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Title: Bowling Catalog E
Author: Company, Narragansett Machine
Language: English
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 BOWLING CATALOG E
 by NARRAGANSETT MACHINE COMPANY,
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.



Bowling and Alleys.


The recent revival of this interesting game has resulted in the
application of modern principles of system and exactness to Alleys,
Pins, and Balls. What would have been very good ten years ago will not
answer at all now. The alley in particular must be right from the start
and remain so. This can only be expected of experienced builders, using
first class materials. We have been building alleys for ten years and
by giving them careful study have produced good alleys. This catalogue
describes them in every detail. There are alleys and ALLEYS, but there
is only one “STANDARD” ALLEY. The statements we make regarding it are
facts, borne out by the class of people who use it.

 Yours respectfully,

 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.,

 Providence, R. I.



CLASS D, “STANDARD” BOWLING ALLEYS.


[Illustration]

_CONSTRUCTION._ The beds rest on sleepers supported at their ends by
sills running the entire length of the alleys. These may rest on a
concrete, cement, or other solid floor, or on posts or piers set 8 ft.
apart, or where the ground is firm and dry of a gravelly nature, on
flat stones laid on the ground. The sills raise both sleepers and bed
clear of the ground or cement, and as there is ample air space beneath
them they are not liable to be affected by moisture which nearly always
collects in confined places near the ground. The beds are made of
strips three inches wide, tongued and grooved on the sides, (see page
14) and are built up by nailing and glueing each strip on top of the
preceding one until the bed stands on edge 42 inches high: in this way
the strips are firmly driven together and a solid bed secured. The bed
is then laid down, screwed to the sleepers and planed.

_DURABILITY._ This is secured, first by the use of good well-seasoned
timber. Second by the ample air space beneath the alleys. As we use
large quantities of the Hard White Maple of which the beds are made,
we have arranged with several of the largest mills in the country
to select from their finest stock the best for our use, shipping in
car-load lots. No such timber can be found in any city yards. The
Sills and Sleepers are of Selected Hard Pine, known as one of the
most durable woods. As none of the woodwork is bedded in cement or
in any way closed up there is no tendency to dry rot, and it cannot
be affected by any ordinary degree of moisture. By long experience
in alley building we have ascertained the most durable materials for
different parts and their best forms, features that save wear and avoid
early and expensive repairs.



CLASS C, “STANDARD” ADJUSTABLE ALLEYS.


[Illustration: CROSS SECTION OF A PAIR OF CLASS C. ALLEYS.]

The Standard (Reiskey & Wolf Patent) Adjustable Alleys are constructed
in every detail the same as the Standard Bowling Alleys except that the
sleepers on which the beds rest are adjustable. The adjusting screws
are placed at the ends of the sleepers and rest on the sills as shown
above. They are riveted to Iron Shoes that are secured to the sills so
that the screws can raise up or draw down the beds. Any deviations of
the beds from level, except such as are due to wear, may be corrected
by the adjusting screws, and the expense of re-planing avoided or
reduced in cost. When it is necessary to plane out a worn spot the worn
part may be raised by the screws and the necessity of taking a deep cut
of the whole bed avoided.

_SECTIONAL ALLEYS._ On the Adjustable principle we build sectional
Alleys with the beds in sections 12 to 14 feet long and 42 inches wide.
After the Adjustable Sleepers are set and leveled, the bed sections are
screwed to them and if necessary again leveled by the adjusting screws.
Such alleys are as near portable as it has been possible to get alleys
and may be moved from Winter to Summer resorts, etc.



GENERAL SPECIFICATION.

“STANDARD” Bowling Alleys.


_BEDS_ first quality white maple, 3 in. wide, rabbetted on the sides,
laid on edge, glued and nailed with cut steel nails.

_LENGTH OF BED_, 78 ft., width, 41 to 42 in., thickness, 3 in.

_SLEEPERS_ to be of selected hard pine, 6 in. deep, 3 in. wide, placed
at an average of 36 in. apart.

