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´╗┐Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Jonathan Swift
Author: Swift, Jonathan
Language: English
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*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Jonathan Swift" ***

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WORKS OF

JONATHAN SWIFT



CONTENTS


THE BATTLE OF THE BOOKS

A MODEST PROPOSAL

##  THE BICKERSTAFF-PARTRIDGE PAPERS

THE JOURNAL TO STELLA

##  THE TALE OF A TUB AND THE HISTORY OF MARTIN

##  PRAYERS AND SERMONS

##  THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, Vol. IV

##  THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, Vol. VI

##  THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, Vol. VII

##  THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, Vol. IX

##  THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, VOL. X.

##  THE POEMS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, Vol. I (of II)

##  THE POEMS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, Vol. II (of II)

##  GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, (Illustrated)

GULLIVER'S TRAVELS

##  IRELAND IN THE DAYS OF DEAN SWIFT

##  HINTS TO SERVANTS



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



THE BICKERSTAFF-PARTRIDGE PAPERS
by Jonathan Swift



CONTENTS
Predictions For The Year 1708
The Accomplishment of the First of Mr Bickerstaff's Predictions;
An Elegy on the supposed Death of Partridge, the Almanack-Maker.
An Epitaph on Partridge.
Partridge's reply
A vindication of Isaac Bickerstaff, Esq;
A famous prediction of Merlin, the British wizard.
Dr. John Arbuthnot and Alexander Pope



A TALE OF A TUB AND THE HISTORY OF MARTIN
By Jonathan Swift



CONTENTS.

A Tale of a Tub



To the Right Honourable John Lord Somers


37



The Bookseller to The Reader


41



The Epistle Dedicatory


43



The Preface


49



Section I.


The Introduction


59



Section II.



70



Section III.


A Digression Concerning Critics


81



Section IV.


A Tale of a Tub


90



Section V.


A Digression in the Modern Kind


100



Section VI.


A Tale of a Tub


106



Section VII.


A Digression in Praise of Digressions


113



Section VIII.


A Tale of a Tub


118



Section IX.


A Digression Concerning the Original . . .


125



Section X.


A Farther Digression


138



Section XI.


A Tale of a Tub


143



The Conclusion


155

The History of Martin



The History of Martin


159



A Digression on the Nature . . .


163



The History of Martin\x97Continued


164



A Project for the Universal Benefit of Mankind


165



THREE PRAYERS AND SERMONS
By Jonathan Swift



CONTENTS

On Sleeping in Church


385

On the Wisdom of this World


393



THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
VOLUME IV.
By Jonathan Swift



CONTENTS
SWIFT'S WRITINGS ON RELIGION AND THE CHURCH
A LETTER FROM A MEMBER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS IN IRELAND TO A MEMBER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS IN ENGLAND CONCERNING THE SACRAMENTAL TEST. WRITTEN IN THE YEAR 1708.
THE PRESBYTERIANS' PLEA OF MERIT.
A NARRATIVE OF THE SEVERAL ATTEMPTS, WHICH THE DISSENTERS OF IRELAND HAVE MADE, FOR A REPEAL OF THE SACRAMENTAL TEST.
QUAERIES WROTE BY DR. J. SWIFT, IN THE YEAR 1732. [RELATING TO THE SACRAMENTAL TEST.]
THE ADVANTAGES PROPOSED BY REPEALING THE SACRAMENTAL TEST, IMPARTIALLY CONSIDERED. BY THE REV. DR. SWIFT, DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S,
REASONS HUMBLY OFFERED TO THE PARLIAMENT OF IRELAND FOR REPEALING THE SACRAMENTAL TEST, &c. IN FAVOUR OF THE CATHOLICS, OTHERWISE CALLED ROMAN CATHOLICS, AND BY THEIR ILL-WISHERS PAPISTS.
SOME FEW THOUGHTS CONCERNING THE REPEAL OF THE TEST.[1]
TEN REASONS FOR REPEALING THE TEST ACT.[1]
SERMONS.
ON MUTUAL SUBJECTION.
ON THE TESTIMONY OF CONSCIENCE.
ON THE TRINITY.
ON BROTHERLY LOVE.[1]
THE DIFFICULTY OF KNOWING ONE'S-SELF.[1]
ON FALSE WITNESS.
ON THE WISDOM OF THIS WORLD.[1]
DOING GOOD:
ON THE MARTYRDOM OF KING CHARLES I.
ON THE POOR MAN'S CONTENTMENT.
A SERMON ON THE CAUSES OF THE WRETCHED CONDITION OF IRELAND.[1]
A SERMON UPON SLEEPING IN CHURCH.
APPENDIX I. SWIFT'S REMARKS ON DR GIBBS'S PARAPHRASE OF THE PSALMS.
THE FIRST FIFTEEN PSALMS, TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE.
APPENDIX II. A PROPOSAL HUMBLY OFFERED TO THE P T FOR THE MORE EFFECTUAL PREVENTING THE FURTHER GROWTH OF POPERY.
APPENDIX III. SWIFT AND SERJEANT BETTESWORTH.
AN EPIGRAM.[1] INSCRIBED TO THE HONOURABLE SERGEANT KITE.
"THE YAHOO'S OVERTHROW; OR, THE KEVAN BAYL'S NEW BALLAD."[3] UPON SERGEANT KITE'S INSULTING THE DEAN.
"ON THE ARCHBISHOP OF CASHEL,[1] AND BETTESWORTH.
APPENDIX IV. A TRUE AND FAITHFUL NARRATIVE OF WHAT PASSED IN LONDON, DURING THE GENERAL CONSTERNATION OF ALL RANKS AND DEGREES OF MANKIND; ON TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, AND FRIDAY LAST.



THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
VOLUME VI.
By Jonathan Swift



CONTENTS
THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
INTRODUCTION
LETTER I. TO THE SHOP-KEEPERS, TRADESMEN, FARMERS, AND COMMON-PEOPLE OF IRELAND.
LETTER II. TO MR. HARDING THE PRINTER.
THE REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE LORDS OF HIS MAJESTY'S MOST HONOURABLE PRIVY-COUNCIL, IN RELATION TO MR. WOOD'S HALFPENCE AND FARTHINGS, ETC.[1] AT THE COUNCIL CHAMBER AT WHITEHALL, THE 24TH DAY
LETTER III. TO THE NOBILITY AND GENTRY OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
LETTER IV. A LETTER TO THE WHOLE PEOPLE OF IRELAND.
SEASONABLE ADVICE TO THE GRAND JURY, CONCERNING THE BILL PREPARING AGAINST THE PRINTER OF THE DRAPIER'S FOURTH LETTER.
LETTER V. A LETTER TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR MIDDLETON.
ADVERTISEMENT TO THE READER[2]
LETTER V. A LETTER TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR MIDDLETON.[5]
LETTER VI. A LETTER TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THE LORD VISCOUNT MOLESWORTH.
DIRECTIONS TO THE PRINTER.
LETTER VI. A LETTER TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THE LORD VISCOUNT MOLESWORTH, AT HIS HOUSE AT BRACKDENSTOWN NEAR SWORDS.[6]
LETTER VII. AN HUMBLE ADDRESS TO BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT. BY M.B. DRAPIER.
LETTER VII. AN HUMBLE ADDRESS TO BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT.
APPENDIX I. ADDRESSES TO THE KING
APPENDIX II. REPORT OF THE ASSAY ON WOOD'S COINAGE, MADE BY SIR ISAAC NEWTON, EDWARD SOUTHWELL, ESQ., AND THOMAS SCROOPE, ESQ.[1]
APPENDIX III, TOM PUNSIBI'S DREAM[1]
APPENDIX IV. A LETTER FROM A FRIEND TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE \x97\x97\x97[1]
A SECOND LETTER FROM A FRIEND TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE \x97\x97\x97
APPENDIX V. THE PRESENTMENT OF THE GRAND JURY OF THE COUNTY OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN.[1]
APPENDIX VI. PROCLAMATION AGAINST THE DRAPIER.
APPENDIX VII.
APPENDIX VIII.
IRELAND'S CASE HUMBLY PRESENTED TO THE HONOURABLE THE KNIGHTS, CITIZENS, AND BURGESSES IN PARLIAMENT ASSEMBLED
APPENDIX IX. DESCRIPTIONS OF THE VARIOUS SPECIMENS OF WOOD'S COINS
INDEX.



THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
VOL. VII
HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL TRACTS-IRISH
CONTENTS
A Letter to a Member of Parliament, in Ireland, upon the choosing a New Speaker there 	1

A Proposal for the Universal Use of Irish Manufacture 	11

An Essay on English Bubbles. By Thomas Hope, Esq. 	31

The Swearer's Bank 	37

A Letter to the King at Arms 	47

The Last Speech and Dying Words of Ebenezer Elliston 	55

The Truth of Some Maxims in State and Government, examined with Reference to Ireland 	63

The Blunders, Deficiencies, Distresses, and Misfortunes Of Quilca 	73

A Short View of the State of Ireland 	79

The Story of the Injured Lady. Written by Herself 	93

The Answer to the Injured Lady 	104

An Answer to a Paper called "A Memorial of the Poor Inhabitants, Tradesmen, and Labourers of the Kingdom of Ireland" 	107

Answer to Several Letters from Unknown Persons 	117

An Answer to Several Letters sent me from Unknown Hands 	127

A Letter to the Archbishop of Dublin concerning the Weavers 	135

Observations occasioned by reading a Paper entitled "The Case of the Woollen Manufactures of Dublin," etc. 	145

The Present Miserable State of Ireland 	151

The Substance of what was said by the Dean of St. Patrick's
to the Lord Mayor and some of the Aldermen
when His Lordship came to Present the said Dean
with his Freedom in a Gold Box 	167

Advertisement by Dr. Swift in his Defence Against Joshua, Lord Allen 	173

[Pg xxii]
A Letter on Mr. M'Culla's Project about Halfpence, and a new one Proposed 	177

A Proposal that all the Ladies and Women of Ireland
should appear constantly in Irish Manufactures 	191

A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of
Poor People from being a Burthen to their Parents
or the Country, and for making them beneficial to the Public 	201

Answer to the Craftsman 	217

A Vindication of his Excellency John, Lord Carteret 	225

A Proposal for An Act of Parliament to Pay off the
Debt of the Nation without Taxing the Subject 	251

A Case submitted by Dean Swift to Mr. Lindsay,
Counsellor at Law 	259

An Examination of Certain Abuses, Corruptions, and
Enormities in the City of Dublin 	261

A Serious and Useful Scheme to make an Hospital for Incurables 	283

The Humble Petition of the Footmen in and about the
City of Dublin 	305

Advice to the Freemen of the City of Dublin in the
Choice of a Member to represent them in Parliament 	309

Some Considerations humbly offered to the Lord
Mayor, the Court of Aldermen and Common-Council
of the City of Dublin in the Choice of a Recorder 	317

A Proposal for giving Badges to the Beggars in all the
Parishes of Dublin 	321

Considerations about Maintaining the Poor 	337

On Barbarous Denominations in Ireland 	343

Speech delivered on the Lowering of the Coin 	351

Irish Eloquence 	361

A Dialogue in Hibernian Style 	362

To the Provost and Senior Fellows of Trinity
College, Dublin 	364

To the Right Worshipful the Mayor, Aldermen,
Sheriffs, and Common-Council of the City of Cork 	366

To the Honourable the Society of the Governor and
Assistants in London, for the New Plantation in Ulster 	368

Certificate to a Discarded Servant 	369

[Pg xxiii]
An Exhortation addressed to the Sub-Dean and Chapter
of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin 	370


Appendix:

A Letter to the Writer of the Occasional Paper 	375

An Account of the Court and Empire of Japan 	382

The Answer of the Right Hon. William Pulteney,
Esq., to the Right Hon. Sir Robert Walpole 	392

Index 	401



THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
VOL. VII
HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL TRACTS-IRISH
CONTENTS
A Letter to a Member of Parliament, in Ireland, upon the choosing a New Speaker there 	1

A Proposal for the Universal Use of Irish Manufacture 	11

An Essay on English Bubbles. By Thomas Hope, Esq. 	31

The Swearer's Bank 	37

A Letter to the King at Arms 	47

The Last Speech and Dying Words of Ebenezer Elliston 	55

The Truth of Some Maxims in State and Government, examined with Reference to Ireland 	63

The Blunders, Deficiencies, Distresses, and Misfortunes Of Quilca 	73

A Short View of the State of Ireland 	79

The Story of the Injured Lady. Written by Herself 	93

The Answer to the Injured Lady 	104

An Answer to a Paper called "A Memorial of the Poor Inhabitants, Tradesmen, and Labourers of the Kingdom of Ireland" 	107

Answer to Several Letters from Unknown Persons 	117

An Answer to Several Letters sent me from Unknown Hands 	127

A Letter to the Archbishop of Dublin concerning the Weavers 	135

Observations occasioned by reading a Paper entitled "The Case of the Woollen Manufactures of Dublin," etc. 	145

The Present Miserable State of Ireland 	151

The Substance of what was said by the Dean of St. Patrick's
to the Lord Mayor and some of the Aldermen
when His Lordship came to Present the said Dean
with his Freedom in a Gold Box 	167

Advertisement by Dr. Swift in his Defence Against Joshua, Lord Allen 	173

[Pg xxii]
A Letter on Mr. M'Culla's Project about Halfpence, and a new one Proposed 	177

A Proposal that all the Ladies and Women of Ireland
should appear constantly in Irish Manufactures 	191

A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of
Poor People from being a Burthen to their Parents
or the Country, and for making them beneficial to the Public 	201

Answer to the Craftsman 	217

A Vindication of his Excellency John, Lord Carteret 	225

A Proposal for An Act of Parliament to Pay off the
Debt of the Nation without Taxing the Subject 	251

A Case submitted by Dean Swift to Mr. Lindsay,
Counsellor at Law 	259

An Examination of Certain Abuses, Corruptions, and
Enormities in the City of Dublin 	261

A Serious and Useful Scheme to make an Hospital for Incurables 	283

The Humble Petition of the Footmen in and about the
City of Dublin 	305

Advice to the Freemen of the City of Dublin in the
Choice of a Member to represent them in Parliament 	309

Some Considerations humbly offered to the Lord
Mayor, the Court of Aldermen and Common-Council
of the City of Dublin in the Choice of a Recorder 	317

A Proposal for giving Badges to the Beggars in all the
Parishes of Dublin 	321

Considerations about Maintaining the Poor 	337

On Barbarous Denominations in Ireland 	343

Speech delivered on the Lowering of the Coin 	351

Irish Eloquence 	361

A Dialogue in Hibernian Style 	362

To the Provost and Senior Fellows of Trinity
College, Dublin 	364

To the Right Worshipful the Mayor, Aldermen,
Sheriffs, and Common-Council of the City of Cork 	366

