Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII | HTML | PDF ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux
Author: Marivaux, Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de, 1688-1763
Language: French
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



A SELECTION FROM THE COMEDIES OF MARIVAUX

EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES

BY
EVERETT WARD OLMSTED

New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
LONDON: MACMILLAN & CO., LTD.
1901
_All rights reserved_.


To Thomas Frederick Crane, A.M., Of Cornell University,
Whose Profound Scholarship, Inspiring Teachings,
And Lasting Friendship Are Here Gratefully Acknowledged.



PREFACE.


That so typical a representative of eighteenth century society, so
gracious a personality, so charming a writer, and so superior a genius as
Marivaux should be not only unedited, but practically unknown to the
American reading public, is a matter of surprise. His brilliant comedies,
written in an easy prose, and free from all impurities of thought or
expression, offer peculiarly attractive texts for our classes. It is for
these reasons that this edition was undertaken.  The plays chosen, _le Jeu
de l'Amour et du Hasard_, _le Legs_, and _les Fausses Confidences_ are
generally considered his best plays, and are fortunately free from
dialect, which, in the mouths of certain characters of _l'Épreuve_ and of
_la Mère confidente_, charming as are these comedies, makes them
undesirable for study in college or school. The text of _les Fausses
Confidences_ is that of 1758 (Paris, Duchesne, 5 vols.), the last
collective edition published during the lifetime of the author, that of
_le Legs_, from the edition of 1740 (Paris, Prault père, 4 vols.), while
that of _le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_, which is contained in neither
the edition of 1758 nor in that of 1740, is from the first collective
edition of his works of 1732 (Paris. Briasson, 2 vols.). It has not seemed
wise to retain the curious orthography of these early editions, as the
explanation of the same would uselessly burden the notes, and possibly
confuse the student. An orthography following the same lines as that of
the edition of _les Grands Écrivains_ has been adopted.

The Introduction is rather extensive, but, as it serves in truth as an
introduction to students in American schools of an author as yet little
known, a less minute statement of his qualifications would hardly have
been pardonable. Many quotations have been given, some from Marivaux
himself, or from contemporary biographers, of so authoritative a nature as
to add more weight than any summing up by the editor, and others from
celebrated French critics, whose views, or whose picturesqueness of
expression, have been often invaluable. In fact, the Introduction does not
claim to be so much a literary essay as a compilation of authorities.

The notes to a text containing no historical, literary, or biographical
allusions are naturally limited to explaining the difficulties of the
French, and are less extensive than would otherwise be required.

Words and idioms, which, though unusual or difficult, can be found in any
of the small dictionaries accessible to students, have been excluded from
the notes as unnecessary, except such as might mislead unless explained,
or such as differ from the modern use.

It remains for the editor to acknowledge his indebtedness for sympathetic
interest and valuable suggestions to Gustave Larroumet, professor of
French Literature at the University of Paris, and perpetual secretary of
the Académie des Beaux Arts, to Professor Crane and Mr. Guerlac of Cornell
University, and to Professor de Sumichrast of Harvard.

EVERETT WARD OLMSTED.
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, ITHACA, N.Y.,
January 9, 1901.



CONTENTS.


INTRODUCTION

CHRONOLOGY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

LE JEU DE L'AMOUR ET DU HASARD

LE LEGS

LES FAUSSES CONFIDENCES

NOTES



INTRODUCTION


Among the treasures of the Comédie-Française, interesting alike to
students of letters and of art, is a painting by Vanloo. It bears the date
of 1753, and represents a man of doubtful age--for it is hard to tell
whether he is past his prime or not--yet, if the truth were known, one
could not write him down for less than sixty-five. The face is life-like
and attractive, full of an expression of gentle breeding, kindliness, wit,
and subtlety. The eyes are rather dark, large, fine, and keen; with the
thin lips, pursed in a half-smile, they form the most striking features of
the countenance, and serve to give it that characteristic of _finesse_ so
peculiar to the man. The well-developed brow, the full cheeks, and faint
suggestion of a double chin, the powdered hair, the black silk coat, the
lace _jabot_, are all in keeping with our conception of this French
dramatist, whom a competent critic[1] of to-day has classed as greater
than any of his contemporaries in the same field, than Beaumarchais,
Voltaire, Regnard, Le Sage, and second only to Molière, Corneille, and
Racine. Marivaux, whose rehabilitation has come but slowly, and in spite
of many critics, occupies a place to-day, not only with the ultra-refined,
but in the hearts of the theatre-going public, which, I doubt not, even
the most enthusiastic admirers among his contemporaries would not have
dared to hope for him; for, next to Molière, no author of comedies appears
so often upon the stage of the Théâtre-Français as does the author of _le
Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_.

In the very heart of Paris, and just back of the Hôtel de Ville, stands
the church of Saint-Gervais, a church of comparatively little fascination
to the general student of art or history, although its mingling of
Flamboyant and Renaissance styles may attract the specialist in
architecture: but to the student of literary history it has a greater
interest, for it is here that "poor Scarron sleeps." and it was in this
parish that Pierre Cariet de Chamblain de Marivaux was born, and in this
church, doubtless, that he was christened, although the register of
baptism was destroyed at the time of the burning of the archives of the
Hôtel de Ville, in May, 1871.

The date of his birth was February 4, 1688, a year noteworthy as
introducing to the public the first edition of the _Caractères_ of La
Bruyère, with whom Marivaux has often been compared. His father was of an
old Norman family, which had had representatives in the _parlement_ of
that province.[2] Since then the family had "descended from the robe to
finance," following the expression of d'Alembert.[3] Ennobled by the robe,
they had assumed the name de Chamblain, but unfortunately the latter name
was common to certain financiers, and, to still better distinguish
themselves, the family had adopted the additional name of Marivaux.[4]
There seems, however, to have been no connection between them and the
lords of Marivaux (or Marivaulx), a branch of the house of l'Isle-Adam.[5]
Our author signed, himself _de Marivaux_ or _Carlet de Marivaux_.

His childhood was passed at Riom in Auvergne, where his father had been
appointed director of the Mint. Gossot declares that Marivaux was six
years of age when he was taken to Riom,[6] but does not give his authority
for the statement. It is certain, however, that he was so young at the
time that some of his contemporaries supposed he had been born there.[7]
Marivaux received his early education at Riom, and later at Limoges, where
the family went to dwell, and where his father was perhaps again connected
with the Mint.

His biographers differ with regard to the education he received. His
earliest biographer, de La Porte, maintains that his father "ne négligea
rien pour l'éducation de son fils, qui annonça de bonne heure, par des
progrès rapides dans ses premières études, cette finesse d'esprit qui
caractérise ses ouvrages."8] Lesbros de la Versane gives the same
testimony: "Ses heureuses dispositions lui firent profiter de celle (the
education) qu'il reçut," and adds: "Il fut admiré de ses maîtres, et il a
fait les délices de tous ceux qui l'ont connu."[9] There is no reason why
we should not accept the testimony of one who, in general, is so judicious
in his statements as is de La Porte, and, particularly, when the adverse
testimony comes from so evidently prejudiced a writer as Palissot.[10]

D'Alembert follows the testimony of Palissot and others, although he
confesses that they are "in truth very ill disposed" towards Marivaux, and
adds that perhaps they have very unjustly accused him of ignorance of
Latin. Their pardoning him his lack of knowledge of Greek, d'Alembert
cleverly ascribes to that "indulgent equity" which does not require of
one's fellows that which one lacks himself.[11] The following extract from
the _Spectateur_ will prove that, while Marivaux could read the Greek
writers in translations only, he was able to read Latin in the original:
"Si c'est une traduction du grec, et qu'elle m'ennuie, je penche à croire
que l'auteur y a perdu; si c'est du latin, _comme je le sais_, je me livre
sans façon au dégoût ou au plaisir qu'il me donne."[12] It is also known
that he completed his law studies and might have practiced, but for the
hatred which he, in common with so many other young _littérateurs_ in
times past, had conceived for the profession.

Admitted early to the best society of Limoges, Marivaux enjoyed advantages
from which he gained the polish that made him acceptable in the Paris
salons of which he was later an habitué, When he was but seventeen years
of age there occurred an incident, which, if it did not have so serious an
effect upon his life as he himself believed, at least was not without its
influence in fostering that spirit of observation and inquiry, not to say
scepticism, with regard to the motives that influence his fellow man,
which was so prominent a characteristic of this writer. Marivaux describes
the incident in the first _feuille_ of the _Spectateur français_, and,
inasmuch as the sketch gives an excellent idea of the man, I translate it
in full.

"At the age of seventeen I became attached to a young girl, to whom I owe
the sort of life which I adopted. I was not uncomely then, I had a mild
disposition and affectionate ways. The decorum which I noticed in the girl
had drawn my attention to her beauty. I found in her, moreover, so much
indifference to her charms, that I would have sworn she was ignorant of
them. How simple minded I was at that time! What a pleasure, said I to
myself, if I can win the love of a girl who does not care to have lovers,
since she is beautiful without observing it, and hence is no coquette! I
never left her without my affectionate surprise increasing at the sight of
so many graces in a person who was not the more vain because of it. Were
she seated or standing, speaking or walking, it always seemed to me that
she was absolutely artless, and that she thought of nothing less than
appearing to be what she was.

"One day in the country, when I had just left her, a forgotten glove
caused me to retrace my steps to get it. I perceived the beauty in the
distance, regarding herself in a mirror, and I noticed, to my great
astonishment, that she was picturing herself to herself in all the phases
in which, during our conversation, I had seen her face, and it turned out
that the expressions of her countenance, which I had thought so
unaffected, were, to name them correctly, only tricks; I judged from a
distance that her vanity adopted certain ones, that it improved upon
others; they were little ways that one might have noted down and that a
woman might have learned like a musical air. I trembled for the risk which
I should have run, if I had had the misfortune to experience again in good
faith her deceptions, at the point of perfection to which her cleverness
had carried them; but I had believed her natural, and had loved her only
on that footing; so that my love ceased immediately, as if my heart had
been only conditionally moved. She, in turn, perceived me in the mirror,
and blushed. As for me, I entered laughing, and picking up my glove: 'Ah!
mademoiselle, I beg your pardon,' I said to her, 'for having, up to this
time, attributed to nature charms, the whole honour of which is due to
your ingenuity alone.' 'What is the matter? What does this speech mean?'
was her reply. 'Shall I speak to you more frankly?' I said to her: 'I have
just seen the machinery of the Opera; it will still divert me, but it will
touch me less.' Thereupon I went out, and it is from this adventure that
there sprang up in me that misanthropy which has not left me, and which
has caused me to pass my life in examining mankind, and in amusing myself
with my reflexions."[13]

We could not have in miniature a more perfect sketch than this of the
character of the man, with those peculiarities that were to make of him so
original a writer, and little did Marivaux imagine that in the coquette of
Limoges he "had seen the living and faithful image of his Muse,"[14] with
all its archness, coquettishness, and ingenuity in style and expression.
Marivaux had much of the feminine in his nature,--a rare intuition, a
marked finesse in observation, an extreme sensitiveness with regard to his
own and others' feelings, a dislike of criticism with a reluctance to
reply to it, though never forgetting the attack, a certain timidity with
men, a fondness for dress and luxury, an extreme love of conversation,
generosity to the point of self-sacrifice, and a religious turn of mind in
a sceptical century. His connection with the salons of Paris, where so
much of his life was spent in the society of women, probably contributed
largely to develop those traits that were doubtless innate.

With something of the coquette in his own nature, Marivaux had no patience
with it in others. D'Alembert relates another incident, which will serve
to show that not only affectation, but also everything that seemed to him
too studied, received his condemnation. "One day, he went to see a man
from whom he had received many letters, which were almost in his own
style, and, which, as one may well imagine, had seemed to him very
ingenious. Not finding him, he determined to wait. He noticed, by chance,
on the desk of this man, the rough draughts of the letters which he had
received from him, and which he supposed had been written off-hand. Here
are rough draughts, said he, which do him no credit: henceforth, he may
make minutes of his letters for whomsoever he likes, but he shall receive
no more of mine. He left the house instantly, and never returned."[15]

At the age of eighteen[16] (1706), and shortly after leaving college,
Marivaux made his début in literature as the result of a discussion in
which he maintained that a comedy was not a difficult thing to write. Upon
being challenged to prove his point, he set to work, and, a few days
later, brought to the company a comedy in one act, entitled _le Père
prudent et équitable, ou Crispin l'heureux fourbe_. It is the only one of
Marivaux's comedies written in verse, which form of composition he adopted
the better to test himself and to demonstrate his claim; but he took good
care not to give to the public his comedy, "pour ne pas perdre en public,"
he said, "le pari qu'il avait gagné en secret,"[17] and it was not until
nearly fifteen years later, when he had reached the age of thirty-two,
that he entrusted a work to the stage. He did well to keep this comedy
from the public, for it contained little that gave promise of genius,
being juvenile in character, dull and faulty in versification, and
largely, though poorly, imitated from Molière and Regnard.

It must have been shortly after this that Marivaux returned to Paris to
continue his studies, and possibly to prepare himself for the life of a
literary dilettante. His means were sufficient to enable him to indulge
his taste in this way. Here we find him admitted to the salon of Mme. de
Lambert, held in her famous apartments, situated at the corner of the rue
Richelieu and the rue Colbert, and now replaced by a portion of the
Bibliothèque Nationale. It was a rendezvous of select society on
Wednesdays, and particularly of the literary set on Tuesdays, and among
its habitués may be mentioned such men as Fontenelle, d'Argenson, Sainte-
Aulaire, La Motte, and President Hénault. "It was," says Fontenelle, "with
few exceptions, the only house which had preserved itself from the
epidemic disease of gambling, the only one in which one met to converse
reasonably and even with _esprit_ upon occasion."[18] Its influence was
inestimable upon literary questions of the time, and it might be
considered almost as the antechamber of the French Academy. The envious
dubbed it _un bureau d'esprit_, and its form of _préciosité_,
_lambertinage_.

That Mme. de Lambert had a great influence in forming the mind of the
young author no one can read his works and doubt. A "_précieuse_ in the
most flattering and most exact acceptation"[19] of the term, she promoted
a similar turn of mind in Marivaux. His dislike for Molière may have
received its encouragement from her, as she was never quite willing to
forgive that great genius for his attack upon _les femmes savantes_.
Marivaux, too, had, as Palissot expresses it, "un faible pour les
précieuses,"[20] and for the author of those famous attacks, a contempt as
unfeigned as absurd. The high moral character of his writings and his
ideas on marriage and children may readily have found their origin with
Mme. de Lambert.

Mme. de Tencin, to whose salon of the rue Saint-Honoré Marivaux was
likewise welcomed, was as different a character from the kindly, serious,
upright, and judicious Mme. de Lambert as can well be imagined, and it was
only after the death of the latter, in 1733, that her salon was
particularly brilliant. Her youth had been most disorderly. At an early
age she had assumed the veil, but, through the efforts of her brother, the
abbé de Tencin, and later cardinal, who, doubtless, saw in her a powerful
factor for his own promotion, she obtained her secularization. Coming to
Paris a short time before the death of Louis XIV, she was ready to welcome
the gross immorality of the Regency, and, for personal advancement,
entered into a series of liaisons with Prior, the friend of Lord
Bolingbroke, René d'Argenson, the Regent himself, Dubois, and the
Chevalier Destouches. The latter was the father of her son, whom she
abandoned on the steps of the church Saint-Jean-le-Rond, and who, reared
by a glazier's wife, became the celebrated d'Alembert. Another lover,
Lafresnaye, whom she had induced to put all of his property in her name,
shot himself, or was shot, at her house. Although imprisoned on suspicion
at the Châtelet, and later at the Bastille, she soon gained her liberty by
the intervention of powerful friends. That she could maintain her position
in society as she did is a striking proof of its terribly corrupt
condition. In her declining years she sought to veil the disorders of her
youth by more serious pursuits, and gathered about her a number of
literary spirits of whom she spoke as her _bêtes_ or her _ménagerie_.

Marmontel gives the following description of the habitués of her salon and
of the desire that pervaded all to show their wit: "L'auditoire était
respectable. J'y vis rassemblés Montesquieu, Fontenelle, Mairan, Marivaux,
le jeune Helvétius, Astruc, je ne sais qui encore, tous gens de lettres ou
savants, et au milieu d'eux une femme d'un esprit et d'un sens profonds,
mais qui, enveloppée dans son extérieur de bonhomie et de simplicité,
avait plutôt l'air de la ménagère que de la maîtresse de la maison:
c'était là Mme. de Tencin ... je m'aperçus bientôt qu'on y arrivait
préparé à jouer son rôle, et que l'envie d'entrer en scène n'y laissait
pas toujours à la conversation la liberté de suivre son cours facile et
naturel. C'était à qui saisirait le plus vite, et comme à la volée, le
moment de placer son mot, son conte, son anecdote, sa maxime ou son trait
léger et piquant; et, pour amener l'à-propos, on le tirait quelquefois
d'un peu loin. Dans Marivaux, l'impatience de faire preuve de finesse et
de sagacité perçait visiblement."[21]

Marivaux, in describing the feelings of Marianne upon being introduced
into polite society at the home of Mme. Dorsin, makes an evident allusion
to the salon of Mme. de Tencin, and shows how differently from Marmontel
he regarded the spirit that marked those gatherings. As though to answer
the latter's accusations, he exclaims: "On accuse quelquefois Ses gens
d'esprit de vouloir briller; oh! il n'était pas question de cela ici." "Ce
n'était point eux qui y mettaient de la finesse, c'était de la finesse qui
s'y rencontrait; ils ne sentaient pas qu'ils parlaient mieux qu'on ne
parle ordinairement; c'étaient seulement de meilleurs esprits que
d'autres."[22] All that was said there, he adds, was uttered with so
little effort, so naturally, so simply, and yet with so much brilliancy
that one could see that it was a company of persons of exquisite taste and
breeding. Society, as depicted here, was not "full of solemn and important
trifles, difficult to learn, and, however ridiculous they are in
themselves, necessary to be known under penalty of being ridiculous." [23]
One was made to feel at home, and what one lacked in wit was supplemented
by that of the company, without one's being made to feel that what he
seemed to utter was not all his own.

The description of Mme. Dorsin is that of Mme. de Tencin herself, seen
through the eyes of an enthusiastic friend, and she knew the art of
gaining friends, and of keeping them, too. In fact, she was never weary of
doing for them, as Marivaux had reason to know as well as any of them,
and, had it not been for her efforts, he would never have belonged to the
French Academy. Her judgment of the literary productions of her friends
was most unprejudiced and judicious, so that whatever met with an
enthusiastic reception in her salon was reasonably certain of success in
the world.

After the death of Mme. de Tencin, in 1749, Marivaux frequented the
_mercredis_ of the _bonne maman_ Geoffrin, and, through friendship for
her, sustained the candidature of Marmontel for the French Academy.[24]
However, he must have felt ill at ease in company with the philosophers
and encylopedists who gave dignity to her salon, and, with his love of
admiration, must have sighed for the days when he shone so brilliantly in
the circle that surrounded Mme. de Lambert or Mme. de Tencin; and, perhaps
in sheer desperation, was led to seek in the salons of the brilliant but
discontented Mme. du Deffand, of that poet too highly valued by her
contemporaries, Mme. du Bocage, and of the actress Mlle. Quinault
_cadette_, that form of _préciosité_ for which his mind was suited, and
which he never found again, because he had outlived the fashion.

Marmontel, in describing the society that frequented the salon of Mme.
Geoffrin, mentions d'Alembert as "the gayest, the most animated, the most
amusing in his gayety,"[25] and goes on to say that Marivaux, too, "would
have liked to have this playful humour; but he had in his head an affair
which constantly preoccupied him and gave him an anxious air. As he had
acquired through his works the reputation of a keen and subtle wit, he
considered himself obliged to constantly display that turn of mind, and
was continually on the watch for ideas susceptible of contrast or
analysis, in order to set them off against each other or to put them
through a test. He would agree that such a thing was true up to a certain
point or under a certain aspect; but there was always some restriction,
some distinction to be made, which he alone had perceived. This labor of
attention was hard for him, often painful for the others; but sometimes
there resulted from it happy observations and brilliant hits. However, by
the anxiety of his glances, one could see that he was uneasy about the
success that he was having or might have. There never was, I think, a more
delicate, more tender, and more apprehensive _amour-propre_; but, as he
carefully considered that of others, they respected his, and merely pitied
him for not being able to determine to be simple and natural."[26]

Although this characterization by Marmontel may be true, too much must not
be attributed to self-conceit, for Marivaux was rather timid and
suspicious of himself at heart than self-conceited, and this very lack of
confidence, this desire to please and to be thought well of, which caused
him, at times, to emphasize before his friends his own worth, is a key to
his nature, without which it would be difficult to understand him. This
timidity of his explains his fear of being duped by the _ingénue_ of
Limoges, as well as his mistrust of the man who made rough draughts of his
letters, instead of writing them off-hand. That Marivaux was over-
sensitive we must agree, for, although the testimony of his contemporaries
may be somewhat biased by jealousy, it is too overwhelmingly unanimous to
be gainsaid.[27]

We cannot conclude, however, despite the testimony of Grimm, whose caustic
tongue was none too chary of his friends, that intercourse with Marivaux
was "épineux et insupportable," for, were it so, he never would have been
so cordially welcomed into society as he was, for which, according to the
abbé de La Porte, he possessed all the qualities required, "an exact
honesty, a noble disinterestedness,... a pleasing candour, a charitable
soul, a modesty without affectation and without pretense, an extremely
sensitive courtesy, and the most scrupulous attention to avoid whatever
might offend or displease."[28]

A brilliant conversationalist, Marivaux excelled in the quality, no less
rare, of being a good listener, and never gave way to "that distraction
which always wounds when it does not provoke laughter."[29]

The following incident[30] will serve to illustrate the extreme
sensitiveness of Marivaux. He had confided to Mme. Geoffrin a certain
grievance against Marmontel. She, in turn, spoke to the latter of the
fancied slight, although she assured him that, even in his complaints,
Marivaux spoke only well of him, a small matter, but one that proves the
nobility of our author's nature. When the occasion presented itself,
Marmontel asked for an explanation of his grievance, and, with some
difficulty, elicited the following reply: "Have you forgotten that at the
house of Mme. du Bocage, one evening, being seated near Mme. de
Villaumont, you both kept looking at me and laughing, while whispering
together? Assuredly you were laughing at me, and I do not know why, for on
that day I was no more ridiculous than usual." Upon an assurance from
Marmontel that he was not the object of their amusement, he declared that
he believed him, but it is doubtful whether he ever quite forgave him or
forgot the fact.

This habit of suspiciousness grew upon Marivaux with age; but we must
return to his early years at Paris and to his first literary attempts,
after this long digression, which has served, I hope, to give something of
an idea of the _milieu_ in which he moved, and of the influences at work
upon the formation of his talent.

He had made his début, as has been said, with _le Père prudent_ in 1706.
This was followed a few years later by three mediocre novels. The first of
these, written in 1712, though not published" until 1737, appeared under
the several titles of _Pharsamon_, _les Folies romanesques_, and _le Don
Quichotte moderne_, and was, as one of the titles discloses, an attack
upon the romantic novel, as exemplified in those of Mlle. de Scudéry. It
must not be considered a parody, but rather a weak imitation of Cervantes'
_Don Quijote_. He was no more successful in _les Aventures de..., ou les
Effets surprenants de la sympathie_ (1713-1714), written, in much the same
style, or in _la Voiture embourbée_,[31] which appeared between the two
publications of the former. This latter follows a familiar device: that is
to say, one of the personages of the main narrative begins a story. which
is continued by another when he reaches the end of his imagination, and so
on. The purpose of the story was to turn to ridicule romantic love, but,
following the expression of Fournier, it advanced only "cahin-caha, comme
le pauvre coche dont il contait les accidents, et il finit par s'embourber
avec lui."[32] He somewhat redeemed himself in 1715 with _le Triomphe de
Bilboquet, ou la Défaite de l'Esprit, de l'Amour et de la Raison_, a fancy
inspired by the game of cup and ball, so much in vogue at that period that
it threatened to usurp the time and rights of conversation, and had even
made its way upon the stage, in which simple matter Marivaux found
occasion for moral observation.

In 1717 he allied himself with _le Nouveau Mercure_, a paper devoted to
the interests of the _Modernes_ as against those of the _Anciens_. This
quarrel over the comparative merits of the ancient and modern writers,
begun in the first half of the seventeenth century with the abbé de Bois-
Robert, Desmarets de Saint-Sorlin, and later Perrault, Fontenelle, La
Motte, and others ranged on the side of the latter, while Boileau,
Corneille, Racine, Rollin, Mme. Dacier, and followers strenuously upheld
the honor of antiquity, had dragged on through the seventeenth and into
the eighteenth century, until apparently the last word had been said by
Mme. Dacier in her _Préface à la traduction de l'Odyssée_ (1716).
Marivaux, however, by turn of mind and training a modern, and ever the
champion of his friend La Motte, and, perhaps more to avenge him for the
"grosses paroles de Mme. Dacier"[33] than to depreciate _le divin Homère_
(whom he made a point of always mentioning in that way), would not let the
matter rest, and, in 1717, composed a burlesque poem entitled _l'Iliade
ravestie_. Had he been familiar with the Greek language, he might never
have committed this piece of literary impudence, but he knew Homer only
through La Motte's reduction of the Iliad, which in turn was based upon
Mme. Dacier's translation. If his object was to overthrow the great Greek
poet, it must have been a bitter disappointment to Marivaux to see that
his burlesque passed almost unnoticed by his contemporaries and was soon
forgotten. The same year he wrote a _Télémaque travesti_, a parody on the
masterpiece of Fénelon. This work was not published until 1736, when it
was received with such disapprobation that he hastened to disavow its
authorship.[34]

Marivaux was now some twenty-nine years of age, and had had but little
success as a writer. He must have felt that parody was not his forte, and,
with his connection with _le Mercure_, an opportunity was presented to
deal with actualities, where his powers of observation might come into
play. He was, as he says of himself, born an observer. "Je suis né de
manière que tout me devient une matière de réflexion; c'est comme une
philosophie de tempérament que j'ai reçue, et que le moindre objet met en
exercice."[35] With his keen eyes constantly on the watch and his subtle
mind ever ready to ferret out the eccentricities, defects, or hidden
motives which some glance or gesture in his neighbor has revealed to him,
and which a less delicate mind would have failed to grasp, going so far
sometimes as to impute finesse where he has seen but the reflection of his
own nature, he, nevertheless, presents to us, as no other author of the
time, a vivid picture of the brilliant and refined society in which he
moved, and sometimes, also, bold and clever sketches of the world at
large. "C'est une fête délicieuse," he tells us, "pour un misanthrope, que
le spectacle d'un si grand nombre d'hommes assemblés; c'est le temps de sa
récolte d'idées. Cette innombrable quantité d'espèces de mouvements forme
à ses yeux un caractère générique. A la fin, tant de sujets se réduisent
en un; ce ne sont plus des hommes différents qu'il contemple, c'est
l'homme représenté dans plusieurs milliers d'hommes."[36] Wherever he
might be, on the street, at the homes of his friends, at church, or at the
theatre, he was ever a prey to this demon of observation. Behold him
coming from the theatre; forced by the throng to stop a moment, he employs
the time to examine the passers-by: "J'examinais donc tous ces _porteurs
de visages_, hommes et femmes; je tâchais de démêler ce que chacun pensait
de son lot; comment il s'en trouvait; par exemple, s'il y en avait
quelqu'un qui prît le sien en patience, faute de pouvoir faire mieux; mais
je n'en découvris pas un, dont la contenance ne me dît: Je m'y tiens."[37]

Whatever he saw became food for meditation, and, if not used at once, was
treasured up for future need. Marivaux came at last to surmise that here
lay the secret of his inspiration, but it was not for some years yet that
he expressed himself, as he did in the _Spectateur français_: "Ainsi je ne
suis point auteur, et j'aurais été, je pense, fort embarrassé de le
devenir... je ne sais point créer, je sais seulement surprendre en moi les
pensées que le hasard me fait naître, et je serais fâché d'y mettre rien
du mien."[38]

In the _Mercure_ for August, September, and October, 1717, and for March
and June, 1718, appeared from the pen of Marivaux "five letters to M. de
M----, containing an adventure, and four letters to Mme. ----, containing
reflections on the populace, the _bourgeois_, the merchants, the men and
women of rank, and the _beaux esprits_." This seems to be a turning point
in his literary life. He appears now to have grasped the idea of his own
limitations and of his own powers, powers which will be disclosed, not
only in his journalistic work, but in his novels and his plays. I refer to
those excellences which are the direct result of the acuteness of his
observation. These writings gained for him the agnomen of _Théophraste
moderne_, which his sense of fitness and natural dislike of over-praise
led him to disclaim in a letter to the _Mercure_ of October, 1717. That
same year a _Portrait de Climène, ode anacréontique_, proves that he had
yet to sustain a real defeat in the line of verse before he came to
realize that he should confine himself to prose alone. The _Mercure_ of
March, 1719, contained some _Pensées sur divers sujets: sur la clarté du
discours, sur la pensée sublime_. The next year, 1720, however, was one of
the utmost importance in determining his future career.

The statement has already been made that when Marivaux came to Paris his
fortune, if not munificent, was at least ample for his needs, and, fond of
his ease and indifferent to business affairs, he might have enjoyed
independence for the rest of his life, had he not yielded to the influence
of certain friends and entrusted his fortune to the speculations of the
Law system. When the crash came, in May, 1720, he lost all that he had. In
a letter, written in 1740, he relates the circumstances of the affair in
so philosophical a tone that it is well worth reading. He says: "Oui, mon
cher ami, je suis paresseux et je jouis de ce bien-là, en dépit de la
fortune qui n'a pu me l'enlever et qui m'a réduit à très peu de chose sur
tout le reste: et ce qui est fort plaisant, ce qui prouve combien la
paresse est raisonnable, combien elle est innocente de tous les blâmes
dont on la charge, c'est que je n'aurais rien perdu des autres biens si
des gens, qu'on appelait sages, à force de me gronder, ne m'avaient pas
fait cesser un instant d'être paresseux, je n'avais qu'à rester comme
j'étais, m'en tenir à ce que j'avais, et ce que j'avais m'appartiendrait
encore: mais ils voulaient, disaient-ils, doubler, tripler, quadrupler mon
patrimoine à cause de la commodité du temps, et moitié honte de paraître
un sot en ne faisant rien. moitié bêtise d'adolescence et adhérence de
petit garçon au conseil de ces gens sensés, dont l'autorité était regardée
comme respectable, je les laissai disposer, vendre pour acheter, et ils me
menaient comme ils voulaient... Ah! sainte paresse! salutaire indolence!
si vous étiez restées mes gouvernantes, je n'aurais pas vraisemblablement
écrit tant de néants plus ou moins spirituels, mais j'aurais eu plus de
jours heureux que je n'ai eu d'instants supportables..."[39]

Marivaux acknowledges his fondness of ease and idleness elsewhere, as well
as in this letter,[40] and it would certainly seem natural, from what we
know of the man, to accept his own statement. However, all men fond of
idleness are not necessarily idle, nor do all lazy men lack industry.
There are various motives that force them to labor, often mere pride, and
more often still, necessity. Marivaux was a great worker, as his works in
ten large volumes (as edited by Duviquet) prove, but they do not in the
least disprove his statement that he was not fond of work, and it is
undoubtedly true that, had it not been for the spur of necessity, he would
not have written "tant de néants plus ou moins spirituels," and the world
would have been deprived of his best writings, for the poorest work that
he produced was done while he was rich.

The loss of his fortune was a cruel blow, for it deprived him of the means
of gratifying his fondness for dress and good living[41], and, worst of
all, it debarred him largely from indulging his passion for charity. His
generosity and fellow-feeling for others were so great that he really
suffered at sight of their misfortunes, if he was unable to alleviate
them. "Quoi! voir les besoins d'un honnête homme, et n'être point en état
de les soulager, n'est-ce pas les avoir soi-même? Je serai donc pauvre
avec les indigents, ruiné avec ceux qui seront ruinés, et je manquerai de
tout ce qui leur manquera," he exclaims in the thirteenth _feuille_ of the
_Spectateur_, and it was this spirit of generosity that led him to deprive
himself often of the necessities of life for the sake of giving to others,
and even, at times, to give unwisely.

The following anecdote, related by both Lesbros de la Versane[42] and
d'Alembert[43], goes to show how far his love of giving sometimes led him.
One day he was accosted by a beggar, who seemed to him so young and strong
that he was indignant, and, with a desire to shame him, asked him why he
did not work. "Hélas! monsieur, si vous saviez combien je suis paresseux!"
was the unexpected answer of the youth. Marivaux, who hated all deceit,
was so struck by the naïve frankness of the reply that he gave him money
to continue his idle way of life.

Another incident has come down to us from the same Sources[44]. A young
actress, lacking in beauty and talent, had entered upon a career which
Marivaux saw meant failure, and, to preserve her from the inevitable end,
he persuaded her to enter a convent and provided the necessary funds,
although at the price of great self-sacrifice.

Meanwhile Marivaux had married, at the age of thirty-three, a Mlle.
Martin, "d'une bonne famille de Sens,"[45] whom he had the misfortune to
lose within two years (in 1723), and whom he "regretted all his life."[46]
She left him with an only daughter, who later became a nun and took the
veil at the Abbaye du Trésor.

The Duke of Orléans, son of the Regent, through fondness for Marivaux,
generously met all of the expenses of her installation.

Marivaux numbered among his faithful friends, La Motte, Fontenelle,
Helvétius, Mme. de Lambert, Mme. de Tencin, Mme, de Bez, and, toward the
end of his life, Mlle. de Saint-Jean, and, had it not been for their
generous aid, he would have almost lacked the necessities of life, not to
mention the means for his charities. Through the efforts of Mme. de
Tencin, he received an annuity of three thousand _livres_ from Mme. de
Pompadour, who had the delicacy, however, to spare his pride by allowing
him to attribute the gift to the generosity of Louis XV. The chagrin,
caused by the discovery that the pension came, not from the king, but from
the favourite, is said to have hastened his death, which followed a few
months later.

This was not the only allowance that he received, for his income in this
way amounted to "some four thousand _livres_," and with this sum he could
have been quite comfortable "had he been less sensitive to the misfortunes
of others and less liberal; but he spent only fifteen hundred for his own
needs, and the rest was employed for those of others."[48] His friend
Helvétius helped to swell the sum of his annual income, but, although he
had succeeded in prevailing upon Marivaux to accept of his benevolence,
the latter had at once too much self-respect and too much respect for his
friend to feel bound for that reason to smother his own feelings and
ideas. "One day, in a dispute, he quite lost his temper with Helvetius,
who accepted this attack with the most philosophical tranquillity and
contented himself by saying, when Marivaux had departed: 'How I would have
replied to him, if I were not indebted to him for having been kind enough
to accept of my services!'"[49] A charming reply, which speaks well for
the hearts of both men. At another time, when Marivaux was ill,
Fontenelle, fearing lest he might be in need of money, brought him a
hundred _louis_, but Marivaux, deeply moved at his friend's generosity,
yet too independent to accept it, said simply: "I regard them as received;
I have made use of them, and I return them to you with gratitude." [50]

Such a character was not likely to sue for the favour of the great. Only
three of his writings, and these among his early works, contain
dedications--_l'Homère travesti_ to the Duke de Noailles, _la Double
Inconstance_ to Madame de Prie, and the second _Surprise de l'Amour_ to
the Duchess du Maine.[51] His whole life exemplified the thought contained
in these words from the _Spectateur français_:[52] "Quand on demande des
grâces aux puissants de ce monde, et qu'on a le coeur bien placé, on a
toujours l'haleine courte," and we shall see this same attitude
characterizing his relations with the French Academy.

There were at this time in Paris, besides the Opera, three theatres, [53]
--the Théâtre-Français (known also as the Comédie-Française), the Théâtre-
Italien (or Comédie-Italienne), and the Theatre de la Foire, to name them
in order of importance.

The Théâtre-Français had been regularly organized by royal edict on
October 21, 1680, when the troupe of the Hôtel de Bourgogne and that of
the Théâtre Guénégaud were united,[54] although its origin is much more
ancient, going back as far as 1548, when the theatre of the Hôtel de
Bourgogne was opened by the Confrères de la Passion. In 1720 it occupied
the Théâtre de la Comédie-Française, on the rue des Fossés-Saint-Germain,
since become the rue de l'Ancienne-Comédie. Its reputation, as a criterion
of dramatic art, was already established, and this reputation has ever
since been sustained.

In 1576[55] Henry III called from Venice a troupe of Italian actors, the
_Gelosi_, and, from the time of their installation at Paris, in 1577,
until 1697, when they were expelled from France by Louis XIV, for their
temerity in ridiculing Mme. de Maintenon in _la Fausse Prude_, Paris had
seen an almost uninterrupted succession of troupes of these Italian
actors. Up to this time almost unlimited license in language and themes
had been tolerated in them. The plays had been mostly in Italian, but,
some time before their banishment, French had also made its way into their
repertory, and, in spite of many complaints to the king on the part of the
members of the Comédie-Française, who found this prejudicial to their
interests, the French had held its ground, not, however, to the exclusion
of the Italian, until after the time of their recall.

Their exile lasted nineteen years, or until 1716, when they were recalled
by the Regent. A new troupe was organized under the direction of Louis
Riccoboni, a famous actor, and author, among other works, of a valuable
history of the Théâtre-Italien. Riccoboni took the young lovers' parts and
the name of Lelio. The rest of the cast[56] was as follows: Joseph
Baletti, called Mario, second lover; Thomasso Vicentini, called Thomassin,
who took the rôles of Harlequin; Alborghetti, as Pantalon; Matterazzi, the
doctor; Bissoni, as Scapin; and Giacoppo, as Scaramouche;[57] with Hélène
Baletti, sister of Joseph Baletti and wife of Louis Riccoboni, who, under
the name of Flaminia, for thirty-six years was to take the rôles of
_première amoureuse_, of _soubrette_, and the _travestis_; Silvia, who
later married Joseph Baletti, and performed for forty-two years the rôles
of second _amoureuse_; and Violette, the charming soubrette, with one or
two others of less consequence.[58] The characters are those of the old
_commedia dell'arte_. However, written plays had now begun to take the
place of the improvisation of the earlier Italian comedy.

Not long after the reëstablishment of the Théâtre-Italien at Paris, and,
in fact, as early as the first of June of that same year, we find them
housed in the Hôtel de Bourgogne, rue Mauconseil, over the principal door
of which, after the death of the Regent in 1723, was engraved the
following inscription: _Hôtel des comédiens italiens ordinaires du Roi,
entretenus par Sa Majesté, rétablis à Paris en 1716_. In 1762 it lost its
individuality, and became merged into the Opéra-Comique, but that was some
years after the last play of Marivaux had been staged, and does not
concern us here.

The Théâtre, or rather Théâtres de la Foire, for there were two that were
particularly noteworthy, that of Saint-Germain and that of Saint-Laurent,
had had a more humble, though scarcely less early, origin than either of
the other theatres just mentioned, for, as early as the year 1595, an
ambulant troupe had played at the former of these two fairs. For many
years their performances consisted largely of juggling, tumbling, tight-
rope walking, and the like, interspersed perhaps with dialogues, which, in
time, came to occupy the principal part. The characters were largely
borrowed from the Italian _commedia dell'arte_. Extreme license of
expression characterized these plays. Music often accompanied them. In
fact the Théâtre de la Foire was the germ that later developed into the
Opéra-Comique. Harrassed not only by the Théâtre-Français and the Théâtre-
Italien, but also by the Opéra itself, they saw themselves obliged by the
Court to abandon, in turn, dialogue and even monologue, and to depend upon
placards as a means of expressing the plot to the audience. However, in
spite of difficulties and opposition the Théâtre de la Foire maintained
its ground.

Among the authors writing for the Théâtre-Français were such celebrities
as Crébillon _père_,[59] Voltaire, Destouches, etc. No lesser names than
those of Lesage and Piron were the support of the Théâtre de la Foire. It
remained for Marivaux to render illustrious the Italian stage[60].

Here it was, then, on the fourth of March, 1720, that he made his début
before the public with a comedy in three acts, _l'Amour et la Vérité_. It
may be recalled that _Crispin l'heureux fourbe_ had been presented only in
private. Perhaps to give himself confidence in a line as yet almost
untried, and which, after his boasting of fourteen years before and his
rather unsuccessful attempt, he had come to consider as not so "easy"
after all, he may have sought the aid of one of his co-workers on the
_Mercure_. At any rate, the play was written in collaboration with the
Chevalier de Saint-Jory, and was the only piece in which Marivaux accepted
similar aid, "except for the musical diversions of his plays."[61]
_L'Amour et la Vérité_ failed to please the public, but, as it was never
printed, we cannot judge of its merits.

However, that same year, Marivaux amply retrieved himself in the exquisite
fairy-play of _Arlequin poli par l'Amour_, a comedy in one act, presented
at the Théâtre-Italien, October 20, and which Jules Lemaître characterizes
as perhaps of all his plays "the most purely poetical, in spite of the
excess of _esprit_, and the one in which fancy is the freest."[62] It was
greeted by the public with enthusiasm, and even such severe critics of
Marivaux as La Harpe could find little to say against it,--that it "lacked
intrigue" and had a "weak dénouement " possibly, but after all that he had
made of Harlequin, "of that ideal personage, who up to that time had only
known how to provoke laughter," an "interesting" character "by making him
in love."[63]

The plot of the play is as follows: A fairy, enflamed with love for
Harlequin, on account of his beauty, has caused him to be brought to her
realm, but, in spite of all her charms and graces and her assiduous
attentions, she cannot awaken love in him, nor change him from the rude
and clownish fellow that he is; and it is not until he meets with Silvia,
the shepherdess, that love is seen to be more potent than all the charms
of fairy-land to make of simple Harlequin, as of Hawthorne's Faun, a man.
The developing influence of love is the theme of the comedy, and, although
the development is rapid, as befits a play, it is nevertheless by
graduated stages. Each meeting of the lovers fans the flame, and the need
of secrecy but stimulates their wit, until, at last, by a cunning wile,
Harlequin gains possession of the fairy's wand and with it, of her power.
This, of course, brings about the natural dénouement, and the play ends to
the satisfaction of the lovers.

Many of the scenes are characterized by an artlessness and grace that
recall Florian's _les Deux Billets_ or Musset's _A quoi rêvent les jeunes
Filles_. It is the poetry of an epoch of prose. "All the poetry of the
first half of the eighteenth century is in Marivaux, as all the poetry of
the second half is in Jean-Jacques Rousseau and in Bernardin de Saint-
Pierre."[64] The first two plays of Marivaux presented to the public were
performed upon the stage of the Théâtre-Italien, and throughout his life
he showed a marked preference for that theatre.

His success was brilliant, and _Arlequin poli par l'Amour_ had twelve
representations. At last Marivaux appears to have found his true sphere;
but no, he has still to feel his way, and to experience another check,
before entrusting himself to the promptings of his genius. His was not a
talent to blossom in a night, and only an over-zealous friend could say of
him: "Il ne se décida point pour les lettres, il fut entraîné par elles.
Il ne chercha point à devenir auteur, il fut étonné de l'être devenu."[65]

At this time tragedy still held sway over the hearts of the French,
although the period of its glory was past. As nearly every writer of the
century had produced his tragedy, not to mention the immediate friends of
Marivaux, Fontenelle with his _Aspar_ and La Motte with his _Oedipe_ and
_Romulus_, it is not strange that Marivaux felt tempted to try his wings
in this upper sphere. His _Annibal_, a tragedy in five acts and in verse,
was produced at the Théâtre-Français on December 16, 1720. In this play
the very qualities, destined later to procure for the author such splendid
successes in his comedies, were either lacking or out of place. It
survived four representations, three at the Théâtre-Français and one at
Court, and then disappeared from the repertory, not to be taken up again
until Marivaux was an academician, and as such, in the minds of many, of
course worthy of applause.

Marivaux had the good judgment to abandon a style of composition for which
he was in no way fitted, and, on May 3, 1722, returned to the Théâtre-
Italien with _la Surprise de l'Amour_, a comedy in three acts, and a
decided success. His predilection for the Théâtre-Italien was such that he
gave to it twenty of his plays, while only ten were brought out at the
Théâtre-Français. "Of the six plays of our author which were to remain in
the repertory, only one, _le Legs_, was first played at the Comédie-
Française; the five others, _la Surprise de l'Amour_, _le Jeu de l'Amour
et du Hasard_, _l'École des Mères_, _les Fausses Confidences_,
_l'Épreuve_, appeared for the first time at the Théâtre-Italien."[66]

L'abbé de La Porte declares, moreover, that, had it not been for his
support, through lack of spectators the actors would have been obliged to
give up their theatre.[67]

Why was this preference of Marivaux for the Théâtre-Italien? In the first
place, because he found the Italian actors better fitted to interpret him
with that "brillante et abondante volubilité" of the Italian nature, which
his plays seem to require, masterpieces, as they are, of dialogue and
conversational style. Moreover, the Italians were performing in a foreign
language and in a country in which they had a reputation yet to gain, and,
consequently, were willing to accept suggestions from the author. At the
Théâtre-Français, on the contrary, both actors and audience were under the
ban of certain traditions, which hindered the one from performing with the
requisite natural grace and the other from accepting without criticism
that which at the Théâtre-Italien they might have received with
enthusiasm.[68]

The prestige enjoyed by the members of the Comédie-Française was not
calculated to make them readily accept advice, and Marivaux was often
heard lamenting over their intractability. The beauty of his plays depends
upon the artless grace with which they are rendered. "Il faut ... que les
acteurs ne paraissent jamais sentir la valeur de ce qu'ils disent, et
qu'en même temps les spectateurs la sentent et la démêlent à travers
l'espèce de nuage dont l'auteur a dû envelopper leurs discours."[69] Such
were the recommendations of Marivaux, but all to no purpose. "J'ai eu beau
le répéter aux comédiens, la fureur de montrer de l'esprit a été plus
forte que mes très humbles remontrances; et *iis ont mieux aimé commettre
dans leur jeu un contre-sens perpétuel, qui flattait leur amour-propre,
que de ne pas paraître entendre finesse à leur rôle."[70]

Mlle. Lecouvreur, of the Comédie-Française, who played the rôles of the
_jeunes amoureuses_, was the source of considerable annoyance to Marivaux.
She would often catch the spirit of these subtle and metaphysical rôles in
the first performances, but, encouraged by applause, and to improve, if
possible, upon her manner, would so force the action as to become affected
in the later representations.[71] At the Théâtre-Italien, however,
Marivaux found an actress just suited to these rôles, Giovanna-Rosa
Benozzi, the famous Silvia.

It was as a result of the presentation of the first _Surprise de l'Amour_
that Marivaux made the acquaintance of the renowned actress.[72] With that
characteristic timidity, which we have already noted, Marivaux had
withheld from the public his name as author. Although Silvia had played
her part well, she felt that there was still lacking a shade of meaning,
which, if she only knew the author, she might grasp. Yielding to the
solicitation of a friend of hers, Marivaux consented to pay her his
respects, but on condition that he might keep his incognito. Upon being
presented to the artist, he congratulated her upon her charming rendition
of the play. Silvia was pleased with his appreciation, but, foreseeing
possibilities in the piece as yet unattained by her, she said: "It is a
charming comedy; but I have a grudge against the author... for not
disclosing himself. We would play it a hundred times better, if he had
merely deigned to read it to us."

Marivaux took the rôle, and, choosing a few passages, read into them all
of their hidden meaning, with the fluent ease and clearness which had
gained for him the reputation of a fascinating reader. Silvia listened
with ever increasing surprise, and at last exclaimed: "Ah, sir, you are
the author of the piece, or else the devil." He assured her with a smile
that he was not the latter, and their friendship had begun, a friendship
which had in it something akin to that of Racine and la Champmeslé, for,
from this time on, Marivaux wrote most of his plays with Silvia in mind;
but here the comparison must end, for no closer relation has ever been
suggested by any of Marivaux's contemporaries, and it is not likely that
so tempting a bit of scandal would ever have been allowed to pass
unnoticed by the eighteenth century, "si friand d'indiscrétions de ce
genre."[73]

As can be seen by a _Compliment_ in prose and verse, addressed to Mlle.
Silvia the same year that the first _Surprise de l'Amour_ appeared.
Marivaux joined also in the well-nigh universal chorus of praise which
rose on all sides in celebration of the graceful actress. If the author
contributed much to the perfection of her talent, she, too, lent no small
part to the    popularity which many of Marivaux's plays attained.

In the year of the presentation of the first _Surprise de l'Amour_, and
the more speedily and surely to relieve his financial embarrassment,
Marivaux turned his mind to journalism, and began the publication of what
he termed _le Spectateur français_, modelled after Addison's _Spectator_.
He adopted a literary fiction to introduce his observations and moral
reflections similar to that which gave life to Sir Roger de Coverly, but
the whole was carried out with less simplicity, logical development, and
power in the creation of types, though, perhaps, with greater subtlety.
Strange to say, the _Spectateur_ has never been as much appreciated in
France as in England, where Marivaux has been compared not unfavorably
with La Bruyère.[74]

Germany was a scarcely less enthusiastic admirer, and even so severe a
critic of French literature, as was Lessing, could find words of
commendation for Marivaux; but the latter was less prodigal in his
admiration of the works of foreign literatures. "and preferred
unhesitatingly our writers to those of any nation, ancient or modern,"
says d'Alembert.[75]

The journal is composed of a series of _feuilles_ or leaflets, more or
less closely connected, familiar and conversational in character. Most of
the sketches are characterized by that intuitive and feminine delicacy of
perception and that subtlety sometimes lacking in Addison, and, while
perhaps too often they appear over quintessenced or subtilized, at times
they attain an eloquent and virile tone. Aside from their literary value,
they are of great interest in the study of the author's character.

The humanity of the man and his sensitiveness to the wrongs of others are
manifest in the description of a young girl forced to beg for a mother,
sick and in want, or to accept dishonor with the assistance of a rich man,
whose aid is offered at so dear a price. The concluding words of this
sketch contain a confession of his own weakness, but with an eloquent and
vigorous attack upon those who basely sacrifice the happiness of others
for the gratification of their own pleasures. "Homme riche, vous qui
voulez triompher de sa vertu par sa misère, de grâce, prêtez-moi votre
attention. Ce n'est point une exhortation pieuse, ce ne sont point des
sentiments dévots que vous allez entendre; non, je vais seulement tâcher
de vous tenir les discours d'un galant homme, sujet à ses sens aussi bien
que vous; faible, et, si vous voulez, vicieux; mais chez qui les vices et
les faiblesses ne sont point féroces, et ne subsistent qu'avec l'aveu
d'une humanité généreuse. Oui, vicieux encore une fois, mais en honnête
homme, dont le coeur est heureusement forcé, quand il le faut, de ménager
les intérêts d'autrui dans les siens, et ne peut vouloir d'un plaisir qui
ferait la douleur d'un autre."[76]

Perhaps in no other writing has he attained the eloquence, sustained
throughout the description, that characterizes the letter[77] from a
father self-impoverished for his son's advancement and then abandoned by
that same son.

One is not accustomed to think of Marivaux as a moralist, yet this frilled
and powdered representative of the _beau monde_, this courtly gentleman,
this graceful writer, was one of the powers for good of his time.
Throughout his plays and novels, and particularly in his journals, may be
seen this nobler side of the man's nature. He was a practical moralist,
with little love for abstract theories, and a morality far from
asceticism, but, with profound unselfishness and pity for his fellow-man,
he strove to right the wrongs and correct the abuses of a cruelly
indifferent and light-hearted society. He once said of himself: "Je serais
peu flatté d'entendre dire que je suis un bel esprit; mais si on
m'apprenait que mes écrits eussent corrigé quelques vices, ou seulement
quelque vicieux, je serais vraiment sensible à cet éloge."[78] However, he
was tolerant, as one who knows the weaknesses that flesh is heir to, and,
whether his attack was aimed at the petty foibles or graver weaknesses of
the individual, coquetry, ambition, avarice, hypocrisy, vanity, and the
like, or at certain social evils, the reprimand was always given with a
tone of moderation.

Throughout his writings Marivaux showed himself heartily opposed to the
loose ideas then prevalent upon the marriage relation, and, as though to
emphasize his convictions in this matter, his comedies all end with "the
triumph of love in marriage." In certain ones, as for example _le Petit
Maître corrigé_ (acte I, scène XII) and _l'Héritier de Village_ (scène
II), this social evil is more directly attacked, as it is also in several
portions of the _Spectateur français_, and particularly in the sixteenth
_feuille_.

He was likewise an opponent of the strained relations that existed in most
families between parents and children. Instead of the deplorable custom of
making of each household a miniature court, in which the parents reigned
over timid but unwilling subjects, he advocated intimate and loving
relations. "Voulez-vous faire d'honnêtes gens de vos enfants? Ne soyez que
leur père, et non pas leur juge et leur tyran. Et qu'est-ce que c'est
qu'être leur père? c'est leur persuader que vous les aimez. Cette
persuasion-là commence par vous gagner leur coeur. Nous aimons toujours
ceux dont nous sommes sûrs d'être aimés."[79]

Was it not Mme. de Lambert, from whom Marivaux gained many of his ideas,
who had said: "Les enfants aiment à être traités en personnes
raisonnables. Il faut entretenir en eux cette espèce de fierté, et s'en
servir comme d'un moyen pour les conduire où l'on veut"? Where is there a
more charming character than that of _la Mère confidente_, willing to
sacrifice the dreaded name of mother in order to become her daughter's
friend and confidante, or than the indulgent father of _le Jeu de l'Amour
et du Hasard_? Such examples indicate the kindly philosophy that permeates
his writings.

Marivaux has been said to have held revolutionary ideas, and, in some
degree, to have forecast the terrible rending of society of 1789. While
the unqualified statement may give rise to a false conception, and tend to
exaggerate the part that he played in the progress of social emancipation,
it is not difficult to discover in him the sentiments, if not of a
revolutionist,[80] at least of a reformer. The prejudice of birth is
attacked in the comedies _les Fausses Confidences_, _le Préjugé vaincu_,
_la Double Inconstance_ (acte III, scène IV), and in many a passage in
other plays, _le Dénoûment imprévu_, _l'Héritier de Village_, etc., as
well as in his novels and other writings, while the comedy _l'Ile des
Esclaves_ is a social satire on the abuses of the day. The increasing
importance and the social elevation of servants in his drama is but
another tendency along the same line.

One of the most obvious faults of the _Spectateur français_ was the
irregular and disconnected manner of its publication. Perhaps through
natural indolence, but more likely through over conscientiousness and too
high an ideal of artistic perfection, which caused him to magnify his own
shortcomings and to soon tire of the subject in hand, he was inclined to
abandon his work unfinished and to turn to newer interests. This tendency
may be seen in the _Spectateur_, which, after sundry interruptions,
finally reaches the twenty-fifth leaflet, after which it suddenly, and
without warning, comes to an end.

Another journal in the same vein, _l'Indigent Philosophe_, undertaken in
1728, fared even worse, for it was carried only through the seventh
leaflet, when it too succumbed, to be revived, however, in 1734, under the
title of _le Cabinet du Philosophe_. The same fate awaited the latter, and
Marivaux's enthusiasm forsook him at the end of the eleventh leaflet,
Fleury[81] characterizes this as the best of his three periodical
publications. but I am of the opinion of Lavollée,[82] who does not
consider it comparable "either in interest or variety" with the
_Spectateur_.

It is not alone in this style of literature that our author wearies of his
theme and drops his pen, for neither of his novels _Marianne_ nor _le
Paysan parvenu_ was completed. The former was begun in 1731, and the
publication of its eleven parts was not completed until 1741, ten years
later; but the periodical publication of novels was common at that
epoch,[83] and the _chef-d'oeuvre_ of Le Sage, contemporary with it (1715-
1735), was double that time in appearing.

It has long been thought that the twelfth part, which concludes the story
of _Marianne_, was by Mme. Riccoboni; but Fleury[84] has proved quite
satisfactorily that the _Conclusion_, which appeared in 1745, in an
Amsterdam edition of _Marianne_, was written by one of those who, as
d'Alembert says, "se sont chargés, sans qu'on les en priât, de finir les
romans de M. de Marivaux, et (qui) ont eu dans cette entreprise un succès
digne de leurs talents:" while a simple _Continuation_, written, in fact,
by Mme. Riccoboni, and so cleverly, too, as to almost deceive the critics
of the eighteenth century, did not appear until 1751.[85]

Marianne is a young girl, beautiful and of high birth, who, when but a
small child, has the misfortune to lose her parents in an attack by
robbers on the road to Bordeaux. Sheltered by a priest and his sister, she
reaches the age of fifteen, without, however, having discovered who her
parents were. Deprived by death of her guardians, she finds herself at
this early age alone and unprotected in the streets of Paris. She seeks
the counsel of a kindly priest, who refers her to a rich and apparently
respectable man, but in reality the personification of hypocrisy. Of his
character study of M. de Climal, Marivaux was justly proud. Few, if any,
however, will justify him in rating it superior to Molière's Tartuffe.[86]
Throughout her trials and temptations Marianne preserves her innocence and
her hand for M. de Valville, a handsome and wealthy young aristocrat, who
is really enamoured of Marianne, despite certain infidelities of which he
is guilty, and which Marianne pardons with the same forbearing charity and
kindly philosophy that characterize our author himself.[87]

The story of _Marianne_ is interesting, though never of so absorbing an
interest as to hold the reader's attention more closely than was held that
of the writer himself. It is a book to be read by piecemeal, and it may be
laid down at any time. Indeed, one is not surprised, nor much distressed,
when the author fails to grasp again his fallen pen after the eleventh
part. I would not in any way detract from the literary value of a work
which, as even critical La Harpe declares, "assures him one of the first
places among French novelists;"[88] but the interest inspired by
_Marianne_ is of much the same sort as that inspired by the _Spectateur_.
The thread of the story serves merely to join the analyses of character,
moral reflections, and digressions of various kinds which abound. The
style is conversational, very similar to that of his journals.

Taken as a whole it may be considered as a psychological study of a young
girl's heart, as viewed by herself in maturer years. I am half inclined to
say the heart of a coquette, for Marianne has much of the coquette in her
nature, but she has, too, the nobler qualities of heart and mind. She is
an epitome, in short, of the feminine side of Marivaux.

One of the chief faults of the author's style is apparent in _Marianne_ to
a degree unparalleled by most of his other writings, and that is the fault
of over-elaborate description or definition. His subtle mind could
perceive so many delicate shades of character, which the less cultivated
eye could not detect, that, by elaborating thereupon and endeavoring to
disclose to others what he saw, he seemed to overdefine, or even to repeat
himself, and sometimes became monotonous. His was the delicate ear of the
musical prodigy, capable of grasping half-tones quite beyond the range of
the normal ear, and his attempt to cause them to be heard and appreciated
by his coarser fellows brought him only criticism and abuse. He realized
at times his own powerlessness to convey in words all that he felt, and
once said: "On ne saurait rendre en entier ce que sont les personnes; du
moins cela ne me serait pas possible; je connais bien mieux celles avec
qui je vis, que je ne les définirais; il y a des choses en elles que je ne
saisis point assez pour les dire, et que je n'aperçois que pour moi, et
non pas pour les autres: ou, si je les disais je les dirais mal: ce sont
des objets de sentiment si compliqués, et d'une netteté si délicate,
qu'ils se brouillent dès que ma réflexion s'en mêle; je ne sais plus par
où les prendre pour les exprimer; de sorte qu'ils sont en moi et non pas à
moi. N'êtes-vous pas de même? Il me semble que mon âme, en mille
occasions, en sait plus qu'elle n'en peut dire, et qu'elle a un esprit à
part, qui est bien supérieur à celui que j'ai d'ordinaire. Je crois aussi
que les hommes sont bien au-dessus de tous les livres qu'ils font."[89]

It was with great difficulty that Marivaux could prevail upon himself to
draw a description or a reflection to an end, feeling, as he did, that
there was always something left unsaid. His struggle with himself and his
apology to the reader are sometimes quite amusing in their naïveté. "Me
voilà au bout de ma réflexion," he says: "j'aurais pourtant grande envie
d'y ajouter quelques mots pour la rendre complète: le voulez-vous bien?
Oui, je vous en prie. Heureusement que mon défaut là-dessus n'a rien de
nouveau pour vous. Je suis insupportable avec mes réflexions, vous le
savez bien."[90]

The success that greeted _Marianne_ was calculated to make his rivals in
the field of fiction jealous. Perhaps no one felt more keenly than did
Crébillon _fils_ the growing popularity of a novel the purity of which but
enhanced the obscenity of his own writings. To this feeling may be
attributed his attack upon Marivaux's style in a very free and tiresome
story, entitled _Tanzaï et Néadarné, ou l'Écumoire_, in which his rival's
muse is represented as a mole. The mole relates her life, in a most
diffuse and wearisome manner, constantly interrupting the story with
reflections and digressions. The imitation was so clever that it deceived
even Marivaux himself into thinking that a justification of his style was
intended. Doubtless the offense that he felt was the greater, owing to
this additional wound to his _amour-propre_. At any rate, for the first
time he dignified a criticism by a reply in print. Even here he did not go
so far as to mention any name, but the allusion to Crébillon _fils_ was
evident. "Il est vrai, monsieur, que nous sommes naturellement libertins,
ou, pour mieux dire, corrompus; mais en fait d'ouvrages d'esprit, il ne
faut pas prendre cela à la lettre ni nous traiter d'emblée sur ce pied-là.
Un lecteur veut être ménagé. Vous, auteur, voulez-vous mettre sa
corruption dans vos intérêts? Allez-y doucement du moins, apprivoisez-la,
mais ne la poussez pas à bout.

Ce lecteur aime pourtant les licences, mais non pas les licences extrêmes,
excessives; celles-là ne sont supportables que dans la réalité qui en
adoucit l'effronterie; elles ne sont à leur place que là, et nous les y
passons, parceque nous y sommes plus hommes qu'ailleurs; mais non pas dans
un livre, où elles deviennent plates, sales et rebutantes, à cause du peu
de convenance qu'elles ont avec l'état tranquille d'un lecteur."[91]

The morality set forth in this passage is not stringent. Attention has
already been called to the leniency of Marivaux with regard to weaknesses
of a certain type, and to his confession of his own shortcomings. When we
consider the extreme immorality of French society in the eighteenth
century, to which taste Crébillon _fils_ truckled, as did most of the
dramatists and novelists to a certain degree, to which even Montesquieu in
the _Lettres persanes_ paid his tribute, we can esteem at its full value
the "chaste pen" of Marivaux, in whose theatre the dignity and sacredness
of marriage is never once abused, the moral tone of whose journals and of
_Marianne_ is uplifting, and even in whose _Paysan parvenu_ the tone stops
short of license, and illegitimate love is left unsatisfied.[92]

Mention has been made of the feminine side of Marivaux's writings, but the
_Paysan parvenu_, published in 1735, some six years before the last
publication of _Marianne_ is of an entirely different type. Its principal
character is not here a woman, but a young man, Jacob by name, a peasant
boy, who, finding provincial life distasteful to him, comes to Paris, and,
by the aid of his good looks, loose morals, self-assurance, adaptability,
ambition, and a peculiar power over women, succeeds in gaining for himself
an enviable position in the upper circles of the _bourgeoisie_, as well as
the hand and fortune of a rich and pious old maid, Mlle. Habert, whom his
youth and charms entice. Quite another _Bel Ami_, as Jules Lemaître[93]
remarks; but the dissimilarity is no less striking than the resemblance.
While the hero of Marivaux yields easily to temptation, we feel that it is
due to youth, a lack of moral training and a desire to please, along with
a shrewd ambition, to be sure, and after each step upward in the social
scale a moral development takes place, rendered possible by a natural
sentiment of honor, which was with him from the first, so that though the
story has been left unfinished by Marivaux after the fifth part, we are
led to expect at least a complete emancipation from the sins of the flesh,
if not a high ethical status. The hero of Maupassant, on the other hand,
is basely sensual and cruelly self-interested from the first, and totally
lacking in those heart-qualities which, in spite of his vices, gain our
sympathies for Jacob.

The style of the _Paysan parvenu_ is simpler, less diffuse, bolder, and
more virile, than that of _Marianne_; but its characters are uniformly
less noble, and, if its general intent is not immoral, at least many of
the scenes verge upon the _risqué_. What is the cause of this digression
from a style of writing so much more natural to Marivaux? Fleury
attributes the reason to his pique with Crébillon _fils_ and his desire to
prove to him "that in a work that borders upon license, brutal license is
not enough; that it must be presented in a delicate form, and seasoned
with wit and observation."[94] Certain it is that _les Égarements de
l'esprit et du coeur_, published the following year (in 1736), shows the
least immorality, as well as the most talent, of any of the works of this
author.

The scene of _Marianne_ is laid in aristocratic circles, while that of the
_Paysan_ presents to us the _bourgeoisie_ and the world of finance. Though
there are many differences between these two novels, there are likewise
many points of similarity. We have to do with the same cunning observer,
and with one who did not consider the common people beneath his notice.
Marivaux has in his style of description many traits of the realist, as we
understand the term to-day. Witness the quarrel of the linen dealer and
the cabman in _Marianne_, of which Grimm writes as follows: "On est
excédé, par exemple, de cette querelle de la lingère et du fiacre, dans la
_Marianne_ de M. de Marivaux: rien n'est mieux rendu d'après nature, et
d'un goût plus détestable que le tableau que je cite."[95]

Another trait common to _Marianne_ and _le Paysan parvenu_, and indeed in
a degree to all of his writings, is his detestation of false piety and his
attack upon hypocrisy in all its forms, whether in the person of M. de
Climal, M. Doucin or Mlle. Habert aînée; but, while false devotion was
constantly the object of his most bitter hatred, his attitude toward true
religion was noteworthy, especially for the time in which he lived. "A
Dieu ne plaise qu'on me soupçonne d'avoir, un seul instant de ma vie,
douté de ce que nous dit cette religion,"[96] he exclaims through the lips
of one of his characters.

His whole nature, his kindliness, his compassion for human suffering, his
hope for the ultimate welfare of all, inclined him to a kindly dogmatism,
which included even those unbelievers "qui ont beau faire, pour s'étourdir
sur l'autre monde, et qui finiront par être sauvés malgré eux."[97] "La
religion, disait-il, est la ressource du malheureux, quelquefois même
celle du philosophe; n'enlevons pas à la pauvre espèce humaine cette
consolation, que la Providence divine lui a ménagée."[98] He had a
distinct dislike for philosophical arguments in refutation of things
spiritual, and one day on being asked as to what he considered the nature
of the soul, he replied, "Je sais qu'elle est spirituelle et immortelle,
et je n'en sais rien de plus "; and when it was suggested to refer the
discussion to Fontenelle, with his characteristic readiness of speech
retorted, "Il a trop d'esprit pour en savoir là-dessus plus que moi."[99]

If Marivaux was preeminently admired in England for his _Spectateur_, he
was scarcely less so for his novels; there is no doubt that _Marianne_
inspired Richardson's _Pamela_ and _Clarissa Harlowe_, and that _le Paysan
parvenu_ had its influence upon Fielding's _Joseph Andrews_ and _Tom
Jones_.[100]

Opinions differ greatly as to the comparative merits of Marivaux the
novelist and Marivaux the dramatist. His contemporaries[101] considered
him superior in the former capacity. Larroumet classes him in the "small
number of those who have shown themselves equally fitted for the drama and
the novel,"[102] while Sainte-Beuve [103] declares for the superiority of
his drama. Certainly, one does not weary of his delightful comedies, never
long enough to tire, even were they less fascinating than they are, for
they never exceed three acts, except in the case of the _Serments
indiscrets_, which is in five. His creative genius is seen, as nowhere
else, in these brief comedies.

After the _haute comédie_ of Molière, with its presentation of types of
character rather than of individuals, and with its general lessons to
mankind, it would have been impossible for Marivaux to have gained glory
in the same field. His fondness for originality forbade him from following
the traces of his predecessors. He preferred, he said, "être humblement
assis sur le dernier banc dans la petite troupe des auteurs originaux,
qu'orgueilleusement placé à la première ligne dans le nombreux bétail des
singes littéraires."[104] So, in the midst of the society in which he
moved, a society of idlers, rich, elegant, refined, men in periwigs, in
rich brocades and laces, women too, bewitching with their powdered hair,
their delicate complexions enhanced by rouge and patches coquettishly
arranged, their caught-up skirts and low-cut bodices, Marivaux, with his
keen eyes open to the love intrigues so artfully conducted, with his mind
awake to all the witty sayings rife on everybody's tongue, and with his
kindly, charitable heart, found inspiration for those dainty creations, so
picturesque, so subtle, and so fascinating that they have never ceased to
charm, perhaps less truly creations than sketches of the society about
him, although no other writer has been able to handle his elusive pen in
the portrayal of similar scenes.

