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Title: Salads, Sandwiches and Chafing-Dish Dainties - With Fifty Illustrations of Original Dishes
Author: Hill, Janet McKenzie, 1852-1933
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Salads, Sandwiches and Chafing-Dish Dainties - With Fifty Illustrations of Original Dishes" ***

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Salads, Sandwiches

and

Chafing-Dish Dainties

[Illustration: Table laid for Sunday-Night Tea.

"Sunday clears away the rust of the whole week."--ADDISON.]



Salads, Sandwiches

and

Chafing-Dish Dainties

_With Fifty Illustrations of Original Dishes_

By

Janet McKenzie Hill

  Editor of "The Boston Cooking-School Magazine"
  Author of "Practical Cooking and Serving"

  NEW EDITION
  WITH ADDITIONAL RECIPES

          "_Things which in hungry mortals' eyes find favor._"
                                                    BYRON

Boston
Little, Brown, and Company
1909



  _Copyright, 1899, 1903_
    BY JANET M. HILL.

                  Printers
  S. J. PARKHILL & CO., BOSTON, U. S. A.



                   TO

            MRS. WILLIAM B. SEWALL,

President of the Boston Cooking-School Corporation,

   IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION OF THE OPPORTUNITY

    PRESENTED BY HER FOR CONGENIAL WORK IN A

    CHOSEN FIELD OF EFFORT, THIS LITTLE BOOK

         IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

              BY THE AUTHOR.



PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

       *       *       *       *       *


THE favor with which the first edition of this little book has been
received by those who were interested in the subjects of which it
treats, is eminently gratifying to both author and publishers. It has
occasioned the purpose to make a second edition of the book, even more
complete and helpful than the first.

In making the revision, wherever the text has suggested a new thought
that thought has been inserted; under the various headings new recipes
have been added, each in its proper place, and the number of
illustrations has been increased from thirty-seven to fifty. A more
complete table of contents has been presented, and also a list of the
illustrations; the alphabetical index has been revised and made
especially full and complete.

                                                      JANET M. HILL.
April 10, 1903.



PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION.

       *       *       *       *       *


THERE is positive need of more widespread knowledge of the principles of
cookery. Few women know how to cook an egg or boil a potato properly,
and the making of the perfect loaf of bread has long been assigned a
place among the "lost arts."

By many women cooking is considered, at best, a homely art,--a necessary
kind of drudgery; and the composition, if not the consumption, of salads
and chafing-dish productions has been restricted, hitherto, chiefly to
that half of the race "who cook to please themselves." But, since women
have become anxious to compete with men in any and every walk of life,
they, too, are desirous of becoming adepts in tossing up an appetizing
salad or in stirring a creamy rarebit. And yet neither a pleasing salad,
especially if it is to be composed of cooked materials, nor a tempting
rarebit can be evolved, save by happy accident, without an accurate
knowledge of the fundamental principles that underlie all cookery.

In a book of this nature and scope, the philosophy of heat at different
temperatures, as it is applied in cooking, and the more scientific
aspects of culinary processes, could not be dwelt upon; but, while we
have not overlooked the ABC of the art, our special aim has been to
present our topics in such a simple and pleasing form that she who
attempts the composition of the dishes described herein will not be
satisfied until she has gained a deeper insight into the conditions
necessary for success in the pursuit of these as well as other
fascinating branches of the culinary art.

Care has been exercised to meet the actual needs of those who wish to
cultivate a taste for light, wholesome dishes, or to cater to the
vagaries of the most capricious appetites.

There is nothing new under the sun, so no claim is made to absolute
originality in contents. In this and all similar works, the matter of
necessity must consist, in the main, of old material in a new dress.

Though the introduction to Part III. was originally written for this
book, the substance of it was published in the December-January
(1898-99) issue of the _Boston Cooking-School Magazine_. From time to
time, also, a few of the recipes, with minor changes, have appeared in
that journal.

Illustrations by means of half-tones produced from photographs of actual
dishes were first brought out, we think, by The Century Company; in this
line, however, both in the number and in the variety of the dishes
prepared, the author may justly claim to have done more than any other
has yet essayed. The illustrations on these pages were prepared
expressly for this work, and the dishes and the photographs of the same
were executed under our own hand and eye. That results pleasing to the
eye and acceptable to the taste await those who try the confections
described in this book is the sincere wish of the author.

                                                       JANET M. HILL



Contents

Part I.

SALADS

                                                      PAGE
  INTRODUCTION                                          3
  THE DRESSING                                          6
  USE OF DRESSINGS                                      7
  ARRANGEMENT OF SALADS                                 8
  COMPOSITION OF MAYONNAISE                             8
  VALUE OF OIL                                          8
  BOILED AND CREAM DRESSINGS                            9
  IMPORTANT POINTS IN SALAD-MAKING                      9
  WHEN TO SERVE SALADS WITH FRENCH OR MAYONNAISE
  DRESSING                                              9
  WHEN TO SERVE A FRUIT SALAD                          10
  SALADS WITH CHEESE                                   10
  HOW TO MAKE AROMATIC VINEGARS, KEEP VEGETABLES,
  AND PREPARE GARNISHES                                11
  HOW TO BOIL EGGS HARD FOR GARNISHING                 11
  TO POACH WHITES OF EGGS                              11
  ROYAL CUSTARD FOR MOULDS OF ASPIC                    11
  HOW TO USE GARLIC OR ONION IN SALADS                 12
  HOW TO SHELL AND BLANCH CHESTNUTS AND OTHER NUTS     12
  HOW TO CHOP FRESH HERBS                              13
  HOW TO CUT RADISHES FOR A GARNISH                    13
  HOW TO CLEAN LETTUCE, ENDIVE, ETC.                   13
  HOW TO CLEAN CRESS, CABBAGE, ETC.                    14
  HOW TO RENDER UNCOOKED VEGETABLES CRISP              14
  HOW TO BLANCH AND COOK VEGETABLES FOR SALADS         14
  HOW TO CUT GHERKINS FOR A GARNISH                    15
  HOW TO FRINGE CELERY                                 15
  HOW TO SHRED ROMAINE AND STRAIGHT LETTUCE            15
  HOW TO KEEP CELERY, WATERCRESS, LETTUCE, ETC.        16
  HOW TO COOK SWEETBREADS AND BRAINS                   16
  HOW TO PICKLE NASTURTIUM SEEDS                       16
  NASTURTIUM AND OTHER VINEGARS                        17
  TO DECORATE SALADS WITH PASTRY BAG AND TUBES         18
  RECIPES FOR FRENCH DRESSING                          21
  RECIPES FOR MAYONNAISE DRESSING                      22
  BOILED, CREAM, AND OTHER DRESSINGS                   26
  VEGETABLE SALADS SERVED WITH FRENCH DRESSING         29
  SALADS LARGELY VEGETABLE WITH MAYONNAISE, ETC.       39
  INTRODUCTION TO FISH SALADS                          53
  RECIPES FOR FISH SALADS                              55
  RECIPES FOR VARIOUS COMPOUND SALADS                  77
  RECIPES FOR FRUIT AND NUT SALADS                     89
  HOW TO PREPARE AND USE ASPIC JELLY                   97
  CONSOMMÉ AND STOCK FOR ASPIC                         98
  CHEESE DISHES SERVED WITH SALADS                    105


Part II.

SANDWICHES

  BREAD FOR SANDWICHES                                115
  THE FILLING                                         116
  RECIPES FOR SAVORY SANDWICHES                       119
  RECIPES FOR SWEET SANDWICHES                        131
  RECIPES FOR BREAD AND CHOU PASTE                    137
  HOW TO BOIL MEATS FOR SANDWICHES                    140
  RECIPES FOR BEVERAGES SERVED WITH SANDWICHES        143


Part III.

CHAFING-DISH DAINTIES

  CHAFING-DISHES PAST AND PRESENT                     151
  CHAFING-DISH APPOINTMENTS                           153
  ARE MIDNIGHT SUPPERS HYGIENIC?                      157
  HOW TO MAKE SAUCES                                  158
  MEASURING AND FLAVORING                             160
  RECIPES FOR OYSTER DISHES                           163
  RECIPES FOR LOBSTER AND OTHER SEA FISH              169
  RECIPES FOR CHEESE CONFECTIONS                      182
  RECIPES FOR EGGS                                    188
  RECIPES FOR DISHES LARGELY VEGETARIAN               195
  RECIPES FOR RÉCHAUFFÉS AND OLLA PODRIDA             202



Illustrations


  Table laid for Sunday Night Tea                 _Frontispiece_
  The Tender Lettuce brings on softer Sleep   _Facing page_  18
  Cucumber Salad for Fish Course                  "    "     28
  Cooked Vegetable Salad                          "    "     28
  Potato Balls, Pecan Meats, and Cress Salad      "    "     32
  Potato-and-Nasturtium Salad                     "    "     32
  Endive, Tomato, and Green String Bean Salad     "    "     36
  Stuffed Beets                                   "    "     36
  Cress, Cucumber, and Tomato Salad               "    "     41
  Tomato Jelly with Celery and Nuts               "    "     41
  Russian Vegetable Salad                         "    "     48
  Macedoine of Vegetable Salad                    "    "     48
  Miroton of Fish and Potato Salad                "    "     58
  Cowslip and Cream Cheese Salad                  "    "     58
  Russian Salad                                   "    "     62
  Halibut Salad                                   "    "     62
  Shell of Fish and Mushrooms                     "    "     68
  Shrimp Salad in Cucumber Boat                   "    "     68
  Shrimp Salad, Border of Eggs in Aspic           "    "     70
  Lobster Salad                                   "    "     70
  Bluefish Salad                                  "    "     72
  Litchi Nut and Orange Salad                     "    "     72
  Moulded Salmon Salad                            "    "     74
  Salad of Shrimps and Bamboo Sprouts             "    "     74
  Spinach and Egg Salad                           "    "     84
  Marguerite Salad                                "    "     84
  Easter Salad                                    "    "     86
  Country Salad                                   "    "     86
  Fruit Salad                                     "    "     94
  Turquoise Salad No. 2                           "    "     94
  Cheese Ramequins                                "    "    106
  Individual Soufflé of Cheese                    "    "    106
  Pineapple-Cheese and Crackers                   "    "    110
  Salad of Lettuce with Cheese and Macedoine      "    "    110
  Chicken Salad Sandwiches                        "    "    126
  Halibut Sandwiches with Aspic                   "    "    126
  Wedding Sandwich Rolls                          "    "    128
  Club Sandwich                                   "    "    128
  Boston Brown Bread                              "    "    138
  Bread cut for Sandwiches                        "    "    138
  Bowl of Fruit-Punch ready for serving           "    "    143
  Copper Chafing-Dish with Earthen Casserole      "    "    149
  Chafing-Dish, Filler, etc.                      "    "    153
  Course at Formal Dinner served in Individual
  Chafing-Dishes                                  "    "    157
  Butter Balls with Utensils for Chafing-Dish     "    "    178
  Moulded Halibut with Creamed Peas               "    "    178
  Yorkshire Rabbit                                "    "    186
  Curried Eggs                                    "    "    186
  Mushroom Cromeskies, ready for cooking          "    "    198
  Prune Toast                                     "    "    198



PART I.

SALADS.

          "_Though my stomach was sharp, I could scarce help regretting
           To spoil such a delicate picture by eating._"



INTRODUCTION.

          At their savory dinner set
          Herbs and other country messes,
          Which the neat-handed Phyllis dresses.
                                           --_Milton._


Our taste for salads--and in their simplest form who is not fond of
salads?--is an inheritance from classic times and Eastern lands. In the
hot climates of the Orient, cucumbers and melons were classed among
earth's choicest productions; and a resort ever grateful in the heat of
the day was "a lodge in a garden of cucumbers."

At the Passover the Hebrews ate lettuce, camomile, dandelion and
mint,--the "bitter herbs" of the Paschal feast,--combined with oil and
vinegar. Of the Greeks, the rich were fond of the lettuces of Smyrna,
which appeared on their tables at the close of the repast. In this
respect the Romans, at first, imitated the Greeks, but later came to
serve lettuce with eggs as a first course and to excite the appetite.
The ancient physicians valued lettuce for its narcotic virtue, and, on
account of this property, Galen, the celebrated Greek physician, called
it "the philosopher's or wise man's herb."

The older historians make frequent mention of salad plants and salads.
In the biblical narrative Moses wrote: "And the children of Israel wept
again and said, We remember the fish which we did eat in Egypt freely;
the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the
garlick."

In his second Eclogue, Virgil represents a rustic maid, Thestylis,
preparing for the reapers a salad called _moretum_. He wrote, also, a
poem bearing this title, in which he describes the composition and
preparation of the dish.

A modern authority says, "Salads refresh without exciting and make
people younger." Whether this be strictly true or not may be an open
question, but certainly in the assertion a grain of truth is visible;
for it is a well-known fact that "salad plants are better tonics and
blood purifiers than druggists' compounds." There is, also, an old
proverb: "Eat onions in May, and all the year after physicians may
play." What is health but youth?

Vegetables, fish and meats, "left over,"--all may be transformed, by
artistic treatment, into salads delectable to the eye and taste.
Potatoes are subject to endless combinations. First of all in this
connection, before dressing the potatoes allow them to stand in
bouillon, meat broth, or even in the liquor in which corned beef has
been cooked; then drain carefully before adding the oil and other
seasonings.

Of uncooked vegetables, cabbage lettuce--called long ago by the Greek
physician, Galen, the philosopher's or wise man's herb--stands at the
head of salad plants. Like all uncooked vegetables, lettuce must be
served fresh and crisp, and the more quickly it is grown the more tender
it will be. When dressed for the table, each leaf should glisten with
oil, yet no perceptible quantity should fall to the salad-bowl.
Watercress, being rich in sulphuretted oil, is often served without oil.
Cheese or eggs combine well with cress; and such a salad, with a
sandwich of coarse bread and butter, together with a cup of sparkling
coffee, forms an ideal luncheon for a picnic or for the home piazza.
Indeed, all the compound salads,--that is, salads of many
ingredients,--more particularly if they are served with a cooked or
mayonnaise dressing, are substantial enough for the chief dish of a
hearty meal. Their digestibility depends, in large measure, on the
tenderness of the different ingredients, as well as upon the freshness
of the uncooked vegetables that enter into their composition.

A salad has this superiority over every other production of the culinary
art: A salad (but not every salad) is suitable to serve upon any
occasion, or to any class or condition of men. Among _bon vivants_,
without a _new_ salad, no matter how _recherché_ the other courses may
be, the luncheon, or dinner party, of to-day does not pass as an
unqualified success.

While salads may be compounded of all kinds of delicate meats, fish,
shellfish, eggs, nuts, fruit, cheese and vegetables, cooked or uncooked,
two things are indispensable to every kind and grade of salad, viz., the
foundation of vegetables and the dressing.


=The Dressing.=

Salads are dressed with oil, acid and condiments; and, sometimes, a
sweet, as honey or sugar, is used. A perfect salad is not necessarily
acetic. The presence of vinegar in a dressing, like that of onions and
its relatives, on most occasions should be suspected only. Wyvern and
other true epicures consider the advice of Sydney Smith, as expressed in
the following couplet, "most pernicious":--

          "Four times the spoon with oil of Lucca crown,
           And twice with vinegar procured from town."

Aromatic vinegars, a few drops of which, used occasionally, lend
piquancy and variety to an every-day salad, can be purchased at
high-class provision stores; but the true salad-maker is an artist, and
prefers to compound her own colors (_i.e._, vinegars); therefore we have
given several recipes for the same, which may be easily modified to suit
individual tastes.

Indeed, the dressing of a salad, though in the early days of the century
considered a special art,--an art that rendered it possible for at least
one noted Royalist refugee to amass a considerable fortune,--is
entirely a matter of individual taste, or, more properly speaking, of
cultivation. On this account, particularly for a French dressing, no set
rules can be given. By experience and judgment one must decide upon the
proportions of the different ingredients, or, more specifically, upon
the proportions of the oil and acid to be used. Often four spoonfuls of
oil are used to one of vinegar. Four spoonfuls of oil to two, three or
four of vinegar may be the proportion preferred by others, and the
quantity may vary for different salads.

Though in many of the recipes explicit quantities of oil, vinegar and
condiments are given, it is with the understanding that these quantities
are indicated simply as an approximate rule; sometimes less and
sometimes more will be required, according to the tendency of the
article dressed to absorb oil and acid, or the taste of the salad
dresser.


=Use of Dressings.=

The dressings in most common use are the French and the mayonnaise. A
French dressing is used for green vegetables, for fruit and nuts, and to
marinate cooked vegetables, or the meat or fish for a meat or fish
salad. Mayonnaise dressing is used for meat, fish, some varieties of
fruit, as banana, apple and pineapple, and for some vegetables, as
cauliflower, asparagus and tomatoes. Any article to be served with
mayonnaise, after standing an hour or more in a marinade,--_i.e._,
French dressing,--should be carefully drained, as, by the pickling
process, liquid will drain out into the bottom of the vessel and, mixing
with the mayonnaise, will liquefy the same.


=Arrangement of Salads.=

In the arrangement of salads there may be great display of taste and
individuality. By a judicious selection from materials that may be kept
constantly in store, and with one or two window boxes, in which herbs
are growing, any one, with a modicum of inventive skill, can so change
and modify the appearance and flavor of her salads that she may seem
always to present a new one.


=Composition of Mayonnaise.=

Mayonnaise dressing is composed largely of olive oil. A small amount of
yolk of egg is used as a foundation. The oil, with the addition of
condiments, is slightly acidulated with vinegar and lemon juice, one or
both, and the whole is made very light and thick by beating. Mayonnaise
forms a very handsome dressing, and it is much enjoyed by those who are
fond of oil.


=Value of Oil.=

Pure olive oil is almost entirely without flavor, and a taste for it can
be readily acquired; and, when we consider that it contains all the
really desirable qualities of the once-famous cod-liver oil, except the
phosphates, and that these may be supplied in the other materials of the
salad, it would seem wise to cultivate a taste for so wholesome an
article. By the addition of cream, in the proportion of a cup of whipped
cream to a pint of dressing, those to whom oil has not become agreeable
can so modify its "tone" that they too will enjoy the mayonnaise
dressing.


=Boiled and Cream Dressings.=

For the French and mayonnaise dressings--particularly for the latter--we
sometimes substitute a _boiled_ and sometimes a _cream_ dressing. In the
first, butter, or cream, is substituted for oil, and the materials are
combined by cooking. In the latter, as the name implies, cream is the
basis, and this may be either sweet or sour.


=Important Points in Salad-Making.=

(1) The green vegetables should be served fresh and crisp.

(2) Meat and fish should be well marinated and cold.

(3) The ingredients composing the salad should not be combined until the
last moment before serving.


=When to Serve Salads with French or Mayonnaise Dressing.=

As a rule, subject, however, to exceptions, light vegetable salads,
dressed with French dressing, are served at dinner; while heavy meat or
fish Salads are reserved for luncheon, or supper, and are served with
mayonnaise or cream dressing.


=When to Serve a Fruit Salad.=

A fruit salad, with sweet dressing, is served with cake at a luncheon,
or supper, or in the evening; that is, it may take the place of fruit in
the dessert course. A fruit salad, with French or mayonnaise dressing,
may be served as a first course at luncheon, or with the game or roast,
though in the latter case the French dressing is preferable.


=Salads with Cheese.=

The rightful place of salads is with the roast or game. Here the crisp,
green salad herbs, delicately acidulated, complement and correct the
richness of these _plats_.

Occasionally when the game is omitted and an acid sauce accompanies the
roast, a simple salad combined with cheese in some form, preferably
cooked and hot, is selected to lengthen the menu. This same combination
of hot cheese dish and salad should be a favorite one for home
luncheons, when this meal is not made the children's dinner. The salad
too in this combination, aided by the bread accompanying it, corrects by
dilution the over concentration and richness of the cheese dish. In
England neatly trimmed-and-cleansed celery stalks and cheese often
precede the sweet course; but by virtue of its mission as a digester of
everything but itself and of the common disinclination to have the taste
of sweets linger upon the palate, the place of cheese as cheese is with
the coffee.



HOW TO MAKE AROMATIC VINEGARS, TO KEEP VEGETABLES AND TO PREPARE
GARNISHES.


=How to Boil Eggs Hard for Garnishing.=

Cover the eggs with boiling water. Set them on the back of the range,
where the water will keep hot without boiling, about forty minutes. Cool
in cold water, and with a thin, sharp knife cut as desired.


=To Poach Whites of Eggs.=

Turn the whites of the eggs into a well-buttered mould or cup, set upon
a trivet in a dish of hot water, and cook until firm, either upon the
back of the range or in the oven, and without letting the water boil.
Turn from the mould, cut into slices, and then into fanciful shapes; or
chop fine.


=Royal Custard for Moulds of Aspic.=

Beat together one whole egg and three yolks; add one-fourth a
teaspoonful, each, of mace, salt and paprica, and, when well mixed, add
half a cup of cream. Bake in a buttered mould, set in a pan of water,
until firm. When cold cut in thin slices, then stamp out in fanciful
shapes with French cutters. Use in decorating a mould for aspic jelly.


=How to Use Garlic or Onion in Salads.=

The salad-bowl may be rubbed with the cut surface of a clove of garlic,
or a _chapon_ may be used. A _chapon_, according to gastronomic usage,
is a thin piece of bread rubbed on all sides with the cut surface of a
clove of garlic and put into the salad-bowl before the seasonings. It is
tossed with the salad and dressings, to which it imparts its flavor. It
may be divided and served with the salad. Oftentimes, instead of one
piece, several small cubes of bread are thus used.

After a slice of onion has been removed, the cut surface of the onion
may be pressed with a rotary motion against a grater and the juice
extracted; or a lemon-squeezer kept for this special purpose may be
used.


=How to Shell and Blanch Chestnuts.=

Score the shell of each nut, and put into a frying-pan with a
teaspoonful of butter for each pint of nuts. Shake the pan over the fire
until the butter is melted; then set in the oven five minutes. With a
sharp knife remove the shells and skins together.


=How to Blanch Walnuts and Almonds.=

Put the nut meats over the fire in cold water, bring quickly to the
boiling-point, drain, and rinse with cold water, then the skins may be
easily rubbed from the almonds; a small pointed knife will be needed for
the walnuts.


=How to Chop Fresh Herbs.=

Pluck the leaves close, discarding the stems; gather the leaves together
closely with the fingers of the left hand, then with a sharp knife cut
through close to the fingers; push the leaves out a little and cut
again, and so continue until all are cut. Now gather into a mound and
chop to a very fine powder, holding the point of the knife close to the
board. Put the chopped herb into a cheese-cloth and hold under a stream
of cold water, then wring dry. Use this green powder for dusting over a
salad when required.


=How to Cut Radishes for a Garnish.=

Cut a thin slice from the leaf end of each; cut off the root end so as
to leave it the length of the pistil of a flower. With a small, sharp
knife score the pink skin, at the root end, into five or six sections
extending half-way down the radish; then loosen the skin above these
sections. Put the radishes in cold water for a little time, when they
will become crisp, and the points will stand out like the petals of a
flower.


=How to Clean Lettuce, Endive, Etc.=

A short time before serving cut off the roots and freshen the vegetable
in cold water. Then break the leaves from the stalk; dip repeatedly
into cold water, examining carefully, until perfectly clean, taking care
not to crush the leaves. Put into a French wire basket made for the
purpose, or into a piece of mosquito netting or cheese-cloth, and shake
gently until the water is removed. Then spread on a plate or in a
colander and set in a cool place until the moment for serving.


=How to Clean Cress.=

Pick over the stalks so as to remove grass, etc. Wash and dry in the
same manner as the lettuce, but without removing the leaves from the
stems, except when the stems are very coarse and large.


=How to Clean Cabbage and Cauliflower.=

Let stand head downwards half an hour in cold salted water, using a
tablespoonful of salt to a quart of water.


=How to Render Uncooked Vegetables Crisp.=

Put into cold water with a bit of ice and a slice of lemon. When ready
to use, dry between folds of cheese-cloth and let stand exposed to the
air a few moments.


=How to Blanch and Cook Vegetables for Salads.=

Cut the vegetables as desired, in cubes, lozenges, balls, _juliennes_,
etc. Put over the fire in boiling water, and, after cooking three or
four minutes, drain, rinse in cold water, and put on to cook in boiling
salted water to cover. Drain as soon as tender.


=How to Cut Gherkins for a Garnish.=

Select small cucumber pickles of uniform size. With a sharp knife cut
them, lengthwise, into slices thin as paper, without detaching the
slices at one end; then spread out the slices as a fan is spread.


=How to Fringe Celery.=

Cut the stalks into pieces about two inches in length. Beginning on the
round side at one end, with a thin, sharp knife, cut down half an inch
as many times as possible; then turn the stalk half-way around and cut
in the opposite direction, thus dividing the end into shreds, or a
fringe. If desired, cut the opposite end in the same manner. Set aside
in a pan of ice water containing a slice of lemon.


=How to Shred Romaine and Straight Lettuce.=

Wash the lettuce leaves carefully, without removing them from the stalk;
shake in the open air, and they will dry very quickly; fold in the
middle, crosswise, and cut through in the fold. Hold the two pieces, one
above the other, close to the meat-board with the left hand, and with a
sharp knife cut in narrow ribbons not more than a quarter of an inch
wide.


=How to Keep Celery, Watercress, Lettuce, Etc.=

Many green vegetables--celery in particular--discolor or rust, if
allowed to stand longer than a few hours after being wet. When brought
from the market they may be put aside, in a tightly closed pail, or in a
paper bag, in a cool, dry place. By thus excluding the air they will
keep fresh several days. A short time before serving put them into
ice-cold water to which a slice or two of lemon has been added.


=How to Cook Sweetbreads and Brains.=

Remove the thin outer skin or membrane and soak in cold water, changing
the water often, an hour or more. Cover with salted boiling water,
acidulated with lemon juice and flavored with vegetables, and cook, just
below the boiling-point, twenty minutes. They are then ready for
preparation in any of the ways mentioned. Tie the brains in a cloth
before cooking.


=How to Pickle Nasturtium Seeds.=

As the seeds are gathered wash and dry them; then put them into vinegar
to which salt (half a teaspoonful to a pint) has been added. When a
sufficient quantity has been collected, scald fresh vinegar, add salt as
before, and the seeds from which the first vinegar has been drained.
Pour scalding hot into bottles, having the seeds completely covered with
vinegar.


=Nasturtium Vinegar.=

Fill a quart jar loosely with nasturtium blossoms fully blown; add a
shallot and one-third a clove of garlic, both finely chopped, half a red
pepper, and cold cider vinegar to fill the jar; cover closely and set
aside two months. Dissolve a teaspoonful of salt in the vinegar, then
strain and filter.


=Tarragon Vinegar.=

Fill a fruit jar with fresh tarragon leaves or shoots, putting them in
loosely; add the thin _yellow_ paring of half a lemon with two or three
cloves, and fill the jar with white wine or cider vinegar. Screw down
the cover tightly, and allow the jar to stand in the sun two weeks;
strain the vinegar through a cloth, pressing out the liquid from the
leaves; then pass through filter paper, and bottle for future use. If a
quantity be prepared, it were better to seal the bottles.


=Fines Herbes Vinegar.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 cups of tarragon vinegar.
          2 tablespoonfuls of garden cress, chopped fine.
          2 tablespoonfuls of sweet marjoram, chopped fine.
          2 cloves of garlic, chopped fine.
          4 small green capsicums, chopped fine.
          2 shallots, chopped fine.

_Method._--Mix the ingredients in a pint fruit jar, cover closely, and
set in the sun; after two weeks strain, pass through filter paper and
store in tightly corked bottles.


=Fines Herbes Vinegar, No. 2.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of tarragon vinegar.
          2 tablespoonfuls of seeds of garden cress, bruised or crushed.
          2 tablespoonfuls of celery seeds, crushed.
          2 tablespoonfuls of parsley seeds, crushed.
          4 capsicums, chopped fine.
          2 cloves of garlic, chopped fine.

_Method._--Prepare as in preceding recipe.


=To Decorate Salads with Mayonnaise by Use of Pastry Bag and Tubes.=

Make the dressing very thick by the addition of oil, or use "jelly
mayonnaise." Put the dressing into a pastry bag with star tube attached;
twist the large end of the bag with the left hand, pressing the mixture
towards the tube, and with the right guide the tube as in writing, to
produce the pattern desired. To form stars, hold the bag in an upright
position, point downward, press out a little of the dressing, then push
the tube down gently, and raise it quickly to break the flow.

[Illustration: "The tender lettuce brings on softer sleep."--W. KING,
_Art of Cookery_.]



SALAD DRESSINGS.



SALAD DRESSINGS.

          "Just, as in nature, thy proportions be,
           As full of concord their variety."


=French Dressing.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A few grains of cayenne or paprica.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of pepper.
          2 to 6 tablespoonfuls of vinegar or lemon juice.
          6 tablespoonfuls of oil.

If desired,--

          1/2 a teaspoonful of prepared mustard.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of onion juice, or rub the salad-bowl with
              slice of onion, or clove of garlic.

_Method._--Mix the condiments, add the oil and mix again; then add the
acid, a few drops at a time, and beat until an emulsion is formed; then
pour over the vegetables, toss with the spoon and fork, and serve. In
Chicago a method has obtained that is well worth a trial: Put a bit of
ice into the bowl with the condiments, and, by means of a fork pressed
against or into this, use in mixing.

_Second Method._--Pour the oil over the vegetables, toss, until the oil
is evenly distributed, and dust with salt and pepper; then add the acid
and toss again. When the salad is prepared at the table, the vegetables
may be dressed in a bowl, then arranged on the serving-dish; or, if but
one vegetable is used, it is preferable to serve from the dish in which
it is dressed.


=To Mix a Quantity of Dressing.=

Put all the ingredients into a fruit jar, fit on one or more rubbers and
the cover; then shake the jar vigorously, until a smooth dressing is
formed.


=Claret Dressing.=

(_For lettuce or fruit salad._)

Mix half a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of pepper, white or paprica, and
four tablespoonfuls of oil; add gradually one tablespoonful of claret
and one tablespoonful of lemon juice or vinegar.


=Mayonnaise Dressing.=

INGREDIENTS.

          The yolks of 2 raw eggs.
          1 pint of olive oil.
          2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
          2 tablespoonfuls of lemon juice.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A few grains of cayenne or paprica.

If desired,--

          1 teaspoonful, each, of mustard and powdered sugar.

_Method._--An amateur will probably find it helpful to have all the
utensils and ingredients thoroughly chilled, but the professional
salad-maker thinks it expedient to have the ingredients and utensils of
the same temperature as the room in which the dressing is to be served.
Beat the yolks with a small wooden spoon or silver fork, add the
condiments and mix again; then add one teaspoonful of vinegar, and, when
well mixed with the other ingredients, add the oil, at first drop by
drop. When the mixture has become of good consistency the oil may be
added faster. When it is too thick to beat well, add a little of the
lemon juice, then more oil, and so on alternately, until the ingredients
are used. If a very heavy dressing is desired, as when it is to be put
on with forcing-bag and tubes for a garnish, an additional half a cup of
oil may be added without increasing the quantity of acid.

In preparing mayonnaise, there is absolutely no danger of curdling, if
the eggs be fresh and the oil be added slowly, especially if the
materials and utensils have been thoroughly chilled. If the yolks do not
thicken when beaten with the condiments, but spread out over the bowl,
you have sufficient indication that they will not thicken upon the
addition of the oil, and it were better to select others and begin
again. Take care to add the teaspoonful of acid to the yolks and
condiments before beginning to drop in the oil, as this lessens the
liability of the mixture to curdle.


=How to Make Mayonnaise in Quantity.=

If four quarts or more of dressing be required, make the full amount at
one time; cut down the number of yolks to one for each pint of oil, but
keep the usual proportions of the other ingredients. Use a Dover
egg-beater from the start; after a little a teaspoonful of oil can be
added instead of drops, and, very soon, a much larger quantity.


=Curdled Mayonnaise.=

Occasionally a mayonnaise will assume a curdled appearance; under such
circumstances, often the addition of a very little of white of egg or a
few drops of lemon juice, with thorough beating, will cause the sauce to
resume its former smoothness. In case it does not become smooth, put the
yolk of an egg into a cold bowl, beat well, and add to it the curdled
mixture, a little at a time.


=Red Mayonnaise.=

Mix a level teaspoonful of Italian tomato pulp with a teaspoonful of
mayonnaise dressing, and when well blended beat very thoroughly into a
cup or more of the dressing, or add dressing until the desired tint is
attained.


=Red Mayonnaise, No. 2.=

(_For fish._)

Pound dried lobster coral in a mortar, sift, and add gradually to the
dressing, to secure the shade desired. Or, after the salad is arranged
in the bowl, or in nests, mask the top with mayonnaise of the usual
color, and sift the coral over the centre, leaving a ring of yellow
around the edge.


=Sauce Tartare.=

Make a mayonnaise dressing, using tarragon vinegar. To each cup of
dressing add one shallot, chopped fine, two tablespoonfuls, each, of
finely chopped capers, olives and cucumber pickles, one tablespoonful of
chopped parsley, and one-fourth a teaspoonful of powdered tarragon.


=Sardine Mayonnaise.=

Skin and bone three sardines and pound them to a pulp; sift the cooked
yolks of three eggs and add to the pulp; work until smooth, then add to
one cup of mayonnaise dressing.


=Jelly Mayonnaise.=

(_Used for masking cold fish or salads, or as a garnish with forcing-bag
and tube._)

To a cup of mayonnaise dressing beat in gradually from two
tablespoonfuls to one-third a cup of chilled but liquid aspic. More
seasoning may be needed. Apply to a cold surface, or chill before using
with forcing-bag.


=Livournaise Sauce.=

To a cup of mayonnaise dressing add a grating of nutmeg, one
tablespoonful of chopped parsley and the pulp of eight anchovies.

To prepare the anchovies, wash, dry, remove skin and bones and pound to
a pulp in a mortar.


=Boiled Dressing for Chicken Salad.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/2 a cup of chicken stock, well reduced.
          1/2 a cup of vinegar.
          1/4 a cup of mixed mustard.
          1 teaspoonful of salt.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of paprica.
          Yolks of 5 eggs.
          1/2 a cup of oil.
          1/2 a cup of thick, sweet cream.

_Method._--Simmer the liquor in which a fowl has been cooked, until it
is well reduced. Put the stock, vinegar and mustard into a double
boiler, and add the salt and pepper. Beat the yolks of the eggs and add
carefully to the hot mixture, cooking in the same manner as a boiled
custard. When cold and ready to serve, beat in with a whisk the oil, and
then fold in the cream, beaten stiff with a Dover egg-beater. Melted
butter, added before the dressing is cold, may be substituted for the
oil.


