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Title: Uncle Wiggily on The Flying Rug - The Great Adventure on a Windy March Day
Author: Garis, Howard Roger
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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Uncle Wiggly on the Flying Rug



This little book is from the library of ________.
When you have read, and laughed with glee
Please bring this book right back to me.



UNCLE WIGGLY ON THE FLYING RUG

Or

THE GREAT ADVENTURE ON A WINDY MARCH DAY

and

HOW MR. LONGEARS SHOWED THE PIGGY BOYS HOW TO BEHAVE IN SCHOOL

also

NURSE JANE’S PUDDING IS DELIVERED TO MR. BOW WOW

TEXT BY HOWARD R. GARIS

Author of THREE LITTLE TRIPPERTROTS and BED TIME STORIES

PICTURED BY LANG CAMPBELL

NEWARK, N. J.

CHARLES E. GRAHAM & CO.

NEW YORK



IF YOU LIKE THIS FUNNY LITTLE PICTURE BOOK ABOUT THE
BUNNY RABBIT GENTLEMAN YOU MAY BE GLAD TO KNOW THERE ARE OTHERS.

So if the spoon holder doesn’t go down cellar and take the coal shovel
away from the gas stove, you may read

     1 UNCLE WIGGILY’S AUTO SLED.
     2 UNCLE WIGGILY’S SNOW MAN.
     3 UNCLE WIGGILY’S HOLIDAYS.
     4 UNCLE WIGGILY’S APPLE ROAST.
     5 UNCLE WIGGILY’S PICNIC.
     6 UNCLE WIGGILY’S FISHING TRIP.
     7 UNCLE WIGGILY’S JUNE BUG FRIENDS.
     8 UNCLE WIGGILY’S VISIT TO THE FARM.
     9 UNCLE WIGGILY’S SILK HAT.
    10 UNCLE WIGGILY, INDIAN HUNTER.
    11 UNCLE WIGGILY’S ICE CREAM PARTY.
    12 UNCLE WIGGILY’S WOODLAND GAMES.
    13 UNCLE WIGGILY ON THE FLYING RUG.
    14 UNCLE WIGGILY AT THE BEACH.
    15 UNCLE WIGGILY AND THE PIRATES.
    16 UNCLE WIGGILY’S FUNNY AUTO
    17 UNCLE WIGGILY ON ROLLER SKATES.
    18 UNCLE WIGGILY GOES SWIMMING.

Every book has three stories, including the title story.

Made in U. S. A.



Copyright 1919 McClure Newspaper Syndicate. Trade mark registered.

Copyright 1920, 1922, 1924 Charles E. Graham & Co., Newark, N. J.,
and New York.



A GREAT ADVENTURE ON A WINDY MARCH DAY

1. One day in March, Nurse Jane bought a new rug, and Uncle Wiggily
helped her take it home to the hollow stump bungalow. “If you hadn’t
helped me I never could have carried it,” said the muskrat lady
housekeeper. “My! how hard the wind blows!” Uncle Wiggily could feel
it on his pink, twinkling nose. “The wind is getting worse!” he
shouted. “Hold the rug, Nurse Jane! My hat is blowing off my head!”

2. Uncle Wiggily let go his end of the rug and reached up to grasp his
hat as it blew off his head. But the wind was so strong that it filled
the tall hat like a balloon, and lifted the bunny rabbit off his feet.
“Uncle Wiggily! Help me!” cried Nurse Jane, as she felt the March
wind beginning to raise the rug and her with it. But the bunny rabbit
gentleman was having troubles of his own. Just look!

3. Uncle Wiggily heard Nurse Jane’s cries and knowing that if he wished
to save his housekeeper he would have to let go his hat, he did. Away it
sailed, and then up in the air went the rug, taking the muskrat lady
with it. “Come along, Uncle Wiggily!” shouted Miss Fuzzy Wuzzy, “I
don’t want to go adventuring alone!” The bunny hopped along until he
grasped one corner of the rug. “Pull me up!” he begged.

