Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: Mother Goose's Bicycle Tour
Author: Bonnell, M. A.
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Mother Goose's Bicycle Tour" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



Transcriber’s Note:-

The original spelling, hyphenation, accentuation and punctuation has
been retained, with the exception of apparent typographical errors
which have been corrected.

The transcriber has added a Table of Contents, following the Dedication.

Italic text is denoted _thus_.

Bold text is denoted =thus=.



  WRITTEN AND ADAPTED

  _by_

  M. A. BONNELL



  =A=wake, sweet hope! for she who shares the throne
  =L=ends her own merit to make dulness bright,
  =E=ven as Luna to the insipid drop its light.

  =X=anthine yellow might the aster take for hue,
  =A=n emerald green the clove carnation crown,
  =N=or could fair England’s rose yet learn to frown.

  =D=iadems of humble bloom and royal fleur-de-lis,
  =R=are crowns of love, have crowned her long ago;
  =A=nd ever round her noble brow more intertwined they grow.

  —_M. A. BONNELL_

  _July 3rd, 1901._

  _The above lines accompanied the copy which was graciously accepted
  by Queen Alexandra._



  MOTHER GOOSE’S BICYCLE

  TOUR.

  [Illustration: title page]

  BY M. S. G.

  Toronto:
  William Briggs.



  With honest pride the rhymer sings
    Her ancestress’ renown,—
  Oh, proud the day that gave her birth!
    And proud her natal town!

  Oh, may the theme the verse redeem,
    Of meagre wit and rhyming loose,
  And win a kind indulgence still
    For Mary Susan Goose!


  Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year
  one thousand nine hundred, by WILLIAM BRIGGS, at the Department of
  Agriculture.



  Dedicated

  By

  Permission

  To

  Miss Liv Nansen



DEDICATION.


1.

  Though pure the drifting snows of northern realms,
    Dazzling the Aurora of the polar girth,
  More stainless still thy fair and childish brow,
    More bright the aureole that surrounds thy birth.


2.

  Ofttimes a nation bends its tender gaze
    To watch the blooming of a royal flower;
  Child of heroic blood, genius thy heritage!
    The loving interest of a world thy dower!

  M. A. B.



CONTENTS.


  DEDICATION.
  THE DEPARTURE.
  PUSSY CAT.
  HIGH DIDDLE-DIDDLE.
  THE QUEENS OF THE CARDS.
  JACK AND JILL.
  OLD KING COLE.
  THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN.
  BAA-BAA BLACK SHEEP.
  OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.
  WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO, MY PRETTY MAID?
  WHEN I WAS A BACHELOR.
  HUMPETY DUMPETY.
  TAFFY WAS A WELSHMAN.
  THREE WISE MEN OF ST. IVES.
  THE FROG AND THE CROW.
  THE DONKEY’S REPLY.
  FARMER BROWN.
  THE CAPTAIN.
  THE SHOEMAKER.
  THE COOK.
  THE GROCER.
  THE FARMER.
  THE FARMER’S WIFE.
  THE TAILOR.
  MRS. THOMPKINS AND MR. HOPKINS.
  THIS VERY BLACK MAN OF SIAM.
  THIS LAZY OLD MAN OF MOSELLE.
  CE COCHON, AN INTERESTING PIG.
  THIS SHOCKING OLD MAN FROM CAPE RAY.
  PETER PRADDLE BOUGHT A SADDLE.
  THE MAN FROM HONG KONG.
  THE LITTLE BOHEMIAN.
  THE KING IS RETURNING TO PARIS.
  LE PETIT MARÉCHAL.
  LA PETITE ÉTRANGÈRE.
  LAY THE TABLE.
  TOMMY HAS A GUN.
  ENIGMAS.
  THE MAID WITH EYES OF BLUE.
  THIS STUDIOUS GIRL OF OGONTZ
  ENIGMAS.
  THE MILLER.
  A KING.
  LOUIS HAD A SISTER TRÈS-PETITE.
  DICK’S POEM.
  THE LITTLE NUT TREE.
  L’ENFANT TERRIBLE.
  ISIDORE ET ISABELLE.
  EVERY DOG ON THE STREET.
  THE APPLE-PIE PARTY.
  GLOSSARY.



Mother Goose’s Bicycle Tour.



[Illustration]


THE DEPARTURE.


1.

  Long years ago dear Mother Goose
    For little people made, you see,
  Of merry rhymes and odd conceits
    A veritable pot pourri.


2.

  Some riddles hard the brain to puzzle,
    Tales that really seemed quite true,
  Rhymes with fun just brimming o’er,
    For each one something à son goût.

[Illustration: a princess]


3.

  Her fame had spread through many lands,—
    A princess came from France to see
  The tree that bore the golden pear:
    At least such was l’on dit.


4.

  But years rolled by, the dame grew old,—
    Alas, the universal fate!
  She found herself almost forgot,
    And with her goose left tête à tête.

[Illustration: they plan the journey]


5.

  Said Mother Goose:  “My faithful bird,
    Our friends neglect us, to be sure;
  But never mind, we’ll just prepare
    And take a pleasant little tour.


6.

  Some evenings spent in brushing up
    The foreign words we used to know,
  Ere setting out upon our trip,
    Would now be very à propos.


7.

  I’ll order from my milliner
    A brand new hat and travelling suit;
  And then procure some maps and guides;
    We’ll surely need them whilst en route.


8.

  ’Tis fifty years since you and I
    Our journey took the moon to see;
  For fear we never should come back
    We left our cards with P. P. C.


9.

  What crowds there were to see us off!
    What merry shout and loud hurrah!
  Most certainly we undertook
    Our enterprise with great éclat.


10.

  And then the journey back again,
    And how we made the world to stare
  When home we brought the wondrous news—
    The moon was made of fromage vert!


11.

  But times are changed, and people now
    Doubt everything they cannot see;
  And men are old before they’re young,
    And even children feel ennui.


12.

  No fairies now their revels hold,
    Nor dare their merry pranks pursue;
  The prying eye, the searchlight’s glare,
    Have made them bid the land adieu.


13.

  Should you in this material age
    Your magic powers reveal by chance,
  You’d never be a moment free
    From scientific surveillance.


14.

  Besides, to ride upon your back
    Would outrage modern fashion’s code;
  To go upon a two-wheeled thing
    Is now considered à la mode.”


15.

  When thus the dame had spoke her mind,
    Her banker first she went to see;
  Then purchase made of many things,
    Besides a flask of eau-de-vie.


16.

  She meant to cross the Channel soon,
    And for the future had a care;—
  All those who travel on the sea
    Provision make for mal de mer.


17.

  Two bicycles were ordered then
    From Monsieur Brun de Chambray;
  To tell the truth, the dame on hers
    Looked really most distinguée.


18.

  The goose all unaccustomed was
    To this most curious gait,
  But spite of this her mistress vow’d
    She thought her manner was parfaite.