=Boiled Salad Dressing.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 teaspoonful of mustard.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of paprica.
          Yolks of 3 eggs.
          4 tablespoonfuls of melted butter.
          2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
          1/2 a cup of thick cream.
          2 tablespoonfuls of lemon juice.

_Method._--Mix together the mustard, salt and paprica, and add the yolks
of eggs; stir well and add slowly the butter, vinegar and lemon juice,
and cook in the double boiler until thick as soft custard. When cool and
ready to serve, add the cream, beaten stiff with the Dover egg-beater.


=Cream Salad Dressing.=

INGREDIENTS.

          3/4 a cup of thick cream.
          2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar or lemon juice.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A dash of white pepper and paprica.

_Method._--Add the seasonings to the cream and beat with a Dover
egg-beater until smooth and light. Add a scant fourth a cup of grated
horseradish, for a change. The radish should be freshly grated, and
added to the cream after it is beaten.


=Dressing for Cole-Slaw.=

Beat the yolks of three eggs with half a teaspoonful of made mustard, a
dash of pepper and one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt; add one-third a cup
of vinegar and two tablespoonfuls of butter, and cook over hot water
until slightly thickened. Set aside to become cold before using.


=Bacon Sauce.=

Heat five tablespoonfuls of bacon fat; cook in it two tablespoonfuls of
flour and a dash of paprica; add five tablespoonfuls of vinegar and half
a cup of water; stir until boiling; then beat in the beaten yolks of two
eggs, and a little salt if necessary. Do not allow the sauce to boil
after the eggs are added. Add to salad after it has become thoroughly
cold. Good with dandelion, endive, chicory, corn salad or lettuce.


=Hollandaise Sauce.=

Beat half a cup of butter to a cream; add the yolks of four eggs, one at
a time, beating in each thoroughly; add one-fourth a teaspoonful of
salt, a dash of paprica or cayenne, and half a cup of boiling water.
Cook over hot water until thick, adding gradually the juice of half a
lemon. Chill before using. This is good, especially for a fish salad, in
the place of mayonnaise.


=Bernaise Sauce.=

Use tarragon instead of plain vinegar, omit the water, with the
exception of one tablespoonful, and the hollandaise becomes bernaise
sauce. Oil may be used in the place of butter. The sauce resembles a
firm mayonnaise, and, as it keeps its shape well, is particularly
adapted for garnishing with pastry bag and tube.

[Illustration: Cucumber Salad for Fish Course.

(See page 36)]

[Illustration: Cooked Vegetable Salad

(See page 37)]



VEGETABLE SALADS SERVED WITH FRENCH DRESSING.

          "Bestrewed with lettuce and cool salad herbs."


=Lettuce Salad.=

Wash and drain the lettuce leaves; toss lightly, so as to remove every
drop of water. Sprinkle them with oil, a few drops at a time, tossing
the leaves about with spoon and fork after each addition. When each leaf
glistens with oil (there should be no oil in the bottom of the bowl)
shake over them a few drops of vinegar, then dust with salt and freshly
ground pepper. The cutting of lettuce is considered a culinary sin; but,
when the straight-leaved lettuce, or the Romaine, is to be used, better
effects, at least as far as appearance is concerned, will be produced,
if the lettuce be cut into ribbons. To do this, wash the lettuce
carefully, without removing the leaves from the stem; fold together
across the centre, and with a sharp, thin knife cut into ribbons _less_
than half an inch in width.


=Endive Salad.=

Prepare as lettuce salad, first rubbing over the bowl with a clove of
garlic cut in halves. A few sprigs of chives, chopped fine, are
exceedingly palatable, sprinkled over a lettuce, endive, string-bean, or
other bean salad.


=A Few Combinations.=

Dress each vegetable separately with the dressing; then arrange upon the
serving-dish. Or, have the salad arranged upon the serving-dish and pour
the dressing over all; then toss together and serve. About three
tablespoonfuls of oil, with other ingredients in accordance, will be
needed for one pint of vegetable.

1. Lettuce, tomatoes cut in halves, sprinkled with powdered tarragon,
and parsley or chives.

2. Lettuce, moulded spinach and fine-chopped beets.

3. Lettuce, Boston baked beans and chives.

4. Lettuce and peppergrass.

5. Lettuce, shredded sweet peppers or pimentos, and sliced pecan nuts or
almonds.

6. Lettuce, tomatoes stuffed with peas or string beans cut small, and
chives chopped fine.

7. Lettuce, asparagus tips and sliced radishes. Arrange the lettuce at
the edge of dish, inside a ring of radishes sliced thin, without
removing the red skins; centre of asparagus tips, with radish cut to
resemble a flower.

8. Lettuce, shredded tomatoes and shredded green peppers.

9. Shredded lettuce, English walnuts, and almonds or cooked chestnuts,
sliced.

10. Lettuce, Neufchatel cheese in slices and shredded pimentos.

11. Lettuce, cauliflower, string beans and shredded pimentos.

12. Lettuce or cress, artichoke slices and powdered tarragon.

13. Shredded cabbage and shredded green peppers.

14. Cauliflower broken into flowerets, string beans cut into small
pieces, and beets cut in fancy shapes or chopped. Arrange each vegetable
in a mass by itself; surround with lettuce.

15. Cucumbers and new onions, sliced.

16. Watercress, diced boiled beets, and olives in centre.

17. Lettuce, Brussels sprouts and chopped pepper.


=Lentil Salad.=

Soak the lentils over night; wash and rinse thoroughly, then cook until
tender, adding hot water as needed. Drain, and when cold mix with each
pint of lentils about five tablespoonfuls of oil, two tablespoonfuls of
tarragon vinegar and one teaspoonful, each, of capers, parsley, chives
and cucumber pickles, all, save the capers, chopped fine. Serve in a
mound, on a bed of lettuce leaves. Garnish with heart leaves of lettuce
at the top and sections of tomato, or diamonds of tomato jelly, at the
base.


=White-Bean Salad.=

Toss one pint of white beans, cooked, with one tablespoonful of vinegar
and three tablespoonfuls of oil, a little salt and a dash of cayenne or
paprica. Arrange in a mound on a bed of shredded lettuce, and sprinkle
with chives, parsley and pimentos, all finely chopped. Finish the top of
the salad with a large pim-ola.


=Potato Salad.=

(MISS COHEN.)

INGREDIENTS.

          3 cups of cold boiled potatoes, cut in cubes.
          1 cup of pecan nuts, broken in pieces.
          5 tablespoonfuls of oil.
          1 tablespoonful of salt.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of onion juice.
          A dash of cayenne.
          2 or 3 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
          Watercress.

_Method._--Mix the potatoes and nuts, add the oil and mix again; add the
other seasonings, and, when well mixed, set aside in a cool place an
hour or more. Remove the coarse stalks from two bunches of watercress
that have been well washed and dried. Season with French dressing and
arrange in a wreath about the edge of the salad.

[Illustration: Potato Balls, Pecan Meats, and Cress Salad.]


[Illustration: Potato-and-Nasturtium Salad.

(See page 34)]


=Potato Salad.=

(CARRIE M. DEARBORN.)

INGREDIENTS.

          12 cold boiled potatoes.
          4 cooked eggs.
          2 small Bermuda onions.
          Chopped parsley.
          1 saltspoonful of white pepper.
          2 teaspoonfuls of salt.
          6 tablespoonfuls, each, of oil and vinegar.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of powdered sugar.

_Method._--Cut the potatoes into dice and chop the eggs fine. Chop the
onions, or slice them very thin. Sprinkle the potatoes, eggs and onions
with the salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Pour the oil gradually
over the mixture, stirring and tossing continually; lastly, mix with the
other ingredients the vinegar, in which the sugar has been dissolved.
Sprinkle chopped parsley over the top.


=Potato Salad.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 quart of cubes of cold boiled potatoes.
          1-1/2 teaspoonfuls of salt.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of paprica.
          3 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
          4 tablespoonfuls of oil.
          Capers, beets, whites and yolks of eggs, and lettuce.

_Method._--To the potato cubes add the salt, pepper and oil, and mix
thoroughly; add the vinegar and mix again. Pile the cubes in a mound in
the salad-bowl. Mark out the surface of the mound into quarters with
capers; fill in two opposite sections with chopped beet; use chopped
whites of eggs in a third, and sifted yolks of eggs in the fourth
section. Finish with a border of parsley.


=Potato-and-Nasturtium Salad.=

(E. J. MCKENZIE.)

INGREDIENTS.

          1 quart of potatoes, cut in cubes.
          1/2 a cup of chopped gherkins.
          1 cup of tender nasturtium shoots, cut in bits.
          2 tablespoonfuls of pickled nasturtium seeds.
          Onion juice or garlic.
          6 tablespoonfuls of oil.
          5 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
          Salt and pepper.
          Chopped parsley.

_Method._--Mix the potatoes, gherkins, nasturtium shoots and seeds in a
bowl rubbed over with garlic; add the oil, vinegar and seasonings, and
mix again. Pile in a mound on a serving-dish, dust with chopped parsley,
and garnish with a wreath of nasturtium blossoms and leaves.


=Stuffed Beets.=

Boil new beets, of even size, until tender. Set aside for some hours, or
over night, covered with vinegar. When ready to serve, rub off the skin,
scoop out the centre of each to form a cup, and arrange the cups on
lettuce leaves. For each five cups chop fine a cucumber. Make a French
dressing of two tablespoonfuls of oil, half a tablespoonful (scant) of
vinegar, one-fourth a teaspoonful, each, of paprica and salt. Stir the
dressing into the cucumber and fill the beets with the mixture. Of the
beet removed to form the cups, cut slices and stamp out from these stars
or other fanciful shapes, and use to decorate the top of each cup.

Chopped radish, cress, olives or celery are all admissible for a
filling.


=Salad of Brussels Sprouts and Beets.=

Soak the sprouts in salted water; then drain and cook in salted boiling
water about fifteen minutes, or until tender; drain and cool. Dress with
French dressing and pile in a mound. Finish the top with a
fanciful-shaped figure cut from a slice of pickled beet, and place a
wreath of cooked beet, chopped and seasoned with French dressing, about
the whole.


=Macedoine Salad.=

Cut pieces of carrot and turnip one inch long and half an inch thick.
Put over the fire in boiling water and bring quickly to the
boiling-point; drain, cover with fresh water, and cook until tender;
score the top of each piece and insert an asparagus point. Dip the
pieces in a little melted gelatine and set alternately in a circle on
the serving-dish. Have carrots cut in small cubes or straws, turnips and
beet root the same, green string beans cut in small pieces, asparagus
and peas, all cooked separately until tender. Mix with French dressing
and dispose inside the circle. Each vegetable may be massed by itself,
or all may be mixed together. Finish the top with half a dozen short
stalks of asparagus.


=Tomato-and-Onion Salad.=

Peel and shred four tomatoes; slice thinly a very mild onion and
separate into rings; dress freely with oil and tarragon vinegar, and
season with salt and pepper. Serve on lettuce leaves, sprinkling the
whole with fine-chopped parsley and green peppers.


=Endive,-Tomato-and-Green-String-Bean Salad.=

Dress the well-blanched stalks of a head of endive, three tomatoes,
peeled, cut in halves and chilled, and a cup of cold cooked string
beans, separately, with French dressing, using in the dressing tarragon
vinegar and a few drops of onion juice; then arrange on a serving-dish.

[Illustration: Endive, Tomato, and Green String Bean Salad.]

[Illustration: Stuffed Beets.

(See page 34)]


=Cucumber Salad.=

(_German style._)

Pare large cucumbers and cut them into thin slices; cut each slice round
and round so as to form a long, narrow curling strip. Let these strips
stand two hours in salted ice water, drain, and dry in a soft cloth.
Serve with French dressing. Toss first in the oil, then add the
condiments, and lastly the vinegar. Americans would prefer to omit the
salt from the ice water, as it softens the cucumber.


=Cucumber Salad for Fish Course.=

With a handy slicer remove the outside rind from the cucumbers, cut in
thin slices, and let stand in ice-water to chill. Wipe dry, and
arrange the slices in the salad bowl in the form of a Greek cross. Make
a French dressing, in the proportion of three tablespoonfuls of cider
vinegar to six tablespoonfuls of oil, half a teaspoonful of salt, and a
dash of paprica. Rub the inside of the salad bowl with the cut side of
an onion before the salad is disposed in it.


=Cooked Vegetable Salad.=

Dress cooked kidney beans, peas, and balls cut from potatoes, each
separately with French dressing, to which a few drops of onion juice
have been added. Dispose upon a serving-dish and let stand in a cool
place an hour or more. Garnish at serving with heart leaves of lettuce.


=Potato Salad.=

(_German Style._)

INGREDIENTS.

          1 quart of potato slices or cubes.
          About 1/2 a cup of beef broth.
          1 teaspoonful of salt.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of paprica.
          8 tablespoonfuls of oil.
          1 tablespoonful of grated onion.
          2 hard boiled eggs.
          4 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
          1 teaspoonful of mustard.
          1 teaspoonful of sugar.
          Fine chopped parsley.
          (1 cup of mushrooms.)

_Method._--Boil the potatoes without paring. German potatoes, which are
waxy rather than mealy, may be procured in large cities especially for
salads. Peel the potatoes and cut them while hot into slices or cubes;
pour over them as much beef broth as they will readily absorb and
sprinkle with the salt and pepper, the oil and onion; mix lightly and
set aside for some hours. Then add the whites of the eggs chopped fine,
the yolks passed through a sieve, and mix with the rest of the oil,
stirred with the vinegar into the mustard and sugar. After disposing in
the dish, sprinkle with the parsley. If mushrooms be at hand, simmer ten
or fifteen minutes in broth, break in pieces, and add to the salad with
the egg.



SALADS, LARGELY VEGETABLE, SERVED WITH MAYONNAISE, CREAM OR BOILED
DRESSING.


=Cauliflower Salad.=

Soak the cauliflower in salted water an hour; cook in boiling salted
water until tender; drain and chill, then sprinkle with French dressing
and set aside for half an hour. Sever the flowerets partly from the
stalk, but so as not to change their relative positions, and place on a
serving-dish; put heart leaves of lettuce between the flowerets and
about the base of the vegetable; pour a cup of mayonnaise dressing over
the whole, and sprinkle with pimentos or fine-chopped parsley. In
serving, separate the flowerets with a sharp knife.


=Tomatoes Stuffed with Nuts and Celery.=

Peel the tomatoes; cut out a circular piece at the stem end of each and
scoop out the flesh so as to form cups. Chill thoroughly, then fill with
English walnut or pecan meats, broken into pieces, and celery, cut into
small pieces and mixed with mayonnaise. Serve on lettuce leaves.


=Stuffed-Tomato Salad.=

INGREDIENTS.

          6 smooth, small-sized tomatoes.
          6 tablespoonfuls of chicken, veal or tongue, cut fine.
          6 tablespoonfuls of peas.
          3 olives, chopped fine.
          3 gherkins, chopped fine.
          2 tablespoonfuls of capers.
          Salt and pepper.
          Mayonnaise dressing.

_Method._--Remove a round piece from the stem end of the tomatoes and
scoop out the seeds and centre. Chill thoroughly. When ready to serve,
mix together the solid part removed from the tomatoes, cut fine, and the
other ingredients; season to taste with salt and pepper, adding also
mayonnaise to hold the mixture together. With this fill the tomatoes,
put them in nests of lettuce or cress, and force a star of mayonnaise on
the top of each tomato.


=Tomato Salad, Horseradish Dressing.=

Plunge the tomatoes, placed in a wire basket, into a kettle of hot
water; remove at once and rub off the skin; chill thoroughly and cut in
halves. Serve on lettuce leaves with a star of cream dressing, seasoned
with grated horseradish, on the top of each slice.


=Tomato-and-Sweetbread Salad.=

Cook two sweetbreads as directed on another page, or braise with
vegetables. Cool between two plates bearing a weight. When cold cut into
slices and stamp into rounds of suitable size to use with slices of
tomato. Cover the slices of sweetbread with chaud-froid sauce and
decorate with fine-chopped parsley or sifted yolk of egg; pour over a
little melted aspic. When the aspic is set, trim neatly, and arrange
each round of sweetbread on a slice of chilled tomato. Serve inside a
border of lettuce around a salad made of the trimmings of the
sweetbreads and a cucumber cut in cubes and dressed with mayonnaise.

[Illustration: Cress, Cucumber, and Tomato Salad.

(See page 41)]

[Illustration: Tomato Jelly with Celery and Nuts.

(See page 43)]


=Cress,-Cucumber-and-Tomato Salad.=

Wash the cress and shake dry; arrange as a bed on a serving-dish,
discarding the coarse stems; above this make a smaller bed of cucumbers,
cut in slices or dice and dressed with French dressing, using three
tablespoonfuls of oil and one of vinegar or lemon juice to a pint of
cucumber. Arrange peeled tomatoes, chilled and cut in pieces, upon the
cucumbers. Serve with French, cream or mayonnaise dressing.


=Tomatoes Stuffed with Cucumber.=

Peel five tomatoes, cut off the stem ends and scoop out the pulp, thus
forming cups; set, turned upside down, in a cool place. Chop fine the
solid pulp from the tomatoes and one cucumber, chilled before chopping;
stir into a cup of cream dressing and fill the tomatoes with the
mixture. Salt and pepper will be needed in addition to that in the
dressing. If at hand, a pimento may be chopped with the other
ingredients, or two tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish may be used.
Serve at once on lettuce leaves.


=Tomatoes Stuffed with Jelly.=

Chop one sweetbread and one cucumber fine. To each cup (solid and
liquid) add one-fourth a teaspoonful, each, of salt and paprica, a few
drops of onion juice and a tablespoonful of capers; add also half a
tablespoonful of granulated gelatine, soaked in two or three
tablespoonfuls of cold water and melted over hot water. Stir until the
mixture begins to congeal, then fill into tomatoes prepared as above.
Set aside on the ice for half an hour, at least; then serve on lettuce
leaves with either mayonnaise, boiled or cream dressing. Calf's brains,
chicken, veal, tongue or ham may be substituted for the sweetbread.


=Tomatoes Farces à l'Aspic.=

INGREDIENTS.

          6 even-sized ripe tomatoes.
          1 pint of aspic jelly.
          1/2 a cup of lobster meat, chopped fine.
          1 tablespoonful of capers.
          2 yolks of hard-boiled eggs.
          Mayonnaise, parsley, lettuce.

_Method._--Scoop out the centres of the tomatoes, after removing the
skin, and chill thoroughly. Pass the yolks through a sieve, add to the
lobster, with the capers, half a cup of mayonnaise and half a cup of
chicken aspic, thick and cold, but not set; stir these in a dish
standing in ice water until nearly set; then fill the cavities in the
tomatoes with the mixture. Brush over the outside of the tomatoes with
half-set aspic; when the aspic is set, repeat twice, then set aside on
ice for some time before serving. Serve on a bed of lettuce seasoned
with French dressing. Garnish each tomato with a sprig of parsley and
the salad-dish with blocks of aspic. Anchovies or any cooked fish may be
substituted for the lobster. Serve with mayonnaise.


=Tomato Jelly.=

Soak three-fourths a box of gelatine in half a cup of cold water. Cook a
can of tomatoes, half an onion, a stalk of celery, a bay leaf, two
cloves, a teaspoonful of salt and a dash of paprica ten minutes. Add two
tablespoonfuls of tarragon vinegar and the gelatine, stir till
dissolved, strain, and mould in a ring mould. When cold turn from the
mould and fill the centre with


=CELERY-AND-NUT SALAD.=

Cut fine tender stalks of celery and English walnuts and mix with French
dressing. Garnish the centre of the salad and the border of the jelly
with tender leaves of lettuce and bits of curled celery.


=Tomato-Jelly Salad, No. 2.=

Make the jelly and mould as before. Fill in the centre of the ring with
shredded cabbage, pimentos and pecan nuts, mixed with boiled dressing.


=Tomato Jelly with String Beans.=

Cook tiny string beans until tender in boiling salted water; season
while hot with onion juice, salt, pepper and tarragon vinegar. When cold
add oil and toss the beans about until each bean is coated with the oil.
Fill the centre of the jelly, fashioned in a ring mould, with the beans,
and sprinkle over them a fine-chopped pimento. Garnish with lettuce
leaves. Fine-chopped chives may be used in the place of the onion juice;
they are particularly appropriate in any bean salad. If the beans are
large, cut in halves lengthwise and the halves crosswise.

Tomato jelly may be served in a ring mould with turkey, oyster, plain
chicken, French chicken, and other salads. The oysters should be scalded
and drained, then marinated with French dressing. Chicken and turkey
should also be marinated before mixing with celery and the mayonnaise or
boiled dressing.


=Tomato-and-Artichoke Salad.=

(MRS. E. M. LUCAS, IN BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE.)

Choose medium-sized tomatoes, firm and smooth skinned. Peel them, cut a
slice from the stem end and remove the seeds with a small spoon.
Sprinkle the interior of these cups with salt and set on ice. When ready
to serve, wipe them dry and fill with artichokes cut into dice and mixed
with mayonnaise. Serve on lettuce leaves. Use tarragon vinegar in
preparing the dressing. Cook the artichoke hearts until just tender,--no
longer,--in salted boiling water, then drain and cool.


=Artichoke Salad.=

(_For game._)

(MRS. E. M. LUCAS, IN BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE.)

Peel three oranges, remove the pith and white skin and slice lengthwise;
use an equal amount of tender blanched celery stalks cut into inch
lengths. Mix together lightly with two tablespoonfuls of olive oil, one
tablespoonful of lemon juice, half a teaspoonful of salt and a quarter a
teaspoonful of paprica. Heap together lightly on a serving-dish and
surround with cooked hearts of artichokes cut into quarters; wreathe
with blanched celery leaves.


=Artichoke Salad.=

(_Used as a border for shrimp, lobster, chicken and other salads._)

(MRS. E. M. LUCAS, IN BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE.)

Cut boiled artichokes into quarter-inch slices and stamp out with a
French vegetable cutter. To half a pint add one tablespoonful of olive
oil, half a tablespoonful of tarragon vinegar and one-fourth a
teaspoonful of salt; toss lightly together and let stand one hour;
drain, and arrange as a border with an outer layer of tiny blanched
lettuce leaves.

2. Scoop out the centres of the artichokes and fill with mayonnaise, or
with ravigote, tartare or tyrolienne sauce. Serve on lettuce leaves as a
border to a meat or fish salad.

3. Fill the centres with walnut meats, sliced, or tender celery stalks,
cut fine and mixed with mayonnaise.


=Asparagus Salad.=

Cut cold cooked asparagus into pieces an inch long, mix lightly with
cream dressing and serve, in individual portions, on curly lettuce
leaves.


=Asparagus-and-Salmon Salad.=

Mix cold cooked salmon with mayonnaise, form in a mound and encircle
with a wreath of cold cooked asparagus tips dressed with French
dressing.


=Asparagus-and-Cauliflower Salad.=

Break the cooked cauliflower into its flowerets, dispose in the centre
of the serving-dish and surround with a wreath of cooked asparagus tips.
Pour over the whole a mayonnaise, a boiled or a cream dressing, and
sprinkle with chopped capers or pimentos.


=Salad of Turnips with Asparagus Tips.=

Cook the turnips in boiling salted water until tender; drain, and cut
out the centres, forming cups. Sprinkle the inside with oil and a few
grains of salt, and, when the oil is absorbed, pour over the cups a
little lemon juice or vinegar. Set aside to become cool. When ready to
serve, arrange the cups on shredded lettuce and fill with cooked
asparagus tips, cold and mixed with mayonnaise or French dressing, as
desired. Peas, flageolets or wax beans, cut fine, may be used instead of
the asparagus. Garnish with radishes.


=Green-Pea Salad.=

Mix the peas with a cream dressing; serve in nests of lettuce; garnish
the top of each nest with a little chopped beet, or a fanciful figure
cut from a pickled beet or pimento.


=Green-Pea-and-Potato Salad.=

Mix equal parts of cold cooked peas and potatoes cut in very small
cubes; season with salt and pepper, and serve as green-pea salad.


=Asparagus Salad.=

Scrape the scales from the stalks, and cook, standing upright in boiling
salted water, until tender; drain and chill thoroughly. Serve on lettuce
leaves with French dressing. Garnish the lettuce with hard-boiled eggs
cut in quarters lengthwise.


=Macedoine of Vegetable Salad.=

Dress one cup, each, of cooked carrots and turnips, cut in dice, string
beans, cut small, green peas, and half a cup of cooked beets, cut small,
with French dressing; add two tablespoonfuls of chopped gherkins;
drain, and mix with sufficient jelly mayonnaise to hold the vegetables
together. Arrange in dome shape and cover with more jelly mayonnaise.
Set a row of sliced gherkins near the top, and fill in the space to the
top with string beans or asparagus tips. Surround the base with
alternate rounds of beet and potato overlapping one another. Decorate
the space above with slices of potato and beet cut in diamonds, and
surround the base with light-green aspic cut in diamonds. One pint of
aspic will be sufficient; use chicken stock, and tint with color paste.


=Russian Vegetable Salad.=

Select two moulds of suitable shape and size (tin basins or earthen
bowls will do) and chill in ice water. Have ready cooked balls, cut from
carrots and turnips, and cooked string beans and cauliflower, all
marinated with French dressing. Drain the vegetables, dip them into
half-set aspic, and arrange against the chilled sides of the moulds;
then fill the moulds with aspic jelly. When set, with a hot spoon scoop
out the aspic from the centre of each mould and fill in the space with a
mixture of the vegetables and jelly mayonnaise, leaving an open space at
the top to be filled with half-set aspic. When thoroughly chilled and
set, turn from the moulds, the smaller mould above the other. Garnish
with flowerets of cauliflower, dipped in aspic and chilled, and lettuce.
Serve with mayonnaise.

[Illustration: Russian Vegetable Salad.]

[Illustration: Macedoine of Vegetable Salad.

(See page 47)]


=Stuffed-Cucumber Salad.=

Pare a short cucumber and cut it lengthwise in two parts; remove the
seeds and let chill in ice water for an hour. Chop together the solid
part of a peeled and seeded tomato, half a slice of new onion, a stalk
of celery and a sprig of parsley; mix with mayonnaise or a boiled
dressing and use as a filling for the well-dried halves of cucumber.
Serve on cress or lettuce.


=Cowslip-and-Cream-Cheese Salad.=

(See cut facing page 58.)

Cook the cowslip leaves until tender in boiling salted water, reserving
a few choice leaves with blossoms for a garnish. Chop fine, season to
taste with salt and paprica, press into a mould, and set aside to become
chilled. Slice chilled cream cheese (Neufchatel or cottage) in uniform
slices, and arrange at the sides of the mound. Serve with French or
mayonnaise dressing.


=Cauliflower Salad, Egg Garnish.=

Separate a cauliflower into flowerets and boil in salted water until
tender, _not longer_. Drain carefully. Season with oil, vinegar, salt,
pepper, and a sprinkling of chopped tarragon leaves (or use tarragon
vinegar). Arrange symmetrically in an earthen bowl, having the upper
surface level. Let stand to become thoroughly chilled, then turn on to
a serving-dish; the shape of the mould will be retained. Cover with
mayonnaise dressing or Sauce Tartare, and surround with lengthwise
quarters of hard-boiled eggs.


=Potato Salad with Mayonnaise.=

Boil the potatoes and let cool without paring. Then remove the skins and
cut into slices, balls, or cubes. Squeeze over them a little onion
juice, sprinkle with fine-chopped parsley, and let stand in a French
dressing several hours. Mix the dressing after the usual formula, and
use enough to moisten well the potato. When ready to serve, make nests
of heart leaves of lettuce, put a spoonful of the potato in each, with a
teaspoonful of mayonnaise above, sprinkle the mayonnaise with capers,
and press the quarter of a hard-boiled egg into the top of the
mayonnaise. Or add the chopped white of egg to the potato before
marinating, and sift the yolk over the mayonnaise.



FISH SALADS.

          "_Some choice sous'd fish brought couchant in a dish,
            Among some fennel._"

          "_Of what complexion?
            Of the sea water green, sir._"



FISH SALADS.


Ever, and justly, fish have taken high rank in the list of salad
ingredients. No wonder, when we consider that nothing excels in delicacy
of flavor many a variety of fish; and, while fish are not necessarily
expensive in any locality, in many sections of the country their cost is
merely nominal. Then, too, salad-making appeals largely to one's
artistic nature, and the products of sea and fresh water are constantly
furnishing opportunities for studies in many and varied shades of color.
The lobster's vivid red, the brilliant tints of the salmon and red
snapper, the delicate pink of shrimps, the dull white of scallops and
halibut, and the bluish gray of mackerel and bluefish, each, in its
season, may be made to contrast most effectively with fresh green herbs
and yellow dressings.

Oysters, scallops and little-neck clams are frequently served in salads
without cooking. These should be carefully washed, then drained and set
aside in a marinade for an hour. When cooked, they should be heated to
the boiling-point in their own liquor, then drained and cut in halves.
The adductor muscle of the oyster--the white, button-shaped part that
connects the animal with its shell--is often discarded. Other fish than
shellfish, when used in salads, are boiled, broiled or baked; they
present the best appearance, however, when boiled. Thudichum recommends
sea water, whenever it is available, for boiling fish; lacking this, hot
water, salted (an ounce of salt to a quart of water), and acidulated
pleasantly with lemon juice or vinegar, is the proper medium of cooking.
The addition of a slice or two of onion and carrot, a sprig of parsley,
a stalk of celery, with aromatic herbs or spices, provided they be not
used so freely as to overpower the delicate savor of the fish, is
thought to improve the dish.

The quantity of water should be adjusted to the size of the fish; in no
case should it be larger than will suffice to produce the desired
result. At the moment the fish is immersed in the water the temperature
should be at the boiling-point, and thereafter the vessel should be
permitted to simmer during the process of cooking.

The fish may be cooked whole, or cut into small pieces, similar in shape
and size. In the latter case a wire basket is of service, as, by this
means, the fish may be easily removed from the water and drained. If the
fish is to be served whole, remove the skin and fins, and, when
thoroughly cold, mask with jelly mayonnaise or with a fancy butter.
After chilling again, the mask may be decorated with capers, olives,
eggs, etc. If the fish is to be used in flakes, the flakes will separate
more easily while the fish is still hot. In marinating fish, let the
proportions of oil and acid vary with the kind of fish; _i.e._,
according to the oily nature of the flesh.



RECIPES.


=Brook-Trout Salad.=

Dress the trout without removing the heads; boil as previously
indicated. Remove the backbone without destroying the shape of the fish.
Serve, thoroughly chilled, on crisp lettuce leaves dressed with claret
or French dressing. Prepare the latter with tarragon vinegar.


=Brook Trout Moulded in Aspic.=

Pour a little chicken aspic into a pickle or other dish of suitable
shape and size for a single fish; when nearly set, lay a trout, prepared
as above, upon the aspic, add a few spoonfuls of aspic, let it harden so
that the fish may become fixed in place, then add aspic to cover. Slices
of cucumber pickles, capers, or other ornaments, may be used. When the
aspic is thoroughly set and chilled, remove from the mould and serve on
two lettuce leaves, with any dressing desired.


=Halibut Salad.=

Flake the fish and marinate with French dressing (three tablespoonfuls
of oil, one tablespoonful of lemon juice or vinegar, a dash of salt and
pepper, for each pint of fish); drain, and add half as much boiled
potato, cut in small cubes and dressed with French dressing. Serve on a
bed of lettuce leaves. Garnish with sardine dressing. Shredded lettuce
or peas may be used in place of the potato.


=Halibut-and-Cucumber Salad.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pound of cooked halibut.
          2 tablespoonfuls of oil.
          1 tablespoonful of lemon juice.
          A few drops of onion juice.
          Salt and pepper.
          2 pimentos.
          Lettuce.
          Cucumbers.
          French dressing.

_Method._--Flake one pound of cooked halibut while hot, and marinate
with the oil, lemon juice, onion juice, salt and pepper. When cold drain
and mix with the pimentos, shredded, after cutting from the same a few
star-shaped or other fanciful figures. Arrange heart leaves of lettuce
in an upright position in the centre of a serving-dish, the fish and
pimentos around the lettuce, and, around these, one large or two small
cucumbers, cut in small cubes and mixed with French dressing. With
salmon use capers instead of pimentos. Use enough dressing to moisten
the cucumbers thoroughly.


=Halibut Salad.=

Steam a thick slice of chicken halibut, until the flesh separates easily
from the bone. Remove the skin and bones without disturbing the shape of
the fish. Marinate, while hot, with three tablespoonfuls of oil, one
tablespoonful of vinegar or lemon juice, and salt and pepper. When cold
put the fish on a serving-dish, and, using endive or Boston Market
lettuce, put the ends of the leaves beneath the fish, so that the tops
of the leaves will fall over upon the fish. Garnish the top with stars
of mayonnaise. Between the leaves dispose sliced pim-olas and fans cut
from small gherkins. Serve mayonnaise with the salad.


=Fillets of Halibut in Aspic, with Cucumber-and-Radish Salad.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 slices of halibut, cut half an inch or less in thickness.
          1 lobster (a pound and a half).
          3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1/4 a cup of flour.
          1/4 a cup of cream.
          1/4 a cup of stock.
          A dash of paprica.
          1 tablespoonful of lemon juice.
          1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
          1/4 a tablespoonful of salt.
          1 quart of aspic.
          Olives.
          A bunch of radishes.
          2 cucumbers.
          French dressing.

_Method._--Remove the skin and bone from the halibut, thus securing
eight fillets. Season with salt, pepper, onion and lemon juice. Chop the
lobster meat fine; melt the butter, cook in it the flour and seasonings,
add the cream and lobster stock, and, when cooked, stir in the chopped
lobster. When cool spread upon one side of the fillets, roll up the
fillets and fasten with wooden toothpicks that have been dipped in
melted butter. Bake on a fish-sheet about fifteen minutes, basting with
butter melted in hot water.

Set a plain border-mould in ice water; decorate the bottom and sides
with pim-olas or gherkins cut in slices and dipped in half-set aspic;
cover the decoration on the bottom with aspic, and, when set and the
decorations on the side are "fixed" in place, arrange on the aspic the
cold fillets of fish and fill the mould with more aspic. When cold turn
from the mould and fill the centre with diced cucumbers and sliced
radishes dressed with French dressing. Pass mayonnaise or French
dressing in a separate dish. Surround the aspic with shredded lettuce if
desired.


=Fillets of Halibut in Aspic with Cole-Slaw.=

Use a generous half-pint of oysters in the place of the lobster,
parboiling and draining before chopping, and fill in the centre of the
aspic with coleslaw.

[Illustration: Miroton of Fish and Potato Salad.]

