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´╗┐Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Immanuel Kant
Author: Kant, Immanuel
Language: English
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WORKS OF

IMMANUEL KANT



CONTENTS


##  THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON

##  THE CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON

##  FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS

##  THE METAPHYSICAL ELEMENTS OF ETHICS

##  THE INJUSTICE OF COUNTERFEITING BOOKS

##  CRITIQUE OF JUDGEMENT

##  PERPETUAL PEACE

##  PROLEGOMENA



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON
By Immanuel Kant
Translated by J. M. D. Meiklejohn



CONTENTS
Preface to the First Edition (1781)
Preface to the Second Edition (1787)
Introduction
I. Of the difference between Pure and Empirical Knowledge
II. The Human Intellect, even in an Unphilosophical State, is in Possession of Certain Cognitions "a priori".
III. Philosophy stands in need of a Science which shall Determine the Possibility, Principles, and Extent of Human Knowledge "a priori"
IV. Of the Difference Between Analytical and Synthetical Judgements.
V. In all Theoretical Sciences of Reason, Synthetical Judgements "a priori" are contained as Principles.
VI. The Universal Problem of Pure Reason.
VII. Idea and Division of a Particular Science, under the Name of a Critique of Pure Reason.


I. Transcendental Doctrine of Elements
First Part\x97TRANSCENDENTAL AESTHETIC
\xA7 1. Introductory
SECTION I. OF SPACE
\xA7 2. Metaphysical Exposition of this Conception.
\xA7 3. Transcendental Exposition of the Conception of Space.
\xA7 4. Conclusions from the foregoing Conceptions.
SECTION II. OF TIME
\xA7 5. Metaphysical Exposition of this Conception.
\xA7 6. Transcendental Exposition of the Conception of Time.
\xA7 7. Conclusions from the above Conceptions.
\xA7 8. Elucidation.
\xA7 9. General Remarks on Transcendental Aesthetic.
\xA7 10. Conclusion of the Transcendental Aesthetic.
Second Part\x97TRANSCENDENTAL LOGIC
Introduction. Idea of a Transcendental Logic
I. Of Logic in General
II. Of Transcendental Logic
III. Of the Division of General Logic into Analytic and Dialectic
IV. Of the Division of Transcendental Logic into Transcendental Analytic and Dialectic
FIRST DIVISION\x97TRANSCENDENTAL ANALYTIC
BOOK I. Analytic of Conceptions. \xA7 2
Chapter I. Of the Transcendental Clue to the Discovery of all Pure Conceptions of the Understanding
Introductory \xA7 3
Section I. Of the Logical Use of the Understanding in General. \xA7 4
Section II. Of the Logical Function of the Understanding in Judgements. \xA7 5
Section III. Of the Pure Conceptions of the Understanding, or Categories. \xA7 6
Chapter II. Of the Deduction of the Pure Conception of the Understanding
Section I. Of the Principles of a Transcendental Deduction in general \xA7 9
Transition to the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories. \xA7 10
Section II Transcendental Deduction of the pure Conceptions of the Understanding.
Of the Possibility of a Conjunction of the manifold representations given by Sense. \xA7 11.
Of the Originally Synthetical Unity of Apperception. \xA7 12
The Principle of the Synthetical Unity of Apperception is the highest Principle of all exercise of the Understanding. \xA7 13
What Objective Unity of Self-consciousness is. \xA7 14
The Logical Form of all Judgements consists in the Objective Unity of Apperception of the Conceptions contained therein. \xA7 15
