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Title: My Crochet Sampler
Author: Lambert, Miss (F.)
Language: English
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Internet Archive/American Libraries.)



MY CROCHET SAMPLER.



                                   MY
                            CROCHET SAMPLER.

                                   BY
                              MISS LAMBERT,
                AUTHORESS OF THE HAND-BOOK OF NEEDLEWORK,
                     CHURCH NEEDLEWORK, MY KNITTING
                             BOOK, ETC. ETC.

                                  WITH
                         Numerous Illustrations.

                                NEW-YORK:
                       D. M. PEYSER, 58 JOHN-ST.,
                            AND 363 BROADWAY.
                                  1847.

                     LEAVITT, TROW & CO., Printers,
                             33 Ann-street.



PREFACE.


The following pages contain a selection of patterns adapted to almost
every purpose to which the art of Crochet is applicable,—whether as an
useful or a decorative species of work. Many of the designs have been
expressly composed for this little treatise; others have been selected,
as being very effective, from the chapter on Crochet in “THE HAND-BOOK OF
NEEDLEWORK;” but the designs that have been taken from the latter have
been re-engraved.

In the directions for working the several designs, the plan pursued by
the writer (and apparently with success) in her books on Knitting, has
been adopted. She has aimed at simplicity, and the use of as few words as
possible, consistent with a clear explanation of the subject.

The reception given to “MY KNITTING BOOK,” as a treatise, separate from
other descriptions of Decorative Needlework, led her to suppose that a
distinct work on the sister art of Crochet might be equally acceptable;
and the publication of “DAS NEUE HAKELBUCH VON MISS LAMBERT,”—a literal
translation of the present volume, with its engravings, proves that it
has excited some attention, even in Germany, a country which has laid
claim to the invention of the art.

3, NEW BURLINGTON STREET, REGENT STREET.



CONTENTS.


                                                                  PAGE

    Introduction                                                     9

    Explanation of the Terms used in Crochet                        15

    Plain Stitch Open Crochet                                       16

    Open Crochet                                                    17

    Double Open Crochet                                             18

    Treble Open Crochet                                             19

    Hints on Crochet                                                22

    A Sofa Pillow, or Table Cover                                   24

    Another very Easy Pattern                                       26

    A Sofa Pillow in Stripes                                        27

    A very Handsome and Easy Pattern                                29

    Another Sofa Pillow                                             33

    Scroll Border for a Table Cover, etc.                           34

    A Persian Pattern Border                                        39

    A Sofa Pillow in Plain and Treble Open Crochet                  44

    A very Rich Crochet Pattern                                     45

    Turkish Pattern for a Table Cover, etc.                         52

    A Table Cover, or Pillow                                        53

    A Couvre-Pied, or Cradle Quilt                                  55

    Raised Crochet                                                  57

    A Sofa Pillow, Table Cover, etc.                                58

    Border Pattern for a Square                                     60

    A Diagonal-striped Bag, with Star-shaped Bottom                 63

    A Star Bottom for a Bag with Beads                              65

    A Round Bag with Star Bottom, and Sprigs in Silk and Gold       66

    A Bag in Silk and Gold                                          70

    A very Pretty Bag in Shades of Silk with Gold                   73

    A Chenille Bag                                                  75

    An Open Crochet Bag in Chenille                                 78

    A Greek Cap in Crochet Silk                                     80

    A Greek Cap in Coarse Chenille                                  80

    An Essuie-Plume                                                 81

    A Neck Chain                                                    82

    A Crochet Slipper                                               83

    Another Crochet Slipper                                         85

    A Purse                                                         88

    A Plain Purse with one Square and one Round End                 88

    A Plain-stitch Open Crochet Purse                               89

    An elegant Purse in Silk and Gold                               91

    A Short Purse                                                   92

    A Sprigged Purse in Open and Plain Crochet                      93

    An elegant Purse with Gold                                      94

    A Short Purse with Beads                                        95

    A Purse with Beads in Plain and Open Crochet                    97

    Spiral Crochet Purse                                            98

    A Plain and Open Crochet Purse                                  99

    Another Purse                                                  100

    A Round D’Oyley or Mat                                         101

    A Chancelière                                                  103

    A Square Border Pattern                                        106

    A Table Cover, Pillow, or Mat                                  109

    Small Pine-Pattern Table Cover                                 111

    Scroll-Pattern Stripe for a Bag                                113

    An useful Sprig Pattern                                        114

    A Carriage Bag                                                 116

    Another Table Cover                                            118

    A Brioche                                                      120

    Another Bag in Stripes                                         123

    A Similar Bag                                                  126

    A Bag with Five Points                                         126

    A Bag in Treble Open Crochet                                   129

    Patterns in Open Crochet                                       130

    A Travelling Bolster                                           131

    A Slipper in Raised Crochet                                    134

    A Half Square Shawl                                            135

    A Light Shawl                                                  137

    Border for a Shawl                                             138

[Illustration]



MY CROCHET SAMPLER.


Introduction.

Crochet,—a species of knitting originally practised by the peasants in
Scotland, with a small hooked needle called a shepherd’s hook,—aided
by taste and fashion, has, within the last seven years, obtained the
preference over all other ornamental works of a similar nature. It
derives its present name from the French; the instrument with which it
is worked being by them, from its crooked shape, termed “crochet.” This
art has attained its highest degree of perfection in England, whence it
has been transplanted to France and Germany, and both these countries,
although unjustifiably, have claimed the invention. Crochet has been
applied, with considerable success, to the production of numerous useful
and decorative articles, such as shawls, table-covers, couvre-pieds,
pillows, ottomans, chairs, rugs, slippers, bags, cabats, purses, caps,
waistcoats, and the like. Silk, wool, cotton, chenille, and gold, are
all suitable materials for this description of work, but the purpose for
which it is intended must necessarily determine their choice.

Crochet has the recommendation of being a less intricate method of
working than knitting, and therefore claims a more extensive cultivation
than perhaps it has hitherto met with. It is particularly adapted for
making articles for charitable purposes; hence, the instruction of
children in _blind_ schools, in this easy and useful art, is well worthy
the attention of philanthropists. Waistcoats, shawls, knee-caps, sleeves,
comforters, mittens, gloves, etc., may be made, without difficulty, in
crochet. It has not, however, been deemed necessary in the following
pages to give directions for any of these simple articles, as, when the
crochet stitch is acquired, the modes of working such, and a variety of
others, in daily use, will readily present themselves. As an example of
the double appropriation, which almost all the following directions admit
of, we may instance the bottom of a bag;—this, if commenced with a chain
of about fifty stitches (not joining the ends), and worked in coarse
wool, with a large needle, in rows backwards and forwards, gradually
increasing with a seam stitch, will form a warm and comfortable round
cape. A paper pattern, the size of any desired object, can easily be
cut,—and the making a stitch at the commencement, or the decreasing in
the middle, or the end of a row, and _vice versâ_, render this work
subservient to almost any form.

For large pieces of work, when wool is employed, that kind denominated
fleecy, either English or German, is generally to be preferred. This
material, of a six-thread size, with an ivory needle, offers the easiest
kind of work with which we are acquainted. It may be readily learned, and
has, therefore, been much practised, both by invalids, and by persons
whose sight either needs relief, or has become impaired. All striped
patterns, if desired, may be worked in narrow breadths, and joined in the
dividing lines; so that a table cover may be made in four or six lengths,
and afterwards sewn together with wool, without the least detriment to
its appearance. Crochet may be executed with coarse and fine chenille,
for pillows, bags, caps, and waistcoats; with crochet silk, for caps,
slippers, and bags; with coarse netting silk, it forms strong purses,
bags, and slippers; and the most delicate work may be done with the finer
silks. Gold and silver cord, and passing, may be intermixed with the
chenilles and silks, or employed separately; and gold and steel beads,
first strung on the silk, may be worked in various patterns, so as to
produce the most rich and beautiful effect.

Crochet may be divided into plain single crochet, plain double crochet,
plain stitch open crochet, and open crochet with one, two, three, or
more stitches. These varieties will be described, as they occur, in the
following directions for working.

The mode of working the crochet stitch, although in itself most simple,
is difficult to describe in writing; but, with the aid of the annexed
engraving, which shows the position of the hands, and the manner in which
the needle and the work should be held, we will endeavour to explain the
elementary process.

[Illustration]

Having wound a skein of wool, make a loop at one end; through this
loop draw another loop, through this second loop another, and so on,
moderately tightening each, as it is drawn through, until a _chain_ of
sufficient length be made to serve as the _foundation_ for the article
intended to be worked. Pass the needle through the last loop of this
foundation, and catching the wool, draw it through, repeating the
same at every successive loop; then, return along this row, and, in a
similar manner, form a second. A repetition of this process, alternately
backwards and forwards, from right to left, and from left to right, will
give the first and easiest lesson. The work will be the same on both
sides, producing, by turns, one raised and one sunken row.

Before proceeding further, however, it will, be necessary, for the better
understanding of the directions hereafter offered, to give an


Explanation of the Terms used in Crochet.

[Illustration: THE CROCHET NEEDLE.]

_A chain_,—the foundation, formed by a succession of loops drawn one
through the other.

_Plain single crochet_,—where one loop only is made on the needle, and
drawn through each stitch. It is lighter and thinner than double crochet.

_Plain double crochet_,—where two loops are kept on the needle, and
the wool drawn through both before the stitch is finished. This is
the crochet stitch generally practised, and that used for working
table-covers, etc.

_Double stitch crochet_,—in this, both meshes of the chain are taken. It
is principally employed for the soles of shoes, and where extra thickness
is required, but it is not suitable for working patterns.

_Plain stitch elastic crochet_,—is worked alternately in rows backwards
and forwards, from right to left and from left to right, always taking
the under mesh of the chain.


PLAIN STITCH OPEN CROCHET.

[Illustration: No. 1.]

_Plain stitch open crochet_,—is composed of chains, of five stitches
each in length, forming loops, each fifth stitch being crocheted to the
centre stitch of the corresponding loop in the preceding row, as shown in
the engraving. It is mostly used for purses.


OPEN CROCHET.

[Illustration: No. 2.]

_Open crochet_—is worked (as nearly as can be described) as follows:—make
a chain of the length required; work one plain stitch at the beginning.
Bring the silk round the needle, and pass the needle through the first
loop of the chain; through this bring the silk, which makes three
stitches on the needle; draw the silk through the first two stitches,
which leaves two on the needle; then draw the silk through these two,
which leaves one on the needle; through this one, make one plain stitch.
Put the silk over the needle, and bring it through the third loop of the
chain; the three stitches, as before, will now be found on the needle;
draw the silk through the first two, which leaves two on the needle; draw
the silk through these two, which finishes the stitch, and leaves one
upon the needle as before. The plain stitch that is then made between the
two double stitches, allows for the stitch which was passed in the chain,
and leaves an open space. It is suitable for purses, bags, etc.


DOUBLE OPEN CROCHET.

[Illustration: No. 3.]

_Double open crochet_,—similar to the open crochet stitch, but varied
by making the two long stitches together; this is done by omitting the
single stitch, and passing the needle through the next loop of the chain,
instead of missing one stitch; thus producing two stitches together, and
then an open space. It is suitable for bags, purses, &c.


TREBLE OPEN CROCHET.

[Illustration: No. 4.]

_Treble open crochet_,—also similar to the preceding, but varied by
making three stitches successively, without making any plain stitch,
which produces alternate squares of open space and stitches. _Beads_ may
be introduced on it with very good effect in the following manner:—let
the beads be threaded on the silk, and pass one on the middle stitch of
the three double stitches, giving a bead in the centre of each square.
This stitch makes a very pretty purse.

_To make a stitch_,—at the commencement and end of a row, is to make one
stitch of a chain before the first stitch, and after the last, which in
the next row are to be crocheted.

