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´╗┐Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Washington Irving
Author: Irving, Washington
Language: English
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*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Washington Irving" ***

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WORKS OF

WASHINGTON IRVING



CONTENTS


THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW

LITTLE BRITAIN

##  ASTORIA

##  THE ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN BONNEVILLE

##  OLD CHRISTMAS

##  THE SKETCH BOOK OF GEOFFREY CRAYON, GENT.

##  THE CRAYON PAPERS

##  THE CONQUEST OF GRANADA

##  THE STUDENT'S LIFE OF WASHINGTON; CONDENSED

THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON, VOL I (of V)

##  ABBOTSFORD AND NEWSTEAD ABBEY

##  OLIVER GOLDSMITH

LIFE AND VOYAGES OF CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS (VOL. II)

##  WOLFERT'S ROOST AND MISCELLANIES

##  KNICKERBOCKER'S HISTORY OF NEW YORK

##  TALES OF A TRAVELLER

##  BRACEBRIDGE HALL, OR THE HUMORISTS

##  THE ALHAMBRA

##  SPANISH PAPERS



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



ASTORIA; OR, ANECDOTES OF AN ENTERPRISE BEYOND THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS By
Washington Irving



CONTENTS


AUTHOR\x92S INTRODUCTION


CHAPTER I. -- Objects of American Enterprise.-Gold Hunting and Fur
Trading.-Their Effect on Colonization.-Early French Canadian Settlers.-
Ottawa and Huron Hunters.-An Indian Trading Camp. Coureurs Des Bois, or
Rangers of the Woods.-Their Roaming Life.-Their Revels and Excesses.-
Licensed Traders. Missionaries.-Trading Posts.-Primitive French Canadian
Merchant.-His Establishment and Dependents.-British Canadian Fur
Merchant.-Origin of the Northwest Company.-Its Constitution.-Its
Internal Trade.-A Candidate for the Company.-Privations in the
Wilderness.-Northwest Clerks. Northwest Partners.-Northwest Nabobs.-
Feudal Notions in the Forests.-The Lords of the Lakes.-Fort William.-Its
Parliamentary Hall and Banqueting Room.-Wassailing in the Wilderness.

CHAPTER II. -- Rise of the Mackinaw Company.-Attempt of the American
Government to Counteract Foreign Influence Over the Indian Tribes.-John
Jacob Astor.-His Birth-Place.-His Arrival in the United States.-What
First Turned His Attention to the Fur Trade.-His Character, Enterprises,
and Success.-His Communications With the American Government.-Origin of
the American Fur Company

CHAPTER III. -- Fur Trade in the Pacific-American Coasting Voyages-
Russian Enterprises.-Discovery of the Columbia River.-Carver's Project
to Found a Settlement There.-Mackenzie's Expedition.-Lewis and Clarke's
Journey Across the Rocky Mountains-Mr. Astor's Grand Commercial Scheme.-
His Correspondence on the Subject With Mr. Jefferson.-His Negotiations
With the Northwest Company.-His Steps to Carry His Scheme Into Effect.

CHAPTER IV. -- Two Expeditions Set on Foot.-The Tonquin and Her Crew.-
Captain Thorn, His Character.-The Partners and Clerks- Canadian
Voyageurs, Their Habits, Employments, Dress, Character, Songs-Expedition
of a Canadian Boat and Its Crew by Land and Water.-Arrival at New York.-
Preparations for a Sea Voyage.-Northwest Braggarts.-Underhand
Precautions- Letter of Instructions.

CHAPTER V. -- Sailing of the Tonquin.-A Rigid Commander and a Reckless
Crew.-Landsmen on Shipboard.-Fresh-Water Sailors at Sea.- Lubber Nests.-
Ship Fare.-A Labrador Veteran-Literary Clerks.-Curious Travellers.-
Robinson Crusoe's Island.- Quarter-Deck Quarrels.-Falkland Islands.-A
Wild-Goose Chase.-Port Egmont.-Epitaph Hunting.-Old Mortality- Penguin
Shooting.-Sportsmen Left in the Lurch.-A Hard Pull.-Further
Altercations.-Arrival at Owyhee.

CHAPTER VI. -- Owyhee.-Sandwich Islanders-Their Nautical Talents.-
Tamaahmaah.-His Navy.-His Negotiations.-Views of Mr. Astor With Respect
to the Sandwich Islands-Karakakooa.- Royal Monopoly of Pork.-Description
of the Islanders- Gayeties on Shore.-Chronicler of the Island.-Place
Where Captain Cook was Killed.-John Young, a Nautical Governor.-His
Story.-Waititi-A Royal Residence.-A Royal Visit-Grand Ceremonials.-Close
Dealing-A Royal Pork Merchant-Grievances of a Matter-of-Fact Man.

CHAPTER VII. -- Departure From the Sandwich Islands.-Misunderstandings-
Miseries of a Suspicious Man.-Arrival at the Columbia- Dangerous
Service.-Gloomy Apprehensions-Bars and Breakers.-Perils of the Ship.
Disasters of a Boat's Crew.- Burial of a Sandwich Islander.

CHAPTER VIII. -- Mouth of the Columbia.-The Native Tribes.-Their
Fishing.- Their Canoes.-Bold Navigators-Equestrian Indians and Piscatory
Indians, Difference in Their Physical Organization.-Search for a Trading
Site.-Expedition of M'Dougal and David Stuart-Comcomly, the One-Eyed
Chieftain.- Influence of Wealth in Savage Life.-Slavery Among the
Natives.-An Aristocracy of Flatheads.-Hospitality Among the Chinooks-
Comcomly's Daughter.-Her Conquest.

CHAPTER IX. -- Point George-Founding of Astoria-Indian Visitors.-Their
Reception.-The Captain Taboos the Ship.-Departure of the Tonquin.-
Comments on the Conduct of Captain Thorn.

CHAPTER X. -- Disquieting Rumors From the Interior.-Reconnoitring Party-
Preparations for a Trading Post.-An Unexpected Arrival-A Spy in the
Camp.-Expedition Into the Interior-Shores of the Columbia-Mount Coffin.-
Indian Sepulchre.-The Land of Spirits-Columbian Valley-Vancouver's
Point.-Falls and Rapids.-A Great Fishing Mart.-The Village of Wishram.-
Difference Between Fishing Indians and Hunting Indians- Effects of
Habits of Trade on the Indian Character.-Post Established at the
Oakinagan.

CHAPTER XI. -- Alarm at Astoria.-Rumor of Indian Hostilities.-
Preparations for Defense.-Tragic Fate of the Tonquin.

CHAPTER XII. -- Gloom at Astoria-An Ingenious Stratagem.-The Small-Pox
Chief.-Launching of the Dolly.-An Arrival.-A Canadian Trapper.-A Freeman
of the Forest-An Iroquois Hunter.- Winter on the Columbia.-Festivities
of New Year.

CHAPTER XIII. -- Expedition by Land.-Wilson P. Hunt.-His Character.-
Donald M'Kenzie.-Recruiting Service Among the Voyageurs.-A Bark Canoe.-
Chapel of St. Anne.-Votive Offerings.-Pious Carousals,-A Ragged
Regiment.-Mackinaw.-Picture of a Trading Post.-Frolicking Voyageurs.-
Swells and Swaggerers.- Indian Coxcombs.-A Man of the North.-Jockeyship
of Voyageurs-Inefficacy of Gold.-Weight of a Feather-Mr. Ramsay Crooks-
His Character.-His Risks Among the Indians.- His Warning Concerning
Sioux and Blackfeet.-Embarkation of Recruits.-Parting Scenes Between
Brothers, Cousins, Wives, Sweethearts, and Pot Companions.

CHAPTER XIV. -- St. Louis.-Its Situation.-Motley Population.-French
Creole Traders and Their Dependants.-Missouri Fur Company- Mr. Manuel
Lisa.-Mississippi Boatmen.-Vagrant Indians. -Kentucky Hunters-Old French
Mansion-Fiddling-Billiards -Mr. Joseph Miller-His Character-Recruits-
Voyage Up the Missouri.-Difficulties of the River.-Merits of Canadian
Voyageurs.-Arrival at the Nodowa.-Mr. Robert M'Lellan joins the Party-
John Day, a Virginia Hunter. Description of Him. -Mr. Hunt Returns to
St. Louis.

CHAPTER XV. -- Opposition of the Missouri Fur Company.-Blackfeet
Indians.- Pierre Dorion, a Half-Breed Interpreter.-Old Dorion and His
Hybrid Progeny-Family Quarrels.-Cross Purposes Between Dorion and Lisa.-
Renegadoes From Nodowa.-Perplexities of a Commander.-Messrs. Bradbury
and Nuttall Join the Expedition.-Legal Embarrassments of Pierre Dorion.-
Departure From St. Louis.-Conjugal Discipline of a Half- Breed.-Annual
Swelling of the Rivers.-Daniel Boone, the Patriarch of Kentucky.-John
Colter.-His Adventures Among the Indians.-Rumors of Danger Ahead.-Fort
Osage.-An Indian War- Feast.-Troubles in the Dorion Family.-Buffaloes
and Turkey- Buzzards.

CHAPTER XVI. -- Return of Spring.-Appearance of Snakes.-Great Flights of
Wild Pigeons.-Renewal of the Voyage.-Night Encampments.- Platte River.-
Ceremonials on Passing It.-Signs of Indian War Parties.-Magnificent
Prospect at Papillion Creek.- Desertion of Two Hunters.-An Irruption
Into the Camp of Indian Desperadoes.-Village of the Omahas.-Anecdotes of
the Tribe.-Feudal Wars of the Indians.-Story of Blackbird, the Famous
Omaha Chief.

CHAPTER XVII. -- Rumors of Danger From the Sioux Tetons.-Ruthless
Character of Those Savages.-Pirates of the Missouri.-Their Affair with
Crooks and M'Lellan.-A Trading Expedition Broken Up.- M'Lellan's Vow of
Vengeance.-Uneasiness in the Camp.- Desertions.-Departure From the Omaha
Village.-Meeting With Jones and Carson, two Adventurous Trappers.-
Scientific Pursuits of Messrs. Bradbury and Nuttall.-Zeal of a
Botanist.-Adventure of Mr. Bradbury with a Ponca Indian.- Expedient of
the Pocket Compass and Microscope.-A Messenger From Lisa.-Motives for
Pressing Forward.

CHAPTER XVIII. -- Camp Gossip.-Deserters.-Recruits.-Kentucky Hunters.-A
Veteran Woodman.-Tidings of Mr. Henry.-Danger From the Blackfeet.-
Alteration of Plans.-Scenery of the River.- Buffalo Roads.-Iron Ore.-
Country of the Sioux.-A Land of Danger.-apprehensions of the Voyageurs.-
Indian Scouts.- Threatened Hostilities.-A Council of War.-An Array of
Battle.-A Parley.-The Pipe of Peace.-Speech-Making.

CHAPTER XIX. -- The Great Bend of the Missouri-Crooks and M'Lellan Meet
With Two of Their Indian Opponents-Wanton Outrage of a White Man the
Cause of Indian Hostility-Dangers and Precautions.-An Indian War Party.-
Dangerous Situation of Mr. Hunt.-A Friendly Encampment.-Feasting and
Dancing.- Approach of Manuel Lisa and His Party-.A Grim Meeting Between
Old Rivals.-Pierre Dorion in a Fury.-A Burst of chivalry.

CHAPTER XX. -- Features of the Wilderness-Herds of Buffalo.-Antelopes-
Their Varieties and Habits.-John Day.-His Hunting Strategy-Interview
with Three Arickaras-Negotiations Between the Rival Parties-The Left-
Handed and the Big Man, two Arickara Chiefs.-Arickara Village-Its
Inhabitants- Ceremonials on Landing-A Council Lodge.-Grand Conference-
Speech of Lisa.-Negotiation for Horses.-Shrewd Suggestion of Gray Eyes,
an Arickara Chief-Encampment of the Trading Parties.

CHAPTER XXI. -- An Indian Horse Fair.-Love of the Indians for Horses-
Scenes in the Arickara Village.-Indian Hospitality.-Duties of Indian
Women. Game Habits of the Men.-Their Indolence. -Love of Gossiping.-
Rumors of Lurking Enemies.-Scouts.- An Alarm.-A Sallying Forth.-Indian
Dogs.-Return of a Horse -Stealing Party.-An Indian Deputation.-Fresh
Alarms.-Return of a Successful War Party.-Dress of the Arickaras.-Indian
Toilet.-Triumphal Entry of the War Party.-Meetings of Relations and
Friends.-Indian Sensibility.-Meeting of a Wounded Warrior and His
Mother.-Festivities and Lamentations.

