Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Victor Hugo
Author: Hugo, Victor
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Victor Hugo" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



CONTENTS

##  LES MISÉRABLES

##  THE MEMOIRS OF VICTOR HUGO

##  NOTRE-DAME DE PARIS

##  POEMS

##  HISTORY OF A CRIME

##  NAPOLEON THE LITTLE

##  TOILERS OF THE SEA

##  DRAMAS

UNDER SENTENCE OF DEATH

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



LES MISÉRABLES
By Victor Hugo


Translated by Isabel F. Hapgood



Copyright 1887



CONTENTS
LES MISÉRABLES
VOLUME I.—FANTINE.

PREFACE

BOOK FIRST—A JUST MAN
CHAPTER I—M. MYRIEL
CHAPTER II—M. MYRIEL BECOMES M. WELCOME
CHAPTER III—A HARD BISHOPRIC FOR A GOOD BISHOP
CHAPTER IV—WORKS CORRESPONDING TO WORDS
CHAPTER V—MONSEIGNEUR BIENVENU MADE HIS CASSOCKS LAST TOO LONG
CHAPTER VI—WHO GUARDED HIS HOUSE FOR HIM
CHAPTER VII—CRAVATTE
CHAPTER VIII—PHILOSOPHY AFTER DRINKING
CHAPTER IX—THE BROTHER AS DEPICTED BY THE SISTER
CHAPTER X—THE BISHOP IN THE PRESENCE OF AN UNKNOWN LIGHT
CHAPTER XI—A RESTRICTION
CHAPTER XII—THE SOLITUDE OF MONSEIGNEUR WELCOME
CHAPTER XIII—WHAT HE BELIEVED
CHAPTER XIV—WHAT HE THOUGHT

BOOK SECOND—THE FALL
CHAPTER I—THE EVENING OF A DAY OF WALKING
CHAPTER II—PRUDENCE COUNSELLED TO WISDOM.
CHAPTER III—THE HEROISM OF PASSIVE OBEDIENCE.
CHAPTER IV—DETAILS CONCERNING THE CHEESE-DAIRIES OF PONTARLIER.
CHAPTER V—TRANQUILLITY
CHAPTER VI—JEAN VALJEAN
CHAPTER VII—THE INTERIOR OF DESPAIR
CHAPTER VIII—BILLOWS AND SHADOWS
CHAPTER IX—NEW TROUBLES
CHAPTER X—THE MAN AROUSED
CHAPTER XI—WHAT HE DOES
CHAPTER XII—THE BISHOP WORKS
CHAPTER XIII—LITTLE GERVAIS

BOOK THIRD.—IN THE YEAR 1817
CHAPTER I—THE YEAR 1817
CHAPTER II—A DOUBLE QUARTETTE
CHAPTER III—FOUR AND FOUR
CHAPTER IV—THOLOMYÈS IS SO MERRY THAT HE SINGS A SPANISH DITTY
CHAPTER V—AT BOMBARDA’S
CHAPTER VI—A CHAPTER IN WHICH THEY ADORE EACH OTHER
CHAPTER VII—THE WISDOM OF THOLOMYÈS
CHAPTER VIII—THE DEATH OF A HORSE
CHAPTER IX—A MERRY END TO MIRTH

BOOK FOURTH.—TO CONFIDE IS SOMETIMES TO DELIVER INTO A PERSON’S POWER
CHAPTER I—ONE MOTHER MEETS ANOTHER MOTHER
CHAPTER II—FIRST SKETCH OF TWO UNPREPOSSESSING FIGURES
CHAPTER III—THE LARK

BOOK FIFTH.—THE DESCENT.
CHAPTER I—THE HISTORY OF A PROGRESS IN BLACK GLASS TRINKETS
CHAPTER II—MADELEINE
CHAPTER III—SUMS DEPOSITED WITH LAFFITTE
CHAPTER IV—M. MADELEINE IN MOURNING
CHAPTER V—VAGUE FLASHES ON THE HORIZON
CHAPTER VI—FATHER FAUCHELEVENT
CHAPTER VII—FAUCHELEVENT BECOMES A GARDENER IN PARIS
CHAPTER VIII—MADAME VICTURNIEN EXPENDS THIRTY FRANCS ON MORALITY
CHAPTER IX—MADAME VICTURNIEN’S SUCCESS
CHAPTER X—RESULT OF THE SUCCESS
CHAPTER XI—CHRISTUS NOS LIBERAVIT
CHAPTER XII—M. BAMATABOIS’S INACTIVITY
CHAPTER XIII—THE SOLUTION OF SOME QUESTIONS CONNECTED WITH THE MUNICIPAL POLICE

BOOK SIXTH.—JAVERT
CHAPTER I—THE BEGINNING OF REPOSE
CHAPTER II—HOW JEAN MAY BECOME CHAMP

BOOK SEVENTH.—THE CHAMPMATHIEU AFFAIR
CHAPTER I—SISTER SIMPLICE
CHAPTER II—THE PERSPICACITY OF MASTER SCAUFFLAIRE
CHAPTER III—A TEMPEST IN A SKULL
CHAPTER IV—FORMS ASSUMED BY SUFFERING DURING SLEEP
CHAPTER V—HINDRANCES
CHAPTER VI—SISTER SIMPLICE PUT TO THE PROOF
CHAPTER VII—THE TRAVELLER ON HIS ARRIVAL TAKES PRECAUTIONS FOR DEPARTURE
CHAPTER VIII—AN ENTRANCE BY FAVOR
CHAPTER IX—A PLACE WHERE CONVICTIONS ARE IN PROCESS OF FORMATION
CHAPTER X—THE SYSTEM OF DENIALS
CHAPTER XI—CHAMPMATHIEU MORE AND MORE ASTONISHED

BOOK EIGHTH.—A COUNTER-BLOW
CHAPTER I—IN WHAT MIRROR M. MADELEINE CONTEMPLATES HIS HAIR
CHAPTER II—FANTINE HAPPY
CHAPTER III—JAVERT SATISFIED
CHAPTER IV—AUTHORITY REASSERTS ITS RIGHTS
CHAPTER V—A SUITABLE TOMB



VOLUME II.—COSETTE

BOOK FIRST.—WATERLOO
CHAPTER I—WHAT IS MET WITH ON THE WAY FROM NIVELLES
CHAPTER II—HOUGOMONT
CHAPTER III—THE EIGHTEENTH OF JUNE, 1815
CHAPTER IV—A
CHAPTER V—THE QUID OBSCURUM OF BATTLES
CHAPTER VI—FOUR O’CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON
CHAPTER VII—NAPOLEON IN A GOOD HUMOR
CHAPTER VIII—THE EMPEROR PUTS A QUESTION TO THE GUIDE LACOSTE
CHAPTER IX—THE UNEXPECTED
CHAPTER X—THE PLATEAU OF MONT-SAINT-JEAN
CHAPTER XI—A BAD GUIDE TO NAPOLEON; A GOOD GUIDE TO BÃœLOW
CHAPTER XII—THE GUARD
CHAPTER XIII—THE CATASTROPHE
CHAPTER XIV—THE LAST SQUARE
CHAPTER XV—CAMBRONNE
CHAPTER XVI—QUOT LIBRAS IN DUCE?
CHAPTER XVII—IS WATERLOO TO BE CONSIDERED GOOD?
CHAPTER XVIII—A RECRUDESCENCE OF DIVINE RIGHT
CHAPTER XIX—THE BATTLE-FIELD AT NIGHT


BOOK SECOND.—THE SHIP ORION
CHAPTER I—NUMBER 24,601 BECOMES NUMBER 9,430
CHAPTER II—IN WHICH THE READER WILL PERUSE TWO VERSES, WHICH ARE OF THE DEVIL’S COMPOSITION, POSSIBLY
CHAPTER III—THE ANKLE-CHAIN MUST HAVE UNDERGONE A CERTAIN PREPARATORY MANIPULATION TO BE THUS BROKEN WITH A BLOW FROM A HAMMER