To the Honourable the Society of the Governor and
Assistants in London, for the New Plantation in Ulster 	368

Certificate to a Discarded Servant 	369

[Pg xxiii]
An Exhortation addressed to the Sub-Dean and Chapter
of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin 	370


Appendix:

A Letter to the Writer of the Occasional Paper 	375

An Account of the Court and Empire of Japan 	382

The Answer of the Right Hon. William Pulteney,
Esq., to the Right Hon. Sir Robert Walpole 	392

Index 	401



THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
VOL. IX
By Jonathan Swift
> CONTRIBUTIONS TO "THE TATLER," "THE EXAMINER," "THE SPECTATOR," AND "THE INTELLIGENCER"
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
CONTRIBUTIONS TO "THE TATLER."
THE TATLER, NUMB. 32.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 35.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 59.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 63.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 66.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 67.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 68.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 70.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 71.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 230.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 258.
THE TATLER, NUMB. I.
THE TATLER, No. 2.
THE TATLER, No. 5.
THE TATLER, NUMB. 298.[1]
THE TATLER, NUMB. 302.[1]
THE TATLER, NUMB. 306.[1]
CONTRIBUTIONS TO "THE EXAMINER."
THE EXAMINER.
NUMB. 14.[1]
NUMB. 15.[1]
NUMB. 16.[1]
NUMB. 17.[1]
NUMB. 18.[1]
NUMB. 19.[1]
NUMB. 20.[1]
NUMB. 21.[1]
NUMB. 22.[1]
NUMB. 23.[1]
NUMB. 24.[1]
NUMB. 25.[1]
NUMB. 26.[1]
NUMB. 27.[1]
NUMB. 28.[1]
NUMB. 29.[1]
NUMB. 30.[1]
NUMB. 31.[1]
NUMB. 32.[1]
NUMB. 33.[1]
NUMB. 34.[1]
NUMB. 35.[1]
NUMB. 36.[1]
NUMB. 37.[1]
NUMB. 38.[1]
NUMB. 39.[1]
NUMB. 40.[1]
NUMB. 41.[1]
NUMB. 42.[1]
NUMB. 43.[1]
NUMB. 44.[1]
NUMB. 45.[1]
NUMB. 46.[1]
CONTRIBUTION TO "THE SPECTATOR."
THE SPECTATOR, NUMB. L.[1]
CONTRIBUTIONS TO "THE INTELLIGENCER."
THE INTELLIGENCER, NUMB. 1.[1]
THE INTELLIGENCER, NUMB. III.[1]
THE INTELLIGENCER, NUMB. XIX[1].
INDEX.



THE PROSE WORKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
VOL. X of BOHN'S STANDARD LIBRARY
VOL. X
HISTORICAL WRITINGS
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
THE HISTORY OF THE FOUR LAST YEARS OF THE QUEEN. By the late JONATHAN SWIFT, D.D. D.S.P.D.
ADVERTISEMENT
THE AUTHOR'S PREFACE.[1]
THE HISTORY OF THE FOUR LAST YEARS OF THE QUEEN. I
THE HISTORY OF THE FOUR LAST YEARS OF THE QUEEN. II
THE HISTORY OF THE FOUR LAST YEARS OF THE QUEEN. III
THE HISTORY OF THE FOUR LAST YEARS OF THE QUEEN. IV
AN ABSTRACT OF THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND, FROM THE INVASION OF IT BY JULIUS CAESAR TO THE REIGN OF HENRY THE SECOND.
SWIFT'S REMARKS ON THE CHARACTERS OF THE COURT OF QUEEN ANNE. FROM "MEMOIRS OF THE SECRET SERVICES OF JOHN MACKY, ESQ."
REMARKS ON LORD CLARENDON'S HISTORY OF THE REBELLION OXFORD EDITION, 1707, 3 VOLS. FROM THE ORIGINAL, IN ST. PATRICK'S LIBRARY.
PREFACE.
REMARKS ON "BISHOP BURNET'S HISTORY OF ['SCOTLAND IN'-SWIFT] HIS OWN TIME," FOLIO EDITION, 1724-34.
PREFACE
NOTES ON THE FREE-HOLDER.
NOTES ON THE FREE-HOLDER.[1]
INDEX.