_A dividing, or seam stitch_,—called also a _raised_ stitch, is made by
putting the needle through both meshes of the chain, and working two
stitches in the same hole. These stitches must always be made exactly
over each other. In crocheting circles they form a kind of star pattern,
and serve the purpose of increasing stitches. They should not be employed
when working with _chenille_.

_To increase a stitch_,—to make two stitches in the same loop.

_To decrease_,—to take two stitches together, or to miss one stitch.
Decreasing is always done in the same ratio as increasing.

_True or perfect stitch_,—when working in different colours, the keeping
the stitches directly over each other, without any appearance of the
half-stitch. This requires care, but it greatly adds to the beauty of the
work, and makes the pattern more distinct.

_To fasten off_,—to draw the wool through the last stitch.

_To fasten on_,—lay the ends of the wool contrariwise, and crochet a few
stitches with both, or work in the second wool, and run the end in with a
needle at the back of the work.

_To run the ends_,—to pass them down a few stitches with a needle. This
is the neatest and strongest plan; but they may be tied and cut off.

_A dividing line_,—generally formed of two stitches alternately up and
down, into the ground of the stripes on either side.

_N. B. The engravings of the patterns are placed in the book as they are
intended to be worked; that is, by commencing at the lower part, on the
right hand side._


Hints on Crochet.

A steel crochet needle is generally advisable;—with expert workers, it
makes the most even stitches, but it is easier to work with an ivory
needle.

The second-sized netting silk is prettiest for purses.

The coarsest, or crochet silk, is best adapted for bags, with steel or
gold beads.

Where many colours are required in a pattern, and the same do not very
frequently occur, it is advisable to introduce them in short lengths,
instead of carrying on each thread. This should always be attended to
when working with chenille.

When beads are used, they should be strung on the silk with a needle.

When beads are introduced, the wrong side of the work becomes the right.
It is possible to crochet with the beads on the right side, but they
never lay so firmly, nor indeed is it the proper way of using them.

The average number of stitches for the length of a purse, in fine silk,
is one hundred and sixty. In coarse silk,—one hundred and ten.

From ninety to one hundred stitches form the circle of a purse in fine
silk.

One hundred and thirty stitches may be taken for the round of a bag, in
crochet silk.

A table-cover, in six-thread fleecy, is generally computed at about four
hundred stitches in length.

Borders of flowers, and very intricate patterns, may be worked in
crochet, but it would be impossible to convey a complete idea of these
even to the most experienced worker, without greatly exceeding the limits
of the present work. The expert needle-woman will soon perceive the best
method of copying any pattern of this description she may desire.

The terms _chiné_ and _ombré_, are frequently applied to the materials
employed in crochet and knitting. Wool and silk are _chiné_, when two,
three, or more _different_ colours are introduced, at intervals, on one
thread, in the process of dying;—they are _ombré_, when _one_ colour only
is similarly employed, but which gradually runs from the lightest to the
darkest shade.

N. B. In the directions for working the different patterns in crochet,
it must be borne in mind, that unless any other stitch be mentioned, the
plain, or _double crochet stitch_, is always to be employed.


A Sofa Pillow, or Table Cover.

This is merely given as the first and _easiest_ pattern in crochet, for
the purpose of teaching the stitch.

A good-sized ivory or steel crochet needle, with six-thread fleecy, will
be required. Instead of working the rows backwards and forwards, as
before described, begin each row separately at the same end. When the
last stitch of each row is finished, draw the wool through, and cut it
off, leaving an end of two or three inches. It is impossible to determine
the exact number of stitches,—that must depend on the article, and its
required size; but with this description of wool, half a yard in length
will generally be found to number about sixty-five stitches, and a
calculation may accordingly be made.

_First stripe_—one row black; one row white; one row black.

_Second stripe_—one row dark scarlet; one bright scarlet; one light
scarlet;—reverse the same, to form a shaded stripe.

_Third stripe_—the same as the first.

_Fourth stripe_—the same as the second, but in shades of blue.

These stripes are to be repeated alternately.


Another very easy Pattern.

[Illustration: No. 5.]

The ground of this pattern is plain. The cheques are composed of _chiné_
wool, the first row differing in colour from that of the second. The
dividing line is in plain colours.

This pattern may be worked in stripes of different colours, varying the
colour of the cheques agreeably to that of the ground. It is adapted
for a pillow, or a variety of other articles, according to the material
employed.


A Sofa Pillow in Stripes.

[Illustration: No. 6.]

Zephyr, or double German wool.

This pattern may be worked according to the two following methods. The
first is the easiest, as one thread of wool only is required to be
carried on to form the pattern.

Commence with a chain and one row of black. _Second row_—scarlet. _Third
row_—straw colour.

Crochet a stripe, consisting of seven rows of imperial blue, with the
pattern in _chiné_ wool—black, white, and scarlet.

Repeat the three plain rows, as before, reversed,—straw colour, scarlet,
and black.

Crochet another stripe with drab, with the pattern in _chiné_ wool—blue,
black, and white.

Commence again as at first.

The second method of working this pattern is as follows,—having the plain
rows, and the ground of the two stripes as before. Crochet the figure of
the blue stripe,—

_First row_—three stitches black.

_Second row_—three stitches claret; two black.

_Third row_—one stitch dark claret; one gold colour; two dark scarlet;
one black.

_Fourth row_—one stitch scarlet; two gold colour; two scarlet.

_Fifth row_—three stitches scarlet.

Crochet the figure on the drab stripe,—

_First row_—three stitches claret.

_Second row_—three stitches dark green; two claret.

_Third row_—one stitch middle green; one white; two middle green; one
claret.

_Fourth row_—one stitch light green; two white; two light green.

_Fifth row_—three stitches light green.

The above pattern may be worked for a bag, with the same colours, using
silk instead of wool, and commencing with a chain of about one hundred
and thirty stitches, with No. 2 Crochet Silk. It is a very easy bag to
work, and, if wished to be more elegant, gold may be introduced. This
pattern, also, with the same sized silk, will make a very pretty crochet
slipper.


A very Handsome and Easy Pattern.

Commence with a chain and one row of amber.

_Second row_—two stitches of amber, and two of black,—alternately.

[Illustration: No. 7.]

Then crochet one plain row of black, which forms the ground of the first
stripe. The pine pattern on this stripe occupies five rows in height;
the _first row_—blue; the _second_—scarlet; the _third_—green; the
_fourth_—yellow; the _fifth_—white. One plain row of black; and one
row—two stitches of black, and two of amber,—alternately;—followed by one
plain row of amber, complete the first stripe.

The ground of the second stripe is scarlet; the dividing lines,—both
at top and bottom,—imperial blue, the inner row of each being composed
of two stitches, alternately blue and scarlet. The pattern occupies
seven rows in height; the _first row_—green; the _second_—black; the
_third_—blue; the _fourth_—amber; the _fifth_—green; the _sixth_—stone
colour; the _seventh_—white.

The third stripe is imperial blue; the dividing lines—amber; the
pattern,—_first row_—black; _second_—scarlet; _third_—white;
_fourth_—green; _fifth_—drab.

The fourth stripe is white; the dividing lines—scarlet; the
pattern,—_first row_—green; _second_—black; _third_—blue;
_fourth_—scarlet; _fifth_—green: _sixth_—lilac; _seventh_—light green.

Repeat from the first stripe.

This pattern, worked with six-thread fleecy, will be found very easy
and effective for a table cover; using a steel or ivory crochet needle,
according to the fancy of the worker.

The same pattern, with the colours as above described for the first and
second stripes, with No. 1 Crochet Silk, will make an extremely elegant
bag. This should be commenced with a chain of about two hundred and
sixteen stitches, united at the two ends, whether for a round, or square
bag. Gold thread may be substituted in the dividing lines, working only
one plain row, instead of two, as in the engraving. Five of the narrow,
and four of the wide stripes, will form a bag of an ordinary size.

This pattern may be worked beautifully with chenille, or with chenille
and gold, for a variety of purposes.


Another Sofa Pillow.

[Illustration: No. 8.]

This pattern is recommended as being exceedingly easy; and, at the same
time very pretty. Six-thread fleecy, with an ivory needle.

_First stripe._

    Chain and _first row_—drab.
    _Second row_—dark crimson.
    _Third row_—one stitch rose colour; one drab;—alternately.
    _Fourth row_—bright pink.
    _Fifth row_—drab.

_Second stripe._

    _First row_—two stitches white;—two black—alternately.
    _Second row_—two stitches white; two black;—alternately;—commencing
       with one stitch only of white.

_Third stripe._

    _First row_—bright blue.
    _Second row_—dark olive drab.
    _Third row_—one stitch light olive drab; one bright blue;—alternately.
    _Fourth row_—yellow.
    _Fifth row_—blue.

Repeat the second stripe, and commence again from the first.

This pattern may be varied, by working the first and third stripes as
above directed, with the black and white stripes in double open crochet.
It may also be done in either manner with coarse chenille.


Scroll Border for a Table Cover, etc., with Persian Pattern Stripe.

The scroll pattern of the border of this design is on a black ground.
The ground of each stripe of the Persian pattern for the centre may
be varied. Six, or eight thread fleecy, with a steel or ivory needle.
Commence with:—

[Illustration: No. 9.]

Chain and _first row_—dark red brown.

_Second row_—scarlet.

_Third row_—black.

_Fourth row_—one stitch light green; one black; five red brown; five
black; three brown; two black; two green; two black; three brown; five
black; five brown; one black; two green.—Repeat to the end of the row.

_Fifth row_—one stitch middle green; one orange; four black; two orange;
three black; one orange; three black; one orange; four green; one orange;
three black; one orange; three black; two orange; four black; one orange;
two green.—Repeat.

_Sixth row_—one stitch orange; two black; two orange; two black; two
orange; two black; one orange; one scarlet; two orange; one black; one
orange; two dark green; one orange; one black; two scarlet; one black;
one orange; two black; two orange; two black; two orange; two black; one
orange; one green.—Repeat.

_Seventh row_—one stitch gold colour; one black; two scarlet; one black;
one gold colour; one black; three gold colour; one black; one gold
colour; one black; two scarlet; one black; one gold colour; two black;
one gold colour; one black; two scarlet; one black; one gold colour; one
black; three gold colour; one black; one gold colour; one black; two
scarlet; one black; one gold colour; one black.—Repeat.

_Eighth row_—one stitch gold colour; one black; two scarlet; one black;
one gold colour; two black; two gold colour; one black; one gold colour;
two black; one gold colour; one black; one gold colour; two black; one
gold colour; one black; one gold colour; two black; one gold colour;
one black; two gold colour; two black; one gold colour; one black; two
scarlet; one black; one gold colour; one black.—Repeat.

_Ninth row_—one stitch dark blue; one yellow; three black; one yellow;
two black; two yellow; two black; two yellow; two black; one yellow; two
blue; one yellow; two black; two blue; two black; two yellow; two black;
one yellow; three black; one yellow; two blue.—Repeat.

_Tenth row_—one stitch middle blue; one black; three yellow; four black;
two yellow; four black; one yellow; four blue; one yellow; four black;
two yellow; four black; three yellow; one black; two blue.—Repeat.

_Eleventh row_—ten stitches black; five white; two black; two light blue;
two black; five white; ten black; one blue.—Repeat.

_Twelfth row_—black.

_Thirteenth row_—red brown.

_Fourteenth row_—scarlet. This finishes the border.

Commence the ground of the centre, or second stripe, with one plain row
of white; the colours of the Persian pine pattern on which are as follow:—

_First row_—three stitches dark green; two white; two green.

_Second row_—two stitches light scarlet; one white; two scarlet.

_Third row_—two stitches middle green; three dark scarlet; one white;
three scarlet; two green.

_Fourth row_—four stitches light green; two white; one black; two white;
four green.

_Fifth row_—two stitches light green; three dark blue; one white; three
blue; two green.

_Sixth row_—two stitches light blue; one white; two blue.

_Seventh row_—two stitches light green; two white; three green.