All Sensuous Intuitions are subject to the Categories, as Conditions under which alone the manifold Content of them can be united in one Consciousness. \xA7 16
Observation. \xA7 17
In Cognition, its Application to Objects of Experience is the only legitimate use of the Category. \xA7 18
Of the Application of the Categories to Objects of the Senses in general. \xA7 20
Transcendental Deduction of the universally possible employment in experience of the Pure Conceptions of the Understanding. \xA7 22
Result of this Deduction of the Conceptions of the Understanding. \xA7 23
BOOK II. Analytic of Principles
INTRODUCTION. Of the Transcendental Faculty of judgement in General.
TRANSCENDENTAL DOCTRINE OF THE FACULTY OF JUDGEMENT OR, ANALYTIC OF PRINCIPLES.
Chapter I. Of the Schematism at of the Pure Conceptions of the Understanding.
Chapter II. System of all Principles of the Pure Understanding.
Section I. Of the Supreme Principle of all Analytical Judgements.
Section II. Of the Supreme Principle of all Synthetical Judgements.
Section III. Systematic Representation of all Synthetical Principles of the Pure Understanding.
Chapter III Of the Ground of the Division of all Objects into Phenomena and Noumena.
APPENDIX.
SECOND DIVISION\x97TRANSCENDENTAL LOGIC
TRANSCENDENTAL DIALECTIC. INTRODUCTION.
I. Of Transcendental Illusory Appearance.
II. Of Pure Reason as the Seat of Transcendental Illusory Appearance.
TRANSCENDENTAL DIALECTIC\x97BOOK I\x97OF THE CONCEPTIONS OF PURE REASON.
Section I-Of Ideas in General.
Section II. Of Transcendental Ideas.
Section III. System of Transcendental Ideas.
TRANSCENDENTAL DIALECTIC\x97BOOK II\x97OF THE DIALECTICAL PROCEDURE OF PURE REASON.
Chapter I. Of the Paralogisms of Pure Reason.
Chapter II. The Antinomy of Pure Reason.
Section I. System of Cosmological Ideas.
Section II. Antithetic of Pure Reason.
Section III. Of the Interest of Reason in these Self-contradictions.
Section IV. Of the necessity imposed upon Pure Reason of presenting a Solution of its Transcendental Problems.
Section V. Sceptical Exposition of the Cosmological Problems presented in the four Transcendental Ideas.
Section VI. Transcendental Idealism as the Key to theSolution of Pure Cosmological Dialectic.
Section VII. Critical Solution of the Cosmological Problem.
Section VIII. Regulative Principle of Pure Reason in relation to the Cosmological Ideas.
Section IX. Of the Empirical Use of the Regulative Principle of Reason with regard to the Cosmological Ideas.
I. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Composition of Phenomena in the Universe.
II. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Division of a Whole given in Intuition.
III. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Deduction of Cosmical Events from their Causes.
IV. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Dependence of Phenomenal Existences.
Chapter III. The Ideal of Pure Reason.
Section I. Of the Ideal in General.
Section II. Of the Transcendental Ideal (Prototypon Trancendentale).
Section III. Of the Arguments employed by Speculative Reason in Proof of the Existence of a Supreme Being.
Section IV. Of the Impossibility of an Ontological Proof of the Existence of God.
Section V. Of the Impossibility of a Cosmological Proof of the Existence of God.
Section VI. Of the Impossibility of a Physico-Theological Proof.
Section VII. Critique of all Theology based upon Speculative Principles of Reason.
Appendix. Of the Regulative Employment of the Ideas of Pure Reason.