THE POEMS OF

JONATHAN SWIFT
VOLUME I (of II)
CONTENTS
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
POEMS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
ODE TO DOCTOR WILLIAM SANCROFT[1] LATE LORD BISHOP OF CANTERBURY
ODE TO THE HON. SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE WRITTEN AT MOOR-PARK IN JUNE 1689
ODE TO KING WILLIAM ON HIS SUCCESSES IN IRELAND
ODE TO THE ATHENIAN SOCIETY[1]
TO MR. CONGREVE, WRITTEN IN NOVEMBER, 1693
OCCASIONED BY SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE'S LATE ILLNESS AND RECOVERY
WRITTEN IN A LADY'S IVORY TABLE-BOOK, 1698
MRS. FRANCES HARRIS'S PETITION, 1699
A BALLAD ON THE GAME OF TRAFFIC
A BALLAD TO THE TUNE OF THE CUT-PURSE[1]
THE DISCOVERY
THE PROBLEM, "THAT MY LORD BERKELEY STINKS WHEN HE IS IN LOVE"
THE DESCRIPTION OF A SALAMANDER, 1705
TO CHARLES MORDAUNT, EARL OF PETERBOROUGH[1]
ON THE UNION
ON MRS. BIDDY FLOYD; OR, THE RECEIPT TO FORM A BEAUTY. 1707
THE REVERSE (TO SWIFT'S VERSES ON BIDDY FLOYD); OR, MRS. CLUDD
APOLLO OUTWITTED
ANSWER TO LINES FROM MAY FAIR[1]
VANBRUGH'S HOUSE[1], BUILT FROM THE RUINS OF WHITEHALL THAT WAS BURNT, 1703
VANBRUGH'S HOUSE,[1], BUILT FROM THE RUINS OF WHITEHALL THAT WAS BURNT, 1703
BAUCIS AND PHILEMON[1]
BAUCIS AND PHILEMON[1]
THE HISTORY OF VANBRUGH'S HOUSE, 1708
A GRUB-STREET ELEGY ON THE SUPPOSED DEATH OF PARTRIDGE THE ALMANACK MAKER.[1] 1708
THE EPITAPH
A DESCRIPTION OF THE MORNING
A DESCRIPTION OF A CITY SHOWER[1]
ON THE LITTLE HOUSE BY THE CHURCHYARD OF CASTLENOCK, 1710
A TOWN ECLOGUE. 1710[1]
A CONFERENCE BETWEEN SIR HARRY PIERCE'S CHARIOT, AND MRS. D. STOPFORD'S CHAIR [1]
TO LORD HARLEY, ON HIS MARRIAGE[1] OCTOBER 31, 1713
PHYLLIS; OR, THE PROGRESS OF LOVE, 1716
HORACE, BOOK IV, ODE IX., ADDRESSED TO ARCHBISHOP KING,[1] 1718
TO MR. DELANY,[1], OCT. 10, 1718
AN ELEGY[1] ON THE DEATH OF DEMAR, THE USURER; WHO DIED ON THE 6TH OF JULY, 1720
EPITAPH ON THE SAME
TO MRS. HOUGHTON OF BOURMONT, ON PRAISING HER HUSBAND TO DR. SWIFT
VERSES WRITTEN ON A WINDOW, AT THE DEANERY HOUSE, ST. PATRICK'S
ON ANOTHER WINDOW[1]
APOLLO TO THE DEAN.[1] 1720
NEWS FROM PARNASSUS, BY DR. DELANY OCCASIONED BY "APOLLO TO THE DEAN" 1720
APOLLO'S EDICT OCCASIONED BY "NEWS FROM PARNASSUS"
THE DESCRIPTION OF AN IRISH FEAST
THE PROGRESS OF BEAUTY. 1719[1]
THE PROGRESS OF MARRIAGE[1]
THE PROGRESS OF POETRY
THE SOUTH-SEA PROJECT. 1721
FABULA CANIS ET UMBRAE
A PROLOGUE BILLET TO A COMPANY OF PLAYERS SENT WITH THE PROLOGUE
EPILOGUE[1] TO MR. HOPPY'S BENEFIT-NIGHT, AT SMOCK-ALLEY
PROLOGUE[1] TO A PLAY FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE DISTRESSED WEAVERS. BY DR. SHERIDAN. SPOKEN BY MR. ELRINGTON. 1721
EPILOGUE TO A BENEFIT PLAY, GIVEN IN BEHALF OF THE DISTRESSED WEAVERS. BY THE DEAN. SPOKEN BY MR. GRIFFITH
ANSWER TO DR. SHERIDAN'S PROLOGUE, AND TO DR. SWIFT'S EPILOGUE. IN BEHALF OF THE DISTRESSED WEAVERS. BY DR. DELANY.
ON GAULSTOWN HOUSE THE SEAT OF GEORGE ROCHFORT, ESQ. BY DR. DELANY
THE COUNTRY LIFE; PART OF A SUMMER SPENT AT GAULSTOWN HOUSE, THE SEAT OF GEORGE ROCHFORT, ESQ.
DR. DELANY'S VILLA[1]
ON ONE OF THE WINDOWS AT DELVILLE
CARBERIAE RUPES IN COMITATU CORGAGENSI. SCRIPSIT JUN. ANN. DOM. 1723
CARBERY ROCKS TRANSLATED BY DR. DUNKIN
COPY OF THE BIRTH-DAY VERSES ON MR. FORD[1]
ON DREAMS AN IMITATION OF PETRONIUS
SENT BY DR. DELANY TO DR. SWIFT, IN ORDER TO BE ADMITTED TO SPEAK TO HIM WHEN HE WAS DEAF. 1724
THE ANSWER
A QUIET LIFE AND A GOOD NAME TO A FRIEND WHO MARRIED A SHREW. 1724
ADVICE TO THE GRUB-STREET VERSE-WRITERS, 1726
A PASTORAL DIALOGUE, WRITTEN JUNE, 1727, JUST AFTER THE NEWS OF THE DEATH OF GEORGE I, WHO DIED THE 12TH OF THAT MONTH IN GERMANY [1]
DESIRE AND POSSESSION 1727
ON CENSURE, 1727
THE FURNITURE OF A WOMAN'S MIND, 1727
CLEVER TOM CLINCH GOING TO BE HANGED. 1727
DR. SWIFT TO MR. POPE, WHILE HE WAS WRITING THE "DUNCIAD". 1727
A LOVE POEM FROM A PHYSICIAN TO HIS MISTRESS, WRITTEN AT LONDON
BOUTS RIMEZ[1], ON SIGNORA DOMITILLA
HELTER SKELTER; OR, THE HUE AND CRY AFTER THE ATTORNEYS UPON THEIR RIDING THE CIRCUIT
THE PUPPET-SHOW
THE JOURNAL OF A MODERN LADY IN A LETTER TO A PERSON OF QUALITY. 1728
THE LOGICIANS REFUTED
THE ELEPHANT; OR, THE PARLIAMENT MAN
PAULUS: AN EPIGRAM BY MR. LINDSAY[1]
THE ANSWER. BY DR. SWIFT
A DIALOGUE BETWEEN AN EMINENT LAWYER[1] AND DR. JONATHAN SWIFT, D.S.P.D. IN ALLUSION TO HORACE, BOOK II, SATIRE I
ON BURNING A DULL POEM. 1729
AN EXCELLENT NEW BALLAD, OR, THE TRUE ENGLISH DEAN[1] TO BE HANGED FOR A RAPE. 1730
ON STEPHEN DUCK THE THRESHER, AND FAVOURITE POET A QUIBBLING EPIGRAM. 1730
THE LADY'S DRESSING-ROOM. 1730
THE POWER OF TIME. 1730
CASSINUS AND PETER, A TRAGICAL ELEGY. 1731
A BEAUTIFUL YOUNG NYMPH GOING TO BED. WRITTEN FOR THE HONOUR OF THE FAIR SEX. 1731
STREPHON AND CHLOE. 1731
APOLLO; OR, A PROBLEM SOLVED. 1731
THE PLACE OF THE DAMNED. 1731
THE DAY OF JUDGMENT[1]
JUDAS. 1731
AN EPISTLE TO MR. GAY[1]. 1731
TO A LADY WHO DESIRED THE AUTHOR TO WRITE SOME VERSES UPON HER IN THE HEROIC STYLE
EPIGRAM ON THE BUSTS[1] IN RICHMOND HERMITAGE. 1732
ANOTHER
A CONCLUSION DRAWN FROM THE ABOVE EPIGRAMS, AND SENT TO THE DRAPIER
DR. SWIFT'S ANSWER
TO THE REVEREND DR. SWIFT WITH A PRESENT OF A PAPER-BOOK, FINELY BOUND, ON HIS BIRTH-DAY, NOV. 30, 1732.[1] BY JOHN, EARL OF ORRERY
VERSES LEFT WITH A SILVER STANDISH ON THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S DESK, ON HIS BIRTH-DAY. BY DR. DELANY
VERSES OCCASIONED BY THE FOREGOING PRESENTS
VERSES SENT TO THE DEAN WITH AN EAGLE QUILL, ON HEARING OF THE PRESENTS BY THE EARL OF ORRERY AND DR. DELANY. BY MRS. PILKINGTON
AN INVITATION, BY DR. DELANY, IN THE NAME OF DR. SWIFT
THE BEASTS' CONFESSION TO THE PRIEST, OBSERVING HOW MOST MEN MISTAKE THEIR OWN TALENTS. 1732
THE PARSON'S CASE
THE HARDSHIP UPON THE LADIES. 1733
A LOVE SONG IN THE MODERN TASTE. 1733
THE STORM, MINERVA'S PETITION
ODE ON SCIENCE
A YOUNG LADY'S COMPLAINT[1], FOR THE STAY OF THE DEAN IN ENGLAND
ON THE DEATH OF DR. SWIFT, WRITTEN IN NOVEMBER, 1731 [1]
ON POETRY, A RHAPSODY. 1733
VERSES SENT TO THE DEAN ON HIS BIRTH-DAY, WITH PINE'S HORACE, FINELY BOUND. BY DR. J. SICAN[1]
EPIGRAM BY MR. BOWYER INTENDED TO BE PLACED UNDER THE HEAD OF GULLIVER. 1733
ON PSYCHE[1]
THE DEAN AND DUKE. 1734
WRITTEN BY DR. SWIFT ON HIS OWN DEAFNESS, IN SEPTEMBER, 1734
THE DEAN'S MANNER OF LIVING
EPIGRAM BY MR. BOWYER
VERSES MADE FOR FRUIT-WOMEN
ON ROVER, A LADY'S SPANIEL
EPIGRAMS ON WINDOWS SEVERAL OF THEM WRITTEN IN 1726
TO JANUS, ON NEW YEAR'S DAY, 1726
A MOTTO FOR MR. JASON HASARD WOOLLEN-DRAPER IN DUBLIN, WHOSE SIGN WAS THE GOLDEN FLEECE
TO A FRIEND WHO HAD BEEN MUCH ABUSED IN MANY INVETERATE LIBELS
CATULLUS DE LESBIA[1]
ON A CURATE'S COMPLAINT OF HARD DUTY
TO BETTY, THE GRISETTE
EPIGRAM FROM THE FRENCH[1]
EPIGRAM[1]
EPIGRAM ADDED BY STELLA[1]
JOAN CUDGELS NED
VERSES ON TWO CELEBRATED MODERN POETS
EPITAPH ON GENERAL GORGES,[1] AND LADY MEATH[2]
VERSES ON I KNOW NOT WHAT
DR. SWIFT TO HIMSELF ON ST. CECILIA'S DAY
AN ANSWER TO A FRIEND'S QUESTION
EPITAPH INSCRIBED ON A MARBLE TABLET, IN BERKELEY CHURCH, GLOUCESTERSHIRE
EPITAPH ON FREDERICK, DUKE OF SCHOMBERG[1]
VERSES WRITTEN DURING LORD CARTERET'S ADMINISTRATION OF IRELAND
AN APOLOGY TO LADY CARTERET
THE BIRTH OF MANLY VIRTUE
ON PADDY'S CHARACTER OF THE "INTELLIGENCER."[1] 1729
AN EPISTLE TO HIS EXCELLENCY JOHN, LORD CARTERET BY DR. DELANY. 1729[1]
AN EPISTLE UPON AN EPISTLE FROM A CERTAIN DOCTOR TO A CERTAIN GREAT LORD. BEING A CHRISTMAS-BOX FOR DR. DELANY
A LIBEL ON THE REVEREND DR. DELANY, AND HIS EXCELLENCY JOHN, LORD CARTERET. 1729
TO DR. DELANY ON THE LIBELS WRITTEN AGAINST HIM. 1729
DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A BIRTH-DAY SONG. 1729
THE PHEASANT AND THE LARK, A FABLE BY DR. DELANY. 1730
ANSWER TO DR. DELANY'S FABLE OF THE PHEASANT AND LARK. 1730
DEAN SMEDLEY'S PETITION TO THE DUKE OF GRAFTON[1]
THE DUKE'S ANSWER, BY DR. SWIFT
PARODY ON A CHARACTER OF DEAN SMEDLEY, WRITTEN IN LATIN BY HIMSELF[1]



