Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Cornelius Tacitus
Author: Tacitus, Cornelius
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Cornelius Tacitus" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



WORKS OF

Publius (Or Gaius) Cornelius
TACITUS


CONTENTS

##  THE GERMANY AND THE AGRICOLA

##  THE REIGN OF TIBERIUS

##  CONCERNING ORATORY

##  TACITUS THE HISTORIES, Vols I and II

##  ARGUMENTS OF CELSUS, PORPHYRY, AND JULIAN

TACITUS ON GERMANY



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



THE GERMANY AND THE AGRICOLA OF TACITUS.
By Tacitus
With An Introduction By Edward Brooks, Jr.


CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION.
A TREATISE ON THE SITUATION, MANNERS AND INHABITANTS OF GERMANY. [1]
THE LIFE OF CNAEUS JULIUS AGRICOLA.
FOOTNOTES:



THE REIGN OF TIBERIUS, OUT OF THE FIRST SIX ANNALS OF TACITUS
With His Account Of Germany, And Life Of Agricola
By Tacitus
Translated By Thomas Gordon
Edited By Arthur Galton


CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
THE FIRST SIX BOOKS OF THE ANNALS OF TACITUS:
THE ANNALS OF TACITUS
           BOOK I. — A.D. 14 AND 15.
           BOOK II. — A.D. 16-19.
           BOOK III. — A.D. 20-22.
           BOOK IV. — A.D. 23-28.
           BOOK V. — A.D. 29-31.
           BOOK VI. — A.D. 32-37.
A TREATISE OF THE SITUATION, CUSTOMS, AND PEOPLE OF GERMANY.
THE LIFE OF AGRICOLA, WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE SITUATION, CLIMATE, AND PEOPLE OF BRITAIN.



THE WORKS OF CORNELIUS TACITUS
With An Essay On His Life And Genius
By Arthur Murphy, Esq.
In Eight Volumes. Vol. VIII.
A DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY,
OR THE CAUSES OF CORRUPT ELOQUENCE.


CONTENTS.
A DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY, OR THE CAUSES OF CORRUPT ELOQUENCE.
NOTES ON THE DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY.
CONCLUSION.
GEOGRAPHICAL TABLE:
A DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY,
OR THE CAUSES OF CORRUPT ELOQUENCE.
I. General introduction, with the reasons for writing an account of the following discourse.
II. The persons engaged in the dialogue; at first, Curiatius Maternus, Julius Secundus, and Marcus Aper.
III. Secundus endeavours to dissuade Maternus from thinking any more of dramatic composition.
IV. Maternus gives his reasons for persisting.
V. Aper condemns his resolution, and, in point of utility, real happiness, fame and dignity, contends that the oratorical profession is preferable to the poetical.
VIII. He cites the example of Eprius Marcellus and Crispus Vibius, who raised themselves by their eloquence to the highest honours.
IX. Poetical fame brings with it no advantage.
X. He exhorts Maternus to relinquish the muses, and devote his whole to eloquence and the business of the bar.
XI. Maternus defends his favourite studies; the pleasures arising from poetry are in their nature innocent and sublime; the fame is extensive and immortal. The poet enjoys the most delightful intercourse with his friends, whereas the life of the public orator is a state of warfare and anxiety.
XIV. Vipstanius Messala enters the room. He finds his friends engaged in a controversy, and being an admirer of ancient eloquence, he advises Aper to adopt the model of the ancients in preference to the plan of the modern rhetoricians.
XV. Hence a difference of opinion concerning the merit of the ancients and the moderns. Messala, Secundus, and Maternus, profess themselves admirers of the oratory that flourished in the time of the republic. Aper launches out against the ancients, and gives the preference to the advocates of his own time. He desires to know who are to be accounted ancients.
XVIII. Eloquence has various modes, all changing with the conjuncture of the times. But it is the nature of men to praise the past, and censure the present. The period when Cassius Severus flourished, is stated to be the point of time at which men cease to be ancients; Cassius with good reason deviated from the ancient manner.
XX. Defects of ancient eloquence: the modern style more refined and elegant.
XXI. The character of Calvus, Cælius, Cæsar and Brutus, and also of Asinius Pollio, and Messala Corvinus.
XXII. The praise and censure of Cicero.
XXIII. The true rhetorical art consists in blending the virtues of ancient oratory with the beauties of the modern style.
XXIV. Maternus observes that there can be no dispute about the superior reputation of the ancient orators: he therefore calls upon Messala to take that point for granted, and proceed to an enquiry into the causes that produced so great an alteration.
XXV. After some observations on the eloquence of Calvus, Asinius Pollio, Cæsar, Cicero, and others, Messala praises Gracchus and Lucius Crassus, but censures Mæcenas, Gallio, and Cassius Severus.
XXVII. Maternus reminds Messala of the true point in question; Messala proceeds to assign the causes which occasioned the decay of eloquence, such as the dissipation of the young men, the inattention of their parents, the ignorance of rhetorical professors, and the total neglect of ancient discipline.
XXXIV. He proceeds to explain the plan of study, and the institutions, customs, and various arts, by which orators were formed in the time of the republic.
XXXV. The defects and vices in the new system of education. In this part of the dialogue, the sequel of Messala's discourse is lost, with the whole of what was said by Secundus, and the beginning of Maternus: the supplement goes on from this place, distinguished by inverted commas [transcriber's note: not used], and the sections marked with numerical figures.
1. Messala describes the presumption of the young advocates on their first appearance at the bar; their want of legal knowledge, and the absurd habits which they contracted in the schools of the rhetoricians.
2. Eloquence totally ruined by the preceptors. Messala concludes with desiring Secundus and Maternus to assign the reasons which have occurred to them.
4. Secundus gives his opinion. The change of government produced a new mode of eloquence. The orators under the emperors endeavoured to be ingenious rather than natural. Seneca the first who introduced a false taste, which still prevailed in the reign of Vespasian.
8. Licinius Largus taught the advocates of his time the disgraceful art of hiring applauders by profession. This was the bane of all true oratory, and, for that reason, Maternus was right in renouncing the forum altogether.
10. Maternus acknowledges that he was disgusted by the shameful practices that prevailed at the bar, and therefore resolved to devote the rest of his time to poetry and the muses.
11. An apology for the rhetoricians. The praise of Quintilian. True eloquence died with Cicero.
13. The loss of liberty was the ruin of genuine oratory. Demosthenes flourished under a free government. The original goes on from this place to the end of the dialogue.
XXXVI. Eloquence flourishes most in times of public tumult. The crimes of turbulent citizens supply the orator with his best materials.
XXXVII. In the time of the republic, oratorical talents were necessary qualifications, and without them no man was deemed worthy of being advanced to the magistracy.
XXXVIII. The Roman orators were not confined in point of time; they might extend their speeches to what length they thought proper, and could even adjourn. Pompey abridged the liberty of speech, and limited the time.
XXXIX. The very dress of the advocates under the emperors was prejudicial to eloquence.
XL. True eloquence springs from the vices of men, and never was known to exist under a calm and settled government.
XLI. Eloquence changes with the times. Every age has its own peculiar advantages, and invidious comparisons are unnecessary.
XLII. Conclusion of the dialogue.