4. Nurse Jane leaned over the edge of the rug, which was like a raft in
the air, and caught hold of Uncle Wiggily. “Up you come!” she cried.
“We’re sailing away on a regular voyage!” “That’s right!” agreed
Uncle Wiggily, twinkling his pink nose very fast. “Mind your bonnet,
Janie! It’ll blow away.” The muskrat lady said she had it tied by a
string so it couldn’t. “How will we ever get down?” she asked.

5. At last Nurse Jane pulled Uncle Wiggily up on the rug, and there
they were safe for a while, at least. “But what is going to become of
us?” asked the muskrat lady. Uncle Wiggily did not answer. He seemed to
be looking at something in the air. “What is it?” asked Nurse Jane. “It
looks like Mrs. Twistytail, the lady pig,” the bunny rabbit gentleman
answered. “It must be a strong wind to blow her!”

6. The wind blew harder and harder. All at once it blew Mrs. Twistytail
along so that she was directly over the rug on which were sailing Uncle
Wiggily and Nurse Jane. “Quee! Quee!” cried the lady pig. “Oh, this is
terrible!” Nurse Jane whispered and said: “It will be if she falls on
us!” Uncle Wiggily twinkled his nose again. “She would be a good anchor
to bring us to the ground,” said the bunny.

7. “If you can fall in between us, Mrs. Twistytail,” called Uncle
Wiggily to the lady pig, “you will bear us to the ground.” The lady pig
tried, but she missed the rug and fell on some hay. “Oh dear, we’ll
never get down!” sighed Nurse Jane. “Yes! Yes!” cried Uncle Wiggily.
“Mrs. Twistytail struck on some hay and she’s bouncing up! She will
land on us yet and weight us down so that we can land!”

8. “Mrs. Twistytail! Mrs. Twistytail! This way if you please!”
called Nurse Jane, when the lady pig, lovely and fat, was up in the air
again, above the rug. “Fall here, Mrs. Twistytail, and you’ll help bear
us to the earth!” Mrs. Twistytail squealed: “Quee! Quee! I’ll do my
best,” she grunted. And down she fell, landing on the sailing rug,
safely between Uncle Wiggily and Nurse Jane. Down they went!

9 “It’s a good thing you landed here with us, Mrs. Twistytail,” said
Nurse Jane, as the pig lady fell softly on the rug. “It’s a good thing I
didn’t alight on a church steeple!” grunted Mrs. Twistytail. “Oh, I
never felt such a wind in all my life!” Uncle Wiggily said he was glad
the pig lady happened to drop in. And then down to the ground went the
rug with a bump. “How jolly!” laughed the Squiggle Bugs.



And if the lemon squeezer doesn’t pinch the rubber ball and make it
squeal like a little pig having his face washed, the next pictures
and story will tell how

THE OLD FOLKS THINK IT’S EASY TO BE VERY GOOD IN SCHOOL. WELL; UNCLE
WIGGILY TRIED IT, BUT BROKE NEARLY EVERY RULE. HAVE A LOOK!



HOW MR. LONGEARS SHOWED THE PIGGY BOYS HOW TO BEHAVE IN SCHOOL

1. One day, as he was hopping through the woods, Uncle Wiggily met
Curly and Floppy Twistytail coming from school with their books. “Why
are you so late coming from school?” asked the bunny. “We were kept in,”
grunted Floppy. “For being bad and having fun,” squealed Curly. “Tut!
Tut!” scolded Uncle Wiggily. “You should be good in school. Tomorrow
I’ll go to school and show you how.”

2. The Lady Mouse Teacher said she would be very glad to have Uncle
Wiggily come to the Hollow Stump School and show the animal boys and
girls how to be good. So the bunny gentleman, next day, took his place
at one of the desks. But you know how it is—Jackie Bow Wow couldn’t help
trying his new bean-blower. “Zip!” went a bean on Uncle Wiggily’s nose.
Right away Uncle Wiggily felt like a boy again.