CHAPTER XXII. -- Wilderness of the Far West.-Great American Desert-
Parched Seasons.-Black Hills.-Rocky Mountains.-Wandering and Predatory
Hordes.-Speculations on What May Be the Future Population.-Apprehended
Dangers.-A Plot to Desert.-Rose the Interpreter.-His Sinister Character-
Departure From the Arickara Village.

CHAPTER XXIII. -- Summer Weather of the Prairies.-Purity of the
Atmosphere- Canadians on the March.-Sickness in the Camp.-Big River.-
Vulgar Nomenclature.-Suggestions About the Original Indian Names.-Camp
of Cheyennes.-Trade for Horses.-Character of the Cheyennes.-Their
Horsemanship.-Historical Anecdotes of the Tribe.

CHAPTER XXIV. -- New Distribution of Horses-Secret Information of
Treason in the Camp.-Rose the Interpreter-His Perfidious Character- His
Plots.-Anecdotes of the Crow Indians.-Notorious Horse Stealers.-Some
Account of Rose.-A Desperado of the Frontier.

CHAPTER XXV. -- Substitute for Fuel on the Prairies.-Fossil Trees.-
Fierceness of the Buffaloes When in Heat.-Three Hunters Missing.-Signal
Fires and Smokes.-Uneasiness Concerning the Lost Men.-A Plan to
Forestall a Rogue.-New Arrangement With Rose.-Return of the Wanderers.

CHAPTER XXVI. -- The Black Mountains.-Haunts of Predatory Indians.-Their
Wild and Broken Appearance.-Superstitions Concerning Them- Thunder
Spirits.-Singular Noises in the Mountains-Secret Mines.-Hidden
Treasures.-Mountains in Labor.-Scientific Explanation.-Impassable
Defiles.-Black-Tailed Deer.-The Bighorn or Ahsahta.-Prospect From a
Lofty Height.-Plain With Herds of Buffalo.-Distant Peaks of the Rocky
Mountains.-Alarms in the Camp.-Tracks of Grizzly Bears.- Dangerous
Nature of This Animal.-Adventures of William Cannon and John Day With
Grizzly Bears.

CHAPTER XXVII. -- Indian Trail.-Rough Mountain Travelling.-Sufferings
From Hunger and Thirst-Powder River.-Game in Abundance.-A Hunter's
Paradise.-Mountain Peak Seen at a Great Distance.- One of the Bighorn
Chain.-Rocky Mountains.-Extent.- Appearance.-Height.-The Great American
Desert.-Various Characteristics of the Mountains.-Indian Superstitions
Concerning Them.-Land of Souls.-Towns of the Free and Generous Spirits-
Happy Hunting Grounds.

CHAPTER XXVIII. -- Region of the Crow Indians-Scouts on the Lookout-
Visit From a Crew of Hard Riders.-A Crow Camp.-Presents to the Crow
Chief.-Bargaining.-Crow Bullies.-Rose Among His Indian Friends.-Parting
With the Crows.-Perplexities Among the Mountains.-More of the Crows.-
Equestrian Children.-Search After Stragglers.

CHAPTER XXIX -- Mountain Glens.-Wandering Band of Savages-Anecdotes of
Shoshonies and Flatheads.-Root Diggers-Their Solitary Lurking Habits.-
Gnomes of the Mountains.-Wind River.- Scarcity of Food.-Alteration of
Route.-The Pilot Knobs or Tetons.-Branch of the Colorado.-Hunting Camp.

CHAPTER XXX. -- A Plentiful Hunting Camp.-Shoshonie Hunters-Hoback's
River -Mad River-Encampment Near the Pilot Knobs.-A Consultation.-
Preparations for a Perilous Voyage.

CHAPTER XXXI. -- A Consultation Whether to Proceed by Land or Water-
Preparations for Boat-Building.-An Exploring Party.-A Party of Trappers
Detached.-Two Snake Visitors.-Their Report Concerning the River.-
Confirmed by the Exploring Party.-Mad River Abandoned.-Arrival at
Henry's Fort.- Detachment of Robinson, Hoback, and Rezner to Trap.-Mr.
Miller Resolves to Accompany Them.-Their Departure.

CHAPTER XXXII. -- Scanty Fare.-A Mendicant Snake.-Embarkation on Henry
River-Joy of the Voyageurs.-Arrival at Snake River.-Rapids and
Breakers.-Beginning of Misfortunes.-Snake Encampments.-Parley With a
Savage.-A Second Disaster.- Loss of a Boatman.-The Caldron Linn.

CHAPTER XXXIII. -- Gloomy Council.-Exploring Parties-Discouraging
Reports- Disastrous Experiment.-Detachments in Quest of Succor.- Caches,
How Made.-Return of One of the Detachments- Unsuccessful.-Further
Disappointments-The Devil's Scuttle-Hole

CHAPTER XXXIV. -- Determination of the Party to Proceed on Foot.-Dreary
Deserts Between Snake River and the Columbia.-Distribution of Effects
Preparatory to a March-Division of the Party.- Rugged March Along the
River.-Wild and Broken Scenery.- Shoshonies.-Alarm of a Snake
Encampment-Intercourse with the Snakes.-Horse Dealing.-Value of a Tin
Kettle.- Sufferings From Thirst-A Horse Reclaimed.-Fortitude of an
Indian Woman.-Scarcity of Food.-Dog's Flesh a Dainty.-News of Mr. Crooks
and His Party.-Painful Travelling Among the Mountains.-Snow Storms.-A
Dreary Mountain Prospect.-A Bivouac During a Wintry Night.-Return to the
River Bank.

CHAPTER XXXV. -- An Unexpected Meeting.-Navigation in a Skin Canoe.-
Strange Fears of Suffering Men.-Hardships of Mr. Crooks and His
Comrades.-Tidings of M'Lellan.-A Retrograde March.-A Willow Raft.-
Extreme Suffering of Some of the Party-Illness of Mr. Crooks.-Impatience
of Some of the Men.-Necessity of Leaving the Laggards Behind.

CHAPTER XXXVI. -- Mr. Hunt Overtakes the Advance Party.-Pierre Dorion,
and His Skeleton Horse.-A Shoshonie Camp.-A Justifiable Outrage.-
Feasting on Horse Flesh.-Mr. Crooks Brought to the Camp.-Undertakes to
Relieve His Men.-The Skin Ferry- Boat.-Frenzy of Prevost.-His Melancholy
Fate.-Enfeebled State of John Day.-Mr. Crooks Again Left Behind.-The
Party Emerge From Among the Mountains.-Interview With Shoshonies.- A
Guide Procured to Conduct the Party Across a Mountain.- Ferriage Across
Snake River.-Reunion With Mr Crook's Men.- Final Departure From the
River.

CHAPTER XXXVII -- Departure From Snake River-Mountains to the North.-
Wayworn Travellers-An Increase of the Dorion Family.-A Camp of
Shoshonies.-A New-Year Festival Among the Snakes.-A Wintry March Through
the Mountains.-A Sunny Prospect, and Milder Climate.-Indian Horse-
Tracks.-Grassy Valleys.-A Camp of Sciatogas.-Joy of the Travellers.-
Dangers of Abundance.- Habits of the Sciatogas.-Fate of Carriere.-The
Umatilla.- Arrival at the Banks of the Columbia.-Tidings of the
Scattered Members of the Expedition.-Scenery on the Columbia.-Tidings of
Astoria-Arrival at the Falls.

CHAPTER XXXVIII. -- The Village of Wish-ram.-Roguery of the
Inhabitants.-Their Habitations.-Tidings of Astoria.-Of the Tonquin
Massacre. -Thieves About the Camp.-A Band of Braggarts-Embarkation.-
Arrival at Astoria.-A Joyful Reception.-Old Comrade.- Adventures of
Reed, M'Lellan, and M'Kenzie Among the Snake River Mountains.-Rejoicing
at Astoria.

CHAPTER XXXIX. -- Scanty Fare During the Winter.-A Poor Hunting Ground.-
The Return of the Fishing Season.-The Uthlecan or Smelt.-Its Qualities.-
Vast Shoals of it.-Sturgeon.-Indian Modes of Taking It.-The Salmon-
Different Species.-Nature of the Country About the Coast.-Forests and
Forest Trees.-A Remarkable Flowering Vine.-Animals.-Birds.-Reptiles-
Climate West of the Mountains-Mildness of the Temperature.-Soil of the
Coast and the Interior.

CHAPTER XL. -- Natives in the Neighborhood of Astoria-Their Persons and
Characteristics.-Causes of Deformity-Their Dress.- Their Contempt of
Beards-Ornaments-Armor and Weapons.-Mode of Flattening the Head.-Extent
of the Custom.-Religious Belief.-The Two Great Spirits of the Air and of
the Fire.- Priests or Medicine Men.-The Rival Idols.-Polygamy a Cause of
Greatness-Petty Warfare.-Music, Dancing, Gambling.- Thieving a Virtue.-
Keen Traders-Intrusive Habits- Abhorrence of Drunkenness-Anecdote of
Comcomly.

CHAPTER XLI. -- Spring Arrangements at Astoria.-Various Expeditions Set
Out.-The Long Narrows.-Pilfering Indians.-Thievish Tribe at Wish-ram.-
Portage at the Falls-Portage by Moonlight.- An Attack, a Route, and a
Robbery.-Indian Cure for Cowardice.-A Parley and Compromise.-The
Despatch Party Turn Back.-Meet Crooks and John Day.-Their Sufferings.-
Indian Perfidy.-Arrival at Astoria.

CHAPTER XLII -- Comprehensive Views.-To Supply the Russian Fur
Establishment.-An Agent Sent to Russia.-Project of an Annual Ship.-The
Beaver Fitted Out.-Her Equipment and Crew.-Instructions to the Captain.-
The Sandwich Islands.-Rumors of the Fate of the Tonquin.-Precautions on
Reaching the Mouth of the Columbia.

CHAPTER XLIII. -- Active Operations at Astoria-Various Expeditions
Fitted Out.-Robert Stuart and a Party Destined for New York- Singular
Conduct of John Day.-His Fate.-Piratical Pass and Hazardous Portage.-
Rattlesnakes.-Their Abhorrence of Tobacco.-Arrival Among the Wallah-
Wallahs.-Purchase of Horses-Departure of Stuart and His Band for the
Mountains.

CHAPTER XLIV. -- Route of Mr. Stuart-Dreary Wilds.-Thirsty Travelling.-A
Grove and Streamlet.-The Blue Mountains.-A Fertile Plain With Rivulets.-
Sulphur Spring-Route Along Snake River- Rumors of White Men.-The Snake
and His Horse.-A Snake Guide.-A Midnight Decampment.-Unexpected Meeting
With Old Comrades-Story of Trappers' Hardships-Salmon Falls-A Great
Fishery.-Mode of Spearing Salmon.-Arrival at the Caldron Linn.-State of
the Caches.-New Resolution of the Three Kentucky Trappers.

CHAPTER XLV. -- The Snake River Deserts.-Scanty Fare.-Bewildered
Travellers-Prowling Indians-A Giant Crow Chief.-A Bully Rebuked-Indian
Signals.-Smoke on the Mountains.-Mad River.-An Alarm.-An Indian Foray-A
Scamper.-A Rude Indian joke.-A Sharp-Shooter Balked of His Shot.

CHAPTER XLVI. -- Travellers Unhorsed-Pedestrian Preparations-Prying
Spies. -Bonfires of Baggage-A March on Foot.-Rafting a River-The Wounded
Elk.-Indian Trails.-Willful Conduct of Mr. M'Lellan.-Grand Prospect From
a Mountain.-Distant Craters of Volcanoes-Illness of Mr. Crooks.

CHAPTER XLVII. -- Ben Jones and a Grizzly Bear.-Rocky Heights-Mountain
Torrents.-Traces of M'Lellan.-Volcanic Remains-Mineral Earths.-Peculiar
Clay for Pottery.-Dismal Plight of M'Lellan.-Starvation.-Shocking
Proposition of a Desperate Man.-A Broken-Down Bull.-A Ravenous Meal.-
Indian Graves- Hospitable Snakes.-A Forlorn Alliance.

CHAPTER XLVIII. -- Spanish River Scenery.-Trail of Crow Indians.-A Snow-
Storm.-A Rousing Fire and a Buffalo Feast.-A Plain of Salt.-Climbing a
Mountain.-Volcanic Summit.-Extinguished Crater.-Marine Shells.-
Encampment on a Prairie.- Successful Hunting.-Good Cheer.-Romantic
Scenery-Rocky Defile.-Foaming Rapids.-The Fiery Narrows.