TACITUS

THE HISTORIES
Translated With Introduction And Notes By W. Hamilton Fyfe
IN TWO VOLUMES
VOLUME I
VOLUME II
CONTENTS
VOLUME I

Introduction 5
Text: Books I, II 17
VOLUME II

Text: Books III-V 9
Index Of Names 231
MAPS

VOLUME I

Introduction
Summary of Chief Events
VOLUME I
Preface
The State of the Empire
Galba's Position
The Distribution of Forces
The German Revolt and the Adoption of Piso
Galba's Measures of Precaution
The Rise of Otho
The Fall of Galba
Otho on the Throne
Dramatis Personae
The Rise of Vitellius
The March of Valens' Column
The March of Caecina's Column
Otho's Government and the Distribution of Forces
Otho's Plans
Book II
Vespasian and the East
The Trial of Annius Faustus
Otho's Measures of Defence
The Decisive Struggle
Vitellius' Principate
The Revolt of Vespasian
Vitellius in Rome
VOLUME II

Summary of Chief Events
Book III
Antonius' Advance
Dissension in Vitellius' Camp
The Engagement near Cremona
The Fate of Cremona
Vitellius
The State of the Provinces
Antonius' Advance from Cremona
Vitellius' Measures of Defence
The Passage of the Apennines
The Abdication of Vitellius and the Burning of the Capitol
The Taking of Tarracina
The Sack of Rome and the end of Vitellius
Book IV
Rome after the Fall of Vitellius
The Revolt of Civilis and the Batavi
The Mutiny of the Batavian Cohorts
The Siege of Vetera
The Relief of Vetera
Rome and the Empire under Vespasian
The Loss of Germany
The Ebb-tide of Revolt
Events in Rome and in the East
Book V
The Conquest of Judaea
The End of the German Revolt



ARGUMENTS OF CELSUS, PORPHYRY, and THE EMPEROR JULIAN, AGAINST THE CHRISTIANS;
ALSO EXTRACTS FROM DIODORUS SICULUS, JOSEPHUS, AND TACITUS, RELATING TO THE JEWS, TOGETHER WITH AN APPENDIX;
CONTAINING: THE ORATION OF LIBANIUS IN DEFENCE OF THE TEMPLES OF THE HEATHENS, TRANSLATED BY DR. LARDNER; AND EXTRACTS FROM BINGHAM'S ANTIQUITIES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.
By [Thomas Taylor]


CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION.
THE ARGUMENTS OF CELSUS AGAINST THE CHRISTIANS
EXTRACTS FROM, AND INFORMATION RELATIVE TO, THE TREATISE OF PORPHYRY
A FRAGMENT OF THE THIRTY-FOURTH BOOK OF DIODORUS SICULUS.
FROM MANETHO RESPECTING THE ISRAELITES.
EXTRACTS FROM THE FIFTH BOOK OF TACITUS RESPECTING THE JEWS, AS
EXTRACTS FROM THE WORKS OF THE EMPEROR JULIAN RELATIVE TO THE
APPENDIX
EXTRACTS FROM BINGHAM'S ANTIQUITIES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH*,
ILLUSTRATIONS
Celsus
Porphyry
Julian





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Cornelius Tacitus" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home