In what does the originality of the comedies of Marivaux consist? In
general, one may say, in his treatment of love, their prevailing theme.
"Chez mes confrères," says Marivaux, "l'amour est en querelle avec ce qui
l'environne, et finit par être heureux, malgré les opposants; chez moi, il
n'est en querelle qu'avec lui seul, et finit par être heureux malgré lui.
Il apprendra dans mes pièces à se défier encore plus des tours qu'il se
joue, que des pièges qui lui sont tendus par des mains étrangères." It is
true that throughout his plays the lovers rarely encounter any hindrance
from without. There is very little action or intrigue. The dialogue,
witty, brilliant, and ingenious, is all-important, and the denouement
often depends upon a misunderstanding, so easy to explain that one
sometimes wonders at the wilfulness of the characters in failing to set
the matter right until the end.[105] As in all of his plays, marriage
follows closely upon the solution of the difficulty; it has been said that
his lovers "s'aiment le plus tard qu'ils peuvent, et se marient le plus
tôt qu'il est possible." [106] With the respect which we have seen in
Marivaux for the marriage relation, we are not surprised to note in his
characters such fear of _poorly assorted unions_, that it is only with
much questioning into their own and each other's hearts, and with manifold
misgivings, that they are brought at last to say the final word.

Marivaux is the first of the French writers of comedy to treat love
seriously,[107] but, though he freed the theme from the malice or
flippancy with which it had been treated by his predecessors, he was
nevertheless a stranger to that intense and passionate love that we have
come to associate with the romantic drama. Some have gone so far as to say
that it is not _amour_ at all that he portrays, but only _amour-propre_.
It is a gentle, courtly love, respectful, almost reverential, though not
confiding. "Marivaux pense et dit de l'amour ce qu'en pensait, ce qu'en
disait l'auteur de la première partie de ce _Roman de la Rose_,

  Où l'art d'Amour est toute enclose.

Par sa fine sentimentalité, par sa casuistique amoureuse, par son goût
pour l'allégorie, Marivaux aurait fraternisé, au XIIIe siècle, avec le
suave Guillaume de Lorris."[108] His drama is eminently psychological.
"J'ai guetté dans le coeur humain," says Marivaux "toutes les niches
différentes où peut se cacher l'amour lorsqu'il craint de se montrer, et
chacune de mes comédies a pour objet de le faire sortir d'une de ces
niches."[109]

The absence of the broad comic of Molière, Regnard, or Beaumarchais is
conspicuous. The comedies of Marivaux rarely provoke more than a smile,
and never bursts of merriment. The pathetic is no less lacking, and yet
the interest never flags. Where, then, is their charm? It lies in the
brilliant dialogue and in the interest Marivaux has been able to awaken in
the psychological development of love in the hearts of the chief
characters. With so much similarity, it is yet wonderful to note the
variety that the author has been able to introduce into his comedies,
which some critics and envious ones of his time have dubbed, one and all,
as so many _Surprises de l'amour_, D'Alembert, who was often so just, and
at times so unjust, towards Marivaux, blames him for having made but one
comedy in twenty different fashions,[110] but is fair enough to quote the
author's own defence of the accusation, "Dans mes pièces, c'est tantôt un
amour ignoré des deux amants, tantôt un amour qu'ils sentent et qu'ils
veulent se cacher l'un à l'autre, tantôt un amour timide, qui n'ose se
déclarer; tantôt enfin un amour incertain et comme indécis, un amour à
demi-né, pour ainsi dire, dont ils se doutent sans être bien sûrs, et
qu'ils épient au-dedans d'eux-mêmes avant de lui laisser prendre l'essor.
Où est en cela toute cette ressemblance qu'on ne cesse de
m'objecter?"[111]

The years have passed, and critics have fully justified this plea. The
most convincing argument is undoubtedly the examination of the plays
themselves. Leaving out of account _le Père prudent_ and _Annibal_, the
following more or less arbitrary classification may serve to show the
predominating note in each comedy:--

I. Surprises de l'Amour.--The two _Surprises de l'Amour_ (1722 and 1727),
_la Double Inconstance_ (1723), _le Dénouement imprévu_ (1724), _le Jeu de
l'Amour et du Hasard_ (1730), _les Serments indiscrets_ (1732), _l'Heureux
Stratagème_ (1733), _la Méprise_ (1734), _le Legs_ (1736), _les Fausses
Confidences_ (1737), _la Joie imprévue_ (1738).

II. Comédies de caractère.--_La Fausse Suivante_ (1724), _le Petit-maître
corrigé_(1734), _la Mère confidente_ (1735), _les Sincères_ (1739),
_l'Épreuve_ (1740).

III. Comédies de moeurs.--_L'Héritier de Village_ (1725), _l'École des
Mères_ (1732), _le Préjugé vaincu_ (1746).

IV. Comédies héroïques.--_Le Prince travesti_ (1724), _le Triomphe de
l'Amour_ (1732), _la Dispute_ (1744).

V. Comédies philosophiques.--_L'Ile des Esclaves_ (1725), _l'Ile de la
Raison_ (1727), _la Colonie_ (1729).

VI. Comédies mythologiques.--_Le Triomphe de Plutus_ (1728), _la Réunion
des Amours_ (1731).

VII. Comédies féeries.--_Arlequin poli par l'Amour_ (1720), _Félicie_
(1757).

VIII. Fantaisie.--_Les Acteurs de bonne foi_ (1757).

Comedies which have been lost, wholly or in part, cannot be classified;
but the following list may be of value for reference: --_L'Amour et la
Vérité_ (of which the prologue only has come down to us), _la Commère_,
_l'Heureuse Surprise_ (possibly the same as _la Joie imprévue_), _l'Amante
frivole_, _la Femme fidèle_ (fragments of which play have been printed by
Larroumet [pp. 313-319] and by Fleury [pp. 365-371]).

From this classification it will be seen that by no means all of
Marivaux's comedies could be termed _Surprises de l'amour_, although some
of his best come within that category. There is a whole series of plays,
to which Larroumet[112] calls attention, in which Marivaux has left the
real for the imaginary world. There are times when we are almost inclined
to admit with Lemaître "that fancy's wing, which bears so high and so far
the poet of _A Midsummer Night's Dream_, has at least grazed the powdered
brow of Marivaux." [113]

The poetic fantasies of the latter certainly recall the fanciful creations
of the great English poet.

In the limited space of this Introduction it will be impossible to analyze
the plots of any, save only the most important.[114] The following
comedies are about the only ones presented regularly at the Comédie-
Française: _le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_, _le Legs_, _les Fausses
Confidences_, and _l'Épreuve_; but this brief list by no means embraces
all of his exquisite sketches of eighteenth century society. Add to these
_la Mère confidente_, for which both Larroumet[115] and Sarcey[116] plead,
or, at the suggestion of Lemaître,[117] _la Surprise de l'Amour_, _les
Sincères_, _la Double Inconstance_, and _les Serments indiscrets_, and we
shall still have left a whole series of treasures unexplored, especially
in the realm of the fanciful. As we have already examined one of the most
delightful pieces of the latter class, _Arlequin poli par l'Amour_, a
hasty survey of his best known plays will have to suffice. It might be
well to add here that Marivaux's favourite plays were the following: _la
Double Inconstance_, the two _Surprises de l'Amour_, _la Mère confidente_,
_les Serments indiscrets_, _les Sincères_ and _l'Ile des Esclaves_.[118]

_Le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_, a comedy in three acts, presented on
January 23, 1730, at the Théâtre-Italien, is generally considered as the
masterpiece of Marivaux, although he did not include it in the number of
his favourites. It is certainly his best-known play. Its success was great
and immediate, according to the _Mercure_ of January, 1730. The plot is as
follows: With the characteristic caution of the heroines of Marivaux, ever
on their guard against an ill-assorted marriage, and with the sad
experiences of certain friends of hers in mind to make her still more
cautious, Silvia determines not to accept Dorante, the suitor chosen for
her, until she has had an opportunity to study him in secret. She
therefore modifies her dress to suit the rôle of her maid Lisette, which
she assumes; but Dorante, who is no more willing to be mismated than is
Silvia, determines upon the same stratagem, and arrives in the livery of
Harlequin, who in turn is to play the part of the master.

This artifice is not absolutely new to the French stage, and it is
possible, as Fleury[119] thinks, that the idea of the double disguise may
have been borrowed from a short play by Legrand, _le Galant Coureur_, The
situation, most difficult to handle successfully, is treated with
inimitable skill by Marivaux, especially that of the two lovers, whose
disguise as servants is not enough to guarantee their hearts. The
prejudice of birth, against which Marivaux contended so often, is
overthrown, and the lovers are willing, if necessary, to yield all for
love. Silvia is still struggling with her sense of duty, when she
discovers Dorante's identity, but is unwilling to disclose herself and say
the final word, until she is convinced that Dorante loves her for herself
alone. The scenes between Harlequin and Lisette, their language, now
exaggerated, now trivial, and their haste to fall in love, lend the comic
to the play.

_Le Legs_, a comedy in one act, was produced at the Théâtre-Français,
January 11, 1736. Its reception was rather cold the first night, but
enthusiastic on subsequent performances. Lenient says of it: "_Le Legs_
est entre toutes ses oeuvres le spécimen de la bluette réduite à sa plus
simple expression, joignant la finesse et la ténuité de la trame à
l'exiguïté de la donnée. Tout cela tiendrait dans une coquille de noix, et
finit par remplir un acte. Les personnages, aussi légers, aussi volatils
que le sujet lui-même, s'appellent le _Marquis_, la _Comtesse_, le
_Chevalier_; ils représentent, comme nous l'avons dit, des espèces plus
encore que des individus."[120]

A relative has left the _Marquis_ six hundred thousand francs on condition
that he marry Hortense, and if not, that he pay over to her two hundred
thousand. The _Marquis_, in love with the _Comtesse_, to whom, through
excessive timidity,--and here we have the motive of the play,--he dares
not declare his passion, although encouraged in every way, is in business
matters of a decidedly less timid nature, and seeks to secure all of the
property, and at the same time preserve his heart for the one he loves.
Hortense, likewise in love with another, the _Chevalier_, whose fortune is
not large, seeks naturally to come into her inheritance without
sacrificing herself to an odious marriage. In order to deceive the other
into renouncing his share of the property, each feigns willingness to
enter into the marriage as stipulated in the will.

The servants, as is usually the case in Marivaux's comedies, play an
important rôle, and seek to further their own selfish interests. Lépine,
_un Gascon froid_, with a genius for intrigue, urges on the marriage of
the _Marquis_ with the _Comtesse_, the more readily to secure for himself
the hand of Lisette, who, in turn, opposes artfully the marriage of her
mistress to further her own interests and to retain her freedom.

The play ends with the renunciation of the two hundred thousand francs on
the part of the _Marquis_, who has at last become bold enough to declare
himself, after manifold hints on the part of the _Comtesse_; and love
triumphs. Thus with apparently little to work upon has been wrought out an
entire comedy, interesting from beginning to end. Alfred de Musset has
made over this comedy in his _l'Ane et le Ruisseau_, but has come far
short of the original.

_Les Fausses Confidences_, a comedy in three acts, was brought out at the
Comédie-Italienne, March 16, 1737. This piece has sometimes vied with _le
Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_ for the title of Marivaux's _chef-d'oeuvre_.
Without doubt, it is one of the most charming of the author's works. The
_Mercure_ for March, 1737, informs us that the play "was received with
favor by the public." Although it may be fittingly classed in the number
of the _Surprises de l'amour_, it contains as well elements of the
_Préjugé vaincu_, the prejudice overcome being that of wealth and
position, which held a place, not only in the foolish vanity of Madame
Argante, but even in the tender reserve of Araminte.

Dorante, a young man of honorable extraction, but poor, finds himself
reduced to the position of steward or director in the house of Araminte, a
rich young widow, to whose hand he is induced to aspire by Dubois, his
former servant, now in her employ, who, by his profound knowledge of the
feminine heart, aided by his master's comeliness, succeeds in overcoming
the prejudice of social standing in the mind of Araminte, and triumphantly
marries her to Dorante, in spite of Madame Argante's horror at the match
and her enthusiastic support of the Count's suit.

The intrigue is all to the credit of Dubois, who not only has to fan the
flame of love in the heart of Araminte, but also finds himself obliged to
rally his master's failing courage, as when Dorante objects that she is
too much above him, since he has neither rank nor wealth, and the valet
replies: "Point de bien! votre bonne mine est un Pérou. Tournez-vous un
peu, que je vous considère encore; allons, monsieur, vous vous moquez; il
n'y a point de plus grand seigneur que vous à Paris; voilà une taille qui
vaut toutes les dignités possibles, et notre affaire est infaillible
absolument infaillible." His genius for intrigue is certainly admirable,
and, were that a sufficient claim for glory, we would chime in with him in
his final cry of victory, as the piece closes: "Ouf! ma gloire m'accable.
Je mériterais bien d'appeler cette femme-là ma bru." The plot is
complicated by the rôle of Mlle. Marton, companion to Araminte, who is led
by M. Remy, Dorante's uncle, to consider herself the object of the young
man's affection, and thus to second his ambition. She is easily consoled
for her disappointment, however, and all ends to the honor of Dorante, who
frankly confesses to Araminte his share in the intrigue, but assures her
that a desire for her hand and property has culminated in a more noble
passion, and we have again the _triumph of love_.

Marivaux, made use of the same theme in a later comedy, _le Préjugé
vaincu_, but the prejudice attacked was that of birth, instead of wealth,
as here, where both parties belong to the world of the _bourgeoisie_.[121]

_L'Épreuve_ has been called _le chant du cygne_ of Marivaux. It was the
last play he gave to the Théâtre-Italien, and was performed November 19,
1740. It is a little comedy in one act, and belongs to the small number of
those that were enthusiastically received on their "first night." Marivaux
admits this characteristic of his plays in the _Avertissement_ to _les
Serments indiscrets_. "Presque aucune des miennes n'a bien pris d'abord;
leur succès n'est venu que dans la suite, et je l'aime bien autant venu de
cette manière-là."

This time it is a question of a rich young man, Lucidor, who loses his
heart to a poor girl, another Angélique, but, to test her love and to
learn, if possible, whether her affection is for himself rather than for
his wealth, he puts her to a cruel test. He informs her that he has in
mind for her a wealthy party and an intimate friend of his. In her
artlessness Angélique concludes from his description that he means
himself. In her joy she confides the matter to Lisette.

LISETTE.
Hé bien! Mademoiselle, êtes-vous instruite? A qui vous marie-t-on?

ANGÉLIQUE.
A lui, ma chère Lisette, à lui-même, et je l'attends.

LISETTE.
A lui, dites-vous? Et quel est donc cet homme qui s'appelle lui par
excellence? Est-ce qu'il est ici?

A charming bit of dialogue, and but another proof of Marivaux's insight
into a young girl's heart. What is her chagrin, therefore, when he
presents his valet, Frontin, disguised as the rich Parisian! She refuses
his offer, and in desperation is about to consent to marry the peasant
farmer Blaise, who had long sighed for the five thousand _livres_ which
are her marriage portion. This character is the amusing factor of the
play, Lucidor urges him to win her hand, but offers, as a compensation, if
he loses, twelve thousand _livres_. This, of course, is sufficient to turn
the tide and to enlist the interest of Blaise to fail, if possible, in his
forced suit of Angélique. The trial proves Angélique superior to money
considerations, and love triumphs.

Why does the money question occupy so important a place in the works of
Marivaux? Is it not, as some one has suggested, because in his own life he
constantly felt the lack of it? Lesage's _Turcaret_ and Sedaine's _le
Philosophe sans le savoir_ indicate, likewise, the new importance of
wealth in the eighteenth century, which Marivaux could not have failed to
notice or to incorporate in his works.

I cannot pass over in silence _la Mère confidente_, which, as Sainte-Beuve
claims, is of an "ordre à part" among his comedies, and in which "il a
touché des cordes plus franches, plus sensibles et d'une nature
meilleure."[122] Like so many of his best plays, it was first presented at
the Comédie-Italienne, May 9, 1735. This too was one of the plays, the
reception of which was favorable. The lesson that it intended to teach,
for it has a lesson, was one that we have already seen emphasized, by
Marivaux, the rights of children, the duty of parents to respect them, and
the advisability of gaining their love and confidence.

In Madame Argante of _la Mère confidente_ we have the counterpart of the
arrogant mother of the same name of _les Fausses Confidences_, indifferent
to her daughter's real welfare, but powerless to control her will. Madame
Argante of _la Mère confidente_ believes in gentle government by love. Her
daughter Angélique is a charming girl, anxious to do the right, but deeply
in love with, a young man, Dorante, unknown to her mother, and without
fortune. Madame Argante has already made her choice of an older man,
Ergaste, for whose wealth and respectability she has a natural admiration,
but, with her characteristic kindliness, determines not to force her
choice upon her daughter. "Vous ne l'épouserez pas malgré vous, ma chère
enfant," she says, meeting the objection of Angélique, and then, seeing
that there is some secret trouble, she seeks in the most graceful, tactful
way to learn the truth.

MADAME ARGANTE.
... Parle-moi à coeur ouvert; fais-moi ta confidente.

ANGÉLIQUE.
Vous, la confidente de votre fille?

MADAME ARGANTE.
Oh! votre fille, et qui te parle d'elle? Ce n'est point ta mère qui veut
être ta confidente; c'est ton amie, encore une fois.

ANGÉLIQUE, _riant_.
D'accord; mais mon amie redira tout à ma mère; l'une est inséparable de
l'autre.

MADAME ARGANTE.
Eh bien! je les sépare, moi; je t'en fais serment. Oui, mets-toi dans
l'esprit que ce que tu me confieras sur ce pied-là, c'est comme si ta mère
ne l'entendait pas....

Little by little the mother gains the daughter's confidence, until at
last, emboldened, Angélique confesses:

Vous m'avez demandé si on avait attaqué mon coeur? Que trop, puisque
j'aime!

MADAME ARGANTE, _d'un air sérieux_.
Vous aimez?...

ANGÉLIQUE, _riant_.
Eh bien! ne voilà-t-il pas cette mère qui est absente? C'est pourtant elle
qui me répond; mais rassurez-vous, car je badine.[123]

Nothing could be more graceful or more natural. This, then, is that
_marivaudage_, against which so much has been said!

Madame Argante has discovered the secret, and, fearful for her daughter's
welfare, she allows the mother nature to assume the upper hand, and points
out the danger of her course to Angélique, who, at last, comprehends, and
agrees to renounce her lover. This she attempts to do, but love will have
its way, and will not be put down. An elopement is arranged, which is
interrupted by the arrival of Madame Argante, who takes Dorante to task
for his indifference to the real happiness of Angélique. He is covered
with confusion, confesses his mistake, and by his manly attitude gains the
mother's heart and the daughter's hand. Ergaste, the rejected suitor,
proves to be an uncle of Dorante, and in a spirit of self-abnegation, well
nigh superhuman, devotes himself to celibacy and his fortune to the
lovers. Lisette plays the rôle of the _intrigante_ and temptress of her
mistress. The comic of the piece is in the hands of Lubin, a peasant in
the service of the family, who is bribed by each party to spy upon the
other.

Lack of space forbids more than a mere mention of the remaining plays,
many of which are worthy of being compared favourably with those which
have been outlined. We have seen enough to convince us that, although his
drama may be classified in general as psychological and _féminin_ there is
great diversity in the individual plays, and never monotony.

It has been said by certain of his contemporaries that in all the
characters of his comedies he has but embodied himself, that they all have
"the imprint of the style _précieux_, for which he has been reproached
with so much reason in his novels and in his comedies,"[124] and that
all,--"masters, valets, courtiers, peasants, lovers, mistresses, old men,
and young men have the _esprit_ of Marivaux."[125]  To this accusation he
makes reply in these words, quoted by d'Alembert: "On croit voir partout
le même genre de style dans mes comédies, parce que le dialogue y est
partout l'expression simple des mouvements du coeur: la vérité de cette
expression fait croire que je n'ai qu'un même ton et qu'une même langue;
mais ce n'est pas moi que j'ai voulu copier, c'est la nature et c'est
peut-être parce que ce ton est naturel, qu'il a paru singulier."[126]

Both the accusation and the reply are somewhat justifiable. With all the
diversity that may be found in his different characters, there is yet a
similarity of sentiments and of expression, which is due, not to a desire
of representing himself in his plays, but to looking for models to a
society the very natural of which was artificial, and to looking always
from one point of view. To the careful student of the human heart the
infinite variety that Marivaux has known how to introduce into his
characters, which are always clearly distinct from one another, even if by
mere delicate shades of difference, is a greater cause for wonder than the
general family resemblance that unites them all.[127]

The roles of women are the important ones in the works of this author. In
this particular the comedies of Marivaux recall the tragedies of Racine.
Brunetière[128] goes so far as to claim that "the rôles of women in
Marivaux's drama are almost the only women's rôles" in the whole repertory
of French comedies. Of Molière's drama he recognizes only three such rôles
as clearly individualized, those of Agnès, Elmire and Célimène. "The
others, whatever their name--Marianne, Élise, Henriette --are about the
same _ingénue_, or--Dorine, Nicole, Toinon-- about the same _soubrette_."
Marivaux excels in his portrayal of the _ingénue_ and of the coquette, but
perhaps no rôle is more sympathetically developed than that of the young
widow, now tender and yielding like Araminte of the _Fausses Confidences_,
now vivacious and positive, but no less kindly, like the countess of the
_Legs_.

His soubrettes resemble closely their mistresses, to such a degree that by
exchanging rôles they may readily be mistaken for them, as we have seen in
_le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_. Unlike those of Molière, they are always
refined and graceful, and are none the less witty. Contrary to their more
cautious mistresses, they all, or nearly all, believe in love, and seek to
further the marriage of the former. Lisette of _le Legs_ is an exception.
In short, all of the younger women of Marivaux are the perfection of
grace, beauty, delicacy, wit or artlessness, and are simply irresistible.

It is only the mothers that merit our aversion. With few exceptions,
notably Mme. Argante in _la Mère confidente_, he paints them "laides,
vaines, impérieuses, avares, entichées de préjugés." "Il ne pare pas du
moindre rayon de coquetterie leurs maussades et acariâtres personnes. Il a
de la peine à ne pas céder, quand il s'agit d'elles, à la tentation de la
caricature. On dirait qu'il se venge."[129] The rôles of fathers, on the
other hand, are treated with great affection. They are always kind and
indulgent, and exercise their authority as little as possible. Their motto
is that of the good Monsieur Orgon of _le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_:
"_Il faut être un peu trop bon pour l'être assez_."

His _amoureux_ are less varied and less attractive than his _amoureuses_,
and, while no less refined and exquisite, are less sincere, more
calculating and self-interested.

His valets, like his soubrettes, are more refined than those of Molière,
that is to say, are higher in the social scale, and are treated by their
masters with more consideration. The changes, soon to be wrought in the
old régime, are already germinating. While almost rivalling their masters
in wit, they yet occupy a secondary place upon the stage, and rarely dwarf
by their own cleverness, as do often those of Molière, their master's
rôles.[130] "Three of these valets are real creations. Dubois of _les
Fausses Confidences_, Trivelin, of _la Fausse Suivante_, Lépine of _le
Legs_."[131] Trivelin is the ancestor of Beaumarchais' Figaro.[132]

Marivaux has introduced into a number of his plays peasants of the
cunning, calculating, Norman type, who speak a Norman patois, which may be
a souvenir of his own Norman origin.

Piron, who could not resist an occasional thrust at his rivals, was guilty
of the following witticism: "Fontenelle a engendré Marivaux, Marivaux a
engendré Moncrif, et Moncrif n'engendrera personne." The _boutade_ is
amusing, but not just. Moncrif can hardly be considered an offspring of
Marivaux, although he imitated certain of his coquettish graces,[133] any
more, or perhaps even much less, than the latter, may be considered an
offspring of Fontenelle. Larroumet[134] mentions as true successors to
Marivaux, in the line of _proverbes_ and _comédies de société_, Florian,
in the eighteenth century, and in the nineteenth, Picard, Andrieux, Colin
d'Harleville, Carmontelle, Théodore Leclercq, Alfred de Vigny and Alfred
de Musset,[135] in the novel Paul Bourget and his school, and particularly
Paul Hervieu, and in the journal, the masters of the modern _chronique_.

One feature common to all of the writings of our author, as to many of his
contemporaries, is their lack of the sentiment of nature. There are no
streams, no flowers, no birds throughout his works. The two slight
exceptions, mentioned by Larroumet,[136] show so evident a lack of
interest in the beauties of nature that they offer the strongest proof in
support of the rule. Here they are, the first from the eighth and the
second from the eleventh part of _Marianne_: "Pendant qu'on était là-
dessus, je feignis quelque curiosité de voir un cabinet de verdure qui
était au bout de la terrasse. Il me paraît fort joli, dis-je à Valville,
pour l'engager à m'y mener." [137] --"Il faisait un fort beau jour, et il
y avait dans l'hôtellerie un jardin qui me parut assez joli. Je fus
curieuse de le voir, et j'y entrai. Je m'y promenai même quelques
instants."[138] This passage, from the sixth part of the same work, shows
a somewhat greater appreciation: " Ah, çà! vous n'avez pas vu notre
jardin; il est fort beau; madame nous a dit de vous y mener; venez y faire
un tour; la promenade dissipe, cela réjouît. Nous avons les plus belles
allées du monde!"[139] There is one passage, however, in the fifth part,
in which Marivaux gives evidence of a frank and simple enjoyment of
nature: "Nous nous promenions tous trois dans le bois de la maison;... et
comme les tendresses de Valvilîe interrompaient ce que nous disions, cette
aimable fille et moi, nous nous avisâmes, par un mouvement de gaîté, de le
fuir, de l'écarter d'auprès de nous, et de lui jeter des feuilles que nous
arrachions des bosquets."[140]

Marivaux has had the singular honor of causing the creation of a new word
in the French literary vocabulary, to designate his peculiar style, _le
marivaudage_, a term which has had in the past rather more of discredit
than of esteem in its general acceptation. Sainte-Beuve thus defines it:
"Qui dit _marivaudage_, dit plus ou moins badinage à froid, espièglerie
compassée et prolongée, pétillement redoublé et prétentieux, enfin une
sorte de pédantisme sémillant et joli; mais l'homme, considéré dans
l'ensemble, vaut mieux que la définition à laquelle il a fourni occasion
et sujet."[141] With the increasing popularity of Marivaux, there has
gradually arisen a different and more complimentary idea of the term.
Deschamps, in his excellent work on the author, thus defines it: "Cet
examen de conscience, dicté par une probité inquiète,--cette application à
éviter les illusions qui trompent, à déjouer les pièges du caprice et de
la fantaisie, à mettre au service du sentiment les plus subtiles lumières
de la raison,...--l'esprit de finesse employé à découvrir les plus secrets
mouvements de notre sensibilité,--par conséquent l'usage conscient d'un
style ajusté à la ténuité de ces enquêtes, style qui n'est pas exempt de
recherche, mais qui abonde en trouvailles décisives,--voilà précisément le
marivaudage."[142]

Marivaux has been blamed for an affectation, an ingenuity, a delicacy of
style, together with a diffuseness, which led him to turn a thought in so
many different ways as to weary the reader, a habit of clothing in popular
expressions subtle and over-refined ideas, and, finally, a studied and
far-fetched neologism.[143]

His ideas on style may be found in the sixth leaflet of the _Cabinet du
Philosophe_, in which he answers the accusations of his critics. With him
the _idea_ is primary and the _word_ used to express it but secondary.
Wherefore, an author should be judged rather by the thoughts which the
words express than by the words themselves. If, moreover, the finesse of
the writer is such that he can perceive certain shades of meaning, not
evident to the more commonplace beholder, how can he make them clear
without deviating from the regular forms of expression? A man who
understands his language may have poor thoughts, but cannot express his
thoughts poorly. "Venons maintenant à l'application de tout ce que j'ai
dit. Vous accusez un auteur d'avoir un style précieux. Qu'est-ce que cela
signifie?... Ce style peut-être bien n'est accusé d'être mauvais,
précieux, guindé, recherché, que parce que les pensées qu'il exprime sont
extrêmement fines, et ont dû se former d'une liaison d'idées singulières,
lesquelles idées ont dû à leur tour être exprimées par le rapprochement de
mots et de signes qu'on a rarement vus aller ensemble." We should have to
tell him to think less, or else urge the others to allow him to use the
only expressions possible of conveying his thoughts, even should they
appear _précieuses_. If, then, his thoughts are understood, the next
question is whether they could be formed with fewer ideas, and
consequently fewer words, and still convey to the hearer all the necessary
finesse, all of the delicate shades of meaning. "Il y a des gens qui, en
faisant un ouvrage d'esprit, ne saisissent pas toujours précisément une
certaine idée qu'ils voudraient joindre à une autre. Ils la cherchent; ils
l'ont dans l'instinct, dans le fond de l'âme; mais ils ne sauraient la
développer. Par paresse, ou par nécessité, ou par lassitude. ils s'en
tiennent à une autre qui en approche, mais qui n'est pas la véritable: et
ils l'expriment pourtant bien, parce qu'ils prennent le mot propre de
cette idée à peu près ressemblante à l'autre, et en même temps
inférieure." Montaigne, La Bruyère, Pascal, and all great writers, have
had individual ideas, hence a singular style, as it is termed.

In the seventh leaflet of the _Spectateur_ he replies to the accusation
that he attempted in his writings to display his wit at the expense of
naturalness. "Combien croit-on, par exemple, qu'il y ait d'écrivains, qui,
pour éviter le reproche de n'être pas naturels font justement tout ce
qu'il faut pour ne l'être pas, et d'autres qui se rendent fades, de
crainte qu'on ne leur dise qu'ils courent après l'esprit! Courir après
l'esprit, et n'être point naturel, voilà les reproches à la mode." What
Marivaux sought, above everything else, was naturalness, and he prided
himself upon employing more nearly than most writers the language of
conversation. Summing up the whole matter, he declares: "J'ajouterai
seulement, là-dessus, qu'entre gens d'esprit, les conversations dans le
monde sont plus vives qu'on ne pense, et que tout ce qu'un auteur pourrait
faire pour les imiter, n'approchera jamais du feu et de la naïveté fine et
subite qu'ils y mettent."[144]

Although the term of _néologue_ was applied to Marivaux by Voltaire, and
has been repeated ever since, he was less of a neologist than a _précieux_
in language.[145] That is to say, he was less inclined to coin new words,
or even to use old words with new meanings, than he was to employ unusual
and peculiar turns of expression.[146] Marivaux was not the only writer of
the time to make use of _expressions précieuses_, and, although he figures
rather more prominently than most of the authors ridiculed by Desfontaines
in his _Dictionnaire néologique_,[147] he has the company of many others,
and among them, of his friends La Motte, Fontenelle, de Houtteville, and
even Montesquieu. Some of the expressions which were considered
reprehensible by Desfontaines have since been received into common
parlance, and so do not appear unnatural or unusual: _sortir de sa
coquille_, etc.

Fleury[148] gives six divisions of the peculiar turns of expression
employed by Marivaux, which constitute that part of the _marivaudage_ most
condemned by his critics:

1. The use of a common expression, in which a word is first taken in a
figurative sense, to be followed by its literal sense:

  _Il ne veut que vous donner la main.--Eh! que veut-il que
  je fasse de cette main, si je n'ai pas envie de la prendre?_

  _Son coeur ne se marie pas, il reste garçon._

2. The use of a metaphor unexpectedly carried out:

  _Un amour de votre façon ne reste pas longtemps au berceau: votre
  premier coup d'oeil a fait naître le mien; le second lui a donné la
  façon; le troisième l'a rendu grand garçon. Tâchons de l'établir au plus
  vite; ayez soin de lui, puisque vous êtes sa mère._

  _Monsieur a couru après moi, je m'enfuyais, mais il m'a jeté de l'or,
  des nippes et une maison fournie de tous ses ustensiles à la tête; cela
  m'a étourdie, je me suis arrêtée._

3. A metaphor piquant by its oddity:

  _Je crois que j'ai laissé ma respiration en chemin.

  La vie que je mène aujourd'hui n'est point bâtarde, elle vient bien en
  ligne droite de celle que je menais._

4. A phrase ending in a surprise:

  _Je gage que tu m'aimes.--Je ne parie jamais, je perds toujours._

5. A metonymy put into action:

  _Voyez-vous cette figure tendre et solitaire qui se promène là-bas en
  attendant la mienne?_

6. A rough comparison, which will not admit of examination:

  _Si j'étais roi, nous verrions qui serait reine, et comme ce ne serait
  pas moi, il faudrait que ce fût vous._

Although these divisions are not altogether satisfactory, they, with the
examples cited, will serve to convey an accurate enough idea of this side
of the _marivaudage_. Such expressions, or, at least, those in which the
exaggeration of the figure is most apparent, are usually found in the
mouths of servants and peasants, to which class such complicated language
is not unnatural.[149]

A very minor phase of the literary activity of Marivaux remains to be
considered, and that is his work in criticism. Eulogiums of the tragedies
of Crébillon _père_,[150] of the _Romulus_[151] and the _Inès de
Castro_[152] of La Motte, and of the _Lettres persanes_[153] of
Montesquieu constitute almost his entire equipment in this line.

That he was not an unbiased critic, this unwarranted praise of his friend
La Motte is enough to prove: "Je sortais, il y a quelques jours, de la
comédie, ou j'étais allé voir _Romulus_, qui m'avait charmé, et je disais
en moi-même: on dit communément _l'élégant Racine_, et le _sublime
Corneille_; quelle épithète donnera-t-on à cet homme-ci, je n'en sais
rien; mais il est beau de les avoir méritées toutes les deux." His
criticism of the _Lettres persanes_ is, after all, the only one worthy of
praise. In it he has shown himself a fair and competent judge of this
first celebrated work of Montesquieu. I realize that, in thus restricting
the critical works of Marivaux, it is taking a narrow view of criticism,
and that his works ridiculing the classics, _l'Iliade travestie_ and _le
Télémaque travesti_, together with his ideas upon the quarrel of the
ancients and moderns, as seen throughout certain of his works, and
particularly in _le Miroir_, and lastly his opinion of criticism in
general, and his defense of his own style, as embodied in works already
mentioned, should be taken into consideration, if we had the time to study
him as critic in this broader sense.

If Marivaux, yielding to his sense of etiquette and good breeding, was
sparing in his criticism of his contemporaries, he was certainly not
spared by them. The circle of his friends was small, but intimate, and his
timidity with men, his suspiciousness, his lack of self-assertion, made
him an easy prey to such unscrupulous opponents as Voltaire. Fond of the
refined society of the salons, and repelled by the less feeling and more
boisterous set of the cafés, which he avoided, Marivaux became a
convenient object of attack for the cabals set in motion by the latter,
and, although, in spite of his general suspiciousness, he refused to give
credence[154] to an idea so obnoxious to him, it is not unlikely that the
frequent failure of his comedies on their "first night" may be most
satisfactorily explained in this way.

Marivaux was ever ready to accept a criticism that seemed to him deserved.
"J'ai eu tort de donner cette comédie-ci au théâtre," he says in the
preface to his _Ile de la Raison_: "Elle n'était pas bonne à être
représentée, et le public lui a fait justice en la condamnant. Point
d'intrigue, peu d'action, peu d'intérêt; ce sujet, tel que je l'avais
conçu, n'était point susceptible de tout cela...." At another time, having
been present at the first performance of one of his comedies, and noticing
the undissimulated yawns of the parterre, he confessed, upon leaving the
theatre, that no one had been more bored than he.[155] However,
notwithstanding his readiness to acknowledge his own defects, and to defer
to the opinions of others, Marivaux required the criticism to be fair-
minded and impersonal.

The seventh leaflet of the _Spectateur_ contains his ideas upon this
matter of criticism, which a few selections will suffice to illustrate: "A
l'égard de ces critiques qui ne sont que des expressions méprisantes, et
qui, sans autre examen, se terminent à dire crûment d'un ouvrage _cela ne
vaut rien, cela est détestable_, nous serons bientôt d'accord là-dessus,
et je vous ferai convenir sur-le-champ que ces sortes de raisonnements à
leur tour ne valent rien et sont détestables.... Ah! que nous irions loin,
qu'il naîtrait de beaux ouvrages, si la plupart des gens d'esprit qui en
sont les juges, tâtonnaient un peu avant de dire, _cela est mauvais_ ou
_cela est bon!_ ... mais je voudrais des critiques qui pussent corriger et
non pas gâter, qui réformassent ce qu'il y aurait de défectueux dans le
caractère d'esprit d'un auteur, et qui ne lui fissent pas quitter ce
caractère. Il faudrait aussi pour cela, s'il était possible, que la malice
ou l'inimitié des partis n'altérât pas les lumières de la plupart des
hommes, ne leur dérobât point l'honneur de se juger équitablement,
n'employât pas toute leur attention à s'humilier les uns les autres, à
déshonorer ce que leur talents peuvent avoir d'heureux, à se ruiner
réciproquement dans l'esprit du public...."[156] When obliged to endure
unfair and personal criticism, as he often was, Marivaux met it invariably
with contemptuous silence,[157] saying to his friends: "J'aime mon repos
et je ne veux point troubler celui des autres."[158]

Among those most bitter and most constant in their attacks upon him was
Voltaire, some of whose remarks have come down to us. "C'est un homme,"
says Voltaire, "qui passe sa vie à peser des riens dans des balances de
toile d'araignée" ... or again: "C'est un homme qui sait tous les sentiers
du coeur humain, mais qui n'en connaît pas la grande route." On June 8,
1732, writing to M. de Fourmont, Voltaire declares: "Nous allons avoir cet
été une comédie en prose du sieur Marivaux, sous le titre _les Serments
indiscrets_. Vous comptez bien qu'il y aura beaucoup de métaphysique et
peu de naturel."

The strong antipathy felt by Marivaux for Voltaire forced him at times, in
the presence of friends, to give vent to his feelings in words quite as
spiteful as those of his enemy: "M. de Voltaire est le premier homme du
monde pour écrire ce que les autres ont pensé.... M. de Voltaire est la
perfection des idées communes.... Ce coquin-là a un vice de plus que les
autres; il a quelquefois des vertus." But his retorts never went so far as
publication, and when, in 1735, the _Lettres philosophiques_ of Voltaire
were condemned to be burned by Parliament, and Marivaux was urged by a
publishing house, offering a good round sum, to make the most of
Voltaire's discomfiture and write a refutation of the same, he refused,
with his characteristic nobility of soul, to advance his own interests at
the expense of those of his enemy. As much cannot be said of the latter,
who, in letters written at this time, shows a cowardly fear of Marivaux's
acceptance of the offer.

Voltaire was not the only rival to show hostility. Destouches, in the
_Envieux, ou la Critique du Philosophe marié_ (XII), Le Sage, in _Gil
Blas_ (Book VII, chapter XIII), as well as Crébillon _fils_, in the work
already mentioned, were among the number.

Marivaux's admission to the French Academy had long been a matter of grave
doubt to his friends, for he was too honest for intrigue and too proud to
sue for favours, and there was much opposition on the part of many
members, who declared that their purposes were at war, as they had assumed
the task of composing the language, while he seemed to aim at its
decomposition; but Mme. de Tencin had set her mind upon making of him an
academician, and spared no pains to accomplish her purpose. The influence
of this brilliant, scheming, unprincipled, and headstrong woman, aided by
Bouhier, president of the parliament of Dijon, and likewise a warm
supporter of Marivaux, gained the day, and she had the pleasure of seeing
her old friend, upon his fifty-fifth birthday, February 4, 1743, received
within the ranks of the forty Immortals. Voltaire, although a dangerous
competitor, was not received until three years later; Piron, Le Sage, and
Crébillon _fils_, never.

Strangely enough, this painter of gay and brilliant society succeeded to
the _fauteuil_ of an ecclesiastic, l'abbé d'Houtteville, and was welcomed
by another, Languet de Gergy, archbishop of Sens. At his death his place
was filled by still another, a certain abbé de Radonvilliers. The task of
the archbishop was not one of the easiest, for it devolved upon him to
eulogize an author, many of whose works, by reason of his ecclesiastical
position, he was not supposed to have read. The acquaintance that he shows
with them, however, is rather too intimate to credit his assertion that
his judgment is drawn from hearsay: but with due deference to public
opinion and his supposed position, the archbishop lauds rather the
character of the man than the excellence of the author, declaring that it
is not so much for the multitude of his books, though welcomed by the
public with avidity, that Marivaux owes his election, as it is to
"l'estime que nous avons faite de vos moeurs, de votre bon coeur, de la
douceur de votre société, et, si j'ose le dire, de _l'amabilité_ de votre
caractère."[159]

Along with much praise of the author's ability, with flattering
comparisons such as these: "Théophraste moderne, rien n'a échappé à vos
portraits critiques.... Le célèbre La Bruyère paraît, dit-on, ressusciter
en vous..." are criticisms upon the immoral influence of certain of his
works, particularly the _Paysan parvenu_, which claim to have a moral aim.
The archbishop suggests that his descriptions of licentious love are
painted in such "naïve and tender colors" that they must create upon the
reader an impression other than that intended by the author, and that the
young may be led to follow the example of the "paysan, parvenu à la
fortune par des intrigues galantes," in spite of his recommendations of
sobriety.[160]

Nothing, perhaps, could have so wounded Marivaux as this imputation, for
few writers have been actuated by purer and more noble motives, and it was
with difficulty that he restrained his impulse to call upon the assembled
company for justification.[161] This is but another instance of his
extreme sensibility, for, despite the criticism more or less just, the
spirit of the discourse was both kindly and complimentary, as may be seen
from these closing words: "J'ai rendu justice, monsieur, à la beauté de
votre génie, à sa fécondité, à ses agréments: rendez-la, je vous prie, de
votre part, au ministère saint dont je suis chargé; et en sa faveur,
pardonnez-moi une critique qui ne déroge point, ni à ce qui est dû
d'estime à votre aimable caractère, ni à ce qui est dû d'éloge à la
multitude, à la variété, à la gentillesse de vos ouvrages."[162]

No sooner was Marivaux a member of the French Academy than epigrams, such
as this, began to be showered upon him: "Il eût été mieux placé à
l'Académie des Sciences, comme inventeur d'un idiome nouveau, qu'à
l'Académie Française, dont assurément il ne connaissait pas la
langue."[163]

From the time of his admission to the French Academy until his death he
wrote little of value. A _Lettre à une dame sur la perte d'un perroquet_,
in verse, may serve to represent the decline of his genius. His popularity
waned and was eclipsed by that of the vigorous writers and philosophical
thinkers that followed him. His graceful sketches were soon to be
forgotten in those terrible scenes that closed the century, which the most
morbid and foreboding mind could scarcely have foreseen or pictured in the
lurid colourings that history has painted them. His closing years were
embittered by a knowledge of his failing powers and a growing
suspiciousness of those about him, and his increasing poverty would have
made his sufferings more keen, had it not been for the generous devotion
of a friend, Mlle. de Saint-Jean, with whom he lived for the last few
years of his life, in her apartments, rue de Richelieu, and whose modest
fortune he shared. He died on February 12,[164] "after a rather long
illness,"[165] which he bore with fortitude, and "with all the
tranquillity of a Christian philosopher"[166] saw the inevitable end
approach. His death passed almost unnoticed by his contemporaries.

Although at the time of his death he was seventy-five years of age, as
Collé records in his journal, "he did not seem to be fifty-eight."[167] He
had that gift, which none but his own light-hearted time has known, of
warding off, if not old age itself, at least the appearance of it. And
from that first half of the eighteenth century, that period of perennial
youth, have come down to us those ever fresh and rose-hued creations,
which are our charm to-day, recalling, as they do, a society long past, a
brilliancy of wit, of conversation well-nigh forgotten, a gayety, a
thoughtlessness, which we of the money-loving, practical, and scientific
twentieth century may long for, but not know.



CHRONOLOGY OF THE WORKS OF MARIVAUX.

(_Taken from the third appendix of Larroumet's "Marivaux", edition
of 1882, pp. 592-596._)

[Note: T.I. indicates the _Théâtre-Italien_ and T.F. the _Théâtre-
Français_.]


1706.   _Le Père prudent et équitable, ou Crispin l'heureux fourbe_,
        comedy in one act, in verse, printed in 1712.

1712.   _Pharsamon, ou les Folies romanesques_, novel in ten parts,
        printed in 1737.

1713-1714. _Les Aventures de..., ou les Effets surprenants de la
        sympathie_, novel in five volumes.
        _La Voiture embourbée_, novel in one volume.

1715.   _Le Triomphe du Bilboquet, ou la Défaite de l'Esprit, de l'Amour
        et de la Raison._

1717.   _L'Iliade travestie_, in twelve books and in verse,
        _Le Télémaque travesti_, in three books, printed in 1736.

1717-1718. Five _Lettres contenant une aventure_, four _Lettres à
        madame..., contenant des réflexions sur la populace, les bourgeois
        et les marchands, les hommes et les femmes de qualité,--et les
        beaux esprits_, in _le Mercure_ for August, September and
        October, 1717, March and June, 1718.

1717.   _Portrait de Climène, ode anacréontique_ in _le Mercure_ for
        September,
       _Lettre écrite à l'auteur du Mercure_ (October), to object to the
        agnomen of _Théophraste moderne_.

1719.   _Pensées sur divers sujets: sur la clarté du discours, sur la
        pensée sublime_, in _le Mercure_ for March.

1720.   March 4. _L'Amour et la Vérité_, comedy in three acts, in
        collaboration with the Chevalier de Saint-Jory. T.I.
        _Prologue_ inserted in _le Mercure_ for March.
        October 19. _Annibal_, tragedy in five acts and in verse, T.F.
        Four representations, one of which at the court.
        October 20. _Arlequin poli par l'Amour_, comedy in one act. T.I.
        Twelve representations.

1722.   May 3. The first _Surprise de l'Amour_, comedy in three acts. T.I.
        Sixteen representations.
        _Compliment_, in prose and verse, to Mlle. Sylvia.
        _Réflexions sur le_ Romulus _de la Motte_, pamphlet.

1722-1723. _Le Spectateur français_, journal in twenty-five leaflets.

1723.   April 6. _La Double Inconstance_, comedy in three acts. T.I.
        Number of representations unknown: break in the registers of the
        theatre, from March to June.

1724.   February 5. _Le Prince travesti_, comedy in three acts. T.I.
        Sixteen representations.
        July 8. _La Fausse Suivante_, comedy in three acts. T.I. Thirteen
        representations.
        December 2. _Le Dénouement imprévu_, comedy in one act. T.F. Six
        representations.

1725.   March 5. _L'Ile des Esclaves_, comedy in one act. T.I. Twenty-one
        representations.
        August 19. _L'Héritier de Village_, comedy in one act. T.I. Six
        representations.

1727.   September 11. _Les Petits Hommes, ou l'Ile de la Raison_, comedy
        in three acts. T.F. Four representations. Received August 3.
        December 31. The second _Surprise de l'Amour_, comedy in three
        acts. T.F. Fourteen representations. Received January 30.

1728.   April 22. _Le Triomphe de Plutus_, comedy in one act. T.I. Twelve
        representations.
        _L'Indigent philosophe ou l'Homme sans souci_, journal in seven
        leaflets.

1729.   April 18. _La Nouvelle Colonie, ou la Ligue des Femmes_, comedy
        in three acts. T.I. Number of representations unknown. Reduced
        later to one act, to be played in the _théâtres de société_;
        published in this form in _le Mercure_ for December, 1750.

1730.   January 23. _Le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_, comedy in three
        acts. T.I. Fourteen representations.

1731-1741. _La Vie de Marianne, ou les Aventures de Madame la comtesse
        de..._, novel in eleven parts.

1731.   November 5. _La Réunion des Amours_, comedy in one act, T.F. Nine
        representations. Received October 4.

1732.   May 12. _Le Triomphe de l'Amour_, comedy in three acts. T.I.
        Number of representations unknown.
        June 8. _Les Serments indiscrets_, comedy in five acts. T.F. Nine
        representations. Received March 9, 1731.
        July 26. _L'Ecole des Mères_, comedy in one act. T.I. Fourteen
        representations.

1733.   June 6. _L'Heureux Stratagème_, comedy in three acts. T.I.
        Eighteen representations.

1734.   _Le Cabinet du Philosophe_, journal in eleven leaflets.
        August 6. _La Méprise_, comedy in one act. T.I. Three
        representations.
        November 6. _Le Petit-Maître corrigé_, comedy in three acts. T.F.
        Two representations. Received September 21.

1735.   May 9. _La Mère confidente_, comedy in three acts, T.I. Seventeen
        representations.

1735.   _Le Paysan parvenu_, novel in five parts.

1736.   January 11. _Le Legs_, comedy in one act. T.F. Seven
        representations. Received April 20, 1735.

1737.   March 16. _Les Fausses Confidences_, comedy in three acts. T.I.
        Number of representations unknown.

1738.   July 7. _La Joie imprévue_, comedy in one act. T.I. Number of
        representations unknown.

1739.   January 13. _Les Sincères_, comedy in one act. T.I. Number of
        representations unknown.

1740.   November 19. _L'Épreuve_, comedy in one act. T.I. Twenty
        representations.

1743.   February 4. _Discours de réception_ to the French Academy.

1744.   August 24. _Réflexions sur les progrès de l'esprit humain_, read
        before the French Academy; inserted in _le Mercure_ for June,
        1755, under the title of _Réflexions sur Thucydide._
        October 19. _La Dispute_, comedy in one act. T.F. One
        representation.
        December 29. _Réflexions sur les différentes sortes de gloire_,
        read before the French Academy; printed in _le Mercure_ for March,
        1751, under the title of _Réflexions sur les hommes_.

1746.   August 6. _Le Préjugé vaincu_, comedy in one act. T.F. Seven
        representations.

1748.   April 4. _Réflexions sur l'esprit humain_, in the form of a
        letter read before the French Academy.

1749.   August 24. _Réflexions sur Corneille et sur Racine_, read before
        the French Academy; inserted in _le Mercure_ for April, 1755,
        under the title of _Réflexions sur l'esprit humain à l'occasion de
        Corneille et de Racine_.
        September 24. Continuation of the same reading.

1750.   August 25. Continuation of the same reading.
        December 27. _Compliment_ addressed in the name of the French
        Academy to the Chancellor de Lamoignon; inserted in _le Mercure_
        for March, 1751.

1751.   January 8. _Compliment_ addressed in the name of the French
        Academy to the _garde des sceaux_.
        August 24. _Réflexions sur les Romains et sur les anciens Perses_,
        read before the French Academy; inserted in _le Mercure_ for
        October, 1751.

1754.   _L'Éducation d'un prince_, dialogue, in _le Mercure_, first
        volume for December.

1757.   _Les Acteurs de bonne foi_, comedy in one act, published in _le
        Conservateur_ for November, 1757.
        March 5. Reading and reception at the Comédie-Française of
        _Félicie_, comedy in one act, not played; published in _le
        Mercure_ for March, 1757.
        Date unknown. _Lettre à une dame sur la perte d'un perroquet_
        (in verse).



BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE.

[Footnote: The first biographical and literary study upon Marivaux is that
of the Abbé de la Porte, published four years before the former's death in
the _Observateur littéraire_ of 1759, vol. 1, p. 73, etc., reprinted with
additional details in the edition of the _Oeuvres diverses_ de Marivaux,
published in 1765 by Duchesne, and again in the edition of the _Oeuvres
complètes_, published in 1781 by the widow Duchesne. It is to this last-
named text that I refer in the introduction. This essay by De la Porte is
quite fair and trustworthy. It is particularly interesting as being the
first. It is followed by an Éloge, or, rather, a contemptuous sketch, for
it is anything but a eulogy, published by Palissot (and de Sivry) in the
_Nécrologe des hommes célèbres_ of 1764. In 1769 Lesbros de la Versane
published _l'Esprit de Marivaux ou Analectes de ses ouvrages_, preceded by
an _Éloge historique de cet auteur_, "a panegyric without reservation upon
the man and the writer." It is to a reprint of this _Éloge_, published by
Gogué et Née de la Rochelle, Paris, 1782, that I make my references. These
are the sources from which d'Alembert drew most of the matter for his
_Éloge_, which is characterized by a kindly criticism, that, though
sometimes too severe, does not offend. These four are the principal early
sources from which Marivaux's biographers have drawn, and, if we add
Desfontaines' _Dictionnaire néologique_, published in 1726 (and several
times reprinted), Grimm's _Correspondance littéraire_ (1753-1790), Collé's
_Journal et mémoires_ (1748-1772), Marmontel's _Mémoires_, published in
1804, those of the President Henault, published by the Baron de Vigan,
Paris, 1854, those of the Abbé de Trublet, published in Amsterdam, 1759,
and La Harpe's _Cours de littérature ancienne et moderne_ (see edition by
Buchon, Paris, 1825-1826), we shall have almost covered the ground of
early sources. Much of the first part of this note is taken from
Larroumet's _Marivaux_, p. 14, note 2.]



COLLECTIVE EDITIONS.

MARIVAUX: Les Comédies de Monsieur de Marivaux, jouées sur le Théâtre
    de l'Hôtel de Bourgogne, par les Comédiens Italiens ordinaires du Roy.
    Paris, Briasson, 2 vol. in-12, 1732.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres de théâtre de M. de Marivaux. A Paris, chez Prault père,
    4 vol. in-12, 1740.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres de théâtre de M. de Marivaux, de l'Académie françoise.
    Nouvelle édition. A Paris, chez N.B. Duchesne, rue S. Jacques,
    au-dessous de la Fontaine S. Benoît, au Temple du Goût; 5 vol. in-12,
    avec portrait gravé par Chenu d'après Garand, 1758.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres complètes. Paris, chez Gogué et Née de la Rochelle,
    12 vol. in-8, 1781-1782.

MARIVAUX: Oeuvres complètes de Marivaux de l'Académie Française
    (Duviquet). Paris, Haut-Coeur et Gayet jeune, P.J. Gayet et
    Dauthereau, 10 vol. in-8, 1825-1830.


WORKS CONSULTED OR REFERRED TO IN THE INTRODUCTION.

BIBLIOTHÈQUE FRANÇAISE, ou _Histoire littéraire de la France_. Tome XXII,
    dernière partie. Amsterdam, H. du Sauzet, 1736.

FERDINAND BRUNETIÈRE: Nouvelles critiques sur l'histoire de la
    littérature française. Paris, Hachette et Cie., 1882.

CHARLES COLLÉ: Journal et mémoires sur les hommes de lettres, les ouvrages
    dramatiques et les événements les plus mémorables du règne de Louis
    XV (1748-1772), (édition Honoré Bonhomme). Tome II. Paris,
    Firmin-Didot Frères, Fils et Cie., 1868.

D'ALEMBERT (Jean Le Rond, dit): Éloge de Marivaux. Contained in his
    Oeuvres philosophiques, historiques et littéraires. Tome X. Paris,
    Jean-François Bastien, An XIII (1805).

GASTON DESCHAMPS: Marivaux (in les Grands écrivains de la France).
    Paris, Hachette et Cie., 1897.

L'ABBÉ PIERRE-FRANÇOIS GUYOT DESFONTAINES: Dictionnaire néologique
    à l'usage des beaux esprits du siècle. Amsterdam, Michel-Charles
    le Cène, 1731.

JEAN FLEURY: Marivaux et le marivaudage. Paris, E. Pion et Cie., 1881.

LÉON FONTAINE: Le Théâtre et la philosophie au XVIIIe siècle. Versailles,
    Cerf et Fils, 1879.

BERNARD LE BOVIER DE FONTANELLE: Éloge de Mme. de Lambert. Contained in
    his Oeuvres. Tome VII. Paris, J.F. Bastien et J. Servière, 1792.

EDOUARD FOURNIER: Étude sur la vie et les oeuvres de l'auteur. Preceding
    the Théâtre complet de Marivaux. Laplace et Sanchez, 1878.

EMILE GOSSOT: Marivaux moraliste. Paris, Didier et Cie., 1881.

FRÉDÉRIC-MELCHIOR GRIMM ET DENIS DIDEROT: Correspondance littéraire,
    philosophique et critique ... depuis 1753 jusqu'en 1790. Tomes I
    (1753-1756), III (1761-1764), and IV (1764-1765). Paris, Furne et
    Ladrange, 1829.

LE PRÉSIDENT CHARLES-J.-F. HÉNAULT: Mémoires (édition Le Baron de
    Vigan). Paris, 1854.

ARSÈNE HOUSSAYE: Galerie du XVIIIe siècle. Première série. Paris, Hachette
    et Cie., 1858.

JEAN-FRANÇOIS DE LA HARPE: Cours de littérature ancienne et moderne.
    Tomes XIII, XIV, XVI. Paris, P. Dupont et Ledentu, 1825.

L'ABBÉ JOSEPH DE LA PORTE: Essai sur la vie et sur les ouvrages de M. de
    Marivaux. Contained in the Oeuvres complètes de M. de Marivaux.
    Tome I. Paris, la Veuve Duchesne, 1781. [References in the
    introduction are to this edition of De la Porte, unless otherwise
    stated.]

L'ABBÉ JOSEPH DE LA PORTE: Lettre IV, concerning the Nouvelle édition
    du Théâtre de M. de Marivaux. In the Observateur littéraire for
    1759. Tome I. Amsterdam, 1759.

GUSTAVE LARROUMET: Marivaux, sa vie et ses oeuvres d'après de nouveaux
    documents. Paris, Hachette et Cie. The editions of 1882 and 1894.
    [References in the introduction are to the former, unless otherwise
    stated.]

LESBROS DE LA VERSANE: Éloge historique. In the Esprit de Marivaux.
    Paris, Gogué et Née de la Rochelle, 1782.

RENÉ LAVOLLÉE: Marivaux inconnu (extrait de la Revue de France). Paris,
    Imprimerie de la société anonyme de publication, périodiques, 1880.

JULES LEMAÎTRE: Impressions de théâtre. Deuxième et quatrième séries.
    Paris, H. Lecène et H. Oudin, 1888 and 1890.

CHARLES LENIENT: La Comédie en France au XVIIIe siècle. Tome I. Paris,
    Hachette et Cie., 1888.

M. DE LESCURE: Éloge de Marivaux. In the Théâtre choisi de Marivaux.
    Paris, Firmin-Didot et Cie., 1894.

HENRI LION: La comédie "métaphysique" de Marivaux. In the Histoire de
    la langue et de la littérature française, under the direction of
    Petit de Julleville. Tome VI. Paris, Armand Colin et Cie., 1900.

JEAN-FRANÇOIS MARMONTEL: Mémoires (édition Maurice Tourneux). Tomes I
    and II. Paris, Librairie des Bibliophiles, 1891.

CHARLES PALISSOT: Éloge de Marivaux. In le Nécrologe des hommes célèbres
    de France, par une société de gens de lettres. Paris, Moreau, 1767.

PAUL-E.-A. POULET-MALASSIS: Théâtre de Marivaux. Bibliographie des
    éditions originales et des éditions collectives données par l'auteur.
    Paris, P. Rouquette, 1876.

WILHELM PRINTZEN: Marivaux, sein Leben, seine Werke und seine
    litterarische Bedeutung. Münster, 1885.

CHARLES-AUGUSTIN SAINTE-BEUVE: Causeries du lundi. Tome IX. Paris,
    Garnier Frères, 1854.

FRANCISQUE SARCEY: Quarante ans de théâtre. Tome II. Bibliothèque des
    annales politiques et littéraires, Paris, 1900.

FRANCISQUE SARCEY: Preface to vol. 1 of the Théâtre choisi de Marivaux.
    Paris, Librairie des Bibliophiles, E. Flammarion successeur. 1892.

L'ABBÉ NICOLAS-CHARLES-JOSEPH DE TRUBLET: Mémoires. Amsterdam, 1739.


       *       *       *       *       *


LE JEU DE L'AMOUR ET DU HASARD


COMÉDIE EN TROIS ACTES

_Représentée pour la première fois par les Comédiens Italiens ordinaires
du Roi, le 23 janvier 1730._


ACTEURS.

M. ORGON.
MARIO.
SILVIA.[1]
DORANTE.
LISETTE, femme de chambre de Silvia.
ARLEQUIN,[2] valet de Dorante.
UN LAQUAIS.

       *       *       *       *       *

_La scène est à Paris._



ACTE I

SCÈNE PREMIÈRE.

SILVIA, LISETTE.

SILVIA.

Mais, encore une fois, de quoi vous mêlez-vous? Pourquoi répondre de mes
sentiments?

LISETTE.

C'est que j'ai cru que, dans cette occasion-ci, vos sentiments
ressembleroient à ceux de tout le monde. Monsieur votre père me demande si
vous êtes bien aise qu'il vous marie, si vous en avez quelque joie. Moi,
je lui réponds qu'oui[3]; cela va tout de suite;[4] et il n'y a peut-être
que vous de fille[5] au monde pour qui ce _oui_-là ne soit pas vrai. Le
_non_ n'est pas naturel.

SILVIA.

Le non n'est pas naturel? Quelle sotte naïveté! Le mariage auroit donc de
grands charmes pour vous?

LISETTE.

Eh bien! c'est encore _oui_, par exemple.

SILVIA.

Taisez-vous; allez répondre vos impertinences ailleurs,[6] et sachez que
ce n'est pas à vous à juger[7] de mon coeur par le vôtre.

LISETTE.

Mon coeur est fait comme celui de tout le monde. De quoi le vôtre s'avise-
t-il de n'être fait comme celui de personne?

SILVIA.

Je vous dis que, si elle osoit, elle m'appellerait une originale.[8]

LISETTE.

Si j'étois votre égale, nous verrions.

SILVIA.

Vous travaillez à me fâcher. Lisette.

LISETTE.

Ce n'est pas mon dessein. Mais, dans le fond, voyons, quel mal ai-je fait
de dire à monsieur Orgon que vous étiez bien aise d'être mariée?

SILVIA.

Premièrement, c'est que tu n'as pas dit vrai: je ne m'ennuie pas d'être
fille.

LISETTE.

Cela est encore tout neuf.[9]

SILVIA.

C'est qu'il n'est pas nécessaire que mon père croie me faire tant de
plaisir en me mariant, parce que cela le fait agir avec une confiance qui
ne servira peut-être de rien.

LISETTE.

Quoi! vous n'épouserez pas celui qu'il vous destine?

SILVIA.

Que sais-je? Peut-être ne me conviendra-t-il point, et cela m'inquiète.

LISETTE.

On dit que votre futur est un des plus honnêtes hommes du monde; qu'il est
bien fait, aimable,[10] de bonne mine; qu'on ne peut pas avoir plus
d'esprit; qu'on ne sauroit être d'un meilleur caractère. Que voulez-vous
de plus? Peut-on se figurer de mariage plus doux, d'union[11] plus
délicieuse?[12]

SILVIA.

Délicieuse? Que tu es folle, avec tes expressions!

LISETTE.

Ma foi! Madame, c'est qu'il est heureux qu'un amant de cette espèce-là
veuille se marier dans les formes;[13] il n'y a presque point de fille,
s'il lui faisoit la cour, qui ne fût en danger de l'épouser sans
cérémonie. Aimable, bien fait, voilà de quoi vivre[14] pour l'amour;
sociable et spirituel, voilà pour l'entretien de la société. Pardi![15]
tout en sera bon[16] dans cet homme-là; l'utile et l'agréable, tout s'y
trouve.[17]

SILVIA.

Oui, dans le portrait que tu en fais, et on dit qu'il y ressemble; mais
c'est un on dit, et je pourrais bien n'être pas de ce sentiment-là, moi.
Il est bel homme, dit-on, et c'est presque tant pis.

LISETTE.

Tant pis! tant pis! mais voilà une pensée bien hétéroclite![18]

SILVIA.

C'est une pensée de très bon sens.[19] Volontiers un bel homme est fat; je
l'ai remarqué.

LISETTE.

Oh! il a tort d'être fat, mais il a raison d'être beau.

SILVIA.

On ajoute qu'il est bien fait; passe.[20]

LISETTE.

Oui-da,[21] cela est pardonnable.

SILVIA.

De beauté[22] et de bonne mine, je l'en dispense; ce sont là des agréments
superflus.

LISETTE.

Vertuchoux![23] si je me marie jamais, ce superflu-là sera mon
nécessaire.[24]

SILVIA.

Tu ne sais ce que tu dis. Dans le mariage, on a plus souvent affaire à
l'homme raisonnable qu'à l'aimable homme: en un mot, je ne lui demande
qu'un bon caractère, et cela est plus difficile à trouver qu'on ne pense.
On loue beaucoup le sien; mais qui est-ce qui a vécu avec lui? Les hommes
ne se contrefont-ils[25] pas, surtout quand ils ont de l'esprit? N'en ai-
je pas vu, moi, qui paroissoient, avec leurs amis, les meilleures gens du
monde? C'est la douceur, la raison, l'enjouement même; il n'y a pas
jusqu'à leur physionomie qui ne soit garante de toutes les bonnes qualités
qu'on leur trouve. Monsieur un tel a l'air d'un galant homme, d'un homme
bien raisonnable, disoit-on tous les jours d'Ergaste. Aussi l'est-il[26]
répondoit-on; je l'ai répondu moi-même. Sa physionomie ne vous ment pas
d'un mot.[27] Oui, fiez-vous y à cette physionomie si douce, si
prévenante, qui disparoit un quart d'heure après, pour faire place à un
visage sombre, brutal, farouche, qui devient l'effroi de toute une maison.
Ergaste s'est marié; sa femme, ses enfants, son domestique, ne lui
connoissent encore que ce visage-là, pendant qu'il promène partout
ailleurs cette physionomie si aimable que nous lui voyons, et qui n'est
qu'un masque qu'il prend au sortir de chez lui.

LISETTE.

Quel fantasque avec ses deux visages!

SILVIA.

N'est-on pas content de Léandre, quand on le voit? Eh bien! chez lui,
c'est un homme qui ne dit mot, qui ne rit ni qui ne gronde:[28] c'est une
âme[29] glacée, solitaire, inaccessible. Sa femme ne la connoît point, n'a
point de commerce avec elle; elle n'est mariée qu'avec une figure qui sort
d'un cabinet, qui vient à table, et qui fait expirer de langueur, de froid
et d'ennui tout ce qui l'environne. N'est-ce pas là un mari bien amusant?

LISETTE.

Je gèle au récit que vous m'en faites. Mais Tersandre, par exemple?

SILVIA.

Oui, Tersandre! il venoit l'autre jour de s'emporter contre sa femme.
J'arrive, on m'annonce: je vois un homme qui vient à moi les bras ouverts,
d'un air serein, dégagé; vous auriez dit qu'il sortait de la conversation
la plus badine; sa bouche et ses yeux rioient encore. Le fourbe! Voilà ce
que c'est que les hommes. Qui est-ce qui croit que sa femme est à plaindre
avec lui? Je la trouvai toute abattue, le teint plombé, avec des yeux qui
venoient de pleurer; je la trouvai comme je serai peut-être: voilà mon
portrait à venir; je vais du moins risquer d'en être une copie. Elle me
fit pitié, Lisette; si j'allois te faire pitié aussi? Cela est terrible!
qu'en dis-tu? Songe à ce que c'est qu'un mari.

LISETTE.

Un mari? c'est un mari. Vous ne deviez pas finir par ce mot-là; il me
raccommode avec tout le reste.[30]


SCÈNE II.

M, ORGON, SILVIA, LISETTE.

M. ORGON.

Eh! bonjour, ma fille. La nouvelle que je viens t'annoncer te fera-t-elle
plaisir? Ton prétendu arrive aujourd'hui; son père me l'apprend par cette
lettre-ci. Tu ne me réponds rien; tu me parois triste. Lisette de son côté
baisse les yeux. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie? Parle donc, toi; de quoi
s'agit-il?

LISETTE.

Monsieur, un visage qui fait trembler, un autre qui fait mourir de froid,
une âme gelée qui se tient à l'écart; et puis le portrait d'une femme qui
a le visage abattu, un teint plombé, des yeux bouffis et qui viennent de
pleurer; voilà, Monsieur, tout ce que nous considérons avec tant de
recueillement.