BOOK THIRD.—ACCOMPLISHMENT OF THE PROMISE MADE TO THE DEAD WOMAN
CHAPTER I—THE WATER QUESTION AT MONTFERMEIL
CHAPTER II—TWO COMPLETE PORTRAITS
CHAPTER III—MEN MUST HAVE WINE, AND HORSES MUST HAVE WATER
CHAPTER IV—ENTRANCE ON THE SCENE OF A DOLL
CHAPTER V—THE LITTLE ONE ALL ALONE
CHAPTER VI—WHICH POSSIBLY PROVES BOULATRUELLE’S INTELLIGENCE
CHAPTER VII—COSETTE SIDE BY SIDE WITH THE STRANGER IN THE DARK
CHAPTER VIII—THE UNPLEASANTNESS OF RECEIVING INTO ONE’S HOUSE A POOR MAN WHO MAY BE A RICH MAN
CHAPTER IX—THÉNARDIER AND HIS MANÅ’UVRES
CHAPTER X—HE WHO SEEKS TO BETTER HIMSELF MAY RENDER HIS SITUATION WORSE
CHAPTER XI—NUMBER 9,430 REAPPEARS, AND COSETTE WINS IT IN THE LOTTERY

BOOK FOURTH.—THE GORBEAU HOVEL
CHAPTER I—MASTER GORBEAU
CHAPTER II—A NEST FOR OWL AND A WARBLER
CHAPTER III—TWO MISFORTUNES MAKE ONE PIECE OF GOOD FORTUNE
CHAPTER IV—THE REMARKS OF THE PRINCIPAL TENANT
CHAPTER V—A FIVE-FRANC PIECE FALLS ON THE GROUND AND PRODUCES A TUMULT

BOOK FIFTH.—FOR A BLACK HUNT, A MUTE PACK
CHAPTER I—THE ZIGZAGS OF STRATEGY
CHAPTER II—IT IS LUCKY THAT THE PONT D’AUSTERLITZ BEARS CARRIAGES
CHAPTER III—TO WIT, THE PLAN OF PARIS IN 1727
CHAPTER IV—THE GROPINGS OF FLIGHT
CHAPTER V—WHICH WOULD BE IMPOSSIBLE WITH GAS LANTERNS
CHAPTER VI—THE BEGINNING OF AN ENIGMA
CHAPTER VII—CONTINUATION OF THE ENIGMA
CHAPTER VIII—THE ENIGMA BECOMES DOUBLY MYSTERIOUS
CHAPTER IX—THE MAN WITH THE BELL
CHAPTER X—WHICH EXPLAINS HOW JAVERT GOT ON THE SCENT

BOOK SIXTH.—LE PETIT-PICPUS
CHAPTER I—NUMBER 62 RUE PETIT-PICPUS
CHAPTER II—THE OBEDIENCE OF MARTIN VERGA
CHAPTER III—AUSTERITIES
CHAPTER IV—GAYETIES
CHAPTER V—DISTRACTIONS
CHAPTER VI—THE LITTLE CONVENT
CHAPTER VII—SOME SILHOUETTES OF THIS DARKNESS
CHAPTER VIII—POST CORDA LAPIDES
CHAPTER IX—A CENTURY UNDER A GUIMPE
CHAPTER X—ORIGIN OF THE PERPETUAL ADORATION
CHAPTER XI—END OF THE PETIT-PICPUS

BOOK SEVENTH.—PARENTHESIS
CHAPTER I—THE CONVENT AS AN ABSTRACT IDEA
CHAPTER II—THE CONVENT AS AN HISTORICAL FACT
CHAPTER III—ON WHAT CONDITIONS ONE CAN RESPECT THE PAST
CHAPTER IV—THE CONVENT FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF PRINCIPLES
CHAPTER V—PRAYER
CHAPTER VI—THE ABSOLUTE GOODNESS OF PRAYER
CHAPTER VII—PRECAUTIONS TO BE OBSERVED IN BLAME
CHAPTER VIII—FAITH, LAW

BOOK EIGHTH.—CEMETERIES TAKE THAT WHICH IS COMMITTED THEM
CHAPTER I—WHICH TREATS OF THE MANNER OF ENTERING A CONVENT
CHAPTER II—FAUCHELEVENT IN THE PRESENCE OF A DIFFICULTY
CHAPTER III—MOTHER INNOCENTE
CHAPTER IV—IN WHICH JEAN VALJEAN HAS QUITE THE AIR OF HAVING READ AUSTIN CASTILLEJO
CHAPTER V—IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO BE DRUNK IN ORDER TO BE IMMORTAL
CHAPTER VI—BETWEEN FOUR PLANKS
CHAPTER VII—IN WHICH WILL BE FOUND THE ORIGIN OF THE SAYING: DON’T LOSE THE CARD
CHAPTER VIII—A SUCCESSFUL INTERROGATORY
CHAPTER IX—CLOISTERED



VOLUME III—MARIUS.

BOOK FIRST.—PARIS STUDIED IN ITS ATOM
CHAPTER I—PARVULUS
CHAPTER II—SOME OF HIS PARTICULAR CHARACTERISTICS
CHAPTER III—HE IS AGREEABLE
CHAPTER IV—HE MAY BE OF USE
CHAPTER V—HIS FRONTIERS
CHAPTER VI—A BIT OF HISTORY
CHAPTER VII—THE GAMIN SHOULD HAVE HIS PLACE IN THE CLASSIFICATIONS OF INDIA
CHAPTER VIII—IN WHICH THE READER WILL FIND A CHARMING SAYING OF THE LAST KING
CHAPTER IX—THE OLD SOUL OF GAUL
CHAPTER X—ECCE PARIS, ECCE HOMO
CHAPTER XI—TO SCOFF, TO REIGN
CHAPTER XII—THE FUTURE LATENT IN THE PEOPLE
CHAPTER XIII—LITTLE GAVROCHE

BOOK SECOND.—THE GREAT BOURGEOIS
CHAPTER I—NINETY YEARS AND THIRTY-TWO TEETH
CHAPTER II—LIKE MASTER, LIKE HOUSE
CHAPTER III—LUC-ESPRIT
CHAPTER IV—A CENTENARIAN ASPIRANT
CHAPTER V—BASQUE AND NICOLETTE
CHAPTER VI—IN WHICH MAGNON AND HER TWO CHILDREN ARE SEEN
CHAPTER VII—RULE: RECEIVE NO ONE EXCEPT IN THE EVENING
CHAPTER VIII—TWO DO NOT MAKE A PAIR

BOOK THIRD.—THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON
CHAPTER I—AN ANCIENT SALON
CHAPTER II—ONE OF THE RED SPECTRES OF THAT EPOCH
CHAPTER III—REQUIESCANT
CHAPTER IV—END OF THE BRIGAND
CHAPTER V—THE UTILITY OF GOING TO MASS, IN ORDER TO BECOME A REVOLUTIONIST
CHAPTER VI—THE CONSEQUENCES OF HAVING MET A WARDEN
CHAPTER VII—SOME PETTICOAT
CHAPTER VIII—MARBLE AGAINST GRANITE

BOOK FOURTH.—THE FRIENDS OF THE A B C
CHAPTER I—A GROUP WHICH BARELY MISSED BECOMING HISTORIC
CHAPTER II—BLONDEAU’S FUNERAL ORATION BY BOSSUET
CHAPTER III—MARIUS’ ASTONISHMENTS
CHAPTER IV—THE BACK ROOM OF THE CAFÉ MUSAIN
CHAPTER V—ENLARGEMENT OF HORIZON
CHAPTER VI—RES ANGUSTA

BOOK FIFTH.—THE EXCELLENCE OF MISFORTUNE
CHAPTER I—MARIUS INDIGENT
CHAPTER II—MARIUS POOR
CHAPTER III—MARIUS GROWN UP
CHAPTER IV—M. MABEUF
CHAPTER V—POVERTY A GOOD NEIGHBOR FOR MISERY
CHAPTER VI—THE SUBSTITUTE