CHAPTER XLIX. -- Wintry Storms.-A Halt and Council.-Cantonment for the
Winter.-Fine Hunting Country.-Game of the Mountains and Plains.-
Successful Hunting-Mr. Crooks and a Grizzly Bear.- The Wigwam.-Bighorn
and Black-Tails.-Beef and Venison.- Good Quarters and Good Cheer.-An
Alarm.-An Intrusion.- Unwelcome Guests.-Desolation of the Larder.-
Gormandizing Exploits of Hungry Savages.-Good Quarters Abandoned.

CHAPTER L. -- Rough Wintry Travelling-Hills and Plains.-Snow and Ice.-
Disappearance of Game.-A Vast Dreary Plain.-A. Second Halt for the
Winter.-Another Wigwam.-New Year's Feast.-Buffalo Humps, Tongues, and
Marrow-Bones.-Return of Spring.-Launch of Canoes.-Bad Navigation.-
Pedestrian March.-Vast Prairies.-Deserted Camps.-Pawnee Squaws.-An Otto
Indian.-News of War.-Voyage Down the Platte and the Missouri.-Reception
at Fort Osage.-Arrival at St. Louis.

CHAPTER LI. -- Agreement Between Mr. Astor and the Russian Fur Company-
War Between the United States and Great Britain.-Instructions to Captain
Sowle of the Beaver-Fitting Out of the Lark.- News of the Arrival of Mr.
Stuart.

CHAPTER LII. -- Banks of the Wallah-Wallah.-Departure of David Stuart
for the Oakinagan.-Mr. Clarke's Route Up Lewis River.- Chipunnish, or
Pierced-Nose Indians-Their Character, Appearance, and Habits.-Thievish
Habits.-Laying Up of the Boats.-Post at Pointed Heart and Spokan
Rivers.-M'Kenzie, His Route Up the Camoenum.-Bands of Travelling
Indians.- Expedition of Reed to the Caches.-Adventures of Wandering
Voyageurs and Trappers.

CHAPTER LIII. -- Departure of Mr. Hunt in the Beaver-Precautions at the
Factory.-Detachment to the Wollamut.-Gloomy Apprehensions.- Arrival of
M'Kenzie.-Affairs at the Shahaptan.-News of War.-Dismay of M'Dougal.-
Determination to Abandon Astoria.- Departure of M'Kenzie for the
Interior.-Adventure at the Rapids.-Visit to the Ruffians of Wish-ram.-A
Perilous Situation.-Meeting With M'Tavish and His Party.-Arrival at the
Shahaptan.-Plundered Caches.-Determination of the Wintering Partners Not
to Leave the Country.-Arrival of Clarke Among the Nez Perces.-The Affair
of the Silver Goblet.-Hanging of An Indian.-Arrival of the Wintering
Partners at Astoria.

CHAPTER LIV. -- The Partners Displeased With M'Dougal.-Equivocal Conduct
of That Gentleman-Partners Agree to Abandon Astoria.-Sale of Goods to
M'Tavish.-Arrangements for the Year.-Manifesto Signed by the Partners-
Departure of M'Tavish for the Interior.

CHAPTER LV. -- Anxieties of Mr. Astor.-Memorial of the Northwest
Company- Tidings of a British Naval Expedition Against Astoria.-Mr.
Astor Applies to Government for Protection.-The Frigate Adams Ordered to
be Fitted Out.-Bright News From Astoria.- Sunshine Suddenly Overclouded.

CHAPTER LVI. -- Affairs of State at Astoria.-M'Dougal Proposes for the
Hand of An Indian Princess-Matrimonial Embassy to Comcomly.- Matrimonial
Notions Among the Chinooks.-Settlements and Pin-Money.-The Bringing Home
of the Bride.-A Managing Father-in-Law.-Arrival of Mr. Hunt at Astoria.

CHAPTER LVII. -- Voyage of the Beaver to New Archangel.-A Russian
Governor.- Roystering Rule.-The Tyranny of the Table-Hard Drinking
Bargainings.-Voyage to Kamtschatka.-Seal Catching Establishment at St.
Paul's.-Storms at Sea.-Mr. Hunt Left at the Sandwich Islands.-
Transactions of the Beaver at Canton.-Return of Mr. Hunt to Astoria.

CHAPTER LVIII. -- Arrangements Among the Partners-Mr. Hunt Sails in the
Albatross.-Arrives at the Marquesas-News of the Frigate Phoebe.-Mr. Hunt
Proceeds to the Sandwich Islands.-Voyage of the Lark.-Her Shipwreck.-
Transactions With the Natives of the Sandwich Islands-Conduct of
Tamaahmaah.

CHAPTER LIX. -- Arrival of M'Tavish at Astoria.-Conduct of His
Followers.- Negotiations of M'Dougal and M'Tavish.-Bargain for the
Transfer of Astoria-Doubts Entertained of the Loyalty of M'Dougal.

CHAPTER LX. -- Arrival of a Strange Sail.-Agitation at Astoria.-Warlike
Offer of Comcomly.-Astoria Taken Possession of by the British.-
Indignation of Comcomly at the Conduct of His Son- in-Law.

CHAPTER LXI. -- Arrival of the Brig Pedler at Astoria.-Breaking Up of
the Establishment.-Departure of Several of the Company.- Tragical Story
Told by the Squaw of Pierre Dorion.-Fate of Reed and His Companions.-
Attempts of Mr. Astor to Renew His Enterprise.-Disappointment.-
Concluding Observations and Reflection.



APPENDIX

Draught of a Petition to Congress, sent by Mr. Astor in 1812.

AN ACT to enable the American Fur Company,

Letter from Mr. Gallatin to Mr. Astor

Notices of the Present State of the Fur Trade,

Height of the Rocky Mountains.



THE ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN BONNEVILLE Digested from his journal By
Washington Irving



Originally published in 1837



CONTENTS

Introductory Notice


1. -- State of the fur trade of the-Rocky Mountains-American
enterprises-General-Ashley and his associates-Sublette, a famous leader-
Yearly rendezvous among the mountains- Stratagems and dangers of the
trade-Bands of trappers- Indian banditti-Crows and Blackfeet
Mountaineers-Traders of the-Far West-Character and habits of the trapper

2. -- Departure from-Fort Osage-Modes of transportation-Pack- horses-
Wagons-Walker and Cerre; their characters-Buoyant feelings on launching
upon the prairies-Wild equipments of the trappers-Their gambols and
antics-Difference of character between the American and French trappers-
Agency of the Kansas-General-Clarke-White Plume, the Kansas chief-Night
scene in a trader's camp-Colloquy between- White Plume and the captain-
Bee-hunters-Their expeditions-Their feuds with the Indians-Bargaining
talent of White Plume

3. -- Wide prairies Vegetable productions Tabular hills-Slabs of
sandstone Nebraska or Platte River-Scanty fare-Buffalo skulls-Wagons
turned into boats-Herds of buffalo-Cliffs resembling castles-The
chimney-Scott's Bluffs Story connected with them-The bighorn or ahsahta-
Its nature and habits-Difference between that and the "woolly sheep," or
goat of the mountains

4. -- An alarm-Crow-Indians-Their appearance-Mode of approach -Their
vengeful errand-Their curiosity-Hostility between the Crows and
Blackfeet-Loving conduct of the Crows- Laramie's Fork-First navigation
of the-Nebraska-Great elevation of the country-Rarity of the atmosphere-
Its effect on the wood-work of wagons-Black Hills-Their wild and broken
scenery-Indian dogs-Crow trophies-Sterile and dreary country-Banks of
the Sweet Water-Buffalo hunting- Adventure of Tom Cain the Irish cook

5. -- Magnificent scenery-Wind River-Mountains-Treasury of waters-A
stray horse-An Indian trail-Trout streams-The Great Green River Valley-
An alarm-A band of trappers- Fontenelle, his information-Sufferings of
thirst- Encampment on the Seedskedee-Strategy of rival traders-
Fortification of the camp-The-Blackfeet-Banditti of the mountains-Their
character and habits

6. -- Sublette and his band-Robert-Campbell-Mr. Wyeth and a band of
"down-easters"-Yankee enterprise-Fitzpatrick-His adventure with the
Blackfeet-A rendezvous of mountaineers- The battle of-Pierre's Hole-An
Indian ambuscade- Sublette's return

7. -- Retreat of the Blackfeet-Fontenelle's camp in danger- Captain
Bonneville and the Blackfeet-Free trappers-Their character, habits,
dress, equipments, horses-Game fellows of the mountains-Their visit to
the camp-Good fellowship and good cheer-A carouse-A swagger, a brawl,
and a reconciliation

8. -- Plans for the winter-Salmon River-Abundance of salmon west of the
mountains-New arrangements-Caches-Cerre's detachment-Movements in-
Fontenelle's camp-Departure of the-Blackfeet-Their fortunes-Wind-
Mountain streams- Buckeye, the Delaware hunter, and the grizzly bear-
Bones of murdered travellers-Visit to Pierre's Hole-Traces of the
battle-Nez-Perce-Indians-Arrival at-Salmon River

9. -- Horses turned loose-Preparations for winter quarters- Hungry
times-Nez-Perces, their honesty, piety, pacific habits, religious
ceremonies-Captain Bonneville's conversations with them-Their love of
gambling

10.-- Black Feet in the Horse Prairie-Search after the hunters-
Difficulties and dangers-A card party in the wilderness- The card party
interrupted-"Old Sledge" a losing game- Visitors to the camp-Iroquois
hunters-Hanging-eared Indians

11. -- Rival trapping parties-Manoeuvring-A desperate game- Vanderburgh
and the Blackfeet-Deserted camp fire-A dark defile-An Indian ambush-A
fierce melee-Fatal consequences-Fitzpatrick and Bridger-Trappers
precautions -Meeting with the Blackfeet-More fighting-Anecdote of a
young-Mexican and an Indian girl.

12. -- A winter camp in the wilderness-Medley of trappers, hunters, and
Indians-Scarcity of game-New arrangements in the camp-Detachments sent
to a distance-Carelessness of the Indians when encamped-Sickness among
the Indians- Excellent character of the Nez-Perces-The Captain's effort
as a pacificator-A Nez-Perce's argument in favor of war- Robberies, by
the Black feet-Long suffering of the Nez- Perces-A hunter's Elysium
among the mountains-More robberies-The Captain preaches up a crusade-The
effect upon his hearers.

13. -- Story of Kosato, the Renegade Blackfoot.

14. -- The party enters the mountain gorge-A wild fastness among hills-
Mountain mutton-Peace and plenty-The amorous trapper-A piebald wedding-A
free trapper's wife-Her gala equipments-Christmas in the wilderness.

15. -- A hunt after hunters-Hungry times-A voracious repast- Wintry
weather-Godin's River-Splendid winter scene on the great-Lava Plain of
Snake River-Severe travelling and tramping in the snow-Manoeuvres of a
solitary Indian horseman-Encampment on Snake River-Banneck Indians-The
horse chief-His charmed life.

16. -- Misadventures of Matthieu and his party-Return to the caches at
Salmon River-Battle between Nez Perces and Black feet-Heroism of a Nez
Perce woman-Enrolled among the braves.

17. -- Opening of the caches-Detachments of Cerre and Hodgkiss Salmon
River Mountains-Superstition of an Indian trapper- Godin's River-
Preparations for trapping-An alarm-An interruption-A rival band-
Phenomena of Snake River Plain Vast clefts and chasms-Ingulfed streams-
Sublime scenery-A grand buffalo hunt.

18. -- Meeting with Hodgkiss-Misfortunes of the Nez Perces- Schemes of
Kosato, the renegado-His foray into the Horse Prairie-Invasion of Black
feet-Blue John and his forlorn hope-Their generous enterprise-Their
fate-Consternation and despair of the village-Solemn obsequies-Attempt
at Indian trade-Hudson's Bay Company's monopoly-Arrangements for autumn-
Breaking up of an encampment.

19. -- Precautions in dangerous defiles-Trappers' mode of defence on a
prairie-A mysterious visitor-Arrival in Green River Valley-Adventures of
the detachments-The forlorn partisan -His tale of disasters.