THE POEMS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
VOL. II (of II)


CONTENTS
POEMS OF JONATHAN SWIFT
POEMS ADDRESSED TO VANESSA AND STELLA
CADENUS AND VANESSA[1]
LOVE[1]
A REBUS. BY VANESSA
THE DEAN'S ANSWER
STELLA'S BIRTH-DAY MARCH 13, 1718-19
STELLA'S BIRTH-DAY.[1] 1719-20
TO STELLA, WHO COLLECTED AND TRANSCRIBED HIS POEMS
STELLA VISITING ME IN MY SICKNESS
STELLA TO DR. SWIFT ON HIS BIRTH-DAY, NOV. 30, 1721
TO STELLA ON HER BIRTH-DAY, 1721-2
ON THE GREAT BURIED BOTTLE BY DR. DELANY
EPITAPH BY THE SAME
STELLA'S BIRTH-DAY:
STELLA AT WOOD PARK,
A NEW YEAR'S GIFT FOR BEC [1]
DINGLEY AND BRENT[1]
TO STELLA WRITTEN ON THE DAY OF HER BIRTH
VERSES BY STELLA
A RECEIPT TO RESTORE STELLA'S YOUTH. 1724-5
STELLA'S BIRTH-DAY. 1724-5
BEC'S[1] BIRTH-DAY NOV. 8, 1726
ON THE COLLAR OF TIGER, MRS. DINGLEY'S LAP-DOG
STELLA'S BIRTH-DAY, MARCH 13, 1726-7
DEATH AND DAPHNE
DAPHNE
RIDDLES BY DR. SWIFT AND HIS FRIENDS.
PETHOX THE GREAT. 1723
ON A PEN. 1724
ON GOLD
ON THE POSTERIORS
ON A HORN
ON A CORKSCREW
THE GULF OF ALL HUMAN POSSESSIONS, 1724
LOUISA[1] TO STREPHON. 1724
A MAYPOLE. 1725
ON THE MOON
ON A CIRCLE
ON INK
ON THE FIVE SENSES
FONTINELLA[1] TO FLORINDA
AN ECHO
ON A SHADOW IN A GLASS;
ON TIME
ON THE GALLOWS
ON THE VOWELS
ON SNOW
ON A CANNON
ON A PAIR OF DICE
ON A CANDLE, TO LADY CARTERET
TO LADY CARTERET, BY DR. DELANY
ANSWERED BY DR. SWIFT
TO LADY CARTERET, BY DR. SWIFT
ANSWERED BY DR. SHERIDAN
A RIDDLE
ANSWER, BY MR. F\x97\x97R
A LETTER TO DR. HELSHAM
PROBATUR ALITER
POEMS COMPOSED AT MARKET HILL
ON CUTTING DOWN THE THORN AT MARKET-HILL.[1] 1727
TO DEAN SWIFT, BY SIR ARTHUR ACHESON. 1728
DEAN SWIFT AT SIR ARTHUR ACHESON'S IN THE NORTH OF IRELAND
ON A VERY OLD GLASS AT MARKET-HILL
ANSWERED EXTEMPORE BY DR. SWIFT
EPITAPH IN BERKELEY CHURCH-YARD, GLOUCESTERSHIRE
MY LADY'S[1] LAMENTATION AND COMPLAINT AGAINST THE DEAN
A PASTORAL DIALOGUE. 1728
THE GRAND QUESTION DEBATED: WHETHER HAMILTON'S BAWN[1] SHOULD BE TURNED INTO A BARRACK OR MALT-HOUSE.
DRAPIER'S-HILL.[1] 1730
THE DEAN'S REASONS FOR NOT BUILDING AT DRAPIER'S-HILL
THE REVOLUTION AT MARKET-HILL
ROBIN AND HARRY.[1] 1730
A PANEGYRIC ON THE DEAN IN THE PERSON OF A LADY IN THE NORTH [l] 1730
TWELVE ARTICLES[1]
POLITICAL POETRY
PARODY ON THE RECORDER OF BLESSINGTON'S ADDRESS TO QUEEN ANNE
MR. WILLIAM CROWE'S ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY, TURNED INTO METRE
JACK FRENCHMAN'S LAMENTATION[1] AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG
THE GARDEN PLOT
SID HAMET'S ROD
THE VIRTUES OF SID HAMET[1] THE MAGICIAN'S ROD. 1710[2]
THE FAMOUS SPEECH-MAKER OF ENGLAND, OR BARON (ALIAS BARREN) LOVEL'S CHARGE AT THE ASSIZES AT EXON, APRIL 5, 1710
PARODY ON THE RECORDER'S SPEECH TO HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF ORMOND, 4TH JULY, 1711
THE RECORDER'S SPEECH EXPLAINED BY THE TORIES
THE SPEECH
BALLAD
ATLAS; OR, THE MINISTER OF STATE[1] TO THE LORD TREASURER OXFORD, 1710
LINES WRITTEN EXTEMPORE ON MR. HARLEY'S BEING STABBED,mAND ADDRESSED TO HIS PHYSICIAN, 1710-11 [1]
AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG BEING THE INTENDED SPEECH OF A FAMOUS ORATOR AGAINST PEACE. 1711
THE SPEECH
THE WINDSOR PROPHECY[1]
CORINNA,[1] A BALLAD, 1711-12
THE FABLE OF MIDAS.[1] 1711-12
TOLAND'S INVITATION TO DISMAL[1] TO DINE WITH THE CALVES HEAD CLUB
PEACE AND DUNKIRK, BEING AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG UPON THE SURRENDER OF DUNKIRK TO GENERAL HILL, 1712
HORACE, EPIST. I, VII, IMITATION OF HORACE, TO LORD OXFORD, A.D. 1713[1]
THE AUTHOR UPON HIMSELF, 1713
THE FAGOT[1]
IMITATION OF PART OF THE SIXTH SATIRE OF THE SECOND BOOK OF HORACE.[1] 1714
HORACE, BOOK II, ODE I, PARAPHRASED, ADDRESSED TO RICHARD STEELE, ESQ. 1714
DENNIS INVITATION TO STEELE, HORACE, BOOK I, EP. V
IN SICKNESS, WRITTEN IN OCTOBER, 1714
THE FABLE OF THE BITCHES[1], WRITTEN IN THE YEAR 1715, ON AN ATTEMPT TO REPEAL THE TEST ACT
THE MORAL
HORACE, BOOK III, ODE II, TO THE EARL OF OXFORD, LATE LORD TREASURER. SENT TO HIM WHEN IN THE TOWER, 1716
ON THE CHURCH'S DANGER
A POEM ON HIGH CHURCH
A POEM OCCASIONED BY THE HANGINGS IN THE CASTLE OF DUBLIN, IN WHICH THE STORY OF PHAETHON IS EXPRESSED
A TALE OF A NETTLE[1]
A SATIRICAL ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF A LATE FAMOUS GENERAL[1]
POEMS CHIEFLY RELATING TO IRISH POLITICS
