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Title: The Early Oxford Press - A Bibliography of Printing and Publishing at Oxford - '1468'-1640 With Notes, Appendixes and Illustrations
Author: Madan, Falconer
Language: English
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------------------------------------------------------------------------



                           EARLY OXFORD PRESS

                                _MADAN_



                                 London

                              HENRY FROWDE

                   OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS WAREHOUSE
                           AMEN CORNER, E.C.

[Illustration: DOMINVS ILLUMINATIO MEA]

                                New York

                    MACMILLAN & CO., 66 FIFTH AVENUE

[Illustration:

  INSTAVR·MAG·P·I·

  OF THE
  ADVANCEMENT AND
  PROFICIENCE OF LEARNING
  or the
  _PARTITIONS OF SCIENCES_

  I̅X̅ Bookes

  _Written in Latin by the Most Eminent
  Illustrious & Famous LORD
  FRANCIS BACON
  Baron̄ of Verulam Vicont S^t Alban
  Counsilour of Estate and Lord
  Chancellor of England._

  Interpreted
  _by_ GILBERT WATS.

  _Multi pertransibunt & augebitur Scientia._

  OXFORD
  _Printed by_ Leon: Lichfield,
  _Printer to the_ University, _for_
  Rob: Young, & Ed: Forrest.

  C|Ↄ|ↃC XL

  _W. Marshall sculpsit._

  AN OXFORD TITLE-PAGE, 1640
]



                                  _The
                          Early Oxford Press_

          A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF PRINTING AND PUBLISHING AT OXFORD
                              ‘1468’–1640
               _WITH NOTES, APPENDIXES AND ILLUSTRATIONS_


                                   BY

                         FALCONER MADAN, M. A.
                  FELLOW OF BRASENOSE COLLEGE, OXFORD


                                 Oxford
                         AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

                                  1895



                                 Oxford
                     PRINTED AT THE CLARENDON PRESS
               BY HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

------------------------------------------------------------------------



                                PREFACE


The present work was undertaken early in 1889, and is an attempt to
describe in detail the products and working of the Oxford Press in its
early days. Though eclipsed by the glories of the later University
Press, the first period, included in this book, has a natural importance
of its own. The Fifteenth and early Sixteenth Century presses[1] are
necessarily of interest, and when printing became firmly established in
1585 it began to reflect faithfully the current tendencies of thought
and study in the University. Theology is predominant, animated on its
controversial side with fierce opposition to the Church of Rome, but the
quieter fields of classical work are well represented, and side by side
is seen an increasing study of English literature. Of lighter books
there are few, and of chapbooks perhaps only one (1603, no. 5).

The most important works produced at Oxford between 1585 and 1640 were
Richard de Bury’s Philobiblon (1599), Wycliff’s treatises (1608), capt.
John Smith’s Map of Virginia (1612), Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy
(1621, &c.), Field on the Church (1628, &c.), Sandys’ translations of
Ovid’s Metamorphoses (1633), the University Statutes (1634), Chaucer’s
Troilus and Cressida in English and Latin (1635), Chillingworth’s
Religion of Protestants (1638), and Bacon’s Advancement and Proficience
of Learning, in English (1640: see frontispiece). There are of course
many books on logic, philosophy and the like, intended for the
University curriculum, and many collections of the rhetorical poems by
which the University was expected to condole or rejoice with every
change in the royal estate. 180 pages of mechanical grief at Elizabeth’s
death in 1603 are at once followed by 200 pages of equally mechanical
congratulations to James I: and the metrical tears dropped in turn on
the grave of the latter monarch in March 1625, are in May succeeded with
indecorous haste by songs of joy on the marriage of his successor. Some
volumes of English poems and plays occur, by Skelton, Nicholas Breton,
Churchyard, Fitz-Geffrey, Randolph, Cartwright, Fletcher, and others,
and a few still lighter pieces, such as a Masque at Richmond, partly in
Wiltshire dialect, and “Bushell’s Rock,” both in 1636. There are traces
of the study of Spanish, French and Welsh, as well as of Latin and
Greek; and an attempt to introduce phonetic writing and spelling was
made by Charles Butler in 1633 and 1634. Even theological disputes are
lightened by the solemn account of certain Jesuits in the East, who
dressed up a carcase as that of a queen recently deceased, obtained much
glory from the miracles it wrought, until the real corpse arrived and
the priests vacated the vicinity (1633, Gregorius). There is something
surprising in Oxford being chosen as the printing-place of a book to
persuade mothers to nurse their own children (1622, Clinton); and an
episcopal alchemist is not often to be met with in real life (1621,
Thornborough). It is less to be wondered at that a college which had
leased land to Queen Elizabeth for a quiet five thousand years, should
try to be relieved of its agreement within fifty (1623, Oxford).

There is no need of a general history of the University Press at this
time, as distinguished from the annals which the Appendixes of this work
present. The printers were privileged members of the University, and
occasionally printed “cum privilegio,” but there is little to invest
their personal proceedings with importance. Though it is true that money
was advanced in 1585 by the Earl of Leicester, Chancellor of the
University, to set up Joseph Barnes with a new press, and that the
charter of privileges in 1632 gave the University direct control of the
printing, there are as yet few signs of actual academical patronage or
interference, and the failures and successes of the printers and
publishers, which can be traced in detail in Appendixes C and F, are the
ordinary fluctuations of trade. Nor can the Oxford press at this time
claim much connexion with the greater world of the English Court or
Church. After it was placed on a permanent footing by the Earl of
Leicester, its one great patron and protector within our period was
Archbishop Laud, who occupied a similar position to that of Bishop Fell
at a later period in the same century.

The year 1640 has been chosen as the inferior limit of this
bibliography, partly because both the British Museum Catalogue of early
English books and Arber’s Transcript of the Registers of the Stationers’
Company stop at that point, partly because the interest in the products
of the press as such was found to be rapidly diminishing, and partly in
consequence of the break-up of all quiet progress during the convulsions
of the Rebellion, combined with the dismal prospect of that trackless
wilderness—the literature of the Civil War.

The present bibliography presents, it is believed, four features of
novelty:—the better representation of the titlepage by the use of Roman
and Italic capitals as well as ordinary type; the mention of the chief
type used in each book; the furnishing of the first words of certain
pages, to facilitate the identification of imperfect copies; and the
insertion of actual pages[2] of books printed at Oxford, selected from
works which are cheap and common. These points are explained and
discussed in a paper on ©Method in Bibliography©, printed at pp. 91–106
of vol. 1 of the Transactions of the Bibliographical Society (1893), to
which the reader is referred, if he wishes to see a fuller account of
the whole aim and method of the present book.

The best thanks of the writer are due for general help to Mr. E. Gordon
Duff, Librarian of the John Rylands (late Spencer) Library at
Manchester, to Mr. F. J. H. Jenkinson, Librarian of the Cambridge
University Library, and to Mr. W. H. Allnutt of the Bodleian: but
especially to the Delegates of the Clarendon Press both for undertaking
on liberal terms a work which can scarcely prove remunerative, and for
enabling the Oxford Historical Society to supply copies to its members,
as vol. xxix, at a price far below its actual cost[3]. Mr. Horace Hart,
the Controller of the Press, has taken a warm personal interest in the
printing, and any merits of form which may be found are due to his
experience and to the co-operation of his compositors. Nothing, however,
can relieve the writer of responsibility for the errors and shortcomings
which will be detected; and he can only plead that it is better to bring
out an imperfect book, if it is a useful one and the result of hard
work, than, by straining after an unattainable completeness, to delay
indefinitely its publication.

                                                               F. MADAN.

 OXFORD, _Dec._, 1894.


                             MINOR POINTS.

  _Dates._ The books classed under a given year, such as 1615, are
  necessarily such as were issued between 25 March 1615 and 24 March
  1616, since no means exist for dividing them according to the
  historical year. In recording a date between Jan. 1 and March 24, the
  form used is invariably the double one, such as 23 Feb. 1615/6, by
  which is implied what we understand by 23 Feb. 1616.

  _Numbers of books._ Some notes on the number of books printed at
  Oxford will be found on p. 291, and of books printed or published at
  Oxford on p. 292, among the Notanda.

  _References._ The usual style of reference throughout the book
  (including index) is to the _year_ followed by the _initial letter_ of
  the particular heading; as 1634 C, when the reference is to no. 9 on
  p. 177 (Cosin). A few references will be found in the earlier pages to
  years beyond 1640, made before it was decided to close the work at
  that year.

  _Titles._ The heading usually presents the author’s name in the form
  by which he is generally known to posterity, as “James ii, king,”
  although at the time of the book referred to he was prince James.

-----

Footnote 1:

  See Appendixes A, B.

Footnote 2:

  Separate leaves from rare and costly books are given in G. E.
  Klemming’s ©Sveriges äldre liturgiska literatur©, Stockholm, 1879—a
  practice which cannot be approved—but no local press has as yet been
  similarly illustrated.

Footnote 3:

  Separate copies can _only_ be obtained by ordering them from the
  Clarendon Press, and are not supplied by the Society.



                            LIST OF CONTENTS


                                                                    PAGE

 PREFACE                                                               v

 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES                                      x

 PLAN OF THE BIBLIOGRAPHY                                             xi

 THE OXFORD PRESS:—

     Fifteenth Century                                                 1

     Early Sixteenth Century                                           5

     Fictitious or Lost Oxford books, &c., 1459–1584                   8

     The Oxford University Press, 1585–1640                           14

     Periodical                                                      225

     Supplement of Additions and Corrections                         227

     List of Undated books                                           236

 APPENDIX A—The Fifteenth Century Press (a detailed account of
   books, type, copies known, &c.)                                   237

 APPENDIX B—The Early Sixteenth Century Press                        263

 APPENDIX C—A chronological list of persons and proceedings
   connected with book-production at Oxford, A.D. 1180–1640          266

 — Discussion of the authorship of the ©Praise of Music©, 1586       279

 APPENDIX D—Documents (Statute, 1373—Charters, 1632, 1632/3,
   1636/7—Statute, 1636)                                             281

 APPENDIX E—Woodcut and metal ornaments, tables of use of type,
   notanda                                                           289

 APPENDIX F—Lists of Imprints and tables of Oxford printers and
   publishers, 1585–1640                                             293

 INDEX                                                               315



                    LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES


 PLATE

    I. A collotype (as are also plates II-VII) of the
         titlepage of Wats’s translation of Bacon’s
         ©Advancement of Learning© (Oxford, 1640), see
         p. 217: here reduced one-third in length and
         breadth                                          _Frontispiece_


                         OXFORD TYPE, “1468”-86.

   II. Type 1 (see p. 241). The last page of the first
         Oxford book, bearing the famous colophon with
         date MCCCCLXVIII, discussed on pp. 245–52             _At end._

  III. Types 2 and 3 (see pp. 242–3). The upper part of
         the first page of the Latteburius, printed in
         1482. Parts of the curious woodcut border are
         also shown, which is the first used in English
         printing                                              _At end._

   IV. Types 3, 4, 5, 6 (see pp. 243–4). The upper part
         of K7^v of the Lyndewoode, printed in 1483 (?).
         The coloured initials are of course inserted by
         hand in the original                                  _At end._

    V. Types 5, 7 (see pp. 243–4). The text of f2^v of
         the ©Festial©, printed in 1486/7 (?), showing
         one of the smaller woodcuts and the woodcut
         capital G                                             _At end._


                          OXFORD TYPE, 1517–19.

   VI. (_a_) The titlepage of Burley on the Posterior
         Analytics of Aristotle, printed in 1517 (see
         pp. 5, 263), showing the large wood-engraving
         of the University Arms and the ordinary large
         type.

       (_b_) The four last lines of the back of the
         titlepage reproduced above, showing the
         ordinary large and small type                         _At end._

  VII. The titlepage of Burley de Materia et Forma,
         printed in 1518 by John Scolar. The woodcut
         represents a master and scholar. The type is
         the largest, used in titles only                      _At end._


                       OXFORD PRINTING, 1585–1640.

 Each of the first seven hundred copies of this work contains three
 specimens of actual pages from old Oxford books, copies of which are
 both common and cheap. Thus nos. 1–200 contain pages from (1) Ursinus’s
 Summe of Christian Religion, 1587, (2), N. Fuller’s Miscellanea Sacra,
 1616, (3) Carpenter’s Philosophia Libera, 1636: nos. 201–322 (1)
 Ursinus, (2) Fuller, (3) Reusner’s Symbola, 1638: nos. 323–500 (1)
 Ursinus, (2) Sanderson’s Logica, 1618, (3) Reusner: nos. 501–700 (1)
 Ursinus’s Summe of Christian Religion, 1589, (2) Du Moulin’s
 Accomplishment of the prophecies, 1613, (3) Grotius’s Defensio fidei
 catholicæ, 1636.

 After no. 700, at least one actual page will be given, and its
 provenance will be indicated by a note of the form “38.20,” implying a
 page from the 20th book of 1638 (Reusner).


                             LIST OF TABLES.

                                                                    PAGE

 Details of the 15th century books                                 238–9

 Owners of copies of ditto                                           240

 Details of the early 16th century books                             265

 Type used in Oxford books, 1585–1640                                291

 The relations of Oxford printers and publishers,
   1585–1640                                                       311–3



                        PLAN OF THE BIBLIOGRAPHY


                      15th and early 16th century.

The books of these periods are in some respects exceptionally treated,
but the general plan is similar to that of the later press. Pages 1–7
(printed off in 1889) must be taken in close connexion with Appendixes A
and B, which correct and supplement those pages in important points.


                               1585–1640.

1. After the heading (which in all cases is the author or a body
representing the author, if known; otherwise the catch-title) comes the
title, reproduced faithfully so far as was possible with the employment
of four types. A fifth minute type indicates letters represented by
contractions in the original. The occurrence of a “motto” (whether a
text or quotation), a device (see p. 289) or woodcuts (see p. 290) is
noted in square brackets. A * before the heading implies “undated”: a †
“no place of printing mentioned.”

2. Next follows the technical description, comprising:—

  _a._ The number of the imprint (see pp. 292–310: it would have been
  better to add the names of the printer and publisher to the bare
  reference).

  _b._ The date.

  _c._ The apparent size of a page of an ordinary uncut copy, according
  to the scale,

         _for narrow sizes_                   _for broad sizes_
        in.                                 in.
       12–18       folio                   12–18       large 4^o
        9–12       large 8^o                9–12       4^o
        7–9        8^o                      7–9        small 4^o
        6–7        12^o                     6–7        square 12^o
        5–6        16^o                                 &c.
        4–5        24^o

  The number of leaves in a section (quire or gathering) precedes,
  within round brackets, when different from what is suggested by the
  apparent size: as “(eights) small 4^o.” When it has been desirable to
  indicate further the way in which the original sheets of paper have
  been folded, the words _single_, _double_, or _treble_ (for once,
  twice, or thrice folded) are used on p. 238.

  _d._ The number of pages of a perfect copy, in square brackets when
  there is no printed pagination, as “pp. [16] + 121 + [9].” When
  printed pagination does not occur in the book at all, the signatures
  are also given.

  _e._ The first words of the 11th page, and of later ones in the case
  of a large work, always in italics.

  _f._ The common type of the body of the work, followed by the terms
  Roman, Italic, or English (i. e. Black-letter): see pp. 291–2.

  _g._ The contents. _Every page not mentioned is blank_, without
  exception.

3. Notes on the book. A reference to Wood’s ©Athenæ© and ©Fasti
Oxonienses©, as edited by Bliss (1813–20), has been considered as
superseding in most instances any biographical account of the author.
And the limitation of the present work to a bibliography of a press, not
of books connected with the University, has been borne in mind.



                           THE OXFORD PRESS.



                    The Fifteenth Century Press[4].


                                “1468.”

[¬Rufinus¬, of Aquileia]. [Sign. a 1^r:—] Incipit exposicio sancti
Ieronimi in | simbolum apostolorum ad papam laure¿n¿tiu¿m¿. [Sign. e
9^v:—] Explicit exposicio sancti Ieronimi in | simbolo apostolorum ad
papam laure¿n¿|cium Impressa Oxonie Et finita An|no domini . M . cccc .
lxviij . xvij . die | decembris.

  Impr. as above, Oxford, “1468”: 8^o: pp. [84], signn. a-d^8 e^{10}:
  sign. b 1^r beg. _tali generacione_. Contents:—pp. (1–82) the
  treatise.

  The work here ascribed to St. Jerome is in reality by Tyrannius
  Rufinus of Aquileia, _d._ 610.


                                 1479.

1. ¬Aegidius¬ de Columna, of Rome. [Sign. a 2^r:—] Incipit tractatus
sole¿n¿nis fratris Egi|dij de ordine fratrum Augustinensium de | peccato
originali [Sign. c 7^v:—] Explicit tractatus breue [altered by hand to
_breuis_] et vtilis de | origi¿n¿ali peccato Editus a fratre Egidio |
Romano ordinis fratru¿m¿ heremita¿rum¿ san|cti augustini. Impresso
[altered by hand to _impressus_] et finito [_finitus_, as before]
Oxonie. | A natiuitate d¿omi¿ni . M . cccc . lxxix . xiiij . die |
mensis marcij

  Impr. as above, Oxford, probably 1479/80: 8^o: pp. [48], signn. a-c^8:
  sign. b 1^r beg. _quod contrahamus_. Contents:—pp. (3–46) the
  treatise.

  The _editio princeps_ of this work by bp. Aegidius de Columna, of
  Rome.


2. ¬Aristotle.¬ [Sign. y 6^r:—] Explicit textus ethicorum Aristotelis |
per leonardu¿m¿ arretinu¿m¿ lucidissime transla|tus correctissimeq¿ue¿.
Imp ressus Oxoniis | Anno d¿omi¿ni . M . cccc. lxxix.

  Impr. as above, Oxford, 1479: 8^o: pp. [348], signn. a-x^8 y^6: sign.
  b 1^r beg. _Mnis ars_. Contents:—pp. (3–4) “prefacio leonardi arretini
  in libros ethicorum”: (5–15) “prologus” by the same: (17–347) the
  treatise.

  A Latin translation of the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle by
  Leonardus Brunus of Arezzo (Arretium).


                                 1480.

*†¬Cicero¬, Marcus Tullius. [M. Tulli Ciceronis Oratio pro T. Annio
Milone.]

  [Oxford, about 1480]: 6^o: probably 60 pages, signn. a-e^6.
  Contents:—pp. (probably 3–60) the oration.

  Only known from fragments containing signn. b 3, b 4, e 3, e 4, in the
  Bodleian Library at Oxford. It is still not absolutely certain that
  this book was printed at Oxford. If it was, this, and not the Andria
  of Terence printed by Pynson in 1497, was the first English edition of
  any part of a classic author in the original language.


                                 1481.

1. ¬Alexander¬ de Hales, the _doctor irrefragabilis_. [Sign. g 5^v:—]
Explicit expositio venerabilis | Alexandri sup¿er¿ primu¿m¿ lib¿rum¿ de
a¿n¿i¿m¿a. [Sign. y 7^v:—] Explicit elucidantissima exposi⸗|tio egregij
Alexandri sup¿er¿ secundu¿m¿ | libru¿m¿ de anima. [Sign. H 8^r:—]
Explicit sentenciosa atq¿ue¿ studio | digna expositio venerabilis
Alexan|dri sup¿er¿ terciu¿m¿ lib¿rum¿ de anima. Imp⸗|pressum p¿er¿ me
Theodericu¿m¿ rood de | Colonia in alma vniu¿er¿sitate Oxon̄. | Anno
incarnac¿i¿onis d¿omi¿nice. M . cccc . | lxxxi . xi . die mensis
Octobris.

  Impr. as above, Oxford, 1481: la. 8^o, perhaps (eights) fol.: pp.
  [480], signn. a-f^8, g^6, h-s^8, t-x^6, y-z and A-H^8: sign. b 1^r
  beg. _vel non sit_, B 1^r beg. _vna natura_. Contents:—signn. a 2^r-g
  5^v, bk. 1, with short preface: h 1^r-y 7^v, bk. 2: z 1^r-H 8^r, bk 3.

  The _editio princeps_ et unica of the Latin Commentary on the De Anima
  (περὶ ψυχῆς) of Aristotle, made by Alexander de Hales (i.e. probably
  Hailes near Winchcombe) the _doctor irrefragabilis_ (_d._ 1245), to be
  distinguished from Alexander de Ales or Alesius. Of this book there
  are two issues, the earlier with no border, the later with an
  elaborate woodcut border, the first ever found in an English printed
  book, surrounding the entire printed text of sign. a 2^r. There are
  two similar issues of the Lathbury, 1482.


2. *†¬Latin Grammar.¬ [A Latin Grammar in English with examples, only
known from two leaves in the British Museum, signn. b 2 and (presumably)
b 5: b 2 beg. “case As I muste”, ends “adyectyuys and voy”: b 5 beg.
“Also when y haue”, ends “que¿m¿ queris”. Date probably 1481: probably
sm. 4^o (but in eights), the chain lines being across the page.]


                                 1482.

†¬Lathbury¬, John. [Sign. b 8^v:—] Explicit p¿ro¿logus Sequitur li⸗|ber
moraliu¿m¿ sup¿er¿ trenis Iheremie p¿ro¿⸗|phete &c̄. [Sign. z 8^v:—] Et
sic e¿st¿ fmis huius op¿er¿is mo⸗|raliu¿m¿ sup¿er¿ ca . I . treno¿rum¿
ihere. p¿ro¿ph¿et¿e In | cipit treno¿rum¿ Capitulum s¿ecundu¿m. [A
similar colophon follows chapter 2 on sign. K (“k k”) 7^v.] [Sign. L
7^v:—] Explicit exposicio ac moralisacio | tercij capituli trenoru¿m¿
Iheremie pro|phete . Anno d¿omi¿ni M . cccc . lxxxij vlti⸗|ma die mensis
Iulij | [Sign. O 5^v:—] Explicit tabula sup¿er¿ opus trenoru¿m¿ |
compilatu¿m¿ per Iohannem Lattebu . | rij ordinis minorum.

  Impr. as above, [Oxford] 1482: la. 8^o, perhaps (eights) fol.: pp.
  [584], signn. a-z, A-I, kk, L-M^8, N-O^6: sign. b 1^r beg.
  _strennuitatem_, B 1^r beg. _didit &c̄._ Contents:—signn. a 2^r-b 8^v,
  prologue: c 1^r-L 7^v, the work in 3 chapters: M 1^r-O 5^v,
  alphabetical index.

  The _editio princeps_ et unica of the Latin Commentary on the
  Lamentations of Jeremiah, made by John Lathbury. Of this book there
  are two issues, with and without the woodcut border mentioned under
  the Alexander de Hales, 1481.


                                 1483.

1. [*†¬Anwykyll¬, John]. [Compendium totius grammaticae]. [Sign. n
1^r:—] Uulgaria quedam abs Terentio in Anglica¿m¿ ling|uam traducta.

  No doubt printed at Oxford, probably in 1483: sm. 4^o: pp. [256?],
  signn. a-q^8(?). Contents:—signn. a-m, the work(?), n 1^r-q 8^v,
  Vulgaria Terentii.

  A Latin Grammar in Latin believed to be by John Anwykyll, of which
  this edition is only known from fragments, but which was reprinted at
  Deventer in 1489. The Vulgaria Terentii (sentences from Terence with
  English translation) was sold as a separate part, and still exists
  complete in itself. There are two issues of the Grammar, not at
  present clearly distinguished.


2. *†¬Hampole¬, Richard Rolle of. [Sign. a 2^r:—] Explanationes
notabiles deuotissimi viri Ricardi | Hampole heremite sup¿er¿
lectio¿n¿es illas beati Iob q¿ue¿ solent | in exequijs defunctoru¿m¿
legi q¿ue¿ no¿n¿ minus historia¿m¿ q¿uam¿ tropo|logiam & anagogiam ad
studentiu¿m¿ vtilitatem exactissi⸗|me annotauit. [Sign. k 6^v:—] Sermo
beati Augustiui de misericordia | et pia oracione pro defunctis. |

  [Oxford, probably 1483]: (sixes) 12^o: pp. [128], signn. a-k [“lr”]^6
  l^4: sign. b 1^r beg. _visitat ad_. Contents:—sign. a 2^r-k 6^r,
  Hampole on Job: k 6^v-l 3^v, Augustine.


3. *¬Logic.¬ [Sign. A 2^r:—] Uonia¿m¿ ex t¿er¿mi¿ni¿s fiu¿n¿t
p¿ro¿p¿osici¿o¿n¿es ... [19 Latin treatises on logical subjects].

  No place or date [Oxf., about 1483]: (sixes) 8^o: pp. [328], signn.
  A-Z, Aa-Cc^6: Dd^8: sign. B 1^r beg. _nulla proposicio_, Bb 1^r _illis
  superfluum_. Contents:—signn. A 2^r-Dd 5^v nineteen logical treatises,
  the last ending “Explicit tractatus de motu velocitatis. Sequitur
  tabula”: Dd 6^r-8^r, a table in Latin giving the heads of the parts of
  each treatise, each group preceded by “Tractatus”: Dd 8^r “Ad lectores
  carmen” and “Registrum cartarum”.

  These nineteen logical treatises are strung together to form a
  systematic work on Logic: at the end of the 17th, on sign. Bb 3^v, is
  “Et sic finiuntur insolubilia swynishede.”, i. e. Roger Swineshede
  (Suinesheved, Swincet &c.), but he was probably only the author of
  that part. The last treatise is physical rather than logical.


4. *¬Lyndewoode¬, William. [Sign. S 9^v:—] Explicit opus magistri
wil|helmi lyndewoode Super con⸗|stituc¿i¿ones prouinciales laus deo.
[Sign. dd 7^v:—] Explicit tabula co¿m¿pendiosa super librum | qui
intitulatur p¿ro¿uincialis co¿m¿pilata per wil⸗|helmu¿m¿ de Tylia nemore
completa In festo | co¿n¿uersacionis Sancti Pauli . Anno d¿omi¿ni |
Millesimo . CCCC . xxxiij.

  No imprint, but Oxford about 1483: (eights) fol.: pp. [732], signn.
  a-c^8, d^6, e-i^8, k^6, l-o^8, p^6, q-s^8, t^6, v-y^8, z^6, A-D^8,
  E^6, F-N^8, O^6, P-R^8, S^{10}, aa-cc^8, dd^{10}: sign. b 1^r beg. _de
  hijs habes_, B 1^r beg. _supra c. proxi._, bb 1^r beg. _eas
  delinquat_. Contents:—sign. a 1^v, woodcut of a doctor at his desk: a
  2^r, “Prologus”: a 2^v-S 9^v, the work in five books: aa 2^r-aa 2^v
  “tabula constitucionum prouincialium”: aa 3^r-dd 7^v, an index: dd
  8^r-10^r, table of Constitutions according to author.

  The _editio princeps_ of the Provincial Constitutions of England, in
  Latin, with a Latin Commentary on them by William Lyndewoode (_d._
  1446). See 1664 L, 1679 L.


                                 1485.

1. *†¬Alexander¬ de Villa Dei. [Textus Alexandri cum sententiis].

  [Oxford, about 1485]: sm. 4^o.

  Only known from two leaves (signn. c^2-c^3) in the Library of St.
  John’s College, Cambridge. A grammatical work, of which other editions
  were printed in London by Wynkin de Worde (sine anno) and Pynson
  (1516), and elsewhere.


2. ¬Phalaris.¬ [Sign. a 2^r:—] Francisci Aretini Oratoris
p¿re¿⸗|clarissimi in eloq¿ue¿ntissimas Phala|ridis tyranni epistolas per
ipsum | e greco in latinu¿m¿ versas. Prohe⸗|mium foeliciter incipit
[Sign. m 6^r:—] Hoc oposculu¿m¿ in alma vniuersi⸗|tate Oxonie. A Natali
christiano | Duce¿n¿tesima & nonagesi¿m¿a septima. | Olimpiade
foeliciter impressum e¿st¿.

  Oxford, 1485, printed by Theodoric Rood and Thomas Hunte: (eights)
  squ. 12^o: pp. [176], signn. a-d^8, e^6, f^8, g^6, h^8, i^6, k-l^8,
  m^6: sign. b 1^r beg. _Udio vos_. Contents:—sign. a 1^v “Carmeliani
  Brixiensis Poete ad lectorem Carmen,” 12 elegiac lines: a 2^r-m 6^r,
  the work: on m 6^v after the colophon “Hoc Teodericus rood quem
  collonia misit | Sanguine germanus nobile pressit opus | Atque sibi
  socius thomas fuit anglicus hunte. | Dij dent vt venetos exuperare
  queant | Quam ienson venetos decuit vir gallicus artem | Ingenio
  didicit terra britanna suo. | Celatos veneti nobis transmittere libros
  | Cedite nos alijs vendimus o veneti | Que fuerat vobis ars primum no
  ta latini | Est eadem nobis ipsa reperta patres. | Quamuis semotos
  toto canit orbe britannos | Uirgilius. placet his lingua latina tamen.

  A Latin translation of the spurious Letters of Phalaris.


                                 1486.

[†¬Mirk¬, John]. [Sign. ( ) 2^r:—] Incipit liber qui | vocatur festialis
[Sign. z 3^r:—] Here endith the boke | that is callid festiuall. | the
yere of oure lord M | cccc . lxxxvi . the day aftir | seint Edward the
kyng.

  Imprint as above, n. pl., but Oxford 1486 (probably 19 Mar. 1486/7):
  la. 8^o: pp. [348], signn. ( )^8, a-b^8, c^6, d^8, d⸴^8, e^6, f^8,
  g^4, h^8, i^6, k-l^8, m^6, n-o^8, p^6, q^8, r^6, s^8, t-v^6, x^8, y^6,
  z^4: sign. b 1^r beg. _diuerse skylles_. Contents:—sign. ( ) 1^r,
  woodcut of Crucifixion: ( ) 1^v-z 3^r, the work.

  English sermons on the holy days and a few of the Sundays of the year:
  written or collected by John Mirk, canon of Lilleshall. Other early
  English printed editions exist, beginning with one by Caxton in about
  1483. Variations are found in the setting up of signn. h and i. The
  first two leaves are not at present known to exist.

-----

Footnote 4:

  For a discussion of special points connected with the Fifteenth
  Century Oxford Press, see Appendix A.



                 The Early Sixteenth Century Press[5].


                                 1517.

¬Burley¬, Walter. ¶ Tractatus expositorius ⁄ super libros
poste⸗|rioru¿m¿ Arestotilis: preclarissimi philisophi | Walteri Burlei
artium liberalium | et trium philosophiaru¿m¿ magi⸗|stri meritissimi: ac
in sacra | theologia doctoris perspi|cacissimi planissimiq¿ue¿ | suis
posteris Oxoniensibus admodum vtilis incipit feli⸗|citer cum summa
diligentia. | recognitus. [Then _woodcut_]. [Sign. B 6^v:—] Explicit
scriptum planissimi doctoris Walteri | Burlei super libros posterioru¿m¿
Impressum | in academia Oxonie anno dominice i¿n¿|carnatio¿n¿is . M .
CCCCC . xvii . | Die vero dece¿m¿bris quar|to ad laudem dei | &
profectum | stude¿n¿tiu¿m¿. [Then _woodcut_: then] Fata regunt finem:
spero dij cepta secundent. |

  Impr. as above, Oxford 1517: sm. 4^o: pp. [20], signn. A^4, B^6: sign.
  B 1^r beg. _Sed quia_. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title, with arms of
  University: A 1^v-B 5^v, the work: B 6^r, royal arms: B 6^v, colophon
  with arms of University repeated.

  A Latin Commentary by Walter Burley on the Posterior Analytics of
  Aristotle.


                                 1518.

1. ¬Burley¬, Walter. ¶ Tractat¿us¿ p¿er¿breuis de materia & forma: |
M¿a¿g¿ist¿ri Walteri Burlei doctoris planissimi. [Then _woodcut_: then]
¶ Aliud perbreue co¿m¿pendiu¿m¿ de relatiuis e⸗|iusdem doctoris vtile
tamen admodum | nouellis logicis. [Sign. B 3^r:—] ¶ Finit tractatus
duorum principio⸗|rum et de relatiuis. M¿a¿g¿ist¿ri Walte|ri Burley
Oxoniensis. | ¶ Finis. [Sign. B 4^v:—] ¶ Impositus est finis tractatui
doctoris planissimi | de duobus principijs . s.[iue] mater ia et forma
et de rela⸗|tiuis cum speciali priuilegio p¿er¿ septe¿n¿niu¿m¿ ex edicto
dig|nissimi cancellarii Oxonie. [Then _woodcut_: then] ¶ Impressum est
presens opusculum in celeberima | vniuersitate Oxoniensi per me Ioannem
Scolar in | viculo diui Ioannis baptiste moram trahentem An⸗|no d¿omi¿ni
. M . CCCCC . deci¿m¿ooctauo. Mensis vero Iu⸗|nij die septimo.

  Impr. as above, Oxford, 1518: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B
  1^r beg. _est dare_. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-B 3^r, the
  work in two parts: B 3^v, woodcut of royal arms: B 4^v, colophon.


2. ¬Dedicus¬, Joannes. Questiones | moralissime super li⸗|bros
Ethicoru¿m¿ eruditissimi | viri Ioannis Dedicus artium libe⸗|ralium
triumq¿ue¿ philosophiarum magistri | optime meriti / et in moralibus
pre ceteris satis pe⸗|riti feliciter incipiunt subtilissimis
Oxoniensibus in philo⸗|sophia morali lucubrare cupientibus non magis |
vtiles q¿uam¿ necessarie. | [Then _engraving of the University arms_].
[Sign. N 4^v:—] ¶ Explicitum est Ioannis Dedici Oxoniensis in | morali
philosophia eruditissimi preclaru¿m¿ opusculum | questionu¿m¿ /
subtilissimediscucientiu¿m¿ (licet sparsim cu¿m¿ | quada¿m¿ tame¿n¿
depende¿n¿tia) singulas materias in dece¿m¿ | libris ethicoru¿m¿
Arestotilis inuestigatas / vti summa | industria lucubranti patebit.
Impressumq¿ue¿ in cele⸗|berima vniuersitate Oxoniensi per me Iohannem
| Scolar in viculo sancti Ioannis Baptiste mora¿m¿ tra⸗|hente¿m¿ .
Anno d¿omi¿ni . M . CCCCC . decimooctauo . Men⸗|sis vero Maij die
decimoquinto . [_ornament_] | ¶ Cu¿m¿ priuilegio . | ¶ Uetitum est per
edictum sub sigillo ca¿n¿cellariatus | ne quis in septennio hoc
insigne op¿us¿ imprimat | vel aliorum ductu impensis venditet in
vni⸗|uersitate Oxonie: aut infra precinctum | eiusdem: sub pena
amissionis omnium | librorum et quinq¿ue¿ libraru¿m¿ ster⸗|lingorum
pro singulis sic ve¿n¿|ditis ubiubi impressi fue⸗|rint preter pena¿m¿
pretax⸗|atam in decreto. | ¶ Cornicum oculos configere noli.

  Impr. as above, Oxf. 1518: (eights & fours) sm. 4^o: pp. [152], foll.
  75 + [1], signn. A^8, B^4, C^8, D^4, E^8, F^4, G^8, H^4, I^8, K^4,
  L^8, M-N^4: sign. B 1^r beg. _pertinet ad_. Contents:—p. (1) Title and
  large woodcut: (2) large woodcut of the royal arms with supporters
  &c.: (3–152) the work: (152) colophon, &c.

  Of Johannes Dedicus (perhaps, as has been suggested by prof. H. W.
  Chandler, Dethick) nothing is known. The Quaestiones extend to the end
  of the 5th book of the Ethics, and the last paragraph is a summary of
  the 6th.


3. *¬Laet¬, Jaspar. [at end:—] FIniunt prenostica exerpta a prenosticis
egregii viri magistri Iasparis | Laet angligenis cognitu maxime vtilia.
Et in celebe⸗|rima oxoniensi academia | [_woodcuts_] impressa
[_woodcuts_]. |

  Imprint as above, Oxford, [probably 1518]: 4^o[?]: broadside.
  Contents:—on 1st page, the Praenostica.

  Only known from the lower half of the sheet preserved in the Cambridge
  University Library, where the upper half is also believed to be.


4. ¬Lux.¬ ¶ Co¿m¿pendium questionu¿m¿ de luce et lumine [followed by a
small woodcut and the four quaestiones]. [Sign. B 4^v:—] ¶ Cum
priuilegio dignissi⸗|mi Cancellarij vniuer⸗|sitatis Oxonie. [Then a
large _woodcut_: then] ¶ Finit compendium questiuncularum de luce & de |
lumine nouiter recognitum. Impressu¿m¿q¿ue¿ in celiberi⸗|ma vniuersitate
Oxoniensi per me Ioannem Sco⸗|lar in viculo diui Ioannis baptiste moram
trahentem | Anno d¿omi¿ni . M . CCCCC . deci¿m¿ooctauo . Mensis vero |
Iunij die quinto.

  Impr. as above, Oxford, 1518: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B
  1^r beg. _vt intentio_. Contents:—A 1^r, title: A 1^v-B 4^r, the work:
  B 4^v, the colophon.


5. ¬Whittington¬, Robert. ¶ De heteroclitis nominibus. | ¶ Editio
Roberti Whittintoni lichfeldien|sis Grammatice magistri: et protouatis |
anglie in florentissima Oxoniensi achade|mia Laureati ⁄ de heteroclitis
nominibus | et gradibus comparat¿i¿onis. [Then _woodcut_: then a
“tetrastichon” and a “distichon.”] [Sign. B 4^v:—] [Roberti] whittintoni
lichfeldiensis de heteroclitis no|[minibus & de] gradibus
co¿m¿parationis Oxonie impressa p¿er¿ | [me Ioannem] Scolar in viculo
diui Ioannis baptiste mo|[ram tra]hentem Anno d¿omi¿ni . M . CCCCC .
decimooctauo | [M]ensis vero Iunij . die vicesimoseptimo.

  Impr. as above, Oxford, 1518: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A^6, B^4:
  sign. B 1^r beg. _Hic tapes_. Contents:—A 1^r, title &c. as above: A
  2^r-B 4^v, the work (on B 4^v also occur a woodcut of the arms of the
  University and the colophon).

  Only known from an imperfect copy in the Bodleian rescued from the
  binding of a book.


                                 1519.

¬Compotus.¬ ¶ Compotus manualis | ad vsu¿m¿ Oxoniensiu¿m¿. | [_device_].
[sign. B 4^v:—] ¶ Impressum est presens opusculu¿m¿ in ce⸗|leberrima
vniuersitate Oxoniensi p¿er¿ | me Carolum Kyrfoth. In vico | diui
Joa¿n¿nis baptiste mora¿m¿ | trahe¿n¿te¿m¿ Anno d¿omi¿ni . M . D . xix.
Me¿n¿sis | vero Februarij . die V. |

  Imprint as above, Oxford, 1519: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign.
  B 1^r beg. ¶ _Februarius_. Contents:—A 1^r, title, and woodcut: A
  1^v-B 4^r, the Compotus: B 4^v, University arms and colophon.

  A system of arithmetic illustrated by wood engravings of the open
  hand, values being attached to each part. Panzer after Maittaire
  mentions a Paris ed. of 1498 “cum commento.”

-----

Footnote 5:

  For a general discussion of the circumstances of the Early Sixteenth
  Century Oxford Press, see Appendix B.



                    Fictitious Or Lost Oxford Books.
                               1459–1584.


                                 1459.

A small sheet of paper printed on the ice-bound Thames at London 18 Jan.
1716 ascribes to Oxford the first printing in England, in the year 1459.
Most of the information on the sheet is derived from Atkyns’s ©Original
and Growth of Printing© (Lond. 1664).


                                 1461.

Printing was “practised in Oxford in 1461,” according to Randle Holmes’s
©Academy of Armory© (Chester, 1688), quoted in Bigmore, i. 337.


                                1469–70.

In Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1393 we read:—“In the late Tho. Osborne’s
catalogue of books for sale in June 1756, No. 1345 ‘Plinii Secundi
Epistolarum, Liber primus. Exemplar elegans, literis initial. colorat.
corio turcico, fol. deaur. lineis rubris & auro elegans ornat. 15l. 15s.
Oxon. apud F. Corsellis. 1469.’ To which is added this note, ‘Hocce
unicum est exemplar notum, a variis allegatum, et vix uni visum adeo ut
Phoenix librorum dici mereratur [_sic_], certe primus est ex libris a
Corcellis impressis, cui nomen suum adjunxerit, secundus vero ordine
omnium quos unquam ille impressit, priorem scilicet scimus fuisse,
Jeronymi Expositionem in Symbol. Apostol. Oxoniae 1468. Anno 1470, varia
idem typographus impressit Opuscula, addito in fine nomine, sed nec
unicum eorum reperitur hodie integrum. Possident quidam amatores
fragmenta aliqua poematum Latinorum, ut Gerardi Lystrii Rhenensis, &c.
Carmen Listrii lividorum hominum venenosas linguas, &c.’ This raised the
curiosity of the book collectors, who considered this article as a
confirmation of what R. Atkins had asserted about printing at Oxford.
They all flocked to Osborne’s shop, who instead of the book, produced a
letter from a man at Amsterdam, filled with frivolous excuses for not
sending them to him. They were disappointed, and looked on the whole as
a HVM; however the Plinii Epistolæ, and Ger. Listrii Oratio, &c.
afterwards appeared at an auction at Amsterdam, and were bought for the
late Dr. Ant. Askew; and were sold again at an auction of his books, by
Baker and Leigh, in Feb. 1775. Lot 2064, and 2622, to which articles are
annexed, viz. to Lot 2064, ‘Ad finem hæc verba, _Impr. Oxon. apud F.
Corsellis_, 1470, Manu recentiore exarata sunt.’ Also to lot 2622, ‘Hæc
verba, _Imprim. Oxon. ap. Corsellis_, 1469, Manu recentiore exarata
sunt.’ To those who are at all conversant in early printing, the dates
will appear at first sight a bungling forgery.” So far Herbert’s Ames,
cf. Bowyer and Nichols’s ©Origin of Printing©, 2nd ed. (Lond. 1776), p.
171. The full entry of art. 2064 is “Listrii (Ger.) Oratio habita in
Enarrationem Dionysii Halicarnassii; Dionysii Orbis expositio e Greco
tralata Prisciano interprete; Ejusdem Carmen in venenosas Linguas
Hominum, & Epicedium doctissimi Adoloscentis Ingenisissimique Petri
Thessaliensis”: sold to Mr. Dent for £2 3_s._: art. 2622 has 1569 for
1469, and was sold to Capt. Smith for £1 6_s._

                  *       *       *       *       *

In the Auction Catalogue of the Library of Dr. Abr. de Vries of Haarlem
(Amsterdam, Frederick Muller, 1864) art. 181 was:—“CORCELLIS.—Collection
de lettres, copies authentiques, déclarations et notices en 1756 et 57
sur l’imposture fameuse du falsaire G. SMITH, à Amsterdam et la Haye,
qui fabriqua une édition de ©Plinii epistolae©, avec souscription:
_Oxoniae_, _Corcellis_. 1469. ©Hedwigii liber© 16. ibidem. 1470, etc. et
trompa Mr. P. v. Damme et autres en Angleterre.—Recueillie et conservée
pour prouver son innocence à la falsification et annotée par Mr. v.
Damme. 12 pc. MS. Collection très-curieuse, contenant e. a. 7 lettres de
Smith à v. Damme, une lettre forgée ou falsifié du Comte de Pembroke,
une lettre de P. Burman Sec., copie d’une déclaration de Meerman, etc.
etc.” It is to be hoped that this interesting collection will be brought
to light again.

                  *       *       *       *       *

In the ©Monthly Miscellany, or Memoirs for the Curious© (June 1708), p.
177 it is stated that in the Bishop of Ely’s Library (now at Cambridge)
are books “of the first printing in England at Oxford in 1469.”


                                 1480.

“Guido de Columnia de historia Trojana, per T. R. (_Theodore Rood_).
Quarto. 1480.” So Herbert’s Ames, p. 1393. The source of the error was
discovered by Cotton to be a forgery in a copy of Guido sine anno et
loco preserved in the Earl of Pembroke’s Library at Wilton (©Typ. Gaz.©,
1st ser., 2nd ed., p. 209.)


                              Before 1487.

“Books from the Oxford Press.... 208*. The Chronicles of England. Folio.
Lent by the Earl of Jersey.” So in the Catalogue of the Caxton
Celebration, 1877, p. 28. Some error. The reference is no doubt to
Caxton’s Chronicle of England, printed in 1482.


                                 1489.

When Cotton printed his ©Typographical Gazetteer©, 2nd series, (Oxf.
1866) he believed that an Indulgence of 1489 (altered to 1499), in the
Library of Trinity College, Dublin, was printed at Oxford. It is “a
small broadside on vellum, consisting of 24 lines only, printed very
closely and occupying a space of about nine inches by six.” The
Indulgence is from Johannes de Gigliis alias de Liliis Apostolicus
Subdiaconus, granted by Pope Innocent iii: and is dated 1499, there
being no name of place or date of printing. There is no doubt that
Cotton was mistaken in attributing this piece to the Oxford press.


                                 1498.

1. Bagford, in his inaccurate way, gives the title of an edition of the
Greek text of the Ethics of Aristotle by Aretinus “Oxon. 1498” (Brit.
Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol. 3). He mentions the 1479 edition of the Latin
text separately, but the former date can only be due to some confusion
with the latter.


2. The Rufinus of 1468 appears as dated 1498 in Panzer, who quotes
Schoenemann i. 585, and also in Migne’s ©Patrologia Latina©, xxi. col.
17.


                                 1499.

Indulgence: see 1489.


                                 1500.

1. Buridanus: see next article.


2. “Gualtheri Burley Tractatus de materia et forma ac de relativis.
Oxonii 1500. 4.” So in Panzer ii (1794) p. 244, quoting Maittaire p.
739, ex Bibl. Bodl. p. 117 (an allusion to an error in the Bodleian
Catalogue of 1674, repeated in the 1738 Catalogue p. 206). Bagford makes
the same mistake, twisting the author’s name into Johannes Buridanus
(Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol. 3). Even Hain (no. 4142) has copied
from Panzer. The colophon of 1518. B shows how the error arose, as
Cotton points out (©Typ. Gaz.©, 1st ser., 2nd ed., p. 209).


3, 4. Bagford is responsible for two more fictitious Oxford books of
1500. a ©Quaestiones de lumine et luce© (Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol.
3, Bodl. MS. Rawl. D. 375, fol. 103: a confusion with 1518. L) and a
Whitinton _de heteroclytis nominibus_ printed at Oxford by Peter
Treveris (!) (Bodl. MS. Rawl. D. 375, fol. 103: see 1518. W).


                                 1506.

The following book though not printed at Oxford supplies information
about an Oxford bookseller:—[sign. a 1^r:—] “Principia seu
introduc-tiones f_rat_ris peregrini ytalici de lugo in via doctoris
subtilis: adipisci eiusde_m_ doctoris doctrinam cupientibus. [at foot:—]
Uenu_n_dant_ur_ autem in alma ac florentissima vniuersitate Oxonie_n_se.
in intacte v_ir_g_in_is ac i_m_maculate / vico: s_an_cti ioha_n_nis
eua_n_geliste / ad intersignium. [Then follow 4 tractatus: then on sign.
g 4^r:—] Expliciunt principia seu introductiones (pro iuuenib_us_)
fratris peregrini de lugo ... Imp_re_ssa aut_em_ Londini. p_er_
Richardu_m_ pyns_on_. cum solerti cura ac diligentia Honestissimi
Iuuenis ac prudentissimi Hugonis Meslier. Expe_n_s_is_ aut_em_ georgii
castellani / oxonii morantis / ad intersignium sancti Ioha_n_nis
euangeliste: in quo venundatur op_us_ hoc. Finis....” Then follows a 5th
treatise, ending with a letter from Peregrinus de Lugo dated “Tholose
quarto Kalendas Februarij . M . ccccc . vj.” Herbert’s Ames (iii. 1396)
refers this book to Oxford, although at i. 252 it is referred rightly to
Pynson’s press at London.


                                 1510.

References to a ©Compendium quaestiuncularum de luce et lumine©, Oxford
1510, will be found in Bagford (Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol. 22^v,
Bodl. MS. Rawl. D. 375, p. 104), no doubt from the ©Catalogus librorum
MSS^{rum} Angliæ et Hiberniæ© (Oxf. 1697, fol.), tom. 2, p. 280, col. 1,
among the printed books of John Moore bp. of Norwich. An error for 1518.

                                 1511.

The 1481 Alexander de Hales appears in Bagford (Brit. Mus. MS. Harl.
5901, fol. 23, Bodl. MS. Rawl. D. 375, p. 104) as of 1511, printed at
Oxford.


                                 1512.

“Walterus Burleius, super libros Posteriorum. 1512. 4^o.” So in Cotton’s
©Typ. Gaz.©, 2nd ser., p. 169, and in a longer form in Herbert’s Ames
iii. 1396, and Panzer vii. p. 494, quoting Brüggemann i. 172. The source
of the mistake is easily found in the colophon of 1517. B, a “v” having
been overlooked. The error is repeated in the ©Bookworm© (1868) p. 126.


                              Before 1519.

According to Cotton (©Typ. Gaz.©, 2nd ser., p. 169) an edition of “Jo.
Duns Scotus, Scriptum Oxoniense super primum Sententiarum” (Paris 1519)
professes to be “impressa juxta editionem Oxoniensem.” This cannot be
correct, unless _editio_ refers only to some traditional method of
exposition or arrangement at Oxford.


                              About 1519.

“The following book printed at the charge of Cardinal Wolsey, with the
King’s arms on one side, and the cardinal’s on the other; though it has
neither date nor printer’s name, was probably performed about this time
[1519] at this place [Oxford].” ‘Libellus prim. epistol. M. Tullii
Cicer. Decus Oxoniensium, finitum universitate Oxoniensi. Quarto.’ So in
Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1398, and substantially in Bagford’s account (Brit.
Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol. 24^v, Bodl. MS. Rawl. D. 375, fol. 103): see
Cotton’s ©Typ. Gaz.©, 2nd ser., p. 169. Clearly a blunder. The book
which is said to be at Trinity College, Dublin, could not be found there
in 1885.


                                 1519.

“Roberti Whitintoni Lichfeldiensis Protovatis Angliæ in Florentissimâ
Oxoniensi Academiâ Laureati, Opusculum de Concinnitate Grammatices &
Constructione recognitum Anno Domini xix supra Sesquimillesimum, in
4to.” So Bagford (Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol. 23^v, cf. Bodl. MS.
Rawl. D. 375, p. 103). Probably not printed at Oxford.


                              Before 1520.

John Dorne, bookseller in Oxford, sold in 1520 several copies of a small
book described in his day-book as “Bene fundatum,” “Bene fundatum
Oxonie” or “Bene fundatum uosgraf.” This seems to be a trace of a real
Oxford book now lost, but no such printer as Vosgraf or Foxgrave (Dorne
was from the Low Countries) is known. It would probably belong to the
1517–19 press. See Dorne’s book edited in the ©Collectanea© vol. i of
the Oxford Historical Society, 1885. Cotton erroneously reads the title
as “Bene sum datum.”


                                 1542.

Shepery’s ©Hippolytus©: see under 1586. S.


                                 1549.

“P. Martyr de Sacramento Eucharistiæ, disputatio hab. in acad., 1549,”
4^o. So in the ©Catalogus librorum R. Davisii©, pt. 4 (1692), p. 7, cf.
p. 10. Some error.


                                 1564.

“Analysis libri Aristotelis de Sophisticis Elenchis, opera et studio
Griff. Poweli.” So in the ©Catalogus librorum R. Davisii©, pt. 2 (1686),
p. 72. Error for 1594, which see.


                                 1565.

“Ιωαννοῦ τοῦ Χρυσοστομου Ομιλιαι. Oxonii 1565 in forma minore.” So in
the ©Bibliotheca Gudiana© (Hamb. 1706), p. 75: thence in Brüggemann, p.
422. An error for 1586, which see.


                                 1569.

1. Guild’s ©Throne of David or an Exposition of the 2nd of Samuel©.
Error in the ©Catalogus librorum R. Davisii©, pt. 1 (1686), p. 164, for
1659, which see.


2. “1569. An account of the Lithuanian translation of the Bible is in
the Brit. Museum. Quarto.” So Herbert’s Ames, iii. p. 1398. For 1659,
which see under _Chylinski_, Samuel B.


                                 1576.

Fabricius, J. S.: “Meditationes Sacræ de unitate Ecclesiæ Britannicæ.
1576,” 8vo. So _twice_ in the ©Catalogus librorum R. Davisii©, pt. 2
(1686) p. 20, pt. 3 (1688) p. 11. For 1676, which see.


                                 1578.

“Thesaurus œconomiæ ... Johanne Caso Authore. 1597 ... Again 1578.” So
Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1407. Perhaps for 1598, which see, but even that is
perhaps an error for 1597!


                                 1584.

Shepery’s ©Hippolytus©: see under 1586. S.



                      The Oxford University Press.


                                 1585.

1. ¬Bilson¬, Thomas. THE TRVE DIFFE-|RENCE BETWEENE CHRI-|STIAN
SUBIECTION AND | VNCHRISTIAN REBELLION: | WHEREIN THE PRINCES LAWFULL |
power to commaund for trueth, and indepriuable | right to beare the
sword are defended against the | Popes censures and the Iesuits
sophismes vt-|tered in their APOLOGIE and DE-|FENCE OF ENGLISH |
CATHOLIKES: | _With a demonstration that the thinges refourmed in the
Church of England by the_ | _Lawes of this Realme are truely Catholike,
notwithstanding the vaine shew_ | _made to the contrary in their late_
Rhemish Testament: _by_ | THOMAS BILSON Warden of Winchester. | Perused
and allowed by publike authoritie. | [_Device_: then _two mottos_].

  Impr. 2: 1585 (CIↃIↃXXCV): (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 820 + [10]: p.
  11 beg. _wee bee farre_, p. 111 _be not Judges_: chiefly Pica English.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–12) Epistle dedicatorie to queen Elizabeth:
  (13) “the generall contents of euerie part”: (14–22) “To the Christian
  Reader”: 1–820 the work, in 4 parts: (1–9) “the speciall contents of
  euery part”: (9) “Faultes escaped”, i.e. errata.

  For the author &c. see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 169: where it is
  pointed out that the book has a curious history. Its ostensible
  purpose is to uphold the doctrine afterwards called “passive
  obedience” by refuting two books which were regarded as subversive of
  the Queen’s temporal power, (1) ©An apologie and true declaration of
  the institution ... of the tvvo English colleges ... in Rome ... (and)
  in Rhemes©, 1581 (ascribed to card. Will. Allen), (2) ©A true, sincere
  and modest defence of English catholiques that suffer for their
  faith©, n. d. (asserted by Antony à Wood to be also by card. Allen).
  But Wood declares that the Queen “conceiving it convenient for her
  worldly designs to take on her the protection of the Low-Countries
  against the King of Spain, did employ our author ... to write the said
  book” to _justify_ the Netherland revolt. And certain it is that in
  consequence of the temperance and fairness with which Bp. Bilson
  treats his subject, the parliamentary party in Charles I’s time used
  this book to _oppose_ “passive obedience.”

                  *       *       *       *       *

  Probably issued about the end of November, 1585. Greek type is used on
  p. 263 and perhaps elsewhere. Another ed. appeared at London in 1586:
  an extract from pp. 520–21 was reprinted in 1641 and again in Somers’s
  Tracts, 2nd ed., iv. 29 (Lond. 1810).


2. ¬Case¬, John. [_Ornament_] SPECVLVM MORALIVM | QVAESTIONVM IN
VNIVERSAM ETHICEN | Aristotelis, Authore Magistro IOHANNE CASO |
Oxoniensi, olim Collegij Diui Io-|hannis Præcursoris | Socio. | [then
the University Arms: then a _motto_ from Seneca].

  Impr. 1, so also colophon: 1585: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [28] + 401 +
  [19]: p. 11 beg. _Opp. Iuuenes_, p. 111, _Distinctio_: chiefly Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) Title: (3–7) Epistola nuncupatoria to Robert
  Dudley, earl of Leicester, chancellor of the University, signed
  “Iohannes Casus”: (8–10) “Ad studiosos iuuenes vtriusque academiae”:
  (10) “Prosopopœia Libri Ad Lectorem”: (11) “Honoratissimo suo domino
  et patrono Comiti Leicestrensi &c. Iosephus Barnesius Typographus
  Oxonie nsis”: (12–23) Complimentary Latin verses to the author:
  between (24) and (25), “Tabula virtutum et vitiorum omnium”, a folio
  leaf printed on one side only: (25–28) Præfatio: 1–401 the work in 6
  books: (1–2) “Peroratio ad lectorem”: (4–17) Index: (17) Errata and
  colophon.

  The first book printed at the new Oxford press. The allusions to this
  and kindred facts are (1) in the “Epistola Nuncupatoria.” Case says of
  the reasons for dedicating the work to the Earl of Leicester “Unum est
  nouum hoc præli beneficium, quod te authore nostra Academia nuper
  recepit ... Prælum hoc nouum (cuius author existis) hunc nouum de
  moribus libellum pressit. Ne ergo author libelli præli authori
  videatur ingratus, tibi primùm eiusdem fructum ex animo propinauit
  ...” (2) the printer himself writes “Admirabilem hanc artem
  typographicam (Mecęnas amplissime) primum Iohannes Faustus Moguntiæ
  fauste genuit [the marg. supplies “Anno 1450”], eandem Guilielmus
  Caxtonus ciuis Londinensis probè aluit & perpoliuit: Laus summa
  debetur authori qui invenit, laus magna debetur mercatori qui primùm
  ad nos transuexit ... Londinum diù in hac arte floruit, & non inuideo:
  Cantabrigia eandem nunc didicit, Oxonia recepit, & certè gaudeo. Nam
  si characteres typographi sint vera insignia & arma Mineruæ; vbi
  terrarum potius floreret hæc nobilis scientia, quàm vbi vera publicè
  docetur sapientia? vt enim à fonte in riuum dulcis aqua, ita hîc
  quidem à mente in prælum dulcissima Musa fluet. Non nugæ, non aniles
  fabulæ, non Aristarchi dentata opera hîc excudentur: ea solùm ex his
  prælis in lucem venient quȩ sapientum calculis approbentur, & Sybillȩ
  foliis sint veriora. Hoc vnum nunc restat (vir inclytissime) vt hunc
  librum opus alterius ingenij & pignus laboris mei tuo honori offeram
  ... Vt ergo Thomas Thomasius collega meus [Cantabrigiensis] suo, ita
  ego Iosephus Barnesius tibi (vir summe) meo patrono dominoque
  gratulor: nos ambo & publico pro multis, & priuato nomine pro magnis
  in nos meritis vobis vtriusque Academiæ patronis deuincti sumus,
  gratias immortales vterque agimus, maiores in posterum pollicemur”:
  (3) the Vice-chancellor, J. Underhill, writes “Non dedit hoc seclo
  prælum Oxoniense priorem [librum] | Doctrinâque dabunt secula nulla
  parem.” (4) Laurence Humfrey says “Hoc Speculum vobis nunc Oxoniensis
  alumnus | Porrigit, en præli dat quoque primitias.”

  It is clear that neither the Vice-chancellor nor the printer of this
  volume had any suspicion that there had been printing in Oxford
  previous to the publication of the present volume, unless “recepit” be
  a vague allusion to it.

  The work is a companion one to the same author’s ©Summa veterum
  interpretum in universam dialecticam Aristotelis©, Lond., Tho.
  Vautrollerius, 1584, see 1592. C, 1598. C: and there is even a
  typographical connexion between the two.

  For an account of the author, see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 685. The
  method adopted by Case is by _quaestiones_, _oppositiones_ and
  _responsiones_ in the manner of the disputations in the schools at the
  time. Other editions were issued at Oxford in 1596, and at Frankfurt
  in 1589, 1610 and 1625. See 1596. C.


3. Corro, Antonio de. Sermons on Ecclesiastes: see 1586. E.


4. ¬Dudley¬, Robert, earl of Leicester. [_ornament_] IN | ADVENTVM
ILLVSTRIS-|_SIMI LECESTRENSIS COMITIS AD_ | _Collegium Lincolniense_. |

  Impr. 3: “tertio idus Ianuarij” 1585: (one) 8^o: pp. [2]: chiefly Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title as above: large device of University
  arms: then “Carmen gratulatorium” of 8 elegiac lines, _beg._ “Comiter
  hoc factum est”: then imprint.

  Very rare. The visit appears from Wood’s ©Annals© ii. 223 to have been
  in Jan. 1584/5, and the date of printing 11 Jan. 1584/5. The
  difficulties in the way of regarding this sheet as the first printing
  of the new Oxford Press are the form of the date, which usually
  implies Jan. 1585/6, the assertion of Barnes that the Case was the
  first production, and the improbability that the Committee of
  Convocation appointed to consider “de libris imprimendis” on 23 Dec.
  1584 would proceed to action so soon as 11 Jan. 1584/5. But the
  fitness of the earlier date is too obvious to be gainsaid. This piece
  is probably the first printed sheet issued by Barnes.


5. ¬Parsons¬, Robert. A | BOOKE OF | CHRISTIAN EX-|ERCISE APPERTAI-|ning
to RESOLVTI-|ON, that is, shewing | how that we should re-|solue our
selues to be-|come Christians in-|deede. _By R. P._ | _Perused, and
accompanied_ | _nowe with a treatise ten-_|_ding to pacificati-_|_on,
By_ | EDMVND BVNNY. [Then a _motto_ from Hebr. xiii. 8: the whole title
and imprint is within a border of ornament.]

  Impr. 2_a_ (colophon 4): 1585: sm. 12^o: pp. [28] + 494 + [2] + 140:
  p. 11 beg. _ons, or if_, 111 _confidence_, 2nd p. 11 _helpes
  whatsoeuer_, 111 _hel should_: chiefly Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–8) Bunny’s Epistle dedicatorie to Edwin Sandys, archbp.
  of York (9–18) Bunny’s “Preface to the reader”: (19–28) “The contentes
  of ... this booke”: 1–493 [misprinted 439], the work, in 2 parts: (1)
  title of Bunny’s treatise: 1–140, the treatise: before p. 1 of the
  treatise is an oblong sheet 5 × 11 in., folded, containing on one side
  in two divisions “A table ... of the treatise following”: on p. 140 is
  also a colophon.

  Of this book also there is a curious history. Gaspare Loarte, a
  Spanish Jesuit who spent most of his life at Rome, wrote an
  “Essercitio della vita christiana” some time before 1569. In 1570, J.
  Sancer, a friend of Robert Parsons the Jesuit, published a translation
  into English of one of the three parts of the work. In 1582 Parsons
  himself published “The firste booke of the Christian Exercise,
  appertayning to resolution” in two parts, which is practically a new
  work based on part of the original “Essercitio.” Loarte is mentioned
  in the preface, but the author only signs his name by the initials, R.
  P. This was again issued without Parsons’ knowledge in 1584.

  In 1585 (or according to Wood and Ames, copied by Herbert and Dibdin,
  in 1584) Edmund Bunny printed and published the first edition of an
  adaptation of Parsons’ book fitted for Protestant readers “at London,
  by N. Newton, for Iohn Wight,” 8^o. The dedication is to the archbp.
  of York and the preface dated 9 July 1584 at Bolton-Percy. The book
  was entered at Stationers’ Hall on 28 Aug. 1584. The Oxford edition
  before us is a reprint of this London edition with no intentional
  variation, except the omission of the arms of the archbishop of York
  on the _verso_ of the title of the London issue. Some of the woodcut
  ornaments and capitals of the two issues are identical.

  In “1585, Aug. 30” Parsons again put out his book in a revised and
  largely augmented form with a new title “A Christian Directorie” which
  when complete was to consist of three books, the first of which,
  treating of Resolution, is alone contained in this edition. The
  preface contains a criticism of the London issue of Bunny’s
  adaptation, which provoked “A briefe answer vnto those idle and
  friuolous quarrels of R. P. against the late edition of the
  Resolution: By Edmund Bunny.” Lond., 1589, 8^o.

  Other editions of Bunny’s adaptation of Parsons’ “Christian exercise”
  are 1586 (Lond., “by I. Iackson and Ed. Bollifant for John Wight,”
  12^o; in Herbert’s possession), 1589 (Lond., 12^o: Bohn), 1594 (Lond.,
  24^o: Bohn), 1609 (Lond., 12^o: Bohn), 1615 (Lond., 12^o). See also
  next art. Parsons’ own work was several times reprinted: and in 1591
  appeared an edition of his “Christian Directorie,” anonymously
  adapted, as the former work, for the use of Protestants, and with the
  deceptive title “The second part of the booke of Christian Exercise,
  appertayning to Resolution, or a Christian directorie ... written by
  the former authour R. P.” (Lond., 12^o). This was several times
  reprinted, as in 1592, 1594, 1598, 1615. See also Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©,
  ii. 221: and the next art.


6. ¬Parsons¬, Robert. A | BOOKE OF | CHRISTIAN EX-|ERCISE APPERTAI-|NING
TO RESOLVTION, | that is, shewing how that | wee shoulde resolue
our|selues to become Christi-|ans indeede, _By R. P._ | _Perused, and
accompanied now_ | _with a treatise tending to_ | _Pacification, By_ |
EDMVND BVNNY. | [_motto._ The whole title is within a border.]

  Impr. 2_a_ (colophon 4): 1585: sm. 12^o: pp. [30] + 492 + [2] + 140:
  p. 11 beg. _what man_, 111 _Gospell, which_: also p. 11 _nounce all_,
  111 _it they should_: chiefly Long Primer Roman. Contents:—as
  preceding article, without the folded “Table” to Bunny’s treatise,
  viz.:—p. (1) title: (3–9) epistle: (10–19) preface: (20–29) contents:
  1–491, the treatise: (1) title: 1–140 Bunny’s treatise, with colophon.

  This volume is apparently identical in text (not spelling or
  punctuation) with the preceding art., but is entirely reset: from p.
  252 of this edition (= 254 of the other) the two correspond page for
  page in Parsons’ treatise.


7. ¬Prime¬, John. A SERMON BRIEF-|LY COMPARING THE E-|STATE OF KING
SALOMON AND | his Subiectes togither with the condi-|tion of Queene
ELIZABETH | and her people. | PREACHED IN SAINCT MA-|_ries in Oxford
the_ 17. _of Nouember, and_ | _now printed with some small alteration_,
| _by_ IOHN PRIME, | 1585. | [_ornament._]

  Impr. 4: 1585: sm. 8^o: pp. [32], signn. A-B^8: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _passion, that_: chiefly Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5)
  Epistle “to the Christian reader”: (6–30), the sermon, on 1 Kings x.
  9: (31–32) “A praier in consideration of the former respects.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 653. The Epistle is dated 27 Nov. 1585,
  and alludes to Bilson’s book as “euen now comming foorth.”


8. Shepery, John. See 1586. S.


9. ¬Sparke¬, Thomas. “‘A Sermon preached at Cheanies the 14. of
September, 1585, at the burial of the right Honorable the Earle of
Bedford, by Thomas Sparke Doctor of Diuinitie.’ The university’s arms.
‘Imprinted at Oxford by _him_ Printer to that famous Vniuersitie.’ My
copy is cut so close at bottom that it is uncertain whether there was
any date added. Dedicated ‘To—Arthur Lord Gray of Wilton, Knight of—the
Garter.—At Bletchley the 25 of September, 1585.—Thomas Sparke.’ The
text, ‘Apocal. 14. 13. I heard a voice from heauen’ &c. At the end of
the sermon ‘September 22. An. Do. 1585,’ Besides; 110 pages, W. H.
16^o.”

  The above is the account of the book in Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1399, in
  the account of Joseph Barnes’s press at Oxford in 1585. The copy sold
  in the Heber sale, 9 April 1835, Catal. pt. vi, p. 248, art. 3559 for
  8_s._ was probably Herbert’s. Ames in his ©Typographical Antiquities©
  (Lond. 1749) gives a shorter title and describes the book as a quarto.
  Other edd. are Lond. 1585, in eights (pp. [10] + 106), and Oxf. 1594
  (with 25 _December_ at end of dedication, pp. [10] + 110): but both
  are different from the present book, if Herbert’s description may be
  trusted.


                                 1586.

1. ¬Case¬, John. “‘Reflexus speculi moralis, seu commentarius in magna
moralia Aristotelis. Authore Johanne Caso.’ Again 1596. Octavo.”

  The above is from Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1401, slightly altered from
  Ames, p. 453: but both are probably errors for 1596: see 1596. C.


2. ¬Catilinariae proditiones.¬ “‘In Catilinarias proditiones, ac
proditores domesticos, Odæ 6.’ The university arms. ‘Oxoniæ, ex Officina
Typographica Josephi Barnesii, & veneunt in cœmeterio Paulino sub signo
capitis Tygurini. Anno 1586.’ On the back, in a lozenge form, ‘Odæ sex
ornatissimis viris D. Doctori Jameso Ædis Christi Oxon. decano, et
doctori Hetono prodecano, cæterisque clarissimis atque optimis viris
eiusdem ecclesiæ præbendariis, & privatæ observantiæ, et publicæ
pietatis ergô dicatæ.’ 8 leaves, the first has only signature A. Brit.
Museum. Octavo.”

  The above is from Herbert’s Ames, iii. p. 1401. In May 1886 the
  officials of the British Museum were unable to find the book. A copy
  was sold at the Bliss sale in 1858 (Catal. pt. 2, art. 7) to Stenson a
  bookseller for £4 4_s._


3. ¬Chardon¬, John. A SERMON | VPON PART OF | THE NINTH CHAPTER | OF THE
HOLY GOSPEL | OF IESVS CHRIST | _ACCORDING TO_ | S. IOHN: | Preached at
S. Maries in | Oxford by _Iohn Chardon_ | Doctor of Diuinitie. |
[_motto._]

  Impr. 2_b_: 1586: (eights) 16^o: pp. [48], signn. A-C^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _streight waie_: chiefly Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–10) Epistle dedicatory to Ambrose earl of Warwick, Oxf. 6 Oct.
  1586: (11–44) the sermon, on John ix. 1–3: (45–47) “The prayer.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 716.


4. ¬Chardon¬, bp. John. “‘A comfortable sermon for all such as thirst
and desire to be ioined with their head Jesus Christ, &c. Preached at
the funerals of Syr Gawen Carewe, very worshipfully buried in the
Cathedral Church of Exeter, 22d April, 1584, By John Charden bachelor of
Divinity.’ The text, 1 Thes. 4; 13–18. Octavo.”

  So in Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1400: see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 716,
  Maunsell i. 97.


5. ¬Chrysostom¬, St. D. IOANNIS CHRY-|SOSTOMI ARCHIE-|PISCOPI
CONSTANTI-|NOPOLITANI, _Homiliæ sex_, | Ex manuscriptis Codicibus Noui
Collegij; | IOANNIS HARMARI, eiusdem Col-|legij socij, & Græcarum
literarum in | inclyta OXONIENSI Academia | Professoris Regij, opera & |
industria nunc primùm | græcè in lucem | editæ. | [_device._]

  Impr. 5: 1586 (CIↃIↃXXCVI): (eights) 16^o: pp. [12] + 138: p. 11 beg.
  σίον ἀυτοῦ, 111 πάντες συμφωνοῦσιν: chiefly Long Primer Greek.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–12) Epistola dedicatoria to sir Thomas
  Bromley, lord chancellor of England, Oxf. 28 Dec. [1585]: 1–138, the
  six Homilies, in Greek.

  “Primitiæ typographici nostri in græcis literis preli,” as the
  dedication says. The first Greek book printed in England was also a
  Chrysostom (Two Homilies, Lond., Reg. Wolfe, 1543), but separate Greek
  words occur in the first book printed at Cambridge (Cujusdam ...
  Christiani Epistola, 1521), and single words cut in wood still
  earlier. The six homilies are 1. Κατὰ τῶν παρατηρούντων τὰς νεομηνίας
  (Migne, ©Patrol. Gr.©, Chrysost., i. 953.) 2–5. Εἰς τὸν Λάζαρον, αʹ,
  βʹ, γʹ, δʹ (ibid. 963, 981, 991, 1005). 6. Εἰς τὸ Περὶ δὲ τῶν
  κεκοιμημένων (ibid. 1017). See p. 12 (1565), Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii.
  138.

  An imperfect book, (signn. A 2-D 7), containing Isocrates Πρὸς
  Δημόνικον, Πρὸς Νικοκλέα, Νικόκλης ἢ συμβουλευτικὸς λόγος τρίτος,
  Plutarch Περὶ παιδῶν ἀγωγῆς and “Luciani Cupido,” all in Greek, once
  owned by Thomas Hearne and now in the Bodleian Library, is in similar
  type to this Chrysostom and is accordingly assigned by Hearne to
  Barnes’s Press. But minute inspection shows that some of the woodcuts
  of the book are not identical with any used at Oxford. It is probably
  London printing (not Bynneman 1581 nor 1621: perhaps Bishop 1599: see
  Brüggemann, p. 128.)


6. ¬Ecclesiastes.¬ SOLOMONS SERMON: | OF MANS CHIEF | FELICITIE: CALLED
| IN HEBREW KOHELETH, | IN GREEKE AND LATIN | ECCLESIASTES. | With a
learned, godly, and familiar pa-|raphrase vppon the same: gathe-|red out
of the Lectures of A. | C. & now englished for | the benefit of the |
vnlearned. | [_motto & device._]

  Impr. 4: 1586: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 219 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _that
  is brought_, 111 _and this meditation_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–7) Epistle dedicatorie to the “lady Marie Dudley,” Oxford, 8
  Mar. 1586, signed “T. P.”: (8–16) “To the Christian reader ...” with
  the writer’s name, Th. Pie: 1–219, the paraphrase, the text of
  Ecclesiastes occurring in the margin.

  This book is a translation into English of “Sapientissimi regis
  Salomonis concio de summo hominis bono quam ... Latini Ecclesiasten
  vocant, in Latinam linguam ab Antonio Corrano ... versa et ex eiusdem
  prælectionibus paraphrasi illustrata: accesserunt & notæ quædam”
  (Lond., 1579) with the omission of the notes. For Ant. de Corro see
  Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 578: and for Thomas Pye, _ibid._ ii. 59. Wood
  was not acquainted with this earliest work of Pye, but alludes to the
  book (as above, i. 581) as Corro’s “Sermons on Ecclesiastes. Abridged
  by Thomas Pitt. Oxon 1585, oct., which is called by some Pitt’s
  Paraphrase on Ecclesiastes”! The name Pitt, but not the error of date,
  may be taken from Maunsell, who three times (i. 38, 81, 104) alludes
  to the book as by Tho. Pitt. Pye in his Epistle states with respect to
  the original Latin edition, “which treatise, as it came first to the
  print, myselfe by occasion being charged with som ouerseeing of the
  presse, at the earnest request aswel of the author himself, as of
  other many, I translated into English: being the rather a greate deale
  moued thereunto, because there was no comment or like exposition then
  extant in our vulgar tongue vpon this part of Scripture.” This latter
  statement is not strictly true, since “An exposition of Salomon’s
  booke called Ecclesiastes” was printed in London in 1573. In 1585
  Serranus’s commentary translated into English by T. Wilcocke was
  printed in London.


7. ¬Hutchins¬, Edward. A SERMON | PREACHED IN S. | PETERS CHURCH AT |
WEST-CHESTER THE XXV | OF _SEPTEMBER_, 1586. | CONTAINING MATTER | FIT
FOR THE TIME: | By Edward Hutchins Maister | of Arts, and Fellowe of
Bra-|zennose College. |

  Impr. 6: (1586): (eights) 16^o: pp. [32]: sign. B 2^r beg. _the
  fould_: chiefly Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication
  to Roger Puleston: (5–30) the sermon, on Gal. 5. 12.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 453. The only copy seen, that in
  the British Museum, wants the last leaf, presumably blank.


8. ¬Hutchins¬, Edward. A | SERMON PREA-|CHED IN WEST-|CHESTER THE VIII.
| OF OCTOBER, 1586. | _BEFORE THE IVD-_|GES AND CERTAIN | _RECVSANTES_:
| Wherein the conditions of al he-|retiques, but especiallie of
stub-|born and peruerting Papists, | are discouered, & the duty | of al
magistrats concer-|ning such persons, ap-|plied & opened | _By_ EDWARD
HVTCHINS, _Ma-_|_ster of Artes, & Fellowe of_ BRA-|SENNOSE Colledge. |
...

  Impr. 6: (1586): (eights) 16^o: pp. [32], signn. A-B^8: sign. B 2^r
  beg. _are they_: chiefly Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  dedication to Thomas Egerton: (5–32) the sermon, on Canticles ii. 15.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 452.


9. ¬Massie¬, William. A | SERMON PREA-|CHED AT TRAFFORD | IN LANCASHIRE
AT | _THE MARIAGE OF A_ | DAVGHTER OF THE | right Worshipfull Sir
ED-|MOND TRAFFORDE | Knight, the 6. of Sep-|_tember Anno_, 1586. | By
WILLIAM MASSIE bacheler in di-|uinity, and fellow of Brasen-nose
Col-|ledge in Oxforde. | [_motto._]

  Impr. 6: 1586: (eights) 16^o: pp. [32], signn. A-B^8: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _of body, sorrow_: chiefly Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  dedication to sir E. Trafford: (5–32) the sermon, on Ps. cxxviii.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 237. The marriage was between Margaret
  Trafford and Sir Urian Legh, kt., of Adlington, a member of the same
  College as the preacher.


10. ¬Music.¬ THE PRAISE | OF MVSICKE: | Wherein besides the antiquitie,
| dignitie, delectation, & vse there-|of in ciuill matters, is also
decla-|red the sober and lawfull vse of the | same in the congregation
and | Church of God. [_device, then motto._]

  Impr. 6: 1586: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 152: p. 11 beg. _Musicke of_,
  111 _proper place_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  dedication by the printer to “sir Walter Rawley”: (5–8) “The preface
  to the Reader”: 1–152, the work in 12 chapters, with the sub-title
  “The antiquitie and original of Musicke ...”

  This work has been constantly attributed to John Case, the author of
  the ©Apologia Musices©, Oxf. 1588, but the present writer believes
  that from internal evidence it cannot be regarded as his. See Appendix
  C, and Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 686. It was reprinted in the ©Choir and
  Musical Record© 1864, by dr. Rimbault, who contributed an
  introduction.


11. ¬Overton¬, John. IACOBS | TROVBLE-|SOME IOVR-|NEY TO BE-|THEL:
Conteining a briefe ex-|position, or excellent | Treatise of the four
first | verses of the 33. Chapter | of GENESIS: | _Set foorth by_ IOHN
OVER-|TON, _Maister of Arts_. | [_motto._]

  Impr. 7: 1586: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 75 + [5]: p. 11 beg. _many
  wise_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) Epistle dedicatory
  to William Brent, Welsborne, 1 Apr. 1586: (8) Gen. xxxiii. 1–3: 1–75,
  the treatise: (1–5) “A prayer against the enimies of the Church of
  Christ ...”

  This book was the “first fruits” of the author’s study.


12. *†¬Philosophy.¬ DE | PHILOSO-|PHIA, | PANATHENA-|ICAE DUAE: | IN
COMITIIS OXONII HABITAE. | [_woodcuts and motto._ The whole title is
within a border.]

  N. pl.: n. d. (1586?): (eights) 12^o: pp. [32], signn. A-B^8: sign. B
  1^r beg. _lem, Demosthenem_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1–2) unknown:
  (3) title: (5) three Quaestiones: (6–18) “Panathenaica prima, v. Id.
  Iulii 1585. habita”: (19–20) three Quaestiones: (20–31) “Panathenaica
  secunda, iii Id. Iulii 1586. habita.”

  The Bodleian Catalogue suggests that these speeches are perhaps by
  Thomas Savile (see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 591), brother of sir Henry
  Savile, both of Merton. There is no place of imprint, but probably it
  is Oxford printing. Wood did not know the book.


13. ¬Rainolds¬, John. A SERMON | VPON PART | OF THE EIGH-|TEENTH PSALM:
| Preached to the publik assem-|blie of Scholers in the Vniuer-|sitie of
Oxford the last day | of August, 1586. by | IOHN RAINOLDS: | Vpon
occasion of their meeting to giue | thankes to God for the late
detection | _and apprehension of Traitours, who_ | wickedlie conspired
against the _Queens Maiestie and the_ | state of the Realme. |
[_motto._]

  Impr. 2: 1586: (eights) 16^o: pp. [40], signn. A-B^8 C^4: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _But al this_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r “Aj.”: A 2^r,
  title: A 3^r-A 4^r, “Iohn Rainoldes, to the Reader,” Oxford, 24 Oct.
  1586: A 4^v, Ps. xvii. 47–51: A 5^r-C 4^v, the sermon, on Ps. xviii.
  47–51: C 4^v, Ps xxi. 7–9.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 15. Reprinted at Oxford in 1613.
  Occasioned by “Babington’s conspiracy”: there are several references
  to current events.


14. *¬Shepery¬, John. HYPPOLITVS OVIDIANÆ | PHAEDRAE RES-|PONDENS, PER
IOAN-|NEM SCHEPREVVM SOMA-|TO CHRISTIANVM. | [_device._]

  Impr. 8: [1586]: (eights) 12^o: pp. [80], signn. *,A-D^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Scilicet expectas_: Pica Italic. Contents:—sign. *1^r, title:
  *2^r-*7^v, “Ioannis Schepreui præfatio, in epistolam Hyppoliti sui ad
  Phædram, ad M. Guadum dedicatam,” in Latin elegiacs: *8^r-*8^v,
  “Candido lectori Georgius Edrychus medicus S. P. D.,” a Latin preface:
  A 1^r-D 8^r, the poem.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 135. This work is an imaginary reply of
  Hippolytus to the temptations of Phaedra, in Ovidian elegiacs. The
  author, John Shepery, of Corpus Christi College (“Somatochristianus”),
  tells us in the preface that it was composed as a return for kindness
  shown him by one Guadus (Wade ?, whom the editor describes as a
  chaplain to Henry viii), but delayed for some years. Shepery died in
  1542, aged 32 years. George Etheridge (“Edrychus”) was a pupil of
  Shepery, fellow of Corpus, and a Roman Catholic.

  The date is fixed at 1586 by two passages: Etheridge in his preface
  states that for about 53 years he had been a member of the University:
  he was admitted scholar of Corpus in Nov. 1534. Also Dr. Humphrey in
  his introduction to the ©Summa et synopsis© (see below) alludes to the
  ©Hippolytus© as “nuperrime impressum.” Wood places the date at about
  1584, and the Bodleian catalogue of 1843 assigns the book to 1542,
  owing to the date of Shepery’s death, which happens to occur
  prominently at the end of Etheridge’s preface.


15. ¬Shepery¬, John. SVMMA | ET SYNOPSIS | NOVI TESTAMEN-|TI DISTICHIS
DV-|CENTIS SEXAGIN-|TA, QVAE TOTI-|DEM CAPITIBVS | RESPONDENT, |
_comprehensa_: | Prior a IOANNE SCHEPREVO | Oxoniensi olim conscripta:
Posterior ex ERASMI | ROTERODAMI _Editione decerpta: Tyrunculis &
om-_|nibus pietatis & Theologiæ candidatis non inutilis, à | LAVRENTIO
HVMFREDO _recognita, & iu-_|uandæ memoriæ causâ, edita: | Cui præmissa
est eiusdem | _De Scholis & studijs Christianorum piè & metho-_|_dicè
instituendis breuis Admonitio_. | [_motto_ by L. H.(umfrey).]

  Impr. 5: 1586: (eights) 16^o: pp. [62], signn. A-B^8 C^9 (see below)
  D^6: sign. B 1^r beg. _disticha Ioannis_: Pica Italic. Contents:—sign.
  A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A 8^r “Admonitio Laurentii Humfredi ad Studiosos”:
  A 8^v, “Librorum Novi Testamenti elenchus & ordo per Cor. Graphæ ...”:
  B 1^r-C 3^v “Disticha Ioannis Sheprevi ...”: verso of leaf after C 3-D
  6^r, “Disticha ... in Editione Erasmi Roterodami inserta.”

  The “Summa Ioannis Sheprevi” is a set of elegiac stanzas, each stanza
  describing the contents of a chapter in the New Testament, and
  beginning successively with the letters of the alphabet, written by
  John Shepery, of Corpus Christi College, Reader of the Hebrew Lecture
  from about 1537 to his death in 1542. The ©Summa© is stated by Wood to
  have been first published at Strasburg in about 1556 by John Parkhurst
  bp. of Norwich, next in Lond. 1560 (Wood), and from Humfrey’s ed. in
  “Gemma Fabri,” Lond. 1598, and “Biblii (or Bibliorum) summula,” Lond.
  1621, etc. The first distich is “A priscis oritur Christus, turbatur
  Ioseph, | Angelus hunc retinet, virgo beata parit.” MS. C. C. C.
  (Oxf.) 266 contains these verses.

  The “Synopsis” is a similar set of elegiac stanzas, without the
  alphabetical succession of first letters, first inserted in the Latin
  editions of Erasmus’s New Testament, from that of 1542 on. The author
  appears to be unknown: the first distich is “Angelus in somnis iustum
  solatur Ioseph, | Prototoco Mariæ nomen Iesus erit.”

  In the preface Dr. Humfrey states that his object in editing the book
  was to recall young students to the study of the text of the Bible,
  and that he had collated a MS. copy of the ©Summa© with bp.
  Parkhurst’s edition, and had compared different editions of the
  ©Synopsis©: he alludes also to the Hippolytus of Shepery as “nuperrime
  impressum.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 135, 560. Dr. Philip Bliss noted in his
  copy “Whoever wants to write a history of the Oxford press should
  first get together all the little vols printed by Jo. Barnes, of which
  this is one of the rarest.”


16. ¬Spanish.¬ REGLAS GRAM-|MATICALES PARA A|PRENDER LA LENGVA
ESPA-|n̄ola y Francesa, confiriendo la | vna con la otra, segun el
or-|den de las partes de la o-|ration Latinas. | ⁂ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 9*: 1586: 12^o in size.

  Only known from a title-page in the British Museum (Bagford
  Collection, 463. h. 8, no. 456). Mentioned in Ames and Herbert’s Ames,
  but not in such terms as to prove that either editor had seen the book
  complete. For the reference to the British Museum and a transcript of
  the title I am indebted to Mr. E. G. Duff, of Wadham College, Oxford.


17. ¬Westfaling¬, Herbert. “‘Articles Ecclesiasticall to be inquired of
by the Church-wardens and the Sworne-men within the dioces of Hereford
in the first visitation of the reuerend father in God, Harbart Bishop of
the said dioces: this present yeare M . D . lxxxvi and the xxviii. yeare
of the raigne of our most gracious soueraigne Lady Queene Elizabeth, &c.
And so hereafter, till the next visitation, and from time to time to be
presented.’ B, in fours: 70 articles. W. H. Quarto.”

  So in Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1401.


                                 1587.

1. [Bailey, Walter.] A briefe discours of certain Bathes ... neare vnto
... Newnam Regis, 1587.

  Probably not printed at Oxford, but at London, though ascribed to the
  former place in the British Museum Catalogue.


2. ¬Beza¬, Theodorus. MASTER BEZAES SER-|MONS VPON THE THREE | FIRST
CHAPTERS OF THE | CANTICLE OF CANTICLES: | WHEREIN ARE HANDLED THE |
CHIEFEST POINTS OF RELIGION | _CONTROVERSED AND DEBATED BE-_|_TWEENE VS
AND THE ADVERSA-_|RIE AT THIS DAY, ESPECIALLY TOV-|_CHING THE TRVE IESVS
CHRIST AND_ | THE TRVE CHVRCH, AND THE CER-|TAINE & INFALLIBLE MARKS |
BOTH OF THE ONE AND | OF THE OTHER. | _TRANSLATED OVT OF FRENCH INTO_ |
ENGLISH BY IOHN HARMAR, HER HIGHNES | _PROFESSOR IN THE GREEKE TOVNG_ |
IN THE VNIVERSITIE OF OXFORD, | AND FELOWE OF THE NEWE | COLLEGE THERE.
| [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 6_a_: 1587: (fours) 8^o: pp. [12] + 435 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _and
  because no_, 111 _with all rigor_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–6) epistle dedicatory to the earl of Leicester: (7–12) “The
  Argument of the xlv. Psalme, seruing for an Argument of ... the
  Canticle of Canticles ...”: 1–435, the sermons (thirty-one) on the
  Song of Solomon chapp. 1–3.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 138. The best account of this work will
  be extracts from the Epistle dedicatory. John Harmar the translator
  was in this year Proctor, Regius professor of Greek and Fellow of New
  College. He says, “I was requested, right honorable, by manie of my
  friends to emploie the time of this last vacation of mine from my
  publique readinges in the Vniuersitie, in the translating of Master
  Bezaes Sermons vpon the Canticle of Canticles, which I had a little
  before receaued from the Francfurt mart in French, into our vulgare
  and Mother tongue.” The patronage of Lord Dudley is acknowledged and
  details of the translator’s life are given, as that he attended Beza’s
  lectures and sermons at Geneva. The work translated was no doubt
  Beza’s “Sermons sur les trois premiers chapitres du Cantique des
  cantiques de Salomon,” _Genève, Jehan le Preux_, 1586, 8^o (Brunet).


3. ¬Case¬, John. “‘Thesaurus oeconomiae, seu commentarius oeconomica
Aristotelis. Authore Johanne Caso.’ Again 1598. Quarto.”

  So Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1402, after Ames: but perhaps an error for
  1597.


4. ¬Legatus.¬ DE LEGATO ET ABSOLV-|TO PRINCIPE PERDV-|ELLIONIS REO. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 10: 1587: (eight) 12^o: pp. [16], sign. A^8: p. (11) beg. _su
  fortuito_: Pica Italic. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–16) the treatise.

  This anonymous treatise is a formal and precise legal argument on the
  question “Utrum legatus alicuius principis absoluti vel ipse princeps
  absolutus morte sit afficiendus, si in aliena republica, contra vitam
  principis vel salutem totius reipublicae, nefariam coniurationem
  fuerint machinati.” It was intended to support Queen Elizabeth in her
  resolution to execute Mary Queen of Scots, and seems to have been
  written after 4 Dec. 1586 (p. 13) and before the execution 8 Feb.
  1587: but there is no clue to the author.


5. [¬Penry¬, John.] A TREATISE | CONTAINING | THE AEQVITY OF | AN HVMBLE
SVPPLI-|CATION WHICH IS TO BE | _EXHIBITED VNTO HIR_ | GRACIOVS MAIESTY
AND | this high Court of Parliament | _in the behalfe of the Countrey
of_ | Wales, that some order may | _be taken for the preaching of_ | the
Gospell among those | people. | Wherein also is set downe as much of the
| estate of our people as without offence | could be made known, to the
end that | our case (if it please God) may be piti-|ed by them who are
not of this assem-|bly, and so they also may be driuen to | labour on
our behalfe. |

  Impr. 6: 1587: (eights) 16^o: pp. 62 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _The
  Necessity_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–10, “To al
  that mourn in Sion ...”: 11–62, the work: (1) “To the reader”
  explanation and erratum.

  The author’s name nowhere occurs, but there can be but little doubt
  that the volume was written by John Penry of St. Alban hall, Oxford
  (B.A. 1586), who is conspicuous in the Marprelate controversy and who
  published ©An exhortation vnto the Gouernours and people of Wales, to
  labour earnestly to haue the preaching of the Gospell planted among
  them© (n. pl. or d., and n. pl. 1588): and also ©A View of ... publike
  wants & disorders ... in the service of God ... within Wales©, n. pl.
  1588. The author says, p. 63, “Some rumor of the speedy dissolution of
  the Parliament enforced me from the 32 Pag. or there abouts (so much
  being already vnder the presse) to cut off more of the booke by two
  parts than is now in the whole.” Parliament sat in 1586 from 28 Oct.
  to 2 Dec. and not during 1587. At pp. 53–4 Penry alludes to the state
  of the Universities. Wood does not know of this work, and the best
  account of the author is in Cooper’s ©Athenæ Cantabr.©, ii. 154.


6. ¬Prime¬, John. AN | EXPOSITION, | AND OBSERVATI-|ONS VPON SAINT |
PAUL TO THE GALA-|THIANS, TOGETHER | with incident Qæstions de-|_bated,
and Motives re-_|moued, by | IOHN PRIME. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 6: 1587: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 317 + [3]: p. 11 beg.
  _moment_, 111 _dangerous_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–7), dedication to John Pierce bishop of Salisbury, Oxford, 30 Jan.
  “1587”: 1–317, the work: (2–3) unknown.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 653. Compiled from notes of fortnightly
  discourses at Abingdon.


7. ¬Rainolds¬, John. IOHANNIS RAINOLDI | ORATIONES DU_Æ_: | Ex ijs quas
habuit in Collegio | Corporis Christi, quum | linguam Graecam |
profiteretur. | HABITÆ, QVVM STUDIA, DE | more per ferias intermissa, |
repeterentur: | _Prior, quæ duodecima, post vaca-_|_tionem Natalitiam;_
| _Posterior, decima tertia, post va-_|_cationem Paschalem;_ | _Anno_
1576. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 5: 1587: (eights) 16^o: pp. [88]: p. 11 beg. _ignorantiam_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. 1 “A”: 3, title: 5–8, “Iohannes Rainoldus
  Academicis Oxoniensibus S. P. D.,” with preface following, Oxf. 2
  Feb.: 9–85, the two Orations.

  These are general exhortations to study, selected out of twenty
  orations of the kind. They are reprinted in the various editions of
  Rainolds’s Orations. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 15.


8. ¬Sidney¬, sir Philip. EXEQVIÆ | ILLVSTRISSIMI | EQVITIS, D.
PHILIP-|PI SIDNAEI, GRATISSI-|MAE MEMORIAE AC NO-|_MINI IMPENSÆ_. |
[_device_: then _motto_.]

  Impr. 5: 1587: sm. 4^o: pp. [96], signn. *, A-L^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Et verò_: Pica Roman and Italic. Contents:—sign. *1^r, title:
  *2^r-3^v, Epistola dedicatoria to the earl of Leicester, signed
  “Guilielmus Gagerus,” Oxf., 22 Oct. 1587: *4^v, Latin poem by Laurence
  Humfrey: A 1^r-L 4^v, the poems, in Latin: L 4^v, an erratum.

  Sir Philip Sidney died at Arnheim 7 Oct. 1586. Dr. William James, dean
  of Christ Church, urged W. Gager to collect and edit poems which had
  been privately made at the time of Sidney’s death: the editor found it
  necessary from considerations of space to reject Hebrew, Greek, French
  and Italian poems, but it may be doubted whether the printer possessed
  Hebrew type. See next art.


9. ¬Sidney¬, sir Philip. PEPLVS | ILLVSTRISSIMI | VIRI D. PHILIPPI |
SIDNAEI SVPRE-|MIS HONORIBVS | DICATVS. | [_woodcut_, then two
_mottos_.]

  Impr. 11: 1587: sm. 4^o: pp. 54 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Cur temet_: Pica
  Roman and Italic. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–4, dedication to Henry
  Herbert earl of Pembroke, in Latin, by “Ioannes Luidus,” New college,
  Oxford, 26 Aug. 1587: 5–54, the work: 54, two errata.

  The title is an allusion to the spurious Peplus of Aristotle, a
  commemoration of the heroes who fell before Troy. The editor was John
  Lhuyd, and the poems (almost all Latin) are all by New College men,
  among whom the earl of Pembroke, Sidney’s brother-in-law, had been
  educated. See preceding art., and Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 523.


10. ¬Sprint¬, John. AD | ILLVSTRIS-|SIMOS COMI-|TES WARWICENSEM | ET
LEICESTRENSEM ORA-|_TIO GRATVLATORIA_ | BRISTOLLIÆ HABITA | _APRIL.
ANNO_ | 1587. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 5: (1587): (eight) 16^o: pp. [16], sign. A^8: p. (11) beg.
  _Atque hic_: Pica Italic. Contents:—sign. A 1 unknown: A 2^r, title: A
  2^v, introduction to the speech, in Latin: A 3^r, dedication to lord
  Leicester by “Ioh. Sprint” dean of Bristol: A 3^r-A 7^v, the speech,
  16 Apr. 1587: A 8^r, “In aduentum Illustrissimi Comitis Leicestrensis
  cùm primùm Cancellarius Oxoniensis Academiam accederet” (29 Aug.
  1566?), a poem of 13 hexameters, the initial letters of the words
  forming a complimentary wish.

  Extremely rare: see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 333, where the poem &c.
  is reprinted.


11. ¬Ursinus¬, Zacharias. THE SVMME | OF CHRISTIAN | _RELIGION_: |
Deliuered by ZACHA-|RIAS VRSINVS in his Le-|_ctures vpon the Cateckism
auto-_|rised by the noble Prince FREDE-|RICK, throughout his dominions:
| _Wherein are debated and re-_|solued the Questions of whatsoe-|_uer
new points of moment, which haue beene_ | _or are contro-_|_uersed in
Diuinitie._ | _Translated into English by_ HEN-|RIE PARRIE, _out of the
last & best_ | _Latin Editions, together with some sup-_|_plie of wants
out of his Discourses of Di-_|_uinitie, and with correction of sundrie_
| _faults & imperfections, which ar as yet_ | _remaining in the best
corrected Latine._

  Impr. 6: 1587: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 1047 + [9]: p. 11 beg. _alone
  is it_, 111 _iecting it of_, 1001 _Now we haue_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title, within a border: (3–8) Epistle dedicatorie to
  the earl of Pembroke, signed by Parry: (9–15) “To the Christian
  readers,” by Parry: 1–1047, the work: (2–9), “A table ...” of
  contents.

  Other editions were printed at Oxford in 1589, 1591, 1595, 1601. The
  work, which is a commentary on the Heidelberg Catechism, appears to be
  a cento from the Tractationes Theologicae of Ursinus (vol. 1, 1587,
  fol.). See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 192. Parry’s Prefaces are
  reprinted in 1600. U.


                                 1588.

1. ¬Ca[se]¬, Jo[hn]. APOLOGIA MV-|SICES TAM VO-|CALIS QVAM |
INSTRUMEN-|_TALIS ET_ | MIXTÆ. | [four _mottos_.]

  Impr. 11: 1588: (eights) 16^o: pp. [6] + 78 (“77”): p. 11 beg. _am,
  Lydiam_: Pica Italic. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) dedication
  “Henrico Vntono et Guilielmo Hattono ... Io. Ca. S. P. D.,” with
  preface signed “I. C.,” Oxf. 30 Nov. 1588: 1-“77” the work.

  Rare. By John Case, cf. 1586. M, Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 686. The
  dedication is to two persons for their fathers’ interest in music.
  Sign. F consists of F 1 & F 3 only, paged 74–77 instead of 75–78.
  Copies usually have a border, &c. of red ink lines, throughout.


2. ¬Case¬, John. SPHÆRA CIVITATIS, | AVTHORE MAGISTRO | IOHANNE CASO
OXONI-|ENSI, OLIM COLLEGII DIVI | Iohannis Præcursoris socio. |
[_device_, then _motto_.]

  Impr. 11: 1588: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [36] + 740 + [12]: p. 11 beg.
  _regni plusquam_, 111 _Communitas_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (2) 4 verses to the author from the “Sphæra Civitatis”! with a
  curious engraving of the sphere surmounted by the head and shoulders
  of the queen: (3) Latin poem to the author signed “Richardus Late-War”
  pres. of St. John’s college: (5–9) Epistola dedicatoria to Christopher
  lord Hatton: (10–25) “Ad Christianum lectorem,” 11 May 1588: (26–28)
  complimentary poems: (29–36) “Quæstiones et dubia quæ in octo libris
  Politicorum continentur,” a table of contents: (36) two complimentary
  poems: 1–740, the work: (1–4) “Peroratio operis,” 11 May, 1588: (5–11)
  “Rerum contentarum index.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 686. A commentary on the Politics of
  Aristotle, made into a general political treatise. On 16 July 1590
  Barnes petitioned for a decree of Convocation that every determining
  bachelor should purchase this work, but it does not appear that any
  action was taken on the petition. Reprinted at Frankfurt in 1616.


3. ¬Catechism.¬ A CATECHISME, | OR SHORT KIND OF IN-|STRVCTION, WHEREBY
| TO TEACH CHILDREN AND | THE IGNORAVNTER SORT, THE | _CHRISTIAN
RELIGION_. | _Whereunto is prefixed a learned Treatise of the necessity
and vse of_ | _Catechising: together with Godly praiers most fit for al
estates at al_ | _times._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 6: 1588: sm. 4^o: pp. [10] + 212 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _God,
  committed_, 111 _lowest partes_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1) title:
  (3–9) Epistle dedicatory by Thomas Sparke and John Seddon to Arthur
  lord Grey of Wilton, Bletchley, 30 Jan. 1587: 1–61, the treatise on
  catechising, signed by Sparke: 62, a prayer: 63–194, the catechism:
  195–211, prayers, with a confession of the faith: 212 “Causes why men
  doe not vnderstand the holie Scriptures,” &c.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 190 (bis). This is the Heidelberg
  Catechism translated into English by Thomas Sparke and John Seddon,
  with scriptural proofs annexed to each paragraph, and a long treatise
  on catechising. See next art.


4. ¬Catechism.¬ A CATECHISME, OR SHORT | KIND OF INSTRVCTION, WHEREBY, |
_TO TEACH CHILDREN, AND_ | THE IGNORAVNTER SORT, THE | _CHRISTIAN
RELIGION_ | _Whereunto, is prefixed, a learned Treatise, of the
necessity, & vse of Ca-_|_techising: together, with Godly praiers, most
fit, for al estates, at al times._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 6: 1588: (eights) 12^o: pp. [12] + 274 (?): p. 11 beg. _the
  greatnes_, 111 _I beleeue_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1) title: (3–11)
  Epistle, as before: 1–80, the treatise, as before: 81, “The causes
  ...” &c. as before at end: 82, a prayer: 83–254, the catechism:
  255–274, prayers &c. as above.

  This is a reprint of the preceding quarto edition, with slight
  varieties of spelling, arrangement, &c.: the type is newly set up
  throughout.


5. ¬Humfrey¬, Laurence. A VIEW | OF THE ROMISH | HYDRA AND MON-|STER
TRAISON A-|GAINST THE LORDS | _ANNOINTED: CON-_|DEMNED BY DAVID | 1.
_SAM._ 26 _AND NOWE_ | CONFVTED IN SE-|VEN SERMONS | To perswade
Obedience to Prin-|ces, Concord among ourselues, and a | _generall
Reformation and Repen-_|taunce in all states | By L. H. | [_two
mottos._]

  Impr. 6: 1588: (eights) 16^o: pp. [24] + 192: p. 11 beg. _as R.
  Holcot_, 111 _Kent, Roger_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2)
  “The Dialogue and talk of Dauid ...” (1 Sam. xxvi. 8–12): (3–17)
  Epistle dedicatory to the earl of Leicester, Oxf., “Decemb. 28”
  [1587], furnishing the author’s full name: (18–24) “A table of the
  special points and common places”: (24) “Faultes escaped correct
  thus,” six: 1–192, the seven sermons, on 1 Sam. xxvi. 8–12.

  Very rare. Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© (i. 560) represents this as a London
  book, but Maunsell (i. 100) and Herbert (iii. 1403) testify to this
  Oxford edition. The Bodleian copy wants the title and all after p.
  186, the account of which is from a very accurate description
  obligingly supplied from a copy in the Peterborough Cathedral Library
  by the Bishop of Leicester in Dec. 1888.


6. ¬Prime¬, John. [_woodcut._] THE CONSO-|LATIONS OF DAVID, | BREEFLY
APPLIED TO | QVEENE ELIZABETH: IN A | Sermon preached in Ox-|ford the
17. of Nouember. | By IOHN PRIME, | 1588. | [_motto_: then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 6_b_: 1588: (eights) 16^o: pp. [32], signn. A-B^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _ventereth his_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  2^r-A 3^v, Epistle dedicatorie to the bp. of Winchester, Oxf. 7 Dec.
  1588: A 4^r-B 7^r, the sermon, on Ps. xxiii. 4: B 7^v, 2 Kings vi.
  15–16.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 653. The Marprelate controversy and the
  defeat of the Armada are mentioned.


7. ¬Sparke¬, Thomas. “Treatise to prove that Ministers publicly, and
Householders privately, are bound to catechise their Parishioners and
Families &c. Oxon. 1588. oct.”

  So Wood (©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 190): the treatise is part of the Catechism
  above, and is unlikely to have been separately issued.


8. ¬Theocritus.¬ SIXE IDILLIA | THAT IS | _SIXE SMALL, OR PETTY_ |
POEMS, OR ÆGLOGVES, CHO-|_sen out of the right famous Sicilian_ | Poet
THEOCRITUS, and tran-|_slated into English verse_. | [_motto_: then
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1588: (eight) 12^o: pp. [16], sign. A^8: p. (11) beg. _The
  heauens_: Long Primer Italic. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title, within a
  border: A 1^v “E. D. _Libenter hic & omnis exantlabitur_ | _Labor, in
  tuæ spem gratiæ_,” [Hor. Epod i. 23–4], within a border: “H” 2^r-A
  8^r, Idylls 8, 11, 16, 18, 21, 31 of Theocritus.

  The only copy known is in the Bodleian. It was reprinted in 1883 at
  the private press of Mr. C. H. Daniel of Worcester College, Oxford.
  Each idyll is preceded by an “argument” and followed by an “embleme”
  or motto. It has been suggested that E. D. to whom the dedication is
  addressed, may be Edward Dyer. This is the first Oxford _édition de
  luxe_, except perhaps the xvth. cent. issues on vellum.


                                 1589.

1. ¬Hermaica gymnasmata.¬ HERMAICA GYM-|NASMATA. | Literarum nobilitas,
& gloria. | LITERAE ORTV CAELESTES, | genere divinæ, authoritate &
gratia illustres, | _studijs sapientum præclaræ, fructu saluta-_|_res,
iucunditate præstantes_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 1_a_: 1589: (eights) 12^o: pp. [88], signn. A-E^8, F^4: sign. B
  1^r beg. _luat: aut_: Pica Italic. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  1^v, “Tituli” of the 22 Exercises: A 2^r, “Philologo”: A 3^r-F 3 (“A
  3”)^v, the exercises: F 3^v, note that the 3rd Exercise is out of its
  place: F 4, unknown.

  Very rare. Twenty-two short anonymous exercises in Latin prose, such
  as would serve for College or University disputations. By a Magdalen
  man, the “Epitaphius” being on William of Waynfleet, cf. the Phasma,
  &c.


2. ¬Hutchins¬, Edward. A SERMON | PREACHED AT | S. MARIES IN OXFORD |
VPON THE FEAST OF EPI-|_PHANY CONCERNING_ | THE TRVE COMFORT OF | _GOD
HIS CHVRCH TRVLY_ | MILLITANT AND APOLO-|_gie of the same_. | Ianuary 6.
1589. | By Edwarde Hutchins Maister | of Arts, and fellow of
Brazen-|nose College in Oxford. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 6_b_: (1589): (eights) 12^o: pp. [32], signn. A-B^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _blessing: no_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  2^r-A 2^v, dedication to Thomas Egerton: A 3^r-B 8^r, the sermon, on
  Cant. iv. 7.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 452, where the book is divided into two,
  without cause.


3. ¬Rider¬, John. BIBLIOTHECA | SCHOLASTICA. | A DOVBLE DICTIONARIE, |
Penned for all those that would haue within short | space the vse of the
Latin tongue, either to speake, or write. | _Verie profitable and
necessarie for Scholers, Courtiers, Lawyers and their_ | Clarkes,
Apprentices of London, Travellers, Factors for Marchants, | and briefly
for all Discontinuers within her Majesties realmes | of England and
Ireland. | _Compiled by_ Iohn Rider, _Master of Artes, and preacher of
Gods word_. | [_device._] |

 { First reade
 { With others c...
 { Then censure

_Read the Preface, Le..._ | [_imprint_] | Cum privile... |

  Impr. 12: 1589: (eights) sm. 4^o. pp. [12] + 1800 columns. 3 in a page
  + ?   : col. 111 beg. _Belching_, 1001, _Notched_: Minion.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to sir Francis Walsingham,
  signed “Iohannes Riderus,” Oxford, 1 Oct. [1589], in Latin: (5) “To
  the Reader,” signed “Ioh. Ridir,” 30 Sept.: (6) “Directions for the
  Reader”: (7) “Rideri gratitudinis carmen, ad suum prænobilem
  Mecænatem,” acrostics “Comiti Sussexio” and “VVilielmo VVaddo”: (8–12)
  complimentary Latin verses to the author: coll. 1–1800, the work,
  English-Latin: (?)

  Very rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 457, ©Notes and Queries©, 6th
  S. iv. 274. The above description is from a copy of the first part,
  with damaged title, in the Bodleian. Rider claims that the Dictionarie
  is the first “that hath the English before the Latine, with a ful
  Index of al such latine words as are in any one common Dictionarie”
  and that it has 4000 more words than any other. He acknowledges the
  pecuniary help of the earl of Sussex and Will. Waade. The book is a
  “retort courteous” to the Cambridge dictionary by Tho. Thomas of 1588.
  Several edd. were subsequently issued (see 1627. H), and Thomas
  Holyoke refashioned it.


4. ¬Skelton¬, John. “A Skeltonicall salutation, | or condigne
gratulation | and iust vexation | of the Spanish nation, | that in a
bravado | spent many a crusado | in setting forth an armado | England to
invado | 4to, Oxf. J. Barnes, 1589.”

  So in the ©Catalogue of the ... library of ... Benjamin Heywood Bright
  ... which will be sold by auction ... 1845©, art. 5276, p. 331.
  Extremely rare. J. Payne Collier once saw a copy (©Notes and Queries©,
  1st S. i. 18, 1849), the imprint being nearly as No. 5_b_. There were
  copies in the Farmer sale (1798, sold to lord Spencer) and Inglis sale
  (1826). In ©Notes and Queries©, _ibid._, p. 12 is printed a letter
  from John Aylmer bp. of London to the Lord Treasurer about “this
  foolish rime.” The London reprint, which contains a Latin version said
  not to be in the Oxford edition (but query?) “imprinted at London for
  Toby Cooke, 1589” (sm. 4^o, 8 leaves), is not uncommon. See also
  Brydges, ©Censura Literaria©, 2nd ed., p. 18, Ames and Herbert’s Ames.


5. ¬Ursinus¬, Zacharias. THE SVMME | OF CHRISTIAN | RELIGION: |
Delivered by ZACHARIAS VRSINVS in | his Lectures vpon the Catechisme,
authori-|_sed by the noble Prince_ FREDERICKE | throughout his
Dominions: | Wherein are debated and resolved the Questions | _of
whatsoever points of moment, which haue beene_, | or are controversed in
Divinity. | _Translated into English by_ HENRY PARRY, _out of the last
and_ | best Latine Editions, together with some supplie of | _wants out
of his Discourses of Divinity, and with correction_ | of sundry faults &
imperfections, which are | as yet remaining in the best corrected
Latine. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 6: 1589: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 966 + [10]: p. 11 beg.
  _nister comfort_, 111 _might fal?_, 501 _father al_: Long Primer
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) Epistle dedicatorie to the earl
  of Pembroke, signed by Parry: (9–15) “To the Christian readers,” by
  Parry: 1–966, the work: (1–9) “A Table ...” of contents.

  See 1587. U. It is noteworthy that the change from u consonantal to v
  can be traced in progress by a comparison of this title with that of
  the first edition.


                                 1590.

1. ¬Bacon¬, Roger. LIBELLVS ROGERII BA-|CONI ANGLI, DOCTISSIMI
MA-|thematici & medici, De retardandis senectu-|_tis accidentibus, & de
sensibus_ | conservandis. | Item, | LIBELLVS VRSONIS | MEDICI, DE
PRIMARVM QVALI-|tatum arcanis & effectibus. Vterq¿ue¿ affixis ad |
_marginem notulis illustratus, & emendatus_, | in lucem prodijt, operâ
Iohannis Willi-|_ams Oxoniensis, cuius_ | sequitur | Tractatus
Philosophicus, de humo-|rum numero & natura, complexionis, morbi, |
_perturbationum origine, caloris & humidi nati-_|vi virtute & munere in
humano corpore, & de | _aëris infectione, vndè non rarò humores_ | &
spiritus coinquinantur. |

  Impr. 5: 1590: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 31 + [1] + 134 + [2],
  (signatures continuous): p. 11 beg. _cana rerum_, also _tur. Sed
  potest_, 111 _li, tendones_: Brevier Roman (1st part), Pica Italic
  (2nd and 3rd parts). Contents:—p. (1), title: (3–5) epistola
  dedicatoria to Christopher lord Hatton by J. Williams: (6–7) “Ad
  lectorem,” a preface, mentioning some errata: (8) title of Bacon’s
  treatise, and a poetical Latin “R. Baconi vita”: 1–31, Bacon’s
  treatise: 1–29, Urso’s treatise: 33–134, Williams’s treatise, signed
  at end by the author.

  The preface contains curious critical principles. See Wood’s ©Ath.
  Oxon.©, ii. 132.


2. ¬Gentilis¬, Albericus. ALBERICI GEN-|TILIS I. C. PROFES-|SORIS REGII
| DE INIVSTITIA BELLICA | ROMANORVM ACTIO. | [_device._]

  Impr. 13: 1590: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 23 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _rum vos non_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1), “¶j”: (3) title: (5–8) dedication
  “Roberto Devoraxio ... comiti Essexio,” Oxford, 24 Dec. 1590: 1–23,
  the treatise.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 91. The author says that he has a
  treatise ready prepared defending the precise opposite of the present
  argument.


3. ¬Josephus.¬ ΦΛΑΒΙΟΥ ΙΩΣΗΠΟΥ ΕΙΣ ΜΑΚΚΑ-|βαίους λόγος: ἢ περὶ
ἀυτοκράτορος λογισμοῦ. | Flavij Iosephi de Maccabæ-|_is; seu de Rationis
imperio liber_. | MANUSCRIPTI CODICIS | _OPE, LONGE, QVAM_ | antehac, &
emendatior, & au-|_ctior: cum Latina interpreta-_|_tione ac notis
Ioannis Luidi_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 11: 1590: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 33 + [4] + 39 + [4], signn.
  ¶^4, A-E^8: p. 11 beg. οὐχ οὕτως, also _ramo Moses_ or _sim vt_: Long
  Primer Greek and Latin. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) dedication to
  Roger Gifford physician to the King by Ioannes Luidus, in Latin,
  Oxford, 29 Sept. 1590: 1–33, & (1), text of Josephus: (2–4) “Veterum
  de hocce Iosephi libello elogia”: 1 (“6”)-39, Latin tr. of Josephus:
  (1–3) “Adversaria” including various readings: (3–4) “Castigationes.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 738 for John Lhuyd or Lloyd. The paging of
  the second part is very irregular up to p. 12.


4. ¬Trigge¬, Francis. “Comment. in cap. 12. ad Rom. Ox. 1590.”

  So in Bliss’s ed. of Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 759.


5. ¬Trigge¬, Francis. “Noctes sacræ seu lucubrationes in primam partem
apocalypseos in quibus perspicue docetur quænam sit vera ecclesia, et
quæ falsa, quod hoc seculo tam multos in religione et fide suspensos
tenet, &c. Oxon. 1590, 4to. RAWLINSON.”

  So in Bliss’s ed. of Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 760. A copy was sold in
  the Davis sale at Oxford in 1686 (Catal. pt. 1, p. 26).


                                 1591.

1. ¬Barne¬, Thomas. A | SERMON PREA-|CHED AT PAVLS CROSSE | THE
THIRTEENTH OF IVNE, THE SE-|cond Sunday in Trinitie tearme 1591. by |
THωMAS BARNE _student in Diuinity_. [_three mottos_, then a _metal
engraving_ (arms of the University &c.)].

  Impr. 4: 1591: 8^o in size.

  Extremely rare. Only known from a titlepage preserved in the Bodleian
  Library. Probably this is the source of Herbert’s description (iii.
  1405). He calls the book a quarto: the size of the close-cut titlepage
  is 6–9/16 in. × 3¾ in. The metal engraving is curious: see 1591. T.


2. ¬Hacket¬, Roger. “Roger Hacket, his sermon at Paules Crosse on 1 Sam.
xi; 5, 6, 7 ... Octavo.”

  So Herbert’s Ames, p. 1404, from Maunsell, i. 100. See Wood’s ©Ath.
  Oxon.©, ii. 317.


3. ¬Herodotus.¬ FEBRVARII.Υ Α῾ΛΙΚΑ´ΡΝΑΣΣΕ´ΩΣ Ι῾ΣΤΟΡΙ-|Ω῀Ν ΠΡΩ´ΤΗ,
ΚΛΕΙΩ´. | HERODOTI HALICAR-|NASSENSIS HISTORIARVM | liber primus, Clio.
| [_device._]

  Impr. 15: 1591: sm. 4^o: pp. 69 + [3]: p. 11 beg. βιώτατον: Pica
  Greek. Contents:—p. 1, title: 2, “Herodoti vita ex Suida,” &c.: 3–69,
  Herodotus, bk. 1: 69, “Errata graviora sic corrigenda.”


4. ¬Sparke¬, Thomas. AN ANSWERE TO MA-|STER IOHN DE ALBINES, | NOTABLE
DISCOVRSE AGAINST | heresies (as his frendes call his booke) | _Compiled
by_ THOMAS SPARK _pastor_ | of Blechley in the county of Buck. | [two
_mottos_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 4: 1591: 8^o: pp. [76] + 426 + [6]: p. 11 beg. _you are quite_,
  111 _thing which it_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) Title: (3–14)
  Epistle dedicatorie to Arthur lord Grey of Wilton, signed “Thomas
  Sparke”: (15–76) “The preface to the Reader,” including (27–76) an
  answer to the preface to Albines’ book: 1–407, the treatise: 408–426,
  “A short answere to a new offer ... an enumeration of six ... signes
  of Antichristians ...”: (1–4) “A Table”: (5) “Faults escaped in
  printing, through the absence of the author, the hardnes and smalnes
  of the hand, wherein the copy was offered to the presse, and the
  vnacquaintance of the ouerseers with the same.”

  In answer to Jean de Albin’s treatise against heresies printed in
  English at Douai in 1575: the text of which appears to be entirely
  reprinted in this edition. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 190.


5. ¬Tacitus.¬ THE | ENDE OF NERO | AND BEGINNING OF | GALBA. | FOWER
BOOKES OF THE HISTO-|RIES OF CORNELIVS TACITVS. | THE LIFE OF AGRICOLA.
|

  [Colophon on sign. H 2^r:—] impr. 14: [on titlepage:—M . D . LXXXXI]
  1591: (sixes) la. 8^o: pp. [6] + 17 + [1] + 267 + [1] + 80 + [4]: p.
  11 beg. _so good a_, and _another Prince_, 111 _xxix. The setting_, 11
  _ted to all_: 1st pt. Great Primer, 2nd pt. Pica, Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–4) dedication to the Queen, signed “Henry Savile”: (5–6)
  “A. B. To the Reader”: 1–17, the Ende of Nero, &c.: 1–267, the
  translation of Tacitus’s Histories bks. 1–4, and (p. 237) his Life of
  Agricola: 1–48, Annotations upon the four books and the Life: 49–75,
  “A view of certain militar matters,” with plan of Roman camp at p. 59:
  75–77, “The explication of a place in Polybius” about Greek money:
  78–80, “Translations of the marginall Greeke”: (1) “A note of the
  editions vsed in such authors as are cited by page”: (2) “Errours of
  the printe, or changes”: (3) colophon.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 312. The A. B. of the preface was
  believed to be lord Essex (Edm. Bolton’s ©Hypercritica© ad fin., Oxf.
  1722). There is something peculiar about this edition, for
  bibliographers describe it as London, and the woodcut in the
  dedication is not otherwise known to belong to Barnes. The titlepage
  and form are rather of London than Oxford. A metal engraving in the
  text is perhaps Barnes’s: see 1591. B.


6. ¬Trigge¬, Francis. ANALYSIS CAPI-|TIS VICESIMI QVARTI | EVANGELII
SECVNDVM MATTHÆVM, | in qua Prophetiæ omnes, & quæ ad Sinagogam, | _&
quæ ad Antichristum seductorem illum, & quæ ad nostra_ | _tempora
spectant, clarè explicantur, nec non ministerium ec-_|_clesiasticum cum
omnibus suis adiunctis declaratur_ | _ac delineatur_. | Authore
FRANCISCO TRIGGO. | [_device._]

  Impr. 1_a_: 1591: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 128: p. 11 beg. _loquutus est_,
  111 _ti ora vult_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  dedication to Will. James, dean of Christ Church, vice-chancellor, “ex
  Welburnia mea” 19 Apr. 1591: 1–128, the Analysis.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 759.


7. ¬Ursinus¬, Zacharias. THE SVMME | OF CHRISTIAN | RELIGION: | [&c. as
1589. U, except in l. 7 : for ., l. 9 comma added after _beene_, l. 15
is in italic, in imprint “Ty|_gres head_. 1591” for “Tygres | _head_.
1589”].

  Impr. 6: 1591: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 966 + [10]: p. 11 beg.
  _nister comfort_, 111 _might fall?_, 501 _father al_: Long Primer
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–16), as 1589. U: 1–966, the
  catechism: (1–9) “A table ...” of contents.

  See 1587. U.


                                 1592.

1. ¬Barlaamus.¬ ΤΟΥ῀ ΣΟΦΩΤΑ´ΤΟΥ ΒΑΡΛΑΑ`Μ ΛΟ´ΓΟΣ ΠΕΡΙ` | ΤΗ῀Σ ΤΟΥ῀ ΠΑ´ΠΑ
ἈΡΧΗ῀Σ. | BARLAAMI DE PAPAE PRINCI-|PATV LIBELLVS. | _Nunc primùm Græcé
& Latiné editus opera_ IOANNIS | LVIDI _Procuratoris Academiæ
Oxoniensis_. | Ad | Illustrissimum Dominum Bucchurstium | eiusdem
Academiæ Cancellarium | Amplissimum. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1592: sm. 4^o: pp. [40], signn. ¶, A-D^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  ἀξιοῦσθαι χειροτονίας: Pica Greek and Roman. Contents:—¶ 1^r, “¶ j”: ¶
  2^r, title: ¶ 2^v, arms of Buckhurst engraved on metal: ¶ 3^r-¶ 4^r,
  epistle dedicatory to Thomas Sackville lord Buckhurst, afterwards earl
  of Dorset, 1 Jan. “1592,” i. e. 1591/2: A 1^r-B 3^r, the Greek text: B
  4^r-D 3^v, the Latin text.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 739. This is the editio princeps of the
  work of bp. Barlaamus. A copy presented by the author to John Selden,
  now in the Bodleian, is without the device on the titlepage.


2. ¬Brasbridge¬, Thomas. Quæstiones in Officia M. T. Ciceronis,
compendiariam totius Opusculi Epitomen continentes. 16^o: (Impr. 5).

  From notes of a copy belonging to lord Robartes, seen by me in Dec.
  1879. The dedication is dated 1586, of which date there is a copy of
  the book in Christ Church Library, Oxford: see 1615. B, an edition
  noticed in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 526.


3. ¬Breton¬, Nicholas. THE PILGRIMAGE TO PARA-|DISE, IOYNED WITH THE |
Countesse of Pembrookes loue, compiled | _in verse by_ NICHOLAS BRETON |
_Gentleman_. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 6: 1592: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 102 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _But, waking_:
  Primer (Great Primer?) Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4), epistle
  dedicatory to Mary Countess of Pembroke: (5) “To the Gentlemen
  studients and Scholers of Oxforde,” 12 Apr. 1592, with a note
  disclaiming an edition “of late printed in london by one Richarde
  Ioanes ... entituled _Bretons bower of delight_,” as unauthorized and
  to a large extent not his own poems: (6) “To my honest true friende
  Master Nicholas Breton,” signed “Iohn Case”: (7–8) poems by Will.
  Gager and Henry Price to Breton: 1–65, the pilgrimage: 66–102, the
  countess of Pembroke’s love, both poems in 6-line stanzas: (1) 7
  “Errata.”

  Very rare. See Hazlitt’s ©Handbook©, p. 56.


4. ¬Case¬, John. SVMMA | VETERVM INTER-|PRETVM IN VNIVER-|SAM
DIALECTICAM ARISTO-|_TELIS; QVAM VERE FALSO-_|ue Ramus in Aristotelem
inueha-|tur, ostendens. | _Auctore._ | IOANNE CASE OXONIENSI, | olim
Collegii D. Ioannis Præcurso-|ris socio. | _Omnibus Socraticæ
Peripateticæq¿ue¿ philosophiæ studiosis in_ | _primis vtilis ac
necessaria._ | _Recognita & emendata._ | Cum INDICE rerum & verborum
locupletiss. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1592: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 201 + [7]: p. 11 beg. _Resp.
  Definitio_, 111 _Opponens Aliquid_: Brevier Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (2) “Ioannis Readi carmen, in dialecticam Ioannis Casi”: (3–5)
  Epistola nuncupatoria to Rob. Dudley earl of Leicester: (6–8) “Ad
  benevolum lectorem,” dated “Idibus August.”: 1–201 the work: (1–6)
  Index.

  The first edition of this book was issued at London by Thomas
  Vautrollier in 1584. The text of the treatise appears to be an
  inaccurate reprint of the 1584 edition, but most of the complimentary
  verses, with Nicholas Maurice’s preface dated Sept. 1582, are here
  omitted: and there are other slight alterations. See 1598. C. See
  Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 686.


5. ¬Churchyard¬, Thomas. A | HANDEFVL OF | GLADSOME VERSES, | giuen to
the Queenes Maiesty | _at Woodstocke this Prograce_. | 1592. | By |
THOMAS CHVRCHYARDE. | [_device._]

  Impr. 2: 1592: sm. 4^o (perhaps [fours] 8^o): pp. [20]. signn. A-B^4
  C^2: sign. B 2^r beg. _That pleaseth_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A
  1^r title, within border: A 2^r-A 2^v, dedication to the Queen: A
  3^r-A 4^v, “A few volu ntary verses to the general readers”: B 1^r-C
  2^r, the Handful of Verses: C 2^v “[A V]erse of variety to all those
  that honors the onely Phœnix of the world” i. e. the Queen.

  Extremely rare: a copy is in the British Museum. Reprinted in H.
  Huth’s ©Fugitive Tracts in Verse©, 1st Ser., no. xxxi (privately
  printed, Lond. 1875.)


6. ¬Elizabeth¬, queen. [Speeches delivered | to Her Majesty this last
Progress | at the Rt. Hon. the Lady Russels, at | Bissam; the Lord
Chandos | at Sudeley; the Lord | Norris, at Ricott.]

  [Impr. 7_a_: 1592]: sm. 4^o: pp. [24], signn. A-C^4: sign. B 2^r beg.
  _Daphnes mischance_: Pica Roman. Contents:—[A 1^r, title?]: A 2^r-C
  4^r, the speeches, &c.

  Very rare. In the British Museum copy, the only one at present known
  (?), the titlepage (A 1) is lost, a transcript being supplied
  apparently from some other copy: also B 1 is lost. The text is
  reprinted in John Nichols’ ©Progresses ... of Queen Elizabeth©, new
  edition, iii. (London. 1823), p. 130, but the source is not stated. A
  copy was sold in the Heber sale (Catal. pt. ii, p. 198, lot 3800) in
  1834. Herbert’s Ames in the Additions iii. 1813 mentions the book.


7. ¬Gager¬, William. MELEAGER. | Tragœdia noua. | BIS PVBLICE ACTA IN |
_ÆDE CHRISTI_ | Oxoniæ. [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1592: (eights) 16^o: pp. [96], signn. A-F^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Non leuior_: Pica Italic. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r-A
  3^r, letter dedicatory to Robert earl of Essex, 1 Jan. “1592”
  (1592/3?), signed “Guilielmus Gagerus”: A 3^v-A 4^r, Complimentary
  poems to the author, one by Albericus Gentilis: A 4^v-A 5^r, short
  poetical and prose account of the play by the author: A 5^v
  “Personae”: A 6^r-E 7^v, the play with prologues, argument and
  epilogues: E 8^r-F 5^v, “Panniculus Hippolyto Senecæ Tragœdiæ assutus
  1591,” a short play: F 6^r “Apollo προλογίζει ad Serenissimam Reginam
  Elizabetham 1592,” a poem: F 6^v-F 7^r, Prologue and Epilogue to
  “Bellum Grammaticale.” [F 8 not seen].

  For the controversy caused by the publication of this play (which had
  been acted according to the letter dedicatory in 1581 or 1582 and 1584
  or 1585), see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 88.