20. -- Gathering in Green River valley-Visitings and feastings of
leaders-Rough wassailing among the trappers-Wild blades of the
mountains-Indian belles-Potency of bright beads and red blankets-Arrival
of supplies-Revelry and extravagance -Mad wolves-The lost Indian

21. -- Schemes of Captain Bonneville-The Great Salt Lake Expedition to
explore it-Preparations for a journey to the Bighorn

22. -- The Crow country-A Crow paradise Habits of the Crows- Anecdotes
of Rose, the renegade white man-His fights with the Blackfeet-His
elevation-His death-Arapooish, the Crow chief-His eagle Adventure of
Robert Campbell-Honor among Crows

23. -- Departure from-Green River valley-Popo-Agie-Its course- The
rivers into which it runs-Scenery of the Bluffs the great Tar Spring-
Volcanic tracts in the Crow country- Burning Mountain of Powder River-
Sulphur springs-Hidden fires-Colter's Hell-Wind River-Campbell's party-
Fitzpatrick and his trappers-Captain Stewart, an amateur traveller-
Nathaniel Wyeth-Anecdotes of his expedition to the Far West-Disaster of
Campbell's party-A union of bands-The Bad Pass-The rapids-Departure of
Fitzpatrick- Embarkation of peltries-Wyeth and his bull boat-Adventures
of Captain-Bonneville in the Bighorn Mountains-Adventures in the plain-
Traces of Indians-Travelling precautions- Dangers of making a smoke-The
rendezvous

24. -- Adventures of the party of ten-The-Balaamite mule-A dead point-
The mysterious elks-A night attack-A retreat- Travelling under an alarm-
A joyful meeting-Adventures of the other party-A decoy elk-Retreat to an
island-A savage dance of triumph-Arrival at Wind River

25. -- Captain Bonneville sets out for Green River valley-Journey up the
Popo Agie-Buffaloes-The staring white bears-The smok-The warm springs-
Attempt to traverse the Wind River Mountains-The Great Slope Mountain
dells and chasms- Crystal lakes-Ascent of a snowy peak-Sublime prospect-
A panorama "Les dignes de pitie," or wild men of the mountains

26. -- A retrogade move Channel of a mountain torrent-Alpine scenery-
Cascades-Beaver valleys-Beavers at work-Their architecture-Their modes
of felling trees-Mode of trapping beaver-Contests of skill-A beaver "up
to trap"-Arrival at the Green River caches

27. -- Route toward-Wind River-Dangerous neighborhood-Alarms and
precautions-A sham encampment-Apparition of an Indian spy- Midnight
move-A mountain defile-The Wind River valley- Tracking a party-Deserted
camps-Symptoms of Crows-Meeting of comrades-A trapper entrapped-Crow
pleasantry-Crow spies-A decampment-Return to Green River valley-Meeting
with Fitzpatrick's party-Their adventures among the Crows- Orthodox
Crows

28. -- A region of natural curiosities-The plain of white clay- Hot
springs-The Beer Spring-Departure to seek the free trappers-Plain of
Portneuf-Lava-Chasms and gullies- Bannack Indians-Their hunt of the
buffalo-Hunter's feast- Trencher heroes-Bullying of an absent foe-The
damp comrade-The Indian spy-Meeting with Hodgkiss-His adventures-
Poordevil Indians-Triumph of the Bannacks- Blackfeet policy in war

29. -- Winter camp at the Portneuf-Fine springs-The Bannack Indians-
Their honesty-Captain-Bonneville prepares for an expedition-Christmas-
The American-Falls-Wild scenery- Fishing Falls-Snake Indians-Scenery on
the Bruneau-View of volcanic country from a mountain-Powder River-
Shoshokoes, or Root Diggers-Their character, habits, habitations, dogs-
Vanity at its last shift

30. -- Temperature of the climate-Root Diggers on horseback-An Indian
guide-Mountain prospects-The Grand Rond- Difficulties on Snake River-A
scramble over the Blue Mountains-Sufferings from hunger-Prospect of the
Immahah Valley-The exhausted traveller

31. -- Progress in the valley-An Indian cavalier-The captain falls into
a lethargy-A Nez-Perce patriarch-Hospitable treatment-The bald head-
Bargaining-Value of an old plaid cloak-The family horse-The cost of an
Indian present

32. -- Nez-Perce camp-A chief with a hard name-The Big Hearts of the
East-Hospitable treatment-The Indian guides- Mysterious councils-The
loquacious chief-Indian tomb- Grand Indian reception-An Indian feast-
Town-criers- Honesty of the Nez-Perces-The captain's attempt at healing.

33. -- Scenery of the Way-lee-way-A substitute for tobacco- Sublime
scenery of-Snake River-The garrulous old chief and his cousin-A Nez-
Perce meeting-A stolen skin-The scapegoat dog-Mysterious conferences-The
little chief-His hospitality-The captain's account of the United States-
His healing skill

34. -- Fort Wallah-Wallah-Its commander-Indians in its neighborhood-
Exertions of Mr. Pambrune for their improvement-Religion-Code of laws-
Range of the Lower Nez Perces-Camash, and other roots-Nez-Perce horses-
Preparations for departure-Refusal of supplies-Departure- A laggard and
glutton

35. -- The uninvited guest-Free and easy manners-Salutary jokes- A
prodigal son-Exit of the glutton-A sudden change in fortune-Danger of a
visit to poor relations-Plucking of a prosperous man-A vagabond toilet-A
substitute for the very fine horse-Hard travelling-The uninvited guest
and the patriarchal colt-A beggar on horseback-A catastrophe-Exit of the
merry vagabond

36. -- The difficult mountain-A smoke and consultation-The captain's
speech-An icy turnpike-Danger of a false step- Arrival on Snake River-
Return to-Portneuf-Meeting of comrades

37. -- Departure for the rendezvous-A war party of Blackfeet-A mock
bustle-Sham fires at night-Warlike precautions- Dangers of a night
attack-A panic among horses-Cautious march-The Beer Springs-A mock
carousel-Skirmishing with buffaloes-A buffalo bait-Arrival at the
rendezvous- Meeting of various bands

38. -- Plan of the Salt Lake expedition-Great sandy deserts- Sufferings
from thirst-Ogden's-River-Trails and smoke of lurking savages-Thefts at
night-A trapper's revenge- Alarms of a guilty conscience-A murderous
victory- Californian mountains-Plains along the-Pacific-Arrival at-
Monterey-Account of the place and neighborhood-Lower- California-Its
extent-The Peninsula-Soil-Climate- Production-Its settlements by the
Jesuits-Their sway over the Indians-Their expulsion-Ruins of a
missionary establishment-Sublime scenery-Upper California Missions-Their
power and policy-Resources of the country-Designs of foreign nations

39. -- Gay life at Monterey-Mexican horsemen-A bold dragoon-Use of the
lasso-Vaqueros-Noosing a bear-Fight between a bull and a bear-Departure
from Monterey-Indian horse stealers- Outrages committed by the
travellers-Indignation of Captain Bonneville

40. -- Traveller's tales-Indian lurkers-Prognostics of Buckeye Signs and
portents-The medicine wolf-An alarm-An ambush The captured provant-
Triumph of Buckeye-Arrival of supplies Grand carouse-Arrangements for
the year-Mr. Wyeth and his new-levied band.

41. -- A voyage in a bull boat.

42. -- Departure of Captain Bonneville for the Columbia-Advance of
Wyeth-Efforts to keep the lead-Hudson's Bay party-A junketing-A
delectable beverage-Honey and alcohol-High carousing-The Canadian "bon
vivant"-A cache-A rapid move Wyeth and his plans-His travelling
companions-Buffalo hunting More conviviality-An interruption.

43. -- A rapid march-A cloud of dust-Wild horsemen-"High Jinks"
Horseracing and rifle-shooting-The game of hand-The fishing season-Mode
of fishing-Table lands-Salmon fishers-The captain's visit to an Indian
lodge-The Indian girl-The pocket mirror-Supper-Troubles of an evil
conscience.

44. -- Outfit of a trapper-Risks to which he is subjected- Partnership
of trappers-Enmity of Indians-Distant smoke-A country on fire-Gun Greek-
Grand Rond-Fine pastures- Perplexities in a smoky country-Conflagration
of forests.

45. -- The Shynses-Their traffic-Hunting-Food-Horses-A horse- race-
Devotional feeling of the Skynses, Nez Perces and Flatheads-Prayers-
Exhortations-A preacher on horseback Effect of religion on the manners
of the tribes-A new light.

46. -- Scarcity in the camp-Refusal of supplies by the Hudson's Bay
Company-Conduct of the Indians-A hungry retreat-John Day's River-The
Blue Mountains-Salmon fishing on Snake River Messengers from the Crow
country-Bear River Valley- immense migration of buffalo-Danger of
buffalo hunting-A wounded Indian-Eutaw Indians-A "surround" of
antelopes.

47. -- A festive winter-Conversion of the Shoshonies-Visit of two free
trappers-Gayety in the camp-A touch of the tender passion-The reclaimed
squaw-An Indian fine lady-An elopement-A pursuit-Market value of a bad
wife.

48. -- Breaking up of winter quarters-Move to Green River-A trapper and
his rifle-An arrival in camp-A free trapper and his squaw in distress-
Story of a Blackfoot belle.

49. -- Rendezvous at Wind River-Campaign of Montero and his brigade in
the Crow country-Wars between the Crows and Blackfeet-Death-of
Arapooish-Blackfeet lurkers-Sagacity of the horse-Dependence of the
hunter on his horse-Return to the settlements.


Appendix

Wreck of a Japanese Junk on the Northwest Coast

Instructions to Captain Bonneville



OLD CHRISTMAS By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

Christmas

The Stage-coach

Christmas Eve

Christmas Day

The Christmas Dinner

Notes



THE SKETCH BOOK of GEOFFREY CRAYON, GENT. By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

THE SKETCH-BOOK OF GEOFFREY CRAYON, GENT.

PREFACE TO THE REVISED EDITION.

THE SKETCH BOOK.

THE AUTHOR\x92S ACCOUNT OF HIMSELF

THE VOYAGE.

ROSCOE.

THE WIFE.

RIP VAN WINKLE.

ENGLISH WRITERS ON AMERICA.

RURAL LIFE IN ENGLAND.

THE BROKEN HEART.

THE ART OF BOOK-MAKING.

A ROYAL POET.

THE COUNTRY CHURCH.

THE WIDOW AND HER SON.

A SUNDAY IN LONDON.*

THE BOAR\x92S HEAD TAVERN, EASTCHEAP.

THE MUTABILITY OF LITERATURE.

RURAL FUNERALS.

THE INN KITCHEN.

THE SPECTRE BRIDEGROOM.

WESTMINSTER ABBEY.

CHRISTMAS.

THE STAGE-COACH.

CHRISTMAS EVE.

CHRISTMAS DAY.

THE CHRISTMAS DINNER.

LONDON ANTIQUES.

LITTLE BRITAIN.

STRATFORD-ON-AVON.

TRAITS OF INDIAN CHARACTER.

PHILIP OF POKANOKET.

JOHN BULL.

THE PRIDE OF THE VILLAGE.

THE ANGLER.

THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW.

L\x92ENVOY.*



THE CRAYON PAPERS By Geoffrey Crayon



CONTENTS

MOUNTJOY, OR SOME PASSAGES OUT OF THE LIFE OF A CASTLE-BUILDER

THE GREAT MISSISSIPPI BUBBLE

DON JUAN

BROEK

SKETCHES IN PARIS IN 1825

ENGLISH AND FRENCH CHARACTER

THE TUILERIES AND WINDSOR CASTLE

THE FIELD OF WATERLOO

PARIS AT THE RESTORATION

AMERICAN RESEARCHES IN ITALY

THE TAKING OF THE VEIL

THE CHARMING LETORI\xC8RES

THE EARLY EXPERIENCES OF RALPH RINGWOOD

THE SEMINOLES

ORIGIN OF THE WHITE, THE RED, AND THE BLACK MEN

THE CONSPIRACY OF NEAMATHLA

LETTER FROM GRANADA

ABDERAHMAN

THE WIDOW\x92S ORDEAL

THE CREOLE VILLAGE

A CONTENTED MAN



CHRONICLE OF THE CONQUEST OF GRANADA By Washington Irving

CONTENTS

EXPANDED CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION.

NOTE TO THE REVISED EDITION.

A CHRONICLE OF THE CONQUEST OF GRANADA.

CHAPTER I. -- Of the Kingdom of Granada, and the Tribute which it Paid
to the Castilian Crown.

CHAPTER II. -- Of the Embassy of Don Juan de Vera to Demand Arrears of
Tribute from the Moorish Monarch.

CHAPTER III. -- Domestic Feuds in the Alhambra\x97Rival
Sultanas\x97Predictions concerning Boabdil, the Heir to the Throne\x97How
Ferdinand Meditates War against Granada, and how he is Anticipated.

CHAPTER IV. -- Expedition of the Muley Abul Hassan against the Fortress
of Zahara.

CHAPTER V. -- Expedition of the Marques of Cadiz against Alhama.

CHAPTER VI. -- How the People of Granada were Affected on Hearing of the
Capture of the Alhama; and how the Moorish King sallied forth to Regain
it.

CHAPTER VII. -- How the Duke of Medina Sidonia and the Chivalry of
Andalusia Hastened to the Relief of Alhama.

CHAPTER VIII. -- Sequel of the Events at Alhama.

CHAPTER IX. -- Events at Granada, and Rise of the Moorish King, Boabdil
el Chico.