19.

  “I am an awkward creature,”
    Quoth the goose, “as people say;
  But on the water, rest assured,
    You’ll find me quite au fait.


20.

  “I know you dread the noisy ship,
    With all its bustle and to-do;
  And for the horrid smell of tar
    You have a natural dégoût.


21.

  “So let us take an open boat;
    The voyage is not very long.
  I’m sure we’ll reach the other side
    Without the slightest contre-temps.”


22.

  With courage rare the dame replied,
    “Your plan, I think, is for our weal;
  We’ll follow it without delay.”
    Her charming nature was facile.

[Illustration: at sea]


23.

  The noble, brave, and clever bird,
    As one may well perceive,
  For new and strange adventures now
    Was quite on the qui vive.


24.

  Adventures came too soon, alas!
    For on that self-same day
  A storm arose, and they were wrecked
    In that short traversée.


25.

  In this extremity most dire
    The dame takes off a wooden boot,
  And says, “I’ll buoy these precious bikes,
    And get them sometime coûte que coûte.”


26.

  For string she ravels out her hose,
    While briny waters saturate her;
  Her plan will surely win success
    For is it not a coup de maître!


27.

  “Now bind together, mistress dear,
    Before they float away,
  Those oars of good Canadian pine;
    They are our pis aller.


28.

  “Your weight, supported by this frame,
    I have the power to draw;
  Nor danger fear while you retain
    Such admirable sang-froid.”


29.

  By strength of will, and wing, and web,
    They reached a passing man-of-war,
  And now to Mother Goose and bird
    We must say “au revoir.”



[Illustration]


PUSSY CAT.


  “Pussy cat, pussy cat, where have you been?”
  “I’ve been to London to see the Queen.”
  “Pussy cat, pussy cat, what saw you there?”
  “I saw a little mouse under the chair.”
  “Pussy cat, pussy cat, what did you do?”
  “J’ai mangé la souris tout à coup.”



[Illustration]


HIGH DIDDLE-DIDDLE.


1.

  High diddle-diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
    The cow jumped over the moon.
  Regardez donc cette vache agile,
    Qui saute par-dessus la lune.


2.

  Je vais au marché à l’instant,
    I’m going to the market now,
  Pour acheter cette vache surprenante,
    To buy that remarkable cow.


3.

  The well-known cat and the wonderful cow,
    On the picture now you may see,
  Ainsi que le chien intelligent,
    Qui avait beaucoup ri.

[Illustration: page decoration]



[Illustration]


THE QUEENS OF THE CARDS.


  Les dames des cartes,
  Elles firent des tartes
  All on a summer’s day.

[Illustration]

  Les valets des cartes
  Volèrent ces tartes,
  And took them clean away.

[Illustration]

  Les rois des cartes
  Cherchèrent les tartes,
  And beat the knaves full sore.

[Illustration]

  Les valets des cartes
  Rapportèrent les tartes,
  And vow’d they’d steal no more.



[Illustration]


JACK AND JILL.


1.

  Jack and Jill went up the hill,
    Ensemble de l’eau y chercher;
  Jack fell down and broke his crown,
    La pauvre Jille fut renversée.


2.

  Up Jack got and home did trot,
    En colère et très-pressé;
  Dame Jill had the job to plaster his knob,
    Quand l’effusion de sang eut cessé.


3.

  Jill came in and she did grin,
    En voyant cet emplâtre;
  Her mother vow’d she’d whip her next,
    À cause de ce désastre.



[Illustration]


OLD KING COLE.


  Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
   Il aimait la compagnie;
  He called for his pipe, he called for his bowl,
   Singing “Vive la compagnie!”

  He shared with his fiddlers the very best cheer,
    Singing “Vive la compagnie!”
  He drank from his bowl the very best beer,
    Singing “Vive la compagnie!”

  He never knew sorrow, he never knew fear,
    Singing “Vive la compagnie!”
  He lived very happy (cela va sans dire),
    Singing “Vive la compagnie!”

[Illustration: page decoration]



[Illustration]


THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN.


1.

  There was an old woman
    Who lived in a shoe,
  Elle avait beaucoup d’enfants,
    And she didn’t know what to do.


2.

  She gave them some broth,
    Without any bread,
  Elle les battait très-fort,
    And sent them to bed.



Illustration]


BAA-BAA BLACK SHEEP.


  “Baa-baa black sheep,
    As-tu de la laine?”
  “Oui, Monsieur, j’en ai
    Deux poches pleines.

  “Une pour mon maître,
    Une pour ma dame,
  Rien pour le garçon
    Qui versa des larmes.”



[Illustration]


OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.


1.

  Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard
    Des os d’obtenir pour son chien,
  But when she got there, the cupboard was bare,
    Hélas! le pauvre chien n’eut rien.

[Illustration: chien mort]


2.

  She went to get bread
    From the baker next door,
  But when she returned
    Le chien était mort.


3.

  She went for a coffin,
    With many a tear,
  But the dog was only joking,
    Se met donc à rire.


4.

  She went for some tripe,
    Feeling all in a maze,
  But when she returned
    Il fumait à l’aise.


5.

  “I will get him some ale,”
    Mother Hubbard said she,
  But when she returned
    Le chien était assis.


6.

  She went for some wine,
    Her favorite to fête,
  Returning she found him
    Debout sur sa tête.


7.

  She went to the hatter’s
    To get him a hat,
  But when she returned
    Il nourrissait la chatte.


8.

  She went to the barber’s
    To buy him a wig,
  But when she returned
    Il dansait une gigue.


9.

  She went to the fruiterer’s
    To get him some fruit,
  Returning she found him
    Jouant de la flûte.


10.

  To buy him a coat
    She went to the tailor,
  Returning she found him
    À cheval sur une chèvre.

[Illustration: dog reads by the fire]


11.

  She went to buy shoes,
    But, most strange to tell,
  Returning, she found him
    Lisant les nouvelles.


12.

  To buy him some linen
    She went one fine day,
  Returning, she found
    Le chien qui filait.

[Illustration: dog fully dressed]


13.

  She went to buy hose
    From old Father Drew,
  Returning she found him
    Paré de son mieux.


14.

  The dame made a curtsey,
    The dog made a bow;
  The dame said, “Your servant,”
    Le chien dit, “Bow-wow.”


15.

  This wonderful dog
    To the dame was most dear,
  He could read, sing and dance,
    Et il savait écrire.


16.

  Whilst living she fed him
    With dainties galore,
  And built him a tombstone
    Quand il était mort.

[Illustration: page decoration]



[Illustration]


WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO, MY PRETTY MAID?