8. ¬Gager¬, William. VLYSSES REDVX | TRAGOEDIA NOVA. | IN AEDE CHRISTI
OXONIAE | _PVBLICE ACADEMICIS RE-_|_CITATA, OCTAVO IDVS_ | FEBRVARII.
1591. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1591: (eights) 12^o: pp. [96], signn. A-F^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Viæque fessum_: Pica Italic. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  2^r-A 2^v, “Prologus ad Academicos” in verse: A 3^r-A 4^r, epistle
  dedicatory to lord Buckhurst, Ch. Ch., 10 May 1592, signed “Guilielmus
  Gagerus”: A 4^v-A 7^r, complimentary poems, &c., one by Albericus
  Gentilis: A 7^v, “Personæ”: A 8^r-F 1^r, the play: F 2^r-F 6^v, five
  Latin pieces by Gager, including a “Prologus in Rivales, Comœdiam.” [F
  8 not seen].

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 89.


9. ¬Lycophron.¬ ΛΥΚΟΦΡΟΝΟΣ ΤΟΥ | ΧΑΛΚΙΔΕΩΣ | Αλεξάνδρα. | LYCOPHRONIS
CHAL-|cidensis Alexandra. | _In vsum Academiæ Oxoniensis._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 13_a_: 1592: (fours) 12^o: pp. [2] + 44 + [2] : p. 11 beg.
  ὠνητὸς ἀιθαλω: Pica Greek. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a border:
  1–44, the work: (1–2) (not seen.)

  The poem is better known as the ©Cassandra©, which is the running
  title throughout. Some various readings are printed in the margin.


10. ¬Sanford¬, John. APOLLINIS ET MVSARVM | ἘΥΚΤΙΚΑ` ἘΙΔΎΛΛΙΑ, | _IN
SERENISSIMÆ REGINÆ_ ELIZABETHAE | auspicatissimum Oxoniam aduentum,
de-|_cimo die Calend. Octobris, An: M . D . LXXXXII._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1592 : sm. 4^o: pp. [24], signn. A-C^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Cernis vt_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 1^v,
  Latin poetical dedication to dr. Nicholas Bond, vice-chancellor and
  president of Magdalen college, signed “Ioannes Sanfordus”: A 2^r-C
  4^r, the Idylls.

  Very rare, unknown even to Wood and Nichols (©Progresses of Qu.
  Elizabeth©). Two copies are in the British Museum, and lord Robartes
  has an imperfect one, seen in 1881. Reprinted literatim in the Oxford
  Historical Society’s viii^{th} volume, (Oxf., 1887, 8v^o), where see
  notes by the editor, the rev. Charles Plummer. The poems are ‘in
  honour of the Queen’s Visit, and especially in connection with a
  banquet given by the President and Fellows of Magdalen to the nobles
  and Privy Councillors of the Queen’s retinue,’ 22 Sept. 1592.


11. ¬Thorne¬, William. DVCENTE DEO. | WILLELMI THORNI | TVLLIVS, SEV
Ρ῾ΉΤΩΡ IN TRIA | _STROMATA DIVISVS_. | [_motto._] | E NOVO BEATÆ MARIÆ |
WINTON IN OXON COLLEGIO. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 16: 1592: (eights) 12^o: pp. [32] + 253 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _Primi
  Stromatis_, 111 ‘Πρόληψις: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (2) Engraved arms and motto of lord Pembroke, with verses: (3–8)
  epistle dedicatory to William Herbert heir of lord Pembroke: (9–25)
  “Eidem Willelmi Thorni parænesis ad Rhetoricam ἐγκωμιαστική”: (26–30)
  complimentary verses to Thorn: (31–32) address to the reader, in
  Latin: (32) 3 lines of errata: 1–253, the work, in three Stromata and
  an appendix: (1) “Errata sic corrigenda.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 480. A treatise on Rhetoric. A poem on p.
  (30) shows that John Sanford of Magdalen was ‘Corrector Typograph.’


                                 1593.

1. ¬Aristophanes.¬ ΑΡΙΣΤΟΦΑΝΟΥΣ | ἹΠΠΕΙΣ. | ⁂ | ARISTOPHANIS | EQVITES |
[_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1593: sm. 4^o: pp. [56], signn. A-G^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  Κλέπτων τὸν οἶνον: Pica Greek. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title within
  border: A 2^r, Ὑπόθεσις and Δράματος πρόσωπα: A 3^r-G 4^r, the play.

  The first separate edition of this comedy.


2. ¬Demosthenes.¬ “‘Demosthenis Orationes 15, cum interpretatione
Nicolai Carri; 3 Olynthiacarum, 4 Philippicarum.’ Quarto.”

  So in Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1405. Possibly a mistake for 1597.


3. ¬Gentilis¬, Albericus. “‘Albericus Gentilis Commentarii de Malificis
& Mathemat. & aliis similibus.’ Quarto.”

  So in Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1405. In the reprint (©Hanover©, 1604) the
  title is ‘Alberici Gentilis, I. C., Professoris Regii, Ad Tit. C. de
  Maleficis et Math. & ceter. similibus commentarius ...;’ the preface
  is dated Oxford 26 June 1593, and addressed to dr. Toby Matthew.


4. ¬G[winne]¬, M[atthew], and Henry Price. EPICEDIVM | IN OBITVM
ILLVS-|TRISSIMI HEROIS HEN-|RICI COMITIS DER-|BEIENSIS. &C. | [_device_:
then _motto_.]

  Impr. 11: 1593: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Epitaphium_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  2^r-A 2^v, epistle dedicatory to Ferdinand Stanley (“Sanleio”) earl of
  Derby, signed M[atthew] G[winne], H[enry] P[rice]: A 3^r-B 4^v, seven
  Latin poems or epitaphs, the last signed in full “Henricus Priceus.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 702, ii. 415.


5. ¬Parry¬, Henry. “Concio de Victoria Christianâ, in Apoc. 3. 21. Oxon.
1593–94. Lond. 1606.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 193: see 1594. P.


6. ¬Sparke¬, Thomas. A | SERMON PREA-|_CHED AT WHADDON_ | in
Buckinghamshyre the 22. of | _Nouember_ 1593. _at the buriall of_ | the
Right Honorable, ARTHUR | _Lorde_ GREY _of Wilton, Knight of the_ | most
Honorable order of the Garter, | _by_ | THOMAS SPARKE Pastor of |
_Blechley_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 2: 1593: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 87 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _talkes
  of_: Pica English. Contents:—(1) title, within border: (3–7) Epistle
  dedicatorie to the countess of Bedford, her daughter lady Grey and
  Thomas lord Grey of Wilton, Bletchley, 1 Dec. 1593: (8) “In obitum
  clarissimi Herois, Domini Arthuri Greij. θρηνῳδία,” a Latin hexameter
  poem by “Ioannes Sanfordus”: 1–87, the sermon, on Is. lvii. 1–2: 87,
  “Faultes escaped,” eight errata.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 190.


                                 1594.

1. ¬Beacon¬, Richard. SOLON HIS FOLLIE, | _OR_ | A POLITIQVE
DIS-|COVRSE, TOVCHING THE | Reformation of common-weales conque-|red,
declined or corrupted. | BY RICHARD BEACON GENT. STV-|_DENT OF GRAYES
INNE, AND SOME-_|times her Maiesties Attorney of the province | _of
Mounster in Irelande_. | ⁂ | [_device._]

  Impr. 2: 1594: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 114 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _nius. Sol:_,
  111, _the thirde matter_: Pica English. Contents:—pp. (1–2) (not seen,
  but presumably blank): (3) title: (5–8) Epistle dedicatorie to the
  queen: (9) “The Authour to the Reader,” (10) “The booke vnto the
  Reader”: (1–114) the treatise: (1–2) (not seen, but presumably blank).


2. [¬Lewes¬, Richard.] [_woodcuts_] APOLOGIA | INNOCENTIAE ET |
INTEGRITATIS R. L. | _SACRÆ THEOLOGIÆ BAC-_|calaurei adversus
inquissimas | E. Osb. transfugæ sacrifi-|culi calumnias ad Acade-|micos
Oxonienses. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1594: (eights) 12^o: pp. [48], signn. A-C^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _& Apostolus_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r-A
  7^v, the Apologia: A 8^r-C 8^r, “Concio habita Oxoniæ festo cineritio,
  A. D. 1594 per R. L. B. S. Th. Textus ex 3. cap. Ep. D. Pau. ad
  Philipp. Ver. 1.”

  Very rare. A diatribe against Edward Osberne’s ©Palinodia©, printed in
  the ©Concertatio ecclesiae catholicae in Anglia© by Johannes
  Aquepontanus (Bridgwater), _Augsburg_ 1594, p. 240, in which Osberne
  who had been twice converted to the Roman Catholic religion had made
  reflexions on Lewes a Protestant. The clue to the author’s name is
  sign. A 5^v compared with p. 241 of the Concertatio. Some account of
  the author is in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 227.


3. ¬Lewes¬, R[ichard]. A | SERMON PREA-|_CHED AT PAVLES_ | Crosse, by R.
LEWES, Bacche-|ler of Divinitie, concerning _Isaac_ | his Testament,
disposed by the | Lord to _Iacobs_ comfort, though it | were intended to
_Esau_ by his fa-|ther; shewing, that the counsel of | God shal stand,
albeit the whole | worlde withstande it. | [_device._]

  Impr. 2_a_: 1594: (eights) 12^o: pp. [48], signn. A-C^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Isaac, see_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title, within
  a border: A 2^r-A 3^r, Epistle dedicatory to sir Henry Unton, dated
  “This xviij of June”: A 4^r-C 8^v, the sermon, on Gen. xxvii. 1–10.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 227.


4. ¬Parry¬, Henry. VICTORIA CHRISTIANA. | CONCIO AD | CLERVM: HABITA |
OXONIAE ANNO | Domini. 1591. | _H. Parry Auctore._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1594: (eights) 16^o: pp. [48], signn. A-C^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _culeo suo_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A
  4^v, epistle dedicatory to William Herbert, lord Cardiff: sign. A
  5^r-C 7^r(?: C 7 not seen), the sermon, on Rev. iii. 21: C 8 (not
  seen, probably blank.).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 193, where an edition of 1593 is
  mentioned, perhaps by error.


5. ¬Powel¬, Griffith. ANALYSIS | ANALYTICO-|RVM POSTERIORVM | _SIVE
LIBRORVM ARISTO_-|telis de Demonstratione, in | qua singula capita per
quæ-|stiones & responsiones | perspicuè exponuntur: | _adhibitis_ |
QVIBVSDAM SCHOLIIS, | ex optimis quibusq¿ue¿ interpretibus | _desumptis,
operâ & studio G. P. Oxoniensis_ | _confecta & edita in vsum iuniorum_.
| [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1594: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + “344” [really 333] + [3]: p.
  11 beg. _mia magnitudinem_, “111” _singularis_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) epistle dedicatory to Robert earl of
  Essex, signed “Griffinus Powel,” Jesus coll. Oxford, Feb. 27: (7–10)
  “Ad Lectorem Academicum”: (11–15) “Prolegomena”: 1-“344,” the
  Analysis.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 283. In the preface the author promises a
  similar analysis of the Topica, Sophistici Elenchi (see 1598. P) and
  Physica, and says that his method is derived from that of Ursinus. The
  paging is very wild: the signatures are ¶, A-X^8 = 352 pages. See
  1564. Diagrams occur in the text and margins.


6. Powel, Griffith. “Analysis libri Aristot. de Sophisticis Elenchis.
Ox. 1594.” A mistake in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 283 for
1598: see 1598. P.


7. ¬Sparke¬, A | SERMON | _PREACHED AT_ | Cheanies the 14. of |
_September_, 1585, _at the bu-_|riall of the Right Honora-|_ble the
Earle of_ BEDFORDE, | _by_ | THOMAS SPARKE DO-|_ctor of Divinitie._ |
_Newly perused and corrected by_ | _the Authour._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 2: 1594: (eights) 16^o: pp. [10] + 110: p. 11 beg. _as good_:
  Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title, within border: (3–10) Epistle
  dedicatorie to Arthur lord Grey of Wilton, dated Bletchley. 25 Dec.
  1585: 1–110, the sermon, dated at end 22 Sept. 1594.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 193. A new ed. of 1585. S.


8. ¬Trigge¬, Francis. A | GODLY AND FRVIT-|FVLL SERMON PREA-|_CHED AT
GRANTHAM_. | Anno. Dom. 1592. | by | FRANCIS TRIGGE. | Wherein as in a
glasse, every de-|gree may plainely see their spots and staines: | _and
may bee thereby made in deede beautifull_ | (if they doe not hate to be
reformed) | _against the appearance of_ | _Jesus Christ_. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7: 1594: (eights) 16^o: pp. [96], signn. A-F^8: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _state of Christes_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  2^r-A 4^v, address “To the Christian Reader”: A 5^r-F 8^r, the sermon,
  on Is. xxiv. 1–3.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 759: and 1595. T.


                                 1595.

1. ¬Moore¬, Robert. DIARIVM HISTORICOPOETICVM, | IN QVO | PRAETER
CONSTELLATIO-|NVM VTRIVSQVE HEMISPHAE-|RII, ET ZODIACI, ORTVS, ET
OCCA-|sus, numerum stellarum causarum-|q́¿ue¿, ad poesin spectantium,
vari-|_etatem, declarantur_ | CVIVSQUE MENSIS DIES FERE | _SINGVLI,
REGVM, IMPERATORVM_, | Principum, Pontificum, virorumq̄¿ue¿ doctorum,
na-|_talibus_, _nuptiis, inaugurationibus, morte de_⸗|_niq̄¿ue¿, aut re
alia quacunq¿ue¿ insig-_|_niore, celebriores_, | sic, | VT NIHIL PAENE
DESIDERARI POSSIT, | ad perfectam rerum gestarum Chronolo-|giam, cum, ex
auctoribus probatissimis, accu-|_rata quoq¿ue¿ annorum ratio margini_ |
_ascribatur_. | [_motto_] | Suasu, & permissu superiorum. |

  Impr. 11: 1595: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 102 + [6]: p. 11 beg. _Sic
  respiraram_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) Epistola
  Dedicatoria to sir (?) John Wolley and his wife Elizabeth, signed
  “Robertus Moore,” New College, Oxford, 6 July 1595: (7–8) address “Ad
  Lectorem Benevolum”: (8) “Auctoris ad libellum parænesis,” a short
  poem: 1–102, the work: (1–6) Index: (6) five errata.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 654. The book is a long hexameter poem,
  divided into twelve books, one for each month, in which historical
  events are successively alluded to.


2. ¬Trigge¬, Francis. “Trigge (F.) Godly and Fruitfull Sermon, at
Grantham, 1592, _black letter_, _Oxford_, 1595.”

  So in the Pyne Auction sale catalogue at Sotheby’s, art. 1058, sold on
  8 July 1886. Quaritch ascertained that the date was correct. Probably
  a reissue of 1594. T.


3. ¬Ursinus¬, Zacharias. THE SVMME | OF CHRISTIAN | RELIGION: |
Delivered by ZACHARIAS VRSINVS in | his Lectures vpon the Catechisme,
authori-|_sed by the noble Prince_ FREDERICKE | throughout his
dominions. | Wherein are debated and resolved the Questions | _of
whatsoever pointes of moment, which have beene_ | or are controversed in
Divinity. | _Translated into English by_ HENRY PARRY, _out of the last
and_ | best Latine Editions, together with some supply of | _wantes out
of his Discourses of Divinity, and with correction_ | of sundry faults &
imperfections. which are | _as yet remaining in the best corrected
Latine_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 6: 1595: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 966 + [10]: p. 11 beg.
  _nister comfort_, 111 _might fall_, 801 _he that hath_: Long Primer
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) Epistle dedicatorie to the earl
  of Pembroke: (9–15) “To the Christian readers”: 1–966, the treatise:
  (1–9) “A table ...”.

  See 1587. U.


4. ¬Wermueller¬, Otto. PERL MEWN ADFYD | neu, | ±Perl ysprydawl,
gwyrthfawrocaf±, | _yn dyscu i bôb dyn garu, a chofleidio y groes_, |
_meis peth hyfryd angenrheidiawl ir enaid, pa_|_gonffordd sy yw gael o
honi, ple, ac ym ha fodd_, | _y dylid ceisiaw diddanwch, a chymorth ym
hob_ | _adfyd: a thrachefn, pa wedd y dyle bawb i ym-_|_ddwyn i hunain
mewn blinder, yn ol gair duw_, | _a escrifennwyd yn gyntaf mewn Dwitch_
| _gann bregethwr dyscedig_ Otho Wer-|mulerus, _ac a droed ir Saesonaeg_
| _gann D. Miles Coverdal_, | _ac yrawrhon yn hwyr ir_ | _Gambraeg
gann._ | H L. | [Welsh _motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 17: 1595: 12^o: pp. [24] + 246 + [6]: pp. 11 beg. _mal i
  llefarod’_, 111 _duw, er_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–11) dedication to dr. Richard Vychan (Vaughan), archdn. of
  Middlesex, signed “Huw Lewys”: (12–13) poem “At yr vnrhyw wr” by
  Lewys: (15–23) “Ir darlennydd Christnogaidd rhad a thangneddyf
  Ynghrist”: 1–246 the work: (1–4) poem “Cowydd ir Iesu” by Lewys: (5)
  “Gweddi ferr yw doedyd mewn adfyd.”

  A translation into Welsh by Hugh Lewis of Wermueller’s ©Spiritual and
  most precious Pearl©, a religious treatise, translated from the German
  into English by Miles Coverdale (_Lond._ 1550). See M. Williams’s
  ©Cofrestr o’r holl Lyfrau printjedig ... yn y Faith Gymraeg ...©
  (Lond. 1717), ©Cambrian Bibliography© by the rev. William Rowlands,
  ed. by the rev. D. S. Evans (©Llandidloes©, 1869, 8v^o), p. 71. This
  is the first Welsh book printed at Oxford and the first occurrence of
  Rhydychen (Oxenford) in Oxford imprints. The translator begs the
  reader to excuse the absence of _y_ in some places before _n_ and _r_,
  the printer’s stock being too small. For the same reason _dd_ is
  usually _d’_ and _ll_ _l’_. If a word is here and there omitted it
  should be remembered that the printing is done by Englishmen!


                                 1596.

1. ¬Case¬, John. REFLEXVS | SPECVLI MORALIS | QVI COMMENTARII VICE |
esse poterit in Magna Moralia Aristo-|telis: auctore JOHANNE CASO, | in
Medicina Doctore, Collegij | Divi Iohannis Præcursoris | Oxon. olim
socio. | [_five mottos_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 5_a_: 1596: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 271 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _one
  ab_, 111 _Quæst._ 3: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5)
  Epistola dedicatoria to Richardus Phetiplacius, Oxf. 20 Sept. 1596:
  (7–11) address “Ad Lectorem, Benevolum” 26 Nov. 1596: (13–15) 5 Latin
  poems on the book: 1–198, the work: 199–200, “Peroratio operis, ad
  lectorem” 20 Sept. 1596: 201–206, “Quæstionum ... ordo ...”: 207–208,
  “Index Capitum”: 209–268, “A B Cedarium moralis philosophiæ Johanni
  Phetipacio Richardi Phetiplacii filiolo: omnibusque Tyronibus virtutum
  studiosis, scriptum & commendatum,” by question and answer: 269–271,
  “Peroratio ad adolescentem studiosum lectorem,” 30 Nov. (1596).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 687. The first address shows that for a
  time the printer refused to produce the work, which is related to the
  ©Speculum© of 1585, for fear that it might be reprinted at once
  elsewhere, and he suffer loss as in the case of the ©Sphæra Civitatis©
  of 1588. See 1586. C. A presentation copy has red lines round the
  page, on three sides double. This book is strictly the second part of
  the next art., Case’s ©Speculum©.


2. ¬Case¬, John. SPECVLVM | QVÆSTIONVM | MORALIVM, IN VNI-|VERSAM
ARISTOTELIS | Philosophi summi Ethicen, cui ad-|ditur brevis
commentarius in magna | Moralia Aristotelis, qui ab Autho-|re Reflexus
speculi Moralis | nominatur, | IOHANNE CASO OXONIENSI | Doctore in
Medicina olim Collegii præ-|cursoris socio Authore, | _NVNC DENVO
RECOGNITVM_, | _& à mendis plerisque repurgatum_. | CVM INDICE VERBORVM
ET RERVM | præcipuè memorabilium locuplete. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 20: 1596: (eights) 12^o: pp. [32] + folded sheet + 533 + [27]:
  p. 11 beg. _empli causa_, 111 _tur: quod_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–9) epistola nuncupatoria to the earl of Leicester, dated
  7 Mar. “1585”: (11–15), address “ad studiosos iuvenes utriusque
  academiæ,” with a short poem: (17–31) complimentary Latin verses: a
  “Tabula virtutum et vitiorum omnium,” folio sheet printed on one side
  only: 1–531, the work: 532–533, “Peroratio ad lect orem”: (1–26)
  Index.

  A reprint of 1585. C. The above title covers the preceding article,
  Case’s ©Reflexus Speculi©, but for convenience they are separately
  treated.


3. ¬Fitz-Geffrey¬, Charles. SIR | FRANCIS DRAKE | _His_ | Honorable
lifes com-|mendation, and his | Tragicall Deathes lamentation. | ⁂ |
[_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 19: 1596: (eights) 12^o: pp. [106], signn. A^4, one leaf, B-G^8:
  sign. B 2^r beg. _See how Apollo_: Long Primer English. Contents:
  sign. A 1^r title, within border: A 2^r poetical dedication to lady
  Elizabeth widow of sir F. Drake, signed by the author of the book
  “Charles Fitz-geffrey”: A 3^r “To the Authour,” poem, beg. _Once
  dead_, signed “Richard Rous”: A 3^v “To C. F.,” poem, beg. _When to_,
  signed “Francis Rous”: A 4^r “To the Authour,” poem, beg. _Englands
  Vlysses_, signed “D. W.”: 5th leaf^r “In Dracum redivivum; Carmen,”
  beg. _Quis vostrûm_, signed “Thomas Michelborne”: B 1^r-G 8^v, the
  poem.

  Very rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 607. The book was reprinted in
  the same year with small differences in the text chiefly of spelling,
  but with considerable changes in the prefatory matter: see below. It
  was also reprinted in 1819 at the Lee Priory Press, and edited by dr.
  Grosart in 1881⁂. The poem is in 7-line stanzas, rhyming ABABBCC.
  Woodcut ornaments occur at the top and bottom of almost every page,
  and the book has the appearance of an _édition de luxe_.


4. ¬Fitz-Geffrey¬, Charles. SIR | FRANCIS DRAKE | _his_ | Honorable
lifes com-|mendation, and his | Tragicall Deathes | lamentation. | ⁂ |
[_motto._] | Newly Printed with additions. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 19: 1596: (eights) 12^o: pp. [112], signn. A-G^8: sign. B 2^r
  beg. _See how Apollo_: Long Primer English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r
  title, within border: A 2^r poetical dedication to lady Elizabeth
  Drake, signed “Charles Fitz-geffrey”: A 2^v “To C. F.,” poem, beg.
  _Once dead_, signed “Richard Rous”: A 3^r “To C. F.,” poem, beg. _When
  to_, signed “Francis Rous”: A 3^v “To C. F.”, poem, beg. _Many
  greate_, signed “Thomas Mychelborne”: A 4^r “To the Author,” poem,
  beg. _Englands Vlysses_, signed “Diag. Vvh.,” i. e. Degory Whear: A
  4^v “Ad Dracum,” English poem, beg. _Weepe not_, signed “Ty. Co.”: A
  5^r-A 6^v, address “To the Reader” signed “C. F.” Broadgates (Oxford),
  17 Nov. 1596: A 7^r-A 8^v, quotations ending “Hæc ferè sunt quæ de
  Draco nostro apud exoticos poetas legimus”: B 1^r-G 8^v, the poem.

  See preceding article.

  Very rare. This issue is almost identical with the first, but the
  whole text appears to be newly set up, with minute differences.


5. ¬Morlet¬, Pierre. IANITRIX | siue | _INSTITVTIO AD PER-_|fectam
linguæ Gallicæ | cognitionem ac-|_quirendam_. | Authore PETRO MORLETO |
GALLO. | [_motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 11: 1596: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 92 + [4] : p. 11 beg.
  _Antequam verò_: Pica Italic. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a border:
  (3–7) Epistola dedicatoria to sir Robert Beal, dated Broadgates Hall,
  “15 Mar. 1596”: (9–13) complimentary poems in Latin and Greek: (14)
  “Errata”: 1–92 the treatise.

  Very rare: a French grammar, in Latin, by Pierre Morlet (?). The
  dedication states that the author was tutor to sir Robert Beal, having
  been introduced by David Chytræus.


6. ¬Perrot¬, sir James. “A Discovery of Discontented Minds wherein their
several sorts & purposes are described especially such as are gone
beyond y^e Seas. Dedicated to y^e Earl of Essex by James Perrot &
printed at Oxford in 4^{to} by Joseph Barnes Printer to the
University—1596.”

  Very rare. The above is from Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5904 (Bagford’s
  Collections), foll. 20 & 171. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 606,
  Herbert’s Ames, p. 1406, both notices derived from Oldys’s ©Catalogue
  of pamphlets in the Harleian Library© (Harleian Miscellany, vol. x.
  (1813), p. 358, where ‘Quarto, in thirty-four pages’ is added).


7. ¬Pinner¬, Charles. [Sermon by Charles Pinner at Marlborough, on 1
Tim. iv. 16.]

  (Impr. ?: 1596?): (eights) 16^o: pp. 53 +[3]: p. 11 beg. _through
  knowledge_: Pica English. Contents:—p. 1 title: 3–4, Epistle
  dedicatory to “master Iohn Bailife” of Marlborough, dated from Wotton
  Basset, 20 Oct. 1596: 5–53, the sermon.

  Very rare: see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 667. In the Bodleian copy, the
  only one known, the title is lost, so that the date is uncertain. But
  the book was certainly printed at Oxford, the woodcut on p. 5 being
  decisive.


8. ¬Rainolds¬, John. JOHANNIS RAINOLDI, | DE ROMANÆ ECCLE-|SIÆ
IDOLOLATRIA, IN | CVLTV SANCTORVM, RE-|liquiarum, imaginum, aquæ, salis,
olei, | alarumq¿ue¿ rerum consecratarum, & | sacramenti Eucharistiæ, |
OPERIS INCHOATI | LIBRI DVO. | _IN QVIBUS CUM ALIA MVLTA_ | _VARIORVM
PAPISMI PATRONO-_|_rum errata patefiunt: tûm inprimis Bellarmini_, |
_Gregoriiq¿ue¿ de Valentia, calumniæ in Calvi-_|_num ac ceteros
Protestantes, argutiæq¿ue¿_ | pro Papistico idolorum cultu |
discutiuntur & ven-|tilantur. | [_motto_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 18: 1596: eights, sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 646: p. 11 beg. _cisse
  tantùm_, 111 _am secundum_, 501 _bus Gentium_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) “¶ 1” alone: (3) title: (5–12) dedicatory epistle to
  the earl of Essex, in Latin, Queen’s coll. Oxford, 7 July 1596:
  (13–15) “Index tractatuum, librorum, et capitum”: 1–609, the work in
  two books, preceded by an “Epistola ad Anglicorum Seminarioram alumnos
  Romæ & Rhemis” and preface, and followed by an “Admonitio ad
  lectorem”: 609–627, “Index locorum Sacræ Scripturæ”: 628–646, “Index
  rerum præcipuarum.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 15. Hebrew Pica type occurs on p. 497 and
  elsewhere, both pointed and without points: and unpointed Long Primer
  on pp. 169, 451, 603, &c.


9. ¬Unton¬, sir Henry. FVNEBRIA | NOBILISSIMI AC | PRÆSTANTISSIMI |
EQVITIS, | D. HENRICI VNTONI, | _AD GALLOS BIS LEGATI_ | Regij, ibiq¿ue¿
nuper fato functi, | CHARISSIMÆ MEMORIÆ, | _ac desiderio, à Musis
Oxoniensi_⸗|_bus Apparata_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1596: sm. 4^o: pp. [68], signn. ¶, A-G^4, H^2: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Virtutis môvere_: Pica Italic. Contents:—sign. ¶ 1^r title: ¶
  1^v “Liber ad Lectorem,” Latin poem: ¶ 2^r-¶ 2^v, address “Benevolo
  lectori,” signed “Robertus Wright,” Trinity college, Oxford, 13 June
  1596: ¶ 3^r-H 2^v, poems in memory of Unton, the only two not Latin
  being on sign. A 1^r in Greek and Hebrew: see below.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 648. The first (unpointed) Hebrew type
  used at Oxford appears in the poem alluded to above, a Pica fount.
  Some (probably early) copies omit the preface, the ‘Liber ad Lectorem’
  occurring on sign. ¶ 2^r, the page preceding and following being
  blank.


                                 1597.

1. ¬Agatharchides.¬ AGATHAR-|CHIDIS ET MEM-|NONIS HISTORI-|corum, quæ
supersunt, | _omnia, è Græco iam recèns in_ | _Latinum traducta_: | per
| RICH. BRETTVM, Oxonien-|sem, è Collegio Lincoln. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 5: 1597: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 128 + “140” (really 142) +
  [2]: p. 11 beg. ἐπιβουλευθῆναι, 111 ρίευσεν. ἐκεῖθεν, also 11 _bus
  coctum_, 111 _actarum_: Pica Greek and Roman. Contents:—p. (1) “*j”
  only: (3) title: (5–13) Epistola dedicatoria to sir Thomas Egerton,
  dated 20 Aug. 1597: 1–62, Ἐκ τῶν τοῦ Ἀγαθαρχίδου περὶ τῆς ἐρυθρᾶς
  θαλάσσης : 63–128, Ἐκ τῶν τοῦ Μέμνονος: 1–71, “Excerpta quaedam ex
  Agatharchide de rubro mari”: 72–140, “Ex Memnone excerpta quædam” de
  statu Heraclææ Ponticæ.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 611. The excerpts of both authors are
  from Photius’s ©Bibliotheca©.


2. ¬Case¬, John. THESAVRVS OECONO-|MIÆ, SEV COMMENTA-|RIVS IN OECONOMICA
A-|ristotelis; in quo veræ divitiæ fami-|liarum, earumq¿ue¿ leges,
partes, & | _officia describuntur_: | JOHANNE CASO Authore. | [_device_,
then _motto_.]

  Impr. 20: 1597: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + folded sheet + 277 +
  [13]: p. 11 beg. _prætoriam_, 111 _admittantur_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) epistola dedicatoria to lord Buckhurst:
  (9–11) epistola ad lectorem: (12) two complimentary poems: then a
  small folio sheet containing an analysis of the work: 1–245, the work,
  in two books: 246–277, “Appendix Thesauri Oeconomici”: (1) “Peroratio
  operis ad Lectorem”: (2–12), “Index rerum ...”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 687: also 1578, 1587. C, 1598. C. In the
  Epistola Case gives some account of his works, printed and manuscript.
  A reference in the Bowman Catalogue (Oxf. 1687) p. (14) to Case’s
  ©Cursus Philosophicus© in 3 volumes (Oxf. 1597) can only refer to a
  set of Case’s books of various years.


3. ¬Demosthenes.¬ ΔΗΜΟΣΘΕΝΟΥΣ | ΛΟΓΟΙ ΙΕ. | [_woodcuts_] | Ολυνθιακοὶ.
γ. | κατὰ Φίλιππον. δ. | Περὶ εἰρήνης. | Περὶ τῶν ἐν Χεῤῥονήσῳ. |
Επιστολὴ Φιλίππου. | Πρὸς τὴν Φίλιππου ἐπιστολὴν. | Περί συνταξέων. |
Περὶ συμμοριῶν. | Περὶ Ροδίων ἐλευθερίας. | Υπὲρ Μεγαλοπολιτῶν. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 20: 1597: sm. 4^o: pp. [96]: p. 11 beg. νὴς καὶ πολλῶν: Pica
  Greek. Contents:—p. 1, title, within border: 3–96, the orations &c.
  some with ὑποθέσεις.

  See 1593. D.


4. ¬King¬, John. LECTVRES | VPON IONAS, | DELIVERED AT | YORKE | In the
yeare of our Lorde 1594. | By JOHN KINGE. | [_device._]

  Impr. 19_a_: 1597: (eights) 4^o: pp. [12] + 706, not including two
  unpaged title-leaves, see below, + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Who hath
  instructed_, 111 _their former labours_, 671 _& these (in_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–11) Epistle dedicatorie to the lord
  keeper sir Thomas Egerton: 1–660, the 48 lectures: after 660 “A |
  SERMON PREACHED | AT THE FVNERALLES OF | THE MOST REVEREND | FATHER,
  JOHN, late | Arch-bishoppe of Yorke, _No-_|_vemb. the_ 17. _in the
  yeare of_ | _our Lorde_, 1594.” [_device_: then impr. 7_a_, 1597: then
  a blank page]: 661–683, the sermon, on Ps. cxlvi. 3–4: after 683 a
  blank page (684), then “A | SERMON PREACHED | IN YORKE THE
  SEVEN-|TEENTH DAY OF NO-|VEMBER IN THE YEARE OF | our Lorde 1595.
  being the | _Queenes day_.” | [_device_, then impr. 7_a_, 1597: then a
  blank page]: 685–706, the sermon, on 2 Kings xxiii. 25: 706, “Faultes
  escaped in Printing ...”.

  See 1599. K, 1600. K: other edd. were printed at London. For King, see
  Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 294.


5. ¬Pinner¬, Charles. A | SERMON, VPON | the wordes of Paul the Apostle
| vnto Timothie, Epist. 1. Chap. 4. | _vers._ 8. | _PREACHED AT
LITLE-_|cot, in the Chappel of the Right Ho-|nourable SIR IOHN POMPHAM,
| Knight, Lord chiefe Iustice, of En-|gland, before his honourable |
Lordeshippe, and to the as-|semblie there, the 17. of | _Iulie_, 1597. |
By CHARLES PINNER, Minister of | _the Church of Wotton Basset, in_ |
_North-Wiltshire_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 19_a_: 1597: (eights) 12^o: pp. 40: p. 11 beg. _haue or doe_:
  Pica English. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–5, epistle dedicatorie to John
  Sims, dated Wotton Basset, 23 July 1597: 7–40, the sermon.

  Very rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 667.


6. ¬Pinner¬, Charles. “Sermon ... _Honour all Men, love brotherly
Fellowship, on_ 1 _Pet. 2._ 17. Oxon 1597, in oct.”

  So Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 667.


7. ¬Williams¬, rev. John. “_De Christi Justitia & in Regno spirituali
Ecclesiæ Pastorum Officio, Concio ad Clerum, Oxon. in cap._ 10. _Rev.
vers._ 1. Oxon. 1597. qu[arto].”

  So Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 132, copied by Herbert.


8. ¬Presse¬, Symon. “‘A sermon preached at Eggington, in the County of
Darby, concerning the right vse of things indifferent, the 8. Day of
August, 1596. By Symon Presse Minister there. Feare God, honour the
Kinge. 1 Pet. 2; 17. Printed at Oxford—, and are to bee solde in Paules
Church-yard at the signe of the Bible. 1597.’ Dedicated ‘To his loving
Parishioners Mr. F. Cooke,’ &c. The text, 1 Cor. 8; 10–13. Pages 28,
including the title. W. H. Sixteens.”

  So in Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1406: see Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 220.
  Impr. 19_a_.


9. ¬Symeon¬, Metaphrastes. VITÆ SANC-|TORVM EVAN-|GELIST. IOHAN-|NIS, &
LVCÆ, à SY-|MEONE METAPHRASTE _olim con-_|_cinnatæ, iam recens_ |
_traductæ à_ | RICH. BRETTO. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 20: 1597: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 95 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Montem
  Tabor_: Pica Greek and Roman. Contents:—p. (1) “Ai” only: (3) title,
  within border: (5–14) Epistola dedicatoria to judge Thomas Owen
  (Ovvinus), dated Lincoln college, Oxford, 23 Dec 1596: 1–95, “Οἱ βίοι
  τῶν ἁγίων Εὐαγγελιστῶν Ἰωάννου καὶ Λουκᾶ ὑπὸ Συμεὼν τοῦ Μεταφράστου
  πάλαι ἀναταχθέντες” in Greek and Latin.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 611. The editor has practically made the
  Latin translation a commentary by expanding where his author was
  obscure, and the like.


                                 1598.

1. ¬Abbot¬, George, archbp. of Canterbury. QVÆSTIO-|NES SEX, TOTI-|DEM
PRÆLECTIO-|NIBVS, IN SCHOLA | THEOLOGICA, OXONIÆ, | PRO FORMA, HABITIS,
| DISCVSSÆ, ET | DISCEPTATÆ. | ANNO. 1597. | IN QVIBVS, E SACRA
SCRIP-|TVRA, ET PATRIBVS AN-|tiquissimis, quid statuendum | sit,
definitur: | PER GEORGIVM ABBATEM | tunc Collegij Baliolensis | socium.
| [_mottos_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 5_b_: 1598: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 214 (“224” the next p. to 24
  being “35”) + [18]: p. 11 beg. _verè est_, 111 _secretâque(**not sure
  of accent)_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) “A” between woodcuts: (3)
  title: (5–10) Epistola dedicatoria to lord Buckhurst, dated University
  college, Oxford, 16 May 1598: (11) List of contents: 1–21, Præfatio ad
  lectorem: 23-“224,” the six lectures: (1–15) “Index rerum
  præcipuarum.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 562. Reprinted at Frankfurt in 1616, with
  the title ‘Georgii Abbatti ... Explicatio sex illustrium quæstionum
  ...’


2. ¬Case¬, John. SVMMA | VETERVM INTER-|PRETVM IN VNIVERSAM |
DIALECTICAM ARISTOTELIS; | _QVAM VERE FALSOVE RAMVS_ | in Aristotelem
inuehatur, | ostendens. | _Auctore._ | IOANNE CASE OXONIENSI, | olim
Collegij D. Ioannis Præcur-|soris socio. | _Omnibus Socraticæ
Peripateticæq¿ue¿ philosophiæ_ | _studiosis in primis vtilis ac
necessaria._ | _Recognita & emendata._ | Cum INDICE rerum & verborum
locupletiss. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1598: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 201 + [7]: p. 11 beg.
  _Respondens. Definitio_: 111 _Oppon. Aliquid_: Brevier Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) as 1592. C: 1–201, the work: (1–6)
  Index.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 686. A reprint of 1592. C, almost
  _literatim_.


3. Case, John. “1587. ‘Thesaurus oeconomiae, seu commentarius oeconomica
Aristotelis. Authore Johanne Caso.’ Again 1598. Quarto.”

  So Herbert’s Ames p. 1402: see 1587. C. Error for 1597?


4. ¬Ingmethorp¬, Thomas. A | SERMON VPON | PART OF THE SE-|cond chapter
of the first e-|pistle of S. Iohn: | _Preached by_ THOMAS INGMETHORP. |
The summe whereof is briefly compri-|sed in this Hexameter: | _Omne
tulit punctum qui_ πράξιν _miscuit arti_: | He beares the bell awaie, |
that liues, as he doth saie. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 2: 1598: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 45 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _of
  Christ. This_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication
  to “master Thomas Flit” of the city of Worcester, the author’s
  godfather, dated Stainton-in-the-Street, 1 Mar. “1597”: (7–8) “To the
  Reader”: 1–45, the sermon, on 1 John ii. 3–6.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 592.


5. ¬Powell¬, Griffith. _ANALYSIS_ | LIB. ARISTOTELIS | DE SOPHISTICIS
ELEN-|chis, in qua singula capita per | quæstiones & responsiones |
perspicuè & dilucidè ex-|ponuntur, | _Adhibitis_ | Quibusdam scholiis ex
optimis quibusq¿ue¿ in-|terpretibus desumptis, in quibus natura | & modi
Fallaciarum plenè | explicantur, | _Necnon_ | Exemplis, partim
Sophistarum Paralogismis, partim Hæreticorum Elenchis | illustrantur, |
_operâ & studio_ G. P. _Oxoniensis confecta & edita_ | _in vsum
iuniorum_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 5_a_: 1598: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 396 + [4]: p. 11 beg.
  _hostias quas_, 111 _tariam &_: Long Primer Roman and Pica Italic.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) dedication to the earl of Essex, signed
  “Griffinus Powel,” Jesus coll., Oxford, 3 Apr. (1598): (7–8) “Ad
  lectorem Acamedicum”: (8) “Liber ad Lectorem,” a Latin poem: (9–16)
  Prolegomena: 1–396, the Analysis of the two books.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 283: and 1594. P. (_bis_), 1664. P.


6. Richard de Bury. Philobiblon: see 1599. R.


                                 1599.

1. ¬Case¬, John. ANCILLA | PHILOSOPHIÆ, SEV | EPITOME IN OCTO LI=|BROS
PHYSICORUM | ARISTOTELIS, | _Authore_, | Jo. Caso Oxon. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1599: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 73 + [7]: p. 11 beg. _De genere_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to the young John
  Egerton “ab ȩdibus meis Oxon.”, 26 Oct. 1599: 1–4, “Ad lectorem
  benignum”: 5–73, the work: (2–7) Index: (7) “Corrigenda.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 687. Connected with the ©Lapis
  philosophicus©, see below: but issued (apparently) slightly later. In
  the preface Case alludes to his approaching end, and his unpublished
  work on Philosophy.


2. ¬Case¬, John. _LAPIS_ | PHILOSOPHICVS SEV | commentarius in 8^o lib:
| _phys: Aristot: in quo_ | _arcana_ | _Physiologiæ exa_⸗|minantur |
AVCTORE IO: CASO | _in Medicina Doctore_ | Oxoniensi |

  Impr. 11_a_: (1599): (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [32] + 871 [“869,” for
  109–112 are omitted and 274–279 doubled, in the pagination] + [17]: p.
  11 beg. _magnum pondus_, 113 _si materia_, 501 _tatur si ergo_: Pica
  Italic and Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, engraved, see below: (3–8)
  dedication to sir Thomas Egerton: (9–17) “Epistola ad lectorem,” 31
  Oct. 1599: (18) “In primæ paginæ decem Imagines Decastichon”: (19–25)
  complimentary verses, in Latin and Greek: (26–32) “Quæstiones & dubia
  quæ in octo libris Physicorum continentur”: 1–30, “Prolegomena”:
  31-“869,” the work: (1) “Lectori benevolo,” 31 Oct. 1599: (2–15)
  Index: (16) “Lectori ingenuo et philosopho” (errata).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 687. The titlepage is an elaborate
  engraving on metal, the title within 10 squares arranged

                               4. 5.  6
                               3      7
                               2      8
                               1. 10. 9,

  representing Chaos, Nature, Fortune, the Fates, Time, Phaethon and
  Arctos, Sky, Space, Infinity and Terminus, Effigy of Case. The last
  compartment represents the author in effigy on a tomb with the words
  “Casus in occasum vergit vivitque sepultus.” The whole tone of the
  prefaces is pathetic, Case feeling that he was close to his end, which
  actually came on 23 Jan. 1599/1600. At p. (7) is a reference to the
  new Bodleian: at (p. 11) it is stated that some German friends with
  those at Oxford offered to pay the expense of printing the book rather
  than that it should not be printed at all, and that the author
  carefully revised and pruned it five times before publication. In an
  epilogue to the first book (p. 170), dated 25 June 1597, Case
  apologises to a friend for not giving the _text_ of each book and for
  not printing his discourse on Philosophy in general. See the ©Ancilla
  philosophiae©, above.


3. ¬Holland¬, Thomas. ORATIO | SA-|RISBVRIÆ HABITA | _viii. Id. Iun._ |
CVM REVERENDVS IN CHRIS-|to Pater HENRICVS permissione divinâ |
Episcopus Sarisburiensis gradum | Docto-|ratus in Theologiâ susciperet,
ex de-|_creto Convocationis Oxoniensis_. | _Authore_ T. HOLLAND _Theol.
Doct._ | _& Profess. Regio._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1599: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4, B^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _tutis, eruditionis_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–12) the
  Oration.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 111: ©Reg. Univ. Oxon.©, vol. 2 (ed.
  Clark), pt. i, p. 145. The Commission to confer the degree on bp.
  Henry Cotton (of Magdalen) is dated 2 June 1599. The oration gives an
  interesting account of the ceremony of conferment (6 June) and its
  symbolism.


4. James, Thomas. (Bagford’s statement that James’s “Catalogue of the
Oxford and Cambridge Manuscripts” appeared in this year (Brit. Mus. MS.
Harl. 5901, fol. 65), is due to the title of the Appendix of Richard de
Bury’s ©Philobiblon©, see below. The Catalogue came out in 1600.)


5. ¬Kinge¬, John, bp. of London. ARTICLES MINISTRED | IN THE VISITATION
OF | THE RIGHT WORSHIPFVLL | Maister JOHN KING Arch-deacon | _of
Nottingham, in the yeare of our_ | _Lord God_. 1599. | [_device._]

  Impr. 4: (1599): sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4, B^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  29. _Whether they_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–10) the
  43 questions: (11) “The oath of the Church-wardens and side-men.”


6. ¬King¬, John. LECTVRES | VPON IONAS, | DELIVERED AT | YORKE | In the
yeare of our Lorde 1594. | By JOHN KINGE: | _Newlie corrected and
amended_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 19_a_: 1599: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 706 + [2], not
  counting two extra title-leaves, see below: p. 11 beg. _Who hath
  instructed_, 111 _their former_, 671 _& these in_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—precisely as 1597, K, except LATE not “late,” _No-_|_vem._,
  not _No-_|_vemb._, 1494 (by error) not 1594, and 1599 on both extra
  titles, not 1597: there is no list of Errata. The first and last
  leaves have not been seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 295. A reprint of 1597. K.


7. ¬Lomazzo¬, Giovanni Paolo (Lomatius). [_engraved title_:—] A | TRACTE
CONTAI=|NING THE ARTES | of curious Paintinge Caruinge & | Buildinge |
written first in Italian by Jo: | Paul Lomatius painter of Milan | AND
ENGLISHED BY | R. H. student in Physik | [_motto._]

  Impr. 21, as colophon: 1598: (sixes) la. 8^o: pp. [24] + 119 + [1] +
  218 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _hardly bee able_, 111 _wise a master_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) engraved title, see below: (3–4) dedication to
  sir Thomas Bodley, signed “Richard Haydocke,” New coll., Oxford, 24
  Aug. 1598: (5–12) (the Translator) to the ingenuous Reader: (13–14)
  “Iohn Case D. of Physicke to his friende _R. H._ of New Colledge”:
  (15) “The titles of the bookes,” five in all: (17–23) “A table of the
  Chapters ...”: 1–7, “The preface to the worke” by Lomazzo: 9–11, “The
  division of the worke”: 13–119, and 1–218, the work: (1) Device and
  colophon.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 678. Lomazzo’s ©Trattato dell’ arte de la
  pittura© was published at Milan in 1584, and Haydocke’s Preface gives
  an account of its rarity in England. Only five out of the seven books
  of the original are here published. In the dedication the translator
  alludes to Bodley’s design of “erecting and restoring of this worthie
  Panbiblion or Temple of all the Muses,” the Bodleian.

  The title is an elaborate engraving on metal, the words on an oval in
  the centre: at top “IO: PAOLO LOMAZZO:” surrounding his bust: on
  either side Juno and Apollo (?): on either side the oval, the arms of
  the University and of New College: below, in the centre a bust of the
  translator surmounted by his arms, between figures derived from
  classical mythology. In the book are thirteen full-page engravings
  marked A-I, K-N, and a profusion of woodcut ornaments. On the last
  page but one occurs the large device of the University arms, within a
  border: then the colophon: then a woodcut of the arms of New College
  between two Ws (William of Wykeham). By some confusion this book is
  dated 1605 by Bagford (Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol. 66).


8. ¬Richard¬ de Bury, bp. of Durham, _d._ 1345. PHILOBIBLON | RICHARDI |
DUNELMENSIS | _sive_ | DE AMORE LIBRORVM, ET INSTI-|_TVTIONE
BIBLIOTHECÆ_, | _tractatus pulcherrimus_. | Ex collatione cum varijs
manuscriptis edi-|_tio jam secunda_; | cui | _Accessit appendix de
manuscriptis Oxoniensibus_. | Omnia hæc, | _Opera & studio T. I. Novi
Coll. in alma Academia_ | _Oxoniensi Socij_. [_motto_, preceded by “B.
P. N.,” then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1599: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 62 + [10]: p. 11 beg. _tiqui pro_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) Epistola dedicatoria to sir
  Thomas Bodley, “ex Musæo meo in Collegio Novo. Iulij. 6. 1599,” signed
  “Thomas James”: (7) “Vita ex Balæo”: 1–4, “Præfatio auctoris ad
  lectorem”: 5, “Capitula libri sequentis”: 7–62, the work in 20
  chapters: (3–10) “Appendix de manuscriptis Oxoniensibus.”

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 466. This is the first English
  edition of the first book on the love of books. The _editio princeps_
  is that of 1473 printed at Cologne: the next Spires, 1483 and Paris
  1500. An account of these editions and of the known MSS. of the
  ©Philobiblon© will be found in E. C. Thomas’s edition (Lond., 1888).
  The mysterious “_B. P. N._” on the titlepage (followed by “Non quæro
  quod mihi vtile est, sed quod multis”) is explained by him as perhaps
  “Bibliothecae Praefectus Novae” or “Nostrae” or rather “Bono Publico
  Natus:” it has been suggested that they may stand for “Beati Pauli
  Norma,” alluding to 1 Cor. x. 33. The Editor explains that it was
  intended that the work should be followed by an Appendix containing a
  catalogue of all MSS. at Oxford, a purpose which seriously delayed the
  issue of the book. In fact the whole of the text of the ©Philobiblon©
  was printed off in 1598, as is proved by a single copy still preserved
  in the Bodleian dated in that year but containing only the titlepage,
  (identical in type with the published one, except in one figure of the
  date) and pp. 1 to 62 + [2 blank]. As it is, the Appendix only
  contains an alphabetical list, without references, of the authors of
  which manuscripts were preserved at Oxford: the intended catalogue
  appears in the ©Ecloga Oxonio-Cantabrigiensis©, Lond., 1600. The
  preface alludes to the founding of the Bodleian, but dr. James had not
  yet been appointed Librarian. There is no sufficient ground for
  supposing with mr. Thomas (_ut supra_, p. lv) and mr. Macray (©Annals
  of the Bodleian©, 2nd ed., p. 25) that the single advance copy of 1598
  implies an issue or edition of that year.


9. ¬Roche¬, Robert. EVSTATHIA | _or the_ | CONSTANCIE OF SVSANNA |
CONTAINING THE PRESER-|vation of the Godly, subversion of the wic-|ked,
precepts for the aged, instructi-|_ons for youth, pleasure_ | _with
profitte_. | Penned by R. R. G. [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 19_a_: 1599: (eights) 12^o: pp. [128], signn. A-H^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Then clims_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A
  2^v, dedication to “Mistris M.B. wife to ... D.B. Esquier,” signed
  Robert Roche: A 3^r-A 4^r “To the Reader,” a poem: A 4^v-A 5^v,
  “Coricæus to the Author,” a poem signed “C. A. R.”: A 5^v-B 1^v, “An
  induction to the story”: B 2^r-H 7^r, the poem: H 7^r, “Faultes
  escaped.”

  The Bodleian copy, which belonged to Robert Burton, is perhaps unique.
  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 682, where extracts are given from this
  poem, which is chiefly in a peculiar 7-line stanza, ABABBCC. G. on the
  titlepage is no doubt _Gentleman_.


10. Ubaldini, Petruccio. (The edition of “La Vita di Carlo Magno
Imperadore. Di nuevo corretta” by P. Ubaldini, doubtfully ascribed in
the Catalogue of the Printed Books in the British Museum to the Oxford
Press, was certainly not printed there.)


                                 1600.

1. ¬Butler¬, Charles. “‘Rhetoricæ libri duo, quorum Prior de Tropis &
Figuris, Posterior de Voce & Gestu, Præcipiti [_sic_] in vsum scholarum
accuratiûs editi. Oxoniæ, Excudebat—1600. ... Viro virtutis & honoris
nomine nobilissimo, Thomæ Egertono, Equiti, Domino Custodi magni sigilli
Angliæ, Carolus Butler Magdalenensis, S. D.—Basingstochiæ, 5 Jdus
Martii. 1600.’ ... Some commendatory verses; Lat. & Gr. ... Ad
lectorem.’ I3, in eights, besides the prefixes. W. H. Sixteens.”

  So in Herbert’s Ames, iii. 1409. For the author, see Wood’s ©Ath.
  Oxon.©, iii. 209, Bloxam’s ©Magd. Reg.©, i. 20. See 1618. B, 1629. B.


2. ¬Holland¬, Robert. “‘Darmerth, neu Arlwy Gweddi, a ddychymygwyd er
mawr dderchafiad Duwioldeb, ac i chwanegu Gwybodaeth ac Awydd yr
annysgedig ewyllysgar i iawn wasanaethu’r gwir Dduw. Gan Robert Holland,
gweinidog gair Duw, a Pherson Llan Ddeferowg, yn sir Gaerfyrddin’
[Rhydychain, 4plyg.”]

  So in W. Rowland’s ©Cambrian Bibliography©, ed. by D. S. Evans,
  (Llanidloes, 1869) p. 72. It is ascribed also to Oxford in M.
  Williams’s ©Cofrestr© (Lond. 1717): but the evidence is at present not
  sufficient to establish a connexion with Barnes’s press: nor is the
  present place of any copy known to the editor of Rowlands.


3. Holland, Thomas. Panegyris: see 1601. H.


4. ¬King¬, John. LECTVRES | VPON IONAS | DELIVERED AT | YORKE | In the
yeare of our Lorde 1594. | By JOHN KINGE: | _Newly corrected and
amended_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 19_a_: 1600: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 706 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _Who hath instructed_, 111 _their former_, 671 _& these in_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—exactly as 1599. K, except (in 2nd title) “Lord” not
  “Lorde,” 1594 not 1494, (in 3rd title) NOVEM-|BER not NO-|VEMBER,
  _daie_ not _day_: and dates on titles 1600 not 1599. The first and
  last leaves have not been seen.

  A reprint of 1599. K.


5. ¬Perrot¬, sir James. [_woodcut._] THE | FIRST PART | OF THE
CONSIDE-|RATION OF HV-|mane Condition: | _WHERIN IS CONTAINED_ | _the
Morall Consideration of a mans selfe:_ | _as what, who, and what manner_
| _of man he is_. | Written by I. P. Esquier. | [_motto_: then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 19: 1600: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 60: p. 11 beg. _of the earth_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–6) dedication to lord Buckhurst,
  dated Haroldston 16 Nov. 1600, signed “I. P.”: (7–8) “To the
  indifferent and friendly Reader,” signed “Iames Perrott”: 1–60, the
  work, in three sections.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 605. The second part was to be the
  Political consideration of things under us, the third the Natural
  Consideration of things about us, the last the Metaphysical
  Consideration of things above us: but they were never published.


5. ¬Roberts¬, Hugh. THE | DAY OF HEARING: | _Or_, | SIX LECTVRES VPON
THE | latter part of the thirde Chapter of the Epi-|stle to the
Hebrewes: of the time and | meanes that God hath appointed for | _men to
come to the knowledge of his_ | _truth, that they may be sa-_|_ved from
his wrath_. | The summary pointes of every one of which Lectures are set
| downe immediatly after the Epistle dedicatory. | Herevnto is adioyned
a Sermon against | _fleshly lusts, & against certaine mischie-_|_vous
May-games which are the_ | _fruit thereof_. | By H. R. Master of Artes,
and now | _Minister of the word_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 19_a_: 1600: (eights) 16^o: pp. [12] + 116 + [32]: p. 11 beg.
  _which he wrought_, 111 _now for the_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–10) dedication to sir Thomas Egerton, signed “Hugh Roberts”:
  (11–12) “The Contents or briefe summe of the Lectures ...”: 1–116, the
  six lectures on Heb. iii. 7–11, 12–13, 14, 15, 16–17, 18–19: (1) title
  of sermon “A | GODLY AND | NECESSARY SERMON | against fleshly lustes;
  and against cer-|taine mischievous May-games, which | are the fruite
  thereof. Preached | _vpon the first Sabbath day in Maie_, | _in the
  yeere_. 1598. | By H. R. Master of Artes, and now | Minister of the
  word. | [_Motto_, then _woodcuts_].” Impr. 19_a_, 1600: (3–5) “To the
  Reader”: (7–32) the sermon, on 1 Pet. ii. 11.

  In the preface to the sermon it is hinted that the publication of the
  sermon was prevented when it was first delivered “now more then a
  yeere and a halfe agone.” Wood (©Ath. Oxon.© i. 703), describes this
  book as “_Lond._ 1600, _quarto_,” wrongly.


6. ¬Terry¬, John. [_woodcut._] | THE | TRIAL OF TRVTH: | _Containing_ |
A PLAINE AND SHORT DISCOVE-|ry of the chiefest pointes of the Doctrine
of the | great Antichrist, and of his adherentes the | false Teachers
and Heretikes of these | last times. | [_mottos_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 19: 1600: sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 160: p. 11 beg. _a faithfull
  brother_, 111 _are remitted_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–7) Epistle dedicatorie to bp. Henry Cotton, signed “Iohn Terry”:
  (9–22) “To the Christian Reader.” also signed: (23–24) “The principall
  vses of this Treatise”: 1–160, the work (first part.)

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 410. For the second and third parts, see
  1602. T, (which contains on the last page “Faultes escaped in printing
  the first part”), 1625 T.


7. ¬Ursinus¬, Zacharias. _A_ | COLLECTION OF CERTAINE | LEARNED
DISCOVRSES, | _WRITTEN_ | BY THAT FAMOVS MAN OF MEMORY | ZACHARY VRSINE;
Doctor and Pro-|_fessor of Divinitie in the noble and flou-_|rishing
Schoole of NEVSTAD. | _For explication of divers difficult points_, |
laide downe by that Author in his | CATECHISME. | Lately put in Print in
Latin by the last | labour of D. DAVID PARRY: and | _now newlie
translated into English_ | _by_ I. H. _for the benefit and_ | _behoofe
of our Christian_ | _country-men_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 19: 1600: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + “341” (really 327, for
  180–191 and 236–237 are omitted in the pagination) + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _vnto it certaine_, 111 _ble that it is_: Pica Roman. Contents: | p.
  (1) title: (3–5) “To the Reader”: (7) “A table of the several
  discourses”: 1–341, the nine discourses (1 is Parry’s prefaces to the
  3rd and 4th parts of Ursinus’s Catechism in the first edition see
  1587. U); 5, 6 are translated by Parry; 3 is a passage out of Vigilius
  about the Incarnation; 9 a funeral oration on Ursinus (who died “6
  Mar. 1583”) by Francis Junius: (1) “Faultes escaped.”

  Rare. The editor apologizes in the preface for this “three weekes
  worke,” due to the importunity of the printer, after the editor had
  given over the task when only begun.


                                 1601.

1. ¬Fitz-Geoffrey¬, Charles. CAROLI | FITZGEOFRIDI | AFFANIAE: | sive |
EPIGRAMMATVM | _Libri tres_: | Ejusdem | CENOTAPHIA. | [_motto_, then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1601: (eights) 12^o: pp. [200], signn. A-M^8 N^4: sign. B
  1^r beg. _Vel si quid_, M 1^r _Si non immemor_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r-A 2^v poetical Latin dedication to
  Edw. Michelborne: A 3^r, Michelborne’s reply in Latin verse: A 3^v,
  poetical Latin dedication to William Raleigh barrister: A 4^r-M 1^v
  the Affaniae in 3 books: M 2^r [_woodcuts_] | _CENOTAPHIA._ | A |
  CAROLO FITZGEOFRIDO | _Posita & sacrata_ | D. M. & piæ Memoriæ |
  nonnullorum, | _Quos nunc emeritæ permensos tempora vitæ_ | _Secreti
  sinus orbis habet mundusq¿ue¿ piorum_. | [_woodcuts_]: then impr. 11,
  1061 [_sic_]: M 3^r-N 4^v, the epitaphs.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 607. The epigrams and epitaphs are
  of much interest, and some are translated and printed in Dr. Grosart’s
  ©Poems of Charles Fitzgeoffrey©, 1881.


2. ¬Holland¬, Thomas. Πανηγυρὶς | _D. Elizabethæ, Dei Gratiâ Angliæ,
Franciæ, & Hiberniæ Reginæ_. | A | SERMON PREACHED AT PAVLS | in London
the 17. of November Ann. Dom. 1599. the | one and fortieth yeare of her
Maiesties raigne, and aug-|mented in those places wherein, for the
shortnes of the | time, it could not there be then delivered. |
_VVherevnto is adioyned an Apologeticall discourse_, | _whereby all such
sclanderous Accusations are fully_ | _and faithfully confuted, wherewith
the Honour of_ | _this Realme hath beene vncharitably traduced by_ |
_some of our adversaries in forraine nations, and at_ | _home, for
observing the_ 17. _of November yeerely in_ | _the forme of an Holy-day,
and for the ioifull exerci-_|_ses, and Courtly triumphes on that day in
the honour_ | _of her Maiestie exhibited._ | By THOMAS HOLLAND, Doctor
of Divinity, | & her Highnes Professor thereof in her Vni-|versity of
Oxford. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 19: 1601: sm. 4^o: pp. [166], signn. _a_-_c_, A-R^4, S^2, and
  one folded leaf, see below: sign. B 1^r beg. _Moses, who_, O 1^r
  _shall be safe_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. _a_ 1^r title: _a_ 1^v
  Latin poem on the Queen’s arms: then a folded leaf, see below: _a_
  2^r-_c_ 2^v “To al faithful Christians ...”: _c_ 3^r-_c_ 3^v
  dedication to Richard Bancroft, bp. of London, dated “Oxoniæ, è
  Collegio Exon.” 1 Oct. 1599: _c_ 4^r “Faultes escaped, and certaine
  observations”: A 1^r-H 1^r, the sermon, on Matt. xii. 42: H 1^r-S 2^v,
  the Apology.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 111, and 1602. H. At sign. L 3^r begins a
  long dissertation on St. Hugh of Lincoln, and at sign. N 3^r the
  author claims for the University of Oxford the first celebration of
  Nov. 17 as the Queen’s Day, in 1569? The Stonor Press and Edm.
  Campian’s ©Decem Rationes© are alluded to in sign. B 4. The folding
  leaf contains a woodcut of the royal arms between two pillars
  connected by a scroll bearing the words VIVAT·RE· On the base of the
  columns are “I” “D” (the engraver’s initials?). The woodcut, which is
  of a rough character, is 5–7/16 in. × 6–15/16 in. A curious usage has
  been pointed out to me: on sign. D 4^v, E 2^v, P 4^v, Q 1^r and
  perhaps elsewhere Hebrew words are transliterated, but in _b_ 2^r, O
  3^v, O 4^v, P 1^r unpointed Hebrew type is used. In the Laing Sale ii.
  3709 (15 Apr. 1880) there is mention of a 1600 edition of this book.


3. ¬Ursinus¬, Zacharias. [_woodcuts._] | THE SVMME | OF CHRISTIAN |
RELIGION: | DELIVERED BY ZACHARIAS VRSINVS IN HIS | Lectures vpon the
Catechisme, authorised by the noble | _Prince_ FREDERICKE _throughout
his dominions_. | Wherein are debated and resolved the Questions of
what-|_soever pointes of moment, which haue beene or are_ |
_controversed in Divinitie_. | Translated into English first by D.
Henrie Parry, and late-|ly conferred with the last and best Latine
Edition of | D. DAVID PAREVS _Professor of Divinity_ | _in Heidelberge_.
| [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 19: 1601: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 1139 + [13]: p. 11 beg.
  _authors, we_, 111 4. _VVhat are_, 1111 _ever of the elect_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) “To the Christian Readers Henry
  Parry ...”: (7–8) “To the same Christian Readers Richard Crosse ...”:
  1–1139, the catechism: (1–10) “A Table ...”, a short analysis of the
  book: (10) “Faults escaped”: pp. (11–12) have not been seen.

  See 1587. U. Richard Crosse edited this edition with some slight
  additions.


                                 1602.

1. [¬Bailey¬, dr. Walter.] [_woodcuts._] | A | BRIEFE | TREATISE
TOV=|ching the preservation of | _the eie sight, consisting partly_ | in
good order of diet, and partly | in vse of medicines. | _The sixte
Edition._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 24: 1602: (eights) 16^o: pp. [6] + 25 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _rected
  by the_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) a preface: 1–17,
  19–25, the treatise.

  Rare. For author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© i. 586: the first edition
  with the author’s name is that of 1616. An edition of 1586 (London) is
  in the British Museum, but the other four preceding the present one
  appear to be unknown. See 1616. B, 1654. B, 1673. B: other editions
  were issued, not at Oxford.


2. ¬Budden¬, dr. John. [_woodcut._] | GVLIELMI | PATTENI, CVI |
VVAYNFLETI AGNOMEN | FVIT, WINTONIENSIS ECCLE-|_SIÆ PRÆSULIS QVONDAM_ |
pientissimi, Summi Angliæ Cancellarij, | Collegijq¿ue¿ Beatæ Mariæ
Magdalenæ | apud Oxonienses fundato⸗|_ris celeberrimi, vi_⸗|_ta
obitusq¿ue¿_. | [_motto_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1602: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 84: p. 11 beg. _centis pænè_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) Epistola
  nuncupatoria to dr. Nicholas Bond president of Magdalen college,
  Oxford, signed “Johannes Buddenus”: (7–11) complimentary verses, in
  Latin, except one Italian sonnet by Alberico Gentile: 1–84, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 282. Budden was philosophy reader at
  Magdalen (afterwards principal of New Inn hall and Broadgates hall),
  and this biography was entrusted to him by the college. The running
  title is “Waynfleti παλιγγενεσία.” Several original documents are
  printed in the work: which was reprinted in [Bates’s] ©Vitæ selectorum
  aliquot virorum©, Lond. 1681, p. 49. Rhetoric is more prominent than
  historical treatment.


3. ¬Chrysostom¬, st. THEORREMΩN: | _or_, | THE ANCIENT AND MOST |
comfortable Goldenmouth’d Father, | S^t. CHRYSOSTOME Arch-bishop of |
Constantinople, treating on severall places | of holy scripture:
selected, and tran-|slated faithfully according to | the Greeke Copies:
| _by_ | JOHN WILLOVGHBIE. | [3 _mottos_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 24: 1602: (eights) 16^o: pp. [24] + 287 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _saultes of humane_, 111 _belōgs much time_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–15) Epistle dedicatorie to a kinsman of the
  author lately deceased: (16–21) “To the Christian Reader,” dated from
  “Brodegats hall,” Oxford, 2 Sept. 1602: (22–23) “Τοῖς περὶ τῶν λόγων
  τουτωνί Ελληνο-Αγγλοικῶν ἐυγνωμώνως ἔχουσιν,” a Greek preface: (24)
  “The names of the [seven] Tractes contained in this Booke,” and a
  quotation: 1–287, the treatises.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 28. Wood did not know Willoughby as an
  author, and Bliss could find no trace of his academical career. But a
  John Willoughby certainly matriculated at Exeter College in 1585 (B.A.
  1589, M.A. 1593). The treatises are on the Pharisee and the Publican
  (Luke xviii), on Ps. xlix. 16, on Ps. xxxix. 6, on the Sick of the
  Palsy (John v), on 2 Cor. xii. 9, on the Shepherd and Sheep, &c. (John
  xx) and “A Tracte of _Vertue_ and _Vice_.” Unpointed English and Long
  Primer Hebrew is used on pp. 1, 26, 67, 107.


4. ¬Higins¬, John. [_woodcuts_] | AN | ANSVVERE TO | MASTER WILLIAM |
PERKINS, CONCER-|ning Christs Descen-|_sion into Hell_: | _By_ | JOHN
HIGINS. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 24: 1602: (eights) 16^o: pp. [4] + 52: p. 11 beg. _to it they_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) preface “To the Christian
  Reader,” Winsam, 22 June 1602: 1–51, the treatise: 52, “Faultes
  escaped in the printing ... Finis.”

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© i. 734, and following art.


5. Higins, John. AN | ANSWERE | TO MASTER WILLI-|am Perkins, concerning
| _Christs Descension in-_|to hell. | By IOHN HIGINS. | [_device._]

  Impr. 24: 1602: (eights) 16^o: pp. [4] + 51 + [1]: p 11 beg. _it they
  must_: Small Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) preface “To the
  Christian Reader,” Winsam, 22 June 1602: 1–51, the treatise.

  Rare. See preceding art. Like the Powel below this book was certainly
  not printed at Oxford, and the imprint is fictitious, the type and
  woodcuts being unknown at Oxford. These falsifications can hardly be
  unconnected with the fact that John Barnes, the son of Joseph Barnes,
  in this year set up business for himself in London. The text is a
  reprint of no. 4 above.


6. ¬Howson¬, dr. John. A | SERMON | PREACHED AT S^t. | MARIES IN OXFORD,
| THE 17. DAY OF NO-|vember, 1602. in defence of | _the Festivities of
the Church_ | of _England, and namely_ | _that of her Maiesties_ |
_Coronation_. | By _IOHN HOVVSON DOCTOR OF_ | _Divinitie, one of her
Highnes Chaplaines, and_ | _Vicechancellour of the Vniversitie_ | _of
Oxforde_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 23: 1602: sm. 4^o: pp. [36], signn. ( )^2 A-D^4: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _ship or honor_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. ( ) 1^r title:
  ( ) 2^r-2^v, dedication to lord Buckhurst, dated from Christ Church,
  Oxford, 29 Nov. 1602: A 1^r-D 3^v, the sermon, on Ps. cxviii. 24.

  See 1603. H, and Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 518. On a kindred subject
  with Holland’s speech printed in 1601: the priority of the University
  in celebrating the Queen’s day is again mentioned. Reprinted in
  Somers’ ©Tracts©.


7. ¬Howson¬, dr. John. [_woodcuts_] | VXORE | DIMISSA PROPTER |
fornicationem aliam non | _licet superinducere_. | TERTIA THESIS |
IOANNIS HOVSONI | Inceptoris in Sacra Theolo-|gia, proposita & disputata
in | _Vesperijs Oxonij_. | 1602. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1602: (eights) 16^o: [2] + 61 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _dij, &
  quæ_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–61, the essay.

  See 1606. H, and Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 60, 518, iii. 18, where a
  bibliography is given of the controversy excited by Dr. Howson’s
  Thesis. The actual day of disputation was 10 July 1602. There are two
  issues of this book, one in which the title is a separate leaf,
  independent of the four sections (A-D^8) which follow, D 8 being
  blank: the other where the title is A 1, D 8 being the last leaf of
  the _text_.


8. †¬Oxford¬, Trinity College. Decretum de Gratiis Collegio rependendis.
| [the text of the decree.]

  No imprint, but probably printed at Oxford: (1602?): (one) fol.: pp.
  [2]: l. 11 beg. I. _Imprimis_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title
  and text of the decree.

  A Latin decree passed by the President and Fellows of Trinity college
  on 12 Dec. 1602, compelling all who have been or are on the foundation
  of the college to show their gratitude by a proportionate gift of
  money, and enjoining on all future scholars an oath that they will
  fulfil this decree. Signed by the President and Fellows. There is
  another issue similar in form but apparently printed in London, which
  can readily be distinguished by having a headline of woodcuts, and 43
  (instead of 52) lines of print.


9. *†¬Oxford¬, University. [Orders for the Market of the City of Oxford,
issued by the Chancellor of the University: beg. “Thomas Baron of
Buckurst,” ends “transgressor of this commaundement. God save the
Queene.”]

  No impr.: [not later than 1602]: (ones) fol.: pp. [4]: English Roman.
  Contents:—pp. (1, 3) the orders (probably 30 in number).

  The only copy known was rescued from a binding in Brasenose College
  Library at Oxford, where it now is. The titles of Lord Buckhurst are
  given, and show that the earliest possible date is 15 May 1598 when he
  became Lord High Treasurer: the latest being 24 March 1602/3, when the
  Queen died. No doubt the sheets were fastened together forming one
  long notice. The Brasenose copy has lost a few lines at the end of the
  first column (67 lines left), the second is complete (62 lines).


10. ¬Powel¬, Gabriel. _PRODROMVS._ | A LOGICALL | RESOLVTION OF THE | I.
Chap. of the Epistle of | _the Apostle PAVLE_ | _vnto the Romanes_. |
TOGITHER WITH SVCH | severall Jnstructions, Notes, Ob-|_servations, and
Vses, as naturally_ | _arise out of every particular_ | _Verse. By_ |
_Gabriel Powel._ | [_motto_, then _asterisks_.]

  Impr. 22: 1602: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 267 + [5]: p. 11 beg.
  _sumption is_, 111 _profit al, wisdom_: English Roman. Contents:—p.
  (3) title: (5–12) Epistle dedicatorie to John Whitgift archbp. of
  Canterbury and William Morgan bp. of St. Asaph, dated from St. Mary
  hall, Oxford, 5 July 1602: (13–15) “To the Christian Reader,” dated
  similarly: 1–267, the work: (1) “Faults escaped in the Printing.”

  See 1615. P: Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 25. The dedications are due to
  his patrons’ favour to his father David as well as to himself.


11. Powel, Gabriel. _Theologicall and Scholasticall_ | Positions,
concerning | Vsurie. | Set forth, by _Definitions_ and _Partitions_, |
framed according to the rules of | a naturall Method. | [_asterisks_,
then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 23: 1602: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 71 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _and
  quantitie_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) “A”: (3) title: (5–13)
  Epistle dedicatorie to Ralph Hockenhul and Hugh Hurlston, dated from
  St. Mary hall, Oxford, 1 Apr. 1602: (14) “The Contents of this
  Treatise”: 1–71, the treatise.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 25. In spite of the imprint this book,
  like the Higins (No. 5) above, was not printed at Oxford, the type but
  especially the woodcuts (with one exception) being entirely unknown at
  Oxford. It was printed no doubt in London, and the imprint falsified,
  perhaps in order to escape the necessity of registration at the office
  of the Stationers’ Company.


12. Rawlinson, John. See under 1612. R.


13. ¬Sanderson¬, dr. John. INSTITVTI-|ONVM DIALEC-|TICARVM LI-|_bri
Quatuor_, | _A_ | IOANNE SANDERSONO, | Lancastrensi, Anglo, Liberalium |
artium Magistro, & sacræ Theologiæ | _Doctore, Metropolitanæ
Ec-_|_clesiæ Cameracensis Ca-_|_nonico, conscripti_. | _Editio tertia._
| [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1602: 8^o: pp. [4] + 228 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _Vox singularis_,
  111 _victus, habitus_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) “Auctoris Præfatio ad iuventutem bonarum artium studiosam”:
  1–228, the work: (pp. (3–4) not seen.)

  Rare. This John Sanderson of Lancashire, doctor of Theology, canon of
  Cambrai, seems to have escaped the notice of biographers. The better
  known bp. Robert Sanderson also wrote on Logic, see 1615. S. The
  preface throws no light on the life of the author. For the 4th ed.,
  see 1609. S. The first edition was printed by Plantin at Antwerp in
  1589, the dedication to cardinal Allen being dated from Antwerp 1 Jan.
  “1589,” but neither in the dedication nor in the congratulatory poems
  which follow in this first edition is there any biographical matter.


14. ¬Smith¬, bp. Miles. [_woodcuts_] | A | LEARNED AND | GODLY SERMON, |
preached at Worcester, | _at an Assise_: | _By_ | THE REVEREND | and
learned, MILES | SMITH, _Doctor of_ | _Diuinitie_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 23: 1602: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 64: p. 11 beg. _him, and
  so_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–13) Epistle dedicatorie
  to Gervase Babington, bp. of Worcester, dated from C. C. C., Oxford,
  Nov. 12. 1602, signed “Robert Burhil” who issued the sermon: (15) “The
  chiefe points of matter ... in the sermon ...”: 1–63, the sermon, on
  Jer. ix. 23–24.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 360. The preface states that the
  sermon was issued without the knowledge of the author, he being too
  modest to publish his works.


15. ¬Terry¬, John. [_woodcut_] | THE SECOND PART | _OF_ | THE TRIAL OF
TRVTH: | WHEREIN IS SET DOWNE THE | proper fountaine or foundation of
all good | _works, & the fowre principal motiues which the spi_⸗|_rit of
God so often vseth in the sacred scriptures to perswade_ | therevnto: |
togither with the contrariety of the doctrine of | the Church of Rome to
the same: wherein also are ope-|ned not only the causes of all true
piety and godli-|ness, but also of all heresie and Idolatry, which is |
and hath beene among Gentiles and Iewes, | and vs likewise that are
called | Christians. | By JOHN TERRY. | [two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 23: 1602: sm. 4^o: pp. [38] + 125 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _venemous
  drops_, 111 _mande the carefull_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–14) Epistle dedicatorie to dr. George Rives, Warden, and all other
  students of New College, Oxford: (15–37) “To the Christian Reader”:
  (37) a short prayer: 1–125, the work: (1) “Faultes escaped” in parts
  one and two.

  See 1600. T, Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 410.


                                 1603.

1. ¬Brett¬, Richard. ICONVM SA-|CRARVM DECAS, IN | QVA E SVBIECTIS TYPIS
| compluscula sanæ doctrinæ | _capita eruuntur_. | Autore _R. B._ Sacræ
Theol. Baccalaureo. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 72: p. 11 beg. _divini vultus_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) Latin dedication to the
  King, signed “Richardus Brett,” 12 Aug. 1603: 1–72, the work, in ten
  essays.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 611. The preface explains ‘Icones
  inscripsi prȩsens opusculum, quia sub typis varia fidei & morum
  adumbrat documenta. Nam ... est aliquando sub cute literæ, suavis
  quædam & interior medulla.”


2. Burhill, Robert. Invitatorius panegyricus: see under _Oxford_ (no. 9,
below).


3. ¬Carleton¬, George. HEROICI CHARACTERES. | AD | ILLVSTRISSI-|MVM
EQVITEM, | _Henricum Nevillum_. | AUTORE, | _Georgio Carletono_. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 48 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Numine
  tanta_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) Latin poetical
  dedication to sir Henry Nevill: 1–48, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 423, 425. The pieces are “Ad ...
  Elizabetham ... Carmen Panegyricum,” “Ad ... Iacobum ... Carmen
  Panegyricum,” “Devoraxeis,” on the earl of Essex, “P. Sidnæi funus,”
  all Latin hexameter poems.


4. ¬Davies¬, John, of Hereford. _MICROCOSMOS._ | THE DISCOVERY | OF THE
LITTLE | World, with the government | thereof. | [_motto_] | By IOHN
DAVIES. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 23: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 254 + [30]: p. 11 beg. _The Day_,
  111 _And^e Providence_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within
  a border: (3) poetical dedication to king James: (4) Do. to the queen:
  (5–8) short poems by Davies: (8–16) complimentary verses to the author
  or book: 1–28, “A Preface ...” to the king: (29–38) “Cambria to the
  ... Prince of Wales,” both poems: 39–232, the work: 233–254, “An
  extasie,” a poem: (1–20) short poems by Davies, including two to
  Magdalen college, p. (17): (20–29) complimentary verses to the author
  or book.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 262, and 1605. D. The poem describes
  the whole state of man, his condition, qualities and surroundings, in
  a discursive manner which allows a short history of England to come in
  (at p. 131). The stanzas are 9-line, rhyming ABABBCBCC. The author was
  a professional calligrapher in Oxford, not a member of the University.
  Davies’s ©Works© were edited by dr. Grosart in 1878. An ed. of 1611 is
  perhaps only due to a misprint in a 17th cent. bookseller’s catalogue.


5. †¬Godwin¬, Francis, bp. of Hereford. [_woodcut_] | TO THE PARSON,
VICAR | or Cur ate, of      | and to everie of them. | [letterpress of
the articles.]

  No imprint: (1603): (two) sm. 4^o: pp. 4: p. 3 beg. _or M. Doctor
  Trevor_: Pica English. Contents:—p. 1, head title, as above: 1–4, the
  orders: signed at end “Matherne. Sept. 30. 1603. _Fr. Landaven._,”
  i.e. F. Godwin, then bp. of Llandaff.

  Very rare. Orders of the bishop of Llandaff for the reformation of
  abuses in his diocese. The woodcuts are sufficient to prove by their
  particular imperfections that this is a product of the Oxford press.


6. ¬Howson¬, dr. John. A | SERMON | [&c. precisely as 1602. H, except
that a line “The second Impression.” is added after “of Oxforde” before
the woodcuts.]

  Impr. 23: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 30 + [2]: sign. B 1^r beg. _ship or
  honor_, p. 11 _& hyems erat_: English Roman. Contents:—(exactly as
  1602. H.)

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 518. This is a verbatim but not literatim
  reprint of 1602. H, except as noted above.


7. ¬Oxford¬, University. ACADEMIÆ OXONIENSIS | _PIETAS_ | ERGA |
SERENISSI-|MVM ET POTEN-|TISSIMVM IACOBVM AN-|_GLIÆ SCOTFÆ FRANCIÆ_ | _&
Hiberniæ Regem, fidei defenso_⸗|_rem, Beatissimæ Elisabethæ nu-_|_per
Reginæ legitimè & au-_|_spicatissimè succedentem_. | ⁂ ⁂ | ⁂ |
[_device._]

  Impr. 13_b_: 1603: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 207 + 1: p. 11 beg.
  _Virginis atque_: 111 _Votum pro_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) dedication to the King in Latin, by the university: 1–207, the
  poems: (1) “Votum Typographi ad ... Regem,” a poem.

  More than 470 Latin poems, with a few in Greek, Italian, and French.
  On p. 17 there is a complaint of the lack of Hebrew type. There is an
  earlier and less common issue without the “Votum typographi,” the page
  being left blank.


8. ¬Oxford¬, University. THE | ANSVVERE | OF THE VICECHAN-|CELOVR, THE
DOCTORS, | both the Proctors, and other the | Heads of Houses in the
Vniversi-|_tie of Oxford_: | (_Agreeable, vndoubtedly, to the ioint and
Vniforme_ | _opinion, of all the Deanes and Chapters, and all o-_|_ther
the learned and obedient Cleargy_, | _in the Church of England._) | To
the humble Petition of the Ministers of the | Church of England,
desiring Reformation of cer-|taine Ceremonies and Abuses of the Church.
| [two _mottos_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 2: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 32, signn. ¶, ¶¶, A-D^4: sign. ¶¶
  1^r beg. _you hartely_, p. 11 beg. _Concerning the_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–13) “Epistle dedicatorie” to the archbp. of
  Canterbury and the Chancellors of the Universities of Oxford and
  Cambridge, beg. “Many and excellent”: 1–5, “The humble petition of the
  Ministers ...”: 6–32, “The Answer ...”.

  Three other issues are known:—(_a_), title identical except that the
  imprint is no. 25: after p. (13) comes (14–16) a letter from the
  University of Cambridge to that of Oxford in Latin, 7 Oct. 1603,
  introduced by a few sentences “to the reader”: the rest identical:
  (_b_) with title identical till the 9th line which runs:—“_opinion, of
  all the Deanes and Chapters, and all other_ | _the learned & obedient
  Cleargy, in the Church of Eng:_ | And confirmed by the expresse
  consent of the | Vniversitie of Cambridge.) | To the humble Petition”
  [&c. as before]: with the same imprint as (_a_), but in small roman
  type. Four new leaves follow the title, *2^r-*4^r containing a
  dedication to the king, and ¶ 1^r the arms of the University with
  woodcuts above and below. Then follows “the Præface,” the title only
  being re-set, and the headline being no longer “The Epistle |
  dedicatorie” but “The Præface | to the LL^s”, while on ¶¶ 4^v a
  passage from Gregory Nazianzen is inserted: all the rest is identical
  with the other issues: *(_c_) identical with (_b_) throughout except
  that the imprint is no. 2 and is without date. Of these four editions
  or issues, the first is very rare, being perhaps stopped in the course
  of issue: _a_ is common, _b_ less so, _c_ rare.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© i. 3 (where a doubtful 1641 edition is
  referred to): 1604. O.


9. ¬Oxford¬, University. OXONIENSIS ACADEMIÆ | Funebre Officium | _JN_ |
MEMORIAM | HONORATISSIMAM | SERENISSIMÆ ET BEATIS=|SIMÆ ELISABETHÆ,
NVPER | _Angliæ, Franciæ, & Hiberniæ_ | _Reginæ_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 13_b_: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 182 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _Lugentem_, 111 _Sævit, &_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  poetical Latin dedication to the king: 1–182, the poems.

  Chiefly Latin poems in memory of queen Elizabeth: a few Greek occur,
  one Hebrew (p. 5, cf. 97, 171), one French (p. 64), one Italian (p.
  171). The longest poem is one by Robert Burhill entitled “Invitatorius
  Panegyricus ... de ... Reginæ posteriore ad Oxoniam adventu,” which
  Wood mentions (©Ath. Oxon.© iii. 18) as a separate publication.


10. ¬Storre¬, William. THE | MANNER OF | THE CRVELL OVT-|RAGIOVS MVRTHER
OF | WILLIAM STORRE _Mast. of Art, Mi_⸗|nister, and Preacher at Market
Raisin in | the County of Lincolne: | COMMITTED | _By Francis Cartwright
one of his parishioners_, | _the_ 30. _day of August Anno._ 1602. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [12?], signn. A^4 B^2 (?): sign. A 3^r
  beg. _thirsted for_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–11?) the
  work.

  Extremely rare. The only known copy, in the Bodleian, has sign. A 4
  imperfect, and has lost all after that leaf. The pamphlet was
  reprinted with slight changes at London in 1613 with the title “Three
  bloodie Murders ...” of which this is the first. “The Life,
  confession, and heartie repentance of Francis Cartwright, gentleman;
  for his bloudie sinne in killing of one Master Storr, Master of Arts
  ... written with his owne hand” was published at London in 1621.
  Storre was a Fellow of Corpus Christi College at Oxford.


11. ¬Thornborough¬, bp. John. [_woodcut._] | ARTICLES | TO BE MINISTRED
| AND TO BE ENQVIRED | OF, AND ANSWERED IN | the first generall
visitation of | _the reverend father in God, John_, | _by Gods
permission, Bishop_ | _of Bristoll_. | ⁂ | [_device._]

  Impr. 2_c_: 1603: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 18: p. 11 beg. _or keep_: Pica
  English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “The Tenor of the oath ministred
  to the Church-wardens, and sworne men”: 1–18, the articles, 37 + 41 in
  number.


12. ¬Willoughby¬, John. “©A Treatise for the Preparation of the Lord’s
Supper.© Oxon. 1603, ded. to K. James I. at which time the author was
living in Oxon.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© i. 744: very rare: a copy is mentioned in “A
  catalogue of choice English books ... which will be sold by Auction, 6
  Aug. 1688” (Lond. 1688, 4^o) Appendix p. 7.


                                 1604.

1. ¬Abbot¬, archbp. George. THE | REASONS | VVHICH DOCTOVR HILL | HATH
BROVGHT, FOR THE | vpholding of Papistry, which is false⸗|_lie termed
the Catholike Religion:_ | _Vnmasked, and shewed to be very weake, and
vpon exa_⸗|_mination most insufficient for that purpose_: | By GEORGE
ABBOT Doctor of Divinity & Deane | of the Cathedrall _Church in
VVinchester_. | The first Part. | [two _mottos_: then _woodcuts_] |

  Impr. 25: 1604: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + “438” (really 436 for
  384–5 are omitted in the pagination) + [8]: p. 11 beg. _is both_, 111
  _G. Abbot_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) large device of the
  University arms between woodcuts: (3) title: (5–7) Epistle dedicatorie
  to lord Buckhurst, dated from University college Oxford, 4 Jan.
  “1604”: 1–438, the work: (1–6) “To the Christian Reader.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 562. The book is in answer to dr. Thomas
  Hill’s “Quartron of reasons of Catholike Religion,” Antw. 1600: but
  contains only ten out of sixteen answers which the author had
  prepared.


2. ¬Bridges¬, John, bp. of Oxford. ARTICLES TO | BE ENQVIRED OF WITHIN
THE | Dioces of Oxford, giuen by the Reuerende | _Father in God_ IOHN
_by Gods permission now_ | Bishop of Oxford in his Visitation begun |
_the second day of October_. 1604. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1604: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4-B^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _your Parish_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-B
  2^r, the 55 articles: B 2^r “the oath of the Church-wardens and
  Sidemen.”


3. ¬Corderoy¬, Jeremy. A SHORT DIA-|LOGVE, WHEREIN | is proved, that no
man | can be saved without good | vvorkes. Edit. 2. With some Additions
| [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25: 1604: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [22] + 2 + 110 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _vvhich no doubt_, 101 _workes he may_: Pica Roman. Contents: p. (1)
  title: (3–6) Epistle dedicatorie to sir Robert Vernon, signed “Ieremy
  Corderoy”: (7–21) “To the Christian Reader,” also signed: 1–2, 1–110,
  the work, the half title being “A short dialogue between a Gallant, a
  Scholler of Oxforde, and a Church-Papist ...”.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 47. The first edition may be the one
  of _Lond._ 1604 recorded by Watt in the ©Bibliotheca Britannica©.


4. ¬Hubbocke¬, William. AN ORATI-|ON GRATULATORY TO | the High and
Mighty IAMES of _England_, | _Scotland, France and Ireland, King,
Defendor of the_ | faith, &c. On the twelft day of February last
pre-|_sented, when his Maiesty entered the Tower of_ | London to
performe the residue of the solemni-|_ties of his Coronation thorough
the citie of London_ | differred by reason of the plague: and
publi-|_shed by his Highnesse speciall allowance_. | _VVherein both the
description of the Tower of_ | _London and the vnion of the kingdomes
is_ | _compendiously touched_: | By | WILLIAM HVBBOCKE. |[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 25: 1604: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B 1^r beg. _I
  wil giue_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 1^v, Latin
  dedication to the king: A 2^r-A 4^r, the speech, in Latin: B 1^r-B
  4^v, the same in English.

  Extremely rare: the only copy at present known is in the Bodleian, but
  there was a copy among the Harleian Pamphlets. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©
  i. 753. The speech was really delivered on _March_ 12, not February,
  1603/4, Hubbocke being Chaplain at the Tower. The speech describes the
  Tower as mint, armoury, jewel-house, &c. It is reprinted in Nichols’s
  ©Progresses of king James I©.


5. ¬Oxford.¬ THE | ANSVVERE | OF THE VICECHAN-|CELOVR ... [&c. exactly
as 1603, _Oxford_ Answer, variation _b_.]

  Impr. 25: 1604: sm. 4^o: pp. [46], signn. A-E^4 F^2 ( )^1: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _But these_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) dedication
  to the king: (7–15) “The Præface”: (16–17) Letter from Cambridge, 7
  Oct. 1603, introduced by a short note: (18) quotation from Gregory
  Nazianzen: (19–22) “The humble petition of the Ministers ...”: (23–44)
  “The Answere ... to the Petition ...”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© i. 3, and 1603. O. This is a reprint of
  variation _b_.


6. ¬Panke¬, John. A | SHORT ADMONI-|tion by way of Dialogue, to all |
those who hitherto vpon pretence of | of their vnworthines haue
dangerously, | _in respect of their salvation, with held them-_|selues
from comming to the Lordes Table: | _Exhorting them without any longer
delay_ | _to present themselues herevnto._ | _VVherein is shewed that
there is an vn_⸗|worthy receiving of baptisme, an vnworthy | _hearing of
the worde, and an vnworthy pre-_|senting our selues to prayer aswell as
an vn·|worthy receiving of the supper, which | yet these vnworthies
worthi-|ly thinke not of. | _By_ IOHN PANKE. | [_motto_, then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25: 1604: (eights) 12^o: pp. [72], signn. A-D^8 E^4: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _adding to_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A
  3^v, epistle dedicatorie to lady Katherine Wroughton, dated from Broad
  Hinton, 25 Mar. “1604”: A 4^r-A 6^v, “To the Christian and Godly
  Reader”: A 7^r-E 4^v, the dialogue, between “Romannus the scholler”
  and “Tuberius the gentleman.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 274.


7. [¬Parkes¬, Richard.] A | BRIEFE | AN-|SVVERE VNTO CER-|TAINE
OBIECTIONS AND | Reasons against the descension of Christ | _into hell,
lately sent in writing vnto a Gen-_|_tleman in the Countrey_. |
[_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25: 1604: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 58 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _tweene
  Death_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) “To the Christian
  Reader”: 1–58, the work: (1) “A note for the Readers Instruction,”
  bibliographical, on the meaning of certain references to books.

  See 1613. A. This controversy about the Descent into Hell began with
  the manuscript (?) objections referred to in the title: then came this
  book (which is anonymous, but confessed by the author in his
  ©Apologie©, see below), followed by (1) [Andrew Willett’s]
  ©Limbomastix, that is a Canuise of Limbus Patrum© (published without
  the author’s knowledge), with a reply to the ©Brief answere© (Lond.
  1604); then (2) by an interminable rejoinder by Richard Parkes (©An
  Apologie©, Lond. 1607, of which the first part is a revised issue of
  the ©Brief Answer©,) answered by Willett’s ©Loidoromastix: that is a
  scourge for a rayler© (Cambr. 1607). The ©Brief Answer© holds the
  orthodox opinion of the “local descension of Christ’s soul to Hell.”


8. ¬Powel¬, Gabriel. _A_ | CONSIDERATION OF | the Papists Reasons of
State and Reli-|gion, for toleration of Poperie | in England, |
_INTIMATED IN THEIR_ | _Supplication vnto the Kings Maie-_|_stie, & the
States of the Pre-_|_sent Parliament_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25: 1604: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 128: p. 11 beg. _Priest: or_, 111
  _and was the_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “To the
  Christian Reader,” signed “Oxford, from S^t. Marie Hall. 13. of
  Aprill. 1604. ... Gabriel Powel”: 1–125, the work: 126–128, “The
  Auctors Teares and humble Petition vnto Almightie God.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 25.


9. ¬Sanford¬, John. GODS ARROWE | _Of the_ | _PESTILENCE_. | _By_ | JOHN
SANFORD Master of Artes, and Chapleine of Magdalen | _Colledge in
Oxford_. | [_motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 25: 1604: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 55 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _that
  verse of_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) Epistle
  dedicatorie to the University of Oxford, dated from Magdalen college
  13 Mar. 1603/4: 1–55, the discourse, on Ps. xxxviii. 2.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 472. Intended as a sermon, but the author
  found himself disabled in speech, and could not deliver it.


10. ¬Sanford¬, J[ohn]. [_woodcut._] | Le | _Guichet François_. | SIVE |
_JANICVLA ET BREVIS INTRO-_|_ductio ad Linguam Gallicam_. | [three
_mottos_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1604: sm. 4^o: pp. [40 + inserted leaf], signn. A-E^4, and
  one leaf after D 1: sign. B 1^r beg. _ta aliaq;_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A 3^v, Latin dedication to dr.
  Bond president of Magdalen college Oxford, signed “I. Sanfordus”: A
  4^r-B 1^v “Ad Gallicæ Linguæ Studiosum Lectorem”: B 2^r-E 4^r, the
  work.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 472. This is a French grammar and
  syntax written in Latin. After sign. D 1 is a folio folded leaf,
  printed on one side only, a “Tabula coniugationum.” See 1605. S.


                                 1605.

1. ¬Davies¬, John, of Hereford. _MICROCOSMOS._ | THE DISCOVERY | OF THE
LITTLE | World, with the governe-|ment thereof. | [_motto_] | By Iohn
Davies. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 27: 1605: &c. as 1603. D. Contents:—exactly as 1603. D.

  Very rare. See 1603. D, of which this is a reissue, with no alteration
  whatever except a new titlepage.


2. ¬Hutten¬, Leonard. AN | ANSVVERE TO A CER-|TAINE TREATISE OF THE |
CROSSE IN BAPTISME. | _Intituled_ | A Short Treatise of the Crosse in
Baptisme, con-|tracted into this Syllogisme. | [_the syllogism follows
in six lines_] | VVherein not only the weaknesse of the Syllogisme
it|selfe, but also of the grounds and proofes there-|of, are plainely
discovered. | _By L. H. Doct. of Divinitie._ | [two _mottos_, then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25_a_: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 139 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _tions
  were_, 111 _swaded to set_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–7) Epistle dedicatory to the archbp. of Canterbury, signed “Leon.
  Hutten”: 1–139, the answer.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 533. The book to which this is a reply is
  [William Bradshaw’s] ©Short treatise of the crosse in Baptisme©, _n.
  p._ 1604, in which the unlawfulness of the use of the cross was
  insisted on.


3. ¬Hutton¬, Thomas. REASONS FOR REFVSAL | OF SVBSCRIPTION TO THE |
booke of Common praier, vnder the | hands of certaine Ministers of
Devon, and | Cornwall word for word as they were ex-|hibited by them to
the Right Reverend | Father in God WILLIAM CO-|TON Doctor of Divinitie |
_L. Bishop of Exceter_. | _VVITH AN ANSVVERE AT SE-_|verall times
returned them in publike conference | _and in diverse sermons vpon
occasion prea-_|ched in the Cathedrall Church of _Exceter_, | by THOMAS
HVTTON, Bachi-|ler of Divinitie & fellow of | S^t. Iohns Coll. in Oxon.
| AND NOW PVBLISHED AT | _the very earnest intreatie of some especiall_
| friends for a farther contentment of o-|ther the Kings Maiesties good
| and loyall subiects. | [_motto_ then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25_a_: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. 200: p. 11 beg. _are, wherein_, 111
  _times haue thought_: English Roman. Contents:—p. 1 title: 3–6,
  Epistle dedicatorie to the bp. of Exeter: 7–10, “To my fellow brethren
  the ministers of Devon and Cornwall ...”: 10–17, “To the Christian
  Reader”: 18–34, the Reasons: 35–200, the Answer to the Reasons.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 646. A “Second and last part of Reasons
  for Refusall ...” was published in London in 1606, and “The Remoouall
  of certaine imputations laid vpon the Ministers of Deuon: and Cornwall
  by one M. T. H. ...,” printed abroad in 1606: and other books on the
  controversy later.


4. ¬James¬, Thomas. CATALOGVS LIBRORVM | BIBLIOTHECÆ PVB-|LICÆ QVAM VIR
ORNATIS-|simus THOMAS BODLEIVS Eques | Auratus in Academia Oxoniensi
nuper in-|stituit; continet autem Libros Alphabeti-|cè dispositos
secundum quatuor | Facultates: | CVM | _QUADRVPLICI ELENCHO_ |
Expositorum S. Scripturæ, Aristotelis, Iuris | _vtriusq¿ue¿ & Principum
Medicinæ, ad vsum_ | Almæ Academiæ Oxoniensis. | _Auctore_ | THOMA JAMES
| Ibidem Bibliothecario. | [_woodcuts_]

  Impr. 18: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + “655” (really 651) + [67]: p. 11
  beg. _A._ 11. 1. _Chron._, 111 _P._ 1. 1. _Philon._, p. 501 _V_ ¶
  _Hug. de_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “Observanda in
  hoc catalogo”: (3–4) Epistola dedicatoria to Henry Frederick prince of
  Wales: (5–8) “Præfatio ad Benevolum Lectorem,” dated “E Bibliotheca
  publica Oxoniæ Iunij 27. Anno. 1605.”: 1–162, catalogue of “Libri
  Theologici”: 163–179, “Catalogus Expositorum S. Scripturæ iuxta
  ordinem Voluminum vtriusque Testamenti dispositus”: 180, “Ad
  Lectorem”: 181–218, “Libri Medici”: 219–274, “Libri Iuris”: 275–415,
  “Libri Artium”: 417–425, “Interpretes librorum Aristotelis”: 427–640,
  “Appendix” to each of the four faculties: 641–646, “Appendix ad
  Expositores S Scripturæ”: 646–648, “Appendix ad Interpretes Lib.
  Arist.”: 648–651, “Interpretes Juris Civilis”: 651–652, “Interpretes
  Juris Canonici”: 652–653, “In omnia vel pleraque Scripta Hippocrat.”:
  653–655, “Scriptores in Cl. Galenum”: 655, “Scriptores in
  Dioscoridem”: (2–67) “Index Auctorum in hoc volumine”: (68) “Nomina
  Hebraica quæ corruptè imprimuntur: & quia defuerunt characteres
  Hebraici, Latinè hîc omnia exprimimus”: (68) “Errata in Latinis
  nominibus.”

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii 466. and 1620. J. The catalogue
  includes also the MSS. then in the Library. In the dedication the
  “Bibliotheca Bodleiana” is stated to be not yet four years old, having
  been formally opened on 8 Nov. 1602. The preface gives an interesting
  account of the early history of the Library. In the pagination a leaf
  is omitted after p. 426, but “457” follows “450”: the total number of
  pages is no doubt 726 (signn. ¶ A-Y^4 Z^2, Aa-Zz, Aaa-Zzz, Aaaa-Xxxx^4
  ( )^1), so that Upcott (©English Topography©, iii. p. 1122, Lond.
  1818) is wrong. Other editions of the complete catalogue of Bodleian
  printed books were issued at Oxford in 1620, 1674, 1738 and 1843, and
  one of the MSS. in 1697.


5. ¬King¬, John, bp. of London. ARTICLES MINISTRED | IN THE VISITATION
OF | THE RIGHT WORSHIPFVL MAI-|ster IOHN KING, Doctor of divinitie,
Arch-|deacon of Nottingham, in the yeare of | _our Lord God_. 1605. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. [8 + ?]: signn. A^4 + ?: sign. A 4^r
  beg. _Visiting of_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  2^r-?, the articles.

  Very rare. The only recorded copy, in the Bodleian, contains only
  sign. A. For the issuer see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 294.


6. ¬Kingsmill¬, Thomas. CLASSICVM | POENITENTIALE, | THOMA KINGESMILLO,
auctore, | _olim Socio Coll. Magdalenensis & non ita_ | _pridem Hebraicæ
Linguæ in alma Aca-_|_demia Oxon: professore regio_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 26: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. [56] + 130 + [2] + 65 + [3]: p. 11 be.
  _resipiscentiam_, 111 _mitto cætera_, 2nd p. 11 beg. _suluerunt, vos_:
  English and (2nd part) Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–47)
  dedication to the king: (49–56) “Ad Lectorem”: 1–130, the treatise:
  (1) a title:—“[_woodcut_] | TRACTATVS | DE SCANDALO | EODEM AVCTORE. |
  [_device._]” Impr. 11, 1605: 1–65, the second treatise.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© i. 758. These two treatises on the moral state
  of England are printed without list of contents, index or even
  division into paragraphs. No one but the author and compositor can
  have ever read them, and the former had been insane, though according
  to Wood he recovered his powers.


7. ¬Oxford¬, Christ Church. MVSA HOSPITALIS | ECCLESIÆ CHRISTI | OXON. |
_Jn adventum Fælicissimum Sereniss._ IACOBI | _Regis_, ANNæ _Reginæ_, &
HENRICI _Prin-_|_cipis ad eandem Ecclesiam._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 18: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. [48], signn. A-F^4: English Roman.
  Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-F 4^r, the poems.

  Christ Church poems to commemorate the visit of the King, Queen, and
  Prince Henry to Oxford and Christ Church, 27–30 Aug. 1605. All but one
  (Greek) are in Latin.


8. ¬Oxford¬, New College. ENCOMION | RODOLPHI VVARCOP-|PI ORNATISSIMI,
QVEM | habuit Anglia, Armigeri, qui commu-|ni totius patriæ luctu
extinctus est | _Die Iovis Kalend. Aug._ 1605. | [_motto_: then
_device_.]

  Impr. 18: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. [32], signn. A-E^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Magne Deus_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A
  2^v, dedication to Will. lord Knollys de Grays, unsigned: A 3^r-E 3^v,
  poems to the memory of Warcop, the first signed “W. Kingesmillus,” the
  editor of the volume, “Oxonij e Coll. Novo die 25. Octob.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© i. 754, ©Fasti Oxon.© i. 366. The poems, which
  are all except one (Greek) in Latin, are by New College men and edited
  by William Kingsmill of New College, a nephew of Warcop, who was
  himself at Ch. Ch. The device on the titlepage bears the arms of New
  College, between W. W. (William of Wykeham).


9. ¬Sanford¬, John. _A_ | BRIEFE EX-|TRACT OF THE FOR-|MER LATIN
GRAMMER, | DONE INTO ENGLISH, FOR | the easier instruction of | _the
Learner_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B 1^r beg. _L
  in the middest_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A
  3^v, dedication to William Grey son of Arthur lord Grey of Wilton,
  signed “John Sanford”: A 4^r-B 4^v, the extracts.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 472. The word “Latin” on the title
  seems to be a mistake for “French,” see 1604. S, to which this is a
  sort of appendix.


10. ¬Sanford¬, John. _A_ | GRAMMER | OR INTRODVCTION | TO THE ITALIAN |
_TONGVE_. | §§§ | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25: 1605: sm. 4^o: pp [8] + 44 + [4?]: p. 11 beg. _as i
  Soldati_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) motto from Dante:
  (3–6) dedication to Magdalen college, Oxford, signed “Joannes
  Sanford”: (7) “To the reader”: (8) poem “Sur l’Autheur” in French, by
  Jean More: 1–44, the grammar: perhaps two blank leaves follow.

  Very rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©> ii. 472. The grammar includes a
  short syntax.


11. *¬Thornborough¬, John, bp. of Bristol. THE IOIE-|FVLL AND BLESSED
REV-|niting the two mighty & famous King⸗|domes, England & Scotland into
their an-|_cient name of great Brittaine_. | By JOHN BRISTOLL. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 25_a_: [1605?]: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 80: p. 11 beg. _Therefore the
  wise_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) dedication to king
  James: 1–80, the treatise.

  The preface alludes to “my two bookes,” the other being “A discourse
  plainely proving the euident vtilitie and vrgent necessitie of the ...
  Vnion of ... England and Scotland ...” (Lond., 1604, sm. 4^o), which
  latter was the subject of a remonstrance of the House of Commons to
  the House of Lords, 26 May 1604, ending in an apology on the part of
  the author. There is nothing but Wood’s express statement (©Ath.
  Oxon.© iii. 5) to settle whether this book was published at the close
  of 1604 or in 1605: so that statement has been accepted. Otherwise it
  would seem that the two books were not long separated in point of
  time. Both were reprinted at London in 1641.


12. ¬Wakeman¬, Robert. THE | CHRISTIAN | PRACTISE. | _A_ | Sermon
preached on the Act-Sun-|_day in S^t. Maries Church in_ | _Oxford. Iul._
8. 1604. | By ROB. WAKEMAN Bachelor | of Divinity and fellow of Balioll
| Colledge in Oxford. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25_a_: 1605: (eights) 16^o: pp. 92 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _ple but
  serued_: English Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 2, “Points handled in
  this Sermon”: 3–92, the sermon, on Acts ii. 46.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 471, and 1612. W.


13. ¬Wakeman¬, Robert. SALOMONS EXALTATION. | _A_ | SERMON PREA-|CHED
BEFORE THE | KINGS Maiestie at None-|_Such, April._ 30. 1605. | By ROB.
WAKEMAN Bachelor | of Divinity and fellow of Balioll | Colledge in
Oxford. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25_a_: 1605: (eights) 16^o: pp. [2] + 68 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _halt
  goe_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–68, the sermon, on 2
  Chron. ix. 8.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 471.


                                 1606.

1. [¬Burhill¬, Robert.] IN CONTRO-|VERSIAM INTER IO-|HANNEM HOWSONVM | &
_Thomam Pyum_ S. T. Doctores de | _novis post divortium ob
adulteri-_|_um nuptijs_. | TRACTATVS MODESTVS ET | Christianus in sex
commentationes, & | _Elenchum monitorium distinctus_. | _VBI ET AD
EXCVSAM D. PYI AD_ | D. Howsonum Epistolam, quâ libri Howsoni-|_ani
refutationem molitur, & ad ejusdem_ | _alteram manuscriptam Epistolam
e-_|_iusdem argumenti, quâ contra_ Al-|bericum Gentilem
_iurispruden-_|_tiæ apud Oxonienses professorem_ | _regium disputat,
diligenter_ | _respondetur_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1606: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 206 + [20]: p. 11 beg. _non
  licuisse_, 111 _polluatur? Ita_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (2) “Auctoris protestatio de calumniâ”: (3) “Admonitiones ad
  Lectorem”: (4) 17 lines of errata, not found in all copies, &
  sometimes pasted on: (5–6) Latin poem to Rich. Bancroft archbp. of
  Canterbury: (7–11) “Dispositio totius operis”: 1–176, the work in six
  parts: 177–206, the Elenchus: (1) “Ad Lectorem,” a preface to what
  follows: (2–10) “To Master Doctor Pye,” a letter in English from dr.
  “John Rainolds,” dated 27 Feb. [1603/4?]: (13) “Ad Lectorem,”
  introductory: (15–20) Latin letter from Albericus Gentilis to dr.
  Howson, dated from London, 12 Aug. 1603.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© iii. 18, also ii. 15 and 60. Thomas Pye’s work
  against Howson’s Thesis is entitled “Epistola ad ... D. Johannem
  Housonum, quâ Dogma ejus ... refutatur ...” Lond. 1603. The signatures
  show that this work (which is strictly anonymous) is part of the art.
  ©Howson© below, and was indeed printed before it, and written before
  there was any intention of reprinting the ©Thesis©.


2. ¬Howson¬, dr. John. VXORE DI-|MISSA PROPTER FOR-|nicationem aliam non
licet | _superinducere_. | TERTIA THESIS | IOANNIS HOWSONI IN-|ceptoris
in Sacra Theologia, propo-|sita & disputata in Vesperijs | _Oxonij_.
1602. | _ACCESSIT EIVSDEM THESEOS_ | _defensio contra reprehensiones T.
Pyi_ | _S. T. Doctoris._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 28: 1606: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 36 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _tis impetum_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “Ad Lectorem,” a note that
  the pages of the 1602 edition are noted in the margin, because the
  “Defensio” refers to them: 1–36, the thesis.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 518, and 1602. H, of which this is a
  verbatim reprint. The entry above under _Burhill_ is really part of
  this work, but treated separately for convenience.


3. ¬King¬, John. THE | FOVRTH | SERMON PREACHED AT | _HAMPTON COVRT ON_
| _Tuesday the last of Sept._ 1606. | [_line_] | BY | [_line_] | JOHN
KINGE Doctor of Divinity, and | _Deane of Christ-Church in Oxon_. |
[_device_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 2: 1606: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 49 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _stration of
  the_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines: 1–49, the
  sermon, on Cant. viii. 11: 49, “Faults escaped in the printing ...”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 295: and 1607. K.


4. ¬Oxford¬, Magdalen college. BEATÆ MAR-|IAE MAGDALENAE | LACHRYMÆ, IN
OBITVM | NOBILISSIMI IVVENIS GU-|LIELMI GREY, Domini ARTHVRI | GREY
_Baronis de VVilton, aureæ_ | _Periscelidis Equitis Clarissimi_, |
_Filij natu minoris_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1606: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 42: p. 11 beg. _Perpetuos_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to lady Joanna Sybil
  Grey, dowager lady Grey, mother of William Grey, signed “Rob. Barnes,”
  dated Magd. coll. Oxford, 11 March (1605/6): 1–42, the poems.

  Poems by members of Magdalen college, Oxford, in memory of William
  Grey, who matriculated at Magdalen, 18 May 1604 and died 18 Feb.
  1605/6. The editor of the volume was a son of the printer of the book
  and a Fellow of Magdalen. The poems are Latin except four Greek, one
  Spanish (?) and one Italian.


5. *†¬Oxford¬, University. [Orders for the Market of the City of Oxford,
issued by the Chancellor of the University: beg. “Thomas Earle of
Dorset,” ends “transgressor of this commaudement. God saue the King.”]

  No impr.: [1606]: (one) obl. fol.: pp. [2]: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) the orders (31 in number).

  “Proclaimed July 2^o, 1606. Dr. Abbotts Vice-Chancellor,” according to
  a MS. note on the copy in the Oxford University Archives.


6. ¬Rawlinson¬, rev. John. THE | FOVRE SVM-|MONS OF THE | _SHVLAMITE_. |
A | _Sermon preached at Pauls Crosse vpon_ | _Rogation Sunday, the_ 5.
_of_ | May. 1605. | By JOHN RAWLINSON, Bache-|lor of Divinitie, and
fellow of | Saint Iohns Colledge in | Oxford. | [_motto_: then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25_a_: 1606: (eights) 16^o: pp. [10] + 82 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _and
  commeth_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–9) “To the
  Reader,” dated from St. John’s College in Oxon, 10 Jan [1605/6]: 1–82
  the sermon, on Cant. vi. 13: [(3–4) have not been seen.]

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 506. The author states that the
  sermon occupied two hours in delivery.


7. ¬Trelcatius¬, Lucas. SCHOLASTICA, | ET METHODICA, | Locorum
Communium, | _S. Theologiæ Institutio_, | Didacticè, & Elencticè in
Epitome explicata: | IN QVA, | _Veritas Locorum Communium, definitionis
cu-_|_iusq¿ue¿ Loci, per Causas suas Analysi asseritur:_ | _Contraria
verò Argumenta, imprimis_ | _Bellarmini, Generalium_ | _Solutionum
appendice_ | _refutantur_: Auctore, LVCA TRELCATIO, L. F. | _Pastore, &
Professore_. | [_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1606: (eights?) 12^o?.

  Only known at present from a titlepage in the Bagford collections at
  the British Museum, but no doubt other copies exist. Probably a
  reprint of the first edition, Lugd. Bat. 1604, 4^o.


8. ¬Wakeman¬, Robert. IONAHS SERMON, | AND | _Ninivehs repentance_. |
_A_ | SERMON PREACHED AT | Pauls Crosse Jun. 20. 1602. and now | thought
fit to be published for | our meditations in | these times. | _By_ RO.
WAKEMAN _Master of Arts_, | _and fellow of Balioll Colledge_ | _in
Oxford_. | The second Impression. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 25_a_: 1606: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 102 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _to
  send his_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) “To the
  Christian Reader,” dated from “Balioll Colledg in Oxford October. 10.
  1603.”: (7) “Ionah. 3. 4. 5. The Analysis of the Text.”: 1–102, the
  sermon, on Jonah iii. 4–5.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 471. No copy of the first
  impression, which may have been printed at Oxford in 1603 or 1604, has
  yet been seen. There is no allusion to this being a second edition, in
  the preface.


                                 1607.

1. ¬Bunny¬, Francis. AN | ANSVVERE TO A | POPISH LIBELL IN-|tituled _A
Petition to the Bishops_, | _Preachers, and Gospellers_, | lately spread
abroad in | the North partes. | By FRANCIS BVNNY _Prebenda-_|_ry of
Durham; sometimes fel-_|_low of Magdalen Col-_|_ledge in Oxford_. |
[_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 2: 1607: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 159 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _who
  would_, 111 _receiue some_: English Roman. Contents:—pp. (1–2) [not
  seen]: (3) title: (5–15) “To all Popish Recusants ...”: 1–159, the
  work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 201. The “Petition” came out in
  “September last” (1606?).


2. ¬Cleland¬, James. ΗΡΩ-ΠΑΙΔΕΙΑ, | OR | THE INSTITVTION OF A | YOVNG
NOBLE MAN, | BY | JAMES CLELAND. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1607: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + “271” (really 269, for 249–50 are
  omitted in the pagination) + [3]: p. 11 beg. _the first booke_, 111
  _fained voice_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines:
  (3–4) dedication to prince Charles: (5–8) “To the Noble Reader”: (9)
  “The Subiect and Order of these six Bookes”: (15) some errata, with
  introductory note: (16) dedication of the preface and book 1 to lord
  Hay: 1–10 the preface: 11–271, the work in six books each with a
  dedication, see below.

  See 1612 C, which is simply a reissue with new titlepage. The author
  recommends a nobleman to go to no University, but to Prince Henry’s
  Court or Academy at Nonsuch. The 2nd book is dedicated to Thomas
  Mourray, tutor to prince Charles: the 3rd to George earl of Essex, son
  of the marquess of Huntly: the 4th to sir John Harington, son of lord
  Harington: the 5th to mr. Francis Stewart Master of Mourray, and to
  mr. John Stewart son of the duke of Lennox: the 6th to Robert earl of
  Essex. The author was not an Oxford man, nor, apparently, connected
  with the place in any way.


3. ¬Cooper¬, Thomas. NONÆ | NOVEMBRIS | _Æternitati Consecratæ_ | JN |
_Memoriam admirandæ illius liberationis_ Principis, | _&_ Populi
_Anglicani à Proditione_ | _Sulphurea_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1607: sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 124: p. 11 beg. _Num laqueus_, 111
  _mus Deum_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication to
  the king and parliament: (4–7) “Præfatio ad Lectorem ...,” signed
  “Thomas Cooper”: (8–23) “Præludia ad Nonas,” short poems by Cooper:
  (23) “Errata ...”: 1–124, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 612, ©Fasti© i. 285, but the identity of
  the author appears to be still quite uncertain. The work is a
  rhetorical commentary, almost a sermon, on the Gunpowder Plot of 5
  Nov. 1605: but seems to afford no clue to the connexion of the author
  with Oxford.


4. ¬D\[unster]¬, I[ohn]. A | PROTESTATION A-|GAINST POPERY BY | _way of
a Confession of Christian_ | _Religion collected for the benefit_ | _of
private friends_. | [two _mottos_: then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 2: 1607: eights, 12^o: pp. [2] + 38: p. 11 beg. _of his
  transgression_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–38, the
  treatise, signed on last page “I. D.”, followed by a short poem “To
  the reader” signed “Roger Knight.”

  See 1609 D, and for the author Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 142. The poem
  on p. 38 explains that the work was written “some time agoe” “for
  priuate vse.” The Bodleian Catalogue (perhaps following Draudius’s
  ©Bibliotheca Exotica©, Frankf. 1625, p. 293) ascribes this book to
  John Dunster, but Wood did not know the author.


5. ¬James¬, dr. Thomas. [_woodcut_] | CONCORDANTI_Æ_ | SANCTORVM |
PATRVM HOC EST VERA ET | PIA LIBRI CANTICORVM PER | Patres vniversos tam
Græcos quam Lati-|_nos expositio_. | _Auctore Thoma Iames in Alma
Academia Oxo-_|_niensi Proto-Bibliothecario &_ | _olim Socio Coll.
Novi._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1607: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 18 + [2]: p. 11 beg. 930.
  _Hieron._; English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) motto: (3)
  “Lectori pio doctoque ...”, dated 30 July 1607: (4) List of
  Commentators on the Song of Solomon: 1–18, the work, a catena of
  references to printed expositions of the Song: 1–2, bibliographical
  list of editions cited.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 467. One of the Bodleian copies (4^o A.
  64 Th.) has a MS. list by James of 26 presentation copies, out of 78
  copies “receaued of Mr. Joseph [Barnes?] ... 30 Jul”, and some private
  opinions and suggestions about the book. The preface explains that if
  this instalment was well received, the author intended to proceed to
  similar publications for the rest of the Bible.


6. ¬King¬, bp. John. “John King’s Five Sermons preached before the King.
Oxf. 1607.”

  So in “Catalogi variorum ... librorum Richardi Davis ... Pars Tertia”
  (1688), p. 83, cf. “... Pars secunda” (1686), p. 125. Rare. See next
  art.


7. ¬King¬, bp. John. THE | FOVRTH | SERMON PREACHED AT | _HAMPTON COVRT
ON_ | _Tuesday the last of Sept._ 1606. | [_line_] | BY | [_line_] |
JOHN KINGE Doctor of Divinity, and | _Deane of Christ-Church in Oxon._ |
[_device_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 2: 1607: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 49 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _stration of
  the_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines: 3–49, the
  sermon, on Cant. viii. 11.

  A reprint of 1606 K. This is perhaps part of the preceding article.


8. ¬King¬, John. A | SERMON | PREACHED IN OXO^N: | the 5. of November.
1607. | [_line_] | _BY_ | [_line_] | JOHN KINGE Doctor of Divinity,
Deane | _of Christ Church, and Vicechancellor_ | of the Vniversity. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1607: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 35 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _causes and_:
  English Roman. Contents:—(3) title, within lines: 1–35 the sermon, on
  Ps. xlvi. 7–11.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 295.


9. ¬Prideaux¬, John. TABVL_Æ_ | AD GRAM-|MATICA GRÆCA | INTRODVCTORIÆ. |
IN QVIBVS | _Succinctè compingitur, brevissima, sed tamen ex-_|_pedita,
singularum partium orationis decli_⸗|_nabilium, Variandi ratio_. |
_Accessit_ | Vestibuli vice, ad eandem linguam παραίνεσις, in gratiam |
tyronum, quibus vt convenit explicatiora evol-|vere, ita necesse est hæc
ipsa | ad vnguem tenere. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1607: sm. 4^o: pp. [34], signn. A-D^4, ( )^1: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _profero clarâ_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A
  2^r-A 2^v, dedication to dr. Tho. Holland, signed “Jo. Prideaux”: A
  3^r-B 3^v “In Isocratis Busiridem de Græcæ linguæ studio, Præfatio”: B
  4^r-D 4^v “Grammatices Græcæ. Σχεδάρια.”, the work in six sections:
  ( ) 1^r “Conclusio ad Lectorem,” and short epigram.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267 where the date 1608 may be an error
  for 1607: and 1629 P, 1639 P, both of which edd. supply the date of
  the dedication as “1 Jan. 1607 = 1607/8,” but are otherwise apparently
  simply reprints. The dedication declares that the work was due to the
  suggestion of dr. Holland, and done in the last Whitsuntide holidays
  (1606).


10. ¬Wake¬, Isaac. REX PLATONICVS: | SIVE, | DE POTEN-|TISSIMI PRINCIPIS
| IACOBI BRITANNIARVM | Regis, ad illustrissimam Academiam |
_Oxoniensem, adventu, Aug._ 27. | Anno. 1605. | _NARRATIO_ | _AB ISAACO
VVAKE, PVBLICO A-_|_cademiæ ejusdem Oratore, tum temporis_ |
_conscripta, nunc verò in lucem_ | _edita, non sine authoritate_ |
_Superiorum._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1607: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 140 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _cademiæ_,
  111 _Romanas_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title; (5–8) dedication
  to Henry prince of Wales, dated “Oxoniæ, e Collegio Mertonensi”, 19
  June (1607): 1–140, the work, with the running title “Rex Platonicus,
  Sive Musæ Regnantes”: (1–2) Latin letter from the Chancellor of the
  University to the Vice-Chancellor, about the royal visit, with a
  preface by Wake.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 540. For other edd., which are only
  slightly altered, but add a funeral oration, see next art., and 1615
  W, 1627 W, 1635 W, 1663 W. The visit of the King was from 27 to 30
  Aug. 1605. The author says he wrote the account at the actual time of
  the visit. The oration was also printed at Oxford in 1608, and in
  English in Fuller’s ©Abel Redivivus©.


11. ——. REX PLATONICVS: | SIVE, | DE POTENTIS-|SIMI PRINCIPIS IA-|COBI
BRITANNIARVM | Regis, ad illustrissimam Aca-|demiam Oxoniensem, |
_adventu, Aug._ 27. | Anno. 1605. | _NARRATJO_ | AB ISAAcO WAKE,
PVBLI-|co Academiæ ejusdem Oratore, | _tunc temporis conscripta, nunc
i-_|_terum in lucem edita, multis_ | _in locis auctior &
emen-_|_datior_. | Editio Secunda. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1607: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 224 + [18]: p. 11 beg.
  _minum memoriam_, 111 _cumano irruunt_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) dedication to prince Henry, dated as 1st
  ed.: 1–224, the work: (1–3) the Chancellor’s letter, with preface: (4)
  device: (5) ORATIO | FVNEBRIS HA-|bita in Templo be-|_atæ Mariæ Oxon._
  | Ab ISAACO WAKE, | PVBLICO ACADE-|miȩ Oratore, _Maij_ 25. _An._ |
  1607. quum mœsti | _Oxonienses, pijs mani-_|_bus_ IOHANNIS | RAINOLDI
  | _parentarent_. | [_woodcuts_, then Impr. 11, 1607.]: (6–18) the
  oration.

  Rare: see preceding art.: for edd. of the Oration, see also preceding
  art.


                                 1608.

1. ¬Chetwind¬, Edward. CONCIO AD | CLERVM PRO GRA-|dû habita Oxoniæ. 9.
die | _Decembris._ 1607. | Per EDOARDVM CHETWIND è Coll. | _Exoniensi
sacræ Theologiæ_ | _Bacchalaureum._ | _Matri Academiæ Sacra._ |
[_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1608: (eights) 16^o: pp. [4] + 40 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _vt
  vobis_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Methodus,
  brevisque summa totius concionis”: 1–40, the sermon, on Acts xx. 24:
  (1) “Ad Lectores ... amicos.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 641.


2. ¬Cooke¬, James. IVRIDICA TRIVM QV_Æ_STI-|_onum ad Maiestatem
pertinentium deter-_|_minatio_; | IN QVARVM PRIMA ET VLTIMA | Processus
Iudicialis contra _H. Garnetum_ institutus, ex Iure Civili & Canonico
defenditur: | IN SECVNDA SVPREMA ET VNI-|versalis Principum potestas
explicatur, & ex eisdem | _principijs succinctè asseritur_; | OPPOSITA
PRAECIPVE EPISTOLAE CVI-|dam Dedicatoriæ Ad clarissimum virum. D. E. C.
| militem, advocatum fiscalem Generalem à Ca-|tholico, (vt ipse
subscribit) Theo-|logo conscriptæ; | _Habita Oxoniæ in vesperijs
Comitiorum Anno Do-_|_mini_ 1608. _à_ JACOBO COOKE _Novi_ | _Collegij
Socio Inceptore in_ | _Iure Civili_. | [_motto_, in Greek: then
_device_.]

  Impr. 11: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 49 + [3]: p. 11 beg.
  _intelligitur?_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3)
  dedication to Tho. Bilson bp. of Winchester: 1–49, the three theses
  and their determination.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 95. The theses were for the degree of
  D.C.L., chosen by the candidate himself.


3. ¬Hakewill¬, George. THE | VANITIE OF | the eie. | First beganne for
the Comfort of a | Gentlewoman bereaved of | her sight, and since vpon |
occasion inlarged & | published for the | Common | good, | BY | GEORGE
HAKEWILL _Master_ | _of Arts, and fellow of Exe-_|_ter Coll. in Oxford_.
[_motto_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7: 1608: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [6] + 161 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _and by
  consequence_, 111 _gers may not_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–6) “The Contents ...”: pp. 1–161, the work, in 31 chapters.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 255: and next art., 1615 H, 1633 H. The
  treatise contains all that can be said on physical and moral grounds
  against the Eye.


4. ——. [exactly as above, except that after “_Oxford_.” is added] “|
_The second Edition augmented by the_ | _Authour._ |”

  Impr. 7: 1608: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [6] + 170 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _and by
  consequence_, 111 _maker; I_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1–6) as 1st ed.:
  1–170, the work, in 31 chapters.

  See preceding art., of which this is a reprint with additions, except
  that the titlepage is not reprinted but only re-set.


5. ¬James¬, Thomas. AN | APOLOGIE FOR IOHN | WICKLIFFE, shewing his
conformitie | with the new Church of England; with an-|swere to such
slaunderous obiections, | as haue beene lately vrged against him | by
Father Parsons, the Apolo-|gists, and others. | _COLLECTED CHIEFLY OVT
OF_ | diuerse works of his in written hand, by Gods e-|speciall
providence remaining in the Publike | Library at Oxford, of the
Honorable foun-|dation of S^r. THOMAS BODLEY Knight: | BY | THOMAS JAMES
keeper of the same. [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 2: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 75 + [5]: p. 11 beg. _providence,
  which_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) dedication to sir
  Edw. Cooke, lord chief justice of the Common Pleas, dated “From the
  Library in Oxford _Feb._ 10. 1608”: (8) “Faults escaped in the
  printing ...”: 1–3, “the Preface vnto all true Catholicks, and
  Christian Readers”: 5–75, the Apology: 2–5, “Iohn VVickliffs life
  collected out of diuerse Auctors.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 467. This is closely connected with the
  Wycliff art., below: and on p. 60 marg. the other is said to be
  “printed with this Apologie”: the form of the signatures also
  indicates connexion. The Bodleian MSS. quoted seem to be MSS. Bodl.
  288 and 647, perhaps with others.


6. ¬King¬, John. A | SERMON | PREACHED AT WHITE-|HALL THE 5. DAY OF
NO.|vember, ann. 1608. | [_line_] | BY | [_line_] | JOHN KING Doctor of
Divinity, Deane of | _Christ=Church in Oxon: and Vicechauncel-_|_lor of
the Vniversity_. | _Published by commandement._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 2: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 40 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Seldome shal_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines: 1–40, the sermon,
  on Ps. xi. 2–4, within lines.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 295.