CHAPTER X. -- Royal Expedition against Loxa.

CHAPTER XI. -- How Muley Abul Hassan made a Foray into the Lands of
Medina Sidonia, and how he was Received.

CHAPTER XII. -- Foray of Spanish Cavaliers among the Mountains of
Malaga.

CHAPTER XIII. -- Effects of the Disasters among the Mountains of Malaga.

CHAPTER XIV. -- How King Boabdil el Chico Marched over the Border.

CHAPTER XV. -- How the Count de Cabra sallied forth from his Castle in
Quest of King Boabdil.

CHAPTER XVI. -- The Battle of Lucena.

CHAPTER XVII. -- Lamentations of the Moors for the Battle of Lucena.

CHAPTER XVIII. -- How Muley Abul Hassan Profited by the Misfortunes of
his Son Boabdil.

CHAPTER XIX. -- Captivity of Boabdil el Chico.

CHAPTER XX. -- Of the Treatment of Boabdil by the Castilian Sovereigns.

CHAPTER XXI. -- Return of Boabdil from Captivity.

CHAPTER XXII. -- Foray of the Moorish Alcaydes, and Battle of Lopera.

CHAPTER XXIII. -- Retreat of Hamet el Zegri, Alcayde of Ronda.

CHAPTER XXIV. -- Of the reception at Court of the Count de Cabra and the
Alcayde de los Donceles.

CHAPTER XXV. -- How the Marques of Cadiz concerted to Surprise Zahara,
and the Result of his Enterprise.

CHAPTER XXVI. -- Of the Fortress of Alhama, and how Wisely it was
Governed by the Count de Tendilla.

CHAPTER XXVII.-- Foray of Christian Knights into the Territory of the
Moors.

CHAPTER XXVIII.-- Attempt of El Zagal to Surprise Boabdil in Almeria.

CHAPTER XXIX. -- How King Ferdinand Commenced another Campaign against
the Moors, and how he Laid Siege to Coin and Cartama.

CHAPTER XXX. -- Siege of Ronda.

CHAPTER XXXI. -- How the People of Granada invited El Zagal to the
Throne, and how he Marched to the Capital.

CHAPTER XXXII. -- How the Count de Cabra attempted to Capture another
King, and how he Fared in his Attempt.

CHAPTER XXXIII. -- Expedition against the Castles of Cambil and Albahar.

CHAPTER XXXIV. -- Enterprise of the Knights of Calatrava against Zalea.

CHAPTER XXXV. -- Death of Muley Abul Hassan.

CHAPTER XXXVI. -- Of the Christian Army which Assembled at the City of
Cordova.

CHAPTER XXXVII. -- How Fresh Commotions broke out in Granada, and how
the People undertook to Allay them.

CHAPTER XXXVIII. -- How King Ferdinand held a Council of War at the Rock
of the Lovers.

CHAPTER XXXIX. -- XXXIX......How the Royal Army appeared Before the City
of Loxa, and how it was Received; and of the Doughty Achievements of the
English Earl.

CHAPTER XL. -- Conclusion of the Siege of Loxa.

CHAPTER XLI. -- Capture of Illora.

CHAPTER XLII. -- Of the Arrival of Queen Isabella at the Camp before
Moclin; and of the Pleasant Sayings of the English Earl.

CHAPTER XLIII. -- How King Ferdinand Attacked Moclin, and of the Strange
Events that attended its Capture.

CHAPTER XLIV. -- How King Ferdinand Foraged the Vega; and of the Battle
of the Bridge of Pinos, and the Fate of the two Moorish Brothers.

CHAPTER XLV. -- Attempt of El Zagal upon the Life of Boabdil, and how
the Latter was Roused to Action.

CHAPTER XLVI. -- How Boabdil returned Secretly to Granada, and how he
was Received.\x97Second Embassy of Don Juan de Vera, and his Perils in the
Alhambra.

CHAPTER XLVII. -- How King Ferdinand laid Siege to Velez Malaga.

CHAPTER XLVIII. -- How King Ferdinand and his Army were Exposed to
Imminent Peril before Velez Malaga.

CHAPTER XLIX. -- Result of the Stratagem of El Zagal to Surprise King
Ferdinand.

CHAPTER L. -- How the People of Granada Rewarded the Valor of El Zagal.

CHAPTER LI. -- Surrender of the Velez Malaga and Other Places.

CHAPTER LII. -- Of the City of Malaga and its Inhabitants.\x97Mission of
Hernando del Pulgar.

CHAPTER LIII. -- Advance of King Ferdinand against Malaga.

CHAPTER LIV. -- Siege of Malaga.

CHAPTER LV. -- Siege of Malaga continued.\x97Obstinacy of Hamet el Zegri.

CHAPTER LVI. -- Attack of the Marques of Cadiz upon Gibralfaro.

CHAPTER LVII. -- Siege of Malaga continued.\x97Stratagems of Various Kinds.

CHAPTER LVIII. -- Sufferings of the People of Malaga.

CHAPTER LIX. -- How a Moorish Santon Undertook to Deliver the City of
Malaga from the Power of its Enemies.

CHAPTER LX. -- How Hamet el Zegri was Hardened in his Obstinacy by the
Arts of a Moorish Astrologer.

CHAPTER LXI. -- Siege of Malaga continued.\x97Destruction of a Tower by
Francisco Ramirez de Madrid.

CHAPTER LXII. -- How the People of Malaga expostulated with Hamet el
Zegri.

CHAPTER LXIII. -- How Hamet el Zegri Sallied forth with the Sacred
Banner to Attack the Christian Camp.

CHAPTER LXIV. -- How the City of Malaga Capitulated.

CHAPTER LXV. -- Fulfilment of the Prophecy of the Dervise.\x97Fate of Hamet
el Zegri.

CHAPTER LXVI. -- How the Castilian Sovereigns took Possession of the
City of Malaga, and how King Ferdinand signalized himself by his Skill
in Bargaining with the Inhabitants for their Ransom.

CHAPTER LXVII. -- How King Ferdinand prepared to Carry the War into a
Different Part of the Territories of the Moors.

CHAPTER LXVIII. -- How King Ferdinand Invaded the Eastern Side of the
Kingdom of Granada, and how He was Received by El Zagal.

CHAPTER LXIX. -- How the Moors made Various Enterprises against the
Christians.

CHAPTER LXX. -- How King Ferdinand prepared to Besiege the City of Baza,
and how the City prepared for Defence.

CHAPTER LXXI. -- The Battle of the Gardens before Baza.

CHAPTER LXXII. -- Siege of Baza.\x97Embarrassments of the Army.

CHAPTER LXXIII. -- Siege of Baza continued.\x97How King Ferdinand
completely Invested the City.

CHAPTER LXXIV. -- Exploit of Hernan Perez del Pulgar and Other
Cavaliers.

CHAPTER LXXV. -- Continuation of the Siege of Baza.

CHAPTER LXXVI. -- How Two Friars from the Holy Land arrived at the Camp.

CHAPTER LXXVII. -- How Queen Isabella devised Means to Supply the Army
with Provisions.

CHAPTER LXXVIII. -- Of the Disasters which Befell the Camp.

CHAPTER LXXIX. -- Encounters between the Christians and Moors before
Baza, and the Devotion of the Inhabitants to the Defence of their City.

CHAPTER LXXX. -- How Queen Isabella arrived at the Camp, and the
Consequences of her Arrival.

CHAPTER LXXXI. -- Surrender of Baza.

CHAPTER LXXXII. -- Submission of El Zagal to the Castilian Sovereigns.

CHAPTER LXXXIII. -- Events at Granada subsequent to the Submission of El
Zagal.

CHAPTER LXXXIV. -- How King Ferdinand turned his Hostilities against the
City of Granada.

CHAPTER LXXXV. -- The Fate of the Castle of Roma.

CHAPTER LXXXVI. -- How Boabdil el Chico took the Field, and his
Expedition against Alhendin.

CHAPTER LXXXVII. -- Exploit of the Count de Tendilla.

CHAPTER LXXXVIII. -- Expedition of Boabdil el Chico against
Salobrena.\x97Exploit of Hernan Perez del Pulgar.

CHAPTER LXXXIX. -- How King Ferdinand Treated the People of Guadix, and
how El Zagal Finished his Regal Career.

CHAPTER XC. -- Preparations of Granada for a Desperate Defence.

CHAPTER XCI. -- How King Ferdinand conducted the Siege cautiously, and
how Queen Isabella arrived at the Camp.

CHAPTER XCII. -- Of the Insolent Defiance of Tarfe the Moor, and the
Daring Exploit of Hernan Perez del Pulgar.

CHAPTER XCIII. -- How Queen Isabella took a View of the City of Granada,
and how her Curiosity cost the Lives of many Christians and Moors.

CHAPTER XCIV. -- The Last Ravage before Granada.

CHAPTER XCV. -- Conflagration of the Christian Camp.\x97Building of Santa
Fe.

CHAPTER XCVI. -- Famine and Discord in the City.

CHAPTER XCVII. -- Capitulation of Granada.

CHAPTER XCVIII. -- Commotions in Granada.

CHAPTER XCIX. -- Surrender of Granada.

CHAPTER C. -- How the Castilian Sovereigns took Possession of Granada.

-- APPENDIX.



LIFE OF WASHINGTON; CONDENSED FROM THE LARGER WORK OF WASHINGTON IRVING.
FOR YOUNG PERSONS AND FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS. 1876.



CONTENTS.


I. 	Birth of Washington.\x97His Boyhood. II. 	Washington's Youth.\x97First
Surveying Expedition. III. 	Rival Claims of the English and the
French.\x97Preparations for Hostilities. IV. 	Washington's Mission to the
French Commander. V. 	Military Expedition to the Frontier. VI.
Misfortunes.\x97Capitulation of Fort Necessity. VII. 	A Campaign under
General Braddock. VIII. 	Braddock's Advance.\x97His Defeat. IX. 	Washington
in Command.\x97Panics on the Frontier. X. 	Frontier Service. XI. Operations
against the French.\x97Washington's Marriage. XII. 	Campaigns in the
North.\x97Washington at Mount Vernon. XIII. 	Colonial Discontents. XIV.
Expedition to the Ohio.\x97Tea Tax. XV. 	The First General Congress. XVI.
Military Measures.\x97Affairs at Lexington. XVII. 	Capture of Ticonderoga
and Crown Point.\x97Washington appointed Commander-in-Chief. XVIII. 	Battle
of Bunker Hill. XIX. 	Washington on his Way to the Camp. XX. 	Siege of
Boston. XXI. 	Projects for the Invasion of Canada. XXII. 	War along the
Coast.\x97Progress of the Siege. XXIII. 	Affairs in Canada. XXIV. Incidents
of the Camp.\x97Arnold before Quebec. XXV. 	Washington's Perplexities.\x97New
York in Danger. XXVI. 	Attack on Quebec.\x97Affairs in New York. XXVII.
Movements before Boston.\x97Its Evacuation. XXVIII. Reverses in Canada.\x97The
Highlands.\x97Close of the Invasion of Canada. XXIX. 	The Army in New York.
XXX. 	Proceedings of Lord Howe.\x97Gates and Schuyler. XXXI. 	The War in
the South.\x97Affairs in the Highlands. XXXII. Battle of Long
Island.\x97Retreat. XXXIII. 	Retreat from New York Island. XXXIV. 	Retreat
through Westchester County.\x97Battle of White Plains. XXXV. 	Washington at
Peekskill.\x97The Northern Army. XXXVI. 	Capture of Fort Washington and
Garrison.\x97Retreat through New Jersey. XXXVII. Retreat across the
Delaware.\x97Battle of Trenton. XXXVIII. 	Washington recrosses the
Delaware.\x97Battle of Princeton. XXXIX. 	The Army at Morristown.\x97Attack on
Peekskill. XL. 	The Northern Army.\x97British Expedition to Connecticut.
XLI. 	The Highlands.\x97Movements of the Army. XLII. 	Invasion from Canada.
XLIII. 	Exploits and Movements.\x97Howe in the Chesapeake. XLIV. 	Advance
of Burgoyne.\x97Battle of Oriskany.\x97Battle of Bennington. XLV. 	Battle of
the Brandywine.\x97Fall of Philadelphia. XLVI. The Northern Invasion.\x97Fall
of the Highland Forts.\x97Defeat and Surrender of Burgoyne. XLVII. 	Battle
of Germantown.\x97Hostilities on the Delaware. XLVIII. 	The Army on the
Schuylkill.\x97At Valley Forge.\x97The Conway Cabal. XLIX. 	Exploits of Lee
and Lafayette.\x97British Commissioners. L. Evacuation of
Philadelphia.\x97Battle of Monmouth Court House. LI. 	Arrival of a French
Fleet.\x97Massacre at Wyoming Valley.\x97Capture of Savannah. LII. Washington
in Philadelphia.\x97Indian Warfare.\x97Capture of Stony Point.\x97Ravages in
Connecticut.\x97Repulse at Savannah. LIII. 	Army at Morristown.\x97Arnold in
Philadelphia.\x97Charleston Besieged. LIV. Discontents in the Army.\x97Fall of
Charleston. LV. 	Marauds in the Jerseys.\x97The French Fleet at Newport.
LVI. 	Battle of Camden. LVII. 	The Treason of Arnold.\x97Trial and
Execution of Andr\xE9. LVIII. 	Plan to entrap Arnold.\x97Projects against New
York. LIX. 	The War in the South.\x97Battle of King's Mountain. LX.
Hostilities in the South.\x97Mutiny. LXI. 	Battle of the Cowpens.\x97Battle of
Guilford Court-house. LXII. 	The War in Virginia.\x97Demonstrations against
New York. LXIII. 	Ravages in Virginia.\x97Operations in Carolina.\x97Attack on
New London. LXIV. Operations before Yorktown.\x97Greene in the South. LXV.
Siege and Surrender of Yorktown. LXVI. 	Dissolution of the Combined
Armies.\x97Discontents in the Army. LXVII. 	News of Peace.\x97Washington's
Farewell to the Army, and Resignation of his Commission. LXVIII.
Washington at Mount Vernon. LXIX. 	The Constitutional
Convention.\x97Washington elected President. LXX. 	Organization of the New
Government. LXXI. 	Financial Difficulties.\x97Party Jealousies.\x97Operations
against the Indians. LXXII. 	Tour Southward.\x97Defeat of St.
Clair.\x97Dissensions in the Cabinet. LXXIII. 	Washington's Second
Term.\x97Difficulties with the French Ambassador. LXXIV.
Neutrality.\x97Whiskey Insurrection.\x97Wayne's Success against the Indians.
LXXV. 	Jay's Treaty.\x97Party Claims.\x97Difficulties with France.\x97Farewell
Address. LXXVI. 	Washington's Retirement and Death.



