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Title: Index of The Project Gutenberg Works of Madame D'Arblay (Frances Burney)
Author: Burney, Fanny
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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CONTENTS

##  EVELINA

##  CECILIA, Volume 1

##  CECILIA, Volume 2

##  CECILIA, Volume 3

EMIGRANT

##  THE WANDERER, Volume 1

##  THE WANDERER, Volume 2

##  THE WANDERER, Volume 3

##  THE WANDERER, Volume 4

##  THE WANDERER, Volume 5

##  CAMILLA

##  FANNY BURNEY AND HER FRIENDS

##  DIARY AND LETTERS OF MADAME D'ARBLAY, v1

##  DIARY AND LETTERS OF MADAME D'ARBLAY v2

DIARY AND LETTERS OF MADAME D'ARBLAY v3



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



EVELINA
or
THE HISTORY OF A YOUNG LADY’S ENTRANCE INTO THE WORLD
1778
By Fanny Burney



CONTENTS

ORIGINAL INSCRIPTION: TO DR. BURNEY

ORIGINAL PREFACE.

LETTER I - LADY HOWARD TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, Kent.

LETTER II - MR. VILLARS TO LADY HOWARD Berry Hill, Dorsetshire.

LETTER III [Written some months after the last]

LETTER IV - MR. VILLARS TO LADY HOWARD Berry Hill, March 12.

LETTER V - MR. VILLARS TO LADY HOWARD March 18. Dear Madam,

LETTER VI - LADY HOWARD TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove.

LETTER VII - LADY HOWARD TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, March 26.

LETTER VIII - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, March 26.

LETTER IX - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA Berry Hill, March 28.

LETTER X - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Queen Ann Street, London, Saturday,

LETTER XI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Queen Ann Street, April 5, Tuesday Morning.

LETTER XII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Tuesday, April 5.

LETTER XIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Tuesday, April 12. My dear Sir,

LETTER XIV - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Queen Ann Street, April 13.

LETTER XV - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA Berry Hill, April 16.

LETTER XVI - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Queen Ann Street, Thursday morning,

LETTER XVII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Friday Morning, April 15.

LETTER XVIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION

LETTER XIX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Saturday Morning, April 16.

LETTER XX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION

LETTER XXI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION

LETTER XXII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Monday Morning, April 18.

LETTER XXIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Queen Ann Street, Tuesday, April 19.

LETTER XXIV - MR VILLARS TO EVELINA Berry Hill, April 22.

LETTER XXV - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, April 25.

LETTER XXVI - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, April 27.

LETTER XXVII - LADY HOWARD TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove.

LETTER XXVIII - MR VILLARS TO LADY HOWARD Berry Hill, May 2.

LETTER XXIX - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA Berry Hill, May 2.

LETTER XXX - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, May 6.

LETTER XXXI - LADY HOWARD TO SIR JOHN BELMONT, BART Howard Grove, May 5.

LETTER XXXII - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, Kent, May 10.

LETTER XXXIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION May 13th.

LETTER XXXV - SIR JOHN BELMONT TO LADY HOWARD Paris, May 11.

LETTER XXXVI - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Howard Grove, May 18.

LETTER XXXVII - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA Berry Hill, May 21.

LETTER XXXVIII - MR. VILLARS TO LADY HOWARD Berry Hill, May 27.

LETTER XXXIX - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA Berry Hill, May 28.

LETTER XLI - EVELINA TO MISS MIRVAN June 7th

LETTER XLII - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Holborn, June 9.

LETTER XLIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION

LETTER XLIV - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION Holborn, June 13th.

LETTER XLV - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION June 15th.

LETTER XLVI - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS Holborn, June 17th.

LETTER XLVII - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS. Holborn, June 18th.

LETTER XLVIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. June 21st.

LETTER XLIX - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA. Berry Hill.

LETTER L - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS. Holborn, June 27th.

LETTER LI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION.

LETTER LII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Holborn, July 1.-5 o’clock in the morning.

LETTER LIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Holborn, July 1st.

LETTER LIV - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. July 3rd.

LETTER LV - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. July 4th.

LETTER LVI - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA. Berry Hill, July 7th.

LETTER LVII - EVELINA TO MISS MIRVAN. Berry Hill, July 14th.

LETTER LVIII - EVELINA TO MISS MIRVAN. Berry Hill, July 21st.

LETTER LIX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Berry Hill, July 29th.

LETTER LX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Berry Hill, August 10th.

LETTER LXI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Bristol Hotwells, August 28th.

LETTER LXII - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS. Bristol Hotwells, Sept. 12th.

LETTER LXIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Bristol Hotwells, Sept. 16th.

LETTER LXIV - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Bristol Hotwells, Sept. 19th.

LETTER LXV - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Clifton, Sept. 20th.

LETTER LXVI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Clifton, Sept. 24th.

LETTER LXVII - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA. Berry Hill, Sept. 28th.

LETTER LXIX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Sept. 30th.

LETTER LXX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Oct. 1st.

LETTER LXXI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Clifton, October 1st.

LETTER LXXII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. October 2nd.

LETTER LXXIII - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA. Berry Hill, Oct. 3rd.

LETTER LXXIV. [Inclosed in the preceding Letter.]

LETTER LXXV - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS. Clifton, Oct. 3rd.

LETTER LXXVI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Oct. 6th.

LETTER LXXVII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Clifton, Oct. 7th.

LETTER LXXVIII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Oct. 9th.

LETTER LXXIX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. October 9th.

LETTER LXXX - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Oct. 11th.

LETTER LXXXI - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Clifton, Oct. 12th.

LETTER LXXXII - EVELINA IN CONTINUATION. Clifton, Oct. 13th.

LETTER LXXXIII - MR. VILLARS TO EVELINA.

LETTER LXXXIV - EVELINA TO THE REV. MR. VILLARS.



CECILIA,
or
MEMOIRS OF AN HEIRESS
Volume 1 (of 3)
By Frances Burney



CONTENTS

PREFACE


BOOK I.

CHAPTER i. — A JOURNEY.

CHAPTER ii. — AN ARGUMENT.

CHAPTER iii. — AN ARRIVAL.

CHAPTER iv. — A SKETCH OF HIGH LIFE.

CHAPTER v. — AN ASSEMBLY.

CHAPTER vi. — A BREAKFAST.

CHAPTER vii. — A PROJECT.

CHAPTER viii. — AN OPERA REHEARSAL.

CHAPTER ix. — A SUPPLICATION.

CHAPTER x. — A PROVOCATION.

CHAPTER xi. — A NARRATION.


BOOK II.

CHAPTER i. — A MAN OF WEALTH

CHAPTER ii. — A MAN OF FAMILY.

CHAPTER iii. — A MASQUERADE.

CHAPTER iv. — AN AFFRAY.

CHAPTER v. — A FASHIONABLE FRIEND.

CHAPTER vi. — A FAMILY PARTY.

CHAPTER vii. — AN EXAMINATION.

CHAPTER viii. — A TETE A TETE.


BOOK III.

CHAPTER i. — AN APPLICATION.

CHAPTER ii. — A PERPLEXITY.

CHAPTER iii. — AN ADMONITION.

CHAPTER iv. — AN EVASION.

CHAPTER v. — AN ADVENTURE.

CHAPTER vi. — A MAN OF GENIUS.

CHAPTER vii. — AN EXPEDIENT.

CHAPTER viii. — A REMONSTRANCE.

CHAPTER ix. — A VICTORY.


BOOK IV.

CHAPTER i. — A COMPLAINT.

CHAPTER ii. — A SYMPATHY.

CHAPTER iii. — A CONFLICT.

CHAPTER iv. — AN EXPECTATION.

CHAPTER v. — AN AGITATION.

CHAPTER vi. — A MAN OF THE TON.

CHAPTER vii. — A REPROOF.

CHAPTER viii. — A MISTAKE.

CHAPTER ix. — AN EXPLANATION.



CECILIA
or
MEMOIRS OF AN HEIRESS
VOLUME II (of III)


By Frances Burney



CONTENTS

BOOK IV. Continued.

CHAPTER x. — A MURMURING.


BOOK V.

CHAPTER i. — A ROUT.

CHAPTER ii. — A BROAD HINT.

CHAPTER iii. — AN ACCOMMODATION.

CHAPTER iv. — A DETECTION.

CHAPTER v. — A SARCASM.

CHAPTER vi. — A SURMISE.

CHAPTER vii. — A BOLD STROKE.

CHAPTER viii. — A MISER'S MANSION.

CHAPTER ix. — A DECLARATION.

CHAPTER x. — A GAMESTER'S CONSCIENCE.

CHAPTER xi. — A PERSECUTION.

CHAPTER xii. — A MAN OF BUSINESS.

CHAPTER xiii. — A SOLUTION.


BOOK VI

CHAPTER i. — A DEBATE.

CHAPTER ii. — A RAILING.

CHAPTER iii. — AN ANTIQUE MANSION.

CHAPTER iv. — A RATTLE.

CHAPTER v. — A STORM.

CHAPTER vi. — A MYSTERY.

CHAPTER vii. — AN ANECDOTE.

CHAPTER viii. — A CONFERENCE.

