CLAPHAM, M.C., Royal A. S. Corps, of
    Skipton.

    LIEUT. CLIFFORD CURL, M.C., East Lancashire Regt., of
    Skipton.

    2ND LIEUT. WALTER H. DAVY, M.C., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Grassington.

    2ND LIEUT. W. CROFT DICKINSON, M.C., Scottish
    Division, of Silsden.

    LIEUT. (A/Lt.-Col.) ARTHUR DRIVER, D.S.O.,
    M.C., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Silsden.

    LIEUT. HARRY A. DINSDALE, M.C., King’s Own Yorks. L.
    Infantry, of Bainbridge.

    2ND LIEUT. ROBERT DUCKETT, M.C., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    CAPTAIN R. M. L. DUTTON, M.C., 28th Mountain Batty.,
    10th Mule Corps., of Lothersdale.

    LIEUT. J. H. EDDISON, M.C., 4th West Riding Bde.,
    Royal Field Artillery, of Ilkley.

    CAPTAIN MALCOM ECCLES, M.C., Indian Army, of High
    Bentham.

    CAPT. C. A. FEARN, M.C., King’s Own Yorks. Light
    Infantry, of Settle.

    LIEUT. GEORGE ANNESLEY FISHER, M.C., King’s Royal
    Rifle Corps, of Skipton.

    LIEUT. J. B. HARTLEY, M.C., of Thornton-in-Craven.

    LIEUT. J. HOGAN, M.C., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Long
    Preston.

    LIEUT. (A/Capt.) H. HOPWOOD, M.C., ⅙th Duke
    of Well.’s Regt., of Skipton.

    LIEUT. J. ILLINGWORTH, M.C., West Yorks Regt., of
    Skipton (killed in action).

    2ND LIEUT. ALLEN W. JAGOE, M.C., M.M., Machine Gun
    Corps, of Skipton.

    LIEUT. L. JAQUES, M.C., Duke of Wellington’s Regt.,
    Skipton.

    LIEUT. P. JOWETT, M.C., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Skipton.

    LIEUT. H. LONGBOTTOM, M.C., Royal Field Artillery, of
    Silsden.

    LIEUT. J. W. LUMB, M.C., ¼th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Skipton (since killed in action).

    MAJOR THOS. GORDON MACKENZIE, M.C., ⅕th King’s Own
    Yorks. Light Infantry, of Ingleton.

    2ND LIEUT. CHARLES PARKER, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Settle.

    LIEUT. (A/Capt.) J. PETTY, M.C., Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Crosshills.

    LIEUT. J. W. N. A. PROCTER, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Rylstone (killed in action).

    2ND LIEUT. W. A. RODWELL, M.C., Royal Engineers, of
    Skipton (killed in action).

    LIEUT. F. A. SHUFFREY, M.C., Machine Gun Corps., of
    Arncliffe.

    CAPTAIN A. M. SLINGSBY, M.C., 56th Punjawbi Rifles,
    I.A., of Carla Beck, Skipton (since killed in action).

    LIEUT. F. H. SLINGSBY, M.C., 2nd Bn. South Stafford
    Regt., of Sedbergh, (formerly of Kildwick).

    CAPT. & ADJT. F. L. SMITH, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Keighley.

    CAPTAIN (A/Major) CHARLES NIXON SMITH, M.C.,
    R.A.M.C., of Giggleswick.

    2ND LIEUT. HENRY H. C. FOX SMITH, M.C., York &
    Lancaster Regt., of Silsden.

    LIEUT. J. S. SPENCER, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Wellington’s
    Regt., of Crosshills.

    2ND LIEUT. WALTER SPENCER, M.C., Durham Light
    Infantry, of Earby.

    LIEUT. (A/Capt.) JAMES STOCKS, M.C., Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Silsden.

    2ND LIEUT. H. T. STYLES, M.C., Manchester Regt., of
    Austwick (since, killed in action).

    CAPTAIN E. WALLING, M.C., 7th West Yorks. Regt., of
    Ingleton (since killed in action).

    LIEUT. H. C. WATKINS, M.C., Liverpool Regt., of
    Austwick.

    LIEUT. T. WILFRED WELLS, M.C., Machine Gun Corps, of
    High Bentham.

    2ND LIEUT. MAURICE B. WINDLE, M.C., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    2ND LIEUT. VICTOR WHITTAKER, M.C., 4th West Riding
    Bde. Royal Field Artillery, of Burley-in-Wharfedale.

    LIEUT. W. P. WRATHALL, D.S.O., M.C., 6th Black Watch,
    of Farnhill.

    LIEUT. WALTER YATES, M.C., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Settle.


PROMOTIONS TO BREVET RANK.

    CAPT. (T/Lt.-Col.) NORMAN ENGLAND, D.S.O.,
    ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt. (late commanding 8th West Yorks
    Regt.), promoted Brevet Major.

    COL. R. S. TEMPEST, C.M.G., D.S.O., Brevet Lieut.-Col.
    and Brevet Col.

    COL. R. F. ROUNDELL, Brevet Col.

    MAJOR (T/Brig.-General) RODGER STEPHEN
    TEMPEST, C.M.G., D.S.O., Scots Guards, promoted Brevet
    Lt.-Colonel.


GRANTED HIGHER RATE OF PAY UNDER ROYAL WARRANT.

    QUARTERMASTER & CAPTAIN J. CHURCHMAN, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke
    of Well.’s Regt., of Skipton. Dated 3rd June, 1919.


DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL.

    CORPORAL J. G. BARRETT, D.C.M., Machine Gun Corps, of
    Silsden.

    PRIVATE JOHN BIBBY, D.C.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Low Bentham.

    PRIVATE F. BRACEWELL, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    LANCE CORPORAL HENRY BREWER, D.C.M., King’s Own Royal
    Lancs. Regt., of Low Bentham.

    SERGEANT J. J. BROWN, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton (since killed in action).

    SERGEANT GEORGE BURROW, D.C.M., M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Low Bentham.

    SERGEANT JAMES BURY, D.C.M., M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick (since killed in action).

    LANCE SERGEANT JAMES CALVERT, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Haworth.

    SERGEANT GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, D.C.M., of Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Giggleswick.

    LANCE CORPORAL HAROLD COWGILL, D.C.M., West Yorks.
    Regt., of Glusburn (since killed in action).

    PRIVATE A. R. DEAN, D.C.M., West Yorks. Regt. (Ilkley
    Pals), of Ilkley.

    CORPORAL JOHN DINSDALE, D.C.M., Lancers, of Bainbridge
    (since dead).

    CORPORAL GORDON DRIVER, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Keighley.

    SERGEANT HORACE DRIVER, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Bingley.

    SERGEANT K. EARNSHAW, D.C.M., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Airton (since killed).

    SERGEANT J. FISHWICK, D.C.M., M.M., 2nd Dragoon Guards
    (Queen’s Bays), of Barnoldswick.

    CORPORAL R. W. FOTHERGILL, D.C.M., M.M., 5th Bn.
    King’s Liverpool Regt., of Hawes Junction.

    SERGEANT P. H. GARRETT, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT WALTER GIBSON, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton (since killed in action).

    SERGT.-MAJOR GREEN, D.C.M., Scottish Rifles, of
    Tatham, Bentham.

    SERGEANT EDGAR GREEN, D.C.M., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Sutton (since killed in action).

    SERGEANT-MAJOR F. GREEN, D.C.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick (killed).

    SERGEANT TIMOTHY GREEN, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Keighley.

    SERGEANT T. C. GREEN, D.C.M., M.M., 10th Canadians, of
    Glusburn.

    SERGEANT-MAJOR GUNN, D.C.M., Scottish Rifles, of
    Tatham, Bentham.

    SERGEANT-MAJOR GEORGE HARRISON, D.C.M., M.S.M.,
    R.A.S.C., of Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    CORPORAL H. HORSMAN, D.C.M., West Yorkshire Regt.
    (Ilkley Pals), of Addingham.