One plain row of white finishes the stripe. The brown and scarlet rows
are again to be worked, when the border may be repeated, alternately with
the stripes of the Persian pattern; or, the latter alone may be repeated,
with the colour of the ground varied,—the colours of the pattern being
also changed, to harmonize with it.—The colours, as above given, are for
a white ground.


A Persian Pattern Border.

This pattern is adapted for the border of a table-cover, hearth-rug or
stair-carpet. It may be worked in four, six, or eight-thread fleecy,
with a steel or ivory needle, according to its appropriation. The colours
required are three distinct shades of green, two of scarlet, two of blue,
two of gold colour, two of lilac, black, white, and geranium: the proper
selection of these constitutes much of the beauty of the pattern:—the
geranium colours should be very bright. Commence with:—

[Illustration: No. 10.]

Chain and _first row_—black.

_Second row_—gold colour.

_Third row_—black.

_Fourth row_—two stitches black; one light green; one black; one green;
two black; three geranium.—Repeat to the end of the row.

_Fifth row_—two stitches geranium; one white; one dark green; one white;
two geranium; three gold colour.—Repeat.

_Sixth row_—the same as the fourth.

_Seventh row_—black.

_Eighth row_—blue.

The above finishes the narrow border. The ground of the centre border is
white; having worked two rows of which, commence the pattern with,—

_First row_—two stitches white; six dark scarlet; two white; three light
green; two white; three green; three white; one scarlet; two white; two
scarlet; two white; three green; two white; three green; three white;
one scarlet; two white; two scarlet; two white; three green; two white;
three green.—Repeat to the end of the row.

_Second row_—one stitch white; two light scarlet; one white; one middle
green; four scarlet; two white; three green; one white; two green; two
white; four scarlet; one white; three scarlet; two white; three green;
one white; two green; two white; four scarlet; one white; three scarlet;
two white; three green; one white; two green; one white.—Repeat.

_Third row_—one stitch white; two dark blue; one white; one dark green;
four blue; three white; five green; four white; two blue; one white;
three blue; three white; five green; four white; two blue; one white;
three blue; three white; five green; one white.—Repeat.

_Fourth row_—one stitch black; two white; six light blue; ten black;
three white; five blue; ten black; three white; five blue; nine
black.—Repeat.

_Fifth row_—one stitch black; eight white.—Repeat.

_Sixth row_—ten stitches black; three white; five light gold colour; ten
black; two white; six gold colour; ten black; three white; five gold
colour.—Repeat.

_Seventh row_—Four stitches white; three dark green; five white; two dark
gold colour; one white; three gold colour; four white; three green; three
white; two gold colour; one white; one green; four gold colour; four
white; three green; five white; two gold colour; one white; three gold
colour.—Repeat.

_Eighth row_—two stitches white; six middle green; two white; four light
lilac; one white; three lilac; two white; six green; two white; two
lilac; one white; one green; four lilac; two white; six green; two white;
four lilac; one white; three lilac.—Repeat.

_Ninth row_—one stitch white; three light green; three white; two green;
three white; one dark lilac; two white; two lilac; two white; three
green; three white; two green; two white; six lilac; two white; three
green; three white; two green; three white; one lilac; two white; two
lilac; one white.—Repeat.

Two rows of white complete the centre border.

Repeat the small border, beginning with the row of blue.


A Sofa Pillow in Plain and Treble Open Crochet.

This pattern may be worked with double German wool.

Commence with a chain of about one hundred and ninety stitches in black.
Then,—

With three distinct shades of scarlet, crochet a shaded stripe,
consisting of five rows,—beginning with the darkest colour,—the lightest
forming the centre.—Repeat the black row.

Work a stripe of treble open crochet, consisting of one row of each of
the following colours: namely,—chrysophas green, scarlet, white, gold
colour, lilac, and chrysophas green.

Repeat the black row.—Form a stripe similar to the first, with shades of
white.—Repeat the black row.

Repeat the stripe of treble open crochet.—Repeat the black row.—Crochet
another shaded stripe with lilac.—Repeat the black row.—Repeat the stripe
of treble open crochet.—Repeat the black row.—Work another shaded stripe
with gold colours.—Repeat the black row.—Repeat the stripe of treble open
crochet.—Repeat the black row, and the first shaded stripe with scarlet.
This forms the centre stripe. Reverse the order of the coloured stripes
to complete the pillow.


A Very Rich Crochet Pattern.

Commence with two plain rows, the first—gold colour; the second—black.
The black forms the ground of the first half stripe.

[Illustration: No. 11.]

N. B. The zigzag edges of the riband stripe are every where worked with
white.

_Third row_—twelve stitches of black, one of white,—alternately.

_Fourth row_—one stitch white; three black; three red brown; two black;
two middle green; one black; one white.—Repeat.

_Fifth row_—three stitches white; one black; three orange; two light
green; three black; one white.—Repeat.

_Sixth row_—three stitches scarlet; two white; three black; three gold
colour; one black; one white.—Repeat.

_Seventh row_—five stitches scarlet; two white; one black; three yellow;
one black; one white.—Repeat.

_Eighth row_—one stitch scarlet; four dark stone colour; two scarlet; two
white; three black; one white.—Repeat.

_Ninth row_—two stitches scarlet; four middle stone colour; three
scarlet; four white.—Repeat.

_Tenth row_—two stitches dark green; three light stone colour; seven
scarlet; one black.—Repeat.

_Eleventh row_—three stitches middle green; ten scarlet.—Repeat.

_Twelfth row_—five stitches light green; five scarlet; one dark stone
colour; one scarlet; one light green.—Repeat.

_Thirteenth row_—one stitch dark stone colour; one scarlet; four dark
green; four scarlet; three dark stone colour.—Repeat.

_Fourteenth row_—one stitch middle stone colour; two scarlet; three
middle green; four scarlet; three middle stone colour.—Repeat.

_Fifteenth row_—one stitch light stone colour; three scarlet; two light
green; five scarlet; two light stone colour.—Repeat.

_Sixteenth row_—six stitches scarlet; four white; three scarlet.—Repeat.

_Seventeenth row_—six stitches scarlet; one white; three drab; three
white.—Repeat.

_Eighteenth row_—three stitches white; three scarlet; one white; one
drab; four dark lilac; one drab.—Repeat.

_Nineteenth row_—three stitches drab; four white; two drab; four middle
lilac.—Repeat.

_Twentieth row_—six stitches drab; three dark green; three light lilac;
one drab.—Repeat.

_Twenty-first row_—seven stitches drab; three middle green; three
drab.—Repeat.

_Twenty-second row_—four stitches drab; one dark lilac; one drab; six
light green; one drab.—Repeat.

_Twenty-third row_—Four stitches drab; four dark lilac; one drab; four
dark green.—Repeat.

_Twenty-fourth row_—four stitches drab; four middle lilac; two drab;
three middle green.—Repeat.

_Twenty-fifth row_—five stitches drab; three light lilac; three drab; two
light green.—Repeat.

_Twenty-sixth row_—four stitches white; nine drab.—Repeat.

_Twenty-seventh row_—one stitch white; three blue; three white; six
drab.—Repeat.

_Twenty-eighth row_—one stitch white; one blue; four claret; one blue;
three white; three drab.—Repeat.

_Twenty-ninth row_—one stitch white; two blue; four dark scarlet; three
blue; three white.—Repeat.

_Thirtieth row_—three stitches dark olive; three scarlet; seven
blue.—Repeat.

_Thirty-first row_—one stitch blue; three middle olive; nine blue.—Repeat.

_Thirty-second row_—six stitches light olive; five blue; one claret; one
blue.—Repeat.

_Thirty-third row_—two stitches claret; one blue; four dark olive; four
blue; two claret.—Repeat.

_Thirty-fourth row_—two stitches dark scarlet; two blue; three middle
olive; four blue; two dark scarlet.—Repeat.

_Thirty-fifth row_—two stitches scarlet; three blue; two light olive;
five blue; one scarlet.—Repeat.

_Thirty-sixth row_—seven stitches blue; four white; two blue.—Repeat.

_Thirty-seventh row_—one stitch white; six blue; one white; three scarlet
(the ground of the next stripe); two white.—Repeat.

This completes the pattern, which consists of the same sprig repeated
in different colours, on three different coloured grounds. It will
be perceived that the sprigs run in a diagonal direction; and the
commencement of the first two rows of the fourth stripe, on referring to
the corresponding part of the previous stripe, will show where the next
sprig is to be begun.

If worked for a bag, or sac de voyage, the pattern should be commenced
from the bottom, thus forming a border at the lower part; but if a
pillow, table cover, or couvre-pied, is intended to be made,—first
crochet two plain rows, and then commence the pattern as at the
_sixteenth row_.

For working the larger articles in the above pattern, fleecy may be
employed; for the smaller—German wool; and for the more elegant—chenille
and gold, or silk and gold.


Turkish Pattern for a Table Cover, etc.

[Illustration: No. 12.]

This is suitable either for a table cover, counterpane, pillow, the tops
of large ottomans, the cover for a chair, a rug, or a bedside carpet.
Six-thread fleecy and a steel needle will be required. The dividing line
is formed of two clarets. The stripes are scarlet, blue, gold colour,
and white.

The pattern on the scarlet stripe—two shades of green, lilac, white,
brown, and bright yellow.

On the blue stripe—two scarlets, two whites, two gold colours, two dark
scarlets.

On the gold coloured stripe—two blues, claret, white, lilac, and green.

On the white stripe—two greens, two scarlets, two blues, brown, and
yellow.


A Table Cover, or Pillow.

Six-thread fleecy with a steel needle.

The pattern of the _border_ is in black,—the ground in shades of gold
colour. Commence with a chain of black, and one plain row of the same;
then, two plain rows of red brown. In the next row begin the pattern as
follows:—

_First row_—black, with the single stitches of the ground in red brown.

_Second and third rows_—black and orange.

_Fourth, fifth, and sixth rows_—black, and gold colour.

[Illustration: No. 13.]

_Seventh, eighth, and ninth rows_—black and yellow. One plain row of
straw colour, followed by one plain row of white, complete the border.

Commence the ground of the centre, with one plain row of middle blue. On
this blue ground, work the pattern in the following colours:—

_First row_—dark claret.

_Second row_—claret.

_Third row_—claret, with the three centre stitches in white.

_Fourth row_—middle scarlet.

_Fifth row_—light scarlet.

_Sixth and seventh rows_—(forming the second pattern of the centre)—the
gold colour and yellow that were used in the ground of the border.

Commence again with the claret, as in the first row of the pattern.

When the square is completed, neatly run in the wools with a rug needle,
or tie them close to the work; this will produce a firm edge, on which a
fringe may be sewn.


A Couvre-Pied, or Cradle Quilt.

This pattern is very easy, and the effect exceedingly good. It is well
adapted for working with _chiné_ wool.

[Illustration: No. 14.]

The chain and first row black. The next row alternate stitches of black
and chiné wool (say blue). The ground of the first stripe is in blue
chiné wool, with the pattern in white. The dividing line black. The
ground of the next stripe is worked in scarlet chiné wool, with the
pattern in white, except the centre line or wave, which should be black.


Raised Crochet.

Raised, or ribbed crochet is worked in rows from right to left, according
to the ordinary method; but the side of the work is reversed at every
alternate row, as in plain crochet (see page 14), hence it becomes the
same as that description of work, with this exception, that the back, or
under stitch, is always to be taken; it has therefore a ribbed or raised
appearance, and is rendered thicker and closer, and of a more elastic
texture.

[Illustration: No. 15.]

The annexed design is well adapted for working in raised crochet. The
colour, forming the pattern, should only be introduced when necessary,
and should not be carried on through the ground, as in plain double
crochet; therefore, the same thread must be taken up and dropt, as the
form of the pattern may require—a process by no means difficult. When
necessary, however, the idle wool should be carried through the stitches
of that in use, and not left loose at the back.

