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Title: A Supplement to A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents
Author: McKinley, William, 1843-1901
Language: English
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A Supplement to

A COMPILATION OF THE MESSAGES AND PAPERS OF THE PRESIDENTS

1789-1902

BY JAMES D. RICHARDSON

A REPRESENTATIVE FROM THE STATE OF TENNESSEE

COMPILED AND ARRANGED BY

GEORGE RAYWOOD DEVITT, M.A.

MEMBER NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, ETC., ETC.

THIS VOLUME PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF BUREAU OF NATIONAL LITERATURE AND
ART

1904



Prefatory Note

As the exigencies which prompted, at a late date, the change of plans
in the compilation of this work, left the messages and papers of the
McKinley administration incomplete and defective, it has been felt that
the time has now arrived for their collection. In this supplement are
included the messages, proclamations and executive orders of President
McKinley which do not appear in Volume X, and those of his successor,
President Roosevelt, to date. They set forth the home affairs of the
nation, and illustrate the stability of the government and institutions
of the United States. They demonstrate that affairs were conducted with
attention and directness unaffected by the apparently distracting, but
glorious, incidents, which marked her interposition by arms and the
extension of her sheltering aegis to Cuba. They teach us that the
foundations of this country are deep-rooted and that the process of
nation-building, as recounted in these volumes, has proceeded upon
right lines and with an unbounded fidelity to principle and purpose.

GEORGE RAYWOOD DEVITT.

WASHINGTON, D.C., _October 1, 1902._



SUPPLEMENT



       *       *       *       *       *

William McKinley

March 4, 1897, to September 14, 1901

       *       *       *       *       *


Additional Messages, Proclamations, Executive Orders and Last Public
Utterance to the People at Buffalo



William McKinley

(For portrait and early biographical sketch see Vol. X, pp. 125, 126,
127)

At the National Republican Convention which met at Philadelphia in June,
1901, William McKinley was again nominated the Republican candidate for
the Presidency of the United States. At the November election he was
re-elected, receiving 292 electoral votes, against 155 votes for William
J. Bryan.

In September, 1901, he accepted an invitation to be present at the
Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo. On September 5 he delivered his
last public utterance to the people, in the Temple of Music, to a vast
audience. The next day, returning from a short trip to Niagara Falls, he
yielded to the wishes of the people and held a reception in the Temple.
Among those who, passing in single file, took him by the hand, was one
who approached with his hand wrapped and held to his breast as though
injured. Concealed within the covering was a loaded revolver; and as he
gave his other hand to the President, a token of friendship, he quickly
fired two shots, from the effects of which the President sank into the
arms of those near him. He was taken to the residence of Mr. John G.
Milburn, President of the Exposition Company, where on September 14,
1901, after an unexpected relapse, he died. The body was taken to
Washington, D.C., and the state funeral was held in the rotunda of the
Capitol. Thence the body was taken to his home in Canton, Ohio, for
interment.

The period covered by the administration of William McKinley was,
undoubtedly, more crowded with events calculated to try and to touch the
very heart of the nation than was any period since the Civil War. The
United States has passed through crisis after crisis in quick succession
and has emerged not only in safety but with untarnished honor, increased
glory, and the great consciousness of solidarity and unification. This
is attested by the wise management of affairs in connection with the
Nicaragua Canal; the increase of the navy, the formation of an army and
the imposition of taxes which in no way impeded the march of industry;
the settlement of railway claims; and the successful starting in life of
Cuba and the administration of far colonial affairs. Aside from the wise
counsels of the Executive of the nation, the calmness and cool action of
the people, amid distracting and perplexing events, have contributed to
the honor of the nation in no slight degree. All of this, and more, was
abundantly testified to, at the time of the deplorable circumstances
attending William McKinley's death by the unexampled outburst throughout
the world of sympathy with the bereaved nation and of admiration for the
man.



INAUGURAL ADDRESS

_Fellow-Citizens_:

In obedience to the will of the people, and in their presence, by
the authority vested in me by this oath, I assume the arduous and
responsible duties of President of the United States, relying upon the
support of my countrymen and invoking the guidance of Almighty God. Our
faith teaches that there is no safer reliance than upon the God of our
fathers, who has so singularly favored the American people in every
national trial, and who will not forsake us so long as we obey His
commandments and walk humbly in His footsteps.

The responsibilities of the high trust to which I have been
called--always of grave importance--are augmented by the prevailing
business conditions, entailing idleness upon willing labor and
loss to useful enterprises. The country is suffering from industrial
disturbances from which speedy relief must be had. Our financial system
needs some revision; our money is all good now, but its value must not
further be threatened. It should all be put on an enduring basis, not
subject to easy attack, nor its stability to doubt or dispute. Our
currency should continue under the supervision of the Government.
The several forms of our paper money offer, in my judgment, a constant
embarrassment to the Government and a safe balance in the Treasury.
Therefore I believe it necessary to devise a system which, without
diminishing the circulating medium or offering a premium for its
contraction, will present a remedy for those arrangements which,
temporary in their nature, might well in the years of our prosperity
have been displaced by wiser provisions. With adequate revenue secured,
but not until then, we can enter upon such changes in our fiscal laws as
will, while insuring safety and volume to our money, no longer impose
upon the Government the necessity of maintaining so large a gold
reserve, with its attendant and inevitable temptations to speculation.
Most of our financial laws are the outgrowth of experience and trial,
and should not be amended without investigation and demonstration of
the wisdom of the proposed changes. We must be both "sure we are right,"
and "make haste slowly." If, therefore, Congress, in its wisdom,
shall deem it expedient to create a commission to take under early
consideration the revision of our coinage, banking and currency laws,
and give them that exhaustive, careful and dispassionate examination
that their importance demands, I shall cordially concur in such action.
If such power is vested in the President, it is my purpose to appoint
a commission of prominent, well-informed citizens of different parties,
who will command public confidence, both on account of their ability and
special fitness for the work. Business experience and public training
may thus be combined, and the patriotic zeal of the friends of the
country be so directed that such a report will be made as to receive the
support of all parties, and our finances cease to be the subject of mere
partisan contention. The experiment is, at all events, worth a trial,
and, in my opinion, it can but prove beneficial to the entire country.