PARODY ON THE SPEECH OF DR. BENJAMIN PRATT,[1] PROVOST OF TRINITY COLLEGE TO THE PRINCE OF WALES
AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG[1] ON A SEDITIOUS PAMPHLET. 1720-21
THE RUN UPON THE BANKERS[1]
UPON THE HORRID PLOT DISCOVERED BY HARLEQUIN, THE BISHOP OF ROCHESTER'S FRENCH DOG,[1] IN A DIALOGUE BETWEEN A WHIG AND A TORY
A QUIBBLING ELEGY ON JUDGE BOAT, 1723
THE EPITAPH
VERSES OCCASIONED BY WHITSHED'S [1] MOTTO ON HIS COACH. 1724
PROMETHEUS[1] ON WOOD THE PATENTEE'S IRISH HALFPENCE[2], 1724
VERSES ON THE REVIVAL OF THE ORDER OF THE BATH,[1] DURING WALPOLE'S ADMINISTRATION, A. D. 1725
EPIGRAM ON WOOD'S BRASS MONEY
A SIMILE ON OUR WANT OF SILVER, AND THE ONLY WAY TO REMEDY IT. 1725
WOOD AN INSECT. 1725
ON WOOD THE IRONMONGER. 1725
WILL WOOD'S PETITION TO THE PEOPLE OF IRELAND, BEING AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG,
A NEW SONG ON WOOD'S HALFPENCE
A SERIOUS POEM UPON WILLIAM WOOD, BRAZIER, TINKER, HARD-WAREMAN, COINER, FOUNDER, AND ESQUIRE
AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG, UPON THE DECLARATIONS OF THE SEVERAL CORPORATIONS OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN AGAINST WOOD'S HALFPENCE
VERSES ON THE UPRIGHT JUDGE, WHO CONDEMNED THE DRAPIER'S PRINTER
ON THE SAME
ON THE SAME
EPIGRAM IN ANSWER TO THE DEAN'S VERSES ON HIS OWN DEAFNESS [1]
HORACE, BOOK I, ODE XIV PARAPHRASED AND INSCRIBED TO IRELAND 1726
VERSES ON THE SUDDEN DRYING UP OF ST. PATRICK'S WELL NEAR TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN. 1726
ON READING DR. YOUNG'S SATIRE, CALLED THE UNIVERSAL PASSION, 1726
THE DOG AND THIEF. 1726
A DIALOGUE[1] BETWEEN MAD MULLINIX AND TIMOTHY, 1728
TIM AND THE FABLES
TOM AND DICK[1]
DICK, A MAGGOT
CLAD ALL IN BROWN, TO DICK[1]
DICK'S VARIETY
TRAULUS. PART I, A DIALOGUE BETWEEN TOM AND ROBIN[1], 1730
TRAULUS. PART II
A FABLE OF THE LION AND OTHER BEASTS
ON THE IRISH BISHOPS.[1] 1731
HORACE, BOOK IV, ODE IX., ADDRESSED TO HUMPHRY FRENCH, ESQ.[1] LATE LORD MAYOR OF DUBLIN
ON MR. PULTENEY'S[1] BEING PUT OUT OF THE COUNCIL. 1731
ON THE WORDS BROTHER PROTESTANTS AND FELLOW CHRISTIANS, SO FAMILIARLY USED BY THE ADVOCATES FOR THE REPEAL OF THE TEST-ACT IN IRELAND, 1733
BETTESWORTH'S EXULTATION UPON HEARING THAT HIS NAME WOULD BE TRANSMITTED TO POSTERITY IN DR. SWIFT'S WORKS. BY WILLIAM DUNKIN
AN EPIGRAM
AN EPIGRAM INSCRIBED TO THE HONOURABLE SERGEANT KITE
THE YAHOO'S OVERTHROW, OR, THE KEVAN BAYL'S NEW BALLAD, UPON SERGEANT KITE'S INSULTING THE DEAN [1]
ON THE ARCHBISHOP OF CASHEL,[1] AND BETTESWORTH
ON THE IRISH CLUB. 1733[1]
ON NOISY TOM. HORACE, PART OF BOOK I, SAT. VI, PARAPHRASED, 1733
ON DR. RUNDLE, BISHOP OF DERRY, 1734-5
EPIGRAM
A CHARACTER, PANEGYRIC, AND DESCRIPTION OF THE LEGION CLUB, 1736
PRIVILEGE OF PARLIAMENT,
ON A PRINTER'S[1] BEING SENT TO NEWGATE
A VINDICATION OF THE LIBEL; OR, A NEW BALLAD, WRITTEN BY A SHOE-BOY, ON AN ATTORNEY WHO WAS FORMERLY A SHOE-BOY
A FRIENDLY APOLOGY FOR A CERTAIN JUSTICE OF PEACE BY WAY OF DEFENCE OF HARTLEY HUTCHESON, ESQ. BY JAMES BLACK-WELL, OPERATOR FOR THE FEET
AY AND NO, A TALE FROM DUBLIN.[1] WRITTEN IN 1737
A BALLAD
A WICKED TREASONABLE LIBEL[1]
EPIGRAMS AGAINST CARTHY BY SWIFT AND OTHERS
ON CARTHY'S TRANSLATION OF HORACE
ON CARTHY MINOTAURUS
ON THE SAME
ON THE SAME
IMITATED
AD HORATIUM CUM CARTHIO CONSTRICTUM
IMITATED
AN IRISH EPIGRAM ON THE SAME
ON CARTHY'S TRANSLATION OF LONGINUS
RATIO INTER LONGINUM ET CARTHIUM COMPUTATA
ON THE SAME
CARTHY KNOCKED OUT SOME TEETH FROM HIS NEWS-BOY
TO CARTHY
ON CARTHY'S PUBLISHING SEVERAL LAMPOONS, UNDER THE NAMES OF INFAMOUS POETASTERS
TO CARTHY
TO CARTHY, ATTRIBUTING SOME PERFORMANCES TO MR. DUNKIN
UPON CARTHY'S THREATENING TO TRANSLATE PINDAR
POETICAL EPISTLE TO DR. SHERIDAN
LINES WRITTEN ON A WINDOW[1] IN THE EPISCOPAL PALACE AT KILMORE
THE UPSTART
ON THE ARMS OF THE TOWN OF WATERFORD[1]
VERSES ON BLENHEIM[1]
AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG[1] UPON THE LATE GRAND JURY
AN EXCELLENT NEW SONG UPON HIS GRACE OUR GOOD LORD ARCHBISHOP OF DUBLIN
TO HIS GRACE THE ARCHBISHOP OF DUBLIN
TO THE CITIZENS[1]
PUNCH'S PETITION TO THE LADIES
EPIGRAM
EPIGRAM ON JOSIAH HORT[1]
EPIGRAM[1]
TRIFLES
GEORGE ROCHFORT'S VERSES FOR THE REV. DR. SWIFT, DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S, AT LARACOR, NEAR TRIM
MUSA CLONSHOGHIANA