II. Transcendental Doctrine of Method
Chapter I. The Discipline of Pure Reason.
Section I. The Discipline of Pure Reason in the Sphere of Dogmatism.
Section II. The Discipline of Pure Reason in Polemics.
Section III. The Discipline of Pure Reason in Hypothesis.
Section IV. The Discipline of Pure Reason in Relation to Proofs.
Chapter II. The Canon of Pure Reason.
Section I. Of the Ultimate End of the Pure Use of Reason.
Section II. Of the Ideal of the Summum Bonum as a Determining Ground of the Ultimate End of Pure Reason.
Section III. Of Opinion, Knowledge, and Belief.
Chapter III. The Architectonic of Pure Reason.
Chapter IV. The History of Pure Reason.



THE CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON
By Immanuel Kant
1788
Translated by Thomas Kingsmill Abbott



CONTENTS
PREFACE.
INTRODUCTION.
Of the Idea of a Critique of Practical Reason.
FIRST PART \x97 ELEMENTS OF PURE PRACTICAL REASON.
BOOK I. The Analytic of Pure Practical Reason.
CHAPTER I. Of the Principles of Pure Practical Reason.
I. DEFINITION.
REMARK.
II. THEOREM I.
III. THEOREM II.
REMARK I.
REMARK II.
IV. THEOREM II.
REMARK.
V. PROBLEM I.
REMARK.
VII. FUNDAMENTAL LAW OF THE PURE PRACTICAL REASON.
REMARK.
COROLLARY.
REMARK.
VIII. THEOREM IV.
REMARK.
REMARK II.
Practical Material Principles of Determination taken as the Foundation of Morality, are:
I. Of the Deduction of the Fundamental Principles of Pure
II. Of the Right that Pure Reason in its Practical use has to an Extension which is not possible to it in its Speculative Use.
CHAPTER II. Of the Concept of an Object of Pure Practical Reason.
Table of the Categories of Freedom relatively to the Notions of Good
Of the Typic of the Pure Practical Judgement.
CHAPTER III. Of the Motives of Pure Practical Reason.
Critical Examination of the Analytic of Pure Practical Reason.
BOOK II. Dialectic of Pure Practical Reason.
CHAPTER I. Of a Dialectic of Pure Practical Reason Generally.
CHAPTER II. Of the Dialectic of Pure Reason in defining the Conception of the "Summum Bonum".
I. The Antinomy of Practical Reason.
II. Critical Solution of the Antinomy of Practical Reason.
III. Of the Primacy of Pure Practical Reason in its Union with the Speculative Reason.
IV. The Immortality of the Soul as a Postulate of Pure Practical Reason.
V. The Existence of God as a Postulate of Pure Practical Reason.
VI. Of the Postulates of Pure Practical Reason Generally.
VII. How is it possible to conceive an Extension of Pure Reason in a Practical point of view, without its Knowledge as Speculative being enlarged at the same time?
VIII. Of Belief from a Requirement of Pure Reason.
IX. Of the Wise Adaptation of Man's Cognitive Faculties to his Practical Destination.
SECOND PART. -- METHODOLOGY OF PURE PRACTICAL REASON.
Methodology of Pure Practical Reason.
CONCLUSION.



FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS
By Immanuel Kant
1785
Translated by Thomas Kingsmill Abbott


CONTENTS
PREFACE
FIRST SECTION\x97TRANSITION FROM THE COMMON RATIONAL KNOWLEDGE OF MORALITY TO THE PHILOSOPHICAL
SECOND SECTION\x97TRANSITION FROM POPULAR MORAL PHILOSOPHY TO THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS
The Autonomy of the Will as the Supreme Principle of Morality
Heteronomy of the Will as the Source of all spurious Principles of Morality
Classification of all Principles of Morality which can be founded on the Conception of Heteronomy
THIRD SECTION\x97TRANSITION FROM THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS TO THE CRITIQUE OF PURE PRACTICAL REASON
The Concept of Freedom is the Key that explains the Autonomy of the Will
Freedom must be presupposed as a Property of the Will of all Rational Beings
Of the Interest attaching to the Ideas of Morality
How is a Categorical Imperative Possible?
Of the Extreme Limits of all Practical Philosophy.
CONCLUDING REMARK



THE METAPHYSICAL ELEMENTS OF ETHICS
By Immanuel Kant
1780
Translated by Thomas Kingsmill Abbott


CONTENTS
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION TO THE METAPHYSICAL ELEMENTS OF ETHICS
I. Exposition of the Conception of Ethics
II. Exposition of the Notion of an End which is also a Duty
REMARK
III. Of the Reason for conceiving an End which is also a Duty
IV. What are the Ends which are also Duties?
V. Explanation of these two Notions
A. OUR OWN PERFECTION
B. HAPPINESS OF OTHERS
VI. Ethics does not supply Laws for Actions (which is done by Jurisprudence), but only for the Maxims of Action
VII. Ethical Duties are of indeterminate, Juridical Duties of strict, Obligation
VIII. Exposition of the Duties of Virtue as Intermediate Duties
(1) OUR OWN PERFECTION as an end which is also a duty
(2) HAPPINESS OF OTHERS as an end which is also a duty
IX. What is a Duty of Virtue?
X. The Supreme Principle of Jurisprudence was Analytical; that of Ethics is Synthetical
XI. According to the preceding Principles, the Scheme of Duties of Virtue may be thus exhibited
XII. Preliminary Notions of the Susceptibility of the Mind for Notions of Duty generally
A. THE MORAL FEELING
B. OF CONSCIENCE
C. OF LOVE TO MEN
XIII. General Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals in the treatment of Pure Ethics
XIV. Of Virtue in General
XV. Of the Principle on which Ethics is separated from Jurisprudence
REMARKS
Of the Doctrine of Virtue on the Principle Of Internal Freedom.
XVI. Virtue requires, first of all, Command over Oneself
XVII. Virtue necessarily presupposes Apathy (considered as Strength)
REMARK
ON CONSCIENCE