7. ——. A | SERMON | PREACHED IN S^t. MARIES | at Oxford the 24. of March
being the | day of his sacred Maiesties inauguration | _and Maundie
thursday_. | [_line_] | BY | [_line_] | JOHN KINGE Doctor of Divinity,
Deane | _of Christ Church, and Vicechancellor_ | _of the Vniversitie_. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 30: p. 11 beg. _dome, hee_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines: 1–30, the sermon, on 1
  Chron. xxix. 26–28, within lines.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 295.


8. ¬Panke¬, John. THE FAL OF BABEL. | _By the confusion of tongues,
directly proving against the_ | Papists of this, and former ages; that a
view of their wri-|_tings, and bookes being taken, it cannot be
discerned by any man_ | _living, what they would say, or how be
vnderstoode, in the_ | _question of the sacrifice of the Masse, the
Reall pre-_|_sence or transubstantiation; but in explaning_ | _their
mindes, they fall vpon such termes_, | _as the Protestants vse and
allow_. | FVRTHER | In the question of the Popes supremacy is shewed,
how they | abuse an authority of the auncient father S^t. Cyprian, A
Canon of | the 1. Niceene counsell, And the Ecclesiasticall historie of
Socra-|tes, and Sozomen. And lastly is set downe a briefe of the
suc-|cession of Popes in the sea of Rome for these 1600. yeeres |
_togither; what diversity there is in their accompt, what here-_|_sies,
schismes, and intrusions there hath bin in that sea_, | _deliuered in
opposition against their tables, where-_|_with now adaies they are very
busie; and o-_|_ther things discovered against them_. | _By_ | IOHN
PANKE. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [34] + 147 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _fence &
  proofe_, 111 _shop of Rome_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7)
  general Epistle dedicatorie to Protestants at Oxford, Cambridge and
  elsewhere, dated “From Tydworth the 1. of Nouember. 1607”: (9–29) “To
  al ... Recusants ...”, dated as before: (31–2) “The names of the
  Popish Writers, out of which this booke hath beene gathered.”: 1–147,
  the work, in the form of a dialogue between “Tuberius the Gent.” and
  “Romannus the Scholler”: (2–3) “The names of the Bishops or Popes of
  Rome for these 1600. yeeres ...”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 274. The work has no divisions, index or
  table of contents.


9. ¬Price¬, Daniel. THE MARCHANT. | A | SERMON | PREACHED AT PAVLES |
Crosse on Sunday the 24. of Au-|gust, being the day before Bar-|tholomew
faire. 1607. | [_line_] | BY | [_line_] | DANIELL PRICE _Master of Arts,
of Exeter_ | _Colledge in Oxford_. | [_device._] |

  Impr. 7: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 38: p. 11 beg. _of many who_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines: (3–4) dedication
  “to the honorable Companie of Merchants of the Cittie of London”,
  dated from Exeter Coll., Oxford, 20 Apr. 1608: 1–38, the sermon, on
  Matt. xiii. 45–46: every page of the book is within lines.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 511.


10. ——. _Prælium & præmium._ | THE CHRISTIANS WARRE | and rewarde. | A |
SERMON PREACHED | before the Kings Maiestie at VVhite-|_hall the_ 3. _of
May._ 1608. | [_line_] | BY | [_line_] | DANIELL PRICE _Master of Arts
of Exeter_ | _Colledge, and Chapleyn in ordinarie_ | _to the_ PRINCE. |
[_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 7_b_: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 34 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _guler,
  effectual_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines: (3–4)
  dedication to the archbp. of Canterbury, dated from Exeter coll.,
  Oxford, 19 June 1608: 1–34, the sermon on Rev. ii. 26: every page of
  the book has a border of lines.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 511. The dedication implies that the book
  took four days to print (?), and claims to be the first from the
  University Press since the archbishop (Richard Bancroft) became
  Chancellor (23 Apr. 1608).


11. ——. RECVSANTS | CONVERSION: | A | SERMON PREACHED AT S^t. | JAMES,
before the PRINCE on the 25. | _of Februarie._ 1608. | [_line_] | BY |
[_line_] | DANIELL PRICE _Master of Arts, of Exeter_ | _Colledge in
Oxford_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 35 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _ctions and_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within lines: 1–2, dedication
  to prince Henry: 3–35, the sermon, on Is. ii. 3, within lines: (2–3)
  [not seen].

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 511.


12. ¬Prideaux¬, John. [The ©Tabulae ad Grammatica Græca©, assigned by
Wood (©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267) to this date, is probably the 1607
edition, which see.]


13. ¬Rainolds¬, John. IOHANNIS RAI-|NOLDI ORATI-|_ones duæ_, | Ex ijs
quas habuit in Collegio Cor-|poris Christi, quum linguam | Græcam
profiteretur. | HABITAE, QVVM STVDIA, DE | more per ferias intermissa, |
repeterentur: | _Prior, quæ duodecima, post vaca-_|_tionem Natalitiam;_
| _Posterior, decima tertia, post vaca-_|_tionem Paschalem;_ | _Anno._
1576. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 5: 1608: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 106 + [6]: p. 11 beg. _non
  exhorter_, 101 _& in_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8)
  “Iohannes Rainoldus Academicis Oxoniensibus ...”, dated “è Colleg.
  Corp. Christ. Februar. 2:” 1–52, the first oration: 53–106, the second
  oration.

  The only copy at present met with is one in Worcester College Library
  at Oxford, but there is no special reason why the book should be
  scarce.


14. ¬S[ansbury]¬, I[ohn]. [_woodcuts_] | _ILIVM IN ITALIAM._ | OXONIA AD
| PROTECTIONEM | _Regis sui omnium opti-_|_mi filia, pedisequa_. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1608: (eights) 16^o: pp. [48], signn. A-C^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Flos regum_: Long Primer Italic. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  1^v, dedication to the king, signed “I. S.”, i. e. John Sansbury: A
  2^r-C 7^r, the work, the verso of every leaf being blank.

  Rare and valuable. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 58, where some
  extracts are given. Each leaf bears an engraving of the arms of the
  University or a College, and a short Latin poem following. The title
  appears to indicate the struggle of king James and England against
  Italian wiles, the words being from Virg. Aen. i. 72, where the
  context bears a different meaning. The dedication shows that the poems
  were written in 1606. The arms are in some respects peculiar, and were
  probably engraved at Oxford.


15. ¬Twyne¬, Brian. ANTIQVI-|TATIS ACADEMIÆ OXO-|NIENSIS APOLOGIA. | _In
tres libros divisa._ | AVTHORE | BRIANO TWYNO _in facultate Artium
Ma-_|_gistro, & Collegij Corporis Christi in eâdem_ | _Academia Socio._
[_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 384 + [72]: p. 11 beg. _perit quod
  nemo_, 111 _xitq;, sed etiàm_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–6) dedication to Robert Sackvill earl of Dorset, dated from Corpus
  Christi college, Oxford, 3 June 1608: 1–384, the work, in three books:
  (1–10) “Index rerum et verborum ...”: (11–21) “Catalogus authorum ...
  quibus Author ... vsus est”: (21) “Errata ...”: (23–54) “Miscellanea
  quædam de antiquis aulis et studentium collegiis ...”, according to
  parishes: (55–72) “Summorum Oxoniensis Academiæ Magistratuum
  [Chancellors, Vice-Chancellors, Proctors] ... catalogus.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 109 (where there is much about the fate
  of the MS., Twyne’s intentions, &c.) ii. 358. This is the first
  history of Oxford, but to some extent thrown into a controversial
  form, to prove the prior antiquity of Oxford to that of Cambridge. For
  a man of 28 it is, as Wood says, a wonderful performance. Almost all
  Twyne’s Oxford collections are still preserved in the University
  Archives and the Library of Corpus Christi college, Oxford. See 1620
  T.


16. ¬Wake¬, Isaac. ORATIO FV-|NEBRIS HABI-|ta in Templo beatæ | _Mariæ
Oxon._ | Ab ISAACO WAKE | [&c. precisely as in 1607 W.] | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1608: (twelve) 16^o: pp. [24], sign. A^12: sign. A 4^r beg.
  _occasionis ratione_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 2^r title: A
  3^r-A 9^r, the oration: (A 1 and A 12 not seen).

  A reprint of 1607 W (speech in 2nd ed.), which see.


17. [Wells, William.] Epistola ad authorem anonymum Libelli ... cui
titulus Stricturæ Breves in Epistolas D.D. Genevensium & Oxoniensium.

  Oxonii, e Theatro Sheldoniano, ... MDCviii, 4^o.

  An error for 1708.


18. ¬Wycliff¬, John. [_woodcut._] | TVVO SHORT TREA-|TISES, AGAINST THE
| _Orders of the Begging Friars_, | _compiled by_ | THAT | _FAMOVS
DOCTOVR OF THE CHVRCH_, | _and Preacher of Gods word_ JOHN WICKLIFFE, |
_sometime fellow of Merton, and Master of_ | _Ballioll Coll. in Oxford,
and afterwards_ | Parson of Lutterworth in Lece-|_stershire_. |
Faithfully Printed according to two ancient | Manuscript Copies, extant,
the one in | Benet Colledge in Cambridge, the o-|ther remaining in the
Publike Li-| brarie at Oxford. | [_motto._]

  Impr. 2: 1608: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 62 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _thow shalt
  haue_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “Faults escaped in
  the printing ...”: (3–8) Epistle dedicatorie to sir Thomas Flemynge,
  lord chief justice of England: signed “Tho: Iames,” “from the Publike
  Librarie in Oxford. Feb. 10. 1608”: 1–17, “A complaint of Iohn
  VVickliffe, exhibited to the King and Parliament”: 19–62, “A Treatise
  of Iohn VVickliffe against the orders of Friars”: (1–2) “An exposition
  of the hardest words,” a glossary.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 468. This is still the only printed
  edition of these two works of Wyclif, edited by dr. James. The usual
  titles of the treatises are “Four Articles” and “Objections of
  Freres.” This book is usually found with the James volume above, which
  is alluded to in the dedication. Dr. James does not specify the MSS.
  from which these treatises are printed, but MS. C.C.C. (Cambr.) 296
  seems to have both, while MS. Bodley 647 only contains the latter of
  the two.


                                 1609.

1. ¬Butler¬, Charles. THE | _FEMININE MONARCHIE_ | OR | A TREATISE
CONCERNING BEES, | AND THE DVE ORDERING OF THEM: | _Wherein_ | The
truth, found out by experience and diligent | observation, discovereth
the idle and fond | conceipts, which many haue writ-|ten anent this
subiect. | _By_ | CHAR: BVTLER Magd. | [_device._] |

  Impr. 7: 1609: (eights) 12^o: pp. [240], signn. _a_^4 _b_, A-N^8 O^4:
  sign. B 1^r beg. _animum, artem_, L 1^r _In Aquarius_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—sign. _a_ 1^r, title: _a_ 2^r-_a_ 4^r, “The preface to the
  Reader”, dated from Wotton (St. Lawrence) 11 July 1609: _a_ 4^v-_b_
  1^r, three commendatory poems, by Warner South (Latin) and A. Crosley:
  _b_ 1^v-_b_ 8^v, “The contents of this Booke”: A 1^r-O 4^v, the
  treatise.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 209, and 1633 B, 1634 B, 1682 B (in
  Latin): there are also edd. at Lond. 1623 and (in Latin) 1673. This is
  a remarkable book, from the style and evident practical experience of
  its author. Rude engravings occur on signn. C 7^r, C 7^v and (the
  first music printed at Oxford) F 1^r. The author mentions incidentally
  in the preface that a book on bees by T. H. of London (presumably
  Thomas Hill’s ©Profitable instructions for the ordering of bees©,
  Lond. 1579 and 1593) is really a plagiarism from Georgius Pictorius.


2. ¬Du Moulin¬, Pierre (_d._ 1658). HERACLITUS: | OR | MEDITATIONS VPON
THE | vanity & misery of humane life, first | written in French by that
excel-|lent Scholler & admirable di-|vine _Peter Du Moulin_ Mi-|nister
of the sacred | word in the refor-|med Church | of Paris: | _And
translated into English by_ | R. S. Gentleman. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1609: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [14] + 121 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _time is_, 111 _will say_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–6) Epistle dedicatorie “to his much honored Father: S. F. S.”:
  (7–13) “The authors epistle dedicatory to the Lady Ann of Rohan,
  Sister to the Duke of Rohan”, signed “Peter du Moulin”: 1–121, the
  work.

  See 1634 D. The original edition of Pierre Du Moulin’s Héraclite, ou
  de la Vanité et Misère de la vie humaine was printed in 1609. The
  present translator was probably Robert Stafford of Exeter college, who
  matr. on 15 Mar. 1604/5 at the age of 16, his father being sir Francis
  (?) Stafford, see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 291, and especially Bliss’s
  MS. additions in his own copy of the ©Athenæ© in the Bodleian. The
  coincidence of initials with Richard Smith in the 1634 edition seems
  to be accidental. See next art.


3. ——. [Another issue, almost identical in appearance, but entirely
reprinted: easy tests of the two issues are such as (1) on the titlepage
of this second issue, if it be the second, the fourth line begins
immediately under the beginning of the third line, whereas in the first
issue it begins an _em_ to the right: (2) the O of the imprint is upside
down in the first issue: (3) in the title of the author’s Epistle the
second issue has “Anne”, the first “Ann”: (4) p. 41 l. 6 of text, the
first issue has “Enuy”, the second “Envy”: (5) p. 121 l. 1 of text, the
first issue ends with “God”, the second with “God is.” But it is
difficult to say which is a reprint of the other: the second issue is
more modern in spelling and type, and the woodcut ornaments are possibly
less worn in the first. In fact it is conceivable that the second issue
is in reality a few years later.]


4. ¬D\[unster¬], I[ohn]. A | CONFESSION OF | CHRISTIAN RELIGION. |
[four _mottos_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7: 1609: (eights) 12^o: pp. 52 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _and
  punishment_: English Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–48, the treatise:
  on p. 48 “Etiam sic sentio, sic credo. I. D.”.

  For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 42. This is a reprint,
  omitting the poem at the end, of 1607 D. The paging is wild.


5. ¬H\[eale¬], W[illiam]. AN | APOLOGIE | FOR VVOMEN. | OR | AN
OPPOSITION TO M^r. | D^r. G. his assertion. Who held | in the Act at
Oxforde. | _Anno._ 1608. | _That it was lawfull for husbands to beate_ |
_their wiues._ | By W. H. of Ex. in Ox. | [_motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 2: 1609: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 66: p. 11 beg. _lemnize marriage_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication “to the
  honourable and right-vertuous Ladie, the Ladie M. H. ...”: (5) “The
  contents of this Apologie”: (6) the arms of the University: 1–66, the
  work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 89, where Wood states that the author was
  William Heale and the person opposed dr. William Gager, D.C.L. in
  1589. The question “An liceat marito uxorem verberare” was one of
  those selected for the degree of D.C.L., 11 July 1608, but Gager was
  neither inceptor nor respondent. The lady M. H. seems from the
  dedication to have commanded Heale to undertake the task of replying
  and to have allowed him scant time in which to do it.


6. ¬Reuter¬, Adam. EX L. VT | VIM 3. D. IVST: | ET JVRE. | _QVÆSTIONES_
| Iuris controversi | 12. | _Auctore_ | ADAMO REVTER. Cotbusio L. |
Siles. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1609: sm. 4^o: pp. [56], signn. A-G^4: sign. B 1^r beg. _pi
  patitur_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to New
  College, dated “Cursim ex Musæo. Oxon.” 1 Jan. “1609”: (5–56) the 12
  quaestiones.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 420. Wood is mistaken in calling Reuter a
  Welshman. He was a Silesian from Cottbus, as he testifies above and in
  the admission register of the Bodleian, 3 Sept. 1608. L probably
  stands for Licentiatus utriusque juris. He was never matriculated.


7. ¬Sanderson¬, John. INSTITVTIONVM | DIALECTICARVM | _Libri Quatuor_, |
_A_ | IOANNE SANDERSONO, | Lancastrensi, Anglo, Liberalium | _artium
Magistro, et sacræ Theologiæ_ | _Doctore, Metropolitanæ Ec-_|clesiæ
Cameracensis Ca-|nonico, conscripti. | _Editio quarta._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1609: 8^o: pp. [4] + 91 + [1]: beg. ^h_Propriū est_: Brevier
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Auctoris praefatio. Ad
  iuventutem bonarum artium studiosam”: 5–91, the work.

  A reprint of 1602 S, which see.


                                 1610.

1. ¬Benefield¬, Sebastian. DOCTRINÆ CHRISTIANÆ | SEX CAPITA, | _TOTIDEM
PRÆLECTIONIBVS_ | _in Scholâ Theologicâ Oxoniæ pro formâ_ | _habitis
discussa, &_ | _disceptata_. | ACCESSIT APPENDIX AD CA-|put secundum, de
Consiliis Evangelicis, in | quâ ad omnes SS. PATRVM autorita-|tes, ab
HVMPHREDO LEECHIO | pro iisdem asserendis citatas, | respondetur. |
AVTORE | SEBASTIANO BENEFIELD. | SS. THEOLOGIÆ D. COLLEGII | Corporis
Christi Socio. | [_motto_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1610: sm. 4^o: pp. [20] + 208 + [12]: p. 11 beg. _&
  Sacerdotes_, 111 _ci me dedet_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–6) dedication to bp. George Abbot, dated “Oxon. è Collegio Corporis
  Christi. Junii 7. 1610”: (7) “Catalogus eorum quæ hoc opere
  continentur”: (9–20) præfatio ad Academicos Oxonienses, 10 June 1610:
  1–208, the work: p. 145 is a titlepage:—“APPENDIX | AD CAPVT |
  SECVNDVM, DE | CONSILIIS EVANGELI-|CIS, in quâ ad omnes S. S. PA-|TRVM
  autoritates, ab HVM-|PHREDO LEECHIO pro | _iisdem asserendis
  cita-_|_tas, respondetur_. | AVTORE | SEBASTIANO BENEFIELD. | SS.
  THEOLOGIÆ D. COLLEGII | Corporis Christi Oxon. Socio. | [2 _mottos_,
  then _woodcuts_, then impr. 7 and date]: (1–4) “Index locorum Sacræ
  Scripturæ ...”: (5–12) “Index rerum”: (12) “Ad lectorem ... Errata
  typographica ...” (corrected in some copies.)

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 488. This work is a reply to a challenge
  from Leech.


2. ¬Bunny¬, Edmund. OF DIVORCE | FOR ADVLTERIE, AND | Marrying againe:
that there is | _no sufficient warrant so to do_. | _VVITH A NOTE IN THE
END_, | _that_ R. P. _many yeeres since was answered._ | By EDM. BVNNY
Bachelour of Divinitie. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1610: sm. 4^o: pp. [22] + 171 + [9]: p. 11 beg. _ces,
  which_, 111 _they had not_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–5) Dedication to archbp. Bancroft, dated Oxford, 3 July 1610:
  (6–11) the preface, dated Bolton Percy, 13 Dec. 1595: (12–18) “An
  Advertisement to the Reader,” dated Oxford 4 June 1610: (19–20) “The
  Contents of the Treatice ...”: (21–22) “The Table of Method” an
  inserted quarto leaf folded, printed on the recto only, a logical plan
  of the argument: 1–171, the treatise: (1–3) “Another note for the
  Reader” against R. P. and Radford, dated Oxford, 22 June 1610: (4–9)
  “The Alphabet Table ...,” an index.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 222. The dedication states that the
  treatise was completed many years before (1595?) and that archbp.
  Whitgift had it in his hands and approved it. The advertisement gives
  further details of the occasion and history of the treatise. The note
  alludes to Bunny’s connexion with Robert Parsons’ ©Resolution© or
  ©Directory©, see 1585 P, and J. Radford’s ©Directory©. See 1613 B.


3. ¬Dunster¬, John. CÆSARS PENNY, | _OR_ | A SERMON OF | OBEDIENCE,
PROVING | by the practise of all ages, that all per-|_sons ought to be
subiect to the_ | _King, as to the Su-_|_periour_. | PREACHED AT S^t
MARIES | in Oxford at the Assises the 24 | of Iuly 1610. | BY | JOHN
DVNSTER _Master of Arts and Fel-_|_low of Magdal. Colledge_. | [_motto_,
then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7: 1610: (eights) 12^o: pp. [6] + 38 + [4]: p. 11 beg.
  _offendere nō_: English Roman. Contents: p. (1) title: (3–6)
  dedication to George Abbot bp. of London: 1–38, the sermon, on 1 Pet.
  ii. 13–14.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 142.


4. ¬Holyoke¬, Francis. A | SERMON OF OBEDIENCE | ESPECIALLY VNTO
AVTHORITIE | Ecclesiasticall wherein the principall controver-|sies of
our church are handled, and many of | their obiections which are
refractorie to | the government established, answered | _though briefly
as time and space could_ | _permit; being preached at a Visita-_|_tion
of the Right Worsh:_ | _M_^r D. HINTON, | _in Coventree_. | _By_ | FRAN:
HOLYOKE. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7: 1610: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 32: p. 11 beg. _readeth, receiueth_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) short dedication to sir
  Clement Throckmerton: (3–4) preface to the author signed I. D. H.:
  1–32, the sermon, on Hebr. xiii. 17: 32, “To the Reader”, an apology
  for the rude style.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 346: and 1613 H. The author is the
  well-known writer of the Latin and English Dictionary. From the
  preface it is clear that the sermon, which is written in an
  uncompromising tone, caused great opposition in Coventry, of which
  town some curious details of the puritanical feeling are given: it is
  now published “not altogether against” the author’s mind. See 1613 H.


5. ¬James¬, Thomas. BELLVM GREGORIANVM | SIVE | CORRVPTI-|ONIS ROMANÆ IN
OPE-|RIBUS D. GREGORII M. JUS-|su Pontificum Rom. recognitis atq¿ue¿ |
editis, ex Typographia Vaticana, | _Loca insigniora, observata à_ |
_Theologis ad hoc offici-_|_um deputatis_. [three _stars_: then
_device_.]

  Impr. 11: 1610: sm. 4^o: pp. [8], sign. A^4: p. 7 beg. _Romæ_ 1591:
  Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) dedication to English
  theologians by “Tho. Iames” in Latin: (3–4) preface “benevolo
  lectori”: (5–7) the list of passages: (7–8) conclusion: (8) list of
  MSS. used.

  A table of passages corrupted in the Rome edition of 1591 and the Bâle
  ed. of 1564, of the Epistolae, Moralia and Pastoralia of Gregory the
  Great, compared with the readings of MSS. in the Bodleian, New, Oriel,
  Merton, Corpus and St. John’s colleges, and belonging to Richard
  Bancroft, archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Allen, and Rich. Hooker,
  the task being undertaken by 12 theologians.


6. ¬Price¬, Daniel. [_line_] | THE | [_line_] | DEFENCE | OF TRVTH
AGAINST A | _booke falsely called_ | THE TRIVMPH OF TRVTH | sent over
from Arras A. D. 1609. | BY | HVMFREY LEECH late Minister. | _Which
booke in all particulars is answered_, | _and the adioining Motiues of
his_ | _revolt confuted_: | BY | DANIELL PRICE, of Exeter Colledge in |
Oxford, Chaplaine in ordinary to the most high | and mighty, the
_Prince_ of _Wales_. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 7: 1610: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 379 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _ving to
  vindicate_, 111 _your soule_: English Roman. Contents—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) dedication to the Prince of Wales: 1–379, the work: (1) a
  postscript: then “Errata.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 511. The book is an answer to Leech’s ©A
  triumph of truth. Or declaration of the doctrine concerning
  Evangelicall counsayles; lately delivered in Oxford ...© _n. pl._
  1609, 8^o: and appears to reprint the whole of the latter work.


7. ¬Rainolds¬, John. SVMMA COLLO-|QVII JOHANNIS RAINOLDI | CVM JOHANNE
HARTO | _De Capite & Fide Ecclesiæ_ | UBI VARIÆ OBITER TRACTANTUR
QVÆSTI-|ones, de _Sufficientia_, & _orthodoxa expositione Scripturarum_,
_Ministerio_ | _Ecclesiæ_, _Functione Sacerdotali_, _Sacrificio Missæ_,
unà cum aliis, | quȩ in religione agitantur controversiis; prȩcipuè |
verò, & ex instituto, quæstio de _Ecclesiæ regi-_|_mine_, explicata in
iis quȩ de Christi su-|premâ Monarchiâ, de Petri prȩ-|tensâ, Papȩ
usurpatâ, Princi-|pis _legitimâ supremitate_ | disputantur. | _A JOHANNE
RAINOLDO CONSCRIPTA, CONVENIENTER COM-_|pendiis illis quæ uterque
scripto mandârat: examinata demum, à JOHAN-|NE HARTO, atq¿ue¿ (post
addita quædam, quædam mutata ut ipsi | commodum videbatur) pro fideli
narratione eorum, quæ | inter ipsos in Colloquio disserebantur, | habita
& comprobata. | ANTE QVATVOR ET VIGINTI ANNOS EX AN-|_glico sermone in
Latinum versa, nunc autem primùm jussu, curáq¿ue¿ Reverendis-_|_simi
atq¿ue¿ vigilantissimi Præsulis_, RICHARDI BANCROFTI, | _Cantuariensis
Archi-episcopi_ (_qui non domesticarum modò_, | _quibus præest, sed
etiam exterarum Ecclesiarum_ | _bono impensè studet_,) _è situ & pulvere
evo-_|_cata, & in lucem emissa_. | HENRICO PARRAEO, _Gloucestrensi
Episcopo, interprete_. | [_line._] | [_device._] | [_line._]

  Impr. 11: 1610: (sixes), la. 8^o or perhaps fol.: pp. [16] + 402 +
  [14]: p. 11 beg. _bras; neque_, 111 _tit, & præ_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–7) dedication to Christian iv, king of
  Denmark (brother of the Queen) by Parry: (9–10) “Iohannes Hartus
  candido Lectori,” dated “ex Arce Londinensi, Julii 7”: (11–16)
  “Johannes Rainoldus alumnis anglicorum Seminariorum Romæ & Rhemis”:
  1–402, the work: (3–11) “Index rerum ...”: (12–14) “Index locorum
  Sacræ Scripturæ”: (14) “Errata typographica: quorum quædam in omnibus,
  quædam in quibusdam exemplaribus tantùm.” Every page is within a
  border of lines.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 15. The original ©Summe of the
  Conference© was published at London in 1584 &c. The conference itself
  was at the Tower of London in about 1583, see Gillow’s ©English
  Catholics© iii (1888?). 155.


                                 1611.

1. ¬Benefield¬, Sebastian. A | SERMON | PREACHED IN S^t MARIES | Church
in Oxford, March xxiv. MDCX. | at the solemnizing of the happy
in-|_auguration of our gracious sove-_|_raigne_ KING IAMES. | WHEREIN IS
PROVED THAT KINGS DOE | hold their kingdomes immediately from God. |
_By_ | SEBASTIAN BENEFIELD D. of Divinitie | _Fellow of Corpus Christi
College_. |[_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1611: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 18 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _vp, is
  avowed_: English Roman. Contents.—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to
  John King, bp. of London, dated “from my study in Corpus Christi
  College. Septemb. 9. 1611”: 1–18, the sermon, on Ps. xxi. 6.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 488. The Bp. of London had only been
  consecrated the day before this dedication.


2. Davies, John. Microcosmos: see 1603 D.


3. ¬Jesuit’s Pater Noster.¬ THE | IESVITES PATER | NOSTER | _Giuen_ | TO
PHILIP III KING | of SPAINE for his new | _yeares gift this present_ |
yea e. 1611. | _Together with the Ave Maria._ | Written first in French:
Engli-|shed by _W. I._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7_a_: (four) 16^o or 12^o: pp. [8], sign. A^4: sign. A 3^r beg.
  _There are_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title, within a
  border: A 2^r-A 3^v, “The Jesuits Pater Noster,” beg. “O Mighty
  Phillip King Of men”: A 4^r-A 4^v, “The Ave Maria to the Queene of
  France”, beg. “WHen Iudas with a kisse betraid his Lord.”

  The only copy known is in the British Museum. A bitter satire against
  the Jesuits. In each piece the stanzas consist of four English lines
  and a Latin clause of the Pater Noster or Ave Maria (24 and 8
  respectively). This piece was probably not printed at Oxford, two of
  the woodcuts being not otherwise found there.


4. ¬Reinolds¬, John. EPIGRAMMATA, | AVCTORE IOAN-|NE REINOLDO IN LL. |
Baccalaureo. Novi Colle-|gij socio. | [_motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 11: 1611: (eight) 12^o: pp. [16], sign. A^8: sign. A 4^r beg.
  21. _Guiderius_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 1^v
  divisions of “Prima Chilias complectens disticha tantùm anthrôpina in
  decem centurias divisa”. (Reges, Episcopi, Barones, Doctores, Equites,
  Graduati, Armigeri, Scholares, Generosi, Generalia): A 2^r “Prima
  centuria reges Britannici & Anglici in Honorem regis Jacobi,” with a
  motto: A 2^v “Elenchum personarum tibi lector exhiberemus, nisi
  libellus ipse esset pro Elencho”: A 2^r-A 8^v the prima Centuria, 111
  Latin distiches: A 8^v “Ad Lectorem,” promising 10 Centuriae.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 148, and 1612 R. This is a first
  instalment of 111 distiches on Kings and Queens of Britain: only the
  second part (Episcopi) seems to have subsequently seen the light, in
  1612.


                                 1612.

1. ¬Cleland¬, James. The Instruction of | a young Noble-man, | BY |
IAMES CLELAND. | [_woodcut: the whole title is within a border of
ornament._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: in every other point identical with 1607 C.

  This is a reissue of the sheets of 1607 C, errata and all, with a new
  titlepage sewn in, the old one being torn off. The new titlepage was
  not printed at Oxford, as is shown by the woodcut ornaments and
  general style, but probably by W. Stansby for John Barnes in London.


2. ¬Day¬, John, of Oriel college, Oxford. CONCIO AD CLERVM. | Habita in
Templo _B. Mariæ_ Oxon. | _Iunij_ 25 _Ann. Dom._ 1612. | JOANNES c. 9.
v. 1. [_error for_ 4] | _Donec_ DIES _est_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 11: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 25 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _Magistratus
  indicat_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2–3) Latin
  dedication to the heads of Colleges and Halls at Oxford, signed
  “Joannes Dayus,” with a list of the Heads: (4) text of the sermon, 2
  Kings vi. 1–4: 1–25, the sermon: (2–3) Latin letter from Day to dr.
  Thomas Clayton, dated from Oriel coll. Oxford, 11 July (1612).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 412, and 1615 D. The dedication gives a
  complete list of the Heads of Houses, and two official orders of the
  Colleges, in dignity, and in antiquity. The letter gives details of
  possible future publications by Day and personal points about dr.
  Clayton, who advised the printing of this sermon. At p. 21 is a list
  of Founders of Colleges.


3. ¬Day¬, John. Concio ad Clerum “In Joh. 9. 4. Oxon. 1612. qu[arto].”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 412, after the notice of the preceding
  art., and no doubt due to confusion with it.


4. ¬Day¬, John. DAVIDS DESIRE | TO GO TO CHVRCH: | as it was published
in two | Sermons in _S_^t _Maries_ | in Oxford. | The _One_ the _fift_
of _November_ in the After-|noone to the Vniversity 1609. The | _Other_
on Christmas Day fo llow-|ing to the Parishioners | of that place. |
_By_ | IOHN DAY Bachelour of Divinity, and one of the _Fellowes_ of |
_Oriell Colledge_. | [_motto_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7: 1612: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 104: p. 11 beg. _Even that_:
  English Roman. Contents:—pp. (1–2) [not seen]: (3) title: (5)
  dedication to Oriel college and St. Mary’s parish, Oxford: (7–15) “The
  Epistle dedicatorie”: 1–57 the 1st sermon, on Ps. xxvii. 4: 57, an
  Erratum: 59–104, the 2nd sermon, on the same.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 412, and 1615 D. The second sermon is
  stated by the author to have been his first preached as Vicar of St.
  Mary’s, succeeding mr. Wharton. At p. 40 he mentions Tuesday as a
  proverbially fatal day to the Irish.


5. ¬Du Moulin¬, Pierre, the elder. THE WATERS OF SILOE. | TO QVENCH |
THE FIRE OF PVRGATORY | and to drowne the traditions, Lim-|boes, mans
satisfactions and all Popish | Indulgences, against the rea-|_sons and
allegations of a Portu-_|_gall Frier of the order of_ | S^t. Frances,
_suppor-_|_ted by three_ | _treatises_. | The one written by the same
Franciscan and | entituled _The fierie torrent, &c._ | The other two by
two Doctors of Sorbon. | The one intituled _The burning furnasse_. The |
other _The fire of Helie_. | BY | PETER DV MOVLIN Minister of | Gods
word. | [_motto_] | Faithfully translated out of French by _I. B._ |

  Impr. 30: 1612: (eights) 12^o: pp. [34] + 406: p. 11 beg. _assured
  of_, 111 _one part of_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–7)
  Epistle dedicatory to “sir Dudley Digs,” signed “I. B.”: (9–32) “The
  Preface to the Reader”: (33–34) “The Contents of this booke”: 1–406,
  the work, entitled “A Confutation of Purgatory.”

  The Friar against whom this book was written was Jacques (sign. A 4^r)
  i. e. Jacques Suares, and the two Doctors were P. V. Palma Cayer and
  A. Duval (sign. A 3^v). The first French edition was printed in 1603,
  entitled ©Accroissement des eaux de Siloé ...© The work is one of Du
  Moulin’s less known productions.


6. ¬Henry¬, prince, _d._ 1612. [_woodcuts_] | EIDYLLIA | IN OBITVM
FVLGENTISSIMI | HENRICI | Walliæ Principis duodecimi, Romæq¿ue¿ ruentis
| Terroris maximi, | _Quo nihil maius meliúsve terris_ | _Fata donavere,
boniq¿ue¿ Divi_ | _Nec dabunt, quamvis redeant in aurum_ | _Tempora
priscum_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [36], signn. A-D^4 E^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Amyntas_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r, short
  dedication to the memory of prince Henry, in Latin: A 3^r-E 2^r, the
  poems: E 2^v “Lectori ξυναποθνήσκοντι,” an epilogue.

  The writers and editor of these poems on the death of Prince Henry are
  more disguised than usual. The editor was undoubtedly “Jacobus
  Aretius,” i. e. James Martin, of Broadgates hall. There is one poem in
  Chaldee (Hebrew type), one in Syriac, one in Arabic, one in Turkish
  (all three in Roman type) and a few in Greek. There are three Idylls,
  “Amyntas,” “Tityrus,” and “Daphnis,” in Latin hexameter verse,
  presumably by the Editor.


7. ——. LVCTVS POSTHVMVS | SIVE | ERGA DEFVN-|CTVM ILLVSTRIS-|SIMVM
HENRICVM WAL-|LIÆ PRINCIPEM, COL-|legij Beatæ MARIæ MAGDALENæ | apud
Oxonienses Mecænatem | longè indulgentissimum, | _Magdalenensium
of-_|ficiosa Pietas. | [_motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 11: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 62 + [8]: p. 11 beg. _Multâque
  Myrrhæ_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) distich, within a
  border: 1–62, the poems: 1–7, “... Oratio funebris habita apud
  Magdalenenses tempore Prandij exequialis, 7^o Decemb. quo die
  desideratiss. Principi Henrici funeri iusta persoluta fuere,” signed
  “Accep. Frewen.”

  Poems, chiefly in Latin (a few in Greek and one Spanish), by members
  of Magdalen College, on the death of Prince Henry (_d._ 6 Nov. 1612),
  who was connected with the College through his tutor John Wilkinson.


8. ¬Hooker¬, dr. Richard. [_woodcut._] | THE | ANSVVERE | _OF_ | M^r.
RICHARD HOOKER TO A | _SVPPLICATION PREFERRED_ | by M^r. WALTER TRAVERS
to | the H H. Lords of the Pri-|_vie Counsell_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 32 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _ver heard
  that_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–32, the Answer.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 697, and under _Travers_, below: both
  treatises have often been reprinted. This and the following treatises
  by Hooker seem to have been edited by Henry Jackson, see Wood’s ©Ath.
  Oxon.©, iii. 577.


9. ——. A | LEARNED | AND COMFORTA-|BLE SERMON OF THE | certaintie and
perpetuitie of | _faith in the Elect; especially_ | _of the Prophet
Habak-_|_kuks faith_. | BY | RICHARD HOOKER, SOME-|times fellow of
Corpus Christi | _College in Oxford_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 17 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _ly enimy is_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title; 1–17, the sermon, on Hab. i. 4.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 697.


10. ——. A | LEARNED | DISCOVRSE OF IV-|STIFICATION, WORKES, | and how
the foundation of faith | _is overthrowne_. | _By_ | RICHARD HOOKER,
sometimes Fellow | of Corpus Christi College | _in Oxford_. | ⁂ |
[_University arms._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 69 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _should make
  vs_, 61, _men, how many_: English Roman. Contents: p. (1) title: (3–4)
  “To the Christian reader” signed “from Corpus Christi College in
  Oxford” “Henry Iackson”: 1–69, the Sermon (on Hab. i. 4): (2–3) (not
  seen).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 697. This is the first edition, and
  apparently the first of Jackson’s issues of Hooker’s sermons.


11. ——. [_woodcut._] | A | LEARNED | SERMON OF | THE NATVRE | _OF
PRIDE_, | BY | RICHARD HOOKER, SOME-|times fellow of Corpus Christi |
_College in Oxford_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 17 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _dome as my_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–17, the sermon, on Hab. ii.
  4.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 697.


12. ——. [_woodcut_] | A | REMEDIE | AGAINST SOR-|ROW AND FEARE, |
delivered in a funerall | _Sermon_, | BY | RICHARD HOOKER, SOME-|times
fellow of Corpus Christi | _College in Oxford_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 14: p. 11 beg. _full and
  faintharted_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–14, the sermon,
  on John xiv. 27.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 697.


13. ¬James¬, dr. Thomas. _The Iesuits Downefall_, | THREATNED | AGAINST
THEM | BY THE SECVLAR | Priests for their wicked liues, accur-|_sed
manners, Hereticall doctrine, and more then Matchiavil-_|_lian Policie_.
| _TOGETHER_ | WITH THE LIFE OF FATHER | PARSONS _AN ENGLISH_ |
_IESVITE_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 72: p. 11 beg. _by a secular_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–9) Epistle dedicatory to the
  “Iudges and Iustices of Peace for the Countie of Oxon.”, dated “From
  the Publique Library in Oxford, Sept. 16. 1612”, signed “Tho. James”:
  (10–12) “The Propositions”: 1–51, 100 propositions against Jesuits
  stated and commented on: 52–72, the Life of Parsons.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 467. A story is told at p. 53 of
  Parsons disfurnishing the Balliol College Library of “many ancient
  bookes and rare Manuscripts”, and of his expulsion at a later period
  from the College.


14. [¬Mornay¬, Philippe de, seigneur Du Plessis.] [_woodcuts._] | TWO |
HOMILIES | CONCERNING | the meanes how to re-|_solue the
controver-_|_sies of this time_. | ⁂⁂ | _Translated out of French._ |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [4] + 138: p. 11 beg. _it be_, 111
  _the one_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “To the
  Reader”: 1–71, homily on Matt. xvii. 5 (_Hunc audite_): 72–138, homily
  on Matt. xix. 8 (_Non sic fuit ab initio_): 138, “Errata.”

  Rare. There is another issue of this book in the same year, identical
  in every respect, even to the Errata, except that on the title after
  the asterisks and before the woodcuts come the words “_First written
  in French by_ Ph. | Mornay, _and now translated_ | _into English_”
  instead of the single line of the first issue. The second issue
  appears to be less rare. In each sign. A 1 is almost entirely gone,
  which consisted of the titlepage in some early form before a preface
  was decided on. The preface even in the second issue pretends that the
  author is unknown to the translator: who _may_ be identical with the
  “I. V.” of 1615 M.


15. ¬Panke¬, John. _ECLOGARIVS_, | OR BRIEFE SVMME | OF THE TRVTH OF
THAT | Title of Supreame Governour, given | to his Maiestie in causes
Spirituall, | and Ecclesiasticall, from the Kings of Israell, | in the
old Testament; the Christian Em-|perours in the Primitiue Church; |
confirmed by 40. Epistles of Leo the Bishop of Rome, vnto | the
Emperours, Theo-|dosius, Martianus, | and Leo. | _Not published before._
| _BY_ | IOHN PANKE. | [_motto_: then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 7: 1612: (eights) 12^o: pp. [2] + (82 + ?): p. 11 beg. _may take
  an oath_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1-(82-?) the treatise.

  Very rare. The running title is “The truth of the oath | of
  Supremacie.” All after p. 82 (sign. F 2) is at present unknown, the
  British Museum copy being imperfect: but probably other copies exist.


16. ¬Sclater¬, William, of King’s college, Cambridge. [_woodcut._] | THE
| CHRISTIANS | STRENGTH. | _BY_ | WILLIAM SCLATER. | BATCHELAR OF
DIVINITY | _and Minister of the word of God at_ PIT-|MISTER _in
Somerset_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 17 + [3]: p. 11 beg. ^k_Be warmed_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to William
  Hill of Pitmi[n]ster: 1–17, the sermon, on Phil. iv. 13.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 228.


17. ——. [_woodcut._] | THE | MINISTERS | PORTION. | _BY_ | WILLIAM
SCLATER. | BATCHELAR OF DIVINITY | _and Minister of the Word of God at_
PIT-|MISTER _in Somerset_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 49 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _Christs
  priesthood_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication
  to Thomas Southcot of Moones-Ottery in Devon: 1–49, the sermon, on 1
  Cor. ix. 13–14.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 228.


18. ——. [_woodcut._] | THE | SICK SOVLS | SALVE. | _BY_ | WILLIAM
SCLATER. | BATCHELAR OF DIVINITY | _and Minister of the word of God at_
PIT-|MISTER _in Somerset_. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 36: p. 11 beg. _wish? The_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to John and Anna
  Horner of Melles in Somerset: 1–36, the sermon, on Prov. xviii. 14.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 228.


19. ¬Smith¬, capt. John. _A MAP OF VIRGINIA_ | VVIT¿H¿ A DESCRIPTI-|ON
OF THE COVNTREY, THE | Commodities, People, Govern-|ment and Religion. |
_VVritten by Captaine_ SMITH, _sometimes Go-_|_vernour of the Countrey._
| WHEREVNTO IS ANNEXED THE | proceedings of those Colonies, since their
first | departure from England, with the discourses, | Orations, and
relations of the Salvages, | and the accidents that befell | them in all
their Iournies | and discoveries. | _TAKEN FAITHFVLLY AS THEY_ | _were
written out of the writings of_ | DOCTOR RVSSELL. RICHARD WIEFIN. | THO.
STVDLEY. WILL. PHETTIPLACE. | ANAS TODKILL. NATHANIEL POVVELL. | IEFFRA
ABOT RICHARD POTS. | And the relations of divers other diligent
observers there | _present then, and now many of them in England_. | _By
VV. S._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + map + 39 + [5] + 110 + [2]: p. 11
  beg. _some neere_, also _Such actions_, 101 _those humors_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication “To the hand” (explained
  by “I found it only dedicated to a Hand, and to that hand I addresse
  it”), signed “T. A.”: (5–7) glossary of Indian words, with a few
  sentences &c.: after p. (8) a map, see below: 1–39, “The description
  of Virginia by captaine Smith”: (2) title, “The proceedings of the
  English colonie” &c. as next art.: (4–5) “To the Reader”, signed “T.
  Abbay”: 1–110, the Proceedings.

  Very rare: priced in Quaritch’s Rough List 88, (1888), no. 174 (cf.
  181), at £125: the map alone at £40. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 650.
  The map of Virginia which follows p. 8 is about 12–15/16 in. high ×
  16⅜ in. broad, taking the extreme limits of the copperplate (the inner
  bounding line is 12⅜ × 15¾ in.): the title “Virginia” is on a scroll,
  and below the Scale of Leagues is “Discovered and Discribed by Captain
  Iohn Smith | Grauen by William Hole”: at the top left corner (to the
  reader) is a picture of Powhatan in state, and at the top right corner
  a figure of a “Sasquesahanoug” man. This first state of the map ought
  _not_ to have “1607” below the inscription about Powhatan, _nor_
  “1606” below the word “Smith” in the words below the Scale, _nor_
  “Page 41 | Smith” in the lower right corner, _nor_ the latitude and
  longitude marks on any side except the base; all of which additions
  are on the reissue of the map in Smith’s ©General Historie of Virginia
  ...© (Lond. 1624, fol.), and also in the reissue in ©Purchas his
  Pilgrimes©, 4th part, Lond. 1625, except that instead of “Page 41
  Smith” there is in the upper right (?) corner “1690,” a reference to
  the page.

  The W. S. of the first part is the rev. William Simmonds, D.D. of
  Magd. Coll. Oxford, for some time a resident in Virginia, see Wood’s
  ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 142, while the publisher of both parts was Thomas
  Abbay. The whole of the first part with trifling changes is reprinted
  in Smith’s ©Generall Historie of Virginia© (London. 1624, fol.) bk. 2,
  p. 21: in ©Purchas his Pilgrimes© (Lond. 1625, fol.) Lib. ix, ch. 3,
  p. 1691: and the second part, slightly abridged, in the same books,
  bk. 3, p. 41, where the glossary and map occur, but the 12th chap. is
  considerably altered: and ch. 4, p. 1705, respectively. The whole is
  carefully reprinted from the 1612 ed. by Edw. Arber in his ©English
  Scholar’s Library. Capt. John Smith ... Works.© (Birmingham, 1884),
  from whose notes the following words are taken:—

                           [Preface to part 1].

  “The first part of this Work is evidently an expanded and revised text
  of that “Mappe of the Bay and Rivers, with an annexed Relation of the
  Countries and Nations that inhabit them” (p. 444), which President
  JOHN SMITH sent home, about November 1608, to the Council in London,
  as the result of his explorations in Chesapeake Bay in the previous
  summer.

  That this book of travels &c. should have been printed at the Oxford
  University Press is a most singular fact....

  The hand printing presses in England were jealously registered, and
  locked up every night, to prevent surrepti[ti]ous printing; all
  through the lifetime of our Author: and the Company of Stationers of
  London especially watched with a keen jealousy the printing operations
  of the two Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, who each possessed a
  single hand press. See W. HERBERT’S edition of J. AMES’S
  ©Typographical Antiquities©, iii, 1398, Ed. 1790, 4to.

  This solitary hand printing press at Oxford, usually produced sermons,
  theological and learned Works, &c.; in the midst of which, this book
  of travels crops up in a startling manner.

  Why could not, or would not SMITH get it printed in London? Had the
  revision of its second Part by the Rev. DR. SIMMONDS anything to do
  with the printing at Oxford? These nuts we must leave for others to
  crack.

  Of course, being printed at Oxford, this book was not registered at
  Stationer’s Hall, London ...

  It is sometimes misnamed the Oxford _tract_; but it is rather a book
  than a tract.

                           [Preface to part 2].

  T. ABBAY states, ... [in his preface] respecting this second Part,

  _Neither am I the author, for they are many, whose particular
  discourses are signed by their names. This solid treatise, first was
  compiled by_ Richard Pots, _since passing the hands of many to pervse,
  chancing into my hands, (for that I know them honest men, and can
  partly well witnesse their relations true) I could do no lesse in
  charity to the world then reveale; nor in conscience, but approve._

  This Part is therefore the Vindication or Manifesto of the thirty or
  forty Gentlemen and Soldiers, who, under SMITH, saved the Colony ...

  This second Part of the ©Map of Virginia©, compiled, and perhaps added
  to, by RICHARD POTS, ... tested and revised by the Rev. WILLIAM
  SIMMONDS, D. D., ... and published by T. ABBAY; is a condensed summary
  of the sayings and writings of the following seven Virginian
  Colonists:

                               _GENTLEMEN._

                        _Original Planters_, 1607.

       NATHANIEL POWELL (killed in the Massacre, 22 March 1622) ...
    THOMAS STUDLEY, Cape Merchant or Colonial Storekeeper (who died 28
                             August 1607) ...


                          ©First Supply©, 1608.

                         WILLIAM PHETTIPLACE, ...
                         Dr. WALTER RUSSELL, ...
                           RICHARD WIFFIN, ...


                          ©Second Supply©, 1609.

                             THOMAS ABBAY ...


                                _SOLDIER._

                        _Original Planter_, 1607.

                             ANAS TODKILL ...

  In the revision of this text in the ©General History©, Lib. 3, in
  1624; the testimonies of eight other Gentlemen were incorporated (not
  _invented_ as some would think) ...

  It is to be especially noted that, while he would endorse it all,
  Captain SMITH is not named as an author of _any portion_ of this
  Second Part, either in the title in the previous page or in the text
  itself: therefore no allusion to the POCAHONTAS deliverance should be
  expected in it; and there is none.”


20. ¬Smith¬, capt. John, of Virginia. THE | PROCEEDINGS OF | THE ENGLISH
COLONIE IN | Virginia since their first beginning from | England in the
yeare of our Lord 1606, | _till this present_ 1612, _with all their_ |
_accidents that befell them in their_ | _Iournies and Discoveries_. |
Also the Salvages discourses, orations and relations | of the Bordering
neighbours, and how they be-|came subiect to the English. | _Vnfolding
even the fundamentall causes from whence haue sprang so many
mise-_|_ries to the vndertakers, and scandals to the businesse: taken
faith-_|_fully as they were written out of the writings of Thomas_ |
_Studley the first provant maister, Anas Todkill, Walter_ | _Russell
Doctor of Phisicke, Nathaniell Powell_, | _William Phettyplace, Richard
Wyffin, Tho-_|_mas Abbay, Tho: Hope, Rich. Polts and_ | _the labours of
divers other dili-_|_gent observers, that were_ | _residents in
Virginia._ | _And pervsed and confirmed by diverse now resident in_ |
_England that were actors in this busines._ | By W. S. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: strictly speaking part of the preceding art., which
  see.


21. ¬Smyth¬, rev. Richard, of Barnstaple. MVNITION A-|GAINST MANS |
_MISERY AND_ | _MORTALITY_. | _A_ | TREATICE CONTAI-|ning the most
effectuall remedies | against the miserable state of | man in this life,
selected | out of the chiefest | both humane | and divine | authors; |
_BY_ | RICHARD SMYTH _preacher of_ | _Gods word in Barstaple in_ |
_Devonshire_. | The second Edition. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [18] + 136 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _ved
  with the_, 111 _ry bosomes_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–10) Epistle dedicatorie to lady Elizabeth Basset, dated from
  Barnstaple, 1 Jan. “1609”: (11–13) “The contents of the severall
  chapters”: (14–17) “The sinners counsell to his soule. A Sonnet of the
  Authors,” 18 quatrains, beg. “Awake ô Soule, and looke abroad”: 1–136,
  the treatise.

  Nothing seems to be known of the author, nor can I find mention of the
  1st edition, presumably issued in 1609 or 1610. See 1634 S.


22. ¬Rawlinson¬, rev. John. MERCY TO A BEAST. | _A_ | SERMON | PREACHED
AT SAINT | MARIES SPITTLE IN | London on Tuseday in | _Easter weeke_.
1612. | BY | IOHN RAWLINSON DOCTOR | _OF DIVINITI_ϵ. | [_University
arms._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 52 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _sort, that
  of_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) epistle dedicatorie
  to Thomas lord Ellesmere, chancellor of the University of Oxford:
  1–52, the sermon, on Prov. xii. 10.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 506 (where 1612 is misprinted 1602). The
  author was chaplain to lord Ellesmere.


23. ¬Reinolds¬, John. (Antony Wood asserts, in his ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii.
149, that the second part of John Reinolds’ Epigrammata (in Episcopos)
was printed at Oxford in 1612 in 8^o. No copy appears now to be known.)


24. ¬Travers¬, Walter. [_woodcut_] | A | SVPPLICATI-|ON MADE TO THE |
PRIVY COVNSEL | BY | M^r WALTER TRAVERS. | [_University arms._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 25 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _there were_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–25, the treatise.

  This is an appeal made by Travers, who was afternoon preacher at the
  Temple in London when Hooker was Master (about 1585–91), against the
  inhibition from preaching issued against him by the Privy Council.
  Travers was ordained at Antwerp, and had imbibed Genevan doctrine with
  which he opposed Hooker. See Hooker’s ©Answer© above. Both treatises
  have been frequently reprinted, in Hooker’s ©Works©, &c. This issue
  does not seem to have been published by Travers himself, but only in
  order to accompany Hooker’s posthumously printed ©Answer©.


25. ¬Twofold treatise.¬ [_woodcut_] | A | TVVO-FOLD | TREATISE, | THE
ONE | _DECYPHERING THE_ | _worth of_ SPECVLATION, | _and of a retired
life_. | THE OTHER | CONTAINING A | discoverie of YOUTH | and OLD AGE. |
[_woodcut._]

  Impr. 7: 1612: twelves 16^o: pp. [2] + 45 + [1] + 35 + [1]: pp. 11
  beg. _vnwilling to_, and _^her behalfe_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: 1–45, the first treatise: 1–35, the second treatise.


26. ¬Wakeman¬, Robert. THE | CHRISTIAN | PRACTISE. | _A_ | Sermon
preached on the Act-Sun-|_day in S. Maries Church in_ | _Oxford. Iul. 8.
1604_. | By ROB. WAKEMAN Bachelor | _of Divinity & fellow of Balliol_ |
_Colledge in Oxford_. | [_motto._] | The second Impression. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: (eights) 12^o: pp. 92 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _ple, but
  served_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 2, “Points handled in this
  Sermon”: 3–92, the sermon, on Acts ii. 46.

  See 1605 W, of which this is a verbatim reprint.


27. ¬Wakeman¬, Robert. “Jonah’s Sermon and Ninivehs repentance (_J.
Barnes_) 1612 ... 16_mo_.”

  So in the ©Catalogue of the Second ... portion of the ... library
  formed by ... Philip Bliss©, Lond. (1858), p. 6, corroborated by a MS.
  note in a Bodleian copy (once the editor’s) of Bliss’s Wood’s
  ©Athenæ©, which states that this is a third edition.


28. ¬Wyclif¬, John. WICKLIFFES WICKET, | OR | A LEARNED AND | GODLY
TREATISE OF | _THE SACRAMENT_, | _made by_ | JOHN WICKLIFFE. | _Set
forth according to an ancient_ | _Printed Copie._ | ⁂ | [_University
arms._]

  Impr. 29: 1612: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 18 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _comprehend
  either_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) preface “To the
  Christian Reader” about Wyclif: dated “from Corpus Christi College in
  Oxford, Iuly 6. MDCXII,” signed “Henry Iackson”: 1–18, the sermon, on
  Rom. xv. 30.

  For the editor see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 577. The “ancient printed
  copie” was neither of the two issues dated Nuremberg 1546, but the
  undated one (probably 1546) “overseen” by M[iles] C[overdale], though
  Coverdale’s preface is omitted. This was reprinted at Cambr. in 1851,
  and one of the others at Oxford in 1828.


                                 1613.

1. ¬Answer.¬ A | BRIEFE AN-|SWERE VNTO | Certaine Obiections | and
Reasons against the Descen[/]|tion of Christ into Hell, late[/]|ly sent
in writing vnto a | Gentleman in the | Countrey. | [_motto_, then
_woodcut_.] |

  Impr. 32: 1613: the rest precisely as 1604 A.

  A reissue of the sheets of 1604 A, with a new titlepage not printed at
  Oxford, the woodcut on title being unknown there.


2. ¬Basse¬, William. GREAT BRITTAINES | SVNNES-SET, | _BEWAILED WITH A
SHOW-_|_ER OF TEARES_. | _BY_ | WILLIAM BASSE.

  Impr. 7 (not at foot of page, but, with date, close to rest of title):
  1613: (eight & four) 16^o: pp. [2] + 22: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) short dedication “to his honourable master
  S^r Richard Wenman Knight”: 1–19, the poem in 8-line stanzas, one on
  each page, ending with “finis.”: 21–22, “A morning after mourning,” 2
  more stanzas, ending with “finis.”

  Extremely rare. This book has never been found except in fragments,
  and usually in the bindings of books. The Bodleian copy is complete:
  Merton college, Oxford, has nearly a complete one from its bindings:
  the British Museum copy was dr. Bandinel’s (Sale Catal., Aug. 1861,
  no. 44), and contains the first 16 (?) pages. Other fragments are
  known to exist, chiefly in Oxford college library bindings. The poem
  was reproduced in facsimile in 1872 by W. H. Allnutt (100 copies).

  It seems on the whole probable that this William Basse, who was a
  retainer in sir R. Wenman’s house (Thame Park), is identical with the
  William Bas who wrote ©Sword and Buckler© (Lond. 1602, 4^o), which is
  a poetical defence of Serving-men against the scorn of their
  superiors. In Stanza 2 of the present poem is a clear reference to
  Bas’s ©Three Pastoral Elegies© (Lond. 1602, 4^o) in the following
  terms:—“Not (like as when some triviall discontents | First taught my
  raw and lucklesse youth to rue | Doe I to Flockes, now vtter my
  laments ...”. On the other hand the author of the ©Sword and Buckler©
  had two sons, whereas here he speaks of his “young Muse.” Other poems
  by “William Basse” (Bas) prepared for the press in 1653 were printed
  by J. P. Collier in 1870; and contributions to the ©Annalia Dubrensia©
  (1636) and Walton’s ©Angler©, as well as an “Epitaph upon Shakespeare”
  are mentioned.

  See J. Payne Collier’s ©Bibliographical account© (1865) p. 54, W. C.
  Hazlitt’s ©Handbook© (1867) and ©(Bibliographical) Collections©, 1st
  series (1876). The author is mentioned as living at Moreton near
  Thame, in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iv. 222.

  The subject of the first poem is Prince Henry’s death, and of the
  “Morning” the wedding of the princess Elizabeth.


3. ¬Benefield¬, Sebastian. [_woodcut._] | _A_ | COMMENTARIE | OR |
EXPOSITION VPON THE FIRST | Chapter of the Prophecy of AMOS, delivered |
in xxi. Sermons in the Parish Church of | MEISEY HAMPTON _in the
Di-_|_ocesse of Gloucester_, | BY | SEBASTIAN BENEFIELD DOCTOR | of
Divinity and fellow of Corpus Christi | _College in Oxford_. | _HEREVNTO
IS ADDED A SERMON_ | _vpon_ 1. _Cor._ 9. 19. _wherein is touched the
law-_|full vse of things indifferent. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 29_a_: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 280 + [8]: p. 11 beg. _the^r
  numbring_, 111 _Which truth_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) dedication to bp. King, dated “from my study in Corpus Christi
  College in Oxford, Iuly 5. 1613”: (5–7) “The Preface to the Christian
  Reader”: 1–264, the 21 “lectures”: 265, a title:—“[_woodcut_] | A |
  SERMON | PREACHED AT WOTTON | VNDER EDGE in the Diocesse of |
  _Gloucester before the Clergy there assem-_|_bled at the Episcopall
  Visitation of_ | THOMAS RAVIS, _late Bishop_ | _of Gloucester_. 1605.
  | BY SEBASTIAN BENEFIELD. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_],” impr. 7_a_,
  1613: 267–280, the sermon, on 1 Cor. ix. 19, with the head title “The
  Christians Libertie”: 280, Errata, corrected in many copies: (1–7) “A
  Table of such particulars as are contained in this Commentarie,”
  alphabetical.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 488. A Latin translation of the lectures
  (without the sermon) was made by Benefield’s pupil Henry Jackson
  (_ibid._ iii. 578) and published at Oppenheim in 1615, the preface
  being dated 21 May 1614 and addressed to Abraham Scultetus who had
  visited Oxford and made a friendship with Benefield. Benefield printed
  a commentary in 21 sermons on Amos chap. 2 at London in 1620, and in
  17 sermons on Amos chap. 3 (together with a separate reprint of the
  present commentary) at London in 1629.


4. ¬Benefield¬, Sebastian. THE | HAVEN OF THE AFFLICTED. | A | SRRMON |
PREACHED IN THE | CATHEDRAL CHVRCH | OF GLOVCESTER | _Aug._ 10. 1613. |
BY | SEBASTIAN BENEFIELD Doctor of Divinity | and fellow of C. C. C. |
_in Oxford_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 20 + [2] : p. 11 beg. _wife,
  rebellious_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) Epistle
  dedicatorie to bp. Miles Smyth, dated “from my study in Corpus Christi
  College in Oxford, August 27, 1613”: (6) A quotation from Augustine
  with English translation: 1–20, the sermon, on Amos iii. 6.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 488.


5. ¬Bible¬, Psalms. [_woodcut._] | A | MEDITATI-|ON ON PART OF | THE
SEAVENTH | PSALME. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 31 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _not Henry_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication “to the
  worshipfull his loving Cousen M^r E. N. and his virtuous wife Mistris
  K. N. ...”, dated “from Cote,” 7 Nov. 1605: 1–31, the meditation, on
  Ps. vii. 9.

  Very rare.


6. ¬Bunny¬, Edmund. OF | DIVORCE | For Adulterie, and | Marrying againe:
that there | is no sufficient warrant | so to doe. | With a note in the
end, that _R. P._ many | yeares since was answered. | By _Edm. Bunny_
Batchelour of Deuinitie. | [_woodcut._] [The whole title is within a
border of woodcut ornaments.]

  Impr. 32: 1613: &c. precisely as 1610 B.

  This is a rare reissue of 1610 B with a new titlepage printed (not at
  Oxford, for the woodcut in the title is unknown there, but) at London,
  perhaps by W. Stansby. The old titlepage was simply cut off, and the
  new one pasted in.


7. ¬Burhill¬, Robert. DE POTESTATE | REGIA, ET VSVR-|_patione Papali_, |
PRO TORTVRA TORTI, | Contra Parallelum ANDREæ EVDæ-| MONIOANNIS Cydonij
Iesuitæ, | _Responsio_ | ROBERTI BVRHILLI | ANGLI. | [_motto_: then
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 11: 1613: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 291 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _piscopi Romani_, 111 _quod contra vos_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–4) Latin poem to prince Charles: (5) “Summa Tractatuum”:
  (6–8) “Index Responsionum iuxta ordinem apud Adversarium”: 1–280, the
  treatise, in three “tractatus”: 280, “Lectori”, a note: 281–291,
  “Appendix, ubi Auctoris ante biennium edita Responsio, ad Martini
  Becani Refutationem (quam vocat) Torturæ Torti defenditur ...”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 18. The bibliography of the controversy
  excited by the fresh oath of Allegiance imposed after the Gunpowder
  Plot is too intricate to be here treated. It was begun by card.
  Bellarmine (“Matthaeus Tortus”) and James I, and followed by bp.
  Andrewes’ ©Tortura Torti©, Andreas Eudaemon-johannes (André
  L’Heureux’s) ©Parallelus Torti ac Tortoris© (Colon. 1611), Martinus
  Becanus’s ©Refutatio Torturae Torti© (Mogunt. 1610), and many others.
  See _Du Moulin_, below.


8. ¬Byrd¬, Josias. LOVES PEERELES PARAGON, | OR | _THE ATTRIBVTES, AND
PROGRESSE_ | OF THE CHVRCH. | A | SERMON | PREACHED IN S^t. MARIES IN |
Oxford, and at HARFIELD in Middle-|sex. 1613. | BY | JOSIAS BYRD. |
[Latin _motto_, and _translation_: then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 27 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _The Church
  is_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication to Alice
  “dowager of Derby, wife to the ... Baron of Elsemere”, dated from
  “Oxford, Alsoules. September the 3. 1613”: 1–27, the sermon, on Cant.
  ii. 10: (1) “Faults escaped”, at end “Delay is dangerous | and hast
  erroneous”, all between woodcuts.

  The author took his B.A. degree at Cambridge, and incorporated at All
  Souls on 4 May 1609; M.A., 1610.


9. ¬Colmore¬, Matthew. _ORATIO FVNEBRIS_ | IN OBITVM | clarissimi viri
et mvni⸗|FICENTISSIMI COLLEGII COR-|PORIS CHRISTI Oxon. benefactoris |
GEORGII SANCTPAVL Equitis | Aurati, habita in medijs epulis | Decembris
9. 1613. | _A_ | MATTHæO COLMORE | Somatochristiano. | [_motto_, then
_device_.]

  Impr. 11: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4 B^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _mentis luxuriȩ_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r,
  Latin preface to the reader: A 3^r-B 2^r, the oration.

  Rare. Little seems to be known of the subject of this Oration. Sir
  George St. Paul of Snarford never matriculated or took a degree,
  though according to the oration a commoner of Corpus for two years.
  His work at Lincoln and Stamford is described, and his munificence to
  the College and the new Schools at Oxford.


10. ¬Du Moulin¬, Pierre. THE | ACCOMPLIS¿H¿MENT | OF THE PROPHECIES; |
OR THE THIRD BOOKE IN | defense of the Catholicke faith, con-|tained in
the booke of the high | & mighty KING IAMES . I. | by the grace of God
King | of Great Brittaine | and Ireland. | _AGAINST THE ALLEGATIONS_ |
_of_ R. Bellarmine; _and_ F. N. Coëffeteau _&_ | _other Doctors of the
Romish Church_: | _BY_ | PETER DV MOVLIN Minister of the | _word of God
in the Church of Paris._ | _Translated out of French by_ I. HEATH,
_Fellow of_ | _New College in Oxford._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 29_a_: 1613: (eights) 16^o: pp. [18] + 484 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _Innocent in his_, 111 _of this, but this_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–16) “The preface to the Reader”: (17–18) “A table of the
  matters contained in this third booke.”: 1–484, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 169. The title of the complete work is
  “Defense de la foy catholique contenue au livre de ... Iaques I Roy de
  la grād’ Bretagne ... contenue en trois liures. Contre la Response de
  F. N. Coeffeteau ... Par Pierre du Moulin ... 1612.” The 3rd book was
  subsequently printed separately in French also, with the title
  “Accomplissement des propheties ... Par Pierre du Moulin ...”. The
  original work by King James I is “Triplici nodo, triplex cuneus. Or an
  apologie for the oath of allegiance ...” (anon., Lond. 1607, and with
  author’s name Lond. 1609 &c.: in Latin ©Apologia pro iuramento
  fidelitatis©, Lond. 1609, &c.). Coeffeteau’s book was “Responce a
  l’Advertissement ... par le ... Roy de la grande Bretagne ...” (Par.
  1610). See _Burhill_, above.


11. ¬Gamage¬, William. LINSI-WOOLSIE. | OR | TWO CENTVRIES OF |
_EPIGRAMMES_. | _Written by_ WILLIAM GAMAGE _Batche-_|_lour in the
Artes_. | [_motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 29: 1613: (eights) 12^o: pp. [80], signn. A-E^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Which vpward’s_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  2^r-A 2^v, dedication to Katherine lady Mansell, daughter of lord
  Lisle: A 3^r-A 5^r, complimentary verses to the author: A 5^v, “The
  Author to the Praisers of his booke”, a short poem: A 6^r-E 8^v, the
  200 epigrams.

  Very rare: see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 350. This author escaped
  Wood’s notice altogether, and his claim to be an Oxford man eluded
  even dr. Bliss when he edited Wood in 1815: but he subsequently writes
  in a MS. note, “I have now no doubt but that the author of
  ©Linsi-Woolsie© was of Jesus, matriculated May 18. 1604, a native of
  Glamorgan, pleb. fil., æt. 20: B.A. Dec. 17. 1607.” The verses are
  extremely poor. The only copy at present known is that in the British
  Museum, which was the Heber copy (Heber sale, 1834, pt. 1, p. 141, no.
  2734.)


12. ¬Glanville¬, John. ARTICVLI | CHRISTIANÆ | FIDEI, QVAM EC-|CLESIA
PROFITETVR | ANGLICANA, | VERSV | (_QVOAD EIVS FIERI POTVIT_) |
_EXPRESSI FACILLIMO_. | [_device_, then two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 11: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 39 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _Articulus_
  13: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to John
  King, bp. of London, signed “Johannes Glanvillus”: (5) “Ad Carmen
  meum”, a poem in Latin: (6) “Ad lectorem benevolum”, a distich: 1–39,
  the 40 Articles, in elegiac verse, the 40th being “De Articulorum
  ratificatione”: (1–2) “De numero & nominibus Articulorum”, a list: (2)
  “Ad lectorem”, a Latin poem.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 343. The verses are a paraphrase, with
  short additional poems of a meditative kind, written during an
  illness.


13. Godwin, Thomas. “©Romanæ Historiæ Anthologia. An English Exposition
of the Roman Antiquities ...© Oxon. 1613 ... &c. qu.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 52, but probably a misprint for 1614,
  which see, though Wood’s apparent error is copied by Watt, Bohn’s
  Lowndes, &c.


14. ¬Hinde¬, William. A | _PATH TO PIETIE_, | LEADING TO THE | WAY, THE
TRVTH, | AND THE LIFE | CHRIST IESVS. | _DRAWNE VPON THE_ | Ground _and
according to_ | _the_ Rule _of Faith_, | BY | WILLIAM HINDE | Sometimes
Fellow of Queenes | College in Oxford, and now | Preacher of Gods word |
at BVNBVRY in | Cheshire. | _Published for the benefit of his owne_ |
_Flocke and Family._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 7: 1613: (eights) 16^o?: pp. [8] + 56: p. 11 beg. _Q. VVhat
  learne_: Pica Roman & Italic. Contents:—(1) title: (3–7) dedication to
  sir Thomas Lowe, Master, and to the 4 Wardens, of the Haberdashers’
  Company in London, dated Bunbury, 19 July 1613: 1–56, the treatise, in
  question and answer.

  Rare. For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 461, where _Banbury_
  is twice a misprint for _Bunbury_.


15. ¬Holyoke¬, Francis. A | Sermon of Obedience. | Especially vnto
Authoritie Ecclesiasticall, | wherein the principall controuersies of
our | _Church are handled, and many of their_ | Obiections which are
refractorie to | _the gouernment established, answered_, | though
briefly as time and | place could permit: | Being preached at a
Visitation of the right | Worshipfull M.D. _Hinton_, in _Couentry_. |
_By_ | FRAN: HOLYOKE. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 29: 1613: (rest as 1610 H.)

  A reissue of the sheets of 1610 H, with a new titlepage printed in
  London, within a border of woodcuts. The woodcut on the titlepage is
  unknown at Oxford.


16. ¬Hooker¬, dr. Richard. (A learned discourse of Iustification, &c., a
reprint of the title of 1612 H, adding after the word “Oxford ⁂”:—_The
second edition, corrected, and amended._ |

  Impr. 7: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 68: p. 11 beg. _should make vs_, 61
  _man should hope_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “To
  the Christian Reader”, signed as before, but dated “from Corpus
  Christi College in Oxford the 6. of Iuly. 1612.”: 1–68, the discourse,
  on Hab. i. 4.

  A second edition of 1612 H: the alterations are chiefly literal and
  verbal.


17. ¬Kilbie¬, Richard. A | SERMON | PREACHED IN SAINT MA-|RIES CHVRCH IN
OXFORD | March 26. 1612. at the funerall of | THOMAS HOLLAND, Do·|ctor
of the Chaire in Divini-|tie, and Rector of Exce-|ter College, | BY |
RICHARD KILBIE _Doctor of Divinity, Rector_ | _of Lincolne College_. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 29_a_: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 20 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _ken away
  even_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–20, the sermon, on 1
  Cor. xv. 55–57.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 287 & 112. There is some little
  biographical matter about dr. Holland.


18. ¬Oxford¬, Exeter College. _THRENI EXONIENSIVM_ | IN OBITVM |
ILLVSTRISSIMI VIRI D. IO=|HANNIS PETREI, BARONIS DE | Writtle, Filij
honoratissimi viri D. | GVILIELMI PETREI ordinis au-|reȩ Periscelidis
Equitis clarissimi, | & quatuor Principibus à con-|silijs secretioribus.
| _Qui Exoniense Collegium octo Socijs, amplis reditibus_, | _plurimis
privilegijs, auxerunt liberaliter & ornâ-_|_runt, Benefactores,
Mecænates, & Patroni_ | _munificentissimi._ | Per ejusdem Collegij
Alumnos & ceteros studiosos. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 48: p. 11 beg. Δεύτερος: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication, partly in Latin verse,
  to lord William Petrie son of lord Petre of Writtle: 1–48, the poems.

  Most of the poems are Latin, but 4 Greek, 2 Hebrew, and one French.
  John lord Petre died on 11 Oct. 1613.


19. —— Merton College. [_woodcut._] | BODLEIO-|MNEMA. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 84 + [20]: p. 11 beg. _Ad sanam_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) Latin dedication to the
  memory of sir Thomas Bodley, by Merton college: (4) Latin poem by the
  editor: 1–84, the poems, chiefly Latin: (1–18) “Oratio funebris habita
  in Collegio Mertonensi à Johanne Halesio ... anno 1613 Martij 29^o;
  quo die Clarissimo Equiti D. Thomæ Bodleio funus ducebatur.”

  This book consists of about 80 poems (four in Greek, the rest in
  Latin) in memory of sir Thomas Bodley by members of Merton college, of
  which society Bodley was a fellow. The editor’s name does not appear.
  Bodley died in London on Jan. 28. 1612/3, but both the dedication of
  this volume and p. 117 of the ©Justa Funebria© (see below) state that
  it was on Jan. 29: see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 126.


20. ¬Oxford¬, University. [_woodcut_] | EPITHALAMIA. | SIVE | LVSVS
PALA-|tini in nvptias celsissi-|mi principis domini fride-|rici comitis
palatini ad | _RHENVM,¿&¿C.ET SERENISSI-_|MÆ ELISABETHÆ IACOBI |
_POTENTISSIMI BRI-_|_TANNI_Æ _REGIS_ | _FILI_Æ PRIMO-|_GENIT_Æ |
[_device._]

  Impr. 31: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [128], signn. ( )^2 A-P^4 Q^2: sign. B
  1^r beg. _Cur^c Atalanta_, M 1^r Impar nulla: English Roman.
  Contents:—sign. ( ) 1^r title: ( ) 2^r “Oxonia Heydelbergæ”, a short
  poem: A 1^r-Q 2^v, the verses.

  Poems by Oxford men on the marriage of Frederick v, elector Palatine,
  with the princess Elizabeth of England on 14 Feb. 1612/3. All are
  Latin except five Greek, two Italian and one Hebrew (unpointed, Pica
  and Brevier).


21. —— University. IVSTA FVNEBRIA | PTOLEMÆI | OXONIENSIS THO-|MÆ
BODLEII EQVITIS | AVRATI CELEBRATA | in Academiâ Oxoniensi | _Mensis
Martij_ 29.| 1613. | [_device._]

  Impr. 31: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 134 + [14]: p. 11 beg. _Sed
  calcanda_, 111 _Non famam_. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) short Latin
  poems as by the University: 1–134, the poems: (1) a titlepage:—“ORATIO
  FVNEBRIS | HABITA IN | SCHOLA THEOLOGICA AB | ORATORE PVBLICO, IN
  OBI-|TV CLARISSIMI EQVITIS | _THOMÆ BODLEII_. | ⁂⁂ | [_device_]”,
  impr. 11: (3) “Ad lectorem” a preface by the orator (Isaac Wake):
  (5–12) the oration.

  About 270 poems, chiefly Latin, but two Hebrew (unpointed, Pica), four
  Greek, two Italian, one English: in memory of sir Thomas Bodley, see
  preceding art. The oration by Wake (see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 540)
  was reprinted in W. Bates’s ©Vitæ selectorum virorum© (1681), p. 416.
  The British Museum printed Catalogue, and the Catalogue of English
  Books in the Museum up to 1640, attribute this speech to Richard
  Corbet, by error.


22. ¬Petrucci¬, Lodovico. [_woodcuts_] | RACCOLTA, | D’ ALCVNE RIME, DEL
CAVA-|liere LODOVICO PETRVCCI, Nobile Toscano, in | più luoghi, e tempi
composte, & à diversi Pren-|cipi dedicate; con la selua delle sue |
Persecutioni. | _FARRAGO POEMATVM, EQVITIS LVDO-_|_VICI PETRVCCI,
Nobilis Tuscani, diversis lo-_|_cis et temporibus conscriptorum, & ad
diversos_ | _Principes dedicatorum; vnà cum syluâ, sua-_|_rum
Persecutionum._ | * * * * | * * * | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [130], sign. A-P^4, Q 1–3, one leaf, Q 4:
  sign. H 1^r beg. _Quod signis_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r,
  title: A 1^v, A 2^v, Italian dedication to James i signed “L’infelice
  Lodovico Petrucci Cavaliere”: A 2^r, A 3^r, the same in Latin: A 3^v-Q
  3^v, the poems in Italian and Latin: (one leaf)^v “I principali errori
  commessi nell’ Italiano di questo libro”, a long list, beginning with
  the titlepage (“Cavalliere”), followed by some Errata in the Latin:
  the references oddly are to _pages_.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 293. This is a singular and uncommon
  book. The author was a soldier of fortune, who was admitted as a
  reader in the Bodleian as from St. Edmund hall on 27 Apr. 1611, but
  did not matriculate till 5 Sept. 1612. The verso of each leaf is in
  general Italian poems, and the recto of the next leaf a Latin version
  of them. On signn. F 2^v and L 3^v-M 2^v are letters and testimonials
  about him: at H 1^v is a poem in Italian and Latin on sir Thomas
  Bodley’s death: at H 2^v begins his ©Selua© or ©Sylva© in two parts,
  and at N 4^v a long and curious account in Italian and Latin verse of
  his stay in England and particularly Oxford and New College, which he
  was forced to leave (in 1614?) by the puritanical party. On M 3^v is
  an oration delivered in Italy, and on Q 2^v is a poem in both
  languages on the death of dr. Rives, which is repeated on Q 3^r. The
  whole book was intended to be produced at the wedding of Frederick
  elector Palatine with the princess Elizabeth (14 Feb. 1612/3), but by
  the printer’s delay was too late.


23. ¬Potter¬, bp. Barnabas. _THE BARONETS BVRIALL_, | OR | A FVNERALL |
SERMON PREACHED | at the solemnitie of that honou-|rable Baronet S^r
EDVVARD | SEYMOURS buriall. | * * * | BY | BARNABY POTTER | _Bachelor in
Divinitie, Fellow of Queenes Col-_|_lege in Oxford, and Preacher to the_
| _Towne of Tottnes in Devon_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 37 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _the
  divell_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication to
  sir Edw. and lady Mary Giles, dated “from your house at Bowdon, Aug.
  24. 1613.”: 1–37, the sermon, on Deut. xxxiv. 5.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 22. The author seems to have been
  private chaplain to sir E. Giles. He quotes against himself in the
  dedication a thesis disputed at the Act in Oxford 1613 “Doctior
  quisque fuit in scribendo parcissimus.”


24. ¬Powell¬, Thomas, of Brasenose college, Oxford. [_woodcut_] | A |
SERMON | PREACHED IN SAINT MA-|RIES IN OXFORD, | BY THOMAS POWELL. |
1613. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 17 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _vpon the
  text_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) Latin dedication
  to dr. Thomas Singleton, principal of Brasenose: 1–17, the sermon, on
  Ex. xxviii. 34.


25. ¬Price¬, Daniel. DAVID HIS OATH OF | ALLEGEANCE TO | IERVSALEM. |
THE | SERMON PREACHED ON ACT | SVNDAY LAST IN THE MORNING, | _IN S_^t.
_MARIES IN OXFORD_. | BY | DANIEL PRICE _Doctor in Divinity_. |
[_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 7: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 40: p. 11 beg. _the blood of Ahab_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to Charles i,
  dated from Exeter college Oxford, July 27 (1613): 1–40, the sermon, on
  Ps. cxxxvii. 5.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 512. Every printed page has lines
  bounding the text, head-line and margin.


26. ——. PRINCE HENRY | HIS | FIRST ANNIVERSARY. | [_motto._] | BY |
DANIEL PRICE _Doctor in Divinity, one of_ | _his Highnesse Chaplaines_.
| [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 32: p. 11 beg. _himselfe with_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to Will.
  Cotton bp. of Exeter: 1–32, the “meditation.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 512, and 1614 P. The essay, which
  contains some personal matter about prince Henry of historical
  interest, was written for 6 Nov. 1613. The text, head-line and margin
  of each printed page are within bounding lines.


27. ——. SPIRITVALL | ODOVRS TO T¿H¿E | MEMORY OF PRINCE | _HENRY_ | IN
FOVRE OF THE LAST SER-|mons preached in S^t JAMES after his High-|nesse
death, the last being the Sermon be-|fore the body, the day before | the
Funerall. | BY | DANIEL PRICE _then Chaplaine in Attendance_. |
[_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 29: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 52 + [4] + 29 + [5] + 26: p. 11
  beg. (1) _the Manna_, (2) _ces, the furies_, (3) _Lastly to close_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) short dedication to Charles
  i: 1–26, sermon on Ps. xc. 15: 27–52, sermon on 2 Sam. xii. 23, with
  running title to both “Meditations of Consolation in our
  Lamentations”: (1) a title:—“SORROVV | FOR THE SINNES OF | _THE TIME_.
  | _A_ | SERMON PREACHED AT S^t. | JAMES on the third Sunday after |
  _the_ PRINCE _his death_. | BY | DANIEL PRICE _then Chaplaine in
  Attendance_. | [_motto_, then _device_, then _impr._ 29, 1613.]”:
  (3–4) dedication to lady (Robert) Carey: 1–29, the sermon, on Ezek.
  ix. 4: (2) title:—“TEARES | SHED OVER ABNER. | _THE_ | SERMON PREACHED
  ON THE | Sunday before the PRINCE his fu-|nerall in S^t. JAMES
  Chappell | _before the body_. | BY | DANIELL PRICE _then Chaplaine in
  Attendance_. | [_motto_, then _device_, then _impr._ 29, 1613.]”:
  (4–5) dedication to sir David Murray: the sermon, on 2 Sam. iii. 31.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 511. Every printed page is within lines
  bounding the text, head-line and margin. The signatures are
  continuous, ( )^2 A-O^4 P^2. There is very little of historical
  interest in the sermons.


28. ¬Rainolds¬, dr. John. D. IOHANNIS | RAINOLDI | OLIM GRÆCÆ LIN-|guæ
Prælectoris in Col-|legio CORPORIS | CHRISTI apud | _Oxonienses_, |
_ORATIONES_ 5. _CVM_ | _aliis quibusdam opusculis_. | OMNIA NVNC
PRI-|_MVM EDITA_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1613: 16^o.

  At present this book is only known to me from a titlepage at the end
  of the 1614 edition of Rainolds’s ©Orationes© (which see), and notices
  in Thomas Bowman’s ©Catalogus librorum© (Oxf. 1687) [sign. I1^r:—“146.
  Rainoldi (Joan) Orationes. Oxon. 1613”] and Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901,
  fol. 70 (Bagford). But the book is not likely to be really rare,
  unless the 1614 edition caused its recall or destruction.


29. ——. THE | PROPHECIE | OF OBADIAH | OPENED AND APPLYED IN | SVNDRY
LEARNED AND GRA-|CIOVS SERMONS PREACHED | at ALL-HALLOWES and S^t |
MARIES in OXFORD, | BY | THAT FAMOVS AND IVDICI-|ous Divine IOHN
RAINOLDS D. | of Divinity and late President of | Corp. Chr. Coll. |
Published for the honour and vse of that famous Vni-|versity, and for
the benefit of the Churches of | Christ abroad in the Country, | BY W.
H. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 136 + [4] + 20: p. 11 beg. (1)
  _promised to consume_, (2) _hād of the Philistines_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) epistle dedicatory to D. Airay provost
  of Queen’s college, Oxford, dated “Bunbury in Cheshire, July 19.
  1613”, signed “W. Hinde”: 1–136, the commentary: (1) a title:—“A |
  SERMON | VPON PART OF THE | eighteenth Psalme. | PREACHED TO THE
  PVBLIKE | assembly of Scholers in the Vniversity of | Oxford the last
  day of August, 1586. | BY | JOHN RAINOLDES | _Vpon occasion of their
  meeting to giue thankes to God_ | _for the detection and apprehension
  of Trai-_|_tours, who wickedly conspired against_ | _the_ Queenes
  _Maiestie and_ | the state of the Realme. | [_motto_, then
  _woodcuts_]”, impr. 7_a_, 1613: (3–4) “Iohn Rainolds, to the Reader
  ...”, dated “At Corpus Christi College in Oxford, Octob. 24. 1586.”:
  1–20, the sermon, on Ps. xviii. 47–51.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 16 & 15, and 1586 R. The commentary has
  special reference to the 1st Epistle of St. Peter, and is in 10
  divisions or sermons. The editor, William Hinde of Queen’s college,
  seems to have long possessed the MS. of the lectures. The sermon is a
  reprint of 1586 R, and an integral part of the whole volume, as the
  signatures show, which for the sermon begin at T 1. Every printed page
  has bounding lines to the text, margin and head-line.


30. S[mith], S[amuel]. Aditus ad logicam. In usum eorum qui primò
Academiam salutant. Autore S. S. Artium Magistro. Imprint:—“Anno Domini
1613”, (eights) 12^o.

  This book is attributed to the Oxford Press by Wood (©Ath. Oxon.©, ii.
  283), but was not printed there, the woodcuts being unknown in Oxford.
  See 1684 S.


                                 1614.

1. ¬Andrewes¬, John. “Christ his Crosse, or the most comfortable
Doctrine of Christ Crucified & joyfull Tidings of his Passion, teaching
us to Love & Embrace his Crosse, as the most Sweete & Celestiall
Doctrine unto the Soule, and how We should behave ourselves therein
according to the Word of God. Newly Published by John Andrewes, Minister
& Preacher of the Word of God at Barricke Basset in the County of
Wiltes.”

  So in manuscript in the Bagford collections (Brit. Mus. MS. Harl.
  5901, fol. 71): see Wood’s ©Ath Oxon.©, ii. 493, where the book is
  described as quarto in two parts. The existence of a copy does not
  seem to be at present known, nor is one noticed in the ordinary
  bibliographical works.


2. ¬Benefield¬, Sebastian. EIGHT SER-|MONS PVBLIKELY | PREACHED IN THE
V-|NIVERSITY OF OXFORD, | the second at _S_^t _Peters_ in the _East_, |
the rest at _S_^t _Maries_ Church . Be-|gunne in the yeare 1595. |
_Decemb. XIII._ | _NOW FIRST PVBLISHED BY SEBAS-_|TIAN BENEFIELD Doctor,
and Professour of | Divinity for the Lady MARGARET. | [_motto_: then
_device_.]

  Impr. 7: 1613: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 153 + [7]: p. 11 beg. _It may be_,
  111 _what they thinke_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  dedication to lord Ellesmere, Chancellor of the University of Oxford,
  dated “from my Study in Corpus Christi College in Oxford, Iuly 2.
  1614”: 1–57, three sermons on Luke ix. 23: 58–153, five sermons on
  James iv. 10: (2–6) “The table containing in alphabeticall order the
  particulars of this booke.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 488.


3. ¬Dawes¬, Lancelot. “©Two Sermons preached at the Assize holden at
Carlisle, touching sundry Corruptions of these times.© Oxon. 1614. oct.”

  Impr. —: 1614?: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 146 + [2?]: p. 11 beg.
  _turall disposition_, 111 _his brother, and_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–7) dedication to dr. Robinson bp. of Carlisle, signed
  “Lancelot Dawes”: 1–75, a sermon, on Matt. xxvi. 15: 77–146, a sermon,
  on Ps. lxxxii. 6–7: (1–2) (_not seen._)

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 349, where the above title is
  given. The only copy readily traceable is that in the Bodleian which
  has lost the title and following leaf, beginning on ¶ 3, as well as a
  blank leaf there must have been after p. 146 (sign. K 1.) The sermons
  and dedication, but not title, were reprinted in ©Sermons ... by
  Lancelot Dawes ...© (Lond., 1653), pp. 49, 105. At present the date
  (1614) depends on Wood’s accuracy.


4. ¬Day¬, John. DAY’S DYALL | OR, | HIS TWELVE HOWRES | THAT IS, |
TWELVE SEVERALL LECTVRES | BY WAY OF CATECHISME, AS | they were
delivered by him in the Chappel of | ORIELL COLLEDGE in _Ox-_|_ford_, in
the yeeres of our Lord | _God_ 1612, and 1613. | [_device_, then two
_mottos_.]

  Impr. 7: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 329 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _which our
  Master_, 111 _^y speakes: The_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–7) dedication to Oriel college, Oxford, dated “from my Study in
  that Colledge ... Octob. 17. 1614”, signed “Iohn Day”: (8) “The
  severall arguments with the severall Texts of Scripture, of every
  severall Lecture in this Booke”, with a quotation: 1–329, the twelve
  lectures, with a page occasionally blank: (1–2) “To the Reader”:
  including a few errata.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 412. The author in the Preface says that
  he was appointed “Catechisme Reader” in Oriel for a year in 1612, when
  these lectures were delivered. In a footnote he alludes to his father
  John Day the printer. The general subjects are those of the Catechism,
  but carried further.


5. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. ROMANæ HISTORIæ ANTHOLOGIA. | AN | ENGLISH
EX-|POSITION OF | THE ROMANE AN-|TIQVITIES, WHEREIN | many Romane and
English | offices are paralleld and di-|vers obscure phrases |
_explained_. | _BY_ | THOMAS GODWYN _Master of Arts_. | For the vse of
ABINGDON _Schoole_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 193 + [19]: p. 11 beg. _ved in the
  treasury_, 111 _cense the people_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) dedication in Latin to dr. Francis James, dated “Abingdoniæ
  decimo calend. Aprilis. Anno 1613.” [i. e. 23 Mar. 1613/4], signed
  “Thomas Godwinus”: (5–6) “Benevolo Lectori”: (7) Latin poems on the
  book by dr. Laurence Humphrey and John Sanford: (8) “A short table
  shewing the argument of every Booke and Section”: 1–193, the work:
  (2–18) “Index rerum et verborum maxime insignium.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 52. This was a popular work, see 1616 G,
  1620 G, 1623 G, 1625 G, 1628 G, 1631 G, 1633 G, 1638 G, 1642 G, 1655
  G, 1658 G. Other edd. were printed at London in 1661, 1668, 1674,
  1680, 1685 (14th), 1689 (15th), 1696 (16th). For the supposed 1613
  ed., see 1613 G. Godwin’s ©Synopsis Antiquitatum Hebraicarum© (see
  1616 G) and Francis Rous’s ©Archæologia Attica© (see 1637 R) may be
  regarded as companion works to the present volume, and are often found
  bound with it. The author apologizes for an English treatise on such a
  subject, and states that one of his main objects was to illustrate
  Cicero.


6. ¬Goodwin¬, dr. William. A | SERMON | PREACHED BEFORE | THE KINGS MOST
| EXCELLENT MAIES-|TIE AT WOODSTOCKE, | AVG. 28. 1614. | _BY_ | WILLIAM
GOODWIN, _Deane . of Christ’s_ | _Church and Vice-Chancellor of the
Vni-_|_versity of Oxon._ | Published by Commandement. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 38: p. 11 beg. _à Peccato; delicta_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–38, the sermon, on Jer. i.
  10.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 297. The sermon is directed against the
  jurisdiction of the Roman Church over temporal sovereigns.


7. ¬Hooker¬, dr. Richard. [_woodcut._] | TVVO | SERMONS | VPON PART OF |
S. JVDES EPISTLE, | _BY_ | RICHARD HOOKER _sometimes Fellow of_ |
_Corpus Christi College in Oxford_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 56: p. 11 beg. _Iesus with_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) dedication to George
  Summaster, principal of “Broad-Gates Hall in Oxford,” by “Henry
  Iackson,” dated “Oxon. from Corp. Christ. College, this 13. of
  Ianuary, 1613” (1613/4): 1–29, the first sermon: 31–56, the second,
  both on Jude 17–21.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 698, and for the editor iii. 577.
  This and other Sermons of Hooker were reprinted with editions of the
  ©Ecclesiastical Polity©, in 1622, &c.


8. ¬Jewell¬, bp. John. ΑΠΟΛΟΓΙΑ ΤΗΣ ΑΓΓΛΩΝ | Εκκλησίας Ελληνιστὶ
μετα-|φρασθεῖσα. | APOLOGIA ECCLE-|siæ Anglicanæ Græcè versa. |
_Interprete_ I. S. _Bacc. in Art._ | Πρωτοπείρῳ συγγνώμη. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1614: (twelves) 24^o: pp. [24] + 214 + [2]: p. 11 beg. ὁ
  Ιερώνυμος), 111 θολικῆς πίστεως: Pica Greek. Contents:—p. (3) title:
  (5–13) dedication to dr. William Langton, pres. of Magdalen college,
  Oxford, dated 22 July 1613, signed “Joh. Smith”: (15–20) “Lectori
  φιλέλληνι”: 1–214, the Apologia: (1) “Errata sic corrigenda.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 393, and 1639 J, 1671 J. The original
  edition of this celebrated ©Apologia© was published in 1562, an
  English translation in the same year, and a German in 1589. This is
  the first Greek edition, as 1671 J is the first Welsh one. The
  translator, John Smith of Magdalen, explains that the task was meant
  as a College exercise merely, at first: and apologizes for using such
  words as Ἰουβιλαῖα, Βούλλαι, Ἰνδουλγεντίαι, for νὴ Δία in a Christian
  work, and for having only a month and a half to spare for the work.


9. ¬N.¬, S. “©Papistogelastes, or Apologues by which are pleasantly
discovered the Abuses, Follies, Superstitions, Idolatries, and
Impieties, of the Synagogue of the Pope, and especially of the Priests
and Monks thereof©, written first in Ital. by N. S. and thence
translated into French by S. J. and now out of French into English by R.
W. ut supr. Oxon, 1614, in tw[elves].”

  So in an account of Rowland Willet in Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 362:
  but I find no other reference to a copy.


10. ¬Price¬, dr. Daniel. PRINCE HENRY | HIS | SECOND | ANNIVERSARY. |
[_motto._] | _BY_ | DANIEL PRICE Doctor in Divinity, one of | his
Highnesse chaplaines. | [_device._]

  Impr. 33: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 44: p. 11 beg. _wherein they
  might_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to
  king Charles i, dated “Ex. Coll. Novemb. 6. [1614] the fatall day of
  Prince Henries decease”: 1–44, the discourse.

  See 1613 P, and for the author Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 511: there is
  some historical matter in the essay. Every printed page has its text,
  margin and headline within bounding lines.


11. ¬Price¬, Sampson. A | HEAVENLY | PROCLAMATION TO | FLY ROMISH
BABYLON. | _A_ | SERMON PREACHED AT OX-|ford in S^t MARIES _Nov. 21.
1613._ | BY | SAMPSON PRICE _Master of Arts of Exe-_|_ter Colledge and
Preacher to the Citty_ | _of Oxford_. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 7: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 34 + [2]: p 11 beg. _ing,
  drunkennesse_: English Roman. Contents:-p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication
  to sir Roger Owen, dated “from my study at Exeter Colledge, Oct. 28.
  1614.”: 1–34, the sermon, on Rev. xviii. 4.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 489, where it is related that Price
  earned the name of “the Mawle of Heretics” for his violence against
  Roman Catholicism. The preface gives some biographical details of
  Price, incidentally.


12. ¬Prideaux¬, dr. John. CASTIGATIO | CVIVSDAM CIR-|CVLATORIS, QVI R.
P. | ANDREAM EVDÆMON-|IOHANNEM CYDONI-|VM E SOCIETATE IE-|su seipsum
nuncupat. | _OPPOSITA IPSIVS CA-_|_lumnijs in Epistolam_ ISAACI |
CASAVBONI _ad Fronto-_|_nem Ducæum_. | Per IOHANNEM PRIDEAUX SS.
The-|ologiæ Doctorem & Collegij | _Exoniensis Rectorem_. | [_motto_,
then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1614: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 242: p. 11 beg. _apud
  regiam_, 111 _us, qui opus_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7)
  dedication to archbp. Abbot, dated “Oxon. è Collegio Exoniensi 9. Cal.
  Ianuarij”: (9–13) “Ad Lectorem”: (14–15) “Index capitum ...”: 1–242,
  the work, p. 20 being blank.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267. The circumstances of this book will
  be found in Mark Pattison’s ©Isaac Casaubon© (Lond., 1875: a work
  without an index), pp. 332, 347, 353, 410, esp. 438–443. Briefly,
  Casaubon’s “... ad Frontonem Ducæum [Fronto Le Duc] ... Epistola ...
  (Lond. 1611) was a defence of the execution of Henry Garnett in 1606,
  against some Jesuit books; a reply was published at Cologne in 1613 by
  Andreas Eudaemon-Johannes (L’Heureux) “... Epistola ad Amicum Gallum
  ... item Responsio ad Epistolam Isaaci Casauboni”, the Responsio being
  dated 1612 on a separate titlepage. Then Prideaux was selected to
  answer the ©Responsio©, in order to relieve Casaubon of the task: at
  p. 224 he quotes Casaubon’s account of his father’s last days. There
  is no real ground for Pattison’s remark that “few copies of Prideaux’s
  pamphlet survive” (_ut supra_, p. 443).


13. ——. EPHESVS BACKSLIDING | CONSIDE-|RED AND APPLY-|ED TO THESE |
times, in a Sermon preached at | Oxford, in S^t MARIES, the | tenth of
Iuly, being the Act | _Sunday_. 1614. | BY | IOHN PRIDEAUX, Doctor of
Divinity, | and Rector of Exceter College. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 7: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 37 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _worthie
  comming_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) dedication to
  dr. Bodley, “canon of Exeter, and parson of Shobrooke in Devon,” dated
  “from Exceter College in Oxford, August 5.”, 1614: 1–37, the sermon,
  on Rev. ii. 4.

  For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 265. This sermon was
  reprinted in 1621 (London) and 1636, see 1636 P. The dedication
  mentions dr. Bodley’s favours towards Prideaux, and mr. (sir William?)
  Periam’s to one Orford of Exeter Coll., Oxford.


14. ¬R[ainolds]¬, I[ohn]. THE | DISCOVERY | OF THE MAN OF SINNE: |
WHEREIN IS SET FORTH THE | CHANGES OF GODS CHURCH, | _In her_ {
_Afflictions by his Raigne_. | { _Consolations by his Raine_. | First
preached in divers Sermons to the Vniver-|sitie and Cittie of Oxon, by a
Reverend & Iu-|dicious Divine IR. D. of Divinity and some-|times of
Queenes College. | _And now published for the farther vse of both, and_
| _comfort of all that hate Antichrist and loue_ | _the Lord Iesus
Christ wheresoever:_ | _By W. H._ | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7: 1614: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 50: p. 11 beg. _gather that seeing_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to dr. Airay
  provost of Queen’s college, Oxford, dated “Bunbury in Cheshire, Iuly
  8. 1614” signed “W. Hinde”: (5–6) “Advertisement to the Reader,” dated
  as before, with “William Hinde”: 1–50, one sermon, on 2 Thess. ii. 3.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 16, 462. Dr. John Raynolds was Scholar,
  Fellow, and President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, but at one
  time or another was connected with Queen’s, Merton, New College,
  University, and Oriel (©Register of the Univ. of Oxford©, vol 2, ed.
  A. Clark, pt. 1, p. 4). There is no clear reference to the author
  being dr. Raynolds anywhere in the volume, but the fact is undoubted.
  The “Advertisement,” as a matter of printing, follows the Sermon, but
  was probably intended to be torn off at that place and pasted in where
  it is described above.


15. ¬Rainolds¬, dr. John. _V. CL._ | D. IOANNIS | _RAINOLDI_,| OLIM
GRÆCÆ LIN-|guæ Prælectoris in _Collegio_ | _Corporis Christi_ apud |
Oxonienses, | _Orationes Duodecim; cum alijs_ | quibusdam opusculis. |
ADIECTA EST ORATIO | Funebris, in obitu eiusdem habi-|ta à M. ISAACO
WAKE | Oratore Publico. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1614: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [6] + 77 + [17] + 201 + [111]:
  p. 11 beg. (1) _mi sint Antonii_, (2) _ponant laborioso_, 111
  _speramus . Veruntamen_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6)
  “Iohannes Rainoldus Academicis Oxoniensibus ...”, the Latin preface
  of 1587. R reprinted, date and all, “è Colleg. Corp. Christ.
  Februar. 2.”: 1–36 (i) “Oratio post vacationem Natalitiam. 1576.”,
  beg. _Epaminondam_: 37–77 (ii) “Oratio post vacationem Paschalem,
  Anno. 1576.”, beg. _Etsi Vestros_: (2) (iii) a titlepage:—“ORATIO
  FV-|NEBRIS HABI-|ta in Templo beatæ | _Mariæ Oxon._ | Ab ISAACO
  WAKE, | PVBLICO ACADE-|miȩ Oratore, _Maij_ 25. _An._ | 1607. quum
  mœsti | _Oxonienses, pijs mani-_|_bus_ IOHANNIS | RAINOLDI |
  _parentarent_. |”, woodcuts, then impr. 11: 4–12, the oration, beg.
  _Quam fragilis_: 1–45 (iv) “Oratio post festum Paschatis. 1574.”,
  beg. _Pythagoram_: 46–66 (v) “Oratio post festum Nat. Chr. 1575.
  ...”, beg. _Cicero cum_: 67–111 (vi) “Oratio post festum Paschatis,
  1576.”, beg. _Consideranti_: 112–142 (vii) “Oratio post festum
  Michael. 1575.”, beg. _Non modò_: 143–164 (viii) “Oratio post festum
  Michael. 1576.”, beg. _Frequentia_: 165–196 (ix) “D. Iohannes
  Rainoldus Gulielmo Rainoldo fratri suo ...”, a Latin epistle on the
  Church, beg. _Neque meus_, dated “Oxoniæ 4. Non. Septemb.”: 197–199
  (x) “D. Iohannes Rainoldus D. Gulielmo VVhitakero ...”, an epistle
  urging Whitaker to answer Possevinus, dated “Oxon. 14 Kalend.
  Novemb.”, beg. “Facit amor”: 200–201 (xi) the dedication to the
  Queen of Rainolds’s ©De Romanæ Ecclesiæ Idololatria©, dated “Iul.
  vii. MDXCVI,” beg. _Quod olim_: (2) (xii) a titlepage:—“PLVTARCHI |
  CHÆRONENSIS | LIB. II. | 1 _De vtilitate ex hostibus_ | _capienda._
  | 2 _De morbis animi & cor-_|_poris._ | D. IOHANNE RAINOLDO |
  Interprete. |”, woodcuts, then impr. 11: (4–12) Dedication in Latin
  to Queen Elizabeth, dated “Oxon. è Coll. Corp. Christi.”, (13–41,
  42–50) the two treatises: (52) (xiii) a titlepage:—“MAXIMI TYRII |
  PHILOSOPHI | PLATONICI | Disputationes Tres, | 1 _Vitam activam
  contem-_|_plativâ_, | 2 _Contemplativam activâ_ | _meliorem esse._ |
  3 _Qui morbi graviores, ani-_|_mi, an corporis._ | D. IOHANNE
  RAINOLDO | Interprete. |,” woodcuts, then impr. 11: (54–60) Latin
  dedication to Thomas Wilson “Regiæ Majestati à libellis
  supplicibus”: (61–78, 79–94, 95–109) the three disputations: (110)
  (xiv) the titlepage noticed in 1613. R.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 16, where he mentions that Henry Jackson
  was editor of all the Orations except the first two which had been
  published before, see 1587 R. The funeral oration was first printed in
  1607, see 1607 (Wake, 2nd ed.). From a bibliographical point of view
  there is great confusion in this and the two subsequent editions of
  Rainolds’s Orations (_Lond._ 1610, and _Lond._ 1628). For instance
  Wood himself in his remarks about Henry Jackson has confused the
  London edd. (B. C.) with the Oxford one (A).

  In A (the present volume) it is impossible to reckon twelve Orations,
  and the book falls into three parts (_a_) pp. [6] + 77 + [17], signn.
  A-D^{12}, sectt. i-iii. above: (_b_) pp. 201 + [1], signn. A-H^{12}, I
  1–5, sectt. iv-xi.: (_c_) pp. [110], signn. I 6–12, K-N^{12}, sectt.
  xii-xiv. In B (Lond. 1619) _a_ is as before occupying pp. [12] +
  1–106: then follows “... Rainoldi ... Orationes quinque ...” with a
  separate titlepage and preface by H. Jackson, occupying pp. 107–348
  [the Orations beg. ©Si quis© (1573), ©Redit agricolis© (1574), ©Si
  quantum vel, cum in isto© (1577), _Si quantum ad_ (1573)]: then _b_,
  pp. 349–528: then _c_, the Plutarch and Maximus Tyrius, with separate
  titlepages, occupying pp. 529–624: there is no extra titlepage at end.
  In C (Lond. 1628) the same four sections occupy pp. [6] + 1–92,
  93–302, 303–460, 461–548, corresponding closely with B in contents.


16. ¬St. Paul¬, sir George. “2591. Oxford. Carmina Funebria in Obitum
Clarissimi Viri Georgii de Sancto Paulo Equitis Aurati C.C.C. Oxon. olim
Convictoris et _ejusdem Benefactoris munifici_,    _Oxoniæ_, Jos.
Barnesius, 1614” quarto.

  So in the ©Bibliotheca Heberiana© (Auction catalogue of Richard
  Heber’s Library), part 6 (Lond. 1835), p. 185: the book sold for 9_s._
  See 1613 C.


17. Smith, Samuel. “262. Smith (Sam.) & Brerewoodi Logica—Oxon. 1614.”

  So in “Catalogi Librorum Richardi Davis bibliopolæ. Pars secunda”
  (Lond. 1686), p. 77. No Oxford edition of Smith’s ©Aditus ad Logicam©
  is at present known, see 1613. S, 1617. S (reff. there), but as the
  latter is a 3rd edition, there may well have been one printed at
  Oxford in this year, of which no copy has yet found its way into
  bibliography. Of Brerewood’s ©Logica© there is a London 1614 ed.,
  probably alluded to in Davis’s Catalogue above.


                                 1615.

1. ¬Anyan¬, Thomas. A | SERMON | PREACHED AT SAINT | MARIE SPITTLE |
_April. 10. 1615._ | _BY_ | THOMAS ANYAN Doctour of Divinity, and |
_President of Corpus Christi College_ | _in Oxon_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 2: (1615): sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 42 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _like
  Vessels_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication to
  Thomas Egerton lord Ellesmere, chancellor of the University: 1–42, the
  sermon, on Acts x. 34–35.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 359.


2. ¬Benefield¬, Sebastian. THE | SINNE | AGAINST THE HOLY | GHOST
DISCOVERED: | AND OTHER CHRISTI-|an doctrines delivered: | IN | TWELVE
SERMONS VPON PART | of the tenth Chapter of the Epistle to | the
Hebrewes. | _By_ | SEBASTIAN BENEFIELD _Doctor of Divinity_ | _and
Professour for the Lady Margaret_, | _in the Vniversitie of_ OXFORD. |
[_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 2: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 181 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _hold on
  their_, 111 _The writer of_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  dedication to William lord Paget, “From my Study in Corpus Christi
  College in Oxford, March 25. 1615”: 1–181, the 12 sermons, on Heb. x.
  26–31: (1–3), “The Table containing the particulers of this booke,” an
  alphabetical index.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 488. The dedication states that the
  Sermons were written “many years” before, and existed in several MS.
  copies, and thanks lord Paget for benefactions to the Margaret
  Professor. The Sin is discovered to be a malicious denial of
  Christianity.


3. ¬Brasbridge¬, Thomas. “©Questiones in Officia M. T. Ciceronis,
compendiariam totius opusculi Epitomen continentes.© Oxon. 1615, oct.
Dedicated to Dr. Laur. Humphrey president of Magd. coll. an. 1586.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 526, cf. Wood’s ©Historia et
  Antiquitates Universitatis Oxoniensis© (Oxon. 1674) lib. 2, p. 197.
  See 1592 B.


4. Case, John. “292 Casus (Joan.) de Sphæra Civitatis — — Oxon. 1615”

  A doubtful entry in Tho. Bowman’s ©Catalogus librorum© (Oxf. 1687)
  sign. H 1^r.


5. ¬Day¬, John. CONCIO AD CLERVM | IN SECVNDI, VEL QVARTI, RE-|_GVM,
CAPITIS SEXTI, VER-_|SVM PRIMVM, SECVNDVM, | _TERTIVM, ET QVARTVM_. |
Habita in Templo _B. Mariæ_ Oxon. | Iunij 25^o. _Ann. Dom._ 1612. | PER
IOANNEM DAYVM BACCALAV-|reum in Theologia, et Collegij ORIELEN-|SIS apud
Oxonienses Socium. | _EDITIO SECVNDA._ [_device_, then _motto_.]

  Impr. 11: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 26 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _dimento
  minimè_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) Latin dedication,
  nearly as 1st ed.: (4) “Thema,” the text: 1–26, the sermon: (1–2)
  letter, as 1st ed.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 412. This is a reprint with a few changes
  of 1612 D.


6. ——. DAVID’S DESIRE | TO GOE TO CHVRCH: AS IT | was published in two
Sermons | in _S_^t MARIES in | OXFORD. | The _One_, the _Fift_ of
_November_, in the Afternoone | to the Vniversitie, in the Yeare of our
Lord | God 1609. the _Other_, on _Christmas_ | _Day_ next following, to
the Pa-|rishioners of that | place. | [_device_, then 2 _mottos_.]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 48: p. 11 beg. _waies but often_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) epistle dedicatory to Oriel
  college and St. Mary’s parish, Oxford, signed “Iohn Day”: 1–25, the
  first sermon: 26, quotation from Camden’s Annales about queen
  Elizabeth: 27–48, the second sermon.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 411. This is a reprint of 1612 D, but
  neither is that fact mentioned, nor is the author’s name on the title.


7. ——. DAY’S FESTIVALS | _OR,_ | _TWELVE OF HIS SERMONS_: | DELIVERED BY
HIM AT SEVERAL | times to the PARISHIONERS of S^t MARYES | in OXFORD, on
the three Chiefe FESTI-|VALS of the Yeere, CHRISTMAS, | EASTER, and
WHIT-SONTIDE. | _THREE OF VVHICH SERMONS_, | _are touching our_ SAVIOUR;
ONE, _the_ HO-|LY GHOST; TWO, _the_ TWO SA-|CRAMENTS; _The other_ SIX,
_such_ | _severall_ DVTIES _as belong to_ | _the severall sorts of all_
| CHRISTIANS. | [_device_, then two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 7_a_: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 352: p. 11 beg. _the Nations of_,
  111 _selfe same Steps_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7)
  dedication to Oriel college, Oxford: (8) “The Severall Arguments, with
  Severall Texts ...”, with a note: 1–160, six sermons: 161–188 short
  pieces on the Lord’s Supper, containing a letter to “Ea.” of St.
  Mary’s parish dated “Oriel. Coll. March. 2.”, “Sacred Fragments” (on
  both Sacraments) and prayers: 189–352, the six last sermons.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 411. The dedication alludes to the
  circumstances of preaching “David’s Desire to go to Church,” see 1612
  D, and foreg. art.


8. ¬Evans¬, Edward. VERBA DIERVM, | OR, | _THE DAYES REPORT_, | OF GODS
GLORY. | _As it hath beene delivered some yeeres since, at Foure
Ser-_|_mons, or Lectures vpon one Text, in the Famous V-_|_niversity of_
OXFORD; _And since that time_ | _somewhat Augmented; And is now
com-_|_mended vnto All Times to be Aug-_|_mented and Amended._ | _By_ |
EDWARD EVANS, Preacher and Minister | _of Gods word_. | [3 _mottos_,
then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 7: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 181 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _tie? And_,
  111 _to come. By_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3)
  dedication to the honour of God: (4) “Faults of Omission and
  Commission ...” beg. “Pag. 5. for ὁλὴν Read, ὅλην”: 1–181, the four
  sermons, on Ps. xix. 2: (1) 3 mottos.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 168, where a MS. note by Bliss in his own
  copy shows that the author _was_ the Fellow of New College, and that
  Wood was in error in supposing otherwise. See next art.


9. ——. VERBA DIERVM, | [&c. precisely as foreg. art.]

  Impr. 7: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 181 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _tie? And_,
  111 _to come. By_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2–3)
  dedication to the honour of God, with words in italic inserted between
  the two parts of the original dedication: (4) “Faults of Omission and
  Commission,” beg. “Pag. 31. lin. 1 For _tations_”: rest as foreg.
  art., except 4 mottos, not 3.

  This is a second issue with some of the text reset, with additions and
  alterations, as for instance on p. 144 in which the paginal misprint
  “134” is corrected, and which begins “newes of His Glory,” instead of
  “of Speech more warrantable.”


10. ¬Hakewill¬, George. THE | VANITIE OF | _THE EYE_, | First beganne
[&c. exactly as 1608 H, second edition, except “_third_” for “_second_,”
“_Author_” for “_Authour_,” and different woodcuts on title.]

  Impr. 2: 1615: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 170 + [24]: p. 11 beg. _and
  by consequence_, 111 _maker; I_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title:
  5–8, “The Contents ...”: 1–170, the work: (1–18) additional quotations
  and notes for the third edition, preceded by an explanatory paragraph.

  See 1608 H. This is a reprint throughout, with the addition of some
  quotes on an extra sheet.


11. Haven. “The hauen of the afflicted / _Oxon._ 1615.”.

  A doubtful entry in the ©Bibliotheca classica ... authore M. Georgio
  Draudio© (Francof. 1625), 2nd part, p. 269: probably referring to
  Sebastian Benefield’s Sermon, 1613, which see.


12. ¬Mornay¬, Philippe de, seigneur Du Plessis. AN | HOMILY VPON | THESE
WORDS | of Saint Matthew, | Chap. 16, v. 18. | _Tu es Petrus._ | WRITTEN
FIRST | in French by that Hono-|_rable and learned perso-_|nage,
Monsieur Du PLES-|SIS MORNAY. | AND TRANSLATED | into English by I. V. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 2: 1615: (twelve & six) 16^o: pp. [8] + 28: p. 11 beg. _ceaued
  of God_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–7) epistle
  dedicatory to D^r Prideaux rector of Exeter college Oxford “my most
  respected good Master,” signed “I. V”: 1–28, the homily.

  The “I. V.” is supposed to be John Verneuil sublibrarian of the
  Bodleian, who was a Frenchman by birth: but he was of Magdalen and so
  not very likely to dedicate his first work to the head of another
  college. The collocation of this work and another translation of
  Mornay (1612 M) in a Bodleian volume suggest the possibility of the
  same person being translator of both.


13. Powell, Gabriel. “©Prodromus. A Logical Resolution of the first
Chapter of the Epist. of St. Paul to the Rom.© Lond. 1600. Ox. 1602.
oc.... Printed there again in Lat. 1615. oct. ©Theological and
Scholastical Positions concerning Usury.©—Pr. with ©Prodromus©.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 25, perhaps dubious.


14. ¬Prayer¬, book of Common. LIBER | PRECVM | PVBLICARVM | IN VSVM
ECCLE-|siæ Chathedralis Chri-|_sti Oxon_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1615: (eights) 16^o: pp. [40] + 240 + [16]: p. 11 beg.
  _filiæ Sion_, 111 _12. Nam liberabit_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–40) Matutinæ: preces, Vespertinæ preces, Letania, not in
  full: 1–240, the Psalms, in Latin: (1–6) Special prayers, “Pro officio
  totius Ecclesiæ in Communi,” “Pro Rege,” “Tempore Pestilentiæ,” “Pro
  docilitate,” “Gratiæ. Ante cibum” and “Post cibum”: (7) the versicle
  and response still used at Ch. Ch. after the Anthem, a prayer for the
  King and a commemoration of Henry viii, founder of Ch. Ch., all in
  Latin: (9–16) Psalms 43, 114, 117, 119 (part), 133, 150, in Latin
  rhyming verse, perhaps a separate piece of printing.

  See 1639 P, 1660, 1676, 1689, 1726, all which editions differ in the
  details of contents, and the 1639 ed. is entitled “Liber Psalmorum et
  precum ...” It may be noted that the signatures and paging constitute
  the Psalms a separate book, whereas the Stationers’ Company had
  obtained in 1603 a monopoly of printing the Psalms, confirmed in 1615.


15. ¬Prideaux¬, dr. John. [_woodcut_] | CHRISTS | COVNSELL FOR EN-|DING
LAW CASES. | _AS IT HATH BEENE DELIVE-_|red in two Sermons vpon the
25^{th} | Verse of the 5^{th} of Matthew. | BY | JOHN PRIDEAUX _Doctor
of Divinity and_ | _Rector_ of Exceter Colledge. | [_motto_, then
_device_.]

  Impr. 2: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 58: p. 11 beg. _Tremelius notes_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–26, 27–58, the sermons.

  See 1636 P.


16. [¬Sanderson¬, Robert]. LOGICÆ AR-|_TIS COMPENDIVM_. | _In quo_ |
Vniversæ artis Synopsis, methodo ac for-|mâ ad Scholarum vsum, quàm
fieri | potuit, accommodatissi-|mâ breviter pro-|ponitur. | _In privatam
nonnullorum gratiam_ | _& vtilitatem tantisper edi-_|_tum, dùm ad
pleniora_ | _maturuerint._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1615: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 230 + [Appendixes, see below]
  124 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _possunt. Individua_: 111 _tur auferendo_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) “Elenchus capitum”: (7–8)
  “Admonitio ad Lectorem”: 1–230, the Compendium, in three parts.

  Very rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 626. See 1618 S (2nd. ed.,
  reprinted in Sanderson’s Works, vol. 6), 1631 S (3rd), 1640 S (4th),
  1657 (5th), 1664 (6th), (7th), 1672 (8th), 1680 (9th), _no date_
  (10th, according to dr. Jacobson, Sanderson’s editor), and 1707, 1741,
  1841, 1854 (in Sanderson’s works, Oxf. 1854, vol. 6). Cf. 1602 S. The
  ©Admonitio© declares that the Appendixes are not ready and must be
  omitted. There is no clue to the author in the book. The only copy I
  have seen (in Queen’s College Library, Oxford) has the Appendixes of
  the second edition bound with it, so possibly they were printed in
  time to be issued with some copies.


17. ¬Sharpe¬, Lionel, archdeacon of Berkshire. ARTICLES MINISTRED IN |
the Visitation of the Right Worshipfull | M^r. DOCTOR SHARPE
Arch-|_deacon of Barkeshire, in the yeare_ | _of our Lord God. 1615._ |
[_device._]

  Impr. 4: 1615: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4 B^2: sign. B 1^r beg. _at
  morning_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-B 2^r, 51
  articles: B 2^v, “The oath of the Church-wardens.”


18. ¬Wake¬, Isaac. REX PLATONICVS: | [&c. exactly as 1607 W, 2nd ed.,
except “Aug.” for “Aug”, “An.” for “Anno.”, “_NARRATIO_,” “AB ISAACO
WAKE”, “_e-_|_mendatior_,” and “Tertia” for “Secunda.”]

  Impr. 13_c_: 1615: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 224 + [20]: p. 11 beg.
  _minum memoriam_, 111 _cumano irruunt_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—as 1607 W., 2nd ed., except “13 Cal. Jul.” in dedication,
  and in 2nd titlepage “HABI-|ta,” “beatæ | ,” “ACADE-|miæ,” “_piis_,”
  “_parenta-_|rent.”, and the Oration is (6–19), and dated 1615.

  This is a reprint verbatim but not literatim. Cf. 1607 W., 2nd ed.


                                 1616.

1. ¬Advice.¬ [_woodcut_] | THE | ADVISE OF | A SONNE, NOVV PRO-|FESSING
THE RELIGI-|ON ESTABLISHED IN | the present Church of England, | _to his
deare Mother, yet a Ro-_|man Catholike. | [_device._]

  Impr. 2: 1616: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 38: p. 11 beg. _answere, that_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–38, the work.

  A controversial discourse against Roman Catholicism.


2. ¬Bailey¬, Walter. _TWO_ | TREATISES | CONCERNING | the Preseruation
of | EIE[/]SIGHT. | The first written by Do-|ctor BAILY sometimes of
Ox-|ford: the other collected | _out of those two famous_ | Physicions
FERNELIVS | and RIOLANVS. | [_device._]

  Impr. 34: 1616: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 64: p. 11 beg. _yeeld into_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–7) “To the Reader,” a preface
  by I[ohn] B[arnes]: 1–24, “A breefe Treatise concerning the
  preseruation of the eye sight”: 25–62, “A Treatise of the principall
  diseases of the eyes, gathered _out of_ Fernelius _and_ Iohn Riolamus
  _Doctors of Phisicke_.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 586 and 1602 B, for the first treatise.
  Johannes Fernelius and Johannes Riolanus the elder, both French
  physicians, died in 1558 and 1609 respectively, but neither wrote a
  special treatise on eyesight. The preface is no doubt by John Barnes
  and alludes to the worth and undeserved obscurity of Bailey’s work.
  The whole book with the possible exception of the titlepage, was
  printed in London, the woodcuts being quite unknown at Oxford. Even
  the arms of the University on the titlepage are re-cut on wood. The
  first treatise is only a reprint, Dr. Bailey having died in 1592, and
  the whole book, preface and all, was reprinted at London in 1626.


3. ¬Fuller¬, Nicholas. _MISCELLANEORVM_ | _Theologicorum_, | QVIBVS NON
| MODO SCRIPTVRÆ DIVINÆ, | SED ET ALIORVM CLASSICO-|rum Auctorum plurima
monumenta explican-|tur atque illustrantur; | LIBRI TRES, | _Plurimarum
observationum, in hac Editione, insigni_ | auctario Locupletati: | _His
insuper accessit, consimilis argumenti_, Liber | item Quartus, _antehac
nunquam pervulgatus_. | _AVCTORE_ | NICOLAO FULLERO antiquæ & | inclytæ
Ecclesiæ Cathedralis | SARISBVRIENSIS | _Canonico_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1616: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + “452” (440–443 are omitted in the
  numbers of pages) + [8] + “453”-“645” + [3]: p. 11 beg. _mi, quibus
  ait_, 111 _Astrologum_, 501 _sum est illud_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) Epistola dedicatoria to sir Henry
  Wallop, dated “Ex Musæo nostro Aldingtonæ” 25 Jan. 1615 i. e. 1615/6:
  (9–10) “Ad lectorem”: (11–16) list of chapters in books 1–3: 1–452,
  the work, bks. 1–3: (1–5) dedication of bk. 4 to dr. Arthur Lake
  warden of New College, Oxford, dated “Ex Musæo nostro Aldingtonȩ 1
  Feb. 1615” i. e. 1615/6: (6–8) list of chapters in bk. 4: 453–645, the
  work, bk. 4: (1) “Errata ... & prætermissa ...”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 327, the biography in which appears to be
  largely founded on the preface to this book. The first edition of bks.
  1–3 is _Heidelberg_ 1612, the preface dated 1609. There is a reissue
  of the sheets of the present edition (Errata and all) “Londini, apud
  Johannem Billium. Anno 1617,” the titlepage alone being newly printed
  and the old one torn off. The 4th and 5th books were published at
  Leyden in 1622, and all reprinted in the 9th volume of the ©Critici
  Sacri© (Lond. 1660).


4. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. ROMANÆ HISTORIÆ ANTHOLOGIA | [&c. exactly as 1614
G, except “Eng-|lish,” “and | divers,” “For the use of” (not italic):
and after “Schoole” is added | “Editio Secunda.” |]

  Impr. 2: 1616: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 193 + [19]: p. 11 beg. _ved in the
  treasurie_, 111 _cense the people_: Pica Roman. Contents:—exactly as
  1614 G, except “Calend.” and “Godvvinus.”

  See 1614 G., of which this is a verbatim and almost paginatim, but not
  literatim, reprint.


5. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. SYNOPSIS | ANTIQVITATVM HE-|braicarum, ad
explicationem vtri-|usque Testamenti valde | necessaria. | _AD
FACILIOREM INTELLE-_|_CTVM, PLVRIMA SVNT COL-_|_LATA CVM REBVS HO-_|DIE
IN VSV. | _Authore_ | THOMA GODWINO | in _Art. Magistro_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 11: 1616: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 190 + [10]: p. 11 beg. _illîc
  loci_, 111 _& inter semen_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) dedication to James Montague bp. of Bath & Wells, dated “Oxon.
  pridie Iduum Januarij”: (5–6) “Lectori ...”: (7) a table of divisions:
  1–190, the work: (1) Comparative table of Hebrew and English Coins:
  (3–9) “Index rerum et verborum maxime insignium.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 52, and 1613 G note. The author was
  chaplain to the bp. of Bath and Wells. The ©Moses et Aaron© of the
  same author (Lond. 1625 and often) covers some of the same ground, but
  is a distinct work and in English.


6. [¬Nixon¬, Anthony.] THE | DIGNITIE | OF MAN, | Both | IN THE
PERFECTIONS | OF HIS SOVLE AND BODIE. | [_line_] | _SHEWING AS WELL THE_
| faculties in the disposition of the one: as the | Senses and Organs,
in the composi-|tion of the other. | By _N. A_ | [_line_, then _device_
with _woodcuts_, then _line_]

  Impr. 35: 1616: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 125 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _Q. How are_,
  111 _Q. What is the_: English Roman. Contents:—pp. (1–2), [not seen]:
  (3) title: (5–7): dedication to William Redman of Great Shelford,
  signed N. A.: 1–125, the work: (1–3) [not seen.]

  Very rare. This book is questions and answers on almost every subject
  concerned with man’s body and mind. Not a line of it was printed at
  Oxford, the woodcuts and type differ from Oxford ones, and even the
  device, which is like the smaller Oxford Arms of the University, is
  from a different block. The British Museum catalogue supplies the
  author’s name.


7. ¬Persius.¬ AVLVS PERSIVS FLACCVS | _HIS_ | SATIRES TRANSLA-|_TED INTO
ENGLISH_, | BY |BARTEN HOLYDAY M^r of Arts, | and Student of
Christ-Church | _in Oxford_. | [_motto_] | The second Impression. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 2: 1616: (eights) 12^o: pp. [72], signn. A-D^8 E^4: sign. B 4^r
  beg. _Dissolu’d vnto_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title:
  A 2^r-A 5^r, “To the Reader”: A 5^v-B 1^r, Complimentary letter from
  John Ley, and verses by John Wall and others: B 1^v-E 2^r, the
  translation, with a few notes: E 2^v-E 3^r, “An apostrophe of the
  translatour to his Authour _Persius_,” &c.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 523. The first edition seems to be
  unrecorded. There are London editions of 1617, 1635, and 1650: and
  Oxf. 1673. Some edition of this book was entered at Stationers’ Hall
  by John Barnes on 14 Nov. 1616, and another by William Arundel, by
  John Barnes’s consent on 29 Mar. 1617.


8. ¬Robinson¬, Hugh. “©Preces.© Written for the use of the children of
Winchester school in Lat. and Engl. ©Grammaticalia quædam©, in Lat. and
Engl. ©Antiquæ Historiæ Synopsis©. All which were printed at Oxon. 1616.
in a large oct.”

  So Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 395.


                                 1617.

1. ¬Angelus¬, Christophorus. [_woodcut._] | Πόνησις Χριστοφόρου τοῦ
Ἀγγέλου, Ἕλληνος τοῦ πολλῶν πλη-|γῶν, καὶ Μαστίγων γευσαμένου ἀδίκως
παρὰ τῶν | Τουρκῶν διὰ τὴν εἰς Χριστὸν Πίστιν. | [_device._]

  Impr. 36: 1617: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A^4 B^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  σφόδρα· καὶ ὅτι: Pica Greek. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r,
  dedication to English people in Greek: A 2^r-B 2^r, the work: B 2^v, a
  woodcut, see below.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 633, and the next art. Two very
  rude wood engravings illustrate the text, one on sign. A 4^r depicting
  the tortures inflicted on Angelus by the Turks, the other (sig. B 4^v)
  possibly an emblematic figure representing England.


2. ——. [_woodcut_] | CHRISTOPHER ANGELL,—a Grecian, who tasted of many |
stripes and torments inflicted by the | Turkes for the faith which he |
had in Christ Iesus. | ⁂⁂ | [_line_] | [_woodcut_] | [_line_.]

  Impr. 36: 1617: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A B^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _much in debt_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r
  dedication to England: A 2^r-B 3^r, the work: B 4^r, a woodcut, see
  below.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 633, 1618 A, and preceding art., of
  which this is a translation, in good English. The same two engravings
  occur as in the Greek text, on sign. A 4^r and B 4^r.


3. ¬Duck¬, Arthur. [_woodcut._] | VITA | HENRICI | CHICHELE |
ARCHIEPISCOPI | _CANTVARIENSIS_ | SVB REGIBVS HENRIC: V. ET VI. |
DESCRIPTA AB ARTHVRO DUCK: | _LL. D._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 11: 1617: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 108 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _licentur
  etiam_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–180, the Life: (1)
  account of the sources of the Life: (3) “Errata.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 258. The Life was reprinted in [Bates’s]
  ©Vitæ Selectorum ... virorum©, Lond. 1681, p. 1: and an English
  translation was published at London in 1699. This Life of the founder
  of All Souls contains some solid historical matter, with a few
  documents. Some copies want the Errata.