_SILLS_ to be of Hard Pine 6 × 6, built of three pieces.

_SCORE BOARDS_ of artificial slate, 20 in. by 27 in. inside frame,
ruled to 2 in. squares, framed in oak, with chalk rail.

_SCRATCH LINE AND PIN SPOTS_ to be of Black Vulcanized fibre. Side
cushions to be of hard wood faced with sole leather from a point
opposite the head pin to one foot beyond the end of the bed.

_RUNS._ One set for each pair of alleys, placed in the centre between
the alleys, built low with oak centre post placed at Scratch line as
per regulation.

_CAGE_ for starting the balls to be of hickory with wrought iron
brackets.

_GUTTERS_ 9 in. wide, of selected hard pine.

_SWINGING BUNTERS_ padded with palm fibre in sections, divided by
burlap and covered with heavy Black duck.

_PIT_ 4 ft. wide, length equal to width of alleys, padded on bottom,
under end of bed and at the sides, with hair felt covered with heavy
duck.

_WOOD WORK_ where not otherwise specified to be of selected hard pine.

_WORKMANSHIP_ to be first-class throughout, beds to be true from end
to end and level crosswise. All parts to be firmly secured and left in
condition for use.

_FINISH._ Surfaces of beds to be planed and sanded to a smooth even
surface, level from side to side, and end to end. Posts, runs, gutters,
etc., to have two coats of shellac varnish.



 LYMAN GYMNASIUM,
 BROWN UNIVERSITY,
 PROVIDENCE . . R. I.


 Stone, Carpenter & Wilson, Architects.
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

 TWO ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE. R. I.

[Illustration]



ADVANTAGES.


The following claims are made for the “STANDARD” Bowling Alleys, and
have been sustained by use:

_KEEP LEVEL._ On account of the air space underneath them, which is
ventilated by openings, the beds are less affected by moisture rising
from the ground, cement, etc.

_SURFACE._ The bed being glued up of strips having rabbets cut on the
sides, form a solid bed in which no piece can get loose, slip, raise
up, or give any trouble.

_FOUNDATIONS._ Practically, no foundation is required; hence, a great
saving is effected. The sills can be laid on a tar concrete or cement
floor, or on piers or posts set three feet in the ground. All sills are
supplied by us. As no part of the foundation is buried in cement, it
lasts indefinitely.

_WEAR AND TEAR._ By long experience we have ascertained the best
materials and forms to stand the severe usage of public and club alleys
and by their use avoid the vexatious break-downs formerly so common on
alleys.

_EXPERIENCE._ As we build a great many alleys our workmen are
accustomed to the work and know its requirements. Our alleys are not
experiments; they are tried and proved successes.

_DURABILITY._ The beds being made of double kiln dried White Rock
Maple, last longer and do not require so much re-planing as if made of
softer woods or maple as ordinarily seasoned.

_RE-PLANING._ The strips of which the beds are made do not dry out and
have cracks between them that fill with grit and make re-planing almost
impossible.



 WEST SIDE CLUB,
 BOWLING ALLEYS,
 PROVIDENCE . . R. I.


 Gould, Angell & Swift, Architects,
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

 BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE. R. I.

[Illustration]



Maple is unquestionably the best wood for alley beds. It is hard,
white, durable, even grained and when properly seasoned and dried, will
remain as laid without shrinking or warping. That is, the best maple
will do all this. We are large buyers of maple for alleys and other
purposes, and get direct from the mills the highest grade of Hard,
White (Rock) Maple. Such stock as is never carried by city yards—they
have no call for it. This fine stock enables us to build alley beds
that are clear white from end to end, without spots or streaks, level
and true. The ideal bowling surfaces.

[Illustration]



 TAUNTON WINTHROP CLUB,
 TAUNTON . . MASS.