  “Où vas-tu, ma belle chérie?”
  “I’m going a-milking, sir,” said she.
  “Puis-je t’accompagner, belle chérie?”
  “Just as you please, kind sir,” said she.
  “Que fait ton père, ma belle chérie?”
  “My father’s a farmer, sir,” said she.
  “Que fait ta mère, ma belle chérie?”
  “Wife to my father, sir,” said she.
  “Quelle est ta fortune, belle chérie?”
  “My face is my fortune, sir,” said she.
  “S’il en est ainsi, belle chérie—”
  “What do you mean, kind sir,” said she.
  “Nous n’aurons jamais de fiançailles.”
  “Nobody asked you, sir,” said she.



WHEN I WAS A BACHELOR


1.

  Quand j’étais un garçon,
    I lived by myself,
  Et toute la viande et le fromage
    I put upon a shelf.


2.

  Les rats et les souris
    Did lead me such a life,
  Je m’en allai à Londres
    To get myself a wife.


3.

  Les rues étant grandes,
    And the lanes being narrow,
  Je dus amener mon épouse,
    In a wheel-barrow.


4.

  La brouette se cassa,
    My wife got a fall,
  A terre fut la brouette,
    Little wife and all.



[Illustration]


HUMPETY DUMPETY.


  Humpety Dumpety sat on a wall;
  Humpety Dumpety had a great fall.
    All the King’s horses
      Et l’armée du roi
    Couldn’t make Humpety Dumpety
      Ce qu’il était autrefois.



TAFFY WAS A WELSHMAN.


1.

  Taffy was a Welshman,
    Taffy was a thief,
  Taffy coura chez moi
    And stole a leg of beef.


2.

  I went to Taffy’s house,
    Taffy wasn’t at home,
  Taffy coura chez moi
    And stole a marrow bone.


3.

  I went to Taffy’s house,
    Taffy was in bed,
  Je pris vite le savouret,
    And beat him on the head.



[Illustration]


THREE WISE MEN OF ST. IVES.


1.

  Said this very wise man of St. Ives,
    “I hear that potatoes have eyes;
  I’ll shave all my head and dye my clothes red,
    I’ve a nervous objection to spies.”


2.

  Said the wiser, “I cannot advise
    Such a strange and uncommon disguise;
  But this is my plan, to eat all we can,
    Regardless of shape or of size.”


3.

  Said the sagest, “You don’t realize
    That your scheme is most truly unwise;
  If you eat them at all, either large ones or small,
    Every thought of your heart they’ll surmise.


4.

  “On the man who successfully tries,
    Or some feasible plan can devise,
  To grow us a kind that really is blind,
    We’ll bestow a magnificent prize.”

[Illustration: page decoration]



[Illustration]


THE FROG AND THE CROW.


[Illustration: musical score

   1. Une chère petite grenouille, Lived on the river brink, oh! Un
      corbeau noir et gaillard Came there to get a drink, oh! “Come
      ashore, Come ashore,” Dit le corbeau  à la grenouille, “Come
      ashore, come ashore,” Dit le corbeau à la grenouille.

  2. “And you shall hear the music On yonder green hill, oh! And you
      shall see the dancers All dressed up in yellow.” “Je vous
      remercie, Je vous remercie,” Dit la jeune petite grenouille,
      “Je vous remercie, Je vous remercie,” Dit la jeune petite
      grenouille.]


3.

  So the frog began a-jumping,
    A-jumping to land, oh!
  And the crow began a-hopping,
    To give her his hand, oh!
  “Je vous remercie, je vous remercie,”
    Dit encore la jeune grenouille.
  “Miss, you’re welcome; Miss, you’re welcome,”
    Dit le corbeau à la grenouille.


4.

  “But where is the music
    On yonder green hill, oh!
  And where are the dancers
    All dressed up in yellow—?”
                      “Yough” (scream).

[Illustration: crow swallows toad]



[Illustration]


THE DONKEY’S REPLY.


1.

  “Dear Neddy, I called you long ago,
  Are you cold out here in the snow?
  I would take you down to the kitchen below,
  Only—”

                “Frottez le dos.”


2.

  “Cook is so cross I’m afraid to go;
  When I wanted to help her knead the dough
  She sent me away and scolded so,
  But—”

                “Frottez le dos.”


3.

  “But if you are quiet and speak very low,
  And try to walk on your very tip-toe,
  We might go to the room where sisters sew,
  Or—”

                “Frottez le dos.”


4.

  “Dear old Ned, you are as hoarse as a crow,
  And you wobble your long ears to and fro,
  But whatever you mean, I would like to know,
  By—”

                “Frottez le dos.”



FARMER BROWN.


[Illustration: artist at his easel]


  I painted a picture of his two cows,
    And sent him in the bill;
  Old Pogue is there, and Sukie, too,
    And Minn’s behind the hill.


1.

  Farmer Brown is a sneak,
    And Farmer Brown is a rogue!
  He said he would give me a pound, and he didn’t,
    For painting his cows and Pogue.


2.

  He wanted a picture of his two cows,
    Sukie and coal-black Minn;
  And then for the pound he was to give
    Old Pogue must be painted in.


3.

  Oh, Farmer Brown is a sneak,
    And Farmer Brown is a rogue!
  He said he would give me a pound, and he didn’t,
    For painting his cows and Pogue.


4.

  I painted a picture of his two cows,
    Sukie and coal-black Minn;
  And then for the pound he was to give,
    Old Pogue was painted in.


5.

  Oh, Farmer Brown is a sneak,
    And Farmer Brown is a rogue!
  He said he would give me a pound, and he didn’t,
    For painting his cows and Pogue.


6.

  I painted a picture of his two cows,
    And sent him in the bill;
  Old Pogue is there, and Sukie, too,
    And Minn’s behind the hill.


7.

  Oh, Farmer Brown is a sneak,
    And Farmer Brown is a rogue!
  He said he would give me a pound, and he didn’t,
    For painting his cows and Pogue.



[Illustration]


THE CAPTAIN.


  “I’ve finished my ship to the very last nail,
  I’ve painted the deck and set the sail,
  And now I’m ready to cross the main,
  For I will be le capitaine.”



[Illustration]


THE SHOEMAKER.


  “I mean to make shoes of the strongest leather,
  That boys may go out in any weather.
  I’ve got some wax, and I know the way,
  So I will be le cordonnier.”



[Illustration]


THE COOK.


  “My cakes will be indeed a treat;
  I’ll make them of raisins and sugar sweet:
  First a story and then a layer,
  And I will be la cuisinière.”



[Illustration]


THE GROCER.


  “Currants and chocolate, apples as well,
  The very things I would like to sell;
  In spite of brother Ned’s facetiæ,
  I’ll be a prosperous épicier.”[A]

FOOTNOTES:

[A] The exigencies of the language do not admit of a very good rhyme
here.



[Illustration]


THE FARMER.


  “You must have horses large and strong,
  To drag the heavy plough along;
  And go to market and draw the hay,
  So I will be le fermier.”



[Illustration]


THE FARMER’S WIFE.