4. ¬Hales¬, John. A | SERMON | PREACHED AT S^t MA-|RIES IN OXFORD VPON |
TVESDAY IN EASTER | _VVEEKE_, 1617. | _CONCERNING THE ABVSES_ | _of
obscure and difficult places of holy_ | _Scripture, and remedies
a-_|_gainst them_. | By IOHN HALES, | FELLOW OF ETON COLLEDGE, | and
_Regius Professour_ of the Greeke | tongue in the Vniversitie | of
Oxford. | [_line_: then _device_: then _line_.]

  Impr. 36: 1617: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 41 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _monly they_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–41, the sermon, on 2 Pet.
  iii. 16.

  For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 409. This sermon was
  reprinted in Hale’s ©Golden Remains© (Lond. 1659 &c.), with others.
  The text, outer margin and headlines of every page are within bounding
  lines.


5. ¬Hutchins¬, Robert. Stationers’ Register, ed. Arber, iii. 654 “7^o
Augusti 1619. John Barnes. Entred for his copie by order of a Court _A
short Catechisme_ made by ROBERT HUTCHINS which was the copie of ¬Joseph
Barnes¬ his ffathers ... vj^d,” assigned to John Wright the same day.
This Catechism cannot be later than 1617, in which year Joseph Barnes
ceased printing, nor before 1605 when John Wright began to publish: but
I find no other notice of the book or author.


6. ¬Jackson¬, Thomas. NAZARETH AND BETHLEHEM, | OR, | ISRAEL’S | PORTION
IN THE SONNE | OF IESSE. | AND, | MANKINDS COMFORT | _FROM THE WEAKER
SEXE._ | _TVVO SERMONS PREACHED IN_ | _S_^t Maryes Church in Oxford. |
BY | THOMAS IACKSON, Bachelour of Divinitie, and | Fellow of Corpus
Christi College | _in Oxford_. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 38: 1617: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 75 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _returne to_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to James
  Montague bp. of Winchester, dated “from my study in Corpus Christi
  College ... Septemb. 6. 1617”: 1–37, the first sermon, on Jer. xxxi.
  21–22: 38–75, the second, on Gal. iv. 4–5.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 668. The text, outer margins and
  headlines are within bounding lines.


7. ¬M[orrice?]¬, T[homas?] DIGESTA | SCHOLASTICA, | IN GRATIAM
PVE-|RORVM EDITA: | IN DVAS DIVISA PAR-|_tes: quarum prior Prosaica_, |
_posterior Metrica_ | _continet_. | Per T. M. | [_device._]

  Impr. 37: 1617: (eights) 12^o: pp. [4] + 52 + 127 + [1]: pp. 11 beg.
  _impetu_ and _Ipse Perillæo_, 111 _Vt plus_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) “ad lectorem”: (4) the contents: 1–52, the
  first part: 1–127, the second part.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 272. The book consists of adages and
  extracts suitable for school use.


8. ¬Oxford¬, University. IACOBI ARA | [_engraving_] | CEV, IN IACOBI
MAG-|NÆ BRITANNIÆ FRANCIÆ | ET HIBERNIÆ REGIS SERENIS-|SIMI, &C:
AVSPICATISSIMVM | REDITVM E SCOTIA IN | ANGLIAM, ACADEMIÆ | _OXONIENSIS
GRA-_|TVLATORIA. |

  Impr. 37: 1617: sm. 4^o: pp. [80], signn. A-K^4: sign. B 1^r beg. _Vis
  restituta_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 1^v “Iacobi
  patriarchæ cum Iacobo rege ... comparatio,” a poem: A 2^r-K 4^r, the
  poems: K 4^v, “Conclusio,” a poem.

  Congratulatory poems by members of the University of Oxford, on the
  occasion of the return of James i from a short visit to Scotland. All
  are in Latin except two Greek and two French: one is acrostic and one
  in the shape of an altar. On the title is a rough wood engraving of an
  altar with fire, bearing the words DEO REDVCI:.


9. ¬Smith¬, Samuel. ADITVS | AD | LOGICAM. | In vsum eorum qui pri-|mò
ACADEMIAM | Salutant. | [_line_] | _Autore_ SAMVELE SMITH | _Artium
Magistro_. | [_line_] | Editio Tertia. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 13_c_: 1617: (twelves) 16^o: [2] + 204 + [2] + 2 unpaged tables,
  see below: p. 11 beg. _Tertio Ge-_, 111 _ctivam habet_: Long Primer
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–204, the work, in 3 books, with two
  sm. 4^o leaves unpaged inserted at pp. 32–3 and 42–3, printed on one
  side only with logical divisions of Substantia and Qualitas
  respectively: (1) “Lectoribus ...”, a deprecation of criticism.

  For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 283. This is the first
  known Oxford edition: see 1613 S., 1614 S., 1618 S., 1627 S., 1633 S.,
  1639 S., 1684. There is also a London ed. of 1621.


10. ¬Terry¬, John. _THE_ | REASONA-|BLENESSE OF WISE AND | holy truth:
and the absurditie | _of foolish and wicked_ | _Errour_. | [_two texts_,
then _device_.]

  Impr. 36: 1617: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 38 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _able so_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to Arthur Lake,
  bp. of Bath and Wells: 1–38, the sermon, on John xvii. 17.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 410.


11. ¬W.¬, R., of Hart Hall, Oxford. “©Merry Jests concerning Popes,
Monkes and ffryers© translated out of Ffrench by R. W. Bachelour of Arts
of H[arts]. H[all]. in Oxon.”

  So in Arber’s ©Transcript of the Stationers’ Register©, as a book of
  Joseph Barnes’s, entered at Stationers’ Hall 26 Feb. 1620/1 by John
  Barnes. It must have been printed between 1585 and 1617 inclusive,
  probably after 1610.


                                 1618.

1. ¬Angelus¬, Christophorus. [_woodcut_] | CHRISTO-|PHER ANGELL, | A
GRECIAN, WHO TA-|sted of many stripes and tor-|ments inflicted by the |
_Turkes for the faith_ | _which he had in_ | _Christ Iesus_.| ⁂ |
[_device_].

  Impr. 39: 1618: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _much in debt_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r,
  dedication to England: A 2^r-B 3^r, the work: B 4^r, a woodcut, see
  below.

  Very rare: for the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 633. Dr. Bliss
  in his copy of Angelus, now in the Bodleian, suggests that this
  edition was worked off without the Greek when Angelus betook himself
  to travel about the country. It is a reprint almost literatim of 1617
  A. Angelus was in Oxford, according to Dr. Bliss, from Whitsuntide
  1610 to about Easter 1618, and died 1 Feb. 1638/9. The second woodcut
  is a new and rather more elaborate one than in the 1617 issue, but not
  more intelligible, and is enclosed in an oval frame: the first (on
  sign. A 4^r) is unchanged.


2.*† ——. [Letters testimonial to the good behaviour of Christopher
Angell, (1) & (3) from the University of Oxford, 10 May 1610 and 20 Mar.
1617 (1617/8), and (2) from the bp. of Salisbury 15 Aug. 1616, all in
English.

  Probably printed at Oxford in 1618: (one) la. 8^o: pp. [2]: p. 1 beg.
  “[woodcuts] _The bearer hereof, Christopher Angell_”: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) the testimonials.

  Very rare.


3. ¬Butler¬, Charles. “©Rhetoricæ Libri duo, ‘quorum prior de Tropis &
Figuris, posterior de Voce & Gestu præcipit©, &c.’ Oxon. 1618, the 4th
edit. ... qu.”

  So Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 210: see Supplement 1598 B: and 1600 B.


4. ¬Farrear¬, Robert. “‘_A brief Direction to the French Tongue_, &c.’
Oxon 1618. oct. in the title of which book he wrote himself M.A.”

  So Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 278.


5. ¬Panke¬, John. _COLLECTANEA._ | OVT OF | S^t GREGORY | THE GREAT, |
AND | _S_^t _BERNARD THE_ | _Devout, against the Papists who ad-_|_here
to the doctrine of the present_ | _Church of Rome, in the most_ |
_fundamentall points_ | _betweene them_ | _and vs_. | [_motto_, then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 39: 1618: (eights) 12^o: pp. [22] + 113 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _which
  by Sathans_, 111 _quod accepistis_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–21) Epistle dedicatorie to George Churchowse, mayor of “New
  Sarum” and the corporation, dated “from the Close at Sarum this 24
  _Iunij. 1618_,” signed “John Panke.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 274. This tract was reprinted at
  Salisbury in 1835, in 8vo, with the title “Romanism condemned by the
  Church of Rome, or Popery convicted ... By the Rev. John Panke ...,”
  with the spelling modernized.


6. ¬Sanderson¬, Robert. LOGICÆ | . ARTIS COMPEN-|_DIVM_. | SECVNDA HAC
EDI-|tione recognitum, duplici | _Appendice auctum, & pub-_|_lici iuris
factum_ | à ROB. SANDERSON Col-|legij Lincolniensis in al-|_mâ Oxoniensi
Socio_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 40: 1618: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 232 + 124 + [4]: pp. 11 beg.
  _possunt. Individua_ and _sed ij ferè_: 111 _tur auferendo_ and
  _margine peculiari_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7)
  “Elenchus capitum”: 1–232, the work, in three parts: 1–87, the first
  Appendix, De usu Logicæ: 89–124, the second Appendix, Miscella: (1)
  Errata typographica.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 626, and 1615 S.


7. ¬Smith¬, Samuel. ADITVS AD | LOGICAM. | In vsum eorum qui pri=|mo
ACADEMIAM | Salutant. | [_line_] | _Autore_ SAMVELE SMITH | _Artium
Magistro_. | [_line_] | Edito quarta à multis mendis | quæ per incuriam
Typo-|graphi irrepserunt, | repurgata. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 41: 1618: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [2] + 205 + [1] + 2 unpaged
  tables, see below: p. 11 beg. _Tertiò Ge-_, 111 _ctivam habet_: Long
  Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–205, the work, with two sm.
  4^o leaves, as in the 3rd ed.: (1) “Lectoribus...”.

  See 1617 S of which this is a slightly corrected reprint.


                                 1619.

1. ¬Bedé¬, Jean. _THE_ | MASSE DIS-|PLAYED. | VVRITTEN IN FRENCH | by
M^r JOHN BEDE, advocate to | _the Parliament of_ Paris, _and_ | _now
translated into_ | _English_.| [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 39: 1619: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 112: p. 11 beg. _signifieth to_,
  111 _bin no small_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–16) “The
  Preface to the Reader”, signed “E. C.”: 1–112, the work.

  This is a translation of “La Messe en François, exposée par M. Iean
  Bedé Angevin ...”, Geneva, 1610, 8^o. The translator may be Edward
  Chaloner, as suggested in the Bliss Sale Catalogue, for whom see
  Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 377.


2. ¬Bernard¬, Richard. _THE_ | FABVLOVS | FOVNDATION OF | THE POPEDOME:
| _OR_ | A FAMILIAR CONFERENCE BE-|tween two friends to the truth
PHILALETHES, | and ORTHOLOGVS, shewing that it can-|not be proued, _That
Peter was_ | _ever at Rome_. | _VVHEREVNTO IS ADDED A_ |
_CHRONOGRAPHICALL DESCRIP-_|_tion of_ Pauls _peregrination with_ Peters
_travells_, | _and the reasons why he could not be at_ | _Rome, that so
the truth in one_ | _view may be more fully and ea-_|_sily be seene of
e-_|_very one_. | [two _mottos_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 43: 1619: sm. 4^o: pp. [10] + 68 + 1 unpaged sheet, see below +
  [2]: p. 11 beg. _Christs Vicar_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title:
  (5–6) dedication to drs. Goodwin, Prideaux and Benefield, dated
  “Batcombe April 1. 1619,” signed “Richard Bernard”: (7–8) “To the
  Reader”, same date signed

                                   “R.
                                  B. B”:

  (9–10) “A summarie of the reasons, prouing Peter neuer to haue beene
  at Rome”: 1–68, the work: after p. 68 a large folded folio printed
  sheet, printed on one side only, “A short chronographicall description
  ...”, signed

                                    R.
                                  B. B,

  and with impr. 43. Pp. (1–2) (7–8) are an addition, wanting in some
  copies.


3. ¬Crakanthorp¬, Richard. _INTRODVCTIO_ | IN | METAPHYSICAM. |
_AVTHORE_ | RI. CRAKANTHORP | olim Collegij Reginæ | Oxon. Socio. |
[_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 40: 1619: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 96: p. 11 beg. _di modum_:
  Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title, within a border: (5–8) “Ad
  studiosos Academiæ Oxoniensis alumnos,” dated “Oxon. è Collegio
  Reginæ. Decemb. 7. 1619”, signed “Guiliel. Richardson”: (9–12)
  “Lectori benevolo,” signed “R. C[rakanthorp]”: (13–16) “Index capitum
  et rerum ...”: 1–96, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 362. The author seems to have allowed
  Richardson to take the book through the press, but to have revised and
  prepared it himself.


4. ¬Flavel¬, John. TRACTA-|TVS DE DE-|MONSTRATIONE | METHODICVS & |
POLEMICVS, quatuor | libris absolutus: | _antehæc in usum Iuventutis_ |
in Collegio WADHAMI | apud Oxonienses privatis | prælectionibus
traditus, | à | IOANNE FLAVEL | Art. Mag. & ejusdem | Collegii Socio. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 42: 1619: (eights) 12^o: pp. [12] + 1 unpaged sheet + 144 +
  [12]: p. 11 beg. _Tractatus de_, 111 _rantiæ suæ_: Long Primer
  English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to bp. Arthur Lake,
  dated “Oxonij è Coll. Wad. Kal. Martij. 1618 [1 Mar. 1618/9]”, signed
  “Alexander Huish”: (5–6) “Lectori ...” by Huish: (7–10) “Index capitum
  ...”: after p. (12) is a folded obl. sm. 4^o sheet containing a
  conspectus of the work, printed on one side only: 1 “Prooemium”:
  2–144, the work, in 4 bks.: (1–12) “Index rerum et verborum.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 207, and 1624 F, 1651 F. Flavel died in
  Nov. 1617, a Huish a co-collegian issued this volume from notes of
  Flavel’s pupils, preparing and editing them as he thought best.


5. ¬Howson¬, bp. John. ARTICLES | TO BE ENQVIRED | OF VVITHIN THE
DIO-|ces of Oxford, in the first Visitation | of the Right Reverend
Father | in God, _Iohn_ Bishop | of _Oxford_. | _HELD_ | In the yeare of
our Lord God 1619. in the seuen-|teenth yeare of the Raigne of our most
gratious Sove-|raigne Lord, _Iames_, by the grace of God, King | of
Great _Brittaine_, _France_, and _Ireland_, Defender of the | Faith: &c.
and of _Scotland_ | the three & fiftieth. | [_device._]

  Impr. 44: 1619: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Parents dwell_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 1^v,
  “The ... Oath ministred to the Churchwardens ...”, and “The Charge of
  the Churchwardens ...”: A 2^r-B 3^r, the articles: B 3^v, a further
  charge.


6. ¬Mandevill¬, Robert. TIMOTHIES | TASKE: | _OR_ | _A CHRISTIAN
SEA-CARD_, | _guiding through the coastes of a peaceable con-_|_science
to a peace constant, and a_ | _Crowne immortall_. | Wherein I. Pastors
are put in minde of their | double dutie, and how to discharge it. 1.
Personall, | as watchful men. 2. Pastorall, as faithful watch-|men. II.
True doctrine is advanced. III. Tradi-|tions discountenanced, & their
rancour discovered. | _In two Synodoll assemblies at_ Carliell, _out of
two seuerall, but_ | _sutable Scriptures. This of_ 1 Timoth. 4. 16.
_and_ | _that of Actes_ 20. 28. | Since concorporate, and couched with
augmentation | vnder their prime Head: | BY | ROBERT MANDEVILL,
_sometimes of Queenes Colledge_ | _in Oxford, and Preacher of Gods word
at_ | _Abbey-holme in Cumberland_. | [_text_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 45: 1619: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 64: p. 11 beg. _but Nusquam_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication to the University,
  signed “Rob. Magnadevilla”: (5–7) dedicatory Epistle to dr. William
  Goodwin, dated “In Coll: Regin: ... 8 Idus Julij ... MDCXIX,” signed
  “Tho: Vicars”: (8) two laudatory Latin poems: 1–64, the discourse, on
  1 Tim. iv. 16, ending with a chronogram.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 251. Vicars published the book, the
  author having died in 1618.


7. ¬Oxford¬, University. _Academiæ Oxoniensis_ | FVNEBRIA | SACRA. |
ÆTERNÆ MEMORIÆ SERENISSIMÆ REGINÆ | ANNÆ | _POTENTISSIMI MONARCHÆ_ |
IACOBI Magnæ Britanniæ, Fran-|ciæ, & Hiberniæ Regis &c.
De-|sideratissimæ Sponsæ, | DICATA. | [_device._]

  Impr. 42: 1619: sm. 4^o: pp. [144], signn. A-S^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Quæ solita_, R 1^r _Et obruemus_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A
  1^r title: A 2^r, dedicatory Latin poem to King James i: A 2^v-S 1^v,
  the poems: S 2^r-S 3^r, “Ad ... regem ... conclusio”, a poem.

  Poems on the death of queen Anne of Denmark, 1 Mar. 1618/9: all in
  Latin except 8 Greek and 3 Hebrew: there are also chronograms,
  anagrams and an acrostic.


8. Rainolds, John. “The sum of a conference” &c. Oxon. 1619, fol. So in
Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 193, 1619 being an error for 1610.

9. ¬Rawlinson¬, John. VIVAT REX. | _A_ | SERMON PREACHED | AT PAULS
CROSSE ON THE | day of his Maiesties happie inau-|guration, _March_
24^o. | _1614._ | _And now newly published, by occasion of His_ | _late_
(_no lesse happy_) _recovery._ | By | JOHN RAWLINSON D^r of Divinity,
and | one of his Maiesties Chaplaines | in Ordinary. | [_line, motto,
line, woodcuts._]

  Impr. 39: 1619: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 40 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _But let him_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication to the King: (6)
  University arms: 1–40, the sermon, on 1 Sam. x. 24.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 506. Page 1 shows that the ordinary
  length of a Paul’s Cross sermon was two hours.


                                 1620.

1. ¬Day¬, John. DAY’S DESCANT | _ON_ | DAVIDS PSALMES: | _OR_ | A
_Commentary_ vpon the _Psalter_, as it is vsually | read throughout the
Yeere, at _Mor-_|_ning_, and _Euening_ Prayer. | And First, | Of the
First _Eight Psalmes_, appointed to be read, | the _First_ Day of the
_Moneth_. | [_device_, then 3 _mottos_.]

  Impr. 39: 1620: sm. 4^o: pp. [40] + 222: p. 11 beg. _not in these_,
  111 II _Destroy thou_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8)
  Epistle dedicatory to archbp. Abbot, signed “John Day”: (9–40) “To the
  reader”: 1–220, the work, on Ps. 1–8: 221–222, “To the reader”, on the
  author’s orthography, with Errata.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 412. The introduction contains some
  autobiographical matter, and treats of “Our Lady’s Psalter.”


2. ¬Du Moulin¬, Pierre. A | SERMON | PREACHED | BEFORE THE KINGS |
MAIESTY at _Greenwich_ the | 15. of Iune. 1615. | _BY_ | Master PETER du
MOVLIN, one of the Preachers | of Gods Word in the Church of Paris, and
| newly translated out of French into | English, by I. V. | _According
to the Copy printed at_ Charenton | _by_ Paris. 1620. | [_device_].

  Impr. 46: 1620: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 35 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _to certaine
  fishes_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication to the
  Curators of the Bodleian, signed “Iohannes Vernulius, Bodleianæ
  Bibliothecæ hypobibliothecarius” the translator: 1–35, the sermon, on
  Rom. i. 16.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 221. The text, margin and headline of
  each page are within bounding lines.


3. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. ROMANÆ HISTORIÆ | _ANTHOLOGIA_. | AN | ENGLISH
EXPO-|SITION OF THE RO-|MANE ANTIQVITIES, | WHEREIN MANY RO-|MANE AND
ENGLISH | Offices are parallel’d, and | divers obscure Phrases |
Explained. | BY | THOMAS GODWIN _Master of Arts_. | For the vse of
ABINGDON Schoole. | Editio Tertia. | [_device._]

  Impr. 48: 1620: 12^o?

  For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 51: see 1614 G. Only
  known at present from references in 17th cent. catalogues and from a
  titlepage in the Bagford Collections at the British Museum (463. h. 3,
  no. 546), but it is not likely to be really rare.


4. ¬Goffe¬, Thomas. ORATIO | FVNEBRIS | HABITA IN ECCLESIA | Cathedrali
Christi Oxon | in Obitum viri omni ævo dig-|_nissimi_ | GVLIELMI |
GOODVVIN _istius_ | _Ecclesiæ Decani, S._ | Theol. Doctoris. | A THO.
GOFFE _Artium Ma-_|_gistro ex Æde Christi_. | [_device_].

  Impr. 40: 1620: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4 B^2: beg. _fecit
  operationes_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r “Ad
  Lectorem”: A 3^r-B 2^v the oration.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 463. Goodwin died 11 June 1620. A second
  edition of this year is simply a reissue of the sheets with an
  identical titlepage adding only “Editio Secunda,” in a separate line
  after “Æde Christi.”


5. ¬James¬, Thomas. CATALOGUS | VNIVERSALIS LIBRO-|RVM IN BIBLIOTHECA |
BODLEIANA omnium Librorum, | Linguarum & Scientiarum genere |
refertissimâ, sic compositus; | Vt | _Non solum Publicis per Europam
Vniversam Bibliothe-_|_cis, sed etiam Privatis Musæis, aliisq_¿ue¿ _ad
Catalogum_ | _Librorum conficiendum vsui esse possit_. | Accessit
Appendix Librorum, qui vel ex munificentiâ aliorum, | vel ex censibus
Bibliothecæ recens allati sunt, | Auctore THOMA IAMES S. Th. | Doctore,
ac nuper Proto-|Bibliothecario | _Oxoniensi_. | _Operis vsum ac
vtilitatem, Præfatio_ | _ad Lectorem indicabit._ | [_device_].

  Impr. 42, adding “Impensis Bodleianis”: 1620: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp.
  [16] + 539 + [1] + 36: p. 11 beg. _Albertus Dux_, 111 _Somnium magni_:
  Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to the
  King, prince Charles, &c.: (5–14), “Prooemium ...,” dated 30 June
  1620: 1–539, the catalogue in alphabetical order: 1–36, “Appendix ad
  catalogum priorem.”

  This is a new edition of 1605 J, arranged in one alphabetical order of
  authors’ names. The _Proeomium_ contains much information about the
  Library. The MSS. and printed books are treated alike in this
  catalogue, each with its pressmark. Dr. James had resigned the office
  of Librarian in May 1620 from illness. The Hebrew MSS. are not all
  entered in the Catalogue, and “propter typorum defectum” are described
  in Latin, not Hebrew type. A second edition of the Appendix was issued
  in 1635. The expense of printing the volume was £112 10_s._, (Reg.
  Convoc. N. 23, fol. 93, quoted by Macray ©Annals of the Bodleian©, 2nd
  ed. p. 58 _n._)


6. ¬Twyne¬, Brian. ANTIQVI-|TATIS ACADEMIÆ OXO-|NIENSIS APOLOGIA. | _In
tres Libros divisa._ | AVTHORE | BRIANO TWYNO _in facultate Artium
Ma-_|_gistro & Collegij Corporis Christi in eâdem_ | _Academia Socio_. |
Vltima Editio. | [_device_].

  Impr. 47: 1620: the rest as 1608 T.

  This is a simple reissue of the sheets of the 1608 edition, with a new
  titlepage, but is extremely rare.


                                 1621.

1. ¬Broad¬, Thomas. THREE | QVESTIONS | ANSVVERED. | I. QVESTION. |
_What should our meaning be, when after the reading of_ | _the fourth
Commandement, we pray; Lord incline our_ | _hearts to keepe this law?_ |
II. QVESTION. | _How shall the fourth Commandement, being deliuered in_
| _such forme of words, binde vs to sanctifie any day, but onely_ | _the
seauenth, the day wherein God rested, & which the Iewes_ | _sanctified?_
| III. QVESTION. | _How shall it appeare to be the Law of Nature to
sancti-_|_fie one day in every weeke?_ | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 39: 1621: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 38 + [2]: p. 11 (“10”) beg. _which
  is the_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “To the Reader”,
  signed “Th. Broad”: 1–26, the work: 27–33 “A DIALOGVE | BETVVEENE A
  IEVV and a CHRISTI-|AN of the Common | Opinion.” 33–38, “_A note
  touching the Lords Day_”: (1) “Errata.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 594. A treatise against too strict
  observance of Sunday, answered by George Abbot, M.P. for Guildford, in
  his ©Vindiciæ Sabbathi©, Lond. 1641.


2. [¬Burton¬, Robert.] _THE_ | ANATOMY OF | MELANCHOLY⸴ | _VVHAT IT IS_.
| VVITH ALL THE KINDES, | CAVSES, SYMPTOMES, PROG-|_NOSTICKES, AND
SEVE-_|_RALL CVRES OF IT_. | IN THREE MAINE PARTITIONS | with their
seuerall SECTIONS, MEM-|BERS, and SVBSEC-|TIONS. | _PHILOSOPHICALLY,
MEDICI-_|_NALLY, HISTORICALLY, OPE-_|_NED AND CVT VP._ | BY | DEMOCRITVS
_Iunior_. | With a Satyricall PREFACE, conducing to | _the following
Discourse_. | [_motto._]

  Impr. 48: 1621: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 72 + [8] + 783 + [9]: pp.
  11 beg. _sed and busied_ and _Lethargye_, 111 _Mutavere viros_, 611
  _^u Mille habet_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication
  to lord Berkeley: 1–72, “Democritus Iunior to the Reader”: (1–8) “The
  Synopsis of the first partition”: 1–783, the work: (1) 3 mottos: (2–7)
  “The Conclusion of the Author to the Reader”, signed “Robert Burton.
  From my Studie in _Christchurch Oxon._ Decemb. 5. 1620”: (8) “Errata.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 653. For subsequent Oxford editions see
  1624 B, 1628 B, 1632 B, 1638 B, 1651. Other editions are Lond. 1660
  (7th), 1676 (8th), 1800 (9th),      (10th), 1806 (11th), 1845, 188-,
  as well as epitomes. This celebrated work is replete with erudition,
  humour, and acuteness. The recondite sources of the numberless
  quotations are perhaps only to be found in the Bodleian, to which
  Burton bequeathed his printed books, of which a catalogue is among the
  Bodleian MSS. This first edition, which is anonymous except for one
  signature on p. (7) of the Conclusion, is accounted rare, but copies
  not infrequently appear for sale. Each successive edition during the
  author’s lifetime (he died in Jan. 1639/40) shows alterations.


3. ¬Denison¬, John. DE | CONFESSIONIS | AVRICVLARIS | VANITATE,
AD-|VERSVS CARDINALIS | BELLARMINI | _Sophismata_, | ET DE | _SIGILLI
CONFESSIONIS IMPIE-_|_tate, contra Scholasticorum, & Neoterico-_|_rum
quorundam dogmata_ | _Disputatio_. | _AVTHORE_ | IOANNE DENISONO
Oxoniensi | Sacræ Theologiæ Doctore. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 39: 1621: sm. 4^o: pp. [10] + 126: p. 11 beg. _catione, tum_,
  111 _Cap. 2. Argumenta_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6)
  dedicatory epistle to the king: (7–8) “Ad Lectorem”: (9–10) “Elenchus
  Capitum ...”: 1–126, the work, in two parts: 126 “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 439.


4. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. MICROCOSMVS, | OR | A LITTLE DE-|SCRIPTION OF | THE
GREAT WORLD. | A Treatise Historicall, Geographicall, | Politicall,
Theologicall. | [_line_] | By P. H. | [_line_, then _motto_, then
_device_.]

  Impr. 39: 1621: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 417 (“317”) + [3]: p. 11 beg.
  _pearance of diuers_, 111 _of Florence_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–5) Epistle dedicatory to prince Charles, signed “Pet.
  Heylyn”: (7–11) “The Preface”: (12–13) “To my brother the Author” an
  English poem by Edw. Heylyn: (14–15) “The Table” of contents, in
  alphabetical order: (16) “A computation of the forraine Coynes herein
  mentioned with ours”: 1–417, (1–2) the work: (3) “Errata.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 557, where 1622 is a misprint for 1621
  and 1624 for 1625. For other Oxford editions of this well-known and
  popular manual of Geography see 1625 H, 1627 H, 1629 H, 1631 H, 1633
  H, 1636 H, 1639 H: there are also London editions (entitled
  ©Cosmographie©) of 1652, 1657, 1664?, 1666, 1670, 1674?, 1677, 1682,
  1703.


5. ¬Savile¬, sir Henry. [two _lines_] | PRAELE-|CTIONES TRES-|DECIM IN
PRIN-|CIPIVM ELEMENTO_|RVM EVCLIDIS, | _OXONII HABITÆ_.| M.DC.XX. |
[_device_, see below.]

  Impr. 40: 1621: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 260: p. 11 beg. _ma. Quid_, 111
  _trag; à centro_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2)
  “Errata ...”: (3) “Henricus Savilius lectori”: 1–260, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 314. This was Savile’s last publication,
  for he died 19 Feb 1621/2. There are many woodcuts of figures of
  propositions. Most copies have a device on the titlepage, but a
  presentation copy from the author to the Bodleian and the copy in the
  Savile Library omit it. The absence of a dedication is unusual.


6. ¬Thornborough¬, bp. John. ΛΙΘΟΘΕΩΡΙΚΟΣ, | _SIVE_, | _NIHIL, ALIQVID,
OMNIA_, | ANTIQVORVM | SAPIENTVM VI-|vis coloribus depicta,
Philo-|_sophico=theologicè_, | In gratiam eorum qui Artem auriferam
Physico-chymicè & piè profitentur. | _AVTHORE_ | IOHANNE THORNBVRGH,
EPISCOPO | _VVIGORNIENSI_. | [2 _mottos_.]

  Impr. 40: 1621: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + plate + 152: p. 11 beg. _tur
  potiùs_, 111 _lestium corporum_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–6) dedication to the duke of Lennox: (7–11) “Ad Lectorem
  benevolum”: (12) “Παραρυάδες sic restituantur ...”: folded quarto
  leaf, see below: 1–152, the work in three divisions.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 5. The Episcopal Alchemist endeavours to
  find the Philosopher’s stone through Sulphurous Magnesia (Nil), water
  (Aliquid) and gold (Omnia). Vitriol is regarded as of vital
  importance. Much Theology is introduced. The woodcut plate represents
  the concord and discord of the four elements in various relations, in
  a circular table.


                                 1622.

1. ¬Abbot¬, George. [_woodcut_] | THE COPPIE | OF A LETTER SENT | from
my Lords Grace of Can-|terburie shewing the graue and | _weighty reasons
which induced_ | _the Kings Maiestie to pre-_|_scribe those former_ |
_directions for_ | _Preachers_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 45: 1622: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], sign. A, *^4: sign. A 3^r beg.
  _damentall grounds_, * 3^r _or of the Vniversalitie_: English Roman.
  Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-3^v, the letter, to the bp. of
  Oxford: dated “from Croydon Sept. 4th _1622_”: A 4 [not seen, probably
  blank]: * 1^r-4^r, “To the minister, churchwardens and parishioners of
         in the Diocesse of Oxon.”, 31 Aug. 1622, as under _Howson_,
  John, below.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 564. The latter part of this piece seems
  to have been issued separately, see ¬Howson¬, John, below.


2. ¬Carpenter¬, Nathanael. PHILOSOPHIA | LIBERA, | _TRIPLICI
EXERCITA-_|_tionum Decade proposita_. | _IN QVA_, | ADVERSVS HVIVS
TEM-|poris Philosophos, dogmata | quædam noua discu-|tiuntur. | AVTHORE
| NATHANAELE CARPNETARIO, | _Exoniensis Collegij, in florentissimâ_ |
_Academiâ Oxoniensi, Socio_. | EDITIO SECVNDA, VNA | Decade auctior, &
emendatior. | [_motto._]

  Impr. 42_a_: 1622: (eights) 16^o: pp. [24] + 395 + [5]: p. 11 beg.
  _tute ab alio_, 111 _ali: At nullam_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3)
  title: (5–14) dedication to James Hamilton duke of Hamilton (_d._
  1649): (15–21) “Ad florentissimam Oxoniensis Academiæ Iuventutem
  Præfatio”: (22–23) “Elenchus Exercitationum ...”: 1–395, the work: (2)
  “Errata Typographica.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 421, where _Lond._ is a misprint for
  _Oxon._ The first edition was issued at Frankfort in 1621 “authore N.
  C. Cosmopolitano,” with different prefatory matter, only two Decads,
  and variations in text and arrangement. See 1636 C, 1637 C, 1675. Some
  woodcuts of diagrams occur in the text.


3. ¬Clinton¬, Elizabeth, countess of Lincoln. [_woodcuts_] | THE |
COVNTESSE | OF LINCOLNES | NVRSERIE· | [_device._]

  Impr. 39: 1622: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 21 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _own natural_:
  Great Primer English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication to lady
  Briget countesse of Lincolne, signed “Elizabeth Lincolne”: (7–8) “To
  the ... Reader,” signed “T. L.”, i. e. Thomas Lodge: 1–21, the work:
  (2–3) not seen.

  Rare. The object of this small treatise, “the first worke of” the
  authoress “that ever came in Print,” is to persuade mothers to nurse
  their own children. The author appears to dedicate it to her
  daughter-in-law, not mother-in-law as Bliss states (Wood’s ©Ath.
  Oxon.©, ii. 384 _n._). The authorship has been ascribed to Thomas
  Lodge (Wood, as above), but there is every internal mark that he only
  wrote the address to the Reader, and possibly revised the whole.


4. ¬Gardiner¬, Richard. A | SERMON | PREACHED AT | S^t MARIES IN
OX-|FORD ON ACT SVN-|_DAY LAST IN THE AF-_|TER-NOONE 1622. | BY |
RICHARD GARDINER Student | _of Christ-Church_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 49: 1622: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 30 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _and crabbed_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–8) dedication to Richard
  earl of Dorset: 1–30, the sermon, on Gen. xlv. 8.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 921.


5. Heylyn, Peter. Microcosmus: see 1621 H.


6. *†¬Howson¬, John, bp. of Oxford. [_woodcut_.] | TO THE MINISTER |
CHVRCHWARDENS | and parishioners of      | _in the Diocesse of Oxon._ |
[text begins on same page.]

  No impr. or date, but 1622: sm. 4^o: pp. [8], sign. *^4: sign. * 2^r
  beg. _By this you see_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. * 1^r, heading
  as above: * 1^r-4^{*r}, the directions.

  These are Directions to preachers in the Diocese of Oxford, to
  restrict their choice of subjects and treatment of them within the
  bounds of the XXXIX Articles. The Directions are dated 31 Aug. 1622,
  and quote mandates from the King (4 Aug. 1622) and the archbp. of
  Canterbury (12 Aug. 1622). It is perhaps doubtful whether this is
  genuinely a separate book from _Abbot’s_ Letter, above.


7. ¬Oxford¬, University. DECRETVM | VNIVERSITATIS | OXONIENSIS DAMNANS |
PROPOSITIONES NEOTERI-|CORVM INFRA-SCRIPTAS, | SIVE _IESVITARVM_, | SIVE
| _PVRITANORVM_, SIVE | aliorum cuiuscunq¿ue¿ gene-|_ris Scriptorum_. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 40: 1622: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4 B^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Vniversitas_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A 2^r title: A
  3^r-B 2^r, the propositions.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 3 and ©Hist. and Antiqq. of the University
  of Oxford©, sub anno 1622. The propositions condemned were those
  delivered by William Knight of Broadgates Hall in a University sermon
  on Apr. 15, 1622, founded on principles of David Pareus, to the effect
  that subjects may take up arms against their sovereign. The
  propositions and censures were considered in a Convocation 25 June
  1622. The form of oath to be taken by all future graduates is
  appended, and a note that Pareus’s book was burnt on 6 June 1622.


8. ¬Oxford¬, University. [_woodcut_.] | VLTIMA LINEA | SAVILII | SIVE IN
OBITVM CLARISSI-|mi Domini HENRICI SAVILII E-|quitis Aurati,
Mathematicorum facilè Principis, nuperri-|mè Collegij MERTONENSIS
Custodis Vigi-|_lantissimi_, ETONENSIS _iuxta Windsore Præ-_|_positi
dignissimi, &_ BENEFACTORIS | _de Vniversitate Oxoniensi_ | _optimè
meriti_. | _Iusta Academica._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 40: sm. 4^o: pp. [58] signn. ( ), *^4, **^1, A-F^4: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Heroum vulgus_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. ( ) 2^r title: ( )
  3^r “Munificentia Savilii in celeberrimam Vniversitatem Oxoniensem”:
  ( ) 4^r, dedication to the Earl of Pembroke by the “Genius Scholarum”:
  ( ) 4^v, see below: * 1^r-** 1^v “Oratio funebris habita in scholâ
  Theologiæ Oxon. in obitum celeberrimi viri, Henrici Savilii, Equitis
  Aurati. A Tho. Goffe ... publico Academiæ Oratore tunc temporis
  deputato”: ( ) 4^v, A 1^r-F 3^v, the poems.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 315, 463. The poems are nearly all in
  Latin, but 5 are Greek, 2 Hebrew, one French, and one English: there
  is one chronogram. The “Oratio funebris” is clearly an added piece.


9. ¬Rawlinson¬, John. “©The Bridegroom and Bride©: On Cant. 4. 8. Ib.
[i. e. Oxon.] 1622, &c. qu.”

  So in Wood’s list of Rawlinson’s sermons (©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 506). It
  was preached in 1662 and re-printed at Oxford in 1625, but Wood’s
  statement is explicit, and there may have been a separate issue in
  1622, though I have not met with a copy or other reference to it.


10. ¬Spark.¬ A | SPARKE | OF CHRISTS | BEAVTY. | [_device._]

  Impr. 44_a_: 1622: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 39 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _wrought
  our_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1–2) [not seen]: (3) title: (4–7)
  “To the Reader ...”: 1–39, the work, a discourse on Is. ix. 6.

  Very rare.


                                 1623.

1. ¬Cotta¬, John. COTTA | CONTRA | ANTONIVM: | _OR_ | AN ANT-ANTONY: |
_OR_ | AN ANT-APOLOGY, | manifesting Doctor _Antony_ his Apo-|logie for
_Aurum potabile_, in true and e-|quall ballance of right Reason, to | be
false and counterfait. | _By_ IOHN COTTA Doctor in Physicke. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 48: 1623: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 108: p. 11 beg. _may be one_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) Advertisement to the reader about
  the prefaces: (3–7) Epistle dedicatory to the resident Doctors in
  Physic in the University of Oxford: (8) “Errata ...”: (9–12) “To the
  Reader”: 1–108, the work.

  This is a reply by a Cambridge man to Francis Anthony’s supposed
  discovery of a medicine called Aurum Potabile, in his ©Apologia
  veritatis illucescentis, pro auro potabili©, Lond. 1616. For the
  controversy see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 416. This work was sent to
  press at Oxford in 1616, but recalled before printing.


2. ¬France.¬ ARTICLES | AGREED ON | IN THE | NATIONALL SYNODE | of the
Reformed Churches of | FRANCE, | Held at _Charenton_ neere _Paris_, in
the Moneth | _of September_, 1623. | Which the same ordaineth to be
inuiolably kept | in all the CHVRCHES and VNIVERSI-|TIES of that REALME.
| [_device._]

  Impr. 39: 1623: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 34: p. 11 beg. _Who teach, That_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–34, the Articles in 4 chapters.

  See 1624, F.


3. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. ROMANAE | HISTORIAE | ANTHOLOGIA | RECOGNITA ET |
AVCTA. | _AN_ | ENGLISH EXPOSITION OF | THE ROMANE ANTIQVITIES, |
wherein many Romane and English | offices are paralleld, and divers |
obscure Phrases | _explained_. | _For the vse of_ ABINGDON _Schoole_. |
[_line_] | Revised and enlarged by the Author | [_line_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 47: 1623: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 277 + [17]: p. 11 beg. _a
  malefactor_, 111 _ther, sometimes_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–4) dedication to dr. John Young dean of Winchester, dated
  “Abindoniæ 14. Calend. Decemb. ... 1622,” signed “Tho. Godwyn”: (5)
  “Benevolo lectori” : (7) “A short Table ...” of contents: 1–277, the
  work: (2–24) “Index Rerum et Verborum ...”

  See 1614 G.


4. *†¬Oxford¬, Merton College. Merton Colledge Case. | [the text
follows.]

  No place or date, but probably printed at Oxford in about 1623: folio:
  pp. [4], sign. ( )^2: sign. ( ) 2^r beg. 3 _What Baron Althams_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—pp. (2–3) the Case.

  Merton College let the manor of Maldon to the Queen in 21 Eliz.
  (1578–79), for 5000 years. The lease was disputed by the College in
  1621 (“about two yeares since”), and again in this Case, which sets
  out the reasons for annulling the same.


5. ¬Oxford¬, University. CAROLVS | REDVX. | [_device_ with AC. on one
side and OX. on the other.]

  Impr. 42: 1623: sm. 4^o: pp. [92], signn. ( )^2 ¶^4 ¶¶^2 A-I^4 K^2:
  sign. B 1^r beg. _Pierides nuper_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. ( ) 1^r
  title; 2^r-2^v, dedications to king James and prince Charles, Latin
  poems by the vice-chancellor: ¶ 1^r-¶¶ 2^v “ΠΑΝΑΚΑΔΗΜΙΚΟΣ. sive,
  gratulatio pro Carolo reduce, Oxoniensium nomine recitata, à Iohanne
  King publico Acad. Oratore”: A 1^r-K 1^r, the poems: K 2^r “Epilogus
  typographorum ad Principem,” two short Latin poems.

  Poems by members of the University of Oxford to congratulate prince
  Charles on his return from Madrid to England 5 Oct. 1623. Most are in
  Latin, but 4 in Greek and 2 in Hebrew: there are also 4 chronograms, 1
  acrostich and 1 anagram. For King’s speech see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©,
  ii. 632.


6. Panke, John. See 1613 P.


                                 1624.

1. A, J. The younger brother his apologie: see 1634 A.


2. †A[yton, sir] R[obert]. [_woodcut_] | IN | OBITVM | THOMÆ RHÆDI, |
_VIRI VNDEQVAQVE_ | _MERITISSIMI_, | ET | _SERENISSIMO REGI_ | _AB_ |
_EPISTOLIS LATINIS_ | EPICEDIVM. | [_device._]

  No imprint: 1624: sm. 4^o: pp. [8]: ( ) 3^r beg. _Consilium extorsit_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—( ) 1^r, title: 2^r-4^r, the Latin poem,
  at end “_Faciebat R.A._”

  A Latin hexameter poem on the death of sir Thomas Reid, of whom I do
  not readily find any account. No part of this was printed in Oxford,
  the woodcuts and type being unknown there: even the small device of
  the Arms of the University on the titlepage (which has caused this
  work to be ascribed to the Oxford Press) differs from the genuine one.
  No doubt the book was printed in London.


3. [¬Burton¬, Robert]. _THE_ | ANATOMY OF | MELANCHOLY: | _VVHAT IT IS_.
| WITH ALL THE KINDES, CAV-|SES, SYMPTOMES, PROGNOSTICKS, | AND SEVERALL
CVRES OF IT. | _IN THREE MAINE PARTITIONS_, | with their seuerall
SECTIONS, MEM-|BERS, AND SVBSECTIONS. | _PHILOSOPHICALLY,
MEDICI-_|_NALLY, HISTORICALLY_ | _opened and cut vp_, | BY | DEMOCRITVS
_Iunior_. | With a Satyricall PREFACE, conducing to | the following
Discourse. | _The second Edition, corrected and aug-_|_mented by the
Author._ | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 48: 1624: (fours) folio: pp. [4] + 64 + [4] + “1”-“188” + [4] +
  “189”-“332” + [2] + “333”-“557” + [7]: pp. 11 beg. _make sport_, and
  _uing borne in_, 401 _Da mihi basia_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3) dedication to George lord Berkeley: 1–64, “Democritus
  Iunior to the Reader”: 64, Errata: (1–4) “The Synopsis of the first
  partition”: 1–188, the first part: (1–4) “The Synopsis of the second
  partition”: 189–332, the second part: (1–2) “Analysis of the third
  partition”: 333–557, the third part: (1–7) “the table.”

  See “Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 653, and 1621 B. The author’s name does
  not seem to occur anywhere in the book.


4. ¬C[arleton]¬, G[eorge], bishop of Chichester. ΑΣΤΡΟΛΟΓΟΜΑΝΙΑ: | The
Madnesse of ASTROLOGERS. | OR | An Examination of Sir | Christopher
Heydons | Booke, | _JNTITULED_ | A DEFENCE OF | Iudiciarie Astrologie. |
_Written neere vpon twenty yeares ago, by_ G. C. _And_ | by permission
of the Author set forth for the Vse of | _such as might happily be
misled by the_ | _Knights booke_. | Published by T. V. B. of D. |
[_motto._]

  Impr. 51: 1624: sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 123 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _neither can
  they_, 111 _them: which_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) “A”: (3)
  title: (5–15) Epistle dedicatory to Thomas Carleton, signed “Tho:
  Vicars”: (17) “In Authorem & eius opera. Προσφώνησις”, a Latin poem:
  (19–22) “Ἀνακεφαλαίωσις: or Recapitulation of the Chiefe Passages in
  this Treatise”, a list of Contents: (23) quotation from Ennius: 1–123,
  the work: 123, a chronogram, 1624.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 424. The book was entered at Stationers’
  Hall to Will. Turner, 18 July 1623. The author, whose initials only
  occur in the book, was at this time bishop of Chichester: the editor
  Vicars had married the bishop’s daughter. Sir Chr. Heydon’s book was
  published in 1603 at Cambridge, and a second book by him on Astrology
  published in 1650 was followed by a reprint of the present work in
  1651.


5. ¬Flavel¬, John. TRACTA-|TVS DE DE-|MONSTRATI-|ONE METHO-|DICVS &
PO-|LEMICVS, _quatuor_ | _libris absolutus:_ | _Antehæc in usum
Iuventutis_ | _in Collegio_ WADHAMI | _apud Oxonienses privatis_ |
_prælectionibus traditus_, | à | IOHANNE FLAVEL | Art. Mag. & ejusdem |
Colleg;j Socio. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 42: 1624: 16^o.

  For the author and book see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 207, and 1619 F.
  Only known at present from a titlepage in the Bagford collections at
  the British Museum (463. h. 3), but it is not likely to be rare.


6. ¬France.¬ ARTICLES | [&c. precisely as 1623 F adding after REALME.:—]
_Wherein, their iudgement touching the principall Contro-_|_versies now
on foote betwixt the Remonstrantes_ | _and Contra-remonstrantes, is
briefly declared._ | [then _woodcuts_, not device].

  Impr. 39, &c. exactly as 1623 F.

  This is a reissue of the sheets of 1623 F with part of the titlepage
  altered. There is another issue of this reissue, *undated, with impr.
  49_a_, but no other change from the present edition of any kind.


7. ¬Hayes¬, William. THE | PARAGON | OF PERSIA; | _OR_ | THE LAVVYERS |
_LOOKING-GLASSE_. | Opened in a sermon at S. MARIES | in Oxford, at the
Assises, the | 7 day of Iuly, 1624. | _By_ WILLIAM HAYES, _Master of
Arts of_ Magdalen Hall. | [two _mottos_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 45: 1624: 16^o.

  Only known at present from a titlepage in the Bagford collections in
  the British Museum (463. h. 3), but it is not likely to be rare.


8. Heylyn, Peter. Microcosmus: the reference in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©,
iii. 557 to an edition of this year, is probably an error for 1625.


9. ¬Oxford¬, University. CAMDENI | INSIGNIA· |

  Impr. 42: 1624: sm. 4^o: pp. [76], signn. ( )^2 ¶, ¶¶^4, ¶¶¶^2 A-F^4
  G^2: sign. B 1^r beg. _In Camdenum_: Pica Roman. Contents:—( ) 1^r
  title: 1^v “Donum Camdenianum”, his benefaction to the University: ( )
  2^r-2^v, A 1^r-G 2^v, the poems: ¶ 1^r-4^v “Oratio in memoriam ...
  Gulielmi Camdeni ... prolata per Zoucheum Townley ex Æde Christi,
  Oratorem publicum tunc temporis deputatum”: ¶¶ 1^r-¶¶¶ 1^v,
  “Parentatio historica: sive Commemoratio vitæ et mortis V. C. Gulielmi
  Camdeni Clarentii, facta Oxoniæ in Scholâ Historicâ per Degoreum Whear
  Historiarum Prælectorem, ab eodem Camdeno ibidem constitutum”, 2 Dec.
  1623: ¶¶¶ 1^v-2^v “Nuncius chronogrammaticus”, 3 Latin poems on Camden
  by Whear, introducing chronograms: A 1^r-G 2^v, see above.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 348, ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 398. Poems by
  members of the University of Oxford on the death of William Camden,
  which took place on 9 Nov. 1623. Most are in Latin, but there are 10
  Greek, with 5 anagrams, and 2 chronograms. Whear’s Oration contains
  many biographical details about Camden.


10. ——. SCHOLA | MORALIS | PHILOSOPHIAE | _OXON._ | In funere WHITI
pullata. | [_device._]

  Impr. 40: 1624: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 6 + [8]: p. 3 beg. _VVhite dato_:
  Pica & Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “Annua Whiti
  munificentia”, his bequests to the University, &c.: 1–6 poems: (1–8)
  “Oratio funebris habita Oxoniae, Aprilis 22^o, A^o 1624, in laudem
  Doctoris White ... per Guil. Price ...”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 352. Dr. Thomas White, founder of a
  Professorship of Moral Philosophy, died 1 Mar. 1623/4. The poems are
  all in Latin, except two in Greek.


11. *†¬P[rideaux]¬, I[ohn]. ALLOQVIVM SERE-|NISSIMO REGI IACOBO |
WOODSTOCHIÆ HABITVM | 24. _Augusti. Anno_ 1624. | [the text follows.]

  [Oxford, 1624?] sm. 4^o: pp. [8], sign. A^4: sign. A 2^r beg. _turbat
  quid dicam_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 1^r-A
  4^r, the speech, signed “I. P. V. Ox.” i. e. J. Prideaux,
  Vicecancellarius Oxon.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267. The speech describes, among other
  things, the recent architectural and public works in Oxford: and is
  reprinted in Prideaux’s Perez-Vzzah (1625 P).


12. ¬Randol¬, John. A | SERMON | PREACHT AT | S^t MARIES IN | OXFORD,
the 5. of August: | 1624. Concerning the | _Kingdomes Peace_. | BY |
IOHN RANDOL B: in D: of | _Brasen-nose_ Colledge. | [two _mottos_: then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 50: 1624: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 33 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _especially
  if_: Pica Roman. Contents: p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to lord
  “Davers” (i.e. Danvers): 1–33, the sermon, on Mark iii. 24: (2) “To
  the most criticall Reader” (altered by the use of smaller type to “To
  other most criticall Readers”), an apology for Errata, giving two
  examples.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 415.


                                 1625.

1. ¬Bedingfield¬, Robert. A | SERMON | PREACHED AT | PAVLS CROSSE | THE
24. OF OCTO_|BER. 1624. | BY | ROBERT BEDINGFIELD Master | of Arts, and
Student of | _Christ-Church_ in | Oxford. | [device: the whole title is
within lines.]

  Impr. 52: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 43 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _ent
  euidence_: English Roman. Contents: p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to
  Sir Thomas Richardson, the author’s uncle, dated “From my study in
  Christ-Church in Oxford. Nouemb. 24.” 1624: 1–43 the sermon, on Rom.
  vi. 23: 43, “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 457. The title and each page are within
  bounding lines. The author gives as one of his reasons for printing
  the sermon, that it was very wet when he delivered it, so that his
  auditors were few.


2. ¬Butler¬, Charles. ΣΥΓΓΕ´ΝΕΙΑ. | DE PROPINQVITATE | Matrimonium
impediente, | REGVLA. | _Quæ vna omnes quæstionis huius_ |
_difficultates facilè_ | _expediat._ | [line] | Authore CAROLO BVTLER,
Magd. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 60: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 71 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _linea recta_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Ad Lectorem”: 1–71
  the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 210.


3. ¬Carpenter¬, Nathanael. GEOGRAPHY | DELINEATED | FORTH IN TWO |
BOOKES. | _CONTAINING THE SPHÆRICALL_ | _AND TOPICALL PARTS_ |
_THEREOF._ | By NATHANAEL CARPENTER | Fellow of _Exceter Colledge_ | in
Oxford. | [_motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 61: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [18] + 274 + [18] + 286 + [4] + 4 folded
  leaves, see below: pp. 11 beg. _Earth &_ W_ater_, 111 _VVorld may be_,
  also 11 _teration next_, 111 _monstrated in_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—(3) title: (5–7) dedication to the earl of Pembroke: (9–15)
  “... contents of each chapter of the first booke ...”: (17–18) “To my
  Booke”, a poem: 1–274 the first book: (5) a titlepage:—“GEOGRAPHY |
  THE SECOND | BOOKE. | _CONTAINING THE GENERALL_ | _Topicall part
  thereof._ | By ... [&c. exactly as first title, imprint and all, but
  different motto]: (7–9) dedication to the earl of Montgomery: (11–18)
  “A table of the ... contents of the second booke ...”: 1–286, the
  second book: (1) Apology for erratas and an omitted diagram: (2)
  “Errors ...”. There should be four diagrams on folded leaves, after
  pp. (8) “The Analysis of the first Booke”: 252 “A Table ...”: (18)
  “The Analysis of the seconde Booke”: 228 “A Table of the Climates
  ...”. The omitted diagram would have followed p. 62 of the second
  part.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 422, and 1635 C. The treatise is of the
  theory and principles of Geography, not of details like Heylyn’s
  ©Microcosmus©. The author maintains that the earth is the centre of
  the universe, the sun and planets revolving round it! There are many
  woodcut diagrams in the text.


4. ¬G.¬, T. AN | ANSWER | TO | VVITHERS | MOTTO. | _Without a
Frontispice._ | WHEREIN, | Nec HABEO, Nec CAREO, Nec CVRO, | are neither
approued, nor confuted: | but modestly controuled, | or qualified. |
[_mottos_, a quaestio and responsio] | [two _lines_.]

  Impr. 50: 1625: (eights) 12^o: pp. [96], signn. A-F^8: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _whom Princes_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A 2^r,
  “The Booke to the Reader”: A 2^v, “Virgilius de litera _Pythagorea_”:
  A 3^r-A 4^v “To Master _Wither_ himselfe”, signed “_T. G. Esquire_”: A
  5^r-A 6^v “To the Reader”, signed as before: A 7^r-B 2^r, “The
  Introduction”, in verse: B 3^r-F 6^v, The Answer, in three parts: F
  7–8 [not seen].

  Very scarce. George Wither’s ©Withers Motto, Nec habeo, nec Careo, nec
  Curo©, was published in 1621 and consists of reflexions on human
  affairs: this book is a poetical satire on those reflexions, and on
  the character of Wither. The author is unknown.


5. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. ROMANAE | HISTORIAE AN-|THOLOGIA RECOG-|NITA ET
AVCTA. | _AN_ | ENGLISH EXPOSI-|TION OF THE ROMANE | Antiquities,
wherein many Romane | and English Offices are paralleld, | _and divers
obscure Phrases_ | explained. | For the vse of ABINGDON Schoole. |
[_line_] | _Reuised and enlarged by the Author._ | [_line_: then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 53: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 276 + [28]: p. 11 beg. _malefactor,
  but_, 111 _ther, sometimes_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: 5–6,
  dedication to dr. John Young, dated “Abindoniae 14. Calend. Decemb.
  ... 1622 ... Tho: Godwyn”: (7) “Benevolo lectori”: (8) “A short Table
  ... of every Booke and Section”: 1–276, the work: (1–26) “Index rerum
  et verborum ...”.

  See 1614 G. This edition was printed in London, though published in
  Oxford: it was not entered at Stationer’s Hall in 1624 or 1625.


6. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. ΜΙΚΡΟ´ΚΟΣΜΟΣ. | A | LITTLE DESCRIP-|TION OF THE |
GREAT WORLD. | _Augmented and reuised._ | [_line_] | By PETER HEYLYN. |
[_line_: then _motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 55: 1625: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 812 + [2] + one leaf, see
  below: p. 11 beg. 1. _First then_, 711 _Captain obseruing_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2–3) dedication to King Charles: (5–6)
  “To the Reader”: (7–8) “To my brother the Author”, a poem by Edw.
  Heylyn: (9–11) “A Table of the principall countries, ...”: (12–16) “A
  Table of the principall things”: (16) “A computation of ... forraine
  coynes ...”: 1–812, (1) the work: (2) a correction of p. 148 and
  “Errata”. Before p. 7 should come a narrow folded leaf, probably about
  10 in. high by 5 in. wide, with “The Table of Climes”, printed on one
  side only.

  See 1621 H: Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 557 (“1624”).


7. ¬James¬, Richard. ANTI-POSSEVINVS, | _SIVE_ | CONCIO | HABITA AD |
Clerum in Academiâ Ox-|_oniensi Ann. Domini_ | 1625. | [_line_] |
_Authore_ | RICHARDO IAMESIO Socio | _C. C. C. Vectensi_. | [_line_,
then _motto_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 60: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 25 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _præsertim
  cùm_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5) “Ad librum suum”, a
  Latin poem: 1–25 the Sermon, on 2 Tim. iv. 13.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 629. A singular sermon, more learned than
  theological. The title seems to be explained by pp. 20–21, where
  Antonio Possevino (_d._ 1611) is cited as planning a purgatio
  bibliothecarum in the interests of the Roman Catholic Church: to this
  James opposes his plea for freedom of research.


8. ¬James¬, Thomas. AN | EXPLANATION | _OR_ | ENLARGING OF | the ten
Articles in the Supplication of | Doctor IAMES, lately exhibi-|ted to
the Clergy of | _England_. | _OR_ | A manifest proofe that they are both
reas-|onable and faisible within the time mentioned. | [_motto_, then
_device_.]

  Impr. 58: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 36 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Dowists doe
  make_: Pica Roman. Contents: p. (1) title: 1–36, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 467. This is a reprint of the text of the
  ©Humble ... Request© below (except the last paragraph beginning “For
  the raising of the charges,” which James probably saw to be
  unpractical), with the addition of comments, written in senile style
  but obviously by dr. James, and of great interest both for the
  biography of the author and the principles of criticism as applied to
  editing a text from MSS. These 26 “Theses or Rules concerning the Art
  Criticke” are, at p. 23, followed by examples. Dr. James paid two
  Dutchmen for transcription abroad at the rate of 20_s._ per quire,
  each quire taking them a week, and the hundred quires per year
  sufficing to keep two presses at work (p. 17). At p. 26 he explains
  that a critical remark by bp. Bilson first set him about compiling the
  ©Ecloga Oxonio-Cantabrigiensis© (Lond. 1600).


9. *†¬James¬, dr. Thomas. [woodcuts] | THE | HVMBLE | AND EARNEST |
REQVEST OF THOMAS | IAMES, D^r OF DIVINI-|TY, AND SVBDEANE | of the
Cathedrall Church | of _Welles_, to the _Church_ | _of England_; for,
and | in the behalfe of | Bookes touching Re-|ligion. | [the text of the
work follows.]

  No imprint or date, but Oxford, 1625 (perhaps 1624) (eight) 16^o: pp.
  15 + [1]: Great Primer English. Contents:—p. 1 title as above: 1–15,
  the request, signed “T. I. S. T. P. B. P. N.” (i. e. Thomas James,
  Sanctae Theologiae Professor: for B. P. N. see note to 1599 R.: but
  the occurrence of the letters here without any text or motto favours
  the interpretation “Bono Publico Natus”): (1) a form of approbation of
  the scheme, signed by 17 leading men in Oxford.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 467. This (and still more the
  ©Explanation© above, which see) is an interesting plea for the
  application of criticism to aid in restoring the texts of Fathers and
  Schoolmen which had been corrupted by Roman Catholic theologians. The
  date cannot be precisely ascertained: the titles of the approvers only
  confine it to 1624, 1625, or 1626: the ©Explanation© alludes to it as
  “lately” issued: so that it is difficult to say whether 1624 or 1625
  is the year of issue.


10. ——. A MANVDV-|CTION, OR INTRO-|DVCTION VNTO | DIVINITIE: |
_CONTAINING_ | A Confutation of Papists by Pa-|pists, throughout the
important Articles | _of our Religion; their testimonies taken_ | either
out of the _Indices Expurgatorii_, | or out of the _Fathers_, and
ancient | _Records_; | But especially the Manuscripts. | [_line_] | _By_
THO. IAMES, _Doctor of Diuinitie, late_ | Fellow of _New Colledge_ in
_Oxford_, and Sub-Deane | of the Cathedrall Church of Welles. | [_line_,
then _note_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 62: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 136 + [8]: p. 11 beg. _The first
  Corollary_, 111 _onely titular_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–6) dedication to the bp. of Lincoln, dated “Lond. 26 April, 1625”:
  (7) “The points that are briefly handled in this Booke”: (8) “Errata”:
  1–136, (1), the work: (2–3) “A Table of the Manuscript bookes vrged in
  this Booke”: (4–8) “An Alphabeticall note of the Printed Bookes ...
  here cited”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 467. The whole of this book was printed
  in London, not Oxford.


11. ¬King¬, Henry, and John King. TWO | SERMONS. | VPON THE ACT |
SVNDAY, BEING | the 10^{th} of Iuly. | 1625. | Deliuered at S^t MARIES |
in Oxford. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 56: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 33 + [3] + 43 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _doe not your_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) a
  half-title “David’s Enlargement. The morning sermon on the Act Sunday:
  Preached by Henry King ...”: 1–33, the sermon, on Ps. xxxii. 5, (2) a
  half-title “David’s Strait. The after-noones sermon ... Deliuered by
  Iohn King ...”: 1–43, the sermon, on 2 Sam. xxiv. 14.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 632, iii. 840 respectively. Every page,
  including the title, is included within bounding lines.


12. ¬King¬, dr. John. CENOTAPHIVM | IACOBI. | _Sive_ | _LAVDATIO
FVNEBRIS_ | _PIÆ ET FOELICI MEMORIÆ_ | _SERENISSIMI POTENTISSIMIQVE_ |
IACOBI | Magnæ Britanniæ, Franciæ, _&_ Hiberniæ | _Monarchæ dedicata, &
pub-_|_licè recitata_ | à IOHANNE KING Academiæ | Oxoniensis Oratore. |
[chronogrammatical _motto_: then _line_.]

  Impr. 53: 1625: sm. 4^o; pp. [40], signn. A-E^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _lire, quæ alioquin_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A 2^r,
  title: A 3^r-E 3^r, the oration.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 632. At sign. D 2^r begins a list of the
  late king’s literary works.


13. ¬Leslie¬, Henry. A | SERMON | PREACHED | BEFORE HIS | MAIESTY at
_Windsore_, | the 19. of _Iuly._ 1625. | By HENRIE LESLIE, one of his |
MAIESTIES Chaplaines | in Ordinary | [_line_, then 2 _mottos_ with
_line_ between, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 56: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 34: p. 11 beg. _in the Parable_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to James earl
  of Carlisle: (5) “A Table of the Contents”: (6) “... Errours in the
  Print”: 1–34, the sermon, on Heb. iii. 8.


14. ¬Nettles¬, Stephen. AN | ANSWER TO | THE IEVVISH | PART OF M^r
SELDEN’S | HISTORY OF TITHES. | By STEPHEN NETTLES, | B. of Divinity |
[_line_: then motto in Hebrew and English: then _device_.]

  Impr. 58_a_: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 189 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _giue
  him_, 111 _diuiding these_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–5) dedication to dr. John Prideaux, dated “Lexden, May 4. 1625”:
  (7–11) “The Præface”: 1–189, the work: (2) “... faults ...” due to
  absence of author and difficulty of the written copy.

  See Woods ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 416. Selden’s ©History of Tithes© was
  published in 1618. This treatise is a vindication of a public sermon
  on the subject which gave some offence. Hebrew Pica (unpointed) type
  is freely used in the book, for the first time. The title and every
  page are within bounding lines.


15. ¬Oxford¬, University. EPITHALAMIA | OXONIENSIA. | IN
AVSPICATISSIMVM, | POTENTISSIMI MONARCHÆ | CAROLI, | _MAGNÆ BRITANNIÆ_,
| _FRANCIÆ, ET HIBERNIÆ_ | _Regis &c. cum_ HENRETTA MARIA, | _æternæ
memoriæ_ HENRICI | _Magni Gallorum Regis_ | _Filia, Connubium_. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 53: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [100], signn. ¶, A-L^4 M^2: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _Virtutis qui_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. ¶ 1^r title: ¶
  2^r-4^v 5 special Latin poems: A 1^r-M 1^v, the poems: M 2^r “Ad
  Lectorem”, a final poem.

  The marriage of king Charles with Henrietta Maria was on 1 May 1625 at
  Paris and on 14 June at Canterbury. The poems are Latin, except 1
  Hebrew and 7 Greek: not one is French. There are five anagrams and two
  chronograms.


16. ——. OXONIENSIS | ACADEMIAE | PARENTALIA. | _SACRATISSIMÆ MEMORIÆ_ |
potentissimi Monarchæ IACOBI, Magnæ | BRITANNIAE, FRANCIAE & | HIBERNIAE
Regis, Fidei Orthodoxæ | defensoris celeberrimi, &c. Dicata. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 53: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [96], signn. ¶^4, ¶¶^2 A-K^4 L^2: sign. B
  1^r beg. _Sacrificûm_: English (except sign. G which is Great primer)
  Roman. Contents:—sign. ¶ 2^r title, ¶ 3^r, poetical Latin dedication
  to king Charles: ¶ 3^v-L 1^v, the poems: L 2^r “Conclusio ad
  Lectorem”, a Latin poem.

  Latin poems by members of the University on the death of king James i,
  which took place on 27 Mar. 1625: all in Latin except 3 Hebrew and 2
  Greek: there are 5 chronograms, an anagram, and one poem printed in a
  peculiar shape.


17. ¬Pemble¬, William. Vindiciae fidei, or a treatise of iustification
by faith, wherein that point is fully cleared, and vindicated from the
cauils of its aduersaries. Deliuered in certaine Lectures at Magdalen
Hall in Oxford, By William Pemble ... and now published since his death
for the publique benefit.

  Impr. 59: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 239 + [3].

  Very rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 331. The above title and
  details are from notes of a copy belonging to lord Robartes, seen by
  me 18 Nov. 1881.


18. ¬Prideaux¬, dr. John. Lectiones novem de totidem religionis
capitibus ...

  A private copy was seen by me in 1881.


19. ——. PEREZ-VZZAH: | _OR_ | The Breach of VZZAH: | As it was deliuered
in a Sermon before His | MAIESTY at _Woodstocke_, August | the 24.
_Anno_ 1624. | BY | IOHN PRIDEAUX, _Rector of Exceter Colledge_, | _His_
MAIESTIE’S _Professor in Divinity_, | _and at that time Vice-Chancellor
of_ | _the Vniversity of_ Oxford. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 50: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 23 + [9]: p. 11 beg. _so often_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to James earl
  of Arran, dated “Oxford, Exceter Colledge, Octob. 22. 1624.”: 1–23,
  the sermon, on 2 Sam. vi. 6–7: (2–7) “Alloquium serenissimo regi
  Jacobo Woodstochiæ habitum 24 Augusti. Anno 1624.”, signed “I. P.  V.
  _Oxon._”: (8–9) not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267, 1636 P, (_alloquium_) 1624 P.


20. ——. A | SERMON | PREACHED ON | THE FIFTH OF OC-|TOBER 1624: AT THE |
CONSECRATION OF | S^t IAMES CHAPPEL | IN _Exceter Colledge_. | BY | IOHN
PRIDEAUX, _Rector of_ Exceter Col-|ledge, _His_ MAIESTIES _Professor in_
| _Diuinity, and at that time Vice-_|_Chancellour of the Vniuer-_|_sity
of_ Oxford. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.].

  Impr. 50: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [36], signn. ¶, A-C^4 D^2: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _uell whether_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 2^r, title: A
  3^r-4^v, Epistle dedicatory to dr. Geo. Hakewill, dated “Exceter
  Colledge. Novemb. 15”. (1624): A 1^r-D 1^v, the sermon, on Luke xix.
  46: D 2, not seen.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267. The Chapel of Exeter here
  concerned (which is not now standing) was built entirely at dr.
  Hakewill’s expense, at a cost of about £1200. The preface to the
  sermon mentions many Exeter men of the time and, incidentally, that
  dr. Hakewill was a kinsman of sir Thomas Bodley. The sermon was
  reprinted at Oxford in 1636.


21. ¬Rawlinson¬, John. QVADRIGA | SALVTIS. | FOVRE | QUADRA-GESIMAL, |
OR LENT-SERMONS, PREACHED | at _WHITEHALL_: | BY | IO. RAWLINSON Doctor
of Diuinity, | Principal of _Edmund-Hall_ in _Oxford_, | and one of his
MAIESTIES | Chaplaines in Ordinary. | [_device._]

  Impr. 57: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 26 + [4] + 29 + [3] + 29 + [3] + 28
  + [2]: pp. 11 beg. _after, if at: Adonibezek, it: So, in like_, and
  _she wilbee_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication
  to Charles i, as Prince Charles: (7) half-title “The Dove-like Soule
  ... Feb. 19. 1618. By I. R. ...”: 1–26, the sermon, on Ps. lv. 6: (3)
  half-title “Lex Talionis. ... March 17. 1620. By I. R. ...”: 1–29, the
  sermon, on Judges i. 7: (2) half-title “The Surprising of Heaven....
  March 29. 1621. By I. R. ...”: 1–29, the sermon, on Matt. xi. 12: (2)
  half-title “The Bridegrome, and his Bride. ... March 19. 1622 ... By
  I. R. ...”: 1–28, the sermon, on Song of Solomon iv. 8: (1) “Faults
  escaped in some of the printed Copies ...” beginning with “_Ser._ 1.
  P. 10. _Of the soule, as wings do the nakednes._ (omitted) lin. 1”.
  (in the copy seen these are corrected).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 506, and 1622 R. The title and every page
  have bounding lines.


22. ¬Taylor¬, John, the Water-poet. THE | FEAREFVLL | SVMMER_:_ | _OR_ |
LONDONS | CALAMITY, | the countries courtesy, | and both their misery. |
[_line_] | By IOHN TAYLOR | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 58: 1625: eights” 12^o: pp. [32], signn. AB^8: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Although my pangs_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r,
  dedication to sir John Millissent, in verse: A 2^v “To the Printer”,
  signed “Io. Taylor. Or. Coll.”: A 3^v “The Præface”: A 4^r-B 2^r, the
  poem: B 3^r-B 6^v “Against Swearing”, in prose and verse: B 7^r-7^v
  “My fare-well to the famous Vniuersity of Oxford”, in prose.

  Rare. A poem on the plague at London in the summer of 1625. There are
  allusions to the author’s stay in Oxford for some weeks and the small
  mortality there.


23. ¬Terry¬, John. THEOLOGICALL | LOGICKE: | _OR_ | THE THIRD PART OF
THE | TRYALL OF TRVTH: | Wherein is declared the excellency and æquity
of the | Christian Faith, and that it is not withstood and resi-|sted;
but assisted and fortified by all the forces of right | reason, and by
all the aide that artificiall Logicke can | yeeld. | _Against the
heathenish Atheist, and the Romish Catholick_, | _whereof the one taketh
exception against the Faith of_ | _Christ in generall; and the other
against the doctrine_ | _thereof, as it is professed in the Reformed
Churches, as_ | _being in their opinions absurd, and contrary to the
eui-_|_dent and vndeniable grounds of reason._ | _BY_ | IOHN TERRY
Minister of the Word of | God at _Stocton_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 50: 1625: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 229 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _O Lord,
  and_, 111 _party to whom_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) 2
  mottos: 1–4, dedication to the bp. of Bath and Wells: 5–11 “To the
  Christian Reader”: 12–23 “The Quæstions that are handled in ... this
  Treatise”: 25–229, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 410, and 1600 T, 1602 T.


24. ¬Wall¬, dr. John. THE | VVATERING | OF APOLLOS. | Deliuered in a
Sermon at | S^t MARIES in _Oxford_ | the 8. of August | 1624. | _By_
IOHN WALL _Do-_|_ctor in Divinity of_ | Christ-Church. | [_motto_, then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 59: 1625: (eights) 16^o: pp. [64], signn. A-D^8: sign. B 2^r
  beg. _and art mightie_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A
  2^r, dedication to the bp. of Lincoln: A 3^r-A 6^v the Epistle
  dedicatory to the same: A 7^r-D 6^v, the sermon, on Acts xviii. 28.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 736. The author was chaplain to the
  bishop of Lincoln. Hebrew pointed type seems to be used for the first
  time at Oxford in this sermon, at sign. C 6^v.


25. ¬Whear¬, Degory. DE | RATIONE | ET METHODO | Legendi Historias |
_Dissertatio_. | Authore DEGOREO WHEAR | Pri. Hist. Præl. Pub.
CAM-|DENIANO apud | _Oxonienses_. | _Huic præmittitur eiusdem Authoris_
| _Oratio Auspicalis habita, vbi Ca-_|_thedram Historicam primum
ad-_|_scendit._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 53: 1625: (fours) 12^o: pp. [8] + 24 + [8] + 79 + [1]: pp. 11
  beg. _horremus, domi_ and _quam immensum_: English Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–7) dedication to the earl of Pembroke, dated “Scrib.
  Oxoniæ 8 Kal. vii^{bris}, 1625”: 1–24 “Oratio auspicalis habita in
  Scholis publicis cùm primùm L. Annæi Flori interpretationem
  aggrederer”: (1–3) “Rerum per dissertationis totius partes tractatarum
  indigitamenta”, a conspectus: 1–79, (1), the work, in 3 parts.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 217. The first edition was published in
  London in 1623, with a similar title, giving 12 July 1623 as the date
  of the Dissertation: the preface is dated 29 Sept. 1623 and the
  dedication is to William Camden, then alive, but the Oratio is not
  prefixed. For other edd. see 1637 W, 1662.


                                 1626.

1. Attonitus, Richardus, pseudonym. VERITAS ODIOSA. | FRAGMENTA VARIA |
COLLOQVII | MACHIAVELLI ET MERCVRII. | 1626. | Ex Schedis M. S. Richardi
Attoniti Eboracensis Pro-|to-Cancellarij nuper Classis | Anglicanæ. |
[_two lines._]

  Impr. 67: [1626?]: sm. 4^o: pp. 30 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Chrestienté_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. 1 title: 3–30, the work: (1–2) not seen.

  Very rare. This is a curious production of a Dutch press, and appears
  to be a vigorous defence of Barneveldt (_d._ 1619) and the Arminians
  against Maurice prince of Orange and the Gomarists. Latin, French,
  Dutch and Italian are used, and the whole piece abounds with lacunae.
  “Walter Map” in the imprint is of course the well-known archdeacon of
  Oxford in the 12th cent., whose satires are still appreciated.


2. ¬Barnes¬, Robert. A | SERMON | PREACHED AT | HENLY AT THE
VISI-|tation on the 27. of Aprill, | 1626. | _VPON THOSE WORDS OF_ |
_the_ 9. _Psalme, Vers._ 16. | _The Lord is knowne to execute
judgement._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 63: 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 30 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _of Yorke_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) Epistle dedicatorie to
  sir Richard Blunt, signed “Rob. Barnes”, “from my study at Greys this
  4th of May, 1626”: 1–30, the sermon.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 339. The author was the son of Joseph
  Barnes the printer, and a Fellow of Magdalen College: the dedication
  contains some biographical matter, and the sermon some Henley affairs,
  such as ploughing on Easter Tuesday, which the preacher laments.


3. ¬Bayley¬, Thomas. THOMÆ BAYLÆI | MANINGFORDIENSIS | _Ecclesiæ
Pastoris_. | DE | MERITO MORTIS CHRISTI, | ET MODO CONVERSIONIS. |
DIATRIBÆ DVÆ. | _PROVT AB IPSO IN SCHOLA_ | _THEOLOGICA APVD
OXONIEN-_|_ses publicê ad disputandum_ | _propositæ fuerunt Maij._ 8. |
_An. Dom._ 1621. | _Nec non Concio ejusdem ad_ | _Clerum._ | APVD |
_Eosdem habita in templo_ B_eatæ_ Mariæ, | _Iulij_ 5. _An. D._ 1622. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 65: 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 63 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _per se
  quidem_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–8) Epistola
  dedicatoria to sir Thomas Coventry: (9–11) “Praefatio ad lectorem
  christianum”: (12) the two quaestiones debated in the Diatribae, with
  answers in Latin verse: 1–25 the two diatribae; 27–63, the concio, on
  Jud. 11.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 633. The preface explains that the
  discourses were printed in order to confute a charge of Arminianism.


4. ¬Cameron¬, John. AN | EXAMINATION | OF THOSE PLAVSI-|ble Appearances
which seeme | most to commend the Romish | Church, and to preiudice |
the Reformed. | _DISCOVERING THEM_ | _to be but meere shifts, purposely
in-_|_vented, to hinder an exact triall of do-_|_ctrine by the
Scriptures._ | _BY_ | M^r IOHN CAMERON. | _Englished out of French._ |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 59: 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 173 + [3]: P. 11 beg. _superiours.
  These_, 111. _Chap. xxvii_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) “To the Reader,” unsigned, but by William Pinke the translator,
  see below: (5–8) “A Table of the Chapters”: 1–173 The Examination, in
  41 chapters and a Conclusion: (2) “Faults escaped in some copies,” 6¼
  lines of Errata.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 476, where Bliss adds a note from White
  Kennett’s copy of the 1^{st} ed. of the Athenæ (at i. 463) “William
  Pinke. He translated and published An Examination ... 1626. 4^{to}.
  Ded. to the Master Wardens and Assistants of the Skinners Company. by
  W. P. [William Pinke] acknowledging his Engagements to the whole
  Company, and reverencing the Memory of that worthy Knight Sir James
  Lancaster.” Neither the British Museum copy nor the two Bodleian
  copies contain the above dedication, the signatures of the preliminary
  matter being, on each leaf:—(blank), *2, **, (blank), forming one
  gathering of 4 leaves of a natural kind, though the double asterisk is
  odd. The original French bore the title “Traicté auquel sont examinez
  les preiugez de ceux de l’Eglise Romaine. Contre la Religion Reformee”
  (La Rochelle, 1617.) Cameron was a Scotchman, minister at Bordeaux and
  Professor of Theology at Saumur. The address to the reader apologises
  for using the word _prejudice_ as a translation of the French
  _Preiugé_, which means a preconceit either good or bad: and says “I
  have not construed but translated.”


5. ¬H[akewell]¬, G[eorge]. A | COMPARISON | BETVVEENE THE | DAYES OF
PURIM | and that of the _Powder treason_ | for the better Continuance of
| the memory of it, and the | stirring vp of mens affe-|ctions to a more
Zea-|lous observati-|on there of. | [_line_]| _Written by G. H._ D. D.|
[_line._]

  Impr. 58: 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. 36: p. 11 beg. _more diuelish_: Great
  Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title, within arched border: 2, the
  text, Deut. xxxii. 26–28: 3–36, the sermon.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 255.


6. ¬Prideaux¬, John. CONCIO | HABITA OXONIÆ | ad Artium _Baccalaureos_
in | Die Cinerum Feb. 22^o. | 1626. | _PER_ | IOHANNEM PRIDEAVX S. S.
Th. | _Professorem Regium, &_ P. T. _ejusdem_ | _Academiæ
Vicecancellarium_. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 60 (with “Excubebant”): 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. viii + 40: p. 11 beg.
  _latet ad_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–7) Latin
  dedication to Robert lord Dormer, dated “Exon: Coll: ex Musæo meo d.
  8. Martij ... 1626” i.e. 1625/6: 1–44 (“40”), the sermon, on 1 Sam.
  xiv. 26.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 273. The “P. T.” of the title seems to
  be _Pro Tempore_: the use of 1626 for 1625 or 1625/6 is noticeable.


7. ——. LECTIONES | DECEM. | DE TOTIDEM RELIGIONIS | Capitibus præcipuè
hoc tempore con-|_troversis prout publicè habebantur_ | _Oxoniæ in
Vesperijs_. | PER | IOHANNEM PRIDEAVX Exoniensis Collegij | Rectorem, &
S. Th. Professorem Regium. | _Editio secunda, priori emaculatior, &
auctior._ | [two _mottos_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 60: 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. [14] + 366: p. 11 beg. _& ult._, 111
  _mitia celebramus_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7)
  Latin dedication to Charles prince of Wales: (9–11) “Ad Lectorem”:
  (12–14) “Rerum Capita ... Quæstiones ...”, 10 of each: 1–366, the 10
  lectiones delivered in successive Comitia 1616–1625.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267. I have not seen even any notice of
  the first edition. These Lectiones are quite distinct from the
  Orationes below. See 1627 P.


8. ——. ORATIONES | NOVEM INAVGV-|RALES, DE TOTIDEM | THEOLOGIÆ APICIBVS,
| scitu non indignis, prout in promo-|tione Doctorum, Oxoniæ | publicè
proponebantur. | in Comitijs. | _Accedit ad Arti_u_m Baccalaureos, de_
Mosis | _Institutione Concio, pro more habita_ | _in die Cinerum, An._
1616. | PER | IOHANNEM PRIDEAVX, | Exoniensis Collegij Recto-|rem, & SS.
Th. Professo-|rem Regium. | [two _mottos_, one in Hebrew: then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 64: 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 196 + 28: pp. 11 beg. _lia est
  terebrans_, and _de vita Mosis_, 111 _randum. Verum_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) Latin dedication to the earl of
  Pembroke: (9–10) “Ad lectorem”: (11) “Rerum Capita”: 1–196, the nine
  orations, delivered at successive Comitia 1616–22, 1624–5: 1–28, the
  Concio, on Acts vii. 22.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267. The names of the doctors are given
  for each year.


9. ¬Reuter¬, Adam. DE | CONSILIO | TRACTATVS | _QVEM_ | NOBILISSIMO
SVFFOLCIÆ | _Comiti consecrat_ | ADAM REVTER | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 53: 1626: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 220 [“221”, 129 being omitted] +
  [2]: p. 11 beg. _sapientis principis_, 111 _Quo jure?_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) Latin dedication to the duke of Suffolk:
  1-“221” the treatise.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 421.


10. ¬Wall¬, John. IACOBS | LADDER, | _OR_ | _Christian advancement_. |
Deliuered in a Sermon at | _Newparke_ in Glocester-|shire, the seat of
the right | Honourable the Lord | _Berkley_, this late heauy |
visitation. | _By_ IOHN WALL D_octour_ in | _Divinity of Christ-Church_
| _in Oxford_. | [_motto_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 66: 1626: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 55 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _not
  mount as_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5) dedication
  to lady Eliz. Berkley: (7–13) Epistle dedicatory to the same: 1–55,
  the sermon, on 1 Pet. v. 6.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 734.


11. ¬Wower¬, Jan. “Joan. Wouveri ... pietas erga _B_enefactores—Oxon.
1626.”

  So in the sale catalogue of the ©Bibliotheca Gulstoniana© (bp. William
  Gulston’s books), Lond. 1688, 4^o, p. 35, no. 290. But see 1628 W.


                                 1627.

1. ¬Felix¬, Marcus Minucius. M. MINVCII | FELICIS | OCTAVIVS. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 74: 1627: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [6] + 129 + [9]: p. 11 beg. _bere,
  quàm in_, 111 _dicimus; non_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–5) “Typographus lectori”: (6) quotation from Lactantius about
  Minucius Felix: 1–129, the work: (2) “Errata”.

  See 1631 F, 1636 F, 1662, 1678. The printer says that he has cleared
  this edition from the errors of Froben’s. I have seen a copy in which
  the type of pages 12 and 13 has changed places. The work is an apology
  for Christianity.


2. ¬Fell¬, dr. Samuel. _PRIMITIÆ_, | SIVE | ORATIO | H^ABI^{TA} OXON^IAE
| IN SCHOLA THEOLOGICA | _NONO NOVEMBRIS_. | ET | _CONCIO LATINA AD_ |
_BACCALAVREOS DIE_ | _CINERVM_. | Per SAMVELEM FELL Præbendarium
Ecclesiæ | Christi, & Publicum Professorem in Theo-|logiâ, pro Dominâ
MARGARETA | _Comitissâ Richmondiæ_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 53: 1627: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 17 + [1] + 18 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _quantulùm theologicæ_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–17,
  the oration: (1) half title to the Concio: 1–18, the sermon on Col.
  ii. 8.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 243. The (inaugural) oration contains
  some details about Fell’s predecessor in the professorship, dr. Seb.
  Benefield: the two pieces would seem to have been delivered in 1626
  and 1626/7.


3. ¬H[akewill]¬, G[eorge]. AN | APOLOGIE | OF THE POWER AND | PROVIDENCE
OF GOD | IN THE GOVERNMENT | OF THE WORLD. | _OR_ | AN EXAMINATION | AND
CENSVRE OF THE | COMMON ERROUR TOVCHING | NATVRES PERPETVALL AND |
VNIVERSALL DECAY, DIVI-|DED INTO FOVRE BOOKES: | _WHEREOF_ | _The first
treates of this pretended decay in generall, together with some
prepa-_|_ratiues thereunto._ | _The second of the pretended decay of the
Heauens and Elements, together with_ | _that of the Elementary bodies,
man only excepted._ | _The third of the pretended decay of mankinde in
regard of age and duration, of_ | _strength and stature, of arts and
wits._ | _The fourth of this pretended decay in matter of manners,
together with a large_ | _proofe of the future consummation of the World
from the testimony of the_ | _Gentiles, and the vses which we are to
draw from the consideration thereof._ | By _G. H._ D. D. | [_motto_,
then _device_.]

  Impr. 58: 1627: (fours) fol.: pp. [36] + 473 + [5]: p. 11 beg. _Yet
  Phillip_, 111 _rable to their_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–7) dedication to the University of Oxford, signed “G. H.”: (9–19)
  “the Preface”: (20) “Errata”: (21–34) “The Contents ...”: (35) “of the
  value of the Roman sesterce ...”: (36) quotation from Boethius, with
  English translation: 1–473, the work: (2–5) “A Revise,” corrections of
  a few passages, &c.

  The author was George Hakewill. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 256,
  where “Lond.” is a mistake for “Oxford”: for other edd. see 1630 H,
  1635 H.


4. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. ΜΙΚΡΟ´ΚΟΣΜΟΣ. | _A_ | LITTLE DE-|SCRIPTION OF | THE
GREAT WORLD. | The third Edition. Revised. | [_line_] | By PETER HEYLYN.
| [_line_, then _motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 71: 1627: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [20] + folded leaf + 807 + [5]:
  p. 11 beg. 1. _First then_, 501 _Scotland is by_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title, within an arched border; (3–4) dedication to
  prince Charles: (5–6) “To the Reader” from the second ed.: (7–8) “To
  my brother the Author”, a poem by Edw. Heylyn: (9–12) “A Table of the
  principall Countries ...”: (13–14) “A table of the antient ... nations
  ...”: (15–19) “A table of the most principall things ...”: (19) “...
  Forraine coynes ...”: 1–807, (1–2), the work: (3) “Errata”. Before p.
  7 should come a folded leaf, as in the 2nd ed. (1625).

  See 1621 H, Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 557. In the copy seen on p. (2)
  at the end of the book, in the original printing of the English lines
  beginning “But whither goeth”, l. 6 (beg. “Into safe”) is before l. 4,
  making nonsense: and a corrected reprint of the whole 12 lines is
  pasted over the faulty original.


5. ¬Holyoke¬, Francis. DICTIONARIVM ETYMO-|LOGICVM LATINVM,
ANTIQVIS-|simum & novissimum nunc demum infinitis | penè laboribus &
continuis vigilijs com-|positum & absolutum à FRANCISCO | de Sacra
Quercu. | That is, | _A Dictionarie declaring the originall and
derivations of all words vsed_ | in any Latine Authors, with the reason
of their derivations and appella-|tions; neuer any in this kinde extant
before: the quantities of syllables, as | also the differences of those
words, whose affinitie in signification | or otherwise, might cause a
promiscuous and improper | vse: the pure and improper words gathered |
into one Dictionarie, and distingui-|shed by this marke: †. | Wherevnto
besides the hard and most vsefull words in Divinitie, Philosophie, |
Physicke, and Logicke, are added many thousand other words out of |
approved authours old and new, with their Greeke in more exactnesse then
| ever was in _Calepine_, _Morelius_, or any other: and also the coines,
| measures, weights, and Greeke Rootes, none of which | are extant in
any Edition formerly | published. | _Herevnto is also annexed the proper
names adorned with their Etymologies, illustrated_, | and explained,
with Histories, Proverbes, Mythologies, &c. together with the
Chronologie of | the persons, and the beginning of noted Citties, and
plantation of sundry Coun-|tries, the Geography, and the names both
ancient and new | of the most remarkable places, | _LASTLY RIDERS
DICTIONARIE I THE ENGLISH_ | before the latine compiled by RIDER, is
augmented | with many hundreds of words, both out of the Law, | and out
of the Latine, French, and other languages, | such as were and are with
vs in common vse, | but never printed vntill now to the | perfecting of
that worke. | Also the Romane | Calender. | _By the great industrie and
paines of_ | FRANCIS HOLYOKE. |

  Impr. 68: 1627: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [1736], signn. ( )^2, A-Z,
  Aa-Zz, Aaa-Zzz, Aaaa-Eeee^8, Ffff-Llll^4, Mmmm^2, ( )^4, A-Z, Aa-Ff^8,
  Gg-Ii^4: signn. Bb 1^r beg. _Plin. l._ 4. 45, Bbb 1^r _Præcĭpuè,
  adu._, B 1^r _A crafts mans_, Bb 1^r _Taken or drawne out_: Long
  Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. ( ) 1^r title within lines, 2^r “Ad
  Lectorem” signed “T. S. C. R.”: 2^r-2^v, seven Latin poems on the
  book, one by Robert Burton: A 1^r-Sss 1^r, the Latin-English lexicon:
  Sss 1^v, Holyoke’s Latin dedication to Clement Throckmorton “20 [!]
  Cal. Mart. 1611”: Sss 2^r-Ffff 4^v, “Dictionarium etymologicum
  propriorum nominum”: Gggg 1^r-Mmmm 1^r, “Radices Græcæ linguæ ...
  collectæ & compositæ. Opera & studio T. W.”, a short Greek-Latin
  lexicon: ( ) 1^r a title within lines:—“_RIDERS_ | DICTIONARIE |
  CORRECTED AND | AVGMENTED WITH THE | ADDITION OF MANY HVN-|DRED WORDS
  NOT EXTANT | IN ANY FORMER EDITION. | HEREVNTO ARE ANNEXED | RIDERS
  CALENDER, AND CER-|TAINE TABLES EXPLAINING | _the names, weights and
  valuations of_ | auncient and modern coynes, as | _also a table of the
  Hebrew, Greeke_ | _& Latine measures reduced to our_ | _English
  standard & assise_. | _WHEREVNTO IS JOINED A_ d_ICTIO-_|NARY
  ETYMOLOGICALL, DERIVING | _each word from his proper fountaine, the
  first_ | that ever was extant in that kind, with | many worthy
  castigations and addi-|_tions, as will appeare in the title and
  epistle before it_. | [_line_] | _BY_ | FRANCIS HOLIOKE | [_line_]”,
  then impr. 58: ( ) 2^r-2^v, dedication to lady Dudley by Holyoke: ( )
  3^r, Latin dedication to sir F. Walsingham, dated, “Oxoniæ, Calend.
  Octob.” by John Rider: ( ) 3^v “To the Reader” dated “From Oxon. the
  xxx of September” by Rider: ( ) 4^r-4^v, poems &c. by Rider, John Case
  (30 Sept. 1589) &c.: A-Ee 8^v, “Bibliotheca Rideri scholastica”, an
  English-Latin lexicon: Ff1^r-Hh 3^r “Certaine generall heads of Birds,
  Colours, &c.”, English-Latin: Hh 3^v-4^r, a short English-Latin
  geographical dictionary: Hh 4^r-Ii 4^v, “Johannis Rideri Calendarium
  Romanum ...”, followed by lists of weights, measures, &c. and foreign
  coins, the last, signed “W. T. P.”

  Rare, see 1589 R. Of bp. Rider’s double lexicon the first part at
  least (English-Latin) was published at Oxford in 1589. In 1606 Francis
  Holyoke supplied a Latin-English part (based on Rider’s Index) and
  published both at London. Subsequent edd. of the two parts together
  are Lond. 1617, Lond. 1626 (ed. N. Gray), the present one Oxf. 1627,
  Lond. 1633 (called the 4th), Lond. 1640 (called the 5th), Lond. 1649,
  Lond. 1659, (acc. to Bohn’s Lowndes, s.v. Rider, where however since
  1637 is an error for 1627, this 1659 may be one for 1649), and, edited
  by Thomas Holyoke son of Francis, Lond. 1677.


6. ¬James¬, dr. Thomas. _INDEX_ | GENERALIS | LIBRORVM PROHI-|BITORVM à
PONTIFI-|ciis, unà cum Editionibus | _expurgatis vel expur-_|gandis
juxta seriem Li-|terarum & tripli-|cem classem. | _In usum Bibliothecæ
Bodleia-_|_anæ, & Curatoribus eiusdem_ | specialiter designatus | PER |
THO. IAMES S. Theol. | D. Coll. B. Mariæ Winton | in Oxon. Vulgò Novi
dicti | quondam Socium. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 69: 1627: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [144], signn. *, A-L^{12}: sign. B
  1^r beg. _In Biblia_: Pica Roman. Contents:—* 1^r, “[*]”: 2^r, title:
  3^r, Latin dedication to the Curators of the Bodleian, followed
  (4^r-6^v) by an Epistola dedicatoria to them: 7^r-10^v, Ad Lectorem:
  11^r, Errata: A1-K5^v, the work: K6^r-L10^v, “Tabula”, an index of
  authors: L11^r “Cautio”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 467. The intention of the book is the
  reverse of the aim of the ©Indices Expurgatorii©, namely to give a
  select list of recommended books. Those which were in the Bodleian are
  marked with a star.


7. ¬Pasor¬, Matthias. ORATIO | _PRO_ | LINGVÆ ARABICÆ |
_PROFES_S_IONE, PVBLICE_ | ad Academicos habita in | schola Theologica
_Vni-_|_versitatis Oxoniensis_ | xxv. Octob. | 1626. | à | MATTHIA
PASORE, _Artium Magi-_|_stro & non ita pridem Mathematum
Pro-_|_fessore in Vniversitate_ Haidelbergensi. | [two _mottos_, one
Hebrew.]

  Impr. 60: 1627: (eights) 16^o: pp. [34], signn. A-B^8C^2: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _mentariorum Rabbinnicorum_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A
  1^r, title: A 1^v, “decretum Concilii Viennensis”, see below, then
  device: 2^r-2^v, dedication to the University of Oxford, in Latin,
  dated 5 Dec. 1626: A 3^r-C 2^v, the oration.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 445. The oration is of considerable
  interest for the history of Oriental studies at Oxford. It claims to
  be the first on the subject at Oxford, quotes the decree of the
  Council of Vienne 1311–12 that there ought to be instruction in
  Hebrew, Arabic and Chaldee at Oxford, and urges the fitness of the
  study in Oxford. Pasor was lecturer on Arabic only from 1626 to 1629.
  Some Arabic MSS. in the Bodleian are mentioned on sign. B7^r and B7^v.


8. ¬Prideaux¬, dr. John. In the ©Catalogus ... librorum ... Richardi
Davis bibliopolæ, pars quarta© (Lond. 1692, 4^o) p. 10, no. 183 is
“Joan. Prideaux Lectiones novem, Oxon. 1627.” See 1626 P.


9. ¬Richardson¬, Gabriel. [_woodcut_] | OF | THE STATE | OF EVROPE. |
_XIIII. Bookes._ | CONTAINING THE HISTO-|RIE, AND RELATION OF THE |
_MANY PROVINCES_ | HEREOF. | _Continued out of approved Authours._ | BY
| GABRIEL RICHARDSON BATCHELOVR | in Divinitie, and FELLOW of
BRASEN-|NOSE _College in Oxford_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 70: 1627: (fours) fol.: pp. [4] + 18 + 67 + 37 + [1] + 14 + 13 +
  [1] + 50 + 23 + [1] + 11 + [1] + 74 + 26 + [2] + 11 + [1] + 68 + 29 +
  [1] + 64 + [2]: pp. 11 [bk. 1] beg. _Di ocesse with_, (bk. 6)
  _Arcobriga_, (bk. 10) _Berry. Bounded_, (bk. 11) _Vindomana_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title; (3–4) dedication to the bp. of Lincoln:
  1– ... 64, the treatise in 14 books separately paged.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 38. The first four books contain Great
  Britain. The signatures begin again with the 10th and with the 11th
  book, but every book is separately paged. The matter is a mixture of
  history and geography.


10. ¬Smith¬, Samuel. Wood (©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 283) mentions an edition of
the Aditus ad Logicam of this year: see 1617 S.


11. ¬Vicars¬, Thomas. PVSILLVS GREX. | ¿E¿Λ¿E¿ΓΧΟΣ. | REFVTATIO |
CVIVSDAM LIBELLI DE AM-|PLITVDINE REGNI COELESTIS | _SVB EMENTITO CAELII
SECVNDI_ | CVRIONIS NOMINE IN LV-|_CEM EMISSI_. | _Qua docetur ex
Scripturis beatorum numerum ma_j_orem_ | _non esse numero damnatorum,
sed potius minorem._ | _Ad excutiendum securitatis veternum nostris
hominibus_ | _potissimùm conscripta._ | _Authore_ THOMA _de_ VICARIIS
_S. T. Bac. Pastore_ | _Cockfieldiensi in agro quondam Australium
Saxonum._ | [two _mottos_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 72: 1627: sm. 4^o: pp. 32: p. 11 beg. _argumentaque_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 2, “Ad Lectores Candidos”: 3–6, Latin
  letters between “Thom. Vicarsius” (“Gallager”, = of Cockfield) and
  John Goldsmith (“Gallinager” = of Henfield), and William Cox, canon of
  Chichester, one dated 7 Jan. 1622 or 1623: 7–32, the discourse, on
  Luke xii. 32.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 443. The original treatise of Coelius
  Secundus Curio (an Italian, _d._ 1569) entitled “... De amplitudine
  beati regni Dei dialogi sive libri duo” was first published in 1554,
  and his contention that the number of the saved is greater than that
  of the lost is here refuted.


12. ¬Wake¬, Isaac. REX PLATONICVS_:_ | [&c. exactly as 1615 W, except
that the colon in the first line is italic, not Roman, and “Quarta” for
“Tertia”.]

  Impr. 73: 1627: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 238 + [18]: p. 11 beg.
  _mentum demississimo_, 111 _neri, vt quum_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) dedication to prince Henry, as in 1st
  ed.; 1–236, the work: 237–238, (1), the Chancellor’s letter with
  preface: (3) title “ORATIO | FVNEBRIS | habita in Tem-|_plo beatæ
  Ma-_|_riæ Oxon._ | Ab ISAACO WAKE, | _PVBLICO ACA-_|_demiæ Oratore,
  Maij_ | 25. An. 1607. quum | _mæsti Oxonienses_, | _pijs manibus_
  IO-|HANNIS RAI-|NOLDI _paren-_|_tarent_. |” [woodcuts, then impr. 73]:
  (5–17) the oration.

  See 1607 W. This fourth edition is a verbatim but not literatim
  reprint of the 3^{rd} ed. (1615).


13. ¬Wall¬, dr. John. CHRIST IN | PROGRESSE. | DELIVERED IN A SER-|mon
at _Shelford_ i_n Nottingham-_|_shire_, the seate of the right
Honou-|rable the Lord STANHOPE. | _By_ IOHN WALL _Doctour in
Divini-_|_ty of Christ-Church in Oxford_. | [_motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 58: 1627: eights 12^o: pp. [16] + 50 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _where
  the Lord_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1–2) not seen: (3) title:
  (5) dedication to sir Henry Stanhope, son of lord Stanhope: (7–13)
  “The Epistle dedicatory”: (15–16) not seen: 1–50, the sermon, on
  Matth. xxi. 9.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 735.


                                 1628.

1. [¬Airay¬, Christopher]. FASCICVLVS | PRÆCEPTORVM | _LOGICORVM IN_ |
_gratiam juventutis_ A-|CADEMICÆ _compositus_ | _& nunc primùm typis_ |
_donatus_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 72: 1628: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 224: p. 11 beg. _eo: vt, si_,
  111 I. _Necessaria, cui_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title:
  (5–6) “Typographus benevolo Lectori ...”: (7) “Sphalmata ...”, errata:
  (8) “_Arbor Porphyriana_”: 1–224, the work comprising an “Introductio
  generalis ...” and six books.

  The first edition of Airay’s Logic, see 1633 A, 1660. The preface
  explains that the author’s name is omitted from modesty, and that
  several MSS. of the first three books have been compared and something
  added, as well as three more books.


2. Bodleian Library. The entry in the “Catalogi ... librorum ...
Richardi Davis ... pars quarta,” Lond. 1692, p. 29:—“108. Catalogus
Librorum in Bibliotheca Bodleiana—Oxon. 1628” must be an error for 1620.


3. ¬Brerewood¬, Edward TRACTATVS | QVIDAM | LOGICI | DE |
_PRÆDICABILIBUS_, | ET | _PRÆDICAMENTIS_. | _Ab eruditissimo Viro_
EDVARDO BREREWOOD | Artium Magistro, è Collegio _Ænei-Nasi_, olim
conscripti: | nunc verò ab erroribus (qui frequenti transcriptione
irrepserant) vindicati, ad pristinum nitorem, na-|tivamq; puritatem
diligentissimâ manuscripto-|rum collatione restituti, & in lucem editi,
| _Per_ T. S. _Art. Mag. & Collegij Ænei-Nasi Socium_. | [_line_, then
_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 72 _b_: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [32] + single leaf + 472: p. 11 beg.
  _genus & species_, 401 _tes sit sanus_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–8) epistola dedicatoria to sir Rich. Brook of Norton, signed
  “Thomas Sixesmith”, “Oxonij, è Musæo meo, in Collegio Ænea-Nasensi,
  13. Calend. Octob. 1628”: (9–12) “Erudito Lectori ...”: (13–31) “Index
  sectionum quæstionumque ...”: a folded sm. folio leaf “Pag. 1” bearing
  an “Analysis” of logic, printed on one side only, perhaps not by
  Brerewood: 1–472, the ten treatises (pp. 63–64 are another folded
  leaf, printed in style similar to the former one, but “Sect. 17”).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 140. Brerewood died in 1613.


4. ¬Burton¬, Robert. [Engraved title:—] THE | ANATOMY OF | MELANCHOLY. |
_What it is, with all the kinds causes_, | _symptomes, prognostickes, &
seuerall cures of it._ | In three Partitions, with their severall |
Sections, members & subsections, | Philosophically, Medicinally, |
Historically, opened & cut up. | BY | _Democritus Junior_. | _With a
Satyricall Preface, conducing_ | _to the following Discourse._ | _The
thirde Edition, corrected and_ | _augmented by the Author._ | [_motto_:
see below.]

  Impr. 70: 1628: (fours) folio: pp. [8?] + 77 + [11] + 646 (after 208
  are two unnumbered leaves, and after 374 one) + [12]: p. 11 beg. _atq;
  auidè_, 501 _so they must_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) engraved
  title: [(3–6) not seen, two leaves of verses?] (7) dedication to
  George lord Berkeley: 1–77 “Democritus Iunior to the reader”: (2)
  “Lectori malè feriato”: (4–7) “the Synopsis of the first partition”:
  (8–9) “Democritus Iunior ad librum suum”, elegiacs: (10–11) “The
  Authors Abstract of Melancholy, διαλογικῶς”, verses: 1–208, the first
  partition: (1–4) “The Synopsis of the second partition”: 209–374, the
  second partition: (1–2) “Analysis of the third partition”: 375–646,
  the third partition: (1–8) “The Table”, an index: (9) “Errata sic
  corrigas”: (11) Impr. 75, between woodcuts.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 653, and 1621 B. The author’s name does
  not occur in the book. The engraved title is divided into 12 parts,
  arranged in horizontal rows of three, but the rows are not of equal
  height: no. 1 (left top corner) is “Zelotipia,” birds with river and
  trees: 2. “Democritus Abderites” by his garden, under a tree: 3.
  Solitudo,” deer &c. in a glade: 4. (second row) “Inamorato” a
  love-sick youth with suitable surroundings: 5. title, as above: 6.
  “Hypocondriacus” a king, sitting: 7. “Superstitiosus,” a monk on his
  knees, telling his beads: 8. “Democritus Junior,” half length, with
  arms, book, sphere and ladder (?): 9. “Maniacus,” chained: 10.
  “Borago,” the plant: 11. Imprint, with “C: le ... Blon. fe:” the
  engraver: 12. “Helleborus,” the plant. This title is found in later
  editions, but in a comparatively worn state.


5. ¬Cameron¬, John. A | TRACT OF THE | SOVERAIGNE IVDGE | OF
CONTROVERSIES | IN MATTERS OF | RELIGION. | [_line_] | By IOHN CAMERON
Minister of the | Word of God, and Divinity Professour | in the Academie
of _Montauban_. | [_line_] | _Translated into English by_ IOHN |
Vernevil. _M.A._ | [_motto_, and translation.]

  Impr. 80: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. 48: p. 11 beg. _constrayned first of
  all_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–4, dedication to sir Thomas
  Leigh, dated “from the publique Library in Oxford this 30 of Aug.
  1628”: 5–6, “To the Reader”: 7–48, the treatise.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 222. The author states that when he
  first came into England he “belonged unto” Sir Tho. Leigh and his
  grandfather of the same names. The “sovereign judge” of the treatise
  is declared to be “God speaking in the Scriptures.”


6. ¬Carpenter¬, Nathaniel. ©Achitophel: or, the Picture of a wicked
Politician©, in 3 parts. Dubl. 1627, oct. Ox. 1628, qu.

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 422, where Wood relates that the Lond.
  1629 ed. (and presumably all subsequent editions) is expurgated of
  passages supposed to reflect on Arminianism. See 1640 C. The British
  Museum, Bodleian, Advocates’ Library at Edinburgh and the Library of
  Trinity College, Dublin, do not seem to possess a copy of either of
  the two first editions.


7. ¬C[asa]¬, J[=Giovanni della]. ETHICA | IVVENILIS | _J. C._| GALATEVS
| Seu | De Morum Honestate & E-|legantia; Liber ex Italico | Latinus; |
[_line_] | Ejusdem _J. W._ de Umbra | Variæ. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 87: 1628: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [4] + 129 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _mo
  nobis bene_, 111 _prehendere, vel_: Pica Roman. Contents.—pp. (1–2),
  not seen: (3) title, within a double line: (4) second title “Ethica
  Iuvenilis, seu Manuductorium ad laudabilem morum Concinnitatem ...”,
  and preface signed “G. W.”: 1–129, the treatise: (2–3) not seen.

  See 1630 C. The author was Giovanni della Casa, and the translator
  Nathan Chytraeus, whose initials occur on p. 1: but the copy seen had
  no trace of “J. W. de Umbra variæ,” though the binding was original.
  There are many editions of the Italian and Latin forms of this
  treatise (see 1630 C and 1665), and some of an English translation.
  Pp. 1–128 of this edition were reissued as part of the 1665 edition.


8. ¬D[ickinson]¬, W[illiam]. _MILKE_ | FOR BABES. | _THE_ | ENGLISH
CATECHISME, | SET DOWNE IN THE | Common-Prayer Booke, breifly ex-|planed
for the private vse of the | _Younger and more vnlearned sort of_ | _his
Parishioners of_ Apleton, _in_ | the County of Berks. | ⁂⁂ | By W. D. |
[two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 85: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 39 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _sible
  resemblance_: Pica English and Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, (2) four
  “Errata”: 3–8 “To his parishioners ...” of Appleton, a dedication and
  preface: 1–39 the work.

  For the author see Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 389.


9. ¬Doughty¬, John. _A DISCOVRSE_ | CONCERNING | THE ABSTRUSENESSE | of
Divine Mysteries, together | _with our knowledge of them_ | MAY 1. 1627.
| ANOTHER | _TOVCHING CHVRCH-_|Schismes but the Vnanimity | of Orthodox
Professours | FEB. 17. 1628. | [_line_] | By _I. D._ M^r of Arts and
Fellow of | _Merton Colledge in Oxford_. | [_line._]

  Impr. 84: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 26 + 26: pp. 11 beg. _for mans
  delight_, and _by discountenance_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within a line: (3–4) dedication to Dr. Brent, warden of Merton,
  signed “Iohn Doughty”: 1–26 the first sermon, on Rom. xii. 16: 1–26
  the second, on Rom. xvi. 17.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 977. The signatures run through the
  whole volume. All the pages of text are within a bounding line doubled
  at the top and outer side.


10. ¬Field¬, dr. Richard. OF | THE CHVRCH, | FIVE BOOKES. | BY | RICHARD
FIELD DOCTOR | OF DIVINITY | AND SOME=|TIMES DEANE OF | _GLOCESTER_. |
[_line_] | _THE SECOND EDITION VERY MVCH AVG=_|_mented, in the thirde
booke, and the Appendix to the same._ | [_line_, then _device_, then
_line_.]

  Impr. 68_a_: 1628: (sixes) fol.: pp. [16] + 906 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _tation of daungerous_, 701 _wrongs of the Court_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) Epistle dedicatory to the duke of
  Buckingham, signed “Nathaniel Field”, the author’s son. (5–7) Epistle
  dedicatory to the archbp. of Canterbury, by Rich. Field: (9–15) “what
  things are handled in the bookes following”: (15) “Errata”: 1–28, the
  work, bk 1: 29–46, bk 2: 47–182, bk 3: 183–342, “an Appendix ...”:
  343–402, bk 4: 403, a title to book 5, and its appendix, with impr.
  68: 403–746, bk 5: 747–906, the appendix: (1–2) not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 184, 1635 F. The first ed. (two different
  issues) was Lond. 1606 (5th book, Lond. 1610). The author died in
  1616. Three edd. or parts of edd. have been issued even in the 19th
  century. The signatures run completely through the book.


11. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. _ROMANÆ_ | HISTORIAE | ANTHOLOGIA | RECOGNITA ET |
AVCTA. | _AN_ | ENGLISH EXPOSITION | OF THE ROMAN ANTI-|quities, wherein
many Roman | & English offices are paralleld | _and divers obscure
phrases_ | _explained_ | _For the vse of_ ABINGDON _Schoole_. | [_line_]
| Newly revised and inlarged by the | _Author_. | [_line._]

  Impr. 70: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 277 + [23]: p. 11 beg. _malefactor,
  but_, 201 _Cap. 8. De rupe_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within an arched border: (3–4) dedication to dr. Young, 14 Cal. Dec.
  1622: (5) “Benevolo lectori ...”: (7) “A short table ...” of contents:
  1–277 the work: (1–23) “Index rerum et verborum”.

  See 1614 G.


12. ¬Gumbleden¬, John. _GODS_ | GREAT MERCY | TO MANKINDE IN | _JESVS
CHRIST_. | _A_ | SERMON PREACHED AT | Pauls Crosse, March 18: being |
_Palme Sunday_. 1626. | By IOHN GVMBLEDEN M^r of Artes. | [two _mottos_,
then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 81: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 34 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _off) he
  comes_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “To the Reader”,
  dated “From my Study at Longworth in Berkshiere. Octob. 14. 1627”:
  1–34, the sermon, on Is. liii. 6.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 436.


13. ¬Howson¬, John, bp. of Oxford. ARTICLES | ECCLESIASTICALL | to be
enquired of by the Church-wardens & | Sidesmen within the Dioces of
Oxon: set forth | _by the authority of the Right Reverend Father_ | _in
God_ IOHN by the Divine providence | _of God Lord Bishop of_ Oxon_:
Anno_ | 1628. _Being the third yeare_ | _from his Lordships_ |
_Visitation._ | [_woodcut._] |

  Impr. 82: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4 B^2: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _spected to conceale_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r title: A
  1^v “The Oath”: A 2^r-B 2^r “Articles concerning the Clergie”, &c.


14. ¬Parre¬, bp. Richard. CONCIO AD | CLERVM HABI=|TA OXONIÆ IN |
_Comitijs Iul._ 12. 1625. | _PER_ | RICH_:_ PARRE. S.S. | _Theol. Bac.
Coll. Aenei_⸗|_nasi Socium_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 72_a_: 1628: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 46 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _demùm sunt hæc_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7)
  epistola dedicatoria to Thomas earl of Southampton: (8) “Errata”:
  1–46, the sermon on Rev. iii. 4.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 345. The dedication states that Parre
  was chaplain to his patron the earl of Southampton.


15. ¬Parre¬, bp. Richard. THE | END OF THE | PERFECT MAN. | A | _SERMON
PREACHED AT_ | _the Buriall of the right Honourable Sir_ | ROBERT
SPENCER Knight | Baron SPENCER of _Wormeleighton_, | _Novemb._ 6. 1627.
in _Braynton_ | _Church in Nor-_|_thamptonshire_, | _BY_ | RICHARD PARRE
Bachelour in | Divinity, and late Fellow of Brasen-nose Col-|ledge in
Oxford, now Rector of | _Ladbrook_ in Warwickshire. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 68: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 29 + [7]: p. 11 beg. _hortation. As
  long_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) epistle dedicator to
  William lord Spencer of Wormleighton: (7–8) “The Preface”: 1–29, the
  sermon on Ps. xxxvii. 37: (2–6) seven poems, in English, Greek (one)
  and Latin (one) on lord Spencer’s death, no doubt by Parre.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 345.


16. ¬Pemble¬, William. _FIVE_ | GODLY, AND PRO-|fitable Sermons
concerning | 1 _The slaverie of sinne._ | 2 The mischiefe of ignorance.
| 3 The roote of Apostasie. | 4 The benefit of Gods service. | 5 The
Christians loue. | _Preached in his life time in sundry places._ | By
that late faithfull Minister of | _Christ_ M^r WILLIAM | PEMBLE _of
Mag-_|_dalen Hall in the Vni-_|_versity of Oxford_. |

  Impr. 84: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 24 + 72 + “31”-“38” + [4?]: pp. 11
  beg. _and cast themselues_, and _tence 2. Thess_: pp. 33 beg. _as
  those Children_, and _his happyness_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within arched border: (3–4) “To the Reader”, signed by the
  editor “Iohn Tombes”: 1–24 the first sermon, on John viii. 34: 1–25,
  the second, on Hos. iv. 6: 27–43, the third, on Heb. iii. 12–13:
  44–66, the fourth on Ex. xxxiv. 23–24: 67–71, “31”-“38”, 1, the fifth,
  on Cant. ii. 16: (3–4) not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 331 (where “Lond.” is an error for
  “Oxf.”) and 1629 P. Pemble died in 1623. The editor was a pupil of
  Pemble (Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 1062), and succeeded him in his
  lectureship at Magdalen hall. There is something curious about the
  printing of this volume: the pagination is peculiar, and sign. K 1^r
  (p. “31”) has the running title of sermon 4 instead of 5: also the
  catchword on p. “38” is _have_ instead of _having_, and the next page
  differs in style of printing. The second edition shows each sermon
  with a separate pagination, but appears otherwise to be a verbatim
  reprint. The signatures of this first ed. begin again with the second
  sermon, and the first at least of the last two leaves bears no
  signature, though beginning a new sheet.


17. ¬Rudyerd¬, sir Benjamin. _BENIAMIN RVDIERD_ | HIS SPEECH IN BEHALFE
| OF THE CLERGIE, AND OF | _Parishes_ miserably destitute of
In-|struction, through want of | _Maintenance_. | CONFIRMED BY THE |
Testimonies of Bishop IEWEL, | Master PERKINS, and Sir | HENRY SPELMAN.
| [_line, motto, line._]

  Impr. 76: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 14 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _taine vnto
  him_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 1–14, the speech.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 456. This tract is generally found
  without any title page (signn. A—B^4 only): the London booksellers
  seem to have printed one for their own purposes, not deeming the title
  as it heads p. 1 (“Sir Beniamin Ruddierd’s speach in behalfe of the
  Cleargy.”) sufficient. Some early copies have the number of the first
  page central over the author’s name, enclosed in brackets; but it was
  doubtless soon moved to the upper right hand corner, because in its
  original place it seemed to indicate a first _part_ of the tract
  rather than simply the first page. This speech was reprinted at London
  in 1641.


18. ¬Sparke¬, William. THE | MYSTERY | OF | GODLINESSE: | A | GENERALL
DISCOVRSE | OF THE REASON THAT IS | IN CHRISTIAN RELIGION. | [_line_] |
By WILLIAM SPARKE Divinity Rea⸗|der at _Magd: Coll:_ in _Oxford_ and
Par⸗|son of _Blechly_ in _Buckingham-shire_. | [_line_, then 2
_mottos_.]

  Impr. 77: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 78 + [2] + 78 + [2]: pp. 11 beg.
  _All the glory_, and _children, yee cannot_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication to George duke of Buckingham:
  (7–12) “The Preface to the Reader”: (13–15) “The Contents”: 1–78
  “Booke I”, in 3 chapters: 1–78 “Booke II”, in 3 chapters: 78, imprint
  78.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 495. The second book, which is distinct
  in pagination, signatures and colophon, seems to have been printed
  separately and even issued by itself.


19. ¬Tozer¬, Henry. DIRECTIONS | _FOR_ | A GODLY LIFE: | Especially for
Communi-|cating at the Lord’s Table. | _Intended first for private vse;_
| _now publish’d for the good of_ | _those who desire the safty of_ |
_their owne soules, and_ | _shall bee pleased to_ | _make vse thereof._
| BY | H. TOZER M^r of Arts, and | Fellow of _Exceter_ Col-|ledge in
_Oxford_. | [_motto_: then _line_.]

  Impr. 68: 1628: (twelves) 16^o: pp. 198 + [6]: p. 11 beg. _this I
  now_, 101 _Redeemer liueth_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–11,
  Epistle dedicatory to Lorenzo Cary son of viscount Falkland: 13–198,
  the directions: (1–3) “The Contents of each Chapter”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 274, and 1640 T. There were also Oxford
  edd. in 1671 (8th), 1680 (10th), but all editions seem to be uncommon.


20. ¬Vossius¬, Gerardus Johannes. GERARDI IOH. VOSSII | _V. CL._ |
THESES THEOLOGICÆ | ET | HISTORICÆ, | _De varijs doctrinæ Christianæ
Capitibus_; | Quas, aliquot abhinc annis, dispu-|tandas proposuit in |
ACADEMIA LEIDENSI. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 83: 1628: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 680: p. 11 beg. _illius de
  chao_, 501 _Nec meliorem_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: [pp.
  3–4 are perhaps always torn out, as blank]: (5) Errata: (6–7)
  “Syllabus & Ordo Disputationum”: 1–680, the forty deputations, each
  divided into theses.

  See 1631 V. These Disputations were printed at Leiden in 1615, and the
  Hague in 1658. In the title the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th and 9th, as well as
  the first line of the Imprint “Bellositi Dobunorum,” are in red ink.
  There are large paper copies of this work.


21. ¬Wall¬, John. _THE_ | LION IN THE | LAMBE. | OR STRENGTH IN
| _WEAKENES_. | DELIVERED IN A SER-|mon at _Shelford_ in
_Nottingham-_|_shire_, the seate of the right Ho-|nourable the Lord |
STANHOPE. | By IOHN WALL _Doctour in Divini-_|_ty of Christ-Church in_
Oxford. | [_motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 86: 1628: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 55 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _was
  sinne wrought_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5, 7–15)
  dedication and epistle dedicatory to lady Katharine Stanhope: 1–55,
  the sermon, on Rev. vii. 10.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 735.


22. ¬Whear¬, Degory. DEGOREI | WHEARI | _PRAEL. HIST._ | CAMDENIANI. |
_PIETAS erga BE-_|_NEFACTORES_ | continens, | _Parentationem Historicam_
| _Manibus Camdeni oblatam._ | __{D}edicationem Imaginis Camde-_|_nianæ
in Scholâ Historica._ | _Necnon_ | _Epistolarum Eucharisticarum
fascicu-_|_lum._ | [_line._]

  Impr. 72 _a_: 1628: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 48 + 133 + [3]: pp. 11
  beg. _tutes tam charè_, and _incolumem. dabam_, 111 _Prædocto Guil.
  Smitho_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) two mottos: (3–7)
  dedication to the University of Oxford: 1–19, “Parentatio historica .
  sive Commemoratio vitæ et mortis V.C. Gulielmi Camdeni Clarentii,
  facta Oxoniæ in Scholâ Historicâ statim à funere, Ann. 1623”, a
  speech: 20–22, “Nuncius Chronogrammaticus, de obitu ... Camdeni ...”,
  a poem with chronograms: 23–48, “Dedicatio imaginis Camdenianæ in
  Schola Historica, 12 Novemb. 1626,” a speech, with more chronograms:
  1, a half title “Epistolarum eucharisticharum fasciculus”: 2, a motto:
  3–5 dedication to dr. Benj. Rudierd, dated “Oxoniæ 6 Idus Apr. 1628”,
  in Latin: 6–93, 56 letters from dr. Whear to friends, 1601–26; in
  Latin: 95, a title “[_woodcuts_] | DEGOREI | WHEARI | PRAELEC. |
  HISTOR. | _CAMDEN._ | _CHARISTERIA_ | [_woodcuts_]” | impr. 69: 96,
  motto: 97–103, dedication to John Pym, dated “Oxon. . a.d. 5 Kal. Mai.
  1628”: 104–133, the Charisteria, letters by Whear to accompany
  presentation copies of his _Methodus historica_ (1625 W): 134 “Errata
  sic corrigenda ...”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 219. The title of this work appears to
  explain an extraordinary entry in the ©Bibliotheca Gulstoniana© (1688)
  p. 35 “Joan. Wouveri pietas erga Benefactores, Oxon. 1626”!


23. ¬White¬, Antony. TRVTH | AND ERROR | DISCOVERED | IN TWO SER-|MONS
IN S^t MA-|ries in _Oxford_. | [_line_] | _By_ ANTONY WHITE _Master of
Arts_ | _of Corpus Christi Colledge in Oxford._ | [_line_, then
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 79: 1628: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 59 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _in the
  superstitious_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  dedication to sir Henry Neville: 1–30, the first sermon, on Prov.
  xxiii. 23, “Truth purchast”: 31–59, the second, on James i. 16, “Error
  abandon’d”.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 347. Every printed page is within
  bounding lines, on the top and outer side double.


                                 1629.

1. ¬Ames¬, William. BELLARMINVS | ENERVATVS, | à | GVILIELMO AMESIO |
_S. S. Theologiæ Doctore in_ | Academia Franekerana. | _In quatuor Tomos
divisus:_ | _Ab Auctore recognitus, & multis_ | _in locis auctus._ |
Editio tertia. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 88: 1629: 12^o: pp. [24] + 283 + [5] + 288 + 299 + [5] + 230:
  pp. 11 beg. _Canonem retulerunt_, and _Argumenta Bellarmini_, and
  _Bona opera_, and _nullam. Protest._: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–5) dedication to the Belgian states: (6) “Ad Lectorem”:
  (7–12) “Index Controversiarum quæ hoc opere tractantur”: (13–23)
  “Index locorum Scripturæ ...”: 1–283, tome 1: (2) a title “Bellarminus
  enervatus, sive disputationes antibellarminianæ, in Illustri Frisiorum
  Academia, quæ est Franekeræ, publicè habitæ; a Guilielmo Amesio
  Theologiæ Doctore. Tomus secundus. Ab Auctore recognitus & auctus”,
  with impr. 72 _a_: (4–5) dedication to Ernest Casimir count of Nassau,
  20 Nov. 1625, in Latin: 1–288, tome 2: 1, title, exactly as in vol. 2,
  with _tertius_ for _secundus_: 3–4, dedication to senators of
  Friesland, 4 Kal. Apr. 1626: 5–299, tome 3: (2) title, exactly as in
  vol. 2 with _quartus_ for _secundus_: (4–5) dedication to four
  curators of the University of Franeker, 3 Kal. Oct. 1626: 1–230, tome
  4.

  This is a long controversial treatise against Bellarmine on the
  Calvinist side, and covers nearly the whole ground of theology. There
  are editions issued at Amsterdam in 1625–6, 1628 and 1638, and at
  London in 1632–33.


2. ¬Burges¬, Cornelius. BAPTISMALL | _REGENERATION_ | of Elect Infants,
| Professed by the Church of | _England, according to the Scriptures_, |
_the Primitiue Church, the pre-_|_sent Reformed Churches, and_ | _many
particular Di-_|_vines apart_. | By COR: BVRGES, D^r of Divinity, and |
one of his Maiesties Chaplaines | in Ordinary. | [two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 91: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 347 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _world with
  such_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within arched
  border: (3–8) Epistle dedicatory to Francis earl of Bedford: (9–13)
  “To the Readers”: (14–15) “A Table of the severall Chapters ...”: (16)
  “The principall Authors quoted ...”. 1–347, the work: 347 “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 684. The address “to the Reader” states
  that the book is “the summe of sundry Lectures deliuered in mine owne
  Charge” St. Magnus, London, and that some had accused him of altering
  what he had preached before publishing it.


3. ¬Burton¬, Samuel, archdeacon of Gloucester. _ARTICLES_ | TO BE
ENQVIRED OF | in the Generall Visitation of the | _Archdeacon_ of the
Diocesse of | GLOCESTER, | HOLDEN IN THE YEARE OF OVR | Lord God, 1629.
In the fift yeare of the Reigne | of our most gracious Soueraigne Lord,
| CHARLES, by the grace of | God, King of great Brit-|taine, France, and
| _Ireland, Defender of_ | _the Faith, &c._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 93: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _Articles concerning Schoolmasters_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A
  1^r, title: A 1^v “The Tenor of the Oath to be ministred to the
  Churchwardens and Sworne-men”, with a text: A 2^r-B 4^r, the Articles:
  B 4^r, note about Recusants and Communicants.


4. ¬Butler¬, Charles. ORATORIÆ | LIBRI DVO. | QVORVM | _Alter ejus
Definitionem_, | _Alter Partitionem_ | EXPLICAT: | _IN VSVM SCHOLARVM_ |
_recèns editi_. | [_line_] | Authore CAROLO BVTLERO, Magd. | [_line_,
then _device_.]

  Impr. 98: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [132], signn. ( )^2 A-Q^4: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _clarant: vt cum_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. ( ) 1^r,
  title: 2^r “Lectori Benevolo ...”, dated “Wotton. 8. _Cal. Iul._
  1629”, signed “C. B. M.”: A 1^r-Q 4^v, the work: Q 4^v, “Monitio ad
  Lectorem”, errata and corrigenda.

  See 1633 B. For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 209–10. The
  reference there to a ©Rhetoricæ Libri duo© of this year is probably an
  error for ©Oratoriæ Libri duo©. At sign. A4^2 is a description of the
  various type in use, giving a series of Nonpareil, Breuier, (Long)
  Primier, Pique, English, Great Primier, Double Pique, Canon, with
  specimens of each.


5. ¬Catechism.¬ Catechesis | RELIGIONIS | CHRISTIANÆ | QVÆ TRADITVR | in
Ecclesijs & Scholis Ele⸗|ctoralis Palatinatus. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 72: 1629: (twelves) 24^o: pp. [6] + 63 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _est,
  Vnctus_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) woodcuts and a
  text: (3–6) edict of Frederick Elector of the Rhine about the
  Catechism, 19 Jan. 1563/4, in Latin: 1–49, the catechism: 50–63
  “Precationes aliquot privatæ & publicæ”.

  An edition of the Heidelberg catechism.