 A. E. SWAZEY, Architect,
 TAUNTON, MASS.

 ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

[Illustration]



Low Posts and runs are an innovation we introduced three or four years
ago. Their advantages were apparent from the start and now nothing
else will be tolerated. They give both players and spectators an
unobstructed view of the alley beds and pins. In a room containing
eight or ten alleys, one can see every pin. The runs are strong, the
posts being short, and as the balls do not have to be raised so high to
put them in the cage they are dropped in easier and wear longer.

[Illustration]



 PALACE BOWLING ALLEYS,
 MUSIC HALL,
 PAWTUCKET . . R. I.


 BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

[Illustration]



DESCRIPTION.


The runs are low with a low post placed inside of the scratch line.
These alleys conform in every detail to the Regulations of the
Massachusetts Amateur Bowling League, which are generally adopted by
other Eastern organizations.

The pit is four feet wide and is dropped well below the beds so that
balls go over pins or balls lying in the pit.

[Illustration: LONGITUDINAL SECTION OF A STANDARD BOWLING ALLEY]

The swinging bunters are large, heavy, and well padded with a durable
palm fibre, the padding being in sections to prevent its packing down
in the bottom of the bunter. The bottom and sides of the pit are
padded, and from opposite the head-pin to one foot beyond the beds, the
sides, where the flying pins strike, are covered with sole leather.

The ball cage and the first section of the runs are made of hickory to
stand the severe use.



Tonguing and grooving alley stock is a feature we introduced several
years ago—long enough to have given it a good test. A bed built this
way, especially when glued and well nailed with cut steel nails, as
ours are, is a solid plank from end to end with the tendency to warp
removed by the strips having their grain in various directions. Loose
or split ends that rise up and turn balls aside are an impossibility,
and so close are the boards drawn to each other that it is almost
impossible to find the joints. Thus the dirt is kept from working
between the boards and forming unsightly cracks which let in water,
when the alleys are washed, to work still more destruction.

[Illustration]



 ALLSTON CLUB,
 ALLSTON . . MASS


 TWO ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

[Illustration]



“STANDARD” BOWLING ALLEYS.


The following is a list of Bowling Alleys laid from 1893 to 1895.
The increasing number of parties using these alleys is their best
recommendation.