[Illustration: Cowslip and Cream Cheese Salad.

(See page 49)]


=Miroton of Fish and Potato.=

Marinate one pint of cold cooked fish--salmon, cod, haddock, halibut,
etc.--with three or four tablespoonfuls of oil, half a teaspoonful of
salt, a dash of pepper and two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. Marinate,
separately, one pint of cold potatoes, cooked in their skins and cut in
cubes, with the same quantity of dressing, adding also one teaspoonful
of onion juice. Let stand in a cool place one hour or more. Have ready
six hard-boiled eggs; cut a thin slice from the round end of each egg,
that it may stand upright, then cut in quarters lengthwise. Dip into a
little aspic jelly or melted gelatine and arrange the quarters in the
form of a circle, with the yolks outside. Toss together the fish, potato
and three tablespoonfuls of capers, and fill in the centre of the
circle. Dust with fine-chopped parsley or beets; add a tuft of lettuce
at the top and a few heart leaves of lettuce above the crown of eggs.


=Fish Salad Moulded in Aspic.=

Cover the bottom of a mould with aspic to the depth of one-fourth an
inch. Set the mould in ice water, and, when the aspic is set, arrange
upon it a decoration of cooked vegetables cut in shapes with French
cutter, or fashion a conventional design or some flower. Dogwood
blossoms provide a simple pattern, and one easily carried out. Cut the
four petals from a thin slice of cooked turnip and the centre of the
blossom from carrot or lemon peel. Fasten each piece in place with
liquid jelly, and, when set, cover with more jelly. To decorate the
sides of the mould, take the figures on the point of a skewer, dip in
jelly, then set in position against the _chilled_ sides of the mould,
and they will remain in place. After the jelly covering the figures on
the bottom of the mould has "set," place a smaller mould in the centre
of the aspic in the first, and fill this with ice and water. Pour in
aspic to fill the space about the smaller mould, and, when this aspic is
firm, dip out the water and ice. Fill with _warm_ water and quickly
remove the mould. Separate a pound of cooked fish into flakes, add half
a cup of cold cooked peas, three or four gherkins, cut very fine, and
three tablespoonfuls of capers. Mix together and then mix with one cup
of mayonnaise made with jelly; with this fill the vacant space in the
mould. When ready to serve, dip the mould very quickly into warm water,
letting the water rise to the top of the mould, and invert over a
serving-dish; remove the mould, and garnish with lettuce, tiny gherkins
cut to resemble fans, blocks of aspic, or aspic moulded in shells, and
mayonnaise.


=Fish Salad Moulded in Aspic, No. 2.=

Decorate the mould as before; then put in a layer of the fish and
dressing; when set, add a layer of aspic; alternate the layers until the
materials are used or the mould is filled. Individual moulds may be
prepared in the same way.


=Salad of Mackerel or Bluefish.=

Separate a cooked fish into flakes and mix with the chopped whites and
sifted yolks of three hard-boiled eggs. Season with French dressing, mix
lightly and turn on to a bed of lettuce or cress, also seasoned with the
dressing. Garnish with fans cut from small gherkins, or with pickled
beet cut in fanciful shape or chopped.


=Salad of Salt Mackerel.=

Freshen the fish carefully before cooking. Use equal parts of fish,
flaked, and cold boiled potatoes. If potatoes are specially prepared for
the purpose, cut them in cubes or balls, blanch, and cook in
well-seasoned beef stock; drain, and add, when cold, to the fish. Season
with French dressing. Arrange on a bed of cress and sift the yolk of an
egg over the whole.


=Salad of Shad Roe and Cucumber.=

Cook two shad roes with an onion, sliced, and a bay leaf, in salted,
acidulated water twenty minutes; drain, and marinate with about two
tablespoonfuls of oil, one tablespoonful of lemon juice and a dash of
pepper and salt. When cold cut in small cubes. Rub the salad-bowl with a
clove of garlic cut in halves. Cut a thoroughly chilled cucumber in
dice; put the cucumber on a bed of lettuce leaves in the bottom of the
bowl, and the roe, well drained, above; mask with mayonnaise,--nearly a
cup will be required,--in the top insert a few heart leaves of lettuce,
and place around the centre of the mound a circle of cucumber slices
overlapping one another; or alternate these with lozenges cut from
pickled beet.


=Boudins-de-Saumon Salad.=

Butter four small dariole moulds, or small cups; sprinkle the butter
with chopped parsley. Select four small pieces of cooked salmon, dry on
a soft cloth so as to remove all oily liquor, and put a piece in each
mould. Beat two eggs (or, better, one egg and the yolks of two)
slightly, season with one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of
paprica and a few drops of anchovy essence or onion juice; add half a
cup of milk, and, when well mixed, pour into the moulds around the fish.
Set the moulds in a pan of hot water and bake until the custard is set.
Do not let the water boil. Chill thoroughly, then turn from the moulds
on to lettuce leaves. Serve with a star of mayonnaise dressing on the
top of each _boudin_.


=Russian Salad.=

(BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL.)

INGREDIENTS.

          1 cup of carrots.
          1 cup of potatoes.
          1 cup of peas.
          1 cup of beans (flageolets preferred).
          6 tablespoonfuls of oil.
          3 tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
          1 teaspoonful of salt.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of pepper.
          A head of lettuce.
          1 cup of mayonnaise.
          1 cup of shrimps.
          1/4 a lb. of smoked salmon.
          1 hard-boiled egg.

_Method._--Marinate the carrots and potatoes, cut in small pieces, also
the peas and beans, with French dressing. Arrange on a dish in four
sections, having lettuce for the foundation of each. Cover each
vegetable with mayonnaise. Strew the tops of two sections with small
pieces of smoked salmon; on a third section strew the sifted yolk of the
egg, and on the fourth, the white of the egg, cut rather coarsely.
Outline the inner side of each section with shrimps, by lightly
pressing the ends of the shrimps into the mayonnaise. Finish with a tuft
of lettuce in the centre of the dish.


=Spanish Salad.=

In the centre of a flat serving-dish arrange a mound of endive. Peel
tomatoes, divide into sections or cut in slices, and arrange these
around the endive. Shell cold, hard-boiled eggs; cut in halves,
crosswise, and in points; remove the yolks and pound to a paste with an
equal amount of the flesh of lobster, shrimp, anchovies or salmon. With
this paste, seasoned to taste with oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper,
fill the cups fashioned from the whites of the eggs, and arrange them
around the tomatoes. Strew chopped shallot and sweet pepper over the
endive. Mix equal portions of oil and vinegar, add salt and pepper to
taste, and pour over the salad. Serve at once.


=Salmon Salad.=

(_For evening company, or fish course at a dinner party._)

INGREDIENTS.

          Hard-boiled eggs.
          1 teaspoonful of gelatine, softened in one tablespoonful
            of cold water.
          1 pint of string beans or asparagus tips.
          1 pint of cooked peas.
          French dressing.
          2 slices of salmon, 2 inches thick.
          Jelly mayonnaise, or fancy butter.
          Capers.

_Method._--Cut the eggs into halves lengthwise; cut a thin slice from
the round ends, that the pieces may be set upright; dip lightly in the
gelatine dissolved over hot water, and arrange _miroton_ fashion around
an oval serving-dish. Set aside, that the eggs may become fixed in
position. Marinate the vegetables, separately, with French dressing;
cook the salmon by the directions previously given; remove the skin and
cover the sides with jelly mayonnaise or fancy butter. When cold
decorate with whites of eggs and capers. Use the trimmings from the
eggs, and fix them in place by dipping in jelly mayonnaise. Set aside
for the decorations to become fixed. Drain the vegetables and arrange
inside the border, higher in the centre. Lay the decorated slices of
fish upon opposite sides of the mound, and serve either with or without
mayonnaise.


=Halibut Salad.=

(_For evening company, or fish course at a dinner party._)

INGREDIENTS.

          A slice of chicken halibut, 3 inches thick.
          3 cups of cooked peas.
          French dressing.
          Hard-boiled eggs.
          3 slices of pickled beet.
          1 teaspoonful of gelatine.
          Jelly mayonnaise, or green butter.
          Heart leaves of lettuce.
          2 olives.

_Method._--Prepare the eggs and fasten to the plate as in salmon salad.
Dip diamond-shaped pieces of pickled beet in the dissolved gelatine
and place upon the front and top of each half of egg. Spread the edge of
the fish, after removing the skin, with jelly mayonnaise, or green
butter, and, when set, decorate with figures cut from the cooked white
of an egg. With forcing-bag and tube shape a pattern around the upper
edge of the fish. Place the fish in the centre of the crown or _miroton_
of eggs, with the peas seasoned with French dressing around it; cover
the place from which the bone was taken with the centre of a head of
lettuce, cut in halves, and two fine olives. Serve with a bowl of
mayonnaise.

[Illustration: Russian Salad.]

[Illustration: Halibut Salad.

(See page 64)]


=Shells of Fish and Mushrooms.=

Cut cold fish--salmon, halibut, lobster, etc.--into small cubes, mix
with one-third in measure of cooked mushrooms, also cut small, and add
for each cup of mushrooms and fish one tablespoonful of gherkins cut
fine. Season with French dressing and let stand one hour; then drain,
and mix with jellied mayonnaise. Fill chilled shells with this
preparation, rounding it on the top. Make smooth, and mask with jellied
mayonnaise. Decorate with gherkins and the white of a hard-boiled egg
cut in fanciful shapes, and with stars of mayonnaise.


=Oysters in Aspic Jelly.=

Parboil, drain, cool, and wipe dry one quart of oysters. Make a pint of
mayonnaise sauce with aspic jelly and coat the well-dried oysters with
the sauce. Prepare a quart of chicken aspic. Dip in half-set aspic the
white of egg, poached and cut in fanciful shapes, and small gherkins cut
in thin slices, and decorate the bottom and sides of a charlotte or
cylindrical mould standing in ice water. Pour in jelly to the depth of
half an inch; when set, arrange the oysters on it in a circle, one
overlapping another; pour in more jelly, and, when set, dispose upon it
another circle of oysters. Continue this order until the mould is
filled. When removed from the mould, garnish with chopped aspic and fans
cut from gherkins and lettuce. Serve with the remainder of the pint of
mayonnaise.


=Oyster-and-Celery Salad.=

Parboil the oysters (heating them to the boiling-point in their own
liquor), drain, and, if large, halve each; marinate with a French
dressing (_i.e._, toss the bits of oyster in oil enough to coat them
nicely; then toss them in a little lemon juice, dust with salt and
pepper, and set aside to become thoroughly chilled). When ready to
serve, drain again and add about one-third as much in bulk of
fine-chopped celery and one or two tablespoonfuls of pickled nasturtium
seeds or capers; then mix with mayonnaise or a boiled dressing. Serve on
a bed of lettuce leaves. Cabbage, sliced as for slaw, may be used in the
place of celery. Garnish with small pickles cut in thin slices and
spread to resemble a fan.


=Oyster-and-Sweetbread Salad.=

Cut a pair of cold cooked sweetbreads into cubes. Parboil one pint of
oysters, drain, cool, and cut in halves; marinate the sweetbreads and
oysters with French dressing, and allow them to stand at least half an
hour; drain, mix with mayonnaise, and serve on a bed of lettuce or
cress. Or, surround with a circle of chopped cucumbers seasoned with
French dressing.


=Shrimp Salad in Cucumber Boats.=

Pare the cucumbers, which should be rather short, and cut them in halves
lengthwise; remove the seeds and steam until tender; chill, and arrange
on lettuce leaves, or on a bed of watercress. Clean and marinate the
shrimps. If large, divide into two or three pieces. Mix with mayonnaise
and place in the cucumbers. Decorate with stars of mayonnaise and whole
shrimps.


=Shrimp Salad with Aspic Border.=

Set a border mould in ice water; dip hard-boiled eggs, cut in halves
lengthwise and trimmed to fit the mould, in aspic jelly, and press
against the sides of the mould alternately with small vegetable balls,
or peas dipped in half-set aspic; fill gradually the empty space in the
mould with partly cooled jelly, adding vegetables here and there if
desired. Dip in hot water and turn from the mould. Fill in the centre
with lettuce, torn in pieces, and one pint of shrimps, broken in pieces
and dressed with French dressing. Smooth the mound and mask with jelly
mayonnaise. Decorate with shrimps and small heart leaves of lettuce.


=Shrimp Salad with Aspic Border, No. 2.=

Decorate the sides of a ring mould, chilled, with hard-boiled eggs cut
in halves, alternated with hearts of lettuce cut in halves; dip the egg
and lettuce in half-set aspic, and they will adhere to the sides of the
mould. Then proceed as above.


=Shrimp Salad.=

Take the shrimps from the shells, reserve the most perfect for
garnishing, and break the others into pieces; marinate with French
dressing. When ready to serve, drain, and mix with shredded lettuce, or
celery cut fine, and mayonnaise. Shape in a mound on a bed of lettuce
leaves and mask with mayonnaise. Use capers or olives, chopped very
fine, to mark out five or six designs on the mound; a scroll effect is
always pretty. Fill in the designs with shrimps and the rest of the
mound with capers, sifted yolks or chopped whites of cooked eggs; or
fill the designs with the capers or eggs and the rest of the mound with
shrimps. Finish with a tuft of lettuce at the top.


=Scallop Salad.=

Soak the scallops in salted water (a tablespoonful of salt to a quart of
water) one hour; rinse in cold water, cover with boiling water, and
let simmer five or six minutes. Rinse again in cold water, drain, and
when cold cut into slices. Cut white stalks of celery into small pieces.
Mix the celery and scallops--half as much celery as scallops--with
mayonnaise or boiled dressing, and shape in a mound. Mask the mound with
a thin coating of mayonnaise. With large-sized capers outline a design
on each of the four sides of the mound, fill these with whites of eggs,
cooked and chopped fine. Ornament with figures cut from slices of boiled
beets. Fill in the spaces around the designs with capers, and garnish
with green celery leaves and white stalks of celery, fringed.

[Illustration: Shell of Fish and Mushrooms.

(See page 65)]

[Illustration: Shrimp Salad in Cucumber Boat.

(See page 67)]


=Sardine Salad.=

Lay the sardines upon soft paper, that they may be freed from oil.
Scrape off the skin and remove the bones; squeeze over them a little
lemon juice. Arrange upon a bed of crisp lettuce leaves, or upon
shredded lettuce, and dress with either French or mayonnaise dressing.
Garnish with hard-boiled eggs cut in slices.


=Sardine Salad, No. 2.=

Arrange a pint of cold cooked fish, flaked, on a bed of lettuce leaves
and cover with sardine dressing. Carefully split six selected sardines;
remove the bones and arrange the halves on the top of the salad, with
the heads at the centre. Garnish with slices of lemon.


=Sardine-and-Egg Salad.=

Skin and bone a dozen sardines and put them in a mortar; remove the
shells from an equal number of hard-boiled eggs and cut them into halves
crosswise, so as to form cups with pointed edges; put the yolks into the
mortar with the sardines, add a tablespoonful, or less, of chopped
parsley, a dash of pepper and salt, and work to a smooth paste; moisten
with salad dressing and season to taste with salt and pepper. Cut a thin
slice from the ends of the egg cups, that they may be set upright on the
serving-dish, and fill with the mixture, making it round on the top like
a whole yolk. Arrange these on a bed of watercress, or shredded lettuce,
and sprinkle plentifully with French dressing.


=Lobster Salad.=

Cut lobster meat in dice and marinate with French dressing. Keep on ice
until ready to serve, then drain carefully. Make cups of the inside
leaves of lettuce, put a spoonful of the lobster meat in the centre of
each cup, and press mayonnaise dressing through a pastry bag with star
tube attached on the top of the lobster in each nest. Or, arrange the
lobster in a mound on a bed of lettuce leaves, and mask the mound with
mayonnaise. Finish the centre with a little bouquet of the heart leaves
of lettuce; sift dried coral in a circle about it, and below that
arrange circles of sifted yolk or chopped white of egg alternately
with the coral. Garnish with the fans and feelers of the lobster. Or,
arrange as before, then finish the centre with a bouquet of heart leaves
of lettuce and the head of the lobster. Garnish with stars of mayonnaise
and fans from the tail.

[Illustration: Shrimp Salad, Border of Eggs in Aspic.

(See page 68)]

[Illustration: Lobster Salad.]


=Lobster Salad, No. 2.=

Remove the flesh carefully from the shell of a lobster, so as to keep
the shell of body and tail intact; wash and dry the shell and arrange on
a bed of lettuce leaves. Marinate the flesh, cut into cubes, with French
dressing. After an hour drain, mix with an equal quantity of shredded
lettuce, and replace in the shell. Garnish with mayonnaise and the
lobster coral. Dry the coral thoroughly, after which it may be passed
readily through a sieve.


=Lobster Salad, No. 3.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 good-sized lobsters.
          Lettuce.
          Mayonnaise, or sauce tartare.
          Lobster cutlets.
          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1/3 a cup of flour.
          Salt and paprica.
          1 cup of milk.
          Lobster coral.
          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          1 yolk of egg.
          1 teaspoonful of lemon juice.
          2 cups of lobster meat.
          3 cups of aspic jelly.

_Method._--Make a white sauce of the butter, flour, seasonings and milk;
add the coral and butter, after pounding until smooth in a mortar, also
the yolk of egg, beaten and diluted with the lemon juice, and the
lobster meat chopped rather coarsely. When cold shape into cutlets, dust
over with sifted coral, and insert a bit of feeler or claw into the
small end of each. Pour a little aspic into a dish, and, when it sets,
arrange the cutlets upon it a little distance apart; pour over each a
few spoonfuls of aspic, and when set cover with more aspic. When cold
and very firm cut out the cutlets, giving a border of aspic to each.

Marinate the flesh of the other lobster, cut into cubes, with French
dressing; pile in a mound on a bed of lettuce leaves. Insert a tuft of
leaves in the top, and arrange the cutlets against the mound. Garnish
with feelers and claws. Serve mayonnaise or sauce tartare with the
salad.


=Lobster Salad in Ring of Aspic.=

Set a ring mould in ice water. In the bottom of the mould arrange pitted
olives or pim-olas an inch apart. Dip figures, cut from slices of royal
custard, or from cooked carrot or turnip, into liquid aspic, and place
them on the sides of the mould, to which they will adhere; dip
large-sized capers (a larding-needle or skewer is of assistance in this
work) in aspic and with them ornament the mould; then fill with aspic
and set aside to become fixed. When ready to serve, dip the mould in hot
water and invert on a serving-dish. Cut the meat from two two-pound
lobsters into small cubes. Season with French dressing. Fill the open
space in the aspic with the salad; garnish the top with the feelers and
delicate lettuce leaves, and arrange a wreath of lettuce leaves around
the aspic. Stamp out rounds of bread; stamp again with the same cutter
to form crescents, spread delicately with butter, and then with caviare
seasoned with a few drops of lemon juice, and dispose symmetrically on
the lettuce.

[Illustration: Bluefish Salad.

(See page 75)]

[Illustration: Litchi Nut and Orange Salad.

(See page 88)]


=Mousseline of Lobster as a Salad.=

Chill timbale moulds in ice water; dip thin slices of gherkins into
half-set aspic, and arrange them symmetrically against the sides of the
moulds, and brush over the decoration with aspic. Cut the claw meat of a
two-pound lobster into small cubes; chop fine, and pound the remaining
meat in a mortar; then add to it the liver and fat, and pass through a
sieve. There should be about one cup. Simmer the shell in water to cover
half an hour. Beat the yolks of three eggs, slightly, with one-fourth a
teaspoonful of salt and a dash of paprica; add one cup of the lobster
liquor very gradually, and cook over hot water as a boiled custard.
Remove from the fire and add one-fourth a package of gelatine, softened
in one-fourth a cup of cold lobster liquor, or chicken stock; strain
over the sifted lobster meat and stir occasionally over ice water; when
it begins to set, add the lobster dice, and fold in carefully one cup of
whipped cream. Turn the mixture into the decorated mould, and, when
set, turn out on to lettuce leaves. Decorate with the head, feelers and
claws of the lobster. Serve with French or mayonnaise dressing. French
dressing is preferable with so rich a mixture.


=Anchovy Salad.=

INGREDIENTS.

          8 salted anchovies, or 12 bottled anchovies.
          4 hard-boiled eggs.
          1 head of lettuce.
          Juice of half a small lemon.
          French or mayonnaise dressing, or Sauce tartare.

_Method._--If salt anchovies are to be used, soak them in cold water two
hours, then drain, dry, and remove skin and bones; divide the flesh into
small pieces and squeeze the lemon juice over them. When ready to serve,
arrange the lettuce leaves upon a serving-dish, stalk ends at the
centre, cut the eggs in slices, mix with the bits of anchovies, and
arrange upon the lettuce. Pour a French or mayonnaise dressing made with
onion juice, or a sauce tartare, over the salad.


=Salad of Lettuce, Bamboo Sprouts, and Shrimps.=

Marinate a cup of shrimps, broken in small pieces, with three
tablespoonfuls of oil, one tablespoonful of lemon juice, a dash of salt
and pepper. Select the tender bamboo sprouts in a can, and cut them into
small pieces of the shape desired. When ready to serve, dress these with
salt, pepper, oil, and lemon juice. Use three measures of oil to one
of acid. Begin with the oil. Continue mixing and adding oil, until each
piece is glossy. Then add the acid. Mix the prepared sprouts and the
drained shrimps, and turn them onto a bed of lettuce, cut in narrow
shreds, and dressed with oil and acid. Decorate the salad with heart
leaves of lettuce, whole shrimps, and hollow sections of bamboo, cut in
thin slices.

[Illustration: Moulded Salmon Salad.

(See page 75)]

[Illustration: Salad of Shrimps and Bamboo Sprouts.]


=Bluefish Salad (excellent).=

Separate the remnants of a baked bluefish into flakes, discarding skin
and bones. Set aside, covered, until cold. About an hour before serving,
sprinkle with salt and pepper and (for a generous pint of fish) the
juice of a lemon. When ready to serve, dispose heart leaves of lettuce
on the edge of a salad plate, and turn the fish into the centre, letting
it come out over the stems of the lettuce leaves. Pour a boiled dressing
over the top, and spread evenly (with a silver knife) over the fish. Put
a tablespoonful of chopped pickled beet at the stems of each group of
leaves, a ring of the beet near the top, and figures, cut from the beet,
between.


=Moulded Salmon Salad.=

Use a pound of salmon, fresh-cooked or canned. Remove skin and bone, and
pick the flesh fine with a silver fork. Mix half a teaspoonful of salt,
a teaspoonful of sugar, a teaspoonful of flour, half a teaspoonful of
mustard, and a dash of paprica. Over these pour very gradually
three-fourths a cup of hot milk and stir and cook over hot water ten
minutes, then add one-fourth a cup of hot vinegar and two tablespoonfuls
of butter creamed and mixed with the beaten yolks of two eggs; stir
until the egg is set, then add one level tablespoonful of granulated
gelatine, softened in one-fourth a cup of cold water, and strain over
the salmon; mix thoroughly, and turn into a mould. When chilled serve
with Cream Salad Dressing (page 27), to which half a cucumber, chopped
fine and drained, has been added. Reserve a part of the dressing,
omitting the cucumber, and use with slices of cucumber as a garnish. To
prepare the cucumber, pare with a handy slicer and cut from it a section
three-fourths an inch thick; pare this round and round very thin and
roll loosely to form a cup. Dispose this on the top of the fish and fill
with dressing. (Use a pastry bag and tube.) Cut the rest of the cucumber
in thin slices.



VARIOUS COMPOUND SALADS.

          Give us the luxuries of life, and we will dispense
          with its necessaries.--_Motley._

          Three several salads have I sacrificed, bedew'd
          with precious oil and vinegar.--_Beaumont and
          Fletcher._


=Sweetbread-and-Cucumber Salad.=

Arrange the leaves of a head of cabbage lettuce loosely upon a
serving-dish, without destroying its shape. Have ready a pair of
sweetbreads cooked in salted, acidulated water twenty minutes, and
cooled and cut in small cubes and marinated; also the same quantity of
cucumber cut in dice, chilled in ice water and dried upon a cloth. Drain
the French dressing from the sweetbread and scatter the bits of
sweetbread and cucumber through the lettuce. Press three-fourths a cup
of firm jelly mayonnaise through a pastry bag with small tube, in little
stars, here and there, throughout the lettuce, and serve at once.


=Sweetbread-and-Cucumber Salad, No. 2.=

Cook, marinate and drain the sweetbreads as before; mix with an equal
quantity of cucumber cut in dice, and then with cream dressing. Line
the inner side of lettuce nests with slices of radish, one overlapping
another (do not remove the pink skin from the radish). Put in a spoonful
of the salad and garnish each nest with a small radish cut to resemble a
flower.


=Chicken Salad.=

Use two parts of cold cooked chicken to one part of celery. Marinate and
drain the chicken, add the celery, and mix with mayonnaise or boiled
dressing. Arrange the salad in nests of lettuce leaves and put a pim-ola
in the centre of each nest.


=Chicken Salad, No. 2.=

Prepare the salad as before; dispose in a mound on a bed of lettuce
leaves and mask with mayonnaise. By the use of stoned olives, cut in
halves, divide the surface into quarters. Fill two opposite sections
with whites of eggs chopped fine, a third with capers or olives chopped
fine, and the fourth with sifted yolks of eggs. Garnish with lettuce and
curled celery.


=French Chicken Salad.=

Cook the meats of English walnuts in well-seasoned chicken stock until
tender; remove the brown skin and break in pieces; when cold mix with
chicken and celery, and proceed as in preceding recipes. The walnuts
give the salad a flavor similar to that produced in France by the use of
truffles.


=Chicken-and-Fresh-Mushroom Salad.=

Peel mushroom caps, break in pieces, and sauté in melted butter five or
six minutes with a slice of onion; add chicken liquor or hot water and
let simmer until tender. Remove from the liquor, cover, and set aside to
cool. Add the liquor and the peelings and stalks of the mushrooms to the
liquid in which the chicken is to be cooked. Use the chicken and
mushrooms with celery or lettuce in any recipe for chicken salad.


=Chicken Salad, No. 3.=

Arrange the salad upon the centre of the dish and mask with mayonnaise;
then with pastry bag and tube pipe the dressing in some fanciful design.
Surround with a border of aspic jelly, tinted a delicate green. The
jelly may be cut in blocks or triangles, or into small cubes, and then
massed about the salad. Cut the aspic in a cold room; first dip the
knife in hot water and wipe dry.


=Chicken Salad, No. 4.=

Cut one cucumber and one bunch of round radishes in thin slices, and add
two-thirds a cup of shredded celery. Season with four tablespoonfuls of
oil, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar or lemon juice, half a teaspoonful of
salt and a dash of paprica. Put on a bed of shredded lettuce or on heart
leaves of lettuce; cover with three cups of chicken cut in cubes and
marinated an hour or more with four tablespoonfuls of oil, two
tablespoonfuls of lemon juice or vinegar, half a teaspoonful of salt and
a dash of white pepper. Mask with mayonnaise. Arrange some bits of
celery, an inch and a half in length and curled on one end, about the
salad, with a bit of yolk of egg in the centre of each. Or, instead of
the celery and yolk of egg, use sliced radishes (do not remove the red
skin), having the slices overlap one another. Finish the top with tuft
of lettuce or curled celery and yolk of egg.


=Mushroom Salad with Medallions of Chicken.=

Bone a chicken, fill with forcemeat, and cook until tender in stock;
then press between two dishes until cold. Cut in slices and stamp in
rounds. Stamp out an equal number of rounds from cooked tongue. Spread
these with "green butter" (see Green-Butter Sandwiches) and place the
rounds of chicken evenly on the tops. Coat these with white chaud-froid
sauce and decorate in some design with truffles, ham or tongue. When the
sauce has set, brush over the medallions with aspic jelly, cold but not
set. When thoroughly cold stamp out with a round cutter. Drain and dry a
can of white button mushrooms; toss them about in cold aspic until they
are well coated. When the jelly has become fixed about them, pile high
in the centre of a serving-dish; arrange the medallions about them,
resting on delicate leaves of lettuce. Serve mayonnaise or tartare
sauce with the salad. Sweetbreads may be substituted for the chicken,
and fresh mushrooms for the canned.


=Mousse-de-Poulet Salad.=

Scald one cup of milk, cream or _well-reduced_ chicken stock (the last
is preferable); beat the yolks of three eggs slightly, add one-fourth a
teaspoonful, each, of common salt and celery salt, and a dash of
paprica, and cook as a boiled custard. Remove from the fire and add
one-fourth a package of gelatine (one tablespoonful of granulated
gelatine), softened in one-fourth a cup of chicken liquor or water.
Strain over half a cup of cooked chicken (white meat), chopped and
pounded in a mortar and passed through a sieve. Stir over ice water
until the mixture is perfectly smooth and begins to set, then fold into
it one cup of whipped cream. Turn into a ring mould, and, when chilled
and well set, turn on to a bed of lettuce and fill in the centre with
equal parts of celery and English walnuts, blanched, sliced and mixed
with a French dressing.

The half-cup of chicken, well pressed down, should weigh four ounces.
The chicken broth should be strong and well flavored. Either one cup of
whipped cream, or one cup of cream, whipped, may be used. The latter
gives a firmer mousse, more pronounced in flavor; the former, a mousse
of a lighter and more delicate consistency, and one more delicate in
flavor.


=Mousse-de-Poulet, No. 2.=

Mould the mousse in small cups; turn out on to a slice of chilled tomato
resting upon a lettuce leaf; garnish with mayonnaise dressing,
decorating both the tomato and the mousse.


=Mousse-de-Poulet, No. 3.=

Mould the mousse in a ring mould and fill in the centre with equal parts
of cucumber or asparagus tips and diced sweetbread; marinate the
sweetbread with French dressing, and drain thoroughly before mixing with
the cucumber or asparagus. Garnish with mayonnaise dressing.


=Mousse-de-Poulet, No. 4.=

Fill in the centre of the ring with diced cucumbers and sliced radishes,
mixed with cream dressing. Garnish with cream dressing, using pastry bag
and tube, and radishes cut to resemble roses.


=Mousse-de-Poulet, No. 5.=

Fill in the centre of the ring with mushrooms and sweetbread dressed
with a French dressing. If the button mushrooms (canned) are used, cut
in quarters; if fresh mushrooms are at hand, remove the stems and peel
the caps; break into pieces and sauté in a little hot butter; then add
hot water or stock and let simmer until tender (fifteen or twenty
minutes). Drain and chill before using.


=Turkey-and-Chestnut Salad.=

Prepare the chestnuts as previously directed, using twice as much turkey
meat, light or dark, cut into small cubes. Serve with lettuce and
French, boiled or mayonnaise dressing, as desired. Marinate and drain
the meat before adding the nuts.


=Duck-and-Olive Salad.=

Cut the meat from a duck in small pieces, and slice pim-olas very thin;
use two tablespoonfuls of pim-olas to a cup of meat. Serve on a bed of
cress with a French dressing.


=Duck-and-Orange Salad.=

Slice the oranges lengthwise; use twice as much flesh as fruit. Dress
with oil, salt and paprica, and serve on lettuce leaves.


=Ham Salad.=

Soak half a tablespoonful of granulated gelatine in one tablespoonful
and a half of cold water, and dissolve in three-fourths a cup of hot
chicken liquor. Strain over one cup of chopped ham and stir until the
mixture begins to thicken, then fold in one cup of _thick_ cream beaten
stiff; add, also, a few grains of paprica and salt, if needed. Mould in
a ring mould, and, when set and cold, turn from the mould; fill in the
centre with lettuce arranged like a cup, and fill the cup with
mayonnaise. Or, serve with French dressing.


=Bacon Salad.=

Cut six or eight slices of tender bacon into small squares and fry until
they are delicately browned; then drain on soft paper. Heat six
tablespoonfuls of the fat and two tablespoonfuls of vinegar or lemon
juice; beat together the yolks of three eggs and one-fourth a
teaspoonful, each, of paprica and mustard, and cook with the fat and
vinegar over hot water until the mixture thickens slightly. When the
dressing is cold cut a head of lettuce into narrow ribbons, toss the
lettuce and bits of bacon together, and mix with the dressing. Serve at
once.


=Italian Salad.=

(MISS COHEN.)

INGREDIENTS.

          2 herrings, soaked in milk over night.
          3 boiled potatoes, cut in very small dice.
          2 tablespoonfuls of cucumber pickles, chopped fine.
          1 tablespoonful of capers, chopped fine.
          2 small boiled beets, cut fine.
          1/2 a pound (1 cup) of cold roast chicken, cut fine.
          1/2 a pound (1 cup) of boiled tongue, cut fine.
          2 apples, pared and finely chopped.
          2 carrots, cooked and finely chopped.
          1 celery root, cooked and chopped.
          1/2 a cup of pecan nuts, broken fine.
          A little onion juice.

_Method._--Mix the ingredients together thoroughly; add mayonnaise to
moisten well. Serve on a flat dish. Mask the top with mayonnaise, then
divide into squares like a checker-board, using fine-shredded pimento or
pickled beet to mark the divisions; fill in alternate squares with
sifted yolk of hard-boiled egg and the remaining squares with chopped
white of egg. Garnish the edge with parsley, and set in the centre half
a hard-boiled egg cut lengthwise in points and filled with capers.

[Illustration: Spinach and Egg Salad.

(See page 86)]

[Illustration: Marguerite Salad.

(See page 86)]


=Pâté de Foie Gras, Moulded in Aspic.=

Cover the bottoms of small-sized timbale moulds with a little aspic
jelly; decorate the jelly with bits of royal custard and capers; cover
with more aspic; then add, alternately, layers of _pâté de foie gras_
and aspic, until the mould is filled. Turn on to shredded lettuce and
garnish with mayonnaise, using pastry bag and tube. Arrange on
individual dishes, so as not to disarrange the dressing in serving. Or,
garnish with a chopped cucumber dressed with French dressing.


=Spinach-and-Tongue Salad.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/4 a peck of spinach.
          1 tablespoonful of lemon juice.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A dash of paprica.
          1 tablespoonful of oil or butter.
          Slices of cold tongue.
          Sauce tartare.

_Method._--Cook the spinach in salted boiling water until tender; drain,
and chop very fine, and season with salt, pepper, oil and lemon juice.
Press into small, well-buttered moulds or cups. Have ready thin, round
slices of cold boiled or braised tongue, the slices a trifle larger than
the cups of spinach. When the spinach is cold turn it from the moulds on
to the rounds of tongue, and press a star of sauce tartare on the top of
each mould. Garnish with parsley and slices of lemon.


=Spinach-and-Egg Salad.=

(See cut facing page 84.)