M. ORGON.

Que veut dire ce galimatias? Une âme, un portrait! Explique-toi donc: je
n'y entends rien.

SILVIA.

C'est que j'entretenois Lisette du malheur d'une femme maltraitée par son
mari; je lui citois celle de Tersandre, que je trouvai l'autre jour fort
abattue, parce que son mari venoit de la quereller; et je faisois là-
dessus mes réflexions.

LISETTE.

Oui, nous parlions d'une physionomie qui va et qui vient; nous disions
qu'un mari porte un masque avec le monde, et une grimace[31] avec sa
femme.

M. ORGON.

De tout cela,[32] ma fille, je comprends que le mariage t'alarme, d'autant
plus que tu ne connois point Dorante.

LISETTE.

Premièrement, il est beau; et c'est presque tant pis.

M. ORGON.

Tant pis! Rêves-tu, avec ton tant pis?

LISETTE.

Moi, je dis ce qu'on m'apprend: c'est la doctrine de Madame; j'étudie sous
elle.

M. ORGON.

Allons, allons, il n'est pas question de tout cela. Tiens, ma chère
enfant, tu sais combien je t'aime. Dorante vient pour t'épouser. Dans le
dernier voyage que je fis en province, j'arrêtai ce mariage-là avec son
père, qui est mon intime et mon ancien ami; mais ce fut à condition
que[33] vous vous plairiez à tous deux et que vous auriez entière liberté
de vous expliquer là-dessus. Je te défends toute complaisance à mon égard.
Si Dorante ne te convient point, tu n'as qu'à le dire, et il repart; si tu
ne lui convenois pas, il repart de même,

LISETTE.

Un _duo_ de tendresse en décidera, comme à l'Opéra: «Vous me voulez, je
vous veux; vite un notaire[34]!» ou bien: «M'aimez-vous? non; ni moi non
plus, vite à cheval!»

M. ORGON.

Pour moi, je n'ai jamais vu Dorante: il étoit absent quand j'étois chez
son père; mais, sur tout le bien[35] qu'on m'en a dit, je ne saurois
craindre que vous vous remerciiez[36] ni l'un ni l'autre.

SILVIA.

Je suis pénétrée de vos bontés, mon père. Vous me défendez toute
complaisance, et je vous obéirai.

M. ORGON.

Je te l'ordonne.

SILVIA.

Mais, si j'osois, je vous proposerois, sur une idée qui me vient, de
m'accorder une grâce qui me tranquilliseroit tout à fait.

M. ORGON.

Parle ... Si la chose est faisable, je te l'accorde.

SILVIA.

Elle est très faisable; mais je crains que ce ne soit abuser de vos
bontés.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! abuse. Va, dans ce monde, il faut être un peu trop bon pour
l'être assez.

LISETTE.

Il n'y a que le meilleur de tous les hommes qui puisse dire cela.

M. ORGON.

Explique-toi, ma fille.

SILVIA.

Dorante arrive ici aujourd'hui.... Si je pouvois le voir, l'examiner un
peu sans qu'il me connût! Lisette a de l'esprit, Monsieur; elle pourroit
prendre ma place pour un peu de temps, et je prendrois la sienne.

M. ORGON, _à part_.

Son idée est plaisante.[37] (_Haut_.) Laisse-moi rêver un peu à ce que tu
me dis là. (_A part_.) Si je la laisse faire, il doit arriver quelque
chose de bien singulier. Elle ne s'y attend pas elle-même.... (_Haut_.)
Soit, ma fille, je te permets le déguisement. Es-tu bien sûre de soutenir
le tien, Lisette?

LISETTE.

Moi, Monsieur? Vous savez qui je suis; essayez de m'en conter,[38] et
manquez de respect, si vous l'osez, à cette contenance-ci. Voilà un
échantillon des bons airs[39] avec lesquels je vous attends. Qu'en dites-
vous? Hem? retrouvez-vous Lisette?

M. ORGON.

Comment donc! je m'y trompe actuellement moi-même. Mais il n'y a point de
temps à perdre: va t'ajuster suivant ton rôle. Dorante peut nous
surprendre. Hâtez-vous, et qu'on donne le mot à toute la maison.

SILVIA.

Il ne me faut presque qu'un tablier.[40]

LISETTE.

Et moi, je vais à ma toilette. Venez m'y coiffer, Lisette, pour vous
accoutumer à vos fonctions.... Un peu d'attention à votre service, s'il
vous plaît.

SILVIA.

Vous serez contente, marquise. Marchons!


SCÈNE III.

MARIO, M. ORGON, SILVIA.

MARIO.

Ma soeur, je te félicite de la nouvelle que j'apprends.... Nous allons
voir ton amant, dit-on.

SILVIA.

Oui, mon frère, mais je n'ai pas le temps de m'arrêter: j'ai des affaires
sérieuses, et mon père vous les dira. Je vous quitte.


SCÈNE IV.

M. ORGON, MARIO.

M. ORGON.

Ne l'amusez pas,[41] Mario; venez, vous saurez de quoi il s'agit.

MARIO.

Qu'y a-t-il de nouveau, Monsieur?

M. ORGON.

Je commence par vous recommander d'être discret sur ce que je vais vous
dire, au moins.

MARIO.

Je suivrai vos ordres.

M. ORGON.

Nous verrons Dorante aujourd'hui; mais nous ne le verrons que déguisé.

MARIO.

Déguisé! Viendra-t-il en partie de masque?[42] lui donnerez-vous le bal?

M. ORGON.

Écoutez l'article[43] de la lettre du père. Hum!... _Je ne sais, au reste,
ce que vous penserez d'une imagination[44] qui est venue à mon fils: elle
est bizarre, il en convient lui-même; mais le motif est pardonnable et
même délicat: c'est qu'il m'a prié de lui permettre de n'arriver d'abord
chez vous que sous la figure[45] de son valet, qui, de son côté, fera le
personnage de son maître.

MARIO.

Ah! ah! cela sera plaisant.[46]

M. ORGON.

Écoutez le reste: _Mon fils sait combien l'engagement qu'il va prendre est
sérieux, et il espère, dit-il, sous ce déguisement de peu de durée, saisir
quelques traits du caractère de notre future[47] et la mieux connaître,
pour se régler ensuite sur ce qu'il doit faire, suivant la liberté que
nous sommes convenus de leur laisser. Pour moi, qui m'en fie bien à ce que
vous m'avez dit de votre aimable fille, j'ai consenti à tout, en prenant
la précaution de vous avertir, quoiqu'il m'ait demandé le secret de votre
côté. Vous en userez là-dessus avec la future comme vous le jugerez à
propos...._ Voilà ce que le père m'écrit. Ce n'est pas le tout;[48] voici
ce qui arrive: c'est que votre soeur, inquiète de son côté sur le
chapitre[49] de Dorante, dont elle ignore le secret, m'a demandé de jouer
ici la même comédie, et cela, précisément pour observer Dorante, comme
Dorante veut l'observer. Qu'en dites-vous? Savez-vous rien de plus
particulier que cela? Actuellement la maîtresse et la suivante se
travestissent. Que me conseillez-vous, Mario? Avertirai-je votre soeur, ou
non?

MARIO.

Ma foi, Monsieur, puisque les choses prennent ce train-là, je ne voudrois
pas les déranger, et je respecterois l'idée qui leur est inspirée[50] à
l'un et à l'autre. Il faudra bien qu'ils se parlent souvent tous deux sous
ce déguisement. Voyons si leur coeur ne les avertiroit[51] pas de ce
qu'ils valent. Peut-être que Dorante prendra du goût pour ma soeur, toute
soubrette qu'elle sera, et cela seroit charmant pour elle.

M. ORGON.

Nous verrons un peu comment elle se tirera d'intrigue.[52]

MARIO.

C'est une aventure qui ne sauroit manquer de nous divertir. Je veux me
trouver au début et les agacer[53] tous deux.


SCÈNE V.

SILVIA, M. ORGON, MARIO.

SILVIA.

Me voilà, Monsieur: ai-je mauvaise grâce en femme de chambre? Et vous, mon
frère, vous savez de quoi il s'agit, apparemment... Comment me trouvez-
vous?

MARIO.

Ma foi, ma soeur, c'est autant de pris que le valet;[54] mais tu pourrois
bien aussi escamoter Dorante à ta maîtresse.

SILVIA.

Franchement, je ne haïrois pas de lui plaire sous le personnage que je
joue; je ne serois pas fâchée de subjuguer sa raison, de l'étourdir[55] un
peu sur la distance qu'il y aura de lui à moi. Si mes charmes font ce
coup-là, ils me feront plaisir; je les estimerai. D'ailleurs, cela
m'aiderait à déméler Dorante. A l'égard de son valet, je ne crains pas ses
soupirs; ils n'oseront m'aborder; il y aura quelque chose dans ma
physionomie qui inspirera plus de respect que d'amour à ce faquin-là.

MARIO.

Allons, doucement, ma soeur: ce faquin-là sera votre égal...

M. ORGON.

Et ne manquera pas de t'aimer.

SILVIA.

Eh bien! l'honneur de lui plaire ne me sera pas inutile. Les valets sont
naturellement indiscrets; l'amour est babillard, et j'en ferai l'historien
de son maître.

UN VALET.

Monsieur, il vient d'arriver un domestique qui demande à vous parler; il
est suivi d'un crocheteur[56] qui porte une valise.

M. ORGON.

Qu'il entre: c'est sans doute le valet de Dorante. Son maître peut être
resté au bureau pour affaires. Où est Lisette?

SILVIA.

Lisette s'habille, et dans son miroir[57] nous trouve très imprudents
de lui livrer Dorante; elle aura bientôt fait.

M. ORGON.
Doucement! on vient.


SCENE VI.

DORANTE _en valet_, M. ORGON, SILVIA, MARIO.

DORANTE.

Je cherche M. Orgon: n'est-ce pas à lui que j'ai l'honneur de faire la
révérence?

M. ORGON.

Oui, mon ami, c'est à lui-même.

DORANTE.

Monsieur, vous avez sans doute reçu de nos nouvelles; j'appartiens à
monsieur Dorante, qui me suit, et qui m'envoie toujours[58] devant, vous
assurer de ses respects, en attendant qu'il vous en assure lui-même.

M. ORGON.

Tu fais ta commission de fort bonne grâce. Lisette, que dis-tu de ce
garçon-là?

SILVIA.

Moi, Monsieur, je dis qu'il est bien venu,[59] et qu'il promet.

DORANTE.

Vous avez bien de la bonté; je fais du mieux qu'il m'est possible.

MARIO.

Il n'est pas mal tourné, au moins: ton coeur n'a qu'à se bien tenir,[60]
Lisette.

SILVIA.

Mon coeur! c'est bien des affaires.[61]

DORANTE.

Ne vous fâchez pas, Mademoiselle; ce que dit Monsieur ne m'en fait point
accroire.[62]

SILVIA.

Cette modestie-là me plaît; continuez de même.

MARIO.

Fort bien! Mais il me semble que ce nom de Mademoiselle qu'il te donne est
bien sérieux.[63] Entre gens comme vous, le style des compliments ne doit
pas être si grave; vous seriez toujours sur le qui-vive:[64] allons,
traitez-vous plus commodément.[65] Tu as nom[66] Lisette; et toi, mon
garçon, comment t'appelles-tu?

DORANTE.

Bourguignon, Monsieur, pour vous servir.

SILVIA.

Eh bien! Bourguignon, soit.

DORANTE.

Va donc pour Lisette;[67] je n'en serai pas moins votre serviteur.

MARIO.

Votre serviteur! Ce n'est point encore là votre jargon: c'est «ton
serviteur» qu'il faut dire.

M. ORGON.

Ah! ah! ah! ah!

SILVIA, _bas à Mario_.

Vous me jouez, mon frère.

DORANTE.

A l'égard du tutoiement, j'attends les ordres de Lisette.

SILVIA.

Fais comme tu voudras, Bourguignon; voilà la glace rompue, puisque cela
divertit ces messieurs.

DORANTE.

Je t'en remercie, Lisette; et je réponds sur le champ à l'honneur que tu
me fais.

M. ORGON.

Courage, mes enfants! Si vous commencez à vous aimer vous voilà
débarrassés des cérémonies.

MARIO.

Oh! doucement! S'aimer, c'est une autre affaire: vous ne savez peut-être
pas que j'en veux au coeur de Lisette,[68] moi qui vous parle. 11 est vrai
qu'il m'est cruel; mais je ne veux pas que Bourguignon aille sur mes
brisées.[69]

SILVIA.

Oui! le prenez-vous sur ce ton-là? Et moi, je veux que Bourguignon m'aime.

DORANTE.

Tu te fais tort de dire «je veux,» belle Lisette; tu n'as pas besoin
d'ordonner pour être servie.

MARIO.

Monsieur Bourguignon, vous avez pillé cette galanterie-là quelque part.

DORANTE.

Vous avez raison, Monsieur, c'est dans ses yeux que je l'ai prise.

MARIO.

Tais-toi, c'est encore pis: je te défends d'avoir tant d'esprit.

SILVIA.

Il ne l'a pas à vos dépens, et, s'il en trouve dans mes yeux, il n'a qu'à
prendre.

M. ORGON.

Mon fils, vous perdrez votre procès;[70] retirons-nous. Dorante va venir,
allons le dire à ma fille; et vous, Lisette, montrez à ce garçon
l'appartement de son maître. Adieu, Bourguignon.

DORANTE.

Monsieur, vous me faites trop d'honneur.


SCÈNE VII.

SILVIA, DORANTE.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Ils se donnent la comédie;[71] n'importe, mettons tout à profit. Ce
garçon-ci n'est pas sot, et je ne plains pas la soubrette qui l'aura.[72]
II va m'en conter:[73] laissons-le dire, pourvu qu'il m'instruise.

DORANTE, _à part_.

Cette fille-ci m'étonne! Il n'y a point de femme au monde à qui sa
physionomie ne fît honneur: lions connoissance avec elle.... (_Haut_.)
Puisque nous sommes dans le style amical,[74] et que nous avons abjuré les
façons, dis-moi, Lisette, ta maîtresse te vaut-elle? Elle est bien hardie
d'oser avoir une femme de chambre comme toi!

SILVIA.

Bourguignon, cette question-là m'annonce que, suivant la coutume, tu
arrives avec l'intention de me dire des douceurs: n'est-il pas vrai?

DORANTE.

Ma foi, je n'étois pas venu dans ce dessein-là, je te l'avoue; tout valet
que je suis, je n'ai jamais eu de grande liaison avec les soubrettes: je
n'aime pas l'esprit domestique; mais, à ton égard, c'est une autre
affaire. Comment donc! tu me soumets; je suis presque timide; ma
familiarité n'oseroit s'apprivoiser avec toi; j'ai toujours envie d'ôter
mon chapeau[75] de dessus ma tête, et, quand je te tutoie, il me semble
que je joue:[76] enfin j'ai un penchant à te traiter avec des respects qui
te feroient rire. Quelle espèce de suivante es-tu donc, avec ton air de
princesse?

SILVIA.

Tiens, tout ce que tu dis avoir senti en me voyant est précisément
l'histoire de tous les valets qui m'ont vue.

DORANTE.

Ma foi, je ne serois pas surpris quand ce seroit aussi l'histoire de tous
les maîtres.

SILVIA.

Le trait est joli, assurément; mais, je te le répète encore, je ne suis
pas faite aux cajoleries de ceux dont la garde-robe ressemble à la tienne.

DORANTE.

C'est-à-dire que ma parure ne te plaît pas?

SILVIA.

Non, Bourguignon; laissons-la l'amour, et soyons bons amis.

DORANTE.

Rien que cela? Ton petit traité n'est composé que de deux clauses
impossibles.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Quel homme pour un valet! (_Haut_.) Il faut pourtant qu'il s'exécute; on
m'a prédit que je n'épouserai jamais qu'un homme de condition, et j'ai
juré depuis de n'en écouter jamais d'autres.

DORANTE.

Parbleu! cela est plaisant![77] Ce que tu as juré pour homme, je l'ai juré
pour femme, moi: j'ai fait serment de n'aimer sérieusement qu'une fille de
condition.

SILVIA.

Ne t'écarte donc pas de ton projet.

DORANTE.

Je ne m'en écarte peut-être pas tant que nous le croyons: tu as l'air bien
distingué, et l'on est quelquefois fille de condition sans le savoir.

SILVIA.

Ah! ha! ha! Je te remercierois de ton éloge si ma mère n'en faisoit pas
les frais.

DORANTE.

Eh bien! venge-t-en sur la mienne, si tu me trouves assez bonne mine pour
cela.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Il le mériteroit. (_Haut_.) Mais ce n'est pas là de quoi il est question:
trêve de badinage. C'est un homme de condition qui m'est prédit pour
époux, et je n'en rabattrai rien.

DORANTE.

Parbleu! si j'étois tel, la prédiction me menacerait; j'aurois peur de la
vérifier. Je n'ai pas de foi à l'astrologie, mais j'en ai beaucoup à ton
visage.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Il ne tarit point. (_Haut_.) Finiras-tu? Que t'importe la prédiction,
puisqu'elle t'exclut?

DORANTE.

Elle n'a pas prédit que je ne t'aimerois point.

SILVIA.

Non, mais elle a dit que tu n'y gagnerois rien; et moi, je te le confirme.

DORANTE.

Tu fais fort bien, Lisette: cette fierté-là te va à merveille, et,
quoiqu'elle me fasse mon procès,[78] je suis pourtant bien aise de te la
voir; je te l'ai souhaitée d'abord que[79] je t'ai vue: il te falloit
encore cette grâce-là, et je me console d'y perdre, parce que tu y gagnes.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Mais, en vérité, voilà un garçon qui me surprend, malgré que j'en
aie...[80] (_Haut._) Dis-moi, qui es-tu, toi qui me parles ainsi?

DORANTE.

Le fils d'honnêtes gens qui n'étoient pas riches.

SILVIA.

Va, je te souhaite de bon coeur une meilleure situation que la tienne, et
je voudrois pouvoir y contribuer; la fortune a tort avec toi.[81]

DORANTE.

Ma foi! l'amour a plus de tort[82] qu'elle: j'aimerois mieux qu'il me fût
permis de te demander ton coeur que d'avoir tous les biens du monde.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Nous voilà, grâce au Ciel, en conversation réglée. (_Haut_.) Bourguignon,
je ne saurois me fâcher des discours que tu me tiens; mais, je t'en prie,
changeons d'entretien. Venons à ton maître. Tu peux te passer de me parler
d'amour, je pense?

DORANTE.

Tu pourrais bien te passer de m'en faire sentir, toi.

SILVIA.

Ahi! je me fâcherai; tu m'impatientes. Encore une fois, laisse là ton
amour.

DORANTE.

Quitte donc ta figure.

SILVIA, _à part_.

A la fin, je crois qu'il m'amuse...[83] (_Haut_.) Eh bien! Bourguignon, tu
ne veux donc pas finir? Faudra-t-il que je te quitte? (_A part_.) Je
devrois déjà l'avoir fait.

DORANTE.

Attends, Lisette, je voulois moi-même te parler d'autre chose; mais je ne
sais plus ce que c'est.

SILVIA.

J'avois de mon côté quelque chose à te dire, mais tu m'as fait perdre mes
idées aussi, à moi.

DORANTE.

Je me rappelle de[84] t'avoir demandé si ta maîtresse te valoit.

SILVIA.

Tu reviens à ton chemin par un détour: adieu.

DORANTE.

Et non, te dis-je, Lisette; il ne s'agit ici que de mon maître.

SILVIA.

Eh bien! soit: je voulois te parler de lui aussi, et j'espère que tu
voudras bien me dire confidemment[85] ce qu'il est. Ton attachement pour
lui m'en donne bonne opinion: il faut qu'il ait du mérite, puisque tu le
sers.

DORANTE.

Tu me permettras peut-être bien de te remercier de ce que tu me dis là,
par exemple?

SILVIA.

Veux-tu bien ne prendre pas garde[86] à l'imprudence que j'ai eue de le
dire?

DORANTE.

Voilà encore de ces réponses qui m'emportent! Fais comme tu voudras, je
n'y résiste point, et je suis bien malheureux de me trouver arrêté par
tout ce qu'il y a de plus aimable au monde.

SILVIA.

Et moi je voudrois bien savoir comment il se fait que j'ai la bonté de
t'écouter, car, assurément, cela est singulier!

DORANTE.

Tu as raison, notre aventure est unique.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Malgré tout ce qu'il m'a dit, je ne suis point partie, je ne pars point,
me voilà encore, et je réponds! En vérité, cela passe la raillerie.
(_Haut_.) Adieu.

DORANTE.

Achevons donc ce que nous voulions dire.

SILVIA.

Adieu, te dis-je; plus de quartier. Quand ton maître sera venu, je
tâcherai, en faveur de[87] ma maîtresse, de le connoître par moi-même,
s'il en vaut la peine. En attendant, tu vois cet appartement: c'est le
vôtre.

DORANTE.

Tiens! voici mon maître.


SCÈNE VIII.

DORANTE, SILVIA, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! te voilà, Bourguignon? Mon porte-manteau[88] et toi, avez-vous été
bien reçus ici?

DORANTE.

Il n'étoit pas possible qu'on nous reçût mal, Monsieur.

ARLEQUIN.

Un domestique là-bas m'a dit d'entrer ici, et qu'on alloit avertir mon
beau-père, qui étoit avec ma femme.

SILVIA.

Vous voulez dire monsieur Orgon et sa fille, sans doute, Monsieur?

ARLEQUIN.

Et oui, mon beau-père et ma femme, autant vaut.[89] Je viens pour épouser,
et ils m'attendent pour être mariés; cela est convenu; il ne manque plus
que la cérémonie, qui est une bagatelle.

SILVIA.

C'est une bagatelle qui vaut bien la peine qu'on y pense.

ARLEQUIN.

Oui; mais, quand on y a pensé, on n'y pense plus.

SILVIA, _bas à Dorante_.

Bourguignon, on est homme de mérite à bon marché chez vous, ce me semble.

ARLEQUIN.

Que dites-vous là à mon valet, la belle?[90]

SILVIA.

Rien: je lui dis seulement que je vais faire descendre[91] monsieur Orgon.

ARLEQUIN.

Et pourquoi ne pas dire mon beau-père, comme moi?

SILVIA.

C'est qu'il ne l'est pas encore.

DORANTE.

Elle a raison, Monsieur: le mariage n'est pas fait.

ARLEQUIN.

Eh bien! me voilà pour le faire.

DORANTE.

Attendez donc qu'il soit fait.

ARLEQUIN.

Pardi! voilà bien des façons pour un beau-père de la veille ou du
lendemain![92]

SILVIA.

En effet, quelle si grande différence y a-t-il entre être mariée ou ne
l'être pas? Oui, Monsieur, nous avons tort, et je cours informer votre
beau-père de votre arrivée.

ARLEQUIN.

Et ma femme aussi, je vous prie. Mais, avant que de[93] partir, dites-moi
une chose: vous qui êtes si jolie, n'êtes-vous pas la soubrette de
l'hôtel?[94]

SILVIA.

Vous l'avez dit.

ARLEQUIN.

C'est fort bien fait; je m'en réjouis. Croyez-vous que je plaise ici?
Comment me trouvez-vous?

SILVIA.

Je vous trouve ... plaisant[95].

ARLEQUIN.

Bon, tant mieux; entretenez-vous dans ce sentiment-là, il pourra trouver
sa place.

SILVIA.

Vous êtes bien modeste de vous en contenter. Mais je vous quitte; il faut
qu'on ait oublié d'avertir votre beau-père, car assurément il seroit venu;
et j'y vais.

ARLEQUIN.

Dites-lui que je l'attends avec affection.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Que le sort est bizarre! Aucun de ces deux hommes n'est à sa place.


SCÈNE IX.

DORANTE, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Eh bien! Monsieur, mon commencement va bien: je plais déjà à la soubrette.

DORANTE.

Butor que tu es!

ARLEQUIN.

Pourquoi donc? Mon entrée est si gentille!

DORANTE.

Tu m'avois tant promis de laisser là tes façons de parler sottes et
triviales! Je t'avois donné de si bonnes instructions! Je ne t'avois
recommandé que d'être sérieux. Va, je vois bien que je suis un étourdi de
m'en être fié à toi.[96]

ARLEQUIN.

Je ferai encore mieux dans les suites,[97] et, puisque le sérieux n'est
pas suffisant, je donnerai du mélancolique;[98] je pleurerai, s'il le
faut.

DORANTE.

Je ne sais plus où j'en suis; cette aventure-ci m'étourdit. Que faut-il
que je fasse?

ARLEQUIN.

Est-ce que la fille n'est pas plaisante?[99]

DORANTE.

Tais-toi; voici monsieur Orgon qui vient.


SCÈNE X.

M. ORGON, DORANTE, ARLEQUIN.

M. ORGON.

Mon cher Monsieur, je vous demande mille pardons de vous avoir fait
attendre; mais ce n'est que de cet instant[100] que j'apprends que vous
êtes ici.

ARLEQUIN.

Monsieur, mille pardons, c'est beaucoup trop, et il n'en faut qu'un quand
on n'a fait qu'une faute: au surplus, tous mes pardons sont à votre
service.

M. ORGON.

Je tâcherai de n'en avoir pas besoin.

ARLEQUIN.

Vous êtes le maître, et moi votre serviteur.

M. ORGON.

Je suis, je vous assure, charmé de vous voir, et je vous attendois avec
impatience.

ARLEQUIN.

Je serois d'abord venu ici avec Bourguignon; mais, quand on arrive de
voyage, vous savez qu'on est si mal bâti![101] et j'étois bien aise de me
présenter dans un état plus ragoûtant.[102]

M. ORGON.

Vous y avez fort bien réussi. Ma fille s'habille; elle a été un peu
indisposée. En attendant qu'elle descende, voulez-vous vous rafraîchir?

ARLEQUIN.

Oh! je n'ai jamais refusé de trinquer[103] avec personne.

M. ORGON.

Bourguignon, ayez soin de vous, mon garçon.

ARLEQUIN.

Le gaillard est gourmet: il boira du meilleur.

M. ORGON.

Qu'il ne l'épargne pas.


ACTE II.


SCÈNE PREMIÈRE.

LISETTE, M. ORGON.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! que me veux-tu, Lisette?

LISETTE.

J'ai à vous entretenir un moment.

M. ORGON.

De quoi s'agit-il?

LISETTE.

De vous dire l'état où sont les choses, parce qu'il est important
que vous en soyez éclairci, afin que vous n'ayez point à vous plaindre de
moi.

M. ORGON.

Ceci est donc bien sérieux?

LISETTE.

Oui, très sérieux. Vous avez consenti au déguisement de mademoiselle
Silvia; moi-même je l'ai trouvé d'abord sans conséquence, mais je me suis
trompée.

M. ORGON.

Et de quelle conséquence est-il donc?

LISETTE.

Monsieur, on a de la peine à se louer soi-même; mais, malgré toutes les
règles de la modestie, il faut pourtant que je vous dise que, si vous ne
mettez ordre[104] à ce qui arrive, votre prétendu gendre[105] n'aura plus
de coeur à donner à mademoiselle votre fille. Il est temps qu'elle se
déclare, cela presse: car, un jour plus tard, je n'en réponds plus.

M. ORGON.

Eh! d'où vient qu'il ne voudra plus de ma fille? Quand il la connoîtra, te
défies-tu de ses charmes?

LISETTE.

Non; mais vous ne vous méfiez pas assez des miens. Je vous avertis qu'ils
vont leur train,[106] et que je ne vous conseille pas de les laisser
faire.

M. ORGON.

Je vous en fais mes compliments Lisette. (_Il rit_.) Ah! ah! ah!

LISETTE.

Nous y voilà:[107] vous plaisantez, Monsieur, vous vous moquez de moi.
J'en suis fâchée, car vous y serez pris.

M. ORGON.

Ne t'en embarrasse pas, Lisette; va ton chemin.

LISETTE.

Je vous le répète encore, le coeur de Dorante va bien vite. Tenez,
actuellement je lui plais beaucoup, ce soir il m'aimera, il m'adorera
demain. Je ne le mérite pas, il est de mauvais goût,[108] vous en direz ce
qu'il vous plaira; mais cela ne laissera pas que d'être.[109] Voyez-vous,
demain je me garantis adorée.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! que vous importe? S'il vous aime tant, qu'il vous épouse.

LISETTE.

Quoi! vous ne l'en empêcheriez pas?

M. ORGON.

Non, d'homme d'honneur,[110] si tu le mènes jusque là.

LISETTE.

Monsieur, prenez-y garde. Jusqu'ici je n'ai pas aidé à mes appâts, je les
ai laissé faire tout seuls, j'ai ménagé sa tête:[111] si je m'en mêle, je
la renverse, il n'y aura plus de remède.

M. ORGON.

Renverse, ravage, brûle, enfin épouse, je te le permets, si tu le peux.

LISETTE.

Sur ce pied-là, je compte ma fortune faite.

M. ORGON.

Mais, dis-moi, ma fille t'a-t-elle parlé? Que pense-t-elle de son
prétendu?

LISETTE.

Nous n'avons encore guère trouvé le moment[112] de nous parler, car ce
prétendu m'obsède; mais, à vue de pays,[113] je ne la crois pas contente;
je la trouve triste, rêveuse, et je m'attends bien qu'elle me priera de le
rebuter.

M. ORGON.

Et moi, je te le défends. J'évite de m'expliquer avec elle; j'ai mes
raisons pour faire durer ce déguisement: je veux qu'elle examine son futur
plus à loisir. Mais le valet, comment se gouberne-t-il? ne se  mêle-t-il
pas d'aimer ma fille?

LISETTE.

C'est un original: j'ai remarqué qu'il fait l'homme de conséquence avec
elle, parce qu'il est bien fait;[114] il la regarde, et soupire.

M. ORGON.

Et cela la fâche.

LISETTE.

Mais... elle rougit.

M. ORGON.

Bon, tu te trompes: les regards d'un valet ne l'embarrassent pas jusque
là.[115]

LISETTE.

Monsieur, elle rougit.

M. ORGON.

C'est donc d'indignation.

LISETTE.

A la bonne heure.[116]

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! quand tu lui parleras, dis-lui que tu soupçonnes ce valet de la
prévenir contre son maître; et, si elle se fâche, ne t'en inquiète point:
ce sont mes affaires. Mais voici Dorante, qui te cherche apparemment.


SCENE II.

LISETTE, ARLEQUIN, M. ORGON.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! je vous trouve, merveilleuse dame! je vous demandois à tout le monde.
Serviteur, cher beau-père, ou peu s'en faut.

M. ORGON.

Serviteur. Adieu, mes enfants: je vous laisse ensemble; il est bon que
vous vous aimiez un peu avant que de[117] vous marier.

ARLEQUIN.

Je ferois bien ces deux besognes-là à la fois, moi.

M. ORGON.

Point d'impatience. Adieu.


SCÈNE III.

LISETTE, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Madame, il dit que je ne m'impatiente pas; il en parle bien à son aise, le
bonhomme!

LISETTE.

J'ai de la peine à croire qu'il vous en coûte tant d'attendre, Monsieur;
c'est par galanterie que vous faites l'impatient: à peine êtes-vous
arrivé. Votre amour ne sauroit être bien fort: ce n'est tout au plus qu'un
amour naissant.

ARLEQUIN.

Vous vous trompez, prodige de nos jours: un amour de votre façon[118] ne
reste pas longtemps au berceau; votre premier coup d'oeil a fait naître le
mien, le second lui a donné des forces, et le troisième l'a rendu grand
garçon. Tâchons de l'établir au plus vite; ayez soin de lui, puisque vous
êtes sa mère.

LISETTE.

Trouvez-vous qu'on le maltraite? est-il si abandonné?

ARLEQUIN.

En attendant qu'il soit pourvu, donnez-lui seulement votre belle main
blanche pour l'amuser un peu.

LISETTE.

Tenez donc, petit importun, puisqu'on ne sauroit avoir la paix qu'en vous
amusant.

ARLEQUIN, _lui baisant la main_.

Cher joujou de mon âme! cela me réjouit comme du vin délicieux. Quel
dommage de n'en avoir que roquille![119]

LISETTE.

Allons, arrêtez-vous; vous êtes trop avide.

ARLEQUIN.

Je ne demande qu'à me soutenir, en attendant que je vive.

LISETTE.

Ne faut-il pas avoir de la raison?

ARLEQUIN.

De la raison! Hélas! je l'ai perdue; vos beaux yeux sont les filous qui me
l'ont volée.

LISETTE.

Mais est-il possible que vous m'aimiez tant? Je ne saurois me le
persuader.

ARLEQUIN.

Je ne me soucie pas de ce qui est possible, moi, mais je vous aime comme
un perdu,[120] et vous verrez bien dans votre miroir que cela est juste.

LISETTE.

Mon miroir ne servirait qu'à me rendre plus incrédule.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! mignonne, adorable! votre humilité ne seroit donc qu'une hypocrite!

LISETTE.

Quelqu'un vient à nous: c'est votre valet.


SCÈNE IV.

DORANTE, ARLEQUIN, LISETTE.

DORANTE.

Monsieur, pourrois-je vous entretenir un moment?

ARLEQUIN.

Non: maudite soit la valetaille[121] qui ne sauroit nous laisser en repos!

LISETTE.

Voyez ce qu'il vous veut, Monsieur.

DORANTE.

Je n'ai qu'un mot à vous dire.

ARLEQUIN.

Madame, s'il en dit deux, son congé sera[122] le troisième. Voyons!

DORANTE, _bas à Arlequin_.

Viens donc, impertinent![123]

ARLEQUIN, _bas à Dorante_.

Ce sont des injures, et non pas des mots, cela... (_A Lisette_) Ma reine,
excusez.

LISETTE.

Faites, faites.

DORANTE.

Débarrasse-moi de tout ceci.[124] Ne te livre point;[125] parois sérieux
et rêveur, et même mécontent: entends-tu?

ARLEQUIN.

Oui, mon ami; ne vous inquiétez pas, et retirez-vous.


SCÈNE V.

ARLEQUIN, LISETTE.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! Madame! sans lui j'allois vous dire de belles choses, et je n'en
trouverai plus que de communes à cette heure, hormis mon amour, qui est
extraordinaire. Mais, à propos de mon amour, quand est-ce que le vôtre lui
tiendra compagnie?

LISETTE.

Il faut espérer que cela viendra.

ARLEQUIN.

Et croyez-vous que cela vienne?

LISETTE.

La question est vive:[126] savez-vous bien que vous m'embarrassez?

ARLEQUIN.

Que voulez-vous? je brûle, et je crie au feu.

LISETTE.

S'il m'étoit permis de m'expliquer si vite...

ARLEQUIN.

Je suis du sentiment que vous le pouvez en conscience.

LISETTE.

La retenue de mon sexe ne le veut pas.

ARLEQUIN.

Ce n'est donc pas la retenue d'à présent, qui donne bien
d'autres permissions.

LISETTE.

Mais que me demandez-vous?

ARLEQUIN.

Dites-moi un petit brin[127] que vous m'aimez. Tenez, je vous aime, moi.
Faites l'écho: répétez, Princesse.

LISETTE.

Quel insatiable! Eh bien! Monsieur, je vous aime.

ARLEQUIN.

Eh bien! Madame, je me meurs, mon bonheur me confond, j'ai peur d'en
courir les champs.[128] Vous m'aimez! cela est admirable!

LISETTE.

J'aurois lieu, à mon tour, d'être étonnée de la promptitude de votre
hommage. Peut-être m'aimerez-vous moins quand nous nous connoîtrons mieux.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! Madame, quand nous en serons là, j'y perdrai beaucoup, il y aura bien
à décompter.[129]

LISETTE.

Vous me croyez plus de qualités que je n'en ai.

ARLEQUIN.

Et vous, Madame, vous ne savez pas les miennes, et je ne devrois vous
parler qu'à genoux.

LISETTE.

Souvenez-vous qu'on n'est pas les maîtres[130] de son sort.

ARLEQUIN.

Les pères et mères font tout à leur tête.[131]

LISETTE.

Pour moi, mon coeur vous auroit choisi, dans quelque état que vous eussiez
été.

ARLEQUIN.

Il a beau jeu[132] pour me choisir encore.

LISETTE.

Puis-je me flatter que vous êtes de même à mon égard?

ARLEQUIN.

Hélas! quand vous ne seriez que Perrette ou Margot,[133] quand je vous
aurois vue, le martinet à la main, descendre à la cave, vous auriez
toujours été ma princesse.

LISETTE.

Puissent de si beaux sentiments être durables!

ARLEQUIN.

Pour les fortifier de part et d'autre, jurons-nous de nous aimer toujours,
en dépit de toutes les fautes d'orthographe[134] que vous aurez faites sur
mon compte.

LISETTE.

J'ai plus d'intérêt à ce serment-là que vous, et je le fais de tout mon
coeur.

ARLEQUIN _se met à genoux_.

Votre bonté m'éblouit, et je me prosterne devant elle.

LISETTE.

Arrêtez-vous! Je ne saurais vous souffrir dans cette posture-là; je serois
ridicule de vous y laisser: levez-vous. Voilà encore quelqu'un.


SCÈNE VI.

LISETTE, ARLEQUIN, SILVIA.

LISETTE.

Que voulez-vous, Lisette?

SILVIA.

J'aurois à vous parler, Madame.

ARLEQUIN.

Ne voilà-t-il pas![135] Hé! ma mie,[136] revenez dans un quart d'heure,
allez: les femmes de chambre de mon pays n'entrent point qu'on ne les
appelle.[137]

SILVIA.

Monsieur, il faut que je parle à Madame.

ARLEQUIN.

Mais voyez l'opiniâtre soubrette! Reine de ma vie, renvoyez-la. Retournez-
vous en, ma fille; nous avons ordre de nous aimer avant qu'on nous marie;
n'interrompez point nos fonctions.

LISETTE.

Ne pouvez-vous pas revenir dans un moment, Lisette?

SILVIA.

Mais, Madame...

ARLEQUIN.

Mais, ce mais-là n'est bon qu'à me donner la fièvre.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Ah! le vilain homme! (_Haut_.) Madame, je vous assure que cela est pressé.

LISETTE.

Permettez donc que je m'en défasse, Monsieur.

ARLEQUIN.

Puisque le diable le veut,[138] et elle aussi... Patience... je me
promènerai en attendant qu'elle ait fait. Ah! Les sottes gens que nos
gens!


SCÈNE VII.

SILVIA, LISETTE.

SILVIA.

Je vous trouve admirable[139] de ne pas le renvoyer tout d'un coup et de
me faire essuyer les brutalités de cet animal-là!

LISETTE.

Pardi! Madame, je ne puis pas jouer deux rôles à la fois: il faut que je
paroisse ou la maîtresse ou la suivante, que j'obéisse ou que j'ordonne.

SILVIA.

Fort bien; mais, puisqu'il n'y est plus, écoutez-moi comme votre
maîtresse. Vous voyez bien que cet homme-là ne me convient point.

LISETTE.

Vous n'avez pas eu le temps de l'examiner beaucoup.

SILVIA.

Etes-vous folle, avec votre examen? Est-il nécessaire de le voir deux fois
pour juger du peu de convenance? En un mot, je n'en veux point.
Apparemment que mon père n'approuve pas la répugnance qu'il me voit, car
il me fuit et ne me dit mot. Dans cette conjoncture, c'est à vous à me
tirer tout doucement d'affaire en témoignant adroitement à ce jeune homme
que vous n'êtes pas dans le goût de l'épouser.

LISETTE.

Je ne saurois, Madame.

SILVIA.

Vous ne sauriez? Et qu'est-ce qui vous en empêche?

LISETTE.

Monsieur Orgon me l'a défendu.

SILVIA.

Il vous l'a défendu! Mais je ne reconnois point mon père à ce procédé-là!

LISETTE.

Positivement défendu.

SILVIA.

Eh bien! je vous charge de lui dire mes dégoûts et de l'assurer qu'ils
sont invincibles. Je ne saurois me persuader qu'après cela il veuille
pousser les choses plus loin.

LISETTE.

Mais, Madame, le futur, qu'a-t-il donc de si désagréable,  de si rebutant?

SILVIA.

Il me déplaît, vous dis-je, et votre peu de zèle aussi.

LISETTE.

Donnez-vous le temps de voir ce qu'il est: voilà tout ce qu'on vous
demande.

SILVIA.

Je le hais assez sans prendre du temps pour le haïr davantage.

LISETTE.

Son valet, qui fait l'important, ne vous auroit-il point gâté l'esprit sur
son compte?[140]

SILVIA.

Hum! la sotte! son valet a bien affaire ici!

LISETTE.

C'est que je me méfie de lui, car il est raisonneur.

SILVIA.

Finissez vos portraits, on n'en a que faire.[141] J'ai soin que ce valet
me parle peu, et, dans le peu qu'il m'a dit, il ne m'a jamais rien dit que
de très sage.

LISETTE.

Je crois qu'il est homme à vous avoir conté des histoires maladroites pour
faire briller son bel esprit.

SILVIA.

Mon déguisement ne m'expose-t-il pas à m'entendre dire de jolies choses! A
qui en avez-vous? D'où vous vient la manie d'imputer à ce garçon une
répugnance à laquelle il n'a point de part? Car enfin vous m'obligez à le
justifier: il n'est pas question de le brouiller avec son maître, ni d'en
faire un fourbe pour me faire une imbécile, moi qui écoute ses histoires.

LISETTE.

Oh! Madame, dès que vous le défendez sur ce ton-là, et que cela va jusqu'à
vous fâcher, je n'ai plus rien à dire.

SILVIA.

Dès que je le défends sur ce ton-là! Qu'est-ce que c'est que le ton dont
vous dites cela vous-même? Qu'entendez-vous par ce discours? Que se
passe-t-il dans votre esprit?

LISETTE.

Je dis, Madame, que je ne vous ai jamais vue comme vous êtes, et que je ne
conçois rien à votre aigreur. Eh bien! si ce valet n'a rien dit, à la
bonne heure; il ne faut pas vous emporter pour le justifier; je vous
crois, voilà qui est fini; je ne m'oppose pas à la bonne opinion que vous
en avez, moi.

SILVIA.

Voyez-vous le mauvais esprit! comme elle tourne les choses! Je me sens
dans une indignation... qui... va jusqu'aux larmes.

LISETTE,

En quoi donc,[142] Madame? Quelle finesse entendez-vous à ce que je dis?

SILVIA.

Moi, j'y entends finesse! moi, je vous querelle pour lui! j'ai bonne
opinion de lui! Vous me manquez de respect jusque là! Bonne opinion, juste
Ciel! bonne opinion! Que faut-il que je réponde à cela? Qu'est-ce que cela
veut dire? A qui parlez-vous? Qui est-ce qui est à l'abri de ce qui
m'arrive? Où en sommes-nous?

LISETTE.

Je n'en sais rien; mais je ne reviendrai de longtemps de la surprise où
vous me jetez.

SILVIA.

Elle a des façons de parler qui me mettent hors de moi. Retirez-vous, vous
m'êtes insupportable; laissez-moi, je prendrai d'autres mesures.


SCÈNE VIII.

SILVIA.

Je frissonne encore de ce que je lui ai entendu dire. Avec quelle
impudence les domestiques ne nous traitent-ils pas dans leur esprit! Comme
ces gens-là vous dégradent! Je ne saurois m'en remettre; je n'oserois
songer aux termes dont elle s'est servie: ils me font toujours[143] peur.
Il s'agit d'un valet! Ah! l'étrange chose! Écartons l'idée dont cette
insolente est venue me noircir l'imagination.[144] Voici Bourguignon,
voilà cet objet[145] en question pour lequel je m'emporte; mais ce n'est
pas sa faute, le pauvre garçon! et je ne dois pas m'en prendre à lui.


SCÈNE IX.

DORANTE. SILVIA.

DORANTE.

Lisette, quelque éloignement que tu aies pour moi, je suis forcé de te
parler; je crois que j'ai à me plaindre de toi.

SILVIA.

Bourguignon, ne nous tutoyons plus, je t'en prie.

DORANTE.

Comme tu voudras.

SILVIA.

Tu n'en fais pourtant rien.

DORANTE.

Ni toi non plus; tu me dis: «Je t'en prie.»

SILVIA.

C'est que cela m'est échappé.

DORANTE.

Eh bien! crois-moi, parlons comme nous pourrons: ce n'est pas la peine de
nous gêner pour le peu de temps que nous avons à nous voir.

SILVIA.

Est-ce que ton maître s'en va? Il n'y auroit pas grande perte.

DORANTE.

Ni à moi[146] non plus, n'est-il pas vrai? J'achève ta pensée.

SILVIA.

Je l'achèverois bien moi-même, si j'en avois envie; mais je ne songe pas à
toi.

DORANTE.

Et moi, je ne te perds point de vue.

SILVIA.

Tiens, Bourguignon, une bonne fois pour toutes, demeure, va-t-en, reviens,
tout cela doit m'être indifférent, et me l'est en effet: je ne te veux ni
bien ni mal; je ne te hais, ni ne t'aime, ni ne t'aimerai, à moins que
l'esprit ne me tourne, Voilà mes dispositions; ma raison ne m'en permet
point d'autres, et je devrois me dispenser de te le dire.

DORANTE.

Mon malheur est inconcevable: tu m'ôtes peut-être tout le repos de ma vie.

SILVIA.

Quelle fantaisie il s'est allé mettre dans l'esprit! Il me fait de la
peine. Reviens à toi. Tu me parles, je te réponds: c'est beaucoup, c'est
trop même, tu peux m'en croire, et, si tu étois instruit, en vérité, tu
serois content de moi; tu me trouverais d'une bonté sans exemple, d'une
bonté que je blâmerois dans une autre. Je ne me la reproche pourtant pas;
le fond de mon coeur me rassure: ce que je fais est louable, c'est par
générosité que je te parle; mais il ne faut pas que cela dure: ces
générosités-là ne sont bonnes qu'en passant,[147] et je ne suis pas faite
pour me rassurer toujours[148] sur l'innocence de mes intentions. A la
fin, cela ne ressembleroit plus à rien.[149] Ainsi, finissons,
Bourguignon; finissons, je t'en prie. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie? C'est
se moquer. Allons, qu'il n'en soit plus parlé.

DORANTE.

Ah! ma chère Lisette, que je souffre!

SILVIA.

Venons à ce que te voulois me dire. Tu te plaignois de moi quand tu es
entré: de quoi étoit-il question?

DORANTE.

De rien, d'une bagatelle; j'avois envie de te voir, et je crois que je
n'ai pris qu'un prétexte.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Que dire à cela? Quand je m'en fâcherois, il n'en seroit ni plus ni
moins.[150]

DORANTE.

Ta maîtresse, en partant, a paru m'accuser de t'avoir parlé au désavantage
de mon maître.

SILVIA.

Elle se l'imagine, et, si elle t'en parle encore, tu peux le nier
hardiment; je me charge du reste.

DORANTE.

Eh! ce n'est pas cela qui m'occupe.

SILVIA.

Si tu n'as que cela à me dire, nous n'avons plus que faire ensemble.

DORANTE.

Laisse-moi du moins le plaisir de te voir.

SILVIA.

Le beau motif qu'il me fournit là! J'amuserai[151] la passion de
Bourguignon! Le souvenir de tout ceci me fera bien rire un jour.

DORANTE.

Tu me railles, tu as raison: je ne sais ce que je dis ni ce que je te
demande. Adieu.

SILVIA.

Adieu; tu prends le bon parti... Mais, à propos de tes adieux, il me reste
encore une chose à savoir. Vous partez, m'as-tu dit... Cela est-il
sérieux?

DORANTE.

Pour moi, il faut que je parte, ou que la tête me tourne.

SILVIA.

Je ne t'arrêtois pas pour cette réponse-là, par exemple.

DORANTE.

Et je n'ai fait qu'une faute: c'est de n'être pas parti dès que je t'ai
vue.

SILVIA, _à part_.

J'ai besoin à tout moment d'oublier que je l'écoute.

DORANTE.

Si tu savois, Lisette, l'état où je me trouve...

SILVIA.

Oh! il n'est pas si curieux à savoir que le mien, je t'en assure.[152]

DORANTE.

Que peux-tu me reprocher? Je ne me propose pas de te rendre sensible.[153]

SILVIA, _à part_.

I1 ne faudroit pas s'y fier.

DORANTE.

Et que pourrois-je espérer en tâchant de me faire aimer? Hélas! quand même
j'aurois ton coeur.

SILVIA.

Que le Ciel m'en préserve! Quand tu l'aurois, tu ne le saurois pas, et je
ferois si bien que je ne le saurois pas moi-même. Tenez, quelle idée il
lui vient là!

DORANTE.

Il est donc bien vrai que tu ne me hais, ni ne m'aimes, ni ne m'aimeras?

SILVIA.

Sans difficulté.[154]

DORANTE.

Sans difficulté! Qu'ai-je donc de si affreux?

SILVIA.

Rien: ce n'est pas là ce qui te nuit.

DORANTE.

Eh bien! chère Lisette, dis-le moi cent fois, que tu ne m'aimeras point.

SILVIA.

Oh! je te l'ai assez dit! Tâche de me croire.

DORANTE.

Il faut que je le croie! Désespère une passion dangereuse, sauve-moi des
effets que j'en crains; tu ne me hais, ni ne m'aimes, ni ne m'aimeras!
Accable mon coeur de cette certitude-là! J'agis de bonne foi, donne-moi du
secours contre moi-même: il m'est nécessaire, je te le demande à genoux.

(_Il se jette à genoux. Dans ce moment, M. Orgon et Mario entrent, et ne
disent mot_.)


SCÈNE X.

M. ORGON, MARIO, SILVIA, DORANTE.

SILVIA.

Ah! nous y voilà! il ne manquoit plus que cette façon-là[155] à mon
aventure! Que je suis malheureuse! C'est ma facilité qui le place là.
Lève-toi donc, Bourguignon, je t'en conjure: il peut venir quelqu'un. Je
dirai ce qu'il te plaira. Que me veux-tu? Je ne te hais point. Lève-toi;
je t'aimerois si je pouvois; tu ne me déplais point, cela doit te suffire.

DORANTE.

Quoi! Lisette, si je n'étois pas ce que je suis, si j'étois riche, d'une
condition honnête, et que je t'aimasse autant que je t'aime, ton coeur
n'auroit point de répugnance pour moï?

SILVIA.

Assurément.

DORANTE.

Tu ne me haïrois pas? tu me souffrirois?

SILVIA.

Volontiers.... Mais lève-toi.

DORANTE.

Tu parois le dire sérieusement, et, si cela est, ma raison est perdue,

SILVIA.

Je dis ce que tu veux, et tu ne te lèves point!

M. ORGON, _s'approchant_.

C'est bien dommage de vous interrompre: cela, va à merveille, mes enfants;
courage.

SILVIA.

Je ne saurois empêcher ce garçon de se mettre à genoux, Monsieur; je ne
suis pas en état de lui en imposer, je pense?

M. ORGON.

Vous vous convenez parfaitement bien tous deux; mais j'ai à te dire un
mot, Lisette, et vous reprendrez votre conversation quand nous serons
partis. Vous le voulez bien, Bourguignon?

DORANTE.

Je me retire, Monsieur.

M. ORGON.

Allez, et tâchez de parler de votre maître avec un peu plus de ménagement
que vous ne faites.

DORANTE.

Moi, Monsieur?

MARIO.

Vous-même, monsieur Bourguignon; vous ne brillez pas trop dans le
respect[156] que vous avez pour votre maître, dit-on.

DORANTE.

Je ne sais ce qu'on veut dire.

M. ORGON.

Adieu, adieu; vous vous justifierez une autre fois.


SCÈNE XI.

SILVIA, MARIO, M. ORGAN.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! Silvia, vous ne nous regardez pas; vous avez l'air tout
embarrassé.

SILVIA.

Moi, mon père! et où seroit le motif de mon embarras? Je suis, grâce au
Ciel, comme à mon ordinaire; je suis fâchée de vous dire que c'est une
idée.

MARIO.

II y a quelque chose, ma soeur, il y a quelque chose.

SILVIA.

Quelque chose dans votre tête, à la bonne heure, mon frère; mais, pour
dans[157] la mienne, il n'y a que l'étonnement  de ce que vous dites.

M. ORGON.

C'est donc ce garçon qui vient de sortir qui t'inspire cette extrême
antipathie que tu as pour son maître?

SILVIA.

Qui? le domestique de Dorante?

M. ORGON.

Oui, le galant Bourguignon.

SILVIA.

Le galant Bourguignon, dont je ne savois pas l'épithète, ne me parle pas
de lui.

M. ORGON.

Cependant on prétend que c'est lui qui le détruit auprès de toi, et c'est
sur quoi j'étois bien aise de te parler.

SILVIA.

Ce n'est pas la peine, mon père, et personne au monde que son maître ne
m'a donné l'aversion naturelle que j'ai pour lui.

MARIO.

Ma foi, tu as beau dire, ma soeur, elle est trop forte pour être si
naturelle, et quelqu'un y a aidé.

SILVIA, _avec vivacité_.

Avec quel air mystérieux vous me dites cela, mon frère! Et qui est donc ce
quelqu'un qui y a aidé? Voyons.

MARIO.

Dans quelle humeur[158] es-tu, ma soeur? Comme tu t'emportes!

SILVIA.

C'est que je suis bien lasse de mon personnage, et je me serois déjà
démasquée si je n'avois pas craint de fâcher mon père.

M. ORGON.

Gardez-vous en bien, ma fille; je viens ici pour vous le recommander.
Puisque j'ai eu la complaisance de vous permettre votre déguisement, il
faut, s'il vous plaît, que vous ayez celle de suspendre votre jugement sur
Dorante, et de voir si l'aversion qu'on vous a donnée pour lui est
légitime.

SILVIA.

Vous ne m'écoutez donc point, mon père?... Je vous dis qu'on ne me l'a
point donnée.

MARIO.

Quoi! ce babillard qui vient de sortir ne t'a pas un peu dégoûtée de lui?

SILVIA, _avec feu_.

Que vos discours sont désobligeants! M'a dégoûtée de lui! dégoûtée!
J'essuie des expressions bien étranges, je n'entends plus que des choses
inouïes, qu'un langage inconcevable: j'ai l'air embarrassé, il y a quelque
chose, et puis c'est le galant Bourguignon qui m'a dégoûtée. C'est tout
ce qui vous plaira; mais je n'y entends rien.

MARIO.

Pour le coup, c'est toi qui es étrange. A qui en as-tu donc? D'où vient
que tu es si fort sur le qui-vive?[159] Dans quelle idée[160] nous
soupçonnes-tu?

SILVIA.

Courage, mon frère... Par quelle fatalité aujourd'hui ne pouvez-vous me
dire un mot qui ne me choque?[161] Quel soupçon voulez-vous qui me vienne?
Avez-vous des visions?

M. ORGON.

Il est vrai que tu es si agitée que je ne te reconnois point non plus. Ce
sont apparemment ces mouvements-là[162] qui sont cause que Lisette nous a
parlé comme elle a fait. Elle accusoit ce valet de ne t'avoir pas
entretenue à l'avantage de son maître, «et Madame, nous a-t-elle dit, l'a
défendu contre moi avec tant de colère que j'en suis encore toute
surprise»; et c'est sur ce mot de «surprise» que nous l'avons
querellée.[163] Mais ces gens-là ne savent pas la conséquence d'un mot.

SILVIA.

L'impertinente! Y a-t-il rien de plus haïssable que cette fille-là?
J'avoue que je me suis fâchée, par un esprit[164] de justice pour ce
garçon.

MARIO.

Je ne vois point de mal à cela.

SILVIA.

Y a-t-il rien de plus simple? Quoi! parce que je suis équitable, que je
veux qu'on ne nuise à personne, que je veux sauver un domestique du tort
qu'on peut lui faire auprès de son maître, on dit que j'ai des
emportements, des fureurs, dont on est surprise![165] Un moment après, un
mauvais esprit[166] raisonne; il faut se fâcher, il faut la faire taire et
prendre mon parti contre elle, à cause de la conséquence[167] de ce
qu'elle dit! Mon parti! J'ai donc besoin qu'on me défende, qu'on me
justifie? on peut donc mal interpréter ce que je fais? Mais que fais-je?
de quoi m'accuse-t-on? Instruisez-moi, je vous en conjure: cela est
sérieux? Me joue-t-on? se moque-t-on de moi? Je ne suis pas tranquille.

M. ORGON.

Doucement donc!

SILVIA.

Non, Monsieur, il n'y a point de douceur qui tienne. Comment donc? des
surprises, des conséquences! Eh! qu'on s'explique: que veut-on dire? On
accuse ce valet, et on a tort; vous vous trompez tous, Lisette est une
folle, il est innocent, et voilà qui est fini. Pourquoi donc m'en
reparler encore? car je suis outrée!

M. ORGON.

Tu te retiens, ma fille; tu aurois grande envie de me quereller aussi.
Mais faisons mieux: il n'y a que ce valet qui est[168] suspect ici,
Dorante n'a qu'à le chasser.

SILVIA.

Quel malheureux déguisement! Surtout que Lisette ne m'approche pas! Je la
hais plus que Dorante.

M. ORGON.

Tu la verras si tu veux; mais tu dois être charmée que ce garçon s'en
aille, car il t'aime, et cela t'importune assurément.

SILVIA.

Je n'ai point à m'en plaindre: il me prend pour une suivante, et il me
parle sur ce ton-là; mais il ne me dit pas ce qu'il veut, j'y mets bon
ordre.[169]

MARIO.

Tu n'en es pas tant la maîtresse que tu le dis bien.

M. ORGON.

Ne l'avons-nous pas vu se mettre à genoux malgré toi? N'as-tu pas été
obligée, pour le faire lever, de lui dire qu'il ne te déplaisoit pas?

SILVIA, _à part_.

J'étouffe.

MARIO.

Encore a-t-il fallu, quand il t'a demandé si tu l'aimerois, que tu aies
tendrement ajouté: «Volontiers»; sans quoi il y seroit encore.

SILVIA.

L'heureuse apostille,[170] mon frère! Mais, comme l'action m'a déplu, la
répétition n'en est pas aimable.[171] Ah çà, parlons sérieusement: quand
finira la comédie que vous vous donnez sur mon compte?

M. ORGON.

La seule chose que j'exige de toi, ma fille, c'est de ne te déterminer à
le refuser qu'avec connoissance de cause. Attends encore. Tu me
remercieras du délai que je demande, je t'en réponds.

MARIO.

Tu épouseras Dorante, et même avec inclination, je te le prédis... Mais,
mon père, je vous demande grâce pour le valet.

SILVIA.

Pourquoi grâce? Et moi, je veux qu'il sorte.

M. ORGON.

Son maître en décidera. Allons-nous en.

MARIO.

Adieu, adieu, ma soeur, sans rancune.


SCÈNE XII.

SILVIA, _seule_; DORANTE, _qui vint peu après_.

SILVIA.

Ah! que j'ai le coeur serré! Je ne sais ce qui se mêle à l'embarras où je
me trouve: tout cette aventure-ci m'afflige; je me défie de tous les
visages; je ne suis contente de personne, je ne le suis pas de moi-même.

DORANTE.

Ah! je te cherchois, Lisette.

SILVIA.

Ce n'étoit pas la peine de me trouver, car je te fuis, moi.

DORANTE, _l'empêchant de sortir_.

Arrête donc, Lisette! J'ai à te parler pour la dernière fois: il s'agit
d'une chose de conséquence qui regarde tes maîtres.

SILVIA.

Va la dire à eux-mêmes: je ne te vois jamais que tu ne me chagrines;[172]
laisse-moi.

DORANTE.

Je t'en offre autant;[173] mais écoute-moi, te dis-je: tu vas voir les
choses bien changer de face par ce que je te vais dire,

SILVIA.

Eh bien! parle donc; je t'écoute, puisqu'il est arrêté que ma complaisance
pour toi sera éternelle.

DORANTE.

Me promets-tu le secret?

SILVIA.

Je n'ai jamais trahi personne.

DORANTE.

Tu ne dois la confidence que je vais te faire qu'à l'estime que j'ai pour
toi.

SILVIA.

Je le crois, mais tâche de m'estimer sans me le dire, car cela sent le
prétexte.

DORANTE.

Tu te trompes, Lisette. Tu m'as promis le secret: achevons. Tu m'as vu
dans de grands mouvements;[174] je n'ai pu me défendre de t'aimer.

SILVIA.

Nous y voilà. Je me défendrai bien de t'entendre, moi! Adieu.

DORANTE.

Reste: ce n'est plus Bourguignon qui te parle.

SILVIA.

Eh! qui es-tu donc?

DORANTE.

Ah! Lisette, c'est ici où[175] tu vas juger des peines qu'a dû ressentir
mon coeur!

SILVIA.

Ce n'est pas à ton coeur à qui[176] je parle: c'est à toi.

DORANTE.

Personne ne vient-il?

SILVIA.

Non.

DORANTE.

L'état où sont les choses me force à te le dire; je suis trop honnête
homme pour n'en pas arrêter le cours.

SILVIA.

Soit.

DORANTE.

Sache que celui qui est avec ta maîtresse n'est pas ce qu'on pense.

SILVIA, _vivement_.

Qui est-il donc?

DORANTE.

Un valet.

SILVIA.

Après?

DORANTE.

C'est moi qui suis Dorante.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Ah! je vois clair dans mon coeur.

DORANTE.

Je voulois sous cet habit pénétrer[177] un peu ce que c'étoit que ta
maîtresse avant que de[178] l'épouser. Mon père, en partant, me permit ce
que j'ai fait, et l'événement m'en paroît un songe: je hais ta maîtresse,
dont je devois être l'époux, et j'aime la suivante, qui ne devoit trouver
en moi qu'un nouveau maître. Que faut-il que je fasse à présent? Je
rougis pour elle de le dire; mais ta maîtresse a si peu de goût qu'elle
est éprise de mon valet, au point qu'elle l'épousera si on la laisse
faire. Quel parti prendre.

SILVIA, _à part_.

Cachons-lui qui je suis... (_Haut_.) Votre situation est neuve,[179]
assurément! Mais, Monsieur, je vous fais d'abord mes excuses de tout ce
que mes discours ont pu avoir d'irrégulier[180] dans nos entretiens.

DORANTE, _vivement_.

Tais-toi, Lisette; tes excuses me chagrinent: elles me rappellent la
distance qui nous sépare, et ne me la rendent que plus douloureuse.

SILVIA.

Votre penchant pour moi est-il si sérieux? m'aimez-vous jusque-là?[181]

DORANTE.

Au point de renoncer à tout engagement, puisqu'il ne m'est pas permis
d'unir mon sort au tien; et, dans cet état, la seule douceur que je
pouvois goûter, c'étoit de croire que tu ne me haïssois pas.

SILVIA.

Un coeur qui m'a choisie dans la condition où je suis est assurément bien
digne qu'on l'accepte, et je le paierois volontiers du mien si je ne
craignois pas de le jeter dans un engagement qui lui feroit tort.[182]

DORANTE.

N'as-tu pas assez de charmes, Lisette? y ajoutes-tu encore la noblesse
avec laquelle tu me parles.

SILVIA.

J'entends quelqu'un. Patientez encore sur l'article de[183] votre valet;
les choses n'iront pas si vite; nous nous reverrons, et nous chercherons
les moyens de vous tirer d'affaire.

DORANTE.

Je suivrai tes conseils. (_Il sort_.)

SILVIA.

Allons, j'avois grand besoin que ce fût là Dorante.


SCÈNE XIII.

SILVIA, MARIO.

MARIO.

Je viens te retrouver, ma soeur. Nous t'avons laissée dans des inquiétudes
qui me touchent: je veux t'en tirer; écoute-moi.

SILVIA, _vivement_.

Ah! vraiment, mon frère, il y a bien d'autres nouvelles!

MARIO.

Qu'est-ce que c'est?

SILVIA.

Ce n'est point Bourguignon, mon frère; c'est Dorante.

MARIO.

Duquel parlez-vous donc?

SILVIA.

De lui,[184] vous dis-je; je viens de l'apprendre tout à l'heure. Il sort;
il me l'a dit lui-même.

MARIO.

Qui donc?

SILVIA.

Vous ne m'entendez donc pas?

MARIO.

Si j'y comprends rien, je veux mourir.

SILVIA.

Venez, sortons d'ici; allons trouver mon père: il faut qu'il le sache,
j'aurai besoin de vous aussi, mon frère. Il me vient de nouvelles idées.
Il faudra feindre de m'aimer; vous en avez déjà dit quelque chose en
badinant; mais surtout gardez bien le secret, je vous prie.

MARIO.

Oh! je le garderai bien, car je ne sais ce que c'est.

SILVIA.

Allons, mon frère, venez; ne perdons point de temps. Il n'est jamais rien
arrivé d'égal à cela!

MARIO.

Je prie le Ciel qu'elle n'extravague pas.


ACTE III.


SCÈNE PREMIÈRE.

DORANTE, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Hélas! Monsieur, mon très honoré maître, je vous en conjure...

DORANTE.

Encore!

ARLEQUIN.

Ayez compassion de ma bonne aventure; ne portez point guignon[185] à mon
bonheur, qui va son train si rondement; ne lui fermez point le passage.

DORANTE.

Allons donc, misérable! je crois que tu te moques de moi! Tu mériterois
cent coups de bâton.

ARLEQUIN.

Je ne les refuse point si je les mérite; mais, quand je les aurai reçus,
permettez-moi d'en mériter d'autres. Voulez-vous que j'aille chercher le
bâton?

DORANTE.

Maraud!

ARLEQUIN.

Maraud soit; mais cela n'est point contraire à faire fortune.[186]

DORANTE.

Ce coquin! quelle imagination[187] il lui prend![188]

ARLEQUIN.

Coquin est encore bon, il me convient aussi: un maraud n'est point
déshonoré d'être appelé coquin: mais un coquin peut faire un bon mariage.

DORANTE.

Comment, insolent, tu veux que je laisse un honnête homme dans l'erreur,
et que je souffre que tu épouses sa fille sous mon nom? Ecoute, si tu me
parles encore de cette impertinence-là, dès que j'aurai averti monsieur
Orgon de ce que tu es, je te chasse, entends-tu?

ARLEQUIN.

Accommodons-nous.[189] Cette demoiselle m'adore, elle m'idolâtre... Si je
lui dis mon état de valet, et que nonobstant son tendre coeur soit
toujours friand[190] de la noce avec moi, ne laisserez-vous pas jouer les
violons?

DORANTE.

Dès qu'on te connoîtra, je ne m'en embarrasse plus.

ARLEQUIN.

Bon! et je vais de ce pas prévenir cette généreuse personne sur mon habit
de caractère.[191] J'espère que ce ne sera pas un galon de couleur[192]
qui nous brouillera ensemble, et que son amour me fera passer à la table,
en dépit du sort, qui ne m'a mis qu'au buffet.[193]


SCÈNE II.

DORANTE, _seul, et ensuite_ MARIO.

DORANTE.

Tout ce qui se passe ici, tout ce qui m'y est arrivé à moi-même, est
incroyable... Je voudrais pourtant bien voir Lisette, et savoir le
succès[194] de ce qu'elle m'a promis de faire auprès de sa maîtresse pour
me tirer d'embarras. Allons voir si je pourrai la trouver seule.

MARIO.

Arrêtez, Bourguignon! j'ai un mot à vous dire.

DORANTE.

Qu'y a-t-il pour votre service, Monsieur?

MARIO.

Vous en contez à[195] Lisette?

DORANTE.

Elle est si aimable qu'on auroit de la peine à ne lui pas parler d'amour.

MARIO.

Comment reçoit-elle ce que vous lui dites?

DORANTE.

Monsieur, elle en badine.

MARIO.

Tu as de l'esprit. Ne fais-tu pas l'hypocrite?

DORANTE.

Non; mais qu'est-ce que cela vous fait? Supposé que Lisette eût du goût
pour moi...

MARIO.

Du goût pour lui! Où prenez-vous vos termes? Vous avez le langage bien
précieux[196] pour un garçon de votre espèce!

DORANTE.

Monsieur, je ne saurais parler autrement.

MARIO.

C'est apparemment avec ces petites délicatesses-là que vous attaquez
Lisette? Cela imite l'homme de condition.

DORANTE.