3. “Oh, zippie!” whispered Uncle Wiggily out loud when he felt the
bean sting him on the nose. “I’ll fix you for that, Jackie!” Then,
forgetting he was there to show the pupils how to be good, Uncle Wiggily
threw his wet sponge straight at the doggie boy. “Uncle Wiggily, I am
surprised at you!” squeaked the Lady Mouse Teacher. “Why did you do
that?” But Uncle Wiggily wouldn’t tell why he did it.

4. “I’ll ask you to come up and sit in the front seat, Uncle Wiggily,”
squeaked the Lady Mouse Teacher sadly. “You said you wanted to come here
to show my pupils how to be good in school, but you are cutting up worse
than any of them ever did.” So the bunny gentleman took his place in the
punish seat. But still he wouldn’t tell that Jackie had first hit him
with a bean. Uncle Wiggily was a “SPORT,” I think.

5. “Now that Uncle Wiggily sits where he can’t play any more of his
tricks,” squeaked the Lady Mouse, “we shall go on with our lessons.” But
while she was at the blackboard, Billie Wagtail, the goat, fastened a
feather on a long stick, and, reaching over, tickled Mr. Longears. This
was more than the bunny could stand. He turned around and Oh! he gave
Billie such a look! And then something else happened.

6. Being tickled by a goat’s feather—I mean by a feather the goat boy
had—was too much for Uncle Wiggily. “Billie, I’m going to tickle you!”
laughed Uncle Wiggily in his jolly voice. Then, forgetting all about
being in school, the bunny snatched the stick away from Billie Wagtail
and poked him in the ribs. “Oh, Ho! Ho! Ha! Ha!” laughed the goat.
“Uncle Wiggily, I’m surprised at you!” squeaked the Mouse.

7. “Why did you tickle Billie with that stick, Uncle Wiggily?” asked
the Lady Mouse Teacher. “Oh, because,” answered the bunny. And that was
all he would say. He wouldn’t be a tattle-tale and tell on Billie. No,
indeed! “I’m sorry, but I shall have to ask you to stand in the
corner,” said the Lady Mouse. “I am afraid you aren’t doing my
children much good.” So Uncle Wiggily stood in the corner.

8. All of a sudden, just as the Lady Mouse was going to ask the
Kindergarten Class to sing, there was a noise at the door and in burst
the bad old Skillery Scallery Alligator with the double-jointed tail.
“Oh, my goodness!” squeaked Miss Mouse “Don’t be afraid,” bellowed
the Alligator. “All I want are some nibbles from Uncle Wiggily’s ears!”
And the Skillery Scallery creature made a jump for the bunny.

9. All of a sudden, just as the Alligator was going to grab him, Uncle
Wiggily blew chalk dust from the blackboard eraser into the eyes, nose
and mouth of the bad chap. “A-ker-choo! Ker-zoo! Ker-snitzium!”
sneezed the ’Gator, and he flopped a somersault and jumped out of the
window, not nibbling any ears at all. “Uncle Wiggily, I shall forgive
you because you saved us from the bad Alligator,” said Miss Mouse.



And If the Ice Cream Doesn’t Catch Cold When It Goes to the Rag Doll’s
Party With the Chocolate Cake’s Little Sister, the Next Pictures and
Story Will Tell How

NURSE JANE MADE A PUDDING AND SHE MADE IT HOT AND SWEET. THE DOGGIE
BOYS SCRATCHED SNOW UPON THE ’GATOR WITH THEIR FEET. DIDN’T THEY?



NURSE JANE’S PUDDING IS DELIVERED TO MR. BOW WOW

1. One day Nurse Jane said to Uncle Wiggily: “Here is a fine hot snow
pudding that I have made for Mr. Bow Wow, the dog gentleman. Will you
take it to him?” The bunny rabbit twinkled his pink nose and said that
he would. “Is Mr. Bow Wow ill?” asked Uncle Wiggily. “Just a little
cold,” answered nurse Jane. “I think the hot snow pudding will do him
good.” The bunny laughed “Ha! Ha!”

