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Title: Little Songs of Long Ago - More old Nursery Rhymes
Author: Various
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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Transcriber's Note:

    Irregular spelling, punctuation, and numbering preserved. Lyrics
    contained in the music notation are marked as [Music: lyrics].
    Ads from inside the dust jacket have been placed at the end.
    Music repeat signs are shown like this: ||:   :||.


                 Little
            Songs of Long Ago

        “More old Nursery Rhymes”

      The original tunes harmonized
                   by
              Alfred Moffat

             Illustrated by
          H. Willebeek Le Mair


              Augener Ltd.
                 London

              Philadelphia:
         David McKay, Publisher,
      604-8 So. Washington Square.



[Illustration]

  Copyright, 1912, by Augener Ltd.
        Printed in England.



Contents

                                       Page
    Dame get up and bake your pies        5
    Dance a baby diddy                    7
    Young lambs to sell                   9
    Over the hills                       11
    Little Polly Flinders                13
    The north wind                       15
    Old King Cole                        17
    Dance to your daddy                  19
    I saw three ships                    21
    Curly locks                          23
    London Bridge                        25
    Little jumping Joan                  27
    O dear, what can the matter be       29
    There came to my window              31
    The babes in the wood                33
    Simple Simon                         35
    Where are you going to?              37
    Lazy sheep                           39
    Three mice went to a hole            41
    Four and twenty tailors              43
    See Saw, Margery Daw                 45
    The crooked man                      47
    Lavender blue                        49
    Little Tom Tucker                    51
    A frog he would a-wooing go          53
    The spider and the fly               55
    I had a little nut tree              57
    Goosey Gander                        59
    A little cock sparrow                61
    Sleep baby, sleep                    63


       Uniform with this volume
        Our Old Nursery Rhymes
  30 Illustrations by the same Artist



[Illustration]


DAME GET UP AND BAKE YOUR PIES.


    [Music:

    1. Dame, get up and bake your pies,
    Bake your pies, bake your pies;
    Dame, get up and bake your pies
    On Christmas Day in the morning]

    2. Dame, what makes your maidens lie?
    Maidens lie, maidens lie;
    Dame, what makes your maidens lie
    On Christmas Day in the morning?

    3. Dame, what makes your ducks to die? etc

    4. “Their wings are cut, they cannot fly; etc.



[Illustration]


DANCE A BABY DIDDY.


    [Music:

    Dance a Baby Diddy,
    What can mammy do wid ’e?
    Sit in her lap,
    Give it some pap,
    And dance a Baby Diddy!]



[Illustration]


YOUNG LAMBS TO SELL.


    [Music:

    Young lambs to sell, young lambs to sell,
    Young lambs to sell, young lambs to sell;
    If I’d as much money as I could tell
    I wouldn’t come here with young lambs to sell.
    Two for a penny, eight for a groat,
    As fine young lambs as ever were bought.]



[Illustration]


OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY.


    [Music:

    1. Tom he was a piper’s son,
    He learnt to play when he was young;
    But all the tune that he could play,
    Was “Over the hills and far away.”
    Over the hills and a great way off
    The wind shall blow my top-knot off!]

    2. Tom with his pipe made such a noise
    That he pleased both the girls and boys.
    And so they stopped to hear him play
    “Over the hills and far away.” etc



[Illustration]


LITTLE POLLY FLINDERS.


    [Music:

    Little Polly Flinders
    Sat among the cinders
    Warming her pretty little toes.
    Her mother came and caught her
    And smacked her little daughter
    For spoiling her nice new clothes.]



[Illustration]


THE NORTH WIND DOES BLOW.


    [Music:

    The North Wind does blow
    And we shall have snow;
    And what will the Robin do then, poor thing?
    He’ll sit in the barn
    To keep himself warm,
    And hide his head under his wing, poor thing!]



[Illustration]


OLD KING COLE.


    [Music:

    Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
    And a merry old soul was he:
    And he called for his pipe,
    And he called for his bowl,
    And he called for his fiddlers three.
    Ev’ry fiddler had a fiddle fine,
    A very fine fiddle had he;
    Then tweedle-dee went the fiddlers three,
    And so merry we will be.]



[Illustration]


DANCE TO YOUR DADDY.


    [Music:

    Dance to your daddy
    My little laddie!
    Dance to your daddy
    My little lamb!

    You shall have a fishy
    On a little dishy,
    You shall have a fishy
    When the boat comes in!

    Dance to your daddy
    My little babby!
    Dance to your daddy
    My little lamb!]



[Illustration]


I SAW THREE SHIPS COME SAILING BY.