Je vous assure, Monsieur, que je n'imite personne; mais sans doute que
vous ne venez pas exprès pour me traiter de ridicule, et vous aviez autre
chose à me dire. Nous parlions de Lisette, de mon inclination pour elle,
et de l'intérêt que vous y prenez,

MARIO.

Comment, morbleu! il y a déjà un ton de jalousie dans ce que tu me
réponds! Modère-toi un peu. Eh bien! Tu me disois qu'en supposant que
Lisette eût du goût pour toi... Après?

DORANTE.

Pourquoi faudroit-il que vous le sussiez, Monsieur?

MARIO.

Ah! le voici: c'est que, malgré le ton badin que j'ai pris tantôt, je
serois très fâché qu'elle t'aimât; c'est que, sans autre raisonnement, je
te défends de t'adresser davantage à elle, non pas, dans le fond, que je
craigne qu'elle t'aime: elle me paroît avoir le coeur trop haut pour cela;
mais c'est qu'il me déplaît, à moi, d'avoir Bourguignon pour rival.

DORANTE.

Ma foi, je vous crois: car Bourguignon, tout Bourguignon qu'il est, n'est
pas même content que vous soyez le sien.

MARIO.

Il prendra patience.

DORANTE.

Il faudra bien. Mais, Monsieur, vous l'aimez donc beaucoup?

MARIO.

Assez pour m'attacher sérieusement à elle dès que j'aurai pris de
certaines mesures. Comprends-tu ce que cela signifie?

DORANTE.

Oui, je crois que je suis au fait. Et sur ce pied-là vous êtes aimé sans
doute?

MARIO.

Qu'en penses-tu, est-ce que je ne vaux pas la peine de l'être?

DORANTE.

Vous ne vous attendez pas à être loué par vos propres rivaux, peut-être?

MARIO.

La réponse est de bon sens, je te la pardonne; mais je suis bien mortifié
de ne pouvoir pas dire qu'on m'aime, et je ne le dis pas pour t'en rendre
compte, comme tu le crois bien; mais c'est qu'il faut dire la vérité.

DORANTE.

Vous m'étonnez, Monsieur: Lisette ne sait donc pas vos desseins?

MARIO.

Lisette sait tout le bien que je lui veux, et n'y paroît pas  sensible;
mais j'espère que la raison me gagnera son coeur. Adieu, retire-toi sans
bruit: son indifférence pour moi, malgré tout ce que je lui offre, doit te
consoler du sacrifice que tu me feras.... Ta livrée n'est pas propre à
faire pencher la balance en ta faveur, et tu n'es pas fait pour lutter
contre moi.


SCÈNE III.

SILVIA, DORANTE, MARIO.

MARIO.

Ah! te voilà, Lisette?

SILVIA.

Qu'avez-vous, Monsieur? vous me paroissez ému.

MARIO.

Ce n'est rien: je disois un mot à Bourguignon.

SILVIA.

Il est triste: est-ce que vous le querelliez?

DORANTE.

Monsieur m'apprend qu'il vous aime, Lisette...

SILVIA.

Ce n'est pas ma faute.

DORANTE.

Et me défend de vous aimer.

SILVIA.

Il me défend donc de vous paroître aimable?

MARIO.

Je ne saurais empêcher qu'il ne t'aime, belle Lisette; mais je ne veux pas
qu'il te le dise.

SILVIA.

Il ne me le dit plus, il ne fait que me le répéter.

MARIO.

Du moins ne te le répétera-t-il pas quand je serai présent. Retirez-vous,
Bourguignon.

DORANTE.

J'attends qu'elle me l'ordonne.

MARIO.

Encore!

SILVIA.

Il dit qu'il attend: ayez donc patience.

DORANTE.

Avez-vous de l'inclination pour Monsieur?

SILVIA.

Quoi! de l'amour? Oh! je crois qu'il ne sera pas nécessaire qu'on me le
défende.

DORANTE.

Ne me trompez-vous pas?

MARIO.

En vérité, je joue ici un joli personnage! Qu'il sorte donc! A qui est-ce
que je parle?

DORANTE.

A Bourguignon, voilà tout.

MARIO.

Eh bien! qu'il s'en aille!

DORANTE, _à part_.

Je souffre.

SILVIA.

Cédez, puisqu'il se fâche.

DORANTE, _bas à Silvia_.

Vous ne demandez peut-être pas mieux?

MARIO.

Allons, finissons.

DORANTE.

Vous ne m'aviez pas dit cet amour-là, Lisette.


SCÈNE IV.

M. ORGON, MARIO, SILVIA.

SILVIA.

Si je n'aimois pas cet homme-là, avouons que je serois bien ingrate.

MARIO, _riant_.

Ha! ha! ha! ha!

M. ORGON.

De quoi riez-vous, Mario?

MARIO.

De la colère de Dorante, qui sort, et que j'ai obligé de quitter Lisette.

SILVIA.

Mais que vous a-t-il dit dans le petit entretien que vous avez eu tête à
tête avec lui?

MARIO.

Je n'ai jamais vu d'homme ni plus intrigué ni de plus mauvaise humeur.

M. ORGON.

Je ne suis pas fâché qu'il soit la dupe de son propre stratagème; et
d'ailleurs, à le bien prendre,[197] il n'y a rien de plus flatteur ni de
plus obligeant pour lui que tout ce que tu as fait jusqu'ici, ma fille.
Mais en voilà assez.

MARIO.

Mais où en est-il précisément, ma soeur?

SILVIA.

Hélas! mon frère, je vous avoue que j'ai lieu d'être contente.

MARIO.

«Hélas! mon frère,» me dit-elle. Sentez-vous cette paix douce qui se mêle
à ce qu'elle dit?

M. ORGON.

Quoi! ma fille, tu espères qu'il ira jusqu'à t'offrir sa main dans le
déguisement où te voilà?

SILVIA.

Oui, mon cher père, je l'espère.

MARIO.

Friponne que tu es, avec ton «cher père»! Tu ne nous grondes plus à
présent, tu nous dis des douceurs.

SILVIA.

Vous ne me passez[198] rien.

MARIO.

Ha! ha! je prends ma revanche. Tu m'as tantôt chicané sur les[199]
expressions: il faut bien, à mon tour, que je badine un peu sur les
tiennes; ta joie est bien aussi[200] divertissante que l'étoit ton
inquiétude.

M. ORGON.

Vous n'aurez point à vous plaindre de moi, ma fille: j'acquiesce à tout ce
qui vous plaît.

SILVIA.

Ah! Monsieur, si vous saviez combien je vous aurai d'obligation! Dorante
et moi nous sommes destinés l'un à l'autre; il doit m'épouser. Si vous
saviez combien je lui tiendrai compte de ce qu'il fait aujourd'hui pour
moi, combien mon coeur gardera le souvenir de l'excès de tendresse qu'il
me montre! Si vous saviez, combien tout ceci va rendre notre union
aimable! Il ne pourra jamais se rappeler notre histoire sans m'aimer; je
n'y songerai jamais que je ne l'aime.[201] Vous avez fondé notre bonheur
pour la vie en me laissant faire: c'est un mariage unique; c'est une
aventure dont le seul récit est attendrissant; c'est le coup de hasard le
plus singulier, le plus heureux, le plus...

MARIO.

Ha! ha! ha! que ton coeur a de caquet,[202] ma soeur! quelle éloquence!

M. ORGON.

If faut convenir que le régal que tu te donnes est charmant, surtout si tu
achèves.

SILVIA.

Cela vaut fait,[203] Dorante est vaincu: j'attends mon captif.

MARIO.

Ses fers seront plus dorés qu'il ne pense. Mais je lui crois l'âme en
peine, et j'ai pitié de ce qu'il souffre.

SILVIA.

Ce qui lui en coûte à se déterminer ne me le rend que plus estimable: il
pense qu'il chagrinera son père en m'épousant; il croit trahir sa fortune
et sa naissance. Voilà de grands sujets de réflexion: je serai charmée de
triompher. Mais il faut que j'arrache ma victoire, et non pas qu'il me la
donne; je veux un combat entre l'amour et la raison.

MARIO.

Et que la raison y périsse.

M. ORGON.

C'est-à-dire que tu veux qu'il sente toute l'étendue de 'impertinence[204]
qu'il croira faire. Quelle insatiable vanité d'amour-propre!

MARIO.

Cela, c'est l'amour-propre d'une femme, et il est tout au plus uni.[205]


SCÈNE V.

M. ORGON, SILVIA, MARIO, LISETTE.

M. ORGON.

Paix! voici Lisette. Voyons ce qu'elle nous veut.

LISETTE.

Monsieur, vous m'avez dit tantôt que vous m'abandonniez Dorante, que vous
livriez sa tête à ma discrétion: je vous ai pris au mot, j'ai travaillé
comme pour moi, et vous verrez de l'ouvrage bien fait, allez; c'est une
tête bien conditionnée.[206] Que voulez-vous que j'en fasse, à présent?
Madame me le[207] cède-t-elle?

M. ORGON.

Ma fille, encore une fois, n'y prétendez-vous rien?

SILVIA,

Non: je te le donne, Lisette; je te remets tous mes droits, et, pour dire
comme toi, je ne prendrai jamais de part[208] à un coeur que je n'aurai
pas conditionné moi-même.

LISETTE.

Quoi? vous voulez bien que je l'épouse? Monsieur le veut bien aussi?

M. ORGON.

Oui, qu'il s'accommode.[209] Pourquoi t'aime-t-il?

MARIO.

J'y consens aussi, moi.

LISETTE,

Moi aussi, et je vous en remercie tous.

M. ORGON.

Attends; j'y mets pourtant une petite restriction; c'est qu'il faudroit,
pour nous disculper de ce qui arrivera, que tu lui dises un peu qui tu es.

LISETTE.

Mais, si je lui dis[210] un peu, il le saura tout-à-fait.

M. ORGON.

Eh bien! cette tête en si bon état ne soutiendra-t-elle pas cette
secousse-là? Je ne le[211] crois pas de caractère à s'effaroucher là-
dessus.

LISETTE.

Le voici qui me cherche; ayez donc la bonté de me laisser le champ libre:
il s'agit ici de mon chef-d'oeuvre.

M. ORGON.

Cela est juste: retirons-nous.

SILVIA.

De tout mon coeur.

MARIO.

Allons.


SCÈNE VI.

LISETTE, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Enfin, ma reine, je vous vois, et je ne vous quitte plus, car j'ai trop
pâti d'avoir manqué de votre présence, et j'ai cru que vous esquiviez la
mienne.[212]

LISETTE.

Il faut vous avouer, Monsieur, qu'il en étoit quelque chose.[213]

ARLEQUIN.

Comment donc! ma chère âme, élixir de mon coeur, avez-vous entrepris la
fin de ma vie?[214]

LISETTE.

Non, mon cher, la durée m'en est trop précieuse.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! que ces paroles me fortifient!

LISETTE.

Et vous ne devez point douter de ma tendresse.

ARLEQUIN.

Je voudrois bien pouvoir baiser ces petits mots-là, et les cueillir sur
votre bouche avec la mienne.

LISETTE.

Mais vous me pressiez sur notre mariage, et mon père ne m'avoit pas encore
permis de vous répondre. Je viens de lui parler, et j'ai son aveu pour
vous dire que vous pouvez lui demander ma main quand vous voudrez.

ARLEQUIN.

Avant que je la demande à lui,[215] souffrez que je la demande à vous: je
veux lui rendre mes grâces[216] de la charité qu'elle aura de vouloir bien
entrer dans la mienne, qui en est véritablement indigne.

LISETTE.

Je ne refuse pas de vous la prêter un moment, à condition que vous la
prendrez pour toujours.

ARLEQUIN.

Chère petite main rondelette et potelée, je vous prends sans marchander;
je ne suis pas en peine de l'honneur que vous me ferez, il n'y a que celui
que je vous rendrai qui m'inquiète.

LISETTE.

Vous m'en rendrez plus qu'il ne m'en faut.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! que nenni[217]: vous ne savez pas cette arithmétique-là aussi bien que
moi.

LISETTE.

Je regarde pourtant votre amour comme un présent du ciel.

ARLEQUIN.

Le présent qu'il vous a fait ne le ruinera pas; il[218] est bien mesquin.

LISETTE.

Je ne le trouve que trop magnifique.

ARLEQUIN.

C'est que vous ne le voyez pas au grand jour.

LISETTE.

Vous ne sauriez croire combien votre modestie m'embarrasse.

ARLEQUIN.

Ne faites point dépense d'embarras:[219] je serois bien effronté si je
n'étois pas modeste.

LISETTE.

Enfin, Monsieur, faut-il vous dire que c'est moi que votre tendresse
honore?

ARLEQUIN.

Ahi! ahi! je ne sais plus où me mettre.

LISETTE.

Encore une fois. Monsieur, je me connois.

ARLEQUIN.

Hé! je me connois bien aussi; et je n'ai pas là une fameuse connoissance,
ni vous non plus, quand vous l'aurez faite; mais c'est là le diable que de
me connoître: vous ne vous attendez pas au fond du sac.

LISETTE, _à part_.

Tant d'abaissement n'est pas naturel! (_Haut_) D'où vient me dites-vous
cela?[220]

ARLEQUIN.

Et voilà où gît le lièvre.[221]

LISETTE.

Mais encore? Vous m'inquiétez: est-ce que vous n'êtes pas...

ARLEQUIN.

Ahi! ahi! vous m'ôtez ma couverture.

LISETTE.

Sachons de quoi il s'agit.

ARLEQUIN, _à part_.

Préparons un peu cette affaire-là... (_Haut._) Madame, votre amour est-il
d'une constitution bien robuste? soutiendra-t-il bien la fatigue que je
vais lui donner? Un mauvais gîte lui fait-il peur? Je vais le loger
petitement.

LISETTE.

Ah! tirez-moi d'inquiétude. En un mot, qui êtes-vous?

ARLEQUIN.

Je suis... N'avez-vous jamais vu de fausse monnoie? Savez-vous ce que
c'est qu'un louis d'or faux? En bien, je ressemble assez à cela.

LISETTE.

Achevez donc. Quel est votre nom?

ARLEQUIN.

Mon nom! (_A part._) Lui dirai-je que je m'appelle Arlequin? Non: cela
rime trop avec coquin.

LISETTE.

Eh bien?

ARLEQUIN.

Ah, dame! il y a un peu à tirer[222] ici. Haïssez-vous la qualité de
soldat?

LISETTE.

Qu'appellez-vous un soldat?

ARLEQUIN.

Oui, par exemple, un soldat d'antichambre.

LISETTE.

Un soldat d'antichambre! Ce n'est donc point Dorante à qui je parle enfin?

ARLEQUIN.

C'est lui qui est mon capitaine.

LISETTE.

Faquin!

ARLEQUIN, _à part_.

Je n'ai pu éviter la rime.

LISETTE.

Mais voyez ce magot. tenez!

ARLEQUIN

La jolie culbute que je fais là!

LISETTE.
Il y a une heure que je lui demande grâce et que je  m'épuise en humilités
pour cet animal-là.

ARLEQUIN.

Hélas! Madame, si vous préfériez l'amour à la gloire,[223] je vous ferois
bien autant de profit qu'un monsieur.

LISETTE, _riant._

Ah! ah! ah! je ne saurais pourtant m'empêcher d'en rire, avec sa gloire!
et il n'y a plus que ce parti-là à prendre... Va, va, ma gloire te
pardonne; elle est de bonne composition.

ARLEQUIN.

Tout de bon, charitable dame? Ah! que mon amour vous promet de
reconnoissance!

LISETTE.

Touche-là, Arlequin; je suis prise pour dupe: le soldat d'antichambre de
Monsieur vaut bien la coiffeuse de Madame.

ARLEQUIN.

La coiffeuse de Madame!

LISETTE.

C'est mon capitaine, ou l'équivalent.

ARLEQUIN.

Masque!

LISETTE.

Prends ta revanche.

ARLEQUIN.

Mais voyez cette magotte, avec qui, depuis une heure, j'entre en confusion
de ma misère![224]

LISETTE.

Venons au fait. M'aimes-tu?

ARLEQUIN.

Pardi,[225] oui: en changeant de nom, tu n'as pas changé de visage, et tu
sais bien que nous nous sommes promis fidélité en dépit de toutes les
fautes d'orthographe.[226]

LISETTE.

Va, le mal n'est pas grand, consolons-nous; ne faisons semblant de rien,
et n'apprêtons point à rire.[227] Il y a apparence que ton maître est
encore dans l'erreur à l'égard de ma maîtresse: ne l'avertis de rien;
laissons les choses comme elles sont. Je crois que le voici qui entre.
Monsieur, je suis votre servante.

ARLEQUIN.

Et moi votre valet, Madame. (_Riant._) Ha! ha! ha!


SCÈNE VII.

DORANTE, ARLEQUIN.

DORANTE.

Eh bien, tu quittes la fille d'Orgon: lui as-tu dit qui tu étois?

ARLEQUIN.

Pardi, oui. La pauvre enfant! j'ai trouvé son coeur plus doux qu'un
agneau: il n'a pas soufflé. Quand je lui ai dit que je m'appellois
Arlequin et que j'avois un habit d'ordonnance:[228] «Eh bien, mon ami,
m'a-t-elle dit, chacun a son nom dans la vie, chacun a son habit; le vôtre
ne vous coûte rien.» Cela ne laisse pas d'être[229] gracieux.

DORANTE.

Quelle sort d'histoire me contes-tu là?

ARLEQUIN.

Tant y a que[230] je vais la demander en mariage.

DORANTE.

Comment? elle consent à t'épouser?

ARLEQUIN.

La voilà bien malade![231]

DORANTE.

Tu m'en imposes: elle ne sait pas qui tu es.

ARLEQUIN.

Par la ventrebleu![232] voulez-vous gager que je l'épouse avec la
casaque[233] sur le corps, avec une souquenille,[234] si vous me fâchez?
Je veux bien que vous sachiez qu'un amour de ma façon[235] n'est point
sujet à la casse,[236] que je n'ai pas besoin de votre friperie[237] pour
pousser ma pointe,[238] et que vous n'avez qu'à me rendre la mienne.[239]

DORANTE.

Tu es un fourbe. Cela n'est pas concevable, et je vois bien qu'il faudra
que j'avertisse monsieur Orgon.

ARLEQUIN.

Qui, notre père? Ah! le bon homme! nous l'avons dans notre manche.[240]
C'est le meilleur humain, la meilleure pâte d'homme.[241].. Vous m'en
direz des nouvelles.[242]

DORANTE.

Quel extravagant! As-tu vu Lisette?

ARLEQUIN.

Lisette! non: peut-être a-t-elle passé devant mes yeux; mais un honnête
homme ne prend pas garde à une chambrière: je vous cède ma part de cette
attention-là.

DORANTE.

Va-t-en, la tête te tourne.

ARLEQUIN.

Vos petites manières[243] sont un peu aisées; mais c'est la grande
habitude qui fait cela. Adieu. Quand j'aurai épousé, nous vivrons but à
but.[244] Votre soubrette arrive. Bonjour, Lisette; je vous recommande
Bourguignon: c'est un garçon qui a quelque mérite.


SCENE VIII.

DORANTE, SILVIA.

DORANTE, _à part._

Qu'elle est digne d'être aimée! Pourquoi faut-il que Mario m'ait
prévenu?[245]

SILVIA.

Où étiez-vous donc, Monsieur? Depuis que j'ai quitté  Mario, je n'ai pu
vous retrouver pour vous rendre compte de ce que j'ai dit à monsieur
Orgon.

DORANTE.

Je ne me suis pourtant pas éloigné. Mais de quoi s'agit-il?

SILVIA, _à part._

Quelle froideur! (_Haut_.) J'ai eu beau décrier votre valet et prendre sa
conscience à témoin de son peu de mérite, j'ai eu beau lui représenter
qu'on pouvoit du moins reculer le mariage, il ne m'a pas seulement
écoutée. Je vous avertis même qu'on parle d'envoyer chez le notaire, et
qu'il est temps de vous déclarer.

DORANTE.

C'est mon intention, je vais partir _incognito_, et je laisserai un billet
qui instruira monsieur Orgon de tout.

SILVIA, _à part._

Partir! ce n'est pas là mon compte.

DORANTE.

N'approuvez-vous pas mon idée?

SILVIA.

Mais ... pas trop.

DORANTE.

Je ne vois pourtant rien de mieux dans la situation où je suis, à moins
que de parler moi-même: et je ne saurois m'y résoudre. J'ai d'ailleurs
d'autres raisons qui veulent que je me retire; je n'ai plus que faire ici.

SILVIA.

Comme je ne sais pas vos raisons, je ne puis ni les approuver ni les
combattre, et ce n'est pas à moi à vous les demander.[246]

DORANTE.

Il vous est aisé de les soupçonner, Lisette.

SILVIA.

Mais je pense, par exemple, que vous avez du goût pour la fille de
monsieur Orgon.

DORANTE.

Ne voyez-vous que cela?

SILVIA.

Il y a bien encore certaines choses que je pourrais supposer;  mais je ne
suis pas folle, et je n'ai pas la vanité de m'y arrêter.

DORANTE.

Ni le courage d'en parler, car vous n'auriez rien d'obligeant à me dire.
Adieu, Lisette.

SILVIA.

Prenez garde: je crois que vous ne m'entendez[247] pas, je suis obligée de
vous le dire.

DORANTE.

A merveille, et l'explication ne me seroit pas favorable. Gardez-moi le
secret jusqu'à mon départ.

SILVIA.

Quoi! sérieusement, vous partez?

DORANTE.

Vous avez bien peur que je ne change d'avis.

SILVIA.

Que vous êtes aimable d'être si bien au fait!

DORANTE.

Cela est bien naïf. Adieu.

(_Il s'en va._)

SILVIA, _à part._

S'il part, je ne l'aime plus, je ne l'épouserai jamais... (_Elle le
regarde aller_.) Il s'arrête pourtant: il rêve, il regarde si je tourne la
tête. Je ne saurais le rappeler, moi... Il seroit pourtant singulier qu'il
partît, après tout ce que j'ai fait!... Ah! voilà qui est fini: il s'en
va; je n'ai pas tant de pouvoir sur lui que je le croyois. Mon frère est
un maladroit, il s'y est mal pris: les gens indifférents gâtent tout. Ne
suis-je pas bien avancée? Quel dénouement!... Dorante reparoît pourtant;
il me semble qu'il revient; je me dédis donc, je l'aime encore... Feignons
de sortir, afin qu'il m'arrête: il faut bien que notre réconciliation lui
coûte quelque chose.

DORANTE, _l'arrêtant_.

Restez, je vous prie; j'ai encore quelque chose à vous dire.

SILVIA.

A moi, Monsieur?

DORANTE.

J'ai de la peine à partir sans vous avoir convaincue que je n'ai pas tort
de le faire.

SILVIA.

Eh! Monsieur, de quelle conséquence est-il de vous justifier auprès de
moi? Ce n'est pas la peine: je ne suis qu'une suivante, et vous me le
faites bien sentir.

DORANTE.

Moi, Lisette? Est-ce à vous à vous plaindre,[248] vous qui me voyez
prendre mon parti sans me rien dire?

SILVIA.

Hum! si je voulois, je vous répondrois bien là-dessus.

DORANTE.

Répondez donc: je ne demande pas mieux que de me tromper. Mais que dis-je?
Mario vous aime.

SILVIA.

Cela est vrai.

DORANTE.

Vous êtes sensible à son amour, je l'ai vu par l'extrême envie que vous
aviez tantôt que je m'en allasse: ainsi vous ne sauriez m'aimer.

SILVIA.

Je suis sensible à son amour! qui est-ce qui vous l'a dit? Je ne saurois
vous aimer! qu'en savez-vous? Vous décidez bien vite.

DORANTE.

Eh bien, Lisette, par tout ce que vous avez de plus cher au monde,
instruisez-moi de ce qui en est, je vous en conjure.

SILVIA.

Instruire un homme qui part!

DORANTE.

Je ne partirai point.

SILVIA.

Laissez-moi. Tenez, si vous m'aimez, ne m'interrogez point: vous ne
craignez que mon indifférence, et vous êtes trop heureux que je me taise.
Que vous importent mes sentiments?

DORANTE.

Ce qu'ils m'importent, Lisette? Peux-tu douter encore que je ne t'adore?

SILVIA.

Non, et vous me le répétez si souvent que je vous crois; mais pourquoi
m'en persuadez-vous? que voulez-vous que je fasse de cette pensée-là,
Monsieur? Je vais vous parler à coeur ouvert. Vous m'aimez; mais votre
amour n'est pas une chose bien sérieuse pour vous. Que de ressources
n'avez-vous pas pour vous en défaire! La distance qu'il y a de vous à moi,
mille objets que vous allez trouver sur votre chemin, l'envie qu'on aura
de vous rendre sensible,[249] les amusements d'un homme de votre
condition, tout va vous ôter cet amour dont vous m'entretenez
impitoyablement. Vous en rirez peut-être au sortir d'ici, et vous aurez
raison. Mais moi, Monsieur, si je m'en ressouviens, comme j'en ai peur,
s'il m'a frappée, quel secours aurai-je contre l'impression qu'il m'aura
faite? Qui est-ce qui me dédommagera de votre perte? Qui voulez-vous que
mon coeur mette à votre place? Savez-vous bien que, si je vous aimois,
tout ce qu'il y a de plus grand dans le monde ne me toucheroit plus? Jugez
donc de l'état où je resterois; ayez la générosité de me cacher votre
amour. Moi qui vous parle, je me ferois un scrupule de vous dire que je
vous aime dans les dispositions où vous êtes: l'aveu de mes sentiments
pourrait exposer votre raison; et vous voyez bien aussi que je vous les
cache.

DORANTE.

Ah! ma chère Lisette, que viens-je d'entendre! Tes  paroles ont un feu qui
me pénètre; je t'adore, je te respecte. Il n'est ni rang, ni naissance, ni
fortune, qui ne disparoisse devant une âme comme la tienne; j'aurois honte
que mon orgueil tînt encore contre toi, et mon coeur et ma main
t'appartiennent.

SILVIA.
En vérité, ne mériteriez-vous pas que je les prisse? Ne faut-il pas être
bien généreuse pour vous dissimuler le plaisir qu'ils me font? et croyez-
vous que cela puisse durer?

DORANTE.
Vous m'aimez donc?

SILVIA.
Non, non; mais, si vous me le demandez encore, tant pis pour vous.

DORANTE.
Vos menaces ne me font point de peur.

SILVIA.
Et Mario, vous n'y songez donc plus?

DORANTE.
Non, Lisette; Mario ne m'alarme plus: vous ne l'aimez point; vous ne
pouvez plus me tromper; vous avez le coeur vrai; vous êtes sensible à
[250] ma tendresse, je ne saurais en douter au transport qui m'a pris;
j'en suis sûr, et vous ne sauriez plus m'ôter cette certitude-là.

SILVIA.
Oh! je n'y tâcherai point;[251] gardez-la, nous verrons ce que vous en
ferez.

DORANTE.

Ne consentez-vous pas d'être à moi?

SILVIA.

Quoi! vous m'épouserez malgré ce que vous êtes, malgré la colère d'un
père, malgré votre fortune?

DORANTE.

Mon père me pardonnera dès qu'il vous aura vue: ma fortune nous suffit à
tous deux, et le mérite vaut bien la naissance.[252] Ne disputons point,
car je ne changerai jamais.

SILVIA.

Il ne changera jamais! Savez-vous bien que vous me charmez, Dorante.

DORANTE.

Ne gênez donc plus votre tendresse, et laissez-la répondre...

SILVIA.

Enfin, j'en suis venu à bout: vous... vous ne changerez jamais?

DORANTE.

Non, ma chère Lisette.

SYLVIA.

Que d'amour!


SCÈNE DERNIÈRE.

M. ORGON, SILVIA, DORANTE, LISETTE, ARLEQUIN, MARIO.

SILVIA.

Ah! mon père, vous avez voulu que je fusse à Dorante: venez voir votre
fille vous obéir avec plus de joie qu'on n'en eut jamais.

DORANTE.

Qu'entends-je! vous, son père, Monsieur?

SILVIA.

Oui, Dorante. La même idée de nous connoître nous est venue à tous deux;
après cela, je n'ai plus rien à vous dire. Vous m'aimez, je n'en saurais
douter; mais, à votre tour, jugez de mes sentiments pour vous; jugez du
cas que j'ai fait de votre coeur par la délicatesse avec laquelle j'ai
tâché de l'acquérir.

M. ORGON.

Connoissez-vous cette lettre-là? Voilà par où j'ai appris votre
déguisement, qu'elle n'a pourtant su que par vous.

DORANTE.

Je ne saurais vous exprimer mon bonheur, Madame;[253] mais ce qui
m'enchante le plus, ce sont les preuves que je vous ai données de ma
tendresse.

MARIO.

Dorante me pardonne-t-il la colère où j'ai mis Bourguignon?

DORANTE.

Il ne vous la pardonne pas, il vous en remercie.

ARLEQUIN.

De la joie, Madame: vous avez perdu votre rang; mais vous n'êtes point à
plaindre, puisqu'Arlequin vous reste.

LISETTE.

Belle consolation! il n'y a que toi qui gagne à cela.

ARLEQUIN.

Je n'y perds pas. Avant notre reconnoissance, votre dot valoit mieux que
vous; à présent, vous valez mieux que votre dot. Allons, saute,
marquis![254]


       *       *       *       *       *


LE LEGS

COMÉDIE EN UN ACTE, EN PROSE

ACTEURS.

LA COMTESSE.
LE MARQUIS.
HORTENSE.
LE CHEVALIER.
LISETTE,[1] suivante de la Comtesse.
LÉPINE,[2] valet de chambre du Marquis.


SCÈNE PREMIÈRE.

LE CHEVALIER, HORTENSE.

LE CHEVALIER.

La démarche que vous allez faire auprès du Marquis m'alarme.

HORTENSE.

Je ne risque rien, vous dis-je. Raisonnons. Défunt son parent et le mien
lui laisse six cent mille francs, à la charge, il est vrai, de m'épouser
ou de m'en donner deux cent mille: cela est à son choix; mais le Marquis
ne sent rien pour moi. Je suis sûre qu'il a de l'inclination pour la
Comtesse; d'ailleurs, il est déjà assez riche par lui-même: voilà encore
une succession de six cent mille francs qui lui vient, à laquelle il ne
s'attendoit pas; et vous croyez que, plutôt que d'en distraire deux cent
mille, il aimera mieux m'épouser, moi qui lui suis indifférente, pendant
qu'il a de l'amour pour la Comtesse, qui peut-être ne le hait pas, et qui
a plus de bien que moi? Il n'y a pas d'apparence.

LE CHEVALIER.

Mais à quoi jugez-vous que la Comtesse ne le hait pas?

HORTENSE.

A mille petites remarques que je fais tous les jours, et je n'en suis pas
surprise. Du caractère dont elle est, celui du Marquis doit être de son
goût. La Comtesse est une femme brusque, qui aime à primer, à gouverner, à
être la maîtresse. Le Marquis est un homme doux, paisible, aisé à
conduire; et voilà ce qu'il faut à la Comtesse. Aussi ne parle-t-elle de
lui qu'avec éloge. Son air de naïveté lui plaît: c'est, dit-elle, le
meilleur homme, le plus complaisant, le plus sociable. D'ailleurs, le
Marquis est d'un âge qui lui convient; elle n'est plus de cette grande
jeunesse:[3] il a trente-cinq ou quarante ans, et je vois bien qu'elle
seroit charmée de vivre avec lui.

LE CHEVALIER.

J'ai peur que l'événement[4] ne vous trompe. Ce n'est pas un petit objet
que deux cent mille francs qu'il faudra qu'on vous donne si l'on ne vous
épouse pas; et puis, quand le Marquis et la Comtesse s'aimeroient, de
l'humeur dont ils sont tous deux, ils auront bien de la peine à se le
dire.

HORTENSE.

Oh! moyennant[5] l'embarras où je vais jeter le Marquis, il faudra bien
qu'il parle; et je veux savoir à quoi m'en tenir. Depuis le temps que nous
sommes à cette campagne,[6] chez la Comtesse, il ne me dit rien. Il y a
six semaines qu'il se tait; je veux qu'il s'explique. Je ne perdrai pas le
legs qui me revient si je n'épouse point le Marquis.

LE CHEVALIER.

Mais s'il accepte votre main?

HORTENSE.

Eh! non! vous dis-je. Laissez-moi faire. Je crois qu'il espère que ce sera
moi qui le refuserai. Peut-être même feindra-t-il de consentir à notre
union; mais que cela ne vous épouvante pas. Vous n'êtes point assez riche
pour m'épouser avec deux cent mille francs de moins: je suis bien aise de
vous les apporter en mariage. Je suis persuadée que la Comtesse et le
Marquis ne se haïssent pas. Voyons ce que me diront là-dessus Lépine et
Lisette, qui vont venir me parler. L'un, est un Gascon froid,[7] mais
adroit; Lisette a de l'esprit. Je sais qu'ils ont tous deux la confiance
de leurs maîtres; je les intéresserai à m'instruire, et tout ira bien. Les
voilà qui viennent. Retirez-vous.


SCÈNE II.

LISETTE, LÉPINE, HORTENSE.

HORTENSE.

Venez, Lisette; approchez.

LISETTE.

Que souhaitez-vous de nous, Madame?

HORTENSE.

Rien que vous ne puissiez me dire sans blesser la fidélité que vous devez,
vous au Marquis, et vous à la Comtesse.

LISETTE.

Tant mieux, Madame.

LÉPINE.

Ce début encourage. Nos services vous sont acquis.

HORTENSE, _tire quelque argent de sa poche._

Tenez, Lisette, tout service mérite récompense.

LISETTE, _refusant d'abord._

Du moins, Madame, faudroit-il savoir auparavant de quoi il s'agit.

HORTENSE.

Prenez; je vous le donne, quoi qu'il arrive. Voilà pour vous, monsieur de
Lépine.[8]

LÉPINE.

Madame, je serois volontiers de l'avis de Mademoiselle; mais je prends. Le
respect défend que je raisonne.

HORTENSE.

Je ne prétends vous engager en rien, et voici de quoi il est question. Le
Marquis, votre maître, vous estime, Lépine?

LÉPINE, _froidement._

Extrêmement, Madame; il me connoît.

HORTENSE.

Je remarque qu'il vous confie aisément ce qu'il pense.

LÉPINE.

Oui. Madame, de toutes ses pensées incontinent[9] j'en ai copie; il n'en
sait pas le compte mieux que moi.

HORTENSE.

Vous, Lisette, vous êtes sur le même ton[10] avec la Comtesse?

LISETTE.

J'ai cet honneur-là, Madame.

HORTENSE.

Dites-moi, Lépine, je me figure que le Marquis aime la  Comtesse. Me
trompé-je? Il n'y a point d'inconvénient à me dire ce qui en est.

LÉPINE.

Je n'affirme rien; mais patience: nous devons ce soir
nous entretenir là-dessus.

HORTENSE.

Eh! soupçonnez-vous qu'il l'aime?

LÉPINE.

De soupçons,[11] j'en ai de violents. Je m'en éclaircirai tantôt.

HORTENSE.

Et vous, Lisette, quel est votre sentiment sur la Comtesse?

LISETTE.

Qu'elle ne songe point du tout au Marquis, Madame.

LÉPINE.
Je diffère avec vous de pensée.[12]

HORTENSE.

Je crois aussi qu'ils s'aiment. Et supposons que je ne me trompe pas: du
caractère dont ils sont, ils auront de la peine à s'en parler. Vous,
Lépine, voudriez-vous exciter le Marquis à le déclarer à la Comtesse? Et
vous, Lisette, disposer la Comtesse à se l'entendre dire? Ce sera une
industrie fort innocente.

LÉPINE.

Et même louable.

LISETTE, _rendant l'argent._

Madame, permettez que je vous rende votre argent.

HORTENSE,

Gardez. D'où vient?[13]

LISETTE.

C'est qu'il me semble que voilà, précisément le service que vous exigez de
moi, et c'est précisément celui que je ne puis vous rendre. Ma maîtresse
est veuve, elle est tranquille; son état est heureux; ce seroit dommage de
l'en tirer: je prie le Ciel qu'elle y reste.

LÉPINE, _froidement._

Quant à moi, je garde mon lot: rien ne m'oblige à restitution. J'ai la
volonté de vous être utile. Monsieur le Marquis vit dans le célibat; mais
le mariage, il est bon, très bon; il a ses peines: chaque état a les
siennes; quelquefois le mien me pèse. Le tout est égal.[14] Oui, je vous
servirai, Madame, je vous servirai; je n'y vois point de mal. On s'épouse
de tout temps, on s'épousera toujours; on n'a que cette honnête ressource
quand on aime.

HORTENSE.

Vous me surprenez, Lisette, d'autant plus que je m'imaginois que vous
pouviez vous aimer tous deux.

LISETTE.

C'est de quoi il n'est pas question de ma part.

LÉPINE.

De la mienne, j'en suis demeuré à l'estime. Néanmoins, Mademoiselle est
aimable; mais j'ai passé mon chemin sans y prendre garde.

LISETTE.

J'espère que vous penserez toujours de même.

HORTENSE.

Voilà ce que j'avois à vous dire. Adieu, Lisette; vous ferez ce qu'il vous
plaira. Je ne vous demande que le secret. J'accepte vos services, Lépine.


SCÈNE III.

LÉPINE, LISETTE.

LISETTE.

Nous n'avons rien à nous dire, mons[15] de Lépine. J'ai affaire, et je
vous laisse.

LÉPINE.

Doucement, Mademoiselle; retardez d'un moment. Je trouve à propos de vous
informer d'un petit accident qui m'arrive.

LISETTE.

Voyons.

LÉPINE.

D'homme d'honneur,[16] je n'avois pas envisagé vos grâces; je ne
connoissois pas votre mine.

LISETTE.

Qu'importe? Je vous en offre autant:[17] c'est tout au plus si je connois
actuellement la vôtre.[18]

LÉPINE.

Cette dame se figuroit que nous nous aimions.

LISETTE.

Eh bien! elle se figuroit mal.

LÉPINE.

Attendez, voici l'accident: son discours a fait que mes yeux se sont
arrêtés dessus[19] vous plus attentivement que de coutume.

LISETTE.

Vos yeux ont pris bien de la peine.

LÉPINE.

Et vous êtes jolie, sandis![20] oh! très jolie!

LISETTE.

Ma foi, monsieur de Lépine, vous êtes très galant, oh! très galant. Mais
l'ennui me prend dès qu'on me loue. Abrégeons; est-ce là tout?

LÉPINE.

A mon exemple, envisagez-moi, je vous prie; faites-en l'épreuve.

LISETTE.

Oui-da![21] Tenez, je vous regarde.

LÉPINE.

Eh donc! Est-ce là ce Lépine que vous connoissiez? N'y voyez-vous rien[22]
de nouveau? Que vous dit le coeur?

LISETTE.

Pas le mot; il n'y a rien là pour lui.

LÉPINE.

Quelquefois pourtant nombre de gens ont estimé que j'étois un garçon assez
revenant;[23] mais nous y retournerons: c'est partie à remettre. Écoutez
le restant. Il est certain que mon maître distingue[24] tendrement votre
maîtresse. Aujourd'hui même il m'a confié qu'il méditoit de vous
communiquer ses sentiments.

LISETTE.

Comme il lui plaira. La réponse que j'aurai l'honneur de lui communiquer
sera courte.

LÉPINE.

Remarquons d'abondance[25] que la Comtesse se plaît avec mon maître,
qu'elle a l'âme joyeuse en le voyant. Vous me direz que nos gens[26]
sont d'étranges personnes, et je vous l'accorde. Le Marquis, homme tout
simple, peu hasardeux dans le discours, n'osera jamais aventurer la
déclaration, et, des déclarations, la Comtesse les épouvante:[27] femme
qui néglige les compliments, qui vous parle entre l'aigre et le doux, et
dont l'entretien a je ne sais quoi de sec, de froid, de purement
raisonnable. Le moyen que l'amour puisse être mis en avant avec cette
femme! Il ne sera jamais à propos de lui dire:  «Je vous aime,» à moins
qu'on ne lui dise[28] à propos de rien. Cette matière, avec elle, ne peut
tomber que des nues. On dit qu'elle traite l'amour de bagatelle d'enfant;
moi, je prétends qu'elle a pris goût à cette enfance.[29] Dans cette
conjoncture, j'opine que nous encouragions ces deux personnages. Qu'en
sera-t-il?[30] Qu'ils s'aimeront bonnement, en toute simplesse,[31] et
qu'ils s'épouseront de même. Qu'en sera-t-il? Qu'en me voyant votre
camarade, vous me rendrez votre mari par la douce habitude de me voir. Eh
donc! Parlez: êtes-vous d'accord?

LISETTE.

Non.

LÉPINE.

Mademoiselle, est-ce mon amour qui vous déplaît?

LISETTE.

Oui.

LÉPINE.

En peu de mots vous dites beaucoup. Mais considérez l'occurrence:[32] je
vous prédis que nos maîtres se marieront: que la commodité vous tente.[33]

LISETTE.

Je vous prédis qu'ils ne se marieront point: je ne veux pas, moi. Ma
maîtresse, comme vous dites fort habilement, tient l'amour au-dessous
d'elle, et j'aurai soin de l'entretenir dans cette humeur, attendu qu'il
n'est pas de mon petit intérêt qu'elle se marie. Ma condition n'en seroit
pas si bonne, entendez-vous? Il n'y a pas d'apparence que la Comtesse y
gagne, et moi j'y perdrais beaucoup. J'ai fait un petit calcul là-dessus,
au moyen duquel je trouve que tous vos arrangements me dérangent et ne me
valent rien.[34] Ainsi, quelque jolie que je sois, continuez de n'en rien
voir; laissez-la la découverte que vous avez faite de mes grâces, et
passez toujours sans y prendre garde.

LÉPINE, _froidement._

Je les ai vues, Mademoiselle; j'en suis frappé, et n'ai de remède que
votre coeur.

LISETTE.

Tenez-vous donc pour incurable.

LÉPINE.

Me donnez-vous votre dernier mot?

LISETTE.

Je n'y changerai pas une syllabe.

(_Elle veut s'en aller._)

LÉPINE, _l'arrêtant_.

Permettez que je reparte.[35] Vous calculez, moi de même. Selon vous, il
ne faut pas que nos gens se marient; il faut qu'ils s'épousent, selon moi:
je le prétends.

LISETTE.

Mauvaise gasconnade!

LÉPINE. Patience. Je vous aime, et vous me refusez le réciproque? Je
calcule qu'il me fait besoin,[36] et je l'aurai, sandis![37] Je le
prétends.

LISETTE. Vous ne l'aurez pas, sandis!

LÉPINE.
J'ai tout dit. Laissez parler mon maître, qui nous arrive.


SCÈNE IV.

LE MARQUIS, LÉPINE, LISETTE.

LE MARQUIS.

Ah! vous voici, Lisette! Je suis bien aise de vous trouver.

LISETTE.

Je vous suis obligée, Monsieur; mais je m'en allois.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous vous en alliez? J'avois pourtant quelque chose à vous dire. Êtes-vous
un peu de nos amis?

LÉPINE.

Petitement.

LISETTE.

J'ai beaucoup d'estime et de respect pour monsieur le Marquis.

LE MARQUIS.

Tout de bon? Vous me faites plaisir, Lisette. Je fais beaucoup de cas de
vous aussi; vous me paroissez une très bonne fille, et vous êtes à une
maîtresse qui a bien du mérite.

LISETTE.

Il y a longtemps que je le sais, Monsieur.

LE MARQUIS.

Ne vous parle-t-elle jamais de moi? Que vous en dit-elle?

LISETTE.

Oh! rien.

LE MARQUIS.

C'est que, entre nous, il n'y a point de femme que j'aime tant qu'elle.

LISETTE.

Qu'appelez-vous aimer, monsieur le Marquis? Est-ce de l'amour que vous
entendez?

LE MARQUIS.

Eh! mais oui, de l'amour, de l'inclination, comme tu voudras: le nom n'y
fait rien. Je l'aime mieux qu'une autre.[38] Voilà tout.

LISETTE.

Cela se peut.

LE MARQUIS.

Mais elle n'en sait rien; je n'ai pas osé le lui apprendre. Je n'ai pas
trop le talent de parler d'amour.

LISETTE.

C'est ce qui me semble.

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, cela m'embarrasse; et, comme ta maîtresse est une femme fort
raisonnable, j'ai peur qu'elle ne se moque de moi, et je ne saurois plus
que lui dire: de sorte que j'ai rêvé qu'il seroit bon que tu la prévinsses
en ma faveur.

LISETTE.

Je vous demande pardon, Monsieur; mais il falloit rêver tout le contraire.
Je ne puis rien pour vous, en vérité.

LE MARQUIS.

Eh! d'où vient?[39] Je t'aurai grande obligation. Je payerai bien tes
peines. (_Montrant Lépine._) Et, si ce garçon-là te convenoit, je vous
ferois un fort bon parti[40] à tous les deux.

LÉPINE, _froidement, et sans regarder Lisette_.

Derechef,[41] recueillez-vous là-dessus, Mademoiselle.

LISETTE.

Il n'y a pas moyen, monsieur le Marquis. Si je parlois de vos sentiments à
ma maîtresse, vous avez beau dire que le nom n'y fait rien, je me
brouillerais[42] avec elle; je vous y brouillerais vous-même. Ne la
connoissez-vous pas?

LE MARQUIS.

Tu crois donc qu'il n'y a rien à faire?

LISETTE.

Absolument rien.

LE MARQUIS.

Tant pis. Cela me chagrine. Elle me fait tant d'amitié,[43] cette femme!
Allons, il ne faut donc plus y penser.

LÉPINE, _froidement_.

Monsieur, ne vous déconfortez[44] pas. Du récit de Mademoiselle, n'en
tenez compte;[45] elle vous triche. Retirons-nous. Venez me consulter à
l'écart; je serai plus consolant. Partons.

LE MARQUIS.

Viens. Voyons ce que tu as à me dire. Adieu, Lisette. Ne me nuis pas,
voilà tout ce que j'exige.


SCÈNE V.

LÉPINE, LISETTE.

LÉPINE.

N'exigez rien: ne gênons point Mademoiselle. Soyons galamment ennemis
déclarés; faisons-nous du mal en toute franchise. Adieu, gentille
personne. Je vous chéris ni plus ni moins: gardez-moi votre coeur: c'est
un dépôt que je vous laisse.

LISETTE.

Adieu, mon pauvre Lépine. Vous êtes peut-être de tous les fous de la
Garonne[46] le plus effronté, mais aussi le plus divertissant.


SCÈNE VI.

LA COMTESSE, LISETTE.

LISETTE.

Voici ma maîtresse. De l'humeur dont elle est, je crois que cet amour-ci
ne la divertira guère. Gare[47] que le Marquis ne soit bientôt congédié!

LA COMTESSE, _tenant une lettre_.

Tenez, Lisette, dites qu'on porte cette lettre à la poste. En voilà dix
que j'écris depuis trois semaines. La sotte chose qu'un procès! Que j'en
suis lasse! Je ne m'étonne pas s'il y a tant de femmes qui se marient!

LISETTE, _riant_.

Bon! votre procès! une affaire de mille francs! Voilà quelque chose de
bien considérable pour vous! Avez-vous envie de vous remarier? J'ai votre
affaire.

LA COMTESSE.

Qu'est-ce que c'est qu'envie de me remarier? Pourquoi me dites-vous cela?

LISETTE.

Ne vous fâchez pas; je ne veux que vous divertir.

LA COMTESSE.

Ce pourrait être quelqu'un de Paris qui vous auroit fait une confidence.
En tout cas, ne me le nommez pas.

LISETTE.

Oh! il faut pourtant que vous connoissiez celui dont je parle.

LA COMTESSE.

Brisons là-dessus. Je rêve à une chose: le Marquis n'a ici qu'un valet de
chambre, dont il a peut-être besoin, et je voulois lui demander s'il n'a
pas quelque paquet à mettre à la poste: on le porteroit avec le mien. Où
est-il, le Marquis? L'as-tu vu ce matin?

LISETTE.

Oh! oui. Malepeste![48] il a ses raisons pour être éveillé de bonne heure!
Revenons au mari que j'ai à vous donner, celui qui brûle pour vous et que
vous avez enflammé de passion...

LA COMTESSE.

Qui est ce benêt-là?

LISETTE.

Vous le devinez.

LA COMTESSE.

Celui qui brûle est un sot. Je ne veux rien savoir de Paris.

LISETTE.

Ce n'est point de Paris: votre conquête est dans le château. Vous
l'appellez benêt; moi, je vais le flatter: c'est un soupirant qui a l'air
fort simple, un air de bon homme. Y êtes-vous?

LA COMTESSE.

Nullement. Qui est-ce qui ressemble à celui-ci?

LISETTE.

Eh! le Marquis.

LA COMTESSE.

Celui qui est avec nous?

LISETTE.

Lui-même.

LA COMTESSE.

Je n'avois garde d'y être.[49] Où as-tu pris son air simple et de bon
homme? Dis donc un air franc et ouvert, à la bonne heure: il sera
reconnoissable.

LISETTE.

Ma foi, Madame, je vous le rends comme je le vois.

LA COMTESSE.

Tu le vois très mal, on ne peut pas plus mal: en mille ans on ne le
devineroit pas à ce portrait-là. Mais de qui tiens-tu ce que tu me contes
de son amour?

LISETTE.

De lui, qui me l'a dit; rien que cela. N'en riez-vous pas? Ne faites pas
semblant de le savoir. Au reste, il n'y a qu'à vous en défaire tout
doucement.

LA COMTESSE.

Hélas! je ne lui en veux point de mal.[50] C'est un fort honnête homme, un
homme dont je fais cas, qui a d'excellentes qualités; et j'aime encore
mieux que ce soit lui qu'un autre. Mais ne te trompes-tu pas aussi? Il ne
t'aura peut-être parlé que d'estime: il en a beaucoup pour moi, beaucoup;
il me l'a marquée en mille occasions d'une manière fort obligeante.

LISETTE.

Non, Madame, c'est de l'amour qui regarde vos appas; il en a prononcé le
mot sans bredouiller comme à l'ordinaire. C'est de la flamme... Il
languit, il soupire.

LA COMTESSE.

Est-il possible? Sur ce pied-là, je le plains, car ce n'est pas un
étourdi: il faut qu'il le sente, puisqu'il le dit; et ce n'est pas de ces
gens-là dont[51] je me moque: jamais leur amour n'est ridicule. Mais il
n'osera m'en parler, n'est-ce pas?

LISETTE.

Oh! ne craignez rien! j'y ai mis bon ordre:[52] il ne s'y jouera pas.[53]
Je lui ai ôté toute espérance. N'ai-je pas bien fait?

LA COMTESSE.

Mais oui, sans doute, oui, pourvu que vous ne l'ayez pas brusqué,
pourtant. Il falloit y prendre garde: c'est un ami que je veux conserver.
Et vous avez quelquefois le ton dur et revêche, Lisette; il valoit mieux
le laisser dire.

LISETTE.

Point du tout. Il vouloit que je vous parlasse en sa faveur.

LA COMTESSE.

Ce pauvre homme!

LISETTE.

Et je lui ai répondu que je ne pouvois pas m'en mêler, que je me
brouillerais avec vous si je vous en parlois, que vous me donneriez mon
congé, que vous lui donneriez le sien.

LA COMTESSE.

Le sien. Quelle grossièreté! Ah! que c'est mal parler! Son congé? Et même
est-ce que je vous aurois donné le vôtre? Vous savez bien que non. D'où
vient[54] mentir, Lisette? C'est un ennemi que vous m'allez faire d'un des
hommes du monde que je considère le plus et qui le mérite le mieux. Quel
sot langage de domestique! Eh! il étoit si simple de vous tenir[55] à lui
dire: «Monsieur, je ne saurois; ce ne sont pas là mes affaires. Parlez-en
vous-même.» Et je voudrais qu'il osât m'en parler, pour racommoder un peu
votre malhonnêteté. Son congé! son congé! Il va se croire insulté.

LISETTE.

Eh non, Madame; il étoit impossible de vous en débarrasser à moins de
frais. Faut-il que vous l'aimiez, de peur de le fâcher? Voulez-vous être
sa femme par politesse, lui qui doit épouser Hortense? Je ne lui ai rien
dit de trop; et vous en voilà quitte. Mais je l'aperçois qui vient en
rêvant. Évitez-le, vous avez le temps.

LA COMTESSE.

L'éviter, lui qui me voit! Ah! je m'en garderai bien. Après les discours
que vous lui avez tenus, il croirait que je les ai dictés. Non, non, je ne
changerai rien à ma façon de vivre avec lui. Allez porter ma lettre.

LISETTE, _à part_.

Hum! il y a ici quelque chose. (_Haut_.) Madame, je suis d'avis de rester
auprès de vous. Cela m'arrive souvent, et vous en serez plus à l'abri
d'une déclaration.

LA COMTESSE.

Belle finesse! Quand je lui échapperois aujourd'hui, ne me trouvera-t-il
pas demain? Il faudrait donc vous avoir toujours à mes côtés? Non, non.
Partez. S'il me parle, je sais répondre.

LISETTE.

Je suis à vous dans l'instant; je n'ai qu'à donner cette lettre à un
laquais.

LA COMTESSE.

Non, Lisette: c'est une lettre de conséquence, et vous me ferez plaisir de
la porter vous-même, parce que, si le courier est passé, vous me la
rapporterez, et je l'enverrai par une autre voie. Je ne me fie point aux
valets: ils ne sont point exacts.

LISETTE.

Le courrier ne passe que dans deux heures, Madame.

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! allez, vous dis-je. Que sait-on?

LISETTE, _à part_.

Quel prétexte! (_Haut_.) Cette femme-là ne va pas droit avec moi.

SCÈNE VII.

LA COMTESSE, _seule_.

Elle avoit la fureur de rester. Les domestiques sont haïssables; il n'y a
pas jusqu'à leur zèle qui ne vous désoblige. C'est toujours de travers
qu'ils vous servent.


SCÈNE VIII.

LA COMTESSE, LÉPINE.

LÉPINE.

Madame, monsieur le Marquis vous a vue[56] de loin avec Lisette. Il
demande s'il n'y a point de mal qu'il approche; il a le désir de vous
consulter, mais il se fait le scrupule[57] de vous être importun.

LA COMTESSE.

Lui importun! Il ne sauroit l'être. Dites-lui que je l'attends, Lépine;
qu'il vienne.

LÉPINE.

Je vais le réjouir de la nouvelle. Vous l'allez voir dans la minute.


SCÈNE IX.

LÉPINE, LE MARQUIS.

LÉPINE, _appelant le Marquis_.

Monsieur, venez prendre audience. Madame l'accorde. (_Quand le Marquis est
venu, il lui dit à part:_) Courage, Monsieur! l'accueil est gracieux,
presque tendre: c'est un coeur qui demande qu'on le prenne.


SCÈNE X.

LA COMTESSE, LE MARQUIS.

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! d'où vient donc la cérémonie que vous faites, Marquis?... Vous n'y
songez pas.[58]

LE MARQUIS.

Madame, vous avez bien de la bonté... C'est que j'ai bien des choses à
vous dire.

LA COMTESSE.

Effectivement, vous me paroissez rêveur, inquiet.

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, j'ai l'esprit en peine. J'ai besoin de conseil, j'ai besoin de
grâces, et le tout de votre part.

LA COMTESSE.

Tant mieux. Vous avez encore moins besoin de tout cela que je n'ai d'envie
de vous être bonne à quelque chose.

LE MARQUIS.

O bonne! Il ne tient qu'à vous de m'être excellente, si vous voulez.

LA COMTESSE.

Comment, si je veux? Manquez-vous de confiance? Ah! je vous prie, ne me
ménagez point. Vous pouvez tout sur moi, Marquis; je suis bien aise de
vous le dire.

LE MARQUIS.

Cette assurance m'est bien agréable, et je serois tenté d'en abuser.

LA COMTESSE.

J'ai grand'peur que vous ne résistiez à la tentation. Vous ne comptez pas
assez sur vos amis, car vous êtes si réservé, si retenu...

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, j'ai beaucoup de timidité.

LA COMTESSE.

Je fais de mon mieux pour vous l'ôter, comme vous voyez.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous savez dans quelle situation je suis avec Hortense; que je dois
l'épouser ou lui donner deux cent mille francs.

LA COMTESSE.

Oui, et je me suis aperçue que vous n'aviez pas grand goût pour elle.

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! on ne peut pas moins.[59] Je ne l'aime point du tout.

LA COMTESSE.

Je n'en suis pas surprise: son caractère est si différent du vôtre! Elle a
quelque chose de trop arrangé[60] pour vous.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous y êtes. Elle songe trop à ses grâces. Il faudroit toujours
l'entretenir de compliments, et moi, ce n'est pas là mon fort. La
coquetterie me gêne, elle me rend muet.

LA COMTESSE.

Ah! ah! je conviens qu'elle en a un peu; mais presque toutes les femmes
sont de même. Vous ne trouverez que cela partout, Marquis.

LE MARQUIS.

Hors chez vous. Quelle différence, par exemple! Vous plaisez sans y
penser. Ce n'est pas votre faute: vous ne savez pas seulement que vous
êtes aimable; mais d'autres le savent pour vous.

LA COMTESSE.

Moi, Marquis, je pense qu'à cet égard-là les autres songent aussi peu à
moi que j'y songe moi-même.

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! j'en connois qui ne vous disent pas tout ce qu'ils songent.

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! qui sont-ils, Marquis? Quelques amis comme vous, sans doute.

LE MARQUIS.

Bon, des amis! Voilà bien de quoi! Vous n'en aurez encore de
longtemps.[61]

LA COMTESSE.

Je vous suis obligée du petit compliment que vous me faites en passant.

LE MARQUIS.

Point du tout. Je ne passe jamais, moi; je dis toujours exprès.

LA COMTESSE, _riant_.

Comment! vous qui ne voulez pas que j'aie encore des amis, est-ce que vous
n'êtes pas le mien?

LE MARQUIS.

Vous m'excuserez; mais, quand je serois autre chose,[62] il n'y auroit
rien de surprenant.

LA COMTESSE.

Eh bien! je ne laisserois pas que d'en être surprise.[63]

LE MARQUIS.

Et encore plus fâchée.

LA COMTESSE.

En vérité, surprise. Je veux pourtant croire que je suis aimable, puisque
vous le dites.

LE MARQUIS.

O charmante! Et je serois bien heureux si Hortense vous ressembloit. Je
l'épouserois d'un grand coeur, et j'ai bien de la peine à m'y résoudre.

LA COMTESSE.

Je le crois, et ce seroit encore pis si vous aviez de l'inclination pour
une autre.

LE MARQUIS.

Eh bien! c'est que justement le pis s'y trouve.

LA COMTESSE, _par exclamation_.

Oui? Vous aimez ailleurs?

LE MARQUIS.

De toute mon âme.

LA COMTESSE, _en souriant_.

Je m'en suis doutée, Marquis.

LE MARQUIS.

Et vous êtes-vous doutée de la personne?

LA COMTESSE.

Non, mais vous me la direz.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous me feriez grand plaisir de la deviner.

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! pourquoi m'en donneriez-vous la peine, puisque vous voilà?

LE MARQUIS.

C'est que vous ne connoissez qu'elle:[64] c'est la plus aimable femme, la
plus franche. Vous parlez de gens sans façon: il n'y a personne comme
elle; plus je la vois, plus je l'admire.

LA COMTESSE.

Épousez-la, Marquis, épousez-la, et laissez là Hortense. Il n'y a point à
hésiter: vous n'avez point d'autre parti à prendre.

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, mais je songe à une chose... N'y auroit-il pas moyen de me sauver les
deux cent mille francs? Je vous parle à coeur ouvert.

LA COMTESSE.

Regardez-moi dans cette occasion-ci comme une autre vous-même.

LE MARQUIS.

Ah! que c'est bien dit! une autre moi-même!

LA COMTESSE.

Ce qui me plaît en vous, c'est votre franchise, qui est une qualité
admirable. Revenons. Comment vous sauver ces deux cent mille francs?

LE MARQUIS.

C'est que Hortense aime le Chevalier. Mais, à propos, c'est votre parent?

LA COMTESSE.

Oh! parent de loin.

LE MARQUIS.

Or, de cet amour qu'elle a pour lui, je conclus qu'elle ne se soucie pas
de moi. Je n'ai donc qu'à faire semblant de vouloir l'épouser. Elle me
refusera, et je ne lui devrai plus rien. Son refus me servira de
quittance.

LA COMTESSE.

Oui-da,[65] vous pouvez le tenter. Ce n'est pas qu'il n'y ait du
risque:[66] elle a du discernement, Marquis, Vous supposez qu'elle vous
refusera; je n'en sais rien: vous n'êtes pas homme à dédaigner.

LE MARQUIS.

Est-il vrai?

LA COMTESSE.

C'est mon sentiment.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous me flattez; vous encouragez ma franchise.

LA COMTESSE.

Je vous encourage! Eh! mais en êtes-vous encore là? Mettez-vous donc dans
l'esprit que je ne demande qu'à vous obliger, qu'il n'y a que l'impossible
qui m'arrêtera, et que vous devez compter sur tout ce qui dépendra de moi.
Ne perdez point cela de vue, étrange homme que vous êtes, et achevez
hardiment. Vous voulez des conseils, je vous en donne. Quand nous en
serons à l'article des grâces, il n'y aura qu'à parler: elles ne feront
pas plus de difficulté que le reste, entendez-vous? Et que cela soit dit
pour toujours.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous me ravissez d'espérance.

LA COMTESSE.

Allons par ordre. Si Hortense alloit vous prendre au mot?

LE MARQUIS.

J'espère que non. En tout cas, je lui payerais sa somme, pourvu
qu'auparavant la personne qui a pris mon coeur ait la bonté de me dire
qu'elle veut bien de moi.

LA COMTESSE.

Hélas! elle serait donc bien difficile? Mais, Marquis, est-ce qu'elle ne
sait pas que vous l'aimez?

LE MARQUIS.

Non, vraiment; je n'ai pas osé le lui dire.

LA COMTESSE.

Et le tout par timidité. Oh! en vérité, c'est la pousser trop loin; et,
toute amie des bienséances que je suis, je ne vous approuve pas; ce n'est
pas se rendre justice.

LE MARQUfS.

Elle est si sensée que j'ai peur d'elle. Vous me conseillez donc de lui en
parler?

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! cela devroit être fait. Peut-être vous attend-elle. Vous dites qu'elle
est sensée: que craignez-vous? Il est louable de penser modestement sur
soi; mais, avec de la modestie, on parle, on se propose. Parlez, Marquis,
parlez: tout ira bien.

LE MARQUIS.

Hélas! si vous saviez qui c'est, vous ne m'exhorteriez pas tant. Que vous
êtes heureuse de n'aimer rien et de mépriser l'amour!

LA COMTESSE.

Moi, mépriser ce qu'il y a au monde de plus naturel! Cela ne seroit pas
raisonnable. Ce n'est pas l'amour, ce sont les amants, tels qu'ils sont la
plupart,[67] que je méprise, et non pas le sentiment qui fait qu'on aime,
qui n'a rien en soi que de fort honnête, de fort permis et de fort
involontaire. C'est le plus doux sentiment de la vie: comment le haïrois-
je? Non, certes, et il y a tel homme à qui je pardonnerois de m'aimer s'il
me l'avouoit avec cette simplicité de caractère que je louois tout à
l'heure en vous.

LE MARQUIS.

En effet, quand on le dit naïvement comme on le sent...

LA COMTESSE.

Il n'y a point de mal alors. On a toujours bonne grâce: voilà ce que je
pense. Je ne suis pas une âme sauvage.

LE MARQUIS.

Ce seroit bien dommage. Vous avez la plus belle santé.

LA COMTESSE, _à part_.

Il est bien question de ma santé. (_Haut_.) C'est l'air de la campagne.

LE MARQUIS.

L'air de la ville vous fait de même l'oeil le plus vif, le teint le plus
frais!

LA COMTESSE.

Je me porte assez bien. Mais savez-vous bien que vous me dites des
douceurs sans y penser?

LE MARQUIS.

Pourquoi sans y penser? Moi, j'y pense.

LA COMTESSE.

Gardez-les pour la personne que vous aimez.

LE MARQUIS.

Eh! si c'étoit vous, il n'y auroit que faire de[68] les garder.

LA COMTESSE.

Comment! si c'étoit moi? Est-ce de moi dont il s'agit? Est-ce une
déclaration d'amour que vous me faites?

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! point du tout.

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! de quoi vous avisez-vous donc de m'entretenir de mon teint, de ma
santé? Qui est-ce qui ne s'y tromperoit pas?

LE MARQUIS.

Ce n'est que façon de parler. Je dis seulement qu'il est fâcheux que vous
ne vouliez ni aimer, ni vous remarier, et que j'en suis mortifié, parce
que je ne vois pas de femme qui me puisse convenir autant que vous. Mais
je ne vous en dis mot, de peur de vous déplaire.

LA COMTESSE.

Mais, encore une fois, vous me parlez d'amour. Je ne me trompe pas, c'est
moi que vous aimez: vous me le dites en termes exprès.

LE MARQUIS.

Hé bien, oui. Quand ce seroit vous, il n'est pas nécessaire de se fâcher.
Ne diroit-on pas que tout est perdu? Calmez-vous. Prenez[69] que je n'aie
rien dit.

LA COMTESSE.

La belle chute! Vous êtes bien singulier.

LE MARQUIS.

Et vous de bien mauvaise humeur. Eh! tout à l'heure, à votre avis, on
avoit si bonne grâce à dire naïvement qu'on aime! Voyez comme cela
réussit! Me voilà bien avancé!

LA COMTESSE.

Ne le voilà-t-il pas[70] bien reculé? A qui en avez-vous? Je vous demande
à qui vous parlez.

LE MARQUIS.

A personne, Madame. Je ne dirai plus mot. Êtes-vous contente? Si vous vous
mettez en colère contre tous ceux qui me ressemblent, vous en querellerez
bien d'autres.

LA COMTESSE, _à part_.

Quel original! (_Haut_.) Eh! qui est-ce qui vous querelle?

LE MARQUIS.

Ah! la manière dont vous me refusez n'est pas douce.

LA COMTESSE.

Allez, vous rêvez.

LE MARQUIS.

Courage. Avec la qualité d'original dont vous venez de m'honorer tout bas,
il ne me manquoit plus que celle de rêveur. Au surplus, je ne m'en plains
pas. Je ne vous conviens point: qu'y faire? Il n'y a plus qu'à me taire,
et je me tairai. Adieu, Comtesse; n'en soyons pas moins bons amis, et du
moins ayez la bonté de m'aider à me tirer d'affaire avec Hortense. (_Il
s'en va_.)

LA COMTESSE.

Quel homme! Celui-ci ne m'ennuiera pas du récit de mes rigueurs. J'aime
les gens simples et unis;[71] mais, en vérité, celui-là l'est trop.


SCÈNE XI.

HORTENSE, LA COMTESSE, LE MARQUIS.

HORTENSE, _arrêtant le Marquis prêt à sortir_.

Monsieur le Marquis, je vous prie, ne vous en allez pas; nous avons à nous
parler, et Madame peut être présente.

LE MARQUIS.

Comme vous voudrez. Madame.

HORTENSE.

Vous savez ce dont il s'agit?

LE MARQUIS.

Non, je ne sais pas ce que c'est; je ne m'en souviens plus.

HORTENSE.

Vous me surprenez! Je me flattois que vous seriez le premier à rompre le
silence. Il est humiliant pour moi d'être obligée de vous prévenir. Avez-
vous oublié qu'il y a un testament qui nous regarde?

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! oui, je me souviens du testament.

HORTENSE.

Et qui dispose de ma main en votre faveur?

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, Madame, oui, il faut que je vous épouse. Cela est vrai.

HORTENSE.

Hé bien, Monsieur, à quoi vous déterminez-vous? Il est temps de fixer mon
état. Je ne vous cache point que vous avez un rival: c'est le Chevalier,
qui est parent de Madame, que je ne vous préfère pas, mais que je préfère
à tout autre, et que j'estime assez pour en faire mon époux si vous ne
devenez pas le mien. C'est ce que je lui ai dit jusqu'ici, et, comme il
m'assure avoir des raisons pressantes de savoir aujourd'hui même à quoi
s'en tenir, je n'ai pu lui refuser de vous parler. Monsieur, le
congédierai-je, ou non? Que voulez-vous que je lui dise? Ma main est à
vous, si vous la demandez.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous me faites bien de la grâce... Je la prends, Mademoiselle.