The question of international bimetallism will have early and earnest
attention. It will be my constant endeavor to secure it by co-operation
with the other great commercial powers of the world. Until that
condition is realized when the parity between our gold and silver money
springs from and is supported by the relative value of the two metals,
the value of the silver already coined and of that which may hereafter
be coined, must be kept constantly at par with gold by every resource at
our command. The credit of the Government, the integrity of its
currency, and the inviolability of its obligations must be preserved.
This was the commanding verdict of the people, and it will not be
unheeded.

Economy is demanded in every branch of the Government at all times, but
especially in periods, like the present, of depression in business and
distress among the people. The severest economy must be observed in all
public expenditures, and extravagance stopped wherever it is found, and
prevented wherever in the future it may be developed. If the revenues
are to remain as now, the only relief that can come must be from
decreased expenditures. But the present must not become the permanent
condition of the Government. It has been our uniform practice to retire,
not increase our outstanding obligations, and this policy must again be
resumed and vigorously enforced. Our revenues should always be large
enough to meet with ease and promptness not only our current needs and
the principal and interest of the public debt, but to make proper and
liberal provision for that most deserving body of public creditors, the
soldiers and sailors and the widows and orphans who are the pensioners
of the United States.

The Government should not be permitted to run behind or increase its
debt in times like the present. Suitably to provide against this is the
mandate of duty--the certain and easy remedy for most of our financial
difficulties. A deficiency is inevitable so long as the expenditures of
the Government exceed its receipts. It can only be met by loans or an
increased revenue. While a large annual surplus of revenue may invite
waste and extravagance, inadequate revenue creates distrust and
undermines public and private credit. Neither should be encouraged.
Between more loans and more revenue there ought to be but one opinion.
We should have more revenue, and that without delay, hindrance, or
postponement. A surplus in the Treasury created by loans is not a
permanent or safe reliance. It will suffice while it lasts, but it can
not last long while the outlays of the Government are greater than its
receipts, as has been the case during the past two years. Nor must
it be forgotten that however much such loans may temporarily relieve
the situation, the Government is still indebted for the amount of the
surplus thus accrued, which it must ultimately pay, while its ability
to pay is not strengthened, but weakened by a continued deficit. Loans
are imperative in great emergencies to preserve the Government or its
credit, but a failure to supply needed revenue in time of peace for
the maintenance of either has no justification.

The best way for the Government to maintain its credit is to pay as it
goes--not by resorting to loans, but by keeping out of debt--through an
adequate income secured by a system of taxation, external or internal,
or both. It is the settled policy of the Government, pursued from the
beginning and practised by all parties and Administrations, to raise the
bulk of our revenue from taxes upon foreign productions entering the
United States for sale and consumption, and avoiding, for the most part,
every form of direct taxation, except in time of war. The country is
clearly opposed to any needless additions to the subject of internal
taxation, and is committed by its latest popular utterance to the system
of tariff taxation. There can be no misunderstanding, either, about the
principle upon which this tariff taxation shall be levied. Nothing has
ever been made plainer at a general election than that the controlling
principle in the raising of revenue from duties on imports is zealous
care for American interests and American labor. The people have declared
that such legislation should be had as will give ample protection and
encouragement to the industries and the development of our country.
It is, therefore, earnestly hoped and expected that Congress will, at
the earliest practicable moment, enact revenue legislation that shall
be fair, reasonable, conservative, and just, and which, while supplying
sufficient revenue for public purposes, will still be signally
beneficial and helpful to every section and every enterprise of the
people. To this policy we are all, of whatever party, firmly bound by
the voice of the people--a power vastly more potential than the
expression of any political platform. The paramount duty of Congress is
to stop deficiencies by the restoration of that protective legislation
which has always been the firmest prop of the Treasury. The passage of
such a law or laws would strengthen the credit of the Government both
at home and abroad, and go far toward stopping the drain upon the gold
reserve held for the redemption of our currency, which has been heavy
and well-nigh constant for several years.

In the revision of the tariff especial attention should be given
to the re-enactment and extension of the reciprocity principle of the
law of 1890, under which so great a stimulus was given to our foreign
trade in new and advantageous markets for our surplus agricultural and
manufactured products. The brief trial given this legislation amply
justifies a further experiment and additional discretionary power in
the making of commercial treaties, the end in view always to be the
opening up of new markets for the products of our country, by granting
concessions to the products of other lands that we need and cannot
produce ourselves, and which do not involve any loss of labor to our
own people, but tend to increase their employment.