BOOK SIXTH.—THE CONJUNCTION OF TWO STARS
CHAPTER I—THE SOBRIQUET: MODE OF FORMATION OF FAMILY NAMES
CHAPTER II—LUX FACTA EST
CHAPTER III—EFFECT OF THE SPRING
CHAPTER IV—BEGINNING OF A GREAT MALADY
CHAPTER V—DIVERS CLAPS OF THUNDER FALL ON MA’AM BOUGON
CHAPTER VI—TAKEN PRISONER
CHAPTER VII—ADVENTURES OF THE LETTER U DELIVERED OVER TO CONJECTURES
CHAPTER VIII—THE VETERANS THEMSELVES CAN BE HAPPY
CHAPTER IX—ECLIPSE

BOOK SEVENTH.—PATRON MINETTE
CHAPTER I—MINES AND MINERS
CHAPTER II—THE LOWEST DEPTHS
CHAPTER III—BABET, GUEULEMER, CLAQUESOUS, AND MONTPARNASSE
CHAPTER IV—COMPOSITION OF THE TROUPE

BOOK EIGHTH.—THE WICKED POOR MAN
CHAPTER I—MARIUS, WHILE SEEKING A GIRL IN A BONNET, ENCOUNTERS A MAN IN A CAP
CHAPTER II—TREASURE TROVE
CHAPTER III—QUADRIFRONS
CHAPTER IV—A ROSE IN MISERY
CHAPTER V—A PROVIDENTIAL PEEP-HOLE
CHAPTER VI—THE WILD MAN IN HIS LAIR
CHAPTER VII—STRATEGY AND TACTICS
CHAPTER VIII—THE RAY OF LIGHT IN THE HOVEL
CHAPTER IX—JONDRETTE COMES NEAR WEEPING
CHAPTER X—TARIFF OF LICENSED CABS: TWO FRANCS AN HOUR
CHAPTER XI—OFFERS OF SERVICE FROM MISERY TO WRETCHEDNESS
CHAPTER XII—THE USE MADE OF M. LEBLANC’S FIVE-FRANC PIECE
CHAPTER XIII—SOLUS CUM SOLO, IN LOCO REMOTO, NON COGITABUNTUR ORARE PATER NOSTER
CHAPTER XIV—IN WHICH A POLICE AGENT BESTOWS TWO FISTFULS ON A LAWYER
CHAPTER XV—JONDRETTE MAKES HIS PURCHASES
CHAPTER XVI—IN WHICH WILL BE FOUND THE WORDS TO AN ENGLISH AIR WHICH WAS IN FASHION IN 1832
CHAPTER XVII—THE USE MADE OF MARIUS’ FIVE-FRANC PIECE
CHAPTER XVIII—MARIUS’ TWO CHAIRS FORM A VIS-A-VIS
CHAPTER XIX—OCCUPYING ONE’S SELF WITH OBSCURE DEPTHS
CHAPTER XX—THE TRAP
CHAPTER XXI—ONE SHOULD ALWAYS BEGIN BY ARRESTING THE VICTIMS
CHAPTER XXII—THE LITTLE ONE WHO WAS CRYING IN VOLUME TWO



VOLUME IV.—SAINT-DENIS.

BOOK FIRST.—A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY
CHAPTER I—WELL CUT
CHAPTER II—BADLY SEWED
CHAPTER III—LOUIS PHILIPPE
CHAPTER IV—CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
CHAPTER V—FACTS WHENCE HISTORY SPRINGS AND WHICH HISTORY IGNORES
CHAPTER VI—ENJOLRAS AND HIS LIEUTENANTS

BOOK SECOND.—ÉPONINE
CHAPTER I—THE LARK’S MEADOW
CHAPTER II—EMBRYONIC FORMATION OF CRIMES IN THE INCUBATION OF PRISONS
CHAPTER III—APPARITION TO FATHER MABEUF
CHAPTER IV—AN APPARITION TO MARIUS

BOOK THIRD.—THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET
CHAPTER I—THE HOUSE WITH A SECRET
CHAPTER II—JEAN VALJEAN AS A NATIONAL GUARD
CHAPTER III—FOLIIS AC FRONDIBUS
CHAPTER IV—CHANGE OF GATE
CHAPTER V—THE ROSE PERCEIVES THAT IT IS AN ENGINE OF WAR
CHAPTER VI—THE BATTLE BEGUN
CHAPTER VII—TO ONE SADNESS OPPOSE A SADNESS AND A HALF
CHAPTER VIII—THE CHAIN-GANG

BOOK FOURTH.—SUCCOR FROM BELOW MAY TURN OUT TO BE SUCCOR FROM ON HIGH
CHAPTER I—A WOUND WITHOUT, HEALING WITHIN
CHAPTER II—MOTHER PLUTARQUE FINDS NO DIFFICULTY IN EXPLAINING A PHENOMENON

BOOK FIFTH.—THE END OF WHICH DOES NOT RESEMBLE THE BEGINNING
CHAPTER I—SOLITUDE AND THE BARRACKS COMBINED
CHAPTER II—COSETTE’S APPREHENSIONS
CHAPTER III—ENRICHED WITH COMMENTARIES BY TOUSSAINT
CHAPTER IV—A HEART BENEATH A STONE
CHAPTER V—COSETTE AFTER THE LETTER
CHAPTER VI—OLD PEOPLE ARE MADE TO GO OUT OPPORTUNELY

BOOK SIXTH.—LITTLE GAVROCHE
CHAPTER I—THE MALICIOUS PLAYFULNESS OF THE WIND
CHAPTER II—IN WHICH LITTLE GAVROCHE EXTRACTS PROFIT FROM NAPOLEON THE GREAT
CHAPTER III—THE VICISSITUDES OF FLIGHT

BOOK SEVENTH.—SLANG
CHAPTER I—ORIGIN
CHAPTER II—ROOTS
CHAPTER III—SLANG WHICH WEEPS AND SLANG WHICH LAUGHS
CHAPTER IV—THE TWO DUTIES: TO WATCH AND TO HOPE

BOOK EIGHTH.—ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS
CHAPTER I—FULL LIGHT
CHAPTER II—THE BEWILDERMENT OF PERFECT HAPPINESS
CHAPTER III—THE BEGINNING OF SHADOW
CHAPTER IV—A CAB RUNS IN ENGLISH AND BARKS IN SLANG
CHAPTER V—THINGS OF THE NIGHT
CHAPTER VI—MARIUS BECOMES PRACTICAL ONCE MORE TO THE EXTENT OF GIVING COSETTE HIS ADDRESS
CHAPTER VII—THE OLD HEART AND THE YOUNG HEART IN THE PRESENCE OF EACH OTHER

BOOK NINTH.—WHITHER ARE THEY GOING?
CHAPTER I—JEAN VALJEAN
CHAPTER II—MARIUS
CHAPTER III—M. MABEUF

BOOK TENTH.—THE 5TH OF JUNE, 1832
CHAPTER I—THE SURFACE OF THE QUESTION
CHAPTER II—THE ROOT OF THE MATTER
CHAPTER III—A BURIAL; AN OCCASION TO BE BORN AGAIN
CHAPTER IV—THE EBULLITIONS OF FORMER DAYS
CHAPTER V—ORIGINALITY OF PARIS

BOOK ELEVENTH.—THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE
CHAPTER I—SOME EXPLANATIONS WITH REGARD TO THE ORIGIN OF GAVROCHE’S POETRY.
CHAPTER II—GAVROCHE ON THE MARCH
CHAPTER III—JUST INDIGNATION OF A HAIR-DRESSER
CHAPTER IV—THE CHILD IS AMAZED AT THE OLD MAN
CHAPTER V—THE OLD MAN
CHAPTER VI—RECRUITS