HORTENSE.

Est-ce votre coeur qui me choisit, monsieur le Marquis?

LE MARQUIS.

N'êtes-vous pas assez aimable pour cela?

HORTENSE.

Et vous m'aimez?

LE MARQUIS.

Qui est-ce qui dit le contraire? Tout à l'heure j'en parlois à Madame.

LA COMTESSE.

Il est vrai, c'étoit de vous dont il m'entretenoit; il songeoit à vous
proposer ce mariage.

HORTENSE.

Et vous disoit-il aussi qu'il m'aimoit?

LA COMTESSE.

Il me semble qu'oui;[72] du moins me parloit-il de penchant.

HORTENSE.

D'où vient donc, monsieur le Marquis, me l'avez-vous laissé ignorer[73]
depuis six semaines? Quand on aime, on en donne quelques marques; et, dans
le cas où nous sommes, vous aviez droit de vous déclarer.

LE MARQUIS.

J'en conviens; mais le temps se passe: on est distrait, on ne sait pas si
les gens sont de votre avis.

HORTENSE.

Vous êtes bien modeste. Voilà qui est donc arrêté, et je vais l'annoncer
au Chevalier, qui entre.


SCÈNE XII.

LE CHEVALIER, HORTENSE, LE MARQUIS, LA COMTESSE.

HORTENSE, _allant au-devant du Chevalier pour lui  dire un mot à part._

Il accepte ma main, mais de mauvaise grâce. Ce n'est qu'une ruse: ne vous
effrayez pas.

LE CHEVALIER, _à part._

Vous m'inquiétez. (_Haut._) Eh bien, Madame, il ne me reste plus
d'espérance, sans doute? Je n'ai pas dû m'attendre que monsieur le Marquis
pût consentir à vous perdre.

HORTENSE.

Oui, Chevalier, je l'épouse; la chose est conclue, et le Ciel vous destine
à une autre qu'à moi. Le Marquis m'aimoit en secret, et c'étoit, dit-il,
par distraction qu'il ne me le déclaroit pas... par distraction.

LE CHEVALIER.

J'entends,[74] il avoit oublié de vous le dire.

HORTENSE.

Oui, c'est cela même; mais il vient de me l'avouer, et il l'avoit confié à
Madame.

LE CHEVALIER.

Eh! que ne m'avertissiez-vous, Comtesse? J'ai cru quelquefois qu'il vous
aimoit vous-même.

LA COMTESSE.

Quelle imagination![75] A propos de quoi me citer ici?

HORTENSE.

Il y a eu des instants où je le soupçonnois aussi.

LA COMTESSE.

Encore! Où est donc la plaisanterie, Hortense?

LE MARQUIS.

Pour moi, je ne dis mot.

LE CHEVALIER.

Vous me désespérez, Marquis.

LE MARQUIS.

J'en suis fâché; mais mettez-vous à ma place: il y a un testament, vous le
savez bien, je ne peux pas faire autrement.

LE CHEVALIER.

Sans le testament, vous n'aimeriez peut-être pas autant que moi.

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! vous me pardonnerez, je n'aime que trop.

HORTENSE.

Je tâcherai de le mériter, Monsieur. (_A part, au Chevalier_.) Demandez
qu'on presse notre mariage.

LE CHEVALIER, _à part, à Hortense_.

N'est-ce pas trop risquer? (_Haut._) Dans l'état où je suis, Marquis,
achevez de me prouver que mon malheur est sans remède.

LE MARQUIS.

La preuve s'en verra quand je l'épouserai. Je ne peux pas l'épouser tout à
l'heure.[76]

LE CHEVALIER, _d'un air inquiet_.

Vous avez raison. (_A part, à Hortense._) Il vous épousera.

HORTENSE, _à part_.

Vous gâtez tout. (_Au Marquis._) J'entends[77] bien ce que le Chevalier
veut dire: c'est qu'il espère toujours que nous ne nous marierons pas,
monsieur le Marquis. N'est-ce pas, Chevalier?

LE CHEVALIER.

Non, Madame, je n'espère plus rien.

HORTENSE.

Vous m'excuserez, je le vois bien. Vous n'êtes pas convaincu, vous ne
l'êtes pas; et, comme il faut, m'avez-vous dit, que vous alliez demain à
Paris pour y prendre des mesures, nécessaires en cette occasion-ci, vous
voudriez, avant que de[78] partir, savoir bien précisément s'il ne nous
reste plus d'espoir. Voilà ce que c'est: vous avez besoin d'une entière
certitude. (_A part, au Chevalier._) Dites qu'oui.

LE CHEVALIER.

Mais oui.

HORTENSE.

Monsieur le Marquis, nous ne sommes qu'à une lieue de Paris, il est de
bonne heure: envoyez Lépine chercher un notaire, et passons notre
contrat[79] aujourd'hui, pour donner au Chevalier la triste conviction
qu'il demande.

LA COMTESSE.

Mais il me paroît que vous lui faites accroire qu'il la demande; je suis
persuadée qu'il ne s'en soucie pas.

HORTENSE, _à part, au Chevalier_.

Soutenez donc.

LE CHEVALIER.

Oui, Comtesse, un notaire me feroit plaisir.

LA COMTESSE.

Voilà un sentiment bien bizarre.

HORTENSE.

Point du tout. Ses affaires exigent qu'il sache à quoi s'en tenir: il n'y
a rien de si simple, et il a raison; il n'osoit le dire, et je le dis pour
lui. Allez-vous envoyer Lépine, monsieur le Marquis?

LE MARQUIS.

Comme il vous plaira. Mais qui est-ce qui songeoit à avoir un notaire
aujourd'hui?

HORTENSE, _au Chevalier_.

Insistez.

LE CHEVALIER.

Je vous en prie, Marquis.

LA COMTESSE.

Oh! vous aurez la bonté d'attendre à demain, monsieur le Chevalier. Vous
n'êtes pas si pressé; votre fantaisie n'est pas d'une espèce à mériter
qu'on se gêne tant pour elle: ce seroit ce soir ici[80] un embarras qui
nous dérangeroit. J'ai quelques affaires; demain il sera temps.

HORTENSE, _à part, au Chevalier_.

Pressez.

LE CHEVALIER.

Eh! Comtesse, de grâce!

LA COMTESSE.

De grâce! L'hétéroclite[81] prière! Il est donc bien ragoûtant[82] de voir
sa maîtresse mariée à son rival? Comme Monsieur voudra, au reste.

LE MARQUIS.

Il seroit impoli de gêner Madame. Au surplus, je m'en rapporte à elle,
demain seroit bon.

HORTENSE.

Dès qu'elle y consent, il n'y a qu'à envoyer Lépine.


SCÈNE XIII.

LA COMTESSE, HORTENSE, LE MARQUIS, LISETTE.

HORTENSE.

Voici Lisette qui entre; je vais lui dire de nous l'aller chercher...
Lisette, on doit passer[83] ce soir un contrat de mariage entre monsieur
le Marquis et moi; il veut tout à l'heure[84] faire partir Lépine pour
amener son notaire de Paris. Ayez la bonté de lui dire qu'il vienne
recevoir ses ordres.

LISETTE.

J'y cours, Madame.

LA COMTESSE, _l'arrêtant_.

Où allez-vous? En fait de mariage, je ne veux ni m'en mêler, ni que mes
gens s'en mêlent.

LISETTE.

Moi, ce n'est que pour rendre service. Tenez, je n'ai que faire de
sortir:[85] je le vois sur la terrasse. (_Elle appelle._) Monsieur de
Lépine?

LA COMTESSE, _à part_.

Cette sotte![86]


SCÈNE XIV.

LÉPINE, LISETTE, LE MARQUIS, LA COMTESSE, LE CHEVALIER, HORTENSE.

LÉPINE.

Qui est-ce qui m'appelle?

LISETTE.

Vite, vite, à cheval! Il s'agit d'un contrat de mariage entre Madame et
votre maître, et il faut aller à Paris chercher le notaire de monsieur le
Marquis.

LÉPINE, _au Marquis_.

Le notaire! Ce qu'elle conte est-il vrai? Monsieur, nous avons la partie
de chasse pour tantôt; je me suis arrangé pour courir le lièvre, et non
pas le notaire.

LE MARQUIS.

C'est pourtant le dernier qu'on veut.

LÉPINE.

Ce n'est pas la peine que je voyage pour avoir le vôtre: je le compte pour
mort. Ne savez-vous pas? La fièvre le travailloit quand nous partîmes,
avec le médecin par-dessus[87]; il en avoit le transport au cerveau.[88]

LE MARQUIS.

Vraiment, oui. A propos, il étoit très malade.

LÉPINE.

Il agonisoit, sandis![89]...

LISETTE, _d'un air indifférent_.

Il n'y a qu'à prendre celui de Madame.

LA COMTESSE.

II n'y a qu'à vous taire, car, si celui de Monsieur est mort, le mien
l'est aussi. II y a quelque temps qu'il me dit qu'il étoît le sien.

LISETTE, _indifféremment, d'un air modeste_.

Il me semble qu'il n'y a pas longtemps que vous lui avez écrit, Madame.

LA COMTESSE

La belle conséquence![90] Ma lettre a-t-elle empêché qu'il ne mourût? Il
est certain que je lui ai écrit, mais aussi ne m'a-t-il point fait de
réponse.

LE CHEVALIER, _à Hortense, à part_.

Je commence à me rassurer.

HORTENSE, _lui souriant à part_.

Il y a plus d'un notaire à Paris. Lépine verra s'il se porte mieux. Depuis
six semaines que nous sommes ici, il a eu le temps de revenir en bonne
santé. Allez lui écrire un mot, monsieur le Marquis, et priez-le, s'il ne
peut venir, d'en indiquer un autre. Lépine ira se préparer pendant que
vous écrirez.

LÉPINE.

Non, Madame; si je monte à cheval, c'est autant de resté par les
chemins.[91] Je parlois de la partie de chasse, mais voici que je me sens
mal, extrêmement mal: d'aujourd'hui[92] je ne prendrai ni gibier ni
notaire.

LISETTE, _en souriant négligemment_.

Est-ce que vous êtes mort aussi?

LÉPINE, _feignant de la douleur_.

Non, Mademoiselle; mais je vis souffrant,[93] et je ne pourrois fournir la
course.[94] Ah! sans le respect de la compagnie, je ferois des cris[95]
perçants. Je me brisai hier d'une chute sur l'escalier, je roulai tout un
étage, et je commençois d'en[96] entamer un autre quand on me retint sur
le penchant. Jugez de la douleur; je la sens qui m'enveloppe.

LE CHEVALIER.

Eh bien! tu n'as qu'à prendre ma chaise. Dites-lui qu'il parte, Marquis.

LE MARQUIS.

Ce garçon qui est tout froissé,[97] qui a roulé un étage, je m'étonne
qu'il ne soit pas au lit. Pars si tu peux, au reste.

HORTENSE.

Allez, partez, Lépine; on n'est point fatigué dans une chaise.

LÉPINE.

Vous dirai-je le vrai, Mademoiselle? Obligez-moi de me dispenser de la
commission. Monsieur traite avec vous de sa ruine. Vous ne l'aimez point,
Madame, j'en ai connoissance, et ce mariage ne peut être que fatal: je me
ferois un reproche d'y avoir part. Je parle en conscience. Si mon scrupule
déplaît, qu'on me dise: «Va-t'en.» Qu'on me chasse, je m'y soumets: ma
probité me console.

LA COMTESSE.

Voilà ce qu'on appelle un excellent domestique! Ils sont bien rares!

LE MARQUIS, _à Hortense_.

Vous l'entendez. Comment voulez-vous que je m'y prenne avec cet opiniâtre?
Quand je me fâcherais, il n'en sera ni plus ni moins.[98] Il faut donc le
chasser. (_A Lépine_.) Retire-toi.

HORTENSE.

On se passera de lui. Allez toujours écrire. Un de mes gens portera la
lettre, ou quelqu'un du village.


SCÈNE XV.

HORTENSE, LE MARQUIS, LE CHEVALIER.

HORTENSE.

Ah ça, vous allez faire votre billet; j'en vais écrire un qu'on laissera
chez moi en passant.

LE MARQUIS.

Oui-da;[99] mais consultez-vous: si par hasard vous ne m'aimiez pas, tant
pis, car j'y vais de bon jeu.[100]

LE CHEVALIER, _à Hortense, à part_.

Vous le poussez trop.

HORTENSE, _à part_.

Paix! (_Haut_.) Tout est consulté, Monsieur; adieu. Chevalier, vous voyez
bien qu'il ne m'est plus permis de vous écouter.

LE CHEVALIER.

Adieu, Mademoiselle; je vais me livrer à la douleur où vous me laissez.

(_Ils sortent_.)


SCÈNE XVI.

LE MARQUIS, LA COMTESSE.

LE MARQUIS, _consterné_.

Je n'en reviens point! C'est le diable qui m'en veut. Vous voulez que
cette fille-là m'aime?

LA COMTESSE.

Non, mais elle est assez mutine pour vous épouser. Croyez-moi, terminez
avec elle.

LE MARQUIS.

Si je lui effrois cent mille francs? Mais ils ne sont pas prêts; je ne les
ai point.

LA COMTESSE.

Que cela ne vous retienne pas: je vous les prêterai, moi... Je les ai à
Paris. Rappelez-les; votre situation me fait de la peine. Courez, je les
vois encore tous deux.

LE MARQUIS.

Je vous rend mille graces. (_Il appelle_.) Madame?  monsieur le Chevalier?


SCÈNE XVII.

LE CHEVALIER, HORTENSE, LE MARQUIS, LA COMTESSE.

LE MARQUIS.

Voulez-vous bien revenir? J'ai un petit mot à vous communiquer.

HORTENSE.

De quoi s'agit-il donc?

LE CHEVALIER.

Vous me rappelez aussi... Dois-je en tirer un bon augure?

HORTENSE.

Je croyois que vous alliez écrire.

LE MARQUIS.

Rien n'empêche. Mais c'est que j'ai une proposition à vous faire, et qui
est tout à fait raisonnable.

HORTENSE.

Une proposition! Monsieur le Marquis, vous m'avez donc trompée? Votre
amour n'est pas aussi vrai que vous me l'avez dit.

LE MARQUIS.

Que diantre[101] voulez-vous? On prétend aussi que vous ne m'aimez point:
cela me chicane.

HORTENSE.

Je ne vous aime pas encore, mais je vous aimerai; et puis, Monsieur, avec
de la vertu, on se passe d'amour pour un mari.

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! je serais un mari qui ne s'en passeroit pas, moi! Nous ne gagnerions,
à nous marier, que le loisir de nous quereller à notre aise, et ce n'est
pas là une partie de plaisir bien touchante. Ainsi, tenez, accommodons-
nous plutôt. Partageons le différend en deux: il y a deux cent mille
francs sur le testament, prenez-en la moitié, quoique vous ne m'aimiez
pas, et laissons là tous les notaires, tant vivants que morts.

LE CHEVALIER, _à Hortense, à part_.

Je ne crains plus rien.

HORTENSE.

Vous n'y pensez pas,[102] Monsieur; cent mille francs ne peuvent entrer en
comparaison avec l'avantage de vous épouser, et vous ne vous évaluez pas
ce que vous valez.

LE MARQUIS.

Ma foi, je ne les vaux pas quand je suis de mauvaise humeur, et je vous
annonce que j'y serai toujours.[103]

HORTENSE.

Ma douceur naturelle me rassure.

LE MARQUIS.

Vous ne voulez donc pas? Allons notre chemin, vous serez mariée.

HORTENSE.

C'est le plus court, et je m'en retourne.

LE MARQUIS.

Ne suis-je pas bien malheureux d'être obligé de donner la moitié d'une
pareille somme à une personne qui ne se soucie pas de moi? Il n'y a qu'à
plaider, Madame: nous verrons un peu si on me condamnera à épouser une
fille qui ne m'aime pas.

HORTENSE.

Et moi je dirai que je vous aime. Qui est-ce qui me prouvera le contraire,
dès que je vous accepte? Je soutiendrai que c'est vous qui ne m'aimez pas,
et qui même, dit-on, en aime[104] une autre.

LE MARQUIS.

Du moins, en tout cas, ne la connoit-on point comme on connoit le
Chevalier.

HORTENSE.

Tout de même, Monsieur, je la connois, moi.

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! finissez. Monsieur, finissez! Ah! l'odieuse contestation!

HORTENSE.

Oui, finissons. Je vous épouserai, Monsieur: il n'y a que cela à dire.

LE MARQUIS.

Eh bien! et moi aussi, Madame, et moi aussi.

HORTENSE.

Épousez donc.

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, parbleu! j'en aurai le plaisir; il faudra bien que l'amour vous
vienne; et, pour début de mariage, je prétends, s'il vous plaît, que
monsieur le Chevalier ait la bonté d'être notre ami de très loin.

LE CHEVALIER, _à Hortense, à part_.

Ceci ne vaut rien; il se pique.

HORTENSE, _au Chevalier_.

Taisez-vous! (_Au Marquis_) Monsieur le Chevalier me connoît assez pour
être persuadé qu'il ne me verra plus. Adieu, Monsieur: je vais écrire mon
billet, tenez le vôtre prêt: ne perdons point de temps.

LA COMTESSE.

Oh! pour votre contrat, je vous certifie que vous irez le signer où il
vous plaira, mais que ce ne sera pas chez moi. C'est s'égorger[105] que se
marier comme vous faites, et je ne prêterai jamais ma maison pour une si
funeste cérémonie. Vos fureurs[106] iront se passer ailleurs, si vous le
trouvez bon.

HORTENSE.

Eh bien! Comtesse, la Marquise est votre voisine, nous irons chez elle.

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, si j'en suis d'avis: car, enfin, cela dépend de moi. Je ne connois
point votre Marquise.

HORTENSE, _en s'en allant_.

N'importe, vous y consentirez, Monsieur. Je vous quitte.

LE CHEVALIER, _en s'en allant_.

A tout ce que je vois, mon espérance renaît un peu.


SCÈNE XVIII.

LA COMTESSE, LE MARQUIS, LE CHEVALIER.

LA COMTESSE, _arrêtant le Chevalier_.

Restez, Chevalier; parlons un peu de ceci. Y eut-il jamais rien de pareil?
Qu'en pensez-vous, vous qui aimez Hortense, vous qu'elle aime? Le[107]
mariage ne vous fait-il pas trembler? Moi qui ne suis pas son amant, il
m'effraye.

LE CHEVALIER, _avec un effroi hypocrite_.

C'est une chose affreuse! Il n'y a point d'exemple de cela.

LE MARQUIS.

Je ne m'en soucie guère. Elle sera ma femme; mais, en revanche, je serai
son mari: c'est ce qui me console, et ce sont plus ses affaires que les
miennes. Aujourd'hui le contrat, demain la noce, et ce soir confinée dans
son appartement: pas plus de façon. Je suis piqué, je ne donnerois pas
cela de plus.[108]

LA COMTESSE.

Pour moi, je serois d'avis qu'on les empêchât absolument de s'engager, et
un notaire honnête homme, s'il étoit instruit,[109] leur refuseroit tout
net son ministère. Je les enfermerois si j'étois la maîtresse. Hortense
peut-elle se sacrifier à un aussi vil intérêt? Vous qui êtes né généreux,
Chevalier, et qui avez du pouvoir sur elle, retenez-la; faites-lui, par
pitié, entendre raison, si ce n'est[110] par amour. Je suis sûre qu'elle
ne marchande si vilainement qu'à cause de vous.

LE CHEVALIER, _à part_.

Il n'y a plus de risque à tenir bon. (_Haut_.) Que voulez-vous que j'y
fasse, Comtesse? Je n'y vois point de remède.

LA COMTESSE.

Comment? que dites-vous? Il faut que j'aie mal entendu, car je vous
estime.

LE CHEVALIER.

Je dis que je ne puis rien là-dedans, et que c'est ma tendresse qui me
défend de la résoudre à ce que vous souhaitez.

LA COMTESSE.

Et par quel trait d'esprit me prouverez-vous la justesse de ce petit
raisonnement-là?

LE CHEVALIER.

Oui, Madame, je veux qu'elle soit heureuse. Si je l'épouse, elle ne le
seroit pas assez avec la fortune que j'ai. La douceur de notre union
s'altéreroit; je la verrois se repentir de m'avoir épousé, de n'avoir pas
épousé Monsieur, et c'est à quoi je ne m'exposerai point.

LA COMTESSE.

On ne peut vous répondre qu'en haussant les épaules. Est-ce vous qui me
parlez, Chevalier?

LE CHEVALIER.

Oui, Madame.

LA COMTESSE.

Vous avez donc l'âme mercenaire aussi, mon petit cousin? Je ne m'étonne
plus de l'inclination que vous avez l'un pour l'autre. Ou, vous êtes digne
d'elle; vos coeurs sont fort bien assortis. Ah! l'horrible façon d'aimer!

LE CHEVALIER.

Madame, la vraie tendresse ne raisonne pas autrement que la mienne.

LA COMTESSE.

Ah! Monsieur, ne prononcez pas seulement le mot de tendresse, vous le
profanez.

LE CHEVALIER.

Mais...

LA COMTESSE.

Vous me scandalisez, vous dis-je! Vous êtes mon parent, malheureusement;
mais je ne m'en vanterai point. N'avez-vous pas de honte? Vous parlez de
votre fortune. je la connois; elle vous met fort en état de supporter le
retranchement d'une aussi misérable somme que celle dont il s'agit, et qui
ne peut jamais être que mal acquise. Ah! Ciel! Moi qui vous estimois!
Quelle avarice sordide! quel coeur sans sentiment! Et de pareils gens
disent qu'ils aiment! Ah! le vilain amour! Vous pouvez vous retirer, je
n'ai plus rien à vous dire.

LE MARQUIS, _brusquement_.

Ni moi plus rien à craindre. Le billet va partir. Vous avez encore trois
heures à entretenir Hortense, après quoi j'espère qu'on ne vous verra
plus.

LE CHEVALIER.

Monsieur, le contrat signé, je pars. Pour vous, Comtesse, quand vous y
penserez bien sérieusement, vous excuserez votre parent et vous lui
rendrez plus de justice.

LA COMTESSE.

Ah! non! Voilà qui est fini, je ne saurois le mépriser davantage.


SCÈNE XIX.

LE MARQUIS, LA COMTESSE.

LE MARQUIS.

Eh bien! suis-je assez à plaindre?

LA COMTESSE.

Eh! Monsieur, délivrez-vous d'elle et donnez-lui les deux cent mille
francs.

LE MARQUIS.

Deux cent mille francs plutôt que de l'épouser! Non, parbleu! je n'irai
pas m'incommoder jusque-là; je ne pourrois pas les trouver sans me
déranger.

LA COMTESSE, _négligemment_.

Ne vous ai-je pas dit que j'ai justement la moitié de cette somme-là toute
prête? A l'égard du reste, on tâchera de vous la faire.[111]

LE MARQUIS.

Eh! quand on emprunte, ne faut-il pas rendre? Si vous aviez voulu de moi,
à la bonne heure; mais, dès qu'il n'y a rien à faire, je retiens la
demoiselle: elle seroit trop chère à renvoyer.

LA COMTESSE.

Trop chère! Prenez donc garde! vous parlez comme eux. Seriez-vous capable
de sentiments si mesquins? Il vaudrait mieux qu'il vous en coûtât tout
votre bien que de la retenir, puisque vous ne l'aimez pas, Monsieur.

LE MARQUIS.

Eh! en aimerois-je une autre davantage? A l'exception de vous, toute femme
m'est égale. Brune, blonde, petite ou grande, tout cela revient au même,
puisque je ne vous ai pas, que je ne puis vous avoir et qu'il n'y a que
vous que j'aimois.

LA COMTESSE.

Voyez donc comment vous ferez, car enfin est-ce une
nécessité que je vous épouse à cause de la situation désagréable
oh vous êtes? En vérité, cela me paroit bien fort,
Marquis.

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! je ne dis pas que ce soit une nécessité: vous me faites plus ridicule
que je ne le suis. Je sais bien que vous n'êtes obligée à rien. Ce n'est
pas votre faute si je vous aime, et je ne prétends[112] pas que vous
m'aimiez. Je ne vous en parle point non plus.

LA COMTESSE, _impatiente, et d'un ton sérieux_.

Vous faites fort bien, Monsieur; votre discrétion est tout à fait
raisonnable. Je m'y attendois, et vous avez tort de croire que je vous
fais plus ridicule que vous ne l'êtes.

LE MARQUIS.

Tout le mal qu'il y a, c'est que j'épouserai cette fille-ci avec un peu
plus de peine que je n'en aurois eu sans vous. Voilà toute l'obligation
que je vous ai. Adieu, Comtesse.

LA COMTESSE.

Adieu, Marquis. Vous vous en allez donc gaillardement comme cela, sans
imaginer d'autre expédient que ce contrat extravagant?

LE MARQUIS.

Eh! quel expédient? Je n'en savois qu'un, qui n'a pas réussi, et je n'en
sais plus. Je suis votre très humble serviteur.

LA COMTESSE.

Bonsoir, Monsieur. Ne perdez point de temps en révérences: la chose
presse.


SCÈNE XX.

LA COMTESSE, _seule_.

Qu'on me dise en vertu de quoi cet homme-là s'est mis dans la tête que je
ne l'aime point! Je suis quelquefois, par impatience, tentée de lui dire
que je l'aime, pour lui montrer qu'il n'est qu'un idiot... Il faut que je
me satisfasse.


SCÈNE XXI.

LÉPINE, LA COMTESSE.

LÉPINE.

Puis-je prendre la licence de m'approcher de madame la Comtesse!

LA COMTESSE.

Qu'as-tu à me dire?

LÉPINE.

De nous rendre réconciliés[113] monsieur le Marquis et moi.

LA COMTESSE.

Il est vrai qu'avec l'esprit tourné comme il l'a, il est homme à te punir
de l'avoir bien servi.

LEPINE.

J'ai le contentement que vous avez approuvé mon refus de partir. Il vous a
semblé que j'étois un serviteur excellent. Madame, ce sont les termes de
la louange dont votre justice m'a gratifié.

LA COMTESSE.

Oui, excellent, je le dis encore.

LÉPINE.

C'est cependant mon excellence qui fait aujourd'hui que je chancelle dans
mon poste. Tout estimé que je suis de la plus aimable comtesse, elle verra
qu'on me supprime.

LA COMTESSE.

Non, non, il n'y a pas d'apparence. Je parlerai pour toi.

LÉPINE.

Madame, enseignez à monsieur le Marquis le mérite de mon procédé. Ce
notaire me consternoit. Dans l'excès de mon zèle, je l'ai fait malade, je
l'ai fait mort; je l'aurois enterré, sandis![114] le tout par affection,
et néanmoins on me gronde, (_S'approchant de la Comtesse d'un air
mystérieux._) Je sais, au demeurant, que monsieur le Marquis vous aime:
Lisette le sait; nous l'avions même priée de vous en toucher deux mots
pour exciter votre compassion, mais elle a craint la diminution de ses
petits profits.

LA COMTESSE.

Je n'entends[115] pas ce que cela veut dire.

LÉPINE.

Le voici au net: elle prétend que votre état de veuve lui rapporte
davantage que ne feroit votre état de femme en puissance d'époux;[116] que
vous lui êtes plus profitable, autrement dit, plus lucrative.

LA COMTESSE.

Plus lucrative! C'étoit donc là le motif de ses refus? Lisette est une
jolie petite personne!

LÉPINE.

Cette prudence ne vous rit[117] pas, elle vous répugne; votre belle âme de
comtesse s'en scandalise, mais tout le monde n'est pas comtesse: c'est une
pensée de soubrette que je rapporte. Il faut excuser la servitude.[118] Se
fâche-t-on qu'une fourmi rampe? La médiocrité de l'état fait que les
pensées sont médiocres.[119] Lisette n'a point de bien, et c'est avec de
petits sentiments qu'on en amasse.

LA COMTESSE.

L'impertinente! la voici. Va, laisse-nous; je te raccommoderai avec ton
maître. Dis-lui que je le prie de me venir parler.


SCÈNE XXII.

LISETTE, LA COMTESSE, LÉPINE.

LÉPINE, _à Lisette_.

Mademoiselle, vous allez trouver le temps orageux; mais ce n'est qu'une
gentillesse de ma façon pour obtenir votre coeur.

(_Il s'en va_.)


SCÈNE XXIII.

LISETTE, LA COMTESSE.

LISETTE, _s'approchant de la Comtesse_.

Que veut-il dire?

LA COMTESSE.

Ah! c'est donc vous?

LISETTE.

Oui, Madame, et la poste n'etoit point partie. Eh bien! que vous a dit le
Marquis?

LA COMTESSE.

Vous méritez bien que je l'épouse.

LISETTE.

Je ne sais pas en quoi je le mérite; mois ce qui est de certain,[120]
c'est que, toute réflexion faite, je venois pour vous le conseiller. (_A
part_.) Il faut céder au torrent.

LA COMTESSE.

Vous me surprenez. Et vos profits, que deviendront-ils?

LISETTE.

Qu'est-ce que c'est que mes profits?

LA COMTESSE.

Oui, vous ne gagneriez plus tant avec moi si j'avois un mari, avez-vous
dit à Lépine. Penseroit-on que je serai peut-être obligée de me remarier
pour échapper à la fourberie et aux services intéressés de mes
domestiques?

LISETTE.

Ah! le coquin! il m'a donc tenu parole! Vous ne savez pas qu'il m'aime,
Madame; que par là il a intérêt que vous épousiez son maître, et, comme
j'ai refusé de vous parler en faveur du Marquis, Lépine a cru que je le
desservois auprès de vous; il m'a dit que je m'en repentirois, et voilà
comme il s'y prend. Mais, en bonne foi, me reconnoissez-vous au discours
qu'il me fait tenir? Y a-t-il même du bon sens? M'en aimerez-vous moins
quand vous serez mariée? en serez-vous moins bonne, moins généreuse?

LA COMTESSE.

Je ne pense pas.

LISETTE.

Surtout avec le Marquis, qui, de son côté, est le meilleur homme du monde.
Ainsi, qu'est-ce que j'y perdrois? Au contraire, si j'aime tant mes
profits, avec vos bienfaits je pourrai encore espérer les siens.

LA COMTESSE.

Sans difficulté.[121]

LISETTE.

Et enfin je pense si différemment que je venois actuellement, comme je
vous l'ai dit, tâcher de vous porter au mariage en question, parce que je
le juge nécessaire.

LA COMTESSE.

Voilà qui est bien: je vous crois. Je ne savois pas que Lépine vous
aimait, et cela change tout: c'est un article[122] qui vous justifie.

LISETTE.

Oui, mais on vous prévient bien aisément contre moi. Madame; vous ne
rendez guère justice à mon attachement pour vous.

LA COMTESSE.

Tu te trompes: je sais ce que tu vaux, et je n'étois pas si persuadée que
tu te l'imagines. N'en parlons plus. Qu'est-ce que tu me voulois dire?

LISETTE.

Que je songeois que le Marquis est un homme estimable.

LA COMTESSE.

Sans contredit. Je n'ai jamais pensé autrement.

LISETTE.

Un homme en qui vous aurez l'agrément d'avoir un ami sûr sans avoir de
maître.

LA COMTESSE.

Cela est encore vrai: ce n'est pas là ce que je dispute.[123]

LISETTE.

Vos affaires vous fatiguent.

LA COMTESSE.

Plus que je ne puis dire. Je les entends[124] mal, et je suis une
paresseuse.

LISETTE.

Vous en avez des instants de mauvaise humeur qui nuisent à votre santé.

LA COMTESSE.

Je n'ai connu mes migraines[125] que depuis mon veuvage.

LISETTE.

Procureurs,[126] avocats,[127] fermiers, le Marquis vous délivreroit de
tous ces gens-là.

LA COMTESSE.

Je t'avoue que tu as réfléchi là-dessus plus mûrement que moi. Jusqu'ici
je n'ai point de raisons qui combattent les tiennes.

LISETTE.

Savez-vous bien que c'est peut-être le seul homme qui vous convienne?

LA COMTESSE.

Il faut donc que j'y rêve.

LISETTE.

Vous ne vous sentez point de l'éloignement pour lui?

LA COMTESSE.

Non, aucun. Je ne dis pas que je l'aime de ce qu'on appelle passion; mais
je n'ai rien dans le coeur qui lui soit contraire.

LISETTE.

Eh! n'est-ce pas assez, vraiment? De la passion! Si, pour vous marier,
vous attendez qu'il vous en vienne, vous resterez toujours veuve; et, à
proprement parler, ce n'est pas lui que je vous propose d'épouser, c'est
son caractère.

LA COMTESSE.

Qui est admirable, j'en conviens.

LISETTE.

Et puis, voyez le service que vous lui rendrez, chemin faisant, en rompant
le triste mariage qu'il va conclure plus par désespoir que par intérêt.

LA COMTESSE.

Oui, c'est une bonne action que je ferai, et il est louable d'en faire
autant qu'on peut.

LISETTE.

Surtout quand il n'en coûte rien au coeur.

LA COMTESSE.

D'accord. On peut dire assurément que tu plaides bien pour lui. Tu me
disposes on ne peut pas mieux; mais il n'aura pas l'esprit d'en profiter,
mon enfant.

LISETTE.

D'où vient[120] donc? Ne vous a-t-il pas parlé de son amour?

LA COMTESSE.

Oui, il m'a dit qu'il m'aimoit, et mon premier mouvement a été d'en
paraître étonnée: c'étoit bien le moins.[129] Sais-tu ce qui est arrivé?
Qu'il a pris mon étonnement pour de la colère. Il a commencé par établir
que je ne pouvois pas le souffrir. En un mot, je le déteste, je suis
furieuse contre son amour: voilà d'où il part; moyennant quoi je ne
saurais le désabuser sans lui dire: «Monsieur, vous ne savez ce que vous
dites;» et ce seroit me jeter à sa tête. Aussi n'en ferai-je rien.

LISETTE.

Oh! c'est une autre affaire: vous avez raison; ce n'est point ce que je
vous conseille non plus, et il n'y a qu'à le laisser là.

LA COMTESSE.

Bon! Tu veux que je l'épouse, tu veux que je le laisse là; tu te promènes
d'une extrémité à l'autre. Eh! peut-être n'a-t-il pas tant de tort,[130]
et que c'est ma faute. Je lui réponds quelquefois avec aigreur.

LISETTE.

J'y pensois: c'est ce que j'allois vous dire. Voulez-vous que j'en parle à
Lépine, et que je lui insinue de l'encourager?

LA COMTESSE.

Non, je te le défends, Lisette, à moins que je n'y sois pour rien.[131]

LISETTE.

Apparemment, ce n'est pas vous qui vous en avisez: c'est moi.

LA COMTESSE.

En ce cas, je n'y prends point de part. Si je l'épouse, c'est à toi à qui
il en aura obligation[132] et je prétends qu'il le sache, afin qu'il t'en
récompense.

LISETTE.

Comme il vous plaira, Madame.

LA COMTESSE.

A propos, cette robe brune qui me déplaît, l'as-tu prise? J'ai oublié de
te dire que je te la donne.

LISETTE.

Voyez comme votre mariage diminuera mes profits! Je vous quitte pour
chercher Lépine; mais ce n'est pas la peine; voilà le Marquis, et je vous
laisse.


SCÊNE XXIV.

LE MARQUIS, LA COMTESSE.

LE MARQUIS.

Voici cette lettre que je viens de faire pour le notaire; mais je ne sais
pas si elle partira: je ne suis pas d'accord avec moi-même. On dit que
vous souhaitez me parler, Comtesse.

LA COMTESSE.

Oui, c'est en faveur de Lépine. Il n'a voulu que vous rendre service; il
craint que vous ne le congédiiez,[133] et vous m'obligerez de le garder:
c'est une grâce que vous ne me refuserez pas, puisque vous dites que vous
m'aimez.

LE MARQUIS.

Vraiment oui, je vous aime, et ne vous aimerai encore que trop longtemps.

LA COMTESSE.

Je ne vous en empêche pas.

LE MARQUIS.

Parbleu! je vous en défierois, puisque je ne saurois m'en empêcher moi-
même.

LA COMTESSE, _riant_.

Ha! ha! ha! Ce ton brusque me fait rire.

LE MARQUIS.

Oh! oui, la chose est fort plaisante![134]

LA COMTESSE.

Plus que vous ne pensez.

LE MARQUIS.

Ma foi, je pense que je voudrois ne vous avoir jamais vue.

LA COMTESSE.

Votre inclination s'explique avec des grâces infinies.

LE MARQUIS.

Bon! des grâces! A quoi me serviroient-elles? N'a-t-il pas plu à votre
coeur de me trouver haïssable?

LA COMTESSE.

Que vous êtes impatientant avec votre haine! Eh! quelles preuves avez-vous
de la mienne? Vous n'en avez que de ma patience à écouter la bizarrerie
des discours que vous me tenez toujours. Vous ai-je jamais dit un mot de
ce que vous m'avez fait dire, ni que vous me fâchiez, ni que je vous hais,
ni que je vous raille? Toutes visions que vous prenez, je ne sais comment,
dans votre tête, et que vous vous figurez venir de moi; visions que vous
grossissez, que vous multipliez à chaque fois que vous me répondez ou que
vous croyez me répondre: car vous êtes d'une maladresse! Ce n'est non plus
à moi à qui vous répondez qu'à qui ne vous parla jamais;[135] et cependant
monsieur se plaint.

LE MARQUIS.

C'est que monsieur est un extravagant.

LA COMTESSE.

C'est, du moins, le plus insupportable homme que je connoisse. Oui, vous
pouvez être persuadé qu'il n'y a rien de si original que vos conversations
avec moi, de si incroyable.

LE MARQUIS.

Comme votre aversion m'accommode![136]

LA COMTESSE.

Vous allez voir. Tenez, vous dites que vous m'aimez, n'est-ce pas? et je
vous crois. Mais voyons: que souhaiteriez-vous que je vous répondisse?

LE MARQUIS.

Ce que je souhaiterois? Voilà qui est bien difficile[137] à deviner!
Parbleu! vous le savez de reste.[138]

LA COMTESSE.

Eh bien! ne l'ai-je pas dit? Est-ce là me répondre? Allez, Monsieur, je ne
vous aimerai jamais, non, jamais.

LE MARQUIS.

Tant pis, Madame tant pis. Je vous prie de trouver bon que j'en sois
fâché.

LA COMTESSE.

Apprenez donc, lorsqu'on dit aux gens qu'on les aime, qu'il faut du moins
leur demander ce qu'ils en pensent.

LE MARQUIS.

Quelle chicane vous me faites!

LA COMTESSE.

Je n'y saurais tenir. Adieu.

LE MARQUIS.

Eh bien! Madame, je vous aime. Qu'en pensez-vous? Et, encore une fois,
qu'en pensez-vous?

LA COMTESSE.

Ah! ce que je pense?[139] Que je le veux bien, Monsieur; et, encore une
fois, que je le veux bien: car, si je ne m'y prenois pas de cette façon,
nous ne finirions jamais.

LE MARQUIS.

Ah! vous le voulez bien? Ah! je respire! Comtesse, donnez-moi votre main,
que je la baise.


SCÈNE DERNIERE.

LA COMTESSE, LE MARQUIS, HORTENSE, LE CHEVALIER, LISETTE, LÉPINE.

HORTENSE.

Votre billet est-il prêt, Marquis? Mais vous baisez la main de la
Comtesse, ce me semble?

LE MARQUIS.

Oui, c'est pour la remercier du peu de regret que j'ai aux[140] deux cent
mille francs que je vous donne.

HORTENSE.

Et moi, sans compliment, je vous remercie de vouloir bien les perdre.

LE CHEVALIER.

Nous voilà donc contents. Que je vous embrasse, Marquis! (_A la
Comtesse._) Comtesse, voilà le dénouement que nous attendions.

LA COMTESSE, _en s'en allant_.

Eh bien! vous n'attendrez plus.

LISETTE, _à Lépine_.

Maraud, je crois, en effet, qu'il faudra que je t'épouse.

LÉPINE.

Je l'avois entrepris.


       *       *       *       *       *


LES FAUSSES CONFIDENCES

COMÉDIE EN TROIS ACTES

_Représentée pour la première fois par les Comédiens Italiens
ordinaires du Roi, le 16 mars 1737._

ACTEURS.

ARAMINTE,[1] fille de Madame Argante.
DORANTE, neveu de Monsieur Remy.
Monsieur REMY,[2] procureur.[3]
Madame ARGANTE.[4]
ARLEQUIN,[5] valet d'Araminte.
DUBOIS,[6] ancien valet de Dorante.
MARTON, suivante d'Araminte.
LE COMTE.
Un DOMESTIQUE parlant
Un GARÇON joaillier.[7]

_La scène est chez Madame Argante_.


ACTE I

SCÈNE PREMIÈRE.

DORANTE, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN, _introduisant Dorante_.

Ayez la bonté, Monsieur, de vous asseoir un moment dans cette salle;
Mademoiselle Marton est chez Madame, et ne tardera pas à descendre.

DORANTE.

Je vous suis obligé.

ARLEQUIN.

Si vous voulez, je vous tiendrai compagnie, de peur que l'ennui ne vous
prenne; nous discourrons en attendant.

DORANTE.

Je vous remercie; ce n'est pas la peine, ne vous détournez[8] point.

ARLEQUIN.

Voyez, Monsieur, n'en faites pas de façon:[9] nous avons ordre de Madame
d'être honnête,[10] et vous êtes témoin que je le suis.

DORANTE.

Non, vous dis-je; je serai bien aise d'être un moment seul.

ARLEQUIN.

Excusez, Monsieur, et restez à votre fantaisie.


SCÈNE II.

DORANTE, DUBOIS, _entrant avec un air de mystère_.

DORANTE.

Ah! te voilà?

DUBOIS.

Oui, je vous guettois.

DORANTE.

J'ai cru que je ne pourrais me débarrasser d'un domestique qui m'a
introduit ici, et qui vouloit absolument me désennuyer en restant. Dis-
moi, monsieur Remy n'est donc pas encore venu?

DUBOIS.

Non; mais voici l'heure à peu près qu'il[11] vous a dit qu'il arriveroit.
(_Il cherche et regarde_.) N'y a-t-il là personne qui nous voie ensemble?
Il est essentiel que les domestiques ici ne sachent pas que je vous
connoisse.

DORANTE.

Je ne vois personne.

DUBOIS.

Vous n'avez rien dit de notre projet à monsieur Remy, votre parent?

DORANTE.

Pas le moindre mot. Il me présente de la meilleure foi du monde, en
qualité d'intendant, à cette dame-ci, dont je lui ai parlé, et dont il se
trouve le procureur[12]; il ne sait point du tout que c'est toi qui m'as
adressé à lui. Il la prévint hier; il m'a dit que je me rendisse ce matin
ici, qu'il me présenteroit à elle, qu'il y seroit avant moi, ou que, s'il
n'y étoit pas encore, je demandasse une mademoiselle Marton. Voilà tout,
et je n'aurois garde de lui confier notre projet, non plus qu'à personne:
il me paroît extravagant à moi qui m'y prête. Je n'en suis pourtant pas
moins sensible à ta bonne volonté. Dubois, tu m'as servi, je n'ai pu te
garder, je n'ai pu même te bien récompenser de ton zèle; malgré cela, il
t'est venu dans l'esprit de faire ma fortune: en vérité, il n'est point de
reconnoissance que je ne te doive.

DUBOIS.

Laissons cela, Monsieur; tenez, en un mot, je suis content de vous, vous
m'avez toujours plu; vous êtes un excellent homme, un homme que j'aime;
et, si j'avois bien de l'argent, il seroit encore à votre service.

DORANTE.

Quand pourrai-je reconnoître tes sentiments pour moi? Ma fortune seroit la
tienne. Mais je n'attends rien de notre entreprise, que la honte d'être
renvoyé demain.

DUBOIS.

Eh bien! vous vous en retournerez.

DORANTE.

Cette femme-ci a un rang dans le monde; elle est liée avec tout ce qu'il y
a de mieux: veuve d'un mari qui avoit une grande charge dans les
finances[13]; et tu crois qu'elle fera quelque attention à moi, que je
l'épouserai, moi qui ne suis rien, moi qui n'ai point de bien?

DUBOIS.

Point de bien! Votre bonne mine est un Pérou.[14] Tournez-vous un peu, que
je vous considère encore. Allons, Monsieur, vous vous moquez, il n'y a
point de plus grand seigneur que vous à Paris, Voilà une taille qui vaut
toutes les dignités possibles, et notre affaire est infaillible: il me
semble que je vous vois déjà en déshabillé dans l'appartement de Madame.

DORANTE.

Quelle chimère!

DUBOIS.

Oui, je le soutiens; vous êtes actuellement dans votre salle, et vos
équipages sont sous la remise.

DORANTE.

Elle a plus de cinquante mille livres de rente, Dubois.

DUBOIS.

Ah! vous en avez bien soixante pour le moins.

DORANTE.

Et tu me dis qu'elle est extrêmement raisonnable.

DUBOIS.

Tant mieux pour vous, et tant pis pour elle. Si vous lui plaisez, elle en
sera si honteuse, elle se débattra tant, elle deviendra si foible, qu'elle
ne pourra se soutenir qu'en épousant; vous m'en direz des nouvelles.[15]
Vous l'avez vue, et vous l'aimez.

DORANTE.

Je l'aime avec passion, et c'est ce qui fait que je tremble.

DUBOIS.

Oh! vous m'impatientez avec vos terreurs: eh! que diantre![16] un peu de
confiance; vous réussirez, vous dis-je. Je m'en charge, je le veux, je
l'ai mis là[17]; nous sommes convenus de toutes nos actions, toutes nos
mesures sont prises; je connois l'humeur de ma maîtresse, je sais votre
mérite, je sais mes talents, je vous conduis, et on vous aimera, toute
raisonnable qu'on est; on vous épousera, toute fière qu'on est, et on vous
enrichira, tout ruiné que vous êtes, entendez-vous? Fierté, raison et
richesse, il faudra que tout se rende. Quand l'amour parle, il est le
maître, et il parlera. Adieu; je vous quitte. J'entends quelqu'un: c'est
peut-être monsieur Remy. Nous voilà embarqués, poursuivons. (_Il fait
quelques pas, et revient_.) A propos, tâchez que Marton prenne un peu de
goût pour vous. L'amour et moi nous ferons le reste.


SCÈNE III.

M. REMY, DORANTE.

M. REMY.

Bonjour, mon neveu; je suis bien aise de vous voir exact. Mademoiselle
Marton va venir; on est allé l'avertir. La connoissez-vous?

DORANTE.

Non, Monsieur; pourquoi me le demandez-vous?

M. REMY.

C'est qu'en venant ici j'ai rêvé à une chose... Elle est jolie, au moins.

DORANTE.

Je le crois.

M. REMY.

Et de fort bonne famille. C'est moi qui ai succédé à son père; il étoit
fort ami du vôtre: homme un peu dérangé[18]; sa fille est restée sans
bien; la dame d'ici a voulu l'avoir; elle l'aime, la traite bien moins en
suivante qu'en amie, lui a fait beaucoup de bien, lui en fera encore, et a
offert même de la marier. Marton a d'ailleurs une vieille parente
asthmatique dont elle hérite, et qui est à son aise. Vous allez être tous
deux dans la même maison; je suis d'avis que vous l'épousiez; qu'en dites-
vous?

DORANTE, _sourit à part_.

Eh!... mais je ne pensois pas à elle.

M. REMY.

Eh bien! je vous avertis d'y penser; tâchez de lui plaire. Vous n'avez
rien, mon neveu, je dis rien qu'un peu d'espérance; vous êtes mon
héritier, mais je me porte bien, et je ferai durer cela le plus longtemps
que je pourrai, sans compter que je puis me marier. Je n'en ai point
d'envie; mais cette envie-là vient tout d'un coup; il y a tant de minois
qui vous la donnent! Avec une femme on a des enfants, c'est la coutume;
auquel cas, serviteur au collatéral.[19] Ainsi, mon neveu, prenez toujours
vos petites précautions, et vous mettez[20] en état de vous passer de mon
bien, que je vous destine aujourd'hui, et que je vous ôterai demain peut-
être.

DORANTE.

Vous avez raison, Monsieur, et c'est aussi à quoi je vais travailler.

M. REMY.

Je vous y exhorte. Voici mademoiselle Marton: éloignez-vous de deux pas,
pour me donner le temps de lui demander comment elle vous trouve.
(_Dorante s'écarte un peu._)


SCÈNE IV.

M. REMY, MARTON, DORANTE.

MARTON.

Je suis fâchée, Monsieur, de vous avoir fait attendre; mais j'avois
affaire chez Madame.

M. REMY.

Il n'y a pas grand mal, Mademoiselle, j'arrive. Que pensez-vous de ce
grand garçon-là? (_Montrant Dorante_.)

MARTON, _riant_.

Eh! par quelle raison, monsieur Remy, faut-il que je vous le dise?

M. REMY.

C'est qu'il est mon neveu.

MARTON.

Eh bien! ce neveu-là est bon à montrer; il ne dépare point la famille.

M. REMY.

Tout de bon? C'est de lui dont[21] j'ai parlé à Madame pour intendant, et
je suis charmé qu'il vous revienne.[22] Il vous a déjà vue plus d'une fois
chez moi quand vous y êtes venue; vous en souvenez-vous?

MARTON.

Non, je n'en ai point d'idée.

M. REMY.

On ne prend pas garde à tout. Savez-vous ce qu'il me dit la première fois
qu'il vous vit? «Quelle est cette jolie fille-là?» (_Marton sourit_.)
Approchez, mon neveu. Mademoiselle, votre père et le sien s'aimoient
beaucoup; pourquoi les enfants ne s'aimeroient-ils pas? En voilà un qui ne
demande pas mieux; c'est un coeur qui se présente bien.

DORANTE, _embarrassé_.

II n'y a rien là de difficile à croire.

M. REMY.

Voyez comme il vous regarde. Vous ne feriez pas là une si mauvaise
emplette.

MARTON.

J'en suis persuadée; Monsieur prévient en sa faveur,[23] et il faudra
voir.

M. REMY.

Bon, bon! il faudra! Je ne m'en irai point que cela ne soit vu.

MARTON, _riant_.

Je craindrois d'aller trop vite.

DORANTE.

Vous importunez Mademoiselle, Monsieur.

MARTON, _riant_.

Je n'ai pourtant pas l'air si indocile.

M. REMY, _joyeux_.

Ah! je suis content, vous voilà d'accord. Oh! ça, mes enfants (_il leur
prend les mains à tous deux_), je vous fiance en attendant mieux. Je ne
saurois rester; je reviendrai tantôt. Je vous laisse le soin de présenter
votre futur à Madame. Adieu, ma nièce.

(_Il sort_.)

MARTON, _riant_.

Adieu donc, mon oncle.


SCÈNE V.

MARTON, DORANTE.

MARTON.

En vérité, tout ceci a l'air d'un songe. Comme monsieur Remy expédie!
Votre amour me paroît bien prompt: sera-t-il aussi durable?

DORANTE.

Autant l'un que l'autre, Mademoiselle.

MARTON.

Il s'est trop hâté de partir. J'entends Madame qui vient, et comme,
grâces[24] aux arrangements de monsieur Remy, vos intérêts sont presque
les miens, ayez la bonté d'aller un moment sur la terrasse, afin que je la
prévienne.

DORANTE.

Volontiers, Mademoiselle.

MARTON, _en le voyant sortir_.

J'admire ce penchant dont on se prend tout d'un coup l'un pour l'autre.


SCÈNE VI.

ARAMINTE, MARTON.

ARAMINTE.

Marton, quel est donc cet homme qui vient de me saluer si gracieusement,
et qui passe sur la terrasse? Est-ce à vous à qui il en veut?[25]

MARTON.

Non, Madame, c'est à vous-même.

ARAMINTE, _d'un air assez vif_.

Eh bien! qu'on le fasse venir; pourquoi s'en va-t-il?

MARTON.

C'est qu'il a souhaité que je vous parlasse auparavant. C'est le neveu de
monsieur Remy, celui qu'il vous a proposé pour homme d'affaires.

ARAMINTE.

Ah! c'est là lui! Il a vraiment très bonne façon.

MARTON.

Il est généralement estimé, je le sais.

ARAMINTE.

Je n'ai pas de peine à le croire: il a tout l'air de le mériter. Mais,
Marton, il a si bonne mine, pour un intendant, que je me fais quelque
scrupule de le prendre: n'en dira-t-on rien?

MARTON.

Et que voulez-vous qu'on dise? Est-on obligé de n'avoir que des intendants
mal faits?

ARAMINTE.

Tu as raison. Dis-lui qu'il revienne. Il n'étoit pas nécessaire de me
préparer à le recevoir: dès que c'est monsieur Remy qui me le donne, c'en
est assez; je le prends.

MARTON, _comme s'en allant_.[26]

Vous ne sauriez mieux choisir. (_Et puis revenant_.) Êtes-vous convenue du
parti [26] que vous lui faites? Monsieur Remy m'a chargé de vous en
parler.

ARAMINTE.

Cela est inutile. Il n'y aura point de dispute là-dessus. Dès que c'est un
honnête homme, il aura lieu d'être content. Appelez-le.

MARTON, _hésitant de partir_.

On lui laissera ce petit appartement qui donne sur le jardin, n'est-ce
pas?

ARAMINTE.

Oui; comme il voudra. Qu'il vienne.

(_Marton va dans la coulisse_.)


SCÈNE VII.

DORANTE, ARAMINTE, MARTON.

MARTON.

Monsieur Dorante, Madame vous attend.

ARAMINTE.

Venez, Monsieur; je suis obligée à monsieur Remy d'avoir songé à moi.
Puisqu'il me donne son neveu, je ne doute pas que ce ne soit un présent
qu'il me fasse. Un de mes amis me parla avant-hier d'un intendant qu'il
doit m'envoyer aujourd'hui; mais je m'en tiens à vous.

DORANTE.

J'espère, Madame, que mon zèle justifiera la préférence dont vous
m'honorez, et que je vous supplie de me conserver. Rien ne m'affligeroit
tant à présent que de la perdre.

MARTON.

Madame n'a pas deux paroles.

ARAMINTE.

Non, Monsieur; c'est une affaire terminée, je renverrai tout.[28] Vous
êtes au fait des affaires, apparemment; vous y avez travaillé?

DORANTE.

Oui, Madame; mon père étoit avocat, et je pourrois l'être moi-même.

ARAMINTE.

C'est-à-dire que vous êtes un homme de très bonne famille, et même au-
dessus du parti[29] que vous prenez?

DORANTE.

Je ne sens rien qui m'humilie dans le parti que je prends, Madame;
l'honneur de servir une dame comme vous n'est au-dessous de qui que ce
soit, et je n'envierai la condition de personne.

ARAMINTE.

Mes façons ne vous feront point changer de sentiment. Vous trouverez ici
tous les égards que vous méritez; et si, dans la suite, il y avoit
occasion de vous rendre service, je ne la manquerai point.

MARTON.

Voilà Madame, je la reconnois.

ARAMINTE.

Il est vrai que je suis toujours fâchée de voir d'honnêtes gens sans
fortune, tandis qu'une infinité de gens de rien et sans mérite en ont une
éclatante; c'est une chose qui me blesse, surtout dans les personnes de
son âge: car vous n'avez que trente ans tout au plus?

DORANTE.

Pas tout à fait encore, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Ce qu'il y a de consolant pour vous, c'est que vous avez le temps de
devenir heureux.

DORANTE.

Je commence à l'être aujourd'hui, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

On vous montrera l'appartement que je vous destine; s'il ne vous convient
pas, il y en a d'autres, et vous choisirez. Il faut aussi quelqu'un qui
vous serve, et c'est à quoi je vais pourvoir. Qui lui donnerons-nous,
Marton?

MARTON.

Il n'y a qu'à prendre Arlequin, Madame. Je le vois à l'entrée de la salle,
et je vais l'appeler. Arlequin, parlez à Madame.


SCÈNE VIII.

ARAMINTE, DORANTE, MARTON, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Me voilà, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Arlequin, vous êtes à présent à Monsieur; vous le servirez; je vous donne
à lui.

ARLEQUIN.

Comment, Madame, vous me donnez à lui? Est-ce que je ne serai plus à moi?
Ma personne ne m'appartiendra donc plus?

MARTON.

Quel benêt!

ARAMINTE.

J'entends qu'au lieu de me servir, ce sera lui que tu serviras.

ARLEQUIN, _comme pleurant_.

Je ne sais pas pourquoi Madame me donne mon congé: je n'ai pas mérité ce
traitement; je l'ai toujours servie à faire plaisir.

ARAMINTE.

Je ne te donne point ton congé, je te payerai pour être à Monsieur.

ARLEQUIN.

Je représente[30] à Madame que cela ne seroit pas juste: je ne donnerai
pas ma peine d'un côté, pendant que l'argent me viendra d'un autre. Il
faut que vous ayez mon service, puisque j'aurai vos gages; autrement je
friponnerois Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Je désespère de lui faire entendre raison.

MARTON.

Tu es bien sot! Quand je t'envoie quelque part, ou que je te dis: «Fais
telle ou telle chose,» n'obéis-tu pas?

ARLEQUIN.

Toujours.

MARTON.

Eh bien! ce sera Monsieur qui te le dira comme moi, et ce sera à la place
de Madame et par son ordre.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! c'est une autre affaire. C'est Madame qui donnera ordre à Monsieur de
souffrir mon service, que je lui prêterai par le commandement de Madame.

MARTON.

Voilà ce que c'est.

ARLEQUIN.

Vous voyez bien que cela méritoit explication.

UN DOMESTIQUE _vient_.

Voici votre marchande qui vous apporte des étoffes, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Je vais les voir, et je reviendrai. Monsieur, j'ai à vous parler d'une
affaire; ne vous éloignez pas.


SCENE IX.

DORANTE, MARTON, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN.

Oh! ça, Monsieur, nous sommes donc l'un à l'autre, et vous avez le pas sur
moi. Je serai le valet qui sert, et vous le valet qui serez servi par
ordre.

MARTON.

Ce faquin, avec ses comparaisons! Va-t'en.

ARLEQUIN.

Un moment, avec votre permission. Monsieur, ne payerez-vous rien? Vous a-
t-on donné ordre d'être servi gratis?

(_Dorante rit_.)

MARTON.

Allons, laisse-nous. Madame te payera; n'est-ce pas assez?

ARLEQUIN.

Pardi,[31] Monsieur, je ne vous coûterai donc guère? On ne sauroit avoir
un valet à meilleur marché.

DORANTE.

Arlequin a raison. Tiens, voilà d'avance ce que je te donne.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! voilà une action de maître. A votre aise le reste.[32]

DORANTE.

Va boire à ma santé.

ARLEQUIN, _s'en allant_.

Oh! s'il ne faut que boire afin qu'elle soit bonne, tant  que je vivrai je
vous la promets excellente. (_A part._) Le gracieux camarade qui m'est
venu là par hasard.


SCÈNE X.


DORANTE, MARTON, Mme. ARGANTE, _qui arrive un instant après_.

MARTON.

Vous avez, lieu d'être satisfait de l'accueil de Madame; elle paroît faire
cas de vous, et tant mieux, nous n'y perdons point. Mais voici madame
Argante; je vous avertis que c'est sa mère, et je devine à peu près ce qui
l'amène.

Mme. ARGANTE, _femme brusque et vaine_.

Eh bien, Marton, ma fille a un nouvel intendant que son procureur lui a
donné, m'a-t-elle dit: j'en suis fâchée; cela n'est point obligeant pour
monsieur le Comte, qui lui en avoit retenu un: du moins devoit-elle
attendre, et les voir tous deux. D'où vient préférer celui-ci?[33] Quelle
espèce d'homme est-ce?

MARTON.

C'est Monsieur, Madame.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Eh! c'est Monsieur! Je ne m'en serais pas doutée: il est bien jeune.

MARTON.

A trente ans, on est en âge d'être intendant de maison, Madame.

Mme. ARGANTE.

C'est selon. Êtes-vous arrêté,[34] Monsieur?

DORANTE.

Oui, Madame.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Et de chez qui sortez-vous?

DORANTE.

De chez moi, Madame; je n'ai encore été chez personne.

Mme. ARGANTE.

De chez vous! Vous allez donc faire ici votre apprentissage?

MARTON.

Point du tout. Monsieur entend les affaires; il est fils d'un père
extrêmement habile.

Mme. ARGANTE, _à Marton, à part_.

Je n'ai pas grande opinion de cet homme-là. Est-ce là la figure d'un
intendant? Il n'en a non plus l'air...

MARTON, _à part aussi_.

L'air n'y fait rien: je vous réponds de lui; c'est l'homme qu'il nous
faut.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Pourvu que Monsieur ne s'écarte pas des intentions que nous avons, il me
sera indifférent que ce soit lui ou un autre.

DORANTE.

Peut-on savoir ces intentions, Madame?

Mme. ARGANTE.

Connoissez-vous monsieur le Comte Dorimont? C'est un homme d'un beau nom;
ma fille et lui alloient avoir un procès ensemble, au sujet d'une terre
considérable; il ne s'agissoit pas moins que de savoir à qui elle
resteroit, et on a songé à les marier, pour empêcher qu'ils ne plaident.
Ma fille est veuve d'un homme qui étoit fort considéré dans le monde, et
qui l'a laissée fort riche; mais madame la Comtesse Dorimont auroit un
rang si élevé, iroit de pair avec des personnes d'une si grande
distinction, qu'il me tarde[35] de voir ce mariage conclu; et, je l'avoue,
je serois charmée moi-même d'être la mère de madame la Comtesse Dorimont,
et de plus que cela peut-être: car monsieur le Comte Dorimont est en
passe[36] d'aller à tout.[37]

DORANTE.

Les paroles sont-elles données de part et d'autre?

Mme. ARGANTE.

Pas tout à fait encore, mais à peu près: ma fille n'en est pas éloignée.
Elle souhaiteroit seulement, dit-elle, d'être bien instruite de l'état de
l'affaire, et savoir si elle n'a pas meilleur droit que monsieur le Comte,
afin que, si elle l'épouse, il lui en ait plus d'obligation. Mais j'ai
quelquefois peur que ce ne soit une défaite.[38] Ma fille n'a qu'un
défaut, c'est que je ne lui trouve pas assez d'élévation[39]; le beau nom
de Dorimont et le rang de comtesse ne la touchent pas assez; elle ne sent
pas le désagrément qu'il y a de n'être qu'une bourgeoise. Elle s'endort
dans cet état[40], malgré le bien qu'elle a.

DORANTE, _doucement_.

Peut-être n'en sera-t-elle pas plus heureuse si elle en sort.

Mme. ARGANTE, _vivement_.

Il ne s'agit pas de ce que vous en pensez; gardez votre petite réflexion
roturière,[41] et servez-nous, si vous voulez être de nos amis.

MARTON.

C'est un petit trait de morale qui ne gâte rien à notre affaire.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Morale subalterne qui me déplaît.

DORANTE.

De quoi est-il question, Madame?

Mme. ARGANTE.

De dire à ma fille, quand vous aurez vu ses papiers, que son droit est le
moins bon; que, si elle plaidoit. elle perdroit.

DORANTE.

Si effectivement son droit est le plus foible, je ne manquerai pas de l'en
avertir. Madame,

Mme. ARGANTE, _à part, à Marton_.

Hum! quel esprit borné! (_A Dorante._) Vous n'y êtes point; ce n'est pas
là ce qu'on vous dit; on vous charge de lui parler ainsi indépendamment de
son droit bien ou mal fondé.

DORANTE.

Mais, Madame, il n'y auroit point de probité à la tromper.

Mme. ARGANTE.

De probité! J'en manque donc, moi? Quel raisonnement! C'est moi qui suis
sa mère, et qui vous ordonne de la tromper à son avantage, entendez-vous?
c'est moi, moi.

DORANTE.

Il y aura toujours de la mauvaise foi de ma part.

Mme. ARGANTE, _à part, à Marton_.

C'est un ignorant que cela, qu'il faut renvoyer. Adieu, monsieur l'homme
d'affaires, qui n'avez fait celles de personne.

(_Elle sort._)


SCÈNE XI.

DORANTE, MARTON.

DORANTE.

Cette mère-là ne ressemble guère à sa fille.

MARTON.

Oui, il y a quelque différence, et je suis fâchée de n'avoir pas eu le
temps de vous prévenir sur son humeur brusque. Elle est extrêmement
entêtée de ce mariage, comme vous voyez. Au surplus, que vous importe ce
que vous direz à la fille, dès que la mère sera votre garant? Vous n'aurez
rien à vous reprocher, ce me semble; ce ne sera pas là une tromperie.

DORANTE.

Eh! vous m'excuserez; ce sera toujours l'engager à prendre un parti
qu'elle ne prendroit peut-être pas sans cela. Puisque l'on veut que j'aide
à l'y déterminer, elle y résiste donc?

MARTON.

C'est par indolence.

DORANTE.

Croyez-moi, disons la vérité.

MARTON.

Oh! ça, il y a une petite raison à laquelle vous devez vous rendre: c'est
que monsieur le Comte me fait présent de mille écus le jour de la
signature du contrat; et cet argent-là, suivant le projet de monsieur
Remy, vous regarde aussi bien que moi, comme vous voyez.

DORANTE.

Tenez, Mademoiselle Marton, vous êtes la plus aimable fille du monde; mais
ce n'est que faute de réflexion que ces mille écus vous tentent.

MARTON.

Au contraire, c'est par réflexion qu'ils me tentent; plus j'y rêve, et
plus je les trouve bons.

DORANTE.

Mais vous aimez votre maîtresse; et, si elle n'étoit pas heureuse avec cet
homme-là, ne vous reprocheriez-vous pas d'y avoir contribué pour une
misérable somme?

MARTON.

Ma foi, vous avez beau dire: d'ailleurs, le Comte est un honnête homme, et
je n'y entends point de finesse.[42] Voilà Madame qui revient; elle a à
vous parier. Je me retire. Méditez sur cette somme, vous la goûterez aussi
bien que moi.

DORANTE.

Je ne suis pas si fâché de la tromper.


SCÈNE XII.

ARAMINTE, DORANTE.

ARAMINTE.

Vous avez donc vu ma mère?

DORANTE.

Oui, Madame; il n'y a qu'un moment.

ARAMINTE.

Elle me l'a dit, et voudroit bien que j'en eusse pris un autre que vous.

DORANTE.

Il me l'a paru.[43]

ARAMINTE.

Oui, mais ne vous embarrassez point, vous me convenez.

DORANTE.

Je n'ai point d'autre ambition.

ARAMINTE.

Parlons de ce que j'ai à vous dire; mais que ceci soit secret entre nous,
je vous prie.

DORANTE.

Je me trahirois plutôt moi-même.

ARAMINTE.

Je n'hésite point non plus à vous donner ma confiance. Voici ce que c'est:
on veut me marier avec monsieur le Comte Dorimont, pour éviter un grand
procès que nous aurions ensemble au sujet d'une terre que je possède.

DORANTE.

Je le sais, Madame, et j'ai eu le malheur d'avoir déplu tout à l'heure là-
dessus à madame Argante.

ARAMINTE.

Eh! d'où vient?[44]

DORANTE.

C'est que, si, dans votre procès, vous avez le bon droit de votre côté, on
souhaite que je vous dise le contraire, afin de vous engager plus vite à
ce mariage: et j'ai prié qu'on m'en dispensât.

ARAMINTE.

Que ma mère est frivole! Votre fidélité ne me surprend point; j'y
comptois. Faites toujours de même, et ne vous choquez point de ce que ma
mère vous a dit; je la désapprouve. A-t-elle tenu quelque discours
désagréable?

DORANTE.

Il n'importe, Madame; mon zèle et mon attachement en augmentent, voilà
tout.

ARAMINTE.

Et voilà aussi pourquoi je ne veux pas qu'on vous chagrine, et que j'y
mettrai bon ordre.[45] Qu'est-ce que cela signifie? Je me fâcherai, si
cela continue. Comment donc? vous ne seriez pas en repos! On aura de
mauvais procédés avec vous, parce que vous en avez d'estimables: cela
seroit plaisant![46]

DORANTE.

Madame, par toute la reconnoissance que je vous dois, n'y prenez point
garde: je suis confus de vos bontés, et je suis trop heureux d'avoir été
querellé.