Prepare and mould the spinach as in the preceding recipe. Have ready,
also, some cold boiled eggs and mayonnaise. Turn the spinach from the
moulds on to nests of shredded lettuce. Dispose, chain fashion, around
the base of the spinach, the whites of the eggs cut in rings, and press
a star of mayonnaise in the centre of each ring. Pass the yolks through
a sieve and sprinkle over the tops of the mounds, and place above this
the round ends of the whites.


=Marguerite Salad.=

(See cut facing page 84.)

Arrange garden cress on a serving-dish; in the centre dispose whites of
hard-boiled eggs cut in eighths lengthwise, to resemble the petals of a
flower, and sift the yolks into the centre. When ready to serve,
sprinkle with French dressing and toss together.


=Easter Salad.=

With the smooth sides of butter-hands roll Neufchatel cheese into small
egg shapes. Cut long radishes into straws and season with French
dressing. Scatter the straws in lettuce nests, arrange the eggs in the
nests, sprinkle with dressing, and fleck with chopped parsley or
paprica.

[Illustration: Easter Salad.]

[Illustration: Country Salad.

(See page 87)]


=Easter Salad, No. 2.=

Arrange flat nests of shredded lettuce on individual plates. Cut a
five-cent Neufchatel cheese in three pieces; roll each piece into a ball
and flatten to resemble the white of a poached egg, having the cheese
about one-fourth an inch in thickness. These may be shaped upon a plate
and then removed carefully with a spatula to the nests of lettuce. With
pastry bag and plain tube put a mound of mayonnaise on the centre of
each cake of cheese, to represent the yolk of an egg. Serve thoroughly
chilled. A dash of pepper (paprica preferred) may decorate the top of
the dressing.


=Country Salad.=

(See cut facing page 86.)

Cut cold boiled corned beef or tongue into thin strips and pile in the
centre of a serving-dish. Cook potato balls in meat broth until tender;
blanch and cool, roll in mayonnaise or boiled dressing, and dispose
about the meat. About these put a ring of celery cut fine, then cooked
carrot and turnip cut in straws. Garnish with parsley and cucumber
pickles cut in fans. Serve with additional dressing.


=Orange-and-Litchi Nut Salad.=

Peel the oranges and cut them into lengthwise slices. Crush the shells
of the nuts, take out the meats, and remove the stones; cut the nut
meats in halves. Mix the nuts with oil, a tablespoonful to a cup, and
sprinkle the orange slices with oil; add also a little lemon juice if
the oranges are sweet. Garnish with slices of orange from which the skin
has not been taken, also, if desired, with lettuce dressed with French
dressing. The oil and lettuce may be omitted, using sugar in place;
little, however, will be needed, as the nuts are sweet, tasting much
like raisins.


=Green-and-White Salad.=

Cut cooked chicken or sweetbreads in half-inch cubes; remove the skin
and seeds from white grapes, and cut each grape in halves; cut tender
blanched celery stalks in small pieces. Take equal portions of celery
and meat and half as much of seeded grapes. Mix with French dressing;
the meat should stand in the dressing an hour or more, when ready to
serve. Serve in nests of lettuce. Dispose a little white mayonnaise or
cream dressing on each nest. Garnish with halves of blanched pistachio
nuts.



=FRUIT AND NUT SALADS.=

          "Fat olives and pistachio's fragrant nut,
           And the pine's tasteful apple."


=Fruit Salad.=

(_Sweet, to serve with cake._)

Peel and slice four bananas, also four oranges, lengthwise, carefully
removing pith and seeds. Dissect half a ripe pineapple, taking the pulp
from the core in small pieces with a silver fork. Hull and wash a part
of a basket of strawberries. Arrange the fruit in the salad-bowl, making
each layer smaller than the preceding. Pour over the dressing given
below, and serve thoroughly chilled.


=Dressing for Fruit Salad.=

(_Sweet._)

Boil one cup of sugar and half a cup of water five minutes, then pour on
to the beaten yolks of three eggs; return to the fire and cook over hot
water, stirring constantly until thickened slightly; cool, and add the
juice of two lemons. Half a cup of wine may be used in the place of the
lemon juice, retaining one tablespoonful of the lemon juice.


=Fruit Salad.=

(_June._)

Pare lengthwise a _ripe_ pineapple and remove the eyes. With a fork
dislodge from the hard centre the single fruits (the lines left by the
bracts will indicate the places where the divisions should be made).
Slice _lengthwise_ three sweet oranges, after removing the peel and
white skin. Peel and slice two bananas, and cut in halves lengthwise one
cup of strawberries. If the fruit be sweet, use the juice of half a
lemon, otherwise omit it. Beat to an emulsion one-fourth a cup of olive
oil, one tablespoonful of honey, and, if needed, the lemon juice; toss
the fruit, together or separately, in the dressing, and serve on
delicate leaves of lettuce. The most striking effect is produced by
dressing each kind of fruit separately, thus massing each color by
itself. When new figs are seasonable, they may be used in fruit salads
to take the place of the honey. If the pineapple be of large size, more
dressing will be required.


=Fruit-and-Nut Salad.=

Peel neatly three oranges and slice them lengthwise; also cut three
bananas in thin slices. Skin and seed half a pound of white grapes, and
blanch and slice the meats of one-fourth a pound of English walnuts.
Serve very cold on lettuce leaves, dressed with four tablespoonfuls of
oil, two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice--less, if the oranges are
sour--and half a teaspoonful of salt.


=Fruit-and-Nut Salad, No. 2.=

Skin and seed half a pound of white grapes; blanch and slice half a
pound of English walnuts or almonds. Toss with four tablespoonfuls of
oil, one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt and two tablespoonfuls of lemon
juice. Serve in nests of lettuce. Garnish the nests with maraschino
cherries.


=Cherry Salad.=

(MRS. PETERSON.)

Marinate as many hazelnuts as cherries with plenty of oil, half as much
lemon juice as oil, and a little salt, one or two hours. Put a nut in
the place of the stone in the cherries. Sprinkle with oil and a very
little lemon juice, and serve in lettuce nests.


=Fruit Salad.=

(_Winter._)

Peel two oranges; with a sharp knife cut between the pulp and the skin
and remove the section entire. Slice the meats of one-fourth a pound of
English walnuts. Of one-fourth a pound of figs select a few for a
garnish and cut the rest in thin slices. Slice three bananas. Toss half
the ingredients with two or three tablespoonfuls of oil, and, if the
oranges are sweet, toss again with one tablespoonful of lemon juice.
Arrange in a mound on a salad-dish. Put the rest of the fruit, each kind
separately, on the mound in sections; garnish the edge and top with
heart leaves of lettuce, and add stars of mayonnaise and candied
cherries here and there.


=Orange-and-Walnut Salad.=

This is a particularly good salad to serve with game. Select fine
oranges, remove the peel and every particle of white skin, and slice
very thin lengthwise. Slice English walnuts, blanched or plain. To each
pint of orange slices add half a pint (scant) of the sliced nuts; dress
with three tablespoonfuls of oil, one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, and,
if the oranges are particularly sweet, a tablespoonful of lemon juice.
Serve on a bed of watercress or lettuce.


=Celery-and-Chestnut Salad.=

Shell and blanch the chestnuts; then boil about fifteen minutes, or
until tender; drain and cool. When cool cut into quarters, add an equal
quantity of fine-sliced celery, dress with French dressing, and serve on
lettuce leaves. Sliced pimentos may be added.


=Apple,-Celery-and-English-Walnut Salad.=

Peel and cut the apples in small cubes; blanch the nuts and break in
pieces, and cut the celery in thin slices; marinate the apple and nuts
with oil and lemon juice half an hour; drain, add the celery and
mayonnaise dressing, and serve in cups made by removing the pulp from
red apples. Cut the edges of the apples in small vandykes; keep fresh in
cold water until ready to serve.


=Orange-and-Banana Salad.=

(_Sweet._)

Stir the juice of two oranges, half a cup of sherry wine, one
tablespoonful of lemon juice, half a cup of sugar and the unbeaten white
of an egg, over the fire, until the boiling-point is reached; let simmer
slowly ten minutes, strain through a cheese-cloth, and, when thoroughly
chilled, pour over three bananas and three oranges, sliced and mixed
together in a salad-bowl. Sprinkle with half a cup of dessicated
cocoanut. Serve thoroughly chilled.


=Fig-and-Nut Salad.=

Slice pulled figs, cooked and cooled, and mix with them a few slices of
walnuts or blanched almonds. Serve with French dressing made of claret
and lemon juice instead of vinegar, or with a cream dressing. In using
the cream dressing, mix the ingredients with a little of the dressing
and dispose additional dressing here and there, using the forcing-bag
and tube. When available, fresh figs are preferable to those that have
been cooked.


=Grapefruit Salad.=

Cut the chilled fruit in halves, crosswise, and take out the pulp with a
spoon; dress with French dressing. The juice of the grapefruit may be
used in the place of other acid, and mayonnaise in the place of French
dressing. Serve on lettuce leaves, or return to the skin from which the
pulp was removed. The edge of the grapefruit cup may be cut in
vandykes, or otherwise ornamented.


=Turquoise Salad.=

Mix together equal parts of celery and tart apple cut in match-like
pieces, and one or two pimentos cut in similar pieces. Dress with
mayonnaise made light with whipped cream. Serve in nests of lettuce.


=Turquoise Salad, No. 2.=

Use pineapple in the place of the apple; serve in a mound on a bed of
lettuce leaves. Garnish with stars cut from the pimentos with French
cutter, curled celery, and heart leaves of celery.


=Salad Chiffonade.=

Seed two green peppers, boil two or three minutes, then cut in shreds.
Shred the light and dark leaves of a head of lettuce, or endive,
separately. Cut three tomatoes in shreds. Remove the peel and skin from
one large grapefruit. Serve with French dressing, seasoning, and then
arranging each article separately upon the serving-dish, having a circle
of light and then dark green material about the edge.


=Peach-and-Almond Salad.=

Blanch the almonds and cut in thin slices. Chill the peaches, peel, and
cut in slices; use one-fifth as much in bulk of sliced nuts as sliced
peaches. Serve with French dressing, or with mayonnaise made white
with whipped cream. Garnish the edge with delicate lettuce leaves and
serve at once.

[Illustration: Fruit Salad.

(See page 90)]

[Illustration: Turquoise Salad, No. 2.

(See page 94)]


=Peach Salad.=

(_English style._)

Cut ripe, fine-flavored peaches into quarters, after removing the skins.
Cover with champagne, thoroughly chilled, and sprinkle with tea-rose
petals. Serve at once.


=Peach,-Strawberry-and-Cherry Salad.=

(_London style._)

Let a large handful of fresh rose petals stand an hour or two in a cool
place in a cup of Hungarian wine. Strain out the leaves and pour the
wine over a quart of mixed fruit,--peaches pared and cut in quarters,
strawberries hulled and cut in halves, and cherries stoned,--all
thoroughly chilled. Let a handful of rose petals stand an hour or two in
a cup of thick cream; then strain the cream, sweeten slightly with
powdered sugar, whip to a stiff froth, and use as a garnish for the
fruit.


=Grapefruit, Pineapple, and Pimento Salad.=

Cut a large grapefruit in halves and remove the pulp with a sharp knife
to avoid crushing it; remove half the pulp of a large pineapple from
the core with a fork, after carefully removing the unedible outside.
Dress with white mayonnaise and serve upon crisp lettuce hearts. Garnish
with tiny bits of pimento. 2d.--Omit the pimento, lettuce and
mayonnaise, and dress with sherry wine and sugar. For a Christmas salad,
use the first formula and canned pineapple if the fresh be not at hand.
Dispose the dressed pineapple and grapefruit upon shredded lettuce,
having a circle of heart leaves around the edge. Dot here and there with
small stars cut from the red pimento with a French cutter. Or chop the
pimento fine and dispose in the shape of a large five-pointed star in
the centre of the dish.



HOW TO PREPARE AND USE ASPIC JELLY.


To make aspic for moulding or decorating a fish salad, use stock
prepared from chicken or veal, or from fish. For chicken, veal or
sweetbread salad, use chicken or veal stock, or a light-colored
consommé. In an emergency, aspic may be made from the prepared extracts
of beef, or from bouillon capsules. Aspic is often tinted delicately to
harmonize with a particular color scheme. A light-green aspic has been
found quite effective.


=RECIPE.=

To one quart of highly seasoned stock, freed from all fat, add the juice
of a lemon, a bay leaf, half a cup of wine and one box of gelatine
soaked in a cup of cold water. Beat into the mixture the slightly beaten
whites and crushed shells of two eggs. Heat to the boiling-point,
stirring constantly, and let boil five minutes. After standing ten
minutes skim off the froth, etc., and strain through a cheese-cloth
folded double and held in a colander.


=Aspic for Garnishing.=

Pour the liquid jelly into a new tin to the depth of half an inch. Wring
a napkin out of cold water and spread it smoothly over the meat-board.
Dip the pan in warm water and turn the jelly onto the napkin; stamp in
rounds, diamonds or other fanciful shapes. If blocks of greater
thickness be required, fill the pan to the required depth with the
liquid aspic. When turned from the mould, cut in squares or diamonds
with a knife, wiped dry after having been dipped in hot water.


=To Chop Jelly.=

Cut the jelly slowly, first in one direction, then in the opposite
direction. Each piece, whether large or small, should be clean-cut and
distinct. Aspic melts or softens in a warm place, and should not be
taken from the mould until the time of serving, and then it must be
handled with care.


=Consommé for Aspic Jelly.=

Cut two pounds of beef from the under part of the round and two pounds
of shin of veal into small pieces; crack the bones in the shin. Place
over the fire with two and a half quarts of cold water; add one ounce of
lean ham. Heat slowly, and cook just below the boiling-point two or
three hours; then add to the kettle a three-pound fowl, and allow it to
remain till tender. Put some marrow into the frying-pan, and when hot
sauté in it a small onion cut fine, two tablespoonfuls, each, of chopped
celery, carrot and turnip; add to the soup kettle, removing the fowl,
together with a sprig, each, of parsley, thyme and summer savory, two
bay leaves, a small blade of mace, four cloves, two peppercorns and one
scant tablespoonful of salt. Let simmer about an hour and a half; then
strain and let cool.


=Chicken Stock for Aspic Jelly.=

Put a four-pound fowl and a few bits of veal from the neck over the fire
in three pints of cold water. Heat slowly to the boiling-point, let boil
five minutes, then skim and let simmer until the fowl is nearly tender.
Now add an onion and half a sliced carrot, a stalk of celery, a
teaspoonful of sweet herbs tied in a bag with a sprig of parsley, two
cloves, a blade of mace, eight peppercorns and a teaspoonful of salt.
Remove the fowl when tender, and let the stock simmer until reduced to
about one quart; strain, and set aside to become cool.


=Second Stock for Use in Sauces, Etc.=

Break the bones from roasts; add the tough or browned bits of meat and
fat; add also the flank ends from chops and steaks, cut small (there
should always be a few bits of fresh meat), and cover with cold water.
Heat slowly and let simmer two or three hours, then add, for each two
quarts of water used, one-fourth a cup, each, of chopped onion and
carrot, two stalks of celery and a tomato cut small, two teaspoonfuls of
sweet herbs, two sprigs of parsley browned in two tablespoonfuls of
butter or drippings, and cook about an hour. Strain and let cool. Stock
will keep a day or two in summer and nearly a week in winter, if the
cake of fat that forms upon the top be left undisturbed.


=Fish Stock.=

(_For use in fish aspic, or any fish dish._)

Cover the bones and trimmings from the fish that is to be used for the
salad with cold water; add, if convenient, the body bones of a lobster
or two. Add also one or two pounds of an inexpensive fish, and a pint of
water for each pound of fish. All must be fresh. Bring the water slowly
to the boiling-point and let simmer an hour, then add, for each quart of
water, one tablespoonful, each, of chopped onion and carrot, a sprig of
parsley and one teaspoonful of sweet herbs, sautéd delicately in two
tablespoonfuls of butter. Season to taste with salt and cayenne.


=Aspic Jelly from Bouillon Capsules, Etc.=

Put over the fire one-fourth a cup, each, of onion and carrot, sautéd in
two tablespoonfuls of butter, two stalks of celery, a bay leaf, half a
dozen peppercorns and two or three cloves, with one quart of water; add
three bouillon capsules, or three teaspoonfuls of beef extract (not
home-made) dissolved in two cups of boiling water; let simmer about half
an hour, then add one box of gelatine softened in one cup of cold water,
any additional flavoring desired, and the slightly beaten white and
crushed shell of one egg (more shells will be advantageous). Bring
slowly to the boiling-point, stirring constantly meanwhile, and let
simmer five minutes; let stand in a hot place ten minutes, then skim and
strain through a cheese-cloth folded double.


=White Chaud-froid Sauce.=

(_For coating joints of fowl or game, or medallions of fowl, tongue or
sweetbreads._)

To one pint of white sauce, made of white stock, add three-fourths a cup
of aspic jelly and one tablespoonful of lemon juice; let simmer until
reduced to the consistency of very thick cream; remove the butter from
the top and let cool slightly before using.



CHEESE DISHES SERVED WITH SALADS.

          _Digestive cheese and fruit there sure will be._
                                              --BEN JONSON.



CHEESE DISHES SERVED WITH SALADS.


=Cheese Custard.=

(MRS. DIMON.)

Butter a baking-dish, put in a layer of bread cut in pieces one inch
square with crust removed, sprinkle thin-sliced cheese over the bread,
dust with salt and paprica, or a few grains of cayenne. Add other layers
of bread and cheese, seasoning as before, using in all half a small loaf
of bread, one cup of cheese and half a teaspoonful of salt. Beat two
eggs slightly, add one pint of milk, and pour the mixture over the bread
and cheese. Bake about half an hour in a moderate oven.


=Cheese Soufflé.=

Cook together four tablespoonfuls of butter and two tablespoonfuls of
flour, into which have been sifted one-fourth a teaspoonful, each, of
soda and mustard and a few grains of cayenne. Add gradually half a cup
of milk. When the sauce boils, remove from the fire and stir into it one
cup of grated cheese (half a pound) and the yolks of three eggs, beaten
until light. When well mixed, fold in the stiffly beaten whites of three
eggs. Bake in a buttered pudding-dish, in a moderate oven, about
twenty-five minutes, or in individual dishes, paper cases, or china
shirring-cups, about twelve minutes. _Serve at once_ from the dish or
dishes. The soufflé will "stand up" a little better, if three-fourths a
cup of milk be used in place of the half-cup as given, and half a cup of
stale grated bread be added before the cheese; but it will not be quite
so delicate.


=Cheese Ramequins.=

Put four tablespoonfuls of butter and half a cup of water into a
saucepan. When these boil, add half a cup of flour and a few grains,
each, of salt and paprica; cook and stir until the mixture cleaves from
the pan. Turn into a mixing-bowl and beat in two ounces of grated
Parmesan cheese; then beat in, one at a time, two eggs. On a
well-buttered baking-sheet shape the paste into flat circular pieces
about an inch in diameter. Brush over the tops with beaten egg, diluted
with one or two tablespoonfuls of milk or water, and put three or four
dice of cheese on each. Bake about fifteen minutes. Serve very hot.


=Cheese Straws.=

Roll plain or puff paste into a rectangular sheet one-fourth an inch
thick. Sprinkle one-half with grated cheese (any kind of cheese will do,
but Parmesan is preferred); also add a few grains of cayenne and salt.
Fold the other half over this and press the edges together closely.
Fold again to make three layers, turn half-way round, pat and roll out
to the thickness of one-fourth an inch. Sprinkle one half with cheese
and proceed as before. Continue rolling and adding the cheese, until, to
one cup and a half of flour, from half to a whole cup of cheese has been
used. After the last rolling, cut into bands half an inch wide, or into
rings and straws one-fourth an inch wide. The straws and bands should be
four or five inches in length, and the rings large enough to hold three
or four straws. Serve the bands piled in log-cabin style on a
doylie-covered plate. If the paste be made expressly for the straws, the
cheese and cayenne may be mixed into the flour with the butter, thus
diminishing time in making. Bake in a moderate oven until delicately
browned.

[Illustration: Cheese Ramequins.]

[Illustration: Individual Soufflé of Cheese.

(See page 108)]


=Gnochi à la Romaine.=

Melt four tablespoonfuls of butter; cook in it four tablespoonfuls,
each, of cornstarch and flour and half a teaspoonful of salt, then add
gradually one pint of milk. When thick and smooth stir in the beaten
yolks of two eggs, add four tablespoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese,
and spread on a buttered pan to cool. Just before serving, cut the paste
in shapes, lay on a baking-sheet, and brown delicately in the oven.


=Cheese Balls.=

Mix together thoroughly one cup and a half of grated cheese, one
tablespoonful of flour, one-fourth, a teaspoonful of salt and a few
grains of cayenne; then add the whites of three eggs, beaten stiff.
Shape in small balls and roll in cracker crumbs, sifted or crushed to a
fine meal; fry in deep fat and drain on soft paper.


=Individual Soufflés of Cheese, Iced.=

(See cut facing page 106.)

Mix half a cup of grated Parmesan and one-fourth a cup of grated Gruyère
cheese and one-fourth a teaspoonful of paprica with two-thirds a cup of
chicken aspic, cold, but not set. Stir over ice water until just
beginning to form, then fold into it one cup of whipped cream. Fasten
strips of white paper around paper soufflé cases, letting the strips
rise an inch and a half above the cases, fixing in place with
sealing-wax, mucilage, or a stitch. Fill the cases and the papers
surrounding them with the cheese mixture, and set them in a pail or
mould that is thoroughly chilled. Press the cover down over a paper, and
pack in equal parts of ice and salt. Let stand an hour. Before serving,
remove the paper, sprinkle the tops with buttered crumbs, browned, and
serve at once.


=Cheese Croquettes.=

(TOURAINE.)

INGREDIENTS.

          3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1/4 a cup of flour.
          2/3 a cup of milk.
          Yolks of 2 eggs.
          1 cup of mild cheese, cut in small cubes.
          1/2 a cup of grated Gruyère cheese.
          Salt and cayenne to taste.

_Method._--Make a sauce of the butter, flour and milk; add the yolks,
slightly beaten, and beat thoroughly; add the grated cheese, and, when
melted, remove from the fire; add the seasonings and cubes of cheese.
Spread in a shallow pan to cool. Cut in any shape desired, dip in
crumbs, then in egg, and again in crumbs; fry in deep fat and drain on
brown paper.


=Cheese Aigrettes.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/2 a cup of water.
          1/4 a cup of butter.
          1/2 a cup of flour.
          2 eggs, with yolk of a third.
          A few grains of cayenne and salt.
          2 ounces (1/4 a cup) of grated Parmesan cheese.
          Hot fat.

_Method._--Boil the water and butter, sift in the flour with the salt
and cayenne; stir and cook until the mixture cleaves from the side of
the pan. When the mixture has slightly cooled, add the eggs, one at a
time, beating in each egg thoroughly before another is added. Lastly,
add the cheese. Drop, by teaspoonfuls, into hot fat and fry a golden
brown. Drain on soft paper and serve piled on a folded napkin.


=Cheese d'Artois.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          White of 1 egg.
          Yolks of 2 eggs.
          Salt and paprica.
          2 ounces of grated Parmesan cheese.
          1/4 a pound of plain or puff paste.

_Method._--Cream the butter, beat in the eggs, and add the cheese with a
few grains, each, of salt and paprica. Roll the pastry very thin and cut
it into two rectangular pieces; lay one of these on a baking-sheet and
spread with the cheese mixture; cover this with the second piece of
pastry. Score with a knife in strips one inch wide and about three
inches long, brush over with beaten egg, and bake about fifteen minutes.
Cut out the strips while hot. Serve at once, or reheat before serving.


=Cheese Fritters.=

Slice thin half a dozen large tart apples (select apples that cook
quickly), and prepare half as many thin slices of cheese. Beat up one or
two eggs, and season with salt, mustard and pepper. Soak the cheese in
the egg mixture, then put each slice between two slices of apple,
sandwich style; dip in the beaten egg, sauté in hot butter, and serve
hot.


=Salad of Lettuce with Cheese and Vegetable Macedoine.=

Mix together a ten-cent cream cheese, a canned pimento (red) cut in tiny
cubes, one-fourth a cup of small green string beans, cut in cubes, five
olives, chopped fine, and enough cream to hold the mixture together.
When thoroughly mixed, use a piece of paraffine or confectioner's paper
to handle and give the mixture the original shape. Let stand in a cold
place, wrapped in the paper, until ready to serve, then dispose in the
centre of a salad dish, lined with lettuce leaves, dressed with French
dressing. Slice the cheese with a silver knife before sending to table.
At luncheon, mayonnaise may be served in a dish apart.

[Illustration: Pineapple Cheese and Crackers.]

[Illustration: Salad of Lettuce with Cheese and Vegetable Macedoine.]



PART II.

SANDWICHES.

          _Socrates brought Philosophy from the clouds, but
          the Englishmen have dragged her into the kitchen._
                                                   --HEGEL.

          _Homer never entertained either guests or hosts
          with long speeches till the mouth of hunger be
          stopped._
                                      --SIR PHILIP SIDNEY.



SANDWICHES.

          A pale young man, with feeble whiskers and a stiff
          white neckcloth, came walking down the lane _en
          sandwich_--having a lady, that is, on each arm.
                              --_Thackeray_ ("_Vanity Fair_").


The term "sandwich," now applied to many a fanciful shaped and encased
dainty, was formerly used in speaking of "two slices of bread with meat
between." In this sense, the word had its origin, about the end of the
eighteenth century, from the fact that the fourth Earl of Sandwich was
so infatuated with the pleasures and excitement of the gaming-table that
he often could not leave it long enough to take his meals with his
family; and, on such occasions, a butler was despatched to him bearing
"slices of bread with meat between."

The fillings of savory sandwiches may be placed between pieces of bread,
crackers, pastry, _chou_ paste or aspic jelly. When preparing sweet
sandwiches, these same materials may be used, as also lady-fingers
(white or yellow), macaroons or sweet wafers.


=Bread for Sandwiches.=

As a rule, bread for sandwiches should be twenty-four hours old; but
fresh bread, which is more pliable than stale, is better adapted to this
use, when the sandwiches are to take the form of rolls or folds. When
stale bread is used for rolls or folds, they must be ribbon-tied; or
tiny Japanese toothpicks may be made to keep them in shape.

The bread may be yeast or peptic bread. It may be white or brown. It is
not even essential that the two bits of bread be of the same kind;
Quaker, rice, whole-wheat, rye or graham bread is interchangeable with
white or brown bread. After selecting your loaf or loaves, slice in
even, quarter-inch slices; then cut in squares, triangles or fingers, or
stamp with a round or fanciful-shaped cutter. Cutters can be obtained in
heart, club, diamond and spade shape, also in racquet shape.

Do not spread butter or filling upon the bread before it is cut from the
loaf and into shape. When so treated, the butter or filling on the
extreme edge of the bread is liable to soil the fingers or gloves that
come in contact with it.

Cream the butter, using a small wooden spoon for the purpose, and then
it can be spread upon the most delicate bread without crumbling.


=The Filling.=

Anything appropriately eaten with the _covering_ may be used for the
_filling_ of a sandwich. In meats, salted meat takes the lead in popular
favor; when sliced the meat should be cut across the grain and as thin
as possible, and several bits should be used in each sandwich, unless a
very small, æsthetic sandwich be in order. Tongue and corned beef,
whether they be used in slices or finely chopped, should be cooked until
they are very tender. When corned beef or ham is chopped for a filling,
the sandwich is much improved by a dash of mustard; Worcestershire or
horseradish sauce improves a filling of roast beef or boiled tongue;
while chopped capers, tomato sauce, catsup or a cold mint sauce is
appropriate in sandwiches made of lamb; celery salt, when the filling is
of chicken or veal, and lemon juice, when the principal ingredient is
fish, are _en rapport_.

The flavor of a few drops of onion juice is relished by many in any kind
of fish or meat sandwich, while others would prefer a few grains of
fine-chopped parsley.

When salad sandwiches are to be prepared, chop the meat or fish very
fine and mix it with the salad dressing. Celery, cabbage, cress,
cucumbers, tomatoes or olives may be chopped and added to the meat with
the dressing. When lettuce is used, the leaf is served whole, the edges
just appearing outside the bread. Any one of these vegetables, combined
with a salad dressing, makes a delicious sandwich without meat or fish.
When desired, other well-prepared sauces may be used in the place of
salad dressings. Fillings of uncooked fruit may be used; but, in the
case of dried fruits, it is preferable to stew until tender, after the
fruit has been finely chopped. Pineapple, lemon or orange juice may be
added at pleasure. Sandwiches prepared from entire-wheat bread, with
fig or date fillings, are particularly wholesome for the children's
luncheon basket.

When a particularly æsthetic sandwich is desired, wrap the butter that
is to be used in spreading the bread in a napkin, and put it over night
in a jar, on a bed of violets or rose petals; strew more flowers over
the top and cover the jar tightly. If meat or fish is to be used as the
basis of the sandwich, substitute nasturtium leaves and blossoms, or
sprigs of mignonette, for the former flowers.

Fancy butter makes an attractive filling for a sandwich; it has also the
merit of being less often in evidence than many another filling.

Sandwiches, except when vegetables and dressings are used, may be
prepared early in the day, placed in a stone jar, covered with a
slightly dampened cloth, and set away in a cool place until such time as
they are wanted. Or, they may be wrapped in paraffine paper. Still, when
convenient, it is preferable to have everything in readiness, and put
the sandwiches together just before serving. Garnish the serving-dish
with parsley, cress, celery plumes, slices of lemon, barberries and
leaves, or fresh nasturtium leaves and blossoms.


=Beverages Served with Sandwiches.=

Coffee heads the list of beverages most acceptably served with
sandwiches. Tea comes next. Cocoa and chocolate are admissible only with
the dainty, æsthetic varieties, in which fruit or some kind of sweetmeat
is used.



SAVORY SANDWICHES.

          "Hail, wedded nourishment!"


=Ham-and-Tongue Sandwiches.=

Chop two parts of cold tongue and one part of cold ham (one-fourth as
much fat ham as lean) very fine; pound in a mortar, and season with
paprica and a little mixed mustard. Spread butter on one piece of bread,
the meat mixture on the other, and press the two pieces together.


=Ham-and-Egg Sandwiches.=

Chop the ham and pound smooth in a mortar; pass the yolks of hard-boiled
eggs through a sieve; mix the yolks with an equal amount of mayonnaise
dressing. Butter one piece of bread lightly and spread with the ham,
spread the other piece with the egg and dressing, and press the two
together.


=Corned-Beef Sandwiches.=

Chop the cold meat very fine, using one-fourth of fat meat. Work into
the meat French mustard, or any "made" mustard, to taste, and prepare
the sandwiches in the usual way. Boston brownbread combines well with
this preparation.


=Tongue-and-Veal (or Chicken) Sandwiches.=

Use a little less of the chopped tongue than of the other kind of meat,
and one-half as much chopped celery as meat. Mix with salad dressing.
Spread one piece of bread with butter, the other with the mixture, and
press together.


=Celery Sandwiches.=

Chop crisp celery very fine and mix with salad dressing. Spread one
piece of bread with butter, the other with a thin layer of the mixture.
With a sharp knife split open the round stems of celery tips and put
them between the bread, so that the tips will just show on the edges.
Tie with narrow ribbon, light-green in color.


=Sardine Sandwiches.=

Use, in bulk, equal parts of yolks of well-cooked eggs, rubbed to a
smooth paste, and the flesh of sardines, freed from skin and bones and
pounded in a mortar; season to taste with a few drops of tobasco sauce
and lemon juice, and spread as usual. Crackers may be used in the place
of bread, if the sandwiches be prepared just before using, otherwise the
crackers lose their crispness. Garnish with slices of lemon and parsley.


=Caviare Sandwich Rolls.=

To each two tablespoonfuls of caviare add ten drops of onion juice and a
few drops of lemon juice, and mix together thoroughly. Remove the crust
from a fresh, moist loaf of bread, cut in thin slices, spread each slice
very delicately with butter and the caviare mixture, roll up in a roll
and tie with ribbon one-fourth an inch wide, or pin with Chinese
toothpicks. The bread should not be more than twelve hours old. If fear
be lest the bread will not be sufficiently moist to roll, wrap the loaf,
when taken from the oven, in a damp cloth and then in a dry one; keep in
this fashion until ready for use.


=Russian Sandwiches.=

Slightly butter thin slices of bread; moisten fine-chopped olives with
mayonnaise dressing and spread upon the buttered slices; spread other
slices with Neufchatel, or any cream cheese, and press together in
pairs.


=Mushroom-and-Lobster Sandwiches.=

Sauté the caps of half a pound of mushrooms in a little butter about
five minutes, adding half a sliced onion if desired. Cover with highly
seasoned stock and let simmer until very tender; chop and press through
a sieve, and, if very moist, reduce to the consistency of a thick purée.
Add an equal quantity of lobster meat pounded smooth in a mortar. Season
to taste with salt, pepper, lemon juice and, if desired, tomato catsup.
When cool use as any filling.


=Cheese-and-English-Walnut Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/4 a pound of grated cheese.
          1/4 a pound of butter.
          1/4 a pound of English walnut meats, sliced.
          Salt and paprica to taste.

_Method._--Work the butter to a cream, add the seasonings and the grated
cheese gradually; then mix in the nuts, which should be _sliced_ very
thin. Spread the mixture upon bits of bread and press together in pairs.
Particularly good made of brownbread and served with a simple vegetable
salad!


=Egg-and-Spinach Sandwiches.=

Use cold boiled spinach, which when hot was chopped very fine or pressed
through a colander, and sifted yolks of well-cooked eggs. Mix the
spinach with sauce tartare and spread on one bit of bread, spread the
other with butter and sifted yolk of egg; press together. Garnish the
serving-dish with parsley and cooked eggs cut in quarters lengthwise.


=Cress-and-Egg Sandwiches.=

Pick the leaves from fresh cress, chop or break apart, season with
French dressing, and proceed as above.


=Imitation Pâté-de-Foie-Gras Sandwiches.=

Chop half an onion and sauté in a little butter; when delicately
browned, add five or six chicken livers and sauté them on both sides.
Cover with well-seasoned chicken stock and let simmer until tender.
Mash the livers fine with a wooden spoon and press them through a sieve;
season with salt, paprica, mustard, or a dash of curry powder. Press
into a cup, pour melted butter over the top, and set away in a cool
place. When ready to serve, remove the butter and prepare the sandwiches
after the usual manner.


=Chicken Rolls.=

INGREDIENTS.

          4 ounces from the breast of chicken (1/2 a cup).
          4 ounces of braised tongue.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of celery salt.
          A few grains of cayenne.
          1 teaspoonful of anchovy paste.
          4 tablespoonfuls of mayonnaise or boiled dressing.