CHAPTER ix. — AN ATTACK.

CHAPTER x. — A RETREAT.

CHAPTER xi. — A WORRY.


BOOK VII.

CHAPTER i. — A RENOVATION.

CHAPTER ii. — A VISIT.

CHAPTER iii. — AN INCIDENT.

CHAPTER iv. — A PROPOSITION.

CHAPTER v. — A LETTER.

CHAPTER vi. — A DISCUSSION.

CHAPTER vii. — A RETROSPECTION.

CHAPTER viii. — AN EMBARRASSMENT.

CHAPTER ix. — A TORMENT.


BOOK VIII.

CHAPTER i



CECILIA
VOLUME III (of III)
Or
MEMOIRS OF AN HEIRESS


By Frances Burney

CONTENTS

BOOK VIII. Continued.

CHAPTER ii. — AN EVENT.

CHAPTER iii. — A CONSTERNATION.

CHAPTER iv. — A PERTURBATION.

CHAPTER v. — A COTTAGE.

CHAPTER vi. — A CONTEST.

CHAPTER vii. — A MESSAGE.

CHAPTER vii. — A PARTING.

CHAPTER viii. — A TALE.

CHAPTER ix. — A SHOCK.


BOOK IX.

CHAPTER i. — A COGITATION.

CHAPTER ii. — A SURPRIZE.

CHAPTER iii. — A CONFABULATION.

CHAPTER iv. — A WRANGLING.

CHAPTER v. — A SUSPICION.

CHAPTER vi. — A DISTURBANCE.

CHAPTER vii. — A CALM.

CHAPTER viii. — AN ALARM.

CHAPTER ix. — A SUSPENSE.

CHAPTER x. — A RELATION.

CHAPTER xi. — AN ENTERPRISE.


BOOK X.

CHAPTER i

CHAPTER ii. — AN INTERVIEW.

CHAPTER iii. — A SUMMONS.

CHAPTER iv. — A DELIBERATION.

CHAPTER v. — A DECISION.

CHAPTER vi. — A PRATING.

CHAPTER vii. — A PURSUIT.

CHAPTER vii. — AN ENCOUNTER.

CHAPTER ix. — A TRIBUTE.

CHAPTER x. — A TERMINATION.



THE WANDERER
Or
Female Difficulties
BY FANNY BURNEY
CONTENTS
VOLUME I

CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
CHAPTER XV
CHAPTER XVI
CHAPTER XVII
CHAPTER XVIII
CHAPTER XIX



THE WANDERER (VOLUME 2 OF 5)
BY FANNY BURNEY
VOLUME II

CHAPTER XX
CHAPTER XXI
CHAPTER XXII
CHAPTER XXIII
CHAPTER XXIV
CHAPTER XXV
CHAPTER XXVI
CHAPTER XXVII
CHAPTER XXVIII
CHAPTER XXIX
CHAPTER XXX
CHAPTER XXXI
CHAPTER XXXII
CHAPTER XXXIII
CHAPTER XXXIV
CHAPTER XXXV
CHAPTER XXXVI
CHAPTER XXXVII
CHAPTER XXXVIII
CHAPTER XXXIX
CHAPTER XL



The Wanderer (Volume 3 of 5)
By Fanny Burney
VOLUME III

CHAPTER XLI
CHAPTER XLII
CHAPTER XLIII
CHAPTER XLIV
CHAPTER XLV
CHAPTER XLVI
CHAPTER XLVII
CHAPTER XLVIII
CHAPTER XLIX
CHAPTER L
CHAPTER LI
CHAPTER LII
CHAPTER LIII
CHAPTER LIV
CHAPTER LV
CHAPTER LVI
CHAPTER LVII.
CHAPTER LVIII
CHAPTER LIX



The Wanderer (Volume 4 of 5)
By Fanny Burney
VOLUME IV

CHAPTER LX
CHAPTER LXI
CHAPTER LXII
CHAPTER LXIII
CHAPTER LXIV
CHAPTER LXV
CHAPTER LXVI
CHAPTER LXVII
CHAPTER LXVIII
CHAPTER LXIX
CHAPTER LXX
CHAPTER LXXI
CHAPTER LXXII
CHAPTER LXXIII
CHAPTER LXXIV
CHAPTER LXXV
CHAPTER LXXVI



The Wanderer (Volume 5 of 5)
Fanny Burney
VOLUME V

CHAPTER LXXVII
CHAPTER LXXVIII
CHAPTER LXXIX
CHAPTER LXXX
CHAPTER LXXXI
CHAPTER LXXXII
CHAPTER LXXXIII
CHAPTER LXXXIV
CHAPTER LXXXV
CHAPTER LXXXVI
CHAPTER LXXXVII
CHAPTER LXXXVIII
CHAPTER LXXXIX
CHAPTER XC
CHAPTER XCI
CHAPTER XCII



FANNY BURNEY
Camilla
OR
A Picture of Youth
CONTENTS
CAMILLA, OR A PICTURE OF YOUTH
	DEDICATION 	3
	ADVERTISEMENT 	5
VOLUME I
BOOK I
I. 	A Family Scene 	7
II. 	Comic Gambols 	14
III. 	Consequences 	26
IV. 	Studies of a grown Gentleman 	33
V. 	Schooling of a young Gentleman 	41
VI. 	Tuition of a young Lady 	44
VII. 	Lost Labour 	49
BOOK II
I. 	New Projects 	53
II. 	New Characters 	60
III. 	A Family Breakfast 	78
IV. 	A Public Breakfast 	82
V. 	A Raffle 	96
VI. 	A Barn 	109
VII. 	A Declaration 	112
VIII. 	An answer 	117
IX. 	An Explication 	123
X. 	A Panic 	125
XI. 	Two Lovers 	133
XII. 	Two Doctors 	139
XIII. 	Two Ways of looking at the same Thing 	147
XIV. 	Two Retreats 	152
XV. 	Two Sides of a Question 	157
VOLUME II
BOOK III
I. 	A few kind Offices 	163
II. 	A Pro and a Con 	173
III. 	An Author's Notion of Travelling 	180
IV. 	An internal Detection 	189
V. 	An Author's Opinion of Visiting 	197
VI. 	An Author's Idea of Order 	206
VII. 	A Maternal Eye 	215
VIII. 	Modern Ideas of Duty 	222
IX. 	A Few Embarrassments 	230
X. 	Modern Ideas of Life 	238
XI. 	Modern Notions of Penitence 	244
XII. 	Airs and Graces 	249
XIII. 	Attic Adventures 	257
BOOK IV
I. 	A few Explanations 	266
II. 	Specimens of Taste 	274
III. 	A few Compliments 	283
IV. 	The Danger of Disguise 	291
V. 	Strictures on Deformity 	299
VI. 	Strictures on Beauty 	305
VII. 	The Pleadings of Pity 	311
VIII. 	The disastrous Buskins 	317
IX. 	Three Golden Maxims 	324
VOLUME III
BOOK V
I. 	A Pursuer 	333
II. 	An Adviser 	338
III. 	Various Confabulations 	343
IV. 	A Dodging 	351
V. 	A Sermon 	355
VI. 	A Chat 	362
VII. 	A Recall 	369
VIII. 	A Youth of the Times 	375
BOOK VI
I. 	A Walk by Moonlight 	386
II. 	The Pantiles 	391
III. 	Mount Ephraim 	400
IV. 	Knowle 	408
V. 	Mount Pleasant 	419
VI. 	The accomplished Monkies 	427
VII. 	The Rooms 	438
VIII. 	Ways to the Heart 	446
IX. 	Counsels for Conquest 	453
X. 	Strictures upon the Ton 	462
XI. 	Traits of Character 	469
XII. 	Traits of Eccentricity 	482
XIII. 	Traits of Instruction 	490
XIV. 	A Demander 	496
XV. 	An Accorder 	503
XVI. 	An Helper 	512
VOLUME IV
BOOK VII
I. 	The right Style of Arguing 	521
II. 	A Council 	525
III. 	A Proposal of Marriage 	531
IV. 	A Bull-Dog 	535
V. 	An Oak Tree 	541
VI. 	A Call of the House 	547
VII. 	The Triumph of Pride 	555
VIII. 	A Summons to Happiness 	561
IX. 	Offs and Ons 	570
X. 	Resolutions 	576
XI. 	Ease and Freedom 	583
XII. 	Dilemmas 	590
XIII. 	Live and Learn 	596
BOOK VIII
I. 	A Way to make Friends 	604
II. 	A Rage of Obliging 	612
III. 	A Pleasant Adventure 	621
IV. 	An Author's Time-keeper 	628
V. 	An agreeable Hearing 	633
VI. 	Ideas upon Marriage 	642
VII. 	How to treat a Defamer 	646
VIII. 	The Power of Prepossession 	655
IX. 	A Scuffle 	661
X. 	A Youthful Effusion 	669
XI. 	The Computations of Self-Love 	679
XII. 	Juvenile Calculations 	685
VOLUME V
BOOK IX
I. 	A Water Party 	695
II. 	Touches of Wit and Humour 	710
III. 	An Adieu 	720
IV. 	A modest Request 	727
V. 	A Self-dissection 	736
VI. 	A Reckoning 	740
VII. 	Brides and no Brides 	750
VIII. 	A Hint for Debtors 	757
IX. 	A Lover's Eye 	766
X. 	A Bride's Resolves 	776
XI. 	The Workings of Sorrow 	784
BOOK X
I. 	A Surprise 	793
II. 	A Narrative 	799
III. 	The Progress of Dissipation 	808
IV. 	Hints upon National Prejudice 	816
V. 	The Operation of Terror 	827
VI. 	The Reverse of a Mask 	840
VII. 	A new View of an Old Mansion 	849
VIII. 	A last Resource 	855
IX. 	A Spectacle 	865
X. 	A Vision 	874
XI. 	Means to still Agitation 	878
XII. 	Means to obtain a Boon 	885
XIII. 	Questions and Answers 	892
XIV. 	The last Touches of the Picture 	903



FANNY BURNEY
AND HER FRIENDS
SELECT PASSAGES FROM HER DIARY AND
OTHER WRITINGS
EDITED BY
L. B. SEELEY, M.A.
Sometime Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge
1895
iii
CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.