ARAMINTE.

Je loue vos sentiments. Revenons à ce procès dont il est question: si je
n'épouse point monsieur le Comte...


SCÈNE XIII.

DORANTE, ARAMINTE, DUBOIS.

DUBOIS.

Madame la Marquise se porte mieux, Madame (_il feint de voir Dorante avec
surprise_), et vous est fort obligée... fort obligée de votre attention.
(_Dorante feint de détourner la tête pour se cacher de Dubois._)

ARAMINTE.

Voilà qui est bien.

DUBOIS, _regardant toujours Dorante_.

Madame, on m'a chargé aussi de vous dire un mot qui presse.

ARAMINTE.

De quoi s'agit-il?

DUBOIS.

Il m'est recommandé de ne vous parler qu'en particulier.

ARAMINTE, _à Dorante_.

Je n'ai point achevé ce que je voulois vous dire; laissez-moi, je vous
prie, un moment, et revenez.


SCÈNE XIV.

ARAMINTE, DUBOIS.

ARAMINTE.

Qu'est-ce que c'est donc que cet air étonné que tu as marqué, ce me
semble, en voyant Dorante? D'où vient cette attention à le regarder?

DUBOIS.

Ce n'est rien, sinon que je ne saurois plus avoir l'honneur de servir
Madame, et qu'il faut que je lui demande mon congé.

ARAMINTE, _surprise_.

Quoi! seulement pour avoir vu Dorante ici?

DUBOIS.

Savez-vous à qui vous avez à faire?

ARAMINTE.

Au neveu de monsieur Remy, mon procureur.

DUBOIS.

Eh! par quel tour d'adresse est-il connu de Madame? Comment a-t-il fait
pour arriver jusqu'ici?

ARAMINTE.

C'est monsieur Remy qui me l'a envoyé pour intendant.

DUBOIS.

Lui votre intendant! Et c'est monsieur Remy qui vous l'envoie! Hélas! le
bonhomme, il ne sait pas qui il vous donne: c'est un démon que ce garçon-
là.

ARAMINTE.

Mais que signifient tes exclamations? Explique-toi: est-ce
que tu le connois?

DUBOIS.

Si je le connois, Madame! si je le connois! Ah! vraiment oui; et il me
connoît bien aussi. N'avez-vous pas vu comme il se détournoit, de peur que
je ne le visse?

ARAMINTE.

Il est vrai, et tu me surprends à mon tour. Seroit-il capable de quelque
mauvaise action, que tu saches? Est-ce que ce n'est pas un honnête homme?

DUBOIS.

Lui? il n'y a point de plus brave homme dans toute la terre; il a, peut-
être, plus d'honneur à lui tout seul que cinquante honnêtes gens ensemble.
Oh! c'est une probité merveilleuse; il n'a peut-être pas son pareil.

ARAMINTE.

Eh! de quoi peut-il donc être question? D'où vient que tu m'alarmes? En
vérité, j'en suis toute émue.

DUBOIS.

Son défaut, c'est là. (_Il se touche le front._) C'est à la tête que le
mal le tient.

ARAMINTE.

A la tête?

DUBOIS.

Oui, il est timbré; mais timbré comme cent.[47]

ARAMINTE.

Dorante! Il m'a paru de très bon sens. Quelle preuve as-tu de sa folie?

DUBOIS.

Quelle preuve? Il y a six mois qu'il est tombé fou; il y a six mois qu'il
extravague d'amour, qu'il en a la cervelle brûlée,[48] qu'il en est comme
un perdu[49]; je dois bien le savoir, car j'étois à lui, je le servois, et
c'est ce qui m'a obligé de le quitter, et c'est ce qui me force de m'en
aller encore. Otez cela, c'est un homme incomparable.

ARAMINTE, _un peu boudant_.[50]

Oh bien! il sera, ce qu'il voudra, mais je ne le garderai pas: on a bien
affaire[51] d'un esprit renversé[52]! et peut-être encore, je gage, pour
quelque objet qui n'en vaut pas la peine: car les hommes ont des
fantaisies...

DUBOIS.

Ah! vous m'excuserez: pour ce qui est de l'objet, il n'y a rien à dire.
Malepeste![53] sa folie est de bon goût.

ARAMINTE.

N'importe, je veux le congédier. Est-ce que tu la connois, cette personne?

DUBOIS.

J'ai l'honneur de la voir tous les jours: c'est vous, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Moi, dis-tu!

DUBOIS.

Il vous adore; il y a six mois qu'il n'en vit point, qu'il donnerait sa
vie pour avoir le plaisir de vous contempler un instant. Vous avez dû voir
qu'il a l'air enchanté quand il vous parle.

ARAMINTE.

Il y a bien en effet quelque petite chose qui m'a paru extraordinaire. Eh!
juste Ciel! le pauvre garçon, de quoi s'avise-t-il?

DUBOIS.

Vous ne croiriez pas jusqu'où va sa démence; elle le ruine, elle lui coupe
la gorge. Il est bien fait, d'une figure passable, bien élevé et de bonne
famille; mais il n'est pas riche, et vous saurez qu'il n'a tenu qu'à lui
d'épouser des femmes qui l'étoient, et de fort aimables, ma foi, qui
offroient de lui faire sa fortune, et qui auroient mérité qu'on la leur
fît à elles-mêmes. Il y en a une qui n'en sauroit revenir, et qui le
poursuit encore tous les jours; je le sais, car je l'ai rencontrée.

ARAMINTE, _avec négligence_.

Actuellement?

DUBOIS.

Oui, Madame, actuellement: une grande brune très piquante, et qu'il fuit.
Il n'y a pas moyen, Monsieur refuse tout. «Je les tromperois, me disoit-
il: je ne puis les aimer, mon coeur est parti »; ce qu'il disoit
quelquefois la larme à l'oeil: car il sent bien son tort.

ARAMINTE.

Cela est fâcheux. Mais où m'a-t-il vue avant que de[54] venir chez moi,
Dubois?

DUBOIS.

Hélas! Madame, ce fut un jour que vous sortîtes de l'Opéra qu'il perdit la
raison: c'était un vendredi, je m'en ressouviens; oui, un vendredi: il
vous vit descendre l'escalier, à ce qu'il me raconta, et vous suivit
jusqu'à votre carrosse; il avoit demandé votre nom, et je le trouvai qui
étoit comme extasié; il ne remuoit plus.

ARAMINTE.

Quelle aventure!

DUBOIS.

J'eus beau lui crier: «Monsieur!» Point de nouvelles, il n'y avoit plus
personne au logis.[55] A la fin. pourtant, il revint à lui avec un air
égaré; je le jetai dans une voiture, et nous retournâmes à la maison.
J'espérois que cela se passeroit, car je l'aimois. C'est le meilleur
maître! Point du tout, il n'y avoit plus de ressource: ce bon sens, cet
esprit jovial, cette humeur charmante, vous aviez tout expédié, et dès le
lendemain nous ne fîmes plus tous deux, lui, que rêver à vous, que vous
aimer; moi, d'épier[56] depuis le matin jusqu'au soir ou vous alliez.

ARAMINTE.

Tu m'étonnes à un point!...

DUBOIS.

Je me fis même ami d'un de vos gens qui n'y est plus, un garçon fort
exact, et qui m'instruisoit, et à qui je payois bouteille.[57] «C'est à la
Comédie[58] qu'on va»; me disoit-il et je courois faire mon rapport, sur
lequel, dès quatre heures,[59] mon homme étoit à la porte. «C'est chez
madame celle-ci, c'est chez madame celle-là»; et, sur cet avis, nous
allions toute la soirée habiter la rue, ne vous déplaise, pour voir Madame
entrer et sortir, lui dans un fiacre, et moi derrière; tous deux morfondus
et gelés, car c'étoit dans l'hiver[60]; lui ne s'en souciant guère, moi
jurant par ci par là[61] pour me soulager.

ARAMINTE.

Est-il possible?

DUBOIS.

Oui, Madame. A la fin, ce train de vie m'ennuya; ma santé s'altéroit, la
sienne aussi. Je lui fis accroire que vous étiez à la campagne: il le
crut, et j'eus quelque repos; mais n'alla-t-il pas deux jours après vous
rencontrer aux Tuileries,[62] où il avoit été s'attrister de votre
absence? Au retour il étoit furieux, il voulut me battre, tout bon qu'il
est; moi, je ne le voulus point, et je le quittai. Mon bonheur ensuite m'a
mis chez Madame, où, à force de se démener, je le trouve parvenu à votre
intendance, ce[63] qu'il ne troqueroit pas contre la place d'un empereur.

ARAMINTE.

Y a-t-il rien de si particulier? Je suis si lasse d'avoir des gens qui me
trompent que je me réjouissois de l'avoir, parce qu'il a de la probité: ce
n'est pas que je sois fâchée, car je suis bien au-dessus de cela.

DUBOIS.

Il y aura de la bonté à le renvoyer. Plus il voit Madame, plus il
s'achève.

ARAMINTE.

Vraiment, je le renverrai bien; mais ce n'est pas là ce qui le guérira.
D'ailleurs, je ne sais que dire à monsieur Remy, qui me l'a recommandé, et
ceci m'embarrasse. Je ne vois pas trop comment m'en défaire honnêtement.

DUBOIS.

Oui; mais vous en ferez un incurable, Madame.

ARAMINTE, _vivement_.

Oh! tant pis pour lui. Je suis dans des circonstances où je ne saurois me
passer d'un intendant; et puis il n'y a pas tant de risque que tu le
crois: au contraire, s'il y avoit quelque chose qui pût ramener cet homme,
c'est l'habitude de me voir plus qu'il n'a fait; ce seroit même un service
à lui rendre.

DUBOIS.

Oui, c'est un remède bien innocent. Premièrement, il ne vous dira mot;
jamais vous n'entendrez parler de son amour.

ARAMINTE.

En es-tu bien sûr?

DUBOIS.

Oh! il ne faut pas en avoir peur: il mourroit plutôt. Il a un respect, une
adoration, une humilité pour vous, qui n'est pas concevable. Est-ce que
vous croyez qu'il songe à être aimé? Nullement, il dit que dans l'univers
il n'y a personne qui le mérite; il ne veut que vous voir, vous
considérer, regarder vos yeux, vos grâces, votre belle taille; et puis
c'est tout: il me l'a dit mille fois.

ARAMINTE, _haussant les épaules_,

Voilà qui est bien digne de compassion! Allons, je patienterai quelques
jours, en attendant que j'en aie un autre. Au surplus, ne crains rien, je
suis contente de toi; je récompenserai ton zèle, et je ne veux pas que tu
me quittes, entends-tu, Dubois?

DUBOIS.

Madame, je vous suis dévoué pour la vie.

ARAMINTE.

J'aurai soin de toi. Surtout qu'il ne sache pas que je suis instruite;
garde un profond secret, et que tout le monde, jusqu'à Marton, ignore ce
que tu m'as dit: ce sont de ces choses qui ne doivent jamais percer.[64]

DUBOIS.

Je n'en ai jamais parlé qu'à Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Le voici qui revient; va-t'en.


SCÈNE XV.

DORANTE, ARAMINTE.

ARAMINTE, _un moment seule_.

La vérité est que voici une confidence dont je me serois bien passée moi-
même.

DORANTE.

Madame, je me rends à vos ordres.

ARAMINTE.

Oui, Monsieur. De quoi vous parlois-je? Je l'ai oublié.

DORANTE.

D'un procès avec monsieur le Comte Dorimont.

ARAMINTE.

Je me remets;[65] je vous disois qu'on veut nous marier.

DORANTE.

Oui, Madame, et vous alliez, je crois, ajouter que vous n'étiez pas portée
à ce mariage.

ARAMINTE.

Il est vrai. J'avois envie de vous charger d'examiner l'affaire, afin de
savoir si je ne risquerois rien à plaider; mais je crois devoir vous
dispenser de ce travail: je ne suis pas sûre de pouvoir vous garder.

DORANTE.

Ah! Madame, vous avez eu la bonté de me rassurer là-dessus.

ARAMINTE.

Oui; mais je ne faisois pas reflexion que j'ai promis à monsieur le Comte
de prendre un intendant de sa main; vous voyez bien qu'il ne seroit pas
honnête de lui manquer de parole, et, du moins, faut-il que je parle à
celui qu'il m'amènera.

DORANTE.

Je ne suis pas heureux, rien ne me réussit, et j'aurai la douleur d'être
renvoyé.

ARAMINTE, _par foiblesse_.

Je ne dis pas cela; il n'y a rien de résolu là-dessus.

DORANTE.

Ne me laissez point dans l'incertitude où je suis, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Eh! mais oui, je tâcherai que vous restiez; je tâcherai.

DORANTE.

Vous m'ordonnez donc de vous rendre compte de l'affaire en question?

ARAMINTE.

Attendons: si j'allois épouser le Comte, vous auriez pris une peine
inutile.

DORANTE.

Je croyois avoir entendu dire à Madame qu'elle n'avoit point de penchant
pour lui.

ARAMINTE.

Pas encore.

DORANTE.

Et, d'ailleurs, votre situation est si tranquille et si douce!

ARAMINTE, _à part_.

Je n'ai pas le courage de l'affliger!... Eh bien, oui-da,[66] examinez
toujours, examinez. J'ai des papiers dans mon cabinet, je vais les
chercher. Vous viendrez les prendre, et je vous les donnerai. (_En s'en
allant_.) Je n'oserois presque le regarder!


SCÈNE XVI.

DORANTE, DUBOIS, _venant d'un air mystérieux et comme passant_.[67]

DUBOIS.

Marton vous cherche pour vous montrer l'appartement qu'on vous destine.
Arlequin est allé boire; j'ai dit que j'allois vous avertir. Comment vous
traite-t-on?

DORANTE.

Qu'elle est aimable! Je suis enchanté! De quelle façon a-t-elle reçu ce
que tu lui as dit?

DUBOIS, _comme en fuyant_.

Elle opine tout doucement à vous garder par compassion: elle espère vous
guérir par l'habitude de la voir.

DORANTE, _charmé_.

Sincèrement?

DUBOIS.

Elle n'en réchappera point; c'est autant de pris.[68] Je m'en retourne.

DORANTE.

Reste, au contraire; je crois que voici Marton. Dis-lui que Madame
m'attend pour me remettre des papiers, et que j'irai la trouver dès que je
les aurai.

DUBOIS.

Partez: aussi bien ai-je un petit avis à donner à Marton. Il est bon de
jeter dans tous les esprits les soupçons dont nous avons besoin.


SCÈNE XVII.

DUBOIS, MARTON.

MARTON.

Où est donc Dorante? Il me semble l'avoir vu avec toi?

DUBOIS, _brusquement_.

Il dit que Madame l'attend pour des papiers, il reviendra ensuite. Au
reste, qu'est-il[69] nécessaire qu'il voie cet appartement? S'il n'en
vouloit pas, il seroit bien délicat; pardi,[70] je lui conseillerais...

MARTON.

Ce ne sont pas là tes affaires; je suis les ordres de Madame.

DUBOIS.

Madame est bonne et sage; mais prenez garde: ne trouvez-vous pas que ce
petit galant-là fait les yeux doux?

MARTON.

Il les fait comme il les a.[71]

DUBOIS.

Je me trompe fort si je n'ai pas vu la mine de ce freluquet considérer, je
ne sais où, celle de Madame.

MARTON.

Eh bien! est-ce qu'on te fâche quand on la trouve belle?

DUBOIS.

Non. Mais je me figure quelquefois qu'il n'est venu ici que pour la voir
de plus près.

MARTON, _riant_.

Ah! ah! quelle idée! Va, tu n'y entends rien; tu t'y connois mal.

DUBOIS, _riant_.

Ah! ah! je suis donc bien sot.

MARTON, _riant en s'en allant_.

Ah! ah! l'original avec ses observations!

DUBOIS, _seul_.

Allez, allez, prenez toujours.[72] J'aurai soin de vous les faire trouver
meilleures. Allons faire jouer toutes nos batteries.


ACTE II


SCÈNE PREMIÈRE.

ARAMINTE, DORANTE.

DORANTE.

Non, Madame, vous ne risquez rien; vous pouvez plaider en toute sûreté.
J'ai même consulté plusieurs personnes, l'affaire est excellente; et, si
vous n'avez que le[73] motif dont vous parlez pour épouser monsieur le
Comte, rien ne vous oblige à ce mariage.

ARAMINTE.

Je l'affligerai beaucoup, et j'ai de la peine à m'y résoudre.

DORANTE.

Il ne seroit pas juste de vous sacrifier à la crainte de l'affliger.

ARAMINTE.

Mais avez-vous bien examiné? Vous me disiez tantôt que mon état étoit doux
et tranquille; n'aimeriez-vous pas mieux que j'y restasse? N'êtes-vous pas
un peu trop prévenu contre le mariage, et par conséquent contre monsieur
le Comte?

DORANTE.

Madame, j'aime mieux vos intérêts que les siens, et que ceux de qui que ce
soit au monde.

ARAMINTE.

Je ne saurois y trouver à redire; en tout cas, si je l'épouse, et qu'il
veuille en mettre un autre ici à votre place, vous n'y perdrez point; je
vous promets de vous en trouver une meilleure.

DORANTE, _tristement_.

Non, Madame, si j'ai le malheur de perdre celle-ci, je ne serai plus à
personne; et apparemment[74] que je la perdrai, je m'y attends.

ARAMINTE.

Je crois pourtant que je plaiderai; nous verrons.

DORANTE.

J'avois encore une petite chose à vous dire, Madame. Je viens d'apprendre
que le concierge d'un de vos terres est mort; on pourrait y mettre un de
vos gens, et j'ai songé à Dubois, que je remplacerai ici par un domestique
dont je réponds.

ARAMINTE.

Non, envoyez plutôt votre homme au château, et laissez-moi Dubois; c'est
un garçon de confiance qui me sert bien, et que je veux garder. A propos,
il m'a dit, ce me semble, qu'il avoit été à vous quelque temps?

DORANTE, _feignant un peu d'embarras_.

Il est vrai, Madame; il est fidèle, mais peu exact. Rarement, au reste,
ces gens-là parlent-ils bien de ceux qu'ils ont servis. Ne me nuiroit-il
point dans votre esprit?

ARAMINTE, _négligemment_.

Celui-ci dit beaucoup de bien de vous, et voilà tout. Que me veut monsieur
Remy?


SCÈNE II.

ARAMINTE, DORANTE, M. REMY.

M. REMY.

Madame, je suis votre très humble serviteur. Je viens vous remercier de la
bonté que vous avez eue de prendre mon neveu à ma recommandation.

ARAMINTE.

Je n'ai pas hésité, comme vous l'avez vu.

M. REMY.

Je vous rends mille grâces. Ne m'aviez-vous pas dit qu'on vous en offroit
un autre?

ARAMINTE.

Oui, Monsieur.

M. REMY.

Tant mieux, car je viens vous demander celui-ci pour une affaire
d'importance.

DORANTE, _d'un air de refus_.

Et d'où vient,[75] Monsieur?

M. REMY.

Patience!

ARAMINTE.

Mais, monsieur Remy, ceci est un peu vif; vous prenez assez mal votre
temps, et j'ai refusé l'autre personne.

DORANTE.

Pour moi, je ne sortirai jamais de chez Madame qu'elle ne me congédie.

M. REMY, _brusquement_.

Vous ne savez ce que vous dites. Il faut pourtant sortir; vous allez voir.
Tenez, Madame, jugez-en vous-même; voici de quoi il est question: c'est
une dame de trente-cinq ans, qu'on dit jolie femme, estimable, et de
quelque distinction; qui ne déclare pas son nom; qui dit que j'ai été son
procureur; qui a quinze mille livres de rente pour le moins, ce qu'elle
prouvera; qui a vu Monsieur chez moi, qui lui a parlé, qui sait qu'il n'a
pas de bien, et qui offre de l'épouser sans délai; et la personne qui est
venue chez moi de sa part doit revenir tantôt pour savoir la réponse et
vous mener tout de suite chez elle. Cela est-il net? Y a-t-il à se
consulter là-dessus? Dans deux heures il faut être au logis. Ai-je tort,
Madame?

ARAMINTE, _froidement_.

C'est à lui de répondre.

M. REMY.

Eh bien! A quoi pense-t-il donc? Viendrez-vous?

DORANTE.

Non, Monsieur, je ne suis pas dans cette disposition-là.

M. REMY.

Hum! Quoi? Entendez-vous ce que je vous dis, qu'elle a quinze mille livres
de rente, entendez-vous?

DORANTE.

Oui, Monsieur; mais, en eût-elle vingt fois davantage, je ne l'épouserois
pas; nous ne serions heureux ni l'un ni l'autre; j'ai le coeur pris;
j'aime ailleurs.

M. REMY, _d'un ton railleur et traînant ses mots_.

J'ai le coeur pris! voilà qui est fâcheux! Ah! ah! le coeur est admirable!
Je n'aurois jamais deviné la beauté des scrupules de ce coeur-là, qui veut
qu'on reste intendant de la maison d'autrui, pendant qu'on peut l'être de
la sienne. Est-ce là votre dernier mot, berger fidèle?

DORANTE.

Je ne saurois changer de sentiment, Monsieur.

M. REMY.

Oh! le sot coeur! mon neveu; vous êtes un imbécile,
un insensé; et je tiens celle que vous aimez pour une guenon,[76] si elle
n'est pas de mon sentiment, n'est-il pas vrai, Madame? et ne le trouvez-
vous pas extravagant?

ARAMINTE, _doucement_,

Ne le querellez point. Il paroît avoir tort, j'en conviens.

M. REMY, _vivement_.

Comment! Madame, il pourroit...

ARAMINTE.

Dans sa façon de penser je l'excuse. Voyez pourtant, Dorante, tâchez de
vaincre votre penchant, si vous le pouvez; je sais bien que cela est
difficile.

DORANTE.

Il n'y a pas moyen. Madame, mon amour m'est plus cher que ma vie.

M. REMY, _d'un air étonné_.

Ceux qui aiment les beaux sentiments doivent être contents; en voilà un
des plus curieux qui se fasse.[77] Vous trouvez donc cela raisonnable,
Madame?

ARAMINTE.

Je vous laisse, parlez-lui vous-même. (_A part._) Il me touche tant qu'il
faut que je m'en aille.

(_Elle sort._)

DORANTE.

Il ne croit pas si bien me servir.


SCÈNE III.

DORANTE, M. REMY, MARTON.

M. REMY, _regardant son neveu_.

Dorante, sais-tu bien qu'il n'y a point de fou aux petites-maisons[78] de
ta force? (_Marton arrive._) Venez, Mademoiselle Marton.

MARTON.

Je viens d'apprendre que vous étiez ici.

M. REMY.

Dites-nous un peu votre sentiment; que pensez-vous de quelqu'un qui n'a
point de bien, et qui refuse d'épouser une honnête et fort jolie femme,
avec quinze mille livres de rente bien venants?[79]

MARTON.

Votre question est bien aisée à décider: ce quelqu'un rêve.

M. REMY, _montrant Dorante_.

Voilà le rêveur; et pour excuse il allègue son coeur, que vous avez pris;
mais, comme apparemment[80] il n'a pas encore emporté le vôtre, et que je
vous crois encore à peu près dans tout votre bon sens, vu le peu de temps
qu'il y a que vous le connoissez, je vous prie de m'aider à le rendre plus
sage. Assurément vous êtes fort jolie, mais vous ne le disputerez point à
un pareil établissement: il n'y a point de beaux yeux qui vaillent ce
prix-là.

MARTON.

Quoi! Monsieur Remy, c'est de Dorante dont vous parlez? C'est pour se
garder à moi qu'il refuse d'être riche?

M. REMY.

Tout juste, et vous êtes trop généreuse pour le souffrir.

MARTON, _avec un air de passion_.

Vous vous trompez, Monsieur, je l'aime trop moi-même pour l'en empêcher,
et je suis enchantée. Ah! Dorante, que je vous estime! Je n'aurois pas cru
que vous m'aimassiez tant.

M. REMY.

Courage! je ne fais que vous le montrer, et vous en êtes déjà coiffée!
Pardi![81] le coeur d'une femme est bien étonnant; le feu y prend bien
vite.

MARTON, _comme chagrine_.

Eh! Monsieur, faut-il tant de bien pour être heureux? Madame, qui a de la
bonté pour moi, suppléera en partie, par sa générosité, à ce qu'il me
sacrifie. Que je vous ai d'obligation, Dorante!

DORANTE.

Oh! non, Mademoiselle, aucune; vous n'avez point de gré à me savoir[82] de
ce que je fais; je me livre à mes sentiments, et ne regarde que moi là-
dedans; vous ne me devez rien, je ne pense pas à votre reconnoissance.

MARTON.

Vous me charmez: que de délicatesse! Il n'y a encore rien de si tendre que
ce que vous me dites.

M. REMY.

Par ma foi, je ne m'y connois donc guère, car je le trouve bien plat. (_A
Marton._) Adieu, la belle enfant; je ne vous aurois, ma foi, pas évaluée
ce qu'il vous achète. Serviteur, idiot; garde ta tendresse, et moi ma
succession. (_Il sort._)

MARTON.

Il est en colère, mais nous l'apaiserons.

DORANTE.

Je l'espère. Quelqu'un vient.

MARTON.

C'est le Comte, celui dont je vous ai parlé, et qui doit épouser Madame.

DORANTE.

Je vous laisse donc; il pourroit me parler de son procès: vous savez ce
que je vous ai dit là-dessus, et il est inutile que je le voie.


SCÈNE IV.

LE COMTE, MARTON.

LE COMTE.

Bonjour, Marton.

MARTON.

Vous voilà donc revenu, Monsieur?

LE COMTE.

Oui. On m'a dit qu'Araminte se promenoit dans le jardin, et je viens
d'apprendre de sa mère une chose qui me chagrine: je lui avois retenu un
intendant, qui devoit aujourd'hui entrer chez elle, et cependant elle en a
pris un autre qui ne plaît point à la mère, et dont nous n'avons rien à
espérer.

MARTON.

Nous n'en devons rien craindre non plus, Monsieur. Allez, ne vous
inquiétez point, c'est un galant homme; et, si la mère n'en est pas
contente, c'est un peu de sa faute: elle a débuté tantôt par le brusquer
d'une manière si outrée, l'a traité si mal, qu'il n'est pas étonnant
qu'elle ne l'ait point gagné. Imaginez-vous qu'elle l'a querellé de ce
qu'il étoit bien fait.

LE COMTE.

Ne seroit-ce point lui que je viens de voir sortir d'avec[83] vous?

MARTON.

Lui-même.

LE COMTE.

Il a bonne mine, en effet, et n'a pas trop l'air de ce qu'il est.

MARTON.

Pardonnez-moi, Monsieur: car il est honnête homme.

LE COMTE.

N'y auroit-il pas moyen de raccommoder cela? Araminte ne me hait pas, je
pense, mais elle est lente à se déterminer, et, pour achever de la
résoudre, il ne s'agiroit plus que de lui dire que le sujet de notre
discussion est douteux pour elle. Elle ne voudra pas soutenir l'embarras
d'un procès. Parlons à cet intendant; s'il ne faut que de l'argent pour le
mettre dans nos intérêts, je ne l'épargnerai pas.

MARTON.

Oh! non; ce n'est point un homme à mener par là;
c'est le garçon de France le plus désintéressé...

LE COMTE.

Tant pis! ces gens-là ne sont bons à rien.

MARTON.

Laissez-moi faire.


SCÈNE V.

LE COMTE, ARLEQUIN, MARTON.

ARLEQUIN.

Mademoiselle, voilà un homme qui en demande un autre; savez-vous qui
c'est?

MARTON, _brusquement_.

Et qui est cet autre? A quel homme en veut-il?[84]

ARLEQUIN.

Ma foi, je n'en sais rien; c'est de quoi je m'informe à vous.[95]

MARTON.

Fais-le entrer.

ARLEQUIN, _le faisant sortir[86] des coulisses_.

Hé! le garçon! venez ici dire votre affaire.


SCÈNE VI.

LE COMTE, LE GARÇON, MARTON, ARLEQUIN.

MARTON.

Qui cherchez-vous?

LE GARÇON.

Mademoiselle, je cherche un certain monsieur à qui j'ai à rendre un
portrait avec une boîte qu'il nous a fait faire: il nous a dit qu'on ne la
remît qu'à lui-même, et qu'il viendroit la prendre; mais, comme mon père
est obligé de partir demain pour un petit voyage, il m'a envoyé pour la
lui rendre, et on m'a dit que je saurois de ses nouvelles ici. Je le
connois de vue, mais je ne sais pas son nom.

MARTON.

N'est-ce pas vous, Monsieur le Comte?

LE COMTE.

Non, sûrement.

LE GARÇON.

Je n'ai point affaire à Monsieur, Mademoiselle, c'est une autre personne.

MARTON.

Et chez qui vous a-t-on dit que vous le trouveriez?

LE GARÇON.

Chez un procureur qui s'appelle monsieur Remy.

LE COMTE.

Ah! n'est-ce pas le procureur de Madame? Montrez-nous la boîte.

LE GARÇON.

Monsieur, cela m'est défendu; je n'ai ordre de la donner qu'à celui à qui
elle est: le portrait de la dame est dedans.

LE COMTE.

Le portrait d'une dame! Qu'est-ce que cela signifie? Seroit-ce celui
d'Araminte? Je vais tout à l'heure savoir ce qu'il en est.


SCÈNE VII.

MARTON, LE GARÇON.

MARTON.

Vous avez mal fait de parler de ce portrait devant lui. Je sais qui vous
cherchez; c'est le neveu de monsieur Remy, de chez qui vous venez.

LE GARÇON.

Je le crois aussi, Mademoiselle.

MARTON.

Un grand homme qui s'appelle monsieur Dorante.

LE GARÇON.

Il me semble que c'est son mon.

MARTON.

Il me l'a dit; je suis dans sa confidence. Avez-vous remarqué le portrait?

LE GARÇON.

Non, je n'ai pas pris garde à qui il ressemble.

MARTON.

Eh bien! c'est de moi dont[87] il s'agit. Monsieur Dorante n'est pas ici,
et ne reviendra pas sitôt. Vous n'avez qu'à me remettre la boîte; vous le
pouvez en toute sûreté; vous lui ferez même plaisir. Vous voyez que je
suis au fait.

LE GARÇON.

C'est ce qui me paroit. La voilà, Mademoiselle. Ayez donc, je vous prie,
le soin de la lui rendre quand il sera revenu.

MARTON.

Oh! je n'y manquerai pas.

LE GARÇON.

Il y a encore une bagatelle qu'il doit dessus,[88] mais je tâcherai de
repasser tantôt, et, s'il n'y étoit pas, vous auriez la bonté d'achever de
payer.

MARTON.

Sans difficulté.[89] Allez. (_A part._) Voici Dorante. (_Au garçon._)
Retirez-vous vite.


SCÈNE VIII.

MARTON, DORANTE.

MARTON, _un moment seule et joyeuse_.

Ce ne peut être que mon portrait. Le charmant homme! Monsieur Remy a
raison de dire qu'il y avoit quelque temps qu'il me connoissoit.

DORANTE.

Mademoiselle, n'avez-vous pas vu ici quelqu'un qui vient d'arriver?
Arlequin croit que c'est moi qu'il demande.

MARTON, _le regardant avec tendresse_.

Que vous êtes aimable, Dorante! Je serois bien injuste de ne vous pas
aimer.[90] Allez, soyez en repos; l'ouvrier est venu, je lui ai parlé,
j'ai la boîte, je la tiens.

DORANTE.

J'ignore...

MARTON.

Point de mystère; je la tiens, vous dis-je, et je ne m'en fâche pas. Je
vous la rendrai quand je l'aurai vue. Retirez-vous, voici Madame avec sa
mère et le Comte; c'est peut-être de cela qu'ils s'entretiennent. Laissez-
moi les calmer là-dessus, et ne les attendez pas.

DORANTE, _en s'en allant et riant_.

Tout a réussi, elle prend le change à merveille.


SCÈNE IX.

ARAMINTE, LE COMTE, MME. ARGANTE, MARTON.

ARAMINTE.

Marton, qu'est-ce que c'est qu'un portrait dont monsieur le Comte me
parle, qu'on vient d'apporter ici à quelqu'un qu'on ne nomme pas, et qu'on
soupçonne être le mien? Instruisez-moi de cette histoire-là.

MARTON, _d'un air rêveur_.

Ce n'est rien, Madame; je vous dirai ce que c'est: je l'ai démêlé après
que monsieur le Comte a été parti; il n'a que faire de[91] s'alarmer. Il
n'y a rien là qui vous intéresse.

LE COMTE.

Comment le savez-vous, Mademoiselle? Vous n'avez point vu le portrait.

MARTON.

N'importe, c'est tout comme si je l'avois vu. Je sais qui il regarde; n'en
soyez point en peine.

LE COMTE.

Ce qu'il y a de certain, c'est un portrait de femme,[92] et c'est ici
qu'on vient chercher la personne qui l'a fait faire, à qui on doit le
rendre, et ce n'est pas moi.

MARTON.

D'accord. Mais quand[93] je vous dis que Madame n'y est pour rien, ni vous
non plus.

ARAMINTE.

Eh bien! si vous êtes instruite, dites-nous donc de quoi il est question,
car je veux le savoir. On a des idées qui ne me plaisent point. Parlez.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Oui, ceci a un air de mystère qui est désagréable. Il ne faut pourtant pas
vous fâcher, ma fille: monsieur le Comte vous aime, et un peu de jalousie,
même injuste, ne messied pas à un amant.

LE COMTE.

Je ne suis jaloux que de l'inconnu qui ose se donner le plaisir d'avoir le
portrait de Madame.

ARAMINTE, _vivement_.

Comme il vous plaira, Monsieur; mais j'ai entendu[94] ce que vous vouliez
dire, et je crains un peu ce caractère d'esprit-là. Eh bien, Marton?

MARTON.

Eh bien, Madame, voilà bien du bruit! C'est mon portrait.

LE COMTE.

Votre portrait?

MARTON.

Oui, le mien. Eh! pourquoi non, s'il vous plaît? Il ne faut pas tant se
récrier.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Je suis assez comme monsieur le Comte; la chose me paroît singulière.

MARTON.

Ma foi, Madame, sans vanité, on en peint tous les jours, et des plus
huppées,[95] qui ne me valent pas.

ARAMINTE.

Et qui est-ce qui a fait cette dépense-là pour vous?

MARTON.

Un très aimable homme qui m'aime, qui a de la délicatesse et des
sentiments, et qui me recherche; et, puisqu'il faut vous le nommer, c'est
Dorante.

ARAMINTE.

Mon intendant?

MARTON.

Lui-même.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Le fat, avec ses sentiments!

ARAMINTE, _brusquement_.

Eh! vous nous trompez; depuis qu'il est ici, a-t-il en le temps de vous
faire peindre?

MARTON.

Mais ce n'est pas d'aujourd'hui qu'il me connoît.

ARAMINTE, _vivement_.

Donnez donc.

MARTON.

Je n'ai pas encore ouvert la boîte, mais c'est moi que vous y allez voir.

(_Araminte l'ouvre, tous regardent_).

LE COMTE.

Eh! je m'en doutois bien: c'est Madame.

MARTON.

Madame!... Il est vrai, et me voilà bien loin de mon compte! (_A part._)
Dubois avoit raison tantôt.

ARAMINTE, _à part_.

Et moi, je vois clair. (_A Marton._) Par quel hasard avez-vous cru que
c'étoit vous?

MARTON.

Ma foi, Madame, toute autre que moi s'y seroit trompée. Monsieur Remy me
dit que son neveu m'aime, qu'il veut nous marier ensemble; Dorante est
présent, et ne dit point non; il refuse devant moi un très riche parti;
l'oncle s'en prend à moi, me dit que j'en suis cause. Ensuite vient un
homme qui apporte ce portrait, qui vient chercher ici celui à qui il
appartient; je l'interroge: à tout ce qu'il répond, je reconnois Dorante.
C'est un petit portrait de femme, Dorante m'aime jusqu'à refuser sa
fortune pour moi, je conclus donc que c'est moi qu'il a fait peindre. Ai-
je eu tort? J'ai pourtant mal conclu. J'y renonce; tant d'honneur ne
m'appartient point. Je crois voir toute l'étendue de ma méprise, et je me
tais.

ARAMINTE.

Ah! ce n'est pas là une chose bien difficile à deviner. Vous faites le
fâché, l'étonné, Monsieur le Comte; il y a eu quelque malentendu dans les
mesures que vous avez prises; mais vous ne m'abusez point: c'est à vous
qu'on apportait le portrait. Un homme dont on ne sait pas le nom, qu'on
vient chercher ici, c'est vous, Monsieur, c'est vous.

MARTON, _d'un air sérieux_.

Je ne crois pas.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Oui, oui, c'est Monsieur; à quoi bon vous en défendre? Dans les termes où
vous en êtes avec ma fille, ce n'est pas là un si grand crime; allons,
convenez-en.

LE COMTE, _froidement_.

Non, Madame, ce n'est point moi, sur mon honneur; je ne connois pas ce
monsieur Remy: comment auroit-on  dit chez lui qu'on auroit de mes
nouvelles ici? Cela ne se peut pas.

Mme. ARGANTE, _a'un air pensif_.

Je ne faisois pas attention à cette circonstance.

ARAMIMTE.

Bon! qu'est-ce que c'est qu'une circonstance de plus ou de moins? Je n'en
rabats rien.[96] Quoi qu'il en soit, je le garde, personne ne l'aura. Mais
quel bruit entendons-nous? Voyez ce que c'est, Marton.


SCÈNE X.

ARAMINTE, LE COMTE, Mme. ARGANTE, MARTON, DUBOIS, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN, _en entrant_.

Tu es un plaisant[97] magot!

MARTON.

A qui en avez-vous donc, vous autres?

DUBOIS.

Si je disois un mot, ton maître sortiroit bien vite.

ARLEQUIN.

Toi? Nous nous soucions de toi et de toute ta race de canaille comme de
cela.[98]

DUBOIS.

Comme je te bâtonnerois, sans le respect de Madame!

ARLEQUIN.

Arrive, arrive: la voilà, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Quel sujet avez-vous donc de quereller? De quoi s'agit-il?

Mme. ARGANTE.

Approchez, Dubois. Apprenez-nous ce que c'est que ce mot que vous diriez
contre Dorante; il seroit bon de savoir ce que c'est.

ARLEQUIN.

Prononce donc ce mot.

ARAMINTE.

Tais-toi, laisse-le parler.

DUBOIS.

Il y a une heure qu'il me dit mille invectives, Madame.

ARLEQUIN.

Je soutiens les intérêts de mon maître, je tire des gages pour cela, et je
ne souffrirai pas qu'un ostrogoth menace mon maître d'un mot; j'en demande
justice à Madame.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Mais, encore une fois, sachons ce que veut dire Dubois par ce mot: c'est
le plus pressé.

ARLEQUIN.

Je lui[99] défie d'en dire seulement une lettre.

DUBOIS.

C'est par pure colère que j'ai fait cette menace, Madame, et voici la
cause de la dispute. En arrangeant l'appartement de monsieur Dorante, j'y
ai vu par hasard un tableau où Madame est peinte, et j'ai cru qu'il
falloit l'ôter, qu'il n'avoit que faire là, qu'il n'étoit point décent
qu'il y restât; de sorte que j'ai été pour le détacher: ce butor est venu
pour m'en empêcher, et peu s'en est fallu que nous ne nous soyons battus.

ARLEQUIN.

Sans doute, de quoi t'avises-tu d'ôter ce tableau, qui est tout à fait
gracieux, que mon maître considéroit, il n'y avoit qu'un moment, avec
toute la satisfaction possible? Car je l'avois vu qu'il[100] l'avoit
contemplé de tout son coeur, et il prend fantaisie à ce brutal de le
priver d'une peinture qui réjouit cet honnête homme. Voyez la malice! Ote-
lui quelqu'autre meuble, s'il en a trop, mais laisse-lui cette pièce,
animal.

DUBOIS.

Et moi, je te dis qu'on ne la laissera point, que je la détacherai moi-
même, que tu en auras le démenti, et que Madame le voudra ainsi.

ARAMlNTE.

Eh! que m'importe? Il étoit bien nécessaire de faire ce bruit-là pour un
vieux tableau qu'on a mis là par hasard, et qui y est resté. Laissez-nous.
Cela vaut-il la peine qu'on en parle?

Mme. ARGANTE, _d'un ton aigre_.

Vous m'excuserez, ma fille: ce n'est point là sa place, et il n'y a qu'à
l'ôter; votre intendant se passera bien de ses contemplations.

ARAMINTE, _souriant d'un air railleur_.

Oh! vous avez raison: je ne pense pas qu'il les regrette. (_A Arlequin et
à Dubois._) Retirez-vous tous deux.


SCÈNE XI.

ARAMINTE, LE COMTE, Mme. ARGANTE, MARTON.

LE COMTE, _d'un ton railleur._

Ce qui est de sûr,[101] c'est que cet homme d'affaires-là est de bon goût.

ARAMINTE, _ironiquement_.

Oui, la réflexion est juste. Effectivement, il est fort extraordinaire
qu'il ait jeté les yeux sur ce tableau.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Cet homme-là ne m'a jamais plu un instant, ma fille; vous le savez, j'ai
le coup d'oeil assez bon, et je ne l'aime pas. Croyez-moi, vous avez
entendu la menace que Dubois a faite en parlant de lui, j'y reviens
encore, il faut qu'il ait quelque chose à en dire. Interrogez-le; sachons
ce que c'est, je suis persuadée que ce petit monsieur-là ne vous convient
point; nous le voyons tous, il n'y a que vous qui n'y prenez pas garde.

MARTON, _négligemment_.

Pour moi, je n'en suis pas contente.

ARAMINTE, _riant ironiquement_.

Qu'est-ce donc que vous voyez, et que je ne vois point? Je manque de
pénétration; j'avoue que je m'y perds! Je ne vois pas le sujet[102] de me
défaire d'un homme qui m'est donné de bonne main,[103] qui est un homme de
quelque chose, qui me sert bien, et que trop bien peut-être: voilà ce qui
n'échappe pas à ma pénétration, par exemple.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Que vous êtes aveugle!

ARAMINTE, _d'un air souriant_.

Pas tant; chacun a ses lumières, je consens,[104] au reste, d'écouter
Dubois; le conseil est bon, et je l'approuve. Allez, Marton, allez lui
dire que je veux lui parler, S'il me donne des motifs raisonnables de
renvoyer cet intendant assez hardi pour regarder un tableau, il ne restera
pas longtemps chez moi; sans quoi, on aura la bonté de trouver bon que je
le garde en attendant qu'il me déplaise à moi,

Mme. ARGANTE, _vivement_.

Hé bien! il vous déplaira; je ne vous en dis pas davantage, en attendant
de plus fortes preuves.

LE COMTE.

Quant à moi, Madame, j'avoue que j'ai craint qu'il ne me servît mal auprès
de vous, qu'il ne vous inspirât l'envie de plaider, et j'ai souhaité par
pure tendresse qu'il vous en détournât. Il aura pourtant beau faire, je
déclare que je renonce à tous[105] procès avec vous, que je ne veux, pour
arbitre de notre discussion, que vous et vos gens d'affaires, et que
j'aime mieux perdre tout que de rien disputer.

Mme. ARGANTE, _d'un ton décisif_.

Mais où seroit la dispute? Le mariage termineroit tout, et le vôtre est
comme arrêté.

LE COMTE.

Je garde le silence sur Dorante; je reviendrai simplement voir ce que vous
pensez de lui, et, si vous le congédiez, comme je le présume, il ne
tiendra qu'à vous de prendre celui que je vous offrois, et que je
retiendrai encore quelque temps.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Je ferai comme Monsieur, je ne vous parlerai plus de rien non plus: vous
m'accuseriez de vision, et votre entêtement finira sans notre secours. Je
compte beaucoup sur Dubois, que voici, et avec lequel nous vous laissons.


SCÈNE XII.

DUBOIS, ARAMINTE.

DUBOIS.

On m'a dit que vous vouliez me parler, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Viens ici: tu es bien imprudent, Dubois, bien indiscret; moi qui ai si
bonne opinion de toi, tu n'as guère d'attention pour ce que je te dis. Je
t'avois recommandé de te taire sur le chapitre de Dorante; tu en sais les
conséquences ridicules, et tu me l'avois promis: pourquoi donc avoir
prise,[106] sur ce misérable tableau, avec un sot qui fait un vacarme
épouvantable, et qui vient ici tenir des discours tous[107] propres à
donner des idées que je serois au désespoir qu'on eût?

DUBOIS.

Ma foi, Madame, j'ai cru la chose sans conséquence, et je n'ai agi
d'ailleurs que par un mouvement[108] de respect et de zèle.

ARAMINTE, _d'un air vif_.

Eh! laisse là ton zèle, ce n'est pas là celui que je veux, ni celui qu'il
me faut; c'est de ton silence dont[109] j'ai besoin pour me tirer de
l'embarras où je suis, et où tu m'as jetée toi-même: car sans toi je ne
savois[110] pas que cet homme-là m'aime, et je n'aurais que faire[111] d'y
regarder de si près.

DUBOIS.

J'ai bien senti que j'avois tort.

ARAMINTE.

Passe encore pour la dispute; mais pourquoi s'écrier: «Si je disois un
mot?» Y a-t-il rien de plus mal à toi?[112]

DUBOIS.

C'est encore une suite de ce zèle mal entendu.

ARAMINTE.

Eh bien! tais-toi donc, tais-toi; je voudrais pouvoir te faire oublier ce
que tu m'as dit.

DUBOIS.

Oh! je suis bien corrigé.

ARAMINTE.

C'est ton étourderie qui me force actuellement de te parler, sous prétexte
de t'interroger sur ce que tu sais de lui. Ma mère et monsieur le Comte
s'attendent que tu vas m'en apprendre des choses étonnantes; quel rapport
leur ferai-je à présent?

DUBOIS.

Ah! il n'y a rien de plus facile à raccommoder: ce rapport sera que des
gens qui le connoissent m'ont dit que c'étoit un homme incapable de
l'emploi qu'il a chez vous, quoiqu'il soit fort habile, au moins[113]: ce
n'est pas cela qui lui manque.

ARAMINTE.

A la bonne heure; mais il y aura un inconvénient s'il en est capable[114];
on me dira de le renvoyer, et il n'est pas encore temps. J'y ai pensé
depuis; la prudence ne le veut pas, et je suis obligée de prendre des
biais,[115] et d'aller tout doucement avec cette passion si excessive que
tu dis qu'il a, et qui éclateroit peut-être dans sa douleur. Me fierois-je
à un désespéré? Ce n'est plus le besoin que j'ai de lui qui me retient,
c'est moi que je ménage. (_Elle radoucit le ton._) A moins que ce qu'a dit
Marton ne soit vrai, auquel cas je n'aurois plus rien à craindre. Elle
prétend qu'il l'avoit déjà vue chez monsieur Remy, et que le procureur a
dit même devant lui qu'il l'aimoit depuis longtemps, et qu'il falloit
qu'ils se mariassent. Je le voudrois.

DUBOIS.

Bagatelle! Dorante n'a vu Marton ni de près ni de loin; c'est le procureur
qui a débité cette fable-là à Marton, dans le dessein de les marier
ensemble; et moi je n'ai pas osé l'en dédire,[116] m'a dit Dorante, parce
que j'aurois indisposé contre moi cette fille, qui a du crédit auprès de
sa maîtresse, et qui a cru ensuite que c'étoit pour elle que je refusois
les quinze mille livres de rente qu'on m'offroit.

ARAMINTE, _négligemment_.

Il t'a donc tout conté.

DUBOIS.

Oui, il n'y a qu'un moment, dans le jardin, où il a voulu presque se jeter
à mes genoux pour me conjurer de lui garder le secret sur sa passion, et
d'oublier l'emportement qu'il eut avec moi quand je le quittai. Je lui ai
dit que je me tairois, mais que je ne prétendois pas rester dans la maison
avec lui, et qu'il falloit qu'il sortît; ce qui l'a jeté dans des
gémissements, dans des pleurs, dans le plus triste état du monde.

ARAMINTE.

Eh! tant pis; ne le tourmente point; tu vois bien que j'ai raison de dire
qu'il faut aller doucement avec cet esprit-là, fu le vois bien. J'augurois
beaucoup de ce mariage avec Marton; je croyois qu'il m'oublieroit; et
point du tout, il n'est question de rien.

DUBOIS, _comme s'en allant_.[117]

Pure fable. Madame a-t-elle encore quelque chose à me dire?

ARAMINTE.

Attends: comment faire? Si, lorsqu'il me parle, il me mettoit en droit de
me plaindre de lui! Mais il ne lui échappe rien; je ne sais de son amour
que ce que tu m'en dis, et je ne suis pas assez fondée pour le renvoyer.
Il est vrai qu'il me fâcherait s'il parloit; mais il seroit à propos qu'il
me fâchât.

DUBOIS.

Vraiment oui; monsieur Dorante n'est point digne de Madame. S'il étoit
dans une plus grande fortune, comme il n'y a rien à dire à ce qu'il est
né,[118] ce seroit une autre affaire; mais il n'est riche qu'en mérite, et
ce n'est pas assez.

ARAMINTE, _d'un ton comme triste_.

Vraiment non, voilà les usages; je ne sais pas comment je le traiterai; je
n'en sais rien; je verrai.

DUBOIS.

Eh bien! Madame a un si beau prétexte... Ce portrait que Marton a cru être
le sien, à ce qu'elle m'a dit.

ARAMINTE.

Eh! non, je ne saurois l'en accuser: c'est le Comte qui l'a fait faire.

DUBOIS.

Point du tout, c'est de Dorante,[119] je le sais de lui-même, et il y
travailloit encore il n'y a que deux mois, lorsque je le quittai.

ARAMINTE.

Va-t'en; il y a longtemps que je te parle. Si on me demande ce que tu m'as
appris de lui, je dirai ce dont nous sommes convenus. Le voici, j'ai envie
de lui tendre un piège.

DUBOIS.

Oui, Madame, il se déclarera peut-être, et tout de suite je lui dirois:
«Sortez.»

ARAMINTE.

Laisse-nous.


SCÈNE XIII.

DORANTE, ARAMINTE, DUBOIS.

DUBOIS, _sortant, et en passant auprès de Dorante et rapidement_.

Il m'est impossible de l'instruire; mais, qu'il se découvre ou non, les
choses ne peuvent aller que bien.

DORANTE.

Je viens, Madame, vous demander votre protection; je suis dans le chagrin
et dans l'inquiétude: j'ai tout quitté pour avoir l'honneur d'être à vous,
je vous suis plus attaché que je ne puis le dire; on ne sauroit vous
servir avec plus de fidélité ni de désintéressement; et cependant je ne
suis pas sûr de rester. Tout le monde ici m'en veut, me persécute et
conspire pour me faire sortir, j'en suis consterné; je tremble que vous ne
cédiez à leur inimitié pour moi, et j'en serois dans la dernière
affliction.

ARAMINTE, _d'un ton doux_.

Tranquillisez-vous; vous ne dépendez point de ceux qui vous en veulent;
ils ne vous ont encore fait aucun tort dans mon esprit, et tous leurs
petits complots n'aboutiront à rien: je suis la maîtresse.

DORANTE, _d'un air inquiet_.

Je n'ai que votre appui, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Il ne vous manquera pas; mais je vous conseille une chose: ne leur
paraissez pas si alarmé, vous leur feriez douter de votre capacité, et il
leur sembleroit que vous m'auriez beaucoup d'obligation de ce que je vous
garde.

DORANTE.

Ils ne se tromperaient pas, Madame; c'est une bonté qui me pénètre de
reconnoissance.

ARAMINTE.

A la bonne heure; mais il n'est pas nécessaire qu'ils le croient, je vous
sais bon gré de votre attachement et de votre fidélité: niais dissimulez-
en une partie, c'est peut-être ce qui les indispose contre vous. Vous leur
avez refusé de m'en faire accroire[120] sur le chapitre du procès;
conformez-vous à ce qu'ils exigent; regagnez-les par là, je vous le
permets; l'événement leur persuadera que vous les avez bien servis, car,
toute réflexion faite, je suis déterminée à épouser le Comte.

DORANTE, _d'un ton ému_.

Déterminée, Madame?

ARAMINTE.

Oui, tout à fait résolue: le Comte croira que vous y avez contribué; je le
lui dirai même, et je vous garantis que vous resterez ici; je vous le
promets. (_A part._) Il change de couleur.

DORANTE.

Quelle différence pour moi, Madame!

ARAMINTE, _d'un air délibéré_.

II n'y en aura aucune, ne vous embarrassez pas, et écrivez le billet que
je vais vous dicter; il y a tout ce qu'il faut sur cette table.

DORANTE.

Eh! pour qui, Madame?

ARAMINTE.

Pour le Comte, qui est sorti d'ici extrêmement inquiet, et que je vais
surprendre bien agréablement par le petit ot que vous allez lui écrire en
mon nom.

(_Dorante reste rêveur, et, par distraction, ne va point à la table._)

ARAMINTE.

Eh bien, vous n'allez pas à la table? A quoi rêvez-vous?

DORANTE, _toujours distrait_.

Oui, Madame.

ARAMINTE, _à part, pendant qu'il se place_.

Il ne sait ce qu'il fait; voyons si cela continuera.

DORANTE _cherche du papier_.

Ah! Dubois m'a trompé!

ARAMINTE _poursuit_.

Êtes-vous prêt à écrire?

DORANTE.

Madame, je ne trouve point de papier.

ARAMINTE, _allant elle-même_.

Vous n'en trouvez point! en voilà devant vous.

DORANTE.

Il est vrai.

ARAMINTE.

Ecrivez. _Hâtez-vous de venir, Monsieur, votre mariage est sûr..._ Avez-
vous écrit?

DORANTE.

Comment, Madame?

ARAMINTE.

Vous ne m'écoutez donc pas? _Votre mariage est sûr; Madame veut que je
vous l'écrive, et vous attend pour vous le dire._ (_A part._) Il souffre,
mais il ne dit mot; est-ce qu'il ne parlera pas? _N'attribuez point cette
résolution à la crainte que Madame pourroit avoir des suites d'un procès
douteux._

DORANTE.

Je vous ai assuré que vous le gagneriez, Madame: douteux, il ne l'est
point.

ARAMINTE.

N'importe, achevez. _Non, Monsieur, je suis chargé de sa part de vous
assurer que la seule justice qu'elle rend à votre mérite la détermine._

DORANTE.

Ciel! je suis perdu. Mais, Madame, vous n'aviez aucune inclination pour
lui.

ARAMINTE.

Achevez, vous dis-je. _Qu'elle rend à votre mérite la détermine..._ je
crois que la main vous tremble! vous paroissez changé. Qu'est-ce que cela
signifie? Vous trouvez-vous mal?

DORANTE.

Je ne me trouve pas bien, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Quoi! si subitement! Cela est singulier. Pliez la lettre et mettez: _A
Monsieur le Comte Dorimont._ Vous direz à Dubois qu'il la lui porte. (_A
part._) Le coeur me bat! (_A Dorante._) Voilà qui est écrit tout de
travers! Cette adresse-là n'est presque pas lisible. (_A part._) Il n'y a
pas encore là de quoi le convaincre.

DORANTE, _à part_.

Ne seroit-ce point aussi pour m'éprouver? Dubois ne m'a averti de rien.


SCÈNE XIV.

ARAMINTE, DORANTE, MARTON.

MARTON.

Je suis bien aise, Madame, de trouver Monsieur ici; il vous confirmera
tout de suite ce que j'ai à vous dire. Vous avez offert en différentes
occasions de me marier. Madame, et jusqu'ici je ne me suis point trouvée
disposée à profiter de vos bontés. Aujourd'hui Monsieur me recherche; il
vient même de refuser un parti infiniment plus riche, et le tout pour
moi.: du moins me l'a-t-il laissé croire, et il est à propos qu'il
s'explique; mais, comme je ne veux dépendre que de vous, c'est de vous
aussi, Madame, qu'il faut qu'il m'obtienne. Ainsi, Monsieur, vous n'avez
qu'à parler à Madame. Si elle m'accorde à vous, vous n'aurez point de
peine à m'obtenir de moi-même.

(_Elle sort._)


SCÈNE XV.

DORANTE, ARAMlNTE.

ARAMINTE, _à part, émue_.

Cette folle! (_Haut._) Je suis charmée de ce qu'elle
vient de m'apprendre. Vous avez fait là un très bon
choix: c'est une fille aimable et d'un excellent caractère.

DORANTE, _d'un air abattu_.

Hélas! Madame, je ne songe point à elle.

ARAMINTE.

Vous ne songez point à elle! Elle dit que vous l'aimez,
que vous l'aviez vue avant que de[121] venir ici.

DORANTE, _tristement_.

C'est une erreur où monsieur Remy l'a jetée sans me consulter; et je n'ai
point osé dire le contraire, dans la crainte de m'en faire une ennemie
auprès de vous. Il en est de même de ce riche parti qu'elle croit que je
refuse à cause d'elle, et je n'ai nulle part à tout cela. Je suis hors
d'état de donner mon coeur à personne: je l'ai perdu pour jamais, et la
plus brillante de toutes les fortunes ne me tenteroit pas.

ARAMINTE.

Vous avez tort. Il falloit désabuser Marton.

DORANTE.

Elle vous auroit peut-être empêché de me recevoir, et mon indifférence lui
en dit assez.

ARAMINTE.

Mais, dans la situation où vous êtes, quel intérêt aviez-vous d'entrer
dans ma maison, et de la préférer à une autre?

DORANTE.

Je trouve plus de douceur à être chez vous, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Il y a quelque chose d'incompréhensible dans tout ceci! Voyez-vous souvent
la personne que vous aimez?

DORANTE, _toujours abattu_.

Pas souvent à mon gré, Madame; et je la verrois à tout instant que je ne
croirois pas la voir assez.

ARAMINTE, _à part_.

Il a des expressions d'une tendresse! (_Haut._) Est-elle fille? a-t-elle
été mariée?

DORANTE.

Madame, elle est veuve.

ARAMINTE.

Et ne devez-vous pas l'épouser? Elle vous aime, sans doute?

DORANTE.

Hélas! Madame, elle ne sait pas seulement que je l'adore. Excusez
l'emportement du terme dont je me sers. Je ne saurois presque parier
d'elle qu'avec transport!

ARAMINTE.

Je ne vous interroge que par étonnement. Elle ignore que vous l'aimez,
dites-vous? Et vous lui sacrifiez votre fortune? Voilà de l'incroyable.
Comment, avec tant d'amour, avez-vous pu vous taire? On essaye de se faire
aimer, ce me semble: cela est naturel et pardonnable.

DORANTE.

Me préserve le Ciel d'oser concevoir la plus légère espérance![122] Etre
aimé, moi! Non, Madame. Son état est bien au-dessus du mien. Mon respect
me condamne au silence, et je mourrai du moins sans avoir eu le malheur de
lui déplaire.

ARAMINTE.

Je n'imagine point de femme qui mérite d'inspirer une passion si
étonnante; je n'en imagine point. Elle est donc au-dessus de toute
comparaison?

DORANTE.

Dispensez-moi de la louer, Madame: je m'égarerois en la peignant. On ne
connoît rien de si beau ni de si aimable qu'elle, et jamais elle ne me
parle, ou ne me regarde, que mon amour n'en augmente.[123]

ARAMINTE, _baisse les yeux, et continue_.

Mais votre conduite blesse la raison. Que prétendez-vous avec cet amour
pour une personne qui ne saura jamais que vous l'aimez? Cela est bien
bizarre. Que prétendez-vous?

DORANTE.

Le plaisir de la voir quelquefois, et d'être avec elle, est tout ce que je
me propose.

ARAMINTE.

Avec elle? Oubliez-vous que vous êtes ici?

DORANTE.

Je veux dire avec son portrait, quand je ne la vois point.

ARAMINTE.

Son portrait! Est-ce que vous l'avez fait faire?

DORANTE.

Non, Madame; mais j'ai, par amusement, appris à peindre, et je l'ai
peinte[124] moi-même. Je me serois privé de son portrait si je n'avois pu
l'avoir que par le secours d'un autre.

ARAMINTE, _à part_.

Il faut le pousser à bout. (_Haut._) Montrez-moi ce portrait.

DORANTE.

Daignez m'en dispenser, Madame; quoique mon amour soit sans espérance, je
n'en dois pas moins un secret inviolable à l'objet aimé.

ARAMINTE.

Il m'en est tombé un par hasard entre les mains: on l'a trouvé ici.
(_Montrant la boîte._) Voyez si ce ne seroit point celui dont il s'agit.

DORANTE.

Cela ne se peut pas.

ARAMINTE, _ouvrant la boîte_.

Il est vrai que la chose seroit assez extraordinaire: examinez.

DORANTE.

Ah! Madame, songez que j'aurois perdu mille fois la vie avant que[125]
d'avouer ce que le hasard vous découvre. Comment pourrai-je expier.. (_Il
se jette à ses genoux._)

ARAMINTE.

Dorante, je ne me fâcherai point. Votre égarement me fait pitié. Revenez-
en, je vous le pardonne.

MARTON _paroît, et s'enfuit_.

Ah!

(_Dorante se lève vite._)

ARAMINTE.

Ah Ciel! c'est Marton! Elle vous a vu.

DORANTE, _feignant d'être déconcerté_.

Non, Madame, non, je ne crois pas; elle n'est point entrée.

ARAMINTE.

Elle vous a vu, vous dis-je. Laissez-moi, allez-vous en: vous m'êtes
insupportable. Rendez-moi ma lettre. (_Quand il est parti._) Voilà
pourtant ce que c'est que de l'avoir gardé!


SCÈNE XVI.

ARAMINTE, DUBOIS.

DUBOIS.

Dorante s'est-il déclaré, Madame, et est-il nécessaire que je lui parle?

ARAMINTE.

Non, il ne m'a rien dit. Je n'ai rien vu d'approchant à ce que tu m'as
conté, et qu'il n'en soit plus question, ne t'en mêle plus.

(_Elle sort._)

DUBOIS.

Voici l'affaire dans sa crise!


SCÈNE XVII.

DUBOIS, DORANTE.

DORANTE.

Ah! Dubois.

DUBOIS.

Retirez-vous.

DORANTE.

Je ne sais qu'augurer de la conversation que je viens d'avoir avec elle.

DUBOIS.

A quoi songez-vous? Elle n'est qu'à deux pas: voulez-vous tout perdre?

DORANTE.

Il faut que tu m'éclaircisses...

DUBOIS.

Allez dans le jardin.

DORANTE.

D'un doute...

DUBOIS.

Dans le jardin, vous dis-je; je vais m'y rendre.

DORANTE.

Mais...

DUBOIS.

Je ne vous écoute plus.

DORANTE.

Je crains plus que jamais.


ACTE III


SCÈNE PREMIÈRE.

DORANTE, DUBOIS.

DUBOIS.

Non, vous dis-je; ne perdons point de temps. La lettre est-elle prête?

DORANTE, _la lui montrant_.

Oui, la voilà, et j'ai mis dessus: "Rue du Figuier."[126]

DUBOIS.

Vous êtes bien assuré qu'Arlequin ne sait pas ce quartier-là?

DORANTE.

Il m'a dit que non.

DUBOIS.

Lui avez-vous bien recommandé de s'adresser à Marton ou à moi pour savoir
ce que c'est?

DORANTE.

Sans doute, et je lui recommanderai[127] encore.

DUBOIS.

Allez donc la lui donner; je me charge du reste auprès de Marton, que je
vais trouver.

DORANTE.

Je t'avoue que j'hésite un peu. N'allons-nous pas trop vite avec Araminte?
Dans l'agitation des mouvements[128] où elle est, veux-tu encore lui
donner l'embarras de voir subitement éclater l'aventure?

DUBOIS.

Oh! oui, point de quartier. Il faut l'achever, pendant qu'elle est
étourdie. Elle ne sait plus ce qu'elle fait. Ne voyez-vous pas bien
qu'elle triche avec moi, qu'elle me fait accroire que vous ne lui avez
rien dit? Ah! je lui apprendrai à vouloir me souffler mon emploi de
confident pour vous aimer en fraude!

DORANTE.

Que j'ai souffert dans ce dernier entretien! Puisque tu savois qu'elle
vouloit me faire déclarer, que ne m'en avertissois-tu par quelques signes?

DUBOIS.

Cela auroit été joli, ma foi! Elle ne s'en seroit point aperçue, n'est ce
pas? Et d'ailleurs, votre douleur n'en a paru que plus vraie. Vous
repentez-vous de l'effet qu'elle a produit? Monsieur a souffert! Parbleu!
il me semble que cette aventure-ci mérite un peu d'inquiétude.

DORANTE.

Sais-tu bien ce qui arrivera? Qu'elle prendra son parti, et qu'elle me
renverra tout d'un coup.

DUBOIS.

Je lui[129] en défie. Il est trop tard; l'heure du courage est passée; il
faut qu'elle nous épouse.

DORANTE.

Prends-y garde: tu vois que sa mère la fatigue.[130]

DUBOIS.

Je serois bien fâché qu'elle la laissât en repos.

DORANTE.

Elle est confuse de ce que Marton m'a surpris à ses genoux.

DUBOIS.

Ah! vraiment, des confusions! Elle n'y est pas. Elle va en essuyer bien
d'autres! C'est moi qui, voyant le train que prenoit la conversation, ai
fait venir Marton une seconde fois.

DORANTE.

Araminte pourtant m'a dit que je lui étois insupportable.

DUBOIS.

Elle a raison. Voulez-vous qu'elle soit de bonne humeur avec un homme
qu'il faut qu'elle aime en dépit d'elle? Cela est-il agréable? Vous vous
emparez de son bien, de son coeur; et cette femme ne criera pas? Allez,
vite, plus de raisonnement; laissez-vous conduire.

DORANTE.

Songe que je l'aime, et que, si notre précipitation réussit mal, tu me
désespères.

DUBOIS.

Ah! oui, je sais bien que vous l'aimez: c'est à cause de cela que je ne
vous écoute pas. Etes-vous en état de juger de rien? Allons, allons, vous
vous moquez. Laissez faire un homme de sang-froid. Partez, d'autant plus
que voici Marton qui vient à propos, et que je vais tâcher d'amuser,[131]
en attendant que vous envoyiez Arlequin.


SCÈNE II.

DUBOIS, MARTON.

MARTON, _d'un air triste_.

Je te cherchois.

DUBOIS.

Qu'y a-t-il pour votre service. Mademoiselle?

MARTON.

Tu me l'avois bien dit, Dubois.

DUBOIS.

Quoi donc? Je ne me souviens plus de ce que c'est.

MARTON.

Que cet intendant osoit lever les yeux sur Madame.

DUBOIS.

Ah! oui: vous parlez de ce regard que je lui vis jeter sur elle. Oh!
jamais je ne l'ai oublié. Cette oeillade-là ne valoit rien. Il y avoit
quelque chose dedans qui n'étoit pas dans l'ordre.

MARTON.

Oh! ça, Dubois, il s'agit de faire sortir cet homme-ci.

DUBOIS.

Pardi! tant qu'on voudra; je ne m'y épargne pas. J'ai déjà dit à Madame
qu'on m'avoit assuré qu'il n'entendoit pas les affaires.

MARTON.

Mais est-ce là tout ce que tu sais de lui? C'est de la part de madame
Argante et de monsieur le Comte que je te parle, et nous avons peur que tu
n'aies pas tout dit à Madame, ou qu'elle ne cache ce que c'est. Ne nous
déguise rien, tu n'en seras pas fâché.

DUBOIS.

Ma foi! je ne sais que son insuffisance, dont j'ai instruit Madame.

MARTON.

Ne dissimule point.

DUBOIS.

Moi un dissimulé! Moi garder un secret! Vous avez bien trouvé votre homme!
En fait de discrétion, je mériterais d'être femme.[132] Je vous demande
pardon de la comparaison, mais c'est pour vous mettre l'esprit en repos.

MARTON.

Il est certain qu'il aime Madame.

DUBOIS.

Il n'en faut point douter: je lui en ai même dit ma pensée à elle.

MARTON.

Et qu'a-t-elle répondu?

DUBOIS.

Que j'étois un sot. Elle est si prévenue...

MARTON.

Prévenue à un point que je n'oserois le dire, Dubois.

DUBOIS.

Oh! le diable n'y perd rien,[133] ni moi mon plus: car je vous
entends.[134]

MARTON.