ABBOTSFORD AND NEWSTEAD ABBEY By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

ARRIVAL AT THE ABBEY.

THE ABBEY GARDEN.

PLOUGH MONDAY.

OLD SERVANTS.

SUPERSTITIONS OF THE ABBEY.

ANNESLEY HALL.

THE LAKE.

ROBIN HOOD AND SHERWOOD FOREST.

THE ROOK CELL.

THE LITTLE WHITE LADY.



OLIVER GOLDSMITH A Biography By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

PREFACE

CHAPTER ONE -- I. Birth and Parentage\x97Characteristics of the Goldsmith
Race\x97Poetical Birthplace\x97Goblin House\x97Scenes of Boyhood\x97Lissoy\x97Picture
of a Country Parson\x97Goldsmith\x92s Schoolmistress\x97Byrne, the Village
Schoolmaster\x97 Goldsmith\x92s Hornpipe and Epigram\x97Uncle Contarine\x97School
Studies and School Sports\x97Mistakes of a Night

CHAPTER TWO -- II. Improvident Marriages in the Goldsmith
Family\x97Goldsmith at the University\x97Situation of a Sizer\x97Tyranny of
Wilder, the Tutor\x97Pecuniary Straits\x97Street Ballads\x97College Riot\x97Gallows
Walsh\x97College Prize\x97A Dance Interrupted

CHAPTER THREE -- III. Goldsmith rejected by the Bishop\x97Second Sally to
see the World\x97Takes Passage for America\x97Ship sails without him\x97Return on
Fiddleback\x97A Hospitable Friend\x97The Counselor

CHAPTER FOUR -- IV. Sallies forth as a Law Student\x97Stumbles at the
Outset\x97Cousin Jane and the Valentine\x97A Family Oracle\x97Sallies forth as a
Student of Medicine\x97Hocus-pocus of a Boarding-house\x97Transformations of a
Leg of Mutton\x97The Mock Ghost\x97Sketches of Scotland\x97Trials of Toryism\x97A
Poet\x92s Purse for a Continental Tour

CHAPTER FIVE -- V. The agreeable Fellow-passengers\x97Risks from Friends
picked up by the Wayside\x97Sketches of Holland and the Dutch\x97Shifts while
a Poor Student at Leyden\x97The Tulip Speculation\x97The Provident
Flute\x97Sojourn at Paris\x97 Sketch of Voltaire\x97Traveling Shifts of a
Philosophic Vagabond

CHAPTER SIX -- VI. Landing In England\x97Shifts of a Man without Money\x97The
Pestle and Mortar\x97Theatricals in a Barn\x97Launch upon London\x97A City Night
Scene\x97Struggles with Penury\x97Miseries of a Tutor\x97A Doctor in the
Suburb\x97Poor Practice and Second-hand Finery\x97A Tragedy in Embryo\x97Project
of the Written Mountains

CHAPTER SEVEN -- VII. Life as a Pedagogue\x97Kindness to
Schoolboys\x97Pertness In Return\x97Expensive Charities\x97The Griffiths and the
\x93Monthly Review\x94\x97Toils of a Literary Hack\x97Rupture with the Griffiths

CHAPTER EIGHT -- VIII. Newbery, of Picture-book Memory\x97How to keep up
Appearances\x97Miseries of Authorship\x97A Poor Relation\x97Letter to Hodson

CHAPTER NINE -- IX. Hackney Authorship\x97Thoughts of Literary
Suicide\x97Return to Peckham\x97 Oriental Projects\x97Literary Enterprise to
raise Funds\x97Letter to Edward Wells\x97To Robert Bryanton\x97Death of Uncle
Contarine\x97Letter to Cousin Jane

CHAPTER TEN -- X. Oriental Appointment, and Disappointment\x97Examination
at the College of Surgeons\x97How to procure a Suit of Clothes\x97Fresh
Disappointment\x97A Tale of Distress\x97The Suit of Clothes in Pawn\x97Punishment
for doing an act of Charity\x97Gayeties of Green-Arbor Court\x97Letter to his
Brother\x97Life of Voltaire\x97Scroggins, an attempt at Hock Heroic Poetry

CHAPTER ELEVEN -- XI. Publication of \x93The Inquiry\x94\x97Attacked by
Griffith\x92s \x93Review\x94\x97Kenrick, the Literary Ishmaelite\x97Periodical
Literature\x97Goldsmith\x92s Essays\x97Garrick as a Manager\x97Smollett and his
Schemes\x97Change of Lodgings\x97The Robin Hood Club

CHAPTER TWELVE -- XII. New Lodgings\x97Visits of Ceremony\x97Hangers-
on\x97Pilkington and the White Mouse\x97Introduction to Dr. Johnson\x97Davies and
his Bookshop\x97Pretty Mrs. Davies\x97Foote and his Projects\x97Criticism of the
Cudgel

CHAPTER THIRTEEN -- XIII. Oriental Projects\x97Literary Jobs\x97The Cherokee
Chiefs\x97Merry Islington and the White Conduit House\x97Letters on the
History of England\x97James Boswell\x97Dinner of Davies\x97Anecdotes of Johnson
and Goldsmith

CHAPTER FOURTEEN -- XIV. Hogarth a Visitor at Islington\x97His
Character\x97Street Studies\x97Sympathies between Authors and Painters\x97Sir
Joshua Reynolds\x97His Character\x97His Dinners\x97The Literary Club\x97Its
Members\x97Johnson\x92s Revels with Lanky and Beau\x97Goldsmith at the Club

CHAPTER -- XV. Johnson a Monitor to Goldsmith\x97Finds him in Distress with
his Landlady\x97Relieved by the Vicar of Wakefield\x97The Oratorio\x97Poem of The
Traveler\x97The Poet and his Dog\x97Success of the Poem\x97Astonishment of the
Club\x97Observations on the PoemFIFTEEN

CHAPTER SIXTEEN -- XVI. New Lodgings\x97Johnson\x92s Compliment\x97A Titled
Patron\x97The Poet at Northumberland House\x97His Independence of the
Great\x97The Countess of Northumberland\x97Edwin and Angelina\x97Gosford and Lord
Clare\x97Publication of Essays\x97Evils of a rising Reputation\x97Hangers-on\x97Job
Writing\x97Goody Two-shoes\x97A Medical Campaign\x97Mrs. Sidebotham

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN -- XVII. Publication of the Vicar of
Wakefield\x97Opinions concerning it\x97Of Dr. Johnson\x97Of Rogers the Poet\x97Of
Goethe\x97Its Merits\x97Exquisite Extract\x97Attack by Kenrick\x97Reply\x97Book-
building\x97Project of a Comedy

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN -- XVIII. Social Condition of Goldsmith\x97His Colloquial
Contests with Johnson\x97Anecdotes and Illustrations

CHAPTER NINETEEN -- XIX. Social Resorts\x97The Shilling Whist Club\x97A
Practical Joke\x97The Wednesday Club\x97The \x93Ton of Man\x94\x97The Pig Butcher\x97Tom
King\x97Hugh Kelly\x97Glover and his Characteristics

CHAPTER TWENTY -- XX. The Great Cham of Literature and the King\x97Scene at
Sir Joshua Reynolds\x92s\x97Goldsmith accused of Jealousy\x97Negotiations with
Garrick\x97The Author and the Actor\x97Their Correspondence

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE -- XXI. More Hack Authorship\x97Tom Davies and the Roman
History\x97Canonbury Castle\x97Political Authorship\x97Pecuniary Temptation\x97Death
of Newbery the elder

CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO -- XXII. Theatrical Maneuvering\x97The Comedy of False
Delicacy\x97First Performance of The Good-Natured Man\x97Conduct of
Johnson\x97Conduct of the Author\x97Intermeddling of the Press

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE -- XXIII. Burning the Candle at both Ends\x97Fine
Apartments\x97Fine Furniture\x97Fine Clothes\x97Fine Acquaintances\x97Shoemaker\x92s
Holiday and Jolly Pigeon Associates\x97Peter Barlow, Glover, and the
Hampstead Hoax\x97Poor Friends among Great Acquaintances

CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR -- XXIV. Reduced again to Book-building\x97Rural
Retreat at Shoemaker\x92s Paradise\x97Death of Henry Goldsmith\x97Tributes to his
memory in The Deserted Village

CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE -- XXV. Dinner at Bickerstaff\x92s\x97Hiffernan and his
Impecuniosity\x97Kenrick\x92s Epigram\x97Johnson\x92s Consolation\x97Goldsmith\x92s
Toilet\x97The bloom-colored Coat\x97New Acquaintances\x97The Hornecks\x97A touch of
Poetry and Passion\x97The Jessamy Bride

CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX -- XXVI. Goldsmith in the Temple\x97Judge Day and
Grattan\x97Labor and Dissipation\x97Publication of the Roman History\x97Opinions
of it\x97History of Animated Nature\x97Temple Rooker\x97Anecdotes of a Spider

CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVEN -- XXVII. Honors at the Royal Academy\x97Letter to his
brother Maurice\x97Family Fortunes\x97Jane Contarine and the
Miniature\x97Portraits and Engravings\x97School Associations\x97Johnson and
Goldsmith in Westminster Abbey

CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT -- XXVIII. Publication of the Deserted
Village\x97Notices and Illustrations of it

CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE -- XXIX. The Poet among the Ladies\x97Description of
his Person and Manners\x97 Expedition to Paris with the Horneck Family\x97The
Traveler of Twenty and the Traveler of Forty\x97Hickey, the Special
Attorney\x97An Unlucky Exploit

CHAPTER THIRTY -- XXX. Death of Goldsmith\x92s Mother\x97Biography of
Parnell\x97Agreement with Davies for the History of Rome\x97Life of
Bolingbroke\x97The Haunch of Venison

CHAPTER THIRTY-ONE -- XXXI. Dinner at the Royal Academy\x97The Rowley
Controversy\x97Horace Walpole\x92s Conduct to Chatterton\x97Johnson at Redcliffe
Church\x97Goldsmith\x92s History of England\x97Davies\x92s Criticism\x97Letter to
Bennet Langton

CHAPTER THIRTY-TWO -- XXXII. Marriage of Little Comedy\x97Goldsmith at
Barton\x97Practical Jokes at the Expense of his Toilet\x97Amusements at
Barton\x97Aquatic Misadventure

CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE -- XXXIII. Dinner at General Oglethorpe\x92s\x97Anecdotes
of the General\x97Dispute about Dueling\x97Ghost Stories

CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR -- XXXIV. Mr. Joseph Cradock\x97An Author\x92s
Confidings\x97An Amanuensis\x97Life at Edgeware\x97Goldsmith Conjuring\x97George
Colman\x97The Fantoccini