The depression of the past four years has fallen with especial
severity upon the great body of toilers of the country, and upon none
more than the holders of small farms. Agriculture has languished and
labor suffered. The revival of manufacturing will be a relief to both.
No portion of our population is more devoted to the institution of
free government nor more loyal in their support, while none bears
more cheerfully or fully its proper share in the maintenance of the
Government or is better entitled to its wise and liberal care and
protection. Legislation helpful to producers is beneficial to all.
The depressed condition of industry on the farm and in the mine and
factory has lessened the ability of the people to meet the demands upon
them, and they rightfully expect that not only a system of revenue
shall be established that will secure the largest income with the least
burden, but that every means will be taken to decrease, rather than
increase, our public expenditures. Business conditions are not the most
promising. It will take time to restore the prosperity of former years.
If we cannot promptly attain it, we can resolutely turn our faces in
that direction and aid its return by friendly legislation. However
troublesome the situation may appear, Congress will not, I am sure,
be found lacking in disposition or ability to relieve it as far as
legislation can do so. The restoration of confidence and the revival of
business, which men of all parties so much desire, depend more largely
upon the prompt, energetic, and intelligent action of Congress than
upon any other single agency affecting the situation.

It is inspiring, too, to remember that no great emergency in the one
hundred and eight years of our eventful national life has ever arisen
that has not been met with wisdom and courage by the American people,
with fidelity to their best interests and highest destiny, and to the
honor of the American name. These years of glorious history have exalted
mankind and advanced the cause of freedom throughout the world, and
immeasurably strengthened the precious free institutions which we enjoy.
The people love and will sustain these institutions. The great essential
to our happiness and prosperity is that we adhere to the principles upon
which the Government was established and insist upon their faithful
observance. Equality of rights must prevail, and our laws be always and
everywhere respected and obeyed. We may have failed in the discharge of
our full duty as citizens of the great Republic, but it is consoling and
encouraging to realize that free speech, a free press, free thought,
free schools, the free and unmolested right of religious liberty and
worship, and free and fair elections are dearer and more universally
enjoyed to-day than ever before. These guaranties must be sacredly
preserved and wisely strengthened. The constituted authorities must be
cheerfully and vigorously upheld. Lynchings must not be tolerated in a
great and civilized country like the United States; courts, not mobs,
must execute the penalties of the law. The preservation of public order,
the right of discussion, the integrity of courts, and the orderly
administration of justice must continue forever the rock of safety upon
which our Government securely rests.

One of the lessons taught by the late election, which all can rejoice
in, is that the citizens of the United States are both law-respecting
and law-abiding people, not easily swerved from the path of patriotism
and honor. This is in entire accord with the genius of our institutions,
and but emphasizes the advantages of inculcating even a greater love
for law and order in the future. Immunity should be granted to none who
violate the laws, whether individuals, corporations, or communities; and
as the Constitution imposes upon the President the duty of both its own
execution, and of the statutes enacted in pursuance of its provisions,
I shall endeavor carefully to carry them into effect. The declaration of
the party now restored to power has been in the past that of "opposition
to all combinations of capital organized in trusts, or otherwise, to
control arbitrarily the condition of trade among our citizens," and it
has supported "such legislation as will prevent the execution of all
schemes to oppress the people by undue charges on their supplies, or by
unjust rates for the transportation of their products to the market."
This purpose will be steadily pursued, both by the enforcement of the
laws now in existence and the recommendation and support of such new
statutes as may be necessary to carry it into effect.

Our naturalization and immigration laws should be further improved to
the constant promotion of a safer, a better, and a higher citizenship.
A grave peril to the Republic would be a citizenship too ignorant to
understand or too vicious to appreciate the great value and beneficence
of our institutions and laws, and against all who come here to make war
upon them our gates must be promptly and tightly closed. Nor must we be
unmindful of the need of improvement among our own citizens, but with
the zeal of our forefathers encourage the spread of knowledge and free
education. Illiteracy must be banished from the land if we shall attain
that high destiny as the foremost of the enlightened nations of the
world which, under Providence, we ought to achieve.

Reforms in the civil service must go on; but the changes should be real
and genuine, not perfunctory, or prompted by a zeal in behalf of any
party simply because it happens to be in power. As a member of Congress
I voted and spoke in favor of the present law, and I shall attempt its
enforcement in the spirit in which it was enacted. The purpose in view
was to secure the most efficient service of the best men who would
accept appointment under the Government, retaining faithful and devoted
public servants in office, but shielding none, under the authority of
any rule or custom, who are inefficient, incompetent, or unworthy. The
best interests of the country demand this, and the people heartily
approve the law wherever and whenever it has been thus administrated.

Congress should give prompt attention to the restoration of our
American merchant marine, once the pride of the seas in all the great
ocean highways of commerce. To my mind, few more important subjects so
imperatively demand its intelligent consideration. The United States
has progressed with marvelous rapidity in every field of enterprise and
endeavor until we have become foremost in nearly all the great lines
of inland trade, commerce, and industry. Yet, while this is true, our
American merchant marine has been steadily declining until it is now
lower, both in the percentage of tonnage and the number of vessels
employed, than it was prior to the Civil War. Commendable progress has
been made of late years in the upbuilding of the American Navy, but we
must supplement these efforts by providing as a proper consort for it a
merchant marine amply sufficient for our own carrying trade to foreign
countries. The question is one that appeals both to our business
necessities and the patriotic aspirations of a great people.