  “I’d like to make butter and skim the milk,
  And go to church in a nice black silk;
  And I like boys with curly hair;
  I think I’ll be la fermière.”



[Illustration]


THE TAILOR.


  “The stylish suits of cloth I’ll make
  The eye of taste will surely take;
  And swain, intent on wedding tour,
  Will ask, ‘Qui est votre tailleur?’”



[Illustration]


MRS. THOMPKINS AND MR. HOPKINS.


[Illustration: musical score


  1. “Oh, here is lit-tle Mrs. Thompkins, In such a frill, in such a
      frill!” “Oh, bless me if it isn’t Hopkins, All dressed to
      kill, all dressed to kill!”

  2. “Good morning to you, Mrs. Thompkins, Pray how d’you do? pray how
      d’you do?” “Oh, none the better, Mr. Hopkins, for see-ing you,
      for seeing you.”

  3. “That sil-ly, sil-ly Mrs. Thompkins, I’m sorry for her, I’m sorry
      for her!” “That horrid, horrid Mr. Hopkins, He’s my _bête
      noir_, he’s my _bête noir_!”]

[Illustration: they turn their backs]



[Illustration]


THIS VERY BLACK MAN OF SIAM.


  Ce jeune homme très-noir de Siam,
  Just asked for a slice of good ham;
  They said, “If you crave it,
  And take affidavit
  You’re not a Mohamme-dan-dan,
      You can.”



[Illustration]


THIS LAZY OLD MAN OF MOSELLE.


  This lazy old man of Moselle
  Said, “Indeed, it is all very well;
  But to kill flies with pease
  Is not taking one’s ease,
  ‘Le jeu ne vaut pas la chandelle.’”



[Illustration]


CE COCHON, AN INTERESTING PIG.


  Ce cochon, an interesting pig,
  Always wore a dress coat and a wig,
  But his friends looked askance,
  And soon took a chance
  To ask why he wore that strange rig.



[Illustration]


THIS SHOCKING OLD MAN FROM CAPE RAY.


  This shocking old man from Cape Ray
  Refusa de mettre son gilet;
  They put him to bed,
  And everyone said,
  “Such men must be made to obey.”



[Illustration]


PETER PRADDLE BOUGHT A SADDLE.


  Peter Praddle bought a saddle,
  Put it on a pump handle;
  When they asked him what for,
  He answered, “Je ne sais quoi.”



[Illustration]


THE MAN FROM HONG KONG.


  This extraordinary man of Hong Kong
  Déclarait la journée trop longue;
  They put on his head a poultice of bread,
  And told him his views were all wrong.



[Illustration]


THE LITTLE BOHEMIAN.


1.

  “Que fais-tu ici, mon petit?
    You must be far from home;
  It is not right that such a mite
    Should be allowed to roam.


2.

  “What is your race and country,—
    It never could be guessed,—
  Your raven locks and Northern bloom
    To different climes attest?”


3.

  “I had a race, a long one,
    Across the river Seine,
  Ma mère parle le Français
    Et elle est Américaine.


4.

  “But I’m going to my own country,
    And it’s forty miles away;
  I’m walking very fast because
    I must be there to-day.


5.

  “My father knows the name of it,
    Il m’appelle Bohème;
  And Victor’s going with me,
    For I think he is the same.”



[Illustration]


THE KING IS RETURNING TO PARIS.


  Le roi revient à Paris,
    La reine est très-heureuse,
  Le roi il est le mari,
    La reine elle est l’épouse.



[Illustration]


LE PETIT MARÉCHAL.[B]


1.

  I was a little sergeant, don’t you see,
  And I drilled my soldiers one and twenty-three,
    And we all stepped out together,
    In fair and stormy weather,
  Myself and soldiers one and twenty-three.


2.

  I was a little captain, happy me!
  Of my chosen band of one and twenty-three,
    And we roamed the world together,
    In fair and stormy weather,
  Myself and soldiers one and twenty-three.


3.

  And now I am a marshal, as you see,
  With a score and four of soldiers under me,
    And we roam the world together
    In fair and stormy weather,
  Just five and twenty soldiers counting me.

[Illustration: page decoration]

FOOTNOTES:

[B] The answer is “A,” the first letter of the twenty-five that compose
the French alphabet.



[Illustration]


LA PETITE ÉTRANGÈRE.


1.

  I met a little foreigner,
    All on a walking tour;
  She smiled at me and sweetly said,
    “Je suis Française, Monsieur.”


2.

  She looked so very elegant—
    A countess, I am sure—
  I quickly lifted off my hat
    And said, “Madame, bonjour.”



[Illustration]


LAY THE TABLE.


1.

  Mettez donc le couvert
    Vite, vite, vite.
  Set the plates immediately
    To heat, heat, heat.


2.

  Jeanne a fait le ragoût,
    Anne a fait la tarte,
  Sue will place the chairs around
    With all her little heart.



[Illustration]


TOMMY HAS A GUN.


  Tommy has a gun,
          Prenez-garde;
  It has bullets made of lead,
          Very hard.
  He might take you for a bear,
  He might take you for a hare,
  He might take you for a bird,
          Prenez-garde.



ENIGMAS


[Illustration: a bear]


ENIGMA.


  I feed all the Summer,
      O dear, yes!
  You’d better keep out of my way.
  I fast all the Winter,
      O dear, dear!
  In the dark and the cold I stay.


[Illustration: man stoking boiler]


ENIGMA.


  I feed all the Winter,
      O dear, yes!
  I feed both night and day.
  I fast all the Summer,
      O dear, dear!
  In a dark, dreary place I stay.


[Illustration: dog being fed at table]


COMME IL FAUT.


  This is a pretty little girl,
    And yet I do not know,
  It seems to me her manners
    Are not quite comme il faut.



[Illustration]


THE MAID WITH EYES OF BLUE.


  I met a little maiden
    With eyes of lovely blue,
  I said in my politest tone,
    “Ma chère, que voulez-vous?”
  She said, “I’d like a cherry ripe,
    Kind sir, or even two.”
  Oh, no one could refuse her,
    La fille aux beaux yeux doux.



[Illustration]


THIS STUDIOUS GIRL OF OGONTZ


  Cette fille studieuse de l’Ogontz[C]
  Said, “This child will, I fear, be a dunce;
  It’s my place to see that
  She is taught to spell cat,
  So come here, little sister, at once.”

  This lad with compassion was smitten,
  Qui vint des environs de Wittin,
  He said, “I fear that
  She’s too young to spell ‘cat’,
  Oh do, please, first try her with ‘kitten.’”

FOOTNOTES:

[C] Ogontz is a college in the United States.



ENIGMAS


[Illustration: rabbits]


ENIGMA.


  Connaissez-vous mon père?
  Connaissez-vous ma mère?
  Connaissez-vous mes frères,
        chérie?


[Illustration: more rabbits]


ENIGMA.