BOOK TWELFTH.—CORINTHE
CHAPTER I—HISTORY OF CORINTHE FROM ITS FOUNDATION
CHAPTER II—PRELIMINARY GAYETIES
CHAPTER III—NIGHT BEGINS TO DESCEND UPON GRANTAIRE
CHAPTER IV—AN ATTEMPT TO CONSOLE THE WIDOW HUCHELOUP
CHAPTER V—PREPARATIONS
CHAPTER VI—WAITING
CHAPTER VII—THE MAN RECRUITED IN THE RUE DES BILLETTES
CHAPTER VIII—MANY INTERROGATION POINTS WITH REGARD TO A CERTAIN LE CABUC

BOOK THIRTEENTH.—MARIUS ENTERS THE SHADOW
CHAPTER I—FROM THE RUE PLUMET TO THE QUARTIER SAINT-DENIS
CHAPTER II—AN OWL’S VIEW OF PARIS
CHAPTER III—THE EXTREME EDGE

BOOK FOURTEENTH.—THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR
CHAPTER I—THE FLAG: ACT FIRST
CHAPTER II—THE FLAG: ACT SECOND
CHAPTER III—GAVROCHE WOULD HAVE DONE BETTER TO ACCEPT ENJOLRAS’ CARBINE
CHAPTER IV—THE BARREL OF POWDER
CHAPTER V—END OF THE VERSES OF JEAN PROUVAIRE
CHAPTER VI—THE AGONY OF DEATH AFTER THE AGONY OF LIFE
CHAPTER VII—GAVROCHE AS A PROFOUND CALCULATOR OF DISTANCES

BOOK FIFTEENTH.—THE RUE DE L’HOMME ARMÉ
CHAPTER I—A DRINKER IS A BABBLER
CHAPTER II—THE STREET URCHIN AN ENEMY OF LIGHT
CHAPTER III—WHILE COSETTE AND TOUSSAINT ARE ASLEEP
CHAPTER IV—GAVROCHE’S EXCESS OF ZEAL



VOLUME V—JEAN VALJEAN

BOOK FIRST.—THE WAR BETWEEN FOUR WALLS
CHAPTER I—THE CHARYBDIS OF THE FAUBOURG SAINT ANTOINE AND THE SCYLLA
CHAPTER II—WHAT IS TO BE DONE IN THE ABYSS IF ONE DOES NOT CONVERSE
CHAPTER III—LIGHT AND SHADOW
CHAPTER IV—MINUS FIVE, PLUS ONE
CHAPTER V—THE HORIZON WHICH ONE BEHOLDS FROM THE SUMMIT OF A BARRICADE
CHAPTER VI—MARIUS HAGGARD, JAVERT LACONIC
CHAPTER VII—THE SITUATION BECOMES AGGRAVATED
CHAPTER VIII—THE ARTILLERY-MEN COMPEL PEOPLE TO TAKE THEM SERIOUSLY
CHAPTER IX—EMPLOYMENT OF THE OLD TALENTS OF A POACHER AND THAT INFALLIBLE MARKSMANSHIP WHICH INFLUENCED THE CONDEMNATION OF 1796
CHAPTER X—DAWN
CHAPTER XI—THE SHOT WHICH MISSES NOTHING AND KILLS NO ONE
CHAPTER XII—DISORDER A PARTISAN OF ORDER
CHAPTER XIII—PASSING GLEAMS
CHAPTER XIV—WHEREIN WILL APPEAR THE NAME OF ENJOLRAS’ MISTRESS
CHAPTER XV—GAVROCHE OUTSIDE
CHAPTER XVI—HOW FROM A BROTHER ONE BECOMES A FATHER
CHAPTER XVII—MORTUUS PATER FILIUM MORITURUM EXPECTAT
CHAPTER XVIII—THE VULTURE BECOME PREY
CHAPTER XIX—JEAN VALJEAN TAKES HIS REVENGE
CHAPTER XX—THE DEAD ARE IN THE RIGHT AND THE LIVING ARE NOT IN THE WRONG
CHAPTER XXI—THE HEROES
CHAPTER XXII—FOOT TO FOOT
CHAPTER XXIII—ORESTES FASTING AND PYLADES DRUNK
CHAPTER XXIV—PRISONER

BOOK SECOND.—THE INTESTINE OF THE LEVIATHAN
CHAPTER I—THE LAND IMPOVERISHED BY THE SEA
CHAPTER II—ANCIENT HISTORY OF THE SEWER
CHAPTER III—BRUNESEAU
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V—PRESENT PROGRESS
CHAPTER VI—FUTURE PROGRESS

BOOK THIRD.—MUD BUT THE SOUL
CHAPTER I—THE SEWER AND ITS SURPRISES
CHAPTER II—EXPLANATION
CHAPTER III—THE “SPUN” MAN
CHAPTER IV—HE ALSO BEARS HIS CROSS
CHAPTER V—IN THE CASE OF SAND AS IN THAT OF WOMAN, THERE IS A FINENESS WHICH IS TREACHEROUS
CHAPTER VI—THE FONTIS
CHAPTER VII—ONE SOMETIMES RUNS AGROUND WHEN ONE FANCIES THAT ONE IS DISEMBARKING
CHAPTER VIII—THE TORN COAT-TAIL
CHAPTER IX—MARIUS PRODUCES ON SOME ONE WHO IS A JUDGE OF THE MATTER, THE EFFECT OF BEING DEAD
CHAPTER X—RETURN OF THE SON WHO WAS PRODIGAL OF HIS LIFE
CHAPTER XI—CONCUSSION IN THE ABSOLUTE
CHAPTER XII—THE GRANDFATHER

BOOK FOURTH.—JAVERT DERAILED
CHAPTER I

BOOK FIFTH.—GRANDSON AND GRANDFATHER
CHAPTER I—IN WHICH THE TREE WITH THE ZINC PLASTER APPEARS AGAIN
CHAPTER II—MARIUS, EMERGING FROM CIVIL WAR, MAKES READY FOR DOMESTIC WAR
CHAPTER III—MARIUS ATTACKED
CHAPTER IV—MADEMOISELLE GILLENORMAND ENDS BY NO LONGER THINKING IT A BAD THING THAT M. FAUCHELEVENT SHOULD HAVE ENTERED WITH SOMETHING UNDER HIS ARM
CHAPTER V—DEPOSIT YOUR MONEY IN A FOREST RATHER THAN WITH A NOTARY
CHAPTER VI—THE TWO OLD MEN DO EVERYTHING, EACH ONE AFTER HIS OWN FASHION, TO RENDER COSETTE HAPPY
CHAPTER VII—THE EFFECTS OF DREAMS MINGLED WITH HAPPINESS
CHAPTER VIII—TWO MEN IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND

BOOK SIXTH.—THE SLEEPLESS NIGHT
CHAPTER I—THE 16TH OF FEBRUARY, 1833
CHAPTER II—JEAN VALJEAN STILL WEARS HIS ARM IN A SLING
CHAPTER III—THE INSEPARABLE
CHAPTER IV—THE IMMORTAL LIVER

BOOK SEVENTH.—THE LAST DRAUGHT FROM THE CUP
CHAPTER I—THE SEVENTH CIRCLE AND THE EIGHTH HEAVEN
CHAPTER II—THE OBSCURITIES WHICH A REVELATION CAN CONTAIN

BOOK EIGHTH.—FADING AWAY OF THE TWILIGHT
CHAPTER I—THE LOWER CHAMBER
CHAPTER II—ANOTHER STEP BACKWARDS
CHAPTER III—THEY RECALL THE GARDEN OF THE RUE PLUMET
CHAPTER IV—ATTRACTION AND EXTINCTION