The pattern here given is intended to be worked in stripes; these
are afterwards to be sewn together. It is very handsome for quilts,
couvre-pieds, &c. The colours may be varied, thus—first stripe, white,
with the pattern in scarlet; the second, scarlet, with the pattern in
white. Shaded wools may be used for the pattern on a plain ground.


A Sofa Pillow, Table Cover, etc.

Commence with a chain of black. Work one row in two stitches of black
and two of scarlet, alternately. Then, one row of scarlet and one row of
black; the latter forms the ground of the border,—the pattern on which
is in four shades of gold colour,—two rows of each, commencing with the
darkest. One plain row of black, and one of scarlet, finish the border.

[Illustration: No. 16.]

Crochet one plain row of white, then one plain row of blue; the latter
forms the ground of the centre. The colours of the pine pattern are as
follows:

_First row_—middle scarlet.

_Second row_—light scarlet.

_Third row_—three stitches drab; two black; three drab.

_Fourth row_—three stitches white; two black; three white.

_Fifth row_—three stitches gold colour; two lilac; three gold colour.

_Sixth row_—three stitches yellow; two lilac; three yellow.

_Seventh row_—three stitches middle scarlet; two black; three middle
scarlet.

_Eighth row_—three stitches light scarlet; two black; three light scarlet.

_Ninth row_—drab.

_Tenth row_—white.


Border Pattern for a Square.

[Illustration: No. 17.]

This pattern may be employed for a tidy, sofa pillow, mat, carpet,
cradle, or bed quilt, carriage wrapper, d’oyley, and a variety of
other purposes, where a border on each side may be required. It may be
worked either in plain double crochet, or in raised crochet. A different
material, together with a different sized needle, are the only requisites
to adapt it to any of the above purposes. Thus,—

For a sofa pillow, eight-thread zephyr fleecy; for a tidy, three-thread
fleecy; for a window mat, eight-thread common fleecy; for a flower mat,
German or English wool; for a cradle quilt, eight-thread zephyr fleecy;
for a bed quilt, six-thread fleecy; for a d’oyley, rather fine knitting
cotton. The size of the article, however, must in the first instance be
determined, and the number of stitches counted, so as to bring in the
pattern as suited to that size. The simplest colouring will be the most
effective,—a plain ground, with the pattern in any bright colour. Designs
of this description, which require calculation and constant counting,
may be adopted as amusing, but not as very easy work.


A Diagonal-Striped Bag, with Star-Shaped Bottom.

Make a chain of fourteen stitches, in claret crochet silk; join both
ends together, and crochet one plain row all round. In the next row
(in order to keep the circle flat), every other stitch is to be made a
seam or dividing stitch, which is done by putting the needle under both
loops instead of one, and making two stitches, in the same place, every
other stitch being a plain stitch. In the next row, work the seam-stitch
in the same place, leaving two plain stitches between each, instead of
one. Repeat this circle sixteen times, always observing to keep the
seam stitch in the same place, the number of plain stitches gradually
increasing, when a flat surface of about four inches in diameter will
be produced, intersected with seven raised stripes. A vandyke border in
claret and green may now be made as follows.

_First row_—five stitches claret; one green.

_Second row_—three stitches claret; three green.

_Third row_—one stitch claret; five green.

_Fourth row_—green.

[Illustration: No. 18.]

The annexed pattern may then be worked in green on the claret ground.

When within five rows of the top of the bag, work one plain row of the
ground, repeat the vandyke, and work two plain rows of the claret ground.

This bag is very pretty and delicate worked in white and gold, and in
blue and gold; it may also be varied in colour as taste may dictate. The
pattern looks extremely well in steel beads.


A Star Bottom for a Bag, with Beads.

Make a chain of fourteen stitches, join both ends together with the
crochet, and crochet one plain row all round. In the next row, every
other stitch is to be made a seam or dividing stitch, which is done by
putting the needle under both loops, instead of under one, and making
two stitches in the same place: every other stitch being a plain stitch,
on which is to be a bead. In the next row, work the seam stitch exactly
over the last, which will leave two plain stitches between, instead
of one; this is to be repeated until eight circles are formed, every
plain stitch having a bead on it. Crochet eight rows more, leaving the
seam-stitch in the same place, but diminish the number of beads, by
leaving out one bead in each division on each successive circle, so that
the last row will have but one bead in each division. Then, crochet four
plain rows, keeping the seam-stitch in the same place as before, then one
plain row all round, without a seam-stitch, which forms the bottom of the
bag.


A Round Bag, with Star Bottom, and Sprigs in Silk and Gold.

This bag is worked in plain stitch double crochet, with crochet silk, and
gold of the same size. A steel needle, with twenty-five yards of gold
cord, and about twelve skeins of silk, will be required. The colours of
the silk are claret, three shades of green, and black.

Commence with a chain of nine stitches, in claret; unite the
ends, and crochet one plain row,—increasing on every stitch.
Join on the black silk, and work one stitch of black, and two of
claret,—alternately,—increasing with the black stitch. There should
now be twenty-seven stitches. Work another row the same, but without
increasing. In the next row, (_the third_, with two colours)—two stitches
black, two claret,—alternately—increasing with the black stitches. The
two stitches of claret are to be repeated over each other (so as to form
a star) in each of the nine following rows.

_Fourth and fifth rows_—claret and black,—increasing one stitch on every
two stitches of the claret.

_Sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth rows_—claret and dark
green,—increasing one stitch, as before.

_Tenth row_—claret, and middle green, increasing one stitch, as before.

_Eleventh row_—one stitch gold; four middle green,—increasing one stitch;
two gold; two green; one gold; two claret.—Repeat.

_Twelfth row_—two stitches gold; two middle green; three gold; two green;
one gold; two claret.—Repeat.

_Thirteenth row_—two stitches gold; three middle green; one gold; three
green; two gold,—increasing on the gold stitches; two claret.—Repeat.

_Fourteenth row_—one stitch claret; two gold; five light green; two gold;
five claret,—increasing on the third stitch.—Repeat from the first two
gold stitches.

_Fifteenth row_—one stitch claret; two gold; three light green; two gold;
eight claret,—increasing on the third stitch.—Repeat from the first two
gold stitches.

_Sixteenth row_—one stitch claret; five gold; five claret,—increasing
on the third stitch; one gold; five claret.—Repeat from the five gold
stitches.

_Seventeenth row_—one stitch claret; three gold; five claret; three gold;
six claret,—increasing on the second stitch.—Repeat from the first three
gold stitches.

_Eighteenth row_—one stitch claret; one gold; three claret,—increasing on
the second stitch; two dark green; two claret; three gold; two claret;
two green; three claret.—Repeat from the first gold stitch.

_Nineteenth row_—four stitches claret; two middle green; two gold; one
claret; one gold; one claret; two gold; two green; seven claret.—Repeat
from the first two green stitches.

_Twentieth row_—one stitch claret; two light green; two claret; one gold;
two claret; two green; nine claret, without increasing.—Repeat from the
first two green stitches.

_Twenty-first row_—two stitches claret; five dark green; fourteen
claret.—Repeat from the five green stitches.

_Twenty-second row_—one stitch claret; three middle green; fifteen
claret.—Repeat from the three green stitches.

The bottom, and the first row of sprigs are now completed,—the bag being
at its full diameter. In the next row the sprigs are to be commenced
again.


A Bag in Silk and Gold.

[Illustration: No. 19.]

The pattern on this bag is in white and gold,—the ground being of a rich
Waterloo blue. It should be worked with middle-sized crochet silk. The
above scroll pattern will be repeated nine times, on a bag of the usual
size. Commence with a chain of one hundred and eighty stitches.

Chain, and _first row_,—Waterloo blue.

_Second row_—white.

_Third row_—Waterloo blue.

_Fourth row_—gold.

_Fifth row_—two stitches gold, two blue,—alternately.

_Sixth row_—one stitch gold, three blue—alternately.

Work one row of blue, and commence the scroll pattern as follows:—

_First row_—two stitches blue; six gold; four blue; three white; five
blue.—Repeat to the end of the row.

_Second row_—one stitch blue; one gold; three blue; two gold; three
white; one blue; two gold; seven blue.—Repeat.

_Third row_—one stitch gold; five blue; three gold; two white; three
blue; three white; three blue.—Repeat.

_Fourth row_—one stitch gold; one blue; three gold; two blue; three gold;
two white; one blue; three gold; four blue.—Repeat.

_Fifth row_—one stitch gold; one blue; one gold; two white; one gold; one
blue; four gold; two white; three blue; three white; one blue.—Repeat.

_Sixth row_—one stitch gold; two blue; three gold; one blue; five gold;
two white; one blue; three gold; two blue.—Repeat.

_Seventh row_—one stitch blue; one gold; three blue; one gold; two blue;
two gold; one blue; two gold; two white; three blue; two white.—Repeat.

_Eighth row_—two stitches blue; four gold; three blue; one gold; one
blue; two gold; one blue; one gold; two white; two gold; one blue.—Repeat.

_Ninth row_—four stitches blue; one gold; seven blue; one gold; one blue;
three gold; one white; two blue.—Repeat.

_Tenth row_—three stitches white; one gold; eleven blue; three gold; two
white.—Repeat.

_Eleventh row_—three stitches gold; fourteen blue; three gold.—Repeat.

[Illustration: No. 20.]

The above cachemir pattern may be taken for the upper part of the
bag,—being worked in white and gold.


A very Pretty Bag in shades of Silk, with Gold.

The most elegant colouring for this bag will be four shades, from black,
of any pretty _écru_; mixed with either blue, violet, scarlet, or green,
in an equal number of shades.

Commence with a chain of two hundred and forty stitches in fine netting
silk;—work two plain rows of open crochet, and join them together at both
their edges: this will form a pretty finish for the bottom of the bag.
Crochet one plain row of black.

[Illustration: No. 21.]

The above pattern is now to be worked.—Commence with the gold, to form a
half row of diamonds, by crocheting one plain row. In the next row,—three
stitches gold, one black,—alternately;—in the next row,—one stitch gold,
three black,—alternately. The next row is black,—forming the centre row,
of the first perfect row of diamonds.

The next row of diamonds,—formed of the darkest shade of écru, is
commenced as the preceding,—one stitch écru; three black; in the next
row,—three stitches écru; one black.

This finishes the first complete row of diamonds in black. The next
row is plain écru,—forming the centre row of the second perfect row of
diamonds. The third row of diamonds is to be a middle shade of écru; the
fourth—the lightest shade of écru.

Repeat one row of diamonds in gold, and commence another stripe of
diamonds with any of the before-mentioned colours, beginning with black;
then the darkest shade; then the middle; and lastly, the lightest.

Repeat the one row of diamonds in gold, and commence again with the
stripe in shades of écru.


A Chenille Bag.

Commence with a chain of four stitches in blue; having united the ends,
crochet three rows,—increasing on every stitch, in the _first and second
rows_; and on every other stitch in the _third row_, which should count
twenty-four stitches.

_Fourth row_—join on the claret; work one stitch claret, one
blue,—alternately.

_Fifth row_—two stitches claret; one blue—alternately,—increasing on the
claret stitches.

_Sixth row_—two stitches claret; two blue,—increasing on the blue
stitches.

_Seventh row_—two stitches claret; three blue,—increasing on the second
stitch of blue.

_Eighth row_—two stitches claret; four blue,—increasing on the second
stitch of blue.

_Ninth row_—two stitches claret; five blue,—increasing on the second
stitch of blue.

_Tenth row_—two stitches claret; six blue,—increasing on the third stitch
of blue.

_Eleventh and twelfth rows_—two stitches claret; six blue,—without
increasing.

_Thirteenth row_—two stitches claret; seven blue,—increasing on the third
stitch of blue.

_Fourteenth row_—one stitch claret; five blue; five claret,—increasing
on the second stitch; five blue; four claret,—without increasing.—Repeat
from the first five stitches of blue.