   1893.
 1 Pair.      Young Men’s Christian Association, Waterbury, Ct.
 1 Pair.      University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.
 1 ½ Pairs.    Germania Aid Association, Roxbury, Mass.
   1894.
 1 ½ Pairs.    S. & B. Lederer, Providence, R. I.
 3 Pairs.     Music Hall, Pawtucket, R. I.
 1 Pair.      Derryfield Club, Manchester, N. H.
 2 ½ Pairs.    Providence Athletic Association.
 1 ½ Pairs.    P. Welch, Boston, Mass.
 1 Pair.      The Gymnasium, Manchester, N. H.
 1 Pair.      Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Mauch Chunk, Pa.
 2 ½ Pairs.    Edw. Hanscom, Worcester, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Portland Athletic Club, Portland, Me.
 1 Pair.      A. Williams, Wollaston, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Charles W. Spalding. Brockton, Mass.
 1 Pair.      J. P. Webber, Brookline, Mass.
 1 Pair.      St. Anne’s Gymnasium, Woonsocket, R. I.
 1 Pair.      Young Men’s Christian Association, Marion, Ohio.
 1 ½ Pairs.    Meiklejohn & Co., Pawtucket, R. I.
 1 Pair.      Methuen Club, Methuen, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Young Men’s Christian Association, Camden, N. J.
 1 Pair.      C. T. Plunkett, Adams, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Elmwood Club, Providence, R. I.
   1895.
 1 Pair.      Young Men’s Catholic Association, Lawrence, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Neighborhood Club, West Hartford, Conn.
 1 Pair.      Butler Hospital, Providence, R. I.
 3 Pairs.     Stanley Brothers, Portland, Me.
 1 ½ Pairs.    Hotel Reynolds, Boston, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Springfield, Mass.
 ½ Pair.      Providence Athletic Ass’n, Prov., R. I., 2d order.
 1 Pair.      Young Men’s Christian Association. Hudson, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Kossuth Hall Association, Roxbury, Mass.
 2 Pairs.     Oriental Billiard and Bowling Co., Buffalo, N. Y.
 2 ½ Pairs.    F. W. Arnold. Providence, R. I.
 2 ½ Pairs.    J. D. Smith, Pt. Breeze, Baltimore, Md.
 1 Pair.      A. G. Cash, Hyannis, Mass.
 1 ½ Pairs.    E. D. Bullock, Bristol, R. I.
 1 Pair.      State Normal School, Oneonta, N. Y.
 4 Pairs.     Bowling and Tennis Co., New Haven, Conn.
 1 Pair.      Dr. F. D. Stackpole, York Harbor, Me.
 1 Pair.      St. Patrick’s Holy Name Society, Fall River, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Wolff Brothers, Baltimore, Md.
 ½ Pair.      C. H. Cummings, Wiers, N. H.
 1 Pair.      Wilmington Whist Club, Wilmington, Del.
 1 ½ Pairs.    Calumet Club, Cambridge, Mass.
 2 ½ Pairs.    Stanley, Kendall & Co., Willimantic, Conn.
 2 Pairs.     Cyrus Randall, Cambridge, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Old Dorchester Club, Dorchester, Mass.
 3 ½ Pairs.    Stanley Brothers, Bridgeport, Conn., 2d order.
 3 ½ Pairs.    Stanley Brothers, Bangor, Me., 3d order.
 1 ½ Pairs.    Catholic Union, Boston, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Boston Turn Verein, Boston, Mass.
 1 ½ Pairs.    Mrs. E. L. Brown, Malden, Mass.
 1 Pair.      Arcanum Club, Norwich, Conn.



 KERNWOOD CLUB,
 MALDEN . . MASS.


 ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

[Illustration]



A list of the Reisky & Wolf Patent Alleys laid by the Narragansett
Machine Co., Providence. Sole Licensees under Patent No. 359,542, for
Adjustable Bowling Alleys.

   1890.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Association, Rochester, N. Y.
  1892.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Association, Evansville, Ind.
 1 Pair.     Brown University, Providence, R. I.
 1 Pair.     Elmwood Club, Providence, R. I.
 2 Pairs.    Colonial Club, Cambridge, Mass.
 4 Pairs.    E. H. Page, Lowell, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Association, Bridgeport, Ct.
 1 Pair.     Terry Gymnasium, Norfolk, Ct.
 2 Pairs.    Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.
 1 Pair.     Kernwood Club, Malden Mass.
 1 Pair.     Calumet Club, Winchester, Mass.
 1 Pair.     West Side Club, Providence, R. I.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Association, Trenton, N. J.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Grand Rapids, Mich.
 2 Pairs.    Charlestown Club, Charlestown Mass.
   1893.
 2 Pairs.    New Haven Lawn Club, New Haven, Ct.
 1 Pair.     Cincinnati Police Gymnasium, Cincinnati, Ohio.
 1 Pair.     Louis D. Collins, Geneva, N. Y.
 2 Pairs.    Eureka Club, Rochester N. Y.
 1 Pair.     D. H. Schwartz, Niagara Falls, N. Y.
 1 ½ Pairs.   Julius Myers, Cambridgeport, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Miss Helen Gould, Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Southbridge, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Allston Club, Allston Mass.
 6 Pairs.    Jno B. Swift, Lowell, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Hartford, Ct.
 1 Pair.     Washington Athletic Club, Washington, D. C.
 1 Pair.     Lakeview Wheelmen, Rochester, N. Y.
 1 Pair.     Salem Bowling Club, Salem, Mass.
 2 Pairs.    Allston Real Estate Co., Allston, Mass.
 1 Alley.    Winthrop Club, Taunton, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Williamsport, Pa.
  1894.
 2 Pairs.    Commercial Club, Brockton, Mass.
 3 Pairs.    G. A. Stanley, Lawrence, Mass.
 2 Pairs.    Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J.
 1 Pair.     26th Ward, Y. M. C. A., Brooklyn, N. Y.
 1 Alley.    Samuel Conant, Dudley, Mass.
 1 Pair.     G. H. Horr, Mankato, Minn.
 1 Pair.     George C. Young. Syracuse, N. Y.
 1 Pair.     A. M. Briggs, Albion, N. Y.
 1 Alley.    State Normal School, Shippensburg, Pa.
 1 Pair.     Wenonah Inn Co., Wenonah, N. J.
 1 Alley.    West Side Club, Providence, R. I., 2d order.
 1 Pair.     N. J. State Normal School, Trenton. N. J.
 1 Pair.     St. Mary’s Institute, Warren, R. I.
 2 Pairs.    M. Fitzpatrick, Waltham, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Fitchburg, Mass.
 2 Pairs.    Ryan & Stanley, Haverhill, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Institute, Valley Falls, R. I.
 2 Pairs.    Thomas Adams, Brooklyn, N. Y.
   1895.
 1 Pair.     Chestnut Hill Casino, Boston, Mass.
 1 Pair.     Young Men’s Christian Association, Melrose, Mass.
 1 Pair.     George H. Young, Syracuse, N. Y., 2d order.
 2 Pairs.    University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.