It has been the policy of the United States since the foundation of
the Government to cultivate relations of peace and amity with all the
nations of the world, and this accords with my conception of our duty
now. We have cherished the policy of non-interference with the affairs
of foreign governments wisely inaugurated by Washington, keeping
ourselves free from entanglement, either as allies or foes, content
to leave undisturbed with them the settlement of their own domestic
concerns. It will be our aim to pursue a firm and dignified foreign
policy, which shall be just, impartial, ever watchful of our national
honor, and always insisting upon the enforcement of the lawful rights of
American citizens everywhere. Our diplomacy should seek nothing more and
accept nothing less than is due us. We want no wars of conquest; we must
avoid the temptation of territorial aggression. War should never be
entered upon until every agency of peace has failed; peace is preferable
to war in almost every contingency. Arbitration is the true method of
settlement of international as well as local or individual differences.
It was recognized as the best means of adjustment of differences between
employers and employees by the Forty-ninth Congress, in 1886, and its
application was extended to our diplomatic relations by the unanimous
concurrence of the Senate and House of the Fifty-first Congress in 1890.
The latter resolution was accepted as the basis of negotiations with
us by the British House of Commons in 1893, and upon our invitation a
treaty of arbitration between the United States and Great Britain was
signed at Washington and transmitted to the Senate for its ratification
in January last. Since this treaty is clearly the result of our own
initiative; since it has been recognized as the leading feature of our
foreign policy throughout our entire national history--the adjustment of
difficulties by judicial methods rather than force of arms--and since
it presents to the world the glorious example of reason and peace, not
passion and war, controlling the relations between two of the greatest
nations in the world, an example certain to be followed by others,
I respectfully urge the early action of the Senate thereon, not merely
as a matter of policy, but as a duty to mankind. The importance and
moral influence of the ratification of such a treaty can hardly be
overestimated in the cause of advancing civilization. It may well engage
the best thought of the statesmen and people of every country, and I
cannot but consider it fortunate that it was reserved to the United
States to have the leadership in so grand a work.

It has been the uniform practice of each President to avoid, as far
as possible, the convening of Congress in extraordinary session. It
is an example which, under ordinary circumstances and in the absence
of a public necessity, is to be commended. But a failure to convene
the representatives of the people in Congress in extra session when
it involves neglect of a public duty places the responsibility of
such neglect upon the Executive himself. The condition of the public
Treasury, as has been indicated, demands the immediate consideration of
Congress. It alone has the power to provide revenues for the Government.
Not to convene it under such circumstances I can view in no other sense
than the neglect of a plain duty. I do not sympathize with the sentiment
that Congress in session is dangerous to our general business interests.
Its members are the agents of the people, and their presence at the seat
of Government in the execution of the sovereign will should not operate
as an injury, but a benefit. There could be no better time to put the
Government upon a sound financial and economic basis than now. The
people have only recently voted that this should be done, and nothing
is more binding upon the agents of their will than the obligation of
immediate action. It has always seemed to me that the postponement of
the meeting of Congress until more than a year after it has been chosen
deprived Congress too often of the inspiration of the popular will and
the country of the corresponding benefits. It is evident, therefore,
that to postpone action in the presence of so great a necessity would
be unwise on the part of the Executive because unjust to the interests
of the people. Our action now will be freer from mere partisan
consideration than if the question of tariff revision was postponed
until the regular session of Congress. We are nearly two years from a
Congressional election, and politics cannot so greatly distract us as if
such contest was immediately pending. We can approach the problem calmly
and patriotically, without fearing its effect upon an early election.

Our fellow-citizens who may disagree with us upon the character of this
legislation prefer to have the question settled now, even against their
preconceived views, and perhaps settled so reasonably, as I trust and
believe it will be, as to insure great permanence, than to have further
uncertainty menacing the vast and varied business interests of the
United States. Again, whatever action Congress may take will be given a
fair opportunity for trial before the people are called to pass judgment
upon it, and this I consider a great essential to the rightful and
lasting settlement of the question. In view of these considerations, I
shall deem it my duty as President to convene Congress in extraordinary
session on Monday, the 15th day of March, 1897.

In conclusion, I congratulate the country upon the fraternal spirit of
the people and the manifestations of good will everywhere so apparent.
The recent election not only most fortunately demonstrated the
obliteration of sectional or geographical lines, but to some extent also
the prejudices which for years have distracted our councils and marred
our true greatness as a nation. The triumph of the people, whose verdict
is carried into effect to-day, is not the triumph of one section, nor
wholly of one party, but of all sections and all the people. The North
and the South no longer divide on the old lines, but upon principles and
policies; and in this fact surely every lover of the country can find
cause for true felicitation. Let us rejoice in and cultivate this
spirit; it is ennobling and will be both a gain and a blessing to our
beloved country. It will be my constant aim to do nothing, and permit
nothing to be done, that will arrest or disturb this growing sentiment
of unity and co-operation, this revival of esteem and affiliation which
now animates so many thousands in both the old antagonistic sections,
but I shall cheerfully do everything possible to promote and increase
it.

Let me again repeat the words of the oath administered by the Chief
Justice which, in their respective spheres, so far as applicable, I
would have all my countrymen observe: "I will faithfully execute the
office of President of the United States, and will, to the best of my
ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United
States." This is the obligation I have reverently taken before the Lord
Most High. To keep it will be my single purpose, my constant prayer; and
I shall confidently rely upon the forbearance and assistance of all the
people in the discharge of my solemn responsibilities.