6. ¬Chaloner¬, dr. Edward. SIX | SERMONS | NOW FIRST | PVBLISHED, |
_Preached by that learned and_ | _worthy Divine_ Edward | Chaloner
_lately deceas’d_, D^r in | Divinity, sometimes Cha-|plaine in Ordinary
to our | Soveraigne K. _Iames_, | and to his MAIESTY | that now is; and
late | Principall of _Al-_|_ban Hall_ in | _Oxford_. | [_line_] |
_Printed according to the Author’s_ | _coppies, written with his owne
hand._ | [_line_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 94: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 150 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _arrow
  drawne_, 111 _and selfe-conceited_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within arched border: (3–5) Epistle dedicatory to the Earl of
  Pembroke, signed “Ab. Sherman”: (7–8) “The Titles and severall Texts
  ...”: 1–150, the six sermons, on Tit. i. 13, Matt xx. 6, Rom. i. 21,
  Acts xxi. 14, Luke viii. 21, Gal. ii. 5: (1) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 378. This is a second set of six sermons:
  one set having been issued by Chaloner himself (who died in 1625) at
  London in 1623, when a Fellow of All Souls.


7. ¬Corbet¬, Richard, bp. of Oxford. ARTICLES | TO BE ENQVIRED | OF
WITHIN THE DIOCES | Of _Oxford_, in the first Visitation of | the Right
Reverend Father in GOD, | _Richard_, Lord Bishop of | _Oxford_. | _HELD_
| In the yeare of our Lord God 1629. in the fift yeare | of the Raigne
of our most gratious Soveraigne Lord, | _Charles_, by the grace of God
King of Great | _Brittaine_, _France_, and _Ireland_, | Defendor of the
Faith &c: | [_device._]

  Impr. 85 _a_: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _3. Whether any hath_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A
  1^v-A 2^r, Directions, Oath &c.: A 2^v-B 4^r, the Articles: B 4^v,
  note about Recusants and Communicants.


8. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. ΜΙΚΡΟ´ΚΟΣΜΟΣ. | _A_ | LITTLE DE=|SCRIPTION OF | THE
GREAT WORLD. | The fourth Edition. Revised. | [_line_] | _By_ PETER
HEYLYN. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 100: 1629: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [20] + 807 + folded leaf
  between pp. 6 and 7 + [5]: p. 11 beg. _1. First then there_, 711 _The
  chiefe riuers_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within an arched
  border: (3–4) dedication to prince Charles: (5–6) “To the Reader”:
  (7–8) “To my brother the Author”: a poem signed “Edw. Heylyn”: (9–12)
  “A table of the principall Countries, Provinces and Seas ...”: (13–14)
  “A table of the antient Tribes and Nations ...”: (15–19) “A table of
  the most principall things ...”: (20) “A computation of the forraine
  coynes herein mentioned ...”: 1–807, (1–2) the work: between pp. 6 and
  7 is a tall narrow strip, about 14 × 5 in., bearing on one side “The
  table of climes.”

  A note in the All Souls copy shows that the book was on sale on 18
  Aug. 1629.


9. ¬Oxford¬, University. [_woodcuts_] | STATVTA. | [and] CAROLVS R. |
_Ordo sive series electionis Procuratorum_ ... | ... | ... _quotannis
faciendæ._ | [and] STATVTA.

  Impr. 96: 1629: (one) obl. folio: pp. [2]: Pica Italic. Contents:—p.
  (1) in centre a title “Carolus R. ...” as above, below a metal
  engraving showing the cycle of Proctors: on left and right two strips
  of printed Statutes concerning Proctors, each headed “Statuta” and
  pasted to the central cycle: the imprint is at the lower right hand
  corner.

  The central part of this broadsheet is entirely occupied with a steel
  or copper engraving representing ingeniously the Colleges which elect
  Proctors from 1629 to 1720: in the centre are some general notes. This
  Caroline cycle is repeated after 23 years, commencing with 1629. The
  two strips of “Statuta” occur also separately, printed on a single
  sheet in two columns.


10. ¬Pemble¬, William. _DE_ | SENSIBVS | INTERNIS. | TRACTATVS |
GVLIELMI PEMBELI, | Aulæ Magdalensis in Aca-|demia Oxoniensi nuper |
_alumni dignissimi_. | [_line_] | _Editio Posthuma._ | [_line_] |
[_woodcut._]

  Impr. 101: 1629: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [4] + 74 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _te,
  quâ sensus_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Lectori
  ...”: 1–74 the work: (1–2) not seen.

  Probably edited by Richard Capel who issued two of Pemble’s treatises
  often bound up with this one (©De formarum (et Animæ) origine©, Lond.
  1629, and ©De (creatione et) providentia Dei©, Lond. 1631).


11. ——. _FIVE_ | GODLY, AND PRO-|fi^{table} Sermons concerni^{ng}. | 1
_The slaverie of sinne._ | 2 _The mischeife of ignorance._ | 3 _The
roote of Apostasie._ | 4 _The benefit of Gods service._ | _The
Christians loue._ | _Preached in his life time in sundry places._ | By
that late faithfull Minister of Christ | M^r WILLIAM PEMBLE | _of
Magdalen Hall in the_ | _Vniversitie of_ | _Oxford_. | The second
Edition. |

  Impr. 97_a_: 1629: (fours) 8^o: [4] + 24 + 25 + [1] + 17 + [1] + 22 +
  15 + [3]: pp. 11 beg. _and cast_ and _tence 2. Thess._ and _ready to_
  and _Votaries vse_ and _in praier_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title
  within an arched border: (3–4) “To the Reader”, signed by the editor
  “Iohn Tombes”: 1–24 (&c. as above, the unnumbered pages being blank,
  and the title of each part appearing only in the headline: the
  signatures run through the entire work) the Sermons, on John viii. 34,
  Hos. iv. 6, Heb. iii. 12, 23, Ex. xxxiv. 23–4, Song of Sol. ii. 16.

  See 1628 P.


12. ——. VINDICIÆ | _FIDEI_, | OR | A TREATISE | of Iustification by
Faith, | _wherein the truth of that point_ | _is fully cleared, and
vindicated_ | _from the cauills of it’s_ | _Adversaries_ | Deliuered at
Magdalen Hall | in Oxford; by WILLIAM | PEMBLE, M^r of Arts. | The
second Edition. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 97: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 248: p. 11 beg. _plainely. He_, 111
  _some time failes_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within
  arched border: (3–6) dedication to Magdalen hall, Oxford, dated “From
  Tewkeisbury this 9 of Iuly 1629”, signed “Iohn Geree”: (7–8) “To the
  Christian Reader,” signed “Rich. Capel”: 1–248, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 330, and 1625 P. The dedication contains
  some account of the author by the editor. The preface is by the
  author’s tutor, to whom Pemble left these lectures, and gives the
  anecdote which Wood relates of Pemble’s death bed.


13. ¬Prideaux¬, dr. John. _TABVLÆ_ | AD | GRAMMATICA | Græca
Introductoriæ. | IN QVIBVS | _Succinctè compingitur, brevissima, sed
tamen ex-_|_pedita, singularum partium orationis decli-_|_nabilium,
Variandi ratio_. | ACCESSIT | Vestibuli vice, ad eandem linguam
παραίνεσις in gratiam | tyronum, quibus vt convenit explicatiora
evol-|vere, ita necesse est hæc ipsa | ad vnguem tenere. | [_motto_,
then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 92: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [34], signn. A-D^4 E^1: sign. B 1^r beg.
  _profero clarâ_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-A
  2^v, dedication to dr. Tho. Holland, dated “Exon. Colleg. Ian. 1. 1607
  ... Io. Prideaux”: A 3^r-B 3^v “... Præfatio”: B 4^r-D 4^v, the
  tables: E 1^r, “Conclusio ad Lectorem”, and short Latin poem.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267; and 1607 P, of which this is a
  reprint.


14. ——. TYROCINIVM | AD SYLLOGISMVM | Legitimum contexendum, & |
_captiosum dissuendum, ex-_|_peditissimum_. | IN QVO | _Ad formam
expensa Syllogisticam perstringuntur_ | _punctìm Sophismata, nec minus
solidè, quàm_ | _vulgò fit, ratione materiæ_; | Excerptis ex optimis
Authoribus exemplis Græcolatinis, | vt majori cum voluptate & fructu, ex
vtriusq; lin-|guæ candidatis & legantur, & | intelligantur. | [_motto_,
then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 92: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [18], signn. A^2, ( )^1, B^4, C^2: sign.
  B 1^r beg. _Sectio prima de_: Pica and Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title: A 2^r-( )^r, dedication to Christianus
  son of Hermannus Julius a Dane, and Gregorius and Erricus sons of
  Petrus Julius, signed “Johannes Prideaux”, “e Musȩo Oxonii ... pridiè
  Solstitium Brumale Exod 22. 21. _ADVenaM_, non _ContrIstabIs_.” =
  1607: ( )^r 2 Latin poems: B 1^r-C 2^v, the treatise.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 267. This piece though apparently
  separate is really an integral part of the preceding piece, sign. E of
  the latter (two leaves) forming the last leaf of that piece and the
  3rd leaf of this! The dedication tells an anecdote of the last moments
  of Offenius the tutor of the three dedicatees.


15. ¬Rainolds¬, dr. John. _THE OVERTHROW_ | OF STAGE-PLAYES, | By the
way of controversie betwixt | _D. Gager_ and _D. Rainoldes_, wherein all
the | reasons that can be made for them are notably refu-|_ted; the
obiections answered, and the case so cleared_ | _and resolved, as that
the iudgement of any man_, | _that is not froward and perverse, may_ |
_easilie bee satisfied_. | WHEREIN IS MANIFESTLY PRO-|ved, that it is
not onely vnlawfull to be an Actor, | _but a beholder of those
vanities_. | _WHEREVNTO ARE ADDED ALSO_ | and annexed in the end
certaine Latine Letters betwixt | the said _Maister Rainoldes_, and
_Doct, Gentiles_, | Reader of the Civill Law in _Oxford_, con-|cerning
the same matter. | _The second Edition._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 89: 1629: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 190 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _ture
  witnesseth it_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) “The Printer
  to the Reader”, from the first ed.: 1–27, Rainolds’ Answer to Gager,
  10 July 1592: 29–164, Rainolds’ second answer, 30 May 1593: 164
  (misprinted “264”)-190, four letters between Rainolds and Albericus
  Gentilis, 1593, in Latin.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 15 and 88 for this controversy. The first
  ed. of this work was issued in 1599, and included the letters: but the
  printer is not at present known. There are mentions of the connexion
  of the University of Oxford with play acting on pp. 143, 149.


16. ¬Salvianus¬, st. SANCTI | SALVIANI | MASSILIENSIS | PRESBYTERI | _DE
GVBERNATIONE_ | _Dei, et de iusto præsentiq;_ | ejus judicio ad S.
SALO-|NIVM EPISCOPVM, | libri VIII. | _Eiusdem Epistolarum_ l_ib._ I. |
TIMOTHEI NOMINE | _ad Ecclesiam Catholic. lib._ IV. | Cum duplici indice
| [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 90: 1629: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [16] + 512: p. 11 beg. _consulari,
  illis_, 401 _tamen quæ emant_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3)
  title: (5–6) account of Salvianus, from Trithemius: (7–13) “Index
  rerum et verborum ...”: (14–15) “Index locorum Scripturæ ...”: 1–297,
  Salvianus de gubernatione Dei: 298–324, ejusdem Epistolae: 325–488,
  ejusdem ad Ecclesiam Catholicam: 489–512 “Annotationes aliquot in
  Salvian(um) ... Autore Ioanne Alexandro Brassicano”.

  See 1633 S.


17. ¬T.¬, B. A | PRESERVATIVE, | TO KEEPE A PRO-|TESTANT FROM |
BECOMMING | _a Papist_. | _Herein these two sayings following_ | _are
expounded._ | Thou art Peter, and vpon this rocke (or stone) | I will
build my Church; _Mat. 16._ 18. | But I haue prayed for thee that thy
faith faile | not; _Luk. 2_2. 3_2_. | _Herevnto is adioyned an
admonition to_ | English _Papists, that deny the_ | _Popes Supremacy in_
| _part or in whole._ | _By T. B._ | [_motto._] |

  Impr. 78: 1629: (eighths) 12^o: pp. [8] + 53 + [3]: p. 11 beg.
  _something doubtfull_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6)
  dedication to sir Thomas Roe, signed “_T. B._”, dated 12 Mar. 1627/8:
  (7–8) “To the Reader”, signed “_T. B._”: 1–53, the exposition.

  The dedication states the author’s obligations to sir T. Roe, and
  especially to sir William Killygrew.


18. ¬Truman¬, Richard. _A_ | CHRISTIAN | _Memorandum_, | OR |
_Advertisement wherein is_ | handled the Doctrine | of Reproofe. | WHAT
IT IS, HOW WE MVST RE-|proue, How necessary it is: With Exhortations |
and Arguments moving vs to the right | performance of that duty, and |
Reproofe for neglecting | _Reproofe_. | By RICHARD TRVMAN _M_^r _of Arts
and_ | _Minister of Gods word at_ Dallington | _neere_ Northampton. |
[_motto._]

  Impr. 99: 1629: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 125 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _the
  Prophet_, 111 _iect malice_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–10) Epistle dedicatory to William lord Spencer: (11–15) “To the
  Reader”: 1–125, the work.


19. ¬Z[ouche]¬, Richard. ELEMENTA | Iurisprudentiæ, | _DEFINITIONIBVS_,
| REGVLIS, ET SENTEN-|tijs Selectioribus Iuris Ci-|vilis Illustrata. |
[_line_] | Autore _R. Z._ P. R. Oxon. | [_line_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 95: 1629: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 277 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _runt,
  personæ_, 111 _ministratione offerunt_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1–2)
  not seen: (3) title, “cum Privilegio”: (5) dedication to lord
  Pembroke, signed “R. Z.”: (7–9) “Iuventuti Magnæ Britanniæ Iuris
  Studiosæ”, an epistle dedicatory, dated “ex Aulâ Alban: pridie Cal:
  Iun. 1629,” but not signed: (11–16) a list of parts and sections:
  1–277, the work, in 7 parts: 277, note by the author of a possible
  future volume completing this one.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 511, and 1636 Z. There are editions of
  Leyden, 1652 and (acc. to Wood) Amst. 1681. The “P. R.” on the title
  of this and the 1636 edition is _Professor Regius_.


                                 1630.

1. ¬Aleman¬, Mateo. THE ROGVE: | OR, | THE LIFE | OF GVZMAN | DE
_ALFARACHE_. | WRITTEN IN SPANISH | by MATHEO ALEMAN, | _Seruant to his
Catholike Majestie_, | _and borne in SEVILL_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 102: 1630: sixes (la. 8^o): pp. [36] + 267 + [17] + 357 + [3]:
  pp. 11 begg. _out reason_, and (_in punishment_, 111 _Chapter ii_ and
  _great deale of_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within two
  bounding lines: (3–6) dedication to sir John Strangwayes, in Spanish,
  signed “Don Diego Puede-Ser; de Santa Maria Magdalena”, i. e. James
  May-be or Mabbe, Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, the translator:
  (7–8) dedication by “Matheo Aleman” to “Don Francisco de Roias
  marquesse de Poza” in English: (9–13) three prefaces: (14–20)
  laudatory pieces on the book, chiefly in poetry, including one poem by
  Ben Johnson: (21–24) “A table of the Chapters and matter ...”: (25–36)
  three lists of indexes: 1–267, the first book: (2) a titlepage “THE
  ROGVE: | [_line_] | OR, | THE SECOND | PART OF THE LIFE | OF _GVZMAN_
  DE | _ALFARACHE_. | WRITTEN IN SPANISH | by MATHEO ALEMAN | _Seruant
  to his Catholike Majestie, and_ | _borne in_ SEVILL. | [_woodcuts_]”
  with impr. 103: (4–7) the author’s Preface to part 2, in English:
  (8–15) laudatory pieces, chiefly in verse: (16–17) “The Contents of
  the Second Part”: 1–357, the second part: (2–3) not seen.

  For the translator see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 53. This is a
  reprint, even to many of the misprints, of the London ed. of 1622
  (also “1623”) printed for Edw. Blount, who assigned his edition to R.
  Allot, for whom the Oxford edition was printed, on 1 Dec. 1628. The
  only omission is the two lists of errata in the London issue. The
  demand for this entertaining book was such that a third corrected
  edition was published by Allot in 1634. The translator was secretary
  to sir John Digby when Ambassador in Spain, and the first edition of
  the original Spanish is dated 1599 (1st part) and 1602 or 1603 (2nd
  part). Each page (and margin) is enclosed within lines.


2. ¬B.¬, E. _THE_ | CVRSE OF SACRILEDGE. | PREACHED IN A PRIVATE
PA-|rish Church, the Sunday before | Michaelmas last. | _TO WHICH ARE
ANNEXED_ | _some certain Quære’s, which are pertinent_ | _to the
vnmasking of our homebred_ | _Church-Robbers._ | [_motto_, then “D. E.
B.”, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 85_b_: 1630: sm. 4^o: pp. (8) + 38 + [6]: p. 11 beg. _the
  learned, That_: English Roman. Contents:—(1–2) not seen: (3) title:
  (5–7) Preface signed “E. B.”, p. 5 marked ¶ 2: 1–38, the sermon on
  Mal. iii. 9: (1) “A Post-script” signed “D. E. B.”: (3–5) “A catalogue
  of ... Quæres ... submitted by the Author ...”.

  A sermon on tithes, in defence of the system.


3. ¬Bayly¬, rev. John. TWO | SERMONS | THE ANGELL | _GVARDIAN_. | THE
LIGHT | _ENLIGHTNING_. | PREACHED | BY IOHN BAYLY ONE OF | HIS MAIESTIES
CHAP-|LAINES, _GVARDIAN_ | of Chrrists Hospitall in | _Ruthyn_, and
sometimes | Fellow of _Exeter_ | _Coll. Oxon._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 85: 1630: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 17 + [3] + 14 + [2]: pp. 11 begg.
  _graunt that_, and _other; the_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–4) dedication to his father Lewes Bayly bp. of Bangor, dated
  “_From my Chamber in Exon Coll. Novemb._ 6 ... 1630”: 1–17, the first
  sermon, on Ps. xxxiv. 7: (2) a titlepage “THE LIGHT | _ENLIGHTNING_. |
  A | SERMON | PREACHED |” [&c., precisely as first title, except
  “Christs”], with device and impr. 85: 1, dedication to John Prideaux
  rector of Exeter college: 3–14, the second sermon, on John i. 9.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 499 (where _Lond._ is an error for
  _Oxf._). The second sermon is independent, in paging and title (not
  signatures), of the rest of the book. The author says these are his
  first printed works.


4. ¬Brerewood¬, Edward. A | LEARNED | TREATISE | _OF THE_ | SABAOTH, |
WRITTEN | By M^r EDWARD BREREWOOD, | Professor in _Gresham Colledge_, |
LONDON· | TO M^r NICOLAS BYFIELD, | _Preacher in Chester_. | With M^r
BYFIELDS answere and | M^r BREREWOODS | _REPLY_. |

  Impr. 108: 1630: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 101 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _by Moses_,
  65 _heare, or see_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1), title: (3) 3
  texts: (4) “Faults” of the press: 1–55, the work, dated at end “May
  16. 1611. At Gresham house in London”: 57, a title “Mr. | BYFIELDS |
  ANSVVERE, | WITH M^r | BREREVVOODS | REPLY. | [device, then impr.
  108]: 59–60, “The Preface to M^r. Brerewoods reply”, signed “M^r.
  Brermwoods”!: 61–101, the Answer and Reply, in parallel columns, as
  far as possible.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 140, 325, and 1631 B, 1632 B. The author
  died in Nov. 1613. Richard Byfield, brother of Nicholas, who received
  Brerewood’s treatise “a little before November” 1640, wrote a special
  confutation of it (Lond. 1631), and the controversy became general.


5. ¬Casa¬, Giovanni della. IO. CASÆ V. CL. | GALATEVS | SEV DE MORVM |
HONESTATE, ET ELE-|GANTIA; LIBER EX | Italico Latinus, | _Interprete_ |
NATHANE CHYTRÆO, | cum ejusdem Notis, nuper additis. | _EIUSDEM CASÆ
LIBEL-_|_lus de officijs inter potentiores_, | _& tenuiores amicos._ |
[_woodcut._]

  Impr. 73_a_: 1630: (eights) 12^o: pp. [18] + 213 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _negotij dedit_, 111 _liq; philosopho?_): Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (2) “Lectori ... Chytræus”: (3–5) dedication to Nicolaüs Casa
  by Chytraeus, “Rostochio Idib. Septemb. ... 1577”: (6–9) “Prooemium”
  to Nic. Casius by “Joannes Caselius”, “Rostochio iv Non. Maias ...
  1578”: (9–13) a recommendation of the book, dated “Rostochij Idibus
  ... sextilis ... 1578”: (14–18) “De tribus virtutibus cognatis ...”
  signed “Ioannes Caselius”: 1–103, the Galateus: 104–141, “Ioannis Casæ
  de Officiis inter potentiores et tenuiores amicos Liber”: 142–213,
  “Nathanis Chytræi Notæ in Galateum ...” with a Prooemium to “Caspar
  von der Wenge”.

  See 1628 C. Even in 1892 an edition of Peterson’s English translation
  of the ©Galateo© (1576) was privately printed.


6. ¬Hakewill¬, George. AN | APOLOGIE | OR | DECLARATION | OF THE POWER
AND | PROVIDENCE OF GOD IN THE | GOVERNMENT OF THE WORLD. | CONSISTING
IN | AN EXAMINATION AND | CENSVRE OF THE COMMON | ERROVR TOVCHING
NATVRES PER=|PETVALL AND VNIVERSALL DECAY, | DIVIDED INTO FOVRE BOOKES.
| _WHEREOF_ | _The first treates_ [&c. as 1627 H, dividing lines at
_there-_|_vnto._ | _that of the_ | _excepted._ | _strength and_ |
_wits._ | _proofe of the_ | _vse which_ | _thereof._ |: also “Heavens,”
“onely”] | [_line_] | By GEORGE HAKEWILL Doctor of | Divinity and
Archdeacon of _Surrey_. | [_line_] | _The second Edition revised, and in
sundry passages augmented by the Authour;_ | _with advertisements and
tables newly annexed in the end of the booke_, | _an Index whereof is
presented in the next page._ | [_motto._] [There is also a London title,
see below.]

  Impr. 68: 1630: (sixes) la. 8^o: pp. [40] + 523 + [69]: p. 11 beg.
  _you to Lucians_, 501 _some bodies which_: English Roman.
  Contents:—(2) “The argument of the Front[ispiece] and of the worke”,
  printed in London: (3) engraved title, see below: (5) title: (6) “An
  index of the advertisements and tables newly annexed ...”: (7–11)
  dedication to the University of Oxford: (13–23) “The Preface”: (25–38)
  “The Contents ...”: (39) quotation from Boethius, with translation:
  1–523, the work in 4 books: (2–42) “Advertisements to the learned
  reader occasioned by this second impression”: (43) “... the value of
  the Roman Sesterce”: (44–45) bp. Godwin’s calculations of large
  numbers of sesterces: (46–60) “An alphabeticall table ...” (60–63) “A
  table of the authours quoted ...”: (64–67) “A table of the texts of
  scripture quoted ...”: (69) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 256 and 1627 H. The chief additions in
  this new edition are to be found in the “Advertisements”, the fifth of
  which contains some complimentary letters about the first edition by
  archbp. Ussher and others. The engraved title measures 10–3/16 × 6⅛
  in. and bears a London imprint, “London. Printed for Robert Allott, at
  the | Beare in Paules Churchyard. 1630”, and six allegorical scenes
  surrounding a short title, beneath which are the arms and crest of the
  author. “T. Cecill sculp”, probably in London.


7. ¬Hommius¬, Festus. LXX. | DISPVTATIO-|NES THEOLOGICÆ; | adversus |
PONTIFICIOS: | Quibus omnes inter Evangelicos & | Pontificios
Controversiæ continentur, & | excutiuntur: In gratiam SS. Theologiæ
Stu-|diosorum in Academiâ LEYDENSI pri-|_vatim institutæ, in_ |
_Collegio Anti=Bellarminiano_, | PRÆSIDE | FESTO HOMMIO, | Eccl. Lugdun.
Pastore. | _Editio secunda; ad_j_ectionibus in_ | _margine locupletior._
| [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 104: 1630: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 428 + [4]: p. 11 beg.
  _Mosen quidem_, 111 _stitutus est_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–8) the author’s dedication to Princes Maurice of Orange
  and Louis of Nassau, dated Leiden, 24 Aug. 1614: (9–10) “Lectori
  Benevolo ...”: (11–12) two complimentary poems: (13–16) “Index
  Disputationum”: 1–428, the work: (1–4) “Leges Collegii hujus
  Anti-Bellarminiani”, with the names of the students. All in Latin:
  every printed page and margin are within bounding lines.

  The first edition was issued at Leiden in 1614: see 1639 H.


8. ¬Oxford¬, University. [_woodcut_] | BRITANNIAE | NATALIS. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 73_a_: 1630: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 78: p. 11 beg. _Crescito
  pacifici_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication to King
  Charles by the University of Oxford: (4), 1–78, the poems.

  148 poems (4 Greek, 3 French, the rest Latin) addressed to the King by
  members of the University of Oxford on the birth of Charles ii on 29
  May 1630: a chronogram is on p. 43.


9. ¬Pemble¬, William. A BRIEFE IN-|TRODVCTION | TO GEOGRAPHY |
CONTAINING A | DESCRIPTION OF THE GROVNDS, AND GENERALL | PART THEREOF,
VERY NE-|_cessary for young students in_ | _that science_. | WRITTEN BY
THAT LEARNED | _man_, M^r WILLIAM PEMBLE, _Master_ | _of Arts, of
Magdalen Hall in Oxford_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 84_a_: 1630: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 64 + [2]: p. 12 beg. _The third
  rule_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) “To the Reader” by the
  editor: 1–64 the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 331. Pemble died in 1623: but the
  treatise was reissued in 1669 (according to Cole in Bliss’s Wood’s
  ©Ath. Oxon.©) and in 1685, both times at Oxford, as well as in the
  collected editions of Pemble’s works (3rd ed. 1635 &c.) at London.
  There are several woodcut diagrams, but the whole book is occupied
  solely with what the author calls the general part of Geography, that
  is to say with the “nature, qualities, measure, with other general
  properties of the earth”, and not with a description of separate
  countries.


10. ——. “©A Sum of moral Philosophy.© Oxon. 1630 qu[arto].”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 331, where 1630 may be an error for
  1632.


11. ¬Pinke¬, William. [two _lines_] | THE TRYALL OF | OVR SINCERE LOVE |
TO CHRIST: | [_line_] | _By_ W. PINKE, _late Fellow of Mag-_|_dalen
Colledge in_ OXFORD. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 106: 1630: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 30 + [2] + 28: pp. 11 begg.
  _custome or_, and _God, and while_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title (every page has a double headline): 1–30, a Sermon, on Eph. vi.
  24: 1–28 a second sermon on the same text.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 475, where the 1631 edition with four
  sermons is confused with this in which there seem to be only two. The
  3rd ed. (Oxf. 1636) and 5th (Oxf. 1659) contain also four. Probably
  William Lyford, whose preface dated 7 July 1630 is prefixed to all
  other editions, edited this tentative issue also. The pagination and
  signatures are separate for the two sermons. Pinke died in 1629.


12. ¬Piscator¬, Johannes. APHORISMI | DOCTRINÆ | CHRISTIANÆ | maximam
partem ex In-|stitutione Calvini | _excerpti_. | _SIVE_ | LOCI COMMVNES
THEOLO-|gici, brevibus sententijs expositi. | _Per JOHAN: PISCATOREM·_ |
EDITIO VNDECIMA. | _Superioribus tum limatior, tum_ | _locupletior._ |
[_woodcut._]

  Impr. 105: 1630: (twelves) 24^o: pp. [10] + 203 + [3]: p. 11 beg.
  _veteris testamenti_, 111 _tarit a in filio_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “Ad Lectorem”, a preface to a new edition
  signed “Philip: Ludovicus Piscator”, the author’s son, 1 May 1629:
  (3–9) the author’s preface to Beza: 1–203, the treatise: (1–2) “Index
  [28] locorum communium”.

  Piscator (Fischer?) died in 1626, and the first edition of the
  ©Aphorismi© appears to have been issued in 1592. This edition is often
  found bound with the Catechismus Oxf. 1629.


13. ¬Thornborough¬, bp. John. THE | LAST WILL AND | TESTAMENT OF IESVS |
Christ, touching the blessed Sacrament | _of his body, and bloud,
Signed, Sealed and_ | _Delivered_ to the vse of all faithfull
Christi-|ans in the presence of many Witnesses, and | _proved in the
Prerogatiue of the Church of_ | Christ, by Reverend Bishops, Learned
Doctors, | _and Ancient Fathers of the same Church_. | Exemplified,
copied out, and explaned by the | _Reverend Father in God_, IOHN
THORNBURGH, | _Bishop of Worcester_. | [_motto_: then _device_.]

  Impr. 68: 1630: (fours) 8^o: pp. [6] + 118 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _are to
  be_, 111 _would not haue_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–5) dedication to (William) earl of Pembroke: 1–118, the work, a
  treatise on the Lord’s Supper: (1–4) not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 5: the dedication gives some
  biographical details of the author.


14. ¬Widdowes¬, Giles. THE | SCHISMATICAL | _PVRITAN_. | _A_ | SERMON
PREACHED AT WIT-|NEY concerning the lawfulnesse of Church-|_Authority,
for ordaining, and comman-_|_ding of Rites, and Ceremonies, to_ |
_beautifie the Church_. | By GILES WIDDOWES Rector of S^t | Martins
Church in Oxford. | [_motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 107: 1630: sm. 4^o: pp. [48], signn. A-F^4: sign. B1^r beg. _wee
  Confesse_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r title: A2^r-A2^v,
  dedication to Katharine duchess of Buckingham: A3^r-C3^v “To the
  Puritan”: C4^r-F3^v, the sermon, on 1 Cor. xiv. 40.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 179, and 1631 P & W (2nd ed. of this
  Sermon), and also an answer to Prynne. The long preface contains an
  account of Puritans, in their ten subdivisions of Perfectists,
  Sermonists, Separatists, Anabaptists, Brownists, Loves-familists,
  Precisians, Sabbatarians, Anti-disciplinarians, Predestinatists.


                                 1631.

1. ¬Acontius¬, Jacobus. STRATAGEMATVM | SATANÆ | _Libri Octo_ | _Quos_ |
_IACOBUS ACONTIUS_ | _Vir Summi iudicij nec mino_|_ris pietatis, annis
abhinc penè_{:}_ | _primum edidit & Sereniss®æ®«:»_ | _Reginæ
ELIZABETHÆ_ | _inscripsit_ | _Editio iterata & emendata_ | [_motto._]

  Impr. 87: 1631: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 426 + [32]: p. 11 beg. _tur
  cupiditate_, 301 _nominis vir_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  engraved: (3) dedication to qu. Elizabeth by the author, in Latin:
  (5–16) “... Præfatio”: 1–426, the work in 8 books: (1–26) “Iacobus
  Acontius Iohanni Wolfio Tigurino ...” a letter on the method of
  preparing books, dated “Londini xii Kal. Decembr. MD.LXII”: (27–32)
  “Index rerum præcipuarum ...”.

  The first edition was published at Bâle in 1565 and there are English
  translations (1648, &c.): the sheets of this Oxford edition were
  reissued at Oxford in 1650 with a printed titlepage. The engraved
  title (4–5/16 × 2–13/16 in.) contains the title in the centre, and on
  each side figures of “Veritas” with a book, and “Charitas” with a
  bird: above is a figure “Religionis” (_sic_). Below are six figures of
  Sins and in their midst Satan rising from hell. The imprint is also
  engraved on the plate. From Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901 fol. 73^v it
  would seem that Bagford saw some _printed_ title stating that Turner
  was the printer: the engraved title only is in the copies seen.


2. ¬Bible¬, Old Testament, Psalms. THE | PSALMES | of | KING | DAVID |
TRANSLATED | by | KING IAMES | _Cum Privilegio Regiæ_ | _Maiestatis_. |

  Impr. (as colophon) 68: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [4] + 319 + [5]: p. 11
  beg. _But whil’st_, 111 _19 My God_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (2) engraved plate of the royal Arms, supporters &c., and a
  proclamation of Charles i allowing the printing of the work, “Will:
  Marshall. sculpsit.”: (3) engraved title, see below: 1–319, the work:
  (1) arms of the University and colophon imprint.

  The titlepage shows the Book of Psalms sent down from heaven and
  received by David and James i. It is on one plate with the royal arms
  and proclamation, and is printed from metal.


3. ¬Bolton¬, Robert. HELPES | TO | HVMILIATION. | [_line_] | _By R. B._
| [_line, motto, line, woodcuts._]

  Impr. 115: 1631: (twelves) 16mo: pp. [12] + 164 + [4]: p. 11 beg.
  _Some measure_, 111 _of nature_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3)
  title: (5–12) “To the Reader”, by the editor, giving the author’s full
  name: 1–164, the work, a discourse on Acts ii. 37: (1) Michael
  Sparke’s business mark.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 515. The preface states that this
  publication is by leave of the author though not undertaken by him, so
  it preceded his death on 17 Dec. 1631. Every page has double bounding
  lines at top and outer side margin. Spark must have sent his engraved
  business mark, chiefly a monogram of the letters of his names, to
  Oxford to be printed: see below, F.


4. ¬Brerewood¬, Edward. A | LEARNED TREATISE | _OF THE_ | SABBATH, |
[&c. exactly as 1630 B, except no comma after “Brerewood” and “Byfield”,
and “Reply.” After “Reply.”:—] _The second Edition diligently
corrected._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 108: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 101 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _by Moses_,
  65 beg. _heare, or see_: English Roman. Contents:—exactly as 1680 B,
  except p. (4) is blank, and “At Gresham ... London” is omitted, as
  well as “M^r. Brermwoods”.

  See 1630 B, of which this is a corrected reprint: the editor in the
  interval discovered the difference between _Sabaoth_ and _Sabbath_,
  and uses the latter only, in the first edition using the former only!


5. ——. TRACTATVS | QUIDAM LOGICI | DE | PRÆDICABILIBVS, | ET |
PRÆDICAMENTIS | _Ab eruditissime Viro_ EDVARDO | BREREWOOD, Artium
Magistro, è Col-|legio _Ænei-Nasi_, olim conscripti: nunc verò | ab
erroribus (qui frequenti transcriptione | irrepserant) vindicati, ad
pristinum nitorem, nati-|vamque puritatem diligentissimâ
manuscripto-|rum collatione restituti, & in lucem editi: | _Per_ T. S.
_Art. Mag. & Collegij_ Ænei-Nasi _Socium_. | _Editio altera_, | In quâ
accessêrunt duo ejusdem Authoris insignes | _Tractatus_; prior de
_Meteoris_, posterior de | _Oculo_: limâ, luceque donati: | _Per eundem_
T. S. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 109: 1631: (eights) 12^o: pp. [32] + folded sheet + 431 + [3] +
  [next article, which see]: p. 11 beg. _Sol. Prædicabilia_, 401, _1
  Respectu communis_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—(1) title: (3–8)
  Epistola dedicatoria to lord Rich. Brooke of Norton, signed by the
  editor “Oxonij, e Musæo meo, in Collegio Ænea-Nasensi, 13 Calend. Oct.
  1628 ... Thomas Sixesmith”: (9–13) “Erudito lectori ...” signed “T.
  S.”: (14–31) “Index sectionum quæstionumque ...”: 1–431, the work, pp.
  58–59 being a folded leaf: (1–3) blank: for the rest see the next art.

  See 1628 B, of which this is a reprint, with the two additional
  treatises. The next article is strictly part of the present work, but
  the signatures, pagination &c. being quite distinct (the only sign of
  its secondary character is the omission of the name of the _place_ in
  the imprint), it is here for convenience’ sake treated separately: it
  is also more common to find it separate than to meet with the entire
  work.


6. —† ——. TRACTATVS DVO | _Quorum primus est_ | DE METEORIS. |
_Secundus_ | DE OCVLO. | Quos scripsit olim eximius ille Philosophus |
EDVARDVS BRIERVVOODVS: | _Restituit tandem, ab erroribus mendisq;
Vin_⸗|_dicavit, & publici iuris fecit._ | T. S. | Art. Mag. & Colleg.
_Ænea-Nasensis_ | Socius. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 109: 1631: (eights) 12^o: pp. [4] + 104 + [4] + 39 (p. 39
  misprinted 63) + [1]: pp. 11 begg. _Sect. 11. In qua, Obliquæ,
  quibus_: Long Primer and (2nd part) Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3) dedication by Thomas Sixesmith the editor to Brasenose
  college, Oxford: 1–83 De Meteoris, in 2 books _De Meteorologicus_ and
  _De Cometis_: 84–104 “De Mari”: (1) “A”: (2–3) woodcut diagrams of the
  eye: (4) “Index ...” to the following treatise: 1–63, De Oculo.

  See preceding article, of which this is a part. Some woodcuts occur in
  the text.


7. ¬Burgersdicius¬, Franco. IDEA | _PHILOSOPHIÆ_ | TVM | NATVRALIS, |
TVM | MOR^ALIS, | _SIVE_ | Epitome compendiosa vtrivsq; ex | Aristotele
excerpta & Me-|thodicè disposita; | _A_ | M. FRANC: BVRGERSDICIO | in
Academia Lugduno-Batavâ, _Lo-_|_gices & Ethices Professore ordinario._ |
_Editio tertia prioribus emendatior._ |

  Impr. 105_a_: 1631: (twelves) 16mo: pp. [6] + 103 + [1] + (next
  article): p. 11 beg. _2 Natura est_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–4) “Philosophiæ studiosis”, signed “Franco Burgersdicius”:
  (5–6) “Tituli et ordo disputationum ...” Ideae Naturalis: 1–103, the
  Idea Philosophiae Naturalis: (1) blank: for the rest see next article.

  The first edition of the Natural Philosophy was in 1622, and of the
  Moral in 1623, both at Leiden: both were again issued at the same
  place in 1626 and the Moral Philosophy again in 1629. The 4th ed. was
  in 1637 (Oxford), the next 1641 (Oxford), and others followed, but not
  at Oxford. The next art. is strictly part of this book, but is in form
  quite independent. Burgersdijck died in Feb. 1635 or 1636.


8. — ——. IDEA | PHILOSOPHIÆ | MORALIS, | EX | ARISTOTELE maxima parte |
excerpta, & methodice | _disposita_. | _A_ | M. FRANCONE BVRGERSDICIO,
in | Academiâ Lugduno Batavâ, | _Logices & Ethices Pro-_|_fessore
Ordinario_. | Editio tertia. | _Plurimùm emendata & magnâ accessione_ |
_Locupletata._ | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 105: 1631: (twelves) 16mo: pp. [4] + 342: p. 11 beg. _natur;
  altera_, 211 _dorem quærunt_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) “Index Capitum & titulorum ...”: 1–342 the work.

  See preceding article.


9. ¬Davenant¬, Edward. ARTICLES | MINISTRED IN | THE FIRST VISITA-|TION
OF THE RIGHT | Worshipfull M^r Doctor _Dave-_|_nant_ Archdeacon of Barke
shire | in the yeare of our Lord | God 1631. | [_device._]

  Impr. 82: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 16: p. 11 beg. _the Church, and_:
  Pica English. Contents:—(1) title: (2) “The Oath of the
  Church-wardens”: (3–4) “The Charge of the Church-wardens ...”: 1–15,
  the 70 articles of enquiry.


10. ¬F.¬, A. _The Saints Legacies_: | OR, | A COLLECTION | of certaine
PROMISES | out of the word of God. | _Collected for private vse, but
pub-_|_lished for the comfort of Gods people._ | BY _A. F._ | [_line_,
then _mottos_.]

  Impr. 116: 1631: (twelves) 16mo: pp. [24] + 203 + [21]: p. 11 beg.
  _thee with many_, 111 _steps shall not_: Great Primer Roman.
  Contents:—(1) title: (3–6) “The Author to the Printer”, dated 4 Aug.
  1630: (7–18) “To the Reader”: (19–23) “Rules to be observed in reading
  the Promises”: 1–203, the 105 Legacies: (2–4) a short conclusion:
  (6–17) “A table ...” or index; (18) Michael Sparke’s business mark.

  The author complains of a pirated and imperfect edition, probably
  under another title, issued by Robert Swayne “now deceased” (printer
  at London, 1621–29). In C. S. Palmer’s Catalogue of Books, pt. 10
  (June 1878), no. 256, this book is attributed to Anthony Farindon, for
  whom see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 457. Every page is within double
  lines at top and outside margin. The original title was probably
  “Promises”, for the compositor of one side of the first sheet of the
  text placed that as part of the headline, while the compositor of the
  other side and of the rest of the work has, as the author suggests,
  the new title “Saints Legacies” or “Legacies”.


11. ¬Felix¬, Marcus Minucius. M. MINVCII | FELICIS | OCTAVIVS. |
[_line_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 110: 1631: (twelves) 24mo: pp. [8] + 129 + [7]: p. 11 beg.
  _bere; quàm_, 111 _dicimus; non_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(3) title:
  (5–7) “Typographus lectori”: (8) passage from Lactantius: 1–129, the
  work.

  See 1627 F, of which this is a reprint.


12. ¬Florus¬, Lucius Annaeus. L. IVLII FLORI | rerum à | ROMANIS |
GESTARVM | LIBRI IV. | A IOHANNE STADIO _emendati_. | _Editio nova
singulis Neotericis purgatior &_ | _emendatior._ | _SEORSVM EXCVSVS_ |
IN EOS COMMENTARIVS | IOAN. STADII, Historiæ & Ma-|theseos Lovanij
Professoris primi: in | quo obscura in lucem proferuntur, omissa
sup-|plentur, inversa restituuntur, breviter denique, | quicquid in
Romana Historia dignum est | observatione annotatur; vnà cum va-|riarum
lectionum & castiga-|tionum rationibus. | [_device._]

  Impr. 117: 1631: (twelves) 16mo: pp. 137 + [1] + 319 + [35]: pp. 11
  beg. _immortalium docuit_ and _rum pleb._, 301 _non potuit (petebat_:
  Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–5, 2 complimentary Latin
  pieces: 7–137, the text of Florus: 1, a title:—“I. STADII | IN L.
  IVLII FLORI | HISTORIA-|RVM LIBROS IV | COMMENTARII. | _Editio nova
  singulis Neotericis_ | _purgatior & emendatior._ | [_device_, then
  impr. 69]: 3–16, “Ioannis Stadii ... Præfatio”: 17–319, the
  commentary: (2–4) “Index capitum ...”: (6–23) “Index nominum ...”:
  (24–31) “Index posterior rerum ...”: (31) two errata.

  The first edition of Stadius’s commentary was in 1567 at Antwerp:
  other Oxford ones were issued in 1638, 1661 and 1669.


13. ¬Gardyner¬, Richard. CONCIO | _AD_ | CLERVM | HABITA | IN TEMPLO
BEATÆ | MARIæ _Oxon: Feb._ 1¿4¿. | PER | RICHARDVM GARDYNER Sa: | Theol:
Doct: & Eccles. Cath: | Christi Canonicum. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 118: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 24: p. 11 beg. _mit, & vadosa_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—(1–2) not seen: (3) title: (5–8)
  dedication to Laud, bp. of London, chancellor of the University: 1–24,
  the sermon, on 1 Tim. iv. 16.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 922: the dedication is of some
  autobiographical interest. One of the Bodleian copies of this sermon
  bears an autograph note of the author which shows that this book was
  issued not later than 16 March 1630/1.


14. ¬Godwin¬, Thomas. _ROMANÆ_ | HISTORIAE | ANTHOLOGIA | [&c. exactly
as 1628 G, and within a similar border.]

  Impr. 75_a_: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 277 + [23]: [&c. exactly as 1628
  G.]

  See 1614 G: this is almost an exact reprint of the 1628 edition, with
  different imprint and date.


15. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. ΜΙΚΡΟ´ΚΟΣΜΟΣ | A | LITTLE | DE-|SCRIPTION OF | THE
GREAT WORLD. | The fifth Edition. | [_line_] | _By_ PETER HEYLYN. |
[_line, motto, device._]

  Impr. 119: 1631: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [20] + 807 + [5]: p. 11 beg.
  _1. First then there_, 701 _dales, or Vindelici_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title, within arched border: (3–4) dedication to
  “Prince Charles” as in 1621: (5–6) “To the Reader”: (7–8) Poem “To my
  brother the Author” by Edw. Heylyn: (9–12) “A Table of the principal
  Countries ...”: (13–14) “A Table of the ancient Tribes ...”: (15–19)
  “A Table of the most principall things ...”: (20) “A computation of
  ... forraine coyne ...”: 1–807, (1–2) the work: (4–5) not seen.

  See 1621 H.


16. ¬Oxford¬, University. AD | magnificvm | Et Spectatissimum Virum
Domi-|num IOHANNEM CIRENBERGIVM | PROCONSVLEM CIVITATIS | _GEDANENSIS_.
| Ob acceptum Synodalium Epistolarum | _Concilij Basileensis_ Αυτόγραφον
_sigillo eiusdem in_ | _plumbum impresso obsignatum, quod nobilissimus_
| _Dominus_ THOMAS ROE _Eques Auratus_, | _Serenissimi Magnæ Britanniæ
Regis Legatus_ | _ab eo sibi priùs officiosè oblatum, Oxoniensi
Bib-_|_liothecæ transmisit ac dono dedit_. | _CARMEN_ | HONORARIVM. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 73_a_: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 17 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Nec
  calamus_: English Roman. Contents:—(1) title: (3–5) Latin preface to
  Johannes Cirenbergius by J. Rous: 1–17, complimentary poems.

  Eight Latin poems by members of the University of Oxford to thank the
  proximate and immediate donors of MS. Roe 20, presented by Johann
  Cirenberg of Dantzig (Gedanum) to sir Thomas Roe on 28 Mar. 1630, and
  by him to the University as an addition to the Roe MSS. in Aug. 1630.


17. ¬Page¬, William. A | TREATISE | OR | IVSTIFICATION | OF BOWING AT |
THE NAME OF | _IESVS_. | By way of Answere to an Appendix | _against
it_. | TOGETHER WITH AN EXAMI-|nation of such considerable reasons as
are | made by M^r _Prinne_ in a reply to | M^r _Widdowes_ concerning |
_the same argument_. | [_line_] | _By_ WILLIAM PAGE _Bac. of Divinity_ |
_and Fellow of_ All-Soules _Colledge_ | _in_ Oxford. | [_line_, then 2
_mottos_.]

  Impr. 85_a_: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 206: p. 11 beg. _since the
  omission_, 101 _lookes forward_: English Roman. Contents:—(1) title:
  (3–15) dedication to the University of Oxford: (16) Errata: 1–126, the
  treatise or “Answere”: 129, a title:—“A | FVRTHER | IVSTIFICATION | OF
  BOWING AT | THE NAME OF | _IESUS_. | OR | AN EXAMINATION | OF SVCH
  CONSIDERA-|BLE REASONS AS ARE | made by Mr. _Prinne_ [&c., exactly as
  in the main title, imprint and all, except that the two mottos are
  different]”: 130–132 (misprinted 140–142) “To the Reader”: 133–206,
  the further answer.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 654, where Wood quotes two letters about
  this book, one against it from the Archbishop of Canterbury’s
  Secretary, one for it by Laud, which show that the book was in course
  of printing in May-June 1631, but not yet published on June 22. The
  error of pagination on pp. 130–32 (“140–42”) was due to the prefatory
  matter of the second part being supposed by the compositor to follow
  the 3rd leaf of what is now sheet S, instead of the 3rd leaf of sheet
  Q.


18. ¬Pareus¬, David. ¤DAVIDIS PAREI¤ | _Theologi Archipalatini_. | IN |
¤S. MATTHÆI¤ | ¤EVANGELIVM¤ | ¤COMMENTARIVS¤ | Quo præter accuratam
textus Sacri Analysin, & Harmoniæ Evangelicæ collatio-|nem Orthodoxa
Fidei Christianæ capita à depravationibus IOHANNIS | MALDONATI Iesuitæ,
& aliorum, Perspicue & solide vindicantur. | ¤Cui subiungitur . in duas
S. _Petri_ Epistolas¤: | _Nec non_ | ¤IN¤

 { ¤IOEL¤,
 { ¤AMOS¤,
 { ¤HAGGAI¤:

_Commentarius, tum eruditione tum perspicuitate celeberrimus._ |
[_device._]

  Impr. 113: 1631: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 800 + 120: pp. 11 begg.
  _voluit, Christi_ and _eo: vnde patet_, 701 _catorum nostrorum_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) “Ad Lectorem” by the editor:
  (4–12), 1–800, Pareus on St. Matthew: 1–48, on St. Peter: 49–78, on
  Joel: 79–91, on Haggai: 92–120, on Amos.

  In 1622 the year of Pareus’s death several of his treatises were
  publicly burnt at Oxford, as opposed to the King’s authority,
  including his commentary on the Romans. Underlined words in the title
  are printed in red. The last 120 pages seem to have been printed in
  London, not Oxford.


19. ¬Parsons¬, Bartholomew. DORCAS: | OR, | A PERFECT | PATTERNE OF A |
TRUE DISCIPLE. | A Sermon Preached by | _Bartholomew Parsons_ B. of
Di-|vinity and Rector of _Ludger-_|_shall_ in the County of _Wilts_. |
[_line_, then 2 _mottos_.]

  Impr. 68: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 36: p. 11 beg. _ing out of_; Great
  Primer Roman. Contents:—(1) title, within arched border: (3–7)
  dedication to sir Francis Pile, dated “From my house at Collingborne
  April 1. 1631”: 1–36, the sermon, on Acts ix. 36.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 26. The title and outer margin of each
  page are within double lines.


20. ¬Pinke¬, William. _THE_ | TRYALL | of a Christians syncere | _loue
vnto Christ_: | [_line_] | By M^r WILLIAM PINKE, Master | of Arts late
Fellow of Mag.|_dalen Colledge in_ | OXFORD. | [_line, motto,
woodcuts._]

  Impr. 84_a_: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 29 + [3] + 30 + [2] + 28 + [2] +
  25 + [1]: pp. 11 beg. _choisest mercies_, and _custome or_, and _God,
  and while_, and _yet doth not_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within arched border; (3–8) dedication to lord George Digby, dated
  “Shirburn. Iul. 7. 1630”, signed by the editor, William Lyford: 1–29,
  sermon on Luke xiv. 26: 1–30, sermon on Eph. vi. 24, beg. _Not to
  mispend_: 1–28, sermon on Eph. vi. 24, beg. _I will not discourage_:
  (1–2) “To the Reader” signed “W. Lyford”: 1–25, pieces of a sermon on
  1 Cor. xvi. 22.

  See 1630 P, of which the 2nd and 3rd sermons here are reissues of the
  sheets; the preface to the fourth explains that it is fragmentary.
  Every page has a double headline, but the four sermons are separate in
  pagination and signatures. Pinke was one of lord Digby’s “Readers”
  when the latter was at Magdalen.


21. ¬Powel¬, Griffith. “Powel (G.) De Demonstratione . Oxon. 1631”:
“Analysis Aristot. lib. de Demonstratione a G. Powell . Oxon. 1631.”

  So in ©Catalogus librorum Richardi Davis©, 1686, p. 94, no. 92: and in
  ©Catalogus librorum ... in ædibus Thomæ Bowman©, 1686/7, sign. D1^v,
  no. 15. The book is no doubt a reprint of 1594 P.


22. ¬Preston¬, John. THREE | SERMONS | VPON THE SA=|CRAMENT OF | THE
LORDS | _SVPPER_. | _By the late Faithfull_ | _and VVorthy Minister_ |
_of Iesus Christ_ | IOHN PRESTON, | D^r in Divinity, Chaplaine in |
Ordinary to his MAIESTY, Master of _Emanuel_ Colledge | in Cambridge,
and some-|times Preacher of | Lincolnes Inne. |

  Impr. 120: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 91 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _onely to
  be_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within arched border: 1–91,
  the sermons, on 1 John v. 14.

  For the author, see Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 333.


23. ¬Primerose¬, James. _ACADEMIA_ | MONSPELIENSIS | A _IACOBO
PRI-_|_MIROSIO Monspe-_|_liensi_ & _Oxoniensi_ | Doctore descripta. |
EIVSDEM LAVRVS | _MONSPELIACA_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 111: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 38 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _tuenda,
  venam_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title within arched border:
  (3–8), 1–2, dedication to dr. Thomas Clayton regius professor of
  Medicine at Oxford: 3–38 the work: (1–2) not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 450. The work contains the Quaestiones
  and Theses by which Primerose obtained his doctor’s degree in medicine
  at Montpellier 2 May 1617, beginning on 21 Jan. 1616/7: also the first
  medical quaestio defended after his degree, on 21 Dec. 1617. The
  “Laurus” must refer to the dedication in which an interesting account
  of the University of Montpellier is given. The occasion of publishing
  this medical work so long after the time at which it was written, was
  no doubt the incorporation of dr. Primerose at Oxford in March 1628/9.
  In the Bliss sale (1858) a copy of this book was sold “with duplicate
  title-page containing a variation” which I have not seen.


24. ¬Sanderson¬, Robert. LOGICÆ | ARTIS COM-|PENDIVM. | TERTIA HAC
EDITI-|one recognitum, duplici | _Appendice auctum, & pub-_|_lici iuris
factum._ | à ROB. SANDERSON Collegij | Lincolniensis in almâ |
_Oxoniensi Socio_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 96: 1631: (eights) 16mo: pp. [8] + 239 + [1] + 124 + [4]: pp. 11
  beg. _possint esse_, and _sed ij ferè_, pp. 111 _mutatis terminis_,
  and _margine peculiari_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6)
  “Elenchus capitum ...”: (7) “Ad Lectorem”: (8) “Errata ...”: 1–239 the
  work: 1–124, two appendixes, one “De usu Logicæ”, one “Miscella”:
  (1–4) not seen.

  See 1615 S. There is a woodcut diagram at p. 149.


25. ¬Scheiblerus¬, Christophorus. PHILOSOPHIA COMPENDIOSA | SEV |
PHILOSOPHIA | _Exhibens_ | LOGICÆ,      METAPHYSICÆ, | PHYSICÆ,
GEOMETRIÆ, | ASTRONOMIÆ,      OPTICÆ, | ETHICÆ,      POLITICÆ, | ET
OECONOMICÆ | COMPENDIVM METHODICVM, | _Cui_ | _Addita est etiam_
HEIZONIS BVSCHERI | _Arithmetica, in vsum Pedagogij Gisseni_. | AVTORE |
CHRISTOPHORO SCHEIBLERO, Logicæ ac | Metaphysicæ Professore. | _Editio
quinta recognita, & multis mendis liberata._ | [_woodcuts._] |

  Impr. 121: 1631: 16mo.

  At present I only know this book from a titlepage in the Bagford
  collections at the British Museum (463. h. 4, no. 981): but it is not
  likely to be really uncommon.


26. ¬Strada¬, Firmianus. FAMIANI | ¤STRADƤ | ¤ROMANI¤ | E SOCIETA-|TE
IESV. | ¤_PROLVSIONES_¤ | _ACADEMICÆ_. | ¤Iuxta exemplar AVTHORIS
recognitæ¤, | _atque suis_ Indicibus _illustratæ_. | [_device._] [the
name of place and date are in red ink, as are also the words underlined
in the above title.]

  Impr. 72 _c_: 1631: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 331 + [29]: p. 11 beg.
  _bus, tam opportuna_, 301 _Volo tnqu am_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) dedication to Alexander card. Ursino:
  1–331, the Prolusiones, in 3 books: (2–27) “Index rerum et verborum
  ...”: (28–29) “Index Prolusionum ...”.

  The first edition was in 1617. The subjects are oratorical, poetical
  and historical.


27. ¬Vincentius¬, Lirinensis. ¤PEREGRINI¤, | _ID EST, VT VVLGO_ |
_PERHIBETVR_, | ¤VINCE_N_TII LI=|RINENSIS, _AD_¤-|VERSUS PROPHA-|_NAS
H¿Æ¿RESES_, | ¤Commonitoria duo¤. | _Editio repurgata, cæteris pu_|_rior
& emendatior._ | _Huic adijcitur_ ¤AVGVSTINI¤ | _liber_ de Hæresibus. |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 112: 1631: (twelves) 24mo: pp. [12] + 274 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _nat. Quid si_: 201 _tibus quamlibet_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  “A”: (5) title: (7–11) “Lectori ...”, a preface: 1–150, Vincentius’s
  work: 151–269, Augustinus’s work: 270–274, “Appendix trium hæresium”,
  i. e. of Papists, Mohammedans, Anabaptists: (1) “Errata ...”.

  Underlined words in the title above are printed in red, and also
  “Oxoniæ”, and “1631.” in the imprint.


28. ¬Vossius¬, Gerardus Johannes. GERARDI IOANNIS VOSSI | RHETORICES |
CONTRACTÆ, | _SIVE_ | PARTITIONVM | ORATORIARUM· | Libri V· | _Ex
decreto Illustr. ac Pot._ HOLLANDIÆ, _&_ | WEST-FRISIÆ DD. ORDINVM _in_
| _vsum Scholarum e_j_usdem Pro-_|_vinciæ excusi_. | Editio altera
castigatior. | [_device._]

  Impr. 114: 1631: (twelves) 16mo: pp. [16] + 559 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _vel
  probatur_, 401 _Hoc est, somnum_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–10) dedication to Beniaminus Auberius Maurerius Fontidangaeus,
  dated “Lugduni Bat. ∞ IↃ C XXI. XII Kal. vii.^{bris}”: (11–15) “Series
  Capitum”: (16) Complimentary Latin poem by Daniel Heinsius: 1–559, the
  work.

  The first edition was presumably in 1621, but the ordinary
  bibliographies do not give the date, except one which gives 1606.
  Other Oxford editions were issued in 1655 and 1672, and several others
  in London and abroad.


29. ——. GERARDI IOH. VOSSII. | _V. CL._ | THESES THEOLOGICÆ | ET |
HISTORICÆ, | _De varijs doctrinæ Christianæ Capitibus_; | Quas, aliquot
abhinc annis, dispu-|tandas proposuit in | ACADEMIA LEIDENSI. | _Editio
Iterata & Emendata._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 87 _a_: 1631: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 680: p. 11 beg.
  _illius de chao_, 501 _Nec meliorem_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, (3–4) “Typographus Lectori ...”: (5–6) “Syllabus & Ordo
  Disputationum”: (8) a Latin 6-line complimentary poem signed
  “Philalethes”: 1–680, the forty dissertations.

  See 1628 V: the printer confesses that this is an unauthorized reprint
  of the original edition, in consequence of the daily complaint of the
  rarity of the book: and says “Nactus itaque tandem amicorum ope
  istarum Thesium fasciculum (integrum vti spero,) ... sumpsi mihi
  fiduciam eum iterùm typis meis exprimendi”. There is nothing in this
  to indicate that this is a reissue of the sheets of 1628 V, without
  even correction of the misprints: on the contrary the list of errata
  given in 1628 is omitted. The first eight pages only are printing of
  1631. This edition appears to be quite rare, but perhaps only
  accidentally so, because copies have not found their way into public
  libraries; or possibly Vossius may have succeeded in stopping a
  pirated issue.


30. *¬W[alkington]¬, T[homas]. THE | OPTICK ... GLASSE | OF HV...MORS |
OR | The touchstone of a golden | _temperature, or the Philosophers_ |
_stone to make a golden temper_. | Wherein the foure complections |
_Sanguine, Cholericke, Phligmaticke, Mel_|_ancholicke are succinctly
painted forth_ | _and their externall intimates laid open_ | _to the
purblindeye of ignorance itselfe_, | _by which euery one may iudge_, |
_of what complection he is, and_ | _answerably learn what is_ | _most
sutable to his_ | _nature_. | _by_ T. W. _Master_ | _of Artes_ |
[_motto._]

  Impr. 122: (eights) 12^o: pp. [26] + 168 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _damagement
  both_, 111 _temperatures, this_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (2)
  engraving, see below: (3) engraved title, see below: (5–13), Epistle
  dedicatory to sir Justinian Lewin, dated “from my study in Saint
  _Iohns_ (Camb.) x Calend March. T. W.”: 15–25 “To the Reader”, signed
  “T. W.”: (25–26) “The Titles and Contents of the severall Chapters
  ...”: 1–162, the work: 163–167, “The Close”, a poem: 168, “Catastrophe
  Lectori”, an English poem.

  For the author, see Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 350. The proof of
  authorship is not clear, but the fact seems generally accepted, and
  Walkington was certainly a Fellow of St. John’s College, Cambridge.
  The book has also been attributed to Tho. Wilbie and T. Wombwell,
  according to Bohn’s Lowndes. This is a reprint of the 1607 London
  edition, re-printed at London in 1639 and 1663. Hitherto this Oxford
  edition has been generally regarded as the first, and the British
  Museum catalogue assigns it doubtfully to 1605. But it cannot be
  earlier than 1627 from the woodcuts used, and in that year first
  William Turner printed books by himself. And it cannot be later than 2
  Aug. 1638 when Michael Sparke assigned this book to John Dawson with
  one of 1631 and one not earlier than 1631. Again, a comparison of 20
  imprints of Michael Sparke between 1627 and 1638 raises a presumption
  that he did not use the expression “are to be sold by Michael Sparke
  at (or, dwelling at) the Blue Bible in Green Arbour” (nor was he
  connected with Oxford printers) until 1632, and he uses no local
  description of the kind at all in his imprints till 1629. On the whole
  1631 is a probable year for the issue of this book, and 1631–33 more
  likely than any earlier or later date.

  The engraved title on steel (size of plate 5½ × 3½ in.) does not occur
  in the 1607 ed. and was doubtless made for this occasion: it was
  altered in the imprint and then used again in 1639 and 1663. On either
  side of the title is a graduate in cap and gown representing
  “CAMBRIDGE” and “OXFORD”: together they hold upright what seems
  intended for an optic glass or touchstone, but presents the exact
  appearance of a half-closed umbrella. Facing the title and part of the
  plate is another engraving (plate 5½ × 3½ in., as the title) which a
  reference to pag. 77 l. 2 shows to represent the Temperaments or
  complexions, with concentric rings: at top are two small wholly
  fanciful engravings of “Oxford” and “Cambridge”, each 5/16 × 1–11/16
  in.


31. ¬Widdowes¬, Giles. THE | LAWLESSE | KNEELESSE | SCHISMATICALL |
_PVRITAN_. | OR | A CONFVTATION | OF THE AVTHOR | OF AN _APPENDIX_, |
concerning bowing at the | name of _Iesus_. | WRITTEN | by GILES
WIDDOWES Rector of S^t | MARTINS Church in Oxford, | and late fellow of
| _Oriell Colledge_. | [_motto._]

  Impr. 107: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 90 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _must bow,
  now_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1) title: (3–4) dedication to Endymion
  Porter: 1–11, “To the true Protestant Reader”: 13–90, the treatise, in
  defence of bowing at the name of Jesus: 91, “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 179, and 1630 W. This is a reply to
  Prynne’s attack on the latter work.


32. ——. THE | SCHISMATICAL | _PVRITAN_. | [&c., exactly as 1630 W,
except _Ceremoines_ for _Ceremonies_, and after “Oxford”] | _The second
edition, Augmented._ |

  Impr. 137: 1631: sm. 4^o: pp. [48], signn. A-F^4: sign. B1^2 beg. _wee
  confesse_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A1: title: A2^r-A2^v,
  dedication, as in 1st ed.: A3^r-C4^r “To the Puritan”: D1^r-F4^v, the
  sermon, on 1 Cor. xiv. 40.

  See 1630 W: the augmentation appears to be only in the Preface.


                                 1632.

1. ¬Bancroft¬, John, bp. of Oxford. ARTICLES TO | BE ENQVIRED OF |
WITHIN THE DIOCES | Of _O_x_ford_, in the first Visitati-|on of the
Right Reverend Fa-|ther in GOD, _Iohn_ Lord | Bishop of _Oxford_. | HELD
| In the yeare of our Lord God 1632. in the eighth | yeare of the Raigne
of our most gracious Soveraigne | Lord, _Charles_, by the grace of God
King of | Great _Brittaine_, _France_, and _Ireland_ | Defender of the
Faith &c. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 93: 1632: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B1^r beg. 15
  _Whether_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. _A_1^r, title: _A_2^r-2^v,
  Oath and Charge of the Churchwardens, &c.: A3^r “Directions for making
  bills of Presentments for the Dioces ...”: A3^v-B3^r, the Articles:
  B3^r-3^v, directions.


2. ¬Brerewood¬, Edward. A | SECOND TREATISE | _Of The_ | SABBATH, | _OR_
| AN EXPLICATION OF | the Fourth _Commandement_. | _Written_, | By M^r
EDWARD BREREWOOD | professor in _Gresham Colledge_ | in LONDON. |
[_woodcut._]

  Impr. 124: 1632: sm. 4^o: pp. 50 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _cation; so_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–40, the treatise: 41–50
  “Quæstio” about servants’ Sunday work, in English.

  See 1630 B, Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 141.


3. ¬Burton¬, Robert. THE | ANATOMY OF | MELANCHOLY | [&c., exactly as
1628 B, being from the same plate with “thirde” altered to “fourth.”]

  Impr. 70: 1632: (fours) folio: pp. [10] + 78 + [6] + 722 (after 218
  are two unnumbered leaves) + [10]: p. 11 beg. _Iudgement_, 601
  _graphers, would_: English Roman. Contents:—(2) “The Argument of the
  Frontispeice”: (3) engraved title, inserted: (5) dedication to lord
  Berkeley: (7–10) “Democritus Iunior ad Librum suum”, English verse:
  1–78, “Democritus Iunior to the Reader”: (1) “Lectori malè feriato”:
  (2) a Latin poem: (3–6) “The Synopsis of the first partition”: 1–218,
  the first partition: (1–4) “The Synopsis of the second partition”:
  219–407, the second partition: 408–10, “Analysis of the third
  partition”: 411–722, the third partition: (1–9) “The Table”: (9)
  “Errata ...”: (10) Impr. 75, between woodcuts.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 653 and 1621 B. Ten of the divisions of
  the titlepage have now small numbers attached to them, arranged
  thus:—2, 1, 3 (top row): 4, title, 5: 6, 10, 7: 8, imprint, 9 (lowest
  row). This plate is described in the ©Catalogue of Prints in the
  British Museum©. _Div._ 1. _Satires_, vol. 1 (Lond. 1870), p. 79.


4. ¬Clement¬, st., of Rome. “Clementis ad Corinthios Epistola prior, Gr.
et Lat. cum Notis P. Junii. 4_to_. _J. Lichfield_, 1632.”

  So in the ©Catalogue of the second ... portion© of dr Philip Bliss’s
  library, sold in Aug. 1858, p. 13, no. 150: but it is probably an
  error for 1633, although possibly some copies may have borne this
  date.


5. ¬Daye¬, Lionel. CONCIO | AD | CLERVM | HABITA | OXONII DIE | Martis
post Comitia | _An: Dom:_ 1609. | AVTHORE LIONELLO DAYE | tunc temporis
Collegij | _Bailiolensis Socio_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 73_a_: 1632: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 33 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _quium
  oris_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Amicis meis
  Oxoniensibus”, dated “Ex ædibus meis Whichfordiensibus. Ian. 23.
  1631”: 1–33, the sermon, on Luke xxii. 31, in Latin.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 326. The author says he now prints his
  old sermon, because it had been a great consolation to him, he having
  just lost his eldest son, a B.A. of Christ Church, by illness.


6. ¬Downinge¬, Calybute. A | DISCOVRSE | OF THE | STATE
ECCLESIA-|STICALL OF THIS | _Kingdome, in relation to the Civill_. |
_Considered vnder three_ CONCLuSIONS. | With a DIGRESSION discussing |
_some ordinary Exceptions against_ | Ecclesiasticall Officers. | [line]
| _By_ C. D. | [_device._]

  Impr. 119: 1632: [the rest _absolutely_ as 1633 D.: for that issue the
  title of this edition was torn off, and a new one substituted.]


7. ¬Ovid.¬ OVID’S | METAMORPHOSIS | ENGLISHED, | MYTHOLOGIZ’D, | _And_ |
Represented in Figures. | An Essay to the Translation | of VIRGIL’S
ÆNEIS. | _By G. S._ |

  Impr. 82_a_: 1632: (fours) folio: pp. [20?] + 549 + 1, not counting 16
  engravings: p. 11 beg. _Who o’re so_, 401 (_^a For Ioue_: English
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “The minde of the frontispeece
  ...”: (3) an engraved titlepage, see description below: (5) dedication
  to prince Charles, signed “George Sandys”: (6–9) two panegyrics:
  (10–12) “to the Reader”: (13–16) “The Life of Ovid”: (17–19) “Ovid
  defended”: (20) Latin poem: 1–531, the work, with notes: 532, “To the
  Reader”: 533–49, the first Aeneid of Virgil in English verse: (1)
  “Errata”. Each of the 15 bks. and the Life are preceded by a full-page
  engraving.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 100. The first and second editions were
  issued at London in 1626 and 1628: this is the third, and others
  followed but were not published at Oxford. The first five books had
  been issued by Sandys at least twice (2nd ed., Lond. 1621). The large
  engraved titlepage (9⅝ × 5⅛ in.) is similar to the title of the 1626
  London folio edition in general design, but different in detail. In
  the 1632 engraving the title (nearly as on the printed leaf, as far as
  “G. S.”, with date only and no imprint) is on a sheet held by and
  between two figures of Amor and Sapientia, and on the lower edge of
  the sheet is “_Francisco Clein Inv: Salamon Sauery sculp:_”. Other
  emblematic figures and some Latin sentences fill the page. The British
  Museum copy has the engraved title, but the copy presented by the
  translator in 1636 to the Bodleian has not. The book is singular in
  having no small woodcut ornaments.


8. ¬Pemble¬, William. A | SVMME OF | MORALL | PHILOSOPHY | SVCCINCTLY |
GATHERED, ELE-|gantly Composed, | and Methodically | _handled_, | BY |
THAT LEARNED SCHOLLER | AND WORTHY DIVINE | _WILLIAM PEMBLE_ M^r of |
Arts and late Commoner | of _Mag. Hall_. | [two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 84_a_: 1632: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + “82” (“56” occurs twice in the
  pagination) + [1]: p. 11 beg. _selues, that_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3) “To the Reader”: (4) a logical division of Disciplines:
  1-“82”, the work: (1) “Index”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 331, and 1630 P. The book is an analysis,
  rather than a readable treatise.


9. ¬Sennertus¬, Daniel. DANIELIS | SENNERTI | Vratislaviensis |
_EPITOME_ | NATURALIS | SCIENTIÆ | [_device_] | EDITIO TERTIA. | Auctior
& Correctior. |

  Impr. 123: 1632: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 632 + [22]: p. 11 beg.
  _Actiones voluntati_, 611 _suam sedem_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–9) Epistola dedicatoria to Severinus Schattenus à
  Schattenhall, dated “Calend. April.... 1618”: (11–13) “Lectori candido
  ...”: (15–16) “Index librorum et capitum”: 1–632, the work, in 8
  books: (1–2) “Conclusio”: (3–20) index.

  The first edition was presumably issued in 1618, the second at
  Wittenberg in 1624: other Oxford editions came out in 1653 and 1664.


                                 1633.

1. ¬A[iray]¬, C[hristopher]. FASCICULUS | _PRAECEPTORVM_ | LOGICORUM: |
IN | _Gratiam_ j_uventutis_ | Academicæ _compo-_|_situs & typis
donatus_. | _Editio altera limatior_ | _operâ secundâ_ | C. A. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 69: 1633: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 224: p. 11 beg. _nec genere_
  111, _1. Necessaria, cui_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—(3) title,
  within an arched border: (5–6) “Typographus Benevolo Lectori ...”: (7)
  “Sphalmata ...”, errata: (8) “_Arbor Porphyriana_”: 1–224, the work.

  This is a reprint of 1628 A, and appears to be rare, for Wood believed
  the 1660 edition to be the second.


2. *¬Articles.¬ ARTICLES | Given by      |      and delivered to the
Church=wardens | to be considered and answered in his visitation |
holden in the yeare of our Lord God      | WHEREVNTO THE SAID |
Church-wardens and sidemen are | vpon their oathes to answere | truly
and particularly. | [_device._]. |

  Impr. 68_b_: n. d.: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B1^r beg.
  _Lords Prayer_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A1^r, title: A2^r,
  instructions and Oath: A3^r-B4^r, the articles.

  This is a general undated form of Articles of Visitation apparently
  for a Bishop’s or Archdeacon’s use. The occurrence of a particular
  woodcut shows that this is the earliest year to which the printing can
  be assigned.


3. ¬Bacon¬, sir Francis, Lord Verulam. THE TWO | BOOKES OF | S^r FRANCIS
BACON, | _OF_ | THE PROFICIENCE | and Advancement of Learning, | DIVINE
and HVMANE. | [_line._] | _To the_ KING. | [_line_, then _woodcut_.] |

  Impr. 138: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 335 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _he
  spoiled_, 201 _tage in the race_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: 1–335, the work.

  This is the 3rd edition, the previous ones being Lond. 1605, Lond.
  1629 (from which latter the present edition is an almost lineatim
  reprint); no separate one in English was subsequently issued till this
  century: see 1640 B.


4. ¬Bartholinus¬, Caspar. _CASP. BARTHOLINI_ | ENCHIRIDION | ETHICVM: |
SEU | _EPITOME_ | PHILOSOPHIÆ | MORALIS. | _Præcepta breviter & dilucidè
me-_|_thodóque novâ & facili expli-_|_cata exhibens_ | Pro angustâ
tyronum me-|moriâ | [_woodcut._] |

  Impr. 137: 1633: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [72], signn. A-C^{12}: sign. B1^r
  beg. _tudinis; ut_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r, title:
  A1^v, dedication to prince Hulderic: A2^r-C10^v, the work:
  C11^r-C11^v, “Index capitum ...”.

  This was reprinted at Oxford in 1665 with Casa’s Galateus.


5. ——. _CASPARI BARTHOLINI_ | _Philosophi & Medici_ | ANATOMICÆ |
INSTITVTIONES | CORPORIS HVMANI | Vtriusque sexùs | HISTORIAM &
DECLARATIO-|nem exhibentes, | Cum plurimis novis observationibus | &
opinionibus, | Nec non | _Illustriorum, quæ in_ ANTHROPO-|LOGIA
_occurrunt controver-_|_siarum decisionibus_. | Cum indice Capitum &
Rerum locupletissimo. | [_woodcut._] |

  Impr. 69: 1633: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [24] + 417 + [51]: p. 11 beg.
  _nisi in_, 301 _ramos intercostales_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (2) contents of the work: (3–7) dedication to Oligerus
  Rosaecranzius, dated 18 Dec. 1610, in Latin: (8–17) “Ad Benevolum
  Lectorem meum ...”, dated as above: (18–24) “Index capitum ...”:
  1–417, the work consisting of a Proœmium, 4 libri and 4 libelli:
  (1–44) the index: (45–47) “Admonitio Autoris ad Lectorem qui benignus”
  about a charge of plagiarism, dated “Hafniæ”, 1 Sept. 1622.

  The first edition was issued in 1611: this new one appears to be
  reprinted from the edition Goslariæ et Rostochii 1632.


6. Browne, Thomas. [The British Museum Catalogue by an error states that
there is a copy of Browne’s ©Copie of a Sermon© dated 1633: see 1634 B.]


7. ¬Burton¬, William. “©Laudatio funebris in Obitum Viri excellentiss.
D. Thomæ Alleni.© Lond. 1632. Ox. 1633. qu.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 439: the London edition of
  1632 is known, but at present not the Oxford issue.


Butler, Charles. The reference to a 1633 edition of the ©Feminine
Monarchie©, made in 1609 B, is an error.


8. ¬Butler¬, Charles. ORATORIÆ | LIBRI DVO: | QVORVM | _Alter ejus
Definitionem_, | _Alter Partitionem_ | EXPLICAT: | IN USUM SCHOLARUM |
_recèns editi_. | [_line_] | Authore CAROLO BVTLERO, _Magd._ | [_line_,
then _device_.]

  Impr. 69: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [136], signn. A, A-Q^4: sign. B1^r beg.
  _clarant; vt cùm_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—A1^r, title:
  A2^r-A2^v, dedication to Thomas lord Coventry, dated “Wotton, 5. _Idus
  Martii_, Ann. Dom. 1633....”: A3^r, two complimentary Latin poems to
  the author by I. H. and S. W.: A3^v-4^v, “Lectori Benevolo ...” as in
  1629: A1^r-Q4^v, the work: Q4^v, “Monitio ...”, errata and corrigenda.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 210, 1629 B. This is a reprint of the
  1629 edition, but the new dedication states that Butler’s Rhetoric
  (see 1600 B) was used in the chief schools of the kingdom.


9. ——. THE | ENGLISH | GRAMMAR, | OR | The Institution of Letters,
Syl-|lables, and Words, in the En-|glish tongue. | _Whereunto is
annexed_ | An Index of Words Like and Unlike. | [_line_] | _By_ | CHARLS
BUTLER Magd. _Master of Arts_. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 125: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 63 + [29]: p. 11 beg. _larg‘
  sarg‘_: Pica Roman and English. Contents:—p. (1) title within double
  lines: (3–8) “To the Reader”, signed “Wotton Sept. 11. An. D. 1633. C.
  B. M.”: (8) “Ad Authorem” a Latin poem by S. W.: 1–63, the grammar:
  (2–29) the index: (29) “The Printer to the Reader”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 210 (where this edition is not
  mentioned), and 1634 B. This book, as well as the same author’s
  ©Feminine Monarchie or history of Bees© (see 1634 B), are printed in a
  peculiar phonetic manner. The system is of considerable interest for
  the history of phonetic reforms of spelling and of English
  pronunciation, but made no way in practical use. The preface asserts
  the superiority of English in generality, by which he means wide
  geographical extent of usage, but laments the uncertain correspondence
  of sound and spelling, and the labour of learning the language, these
  two defects being due both to the want of alphabetical characters for
  certain sounds, and to historical changes of pronunciation, to which
  some persons adapt the old spelling and some do not. The author
  supplies the characters wanted, and counsels strictly phonetic
  spelling with certain exceptions where letters not strictly sounded
  indicate idiom or derivation. Generally an aspirated letter is
  represented by a line drawn through the letter (đ, w̶, ǥ, but ʇ), and
  mute vowels by a substituted comma (as strang‘, tru‘, nam‘ly) when not
  omitted (as qestion). Also conjoined double e and double o are used,
  but the exceptions to the phonetic spelling would be, among others, a
  serious objection to this system of compromise. In 1585 W. Bullokar
  published an edition of Æsop’s Fables in English, in a somewhat
  similar style of orthography.


10. ¬Clemens¬, Romanus. ¤ΚΛΗΜΕΝΤΟΣ¤ | ΠΡΟΣ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΥΣ | ΕΠΙΣΤΟΛΗ ΠΡΩΤΗ.
| ¤CLEMENTIS¤ | AD CORINTHIOS | EPISTOLA PRIOR. | Ex laceris reliquijs
vetustissimi exemplaris Biblio-|thecæ Regiæ eruit, lacunas explevit,
Latinè ver-|tit, & notis brevioribus illustravit. | [_line_] |
¤PATRICIVS IVNIVS¤ _Pet. F. Scotobritannus_, | _Sere^{mo} Britanniarum
Fr. & Hib. Regi_ | ¤CAROLO¤ _à Bibliothecis_. | [_line_, then _motto_.]

  Impr. 73: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 76 + [48]: p. 11 beg. τῶν ἁπάντων:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–8) dedication to the king:
  (9–19) “Veterum testimonia de Clemente ...”: (21–23) “Benevolo
  Lectori”, dated “Oxonij pridie Cal: Nov. 1632”: 1–76, the Epistle:
  (1–40) Latin notes: (41–47) “Fragmentum Epistolæ secundæ ex eodem
  MS.”: (48) “παροράματα”, errata.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 308. Patrick Young was Library
  Keeper to the King’s Library at St. James’s Palace (now the Old Royal
  Library at the British Museum), and edited this book from the
  Alexandrine MS. of the Greek Bible. Red ink is used in the words
  underlined above, and for “Oxonii,” and “Academiæ” in the imprint, and
  for all words in the text which are supplied by the editor, who calls
  it “Novum et inusitatum imprimendi genus”. Some copies are on large
  paper, and some have an inserted leaf containing “Summa Privilegii”,
  reserving rights of translation, reproduction and sale for ten years.
  This leaf is found before or after the dedication.


11. ¬Combachius¬, Johannes. _IOH. COMBACHII_, | METAPHY-|SICORVM, |
LIBRI DVO | _VNIVERSAM PRIMÆ_ | _Philosophiæ doctrinam theoremati-_|_bus
brevissimis comprehendentes, &_ | _Commentariis necessariis
illustrantes: stu-_|_diosis ejus disciplinæ per quam_ | _utiles &
fructuosi_. | EDITIO TERTIA | Prioribus editionibus auctior & |
castigatior. | _Additus est cuilibet libro in fine Index_ | _rerum &
verborum locuples._ | [two _lines_.]

  Impr. 69: 1633: 16mo.

  At present only known from a titlepage in the Bagford Collections at
  the British Museum (463. h. 4, no. 1110), but it is not likely to be
  really rare. The 2nd edition seems to have been issued abroad in 1620,
  and a “3rd” in 1630, of which this is probably a reprint.


12. ¬Cyprianus¬, S. S. CYPRIANVS | _DE_ | BONO PATIENTIÆ | COL LATVS CVM
| _MS. OXONIENSIBVS,_ | _EDITVS_ | A IEREM. STEPHANO, | SS. Theol. Bac.
cum | _spicilegio notarum_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 129_a_: 1633: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [16] + 87 + [5]: p. 11 beg.
  _daret & divina_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within line,
  double at top and bottom: (3–9) dedication to William Noye attorney
  general: (11–16) “... Argumentum libri ...”: 1–57, the work: 59–87,
  “Annotationes in libellum S. Cypriani ...”, with collations of four
  MSS.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 671. In 1632 Stephens had
  issued a similar edition of Cyprian De unitate ecclesiae.


13. ¬Downe¬, rev. John. _CERTAINE_ | TREATISES | OF | THE LATE REVEREND
| and Learned Divine, M^r _Iohn_ | _Downe_, Rector of the Church of
_Instow_ | in _Devonshire_, Bachelour of Divi-|nity, and sometimes
Fellow of _Ema-_|_nuell_ Colledge in _Cambridge_. | _Published at the
instance of his friends._ | [_line_, then _motto_, then _line_, then
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 126: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 57 + [1] + 185 + [3] + 34 + [2] +
  26 + [2] + 34 + [2] + 24 + [2] + 26 + [2] + 51 + [3] + 125 + [3] + 68:
  incipits, see below in Contents: English Roman. Contents:—(1) title,
  within arched border: (3) dedication by the publisher (dr. G.
  Hakewill) to the bp. and clergy of the diocese of Exeter: (4) “The
  Contents of these treatises”, a list of titles: (5) a title “The
  funerall sermon on behalfe of the author of these ensuing workes,
  preached by George Hakewill ...” with impr. 128: 1–54, the sermon, on
  Dan. xii. 3: 55–57, letter from bp. Joseph Hall, dated “Exon Palace
  Mar. 22. 1631”, to Hakewill about the book: p. 11 beg. _Some there_:
  (1) a title “... Two treatises 1 Concerning the force and efficacy of
  reading—2 Christs prayer for his Church”, with impr. 128: 1–51, 1st
  treatise, on Acts xv. 21: 53–185, 2nd treatise, on John xvii. 1 &c.:
  p. 11 beg. _ever bee a_, 101 _are communicated_: (2) a title “A godlie
  discourse of Selfe-deniall”, with impr. 128: 1–34, the sermon, on Luke
  ix. 23: p. 11 beg. _The Counsell_: (1) a title “An apologie of the
  iustice of God”, with impr. 128: 1–26, the sermon, on Gen. xviii. 25:
  p. 11 beg. _divine actions_: (1) a title “An amulet or preservative
  against the contempt of the ministry”, with impr. 128; 1–34, the
  sermon, on Tit. ii. 15: p. 11 beg. _Ghost were_: (1) a title “The
  dove-like serpent”, with impr. 128: 1–24, the sermon, on Matt. x. 16:
  p. 11 beg. _The deafe eare_: (1) a title “Subiection To the higher
  powers”, with impr. 128: 1–26 (“27”), the sermon on Rom. xiii. 5: p.
  11 beg. _Simply considered_: (1) a title “A defence of the
  lavvfulnesse of lots in gaming against the Arguments of N. N.”, with
  impr. 128: 1–51, the work: p. 11 beg. “shall haue these”: (2) a title
  “The Reall Presence of Transubstantiation vnknowne to the Ancient
  Fathers”, with impr. 128: p. 11 beg. _grace of God_: (2) “A defence of
  the former Answer against the Reply of N. N.”, with impr. 128: 1–68,
  the work: 68, a note to be added to the first sermon: p. 11 beg.
  _stantiation? Nothing_.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 286, Dict. of Nat. Biogr., and 1635 D
  (for Hakewill see ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 255). Downe was a nephew of bp.
  Jewel: educated at Emmanuel college Cambridge, and incorporated at
  Oxford in 1600. He died in about 1631. The signatures run through the
  entire work, with one break.


14. ¬Downinge¬, Calybute. A | DISCOVRSE | OF THE | STATE
ECCLESIA-|STICALL OF THIS | Kingdome, in relation to the Civill. |
_Considered vnder three_ CONCLuSIONS. | With a DIGRESSION, discussing |
_some ordinary Exceptions against_ | Ecclesiasticall Officers. |
[_line_] | _BY_ C. D. | [_line_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 119: 1633: sm. 4^o; pp. [4] + 98 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _distinguished by_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1) title: (3) dedication to
  William earl of Salisbury, signed “Calybute Downinge”: (4) “Errata”:
  1–98, the work, in three parts: the digression is on pp. 30–42: (1–2)
  not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 107 and 1632 D, 1634 D. Wood throws
  doubt on this really being by Downinge. Downinge was chaplain to the
  earl of Salisbury.


15. Erasmus, Desiderius. The Oxford 1663 edition of the ©Moriae
Encomium© bears on its first titlepage the erroneous date 1633.


16. ¬Evans¬, William. A | TRANSLATION | of the Booke of | NATURE, | into
the Vse of | GRACE. | PERFORMED AND PRINCIPALLY | intended for the
benefit of those who | plead ignorance, or that they are not
Book-|_learned, or that they want teachers and_ | _so thinke to excuse
themselues_ | _in their sinnes_. | [_line._] | By WILLIAM EVANS, M^r of
Arts of | S^t _Mary Hall in Oxford_. | [_line_, then two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 127; 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 95 + [9]: p. 11 beg. _consumed
  away_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to Thomas
  2nd lord Coventry: (5–8) “To the Reader”: 1–95, the work: (1)
  “Errata”: (2–7) 76 “... heads of certaine doctrines ...” by way of
  index.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, i. 479. The dedication states that this is
  the author’s first (and, as it seems, last) publication.


17. ¬Gerhardus¬, Johannes. IOH: GERHARDI | MEDITATIONES | _SACRÆ_. |
EDITIO POSTREMA, | _prioribus emendatior_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 129: 1633: twelves (16^o): pp. [2] + 238 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _tis
  ex templo_, 201 _hoc interpretare_: Long Primer English. Contents:—p.
  (1) title, within lines: 1–238 (“235”), the Meditations: (2–3)
  “Index”, a list of the 51 meditations.

  The first edition was apparently in 1606 with 50 Meditations, and
  editions were issued in Latin in 1621, 1627, 1629, Lond. 1672, and
  later, and English translations in 1629 (by R. Winterton, printed at
  Cambridge), and later, even in 1840 (at Oxford).


18. ¬Godwyn¬, Thomas. ROMANÆ | HISTORIAE | ANTHOLOGIA | RECOGNITA ET |
AVCTA. | AN | ENGLISH EXPOSITION | OF THE ROMAN ANTI-|quities, wherein
many Roman and | English offices are paralleld | _and divers obscure
phra-_|_ses explained._ | _For the vse of_ ABINGDON _Schoole._ |
[_line_] | Newly revised and inlarged by the | _Author_ | [_line._]

  Impr. 141: 1633: (fours) sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 277 + [23]: p. 11 beg.
  _malefactor, but_, 111 _gainst another_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within an arched border: (3–4) Latin dedication to dr. John
  Young, signed “Tho. Godwyn”, dated “Abindoniæ 14 Calend. Decemb. ...
  1622”: (5) “Benevolo Lectori ...”: (7) “A short table shewing the
  Argument of every Booke and Section”: 1–277, the work, in four books:
  (1–23) “Index rerum et verborum ...”.

  See 1614 G.


19. †¬Grave¬, Jean de. [_line_] | THE | PATH_WAY TO | THE GATE OF |
_TONGVES_: | BEING, | THE FIRST INSTRV-|CTION FOR LITTLE | CHILDREN. |
With | A short manner to conjugue | the French Verbes. | _Ordered and
made Latine, French and_ | _English by_ IEAN de GRAuE, | _Professour of
the French Tongue_ | _in the City of_ | LONDON. | [_line._]

  Impr. 136: 1633: pp. [48], signn. A-C^8: sign. B1^r beg. _discas
  oportet_: Long Primer Roman and English. Contents:—sign. A1^r title,
  within line: A2^r-A2^v. introduction in Latin, English and French:
  A3^r-C6^v, the work.

  Very rare. The book consists of the names of the numbers, the Church
  Catechism, and the conjugation of French verbs, all in parallel Latin,
  English and French columns: and serves as an introduction to the
  English editions by John Anchoran (1631, 1633, 1637, 1639 or 1640,
  &c.) of J. A. Comenius’s celebrated ©Janua linguarum©. See 1634 S. The
  book is interesting as showing a connexion between William Turner the
  Oxford printer (1624–40) and the London printer of the same name
  (1623–35). The Stationers’ Register (ed. Arber, iv. 334) records the
  transfer of all the London Turner’s rights in this book and the
  ©Clavis ad portam© (which was certainly printed by the Oxford Turner
  in 1634, see 1634 S) to Michael Sparke on 17 Mar. 1634/5. Neither of
  these books was registered at Stationers’ Hall, and so probably this
  book as well as the ©Clavis© was printed at Oxford, though the
  imprint, type and woodcuts are not by themselves decisive. Probably
  the two Turners are in fact identical, and the Oxford printing
  establishment, though founded a year later than the other (but as a
  bookseller’s business not later than 1616/7), was the chief one. It is
  curious that under these circumstances Turner was allowed to be a
  member of the Stationers’ Company, which was particularly jealous of
  provincial presses.


20. ¬Gregorius¬, monk. A | LETTER, | RELATING THE | Martyrdome of
KETAB¿A¿N, Mother | of TEIMVRASES Prince of the | _GEORGIANS, & withall_
| A notable Imposture of the Iesuites | vpon that occasion_:_ | _SENT_ |
From GREGORIVS Monke and | Priest, Agent for the Patriarke of | ANTIOCH
_vnto the most_ | _holy and learned_ Abbot | SOPHRONIVS. | [_line_] |
_Written first in Greeke, and now_ | _done in English_ | [_line._]

  Impr. 82: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 23 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _Iberia: and_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) “To the Reader”,
  about the Georgians, probably by the translator: 1–23, the letter,
  dated “Trapezunt May 16. _Ann._ 1626”.

  A rare tract. See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 479. The
  incident related belongs to the year 1614, when the King of Persia put
  Ketaban to death for refusing to forsake Christianity. Some Jesuits
  are said to have dressed up a carcase as Ketaban’s, to have carried it
  to her son, and to have enjoyed much honour by the miracles which it
  wrought. Ultimately the real body arrived and the Jesuits were
  banished. The translator was Thomas Crosfield of Queen’s College,
  Oxford: and the Letter was published in Greek and Latin (at London?)
  in 1632.


21. ¬Hakewill¬, George. THE | VANITIE | OF | THE EYE. | First begun for
the Com-|fort of a Gentlewoman berea-|ved of her sight, and since | upon
occasion inlarged | and published for the | Common good. | BY | GEORGE
HAKEVVILL Ma-|ster of Arts, and Fellow of Exe-|ter Coll. in Oxford. |
[_line_] | _The second Edition._ | [_line_, then _motto_.] |

  Impr. 142: 1633: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [6] + 173 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _ripping up_, 111 _as much of_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within double bounding lines: (3–6) “The Contents of the severall
  Chapters ...”: 1–173, the work in 31 chapters.

  See 1608 H. This is really the 4th ed., not the 2nd.


22. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. ΜΙΚΡΟ´ΚΟΣΜΟΣ | (&c., precisely as 1631 H, except
“sixth” for “fifth”.)

  Impr. 140: 1633: (eights) sm. 4^o; pp. [20] + 808 (the last misprinted
  807) + [4]: p. 11 beg. _1 First then there_, 701 _dales, or
  Vindelici_: Pica Roman. Contents:—exactly as 1631 H, except “Forraine
  Coynes”, and the necessary change of reference (only) to the last five
  pages.

  See 1621 H: this edition is apparently an almost lineatim reprint of
  the 5th edition.


23. ¬Holyday¬, Barten. PHILOSOPHIÆ | POLITO-|BARBARÆ | SPECIMEN, | IN
Quo | _De_ ANIMA & _e_j_us_ | HABITIBuS INTEL-|LECTuALIBuS, |
_Quæstiones aliquot_, | LIBRIS DVOBVS, | Illustrantur à | [_line_] |
BARTENIO HOLYDAY | [_line._] |

  Impr. 69: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 189 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _piniones
  diversas_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title, within arched
  border: (3–8) “Præfatio”: (9–11) “Series rerum ...”, a list of
  contents: 1–189, two books and an oration: (1) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 522. These are exercises and speeches
  composed by Holyday in about 1617–21, when prælector of Rhetoric and
  Philosophy at Christ Church, Oxford, and concern the De Anima, Ethics
  and Rhetoric of Aristotle. What is considered to be the barbarous
  element in the Philosophy, is not clear.


24. ¬James¬, dr. Richard. CONCIO | HABITA AD | _CLERVM_ | _OXONIENSEM_ |
_de Ecclesia_. | AVTHORE _RICHARDO_ | _IAMESIO Vectensi_, Baccalaureo |
Sacræ Th. Socio _CCC._ | [_line, motto, line, woodcut._]

  Impr. 130: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [36], signn. A-D^4 E^2: sign. B1^r beg.
  _cum omnes_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r, title: A2^r-2^v,
  dedication to sir Kenelm Digby: A3^r-E1^v, the sermon, on Matth. xvi.
  18.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 630. Some copies of this book have the
  remains of a torn titlepage, apparently a cancel leaf following the
  ordinary title.


25. ¬More¬, sir Thomas. EPISTOLA | THOMÆ MORI AD | _ACADEMIAM_ | _OXON._
| Adjecta sunt quædam Poemata | in mortem | CLARISSIMI VIRI | ROBERTI
COTTONI | _&_ | THOMÆ ALLENI. | [_line_, then _motto_, then _line_.] |

  Impr. 113_a_: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 18 + [10]: p. 11 beg. _ei
  periti_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication
  to sir Kenelm Digby, signed “Rich. Iamesius”, the editor: 1–17, the
  Letter, dated “Abingdoniæ ... 4^o Kal. Aprilis”: 18, “Nota magistri
  Briani Twyne” about the occasion of the letter: (1–7) three Latin
  poems and a Latin note by James on Cotton and Allen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, i. 85, ii. 630. This is a rather uncommon
  book, containing a persuasive to the study of Greek, written in 1518,
  probably at the king’s instigation. The opponents of the New Learning
  called themselves Trojans in opposition to the Grecians. The letter is
  reprinted by Hearne in his edition of Roper’s Life of More (Oxf. 1716,
  8^o). Sir Robert Cotton died in 1631, and Thomas Allen of Gloucester
  hall in Oxford in 1632.


26. ¬Oxford¬, University. [two _lines_] | _Musarum Oxoniensium_ | PRO |
REGE SVO | _SOTERIA_. | [_Anagram_, &c., then _device_.]

  Impr. 131: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [72], signn. §, §§^4, §§§^2, A, “BC”,
  D-G^4, H^2: sign. BC1^r beg. _Nec morbos_: English Roman.
  Contents:—sign. §1^r, title: §2^r-H2^r, the poems: H2^v, device and
  impr. 132.

  The occasion of these verses seems to have been an illness of the King
  late in 1632. Most of the poems are Latin, but four are English and
  one Greek. One of the printers (W. Turner) contributes some Latin
  verses. An anagram occurs in the title, and a chronogram (1632) on
  E1^v. There are curious variations in issues, and marks (see the
  register of signatures) of the difficulty of obtaining and marshalling
  in order these collections of separate poems. The early issues of
  sheet A on A3^r print “R. NEVVLIN _S. T. B._”, the later and common
  ones insert _C. C. C._ after the name, as also in A1^v, A3^r (twice):
  so “_Nov. C._” is inserted on A4^v, cf. A2^v. An interesting copy is
  in the British Museum, being the one specially printed for the King’s
  personal acceptance. The differences are that the book is on larger
  paper (the size even as bound and cut down being 7⅞ × 6 in.), and the
  title entirely reprinted. Every line of the title is in larger type
  and spread out laterally, except the anagram itself and imprint: also
  ll. 1 and 4 are roman, not italic, and ll. 3, 4, 6, 7 are printed _in
  gold_. In l. 6 the two Vs are lower case Us, and in l. 7 Rex appears
  as REX. So too the device is altered, and it is amusing to see that
  the imprint, for fear of royal vengeance, is altered from the English
  “W. T.” (William Turner) to the Latin “G. T.”! This fact shows also
  that the _last_ and not the first copy was struck off for the King,
  sheet A agreeing with this in being the later issue (see above).


27. ——. SOLIS | BRITANNICI | _PERIGÆUM_. | SIVE | ITINERANTIS | CAROLI |
AVSPICATISSIMA | _PERIODVS_. | [two _lines_.]

  Impr. 53: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [100], signn. § A-C, DE, F-M^4 N^2: sign.
  B1^r beg. Εἴς ἄλοχον: English Roman. Contents:—sign. §1^r title:
  §2^r-N2^r, the poems.

  Poems by members of the University congratulating the King on his
  return from Scotland in Aug. 1633. The perigee of the sun or a planet
  is when it is nearest to the earth. Most of the poems are Latin, but
  six are Greek, sixteen at the end English, and one French. Three
  chronograms occur. One English poem is by John Lichfield the printer.
  There are some signs of an arrangement of the poems, those by great
  persons coming first, and the English last. Some copies of a later
  issue have an extra sheet after I (ii, four leaves) inserted, with
  more poems, which necessitated a rearrangement of sheet K.


28. ——. VITIS | CAROLINÆ | GEMMA ALTERA | _SIVE_ | AVSPICATISSIMA |
DVCIS EBORACENSIS | GENETHLIACA | _Decantata ad_ | _VADA ISIDIS_ | [two
_lines_.]

  Impr. 53: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [88], signn. A-L^4, see below: sign. B1^r
  beg. _Te pariter_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r, title:
  A2^r-L3^v, the poems.

  These poems celebrate the birth of James ii on 15 Oct. 1633, and are
  as usual chiefly in Latin, but six in Greek, eighteen in English (an
  innovation) and one in French. There is a second issue, perhaps
  commoner than the first described above, with the following changes.
  In sheet H, sign. H1^v l. 9 has _Conjugis alvus_, not _uxorius alvus_:
  H3^r begins with a _Greek_ poem, the rest of sheet H is re-arranged
  and a new sheet h of four leaves is inserted. Also in sheet L a new
  poem by W. Dutton is inserted. The sheets not specified above are
  identical in the two issues.


29. ¬Parsons¬, Bartholomew. BOAZ | _AND_ | RUTH | BLESSED_:_ | _OR_ | A
SACRED CON-|TRACT HONOV-|red with a Solemne | _Benediction_. | BY |
BARTHOLOMEW PARSONS B. of Divinity | and Rector of _Ludgershall_ in the
| County of _Wiltes._ | [two _mottos_.]

  Impr. 134: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 40: p. 11 beg. _ever are blessed_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) Epistle Dedicatorie to
  Peregrine Thistlethwaite and Dorothy his wife: 1–40, the sermon, on
  Ruth iv. 11.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 26. This sermon was to have
  been delivered at the wedding of Mr. Thistlethwaite, but some accident
  interposed, and it is here in an enlarged form.


30. ¬Pavonius¬, Franciscus. SUMMA | ETHICAE: | _SIVE_, | INTRODVCTIO |
IN ARISTOTELIS, | ET THEOLOGORVM | DOCTRINAM | Moralem. | _CVM QVATVOR
INDICIBVS_, | _Vno Propositionum in libri initio;_ | _alio Aristotelico,
tertio Tho-_|_mistico, quarto Rerum_, | in fine. | Auctore FRANCISCO
PAVONIO | Catacensi Theologo Societatis JESU. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 139: 1633: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [12] + 381 + [51]: p. 11 beg.
  _maximè_, 301 _justum debitum_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title within double lines: (3–4) dedication to Mutius Vitellescus,
  dated 29 Sept. 1617: (5–12) “Index propositionum”: 1–381, the work:
  (1–2) “Epilogus”: (4–51) The four indexes.

  The author was an Italian Jesuit, who died in 1637. The first edition
  of this work seems to have been issued at Lyons in 1620.


31. ¬Pemble¬, William. ‘©Enchiridion Oratorium.© Ox. 1633 “qu.” &c.’

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 331. There seems to be some
  mistake, since no such treatise was printed among Pemble’s Collected
  Works: possibly Butler’s work on Oratory above has been confused by
  Wood: but Watt mentions the work under _Pembelo_ as well as _Pemble_,
  as if he had been independent of Wood.


32. ¬Potter¬, Christopher. WANT OF | CHARITIE, | Iustly charged, | ON
ALL SVCH _ROMA-_|_nists_, as dare (without truth or | modesty affirme,
that _Prote-_|_stancie destroyeth Salvation_. | In Answer to a late
Po-|pish Pamphlet intituled | _Charity Mistaken &c._ | _By_ CHRISTOPHER
POTTER D.D. | Chaplaine to his Ma^{ty} in Ordina-|rie, and Provost of
_Queenes_ | _Colledge_ in Oxford. |

  Impr. 133: 1633: (eights) 12^o: pp. [24] + 128 + 120: pp. 11 beg.
  _forbids to_ and _struct her children_: English Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title, within double lines: (3–6) “The Epistle Dedicatory”: (7–8)
  to the reader: (9–24) analysis of _Charity mistaken_ and the answer,
  as a list of contents: 1–128, 1–120, “Answer to Charity mistaken”, the
  work.

  The work against which this was directed was written by a Jesuit named
  Matthias Wilson, who also employed the names of Nicholas Smith and, as
  in this case, Edward Knott, and was published in 1630. By Oct. 1634
  this first edition was nearly sold out, and the author submitted a
  copy to archbp. Laud for his approval or correction, with a view to a
  second edition. Laud suggested the alteration of a few passages, and
  this was made part of the accusations against him at his trial (see
  Prynne’s ©Canterburies Doom©, Lond. 1646, p. 251). The second edition
  thus altered was printed at London in 1634.


33. ¬Reusner¬, Nicolas. NICOLAI REVSNERI LEORINI | IC. Comitis Palat.
Cæs. | SYMBOLORVM | IMPERATORIORuM | Classis Prima. | _QVA SYMBOLA
CONTINENTVR_ | _Impp. ac Cæsarum Romanorum Italico-_|_rum, à C. Iulio
Cæsare, usque ad_ | _Constantinum Magnum._ | OPVS PHILOLOGICVM ET |
Politicum, veréque Regium ac Impera-|torium: omnibus omnium ordinum, &
cum | primis civilis sapientiæ studiosis lectu | futurum utile; ac
jucundum. | _QVINTA EDITIO._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 137: 1633: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [12] + 173 + [37] + 209 + [39] +
  198 + [34]: pp. 11 beg. _Quod exemplo_ and _honestam rem_ and _Nam &
  secundum_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–8) preface to
  Maximilian grand duke of Austria, dated 1 Oct. 1587: (9–11) poems on
  the work: 1–173 the Classis Prima: (1–23) indexes: (24) a
  title:—NICOLAI REuSNERI LEORINI | _Silesii_, | SYMBOLORVM |
  IMPERATORIORuM | Classis Secunda. | _QVA CONTINENTVR SYMBOLA_ | _Impp.
  Cæsarúmque Romanorum-Græco-_|_rum, à Fl. Constantino Magno, usque_ |
  _ad Carolum Magnum, pri-_|_mum Cæsarem Germanicum._ | OPuS AuREuM ET
  VERE | Politicum, ac Regium. | [_device_, then impr. 137]: (26–33)
  preface to Ernest grand duke of Austria, dated 7 Oct. 1587: (33–36)
  poems on the work: 1–209, the Classis secunda: (1–24) indexes: (26) a
  title:—NICOLAI REuSNERI LEORINI | IC. Comitis Palat. Cæs. | SYMBOLORVM
  | IMPERATORIORuM | Classis Tertia. | _QVA SYMBOLA CONTINENTVR_ |
  _Impp. Cæsarúmque Romanorum-Ger-_|_manicorum: à Carolo Magno,
  pri-_|_mo Cæs. Germanico, usque ad_ | _Ferdinandum II. Cæs._ |
  _Austriacum_ | OPuS JuCuNDISSIMÆ | Et utilissimæ lectionis. |
  [_device_: then impr. 137]: (28–32) preface to Matthias grand duke of
  Austria, dated 15 Oct. 1587: (33–39) poems on the work: 1–224 (224
  misprinted 198), the Classis Tertia: (1–28) indexes: (29–34) not seen.

  See 1638 R. This is a curious example of three parts of a volume being
  entirely independent of each other, there being no general titlepage,
  but yet being indissolubly welded together by the signatures, so that
  no part could be issued separately. The first edition seems to have
  been issued in 1587, the 4th at London in 1619. The plan of the work
  is to assign a motto to every emperor, and then to discuss the motto
  and character of the person together: so that in effect the book is
  largely a discussion of proverbs of the nature of Erasmus’s ©Adagia©.


34. ¬Salvianus¬, S. SANCTI | SALVIANI | MASSILIENSIS | _PRESBYTERI_, |
DE | GVBERNATIONE | Dei, & de justo præsentiq; | ejus judicio ad _S.
Salonium_ | Episcopum, _Lib._ VIII. | _Eiusdem Epistolarum Lib. I._ |
TIMOTHEI NOMINE AD | _Ecclesiam Catholic._ Lib. IV. | Cum duplici
indice. |

  Impr. 129 _b_: 1633: 12mo: pp. [16] + 512: p. 11 beg. _consulari_, 401
  _tamen quæ_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title within line, double at
  top and bottom: (5–6) Extract from Joh. Trithemius: (7–13) “Index
  rerum et verborum ...”: (14–15) “Index locorum Scripturæ ...”: 1–297,
  De gubernatione Dei: 298–324, Epistolæ: 325–488, Ad ecclesiam
  catholicam: 489–512, “Annotationes aliquot ... autore Ioanne Alexandro
  Brassicano”.

  See 1629 S, of which this is an almost exact reprint in larger type.


35. ¬Sclater¬, William. [_line_] | Vtriusque Epistolæ | AD CORINTHIOS |
EXPLICATIO | _ANALYTICA_. | VNÀ | CVM SCHOLIIS: | Authore _Gul.
Sclatero_ SS. Theol. Doctore, | Nunc tandem à Filio suo _Coll. Regalis_
| in _Academia Cantabr._ Socio | in lucem edita. | [_line, motto, line,
motto, woodcut._]

  Impr. 69: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 260: p. 11 beg. _testimonio_, 201
  _operam nostram_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a
  line: (2–7) Epistola dedicatoria to dr. Edw. Kellett and mr. George
  Goade, signed “Gulielmus Sclater”: (9–10) “Lectori ...”: (11)
  “Sphalmata ...”: 1–2, title repeated, see below: 3–154, the
  explanation of 1 Cor.: 155–260, do. of 2 Cor.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 228, but this author is not to be
  confused, as Wood points out, with William Slatyer the writer of
  ©Palæ-Albion©. The dedication gives some autobiographical notes about
  the editor, whose tutor at Cambridge was mr. Goade. Strictly, it
  appears that there should be two titles as above (to be distinguished
  by the first title having _ANALYTICA._ and ἂρτιος, the second
  _ANALYTICA_; and ἄρτιος): the second was printed as pp. 1–2, when no
  dedication or preface was intended; and when the usual prefatory
  matter with the first title was printed, no doubt the second would be
  generally removed by the binder.


36. ¬Sermonetta¬, cardinal, i.e. Enrico Gaetani. INSTRVCTIONS | FOR
YOVNG | GENTLEMEN; | OR | The instructions of | _Cardinall Sermonetta_,
to | his Cousen PETRO | CAETANO, | AT | _HIS FIRST GOING_ | into
Flanders to the Duke | of _Parma_, to serue | PHILIP, King | _of
Spaine_. |

  Impr. 135: 1633: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 122 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _Keepe letters_, 101 _dissimulatiõ_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title, within a line double except at bottom: (3–7) “The Printer
  to the Reader”, with postscript: 1–122, the work: (1) “Errata”.

  The sheets of this were reissued with a new titlepage at Oxford in
  1644, and republished with other treatises in 1772, and perhaps
  oftener. The head-line throughout is “Instructions for young
  Noblemen”: every page has double lines on the upper and outer margins.


37. ¬Smith¬, Samuel. Aditus ad Logicam.

  Wood in his ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss (ii. 283) mentions an edition of
  this year, which would be the 7th: see 1617 S.


38. ¬T[ipping]¬, W[illiam]. A | DISCOVRSE | _OF_ | ETERNITIE | Collected
and Composed for | _the Common good_, | [_line_] | By W. T. | [_line_,
then _device_.] |

  Impr. 134: 1633: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 71 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _and
  everlasting_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–7) “To the
  Christian Reader”, signed “VV. T.”: (8) “The Contents ...”: 1–71, the
  work, in two books: 71, a prayer, and errata “in some copies”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 244. There was another (anonymous)
  edition Lond. 1646: the author was known after this book was issued as
  “Eternity Tipping”.


39. ¬Tozer¬, Henry. A | CHRISTIAN | AMENDMENT | Delivered in a Sermon on
New-|yeares day 1631. in S^t _Martines_ | Church in _Oxford_, and | _now
published_: | [_line_] | By H. TOZER M^r of Arts and Fellow of |
_Exceter_ Colledge in _Oxford_. | [_line_, two _mottos_, _woodcuts_.] |

  Impr. 85 _a_: 1633: (eights) 12^o: pp. [12] + 80 + [4]: p. 11 beg.
  _And these_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–11)
  Epistle dedicatory to sir Walter Pye, kt.: 1–80, the sermon, on 2 Cor.
  v. 17.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 274. Sir Walter Pye jun. had been
  Tozer’s pupil when at Exeter college.


                                 1634.

1. ¬A[llen?]¬, J[ohn]. THE | YOVNGER | BROTHER HIS | APOLOGIE, | _OR_ |
_A FATHERS FREE POWER_ | disputed, for the disposition of his Lands, |
or other his Fortunes to his Sonne, Sonnes, | _or any one of them: as
right Reason, the_ | _Lawes of God and Nature, the Civill_, | _Canon,
and Municipall Laws_ | _of this Kingdome doe_ | _command_. | [_motto_,
then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 126: 1634 [on title, 1624!]: sm. 4to: pp. [10] + 56 + [2]: p. 11
  beg. _verse, with all_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7)
  The Epistle to the Reader, signed “J. A.”: (8–10) “The principall
  contents”: 1–56, the work: (1) “Mantissa”, a quotation from Salvianus,
  about anonymity: (2) a colophon, consisting of a motto, large device
  of the Arms of the University, and impr. 73 _b_.

  This is a rare book, arguing against exclusive privileges of
  primogeniture, and for the right and in some cases duty of parents to
  disinherit the eldest son. Other editions were issued at Oxford in
  1641 and 1671, but I do not find information about John Allen, nor the
  ground for ascribing the book to one of that name. On the page
  preceding the colophon is this figure:—

                               * I * M *
                               *   F   *
                               * A * M *

  There is an account of the book in Oldys’s ©British Librarian© (1737),
  p. 210.


2. ¬Barclay¬, John. EVPHORMIONIS | LVSININI, | _Sive_, | IOANNIS |
BARCLAII | _Partes quinq;_. | Satyricon bipartitum. L. 1 & 2. | Apologia
pro se. L. 3 | Icon Animo_{r}um. L. 4. | Veritatis Lachrymæ. L. 5. |
_Cum Clavi præfixa._ | [_line._] | _Accessit_ | Conspiratio Anglicana. |
[_line_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 143: 1634: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [10] + 782 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _tibus allatus_, 501 _Illis autem_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–5) dedication by “Euphormio” to James i: (6–10) “Clavis,
  nomina ignota ... exponens”: 1–156, part 1, as above: 157–310, part 2,
  dedicated to lord Salisbury: 311–357, part 3, dedicated to Charles
  Emmanuel I duke of Savoy, dated London, 1 Sept. 1610: 358–553, part 4,
  dedicated to Louis xiii: 554–767, part 5, “Alitophili Veritatis
  Lachrymæ, sive Euphormionis Lusinini Continuatio”, dedicated to Henry
  of Bourbon the Dauphin: 769–782, “Series patefacti divinitus
  parricidii, ... in ... Regem regnumque Britanniæ cogitati ... Nonis
  ixbribus MDCV. Illo ipso Novembri scripta, nunc demum edita,” the
  head-line is “Conspiratio Anglicana”.

  For John Barclay (_d._ 1621) see the Dict. of National Biography, and
  for the bibliography of this work Jules Dukas’s book. Part 1 was first
  issued in 1603, part 2 in 1607, part 3 in 1611, part 4 in 1614, part 5
  in 1625. The author is satirical on Jesuits and Puritans alike, as
  well as on individuals.


3. ——. IOANNIS | BARCLAII | ARGENIS. | _Editio Novissima._ | CVM CLAVE,
HOC | est: nominum propriorum eluci-|tione hactenus nondum | edita. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 144: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [30] + 705 + [9]: p. 11 beg. _sæva
  consilia_, 601 _sedente, regiam_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title: (3–8) Epistola dedicatoria to Louis xiii, dated Rome 1 July
  1621: (9) a sentence: (10–29) “Discursus de autore Scripti, & judicium
  de nominibus Argenidæis”, head line “Discursus in Argenidem”: 1–676,
  the work in five books: 677–705, “Discursus ... [headline “Clavis”] in
  Argenidem ...”: (1–2) “Tabula nominum fictorum ...”: (3–9) “Index
  ...”.

  See last item. The Argenis, which like the Satyricon is a political
  satire, was written and first published in 1621. The first discursus
  must have been rather out of date in this edition, for it suggests
  that the satire was written by William Barclay, father of the author.
  Argenis is a female character in the book, apparently representing the
  hope of the house of Valois.


4. ¬Blaxton¬, John. THE | ENGLISH | VSVRER; | _OR_ | VSVRY CONDEMNED, |
_BY_ | The most learned and famous Di-|uines of the Church of _England_,
and Dedi-|cated to all his Maiesties Subiects, for | the stay of further
increase | of the same. | [_line_] | Collected | By IOHN BLAXTON,
Preacher of | God’s Word at _Osmington_, in _Dorcet-shire_. | [_line_,
then _motto_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 148: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [20] + 84: p. 11 beg. _Chap._ 3. _The
  Testimony_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (2) “The Illustration” a poem on
  the frontispiece: (3) “The English Vsurer”, the frontispiece, a
  picture with title and motto: (7) title: (9–12) “To the Reader”: (13)
  “A Table of the Contents”: (14) a list of authorities: (15–17)
  complimentary English poems by Josua Sylvester, Francis Quarles and
  (in Latin) John Garbrand of Oxford: (18–19) “To the Vsurer”: 1–82, the
  work: 83–84, poem by George Withers.

  This book was printed in London by John Norton jun. (1633–39) for
  Francis Bowman in Oxford, and does not appear to have been entered in
  the Stationers’ Hall Register. The frontispiece contains a woodcut
  representing a Usurer seated at his table, a small fiend behind his
  head, and on a label “I say I will haue all | both Vse & principall.”
  On the reader’s right are two pigs, one alive, one dead, with suitable
  labels. The size of the woodcut is 4–5/16 × 5¼ in. See next entry.


5. ——. THE | ENGLISH | _USURER_. | OR, | USURY CONDEMNED, | _BY_ | The
most Learned, and famous | Divines of the Church of _England_, and |
Dedicated to all his _Ma_j_esties_ Subiects, | for the stay of further
increase | _of the same_. | [_line_] | Collected | By IOHN BLAXTON,
Preacher of | Gods Word at _Osmington_, in _Dorcetshire_. | [_line_] |
_The second Impression, Corrected by the Authour_ | [_line_, then the
same motto as before, but no line following.]

  Impr. 148: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 80: p. 11 beg. _vaine, if it_;
  Pica Roman. Contents (see above):—p. (2) frontispiece: (3) “The
  Illustration”: (5) title: (7–10) “To the Reader”: (11) Table: (12)
  authorities: (13–14) three poems, as above: (15–16) “To the usurer”:
  1–78, the work: 79–80, Withers’ poem.

  See last entry.


6. ¬Browne¬, Thomas. [_woodcut_] | THE | COPIE OF THE | Sermon preached
before the | _Vniversitie at S. Maries in_ | OXFORD, | _on Tuesday the_
| XXIV. of Decem. 1633. | [_line_] | By THO. BROWNE, _One of the_
Students _of Christ-Church_. | [_line_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 146: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. 53 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _Edward the Sixt_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title: 3–53, the sermon, on Ps.
  cxxx. 4: 53, impr. 85 _d_.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 1003. The Bidding Prayer, in
  an informal style, is intercalated at pp. 9–14, between the
  introductory part and the body of the sermon. See 1633 B: the British
  Museum “1633” copy is absolutely identical with the above issue except
  that instead of Impr. 146 with the date in Roman numerals, it has
  Impr. 82 _b_ and “Anno 1634”, the woodcut having been slightly shifted
  downwards in this issue.


7. ¬Butler¬, Charles. THE | ENGLISH | GRAMMAR, | OR | The Institution of
Letters, Syl[/]|lables, and Wꝏrds in the En=|glish tung. | _Wher’unto is
annexed_ | An Index of wꝏrds Lik‘ and Unlik‘ | [_line_] | _By_ | CHARLS
BuTLER, Magd. _Master of Arts_. | [_motto_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 125: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 63 + [29]: p. 11 beg. _larg‘,
  sarg‘_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–4)
  dedication to prince Charles: (5–11) “To the Reader”, dated “Wotton
  Sept. 1. An. D. 1633. C. B. M.”: (12) “Ad Authorem” a Latin poem by S.
  W.: 1–63, the grammar: (2–29) the Index: (29) The Printer to the
  Reader.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 210, and 1633 B. The body of
  the work is a reissue of the sheets of the 1633 edition, but the title
  is reset, and the prefatory matter enlarged.


8. ——. THE | _Feminin‘ Monarchi‘_, | OR | THE HISTORI | OF B[EE]‘S |
SHEWING | _Their admirable Natur‘, and Propertis;_ | _Their Generation
and Colonis;_ | _Their Government, Loyalti, Art, Industri;_ | _Enimi‘s,
VVars, Magnanimiti, &c._ | TOGETHER | With the right Ordering of them
from tim‘ to tim‘: | and the sw[ee]t Profit arising ther‘of. | [_line_]
| _Written out of Experienc‘_ | By | CHARLS BUTLER, _Magd._ | [_line_,
then _motto_.]

  Impr. 126: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 182: p. 11 beg. _her, animamque_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) engraving of a hive, with
  verses: (3–4) dedication to the queen: (5–8) The preface, dated
  “Wotton. Mai 11. 1623”: (8) The Printer to the leader, referring to
  Butler’s English Grammar for the phonetic spelling used: (9–11)
  commendatory verses by George Wither (Latin and English), and others:
  (12–16) The contents of the book: 1–182, the work in 10 chapters.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 209, and 1609 B, of which
  this is an enlarged edition: the preface is that of the 1623 edition.
  The peculiar spelling and type are part of Butler’s system as
  elaborated in his English Grammar (see 1633 B). There are a few
  woodcuts, and music at pp. 78–81.


9. ¬Cosin¬, Richard. ¤ECCLESIÆ ANGLICANAE¤ | POLITEIA IN TABVLAS
DIGESTA. | ¤AVTHORE _RICHARDO COSIN_ LEGVM¤ | Doctore, olim Decano
«C»uriæ de ARCVBVS, & | ¤_Cancellario, seu Vicario Generali
Reverendiss._¤ | Patris IOANNIS Archiepiscopi | ¤_CANTVARIENSIS_¤. |
[_woodcut._]

  Impr. 73: 1634: (twos) obl. 8^o: pp. [64], signn. ( )^2, ( )^2, A-O^2:
  sign. B1^r beg. _TAB. I. B_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. ( )1^r,
  title: ( )2^r-2^v, Epistola dedicatoria to king James by “Tho.
  Crompton”: ( )1^r “Ad Lectorum Monitorium”: ( )1^r-1^v “Capita
  tabularum”: ( )2, not seen: A1^r-O2^r, the tabulae.

  For the editor (_d._ 1608) see Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i.
  249. The author, a lawyer educated at Cambridge, died in 1597. The
  first edition, of which this is a reprint slightly different in
  arrangement, was published at London in 1604, fol.: the 3rd at the
  Hague in 1661: the 4th at Oxford in 1684, fol. These tables exhibit
  the whole status and administration of the Church of England in a
  synoptic form. The words underlined in the above title are in red ink,
  as well as _Oxoniæ_, and _anno salutis M.DC.XXIV._ in the imprint. The
  book is peculiar in form. The 1604 and 1684 editions may be called
  ordinary folios in shape: this one is made up of folio sheets (each
  containing two folio leaves) folded once and bound oblong, the
  intention being that the binder should cut through the line of folding
  at foot and bind the book as if of quarto size, each oblong leaf thus
  bound being again awkwardly folded once so as to lie within an
  ordinary quarto binding. In the present edition the original 16 tables
  are arranged to form 28, and are printed on one side of the leaf only.


10. ¬Downinge¬, Calybute. A | DISCOVRSE | OF THE | STATE
ECCLESIA-|STICALL OF THIS | _Kingdome in relation to the Civill._ |
_Considered under three_ CONCLuSIONS. | With a DIGRE_SS_ION discussing |
_some ordinary Exceptions concer-_|ning Ecclesiasticall Officers. | _By_
C. D. | _The second Edition, revised and enlarged._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 147: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 112: p. 11 beg. _into factions_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3)
  dedication to lord Salisbury, signed “Calybute Downinge”: 1–112, the
  work, the digression occupying pp. 31–44: 112, “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 107, and 1633 D.


11. ¬Du Moulin¬, Pierre, _d._ 1658.

  See _Smith_, Richard, below.


12. ¬Fitz-Geffry¬, Charles. THE BLESSED | BIRTH-DAY | CELEBRATED | _IN_
| Some Pious Meditations, on the | ANGELS ANTHEM. | _Luke_ 2. 14. | ALSO
HOLY RAPTVRES | In contemplating of the most obserue-|able Adjuncts
about our Saviours | NATIVITIE. | [_line_] | By CHARLES FITZ-GEFFRY. |
[_line_, then _motto_.]

  Impr. 84 _b_: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 55 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _For such
  a_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4), 35–6, Complimentary
  poems by Henry Beesley: 1–34, the Blessed Birthday: 37–55, the
  Raptures.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 607, and 1636 F.
  Grosart’s edition of Fitz-Geffrey’s poems reprints the 2nd edition
  (1636) with the passages different from it which occur in this 1st
  edition, and mentions a faulty 3rd edition of 1654.


13. ¬Lucian.¬ CERTAINE SELECT | DIALOGVES | OF | LVCIAN: | _TOGETHER
WJTH_ | _HIS TRVE HISTORIE_, | _Translated from the Greeke into English_
| [_line_] | By M^r FRANCIS HICKS. | [_line_] | Whereunto is added the
life of LuCIAN | gathered out of his owne Writings, with briefe | Notes
and Illustrations upon each Dia-|logue and Booke, by _T. H._ M^r of Arts
of | _Christ-Church_ in _Oxford_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 119: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 196 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Menippus.
  Thus_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–4)
  dedication to dr. Brian Duppa signed “Th. Hickes”: (5–6) “To the
  honest and judicious reader” by ‘T. H.’: (7) Lucian’s epigram on his
  own book, with English translation by ‘T. H.’: (9–15) Life of Lucian:
  1–196, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 491, 584. Francis Hickes died
  in 1630/1, and the Dialogues are edited by his son. They are Lucian’s
  Περὶ τοῦ Ἐνυπνίου ἤτοι βίος Λουκιανοῦ, Ἰκαρομένιππος, Μένιππος,
  Ὄνειρος, Κατάπλους, Χάρων, Ἀληθὴς Ἱστορία, Τίμων, Συμπόσιον.


14. ¬Mason¬, Francis. THE | AVTHORITY | OF THE CHVRCH | in making Canons
and | Constitutions concerning | _things indifferent_. | AND | THE
OBEDIENCE | THERETO REQVIRED; | with particular application | to the
present estate of the | _Church of England_. | By FRAN. MASON Batchelor
of Diuinity, | and sometime fellow of _Merton_ | Colledge in _Oxford_. |
The second edition Revised. | [_motto_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 85 _c_: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 72 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _remooued:
  for_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–6) Epistle dedicatory to
  Richard archbp. of Canterbury, from the first edition: 1–72, the work,
  on 1 Cor. xiv. 40.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 306. The first edition was
  issued at London in 1607, being then enlarged from a sermon at Norwich
  delivered in 1605. The present edition was reprinted in 1705.


15. Mercurius Davidicus. “Mercurius Davidicus, or a patterne of Loyall
Devotion” bears the date of 1634, but is clearly of 1643.


16. ¬Oxford¬, University. [_device_] | A PROCLAMATION, | ¶ For the well
ordering of the Market in the Cittie of OXFORD, and for the | redresse
of Abuses, in Weights and Measures, within the Precincts | of the
VNIVERSITIE of _OXFORD_. |

  Impr. (as colophon) 85_e_: 1634: la. 4^o: pp. [6]: p. (3) beg. _Said
  Victualls for_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—pp. (1, 3, 5), the
  proclamation.

  Rare. This is a proclamation by the Chancellor of the University
  (archbp. Laud), see O. Ogle’s History of the Oxford Market in the
  Oxford Historical Society’s ©Collectanea©, vol. 2. The three leaves
  are separate, and printed on one side only.


17. ——. CORPVS | STATUTORUM | VNIVERSITATIS | OXON. | SIVE | PANDECTES
CONSTITVTIONVM | ACADEMICARVM, E LIBRIS PVBLICIS | ET REGESTIS
VNIVERSITATIS | CONSARCINATVS. | [two _lines_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 60_a_: 1634: fol: pp. [264], signn. ( ), §, ¶, ¶¶, ¶¶¶, A-Z,
  Aa-Kk, a-z, aa-ee^2: sign. B1^r beg. § 4. _De officio_, b1^r _eisdem
  terminis_: Double (Small) Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. ( )2^r, title:
  §1^r-2^r “Præfatio ad Lectorem”: §2^v “Admonitio ad Lectorem de veteri
  Calendario omisso”: §2^v, “Errata ...”: ¶1^r-¶¶¶2^v, “Elenchus
  Titulorum ...”: A1^r-p1^v, the Corpus, in 21 Tituli: p2^r-aa2^v,
  “Appendix Statutorum ...”: bb1^r-ee2^v, “Statuta Aularia”.

  This is the early form of the Laudian Statutes. Its history may be
  read in Wood’s History of the University or in Griffith’s and
  Shadwell’s edition of the later (1636) form, published in 1888.
  Briefly, certain Delegates, especially dr. Zouch and Bryan Twyne (who
  wrote the preface), completed their work, and the University sent up
  the Corpus to the Chancellor, archbp. Laud. in Aug. 1633. He altered
  it and had it printed, and in July 1634 declared that the Corpus thus
  printed (the present work) should be the statutes under which the
  University should be governed for a year, Mich. 1634–Mich. 1635.
  Finally in June 1636 the full and authentic code was formally
  approved, and additions from it were entered in the copies of the 1634
  edition, the code not being printed as a whole or precisely until
  1888. In 1768 a new edition was printed with certain changes and
  additions, and the 1768 edition is still in progress, the successive
  statutes being still connected by paging with that issue.

  A large part of the edition is on parchment, being presented in that
  form to the King, the chancellor of the University, each College, the
  Halls, and the Proctors. Blank spaces are left in many places for
  additions. Large paper copies are also found. For Synopsises of the
  statutes, see 1635 O, 1638 O.