  They are hiding in the hedge,
  They are peeping o’er the ledge,
  They are seeking in the grass
        For me.


[Illustration: boy serenades girl at window]


CASSANDRE.


  À cette fenêtre
  Veux-tu paraître?
  De tout mon être
        Je t’attends.

  My heart is ever true,
  I wait, dear love, for you,
  At this our rendez-vous,
        Cassandre.



[Illustration]


THE MILLER


  This jolly, fat miller works hard every day,
  To grind up the corn in the very best way;
  Oh, bright is his smile and friendly his chat,
  And on his head always he wears a white hat;
  Oh, gay is his whistle and cheery his song.
  Et sur sa tête toujours un chapeau très-blanc.
      Pourquoi?
  Pour se tenir la tête chaude.



[Illustration]


A KING.[D]


  A king:—in history my name is surely known;
  Their love my subjects by word and deed have shown.
  Tho’ grieved to leave the palace of my sires,
  Tho’ grieved to leave the land of sunny skies,
  Choice of evils bade me leave my tottering throne,—
  Should I say more my answer would be known.

FOOTNOTES:

[D] Un certain roi et sa cour furent obligés de laisser leur capital et
partir pour le nouveau monde à cause du tremblement de terre, A.D. 1755.

A certain king and his court were obliged to leave their capital and
set out for the New World on account of an earthquake in A.D. 1755.



[Illustration]


LOUIS HAD A SISTER TRÈS-PETITE.


  Louis had a sister très-petite,
  He thought that standing up she would look sweet;
    But her mother came and sought her,
    And caught her little daughter—
  Before that he had taught her this new feat.



[Illustration]


DICK’S POEM.


  When Benny wasn’t doing something silly he was very wise;
  He was bigger than he was small regarding size;
  His head was about as large as a piece of chalk,
  And when he didn’t run he went in a walk.
  Even when he walked it was on his feet,
  And he never was greedy when he hadn’t anything to eat.
  The way he didn’t behave himself was a disgrace;
  But then he never hurt you when he bit you on your false face.



[Illustration: page decoration]


THE LITTLE NUT TREE.


1.

  J’avais un noisetier,
    Nothing did it bear
  Mais une muscade d’argent
    And a golden pear.


2.

  The King of France’s sister
    Came to visit me,
  All for the sake
    Of my little nut tree.



L’ENFANT TERRIBLE.


1.

  I wish that grown-up gentlemen,
    And grown-up ladies, too,
  Would learn to speak as plainly
    As other people do.


2.

  Uncle calls me some queer name,
    Something “long” I know;
  I cannot tell quite what it is,—
    He always says it low.


3.

  I never call him “long,” although
    He’s seven or eight feet high,
  Or more, perhaps—at any rate,
    He’s longer far than I.


4.

  I tried to wait in uncle’s room
    To ask him what it meant,
  But all my poor dear dollies
    Wanted some of uncle’s scent.


5.

  They’re very fond of scent, you know,
    And so I gave them plenty;
  But, oh, dear me! I was surprised
    To find the bottle empty.


6.

  With sister it is just the same—
    She says I am de trop
  Whenever there is company,
    What’s that, I’d like to know?


7.

  To-day (of course to help them)
    I just took off the string
  From a cunning little parcel
    I saw the postman bring.


8.

  It was the sweetest ring, although
    It did not fit me quite,
  So I put it in my pocket
    To keep it out of sight.


9.

  My birthday cake was getting made
    Down stairs that very minute,
  And when cook looked the other way
    I pushed the ring down in it.


10.

  And if the ring should fall to Rose,
    I’ll be so glad, you know,
  For she is my darling sister
    And I really love her so.



[Illustration]


ISIDORE ET ISABELLE.


  Isidore et Isabelle
  Marchent dessous une grande ombrelle.
  Now which is which? If you can tell,
  You shall have a candy and kiss as well.



[Illustration]


EVERY DOG ON THE STREET.


  Every dog on the street wags its tail when we meet.
    Mais voici une autre chose;
  This one I dread, for it waggles its head,
    And fastens its teeth in my hose.

  This very small child on a stool,
  Had a bird that her nurse called a Poule;
    But the gardener’s son, Ben,
    Always called it “An enn,”
  Though his parents had sent him to school.



[Illustration]


TWICE ONE ARE TWO.


  Twice one are two,
  Toujours je l’ai su.

  Twice two are four,
  J’ai des boutons d’or.

  Twice three are six,
  Ce fait est vraiment fixe.

  Twice four are eight,
  La réponse est parfaite.

  Twice five are ten,
  Les écoliers viennent.

  Un, deux, trois, quatre, cinq,
  De l’argent dans la banque;
  Six, sept, huit, neuf, dix,
  J’en donnerai à mon fils.

  Apportez-moi du potage,
  Apportez-moi du sel,
  Apportez-moi une tranche de pain,
  And I’ll do very well.



THE APPLE-PIE PARTY.


[Illustration: ornate letters A B]

  A was an apple-pie, bitten by Tom;
  French people call an apple “une pomme.”

  B was the bite, and I really must say,
  Tom was sorry that ever he took “la bouchée.”

[Illustration ornate letters C D]

  C was the cook; Tom was always quite safe
  To get goodies and tarts, when he called him “le chéf.”

  D was the dinner got ready that day;
  Dinner in France is called “le dîner.”

[Illustration ornate letters E F]

  E was the edge (in France called “le bord”)
  Of that pie trimmed with pastry to imitate cord.

  F was the fun the sight gave to all;
  In words of the Frenchman “la gaiété folle.”

[Illustration ornate letter G]

  G was the guest Tom was late to receive;
  He came looking happy—a merry “convive.”

[Illustration ornate letter H]

  H was for Harry, who served the pie in great glee;
  In France his name is pronouncéd “Henri.”

[Illustration ornate letters I J]

  I was the ivy; the pie with great care
  Was entwined with the creeper the French call “lierre.”

  J was the juice, well sweetened by the cook;
  He flavoured it nicely and called it “le suc.”

[Illustration ornate letters K L]

  K was the kitchen, so tidy and clean;
  In France it is always called “la cuisine.”

  L was the linen beside each place set,
  In Anglo, the napkin; in French, “serviette.”

[Illustration ornate letters M N]

  M was the music (in French “la musique”)
  Aunt played for the game of “lost treasure seek.”

  N was the nurse (in France called “la bonne”)
  Who brought some small cousins to share in the fun.

[Illustration ornate letters O P]

  O was the oven (in French called “le four”);
  At ’Xmas it bakes many pies for the poor.

  P for the plates (in French “assiettes”),
  Kept warm till the table was all nicely set.

[Illustration ornate letters Q R]

  Q the quadrille, which I think came from France;
  The place where all children learn early to dance.

  R was the room where the dancing took place,
  In French called “le salon,” or else “la pièce.”