_Fifteenth row_—one stitch claret; three blue; seven claret; three blue;
seven claret,—increasing on the third stitch.—Repeat from the first three
blue stitches.

_Sixteenth row_—one stitch claret; one blue; ten claret,—increasing on
the fourth stitch.—Repeat from the first blue stitch.

_Seventeenth and eighteenth rows_—claret,—without increasing.

_Nineteenth row_—claret,—increasing one stitch on every thirty-third.
This row should contain one hundred and thirty-six stitches, when the bag
will have acquired its full size, and the increasing be finished.

The next three rows are worked in four stitches of gold, and four of
claret,—alternately. Then, four plain rows, viz.—one of gold; one of
black; one of white; and one of gold;—followed by one row of blue, and
one row of white, in double open crochet; then, one row of gold, one row
of black, and one row of gold, in plain crochet. Repeat the two rows of
double open crochet,—the first in blue, the second in claret;—also the
one row of gold; the one row of black; and the one row of gold. Commence
again with the rows of blue and white, in double open crochet.

There should be four divisions of double open crochet, the bag being
finished with the black and gold stripe.


An open Crochet Bag in Chenille.

Make a chain of six loops, in fine blue chenille, and unite both ends.
Crochet in rows,—to form a round (increasing a sufficient number of
stitches in each row to keep the work flat), until fourteen rows are
finished. This forms the bottom of the bag.

Commence a _vandyke_ pattern, by making one stitch of gold to every fifth
of the coloured ground, in the first row. In the next row three stitches
of gold, and three of the ground; in the next, five of the gold, and one
of the ground. The two next rows are to be plain—the first of gold, the
second of black.

Work two rows of open crochet,—the one in scarlet, the other in blue.

The two rows of black, with one row of gold between, are then to be
worked in plain crochet; followed by two rows of open crochet,—the first
white, the second blue. Repeat the two rows of black, with the gold
between, and the two rows of open crochet,—alternately, to complete the
bag.

About sixteen skeins of chenille, and twenty-four yards of gold cord,
will be required.


A Greek Cap in Crochet Silk.

Commence at the top with a chain of fourteen stitches, unite the ends,
and crochet one plain row. In the next row, make a raised or dividing
line on every other stitch, as for the bottoms of bags. The increasing
must be continued until the diameter of the circle is about six inches
and a half. Work round this, in plain rows, until the cap be sufficiently
deep; occasional increasing stitches may be made, if it be not large
enough.

The cap should be finished with a double gold braid,—meeting the points
of the increasing lines: a gold band round the bottom, and a handsome
tassel at the top may be added; or in the place of these, silk trimmings
may be substituted. It requires to be very neatly made up in the inside.


A Greek Cap in coarse Chenille.

Commence at the top with a chain of six or eight stitches; unite the
ends, and work in rows round and round, (increasing a sufficient number
of stitches in each row to keep the work flat,) until it be about eight
inches in diameter. The sides may be worked in open crochet, introducing
a few plain lines of black and gold between each two rows of the open
crochet.

The best colours for a cap in chenille are black and gold;—dark blue,
black, and gold;—and claret, black, and gold.


An Essuie-Plume.

Commence with a chain of about six stitches in plain green netting silk;
crochet both ends together; work three plain rows of green, and then one
row of alternate stitches of dark scarlet and green.

The scarlet silk will now form the ground, on which the star pattern of
green is to be worked. Crochet a row with two stitches of green, and two
of scarlet, alternately; in the next row, two of scarlet and three of
green. Crochet, in a similar manner, one row after another, increasing
on each row one stitch in the green pattern, every time that colour is
repeated, until it counts seven stitches in each division; taking care to
keep the two scarlet stitches of the ground exactly over each other.

The pattern is now to be decreased, by working four stitches of scarlet
and five of green; in the next row,—seven of scarlet and three of green;
and in the next,—ten of scarlet and one of green;—increasing one stitch
in each division of the ground.

Work two plain rows of scarlet, increasing a sufficient number of
stitches to keep the work flat, and finish with a kind of fringe, formed
by two rows of open crochet in green.


A Neck Chain.

The chain is made by commencing with five plain stitches, then putting
the needle through the back of the second stitch, and making one plain
stitch. It will be found, by twisting the chain after every stitch, that
one stitch appears to go across,—this is the stitch that is always to be
taken and crocheted.


A Crochet Slipper.

[Illustration]

The light-coloured stripes composing this slipper, are alternately buff
and white: the dark stripe between each is a full blue. Each stripe is
separated by a dividing line of black. The colours of the pattern on each
stripe, are as follow:—

Commence at the toe with the blue stripe,—the colours of the pattern
being claret, gold colour, and scarlet.

The _second stripe_ is buff,—the colours of the pattern being dark blue,
lilac, scarlet, and green.

[Illustration: No. 22.]

Repeat the blue stripe.

The _fourth stripe_ is white,—the colours of the pattern being violet,
lilac, green, and scarlet.

This slipper may be worked in crochet silk, or German wool. The number of
stripes must depend on the required size of the slipper.


Another Crochet Slipper.

[Illustration: No. 23.]

The above pattern is intended for a slipper, in _German wool_, or crochet
silk, in stripes, across the front, continued in the same direction round
the back. The colours of the different stripes,—commencing at the toe,
are as follow:—

_First stripe_—gold colour; with the pattern composed of black, green,
white, bright scarlet, and black.

_Second stripe_—blue; the pattern in scarlet, black, gold colour, white,
and claret.

_Third stripe_—(the centre of the engraving) scarlet; this stripe is
wider than any other on the slipper. The pattern on it is composed of
light green, dark green, black, light blue, and gold colour, dark blue
and claret, black, gold colour and lilac, white and dark lilac, light
green, and dark green.

_Fourth stripe_—white; the pattern in blue, yellow, lilac, green, and
scarlet.

The narrow stripes are repeated round the back of the slipper; they are
gold colour, blue, scarlet, white, and green.

For a moderate-sized gentleman’s slipper in crochet silk, the toe might
be commenced with twenty-four stitches, and increased in the succeeding
rows, until the width across the instep were eighty stitches,—but, as
some persons work so much tighter than others, a positive number cannot
be given. The silk also may vary in size, as well as the dimensions
required for a slipper. The increasing is made by the addition of a
stitch on each side of the work.

The stripes in the front of the slipper are gold colour, blue, scarlet,
and white; the latter crosses the instep. Count the number of stitches on
the white stripe, and, with the gold colour commence a stripe one third
of its length on one side, to form the back. Continue these stripes,
until the back be sufficiently long to be sewn to the front on the other
side. It is advisable, before commencing a slipper, to cut a paper
pattern of the desired size and shape.

The above form _chaussons_ to wear over the shoes, the sole being formed
of coarse crochet in black; or they may be made up in the usual way
for slippers, either for ladies or gentlemen. In crochet silk they are
extremely warm and durable.—The ends of the wool or silk, are to be
threaded with a needle, and run into the work on the inside.


A Purse.

Plain crochet-purses are exceedingly strong, and may be made very
prettily with a moderate sized netting silk. Those, worked in rows the
length of the purse, are the most easily made.

Make a chain in scarlet netting silk of one hundred and forty stitches,
on which crochet three plain rows with the same colour. Then, five plain
rows in shades of green, or stone colour. These two stripes are to be
repeated until the purse is of a sufficient width. When completed, it is
to be neatly sewn up, or joined by crocheting the two sides together. The
ends are then to be drawn up, and the purse trimmed.


A Plain Purse with one Square and one Round End.

Commence with a chain of fourteen stitches, and joining both ends
together, crochet one plain row all round. In the next row, every
alternate stitch is to be made a dividing or seam-stitch; this is done by
passing the needle under both the corresponding loops in the first row,
and making two stitches in the same place. This dividing stitch is to be
repeated in the same place on each row, until ten rows are worked; when
a sufficient number of plain rows are to be crocheted according to the
length of the purse, until the side opening commences.

The opening of the purse is made by crocheting plain rows, alternately,
from right to left, and from left to right. When a sufficient number of
these are done:—

The plain rows are again to be worked, to correspond with the former
part; but, instead of the round end, it is to be left square, and sewn
up, with a tassel at either corner.


A Plain-stitch Open Crochet Purse.

Make a chain of one hundred and sixty, or one hundred and seventy
stitches; to the last stitch of this, crochet a short chain of five
stitches, the last of which is again to be crocheted to the fifth stitch
of _the chain_; repeat this on the whole length of the foundation; and
return along the row in the same way, by attaching every fifth stitch
to the centre stitch of each loop of the last row. The whole of the
purse is to be continued in the same manner, but it may be varied,
according to taste, by using two or more colours. When the purse is
worked to the size desired, cut a piece of stiff cardboard, and sew the
purse firmly to it,—the wrong side outwards; then, damp it with water,
and allow it to remain until dry. This process will stretch the purse,
tighten the stitches, and bring them all into their proper places. Then,
having sewn or crocheted up the sides, draw up the ends and put on the
trimmings.—This purse should only be made with fine silk.

The pattern No. 1 (page 16) represents this stitch.


An Elegant Purse in Silk and Gold.

[Illustration: No. 24.]

Commence with a chain of one hundred and eighty stitches in fine white
netting silk.

_Second row_—gold.

_Third row_—white.

Crochet eleven rows with bright violet silk, with the above pattern in
gold.

_Fifteenth row_—white.

_Sixteenth row_—gold.

_Seventeenth row_—white.

Work three rows of treble open crochet with gold. The above, worked four
times, will complete the purse. It is advisable to omit one of the
circular figures, in the centre of each stripe; and also, to reverse the
direction of the pattern at the opposite end of the purse.

Ponceau, blue, or green, may be substituted for the violet silk.

This pattern may also be effectively worked in any two decided colours,
either with zephyr, or six-thread fleecy, for sofa pillows, tidies, etc.


A Short Purse.

Commence at the bottom with a chain of fourteen stitches; unite both
ends, and work round and round, increasing by means of dividing lines,
until a flat circle of about two inches in diameter be formed. On this,
work plain rows until the purse be about three inches in length. It must
then be exactly divided, and each side worked backwards and forwards, for
about eight rows, or whatever is sufficient for the depth of the snap.

The annexed pine pattern, and the usual _vandyke_, are suitable for short
purses. About one hundred and twenty stitches will form a good-sized
purse.

[Illustration: No. 25.]


A Sprigged Purse in Open and Plain Crochet.

Commence with one row of open crochet, in gold-coloured silk; work a row
of plain crochet, every two stitches alternately blue and gold colour;
then, one row of plain blue.

The next, or _fourth row_—is formed alternately, of two stitches of
scarlet, and five of blue.

_Fifth row_—four blue, five white, alternately.

_Sixth row_—four blue; four stone colour.

_Seventh row_—five stitches blue; two pink.

Repeat the row of plain blue; then, one row, alternately two stitches of
blue and two of gold colour, and commence again with the open crochet.


An Elegant Purse with Gold.

Commence with one row of open crochet, the length of the purse, in
fine white netting silk. Then, one row of plain crochet, in alternate
stitches, of white and full blue, or white and ponceau.

[Illustration: No. 26.]

Work the above pattern in gold, on the blue, or ponceau, ground. Then,
three rows of open crochet in white; and repeat the pattern and open
crochet alternately.

When the purse is finished, it will be found that there are only two
rows of open crochet where it is joined, but this cannot be avoided.

The same pattern may also be worked in gold or steel beads, but it
will then be advisable to omit the pattern in the centre of the purse.
An additional colour may be introduced, with very good effect, on the
ground between the beads. In a moderate-sized purse, the pattern will be
repeated seven times in the length. A few plain stitches at the top and
bottom of the purse will be desirable.


A Short Purse with Beads.

Commence with a chain of one hundred stitches, in dark green netting
silk, and work one plain row; then, crochet five rows with steel beads,
to form the first stripe of the pattern.

Work one plain row of white. Then, on the white ground, crochet the
second stripe of the pattern, with gold beads. Work one plain row of
white.