BOOK NINTH.—SUPREME SHADOW, SUPREME DAWN
CHAPTER I—PITY FOR THE UNHAPPY, BUT INDULGENCE FOR THE HAPPY
CHAPTER II—LAST FLICKERINGS OF A LAMP WITHOUT OIL
CHAPTER III—A PEN IS HEAVY TO THE MAN WHO LIFTED THE FAUCHELEVENT’S CART
CHAPTER IV—A BOTTLE OF INK WHICH ONLY SUCCEEDED IN WHITENING
CHAPTER V—A NIGHT BEHIND WHICH THERE IS DAY
CHAPTER VI—THE GRASS COVERS AND THE RAIN EFFACES

LETTER TO M. DAELLI

FOOTNOTES:



List of Illustrations

Bookshelf

Bookcover

Frontpapers

Frontispiece Volume One

Titlepage Volume One

Titlepage Verso

The Comfortor

The Fall

Awakened

Cossette Sweeping

Candlesticks Into the Fire

Father Champmathieu on Trial

Frontispiece Volume Two

Titlepage Volume Two

The Ship Orion, an Accident

The Gorbeau Hovel

The Black Hunt

Javert on the Hunt

The Resurrection

Royalist Bank-note



Frontispiece Volume Three

Titlepage Volume Three

Little Gavroche

Friends of the A B C

Excellence of Misfortune

Rose in Misery

Red Hot Chisel

Snatched up a Paving Stone

Frontispiece Volume Four

Titlepage Volume Four

A Street Orator

Code Table

Succor from Below

Cosette With Letter

Slang

The Grandeurs of Despair

Frontispiece Volume Five

Titlepage Volume Five

Last Drop from the Cup

The Twilight Decline

Darkness



THE MEMOIRS OF VICTOR HUGO


By Victor Hugo



    CONTENTS


    PREFACE.

    AT RHEIMS. 1823-1838.

    RECOUNTED BY EYE-WITNESSES

    I. THE EXECUTION OF LOUIS XVI.

    II. ARRIVAL OF NAPOLEON IN PARIS. March 20, 1815.


    VISIONS OF THE REAL.

    I. THE HOVEL.

    II. PILLAGE. THE REVOLT IN SANTO DOMINGO.

    III. A DREAM. September 6, 1847.

    IV. THE PANEL WITH THE COAT OF ARMS.

    V. THE EASTER DAISY. May 29, 1841.


    THEATER

    JOANNY. March 7, 1830, Midnight.

    MADEMOISELLE MARS.

    FREDERICK LEMAITRE.

    THE COMIQUES September, 1846

    MADEMOISELLE GEORGES. October, 23, 1867.

    TABLEAUX VIVANTS


    AT THE ACADEMY.

    Session of November 23, 1843.

    October 8, 1844.

    1845.


    AN ELECTION SESSION.

    March 16, 1847.

    April 22, 1847.

    October 4, 1847.

    December 29, 1848. Friday.

    March 26, 1850. Tuesday.


    AN ELECTION SESSION. March 28, 1850.


    LOVE IN PRISON.

    I.

    II.

    III.

    IV.

    V.


    AT THE TUILERIES. 1844-1848.

    I. THE KING. * June, 28, 1844.

    July, 1844.

    August 4, 1844.

    August, 1844.

    August, 1844.

    September 5, 1844.

    September 6, 1844.

    September 6, 1844.

    September 7, 1844.


    1847.


    II. THE DUCHESS D’ORLEANS.

    February 26, 1844.

    August, 1844.


    1847.

    III. THE PRINCES. 1847.

    November 5, 1847.


    IN THE CHAMBER OF PEERS. 1846.


    GENERAL FABVIER

    August 22, 1846.

    April 23, 1847.

    June 22, 1847.

    June 28, 1847.


    1848.

    January 14, 1848.


    THE REVOLUTION OF 1848.


    I. THE DAYS OF FEBRUARY.

    THE TWENTY-THIRD.

    THE TWENTY-FOURTH.

    THE TWENTY-FIFTH.


    II. EXPULSIONS AND ESCAPES.

    III. LOUIS PHILIPPE IN EXILE. May 3, 1848.


    IV. KING JEROME.

    RELATED BY KING JEROME.


    V. THE DAYS OF JUNE.

    MISCELLANEOUS NOTES.

    June 25.


    VI. CHATEAUBRIAND.

    July 5, 1848.


    VII. DEBATES IN THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY ON THE DAYS OF JUNE.

    SESSION OF NOVEMBER 25, 1848.

    1849.

    I. THE JARDIN D’HIVER. FEBRUARY, 1849.

    II. GENERAL BREA’S MURDERERS. March, 1849.

    III. THE SUICIDE OF ANTONIN MOYNE. April, 1849.

    IV. A VISIT TO THE OLD CHAMBER OF PEERS. June, 1849.


    SKETCHES MADE IN THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY.

    ODILON BARROT.

    MONSIEUR THIERS.

    DUFAURE.

    CHANGARNIER.

    LAGRANGE.

    PRUDHON.

    BLANQUI.

    LAMARTINE. February 23, 1850.

    BOULAY DE LA MEURTHE.

    DUPIN.


    LOUIS BONAPARTE.


    I. HIS DEBUTS.

    September 26.

    October 9.

    November 1848.


    II. HIS ELEVATION TO THE PRESIDENCY. December 1848.

    III. THE FIRST OFFICIAL DINNER. December 24, 1848.

    IV. THE FIRST MONTH. January. 1849.

    V. FEELING HIS WAY. January, 1849.

    February, 1849.


    THE SIEGE OF PARIS. EXTRACTS FROM NOTE-BOOKS


    THE ASSEMBLY AT BORDEAUX. EXTRACTS FROM NOTE-BOOKS



NOTRE-DAME DE PARIS
Also known as:
THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME


By Victor Hugo



Translated by Isabel F. Hapgood



    CONTENTS


    PREFACE.


    VOLUME I.

    BOOK FIRST.

    CHAPTER I. THE GRAND HALL.

    CHAPTER II. PIERRE GRINGOIRE.

    CHAPTER III. MONSIEUR THE CARDINAL.

    CHAPTER IV. MASTER JACQUES COPPENOLE.

    CHAPTER V. QUASIMODO.

    CHAPTER VI. ESMERALDA.


    BOOK SECOND.

    CHAPTER I. FROM CHARYBDIS TO SCYLLA.

    CHAPTER II. THE PLACE DE GREVE.

    CHAPTER III. KISSES FOR BLOWS.

    CHAPTER IV. THE INCONVENIENCES OF FOLLOWING A PRETTY WOMAN THROUGH THE

    CHAPTER V. RESULT OF THE DANGERS.

    CHAPTER VI. THE BROKEN JUG.

    CHAPTER VII. A BRIDAL NIGHT.


    BOOK THIRD.

    CHAPTER I. NOTRE-DAME.

    CHAPTER II. A BIRD’S-EYE VIEW OF PARIS.


    BOOK FOURTH.

    CHAPTER I. GOOD SOULS.

    CHAPTER II. CLAUDE FROLLO.

    CHAPTER III. IMMANIS PECORIS CUSTOS, IMMANIOR IPSE.

    CHAPTER IV. THE DOG AND HIS MASTER.

    CHAPTER V. MORE ABOUT CLAUDE FROLLO.

    CHAPTER VI. UNPOPULARITY.


    BOOK FIFTH.

    CHAPTER I. ABBAS BEATI MARTINI.

    CHAPTER II. THIS WILL KILL THAT.


    BOOK SIXTH.

    CHAPTER I. AN IMPARTIAL GLANCE AT THE ANCIENT MAGISTRACY.

    CHAPTER II. THE RAT-HOLE.

    CHAPTER III. HISTORY OF A LEAVENED CAKE OF MAIZE.

    CHAPTER IV. A TEAR FOR A DROP OF WATER.

    CHAPTER V. END OF THE STORY OF THE CAKE.



    VOLUME II.

    BOOK SEVENTH.

    CHAPTER I. THE DANGER OF CONFIDING ONE’S SECRET TO A GOAT.