OF THE INJUSTICE OF COUNTERFEITING BOOKS
By Immanuel Kant



CONTENTS
OF THE INJUSTICE OF COUNTERFEITING BOOKS
I. Deduction of the Editor's Right against the Counterfeiter
Proof of the Major
Proof of the Minor
II. Refutation of the Counterfeiter's pretended Right against the Editor.
Proof of the Major
Proof of the Minor
Universal Observation



KANT'S CRITIQUE OF JUDGEMENT
Translated With Introduction And Notes
By J. H. Bernard, D.D., D.C.L. Bishop Of Ossory
CONTENTS
Editor's Introduction 	xi
Preface 	1
Introduction 	7
I. 	Of the division of Philosophy 	7
II. 	Of the realm of Philosophy in general 	11
III. 	Of the Critique of Judgement as a means of combining the two parts of Philosophy into a whole 	14
IV. 	Of Judgement as a faculty legislating a priori 	17
V. 	The principle of the formal purposiveness of nature is a transcendental principle of Judgement 	20
VI. 	Of the combination of the feeling of pleasure with the concept of the purposiveness of nature 	27
VII. 	Of the aesthetical representation of the purposiveness of nature 	30
VIII. 	Of the logical representation of the purposiveness of nature 	35
IX. 	Of the connexion of the legislation of Understanding with that of Reason by means of the Judgement 	39
First Part.\x97Critique of the Aesthetical Judgement 	43
First Division.\x97Analytic of the Aesthetical Judgement 	45
First Book.\x97Analytic of the Beautiful 	45
First Moment of the judgement of taste, according to quality 	45
\xA7 ?1. 	The judgement of taste is aesthetical 	45
\xA7 ?2. 	The satisfaction which determines the judgement of taste is disinterested 	46
\xA7 ?3. 	The satisfaction in the pleasant is bound up with interest 	48
\xA7 ?4. 	The satisfaction in the good is bound up with interest 	50
\xA7 ?5. 	Comparison of the three specifically different kinds of satisfaction 	53vi
Second Moment of the judgement of taste, viz. according to quantity 	55
\xA7 ?6. 	The Beautiful is that which apart from concepts is represented as the object of a universal satisfaction 	55
\xA7 ?7. 	Comparison of the Beautiful with the Pleasant and the Good by means of the above characteristic 	57
\xA7 ?8. 	The universality of the satisfaction is represented in a judgement of Taste only as subjective 	59
\xA7 ?9. 	Investigation of the question whether in a judgement of taste the feeling of pleasure precedes or follows the judging of the object 	63
Third Moment of judgements of taste according to the relation of the purposes which are brought into consideration therein 	67
\xA7 10. 	Of purposiveness in general 	67
\xA7 11. 	The judgement of taste has nothing at its basis but the form of the purposiveness of an object (or of its mode of representation) 	69
\xA7 12. 	The judgement of taste rests on a priori grounds 	70
\xA7 13. 	The pure judgement of taste is independent of charm and emotion 	72
\xA7 14. 	Elucidation by means of examples 	73
\xA7 15. 	The judgement of taste is quite independent of the concept of perfection 	77
\xA7 16. 	The judgement of taste, by which an object is declared to be beautiful under the condition of a definite concept, is not pure 	81
\xA7 17. 	Of the Ideal of Beauty 	84
Fourth Moment of the judgement of taste, according to the modality of the satisfaction in the object 	91
\xA7 18. 	What the modality in a judgement of taste is 	91
\xA7 19. 	The subjective necessity which we ascribe to the judgement of taste is conditioned 	92
\xA7 20. 	The condition of necessity which a judgement of taste asserts is the Idea of a common sense 	92
\xA7 21. 	Have we ground for presupposing a common sense? 	93
\xA7 22. 	The necessity of the universal agreement that is thought in a judgement of taste is a subjective necessity, which is represented as objective under the presupposition of a common sense 	94
General remark on the first section of the Analytic 	96vii
Second Book.\x97Analytic of the Sublime 	101
\xA7 23. 	Transition from the faculty which judges of the Beautiful to that which judges of the Sublime 	101
\xA7 24. 	Of the divisions of an investigation into the feeling of the Sublime 	105
A.\x97Of the Mathematically Sublime 	106
\xA7 25. 	Explanation of the term "Sublime" 	106
\xA7 26. 	Of that estimation of the magnitude of natural things which is requisite for the Idea of the Sublime 	110
\xA7 27. 	Of the quality of the satisfaction in our judgements upon the Sublime 	119
B.\x97Of the Dynamically Sublime in Nature 	123
\xA7 28. 	Of Nature regarded as Might 	123
\xA7 29. 	Of the modality of the judgement upon the sublime in nature 	130
General remark upon the exposition of the aesthetical reflective Judgement 	132
Deduction of [pure] aesthetical judgements 	150
\xA7 30. 	The Deduction of aesthetical judgements on the objects of nature must not be directed to what we call Sublime in nature, but only to the Beautiful 	150