  	PAGE

Birth-Parentage-The Macburneys-Early Life of Dr. Burney-Fulk Greville-Esther Sleepe-Lynn-Poland Street-Frances Burney's Brothers and Sisters-Her Backwardness in Childhood-Her Mother's Death-David Garrick-The Old Lady-The Wig-maker-Neglect of Fanny's Education-Her Taste for Scribbling-Samuel Crisp-His Early Life-His Tragedy-Its Failure-His Chagrin-His Life at Hampton-His Retirement from the World-Crisp renews his Acquaintance with Burney-Becomes the Adviser of the Family-Burney's Amiable Temper-Chesington Hall-Its Quaint Interior-Contrast between Fanny and her Elder Sister-Burney's Second Marriage-Change of Plans-Mrs. Burney lectures Fanny-An Auto da Fé-Origin of 'Evelina'-Burney takes his Doctor's Degree-His Essay on Comets-Preparations for the 'History of Music'-Musical Tour in France and Italy-House in Queen Square-German Tour-Fanny's Occupation during his Absence-Removal to St. Martin's Street-Newton's House-The Observatory-Fanny's Arrival at Womanhood 	32-59

CHAPTER III.

'Evelina'-Date of its Composition-Negotiations with Publishers-Dr. Burney's Consent-Publication-Illness of the Author-Visit to Chesington-Her Father reads the Book-Mrs. Thrale and Mrs. Cholmondeley-Exciting News-Fanny's Success-Nancy Dawson-The Secret told to Mr. Crisp-Characters in 'Evelina'-Dinner at Streatham-Dr. Johnson-David Garrick-The Unclubbable Man-Curiosity as to Authorship of 'Evelina'-The Bookseller in the Dark-Visits to the Thrales-Table Talk-Mr. Smith-Goldsmith-Johnson and the Scotch-Civil for Four-Sir Joshua Reynolds-Mrs. Montagu-Boswell-The Branghtons-Mrs. Cholmondeley-Talk with Sir Joshua-Is it True?-Mrs. Cholmondeley's Whimsical Manner-Visit to her House-Mr. Cumberland-A Hint for a Comedy-A Charmed Circle-Sheridan-Not a Fair Question-Pressed to Write for the Stage-Flattered by Compliments 	60-99

CHAPTER IV.

Return to Streatham-Murphy the Dramatist-A Proposed Comedy-'The Witlings'-Adverse Judgment of Mr. Crisp and Dr. Burney-Fanny to Mr. Crisp-Dr. Johnson on Miss Burney-A Visit to Brighton-Cumberland-An Eccentric Character-Sir Joshua's Prices-Tragedies-Actors and Singers-Regrets for the Comedy-Crisp's Reply-The Lawrence Family at Devizes-Lady Miller's Vase-The Gordon Riots-Precipitate Retreat-Grub Street-Sudden Death of Mr. Thrale-Idleness and Work-A Sister of the Craft-The Mausoleum of Julia-Progress of 'Cecilia' through the Press-Crisp's Judgment on 'Cecilia'-Johnson and 'Cecilia'-Publication of 'Cecilia'-Burke-His Letter to Miss Burney-Assembly at Miss Monckton's-New Acquaintances-Soame Jenyns-Illness and Death of Crisp-Mrs. Thrale's Struggles-Ill-health of Johnson-Mr. Burney Organist of Chelsea Hospital-Mrs. Thrale marries Piozzi-Last Interview with Johnson-His Death 	100-131

vCHAPTER V.

Mrs. Delany-Her Childhood-Her First Marriage-Swift-Dr. Delany-The Dowager Duchess of Portland-Mrs. Delany a Favourite at Court-Her Flower-Work-Miss Burney's First Visit to Mrs. Delany-Meets the Duchess of Portland-Mrs. Sleepe-Crisp-Growth of Friendship with Mrs. Delany-Society at her House-Mrs. Delany's Reminiscences-The Lockes of Norbury Park-Mr. Smelt-Dr. Burney has an Audience of the King and Queen-The King's Bounty to Mrs. Delany-Miss Burney Visits Windsor-Meets the King and Queen-'Evelina'-Invention Exhausted-The King's Opinion of Voltaire, Rousseau, and Shakespeare-The Queen and Bookstalls-Expectation-Journey to Windsor-The Terrace-Dr. Burney's Disappointment-Proposal of the Queen to Miss Burney-Doubts and Fears-An Interview-The Decision-Mistaken Criticism-Burke's Opinion-A Misconception-Horace Walpole's Regret-Miss Burney's Journals of her Life at Court-Sketches of Character-The King and Queen-Mrs. Schwellenberg-The Queen's Lodge-Miss Burney's Apartments-A Day's Duties-Royal Snuff-Fictitious Names in the Diary-The Princesses-A Royal Birthday-A Walk on the Terrace-The Infant Princess Amelia 	132-166

CHAPTER VI.

Royal Visit to Nuneham-A Present from the Queen-Official Exhortations-Embarrassments at Nuneham-A Laborious Sunday-Hairdressing-The Court visits Oxford-Journey thither-Reception by the University-Address and Reply-Kissing Hands-Christchurch-Fatigues of the Suite-Refreshment under Difficulties-A Surprise-The Routine of Court Life-The Equerries-Draughts in the Palace-Early Prayers-Barley-water-The London Season-Mrs. Siddons-Mrs. Schwellenberg's Apartments-Her Tame Frogs-Her Behaviour to Miss Burney-Cruel Treatment-A Change for the Better-Newspaper Reports-Conversation with the Queen-Miss Burney as Reader-Her Attainments, Tastes, and Power 	167-188

CHAPTER VII.

viThe Trial of Warren Hastings-Westminster Hall-Description of it on the Opening Day of the Trial-Edmund Burke-The other Managers-Procession of the Peers-Entrance of the Defendant-The Arraignment-Speech of Lord Chancellor Thurlow-Reply of Warren Hastings-Opening of the Trial-Mr. Windham-His Admiration of Dr. Johnson-His Reflections on the Spectacle-Bearing of the Lord Chancellor-Windham on Hastings-William Pitt-Major Scott-Conversation with Windham-Partisanship-Close of the First Day's Proceedings-Conference on it with the Queen-Another Day at the Trial-Burke's Great Speech-Resemblance between Hastings and Windham-Fox's Eloquence-Death of Mrs. Delany 	189-200

CHAPTER VIII.

The King's Health-Royal Visit to Cheltenham-Excursions-Robert Raikes-Colonel Digby-The Duke of York-The Court attends the Musical Festival at Worcester-Return to Windsor-M. de Lalande, the Astronomer-His Compliments-His Volubility-Illness of the King-The King grows worse-'The Queen is my Physician'-Alarm and Agitation-Grief of the Queen-The King Insane-Arrival of the Prince of Wales-Paroxysm of the King at Dinner-The Queen Ill-The Physicians-The Royal Pair separated-The Prince takes the Government of the Palace-Prayers for the King's Recovery-The King and his Equerries-Sir Lucas Pepys-A Privy Council-Preparations for leaving Windsor-Departure for Kew-Mournful Spectacle-Mrs. Schwellenberg arrives 	201-229

CHAPTER IX.

State of Kew Palace-Dr. Willis and his Son called in-Progress under the New Doctors-Party Spirit-The Regency Question-Attacks on the Queen-Fluctuations in the King's State-Violence of Burke-Extraordinary Scene between the King and Miss Burney in Kew Gardens-Marked Improvement of the King-The Regency Bill postponed-The King informs Miss Burney of his Recovery-The Restoration-Demonstrations of Joy-Return to Windsor-Old Routine resumed-Reaction 	230-250

CHAPTER X.

viiRoyal Visit to Weymouth-Lyndhurst-Village Loyalty-Arrival at Weymouth-Bathing to Music-Mrs. Gwynn-Mrs. Siddons-The Royal Party at the Rooms-First Sight of Mr. Pitt-The Marquis of Salisbury-Royal Tour-Visit to Longleat-Mrs. Delany-Bishop Ken-Tottenham Park-Return to Windsor-Progress of the French Revolution-Colonel Digby's Marriage-Miss Burney's Situation-A Senator-Tax on Bachelors-Reading to the Queen-Miss Burney's Melancholy-Proposal for her Retirement-Her Tedious Solitude-Her Literary Inactivity-Her Declining Health-A Friendly Cabal-Windham and the Literary Club-James Boswell-Miss Burney's Memorial to the Queen-Leave of Absence proposed-The Queen and Mrs. Schwellenberg-Serious Illness of Miss Burney-Discussions on her Retirement-A Day at the Hastings Trial-The Defence-A Lively Scene-The Duke of Clarence-Parting with the Royal Family-Miss Burney receives a Pension-Her Final Retirement 	251-277

CHAPTER XI.