A LEFT-HANDED LETTER[1] TO DR. SHERIDAN, 1718
TO THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S IN ANSWER TO HIS LEFT-HANDED LETTER
TO MR. THOMAS SHERIDAN
AD AMICUM ERUDITUM THOMAM SHERIDAN
TO THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S
TO THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S
AN ANSWER, BY DELANY, TO THOMAS SHERIDAN
A REPLY, BY SHERIDAN, TO DELANY
ANOTHER REPLY, BY SHERIDAN
TO THOMAS SHERIDAN
SWIFT TO SHERIDAN, IN REPLY
AN ANSWER BY SHERIDAN
TO DR. SHERIDAN. 1718
THE ANSWER, BY DR. SHERIDAN
DR. SHERIDAN TO DR. SWIFT, 1718
THE DEAN'S ANSWER
DR. SHERIDAN'S REPLY TO THE DEAN
TO THE SAME. BY DR. SHERIDAN
THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S, TO THOMAS SHERIDAN
TO THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S
THE DEAN TO THOMAS SHERIDAN
TO DR. SHERIDAN[1]
DR. SHERIDAN'S ANSWER
DR. SWIFT'S REPLY
A COPY OF A COPY OF VERSES FROM THOMAS SHERIDAN, CLERK, TO GEORGE-NIM-DAN-DEAN, ESQ.[1]
GEORGE-NIM-DAN-DEAN'S ANSWER
GEORGE-NIM-DAN-DEAN'S INVITATION TO THOMAS SHERIDAN
TO GEORGE-NIM-DAN-DEAN, ESQ. UPON HIS INCOMPARABLE VERSES. BY DR. DELANY IN SHERIDAN'S NAME[1]
TO MR. THOMAS SHERIDAN UPON HIS VERSES WRITTEN IN CIRCLES BY DR. SWIFT
ON DR. SHERIDAN'S CIRCULAR VERSES BY MR. GEORGE ROCHFORT
ON DAN JACKSON'S PICTURE, CUT IN SILK AND PAPER[1]
ON THE SAME PICTURE
ON THE SAME
ON THE SAME PICTURE
ON THE SAME PICTURE
DAN JACKSON'S DEFENCE
MR. ROCHFORT'S REPLY
DR. DELANY'S REPLY
SHERIDAN'S REPLY
A REJOINDER BY THE DEAN IN JACKSON'S NAME
ANOTHER REJOINDER BY THE DEAN, IN JACKSON'S NAME
SHERIDAN'S SUBMISSION BY THE DEAN
THE PARDON
THE LAST SPEECH AND DYING WORDS OF DANIEL JACKSON
TO THE REV. DANIEL JACKSON TO BE HUMBLY PRESENTED BY MR. SHERIDAN IN PERSON, WITH RESPECT, CARE, AND SPEED. TO BE DELIVERED BY AND WITH MR. SHERIDAN
SHERIDAN TO SWIFT
SHERIDAN TO SWIFT
SWIFT TO SHERIDAN
MARY THE COOK-MAID'S LETTER TO DR. SHERIDAN. 1723
A PORTRAIT FROM THE LIFE
ON STEALING A CROWN, WHEN THE DEAN WAS ASLEEP
THE DEAN'S ANSWER
A PROLOGUE TO A PLAY PERFORMED AT MR. SHERIDAN'S SCHOOL. SPOKEN BY ONE OF THE SCHOLARS
THE EPILOGUE
THE SONG
A NEW YEAR'S GIFT FOR THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S GIVEN HIM AT QUILCA. BY SHERIDAN, 1723
TO QUILCA, A COUNTRY-HOUSE OF DR. SHERIDAN, IN NO VERY GOOD REPAIR. 1725
THE BLESSINGS OF A COUNTRY LIFE, 1725
THE PLAGUES OF A COUNTRY LIFE
A FAITHFUL INVENTORY OF THE FURNITURE BELONGING TO \x97\x97 ROOM IN T. C. D. IN IMITATION OF DR. SWIFT'S MANNER. WRITTEN IN THE YEAR 1725
PALINODIA[1], HORACE, BOOK I, ODE XVI
A LETTER TO THE DEAN WHEN IN ENGLAND. 1726. BY DR. SHERIDAN
AN INVITATION TO DINNER FROM DOCTOR SHERIDAN TO DOCTOR SWIFT, 1727
ON THE FIVE LADIES AT SOT'S HOLE[1] WITH THE DOCTOR[2] AT THEIR HEAD
THE FIVE LADIES' ANSWER TO THE BEAU, WITH THE WIG AND WINGS AT HIS HEAD BY DR. SHERIDAN
THE BEAU'S REPLY TO THE FIVE LADIES' ANSWER
DR. SHERIDAN'S BALLAD ON BALLY-SPELLIN.[1] 1728
ANSWER.[1] BY DR. SWIFT
AN EPISTLE TO TWO FRIENDS[1] TO DR. HELSHAM [2]
TO DR. SHERIDAN
DR. HELSHAM'S ANSWER
A TRUE AND FAITHFUL INVENTORY OF THE GOODS BELONGING TO DR. SWIFT, VICAR OF LARACOR. UPON LENDING HIS HOUSE TO THE BISHOP OF MEATH, UNTIL HIS OWN WAS BUILT[1]
A NEW SIMILE FOR THE LADIES WITH USEFUL ANNOTATIONS, BY DR. SHERIDAN[1] 1733
AN ANSWER TO A SCANDALOUS POEM
PEG RADCLIFFE THE HOSTESS'S INVITATION
VERSES BY SHERIDAN
VERSES ADDRESSED TO SWIFT AND TO HIS MEMORY
ON DR. SWIFT, 1733
TO THE REV. DR. SWIFT, DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S A BIRTH-DAY POEM. NOV. 30, 1736
EPIGRAMS OCCASIONED BY DR. SWIFT'S INTENDED HOSPITAL FOR IDIOTS AND LUNATICS
ON THE DEAN OF ST. PATRICK'S BIRTH-DAY BEING NOV. 30, ST. ANDREW'S DAY
AN EPISTLE TO ROBERT NUGENT, ESQ.[1]
ON THE DRAPIER. BY DR. DUNKIN.[1]
EPITAPH PROPOSED FOR DR. SWIFT. 1745
EPIGRAM ON TWO GREAT MEN. 1754
TO THE MEMORY OF DOCTOR SWIFT
A SCHOOLBOY'S THEME
VERSES ON THE BATTLE OF THE BOOKS, BY MR. JAMES STERLING, OF THE COUNTY OF MEATH
ON DR. SWIFT'S LEAVING HIS ESTATE TO IDIOTS
ON SEVERAL PETTY PIECES LATELY PUBLISHED AGAINST DEAN SWIFT, NOW DEAF AND INFIRM
ON FAULKNER'S EDITION OF SWIFT
EPIGRAM, ON LORD ORRERY'S REMARKS ON SWIFT'S LIFE AND WRITINGS
TO DOCTOR DELANY ON HIS BOOK ENTITLED "OBSERVATIONS ON LORD ORRERY'S REMARKS"
EPIGRAM
AN INSCRIPTION
AN EPIGRAM OCCASIONED BY THE ABOVE INSCRIPTION
INDEX