    SERGEANT-MAJOR A. HUNTER, D.C.M., now Captain R.F.
    Corps, of Skipton.

    SERGEANT JOHN JACKSON, D.C.M., King’s Own Royal Lancs.
    Regt., of Low Bentham.

    SERGEANT-MAJOR JACK KETTLEWELL, D.C.M., Duke of
    Well.’s Regt, of Addingham.

    A/CORPORAL T. LEWIS, D.C.M., 1st Batt. Rifle Brigade,
    of Hellifield.

    PRIVATE M. D. LONG, D.C.M., of Skipton.

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR OWEN MCDERMOTT, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Skipton (since killed in action).

    DRIVER A. MOORHOUSE, D.C.M., Royal Field Artillery, of
    Ilkley.

    CORPORAL W. A. MURGATROYD, D.C.M., Royal Fusiliers, of
    Skipton (since killed in action).

    LANCE-CORPORAL A. J. PICKERING, D.C.M., Yorkshire
    Regt., of Ingleton.

    PRIVATE JOHN E. PICKUP, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT T. W. RAITHBY, D.C.M., West Yorkshire Regt.
    (Ilkley Pals), of Ben Rhydding.

    REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR TOM RICHARDSON, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Keighley.

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR W. J. ROBINSON, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Giggleswick.

    SERGEANT ERNEST ROSENTHAL, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    SERGEANT HARRY SNOWDEN, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Bingley.

    SERGEANT J. T. SAVACE, D.C.M., 10th Division, R.E.
    Signals, of Skipton.

    PRIVATE J. STAINTON, D.C.M., Lincolnshire Regiment, of
    Skipton.

    SERGEANT W. H. THIES, D.C.M., of High Bentham.

    SERGEANT J. W. WARDMAN, D.C.M., M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Steeton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL (now Sergt.) J. H. WARING,
    D.C.M., M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Ingleton.

    SERGT.-MAJOR WILLIAMS, D.C.M., of High Bentham.

    LANCE-CORPORAL JOSEPH E. WILSON, D.C.M., East
    Yorkshire Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR E. WISEMAN, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Sutton.

    PRIVATE GEORGE WOLFENDEN, D.C.M., 10th West Yorks.
    Regt., of Airton.

    (Now A/Capt.) C. B. YOXALL, D.C.M., West Yorks. Regt.,
    of Ilkley.


MILITARY MEDAL AND TWO BARS.

    PRIVATE F. WHAITES, M.M., Royal West Kent Regt.,
    Langcliffe, Settle.


MILITARY MEDAL AND BAR.

    SERGEANT G. CATON, M.M., K.O.Y.L.I., of Kirby Malham.

    PRIVATE T. ROBINSON, M.M., K.O.Y.L.I., of Austwick.

    CORPORAL J. W. STEPHENSON, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    SERGEANT JAMES WALKER, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Earby.

    PRIVATE J. WILLIAMS, M.M., ⅐th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Foulridge.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM SMAILES, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Langcliffe.

    SERGEANT GEORGE WILSON, M.M., Royal Engineers, of
    Cononley.


MILITARY MEDALS.

    CORPORAL ERNEST ALTON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE RALPH ALDERSON, M.M., Grenadier Guards, of
    Gayle, Hawes.

    LANCE-CORPORAL W. ARNOLD, M.M., M.G. Corps, of Earby.

    2ND CORPORAL S. ASHBY, M.M., 457th Field Coy., R.E.,
    of Linton.

    PRIVATE J. W. ATKINSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    MACHINE GUNNER R. H. ATKINSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Silsden.

    SERGEANT JOS. BANCROFT, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Silsden.

    PRIVATE FRED BANCROFT, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Silsden.

    CORPORAL F. BARRETT, M.M., Tank Corps, of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE CHAS. BARGH, M.M., New Zealand Ex. Force, of
    Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    SERGEANT WM. BARGH, M.M., New Zealand Ex. Force, of
    Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    CORPORAL PERCY BARTON, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Hellifield (killed in action).

    CORPORAL CHARLES BATESON, M.M., Black Watch (formerly
    R.A.M.C.), of Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    SERGEANT J. BATESON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Bell Busk.

    PRIVATE ROBERT BATESON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Bell Busk.

    CORPORAL L. BAUL, M.M., 5th Yorkshire Regt., Machine
    Gun Section, of Addingham.

    BOMBARDIER FRANK BENJAMIN, M.M., R.H.A., of Earby.

    SIGNALLER A. C. BENSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Cowling (since killed).

    PRIVATE THOMAS BIRKETT, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    PRIVATE ARTHUR BILSBOROUGH, M.M., R.A.M.C., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE W. BOWKER, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE JOSEPH BOYDELL, M.M., Manchester Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE JOSEPH BRADLEY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Upper Settle.

    SERGEANT W. H. BRASSINGTON, M.M., (late 2nd Lieut.),
    Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Settle (since killed in action).

    LANCE-CORPORAL H. BREWER, M.M., King’s Own Royal
    Lancs. Regt., of Bentham.

    SIGNALLER ALFRED BENSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Cowling.

    PRIVATE H. A. BOOCOCK, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Earby.

    DRIVER FRED BROUGHTON, M.M., R.F.A., of Earby.

    GUNNER ERNEST BROWN, M.M., R.F.A., of Clapham.

    CORPORAL HERBERT BRYDEN, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE P. BUCKLEY, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Cononley.

    SERGEANT GEORGE BURROW, D.C.M., M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Lower Bentham.

    SERGEANT JAMES BURY, D.C.M., M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE RICHARD BUTLER, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Paythorne.

    CORPORAL ALFRED CAREY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Bolton-by-Bowland (since killed).

    SERGEANT ARTHUR CARR, M.M., Army Cyclist Corps, ⅙th
    Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Long Preston.

    CADET H. CARR, M.M., of Middop, Rimington.

    LANCE-CORPORAL CARTER, M.M., 9th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Silsden.

    PRIVATE STANLEY CLARK, M.M., R.A.M.C., of Earby.

    LANCE-SERGEANT J. CHAPMAN, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    BOMBARDIER H. COCKSHOTT, M.M., R.G.A., of Glusburn.

    CORPORAL T. CONSTANTINE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Clapham.

    PRIVATE F. CONSTANTINE, M.M., Leicester Regt., of
    Clapham.

    GUNNER W. C. COULTHARD, M.M., R.F.A., of Earby.

    PRIVATE JAMES COWGILL, M.M., R.A.S.C. (M.T.), of
    Elslack.

    GUNNER HARRY DAVIES, M.M., R.F.A., of
    Thornton-in-Craven.

    BOMBARDIER HARRY DAVIS, M.M., R.G.A., of Skipton.

    SIGNALLER J. W. DAWSON, M.M., R.G.A., Westhouse,
    Thornton-in-Lonsdale.

    PRIVATE W. DINSDALE, M.M., of Ingleton.

    BOMBARDIER H. J. DIXON, M.M., R.H.A., of Giggleswick.

    SERGEANT ROBERT DODGSON, M.M., Canadian Infantry, of
    Ingleton.

    PRIVATE G. DODSWORTH, M.M., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Skipton.

    SERGEANT G. H. DUXBURY, M.M., R.G.A., of Settle.

    PRIVATE JOSEPH DRIVER, M.M., East Yorks., of
    Barnoldswick.

    CORPORAL ROBERT DRAKE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Skipton.

    SERGEANT G. H. DUNCAN, M.M., R.G.A., of Settle.

    SERGEANT T. H. EDMONDSON, M.M., Langcliffe, Settle.

    PRIVATE F. EDWARDS, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Barnoldswick.

    DRIVER WILLIAM ELLIS, M.M., R.F.A., of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE JOHN EMMOTT, M.M., K.O.Y.L.I., of Mewith,
    Bentham.