 COLONIAL CLUB,
 CAMBRIDGE . . MASS.


 FOUR ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

[Illustration]



GUARANTEE.


We guarantee the material and workmanship on all our alleys to be
first-class in every respect and will repair free of charge, for one
year, any breakage due to faulty construction or defective material;
but we cannot guarantee against the natural effect of heat and moisture
on the stock out of which the alleys are laid.



 EXPERIENCE is a very necessary factor in building Bowling Alleys. For
 six years we built alleys according to the old method of setting the
 sleepers in cement, nailing the beds to them, etc., and though we took
 great care to have all work and materials first-class, our alleys did
 not always give the perfect satisfaction we desired. To obviate some
 of the troubles, in 1892 we introduced the Reisky & Wolf adjustable
 alleys with improvements in the construction of the beds, etc., and
 later the Standard non-adjustable alleys built on the same general
 principles. These alleys have given such excellent satisfaction
 that our business has largely increased, and we are confident that
 every alley we build according to our new method will give perfect
 satisfaction.



 COMMERCIAL CLUB,
 BROCKTON . . MASS.


 Metcalf & Hoyt, Architects,
 BOSTON, MASS.

 FOUR ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
 NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO.
 PROVIDENCE, R. I.

[Illustration]



HIGH RUNS.


[Illustration: POST FOR HIGH RUNS.]

When desired we build High Runs and Newel Post as shown by the drawing
on this page. As will be seen by the “end view,” this post is made thin
to allow as much room as possible for the bowlers. This style of runway
has a sift-out that delivers the small balls on a lower rack.



FACILITIES.


Our factory, as will be seen by the illustration on page 24, is located
at Woodlawn, a suburb of Providence, on the New York, New Haven
Railroad. The lumber sheds and dry kilns, of improved construction,
are by the side of a siding or switch built specially for us, enabling
us to load our lumber or ship goods directly from the cars. We buy the
highest grade lumber in car-loads direct from the mills, and have the
latest improved machinery for working it. With the best of facilities
and experienced workmen, we can promise first-class work.



PRICE LIST OF BOWLING SUPPLIES.


NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO., PROVIDENCE, R. I., SEPTEMBER, 1895.


LIST OF BALLS.