Tu as la mine d'en savoir plus que moi là-dessus.

DUBOIS.

Oh! point du tout, je vous jure. Mais, à propos, il vient tout à l'heure
d'appeller Arlequin pour lui donner une lettre; si nous pouvions la
saisir, peut-être en saurions-nous davantage.

MARTON.

Une lettre, oui-da[135]: ne négligeons rien, Je vais de ce pas parler à
Arlequin, s'il n'est pas encore parti.

DUBOIS.

Vous n'irez pas loin; je crois qu'il vient.


SCÈNE III.

DUBOIS, MARTON, ARLEQUIN.

ARLEQUIN, _voyant Dubois_.

Ah! te voilà donc, mal bâti?

DUBOIS.

Tenez: n'est-ce pas là une belle figure pour se moquer de la mienne?

MARTON.

Que veux-tu, Arlequin?

ARLEQUIN.

Ne sauriez-vous pas où demeure[136] la rue du Figuier,[137] Mademoiselle?

MARTON.

Oui.

ARLEQUIN.

C'est que mon camarade, que je sers, m'a dit de porter cette lettre à
quelqu'un qui est dans cette rue, et, comme je ne la sais[138] pas, il m'a
dit que je m'en informasse à vous ou à cet animal-là; mais cet animal-là
ne mérite pas que je lui en parle, sinon pour l'injurier. J'aimerois mieux
que le diable eût emporté toutes les rues que d'en savoir une par le moyen
d'un malotru comme lui.

DUBOIS, _à Marton, à part_.

Prenez la lettre. (_Haut._) Non, non, Mademoiselle, ne lui enseignez rien;
qu'il galope.

ARLEQUIN.

Veux-tu te taire?

MARTON, _négligemment_.

Ne l'interrompez donc point, Dubois. Eh bien! veux-tu me donner ta lettre?
Je vais envoyer dans ce quartier-là, et on la rendra[139] à son adresse.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! voilà qui est bien agréable! Vous êtes une fille de bonne amitié,
Mademoiselle.

DUBOIS, _s'en allant_.

Vous êtes bien bonne d'épargner de la peine à ce fainéant-là.

ARLEQUIN.

Ce malhonnête! Va, va trouver le tableau, pour voir comme il se moque de
toi.

MARTON, _seule avec Arlequin_.

Ne lui réponds rien; donne ta lettre.

ARLEQUIN.

Tenez, Mademoiselle; vous me rendrez[140] un service qui me fait grand
bien. Quand il y aura à trotter pour votre serviable personne, n'ayez
point d'autre postillon que moi.

MARTON.

Elle sera rendue exactement.

ARLEQUIN.

Oui, je vous recommande l'exactitude, à cause de monsieur Dorante, qui
mérite toutes sortes de fidélités.

MARTON, _à part_.

L'indigne!

ARLEQUIN, _s'en allant_.

Je suis votre serviteur éternel.

MARTON.

Adieu.

ARLEQUIN, _revenant_.

Si vous le rencontrez, ne lui dites point qu'un autre galope à ma place.


SCÈNE IV.

Mme. ARGANTE, LE COMTE, MARTON.

MARTON, _un moment seule_.

Ne disons mot que je n'aie vu[141] ce que ceci contient.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Eh bien! Marton, qu'avez-vous appris de Dubois?

MARTON.

Rien que ce que vous saviez déjà, Madame, et ce n'est pas assez.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Dubois est un coquin qui nous trompe.

LE COMTE.

Il est vrai que sa menace paroissoit signifier quelque chose de plus.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Quoi qu'il en soit, j'attends monsieur Remy, que j'ai envoyé chercher; et,
s'il ne nous défait pas de cet homme-là, ma fille saura qu'il ose l'aimer,
je l'ai résolu. Nous en avons les présomptions[142] les plus fortes, et,
ne fût-ce que par bienséance, il faudra bien qu'elle le chasse. D'un autre
côté, j'ai fait venir l'intendant que monsieur le Comte lui proposoit. Il
est ici, et je le lui présenterai sur le champ.

MARTON.

Je doute que vous réussissiez, si nous n'apprenons rien de nouveau; mais
je tiens peut-être son congé, moi qui vous parle... Voici monsieur Remy:
je n'ai pas le temps de vous en dire davantage, et je vais m'éclaircir.

(_Elle veut sortir._)


SCÈNE V.

M. REMY, Mme. ARGANTE, LE COMTE, MARTON.

M. REMY, _à Marton, qui se retire_.

Bonjour, ma nièce, puisqu'enfin il faut que vous la soyez. Savez-vous ce
qu'on me veut ici?

MARTON, _brusquement_.

Passez, Monsieur, et cherchez votre nièce ailleurs; je n'aime point les
mauvais plaisants.

(_Elle sort._)

M. REMY.

Voilà une petite fille bien incivile? (_A madame Argante._) On m'a dit de
votre part de venir ici, Madame: de quoi est-il donc question?

Mme. ARGANTE, _d'un ton revêche_.

Ah! c'est donc vous, monsieur le procureur?

M. REMY.

Oui, Madame, je vous garantis que c'est moi-même.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Et de quoi vous êtes-vous avisé, je vous prie, de nous embarrasser d'un
intendant de votre façon?[143]

M. REMY.

Et par quel hasard Madame y trouve-t-elle à redire?

Mme. ARGANTE.

C'est que nous nous serions bien passés du présent que vous nous avez
fait.

M. REMY.

Ma foi, Madame, s'il n'est pas à votre goût, vous êtes bien difficile.

Mme. ARGANTE.

C'est votre neveu, dit-on?

M. REMY.

Oui, Madame.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Eh bien! tout votre neveu qu'il est, vous nous ferez un grand plaisir de
le retirer.

M. REMY.

Ce n'est pas à vous que je l'ai donné.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Non, mais c'est à nous qu'il déplaît, à moi et à monsieur le Comte que
voilà, et qui doit épouser ma fille.

M. REMY, _élevant la voix_.

Celui-ci est nouveau! Mais, Madame, dès qu'il n'est pas à vous, il me
semble qu'il n'est pas essentiel qu'il vous plaise. On n'a pas mis dans le
marché qu'il vous plairoit, personne n'a songé à cela; et, pourvu qu'il
convienne à madame Araminte, tout[144] doit être content; tant pis pour
qui ne l'est pas. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie?

Mme. ARGANTE.

Mais vous avez le ton bien rogue,[145] Monsieur Remy.

M. REMY.

Ma foi, vos compliments ne sont point propres à l'adoucir, Madame Argante.

LE COMTE.

Doucement, monsieur le procureur, doucement; il me paroît que vous avez
tort.

M. REMY.

Comme vous voudrez, monsieur le Comte, comme vous voudrez; mais cela ne
vous regarde pas. Vous savez bien que je n'ai pas l'honneur de vous
connoître, et nous n'avons que faire ensemble,[146] pas la moindre chose.

LE COMTE.

Que vous me connoissiez ou non; il n'est pas si peu essentiel que vous le
dites que votre neveu plaise à Madame. Elle n'est pas une étrangère dans
la maison.

M. REMY.

Parfaitement étrangère pour cette affaire-ci, Monsieur; on ne peut pas
plus étrangère; au surplus, Dorante est un homme d'honneur, connu pour
tel, dont j'ai répondu, dont je répondrai toujours, et dont Madame parle
ici d'une manière choquante.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Votre Dorante est un impertinent.

M. REMY.

Bagatelle! ce mot-là ne signifie rien dans votre bouche.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Dans ma bouche! A qui parle donc ce petit praticien, monsieur le Comte?
Est-ce que vous ne lui imposerez pas silence?

M. REMY.

Comment donc! m'imposer silence, à moi, procureur! Savez-vous bien qu'il y
a cinquante ans que je parle, madame Argante?

Mme. ARGANTE.

Il y a donc cinquante ans que vous ne savez ce que vous dites.


SCÈNE VI.

ARAMINTE, MME. ARGANTE, M. REMY, LE COMTE.

ARAMINTE.

Qu'y a-t-il donc? On diroit que vous vous querellez.

M. REMY.

Nous ne sommes pas fort en paix, et vous venez très à propos, Madame: il
s'agit de Dorante: avez-vous sujet de vous plaindre de lui?

ARAMINTE.

Non, que je sache.[147]

M. REMY.

Vous êtes-vous aperçue qu'il ait manqué de probité?

ARAMINTE.

Lui? non vraiment. Je ne le connois que pour un homme très estimable.

M. REMY.

Au discours que Madame en tient, ce doit pourtant être un fripon, dont il
faut que je vous délivre, et on se passerait bien du présent que je vous
en ai fait, et c'est un impertinent qui déplaît à Madame, qui déplaît à
Monsieur qui parle en qualité d'époux futur, et, à cause que[148] je le
défends, on veut me persuader que je radote.

ARAMINTE, _froidement_.

On se jette là dans de grands excès. Je n'y ai point de part, Monsieur. Je
suis bien éloignée de vous traiter si mal. A l'égard de Dorante, la
meilleure justification qu'il y ait pour lui, c'est que je le garde. Mais
je venois pour savoir une chose, monsieur le Comte. Il y a là-bas, m'a-t-
on dit, un homme d'affaires que vous avez amené pour moi: on se trompe
apparemment?

LE COMTE.

Madame, il est vrai qu'il est venu avec moi; mais c'est madame Argante...

Mme. ARGANTE.

Attendez, je vais répondre. Oui, ma fille, c'est moi qui ai prié Monsieur
de le faire venir pour remplacer celui que vous avez, et que vous allez
mettre dehors: je suis sûre de mon fait. J'ai laissé dire votre procureur,
au reste; mais il amplifie.[149]

M. REMY.

Courage!

Mme. ARGANTE, _vivement_.

Paix! vous avez assez parlé. (_A Araminte._) Je n'ai point dit que son
neveu fût un fripon. Il ne seroit pas impossible qu'il le fût; je n'en
serois pas étonnée.

M. REMY.

Mauvaise parenthèse, avec votre permission, supposition injurieuse, et
tout à fait hors d'oeuvre.[150]

Mme. ARGANTE.

Honnête homme, soit; du moins n'a-t-on pas encore de preuve du contraire,
et je veux croire qu'il l'est. Pour un impertinent, et très impertinent,
j'ai dit qu'il en étoit un, et j'ai raison. Vous dites que vous le
garderez: vous n'en ferez rien.

ARAMINTE, _froidement_.

Il restera, je vous assure.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Point du tout; vous ne sauriez. Seriez-vous d'humeur à garder un intendant
qui vous aime?

M. REMY.

Eh! à qui voulez-vous donc qu'il s'attache? A vous, à qui il n'a pas
affaire?

ARAMINTE.

Mais, en effet, pourquoi faut-il que mon intendant me haïsse?

Mme. ARGANTE.

Eh! non, point d'équivoque. Quand je vous dis qu'il vous aime, j'entends
qu'il est amoureux de vous, en bon françois; qu'il est ce qu'on appelle
amoureux; qu'il soupire pour vous; que vous êtes l'objet secret de sa
tendresse.

M. REMY.

Dorante?

ARAMINTE, _riant_.

L'objet secret de sa tendresse! Oh! oui, très secret, je pense. Ah! ah! je
ne me croyois pas si dangereuse à voir. Mais, dès que vous devinez de
pareils secrets, que ne devinez-vous que tous mes gens sont comme lui?
Peut-être qu'ils m'aiment aussi: que sait-on? Monsieur Remy, vous qui me
voyez assez souvent, j'ai envie de deviner que vous m'aimez aussi.

M. REMY.

Ma foi, Madame, à l'âge de mon neveu, je ne m'en tirerois pas mieux qu'on
dit qu'il s'en tire.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Ceci n'est pas matière à plaisanterie, ma fille. Il n'est pas question de
votre monsieur Remy; laissons-là ce bonhomme, et traitons la chose un peu
plus sérieusement. Vos gens ne vous font pas peindre, vos gens ne se
mettent point à contempler vos portraits, vos gens n'ont point l'air
galant, la mine doucereuse.

M. REMY, _à Araminte_.

J'ai laissé passer le «bonhomme» à cause de vous, au moins; mais le
«bonhomme» est quelquefois brutal.

ARAMINTE.

En vérité, ma mère, vous seriez la première à vous moquer de moi si ce que
vous me dites me faisoit la moindre impression; ce seroit une enfance[151]
à moi que de le renvoyer sur un pareil soupçon. Est-ce qu'on ne peut me
voir sans m'aimer? Je n'y saurois que faire; il faut bien m'y accoutumer,
et prendre mon parti là-dessus. Vous lui trouvez l'air galant, dites-vous?
Je n'y avois pas pris garde, et je ne lui en ferai point un reproche. Il y
auroit de la bizarrerie à se fâcher de ce qu'il est bien fait. Je suis
d'ailleurs comme tout le monde: j'aime assez les gens de bonne mine.


SCÈNE VII.

ARAMINTE, Mme. ARGANTE, M. REMY, LE COMTE, DORANTE.

DORANTE.

Je vous demande pardon, Madame, si je vous interromps. J'ai lieu de
présumer que mes services ne vous sont plus agréables, et, dans la
conjoncture présente, il est naturel que je sache mon sort.

Mme. ARGANTE, _ironiquement_.

Son sort! Le sort d'un intendant: que cela est beau!

M. REMY.

Et pourquoi n'auroit-il pas un sort?

ARAMINTE, _d'un air vif, à sa mère_.

Voilà des emportements qui m'appartiennent. (_A Dorante._) Quelle est
cette conjoncture, Monsieur, et le motif de votre inquiétude?

DORANTE.

Vous le savez, Madame. Il y a quelqu'un ici que vous avez envoyé chercher
pour occuper ma place.

ARAMINTE.

Ce quelqu'un-là est fort mal conseillé. Désabusez-vous: ce n'est point moi
qui l'ai fait venir.

DORANTE.

Tout a contribué à me tromper, d'autant plus que mademoiselle Marton vient
de m'assurer que dans une heure je ne serois plus ici.

ARAMINTE.

Marton vous a tenu un fort sot discours.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Le terme est encore trop long: il devroit en sortir tout à l'heure.[152]

M. REMY, _comme à part_.

Voyons par où cela finira.

ARAMINTE.

Allez, Dorante, tenez-vous en repos; fussiez-vous l'homme du monde qui me
convînt le moins, vous resteriez; dans cette occasion-ci, c'est à moi-même
que je dois cela; je me sens offensée du procédé qu'on a avec moi, et je
vais faire dire à cet homme d'affaires qu'il se retire; que ceux qui l'ont
amené, sans me consulter, le remmènent, et qu'il n'en soit plus parlé.


SCÈNE VIII.

ARAMINTE, Mme. ARGANTE, M. REMY, LE COMTE, DORANTE, MARTON.

MARTON, _froidement_.

Ne vous pressez pas de le renvoyer. Madame; voilà une lettre de
recommandation pour lui, et c'est monsieur Dorante qui l'a écrite.

ARAMINTE.

Comment!

MARTON, _donnant la lettre au Comte_.

Un instant, Madame, cela mérite d'être écouté; la lettre est de Monsieur,
vous dis-je.

LE COMTE _lit haut_.

_Je vous conjure, mon cher ami, d'être demain sur les neuf heures du matin
chez vous; j'ai bien des choses à vous dire: je crois que je vais sortir
de chez la dame que vous savez; elle ne peut plus ignorer la malheureuse
passion que j'ai prise pour elle, et dont je ne guérirai jamais._

Mme. ARGANTE.

De la passion, entendez-vous, ma fille?

LE COMTE _lit_.

_Un misérable ouvrier que je n'attendois pas est venu ici m'apporter la
boîte de ce portrait que j'ai fait d'elle._

Mme. ARGANTE.

C'est-à-dire que le personnage sait peindre.

LE COMTE _lit_.

_J'étois absent, il l'a laissée à une fille de la maison._

Mme. ARGANTE, _à Marton_.

Fille de la maison, cela vous regarde.

LE COMTE _lit_.

_On a soupçonné que ce portrait m'appartenoit: ainsi je pense qu'on va
tout découvrir, et qu'avec le chagrin d'être renvoyé et de perdre le
plaisir de voir tous les jours celle que j'adore..._

Mme. ARGANTE.

Que j'adore! ah! que j'adore!

LE COMTE _lit_.

_J'aurai encore celui d'être méprisé d'elle._

Mme. ARGANTE.

Je crois qu'il n'a pas mal deviné celui-là, ma fille.

LE COMTE _lit_.

_Non pas à cause de la médiocrité de ma fortune, sorte de mépris dont je
n'oserois la croire capable..._

Mme. ARGANTE.

Eh! pourquoi non?

LE COMTE _lit_.

_Mais seulement à cause du peu que je vaux auprès d'elle, tout honoré que
je suis de l'estime de tant d'honnêtes gens._

Mme. ARGANTE.

Et en vertu de quoi l'estiment-ils tant?

LE COMTE _lit_.

_Auquel cas je n'ai plus que faire à Paris. Vous êtes à la veille de vous
embarquer, et je suis déterminé à vous suivre._

Mme. ARGANTE.

Bon voyage au galant.

M. REMY.

Le beau motif d'embarquement!

Mme. ARGANTE.

Hé bien! en avez-vous le coeur net, ma fille?

LE COMTE.

L'éclaircissement m'en paroît complet.

ARAMINTE, à Dorante.

Quoi! cette lettre n'est pas d'une écriture contrefaite? Vous ne la niez
point?

DORANTE.

Madame...

ARAMINTE.

Retirez-vous.

M. REMY.

Eh bien! quoi? c'est de l'amour qu'il a; ce n'est pas d'aujourd'hui que
les belles personnes en donnent, et, tel que vous le voyez, il n'en a pas
pris pour toutes celles qui auroient bien voulu lui en donner. Cet amour-
là lui coûte quinze mille livres de rente, sans compter les mers qu'il
veut courir; voilà le mal: car, au reste, s'il étoit riche, le personnage
en vaudroit bien un autre; il pourroit bien dire qu'il adore.
(_Contrefaisant madame Argante._) Et cela ne seroit point si ridicule.
Accommodez-vous; au reste, je suis votre serviteur, Madame.

(_Il sort._)

MARTON.

Fera-t-on monter l'intendant que monsieur le Comte a amené, Madame?

ARAMINTE.

N'entendrai-je parler que d'intendant? Allez-vous en, vous prenez mal
votre temps pour me faire des questions.

(_Marton sort._)

Mme. ARGANTE.

Mais, ma fille, elle a raison; c'est monsieur le Comte qui vous en répond,
il n'y a qu'à le prendre.

ARAMINTE.

Et moi je n'en veux point.

LE COMTE.

Est-ce à cause[153] qu'il vient de ma part, Madame?

ARAMINTE.

Vous êtes le maître d'interpréter, Monsieur; mais je n'en veux point.

LE COMTE.

Vous vous expliquez là-dessus d'un air de vivacité qui m'étonne.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Mais en effet, je ne vous reconnois pas. Qu'est-ce qui vous fâche?

ARAMINTE.

Tout: on s'y est mal pris; il y a dans tout ceci des façons si
désagréables, des moyens si offensants, que tout m'en choque.

Mme. ARGANTE, _étonnée_.

On ne vous entend[154] point.

LE COMTE.

Quoique je n'aie aucune part à ce qui vient de se passer, je ne m'aperçois
que trop, Madame, que je ne suis pas exempt de votre mauvaise humeur, et
je serois fâché d'y contribuer davantage par ma présence.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Non, Monsieur, je vous suis. Ma fille, je retiens monsieur le Comte; vous
allez venir nous trouver apparemment.[155] Vous n'y songez pas,[156]
Araminte, on ne sait que penser.


SCÈNE IX.

ARAMINTE, DUBOIS.

DUBOIS.

Enfin, Madame, à ce que je vois, vous en voilà délivrée[157]: qu'il
devienne tout ce qu'il voudra à présent, tout le monde a été témoin de sa
folie, et vous n'avez plus rien à craindre de sa douleur; il ne dit mot.
Au reste, je viens seulement de le rencontrer, plus mort que vif, qui
traversoit la galerie pour aller chez lui. Vous auriez trop ri de le voir
soupirer; il m'a pourtant fait pitié: je l'ai vu si défait, si pâle et si
triste, que j'ai eu peur qu'il ne se trouve mal.

ARAMINTE, _qui ne l'a pas regardé jusque-là, et qui a toujours rêvé, dit
d'un ton haut_.

Mais qu'on aille donc voir! Quelqu'un l'a-t-il suivi? Que ne le secouriez-
vous? Faut-il tuer cet homme?

DUBOIS.

J'y ai pourvu, Madame; j'ai appelé Arlequin, qui ne le quittera pas, et je
crois d'ailleurs qu'il n'arrivera rien: voilà qui est fini; je ne suis
venu que pour vous dire une chose, c'est que je pense qu'il demandera à
vous parler, et je ne conseille pas à Madame de le voir davantage: ce
n'est pas la peine.

ARAMINTE, _sèchement_.

Ne vous embarrassez pas, ce sont mes affaires.

DUBOIS.

En un mot, vous en êtes quitte, et cela par le moyen de cette lettre qu'on
vous a lue, et que mademoiselle Marton a tirée d'Arlequin par mon avis. Je
me suis douté qu'elle pourrait vous être utile, et c'est une excellente
idée que j'ai eue là, n'est-ce pas, Madame?

ARAMINTE, _froidement_.

Quoi! c'est à vous que j'ai l'obligation de la scène qui vient de se
passer?

DUBOIS, _librement_.

Oui, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Méchant valet, ne vous présentez plus devant moi.

DUBOIS, _comme étonné_.

Hélas! Madame, j'ai cru bien faire.

ARAMINTE.

Allez, malheureux! Il falloit m'obéir; je vous avois dit de ne plus vous
en mêler: vous m'avez jetée dans tous les désagréments que je voulois
éviter. C'est vous qui avez répandu tous les soupçons qu'on a eus[158] sur
son compte, et ce n'est pas par attachement pour moi que vous m'avez
appris qu'il m'aimoit: ce n'est que par le plaisir de faire du mal. Il
m'importoit peu d'en être instruite: c'est un amour que je n'aurois jamais
su, et je le trouve bien malheureux d'avoir eu affaire à vous, lui qui a
été votre maître, qui vous affectionnoit, qui vous a bien traité, qui
vient, tout récemment encore, de vous prier à genoux de lui garder le
secret. Vous l'assassinez, vous me trahissez moi-même: il faut que vous
soyez capable de tout. Que je ne vous voie jamais, et point de réplique.

DUBOIS, _s'en va en riant_.

Allons, voilà qui est parfait.


SCÈNE X.

ARAMINTE, MARTON.

MARTON, _triste_.

La manière dont vous m'avez renvoyée il n'y a qu'un moment me montre que
je vous suis désagréable, Madame, et je crois vous faire plaisir en vous
demandant mon congé.

ARAMINTE, _froidement_.

Je vous le donne.

MARTON.

Votre intention est-elle que je sorte dès aujourd'hui, Madame?

ARAMINTE.

Comme vous voudrez.

MARTON.

Cette aventure-ci est bien triste pour moi!

ARAMINTE.

Oh! point d'explication, s'il vous plaît.

MARTON.

Je suis au désespoir!

ARAMINTE, _avec impatience_.

Est-ce que vous êtes fâchée de vous en aller? Eh bien! restez,
Mademoiselle, restez: j'y consens; mais finissons.

MARTON.

Après les bienfaits dont vous m'avez comblée, que ferois-je auprès de vous
à présent que je vous suis suspecte, et que j'ai perdu toute votre
confiance?

ARAMINTE.

Mais que voulez-vous que je vous confie? Inventerai-je des secrets pour
vous les dire?

MARTON.

Il est pourtant vrai que vous me renvoyez, Madame, D'où vient ma disgrâce.

ARAMINTE.

Elle est dans votre imagination. Vous me demandez votre congé, je vous le
donne.

MARTON.

Ah! Madame, pourquoi m'avez-vous exposée au malheur de vous déplaire? J'ai
persécuté par ignorance l'homme du monde le plus aimable, qui vous aime
plus qu'on n'a jamais aimé.

ARAMINTE, _à part_.

Hélas.

MARTON.

Et à qui je n'ai rien à reprocher: car il vient de me parler. J'étois son
ennemie, et je ne la suis plus. Il m'a tout dit. Il ne m'avoit jamais vue:
c'est monsieur Remy qui m'a trompée, et j'excuse Dorante.

ARAMINTE.

A la bonne heure.

MARTON.

Pourquoi avez-vous eu la cruauté de m'abandonner au hasard d'aimer un
homme qui n'est pas fait pour moi, qui est digne de vous, et que j'ai jeté
dans une douleur dont je suis pénétrée.

ARAMINTE, _d'un ton doux_.

Tu l'aimois donc, Marton?

MARTON.

Laissons là mes sentiments. Rendez-moi votre amitié comme je l'avois, et
je serai contente.

ARAMINTE.

Ah! je te la rends toute entière.

MARTON, _lui baisant la main_.

Me voilà consolée.

ARAMINTE.

Non, Marton, tu ne l'es pas encore. Tu pleures, et tu m'attendris.

MARTON.

N'y prenez point garde. Rien ne m'est si cher que vous!

ARAMINTE.

Va, je prétends bien te faire oublier tous tes chagrins. Je pense que
voici Arlequin.


SCÈNE XI.

ARAMINTE, MARTON, ARLEQUIN.

ARAMINTE.

Que veux-tu?

ARLEQUIN, _pleurant et sanglotant_.

J'aurois bien de la peine à vous le dire, car je suis dans une détresse
qui me coupe entièrement la parole, à cause de la trahison que
mademoiselle Marton m'a faite. Ah! quelle ingrate perfidie!

MARTON.

Laisse là ta perfidie, et nous dis[159] ce que tu veux.

ARLEQUIN.

Ah! cette pauvre lettre! Quelle escroquerie!

ARAMINTE.

Dis donc.

ARLEQUIN.

Monsieur Dorante vous demande à genoux qu'il vienne ici vous rendre compte
des paperasses qu'il a eues[160] dans les mains depuis qu'il est ici. Il
m'attend à la porte, où il pleure.

MARTON.

Dis-lui qu'il vienne.

ARLEQUIN.

Le voulez-vous, Madame? car je ne me fie pas à elle. Quand on m'a une fois
affronté[161] je n'en reviens point.

MARTON, _d'un air triste et attendri_.

Parlez-lui, Madame; je vous laisse,

ARLEQUIN, _quand Marton est partie_.

Vous ne me répondez point. Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Il peut venir.

(_Arlequin sort_.)


SCÈNE XII.

DORANTE, ARAMINTE.

ARAMINTE.

Approchez, Dorante.

DORANTE.

Je n'ose presque paroître devant vous.

ARAMINTE, _à part_.

Ah! je n'ai guère plus d'assurance que lui. (_Haut_.) Pourquoi vouloir me
rendre compte de mes papiers? Je m'en fie bien à vous. Ce n'est pas là-
dessus que j'aurai à me plaindre.

DORANTE.

Madame... j'ai autre chose à dire... Je suis si interdit, si tremblant,
que je ne saurais parler.

ARAMINTE, _à part, avec émotion_.

Ah! que je crains la fin de tout ceci!

DORANTE, _ému_.

Un de vos fermiers[162] est venu tantôt, Madame.

ARAMINTE, _émue_.

Un de mes fermiers!... Cela se peut.

DORANTE.

Oui, Madame... il est venu.

ARAMINTE, _toujours émue_.

Je n'en doute pas.

DORANTE, _ému_.

Et j'ai de l'argent à vous remettre.

ARAMINTE.

Ah! de l'argent!... Nous verrons.

DORANTE.

Quand il vous plaira, Madame, de le recevoir.

ARAMINTE.

Oui... je le recevrai... vous me le donnerez. (_A part._) Je ne sais ce
que je lui réponds.

DORANTE.

Ne seroit-il pas temps de vous l'apporter ce soir ou demain, Madame?

ARAMINTE.

Demain, dites-vous? Comment vous garder jusque-là, après ce qui est
arrivé?

DORANTE, _plaintivement_.

De tout le temps de ma vie que je vais passer loin de vous, je n'aurois
plus que ce seul jour qui m'en seroit précieux.

ARAMINTE.

Il n'y a pas moyen, Dorante: il faut se quitter. On sait que vous m'aimez,
et on croiroit que je n'en suis pas fâchée.

DORANTE.

Hélas! Madame, que je vais être à plaindre!

ARAMINTE.

Ah! allez, Dorante, chacun a ses chagrins.

DORANTE.

J'ai tout perdu! J'avois un portrait, et je ne l'ai plus.

ARAMINTE.

A quoi vous sert de l'avoir? vous savez peindre.

DORANTE.

Je ne pourrai de longtemps m'en dédommager. D'ailleurs, celui-ci m'auroit
été bien cher! Il a été entre vos mains, Madame.

ARAMINTE.

Mais vous n'êtes pas raisonnable.

DORANTE.

Ah! Madame, je vais être éloigné de vous. Vous serez assez vengée;
n'ajoutez rien à ma douleur.

ARAMINTE.

Vous donner mon portrait! Songez-vous que ce seroit avouer que je vous
aime.

DORANTE.

Que vous m'aimez, Madame! Quelle idée! Qui pourrait se l'imaginer?

ARAMINTE, _d'un ton vif et naïf_.

Et voilà pourtant ce qui m'arrive.

DORANTE, _se jetant à ses genoux_.

Je me meurs!

ARAMINTE.

Je ne sais plus où je suis. Modérez votre joie; levez-vous, Dorante.

DORANTE _se lève, et tendrement_.

Je ne la mérite pas. Cette joie me transporte. Je ne la mérite pas.
Madame. Vous allez me l'ôter, mais n'importe, il faut que vous soyez
instruite.

ARAMINTE, _étonné_.

Comment! que voulez-vous dire?

DORANTE.

Dans tout ce qui s'est passé chez vous, il n'y a rien de vrai que ma
passion, qui est infinie, et que le portrait que j'ai fait. Tous les
incidents qui sont arrivés partent de l'industrie d'un domestique qui
savoit mon amour, qui m'en plaint, qui, par le charme de l'espérance du
plaisir de vous voir, m'a pour ainsi dire forcé de consentir à son
stratagème: il vouloit me faire valoir auprès de vous, Voilà, Madame, ce
que mon respect, mon amour et mon caractère ne me permettent pas de vous
cacher. J'aime encore mieux regretter votre tendresse que de la devoir à
l'artifice qui me l'a acquise; j'aime mieux votre haine que le remords
d'avoir trompé ce que j'adore.

ARAMINTE, _le regardant quelque temps sans parler_.

Si j'apprenois cela d'un autre que de vous, je vous haïrais sans doute;
mais l'aveu que vous m'en faites vous-même, dans un moment comme celui-ci,
change tout. Ce trait de sincérité me charme, me paroît incroyable, et
vous êtes le plus honnête homme du monde. Après tout, puisque vous m'aimez
véritablement, ce que vous avez fait pour gagner mon coeur n'est point
blâmable: il est permis à un amant de chercher les moyens de plaire, et on
doit lui pardonner lorsqu'il a réussi.

DORANTE.

Quoi! la charmante Araminte daigne me justifier?

ARAMINTE.

Voici le Comte avec ma mère; ne dites mot, et laissez-moi parler.


SCÈNE DERNIÈRE.

DORANTE, ARAMINTE, LE COMTE, Mme. ARGANTE.

Mme. ARGANTE, _voyant Dorante_.

Quoi! le voilà encore!

ARAMINTE, _froidement_.

Oui, ma mère. (_Au Comte_.) Monsieur le Comte, il étoit question de
mariage entre vous et moi, et il n'y faut plus penser. Vous méritez qu'on
vous aime; mon coeur n'est point en état de vous rendre justice, et je ne
suis pas d'un rang qui vous convienne.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Quoi donc! que signifie ce discours?

LE COMTE.

Je vous entends,[163] Madame, et, sans l'avoir dit à Madame (_montrant
madame Argante_), je songeois à me retirer. J'ai deviné tout: Dorante
n'est venu chez vous qu'à cause[164] qu'il vous aimoit; il vous a plu,
vous voulez lui faire sa fortune: voilà tout ce que vous alliez dire.

ARAMINTE.

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

Mme. ARGANTE, _outrée_.

La fortune à cet homme-là!

LE COMTE, _tristement_.

Il n'y a plus que notre discussion, que nous réglerons à l'amiable; j'ai
dit que je ne plaiderois point, et je tiendrai parole.

ARAMINTE.

Vous êtes bien généreux; envoyez-moi quelqu'un qui en décide, et ce sera
assez.

Mme. ARGANTE.

Ah! la belle chute! Ah! ce maudit intendant! Qu'il soit votre mari tant
qu'il vous plaira, mais il ne sera jamais mon gendre.

ARAMINTE.

Laissons passer sa colère, et finissons.

(_Ils sortent_.)

DUBOIS.

Ouf! ma gloire m'accable; je mériterois bien d'appeler cette femme-là ma
bru.[165]

ARLEQUIN.

Pardi,[166] nous nous soucions bien de ton tableau à présent! L'original
nous en fournira bien d'autres copies.


       *       *       *       *       *


NOTES.


INTRODUCTION.

[1] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 564.

[2] Palissot, p. 3, quoting evidently from de La Porte, p. 1.

[3] D'Alembert, p. 209.

[4] Fournier, _Notice_, p. 2.

[5] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 17, note 3.

[6] Gossot, _Marivaux moraliste_, p. 11.

[7] "Pierre Carlet de Marivaux naquit à Paris sur la Paroisse de Saint-
Gervais en 1688, et non en Auvergne, comme on le trouve écrit en plusieurs
endroits." De La Porte, p. 1.

[8] De La Porte, p. 1.

[9] Lesbros de la Versane, p. 5.

[10] "M. de Marivaux, à ce qu'on peut juger [note that Palissot draws his
own conclusions and does not state a fact], n'avait point fait de bonnes
études; on pourrait même soupçonner qu'il n'en avait fait aucunes."
Palissot, pp. 4-5.

[11] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 210.

[12] Marivaux, _le Spectateur français_, 7e feuille. OEuvres, tome IX, p.
62.

[13] Marivaux, _Oeuvres_, tome IX, pp. 9-11. This anecdote has been
narrated by all of Marivaux's biographers, but sometimes so fancifully, as
in the case of Houssaye [_Galerie du XVIIIe siècle_, première série pp.
94-95], that it has seemed well to give the author's own account.

[14] Houssaye, _Galerie du XVIIIe siècle_, première série, p. 95.

[15] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 242.

[16] According to d'Alembert, p. 214. L'abbé de La Porte does not mention
his age.

[17 D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 215.

[18] Fontenelle, _Oeuvres_, tome VII, p. 546 (_Éloge de Mme. de Lambert_).

[19] Lucien Brunel, in Petit de Julleville's _Histoire de la langue et de
la littérature française_, tome vi, p. 396.

[20] Palissot, p. 10.

[21] Marmontel, _Mémoires_, livre IV, tome I, pp. 232-233.

[22] Marivaux, _La Vie de Marianne_, 4e partie. Oeuvres, tome VI, p. 275.

[23] Marivaux, ibid., tome VI, p. 276.

[24] Deschamps, _Marivaux_, p. 87.

[25] Marmontel, _Mémoires_, livre VI, tome II, p. 88.

[26] Ibid., p. 90.

[27] "Sensible, et même ombrageux dans la société, sur les discours qui
pouvaient avoir rapport à lui, il avait souvent le malheur de ne pouvoir
cacher cette disposition, aussi importune pour lui que pour les autres; il
la décelait quelquefois au point d'être vivement blessé de ce qu'on
n'avait pas dit." D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 244.

"Il était repli d'amour-propre lui-même, et je n'ai vu de mes jours à cet
égard personne d'aussi chatouilleux que lui. Il fallait le louer et le
caresser continuellement comme une jolie femme." Collé, _Journal et
mémoires_, p. 289.

"Marivaux était honnête homme, mais d'un caractère ombrageux et d'un
commerce difficile; il entendait finesse à tout; les mots les plus
innocents le blessaient, et il supposait volontiers qu'on cherchait à le
mortifier: ce qui l'a rendu malheureux, et son commerce épineux et
insupportable." Grimm, _Correspondance littéraire_, tome III, p. 183.

[28] De La Porte, pp.6-7. Lebros de la Versane, pp. 20-21, repeats the
words of de La Porte, without, however, acknowledging the quotation.

[29] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 242.

[30] Marmontel, _Mémoires_, livre VII, tome II, pp. 222-224.

[31] There is little, if any, doubt that Marivaux was the author of all
three of these productions, as well as of the _Télémaque travesti_, the
authorship of which he denied. For a discussion of the matter, see
Larroumet, _Marivaux_, edition of 1894, p. 25, note 2, pp. 29, 30, notes 1
and 2; Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, pp. 14, 16, 17, 18;
_Bibliothèque française, ou Histoire littéraire de la France_, Amsterdam,
H. Du Sauzet, in-12, t. XXII, dernière partie, 1736, p. 249, etc.

[32] Fournier, Théâtre complet de Marivaux, Notice, p. 6.

[33] Sainte-Beuve, _Causeries du lundi_, tome IX, p. 275.

[34] See note, p. xxxvi.

[35] Marivaux, _le Spectateur français_, 1e feuille. Oeuvres, tome IX, p.
8.

[36] Marivaux, _le Spectateur français_, 1e feuille. Oeuvres, tome IX, p.
36.

[37] Ibid., 3e feuille, p. 21.

[38] Ibid., 1e feuille, p. 4.

[39] Lesbros de la Versane, pp. 29, 30.

[40] See Marivaux, _le Spectateur français_, 1e feuille. Oeuvres, tome XX,
p. 9.

[41] Charles Collé, in his _Journal et Mémoires_, tome II, p. 288, gives
the following bit of testimony along this line: "Marivaux était curieux en
ligne et en habits; il était friand et aimait les bons morceaux; il était
très difficile à nourrir."

[42] Lebros de la Versane, pp. 37-38.

[43] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 237.

[44] Lebros de la Versane, pp. 27-28. D'Alembert, _Éloge_, pp. 256-257.

[45] De La Porte, p. 8, and Lesbros de la Versane, p. 26, are agreed as to
her name and place of residence. Houssaye, p. 97, gives her name as Mlle.
Julie Duriez, but cites no authority.

[46] Reference as above to de La Porte and Lesbros de la Versane.

[47] De La Porte, p. 8, and Lesbros, p. 27. Houssaye, pp. 100-106, relates
a pathetic and perhaps wholly fanciful romance, in which Guillaume de Bez
and Mlle. Marivaux were the chief actors; but, contrary to the custom of
Marivaux's comedies, love did not triumph; the worldly mother married her
son unhappily, and the blind father, who thought that he could read so
well the heart of woman, immured his daughter in a convent.

[48] Lesbros de la Versane, p. 27.

[49] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 258.

[50] See Lesbros de la Versane, p. 36, and d'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 258.

[51] Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, p. 241.

[52] Marivaux, _le Spectateur français_, 1e feuille. Oeuvres, tome IX, p.
6.

[53] See Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, p. 63.

[54] It was not, however, until 1689 that the _Hôtel des comédiens du Roi,
entretenus par Sa Majesté_ installed itself on the rue des Fossés-Saint-
Germain, and took the title of Comédie-Française.

[55] As early as 1548 a troupe of Italian comedians had performed at
Lyons, for the entrance of Henry II and Catherine de' Medici.

[56] On Oct. 12, 1707, their ranks were increased by Dominique fils,
particularly clever in the rôles of Trivelin.

[57] "The name indicates a type. It is, moreover, about the same with the
Théâtre-Français of this epoch. The mothers are called Argante; the
widows, Araminte; the artless girls, Angélique or Lucile; the lovers,
Dorante, Éraste, Ergaste; the old men, Géronte; the valets, Crispin,
Frontin, Trivelin; the peasants, Blaise, etc." Fleury, _Marivaux et le
marivaudage_, pp. 63-64.

[58] See Larousse, Article _Comédie-Italienne_.

[59] There was a brief period, from 1717 to 1726, in which Crébillon
withdrew in discouragement from the theatre.

[60] Other writers for the Théâtre-Italien at this time were Autreau,
Delisle, Fuzelier, none of whom is very famous.

[61] "On lui en connaît au moins trois pour ces sortes de couplets, alors
à la mode, chantés et dansés, soit entre les divers actes, soit à la fin
de la pièce. Ces collaborateurs sont l'aîné des deux frères Parfaict pour
le divertissement de la _Fausse suivante_ (_Anecdotes dramatiques_, t. II,
p. 345), Riccoboni pour celui de la _Joie imprévue_, le chansonnier Panard
pour celui du _Triomphe de Plutus_ (_Journal de police_, dans _le Journal
de Barbier_, t. VIII, p. 205) et pour celui de la _Colonie_ (_Nouveau
théâtre italien_, t. I, p. 336). Suivant le _Dictionnaire des Théâtres_
(supplément, p. 470), le même François Parfaict, dans un moment où
Marivaux avait hâte de donner à la Comédie-Française son _Dénouement
imprévu_ (un acte, 10 décembre 1724), l'aida à en "dégrossir quelques
scènes." Larroumet, _Marivaux_, edition of 1894, p. 33, note 1.

[62] Jules Lemaître, _Impressions de théâtre_, 4e série, p. 77.

[63] La Harpe, _Cours de littérature ancienne et moderne_, tome XIV, p.
477.

[64] Jules Lemaître, _Imprressions de théâtre, 2e série, p. 28.

[65] Lesbros de la Versane, p. 6.

[66] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 63.

[67] De La Porte, p. 3. Lebros de la Versane repeats the same idea, p. 8.

[68] See Larroumet, _Marivaux_, pp. 63-64.

[69] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 220.

[70] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 220.

[71] Ibid, p. 219.

[72] Both Lesbros de la Versane, pp. 14-17, and d'Alembert, pp. 218-219,
relate the anecdote, and in much the same way. I follow, in the main, the
account given by Lebros.

[73] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 60.

[74] Lesbros de la Versane, p. 19. D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 291, note 19.

[75] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 237.

[76] _Le Spectateur français_, 4e feuille. Oeuvres, tome IX, pp. 30-31.

[77] Found in the twelfth leaflet of the _Spectateur_. See d'Alembert,
_Éloge_, p. 235.

[78] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, note 15.

[79] Marivaux, _le Spectateur français_, 16e feuille. Oeuvres, tome IX, p.
160.

[80] Sarcey, (_Quarante ans de théâtre_, tome II, pp. 265-266) argues
against this conception.

[81] Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, p. 59.

[82] Lavollée, _Marivaux inconnu, p. 61.

[83] See Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage, p. 167.

[84] Ibid., pp. 192-202.

[85] "La première moitié seule fut insérée dans le _Monde_, parce que ce
recueil cessa de vivre. La seconde moitié parut pour la première fois dans
un volume de nouvelles de Mme. Riccoboni." Ibid., p. 202, note I.

[86] "Nous ajouterons que M. de Climal est un Tartuffe de cour, un
hypocrite de _bonne compagnie_, mais en même temps d'une hypocrisie trop
déliée pour être mise sur le théâtre et saisie par la foule des
spectateurs." D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 238.

[87] The attitude of Marianne towards her faithless lover and his ultimate
return are foreshadowed in the early part of the story, although Marivaux
leaves the breach unclosed. In fact, the opportunity for dramatic action
is neglected by Marivaux, whose genius led him to analyses of motives
rather than to portrayals of deep feeling or strong emotion.

[88] La Harpe, _Cours de littérature ancienne et moderne_, tome XVI, p.
273.

[89] Marivaux, _Vie de Marianne_, 4e partie. Oeuvres, tome VI, p. 212.

[90] Ibid., 5e partie. Oeuvres, tome VI, p. 285.

[91] Marivaux, _Le Paysan parvenu_, 4e partie. Oeuvres, tome VIII, pp.
136-137.

[92] An exception must be made in the case of the _Iliade travestie_, in
which work his pen is needlessly wanton. See Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p.
517.

[93] _Impressions de théâtre_, 2e série, p. 29.

[94] Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, p. 214.

[95] Grimm et Diderot, _Correspondence littéraire_, tome 1, p. 41.

[96] Marivaux, _le Spectateur français_, 19e feuille. Oeuvres, tome IX, p.
190.

[97] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 259.

[98] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 259.

[99] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 260.

[100] For an excellent comparison of Marivaux and the English novelists
see Larroumet, _Marivaux_, pp. 348-364.

[101] See d'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 229, and Collé, _Journal historique_,
février, 1763, tome II, p. 290.

[102] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, edition of 1894, pp. 293-294.

[103] _Causeries du lundi_, tome IX, p. 286 and p. 296. His criticism of
Marivaux as novelist is rather harsh.

[104] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 221.

[105] La Harpe criticises Marivaux for this peculiarity. "Le noeud de ses
pièces n'est autre chose qu'un mot qu'on s'obstine à ne dire qu'à la fin,
et que tout le monde sait dès le commencement." _Cours de littérature_,
etc., tome XIII, p. 336.

[106] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 222.

[107] Deschamps, _Marivaux_, p. 186.

[108] Deschamps, _Marivaux_, p. 52.

[109] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 282, note 12.

[110] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 292.

[111] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 293.]

[112] _L'Ile de la Raison, La Réunion des Amours, la Dispute, Félicie,
Arlequin poli par l'Amour, le Prince travesti, l'Ile des Esclaves, le
Triomphe de Plutus, le Triomphe de l'Amour, la Colonie._ Larroumet,
_Marivaux_, p. 252, note 2.

[113] Jules Lemaître, _Impressions de théâtre_, 2e série, p. 27.
Larroumet, pp. 292-297, gives a most interesting comparison of Marivaux
with Shakespeare, and in note 2, p. 292, gives a brief sketch of the
origin of this comparison and of its opponents.

[114] For a more complete idea of his drama one may have recourse to
Larroumet, _Marivaux_, pp. 157-320, Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_,
pp. 66-146, or Printzen, _Marivaux_, pp.41-38, who gives résumés of his
comedies.

[115] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 319.

[116] Marivaux, _Théâtre choisi_, Paris, Librairie des Bibliophiles, 1892.
Preface by F. Sarcey, pp. 7 and 15-17.

[117] J. Lemaître, _Impressions de théâtre_, 2e série, p. 23.

[118] See Lesbros de la Versane, p. 9, who adds: "Ce qui prouve combien
son goût était sûr, puisque ce sont ses meilleures pièces."

De La Porte, p. 3, gives a list of Marivaux's plays most popular with his
contemporaries: "Celles qui reparaissent le plus souvent à la Comédie-
Française sont _la Surprise de l'Amour_, _le Legs_ et _le Préjugé vaincu_;
et aux Italiens, _la Mère confidente_, _l'École des Mères_, _l'Heureux
Stratagème_, _les Fausses Confidences_, _l'Épreuve_, _Arlequin poli par
l'Amour_, _la Double Inconstance_, _le Fausse Suivante_, _l'Ile des
Esclaves_, _le Jeu de l'Amour et du Hasard_."

[119] Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, p 129.

[120] Lonient, _la Comédie en France au XVIIIe siècle_, p. 367.

[121] Sarcey, in _le Temps_ of April 4, 1881 (see _Quarante ans de
théâtre_, tome 11, p. 262), gives an interesting comparison between _les
Fausses Confidences_ and Octave Feuillet's _Roman d'un jeune homme
pauvre_, in which he gives all credit to the former. "M. Octave Feuillet,"
says he, "a récrit (le roman des _Fausses Confidences_) et lui a donné je
ne sais quoi de plus sombre. Son jeune homme pauvre est fier, cassant, et
tombe parfois dans le mélodrame; sa jeune fille riche est agitée et
nerveuse; leurs débats sont souvent violents et tristes. Le roman des
_Fausses Confidences_ se joue au contraire dans le pays lumineux des
songes, et Dorante et Araminte charmeront encore les générations futures
quand déjà il ne sera plus parlé du Maxime Odiot de M. Feuillet et de sa
Marguerite Laroque." Vitet seems to have given an anticipatory reply to
this severe criticism in his _Discours de réception d'Octave Feuillet à
l'Académie française_ (March 26, 1863), and Larroumet (p. 197, note 2)
supports the latter's view.

[122] _Causeries du lundi_, tome IX, p. 299.

[123] Acte I, scène VIII.

[124] Collé, _Journal et mémoires_, tome II, p. 289. Février 1763.

[125] La Harpe, _Cours de littérature ancienne et moderne_, tome XIII, p.
381.

[126] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 329.]

[127] Consult chapter III, on _les Personnages_ (pp. 150-153), of Fleury's
_Marivaux et le marivaudage_ for a brief and happy summing up of these
various differences, or part II, chapter I (pp. 93-155) of Deschamps'
_Marivaux_, for a more extensive development.

[128] Brunetière, _Nouvelles études critiques_, pp. 151-152.

[129] Lescure, _Éloge de Marivaux_, p. 27.

[130] Frontin, of _la Méprise_, is a noteworthy exception. His wit is
decidedly superior to that of his master Ergate.

[131] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 225-226.

[132] See Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, 73-75, and Larroumet,
_Marivaux_, pp. 227-229.

[133] Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, p. 284.

[134] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, pp. 366-370.

[135] "Il habille à la moderne _les Surprises de l'Amour_, refait _le
Legs_ dans _l'Ane et le Ruisseau_, _l'Heureux Stratagème_ dans _le
Caprice_, _le Petit-Maître corrigé_ dans _On ne badine pas avec l'amour_."
Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 369.

[136] Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 395, note I.

[137] Marivaux, _Oeuvres_, tome VII, p. 41.

[138] Ibid., tome VII, p. 237.

[139] Marivaux, _Oeuvres_, tome VI, p. 393.

[140] Ibid., tome VI, p. 345.

[141] Sainte-Beuve, _Causeries du lundi_, tome IX, p. 393.

[142] Deschamps, _Marivaux_, pp. 182-183.

[143] See La Harpe, _Cours de littérature ancienne et moderne_, tome XVI,
p. 272.

[144] Avertissement des _Serments indiscrets_. Marivaux, _Oeuvres_, tome
II, p. 7.

[145] On this subject consult Larroumet, _Marivaux_, pp. 541-561.

[146] Palissot (pp. 8-9) speaks of it as "un reste du jargon proscrit dans
_les Précieuses_ de Molière." "En effet," he continues, "les deux filles
de _Gorgibus_ n'auraient peut-être pas défini le sentiment d'une manière
plus étrange que M. de Marivaux ne l'a fait dans ce passage tiré de
_Marianne_: Qu'est-ce que le sentiment? c'est l'utile enjolivé de
l'honnête; malheureusement dans ce siècle, on n'enjolive plus." The
passage is from the fifth part of _le Paysan parvenu_ (_Oeuvres_, tome
VIII, p. 177) and not from _Marianne_, and is, exactly quoted, as follows:
"Mais c'est la nature qui nous rend amoureux; nous tenons d'elle l'utile
que nous enjolivons de l'honnête; j'appelle ainsi le sentiment; on
n'enjolive pourtant plus guère; la mode en est aussi passée dans ce temps
où j'écris."

[147] Among the words mentioned by Desfontaines as neologisms perpetrated
by Marivaux, none can be considered as coined words, and but very few,
such as _disciplinable_, _fictivement_, _scélératesse_, as obsolete or
unusual.

[148] Fleury, _Marivaux et le marivaudage_, pp. 281-283.

[149] See Sarcey, _Quarante ans de théâtre_, tome II, p. 268.

[150] _Mercure_ for 1719.

[151] _Le Spectateur français_, 3e feuille.

[152] _Le Spectateur français_, 20e feuille.

[153] _Le Spectateur français_, 8e feuille.

[154] After the outrageous reception of his _Serments indiscrets_ by the
public, Marivaux contented himself by saying: "Au reste, la représentation
de cette pièce-ci n'a pas été achevée; elle demande de l'attention; il y
avait beaucoup de monde, et bien des gens ont prétendu qu'il y avait une
cabale pour la faire tomber; mais je n'en crois rien: elle est d'un genre
dont la simplicité aurait pu toute seule lui tenir lieu de cabale, surtout
dans le tumulte d'une première représentation. D'ailleurs, je ne
supposerai jamais qu'il y ait des hommes capables de n'aller à un
spectacle que pour y livrer une honteuse guerre à un ouvrage fait pour les
amuser. Non, c'est la pièce même qui ne plut pas ce jour-là." _Les
Serments indiscrets_: Avertissement. Marivaux. _Oeuvres_, tome II, pp. 7-
8.

[155] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, pp. 248-249. The play was _l'Amour et la
Vérité_. See Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p. 37, note 1.

[156] Marivaux, _Oeuvres_, tome IX, pp. 55, 56, 59.

[157] The one exception is in the case of Crébillon, already noted.

[158] De La Porte, p. 8. D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 298, note 25.

[159] See Marivaux, _Oeuvres_, tome X, p. 547.

[160] Ibid., pp. 550-551.

[161] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, pp. 295-296, note 23.

[162] Marivaux, _Oeuvres_, tome X, p. 552.

[163] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 239.

[164] The registers of the French Academy (see Larroumet, _Marivaux_, p.
629) and d'Alembert (_Éloge_, p. 261) assign as the date of his death
February 12; but l'Abbé de La Porte, p. 10), Lesbros de la Versane (p.
40), and Collé (_Journal historique_, tome II, p. 288) give the date as
February 11.

[165] D'Alembert, _Éloge_, p. 261.

[166] Collé, _Journal historique_, tome II, p. 288.

[167] De La Porte, p. 10.


LE JEU DE L'AMOUR ET DU HASARD.

[1] SILVIA. The 'ideal type' of Marivaux's women. "Young, alert, lively, yet
compliant, already competent, reasonable, and energetic, without her reason,
deliberative as it is, excluding for a moment wit, sprightliness, and charm.
Give her more reserve, more dignity, more tender kindliness, and also more
indulgent experience and you will have, scarcely any older, and already a
widow, Araminte of _les Fausses Confidences_" (Henri Lion, in _Histoire de la
langue et de la littérature française_ Petit de Julleville, tome VI, p. 587).

[2] ARLEQUIN. One of the brightest and merriest of rôles. In passing to the
Comédie-Française, this rôle, which at the Comédie-Italienne was played by
Harlequin, was introduced under the name of Pasquin. It is possible that the
personage of Harlequin has descended from the Greek plays, in which there
appeared an actor filling a similar rôle and dressed in the skin of a goat or
a tiger; but so early an origin, even if it could be proved, would not serve
to explain the costume in which he now appears, and which is itself a
modification of that worn by Harlequin in the sixteenth century.

The part of Harlequin, in the Italian comedy, appears to have originated in
the rôle of the _zanni_, or clown, which comprised several varieties, such as
Scapino, Coviello, etc. The costume of the part, whether the _zanni_
represented a stupid lout or a bright and resourceful valet, consisted of a
loose jacket, very full trousers, a small cape, a broad-brimmed hat with
feathers, and a wooden sword. This dress was varied later for the parts of
Sganarelle and Pierrot, and the Harlequin dress itself was changed to a
certain extent in the sixteenth century.

A description of his costume has come down to us from the time of Henry IV.
"It is composed of a jacket open in front and fastened by cheap ribbons; of
tight-fitting pantaloons, covered with pieces of cloth of different colors,
placed at random. The jacket also is patched. He has a stiff, black beard,
the black half-mask, and a cap shaped like those of the time of Francis I; no
linen; the belt, the pouch, and the wooden sword. His feet are clad in very
thin foot-gear, covered at the ankles by the pantaloons, which serve as
gaiters" (Maurice Sand, _Masques et Bouffons_, p. 72). It was further
changed, as well as the character itself, by the famous Dominique, of the
Italian comedians to King Louis XIV. He made of Harlequin a clever and witty
personage, instead of a stupid lout, and this change was accepted by the
writers of plays for that particular troupe. The dress is greatly modified.
The jacket is closer fitting; the trousers less full and shorter in the leg,
coming down to just below the calf; the patches, still much larger than in
the modern dress, are arranged symmetrically; the hat is soft, with a brim
and a small plume; the shoes are of the ordinary seventeenth century shape,
with the bow of ribbon on the instep. The wooden sword remains, as well as
the half-mask, but with a moustache in the place of the former stiff beard.

The part was then played more and more as one calling for much spirit and
endless fun-making powers,--so much so that when it was admitted to the stage
of the Comédie-Française it evoked very strong condemnation as being unworthy
of the gravity of the place.

The modern dress of Harlequin, rarely seen save in pantomimes, is a very
brilliant close-fitting costume, composed of small triangles of bright cloth
covered with spangles.

[3] QU'OUI. The correct form would be que oui, as the initial vowel of oui is
now treated as an aspirate.

[4] CELA VA TOUT DE SUITE, 'That is a matter of course.' 'That is the natural
conclusion' (judging from the desire of most girls to marry). The expression
_tout de suite_ now means 'at once,' 'immediately.' It is not in that sense
that it is used here. Read, _cela va de suite_, considering the adverb _tout_
as simply adding emphasis to the expression. The word _suite_ was taken in
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in the sense of 'consequence' or
'order.'

[5] DE FILLE. A peculiar use of the substantive after the preposition _de_,
similar to the ordinary participial or adjectival use, as in the expression:
_Il n'y a que vous de sérieux_. Compare "Je n'ai qu'elle de fille" (Molière,
_le Médecin malgré lui_, II, 4). These, and similar expressions, are an
outgrowth of the partitive genitive, usually found after an indefinite: _II
n'y a rien de nouveau_ (that is to say, _parmi les choses nouvelles_).
_Quelque chose de nouveau. Qu'y a-t-il de nouveau? Cent soldats de
prisonniers. Y a-t-il personne d'assez hardi?_ etc. Compare the Latin, _Quid
novi?_

[6] ALLEZ RÉPONDRE VOS IMPERTINENCES AILLEURS. This is not a modern form. The
meaning is, 'Keep your irrelevant remarks for people of your own class.'
_Impertinences_ has here the meaning of 'irrelevant remarks.'

[7] CE N'EST PAS À VOUS À JUGER. An infinitive after _c'est à_ (_moi_,
_vous_, _lui_, etc.) may be introduced by either the preposition _à_ or _de_,
but a difference is felt to-day between the two locutions, the first
signifying 'it is your turn,' and the second, 'it is your right or duty.'

[8] UNE ORIGINALE, 'eccentric.' "Il n'y a qu'en France que le mot _original_
appliqué à un individu, soit presque injurieux."-- Théophile Gautier, _les
Grotesques_.

[9] CELA EST ENCORE TOUT NEUF, 'That is another strange idea.' Bear in mind
that Silvia had already expressed a distaste for marriage.

[10] AIMABLE, 'Fitted to inspire love,' 'worthy of love.'

[11] DE MARIAGE ... D'UNION. A peculiar use of the preposition _de_, allied
to, and possibly derived from, the partitive after a negative: _Il n'y a pas
de mariage_. It would be more natural today to say _un mariage ... une
union_. The use of the form _de mariage_ is easily explained by the ellipsis
of the concluding words, _que celui-ci_.

[12] DÉLICIEUSE. Compare: "Il y a de bons mariages; mais il n'y en a point de
délicieux" (La Rochefoucauld, _Réflexion_, 113).

[13] DANS LES FORMES, 'Legally.'

[14] DE QUOI VIVRE, 'Food.'

[15] PARDI, 'Indeed.' An alteration of _par Dieu_. Though still used,
_parbleu_, likewise a euphemism for _par Dieu_, has largely replaced it. It
is not in the Dictionary of the Academy, 1878.

[16] TOUT EN SERA BON. The _en_ refers apparently to the divers qualities of
Dorante which Lisette has just enumerated, though it is difficult to see the
connection clearly.

[17] TOUT S'Y TROUVE. The modern form would be, _se trouve en lui_, the _y_
not being now used of persons.

[18] HÉTÉROCLITE. Used familiarly and figuratively for 'strange,' 'odd,'
'peculiar.'

[19] UN PENSÉE DE TRÈS BON SENS--_Pleine de sens_. VOLONTIERS, 'Frequently,'
'usually.' 'is usually inclined to be ...'

[20] PASSE, 'We'll let that pass.' Used familiarly for _soit_.

[21] OUI-DA, 'Truly,' 'certainly,' or, more freely and familiarly, 'I should
think so.' _Da_ is, according to Diez, a shortened form of _diva_, an
exclamation composed of the two imperatives _dis_ and _va_: _diva > dea >
da_. It may be added to either the affirmative or the negative (_non-da_), or
stand alone. In any case it adds force to the expression. Its use is becoming
obsolete, especially in the negative.

[22] DE BEAUTÉ. _Quant à la beauté_ would convey the idea, better to the
modern ear. The construction is the genitive after _dispenser_. The
pronominal _en_ is. therefore, redundant.

[23] VERTUCHOUX, written usually _vertuchou_, 'Bless me,' A euphemism like
_vertubleu_, which is similarly a corruption of _vertu (de) Dieu_.

[24] CE SUPERFLU-LÀ SERA MON NÉCESSAIRE. Voltaire, in his _Mondain_ (1736),
lines 22-23, repeated the same idea: "Le superflu, chose très nécessaire, A
réuni l'un et l'autre hémisphère."

[25] SE CONTREFONT-ILS, 'Disguise themselves.'

[26] AUSSI L'EST-IL. The modern form is _Il l'est en effet_.

[27] NE ... MENT PAS D'UN MOT, 'Is not at all deceitful.'

[28] NI QUI NE GRONDE. The repetition of the relative _qui_ is contrary to
modern usage.

[29] ÂME, 'Being.'

[30] This whole scene recalls the dialogue between Angélique and Lisette in
the first scene of Dancourt's _l'Été des Coquettes_ (July 12, 1690), and may
be a clever amplification of the same.

[31] PORTE ... UNE GRIMACE. A metonymy not accepted in common usage.

[32] DE TOUT CELA == _Dans tout cela_.

[33] A CONDITION QUE, 'Provided that.' Governs either the indicative,
conditional, or subjunctive.

[34] UN NOTAIRE. The notary is a frequent figure in French comedy in the
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and appears also in that of the
nineteenth century. It is he who draws up the marriage settlements; he acts
usually as banker and trustee as well as legal adviser. He is a sworn officer
of the government, and nowadays is subject to inspection by officials
appointed for the purpose.

[35] SUR TOUT LE BIEN. The modern form would be _d'après tout
le bien_.

[36] QUE VOUS VOUS REMERCIIEZ, 'That either of you will reject the other.'
See Littré, "remercier," 5°.

[37] PLAISANTE, 'Amusing.'

[38] M'EN CONTER, 'To make love to me.'

[39] DES BONS AIRS, 'Kindly reception.' An example of a very common
antiphrasis, although the expression in itself is antiquated.

[40] IL NE ME FAUT PRESQUE QU'UN TABLIER. An evidence of the similarity in
dress of maid and mistress.

[41] NE L'AMUSEZ PAS, 'Do not detain her.' _Amuser_ is sometimes used in this
sense, 'to detain by idle words.'

[42] EN PARTIE DE MASQUE, 'For a masquerade.' It was a common practice in the
circles of the Court, and of the richer bourgeoisie to get up masquerade
parties and dances. There are frequent references to this in the Memoirs of
Dangeau, Saint-Simon, and other writers.

[43] ARTICLE = _Passage d'un écrit quelconque_ (Littré, "article," 3°).

[44] IMAGINATION. Used here in the sense of _pensée_ or _idée_.

[45] FIGURE, 'Character,' which is also the meaning of _personnage_ in the
next line.

[46] PLAISANT. See note 37.

[47] NOTRE FUTURE. The _notre_ refers to Dorante and his father. Silvia is
the future bride of the one, and the future daughter-in-law of the other. The
expression is not a usual one with _notre_.

[48] LE TOUT. In modern usage the article has disappeared.

[49] SUR LE CHAPITRE, 'About.'

[50] INSPIRÉE. _Venue_ has replaced this verb in some of the later editions,
and would certainly be the more natural expression.

[51] LES AVERTIROIT. Modern syntax requires the future after the imperative,
instead of the conditional present.

[52] SE TIRERA D'INTRIGUE. Used in the sense of _se tirera d'affaire_.

[53] AGACER, 'Tease.' _Taquiner_ would be the modern word in this
sense. _Agacer_ has now more the meaning of 'irritate.'

[54] C'EST AUTANT DE PRIS QUE LE VALET, 'The valet is as good as caught
(captivated).'

[55] L'ÉTOURDIR, 'To make him forget.'

[56] CROCHETEUR, 'Porter.' The name is derived from the _crochet_ (hook)
which they use in lifting or carrying heavy weights. Another and more common
meaning of the word is 'picklock,' or 'housebreaker,' from _crocheter_.
_Crochet_ must have given _crochetier_. It is probably due to paronymy that
_crocheteur_ and not _crochetier_ has come to be used for 'porter' (Littré).

[57] DANS SON MIROIR. An elliptical form for _Quand elle se regarde dans son
miroir_.

[58] TOUJOURS, 'In the meantime.'

[59] BIEN VENU. Now written in one word as a noun and with the article.

[60] TON COEUR N'A QU'À SE BIEN TENIR, 'Your heart must be on its guard.'

[61] C'EST BIEN DES AFFAIRES, 'What nonsense!'

[62] NE M'EN FAIT POINT ACCROIRE, 'Does not make me overrate myself.'
(Littré, "Accroire," 3°.}

[63] SÉRIEUX, 'Formal.'

[64] SUR LE QUI-VIVE, 'Standing on ceremony.'

[65] PLUS COMMODÉMENT, 'With less ceremony.'

[66] TU AS NOM. A Latin construction frequently used even
nowadays.

[67] VA DONC POUR LISETTE, 'Lisette be it, then.'

[68] J'EN VEUX AU COEUR DE LISETTE, 'I have designs upon Lisette's heart.'
The more common modern meaning of the idiom _en vouloir à_ is, 'to have a
grudge against'; but the expression used in the text is also frequent with
the meaning here given. Corneille has, "Alidor en voulait à Célie" (_la
Veuve_, I. 181). "Poppée était une infidèle qui n'en voulait qu'au trône"
(_Othon_, I. 194). "Je n'en veux pas, Cléone, au sceptre d'Arménie"
(_Nicomède_, I. 347). And La Fontaine: "Comme il en voulait à l'argent" (_les
deux Mulets_, I. 8). The Academy gives the locution in its Dictionary, with
the remark: "signifie aussi familièrement, Avoir quelque prétention sur cette
personne, sur cette chose, en avoir quelque désir. _Il en veut à cette fille.
Il en veut à cette charge._"

[69] AILLE SUR MES BRISÉES, 'Be my rival.' _Les brisées_. Branches broken off
by a hunter to recognize the hiding-place of the game, hence 'traces.'
_Suivre les brisées de quelqu'un_, 'To follow someone's example.' _Aller sur
les brisées de quelqu'un_, 'To contest with (or rival) someone' (Littré,
"brisées," 1° and 2°).

[70] VOUS PERDREZ VOTRE PROCÈS, 'You will get the worst of it.'

[71] ILS SE DONNENT LA COMÉDIE, 'They are making fun at my expense.'

[72] QUI L'AURA, 'Who wins his love.'

[73] M'EN CONTER. See note 38.

[74] NOUS SOMMES DANS LE STYLE AMICAL. An expression derived from the
_précieuses_.

[75] OTER MON CHAPEAU. It was still customary to wear the hat in the house,
even in the presence of ladies, though the habit was dying out.

[76] JOUE. The edition of 1732, as well as that edited by Duviquet, gives
_joue_. Some later editions give _jure_, in the sense of 'blaspheme.'

[77] PLAISANT. See note 37.

[78] ME FASSE MON PROCÈS, 'Destroys my hopes.' Compare note 70.

[79] D'ABORD QUE. Used for the more modern _dès que_ (Littré, 10°).

[80] MALGRÉ QUE J'EN AIE, 'In spite of myself.' _Malgré que_ in this sense is
used only with the verb _avoir_ (Littré, 5°).

[81] A TORT AVEC TOI. The modern form is _envers toi_.

[82] A PLUS DE TORT. The _de_ has since been dropped in locutions of this
sort.

[83] JE CROIS QU'IL M'AMUSE, 'I think that he strikes my fancy.'

[84] JE ME RAPPELLE DE. In modern French the _de_ is omitted.

[85] CONFIDEMMENT. _Confidentiellement_ the more common form.

[86] NE PRENDRE PAS GARDE. The modern construction of the negative with an
infinitive requires both parts of the negative to precede the verb.

[87] EN FAVEUR DE = _Dans l'intérêt de_.