    CHAPTER II. A PRIEST AND A PHILOSOPHER ARE TWO DIFFERENT THINGS.

    CHAPTER III. THE BELLS.

    CHAPTER IV. ANANKE.

    CHAPTER V. THE TWO MEN CLOTHED IN BLACK.

    CHAPTER VI. THE EFFECT WHICH SEVEN OATHS IN THE OPEN AIR CAN PRODUCE.

    CHAPTER VII. THE MYSTERIOUS MONK.

    CHAPTER VIII. THE UTILITY OF WINDOWS WHICH OPEN ON THE RIVER.


    BOOK EIGHTH.

    CHAPTER I. THE CROWN CHANGED INTO A DRY LEAF.

    CHAPTER II. CONTINUATION OF THE CROWN WHICH WAS CHANGED INTO A DRY LEAF.

    CHAPTER III. END OF THE CROWN WHICH WAS TURNED INTO A DRY LEAF.

    CHAPTER IV. LASCIATE OGNI SPERANZA—LEAVE ALL HOPE BEHIND, YE WHO

    CHAPTER V. THE MOTHER.

    CHAPTER VI. THREE HUMAN HEARTS DIFFERENTLY CONSTRUCTED.


    BOOK NINTH.

    CHAPTER I. DELIRIUM.

    CHAPTER II. HUNCHBACKED, ONE EYED, LAME.

    CHAPTER III. DEAF.

    CHAPTER IV. EARTHENWARE AND CRYSTAL.

    CHAPTER V. THE KEY TO THE RED DOOR.

    CHAPTER VI. CONTINUATION OF THE KEY TO THE RED DOOR.


    BOOK TENTH.

    CHAPTER I. GRINGOIRE HAS MANY GOOD IDEAS IN SUCCESSION.—RUE DES

    CHAPTER II. TURN VAGABOND.

    CHAPTER III. LONG LIVE MIRTH.

    CHAPTER IV. AN AWKWARD FRIEND.

    CHAPTER V. THE RETREAT IN WHICH MONSIEUR LOUIS OF FRANCE SAYS HIS

    CHAPTER VI. LITTLE SWORD IN POCKET.

    CHAPTER VII. CHATEAUPERS TO THE RESCUE.


    BOOK ELEVENTH.

    CHAPTER I. THE LITTLE SHOE.

    CHAPTER II. THE BEAUTIFUL CREATURE CLAD IN WHITE. (Dante.)

    CHAPTER III. THE MARRIAGE OF PHOEBUS.

    CHAPTER IV. THE MARRIAGE OF QUASIMODO.

    NOTE.



POEMS
By Victor Hugo


1888



CONTENTS

ORIGINAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

MEMOIR OF VICTOR MARIE HUGO.

EARLY POEMS.

ENVY AND AVARICE.

ODES.—1818-28.

KING LOUIS XVII.

THE FEAST OF FREEDOM.

TO YE KINGS.

GENIUS.

THE GIRL OF OTAHEITE.

NERO'S INCENDIARY SONG.

REGRET.

THE MORNING OF LIFE.

BELOVED NAME.

THE PORTRAIT OF A CHILD.


BALLADES.—1823-28.

THE GRANDMOTHER

THE GIANT IN GLEE.

THE CYMBALEER'S BRIDE.

BATTLE OF THE NORSEMEN AND THE GAELS.

MADELAINE.

THE FAY AND THE PERI.

THE PERI.


LES ORIENTALES.—1829.

THE SCOURGE OF HEAVEN.

PIRATES' SONG.

THE TURKISH CAPTIVE.

MOONLIGHT ON THE BOSPHORUS.

THE VEIL.

THE SISTER

THE FAVORITE SULTANA.

THE PASHA AND THE DERVISH.

THE LOST BATTLE.

THE GREEK BOY.

ZARA, THE BATHER

EXPECTATION.

THE LOVER'S WISH.

THE SACKING OF THE CITY.

NOORMAHAL THE FAIR.{1}

THE DJINNS.

THE OBDURATE BEAUTY.

DON RODRIGO.

CORNFLOWERS.

MAZEPPA.

THE DANUBE IN WRATH.

OLD OCEAN.

MY NAPOLEON.


LES FEUILLES D'AUTOMNE.—1831.

THE PATIENCE OF THE PEOPLE.

DICTATED BEFORE THE RHONE GLACIER.

THE POET'S LOVE FOR LIVELINESS.

INFANTILE INFLUENCE.

THE WATCHING ANGEL.

SUNSET.

THE UNIVERSAL PRAYER.

II.


LES CHANTS DU CRÉPUSCULE.—1849.

PRELUDE TO "THE SONGS OF TWILIGHT."

THE LAND OF FABLE.

THE THREE GLORIOUS DAYS.

TRIBUTE TO THE VANQUISHED.

ANGEL OR DEMON.

THE ERUPTION OF VESUVIUS.

MARRIAGE AND FEASTS.

THE MORROW OF GRANDEUR.

THE EAGLET MOURNED.

INVOCATION.

OUTSIDE THE BALL-ROOM.

PRAYER FOR FRANCE.

TO CANARIS, THE GREEK PATRIOT.

POLAND.

INSULT NOT THE FALLEN.

MORNING.

SONG OF LOVE.

SWEET CHARMER.{1}

MORE STRONG THAN TIME.

ROSES AND BUTTERFLIES.

THE POET TO HIS WIFE.


LES VOIX INTÉRIEURES.—1840.

THE BLINDED BOURBONS.

TO ALBERT DÃœRER.

TO HIS MUSE.

THE COW.

MOTHERS.

TO SOME BIRDS FLOWN AWAY.

MY THOUGHTS OF YE.

THE BEACON IN THE STORM.

LOVE'S TREACHEROUS POOL

THE ROSE AND THE GRAVE.


LES RAYONS ET LES OMBRES.—1840.

HOLYROOD PALACE.

THE HUMBLE HOME.

THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

STILL BE A CHILD.

THE POOL AND THE SOUL.

YE MARINERS WHO SPREAD YOUR SAILS.

ON A FLEMISH WINDOW-PANE.

THE PRECEPTOR.

GASTIBELZA.

GUITAR SONG.

COME WHEN I SLEEP.

EARLY LOVE REVISITED.

SWEET MEMORY OF LOVE.

THE MARBLE FAUN.

BABY'S SEASIDE GRAVE.


LES CHÂTIMENTS.—1853.

INDIGNATION!

IMPERIAL REVELS.

POOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

APOSTROPHE TO NATURE.

NAPOLEON "THE LITTLE."

FACT OR FABLE?

NO ASSASSINATION.

THE DESPATCH OF THE DOOM.

THE SEAMAN'S SONG.

THE RETREAT FROM MOSCOW.

THE OCEAN'S SONG.

THE TRUMPETS OF THE MIND.

AFTER THE COUP D'ÊTAT.

PATRIA.{1}

THE UNIVERSAL REPUBLIC.


LES CONTEMPLATIONS.—1830-56.

THE VALE TO YOU, TO ME THE HEIGHTS.

CHILDHOOD.

SATIRE ON THE EARTH.

HOW BUTTERFLIES ARE BORN.

HAVE YOU NOTHING TO SAY FOR YOURSELF?

INSCRIPTION FOR A CRUCIFIX.{1}

DEATH, IN LIFE.

THE DYING CHILD TO ITS MOTHER.

EPITAPH.

ST. JOHN.

THE POET'S SIMPLE FAITH.


LA LÉGENDE DES SIÈCLES.

CAIN.

BOAZ ASLEEP.

SONG OF THE GERMAN LANZKNECHT

KING CANUTE.

II.

THE BOY-KING'S PRAYER.

EVIRADNUS.

THE SOUDAN, THE SPHINXES, THE CUP, THE LAMP.

SEA-ADVENTURERS' SONG.

THE SWISS MERCENARIES.

THE CUP ON THE BATTLE-FIELD.