   Size.        Weight.     Weight.      Tel. Code.
   in.        lb., solid   lb., bored
 Diameter

 4                1 ⅝           ·          (MAGNET)
 4 ½               2 ¼           ·          (MAGPIE)
 5                3 ⅛           ·          (MALADY)
 5 ½               4 ⅛           ·          (MALICE)
 6                5 ⅜           ·          (MALLET)
 6 ½               6 ⅞           ·          (MAMMON)
 7                8 ½           ·          (MANAGE)
 7 ½              10 ½          10 ¼         (MANGLE)
 8               12 ¾          12 ½         (MANNER)
 8 ½              15 ⅜          15          (MANTLE)
 8.59†           16 ⅛          15 ¾         (MANUAL)
 ───────────────────────────────────────
 † Regulation size, 27 in. circumference

These Balls are made of the best lignum-vitæ, or ball wood as it is
termed by the trade. 7 ½ in. and all larger sizes have finger holes,
unless otherwise ordered. Holes are bored 3 ½ in. apart unless ordered
otherwise.

 Re-turning Balls, 4 to 6 in.     $ .75
 Re-turning Balls, 8 to 10 in.     1.00

Sizes measured before re-turning.


TEN PINS.

Turned from selected Rock Maple, turned to regulation sizes and lathe
polished.

 Small        12 ½ in. cir.   14 ½ high, per set, (MARKET) $4.00
 Regulation   15  in. cir.   15  high, per set, (MARROW)  5.00
 Large        17 ½ in. cir.   18 ½ high, per set, (MARTYR)  6.00
 Poney Pins    9  in. cir.    9  high, per set, (MATURE)  2.00
 Candle Pins   2 ½ in dia.    15  high, per set, (MERCER)  2.40


FURNITURE.

The following list is well adapted for one pair of Public or Club
Alleys. For a Single Alley take half of the list of Balls and Pins. It
is desirable to purchase large balls at first as they turn to smaller
sizes.

 4 Regulation Balls      $20.00
 2 Balls, 8 ½ in. diam.    9.00
 2 Balls, 8  in. diam.    8.00
 2 Balls, 7  in. diam.    6.00
 2 Balls, 6  in. diam.    4.00
 4 Balls, 4 ½ in. diam.    5.00
                        ───────
                         $52.00

 2 Sets of Match Pins     10.00
 1 Foot Chalk Box          1.25
 1 Winn’s Ball Retarder   10.00


SUNDRIES.

 Foot Chalk in Box, made to be cut down as the chalk wears,   $1.25

 Score Books bound in cloth, size 9 × 11 ½ in., with American
   League Rules.

 No. 1,  60 Games,                                             1.25.

 No. 2, 120 Games,                                             1.75.

 No. 3, 176 Games,                                             2.50.

 Standard Dressing, for use after washing, to preserve
   the surface and retain the color of the wood. In gallon
   cans. Per gallon                                             .75

 Savogran, for cleaning alleys, 1 lb. package,                  .25

 Savogran, for cleaning alleys, 5 lb. package,                 1.00



WINN’S BALL RETARDER

FOR BOWLING ALLEYS.


Some means for retarding or reducing the speed of returned balls is
an absolute necessity, otherwise they crash into each other making a
disagreeable noise, injure the balls and knock the smaller ones off
the runs. When taking a ball off the runs bowlers have often had their
fingers badly crushed by a swiftly returned ball.

[Illustration]

It is desirable to return balls as swiftly as possible to save time and
get a favorite ball back without delay.

The retarder shown above was invented by a bowler and is perfection
itself in operation. The resistance is greater for large and swift
balls, and very little on slow or small balls. The resistance is
affected by the air chamber under the short end of the lever which has
an outlet for the compressed air controlled by a set screw so it can
be adjusted. The long end of the lever has a wooden shoe with leather
on the under side. A large ball raises this shoe high, compressing the
air, a quick ball raises it quickly and is resisted by the compressed
air which can only escape slowly. A small quick ball raises the shoe a
short distance quickly and is held back by the shoe while a small slow
ball passes under with scarcely any resistance.