\xA7 31. 	Of the method of deduction of judgements of taste 	152
\xA7 32. 	First peculiarity of the judgement of taste 	154
\xA7 33. 	Second peculiarity of the judgement of taste 	157
\xA7 34. 	There is no objective principle of taste possible 	159
\xA7 35. 	The principle of Taste is the subjective principle of Judgement in general 	161
\xA7 36. 	Of the problem of a Deduction of judgements of Taste 	162
\xA7 37. 	What is properly asserted a priori of an object in a judgement of taste 	164
\xA7 38. 	Deduction of judgements of taste 	165
\xA7 39. 	Of the communicability of a sensation 	167
\xA7 40. 	Of taste as a kind of sensus communis 	169
\xA7 41. 	Of the empirical interest in the Beautiful 	173
\xA7 42. 	Of the intellectual interest in the Beautiful 	176
\xA7 43. 	Of Art in general 	183
\xA7 44. 	Of beautiful Art 	185
\xA7 45. 	Beautiful art is an art in so far as it seems like nature 	187
\xA7 46. 	Beautiful art is the art of genius 	188
\xA7 47. 	Elucidation and confirmation of the above explanation of Genius 	190viii
\xA7 48. 	Of the relation of Genius to Taste 	193
\xA7 49. 	Of the faculties of the mind that constitute Genius 	197
\xA7 50. 	Of the combination of Taste with Genius in the products of beautiful Art 	205
\xA7 51. 	Of the division of the beautiful arts 	206
\xA7 52. 	Of the combination of beautiful arts in one and the same product 	214
\xA7 53. 	Comparison of the respective aesthetical worth of the beautiful arts 	215
\xA7 54. 	Remark 	220
Second Division.\x97Dialectic of the Aesthetical Judgement 	229
\xA7 55. 	  	229
\xA7 56. 	Representation of the antinomy of Taste 	230
\xA7 57. 	Solution of the antinomy of Taste 	231
\xA7 58. 	Of the Idealism of the purposiveness of both Nature and Art as the unique principle of the aesthetical Judgement 	241
\xA7 59. 	Of Beauty as the symbol of Morality 	248
\xA7 60. 	Appendix:\x97Of the method of Taste 	253
Second Part.\x97Critique of the Teleological Judgement 	257
\xA7 61. 	Of the objective purposiveness of Nature 	259
First Division.\x97Analytic of the Teleological Judgement 	262
\xA7 62. 	Of the objective purposiveness which is merely formal as distinguished from that which is material 	262
\xA7 63. 	Of the relative, as distinguished from the inner, purposiveness of nature 	268
\xA7 64. 	Of the peculiar character of things as natural purposes 	272
\xA7 65. 	Things regarded as natural purposes are organised beings 	275
\xA7 66. 	Of the principle of judging of internal purposiveness in organised beings 	280
\xA7 67. 	Of the principle of the teleological judging of nature in general as a system of purposes 	282
\xA7 68. 	Of the principle of Teleology as internal principle of natural science 	287
Second Division.\x97Dialectic of the Teleological Judgement 	292ix
\xA7 69. 	What is an antinomy of the Judgement? 	292
\xA7 70. 	Representation of this antinomy 	293
\xA7 71. 	Preliminary to the solution of the above antinomy 	296
\xA7 72. 	Of the different systems which deal with the purposiveness of Nature 	298
\xA7 73. 	None of the above systems give what they pretend 	302
\xA7 74. 	The reason that we cannot treat the concept of a Technic of nature dogmatically is the fact that a natural purpose is inexplicable 	306
\xA7 75. 	The concept of an objective purposiveness of nature is a critical principle of Reason for the reflective Judgement 	309
\xA7 76. 	Remark 	313
\xA7 77. 	Of the peculiarity of the human Understanding, by means of which the concept of a natural purpose is possible 	319
\xA7 78. 	Of the union of the principle of the universal mechanism of matter with the teleological principle in the Technic of nature 	326
Appendix.\x97Methodology of the Teleological Judgement 	334
\xA7 79. 	Whether Teleology must be treated as if it belonged to the doctrine of nature 	334
\xA7 80. 	Of the necessary subordination of the mechanical to the teleological principle in the explanation of a thing as a natural purpose 	336
\xA7 81. 	Of the association of mechanism with the teleological principle in the explanation of a natural purpose as a natural product 	342
\xA7 82. 	Of the teleological system in the external relations of organised beings 	346
\xA7 83. 	Of the ultimate purpose of nature as a teleological system 	352
\xA7 84. 	Of the final purpose of the existence of a world, i.e. of creation itself 	359
\xA7 85. 	Of Physico-theology 	362
\xA7 86. 	Of Ethico-theology 	370x
\xA7 87. 	Of the moral proof of the Being of God 	377
\xA7 88. 	Limitation of the validity of the moral proof 	384
\xA7 89. 	Of the use of the moral argument 	392
\xA7 90. 	Of the kind of belief in a teleological proof of the Being of God 	395
\xA7 91. 	Of the kind of belief produced by a practical faith 	403
General remark on Teleology 	414