[Illustration ornate letters S T]

  S was the sideboard for things stored away;
  Cupboard, or sideboard, in French is “buffet.”

  T was the tray (in French called “plateau”)
  All laden with jellies and cream whipped like snow.

[Illustration ornate letters U V]

  U was the urchin, old cook’s “petite peste”;
  Of leavings and scraps she was always in quest.

  V was the valet; at “dix heures” he came,
  His very small master and mistress to claim.

[Illustration ornate letters W X]

  W a wrangler, a horrid “mégère”;
  Just read the next line, her name will be there.

  X Xantippe was not at the party, I’m told;
  Such people are always left out in the cold.

[Illustration ornate letters Y Z]

  Y was the year (in French called “l’année”),
  Which for these happy children had just passed away.

  Z was the “zeste” that appetites hearty
  Unfailingly give to an apple-pie party.



GLOSSARY.

CODE.

  a, fāte, făt, fāll; e, mē, mĕt, hêr; i, pīne, pĭn, fîr; o, nōte, nŏt,
  nôr; u, tūbe, tŭb, fûll; tŏĭl; oo, ooze.

  Where the letter “g” is added at the end of a syllable in the
  pronunciation, it should be sounded very faintly so as to be scarcely
  perceptible.


  _À cause de ce désastre_ (ă kōs dĕ sĕ dēsăstr), because of this
  misfortune.

  _À cette fenêtre_ (ā sĕt fĕnātr), at this window.

  _À cheval sur une chèvre_ (ă shêvăl soor oon shāvr), riding a goat.

  _Adieu_ (ă-dew), farewell.

  _Ainsi que le chien intelligent_ (ăn-sē kĕ lĕ shē-ĕn ân-tĕl-ē-jôn),
  also the intelligent dog.

  _À la mode_ (ă lă mōd), in the fashion.

  _Anne a fait la tarte_ (ăn ă fā lă tărt), Anne has made the tart.

  _Apportez-moi du potage_ (ă-pōrt-ā mŏá doo pot-ăj, bring me some
  soup.

  _Apportez-moi du sel_ (ă-pōrt-ā mŏá doo sĕl), bring me some salt.

  _Apportez-moi une tranche de pain_ (ă-pōrt-ā mŏà oon transh dĕ
  pă-ng), bring me a slice of bread.

  _Approchez-vous_ (ă-prō-shā voo), come nearer.

  _À propos_ (ă prō-pō), to the purpose, suitable.

  _À son goût_ (ă sōng goo), according to his taste.

  _Assiettes_ (ăs-sē-ĕt), plates.

  _As-tu de la laine?_ (ā too dĕ lă lān) Hast thou any wool?

  _À terre fut la brouette_ (ă tār foo lă broo-ĕt), down came the
  wheelbarrow.

  _Au fait_ (ō fā), expert.

  _Au revoir_ (ō rĕv-vôr), good-bye till our next meeting.


  _Bête-noir_ (bāt nwôr), bugbear.

  _Bonne_ (bŭn), nurse maid, or maid-servant.

  _Bouchée_ (boo-shā), mouthful.

  _Buffet_ (boo-fā), sideboard.


  _Ce cochon_ (sĕ kō-shŏn), this pig.

  _Ce fait est vraiment fixe_ (sĕ fāt ā vrā-mŏng fēx), this fact is
  truly fixed.

  _Ce jeune homme très noir de Siam_ (sĕ joon ŏm trā nwôr dĕ Sē-ăm),
  this young man very black of Siam.

  _Cela va sans dire_ (sĕ-lă vă sŏng dēr), that goes without saying.

  _Cette fille studieuse de l’Ogontz_ (sĕt fēl stoo-dē-oos), this
  studious girl of Ogontz.

  _Ce qu’il était autrefois_ (sĕ kēl ĕt-ā ōtr-fōy), that which he was
  formerly.

  _Chef_ (shāf), head cook, man cook.

  _Cherchèrent les tartes_ (shĕrsh-ār lā tărt), searched for the
  tarts.

  _Comme il faut_ (kŭm ēl fō), the correct thing.

  _Connaissez-vous ma mère?_ (kŏn-nā-sā voo mă mār), Do you know my
  mother?

  _Connaissez-vous mes frères?_ (kŏn-nā-sā voo mā frār), Do you know
  my brothers?

  _Connaissez-vous mon père?_ (kŏn-nā-sā voo mŏng pār), Do you know
  my father?

  _Contre-temps_ (kŏntr-tŏng), mischance.

  _Convive_ (kōng-vēv), companion at table.

  _Coup de maĭtre_ (koo de mātr), master-stroke.

  _Coûte que coûte_ (koot kĕ koot), cost what it may.

  _Cuisine_ (kwē-zēn), kitchen.


  _Debout sur sa tête_ (dā-boo soor să tāt), standing on his head.

  _Déclarait la journée trop longue_ (dā-klă-rā lă joor-nā trō lŏng),
  declared the day was too long.

  _De l’argent dans la banque_ (dĕ lăr-jôn dông lă bănk), some money
  in the bank.

  _De trop_ (dĕ trō), in the way.

  _Des os d’obtenir pour son chien_ (dās ō dōb-tĕ-nēr poor sōng
  shē-ĕn), some bones to procure for her dog.

  _De tout mon être_ (dĕ too mŏng ātr), with all my soul.

  _Deux poches pleines_ (doo pōsh plān), two bags full.

  _Dégoût_ (dā-goo), disgust.

  _Dîner_ (dē-nā), dinner.

  _Distinguée_ (dĕs-tāng-ā), distinguished.

  _Dit encore la jeune grenouille_ (dēt ŏng-kor lă joon grĕn-oo-ē),
  said the young frog again.

  _Dit la jeune petite grenouille_ (dē lă joon pĕ-tēt grĕn-oo-ē),
  said the young little frog.

  _Dit le corbeau à la grenouille_ (dē lĕ kôr-bō ă lă grĕn-oo-ē),
  said the crow to the frog.


  _Eau-de-vie_ (ō-dĕ-vē), brandy.

  _Éclat_ (ā-klă), brilliancy.

  _Elle avait beaucoup d’enfants_ (ĕl ă-vā bō-koo dŏng-fŏng), she had
  a great many children.

  _Elle les battait très-fort_ (ĕl lā băt-tā trā fōr), she beat them
  very soundly.

  _Elles firent des tartes_ (ĕl fēr dā tărt), they made some tarts.

  _En colère et très-pressé_ (ōng ko-lār ā trā prĕssā), in anger and
  haste.

  _Ennui_ (ŏng-nwē), condition or state of being bored.

  _Ensemble de l’eau y chercher_ (ŏng-sômble dĕ lō ē shĕr-shā),
  together to get some water there.

  _En route_ (ŏng root), on the journey.

  _En voyant cet emplâtre_ (ŏng vŏĭ-ŏng sĕt ŏng-plătr), on seeing
  this plaster.