Chelsea Hospital-Tour to Devonshire-Visit to Bath-Reminiscences-The Duchess of Devonshire-Return Home-Literary Pursuits resumed-Attempts at Tragedy-Social Engagements-Death of Sir Joshua Reynolds-A Public Breakfast at Mrs. Montagu's-Mrs. Hastings-Mr. Boswell-Visit to Mrs. Crewe-The Burke Family-Meeting with Edmund Burke-Burke and the French Revolution-Charles Fox-Lord Loughborough-Mr. Erskine-His Egotism-The French Refugees in England-Bury St. Edmunds-Madame de Genlis-The Duke de Liancourt-The Settlement at Mickleham-Count de Narbonne-The Chevalier d'Arblay-Visit of Miss Burney to Norfolk-Death of Mr. Francis-Return to London 	278-292

CHAPTER XII.

Miss Burney at Norbury Park-Execution of the French King-Madame de Staël and Talleyrand at Mickleham-Miss Burney's Impressions of M. d'Arblay-Proposed Marriage-Visit to Chesington-The Marriage takes place-A Happy Match-The General as Gardener-Madame d'Arblay resumes her Pen-Birth of a Son-'Edwy and Elgiva'-Acquittal of Warren Hastings-Publishing Plans-The Subscription List-Publication of 'Camilla'-Visit of the Author to Windsor-Interview with the King and Queen-A Compliment from their Majesties-The Royal Family on the Terrace-Princess Elizabeth-Great Sale of 'Camilla'-Criticisms on the Work-Declension of Madame d'Arblay's Style-Camilla Cottage-Wedded Happiness-Madame d'Arblay's Comedy of 'Love and Fashion' withdrawn-Death of Mrs. Phillips-Straitened Circumstances-The d'Arblays go to France-Popularity of Bonaparte-Reception at the Tuileries and Review-War between England and France-Disappointments-Life at Passy-Difficulty of Correspondence-Madame d'Arblay's Desire to return to England-Sails from Dunkirk 	293-314

viiiCHAPTER XIII.

Madame d'Arblay's Plans for her Son-Landing in England-Arrival at Chelsea-Saddening Change in Dr. Burney-Alexander d'Arblay at Cambridge-Publication of the 'Wanderer'-Death of Dr. Burney-Madame d'Arblay presented to Louis XVIII.-M. d'Arblay appointed to the Corps de Gardes du Roi-Arrives in England and carries Madame back to France-Madame d'Arblay presented to the Duchesse d'Angoulême-The Hundred Days-Panic at Brussels-M. d'Arblay invalided-Settles in England-His Death-Remaining Days of Madame d'Arblay-Visit from Sir Walter Scott-The Memoirs of Dr. Burney-Tributes to their value-Death of Alexander d'Arblay-Death of Madame d'Arblay-Conclusion 	315-331



THE DIARY AND LETTERS OF MADAME D'ARBLAY
By Frances Burney


With Notes By W. C. Ward,

And Prefaced By Lord Macaulay's Essay.

Volume 1 (of 3)

(1778-1787.)



“The Cream Of The Diarists And Memoir Writers”

CONTENTS


DETAILED CONTENTS

PREFACE.

MADAME D'ARBLAY, BY LORD MACAULAY.


DIARY AND LETTERS OF MADAME D'ARBLAY.


SECT. 1 (1778.)

MISS BURNEY PUBLISHES HER FIRST NOVEL AND FINDS HERSELF FAMOUS.

“EVELINA” AND THE MYSTERY ATTENDING ITS PUBLICATION.

A FIRST VISIT TO MRS. THRALE AND AN INTRODUCTION To DR. JOHNSON.

FANNY BURNEY INTERVIEWS HER PUBLISHER.

CONVERSATIONS WITH MRS. THRALE AND DR. JOHNSON.

DR. JOHNSON ON SOME “LADIES” OF HIS ACQUAINTANCE

A LEARNED MAN ON “EVELINA.”

CURIOSITY REGARDING THE AUTHOR OF “EVELINA.”

THE MEMBERS OF DR. JOHNSON'S HOUSEHOLD.

ANTICIPATED VISIT FROM MRS. MONTAGU.

FANNY BURNEY'S INTRODUCTION TO A CELEBRATED “BLUE-STOCKING.”

DR. JOHNSON'S COMPLIMENTS AND GROSS SPEECHES.

SUGGESTED HUSBANDS FOR FANNY BURNEY.

A STREATHAM DINNER PARTY.


SECT. 2 (1779)

THE AUTHOR OF “EVELINA” IN SOCIETY:

A QUEER ADVENTURE.

AN EVENING AT SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDS'S

FANNY BURNEY'S INTRODUCTION TO SHERIDAN.

AN ARISTOCRATIC RADICAL OF THE LAST CENTURY.

MR. MURPHY, THE DRAMATIST.

A BEAUTY WEEPING AT WILL,

MR. MURPHY'S CONCERN REGARDING FANNY BURNEY'S COMEDY.

A SCENE ON THE BRIGHTON PARADE.

MR. MURPHY CONSIDERS THE DIALOGUE IS CHARMING: A CENSORIOUS LADY.

A MILITIA CAPTAIN OFFICIATES AS BARBER.

“HEARTS HAVE AT YE ALL.”

GIDDY MISS BROWN.

SOPHY STREATFIELD AGAIN WEEPS TO ORDER.

“EVERYTHING A BORE.”

PROPOSED MATCH BETWEEN MR. SEWARD AND THE WEEPER-AT-WILL.

THE FATE OF “THE WITLINGS.”

“QUITE WHAT WE CALL,” AND “GIVE ME LEAVE To TELL YOU.”

THE CRYING BEAUTY AND HER MOTHER.

A BEWITCHING PRODIGY.

AT BRIGHTON: A “CURE.” THE JEALOUS CUMBERLANDS.

AN AMUSING CHARACTER: HIS VIEWS ON MANY SUBJECTS.


SECT. 3 (1780-1781)

A SEASON AT BATH: MR. THRALE'S DEATH.

A YOUTHFUL PRODIGY.

LORD MULGRAVE ON THE “SERVICES.”

SARAH, DUCHESS OF MARLBOROUGH.

THE BYRONS.

MR. HENRY WILL BE SO MORTIFIED.

ALL THE BEST FAMILIES IN THE NAVY.

THE LADY OF BATH EASTON.

A FASHIONABLE CONCERT.

A BATH ALDERMAN'S RAREE SHOW.

FLIGHTY CAPTAIN BOUCHIER.

A YOUNG AND AGREEABLE INFIDEL.

BALL-ROOM FLIRTATIONS.

FURTHER FLIRTATIONS.

BATH EASTON AND SCEPTICAL MISS W——

CURIOSITY ABOUT THE “EVELINA” SET.

ALARM AT THE “NO POPERY” RIOTS.

HASTY DEPARTURE FROM BATH.

THE GORDON RIOTS.

A SUGGESTED VISIT To GRUB-STREET.

FANNY BURNEY'S BROTHER IS PROMOTED.

THE DEATH OF MR. THRALE.


SECT. 4 (1781-2)

MISS BURNEY EXTENDS THE CIRCLE OF HER ACQUAINTANCE.

YOUNG MR. CRUTCHLEY RUFFLES MISS BURNEY.

MISS BURNEY SULKS ON.

TOO MUCH OF MANY THINGS.

A “POOR WRETCH OF A PAINTER.”

DR. JOHNSON IN A RAGE.

THE MISERABLE HOST AND MELANCHOLY GUEST.

TWO CELEBRATED DUCHESSES DISCUSSED.

MR. CRUTCHLEY IS BANTERED ABOUT HIS PRIDE.

MISS SOPHY STREATHIELD IS COMMENTED ON

GARRULOUS MR. MUSGRAVE.

A PARTING SHOT AT MR. CRUTCHLEY.

MANAGER HELIOGABALUS.

SISTER AUTHORESSES.

A DINNER AT SIR JOSHUA'S, WITH BURKE AND GIBBON.

A LETTER FROM BURKE To FANNY BURNEY.

MISS BURNEY SITS FOR HER PORTRAIT

GENERAL PAOLI.


SECT. 5 (1782-3-4-)

“CECILIA”: A PAEAN OF PRAISE: LAMENTATIONS.

AT BRIGHTON AGAIN, THE “FAmous Miss BURNEY.”

DR. JOHNSON DOGMATISES.

A CUNNING RUNAWAY HEIRESS.

DR. JOHNSON A BORE.