    PRIVATE JOHN FALSHAW, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    DRIVER JAMES FARNWORTH, M.M., R.F.A., of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT P. FIELDS, M.M., M.S.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE ARTHUR FIRTH, M.M., York & Lancs. Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT J. FISHWICK, D.C.M., M.M., 2nd Dragoon
    Guards, of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE BERNARD FLETCHER, M.M., 11th East Yorkshires,
    of Skipton.

    PRIVATE JAS. CLARENCE FLETCHE, M.M., Royal Scots
    Fusiliers, Skipton (since killed).

    PRIVATE C. S. FLETCHER, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    GUNNER FRANK FOSTER, M.M., of Skipton.

    CORPORAL R. W. FOTHERGILL, D.C.M., M.M., 5th Bn.
    King’s Liverpool Regt., of Hawes Junction.

    LANCE-CORPORAL FRED GARNETT, M.M., Queen’s Westminster
    Rifles, of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT T. GARNETT, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Carleton.

    SERGEANT W. E. GIBSON, M.M., M.S.M., 10th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Settle.

    SERGEANT-MAJOR JOHN GILL, M.M., of Gargrave.

    SERGEANT G. E. GODWIN, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton (killed in action).

    LANCE CORPORAL (now Sergt.) GRAINGER, M.M.,
    ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Sutton.

    SERGEANT T. C. GREENWOOD, D.C.M., M.M., 10th
    Canadians, of Glusburn.

    SERGEANT ELIJAH GUY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Skipton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL A. HALL, M.M., Yorkshire Regt., of
    Marsett, Raydaleside.

    PRIVATE GEO. HANNAM, M.M., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Steeton.

    CORPORAL WM. HANSON, M.M., East Yorks. Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT C. HARDING, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton (killed in action).

    SERGEANT WILSON HARPER, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Bradley.

    PRIVATE G. HARRISON, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE RICHARD HARRISON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Clapham.

    CORPORAL TOM HEAPS, M.M., Canadian Battalion, of
    Ingleton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL ARTHUR HEY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Carleton.

    PRIVATE R. HEYS, M.M., 42nd Batt. M. G. Corps, of
    Barnoldswick.

    CORPORAL WALTER HICKS, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    CORPORAL JAMES HILBECK, M.M., R.E., of Addingham.

    PRIVATE G. H. HILL, M.M., Northumberland Fusiliers, of
    Steeton.

    PIONEER B. T. HIRD, M.M., Royal Engineers, of Skipton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN HITCHEN, M.M., Argyle & Sutherland
    Highlanders, of Long Preston (since killed in action).

    CORPORAL ARTHUR HODKINSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    CORPORAL A. HOLMES, M.M., Royal Engineers, of
    Addingham.

    CORPORAL PERCY HOLMES, M.M., Royal Berkshire Regt., of
    Skipton.

    SERGEANT F. HOLMES, M.M., 210th Field Coy., R.E., of
    Addingham.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM HOWKER, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    PRIVATE WM. HOYLE, M.M., West Riding Regt., of
    Langcliffe, Settle.

    PRIVATE G. F. HUNT, M.M., Liverpool Regt., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE TOM HURTLEY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Cononley.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM INMAN, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Embsay.

    SERGEANT J. INMAN, M.M., of Grassington.

    PRIVATE ARTHUR JACOBS, M.M., Northampton Regt.,
    formerly of Addingham.

    SERGEANT (now 2nd Lieut.) ALLEN W. JAGOE,
    M.C., M.M., M.G. Corps, of Skipton.

    REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR JAMES JACKSON, M.M., Welsh
    Fusiliers, of Steeton.

    PRIVATE J. M. JACKMAN, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Linton.

    PRIVATE E. JONES, M.M., Durham Light Infantry, of
    Barnoldswick.

    SERGT.-MAJOR W. JONES, M.M., 10th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Long Preston.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM JARMAN, M.M., R.A.M.C., of
    Brunthwaite, Silsden.

    PRIVATE J. JEFFERSON, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT J. JEFFREY, M.M., R.F.A., of Skipton (killed
    in action).

    FARRIER-SERGT. JOHN KETTLEWELL, M.M., R.F.A., of
    Silsden.

    PRIVATE JAMES KNIGHT, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Earby.

    LANCE-CORPORAL C. LEIGH, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT SAM LISTER, M.M., West Yorks. Regt., of
    Barden (since killed in action).

    PRIVATE J. LANG, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE J. LAWSON, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Long Preston.

    SERGEANT ARTHUR LAMBERT, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    CORPORAL LAWRENCE, M.M., Machine Gun Corps, of
    Addingham.

    PRIVATE JAMES LORD, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE ALBERT LORD, M.M., West Yorkshires, of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE J. L. I. MARSTON, M.M., R.A.M.C., of Cononley.

    SIGNALLER SERGT. RICHARD MASON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    SERGT. WM. MASON, M.M., R.E., of Dent.

    PRIVATE HERBERT MAUDE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Bolton Abbey.

    SAPPER R. MCCANN, M.M., A.B.L.B., of High Bentham.

    CORPORAL A. V. METCALFE, M.M., R.F.A., of Skipton.

    CORPORAL C. METCALFE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Skipton.

    RIFLEMAN HAROLD METCALFE, M.M., London Rifles, of
    Earby.

    DRIVER TOM METCALFE, M.M., Royal Engineers, of Skipton.

    PRIVATE H. B. MOORHOUSE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Bolton Abbey.

    SERGEANT THOS. MOYLE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Steeton (killed in action).

    SERGEANT J. MOORBY, M.M., of Ingleton.

    CORPORAL JOHN MOORE, M.M., R.F.A., of Hawes.

    LANCE-CORPORAL J. MOSLEY, M.M., York & Lancs. Regt.,
    of Glusburn.

    LANCE-CORPORAL J. W. NELSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Sutton.

    RIFLEMAN ERNEST N. NEWHOUSE, M.M., K. R. R., of High
    Bentham (killed in action).

    PRIVATE J. T. NUSSEY, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Earby.

    CORPORAL R. NUTTER, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Skipton.

    PRIVATE ERNEST OVERSBY, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Bentham.

    SERGT.-MAJOR WM. OLDFIELD, M.M., of Grassington.

    PRIVATE THOMAS PARRINGTON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    DRIVER THOMAS PARKINSON, M.M., R.F.A., of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT HEBER PARTRIDGE, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Silsden.

    SERGEANT (now Coy. Sergt.-Major) W. PASS,
    M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Skipton.

    SERGEANT CHARLES PEACHY, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Settle.

    PRIVATE LEN PILKINGTON, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    LANCE-CORPORAL PRITCHARD, M.M., Cyclist Section, of
    Austwick.

    BOMBARDIER KENNETH PERCY, M.M., R.F.A., of Giggleswick.

    PRIVATE THOMAS PROCTER, M.M., Machine Gun Corps, of
    Newsholme.

    PRIVATE J. PROCTER, M.M., 4th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Austwick.

    LANCE-CORPORAL VICTOR RACE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Steeton.

    SERGEANT DICK REEDER, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    PRIVATE ERNEST REEVE, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    LANCE-CORPORAL L. ROBERTS, M.M., East Lancs. Regt., of
    Langcliffe.

    SERGEANT N. ROBERTS, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Skipton.

    PRIVATE E. RYDER, M.M., 1st Bn. Essex Regt., of
    Skipton.

    SERGT. JAMES SANDERSON, King’s Shropshire Light
    Infantry, Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT WALKER SANDERSON, M.M., King’s Own Royal L.
    Regt., of High Bentham (since killed).

    THOMAS SCRAMBLER, M.M., Royal Engineers, of
    Giggleswick.

    DRIVER FREDERICK JAMES SCOTT, M.M., 2/6th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE CHARLES SIMS, M.M., K.O.Y.L.I., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE WILLIAM E. STRICKLAND, M.M., R.A.M.C., of
    Barnoldswick.

    LANCE-CORPORAL G. H. STRICKLAND, M.M., West Yorks., of
    Addingham.