  _Et elle est Américaine_ (ā ĕl āt ă-mā-rē-kān), and she is an
  American.

  _Et il savait écrire_ (ā ēl săv-āt ā-krēr), and he knew how to
  write.

  _Et l’armée du roi_ (ā lăr-mā doo rwŏĭ), and the army of the king.

  _Et sur sa tête toujours_ (ā soor să tāt too-joor), and on his head
  always.

  _Et toute la viande et le fromage_ (ā toot lă vē-ŏnd ā lĕ frō-măj),
  and all the meat and cheese.


  _Facile_ (fă-sēl), compliant.

  _Four_ (foor), oven.

  _Fromage vert_ (frō-măj vār), green cheese.

  _Frottez le dos_ (frŏt-ā lĕ dō), rub my back.


  _Henri_ (ŏng rē), Henry.

  _Hélas! le pauvre chien n’eut rien._ (ā-lă lĕ pōvr shē-ĕn noo
  rē-ĕn), Alas! the poor dog had nothing.

  _Il aimait la compagnie_ (ēl ā-mā lă kŏm-pă-nē), he used to love
  company.

  _Il dansait une gigue_ (ēl dŏng-sāt oon jē-g), he was dancing a jig.

  _Il fumait à l’aise_ (ēl foo-māt ă lāz), he was smoking comfortably.

  _Il m’appelle Bohème_ (ēl mă-pĕl bō-ām), he calls me a Bohemian.

  _Il nourrissait la chatte_ (ēl noo-rē-sā lă shăt), he was feeding
  the cat.


  _J’ai des boutons d’or_ (jā dā boo-tŏng dōr), I have some gold
  buttons.

  _J’ai mangé la souris tout à coup_ (jē mông-jā lă soo-rē toot ă
  koo), I ate up the mouse instantly.

  _J’avais un noisetier_ (jăv-āz ūn nŏĭ-zĕt-ē-ā), I had a nut-tree.

  _Jeanne a fait le ragoût_ (jān ă fā lĕ ră-goo), Jean has made the
  stew.

  _Je dus amener mon épouse_ (jĕ dooz ămĕn-ā mon ā-pooz), I was
  obliged to bring my wife.

  _Je m’en allai à Londres_ (jĕ mōn ăl-ā ă Lŏndr), I went away to
  London.

  _J’en donnerai à mon fils_ (jŏn dŏn-ĕ-rā ă mŏng fēs), I will give
  some of it to my son.

  _Je ne sais quoi_ (jĕ nĕ sā qàw), I don’t know what.

  _Jouant de la flûte_ (joo-ŏng dĕ lă floot), playing the flute.

  _Je pris vite le savouret_ (jĕ prē vēt lĕ să-voo-rā), I quickly
  took the marrow-bone.

  _Je suis Française Monsieur!_ (jĕ swē frŏng-sāz mŏng-sor), I am a
  French woman, sir!

  _Je t’attends_ (jĕ tă-tŏngd), I wait for thee.

  _Je vais au marché à l’instant_ (jĕ vāz ō măr-shā ă lŏng-stŏng), I
  am going to the market now.

  _Je vous remercie_ (jĕ voo rĕ-mĕr-sē), I thank you.


  _La brouette se cassa_ (lă broo-ĕt sĕ kăs-ă), the wheelbarrow broke.

  _La cuisinière_ (lă kwē-zē-nē-ār), the cook (woman cook).

  _La fermière_ (lă fĕr-mē-ār), the farmer’s wife.

  _La fille aux beaux yeux doux_ (lă fēl ō bōz ū doo), the girl with
  the lovely soft eyes.

  _La fournaise_ (lă foor-nāz), the furnace.

  _La gaieté folle_ (lă gā-ā-tā făl), the merriment, the fun.

  _L’année_ (lă-nā), the year.

  _La pauvre fille fut renversée_ (lă pōvr fēl foo rŏng-vēr-sā), the
  poor girl fell down.

  _La petite étrangère_ (lă pĕ-tēt ā-trŏng-jār), the little foreigner.

  _La reine, elle est l’épouse_ (lă rān ĕl ā lā-poos), the queen, she
  is the wife.

  _La reine est très-heureuse_ (lă rān ā trā-oo-roo-s), the queen is
  very happy.

  _La réponse est parfaite_ (lă rā-pŏns ā păr-fāt), the answer is
  perfect.

  _Le capitaine_ (lĕ kă-pē-tān), the captain.

  _Le chien dit_ (lĕ shē-ĕn dē), the dog said.

  _Le chien était assis_ (lĕ shē-ĕn ĕtāt ăs-ē), the dog was seated.

  _Le chien était mort_ (lĕ shē-ĕn ĕt-ā mōr), the dog was dead.

  _Le chien qui filait_ (lĕ shē-ĕn kē fē-lā), the dog who was
  spinning.

  _Le cordonnier_ (lĕ kŏr-dŭn-ē-ā), the shoemaker.

  _L’enfant terrible_ (lŏng-fâng tĕr-ē-bl), the dreadful child.

  _Le fermier_ (lĕ fĕr-mē-ā), the farmer.

  _Le jeu ne vaut pas la chandelle_ (lĕ joo nĕ vō pă lă shong-del),
  the game is not worth the candle.

  _L’épicier_ (lā-pē-sē-ā), the grocer.

  _Le petit maréchal_ (lĕ pĕ-tē măr-ē-shăl), the little marshal.

  _Les dames des cartes_ (lā dăm dā kărt), the queens of the cards.

  _Les écoliers viennent_ (lās ā-kō-lē-ā vē-ĕn), the scholars are
  coming.

  _Les rats et les souris_ (lā ră ā lā soo-rē), the rats and the mice.

  _Le roi, il est le mari_ (lĕ rŏĭ ēl ā lĕ mă-rē), the king, he is
  the husband.

  _Le roi revient à Paris_ (lĕ rŏĭ rĕ-vengt ă pă-rē), the king is
  returning to Paris.

  _Les rois des cartes_ (lā rŏĭ dā kărt), the kings of the cards.

  _Les rues étant grandes_ (lā roo ĕtŏng gránd), the streets being
  wide.

  _Le suc_ (lĕ sook), the juice.

  _Les valets des cartes_ (lā vă-lā dā kărt), the knaves of the cards.

  _Le tailleur_ (lĕ tă-ē-oor), the tailor.

  _Lierre_ (lē-ār), ivy.

  _Lisant les nouvelles_ (lē-zŏng lā noo-vĕl), reading the news.

  _L’on dit_ (lŏng dē), the rumour, the saying.

  _L’ours_ (loor), the bear.


  _Ma chère, que voulez-vous?_ (mă shār kĕ voo-lā voo), My dear, what
  do you wish?

  _Ma mère parle le Français_ (mă mē-r părl lĕ frāng-sā), my mother
  speaks French.