MESSAGES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 15, 1897_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

Regretting the necessity which has required me to call you together,
I feel that your assembling in extraordinary session is indispensable
because of the condition in which we find the revenues of the
Government. It is conceded that its current expenditures are greater
than its receipts, and that such a condition has existed for now more
than three years. With unlimited means at our command, we are presenting
the remarkable spectacle of increasing our public debt by borrowing
money to meet the ordinary outlays incident upon even an economical and
prudent administration of the Government. An examination of the subject
discloses this fact in every detail and leads inevitably to the
conclusion that the condition of the revenue which allows it is
unjustifiable and should be corrected.

We find by the reports of the Secretary of the Treasury that the
revenues for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, from all sources
were $425,868,260.22, and the expenditures for all purposes were
$415,953,806.56, leaving an excess of receipts over expenditures of
$9,914,453.66. During that fiscal year $40,570,467.98 were paid upon the
public debt, which had been reduced since March 1, 1889, $259,076,890,
and the annual interest charge decreased $11,684,576.60. The receipts
of the Government from all sources during the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1893, amounted to $461,716,561.94, audits expenditures to
$459,374,887.65, showing an excess of receipts over expenditures of
$2,341,674.29.

Since that time the receipts of no fiscal year, and with but few
exceptions of no month of any fiscal year, have exceeded the
expenditures. The receipts of the Government, from all sources, during
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1894, were $372,802,498.29, and its
expenditures $442,605,758.87, leaving a deficit, the first since the
resumption of specie payments, of $69,803,260.58. Notwithstanding there
was a decrease of $16,769,128.78 in the ordinary expenses of the
Government, as compared with the previous fiscal year, its income was
still not sufficient to provide for its daily necessities, and the gold
reserve in the Treasury for the redemption of greenbacks was drawn upon
to meet them. But this did not suffice, and the Government then resorted
to loans to replenish the reserve.

In February, 1894, $50,000,000 in bonds were issued, and in November
following a second issue of $50,000,000 was deemed necessary. The sum of
$117,171,795 was realized by the sale of these bonds, but the reserve
was steadily decreased until, on February 8, 1895, a third sale of
$62,315,400 in bonds, for $65,116,244, was announced to Congress.

The receipts of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895,
were $390,373,203.30 and the expenditures $433,178,426.48, showing a
deficit of $42,805,223.18. A further loan of $100,000,000 was negotiated
by the Government in February, 1896, the sale netting $111,166,246,
and swelling the aggregate of bonds issued within three years to
$262,315,400. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896, the revenues of
the Government from all sources amounted to $409,475,408.78, while its
expenditures were $434,678,654.48, or an excess of expenditures over
receipts of $25,203,245.70. In other words, the total receipts for the
three fiscal years ending June 30, 1896, were insufficient by
$137,811,729.46 to meet the total expenditures.

Nor has this condition since improved. For the first half of the present
fiscal year, the receipts of the Government, exclusive of postal
revenues, were $157,507,603.76, and its expenditures, exclusive of
postal service, $195,410,000.22, or an excess of expenditures over
receipts of $37,902,396.46. In January of this year, the receipts,
exclusive of postal revenues, were $24,316,994.05, and the expenditures,
exclusive of postal service, $30,269,389.29, a deficit of $5,952,395.24
for the month. In February of this year, the receipts, exclusive of
postal revenues, were $24,400,997.38, and expenditures, exclusive of
postal service, $28,796,056.66, a deficit of $4,395,059.28; or a total
deficiency of $186,061,580.44 for the three years and eight months
ending March 1, 1897. Not only are we without a surplus in the Treasury,
but with an increase in the public debt there has been a corresponding
increase in the annual interest charge, from $22,893,883.20 in 1892, the
lowest of any year since 1862, to $34,387,297.60 in 1896, or an increase
of $11,493,414.40.

It may be urged that even if the revenues of the Government had been
sufficient to meet all its ordinary expenses during the past three
years, the gold reserve would still have been insufficient to meet the
demands upon it, and that bonds would necessarily have been issued for
its repletion. Be this as it may, it is clearly manifest, without
denying or affirming the correctness of such a conclusion, that the debt
would have been decreased in at least the amount of the deficiency, and
business confidence immeasurably strengthened throughout the country.

Congress should promptly correct the existing condition. Ample revenues
must be supplied not only for the ordinary expenses of the Government,
but for the prompt payment of liberal pensions and the liquidation of
the principal and interest of the public debt. In raising revenue,
duties should be so levied upon foreign products as to preserve the home
market, so far as possible, to our own producers; to revive and increase
manufactures; to relieve and encourage agriculture; to increase our
domestic and foreign commerce; to aid and develop mining and building;
and to render to labor in every field of useful occupation the liberal
wages and adequate rewards to which skill and industry are justly
entitled. The necessity of the passage of a tariff law which shall
provide ample revenue, need not be further urged. The imperative demand
of the hour is the prompt enactment of such a measure, and to this
object I earnestly recommend that Congress shall make every endeavor.
Before other business is transacted, let us first provide sufficient
revenue to faithfully administer the Government without the contracting
of further debt, or the continued disturbance of our finances.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 7, 1897_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