HOW GOOD ARE THE POOR.


LA VOIX DE GUERNESEY.

MENTANA. {1}


LES CHANSONS DES RUES ET DES BOIS.

LOVE OF THE WOODLAND.

SHOOTING STARS.


L'ANNÉE TERRIBLE.

TO LITTLE JEANNE.

TO A SICK CHILD DURING THE SIEGE OF PARIS.

THE CARRIER PIGEON.

TOYS AND TRAGEDY.

MOURNING.

THE LESSON OF THE PATRIOT DEAD.

THE BOY ON THE BARRICADE.

TO HIS ORPHAN GRANDCHILDREN.

TO THE CANNON "VICTOR HUGO."


L'ART D'ÊTRE GRANDPÈRE.

THE CHILDREN OF THE POOR.

THE EPIC OF THE LION.

LES QUATRE VENTS DE L'ESPRIT.

ON HEARING THE PRINCESS ROYAL{1} SING.

MY HAPPIEST DREAM.

AN OLD-TIME LAY.

JERSEY.

THEN, MOST, I SMILE.

THE EXILE'S DESIRE.

THE REFUGEE'S HAVEN.


VARIOUS PIECES.

TO THE NAPOLEON COLUMN.

CHARITY.

SWEET SISTER.

THE PITY OF THE ANGELS.

THE SOWER.

OH, WHY NOT BE HAPPY?{1}

FREEDOM AND THE WORLD.

SERENADE.

AN AUTUMNAL SIMILE.

TO CRUEL OCEAN.

ESMERALDA IN PRISON.

LOVER'S SONG.

LORD ROCHESTER'S SONG.

THE BEGGAR'S QUATRAIN.

THE QUIET RURAL CHURCH.


DRAMATIC PIECES.

THE FATHER'S CURSE.

PATERNAL LOVE.

THE DEGENERATE GALLANTS.

THE OLD AND THE YOUNG BRIDEGROOM.

THE SPANISH LADY'S LOVE.

THE LOVER'S SACRIFICE.

THE OLD MAN'S LOVE.

THE ROLL OF THE DE SILVA RACE.

THE LOVERS' COLLOQUY.

CROMWELL AND THE CROWN.

MILTON'S APPEAL TO CROMWELL.

FIRST LOVE.

THE FIRST BLACK FLAG.

THE SON IN OLD AGE.

THE EMPEROR'S RETURN.



THE HISTORY OF A CRIME
THE TESTIMONY OF AN EYE-WITNESS
By Victor Hugo
Translated by T.H. JOYCE and ARTHUR LOCKER.



CONTENTS

THE FIRST DAY—THE AMBUSH.

CHAPTER I. "SECURITY"

CHAPTER II. PARIS SLEEPS—THE BELL RINGS

CHAPTER III. WHAT HAD HAPPENED DURING THE NIGHT

CHAPTER IV. OTHER DOINGS OF THE NIGHT

CHAPTER V. THE DARKNESS OF THE CRIME

CHAPTER VI. "PLACARDS"

CHAPTER VII. NO. 70, RUE BLANCHE

CHAPTER VIII. "VIOLATION OF THE CHAMBER"

CHAPTER IX. AN END WORSE THAN DEATH

CHAPTER X. THE BLACK DOOR

CHAPTER XI. THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE

CHAPTER XII. THE MAIRIE OF THE TENTH ARRONDISSEMENT

CHAPTER XIII. LOUIS BONAPARTE'S SIDE-FACE

CHAPTER XIV. THE D'ORSAY BARRACKS

CHAPTER XV. MAZAS

CHAPTER XVI. THE EPISODE OF THE BOULEVARD ST. MARTIN

CHAPTER XVII. THE REBOUND OF THE 24TH JUNE, 1848, ON THE 2D DECEMBER, 1851

CHAPTER XVIII. THE REPRESENTATIVES HUNTED DOWN

CHAPTER XIX. ONE FOOT IN THE TOMB

CHAPTER XX. THE BURIAL OF A GREAT ANNIVERSARY


THE SECOND DAY—THE STRUGGLE.

CHAPTER I. THEY COME TO ARREST ME

CHAPTER II. FROM THE BASTILLE TO THE RUE DE COTTE

CHAPTER III. THE ST. ANTOINE BARRICADE

CHAPTER IV. THE WORKMEN'S SOCIETIES ASK US FOR THE ORDER TO FIGHT

CHAPTER V. BAUDINS'S CORPSE

CHAPTER VI. THE DECREES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES WHO REMAINED FREE

CHAPTER VII. THE ARCHBISHOP

CHAPTER VIII. MOUNT VALERIEN

CHAPTER IX. THE LIGHTNING BEGINS TO FLASH AMONGST THE PEOPLE

CHAPTER X. WHAT FLEURY WENT TO DO AT MAZAS

CHAPTER XI. THE END OF THE SECOND DAY


THE THIRD DAY—THE MASSACRE.

CHAPTER I. THOSE WHO SLEEP AND HE WHO DOES NOT SLEEP

CHAPTER II. THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMMITTEE

CHAPTER III. INSIDE THE ELYSEE

CHAPTER IV. BONAPARTE'S FAMILIAR SPIRITS

CHAPTER V. A WAVERING ALLY

CHAPTER VI. DENIS DUSSOUBS

CHAPTER VII. ITEMS AND INTERVIEWS

CHAPTER VIII. THE SITUATION

CHAPTER IX. THE PORTE SAINT MARTIN

CHAPTER X. MY VISIT TO THE BARRICADE

CHAPTER XI. THE BARRICADE OF THE RUE MESLAY

CHAPTER XII. THE BARRICADE OF THE MAIRIE OF THE FIFTH ARRONDISSEMENT

CHAPTER VIII. THE BARRICADE OF THE RUE THEVENOT

CHAPTER XIV. OSSIAN AND SCIPIO

CHAPTER XV. THE QUESTION PRESENTS ITSELF

CHAPTER XVI. THE MASSACRE

CHAPTER XVII. THE APPOINTMENT MADE WITH THE WORKMEN'S SOCIETIES

CHAPTER XVIII. THE VERIFICATION OF MORAL LAWS


THE FOURTH DAY—THE VICTORY.

CHAPTER I. WHAT HAPPENED DURING THE NIGHT—THE RUE TIQUETONNE

CHAPTER II. WHAT HAPPENED DURING THE NIGHT—THE MARKET QUARTER

CHAPTER III. WHAT HAPPENED DURING THE NIGHT.—THE PETIT CARREAU

CHAPTER IV. WHAT WAS DONE DURING THE NIGHT—THE PASSAGE DU SAUMON

CHAPTER V. OTHER DEEDS OF DARKNESS

CHAPTER VI. THE CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE

CHAPTER VII. THE OTHER LIST

CHAPTER VIII. DAVID D'ANGERS

CHAPTER IX. OUR LAST MEETING

CHAPTER X. DUTY CAN HAVE TWO ASPECTS

CHAPTER XI. THE COMBAT FINISHED, THE ORDEAL BEGINS

CHAPTER XII. THE EXILED

CHAPTER XIII. THE MILITARY COMMISSIONS AND THE MIXED COMMISSIONS

CHAPTER XIV. A RELIGIOUS INCIDENT

CHAPTER XV. HOW THEY CAME OUT OF HAM

CHAPTER XVI. A RETROSPECT

CHAPTER XVII. CONDUCT OF THE LEFT

CHAPTER XVIII. PAGE WRITTEN AT BRUSSELS

CHAPTER XIX. THE INFALLIBLE BENEDICTION


CONCLUSION—THE FALL.

CHAPTER I.

CHAPTER II.

CHAPTER III.

CHAPTER IV.

CHAPTER V.

CHAPTER VI.

CHAPTER VII.

CHAPTER VIII.

CHAPTER IX.

CHAPTER X.