The third stripe is green,—the lower division of the pattern is in steel
beads, the upper, in gold beads.

[Illustration: No. 27.]

The fourth stripe is white, the pattern in steel beads, with one plain
row of white at top and bottom.

Commence again with the green, and having worked the five rows of the
pattern with gold beads, finish with twenty plain rows of green.


A Purse with Beads in Plain and Open Crochet.

Make a star bottom with steel beads (as directed page 65), and fine
netting silk of a dark emerald green. Work three rows of open crochet in
a light green—then, either of the annexed patterns, in steel beads, on a
ponceau ground.

[Illustration: No. 28.]

[Illustration: No. 29.]

Work two more rows of open crochet in light green. Repeat the pattern
with steel beads, and work two more rows of open crochet. This completes
one end of the purse.

The centre is to be in plain crochet.


Spiral Crochet Purse.

[Illustration: No. 30.]

Make a chain of one hundred and seventy stitches, in reel silk. To the
commencement of this chain, crochet another short chain (as in plain
stitch open crochet), of three stitches, the third stitch of which pass
through the fourth stitch of _the chain_, and work three plain stitches.
Crochet another chain of three stitches, and pass the last stitch, as
before, through the fourth stitch of _the chain_. This is to be repeated
to the end of the row.

All the succeeding rows are the same, except that the plain stitches of
the next row are always one stitch in advance of the preceding.

Spiral crochet may be varied by working five, or seven stitches, instead
of three, as above directed. Most elegant purses and bags may thus be
made, by the introduction of gold, and using the silk in shades.


A Plain and Open Crochet Purse.

[Illustration: No. 31.]

Commence with one row of open crochet, in fine netting silk, of a dead
gold colour. Work one row of plain crochet in black, and five rows in
blue; on the latter, the above sprig pattern may be worked in gold, or
steel beads. One plain row of black completes the stripe.

Work two rows of open crochet in the gold colour. Then,—

Seven rows of black, with the Grecian border in ponceau, on the same, to
form a second stripe.

Repeat the two rows of open crochet in gold colour, and commence again,
with the blue stripe, as before.

The purse should be about nine inches in length. It will take three
skeins of blue silk, two of gold colour, one of black, and one of
ponceau. The silk should be fine.


Another Purse.

[Illustration: No. 32.]

Work one row the length of the purse, in treble open crochet, with fine
white netting silk. Then—two rows of plain crochet, in ponceau.

Crochet thirteen rows in white, with the above pattern in gold passing.

Repeat the two rows of ponceau;—then three rows of treble open
crochet,—the first in white; the second in ponceau; the third in white.

Repeat the pattern, etc., and when the purse is of a sufficient width,
finish with one row of treble open crochet in white.

Crochet up the two sides, with ponceau, to the opening. Then, work one
plain row in ponceau, round the opening, to strengthen the purse, and
give it uniformity.

If intended for ordinary use, the colours may be changed to blue and
claret.


A Round D’Oyley or Mat.

Commence with a chain of six stitches, in black eight-thread fleecy.
Unite both ends. Crochet all round, increasing on every stitch, for the
_first row_.

The pattern may be formed in three shades of scarlet, on a blue ground
of three shades; the darkest shade of the scarlet being on the lightest
shade of the blue.

_Second row_—one stitch of dark scarlet, and two stitches of light blue,
alternately;—forming the commencement of a star of six points.

_Third row_—three stitches of the dark scarlet, and two of the blue.

_Fourth row_—five stitches of a lighter shade of scarlet, and two of the
blue.

_Fifth row_—five stitches of the lighter scarlet, and three of the second
shade of blue.

_Sixth row_—three stitches of the lightest scarlet, and six of the second
blue.

_Seventh row_—one stitch of the lightest scarlet, and eight of the
darkest blue.

_Eighth row_—one plain row of the darkest blue.

Three plain rows of black, will finish the D’Oyley.

In every row, increasing stitches are to be made in the blue; and also,
in the plain rows of black.


A Chancelière.

[Illustration]

Four-thread fleecy with a steel needle.

It is impossible to give the exact number of stitches for the
commencement of a chancelière, as each row varies; it is advisable,
therefore, to cut the shape in stiff paper, as a pattern,—first of the
top, and then of the border. In those parts where it is requisite to
increase the width of the work, it should be done by making an extra
stitch on each side. The stitches of the border are to be worked in
a contrary direction to those of the top, as shown in the preceding
engraving.—The following pattern will be found suitable for a chancelière.

[Illustration: No. 33.]

Commence at the toe, by working two plain rows of ground in scarlet, and
crochet the centre stripe of the annexed pattern in rich green, on the
same coloured ground.

The ground of the next stripe is black, on which the pattern is to be
worked in three shades of gold colour.

Work a plain row of middle blue, which also forms the ground of the small
chain pattern, with the exception of the centre row, which is claret. The
chain is in white.

Work a plain row of claret, and then repeat the second stripe as before,
with the colours reversed.

The above colours, if well chosen, are exceedingly pretty, but they may
be varied according to fancy.

The slipper pattern No. 23, and also the Turkish pattern No. 12, are
equally adapted for a chancelière.

The chancelière should be made up on a very firm foundation, and stuffed
between the lining and the work with wool: the inside should be made
separate, and knitted in the _brioche_ stitch, with six or eight thread
fleecy. The ermine ruff, or trimming, of worsted, may easily be procured,
but if it cannot readily be so, a thick knitted fringe, three or four
times doubled, will be a good substitute. The bottom is formed of leather
or cloth.


A Square Border Pattern.

The annexed pattern is adapted for any square requiring a border, such
as a table cover, mat, quilt, sofa cushion, couvre-pied, etc. To render
it easy, the centre may be worked in the same colours as the border,
introducing any spot, sprig, or other small pattern,—the same colours
being carried through the whole, or slipped at the back. If, however, the
plan of introducing the colour only in the pattern be understood, it may
here be employed with advantage.

[Illustration: No. 34.]

The ground of the pattern might be in a self colour,—say white, with the
pattern in scarlet; or, the ground might be in five shades of scarlet,
the pattern being crocheted in emerald green, blue, white, or black,
according to taste, or the purpose for which the work was designed. The
whole of the pattern might also be worked in chiné or shaded wool.

The kind of wool to be used must be adapted to the purpose for which the
work is required; thus,—for a quilt or couvre-pied, six-thread fleecy—for
a mat, eight thread common fleecy;—for a table mat, German wool; for a
baby’s quilt, or a sofa pillow, eight thread zephyr fleecy.

[Illustration: No. 35.]

For the centre of the design, either the preceding sprig pattern, or the
patterns Nos. 20 or 39, may be taken. If the ground be worked in shades,
five shades of any colour, neither too distinct, nor too dark, should be
selected.

This border is well adapted for ribbed or raised crochet, as described at
page 57.


A Table Cover, Pillow, or Mat.

[Illustration: No. 36.]

Commence with a chain and one row of black. Crochet four plain rows,—one
white, one light green, one white, one black. The latter forms the ground
of the border,—the pattern on which is in three shades of scarlet—two
rows of each, beginning with the darkest. One plain row of black finishes
the border.

Work six plain rows:—the first, green; the second, white; the third,
green; the fourth, black; the fifth, white; the sixth, scarlet.

The ground of the centre may be gold colour, commencing with one plain
row,—the colours of the pine pattern on which are as follow:—

_First row_—middle blue.

_Second row_—light blue.

_Third row_—dark scarlet.

_Fourth row_—light scarlet.

_Fifth row_—four stitches middle green; three white; four middle green.

_Sixth row_—four stitches light green; three white; four light green.

_Seventh row_—three stitches lilac; two black; three lilac.

_Eighth row_—four stitches light lilac; two black; four light lilac.

_Ninth row_—middle green.

_Tenth row_—light green.

_Eleventh row_—dark scarlet.

_Twelfth row_—light scarlet.


Small Pine-pattern Table Cover.

[Illustration: No. 37.]

The chain and _first row_—black.

_Second row_—scarlet.

_Third row_—white.

_Fourth row_—bright blue, which continues through the next three rows,
forming the outer ground of the border. The pattern of the border is in
shades of scarlet.

_Fifth and sixth rows_—blue, and dark scarlet.

_Seventh row_—blue, bright scarlet, and drab—the latter forming the inner
ground of the border.

_Eighth row_—bright scarlet and drab. The single stitch at the top of the
blue ground being white.

_Ninth and tenth rows_—light scarlet, and drab.

_Eleventh row_—drab, which also forms the ground of the centre.

The colours for the small pine pattern in the centre, are,—black, two
shades of blue, and white.

In the next, or reversed row of the pattern, the colours may be varied as
follow:—black, two shades of scarlet, and white.


Scroll Pattern Stripe for a Bag.

Commence with chain and _first row_,—bright green.

_Second row_—scarlet.

_Third row_—green.

_Fourth, fifth, and sixth rows_—treble open crochet, with gold.

[Illustration: No. 38.]

_Seventh, eighth, and ninth rows_—repeat the first, second, and third
rows. Then,—crochet a stripe, consisting of eleven rows, with the above
pattern, in dead gold colour, on a violet ground. As these stripes range
perpendicularly, the position of the scrolls in the pattern should be
reversed at the bottom of the bag, in order that they may appear the
same on either side.

This bag may be worked in various combinations of colour; it is very
pretty if the pattern be worked in shaded, or chiné, silk, and the
stripes alternately in two different colours.

It may be as well to observe, that the plain line on either side
of the scroll, as shown in this, as in many other patterns, may be
advantageously omitted. It has therefore not been noticed in the
preceding directions.


A useful Sprig Pattern.

[Illustration: No. 39.]

The above sprig pattern will be found useful for bags, and a variety of
other purposes. It may be worked in two shades of green, and three of
pink, as follows:—

_First row_—first stitch dark green; second, light green.

_Second row_—one stitch light green: two dark green;—two light green; one
dark green;—three dark green.

_Third row_—two stitches light green; three dark green;—two light green;
two dark green.

_Fourth row_—three stitches light green; two dark green;—two dark green.

_Fifth row_—four stitches light green; one dark green;—one dark
green;—two dark green.

_Sixth row_—dark green.

_Seventh row_—three stitches dark pink; one dark green;—one dark green;
two dark green.

_Eighth row_—three stitches dark pink; one dark green; one middle
pink;—one light green.

_Ninth row_—three stitches dark pink; three middle pink;—one light green.

_Tenth row_—one stitch dark green;—three middle pink;—two light green.

_Eleventh row_—three stitches light pink; three middle pink;—three light
green.

_Twelfth row_—three stitches light pink;—two light green.

_Thirteenth and fourteenth rows_—light pink.


A Carriage Bag.

[Illustration: No. 40.]

The above pattern may be worked in German wool, or crochet silk. If an
useful and durable bag be desired, the following colours will be found
to work well on a black ground.—Commence with a chain and two rows of
black. Crochet the border pattern as follows:—

_First row_—one stitch scarlet; four black; two middle green; three
black; one scarlet.—Repeat.

_Second row_—three stitches scarlet; two black; two light green; one
black; two lilac; one black.—Repeat.

_Third row_—one stitch black; three scarlet; four black; two white; one
black.—Repeat.

_Fourth row_—one stitch black; three scarlet; two black; two lilac; three
black.—Repeat.

_Fifth row_—two stitches black; three scarlet; one black; two white; one
black; two middle green.—Repeat.

_Sixth row_—four stitches black; two scarlet; three black; two light
green.—Repeat.

Crochet one plain row of black. Work the sprig pattern in the same
colours as the border,—arranging them in the following order: _first
row_,—scarlet; _second_,—middle green; _third_,—light green;
_fourth_,—lilac; _fifth_,—white.

If German wool be used, the white may be worked with floss silk.


Another Table Cover.

[Illustration: No. 41.]