18. ¬Pinke¬, William. THE | TRYALL | of a Christians syncere | _loue
vnto Christ_. | [_line_] | By M^r WILLIAM PINKE, Master | of Arts late
Fellow of Mag-|_dalen Colledge in_ | OXFORD. | [_line_, then _motto_] |
The second Edition. | [_woodcuts._] |

  Impr. 97_a_: 1634: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [16] + 51 + [1] + 60 + 56 + 66
  [“2” misprinted “46”!]: pp. 11 beg. _whosoever he_, and _separated
  from_, and _head and eares_, and _those reasons I_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–11) Epistle dedicatory to lord George
  Digby, signed “William Lyford”, the editor, “Shirburn. Iul. 7. 1630.”:
  (12–16) “To the Reader”: 1–51, The discourse part 1, on 1 Cor. xvi.
  22: (1), 1–60, part 2 on Eph. vi. 24 (beg. “Not to mispend”): 1–56,
  part 3 on the same text (beg. “I will not discourage”): 1–66, part 4,
  on Luke xiv. 26.

  For the author see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 475, and 1630
  P, where a reference to this, the 2nd ed., is accidentally omitted.
  This issue has four sermons and a slightly altered title.


19. ¬Puteanus¬, Erycius. ERYCI | PuTEANI | COMVS, | SIVE | PHAGESIPOSIA
| CIMMERIA. | SOMNIVM. | [_device._]

  Impr. 121_a_: 1634: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [14] + 190: p. 11 beg.
  _accepto signo_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double
  lines: (3–9) Præfatio, to Christophorus Ettenius: (11–14) Latin poem
  by Daniel Heinsius on the book: 1–185, the work: 186–190, Latin elegy
  by Nic. Burgundus addressed to Puteanus.

  A satire on the gluttony and other luxurious vices of the age, in the
  guise of a dream of what takes place among the utopian Cimmerii. The
  first edition was issued at Louvain in 1611: this may be the second in
  Latin. Puteanus died in 1646, having lived during most of his life at
  Louvain.


20. ——. ERYCI PuTEANI | HISTORIÆ | INSVBRICÆ | libri VI. | Qui
IRRuPTIONES BARBA-|RORuM in ITALIAM continent: | _Rerum ab Origine
gentis ad O-_|_thonem M._ EPITOME. | [_device._]

  Impr. 69: 1634: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [28] + 192 + [32]: p 11 beg.
  _dinis venirent_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double
  lines: (3) dedication to Philip prince of Orange: (4–19) preface to
  the same, dated “Lovanii, in Arce, viii Kal. Septem. M.DC.XIV”:
  (20–23) “Animaduersio”, including some errata: (24–27) complimentary
  pieces: (28) a quotation: 1–143, the work, consisting of a
  “Præfatiuncula” and 6 books: 144, explanation introducing the
  following piece: 145–150, “Irruptio Cimbrorum in Italiam, descripta a
  Floro lib. iii.”: 151, note introducing the following piece: 152–170,
  “Additiuncula ex And. Alciati De formula R. Imperii libello”: 171–2,
  dedication of the Chronology to Floritius: 173–192, “Chronologia
  Insubrica”: (1–31) “Index rerum”.

  This work describes the irruptions of the Barbarians into Italy till
  the year 973: the Insubrians lived in the district round Milan. The
  history seems to have been first issued in 1614, but Puteanus was
  Professor at Milan only from 1601 to 1606.


21. ¬Ridley¬, sir Thomas. A | ¤VIEW OF¤ | THE | CIVILE AND |
¤ECCLESIASTI¤-|CALL LAW: | ¤And wherein the Practice of them¤ | _is
streitned, and may be releeved_ | within this Land. | ¤_VVritten by_ S^r
THOMAS Ridley Knight¤, | and Doctor of the Civile Law. | ¤_The second
Edition, by_ I. G. _M^r of Arts_.¤ | [_device._] |

  Impr. 68_c_: 1634: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 277 + [27]: p. 11 beg. _also
  mad persons_, 201 _wrought by_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within double lines: (3–6) “To the Reader”, signed “I. G.”: (7–10)
  Epistle dedicatory to King James, signed by the author: (11–12) “To
  the Reader” by the author: 1–277, the work: (2–25) “an index of the
  principall Matters and Words ...”: (25) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 205, for the editor and book. The first
  edition was issued at London in 1607: the present one was edited by
  dr. John Gregory, who has added many notes and the index, the author
  having died in 1628/9 or 1629/30. The title in the copies seen (one on
  large paper given by the author) has been sewn or pasted in
  separately, an original titlepage having been torn out. Perhaps this
  was in order to secure proper printing in red ink, for the words
  underlined in the title above are in red ink, as are also in the
  imprint the words _Oxford, University: 1634._, and _Cum Privilegio_.
  The next editions were issued at Oxford in 1662 and 1675 or 1676. This
  is the first Oxford book in which I have noticed Anglo-Saxon type
  (Pica, pp. 184, 193, in the notes).


22. ¬Saltonstall¬, Wye. CLAVIS | AD PORTAM, | OR | A KEY FITTED | to
open the Gate of | Tongues. | WHEREIN YOV MAY | readily finde the Latine
and French for | any English word necessary for | all young Schollers. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 119: 1634: (eights) 12^o: pp. [96], signn. A-F^8: sign B2^r beg.
  _annals_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A3^r, title: A4^r-5^r,
  dedication to the schoolmasters of Great Britain, signed “Wye
  Saltonstall”: A6^r-6^v, “Discipulis ... de usu huius Clavis ...
  præfatiuncula”: A7^r-8^v, five Latin and one English poem about the
  work, by Saltonstall: B1^r-F7^v, the work.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 676. This is an
  alphabetical index of English words and phrases occurring in the 1058
  sections found in Comenius’s ©Gate of Tongues©, as edited for the
  second time in Latin, English and French, by John Anchoran in 1633
  (London). Earlier editions of Comenius’s celebrated work were
  published at Leutschau in 1631 (first edition), then at Leipzig (2nd
  edition) in 1632 (both as ©Janua linguarum©), and (as ©Porta linguarum
  trilinguis©) Anchoran’s editions, Lond. 1631, and 1632: the 3rd and
  4th London Anchoran editions 1637 and 1639 or 1640 reprint
  Saltonstall’s index, but it is noticeable that Saltonstall’s five
  short Latin introductory poems contain at least 18 false quantities,
  and that he was a commoner of Queen’s college without ever
  matriculating or taking his degree. See 1633 G.


23. ¬Smiglecius¬, Martinus. LOGICA | MARTINI | SMIGLECII SO-|CIETATIS
IESV, | S. THEOLOGIÆ | Doctoris, | _SELECTIS DISPUTATIONI-_|_bus &
quæstionibus illustrata_, | Et in duos Tomos distributa: | _In qua_ |
QVICQVID IN ARISTOTELICO | ORGANO VEL COGNITV NECESSARI-|um, vel
obscuritate perplexum, tam clarè & per-|spicuè, quam solidè ac nervosè |
pertractatur. | _Cum Indice Rerum copioso._ | _AD_ | Perillustrem ac
Magnificum Dominum, | D^m THOMAM ZAMOYSCIVM, &c. |

  Impr. 145: 1634: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 761 + [35]: p. 11 beg.
  _Dico igitur_, 501 _lis, posterior_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title: (3–6) epistle dedicatory to Thomas Zamoyscius, dated
  “Calissii [Kalisch] ... 15 Augusti 1616”: (6) an imprimatur dated 24
  June 1616: (7–16) “Index disputationum et quæstionum ...”: 1–761, the
  work in two parts (the second part has a bastard title, with no
  imprint, but date only): (2–35) “Index rerum præcipuarum ...”.

  Reissued at Oxford in 1658. The first edition appeared in two volumes
  at Ingolstadt in 1618, the year of the death of the author, who was a
  Pole by birth. The subject is treated in scholastic style by
  _quaestiones_.


24. ¬Smith¬, rev. Richard, of Barnstaple. MVNITION | AGAINST | MANS
MISERIE | AND | MORTALITIE. | A Treatise containing the | most
effectuall remedies a-|gainst the miserable state of | man in this life,
selected | out of the chiefest both | Humane and Divine | Authors. |
_BY_ | RICHARD SMITH _Prea-_|_cher of Gods Word in_ Bar-|staple _in_
Devonshire. | [_line_] | _The third Edition._ | [_line._]

  Impr. 142: 1634: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [20] + 194 + [14] + 93 + [3]: pp.
  11 beg. _kind^e. A third_, and _unto fresh Rivers_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–14) Epistle dedicatory
  to lady Elizabeth Basset, dated “Barstable ... 1609. Januarie 1 ...”,
  signed “Ricard Smyth”: (15–16) “The Contents ...”: (17–20) “The
  sinners counsell to his Soule”, a poem: 1–194, the work: (3) a title,
  within double lines:—“HERACLITVS: | OR | MEDITATIONS | _Vpon the
  vanitie and mi_⸗|_serie of humane life_; | First written in French by
  | that excellent Scholler and | admirable divine _Peter Du_ | _Moulin_
  Minister of the sa-|cred Word in the reformed | Church of Paris_:_ |
  _And translated into English_ | _by_ R. S. _Gentleman_ | [two
  _lines_]”, impr. 142: (5–8) Epistle dedicatory by the translator to
  his father “S. F. S.”: (9–14) “The author’s Epistle dedicatory to the
  Lady Anne of Rohan, ...”, signed “Peter Du Moulin”: 1–93, the work.

  For the first work see 1612 S, of which this is a simple reprint.
  Twenty-seven Richard Smiths took their degree at Oxford between 1550
  and 1609, and the author of this book has not yet been identified
  among them.

  The second work, which is necessarily linked to the first by the
  signatures, though not covered by the titlepage, is a reprint of 1609
  D. No doubt the reprinter of these works thought the two R. S.s
  identical, but they are in all probability not, the translator of
  Molinaeus being Robert Stafford.


25. ¬Tozer¬, Henry. CHRISTVS: | SIVE | _DICTA & FACTA_ | CHRISTI: |
Prout à quatuor Evangelistis | sparsim recitantur. | Collecta & Ordine
disposita | ab | HENRICO TOZER, _A. M. &_ | Exoniensis _Collegij in
Academiâ_ | Oxoniensi _Socio_.| [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 72_a_: 1634: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 67 + [5]: p. 11 beg. _1.
  Excommunicationem_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double
  lines: (3–7) Epistola dedicatoria to Charles and Philip sons of the
  earl of Pembroke: 1–67, the work: (1) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 274. The matter is arranged
  in a kind of logical order and disposed in divisions and subdivisions.
  Both the dedicatees matriculated at Exeter College in 1632.


26. ¬Zouche¬, Richard. DESCRIPTIO | IVRIS ET IVDICII | FEVDALIS,
SE-|cundum Consuetudi-|nes _Mediolani_ & | _Normanniæ_. | _PRO_ |
INTRODVCTIONE | AD STVDIUM | _IVRISPRVDENTI_Æ | _Anglicanæ_. | [_line_]
| Autore R. Z. I. C. P. R. | _OXONIÆ._ | [_line._]

  Impr. 95_a_: 1634: eights 16^o: pp. [8] + 79 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _bes
  vel habebis_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) dedication to
  archbp. Laud: (5–6) “Iuventuti academicæ Iurisprudentiæ studiosæ”,
  “Dat. ex Aulâ Alban. Pridie Cal. Iunij 1634.”: (7–8) list of divisions
  of the work: 1–79, the work: (1) note of a natural continuation of the
  book, in Latin.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 511: the author was principal of St.
  Alban hall and, as the title indicates, Juris Civilis Professor
  Regius. Wood’s reference to a 1636 8^o edition of this book may be due
  to a confusion between it and the ©Elementa Jurisprudentiae© by the
  same author.


                                 1635.

1. ¬Bancroft¬, John, bp. of Oxford. ARTICLES | TO | BE ENQVIRED | OF
WITHIN THE | Dioces of OXFORD, in the | second _Visitation_ of the Right
Re-|verend Father in God Iohn | Lord Bishop of OXFORD. | HELD | In the
yeare of our LORD GOD 1635. in the | eleauenth yeare of the Raigne of
our most gra-|cious Soveraigne Lord, CHARLES, by the grace | of GOD King
of great _Brittaine_, _France_, and | _Ireland_, Defender of the Faith
&c., | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 152: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B1^r beg. 15
  _Whether hath_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A1^r, title: A2^r, the
  oath: A2^v, the charge: A3^r, directions: A3^v-B3^r, the articles, in
  three divisions: B3^v, directions about Recusants, &c.


2. ¬Carpenter¬, Nathanael. GEOGRAPHIE | DELINEATED FORTH | IN TWO |
BOOKES. | CONTAINING | The Sphericall and Topicall parts thereof, | By
NATHANAEL CARPENTER, Fellow of | Exceter Colledge in Oxford. | [_line_]
| THE SECOND EDITION CORRECTED. | [_line_, then _motto_, then
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 149: 1635: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 272 + [16] + 286 + [2] +
  4 folded leaves, see below: pp. 11 beg. _Eearth & Water_, and
  _teration next_, 111 2. _The position_, and _monstrated in_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication, as in 1625: (6–13)
  “... Contents of each Chapter of the first Booke ...”: (15–16) “To my
  Booke”, a poem: 1–272, the first book: (1–2) not seen: (3) a
  title:—GEOGRAPHIE | THE SECOND | BOOKE. | CONTAINING | the generall
  Topicall | part thereof, | By NATHANAEL CARPENTER, Fellow of | Exceter
  Colledge in Oxford. | [_line_, then _motto_, then woodcut, and Impr.
  149]”: (5–7) dedication, as in 1625: (9–16) “A table of the ...
  Contents of the second Booke ...”: 1–286, the second book: (1–2) not
  seen. There should be four tables as in the 1625 edition, and there
  are numerous woodcut diagrams in the text.

  See Wood’s ©Ath Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 422, and 1625 C. The signatures
  of the two parts are in a certain sense independent, but indicate
  essential connexion.


3. ¬Chaucer¬, Geoffrey. AMORVM | TROILI | _ET_ | CRESEIDÆ | Libri duo
priores | _Anglico-Latini_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 95 _a_: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. [28] + 105 + [8] + 160 [“159”] + [1]:
  p. 11 beg. 13. _Great rumor_, and 15. _With that they_: English Roman
  italic and Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title, within arched border:
  (3–6) dedication to Patricius Junius (Patrick Young) the King’s
  librarian, by sir Francis Kinaston: (7–8) not seen, probably blank:
  (9–12) “Candido Lectori Franciscus Kinaston ...”, dated “Ex Aulâ Albâ
  Regiâ [Whitehall] xiii Calendarum Decembris, ... CIↃ D cxxxiiii”:
  (13–28) complimentary Latin and English poems: 2–105, the first book,
  Latin on the verso of each leaf, English on the recto: (2–7)
  dedication to John Rouse, Bodley’s librarian, by Kinaston: 1–159 (“21”
  repeated after “24”), the second book.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 38. The Latin translation is in a
  singular rhythmical rhyming metre, essentially decasyllabic iambics,
  but with an extra unaccented syllable at end, and with certain
  licences in revolving a long syllable into two short. The rhymes are
  _ababbcc_. The first two lines for example are “Dolorem Troili
  duplicem narrare | Qui Priami Regis Trojæ fuit gnatus.” This appears
  to be by far the earliest translation of any part of Chaucer into
  another language. Part of a commentary on the piece by sir F. Kinaston
  was printed in 1796. The English part is in black-letter, the Latin in
  italic Roman. One of the complimentary poems is in would-be Chaucerian
  style. The collation of this book is difficult: but probably it is
  this:—signn. A, †, *^4, **^2, ( )^1, B-Z, Aa-Nn^4: †1-**^2 is matter
  foisted in, which prevented the true fourth leaf of sign. A from
  forming, as it should, the first leaf of the Latin translation (pp.
  1–2 of the 1st book). Accordingly one of two plans was adopted: either
  the 4th leaf of sign. A was torn off, and a new 4th leaf inserted
  where the translation begins (which seems to have been usually done,
  and which gives the collation above, assuming the existence at one
  time of an A4): or the torn-off fourth leaf was itself awkwardly
  pasted on to sign. 2**.


4. ¬Downe¬, John. _A_ | TREATISE | OF THE TRVE | NATVRE AND |
_DEFINITION_ | _of justifying faith_; | TOGETHER WITH A DEFENCE | of the
same, against the Answere of | _N. Baxter_. | By IOHN DOWNE B. in
Divinity, and some-|time _Fellow of_ EMANVEL _C. in Cambridge_. |
[_motto_, with translation.]

  Impr. 126: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 404: p. 11 beg. _the Prince of_,
  301 _that it was_: English Roman. Contents:—(p. 1) title: (3–16) “To
  the Reader”: 1–15, the treatise on justifying faith: 17–189, “A
  defence of the former treatise ... against the answer of N. B.”: 191,
  a title:—[two _lines_] | OF | THE FAITH | OF | INFANTS, | AND HOW THEY
  ARE | Iustified and Saued. | [_line_] | _By the late Reuerend and
  Learned Diuine_ | _Master_ Iohn Downe, _Bachelour of_ | _Diuinity, and
  sometimes Fellow_ | _of Emanuell Colledge_ | _in Cambridge._ |
  [_woodcut_, then impr. 126]: 193–210, the treatise: 211, a
  title:—[_line_] | 211 | [_line_] | NOT CONSENT | OF FATHERS | BVT |
  SCRIPTVRE | THE GROVND OF FAITH. | [_line_] | _Written by the occasion
  of a conference had_ | _with_ M. Bayly, _by the late Reuerend_ | _and
  Learned Diuine, Master_ Iohn | Downe, _Bachelour of Diuinity_, | _and
  sometimes Fellow of_ | _Emanuell Colledge_ | _in Cambridge._ |
  [_woodcut_, then impr. 126.]: 213–272, the treatise: 263–290, “Of
  sitting and kneeling at the Communion”: 291–296, “How S. Paul and S.
  Iames are to bee reconciled in the matter of Iustification”: 297–309,
  “... of the Creed ...”: 310–315, “A short Catechisme”: 316–320,
  “Peccatum formaliter & propriè non esse infinitum, exercitatio
  aduersus N.”: 321–325, “Of choice of meats and Abstinence”: 326–355,
  “An answer unto certaine reasons for Separation”: 356–365, “Of vowes
  and specially that of virginity”: 366–369, “A letter” of consolation:
  371–376, “The blessed Virgin Mary is truly Deipara, the Mother of
  God”: 377–404, religious poems and translations in verse, including a
  translation of Muretus’s Institution for Children.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 287, where London is probably
  an error for Oxford: and 1633 D. This is a new set of treatises by
  Downe. The introduction to the first piece gives an amusing account of
  the controversy with Baxter.


5. ¬Downeham¬, George. THE | ¤CHRISTIANS¤ | FREEDOME, | Wherein is fully
expressed the | Doctrine of ¤CHRISTIAN | LIBERTIE¤. | _By the R^{t.}
Reuerend Father in God_, | ¤GEORGE DOWNEHAM¤, | _Doctor of Diuinity and_
| _L^d. B^p. of Derry_. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 154: 1635: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 156 + [4] + 80, and one
  folded leaf: pp. 11 begg. _of righteousnesse_, and _In the new_, 101
  _euen by_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines:
  (3–7) “To the ... Reader ...”: 1–156, the work, in 26 sections: 1–23,
  7 additional sections: 25–76, “The necessity of handling the question
  concerning Christian Libertie”: 76–80, “A Prayer”.

  For the author see Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 255: see 1636
  D. The words underlined in the above title are in red ink, as well as
  “Oxford,” and “William Webb.” in the imprint. A folded leaf should
  follow the introductory matter containing “The Table” of the 26
  sections. The signatures show that pp. 1–24, 25–76 in the second part
  are genuine additions, but genuinely part of the book.


6. ——. THE ¤CHRISTIAN¤S FREEDOME | [&c., precisely as the preceding
article, except that “THE SECOND EDITION” is added as a new line after
“_Derry_.”]

  Impr. &c., precisely as the preceding article.

  A simple reissue of the sheets of the first edition, room for the
  additional words on the title being found by slightly depressing the
  woodcuts. Perhaps the folded “table” was not issued with the second
  edition. Some copies have the date 1636.


7. ¬Fawkner¬, Antony. THE | WIDDOWES | PETITION, | Delivered in a Sermon
before the | Iudges at the Assises held at _Northampton_, | Iuly 25.
1633. by ANTONY | FAWKNER, Parson of _Saltry_ | _All-Saints, alias
Moygne_ | in Huntingtonshire. | [_motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 150: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 28 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _demand_,
  Πρυτανεῖα: English Roman. Contents: p. (1) title: (3–5) Epistle
  dedicatory to sir Lewis Watson, dated “Saltry All-Saints ... Iuly 30.
  1633”: 1–28, the Sermon, on Luke xviii. 3.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 611. Sir L. Watson was the
  author’s patron.


8. ¬Field¬, dr. Richard. OF THE | CHURCH, | FIVE BOOKES. | [_line_] | BY
| RICHARD FIELD, DOCTOR OF | DIVINITY, AND SOMETIMES | _Deane of_
GLOCESTER. | [_line_] | _THE THIRD EDITION._ | [_line_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 68: 1635: (sixes) folio: pp. [16] + 906 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _tation of dangerous_, 701 _wrongs of the Court_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—_precisely_ as 1628 F, omitting the Errata on p. (15).

  See 1628 F, of which this appears to be a verbatim reprint.


9. ¬Hakewill¬, George. AN | APOLOGIE [&c., precisely as 1630 H, except
in l. 11 of this 3rd edition, PER-, not PER=, in l. 12 PETUALL AND
UNIVERSALL, in l. 13 SIX, not FOVRE: in l. 1 of the italic type,
_preparatives_, and the line ends with _thereunto_: in l. 7
_testimonie_, _use_, and the line ends at _which we_. After l. 8
(_consideration thereof_) follows:—] _The fifth and sixth are spent in
answering Objections made since the second impression._ | [_line_] | By
GEORGE HAKEWILL Doctour of | Divinitie and Archdeacon of _Surrey_. |
[_line_] | _The third Edition revised, and in sundry passages and whole
Sections augmented by_ | _the Authour; besides the addition of two
entire bookes not formerly published._ | [_motto._] [There is also a
London title, see below.]

  Impr. 68: 1635: (sixes) la. 8^o: pp. [52] + 606 + [10] + 378 + [42]:
  pp. 11 beg. _dan, and Scaliger_ and _dence doth worke_, 501 _of
  right_: English Roman. Contents:—(1–11), as 1630 H, except that p. (6)
  is blank: (13–22) “the preface”: (23) “An Advertisement to the Reader
  occasioned by this third impression”: (24–30) testimonies to the book
  and author: (31–45) “The contents ...”: (46–49) about sesterces: (50)
  extract from Boethius, with translation: (51) “An index of the tables
  added ...”: 1–606, the work, bks. 1–4: (3–6) controversial letters of
  bp. G(odfrey) G(oodman) and dr. Hakewill: (7–8) two encouragements to
  the author: 1–378, the works, bks. 5–6: (1–24) index to bks. 1–4:
  (25–30) index to bks. 5–6: (31–35) authors quoted: (36–42) texts
  quoted: (42) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 256, and 1627 H. The engraved
  title is identical with that of 1630 H, with the date altered. Books
  5–6 appear in this edition for the first time, the former being
  chiefly directed against bp. Goodman’s ©Fall of man© (Lond. 1616) as
  reasserted at greater length in about 1630 by the author, whose
  arguments are printed in the course of this book.


10. ¬Laurence¬, Thomas. TWO | SERMONS· | THE FIRST | PREACHED AT S^t
_MARIES_ | in OXFORD Iuly 13. 1634. | being Act-Sunday. | THE SECOND, |
IN THE CATHEDRALL | CHVRCH OF _SARVM_, AT THE | Visitation of the most
Reverend | Father in God WILLIAM | Arch-Bishop of _Canterbury_, | _May_
23. 1634. | [_line_] | By THOMAS LAVRENCE D^r of Divinity, | and late
Fellow of _Allsoules_ Colledge, | and Chaplaine to his MAIESTY | _in_
ORDINARY. | [_line._]

  Impr. 82: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 40 + 34 + [2]: pp. 11 begg.
  _condition of_, and _hast given them_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (3)
  title, within double lines: 1–34, the first sermon, on Ex. xx. 21:
  1–40, the second sermon on 1 Cor. i. 12.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 438. The signatures would
  suggest that the Sermon on 1 Cor. i. 12 was the Act-Sermon, but all
  copies seem to be bound as above, and the prefixing of the Act Sermon
  may have been an after-thought. There is nothing in the sermons
  themselves to settle the point!


11. ¬Legh¬, Edward. ¤SELECTED¤ | _AND_ | ¤CHOICE¤ | OBSERVATIONS |
concerning the | TWELVE FIRST | ¤CÆSARS¤ | EMPEROVRS of | _¤ROME¤_. |
[_line_] | ¤By EDWARD LEGH¤ Master | of Arts of _Magdalen Hall_ | in
OXFORD. | [_line._]

  Impr. 154: 1635: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [24] + 209 + [7]: p. 11 beg.
  _shew, as_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (9) title: (11–24) author’s
  Epistle dedicatory to his father Henry: 1–208, the observations: 209,
  “An aduertisement to the Reader”, not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 927, where other editions are
  mentioned, some with extended range of subject. The words underlined
  in the above title are printed in red, as well as “Oxford” and
  “William Webb.” in the imprint. The signatures of the prefatory matter
  are peculiar: as four blank leaves precede the title, these were
  neglected and the leaf following the title bears *2 instead of *6, no
  others having any printed signature.


12. ¬Montague¬, bp. Richard. ¤APPARATVS¤ | AD ORIGINES |
¤ECCLESIASTICAS¤· | COLLECTORE | [_line_] | ¤R. MONTACVTIO¤. | [_line_,
then _device_.]

  Impr. 151: 1635: (fours) la. 8^o: pp. [30] + 393 + [11]: p. 11 beg.
  _sponsum est_, 301 _vetus Anna_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within border and double lines: (3) dedication to the memory of James
  i: (5–29) “Præfatio”: 1–393, the work, in 11 Apparatuses: (1)
  “Errata”, a long list: (2–11) “Index”.

  The author, a Cambridge man, though at this time bp. of Chichester
  (1628–38), signs the dedication as “R. M. humillimus Ecclesiæ
  Cicestrensis Minister”. This work discusses pre-Christian antiquities,
  as preparations (apparatus) to the Life of Christ which is the subject
  of the same author’s ©Origines Ecclesiasticæ© (tom. i, 2 parts, Lond.
  1636, 1640). The underlined words in the above title are printed in
  red, as well as “Oxoniæ,” in the imprint. A copy was presented by the
  author to Henry Spelman on 4 Sept. 1635.


13. *†¬Oxford¬, University. ... ENCYCLOPÆDIA

 { Seu ORBIS LITERA⸗            RVM provt in florentissimâ iam et omnium
                                  planè celeberrimâ
                     [_device_]
 { ACADEMIA OXONI⸗              ENSI singulis Terminis publicè in
                                  Scholis auditoribus proponuntur

  No imprint, but Oxford (?), 1635 (?): (one) la. 4^o. Contents:—p. (1)
  the Encyclopædia.

  This is a fine sheet, engraved by “T. Cecill” on metal, 16–3/16 ×
  16–1/16 in. In the upper part there is a dedication of “hæc
  Encyclopædia et Synopsis Statutorum” to archbp. Laud. A large series
  of concentric circular spaces fill the centre, each divided into a
  left hand and right hand half:—counting from the centre (a sun), (1)
  days of the week, (2) hours of the day, (3) subjects, (4) explanation
  of the next circle, (5) List of proper audience and books for each
  lecture: (6) explanation of the next circle, (7) lists of fines for
  absent professors and absent audience: in the four corners are notes,
  one of which supplies another title for the sheet, namely “Cyclus
  Prælectorum ... ex Corpore Statutorum depromptus et delineatus ...”.
  Some copies (issued in 1638, see below) have a small printed label
  “Iovis” pasted over “Martis”, or else the plate itself altered to
  “Iovis”, in the note that Easter Term ends on the _Tuesday_ before
  Pentecost, and a longer slip pasted at the foot containing a note
  about the teaching of Arabic and Medicine.

  The chart is usually found folded and pasted in the 1638 edition of
  the abridged Statutes: but a copy in the University Archives is pasted
  _between_ the two columns of the 1635 ©Synopsis Statutorum©, which in
  combination with the dedication quoted above suggests that it was
  first issued in 1635, a natural year for it, when the interest in the
  new Code of Statutes was fresh. There is nothing to suggest that it
  was printed away from Oxford. The device in the title is a well-made
  representation of the University arms with the motto “Sapientiæ et
  felicitatis”.

  Thomas Crossfield of Queen’s certainly edited the 1638 ©Statuta
  selecta©, and may have issued the ©Synopsis© (which is in his style),
  and possibly therefore the ©Encyclopædia©. At any rate he took the
  plate of the ©Encyclopædia© and used it in 1638. It is in his own copy
  of the ©Statuta selecta© that the altered plate is found (see above);
  and the note about Arabic and Medicine is there in his own handwriting
  preceded by a ☛, just as in the printed slip.


14. ——. _SYNOPSIS SEV EPITOME STATVTORVM_, | _Eorum præsertim, quæ
Iuventuti Academ._ Oxon: _maximè_ | _expedit pro Doctrinâ & Moribus
habere cognita._ |

  Impr. 153: 1635: (one) folio: pp [2]: 2nd col. beg. _Tempus ad
  Gradus_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) the Synopsis, in two
  columns.

  These are extracts from the newly printed Corpus Statutorum, for the
  use of junior members of the University, but the fuller edition in
  book form first issued in 1638 (which see,) was taken as the model for
  all succeeding issues. The title heads the first column, and the
  colophon ends the 2nd. See the preceding article, for possible
  authorship.


Persius. The statement by Wood (©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 523) that
there is a 1635 _Oxford_ edition of Barten Holyday’s translation of
Persius, which deceived Brüggemann, is erroneous: the edition referred
to was printed at London.


15. ¬Rives¬, John, archdeacon of Berks. ARTICLES | MINISTRED IN | THE
FIRST VISITA-|tion of the right worshipfull M^r | IOHN RIVES Batchelour
of Law | Arch-deacon of the Arch-dea-|conry of _Berks_, in the yeare |
of our Lord God | 1635. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 152 _a_: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 18 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _Parishioners in_: Pica English. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) the oath:
  (4) the charge: 1–18, the 77 articles: 18, a direction: (1–2) not
  seen.


16. ¬Rouse¬, John. APPENDIX | AD | CATALOGVM | LIBRORVM IN | BIBLIOTHECA
| BODLEIANA, | QVI PRODIIT | Anno Domini 1620. | [_line_] | EDITIO
SECVNDA | [_line_] | Recognita, & Authoribus plus minus CIↃCIↃCIↃ
locupletata. | [_device._]

  Impr. 73: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 208: p. 11 beg. _App. Appianus
  Alexand._: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4)
  “Bibliothecarius lectori”: 1–208, the work.

  See 1620 J. This is Rouse’s new edition of the little Appendix to the
  1620 edition of the Catalogue. The MSS. are still mixed with the
  printed books. The preface shows that Verneuil’s book, see below in
  this year, could be regarded as a part of this work, though formally
  distinct. Rouse’s name does not occur, but is necessarily inferred
  from the preface.


17. [¬Verneuil¬, John]. CATALOGVS | INTERPRETVM | S. SCRIPTVRÆ, | IVXTA
NVMERORVM ORDINEM, | QVO EXTANT IN | BIBLIOTHECA | BODLEIANA_:_ | OLIM A
D. IAMESIO | _Jn vsum Theologorum concinnatus, nunc verò_ | _alterâ ferè
parte auctior redditus_. | Accessit elenchus Authorum, tam recentium
quam Antiquorum, qui | in quatuor libros Sententiarum & _Th. Aquinatis_
Summas, Item | in Euangelia Dominicalia totius anni, & de Casibus |
conscientiæ; nec non in Orationem Domi-|nicam, Symbolum Apostolorum, | &
Decalogum scripserunt. | _Editio correcta, diu multùmq; desiderata._ |
[_device._] |

  Impr. 73: 1635: sm. 4^o: pp. 55 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Rab. Maurus_: Long
  Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 3, title: 4, a preface: 5–55, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 222. This is an anonymous and
  much enlarged edition of pp. 163–179 of James’s Bodleian Catalogue
  (Oxf. 1605): made by John Verneuil sublibrarian. The preface mentions
  a pirated edition of this book, made without the knowledge of the
  authorities of the Library, but no copy seems to be known. See
  _Rouse_, above in this year.


18. ¬Wake¬, Isaac. REX | _PLATONICVS:_ | SIVE, | DE POTENTISSIMI |
PRINCIPIS | IACOBI | BRITANNIARVM REGIS, | ad Illustrissimam Academiam |
Oxoniensem, aduentu, | Aug. 27. Anno | M.DC.V. | _NARRATIO_ | _Ab_
ISAACO WAKE _Publico_ | _Academiæ ejusdem Oratore, tunc_ | _temporis
conscripta, nunc ite-_|_rum in lucem edita, mul-_|_tis in locis auctior
&_ | _emendatior._ | EDITIO QVINTA. | [_line._]

  Impr. 151: 1635: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 239 + [17]: p. 11 beg.
  _tur. Ipsoque_, 201 _sed istæ_: Long Primer Roman. Contents—p. (1)
  title: (3–7) dedication as in 1st edition: 1–236, the work: 237–239,
  the Chancellor’s letter with preface: (2) title:—ORATIO | FVNEBRIS |
  HABITA IN | Templo Beatæ | M_ariæ Oxon._ | Ab ISAACO WAKE, | Publico
  Academiæ Ora[/]|_tore; Maij_ 25. _An._ 1607. | quum mœsti Oxonienses,
  | piis manibus IOHANNIS | RAINOLDI _parentarent_. | [_woodcut_, then
  Impr. 151.]: (4–16) the oration.

  See 1607 W. This appears to be a reprint of the 4th edition.


                                 1636.

1. ¬Articles.¬ ARTICVLI | DE QVIBVS CONVENIT INTER | ARCHIEPISCOPOS, |
ET | EPISCOPOS VTRIVSQVE PROVINCIÆ, ET | Clerum vniversum in Synodo,
Londini. An. | 1562. secundum computationem Ecclesiæ | Anglicanæ, ad
tollendam opinionum dissentio-|_nem, & consensum in vera Reli-_|_gione
firmandum._ | _Æditi authoritate serenissimæ_ REGINÆ. | ITEM | Liber
quorundam Canonum | DISCIPLINÆ ECCLESIÆ | ANGLICANÆ. ANNO 1571. | 3. De
Episcopis. | 5. De Decanis Ecclesiarum. | 8. De Archi-diaconis. | 9. De
Cancellariis. &c. | 14 De Ædituis Ecclesiarum. | 19. De Concionatoribus.
| 20. De Residentia. | 21. De Pluralitatibus. | 21. De Ludimagistris. |
22. De Patronis. &c. [the last five lines are printed in a parallel line
with the first five, a line separating the two columns] | [_woodcuts_
between two _lines_.]

  Impr. 151: 1636: sm. 4^o: pp. 24 + 23 + [1]: pp. 11 begg. _De
  prædestinatione_, and _gendis sacris_: English Roman. Contents:—p. 1,
  title: 3–24, the Articles: 24, “Confirmatio Articulorum”: 1,
  half-title: 2, list of Canons: 3–23, the Canons: (1) “¶ Forma
  sententiæ excommunicationis.”


2. ¬Barclay¬, John. IOANNIS | BARCLAII | POEMATVM | LIBRI DVO. |
[_line_] | _Editio postrema aucta._ | [_line_, then _device_.]

  Impr. 153: 1636: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [14] + 100 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _Fregit, & Auroræ_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within
  double lines: (3–6) dedication to prince (afterwards king) Charles,
  from the 1615 ed.: (7–12) a Latin poem in Charles’s honour, _beg._
  “Fama per attonitas”: 1–33, the poems, bk. 1: 34, “Ad benevolum
  Lectorem”: 35, a title:—“IOANNIS | BARCLAII | POEMATVM | LIBER II. |
  [_two lines_, then _woodcut_, then _two lines_]”, with impr. 87_a_:
  37–66, the poems, bk. 2: 67–97 “Tumulus ... Gustavi Adolphi ...” a
  poem, by C. B.: 98–100, five short Latin poems, signed at end “H. G.”

  This appears to be a reprint of the 1615 (London) edition, with the
  addition of the poem on pp. 64–100. The signatures indicate that pp.
  67-end are an addition to the original book, but a catchword on p. 66
  shows that the two parts are not independent. Only these two
  (separate) editions of Barclay’s Poems were published: the author died
  in 1621.


3. ¬Bushell¬, Thomas. THE | SEVERALL | SPEECHES AND | Songs, at the
presentment of | M^r BVSHELLS ROCK | TO THE | QVEENES | Most Excellent
Majesty. | _Aug._ 23. 1636. | HER HIGHNESSE | being Gratiously Pleased
to | Honour the said ROCK, not | only with HER | ROYALL _Presence_; |
BVT | COMMANDED THE SAME | to be called after her owne | _Princely name_
| HENRETTA. | [_line._]

  Impr. 152: 1636: sm. 4^o: pp. [12], signn. A^4, B^2: sign. B1^2 beg.
  _And returne_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r, title, within double
  lines and woodcuts: A2^r-B2^r, the speeches and songs.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 1010, where will be
  found an interesting account of Bushell’s discovery of a peculiar rock
  at Enstone near Oxford, and of the ceremonies with which it was
  presented to the Queen. The speeches and songs, presented by a hermit,
  the author himself, Echo, &c., were set to music by Simon Ive (see
  sign. B2^r).


4. ¬Carpenter¬, Nathanael. PHILOSOPHIA | LIBERA, | [&c., exactly as 1622
C, omitting a comma in ll. 5, 7, and with “nova”, “Carpentario”,
“Collegii”, and “| Editio tertia, correctior |”]

  Impr. 159: 1636: [&c., precisely as 1622 C, except that the first leaf
  and the last two leaves have not been seen, p. 111 beg. _substantiali.
  At nullam_, and the title is within a line.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 421, and 1622 C, of which this
  is an almost exact reprint. Some copies bear the date 1637.


Downeham, George. See 1635 D.


5. ¬Felix¬, Marcus Minucius. M. MINVCII | FELICIS | OCTAVIVS. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 69: 1636: (twelves) 24^o: pp. [8] + 129 + [7]: p. 11 beg. _bere,
  quàm_, 111 _dicimus, non_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title within
  two bounding lines, [&c. precisely as 1631 F.]

  See 1627 F: this seems to be a reprint of 1631 F.


6. ——. MINVCIVS | FELIX | His dialogne called | _OCTAVIVS_. | Containing
a defence | of Christian | _religion_. | Translated by | RICHARD IAMES |
of C.C.C. OXON. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 155: 1636: twelves 24^o: pp. [8] + 165 + [19]: p. 11 beg. _to
  heare both_, 111 _reputed Gods_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–6) epistle dedicatory to lady Cotton: (7–8) “To the Reader”: 1–165,
  the work: (2–12) three religious poems, “A Good Friday thought”, “A
  Christmasse Caroll” (_beg._ “Since now the jolly season’s by”), “A
  Hymn on Christs ascension”.

  Scarce. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 630.


7. ¬Fitz-Geffry¬, Charles. THE BLESSED | BIRTH-DAY, | CELEBRATED IN |
some religious meditations | on the Angels Anthem. | LUC. 2. 14. | ALSO
HOLY | TRANSPORTATIONS | in contemplating some of the | most obserueable
adiuncts about | _our Saviours Nativity_. |

 Extracted for the most          { Sacred Scriptures, }
   part out of the               { Ancient Fathers,   } And some moderne
                                 { Christian Poets.   }

Approved Authors. | [_line_] | By CHARLES FITZ-GEFFRY. | [_line_] | The
second Edition with Additions. |

  Impr. 156: 1636: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 80: p. 11 beg. _If he in
  time_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, (3–5) “To the Devote
  Author ...” a poem signed “Hen. Beesely _A.M. A.A._”: (7)
  Complimentary poem to the author by Steph. Haxby of Cambridge: 1–47,
  the Blessed Birthday, a poem: 48 “Votum Authoris ad Iesum ...”: 49–80,
  the Transportations, 16 poems.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 607. This is a reprint of the
  first edition, see 1634 F, with some additions and the omission of the
  poem before the second part. It is this second issue which Dr. Grosart
  reprinted in 1881 in Fitz-Geffrey’s ©Poems©.


8. ¬Florus¬, Lucius Annaeus. THE | ROMAN | Histories of LUCI=|US IULIUS
FLORUS | _from the foundation_ | _of_ ROME, _till Cæsar_ | AUGUSTUS,
_for aboue_ | DCC. _yeares, & from then_⸗|_ce to_ TRAIAN _near_ CC. |
_yeares, divided by_ Flor’ | _into_ IV _ages._ | _Translated into_ |
ENGLISH |

  Impr. 161: 1636: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [26] + 336: p. 11 beg. _wore,
  being_, 301 _more luckie_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1–2) not seen: (3)
  engraved title, inserted: (5–10) Epistle dedicatory to George marquis
  of Buckingham, signed “Philanactophil”: (11–19), “To the Reader”:
  (20–24) “The preface of Lucius Florus”: (25–26) not seen: 1–336, the
  Histories: 336 “The end of the foure Bookes of the Roman Histories ...
  translated into English by E.M.B. Soli Deo gloria”.

  The translator of this work, which first appeared in English at London
  in 1618, was Edmund (Maria) Bolton. The present edition was printed in
  London but published at Oxford, and the title is the engraved one of
  1618, by Simon Pass, displaying in the upper centre a Roman, in the
  lower centre the title, an eagle at top, and symbols and letterpress
  about, and altered in the imprint only. The collation assumes that a
  sheet of ten leaves could not be printed and that a blank leaf is
  needed before and after the prefatory matter: the title is on an
  inserted leaf. This edition was issued after the translator’s death,
  and seems not to be entered in the London Stationers Company’s
  Registers.


9. ¬Grotius¬, Hugo. DEFENSIO | ¤FIDEI CATHOLICƤ | DE | SATISFACTIONE |
¤CHRISTI,¤ | _Adversus_ | ¤FAVSTVM SOCINVM¤ | Senensem: | _Scripta ab_ |
¤HVGONE GROTIO¤. | [_line_] | ¤_Cum_ Gerardi Iohannis Vossii¤ | _ad
judicium_ Hermanni RA-|venspergeri _de hoc_ | LIBRO. | RESPONSIONE. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 153: 1636: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [12] + 256 + [40] + 136: pp. 11
  begg _Cruciatus_, and _hæc nostra_, 111 _Cap. vi_, and _tur. Paulus_:
  Pica and (2nd part) Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–10)
  “Veritatis evangelicæ studiosis ...”, dated “_Lug. Batav._ in Collegio
  Theolog. Ill. DD. Ord. _Holl_ & _Westf._ 8. _Kal. Sept._ An. Chri. CIↃ
  IↃ cxviı. Ger. Ioannides Vossius, _Coll. Regens_”: (11–12) “Lectori”
  by the unnamed editor: 1–219, the Defensio: 220–256 Testimonia
  veterum: (1–16) an index in order of contents: (17) a bastard title to
  the second part, with impr. 87 _a_, and date: (19–35) “Præfatio”,
  signed “Ger. Ioannides Vossiun ...”: (37–40) “Lectori” by the editor:
  1–136, the Responsio.

  The two previous editions of Grotius’s work were issued at Leyden in
  1617, while Vossius’s ©Responsio© was published at the same place in
  1618. Words underlined in the above title are in red ink, as are also
  “Oxoniæ,” and “MDCXXXVI” in the imprint. N is omitted in the series of
  signatures.


10. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. ΜΙΚΡΟΚΟΣΜΟΣ_:_ | A | LITTLE | DESCRIPTION | OF THE
GREAT | WORLD. | _The seventh Edition._ | [_line_] | By PETER HEYLYN. |
[_line, motto, woodcut._]

  Impr. 158: 1636: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [20] + 808 + [4]: p. 11 beg.
  1. _First then_, 701 _dates, or Vindelici_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—(precisely as 1633 H, except that the title is within
  double lines, instead of an arched border, and that every leaf has
  been seen.)

  See 1621 H. This is a reprint, almost line for line, of 1633 H. The
  copy seen had a folded table of climes as in the 1625 edition, after
  p. 228.


11. [¬Lily¬, William]. A | Short Introduction | OF | GRAMMAR | GENERALLY
| TO BE USED_:_ | _Compiled and set forth for the bring-_|ing up of all
those that intend to at-|taine to the knowledge of the | _Latine
tongue_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 68 _d_: 1636: (eights) 12^o: pp. [74] + 130 + [36]: p. 11 beg.
  _comprehenderunt_, 111 _Sic Ovid_: Long Primer Roman and English.
  Contents:—p. (1), title: (2) royal arms, with “C.R.”: (3–8) “¶ To the
  Reader, &c.”: (9) about letters: (10) two prayers: (11–70) a Latin
  grammar in English: (71–2) Latin poem by Will. Lily: (73) a title
  within a line and border:—“Brevissima | institutio, | _Seu_ | Ratio
  Grammatices | cognoscendæ, ad omni-|um puerorum utilita-|tem
  præscripta: _Quam solam Regia Majestas_ | _in omnibus Scholis
  do-_|_cendam præcipit_. | [_line, woodcut, line_]”, with impr. 72 _c_:
  (74) arms of the University, &c.: 1–130, a Latin grammar, syntax and
  prosody, in Latin: (1–30) “Omnium nominum ... ac verborum
  interpretatio ...”: (31–3) four Latin poems, including graces: (34)
  woodcut picture of the tree of knowledge, and students gathering the
  fruit.

  This is the first Latin grammar printed at Oxford since 1518, and is
  issued “Cum Privilegio.” The grammar itself was already, in its Latin
  form, more than a hundred years old, and many editions of it had been
  printed. Other Oxford editions were issued at least in 1651, 1672–3,
  1675, 1679, 1687, 1692, 1699, 1709, 1714, 1733. For William Lily see
  Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 32. The signatures connect the two
  parts of the book.

  The importance of this issue is considerable. In consequence of
  disputes between John Lichfield and Turner, archbp. Laud’s attention
  had been called to the state of printing at Oxford, and the absence of
  any such printing privileges as were possessed by Cambridge. A charter
  of privileges was accordingly obtained, dated 12 Nov. 1632, confirmed
  and amplified by another dated 13 March 1632/3. These allowed the
  University to print Bibles, Prayerbooks, Grammars, Almanacs, &c.,
  which had till then been the monopolies of the London Stationers’
  Company and the University Press at Cambridge. No Bibles or
  Prayerbooks were issued at Oxford till 1675, but this Grammar and
  three Almanacs (see 1637 B, C, and W.) raised the standard of revolt
  against monopoly. On 20 March 1636/7 the Stationers’ Company agreed to
  pay the University £200 a year, if it would agree not to issue the
  classes of books in question, and no further difficulties arose till
  after the Restoration.


12. ¬Longinus¬, Dionysius. ΔΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΥ | ΛΟΓΓΙΝΟΥ | ΡΗΤΟΡΟΣ ΠΕΡΙ | ὕψους
λόγου βιβλίον | DIONYSII LONGINI | Rhetoris | _Præstantissimi_ | Liber |
_De grandiloquentia sive_ | _sublimi dicendi genere_ | Latine redditus |
ὑποθέσεσι συνοπτικαῖς | _et ad oram notationibus_ | _aliquot
illustratus_ | [_line_] | _Edendum curavit et notarum_ | _insuper
auctarium adjunxit. G._ L. | [_line._]

  Impr. 112_a_: 1636: (eights) 12^o: pp. [42] + 176 + [2] + 117 + [1]
  and one folded plate: pp. 11 beg. ἐκ τοῦ φοβεροῦ, and _qui Geometriæ_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) engraved title, see below: (5–10)
  “Iuventuti Academicæ”, signed “Gerardus Langbaine”, the editor:
  (11–24) complimentary Latin pieces by Gabriel de Petra, the author of
  the Latin translation and notes, 1610, and others: (24–42) three Latin
  prefatory pieces, about Longinus: a folded oblong 16mo sheet bearing a
  Diagramma or synopsis of the subject: 1, extract from Suidas about
  Longinus: 2–161, the treatise in Greek and (on the verso of each leaf)
  Latin, with marginal notes: 162–176, (1–2) Συνόψεις, further notes:
  1–117, (1) “Notarum auctarium” with a critical preface, and (on p. 20)
  an engraving: ending with a Latin poem on the death of Thomas
  “Wethereld” (Wetherell) of Queen’s college Oxford.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 446, and 1638 L. The first
  part of this volume to the end of the Συνόψεις except Langbaine’s
  preface, is a reprint of the 1612 (Geneva) edition by Gabriel de
  Petra: the notes are Langbaine’s first published work. The engraved
  title by William Marshall is from a metal plate, displaying Hermes, an
  eagle, Phaethon, &c., round the title: and is an inserted leaf.
  Signatures O and P are run into one. The date on the title appears to
  be that of the engraving, but as it was altered in the 2nd edition,
  though the plate is practically identical, it may be taken as the date
  of the book also.


13. ¬Masque.¬ THE | KING | _AND_ | QVEENES | Entertainement at |
_RICHMOND_. | AFTER | THEIR DEPARTVRE | from OXFORD: In a Masque, |
presented by the most Illustrious | PRINCE, | _PRINCE_ | CHARLES | Sept.
12. 1636. | [_motto_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 152: 1636: sm. 4^o: pp. 31 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Tom. Vellow_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title, within a border of woodcuts
  between lines: 3, dedication to the queen: 5–30, the masque.

  Rare. The introduction explains that the Masque was almost impromptu
  as concerns the speaking, the dances in which Prince Charles took a
  share being the important part. They were composed by Simon Hopper and
  the music by Charles Coleman. Most of the written part is in the
  Wiltshire dialect “because most of the interlocutors were _Wilshire_
  men.”


14. ¬Oxford¬ University. CORONAE | CAROLINÆ | QVADRATVRA. | SIVE |
PERPETRANDI | _IMPERII_ | CAROLINI | EX QVARTO PIGNORE | _FELICITER
SVSCEPTO_ | _Captatum Augurium_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 151 _a_: 1636: sm. 4^o: pp. [92], signn. a, aa^4, aaa^2, aaaa,
  a-d^4, e^2, A-C^4, D^2, and a folded leaf: sign. b1^r beg. _Diva
  paris_, B1^r _From the wombs_: English Roman. Contents:—sign. a1^r,
  title: a2^r-e2^v, Latin poems: A1^r-D1^v, English poems to the queen:
  D2^r “The Printers vote”, an English poem by Leonard Lichfield.

  Poems by members of the University of Oxford on the birth of Princess
  Elizabeth, 28 Dec. 1635: in number about 142, of which 31 are English,
  8 Greek, 2 Hebrew and 1 French. The number of English, and their
  separation from the rest is a mark of change. Most copies want the
  folded sheet (about 11 × 6 in.), which contains an engraved picture of
  a crown on a board supported at the four corners by a prince, two
  princesses and an infant in a cradle, all upon a large pedestal.
  Beneath are six Latin verses, beginning “Quam stabilis Quadrata,” and
  then “Ita augustissimo Domino suo vovet humillima ancilla Acad. Oxon.”
  Curiously the engraving cannot possibly be correct, since the place of
  prince James is taken by a female figure! Perhaps for this reason the
  plate was soon suppressed: it is certainly now very rarely found.


15. ——. FLOS | BRITANNICVS | VERIS NOVISSIMI | FILIOLA | CAROLO & MARJÆ
| NATA | XVII MARTII Anno. | M.DC.XXXVI. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 151_b_: 1636: sm. 4^o: pp. [100], see below: p. (11) beg. _Non
  habeo_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a border of
  woodcuts: (3–100) the poems.

  These are poems by members of the University of Oxford to celebrate
  the birth of the princess Anne, born 17 Mar. 1636/7 (died Dec. 1640).
  About two-thirds of the verses are to the king, chiefly in Latin (nine
  in Greek, one in Hebrew), the rest to the queen in English (two in
  French): there is one chronogram. The make-up of ordinary copies of
  the volume is extraordinary: there are no pages or signatures, but if
  A-O represent the sections the collation would be as follows, the
  figures in brackets indicating the mark affixed to the first page of
  some sections in the place where the pagination would naturally have
  been printed:—A^1, B^4, C^4 (1), D^4 (2), E^4 (3), F^4 (4), G^4 (6),
  H^4 (66: on 2nd leaf, 8). I^4 (5), K^1, L^4 (2), M^4, N^4 (1), O^4
  (3)! The last page contains a poem by the printer, Leonard Lichfield.
  I have seen a copy in which a leaf following the title bore a printed
  Latin poem beginning “Quæ Te Mascula” referring to an emblem in
  diamond form displaying three lilies and two small and one large lion;
  which emblem occurs in a pen-and-ink drawing in the above copy on an
  inserted leaf preceding the title.


16. ¬Parsons¬, Bartholomew. A | SERMON | PREACHED | AT | THE FVNERALL OF
| S^r FRANCIS PILE Baronet, at | _Collingborne Kingstone_ in the |
County of _Wiltes_, on the 8. day of | _December_. 1635. | BY |
BARTHOLOMEW PARSONS | _B.D._ and _Vicar_ there. | [two _mottos_, then
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 154: 1636: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 39 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _there is a_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) dedication to sir Francis
  Pile, “From Ludgershall. Dec. 17. 1635”: 1–39, the sermon, on Is.
  lvii. 1–2.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 26. The dedication to the son
  shows that Parsons had known the father for 20 years.


17. ¬Pinke¬, William. THE TRIALL OF | A | CHRISTIANS | SINCERE .LOVE |
_VNTO CHRIST_. | By M^r WILLIAM PINKE, | M^r of Arts late Fellow of |
Magdalen Colledge | in OXFORD. | [_motto_, then _line_] | THE THIRD
EDITION. | [_line_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 160: 1636: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [16] + 54 + 127 + [1] + 62 + [4]:
  pp. 11 beg. _lat._ 3. 13, and _shrewd grudgings_, and _vnto you what_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (14) title: 3–11 Epistle dedicatory to lord
  Digby, dated “Shirburn. Iul. 7. 1630”, by the editor William Lyford:
  (12–16) “To the reader” by W. Lyford: 1–54, sermon on 1 Cor. xvi. 22:
  1–66, 67–127, two sermons on Eph. vi. 24: (1), 1–62, (1), sermon on
  Luke xiv. 26.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 475, and 1630 P.


18. ¬Prideaux¬, John. “©Twenty Sermons.© Oxon 1636 qu.” [Bodl. 4to. P.
50. Th.]

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 268. There may have been a
  collected edition with some such title issued in 1636: but probably
  Wood refers to a collection without a general title, as contained in
  40^o P. 50 Th. (a reference added however to Wood’s ©Athenæ© by dr.
  Bliss). For a real titlepage to the collection of twenty sermons and
  for details of the separate sermons, all of which are dated 1636, see
  1637 P.


19. ¬Wouwerus¬, Joannes. IOANNIS WOuWERI | DIES ÆSTIVA, | SIVE | DE
VMBRA | PÆGNION. | Unà cum | LANI DOuSÆ F. _in ean-_|_dem Declamatione_.
| [_line_] | _Editio postrema castigatior_, | _& adjectionibus in fine_
| _locupletior._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 153_a_: 1636: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [24] + 156 + [24]: p. 11 beg.
  _interpositionem_, 111 _riosos interemit_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title, within double lines: (3–12) dedication to Hieronymus
  Voeglerus, dated “Ex arce Gottorpiana V. Kal. Augusti CIↃ IↃ CX. T.
  Ioan. VVouwerus”: (13–23) “... Prolegomena”: 24 “Errata”: 1–124, the
  work in 28 chapters: 124–154, Dousa’s Declamatio: 154–156, Dousa’s “In
  eandem rem Carmen”: (1–4) “Index auctorum”: (5–22) “Rerum memorabilium
  Index.”

  This appears to be a reprint of the first (1610) edition omitting the
  Elenchus Capitum and adding Dousa’s Essay. The work is a fanciful
  treatment of the subject of shadow.


20. ¬Zouche¬, Richard. ELEMENTA | IVRISPRVDENTIÆ | DEFINITIONIBVS, |
Regulis, & sententiis selectioribus | _Iuris Civilis illustrata._ |
_Quibus accessit_ | DESCRIPTIO | IVRIS & IVDICII | TEMPORALIS | Secundum
Consuetudines | _Feudales & Normannicas_. | _Nec non_ | DESCRIPTIO |
IVRIS & IVDICII | ECCLESIASTICI | SECVNDVM CANONES | & Constitutiones
Anglicanas. | [_line_] | Autore R.Z. P.R. _Oxoniæ_. |[_line._]

  Impr. 157: 1636: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 145 + [7] + 51 + [7] + 60 + [2]:
  pp. 11 beg. _pars secunda, pars secunda_, and _riæ ex fructibus_: Pica
  Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines separated by
  woodcuts: (3–4) dedication to archbp. Laud, signed “Ric. Zouchæus”:
  (5–7) “Iuventuti iurisprudentiæ studiosæ”, dated “ex Aulâ Alban.
  Pridie Calend. Aug. 1636”: (9–12) list of parts and sections of the
  book: 1–145 the work: (2) a title, within lines:—“DESCRIPTIO | IVRIS &
  IVDICII | TEMPORALIS | SECVNDVM CON-|SVETUDINES FEV-|_DALES ET_ |
  _Normannicas_”. | [_line_, _device_, _line_, and impr. 157]: (4–6)
  list of parts &c.: 1–51, the work: (2) a title, within
  lines:—DESCRIPTIO | _JVRIS_ & _JVDICII_ | ECCLESIASTICI | SECVNDVM
  CANONES | _& CONSTITUTIONES_ | _Anglicanas_. [_line_, _device_,
  _line_, and impr. 157]: (4–7) list of parts, &c.: 1–60, the work: (1)
  note of parts still wanting to the complete treatise, and “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 511. This is a reissue and
  enlargement of 1629 Z and 1634 Z, carrying the scheme further: it was
  completed in 1640 and 1650, and several parts have been reprinted. The
  signatures weld the three parts of the present volume into one.


⁂ The Almanacs by Booker and Wyberd, which bear 1637 on the titlepage,
and are treated under that year, may have been issued late in 1636.


                                 1637.

1. ¬Barlow¬, bp. Thomas. _PIETAS IN PATREM_, | OR | A FEW TEARES VPON |
THE LAMENTED DEATH OF | HIS MOST DEARE, AND LOVING | Father RICHARD
BARLOW, late of | _Langill_ in _VVestmooreland_, who dyed | _December_
29 Ann. 1636. | [_line_] | _By_ THOMAS BARLOW _Master of Arts_, |
_Fellow of_ Queenes Coll. _in_ Oxon: _and_ | _eldest sonne of his
deceased father_. | [_line, motto, woodcut._]

  Impr. 119: 1637: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 16 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _To the sad_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) Τοῦ Παλλαδᾶ εἰς Θάνατον, a
  four-line Greek epigram, beg. Σῶμα πάθος ψυχῆς: 1–16, English poems,
  five by T. Barlow, seven by relations and friends.

  Rare. Barlow’s second poem describes his dream of his father’s death
  at the very time of its occurrence, though he did not know of the
  illness. The impression was strong enough to wake him.


2. ¬Bense¬, Petrus. ANALOGO-DIAPHORA, | SEu | Concordantia Discrepans, |
& Discrepantia Concordans | trium Linguarum, | _Gallicæ, Italicæ, &
Hispanicæ_. | Unde innotescat, quantum quæque à _Romanæ_ lin-|guæ, unde
ortum duxere, idiomate deflexerit; | earum quoque ratio & natura
dilucidè & suc-|cinctè delineantur. | [_line_] | Operâ & studio | PETRI
BENSE _Parisini_ apud | OXON: _has linguas profitentis_. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 98: 1637: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 72: p. 11 beg.
  _quibuscumque_: Pica Roman. Contents:—pp. (1–2) not seen: (3) title:
  (5–8) dedication to the University of Oxford: 1–72, the work.

See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 624. This is not a formal
grammar, but rather a discussion of the resemblances and differences of
the languages treated in points of grammar and syntax.


3. ¬Booker¬, John. ¤ALMANACK¤: | _Sivè_ | ¤Prognosticon Astrologicum¤, |
& Diarium Meteorologicum, | _Vel_ | Spec¤ulum Anni¤ | _M. DC. XXXVII._ |
[_line_] | ¤_Being the first after leap yeare_¤. | [_line_] | Calculated
for the Meridian of the | ¤Honourable Citie of London.¤ | [_line_] |
¤_Autore_ Johanne Bookero _Astroph._¤ | [_line, motto, line._]

  Impr. 171: 1637: (eights) 16^o: pp. (48), signn. A-C^8: sign. B1^r
  beg. _Saturne doth_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r title,
  within border: A1^v-A4^r, preliminary notes: A4^v-B8^r, the Almanac:
  B8^v-C8^v, astrological notes and prognostications, with a chronogram.

  John Booker was a prolific Almanac maker: his ©Almanac and
  Prognostication© was issued from 1631 to 1649: his ©Celestial
  Observations© from 1651 to 1662, and the ©Telescopium© from 1659 to
  1676, but the dates may be capable of extension, and as Booker died in
  1667, the ©Telescopium© must have been carried on by a successor under
  his name. Only this one issue was printed at Oxford, since the
  Stationers’ Company bought out the University’s right of printing this
  and certain other kinds of book in March 1636/7, see 1636 L, and
  _Booker_, _Wyberd_ below. The underlined words in the title are
  printed in red, as well as much of the woodcut border (which bears the
  signs of the zodiac, the royal arms, and an open book), the words
  “Oxford,” “to the famous Universitie. 1637.” in the imprint, and many
  words in the text. The same astrological woodcut occurs as in the
  Wyberd, but in a more injured state, showing that Wyberd had
  precedence in point of date. Booker’s Almanac for 1636 was printed at
  Cambridge.


4. ¬Brerewood¬, Edward. TRACTATVS | QVIDAM LOGICI | DE |
_PRÆDICABILIBVS_, | ET | PRÆDICAMENTIS | _Ab eruditissimo_ EDVARDO
BREREWOOD, | Artium Magistro, è Collegio _Ænei-Nasi_, olim | conscripti:
nunc verò ab erroribus (qui frequenti | transcriptione irrepserant)
vindicati, ad pristinum nito-|rem, nativámque puritatem diligentissimâ
manu-|scriptorum collatione restituti, & in lucem editi: | _Per_ T. S.
_Art. Mag. & Collegij_ Ænei-Nasi _Socium . Editio tertia_, | In quâ
accesserunt duo ejusdem Authoris insignes | _Tractatus_; prior de
_Meteoris_, posterior de | _Oculo:_ limâ, lucéque donati: | _Per eundem_
T. S. | [_line, motto, woodcut._]

  Impr. 162: 1637: (eights) 12^o: pp. [32] + folded sheet + 431 + [5] +
  105 + [3] + 26: pp. 11 begg. _Sol. Prædicabilia_, and _Sect._ 11. _In
  qua_ and 2. _In quo devehuntur_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—[exactly
  as 1631 B to p. 431, except “ê” for “e”, “Cal.” for “Calend.”: then:—]
  p. (2) a title:—“TRACTATVS DVO, | _Quorum primus est_ | DE METEORIS. |
  _Secundus_, DE OCVLO. | Quos scripsit olim eximius ille philosophus |
  EDVARDuS BREREWOODuS: | _Restituit tandem, ab erroribus mendisque_ |
  _vindicavit, & publici juris fecit_ | T.S. | Art. Mag. & Colleg.
  _Ænea=Nasensis_ | Socius | [_woodcut_] |” with impr. 109, but no name
  of place: (4) dedication as 1631 B: 1–83, De Meteoris: 84–105, De
  Mari: (1–2) woodcut diagrams of the eye: (3) Index: 1–26, De Oculo.

  See 1628 B, 1631 B (of which this is a reprint), Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©,
  ed. Bliss, ii. 140. The signatures connect the two divisions of this
  work.


5. ¬Burgersdicius¬, Francon. IDEA | PHILOSOPHIÆ | TuM | MORALIS, | TuM |
NATURALIS: | SIVE | EPITOME COMPENDIOSA | utriusque ex _Aristotele_
excerpta, | _& methodicè disposita_: | _A_ | M. FRANC. BuRGERSDICIO in |
Academia _Lugduno-Batavâ_, Logices & | Ethices Professore ordinario. |
_Editio quarta prioribus castigatior._ | [_line._] |

  Impr. 121: 1637: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [4] + 332 + [6] + 101 + [1]: pp.
  11 beg. _strictiore quâdam_ and 2. _Natura est_, 211 _rem quærunt_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Index Capitum & titulorum
  ...” to the Idea Phil. Mor.: 1–332, the Idea Philosophiae Moralis: (1)
  title:—“FRANCONIS BuRGERSDICI | IDEA | PHILOSOPHIÆ | NATVRALIS: | SIVE
  | Methodus definitionum & con[/]|troversiarum Physicarum. | _Editio
  postrema._” [_woodcut_, then Impr. 121]: (3–4) “Philosophiæ
  Studiosis”, signed “Franco Burgersdicius”: (5–6) “Tituli et Ordo
  disputationum”: 1–101, the Idea Philosophiae Naturalis.

  See 1631 B, of which this is almost a reprint, the order of the two
  parts being reversed.


6. ¬Buridanus¬, Johannes. IOHANNIS | BVRIDANI | PHILOSOPHI | TRECENTIS
RETRO | annis celeberrimi | QVÆSTIONES IN | DECEM LIBROS | _ETHICORVM_ |
ARISTOTELIS | AD NICOMACHVM. | [_device._]

  Impr. 168: 1637: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 889 + [1]: p. 13 beg.
  _ad ea quæ_, 701 _alii prodesse_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within double lines: (3–11) “Index quæstionum”: (12)
  “Typographus ad Lectores” and “Errata”: 1–889, the work in four books:
  889, impr. 151.

  This is perhaps the last separate edition of this work. Buridan, who
  lived in the fourteenth century, was a disciple of the English
  philosopher Occam.


7. ¬Bythner¬, Victorinus. ¤TABVLA DIRECTORIA.¤ | IN QVA | ¤TOTVM ΤΟ
ΤΕΧΝΙΚΟΝ LINGVƤ | Sanctæ, ad amussim delineatur. | QuAM | ... [2 lines]
| ¤D. HENRICO WOTTON¤ | ... [2 lines] | _inscribit Author_ | ¤VICTORINUS
BYTHNER. _P._¤ |

  Impr. 98_a_: 1637: la. 4^o, see below: pp. [6], see below: col. 1 beg.
  1 _Verba vel Nomina_: English Roman. Contents, see below.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 675. These are three rare
  sheets printed on the recto only and intended to be pasted together,
  the two lower about 14 in. high by 18½ in. wide, the upper one about 7
  × 18½ in. The two lower ones contain in five columns a Hebrew grammar
  in nine divisions, the upper one “Chaldaismi & Syriacismi,” between
  which is the title, and below them the preface “Lectori benevolo.” The
  colophon is at the end of the last column. The underlined words in the
  above title are in red, as well as a few other words, including a
  chronogram.


8. ¬Carpenter¬, Nathanael. PHILOSOPHIA | LIBERA, | [&c.]: see 1636 C.


Clement of Rome. References to a supposed edition of Clemens Romanus in
1637, a reprint of the edition of 1633, are due to a confusion: the 1633
edition alone exists.


9. ¬Comenius¬, Johannes Amos (Komensky). CONATVVM | COMENIANORVM |
PRAELVDIA | EX BIBLIOTHECA _S. H._ | [_device._]

  Impr. 72: 1637: sm. 4^o: pp. [6] + 52 + [6]: p. 11 beg. _Tertiò,
  portento_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Ad lectorem”,
  signed “Samuel Hartlibius”: (5) title:—“PORTA SAPIENTIAE | RESERATA_:_
  | SIVE | PANSOPHIÆ CHRISTIANÆ | SEMINARIVM. | Hoc est, | Nova,
  compendiosa, & solida omnes Sci-|entias & Artes, & quicquid manifesti
  vel occulti | est, quod ingenio humano penetrare, solertiæ imitari, |
  linguae eloqui datur, breviùs, veriùs, meliùs, quàm | hactenus,
  addiscendi Methodus. | [_line_] | _Auctore_ | Reverendo Clarissimóque
  Viro | Domino _Iohanne Amoso Comenio_. | [_line_, 2 _mottos_,
  _woodcut._]”, with impr. 72_d_: (6) a motto: 1–52, the work: (1–6)
  “Præcipua Capita Didacticæ Magnæ, à Domino Comenio elaboratæ ...”

  This is a kind of prospectus of the encyclopædic work on education
  which Comenius was at the time contemplating, and although issued by
  Hartlib without the permission of the author, partly in order to
  gather the opinions of scholars on the scheme, it was not displeasing
  to Comenius, especially since some of his critics suggested a
  _Collegium Pansophicum_ to work out the details. This we learn from an
  appendix by Comenius to the reprint of this Oxford edition in vol. i.
  of his ©Opera didactica omnia© (Amst. 1657), vol i. col. 403, cf. 454.


10. ¬Cowper¬, Thomas. ¤COWPER¤ 1637. | AN | ¤ALMANACK¤ | for the yeare
of our | ¤Lord 1637¤. | [_line_] | ¤Being the first after leap-yeare.¤ |
[_line_] | ¤Together with some astrologicall rules¤ | for the prediction
of weather for each | day in the yeare: with the principall High-wayes
in _England_ and | _Wales_. | [_line_] | ¤Referred to the famous
Universitie and¤ | ¤Citie of Oxford;¤ but may indiffe-|rently serve for
any other place within | this Kingdome. | [_line_] | ¤_By_ THOMAS
COWPER.¤ | [_line, motto, line._]

  Impr. 68_d_: 12^o: Pica Roman: title within a border of lines and
  woodcuts.

  Very rare. Only known from a titlepage in Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5937,
  no. 140. See note under _Booker_ above. The underlined words in the
  title above are printed in red ink, as well as “Oxford,” and “the
  famous Universitie. 1637” in the imprint, and some words in the
  “Vulgar Notes” on the back of the title.


11. ¬Deliciae deliciarum.¬ DELITIÆ | DELITIARVM | SIVE | EPIGRAMMATVM |
optimis quibusq; hujus & no-|vissimi seculi poetis in amplissimâ | illâ
Bibliothecâ | BODLEIANA, | Et penè omninò alibi extantibus | ἀνθολογία,
in unam corollam connexa | [_line_] | Operâ AB. WRIGHT Art. Bac. | _& S.
Ioan. Bapt. Coll. Socii_. | [_line_, then _motto_.]

  Impr. 166: 1637: 12^o: [16] + 247 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Tale tamen_, 201
  _De Virgilio_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title: (5–8)
  dedication to dr. Will. Haywood, the editor’s tutor: (9–11) “Lectori”:
  (13–15) “Catalogus Auctorum”: 1–247, the epigrams: 247, Errata.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iv. 276. Wright took his M.A.
  degree on April 22, 1637. Unfortunately there is no indication of the
  source of each epigram, and almost all the authors are continental
  poets.


12. ¬Fitz-Geffry¬, Charles. COMPASSION | TOWARDS CAPTIVES, | CHIEFLY |
Toward our Brethren and Country-men | who are in miserable bondage | in
BARBARIE. | _Vrged and pressed in three Sermons_ | On HEB. 13. 3. |
[_line_] | Preached in PLYMOVTH, in _October_ 1636. | _By_ CHARLES
FITZ-GEFFRY. | [_line_] | _Whereunto are anexed_ | An Epistle of S^t
CYPRIAN concerning the Redemption | of the Bretheren from the bondage of
_Barbarians_; | AND | _A passage concerning the benefits of Compassion,
extracted_ | out of S^t AMBROSE _his second booke of_ Offices, Cap. 28.
| [_motto._]

  Impr. 160 _a_: 1637: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 50 + [10]: p. 11 beg.
  _heaven, but_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–5) dedication to
  John Cause mayor of Plymouth, &c.: (7–12) “To the compassionate, that
  is, to the truly Christian Reader”: 1–19, 21–35, 37–50, the three
  sermons: (1–4) the Cyprian: (5–7) the Ambrose.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 607.


13. ¬Ironside¬, dr. Gilbert. SEVEN | QVESTIONS | OF THE | SABBATH |
BRIEFLY DISPVTED, | after the m®a®nner of the | SCHOOLES. | Wherein such
cases, and scruples, as are | _incident to this subject, are cleared,
and resolved_, | [_line_] | By GILBERT IRONSIDE B.D. | [_line_, two
_mottos_, _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 156 _a_: 1637: sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 297 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _may
  see_, 201 _speaks, were_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within a line: (3–12) Epistle dedicatory to archbp. Laud: (13–18) “To
  the Reader”: (19–23) “The severall Chapters with their Contents”:
  1–297, the work, in 31 chapters: (2) Note and “Errata.”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 939. The note before the
  Errata shows that the author saw no proofs of his book for “the
  Authors coppy being not so legible as we could have wished, we were
  forc’d to transcribe it in his absence, and by this means these
  grosser escapes hapned.”


14. ¬Jackson¬, Thomas. DIVERSE | SERMONS, | WITH A SHORT | TREATISE |
BEFITTING THESE | _PRESENT TIMES_, | Now first published | BY | Thomas
Iackson, D^r _in Divinity_, | _Chaplaine in ordinary_ to his Majestie, |
and President of _Corpus Christi Col-_|_ledge_ in Oxford. | [_note_,
then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 152: 1637: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 51 + [3] + 70 + [2] + 96 (but
  29–34 are numbered 1–6) + [2]: pp. 11 begg. _as no souldier_, and
  _whatsoever afflictions_, and _of his owne_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (3) title, within double lines: (5–6) dedication to
  prince Charles: (7–8) “Errata”, with sub-titles: 1–25, 27–51, 2
  sermons on 2 Chron. vi. 39–40: (2) a title:—“THREE | SERMONS |
  PREACHED | BEFORE THE | KING, | Vpon IER. 26. 19 | ... [4 lines, then
  device and impr. 152]”: 1–70, the sermons: (1) a title:—“A | TREATISE
  | CONCERNING | THE SIGNES OF | THE TIME, OR GODS | FOREWARNINGS. |
  CONTAINING | The summe of some few Sermons delive-|red partly before
  the Kings Majesty partly | in the Towne of _New-Castle_ | upon _Tine_.
  | [_woodcut_, then impr. 152]”: 1–70, three discourses: 71, a
  title:—“A | SERMON | OR | POSTILL | PREACHED IN _NEWE[/]_ | _CASTLE_
  VPON _TINE_ | The second _S_unday in | _Advent_ 1630. | [woodcut, then
  impr. 152]”: 73–93, the sermon, on Luke xxi. 25: 94–96, “A briefe
  Appendix ...”

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 668. The signatures connect
  all the parts of this volume together. Every printed page is
  surrounded by double lines on the upper and outer margin, and a single
  line elsewhere.


15. ¬Parsons¬, Bartholomew. HONOS | & ONVS Levitarum. | OR, | Tithes
vindicated to the | Presbyters of the Gospel: | In a Sermon preached at
an Archidiaco[/]|nall Visitation at _Marlebrough_, in the Diocese | of
_Sarum_, on the 10. of October. 1636. | [_line_] | By _B. P._ | [_line,_
3 _mottos, line, device, line_].

  Impr. 169: 1637: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 31 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _deny, but
  he_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–7) Epistle dedicatory to
  Sir William Doddington “from the Rectory of _Ludgershall_, in the
  county of _Wiltes_, June 7, 1637.”: 1–31, the sermon, on Deut. xxxiii.
  11.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 26. In the copy seen the
  title is an inserted leaf, the first leaf having been torn out:
  perhaps this is accounted for by the title given by Wood “History of
  Tithes: or Tithes vindicated ...”, and the running head line, which is
  still “The history of Tithes.” Early copies may have this older title.


16. ——. “Sermon on Ephes. 6. 12, 13. Oxon. 1637. qu.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 26: but I have not met with
  a copy.


17. ¬Prideaux¬, John. CERTAINE | SERMONS | PREACHED | By IOHN PRIDEAVX,
Rector of | _Exeter Colledge, his_ MAIESTIE’S _Pro-_|_fessor in Divinity
in_ OXFORD, _and_ | Chaplaine _in Ordinary_. | [_device._]

  Impr. 152: 1637: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [632], see below, signn.
  ( )^1A-X^8, Y^1, Z, Aa-Rr^8, Ss^2: pp. 11 begg. as below: English
  Roman. Contents:—sign. ( ) 1^r, title: ¬i.¬ p. 1, a title, within
  double lines, as are all the succeeding titles:—“CHRISTS | COVNSELL
  FOR | ENDING LAVV | _CASES_. | AS IT HATH BEENE DELI-|VERED IN TWO
  SERMONS | vpon the fiue and twentieth verse of | _the fifth of
  Matthew_. | By IOHN PRIDEAVX, Doctor of | Divinity, _Regius
  Professor_, and Rector | of _Exeter Colledge_. | [_motto_, _woodcut_,
  and impr. 152 _b_, dated 1636]”: 3–4, dedication to Edmund Prideaux
  and his wife, dated “From Exeter Colledge in Oxford. October 12.”:
  5–31, 33–65, the sermons: then a blank page: p. 11 beg. _Fall not_:
  ¬ii.¬ (pp. [6] + 39 + [1], p. 11 beg. _it is reserued_) p. (1) a title
  “Ephesus backsliding: considered and applied to these times ...”, with
  impr. 152 _b_, 1636, an Act sermon at St. Mary’s, July 10, on Rev. ii.
  4: (3–6) dedication to dr. Laurence Bodley, Aug. 5: 1–39, the sermon:
  ¬iii.¬ (pp. [2] + 27 + [1], p. 11 beg. _in this point_) p. (1) a title
  “A Christians free-will offering ...”, with impr. 152_b_, 1636, a
  Christmas sermon at Christ Church, on Ps. cx. 3: 1–27, the sermon:
  ¬iv.¬ (pp. [2] + 31 + [1], p. 11 beg. _with Pilate_) p. (1) a title
  “The first fruits of the Resurrection ...” with impr. 152_b_, 1636, an
  Easter sermon at St. Peter’s in the East, Oxford, on 1 Cor. xv. 20:
  1–31, the sermon: ¬v.¬ (pp. [2] + 26, p. 11 beg. _abiects came_) p.
  (1) a title “Gowries Conspiracie ...” with impr. 152_b_, a sermon at
  St. Mary’s, Aug. 5: 1–26, the sermon, of some slight value for the
  history of the Gowrie plot, A. D. 1600: ¬vi.¬ (pp. [2] + 27 + [1], p.
  11 beg. _Saint Augustine_), p. (1) a title “Higgaion & Selah: for the
  discovery of the powder-plot ...” with impr. 152_b_, 1636, a sermon at
  St. Mary’s on Nov. 5, on Ps. ix. 16: 1–27, the sermon: ¬vii.¬ (pp. [2]
  + 27 + [1], p. 11 beg. _murmured_) p. (1) a title “Hezekiah’s
  sicknesse and recovery ...,” with impr. 152_b_, 1636, a sermon before
  the King at Woodstock, on 2 Chron. xxxii. 24: 1–27, the sermon:
  ¬viii.¬ (pp. [4]+ 24 + [8], p. 11 beg. _springs, Schismatickes_) p.
  (1) a title “Perez-Vzzah, or The Breach of Vzzah ...,” with impr.
  152_b_, 1636, a sermon before the King at Woodstock, 24 Aug. 1624, on
  2 Sam. vi. 6–7: (3–4) dedication to James earl of Arran, dated 22 Oct.
  1624: 1–24 (1), the sermon: (3–8) “Alloquium serenissimo regi Iacobo
  Woodstochiæ habitum 24. Augusti. Anno 1624”: ¬ix.¬ (pp. [8] + 29 +
  [1], p. 11 beg. _acknowledge_) p. (1) a title “A sermon preached on
  the fift of October 1624. at the consecration of S^t Iames Chappell in
  Exceter Colledge ...”, with impr. 152_b_, 1636: (3–7) epistle
  dedicatory to dr. George Hakewill, dated Nov. 15: 1–29, the sermon on
  Luke xix. 46: ¬x.¬ (pp. 28, p. 11 beg. _which Iesus_) 1–28, a sermon
  on John vi. 14, without title, see below, but head line “The great
  Prophet’s Advent”: ¬xi.¬ (pp. [2] + 29+ [1], p. 11 beg. _Elenches_) p.
  (1) a title “Reverence to Rulers. A sermon preached at the Court ...”,
  with impr. 152_b_, 1636: 1–29, the sermon, on Acts xxiii. 5: ¬xii.¬
  (pp. [2] + 22, p. 11 beg. _third a comfort_) p. (1) a title “The
  draught of the brooke. A sermon preached at the Court ...”, with impr.
  152_b_, 1636: 1–22, the sermon, on Ps. cx. 7: ¬xiii.¬ (pp. [2] + 32,
  p. 11 beg. _a bit is_) p. (1) a title “Davids rejoycing for Christs
  Resurrection ...”, an Easter sermon at St. Peter’s in the East, on Ps.
  xvi. 10–11, with impr. 152_b_, 1636: 1–32, the sermon: ¬xiv.¬ (pp. [2]
  + 27 + [1], p. 11 beg. _ther. There_) p. (1) a title “The Christians
  Expectation. A sermon preached at the Court ...”, with impr. 152_b_,
  1636: 1–27, the sermon, on 2 Pet. iii. 13: ¬xv.¬ (pp. [2] + 26, p. 11
  beg. _beyond wisdome_), p. (1) a title “Wisedomes Iustification. A
  sermon preached at the Court ...”, with impr. 152_b_, 1636: 1–26, the
  sermon, on Luke vii. 35: ¬xvi.¬ (pp. [2] + 24, p. 11 beg. _Gods
  appoyntment_) p. (1) a title “Heresies progresse. A sermon preached
  before the Court ...”, with impr. 152_b_, 1636: 1–24, the sermon, on 1
  Cor. xi. 19: ¬xvii.¬ (pp. [2] + 27 + [1], p. 11 beg. _the world_) p.
  (1), a title “A Plot for preferment. A sermon preached at the Court
  ...”, with impr. 152_b_, 1636: 1–27, the sermon, on 1 Pet. v. 6:
  ¬xviii.¬ (pp. [2] + 27 + [1], p. 11 beg. _den lost_) p. (1) a title
  “The patronage of Angels. A sermon preached at the Court ...”, with
  impr. 152_b_, 1636: 1–27, the sermon, on Matth. xviii. 10: ¬xix.¬ (pp.
  [2] + 27 + [1], p. 11 beg. _Iohns conclusion_) p. (1) a title
  “Idolatrous Feasting. A sermon preached at the Court ...”, with impr.
  152_b_, 1636: 1–27, the sermon, on 1 Cor. x. 7.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 265 for the author, and 1636
  P. This is a collection of twenty sermons by dr. Prideaux from 1614,
  several preached before the king or court, and several preached at
  Oxford: those delivered at the consecration of Exeter College Chapel
  and about Gowrie’s conspiracy being of considerable interest. All,
  except the second (which is grouped with the first) and the eleventh,
  have separate titlepages, and are often cited as separate editions,
  but the signatures run throughout the volume. Sign. Y consists of one
  leaf only, the other three having been obviously intended for a
  one-leaf title and two-leaf dedication of the sermon following (no. x
  in the above divisions, really the eleventh sermon), but apparently
  they were accidentally omitted. Some were already printed, those
  before printed at Oxford being nos. i (see 1615 P), ii (see 1614 P),
  and ix (see 1625 P): and nos. i-vii at least, were printed separately
  at London in 1621. Collections of these sermons are often found
  without the general title and in a confused order.


18. ¬Rous¬, Francis. _ARCHÆOLOGJÆ_ | ATTICÆ | LIBRI TRES. | THREE BOOKES
OF THE | ATTICK Antiquities. | CONTAINING | The description of the
Citties glory, govern-|ment, division of the People, and Townes with-|in
the _Athenian_ Territories, their Religi-|on, Superstition, Sacrifices,
account of | their Yeare, as also a full relation | of their
Iudicatories. | [_line_] | By FRANCIS ROuS Scholler of _Merton_ |
Colledge in _Oxon_. | [_line_: then _motto_ from Aristides, in Greek and
English.]

  Impr. 160_a_: 1637: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 149 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _in
  height_, 101 _which standing_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title
  within a line: (3–6) Epistle dedicatory to Sir Nathaniel Brent, warden
  of Merton College, Oxford, dated “From my study in Merton College,
  Iun. 9. 1637”: (7) “To the Reader”: (8) “Errata & inserenda”: 1–149,
  the work in 3 bks.: (2–3) not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 104. This book, which passed
  through several editions at Oxford (1649, 1654, 1651, 1662, 1670, and
  1675) and London (2nd ed. 1645, 9th ed. 1685), became a companion
  volume for school use to Godwin’s ©Roman Antiquities© (see 1614 G) and
  ©Moses and Aaron© (Lond. 1625, &c.).


19. ¬Scheibler¬, Christophorus. CHRISTOPHORI | SCHEIBLERI, | ANTEHAC IN
ACADE-|MIA GISSENA PROFESSORIS, ET | PÆDAGOGIARCHÆ, NUNC | TREMONIÆ | in
Ecclesia Superinten-|dentis, & in Gymnasio RECTORIS | METAPHYSICA, |
DUOBUS LIBRIS | _Vniversum hujus scientiæ Systema comprehendens:_ | OPUS
TUM OMNIUM FACUL-|tatum: tum inprimis Philosophiæ & Theolo-|giæ
Studiosis utile & necessarium. | PRÆMISSA EST SUMMARIA METHO-|dus, sive
dispositio totius Scientiæ. | Et accessit Proœmium de usu Philosophiæ in
Theolo-|gia, & prætensa ejus ad Theologiam contrarietate. | _Additi sunt
singulis Libris_ INDICES _duo_: alter _Capitum generalium_ | _Titulorum,
& Articulorum in initio_: alter _rerum in fine_. | Quibus omnibus
accessit Exercitationum auctarium, de selectis aliquibus Meta®-®|physicæ
Capitibus. Per _T. B. Art. Mag._ & _Coll Reg._ OXON Socium. | [_line_] |
EDITIO ULTIMA. | [_line._]

  Impr. 167: 1637: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 21 + [3] + 472 + [48] +
  456 + [34] + 186 + [2]: pp. 11 begg. _absolutè_, and _Pererius_, and
  _voco. Æquivocum_, and _linquatur_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) title within double lines: (3–6) Epistola dedicatoria to Ludwig,
  landgrave of Hesse, by Scheibler, dated Dec. 1616: (7–11) “Lectori
  Philo-Metaphysico ...”, signed “Thomas Barlow ...”, the editor:
  (12–13) “Summaria Methodus ...”: (14–24) “Index ad Librum primum ...”,
  in order of the chapters: 1–21 “Prooenium”: (2) a titlepage to book
  one: 1–472, bk. 1: (1–30) “Index rerum alphabeticus”: (31) a titlepage
  to book two: (33–36) Epistola dedicatoria to Philip, landgrave of
  Hesse, by Scheibler, dated March “1617”: (37–48) “Index ...”, in order
  of the chapters: 1–456, book two: (1–26) “Index rerum alphabeticus
  ...”: (27) a titlepage “Exercitationes aliquot metaphysicæ, de Deo ...
  per Thomam Barlow ...” with impr. 69: (29–31) “Lectori”: (33–34)
  “Exercitationum ... Syllabus”: 1–186, six exercises: (1) errata.

  Scheibler’s ©Metaphysica© was first issued in 1617, and reissued at
  Oxford in 1665, as well as often elsewhere. Bp. Barlow edited it, and
  added the Exercitationes de Deo (see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss,
  iv. 336), which were reissued in 1658. The edition of 1638 is simply a
  reissue of the sheets of the 1637 edition, with different imprint and
  date on the first titlepage, and “Meta®-®” on the first titlepage
  altered to “Meta-.” Some woodcut diagrams occur in the Exercitationes:
  in which also the sections change from eights to fours.


20. ——. “157. Scheibleri (Chr.) Liber Commentariorum Topicorum—Oxon.
1637.”

  So in “Catalogi ... librorum Richardi Davis bibliopolæ pars secunda”
  (1686), p. 75 among octavos. Bagford (Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 9501, fol
  76^v) also describes a copy: and it is probably not really rare, but
  has escaped the nets of the larger libraries.


21. ¬Stinton¬, George. A | SERMON | PREACHED IN | THE CATHEDRALL |
Church of _Worcester_ vp-|on Sunday Morning, | _Novemb._ 27. 1636. | IN
| The time of PESTILENCE in o-|ther places of this Land, and now | in
the time of the Visita-|tion of that _Citie_, with that | greivous
Sicknesse; and | by reason of it. | By GEO. STINTON, | [_motto_, then
_line_.]

  Impr. 170: 1637: (eights) 16^o: pp. 35 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _this
  consideration_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title, within a border of
  woodcuts: 3, dedication to Worcester: 4, the text, 1 Kings viii.
  37–39: 1–35, the sermon.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 406.


22. ¬Thesaurus¬, Emmanuel. REVERENDI PATRIS | EMANVELIS THESAVRI | E
SOCIETATE IESV, | CÆSARES; | Et ejusdem varia carmina_:_ | _Quibus
accesserunt_ | Nobilissimorum ORIENTIS | & OCCIDENTIS | Pontificum
elogia, & | _varia opera Poëtica_. | Editio secunda emendatior, cum
auctariolo. | [_woodcuts_, then _line_.]

  Impr. 163: 1637: [4] + 151 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Caligula. Nascitur_: 101
  *_Illius Panis_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within
  double lines: (3) Latin poem by George Herbert on Francis Bacon lord
  Verulam: (4) Latin epitaph on Gustavus Adolphus by Dan. Heinsius, with
  a chronogram: 1–38, the Cæsares: 39–151, “Ejusdem Carmina.”

  The first edition of this work by Emanuele Tesauro (_b._ 1581) was
  published in 1619 at Milan, and a third at the same place in 1643.
  Backer mentions doubts whether the author of this work is identical
  with the Jesuit who bore the same names. The book contains Latin
  epigrams on the Cæsars, and miscellaneous poems. The occurrence of
  Herbert’s poem in the volume is singular. I have seen a copy in which
  the first line of the title contained “R. P.” only, which probably
  indicates an early issue.


23. ¬V[erneuil]¬, I[ohn]. A | Nomenclator | of such Tracts and | Sermons
as have beene | printed or translated into | English upon any place | of
holy Scripture | [_woodcuts_, then _line_] | _Operâ, studio & impensis_
| I. V. | [_line, woodcut, line._]

  Impr. 119: 1637: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [156], signn. A-F^{12} G^6: sign.
  B1^r beg. _Ruth. Cap._ 4: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r,
  title: A2^r-3^v “To the courteous and judicoius Reader,” unsigned:
  A4^r-G5^r, the work; G^6, not seen.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 222. The second edition of
  this work was issued, doubled in size, in 1642. The author was
  under-librarian at the Bodleian, and had compiled this list for
  private use: nearly all the books referred to in the work have their
  Bodleian references affixed, the arrangement being in the order of the
  books of the Bible, the Apocrypha being excluded. The fact that some
  of the books were not in the library “stirred up some well-wishers ...
  who deprived themselves to furnish this Place with some bookes that
  were wanting” (_Preface of_ 2_nd edition_), among whom was Robert
  Burton.


24. ¬Whear¬, Degory. RELECTIONES | HYEMALES, | DE RATIONE | & Methodo
legendi | _utrasq_; _Historias_, | CIVILES ET | ECCLESIASTICAS. | Quibus
Historici probatissimi, non solùm | ordine quo sunt legendi catenatim
recensentur, | sed doctorum etiam virorum de singulis judicia |
subnectuntur. | _Nec non_ | Vndè sig ulorum in Historia vel brevitas |
dilatari, vel defectus suppleri, vel perplexitas | expediri; vel
mutilationes deniq; temporum | injuriâ factæ resarciri possint,
indicatur | [_line_] | à D. W. prælect. CAMDENIANO. | [_line_].

  Impr. 164: 1637: (eights) 12^o: pp. [32] + 285 + [5]: p. 11 beg.
  _dignos pronunciaret_, 201 _tiam minus_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within a line: (3–10) dedication to the Vice-chancellor and
  Heads of Houses in the University of Oxford, dated “Ab aula
  Glocestrensi Kal. Iul. 1637”, and signed “Degoreus Whear”: (11–32)
  “Relectionum Conspectus”: 1–20 “Antelogium,” delivered 17 Oct. 1635:
  21–285, the work, in three parts (45 + 5 + 7 sections).

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 217 and 1625 W. This is
  really the 3rd edition. Some copies have impr. 165, instead of 164,
  omitting Forest’s name.


25. ¬Wyberd¬, John. ¤SYNOPSIS¤ | Anni Christi 1637. | _Sivè_ | ¤_Diarium
Astronomicum, & Prog=_¤|_nosticon Astrologicum, & Me_-|_teorologicum, ad
annum primum_ | _ab Intercalari._ 1637. | ¤Contriving, besides the
generall state of¤ | the yeare, the daily disposition and inclination |
of the aire, according to the severall positions | and configurations of
the celestiall bodies. Also | the times of Conjunctions, greater and
lesse; | and Aspects Lunar and mutuall. | ¤Faithfully supputated
according to Art, for the use¤ | of those that are residing towards the
end of the | 8 climate of the world; situate in the North-tem-|perate
Zone: The Pole Artique surmounting the | Horizon 51 degrees 34 minutes.
| [_line_] | ¤_Per_ JOANNEM WYBERDuM¤, | Philophysicum, Astronomophilon.
| [_line, motto, line._]

  Impr. 68 _d_: 1637: (eights) 16^o: pp. [48], signn. A-C^8: sign. B1^r
  beg. _The Moone hath_: Long Primer Roman and English. Contents:—sign.
  A1^r, title, within a line and a border of woodcuts: A2^r-4^r
  prefatory notes, chronological and astrological: A4^v-B8^r, the
  Calendar: B8^v-C8^r, “A Prognostication” for each month.

  Rare. This appears to be the first and last Almanac issued by Wyberd.
  See the note under _Booker_, above in this year. Besides the words
  underlined in the above title, the words “Oxford,” and “famous
  Universitie. 1637.” in the imprint, are printed in red: as well as
  other words in the text of the book. There is an astrological woodcut
  of a man on sign. A4^r.


                                 1638.

1. ¬Achilles¬ Tatius. The Loves | OF | CLITOPHON | AND | LEVCIPPE. | A
most elegant History, written in | Greeke by ACHILLES TATIuS: | And now
Englished. | [_line, motto, line, woodcut, line._]

  Impr. 172: 1638: (eights) 12^o: pp. [24] + 255 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _affaires, distraction_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2)
  verses “On the Frontispiece.”: (3) an engraved title, see below: (5–6)
  “The Translator to the Reader”: (7–24) complimentary verses by friends
  of the translator, whose initials and Christian name are incidentally
  mentioned: 1–255, the book.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 301. The translator of the Τὰ
  κατὰ Λευκίππην καὶ Κλειτοφῶντα was Anthony Hodges, of New College.
  Wood refers to an impression of this book in 1638 without the
  commendatory verses: this would be no doubt an early issue. The
  engraved title is a fine one by W. Marshall, in which the words of the
  ordinary title, with impr. 173, are on a shell held by two mermaids;
  behind is a storm-tossed ship with the two lovers on board and Cupid
  in the stern, with the city of “Alexandria” in the background. This
  title was probably intended to be printed on the second leaf of the
  first section: but as it is, the frontispiece is on an inserted leaf,
  and the true second leaf is torn out. This book seems to be still the
  only English translation of the romance, except that in Bohn’s
  library.


2. ¬Bancroft¬, John, bp. of Oxford. ARTICLES | TO BE | ENQVIRED OF |
WITHIN THE DIOCES OF | OXFORD, in the trienniall _Visi-_|_tation_ of the
Right Reverend Fa-|ther in God Iohn Lord Bi-|shop of OXFORD. | HELD | In
the yeare of our LORD GOD 1638. in the | fourteenth yeare of the Reigne
of our most | gracious Soveraign Lord, CHARLES | by the grace of GOD
King of | great, _Brittaine_ _France_, & | _Ireland_, Defender of | the
Faith &c. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 152: 1638: sm 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B1^r beg.
  _buried any_: Pica English. Contents:—p. sign. A1^r, title: A2^r-A3^r,
  Oath, Charge and Directions: A3^v-B3^r, the Articles in two divisions:
  B3^v, directions: B4, not seen.


3. ¬Burton¬, Robert. THE | Anatomy of | melancholy | [&c., exactly as
1628 B, being from the same plate with “fift” instead of “thirde,” and
different date.]

  Impr. 70: 1638: (fours) folio: pp. [14] + 78 + [2] + 723 (after 218
  are two unnumbered leaves) + [9]: pp. 11 beg. _judgement_ and _®i®n
  Germany_, 601 _sate up late_: English Roman. Contents:—exactly as in
  the 1632 edition, except that the “Synopsis of the first partition”
  precedes the poem “ad librum suum”, the “analysis of the third
  partition” occupies pp. 399–401, and the partition extends to p. 723:
  while there is no colophon, there being no p. (10) at end.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 653 and 1621 B. There is a
  note before the _Errata_ in which the author says that the book was
  begun to be printed not long before at Edinburgh “sed à typographis
  nostris illicò suppressa, Londini mox illorum cum venia protelata,
  Oxoniæ demum perfecta.” Accordingly signn. A-X x are not Oxford
  printing, but presumably from Edinburgh type: at p. 347 begins Oxford
  printing, the prefatory matter being also Oxford work. It would appear
  that some Edinburgh printers began a reprint, that the Oxford printers
  interfered and suppressed it, that with their consent the part printed
  in Scotland was not destroyed but _protelata_, prolonged, given a
  further lease of life, at London, and finally brought to Oxford and
  completed. The woodcuts and details of printing point to the division
  being before p. 347. The signatures of the first sheet are _nil_, § 2,
  §, § 2, § 3, _nil_ (!), not counting the engraved title which should
  occur between the first and second leaf.


4. ¬Bythner¬, Victorinus. [_line_] | לְשׁוֹן לִמּוּרִים | [_line_] |
LINGuA ERuDITORuM. | _Hoc est_, | NOVA ET METHODICA | INSTITVTIO |
Linguæ Sanctæ, | [_line_] | _Usui eorum_ | Quibus _Fontes Israëlis_
plenè | intelligere, & ex illis limpidissimas | aquas haurire, curæ
cordique est, | accommodata: | ⁂ | [_line_] | _Studio & Operâ_ |
VICTORINI BYTHNER. | [_line._]

  Impr. 183: 1638: (fours) 12^o: pp. [8] + 224 + [2]: p. 11 beg.
  _discerpi_, 201 _locum ubi_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (2) “Approbatio” by the Oxford Professor of Hebrew, and Imprimatur by
  the Vice-Chancellor: (3–4) Latin dedication to the dean and canons of
  Christ Church: (5) two Greek poems on the book by Edw. Wirley, rector
  of St. Ebbe’s, Oxford: (7) “Sceleton ...” of the book, a plan of
  contents: (8) “Admonitio ad Lectorem”: 1–224, the work in 11 chapters
  (120 rules), with an “Appendix de Aramæismo ...”: (1) “Nomina authorum
  ... ex quibus hæc Institutio est concinnata.”

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 675. This is the first
  edition, the second being published at Cambridge in 1645 (the author
  having moved thither when the Civil War broke out) and afterwards
  several times, separately or with the ©Lyra Prophetica©, in London.
  This is an advance on 1631 B.


5. ¬C[aussin]¬, N[icolas]. _THE_ | uNFORTuNATE | POLITIQUE, | First
written in French | By C. N. | _Englished by_ | G. P. | [_device._]

  Impr. 185: 1638: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 218 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _rule,
  by_, 201 _selfe so_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a
  border of woodcut ornaments: (3–7) “To the courteous and ingenious
  reader”: 1–218, the work, bearing as a second title “The Life of
  Herod.”

  This is a translation of the 4th book of the well-known ©Cour Sainte©
  of Nicolas Caussin the Jesuit (_d._ 1651), entitled “De l’Impieté des
  Cours” or “Le Politique malheureux”, omitting the first few words: and
  is in fact a biography of Herod the Great, with reflections on his
  conduct. The translator gives no clue to his own name, but mentions
  the author as “the judicious and eloquent Causinus.” The ©Cour Sainte©
  (first issued in 1624) was translated as a whole into English in 1631
  and into Italian, German, Spanish, and other languages, but this 4th
  part seems never to have been issued separately in French (in Italian
  1634, &c.): and this Oxford volume though not rare has escaped even
  the eye of Backer and his editor Sommervogel (1891), probably because
  concealed under initials. Some copies have 1639 on the titlepage.


6. ¬Chillingworth¬, William. THE | RELIGION OF | PROTESTANTS | A SAFE
VVAY | TO SALVATION. | OR | AN ANSVVER TO A | BOOKE ENTITLED | MERCY AND
TRVTH, | Or, Charity maintain’d by | Catholiques, which pre-|tends to
prove the | Contrary. | [_line_] | By WILLIAM CHILLINGWORTH Master | _of
Arts of the University of_ OXFORD. | [_line, motto, woodcuts._]

  Impr. 180 or 181: 1638: (fours) la. 8^o: pp. [32] + 413 + [3]: p. 11
  beg. _vinced that they_, 411 _which remain_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–7) epistle dedicatory
  to the king: (8) imprimaturs by the Vicechancellor and the two
  Theological Professors at Oxford, one dated 14 Oct. 1637: (9–31) “The
  Preface to the author of Charity maintained [M. Wilson] with an answer
  to his pamphlet entituled a Direction to N. N.”: 1–413, the book,
  which incorporates most of the text of the book answered: (1) Errata.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 91. This book (which Wood
  erroneously states was issued in 1636, and which was republished in
  1664, 1674, 1684, 1687, 1704, 1719, 1727, 1742, 1752, 1820, 1838,
  1845, 1846), was the effect and cause of considerable controversy,
  Chillingworth having recently reverted from Roman Catholicism to
  Protestantism, and the form of the book being that of an answer to
  part 1 of M. Wilson’s ©Mercy and truth or Charity maintayn’d© (1634),
  itself an answer to Potter’s ©Want of Charity© (see 1633 P). The
  controversy is well described in the Dict. of National Biography.
  There was a suspicion that Wilson obtained advance copies of the
  sheets of this book as it went through the press, see Laud’s History
  of the Chancellorship under the year, where are also given the
  archbishop’s views about the advisability of Chillingworth answering
  the second part also of Wilson’s book. The present volume is headed
  “Part i.” throughout. The issue of this volume with an imprint showing
  that it was published in London is said to have some slight changes,
  but they are not easily to be found, and in general the two issues
  appear to be identical. The description of the Errata and their cause
  shows that it was the custom, at least at Oxford, for authors to
  revise their proofs—which has been recently denied.


7. ¬C[roke]¬, dr. Ch[arles]. A SAD | MEMORIALL | OF | HENRY CURWEN |
ESQuIRE, THE MOST | WORTHY AND ONELY | CHILD OF S^r PATRICIuS | CuRWEN
Baronet of _War-_|_kington_ in _Cum_|_berland_, | WHO WITH INFI-|NITE
SORROW OF | all that knew him depar-|ted this life _August:_ 21. | being
Sunday: | 1636. | IN THE FOURTEENTH | yeare of his age; and lyes
in|terred in the Church of | _Amersham_ in _Buc-_|_kinghamshire_. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 119: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 32: p. 11 beg. _leeve that_: Great
  Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within arched border: (3–4)
  dedication to sir Patricius and lady Curwen, signed “Ch. C.”: (5) “The
  Author to the Reader”: (7–8) not seen: 1–23, the sermon, on Job xiv.
  2: 24–32, description of the funeral and copies of the verses upon the
  hearse.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 424. Sir Patricius
  Curwen’s son had been sent for tuition to the Rector of Amersham, dr.
  Croke, in whose house he died. The monument still exists at Amersham,
  and is described in Lipscomb’s ©Buckinghamshire©, iii. 169: the burial
  was on 23 Aug. 1636. The preface explains that “these papers have lien
  two years in Cumberland in a Manuscript, which privacie not satisfying
  the great affection of Noble Parents towards their deceased Son, they
  are now come to ... view”. The ten copies of verses are in Latin and
  English, the most considerable being “a Dialogue” in verse by Paul
  Solomeaux a Frenchman.


8. ¬Florus¬, Lucius Julius. L. JULII FLORI | rerum à | ¤ROMANIS¤ |
¤GESTARVM¤ | LIBRI IV, | ¤A JOHANNE STADIO _emendati_.¤ | _Editio nova
singulis Neotericis purgatior_ | _& emendatior._ | _SEORSUM EXCUSUS_ |
¤IN EOS COMMENTARIuS¤ | ¤JOHAN: STADII, Historiæ & Ma-¤|theseos Lovanii
Professoris primi, | elaboratissimus: | ¤Cui accesserunt Chronologicæ
Doctiss:¤ | CLAuD: SALMASII excerptiones. | Unà cum variis lectionibus
ex notis _Gruteri_, | _Salmasii_, _Vineti_, & editionibus, colle-|ctis;
& cum hâc nostrâ collatis: | ¤_Sub calce prodit_ L. Ampelii _Liber
Memorialis ex_¤ | _Clariss: Salmasii bibliotheca petitus_. | Cum Indice
Rerum & Verborum | uberrimo. | [two _lines_.]

  Impr. 121: 1638: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [4] + 137 + [1] + 319 + [123] +
  31 + [1]: pp. 11 begg. _immortalium, rum pleb., quem Carthaginienses_:
  Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3–4) “Typographus
  Lectori”: 1, a title precisely as 1631 F, except that all V’s are now
  U’s, I’s consonantal are J’s, and ij’s are ii’s, and in ll. 7–8
  “_purgatior_ | _& emendatior_”, with impr. 72 _a_: 3–137, (1), 1–319,
  (1–35) are also precisely as in 1631 F, the titlepage on p. 2
  differing slightly in minute points: (36–67) the Excerptiones, with
  Epilogus: (68–115) “Ad Florum variarum lectionum libellus”: (116–123),
  1–31 “Lucius Ampelius ex bibliotheca Cl. Salmasii”, with preface.

  This is a reprint of 1631 F, with additions shown on the titlepage.
  The underlined words are in red, as well as “Oxoniæ,” in the imprint.


9. ¬Gardyner¬, dr. Richard. A | SERMON | PREACH’D IN | THE CATHEDRALL |
CHVRCH OF CHRIST | _IN OXFORD_, | On CHRISTMAS Day_:_ | Wherein is
defended the Catholique | Doctrine that Christ is True | God Truely
Incarnate. | _AGAINST THE OLDE DE-_|_cay’d Heresies newely Reviu’d in_ |
_these later Dayes._ | [_line_] | BY | RICHARD GARDYNER, D.D. And |
_Canon_ of the same _Church_. | [_line._]

  Impr. 175: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 31 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _pable to
  save_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title, within a line:
  (5–8) dedication to dr. Duppa dean of Ch. Ch.: 1–31, the sermon, on
  John i. 14.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 921.


10. ——. _A SERMON_ | PREACH’D | ON EASTER-DAY | AT OXFORD, IN SAINT |
PETERS CHVRCH IN THE | EAST, the Accustomed place for the | REHEARSALL
SERMON on | THAT DAY: | Wherein is prov’d the SONNE’S | Equality with
the FATHER, the | _Deity of the Holy GHOST_, | AND | The Resurrection of
the same Numericall Body, | _Against the old, and Recent Oppugners of_ |
_these_ Sacred Verities. | [_line_] | BY | RICHARD GARDYNER, D.D. and
Canon of | the Cathedrall Church of Christ in OXFORD. | [_line._]

  Impr. 174: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 31 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _the vertue_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a line: (3–7)
  Epistle dedicatory to dr. Richard Baylie: 1–31, the sermon, on Rom.
  viii. 11.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 921.


11. ¬Godwyn¬, Thomas. ROMANÆ | HISTORIAE | ANTHOLOGIA | [&c., exactly as
1633 G, except in line 9 “&” for “and,” “use,” and “inlarged by | _the
Author_.”]

  Impr. 182: 1638: sm. 4^o: [collation, contents &c. precisely as 1633
  G, except signature of dedication “Tho:” not “Tho.”]

  See 1614 G. This appears to be an absolute reprint of the 1633
  edition.


12. ¬Jackson¬, dr. Thomas. A | TREATISE | OF THE CONSECRATION | OF THE
SONNE OF | God to his everlasting | PRIESTHOOD. | _AND_ | THE
ACCOMPLISHMENT | of it by his glorious Resurrection | _and Ascension_. |
BEING THE NINTH BOOK | of Commentaries upon the | Apostles CREED. |
CONTINVED BY | THOMAS IACKSON Doctor in | Divinity, Chaplaine in
ordinary to | his MAIESTY, and President of | C. C. C. in OXFORD. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 180_a_: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 352 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _the
  wages_, 301 _10.36. This_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within double lines: (3–7) Epistle dedicatory to the King: (9–11) “To
  the Christian Reader”: (13–22) “A table of the principall Arguments
  ...”, a list of contents: (23) “Errata”: 1–352, (1–3), the treatise,
  in 43 chapters.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii. 667. Ten books of Jackson’s Commentary on
  the Creed were published in 1613–1654, this being the 9th and the last
  issued in the author’s lifetime, he dying in 1640. This part was
  published (according to Wood) in 1628 and 1633 in London, and now in
  Oxford. Every page is within lines.


13. ¬Longinus¬, Dionysius. ΔΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΥ | ΛΟΓΓΙΝΟΥ | [&c., from the same
plate as 1636 L, except that a new line is added at end “Cum Indice”,
the imprint and date are altered, and at the foot outside the bounding
line is “_editio Postrema_.”]

  Impr. 87 _a_: 1638: [&c. precisely as 1636 L, except that the page
  following 117 bears in addition “Errata ...”, and a new “Index rerum
  et verborum” is appended on 14 pages (the last of which adds
  “Imprimatur. _Ric. Baylie Vice-canc. Oxon._”), and 4 blank pages
  follow: so that the collation is pp. [42] + 176 + [2] + 117 + [19] and
  one folded plate.]

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 446. This is a reissue of the
  sheets of 1636 L with the changes noted above. Some copies omit the
  preface by Langbaine and with it the blank sheet before the inserted
  (engraved) title. Conversely there are copies of this edition with the
  1636 title and no ornament at the back of the folded plate.


14. ¬Matthew¬, archbp. Tobias. PIISSIMI | ET | EMINENTISSIMI | VIRI, D.
TOBIÆ | MATTHÆI _Archiepis-_|_copi_ olim _Eboracensis_ | CONCIO
APO-|logetica adversus | Campianum. | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 176: 1638: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [10] + 86: p. 11 beg. _ducens
  qui_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a line doubled at the
  sides: (3) “Campiani Calumnia ... quam D. Tobias Matthæus hac suâ
  Concione depellit”: (4–9) Testimonia about the sermon and author:
  1–86, the sermon, on Deut. xxxii. 7.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 871, but the incident which
  was the occasion of the sermon is related on col. 870. Matthew died on
  29 Mar. 1628, and this sermon was intended to disprove Campian’s
  statement that Matthew practically confessed that if one read and
  believed the fathers he would become a Papist. The sermon was
  originally delivered at Oxford on 9 Oct. 1581, but this is certainly
  the first printed edition.


15. ¬Oxford¬, Christ Church. DEATH REPEAL’D | BY A | THANKFVLL MEMORIALL
| Sent from CHRIST-CHuRCH | in OXFORD, | _CELEBRATING_ | THE NOBLE
DESERTS OF | the Right Honourable, | PAVLE, | Late Lord VIS-COuNT |
BAYNING | of SuDBuRY. | Who changed his Earthly Honours | _Iune the_ 11.
1638. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 174: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 50 (“42”) + [2]: p. 11 beg. _We
  may believe_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double
  lines: (3–4) dedication to lady Penelope widow of viscount Bayning:
  1-“42”, the poems.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 468. These poems on lord
  Bayning’s death at Bentley hall in Essex are all by Christ Church men,
  19 in English, 11 in Latin. William Cartwright, Robert Burton, John
  Fell, Martin Llewellin and Jasper Mayne are among the writers. Lord
  Bayning took his degree from Christ Church in 1633, but was only 24
  years old at his death, when the title became extinct.


16. ¬Oxford¬, University. _Musarum Oxoniensium_ | CHARISTERIA | PRO |
SERENISSIMA | _REGINA_ | MARIA, | RECENS | E NIXVS LABORIOSI |
discrimine receptâ. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 151 _b_: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [88], signn. A-D, DD, E, a-b, bb,
  c-d^4: sign. B1^r beg. _Qui primos_: English Roman. Contents:—sign.
  A1^r title, within double lines: A2^r-d4^v, poems.

  These are verses to congratulate the Queen on her safe delivery and
  condole with her for the loss of the infant princess, who seems to
  have lived only a few hours. The reference is apparently to the birth
  of the princess Catherine (_b._ and _d._ 29 Jan. 1638/9), but the
  ordinary pedigrees and histories seem not to notice this event. The
  poems are in Latin and English, except three Greek and two French. The
  printer (Lichfield) contributes a poem at the end. The signatures show
  the hasty method of printing.


17. ——. ¤STATVTA¤ | _Selecta è Corpore_ | _Statutorum_ | ¤VNIVERSITATIS¤
| OXON, | _¤Vt in promptu & ad ma¤-_|num sint, quæ magis ad usum, |
(_præcipuè Iuniorum_) | facere videntur: | [_line_, then _woodcut_, then
_line_.]

  Impr. 179: 1638: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 213 + [15], and two folding
  plates: p. 11 beg. _libros de Cœlo_, 201 _non priùs_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—p. (3) title, within a border: (5–7) “Admonitio ad lectorem
  de veteri Calendario omisso”, with a table of “Non Dis.” days: (8)
  Explanation of symbols used: 1–197, the statutes: 198–205, “Statuta
  Bibliothecæ Bodleianæ ... 1620”: 207–213, “Επινομις: seu explanatio
  Iuramenti ...”: (2–3), not seen: (4–12) “Elenchus Materiarum”: (14)
  “Errata ...”.

  This is the first edition of the selected Statutes, the beginning of a
  long series, and was compiled by Thomas Crossfield of Queen’s College.
  Other editions were issued in 1661, and with the title “Parecbolæ” in
  1671, 1674, 1682, 1693, 1705, 1710, 1721, 1729, 1740, 1756, 1771,
  1784, 1794, 1808, 1815, 1820, 1828, 1830, 1835, 1838, 1840, 1841,
  1842, 1843, 1845, 1846, and no doubt in some other years, especially
  after 1830: the book was in fact reprinted whenever the stock in hand
  was exhausted. Wharton’s ©Second Volume of the Remains of ... William
  Laud ...©, under the date, proves that it was issued in Jan. 1637/8. A
  small folded sheet “Indiculus Statutorum”, a plan of them arranged by
  subjects and bearing the signature A2, should follow the titlepage,
  and in some copies the large ©Encyclopædia©, described in 1635 O, is
  inserted to face p. 16 or 20: but the book can hardly be pronounced
  imperfect, if this plate is wanting. The signatures of the prefatory
  matter are peculiar: the first two leaves (blank, and title) form a
  section of themselves, and also the next two, not counting the folded
  leaf, and this even in large paper copies. So too sign. Q^6 is divided
  into two sets of two and four leaves respectively! The 4th leaf of P^4
  is presumably blank and perhaps always torn off. The underlined words
  in the above title are printed in red, as well as “Excusa cum
  Licentiâ,” and “pro Guil: Webb,” in the imprint.


18. ¬Ranchinus¬, Gulielmus. A | REVIEW | OF THE | COVNCELL | OF | TRENT.
| VVherein are contained the severall | nullities of it: With the many
grievan[/]|ces and prejudices done by it to Christian | Kings and
Princes: | As also to all Catholique Churches in the | World; and more
particularly to the | GALLICANE Church. | [two _lines_] | First writ in
_French_ by a learned _Roman_-Catholique. | Now | _Translated into_
English _by_ G. L. | [two _lines_ before, between and after a _motto_
and _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 177: 1638: (fours) la. 8^o: pp. [28] + 388: p. 11 beg. _sider
  these_, 301 _to determine_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1) title, within
  double line: (3–4) dedication to dr. Christopher Potter, by Gerard
  Langbaine the translator, dated “Queenes Colledge in Oxford April 12.
  1638”: (5–10) “To the Reader” by the translator: (11–12) “An
  Advertisement to the Reader...” by the anonymous author: (13–26) “A
  summary of the Chapters”: (27) “Faults escaped”: 1–388, the work, in
  seven books.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 448. The author’s name occurs
  in Langbaine’s Preface. Ranchin’s ©Revision du Concil de Trente© was
  published anonymously in 1600.


19. ¬Randolph¬, Thomas. POEMS | WITH THE | MVSES | LOOKING[/]GLASSE_:_ |
_AND_ | AMYNTAS· | [_line_] | By THOMAS RANDOLPH Master of Arts, | and
late Fellow of _Trinity_ Colledge in | _Cambridge_. | [_line_, then
_device_.]

  Impr. 174: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [24] + 128 + [2] + 93 + [7] + 114: pp.
  11 beg. _Went forth, shall see_ and _For to be_: English Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title, within a line double at the sides: (3–24)
  poems on the author and book: 1–128, the poems: (1) a
  title:—“[_woodcut_] | THE MVSES | LOOKING[/]GLASSE. | [_line_] | By T.
  R. | [_line_, then _woodcut_]”, with impr. 184: 1–93, the play, in
  five acts: (2) a title:—“[two _lines_] | AMYNTAS | OR THE | IMPOSSIBLE
  DOVVRY. | A PASTORALL ACTED | before the KING & QuEENE | at
  _White-Hall_. | [_line_] | Written by THOMAS RANDOLPH. | [_line,
  motto, woodcut_]”, with impr. 184: (4) “Drammatis Personæ”: (6–7),
  1–114, the play in five acts.

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 565, and the
  ©Retrospective Review© vi. 61. The volume was posthumous (the author
  having died in March 1634/5) and was edited by his brother Robert
  Randolph of Christ Church, Oxford. There are twelve sets of
  complimentary verses, in Latin and English, by the editor, Owen
  Feltham, and others. Editions of the poems and plays were published in
  1640 (Oxford), 1643 (London), 1652 (London), 1664 (London) and 1668
  (Oxford): both the last call themselves the 5th edition. The
  signatures run through the entire work.


20. ¬Reusner¬, Nicolas. NICOLAI REuSNERI LEORINI | IC. Comitis Palat.
Cæs. | SYMBOLORVM | IMPERATORIORuM | Classis Prima. | [&c., exactly as
1633 R, except “Impp:”, “_Julio_”, “OPuS PHILOLOGICuM,” “utile,” and
“_SEXTA_” for “_QUINTA_”].

  Impr. 137: 1638: [&c. exactly as 1633 R, contents and all, except that
  the 3rd part contains 224 numbered pages, the last _not_ being
  misprinted “198” as it is in the 5th edition: also the 3rd p. 11
  begins “_Nam & secundùm_”: the second and third titles differ slightly
  in small details. The number of unnumbered pages at the end of the 3rd
  part are 36, and the “34” in the collation of 1633 R is an error for
  36: the four last leaves in each edition are blank.]

  This is simply a verbatim reprint of 1633 R.


21. ¬Scheiblerus¬, Christophorus. ... | METAPHYSICA | [precisely as 1637
S, except as there noted].

  Impr. 178: 1638 [&c. exactly as 1637 S, except as there noted].

  This is a reissue of 1637 S.


22. ¬Smiglecius¬, Martinus. LOGICA | MARTINI | SMIGLECII | SOCIETATIS
IESV | S: THEOLOGIÆ | DOCTORIS, | SELECTIS DISPVTATIO[/]|nibus &
quæstionibus illustrata, | ET IN DUOS TOMOS DISTRIBUTA: | In qua |
Quicquid in _Aristotelico_ organo vel | cognitu necessarium, vel
obscuritate perple-|xum, tam clarè & perspicuè, quàm so-|lidè ac nervosè
pertractatur. | [_line_] | _Cum_ INDICE _Rerum copioso_. | [_line_] | AD
Perillustrem ac Magnificum Dominum, | D^m THOMAM ZAMOYSCIuM, &c. |

  Impr. 162_a_: 1638: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 435 + [3] +
  “435”-“761” + [35]: p. 11 beg. _Dico igitur_, 701 _Non tamen_: Long
  Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–6)
  Epistola dedicatoria to Thomas Zamoyscius, dated “Calissii in Collegio
  Carnecoviano Societatis Jesu, 15. Augusti 1616”: (6) “Approbatio R. P.
  Provincialis,” 24 June 1616: (7–11) “Index disputationum et quæstionum
  prima parte Contentarum”, a list: (12–16) “Index ... partis secundæ”:
  1–435, “Pars prima logicæ ...”, disputations 1–11: (2) a bastard
  title:—“Logicæ ... pars altera ...”: 435–761, the second part, dispp.
  12–18: (2–35) “Index rerum præcipuarum ...”.

  See 1634 S: this is a verbatim reprint of that edition.


23. ¬Taylor¬, bp. Jeremy. A | SERMON | PREACHED IN | SAINT MARIES |
Church in OXFORD. | Vpon the Anniversary of the | GuNPOWDER-TREASON. |
[_line_] | By IEREMY TAYLOR, Fellow of | _Allsoules Colledge in_ OXFORD.
| [_line, motto, woodcut._]

  Impr. 180: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [10] + 64: p. 11 beg. _third time_:
  English Roman. Contents: p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–10)
  dedication to archbp. Laud: 1–64, the sermon, on Luke ix. 54.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 787. This sermon, which seems
  to have been delivered on Nov. 5, 1638, dashed the hopes which the
  Roman Catholics seem to have entertained of the conversion of Taylor
  to their faith. Wood asserts (_ut supra_, 782) that “several things
  were put in[to the sermon] against the Papists by the then
  vice-chanc.”, dr. Accepted Frewen. The sheets of this work were
  reissued as part of Taylor’s ©Treatises© (Lond. 1648).


24. *¬Thornburgh¬, Edward, archdeacon of Worcester. ARTICLES TO BE
ENQVIRED | OF AND ANSWERED | unto by the Church-wardens and | Sworne-men
within the _Arch-Dea-_|conrie of _Worcester_ in the Visitation | of the
Right worshipfull _Edward_ | _Thornburgh_ D^r of Divini-|ty Arch-Deacon
of | _Worcester_. | _Anno Domini_ | [_line, woodcut, line._]

  Impr. 152: no date: sm. 4^o: pp. [16], signn. A-B^4: sign. B1^r beg.
  16. _Hath your_: Pica English. Contents:—sign. A1^r, a form of summons
  to appear: A2^r, the title: A2^v-3^r, Directions and Oath: A4^r-B4^v,
  the 86 articles.

  This is not dated, but the copy seen bore a summons to
  Stratford-on-Avon officials, filled up with the date 11 Apr. 1638. It
  could not be earlier than 1635 from the woodcut ornaments used and the
  printer, and is probably of the year 1638.


25. ¬Valdés¬, Juan de. THE HUNDRED AND TEN | CONSIDERATIONS | of
_S_I_GNIOR_ | IOHN VALDESSO_:_ | TREATING OF THOSE | things which are
most profitable, most | necessary, and most perfect in our | Christian
Profession. | WRITTEN IN SPANISH, | Brought out of Italy by _Vergerius_,
and | first set forth in Italian at _Basil_ by | _Cælius Secundus
Curio_, | ANNO 1550. | Afterward translated into French, and Printed |
at _Lions_ 1563. and again at Paris 1565. | And now translated out of
the Italian | Copy into English, with notes. | Whereunto is added an
Epistle of the Authors, | or a Preface to his Divine Commentary | _upon
the Romans_. | [_motto._]

  Impr. 180: 1638: sm. 4^o: pp. [32] + 311 + [13]: p. 11 beg. _Consid.
  V_, 301 _the Heavens_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a
  line: (3–4) “The Publisher to the Reader”: (5–13) “Brief notes
  relating to the dubious and offensive places ...”: (14–19) the preface
  of Curio (Basil, 1 May 1550): (20–28) “A Table of the ...
  Considerations”: (30) A “censure” of the book, or imprimatur, by
  Thomas Jackson president of Corpus Christi College, Oxford: (31–2) “A
  copy of a letter written by Mr. George Herbert to his friend the
  Translator of this Book” dated “Bemmorton Sept. 29”, 1637: 1–311, the
  Considerations: (1–11) the Epistle: (12) “Errata”.

  This translation of Juan de Valdés’ work from the Italian is by
  Nicholas Ferrar of Little Gidding (_d._ 4 Dec. 1637), and it is
  interesting to find that there is a copy of this book in Little
  Gidding binding (Quaritch’s General Catalogue of Books, vol. i.
  (1887), no. 5929: £4). There was an edition issued at Cambridge in
  1646.


                                 1639.

Bacon, sir Francis. Of the advancement and proficience of learning: see
1640 B.


1. ¬Balzac¬, Jean Louis Guez de. _A_ | COLLECTION | OF SOME MODERN |
EPISTLES | _OF MONSIEVR_ | DE BALZAC. | CAREFVLLY | TRANSLATED OuT | _OF
FRENCH_. | [_line_] | _Being the Fourth and last Volume._ | [_line,
motto, woodcuts._]

  Impr. 184: 1639: (eights) 12^o: pp. [48] + 249 + [9]: p. 11 beg. _Let.
  III_, 201 _there is no_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) engraved
  title, see below: (3) title, within double lines: (5–11) “To the
  Reader”, signed “F. B.”, the printer F. Bowman: (13–15) “An
  advertisement of Mons. the King”: (17–47) letters, a poem &c., see
  below: 1–249, the letters: (2–5) “A table of the letters”.

  The first three parts of Balzac’s Letters were printed at London in
  1634 (part 1, translated by William Tyrwhitt) and 1638 (parts 2 and 3,
  translated by sir Richard Baker). The present volume is a venture by
  the printer, who has prefixed some letters, papers, and a Latin poem
  all connected with the quarrel between Balzac and the Jesuit
  Franciscus Garassus, in which Louis xiii intervened as a conciliator.
  There is an engraved title by W. Marshall, in which kings and
  theologians do honour to Balzac, the title being “A new collection of
  Epistles of Mons: de Balzac, being the fourth and last volume. Newly
  translated”, with impr. 192. The range of Balzac’s letters is from
  1631 to 1637.


2. ¬Bird¬, John. GROuNDS OF | GRAMMER | PENNED AND | _PVBLISHED_. |
[_line_] | By | IOHN BIRD Schoolemaster | _in the Citty of Glocester_. |
[_line_, Greek _motto_, _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 180: 1639: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 184: p. 11 beg. _being the_,
  101 _Adjectivall_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within
  double lines: (3–5) dedication to archbp. Laud: (6–8) “To the Reader”:
  1–184, the work.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 411; but nothing seems to be
  known of the author at present. The book is a Latin grammar in
  English, for the use of which latter language the author excuses
  himself. The sheets of this work, omitting the prefatory matter and
  with a different style of title and imprint, were reissued at Oxford
  in 1641. The author divides grammar into Rudiment (grammar proper,
  divided into Elementary and Accidentary) and Regiment (syntax).


3. [¬Cartwright¬, William]. THE | ROYALL | SLAVE. | _A_ |
Tragi[/]Comedy. | Presented to the King and Queene | by the Students of
_Christ-Church_ | in Oxford. _August_ 30. 1636. | Presented since to
both their Ma[/]|jesties at _Hampton[/]Court_ by the | Kings Servants. |
[two _lines_.]

  Impr. 189: 1639: sm. 4^o: pp. [68], signn. A-H^4 I^2: sign. C1^r beg.
  _The grand contrivance_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A1^r, title:
  A2^r, “The Prologue to the King and Queene”: A2^v-3^r, “The Prologue
  to the Vniversity”: A3^v, “The Prologue to their Majesties at
  Hampton-Court”: A4^r, “The Persons of the Play”: B1^r-H4^v, the play:
  I1^r-2^r, three epilogues corresponding to the prologues.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 69, and 1640 C. Cartwright’s
  poems and plays were published together in 1651, the author having
  died in 1643. The scene of this play is laid at Sardis. An account of
  the performance at Christ Church, at which the scenic arrangements
  seem to have been very elaborate, will be found in Wood’s ©Annals©
  under the year 1636.


4. ¬C[aussin]¬, N[icolas]. The unfortunate politique: see 1638 C.


5. ¬Dugres¬, Gabriel. DIALOGI | GALLICO-ANGLICO-LATINI. | PER |
GABRIELEM DVGRES | LINGuAM GALLICAM IN | _JLLVSTRISSIMA ET_ |
FAMOSISSIMA, OXONIENSI | ACADEMIA Edocentem. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 186: (eights) 12^o: pp. [8] + 195 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _Commençons_, 101 _P. Il fera_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (3)
  title, within a line: (5–7) French dedication to Charles prince of
  Wales: 1–195, the 22 dialogues in French, English (central in the
  page) and Latin.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 184. Dugres or Du Gres had
  already issued a French grammar at Cambridge in 1636, and new editions
  of his Dialogues, with rules of pronunciation and tables of verbs,
  were published at Oxford in 1652 and 1660.