Information which has recently come to me from the governors of
Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and from prominent citizens of
these States and Tennessee, warrants the conclusion that widespread
distress, involving the destruction of a large amount of property and
loss of human life, has resulted from the floods which have submerged
that section of the country. These are stated, on reliable authority, to
be the most destructive floods that have ever devastated the Mississippi
Valley, the water being much higher than the highest stage it has
reached before. From Marion, Ark., north of Memphis, to Greenville,
Miss., a distance of more than 250 miles by river, it is reported there
are now at least fifty towns and villages under water, and a territory
extending from 100 miles north of Memphis to 200 miles south, and from
5 to 40 miles wide, is submerged. Hundreds of thousands of acres of
cultivated soil, with growing crops, are included in the submerged
territory. In this section alone there are from 50,000 to 60,000 people
whose property has been destroyed and whose business has been suspended.
Growing crops have been ruined, thousands of cattle have been drowned,
and the inhabitants of certain areas threatened with starvation. As a
great majority of the sufferers are small farmers, they have thus been
left entirely destitute, and will be unprepared for work even after the
floods have subsided.

The entire Mississippi Valley in Arkansas is flooded and communication
with many points cut off. In Mississippi a like condition exists. The
levees in Louisiana, with a single exception, have held; but the water
is rising and the situation there is reported as being extremely
critical.

Under such circumstances the citizens of these States look for the
co-operation and support of the National Government in relieving the
pressing cases of destitution for food, clothing, and shelter, which are
beyond the reach of local efforts. The authorities who have communicated
with the Executive recognize that their first and most energetic duty
is to provide as far as possible the means of caring for their own
citizens; but nearly all of them agree in the opinion that after their
resources have been exhausted a sum aggregating at least $150,000 and
possibly $200,000 will be required for immediate use.

Precedents are not wanting that in such emergencies as this Congress
has taken prompt, generous, and intelligent action, involving the
expenditure of considerable sums of money, with satisfactory results.
In 1874 $590,000 was appropriated, and in 1882 $350,000 was also
appropriated for relief in same direction, besides large sums in other
years.

The citizens' relief committee of Memphis has taken prompt action,
has already cared for from 6,000 to 7,000 refugees from the flooded
districts, and they are still arriving in that city in large numbers
daily. Supplies and provisions have been sent to the various points in
Arkansas and Mississippi by this committee, but the utmost that can be
done by these efforts is to partly relieve the most acute cases of
suffering. No action has yet been taken for the great majority of the
inhabitants living in the interior, whose condition has already been
described.

Under these conditions and having exerted themselves to the fullest
extent, the local authorities have reluctantly confessed their inability
to further cope with this distressing situation unaided by relief from
the Government. It has therefore seemed to me that the representatives
of the people should be promptly informed of the nature and extent
of the suffering and needs of these stricken people, and I have
communicated these facts in the hope and belief that the legislative
branch of the Government will promptly re-enforce the work of the local
authorities in the States named.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 14, 1897_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith for the consideration of the respective Houses
of the Congress, a report of the Secretary of State representing the
appropriateness of early action in order that the Government of the
United States may be enabled to accept the invitation of that of the
French Republic to participate in the Universal Exposition to be held
at Paris in 1900.

The recommendations of this report have my most cordial approval,
and I urge upon the Congress such timely provision for this great
international enterprise as will fittingly respond to the widely
testified wish and expectation of our inventors and producers that they
may have adequate opportunity again, as in the past, to fortify the
important positions that have won in the world's competitive fields
of discovery and industry. Nor are the traditional friendships of the
United States and France and the mutual advantages to accrue from
their enlarged commercial intercourse less important factors than the
individual interests to be fostered by renewed participation in a great
French exposition, especially when it is remembered that the present
display is projected with a degree of completeness and on a scale of
magnificence beyond any of the European exhibitions that have marked
the close of the century.

It is proper that I should emphasize the need of early action, for if
the present session pass without suitable provision being made, the
postponement of the matter for nearly a year longer could not but
operate greatly to the disadvantage of the United States, in view of the
elaborate preparations already making by other governments, and of the
danger that further delay may result in an inadequate allotment of space
to this country as well as an incomplete organization of the American
exhibit.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 3, 1897_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

I transmit a report from the Secretary of State reciting the
circumstances attending the lynching at Hahnville, La., on the night
of August 8, 1896, of three Italian subjects, named Salvatore Arena,
Giuseppe Venturelia, and Lorenzo Salardino, and I recommend the
appropriation by Congress, without admitting the liability of the
Government of the United States in the premises, of the sum of $6,000,
to be paid by the Secretary of State to the Government of Italy, and to
be distributed by that government in such manner as it may deem proper
among the heirs of the three Italian subjects above named.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 13, 1897_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith, in response to the Senate resolution of April 22,
1897, addressed to the Secretary of State, a report from that officer
relative to diplomatic and consular reports on postal savings banks
systems in foreign countries.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 17, 1897_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States_:

Official information from our consuls in Cuba establishes the fact that
a large number of American citizens in the island are in a state of
destitution, suffering for want of food and medicines. This applies
particularly to the rural districts of the central and eastern parts.

The agricultural classes have been forced from their farms into
the nearest towns, where they are without work or money. The local
authorities of the several towns, however kindly disposed, are unable to
relieve the needs of their own people, and are altogether powerless to
help our citizens.