[88] MON PORTE-MANTEAU. Refers not to the valise, but to the _crocheteur_ who
carried it. The office of _porte-manteau_ was an honourable one at the French
court. Twelve officers of the household bore the title and discharged the
duties of the office, which consisted in taking care of the king's hat,
gloves, stick, and sword, and in handing them to his majesty when called for.
One of these officers always accompanied the king when hunting, with a valise
containing raiment. See A. Chéruel, _Dictionnaire historique des
institutions, moeurs et coutumes de la France_.

[89] AUTANT VAUT, 'That's the same thing.' 'That's just as good.'

[90] LA BELLE. The use of the article is here indicative of familiarity. Used
in this way towards inferiors.

[91] JE VAIS FAIRE DESCENDRE. On the part of a supposed servant, a somewhat
free and easy expression.

[92] UN BEAU-PÈRE DE LA VEILLE OU DU LENDEMAIN, 'A man who is as good as my
father-in-law.'

[93] AVANT QUE DE. _Avant de_ is more modern.

[94] L'HÔTEL. In the meaning attached to the word in the seventeenth and
eighteenth centuries, that is, 'mansion,' 'residence.' Originally applied
specifically to the king's residence, it soon was used of the mansions of the
nobility in Paris or other towns. Later, the habit arose among the nobility
of renting rooms and apartments within their mansions when the family was not
in residence, and gradually the word assumed its present more extended
meaning. But _hôtel_ is still used to denote strictly a residence.

[95] PLAISANT. One must understand here a double meaning, Silvia uses it
evidently in the sense of 'amusing,' 'ridiculous' (see note 37), while
Harlequin fails to catch the point, and, as his reply shows, takes it in its
earlier sense of 'agreeable.' It is scarcely used to-day in this latter
sense.

[96] M'EN ÊTRE FIÉ À TOI. The _en_ here is difficult to construe. It refers
to the whole of the preceding clauses. In modern construction it would be
omitted.

[97] DANS LES SUITES. 'After this,' 'henceforth.' For _dans la suite_.

[98] DONNERAI DU MÉLANCOLIQUE. The more ordinary form is _donnerai dans le
mélancolique_.

[99] PLAISANTE, 'Agreeable.' See note 95.

[100] QUE DE CET INSTANT. The modern form would be _qu'à l'instant_.

[101] SI MAL BÂTI, 'In such a bad state.' Colloquial.

[102] RAGOÛTANT, 'Tempting,' 'pleasing.' Its earlier and more common meaning
is, 'tempting to the palate.' As used here it is familiar, and corresponds
with the rest of Harlequin's expressions, though it is by no means an
expression confined by Marivaux to servants. Compare: "Ne voilà-t-il pas un
amant bien ragoûtant!" (_Marianne_, 3e partie). "Cependant comme cette
personne était fraîche et ragoûtante..." (_Le Paysan parvenu_, 1re partie).
"Et à quel âge est-on meilleure et plus ragoûtante, s'il vous plaît?" (id.,
5e partie).

[103] TRINQUER, 'To drink a toast.' From the German _trinken_, Italian
_trincare_. This verb shows a much more jovial spirit than would the verb
_boire_, and, in this case, is more familiar and inelegant.

[104] SI VOUS NE METTEZ ORDRE. After the conjunctions _à moins que_ (unless),
and _si_, in the same sense, the second part of the negation (_pas_) is
omitted. The idiom _mettre ordre à_ means 'to look after.'

[105] VOTRE PRÉTENDU GENDRE, 'Intended son-in-law.' The word _prétendu_ is
commonly used alone, and then means 'intended.' The usage is derived from the
meaning of the verb _prétendre à_, 'to aspire to,' 'to desire.' Here,
therefore, 'the man who aspires to become your son-in-law.'

[106] VONT LEUR TRAIN, 'Are doing their work,' 'are producing their effect.'

[107] NOUS Y VOILÀ, 'Just what I feared.'

[108] IL EST DE MAUVAIS GOÛT. The _il_ refers not to Arlequin, whom Lisette
takes for Dorante, but to the idea that she should be loved by one so much
her superior socially.

[109] CELA NE LAISSERA PAS QUE D'ÊTRE, 'It will be no less true.' The idiom
may be expressed more logically by the omission of the _que_ (Littré,
"laisser," 20°).

[110] D'HOMME D'HONNEUR. An ellipsis for the more complete expression which
later editions print, _foi d'homme d'honneur_.

[111] J'AI MÉNAGÉ SA TÊTE, 'I have spared his mind,' 'I have handled him
carefully.'

[112] LE MOMENT. For _l'occasion_.

[113] A VUE DE PAYS, 'From the looks of things.'

[114] FAIT. Some later editions print _tourné_. The idea is the same.

[115] JUSQUE LÀ, 'To such a degree.'

[116] A LA BONNE HEURE, 'As you please.'

[117] AVANT QUE DE. See note 93.

[118] DE VOTRE FAÇON, 'Brought forth by you.' The whole figure is both
trivial and bombastic, in perfect accord with the rôle of Harlequin.

[119] ROQUILLE. An ancient wine measure amounting to a quarter of a _setier_.
A _setier_, in the current use of the word, was equal to half a _pinte_. A
_pinte_ was a little less than a _litre_ (Hatzfeld and Darmesteter). Hence a
_roquille_ would be less than an eighth of a _litre_. A synonym for any small
measure.

[120] COMME UN PERDU, 'Desperately.'

[121] VALETAILLE, 'Whole set of valets,' Composed of _valet_ and the
pejorative ending _aille_ (Littré).

[122] SERA. The text of 1732 has _fera_, but this is likely a  misprint, as
the f's and long s's were easily confounded.

[123] IMPERTINENT. Here the actor taking the part of Dorante, profiting by
the inattention of Lisette, administers to Harlequin a vigorous kick, which
the latter is obliged to receive with equanimity, much to the amusement of
the spectators. This byplay is also a reminiscence of the habits of the early
_comédiens italiens_, who indulged to excess in _lazzi_, which originally
meant, not witticisms, but tricks more or less buffoon in their nature, such
as circus clowns still indulge in. We know that Marivaux objected to any
liberty being taken with the rôles by the actors. It may well be questioned
whether the above-mentioned gesture would have met his approval. In a letter
written to Sarcey (published in _Quarante ans de théâtre_, tome II, pp. 271-
275), Larroumet writes as follows upon this subject: "Pour ma part, une
longue étude de Marivaux m'a prouvé que lazzis et jeux de scène n'étaient
nullement le fait des premiers interprètes qui jouèrent sous la direction de
l'auteur, mais bien des troupes de petits théâtres qui, après la disparition
de la comédie italienne, en 1782, recueillirent plusieurs pièces de Marivaux
et les jouèrent un peu partout, jusqu'à ce que Mlle. Contat les fît entrer,
vers 1794 et 1796, au Théâtre de la République."

[124] DÉBARRASSE-MOI DE TOUT CECI. A contemptuous expression by which Dorante
designates Lisette. It is entirely in keeping with the manners of the day.

[125] NE TE LIVRE POINT. _Livrer_ is here taken in the sense of 'betray.'

[126] LA QUESTION EST VIVE, 'That is a leading question.'

[127] UN PETIT BRIN. Equivalent to _un petit peu_. _Brin_ means 'spear' (of
grass, etc.), and, as in the case of _goutte_ (drop) and of _mie_ (crumb),
has come to indicate any small particle. Often idiomatically translated by
'bit.'

[128] J'AI PEUR D'EN COURIR LES CHAMPS, 'I am afraid of losing my reason.'
Compare the expression, _être fou à courir les rues, à courir les champs_,
'to be stark mad ' (Littré, "courir," 23°).

[129] DÉCOMPTER, 'Deduct.' Still used, though not commonly, for _rabattre_.

[130] LES MAÎTRES. _On_ may be followed by the plural, if taken in a plural
sense, although some later editions give the singular, _le maître_. In fact,
after this indefinite pronoun, a noun, adjective, or participle may agree in
gender and number with the person or persons to whom the indefinite refers.

[131] FONT ... À LEUR TÊTE, 'Have their own way.' The idiom _faire à sa tête_
means 'to do as one pleases.'

[132] BEAU JEU. The idiom _avoir beau jeu_ is a card term, and means first,
'to hold the best cards,' and hence, 'to have a good opportunity.'

[133] PERRETTE OU MARGOT. Names of the lower classes among servants. The idea
is carried out by the reference to the visit to  the cellar and the flat
candlestick. Compare: "Ne semble-t-il pas qu'il faille tant de cérémonies
pour parler à madame? On parle bien à Perrette" (_Marianne_, 2e partie).
_Perrette_, from the well-known fable of La Fontaine, _Perrette et le pot at
lait_, has come down to us as the personification of the dreamer, the builder
of air-castles. _Margot_, a diminutive of Marguerite, is a common term for
the chatterbox.

[134] FAUTES D'ORTHOGRAPHE, 'Misapprehensions as to real rank.' The ordinary
meaning of the expression, used figuratively, is _fautes de conduite_.

[135] NE VOILÀ-T-IL PAS! An exclamation of surprise. It might here be
translated, 'Just listen to that.' It is more correctly expressed by _ne
voilà pas_, the barbarism resulting from the consideration of _voilà_ as a
verb and the introduction of the euphonic _t_ and the _il_ of impersonal
verbs (Littré, "voilà," 10°),

[136] MA MIE. A curious example of deformation. Originally feminine nouns
beginning with a vowel took the feminine _ma_ before them, the vowel of _ma_
being elided. Thus, _m'amie_; but later the word was modified to its present
form.

[137] QU'ON NE LES APPELLE. _Que_ in the sense of _sans que_ requires the
negative particle _ne_. It is less frequently used to-day than in the
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. _Sans qu'on les appelle_ might replace
this expression.

[138] PUISQUE LE DIABLE LE VEUT. An uncomplimentary variant of the proverb.
"Ce que femme veut, Dieu le veut."

[139] JE VOUS TROUVE ADMIRABLE, 'I think it is very surprising on your part.'

[140] GÂTÉ L'ESPRIT SUR SON COMPTE, 'Prejudiced you against him.'

[141] ON N'EN A QUE FAIRE, 'We have no need of them.'

[142] EN QUOI DONC. The _en_ here must refer to _comme elle tourne les
choses_, in Silvia's last remark.

[143] TOUJOURS, 'Still.'

[144] ME NOIRCIR L'IMAGINATION, 'Soil my thoughts.' Marivaux has very
consistently preserved the character of the high-born lady that Silvia is, in
the remarks he puts into her mouth. It is impossible for her to forget her
real rank, or to forget her usual way of considering menials as of an
inferior race.

[145] OBJET. Usually, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, denotes a
woman loved. Occasionally Corneille, like Marivaux here, employs it to denote
a man loved. This, however, is infrequent.

[146] À MOI. There is an ellipsis at the end of Silvia's remark, which,
completed, would read: _Il n'y aurait pas grande perte à cela_. Dorante's
reply, which is not strictly grammatical, even in the use of the time, would
certainly nowadays be constructed differently, e.g., _Non plus que si je m'en
allais aussi, moi_.

[147] NE SONT BONNES QU'EN PASSANT, 'Can only be indulged in once in a
while.'

[148] JE NE SUIS PAS FAITE POUR ME RASSURER TOUJOURS, 'I do not feel that I
could always be sure of...'

[149] CELA NE RESSEMBLEROIT PLUS À RIEN. The sense is: "My attitude
towards you would be so extraordinary that it might become compromising"
(Larroumet).

[150] IL N'EN SEROIT NI PLUS NI MOINS = _Cela ne changerait rien_.' It would
make no difference.'

[151] J'AMUSERAI, 'Shall I flatter with vain hopes?' Compare: "Il veut que je
l'amuse, et ne veut rien de plus" (Corneille, _Sertorius_, II, 3). "Car vous
lui promettez tous les huit jours de l'épouser dans la semaine, et il y a
près d'un an que vous l'amusez" (Dancourt, _Le Chevalier à la Mode_, I, 7).

[152] JE T'EN ASSURE. The _en_ here is unconnected with any other part of the
sentence. In modern construction it would not be used.

[153] TE RENDRE SENSIBLE. An expression very frequently, indeed generally,
used in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries for _me faire aimer de toi_.
A reminiscence of the days and modes of thought of the _précieuses_ and the
whole tribe of writers of novels after the manner of _l'Astrée_.

[154] SANS DIFFICULTÉ, 'Undoubtedly.'

[155] IL NE MANQUOIT PLUS QUE CETTE FAÇON-LÀ, 'This is the finishing stroke.'

[156] DANS LE RESPECT. The modern form is _par le respect_.

[157] POUR DANS. An awkward expression. The _pour_ might better have been
omitted. Later editions give simply _dans_.

[158] HUMEUR. 'Temper,'

[159] SI FORT SUR LE QUI-VIVE, 'Take offence so readily.'

[160] DANS QUELLE IDÉE. _De would be used nowadays instead of _dans.

[161] QUI NE ME CHOQUE. In relative clauses depending upon a negative
antecedent, the second part of the negative (_pas_) in the relative clause is
generally omitted.

[162] CES MOUVEMENTS-LÀ. 'Emotion.' Compare: "D'un mouvement jaloux je ne fus
pas maîtresse" (Racine. _Bajazet_. I. 4). "L'âme n'est qu'une suite
continuelle d'idées et de sentiments qui se succèdent et se détruisent: les
mouvements qui reviennent le plus souvent forment ce qu'on appelle le
caractère" (Voltaire, _Supplément au siècle de Louis XIV_. 2e partie).

[163] QUERELLÉE, 'Taken her to task.'

[164] UN ESPRIT. In ordinary French of the present day the _un_ would be
omitted.

[165] SURPRISE. The feminine form of the participle is admissible after _on_.

[166] UN MAUVAIS ESPRIT. Referring to Silvia, although the idea is clear,
grammatical consistency is overthrown in the next line when the pronoun _la_
is used instead of _le_.

[167] DE LA CONSÉQUENCE, 'What may be inferred.'

[168] EST. Some later editions give _soit_. This difference in the mode used
in various editions is but another proof of the elasticity of the subjunctive
in French. Either mode is here correct, the indicative expressing greater
positiveness, and the subjunctive more doubt, in the supposition.

[169] J'Y METS BON ORDRE, 'I look after that,' or 'I see that he doesn't. See
note 104.

[170] APOSTILLE, 'Observation.' Literally 'postscript,' from _ad_ and
_postillam_ (low Latin for 'explanation,' 'note.' Littré).

[171] AIMABLE, 'Courteous.'

[172] QUE TU NE ME CHAGRINES. See note 137.

[173] JE T'EN OFFRE AUTANT, 'I can say the same to you.'

[174] MOUVEMENTS. See note 159.

[175] OÙ. Later editions give _que_, which is preferable in modern French.
The relative pronoun should not follow a construction similar to that of its
antecedent placed in the clause immediately preceding. The same is true of
the conjunctive adverb _où_ (P. Larousse). One should not, therefore, say:
_C'est_ à vous à qui _je parle_. _C'est_ dans cette maison où _je suis né_.
_C'est_ ici où _je l'ai trouvé_. _C'est_ de toi dont _il écrit_. _Que_
preferred in each case.

[176] A QUI. See preceding note. A construction much blamed by all modern
authorities, although common to Marivaux, and used also by Boileau, Molière,
and others. "C'est _à vous_, mon Esprit, _à qui_ je veux parler" (Boileau,
_Satire IX_, 1. i). "Mais, madame, puis-je au moins croire que ce soit _à
vous à qui_ je doive la pensée de cet heureux stratagème..." (Molière,
_L'Amour médecin_, III, vi). In this case _que_ would be better than à qui,
and is so printed in most of the later editions.

[177] PÉNÉTRER = _Découvrir_.

[178] AVANT QUE DE. See note 93.

[179] NEUVE, 'Novel.' Compare: "C'était bien le plan le plus original,
le plus beau, le plus neuf!" (Mérimée, _la Guzla, avertissement_).

[180] IRRÉGULIER, 'Unseemly,' 'impolite.'

[181] JUSQUE LÀ. See note 115.

[182] LUI FEROIT TORT. Here modern usage requires the partitive _du_.

[183] SUR L'ARTICLE DE, 'Concerning,' 'in the matter of.'

[184] LUI. Marivaux felt the charm of this artless reply, and repeated it in
_l'Épreuve_ (see Introduction, p. lxiii), with the added epigram of Lisette:
"Et quel est donc cet homme qui s'appelle lui par excellence?"

[185] GUIGNON, 'Bad luck.' From _guigner_ ('to ogle,' 'to peep'), and has
some connection with the idea of the evil eye (Littré).

[186] CELA N'EST POINT CONTRAIRE À FAIRE FORTUNE. _Cela n'empêche pas de
faire fortune_ is more modern and better French.

[187] IMAGINATION. See note 44.

[188] IL LUI PREND. _Il_ is redundant, and in some of the later editions is
omitted.

[189] ACCOMMODONS-NOUS, 'Let us compromise.' Compare: "Le Ciel défend, de
vrai, certains contentements; mais on trouve avec lui des accommodements."
(Molière, _le Tartuffe_).

[190] FRIAND, 'Eager.' Primarily _friand_ signified the gift of a delicate
taste, and a rare appreciation of dainties. As used by Harlequin
it recalls his _ragoûtant_. Cf. note 132.

[191] HABIT DE CARACTÈRE. Garb which designates, which characterizes
any particular profession. As used here, it signifies Harlequin's livery as
valet.

[192] GALON DE COULEUR, 'The fact that I wear livery.' The reference is to
the braiding on the livery-coats worn by the retainers and domestics of the
nobility in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, as well as at the
present day. "Après son deuil (the author speaks of Lauzun, who had gone into
mourning for the Grande Mademoiselle), il ne voulut pas reprendre sa livrée,
et s'en fit une de brun presque noir, avec des galons bleus et blancs"
(Saint-Simon, _Mémoires_, I).

[193] BUFFET, Side-table, on which are placed the dishes destined for table
service, and on which they may be left after clearing the table. The servants
probably often ate the 'leavings' at this table, which may have given rise to
the term _buffet_ for the servants' eating-room, which is the sense in which
the word is used here. Compare: "Je suis las d'être bien battu et mal
nourri... Je suis las enfin d'avoir de la condescendance pour vos débauches,
et de m'enivrer au _buffet_, pendant que vous vous enivrez à table" (Regnard,
_Attendez-moi sous l'orme_, Sc. l).

[194] SUCCÈS = _Résultat_.

[195] EN CONTEZ À. See note 38.

[196] LE LANGAGE BIEN PRÉCIEUX. The use of the expression _du goût_, in the
sense of 'a liking,' 'a fancy,' was much more _recherché_ in the eighteenth
century than now. Hence Mario's feigned surprise at hearing such words from
the lips of a supposed valet. Compare: "Goût, en galanterie, simple
inclination, amusement passager, mot des gens de cour" (De Caillières, 1690).

[197] A LE BIEN PRENDRE, 'If you look at things rightly.'

[198] PASSEZ, 'Overlook.'

[199] LES, in later editions _mes_, which is evidently the better form.

[200] EST BIEN AUSSI, for _tout aussi_.

[201] QUE JE NE L'AIME. See note 137.

[202] TON COEUR A DE CAQUET, 'How effusive your heart is.'

[203] CELA VAUT FAIT = _C'est comme si c'était fait: Regardez la chose comme
faite_ (Dict. of the Academy, 1878).

[204] IMPERTINENCE = _Mésalliance_.

[205] ET IL EST TOUT AU PLUS UNI. The edition of Duviquet renders this
passage as follows: "Et il est tout des plus unis." Larroumet explains it:
"Et il est des plus ordinaires, c'est à dire que toute femme a un amour-
propre semblable à celui-là." Translate: 'And it is the commonest (most
ordinary) kind.' For _uni_ in this sense see Littré, 10°. Compare: "Elle
aurait cru se dégrader par le soin de son ménage, et elle ne donnait pas dans
une piété si vulgaire et si _unie_" (_le Paysan parvenu_, 4e partie).

[206] BIEN CONDITIONNÉE, 'In pretty good condition,' 'pretty well turned
(upset).' A peculiar use of this past participle. Duviquet translates it,
"Une tête qui réunit toutes les conditions nécessaires pour être réputée
sage, forte, bien puissante." I prefer to construe it: 'brought into the
condition which Lisette desires,' that is to say, 'subject to her charms.' If
the context were not clear enough, its use in line 13, below, would suffice
to explain it.

[207] LE, referring, of course, to Dorante, and not to tête, as the gender of
the pronoun shows.

[208] PRENDRAI DE PART, 'Care for.'

[209] QU'IL S'ACCOMMODE, for the more modern _qu'il s'arrange_.

[210] SI JE LUI DIS, for si je _le_ lui dis. Marivaux often omits the direct
object pronoun in similar constructions. See _le Legs_, note 25, and _les
Fausses Confidences_, note 127.

[211] LE, see note 207.

[212] J'AI TROP PÂTI D'AVOIR MANQUÉ DE VOTRE PRÉSENCE, ET J'AI CRU QUE VOUS
ESQUIVIEZ LA MIENNE. An absurd metonymy, perfectly consistent, however, with
Harlequin's jargon, and very similar to the fifth example of _Marivaudage_,
Introduction, p. lxxiv.

[213] IL EN ÉTOIT QUELQUE CHOSE, 'That is about the truth.'

[214] ENTREPRIS LA FIN DE MA VIE, 'Do you intend to make me die?'

[215] AVANT QUE JE LA DEMANDE À LUI, etc. The modern construction of this
sentence would be: _Avant que je ne la lui demande, souffrez que je vous la
demande à vous._

[216] RENDRE MES GRÂCES. In modern usage the _mes_ is omitted in this
locution.

[217] NENNI, 'No.' An antiquated negative particle, coming from _non illud_,
as _hoc illud_ gave oïl > oui (Littré).

[218] IL This second _il_ refers to _présent_.

[219] NE FAITES POINT DÉPENSE D'EMBARRAS, 'Don't waste your  confusion,'
'keep such feelings for a more fitting occasion.'

[220] D'OÙ VIENT ME DITES-VOUS CELA? 'Why do you tell me that?' A strange
wording for _D'où vient que vous me dites cela? D'où vient,_ as used by
Marivaux, is generally synonymous with _pourquoi._

[221] VOILÀ OÙ GÎT LE LIÈVRE, 'That's where the secret lies.' A well-known
proverbial expression, worded also, "C'est là que gît le lièvre."

[222] A TIRER, 'To be allowed for.'

[223] GLOIRE, 'Rank,' 'show.'

[224] J'ENTRE EN CONFUSION DE MA MISÈRE, 'To whom I have been ashamed to
reveal my lowly station.'

[225] PARDI. See note 15.

[226] FAUTES D'ORTHOGRAPHE. See note 134.

[227] N'APPRÊTONS POINT À RIRE, 'Let us give them no occasion to
laugh at us.' _Apprêter à rire_, Littré, 8°, also Dict. de l'Acad., 1878.

[228] HABIT D'ORDONNANCE, 'Livery.' Until 1666 the regiments in the French
army wore the livery of the colonel commanding. After that date they wore the
king's livery or uniform, though some regiments, more highly favored, wore
the actual colors of the royal livery; the uniform was in fact nothing but a
mark that the wearers belonged to the sovereign. Harlequin has played upon
this fact in a preceding scene, when he has called himself "un soldat
d'antichambre."

[229] CELA NE LAISSE PAS D'ÊTRE. See note 109.

[230] TANT Y A QUE, 'However that may be,' or 'Nevertheless, the truth is
that.'

[231] LA VOILÀ BIEN MALADE, 'She is pining with love for me.'

[232] PAR LA VENTREBLEU, _Ventrebleu_, written also _ventrebieu_, is a
euphemism for _ventre (de) Dieu_. A familiar interjection; admitted by the
Academy, 1878. For the _la_, compare a similar corruption of _palsambleu_
(_par le sang [de] Dieu_) into _par LA sambleu_, and _corbleu_ (_corps [de]
Dieu_) into _par LA corbleu_.

[233] CASAQUE. Harlequin's loose upper garment or jacket.

[234] SOUQUENILLE. A long outer garment of coarse cloth, worn especially by
grooms in the care of their horses.

[235] UN AMOUR DE MA FAÇON, 'A passion inspired by me.'

[236] SUJET À LA CASSE, 'Apt to be thwarted.'  _Casse_--literally 'breakage.'

[237] FRIPERIE, 'Old clothes.' Used colloquially; as in English, 'duds.'

[238] POUSSER MA POINTE, 'Carry out my purpose.'

[239] LA MIENNE. Refers to _friperie_.

[240] NOUS L'AVONS DANS NOTRE MANCHE. "Avoir une personne dans sa manche, En
disposer à son gré" (_Dictionnaire de l'Académie française_). The expression,
no doubt, is derived from the custom of using the full sleeves as a
receptacle for all manner of objects to be carried about by the wearer at a
time when pockets were not worn. It is still in vogue in certain cases--
military officers, for instance, carry their handkerchiefs in their left
sleeve. Théophile Gautier, in his _Voyage en Italie_, speaks of giving to a
couple of monks "quelques zwantzigs pour dire des messes à notre intention.
Les bons pères prirent l'argent, le glissèrent dans le pli de leur manche."

[241] PÂTE D'HOMME. A familiar expression for 'sort of a man.'

[242] VOUS M'EN DIREZ DES NOUVELLES, 'You will see that I am right.' See
_Nouvelle_, Littré, 1°. Compare: "(Madame Patin) Tu ne sais ce que tu dis.
(Lisette) Vous m'en direz des nouvelles" (Dancourt, _le Chevalier à la Mode_,
I, IX).

[243] VOS PETITES MANIÈRES, 'Your rude manners.' By apposition to _les belles
manières_, the manners of a class above one's own.

[244] NOUS VIVRONS BUT À BUT, 'We shall live on the same footing.' To
understand Harlequin's impertinent remark, it must be remembered that while
he is well aware of the real rank of both Lisette and Silvia, Dorante is
still ignorant of it. Harlequin knows his master to be in love with the
latter, and to be about to marry her, in spite of the apparently tremendous
difference in rank, and allows himself a little sarcasm at the expense of his
master. This attitude of the domestic towards his superior is not infrequent
in the comedies of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

[245] PRÉVENU, 'Forestalled.'

[246] CE N'EST PAS À MOI À ... DEMANDER. See note 7.

[247] ENTENDEZ. _Entendre_ is here used for _comprendre_.

[248] EST-CE À VOUS À VOUS PLAINDRE. See note 7. Some later editions print
_de vous plaindre_.

[249] VOUS RENDRE SENSIBLE. See note 153.

[250] VOUS ÊTES SENSIBLE À, 'You share.'

[251] JE N'Y TÂCHERAI POINT. This construction would not now be admissible.
The modern form would be, _Je ne tâcherai point de le faire_.

[252] LE MÉRITE VAUT BIEN LA NAISSANCE. A theme often repeated by Marivaux.
Compare: "Son exemple encourageait quiconque avait du mérite sans naissance"
(Voltaire, _Russie_, I, 12). Voltaire founded his comedy, _Nanine_, upon this
line of Marivaux. The Comte d'Olban has fallen in love with Nanine, a girl
brought up by his mother, the Marquise d'Olban, and who occupies the position
of half maid, half companion. She is a peasant's daughter, but the Count
marries her, nevertheless, after he has declaimed a number of speeches full
of very noble and liberal ideas on equality and the worth of real virtue, of
which the following extract is a fair sample:--

  Je ne prends point, quoiqu'on en puisse croire,
  La vanité pour l'honneur et la gloire,
  L'éclat vous plaît; vous mettez la grandeur
  Dans des blasons: je la veux dans le coeur.
  L'homme de bien, modeste avec courage,
  Et la beauté spirituelle, sage
  Sans bien, sans nom, sans tous ces titres vains,
  Sont à mes yeux les premiers des humains.

[253] MADAME. Note that this is the first time Dorante has so addressed
Silvia. That is because it is only now that he has learned her real rank.

[254] ALLONS, SAUTE, MARQUIS! from Regnard's _le Joueur_ (1696), IV, vi.


LE LEGS.

[1] LISETTE. An interesting type. See Introduction, p. lxvii.

[2] LÉPINE. One of the three valets of Marivaux which may be considered as
new types. See Introduction, p. lviii.

[3] DE CETTE GRANDE JEUNESSE, 'So very young.'

[4] L'ÉVÉNEMENT, 'The result,' 'outcome.'

[5] MOYENNANT, 'Considering.' The modern meaning is 'in  consideration
of.'

[6] NOUS SOMMES À CETTE CAMPAGNE. _A_ for _dans_, the modern form.

[7] GASCON FROID. A type striking by reason of its exception to the
general class. _Gascon_ is often synonymous with boaster, liar, and
blusterer. Composure or sobriety is the least of his virtues, and when
found may perhaps give reason for distrust. Compare the character of de
Guiche in Rostand's _Cyrano de Bergerac:_ "Le Gascon souple et froid" (Act
I, Sc. iii). "Rien de plus dangereux qu'un Gascon raisonnable" (Act IV,
Sc. iii).

[8] MONSIEUR DE LÉPINE. This title, though often ironically or latteringly
given to Lépine throughout the play, goes far to show the type of
independent valet one has to deal with here.

[9] INCONTINENT, 'Immediately.' From the Latin _in continenti_.

[10] SUR LE MÊME TON. Equivalent to _pied_, the modern form.

[11] DE SOUPÇONS. There is an ellipsis here: _Pour ce qui est de
soupçons_. More usually: _Quant à avoir des soupçons_, _j'en ai_, etc.

[12] JE DIFFÈRE AVEC VOUS DE PENSÉE. This form would scarcely be used
nowadays. _Je ne suis pas de votre avis_ would be preferred.

[13] D'OÙ VIENT. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 220.

[14] LE TOUT EST ÉGAL, 'Every condition is alike (in that respect).' This
expression would be replaced in modern French by _tout état est bon_.

[15] MONS, an abbreviation for _Monsieur_. Used to express contempt.

[16] D'HOMME D'HONNEUR. The complete expression would be _Foi d'homme
d'honneur_. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 110.

[17] JE VOUS EN OFFRE AUTANT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note
173.

[18] C'EST TOUT AU PLUS SI JE CONNOIS ACTUELLEMENT LA VÔTRE, 'It is
saying a good deal if I even know yours now.'

[19] DESSUS. Later editions print _sur_, which would be the modern
expression.

[20] SANDIS. A Gascon oath. For _sang (de) Dieu_. Cf. _morbleu_,
_parbleu_, _ventrebleu_. None of these expletives, any more than _mon
Dieu_ should ever be translated literally--They have wholly lost their
original force and meaning.

[21] OUI-DA. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 21.

[22] N'Y VOYEZ-VOUS RIEN. Note the use of _y_ applied to a person.
Cf. with the use of the third person.

[23] REVENANT, 'Pleasing.'

[24] DISTINGUE. _Distinguer_ sometimes means 'to examine with a view to
marriage.' Compare: "Est-ce que je l'aimais? Dans le fond je le
distinguais, voilà tout; et distinguer un homme, ce n'est pas encore
l'aimer" (Marivaux, _l'Heureux Stratagème_, I, 4).

[25] D'ABONDANCE. This idiom generally means 'offhand,' but it is
undoubtedly used here in the sense of _d'abondant_, 'moreover,' an
expression already antiquated, and usually replaced by the idiom _de
plus_.

[26] GENS. Generally used, if preceded by a possessive adjective
in the sense of 'servants.' Compare Harlequin's exclamation: "Ah! les
sottes gens que nos gens!" (_le Jeu_, etc., II, VI, p. 42), which has
become almost proverbial.

[27] DES DÉCLARATIONS, LA COMTESSE LES ÉPOUVANTE. The meaning is perfectly
clear, though the construction is not satisfactory according to modern
rules.

[28] NE LUI DISE. For _ne le lui dise_. As has been said, Marivaux not
infrequently omits the direct object pronoun in similar constructions. See
_le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 210, and _les fausses confidences_,
note 127.

[29] CETTE ENFANCE, 'That sort of childishness.' Compare: "Vous venez de
pleurer; c'est une enfance" ... (_Marianne_, 3e partie). Also: "Ce sont
des bêtises ou des _enfances_ dont il n'y a que de bonnes gens qui soient
capables" (id. 2e partie). See _les fausses confidences_, note 151.

[30] QU'EN SERA-T-IL? 'What will be the result?'

[31] SIMPLESSE, _Simplicité ingénue_. Antiquated, according to Hatzfeld
and Darmesteter. The Dictionary of the Academy (1878) admits it with the
meaning of _ingénuité, accompagnée de douceur et de facilité_.

[32] OCCURRENCE, 'The possible case.' _Occurrence_ always signifies an
unforeseen circumstance,' 'an emergency.' Compare: "N'oublie jamais que tu
as pour le moins la moitié de part à tout ce que je fais dans cette
_occurrence_" (_le Paysan parvenu_, 1e partie).

[33] QUE LA COMMODITÉ VOUS TENTE, 'Let the convenient opportunity,' etc.,
'Let your own convenience (or advantage) tempt you.'

[34] NE ME VALENT RIEN. The modern form is _n'ont aucune valeur pour moi._

[35] REPARTE, 'Reply,' from _repartir_, used in the sense of _répondre,
répliquer, riposter_. Compare: "Je ne _repartis_ rien à ce discours mais
mes yeux recommencèrent à se mouiller" (_Marianne_, 3e partie).

[36] QU'IL ME FAIT BESOIN, 'That I need it.' FAIRE BESOIN = _être
nécessaire_. Common to the writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth
centuries. Compare: "S'il vous faisait besoin, mon bras est tout à vous"
(Molière, _le Dépit amoureux_, v, 3).

[37] SANDIS. See note 20.

[38] QU'UNE AUTRE. The edition of 1740 prints _qu'un autre_, but this must
be a mistake.

[39] D'OÙ VIENT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 220.

[40] JE VOUS FEROIS UN FORT BON PARTI, 'I would settle a handsome sum on
you both.'

[41] DERECHEF, 'Once more.' Compound of _de, re_, and _chef_ (Lat.
_caput_). Growing obsolete, and replaced in modern French by _de nouveau_
or _encore une fois_.

[42] JE VOUS Y BROUILLEROIS, 'I would get you into trouble with her.'
Aside from the fact that _y_ should be avoided in speaking of persons, the
preposition used after the verb _brouiller_ is properly _avec_ and not
_à_, as is understood in the use of _y_.

[43] ELLE ME FAIT TANT D'AMITIÉ, 'She inspires me with so much love.'

[44] DÉCONFORTEZ, for the more modern _découragez_.

[45] N'EN TENEZ COMPTE. _Tenir compte_ may be used in the negative without
the addition of _pas_ or _point_. Compare: "Il n'en a tenu compte."
(Racine, _les Plaideurs_, I. i.) The negative is to-day, however,
generally completed.

[46] LA GARONNE. A river in the southwestern part of France, rising in the
valley of Aran, in the Spanish Pyrenees, then flowing northward and
northwest past Toulouse, Agen, and Bordeaux, to its juncture with the
Dordogne, with which it merges its waters to form the Gironde. A not
uncommon term for the Gascons is _Enfants de la Garonne_.

[47] GARE, "Take care." From the verb _garer_. _Prenez garde que_ is the
more natural modern expression.

[48] MALEPESTE, 'Confound it.' Compare our exclamation, 'plague on it.' It
is an antiquated expression composed of _male (feminine)_ and _peste_.
Obsolete. Admitted by the French, Academy in 1762, but not included in the
dictionary of 1878.

[49] JE N'AVOIS GARDE D'Y ÊTRE, 'I had no idea whom you meant.' The idiom
_n'avoir garde de_ means 'to be unable' or 'to be far from' (Littré,
"garde." 7°).

[50] JE NE LUI EN VEUX POINT DE MAL, 'I don't wish him any harm.'
Pleonastic for _je ne lui veux point de mal_.

[51] DONT. Better _que_. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 175.

[52] J'Y AI MIS BON ORDRE. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 104;
_le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 169.

[53] IL NE S'Y JOUERA PAS, 'He will not try that.' _Se jouer à quelque
chose_, 'To attempt something' (Littré, 31°).

[54] D'OÙ VIENT.See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 220.

[55] VOUS TENIR, 'To confine yourself,' _Vous en tenir_ is the modern
form.

[56] VUE. The text of 1740 gives the form _vû_.

[57] IL SE FAIT LE SCRUPULE, 'He is anxious not to,' _Faire scrupule_
(without the article) is more modern.

[58] VOUS N'Y SONGEZ PAS, 'What are you thinking of?' Cf. note 102, and
see _les fausses confidences_, note 154.

[59] ON NE PEUT PAS MOINS. An ellipsis for _on ne peut pas l'aimer moins
que je ne le fais_.

[60] ARRANGÉ. Used here in the sense of 'methodical,' 'stiff,' 'prim.'

[61] BON, DES AMIS! VOILÀ BIEN DE QUOI; VOUS N'EN AUREZ ENCORE DE
LONGTEMPS, 'Yes, talk about friends! That's worth while; you won't have
any for a long time to come.' The idea of the marquis is that the admirers
of the countess will be lovers rather than mere friends.

[62] QUAND JE SEROIS AUTRE CHOSE, 'Even should I be something more.'

[63] JE NE LAISSEROIS PAS QUE D'EN ÊTRE SURPRISE. See _Le Jeu de l'amour
et du hasard_, note 109.

[64] C'EST QUE VOUS NE CONNOISSEZ QU'ELLE. A figure of speech conveying
this idea: 'You are very well acquainted with her.'

[65] OUI-DA. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 21.

[66] CE N'EST PAS QU'IL N'Y AIT DU RISQUE, 'After all, there is some
danger.' _Ce n'est pas que_ in the sense of _après tout_ may introduce
either the indicative or the subjunctive with _ne_. The article of the
partitive _du_ is retained because of the affirmative character of the
phrase.

[67] LA PLUPART. Some later editions print _pour la plupart_. The idea is
the same.

[68] IL N'Y AUROIT QUE FAIRE DE, 'I would have no need to.' Compare _le
Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 141.

[69] PRENEZ. Used in the sense of _supposez_.

[70] NE LE VOILÀ-T-IL PAS, 'Just see how (far from the point he is).' See
_le jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 135.

[71] UNIS, 'Plain,' 'simple.' Compare _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_,
note 205.

[72] QU'OUI. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 3.

[73] D'OÙ VIENT ... ME L'AVEZ-VOUS LAISSÉ IGNORER. This peculiar and
somewhat awkward construction is not uncommon to Marivaux. See _le Jeu de
l'amour et du hasard_, note 220. It would now be written _que vous me
l'avez laissé ignorer_, etc.

[74] J'ENTENDS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 247.

[75] IMAGINATION. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 44.

[76] TOUT À L'HEURE = _tout de suite_, not a modern use. See _les Fausses
Confidences_, note 152.

[77] J'ENTENDS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 247.

[78] AVANT QUE DE. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 93.

[79] PASSONS NOTRE CONTRAT, 'Let us sign the marriage settlements to-day.'

[80] ICI, an early use instead of _-ci_.

[81] HÉTÉROCLITE. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 18.

[82] RAGOÛTANT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 102. The word
has seemed too coarse to the actors of to-day, and has been replaced by
_agréable_.

[83] PASSER. See note 79.

[84] TOUT À L'HEURE. See note 76.

[85] JE N'AI QUE FAIRE DE SORTIR, 'I do not need to go out.' Compare _le
Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 140.

[86] CETTE SOTTE! equivalent to _quelle sotte_. It will be noticed that
the French make a very large use of the demonstrative where in English the
article would be employed. In such cases as the present the English would
be: 'What a ...'

[87] AVEC LE MÉDECIN PAR-DESSUS. Doctors have been the butt of jests from
time immemorial. Compare: "Nuper erat medicus; nunc est vespillo Diaulus:
Quod vespillo facit, fecerat et medicus" (Martial, I, 1, Epigram xlviii).

"En dépit des médecins nous vivrons jusqu'à la mort" (Leroux de Lincy.
_Proverbes_, t. 1, série v).

"De jeune médecin cimetière bossu" (Leroux de Lincy, _Proverbes_, t. 1.
série v).

"Dans les discours et dans les choses, ce sont deux sortes de personnes
que vos grands médecins. Entendez-les parler, les plus habiles gens du
monde; voyez-les faire, les plus ignorants de tous les hommes" (Molière,
_le Malade imaginaire_. III, 3).

  Votre savoir, mon camarade,
  Est d'un succès plus général;
  Car s'il n'emporte point le mal,
  Il emporte au moins le malade."
         (Beaumarchais, _le Barbier de Séville_, II, 13).

These reproaches were, it must be owned, fully justified by the practice
of almost all doctors, which was marked by ignorance and barbarism.

[88] TRANSPORT AN CERVEAU, '_Delirium_.'

[89] SANDIS. See note 20.

[90] LA BELLE CONSÉQUENCE, 'What difference does that make?' Used in the
sense of _la belle raison_.

[91] C'EST AUTANT DE RESTÉ PAR LES CHEMINS, 'I would be as good as left on
the highway.' Compare _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 54.

[92] D'AUJOURD'HUI. The modem meaning of this form is 'from to-day,' but
it is used here in the sense of 'this day.'

[93] JE VIS SOUFFRANT. Used in the sense of _Je suis souffrant_.

[94] FOURNIR LA COURSE, 'manage to reach my journey's end.'

[95] JE FEROIS DES CRIS. _Ferois_ for _pousserois_.

[96] COMMENÇOIS D'EN. The modern form is _commençois à_.

[97] FROISSÉ, 'Bruised.' Used in the sense of _meurtri_ (_Dict. de
l'Acad._, 1878).

[98] IL N'EN SERA NI PLUS NI MOINS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_,
note 150.

[99] OUI-DA. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 21.

[100] De bon jeu, 'Seriously.'

[101] DIANTRE. A euphemism to disguise the word _diable_, as _bleu_ for
_Dieu_ in many exclamations (Littré).

[102] VOUS N'Y PENSEZ PAS, 'What are you thinking of?' Compare note 58,
and _les Fausses Confidences_, note 156.

[103] J'Y SERAI TOUJOURS. For the more modern _Je le serai toujours._

[104] AIME. A singular failure to carry out the agreement of the verb in
the relative clause with its antecedent. _Aimez_ would be the correct
form.

[105] C'EST S'ÉGORGER, 'It is madness.'

[106] VOS FUREURS, 'Your mad purpose.'

[107] LE. The edition of 1740 prints the article _le_, but the
demonstrative _ce_ would carry out the sense better.

[108] CELA DE PLUS. Accompanied with some gesture of impatience, perhaps a
snap of the thumb-nail against the teeth. With us a snap of the fingers
would accompany the words.

[109] INSTRUIT. That is to say, 'informed' about the matter in hand.

[110] SI CE N'EST. = _Sinon_.

[111] LA FAIRE. _Le_ would be more natural, referring to _reste_, which is
masculine. _La_ evidently refers back to _somme_.

[112] PRÉTENDS, 'Expect.'

[113] RENDRE RÉCONCILIÉS. The simple infinitive _réconcilier_ is more
natural French. Marivaux has purposely lent this loosely constructed
expression to Lépine. Mme. de Sévigné uses "rendre révoltée."

[114] SANDIS. See note 20.

[115] ENTENDS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 247.

[116] EN PUISSANCE D'ÉPOUX. A law term meaning: "Qui ne peut contracter ni
disposer de rien sans être autorisée de son mari" (_Dict. de l'Acad_.,
1878). Used often in the mere sense of 'married,' as here. Compare: "Je ne
comprends même pas qu'elle se soit amourachée d'un homme en puissance de
femme" (Augier, _les Effrontés_, v, 4).

[117] RIT. This use of the verb _rire_ in the sense of _plaire_ is not
uncommon.

[118] LA SERVITUDE. An incorrect use of the abstract noun. Lépine,
doubtless, means _les serviteurs, les domestiques_.

[119] LA MÉDIOCRITÉ DE L'ÉTAT FAIT QUE LES PENSÉES SONT MÉDIOCRES.
Compare: "Ne sais-tu pas que les petits scrupules ne conviennent qu'aux
petites gens?" (J.J. Rousseau, _la Nouvelle Héloise_, IV, 13. The same
idea differently applied).

[120] CE QUI EST DE CERTAIN. With _est_ taken in the sense of _il y a_,
the construction is correct. The modern form would be, _Ce qui est
certain_.

[121] SANS DIFFICULTÉ. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 154.

[122] ARTICLE, 'Matter.'

[123] DISPUTE. The correct modern word is _conteste. On dispute sur une
chose_.

[124] ENTENDS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 247.

[125] JE N'AI CONNU MES MIGRAINES. Equivalent to _Je n'ai eu des
migraines_.

[126] PROCUREUR, 'Attorney.' "Name given formerly to the public officer
called to-day _avoué_" (Littré). An _avoué_ is an officer whose duty it is
to represent the parties before the tribunals, and to draw up the acts of
procedure (Littré).

[127] AVOCAT, 'Lawyer' or 'Counsel.'

[128] D'OÙ VIENT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 220.

[129] C'ÉTOIT BIEN LE MOINS, 'I could do no less.'

[130] PAS TANT DE TORT, ET QUE C'EST... The modern form would be:
_tellement tort, et est-ce ma faute_.

[131] A MOINS QUE JE N'Y SOIS POUR RIEN, 'Unless I have no part in it.'

[132] A TOI À QUI IL EN AURA OBLIGATION. Later editions print _A toi qu'il
en aura obligation_, which is the better form. See page 61, notes 1 and 2.

[133] CONGÉDIIEZ. The edition of 1740 prints the form _congédiez_, which
would be impossible to-day.

[134] PLAISANTE. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 37.

[135] CE N'EST NON PLUS À MOI À QUI VOUS RÉPONDEZ QU'À QUI NE VOUS PARLA
JAMAIS, 'Your answers are no more addressed to me than to some one who
never spoke to you.' A very complicated and unwieldy phrase. See _Le Jeu
de l'amour et du hasard_, note 175 and note 176.

[136] COMME VOTRE AVERSION M'ACCOMMODE, 'How cruelly your aversion treats
me.' _Accommoder_ (Littré, 4°), antiquated.

[137] DIFFICILE. The text of 1740 gives _différent_, which would make no
sense here. _Difficile_, moreover, is the general rendering.

[138] DE RESTE, 'Only too well.' Notice the difference in meaning between
this expression and _du reste_ or _au reste_ ('moreover').

[139] CE QUE JE PENSE. Some of the later editions give the more complete
expression, _ce que j'en pense_.

[140] AUX. The use of the preposition _à_ after _avoir regret_ is less
frequent to-day than that of _de_.


LES FAUSSES CONFIDENCES

[1] ARAMINTE. A young widow of independent character, in whose mind the
prejudice of rank and wealth is not so great as to be insurmountable. One
of Marivaux's favourite types.

[2] MONSIEUR REMY. The uncle of Dorante, a man of rough exterior and
crusty humour, frank to an extreme, overbearing with his nephew, but ready
to take his part, a regular _burbero benefico_ (with which character of
Goldoni's comedy, compare).

[3] PROCUREUR. See _le Legs_, note 126.

[4] MADAME ARGANTE. An imperious, selfish, vain, old woman, of the type
Marivaux generally chooses for the mothers in his comedies.

[5] ARLEQUIN. When this play passed to the stage of the Comédie-Française,
the name of _Arlequin_, familiar to the Italian comedy, was changed to
_Lubin_, and his dress modified to suit the new rôle. See _le Jeu de
l'amour et du hasard_, note 2.

[6] DUBOIS. A "real creation" among the valets of Marivaux. Like Lépine of
_le Legs_, he is quite above the station of the traditional valet, and may
well be called _Monsieur_ Dubois. The intrigue of the piece is entirely in
his hands, and is carried out with the shrewdness and dexterity of an able
man of affairs.

[7] JOAILLIER. One who works in, or sells, _joyaux_ ('jewels'), 'a
jeweller.'

[8] DÉTOURNEZ. Used in the sense of _dérangez_ (Littré, 10°).

[9] N'EN FAITES PAS DE FAÇON. The _en_ nowadays would be considered
superfluous, and _façon_ would be put in the plural. The use of _en_ is
peculiar in this case, for it refers to the idea partly expressed by
Dorante. It stands for _Ne faites pas de façons parce que je me dérange
pour vous_.

[10] HONNÊTE, 'Polite,' 'civil.' Notice the use of the singular, following
the rule that after the pronouns _nous_ and _vous_, when these pronouns
designate a single person, even if the verb is plural, the adjective
remains singular.

[11] QU'IL. A _laquelle_ would be better than _que_, in modern French. The
construction of the sentence is somewhat awkward, and betrays the
lingering influence of the Latin forms, still so evident in many of the
best seventeenth century authors, such as Bossuet, whose use of _qui_ and
_que_ is very striking. In the eighteenth century the language was
acquiring greater freedom, but it is not until the nineteenth that it rids
itself of much of the old syntax.

[12] PROCUREUR. See _le Legs_, note 126.

[13] UNE GRANDE CHARGE DANS LES FINANCES. Marivaux refers to the _ferme
générale_, a syndicate of capitalists that exploited the taxes levied by
the government, and collected by the _fermiers généraux_ and their
subordinates. The business was an exceedingly lucrative one for the
members of the syndicate, who made large fortunes out of the profits of
their contract with the State. The comedy of Lesage, _Turcaret_, turns
upon the intrigues and swindles of one of these _traitants_ or
_partisans_, as they were also called. Dancourt, in his _Chevalier à la
mode_, introduces a pretentious widow, Mme. Patin, of whom her maid says:
"Mme. Patin, la veuve d'un honnête partisan, qui a gagné deux millions de
bien au service du roi!" (Act I, Sc. 1).

[14] PÉROU. The gold mines of Peru gave rise to the use of the name as
synonymous with wealth. Compare: "Madame Thibaut est un petit Pérou pour
Monsieur de la Brie." (Dancourt, _Femme d'intrigues_, I, 2.)

[15] VOUS M'EN DIREZ DES NOUVELLES. See _le jeu de l'amour et du hasard_,
note 242.

[16] DIANTRE. See _le Legs_, note 101.

[17] LÀ. _Dans la tête_, with a gesture.

[18] DÉRANGÉ. 'Disorderly' or 'irregular' (in his affairs).

[19] SERVITEUR AU COLLATÉRAL, 'Then the collateral heirs will have to go
without.' _Serviteur au_ is here used in the sense of _tant pis pour.
Serviteur_ is not infrequently used as a formula of dismissal.

[20] VOUS METTEZ. An inverted order quite common in the seventeenth and
eighteenth centuries, when the second of two imperatives is construed with
an object pronoun. Compare: "Quittez cette chimère, et m'aimez "
(Corneille). "Polissez-le sans cesse et le repolissez" (Boileau, _Art
Poétique_, Chant 1).

[21] DONT. _Que would preferably be used to-day, so as not to repeat the
construction of the antecedent. Compare _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_,
note 175.

[22] QU'IL VOUS REVIENNE, 'That you like him.'

[23] MONSIEUR PRÉVIENT EN SA FAVEUR, 'The gentleman's appearance speaks in
his favour.'

[24] GRÂCES. In modern French the singular is preferred.

[25] EST-CE À VOUS À QUI IL EN VEUT, 'Is it you whom he has come to see?'
See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 68; _le Jeu de l'amour et du
hasard_, note 175 and note 176; _le Legs_, note 132, and _le Legs_, note
135.

[26] COMME S'EN ALLANT, for, _comme en s'en allant.

[27] PARTI, 'Position' (Littré, 10°). The idea of 'salary' is conveyed by
the word as used here.

[28] RENVERRAI TOUT. That is to say, _tout ce qui se présentera_; 'I will
dismiss all other applicants.'

[29] PARTI. See note 27.

[30] REPRÉSENTE, 'call attention, 'set forth'; a form often used in
petitions.

[31] PARDI. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 15.

[32] A VOTRE AISE LE RESTE, 'The rest when you like.'

[33] D'OÙ VIENT PRÉFÉRER CELUI-CI. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_,
note 220.

[34] ARRÊTÉ, for the modern French _engagé_ ('engaged').

[35] IL ME TARDE, 'I long.'

[36] EN PASSE, 'In a position to.'

[37] D'ALLER À TOUT. For the more modern expression _d'arriver à tout_,
'to attain any height.'

[38] DÉFAITE, 'Excuse' or 'pretext' (Littré", 4°, also Diet, de l'Acad.
1878).

[39] ÉLÉVATION. Used here with the unusual meaning of 'desire for social
eminence.'

[40] ELLE S'ENDORT DANS CET ÉTAT, 'She is satisfied with her condition.'
While already in the seventeenth century the ambition of rich _bourgeois_
to gain admission to the exclusive circles of the nobility had been
sufficiently marked to induce Molière to attack it in his _Bourgeois
gentilhomme_, it was even more noticeable in the eighteenth, and
_mésalliances_ between noblemen and women of the middle class became much
more frequent.

[41] RÉFLEXION ROTURIÈRE. _Roture_ was the expression used to denote the
_bourgeoisie_ as distinguished from the nobility.

[42] JE N'Y ENTENDS POINT DE FINESSE, 'I cannot enter into such subtle
distinctions on the question of happiness.' She refuses to discuss the
possibility of Araminte's preferring happiness to rank. For her, rank
means happiness, as would wealth.

[43] IL ME L'A PARU = _Cela nil a paru ainsi_.

[44] D'OÙ VIENT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 220.

[45] J'Y METTRAI BON ORDRE. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note
169.

[46] PLAISANT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 37.

[47] TIMBRÉ COMME CENT, 'As crazy as a loon.' It is difficult to preserve
the figure in an idiomatic translation. Compare the colloquial English,
"You act like _sixty_."

[48] CERVELLE BRÛLÉE. A peculiar use of _cervelle_. _Brûlée_ is used here
by Marivaux in the sense _troublée_, as in the passage from Mme. de
Sévigné: "Mme. de Saint-Géran est toute brûlée du départ de son mari."

[49] IL EN EST COMME UN PERDU, 'He is like a man who has lost his reason.'
Cf. _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 120.

[50] UN PEU BOUDANT. Nowadays the adverb follows the verb. Here _boudant_
might at first thought be taken for an adjective, but it is a present
participle used verbally and consequently invariable.

[51] ON A BIEN AFFAIRE DE, 'I have no use for.' This idiom must not be
confounded with _avoir affaire à_, which means 'to have to deal with.'

[52] ESPRIT RENVERSÉ, 'A crazy man.'

[53] MALEPESTE. See _le Legs_, note 48.

[54] AVANT QUE DE. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 93.

[55] IL N'Y AVOIT PLUS PERSONNE AU LOGIS, 'He was quite unconscious.'
(Littré, "logis," 1°.)

[56] D'ÉPIER. Later editions print _qu'épier_, as _d'épier_ would not be
admissible in modern French. _Que de rêver... que d'épier_ would be the
most natural modern form.

[57] PAYOIS BOUTEILLE = _Payais à boire_.

[58] LA COMÉDIE. The _Comédie-Française_, or _Théâtre-Français_, then, as
now, the leading theatre in Paris.

[59] DÈS QUATRE HEURES. The performance did not begin before five o'clock,
in the eighteenth century,

[60] DANS L'HIVER. The modern form is _en hiver_.

[61] JURANT PAR CI PAR LÀ, 'Swearing every now and then.'

[62] AUX TUILERIES. The Cours-la-Reine, in the Champs-Elysées, the
Tuileries gardens, and the Palais-Royal, with its covered galleries and
its garden, were the fashionable resorts of promenaders in the eighteenth
century.

[63] CE QU'IL. The _ce_ is superfluous.

[64] PERCER = _S'apercevoir_.

[65] JE ME REMETS = _J'y suis_.

[66] OUI-DA. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 21.

[67] COMME PASSANT, for _comme en passant_. Compare _les Fausses
Confidences_, note 26.

[68] C'EST AUTANT DE PRIS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 54.

[69] QU'EST-IL = _Pourquoi est-il_?

[70] PARDI. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 15.

[71] IL LES FAIT COMME IL LES A. Untranslatable, save by an équivalent. It
is a pun on Dubois' remark: "making eyes at her."

[72] PRENEZ TOUJOURS, 'Take note of them nevertheless."

[73] LE. The text of 1758 prints _le_; _ce_ would carry out the sense even
better. See _le Legs_, note 38.

[74] APPAREMMENT, 'Evidently.' This adverb may be used with or without the
conjunction _que_ to introduce a verb.

[75] D'OÙ VIENT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 220.

[76] UNE GUENON, 'a fool.'

[77] QUI SE FASSE = _Qu'il y ait_.

[78] LES PETITES-MAISONS. The old Maladrerie de Saint-Germain, which in
1554 became the Hôpital Saint-Germain, later known as les Petites-Maisons,
on account of the great number of cells into which it was divided. It was
used to house infirm old men and women, who received a small weekly dole,
lunatics, and patients suffering from loathsome diseases. The name became
synonymous with either a mad-house or a hospital for certain diseases: it
was changed in 1801 to les Petits-Ménages, the insane having then been
transferred, the men to Bicêtre, the women to La Salpêtrière.

[79] BIEN VENANTS, 'Paid regularly.' Marivaux, like the authors of the
preceding century, considered _bien venants_ as an adjective, and hence
declinable: but _livre_ is feminine, and we should expect here the form
_bien venantes_. The Academy has declared the expression indeclinable.
Compare: "Je le voyais avec vingt-huit mille livres de rente bien
venantes" (Mme. de Sévigné, Dec. 28, 1689).

[80] APPAREMMENT. See _les Fausses Confidences_, note 74.

[81] PARDI. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 15.

[82] VOUS N'AVEZ POINT DE GRÉ À ME SAVOIR. A well-known idiom, better
expressed to-day: _Vous n'avez point à me savoir gré_.

[83] D'AVEC. A shortened form for some such phrase as _d'une conversation
avec. D'avec_ is generally to be translated 'from,' 'in contradiction to.'

[84] A QUEL HOMME EN VEUT-IL? 'For what man is he looking?' Compare _le
Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 68.

[85] A VOUS. _Auprès de vous_ would be the modern expression.

[86] LE FAISANT SORTIR. Note the peculiar use of _le_, which nowadays
would be replaced by the noun to which it refers--_le garçon_.

[87] DONT. Better _que_. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 175.

[88] DESSUS. For _là-dessus_.

[89] SANS DIFFICULTÉ. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 154.

[90] DE NE VOUS PAS AIMER. _De ne pas vous aimer_ is the more natural
order in modern French.

[91] IL N'A QUE FAIRE DE, 'He has no need to.' Compare _le Jeu de l'amour
et du hasard_, note, 141.

[92] C'EST UN PORTRAIT DE FEMME. The construction of the sentence is
peculiar and incomplete. It requires the introduction, before _c'est un
portrait_, of the words _c'est que_. In modern French the awkwardness of
this form would be obviated. In the second clause _que_ would have to be
prefixed to _c'est ici_.

[93] QUAND. _Puisque_ is also found in incomplete expressions of this
kind. The thought might be completed as follows: _Mais, quand_ (or
_puisque_) _je vous dis, etc., vous devriez me croire_.

[94] ENTENDU, used here in the sense of _compris_.

[95] HUPPÉES, 'Fancy,' 'smartly dressed.' It often means 'smart.' Compare;
"Combien en as-tu vu, je dis des plus huppées." (Racine, _Les Plaideurs_,
J, 4); "Bien huppé qui pourra m'attraper sur ce point!" (Molière, _École
des femmes_, 1, I).

[96] JE N'EN RABATS RIEN, 'I retract nothing.' That is to say, 'I insist
that it is the Count.'

[97] PLAISANT, 'Ridiculous.'

[98] COMME DE CELA. With some gesture of contempt. See _le Legs_, note
108.

[99] LUI. For _le_. The verb _défier_ governs to-day the accusative and
not the dative.

[100] QU'IL. Later editions print _qui_, which is the correct form. The
thought may be expressed more simply by the phrase _Je l'avais vu le
contempler_.

[101] CE QUI EST DE SÛR = _Ce qu'il y a de sûr_.

[102] LE SUJET = _La raison_.

[103] DE BONNE MAIN, 'By a reliable person.' (Littré, "main," 17º.)

[104] CONSENS... DE. The verb _consentir_ takes either _de_ or _à_, before
a following infinitive, although in modern French the latter is the more
common.

[105] TOUS PROCÈS. Later editions print _tout procès_, which is the more
natural modern form. The plural, in the sense of 'each' or 'every' is,
however, sometimes found without the article. Compare: "L'auteur des
dialogues a dit que les belles sont de tous pays, et moi je dis que les
sottises sont de tous les siècles " (Fontenelle, _Jugement de Pluton_).

[106] AVOIR PRISE ... AVEC, 'To have a dispute with.' PRISE, 'Quarrel,'
'dispute' (Littré, 6°, also Dict. de l'Acad., 1878).

[107] TOUS. Later editions print _tout_, which is the modern form. In the
seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries is was not customary to
consider the adverbial _tout_ as necessarily invariable.

[108] MOUVEMENT. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 162.

[109] DONT. _Que is preferable. See _Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note
175.

[110] SAVOIS. A not uncommon use of the imperfect indicative in the sense
of the conditional.

[111] JE N'AUROIS QUE FAIRE DE. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note
68. Compare _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 141, and _le Legs_,
note 85.

[112] A TOI. The English idiom is 'of you.'

[113] AU MOINS, 'Nevertheless.'

[114] CAPABLE. Most editions print _incapable_, beginning the sentence
with _s'il_, and punctuating with a comma after _incapable_. The sense is
better carried out with such a rendering.

[115] Des biais = _Des moyens détournés_.

[116] L'EN DÉDIRE = _Le démentir_.

[117] COMME S'EN ALLANT. See _les Fausses Confidences_, note 26.

[118] A CE QU'IL EST NÉ = _A sa naissance_.

[119] C'EST DE DORANTE, for _Il est de Dorante_: 'It has been painted by
Dorante.'

[120] M'EN FAIRE ACCROIRE, 'To impose upon me.'

[121] AVANT QUE DE. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 93.

[122] This speech of Dorante's and Araminte's answer seem to have inspired
Augier and Sandeau in the scene between Bertrand and Hélène, in _Mlle. de
la Seiglière_, Act III, sc. 7.

[123] QUE MON AMOUR N'EN AUGMENTE. See _Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard_,
note 137.

[124] JE L'AI PEINTE. The _peinte_ refers to and agrees with _la_ in
Dorante's preceding speech.

[125] AVANT QUE DE. See _Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 117.

[126] RUE DU FIGUIER. A very ancient and historic street in Paris,
situated not far from the Lycée Charlemagne, and making a triangle with
the rue Charlemagne and the rue Fauconnier. Even before the year 1300 it
bore this name, from a fine fig-tree which stood at its juncture with the
rue Fauconnier, and which was standing as late as 1605. The most important
edifice of the street is the Hôtel de Sens, built in the sixteenth century
by the Archbishop Tristan de Salazar. It was for a time the residence of
Marguerite, first wife of Henry IV.

[127] JE LUI RECOMMANDERAI. Later editions print _je le lui
recommanderai_. Attention has already been called to Marivaux's custom of
omitting the direct object pronoun in similar constructions. Compare _le
Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 210, and _le Legs_, note 29.

[128] MOUVEMENTS. See _Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 162.

[129] LUI. See note 99.

[130] FATIGUE, 'Importune' (Littré, 4°).' Compare: "Ainsi donc mes bontés
vous fatiguent peut-être" (Racine, _Bérénice_, II, 4).

[131] AMUSER. See _Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 41.

[132] EN FAIT DE DISCRÉTION, JE MÉRITERAIS D'ÊTRE FEMME. _Discrétion_
means here 'the ability to keep a secret' (Littré, 5°). Compare;

  "Rien ne pèse tant qu'un secret:
  Le porter loin est difficile aux dames;
  Et je sais même sur ce fait
  Bon nombre d'hommes qui sont femmes.'
                         (La Fontaine, _Fables_, viii, 6.)

[133] LE DIABLE N'Y PERD RIEN, is said of a person who restrains his
feelings with difficulty, or only temporarily (Littré, "diable." 2°). The
whole phrase might here be translated by: 'She cannot conceal the matter,
nor will I.'

[134] ENTENDS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 247.

[135] OUI-DA. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 21.

[136] DEMEURE. The incorrect use of this verb by Harlequin adds to the
comic of the piece. For correct French one might substitute _se trouve_.

[137] LA RUE DU FIGUIER. See note 126.

[138] SAIS. _Savoir_ as used here means 'to know about the street,' 'to
know that it exists,' 'to know where it may be found'; _connaître_ would
mean 'to be acquainted with it.'

[139] RENDRA = _Remettra_.

[140] RENDREZ. Some of the later editions print _rendez_.

[141] QUE JE N'AIE VU, 'Until I have seen.' The negative particle _ne_ is
required in a phrase introduced by _que_, when this conjunction stands in
the place of _avant que_.

[142] PRÉSOMPTIONS. 'Presumptions' or 'reasonable suppositions.' Compare:
"Ce ne sont pas là des convictions entières; mais ce sont les présomptions
les plus fortes" (Voltaire, _Essai sur les moeurs et l'esprit des
nations_, chap. 166).

[143] DE VOTRE FAÇON, 'Of your choosing.'

[144] TOUT. Later editions print _tout le monde_, which is evidently the
sense in which this word is used.

[145] ROGUE, 'Arrogant.' In the edition of 1758 the word is printed
_roque_, which has led some editors into the error of correcting to
_rauque_ (hoarse).

[146] NOUS N'AVONS QUE FAIRE ENSEMBLE, 'We have no dealings together.'

[147] NON QUE JE SACHE. _Non, pas que je sache_ is the more complete
modern expression.

[148] A CAUSE QUE. _Parce que_ is more modern. Littré favors the retention
of _à cause que_, since it is used by good authors, and, in certain cases,
is preferable to _parce que_.

[149] AMPLIFIE, 'Exaggerates.'

[150] HORS D'OEUVRE = _Hors de propos_. Generally used to-day as a
substantive, but in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries often used
adverbially as here. Compare: "Dans le _Cid_, toutes celles (the scenes)
de l'infante sont détachées, et paraissent hors d'oeuvre" (Corneille,
_Horace_, Examen).

[151] ENFANCE. For the more modern word _enfantillage_, although the Dict.
de l'Acad., 1878, retains the word in this sense. Compare: "Ils ne font
que des enfances" (Mme. de Sévigné, Jan. 26, 1689). "On passait encore les
enfances à Mme. la duchesse de Bourgogne par la grâce qu'elle y mettait"
(St. Simon. 294, 6). "Ce sont des bêtises ou des enfances dont il n'y a
que de bonnes gens qui soient capables" (_Marianne_, 2e partie.) See _le
Legs_, note 29.

[152] TOUT À L'HEURE. In the sense of _tout de suite_ the expression is
to-day obsolete, and is not admitted by the Dict. de l'Acad., 1878. See
_le Legs_, note 76.

[153] À CAUSE QUE. See note 147.

[154] ENTEND. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 247.

[155] APPAREMMENT, 'Manifestly,' 'Of course.' In this sense the word has
become obsolete, and is not admitted by the Dict. de l'Acad., 1878.

[156] VOUS N'Y SONGEZ PAS. See _le Legs_, note 58, _le Legs_, note 102.

[157] DÉLIVRÉE. The edition of 1758 prints _délivrées_, which will be
accounted for by the speaker's including madame Argante in his mind. The
singular is, however, preferable.

[158] EUS. The edition of 1758 prints the past participle _eu_, without
making it agree with the preceding object pronoun. See _le Legs_, note 56.

[159] NOUS DIS. For the position of the object pronoun see note 18.

[160] EUES. The edition of 1738 prints _eu_. For similar carelessness in
Marivaux's use of the past participle compare _le Legs_, note 56, and note
158.

[161] AFFRONTÉ, 'Deceived' (Littré, 2°, also the Dict. de l'Acad., 1878).

[162] FERMIER, 'Farmer,' 'One holding a farm by lease.'

[163] ENTENDS. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 247.

[164] A CAUSE QUE. See note 147.

[165] OUF! MA GLOIRE M'ACCABLE; ET JE MÉRITEROIS BIEN D'APPELER CETTE
FEMME-LÀ MA BRU. This expression, seeming too violent to the spectators of
to-day, was suppressed by the Comédie-Française, March 5, 1881. The play
ends with the words of Araminte. See Larroumet, p. 227, note 1.

[166] PARDI. See _le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard_, note 15.





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home