_Method._--Chop the meat and pound to a paste in a mortar; add the
seasonings and mix well. Remove the crust from a loaf of moist bread;
cut in very thin slices, trim each slice into a rectangular shape,
spread lightly with soft butter and then with the mixture. Roll the
slices and tie them with ribbon. Omit the anchovy paste, if desired.


=Epicurean Sandwiches.=

Cream four tablespoonfuls of butter and one teaspoonful of mustard.
Press the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs through a sieve and add them to
the butter and mustard. Then add four boned anchovies, four small
pickles, a teaspoonful of chives and a sprig of tarragon, chopped
together until fine. Cut stale bread in fingers or other fanciful
shapes, and spread with the mixture. Press two pieces together.


=Halibut-and-Lettuce Sandwiches.=

Put a pound and a half of halibut, a slice of onion, a stalk of celery,
four or five peppercorns, one teaspoonful of salt and one tablespoonful
of lemon juice in boiling water, and cook, just below the boiling-point,
ten or fifteen minutes, according to thickness. Remove bone and skin and
rub the fish fine with a wooden spoon; add half a cup of thick cream, a
teaspoonful of salt, a dash of white pepper and one tablespoonful of
lemon juice. Spread this mixture, when cold, on buttered slices of
bread, put a lettuce leaf above the mixture, and spread a teaspoonful of
mayonnaise or boiled salad dressing on the lettuce; finish with a slice
of buttered bread and tie with ribbon.


=Lobster Fingers.=

Chop lobster meat very fine; season to taste with French dressing. Cut
the bread in pieces about four inches long and an inch and a half wide.
Finish as usual. Garnish with parsley and the slender feelers of the
lobster.


=Tower of Babel.=

Pile a _variety_ of sandwiches in form of a pyramid (use bread of
different colors). Arrange a garnish of parsley and radish rosebuds
around the base, and on the top a few sprigs of parsley, or celery
plumes.


=Nasturtium Folds.=

Flavor the butter with nasturtium leaves and blossoms, and with it
spread a thin slice of _moist_ bread, which is longer one way than the
other. Press fresh nasturtium leaves and blossoms upon the butter and
fold one half over the other.


=Harlequin Sandwiches.=

Spread a bit of brownbread with butter and French mustard, and a bit of
white bread, cut to fit the former, with butter and cheese creamed
together. Finish as usual.


=Harlequin Sandwiches, No. 2.=

Spread the brownbread with butter and cheese creamed together, and the
white bread with butter, then with cucumber, chopped fine and seasoned
with French dressing, to which a few drops of onion juice have been
added.


=Beet-and-Cream-Cheese Sandwiches.=

Spread one piece of bread with cream cheese, the other with beets that
have been chopped very fine and seasoned with French dressing.


=Peanut Sandwiches.=

Chop freshly roasted peanuts very fine; then pound them in a mortar
until smooth; season with salt and moisten with thick cream.


=Peanut Sandwiches, No. 2.=

Mix the prepared peanuts with mayonnaise dressing. Butter two pieces of
bread; spread one with the peanut mixture, the other with shredded
lettuce, and press the two together.


=Shad-Roe-and-Yellow-Butter Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/4 a pound of butter.
          Sifted yolks of 4 eggs.
          1 set of shad roe, cooked, pounded in a mortar and sifted.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of paprica.
          4 drops of tobasco sauce.
          2 teaspoonfuls of very fine-chopped capers.

_Method._--Cream the butter and add the other ingredients gradually.
Prepare as usual.


=Green-Butter Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/4 a pound of butter.
          1/8 a peck of spinach.
          2 tablespoonfuls of very fine-chopped parsley.
          6 anchovies.
          2 teaspoonfuls of very fine-chopped capers.

_Method._--Boil the spinach, drain thoroughly, and press through a piece
of muslin. Beat the butter to a cream with a wooden spoon; beat into the
butter enough of the spinach pulp to give the required tint of green.
Wipe the oil from the anchovies, remove the backbone, and pass through a
hair sieve; then add to the colored butter, a little at a time; add also
the parsley and capers; chill slightly and use as a filling for
sandwiches. These butters are used also to mask or decorate cooked fish
for "cold service."

[Illustration: Chicken Salad Sandwiches.

(See page 127)]

[Illustration: Halibut Sandwiches with Aspic.

(See page 128)]


=Chicken-Salad Sandwiches.=

(_Chou-paste boxes._)

(See cut facing page 126.)

Bake _chou_ paste in long, slender shapes, like éclairs, but narrower
and shorter; when cold split apart on the ends and one side and fill
with chicken salad. Put the top back in place, after inserting a celery
plume at each end. Garnish the serving-dish with celery leaves and
pim-olas or olives. Serve other salads in the same way.


=Mosaic Sandwiches.=

Cut the bread, white, brown and graham, as thin as possible, and use
four or five pieces in each sandwich, putting them together so that the
colors will contrast. Either butter or other filling is admissible.


=Chicken-and-Nut Sandwiches.=

Chop fine the white meat of a cooked chicken and pound to a paste in a
mortar. Season to taste with salt, paprica, oil and lemon juice and
spread upon thin bits of bread. Spread other bits of bread,
corresponding in shape to the first, with butter; press into the butter
English walnuts, pecan nuts or almonds, blanched and _sliced_ very thin.
Press corresponding pieces together.


=Aspic Jelly for Sandwiches.=

Soak one box (two ounces) of gelatine in one cup of cold chicken liquor
until thoroughly softened. Add to three cups of chicken stock, seasoned
with vegetables and sweet herbs according to directions previously
given, also the crushed shell and white of one egg, and proceed as for
aspic jelly. Turn the liquid jelly into rectangular pans, having it
three-eighths of an inch or less in thickness, and set aside in a cool
place to harden. When ready to serve, dip the pan in hot water an
instant, and turn the jelly on to a paper. With a thin, sharp knife cut
the jelly into squares or diamonds, or dip a cutter into hot water and
stamp out into hearts or clubs.


=Lobster Sandwiches with Aspic.=

Chop the lobster fine, mix with mayonnaise dressing to taste, spread
upon a bit of aspic, cover with a crisp lettuce leaf, and above this
place another piece of aspic spread with the lobster mixture. Serve at
once.


=Halibut Sandwiches with Aspic.=

After the aspic is poured into the pans, sprinkle upon it some fine-cut
Spanish pimentos. When ready to serve, prepare as lobster sandwiches
with aspic, using fish in the place of lobster, and, if desired, sauce
tartare in the place of mayonnaise. Shrimps, salmon or other fish,
chicken, veal, tongue, sweetbreads, etc., may be used either with
lettuce or with chopped celery, cress, cucumbers, etc. Or the vegetables
may be used without either fish, flesh or fowl.

[Illustration: Wedding Sandwich Rolls.

(See page 129)]

[Illustration: Club Sandwich.

(See page 129)]


=Club Sandwiches.=

(_Steamer Priscilla style._)

Have ready four triangular pieces of toasted bread spread with
mayonnaise dressing; cover two of these with lettuce, lay thin slices of
cold chicken (white meat) upon the lettuce, over this arrange slices of
broiled breakfast bacon, then lettuce, and cover with the other
triangles of toast spread with mayonnaise. Trim neatly, arrange on a
plate, and garnish with heart leaves of lettuce dipped in mayonnaise.


=Wedding Sandwich Rolls.=

Wrap bread as it is taken from the oven closely in a towel wrung out of
cold water, cover with several thicknesses of dry cloth and set aside
about four hours; then cut away the crust, and with a thin, sharp knife
cut the loaf or loaves in slices as thin as possible and spread with
butter, and, if desired, thin shavings of meat, potted meat or chopped
nuts; roll the slices very closely and pile on a serving-dish.


=The Milwaukee Sandwich.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 thin rounds of white bread.
          1 thin round of graham or rye bread.
          4 large oysters, broiled or fried.
          Breast of cooked chicken, or turkey.
          Two slices of crisp bacon.
          Horseradish.
          Lettuce.
          4 small sweet pickles.
          4 small radishes.
          Slice of lemon.
          1 tomato, skin removed.
          Tartare sauce.

_Method._--Dip the bread in beaten egg, seasoned with salt and sauté to
a rich brown in hot butter. Roll the oysters in grated bread crumbs
(centre of the loaf) and broil them, or "egg and bread" them, and fry in
deep fat. Lay the first slice of bread on a plate over two or three
lettuce leaves, put the oysters on the bread, a grating of horseradish
on each oyster; cover with the graham or rye bread; on this lay the
chicken or turkey cut in thin slices, season with salt and pepper, put
on the bacon, and cover with the other slice of bread. On top of the
sandwich lay a slice of lemon cut square, and about this dispose the
pickles and radishes, to form a star. Serve the tomato on a lettuce leaf
at the side. Cut out the hard centre from the tomato and fill the
opening with sauce tartare. In making this sauce, add to mayonnaise or
boiled dressing, onion, olives, sweet pickles and celery, chopped fine
and squeezed dry in a cloth.



SWEET SANDWICHES.

          In the name of the Prophet--figs!
                                   --_Horace Smith._


=Fig Sandwiches.=

Chop one-fourth a pound of figs very fine, add one-fourth a cup of
water, and cook to a smooth paste; add, also, one-third a cup of
almonds, blanched, chopped very fine and pounded to a paste with a
little rose-water, also the juice of half a lemon. When cold spread the
mixture upon lady-fingers or cakelets, white or yellow, press another
above the mixture, and serve upon a handsome doylie-covered plate.
Raisins, dates or marmalade may be used in the place of the figs. The
marmalade, of course, requires no cooking. Bread may be used in the
place of the cake.


=French Fruit Sandwiches.=

Chop the fruit very fine; use a mixture of cherries, plums, pineapple
and angelica root; moisten with wine, orange or lemon juice. Use
lady-fingers or bread for the covering. If bread is used, spread lightly
with butter; if cake be your choice, spread very lightly with marmalade.
Use just enough butter or marmalade to keep the coverings together.


=Date-and-Ginger Sandwiches.=

Chop the dates and preserved ginger; moisten with syrup from the ginger
jar and a little lemon juice; cook as above, and use with bread or
lady-fingers. Preserved ginger may be used alone and without cooking.


=Rose-Leaf Sandwiches.=

Flavor the butter with rose petals according to the directions
previously given. Spread both bits of bread lightly with it and put upon
them three or four candied rose petals. If lady-fingers are used, brush
them over with white of egg and sugar mixed together. Use but little
sugar--just enough to hold the fingers together. The Turkish rose petals
that come in little jars are particularly dainty, and adapted to this
purpose. Garnish the dish on which they are served with rosebuds and
leaves.


=Violet Sandwiches.=

Prepare in the same manner as in the last number, substituting candied
violets for the rose petals, and violets with green leaves for a
garnish.


=Honey Sandwiches.=

Spread one bit of white bread with honey pressed from the comb with a
wooden spoon, the other bit with butter. Garnish with white clover
blossoms and leaves.


=Puff-Paste Sandwiches.=

Roll puff paste very thin (about one-eighth of an inch), cut in fanciful
shapes and bake to a delicate brown; add chopped almonds to rich
strawberry preserves, or peach marmalade, and spread the mixture between
each two bits of pastry.


=Pineapple Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 cup of pineapple juice and pulp.
          3/4 a cup of sugar.
          Juice of half a lemon.
          Lady-fingers.

_Method._--Cook the pineapple, sugar and lemon juice until thick; let
cool, and spread upon lady-fingers or sponge drops. Press together in
pairs and serve.


=Whipped-Cream Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 cup of heavy cream.
          1/4 a cup of powdered sugar.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of vanilla extract.
          Lady-fingers.

_Method._--Add the sugar and extract to the cream and beat until solid;
let chill, then spread quite thick upon lady-fingers or sponge drops.


=Whipped-Cream Sandwiches with French Fruit.=

Soak half a cup of fine-cut candied fruit in wine an hour or more.
Prepare the cream as above, and sprinkle the same with the fruit before
putting the sandwiches together.


=Fruit Jelly for Sweet Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 box of gelatine (2 ounces).
          1 cup of cold water.
          1 cup of boiling water.
          1 cup of sugar.
          1-1/2 cups of orange juice.
          1/4 a cup of lemon juice.

_Method._--Soak the gelatine in the cold water and dissolve in the
boiling water; add the sugar and strain; when cold add the orange and
lemon juice. Mould in sheets three-eighths of an inch thick.


=Claret Jelly for Sweet Sandwiches.=

Substitute claret for the orange juice and prepare as above. Do not omit
the lemon juice.


=Fruit or Claret Jelly Sandwiches with Nuts.=

Slice blanched English walnuts and pecan nuts or almonds very thin, and
stir into whipped cream. Stamp out shapes from the jelly. Spread one
piece with the cream and nuts and cover with a second piece of jelly.


=With French Fruit.=

Substitute candied fruit for the nuts and proceed as above, or use nuts
and fruit together.


=Cupid's Butter Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          The yolks of 4 hard-boiled eggs.
          1 cup of butter.
          1/3 a cup of powdered sugar.
          1 teaspoonful of orange juice.
          A grating of orange rind.
          Angel cakelets or slices of angel cake.

_Method._--Cream the butter, gradually add the yolks of eggs, passed
through a potato ricer or sieve, the sugar and orange juice. Spread upon
thin slices of angel cake, prepared for sandwiches, or upon angel
cakelets or fingers; press two slices together and serve at once. If
allowed to stand any length of time, keep covered and in a cool place.


=Cheese-and-Bar-le-Duc Currant Sandwiches.=

Spread wheat bread, prepared for sandwiches, with cream cheese; put two
or three currants and a little syrup on each piece of bread, and press
two pieces together. These may be varied by using sliced maraschino
cherries. Either the currants or sliced cherries with a little of the
syrup may be mixed with the cheese and then spread upon the bread.
Bar-le-Duc currants are imported from France in tiny glasses. The seeds
have been removed from the currants, which are cooked in honey.


=Hunter's Sandwich (Switzerland).=

Spread fresh bread, cut in thin slices, with fresh butter; over this
spread a layer of Brie or other cream cheese, and over the cheese spread
a layer of honey. Press two similarly shaped pieces together and serve
at once.


=Hunter's Sandwich (Ellwanger).=

Prepare as above, substituting maple syrup (or sugar) for the honey.



BREAD AND CHOU PASTE.

          She needeth least, who kneadeth best,
            These rules which we shall tell;
          Who kneadeth ill shall need them more
            Than she who kneadeth well.
                                           --_F.F._


=Two Loaves of Wheat Bread.=

To two cups of scalded milk or boiled water, in a mixing-bowl, add two
tablespoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, and, when the liquid
becomes lukewarm, one yeastcake dissolved in half a cup of water, boiled
and cooled. With a broad-bladed knife cut and mix in enough well-dried
flour, sifted, to make a stiff dough (about seven cups). Knead until the
dough is elastic; cover, and set to rise in a temperature of about 70°
Fahr. When the dough has doubled in bulk, "cut down" and knead slightly
without removing from the mixing-bowl. When again double in bulk, shape
into two double loaves and set to rise in buttered pans; when it has
risen a third time, bake one hour.


=Entire-Wheat Bread.=

Use the preceding recipe without change other than in kind of flour and
two additional tablespoonfuls of sugar.


=Rice Bread.=

Add three-fourths a cup of rice, cooked until tender and still hot, and,
also, two tablespoonfuls of butter, to the milk or water in the first
recipe. Other cereals, as oatmeal or cerealine, may be used instead of
rice.


=Salad Rolls.=

Make a sponge with one cup of milk, one yeastcake dissolved in
one-fourth a cup of milk, and about one cup and a half of flour; beat
thoroughly, cover, and set to rise in a temperature of about 70° Fahr.
When light add half a teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth a cup of melted
butter, and flour enough to knead. Knead until elastic. Set to rise in a
temperature of 70° Fahr. When doubled in bulk, cut down and shape into
small balls. Set to rise again, covered with a cloth and a dripping-pan.
When light press the handle of a small wooden spoon deeply across the
centre of each ball, brush with butter and press the edges together. Set
the rolls close together in a baking-pan, after brushing over with
butter the points of contact.


=Boston Brownbread.=

Sift together one cup, each, of yellow corn meal, rye meal and
entire-wheat flour, one teaspoonful of salt and three teaspoonfuls of
soda. Add three-fourths a cup of molasses and one pint of thick, sour
milk. Beat thoroughly, and steam in a covered mould three hours and a
half. The quantity here given may be steamed in four baking-powder
boxes in two hours.

[Illustration: Boston Brown Bread.]

[Illustration: Bread cut for Sandwiches.]


=Baking-Powder Biscuit.=

Pass through the sieve two or three times four cups of flour, one
teaspoonful of salt, and, for each cup of flour, two level teaspoonfuls
of baking-powder. With the tips of the fingers work into the flour
one-third a cup of butter. When the mixture looks like meal, mix in
gradually nearly one pint of milk, cutting the dough with a knife until
well mixed. When it is of a consistency to handle, turn out on to a
well-floured board, toss with the knife in the flour, then pat out into
a sheet half an inch thick, and cut into rounds. Let the heat of the
oven be moderate at first, and increase after the dough has risen. Bake
about fifteen minutes.


=Sandwich Biscuit.=

Prepare the dough as above, roll to about three-eighths an inch in
thickness, and cut into rounds. Spread one half of these with softened
butter, and press the others, unbuttered, upon them; bake fifteen or
eighteen minutes.


=Pulled Bread.=

(_To serve with simple salads and cheese._)

Remove the crust from a fresh loaf of French bread. Gash the loaf at the
ends and pull apart into halves; then cut the halves and pull apart
into quarters. Repeat until the pieces are about the thickness of
breadsticks. Put on a rack in a dripping-pan, and dry out the moisture
in a slow oven; then brown delicately. Keep in a dry place (a tin box is
suitable) and reheat in the oven before serving.


=How to Give Rolls and Bread a Glossy, Brown Crust.=

A short time before removing from the oven, brush over the top of each
loaf or roll with beaten yolk of egg, diluted with a little milk, or
with a little sugar dissolved in milk, or with thin starch.


=Chou Paste.=

Put a saucepan with half a cup of butter and one cup of boiling water
over the fire. When the mixture boils, beat into it one cup of flour.
When the dough cleaves from the sides of the saucepan, turn into a bowl
and beat in, one at a time, three large or four small eggs.

       *       *       *       *       *


=To Boil Salted Meats: Ham, Tongue, Etc.=

Cover the meat with cold water and bring the water slowly to the
boiling-point; let boil five minutes, then _slightly_ bubble until the
meat is tender.


=To Boil Chicken, Lamb and Other Fresh Meat.=

Cover the meat with boiling water, let boil rapidly five minutes, then
keep the water just below the boiling-point, or just "quivering" at one
side of the saucepan, until the meat is tender. When the meat is about
half cooked, add a teaspoonful of salt for each quart of water.


=Potted Meat and Fish for Sandwiches.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pound of tender cooked meat or fish (2 cups).
          2 ounces of fat cooked meat (1/4 a cup).
          2 ounces of butter (1/4 a cup).
          Mace and anchovy essence, if desired.
          Pepper and salt.

_Method._--Chop the meat or fish very fine, then pass through a purée
sieve; cream the butter and with a wooden spoon work it into the meat or
fish; add seasonings to taste, press the mixture solidly into small jars
or cups, and pour melted butter to the depth of one-fourth an inch over
the top of the meat. Set aside in a cool place.


=Kinds of Meat and Fish for Potting.=

Ham, fat and lean; either chicken, veal or tongue, with bacon; chicken
and ham, mixed, fat ham; chicken and tongue, mixed, with bacon; veal and
ham, mixed, with fat ham; roast beef and corned beef, mixed, with fat of
either, or bacon; finnan-haddie and bacon; salmon, cod, haddock,
bluefish, etc., with bacon, or with double the amount of butter.

[Illustration: Bowl of Fruit-Punch Ready for Serving.]



BEVERAGES SERVED WITH SANDWICHES.

                        Towards eve there was tea
          (A luxury due to Matilda) and ice,
          Fruit and coffee.
                               --_Meredith's "Lucile."_

          Come, touch to your lips this melting sweetness,
            Sip of this nectar,--this Java fine,--
          Whose tawny drops hold more completeness
            Than lurks in the depths of ruby wine.
                                        --_J. M. L._


=Filtered Coffee.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/2 a cup of coffee, ground very fine.
          3 cups of boiling water.
          About 6 blocks of sugar.
          About 3 tablespoonfuls of cream.
          About 6 tablespoonfuls of hot milk.

_Method._--Put the coffee into the filter of a well-scalded coffee-pot.
Pour the boiling water over the coffee. Serve as soon as the infusion
has dripped through the filter. For black coffee use double the quantity
of coffee.


=Boiled Coffee.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 cup of ground coffee.
          White and shell of 1 egg.
          1 cup of cold water.
          6 cups of boiling water.
          1 tablespoonful of ground coffee.

_Method._--Beat the white and crushed shell of the egg and half the cup
of cold water together; mix with the coffee, pour over the boiling
water, stir thoroughly, and boil from three to five minutes with the
nozzle tightly closed; pour half a cup of cold water down the spout;
stir in one tablespoonful of coffee and let stand on the range, without
boiling, ten minutes.


=Five-o'clock Tea.=

INGREDIENTS.

          Tea.
          Candied ox-heart cherries.
          Slices of lemon.
          Boiling water.

_Method._--Fill the tea-ball half full with tea, put the ball into the
cup, with a cherry or a slice of lemon, and pour boiling water over
them; remove the ball when the tea is of the desired strength.


=Rich Chocolate.=

INGREDIENTS.

          4 ounces of chocolate.
          4 tablespoonfuls of granulated sugar.
          1/4 a cup of hot water.
          1 quart of scalded milk.
          1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract.
          Whites of 3 eggs.
          1 pint of thick cream.
          1/3 a cup of powdered sugar.

_Method._--Grate the chocolate, add the granulated sugar and hot water,
and cook until smooth and glossy; with a whisk beat in the hot milk very
gradually, and return to a double boiler to keep hot. Beat the cream
until solid. Beat the whites of the eggs until dry, then beat in the
powdered sugar and fold the cream into the egg and sugar. Add half of
the cream mixture to the chocolate with the vanilla, and mix while the
cream is heating. Serve the rest of the cream in spoonfuls upon the
chocolate in the cups.


=Plain Chocolate.=

Prepare as in preceding recipe, omitting the cream mixture and such
portion of the chocolate as is desired.


=Plain Cocoa.=

INGREDIENTS.

          4 teaspoonfuls of cocoa.
          4 teaspoonfuls of sugar.
          1 cup of boiling water,
          1 cup of hot milk.
          Whipped cream, if desired.

_Method._--Mix the cocoa and sugar, pour over the boiling water, and
when boiling again add the hot milk; beat the whipped cream into the hot
cocoa, or serve a spoonful upon the top of each cup.


=Ceylon Cocoa.=

Scald a two-inch piece of paper-bark cinnamon with the milk to be used
in making the cocoa.


=Sultana Cocoa.=

Stem and wash half a pound of sultana raisins; let them stand, covered
with one quart of boiling water, upon the back of the range an hour or
more; filter the water through folds of cheese-cloth and use in making
cocoa or chocolate.


=Egg Lemonade.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 egg.
          4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.
          Juice of 2 lemons.
          2 cups of water.

_Method._--Beat the egg until white and yolk are well mixed; then beat
in the sugar, the lemon juice and the water.


=Fruit Punch.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pineapple.
          4 cups of sugar.
          3 cups of boiling water.
          1 cup of tea, freshly made.
          5 lemons.
          6 oranges.
          1 pint of strawberry or grape juice.
          1/2 a pint of maraschino cherries.
          1 bottle of Apollinaris water.
          6 quarts of water.

_Method._--Grate the pineapple, add the boiling water and the sugar, and
boil fifteen minutes; add the tea and strain into the punch-bowl. When
cold add the fruit juice, the cherries and the cold water. A short time
before serving, add a piece of ice, and, on serving, the Apollinaris
water. Strawberries, mint leaves, or slices of banana may be used in the
place of the cherries.


=Punch à la Nantes.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 pounds of rhubarb.
          1 pint of water.
          1 bay leaf.
          1 cup of sugar.
          1 cup of orange juice.
          1/4 a cup of lemon juice.
          1/4 a cup of ginger syrup.

_Method._--Cut the rhubarb into pieces without peeling; add the bay leaf
and water, and let simmer until the rhubarb is tender; strain through a
cheese-cloth. Boil the juice with the sugar five minutes. When cold add
the orange and lemon juice, with one-fourth a cup of syrup from a jar of
preserved ginger, and a piece of ice. Add water as needed.


=Home-made Soda Water.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2-1/4 pounds of granulated sugar.
          1-3/4 ounces of tartaric acid.
          1 pint of water.
          Whites of 3 eggs.
          1/2 an ounce of ginger extract.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of bicarbonate of soda for each glass.

_Method._--Boil the sugar, water and tartaric acid five minutes. When
nearly cold beat into the syrup the whites of the eggs, beaten until
foamy, and the flavoring extract. Store in a fruit jar, closely covered.
To use, put three tablespoonfuls into a glass half full of cold water,
stir in one-fourth a teaspoonful of soda, and drink while effervescing.
A pint of any kind of fruit juice may displace the water, when a
teaspoonful of lemon juice should be added to the contents of each glass
before stirring in the soda.


=Spanish Chocolate.=

(_To serve 60._)

INGREDIENTS.

          6 quarts of milk.
          3 blades of mace.
          1 five-inch stick of cinnamon.
          12 cloves.
          20 pounded almonds.
          1 pound of chocolate.
          3 cups of sugar.
          2 quarts of boiling water.
          Yolks of three eggs.

_Method._--Scald the milk with the spices and nuts. Break up the
chocolate and melt over hot water; add the sugar, mix thoroughly, then
gradually stir in the boiling water; let cook two or three minutes after
all the water has been added, then turn into the hot milk; let stand
over hot water until ready to serve, then add the beaten yolks of eggs,
diluted with half a cup of water, milk or cream, and strain through a
cheese-cloth. Keep hot over hot water.


=Claret Cup.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 quarts of claret.
          1 cup of sugar.
          1 cup of water.
          5 lemons cut in slices.
          1 dozen whole cloves.
          2 qts. of charged Apollinaris or soda water.
          1/4 a cup of brandy, sherry or maraschino.
          Ice.

Boil the sugar and water about six minutes; let cool, then add the lemon
slices, with seeds removed, and the cloves; let stand some hours in a
cold place. When ready to serve, add the claret, water and liqueur, all
chilled on ice. Put a piece of ice in the pitcher and pour over it the
mixture. The beverage should not be sweet.

[Illustration: Copper Chafing-Dish with Earthen Casserole.]



PART III.

CHAFING-DISH DAINTIES.

          _Gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
          We have a trifling foolish banquet._
                             --ROMEO AND JULIET.

          _Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast._
                                 --COMEDY OF ERRORS, iii. I.


          _A little quail, or some such light thing, when I
          come home at night._

                                           --CHARLES DICKENS.

          _Now and then your men of wit
           Will condescend to take a bit._
                                                --SWIFT.



INTRODUCTION.

=Chafing-dishes Past and Present.=

          Well, he was an ingenious man that first found out
          eating and drinking.--_Swift._


How fire was discovered, when it was first applied to the needs of human
beings, the origin and early use of cooking and heating utensils,--all
are concealed from us in the mists that surround the life of prehistoric
man. But at the dawn of history, even before the beginning of our era,
crude appliances for cooking were in use; and, without doubt, one of the
earliest of these was an utensil corresponding in some particulars, at
least, to the chafing-dish of to-day.

The chafing-dish is a portable utensil used upon the table, either for
cooking food or for keeping food hot after it has been cooked by other
means. In ancient times, the fuel of the chafing-dish was either live
coals or olive oil; to-day we use either electricity, gas, alcohol or
colonial spirits.

The first chafing-dishes of which historic mention is made consisted of
a pan heated over a pot of burning oil, the pan resting upon a frame
which held the pot of oil. It was with such an utensil, perhaps, that
the Israelitish women cooked the locusts of Egypt and Palestine, for
these were eaten as a common food by the people of the biblical lands
and age.

Mommsen, in his history of Rome, while speaking of the extravagance of
the times, as shown in the table furnishings, probably refers to the
chafing-dish when he says: "A well-wrought bronze cooking-machine came
to cost more than an estate." The idea that this might be the utensil
referred to is strengthened by the fact that many chafing-dishes have
been found in the ruins of Pompeii. These were made of bronze, and
highly ornamented. Evidently, olive oil was the fuel used in these
dishes.

Coming down to more modern times, Madame de Staël had a dish of very
unique pattern, and, when driven by the command of Napoleon from her
beloved Paris, she carried her chafing-dish with her into exile as one
of her most cherished household gods. At the present day among the
favored few, who have full purses, are found sets of little silver
chafing-dishes about four inches square. These tiny dishes rest upon a
doylie-covered plate, and a bird or rarebit may be served in them as a
course at dinner, one to each guest. The cooking is not done in these
dishes, and they are not furnished with lamps; in them the food, while
it is being eaten, is simply kept hot by means of a tiny pan filled with
hot water.

[Illustration: Chafing-Dish, Filler, Etc.

"With all Appliances and Means to boot."]

In reality, the modern chafing-dish is a species of _bain marie_, or
double boiler, with a lamp so arranged that cooking can be done
without other appliances. It consists of four parts. The _first_ is the
blazer, or the pan in which the cooking is done; this is provided with a
long handle. The _second_ is the hot-water pan, which corresponds to the
lower part of the double boiler; this should be provided with handles,
and is a very inconvenient dish without them. The _third_ is the frame
upon which the hot-water pan rests, and in which the spirit-lamp is set.
The _last_, but by no means least, part is the lamp; this is provided
with a cotton or an asbestos wick. When the lamp has a cotton wick, the
flame is regulated by turning the wick up or down, as in an ordinary
lamp. At present this style of lamp is found only in the more expensive
grades of dishes,--silver-plated, and costing from $15 upwards. When
asbestos is used as the wick, the lamp is filled with this porous stone,
which is to be saturated with alcohol immediately before using, and the
top is covered with a wire netting. The flame is regulated by means of
metal slides, which open and shut over the netting, thus cutting off or
letting on the flame, as it is desired.


=Chafing-dish Appointments.=

          With all appliances and means to boot.
                              --HENRY IV., iii. I.

The chafing-dish should always rest upon a tray, as a very slight
draught of air, or the expansion of the alcohol when heated, will
sometimes cause the flame to flare out and downward, and thus an
unprotected tablecloth might be set on fire.

Often a cutlet dish is considered a necessary part of a chafing-dish
outfit; but as one of the chief merits of the chafing-dish consists in
the possibility of serving a repast the instant it is cooked, there
would seem to be a want of propriety in removing the cooked article to a
platter and garnishing the dish before serving.

A polished wooden spoon, with long handle and small bowl, is a most
convenient utensil to use while cooking the dainty; but the regulation
chafing-dish spoon is needed when serving the same. Such a spoon has a
broad bowl of silver or aluminum, with rounded end, and a long ebony
handle.

The filler is a most convenient article for use, when the lamp needs
replenishing with alcohol, but in its absence the alcohol may be turned
into a small pitcher and from that into the lamp. A lamp of the average
size holds about five tablespoonfuls of alcohol, and this quantity will
supply heat for at least half an hour.

Glass, granite or tin measuring-cups, upon which thirds or quarters are
indicated, also tea- and tablespoons, are essential for accurate
measurements.

Several items are essential to the successful serving of a meal from the
chafing-dish. To be a pronounced success, the work must be done
noiselessly and gracefully. The preparation of all articles is the same
for the chafing-dish as for the common stove; but where the mixing is
done at the table, as for a rarebit, the recipe takes on an additional
flavor, according to the deftness with which it is done.

Let, then, everything be ready and at hand, before the guests or family
assemble at the table. Have the lamp filled and covered, so that it may
remain filled. Have all seasonings measured out in a cup. In case the
yolks of eggs are to be used, they will not injure, having been beaten
beforehand, if they be kept covered. When oysters are to be served, have
them washed, freed from bits of shell, drained, and left in a pitcher
from which they can be readily poured. The quantity of butter used in
the recipes is indicated by tablespoonfuls, and may be measured out
beforehand and rolled into dainty balls with butter-hands, a spoonful in
each ball.

Bear in mind that the hot-water pan is to be used in all cases where the
double boiler would be used, if the cooking were to be done upon the
range. For instance, where the recipe calls for milk or cream, except in
the making of a sauce, use the bath from the beginning. Also, be careful
always to place the blazer in the bath before eggs are added to any
mixture. Indeed, the hot-water pan is the one feature of the
chafing-dish which it is most important to notice; for on the proper use
of the hot-water pan the value of the chafing-dish as an exponent of
scientific cookery entirely depends. She who well understands the
principles upon which the use of this rests has gained no small insight
into the secret of all cookery, be it scientific, economic or hygienic;
for a knowledge of the effect of heat at different temperatures, applied
to food, is the very foundation-stone upon which all cookery rests.

Although the chafing-dish is especially adapted to the needs of the
bachelor, man or maid, its use should not be relegated entirely to the
homeless or the Bohemian. In the sick-room, at the luncheon-table, on
Sunday night, it is most serviceable and wellnigh indispensable; it
always suggests hearty welcome and good cheer.

While it is out of place, at any ceremonial meal, as a means of cooking,
even on such occasions a lobster Newburgh or other dish that needs be
served piping hot to be eaten at its best may be brought on in
individual chafing-dishes. These are supplied with hot-water pans and
lamps. At a chafing-dish supper each guest can prepare his own rarebit.

Any operation in cooking that can be performed on the kitchen range may
be successfully carried out on the chafing-dish, provided one be skilled
in its use. But as the dining-room is usually chosen as the site in
which to test its possibilities, here it were well to confine one's
efforts to such dishes as will not give rise to too much disorder.
Sautéing and frying it were better to reserve for the range and a
well-ventilated kitchen.

[Illustration: Course at Formal Dinner served in Individual
Chafing-Dishes.

(See page 157)]

Alcohol is most commonly used in the lamp of the chafing-dish; and, on
account of its cheapness, one is often advised to buy _wood_ alcohol.
But in large markets, where many fowl are singed daily over an alcohol
flame, the marketmen will tell you that the very best article is none
too good for their purpose. It does not smoke, wastes less rapidly, and
in the end will prove quite as economical.


=Are Midnight Suppers Hygienic?=

          "Being no further enemy to you
           Than the constraint of hospitable zeal."