The latest report of Consul-General Lee estimates six to eight
hundred Americans are without means of support. I have assured him that
provision would be made at once to relieve them. To that end I recommend
that Congress make an appropriation of not less than $50,000, to be
immediately available for use, under the direction of the Secretary of
State.

It is desirable that a part of the sum which may be appropriated by
Congress should, in the discretion of the Secretary of State, also be
used for the transportation of American citizens who, desiring to return
to the United States, are without means to do so.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _July 1, 1897_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

On the 15th ultimo all the buildings of the immigration station at Ellis
Island, New York, excepting the heating plant and lighting apparatus,
were destroyed by fire.

I transmit herewith a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, which
states the fact and explains the need of rebuilding.

In order that there may be no delay in this important work, I recommend
that an appropriation be made at once of $600,000, the sum estimated by
the Secretary of the Treasury as required for this purpose.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, July 23, 1897_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Acting Secretary of State, with an
accompanying paper, in response to the resolution of the Senate of July
12, 1897, requesting the Secretary of State to send to the diplomatic
representatives of the United States abroad a circular letter, similar
to the one sent by Secretary Elaine on May 20, 1881, instructing them to
obtain from the several foreign governments to which they are accredited
as full information as possible (including copy of laws relating
thereto) as to the nature and practical workings (including expenses,
receipts, and rates) of the postal telegraphs, telephones, and postal
savings banks of such countries as have adopted the same.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _July 24, 1897_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

In my message convening the Congress in extraordinary session I called
attention to a single subject--that of providing revenue adequate to
meet the reasonable and proper expenses of the Government. I believed
that to be the most pressing subject for settlement then. A bill to
provide the necessary revenues for the Government has already passed the
House of Representatives and the Senate and awaits executive action.

Another question of very great importance is that of the establishment
of our currency and banking system on a better basis, which I commented
upon in my inaugural address in the following words:

  Our financial system needs some revision; our money is all good now,
  but its value must not further be threatened. It should all be put upon
  an enduring basis, not subject to easy attack, nor its stability to
  doubt or dispute. The several forms of our paper money offer, in my
  judgment, a constant embarrassment to the Government and imperil a safe
  balance in the Treasury.


Nothing was settled more clearly at the late national election than the
determination upon the part of the people to keep their currency stable
in value and equal to that of the most advanced nations of the world.

The soundness of our currency is nowhere questioned. No loss can occur
to its holders. It is the system which should be simplified and
strengthened, keeping our money just as good as it is now with less
expense to the Government and the people.

The sentiment of the country is strongly in favor of early action
by Congress in this direction, to revise our currency laws and remove
them from partisan contention. A notable assembly of business men
with delegates from twenty-nine States and Territories was held at
Indianapolis in January of this year. The financial situation commanded
their earnest attention, and after a two days' session the convention
recommended to Congress the appointment of a monetary commission.

I recommend this report to the consideration of Congress. The authors of
the report recommend a commission "to make a thorough investigation of
the monetary affairs and needs of this country in all relations and
aspects, and to make proper suggestions as to any evils found to exist
and the remedies therefor."

This subject should receive the attention of Congress at its special
session. It ought not to be postponed until the regular session.

I therefore urgently recommend that a special commission be created,
non-partisan in its character, to be composed of well-informed citizens
of different parties who will command the confidence of Congress and the
country because of their special fitness for the work, whose duty it
shall be to make recommendations of whatever changes in our present
banking and currency laws may be found necessary and expedient, and to
report their conclusions on or before the 1st day of November next, in
order that the same may be transmitted by me to Congress for its
consideration at its first regular session.

It is to be hoped that the report thus made will be so comprehensive and
sound as to receive the support of all parties and the favorable action
of Congress. At all events, such a report cannot fail to be of value to
the executive branch of the Government, as well as to those charged with
public legislation, and to greatly assist in the establishment of an
improved system of finance.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



FIRST ANNUAL MESSAGE.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 6, 1897_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

It gives me pleasure to extend greeting to the Fifty-fifth Congress,
assembled in regular session at the seat of Government, with many
of whose Senators and Representatives I have been associated in the
legislative service. Their meeting occurs under felicitous conditions,
justifying sincere congratulation and calling for our grateful
acknowledgment to a beneficent Providence which has so signally blessed
and prospered us as a nation. Peace and good will with all the nations
of the earth continue unbroken.

A matter of genuine satisfaction is the growing feeling of fraternal
regard and unification of all sections of our country, the
incompleteness of which has too long delayed realization of the highest
blessings of the Union. The spirit of patriotism is universal and is
ever increasing in fervor. The public questions which now most engross
us are lifted far above either partisanship, prejudice, or former
sectional differences. They affect every part of our common country
alike and permit of no division on ancient lines. Questions of foreign
policy, of revenue, the soundness of the currency, the inviolability of
national obligations, the improvement of the public service, appeal to
the individual conscience of every earnest citizen to whatever party he
belongs or in whatever section of the country he may reside.

The extra session of this Congress which closed during July last
enacted important legislation, and while its full effect has not yet
been realized, what it has already accomplished assures us of its
timeliness and wisdom. To test its permanent value further time will be
required, and the people, satisfied with its operation and results thus
far, are in no mind to withhold from it a fair trial.

Tariff legislation having been settled by the extra session of Congress,
the question next pressing for consideration is that of the currency.