    [Music:

    1. I saw three ships come sailing by,
    Sailing by, sailing by;
    I saw three ships come sailing by
    On New Year’s Day in the morning.]

    2. And what do you think was in them then, etc.

    3. Three pretty girls were in them then, etc.

    4. And one could whistle, and one could sing,
    The other could play on the violin;
    Such joy there was at my wedding
    On New Year’s Day in the morning.



[Illustration]


CURLY LOCKS.


    [Music:

    Curly Locks, Curly Locks, wilt thou be mine?
    Thou shalt not wash dishes, nor feed the swine;
    But sit on a cushion and sew up a seam,
    And eat fine strawberries, sugar and cream.
    Curly Locks, Curly Locks, wilt thou be mine?
    Thou shalt not wash dishes, nor feed the swine.]



[Illustration]


LONDON BRIDGE IS BROKEN DOWN.


    [Music:

    1. London Bridge is broken down,
                Dance over my Ladye Lea;
    London Bridge is broken down
                With a gay ladye!]

    2. How shall we build it up again?
                Dance over my Ladye Lea!
    How shall we build it up again?
                With a gay ladye!

    3. Silver and gold will be stole away, etc.

    4. Build it up with iron and steel, etc.

    5. Iron and steel will bend and bow, etc.

    6. Build it up with wood and clay, etc.

    7. Wood and clay will wash away, etc.

    8. Build it up with stone so strong, etc.



[Illustration]


LITTLE JUMPING JOAN.


    [Music:

    Here am I, little jumping Joan,
    When nobody’s with me I’m always alone.]



[Illustration]


OH! DEAR, WHAT CAN THE MATTER BE?


    [Music:

    Oh! dear, what can the matter be?
    Oh! dear, what can the matter be?
    Oh! dear, what can the matter be?
    Johnny’s so long at the fair.

    He promised to bring me a basket of posies,
    A garland of lilies, a garland of roses.
    He promised to bring me a bunch of blue ribbons
    To tie up my bonny brown hair.

    Oh! dear, what can the matter be?
    Oh! dear, what can the matter be?
    Oh! dear, what can the matter be?
    Johnny’s so long at the fair.]



[Illustration]


THERE CAME TO MY WINDOW.


    [Music:

    1. There came to my window one morning in spring
    A sweet little robin, she came there to sing;
    The tune that she sang it was prettier far
    Than any I heard on the flute or guitar.]

    2. Her wings she was spreading to soar far away,
    Then resting a moment seem’d sweetly to say:—
    “Oh happy, how happy the world seems to be,
    Awake, little girl, and be happy with me!”

    3. But just as she finished her beautiful song,
    A thoughtless young man with his gun came along;
    He killed and he carried my robin away,
    She’ll never sing more at the break of the day.



[Illustration]


THE BABES IN THE WOOD.


    [Music:

                1. My dears, you must know,
                That a long time ago,
    Two poor little children, Whose names I don’t know,
                Were stolen away
                On a fine summer’s day,
    And left in the wood, as I’ve heard the folk say.
                Poor Babes in the Wood!
                Poor Babes in the Wood!
    Don’t you remember the Babes in the Wood?]

                2. And when it was night,
                So sad was their plight,
    The sun it went down, and the moon gave no light;
                They sobb’d and they sigh’d
                And they bitterly cried,
    And the poor little things they then lay down and died.
                Poor Babes in the Wood! etc.

                3. And when they were dead,
                The robins so red,
    Brought strawberry leaves to over them spread,
                Then all the day long,
                The branches among,
    They mournfully whistled, and this was their song:
                Poor Babes in the Wood! etc.



[Illustration]


SIMPLE SIMON.


    [Music:

    Simple Simon met a Pieman
    Going to the fair;
    Said Simple Simon to the Pieman
    “Let me taste your ware.”
    Said the Pieman unto Simon
    “Show me first your penny,”
    Said Simple Simon to the Pieman
    “Indeed, I have not any.”]



[Illustration]


WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO, MY PRETTY MAID?


    [Music:

    1. “Where are you going to, my pretty maid?
    Where are you going to, my pretty maid?”
    “I’m going a milking, Sir,” she said,
    “Sir!” she said, “Sir!” she said,
    “I’m going a milking, Sir,” she said.]

    2. ||:“May I go with you, my pretty maid?:||
    “You’re kindly welcome, Sir,” she said.

    3. ||:“What is your fortune, my pretty maid?:||
    “My face is my fortune, Sir,” she said.

    4. ||:“Then I can’t marry you, my pretty maid?:||
    “Nobody asked you, Sir,” she said.



[Illustration]


LAZY SHEEP, PRAY TELL ME WHY?