GULLIVER'S TRAVELS
INTO SEVERAL REMOTE REGIONS OF THE WORLD
By Jonathan Swift
WITH THIRTY-EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS AND A MAP
CONTENTS.
VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT.
CHAPTER I.

The Author gives some account of himself and family\x97His first inducements to travel\x97He is shipwrecked, and swims for his life\x97Gets safe on shore in the country of Lilliput\x97Is made a prisoner, and carried up the country.
CHAPTER II.

The emperor of Lilliput, attended by several of the nobility, comes to see the Author in his confinement\x97The emperor's person and habits described\x97Learned men appointed to teach the Author their language\x97He gains favor by his mild disposition\x97His pockets are searched, and his sword and pistols taken from him.
CHAPTER III.

The Author diverts the emperor, and his nobility of both sexes, in a very uncommon manner\x97The diversions of the court of Lilliput described\x97The Author has his liberty granted him upon certain conditions.
CHAPTER IV.

Mildendo, the metropolis of Lilliput, described, together with the emperor's palace\x97A conversation between the Author and a principal secretary concerning the affairs of that empire\x97The Author's offers to serve the emperor in his wars.
CHAPTER V.

The Author, by an extraordinary stratagem, prevents an invasion\x97A high title of honor is conferred upon him\x97Ambassadors arrive from the emperor of Blefuscu, and sue for peace.
CHAPTER VI.

Of the inhabitants of Lilliput; their learning, laws, and customs; the manner of educating their children\x97The Author's way of living in that country\x97His vindication of a great lady.
CHAPTER VII.

The Author, being informed of a design to accuse him of high treason, makes his escape to Blefuscu\x97His reception there.
CHAPTER VIII.

The Author, by a lucky accident, finds means to leave Blefuscu; and after some difficulties, returns safe to his native country.

LIST OF FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.
"He commanded his generals to draw up the troops"
"Map of Lilliput and Blefuscu
"I lay all this while ... in great uneasiness"
"Producing his credentials"
"These gentlemen made an exact inventory"
"Her imperial majesty was pleased to smile very graciously upon me"
"And created me a nardac upon the spot"
"Three hundred tailors were employed"
"The happiness ... of dining with me"
"He desired I would hear him with patience"
"I set sail ... at six in the morning"
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG.
CHAPTER I.

A great storm described; the long-boat sent to fetch water, the Author goes with it to discover the country\x97He is left on shore, is seized by one of the natives, and carried to a farmer's house\x97His reception there, with several accidents that happened there\x97A description of the inhabitants
CHAPTER II.

A description of the farmer's daughter\x97The Author carried to a market-town, and then to the metropolis\x97The particulars of his journey
CHAPTER III

The Author sent for to court\x97The queen buys him of his master the farmer, and presents him to the king\x97He disputes with his majesty's great scholars\x97An apartment at court provided for the Author\x97He is in high favor with the queen\x97He stands up for the honor of his own country\x97He quarrels with the queen's dwarf
CHAPTER IV.

The country described\x97A proposal for correcting modern maps\x97The king's palace, and some account of the metropolis\x97The Author's way of travelling\x97The chief temple described
CHAPTER V.

Several adventures that happened to the Author\x97The execution of a criminal\x97The Author shows his skill in navigation
CHAPTER VI.

Several contrivances of the Author to please the king and queen\x97He shows his skill in music\x97The king inquires into the state of Europe, which the Author relates to him\x97The king's observations thereon
CHAPTER VII

The Author's love of his country\x97He makes a proposal of much advantage to the king, which is rejected\x97The king's great ignorance in politics\x97The learning of that country very imperfect and confined\x97Their laws, and military affairs, and in the state
CHAPTER VIII

The king and queen make a progress to the frontiers\x97The Author attends them\x97The manner in which he leaves the country very particularly related\x97He returns to England
LIST OF FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.
"They concluded I was only Relplum Sealcath"
Map of Brobdingnag
"A huge creature walking ... on the sea"
"Whereupon the huge creature trod short"
"I drew my hanger to defend myself"
"I called her my Glumdalclitch"
"Flourished after the manner of fencers in England"
"This gracious princess held out her little finger"
"She carried me to the king"
"I could only revenge myself by calling him brother"
"The smaller birds did not appear to be at all afraid of me"
"Gave me a gale with their fans"
"The most violent exercise I ever underwent"
"You have made an admirable panegyric"
"She had some foreboding"
"Somebody calling in the English tongue"
"My daughter kneeled, but I could not see her"



IRELAND IN THE DAYS OF DEAN SWIFT.
(IRISH TRACTS, 1720 to 1734.)
By J. Bowles Daly and Jonathan Swift
CONTENTS.
  	PAGE
Introduction 	1
The Drapier\x92s Letters 	25
The Address to the Jury 	131
Swift\x92s Description of Quilca 	137
Answer to a Paper 	142
Maxims Controlled 	151
A short View of the state of Ireland, 1727 	162
The Story of the Injured Lady 	174
The Answer to the Injured Lady 	184
A Letter to the Archbishop of Dublin, concerning the Weavers 	187
Two Letters on Subjects relative to the Improvement of Ireland 	198
The Present Miserable State of Ireland 	216
\x93A Proposal for the Universal Use of Irish Manufactures.\x94 1720 	227
A Modest Proposal. 1729 	240
A Character, Panegyric, and Description of the Legion Club, 1736 	254
On doing Good 	264



HINTS TO SERVANTS:
Being A Poetical And Modernised Version Of Dean Swift's Celebrated "Directions To Servants;"
CONTENTS
  	Page
THE BUTLER 	9
THE COOK 	16
THE VALET 	21
THE WAITING-WOMAN     	27
THE FOOTMAN 	36
THE HOUSEKEEPER 	50
THE CHAMBERMAID 	51
THE PORTER 	55
THE HOUSEMAID 	56
THE STEWARD 	57
THE GROOM 	58
THE COACHMAN 	61
THE NURSERY MAID 	62
THE DAIRY-MAID 	63
THE WET NURSE 	64
THE LAUNDRESS 	ib.
THE GOVERNESS 	65
GENERAL RULES 	66





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Jonathan Swift" ***

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