    CORPORAL JOHN SWALLOW, M.M., Lancs. Fusiliers, of
    Giggleswick.

    PRIVATE JACK TATHAM, M.M., N. Z. Machine Gun Corps, of
    Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    PRIVATE RONALD C. TATTERSALL, M.M., 41st Batt. Machine
    Gun Corps., of Ingleton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL (now 2nd Lieut.) TEALE, M.M.,
    ¼th Seaforth Highlanders, of Eastburn.

    PRIVATE J. H. THOMPSON, M.M., Headquarters Staff, of
    Addingham.

    DRIVER BEN THOMPSON, M.M., Royal Field Artillery, of
    Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT JOSEPH THORNTON, M.M., Trench Motar Battery,
    R.G.A., of Skipton.

    SAPPER JACK TOMLINSON, M.M., Royal Engineers, of
    Ingleton.

    PRIVATE TOM TOWLER, M.M., Liverpool Rifles, of
    Stainforth.

    PRIVATE GEORGE TURNBULL, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Oughtershaw.

    SERGEANT FRED TYRER, M.M., ⅐th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    SERGEANT TOM WADDINGTON, M.M., M.S.M., Royal Field
    Artillery, of Gisburne.

    SERGT.-MAJOR J. W. WARDMAN, D.C.M., M.M., Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Steeton.

    SERGT. JNO. H. WARING, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Ingleton.

    PRIVATE ELI WATERWORTH, M.M., Northumberland Fusiliers
    (Tyneside Scottish), of Barnoldswick (since killed in action).

    PRIVATE THOMAS WATKINSON, M.M., West Yorks., of Embsay.

    PRIVATE ELI WATSON, M.M., Northumberland Fusiliers, of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE T. W. WESTERN, M.M., Field Ambulance, of
    Skipton.

    SERGEANT JOHN WEBSTER, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    CORPORAL F. WHIPP, M.M., Machine Gun Corps, of Settle.

    LANCE-CORPORAL HARRY WHITEOAK, M.M., of Glusburn.

    SERGEANT J. H. WHITELEY, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE J. S. WHITHAM, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Farnhill.

    PRIVATE SMITH STEPHENSON WHITTAKER, M.M., Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Cowling.

    LANCE-CORPORAL REUBEN WILCOCK, M.M., K.O.R.L., of Low
    Bentham.

    CORPORAL G. E. WILKINSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    formerly of Kilnsey.

    PRIVATE W. B. WILKINSON, M.M., East Lancs. Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE WM. H. B. WILKINSON, M.M., Royal Field
    Artillery, of Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT GEORGE WILSON, M.M., Royal Engineers, of
    Cononley.

    LANCE-CORPORAL J. W. WILSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Sutton.

    PRIVATE JAMES WILSON, M.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Ingleton.

    A/COMPANY QUARTER-MASTER SERGEANT W. WOODS, M.M., ⅙th
    Duke of Well.’s Regt. (attached T.M.B.), of Settle.

    PRIVATE H. WRIGHT, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE JOHN WRIGHT, M.M., Northumberland Fusiliers,
    of Embsay.


MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL.

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR J. W. ASHTON, M.S.M., Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE E. J. BAMFORD, M.S.M., 150th Army Field
    Ambulance, of Barnoldswick.

    CORPORAL H. CALVERT, M.S.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.
    (now R.A.S.C.), of Skipton.

    REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR F. J. DANDO, M.S.M., Royal
    Engineers, of Threshfield.

    SERGEANT P. FIELD, M.M., M.S.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE JOSEPH GARRETT, M.S.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Carleton.

    SERGEANT W. E. GIBSON, M.S.M., Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Settle.

    SERGT.-MAJOR GEORGE HARRISON, D.C.M., M.S.M., Royal
    A.S. CORPS, of Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    SERGEANT (O.R.S.) F. CLOSE, M.S.M., ⅙th Duke
    of Well.’s Regt., of Settle.

    REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR R. M. MOORE, M.S.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Skipton.

    REGT. QT.-MASTER SERGT. JAMES NORTON, M.S.M., ⅙th Duke
    of Well.’s Regt., of Skipton.

    COY. QT.-MASTER SERGT. T. PATRICK, Headquarters, 69th
    Brigade, of Barnoldswick.

    LANCE-CORPORAL W. QUINN, M.S.M., East Lancashire
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

    PRIVATE ALEX. SUTHERLAND, M.S.M., R. A. S.
    CORPS, of Skipton.

    SERGEANT TOM WADDINGTON, M.M., M.S.M., Royal Field
    Artillery, of Gisburne.

    SERGEANT W. WOODS, M.S.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.
    (Att. 147th T.M.B.) of Settle.

    SERGT.-MAJOR YOUNG, M.S.M., Military M. Police, of
    Ingleton.


CROIX DE GUERRE (FRENCH).

    CAPT. & BT. MAJOR (T. Lt.-Col.) NORMAN A.
    ENGLAND, D.S.O., Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Gargrave,
    Skipton (with palm).

    J. R. BIBBY, F.A.U., French Army (with Bar).

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR ARTHUR CLARK, Duke of Wellington’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    PRIVATE WILFRED HORNER, British Red Cross Society, of
    Settle (with silver star.)

    SERGT.-MAJOR A. HUNTER, D.C.M. (now Capt. R.F.C.), of
    Skipton.

    PRIVATE CHARLES LELIEVRE, French Infantry, of
    Barnoldswick.

    BREVET COL. R. S. TEMPEST, C.M.G., D.S.O. (French with
    palms).

    PRIVATE ROBERT PRICE, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Gisburne.

    TROOPER CHARLES VALENTINE THORTON, Dragoon Guards, of
    Barnoldswick.

    SERGT.-MAJOR WILLIAMS, D.C.M., of High Bentham.

    MAJOR E. WALLING, M.C., 7th West. Yorks. Regt., of
    Ingleton (since killed in action).


MEDAILLE MILITAIRE (FRENCH).

    SERGT.-MAJOR GEORGE HARRISON, D.C.M. (R.A.S.C.), of
    Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    SERGEANT GEORGE GOLDING, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.


MEDAILLE DES EPIDEMICS (FRENCH).

    NURSE OLIVE AKED, of Hellifield.


CHEVALIER DE L’ORDRE DE LEOPOLD II. (BELGIUM.)

    SERGEANT ARTHUR CARR, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.
    (Army Cyclist Corps), of Long Preston.


CROIX DE GUERRE (BELGIUM).

    CORPORAL ARTHUR HOLMES, M.M., Royal Engineers, of
    Addingham.

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR OWEN MCDERMOTT, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Skipton (since killed).

    CAPTAIN T. COOPER ROBINSON, R.A.S.C., of Conistone.

    SERGEANT MASON TOMLINSON, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Settle.

    SERJEANT ERNEST C. DESSENT, of Sutton.


MEDAILLE MILITAIRE (BELGIUM).

    SERGEANT GEORGE BURROW, D.C.M., M.M., 5th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Higher Bentham.

    LANCE-CORPORAL GEORGE ARTHUR METCALFE, Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.


MEDAILLE OF QUEEN ELIZABETH (BELGIUM).

    MISS TEMPEST, of Broughton Hall.

    MRS. STANSFIELD, of Skipton.


CROCE DE GUERRA (ITALIAN).

    CAPT. GEORGE GREEN, R.A.V.C., of Skipton.

    CAPTAIN H. G. SMITH, formerly of Skipton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL ARTHUR WHINCUP, Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.


ITALIAN SILVER MEDAL.

    SERGEANT TOM MILLER, Royal Garrison Artillery, of
    Carleton.


RUSSIAN MEDAL OF ST. GEORGE, 4th CLASS.

    SICK BERTH STEWARD JAMES M. COWGILL, S.B.N.R., of
    Skipton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL H. O. EASTWOOD, 18th Hussars, of
    Skipton (since killed in action).