Commence with a chain and one plain row of black. Work two plain rows of
scarlet, and in the next row, commence the pattern of the first border in
black. The outer ground of the border is scarlet,—the inner ground of
the border is white. Three wools are worked at the same time.

Work one plain row of white between the two border patterns.

The second border pattern is in two shades of blue—the first two rows
being on the former white ground, the three last on the black ground,
which composes the centre. Commence the centre with,—

Two plain rows of black. Then on the black ground, commence the palm
pattern as follows:—

_First row_—middle green.

_Second row_—bright green.

_Third row_—bright scarlet.

_Fourth row_—scarlet, the centre stitch white.

_Fifth row_—three stitches blue; two white; two blue.

_Sixth row_—blue.

_Seventh row_—gold colour.

_Eighth row_—yellow.

This pattern requires three different coloured wools in many of the rows.
It is very handsome. The side border may be crocheted on.

Six-thread fleecy, and a steel needle, should be used.


A Brioche.

[Illustration]

A Brioche (so called from its resemblance in shape to the well known
French cake of that name), may be as easily worked in crochet as in
knitting. It may also be divided into stripes or compartments, gradually
decreasing in breadth towards the top or centre of the cushion, in the
same manner as in the knitted brioche. Various patterns may be introduced
in these stripes, but, when a very soft cushion is desired, this is not
advisable, as the extra wool, then required to be carried through the
work, would render it of too firm a texture.

The following directions for working a brioche in crochet will be found
very simple, and, at the same time, serve as a guide for those of a more
complicated nature.

Commence with a chain of seventy stitches in eight-thread zephyr
fleecy—black.

_First row_—black.

_Second row_—gold colour.

_Third row_—black.

The above three rows are all of an equal length. Then, crochet fifteen
rows in any pretty colour, omitting four stitches at the end of the
first, and of each successive row, so that in the last of these fifteen
rows there will be only ten stitches.

Repeat the row of black, taking in each of the four stitches omitted at
the ends of the last fifteen rows, as also the four stitches at the top
of the last row of black. Crochet one row of gold colour, and one row of
black, as at the commencement, when one compartment of the brioche will
be completed, forming a conical stripe.

Repeat the fifteen rows, omitting the four stitches at the end of
each row, as before directed; and continue as above until sixteen
similar compartments are worked; this will be found sufficient for an
ordinary-sized brioche.

The colours of the stripes may be varied, thus,—blue, brown, scarlet,
and stone colour, in their order of succession, repeated four times,
will form a very pretty contrast,—the dividing stripe between each being
formed of two rows of black, with a row of gold between them. Either
chiné or ombré wool may also be employed.

When finished, the brioche may be made up either entirely soft, or with
a stiff bottom of mill-board, about six or eight inches in diameter,
covered with cloth or velvet. The top should be drawn together, and
fastened in the centre, either with a tuft of soft wool, or with a cord
and tassels, as represented in the preceding engraving. It should be
stuffed with down or fine combed wool.


Another Bag in Stripes.

[Illustration: No. 42.]

The above pattern will be found very easy to work, in perpendicular
stripes, for a bag, the stripes being divided by two rows of treble open
crochet in gold. Each side of the bag is formed of four stripes of the
above pattern, and five stripes of the treble open crochet; but, as the
latter should form the outer edge at the side of the bag, and cannot
be worked without a foundation, it will be necessary to begin with the
figured stripe in silk, and afterwards to open the treble open crochet in
gold on either side of it.—Therefore,

Commence with a chain in dark green netting silk.—The number of stitches
must depend on the size of the silk employed, but a chain of about twelve
inches in length will be found sufficient for a bag of this description.
The bag should be worked in one length.

_First row_—dark green.

_Second row_—two stitches of ponceau, and two of dark green, alternately.

_Third row_—ponceau.

In the fourth row the pattern commences with two colours, the wave
portion of the pattern being in dark green; with the bell in a lighter
shade of green; the ground, ponceau: or, the pattern may be worked in
chiné greens.

Eight rows complete the pattern, when a plain row of ponceau, a row of
two alternate stitches of ponceau and green, and a plain row of green,
finish the stripe.

Crochet two rows of treble open crochet in gold; and commence again with
the pattern in silk.

This bag when completed is about six inches square; it should be hemmed
at the top, and lined, and finished with strings and tassels.

The pattern No. 24, is also equally adapted for a bag of this
description; but in the centre of the work the pattern should be
reversed, in order that when the two sides of the bag are folded together
the pattern may run in the same direction, as in the manner described for
the bag at page 113.


A similar Bag.

A very easy but extremely elegant bag in perpendicular stripes may be
made by commencing with—

Chain and _first row_—scarlet.

_Second row_—gold.

Crochet eleven plain rows in scarlet.

_Fourteenth row_—gold.

_Fifteenth row_—scarlet.

On each side of the band thus made, crochet two rows of treble open
crochet in gold.

Four plain scarlet stripes, and five of the open crochet, arranged as in
the preceding example, complete the bag.


A Bag with Five Points.

Commence with a chain of eight stitches: having united the ends, make
every other stitch a treble increased stitch,—by crocheting three
stitches in one loop. Continue to increase in a similar manner, until
twenty-eight rows be worked, taking care that the increasing stitches
be kept exactly over each other; when a point in the centre, and a point
at the termination of each line of dividing stitches, will be formed.
The remaining part of the bag is to be worked in rounds, until it be of
sufficient height.

The prettiest way of working this description of bag, is with steel or
gold beads.

The following pine pattern may be taken for the centre of each division
of points.

[Illustration: No. 43.]

The upper part of the bag may be semé, with a pattern composed of beads,
such as the following.

[Illustration: No. 44.]

The top may be finished with three plain rows of crochet; or with any
small border pattern in beads, similar to those figured beneath: but for
this purpose there are several others, in various parts of the book,
equally appropriate, and that may be selected according to the taste of
the worker.

[Illustration: No. 45.]

[Illustration: No. 46.]


A Bag in Treble open Crochet.

This bag should be worked in one long piece, and afterwards folded
together, so that the rows range perpendicularly; in the same manner as
that described at page 123.

Commence with a chain in ponceau.

    _First row_—gold.
    _Second row_—deep blue.
    _Third row_—ponceau.
    _Fourth row_—deep blue.
    _Fifth row_—gold.
    _Sixth row_—ponceau.
    _Seventh row_—black.
    _Eighth row_—ponceau.

treble open crochet.

Repeat from the first row, until the bag be of a sufficient breadth.


Patterns in open Crochet.

Open crochet, as also double and treble open crochet, have already been
fully described (see page 16). The two following patterns are, amongst
numerous others of a like description, merely variations of a similar
kind of work:

[Illustration: No. 47.]

It is therefore unnecessary to enter into a detailed description
of these, as it would occupy too great a space, and the engravings
sufficiently explain themselves. These patterns are useful for a variety
of purposes, particularly for working with cotton, for tidies, D’Oyleys,
etc.

[Illustration: No. 48.]


A Travelling Bolster.

The two circular ends should be worked first. Commence with a chain of
six stitches, in black four-thread fleecy: unite both ends, and crochet
all round, increasing on every stitch for the _first row_.

The pattern is then to be worked in three shades of scarlet, on a ground
composed of three shades of green; the darkest shade of the scarlet being
on the lightest shade of the green.

_Second row_—one stitch dark scarlet; two light green.—Repeat.—This
forms the commencement of a star of six points.

_Third row_—three stitches dark scarlet; two light green.—Repeat.

_Fourth row_—five stitches middle scarlet; two light green.—Repeat.

_Fifth row_—five stitches middle scarlet; three middle green.—Repeat.

_Sixth row_—three stitches light scarlet; six middle green.—Repeat.

_Seventh row_—one stitch light scarlet; eight dark green.—Repeat.

_Eighth row_—dark green.

Two plain rows of black finish the end.

N. B. In every row, increasing stitches are to be made in the green, as
also on the plain rows of black.

Having finished the two ends, make a chain of about sixteen inches in
length, in black; and work the other part of the bolster as follows:—

_First row_—black.

_Second row_—dark green.

_Third row_—middle green.

_Fourth row_—light green.

_Fifth row_—white.

Repeat the first four rows—reversed.

_Tenth and Eleventh rows_—scarlet.

_Twelfth row_—commence a pattern, by working alternately six stitches of
scarlet and four of black.

_Thirteenth row_—seven stitches scarlet (a); four yellow; six
scarlet.—Repeat from (a).

_Fourteenth row_—six stitches scarlet; four black.—Repeat.

_Fifteenth row_—seven stitches scarlet; (b) four light green; six
scarlet.—Repeat from (b).

_Sixteenth and Seventeenth rows_—scarlet.

Commence again as at first row; and repeat, until a piece be worked
sufficiently long to go easily round the ends.

The bolster should be made up by stuffing it with down or soft wool. A
long crochet band, worked similar to the green shaded stripe, should be
attached to either end, with a small worsted tuft in the centre, by way
of ornament.

Bags, worked in a similar manner to the above, are frequently made;
these, however, are not required to be so long. They are fastened at
the opening with strings or buttons. They may be made with eight-thread
zephyr fleecy.


A Slipper in Raised Crochet.

Raised, or ribbed crochet has already been described at page 57. To work
a slipper, commence with a chain of seven stitches, and crochet forty-six
rows backwards and forwards, observing to make three stitches in one loop
in the centre stitch of each row. This will make a sufficient increase in
each succeeding row to form the front of the slipper, and at the same
time cause the ribbed rows to run in an uniform diagonal direction on
either side.

Having thus completed the front of the shoe, crochet, on the right-hand
side, a row of twenty-six stitches, and work a sufficient number of rows
(about ninety) to form the back. The end of this band is then to be sewn
to the other side of the front.

The sole of the slipper may be made either of leather, or of crochet
in coarse wool; the latter is most readily made by cutting the shape
in stiff paper, and then working it to the exact size. The top of the
slipper may be finished with an ermine trimming of worsted.


A Half Square Shawl.

Commence with a chain of nine hundred stitches in black eight-thread
zephyr fleecy.

_First row_—black.

_Second and Third rows_—white.

Crochet eleven rows, alternately with black, and any pretty chiné wool.

_Fourteenth and Fifteenth rows_—white.

_Sixteenth and Seventeenth rows_—green.

Crochet eleven rows, alternately with scarlet, and any bright chiné wool.

_Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth rows_—green.

_Thirty-first and Thirty-second rows_—black.

Crochet eleven rows, alternately with white, and a chiné wool.

_Forty-fourth and Forty-fifth rows_—black.

_Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh rows_—red.

Crochet eleven rows, alternately with green, and a chiné wool.

_Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth rows_—scarlet.

Repeat from second row.

By omitting a stitch in the centre of each row, the shawl will assume,
whilst working, a pointed form, similar to that of a half square, at the
same time that the rows of crochet will run in a diagonal direction from
either side of the centre. It may be trimmed with a black fringe of
about four inches deep sewn on the two sides.

To form the striped pattern as above directed, four chiné wools, of
different colours, should be employed.


A Light Shawl.

[Illustration: No. 49.]

This is worked with German wool, in open crochet stitch, but without
leaving a stitch between each, as in the ordinary method.

Chain and _first row_—claret.

_Second row_—two stitches claret, two blue, alternately.

_Third row_—blue.

Crochet the above pattern in claret on the blue ground.

_Fifteenth row_—blue.

_Sixteenth row_—two stitches claret, two blue, alternately.

_Seventeenth row_—claret.

Repeat from first row.—In the second stripe of the pattern, deep gold
colour should be used in place of the blue, and black in place of the
claret wool; thus working, alternately, a stripe in each of the two
colours.


Border for a Shawl.

This will form a good pine pattern for the border of a shawl, in German
wool on a black ground.

Commence with chain and _first row_—deep gold colour.

_Second row_—black.

Then crochet the annexed pine on a black ground, in the following colours.

[Illustration: No. 50.]

_First row_—imperial blue.