6. ¬Foxle¬, George. THE | GROANES | OF THE | SPIRIT, | OR | THE TRIALL |
of the Truth of | PRAYER. | [_motto, line, motto, line._]

  Impr. 187 or 188: 1639: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [16] + 228 + [6]: p. 11
  beg. _mired, but_, 101 _the sight_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within border of woodcuts: (3–9) Epistle dedicatory “to the
  noble and much honoured Company of Hierusalem’s Artillery”, signed
  “George Foxle”: (10–14) “To the Reader”, also signed: (15) “The
  contents ...”: 1–228, the treatise.

  A (George?) Foxley is mentioned in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iv.
  137, as preaching in London in Jan. 1648/9. Copies of this treatise
  differ in the imprint, showing that it was published both at Leicester
  and Bristol. Each page is within lines, doubled at the top and outer
  side.


7. ¬Fromondus¬, Libertus. LIBERTI FROMONDI | S. TH. L. | _Collegii
Falconis in Academia_ | _Lovaniensi Philosophiæ Profes-_|_soris
Primarii_ | METEOROLOGICORVM | LIBRI SEX. | [_device._]

  Impr. 190: 1639: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 505 + [23]: p. 11 beg.
  _nubem è Zona_, 401 _Multa generosa_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) “A”: (3) title: (5–10) dedication to Maximilian de Rassenghem,
  Lovanii, 1 Jan. 1627: (11–15) “Ad Lectorem”: 1–505, the work, in 6
  books: (2–8) “Index capitum et articulorum” in the order of the book:
  (10–22) “Index rerum memorabilium”, alphabetical.

  This is a reprint of the 1627 or 1631 Antwerp edition, being itself
  the third. The scope of the work may be gathered from the definition
  of “Meteora” as being phenomena produced by vapour (rain, &c.), or by
  exhalation (fiery, as lightning and falling stars: or non-fiery, as
  winds), or by both (clouds). Fromondus lived from 1587 to 1654,
  chiefly at Louvain.


8. ¬Gardyner¬, dr. Richard. A | SERMON | CONCERNING | THE | EPIPHANY, |
PREACHED AT THE | Cathedrall Church of Christ | in _Oxford_. | By
RICHARD GARDYNER, D.D. | and _Canon_ of the same | _Church_. |
[_woodcut._]

  Impr. 193: 1639: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 31 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _What right_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—pp. (1–2), not seen: p. (3) title,
  within a border of woodcuts: (5–8) dedication to bp. John Bancroft:
  1–31, the sermon, on Matth. ii. 2.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 921. The dedication mentions
  that the bishop had built the old palace at Cuddesdon, reformed the
  altars throughout his diocese, and suitably inscribed the Cathedral
  communion plate. Sign. A4^2 is paged 28 by error.


9. ¬Greaves¬, Thomas (Gravius). _DE LINGVÆ_ | ARABICÆ | VTILITATE | ET
PRÆSTANTIA | _Oratio_ OXONII _habita_ | Iul. 19. 1637. | A | THOMA
GREAVES Coll. Corp. | _Christi Socio_. | Cum | Arabicam Lecturam à
Reverendissimo | _Patre ac Domino GVLIELMO_ | Archiepiscopo Cantuariensi
& Academiæ | CANCELLARIO _Oxonij institutam_ | loco absentis Professoris
auspicaretur. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 151: 1639: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 21 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _brarint.
  Innumera_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a line:
  (3) “Lectori ...”: 1–21, the speech.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 1061. The speech mentions
  Laud’s benefactions to the Bodleian. The absent professor was dr.
  Edward Pococke. Some copies have imprint 176.


10. ¬Grotius¬, Hugo. De veritate religionis Christianæ.

  Both in the 3^{rd} and 4^{th} part of Richard Davis’s auction sale
  catalogue (3^{rd} part (1688), p. 12, no. 550: 4^{th} part (1692), p.
  18, no. 323) an Oxford edition of 1639 is mentioned; as well as in
  Ersch and Gruber’s Encyclopædia: but the edition itself is not in the
  greater libraries and ordinary bibliographies. The first edition was
  in Dutch in 1722, the Latin editions before 1639 were all published at
  Leyden in 1624, 1627, 1629, 1633 and 1637. There are Oxford editions
  of 1660 and 1662, as well as later.


11. ¬Heylyn¬, Peter. ΜΙΚΡΟ´ΚΟΣΜΟΣ | A | LITTLE DE[/]|SCRIPTION OF | THE
GREAT WORLD. | [_line_] | _By_ PETER HEYLYN. | [_line, motto, device._]

  Imp. 119: 1639: (eights) sm. 4^o: pp. [20] + 808 + [4]: p. 11 beg. _1.
  First then_, 701 _dals, or Vindelici_: Pica Roman. Contents:—[as 1631
  H, with a few minute differences of spelling or use of capitals, and a
  slight change of reference (only) to the last five pages.]

  For the author and book see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 557:
  see also 1621 H. Some copies of this work have “1939” on the
  titlepage. There should be a folded leaf after p. 228 as in former
  editions.


12. ¬Hommius¬, Festus. LXX. | dispvtatio[/]|nes theologicæ; | [&c.,
precisely as 1630 H, with “_tertia_” for “_secunda_”, and the j in
_adjectionibus_ rightly italic.]

  Impr. 72 _a_: 1639: [&c. exactly as 1630 H.]

  This is a verbatim reprint of the 1630 edition.


13. ¬Hungerford¬, sir Anthony. _THE_ | ADVISE OF | A SONNE
PRO[/]|FESSING THE RELI[/]|GION ESTABLISHED | in the present Church of
Eng-|_land to his deare Mother a_ | Roman Catholike. | VVHEREVNTO IS
ADDED | THE MEMORIAL OF A FATHER | to his deare children, containing an
| acknowledgement of God his great mercy, in | bringing him to the
_Profession_ of the true | _Religion, at this present established_ | _in
the Church of England_. | [_line_] | BY | ANTH. HVNGERFORD of
Blackbourton | in _Com. Oxon._ _KNIGHT_. | [_line._]

  Impr. 182: 1639: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 62: p. 11 beg. _answer, that he_:
  English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within a border of woodcuts:
  1–38, the Advice: 39–40, a preface to the following piece, dated “From
  my house at Blackbourton this 7th of Aprill 1627”: 41–62, the
  Memorial.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 411, where Wood says that the
  first part was written in about 1607, and that the writer died in June
  1627: that Laud refused to license it for printing in 1635, because it
  was so strongly worded against Roman Catholicism, and that after this
  failure the son, sir Edward Hungerford, “got it to be printed at
  Oxon”, with the Memorial.


14. ¬Jewell¬, bp. John. APOLOGIA | ECCLESIÆ | ANGLICANÆ. | [_line_] |
Auctore JOANNE JuELLO, | olim Episcopo Sarisburiensi. | [_line_] | Cum
Versione Græca _J. S._ Bacc. in Art. | Coll. Mag. quondam Socii. |
[_motto_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 153: 1639: (eights) 16^o: pp. [12] + 331 + [1]: p. 11 beg. τῳ
  ἐξαιτεῖσθαι, 301 Θεῖος λόγος: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  (3–4) Epistola P. Martyris, to Jewel: (5–11) the translator’s
  dedication to dr. William Langton, president of Magdalen, signed “Joh.
  Smith”: (1) a poor Greek epigram on this edition, signed “H. H.”:
  2–331, the work, Latin on the verso of each leaf, Greek on the recto.

  See 1614 J: the first English and Latin editions were in 1562. It is
  odd that in the ©Catalogus ... librorum Richardi Davis ... pars
  tertia© (1688) on p. 13 the date of this book is twice misprinted
  1637.


15. ¬Kempis¬, Thomas a. THE | IMITATION | OF CHRIST, | _Divided into
four Books_. | Written in Latin by | THOMAS à KEMPIS, | And the
Translations of it | _Corrected & amended_ | by W. P. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 156 _b_: 1639: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [60] + 381 + [15]: p. 11 beg
  _26. In their life_, 301 _not to be discussed_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–8) Epistle dedicatory
  to Walter Curle, bp. of Winchester, signed “William Page”: (9–60) “To
  the Christian reader” signed “W. P.”: 1–381, the Imitation, in 4
  books: (2–11) “A Table of the chapters...”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 655. This is the first Oxford
  edition of the ©Imitation© and the only edition of dr. Page’s
  revision. The reviser, who was the bp. of Winchester’s chaplain, has
  removed such passages as would offend a Protestant. The preface is
  largely an exhortation to unity among the churches.


16. [¬Mayne¬, Jasper]. THE | CITYE MATCH. | _A_ | COMOEDYE· | PRESENTED
TO THE | KING and QVEENE | _AT WHITE-HALL_. | ACTED SINCE | AT
BLACK[/]FRIERS BY HIS | MAIESTIES _Servants_. | [_motto_, then 2
_lines_.]

  Impr. 180: 1639: (twos) la. 8^o: pp. [6] + 64 + [2]: p. 11 beg. _Scena
  II_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines:
  (3) “To the reader”: (4–5) two prologues: (6) “The Persons of the
  Play” &c.: 1–64, the play: (1–2) two epilogues.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 972. There are subsequent
  editions of the play in 1658 (Oxford) and 1659 (Oxford). The preface
  is depreciatory of the work, stating that it was at first written “out
  of obedience,” and that it was only published in self-defence to avoid
  a threatened unauthorized issue in London.


17. ¬Prayer¬, book of Common. LIBER | PSALMORUM | ET PRECVM | in usum
Ecclesiæ | _Cath. Christi_ | OXON. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 151: 1639: (twelves) 16^o: pp. 295 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Cesset
  quæso_, 201 _Ac tradidit_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—1, title,
  within double lines: 3–283, the Psalter: 285–295, special prayers, as
  in 1615 P.

  See 1615 P. It is noticeable that the University no longer prints the
  book of Common Prayer as a whole, but only the Psalter as found in
  that book, separately.


18. ¬Prideaux¬, John. TABVLÆ | AD | GRAMMATICA | GRÆCA INTRODUCTORIÆ. |
IN QVIBVS | Succinctè compingitur, brevissima, sed | _tamen expedita,
singularum partium orationis_ | _declinabilium, Variandi ratio_. |
ACCESSIT | Vestibuli vice, ad eandem linguam παραίνεσις in | gratiam
tyronum, quibus ut convenit explica-|tiora evolvere, ita necesse est hæc
ipsa | _ad unguem tenere_. | [_motto_] | EDITIO TERTIA. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 191: 1639: sm. 4^o: pp. [68], signn. A-F^4, G^2, H-I^4: sign.
  B1^r beg. _profero clarâ_, F2^r _15. Asserit A_: Pica Roman.
  Contents:—sign. A1^r, title: A2^r-A2^v, dedication to dr. Tho.
  Holland, dated “Exon. Colleg. Ian. 1. 1607”, and signed “Io.
  Prideaux”: A3^r-B3^v, preface as in the 1607 edition: B4^r-E1^r, the
  work, “Conclusio”, &c., as before: E2^r, a title:—“TYROCINIVM | AD
  SYLLOGISMVM | Legitimum contexendum, & | _captiosum dissuendum,
  e_x-|_peditissimum_. | IN QVO | _Ad formam e_x_pensa Syllogisticam
  perstrin-_|_guntur punctìm Sophismata, nec minus solidè_, | _quàm
  vulgò fit, ratione materiæ_; | Excerptis ex optimis Authoribus
  exemplis Græco-latinis, | ut majori cum voluptate & fructu, ex
  utriusq; lin-|guæ candidatis & legantur, & | intelligantur. |
  [_motto_, then _woodcut_]” with impr. 157: E3^r-E4^r, the dedication,
  as in the 1629 edition: E4^r, two Latin poems: F1^r-G2^v, the
  treatise: H1^r, a title:—“HEPTADES | LOGICAE· | _SIVE_ | MONITA AD
  AMPLIORES | Tractatus Introductoria. | [_motto_, then _device_]”, with
  impr. 191 _a_: H2^r-I4^v, the treatise.

  See 1607 P, 1629 P, and Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 267. The
  ©Heptades© (seven divisions of Logic) seem to be here printed for the
  first time.


19. ¬Smith¬, Samuel. ADITVS | AD | LOGICAM· | IN VSVM EORVM | qui primò
ACADEMI-|AM Salutant. | [_line_] | _Autore_ SAMuELE SMITH, | _Artium
Magistro_. | [_line_] | _Editio quinta._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 109 _a_: 1639: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [14] + 204 + [2] + 2 folded
  leaves: p. 11 beg. _Proximum est_, 111 _non autem_: Long Primer Roman.
  Contents:—p. (5) title: (7–11) “De nupera Londinensi editione ad
  Lectorem Προτρεπτικός.”: 1–204, the work in 3 books: (1) “Lectoribus
  ...”: before pp. 33 and 43 should be folded tables of Substantia and
  Qualitas.

  See 1617 S. The undated preface complains of a pirated London edition,
  which may be that of 1621.


20. ¬Tozer¬, rev. Henry. CHRISTIAN | _WISDOME_, | OR | THE EXCELLENCY |
FAME AND RIGHT | MEANES OF | TRVE | WISDOME. | As it was briefly
delivered in | a Sermon in S^t MARIES | Church in OXFORD, | _Novemb:_
11. 1638. | [_line_] | By H. TOZER B.D. Fellow | of Exeter Colledge. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 152: 1639: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 107 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _The
  se-_|_cond Ge_ | : Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. 1, title, within
  double lines: 3–8, Epistle dedicatory to Robert (Kerr) earl of Ancrum:
  1–107, the sermon, on 1 Kings x. 24.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 274.


21. ¬Wescombe¬, Martin. FABuLÆ | PONTIFICIÆ | EVANGELICÆ | Veritatis
radiis | _dissipatæ_. | [_line_] | _Autore_ | MARTINO WESCOMBE | Artium
Magistro in | _Academia celeberrima_ | _Oxoniensi_. | [_line_, then
_woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 157: 1639: (eights) 16^o: pp. [34] + 85 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _it,
  nec alicui_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title, within double
  lines: (5–23) dedication to archbp. Laud: (25–33) “Ad candidum
  lectorem præfatio”: 1–85, the work, in five parts.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 675: the author, according to
  the dedication, was a Franciscan at Toulouse, converted to
  Protestantism by Stephanus de Cursol, settled at Exeter and patronized
  by bp. Hall. In 1637/8 he became a member of Exeter College, and in
  1639 incorporated at Cambridge: after which he is lost sight of,
  except that he is said to have been reconverted to Roman Catholicism,
  and to have gone abroad. The five “fabulæ” are “De universali
  Episcopo,” “de infallibilitate papæ,” “de Purgatorio,” “de
  Transubstantiatione eucharistica,” and “de invocatione Sanctorum.”
  Wescombe is a Somerset and Devon name.


                                 1640.

1. ¬Bacon¬, sir Francis, Viscount St. Alban’s. OF THE | ADVANCEMENT AND
| PROFICIENCE OF LEARNING | or the | _PARTITIONS OF SCIENCES_ | I̅X̅
Bookes | _Written in Latin by the Most Eminent_ | _Illustrious & Famous
LORD_ | _FRANCIS BACON_ | _Baron̄ of Verulam Vicont S^t Alban_ |
_Counsilour of Estate and Lord_ | _Chancellor of England._ | [_line_] |
Interpreted | _by_ GILBERT WATS. |

  Impr. 194: 1640: (fours) la. 8^o: pp. [36] + 60 + [14] + 479 (“477”) +
  [21]: pp. 11 beg. _Nature, but_, and _on between_, 401 _hard and
  severe_: Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) engraved title, see
  below: (3–4) dedication to the king and the two universities, in
  Latin, by Wats: (5–8) dedication to prince Charles, signed “Gilbert
  Wats”: (9–16) preface to the reader, by Wats: (17–22) “Testimonies
  consecrate to ... S^r Francis Bacon ...”: (23–24) Latin poem on the
  _Instauratio Magna_ by George Herbert: (25–33) “Manes Verulamiani sive
  in obitum incomparabilis Francisci de Verulamio, &c. epicedia,” 6
  Latin poems, one by Thomas Randolph, &c.: (35–36) address by Bacon to
  each university, in parallel columns: 1–39, the author’s preface:
  (41–42) “The generall argument of the IX. books”: (43–60) “The
  argument of the chapters ...”: (1–11) the general design of the
  _Instauratio Magna_: (13) a table of “the Emanation of sciences ...”:
  1-“477”, the work in 9 books: (2–5) “A new world of sciences, or the
  Deficients”, headings: (6–8) “The Index of Sacred Scriptures ...”:
  (10–11) “The index of humane authors”: (12) “Errata”, marginal
  corrections only: (13) “Lectori Academico ...”, introducing what
  follows: (14–18) “Catalogus historiarum particularum . secundùm
  capita”: (19) Typographus Lectori” about what follows: (20) a Latin
  letter from the author to Trinity college Cambridge, _beg._ “Res
  omnes”: (21) impr. 195, as a colophon.

  See 1633 B. This is part 1 of the ©Instauratio Magna©, and is an
  expansion of the two books of the ©Advancement of Learning© first
  printed in 1605, which were enlarged in Latin to nine books, and
  published in 1623 (and 1635) by W. Rawley: here they are translated by
  G. Wats. Some copies have 1639 in the colophon. At pp. 266–69 are some
  woodcut facsimiles of cipher-alphabets, &c. The engraved titlepage by
  W. Marshall (9⅝ × 5¾ in.) bears the title on a sheet suspended between
  two obelisks representing Oxford and Cambridge: above it are two
  globes and “INSTAVR.MAG.P.I.”: below, a ship in full sail and the
  imprint: the whole is fully described in the British Museum ©Catalogue
  of Prints and Drawings©, Div. 1, vol. 1 (1870), p. 116 (no. 153).
  Three out of the four British Museum copies have a portrait of Bacon,
  but the translator’s own copy in the Bodleian has not. The collation,
  being elaborate, is here appended:—( )^1, ¶^4, ¶¶^2, ¶¶¶^1, A^2B-C^4:
  aa-gg^4 hh^2: †^4, ††^2, †^1: A-Z, Aa-Zz, Aaa-Qqq^4 Rrr^2: pp. 351–2
  are repeated in the numeration.


2. ¬Brerewood¬, Edward. TRACTATVS | ETHICI: | _SIVE_ | COMMENTARII | IN
ALIQVOT ARI[/]|STOTELIS LIBROS | ad NICHOMACHuM, | _De Moribus_: | A
Celeberrimo Philosopho | EDVARDO BREREWOOD | Art. Mag. è Colleg.
Ænea-|nasensi, olim conscripti: | Iam primùm ex authoris ipsius
Autogra-|pho, summâ fide, nec minori curâ casti-|gati, & publici juris
facti: | Per T. S. S. S. Theolog. Bacchalaureum, & | Colleg.
Ænea-nasens. apud _Oxon_ Socium. | [_line._]

  Impr. 200: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [16] + 245 + [3]: p. 11 beg. _De modo
  Doctrinæ_, 201 _tasia aliquando_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title within double lines: (3–11) Epistola dedicatoria to James lord
  Strange, dated “Oxonii è Musæo meo in Collegio Ænea-nasensi, Nono Cal.
  Januarii 1639.”, and signed “Thomas Sixesmith”: (13–16) “Index
  tractatuum, capitum, et quæstionum ...”: 1–245, the four treatises, on
  the first four books of the Ethics.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 141. The original MS.
  (finished 27 Oct. 1586) is now part of MS. (Queen’s coll. Oxford no.
  218). The method of this commentary or rather analysis is scholastic
  and formal. The editor says that he rescued the original MS. from a
  “rurale musæum,” when it was “pulvere situque squalidum, & tantum non
  sepultum.” The author died in 1613. It is curious that in Moss’s
  ©Manual of classical bibliography© (Lond., 1825, vol. i, p. 157) this
  book is called “Westerman, Commentaria in Ethica Aristotelis. Oxon.
  4to. 1640,” with a reference to Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii.
  141. The explanation is that _Westerman_ heads the column in Wood’s
  work, because the account of William Westerman follows Brerewood on
  that column: but the ascription deceived even so acute a bibliographer
  as the late professor Chandler in his List of editions of the
  Nicomachean Ethics (Oxf. 1878).


3. ¬Buridanus¬, Johannes. IOHANNIS | BVRIDANI | PHILOSOPHI | TRECENTIS
RETRO | annis celeberrimi | QUÆSTIONES IN OCTO | LIBROS POLITICORVM |
_ARISTOTELIS_. | uNA | CVM INDICE QUÆSTIONVM | Dubiorúm-que eisdem
annexorum | locupletissimo. | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 69: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 431 + [16]: p. 11 beg. _quia unus
  homo_, 401 _crimini vitæ_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within double lines: two epigrams, one by, and one to, Guillermus
  Baterel, the original editor: 1–431, the work: (1–15) index.

  Baterel’s annotated edition of Buridanus on the Politics was printed
  at least twice in the sixteenth century (1506 and 1526).


4. ¬Carpenter¬, Nathaniel. _ACHITOPHEL_, | OR | The Picture of a Wicked
| POLITITIAN. | _Divided into three Parts._ | A TREATISE | Presented
heretofore in three | Sermons to the Vniversity | of OXFORD and | _now
Published_. | By NATH. CARPENTER | B. D. & Fellow of _Excet. Coll._ | in
OXFORD. | [_line._]

  Impr. 193 _a_: 1640: (twelves) 24^o: pp. [8] + 177 + [3]: p. 11 beg.
  _common equity_, 101 _next place_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within a line: (3–8) dedication to archbp. Ussher: 1–60, 61–125,
  127–177, the three sermons, on 2 Sam. xvii. 23.

  For an account of the earlier editions, see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ii.
  422, and 1628 C. The present edition closely resembles the London ones
  of 1633 and 1638. Probably the “N. H.” who edited the next article
  below, edited this also, Carpenter having died in 1628. The work is
  evidently intended to be read with a view to the political
  circumstances of the time, under the disguise of dealing with “a
  sacred tragedy” from Old Testament history.


5. ——. CHORAZIN | AND | BETHSAIDA’S | VVoe, or warning[/]|Peece. | A
judicious and learned Sermon | On MATH. 11. V. 21. | Preached at S^t
_Maries_ in _Oxford_, by | that renowned and famous Divine, M^r |
_Nathanael Carpenter_, Bachellor in | Divinity, sometime Fellow of |
_Exeter_ Colledge; late Chap-|laine to my Lords Grace | of _Ardmagh_ in
| _Ireland_. |

  Impr. 193 _b_: 1640: (twelves) 24^o: pp. [8] + 95 + [1]: p. 11 beg.
  _were the Secretaries_: Pica Roman. Contents:—(1) title: (3–8) Epistle
  dedicatory to dr. Thomas Winniffe, dean of St. Paul’s, by “N.H.” the
  editor: 1–95, the sermon.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, ii. 422. This is a reprint of the
  Lond. 1633 edition. The preface gives some valuable biographical notes
  about Carpenter, who died in 1628, and was the editor’s tutor and
  “neere Affine” at Exeter college. It states with reference to the
  present book that “had not a kinsman’s (Io. Ca.) friendly hand given
  it safe conduct over the Surges of the Ocean, in all likelyhood it had
  perished on the Netherland shores.”


6. [¬Cartwright¬, William]. THE | ROYALL | SLAVE. | [&c., exactly as
1639 C, except that the hyphen in l. 7 is horizontal, that “_The second
Edition_” is inserted between the two _lines_, and that after them is a
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 189: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [64], signn. A-H^4: sign. C1^r beg.
  _Atos. I hope_: Pica Roman. Contents:—exactly as in 1639 C, except
  that the play only extends to H3^r, the three epilogues occupying
  H3^v-H4^r.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 69, and 1639 C, of which this
  is a reprint.


7. [¬Clain¬, Johann Theodor]. HISTORIA BRITANNICA | _Hoc est_, | DE
REBUS GESTIS | BRITANNIÆ | SEu | ANGLIÆ. | COMMENTARIOLI | TRES: | Nunc
denuò excusi. | _QVIBVS ACCESSERVNT_ | _præter generalem Angliæ
descripti-_|_onem: Marginalia & Index_ | _rerum copiosus._ |
[_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 197: 1640: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [12] + 220 + [44]: p. 11 beg.
  _fuisset. Brutus_, 201 _quam cogitatione_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p.
  (1) “A” between woodcuts: (5) title, within a line: (7–12) “Lectori
  ...”, signed “M.H.”: 1–7 “Angliæ descriptio generalis, ex Geographico
  Opusculo Johan. Büssenmecheri”: 9–61, 62–81, 82–220, the
  commentarioli: (1–44) “Index rerum et nominum memorabilium.”

  This is an anonymous history of Britain from the earliest times. The
  editor, M(atthew) H(unt), does not mention the fact, that an undated
  edition was printed at London by Henry Bynneman (who published from
  1566 to 1587), with the title “De rebus gestis Britanniæ commentarioli
  tres. Ad Ornatissimum Virum M. Henricum Broncarem Armigerum E.S.”,
  from which it has been conjectured that the author’s initials were
  “E.S.” The first words of the text are “Britannia est Insula natura
  triquetra.” The name of Clain is given in the British Museum catalogue
  as the author of an Amberg edition of 1603, and in Thomas Thorpe’s
  Catalogue of books (1851) p. 51 an edition printed at Hamburg in 1598
  is mentioned under the same name, but I can find no account of the
  author, who probably lived at Amberg. Some have ascribed the book to
  John Clapham, who published an English ©History of England© till the
  coming of the Saxons, in 1602 and 1606.


8. ¬Ferrand¬, Jacques. ¤ΕΡΩΤΟΜΑΝΙΑ¤ | _OR_ | A TREATISE | Discoursing of
the Essence, | Causes, Symptomes, Prog-|nosticks, and Cure of | ¤LOVE,¤
| _OR_ | _EROTIQVE_ | ¤_MELANCHOLY_¤ | [_line_] | _Written by_ | ¤IAMES
FERRAND¤ | D^r _of Physick_. | [_line_].

  Impr. 160 _b_: 1640: (eights) 16^o: pp. [40] + 363 + [5]: p. 11 beg.
  _Poetesse was_, 301 _purpose, and_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1)
  title, within a border between lines: (3–7) “The Author to the
  Reader”: (9–34) 8 English poems to the author and book by Oxford men,
  one by Martin Llewellin: (35–39) “A table of the chapters”: (39)
  “Errata”: 1–363, the work, in 39 chapters.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 350, where the translator
  from the French into English is stated to be Edmund Chilmead. The
  original French edition was published at Toulouse in 1612, under the
  title _Traité de l’essence et guérison de l’amour_, and at Paris in
  1623 as _De la maladie d’amour, ou melancholie erotique_. If Robert
  Burton was acquainted with the first edition of this book, as he well
  may have been, there can be little doubt that he has taken or imitated
  the general method and treatment of the subject, in his _Anatomy of
  Melancholy_: but the French author is surpassed on his own ground. The
  research is greater and the felicities of language more numerous and
  striking in Burton, while the plan is also further and distinctively
  elaborated. There is no mention of Burton’s book in the poems prefixed
  to this translation. The words underlined in the above title are
  printed in red, as well as “Oxford,” and “sold by Edward Forrest .
  1640.” in the imprint.


9. ¬Fletcher¬, John. RVLE A WIFE | And have a Wife. | a comœdy | ACTED
BY HIS | _Majesties Servants_. | [_line_] | Written by | JOHN FLETCHER |
_Gent._ | [_line_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 180: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 67 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _Only for
  present use_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (3) “Prologue”:
  1–67, the play; (1) “Epilogue.”

  This was Fletcher’s unaided composition, before the close of 1624,
  when it was twice performed at court. The underplot is said to be
  based on one of Cervantes’ “Novelas Exemplares.” See the ©Dict. of
  Nat. Biogr.© under Fletcher, p. 307, col. 1. The present is the first
  edition, and the only quarto one.


10. ——. The Tragœdy of | ROLLO | DuKE of Normandy. | ACTED BY HIS |
_Majesties Servants_. | [_line_] | Written by | JOHN FLETCHER | _Gent._
| [_line_, then _woodcut_.]

  Impr. 180: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 73 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _But for
  you_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: (2) “The Names of the
  Actors”: 1–73, the play.

  The authorship of this play is doubtful. The first edition (Lond.
  1639) was entitled “The Bloody Brother. A Tragedy. By _B. J. F._” i.
  e. Ben Johnson and Fletcher?, and it was entered in the Stationers’
  Register on 4 Oct. 1639 as by “J. B.” Massinger is also supposed to
  have had some share in it. See the ©Dict. of Nat. Biogr.© under
  Fletcher, p. 308, col. 2.


11. ¬H[arding]¬, S[amuel], of Exeter college, Oxford. SICILY | AND |
NAPLES, | OR, THE | FATALL VNION· | A Tragœdy. | _By_ | S. H. _A. B. è
C. Ex:_ [_line_, _motto_, two _lines_.]

  Impr. 119: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [12] + 96: p. 11 beg. _Cass. If the
  varlets_: Pica Roman. Contents—p. (1) title: (2) “Dramatis Personæ”:
  (3) “To the Reader”, signed “P.P.”, the editor: (4–11) seven
  complimentary poems to the author, alluding to Shakespeare’s, Ben
  Johnson’s and Randolph’s deaths: (12) Errata: 1–96, the play, with
  epilogue.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 31. The author died before
  1650, not, as Foster’s ©Alumni Oxonienses© asserts, as late as 1699.
  The editor, who is known to be Philip Papillon of Exeter college,
  declares that the play is here printed without the author’s knowledge
  and against his modesty. The lines relating to Shakespeare, which have
  perhaps only been reprinted in Pickering and Chatto’s Catalogue of
  books, nos. 70–72 (June 1893), p. 15, are:—

            “But sad Melpomene ...
            Hyes to pale Shakespeares urne, and from his tombe
            Takes up the bayes, and hither she is come.”


12. ¬Jeanes¬, Henry, of Hart hall, Oxford. A TREATISE | Concerning | A
CHRISTIANS | CAREFULL AB-|stinence from all ap-|pearance of Evill: |
Gathered | FOR THE MOST | part out of the Schoole-|men, and Casuists: |
_Wherein_ | _The Questions and Cases of_ | _Conscience belonging unto
the_ | _difficult matter of Scandall_ | _are briefly resolved:_ | By
HENRY JEANES, | M^r of Arts, lately of _Hart-_|_Hall_ in OXON, and
Rector of | ^{he} Church of _Beere-Cro-_|_combe_ in _Somerset-shire_. |
[_line._]

  Impr. 94_a_: 1640: 12^o: pp. [4] + 151 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _onely from_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3–4)
  dedication to Philip earl of Pembroke: 1–145, the discourse on “1
  Thess. [v] 22”: 147–151, “The Postscript to the Reader”: (1) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 591. This book appears to be rare, and
  was reprinted at Oxford in 1660.


13. ¬Oxford¬, University. HORTI | CAROLINI | _ROSA ALTERA_. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 151: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [108], signn. ( )^2, *, **, A-E^4 F^2,
  _a_-_c_^4, _cc_^2, _d_-_e_^4: sign. B1^r beg. _Iam meritò_, b1^r
  _Prethee forbeare_: English Roman & Italic. Contents:—( )1^r, title,
  within double lines: ( )2^r, poem dedicatory to the king, signed
  “Acad. Oxon.”, in Latin: *1^r-F2^v, Latin poems: _a_1^r-_e_4^r,
  English poems: _e_4^v “The Printer to their Maiesties”, an English
  poem, signed “Leonard Lichfield.”

  These are verses to celebrate the birth of prince Henry, 8 July 1640
  (_d._ 1660). Most are in Latin and English, but three in Greek, two in
  French, one in Hebrew. The signatures as usual show the difficulty of
  getting the poems sent in in time and arranged in proper order.


14. ¬Puteanus¬, Erycius. ERYCI PuTEANI | AMOENITATVM | HuMANARuM |
DIATRIBÆ DuÆ. | _PRIOR_ | DE LACONISMO: | Ad Illustriss: & Excellentiss:
| _Ducem Arschotanum_. | _ALTERA_, | THYRSI | PHILOTESII, | _SIVE_ |
Amor Laconissans: | Ad V. Nobilem & Prudentem, | Maxim. Plouvierium. |
_Utraque elegantiis & acumini-_|_bus referta_. | [two _lines_.]

  Impr. 198: 1640: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [8] + 200 + [8]: p. 11 beg.
  _factus ita_, 101 _Laconismum_: English Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within a line: (3–7) “Lectori benevolo ...”, signed “J. W” (estall):
  1–116, 117 (misprinted 711)-195, the two diatribae: 196–200 “Sententiæ
  aliquot aculeatæ, è Seneca”.

  These are reprints of Diatribae 7 and 8 out of the entire set of
  twelve which form the ©Amœnitates©. The Thyrsi are short essays on
  _aculei_, which are pointed sentences on friendship and love. The
  editor (and printer) mentions the ©Suada Attica© as “nuper excusa”:
  see below.


15. ——. ERYCI PuTEANI | svada attica, | _SIVE_ | ORATIONVM | SELECTARVM
| SYNTAGMA. | _Item_ PALÆSTRA _Bonæ Mentis_, | _prorsus innovata_. |
[_device._]

  Impr. 205: 1640: (eights) 16^o: pp. [16] + 534 + [2 + ?]: p. 11 beg.
  _ego didicerim_, 501 _munerúmque_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title:
  3–10, dedication “Tribus ordinibus Brabantiæ”, dated “Lovanii, in
  Arce, Kalendis Martiis M.DC.XV”: 11–12, two quotations: 13 “Syllabus
  Orationum”: (14) “Character harum orationum”: (15) a quotation: 1–419,
  the 22 orations: 419–421, two passages from Aulus Gellius: 421
  “Typographo lectori”: 422–424, “ErycI Puteani paucula de morte”: 425,
  a bastard title to the Palæstra: 427–429, “Ad lectorem”, dated
  “Lovanii”, XI. Kalend. Octobr. M.DC.XI.”: 430–512, the Palæstra, 20
  exercitationes &c.: 513–534, “Syllabus exercitationum” and short
  pieces, ending with “... Puteanus Lectori ...”: (1–2) blank, the rest
  (if any) not seen.

  There is no bibliography of the numerous works of Erycius Puteanus,
  but the ©Suada Attica© was first published at Louvain in 1615, and the
  ©Palæstra© in 1611. They contain orations and exercises delivered at
  Milan and Louvain. The _Palæstra Bonæ Mentis_ is properly a hall at
  Louvain, where some of these were delivered, and in another sense a
  literary club which met there for debate, recitations and the like.
  See preceding article.


16. ¬Randolph¬, Thomas. POEMS, | With the MuSES | LOOKING-GLASSE, |
_AND_ | AMYNTAS· | [_line_] | By THO. RANDOLPH M.A. and late | Fellow of
_Trinity_ Col. in | _Cambridge_. | [_line._] | The second Edition
Enlarged. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 174: 1640: (eights) 16^o: pp. [28] + 134 + [2] + 87 + [7] + 101
  + [1]: pp. 11 beg. _Africk he loaths, High as the men_, and _For
  Mopsus_: Long Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) an engraved title, see
  below: (3) title, as above, within double lines: (5–26) twelve poems
  on the author and book: 1–134, the poems: (1) title of the Muses
  Looking-glass, almost as in 1638 R, with impr. 174: 1–87, (1), the
  play: (2) title of Amyntas, nearly as in 1638 R, but “By T.R.”, with
  impr. 174: (4) “Dramatis Personæ”: (6–7), 1–101, the play.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 565, and 1638 R. The
  “enlargement” in this edition is not evident. The engraved title bears
  a bust of Randolph on a pedestal, with Philosophia and Poesis doing
  him honour, and a celestial sphere and Pegasus above. On the pedestal
  are the words “Poems by Tho : Randolph. The 2^d Edition much
  Enlarged.”, and below is impr. 196. Each of the three parts is
  separately paged, but the two plays are linked by the signatures,
  while the title alone connects the plays with the poems. The Cambridge
  1640 edition of “The Jealous Lovers”, a comedy by Randolph, is not
  infrequently found bound with this volume, but has no necessary
  connexion with it.


17. ¬R[ogers]¬, H[ugh]. ΓΑΜΗΛΙΑ | On the happy marriage of the most |
_accomplished paire_, | H. R. _Esq._ | And the vertuous _A. B._ |
[_device._] |

  Impr. 202: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [2] + 43 + [1]: p. 11 beg. _What beauty
  on_: Great Primer Italic and Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within
  double bounding lines except at foot (single line): 1–43, 19 poems, of
  which four are in Latin.

  Very rare. The only copy I have seen of this privately printed book is
  in the British Museum. The marriage (in 1640) was between Anne
  daughter of sir Edward Baynton, of Bromham (_d._ 1657), and Hugh
  Rogers esq. of Cannington. The poems are clearly by friends and
  relations of both parties, but are signed only with initials. A copy
  of the book was in the Heber sale (pt. viii, p. 49).


18. ¬Saints’ Legacies.¬ THE | SAINTS | LEGACIES, | OR | A COLLECTION OF
| CERTAINE PROMISES | OVT OF THE WORD | OF GOD. | Collected for private
use, but | published for the comfort of | Gods people. | _Whereunto is
now added the Saints_ | _Support in times of trouble._ | THE 6. EDITION.
|

  Impr. 203: 1640: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [36] + 157 + [5] + 31 + [23]: pp.
  11 begg. _Though your_, and _soule, that_: English Roman.
  Contents:—pp. (1–4) not seen: (5) title, with border within lines:
  (7–24) dedication to all true Believers, by the editor: (25–32) “To
  the Reader”: (33–35) “Rules to be observed in reading of promises”:
  1–157, the 105 legacies: (1–2) “A postscript sent from the Authour”:
  (4) a title within a line:—“AN | EPITOME OF | PROMISES | FOR THE |
  _SAINTS SUPPORT_ | IN TIME OF | TROVBLE. | [_line_] | _The sixth
  Edition._ | [_line, motto, line_]”. with impr. 204: 1–31, 31 promises:
  (1–4) texts: (6–9) “A Postscript, to all true Beleevers”: (10–18,
  20–22) “Five Tables ...” or indexes.

  This is a rare and curious book: rare, inasmuch as no ordinary library
  catalogue or bibliography contains any mention of any edition or copy
  of it; and curious, as having its two parts—which are indissolubly
  joined by the signatures and sections—printed by the same printer for
  two different London publishers, R. Royston and S. Enderby. We must
  suppose these two to have ventured proportionate parts in the book.


19. ¬Sanderson¬, Robert. LOGICÆ | _ARTIS_ | COMPENDIVM. | Editio Quarta.
| [_line_] | Authore ROB. SANDERSON, | Coll. _Lincolniensis_ in almâ |
_Oxoniensi, quondam_ | _Socio_. | [_line_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 201: 1640: (eights) 16^o: pp. [8] + 239 + [1] + ...: p. 11 beg.
  _possint esse_, 201 _Cap. 21._: Pica Roman. Contents:—pp. (1–2) not
  seen: (3) title, within a line: (5–8) “Elenchus capitum”: 1–239 the
  work, in three books: (the two Appendixes contain over 120 pages.)

  Rare. See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 626, and 1615 S. The
  only copy I have seen, in Queen’s College (Oxford) Library, is
  interleaved, and wants the two appendixes, which probably occupied the
  same number of pages as in the 1631 edition.


20. [¬Snelling¬, Thomas]. THIBALDVS | SIVE | _VINDICTÆ_ | _INGENIVM_. |
TRAGOEDIA. | [_line, motto, line, woodcut._]

  Impr. 157: 1640: (eights) 16^o: pp. [24] + 80: p. 11 beg. _Pro morte_:
  Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, with border between lines: (3–4)
  “Lectori”: (5–16) six complimentary Latin poems by St. John’s College
  men: (17) “Dramatis Personæ”: (119–21) “Argumentum”: (23) “Errata
  ...”: 1–80, the play.

  For the author, see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 275. The
  sheets of this work were reissued in 1650 at London, with a new title
  ©Pharamus, sive Libido vindex, Hispanica tragædia©, but neither Wood
  nor his editors have been aware of this earlier edition. Both were
  anonymous, and the direct evidence for the authorship (which need not
  be doubted) is difficult to find. Bp. Barlow wrote the author’s name
  on the title of his copy of ©Pharamus©. The poems imply that the play
  had been written some years before 1640: the author matriculated at St
  John’s College, Oxford, in June 1634.


21. ¬Tipping¬, William. “©A Return of Thankfulness for the unexpected
Recovery out of a dangerous Sickness.© Oxon. 1640. Oct.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 244.


22. ¬Tozer¬, Henry. DIRECTIONS | _FOR_ | A GODLY LIFE: | ESPECIALLY FOR
| Communicating at the | Lords Table. | _INTENDED FIRST FOR_ | _private
use; now published for the_ | _good of those who desire the safty_ | _of
their owne soules, and_ | _shall be pleased to make_ | _use thereof._ |
By H. TOZER Mr of Arts, and | Fellow of _Exceter_ Col-|ledge in
_Oxford_. | _The fifth Edition._ | [_motto._]

  Impr. 199: (twelves) 16^o: pp. [10] + 195 + [11]: p. 11 beg.
  _Minister. 2_, 101 _was due_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title,
  within line and border: (3–9) Epistle dedicatory, as in 1628 T: 1–195,
  the directions: (2–4) “The contents of each Chapter”.

  For the author and book, but not this edition, see Wood’s ©Ath.
  Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 274 (and 1628 T). Each page is within a line,
  doubled at upper and outer margins.


23. ——. “_Sermon on Joh._ 18. 3. Ox. 1640.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 274.


24. ¬Twittee¬, Thomas. AD | CLERVM | PRO | FORMA CONCIO | HABITA IN
TEMPLO | BEATÆ MARIÆ _OXON_: | MARTIJ 13. 1634. | [_line_] | PER THO_:_
TWITTEE SANCTÆ | Theologiæ _Bac. è Coll. Oriell._ | [_line, motto._] |

  Impr. 157: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [4] + 24: p. 11 beg. _men hî verè_:
  Great Primer Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title, within double lines: (3)
  dedication to dr. John Tolson provost of Oriel: 1–24, the sermon, on 1
  Pet. iii. 8.

  See Wood’s ©Fasti Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 469. The dedication is of the
  modern kind, not an epistle dedicatory, and the printing is unusual,
  the first words of a paragraph being generally projections to the
  left, instead of indented.


25. ¬Z[ouche]¬, R[ichard]. DESCRIPTIO | JuRIS & JuDICII | MILITARIS |
_AD QVAM LEGES QUÆ_ | Rem Militarem, & Ordinem | _Personarum_. | NEC NON
| JuRIS & JuDICII | MARITIMI | AD QuAM QuÆ NAVI-|_GATIONEM ET_ |
Negotiationem Maritimam | _respiciunt, referuntur_. | [_line_] | Autore
R. Z.   P. R. _Oxoniæ_. | [_line._]

  Impr. 157: 1640: sm. 4^o: pp. [8] + 36 + [4] + 40 + [4]: pp. 11 beg.
  _meris sunt_, and _quæsitum est_: Pica Roman. Contents:—p. (3) title,
  within double lines: (5–6) “Ad Lectorem”, unsigned, but “Datum ex Aula
  Alb. Prid. Calend. April. 1640”: (7–8) heads of chapters in division
  1: 1–36, the military division, in two parts: (1) a title, within
  double lines: “DESCRIPTIO | JuRIS & JuDICII | MARITIMI | [&c., exactly
  as the main title, to its end, with woodcut and impr. 157: (3–4) heads
  of chapters in division 2: 1–40, “De jure maritimo & de jure nautico”
  in two parts: (1) “Errata”.

  See Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 511. The signatures establish
  a connexion between the two divisions.


26. ——. “_Descr. Juris & Judicii sacri; ad quam Leges, quæ ad Religionem
& piam Causam respiciunt, referuntur._ Oxon. 1640. qu.”

  So in Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, iii. 511, where it is stated
  that the De Jure Sacro, Militari and Maritimo, were issued together.
  In the Leyden reprint of 1652 the De jure sacro is rather shorter than
  the other two. It does not seem to have found its way into the Oxford
  or London libraries which have published their catalogues.



                              Periodical.


The ©Quaestiones in Vesperiis© and ©Quaestiones in Comitiis© (see Andrew
Clark’s ©Register of the University of Oxford©, vol. ii. pt. i. [1887],
p. 169) were often printed.

  1602. The earliest I have seen are the theological “Quæstiones
  (Christo propitio) in Vesperijs discutiendæ, _Iul._ 10. 1602,”
  followed by some belonging to the Comitia, and some Law _quaestiones_
  belonging to both, and by a specimen of dr. John King’s treatment of
  his three _quaestiones_, in Latin verse: the whole forming a small
  sheet of 16 pages, with the last five blank.

  1605. The ©Quaestiones ... in Comitiis ... coram ... Rege ... Aug....
  1605© were printed in folio sheet form, as was invariably the case in
  later years, occupying in this year four pages. Whether this issue was
  exceptional or not, is not clear.

  1608. In this year at latest begins the series of ordinary folio
  sheets of _quaestiones_: of which examples have been seen for the
  years 1608, 1614, 1618, 1619, 1622, 1627, 1628, 1629, 1632, 1634,
  1635, 1639, 1640, and intermittently until at least 1693.



                              SUPPLEMENT.
           ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER.


                              “1468”–86/7.

Pp. 1–4. See pp. 237–62. (App. A).


                                 1483.

P. 3. For the ¬Augustine¬ see p. 259.


P. 3. _For_ 3. *¬Logic¬ _read_ 3. *†¬Logic¬.


P. 3. _For_ 4. *¬Lyndewoode¬ _read_ 4. *†¬Lyndewoode¬.


                                 1485.

P. 4. ¬Alexander¬, l. 3.

  _For_ c^2-c^3 _read_ c2, c3.


                                 1486.

P. 4. ¬Mirk¬, last line.

  The first two leaves are in the Lambeth copy.


                                1517–19.

Pp. 5–7. See pp. 263–65. (App. B).


                                 1518.

P. 7. ¬Whittington¬, l. 3.

  _For_ protouatis _read_ prothouatis. Eleven copies are now known.


Pp. 8–9. ¬Pliny and Lystrius.¬

  Something can be added to the account. The two original books in
  dispute are in the John Rylands (Spencer) Library at Manchester, and
  the _locus classicus_ for their history is naturally in Dibdin’s
  ©Bibliotheca Spenceriana© (1814), ii. 271, iii. 411: where will be
  found a reproduction (in type) of the two titles and colophons. Of the
  Pliny Dibdin states that one George Smith passed it on to Van Damme,
  from whom Askew bought it for fifteen guineas. With respect to the
  Lystrius, it appears that the “Mr. Dent” who purchased it at the Askew
  sale was an agent or pseudonym of Mr. Alchorne. The volume bears a
  manuscript note pretending to be from “i. Korsellis” at Haarlem in
  1471, stating that the book came to him from his brother Frederick.


                              About 1513.

P. 11. _Add_:—


¬Syrretus¬, Antonius. [Antonii Syrreti Formalitates de mente magistri
Johannis Duns?] | Scoti ordinis fratrum minor¿um¿ doctoris
sub⸗|tilissimi cum nouis additionibus et con⸗|cordantijs magistri
Mauritij de por⸗|tu hybernie in margine decora⸗|te et nouiter impresse:
| [two Latin verses, then a woodcut of the Trinity with “Henricus
Iacobi” and printer’s mark at foot, then two more Latin verses] |
¶Uenu¿m¿dantur in vniuersitate Oxonien¿si¿. Sub | intersignio
sanctissime Trinitatis ab Hen⸗|rico Jacobi bibliopole Londonien¿sis¿. |

  This interesting title is found on a fragment of two leaves discovered
  by Mr. R. G. C. Procter in New College Library at Oxford, in Aug.
  1891, and now marked “Auct. V. 16,” fol. 3. The verso of the title is
  occupied with a woodcut of the arms of Henry VIII, with supporters,
  two angels with scroll, &c. The second leaf is marked A 2, and
  contains a dedication and certain definitions, all part of the
  Additiones Mauritii. The book was no doubt printed in London, but sold
  in Oxford by Henricus Jacobi, who died in the latter city towards the
  end of 1514, intestate, see p. 273. From an interesting account of
  Jacobi in ©Bibliographica©, pt. I (1894), by Mr. E. G. Duff, it
  appears that Jacobi, after publishing in London from 1505 to 1512,
  came to Oxford in 1512 or 1513 (see pp. 95, 112 of the account).

  This entry and that of 1506 should strictly be in a list by
  themselves, being neither “lost” nor “fictitious.”


                                 1585.

P. 14. ¬Bilson¬, Thomas. _Add at end_:—

  A curious account of an abortive effort on the part of Edmund
  Bollifant and three partners to produce a reprint of this book, will
  be found in Arber’s ©Transcript of the Stationers’ Registers© II
  (1875), p. 793.


P. 17. ¬Parsons¬, Robert, (2nd entry, no. 6). _Add at end_:—

  An explanation of this reprint will be found in Arber’s ©Transcript of
  the Stationers’ Registers© II (1875), p. 793 (a petition from N.
  Newton, E. Bollifant, and others, in the winter of 1585/6), from which
  it appears that John Wight, printer, of London, who had entered a copy
  of his edition of the book at Stationers’ Hall on 28 Aug. 1584, sent
  his son to Oxford to buy up the whole of Barnes’s reprint: which was
  done. But Barnes promptly printed “two ympressions more,” of which the
  present volume is no doubt one. Possibly the preceding art. is the
  other re-impression, and Wight effectually suppressed the whole first
  edition.


                                 1586.

P. 17. _Insert_:—

¬Brasbridge¬, Thomas, of Magdalen college, Oxford. QVÆESTI-|ONES IN
OF-|FICIA M. T. | CICERONIS: | Compendiariam totius | _Opusculi
Epitomen_ | continentes. | [_woodcuts._]

  Impr. 5: 1586: (eights) 12^o: pp. [68], signn. A-D^8 E^2: sign. B 1^r
  beg. _rum alterum_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. A 1^r, title within a
  border, A 2^r-2^v, dedication to Laurence Humphrey, signed “Thomas
  Brasbrigius,” “Banburiæ, Idibus Nouembris, 1586”: A 3^r-E 2 (printed E
  3)^v, the questions and answers: E 2^v, two Latin lines signed “I. P.
  Iohannensis.”

  Very rare. For the author, see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.©, ed. Bliss, i. 526.
  The preface contains some autobiographical details. There appear to be
  at least three editions of this work, 1586, 1592 (q. v.) and 1615 (q.
  v.), all printed at Oxford.


                                 1589.

P. 28. ¬Skelton¬, John.

  Lord Spencer’s copy is of course now in the John Rylands Library at
  Manchester.


                                 1591.

P. 31. ¬Tacitus.¬ _Add at end_:—

  On 25 May 1591 a patent was issued to Richard Wright of Oxford and his
  assigns to print Tacitus’s ©History© in English, during his lifetime
  (Patent Rolls, 33 Eliz. pt. 17, mentioned in Arber’s ©Transcript of
  the Stationers’ Registers© II (1875), p. 16). The metal engraving of a
  Roman Camp reappears in R. Grenewey’s translation of the ©Annals© of
  Tacitus (Lond. 1598, 1604, 1622).


                                 1592.

P. 32. ¬Barlaamus¬, last line but one.

  _For_ author _read_ editor. Another presentation copy has been seen,
  also without device.


P. 32. ¬Brasbridge.¬

  See 1586 in this Supplement.


P. 33. ¬Elizabeth.¬

  There is a perfect copy of this rare pamphlet in the great
  Gloucestershire collections at Chestal, Dursley, in the possession of
  the Phelps family, kindly pointed out to me by F. A. Hyett, Esq. The
  title is:—SPEECHES | DELIVERED TO | HER MAIESTIE THIS | LAST
  PROGRESSE, AT THE | Right Honorable the Lady RVSSELS, at | Bissam, the
  Right Honorable the Lorde | CHANDOS at Sudley, at the Right |
  Honorable the Lord NORRIS, at | Ricorte. | [_device._] On the verso of
  the title is a preface “To the Reader” signed by “I. B.” the printer.


P. 33. ¬Gager¬ (no. 7).

  The author of the ©Bellum Grammaticale© was Andreas Guarna.


P. 34. ¬Gager¬ (no. 8). l. 4 (not l. 3).

_For_ 1591 _read_ 1592.


                                 1593.

P. 35. After no. 4 _add_:—

¬Oxford¬, New College. Ex donatione Magistri Fran-|cisci Bettes LL. D:
Socij huius Col-|_legij_. _Anno Domini. 1593._

  This is a book label, found in Spiegelius’s ©Lexicon Juris Civilis©,
  1549 (Oo. xii. 5), and perhaps in other volumes in New College Library
  at Oxford. The words are within a border of woodcuts, the outside
  measurement of the printed border being 1–15/16 × 3–3/16 in.


                                 1594.

P. 36. ¬Beacon.¬

  P. 1 bears “¶j”, and is therefore not wholly blank.


P. 37. ¬Powel¬ (no. 5). _Add at end_:—

  See 1631 P.


                                 1597.

P. 42. ¬Agatharchides.¬

  Professor Bywater has pointed out that the extracts from Agatharchides
  and Memnon are from an earlier printed edition of them, and not
  directly from Photius’s ©Bibliotheca©, which was first printed in
  1601. Had the matter been taken from a MS. of Photius, the editor
  would no doubt have claimed the honour, whereas he claims credit only
  for the new translation into Latin.


P. 42. _After_ ¬Agatharchides¬ _add_:—

¬Brett¬, Richard, of Lincoln College. Theses M^{ri} BRET respondentis in
Comitiis. | Oxon. 1597. | [text follows, as below.]

  A single sheet, 8½ in. high by 6 broad, printed on both sides,
  containing three theses. The first is _Politia Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ cum
  iure divino non pugnat_, followed by short Latin, Greek, and Hebrew
  poems. The second is followed by Latin, “Caldaica,” and “Syrica”
  poems, the last being written in MS. The third is followed by Latin,
  Arabic, and Æthiopic poems, the last two being filled in in MS. The
  Hebrew is in Pica type. For Brett, see Wood’s ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 611: he
  took the degree of Bachelor of Divinity on 6 June, 1597.


P. 43. _After_ ¬King¬ _add_:—

¬Oxford¬, University. “Qvaestiones sex, totidem praelectionibvs, in
schola Theologica, Oxoniae, pro Forma, Habitis, Discvssae, Et
Disceptatae Anno 1597.”

  So in the Catalogue of W. H. Holyoak, 75 Humberstone Gate, Leicester,
  “March 1888,” no. 10: the copy was sold on Jan. 3, 1890 to the rev.
  Shaw Urmstone of Manchester.


                                 1598.

P. 44. _After_ ¬Butler¬ _add_:—

¬Butler¬, Charles. RHETORICÆ | LIBRI DVO. | QVORVM | _Prior de Tropis &
Figuris_, | _Posterior de Voce & Gestu_ | PRAECIPIT. | IN VSVM
SCHOLA-|rum accuratiùs editi. | ⁂⁂ | ⁂ | [_motto_, then _woodcuts_.]

  Impr. 11: 1598: (eights) 16^o: pp. [112], signn. ¶^4 A-F^8 G^4: sign.
  B 1^r beg. _sus, vivus_: Pica Roman. Contents:—sign. ¶1^v, title:
  ¶2^r-3^r Epistola dedicatoria to lord Thomas Egerton, dated “Oxon. 16.
  Calend. Decemb. [16 Nov.], 1598”: ¶3^v-4^v, “Ad Lectorem”: A 1^r-G
  3^r, the work: G 4 I have not seen.

  Very rare: the only copy at present known is in Corpus Christi Library
  at Oxford. Even Wood (©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 210) had not seen this first
  edition, since he implies that the date is 1600. See 1600 B, 1618 B,
  1629 B.


                             1598 and 1599.

Pp. 44, 46.

  The article ¬Lomazzo¬ has been inserted under 1599 instead of 1598,
  the proper year.


                                 1599.

P. 47. ¬Richard.¬

  With respect to the letters “B. P. N.”, see also 1625 J.


                                 1603.

P. 55. ¬Davies.¬ _Add at end_:—

  Ingleby, in his ©Shakespeare’s Centurie of Prayse© (2nd ed., 1879),
  points out a Shakespearean allusion on p. 215 of this work.


                                 1606.

P. 65. ¬Oxford¬, l. 1.

  _For_ .4 _read_ 4.


                                 1608.

P. 71. ¬Panke.¬ _Add at end_:—

  See 1613 P, in this Supplement.


                                 1610.

P. 78. ¬Rainolds¬, top line of page.

  _For_ ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 15 _read_ ©Ath. Oxon.© ii. 15 and 193.


                                 1612.

Pp. 82, 85.

  The articles ¬Rawlinson¬ and ¬Reinolds¬ are out of their place at the
  latter reference, and should be on p. 82.


P. 85. ¬Smyth¬, Richard. _Add at end_:—

  The third edition was issued in 1634; see 1634 S.


                                 1613.

P. 86. ¬Answer.¬

  This is of course by Richard Parkes, as is noted in the first edition
  (p. 59; 1604, no. 7). “1604 A” is twice an error for “1604 P.”


P. 89. ¬Colmore¬, l. 3.

  _For_ SAACTPAVL _read_ SANCTPAVL.


P. 92. ¬Oxford¬, Univ. (Justa Funebria), l. 6.

  The type is English Roman.


P. 92. Ibid. l. 11.

  _For_ preceding art. _read_ art. no. 19.


P. 92. _After_ ¬Oxford¬, no. 21, _insert_:—

¬Panke¬, John. THE FALL OF BABEL. | By the confusion of Tongues,
directly proouing against the | Papistes of this, and former ages; that
a view of their writings | and Bookes, being taken, it cannot be
discerned by any | man liuing, what they would say, or how be
vnder-|stood, in the question of the sacrifice of the Masse, | the Reall
presence or Transubstantiation; | but in explaning their mindes, they
fall | vpon such tearmes, as the Prote-|stants vse and allow. | FVRTHER.
| In the question of the Popes Supremacie is shewed, how they | _abuse
an authoritie of the auncient Father S. Cyprian, a Canon of_ | the 1.
Niceene counsell, and the Ecclesiasticall historie of Socrates, and
Sozomen: And lastly is set downe a briefe of the succession | of Popes
in the sea of Rome, for these 1600. yeares togea-|ther: what diuersitie
there is in their accompt, what | heresies, schismes, and intrusions
there hath been in | that sea, deliuered in opposition against their |
Tables, wherewith now adayes they are | very busie, and other thinges
dis-|couered against them. | _By_ IOHN PANKE. | [_motto_, then
_woodcut_.]

  Impr. 29 _a_: 1613: sm. 4^o: the rest as 1608 P.

  The titlepage was not printed at Oxford, the woodcut being unknown
  there: the rest is a reissue of the sheets of 1608 P. This edition has
  been erroneously dated 1623 in the British Museum ©Catalogue of books
  ... to the year 1640©.


P. 95. ¬Smith¬, l. 5.

  _For_ 1684. S. _read_ 1617 S.


                                 1614.

P. 95. ¬Benefield.¬

  The date of the imprint should be 1614, not 1613.


Pp. 97, 100. ¬N.¬, S. (no. 9).

  This article should be headed ¬S.¬, N., and should follow no. 15 on p.
  100.


P. 99. ¬Rainolds¬, l. 8.

  _For_ Pica English _read_ Pica Roman.


                                 1615.

P. 101. ¬Brasbridge.¬ _Add at end_:—

  See 1586 in this Supplement.


                                 1618.

P. 110. ¬Sanderson¬, last line.

  _For_ ii. 626 _read_ iii. 626.


                                 1619.

P. 111. ¬Flavel¬, l. 9.

  _For_ Long Primer English _read_ Long Primer Roman.


                                 1620.

P. 114. ¬James¬, l. 16.

  _For_ Proeomium _read_ Prooemium.


                                 1621.

P. 115. ¬Burton.¬

  An edition of the ©Anatomy of Melancholy© has been issued in 1893, in
  which the editor claims to have verified most of Burton’s quotations.
  See also 1640 F (Ferrand).


                                 1622.

P. 116. ¬Carpenter¬, last line of page.

_For_ CARPNETARIO _read_ CARPENTARIO.


P. 118. ¬Oxford.¬

  The date of the book (1622) has been accidentally omitted.


P. 118. ¬Rawlinson¬, l. 4.

  _For_ 1662 _read_ 1621/2.


                                 1623.

P. 119. ¬Panke.¬

  The words “See 1613 P” are a reference to 1613 in this Supplement.


                                 1625.

P. 123. ¬Carpenter¬, l. 7.

  _For_ W_ater_ _read_ _Water_.


P. 126. ¬Pemble.¬

  A reference to the 2nd edition, 1629, should have been inserted.


                                 1628.

P. 138. ¬Casa.¬ The J. W. (de Umbra) is no doubt J. Wouverus.


                                 1629.

P. 144. ¬Butler¬, ll. 5–7.

  _For the sentence_ The reference ... ©Oratoriæ Libri duo©, _read_ The
  reference to a ©Rhetorica© of this year is to a London edition of the
  ©Rhetorica© and ©Oratoria© together.


                                 1630.

P. 150. ¬Hakewill¬, l. 2.

  _For_ PER=|PETVALL _read_ PER=|PETUALL.


P. 150. Ibid. l. 22.

  For ©Ath. Oxon.©, 256 read ©Ath. Oxon.©, iii. 256.


P. 151. ¬Pemble¬, l. 6.

  _For_ Impr. 84 _b_ _read_ Impr. 84 _a_.


P. 151. ¬Pinke.¬ _Add at end_:—

  See 1634 P (2nd ed.)


P. 151. _Insert_:—

¬Stanley¬, Henry. [_device_] | APPENDIX | AD LIBROS OMNES TAM | VETERIS
QVAM NOVI TESTAMENTI. | HENRICUS [_device_] STANLEY | OXONIÆ. |
M.DC.XXX. |

  Impr. as above: 1630: folio: pp. [2 + “529”-“540”]: pp. 529–40 begg.
  _Appendix_: Pica (?) Roman. Contents:—p. (1) title: 529–40, tables,
  see below.

  This set of seven leaves is apparently an experiment to be used for
  indexing sermons or comments under the verse of the Bible to which
  they refer. They are blank tables in the form “Versus 1 [2, 3, &c. to
  18] _Vid._ L.  P.  L.  ” six times and then “_Vid._  P.  L.  ”
  Eighteen verses are on each page, and references to L(iber) P(agina)
  L(inea) were intended to be filled in. No Latin Bible of folio size of
  1629, ‘30 or ‘31 seems to exist, so probably this was intended to be
  bound up with some earlier edition. The only copy known is in the
  British Museum in MS. Harl. 5932, fol. 45 (Bagford’s collections), and
  no doubt the intended publication was abandoned.


                                 1631.

P. 153. ¬Bible¬, top line.

  The date of imprint (1631) has been accidentally omitted.


P. 155. ¬F.¬, A. (Saints Legacies). _Add at end_:—

  See 1640 S.


P. 155. ¬Felix¬, l. 1.

  _For_ Felıx _read_ Felix.


P. 155. Ibid. ll. 4–5.

  bere; quam _should be italic_.


P. 158. ¬Powel.¬ A copy of the work has now been seen, as follows:—

¬Powel¬, Griffin. ANALYSIS | ANALYTICO-|RVM POSTERIORVM | SIVE LIBRORVM
ARISTO-|telis de Demonstratione, | in qua singula capita per |
quæstiones & responsi-|nes perspicuè ex-|ponuntur: | _adhibitis_ |
QVIBVSDAM SCHOLIIS, | ex optimis quibusq; interpreti-|bus desumptis,
opera & studio _G._ | POWEL _Oxoniensis confecta_ | _& edita in vsum
iuniorum_. | _Editio secunda._ | [_woodcut._]

  Impr. 143 _a_: 1631: (eights) 12^o: pp. [16] + 241 + [3]: p. 11 beg.
  _Analysis cap._ 2, 201 _strationis Medium_: Pica Roman. Contents:—pp.
  (1–2) not seen: (3) title: (5–7) dedication to the earl of Essex,
  dated “Ex Collegio Iesu oxoniæ Tertio Calend: Martij ... Griffinus
  Powel”: (8–14) “Ad Lectorem Academicum”, and “Prolegomena”: (15–16)
  not seen: 1–241, the Analysis: (2–3) not seen.

  See in body of text (1631 P).


                                 1632.

P. 161. ¬Widdowes¬, no. 32, l. 4.

  _For_ Impr. 137 _read_ Impr. 107.


                                 1633.

P. 168. ¬Gerhardus¬, l. 5.

  _For_ Long Primer English _read_ Long Primer Roman.


P. 172. ¬Reusner¬, l. 9 (only).

  In the collation _for_ 198 _read_ 224, with the last page misprinted
  198: and _for_ 34 _read_ 36, making the necessary correction in the
  List of Contents.


                                 1634.

P. 175. ¬Allen¬, 2nd line of page.

  It is the Bodleian Catalogue which ascribes the book to John Allen.


P. 175. ¬Barclay¬, no. 3.

  The date of the imprint (1634) has been accidentally omitted.


                                 1635.

P. 183. ¬Chaucer¬, l. 6.

  _In_ English Roman Italic _the word_ Roman _is superfluous_.


P. 183. Ibid, last line.

  _For_ sign. 2** _read_ sign. **2.


                                 1636.

P. 189. ¬Carpenter.¬

  At the end of the technical description a ] should be added.


P. 194. ¬Prideaux¬, l. 5.

  _For_ 40^o P. 50 Th. _read_ 4^o P. 50 Th.


                                 1637.

P. 197. ¬Cowper.¬

  The date of the imprint (1637) is accidentally omitted.


P. 200. ¬Prideaux¬, halfway down.

  _After_ Christ’s Resurrection ...” _add_ with impr. 152 _b_.


                                 1638.

P. 204. ¬Burton¬, l. 5 from end.

  Perhaps _protelata_ is rather “continued,” although there is no sign
  of London printing.


P. 209. ¬Oxford¬—Statuta. _Add_:—

  A copy of the Statuta Selecta has been seen in which opposite p. 20,
  instead of the ©Encyclopædia© is found an undated folio folded
  broadside entitled:—SPECULUM | ACADEMICUM: | Quadratura Circuli, |
  Sive | _Cyclus Prælectorum_ in Schema redactus.... This table gives a
  note of the day of the week, hour, professor, audience and fines, and
  bears at the foot “Pag. 20.”, showing that it was intended for (at
  least some part of) this edition of the Statuta. In the last line
  copies vary between “Vesp.” (as it should be) and “vesp.”


                                 1639.

P. 212. ¬Dugres.¬

  The date of the imprint (1639) is accidentally omitted.


P. 214. ¬Grotius¬, 3rd line from end.

  _For_ 1722 _read_ 1622.


                                 1640.

P. 223. ¬Saints Legacies.¬ _Add at end_:—

  The first edition of this book is described in 1631 F, so the note of
  its rarity must be modified.

  In Arber’s ©Transcript of the Stationers’ Registers© there is a record
  that this book under the title “A Collection of Certaine Promisis out
  of the Word of God” was entered by Robert Swayne on 21 June 1629, and
  that Swayne’s widow (?) Martha transferred her rights in “the Promises
  or Saintes legacy” to Richard Royston on 6 Feb. 1631/2.


P. 223. ¬Tozer.¬

  The date of the imprint (1640) is accidentally omitted.



                         LIST OF UNDATED BOOKS
    (WITH A REFERENCE TO THE YEAR UNDER WHICH THEY ARE CATALOGUED).


 Alexander: see 1485.

 Angelus, Christophorus: see 1618.

 Articles: see 1633.

 Augustine: see 1483.

 Cicero: see 1480.

 France—Articles: see 1624.

 Godwin, F., bp. of Llandaff: see 1603.

 Hampole: see 1483.

 Howson, John, bp. of Oxford: see 1622.

 Hutchins, Robert: see 1617.

 James, Thomas: Humble Request: see 1625.

 Jesuits Pater Noster: see 1611.

 Laet, Jaspar: see 1518.

 Latin Grammar: see 1481, 1483.

 Logic: see 1483.

 Lyndewoode, Will.: see 1483.

 Oxford, Merton College: see 1623.

 —— University: Encyclopædia: see 1635.

 —— —— Orders for the Market: see 1602, 1606.

 Philosophy: de Philosophia: see 1586.

 Shepery, John: see 1586.

 Terence: see 1483.

 Thornborough, John, bp. of Bristol: see 1605.

 Thornburgh, Edw.: see 1639.

 W., R.: Merry jests: see 1617.

 W(alkington), T(homas): see 1631.



                              APPENDIX A.
                      The Fifteenth Century Press.

            (Supplementary to, and corrective of, pp. 1–4.)


The Oxford Press of the fifteenth century is a peculiarly interesting
one. At present fifteen works are known to belong to it, ranging in date
from “1468” (1478?) to 1486 (1486/7?). Not only is its origin quite
independent, so far as is known, of Caxton’s printing, not only are new
products of the press still from time to time discovered, but the battle
which has been waged about the date of its establishment has made the
“1468” book a veritable typographical battleground, and in Henry
Bradshaw’s opinion a touchstone of intellectual acumen.

In the first place some details of the various books will be given: then
an account of the type and presswork: and lastly a description of each
book supplementary to, and corrective of, that contained on pp. 1–4.


                   DETAILS OF THE EARLY OXFORD PRESS.

 ┌───────────┬───────────────┬───────────┬─────┬─────────────┐
 │NO.  DATE. │ PLACE NAMED.  │  PRINTER  │TYPE │SHORT TITLE. │
 │           │               │  NAMED.   │USED.│             │
 ├───────────┼───────────────┼───────────┼─────┼─────────────┤
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 ├───────────┼───────────────┼───────────┼─────┼─────────────┤
 │  1 “1468,”│    Oxonia     │    ——     │  1  │  ¬Jerome¬   │
 │    Dec. 17│               │           │     │             │
 │  2  1479  │Oxonia (or -ae,│    ——     │  1  │ ¬Aretinus¬  │
 │           │    plural)    │           │     │             │
 │  3 1479/80│    Oxonia     │    ——     │  1  │  ¬Ægidius¬  │
 │     (?),  │               │           │     │             │
 │     Mar.  │               │           │     │             │
 │      14.  │               │           │     │             │
 ├───────────┼───────────────┼───────────┼─────┼─────────────┤
 │  4 [1480?]│      ——       │    ——     │  2  │  ¬Cicero¬   │
 │  5 [1481?]│      ——       │    ——     │  2  │   ¬Latin    │
 │           │               │           │     │  Grammar¬   │
 │  6  1481, │     Alma      │Theodoricus│2, 3 │   ¬Ales¬    │
 │    Oct. 11│  universitas  │  Rood de  │     │             │
 │           │     Oxon̄.    │  Colonia  │     │             │
 │  7  1482, │      ——       │    ——     │2, 3 │¬Latteburius¬│
 │    July 31│               │           │     │             │
 ├───────────┼───────────────┼───────────┼─────┼─────────────┤
 │  8 [1483?]│      ——       │    ——     │4, 5,│ ¬Anwykyll¬, │
 │           │               │           │  6  │    with     │
 │           │               │           │     │ ¬Vulgaria¬  │
 │           │               │           │     │    (two     │
 │           │               │           │     │  editions)  │
 │  9 [1483?]│      ——       │    ——     │4, 5,│ ¬Augustine¬ │
 │           │               │           │  6  │             │
 │ 10 [1483?]│      ——       │    ——     │4, 6 │  ¬Hampole¬  │
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 │ 11 [1483?]│      ——       │    ——     │4, 6 │   ¬Logic¬   │
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 │ 12 [1483?]│      ——       │    ——     │3, 4,│¬Lyndewoode¬ │
 │           │               │           │5, 6 │             │
 │           │               │           │     │             │
 │ 13  1485  │     Alma      │Teodoricus │3, 5 │ ¬Phalaris¬  │
 │           │  universitas  │  Rood de  │     │             │
 │           │    Oxoniae    │ Colonia,  │     │             │
 │           │               │and Thomas │     │             │
 │           │               │   Hunte   │     │             │
 │           │               │ Anglicus  │     │             │
 │ 14 [1485?]│      ——       │    ——     │4, 5,│   ¬Textus   │
 │           │               │           │  7  │ Alexandri¬  │
 │ 15 1486/7 │      ——       │    ——     │5, 7 │  ¬Festial¬  │
 │      [?]  │               │           │     │             │
 └───────────┴───────────────┴───────────┴─────┴─────────────┘
 ┌────┬─────────────┬────────────────────────────────────┐
 │NO. │SHORT TITLE. │         PAPER AND MAKE-UP.         │
 │    │             │                                    │
 ├────┼─────────────┼────────┬────────┬───────────┬──────┤
 │    │             │Size by │Size by │  Size by  │Copies│
 │    │             │folding.│make-up.│appearance.│  on  │
 │    │             │        │        │           │vellum│
 │    │             │        │        │           │known.│
 ├────┼─────────────┼────────┼────────┼───────────┼──────┤
 │  1 │  ¬Jerome¬   │ double │ eights │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │  2 │ ¬Aretinus¬  │ double │ eights │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │  3 │  ¬Ægidius¬  │ double │ eights │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 ├────┼─────────────┼────────┼────────┼───────────┼──────┤
 │  4 │  ¬Cicero¬   │ double │ sixes  │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │  5 │   ¬Latin    │ double │   ?    │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │  Grammar¬   │        │        │           │      │
 │  6 │   ¬Ales¬    │ single │ eights │   folio   │  +   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │  7 │¬Latteburius¬│ single │ eights │   folio   │  +   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 ├────┼─────────────┼────────┼────────┼───────────┼──────┤
 │  8 │ ¬Anwykyll¬, │ double │ eights │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │    with     │        │        │           │      │
 │    │ ¬Vulgaria¬  │        │        │           │      │
 │    │    (two     │        │        │           │      │
 │    │  editions)  │        │        │           │      │
 │  9 │ ¬Augustine¬ │ double │ eight  │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │ 10 │  ¬Hampole¬  │ double │ sixes  │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │ 11 │   ¬Logic¬   │ double │ sixes  │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │ 12 │¬Lyndewoode¬ │ single │eights &│   folio   │  +   │
 │    │             │        │ sixes  │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │ 13 │ ¬Phalaris¬  │ double │ eights │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │    │             │        │        │           │      │
 │ 14 │   ¬Textus   │   ?    │   ?    │  sm. 4^o  │  ⨀   │
 │    │ Alexandri¬  │        │        │           │      │
 │ 15 │  ¬Festial¬  │ single │eights &│   folio   │  ⨀   │
 │    │             │        │ sixes  │           │      │
 └────┴─────────────┴────────┴────────┴───────────┴──────┘
 ┌────┬─────────────┬───────────────────────────────┐
 │NO. │SHORT TITLE. │         COMPOSITION.          │
 │    │             │                               │
 ├────┼─────────────┼───────────┬─────────┬─────────┤
 │    │             │Signatures.│ No. of  │ Size of │
 │    │             │           │pages.[6]│ printed │
 │    │             │           │         │page.[7] │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 ├────┼─────────────┼───────────┼─────────┼─────────┤
 │  1 │  ¬Jerome¬   │ a, b, &c. │   84    │ 4¾ × 2¾ │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │  2 │ ¬Aretinus¬  │ a, b, &c. │   348   │ 4¾ × 2¾ │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │  3 │  ¬Ægidius¬  │ a, b, &c. │   48    │ 4¾ × 2¾ │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 ├────┼─────────────┼───────────┼─────────┼─────────┤
 │  4 │  ¬Cicero¬   │ a, b, &c. │   60    │ 5⅛ × 3½ │
 │  5 │   ¬Latin    │ a, b, &c. │    —    │5–5/16 × │
 │    │  Grammar¬   │           │         │ 3–7/16  │
 │  6 │   ¬Ales¬    │a, b, &c.; │   480   │ 7½ × 4¾ │
 │    │             │ A, B, &c. │         │         │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │  7 │¬Latteburius¬│a, b, &c.; │   584   │ 7⅞ × 4⅞ │
 │    │             │ A, B, &c. │         │         │
 ├────┼─────────────┼───────────┼─────────┼─────────┤
 │  8 │ ¬Anwykyll¬, │ a, b, &c. │   244   │  4⅝ –   │
 │    │    with     │           │         │5–3/16 × │
 │    │ ¬Vulgaria¬  │           │         │  3½ –   │
 │    │    (two     │           │         │ 4–3/16  │
 │    │  editions)  │           │         │         │
 │  9 │ ¬Augustine¬ │     a     │   16    │  4½ ×   │
 │    │             │           │         │ 2–15/16 │
 │ 10 │  ¬Hampole¬  │ a, b, &c. │   128   │5–7/16 × │
 │    │             │           │         │   3⅜    │
 │ 11 │   ¬Logic¬   │A, B, &c.; │   328   │ 5⅜ × 3⅜ │
 │    │             │ A a, B b, │         │         │
 │    │             │    &c.    │         │         │
 │ 12 │¬Lyndewoode¬ │a, b, &c.; │   732   │10½ × 6¼ │
 │    │             │A, B, &c.; │         │   – ⅜   │
 │    │             │aa, bb, &c.│         │         │
 │ 13 │ ¬Phalaris¬  │ a, b, &c. │   136   │ 4⅞ × 2⅞ │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │    │             │           │         │         │
 │ 14 │   ¬Textus   │ a, b, &c. │    —    │5–5/16 × │
 │    │ Alexandri¬  │           │         │ 3–3/16  │
 │ 15 │  ¬Festial¬  │ a, b, &c. │   348   │7–9/16 × │
 │    │             │           │         │ 4–11/16 │
 └────┴─────────────┴───────────┴─────────┴─────────┘

 ┌─────────────────┬──────────────────────────────────────────────┐
 │NO. SHORT TITLE. │            COMPOSITION (¡continued¡).        │
 ├─────────────────┼───────┬───────┬──────────┬────────┬──────────┤
 │                 │Columns│ Lines │ Printing │  Page  │Headlines.│
 │                 │ in a  │ in a  │begins on │even at │          │
 │                 │ page. │column.│signature.│ side.  │          │
 │                 │       │       │          │        │          │
 ├─────────────────┼───────┼───────┼──────────┼────────┼──────────┤
 │  1   ¬Jerome¬   │   1   │  25   │   a 1    │usually │    ⨀     │
 │  2  ¬Aretinus¬  │   1   │  25   │   a 2    │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │                 │       │       │          │        │          │
 │  3   ¬Ægidius¬  │   1   │  25   │   a 2    │   +    │    ⨀     │
 ├─────────────────┼───────┼───────┼──────────┼────────┼──────────┤
 │  4   ¬Cicero¬   │   1   │  19   │   a 2?   │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │  5    ¬Latin    │   1   │  27   │    ?     │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │      Grammar¬   │       │       │          │        │          │
 │  6    ¬Ales¬    │   2   │  38   │   a 2    │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │  7 ¬Latteburius¬│   2   │  40   │   a 2    │   +    │    +     │
 ├─────────────────┼───────┼───────┼──────────┼────────┼──────────┤
 │  8  ¬Anwykyll¬, │   1   │  22?  │    ?     │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │        with     │       │       │          │        │          │
 │     ¬Vulgaria¬  │       │       │          │        │          │
 │        (two     │       │       │          │        │          │
 │      editions)  │       │       │          │        │          │
 │  9  ¬Augustine¬ │   1   │ 26–7  │   a 2    │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │ 10   ¬Hampole¬  │   1   │  31   │   a 2    │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │ 11    ¬Logic¬   │   1   │  31   │   a 2    │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │ 12 ¬Lyndewoode¬ │   2   │ 46 or │  a 2 (a  │   +    │    +     │
 │                 │       │  60   │   1^v)   │        │          │
 │ 13  ¬Phalaris¬  │   1   │  21   │  a 1^v   │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │ 14    ¬Textus   │   1   │   —   │    ?     │   +    │    ⨀     │
 │     Alexandri¬  │       │       │          │        │          │
 │ 15   ¬Festial¬  │   2   │  33   │  a 1^v   │   +    │    ⨀     │
 └─────────────────┴───────┴───────┴──────────┴────────┴──────────┘
 ┌─────────────────┬──────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
 │NO. SHORT TITLE. │          COMPOSITION (¡continued¡).              │
 ├─────────────────┼─────────┬──────────┬─────┬──────────┬────────────┤
 │                 │Marginal │Paragraphs│Space│Directors.│Punctuation.│
 │                 │printing.│set back. │left │          │ . : , ? () │
 │                 │         │          │ for │          │            │
 │                 │         │          │caps.│          │            │
 ├─────────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼─────┼──────────┼────────────┤
 │  1   ¬Jerome¬   │    ⨀    │    +     │  +  │   once   │ + + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │  2  ¬Aretinus¬  │    ⨀    │    +     │  +  │ once, in │ + + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │                 │         │          │     │ one copy │            │
 │  3   ¬Ægidius¬  │    ⨀    │    +     │  +  │    ⨀     │ + + ⨀ + ⨀  │
 ├─────────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼─────┼──────────┼────────────┤
 │  4   ¬Cicero¬   │    ⨀    │    ⨀?    │  ?  │    ?     │+ + (/) + + │
 │  5    ¬Latin    │    ⨀    │    +     │  ⨀  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ? ?  │
 │      Grammar¬   │         │          │     │          │            │
 │  6    ¬Ales¬    │    ⨀    │    +     │  +  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │  7 ¬Latteburius¬│    +    │    +     │  +  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 ├─────────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼─────┼──────────┼────────────┤
 │  8  ¬Anwykyll¬, │    ⨀    │    +     │  +  │   once   │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │        with     │         │          │     │          │            │
 │     ¬Vulgaria¬  │         │          │     │          │            │
 │        (two     │         │          │     │          │            │
 │      editions)  │         │          │     │          │            │
 │  9  ¬Augustine¬ │    ⨀    │    ⨀     │  +  │    ⨀     │ + + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │ 10   ¬Hampole¬  │    ⨀    │    ⨀     │  +  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │ 11    ¬Logic¬   │    ⨀    │    +     │  +  │    +     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │ 12 ¬Lyndewoode¬ │    ⨀    │    ⨀     │  +  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │                 │         │          │     │          │            │
 │ 13  ¬Phalaris¬  │    ⨀    │    ⨀     │  +  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │ 14    ¬Textus   │    ⨀    │    ?     │  ?  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 │     Alexandri¬  │         │          │     │          │            │
 │ 15   ¬Festial¬  │    ⨀    │    +     │  ⨀  │    ⨀     │ + ⨀ ⨀ ⨀ ⨀  │
 └─────────────────┴─────────┴──────────┴─────┴──────────┴────────────┘
 ┌─────────────────┬───────────────────╥─────────────────────────┐
 │NO. SHORT TITLE. │     PRINTING.     ║     ILLUSTRATIONS.      │
 ├─────────────────┼─────┬───────┬─────╫────────┬────────┬───────┤
 │                 │Pages│Spaced.│ Red ║Borders.│Woodcuts│Woodcut│
 │                 │at a │       │ ink ║        │in text.│ caps. │
 │                 │time.│       │used.║        │        │       │
 │                 │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 ├─────────────────┼─────┼───────┼─────╫────────┼────────┼───────┤
 │  1   ¬Jerome¬   │  1  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │  2  ¬Aretinus¬  │  2  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │                 │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │  3   ¬Ægidius¬  │  2  │   ⨀   │  +  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 ├─────────────────┼─────┼───────┼─────╫────────┼────────┼───────┤
 │  4   ¬Cicero¬   │ 2?  │   +   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │  5    ¬Latin    │  ?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │      Grammar¬   │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │  6    ¬Ales¬    │  2  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   +    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │  7 ¬Latteburius¬│  2  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   +    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 ├─────────────────┼─────┼───────┼─────╫────────┼────────┼───────┤
 │  8  ¬Anwykyll¬, │ 2?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │        with     │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │     ¬Vulgaria¬  │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │        (two     │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │      editions)  │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │  9  ¬Augustine¬ │  ?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │ 10   ¬Hampole¬  │ 4?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │ 11    ¬Logic¬   │ 4?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   +    │   ⨀   │
 │ 12 ¬Lyndewoode¬ │  ?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │                 │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │ 13  ¬Phalaris¬  │  2  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │ 14    ¬Textus   │  ?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   ⨀    │   ⨀   │
 │     Alexandri¬  │     │       │     ║        │        │       │
 │ 15   ¬Festial¬  │  ?  │   ⨀   │  ⨀  ║   ⨀    │   +    │   +   │
 └─────────────────┴─────┴───────┴─────╨────────┴────────┴───────┘


                           OWNERS OF COPIES.

 ┌───────────────┬───────┬─────────┬──────────┬────────┐
 │No.            │British│Bodleian.│Cambridge │  John  │
 │               │Museum.│         │University│Rylands │
 │               │       │         │ Library. │Library.│
 ├───────────────┼───────┼─────────┼──────────┼────────┤
 │  1 Jerome     │   1   │  1[8]   │    1     │   1    │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │  2 Aretinus   │   1   │  1[8]   │    ⨀     │   1    │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │  3 Ægidius    │   ⨀   │    1    │    ⨀     │   1    │
 │  4 Cicero     │   ⨀   │  ⨀[8]   │    ⨀     │   ⨀    │
 │  5 Latin      │ ⨀[8]  │    ⨀    │    ⨀     │   ⨀    │
 │      Grammar  │       │         │          │        │
 │  6 Ales       │ 1[8]  │  1[8]   │   2[8]   │   1    │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │  7 Latteburius│ 1[8]  │  1[8]   │    2     │   1    │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │  8 Anwykyll,  │   ½   │   1½    │   ½[8]   │   ½    │
 │      with     │       │         │          │        │
 │      Vulgaria │       │         │          │        │
 │  9 Hampole    │   ⨀   │    ⨀    │    2     │   1    │
 │ 10 Logic      │   ⨀   │  ⨀[8]   │   ⨀[8]   │   ⨀    │
 │ 11 Lyndewoode │   3   │  1[8]   │    2     │   1    │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │               │       │         │          │        │
 │ 12 Augustine  │   1   │    ⨀    │    ⨀     │   ⨀    │
 │ 13 Phalaris   │   ⨀   │  ⨀[8]   │    ⨀     │   1    │
 │ 14 Textus     │   ⨀   │    ⨀    │    ⨀     │   ⨀    │
 │      Alexandri│       │         │          │        │
 │ 15 Festial    │ ⨀[8]  │   1½    │    ⨀     │   1    │
 ├───────────────┼───────┼─────────┼──────────┼────────┤
 │    Totals     │  8½   │    9    │    9½    │   9½   │
 │    Different  │  6½   │    8    │    5½    │   9½   │
 │      books    │       │         │          │        │
 └───────────────┴───────┴─────────┴──────────┴────────┘
 ┌───────────────┬─────────┬─────────┬──────────────┬───────┐
 │No.            │ Oxford  │Cambridge│ Other owners │ Total │
 │               │Colleges,│Colleges.│  of copies.  │  of   │
 │               │   &c.   │         │              │copies.│
 ├───────────────┼─────────┼─────────┼──────────────┼───────┤
 │  1 Jerome     │    3    │    ⨀    │Huth Library, │  12   │
 │               │         │         │  Earl of     │       │
 │               │         │         │  Pembroke,   │       │
 │               │         │         │  Sir H.      │       │
 │               │         │         │  Dryden,     │       │
 │               │         │         │  Paris,      │       │
 │               │         │         │  America.    │       │
 │  2 Aretinus   │  ⨀[A]   │    ⨀    │Norwich       │   7   │
 │               │         │         │  Cathedral,  │       │
 │               │         │         │  Earl of     │       │
 │               │         │         │  Pembroke,   │       │
 │               │         │         │  Chetham     │       │
 │               │         │         │  Library,    │       │
 │               │         │         │  Lord        │       │
 │               │         │         │  Ashburnham. │       │
 │  3 Ægidius    │    1    │    ⨀    │              │   3   │
 │  4 Cicero     │  ⨀[8]   │    ⨀    │              │   ⨀   │
 │  5 Latin      │    ⨀    │    ⨀    │              │   ⨀   │
 │      Grammar  │         │         │              │       │
 │  6 Ales       │  8[8]   │  ⨀[8]   │Durham and    │  16   │
 │               │         │         │  Lincoln     │       │
 │               │         │         │  Cathedrals, │       │
 │               │         │         │  Dulwich     │       │
 │               │         │         │  College.    │       │
 │  7 Latteburius│  3[8]   │  2[8]   │Lambeth,      │  15   │
 │               │         │         │  Westminster,│       │
 │               │         │         │  Stonyhurst, │       │
 │               │         │         │  Brussels, T.│       │
 │               │         │         │  E. Cooke,   │       │
 │               │         │         │  Esq.        │       │
 │  8 Anwykyll,  │    ⨀    │  ⨀[8]   │              │  (3)  │
 │      with     │         │         │              │       │
 │      Vulgaria │         │         │              │       │
 │  9 Hampole    │    ⨀    │  ⨀[8]   │              │   3   │
 │ 10 Logic      │    2    │  ⨀[8]   │              │   2   │
 │ 11 Lyndewoode │    3    │    4    │Edinburgh     │  20   │
 │               │         │         │  (Advocates’ │       │
 │               │         │         │  Library),   │       │
 │               │         │         │  Durham      │       │
 │               │         │         │  Cathedral,  │       │
 │               │         │         │  Glasgow,    │       │
 │               │         │         │  Paris, E. G.│       │
 │               │         │         │  Duff, Esq., │       │
 │               │         │         │  Lord        │       │
 │               │         │         │  Crawford.   │       │
 │ 12 Augustine  │    ⨀    │    ⨀    │              │   1   │
 │ 13 Phalaris   │  2[8]   │  ⨀[8]   │              │   3   │
 │ 14 Textus     │    ⨀    │  ⨀[8]   │              │   ⨀   │
 │      Alexandri│         │         │              │       │
 │ 15 Festial    │  ⨀[8]   │    ⨀    │Lambeth.      │  3½   │
 ├───────────────┼─────────┼─────────┼──────────────┼───────┤
 │    Totals     │   22    │    6    │      24      │  88½  │
 │    Different  │         │         │              │       │
 │      books    │         │         │              │       │
 └───────────────┴─────────┴─────────┴──────────────┴───────┘

The finest set is undoubtedly possessed by the John Rylands Library at
Manchester.


                        THE TYPE AND PRESS-WORK.

Seven kinds of type were used, the use of which can be seen on p. 238.
Facsimiles of all of them are given in plates II-V.

These obviously divide the books into three groups. In the first group
of three (“1468”–1479/80) only type no. 1 is used. In the second group
of four (1480–82, Theodoric Rood) only types 2–3 are found. In the last
group consisting of eight (1483–1486/7, T. Rood and Thomas Hunte) only
types 4–7 are used, except that the peculiar black initial type (no. 3)
is occasionally still used.

The press was of course a wooden hand-screw one, which was at first
employed to print one page at a time (Jerome), but after the first book
two pages and perhaps later four were struck off together. The earliest
printing press of which we have an engraving is as late as 1499/500 (see
an article in ©Bibliographica©, 1894, no. 2), but there was great
conservatism in detail, and from the early engravings and such
researches as those which Blades, De Vinne, Talbot Reed, and others have
made, we know many of the details of working in the earliest days.


                       _Type_ 1. “1468”—1479/80.

Character:—Cologne black.

Body:—English, nearly (10 lines = 1–15/16 in. In modern English 10 lines
= 1⅞ in.).

Used in the Jerome, Aretinus and Aegidius, with no other.

The “upper case” (to use a modern expression) consisted of at least 16
divisions, G, J, K, L, T, U, W, X, Y, Z not being used, and P seldom in
the Jerome, H being there used for both H and P. This misuse is not
found in the other two books. On the other hand there are two forms of
C, E, N, and Q, both probably mixed in the same division. Q is in the
Jerome almost always [reversed Q] (a peculiarity found in some
ornamental MSS., from the convenience of extending the tail into the
margin), in the Aretinus and Aegidius always Q: the letter is however
identical in all three books, but being on a square body it is in the
Jerome turned one quarter round.

                  *       *       *       *       *

The “lower case” consisted of at least 121 divisions. Of the simple
unmodified letters k and z are wanting, and except in the Jerome j (but
ij is found in all, colligated). There are two forms of p, r, and three
of s, the two p’s and r’s being used indiscriminately, but the two s’s
(final) and the ſ (initial and medial) having their proper use. Of
colligated or modified letters there are at least eighty-three, and of
other symbols eleven (for -et, &, con-, -us [two], id est, full stop,
colon, ?). Of these 121 about 95 are common to all three. The signs of
progress are as follows:—

In the Jerome, contrasted with the other two, Q is except in two places
[reversed Q], H is generally used as P, and I have not elsewhere noticed
ḃ, or j used by itself. On the other hand in the two others, and not in
the Jerome, are found an extra short t in which the perpendicular stroke
hardly appears at all above the horizontal line, and eleven new forms,
including fe, ff, and pp in colligation. The Q and P are rightly used,
always.

So too in the Jerome and Aretinus compared with the Aegidius we find
that q is printed too high up, being in fact an inverted b, or, more
accurately, an inverted broken h occasionally used for b. In the Jerome
this is almost always the case, in the Aretinus as often as not, in the
Aegidius hardly ever. It may be accidental that B and H and three minor
modified letters are not found in the short Aegidius, that w (in wlt =
vult) is only found in the Jerome, [·|·] (= id est) only in the
Aretinus: but the occurrence of ؟ (= ?) and of printing in red ink
_only_ in the Aegidius, is not insignificant.

The relative order of the three may therefore be assumed to be as above
indicated.


                         _Origin of the type._

It may be taken as certain that as Caxton’s type is based on Bruges
models, so the first Oxford type is ultimately derived from Cologne.
Ulric Zel began printing there at least as early as 1466, and the
general resemblance to his letters is clear. The likeness is still
nearer when we follow Zel’s influence on Arnold ther Hoernen (Cologne,
from 1470), Richard Paffroet of Cologne (Deventer, from 1477), and
especially a little-known Cologne printer named Gerard ten Raem de
Bercka, whose only dated book is of 1478. John of Westphalia (Alost and
Louvain, from 1473) and Jacobus de Breda, a successor of Paffroet at
Deventer, also supply similarities. In the case of Gerard we actually
find, besides a close general similarity, the same misuse of H as P.
Unfortunately no works printed by him, except the dated ©Modus
Confitendi© and an undated ©Aesopus©, are at present known, so that it
must not be assumed that 1478 is his earliest or only date.

It is at present also unsafe to assume that Theodoricus Rood of Cologne
who printed at Oxford in 1481–85 was the first Oxford printer, or ever
used type no. 1.


                         _Type_ 2 (1480?-1482).

Character:—Narrow Dutch Black.

Body:—English, nearly (10 lines = just less than 2 in.).

Used in the Cicero (1480?: by itself), Latin Grammar (1481?: by itself),
Ales (1481: chiefly, but with no. 3), and Latteburius (1482: chiefly,
but with no. 3).

The “upper case” consisted of 22 letters (J, K, U, W omitted).

                  *       *       *       *       *

The “lower case” consisted of at least 131 divisions. Of the simple
letters j only occurs in colligation with i (as ij), and there are two
forms of r, s (s, ſ) and y. There are about 93 colligated or modified
letters.

Unfortunately it is very difficult to institute a close comparison of
the use of letters, so as to establish a proper order of the books, in
consequence of the fragmentary state of the Milo and the Latin Grammar.
The Milo can be clearly separated from the rest: the type is _spaced_,
so that 10 lines = between 2–9/16 and 2¾ in., and ( ), ؟ (= ?), | (=
comma) are found in it alone. In fact, but for the closest resemblance
of actual type, the Milo would have to be regarded as printed elsewhere:
and it cannot yet be said to be quite certainly printed at Oxford. The
Ales and Latteburius are hardly to be distinguished in the use of type,
but I have observed w only in the Latteburius and Grammar.

The origin of the type is probably to be looked for near Cologne, from
whence came Theodoricus Rood, the avowed printer of the Ales, and where
a Theodoricus, who may probably be identified with Rood, printed in
1485–6 in a type smaller than, but similar to, the present one. The
narrow stilted look of the letters and the semicircular sweep in front
of the A are noticeable features. Henry Bradshaw detected a similarity
between this type and that of Arnold ther Hoernen at Cologne.


                         _Type_ 3 (1481–1485).

Character:—Heading and initial Black, a large special type.

Body:—2-line English, nearly (10 lines = 4 in. -, 10 lines of 2-line
English = 3¾ in. +).

Used only in the Ales (1481) and Latteburius (1482) (for the beginnings
of chapters), in the Lyndewoode (1483?: head lines) and the Phalaris
(1485: one line).

The type is too sparsely used to enable us to describe the extent of the
fount: but F, G, J, j, K, k, v, W, w, X, Y, Z, z are not found: I and g
have two forms each; s, ſ are found; V is only used for the number five;
and nine modified or conjoined letters occur. The peculiarity of the
letters is a slipped or detached upper corner in B, L, N, which is found
in 1506 in Quentell’s printing at Cologne, and may be compared with a
smaller form used by Jean Veldener at Culenburg in 1484.


                        _Type_ 4 (1483?-1485?).

Character:—Small Dutch Black.

Body:—Pica, nearly (10 lines = 1–11/16 + in., 10 lines in Pica = 1–11/16
– in.).

This is the small type of the Anwykyll and Lyndewoode (both 1483?), the
ordinary type of the Hampole, Logic, and Augustine (all 1483?), and the
small type of the Lyndewoode (1483?), and is used in the Textus
Alexandri (1485?). It is in many details similar to type 2, but may be
readily distinguished by the o being broad and round in type 4, instead
of narrow and oval as in type 2. There are two forms of S in type 4, and
only one in type 2. The capitals are identical with those of type 6.

The fount consisted of 25 capitals (J, V, W wanting, but two forms of D,
S), 27 small letters (z wanting, but r, s double) and at least 95
modified or conjoined letters, in all not less than 147 types. Seven of
the last class appear to be peculiar to the Logic, which may therefore
be the latest of the group.


                        _Type_ 5 (1483–1486/7).

Character:—Small Caxtonian Black.

Body:—Great Primer, nearly (10 lines = 2–5/16 in., 10 lines of Great
Primer = 2⅜ in.).

This is the larger type of the Anwykyll, the largest but one (ordinary
large) of the Lyndewoode, the largest of the Augustine (all 1483?), the
ordinary one of the Phalaris (1485), is used in the Textus Alexandri
(1485?), and is the small type of the Festial (1486). The capitals are
identical with those of type 7.

There are 19 capitals (J, K, V, W, X, Y, Z wanting) and 28 small letters
(j, z wanting, but d, g, r, s double), and at least 44 modified or
conjoined letters, five of which seem to be peculiar to the Festial, as
is also the use of k. In all there were not less than 91 types.


                           _Type_ 6 (1483?).

Character:—Large Dutch Black, a Church type going with no. 4.

Body:—Pica, nearly (as no. 4).

This is the larger type of the Hampole, the larger type (two half lines
only) of the Logic, the larger type imbedded in the small type of the
Lyndewoode, the intermediate type (one line) in the Augustine, and
occurs in the Anwykyll (all 1483?). The capitals are identical with
those of type 4.

There are 22 capitals (J, K, V, W, Z wanting, but S double), 24 small
letters (j, k, w, z wanting, but r, s double), and at least 16 modified
or conjoined letters, in all not less than 62 types. Eight of the
modified letters appear to be peculiar to the Hampole.


                        _Type_ 7 (1485?–1486/7).

Character:—Large Caxtonian Black, a Church type going with no. 5.

Body:—Great Primer, nearly (as no. 5).

This is used in the Textus Alexandri (1485?) and is the large type of
the Festial (1486/7). The capitals are identical with those of type 5.

To judge from the Festial, there are 18 capitals (J, K, R, V, W, X, Y, Z
not being used), 24 small letters (k, w, y, z not found, but r, s
double), and at least 9 modified letters, 51 in all.


                              WATERMARKS.

At present the study of watermarks has not reached a stage at which they
are able to contribute scientific proofs of high importance, nor will
any proof be ever deducible from them except the earliest possible
occurrence of an undated issue, although probabilities of concurrent
printing may be arrived at. Only some plain facts, therefore, will be
stated with respect to their occurrence in the early Oxford books.

If we take the first group (the Jerome, Aretinus and Aegidius), we find
no less than 26, out of a total of 50. The Rufinus has seven (two shared
with the others, one shared with the Aretinus only, one shared with the
Latteburius, and three peculiar to itself). The Aretinus has 22, most of
which are found in the later groups, but eight are peculiar to itself.
The Aegidius has two only, common to the group.

In the second group (Cicero, Ales, Latteburius, Latin Grammar) there
appear to be 28, of which four are common to all the groups, one is
shared only with group one, seven only with group three, and sixteen are
peculiar.

In the third group 38 occur, four of which are common to all the groups,
nine are shared with the first alone, seven with the second alone, and
eighteen are peculiar.


                            SEPARATE BOOKS.


                    1. ¬Jerome¬ (“1468,” see p. 1).

The treatise of Tyrannius Rufinus on the Apostles’ Creed, here ascribed
to St. Jerome, was undoubtedly the first product of the Oxford press. It
bears the date of 17 December, 1468, as the day on which the printing
was finished. The colophon is clearly printed and bears no mark of
haste, nor does it show the smallest trace of alteration in any of the
copies seen by the present writer. Saturday is a reasonable day on which
to conclude a work. A facsimile of the colophon is given in plate II.

Unfortunately for the peace of the bibliographer two spectres have
haunted this book, one of which “pulveris exigui jactu” has been laid,
but the other is not yet gone, although there is a prospect of ultimate
eviction.


                       I. THE CORSELLIS FORGERY.

In 1664 Richard Atkyns, a Gloucestershire gentleman of some position,
and educated at Balliol, issued a book, the title of which sets forth
with unusual clearness the object of the volume:—“The Original and
Growth of Printing: Collected Out of History, and the _Records_ of this
Kingdome. Wherein is also Demonstrated, That Printing appertaineth to
the _Prerogative Royal_; and is a Flower of the _Crown_ of _England_. By
Richard Atkyns, _Esq_:” (London, printed by John Streater, for the
Author, MDCLXIV: quarto: pp. [12] + 24). Atkyns’s object was to
recommend himself to Charles II’s attention by proving that printing was
a royal privilege: and for this it was very desirable that there should
be evidence of the introduction of the art into England under royal
protection. The testimony of Stowe—corroborated by Howell—that “William
Caxton of London, Mercer,” introduced it in 1471, was unsuitable.
Atkyns, however, came upon a copy of the “1468” Oxford book, and “the
same most worthy Person who trusted me with the aforesaid Book, did also
present me with the Copy of a Record and Manuscript in _Lambeth_-House,
heretofore in his Custody, belonging to the See (and not to any
particular Arch-Bishop of _Canterbury_); the substance whereof was this
(though I hope, for publique satisfaction, the Record it self, in its
due time, will appear).” Then ensues the following story:—

  _Thomas Bourchier_, Arch-Biſhop of _Canterbury_, moved the then King
  (_Hen._ the 6th) to uſe all poſſible means for procuring a
  Printing-Mold (for ſo ’twas there called) to be brought into this
  Kingdom; the King (a good Man, and much given to Works of this Nature)
  readily hearkned to the Motion; and taking private Advice, how to
  effect His Deſign, concluded it could not be brought about without
  great Secrecy, and a conſiderable Sum of Money given to ſuch Perſon or
  Perſons, as would draw off ſome of the Workmen from _Harlein_ in
  _Holland_, where _John Cuthenberg_ had newly invented it, and was
  himſelf perſonally at Work: ’Twas reſolv’d, that leſs then one
  Thouſand Marks would not produce the deſir’d Effect: Towards which
  Sum, the ſaid Arch-Biſhop preſented the King with Three Hundred Marks.
  The Money being now prepared, the Management of the Deſign was
  committed to Mr. _Robert Turnour_, who then was of the Roabs to the
  King, and a Perſon moſt in Favour with Him, of any of his Condition:
  Mr. _Turnour_ took to his Aſſiſtance Mr. _Caxton_, a Citizen of good
  Abilities, who Trading much into _Holland_, might be a Creditable
  Pretence, as well for his going, as ſtay in the _Low Countries_: Mr.
  _Turnour_ was in Diſguiſe (his Beard and Hair ſhaven quite off) but
  Mr. _Caxton_ appeared known and publique. They having received the
  ſaid Sum of One Thouſand Marks, went firſt to _Amſterdam_, then to
  _Leyden_, not daring to enter _Harlein_ it ſelf; for the Town was very
  jealous, having impriſoned and apprehended divers Perſons, who came
  from other Parts for the ſame purpoſe: They ſtaid till they had ſpent
  the whole One Thouſand Marks in Gifts and Expences: So as the King was
  fain to ſend Five Hundred Marks more, Mr. _Turnour_ having written to
  the King, that he had almoſt done his Work; a Bargain (as he ſaid)
  being ſtruck betwixt him and two _Hollanders_, for bringing off one of
  the Work men, who ſhould ſufficiently diſcover and teach this New Art:
  At laſt, with much ado, they got off one of the Under-Workmen, whoſe
  Name was _Frederick Corſells_ (or rather _Corſellis_), who late one
  Night ſtole from his Fellows in Diſguiſe, into a Veſſel prepared
  before for that purpoſe; and ſo the Wind (favouring the Deſign)
  brought him ſafe to _London_.

  ’Twas not thought ſo prudent, to ſet him on Work at _London_, (but by
  the Arch-Biſhops meanes, who had been Vice-Chancellor, and afterwards
  Chancellor of the Univerſity of _Oxon_) _Corſellis_ was carryed with a
  Guard to _Oxon_; which Guard conſtantly watch’d, to prevent
  _Corſellis_ from any poſſible Escape, till he had made good his
  Promiſe, in teaching how to Print: So that at _Oxford_ Printing was
  firſt ſet up in _England_, which was before there was any
  Printing-Press, or Printer, in _France_, _Spain_, _Italy_, or
  _Germany_, (except the City of _Mentz_) which claimes Seniority, as to
  Printing, even of _Harlein_ it ſelf, calling her City, _Urbem
  Maguntinam Artis Tipographicæ Inventricem primam_, though ’tis known
  to be otherwiſe, that City gaining that Art by the Brother of one of
  the Workmen of _Harlein_, who had learnt it at Home of his Brother,
  and after ſet up for himſelf at _Mentz_.

  This Preſs at _Oxon_ was at leaſt ten years before there was any
  Printing in _Europe_ (except at _Harlein_, and _Mentz_) where alſo it
  was but new born. This Preſs at _Oxford_, was afterwards found
  inconvenient, to be the ſole Printing-place of _England_, as being too
  far from _London_, and the Sea: Whereupon the King ſet up a Preſs at
  St. _Albans_, and another in the Abby of _Weſtminster_, where they
  Printed ſeveral Bookes of Divinity and Phyſick, (for the King, for
  Reaſons beſt known to himſelf and Council) permitted then no Law-Books
  to be Printed; nor did any Printer exerciſe that ART, but onely ſuch
  as were the Kings ſworn Servants; the King himſelf having the Price
  and Emolument for Printing Books.

  Printing thus brought into _England_, was moſt Graciouſly received by
  the King, and moſt cordially entertained by the Church, the Printers
  having the Honour to be ſworn the King’s Servants, and the Favour to
  Lodge in the very Boſome of the Church; as in _Weſtminſter_, St.
  _Albans_, _Oxon_, &c.

As no one believes in this story it is not worth while to do more than
to point out that no corroboration of it has ever been found, (much less
the original record discovered), that Henry VI was deposed 4 March
1460/1, and that the type shows no resemblance to that of Haarlem. Nor
does the rest of the book concern us. The tale, however, in the absence
of contradiction, obtained some vogue, so that we find for instance in
Layer Marney church in Essex some such inscription as the following
“Præ-missus, non amissus, Nicolas Corsellis Armiger Dominus hujus
manerii hic requiescit, hâc vitâ ad meliorem commigratus Anno D 1674 Die
Octobris 19^o.

              Artem typographi miratam Belgicus Anglis
              Corsellis docuit, Regis prece munere victus.
              Hic fuit extremis mercator cognitus Indis:
              Incola jam cælis, virtus sua famaque vivent.

Johannes Corsellis ejus Executor & Consanguineus hoc monumentum posuit.”
The Corsellis family came from Flanders in the 17th century. There is no
question that this clumsy forgery of Atkyns has had its effect in
befogging the subject to which it relates, and has predisposed critics
to suspect the date of the first Oxford book.


                     II. THE DISPUTED DATE, “1468.”

The first who threw doubt on the recorded date of the Jerome was Conyers
Middleton in his ©Dissertation on the origin of Printing© published in
1735, and since then the opinion that 1468 is an error for 1478 (an X
having dropped out of “MCCCCLXXVIII”) has steadily gained ground with
the advance of critical methods, until authorities like Bradshaw and
Blades and Duff have come to regard the question as settled. The only
two separate and formal defences of the date (not counting incidental
passages in books) are a MS. in the Guildhall Library in London, in a
volume of Stukeley’s ©Palæographia Britannica© marked B. 2. 1, perhaps
written in about 1770, and S. W. Singer’s ©Some Account of the book
printed at Oxford in MCCCCLXVIII© (London, 1812, 50 copies for private
distribution), a work which the author subsequently called in as far as
he was able. In the former the arguments are of a general character,
such as that if, as Middleton asserted, the King had not leisure to
attend to such matters during Civil War, the archbishop _had_, and that
Caxton’s silence counts for nothing in the general obscurity which
surrounds the earliest printing presses. The Corsellis story is
accepted. Singer is more scientific, as befits the later date, and
adduces several of the technical arguments which may still be used.

It is now time to state the present aspect of the dispute, and to
ascertain how far the date “1468” is not only dubious but untenable. The
arguments against the date may be stated in presumed order of their
cogency, with the remarks on the other side which they severally
suggest.


                    1. _The presence of Signatures._

The Jerome presents to our eyes the ordinary signatures to which we are
accustomed in fifteenth-century books, that is to say the marks a j, a
ij, a iij, a iiij on the recto of each of the four leaves which form the
first half of the sections of eight leaves (sixteen pages) of which the
book is generally composed. These are placed just below the last letters
of the printed page, close under them. Now the earliest known book with
a date in which signatures elsewhere occur in this developed form is an
©Expositio Decalogi©, by Johannes Nider, printed at Cologne by Koelhoff
in 1472, the next being a Cologne book by F. de Platea in 1474. The
argument is that it is extremely unlikely that an isolated printer in a
provincial town in England should make such a discovery and advance, and
that the next similar book should be a German one four years later[9].

What may be called the common ground of the discussion on this point is
well explained in Blades’s ©Books in Chains© (Lond. 1892), pp. 85–122,
in a paper on Signatures. He shows that the idea of signatures in
manuscripts is as old as books themselves, but that in manuscripts the
marks, being in writing and intended for the binder’s eye alone, were
naturally, as a rule, at the foot or corner of the page, and often cut
off in the process of binding. When printing came in, the obvious
difficulty was to print marks so far from the rest of the printed page
as to be cut off in binding. This difficulty was met in two ways: either
the signatures were _written in_ at the extreme foot (from 1462?), or
the signatures were stamped on by hand with single types (from 1473?).
Some printers, however, did manage by care to print signatures far from
the text (1474 on?). Ultimately in a single case in 1472 and with
increasing frequency from 1474 printers found that the essential
ugliness of printed signatures close to the page was counterbalanced by
the utility and convenience of the change, and our modern system was
begun.

Now, it must be constantly remembered that the entire weight of disproof
lies with those who dispute the printed date. This is why it is simply
amusing to read Blades’s sage words on the subject of this 1472 book
with normal printed signatures. He is pledged to renounce the Oxford
date, but he finds it awkward that there _is_ an isolated book of 1472
in precisely the same category—with the same want of precedent, the same
absence of imitators, the same forlorn appearance. Observe how he deals
with it (p. 116 of the book above cited):—“This is a puzzling book, for
it is at least two years earlier than any other book so signed. In this
city, too. [i. e. Lübeck[10]] many works were issued with MS. signatures
with a later date than this. It is dangerous to assert that a book is
wrongly dated because you cannot make it fit into a bibliographical
theory; but I feel inclined, from the general aspect of the book, to
date it as 1482, rather than 1472.” And yet a very high authority on
typography assures me that the book is _undoubtedly_ of 1472! What then
prevents the tentative and isolated experiment of Cologne from having a
similar tentative and isolated forerunner, even at Oxford? We may
remember too that in the infancy of printing it was common to detect
errors as the book went through the press, and often the printer himself
corrected an error with his pen, as in the colophon of the Aegidius (see
p. 1). Or a reader would do the same. But it is believed that in no copy
of the Jerome is there any attempt to correct or even throw suspicion on
the date. There is the date, plain and detailed, and it is allowable to
wait for scientific proof before it is abandoned. _A priori_
considerations have force, but they are liable to sudden overthrow.

Clearly the consideration of signatures alone cannot avail to disprove
the date of the Jerome. But much more remains.


                        2. _Signs of progress._

It is said that, if we consider the interval between 1468 and 1479, we
shall reasonably expect definite signs of progress. On the contrary, the
first three Oxford books are printed with the same type, with similar
signatures, with the same sized page and the same number of lines in a
column. “In fact,” says Blades in the ©Antiquary©, vol. iii, no. 13,
Jan. 1881, in an article on ©The First Printing Press at Oxford©, “if a
leaf of one was extracted and inserted in another it would,
typographically, excite no remark.” _Natura nihil facit per saltum_, and
we are accustomed to apply the idea of evolution and development to
every art and trade. It is asserted also that there is no other case of
the cessation of a press for over ten years. But cessation of printing
for such a time is not unknown. No book was produced at Bamberg between
1462 and 1480, or at Caen between 1480 and 1500, or at Brussels between
1484 and 1500, or at Haarlem for some years after 1486, or at Saragossa
after 1475 till 1485? Moreover the only early printing known at
Tavistock is two books in 1525 and 1534. The _same type_ and _identical
woodcuts_ are found in the two, with an interval of nine years. And
where there is cessation, it is obvious that we may be content with
fewer signs of advance when work is resumed at the same press with the
same type, than if the activity had been continuous, or if the
instruments were changed.

But this question of progress is a plain issue. Are there no signs of
advance in the two later books compared with the earlier one?

The first book often has an unevenness at the right-hand edge of a
column (in 28 pages out of 84). In the other two it is always perfectly
even[11]. Again, the Jerome starts printing on sign. a 1, whereas the
other two start with a blank leaf, the printing beginning on a 2. Again,
in the Jerome there is a peculiar misuse of the capitals H and Q (see p.
241), not found in the following books. And lastly, to omit smaller
matters, there is the decided and important fact that whereas in the
Jerome each page was printed separately, in the Aegidius and Aretinus
two pages were printed at a time.


                             3. _The Type._

Of the palmary arguments against the date, one still remains. The first
Oxford type presents a remarkable similarity to that used by Gerard ten
Raem de Bercka (see p. 242), and his only dated book at present known is
of 1478. There is certainly a real connexion between the two founts, but
we know so extremely little of this printer that it is at present unsafe
to base any conclusion on his work. The typographical genealogy of the
early printers of the Netherlands and Germany has not yet been fully
drawn out, and of the 1478 ©Modus Confitendi© (Hain 11455), which is
here in question, only two copies _with the date_ are known, one in the
John Rylands (Spencer) library at Manchester and one on the continent.
On this point we shall doubtless know more in time, but at present we
are bound to suspend our judgment.


                     4. _Mistakes of date common._

There are two subsidiary considerations left. One is that mistakes of
date in colophons are not uncommon. An edition of Aeneas Sylvius’s
©Epistolae© (Cologne, printed by Koelhoff) is dated MCCCCLXVIII, which
is stated to be an error for 1478, and an ©Opusculum de componendis
versibus© by Mataratius, printed at Venice, is also believed to be
erroneously dated 1468 for 1478. Caxton’s edition of Gower’s ©Confessio
Amantis© is dated 1493 instead of 1483. I have noticed the following
additional errors affecting dates before 1501:—720 for 1720, 1061 for
1601, 1099 for 1499, 1334 for 1734, 1400 for 1490 or 1500, 1444 for
1494, 1461 for 1471, 1461 for 1641, 1462 for 1472, 1472 for 1482.

There is no doubt therefore that a mistake of date in an early book has
many parallels, and so far the improbability of it happening in other
books is diminished. At the same time one would expect the first
printers in a place of learning to be careful enough, even if an initial
blunder of this magnitude were committed, to correct it in some copies
before issue. It is of course conceivable that the date was deliberately
falsified, to avoid expected unpleasant consequences of being found
_flagrante delicto_, but this hypothesis may be left to be dealt with
when some one maintains it.


                   5. _Books bound with the Jerome._

There remains a consideration of some weight. Until this century it was
common to bind together several books (not merely pamphlets) in one
volume. What books have been found in the same binding with the “1468”
volume? Four copies of the Jerome are, or are known to have been, bound
with several other treatises (see p. 252). One is bound with (and
before) the Aretinus of 1479, and it is interesting that though a few
leaves of modern paper now separate them there is an offset of the first
page of the Aretinus on the last page of the Jerome, showing that the
Aretinus was bound with the Jerome before the former was entirely dry.
No conclusion however about the date of the Jerome can be drawn from
this and whatever presumption of synchronism might be raised is removed
by the fact that the well defined stains at the end of the Jerome and
beginning of the Aretinus do _not_ run from the one to the other. A
second copy was bound with seven others, only two of which are dated,
1478 and (the Oxford Aegidius) 1479: one of the undated is about 1485
(Perottus). A third copy was bound with four preceding treatises, of
which the only dated one was the first, the Oxford Aegidius of 1479. A
fourth has five pieces with it, the first two of which are of about
1480, the Jerome is third, the fourth is of 1485, the fifth is undated,
and the last is of 1486 or 1487.

Clearly we are on very unsafe ground when we base any conclusion on
these companion treatises, and our hesitation is not lessened when we
notice that the only copy of the ©Vulgaria Terentii© (Oxf., not later
than 1483) which is bound with other treatises, occurs after books dated
1488 and 1486, the rest being without a date.


                     6. _First printing in Europe._

The following list of places and dates will show how far it is likely,
if we turn from facts to probabilities, that Oxford should have started
printing in 1468. Only the first two towns of each country are given,
with the exception of England: and the claim of Oxford is purposely
ignored.

  1. Germany (Mainz, not after 1454: Strassburg, before 1460: Cologne
      began not later than 1466).

  2. Italy (Subiaco, 1465: Rome, 1467).

  3. Switzerland (Basel, not after 1468: Beromünster, 1470).

  4. France (Paris, 1470: Lyon, not after 1473).

  5. Netherlands (Utrecht, about 1471–3: Alost, 1473).

  6. Austro-Hungary (Buda-Pesth, 1473: Trient, 1475).

  7. Spain (Valencia, 1474: Saragossa, 1475).

  8. England (Westminster, 1477: Oxford, 1478: St. Alban’s, 1480
      [1479?]: London, 1480).

  9. Denmark (Odensee, 1482: Schleswig, 1486).

  10. Sweden (Stockholm, 1483: Wadsten, 1495).

  11. Portugal (Lisbon, 1489: Leiria, 1492).

  12. Montenegro (Cettinje, 1494).

                  *       *       *       *       *

It is hoped that the above summary statement of the arguments for and
against the date of the Jerome will serve to make the present position
of the question clear. What general conclusion can be arrived at before
further facts are discovered? Caxton, who began to print in England in
1477, nowhere claims to have introduced printing into England. Is it
still conceivable that Oxford preceded Westminster by nine years? The
answer is that it is still conceivable, but not probable. The ground has
been slowly and surely giving way beneath the defenders of the Oxford
date, in proportion to the advance of our knowledge of early printing,
and all that can be said is that it has not yet entirely slipped away.
All the new contributions to the argument and all the chief
bibliographers are against it, while no fresh defending forces are in
sight. But it is still allowable to assert that the destructive
arguments, even if we admit their cumulative cogency, do not at the
present time amount to proof.

In the venerable building at the north-east corner of St. Mary’s Church
at Oxford—the old House of Congregation, which, though once the cradle
of the University,

            Nunc situs informis premit et deserta vetustas—

there is still a single tenant, feebly holding his ground and refusing
to be evicted. He wears the form of King Alfred and bears a legend
beneath, telling us boldly that he founded the University[12]. The
clamour of disputation never reaches that silent room, the changes of
centuries have disregarded it, and it remains the one place where a
belief which cast a lustre of royalty over early Oxford, and to this day
gives primacy to one of the oldest colleges, is still maintained without
contradiction. The figure neither utters nor listens to argument: it
asserts and chooses to assert. But the spirit of the age is at the door:
St. Mary’s is swathed in scaffolding: the sounds of trowel and saw
penetrate through the dim glass and the cobwebs and all things become
new. It is probable that the opening years of the twentieth century will
see the age-worn bust of Alfred and the copy of the Oxford Jerome in the
University archives consigned to a common flame as Impostors in an age
of light.

                            _Copies known._

  1. British Museum. Perfect. Given by the Earl of Oxford on 10 Mar.
      1729/30 to James West, at whose sale in 1773 it probably passed to
      M. C. Tutet: then in the King’s Library, which passed in 1829 to
      the British Museum, where it bore the mark 8. D. 5; now 167. b.
      26.

  2. Bodleian. Wanting e 10, a blank leaf. One page (b 7^r) is printed
      askew, in this copy only. Owned in 1582 by William Wright: then
      Bp. Juxon’s, who gave it on 31 July 1657 to Bp. Barlow, among
      whose books it passed to the Bodleian in 1693: where it has been
      successively marked A. 19. 6 Linc., Auct. Q. 1. 5. 18, Auct. Q. 1.
      6. 12 and Auct. R. supra 13.

  3. All Souls College, Oxford. Wanting a 4, a 5. Given by Benj. Buckler
      in 1756: bound in the 18th cent. with the Aretinus (see p. 253).
      Marked NN. 10. 1, now LL. 10. 17.

  4. Oriel College, Oxford. Perfect. Originally this was bound 4th in a
      volume containing Augustinus de dignitate sacerdotum: Meditationes
      Bernardi: Exempla Scripturae, Paris, 1478: the Jerome: Comm. Petri
      de Osoma in symbolum Quicunque vult, Paris: the Aegidius, Oxf.
      1479: Ars bene moriendi: and Hugonis Speculum ecclesiae. Owned by
      Edmund Lyster in the 16th cent. The present binding is of the 18th
      century: but there are old manuscript signatures throughout the
      volume.

  5. Oxford University Archives. Perfect. Owned by John Rhodes in 1664:
      given by Moses Pit, a London bookseller, 31 Jan. 1679/80. Bound
      with the ©Casus breves© of Johannes Andreas (n. d.).

  6. Cambridge University Library. Wanting e 10, a blank leaf. This copy
      has a painting of St. Jerome, a coloured capital and border, &c.,
      and a coat of arms. It bears a George I bookplate dated 1713.
      Marked C. 5. 1, and now AB. 5. 18.

  7. John Rylands Library, Manchester. Perfect. Bought for the Spencer
      Library for £150: bound by C. Lewis: marked 17320, or E. 237:
      transferred to Manchester with the whole Spencer Library.

  8. The Huth Library.

  9. The Earl of Pembroke’s Library.

  10. Sir Henry Dryden’s Library. Wanting e 10, a blank leaf. In
      original binding, part of a volume containing Joh. Sulp. Verulanus
      de Octo partibus orationis: Aug. Senensis de loquendi regulis: the
      Jerome: Alb. de Ferrariis de horis canonicis, 1485: Kamintus on
      the pestilence: and two leaves of a Prognostication of 1486 or
      1487.

  11. Paris National Library. Bought by Lord Blandford in Feb. 1812 for
      £91: in the White Knights sale sold for £28.

  12. A copy recently sold to an American. Perfect. It was originally in
      an Oxford contemporary binding with the Oxford Aegidius, 1479:
      Mich. de Hungaria’s Tredecim Sermones: “Oxoniensis cuiusdam
      exercitationes”: Adelard of Bath’s Quaestt. naturales: the Jerome
      was last. Owned by A. Hilton in the 15th cent.

  In 1862 a copy in F. S. Ellis’s catalogue (p. 14, no. 957) was priced
      £110.

  Fragments:—Leaves a 2, a 7, a 8, b 4, c 1, c 3, e 3, e 6–8 are in the
      Bodleian.


                    2. ¬Aretinus¬ (1479, see p. 1).

The reasons for placing this book second are given above at pp. 241–2:
if they are regarded as sufficient, we must take “1479” in the Aegidius
as what we should call 1480, which is in agreement with the ordinary
usage of the time and which gains a slight probability, in that the
printing would have been finished on a Sunday, if the year were taken as
1478/9. All copies are poorly printed. It was quite fitting that the
first book printed at Oxford should be theological and the second the
Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle.

                            _Copies known._

  1. British Museum. Wanting a 1, a blank leaf. In this copy alone there
      is a director for the large O of _Omnis_ on b 1^r. Owned by Will.
      Davis in 1792: then in the Grenville Library: marked “7. p. 115.
      1,” 8. D. 5, 163. B. 2, G. 7930, and now C. 2. a. 7. Bound with it
      is a manuscript translation into Latin of Aristotle’s ©Œconomica©
      and ©Politics©, dedicated to Humphrey Duke of Gloucester.

  2. Bodleian. Perfect. In this copy at o 2^r and o 2^v is a ć printed
      in the margin, apparently meaning “cancel,” since the recto is
      printed askew. Manuscript notes show that the book, which is in
      contemporary binding, was at first in the hands of an Oxford
      student (?) who received pittance from the Prior of Oseney. Then
      “Codex Michaelis Canni.” Owned by John Selden, among whose books
      it came to the Library in 1659. Marked 8^o A. 17 Art. Seld., Auct.
      Q. 1. 5. 17, Auct. R. supr. 8, and now S. Selden e. 2.

  3. All Souls College, Oxford. Perfect. Bound with the Jerome (see p.
      252).

  4. Norwich Cathedral Library.

  5. John Rylands Library, Manchester. Imperfect, wanting a 1, a blank
      leaf. Made up out of two copies, the Alchorne and the Freeling.
      Bound by C. Lewis: marked 15969 or G. 237: transferred as the
      Jerome.

  6. The Earl of Pembroke’s Library.

  7. Chetham Library at Manchester. Wants a 1 and two leaves in sign. k.

  8. Lord Ashburnham.

  Anthony Askew possessed a copy (Sale catal. 1775, no. 998, sold for £5
      5_s._ to Dent), and an imperfect one occurred in the Bright sale
      in 1845 (no. 180), and fetched £5 15_s._

  Fragments:—The Bodleian possesses fragments comprising l 3, l 6–8, v
      3, v 6, v 7, v 8: Queen’s College, Oxford, possesses m 8, with
      some variations of reading: and i 4 was in 1888 in the possession
      of F. J. H. Jenkinson, Esq., at Cambridge.


                  3. ¬Aegidius¬ (1479/80?, see p. 1).

In this work the colophon is printed in red, the only instance of colour
printing in the early Oxford press. The book is for some reason rarer
than the two which precede. It is noticeable that in every known copy
the bad grammar of the printed colophon was corrected in red ink before
it left the office.

                            _Copies known._

  1. Bodleian. Perfect. Owned by Robert Burton, the author of the
      ©Anatomy of Melancholy©, in 1601. Originally bound first in a
      volume also containing De viginti preceptis elegantiarum,
      Bois-le-duc, 1487: Perotti grammatica: Bonaventurae Soliloquium.
      Marked 4^o A. 28 Th., then Auct. Q. 1. 5. 16, then separately
      bound as Auct. R. supra 4.

  2. Oriel College Library. Perfect. See the Jerome, no. 4.

  3. John Rylands Library, Manchester. Wanting a 1 and c 8, blank leaves
      and a 8. Purchased by Lord Spencer: once part of the volume
      containing the Jerome no. 12.

  A copy was in the Harleian Library (Catal. vol. 3, no. 6674).


               4. ¬Cicero, Pro Milone¬ (1480?, see p. 2).

This is a puzzling book. The type so closely resembles Oxford type that
every bibliographer has accepted it provisionally as identical. Yet it
exhibits spaced type, it uses / for a comma (both points unique in
Oxford printing), and the sections are made up in sixes. It is also by
many years the first classic printed in England, the next being a
Terence in 1497. The volume probably consisted of a—e in sixes, allowing
a leaf blank at the beginning: perhaps section e was in eight. The first
half of each section bears signatures. The book was clearly made up of
half quarto sheets, three to each section. Mr. Blades was of opinion
that the type was more worn than that of the Ales: and Mr. E. G. Duff
thinks that the spacing and other peculiarities point to a later date
than 1480.