PERPETUAL PEACE, A PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAY
By Immanuel Kant
1795
Translated With Introduction And Notes By M. Campbell Smith
CONTENTS
PAGE
PREFACE BY PROFESSOR LATTA 	v
TRANSLATOR'S INTRODUCTION 	1
PERPETUAL PEACE 	106
FIRST SECTION CONTAINING THE PRELIMINARY ARTICLES OF PERPETUAL PEACE BETWEEN STATES 	107
SECOND SECTION CONTAINING THE DEFINITIVE ARTICLES OF PERPETUAL PEACE BETWEEN STATES 	117
FIRST SUPPLEMENT CONCERNING THE GUARANTEE OF PERPETUAL PEACE 	143
SECOND SUPPLEMENT-A SECRET ARTICLE FOR PERPETUAL PEACE 	158
APPENDIX I.-ON THE DISAGREEMENT BETWEEN MORALS AND POLITICS WITH REFERENCE TO PERPETUAL PEACE 	161
APPENDIX II.-CONCERNING THE HARMONY OF POLITICS WITH MORALS ACCORDING TO THE TRANSCENDENTAL IDEA OF PUBLIC RIGHT 	184
INDEX 	197



PROLEGOMENA
By Kant
Edited In English By Dr. Paul Carus
CONTENTS
PUBLISHERS' PREFACE.
INTRODUCTION.
PROLEGOMENA.
PREAMBLE ON THE PECULIARITIES OF ALL METAPHYSICAL COGNITION.
FIRST PART OF THE TRANSCENDENTAL PROBLEM.
HOW IS PURE MATHEMATICS POSSIBLE?
SECOND PART OF THE TRANSCENDENTAL PROBLEM.
HOW IS THE SCIENCE OF NATURE POSSIBLE?
THIRD PART OF THE MAIN TRANSCENDENTAL PROBLEM.
HOW IS METAPHYSICS IN GENERAL POSSIBLE?
SCHOLIA.
SOLUTION OF THE GENERAL QUESTION OF THE PROLEGOMENA, "HOW IS METAPHYSICS POSSIBLE AS A SCIENCE?"
APPENDIX.





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