_Second row_—lighter shade of blue.

_Third row_—deep scarlet.

_Fourth row_—bright scarlet.

_Fifth row_—dark green.

_Sixth row_—middle green.

_Seventh row_—dark lilac.

_Eighth row_—light lilac.

_Ninth and Tenth rows_—two shades of stone colour.

_Eleventh and Twelfth rows_—two shades of blue.

_Thirteenth and Fourteenth rows_—two shades of scarlet.

Then, work one plain row of black, and one plain row of gold colour.

To form a point, if it be intended for the border of a half square shawl,
omit a stitch in the centre of each row;—this, if the size of the shawl
has been determined upon, previously to commencing the work, may easily
be done without interfering with the pattern, as by calculating the
number of stitches required, a greater space of the ground where the
stitches are to be omitted between the two centre pines may be allowed.
For a square shawl, the border, if preferred, may be worked separately,
and afterwards sewn on.



KNITTED LACE EDGINGS.



INDEX.


    Bonnet Cap, 157

    Broad Open Lace, 158

    Brioche Stitch, 157

    Double Knitting for Comforters, &c., 158

    Eyelet-Hole Edge, 155

    French Cushion, or Antimacassar, 156

    Insertion, 153

    Knitted Insertion, 156

    Knitted Gimp Trimming, 154

    Lace Pattern Edging, 147

    Leaf Edge, 151

    Narrow Edge, 150

    Point Lace Pattern, 149

    Strong Vandyke Border, 153

    Valenciennes Lace, 147

    Vandyke Edge, 145


Vandyke Edge.

Cast on seven stitches, _first and second row_ plain knitting.

_Third row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over,[1] knit two together; turn
over twice, knit two together.

_Fourth row._—Bring the thread forward, knit two, purl one, knit two;
turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Fifth row._—Slip one; knit two, turn over, knit two together; knit four.

_Sixth row._—Knit six, turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Seventh row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, turn
over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together.

_Eighth row._—Knit two, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit two, turn
over, knit two together, knit one.

_Ninth row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit six.

_Tenth row._—Knit eight, turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Eleventh row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, turn
over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together, turn
over twice, knit two together.

_Twelfth row._—Knit two, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit two, purl
one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Thirteenth row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit
nine.

_Fourteenth row._—Cast off all but seven, knit three, turn over, knit two
together, knit one.

Commence again as third row.

[1] By “turn over” means, bring the cotton round the pin so as to make a
stitch.


Lace Pattern Edging.

Cast on eleven stitches.

_First row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, turn over
twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together, turn over
twice, knit two together.

_Second row._—Knit two, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit two, purl one,
knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Third row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit nine.

_Fourth row._—Cast off three, knit seven, turn over, knit two together,
knit one.


Valenciennes Lace.

Cast on sixteen stitches.

_First row._—Knit three, turn over twice, purl two together, knit two,
turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together,
knit five.

_Second row._—Knit seven, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit two, turn
over twice, purl two together, knit three.

_Third row._—Knit three, turn over twice, purl two together, knit
thirteen.

_Fourth row._—Knit thirteen, turn over twice, purl two together, knit
three.

_Fifth row._—Knit three, turn over twice, purl two together, knit two,
turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together,
turn over twice, knit two together, knit five.

_Sixth row._—Knit seven, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit two, purl
one, knit two, turn over twice, purl two together, knit three.

_Seventh row._—Knit three, turn over twice, purl two together, knit
sixteen.

_Eighth row._—Cast off five, knit ten, turn over twice, purl two
together, knit three.


Point Lace Pattern.

Cast on fifteen stitches.

_First row._—Knit three, turn over, slip one, knit two together, then
pull the slip-stitch over, turn over, knit three, turn over, knit two
together, turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two
together.

_Second row._—Turn over, knit two, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit
one, purl six, knit one, turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Third row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, turn over, knit
two together, knit one, knit two together, turn over, knit eight.

_Fourth row._—Cast off three, knit four, purl six, knit one, turn over,
knit two together, knit one.

_Fifth row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, knit one, turn
over, slip one, knit two together, then pull the slip-stitch over, turn
over, knit two, turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit
two together.

_Sixth row._—Turn over, knit two, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit one,
purl six, knit one, turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Seventh row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, knit two
together, turn over, knit one, turn over, knit two together, knit eight.

_Eighth row._—Cast off three, knit four, purl six, knit one, turn over,
knit two together, knit one.—Then commence again.


Narrow Edge.

Cast on six stitches.

_First row._—Slip one, knit one, turn over, knit two together, turn over
twice, knit two together.

_Second row._—Knit two, purl one, knit one, turn over, knit two together,
knit one.

_Third row._—Slip one, knit one, turn over, knit two together, knit three.

_Fourth row._—Cast off one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit
one.

Then commence again.


Leaf Edge.

Cast on eleven stitches.

_First row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit one,
turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together,
knit one.

_Second row._—Knit three, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit three, turn
over, knit two together, knit one.

_Third row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit
three, turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two
together, knit one.

_Fourth row._—Knit three, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit five, turn
over, knit two together, knit one.

_Fifth row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit five,
turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together,
knit one.

_Sixth row._—Knit three, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit seven, turn
over, knit two together, knit one.

_Seventh row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit
seven, turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two
together, knit one.

_Eighth row._—Knit three, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit nine, turn
over, knit two together, knit one.

_Ninth row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit nine,
turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together,
knit one.

_Tenth row._—Knit three, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit eleven, turn
over, knit two together, knit one.

_Eleventh row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit
eleven, turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two
together, knit one.

_Twelfth row._—Knit three, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit thirteen,
turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Thirteenth row._—Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit
eighteen.

_Fourteenth row._—Cast off until ten on one needle and one on the other,
knit seven, turn over, knit two together, knit one.


Insertion.

Cast on nine stitches.

Slip one, knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit one, turn over,
knit two together, purl one.

Every row is the same, it also makes a Fringe by casting off five
stitches and pulling the other four out.


A Strong Vandyke Border.

Cast on eleven stitches.

_First row._—Slip one, knit one, turn over, knit two together, turn over,
knit two together, turn over, knit two together, turn over, and knit the
rest plain.

_Second row._—Plain knitting, continue repeating these two rows until you
get eighteen stitches on your pin, then knit two rows plain knitting.

Next row, knit seven stitches plain, knit two together, turn over, and
knit two together to the end of the row, knitting the last stitch plain.

A plain row. Next row, knit six, knit two together, turn over, knit two
together, repeat, turn over, &c., to the end of the row. A plain row.

Repeat these two last rows until you reduce the number on your pin to
eleven stitches; begin again by knitting two rows plain. Always slip the
first stitch.

This makes also a very pretty Cuff.


Knitted Gimp Trimming.

Cast on two stitches, turn over, and knit two together. Every row is the
same.

This also makes a pretty Watch Guard knitted with the extra coarse Purse
Twist.


Eyelet-hole Edge.

Cast on eleven stitches.

_First row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, turn over three
times, knit one, knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together,
knit one.

_Second row._—Knit three, purl one, knit three, purl one, knit six.

_Third row._—Plain knitting.

_Fourth row._—Plain knitting.

_Fifth row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, repeat turn over
and knit two together three times more, then, turn over twice, knit two
together, knit one.

_Sixth row._—Knit three, purl one, knit eleven.

_Seventh row._—Plain knitting.

_Eighth row._—Cast off four, and knit the remainder.


Knitted Insertion.

Cast on fourteen stitches.

_First row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, turn over twice,
knit two together, turn over twice, knit two together, turn over twice,
knit two, turn over, knit two together, knit one.

_Second row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, knit one, purl
one, knit two, purl one, knit two, purl one, knit two, turn over, knit
two together, knit one.

_Third row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, knit ten, turn
over, knit two together, knit one.

_Fourth row._—Knit three, turn over, knit two together, repeat knitting
two together four times more, knit two, turn over, knit two together,
knit one.


French Cushion, or Antimacassar.

To be knitted with Terneau Wool.

Cast on any uneven number of stitches, pass the Wool round the pin, so as
to have it behind, knit two together, slip a stitch seamwise, (that is
taking the part of the loop nearest you,) pass the Wool round the pin,
knit two together, every row the same, always knitting the last stitch.


Brioche Stitch.

Cast on any uneven number of stitches, bring the Wool in front of the
pin, slip one, and knit two together, every row is the same. This is a
very pretty stitch for Comfortables for Children’s necks knitted on large
pins with Terneau Wool.


A Bonnet Cap.

Cast on ninety stitches in Scarlet Berlin Wool.

_First, second, and third rows_, plain knitting.

_Fourth row._—Turn over, and knit two together to the end of the row,
then join on White Berlin Wool.

Knit three rows in plain knitting, then the same as fourth row.

Repeat these four rows seven times, then the Scarlet Border as before,
this forms the head piece; draw it up at each end, and sew on strings.
Cast on forty stitches for the band behind, with the Scarlet as above,
knit the pattern over three times with the White, and then join on the
Scarlet for the Border.

This must be sewed to the head piece.


Double Knitting for Comforters, &c.

Cast on any even number.

Bring the Wool in front of the pin, slip a stitch, pass the Wool back and
knit one. Every row is the same. The stitch that is knitted in the one
row, becomes in the next the slip-stitch.


A Broad Open Lace.

Cast on fifteen stitches.

_First row._—Slip one, knit one, turn over four times, knit two
together, turn over, knit two together, repeat turn over, knit two
together four times more, knit one.

_Second row_—Slip one, knit twelve, purl one, knit one, purl one, knit
two.

_Third row_—Plain knitting.

_Fourth row_—Plain knitting.

_Fifth row_—Slip one, knit one, turn over five times, knit two together,
knit one, turn over, knit two together, repeat turn over, knit two
together five times more, knit one.

_Sixth row_—Slip one, knit fifteen, purl one, knit one, purl one, knit
three.

_Seventh row_—Plain knitting.

_Eighth row_—Plain knitting.

_Ninth row_—Cast off seven and begin at the first row to knit one, turn
over four times, &c.

THE END.



ADVERTISEMENT


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                 _WHOLESALE STORE, No. 58 JOHN STREET_,
                   Between William and Nassau Streets,
                                NEW-YORK,

               IMPORTER OF GERMAN AND FRENCH FANCY GOODS,

                  _Offers for sale, Wholesale & Retail,
                     at the most reasonable terms,_

    WORSTEDS; Zephyr, German, Tapisserie, Fleecy, Chiné, Ombré,
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    SILKS: Floss, Twisted, Plain and Shaded, in Sticks and Spools.

    CHENILLE: Embroidery, Flower, and all kinds of Trimming and
    Tinsel Chenille Cord.

    PATTERNS: Berlin Embroidery Patterns, a most splendid
    assortment.

    CANVASS: French and German, Canvass for Embroidery of Linen,
    Cotton, Worsted, Imitation Silk, and Silk, Silver and Gold of
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    PERFORATED PAPER OF DIFFERENT COLORS.

    BEADS: Gilt, Silvered, Steel and Glass Beads and Bugles.

    NEEDLES: Embroidery Needles, Wooden, Whalebone, and Ivory
    Knitting Needles.

    Crochet Needles.

    EMBROIDERIES: All kinds, commenced and finished, such as Shoes,
    Suspenders and Ottomans.

    FANCY GOODS.—All kinds of Paris Fancy Goods, such as Purses,
    Purse Trimmings, Head Ornaments, Bracelets, Hair Pins, Combs,
    &c. Necklaces, Gold and Silver Braids and Cords, Tinsel Cords,
    and Silver Bullion Tassels.

    WIRE GOODS, such as Baskets, Watch-holders, &c. &c. German
    Rustic Willow Chairs, Work-tables, and Sofas.

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    qualities, imported and of his own manufacture.

    ALL KINDS OF EMBROIDERY BRAIDS.

    OILED SILKS: The best French, of different colors.

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