In regard to the chafing-dish and its most prominent use, some one may
fittingly ask: Is it hygienic to eat at midnight? Can one keep one's
health and eat late suppers? As in all things pertaining to food, no set
rules can be given to meet every case; much depends upon constitutional
traits, individual habits and idiosyncrasies. One may practise what
another cannot attempt. As a rule, however, people who eat a hearty
dinner, after the work of the day is done, do not need to eat again
until the following breakfast hour.

Those who are engaged, either mentally or physically, throughout the
evening, cannot with impunity, eat a very hearty meal previous to that
effort; but after their work is done they need nourishing food, and food
that is both easily digested and assimilated. But even these should not
eat and then immediately retire; for during sleep all the bodily organs,
including the stomach, become dormant. Food partaken at this hour is not
properly taken care of, and in too many cases must be digested when the
individual has awakened, out of sorts, the next morning.

It is well to remember, also, that, at any time after food is eaten,
there should be a period of rest from all active effort; for then the
blood flows from the other organs of the body to the stomach, and the
work of digestion is begun. Oftentimes we hear men say they must smoke
after meals, for unless they do so they cannot digest their food. They
fail to see that it is not the tobacco that promotes digestion, but the
enforced repose.

But, if we must eat at midnight, the question may well be asked, What
shall we eat? That which can be digested and assimilated with the least
effort on the part of the digestive organs. And among such things we may
note oysters, eggs and game, when these have been properly--that is,
delicately--cooked.


=How to Make Sauces.=

          Let hunger move thy appetyte, and not savory
          sauces.--_Babees Book._

          "Change is the sauce that sharpens appetite."

As so many dishes are prepared in the chafing-dish that require the use
of a simple sauce, we give in this place the methods usually followed in
the preparation of common sauces. For one cup of sauce, put two
tablespoonfuls of butter into the blazer; let the butter simply melt,
without coloring, if for a white sauce, but cook until brown for a brown
sauce. Mix together two tablespoonfuls of flour, one-fourth a
teaspoonful of salt and a dash of black or white pepper, or a few grains
of cayenne or paprica, and beat it into the bubbling butter; let the
mixture cook two or three minutes, then stir into it, rather gradually
at first, and beating constantly, one cup of cold milk, water or stock.
Now, when the sauce boils up once after all the liquid is in, it is
ready for use. In making a white sauce some cooks add, from time to time
while the sauce is being stirred, a few drops of lemon juice, which they
claim makes the sauce much whiter.

Sometimes we make the sauce after another fashion, using the same
proportions of the various ingredients. If water or stock be used, put
it in the blazer directly over the fire. If the liquid be milk, put it
into the blazer, and the blazer over hot water; cream together the
butter, flour and seasonings, dilute with a little of the hot liquid,
pour into the remainder of the hot liquid, and stir constantly until the
sauce thickens, and then occasionally for ten or fifteen minutes, until
the flour is thoroughly cooked.

In making a brown sauce, first brown the butter, then brown the flour in
the butter, and, whenever it is convenient, use brown stock as the
liquid.


INGREDIENTS FOR ONE CUP OF SAUCE.

          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          2 tablespoonfuls of flour.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A few grains of pepper.
          1 cup of liquid.


INGREDIENTS FOR ONE PINT OF SAUCE.

          1/4 a cup of butter.
          1/4 a cup of flour.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of pepper.
          1 pint of liquid.


=Measuring.=

In all recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour
is measured after sifting once. When flour is measured by cups, the cup
is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is meant. A tablespoonful or
teaspoonful of any designated material is a level spoonful of such
material.


=Flavoring.=

When rich soup stock, flavored with vegetables and sweet herbs, is at
hand for use in sauces, additional seasonings are not necessary; but
when a sauce is made of milk, water, or water and meat extract, some
flavor more or less pronounced is demanded. A few bits of onion and
carrot browned in hot butter, or anchovy sauce or curry may be added;
but, all things considered, the most convenient way to secure an
appetizing flavor is by the use of "Kitchen Bouquet." This alone or in
conjunction with a dash of some one of the many really good proprietary
sauces on the market is well-nigh indispensable in chafing-dish
cookery.



RECIPES.

                                          "_No variety here,
          But you, most noble guests, whose gracious looks
          Must make a dish or two become a feast._"



OYSTER DISHES.

          He was a bold man that first ate an
          oyster.--_Swift._


=Oysters.=

Put into the blazer twenty-five to fifty choice oysters. As soon as they
are hot and look plump, add salt, pepper and butter. Serve on buttered
toast or crackers. Add two tablespoonfuls of cream or half a
tablespoonful of lemon juice before serving, if desired.


=Oysters, No. 2.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of solid oysters.
          4 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1 tablespoonful of lemon juice.
          1 scant teaspoonful of salt.
          A few grains of cayenne.
          Beaten yolks of 2 eggs.

_Method._--Put the oysters into the blazer. When they look plump and the
edges curl, put the blazer into the hot-water pan and add the
seasonings. Add a few spoonfuls of the liquor from the pan to the yolks
of the eggs, and, after mixing well, pour into the chafing-dish. Stir
constantly until the liquor thickens, then serve on thin slices of
buttered toast or on thin crackers.


=Oysters à la D'Uxelles.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of parboiled and drained oysters.
          1 pint of oyster liquor or chicken stock.
          4 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          4 tablespoonfuls of chopped mushrooms.
          4 tablespoonfuls of flour.
          A few drops of onion juice.
          A few grains of cayenne.
          1 teaspoonful of salt.
          1 teaspoonful of lemon juice.
          Yolks of 2 eggs.

_Method._--Let the oysters be parboiled and drained beforehand. (To
parboil, heat quickly to the boiling-point in their own liquor.) Melt
the butter in the blazer, add the flour, salt and pepper, and cook till
frothy; add the oyster liquor or chicken stock and cook until the
boiling-point is reached. Now add the oysters, and, as soon as they are
heated thoroughly, put the blazer into the bath and add the beaten
yolks, the onion and lemon juice and the mushrooms. As soon as the eggs
thicken the sauce a little, serve on toast or crackers. If uncooked
mushrooms are used, cook them in the butter two or three minutes before
the flour and seasonings are added.


=Curried Oysters.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of oysters (parboiled and drained).
          1/2 a cup of cream.
          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1 tablespoonful of flour.
          1/2 a cup of oyster liquor.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of curry powder.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of chopped onion.
          1 teaspoonful of salt.
          1 saltspoonful of pepper.

_Method._--Cook the onion and butter in the blazer a few moments. Mix
the flour and curry powder and stir into the butter. When frothy add the
oyster liquor. As soon as the sauce boils up once, add the salt, pepper
and cream, and, in a moment, the oysters. When the oysters are
thoroughly heated, serve on buttered toast or crackers.


=Curried Oysters, No. 2.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 quart of oysters.
          1/4 a cup of butter.
          One small mild onion.
          1 tablespoonful of curry powder.
          1/4 a cup of flour.
          1 cup of oyster liquor.
          1 cup of white stock.
          1/2 a cup of thick tomato pulp.
          Salt and pepper to taste.

_Method._--Bring the oysters to the boiling-point in their own liquor,
skim, drain, and set aside. Heat the butter in the blazer, sauté in it
the onion cut in slices, stir in the flour and curry powder mixed with
the salt and pepper, and, when frothy, add the oyster liquor, stock and
tomato pulp (a pint of pulp reduced by slow cooking to half a cup). When
the sauce boils, add the oysters; and when hot serve on buttered toast
or fried bread.


=Fricassee of Oysters.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 quart of oysters.
          4 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          Yolks of 2 eggs.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
          1 tablespoonful of flour.
          Pepper, salt, cayenne.

_Method._--Brown the butter and add to it the parsley, seasonings and
flour; let heat, then add the well-drained oysters, and, when the edges
begin to curl, add the well-beaten yolks. Serve on warmed plates, with
fried bread and parsley.


=Creamed Dishes.=

(_Oysters, shrimps, lobsters, sweetbreads, chicken, veal, fish,
mushrooms, asparagus tips, peas, etc._)

INGREDIENTS.

          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          4 tablespoonfuls of flour.
          2 saltspoonfuls of salt.
          2 cups of cream, or 2 cups of milk and 4 tablespoonfuls
            of butter.
          1 saltspoonful of pepper.
          1 pint of fish, meat, etc.
          2 tablespoonfuls of mushrooms, chopped or diced.
          1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
          1 teaspoonful of onion juice.
          1 tablespoonful of lemon juice.

_Method._--Prepare the sauce in the usual manner. If oysters are used,
they should have been parboiled previously and drained, and, if large,
cut in pieces. Fish should be flaked when hot, and meats cut into dice
when cold.


=Devilled Dishes.=

Season any of the creamed dishes highly with cayenne, onion juice,
mustard, and Worcestershire or other sauce.


=Scrambled Eggs with Oysters.=

Cream together two tablespoonfuls of butter and one tablespoonful of
anchovy paste. Melt in the blazer, then add half a dozen eggs, beaten
slightly with one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt and a dash of paprica.
Stir and cook, and, when beginning to thicken, add half a pint of
oysters, parboiled, "bearded," and cut fine. When scrambled, serve on
sippets of toast, lightly spread with anchovy paste.


=Panned Oysters.=

With a fork pressed into a butter ball, rub over the bottom of the hot
blazer. Then cover the surface with small rounds of toast, and put one
or two uncooked oysters on each round; cover, and cook until plump, dust
with salt and pepper, and put a bit of butter on each oyster. Serve,
when the butter has melted, with slices of lemon.


=Panned Oysters with Maître d'Hôtel Butter.=

Cook as before. Have ready two tablespoonfuls of butter beaten to a
cream; add a few grains of salt and paprica, one tablespoonful of
chopped parsley, and, by degrees, the juice of half a lemon. Spread upon
the oysters before serving.


=Oyster Cromeskies.=

Scald the oysters in their own liquor over a quick fire. When plump wrap
each oyster in a slice of bacon, and fasten with a small skewer (wooden
toothpick). Sauté in the blazer, heated very hot. Serve on thin rounds
of toast. These cromeskies are most easily cooked in a double broiler,
resting on a dripping-pan, in a hot oven.


=Oysters Sauté.=

Wash and drain the oysters, season with salt and pepper, roll in fine
crumbs, dip in beaten egg, then roll in crumbs again. Put a little olive
oil or clarified butter in the blazer; when it is heated, put in the
oysters, brown them on one side, turn, and brown on the other side.


=Oyster Canapés.=

Scald a cup of cream, add two tablespoonfuls of fine-grated bread
crumbs, a tablespoonful of butter, a dash of paprica and a grating of
nutmeg; then add two dozen oysters, washed, drained and chopped. Stir
until the oysters are thoroughly heated, but without boiling the
mixture. Spread rounds of toast with butter, and then with the oyster
mixture. Serve at once accompanied by olives, pim-olas or gherkins.


=Escalloped Oysters.=

Stir one cup of cracker crumbs into half a cup of melted butter. Heat
half a cup of cream or strained oyster liquor in the blazer, put in a
layer of oysters (about a cup), washed and drained, and sprinkle with a
part of the prepared crumbs, salt and pepper; add another layer of
oysters, the rest of the crumbs, and salt and pepper. Cover, and cook
nearly ten minutes. Do not stir the oysters.



LOBSTER AND OTHER SEA FISH.

          And ate a lobster, and sang and mighty merry.
                                      --_Pepys' Diary._

          Take every creature in of every kind.
                                              --_Pope._


=Buttered Lobster.=

Pick the meat from a boiled lobster and cut it into small pieces; sift
over it the coral; mix with it also the liver, two tablespoonfuls of
vinegar or three of lemon juice, one-third a cup of butter and
one-fourth a teaspoonful, each, of cayenne and made mustard; heat in the
blazer until thoroughly hot. Serve on cup-shaped leaves of lettuce with
a quarter of a hard-boiled _egg_ on the top of each portion.


=Lobster à la Newburgh.=

INGREDIENTS.

          Meat of 2 medium-sized lobsters.
          4 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of pepper.
          2 tablespoonfuls, each, of sherry wine and brandy.
          Grating of nutmeg.
          Yolks of 4 eggs.
          1 cup of cream.

_Method._--Remove the meat from the shells and cut it into delicate
slices. Put the butter in the blazer, and, when it melts, put the
lobster into it and cook four or five minutes. Add the salt, pepper,
nutmeg, wine and brandy. Stir the cream into the beaten yolks, and then
stir both into the lobster mixture. Serve as soon as the eggs thicken
the sauce.


=Plain Lobster.=

Pour three tablespoonfuls of lemon juice over the meat of one lobster
and season with salt and pepper. Put three tablespoonfuls of butter in
the blazer, and, when it is melted, add the prepared lobster; stir until
hot and serve at once.


=Clams à la Newburgh.=

Use one quart of clams. Separate the hard from the soft parts of the
clams. Chop the hard parts fine. Substitute the soft and the chopped
parts of the clams for the lobster and proceed as for lobster à la
Newburgh.

Oyster, chicken, turkey or sweetbread à la Newburgh may be prepared by
substituting one of the above ingredients for the lobster.


=Lobster à la Bordelaise.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 cloves of garlic, chopped.
          1 sliced carrot.
          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          2 glasses of white wine (half a cup).
          Meat of 2 lobsters.
          1 glass of brandy.
          3 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          Chopped parsley, white and cayenne pepper, salt.

_Method._--Melt the butter in the blazer and in it cook the onion and
carrot about five minutes. Remove the carrot; add the wine, lobster and
seasonings. When thoroughly heated, add the butter, parsley and brandy
and serve at once.


=Hawaiian Lobster Curry.=

(ADA D. WAGG.)

INGREDIENTS.

          1-1/2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1/2 an onion, chopped
          1 clove of garlic, very fine.
          A small piece of grated ginger root.
          1-1/2 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch.
          1-1/2 tablespoonfuls of curry powder.
          1 pint of milk.
          1 grated cocoanut.
          Meat of a lobster weighing 2 pounds.
          Salt and pepper to taste.

_Method._--Grate the cocoanut and set it aside to soak an hour in one
pint of milk. Sauté the onion and garlic in the butter, add the
cornstarch and seasonings, and cook until frothy; add the milk strained
from the cocoanut, gradually, and, when the sauce boils up once, add the
lobster; salt and pepper to taste.


=Lobster à la Bechamel.=

INGREDIENTS.

          Meat of 2 lobsters.
          4 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          4 tablespoonfuls of flour.
          Salt and pepper.
          Grating of nutmeg.
          1 cup of cream.
          4 yolks of eggs.
          1 cup of white stock, seasoned with mace, bay leaf, etc.
          1 teaspoonful of lemon juice.
          Dried and sifted coral.

_Method._--Cut the lobster in delicate slices or in dice, as preferred.
Make a bechamel sauce, after the usual manner, of the butter, flour,
seasonings, cream and stock. Add the lobster, and, when heated
thoroughly, add the beaten yolks mixed with a few spoonfuls of the sauce
from the blazer. Add the lemon juice, and sprinkle the dried and sifted
coral or some chopped parsley over the top of the mixture as it is
served.

Oysters, clams, sweetbread, chicken or turkey may be served à la
Bordelaise or Bechamel.


=Lobster à la Poulette.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/3 a cup of butter.
          1/3 a cup of flour.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          Dash of paprica.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of white pepper.
          1 cup of cream.
          1 cup of well-seasoned chicken stock.
          Juice of half a lemon.
          2 hard-boiled eggs.
          1 pint of diced lobster meat.

_Method._--Prepare a white sauce, using the ingredients mentioned, and
adding the lemon juice by degrees. Add the lobster to the sauce. Cut the
whites of the hard-boiled eggs in rings and pass the yolks through a
sieve. Serve the lobster on bits of toast, or on thin crackers, with a
sprinkling of the yolks over the lobster, and circles of the whites
around it.


=Oyster Crabs à la Hollandaise.=

Remove the meat from one pint of oyster crabs; put this, with a little
of the liquor, into the blazer, add two tablespoonfuls of butter, a
dash of paprica and a scant half-teaspoonful of salt, and let cook three
or four minutes without boiling. Set the blazer over hot water and add
three-fourths a cup of hollandaise sauce (either hot or cold). Stir
until the mixture is heated, then add one tablespoonful of lemon juice
and one teaspoonful of chopped parsley. Serve on toast, in Swedish
timbale cases or in patty cases.


=Hollandaise Sauce.=

Put one-fourth a cup of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of butter, a grating
of nutmeg and a dash of paprica over hot water to heat. Beat the yolks
of four eggs, add the hot vinegar to them, return to the fire, and stir
constantly while the mixture thickens; then add two more tablespoonfuls
of butter in bits.

Shrimps, oysters, lobsters and delicate fish are all good when served
after this recipe.


=Devilled Crabs.=

Melt one tablespoonful of butter, add one tablespoonful of flour, and,
when blended, one cup of milk. Add the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs
rubbed through a sieve, and season to taste with salt, paprica, a
teaspoonful of lemon juice and wine; cayenne, mustard and tobasco sauce
are approved by some. Add one cup of crab meat and one-fourth a cup of
canned mushrooms cut in quarters. Serve on toast.


=Oyster Crabs.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of oyster crabs.
          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          1/2 an onion, sliced.
          1 tablespoonful of flour.
          1 cup of white stock.
          1 teaspoonful of lemon juice.
          1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley.
          1 yolk of egg.
          Salt and pepper.

_Method._--Melt the butter in the blazer, add the onion, and let cook
until a light-brown color; add the flour and mix until smooth; add the
stock and stir until it thickens. Add the crab meat, lemon juice,
parsley, salt and pepper. Beat the yolk of the egg and add two or three
spoonfuls of the sauce to it; mix well, add to the ingredients in the
blazer, stir constantly, and serve as soon as heated.


=Crabs à la Creole.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 green pepper, chopped fine.
          1 clove of garlic, chopped fine.
          1 small onion, chopped fine.
          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          1 cup of tomatoes.
          1 cup of crab meat.
          Pepper and salt.

_Method._--Put the butter in the blazer; when melted, add the garlic,
onion, salt, pepper and tomatoes, and let cook ten minutes; add the crab
meat (fresh or canned). Serve when hot on sippets of toast.


=Shrimps à la Poulette.=

Make a sauce of one-fourth a cup, each, of butter and flour, half a
teaspoonful of salt, a dash of pepper and one cup and a half of white
stock; add one tablespoonful of anchovy essence and a quart of shelled
shrimps. When hot add the beaten yolks of two eggs, with half a cup of
cream. Lastly, add a tablespoonful of lemon juice and serve, _without_
boiling, on sippets of toast.


=Shrimps with Peas.=

A pint of shrimps and a cup of peas, heated in a cup and a half of cream
sauce, are particularly good.


=Anchovy Toast.=

Put about two tablespoonfuls of clarified butter into the blazer. When
hot add bread cut as for sandwiches. Brown the bread on one side, turn,
and brown the other side. Spread with anchovy paste and serve at once.


=Anchovy Toast with Eggs.=

Prepare the anchovy toast in one chafing-dish, and, at the same time,
the eggs in another. Beat five eggs slightly, add half a teaspoonful of
salt, a dash of pepper and half a cup of cream or milk. Put a large
tablespoonful of butter in the blazer; when melted, add the egg mixture.
Stir until the egg is creamy, and serve on the anchovy toast.


=Anchovy Toast with Spinach.=

Press cooked spinach, chopped fine, through a purée sieve; reheat with a
little butter, salt and two or three drops of tobasco sauce. Sauté
rounds of bread to a golden brown in a little hot butter, spread with
anchovy paste, and over this spread the purée of spinach. Press into the
spinach on each round of bread a quarter of a hard-boiled egg cut
lengthwise, having the yolk uppermost.


=Anchovies with Olives.=

All the preparations for this dish, with the exception of sautéing the
bread, may be made some hours before serving.

Thoroughly wash the anchovies, cut off the fillets, and chop very fine
with a sprig of parsley and a few chives, or a slice or two of Bermuda
onion; put the whole into a mortar and pound well, adding, meanwhile, a
little paprica. Cut some large selected olives in halves, take out the
stones, and fill them with the anchovy mixture. Cut small rounds of
bread an inch and a half in diameter and an inch in thickness; remove a
crumb, similar in shape to the olive, from the centre of each. Put a
little butter into the blazer, and, when hot, sauté the rounds of bread
on both sides; drain on soft paper, put an olive in the centre of each
and a little mayonnaise over the whole. Five anchovies will suffice to
stuff a dozen olives.


=Sardine Canapés.=

Have ready yolks of eggs, cooked until firm, and an equal bulk of
sardines, each rubbed to a paste. Mix thoroughly, and season with salt,
pepper and lemon juice. Prepare some bread in the blazer as for anchovy
toast; then spread with the sardine mixture and serve at once.


=Curried Sardines.=

Mix together one teaspoonful, each, of sugar and curry powder and a
saltspoonful of salt. Put these into the blazer with one cup of cream
and half a teaspoonful of lemon juice. Stir until the mixture is hot,
then put into it ten or twelve sardines. In the mean time, heat some
butter or oil in a second blazer, and in it sauté some bits of bread a
little larger than the sardines, and round slices of tart apple. Serve
each sardine on a bit of bread; pour a little of the sauce over the top
and garnish with a round of apple. The slices of apple will keep their
shape, if the apples be cored and then cut into rounds without paring.


=Sardines.=

(_French fashion._)

Remove the skins and tails from about a dozen sardines and heat them in
the oven. Heat some butter or oil in the blazer of one chafing-dish, and
in it sauté some bits of bread of suitable shape to serve under the
sardines. Put in the blazer of another chafing-dish, over hot water,
the well-beaten yolks of four eggs, one teaspoonful, each, of tarragon
vinegar, cider vinegar and made mustard, one-fourth a teaspoonful of
salt and one tablespoonful of butter. Stir the sauce until it is quite
thick, then serve the sardines on the bread with the sauce poured over
them. Olives are agreeable with this dish.

[Illustration: Butter Balls, with Utensils for Chafing-Dish.]

[Illustration: Moulded Halibut with Creamed Peas.]


=Moulded Halibut with Creamed Peas.=

Two chafing-dishes will be requisite for preparing this delicious
luncheon dish.

Have ready one pound of raw halibut chopped very fine; beat the yolk of
an egg, add to it one teaspoonful and a fourth of salt, one-fourth a
teaspoonful of white pepper and a few grains of cayenne or paprica.
Blend a teaspoonful of cornstarch with a little milk; then add milk to
make two-thirds a cup, stir gradually into the egg and seasonings, and
then very slowly into the fish. Lastly, fold into the mixture one-third
a cup of thick cream, beaten until stiff. Butter dariole moulds
thoroughly, arrange a circle of cooked peas around the bottom of each
mould, and fill with the fish preparation two-thirds full. Set into the
blazer, surrounded with boiling water; after the water is again boiling,
turn down the flame so that the water will barely quiver, and let cook
about twenty minutes. Prepare, in the mean time, in the second blazer,
creamed peas. Turn the fish from the moulds and surround with the


=Creamed Peas.=

Have ready one can of peas, drained, rinsed, covered with boiling water
and drained again. Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter; add one
tablespoonful of flour with one teaspoonful of sugar and half a
teaspoonful of salt; add the peas and one-third a cup of milk, stir, and
let cook until the liquid begins to bubble.


=Purée of Fish.=

Scald one quart of milk, with half an onion and a stalk of celery;
strain into a pitcher and keep hot if convenient. Add to the remnants of
cold boiled white fish enough canned salmon to make two cups; chop fine
and rub through a purée sieve. Cook together in the blazer two
tablespoonfuls of butter, three of flour, one teaspoonful of salt and a
dash of pepper. Add the milk gradually, and, when all is added and the
contents of the blazer are boiling, put a few spoonfuls of the sauce
into the fish and beat until smooth; add more sauce, and, when well
diluted and smooth, turn the whole into the blazer. Stir, and let cook
until very hot; then serve with crackers, split, buttered, and browned
in the oven. These proportions give three pints of soup. Vegetable
purées may be prepared in the same way.


=Salt Codfish with Tomato Sauce.=

Sauté one clove of garlic and half an onion, grated or chopped fine, in
three tablespoonfuls of butter; add two tablespoonfuls of flour,
one-fourth a teaspoonful of paprica and one pimento, chopped fine; also,
add one cup of tomato pulp, and, when the sauce boils, half a pound of
"hatcheled" codfish, or any salt codfish picked into small pieces and
freshened in one quart of cold water. Serve, while hot, with brownbread
sandwiches, and pickles or pim-olas.


=Salt Codfish in Cream Sauce.=

Pick enough salt codfish into bits to make one cup. Let stand in cold
water about half an hour. Make one cup of cream sauce, using one
tablespoonful and a half of flour, two tablespoonfuls of butter and one
cup of cream; remove all the water from the fish by wringing in a
cheese-cloth, add the fish to the sauce, and, when heated, stir in a
lightly beaten egg. Serve upon rounds of toast, with olives, or plain
lettuce, or tomato salad.


=Réchauffé of Fish.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 cup of cooked fish, flaked.
          1 cup of macaroni, cooked, and still hot.
          1/4 a cup of butter.
          1 cup of tomato purée.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          Dash of pepper.
          8 drops of tobasco sauce.

_Method._--Melt the butter in the blazer and toss about in it the
macaroni and fish; add the seasonings and the tomato purée, which should
be well reduced. Serve when thoroughly heated.


=Réchauffé of Fish, No. 2.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of cooked fish, flaked and seasoned.
          1/4 a cup of butter.
          1/4 a cup of flour.
          1 cup of fish stock.
          1 cup of cream and milk combined.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt, if needed.
          1 teaspoonful of anchovy paste.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of paprica.
          2 tablespoonfuls of oil.
          2 tablespoonfuls of lemon juice.
          1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley.

_Method._--Marinate the fish while hot with salt, pepper, oil and lemon
juice, adding, also, a few drops of onion juice, if desired. At
serving-time make a sauce of the butter, flour, salt, paprica, stock and
cream; add the paste and the fish, and, when the fish is thoroughly
heated, turn down the flame of the lamp or set the blazer into hot
water. Sprinkle with the parsley and serve.


=Sardines on Toast.=

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter in the blazer; add two tablespoonfuls
of flour and a dash of paprica, and stir until smooth and browned a
little; then add half a cup of stock and half a cup of sherry; stir
until thickened, then let simmer a few minutes, and add nearly a cup of
sardines, from which the bones and skin have been removed and the flesh
separated into small pieces. Let stand until very hot.



CHEESE CONFECTIONS.

          You must eat no cheese . . . it breeds melancholy.
                                          --_B. Jonson._

          Art thou come? Why my cheese, my digestion!
                                --_Troilus and Cressida._


Cheese is probably the most popular article served from the
chafing-dish. What possessor of a chafing-dish has not concocted a
rarebit--and the best one ever made? Were you ever present when the
process of evolving a rarebit was in progress and half the guests were
not disappointed in the seasoning? For perfection in this toothsome
dish, mustard is demanded by some; by others the use of this biting
condiment is considered a lapse in culinary taste. The consensus of
opinion, however, is in favor of paprica; and, theoretically, Mattieu
Williams considers bicarbonate of soda to be demanded, not for the sake
of seasoning, but as an aid to digestion.

As regards the digestibility of cheese, and, consequently, its
adaptability to midnight suppers, opinions differ widely. Dr. Hoy, an
excellent authority on diet, calls cheese a concentrated meat, a tissue
builder,--but not itself a tissue, and so without waste elements,--a
condensed, compact food product, and indigestible on account of its
very compactness. Still, when the caseine, or curd, is softened and
broken up by the addition of liquid and gentle heat, it is rendered more
digestible; and cheese so prepared may be for some, if taken with no
other nitrogenous food, an acceptable and easily digested article of
diet.


=Welsh Rarebit.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          1/2 a pound of cheese, cut fine or grated.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A dash of paprica.
          1/2 a cup of cream.
          The beaten yolks of 2 eggs.

_Method._--Melt the butter, add the cheese and seasonings, and stir
until melted; then add the eggs, diluted with the cream, and stir until
smooth and slightly thickened. _Do not allow the mixture to boil_ at any
time in the cooking; if necessary, cook over hot water. Serve on thin
crackers, hot shredded-wheat or granose biscuit, or on bread toasted on
but one side, placing the rarebit on the untoasted side.


=Welsh Rarebit, No. 2.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of cornstarch.
          1/2 a cup of thin cream.
          1/2 a pound of mild cheese.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of salt.
          1/2 a saltspoonful of mustard.
          A few grains of cayenne.

_Method._--Melt the butter; add to it the cream in which the cornstarch
has been stirred. Let cook two minutes, and add the cheese broken into
bits. Stir until the cheese is melted and the mixture perfectly smooth.
Add the salt, mustard and paprica, and serve at once as above.


=Welsh Rarebit with Ale.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          Generous 1/2 a pound of soft American cheese, broken into bits.
          1/3 a teaspoonful of salt.
          1 teaspoonful of mustard.
          A few grains of cayenne.
          1/2 a cup of ale.
          1 egg.

_Method._--Put the butter into the chafing-dish (using the bath); when
melted, add the cheese and ale. Mix the salt, mustard and cayenne, add
the egg, and beat thoroughly. When the cheese is melted, add the egg
mixture and let cook until it thickens. Serve as before.


=Halibut Rarebit.=

Marinate a cup of cooked halibut, flaked, with one tablespoonful of
olive oil, a few drops of onion juice, one tablespoonful of lemon juice,
one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt and a dash of paprica. Make a sauce of
two tablespoonfuls, each, of butter and flour, one-fourth a teaspoonful
of salt and half a cup, each, of chicken stock and cream. Add two-thirds
a cup of grated cheese and the halibut. Serve, as soon as the fish is
hot and the cheese melted, on the untoasted side of bread toasted on one
side.


=Oyster Rarebit.=

Clean and remove the hard muscles from half a pint of oysters; parboil
the oysters in the chafing-dish in their own liquor until their edges
curl, then remove to a hot bowl. Put one tablespoonful of butter, half a
pound of cheese broken in small bits, one-fourth a teaspoonful, each, of
salt and mustard and a few grains of cayenne into the chafing-dish.
While the cheese is melting, beat two eggs slightly, and add to them the
oyster liquor; mix this gradually with the melted cheese, add the
oysters, and turn at once over hot toast.


=Sardine Rarebit.=

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, add half a pound of fresh cheese,
grated or broken into bits, and stir constantly while it melts; then add
gradually the beaten yolk of an egg, diluted with two-thirds a cup of
cream. Stir until smooth and slightly thickened; season with a scant
half a teaspoonful of paprica, one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt and a
few drops of tabasco sauce. Have ready a box of sardines, drained,
broiled carefully and laid on the untoasted side of bread toasted on one
side; pour the rarebit over the sardines and serve at once.


=Golden Buck.=

Prepare a rarebit in one chafing-dish; break some eggs into the blazer
of another containing salted water just "off the boil." When the eggs
are poached and the rarebit ready, place an egg above the rarebit on
each slice of toast.


=Yorkshire Rarebit.=

Add two slices of broiled or fried bacon to each service of golden buck.


=Mock-Crab Toast.=

Melt a tablespoonful of butter in the blazer, turning it about so as to
butter the surface thoroughly. Put in half a pound of mild cheese,
grated, and stir until the cheese is melted; then add the yolks of three
eggs, beaten and diluted with a tablespoonful of anchovy sauce, a
teaspoonful of made mustard, two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice or
vinegar and one-fourth a teaspoonful of paprica. Stir until smooth.
Serve upon the untoasted side of sippets of bread toasted on one side.


=Cheese Fondue.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/4 a pound of cheese broken into bits.
          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          1 tablespoonful of flour.
          1 saltspoonful, each, of soda and mustard.
          3/4 a cup of milk.
          A few grains of cayenne or paprica.
          1/2 a cup of stale bread crumbs.
          3 eggs.

_Method._--Sift the soda, mustard and cayenne into the flour and cook in
the butter until frothy, then add the milk gradually; when the sauce
boils, after all the milk has been added, put the blazer into the
bath, add the crumbs and cheese, and cook and stir until the cheese is
melted and the mixture becomes smooth; add the eggs, beaten until light,
and serve at once.

[Illustration: Yorkshire Rarebit.]

[Illustration: Curried Eggs.

(See page 191)]


=English Monkey.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 cup of milk.
          1 egg.
          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          1 cup of fine bread crumbs from the centre of a stale loaf.
          3/4 to 1 whole cup of cheese.

_Method._--Melt the butter, add the cheese, and stir while melting; then
add the bread crumbs, which have been soaked in the milk and the egg
lightly beaten.



EGGS.

          New-laid eggs, with Baucis' busy care
          Turned by a gentle fire, and roasted rare.
                                         --_Dryden._


=Scrambled Eggs with Cheese.=

Beat six eggs until whites and yolks are well mixed; add half a
teaspoonful of salt, a dash of paprica and six tablespoonfuls of milk or
cream. Melt two tablespoonsful of butter in the blazer, pour in the egg
mixture, and stir and scrape from the blazer as it thickens. Just before
it comes to the proper consistency, sprinkle in half a cup of grated
Parmesan cheese, still stirring as before, and turn down the flame or
set the blazer into the bath. American dairy cheese may be used instead
of the Parmesan.


=Scrambled Eggs with Smoked Salmon.=

Cook half a cup of smoked salmon, cut into thin strips, in a
tablespoonful of butter three or four minutes; then add to the eggs just
before the cooking is finished.


=Scrambled Eggs à la Union Club.=

Heat one can of pimentos (sweet red peppers) in boiling salted water;
drain, and serve on rounds of buttered toast the pimentos filled with
eggs scrambled with mushrooms or truffles. Pour around the pimentos a
pint of well-seasoned brown sauce, to which one-third a cup of madeira
has been added.


=Scrambled Eggs with Dried Beef.=

Cut half a pound of dried beef, sliced thin, into short match-like
strips, cover with boiling water, drain at once, and add six eggs,
beaten slightly, and one-fourth a cup of milk. Put two tablespoonfuls of
butter into the blazer; when hot add the eggs and other ingredients, and
stir and cook until the eggs are set.


=Scrambled Eggs with Tomatoes.=

Have ready a pint of tomato pulp, from which the seeds have been
removed, seasoned with onion, celery or parsley, and sweet herbs. Put a
generous tablespoonful of butter into the blazer; add the tomato, and,
when hot, six eggs, slightly beaten, half a teaspoonful of salt and half
a saltspoonful of pepper. Stir until the contents are of a creamy
consistency. Serve with brownbread toast.


=Eggs and Mushrooms à la Dauphine.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of thick tomato sauce, highly seasoned.
          1 pint of mushrooms.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          1/2 a saltspoonful of pepper.
          6 eggs.

_Method._--Cook the mushrooms in the tomato sauce until tender; add the
seasoning and the eggs, which have been broken into a bowl. Lift the
whites carefully with a silver or wooden fork while cooking, until they
are set; then prick the yolks and let them mix with the tomato, whites
of the eggs and mushrooms. Serve quite soft on toast.