CHAPTER THIRTY-FIVE -- XXXV. Broken Health\x97Dissipation and Debts\x97The
Irish Widow\x97Practical Jokes\x97Scrub\x97A Misquoted Pun\x97Malagrida\x97Goldsmith
proved to be a Fool\x97Distressed Ballad-Singers\x97The Poet at Ranelagh

CHAPTER THIRTY-SIX -- XXXVI. Invitation to Christmas\x97The Spring-velvet
Coat\x97The Haymaking Wig \x97The Mischances of Loo\x97The fair Culprit\x97A dance
with the Jessamy Bride

CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN -- XXXVII. Theatrical delays\x97Negotiations with
Colman\x97Letter to Garrick\x97Croaking of the Manager\x97Naming of the Play\x97She
Stoops to Conquer\x97Foote\x92s Primitive Puppet Show, Piety on Pattens\x97First
Performance of the Comedy\x97Agitation of the Author\x97Success\x97Colman
Squibbed out of Town

CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT -- XXXVIII. A Newspaper Attack\x97The Evans
Affray\x97Johnson\x92s Comment

CHAPTER THIRTY-NINE -- XXXIX. Boswell in Holy-Week\x97Dinner at
Oglethorpe\x92s\x97Dinner at Paoli\x92s\x97The policy of Truth\x97Goldsmith affects
Independence of Royalty\x97Paoli\x92s Compliment\x97Johnson\x92s Eulogium on the
Fiddle\x97Question about Suicide\x97Boswell\x92s Subserviency

CHAPTER FORTY -- XL. Changes in the Literary Club\x97Johnson\x92s objection to
Garrick\x97Election of Boswell

CHAPTER FORTY-ONE -- XLI. Dinner at Dilly\x92s\x97Conversations on Natural
History\x97Intermeddling of Boswell\x97Dispute about Toleration\x97Johnson\x92s
Rebuff to Goldsmith\x97His Apology\x97Man-worship\x97Doctors Major and Minor\x97A
Farewell Visit

CHAPTER FORTY-TWO -- XLII. Project of a Dictionary of Arts and
Sciences\x97Disappointment\x97Negligent Authorship\x97Application for a
Pension\x97Beattie\x92s Essay on Truth\x97Public Adulation\x97A high-minded Rebuke

CHAPTER FORTY-THREE -- XLIII. Toil without Hope\x97The Poet in the Green-
room\x97In the Flower Garden\x97At Vauxhall\x97Dissipation without Gayety\x97Cradock
in Town\x97Friendly Sympathy\x97A Parting Scene\x97An Invitation to Pleasure

CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR -- XLIV. A return to Drudgery\x97Forced Gayety\x97Retreat
to the Country\x97The Poem of Retaliation\x97Portrait of Garrick\x97Of
Goldsmith\x97of Reynolds\x97Illness of the Poet\x97His Death\x97Grief of his
Friends\x97A last Word respecting the Jessamy Bride

CHAPTER FORTY-FIVE -- XLV. The Funeral\x97The Monument\x97The
Epitaph\x97Concluding Reflections



WOLFERT\x92S ROOST AND MISCELLANIES By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

A CHRONICLE OF WOLFERT\x92S ROOST.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE KNICKERBOCKER.

A CHRONICLE OF WOLFERT\x92S ROOST.

SLEEPY HOLLOW.

THE BIRDS OF SPRING.

RECOLLECTIONS OF THE ALHAMBRA.

THE ABENCERRAGE.

THE ENCHANTED ISLAND.

THE ADELANTADO OF THE SEVEN CITIES.

NATIONAL NOMENCLATURE.

DESULTORY THOUGHTS ON CRITICISM.

SPANISH ROMANCE.

LEGEND OF DON MUNIO SANCHO DE HINOJOSA.

COMMUNIPAW.

CONSPIRACY OF THE COCKED HATS.

A LEGEND OF COMMUNIPAW.

GUESTS FROM GIBBET-ISLAND.

THE BERMUDAS.

THE THREE KINGS OF BERMUDA.

PELAYO AND THE MERCHANT\x92S DAUGHTER.

THE KNIGHT OF MALTA.

THE GRAND PRIOR OF MINORCA,

LEGEND OF THE ENGULPHED CONVENT.

THE COUNT VAN HORN.



KNICKERBOCKER'S HISTORY OF NEW YORK COMPLETE By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

KNICKERBOCKER'S HISTORY OF NEW YORK\x97VOLUME I INTRODUCTION THE AUTHOR'S
APOLOGY Notices ACCOUNT OF THE AUTHOR TO THE PUBLIC

BOOK I -- CONTAINING DIVERS INGENIOUS THEORIES AND PHILOSOPHIC
SPECULATIONS, CONCERNING THE CREATION AND POPULATION OF THE WORLD, AS
CONNECTED WITH THE HISTORY OF NEW YORK. CHAPTER I CHAPTER II CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV CHAPTER V


BOOK II -- TREATING OF THE FIRST SETTLEMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF NIEUW
NEDERLANDTS. CHAPTER I CHAPTER II CHAPTER III CHAPTER IV CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI CHAPTER VII CHAPTER VIII CHAPTER IX

BOOK III -- IN WHICH IS RECORDED THE GOLDEN REIGN OF WOUTER VAN TWILLER.
CHAPTER I CHAPTER II CHAPTER III CHAPTER IV CHAPTER V CHAPTER VI CHAPTER
VII CHAPTER VIII CHAPTER IX

BOOK IV -- CONTAINING THE CHRONICLES OF THE REIGN OF WILLIAM THE TESTY.
CHAPTER I CHAPTER II CHAPTER III CHAPTER IV CHAPTER V


KNICKERBOCKER'S HISTORY OF NEW YORK\x97VOLUME II INTRODUCTION

HISTORY OF NEW YORK\x97BOOK IV (Cont'd.) CHAPTER VI CHAPTER VII CHAPTER
VIII CHAPTER IX CHAPTER X CHAPTER XI CHAPTER XII

BOOK V -- CONTAINING THE FIRST PART OF THE REIGN OF PETER STUYVESANT,
AND HIS TROUBLES WITH THE AMPHICTYONIC COUNCIL. CHAPTER I CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III CHAPTER IV CHAPTER V CHAPTER VI CHAPTER VII CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX

BOOK VI -- CONTAINING THE SECOND PART OF THE REIGN OF PETER THE
HEADSTRONG, AND HIS GALLANT ACHIEVEMENTS ON THE DELAWARE. CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II CHAPTER III CHAPTER IV CHAPTER V CHAPTER VI CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII CHAPTER IX

BOOK VII -- CONTAINING THE THIRD PART OF THE REIGN OF PETER THE
HEADSTRONG-HIS TROUBLES WITH THE BRITISH NATION, AND THE DECLINE AND
FALL OF THE DUTCH DYNASTY. CHAPTER I CHAPTER II CHAPTER III CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V CHAPTER VI CHAPTER VII CHAPTER VIII CHAPTER IX CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI CHAPTER XII CHAPTER XIII



TALES OF A TRAVELLER By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

TALES OF A TRAVELLER


PART FIRST\x97STRANGE STORIES BY A NERVOUS GENTLEMAN.

A HUNTING DINNER.

THE ADVENTURE OF MY UNCLE.

THE ADVENTURE OF MY AUNT.

THE BOLD DRAGOON;

THE ADVENTURE OF THE MYSTERIOUS PICTURE.

THE ADVENTURE OF THE MYSTERIOUS STRANGER.

THE STORY OF THE YOUNG ITALIAN.


PART SECOND\x97BUCKTHORNE AND HIS FRIENDS.

LITERARY LIFE.

A LITERARY DINNER.

THE CLUB OF QUEER FELLOWS.

THE POOR DEVIL AUTHOR.

BUCKTHORNE, OR THE YOUNG MAN OF GREAT EXPECTATIONS.

THE BOOBY SQUIRE.

THE STROLLING MANAGER.


PART THIRD\x97THE ITALIAN BANDITTI.

THE INN AT TERRACINA.

THE ADVENTURE OF THE LITTLE ANTIQUARY.

THE ADVENTURE OF THE POPKINS FAMILY.

THE PAINTER\x92S ADVENTURE.

THE STORY OF THE BANDIT CHIEFTAIN.

THE STORY OF THE YOUNG ROBBER.


PART FOURTH\x97THE MONEY DIGGERS.

HELL GATE.

KIDD THE PIRATE.

THE DEVIL AND TOM WALKER.

WOLFERT WEBBER; OR, GOLDEN DREAMS.

THE ADVENTURE OF SAM, THE BLACK FISHERMAN.



BRACEBRIDGE HALL OR THE HUMORISTS By Washington Irving



CONTENTS

BRACEBRIDGE HALL; OR, THE HUMOURISTS

THE AUTHOR.

THE HALL.

THE BUSY MAN.

FAMILY SERVANTS.

THE WIDOW.

THE LOVERS.

FAMILY RELIQUES.

AN OLD SOLDIER

THE WIDOW\x92S RETINUE.

READY-MONEY JACK.

BACHELORS.

WIVES.

STORY TELLING.

THE STOUT GENTLEMAN.

FOREST TREES.

A LITERARY ANTIQUARY.

THE FARM-HOUSE.

HORSEMANSHIP.

LOVE SYMPTOMS.

FALCONRY.

HAWKING.

ST. MARK\x92S EVE.

GENTILITY.

FORTUNE-TELLING.

LOVE-CHARMS.

THE LIBRARY.

THE STUDENT OF SALAMANCA.

BRACEBRIDGE HALL;

ENGLISH COUNTRY GENTLEMEN.

A BACHELOR\x92S CONFESSIONS.

ENGLISH GRAVITY.

GIPSIES.

MAY-DAY CUSTOMS.

VILLAGE WORTHIES.

THE SCHOOLMASTER.

THE SCHOOL.

A VILLAGE POLITICIAN.

THE ROOKERY.

MAY-DAY.

THE MANUSCRIPT.

ANNETTE DELARBRE.

TRAVELLING.

POPULAR SUPERSTITIONS.

THE CULPRIT.

FAMILY MISFORTUNES.

LOVERS\x92 TROUBLES.

THE HISTORIAN.

THE HAUNTED HOUSE.

DOLPH HEYLIGER.

THE STORM-SHIP.

THE WEDDING.

THE AUTHOR\x92S FAREWELL.



THE ALHAMBRA By Washington Irving



CONTENTS PAGE The Journey 	1 Palace of the Alhambra 	33 Important
Negotiations 	47 Inhabitants of the Alhambra 	54 The Hall of Ambassadors
58 The Jesuits' Library 	64 Alhamar, the Founder of the Alhambra 	65
Yusef Abul Hagig 	72 The Mysterious Chambers 	76 Panorama from the Tower
of Comares 	85 The Truant 	92 The Balcony 	95 The Adventure of the Mason
101 The Court of Lions 	105 The Abencerrages 	112 Mementos of Boabdil
124 Public F\xEAtes of Granada 	129 Local Traditions 	137 The House of the
Weathercock 	139 Legend of the Arabian Astrologer 	142 Visitors to the
Alhambra 	162 Relics and Genealogies 	167 The Generalife 	170 Legend of
Prince Ahmed Al Kamel 	172 A Ramble Among the Hills 	205 Legend of the
Moor's Legacy 	214 The Tower of Las Infantas 	236 Legend of the Three
Beautiful Princesses 	237 Legend of the Rose of the Alhambra 	262 The
Veteran 	279 The Governor and the Notary 	281 Governor Manco and the
Soldier 	288 A F\xEAte In the Alhambra 	306 Legend of the Two Discreet
Statues 	311 The Crusade of the Grand Master of Alc\xE1ntara 	330 Spanish
Romance 	338 Legend of Don Munio Sancho De Hinojosa 	341 Poets and
Poetry of Moslem Andalus 	347 An Expedition In Quest of A Diploma 	355
The Legend of the Enchanted Soldier 	358 The Author's Farewell to
Granada 	373