SERBIAN MEDAL.

    A.B. HERBERT HARRISON, H.M.S. “_Aphis_” of Crosshills.


CROIX DE CHARITE (SERBIAN).

    _Miss Elizabeth J. Sagar_, of Barnoldswick.


MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

    CAPTAIN D. H. ALDERTON, R.A.M.C., of Barnoldswick.

    CAPT. BARRETT, Duke of Well.’s Regt.

    LT.-COL. C. M. BATEMAN, D.S.O., T.D., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Sutton (mentioned four times).

    SERGEANT JOHN BATESON, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Bell Busk.

    LIEUT. JACK BEECROFT, M.C., Tank Corps, of Ingleton.

    LIEUT. T. D. T. BROCKLEHURST, Royal Field Artillery,
    of Giggleswick.

    SERGEANT WILLIAM BRAYSHAW, King’s Royal Rifles, of
    Steeton.

    REGT. SERGT.-MAJOR (now Lieut. and Quartermaster ⅐th
    Duke of Well.’s Regt.) O. BUCKLEY, M.C., of Skipton.

    SERGEANT JAMES BURY, D.C.M., M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick (since killed in action).

    NURSE E. BURLEND, of Gargrave.

    CORPORAL H. CALVERT, M.S.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.
    (now R.A.S.C.), of Skipton.

    MAJOR T. S. CARR, Royal Field Artillery, of
    Barnoldswick.

    SERGEANT G. CATON, M.M., King’s Own Yorks. Light
    Infantry, of Kirkby Malham.

    MAJOR N. B. CHAFFERS, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Sutton (mentioned three times).

    LIEUT. & QUARTERMASTER (now Capt. & Quartermaster)
    J. CHURCHMAN, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Skipton.

    CAPTAIN T. B, CLAPHAM, M.C., Royal A. S. Corps, of
    Skipton.

    CAPTAIN W. F. CLARK, of Settle.

    MAJOR A. B. CLARKSON, D.S.O., M.C., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Keighley.

    CAPTAIN S. H. CLOUGH, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Steeton.

    CAPTAIN H. DIXON, ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Steeton (twice mentioned).

    MAJOR E. A. T. DUTTON, 9th West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Lothersdale.

    CAPT. & BT. MAJOR (T/Lt.-Col.) NORMAN A.
    ENGLAND, D.S.O., Duke of Wellington’s Regt. (twice
    mentioned).

    NURSE EGGINS, Matron of Skipton and District Hospital.

    CAPTAIN R. C. FELL, West Yorkshire Regt., of Skipton.

    SERGEANT F. K. HOLMES, Royal Engineers, of Addingham.

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR GEORGE H. HORNER, ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Skipton.

    MAJOR B. LAMBERT, Royal Engineers, of Settle (twice
    mentioned).

    LIEUT. MALCOLM C. M. LAW, ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Guiseley (killed in action).

    CAPT. SYDNEY F. MARRINER, Adjt., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Keighley.

    SERGEANT A. PARKER, ⅙th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Settle.

    SERGEANT CHARLES PEACHEY, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Settle (since killed in action).

    LIEUT. J. N. W. A. PROCTER, M.C., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Rylstone (since killed in action).

    MECH. STAFF SERGT. J. W. PRESTON, M T., R.A.S.C., of
    Skipton.

    2ND LIEUT. (A/Capt.) W. ROBERTS, Loyal North
    Lancashire Regt., of Gisburne.

    CAPT. T. C. ROBINSON, Royal A. S. Corps, of Ingleton.

    LIEUT. J. G. B. TOTTIE, West Yorks. Regt.

    LIEUT. R. TOTTIE, Guards Machine Gun Regt.

    PRIVATE R. SHORROCK, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Hellifield (since killed).

    MAJOR & BT. LT.-COL. (Temp. B. Gen.) RODGER
    STEPHEN TEMPEST, C.M.G., D.S.O., Scots Guards, of
    Broughton Hall, Skipton (six times).

    CAPTAIN H. T. TUNSTILL, 10th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Settle.

    MAJOR E. WALLING, M.C., West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Ingleton (since killed in action).

    LT.-COL. J. WARD, C.M.G., R.A.M.C., of Cowling.

    SERGEANT JOHN WEBSTER, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Skipton.

    SERGEANT GEORGE WHITTAKER, 2nd Duke of Well.’s Regt.,
    of Skipton.

    PRIVATE T. WILKINSON, ⅕th Duke of Well.’s Regt., of
    Kilnsey, near Skipton.

    COY. SERGT.-MAJOR EDWARD WISEMAN, D.C.M., ⅙th Duke of
    Well.’s Regt., of Sutton (twice mentioned).

    LIEUT. W. P. WRATHALL, D.S.O., M.C., 6th Black Watch,
    of Farnhill.


DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CERTIFICATE.

    A/LIEUT. ROBERT HOBSON, R.N.R., nephew of Mr. & Mrs.
    J. W. Lawson, of Water Street, Skipton.


GALLANTRY CARDS.

    CORPORAL WILLIAM ASTLE, West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Skipton (since killed in action).

    PRIVATE FRANK BOTTOMLEY, Notts. & Derby Regt., of
    Glusburn.

    PRIVATE C. BROWN, M.G.C. (formerly Sherwood
    Foresters), of Horton-in-Ribblesdale.

    LIEUT. (late Sergt. ⅙th Bn.) WILLIAM PATRICK
    BARRY, Duke of Well.’s Regt., of Skipton (since killed).

    PRIVATE HAROLD COWGILL, D.C.M., West Yorkshire Regt.,
    of Glusburn (since killed).

    PRIVATE HUGH CLARKE, Westmoreland and Cumberland
    Yeomanry, of Silsden.

    PRIVATE JOHN DRAKE, Duke of Wellington’s Regt., of
    Bradley.

    MR. FRANK DRIVER, of Cowling.

    SERGEANT W. HARPER, M.M., Duke of Wellington’s Regt.,
    of Bradley.

    SERGEANT H. HUSTWICK, West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Addingham.

    PRIVATE REGINALD MAYHALL, Durham Light Infantry, of
    Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    PRIVATE JOHN MACNAMARA, Duke of Wellington’s Regt., of
    Barnoldswick.

    BOMBARDIER JAMES WALKER PARKER, Siege Battery, R.A.,
    of Settle.

    PRIVATE E. PEACOCK, Duke of Wellington’s Regt., of
    Skipton.

    CORPORAL RICHARD SANFORD, Tank Corps, of
    Burton-in-Lonsdale.

    PRIVATE JOHN E. SMITH, West Yorkshire Regt., of
    Skipton.

    LANCE-CORPORAL (now 2nd Lieut.) TEAL, M.M.,
    ¼th Seaforth Highlanders, of Eastburn.

    CORPORAL (now Sergt.) J. WARING, M.M., Duke
    of Wellington’s Regt., of Ingleton.

    SERGEANT J. H. WHITELEY, M.M., ⅙th Duke of Well.’s
    Regt., of Barnoldswick.

[Illustration]



DIARY OF THE WAR.


1914.