NAPOLEON THE LITTLE
By Victor Hugo
1909,
CONTENTS

page

BOOK I

    December 20, 18481
    Mission of the Representatives10
    Notice of Expiration of Term12
    Men Will Awaken17
    Biography22
    Portrait26
    In Continuation of the Panegyrics35


BOOK II

    The Constitution46
    The Senate49
    The Council of State and the Corps Législatif52
    The Finances55
    The Liberty of the Press57
    Novelties in Respect to What Is Lawful60
    The Adherents64
    Meus Agitat Molem69
    Omnipotence76
    The Two Profiles of M. Bonaparte81
    Recapitulation86


BOOK III

    The Crime96
    The Coup d'État at Bay98


BOOK IV
The Other Crimes

    Sinister Questions150
    Sequel of the Crimes159
    What 1802 Would Have Been175
    The Jacquerie180


BOOK V
Parliamentarism

    1789189
    Mirabeau191
    The Tribune193
    The Orators196
    Influence of Oratory201
    What an Orator Is203
    What the Tribune Accomplished205
    Parliamentarism208
    The Tribune Destroyed211


BOOK VI
The Absolution: First Phase

    The Absolution214
    The Diligence215
    Scrutiny of the Vote.—A Reminder
    of Principles.—Facts217
    Who Really Voted for M. Bonaparte229
    Concession232
    The Moral Side of the Question234
    An Explanation for M. Bonaparte's Benefit238
    Axioms244
    Wherein M. Bonaparte Has Deceived Himself246


BOOK VII
The Absolution: Second Phase: The Oath

    For an Oath, an Oath and a Half251
    Difference in Price255
    Oaths of Scientific and Literary Men258
    Curiosities of the Business261
    The 5th of April, 1852266
    Everywhere the Oath272


BOOK VIII
Progress Contained in the Coup D'État

    The Quantum of Good Contained in Evil275
    The Four Institutions That Stand Opposed to the Republic280
    Slow Movement of Normal Progress282
    What an Assembly Would Have Done285
    What Providence Has Done289
    What the Ministers, Army, Magistracy, and Clergy Have Done291
    The Form of the Government of God292


CONCLUSION—PART FIRST
Pettiness of the Master—Abjectness of the Situation

      293
      298
      301


CONCLUSION—PART SECOND
Faith and Affliction

      315
      323

TOILERS OF THE SEA
By Victor Hugo
CONTENTS
PART I
SIEUR CLUBIN
Book I.—The History of a Bad Reputation
CHAP.	 	PAGE
I.	A Word written on a White Page	1
II.	The Bû de la Rue	3
III.	For your Wife: when you Marry	7
IV.	An Unpopular Man	9
V.	More Suspicious Facts about Gilliatt	18
VI.	The Dutch Sloop	20
VII.	A Fit Tenant for a Haunted House	25
VIII.	The Gild-Holm-'Ur Seat	27

Book II.—Mess Lethierry
I.	A Troubled Life, but a Quiet Conscience	30
II.	A Certain Predilection	32
III.	The Old Sea Language	33
IV.	One is Vulnerable where one Loves	35

Book III.—Durande and Déruchette
I.	Prattle and Smoke	37
II.	The Old Story of Utopia	39
III.	Rantaine	41
IV.	Continuation of the Story of Utopia	44
V.	The Devil Boat	46
VI.	Lethierry's Exaltation	50
VII.	The same Godfather and the same Patron Saint	52
VIII.	"Bonnie Dundee"	54
IX.	The Man who discovered Rantaine's Character	57
X.	Long Yarns	58
XI.	Matrimonial Prospects	60
XII.	An Anomaly in the Character of Lethierry	61
XIII.	Thoughtlessness adds a Grace to Beauty	65

Book IV.—The Bagpipe
I.	Streaks of Fire on the Horizon	67
II.	The Unknown unfolds itself by Degrees	69
III.	The Air "Bonnie Dundee" finds an Echo on the Hill	71
IV.	"A serenade by night may please a lady fair,
But of uncle and of guardian let the troubadour beware."
Unpublished Comedy	72
V.	A Deserved Success has always its Detractors	74
VI.	The Sloop Cashmere saves a Shipwrecked Crew	75
VII.	How an Idler had the Good Fortune to be seen by a Fisherman	77

Book V.—The Revolver
I.	Conversations at the Jean Auberge	80
II.	Clubin observes Someone	86
III.	Clubin carries away Something and brings back Nothing	88
IV.	Pleinmont	91
V.	The Birds'-nesters	96
VI.	The Jacressade	108
VII.	Nocturnal Buyers and Mysterious Sellers	114
VIII.	A "Cannon" off the Red Ball and the Black	117
IX.	Useful Information for Persons who expect or fear the Arrival of Letters from beyond Sea	125

Book VI.—The Drunken Steersman and the Sober Captain
I.	The Douvres	130
II.	An Unexpected Flask of Brandy	132
III.	Conversations interrupted	135
IV.	Captain Clubin displays all his great Qualities	142
V.	Clubin reaches the Crowning-point of Glory	147
VI.	The Interior of an Abyss suddenly revealed	151
VII.	An Unexpected Dénouement	158

Book VII.—The Danger of Opening a Book at Random
I.	The Pearl at the Foot of a Precipice	162
II.	Much Astonishment on the Western Coast	169
III.	A Quotation from the Bible	173
PART II
MALICIOUS GILLIATT
Book I.—The Rock
I.	The Place which is difficult to reach, and difficult to leave	181
II.	A Catalogue of Disasters	186
III.	Sound; but not Safe	188
IV.	A Preliminary Survey	190
V.	A Word upon the Secret Co-operations of the Elements	192
VI.	A Stable for the Horse	196
VII.	A Chamber for the Voyager	198
VIII.	Importunæque Volucres	205
IX.	The Rock, and how Gilliatt used it	207
X.	The Forge	210
XI.	Discovery	214
XII.	The Interior of an Edifice under the Sea	217
XIII.	What was seen there; and what perceived dimly	219

Book II.—The Labour
I.	The Resources of one who has nothing	225
II.	Wherein Shakespeare and Æschylus meet	227
III.	Gilliatt's Masterpiece comes to the Rescue of that of Lethierry	229
IV.	Sub Re	232
V.	Sub Umbra	237
VI.	Gilliatt places the Sloop in readiness	242
VII.	Sudden Danger	244
VIII.	Movement rather than Progress	247
IX.	A Slip between Cup and Lip	250
X.	Sea-warnings	252
XI.	A Word to the Wise is enough	255

Book III.—The Struggle
I.	Extremes meet	258
II.	The Ocean Winds	259
III.	The Noises explained	262
IV.	Turba Turma	265
V.	Gilliatt's Alternatives	267
VI.	The Combat	268

Book IV.—Pitfalls in the Way
I.	He who is Hungry is not Alone	280
II.	The Monster	296
III.	Another Kind of Sea-combat	297
IV.	Nothing is hidden; Nothing lost	299
V.	The Fatal Difference between Six Inches and Two Feet	302
VI.	De Profundis ad Altum	306
VII.	The Appeal is heard	311
PART III
DÉRUCHETTE
Book I.—Night and the Moon
I.	The Harbour Bell	315
II.	The Harbour Bell again	327

Book II.—Gratitude and Despotism
I.	Joy surrounded by Tortures	335
II.	The Leathern Trunk	343

Book III.—The Departure of the "Cashmere"
I.	The Havelet near the Church	346
II.	Despair confronts Despair	348
III.	The Forethought of Self-sacrifice	355
IV.	For your Wife: when you Marry	359
V.	The Great Tomb	362

THE DRAMAS OF VICTOR HUGO
MARY TUDOR
MARION DE LORME
ESMERALDA

Profusely Illustrated with Elegant
Wood Engravings

CONTENTS

    Mary Tudor
    Marion de Lorme
    Esmeralda

ILLUSTRATIONS

    The Rendezvous Frontispiece
    Marion de Lorme





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Victor Hugo" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home