2. Uncle Wiggily, with the pail of hot snow pudding, hopped along until
he met Jackie and Peetie Bow Wow with their sled. “Oh, ho, doggie
boys!” cried the bunny. “I am taking this pail of hot pudding to your
father.” Then Jackie and Peetie barked joyfully and said they would give
the pudding a ride on their sled. “And maybe,” said Jackie to Peetie,
“when we get the pudding home we can have some.”

3. All of a sudden, as Jackie and Peetie were talking of how good the
snow pudding would taste (if they had any) all at once Uncle Wiggily
looked around and cried out: “Oh, the Wolf is coming after us! He wants
the snow pudding, I guess!” Then the bunny and the doggie boys ran, and
Jackie barked: “The Wolf can’t have daddy’s pudding!” But the Wolf
howled: “Zoo! Zoo! I’ll get that pudding!”

4. Uncle Wiggily, Jackie and Peetie ran so fast with the pudding on the
sled that they kept ahead of the Wolf. But the bad chap ran faster and
he was almost catching up when, all of a sudden, the sled struck a stone
under the snow. “Oh, see what has happened!” barked Jackie. For the tin
pail of pudding bounced off the sled and hit the Wolf on the end of his
soft, tender nose, bumping and burning him.

5. The Wolf was so frightened when the pail of pudding hit him on the
nose that he ran away. And, as the pudding wasn’t in the least harmed,
Uncle Wiggily picked it up and put it on the sled. “I’ll sit with it and
hold it,” said Jackie. Then, all of a sudden, the Bob Cat began to chase
after the three friends, howling: “I want ears! I want ears!” Uncle
Wiggily told the doggie boys not to be afraid.

6. On and on raced Uncle Wiggily, helping Peetie pull the sled, while
Jackie sat on it holding the pudding. “Why shouldn’t we be afraid, Uncle
Wiggily?” asked Jackie. “How can you save us?” The Bob Cat caught up to
them and took the cover off the pudding pail. Out popped the hot steam.
“Oh, wow! I’m burned!” howled the Bob Cat. “Just what I thought
would happen!” said Uncle Wiggily.

7. The Bob Cat dropped the pail of pudding after it burned him. Uncle
Wiggily picked it up, put the cover back on the pail and started off
again. “You sit on the sled and I’ll ride you and the snow pudding,”
said the bunny. They had not gone very far before Jackie howled:
“Something is chasing us, Uncle Wiggily!” The bunny asked who it was.
“It’s the Skillery Scallery Alligator!” said Peetie.

8. Uncle Wiggily hopped as fast as he could, but still the ’Gator came
on. “Wait a minute, Uncle Wiggily!” barked Jackie. “Let Peetie and I
stop this bad chap from chasing us.” The bunny wanted to know how the
doggies could do this. “We’ll show you!” cried Peetie. He and Jackie
scratched so much snow in the eyes, nose and mouth of the ’Gator that he
could chase them no more.

9. “Oh, wiffie-woofie!” howled the ’Gator as he felt the snow in his
face. “I must have run into a blizzard! This is too much!” He turned
about and ran home and the doggie boys hauled Uncle Wiggily on the sled
with the pudding to their house. “Why did Nurse Jane call it a snow
pudding?” asked the dog lady. “I guess because we had such fun bringing
it to you over the snow,” laughed Uncle Wiggily.



When you have finished reading this nice little book, perhaps you
would like to read a larger volume about Uncle Wiggily.

If so, go to the book store and ask the Man for one of the Uncle
Wiggily Bedtime Story Books, they have a lot of Funny Pictures in and
31 stories—one for every night in the month. If the book store man has
none of these volumes ask him to get you one or send direct to the
Publishers,

A. L. BURT COMPANY,

114 EAST 23rd STREET

NEW YORK CITY



LOOK HERE!

This handsome book has large color pictures throughout and wonderful
stories. Ask the book store man for _Adventures of Uncle Wiggily_.

CHARLES E. GRAHAM & Co.

NEWARK, N. J.





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