MISS BURNEY WILL NOT BE PERSUADED TO DANCE.

DR. JOHNSON HELD IN GENERAL DREAD.

SHORT, FAT, HANDSOME MISS MONCKTON: DUCAL INDIFFERENCE.

MISS MONCKTON'S ASSEMBLY: SACQUES AND RUFFLES.

AT MISS MONCKTON'S: “CECILIA” EXTOLLED BY THE “OLD WITS,” AND BY BURKE.

A WRITER OF ROMANCES.

MRS. WALSINGHAM.

MRS. SIDDONS.

DR. JOHNSON'S INMATES AT BOLT-COURT.

THE TWO MR. CAMBRIDGES IMPROVE UPON ACQUAINTANCE.

THE SHILLING, THE CHAIRMAN, AND THE GREEN-SHOP GIRL.

MR. SOAME JENYNS'S EULOGY ON “CECILIA.”

AN ITALIAN SINGER'S VIEWS OF ENGLAND.

RAPTURES OF THE “OLD WITS” OVER “CECILIA.”

ILLNESS AND DEATH OF MR. CRISP.

FANNY BURNEY to MR. CRISP

DR. JOHNSON ATTACKED BY PARALYSIS.

A PLEASANT DAY WITH THE CAMBRIDGES.

DR. JOHNSON's HEROIC FORBEARANCE.

“SWEET BEWITCHING MRS. LOCKE.”

MRS. THRALE'S SECOND MARRIAGE.

MRS. THRALE to FANNY BURNEY

FANNY BURNEY to MRS. PIOZZI

MRS. PIOZZI to FANNY BURNEY

A HAPPY HOME.

LADY F.'s ANGER AT MRS. PIOZZI'S MARRIAGE.

FANNY BURNEY TO MRS. LOCKE.

DR. JOHNSON'S FAILING HEALTH.

DR. JOHNSON DYING. HIS DEATH.


SECT. 6 (1785-6)

MISS BURNEY IS FAVOURABLY NOTICED BY THE KING AND QUEEN.

ROYAL GENEROSITY to MRS. DELANY.

FANNY BURNEY TO DR. BURNEY

FANNY BURNEY TO MRS. LOCKE.

A VISIT TO MRS. DELANY.

ROYAL CURIOSITY ABOUT MISS BURNEY.

AN ANTICIPATED ROYAL INTERVIEW.

DIRECTIONS FOR A PRIVATE ENCOUNTER WITH THE ROYAL FAMILY.

A PANIC.

“THE KING! AUNT, THE KING!”

THE KING CATEGORICALLY QUESTIONS Miss BURNEY.

THE QUEEN APPEARS UPON THE SCENE.

“MISS BURNEY PLAYS—BUT NOT TO ACKNOWLEDGE IT.”

A DRAWING-ROOM DURING A FOG.

WILL MISS BURNEY WRITE ANY MORE?

A MUSICIAN, WITH A PROBOSCIS.

GENERAL CONVERSATION: ROYALTY DEPARTS.

THE KING AGAIN: TEA TABLE ETIQUETTE.

GEORGE III. ON PLAYS AND PLAYERS.

LITERARY TALK WITH THE QUEEN.

THE QUEEN ON ROMAN CATHOLIC SUPERSTITIONS.

ON BEING PRESENTED.

FANNY BURNEY TO MRS. BURNEY.

DIRECTIONS FOR COUGHING, SNEEZING, OR MOVING BEFORE THE KING AND QUEEN.

DR. BURNEY IS DISAPPOINTED OF A PLACE.

A VISIT TO WARREN HASTINGS AND HIS WIFE.

A PROPOSAL FROM THE QUEEN.

MISS BURNEY ACCEPTS THE QUEEN'S OFFER.

FANNY BURNEY TO DR. BURNEY

FANNY BURNEY TO MRS. FRANCIS


SECT. 7 (1786)

MISS BURNEY ENTERS UPON HER COURT DUTIES.

THE QUEEN'S SUMMONS.

A MILITARY GOURMAND.

A SUCCESSION OF VISITORS.

THE TEA TABLE OF THE KEEPER OF THE ROBES.

EVENING CEREMONIAL IN THE QUEEN'S DRESSING ROOM.

THE QUEEN'S TOILETTES.

CONGRATULATORY VISITS FROM COURT OFFICIALS.

INOPPORTUNE VISITORS.

MAJOR PRICE AND COLONEL POLIER.

MISS BURNEY'S DAILY ROUTINE AT WINDSOR.

THE PRINCESS ROYAL.

THE COURT AT KEW: A THREE YEAR OLD PRINCESS.

A DRAWING-ROOM AT ST. JAMES'S.

ABSENCE OF STATE AT KEW.

MISS BURNEY'S FIRST EVENING OUT

CASUAL CALLERS TO BE KEPT OFF: A NEW ARRIVAL.

THE ROYAL PRINCESSES.

ALARMING NEWS.

THE ATTEMPT AGAINST THE KING.

AGITATION OF THE QUEEN AND PRINCESSES.

A PRIVILEGE IS SECURED.

THE QUEEN CONTINUES ANXIOUS.

SNUFF PREPARER-IN—CHIEF.

A SUPPER MYSTERY.

LITTLE PRINCESS AMELIA'S BIRTHDAY.

THE CIPHER BECOMES A NUMBER.

DISPLAY OF LOYALTY AT LITTLE KEW.

MISS BERNAR, THE QUEEN WILL GIVE YOU A GOWN.

A CROWDED DRAWING-ROOM.

THE KEEPER OF THE ROBES IS VERY MUCH PUT OUT.


SECT. 8 (1786)

ROYAL VISIT TO NUNEHAM, OXFORD AND BLENHEIM.

A JOB'S COMFORTER.

THE JOURNEY To NUNEHAM: UNGRACious RECEPTION.

A HASTY INTRODUCTION To LADY HARCOURT.

APPARITION OF THE PRINCESSES.

FROM PILLAR TO POST.

“THE EQUERRIES WANT THE LADIES.”

SUMMONED TO THE QUEEN.

A CHECK FOR THE COLONEL.

THANKSGIVING SERVICE; AT NUNEHAM.

ROYAL VISIT TO OXFORD: RECEPTION BY THE UNIVERSITY.

THE ROYAL FAMILY ARE MUCH AFFECTED.

THE PRESENTATIONS: RETIRING BACKWARDS.

THE COLLEGES VISITED: A STEALTHY COLLATION.

RETREATING FROM THE ROYAL PRESENCE.

SURPRISED BY THE QUEEN.

AT NUNEHAM AGAIN.

A LIVELY BREAKFAST INCIDENT.


SECT. 9 (1786-7-)

COURT DUTIES AT WINDSOR AND KEW.

THE MISCHIEF-MAKING KEEPER OF THE ROBES.

A TERRACE PARTY.

A NERVOUS READER.

MISS BURNEY REPINES AT HER POSITION.

FANNY BURNEY TO MRS. PHILIPS.

MADAME DE GENLIs DISCUSSED.

A DISTINGUISHED ASTRONOMER.

EFFUSIVE MADAME DE LA ROCHE.

A DINNER DIFFICULTY.

AN ECCENTRIC LADY.

THE WRONG GUEST INVITED.

THE PRINCESS ROYAL's BIRTHDAY.

ARRIVAL OF A NEW EQUERRY.

CUSTODIAN OF THE QUEEN'S JEWEL Box.

A LAUDATORY ESTIMATE OF THE QUEEN.

TABLE DIFFICULTIES.

AN EQUERRY'S DUTIES AND DISCOMFORTS.

ROYAL CAUTIONS AND CONFIDENCES.

THE QUEEN TIRED OF HER GEWGAWS.

A HOLIDAY AT LAST.

TEA ROOM GAMBOLS.

A DREADFUL MISHAP.

“IS IT PERMITTED?”

THE PLUMP PROVOST AND HIS LADY.

THE EQUERRIES VIOLATE THE RULES.

MR. TURBULENT ON COURT ROUTINE.

AN EQUERRY ON THE COURT CONCERT.

DR. HERSCHFL'S LARGE TELESCOPE.

ILLNESS, AND SOME REFLECTIONS IT GAVE RISE TO.


FOOTNOTES:



THE DIARY AND LETTERS
OF
MADAME D’ARBLAY
By Madame D’Arblay (Frances Burney)
With Notes by W. C. Ward
In Three Volumes.
VOL. 2. (1787-1792.)
London: Vizetelly & Co., 16, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 1891.
Printed By J. S. Virtue & Company, London, City Road.