  June 28.--Francis Ferdinand shot at Sarajevo.
  July 5.--Kaiser’s War Council at Potsdam.
  July 23.--Austro-Hungarian Note to Serbia.
  July 23.--Austria declared war on Serbia.
  July 31.--State of war in Germany.
  August 1.--Germany declared war on Russia.
  August 2.--German ultimatum to Belgium.
  August 3.--Germany declared war on France.
  August 4.--Great Britain declared war on Germany.
  August 10.--France declared war on Austria.
  August 12.--Great Britain declared war on Austria.
  August 15.--Fall of Liége.
  August 16.--British Army landed in France.
  August 20.--Germans occupied Brussels.
  August 23.--Japan declared war on Germany.
  August 24.--Fall of Namur.
  August 25.--Sack of Louvain.
  August 26.--Battle of Tannenberg.
  August 28.--British Victory in the Bight.
  August 29.--New Zealanders in Samoa.
  September 2.--Russians took Lemberg.
  September 3.--Paris Government at Bordeaux.
  September 5.--End of Retreat from Mons.
  September 6.--First Marne Battle begun.
  September 15.--First Aisne Battle begun.
  September 16.--Russians evacuated Prussia.
  September 23.--First British Air Raid in Germany.
  October 9.--Fall of Antwerp.
  October 13.--Belgian Government at Havre.
  October 20.--First Battle of Ypres begun.
  November 1.--Naval Action off Coronel.
  November 5.--Great Britain declared war on Turkey.
  November 7.--Fall of Tsingtau.
  November 10.--Emden sunk.
  November 21.--British occupied Basra.
  December 2.--Austrians in Belgrade.
  December 8.--Naval Battle off the Falklands.
  December 14.--Serbians retook Belgrade.
  December 16.--Germans bombarded West Hartlepool.
  December 18.--Hussein Kamel, Sultan of Egypt.
  December 24.--First Air Raid on England.


1915.

  January 24.--Naval Battle off Dogger Bank.
  February 2.--Turks defeated on Suez Canal.
  February 18.--U Boat “Blockade” of England.
  February 25--Allied Fleet attacked Dardanelles.
  March 10.--British capture Neuve Chappelle.
  March 22.--Russians took Przemysl.
  April 22.--Second Battle of Ypres begun.
  April 25.--Allied Landing in Gallipoli.
  May 3.--Battle of the Dunajec.
  May 6.--Battle at Krithia, Gallipoli.
  May 7.--Lusitania torpedoed.
  May 8.--Germans occupied Libau.
  May 11.--German repulse at Ypres.
  May 12.--General Botha occupied Windhuk.
  May 16.--Russian Retreat to the San.
  May 23.--Italy declared war on Austria.
  May 25.--Coalition Cabinet formed.
  June 2.--Italians crossed Isonzo.
  June 3.--Russians evacuated Przemysl.
  June 22.--Austro-Germans recaptured Lemberg.
  July 2.--Pommern sunk in Baltic.
  July 9.--German South-West Africa conquered.
  July 24.--Nasiriyeh, on Euphrates, taken.
  August 4.--Fall of Warsaw.
  August 5.--Fall of Ivangorod.
  August 6.--New Landing at Suvla Bay.
  August 8.--General Birdwood’s advance at Anzac.
  August 9.--British success near Hooge.
  August 15.--National Registration.
  August 17.--Fall of Kovno.
  August 18.--Russian victory in Riga Gulf.
  August 19.--Fall of Novo-Georgievsk.
  August 21.--Cotton declared contraband.
  August 25.--Fall of Brest-Litovsk.
  September 1.--General Alexeieff as Chief of Staff.
  September 2.--Fall of Grodno.
  September 5.--Tsar as Generalissimo.
  September 7.--Russian victory near Tarnopol.
  September 18.--Fall of Vilna.
  September 21.--Russian Retreat ended.
  September 25.--Battle of Loos and in Champagne.
  September 28.--Victory at Kut-el-Amara.
  October 4.--Russian ultimatum to Bulgaria.
  October 5.--Allied landing at Salonika.
  October 6.--Austro-German invasion of Serbia.
  October 9.--Belgrade occupied.
  October 14.--Bulgaria at war with Serbia.
  October 17.--Allied note to Greece.
  October 19.--Lord Derby on the 46 Groups.
  October 22.--Bulgarians occupy Uskub.
  October 28.--M. Briand French Premier.
  November 5.--Fall of Nish.
  November 22.--Battle of Ctesiphon.
  November 29.--British withdraw from Ctesiphon.
  December 2.--Fall of Monastir.
  December 3.--General Townshend at Kut.
  December 9.--Allied retreat in Macedonia.
  December 13.--Salonika lines fortified.
  December 15.--Sir D. Haig C.-in-C. in France.
  December 19.--Withdrawal from Gallipoli.
  December 25.--Turkish defeat at Kut.


1916.

  January 6.--Gallipoli evacuation complete.
  January 13.--Fall of Cettigne.
  February 9.--General Smuts appointed to East Africa.
  February 16.--Russians entered Erzerum.
  February 18.--German Kamerun conquered.
  February 21.--Battle of Verdun begun.
  February 24.--Germans took Ft. Douaumont.
  March 16.--Admiral von Tirpitz dismissed.
  April 9.--German assault at Verdun.
  April 17.--Russians entered Trebizond.
  April 24.--Rebellion in Ireland.
  April 29.--Fall of Kut-el-Amara.
  May 24.--British Conscription Bill passed.
  May 31--Battle of Jutland.
  June 4.--General Brusiloff’s offensive.
  June 5.--Lord Kitchener lost at sea.
  June 14.--Allied Economic Conference in Paris.
  June 21.--Mecca taken by Grand Sherif.
  July 1.--Somme Battle begun.
  July 25.--Russians occupied Erzinjan.
  August 6.--Italian offensive on Isonzo.
  August 10.--Russians at Stanislau.
  August 27.--Rumania entered the war.
  August 29.--Hindenburg Chief of Staff.
  September 3.--Zeppelin destroyed at Cuffley.
  September 26.--British took Thiepval and Combles.
  October 10.--Allied Ultimatum to Greece.
  November 1.--Italian Advance on Carso.
  November 13.--British Victory on the Ancre.
  November 18.--Serbians and French took Monastir.
  November 29.--Grand Fleet under Sir D. Beatty.
  December 1.--Anti-Allied Riot in Athens.
  December 5.--Resignation of Mr. Asquith.
  December 6.--Germans entered Bukarest.
  December 7.--Mr. Lloyd George Prime Minister.
  December 12.--German “Peace Proposals.”
  December 15.--French Victory at Verdun.
  December 20.--President Wilson’s Peace Note.


1917.

  January 1.--Turkey denounced Berlin Treaty.
  February 1.--“Unrestricted” U-Boat War begun.
  February 3.--America broke with Germany.
  February 6.--British captured Grandcourt.
  February 24.--British took Kut-el-Amara.
  March 11.--British entered Baghdad.
  March 12.--Revolution in Russia.
  March 15.--Abdication of the Tsar.
  March 18.--British entered Peronne.
  March 21.--First British Imperial War Cabinet.
  April 6.--America declared war on Germany.
  April 9.--Battle of Vimy Ridge begun.
  May 4.--French took Caronne.
  May 14.--New Italian offensive.
  May 15.--General Petain Generalissimo.
  June 7.--British Victory at Messines Ridge.
  June 12.--Abdication of King Constantine.
  June 26.--First American troops in France.
  June 27.--Mesopotamia Report issued.
  June 29.--General Allenby commander in Egypt.
  July 1.--Last Russian offensive begun.
  July 14.--Bethmann-Hollweg dismissed.
  July 17.--British Royal House styled “Windsor.”
  July 19.--Reichstag “Peace” Resolution.
  July 24.--Russian defeat in Galicia.
  July 31.--Great Allied attack around Ypres.
  August 29.--President Wilson’s Note to the Pope.
  September 4.--Germans occupied Riga.
  September 15.--Russian Republic proclaimed.
  September 28.--British Victory at Ramadieh.
  October 9.--Allied attack in Flanders.
  October 24.--Italian defeat at Caporetto.
  October 29.--Fall of Udine.
  October 30.--Chancellor Michaelis dismissed.
  October 31.--British capture Beersheba.
  November 1.--German retreat on Chemin des Dames.
  November 4.--British troops in Italy.
  November 6.--British stormed Passchendaele Ridge.
  November 7.--British captured Gaza.
  November 8.-Bolshevist coup d’état in Russia.
  November 9.--Italian stand on the Piave.
  November 17.--British in Jaffa.
  November 18.--General Maude’s death in Mesopotamia.
  November 20.--British Victory at Cambrai.
  November 30.--German reaction at Cambrai.
  December 6.--Armistice on Russian front.
  December 9.--British captured Jerusalem.
  December 22.--Brest Conference opened.
  December 26.--Sir R. Wemyss First Sea Lord.