  _Madame, bonjour_ (mă-dăm bŏng-joor), Madam, good day.

  _Mal de mer_ (măl dĕ mār), sea-sickness.

  _Mais voici une autre chose_ (mā vŏĭ-sē oon ōtr shōs), but here is
  a different thing.

  _Mais une muscade d’argent_ (maz oon moos-kărd dăr-jŏn), except a
  silver nutmeg.

  _Marchent dessous une grande ombrelle_ (mărsh dĕs-oos oon grŏnd
  ŏm-brĕl), walk beneath a wide umbrella.

  _Mégère_ (mā-gā-r), a scold.

  _Mettez donc le couvert_ (mĕt-ā dŏng lĕ koo-vār), lay the table
  then.

  _Musique_ (moo-zē-k), music.


  _Nous n’aurons jamais des fiançailles_ (noo nō-rōng jă-mā dā
  fē-ong-sā-ē), we will never be betrothed.

  _Oui, monsieur, j’en ai_ (wē mŏng-soor jŏn ā), yes, sir, I have of
  it.

  _Où vas-tu, ma belle chérie?_ (oo vă-too mă bĕl shārē), Where are
  you going, my pretty dear?


  _Parfaite_ (păr-fāt), perfect.

  _Paré de son mieux_ (pă-rā dĕ song mū), dressed up in his best.

  _Petite peste_ (pĕ-tēt pēst), urchin.

  _Pièce_ (pē-ā-s), apartment.

  _Pis aller_ (pēs ăl-lā), last resource.

  _Plateau_ (plă-tō), tray.

  _Pot pourri_ (pō poorē), mixture.

  _Poule_ (pool), hen.

  _Pour acheter cette vache surprenante_ (poor ăsh-tā sĕt văsh
  soor-prĕn-ānt), to buy that remarkable cow.

  _Pour se tenir la tête chaude_ (poor sĕ tĕn-ēr lă tāt shōd), to
  keep the head warm.

  _Pourquoi_, (poor-kwā), why!

  _P.P.C., Pour prendre congé_ (poor prŏng-dr kŏng-jā), to take
  leave.

  _Prenez-garde_ (prĕn-nā-gărd), take care.

  _Puis-je t’accompagner?_ (pwē-j tā-kōm-pă-nē-ā), May I go with you?


  _Quadrille_ (kwá-drĭl), quadrille.

  _Quand il était mort_ (kŏng-d ēl ĕt-ā mōr), when he was dead.

  _Quand j’étais un garçon_ (kŏng-d jĕt-ā găr-sŏng), when I was a
  bachelor.

  _Quand l’effusion de sang eut cessé_ (kŏng-d lĕf-foo-zē-ŏng dè sŏng
  oo sĕsa), when the effusion of blood had ceased.

  _Que fais-tu ici, mon petit?_ (kĕ fā-too ē-sē mŏng pĕ-tē), What are
  you doing here, my little one?

  _Que fait ton père, ma belle chérie?_ (kĕ fā tŏng pār mă bĕl
  shā-rē), What does your father do, my pretty dear?

  _Quelle est ta fortune?_ (kĕl ā tă fŏr-toon), What is your fortune?

  _Que voulez-vous?_ (kĕ voo-lā voo), What do you wish?

  _Qui avait beaucoup ri_ (kā ă-vā bō-koo rē), Who laughed so much.

  _Que fait ta mère, ma belle chérie?_ (kĕ fā tă mār mă bĕl shā-rē),
  What does your mother do, my pretty dear?

  _Qui est votre tailleur?_ (kē ā vōtr tă-ē-oor), Who is your tailor?

  _Qui saute par-dessus la lune_ (kē sōt păr-dēs-oo lă loon), Who
  jumped over the moon.

  _Qui versa des larmes_ (kē vĕr-să dā lărm), Who shed tears.

  _Qui vint des environs de Wittin_ (kē văngt dās ong-vē-rōng dĕ
  Vit-tăn), Who came from the neighborhood of Wittin.

  _Qui vive_ (kē vēv), state of expectation.


  _Rapportèrent les tartes_ (ră-pōr-tār lā tărt), brought back the
  tarts.

  _Refusa de mettre son gilet_ (rĕ-foo-ză dĭ mĕtr sōng jē-lā),
  refused to put on his waistcoat

  _Regardez donc cette vache agile_ (rĕ-găr-dā dŏng sĕt văsh ăjel),
  look at this active cow.

  _Rendez-vous_ (rŏng-dā-voo), appointed place of meeting.

  _Rien pour le garçon_ (rē-ĕn poor lĕ găr-sŏng), nothing for the
  boy.


  _Salon_ (să-lŏng), drawing-room.

  _Sang-froid_ (săng-frŏĭd), self-possession.

  _Se met donc à rire_ (sĕ mē dŏng ă rēr), began to laugh.

  _Serviette_ (sĕr-vē-ĕt), table napkin.

  _S’il en est ainsi_ (sēl ŏng āt ăng-sē), if that is the case.

  _Six, sept, huit, neuf, dix_ (sēs, sĕt, wēt, noof, dēs), six,
  seven, eight, nine, ten.

  _Surveillance_ (sŭr-vē-lang-s), overseeing, watchfulness.


  _Taffy coura chez moi_ (tă-fē koor-ă shā mŏĭ), Taffy ran to my
  house.

  _Tête-à-tête_ (tāt-ă-tāt), conversation between two persons alone.

  _Toujours je l’ai su_ (too-joor jĕ lā soo), I have always known it.

  _Tour_ (toor), journey or trip.

  _Traversée_ (tră-vĕr-sā), voyage.

  _Très-petite_ (trā-pĕ-tēt), very small.


  _Un chapeau très blanc_ (ŭn shă-pō trā blāng), a very white hat.

  _Un corbeau noir et gaillard_ (ŭn kŏr-bō nŏĭr ā gă-ē-ărd), a jolly
  black crow.

  _Un, deux, trois, quatre, cinq_ (ŭn, doo, trwô, kătr, sănk), one,
  two, three, four, five.

  _Une chère petite grenouille_ (oon shār pĕ-tēt grĕn-oo-ē), a dear
  little frog.

  _Une pomme_ (oon pôm), an apple.

  _Une pour ma dame_ (oon poor mă dăm), one for my lady.

  _Une pour mon maître_ (oon poor mŏng mātr), one for my master.


  _Valet_ (vă-lā), a gentleman’s body-servant.

  _Veux-tu paraître?_ (voo-too pă-rātr), Wilt thou appear?

  _Vite_ (vēt), quickly.

  _Vive la compagnie!_ (vēv lă kŏm-pă-nē), Long life to the company!

  _Volèrent ces tartes_ (vō-lār sē tărt), stole these tarts.


  _Zeste_ (zĕst), Zest.





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Mother Goose's Bicycle Tour" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home