10. (1787) COURT DUTIES AT ST. JAMES’S AND WINDSOR—9-48

The Queen’s Birthday Drawing Room—A Serious Dilemma—Counsels of a Court Official—Mr. Turbulent’s Anxiety to Introduce Mr. Wellbred—Colonel Wellbred is received at Tea—Eccentric Mr. Bryant—Mr. Turbulent in a New Character—Bantering a Princess—Mr. Turbulent meets with a Rebuff—A Surprise at the Play—The King’s Birthday—The Equerries: Colonel Manners—The Duchess de Polignac at Windsor—Colonel Manners’ Musical Accomplishments—Mrs. Schwellenberg’s “Lump of Leather”—Mrs. Schwellenberg’s Frogs—Mr. Turbulent’s Antics.
11 (1787-8) COURT DUTIES: SOME VARIATIONS IN THEIR ROUTINE—49-85

Meeting of the two Princes—Bunbury, the Caricaturist—Mrs. Siddons proves disappointing on near acquaintance—Mr. Fairly’s Bereavement—Troublesome Mr. Turbulent—A Conceited Parson—Mr. Turbulent becomes a Nuisance—Dr. Herschel and his Sister—Gay and Entertaining Mr. Bunbury—The Prince of Wales at Windsor again—False Rumours of Miss Burney’s Resignation—Tyrannical Mrs. Schwellenberg—Mrs. Schwellenberg’s Capriciousness—New Year’s Day—Chatty Mr. Bryant again—Dr. Johnson’s Letters to Mrs. Thrale discussed—A Pair of Paragons—Mr. Turbulent’s Self Condemnation—Miss Burney among her Old Friends—Some Trivial Court Incidents.
12 (1788) THE TRIAL OF WARREN HASTINGS—86-153

Westminster Hall at the opening of the Hastings Trial—Warren Hastings appears at the Bar—The Lord Chancellor’s Speech—The Reading of the Charges commenced—An Old Acquaintance—William Windham, Esq., M.P.—Windham inveighs against Warren Hastings—Miss Burney Battles for the Accused—A Wearied M.P.—Mr. Crutchley reappears—Mr. Windham discusses the Impeachment—Windham affects to commiserate Hastings—Miss Burney is again present at Hastings’s Trial—Burke’s Speech in support of the Charges—Further Conversation with Mr. Windham—Miss Fuzilier likely to become Mrs. Fairly—The Hastings Trial again: Mr. Fox in a Rage—Mrs. Crewe, Mr. Burke and Mr. Windham—Miss Burney’s Unbiassed Sentiments—Burke and Sheridan meet with Cold Receptions—At Windsor again—Death of Mrs. Delany—The page vi Hastings Trial and Mr. Windham again—“The Queen is so kind”— Personal Resemblance between Windham and Hastings—Death of Young Lady Mulgrave—Again at Windsor—Another Meeting with Mr. Crutchley—Mr. Turbulent’s troublesome Pleasantries—Colonel Fairly and Second Attachments.
13. (1788) ROYAL VISIT TO CHELTENHAM—154—219

The Royal Party and their Suite—Loyalty not Damped by the Rain—Arrival at Fauconberg Hall—The Tea-Table Difficulty—A tête-à-tête wit, Colonel Fairly—The King’s Gentlemen and the Queen’s Ladies—Royalty Crowded at Fauconberg Hall—At the wells—Conversation and Flirtation with Colonel Fairly—Miss Burney meets an old Friend—Colonel Fairly again—A Visit to miss Palmer—“Original Love Letters”—The Founder of Sunday Schools criticised—On the Walks—An Unexpected Visitor—Courts and Court Life—The Vindictive Baretti—speculations upon Colonel Fairly’s Re-marrying—Colonel Fairly again presents Himself—The Colonel and the “Original Love Letters”—The Gout and the Love Letters again—A Dinner with Colonel Fairly and Miss Planta—Royal Concern for the Colonel’s Gout—young Republicans Converted—The Princes’ Animal Spirits—The Duke of York: Royal Visit to the Theatre—An uncourtly visitor—Mr. Fairly reads “Akenside” to Miss Burney—The Doctor’s Embarrassment—From Grave to Gay—A Visit to Worcester—The Queen and Mr. Fairly—Mr. Fairly Moralizes—Major Price is tired of Retirement—The Return to Windsor—At Windsor again: The Canon and Mrs. Schwellenberg—Compliments from a famous Foreign Astronomer—The Prince eyes miss Burney curiously—Colonel Manners’s Beating—Mr. Fairly is Discussed by his Brother Equerries—Baron Trenck: Mr. Turbulent’s Raillery—Amiable Mrs. Schwellenberg again—A Royal Joke—Colonel Goldsworthy’s Breach of Etiquette—Illness of Mrs. Schwellenberg—General Grenville’s Regiment at Drill.
14. (1788-9) THE KING’S ILLNESS—220-299

Uncertain State of the King’s Health—The King complains of Want of Sleep—Distress of the Queen—First Outburst of the King’s Delirium—An Anxious Night—The King’s Delirious Condition-The King refuses to see Dr. Warren—The Queen’s anxiety to hear Dr. Warren’s opinion—The Queen removes to more distant Apartments—A Visit from Mr. Fairly—The King’s Night Watchers—A Change in Miss Burney’s Duties—Mr. Fairly Succeeds in Soothing the King—New Arrangements—The Princess Augusta’s Birthday— Strange Behaviour of the First Gentleman in Europe—Stringent New Regulations—Mrs. Schwellenberg is back again—Public Prayers for the King decided upon—Sir Lucas Pepys On the King’s Condition—Further Changes at the Lodge—Mr. Fairly and the Learned Ladies—Reports on the King’s Condition—Mr. Fairly thinks the King needs Stricter Management—Mr. Fairly wants a Change—Removal of the King to Kew determined upon—A Privy Council held—The Removal to Kew—A Mysterious Visitor—The King’s Arrival—The Arrangements at Kew Palace—A Regency hinted at—Mr. Fairly’s Kind Offices—Mrs. Schwellenberg’s Parlour—A new Physician Summoned—Mrs. Schwellenberg’s Opinion of Mr. Fairly—The King’s varying Condition—Dr. Willis and his Son—Learning in Women—The Queen and Mr. Fairly’s Visits-A Melancholy Birthday—Mr. Fairly on Fans—Mr. Fairly continues his Visits: the Queen again Remarks upon them—The Search for Mr. Fairly—Miss Burney’s Alarm on being chased by the King—A Royal Salute and Royal Confidences— Curiosity regarding Miss Burney’s meeting with the King—The Regency Bill—Infinitely Licentious!—Miss Burney is taxed with Visiting Gentlemen—Improvement in the King’s Health—Mr. Fairly and Mr. Windham—The King continues to improve—The King’s Health is completely Restored.
15. (1789) THE KING’S RECOVERY: ROYAL VISIT TO WEYMOUTH—300-333

The King’s Reappearance—An Airing and its Consequences—Illuminations on the King’s Recovery—Mr. Fairly on Miss Burney’s Duties—A Visit from Miss Fuzilier—A Command from Her Majesty—Colonel Manners mystifies Mrs. Schwellenberg—The Sailor Prince—Loyal Reception of the King in the New Forest—The Royal journey to Weymouth—Welcome to Weymouth—The Royal Plunge with Musical honours—“You must Kneel, Sir!”—Royal doings in and about Weymouth—A Patient Audience—A Fatiguing but Pleasant Day—Lulworth Castle—The Royal Party at the Assembly Rooms—A journey to Exeter and Saltram—May “One” come in?—An Excursion to Plymouth Dockyard—A Visit to a Seventy-four—A Day at Mount Edgecumbe—Mr. Fairly on a Court Life—A Brief Sojourn at Longleat—Tottenham Court: Return to Windsor.
16. (1789-90) MR. FAIRLY’S MARRIAGE: THE HASTINGS TRIAL—334-365

Rumours of Mr. Fairly’s impending Marriage—A Royal Visit to the Theatre: jammed in the Crowd—In the Manager’s Box—Mr. Fairly’s Marriage imminent—Court Duties discussed—Mr. Fairly’s Strange Wedding—Renewal of the Hastings Trial: A Political Impromptu—An Illbred Earl of Chesterfield—Miss Burney in a New Capacity—The long-forgotten Tragedy: Miss Burney again as Reader—Colonel Manners in his Senatorial Capacity—A Conversation with Mr. Windham at the Hastings Trial—A Glimpse of Mrs. Piozzi—Captain Burney wants a Ship to go to Court—Captain Burney and Mr. Windham—Mr. Windham speaks on a Legal Point—An Emphatic Peroration-An Aptitude for Logic and for Greek—More Talk with Mr. Windham.
17. (1790-1) MISS BURNEY RESIGNS HER PLACE AT COURT—366-409

A Melancholy Confession—Captain Burney’s Laconic Letter and Interview—Burke’s Speech on the French Revolution—An Awkward Meeting—A New Visit from Mrs. Fairly—One Tragedy Finished and Another Commenced—Miss Burney’s Resignation Memorial—Mr. Windham Intervenes—An Amusing Interview with Mr. Boswell—Ill, Unsettled, and Unhappy—A Medical Opinion on Miss Burney’s Condition—Miss Burney breaks the Matter to the Queen—The Memorial and Explanatory Note—The Keeper of the Robes’ Consternation—Leave of Absence is Suggested—A Royal Gift to the Master of the Horse—Conferences with the Queen—Miss Burney determines on Seclusion—The Hastings Trial Resumed: The Accused makes his Defence—Mr. Windham is Congratulated on his Silence—Miss Burney makes her Report—Prince William insists on the King’s Health being Drunk—The Queen’s Health—The Procession to the Ball-room: Absence of the Princes—Boswell’s Life of johnson—The Close of Miss Burney’s Court Duties—Miss Burney’s Successor: A Pension from the Queen—Leavetakings—Farewell to Kew—The Final Parting.
18. (1791-2) REGAINED LIBERTY—410-468