1918.

  January 5.--Mr. Lloyd George on War Aims.
  January 20.--Breslau sunk: Goeben damaged.
  February 1.--Germany recognised Ukraine.
  February 9.--First Brest Treaty Signed.
  February 16.--General Wilson Chief of Staff.
  February 18.--German invasion of Russia.
  February 21.--British capture Jericho.
  February 24.--Turks recovered Trebizond.
  February 25.--Germans at Reval.
  March 3.--Second Brest Treaty.
  March 7.--German peace with Finland.
  March 11.--Turks recovered Erzrum.
  March 13.--Germans at Odessa.
  March 14.--Brest Treaty ratified at Moscow.
  March 21.--German offensive in the West.
  March 24.--Bapaume and Peronne lost.
  April 5.--Allied landing at Vladivostok.
  April 9--New Military Service Bill.
  April 11.--Armentieres lost.
  April 13.--Turks occupied Batum.
  April 14.--General Foch, Allied Generalissimo.
  April 15--Bailleul lost.
  April 18.--Lord Milner War Secretary.
  April 22.--Naval raid on Zeebrugge and Ostend.
  April 26.--Kemmel Hill lost.
  April 27.--Turks occupied Kars.
  April 30.--Germans at Viborg.
  May 1.--Germans at Sebastopol.
  May 9.--Second raid on Ostend.
  May 27.--Second German offensive.
  May 29.--Soissons lost. Reims held.
  May 31.--Germans reached Marne.
  June 1.--Attacks towards Paris held.
  June 9.--New German assault.
  June 15.--Austrian offensive in Italy.
  June 23.--Great Austrian defeat.
  July 2.--1,000,000 Americans shipped to France.
  July 15.--Third German offensive. Second Marne Battle begun.
  July 18.--General Foch’s counter-attack.
  July 20.--Germans recrossed the Marne.
  August 2.--Soissons recovered.
  August 8.--British attack at Amiens.
  August 29.--Bapaume and Noyon regained.
  September 1.--Peronne recovered.
  September 2.--Drocourt-Queant line breached.
  September 12.-American attack at St. Mihiel.
  September 15.--Austrian Peace Note.
  September 17.--New Macedonian offensive.
  September 19.--British advance in Palestine.
  September 25.--Bulgaria proposed Armistice.
  September 27.--Hindenburg line broken.
  September 29.--Bulgaria surrendered.
  September 30.--Fall of Damascus.
  October 1.--St. Quentin regained.
  October 9.--Cambrai regained.
  October 10.--British took Le Cateau.
  October 13.--French recovered Laon.
  October 14.--British troops at Irtkutsk.
  October 15.--British in Homs.
  October 17.--Ostend. Lille, Douai regained.
  October 20.--Belgian Coast clear.
  October 25.--Ludendorff resigned.
  October 26.--Aleppo fell to the Allies.
  October 27.--Austria sued for Peace.
  October 28.--Italians crossed Piave.
  October 29.--Serbians reached the Danube.
  October 30.--Turkey granted Armistice.
  November 1.--Versailles Conference opened.
  November 2.--British at Valenciennes.
  November 3.--Austrian surrender. Kiel Mutiny.
  November 4.--Versailles Armistice Agreement.
  November 5.--Full Powers for Marshal Foch. Mr. Wilson’s last
    Note to Germany.
  November 6.--Americans reached Sedan.
  November 7.--Bavarian Republic Proclaimed.
  November 9.--Foch received German Envoys.
  November 9.--Abdication of the Kaiser.
  November 10.--Kaiser’s flight to Holland. British at Mons.
  November 11.--Armistice Terms Accepted.


1919.

  June 19.--Peace signed.


  1914.      _POLITICAL._

  June 28--Murder of Archduke Ferdinand at Sarajevo.
  July 23--Austrian Note to Serbia.
  July 28--Austria declares war on Serbia.
  Aug. 1--Germany declares war on Russia.
  Aug. 3--Germany declares war on France.
  Aug. 4--Britain declares war on Germany.
  Sept. 9--Turkey denounces the capitulations.


  1915.

  May 23--Italy declares war on Austria.
  Oct. 12--Greek Government refuses to help Serbia.
  Oct. 14--Bulgaria enters the war.


  1916.

  Aug. 27--Roumania enters the war.
  Nov. 21--Death of Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria.
  Dec. 7--Mr. Lloyd George becomes Prime Minister.
  Dec. 12--Germany’s first peace proposal.
  Dec. 30--Allies give negative answer.


  1917.

  Feb. 3--Diplomatic relations between United States and Germany
    ruptured.
  Mar. 12--Outbreak of Russian Revolution.
  Mar. 13--China breaks off relations with Germany.
  Mar. 15--Czar Nicholas abdicates.
  April 5--United States declares war on Germany.
  June 12--King Constantine of Greece abdicates.
  Sept. 15--Russia becomes Republic, with Kerensky as Premier.


  1918.

  Jan. 19--Bolsheviks dissolve Russian Constituent Assembly.
  Mar. 2--Treaty of Brest-Litovsk signed.
  Sept. 25--Bulgaria seeks armistice.
  Oct. 3--Prince Max of Baden appointed German Chancellor. Germany
    suggests armistice to President Wilson.
  Oct. 30--Turkey surrenders.
  Nov. 3--Austria sues for peace.
  Nov. 11--Germany signs armistice.


_MILITARY._

  1914.

  Aug. 16--British Expeditionary Force lands in France.
  Aug. 23--Battle of Mons.
  Sept. 6--First Battle of the Marne.
  Oct. 11--First Battle of Ypres.


  1915.

  Mar. 10--Battle of Neuve Chapelle.
  Aug. 4--Germans capture Warsaw.
  Aug. 6--Allies land at Suvla Bay.
  Nov. 23--Great Serbian Retreat begins.
  Dec. 15.--Sir Douglas Haig made Commander-in-Chief.


  1916.

  Jan. 8--Gallipoli evacuated.
  Feb. 16--Russians capture Erzeroum.
  Feb. 21--Battle of Verdun begins.
  April 29--Kut surrenders.
  May 15--Battle of Vimy Ridge.
  June 2--Second Battle of Ypres begins.
  July 1--First Battle of the Somme.
  Aug. 9--Italians capture Gorizia.
  Aug. 29--Hindenburg made Chief of General Staff.
  Dec. 1--Allied troops land at the Piræus.


  1917.

  Feb. 24--Kut recaptured.
  Mar. 11--Bagdad occupied by British.
  Mar. 17--Bapaume captured.
  Mar. 27--Battle of Gaza.
  April 9--Vimy Ridge captured.
  April 20--French troops cross the Chemins des Dames.
  June 7--Messines Ridge captured.
  June 29--General Allenby commands in Palestine.
  Oct. 24--Italian defeat at Caporetto.
  Oct. 31--British capture Beersheba.
  Nov. 7--Gaza captured.
  Nov. 15--Italian retreat ends.
  Nov. 20--Battle of Cambrai.
  Dec. 9--British entry into Jerusalem.

  1918.

  Feb. 21--Jericho captured.
  Mar. 21--Great German offensive begins.
  Mar. 30--General Foch assumes Chief Command.
  June 2--German advance stopped.
  July 18--French begin their successful counter-attacks.
  July 20--Second Battle of the Marne.
  Sept. 2--Drocourt-Queant line broken.
  Sept. 12--Americans recapture St. Mihiel Salient.
  Sept. 16--Allied offensive in the Balkans begins.
  Sept. 21--Franco-Serbian troops reach the Vardar.
  Sept. 27--Hindenburg line broken.
  Sept. 28--Anglo-Belgian offensive in Flanders begins.
  Oct. 10--Le Cateau recaptured.
  Oct. 17--Recapture of Ostend, Lille and Douai.
  Oct. 26--Fall of Aleppo.