The retarder will save its cost in the wear of the balls in a single
year and give comfort and safety to the bowlers. It can be secured to
any runway about 10 feet from the post in a few minutes, screws being
sent with each retarder.

 No. 429, Winn’s Ball Retarder   (MEDIUM) $10.00



BOWLING LOCKERS.


These lockers are adapted for public alleys and form a safe receptacle
for the coats, hats, etc. of the bowlers. They are built in sections,
to be easily set up, and other lockers may be added to a cabinet at any
time.

[Illustration]

 Whitewood Locker 7 feet high (6 ft. inside), 18 in.
   square, with lock, knocked down on cars in
   Providence                              net each.      $6.00

 Ball Lockers; 12 in a cabinet, each locker holding two
   Regulation Balls; locks on doors all different; net
   price for cabinet with oak front and ends              30.00



SUPPLIES.


We are prepared to furnish balls, pins, or any other supplies, all of
the best obtainable quality. Our alley balls are turned from the best
lignum vitæ and we make our pins of first quality Rock Maple, to the
form prescribed by the Bowling League.

LISTS AND PRICES ON APPLICATION.

[Illustration: REGULATION PIN.

CANDLE PIN.]

[Illustration]



BALL LOCKERS.


For members of clubs to keep private balls for their own use.

[Illustration]

These Lockers are used in many clubs to keep the private ball of the
members separate from those in general use. They are generally made
of oak with twelve lockers in a cabinet, but may be made of any other
material or number of lockers.

PRICES ON APPLICATION.

[Illustration]



WORKS OF THE NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO., AT WOODLAWN, TWO MILES FROM
PROVIDENCE, R. I.

[Illustration]



DIMENSIONS.


The necessary dimensions for “Regulation” Bowling Alleys are given on
the blue print bound in opposite this page. The required space should
be absolutely free from columns, piers, pipes, etc. Any such projection
will prevent the alleys from being full “Regulation” size as required
in match games. More space at the end of the “Run” for spectators is
desirable, but not necessary. A space 5 ft. wide and 6 in. deep for the
pit should be provided; the rest of the floor or ground should be level
as shown in section on the blue print.



[Illustration: _PLAN AND SECTION OF THE STANDARD REISKEY & WOLF BOWLING
ALLEYS._

_MADE ONLY BY THE NARRAGANSETT MACHINE CO., PROVIDENCE, R. I._]


[Illustration: STANDARD GYMNASTIC APPARATUS

THE LARGEST LINE ON EARTH.

LOCKERS _AND_ BOWLING ALLEYS.

Narragansett Machine Co.

GYMNASIUM OUTFITTERS.

Providence, R.I.

Send for Catalogue.]


[Illustration: LOCKERS.

NEW STYLES. FOR ALL PURPOSES.

SEND FOR CIRCULAR.

NARRAGANSETT MACHINE COMPANY,

PROVIDENCE, R. I.]


[Illustration: SHUFFLE BOARDS.

Regulation Size. Oak with maple beds built like an alley.

PRICE $60.00.]



TRANSCRIBER’S NOTE:

Original spelling and grammar have been generally retained, with some
exceptions noted below. Original small caps are now uppercase. Italics
look _like this_. The transcriber produced the cover image and hereby
assigns it to the public domain. Original page images are available
from archive.org—search for “bowlingcataloge00narr”.

Page 3. “Reiskey” is spelled “Reisky” on pages 18 and 20, both names
are retained.

Pages 12, 13. The illustration extended over two pages, and the caption
was divided between the two. These illustrations have been combined
into one image (Longitudinal Section of a Standard Bowling Alley) for
these ebook editions.

Page 23. The tables were edited, and the first table was restructured,
to remove ditto marks, which do not work well in ebooks. The first
column, last row entry of the first table was changed from “Regulation,
27 in. cir.” to “8.59”—i.e., to the calculated diameter instead of the
stated regulation circumference, to match the other entries in the
column, and a new footnote to the table was added to clarify.





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