Released from Duty—A Western journey: Farnham Castle—A Party of French Fugitives—Winchester Cathedral—Stonehenge, Wilton, and Milton Abbey—Lyme and Sidmouth—Sidmouth Loyalty—Powderham Castle and Collumpton Church—Glastonbury Abbey—Wells Cathedral—Bath Revisited—A Visit from Lady Spencer—Bath Sunday Schools—Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire—Bishop Percy—The Duchess of Devonshire again—Dr. Burney’s Conversation with Mr. Burke: Remarks by Miss Burney—Literary Recreation—Sir Joshua Reynolds’s Blindness—Among Old Friends—A Summons from the Queen—Mr. Hastings’s Defence—Diverse Views—Mr. Law’s Speech Discussed—Mr. Windham on the French National Assembly—“A Barbarous Business!”—Death of Sir Joshua Reynolds—Mr. Windham twitted on his Lack of Compassion—A Point of Ceremonial—Mrs. Schwellenberg and Mlle. Jacobi—A Long Talk with the King and Queen—Madame de Genlis: a Woeful Change—The Weeping Beauty Again—Madame de la Fite and Mrs. Hastings—The Impetuous Orator—Mimicry of Dr. Johnson—The King’s Birthday—Mr. Hastings’s Speech—A Well-preserved Beauty—The Burkes—Burke’s Conversational Powers—A Wild Irish Girl—Erskine’s Egotism—Caen-wood—-An Adventure with Mrs. Crewe—An Invitation from Arthur Young.



CONTENTS

SECTION 10. (1787) COURT DUTIES AT ST. JAMES’S AND WINDSOR.

THE QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY DRAWING ROOM.

A SERIOUS DILEMMA.

COUNSELS OF A COURT OFFICIAL.

MR. TURBULENT’s ANXIETY TO INTRODUCE MR. WELLBRED.

COLONEL WELLBRED IS RECEIVED AT TEA.

ECCENTRIC MR. BRYANT.

MR TURBULENT IN A NEW CHARACTER.

BANTERING A PRINCESS.

MR. TURBULENT MEETS WITH A REBUFF.

A SURPRISE AT THE PLAY.

THE KING’S BIRTHDAY.

THE EQUERRIES: COLONEL MANNERS.

COLONEL MANNERS’ MUSICAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS.

MRS. SCHWELLENBERG’S “LUMP OF LEATHER.”

MRS. SCHWELLENBERG’s FROGS.


SECTION 11. (1787-8.) COURT DUTIES: SOME VARIATIONS IN THEIR ROUTINE.

MEETING OF THE TWO PRINCES.

BUNBURY, THE CARICATURIST.

MRS. SIDDONS PROVES DISAPPOINTING ON NEAR ACQUAINTANCE.

MR. FAIRLY’S BEREAVEMENT.

TROUBLESOME MR. TURBULENT.

A CONCEITED PARSON.

MR. TURBULENT BECOMES A NUISANCE.

DR. HERSCHEL AND HIS SISTER.

GAY AND ENTERTAINING MR. BUNBURY.

THE PRINCE OF WALES AT WINDSOR AGAIN.

FALSE RUMOURS OF MISS BURNEY’S RESIGNATION.

TYRANNICAL MRS. SCHWELLENBERG.

MRS. SCHWELLENBERG’S CAPRICIOUSNESS.

CHATTY MR. BRYANT AGAIN.

DR. JOHNSON’s LETTERS To MRS. THRALE DISCUSSED. Wednesday, Jan.

A PAIR OF PARAGONS.

SOME TRIVIAL COURT INCIDENTS.


SECTION 12. (1788.) THE TRIAL OF WARREN HASTINGS.

WESTMINSTER HALL AT THE OPENING OF THE HASTINGS TRIAL.

WARREN HASTINGS APPEARS AT THE BAR.

THE LORD CHANCELLOR’S SPEECH.

THE READING OF THE CHARGES COMMENCED.

AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.

WILLIAM WINDHAM ESQ., M.P.

WINDHAM INVEIGHS AGAINST WARREN HASTINGS. Somewhat sarcastic, this—but

MISS BURNEY BATTLES FOR THE ACCUSED.

A WEARIED M.P.—MR. CRUTCHLEY REAPPEARS.

MR. WINDHAM DISCUSSES THE IMPEACHMENT.

WINDHAM AFFECTS TO COMMISERATE HASTINGS.

MISS BURNEY IS AGAIN PRESENT AT HASTINGS’S TRIAL.

BURKE’.S SPEECH IN SUPPORT OF THE CHARGES. At length the peers’

FURTHER CONVERSATION WITH MR. WINDHAM.

MISS FUZILIER LIKELY TO RECONCILE MRS. FAIRLY.

THE HASTINGS TRIAL AGAIN: MR. FOX IN A RAGE. And now for my third

MRS. CREWE, MR. BURKE, AND MR. WINDHAM.

MISS BURNEY’S UNBIASED SENTIMENTS.

BURKE AND SHERIDAN MEET WITH COLD RECEPTIONS.

AT WINDSOR AGAIN.

DEATH OF MRS. DELANY.

THE HASTINGS TRIAL AND MR. WINDHAM AGAIN. The part of this month in

“THE QUEEN IS SO KIND.”

PERSONAL RESEMBLANCE BETWEEN WINDHAM AND HASTINGS.

AGAIN AT WINDSOR.

ANOTHER MEETING WITH MR. CRUTCHLEY.

MR. TURBULENT’S TROUBLESOME PLEASANTRIES.

COLONEL FAIRLY AND SECOND ATTACHMENTS.


SECTION 13 (1788.) ROYAL VISIT TO CHELTENHAM.

THE ROYAL PARTY AND THEIR SUITE.

LOYALTY NOT DAMPED BY THE RAIN.

ARRIVAL AT FAUCONBERG HALL.

THE TEA-TABLE DIFFICULTY.

A TETE-A-TETE WITH COLONEL FAIRLY.

THE KING’s GENTLEMEN AND THE QUEEN’S LADIES.

ROYALTY CROWDED AT FAUCONBERG HALL.

AT THE WELLS.

CONVERSATION AND FLIRTATION WITH COLONEL FAIRLY.

MISS BURNEY MEETS AN OLD FRIEND.

COLONEL FAIRLY AGAIN.

A VISIT TO MISS PALMER.

“ORIGINAL LOVE LETTERS.”

THE FOUNDER OF SUNDAY SCHOOLS CRITICIZED.

ON THE WALKS.

AN UNEXPECTED VISITOR.

COURTS AND COURT LIFE.

THE VINDICTIVE BARETTI.

SPECULATIONS UPON COLONEL FAIRLY’S RE-MARRYING.

COLONEL FAIRLY AGAIN PRESENTS HIMSELF.

THE COLONEL AND THE “ORIGINAL LOVE LETTERS.”

THE GOUT AND THE LOVE LETTERS, AGAIN.

A DINNER WITH COLONEL FAIRLY AND MISS PLANTA.

ROYAL CONCERN FOR THE COLONEL’s GOUT.

YOUNG REPUBLICANS CONVERTED.

THE PRINCES’ ANIMAL SPIRITS.

THE DUKE OF YORK: ROYAL VISIT TO THE THEATRE.

AN UN-COURTLY VISITOR.

MR. FAIRLY READS “AKENSIDE” TO MISS BURNEY.

THE DOCTOR’s EMBARRASSMENT.

FROM GRAVE TO GAY.

A VISIT TO WORCESTER.

THE QUEEN AND MR. FAIRLY.

MR. FAIRLY MORALIZES.

MAJOR PRICE IS TIRED OF RETIREMENT.

MR. FAIRLY’S LITTLE NOTE.

THE RETURN TO WINDSOR.

AT WINDSOR AGAIN THE CANON AND MRS. SCHWELLENBERG.

COMPLIMENTS FROM A FAMOUS FOREIGN ASTRONOMER.

THE PRINCE EYES MISS BURNEY CURIOUSLY.

COLONEL MANNERS’S BEATING.

MR. FAIRLY IS DISCUSSED BY HIS BROTHER EQUERRIES.

BARON TRENCK: MR. TURBULENT’S RAILLERY.

AMIABLE MRS. SCHWELLENBERG AGAIN.

A ROYAL JOKE.

COLONEL GOLDSWORTHY’S BREACH OF ETIQUETTE.

ILLNESS OF MRS. SCHWELLENBERG.

GENERAL GRENVILLE’S REGIMENT AT DRILL.


SECTION 14 (1788-9.) THE KING’S ILLNESS.

UNCERTAIN STATE OF THE KING’S HEALTH.

THE KING COMPLAINS OF WANT OF SLEEP.

DISTRESS OF THE QUEEN.

FIRST OUTBURST OF THE KING’s DELIRIUM.

AN ANXIOUS NIGHT.

THE KING’S DELIRIOUS CONDITION.

THE KING REFUSES TO SEE DR. WARREN.