_NAVAL._

  1914.

  Aug. 28--Battle of Heligoland Bight.
  Nov. 1--Battle of Coronel.
  Dec. 8--Battle of Falkland Islands.
  Dec. 16--Bombardment of Scarborough, Whitby and Hartlepools.

  1915.

  Jan. 24--Battle of Dogger Bank.
  Feb. 13--Germany begins “submarine blockade.”
  Feb. 25--Dardanelles Forts attacked.
  May 7--Lusitania sunk.

  1916.

  Mar. 16--Fall of Admiral von Tirpitz.
  May 21--Battle of Jutland.
  June 5--Lord Kitchener drowned in wreck of H.M.S. _Hampshire_.
  Sept. 1--Naval demonstration at Athens by Allies.
  Oct. 7--German submarine appeared off coast of United States.
  Oct. 26--German attack on Dover Patrol.
  Nov. 23--German destroyer attack in Straits of Dover.
  Nov. 29--Sir David Beatty succeeds Lord Jellicoe.

  1917.

  Jan. 22--Destroyer fight off Dutch Coast.
  Feb. 1--Germany begins “unrestricted” submarine war.
  April 7--Destroyer action off Zeebrugge.
  May 15--Austrian raid on drifters in Straits of Otranto.
  May 17--First American warships enter European waters.
  June 5--Destroyer action off Belgian coast.
  Oct. 17--Naval battle in Riga Gulf.
  Nov. 2--Naval engagement in the Kattegat.
  Nov. 17--Naval engagement off Heligoland.

  1918.

  Jan. 20--Raid by Goeben and Breslau at Mudros. Breslau sunk.
  April 22--Zeebrugge and Ostend Harbours blocked by British Navy.
  May 9--H.M.S. _Vindictive_ sunk at entrance to Ostend Harbour.


AIR RAIDS.

  1915.

  Jan. 19--First Zeppelin raid on England.
  June 7--Zeppelin destroyed by Lieut. Warneford.
  Sept. 8--Raid on East Coast and London district; 38 killed, 124
    injured.
  Oct. 13--Raid on London area: 56 killed, 114 injured.

  1916.

  Jan. 31--Air raid on six counties: 67 killed, 117 injured.
  Feb. 9--First inland raid of aeroplanes.
  March 19--Allied air raid on Zeebrugge.
  April 3--Damaged Zeppelin comes down in Thames estuary.
  Aug. 25--Six Zeppelins raid South-East Coast.
  Sept. 3--Raid by 13 Zeppelins. One brought down in flames at
    Cuffley.
  Sept. 23--Raid on East and South-East Coasts. Two Zeppelins
    brought down.
  Oct. 1--Zeppelin brought down in flames near London.

  1917.

  June 13--Daylight raid on London. Killed 97; injured 439.
  June 17--Zeppelin destroyed in East Anglia.
  July 7--Aeroplane attack on London; 43 killed, 197 injured.
  Sept. 3--Raid on Chatham; 107 killed, 86 injured.
  Oct. 19--Six Zeppelins lost in France, after raid on London.
  Dec. 6--Early morning attack on London by 25 aeroplanes. Two
    brought down.

  1918.

  Jan. 31--Four enemy squadrons bomb Paris. Total casualties 252. A
    hospital set on fire.
  Mar. 11--Paris bombed; 100 people killed. Four machines shot down.
  Aug. 5--Zeppelin destroyed on East Anglia.



FACTS AND FIGURES.


FORCES ENGAGED.

Official figures show the strength of the Allied Armies on Nov. 11th,
1918, the date of the armistice with Germany, as follow:

  British    5,680,247
  French     5,075,000
  Italian    3,420,000
  American   3,707,132

The estimated forces of the enemy on the same date were:--

  German               4,500,000
  Austria-Hungarian    2,230,000
  Bulgarian              500,000
  Turkish (under)        400,000


CASUALTIES.

Number of men killed or who died of wounds received in the war, is
estimated by General March, Chief of Staff of the United States Army,
as 7,354,000. He estimates the respective losses thus:--

  Russia               1,700,000
  Germany              1,600,000
  France               1,305,000
  Austria                800,000
  Great Britain          706,000
  Italy                  460,000
  Turkey                 250,000
  Belgium                102,000
  Bulgaria               100,000
  Serbia and Montenegro  100,000
  United States           50,000

The total British casualties, killed, wounded or missing, for Navy,
Army, and Royal Air Force are 2,917,718.


LOSSES AT SEA.


ALLIES.

Great Britain--Battleships, 13; Battle Cruisers, 3; Cruisers, 25;
Monitors, 6; Destroyers, 64; Torpedo Boats, 10; Submarines, 50; Small
Craft, 271. Total, 550,000 tons.

France--Battleships, 4; Cruisers, 5; Destroyers, 14; Torpedo Boats, 8;
Submarines, 14; Small Craft, 9. Total 110,000 tons.

Italy--Battleships, 3; Cruisers, 2; Monitors, 1; Destroyers, 10;
Torpedo Boats, 5; Submarines, 8. Total 76,000 tons.

Japan--Battleships, 1; Cruisers, 4; Destroyers, 3; Torpedo Boat, 1.
Total, 50,000 tons.

United States--Cruiser, 1; Destroyers, 2; Submarine, 1. Total, 17,000
tons.

Total for all the Allies--803,000 tons.


ENEMY.

Germany--Battleship, 1; Battle Cruiser, 1; Cruisers, 24; Destroyers,
72; Torpedo Boats, 51; Submarines, 205. Total, 350,000 tons.

Austria-Hungary--Battleships, 3; Cruisers, 2; Monitors, 3; Destroyers,
5; Torpedo Boats, 4; Submarines, 8. Total, 65,000 tons. Total for the
Central Powers--415,000 tons.


WAR HONOURS.

The list of war honours conferred for services in the field is a
lengthy one. It comprises:--


BRITISH FORCES.

  Victoria Cross       563
      ”     ”    Bars    2
  Distinguished Service Ord.               8,435
         ”      Bars (1st)                   609
         ”           (2nd)                    52
         ”           (3rd)                     3
  Military Cross                          35,802
      ”      ”   Bars (1st)                2,401
      ”      ”        (2nd)                  133
      ”      ”        (3rd)                   14
  Royal Red Cross (1st Class)                350
     ”      ”     (2nd Class)              1,048
     ”      ”     (Bars)                      17
  Distinguished Conduct Medal             22,800
        ”          ”      ”   Bars (1st)     392
        ”          ”      ”        (2nd)       6
  Military Medal                          91,721
          ”   Bars (1st)                   3,773
          ”        (2nd)                      98


FOREIGN DECORATIONS.

Orders and Decorations have been conferred on the British Armies by
Allied Powers as follows:--Officers, 5,931. Other Ranks, 9,398.


COST OF WAR.

It is estimated that the total cost of the war to all the belligerents
up to May 1st, 1919, was £35,000,000,000.

The public debt of the principal Allied countries is estimated at
£21,000,000,000, and that of the Central Powers at £9,000,000,000.

Our war expenditure:

  Total expenditure, August 4, 1914, to March 22, 1919
                                            £9,600,000,000.

  Raised by War Loan, Bonds, and Treasury Bills
                                            £4,600,000,000:

  Borrowed from abroad--£1,300,000,000.


  PRINTED AND BOUND BY
  PERCY LUND, HUMPHRIES AND CO., LTD.,
  THE COUNTRY PRESS, BRADFORD & LONDON.
  33284


[Transcriber’s Note:

Page 34, “Pte. C. Bolton” noted as out of alphabetical order.

Page 35, “Pte. C. Bunnett” noted as out of alphabetical order.

Page 35, “Pte. R. Clark” noted as out of alphabetical order.

Page 36, “L/Cpl. T. Greehow” noted as out of alphabetical order.

Inconsistent spelling and hyphenation are as in the original.]





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