    [Music:

    Lazy sheep, pray tell me why
    In the pleasant field you lie,
    Eating grass and daisies white
    From the morning till the night?
    Ev’rything can something do,
    But what kind of use are you?]

    2. “Nay, my little master, nay,
    Do not serve me so, I pray;
    Don’t you see the wool that grows
    On my back to make your clothes?
    Cold, ah, very cold you’d be
    If you had not wool from me.”



[Illustration]


THREE MICE WENT INTO A HOLE TO SPIN.


    [Music:

    1. Three mice went into a hole to spin;
    Puss passed by, and Puss looked in;
    “What are you doing, my little men?”
    “Weaving coats for Gentlemen”
    “Please let me help you to wind off your threads;”
        “Ah, no, Mistress Pussy, you’d bite off our heads!
        Ah, no, Mistress Pussy, you’d bite off our heads!”]

    2. Says Puss: “You look so wondrous wise,
    I like your whiskers and bright black eyes;
    Your house is the nicest house I see,
    I think there is room for you and me.”
    The mice were so pleased that they opened the door.
        And Pussy soon laid them all dead on the floor.
        And Pussy soon laid them all dead on the floor.



[Illustration]


FOUR-AND-TWENTY TAILORS.


    [Music:

    Four-and-twenty tailors
    Went to kill a snail;
    The best man among them
    Durst not touch her tail
    She put out her horns
    Like a little Kyloe cow;
    Run, tailors, run!
    Or she’ll kill you all e’en now!]



[Illustration]


SEE-SAW, MARJORIE DAW.


    [Music:

    See saw, Marjorie Daw,
    Jacky shall have a new master.
    Jacky shall have but a penny a day
    Because he can’t work any faster.]



[Illustration]


THERE WAS A CROOKED MAN.


    [Music:

    There was a crooked man
    And he went a crooked mile,
    He found a crooked sixpence
    Upon a crooked stile.
    He bought a crooked cat
    Which caught a crooked mouse,
    And they all lived together
    In a little crooked house.]



[Illustration]


LAVENDER’S BLUE.


    [Music:

    1. Lavender’s blue, diddle, diddle!
    Lavender’s green;
    When I am King diddle, diddle!
    You shall be Queen.]

    2. Call up your men, diddle, diddle!
    Set them to work.
    Some to the plough, diddle, diddle!
    Some to the cart

    3. Some to make hay, diddle, diddle!
    Some to cut corn;
    While you and I, diddle, diddle!
    Keep ourselves warm



[Illustration]


LITTLE TOM TUCKER.


    [Music:

    Little Tom Tucker
    Sings for his supper;
    What shall we give him?
    White bread and butter.
    How can he cut it
    Without e’er a knife?
    How can he marry
    Without e’er a wife?]



[Illustration]


A FROG HE WOULD A-WOOING GO


    [Music:

    1 A frog he would a wooing go
                              “Heigh-ho!” said Rowley;
    A frog he would a wooing go,
    Whether his mother would let him, or no,
                              With a rowly, powly, gammon and spinach,
                              “Heigh-ho!” said Anthony Rowley]

    Off he set with his opera hat,
                              “Heigh-ho!” said Rowley;
    Off he set with his opera hat,
    And on the road he met with a rat,
                              With a rowly, powly, &c

    Soon they arrived at the mouse’s hall,
    They gave a loud tap, and they gave a loud call,
                              With a rowly, powly, &c.

    “Pray Mr. Frog will you give us a song?
    Let the subject be something that’s not over long,”
                              With a rowly, powly, &c

    “Indeed, Mrs. Mouse!” replied the frog,
    “A cold has made me as hoarse as a hog,”
                              With a rowly, powly, &c

    “Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog,” mousy said,
    “I’ll sing you a song that I have just made,”
                              With a rowly, powly, &c

    As they were in glee and merry making
    A cat and her kittens came tumbling in
                              With a rowly, powly, &c.

    The cat she seized the rat by the crown
    The kittens they pulled the little mouse down,
                              With a rowly, powly, &c.

    This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright,
    He took up his hat and he wished them good-night,
                              With a rowly, powly, &c

    As froggy was crossing it over a brook,
    A lily-white duck came and gobbled him up
                              With a rowly, powly, &c

    So here is an end of one, two and three,
                              “Heigh-ho!” said Rowley;
    So here is an end of one, two and three
    The rat, the mouse, and the little froggy,
                              With a rowly, powly, &c.



[Illustration]


THE SPIDER AND THE FLY.