  Fragments known:—b 3–4, c 3–4 are in the Bodleian (Auct. R. supra 3),
      having been presented by Sir William H. Cope in 1872. They were
      fly leaves in a volume containing five treatises dated from 1491
      to 1505, probably bound in Oxford for William Cope (d. 1513) who
      lived near Banbury. Also c 1–2, 5–6 are in Merton College Library,
      Oxford, among some loose printed fragments.


                 5. ¬Latin Grammar¬ (1481?, see p. 2).

This is only known from two leaves in the British Museum, acquired in
1872 or late in 1871, which were found in the binding of a book, which
in the sixteenth cent. belonged to Nicholas Browere. It is a Latin
grammar in English, the examples of which connect its composition with
Oxford (e. g. “I goo to grammer att Oxforde Incumbo grammatice Oxonij,”
“Y go to Oxforde Eo Oxonium vel ad Oxonium.”) From letters in the
©Athenaeum©, 4 and 11 Nov. 1871, and notes in the book, it appears that
the author might be John Anwykyll (see p. 257) and that it is probably
not by Holt or Stanbridge. The chain lines run across the page: but it
is at present impossible to say whether the sections were in sixes or
eights. Marked C. 33. i. 10.


                      6. ¬Ales¬ (1481, see p. 2).

The woodcut border which is found in some copies of the Ales and
Latteburius is the earliest found in English printing, though Caxton
uses woodcut engravings in the text (for the first time) in the same
year. It consists of birds and flowers grouped on long winding stems,
the four pieces which form the border measuring in all not less than 11¼
× 7¾ in. (no quite intact copy is known, the binder’s ruthless knife
invariably removing a portion). A full-size reproduction of it is given
in E. G. Duff’s ©Facsimiles of English types© (Lond. 1895).

                            _Copies known._

  1. British Museum. Without border. Wanting a 4, a 5. Re-bound lately,
      but with the original sides. Owned by William Wodebrigge,
      sub-prior of Butleigh, co. Suffolk: then by John Warner: then by
      Cranmer: then by lord Lumley. In the Old Royal Library: once 520.
      9. 12, now C. 38. g. 1.

  2. Bodleian. Without border. Perfect: in original Oxford binding,
      plain sides. Owned by Roger Balkwell in the 15th cent. Marked A.
      5. 4 Art., then C. 7. 15 Art., now Auct. R. supra 10.

  3. Oxford—Balliol.

  4. Oxford—Brasenose. Without border. On vellum. Imperfect, wanting 13
      leaves. In contemporary Oxford binding, with stamped sides. Owned
      by—Claxton and Patrick Grante.

  5, 6. Oxford—Magdalen. Two copies, one imperfect, both with border. In
      J. E. T. Rogers’s ©History of Prices© is a note that Magdalen
      purchased a copy of this book in 1481 for 33_s._ 4_d._

  7. Oxford—New College.

  8. Oxford—St. John’s (_not_ in Oriel, as has been stated).

  9. Oxford—Trinity.

  10. Oxford—Worcester. Without border. Imperfect, wanting a i (blank),
      k 2, y 3. Given to Gloucester Hall by Clement Barksdale.

  11. Cambridge University Library. With border in three places, a 2, h
      1, z 1. Perfect. Marked P*. 9. 15.

  12. Do. Without border. Wanting a 1 (blank). Marked AB. 10. 9: with
      George I’s bookplate.

  13. John Rylands Library, Manchester. With border in three places, a
      2, h 1 and z 1. Wanting three leaves, a 1, g 6, y 8, all blank.
      Marked D. 237, E. 237, 19944, in the Spencer Library.

  14. Durham Cathedral Library. Without border.

  15. Dulwich College Library: bound with Lettou’s edition of Ant.
      Andreae, 1480.

  16. Lincoln Cathedral Library.

  Fragments:—In the Bodleian r 6 and parts of C 1, E 6: in Merton
      College, Oxford, two leaves (one is i 7): in Corpus Christi
      College, Oxford, part of one leaf: in the Cambridge University
      Library, parts of E 1 and other fragments: in the British Museum
      (MS. Harl. 5929, no. 36: last leaf with colophon and date): at
      Trinity College, Cambridge.


                   7. ¬Latteburius¬ (1482, see p. 2).

Some copies of this work also bear the engraved border noticed on p.
254. Some copies have a distinct variation on sign. “kk” (= K) 7^v, thus

               liū super capitulum s’m trenorū Ihe, _or_
               liū suꝑ capitulū secūdū trenorū Ihe.

Clearly the type was altered because s’m is a fair contraction when
meaning “according to,” but not properly used when meaning “second.” See
plate III.

                            _Copies known._

  1. British Museum. With border. Perfect. In the original stamped
      leather binding. Owned by Simon Foderby in the 15th century: by
      Christopher Viscount Castlecomer, and W. F. (?) Hunter, 1824.
      Marked 1215. k. 1, 1215. k. 6, 45. b. 30. 135, now C. 37. h. 10.

  2. Bodleian. With border. Perfect. Owned by John Cuthbertson, priest,
      and Robert Bonwick. Marked L. 1. 3 Th., L. 7. 2 Th., Auct. Q. 1.
      2. 8, now Auct. R. supra 11.


  3. Oxford—All Souls. Without border. On vellum. Perfect, except that
      part of O 6 (blank) is gone. Given by Richard Gavent formerly
      Fellow of the College. The binding is contemporary Oxford stamped
      leather. This copy is remarkable from the fact that four names,
      apparently of parchment-sellers, occur as signing certain leaves:
      on 54 leaves (representing 108) F. H.: on 31, Hawkyns or Haukins:
      on 8, Alison: on 3, J. Alexander (Alysaunder): probably some other
      signings are cut off. A comparison of two sets of similar markings
      in other books almost establishes the fact that these names do not
      represent revisers of the printing, but dimply the owners of the
      parchment. Sometimes “8 ff,” and once “8 ff alison,” occur,
      showing that the pieces were sold in bundles of eight (?). Marked
      P. 2. 18, then QQ. 8. 11.

  4. Oxford—Corpus Christi College. With border. Wanting almost all of a
      1, L 8, O 6 blank leaves. In contemporary binding. Marked X. P.
      iv. 4, then Δ. 18. 3.

  5. Oxford—New College.

  6, 7. Cambridge University Library. Both with border. One perfect (E.
      4. 1), in contemporary binding of stamped leather. Given by
      Albanus Butler to Richard Butler, rector of Aston-le-Walls (co.
      Northants) 23 June 1603. The other, AB. 7. 27, only wants a 1
      (blank leaf); with a George I bookplate.

  8. Cambridge—Jesus College. With border.

  9. Cambridge—Trinity College. Perfect (?). Marked vi^d. 8. 9
      (described in Sinker’s ©Catalogue©, 1876).

  10. John Rylands Library at Manchester. With border. Wanting only a 1
      (blank leaf). Owned by “Henri Joliff.” Marked 16741 or E. 237.

  11. Lambeth Library.

  12. Westminster Chapter Library. On vellum.

  13. Stonyhurst Library. Wanting only three blank leaves.

  14. T. Etherington Cooke, Esq., residing in Glasgow. Perfect. With
      border. In original binding.

  15. Brussels Library.

  Copies occurred in the Sams sale (185-, £17 5_s._, one leaf in
      manuscript): Bateman sale (1893: lot 1176): Payne and Foss (1848:
      art. 3120, £8 8_s._): Gardiner sale (£9 12_s._): Towneley sale
      (1883, with border, wanting O 6, and also L 1 and L 8, H 3 and H 6
      occurring in their stead: this copy was in Quaritch’s Rough List.
      99, no. 572, Sept. 1889, £32 10_s._): B. H. Bright sale 1845, lot
      3364 (£7 7_s._, with another book).

  Fragments known:—Lord Robartes (on vellum, part of one leaf, O 3);
      Trinity College, Cambridge; Queen’s College, Oxford (on vellum; l
      3, l 5, B 4, B 5, kk 5, kk 6); King’s College, Cambridge; Emmanuel
      College, Cambridge (on vellum, two half leaves, in q. 4. 62);
      Wadham College, Oxford (f 2, f 3, f 6, f 7); British Museum (one
      leaf, i 8, in 618. l. 18, and one leaf on vellum in Harl. MS.
      5977. fol. 44); S. Sandars, Esq. (one leaf); New College, Oxford
      (four leaves, H 2, H 7, g 3, p 4: and on vellum four leaves, D
      2–3, &c.); Bodleian (I 3, I 5, kk 2, kk 7, M 2, b 2–5; C 7–8 on
      vellum); Brasenose College, Oxford (on vellum, I 6); Corpus
      Christi College, Oxford (four leaves: and two leaves on vellum).


                    8. ¬Anwykyll¬ (1483?, see p. 3).

Four of the chief English grammarians of the 16th century were connected
with Magdalen College Grammar School at Oxford. The first master was
John Anwykyll (1481?-87); the first usher and second master was John
Stanbridge (1481?-88, 1488–94, _d._ 1510); John Holte, the author of the
©Lac Puerorum©, was master; and Robert Whittington was Stanbridge’s
pupil at the school. Dean Colet, William Lily and Cardinal Wolsey were
also members of Magdalen (see Bloxam’s ©Register of Magdalen College©,
iii., ad init.). Of the Latin Grammar in Latin which is now before us
and has been assigned with probability by Bradshaw to Anwykyll, no
complete copy is known, but it was reprinted at Deventer in 1489. The
©Vulgaria Terentii© occurs also separately, and consists of sentences
from Terence with English translation.

There appear to be two different editions of this Grammar (not
Vulgaria), for it can be shown that the Cambridge fragments are not of
the same edition as the Bodleian book. Not only, for instance, are the
contents of sign. h 3 in each entirely different, but the signatures
themselves are in different type, and in the Corpus (Cambridge) fragment
the signature is n 3, and yet it belongs to the Compendium and not the
Vulgaria. The height of the printed page also varies considerably, and
the width of the Vulgaria pages is less than that of the Grammar. The
subject needs further investigation.

                             _Parts known._

  1. London—British Museum, Vulgaria Terentii only, with written date at
      end 5 Jan. 1500/1. Marked C. 33. i. 3.

  2. Oxford—Bodleian. A fragment containing signn. fg^8hk^6lm^8 and
      (Vulgaria) n-q^8. Sign. i probably contained the Tertia pars
      grammaticae. With the Condover Hall (Cholmondeley) bookplate:
      bought by the Bodleian from Quaritch in 1892: in whose Rough List,
      no. 124, May 1892, it is priced £100. Now marked Inc. e. E 2
      1483/1.

  3. Oxford—Bodleian. The Vulgaria only, bound first in a volume
      containing also P. P. Vergerii de ingenuis moribus liber (Louvain,
      Joh. de Westphalia, n. d.), and Adelardi Quaestiones (n. pl. or
      d.). The following interesting inscription is in it:—“1483. Frater
      Johannes grene emit hunc librum Oxoñ de elemosinis amicorum
      suorum.” In plain 15th cent. binding. Owned also by Henry Strathyn
      at Bedford, John Uncle, Robert Hunter (all 16th cent.). Bought by
      the Bodleian at the T. Thomson sale Jan. 1866 (lot 1068) for £36.
      Marked Auct. R. supra 2.

  4. Cambridge—University Library. The Vulgaria only. Bound originally
      in a volume containing Perotti Erudimenta Grammatices (Par. 1488):
      Opusculum quintu-pertitum grammaticale (Gouda, 1486); Ars
      Epistolandi Jac. P(ublicii) (n. pl. or d.); the Vulgaria; Matheoli
      Perusini tractatus de memoria (n. pl. or d.). Marked AB. 5. 16. 4.

  5. John Rylands Library, Manchester. The Vulgaria only.

  Small Fragments known:—Cambridge University Library (two leaves, h 3,
      and [without sign.] the beginning of the 3rd part): Trinity
      College Library, Cambridge (one leaf, d 1, of the same edition as
      the University Library fragments). Photographs of these fragments
      are in the Bodleian. The Rev. W. D. Macray states in his ©Annals
      of the Bodleian© (2nd ed., 1890, p. 159, _note_) that Bradshaw
      found two leaves at Corpus and two at St. John’s (both Cambridge),
      but these really belong to the Alexander (p. 260). Four leaves are
      in the library of Lord Dillon at Ditchley, Oxfordshire, discovered
      by Mr. Macray in 1867.


                    9. ¬Hampole¬ (1483?, see p. 3).

This work by Richard Rolle of Hampole (_d._ 1349) was also printed at
Paris in 1510 and at Cologne in 1536. Noticed in J. Ph. Berjeau’s
©Bibliophile©, no. 24 (Dec. 1863), p. 146.

                            _Copies known._

  1. Cambridge University Library. Wants a 1 and l 4 (both blank: AB. 4.
      31, with a George I bookplate).

  2. Cambridge University Library. Wants l 4 (H* 9. 51. 5).

  3. John Rylands Library, Manchester, purchased in 1893 from the
      Cambridge University Library. Wants almost all a 1 (F* 5. 26. 3,
      when at Cambridge).

  Fragments:—Some leaves from the Babington sale (1889) are in the
      Library of St. John’s College, Cambridge.


                     10. ¬Logic¬ (1483?, see p. 3).

There is a Registrum cartarum at the end of this book, on sign. D d 8^r.
Diagrams are on A 4^r, A 5^v, B 6^v, cf. C c 2^r.

                            _Copies known._

  1. New College, Oxford. Wanting nearly all a 1 (blank leaf). Owned by
      John Utting. Marked Auct. V. 2. 18.

  2. Merton College, Oxford. Wanting a 1 (blank), B 3, B 4. Marked D. 6.
      13 Art., D. 8. 17 Art., then 19. E. 18.

  Fragments:—Bodleian (one leaf, Q 2: marked Auct. R. supra 16):
      Cambridge University Library: Trinity College, Cambridge (one
      leaf, 26 half leaves): St. John’s College, Cambridge (O 1, O 2, O
      5, O 6): Lambeth Library (four leaves).


                  11. ¬Lyndewoode¬ (1483?, see p. 3).

This contains a large wood engraving (on sign. a 1^v) of Jacobus de
Voragine writing the Golden Legend, seated at his desk beneath a canopy;
on each side are two trees, the foliage of which, as in the Festial, is
represented by nearly horizontal lines in rude style. Size 4⅜ × 7⅜ in.,
to outer bounding lines. See plate IV.

                            _Copies known._

  1. British Museum. Wanting aa 1 and either S 10 or (the second) aa 1
      (both blank). Marked 497. i. 1, then C. 37. l. 2. In this copy f
      1, f 2, f 7, f 8, all g, h and i, k 1, k 2 have been re-set,
      compared with the other two, which are probably the earlier issue.
      As a test, in this copy the catchword on sign. f 1^r is under
      _quamuis_, but in nos. 2 and 3 under _glosa_, as is usual.

  2. British Museum. Wanting S 10 (blank); and a duplicate of f 3, f 6
      is placed after t 3. Owned by Tho. Chandler, dean of Hereford
      March 1481/2 to 1490, then by James Scudamour, who gave it to
      Richard Tomson in 1595. Marked 711. i. 15, and 41. 11. 6. 164: now
      C. 37. l. 7. The sides of the binding are old stamped leather.

  3. British Museum. Wanting a 1, R 1, R 8, cc 3, cc 6, and all dd.
      Owned by Nicholas Peir(ce?), John Harrison (?), and William Graves
      who gave it to the Museum. Marked 497. i. 2.

  4. Oxford, Bodleian. Perfect. In original binding of stamped leather,
      re-backed. Marked L. 4. 8 Jur., then Auct. Q. 1. 1. 4, then Auct.
      R. supra 12, now Inc. b. E 2. 1485/1.

  5. Oxford, All Souls. Perfect. Marked A. 1. 29, C. 3. 12, D. 11. 12,
      now I. 11. 10. Owned by Thomas Windsor in 1634, and bp. Nathaniel
      Crewe.

  6. Oxford, New College. (“Auct. V. 12”.)

  7. Oxford, Queen’s College.

  8. Cambridge University Library. Wanting aa 1 (nearly all), y 4, y 5.
      With a George I bookplate, 1715. Marked B. 1. 5, now AB 1. 19.

  9. —— 2nd copy. Wanting A 2, S. 10, dd 1, dd 10. Marked L. 3. 38, now
      Q. 2. 14.

  10. Cambridge, Clare College.

  11. Cambridge, Corpus Christi College.

  12. Cambridge, King’s College.

  13. Cambridge, St. John’s College. On vellum.

  14. John Rylands Library, Manchester: bought from the late Rev. J. E.
      Millard by Lord Spencer. Wanting a 1, S 10, aa 1, dd 10. This had
      been in the Savile sale (1862), lot 497.

  15. Edinburgh, Advocates’ Library.

  16. Durham Cathedral Library.

  17. Glasgow, Free Church College Library.

  18. E. Gordon Duff, Esq.: bought at a London sale for £12 15_s._:
      wanting a 1, S 10, aa 1.

  19. Lord Crawford.

  20. National Library at Paris. On vellum.

  A copy occurred in the Bateman sale (1893), lot 1190.

  Fragments known:—Bodleian (part of D 2: marked Auct R. supra 17: now
      Inc. c. E 7. 1); Jesus College, Oxford (part of a leaf of index):
      Mr. E. G. Duff possesses a Valerius Maximus of 1519, in a
      Cambridge binding (about 1520), the boards of which are entirely
      made up of the Oxford Lyndewoode; from the Hailstone Library.


☞ ¬The following book was discovered since sheet B was printed off.¬


                        12. ¬Augustine¬ (1483?).

¬Augustine¬, St. [Sign. a 2^r:—] Excitatio fidelis anime ad ele⸗|mosinam
faciendam A b¿ea¿to Au⸗|gustino conscripta.

  [Oxford, about 1483]: (eight) sm. 4^o: pp. [16], sign. a^8: sign. a
      3^r beg. _Non enim_. Contents:—sign. a 2-a 8^r, the sermon.

This piece of Oxford printing was discovered in the spring of 1891 in
the British Museum. It was originally bound with Gerson’s De modo
vivendi (Joh. de Westphalia, n. d.), the Cordiale de quattuor novissimis
(Delft, 1482), Albertanus de arte loquendi, 1484, Adelardi Quæstiones
naturales, and the Historia septem sapientum. Marked 702. d. 34, now C.
38. f. 37: it had been part of lot 4912 in the Colbert sale. A facsimile
is given in E. G. Duff’s ©Early printed books© (Lond. 1893).


                    13. ¬Phalaris¬ (1485, see p. 4).

The computation of the date by Olympiads is very uncommon, in early
printed books: it is however the most ancient classical method. Each
Olympiad is a period of four years, and the first is computed to have
commenced in July, B. C. 776: so that July A. D. 1 corresponded with the
beginning of Olympiad 195. The computation ceased for practical purposes
in A. D. 395, and the present revival is of an artificial kind, in which
the expression “every fifth year,” which by a Greek could be applied to
an Olympiad (Πενταετηρίς), was taken in its ordinary sense and used for
computation. Thus “in the 297th Olympiad from the birth of Christ” was
in the present book taken to represent (297 × 5 =) A. D. 1485. A similar
use is found in the 1472 (Venice) edition of the Epigrams of
Ausonius[13]. But the 1494 (Parma) edition of the Declamations of
Quintilian contains a futile attempt to use the ancient method, for it
was printed “Olympiade quingentesima sexagesima octaua qui est annus a
salute christiana M.cccc.xciiii quinto non. Iul.”, whereas it would
properly have been 1493. And M. A. Giry (©Manuel de Diplomatique©, 1894,
p. 96) records an unintelligible attempt to use this computation in a
deed of 1102.

                            _Copies known._

  1. Oxford, Corpus Christi College. Perfect. Owned by John Lacy, and
      Herbert Randolph (1724). Marked Χ P. 3. 12, then Δ. 1. 14.

  2. Oxford, Wadham College.

  3. John Rylands Library, Manchester. Perfect. Marked in the Spencer
      Library S. 5. 3, and 15835 (G. 237).

  Fragments:—Bodleian (parts of i 4, i 6, now Auct. R. supra 9): Corpus
      Christi College, Oxford (parts of l 2 and l 7): St. John’s College
      Library, Oxford (one leaf): Trin. Coll. Camb. (one leaf of sign.
      d): Westminster Abbey Library (four leaves of sign. k).


                   14. ¬Alexander¬ (1485?, see p. 4).

There are editions of the Textus Alexandri by Pynson in 1505, 1513, 1516
and by Wynkin de Worde, 1503.

  Fragments known:—St. John’s College, Cambridge (c 2 and c 3 [?]):
      Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (two leaves, n 3 and one
      unsigned; probably part of the Alexander).


                   15. ¬Festiall¬ (1486/7, see p. 4).

Printed in “1486,” “on the day aftir Seint Edward the kyng”: which would
seem to be March 19, 1486/7. This book is distinguished by the
occurrence of many woodcut engravings, and by the use of a woodcut
capital G (52 times). This latter is the only woodcut letter used in the
early Oxford Press (see Bradshaw in the ©Communications© of the
Cambridge Antiquarian Society, iii. 136). In the same paper (p. 138)
Bradshaw suggests that the eleven large cuts were perhaps intended for
an edition of the Golden Legend, and that the five smaller ones belong
to a lost Oxford Primer on Horae. The text is nearer to that of Caxton’s
second issue (1491) than of his first (1483). The two sets of woodcuts
are as follows:—


           _Larger kind_ (general size, about 4½ × 4½–5½ in.).

  1. ( )    Woodcut of the Crucifixion, laid sideways.
     1^r.

  2. ( )    Woodcut of St. Christopher bearing Christ, beneath a canopy.
     i^v.

  3. h 5^v. Bishop under canopy, with two trees (facsimile in Dibdin’s
            _Ædes Althorpianæ_).

  4. i 5^v. Martyrdom of St. Thomas.

  5. k 7^r. Stoning of St. Stephen (facsimile in Dibdin).

  6. l 2^r. St. John the Evangelist (?) with cup and palm-branch,
            between two figures.

  7. l 6^r. Murder of the Innocents.

  8. l 8^v. Murder of Thomas a Becket.

  9. m 5^v. The Circumcision.

 10. n 6^r. The Conversion of St. Paul.

 11. o 7^v. The Annunciation.


            _Smaller kind_ (general size, about 2½ × 1½ in.).

 12. c 4^v. Crucifixion.

     d 8^v. Space for woodcut.

     e 2^v.   Do. ?

 13. e 3^r. Pentecost.

     e 5^r.   Do., the same woodcut.

 14. f 2^v. The Trinity.

 15. h 1^r. St. Andrew with his cross, with a book and trees.

 16. h 1^r. St. Andrew with his cross.

The prints are rude in execution, the foliage of trees being generally
indicated simply by horizontal lines (as in a French ©Ortus Sanitatis©
of about 1485). The shoes, sword-scabbards, and the like are often
entirely black, showing that the cuts were intended to be coloured by
hand. They appear to be entirely unknown elsewhere. See plate V.

                            _Copies known._

  1. Bodleian. Imperfect. Wanting all ( ), c 3, c 4, g 4, k 4, k 5, o 4,
      o 5, r 5, s 3, s 4, s 5, s 6, z 1, z 3, z 4. Marked Auct. R. supra
      5. The variations of signn. h and i show that this is a later
      issue than no. 2. Owned by William Little.

  2. Bodleian. Imperfect. Wanting all ( ), a-f, g 1, g 2, h 1, i 6, k
      1–3, k 6–8, l 3, l 6, l 8, o 3, p 6, r 4–6, t 1, t 6, x 1, x 2, x
      7, x 8, y, z: but y 2, y 5 are inserted from Hearne’s fragments.
      This was William Herbert’s copy: no. 730 in the Utterson sale
      1852, where it was bought by the Bodleian for £6 10_s._: marked
      Auct. R. supra 7.

  3. John Rylands Library, Manchester. Wanting a 1, a 2 (supplied in
      manuscript), z 4. Owned by Ratcliffe (sale, no. 1430, £3 2_s._),
      then Alchorne, then Johnes. No. 15409 (E. 237) in the Spencer
      Library. Dibdin’s collation is very faulty. Signn. h, i are of the
      later kind.

  4. Lambeth Library. Wants z 4 (blank). The variations in signn. h, i
      are of the later type. Once archbp. Tenison’s copy. Marked once
      lxiii. 1. 19, now 38. 2. 23. f.

  A copy occurred for sale in Rodd’s 1831 catalogue, priced £6 6_s._

  Fragments:—British Museum (one leaf, y 3, in MS. Harl. 5919, no. 139):
      Wadham College, Oxford (1½ leaves): Brasenose College, Oxford
      (several leaves): parts of two leaves (q 6 and another) were
      offered by A. Iredale, bookseller of Torquay (catal. 31, Oct.
      1887, no. 1) for 21_s._

The Printing Press at Oxford ceases its work suddenly in 1486/7, and
there is no reason for this stop at present known. The printing at St.
Alban’s ceased at about the same time. It has been suggested that Rood
left Oxford for Cologne, where a Theodericus printed books in 1485 and
1486 in a type similar to that of the Ales and Latteburius. In this case
Hunt may have continued for a short time alone, and then relinquished
the work.

-----

Footnote 6:

  None is paged: nor are there catchwords.

Footnote 7:

  Exclusive of headline, signatures, and marginal notes.

Footnote 8:

  With fragments of the book, independently of copies.

Footnote 9:

  As these pages pass through the press I am informed by Mr. E. G. Duff
  that Lord Crawford possesses an edition of Horace’s Opuscula printed
  in “1470” with signatures.

Footnote 10:

  Blades was under the erroneous impression that Koelhoff printed at
  Lübeck, instead of Cologne: where also books with manuscript
  signatures occur later than 1472.

Footnote 11:

  In 1467 Ulric Zel of Cologne (see p. 242) was unacquainted with the
  setting-rule, which made evenness easy: he adopted it in 1468–9, but
  Colard Mansion at Bruges not till 1478 (Blades, ©Books in Chains©, p.
  128).

Footnote 12:

  AELFREDVS . | LEGVM . ANGLIAE . | ACADEMIAE . OXON . | CONDITOR .

Footnote 13:

  “A nativitate Christi ducentesimae nonagesimae quintae Olympiadis
  anno. II. VII. Idus Decembres,” = 7 Dec. 1472.



                              APPENDIX B.
                   The Early Sixteenth Century Press.

            (Supplementary to, and corrective of, pp. 5–7.)


From December 1517 to February “1519” (1519/20?) a printing press is
found in work at Oxford in St. John’s Street near Merton College,
connected in 1518 with the name of Johannes Scolar and in the last book
with the name of Carolus Kyrfoth. Both of these appear to be foreigners,
but nothing certain has yet been discovered about them or the causes of
the establishment and cessation of the press[14]. In 1524 none of these
names occurs among the inhabitants of Oxford paying taxes (Oxf. Hist.
Soc., ©City Documents©, ed. by J. E. T. Rogers, 1891, p. 5): nor are
they otherwise known in Oxford as booksellers or stationers. Although
Scolar uses the arms of the University (their earliest occurrence in
print), yet the Registers of the University almost entirely ignore the
fact that for the second time the greatest literary invention since
speech and writing were known, was silently at work in its midst. Three
of the books were however issued “Cum Privilegio.” It is peculiar that
whereas theology claimed a fair proportion of the first press, it is
entirely absent from the second; grammar, logic, arithmetic, natural
science, and the Ethics of Aristotle being alone represented, except
that one broadside consists of a Prognostication, which Dorne’s lists in
1520 show to have been a popular form of literature in Oxford at that
time. All are in small quarto, and similar in the types used, namely an
English and Brevier black-letter, with a Great Primer for titles. Not
only at Oxford but also at Cambridge, York, Tavistock, and Abingdon, in
all of which there was an early 16th cent. press, printing entirely
ceases for nearly the central forty years of that century.


               1. ¬Burley¬ on Aristotle (1517, see p. 5).

                            _Copies known._

  Oxford—Bodleian.

  Oxford—St. John’s College.

    The titlepage is reproduced in plate VI. The Royal Arms on the
      penultimate page of this treatise, and also in the 1518 Burley’s
      ©Principia©, are a wood engraving which belonged to Winkin de
      Worde, as I am informed by Mr. E. G. Duff.


                  2. ¬Dedicus¬ (1518, May, see p. 6).

On the title is the woodcut mark of John Scolar engraved in Berjeau’s
©Printers’ Marks© (Lond. 1866) no. 81, and his ©Bookworm© (Lond. 1868),
no. 32, p. 126: see also the ©Corrections and Additions© to Chandler’s
Catalogue of editions of Aristotle’s Ethics (Oxf. 1868), p. 7.

                            _Copies known._

  London—British Museum, bought at the Crawford sale, 1891, lot 932. The
      last leaf with colophon is also in MS. Harl. 5929, fol. 41.

  Oxford—Corpus Christi College, wanting titlepage.

  Oxford—Jesus College (two copies).

  Cambridge—University Library: which has also a fragment containing the
      greater part of pp. 1–12, 14–17.

  Edinburgh—University Library (wants 4 leaves, sign. I 3–6).

  King’s Norton Parish Library.

  A copy was in the Inglis sale, 1826.


                 3. ¬De Luce¬ (1518, June 5: see p. 6).

                            _Copies known._

  Oxford—Bodleian.

  Oxford—Jesus College.

  Cambridge—University Library.


           4. ¬Burley’s¬ Principia (1518, June 7: see p. 5).

                            _Copies known._

  Oxford—Bodleian.

  Oxford—Jesus College.

  Cambridge—University Library, wanting D 4.

    The titlepage is reproduced in plate VII. See note on the 1517
      Burley, p. 263.


5. ¬Whittington¬ (1518, June 27: see p. 7, where in l. 3 _protouatis_ is
a misprint for _prothouatis_. The square brackets in the title may now
be removed).

                            _Copies known._

  Oxford—Bodleian (imperfect).

  Oxford—Jesus College.

  Cambridge—University Library.

  Cambridge—Pembroke College (six copies).

  John Rylands Library.

  Ham House.


                      6. ¬Laet¬ (1518?: see p. 6).

The title is now known to be “Prenostica” simply. The parts known are
(1) from the Cambridge copy, from the top a head line and 34 lines, from
the bottom 33 lines of small type and 5 of larger type: (2) from the
Oxford copy, 22 lines from the top, and 22–24 from the bottom. At
present the intervening space, which must be small, is unknown. The type
is 8¼ in. broad, and red ink is used.

                            _Copies known._

  Oxford—Corpus Christi College (28 fragments of the upper and lower
      parts).

  Cambridge—University Library (two fragments).


                    7. ¬Compotus¬ (1519: see p. 7).

Beneath the title is a woodcut, 5¾ × 4⅜ in., representing a master at
his desk, with a birch in his left hand and a book in his right: above
him and on each side are other volumes, and before him five students on
a bench with their books. Two windows are in the background. On A 2^r is
a diagram of the open hand (5 × 3⅝ in.), for purposes of computation:
and different diagrams of the hand or part of it are on A 2^v, A 4^r, A
4^v.

                             _Copy known._

  Cambridge—University Library.


             DETAILS OF THE EARLY SIXTEENTH CENTURY PRESS.

 ──────────────────┬─────────────┬─────────────┬─────────────────────────────
 NO.     BOOK.     │    DATE.    │   PRINTER   │        PLACE NAMED.
                   │             │   NAMED.    │
 ──────────────────┼─────────────┼─────────────┼─────────────────────────────
   1 ¬Burley¬ on   │1517 Dec. 4  │—————————    │Academia Oxonie
       Aristotle   │             │             │
   2 ¬Dedicus¬     │1518 May 15  │J. Scolar[15]│Celeberrima Universitas
                   │             │             │  Oxoniensis (St. John’s St.)
   3 ¬De Luce¬     │1518 June 5  │J. Scolar[15]│Celeberrima Universitas
                   │             │             │  Oxoniensis (St. John’s St.)
   4 ¬Burley’s¬    │1518 June 7  │J. Scolar[15]│Celeberrima Universitas
       Principia   │             │             │  Oxoniensis (St. John’s St.)
   5 ¬Whittington¬ │1518 June 27 │J. Scolar    │Oxonia
   6 ¬Laet¬ (1518?)│———————————— │—————————    │Celeberrima Oxoniensis
                   │             │             │  Academia
   7 ¬Compotus¬    │“1519” Feb. 5│C. Kyrfoth   │Celeberrima Universitas
                   │             │             │  Oxoniensis (St. John’s St.)

 ──────────────────┬──────────────┬─────┬─────────┬─────┬────────────────────
 NO.     BOOK.     │    PAGES.    │LINES│  LARGE  │HEAD │     WOODCUTS.
                   │              │ IN  │CAPITALS.│LINE.│
                   │              │PAGE.│         │     │
 ──────────────────┼──────────────┼─────┼─────────┼─────┼────────────────────
   1 ¬Burley¬ on   │      20      │ 55  │    +    │  ⨀  │Oxf. & Royal Arms
       Aristotle   │              │     │         │     │
   2 ¬Dedicus¬     │152 (foliated)│ 56  │    +    │  +  │Oxf. & Royal Arms
   3 ¬De Luce¬     │      16      │55–6 │    +    │  +  │Oxf. & Magi
   4 ¬Burley’s¬    │      16      │ 57  │    ⨀    │  +  │Oxf. & Royal Arms &
       Principia   │              │     │         │     │  Scholar
   5 ¬Whittington¬ │      20      │ 59  │    ⨀    │  +  │Oxf. & Scholar
   6 ¬Laet¬ (1518?)│           [broadside: no complete copy known]
   7 ¬Compotus¬    │      16      │31–2 │    ⨀    │  +  │Oxf. & Scholars &
                   │              │     │         │     │  Hands

-----

Footnote 14:

  In 1528 we find a John Scolar, probably identical with the Oxford
  printer, printing a Breviary at Abingdon near Oxford for the use of
  the Abbey.

Footnote 15:

  With privilege.



                              APPENDIX C.
     A CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF PERSONS AND PROCEEDINGS CONNECTED WITH
               BOOK-PRODUCTION AT OXFORD, A.D. 1180–1640.


Three districts in Oxford are associated with the early production of
books.

One is Bookbinders Bridge, which is still standing, namely the bridge
which as one starts from close under the Castle in Titmouse Lane towards
St. Thomas’s Church, crosses the second piece of water. The bridge was
on the limits of Oseney Abbey and the neighbouring tenements were
largely occupied by binders who worked for the Abbey. See Clark’s
edition of Wood’s ©History of the City©, i. 433.

Schidyard St., now Oriel St., is said to imply by its name that it was
the locus schediasticorum, the place of writers on _schedae_ or sheets
of paper. Certainly with St. John Baptist St. (now Merton St.) and Cat
St., it was a great centre for scribes, illuminators, bookbinders, and
the like. See Clark’s Wood, as above, i. 139, 175, 184.

Also Cheney Lane, earlier St. Mildred’s Lane, and now Market St., was
largely tenanted by the same class. See Clark’s Wood, i. 72.

The stationarius (or virgifer) of the University was regularly appointed
(see Clark’s ©Register of the University©, vol. ii, pt. 1, p. 261), and
was generally employed to value the books of a scholar after death or
sequestration.

But these general facts require to be supplemented by the details which
follow: with respect to which it must be remembered that many persons
combined several of the trades here recorded, and that, for instance,
the earliest printers always bound the books they produced.


 [_Chief Authorities_:—

  Coxe. = Catalogus codicum MSS. qui in collegiis aulisque Oxoniensibus
      hodie adservantur. Confecit H. O. Coxe. (Oxf. 1852.)

  Kirchhoff, Albrecht: Die Handschriftenhändler des Mittelalters. Zweite
      Ausgabe. (Leipz. 1853), pp. 132, 136.

  Magd. = Notes from the muniments of St. Mary Magdalen College, Oxford,
      by the rev. W. D. Macray. (Oxf. 1882.)

  Oxf. City Doc. = Oxford City Documents, 1268–1665, edited by J. E.
      Thorold Rogers. (Oxf. Hist. Soc. vol. xviii, 1891.)

  Twyne. = Brian Twyne’s manuscript collections in the Oxford University
      archives.

  Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills. = An Index to Wills proved in the Court of
      the Chancellor of the University of Oxford, by John Griffiths.
      (Oxf. 1862.)]


    (SCRIBES, ILLUMINATORS, BOOKBINDERS, STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS,
                      PARCHMENT-MAKERS, PRINTERS.)

  Not later than 1180:—

      Peter, illuminator (Deed of Elias Bradfoth, in Oxf. Univ.
         Archives).
      Ralph, illuminator (do.).
      William, illuminator (do.).
      Thomas, scribe (“scriptor”) (do.).
      Reginald, parchment-maker (do.).
      Roger, parchment-maker (do.).

  c. 1190–1200. John, “illuminator”, in St. Mary’s[16] parish (Magd.).

  c. 1190–1200. Roger, “pergamenarius”, in St. Mary’s parish (Magd.).

  1190–1215. Peter, illuminator, in St. Mary’s parish (Magd.).

  c. 1210–20 (?) Augustine, bookbinder, in St. Peter’s-in-the-East
      parish (Magd.).

  1212, Nov. A, scribe (“Explicit opus manuum mearum, quod compleui ego
      frater A subdiaconus sancte Frideswide seruientium minimus, anno
      ... M^o CC^o ... xii^o ... anno conuersionis mee vij^o ...”:
      Paris, Bibl. Nat. MS. fonds Français 24766).

    In the first half of the 13th cent. occurs as a witness Reginald,
      bookbinder, in an old deed in the Oxford Univ. archives between
      Will. Burgey, and Nicholas “serviens Universitatis”, in one of the
      mayoralties of Petrus filius Toraldi. (Twyne I, p. 52.)

  c. 1232–40. John, illuminator, St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  c. 1232–40. Walter, bookbinder, St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1237–8. Walter de Ensham, illuminator, St. Mary’s (Magd.).

  1240–57. Roger, scribe, (“exemplarius”, alias “Saumplarier”,)
      apparently dead in 1276: St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  c. 1240–90. Simon Scoticus, parchment-maker (“parcamenarius”) in
      Cattestrete, St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1242. Robert de Derbi, illuminator, in Cattestrete, St. Peter’s
      (Magd.).

    About the middle of the 13th cent. the following names occur in
      Twyne’s transcript of a St. Frideswide record—a deed between
      Petrus filius Toraldi and Adam filius Hugonis Ruffi about land in
      the parish of St. Mary the Virgin:—Robert, illuminator; Simon,
      parchment-maker; and as witnesses, Thomas, scribe; Peter,
      parchment-maker (Twyne XXIII, p, 69).

  1251–2. Stephen, parchment-maker (“percamenarius”), in Cattestrete,
      St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1252–3. William, scribe (“le Samplarier”), St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1252–90. Stephen, bookbinder, St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1264–84. William de Pikerynge, bookbinder, (“laminator”), died before
      1308: found both in St. Mary’s and St. Peter’s deeds: probably the
      same as William the bookbinder of Oxford, the motto on whose seal
      in 1275 was “Vivite innocue; lumen adest” (Magd.).

  1266. Hugh, illuminator, St. Mary’s (Magd.).

  1266–78. Symon and Yon, bookbinders, St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1267. Reginald, illuminator, St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1268–90. Martin, scribe (“Exemplarius” alias “le Saumplarier”): dead
      in 1298: St. Peter’s (Magd.).

  1290. In this year it is agreed between the University and City that
      “Pergamenarii, Luminatores, Scriptores” were in the jurisdiction
      of the Chancellor of the University (©Munimenta Academica©, ed.
      Anstey, p. 52).

  Before 1304. Geoffrey, illuminator (“alluminator”), St. Mary’s
      (Magd.).

  1308. Robert, notary and stationer in Cattestrete: St. Mary’s (Magd.).

  In the first quarter of the 14th cent. William of Nottingham wrote
      MSS. Merton Coll. 158, 166, 168, 169, 170 at Oxford (Coxe: see
      Little’s ©Grey Friars in Oxford©, 1892, pp. 165–6).

  1340/1, Feb. Adam, bookbinder, occurs incidentally as holding a
      tenement in Schidyerd way (now Oriel St.), in the Bodleian Oxford
      charter no. 125* (Turner’s Catal., p. 307). This tenement he left
      to the altar of St. Thomas the Martyr in St. Mary the Virgin’s
      church in 1349 (Wood’s ©City©, ed. A. Clark, ii. 22, from a copy
      of the will).

  1341. Symon Faunt and John Faunt, bookbinders, St. Mary’s (Magd.).

  1342. In this year a MS. of William of Ockham’s Summa Logices now at
      Bâle (F. ii. 25 according to A. G. Little’s ©Grey Friars in
      Oxford©, p. 226: see Sir Tho. Phillipps’s Catalogue of MSS. at
      Bâle, p. 7) was written at Oxford.

  1344. John Joye, illuminator (“lumnour”), of Cattestrete: St. Peter’s
      (Magd.).

  1345. In this year the Chancellor of the University was acknowledged
      to have jurisdiction over “quattuor stationarios ad hujusmodi
      officium per ... Universitatem admissos et pro tempore admittendos
      ac Universitati juratos vel jurandos, necnon in omnes et singulos
      scriptores scholaribus in scriptorum officio servientes”
      (©Munimenta Academica©, ed. Anstey, p. 150, cf. 176; Wood’s
      ©Annals©, ed. Gutch, i. 441).

  1349. In I. B. De Rossi’s ©Codices Palatini Latini bibliothecae
      Vaticanae descripti© (1886) in MS. no. 377 “adnotatur emptio
      codicis ‘pro duobus Florenis cum dimidio Anno domini
      M^o.CCC^o.XL^o nono in ciuitate oxoniensi.’”

  XIVth cent. Roger, stationer (Oxf. Univ. Archives, box F, no 24).

  XIVth cent. Adam de Walton, parchment maker (_ibid._, box F. no. 26).

  XIVth cent. William, bookbinder (_ibid._, box F, no. 28).

  c. 1350. MS. New College 134 was written at Oxford in about A.D. 1350
      (Coxe).

  In the 14th cent. in an undated deed in the Oxf. Univ. Archives
      between John Pilat and Walter “filius Paulini de Eynsham” about
      land in St. Mary’s parish, the following occur as
      witnesses:—Ralph, Robert, James, illuminators; Walter, Augustine,
      Adam, bookbinders (“liurs”); Simon, parchment-maker (Twyne XXIII,
      p. 103; cf. Bodl. MS. Wood D. 2, p. 489).

  1353. Thomas Hamme, bookseller (“Vetus quoddam inventarium de bonis
      Thomæ Hamme bibliopolæ et stationarii ut videtur anno domini
      1353,”) once in the Oxf. Univ. Archives, box K, no. 2; but this
      most interesting document is noted by Gerard Langbaine as having
      been stolen during the Civil War (MS. Twyne I, 278).

  1358/9. Richard Lynne, stationer (“stacionarius Universitatis Oxun.”)
      (Coxe): Richard the stationer occurs in Lent 1358 (Boase’s
      ©Registrum Oxoniense©, 1st ed., p. xi).

  1364. MS. New College 173 was written at Oxford in this year (Coxe).

  1370. Robert, bookbinder, St. Mary’s (Magd.): Robert Bokebinder and
      Agnes his wife occur in 1377 (?) and 1380 (Oxf. City Doc., pp. 41,
      47).

  1373/4, Jan. 27. At this date “Quia, propter excessivam multitudinem
      vendentium libros Oxoniæ Universitati minime juratorum, plerique
      codices magni valoris ad partes exteras deferuntur” the University
      decreed that no booksellers except the sworn stationers or their
      deputies should sell any book exceeding half a mark in value.
      (Anstey’s ©Munimenta Academica©, p. 233: see Appendix D. I, below,
      p. 281).

  1377? John, parchment-maker (“Parchemenor”), Holywell (Oxf. City Doc.,
      p. 52).

  1377? Richard, parchment-maker (“Parchemenor”), Holywell (Oxf. City
      Doc., p. 52).

  1377? Roger Somervyle, stationer, St. Peter’s (Oxf. City Doc., p. 52).

  1380. MS. Corpus Christi College (Oxford) 151 was written at Oxford in
      this year (Coxe).

  1380. Roger, illuminator (“lymenour”), St. Mary’s (Oxf. City Doc., p.
      41).

  1380. John Madesdon, illuminator (“limenour”), St. Mary’s (Oxf. City
      Doc., p. 41).

  1380. William, illuminator (“Lymenour”), St. Mary’s (Oxf. City Doc.,
      p. 41).

  1380. John Hyrys, parchment-maker (“Parchemener”) (Oxf. City Doc., p.
      41).

  1380. Richard, parchment-maker (“Parchemener”) (Oxf. City Doc., p.
      43).

  1380. Edward, parchment-maker (“Parchemener”) (Oxf. City Doc., p. 44).

  1380. John Langeport, once stationer (“quondam stationarius”),
      north-east ward (Oxf. City Doc., p. 22).

  1393. In Florence MS. Laurentian, bibl. S. Crucis, plut. xvii Sin.,
      cod. x. “Explicit compilatio quaedam ... scripta per me F[ratrem]
      I[acobum] Fey de Florentia Ordinis Fratrum Minorum in Conventu
      Oxoniae anno Domini MCCCXCiii, die ... [xi Martii]” (Bandini’s
      Catalogue, A. G. Little’s ©Grey Friars in Oxford©, p. 252).

  1393. John Brother, illuminator (“limnator”), St. Mary’s (Magd.).

  1403. John Brown, stationer, sold MS. Merton College 130 in this year,
      (Coxe), cf. MS. New College 104: see A.D. 1440.

  1410. In the record of a tax levied on the University in this year
      occur the names of William and Roger, illuminators; Richard,
      senior and junior, parchment-makers; and Thomas and Robert,
      scribes (Twyne IV, p. 70).

  1411. The University enacts that as the duties of the University
      stationers are laborious and anxious every one on graduation shall
      give clothes to one of the stationers (©Munimenta Academica©, ed.
      Anstey, p. 253).

  1419. See under 1490.

  1423. “Finit Menon Platonis [Latine] scriptus per Fredericum Naghel de
      Trajecto anno Domini MCCCC.XXiij ... in alma Universitate
      Oxoniensi” (MS. Corpus Christi College, Oxford, no. 243: Coxe).

  1424. “Guilermus Secomps venditor librorum” may possibly be an Oxford
      bookseller in this year (see Coxe’s account of MS. Lincoln College
      Latin 14).

  1424/5 John Dolle, bookbinder: see under 1453.

  First half of 15th cent. In Bodl. MS. e Mus. 155, p. 507 (written
      perhaps in the first half of the 15th cent.) “Explicit liber
      3^{us} de consideracione 4^{te} essencie secundum Rogerum Bacon
      correctus et scriptus per Johannem Cokkes manibus suis propriis
      Oxon.”

  1426. John Wake, illuminator (“lymner”), St. Mary’s (Magd.): he
      appears as a surety in 1434 (Univ. Register Aaa, fol. 1).

  1427. “Explicit conflatus Francisci de Maronis finitus per manus
      Nicolai de Bodelswerdia anno Domini 1427 ... tum temporis Oxoniæ
      studentis” (MS. Merton College 133: Coxe). A similar inscription
      dated 1429 is in MS. Oriel College 70 (Coxe). Kirchhoff mentions
      Nicolas de Frisia alias de Bolswerdia as a bookseller in 1427–31.

  1430. “Explicit conflatus Francisci de Mayronis ... finitus et
      completus anno Domini 1430 ... per manus Johannis Jacobi Spaen de
      Amsterdamis, tunc temporis Oxonie studentis” (MS. Magd. Coll.,
      Oxf., 103: Coxe).

  1434. John Clerk (Clericus) occurs as a stationer in this year and
      1438 (Univ. Register Aaa, foll. 4*, 11).

  c. 1436. “Stephanus ligator librorum de Oxonia” occurs at about this
      date in Cambr. Univ. MS. Dd. xiv. 2, fol. 139 (information from T.
      W. Jackson, M.A.).

  1439. John Godsond occurs as a stationer (Oxf. Univ. Archives, Aaa,
      fol. 15^v): he has a dispute in the same year with John Coneley a
      “lymner,” his assistant (Anstey’s ©Munimenta Academica©, pp.
      550–1): in 1458 he is paid for chaining some Exeter College books
      (Boase’s ©Reg. Exon.©, 1st ed., p. 21).

  1440. John Brown, stationer, in this year (cited by Heyner) may be the
      same as the one noted under 1403.

  1440. John More, stationer, occurs frequently: in 1440 he or a person
      of his name sells MS. Lincoln College, Latin 109, probably in
      Oxford (Coxe): on 7 Nov. 1444 he is mentioned in Anstey’s
      ©Munimenta Academica©, p. 741: in Apr. 1445 he values books in
      Oxford (_ibid._, p. 544): also in 1447–48 (_ibid._, pp. 565, 579,
      cf. 741) mentioned in the Treasurer’s accounts at Oriel, 1451–65:
      on 12 Apr. 1454 or ‘55 he sold MS. Magd. Coll. (Oxf.) 4 in Oxford
      (Coxe): in 1457 he values Exeter College books (Boase’s ©Reg.
      Exon.©, 1st ed., p. lxviii): on 21 Oct. 1457 he sold MS. Magd.
      Coll. (Oxf.) 134 in Oxford (“Mare,” in Coxe). A John More was
      living in 1460–61 and 1468–9 on the east side of Cat Street,
      probably in Lady Hall = Great St. Mary’s Entry, according to the
      St. Mary the Virgin church accounts preserved in the Bodleian
      (Oxford Rolls 13 &c.). He was also a binder (Oriel accounts).

  1445. John Coneley, illuminator: see 1439: he is bound to work for
      Godsond for one year from 8 Nov. 1445 for 4 marks and 10
      shillings.

  1446. “Thomas Bokebynder de Catys-street” was imprisoned by the
      Chancellor for saying that the mayor and townsfolk were not under
      oath to respect the rights of the University (Anstey, ©Munimenta
      Academica©, p. 556).

  1448. William Bedewyne, illuminator (“lymnour”), “late of Oxford,” St.
      Peter’s (Magd.).

  XVth cent. Willelmus Sengleton wrote MS. New College 127 (Coxe): he
      may be the Will. Singleton who was admitted B.A. in 1566/7
      (©Register of the Univ.©, vol. i., ed. Boase, p. 265).

  XVth cent. “Expliciunt Questiones ... scripte per Johannem de Almania
      sive de Kasterle, in usum ... Thome Grace, illic [sc. at Oxford]
      in artibus graduati,” in MS. Magd. Coll. (Oxf.) 162 (Coxe).

  1450–64. In these years Willelmus Salomon “Leonensis diocesis” wrote
      the works of Hugo de Sancto Caro or Hugo Viennensis in Oxford for
      Roger Keys, who in 1469/70 presented them to Exeter College, where
      they are now MSS. 51–68 (Coxe).

  1452. “Johannes Bokebyndere Oxoniæ” occurs in the will of dr. Richard
      Browne (Anstey’s ©Munimenta Academica©, p. 648).

  1453. John Delle or Dolle, stationer, mentioned (©Register of the
      Univ.©, vol. i., ed. Boase, p. 20, “Delle”): and in 1454 (Anstey’s
      ©Munimenta Academica©, p. 741, “Dolle”). In 1454 his name occurs
      in Bodleian Oxford Charters 491 (Turner’s Catal., p. 351). He may
      be the same as John Dolle, bookbinder, who lived in Cat Street in
      1424/5 (Boase’s ©Reg. Exon.©, 1894, p. 295).

  1453. John Reynbold, a German, agreed at Oxford to write out three
      books of Duns Scotus on the Sentences (Bodl. MS. Ballard 46, fol.
      70). He wrote several MSS. now at Balliol and Merton between 1451
      and 1464.

  1459. June 17. Will. Bokebynder occurs as a witness in Oxford, when
      MS. Merton Coll. 135 was given to the College (Coxe). In the same
      year he is mentioned in Oxford Univ. Archives, box F, no. 28.

  1467. British Museum MS. Royal 6 D II once bore the following
      interesting inscription, before it was re-bound, “Iste liber
      ligatus erat Oxonii, in Catstrete, ad instantiam Reverendi Domini
      Thome Wybarun in sacra Theologia Bacalarii Monachi Roffensis, Anno
      Domini 1467” (see Casley’s ©Catalogue of the Manuscripts of the
      Kings Library© (1734), Dibdin’s ©Bibliographical Decameron©
      (1817), ii. 449: the volume contains the Letters of St. Jerome,
      and had been given to Rochester by Benedict, bp. of Rochester,
      _d._ 1226).

  “1468”–1486/7. Oxford printing, see Appendix A.

  1473. Thomas Hunt, “universitatis Oxonie stacionarius,” sold Brit.
      Mus. MS. Burney 11 (a Latin Bible) in this year (see the
      Catalogue, printed in 1840). In 1477 and 1479 he was living in
      Haberdasher hall in the parish of St. Mary the Virgin (Bodl. MS.
      Wood F. 15, a collection of Oseney rentals: Wood’s “Thomas Howle,
      stacioniar,” of Haberdasher hall in 1477 in Bodl. MS. Wood D. 2,
      p. 587, from the above MS., is a mis-reading by Wood for Honte, i.
      e. Hunte). In 1483 he appears as agreeing to sell certain books in
      Oxford at fixed prices (the list, which is on a paper now forming
      a fly-leaf of a French translation of Livy (Paris, 1486) now in
      the Bodleian, is printed in the publications of the Oxf. Hist.
      Soc. vol. v. (©Collectanea©, I), pp. 74, 141–3). In all
      probability he is the same Thomas Hunt who in 1485 printed the
      ©Phalaridis Epistolae© at Oxford in conjunction with Theodoric
      Rood (see pp. 4, 238).

  1481–85. Theodoric Rood, printed at Oxford (see pp. 2, 4, 238).

  1482. F. H., — Hawkins, J. Alexander (Alison) occur as
      parchment-sellers: see p. 256.

  1490. William Vavasour, scribe. MS. Corpus Christi Coll. (Oxf.) 228
      was written “per manum fratris Wyllelmi Vavysur,” “Oxonie anno
      1490” (the date and word “Oxonie” might possibly refer to the time
      and place of the “determinationes physicæ”: but) MS. Corpus 227
      was “scriptus per me fratrem Wyllelmum, studentem Oxonie anno ...
      1419 [1491]” and “per manum fratris Wyllelmi Vavysur ejusdem
      ordinis [sc. fratrum Minorum] ... 1491.”

  1501. Sebastian Actors, bookseller of St. Mary the Virgin’s parish.
      Record of a grant of administration after his decease, 23 April
      1501 (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1501. Christopher Coke, stationer. A similar record with inventory, 13
      Dec. 1501 (_ibid._).

  1502/3. William Lesquier, bookseller. A similar record, 1 Feb. 1502/3
      (_ibid._).

  1506. Georgius Castellanus, bookseller (?): see p. 11.

  1514. Henricus Jacobi. On Dec. 11, 1514 administration of the effects
      of Henricus Jacobi, deceased, was granted (Oxf. Univ. Archives).
      Two imperfect leaves of an edition of the ©Formalitates de mente
      magistri Johannis Duns Scoti© by Antonius Syrretus were found in
      New College Library at Oxford by R. G. C. Proctor, Esq., the first
      of which bears the words “Venundantur in vniuersitate Oxoniensi
      sub intersignio sanctissime Trinitatis ab Henrico Jacobi
      bibliopole Londoniensis.” See p. 228.

  1518. John Scolar and (1519/20) Carolus Kyrfoth, printers, see pp.
      5–7, 263.

  1521. John Dorne, bookseller. His day-ledger, showing what books he
      sold and at what prices, from 19 Jan.-23 Dec. 1520, is MS. Corpus
      Christi College, Oxford, no. 131; this and two leaves of a similar
      day-book of about 1518–19, found in a binding in the same College
      library, are printed in the Oxford Historical Society’s
      ©Collectanea© volume, no. 1 (pp. 78–139) and 2 (pp. 457–62), where
      also it is shown that Dorne, who was certainly “a Dutchman,” and
      as such paid with others an alien tax at Oxford in 1524 (see
      Rogers’s ©Oxford City Documents©, Oxf. Hist. Soc. xviii, 1891, p.
      56, as Johan Thorn), may be the Johannes Dorn who printed at
      Brunswick in 1507–9. An ©Opus Insolubilium© printed by Treveris
      was to be sold “apud I. T.”, which Mr. E. G. Duff thinks is
      probably I. Thorne.

  1524. William Howberghe (Howbert or Hubbert), Douchman (Dutchman: he
      resigned his office as Stationer 11 Oct. 1532, see Boase’s ©Reg.
      Oxon.©, p. 171). Gerard Pylegreme, Douchman (his will is extant at
      Oxford, dated 7 Feb. “1537”: Oxf. Univ. Archives). Balthasar
      Churchyard, Douchman. Harry Renkens, Douchman. All these pay taxes
      as Dorne above, in 1524, in the capacity of Stationers or
      Booksellers. Richard Alcoke, bell-ringer, Margarete Page, Rose
      Cater, Henry Mancipull, and “Sir Person” are possible additions to
      this list.

  About 1525. Gressop, bookbinder. In Bodl. MS. Rawl. G. 47 (N. C.
      14778) there is a note that the volume, which had been presented
      to All Souls Library by bp. Goldwell, was “resarcitus per
      Gressopum”: the date must be about 1525.

  1531, Oct. A commission from the bp. of Lincoln to search the
      booksellers’ stalls at St. Frideswide’s fair for heretical books
      (Brit. Mus. MS. Lansdowne 938).

  1532. David Pratt, B.A., of Cambridge, is stationer from 10 March
      1535/6 to Oct. 1536 (Boase’s ©Reg. Oxon.©, p. 171).

  1534. A patent is issued to Cambridge (where printing had been
      exercised from 1521 to 1522) allowing the University to have three
      licensed stationers and printers or sellers of books, and
      authority to print books is granted to the Chancellor and three
      Doctors. No similar patent was issued to Oxford.

  1552. Henry Mylward, stationer (Boase’s ©Reg. Oxon.©, p. xx). He
      retired on 11 Apr. 1597 from old age (Clark’s ©Register©, i. 262,
      where it is suggested that his name appears as Miller in 1578/9,
      living in St. Mary’s Parish). In 1583 (July 12) Beef Hall was
      leased to him (Oxf. Univ. Archives, box O, no. 10. cf. A. no. 14).

  1554, Nov. 14. Herman Evans admitted stationer, but pronounced
      “contumax” in Oct. 1563 (Clark’s ©Register©, i. 261).

  1556, Aug. 11. Nicholas Wayte, admitted bookseller (Clark, i. 321).

  —— —— —— Richard Walles, do. (Clark, _ibid._).

  —— Aug. 12. James à Wood, adm. parchment-seller (Clark, i. 322).

  1564, Sept. 30. Thomas Wadloffe, adm. parchment-seller (Clark,
      _ibid._).

  1566, June 20. “Garbrande Harkes,” bookseller, licensed to sell wine
      (Clark, i. 323).

  1566/7, Jan. 27. Conrad Myller, adm. bookseller (Clark, i. 321):
      licensed to sell ale in St. Mary’s parish, 16 Sept. 1572: living
      in 1587/8 (Clark, i. 325).

  1567, Apr. 3. Gilbert Burnet, alias Cornyshe, adm. parchment-seller
      (Clark, i. 326).

  1570, June 28. Nicholas Clyfton, adm. bookseller (Clark, i. 321).

  —— Oct. 6. Christopher Cavye, do. (_ibid._): in 1574 the Chancellor
      recommended that he should have a monopoly of second-hand books,
      since he was in difficulties (_ibid._).

  1570/1, Mar. 21. William Spyre, of St. Mary’s parish, adm. bookseller
      on the Chancellor’s recommendation. Still bookseller in 1590
      (_ibid._), and stationer in 1617 and 1619 (Clark, i. 321, 343).
      Probably the same as Will “Spewe” of the Company of Stationers (C.
      R. Rivington, ©Stationers Company©, 1883, p. 27). Died before 20
      Nov. 1636 (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1573, Sept. 8. ¬Joseph Barnes¬, adm. bookseller (_ibid._). He was
      licensed to sell wine from Oct. 1575 to at least Oct. 1596. He was
      sole printer to the University from 1585 to 1617, resigned on 12
      Feb. 1616/7, and died in 1618, being buried in St. Mary’s on Dec.
      17 in that year. He lived (and printed) in a house at the west end
      of St Mary’s, now St. Mary’s Entry (see ©Letters from the
      Bodleian©, ii. 428).

  1573, Sept. 8. Robert Cave, adm. bookseller (Clark, i. 321): still a
      bookseller in 1693 (fragm. in C. C. C, Oxf., Library from M. XX.
      II).

  1573, Dec. 5. Richard Garbrand, or Harks, adm. bookseller: still
      bookseller in 1599 (MS. Wood D. 3, p. 281, cf. 286, where it is
      stated that he was churchwarden of St. Mary’s in 1569); he died
      before 31 Jan 1603/4 (Clark, i. 323. compared with Griffiths’
      ©Index of Oxford Wills©).

  1574, Mar. 25. Dominique Pinart, adm. bookseller (Clark, _ibid._): in
      1583 he occurs as a bookbinder (Oxf. Univ. Archives, Reg. Y. 99);
      still bookseller in 1616/7 (Clark, i. 321). Died before 18 Feb.
      1627/8 (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1574. John Gore occurs as an Oxford bookseller in a lease summarized
      in MS. Wood D. 3, p. 281, and lived in or near Cat St.

  1577, Apr. 24. Humphrey Archer, adm. bookseller (Clark, i. 321).
      Administration was granted after his death on 13 Feb. 1587/8 (Oxf.
      Univ. Archives).

  1577. Rowland Jenckes or Jenkes, a bookbinder, was condemned at the
      Assizes at Oxford for sedition (Wood’s ©History and Antiquities of
      the University of Oxford©, ed. Gutch, ii. (1796), p. 188: and
      Webster’s ©Treatise of Witchcraft©, p. 245, quoted by Bagford in
      Brit. Mus. MS. Harl. 5901, fol. 62).

  1583. Carre occurs as a bookbinder (Oxf. Univ. Archives, Reg. Y. 99).

  1584, Aug. 15. £100 is lent by the University to Joseph Barnes with
      which to set up a press, to be repaid in six years (_ibid._ Reg.
      L. 10, fol. 287, cf. 246). In Oct. 1592 the money had not been
      repaid.

  1585. For printers and publishers from 1585–1640, see also p. 311.

  1585/6, Jan. 10. A Committee of Convocation at Oxford appointed to
      consider ©De libris imprimendis© (Oxf. Univ. Archives, Reg. L. 10,
      fol. 283).

  1586, June 23. An Ordinance of the Star Chamber allows only two
      presses outside London, one at Oxford and one at Cambridge, and
      only one apprentice to each press (printed in full in Arber’s
      ©Transcript©, ii. 807).

  1588. In about this year occurs an Inventory of the goods of John
      Pigot, scrivener, implying his previous death (Oxf. Univ.
      Archives—Wills).

  1590, Nov. 27. Robert Foxon, adm. bookseller (Clark, i. 321): but on 7
      Mar. 1590/1 an Inventory of his goods was taken, implying previous
      death (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  —— —— Thomas Middleton, adm. bookseller (Clark, _ibid._): he died
      before 28 March 1604 (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  —— —— Francis Peirce, do. (_ibid._): still bookseller in 1616/7
      (Clark, i. 521): died before 4 Jan. 1622/3 (Oxf. Univ.
      Archives—Wills).

  —— —— Stephen Wilson, do. (_ibid._): in 1591 he is a bookbinder also
      (Clark, i. 342).

  1591, May 25. A patent was granted to Richard Wright of Oxford and his
      assigns to print Tacitus’s ©History© in English, for life. (Patent
      Roll 33 Eliz., part 17, Arber’s ©Transcript©, ii. 16). This partly
      explains the peculiarity noticed in 1591, no. 5 (p. 31, above):
      clearly it was printed nominally by Barnes, but published in
      London and perhaps in part printed there. Wright appears as
      belonging to both cities.

  1593/4, Feb. 21. Thomas Gowre resigns the office of parchment seller
      and is succeeded by William Jennings (Fenninge?) (Clark, i. 322).

  1594, Sept. 3. John Barnes, son of Joseph Barnes, is apprenticed to
      Rich. Watkins of St. Paul’s Churchyard, London, for seven years
      from Mich. 1594 (Arber’s ©Transcript©, ii. 195: see the same work
      under date 7 June, 1602, &c.).

  1596, May 21. Application was made to Convocation for a licence to
      Joseph Barnes to have a monopoly of printing inedited Greek and
      Latin books (Oxf. Univ. Archives, Reg. Ma., p. 15).

  1597, Apr. 11. Lancelot Waistiell or Waystayle adm. stationer of the
      University: he resigned in 1608.

  1598/9, Mar. 16. John Crosley adm. bookseller (Clark, i. 321):
      stationer in 1611 (Clark, i. 342): died before 12 Feb. 1612/3
      (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills, where he is described as a citizen of
      London).

  1600/1. Robert Billingsley occurs as a bookseller (Clark, i. 342):
      also bookbinder: he died before 17 Nov. 1606 (Oxf. Univ.
      Archives—Wills).

  1603. The Stationers Company in London obtain a monopoly of printing
      Primers, Psalms and Almanacs.

  1608, Apr. 18. Denis Edmonds adm. stationer.

  1609. Nicholas Smith, bookbinder, died before 9 Aug. 1609 (Oxf. Univ.
      Archives—Wills): his wife Anne was Rob. Billingsley’s widow.

  1609, Oct 24. John Garbrand alias Herks, bookseller, was licensed to
      sell wine (Clark, i. 323): he died before 29 Sept. 1617 (_ibid._),
      and after 21 Mar. 1616/7 (Clark, i. 321).

  1609, Oct. 20. William Davies occurs as stationer (Clark, i. 342):
      still such in 1615 and 1621 and 1637 (Clark, i. 343–4): bookseller
      in March, 1616/7 (Clark, i. 321).

  1609/10, Mar. 13. A tenement in St. Mary’s parish was leased to John
      Adams, stationer (Oxf. Univ. Archives, box A, no. 23): he was a
      bookbinder from 1610 to 1620 (Magd. college deeds, cf. Clark, i.
      343). In 1637, July 20, a house just North of the Schools
      Quadrangle was “lately” in the tenure of John Adams, bookbinder
      (Agreement between Magdalen and the University in Reg. R. 24, fol.
      149^r). For his printing, see pp. 308, 312.

  1610, Dec. Henry Blewet or Bluett occurs as a bookseller in St Mary’s
      parish (Clark, i. 321): still such in 1616/7 (_ibid._): died
      before 3 Jan. 1633/4 (“bookbinder”: Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1611. Sampson Stronge alias Starkey, limner, died before 30 Mar. 1611
      (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1615/6, Jan. 2. Robert Nixon alias Waie occurs as a bookseller (Clark,
      i. 343): and in 1616/7 (i. 321).

  1616/7, Feb. 12. William Wrench becomes a University printer, until 19
      Jan. 1617/8: see p. 311.

  —— John Lichfield, do.: see p. 311: created Inferior Bedel 20 Mar.
      1616/7: resigned his offices Jan. 1634/5.

  1616/7, Mar. 21. Richard Wylcocks is bookseller (Clark, i. 321,
      _bis_).

  —— —— William Turner, do. (_ibid._): is University printer from 1624
      to 1644/5: see p. 312. In 1639 he was found to have abstracted in
      1634 the Savile Greek type “under the pretence of printing a Greek
      Chronologer (one Malala)”: and by Feb. 13, 1639/40 had brought
      them back (Wharton’s ©Remains of Laud©, ii. 174).

  1616/7, Mar. 21. Edward Forrest is bookseller (Clark, i. 321).

  —— —— William Toldervey, do. (_ibid._).

  —— —— John Westall, do. (ibid.): he occurs as binding for the Bodleian
      in 1636–7 (Macray’s ©Annals©, 2nd ed., p. 77).

  1617/8, Jan. 19. James Short do.: see p. 312.

  1617, May 16. Roger Barnes, adm. bookseller (Clark, i. 321): see 1626,
      below.

  —— June 10. William Wildgoose, do. (_ibid._).

  —— June 11. John Allam, do. (_ibid._).

    The two latter with Christopher Barker, William Johnson and John
      Chambers were reprimanded on 23 May, 1617, for setting up as
      booksellers without the Vice-Chancellor’s leave (_ibid._).

  1619, July 30. Edward Miles occurs as bookseller (Clark, i. 343): he
      was Clerk of the University, and died before 1 May, 1637 (Oxf.
      Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1620/1, Jan. 6. Richard Parne adm. parchment seller, in place of Henry
      Dochin, dead, who had succeeded John Cooke (Clark, i. 322).

  1623, Apr. Thomas Huggins occurs as stationer (Clark, i. 343), also in
      1627 (of St. Mary’s parish) and 1634 (_ibid._ and 344).

  1625/6. William Webbe occurs as stationer (Clark, i. 343). See p. 312.
      Still stationer in 1636/7 (_ibid._ 344), and binder to the
      Bodleian (Macray’s ©Annals©, 2nd ed., p. 77: died in 1652).

  1626, June 18. Roger Barnes and John his son occur as bookbinders
      (Clark, i. 343), John is still bookbinder in 1630 (_ibid._) and
      1636–7, (Macray’s ©Annals of the Bodleian©, 2nd ed., p. 77). Roger
      died before 30 Nov. 1631 (of All Saints parish, bookbinder and
      stationer: Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1629, June 16. The University of Cambridge begs the loan of the Greek
      matrixes given to Oxford by sir Henry Savile: the request was
      granted on June 30 on Laud’s recommendation, and the matrixes
      returned 24 June, 1631. The year in which Savile’s famous “silver”
      Greek type (with which the ©Chrysostom© of 1610–13 was printed at
      Eton) came to Oxford is not at present ascertainable.

  1631. From the fine of £300 inflicted on the printer of the Wicked
      Bible of this year a fount of Greek type was purchased by Laud
      (not before 1634) for printing in London, Oxford or Cambridge, as
      the editors of the books might prefer. As a fact the printing took
      place in London, from 1637 on.

  1632, Nov. 12. The first charter to Oxford allowing printing: printed
      in App D. II., p. 281: confirmed and amplified, 13 March, 1632/3
      (p. 283). Laud in a letter to the University mentions King and
      Motteshead as two printers the University might well appoint out
      of the three allowed.

  1635. Leonard Lichfield succeeded his father John, as University
      printer: died in 1657.

  1636. Tit. xviii, sect. 5 of the Statutes of the University is framed
      “De Typographis Universitatis”: printed in App. D. V., p. 287. The
      Architypographus is here first mentioned.

  1636. John Haviland of London is stated to have a press at London,
      Oxford and Cambridge (Arber’s ©Transcript©, iii. 704).

  1636–37. — Seale occurs as binding for the Bodleian (Macray’s
      ©Annals©, 2nd ed., p. 77).

  —— — Bott, do. (_ibid._).

  1636/7, Mar. 12. See p. 285 (agreement between the University and the
      Stationers’ Company).

  1637, July 11. A severe decree of Star-Chamber is issued, restricting
      printing, but allowing the rights of Oxford: printed in Arber’s
      ©Transcript©, iv. 528.

  1637. In this year Laud, who had in every way facilitated the
      acquisition of good Oriental and other type by the University, was
      able to write to the Vice-Chancellor (on May 5) “You are now upon
      a very good way towards the setting up of a learned Press.”

  1637, Oct. 14. The will of Hugh Jones of St. Mary Magdalen parish,
      printer (apprentice?), was proved (Oxf. Univ. Archives—Wills).

  1638, Apr. 12. The will of John Wilmot, stationer, was proved
      (_ibid._).

  1639. See under 1616/7 (Turner).

  1639, Aug. 12. Agreement with the Stationers’ Company: see p. 287.

The following booksellers of Oxford are at present only known from their
imprints:—

                       Jackson, Simon, 1618.
                       Cripps, Henry, 1620–39.
                       Peerse, Elias, 1625–39.
                       Curteyne, Henry, 1625–40.
                       Butler, Thomas, 1628.
                       Bowman, Francis, 1634–40.
                       Allam, Thomas, 1636–39.
                       Godwin, Joseph, 1637–39.
                       Robinson, Thomas, 1639–40.
                       Hunt, Matthew, 1639–40.
                       Young, Robert, 1640.

[London booksellers who published for Oxford printers are here omitted:
see pp. 311–3.]

                  *       *       *       *       *

[The following discussion of the authorship of the ©Praise of Music©
(1586, no. 10) is referred to on p. 20 as occurring in Appendix C, and
is therefore here inserted.]


                     ©The Praise of Music© (1586).

This work is probably not by John Case, although constantly attributed
to him. The facts of the matter may be stated as follows.

The book is strictly anonymous: all that can be gathered directly from
it is that the author was himself an enthusiastic musician, though not
necessarily of eminence; that he was a well-read scholar, as well in the
Fathers as in the Classics, and that his style and method point to a man
of imaginative mind, young in years, and with considerable elegance of
thought and expression. The printer writes a dedication to Sir Walter
Raleigh, alluding to the book as “an Orphan of one of Lady Musickes
children.” This can only be meant to convey the impression that the
author was dead: on the other hand the treatise can only have been
composed recently from the allusions to the controversy about Church
music: in fact the author was undoubtedly a Protestant in Elizabeth’s
reign, who approved of elaborate music in Churches, within certain
common-sense limits.

In 1588 John Case published at Oxford an “Apologia Musices” written in
Latin, and maintaining nearly the same view about Church music as the
book before us, to which Case makes no allusion. Case was elected
scholar of St. John’s College, Oxford, in 1564; and in 1568 fellow. “But
so it was,” says Wood (©Ath. Ox.©, ed. Bliss, i. 685), “that being
Popishly affected he left his fellowship and married [in 1574] and ...
read logic and philosophy to young men (mostly of the R. C. religion) in
a private house in St. Mary Magd. parish.”

The external evidence about the authorship in question may be put as
follows. In favour of Case is the important fact that Thomas Watson the
poet in a sonnet to Case does certainly seem to allude to the English as
well as the Latin treatise. Most of the expressions may, and more than
one must, apply to the ©Apologia©, but the allusion to Marsyas can only
refer to the “Praise,” which indeed is mentioned by name, “Mr. John Case
... his learned booke lately made in the prayes of Musick.” Again, the
fact that the ©Apologia© nowhere alludes to the former poem is itself an
argument that they were not independent of each other, while supposing
that Case was partly ashamed of so light and poetical a production and
desired to be judged rather by a more philosophical work, such as the
Latin treatise, we can understand a desire to ignore the former. To this
may be added that such considerations as the above were sufficient to
convince critics like Dr. Farmer, Mr. Joseph Haslewood and Dr. Bliss, as
well as almost all others who have considered the point. Against such a
conclusion the following points may be urged. Antony à Wood, who wrote
lives of all Oxford writers up to his own time, and who was born in
1632, will not even suggest that Case was the author, but on the
contrary declares that in all his searches he could never discover who
wrote the book. Richard Heber seems also to have argued against Case’s
connexion. With respect to Watson’s testimony it must be remembered that
he had left the University some years before either book was published,
and that it is quite possible that he wrote his sonnet with both books
before him and with little on which to form a judgment except an obvious
similarity of subject and point of view. Some catalogues are said to
have credited the printer with the authorship, and Lowndes ascribes it
to Barnaby Barnes!

The internal evidence is against the common authorship of the two books.
The style of E.[17] is light, poetical and imaginative, with numerous
digressions, apologized for and repeated: that of L. is more staid and
so to speak scholastic; the sentences and thoughts fall into a logical
form which are natural to Case. The latter passes by the mythological
part of the history of Music, the former finds it in accordance with his
taste. Both authors are learned: in E. the references to the Fathers are
as numerous as those from any other source: in L. the references to
secular authors predominate. Both draw from common sources, such as the
©Theatrum vitae humanae© of Beyerlinck and the classical authors: but in
the longest quotation common to both, one from Ornithoparchus’s
©Micrologus© (E. pp. 39–40: L. pref.), a treatise on singing and music
(afterwards, in 1609, translated into English), in which the imaginary
descent of Concentus and Accentus from Sonus is given, they differ
materially in one point of the account: nor are the explanations of the
kinds and effects of the Greek styles of music entirely in accord. So
too there are expressions peculiar to each book which could hardly have
been absent from the other, had the authors been the same person (as in
E. allusions to Mercury’s three parts of music; the Roman college of
minstrels; three causes of music, pleasure, grief and enthusiasm: in L.
to inanimate nature moved by music, Homer as a minstrel, the idea that
strings from wolves’ and sheep’s guts would not harmonize together, bees
not having ears, modern musicians). But lastly the personality of the
authors is different. Both indeed take up the same general point of
view, that music is lawful in a Church, and both entirely neglect the
_science_ of music though they profess to be ardent musicians: but in E.
there is a distinct purpose to oppose the attempt to exclude all mixed
and “exquisite” music from the public services: the author writes to his
equals for the purpose of interesting and convincing them: in L. we see
the dialectician addressing those trained in the schools and accustomed
to the subtle distinctions and formalities of scholastic logic, and also
the teacher of youth, indulging in moral and didactic reflexions (pp.
53–55). Once more, Case, according to Wood, was known before 1574 to
have proclivities towards the Roman Catholic religion, and accordingly
in L. we find no word of blame addressed to that Church, the nearest
approach being a note of triumph over the defeat of the Armada on the
last page. Could he then have written, as the author of E., the
following expressions, all used in contempt, “in the time of popery” (p.
129), “popish church Musicke” (ibid.), “the hypocriticall Monkes and
Friers sang their seuen canonicall houres” (p. 133), “rotten rythmes of
popery and superstitious inuocation or praying vnto Saints doth not giue
greater cause of vomit to any man than to my selfe” (p. 136)?

The author of the “Praise of Musicke” may one day be discovered, but he
will probably be found to be some other than Dr. John Case.

-----

Footnote 16:

  “St. Mary’s” and “St. Peter’s”, without qualification, are throughout
  this Appendix used for the parishes of St. Mary the Virgin and St.
  Peter-in-the-East.

Footnote 17:

  E., the English ©Praise of Musicke©: L., the Latin ©Apologia musices©.



                              APPENDIX D.
                               DOCUMENTS.


                                   I.

(Statute to prevent the removal of valuable books from Oxford, A.D.
1373: from ©Munimenta Academica©, ed. by F. Anstey (Rolls Series) 1868,
i. 233: with _æ_ altered to _ae_.)

[Sidenote: A.D. 1373.

           There are a great many
           booksellers in Oxford,
           who are not sworn to
           the University; the consequence
           of which is,
           that books of great
           value are sold and
           carried away from Oxford,
           the owners of them
           are cheated, and the
           sworn stationers are
           deprived of their lawful
           business; _it is therefore
           hereby enacted_, that no
           bookseller, except the
           sworn stationers or
           their deputies, shall sell
           any book, being either
           his own property or that
           of another, exceeding
           half a mark in value,
           under pain of, for the
           first offence, imprisonment,
           for the second, a
           fine of half a mark, for
           the third, abjuring his
           trade within the
           precincts of the University.]

  Quia, propter excessivam multitudinem vendentium libros, Oxoniae
  Universitati minime juratorum, plerique codices magni valoris ad
  partes exteras deferuntur, veri domini librorum eorumdem exquisitis
  coloribus seducuntur, a stationariis Universitatis praedictae lucrum
  consuetum subtrahitur, in Universitatis dedecus non modicum, gravamen
  et jacturam, habita primitus de praemissis deliberatione sufficienti,
  per congregationem Regentium antiquam consuetudinem in hac parte
  renovare volentium _extitit ordinatum_, quod de caetero nullus
  librorum venditor, publicis stationariis duntaxat exceptis, seu ab eis
  legitime deputatis, aliquem librum alienum seu proprium vendat
  excedentem pretium dimidiae marcae, infra jurisdictionem domini
  Cancellarii Universitatis praefatae, sub poenis inferius annotatis;
  _videlicet_ quod, si quis legitime convictus fuerit super
  transgressione hujus ordinationis, prima vice incarceretur, et, in
  secunda vice et transgressione, solvat dimidiam marcam Universitatis
  usibus applicandam, tertia vero convictus abjuret officium sive artem
  venditionis hujusmodi infra limites superius expressatos.

  Facta est autem haec ordinatio vicesimo septimo die mensis Januarii,
  anno Domini millesimo trecentesimo septuagesimo tertio.


                                  II.
                             1632, Nov. 12.

(Letters patent from Charles I granting to the University three printers
and booksellers with privileges. Printed from the original in the Oxford
University Archives.)

  ¬Carolus Dei gratia¬ Anglie Scotie Francie et Hibernie Rex fidei
  defensor &c. ¬Omnibus¬ ad quos presentes litere pervenerint salutem
  ¬Sciatis¬ quod nos de gratia nostra speciali ac ex certa scientia et
  mero motu nostris dedimus et concessimus Ac per presentes pro nobis
  heredibus et Successoribus nostris damus et concedimus dilectis nobis
  in Christo Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus Vniversitatis nostre
  Oxon licenciam quod ipsi et Successores sui per scripta comuni eorum
  Sigillo munita de tempore in tempus tres Typographos librorum
  Impressores et Bibliopolas tam de alienigenis et extra obedientiam
  nostram heredum et Successorum nostrorum ortis vel oriundis quam de
  Indigenis infra eandem obedientiam natis vel nascendis infra Septum
  vel Ambitum eiusdem Vniversitatis residentes et inhabitantes tam
  conductivas quam proprias Domos habentes vel tenentes designare
  poterint et constituere quorum singuli omnimodos libros seu Codices
  publice non prohibitos editos vel edendos et librorum exemplar
  Cancellarii eiusdem Vniversitatis vel eius vices gerentis ac trium
  Doctorum quorum vnus ad minus Sacre Theologie existat Professor quibus
  per eosdem Cancellarium magistros et Scholares facultas facta fuerit
  libros examinandi Judicio approbandos ibidem imprimere excudere ac
  Typis mandare ac tam libros et Codices illos quam alios vbicunque sive
  infra Dominia nostra heredum vel successorum nostrorum seu extra eadem
  impressos vel excusos ac vt prefertur approbatos tam in eadem
  vniversitate quam alibi vendicioni exponere vendere et distrahere
  quocies voluerint valeant et possint Quibus quidem Typographis
  librorum Impressoribus ac Bibliopolis et singulis eorum tam
  presentibus quam futuris ad omnia premissa licite et impune agendi
  licentiam similiter damus et concedimus per presentes. ¬Ac¬ pro nobis
  heredibus et Successoribus nostris vlterius volumus et concedimus quod
  huiusmodi Typographi librorum Impressores et Bibliopole eciam extra
  obedienciam nostram heredum vel Successorum nostrorum orti vel oriundi
  et eorum singuli quamdiu infra ambitum vniversitatis predicte moram
  traxerint et negocio antedicto sint intendentes in omnibus et per
  omnia tanquam fideles Subditi et ligei nostri infra Regnum Anglie
  oriundi reputentur habeantur et tractentur et singulis libertatibus
  liberis consuetudinibus legibus et privilegiis vti et gaudere valeant
  libere et quiete provt aliquis fidelis Subditus et ligeus noster
  heredum vel Successorum nostrorum infra Regnum Anglie ortus vel
  oriundus vti et gaudere debeat et ad quotas onera Consuetudines vel
  Imposiciones quascunque aliter aut alio modo quam ceteri fideles
  Subditi et ligei nostri heredum vel Successorum nostrorum infra Regnum
  Anglie orti vel oriundi Solvenda vel contribuenda nullus eorum
  arctetur vel compellatur Statutis de Alienigenis antehac editis seu
  Statutis vel Provisionibus quibusvis aliis in contrarium non
  obstantibus ¬Proviso¬ tamen quod iidem Typographi librorum Impressores
  et Bibliopole et singuli eorum extra obedienciam nostram heredum vel
  Successorum nostrorum oriundi omnia et omnimoda Custumas et Subsidia
  et alia debita et onera pro rebus et merchandizis suis extra Regnum
  Anglie traducendis vel in idem Regnum inducendis vt alienigene solvere
  teneantur et legibus Regni nostri Anglie sint obedientes ¬Eo quod¬
  expressa mencio de vero valore annuo vel de certitudine premissorum
  sive eorum alicuius aut de aliis Donis sive Concessionibus per nos seu
  per aliquem Progenitorum sive Predecessorum nostrorum prefatis
  Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus ante hec tempora facta in
  presentibus minime facta existit aut aliquo Statuto Actu Ordinacione
  Provisione Proclamacione sive Restriccione in contrarium inde antehac
  habitis factis editis ordinatis sive provisis aut aliqua alia re causa
  vel materia quacunque in aliquo non obstante ¬In Cuius¬ rei
  testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus Patentes ¬Teste¬ me ipso
  apud Westmonasterium Duodecimo die Novembris Anno regni nostri octavo.

                                per breve de privato Sigillo.  Wolseley.


                                  III.
                           1632/3, March 13.

(Letters patent from Charles I, confirming the charter of 12 Nov. 1632,
and further allowing each printer to have two presses and two
apprentices, forbidding unauthorized reprints for 21 years. Printed from
the original in the Oxford University Archives.)

  ¬Carolus Dei gratia Anglie Scocie¬ Francie et hibernie Rex fidei
  Defensor &c. ¬Omnibus¬ ad quos presentes litere pervenerint salutem
  ¬Inspeximus¬ quasdam literas nostras Patentes magno Sigillo nostro
  Anglie Sigillatas Quarum tenor sequitur in hec verba Carolus dei
  gracia ... [&c., as above, dated 12 Nov. 1632, ending] ... Anno regni
  nostri Octavo ¬Sciatis¬ quod nos de gracia nostra speciali ac ex certa
  scientia et mero motu nostris predictas literas Patentes et singula in
  eisdem contenta tam predictis Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus
  quam Typographis librorum Impressoribus et Bibliopolis sub forma in
  eisdem literis Patentibus specificata designandis et constituendis tam
  presentibus quam futuris concedimus et confirmamus Volentes quod eorum
  singuli libertatibus et privilegiis in eisdem contentis plenarie
  gaudeant et vtantur ¬Volumus¬ eciam et pro nobis heredibus et
  Successoribus nostris concedimus eisdem Cancellario Magistris et
  Scholaribus et Successoribus suis et Bibliopolis librorum
  Impressoribus et Typographis in vniversitate predicta designandis et
  constituendis vt predictum est dum moram trahunt et residentes sunt
  infra septum vel ambitum eiusdem vniversitatis quod liceat eorum
  cuilibet duo Prela seu Impressoria infra precincta predicta habere et
  occupare eisque vti in omnibus suis necessariis Decreto in Curia
  Camere Stellate Anno regni Domine Elizabethe nuper Regine Anglie
  vicesimo octavo [17 Nov. 1585–16 Nov. 1586] seu decreto quovis alio in
  contrarium in aliquo non obstante ¬Et¬ quod quilibet dictorum
  Typographorum librorum Impressorum et Bibliopolarum duos Apprenticios
  ad sibi deserviendum in arte et misterio predicto capere et conducere
  valeat Statutis in huiusmodi casu editis et provisis in aliquo non
  obstantibus ¬Ac¬ vt Magistri et Scholares eiusdem vniversitatis
  librorum exemplaria idiomatis diversi tam vernaculi quam peregrini in
  Bibliothecis in eadem Vniversitate hactenus latencia divulgare ac
  libros Concionum exemplaria et tractatus de novo componere et edere in
  religionis Christiane ac bonarum literarum et Artium incrementum
  incitentur Dictique Typographi et librorum Impressores labores et
  sumptus huiusmodi exemplaria ac libros typis mandandi et imprimendi
  subeant libencius ¬Sciatis¬ vlterius quod nos de vberiori gracia
  nostra speciali et ex certa scientia et mero motu nostris concessimus
  dictis Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus et Successoribus suis ac
  Typographis et librorum Impressoribus infra septum vel ambitum
  Vniversitatis predicte pro tempore existentibus residentibus tam
  presentibus quam futuris in forma predicta designandis et
  constituendis Et tenore presencium pro nobis heredibus et
  Successoribus nostris volumus et concedimus quod quocies predictorum
  Typographorum seu librorum Impressorum quispiam exemplaria librorum
  Idiomatis cuiuscunque vernaculi vel peregrini ex Bibliotheca quavis
  infra Vniversitatem predictam desumpta preantea non excusa vel
  impressa Dummodo huiusmodi Exemplaria sub forma in predictis literis
  Patentibus specificata divulgari approbentur Typis mandare vel
  imprimere quod non liceat alicui cuiuscunque status vel condicionis
  infra Terminum viginti et vnius Annorum proximorum post huiusmodi
  exemplarium primam impressionem absque speciali licencia Cancellarii
  Magistrorum et Scholarium predictorum in scriptis prehabita imprimere
  seu reimprimere aut ab aliis imprimi seu reimprimi facere aut impressa
  aut reimpressa vendere venalia habere edere vel evulgare seu clam vel
  palam distrahere infra Diciones nobis vbicunque subiectas ¬Ac¬ de
  vberiori gracia nostra speciali ac ex certa scientia et mero motu
  nostris pro nobis heredibus et Successoribus nostris concessimus
  dictis Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus et Successoribus suis ac
  Typographis et librorum Impressoribus infra septum vel ambitum
  vniversitatis predicte pro tempore existentibus residentibus tam
  presentibus quam futuris in forma predicta designandis et
  constituendis ¬Et volumus¬ tenore presencium quod quociescunque
  predictorum Typographorum vel librorum Impressorum quispiam Conciones
  tractatus vel libros per Magistrorum seu Scholarium predictorum
  quempiam de novo componendos et edendos Dummodo huiusmodi Conciones
  tractatus et libri vt prefertur approbentur Typis mandare vel
  imprimere quod non liceat alicui cuiuscunque status vel Condicionis
  infra decem Annos proximos post huiusmodi Concionum tractatuum vel
  librorum primam impressionem absque speciali licencia Cancellarii
  Magistrorum et Scholarium predictorum in scriptis prehabita imprimere
  seu reimprimere aut ab aliis imprimi seu reimprimi facere aut
  impressos vel reimpressos vendere venales habere edere vel evulgare
  seu clam vel palam distrahere infra Diciones nostras Typographis
  Bibliopolis librorum Impressoribus aliisque vniversis cuiuscunque
  Status vel Condicionis existant infra Diciones nostras vbicunque
  constitutis strictius inhibentes ne quis eorum infra seperatos
  Terminos decem Annorum et viginti et vnius Annorum proximorum post
  huiusmodi exemplarium Concionum tractatuum seu librorum primam
  Impressionem preter Typographos vel librorum Impressores in
  Vniversitate predicta vt predictum designandos et constituendos infra
  Diciones nostras imprimere seu reimprimere aut ab aliis imprimi seu
  reimprimi facere aut impressos vel reimpressos vendere venales habere
  edere vel evulgare seu clam vel palam infra Dominia nostra distrahere
  inducere vel importare sine licentia dictorum Cancellarii Magistrorum
  et Scholarium in Scriptis prius habita presumat sub pena
  Confiscacionis librorum huiusmodi preter Arbitrar, in mandata nostra
  contemnentes infligenda ¬Ac¬ eisdem Cancellario Magistris et
  Scholaribus damus et concedimus potestatem in locis quibusvis infra
  Dominia nostra in quibus iusta fuerit suspicionis causa libros excusos
  vel distractos contra tenorem Mandati nostri abscondi vel custodiri
  per seipsos vel Deputatos suos pacis Custode Constabulario vel
  Decennario eis asciociato scrutari et disquirere ac libros huiusmodi
  repertos capere ad loca publica ad vsum nostrum deferre ibidem
  remansuros quovsque vlterius in ea parte ordinatum fuerit ¬Mandantes¬
  insuper vniversis et singulis vice-comitibus Custodibus pacis
  Maioribus Balliuis Constabulariis Decennariis Prepositis et Ministris
  quocies ex parte predictorum Cancellarii Magistrorum et Scholarium
  fuerint requisiti quod eis auxiliantes sint consulentes et presidio
  assistentes. ¬Eo quod¬ expressa mencio de vero valore annuo vel de
  certitudine premissorum sive eorum alicuius aut de aliis Donis sive
  Concessionibus per nos seu per aliquem Progenitorum sive Predecessorum
  nostrorum prefatis Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus ante hec
  tempora facta in presentibus minime facta existit aut aliquo Statuto
  Actu Ordinacione Provisione Proclamacione sive Restriccione in
  contrarium inde antehac habito facto edito ordinato sive proviso aut
  aliqua alia re causa vel materia quacunque in aliquo non obstante ¬In
  Cuius¬ rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus Patentes
  ¬Teste¬ me ipso apud Westmonasterium Tertio-decimo die Marcii Anno
  regni nostri Octavo

                                 per Breve de privato Sigillo   Wolseley
                                         (with the Seal attached).


                                  IV.
                           1636/7, March 12.

(An Indenture between the University of Oxford and the Stationers’
Company, by which the former releases to the latter all its rights of
printing Bibles &c. for the term of three years from 16 Feb. 1636/7, for
the sum of £200 yearly. Printed from the original in the University
Archives.)

  ¬This Indenture made¬ the Twentieth Day of March Anno Domini 1636 And
  in the Twelueth yeare of the Raigne of our soueraigne Lord Charles by
  the grace of God of England Scotland France and Ireland King Defender
  of the faith &c. ¬Betweene¬ the Chancellor Masters and Schollers of
  the vniuersity of Oxford of the one part And the Master and Keepers or
  Wardens and Communaltie of the Art or Mistery of Stationers of the
  Citty of London of the other part. ¬Whereas¬ by an Order made at
  whitehall the Ninth Day of March in the yeare of our Lord god 1635 by
  the Kings most excellent Maiestie and the right honorable the Lords
  and others of his highnes priuie Councell it is recyted that there had
  thentofore risen Diverse Debates and Controuersies betweene the
  vniuersitie of Cambridge and the Printers there And the Kings Printer
  and the Company of Stacioners in London for the printing of Diuers
  Bookes in regard of a Charter for printing graunted to the vniuersitie
  of Cambridge 26^o Hen. 8^o And that the same Controuersies and
  Contentions vpon seuerall Refferences from his Maiestie had byn setled
  by two Orders The one of the Tenth of December 1623 The other of the
  Sixteenth of Aprill 1629 And that in regard his Maiestie of his equall
  indulgence and grace to the vniuersitie of Oxford had graunted the
  like Charter for printing to the said vniuersitie of Oxford as was
  formerly graunted to the vniuersity of Cambridge It was that day
  ordered by the Board according to the Kings expresse pleasure declared
  That the vniuersitie of Oxford and their Printers should for the time
  to Come enioy the benifitt of all the Articles and Clauses in the said
  Orders of the Tenth of December 1623 And of the Sixteenth of Aprill
  1629 As by the same Order made the said Ninth day of March relacion
  being therevnto had appeareth ¬Now this Indenture witnesseth¬ that the
  Chancellor Masters and Schollers of the said vniuersitie of Oxford for
  divers good Causes and Consideracions them therevnto moveing ¬Haue¬
  given and graunted And by these presents doe give and graunt vnto the
  said Master and Keepers or Wardens and Comunaltie their Successors and
  assignes full power License Libertie and authority to print and Cause
  to be Imprinted All and euery such and such number of Bibles and other
  Bookes and things whatsoeuer now or heretofore vsed to be printed by
  the Kings Maiesties Printer And alsoe Lilies Grammers As the said
  Chancellors Masters and Schollers or their Printer or Printers of the
  said vniuersitie may might Could or ought to print or Comprint or
  cause to be Comprinted or imprinted by force or vertue of the said
  Three seuerall Orders before mencioned or any of them ¬To haue and to
  hould¬ the said power License Libertie and authoritie vnto the said
  Master and Keepers or Wardens and Comunalty and their Successors and
  Assignes from the Sixteenth Day of February last past for and During
  the Terme of Three yeares fully to be Compleat and ended ¬At vpon and
  vnder¬ the yearely Rent or Summe of Two hundred Poundes of Currant
  English money Payable at the Feasts of the Annunciacion of the Blessed
  Ladie St Marie the Virgin and of St Michaell Tharchangell by euen and
  equall porcions The first payment thereof to begin and to be made at
  and vpon the Fiue and Twentieth Day of this instant month of March or
  within Fifteene Dayes after either or any of the said Feasts or Dayes
  of payment ¬And the said¬ Chancellor Masters and Schollers doe for
  themselues and their Successors Couenant graunt and agree to and with
  the said Master and Keepers or Wardens and Comunaltie and their
  Successors and Assignes by these presents That neither the printers of
  the said vniuersitie of Oxford nor any of them nor any person or
  persons whatsoeuer by or vpon any License or authoritie deriued or to
  be deriued from or given or graunted by the said Chauncellor Masters
  and Schollers other then the said Master and Keepers or Wardens and
  Communalty their Successors and Assignes shall or will at any tyme or
  tymes hereafter within or During the said Terme of Three yeares print
  or Comprint or Cause permit or suffer to be imprinted or Comprinted
  any Booke Bookes or parcell of Booke Bookes Copies or things
  whatsoeuer in the said Orders or any or either of them mencioned or
  which they the said Chancellor Masters and Schollers or their Printers
  may or might print or Comprint by force or vertue of the said Orders
  or any or either of them ¬And the said¬ Master and Keepers or Wardens
  and Comunaltie doe for themselues and their Successors Couenaunt
  graunt and agree to and with the said Chancellor Masters and Schollers
  and their Successors by these presents That they the said Master and
  Keepers or Wardens and Comunaltie and their Successors shall and will
  well and truely pay the said Two hundred pound in manner and forme and
  at the daies and tymes before lymited and expressed for the payment
  thereof vnto the said Chancellor Masters and Schollers ¬And lastly¬ it
  is mutually Couenanted graunted and promised by and betweene the said
  parties to these presents and their successors respectively That vpon
  and at the tyme of the Expiration of the said Terme of Three yeares
  They and either of them shall and will renue Continue and then make
  and Conclude such and the like amicable Composicion and agreement And
  vpon such termes rates and proposicions as are herein Conteyned and
  expressed for soe long tyme after and vntill it shall be reasonably
  agreed on both parts to relinquish the same ¬In witnes¬ whereof to the
  one part of these present Indentures remayning with the said Master
  and Keepers or wardens and Comunalty of the said Art or mistery of
  Stacioners of the saide Citty of London The said Chancellor Masters
  and Schollers of the said vniuersity of Oxford haue sett their Comon
  seale And to the other parte of these present Indentures remayning
  with the said Chancellor Masters and Schollers of the said vniuersitie
  of Oxford The said Master and Keepers or wardens and Comunaltie of the
  said Art or mistery of Stacioners of the said Citty of London haue
  sett their Comon seale The Day and yeares first aboue written

  Delivered as the Deede of the Stationers of London for the vse of the
      Chancellors M^{rs} and Schollars of the Vniversitie of Oxford 31^o
      Martij 1637. By the Warden of the sayd Companie in the presence of

                             John French
                             John Thimble
                             G. Locksmyth

                     [with a fragment of the seal]

[With this Indenture is an agreement of the same date that if more than
£200 a year be agreed to be paid to the University of Cambridge for a
similar suspension of rights a correspondingly increased sum will be
paid to the University of Oxford.]

                  *       *       *       *       *

A precisely similar indenture and agreement dated 12 Aug. 1639 renew the
deeds of 1636 for a second term of three years from 17 Feb. 1639/40,
under the same conditions.


                                   V.

(Tit. xviii, Sect. v. of the Laudian Statutes of the University, 1636,
printed from Griffiths’ and Shadwell’s edition, Oxford, 1888; with ae
for æ. It would appear that no Architypographus was appointed till
1658.)


                     DE TYPOGRAPHIS UNIVERSITATIS.

  Cum Sereniss. REX CAROLUS eius nominis Primus, pro eo affectu quo
  Literas ac Literatos fovet, Privilegia Universitatis, quoad rem
  Typographicam nimis antehac arctata, mirum in modum amplificaverit; ne
  Clementiss. Regis indulgentia sordidi ac illiberales Artifices ad
  privatum suum quaestum abutantur: Statutum est, quod nullus
  Typographus in posterum his Privilegiis aut titulo Typographi
  Universitatis nostrae gaudebit, nisi qui in Admissione sua singulis
  Statutis et Ordinationibus circa regimen Typographorum, per Domum
  Convocationis factis, vel in posterum edendis, se submiserit.

  Quoniam vero in re Typographica usu compertum est, Mechanicos hosce
  Artifices (lucri sui compendium cum dispendio operis plerumque
  sectantes) Calligraphiae seu Operis decori et elegantiae minime
  studere, sed opera quaeque rudia ac inemendata in publicam lucem
  extrudere; Idcirco praesenti Statuto cautum esto, quod publicae
  Universitatis Typographiae, instruendae in Domo aliqua huic usui
  specialiter deputata, praeficiatur Architypographus unus, Vir Graecis
  Latinisque literis probe instructus, et in studiis Philologicis
  versatissimus: Cuius munus erit, Operis Typographicis ibidem praeesse;
  materiam sive supellectilem typographicam (Chartam scilicet, Praela,
  Typos, et alia huius Opificii instrumenta) ut sint in suo quaeque
  genere lectissima providere. In Operibus e publica Universitatis
  Typographia prodeuntibus, Typorum modulum, Chartae qualitatem,
  Marginum mensuram praescribere; Correctorum errata emendare; et alia
  quaecunque, ad Operis ornatum et perfectionem spectantia, sedulo
  curare. Cui muneri quo alacrius et liberius vacet, (praeter certam
  portionem lucri e libris impressis provenientis, ipsi posthaec, pro
  ratione symbolae quam ad publicae Typographiae peculium seu sortem
  communem contulerit, assignandam ab iis qui a Domo Convocationis ad
  ordinanda Statuta Typographica delegandi erunt,) Officium superioris
  Bedelli in Iure Civili, (utpote reliquis minus negotiosum,)
  quandocunque primum quoquo modo vacaverit, perpetuo in posterum
  annectendum fore praesenti Statuto cautum esto.



                              APPENDIX E.
                     WOODCUT ORNAMENTS, TYPE, ETC.


              A. _Woodcut and Metal Ornaments._ 1585–1640.

Of these there are two classes, the first large and used for the centre
of titlepages or with conspicuous colophons (these I term _Devices_),
the other smaller ornaments, used for borders, or to mark the beginning
or end of a chapter, or generally for decorative purposes: these I call
_Woodcuts_. The descriptions which follow are not intended to be fuller
than is sufficient to distinguish the more important. The measurements
(as always) are the least possible, and not the full size of the plate
or block.


                             I. _Devices._

Of these there are, in the period under review, fourteen:—

  A. 3–11/16 × 2⅞ in. On a shield the arms of the University (with motto
  SAPiEN|TiAE: | ET. | FELi|CiTA|TiS. | ), within a border bearing
  ACADE=|MIA. | OXONI=|ENSIS. | At the corners are two females and two
  satyrs.

  Used in 1585–93, 1597–1600, and at intervals till 1635, but not from
  1625 to 1633.


  B. 1⅞ × 1⅝ in. A metal engraving. In centre the arms of the
  University, with

                                 Sa│et
                                 Pi│Fe,

  within a ribbon bearing ACADEMIA OXONIENSIS. Above and on each side
  and below are female figures with emblems and scrolls, and underneath
  all IOSEPH’ BARNESIUS.

  Used only in 1591. (Barne and Tacitus.)


  B_a_. 1–15/16 × 1¾ in. A wood engraving from B, omitting Barnes’s
  name: the motto is

                                 SA│et
                                 PI│F:

  and there are other small changes.

  Used in 1627–8, 1630–33, 1635–7, 1640.


  C. 1¼ × 1–5/16 in. An ornamental shield, with the arms of the
  University, the legend being

                                 SA│FE
                                 PI│LI
                                 ET│CI:

  at the sides AC: and OX. There is a defect (a short line omitted) on
  one shoulder, which serves to distinguish it from H.

  Used at intervals from 1592 to 1638.

  There is a counterfeit of this used in London printing of at least
  1616 and 1624: see pp. 106, 120, and H, below.


  D. 1–7/16 + in. squ. A nine-spoked wheel with two mottos “Omnia
  subiacent vicissitudini,” and “Sola virtus cadere non potest.”

  Used in 1592–3, 1620, 1629.


  E. 1¼ × 1–1/16 in. An ornamental shield with the Royal Arms, and at
  the sides E: and R.

  Used in 1594.


  F. 1–5/16 × 1–3/16 in. An ornamental shield with the arms of New
  College between two W s (William of Wykeham).

  Used in 1598, 1605.


  G. 1¾ in. squ. A circular watch-face, with “Donec dies est . Iohan:
  9.4”, and figures: for John Day of Oriel.

  Used in 1614–5, 1620.


  H. 1–5/16 × 1⅜. Similar to C, but slightly larger. Perhaps a London
  counterfeit.

  Used in 1616 and 1624.


  I. 2¼ × 1–15/16 in. In centre the arms of the University on a white
  shield with

                               SAP│FEL
                               IEN│ICIT
                               TJA│ATIS,

  and round it a band with ACADE|MIA. | OXONI=|ENSIS. At the corners are
  two winged figures, a rose and a thistle.

  Used in 1628, and at intervals till 1637, by Turner only.


  J. 2⅝ × 2–7/16 in. An Agnus Dei; beneath it “IOH : 1 : 26” and “ECCE
  AGN’ | DEI”, a text round it.

  Used in 1628.


  K. 1–7/16 × 1⅜. The arms of the University, with the motto

                               SAP │.ET
                               IENC│FELI
                               TIA │CIT
                                   │ATE,

  and round it ACADEMIA. | OXONIESIS, a cherub above.

  Used in 1630–4, 1636–8, 1640: in and after 1634 the ATE is altered to
  ATIS.


  L. 3½ × 2⅜ in. The arms of Great Britain and Ireland, crowned, with
  “C.”, “R.” at sides of crown.

  Used in 1636.


  M. 4½ × 3⅜. A Tree of Knowledge, boys plucking fruit, &c.

  Used in 1636 (Lily’s Grammar).


                            II. _Woodcuts._

These are 142 in number (not counting _plain_ woodcut capitals), of
which 32 were used by Barnes. Most of these passed on to his successors,
who augmented them. In 1627 the two University printers printed
separately, and John Lichfield took the larger number for himself, a few
being used in common. It would be idle to print a complete list of
these, but the writer has full notes of the occurrence of all that are
found in each book. Twelve are alphabets, fifteen frames within which
any capital could be placed, and four are arched borders.


                               B. _Type._

The following table exhibits the use made of different type by Oxford
printers 1585–1640, but applies only to the chief type of the body of
the work. Thus Pica Greek is the chief type of a book in 1591 at
earliest, but it is found occasionally in 1587, and Long Primer Greek in
1585. So too Great Primer Greek is used in 1624, 9. And Hebrew type is
used sporadically from 1596 on (Long Primer, Pica and English, pointed
and unpointed: see 1596, 8 & 9; 1601, 2; 1602, 3; &c.)


                              OXFORD TYPE.

 ┌───────────────┬───────────────────┐
 │               │      ¬1585¬       │
 ├───────────────┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │  ¬English:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 1 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 2 Pica        │ 2 │ 6 │ 1 │ 2 │ 1 │
 │ 3 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Roman:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 4 Minion      │   │   │   │   │ 1 │
 │ 5 Brevier     │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 6 Long Primer │ 2 │   │ 1 │   │ 1 │
 │ 7 Pica        │ 2 │ 3 │ 3 │ 3 │   │
 │ 8 English     │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 9 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │
 │10 Double Pica │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Italic:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │
 │11 Long Primer │   │   │   │ 1 │   │
 │12 Pica        │   │ 2 │ 3 │ 1 │ 1 │
 │13 English     │   │   │   │   │   │
 │14 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Greek:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │
 │15 Long Primer │   │ 1 │   │   │   │
 │16 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │The above table has reference only │
 │ to the chief type of the body of  │
 │             the book.             │
 ├───────────────┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │Number of books│ 7 │16 │ 9 │ 7 │ 5 │
 │  or pieces    │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  printed at   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  Oxford       │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │    Average    │         8         │
 └───────────────┴───────────────────┘
 ┌───────────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────┐
 │               │      ¬1590¬       │      ¬1595¬       │
 ├───────────────┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │  ¬English:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 1 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │ 2 │   │   │   │
 │ 2 Pica        │   │ 1 │ 1 │ 1 │ 4 │ 1 │ 1 │ 1 │ 1 │ 2 │
 │ 3 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Roman:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 4 Minion      │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 5 Brevier     │ ½ │   │ 1 │   │   │   │   │   │ 1 │   │
 │ 6 Long Primer │ ½ │ 1 │ 1 │   │ 2 │   │   │   │ ½ │   │
 │ 7 Pica        │ 1 │2½ │1½ │   │ 2 │ 1 │ 1 │ 3 │ 1 │5½ │
 │ 8 English     │   │   │   │   │   │   │ 1 │   │ 2 │   │
 │ 9 Great Primer│   │ ½ │ 2 │ 1 │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │10 Double Pica │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Italic:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │11 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │12 Pica        │ ½ │   │ 2 │   │   │   │ 2 │   │ ½ │ ½ │
 │13 English     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │14 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Greek:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │15 Long Primer │ ½ │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │16 Pica        │   │ 1 │1½ │ 1 │   │   │   │ 2 │   │   │
 ├───────────────┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │The above table has reference only to the chief type of│
 │                 the body of the book.                 │
 ├───────────────┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │Number of books│ 5 │ 7 │11 │ 7 │ 7 │ 4 │ 8 │11 │ 6 │ 7 │
 │  or pieces    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  printed at   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  Oxford       │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │    Average    │                   7                   │
 └───────────────┴───────────────────────────────────────┘
 ┌───────────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────┐
 │               │      ¬1600¬       │      ¬1605¬       │
 ├───────────────┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │  ¬English:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 1 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 2 Pica        │   │   │   │ 2 │ 2 │ 1 │   │   │ 1 │   │
 │ 3 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Roman:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 4 Minion      │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 5 Brevier     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │ 1 │
 │ 6 Long Primer │   │   │ 1 │   │ 1 │   │   │ 1 │ 1 │   │
 │ 7 Pica        │ 5 │ 2 │ 3 │ 5 │ 6 │3½ │ 1 │   │ 4 │ 2 │
 │ 8 English     │ 1 │ 1 │ 7 │ 3 │ 1 │8½ │ 6 │ 9 │ 7 │ 4 │
 │ 9 Great Primer│   │   │ 1 │   │   │   │   │   │ 1 │   │
 │10 Double Pica │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Italic:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │11 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │ 1 │   │
 │12 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │ 1 │   │
 │13 English     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │14 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Greek:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │15 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │16 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │The above table has reference only to the chief type of│
 │                 the body of the book.                 │
 ├───────────────┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │Number of books│ 5 │ 3 │12 │11 │10 │13 │ 8 │10 │17 │ 7 │
 │  or pieces    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  printed at   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  Oxford       │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │    Average    │                  10                   │
 └───────────────┴───────────────────────────────────────┘
 ┌───────────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────┐
 │               │      ¬1610¬       │      ¬1615¬       │
 ├───────────────┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │  ¬English:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 1 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 2 Pica        │   │   │ 1 │   │   │ 1 │   │   │   │ 1 │
 │ 3 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Roman:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 4 Minion      │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 5 Brevier     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 6 Long Primer │ 1 │ 1 │ 1 │ 1 │   │ 2 │ 1 │ 2 │ 1 │ 2 │
 │ 7 Pica        │   │   │ 3 │7½ │ 7 │ 6 │ 1 │ 2 │ 4 │ 4 │
 │ 8 English     │ 6 │ 1 │16 │16 │ 5 │ 5 │ 3 │ 4 │   │ 1 │
 │ 9 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │10 Double Pica │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Italic:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │11 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │12 Pica        │   │   │   │ ½ │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │13 English     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │14 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Greek:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │15 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │16 Pica        │   │   │   │   │ 1 │   │   │ 1 │   │   │
 ├───────────────┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │The above table has reference only to the chief type of│
 │                 the body of the book.                 │
 ├───────────────┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │Number of books│ 7 │ 2 │24 │26 │17 │16 │ 6 │ 9 │ 7 │ 8 │
 │  or pieces    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  printed at   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  Oxford       │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │    Average    │                  12                   │
 └───────────────┴───────────────────────────────────────┘
 ┌───────────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────┐
 │               │      ¬1620¬       │      ¬1625¬       │
 ├───────────────┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │  ¬English:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 1 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 2 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │1½ │ 2 │
 │ 3 Great Primer│   │   │ 1 │   │   │ 1 │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Roman:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 4 Minion      │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 5 Brevier     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │ 6 Long Primer │ 1 │   │   │   │   │   │   │ 2 │ 1 │5½ │
 │ 7 Pica        │ 1 │ 3 │ 2 │ 5 │2½ │ 7 │ 1 │   │12½│6½ │
 │ 8 English     │ 2 │ 2 │ 4 │   │ 2 │12 │ 3 │ 5 │ 5 │ 3 │
 │ 9 Great Primer│   │ 1 │ 1 │   │1½ │ 2 │ 5 │   │ 1 │ 1 │
 │10 Double Pica │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Italic:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │11 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │12 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │ 1 │
 │13 English     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │14 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │   ¬Greek:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │15 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │16 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │The above table has reference only to the chief type of│
 │                 the body of the book.                 │
 ├───────────────┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┤
 │Number of books│ 5 │ 6 │ 9 │ 5 │ 8 │24 │ 9 │14 │22 │19 │
 │  or pieces    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  printed at   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 │  Oxford       │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │
 ├───────────────┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
 │    Average    │                  12                   │
 └───────────────┴───────────────────────────────────────┘
 ┌───────────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────┬──────┐
 │               │      ¬1630¬       │      ¬1635¬       │¬1640¬│
 ├───────────────┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┼───┬───┬───┬───┬───┼──────┤
 │  ¬English:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │ 1 Long Primer │   │   │   │ ½ │   │   │ ½ │ ½ │   │   │      │
 │ 2 Pica        │   │ 1 │ 1 │1½ │   │2½ │   │   │ 2 │   │      │
 │ 3 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │   ¬Roman:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │ 4 Minion      │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │ 5 Brevier     │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │ 6 Long Primer │ 2 │4½ │ 1 │6½ │ 4 │ 4 │ 2 │7½ │ 3 │ 7 │  3   │
 │ 7 Pica        │ 5 │15½│ 3 │4½ │12 │ 3 │9½ │10 │ 5 │ 4 │  14  │
 │ 8 English     │ 7 │ 6 │ 4 │12 │ 2 │ 6 │ 5 │ 4 │10 │ 3 │  3   │
 │ 9 Great Primer│   │ 6 │   │ 3 │ 2 │   │ 1 │   │ 3 │ 5 │  2½  │
 │10 Double Pica │   │   │   │   │ 1 │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │   ¬Italic:¬   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │11 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │12 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │13 English     │   │   │   │   │   │ ½ │   │   │   │   │  ½   │
 │14 Great Primer│   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │  1   │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │   ¬Greek:¬    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │               │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │15 Long Primer │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │16 Pica        │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 ├───────────────┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴──────┤
 │   The above table has reference only to the chief type of    │
 │                    the body of the book.                     │
 ├───────────────┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬──────┤
 │Number of books│14 │32 │ 9 │34 │21 │16 │18 │24 │23 │20 │  26  │
 │  or pieces    │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │  printed at   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 │  Oxford       │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │   │      │
 ├───────────────┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴──────┤
 │    Average    │                      21                      │
 └───────────────┴──────────────────────────────────────────────┘

The ordinary size (_now_) of the type used in the Oxford Press from 1585
to 1640 is as follows, see p. 144 (1629, no. 4):—

                     _Name._                    _Lines in one foot._
   Nonpareil                                                     144
   Minion                                                        120
   Brevier                                                 about 110
   Long Primer                                                    90
   Pica                                                           72
   English                                                        64
   Great Primer                                                   51
   Double Pica (which is double “_small_ Pica”)                   41
   Canon                                                          20

The old measures make the type of all these very slightly smaller than
the above measurements.


                             C. _Notanda._

It is curious to observe the small points which break the smooth course
of ordinary printing in these earlier times, some of them marking
progress, some a perturbation in the office, some stupidity. The
following are random notes of some bibliographical interest.

  1. The change of use in the case of _u_ and _v_ (_Vniuersity_ being
  the old spelling, and _University_ the new) may be remarked in
  progress in 1589, no. 5, and is practically completed by 1610. But a
  capital U is not found at all in the period dealt with, its place
  being in a few cases supplied by a large lower-case u.

  2. For “at Oxford” the common Latin is _Oxoniæ_, but _Oxonii_ occurs
  sporadically. _Bellositi Dobunorum_ occurs in 1628: and _Rhydychen_
  (in Welsh books) in 1595, 1600.

  3. In 1588 (no. 8) we first find an Oxford _édition de luxe_.

  4. The state of the office is shown by 1595, no. 4 (small stock of
  type); 1601, no. 2 (Hebrew words sometimes transliterated, sometimes
  in Hebrew type: yet in 1603, no. 2, there is a complaint of the want
  of Hebrew type!); 1625, no. 16 (one sheet in different type); 1628,
  no. 16 (carelessness).

  5. Red ink is found in 1479/80, 1628, 1631, 1633 and thereafter; and
  gold-printing in 1633.

  6. Curiosities of workmanship will be found in 1629, no. 14; 1631,
  nos. 10, 17; 1633, nos. 26, 33; 1634, no. 9; 1635, no. 3; 1636, no. 15
  (signatures); 1638, nos. 3, 17 (do.); 1640, no. 24: and eccentricity
  on the author’s part in 1631, no. 29; 1633, no. 9 (phonetic spelling);
  1635, no. 10. In 1613 no. 29 (Rainolds) on the first two pages of each
  section the headline is “prophecy”, but on every other page it is
  “prophecie”. 1634 no. 17 (Statuta) is a true folio, in every sense in
  which the word is used.

  7. The number of books or editions issued at Oxford is roughly as
  follows:—15th cent., 15: early 16th cent., 7: 1585–1600, 125:
  1601–1620, 230: 1621–1640, 370: total, about 750. In the 17th cent.
  about 2700 were issued: in the 18th, about 2100: in the first three
  quarters of the 19th, about 6500. The number from “1468” to 1900 may
  be estimated as likely to be about 16000.

  8. Of the Oxford books issued from “1468” to 1640, the British Museum
  contains less than 70 per cent., and the Bodleian about 80 per cent.
  The following calculation is not far from the truth:—

             Oxford books in Brit. Mus. and Bodl. about 450
             Oxford books in Brit. Mus. only        "    50
             Oxford books in Bodl. only             "   150
             Oxford books in neither library        "   100
                                                        ———
                            Total                       750



                              APPENDIX F.
                               IMPRINTS.
            LISTS AND TABLES OF OXFORD IMPRINTS, 1585–1640.


The following tables and lists explain themselves. They give a detailed
picture of the mutual relations of Oxford and London printers and
publishers, and the development of the Oxford book trade. It will be
noticed how the archaisms (_Imprinted at Oxford by_, or _At Oxford,
printed by_, &c.) are gradually worn off, with the rhetorical
descriptions (such as _celeberrimæ Academiæ typographus_), and the use
of colophons.

In some cases we find fictitious imprints, as in 1602, nos. 5, 11, 1611
(see impr. 7_a_), 1612 (impr. 7), 1613 (impr. 32), 1616 (impr. 35), 1626
(impr. 67). The number of books with no printer’s or publisher’s name is
small (see impr. 107, and Appendix, p. 151 (Stanley)), and of _books_
with no imprint at all there are very few instances, see 1586, 12; 1602,
8 and 9; 1603, 5; 1606, 5; 1622, 6; 1625, 9; 1635, 13.

In the list which follows the spelling is modernized, the form alone is
exact.


                                 1585.

                     (_Joseph Barnes_, 1585–1617.)

 ¬1.¬ Oxoniæ, ex officina typographica Josephi Barnesii celeberrimæ
    Academiæ Oxoniensis typographi.
             1585 (also as a colophon).

     1 _a_. (Omitting _typographica_ and _Oxoniensis_).
             1589, 1591.

 ¬2.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, printer to the University.
             1585–6, 1592–4, 1598, 1603, 1606–9, 1615–16.

     2 _a_. ... printer to that famous University.
             1585, 1594.

     2 _b_. ... printer to the famous University.
             1586.

     2 _c_. Omitting “at.”
             1603.

 ¬3.¬ Oxoniæ, ex ædibus Josephi Barnes.
             1585.

 ¬4.¬ Imprinted [or Printed] at Oxford [or Oxenford] by Joseph Barnes,
    printer to the University.
             1585 (also as colophon), 1586, 1591, 1599, 1615.

     4 _a_. Adding “famous” before “University”.
             1585.


                                 1586.

 ¬5.¬ Oxoniæ (or -ii), ex officina typographica Josephi Barnesii.
             1586–7, 1590, 1592, 1597, 1608.

     5 _a_. Omitting _typographica_.
             1596, 1598.

     5 _b_. With _typographica_ the last word.
             1598.

 ¬6.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold in Paul’s
    Churchyard at the sign of the Tiger’s head.
             1586–9, 1591–2, 1595.

     6 _a_. ... at the Tiger’s head.
             1587.

     6 _b_. Imprinted at Oxford by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold in
        Paul’s Churchyard at the sign of the Tiger’s head.
             1588–9.

 ¬7.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes.
             1586, 1594, 1603–4, 1607–9, 1610–12 [once as a fictitious
                imprint], 1613–15.

     7 _a_. Printed at Oxford, by Joseph Barnes.
             1588, 1592, 1597, 1599, 1605, 1608–10, 1611 (a false
                imprint), 1613–15.

     7 _b_. Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes.
             1608.

 ¬8.¬ Excudebat Josephus Barnesius typographus Oxoniensis.
             [1586].

 ¬9.¬ Oxoniæ, ex officina Josephi Barnesii, et veneunt in cœmeterio
    Paulino sub signo capitis Tigerini.
             1586.

 ¬9*.¬ Impressas en Oxford por Ioseph Barnes, en el año de salud
    M.D.L.XXXVI.
             1586.


                                 1587.

 ¬10.¬ Oxoniæ, typis Iosephi Barnesii.
             1587.

 ¬11.¬ Oxonii (or -iæ), excudebat Iosephus Barnesius.
             1587–88, 1590, 1592–96, 1598–99, 1601–17.

     11 _a_. With _Oxoniæ_ last.
             1599.


                                 1589.

 ¬12.¬ Printed by Joseph Barnes, printer ... are to be sold at the
    Tiger’s head i...
             1589.


                                 1590.

 ¬13.¬ Oxonii, excudebat Josephus Barnesius celeberrimæ Academiæ
    Typographus.
             1590.

     13 _a_. Omitting Oxonii, and adding _Oxoniensis_ after _Academiæ_.
             1592.

     13 _b_. With “Oxoniæ”, and “almæ” for “celeberrimæ.”
             1602–3.

     13 _c_. With “Oxoniæ,” and omitting “celeberrimæ.”
             1615, 1617.


                                 1591.

                  (_Richard Wright_, of London, 1591.)

 ¬14.¬ Printed at Oxford, by Joseph Barnes, for Richard Wright. Cum
    Privilegio.
             1591.

 ¬15.¬ Oxoniæ. In officinâ Josephi Barnesii.
             1591.


                                 1592.

 ¬16.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebat Josephus Barnesius, væneunt cum Oxoniæ, tum ad
    caput Tigridis ad Divi Pauli Londinensium.
             1592.


                                 1595.

 ¬17.¬ Joseph Barnes ai printiodd yn Rhydychen.
             1595.


                                 1596.

 ¬18.¬ Oxoniæ, apud Josephum Barnesium.
             1596, 1605.

 ¬19.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold in Paul’s
    Churchyard at the sign of the Bible.
             1596, 1600–1.

     19 _a_. Printed at Oxford, by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold in
        Paul’s Churchyard at the sign of the Bible.
             1597, 1599, 1600.

 ¬20.¬ Oxoniæ, ex officina typographica Iosephi Barnesii, et veneunt
    Londini in Cœmeterio D. Pauli, ad insigne Bibliæ (or _Bibl._).
             1596–7.


                                 1598.

 ¬21.¬ Printed at Oxford, by Joseph Barnes, for R. H. [i.e. Richard
    Haydocke].
             1598.


                                 1602.

                  (_John Barnes_, of London, 1602–16.)

 ¬22.¬ Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold by John
    Barnes at the Turk’s Head in Fleet Street [London].
             1602.

 ¬23.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold in Fleet
    Street [London] at the sign of the Turk’s Head, by John Barnes.
             1602 (Powel: _fictitious imprint_): 1602–3.

 ¬24.¬ At Oxford, by Joseph Barnes, printer to the University.
             1602 (Higins: _fictitious imprint_): 1602.


                                 1603.

                 (_Simon Waterson_, of London, 1603–6.)

 ¬25.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold in Paul’s
    Churchyard [London] at the signe of the Crown, by Simon Waterson.
             1603–5.

     25 _a_. Printed at Oxford, by Joseph Barnes ... [&c. as above.]
             1604–6.


                                 1605.

 ¬26.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebat Jos. Barnesius, prostant Londini apud Simonem
    Waterson in Cæmeterio Ædis Paulinæ.
             1605.

 ¬27.¬ At Oxford ¶ Printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold by John
    Barnes, dwelling without Newgate [London] by S. Sepulchre’s Church,
    at the signe of Paris.
             1605.


                                 1606.

 ¬28.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebat Josephus Barnesius, & veneunt Londini apud
    Simonem Watersonum in cœmeterio Paulino ad signum Coronæ.
             1606.


                                 1612.

 ¬29.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold by John
    Barnes, dwelling near Holborn Conduit [London].
             1612–13 (also _fictitious_).

     29 _a_. Printed at Oxford, by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold by
        John Barnes, dwelling near Holborn Conduit.
             1613 (also _fictitious_).

 ¬30.¬ Printed at Oxford, for John Barnes, dwelling near Holborn
    Conduit.
             1612.


                                 1613.

 ¬31.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebat Josephus Barnesius, & Londini væneunt apud
    Johannem Barnesium propè aquȩductum Holborniensem.
             1613.

 ¬32.¬ At Oxford, printed for John Barnes, and are to be sold near
    Holborn Conduit.
             1613 (_fictitious_).


                                 1614.

 ¬33.¬ At Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold by John
    Barnes, over against St. Pulcher’s Church.
             1614.


                                 1616.

 ¬34.¬ Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, for John Barnes.
             1616 (_perh. fictitious_).

 ¬35.¬ Oxford, printed by Joseph Barnes, for John Barnes, dwelling in
    Hosier Lane, near Smithfield.
             1616 (_fictitious_).


                                 1617.

          (_John Lichfield_, 1617–35. _William Wrench_, 1617.)

 ¬36.¬ At Oxford, printed by John Lichfield and William Wrench, printers
    to the famous University.
             1617.

 ¬37.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebant Johannes Lichfield et Gulielmus Wrench.
             1617 (_excudebat_ once, in _Jacobi Ara_).

 ¬38.¬ At Oxford, printed by John Lichfield and William Wrench.
             1617.


                                 1618.

                       (_James Short_, 1618–24.)

 ¬39.¬ At Oxford, printed by John Lichfield and James Short, printers to
    the famous University.
             1618–19: (without “At”) 1620: (with “At”) 1621–24.

 ¬40.¬ Oxoniæ (or -ii), excudebant Johannes Lichfield et Jacobus Short.
             1618–22, 1624.

                        (_Simon Jackson_, 1618.)

 ¬41.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebant Johannes Lichfield et Jacobus Short, propter
    Simonem Jackson.
             1618.


                                 1619.

 ¬42.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebant Johannes Lichfield et Jacobus Short, Academiæ
    typographi.
             1619–20, 1623–24.

     42 _a_. Adding _Oxoniensis_ after _Academiæ_.
             1622.

                        (_William Spier_, 1619.)

 ¬43.¬ At Oxford, printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for William
    Spier.
             1619.

 ¬44.¬ Printed at Oxford, by John Lichfield and James Short, printers to
    the University.
             1619.

     44 _a_. With “At Oxford” first.

 ¬45.¬ At Oxford, printed by John Lichfield and James Short.
             1619, 1622, 1624.


                                 1620.

       (_Henry Cripps_, 1620–39. _John Pyper_, of London, 1620.)

 ¬46.¬ Oxford, printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry
    Cripps, and are to be sold by John Pyper in Paules Churchyard, at
    the sign of the Cross Keys.
             1620.

 ¬47.¬ Oxoniæ, excudebant I. L. & I. S. Academiæ Typographi.
             1620, 1623.

 ¬48.¬ At Oxford, printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry
    Cripps.
             1620–21, 1623–24.


                                 1622.

                (_William Davis_, bookseller, 1622–40.)

 ¬49.¬ At Oxf