=Scotch Woodcock.=

Make a cup of white sauce; add one tablespoonful of essence of anchovies
and five hard-boiled eggs cut into quarters lengthwise.


=Eggs à la Italienne.=

INGREDIENTS.

          5 eggs.
          1 cup of milk.
          1/2 a cup of boiled spaghetti, chopped.
          1 tablespoonful of butter.
          1/2 a cup of fresh mushrooms, sliced.
          1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
          1 scant teaspoonful of salt.
          White pepper.

_Method._--Melt the butter in the blazer and sauté in it the sliced
mushrooms; add the milk and spaghetti, and, when heated thoroughly, put
the blazer in the bath and add the beaten eggs. Stir and cook until the
eggs have thickened; then add the parsley and seasoning, and serve at
once.


=Eggs à la Parisienne.=

Butter thickly the inner sides of as many dariole moulds as there are
individuals to serve. Then sprinkle them thickly with fine-chopped
parsley, ham or tongue. Break an egg into each mould, taking care not
to break the yolk; sprinkle over the tops a little salt and pepper, and
set in the blazer surrounded by hot water to two-thirds the height of
the moulds. If, after a time, the water boils, even with the lamp turned
low, put the blazer into the bath and continue cooking, until the eggs
are set. The eggs should be covered while cooking. When cooked, turn
from the moulds and serve with a purée of tomatoes. Half a cup of sliced
mushrooms added to the purée improves this dish.


=Curried Eggs.=

(See cut facing page 186.)

INGREDIENTS.

          6 eggs, cooked, in water just below the boiling-point,
            20 minutes.
          1/2 a cup of stock (fish, veal or chicken).
          1/2 a cup of milk.
          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          2 tablespoonfuls of flour, or 1 teaspoonful of cornstarch.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of curry-powder.
          1 slice of onion.
          Teaspoonful of lemon juice.
          Salt and pepper to taste.

_Method._--Cook the onion in the butter a few minutes, then remove it
and add the flour and curry powder; when frothy add the milk and stock.
As soon as the boiling-point is reached, set the blazer into the
hot-water pan and add the eggs cut in quarters. Season with salt and
serve on sippets of toast.

Light meats, fish, oysters and lobsters may be prepared in the same way,
omitting the half-cup of milk in the case of oysters. Chickens' livers
may also be prepared by the same recipe, in which case the livers should
have been cooked previously. Or they may be sautéd in a little hot
butter in one dish, while the sauce is made in another.


=Shirred Eggs.=

Butter four or five shirring-dishes. To half a cup of grated bread
crumbs and half a cup of chopped chicken or ham add enough cream to mix
to a smooth, moist consistency, like butter. Season to taste with salt
and pepper. Put a tablespoonful of the mixture into each dish, break in
an egg, season with a dash of salt and pepper, cover with more of the
mixture, and cook in the same manner as eggs à la Parisienne. Serve in
the cups.


=Eggs.=

(_Creole style._)

Have prepared on a hot serving-dish a can of tomatoes, stewed until they
are reduced to a scant pint, and upon the tomatoes rounds of buttered
toast for each egg to be served. Break some eggs, one by one, into a
cup, and turn them into the blazer two-thirds filled with hot water;
turn the flame low and put on the chafing-dish cover; if the water
boils, turn down the flame. When the eggs are nicely poached, remove
with a skimmer to the toast. Pour out the water and melt in the blazer,
browning if desired, two tablespoonfuls of butter; add one tablespoonful
of lemon juice; heat to the boiling-point, dust the eggs with salt and
pepper, pour over the sauce, and serve.


=Egg Canapés.=

Have ready, cooked beforehand, four hard-boiled eggs; cut them carefully
into halves lengthwise, remove the yolks, and press them through a small
sieve. Soak two anchovies, then dry and remove the bones and chop them
with two or three cold cooked mushrooms and half a teaspoonful of
capers; mix in the sifted yolks, add a seasoning of salt, pepper and
paprica, and one teaspoonful of tarragon vinegar. This work may be done
some hours before the time of serving. Have a little oil or clarified
butter in the blazer, and sauté in it some rounds of bread--one for each
half of an egg. When the bread is of good color on one side, turn it and
place half an egg--the space from which the yolk was taken being filled
with the anchovy mixture--on the bread; cover the blazer, and, when the
second side of the bread is browned nicely and the egg hot, serve at
once.


=Eggs with Asparagus.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 cup of asparagus peas.
          1 cup of asparagus liquor.
          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          2 tablespoonfuls of flour.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of salt.
          Paprica.
          3 or 4 eggs.

_Method._--Cut the asparagus in pieces of the size of a pea and cook
until tender. In cooking, reserve the tips until the other pieces are
partially cooked, or, being more tender, they will become broken while
the others are still uncooked. Make a sauce of the butter, flour, salt,
paprica, and water in which the asparagus was cooked, or use half a cup
of cream in the place of part of the asparagus liquor. When the sauce
boils, add the asparagus and mix lightly with the sauce; break the eggs,
one after another, into a cup and slide them carefully on to the top of
the asparagus. Season with a sprinkling of salt and pepper, and, if
desired, a grating of nutmeg. Set the blazer into the bath and put on
the cover. When the eggs are nicely poached, remove the eggs, with the
asparagus below, on to rounds of toasted and buttered bread.


=Eggs with Spinach.=

Prepare in the same manner, using for one cup of chopped spinach
one-third the quantity of sauce given above. If convenient, the eggs may
be poached in a second dish, and in milk, water or stock.


=Eggs.=

(_Italian Style._)

Cut six cold, hard-boiled eggs into eighths lengthwise; add these, with
a cup of cooked macaroni and half a cup of grated Parmesan cheese, to
two cups of white sauce, at the boiling-point, in the blazer. Set over
hot water, add a teaspoonful of onion juice, a teaspoonful of chopped
parsley, salt and anchovy essence to taste, and serve very hot.



DISHES LARGELY VEGETARIAN.

          Although the cheer be poor,
          'Twill fill your stomachs.
                        --_Titus Andronicus._


=Macaroni à la Italienne.=

Have ready one-fourth a pound of macaroni, cooked until tender, but not
broken, in boiling salted water, and then drained, and rinsed in cold
water.

Make a sauce of two tablespoonfuls of butter, one tablespoonful of
flour, one-fourth a teaspoonful, each, of salt and paprica, half a cup
of well-seasoned stock and half a cup of well-reduced tomato pulp. Add
the drained macaroni and stir occasionally, while it becomes thoroughly
heated, then add one-fourth a cup of grated Parmesan cheese. Lift the
macaroni with a fork and spoon so as to mix thoroughly with the cheese,
and serve at once.

Strain the tomatoes through a sieve sufficiently fine to keep back the
seeds, and cook the pulp, very slowly, until reduced to at least half
its bulk. A more hearty dish may be served by adding, just before the
cheese, three-fourths a cup of cold tongue cut in thin slices and then
stamped into small fanciful shapes with a French cutter; or the tongue
may be cut simply in small cubes.


=Asparagus Peas.=

Scrape the scales from the stalks of asparagus and cut the tender
portions into pieces one-fourth an inch long. Cook in boiling salted
water until tender; drain, and keep the peas hot. For three cups of peas
make one cup of drawn-butter sauce, using as liquid the water in which
the asparagus was cooked, or white stock. Add the peas to the sauce;
beat the yolks of two eggs, add half a cup of cream, and stir into the
sauce and peas; add, also, one tablespoonful of butter. Serve on
croutons of fried bread, or in cases made of shredded-wheat biscuit.


=Fresh Mushrooms and Sweetbreads.=

Soak one pair of sweetbreads in cold water; cover with boiling salted
water and let boil three minutes, then simmer twenty minutes; cool, and
cut in small cubes. Sauté in two tablespoonfuls of hot butter sufficient
mushroom caps, peeled and broken into pieces, to make with the
sweetbreads two cups and a half. Make a sauce in the blazer, using
one-fourth a cup, each, of butter and flour, one cup of chicken stock
and half a cup of cream; add the sweetbreads and mushrooms, one
tablespoonful of lemon juice, and, if desired, the yolks of two eggs,
beaten and diluted with one-fourth a cup of cream or sherry. Serve on
toast, in patty cases, or in cases of shredded-wheat biscuit.


=Mushroom Cromeskies.=

(See cut facing page 198.)

Peel the caps of fresh mushrooms; wrap each mushroom in a slice of
bacon, pinning the bacon around the mushroom with a wooden toothpick.
Sauté in a hot blazer and serve on toast. These are particularly good,
cooked in a hot oven in a double broiler resting over a baking-pan.


=Creamed Mushrooms.=

Wipe carefully half a pound of mushrooms; peel the caps and break them
in pieces. Reserve the stems for another dish. Melt three tablespoonfuls
of butter in the blazer and in it sauté the mushrooms; dust with salt
and pepper, add two tablespoonfuls of flour, and, when cooked in the
butter, one cup of cream, gradually; stir until the sauce boils, let
simmer a few minutes, then serve with toast or crackers.


=Artichokes à la Bordelaise.=

(MRS. E. M. LUCAS.)

Put one-fourth a cup of butter and half a cup of sifted bread crumbs
into the blazer and light the lamp; when the crumbs are well moistened
with the butter, add a teaspoonful of fine-minced parsley, one pint of
cooked artichokes cut into small cubes, half a teaspoonful of salt, a
dash of cayenne and half a pint of rich, sweet cream. Let boil up once
and put out the flame; add a teaspoonful of lemon juice and half a
teaspoonful of the grated rind of a lemon (or omit the grated rind);
stir well and serve at once.


=Puff-balls Sautéd.=

Heat three tablespoonfuls of butter or oil in the blazer. Cut the
puff-balls in slices half an inch in thickness, season with salt and
pepper, dip in egg and bread crumbs, and sauté in the blazer to a golden
brown.


=Mushrooms and Macaroni.=

(_Italian style._)

Put one tablespoonful of butter and one teaspoonful of lemon juice into
the blazer; add a dozen peeled mushrooms, broken into pieces and
blanched, and cook slowly, covered, five or six minutes. Then add one
cup and one-fourth of milk, and, when scalded, stir in two
tablespoonfuls, each, of butter and flour, creamed together. When the
sauce boils, add one-fourth a pound of macaroni, cooked and blanched in
the usual manner; heat over hot water, and, just before serving, add
one-fourth a cup of grated cheese.


=Canned Peas with Egg.=

Rinse, drain, and rinse again in boiling water one can of peas. Add two
tablespoonfuls of butter, one teaspoonful of sugar, half a teaspoonful
of salt and a dash of pepper. Beat the yolk of an egg, dilute with
four tablespoonfuls of cream, and stir into the peas. Serve as soon as
the egg thickens slightly.

[Illustration: Mushroom Cromeskies.

(_Ready for cooking._)

(See page 197)]

[Illustration: Prune Toast.

(See page 217)]


=Curried Vegetables.=

Make a sauce of one-fourth a cup, each, of butter and flour, one
tablespoonful of curry powder, half a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of
pepper and a pint of milk; add half a teaspoonful of onion juice, one
cup of cooked peas, half a cup, each, of potato balls, turnips cut into
cubes or fanciful shapes, and carrots cut into straws.


=Potatoes à la Maître d'Hôtel.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of potato balls, cut with French cutter, and
            cooked tender, may be used either hot or cold.
          1 cup of milk.
          2 tablespoonfuls of butter.
          2 yolks of eggs.
          1 tablespoonful of lemon juice.
          1 tablespoonful of parsley, finely chopped.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A dash of pepper.

_Method._--Heat the milk and potatoes in the blazer over hot water.
Cream the butter and add the yolks of the eggs, beating them in well;
add the parsley and seasonings, mix thoroughly, and, when the potatoes
are hot and have absorbed part of the milk, stir the egg and butter into
them; add the lemon juice and serve at once.


=White Hashed Potatoes.=

Butter the blazer and put into it about three cups of cold chopped
potato, salted during the chopping. Pour over the potato a little hot
stock, or water, and scatter some bits of butter over the top. Cover,
and cook slowly, without stirring or browning, until thoroughly heated.


=String Beans à la Lyonnaise.=

Melt three tablespoonfuls of butter in the blazer; add a fine-sliced
onion and sauté to a delicate brown; add a quart of string beans,
cooked, a dash of pepper, a grating of nutmeg and a little salt; heat
thoroughly, tossing the beans occasionally; add a teaspoonful of chopped
parsley, a tablespoonful of lemon juice and another tablespoonful of
butter, in bits, and serve at once.


=Tomato Sandwich.=

INGREDIENTS.

          6 shredded-wheat biscuit.
          4 medium-sized tomatoes.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          8 teaspoonfuls of sugar, or
          8 teaspoonfuls of mayonnaise dressing.

_Method._--Peel the tomatoes, cut in small pieces, add the salt, and
sugar, if used, and set aside in a cool place. Split the biscuits, dip
the inside lightly into cold water without wetting the outside, put the
halves together, and arrange in a buttered blazer; cover, and heat over
hot water; then separate the halves, and, using a knife dipped in hot
water, spread with butter. Put a layer of tomatoes on the bottom half,
if sugar has not been used, add the salad dressing, and cover with the
top of the biscuit, pressing it down lightly.


=Kornlet Oysters.=

To one cup of kornlet add two well-beaten eggs, two tablespoonfuls of
flour, a scant half teaspoonful of salt and a dash of paprica. Drop, by
spoonfuls, into a hot, well-oiled blazer and cook to a golden brown,
turn, and brown the other side.


=Kornlet Oysters, No. 2.=

To one can of kornlet add a teaspoonful of soda, two well-beaten eggs,
salt and pepper, and enough fine cracker crumbs to hold the mixture
together. Drop from a spoon and cook as above.



RÉCHAUFFÉS AND OLLA-PODRIDA

          "Take heed of enemies reconciled and meats twice
          cooked."


=Suggestions Concerning Réchauffés.=

Many of the dishes prepared in the chafing-dish are réchauffés of cold
cooked meats, including game and fish. The composition of such dishes is
called "the flower of cookery": but it is well to remember that we are
dealing with a class of foods that are more digestible when cooked rare;
also, that in these cases digestibility decreases in proportion to the
length of time, as well as the number of times, the article has been
cooked. The meat or fish composing such dishes should not come into
direct contact with the source of heat; after being freed from skin,
bone and fat, they should simply be heated in a hot sauce over hot
water.


=Corned-Beef Hash.=

(_Spanish style._)

Chop together very fine the corned beef and potatoes and a half or a
whole green pepper, after having removed the seeds and veins; put two
tablespoonfuls of butter into the blazer (over hot water), add the
chopped ingredients, and season to suit the taste, adding a little stock
or milk to moisten; mix thoroughly, then cover, and stir occasionally
until heated through. Put a few bits of butter here and there over the
top, and serve when melted. Use an equal quantity of meat and potato, or
twice as much potato as meat. Serve with olives, pickles or a light
vegetable salad.


=Mock Terrapin.=

Have ready cooked half a calf's liver (it may be boiled or braised with
vegetables). Cut it into small cubes. Put one-fourth a cup of butter
into the blazer; when colored a little add the cubes of liver dredged
with two tablespoonfuls of flour, one-fourth a teaspoonful of paprica
and half a teaspoonful of salt. Stir and cook until the flour is blended
with the butter; then add one cup of water or stock and one teaspoonful
of chopped parsley. As soon as the sauce boils, add one-fourth a cup of
cream, two hard-boiled eggs chopped fine, and one teaspoonful of lemon
juice. Serve on toast, with quarters of lemon cut lengthwise.

_Note._--Cream may be used in the place of stock, and the yolks of two
uncooked eggs instead of the cooked eggs.


=Spaghetti.=

(_Queen style._)

Cut cold cooked chicken or turkey and cooked tongue (enough to make one
cup of meat) in dice; cut into inch-length pieces cooked spaghetti
enough to make one cup. Put one cup and a half of thin cream into the
blazer over hot water, and, when hot, add the meat and spaghetti. Beat
the yolks of two eggs, add two tablespoonfuls of cream, and stir into
the hot mixture; add, also, half a teaspoonful (scant) of salt and a
dash of paprica. Stir constantly until the mixture thickens slightly,
then serve at once with toast or crackers.


=Scrambled Ham and Eggs.=

Put a tablespoonful of butter in the blazer. Break six eggs into a bowl,
add six tablespoonfuls of water, and beat until you can take up a
spoonful. Add about a cup of fine-chopped ham and mix well. Pour into
the blazer, and cook until creamy, stirring constantly.


=Chicken Klopps with Bechamel Sauce.=

INGREDIENTS.

          2 cups of cold chicken, chopped.
          1/4 a teaspoonful of celery pepper.
          1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
          The unbeaten whites of 4 eggs.
          1 teaspoonful of salt.

_Method._--When ready to cook, mix the ingredients together thoroughly
and form into round balls. Place the balls carefully in water _just off
the boil_, and, in about five minutes, or as soon as the egg seems
poached, remove the klopps with a skimmer. Serve with


=BECHAMEL SAUCE.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1/3 a cup of butter.
          1/3 a cup of flour.
          1 cup of cream.
          1 cup of chicken stock.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.
          A dash of paprica.
          The beaten yolks of 1 or 2 eggs.

_Method._--Make the sauce in the usual manner, but _do not let it boil
after the yolks of the eggs are added_.


=Minced Ham à la Poulette.=

To each cup of fine-chopped ham add one tablespoonful of fine bread
crumbs, softened with cream or milk. Season with salt and pepper. Heat
thoroughly and spread on rounds of moist buttered toast. Place a poached
_egg_ on each slice. Use two dishes.


=Epicurean Canapés.=

Heat a little butter in the blazer; sauté in it some narrow strips of
bread and spread them thickly with the mixture used for epicurean
sandwiches. Press a pitted olive in the centre of each and serve at
once.


=Aberdeen Sandwiches.=

Heat one-fourth a cup of chopped cold tongue or ham, and half a cup of
chopped veal or chicken, with half a cup of good sauce and two
tablespoonfuls of curry paste (curry powder mixed with just enough
water to form a paste). Let the mixture simmer five minutes, stirring
constantly; then set aside to become cool. Have some bits of bread
prepared as for sandwiches. Heat some clarified butter in the blazer,
and in it sauté the bread a delicate brown, and drain on soft paper.
Spread with the cold mixture, press two pieces together, and heat over
hot water five or ten minutes. Serve hot.


=Calf's Head en Tortue.=

Peel a dozen mushrooms; break the caps in pieces and chop the stems very
fine. Sauté in three tablespoonfuls of butter, adding, if desired, half
an onion cut fine. Sprinkle in one-fourth a cup of flour, half a
teaspoonful, each, of salt and paprica, and, when the ingredients are
well blended, add gradually one cup and a half of stock and one-fourth a
cup of tomato juice. Let simmer a few moments, after the sauce boils;
then add one pint of meat from a calf's head, cooked and cut in cubes.


=Woodcock Toast.=

Pound to a paste the freshly boiled livers of two fowls (ducks
preferred), one teaspoonful of anchovy paste (or one anchovy may be
pounded with the livers), half a teaspoonful of sugar, one tablespoonful
of butter, one-fourth a teaspoonful of spiced pepper and the yolks of
two raw eggs. Pass through a sieve, dilute with a little hot cream from
a cup of cream heated over hot water, stir, and return to the rest of
the cream. Stir until thickened, then pour over sippets or rounds of
toast sautéd a golden brown in a little butter.


=Scotch Woodcock.=

Beat thoroughly three eggs and three teaspoonfuls of anchovy paste. Put
this into the chafing-dish over hot water with three-fourths a cup of
milk and stir until thick. Spread sippets of toast with butter and then
with anchovy paste, and turn the woodcock upon them.


=Calves' Brains and Mushrooms à la Poulette.=

Sauté a clove of garlic, cut fine, in two tablespoonfuls of butter; add
half a pound of mushrooms, peeled and broken in pieces, one-fourth a cup
of flour, and sauté until well browned. Then add one-fourth a
teaspoonful, each, of mace and paprica, half a teaspoonful of salt and
one cup and a half of stock, and cook five or six minutes. Then add the
yolks of two eggs, one tablespoonful of lemon juice, one tablespoonful
of chopped parsley and three calves' brains, cooked, and cut in dice.
Serve in timbale cases, or upon croustades of bread.


=Beef Tea in Chafing-dish.=

Cut juicy round steak into pieces about two inches square. Heat the
blazer very hot; heat also a wooden lemon-squeezer in hot water or in
any way that is most convenient. Put the meat into the hot blazer, turn
again and again with a fork, keeping the blazer very hot. When the bits
of meat are heated throughout, squeeze them, one by one, with the
lemon-squeezer, into a _hot_ bowl. Season with salt and serve at once.


=Salmi of Duck or Game.=

INGREDIENTS.

          Pieces of game.
          1/3 a cup, each, of butter and flour.
          1 tablespoonful, each, of carrot and onion slices.
          2 cups of rich brown stock, highly seasoned.
          1/4 a cup of madeira.
          1 cup of peas or flageolets, cooked.

_Method._--Cook the butter, onion and carrot in the blazer until well
browned. Skim out the onion and carrot and add the flour, pepper and
salt. Add the stock. As soon as the sauce is cooked, add the madeira,
the pieces of game, and the peas or flageolets. Serve as soon as the
meat is hot.


=Salmi of Duck, No. 2.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 pint of thin slices of duck.
          2 tablespoonfuls, each, of butter and flour.
          1 pint of brown stock.
          1 tablespoonful of catsup.
          10 or 15 drops of onion juice.
          1 teaspoonful of lemon juice.
          6 mushrooms, cut in pieces.
          1 tablespoonful of currant jelly.
          Salt and pepper to taste.

_Method._--Brown the butter and make a sauce with the flour, seasoning
and stock. Add the duck and mushrooms, simmer twenty minutes, add the
currant jelly, and garnish with croutons.


=Sweetbreads Sautéd.=

Split parboiled sweetbreads into two pieces. Wipe dry, sprinkle with
salt, pepper and flour; or season with salt and pepper, and
egg-and-bread-crumb them. Sauté in the blazer in hot olive oil, or
butter, until nicely browned on both sides. Serve with French peas or
tomato sauce.


=Chicken with Mushrooms.=

Melt one-fourth a cup of butter in the blazer; add six mushroom caps,
peeled and sliced, and cook slowly, with a teaspoonful of grated onion,
about six minutes; add two tablespoonfuls of flour, stir until smooth,
then add one cup of cream, stock or milk, pepper and salt, and a few
grains of mace. When the sauce boils, stir in one pint of chicken,
finely chopped, and serve as soon as hot. Sweetbreads, lamb or veal may
be served in the same manner.


=Chopped Beef.=

Chop half a pound of raw beef, from the tender part of the round, very
fine. Rub the bottom of the hot blazer with butter, put in the meat with
one teaspoonful of grated onion, stir, and cook four or five minutes;
add two tablespoonfuls of butter, salt and pepper, and serve at once.
This is good with bread, but better with baked potatoes. A pound of beef
may be cooked at one time in a chafing-dish of good size, and the grated
onion increased to suit the taste. The juice, of which there will be a
large quantity, may be thickened with flour and butter creamed together;
but it is better unthickened.


=Chicken Timbales.=

Pass the breast of a raw chicken through a meat-chopper five or six
times; beat in, one at a time, the whites of two small eggs (the whites
of the eggs are _not_ to be previously beaten), then beat in very
gradually one cup of thick cream. Season with half a teaspoonful of salt
and one-fourth a teaspoonful of white pepper. Turn the mixture into
buttered moulds, set them in the blazer, and cook, surrounded with hot
water to two-thirds their height and covered, about twenty minutes. The
water should not boil; if, with the flame turned low, it still boils,
set the blazer into the bath, in which the water may boil vigorously
without harm to the timbales. Serve with


=BECHAMEL SAUCE.=

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, add two tablespoonfuls of flour,
one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of pepper and half a cup, each,
of chicken stock and cream; add the beaten yolk of one egg and let stand
over hot water five minutes. Or,


=MUSHROOM SAUCE.=

Make as above, substituting one-fourth a cup of mushroom liquor for a
part of the chicken stock, and adding with the egg half a can of
mushrooms, or a cup of fresh mushrooms sautéd in two tablespoonfuls of
butter.


=Supreme of Chicken.=

Chop fine the breast of a raw chicken. Beat one egg, add the chicken,
and continue beating until smooth; then add three eggs, one at a time,
beating each egg in thoroughly. Add a generous teaspoonful of salt, a
saltspoonful of white pepper, a dash of black pepper and one pint of
cream. Butter twelve small moulds and ornament them with truffles. Fill
with the chicken mixture, cover with buttered paper, and steam twenty
minutes. Or, put in a pan of boiling water and cook in a moderate oven
till the centres are firm. Serve with mushroom or bechamel sauce. These
can be cooked and left in the moulds and then reheated. It will take
about fifteen minutes to reheat.


=Egg Timbales.=

Beat six eggs without separating, add a scant teaspoonful of salt, a
dash of pepper, a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, twenty drops of onion
juice and one cup and a half of rich milk. Stir till well mixed. Butter
small-sized timbale moulds and fill two-thirds full with the mixture.
Place moulds in the blazer, pour boiling water about them three-fourths
to the tops of the moulds, and let cook about twenty minutes, or till
the centres are firm; turn out of the moulds on to a warm platter, and
pour about them a thin bread sauce.


=BREAD SAUCE.=

To one pint of milk add half a cup of fine, stale bread crumbs, a small
onion with six cloves stuck in it, half a teaspoonful of salt and a few
grains of cayenne. Cook in the double boiler for about an hour; stir
occasionally. Remove the onion, beat well, and add one tablespoonful of
butter. Put one tablespoonful of butter over the fire in a small
saucepan; when hot add two-thirds a cup of rather coarse bread crumbs;
stir over a hot fire till they are brown and crisp. Sprinkle over the
timbales and sauce. Add a sprig of parsley to the top of each timbale.


=Pan-Broiling.=

Chops, birds, venison, hamburg, sirloin and other steaks, even spring
chickens, may be cooked successfully in the chafing-dish; but they are
not the dishes upon which an amateur should begin his experiments. Heat
the blazer very hot, brush over the surface with a brush dipped in olive
oil (or use a butter-ball and a fork), lay in the article to be cooked,
sear upon one side, turn and sear upon the other; repeat, turning and
cooking until done to taste; five minutes will suffice for small lamb
chops. Serve with


=Maître d'Hôtel Butter.=

Beat four tablespoonfuls of butter to a cream; add half a teaspoonful of
salt and a few grains of pepper, also one tablespoonful of parsley,
chopped very fine, and one tablespoonful of lemon juice, very slowly.


=Fillets of Beef, Mushroom Sauce.=

Have half a dozen slices cut crosswise from a neatly trimmed fillet of
beef. The slices may be cut of any thickness desired, but from half to
three-fourths an inch is preferable for chafing-dish cookery. Melt two
tablespoonfuls of butter in a hot blazer; lay in the meat, and cook four
or five minutes, turning every ten seconds. The heat should be well
maintained throughout the cooking. Season with salt when half cooked. In
another blazer make a cup of brown sauce; brown two tablespoonfuls of
butter, add four tablespoonfuls of flour, and, when this is well
browned, add half a cup of very rich brown stock and half a cup of
liquid from the mushroom can. Season to taste with Kitchen Bouquet,
salt, and a few drops of tabasco sauce, then add half a bottle of
mushrooms, cut in halves. Serve as soon as the mushrooms are hot.


=Fillets of Lamb, Cherry Sauce.=

For the fillets use either the fillet from the loin or the top of a
"best end of a loin" boned. Cut the meat in slices or rounds, and sauté
in hot butter in the blazer. Season with salt and pepper and pour into
the blazer half a cup of maraschino cherries with half a cup of the
liquid from the bottle. Candied cherries that have stood half an hour in
half a cup of boiling water, on the back of the range, and then mixed
with half a cup of sherry wine, may be used in place of the maraschino
cherries. This sauce may also be used with fillets of beef or young
turkey.


=Ham Timbales.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1-1/2 cups of milk or thin cream.
          1 cup of cold, cooked ham, chopped fine.
          1/4 a cup of fine bread crumbs.
          The yolks of 2 "hard-boiled" eggs.
          Two raw eggs.
          A few drops of tabasco sauce.
          1/2 a teaspoonful of salt.

Take the bread crumbs from the centre of a stale loaf. Pass the cooked
yolks of eggs through a sieve. Add the ham, crumbs, yolks, salt and
tabasco to the raw eggs beaten and mixed with the milk. When thoroughly
mixed turn into timbale moulds very carefully buttered. Fit papers into
the bottoms of the moulds before buttering. Set these in the blazer,
surround with hot water, letting it come half way to the top of the
moulds. Heat the water to the boiling-point, then set the blazer into
the hot-water pan partly filled with boiling water, cover and cook until
the mixture is firm in the centre. Serve, turned from the moulds, with
cream or tomato sauce, flavored with onion, or with peas heated in a
cream sauce.


=Fillets of Chicken.=

(_Chafing-dish Style._)

Remove the breast from a plump and tender chicken and separate from the
bone and skin. Detach the small fillets, then cut each side into two or
three lengthwise slices the size of the small fillets. Keep covered
closely until ready to cook. Heat the blazer very hot, butter slightly,
and in it lay the fillets and sprinkle with the juice of half a lemon,
salt and white pepper; add, also, one-third a cup of chicken stock and a
tablespoonful of sherry. Cover and let cook about ten minutes. In the
meantime prepare a sauce in a second chafing-dish, using two
tablespoonfuls, each, of butter and flour, a dash of salt and pepper,
and one cup of stock, in making which a small piece of ham or bacon was
used. Add also a tablespoonful of mushroom or tomato catsup and a
tablespoonful of sherry wine.


=Mutton Réchauffé.=

(_Creole Style._)

Melt three tablespoonfuls of butter in the blazer and sauté in this a
tablespoonful, each, of green pepper and onion, chopped fine; add three
tablespoonfuls of flour and half a teaspoonful of salt, and stir and
cook until frothy; then add, gradually, one cup of brown stock and half
a cup of tomato purée (cooked tomato strained). Let boil two or three
minutes, then set over hot water and stir in one cup of cold roast
mutton cut in strips or cubes, and half a cup of cooked macaroni,
blanched and drained. Two or three mushrooms or a tablespoonful of
mushroom catsup improves this dish.


=Baba or Wine Cake.=

This cake may be made some days in advance, and when wished reheated in
a sauce made in the chafing-dish. Baba is baked in a large mould and cut
in slices, or in individual cylindrical or baba moulds.


=BABA.=

INGREDIENTS.

          1 lb. of flour.
          1 cake of compressed yeast.
          1/2 a cup of water.
          10 oz. of butter (1-1/4 cups).
          1/4 a teaspoonful of salt.
          1/2 a cup of sugar.
          8 eggs.
          1/2 a cup of currants, sultanas or sliced citron.

Make a sponge of the yeast, softened in the water, and flour to knead.
Knead the little ball of dough until elastic, and put into a small
saucepan of lukewarm water. Meanwhile add the butter, sugar, salt and
three of the eggs to the rest of the flour, and beat with the hand until
all are evenly blended; then add the rest of the eggs, one after
another. When the ball of dough rises to the top of the water and is
light, remove from the water with a skimmer and beat it into the egg
paste; beat for some minutes, then beat in the fruit. Turn the mixture
into the mould or moulds, leaving room for the cake to double in bulk.
Let rise in a temperature of 68° F. When nearly doubled in bulk, bake
from twenty to fifty minutes.


=SAUCE FOR BABA.=

Let two cups of sugar and one cup of water boil in the blazer about six
minutes, then add one-fourth a cup, or more, of maraschino, rum or
sherry wine. Lay the baba, sliced or in individual forms, into the hot
syrup and let stand a few minutes, basting the cake with the syrup. When
hot, serve with or without whipped cream. Half a cup of apricot or
quince marmalade may be added with the wine.


=Fig Toast.=

(See cut facing page 198.)

Wash carefully and cook in boiling water half a pound of pulled figs
until tender; add one fourth a cup of sugar and the grated rind and
juice of half a lemon. Cook until the syrup is well reduced. Cut the
crust from a thick slice of bread and sauté to a golden brown, first on
one side, then on the other, in two tablespoonfuls of hot butter. Drain
the bread on soft paper; then heap the figs upon it, cover with
two-thirds a cup of thick cream and a scant fourth a cup of sugar,
beaten until stiff. Serve at once. Prunes, apricots, peaches, pears, or
strawberry preserves, may be prepared in the same manner. If preserves
be used, omit the sugar from the cream. Sponge cake may be used in the
place of bread.


=Pineapple Sponge.=

Heat one pint of grated pineapple over hot water, sprinkle into it
one-third a cup of fine tapioca (a quick-cooking kind), mixed with
two-thirds a cup of sugar, and half a teaspoonful of salt; when the
tapioca is transparent, add the juice of a lemon, and fold in the whites
of two eggs, beaten until dry. Serve with cream and sugar.


=Tapioca-and-Banana Sponge.=

Sprinkle half a cup of tapioca and two-thirds a cup of sugar into one
pint of boiling water; add half a teaspoonful of salt and cook over hot
water, stirring occasionally. When the tapioca is transparent, add the
juice of two lemons, and fold in the whites of two eggs, beaten until
dry. Serve spread over sliced bananas, with cream and sugar, or with a
cold boiled custard, previously made. This dish may be prepared with
canned peaches, apricots or quinces, using the juice of the fruit
instead of water.



INDEX.