    [Music:

    1. “Will you walk into my parlour?” Said the Spider to the Fly.
    “’Tis the prettiest little parlour That ever you did spy;
    The way into my parlour is up a winding stair,
    And I have many pretty things to show you when you’re there.”
    “Oh, no, no!” said the little Fly. “To ask me is in vain,
    For who goes up your winding stair, shall ne’er come down again.”

    2. I am sure you must be weary, dear! with soaring up so high,
    Will you rest up on my little bed?” said the Spider to the Fly;
    “There are pretty curtains drawn around, the sheets are fine and thin,
    And if you like to rest awhile, I’ll snugly tuck you in:”
    “Oh, no, no!” said the little Fly, “For I have heard it said,
    They never, never wake again who sleep upon your bed.”]

    The Spider turned him round about and went into his den,
    For well he knew the silly Fly would soon come back again;
    So he wove a subtle web in a little corner sly,
    And he set his table ready to dine upon the Fly:
    Then he came out to his door again and merrily did sing,
    “Come hither, hither, pretty Fly with the pearl and silver wing.”

    Alas! alas! how very soon this silly little Fly,
    Hearing all these flattering speeches came quickly buzzing by;
    With gauzy wing she hung aloft, then near and nearer drew,
    Thinking only of her crested head and gold and purple hue:
    Thinking only of her brilliant wings poor silly thing, at last
    Up jumped the wicked Spider and fiercely held her fast!



[Illustration]


I HAD A LITTLE NUT-TREE.


    [Music:

    I had a little nut tree
    Nothing would it bear
    But a silver nutmeg
    And a golden pear.

    The King of Spain’s daughter
    Came to visit me
    And all for the sake
    Of my little nut-tree]



[Illustration]


GOOSEY, GOOSEY, GANDER.


    [Music:

    Goosey, goosey, gander,
    Where shall I wander?
    Upstairs and downstairs
    And in my lady’s chamber.]

    There I met an old man
    Who would not say his prayers,
    So I took him by the left leg,
    And threw him down the stairs.



[Illustration]


A LITTLE COCK-SPARROW.


    [Music:

    1. A little cock-sparrow sat on a green tree,
    And he chirrup’d, he chirrup’d, so merry was he;
    A naughty boy came with his wee bow and arrow,
    Determined to shoot the little cock-sparrow.]

    2. “This little cock-sparrow shall make me a stew
    And his giblets shall make me a little pie too:”
    “Oh, no!” said the sparrow, “I won’t make a stew,”
    So he flapped his wings, and away he flew.



[Illustration]


SLEEP, BABY, SLEEP.


    [Music:

    1. Sleep, baby, sleep!
    Our cottage vale is deep;
    The little lamb is on the green,
    With snowy fleece so soft and clean
        Sleep, baby, sleep!]

    2. Sleep, baby, sleep!
    Thy rest shall angels keep,
    While on the grass the lamb shall feed,
    And never suffer want or need.
        Sleep, baby, sleep!



[Illustration]


PRINTED BY AUGENER LTD. 287 ACTON LANE, LONDON W. 4.



WORKS ILLUSTRATED

IN COLOUR BY

H. WILLEBEEK Le MAIR


SONG BOOKS:

  OUR OLD NURSERY RHYMES
  LITTLE SONGS OF LONG AGO

Each book containing 30 of the most popular Nursery Rhymes.

  OLD DUTCH NURSERY RHYMES

16 full page illustrations in colour.


CHILDREN’S BOOKS:

  THE CHILDREN’S CORNER
  LITTLE PEOPLE

Each book contains 16 pictures of Child Life
with Rhymes by R. H. ELKIN.


NURSERY RHYME BOOKS:

  1 GRANNIE’S LITTLE RHYME BOOK
  2 MOTHER’S LITTLE RHYME BOOK
  3 AUNTIE’S LITTLE RHYME BOOK
  4 NURSIE’S LITTLE RHYME BOOK
  5 DADDY’S LITTLE RHYME BOOK
  6 BABY’S LITTLE RHYME BOOK

Delightful little Booklets, containing 10 of the
most popular Rhymes, with Illustrations in colour.


PIANO ALBUM:

  Schumann’s Children’s Pieces


CHILDREN’S POSTCARDS

IN COLOUR.

Eleven Sets of 12 Cards.

  Set
  No.
   1. Our Old Nursery Rhymes
   2. Little Songs of Long Ago
   3. Old Rhymes with New Pictures
   4. Small Rhymes for Small People
   5. More Old Nursery Rhymes
   6. The Children’s Corner
   7. Children’s Pieces—Schumann
   8. Games and Pastimes
   9. Little People
  10. Old Dutch Nursery Rhymes
  11. English & Dutch Rhymes


        AUGENER Ltd.
           LONDON
  DAVID McKAY, Philadelphia





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