THE QUEEN’S ANXIETY TO HEAR DR. WARREN’S OPINION.

THE QUEEN REMOVES TO MORE DISTANT APARTMENTS.

A VISIT FROM MR. FAIRLY.

THE KING’S NIGHT WATCHERS.

MR. FAIRLY SUCCEEDS IN SOOTHING THE KING.

NEW ARRANGEMENTS.

THE PRINCESS AUGUSTA’S BIRTHDAY.

STRANGE BEHAVIOUR OF THE FIRST GENTLEMAN IN EUROPE.

STRINGENT NEW REGULATIONS.

MRS. SCHWELLENBERG IS BACK AGAIN.

PUBLIC PRAYERS FOR THE KING DECIDED UPON.

SIR LUCAS PEPYS ON THE KING’S CONDITION.

FURTHER CHANGES AT THE LODGE.

MR. FAIRLY AND THE LEARNED LADIES.

REPORTS ON THE KING’S CONDITION.

MR. FAIRLY THINKS THE KING NEEDS STRICTER MANAGEMENT.

MR. FAIRLY WANTS A CHANGE.

REMOVAL OF THE KING TO KEW DETERMINED UPON.

A PRIVY COUNCIL HELD.

A MYSTERIOUS VISITOR.

THE KING’S ARRIVAL.

THE ARRANGEMENTS AT KEW PALACE.

A REGENCY HINTED AT.

MR. FAIRLY’S KIND OFFICES.

MRS. SCHWELLENBERG’S PARLOUR.

A NEW PHYSICIAN SUMMONED.

MRS. SCHWELLENBERG’S OPINION OF MR. FAIRLY.

THE KING’S VARYING CONDITION.

LEARNING IN WOMEN.

THE QUEEN AND MR. FAIRLY’S VISITS.

MR. FAIRLY ON FANS.

MR. FAIRLY CONTINUES HIS VISITS: THE QUEEN AGAIN REMARKS UPON THEM.

THE SEARCH FOR MR. FAIRLY.

A ROYAL SALUTE AND ROYAL CONFIDENCES.

CURIOSITY REGARDING Miss BURNEY’S MEETING WITH THE KING.

THE REGENCY BILL.

INFINITELY LICENTIOUS!

MISS BURNEY IS TAXED WITH VISITING GENTLEMEN.

IMPROVEMENT IN THE KING’S, HEALTH.

MR. FAIRLY AND MR. WINDHAM.

THE KING CONTINUES TO IMPROVE.

THE KING’S HEALTH IS COMPLETELY RESTORED.


SECTION 15. (1789-) THE KING’S RECOVERY: ROYAL VISIT TO WEYMOUTH.

THE KING’S REAPPEARANCE.

AN AIRING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

ILLUMINATIONS ON THE KING’s RECOVERY.

TO THE KING.

MR FAIRLY ON MISS BURNEY’S DUTIES.

A VISIT FROM MISS FUZILIER.

A COMMAND FROM HER MAJESTY.

COLONEL MANNERS MYSTIFIES MRS. SCHWELLENBERG.

THE SAILOR PRINCE.

LOYAL RECEPTION OF THE KING IN THE NEW FOREST.

WELCOME TO WEYMOUTH.

THE ROYAL PLUNGE WITH MUSICAL HONOURS. “YOU MUST KNEEL, SIR!”

ROYAL DOINGS IN AND ABOUT WEYMOUTH.

A PATIENT AUDIENCE.

A FATIGUING BUT PLEASANT DAY.

LULWORTH CASTLE.

THE ROYAL PARTY AT THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS.

A JOURNEY To EXETER AND SALTRAM.

MAY “ONE” COME IN?

AN EXCURSION To PLYMOUTH DOCKYARD.

A VISIT TO A SEVENTY-FOUR.

A DAY AT MOUNT-EDGECUMBE.

MR. FAIRLY ON A COURT LIFE.

A BRIEF SOJOURN AT LONGLEAT.

TOTTENHAM COURT: RETURN TO WINDSOR.


SECTION 16. (1789-90.) MR. FAIRLY’S MARRIAGE: THE HASTINGS TRIAL.

RUMOURS OF MR. FAIRLY’S IMPENDING MARRIAGE.

A ROYAL VISIT TO THE THEATRE: JAMMED IN THE CROWD.

IN THE MANAGER’S BOX.

MR. FAIRLY’S MARRIAGE IMMINENT.

COURT DUTIES DISCUSSED.

MR. FAIRLY’S STRANGE WEDDING.

AN ILLBRED EARL OF CHESTERFIELD.

MISS BURNEY IN A NEW CAPACITY.

THE LONG-FORGOTTEN TRAGEDY: MISS BURNEY AGAIN AS READER.

COLONEL MANNERS IN HIS SENATORIAL CAPACITY.

A CONVERSATION WITH MR. WINDHAM AT THE HASTINGS TRIAL.

A GLIMPSE OF MRS. PIOZZI.

CAPTAIN BURNEY WANTS A SHIP AND TO GO TO COURT.

CAPTAIN BURNEY AND MR. WINDHAM.

MR. WINDHAM SPEAKS ON A LEGAL POINT.

AN EMPHATIC PERORATION.

AN APTITUDE FOR LOGIC AND FOR GREEK.

MORE TALK WITH MR. WINDHAM.


SECTION 17. (1790-1) MISS BURNEY RESIGNS HER PLACE AT COURT.

A MELANCHOLY CONFESSION.

CAPTAIN BURNEY’S LACONIC LETTER AND INTERVIEW.

BURKE’S SPEECH ON THE FRENCH REVOLUTION.

AN AWKWARD MEETING.

A NEW VISIT FROM MRS. FAIRLY.

ONE TRAGEDY FINISHED AND ANOTHER COMMENCED.

MISS BURNEY’s RESIGNATION MEMORIAL.

MR. WINDHAM INTERVENES.

AN AMUSING INTERVIEW WITH MR. BOSWELL.

ILL, UNSETTLED, AND UNHAPPY.

A MEDICAL OPINION ON MISS BURNEY’S CONDITION.

MISS BURNEY BREAKS THE MATTER TO THE QUEEN.

THE MEMORIAL AND EXPLANATORY NOTE.

THE KEEPER OF THE ROBES’ CONSTERNATION.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE IS SUGGESTED.

A ROYAL GIFT TO THE MASTER OF THE HORSE.

CONFERENCES WITH THE QUEEN.

MISS BURNEY DETERMINES ON SECLUSION.

THE HASTINGS TRIAL RESUMED: ‘THE ACCUSED MAKES HIS DEFENCE.

MR. WINDHAM IS CONGRATULATED ON HIS SILENCE.

PRINCE WILLIAM INSISTS ON THE KING’S HEALTH BEING DRUNK.

THE QUEEN’s HEALTH.

THE PROCESSION TO THE BALL-ROOM: ABSENCE OF THE PRINCES.

BOSWELL’s LIFE OF JOHNSON.

THE CLOSE OF MISS BURNEY’S COURT DUTIES.

MISS BURNEY’S SUCCESSOR. A PENSION FROM THE QUEEN.

LEAVE-TAKINGS.

FAREWELL TO KEW.

THE FINAL PARTING.


SECTION 18. (1791-2.) REGAINED LIBERTY.

A WESTERN JOURNEY: FARNHAM CASTLE.

WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL.

STONEHENGE, WILTON, AND MILTON ABBEY.

LYME AND SIDMOUTH.

SIDMOUTH LOYALTY.

POWDERHAM CASTLE AND COLLUMPTON CHURCH.

GLASTONBURY ABBEY.

WELLS CATHEDRAL.

BATH REVISITED.

A VISIT FROM LADY SPENCER.

BATH SUNDAY SCHOOLS.

GEORGIANA, DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE

BISHOP PERCY.

THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE AGAIN.

DR. BURNEY’S CONVERSATION WITH MR. BURKE: REMARKS BY Miss BURNEY.

LITERARY RECREATION.

SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDs’s BLINDNESS.

AMONG OLD FRIENDS.

MR. HASTINGS’S DEFENCE.

DIVERSE VIEWS.

MR. LAW’S SPEECH DISCUSSED.

MR. WINDHAM ON THE FRENCH NATIONAL ASSEMBLY.

DEATH OF SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDS.

MR. WINDHAM TWITTED ON His LACK OF COMPASSION.

A POINT OF CEREMONIAL.

MRS. SCHWELLENBERG AND MLLE. JACOBI.

A LONG TALK WITH THE KING AND QUEEN.

MADAME DE GENLIS: A WOEFUL CHANGE.

THE WEEPING BEAUTY AGAIN.

MADAME DE LA FITE AND MRS. HASTINGS.

BOSWELL’S MIMICRY OF DR. JOHNSON.

THE KING’S BIRTHDAY.

MR. HASTINGS’S SPEECH.

A WELL-PRESERVED BEAUTY.

THE BURKES.

BURKE’S CONVERSATIONAL POWERS.

A WILD IRISH GIRL.

ERSKINE’S EGOTISM.

CAEN-WOOD.

AN ADVENTURE WITH MRS. CREWE.

AN INVITATION FROM ARTHUR YOUNG.

FOOTNOTES:





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