SPANISH PAPERS By Washington Irving



CONTENTS. THE LEGEND OF DON RODERICK. CHAPTER I. 	PAGE Of the Ancient
Inhabitants of Spain.- Of the Misrule of Witiza the Wicked. 	1 CHAPTER
II. The Rise of Don Roderick.- His Government. 	8 CHAPTER III. Of the
Loves of Roderick and the Princess Elyata. 	13 CHAPTER IV. Of Count
Julian. 	19 CHAPTER V. The Story of Florinda. 	22 CHAPTER VI. Don
Roderick receives an Extraordinary Embassy. 	31 CHAPTER VII. Story of
the Marvelous and Portentous Tower. 	35 [Pg viii]CHAPTER VIII. Count
Julian.- His Fortunes in Africa.- He hears of the Dishonor of his
Child.- His Conduct thereupon. 	45 CHAPTER IX. Secret Visit of Count
Julian to the Arab Camp.- First Expedition of Taric el Tuerto. 	53
CHAPTER X. Letter of Muza to the Caliph.- Second Expedition of Taric el
Tuerto. 	58 CHAPTER XI. Measures of Don Roderick on Hearing of the
Invasion.- Expedition of Ataulpho.- Vision of Taric. 	64 CHAPTER XII.
Battle of Calpe.- Fate of Ataulpho. 	69 CHAPTER XIII. Terror of the
Country.- Roderick rouses himself to Arms. 	76 CHAPTER XIV. March of the
Gothic Army.- Encampment on the Banks of the Guadalete.- Mysterious
Predictions of a Palmer.-Conduct of Pelistes thereupon. 	82 CHAPTER XV.
Skirmishing of the Armies.- Pelistes and his Son.- Pelistes and the
Bishop. 	88 CHAPTER XVI. Traitorous Message of Count Julian. 	93 [Pg
ix]CHAPTER XVII. Last Day of the Battle. 	97 CHAPTER XVIII. The Field of
Battle after the Defeat.- The Fate of Roderick. 	103 ILLUSTRATIONS OF
THE FOREGOING LEGEND. The Tomb of Roderick. 	108 The Cave of Hercules.
109 LEGEND OF THE SUBJUGATION OF SPAIN. CHAPTER I. Consternation of
Spain.- Conduct of the Conquerors.- Missives between Taric and Muza. 119
CHAPTER II. Capture of Granada.- Subjugation of the Alpuxarra Mountains.
125 CHAPTER III. Expedition of Magued against Cordova.-Defense of the
Patriot Pelistes. 	132 CHAPTER IV. Defense of the Convent of St. George
by Pelistes. 	136 CHAPTER V. Meeting between the Patriot Pelistes and
the Traitor Julian. 	142 [Pg x]CHAPTER VI. How Taric el Tuerto captured
the City of Toledo through the Aid of the Jews, and how he found the
famous Talismanic Table of Solomon. 	146 CHAPTER VII. Muza ben Nosier.-
His Entrance into Spain and Capture of Carmona. 	153 CHAPTER VIII. Muza
marches against the City of Seville. 	158 CHAPTER IX. Muza besieges the
City of Merida. 	160 CHAPTER X. Expedition of Abdalasis against Seville
and the "Land of Tadmir." 	168 CHAPTER XI. Muza arrives at Toledo.-
Interview between him and Taric. 	177 CHAPTER XII. Muza prosecutes the
Scheme of Conquest.- Siege of Saragossa.-Complete Subjugation of Spain.
182 CHAPTER XIII. Feud between the Arab Generals.- They are summoned to
appear before the Caliph at Damascus.-Reception of Taric. 	187 [Pg
xi]CHAPTER XIV. Muza arrives at Damascus.-His Interview with the
Caliph.- The Table of Solomon.- A rigorous Sentence. 	193 CHAPTER XV.
Conduct of Abdalasis as Emir of Spain. 	198 CHAPTER XVI. Loves of
Abdalasis and Exilona. 	203 CHAPTER XVII. Fate of Abdalasis and
Exilona.- Death of Muza. 	208 LEGEND OF COUNT JULIAN AND HIS FAMILY.
Legend of Count Julian and his Family. 	217 Note to the preceding
Legend. 	232 THE LEGEND OF PELAYO. CHAPTER I. Obscurity of the Ancient
Chronicles.- The Loves of Do\xF1a Lucia and the Duke Favila.- Birth of
Pelayo, and what happened thereupon; His Early Fortunes, and his
Tutelage under the veteran Count Grafeses. 	237 CHAPTER II. What
happened to Pelayo at the Court of Witiza. 	246 [Pg xii]CHAPTER III. How
Pelayo lived among the Mountains of Cantabria.- His Adventure with the
Needy Hidalgo of Gascony and the Rich Merchant of Bordeaux.- Discourse
of the Holy Hermit. 	249 CHAPTER IV. Pilgrimage of Pelayo, and what
befell him on his Return to Spain. 	261 CHAPTER V. The Battle of
Covadonga. 	268 CHAPTER VI. Pelayo becomes King of Leon.- His Death. 274
ABDERAHMAN: THE FOUNDER OF THE DYNASTY OF THE OMMIADES OF SPAIN. CHAPTER
I. Of the Youthful Fortunes of Abderahman. 	279 CHAPTER II. Landing of
Abderahman in Spain.- Condition of the Country. 	289 CHAPTER III.
Triumphs of Abderahman.- The Palm-tree which he planted, and the Verses
he composed thereupon.- Insurrections.- His Enemies subdued.-Undisputed
Sovereign of the Moslems of Spain.- Begins the famous Mosque in
Cordova.- His Death. 	293 [Pg xiii]CHRONICLE OF FERNAN GONZALEZ, COUNT
OF CASTILE. Introduction. 	313 CHAPTER I. Installation of Fernan
Gonzalez as Count of Castile.- His First Campaign against the Moors.-
Victory of San Quirce.- How the Count disposed of the Spoils. 	316
CHAPTER II. Of the Sally from Burgos, and Surprise of the Castle of
Lara.-Capitulation of the Town.- Visit to Alfonso the Great, King of
Leon. 	321 CHAPTER III. Expedition against the Fortress of Mu\xF1on.-
Desperate Defense of the Moors.- Enterprise against Castro Xeriz. 	326
CHAPTER IV. How the Count of Castile and the King of Leon make a
Triumphant Foray into the Moorish Country.- Capture of Salamanca.- Of
the Challenge brought by the Herald, and of the Count's Defiance. 	329
CHAPTER V. A Night Assault upon the Castle of Carazo.- The Moorish
Maiden who betrayed the Garrison. 	331 CHAPTER VI. Death of Alfonso,
King of Leon.- The Moors determined to strike a fresh Blow at the Count,
who [Pg xiv] summons all Castile to his Standard.- Of his Hunt in the
Forest while waiting for the Enemy, and of the Hermit that he met with.
335 CHAPTER VII. The Battle of the Ford of Cascajares. 	340 CHAPTER
VIII. Of the Message sent by the Count to Sancho II., King of Navarre,
and the Reply.- Their Encounter in Battle. 	343 CHAPTER IX. How the
Count of Toulouse makes a Campaign against Castile, and how he returns
in his Coffin. 	347 CHAPTER X. How the Count went to receive the Hand of
a Princess, and was thrown into a Dungeon.- Of the Stranger that visited
him in his Chains, and of the Appeal that he made to the Princess for
his Deliverance. 	351 CHAPTER XI. Of the Meditations of the Princess,
and their Result.- Her Flight from the Prison with the Count, and Perils
of the Escape.- The Nuptials. 	355 CHAPTER XII. King Garcia confined in
Burgos by the Count.- The Princess intercedes for his Release. 	361
CHAPTER XIII. Of the Expedition against the ancient City of Sylo.-The
unwitting Trespass of the Count into a Convent, and his Compunction
thereupon. 	363 [Pg xv]CHAPTER XIV. Of the Moorish Host that came up
from Cordova, and how the Count repaired to the Hermitage of San Pedro,
and prayed for Success against them, and received Assurance of Victory
in a Vision.- Battle of Hazinas. 	366 CHAPTER XV. The Count imprisoned
by the King of Leon.- The Countess concerts his Escape.- Leon and
Castile united by the Marriage of the Prince Ordo\xF1o with Urraca, the
Daughter of the Count by his first Wife. 	373 CHAPTER XVI. Moorish
Incursion into Castile.- Battle of San Estevan.- Of Pascual Vivas and
the Miracle that befell him.- Death of Ordo\xF1o III. 	378 CHAPTER XVII.
King Sancho the Fat.- Of the Homage he exacted from Count Fernan
Gonzalez, and of the strange Bargain that he made with him for the
Purchase of his Horse and Falcon. 	385 CHAPTER XVIII. Further of the
Horse and Falcon. 	389 CHAPTER XIX. The Last Campaign of Count Fernan.-
His Death. 	393 CHRONICLE OF FERNANDO THE SAINT. CHAPTER I. The
Parentage of Fernando.- Queen Berenguela.- The Laras.- Don Alvar
conceals the Death of King[Pg xvi] Henry.- Mission of Queen Berenguela
to Alfonso IX.- She renounces the Crown of Castile in favor of her son
Fernando. 	401 CHAPTER II. King Alfonso of Leon ravages Castile.-
Captivity of Don Alvar.- Death of the Laras. 	408 CHAPTER III. Marriage
of King Fernando.- Campaign against the Moors.- Aben Mohamed, King of
Baeza, declares himself the Vassal of King Fernando.- They march to
Jaen.- Burning of the Tower.- Fernando commences the Building of the
Cathedral at Toledo. 	415 CHAPTER IV. Assassination of Aben Mohamed.-His
Head carried as a Present to Abullale, the Moorish King of Seville.-
Advance of the Christians into Andalusia.- Abullale purchases a Truce.
420 CHAPTER V. Aben Hud.- Abullale purchases another Year's Truce.-
Fernando hears of the Death of his Father, the King of Leon, while
pressing the Siege of Jaen.- He becomes Sovereign of the two Kingdoms of
Leon and Castile. 	423 CHAPTER VI. Expedition of the Prince Alonzo
against the Moors.- Encamps on the Banks of the Guadalete.- Aben Hud
marches out from Xerez and gives Battle.- Prowess of Garcia Perez de
Vargas.- Fight and Pursuit of the Moors.- Miracle of the Blessed
Santiago. 	427 [Pg xvii]CHAPTER VII. A bold Attempt upon Cordova, the
Seat of Moorish Power. 	435 CHAPTER VIII. A Spy in the Christian Camp.-
Death of Aben Hud.- A vital Blow to Moslem Power.- Surrender of Cordova
to King Fernando. 	439 CHAPTER IX. Marriage of King Fernando to the
Princess Juana.- Famine at Cordova.- Don Alvar Perez. 	446 CHAPTER X.
Aben Alhamar, Founder of the Alhambra.- Fortifies Granada and makes it
his Capital.- Attempts to Surprise the Castle of Martos.- Peril of the
Fortress.- A Woman's Stratagem to save it.- Diego Perez, the Smasher.-
Death of Count Alvar Perez de Castro. 	450 CHAPTER XI. Aben Hudiel, the
Moorish King of Murcia, becomes the Vassal of King Fernando.- Aben
Alhamar seeks to drive the Christians out of Andalusia.- Fernando takes
the Field against him.- Ravages of the King.- His last Meeting with the
Queen-Mother. 	456 CHAPTER XII. King Fernando's Expedition to
Andalusia.- Siege of Jaen.- Secret Departure of Aben Alhamar for the
Christian Camp.- He acknowledges himself the Vassal of the King, who
enters Jaen in Triumph. 	465 [Pg xviii]CHAPTER XIII. Axataf, King of
Seville, exasperated at the Submission of the King of Granada, rejects
the Propositions of King Fernando for a Truce.- The latter is encouraged
by a Vision to undertake the Conquest of the City of Seville.- Death of
Queen Berenguela.- A Diplomatic Marriage. 	470 CHAPTER XIV. Investment
of Seville.- All Spain aroused to Arms.- Surrender of Alcala del Rio.-
The Fleet of Admiral Ramon Bonifaz advances up the Guadalquivir.- Don
Pelayo Correa, Master of Santiago.- His Valorous Deeds and the Miracles
wrought in his Behalf. 	475 CHAPTER XV. King Fernando changes his Camp.-
Garci Perez and the seven Moors. 	482 CHAPTER XVI. Of the Raft built by
the Moors, and how it was boarded by Admiral Bonifaz.- Destruction of
the Moorish Fleet.- Succor from Africa. 	488 CHAPTER XVII. Of the Stout
Prior Ferran Ruyz, and how he rescued his Cattle from the Moors.-Further
Enterprises of the Prior, and of the Ambuscade into which he Fell. 	492
CHAPTER XVIII. Bravado of the Three Cavaliers.- Ambush at the Bridge
over the Guadayra.-Desperate Valor of Garci Perez.-Grand Attempt of
Admiral Bonifaz on the Bridge of Boats.- Seville dismembered from
Triana. 	496 [Pg xix]CHAPTER XIX. Investment of Triana.- Garci Perez and
the Infanzon. 	504 CHAPTER XX. Capitulation of Seville.- Dispersion of
the Moorish Inhabitants.- Triumphant Entry of King Fernando. 	508
CHAPTER XXI. Death of King Fernando. 	514 SPANISH ROMANCE. Spanish
Romance. 	519 Legend of Don Munio Sancho de Hinojosa. 	523





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