  Aberdeen Sandwiches, 205
  Aigrettes, Cheese, 109
  Almond-and-Peach Salad, 94
  Almonds and Walnuts, To Blanch, 12
  Anchovy Salad, 74
  Anchovy Toast, 175
     "      "   with Eggs, 175
     "      "     "  Spinach, 176
  Anchovies with Olives, 176
  Apple,-Celery-and-Walnut Salad, 92
  Artichoke Salad, 45
       "   -and-Tomato Salad, 44
  Artichokes à la Bordelaise, 197
  Asparagus with Eggs, 193
      "     Peas, 196
      "     Salad, 46
      "     Salad, Egg Garnish, 47
      "     -and-Cauliflower Salad, 46
      "       "   Salmon Salad, 46
      "     Tips in Turnips, 46
  Aspic Jelly from Bouillon Capsules, etc., 100
  Aspic Jelly, Chicken Stock for, 99
    "     "  , Consommé for, 98
    "     "  for Garnishing, 97
    "     "  Oysters in, 65
    "     "  Recipe for, 97
    "     "  for Sandwiches, 127, 128

  Baba, 216
  Baba, Sauce for, 216
  Bacon Salad, 84
  Bacon Sauce, 27
  Baking Powder Biscuit, 139
  Balls, Cheese, 107
  Bamboo Sprouts, Shrimp-and-Lettuce Salad, 74
  Banana-and-Orange Salad, 93
  Banana-and-Tapioca Sponge, 218
  Bar-le-Duc-and-Cheese Sandwiches, 135
  Bean, White, Salad, 32
  Bechamel Sauce, 205, 210
  Beef, Chopped, 209
   "  , Fillets of, 213
   "  Hash, Corned, 202
   "  Sandwiches, Corned, 119
  Beef Tea in Chafing-Dish, 207
  Beet-and-Cream Cheese Sandwiches, 125
  Beets and Brussels Sprouts, Salad of, 35
  Beets, Stuffed, 34
  Bernaise Sauce, 28
  Beverages with Sandwiches, 118
  Biscuit, Baking Powder, 139
     "   , Sandwich, 139
  Bluefish Salad, 60, 75
  Boiled Dressing for Chicken Salad, 26
  Boiled Salad Dressing, 26
  Boston Brown Bread, 138
  Boudins-de-Saumon Salad, 61
  Bread, Boston Brown, 138
    "  , Entire Wheat, 137
    "  , Pulled, 139
    "  , Rice, 138
    "  , Wheat, Two Loaves of, 137
    "  , for Sandwiches, 116
    "  , To Give Glossy Crust, 140
  Brook Trout Salad, 55
   "      "     "  in Aspic, 55

  Cabbage and Cauliflower, To Clean, 14
  Calf's Head en Tortue, 206
  Canapés, Egg, 193
     "   , Epicurean, 205
     "   , Oyster, 168
  Cauliflower-and-Asparagus Salad, 46
  Cauliflower Salad, Egg Garnish, 49
  Caviare Sandwich Rolls, 120
  Celery, Apple-and-Nut Salad, 92
    "   -and-Chestnut Salad, 92
  Celery-and-Nut in Border, 43
  Celery-and-Oyster Salad, 66
  Celery Sandwiches, 120
  Celery, To Fringe, 15
     "  , To Keep, 16
  Ceylon Cocoa, 145
  Chafing-Dish Appointments, 153
  Chafing-Dish Recipes:
    Aberdeen Sandwiches, 205
    Anchovy Toast, 175
        "    "  with Eggs, 175
        "    "    "  Spinach, 176
    Anchovies with Olives, 176
    Artichokes à la Bordelaise, 197
    Asparagus Peas, 196
    Baba on Wine Cake, 216
    Bechamel Sauce, 210
    Beef Tea in Chafing-Dish, 207
    Bread Sauce, 211
    Buttered Lobster, 169
    Calf's Head en Tortue, 206
    Calves' Brains and Mushrooms, Poulette, 207
    Canned Peas with Egg, 198
    Cheese Fondue, 186
    Chicken Klopps with Bechamel Sauce, 204
    Chicken Timbales, 210
    Chicken with Mushrooms, 209
    Chopped Beef, 209
    Chops, etc. Pan Broiled, 212
    Clams à la Newburgh, 170
    Corned Beef Hash, 202
    Crabs à la Creole, 174
    Creamed Dishes, 166
    Creamed Mushrooms, 197
    Creamed Peas, 179
    Curried Eggs, 191
    Curried Oysters, 164
    Curried    "    No. 2, 165
    Curried Sardines, 177
    Curried Vegetables, 199
    Deviled Dishes, 166
    Deviled Crabs, 173
    Egg Canapés, 193
    Egg Timbales, 211
    Egg à la Italienne, 190
    Eggs à la Parisienne, 190
    Eggs, Creole Style, 192
    Eggs, Italian Style, 194
    Eggs and Mushrooms à la Dauphine, 189
    Eggs with Asparagus, 193
      "   "   Spinach, 194
    English Monkey, 187
    Epicurean Canapés, 205
    Escalloped Oysters, 168
    Fig Toast, 217
    Fillets of Beef, Mushroom Sauce, 213
    Fillets of Lamb, Cherry Sauce, 213
    Fresh Mushrooms and Sweetbreads, 196
    Fricassee of Oysters, 165
    Golden Buck, 185
    Halibut Rarebit, 184
    Ham Timbales, 214
    Hawaiian Lobster Curry, 171
    Kornlet Oysters, 201
       "       "    No. 2, 201
    Lobster à la Bechamel, 171
    Lobster à la Bordelaise, 170
    Lobster à la Newburgh, 169
    Lobster à la Poulette, 172
    Macaroni à la Italienne, 195
    Maître d'Hôtel Butter, 212
    Mock Terrapin, 203
    Minced Ham à la Poulette, 205
    Moulded Halibut with Creamed Peas, 178
    Mushroom Cromeskies, 197
    Mushrooms and Macaroni, 198
    Mushroom Sauce, 210
    Mutton Réchauffé, Creole Style, 215
    Oyster Canapés, 168
    Oyster Crabs, 174
    Oyster Crabs à la Hollandaise, 172
    Oyster Cromeskies, 167
    Oyster Rarebit, 185
    Oysters, 163
    Oysters, No. 2, 163
    Oysters à la D'Uxelles, 164
    Oysters Sauté, 168
    Panned Oysters, 167
       "      "     Maître d'Hôtel, 167
    Pineapple Sponge, 217
    Plain Lobster, 170
    Potatoes à la Maître d'Hôtel, 199
    Puff Balls, Sautéd, 198
    Purée of Fish, 179
    Réchauffé of Fish, 180
        "     "   "   No. 2, 181
    Salmi of Duck or Game, 208
    Salmi of Duck No. 2, 208
    Salt Codfish in Cream Sauce, 180
    Salt Codfish with Tomato Sauce, 179
    Sardine Canapés, 177
    Sardine Rarebit, 185
    Sardines, French Fashion, 177
    Sardines on Toast, 181
    Scotch Woodcock, 190, 207
    Scrambled Eggs à la Union Club, 188
    Scrambled Eggs with Cheese, 188
    Scrambled Eggs with Dried Beef, 189
    Scrambled Eggs with Oysters, 166
    Scrambled Eggs with Smoked Salmon, 188
    Scrambled Eggs with Tomatoes, 189
    Scrambled Ham and Eggs, 204
    Shirred Eggs, 192
    Shrimps à la Poulette, 175
    Shrimps with Peas, 175
    Spaghetti, Queen Style, 203
    String Beans à la Lyonnaise, 200
    Supreme of Chicken, 211
    Sweetbreads, Sautéd, 209
    Tapioca and Banana Sponge, 218
    Tomato Sandwich, 200
    Welsh Rarebit, 183
     "      "     No. 2, 183
     "      "     with Ale, 184
    White Hashed Potatoes, 199
    Woodcock Toast, 206
    Yorkshire Rarebit, 186
  Chafing-Dishes, Past and Present, 151
  Chaud-froid Sauce, White, 101
  Cheese Aigrettes, 109
    "    d'Artois, 109
    "    Balls, 107
    "   -and-Cowslip Salad, 49
    "    Croquettes, 108
    "    Custard, 105
    "    Fondue, 186
    "    Fritters, 110
    "    Ramequins, 106
    "    Sandwiches with Bar-le-Duc, 135
    "    Sandwiches with Beets, 125
    "       "        "   Nuts, 122
    "    with Scrambled Eggs, 188
    "    Soufflé, 105
    "    Soufflés, Iced, 108
    "    Straws, 106
  Cheese with Vegetable Macedoine, 110
  Cherry Salad, 91
  Cherry Sauce, 213
  Cherry,-Strawberry-and-Peach Salad, 95
  Chestnuts-and-Celery Salad, 92
  Chestnuts, To Shell and Blanch, 12
  Chicken, Fillets of, 214
     "     Klopps, 204
     "     and Mushrooms, 209
     "     Rolls, 123
     "     Salad, 78
     "       "  , Boiled Dressing for, 26
     "       "  , French, 78
     "       "  with Mushrooms, 79
     "       "  Sandwiches, 127
     "   -and-Nut Sandwiches, 127
     "    Stock for Aspic Jelly, 99
     "    Timbales, 210
  Chiffonade Salad, 94
  Chocolate, Plain, 145
      "    , Rich, 144
      "    , Spanish, 148
  Chopped Beef, 209
  Chou Paste, 140
  Clams à la Newburgh, 170
  Claret Cup, 148
    "    Dressing, 22
    "    Jelly, 134
  Club Sandwiches, 129
  Cocoa, Ceylon, 145
    "  , Plain, 145
    "  , Sultana, 145
  Coffee, Boiled, 143
    "   , Filtered, 143
  Cole Slaw, Dressing for, 27
  Consommé for Aspic Jelly, 98
  Cooked Vegetable Salad, 37
  Corned Beef Hash, 202
    "      "  Sandwiches, 119
  Country Salad, 87
  Cowslip-and-Cheese Salad, 49
  Crab Toast, Mock, 186
  Crabs à la Creole, 174
    "    "   Hollandaise, 172
    "   Deviled, 173
    "   Oyster, 174
  Creamed Dishes, 166
    "     Peas, 179
    "     Mushrooms, 197
  Cream Salad Dressing, 27
  Cress,-Cucumber-and-Tomato Salad, 41
  Cress-and-Egg Sandwiches, 122
  Cress, To Clean, 14
  Cromeskies, Mushroom, 197
      "     , Oyster, 167
  Croquettes, Cheese, 108
  Cucumber Salad, 36
     "      "     for Fish, 36
     "      "     with Shad Roe, 61
     "      "   , Stuffed, 49
  Cupid's Butter Sandwiches, 135
  Currant-and-Cheese Sandwiches, 135
  Curry, Hawaiian Lobster, 171
  Curried Eggs, 191
     " Oysters, 164
     "     "   No. 2, 165
     " Sardines, 177
     " Vegetables, 199
  Custard, Cheese, 105
     "   , Royal, for Aspic, 11

  Date-and-Ginger Sandwiches, 132
  d'Artois, Cheese, 109
  Deviled Dishes, 166
  Dressing, Boiled, 26
     "      Boiled, for Chicken Salad, 26
     "    ,     Claret, 22
     "    ,     for Cole Slaw, 27
     "    , Cream Salad, 27
     "    , French, 21
     "    ,   "    in quantity, 22
     "    , for Fruit Salad, 89
     "    , Horseradish, 40
     "    , Mayonnaise, 22
     "    , Composition, 8
  Dressings, Boiled and Cream, 9
  Dried Beef with Eggs, 189
  Duck-and-Olive Salad, 83
    "   "  Orange  "  , 83
  Duck, Salmi of, 208
  Duck or Game, Salmi of, 208

  Easter Salad, 86
  Egg Canapés, 193
  Egg and Canned Peas, 198
  Egg Lemonade, 146
  Egg-and-Cress Sandwiches, 122
  Egg-and-Ham Sandwiches, 119
   "   "  Spinach Sandwiches, 122
   "   "     "    Salad, 86
  Eggs with Anchovy Toast, 175
  Eggs with Asparagus, 193
   "   to Boil for Garnishing, 11
  Eggs, Creole Style, 192
   "    Curried, 191
   "    Italienne, 190, 194
   "    and Mushrooms, Dauphine, 189
   "    Parisienne, 190
   "    Scrambled with Cheese, 188
   "    Scrambled with Dried Beef, 189
   "    Scrambled with Oysters, 166
   "    Scrambled with Smoked Salmon, 188
   "    Scrambled with Tomatoes, 189
   "    Scrambled à la Union Club, 188
   "    with Spinach, 194
  Eggs, Whites of, To Poach, 11
  Endive, To Clean, 13
  Endive Salad, 30
  English Monkey, 187
  Entire Wheat Bread, 137
  Epicurean Canapés, 205
     "      Sandwiches, 123
  Escalloped Oysters, 168

  Fig-and-Nut Salad, 93
  Fig Sandwiches, 131
  Fig Toast, 217
  Fillets of Beef, Mushroom Sauce, 213
     "    "  Chicken, 214
     "    "  Halibut with Cole Slaw, 58
     "    "    "      "   Salad, 57
     "    "  Lamb, Cherry Sauce, 213
  Filling for Sandwiches, 116
  Filtered Coffee, 143
  Fish, Purée of, 179
   "  , Réchauffé of, 180
  Fish Réchauffé, No. 2, 181
  Fish Salad in Aspic, 59
  Fish-and-Mushroom Salad, 65
  Fish, Salt Cod in Cream Sauce, 180
    "    "    "  "  Tomato  "    179
  Five-o'clock Tea, 144
  Flavoring, 160
  Fondue, Cheese, 186
  French Dressing, Recipes for, 21
     "      "      in quantity, 22
  French Fruit Sandwiches, 131
  Fresh Mushrooms and Sweetbreads, 196
  Fricassee of Oysters, 165
  Fritters, Cheese, 110
  Fruit Jelly for Sandwiches, 134
  Fruit Punch, 146
    "   Salad, 89, 90, 91
    "     "  , Dressing for, 89
    "     "  , When to Serve, 10
  Fruit-and-Nut Salad, 90

  Game, Salmi of, 208
  Gherkins, To Cut for Garnish, 15
  Ginger and Date Sandwiches, 132
  Gnochi à la Romaine, 107
  Golden Buck, 185
  Grapefruit Salad, 93
  Grapefruit, Pineapple,-and-Pimento Salad, 95
  Green Butter Sandwiches, 126
  Green Pea Salad, 47
    "     "   -and-Potato Salad, 47

  Halibut, Fillets of, in Aspic, 57
       " , Moulded, and Creamed Peas, 178
       "  Rarebit, 184
  Halibut Salad, 55, 56
     "      "   for Fish Course, 64
  Halibut-and-Cucumber Salad, 56
  Halibut Sandwiches with Aspic, 128
     "    and Lettuce Sandwiches, 124
  Ham, Minced, Poulette Style, 205
  Ham Salad, 83
  Ham-and-Egg Sandwiches, 119
   "   "  Eggs Scrambled, 204
  Ham-and-Tongue Sandwiches, 119
  Ham Timbales, 214
  Harlequin Sandwiches, 125
  Hash, Corned Beef, 202
  Herbs, How to Chop, 13
  Hollandaise Sauce, 28, 173
  Home-Made Soda-Water, 147
  Honey Sandwiches, 132, 136
  How to Blanch Walnuts and Almonds, 12
   "  "    "    and Cook Vegetables, 14
   "  "  Boil Eggs Hard, 11
   "  "  Boil Fish and Meat, 140
   "  "  Chop Fresh Herbs, 13
   "  "  Clean Lettuce, Endive, Cress, etc., 13
   "  "  Cook Sweetbreads and Brains, 16
   "  "  Cut Radishes for a Garnish, 13
   "  "  Cut Gherkins for a Garnish, 15
   "  "  Fringe Celery, 15
   "  "  Keep Celery, Cress, Lettuce, etc., 16
   "  "  Make Nasturtium and Tarragon Vinegar, 17
   "  "  Make Royal Custard, 11
   "  "   "   Sauces, 158
   "  "  Pickle Nasturtium Seeds, 16
   "  "  Poach Whites of Eggs, 11
   "  "  Render Vegetables Crisp, 14
   "  "  Shell and Blanch Chestnuts, 12
   "  "  Shred Romaine, etc., 15
   "  "  Use Garlic or Onion in Salads, 12
  Hunter's Sandwich, 136

  Individual Soufflés of Cheese, 108
  Ingredients for One Cup of Sauce, 159
      "        "   "  Pint of Sauce, 160
  Italian Salad, 84

  Jelly, Aspic, from Bouillon Capsules, 100
    "  ,   "  , Chicken Stock for, 99
    "  ,   "  , to Chop, 98
    "  ,   "  , Consommé for, 98
    "  ,   "   for Garnishing, 97
    "  ,   "  , Oysters in, 65
    "  ,   "  , Recipe for, 97
    "  ,   "  , for Sandwiches, 127
    "  , Claret, for Sandwiches, 134
    "  , Fruit,   "      "     , 134
    "  , Mayonnaise, 25
    "  , Tomato, 43
    "  ,   "    with Salad, 43, 44

  Klopps, Chicken, 204
  Kornlet Oysters, 201

  Lamb, Fillets of, 213
  Lemonade, Egg, 146
  Lentil Salad, 31
  Lettuce, How to Clean, 13
     "      "  Shred, 15
     "    Salad, 29
  Livournaise Sauce, 25
  Lobster à la Bechamel, 171
     "     "   Bordelaise, 170
     "    Buttered, 169
     "    Curry, Hawaiian, 171
     "    Fingers, 124
  Lobster Mousseline Salad, 73
  Lobster à la Newburgh, 169
     "    Plain, 170
     "    à la Poulette, 172
  Lobster Salad, 71
     "      "   No. 2, No. 3, 71
     "      "   in Aspic, 72
  Lobster in Aspic Sandwiches, 128
  Lobster and Mushroom Sandwiches, 121

  Macaroni à la Italienne, 195
  Macaroni and Mushrooms, 198
  Macedoine, Cheese and Vegetable, 110
  Macedoine Salad, 35
  Mackerel Salad, 60
     "     Salt, Salad, 61
  Maître d'Hôtel Butter, 212
     "      "    Potatoes, 199
  Marguerite Salad, 86
  Mayonnaise, Curdled, 24
      "     , Jelly, 25
      "     , Making in Quantity, 23
      "     , Recipe for, 22
      "     , Red, 24
      "     , Sardine, 25
  Measuring, 160
  Meat and Fish, Potted, 141
  Meats, Fresh, How to Boil, 140
    "  , Salted, "  "   140
  Minced Ham, Poulette, 205
  Miroton of Fish and Potato, 58
  Mock Crab Toast, 186
  Mock Terrapin, 203
  Mosaic Sandwiches, 127
  Moulded Salmon Salad, 75
  Mousse de Poulet Salad, 81, 82
  Mushroom Cromeskies, 197
  Mushroom Salad with Chicken Medallions, 80
     "     and Fish Salad, 65
     "      "  Lobster Sandwiches, 121
     "     Sauce, 210
  Mushrooms and Chicken, 209
     "      Creamed, 197
     "      and Eggs Dauphine, 189
     "       "  Sweetbreads, 196
  Mutton Réchauffé, 215

  Nasturtium Folds, 125
  Nasturtium Seeds, To Pickle, 16
  Nut,-Apple-and-Celery Salad, 92
  Nut-and-Celery Salad, 92
  Nut-and-Cheese Sandwiches, 122
  Nut-and-Chicken   "       122
  Nut-and-Fig Salad, 93
   "   "  Fruit "  90
   " , Litchi,-and-Orange Salad, 88
   " -and-Orange Salad, 92

  Oil, Value of, 8
  Onion and Garlic, How to Use, 12
  Orange-and-Banana Salad, 93
    "     "  Litchi Nut Salad, 88
    "     " Walnut Salad, 92
  Oyster Canapés, 168
    "    Cromeskies, 167
    "    Rarebit, 185
    "    -and-Celery Salad, 66
    "    -and-Sweetbread Salad, 67
  Oysters in Aspic, 65
  Oysters in Chafing-Dish, 163
     "    Creamed, 166
     "    Curried, 164, 165
     "    Deviled, 166
     "    à la D'Uxelles, 164
     "    Escalloped, 168
     "   , Fricassee of, 165
     "   , Kornlet, 201
     "   , Panned, 167
     "   ,   "    Maître d'Hôtel, 167
     "    Sauté, 168
     "    with Scrambled-Eggs, 166

  Pan-Broiling, 212
  Panned Oysters, 167
  Paste, Chou, 140
  Pastry Bag and Tubes, To Decorated Salads, 18
  Pâté-de-Foie-Gras in Aspic, 85
    "  "   "  Sandwiches, 122
  Peach-and-Almond Salad, 94
  Peach Salad, 95
  Peach,-Strawberry-and-Cherry Salad, 95
  Peanut Sandwiches, 125, 126
  Peas, Creamed, 179
    "  with Egg, 198
  Pineapple-and-Pimento Salad, 95
  Pineapple Sandwiches, 133
  Pineapple Sponge, 217
  Plain Chocolate, 145
  Plain Cocoa, 145
  Potato Salad, 32, 33
    "      "  , German Style, 37
    "      "   with Mayonnaise, 50
    "   -and-Nasturtium Salad, 34
  Potatoes, Maître d'Hôtel, 199
     "    , White Hashed, 199
  Potted Meats and Fish, 141
  Puff Balls, Sautéd, 198
  Puff Paste Sandwiches, 133
  Pulled Bread, 139
  Punch, Fruit, 146
    "   à la Nantes, 146

  Radishes, To Cut for Garnish, 13
  Ramequins, Cheese, 106
  Rarebit, Halibut, 184
     "   , Oyster, 185
     "   , Sardine, 185
     "   , Welsh, 183
     "   ,   "   No. 2, 183
     "   ,   "   With Ale, 184
     "   , Yorkshire, 186
  Réchauffé of Fish, 180, 181
      "     " Mutton, 215
  Réchauffés, Concerning, 202
  Rice Bread, 138
  Rich Chocolate, 144
  Rolls, Salad, 138
  Rolls, Wedding Sandwich, 129
  Romaine, To Shred, 15
  Rose Leaf Sandwiches, 132
  Royal Custard for Garnishing, 11
  Russian Salad, 62
     "    Vegetable Salad, 48
     "    Sandwiches, 121

  Salad Dressing, Boiled, 26
  Salad Dressing, Cream, 27
    "   Dressings, Use of, 7
    "  , Fruit, When to Serve, 10
    "   Making, Important Points in, 9
    "   Rolls, 138
  Salad:
    "  Anchovy, 74
    "  Apple,-Celery-and-English-Walnut, 92
    "  Artichoke, 45
    "  Asparagus, 47
    "  Asparagus and Salmon, 46
    "  Asparagus and Cauliflower, 46
    "  Bacon, 84
    "  Bluefish, 75
    "  Boudins-de-Saumon, 61
    "  Brook Trout, 55
    "  Brook Trout in Aspic, 55
    "  Brussels Sprouts and Beet, 35
    "  Cauliflower, 39
    "  Cauliflower, Egg Garnish, 49
    "  Celery-and-Chestnut, 92
    "  Celery-and-Nut, 43
    "  Cherry, 91
    "  Chicken, 78
    "  Chicken-and-Fresh Mushroom, 79
    "  Chicken, No. 3, 79
    "  Chicken, No. 4, 79
    "  Chiffonade, 94
    "  Combination, A Few, 30
    "  Cooked Vegetable Salad, 37
    "  Country, 87
    "  Cowslip-and-Cream Cheese, 49
    "  Cress,-Cucumber-and-Tomato, 41
    "  Cucumber, 36
    "  Cucumber for Fish Course, 36
    "  Duck-and-Olive, 83
    "  Duck-and-Orange, 83
    "  Easter, 86-87
    "  Endive, 30
    "  Endives-Tomato-and-Green-String-Bean, 36
    "  Fig-and-Nut, 93
    "  Fillets of Halibut in Aspic, 57
    "  Fillets of Halibut with Cole Slaw, 58
    "  Fish Moulded in Aspic, 59, 60
    "  French Chicken, 78
    "  Fruit, 89, 91
    "  Fruit-and-Nut, 90, 91
    "  Grapefruit, 93
    "  Grapefruit,-Pineapple-and-Pimento, 95
    "  Green-Pea, 47
    "  Green-Pea-and-Potato, 47
    "  Green and White, 88
    "  Halibut, 55, 56
    "  Halibut-and-Cucumber, 56
    "  Halibut (for Fish Course), 64
    "  Ham, 83
    "  Italian, 84
    "  Lentil, 31
    "  Lettuce, 29
    "  Lettuce,-Bamboo-Sprouts-and-Shrimps, 74
    "  Lobster, 71
    "  Lobster, No. 2, 71
    "  Lobster, No. 3, 71
    "  Lobster in Ring of Aspic, 72
    "  Macedoine, 35
    "  Macedoine of Vegetable, 47
    "  Mackerel or Bluefish, 60
    "  Marguerite, 86
    "  Miroton of Fish-and-Potato, 58
    "  Mousse-de-Poulet, 81, 82
    "  Moulded Salmon Salad, 75
    "  Mousseline of Lobster, 75
    "  Mushroom with Medallions of Chicken, 80
    "  Orange-and-Litchi Nut, 88
    "  Orange-and-Walnut, 92
    "  Orange-and-Banana, 93
    "  Oysters in Aspic, 65
    "  Oyster-and-Celery, 66
    "  Oyster-and-Sweetbread, 67
    "  Pâté de Foie Gras in Aspic, 85
    "  Peach, 15
    "  Peach-and-Almond, 94
    "  Peach,-Strawberry-and-Cherry, 95
    "  Potato, 32, 33
    "  Potato-and-Nasturtium, 34
    "  Potato, German Style, 37
    "  Potato with Mayonnaise, 50
    "  Russian, 62
    "  Russian Vegetable, 48
    "  Salmon, 63
    "  Salt Mackerel, 61
    "  Sardine, 69
    "  Sardine, No. 2, 69
    "  Sardine-and-Egg, 70
    "  Scallop, 68
    "  Shad-Roe-and-Cucumber, 61
    "  Shells of Fish-and-Mushrooms, 65
    "  Shrimp, 68
    "  Shrimp in Cucumber Boats, 67
    "  Shrimp with Aspic Border, 67
    "  Spanish, 63
    "  Spinach-and-Egg, 86
    "  Spinach-and-Tongue, 85
    "  Stuffed Cucumber, 49
    "  Stuffed Beet, 34
    "  Stuffed Tomato, 40
    "  Sweetbread-and-Cucumber, 77
    "  Tomato-and-Artichoke, 44
    "  Tomato-and-Onion, 36
    "  Tomato-and-Sweetbread, 40
    "  Tomato, Horseradish Dressing, 40
    "  Tomato Jelly, No. 2, 43
    "  Tomato Jelly with String Beans, 44
    "  Tomatoes Farces à l'Aspic, 42
    "  Tomatoes Stuffed with Nuts and Celery, 39
    "  Tomatoes Stuffed with Cucumber, 41
    "  Tomatoes Stuffed with Jelly, 42
    "  Turkey-and-Chestnut, 83
    "  Turnip with Asparagus Tips, 46
    "  Turquoise, 94
    "  White Bean, 32
  Salads, Arrangement of, 8
  Salads, Decorating with Bag and Tubes, 18
  Salads, Dressing of, 6
    "   , Introduction to Subject, 3
  Salads, when Served with French Dressing, etc., 9
    "   , Serving with Cheese, 10
  Salmi of Duck or Game, 208
  Salmon Salad, 63
    "      "  , Moulded, 75
  Salmon-and-Asparagus Salad, 46
  Sandwiches: Aberdeen, 205
    "  Beet-and-Cream-Cheese, 125
    "  Beverages Served with, 118
    "  Bread for, 116
    "  Caviare Roll, 120
    "  Celery, 20
    "  Cheese-and-Bar-le-Duc, 135
    "  Cheese- " -English-Walnut, 122
    "  Chicken-and-Nut, 127
    "  Chicken Roll, 123
    "  Chicken Salad, 127
    "  Club, 129
    "  Corned Beef, 119
    "  Cress-and-Egg, 122
    "  Cupid's Butter, 135
    "  Date-and-Ginger, 132
    "  Egg-and-Spinach, 122
    "  Epicurean, 123
    "  Fig, 131
    "  Filling for, 116
    "  French Fruit, 131
    "  Fruit or Claret Jelly, 134
    "  Fruit with Whipped Cream, 133
    "  Green Butter, 126
    "  Halibut with Aspic Jelly, 128
    "  Halibut-and-Lettuce, 124
    "  Ham-and-Egg, 119
    "   "   "  Tongue, 119
    "  Harlequin, 125
    "  Honey, 132
    "  Hunters', 136
    "  Lobster with Aspic, 128
    "  Lobster Fingers, 124
    "  Milwaukee, The, 129
    "  Mosaic, 127
    "  Mushroom-and-Lobster, 121
    "  Nasturtium Fold, 125
    "  Pâté de Foie Gras (Imitation), 122
    "  Peanut, 125, 126
    "  Pineapple, 133
    "  Puff Paste, 133
    "  Rose Leaf, 132
    "  Russian, 121
    "  Sardine, 120
    "  Shad-Roe-and-Butter, 126
    "  Tomato, 200
    "  Tongue-and-Veal, 120
    "  Tower of Babel, 124
    "  Violet, 132
    "  Wedding Sandwich Roll, 129
    "  Whipped Cream, 133
  Sardine Canapés, 177
  Sardine-and-Egg Salad, 70
  Sardine Mayonnaise, 25
     "    Rarebit, 185
     "    Salad, 69
     "    Sandwiches, 120
  Sardines, Curried, 177
      "   , French Fashion, 177
      "    on Toast, 181
  Sauce for Baba, 216
  Sauce, Bacon, 27
    "  , Bechamel, 205, 210
    "  , Bernaise, 28
    "  , Bread, 211
    "  , Chaud-froid, 101
    "  , Cherry, 213
    "  , Hollandaise, 28, 173
    "  , Ingredients for One cup, 159
    "  ,      "       "   "  pint, 160
    "  , Livournaise, 25
    "  , Mayonnaise, 22
    "  , Mushroom, 210
    "  , Tartare, 25
    "  , Tomato, 179
  Sauces, How to Make, 158
    "   , Stock for use in, 99
  Scallop Salad, 68
  Scotch Woodcock, 190, 207
  Scrambled Eggs with Cheese, 188
      "      "     "  Dried Beef, 189
      "      "     "  Ham, 204
      "      "     "  Oysters, 166
      "      "     "  Smoked Salmon, 188
      "      "     "  Tomatoes, 189
      "      "   à la Union Club, 188
  Shad-Roe-and-Butter Sandwiches, 126
  Shad-Roe-and-Cucumber Salad, 61
  Shells of Fish and Mushrooms, 65
  Shirred Eggs, 192
  Shrimp Salad, 68
     "     "   Aspic Border, 67
     "     "  , Cucumber Boat, 67
     " , Bamboo-and-Lettuce Salad, 74
  Shrimps with Peas, 175
     "    à la Poulette, 175
  Smoked Salmon with Eggs, 188
  Soda-Water, Home-Made, 147
  Soufflé, Cheese, 105
  Soufflés,  "     Iced, 108
  Spaghetti, Queen Style, 203
  Spanish Chocolate, 148
  Spanish Salad, 63
  Spinach-and-Egg Salad, 86
     "    with Eggs, 194
     "   -and-Tongue Salad, 85
  Sponge, Pineapple, 217
    "   , Tapioca and Banana, 218
  Stock, Chicken, for Aspic, 99
  Stock, Fish, 100
    "   for Sauces, 99
  Straws, Cheese, 106
  Strawberry,-Peach-and-Cherry Salad, 95
  String Beans, Lyonnaise, 200
  Sultana Cocoa, 145
  Sweetbread-and-Cucumber Salad, 77
  Sweetbreads-and-Brains, To Cook, 16
      "        "  Mushrooms, 196
      "       Sautéd, 209

  Tapioca-and-Banana Sponge, 218
  Tartare Sauce, 25
  Tea, Beef, in Chafing-Dish, 207
  Tea, Five o'clock, 144
  Terrapin, Mock, 203
  Timbales, Chicken, 210
    "     , Egg, 211
    "     , Ham, 214
  Toast, Fig, 217
    "  , Mock Crab, 186
    "  , Woodcock, 206
  Tomato-and-Artichoke Salad, 44
  Tomato, Bean-and-Endive Salad, 36
  Tomato,-Cress-and-Cucumber Salad, 41
  Tomato Jelly, 43
     "     "   Salad, 43, 44
  Tomato-and-Onion Salad, 36
  Tomato Salad, Horseradish Dressing, 40
  Tomato Salad, Stuffed, 40
  Tomato Sandwich, 200
    "   -and-Sweetbread Salad, 40
  Tomatoes Farces à l'Aspic, 42
  Tomatoes with Scrambled Eggs, 189
  Tomatoes Stuffed with Celery and Nuts, 39
  Tomatoes Stuffed with Cucumber, 41
     "        "      "  Jelly, 42
  Tongue-and-Ham Sandwiches, 119
    "   -and-Spinach Salad, 85
    "     "  Veal Sandwiches, 120
  Tower of Babel, 124
  Turkey-and-Chestnut Salad, 83
  Turnips and Asparagus in Salad, 46
  Turquoise Salad, 94
  Two Loaves of Wheat Bread, 137

  Veal-and-Tongue Sandwiches, 120
  Vegetable, Cooked, Salad, 37
  Vegetable Salad, Macedoine of, 47
  Vegetable Salad, Russian, 48
  Vegetables, To Blanch and Cook, 14
      "     , Curried, 199
      "     , To Render Crisp, 14
  Vinegar, Fines Herbes, 17, 18
     "   , Nasturtium, 77
     "   , Tarragon, 17
  Violet Sandwiches, 132

  Watercress, How to Keep, 16
  Wedding Sandwich Rolls, 129
  Welsh Rarebit, 183
    "      "    No. 2, 183
    "      "    with Ale, 184
  Whipped Cream Sandwiches, 133
  White Hashed Potatoes, 199
  Wine Cake (Baba), 216
  Woodcock Scotch, 190, 207
  Woodcock Toast, 206

  Yorkshire Rarebit, 186

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Transcriber's Notes:

Obvious punctuation errors repaired and recipe form made consistent.

Page 5, "recherche" changed to "recherché".

Page 21, "teaspooonful" change to "teaspoonful". (1/2 of teaspoonful of
salt.)

Page 42, "Tomates" changed to "Tomatoes". (Tomatoes Farces)

Page 85, "an" changed to "a". (centre half a)

Page 96, "grape fruit" changed to "grapefruit". (grapefruit upon
shredded)

Page 156, "Newburg" changed to "Newburgh" to match rest of text. (a
lobster Newburgh or)

Page 164, the recipe for Curried Oysters was missing a measurement for
"teaspoonful of curry powder" in the original text. Research showed that
1/2 was most usual for recipes for this involving a fraction of a
teaspoon. The text has been changed to reflect this.

Illustration for Yorkshire Rarebit originally read "Yorkshire Rabbit."
This was changed to fit the actual recipe.

Page 215, "Rechauffé" changed to "Réchauffé". (Mutton Réchauffé)

Page 221, index entry for Plain Lobster was lacking the page number. It
has been added.

Page 225, "Litichi" changed to "Litchi". (Litchi Nut Salad, 88)

Page 225, "Duxelles" changed to "D'Uxelles". (à la D'Uxelles, 164)

Page 228, "Serve" changed to "Served". (when Served with French)

Page 229, in the index both "Souffle" and "Souffles" were changed to
"Soufflé" and "Soufflés."

The four instances of "tabasco" and five instances of "tobasco" were
both retained, as were the instances of "well-nigh" and "wellnigh".





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