The work of putting our finances upon a sound basis, difficult as
it may seem, will appear easier when we recall the financial operations
of the Government since 1866. On the 30th day of June of that year
we had outstanding demand liabilities in the sum of $728,868,447.41.
On the 1st of January, 1879, these liabilities had been reduced to
$443,889,495.88. Of our interest-bearing obligations, the figures
are even more striking. On July 1, 1866, the principal of the
interest-bearing debt of the Government was $2,332,331,208. On the
1st day of July, 1893, this sum had been reduced to $585,037,100, or an
aggregate reduction of $1,747,294,108. The interest-bearing debt of the
United States on the 1st day of December, 1897, was $847,365,620. The
Government money now outstanding (December 1) consists of $346,681,016
of United States notes, $107,793,280 of Treasury notes issued by
authority of the law of 1890, $384,963,504 of silver certificates, and
$61,280,761 of standard silver dollars.

With the great resources of the Government, and with the honorable
example of the past before us, we ought not to hesitate to enter upon a
currency revision which will make our demand obligations less onerous to
the Government and relieve our financial laws from ambiguity and doubt.

The brief review of what was accomplished from the close of the war
to 1893, makes unreasonable and groundless any distrust either of our
financial ability or soundness; while the situation from 1893 to 1897
must admonish Congress of the immediate necessity of so legislating as
to make the return of the conditions then prevailing impossible.

There are many plans proposed as a remedy for the evil. Before we can
find the true remedy we must appreciate the real evil. It is not that
our currency of every kind is not good, for every dollar of it is good;
good because the Government's pledge is out to keep it so, and that
pledge will not be broken. However, the guaranty of our purpose to keep
the pledge will be best shown by advancing toward its fulfillment.

The evil of the present system is found in the great cost to the
Government of maintaining the parity of our different forms of money,
that is, keeping all of them at par with gold. We surely cannot be
longer heedless of the burden this imposes upon the people, even under
fairly prosperous conditions, while the past four years have
demonstrated that it is not only an expensive charge upon the
Government, but a dangerous menace to the National credit.

It is manifest that we must devise some plan to protect the Government
against bond issues for repeated redemptions. We must either curtail the
opportunity for speculation, made easy by the multiplied redemptions
of our demand obligations, or increase the gold reserve for their
redemption. We have $900,000,000 of currency which the Government by
solemn enactment has undertaken to keep at par with gold. Nobody is
obliged to redeem in gold but the Government. The banks are not required
to redeem in gold. The Government is obliged to keep equal with gold all
its outstanding currency and coin obligations, while its receipts are
not required to be paid in gold. They are paid in every kind of money
but gold, and the only means by which the Government can with certainty
get gold is by borrowing. It can get it in no other way when it most
needs it. The Government without any fixed gold revenue is pledged to
maintain gold redemption, which it has steadily and faithfully done,
and which, under the authority now given, it will continue to do.

The law which requires the Government, after having redeemed its United
States notes, to pay them out again as current funds, demands a constant
replenishment of the gold reserve. This is especially so in times of
business panic and when the revenues are insufficient to meet the
expenses of the Government. At such times the Government has no other
way to supply its deficit and maintain redemption but through the
increase of its bonded debt, as during the Administration of my
predecessor, when $262,315,400 of four-and-a-half per cent bonds were
issued and sold and the proceeds used to pay the expenses of the
Government in excess of the revenues and sustain the gold reserve. While
it is true that the greater part of the proceeds of these bonds were
used to supply deficient revenues, a considerable portion was required
to maintain the gold reserve.

With our revenues equal to our expenses, there would be no deficit
requiring the issuance of bonds. But if the gold reserve falls below
$100,000,000, how will it be replenished except by selling more bonds?
Is there any other way practicable under existing law? The serious
question then is, Shall we continue the policy that has been pursued in
the past; that is, when the gold reserve reaches the point of danger,
issue more bonds and supply the needed gold, or shall we provide other
means to prevent these recurring drains upon the gold reserve? If no
further legislation is had and the policy of selling bonds is to be
continued, then Congress should give the Secretary of the Treasury
authority to sell bonds at long or short periods, bearing a less rate of
interest than is now authorized by law.

I earnestly recommend, as soon as the receipts of the Government are
quite sufficient to pay all the expenses of the Government, that when
any of the United States notes are presented for redemption in gold and
are redeemed in gold, such notes shall be kept and set apart, and only
paid out in exchange for gold. This is an obvious duty. If the holder of
the United States note prefers the gold and gets it from the Government,
he should not receive back from the Government a United States note
without paying gold in exchange for it. The reason for this is made
all the more apparent when the Government issues an interest-bearing
debt to provide gold for the redemption of United States notes--a
non-interest-bearing debt. Surely it should not pay them out again
except on demand and for gold. If they are put out in any other way,
they may return again to be followed by another bond issue to redeem
them--another interest-bearing debt to redeem a non-interest-bearing
debt.

In my view, it is of the utmost importance that the Government
should be relieved from the burden of providing all the gold required
for exchanges and export. This responsibility is alone borne by the
Government, without any of the usual and necessary banking powers to
help itself. The banks do not feel the strain of gold redemption. The
whole strain rests upon the Government, and the size of the gold reserve
in the Treasury has come to be, with or without reason, the signal of
danger or of security. This ought to be stopped.

If we are to have an era of prosperity in the country, with sufficient
receipts for the expenses of the Government, we may feel no immediate
embarrassment from our present currency; but the danger still exists,
and will be ever present, menacing us so long as the existing system
continues. And, besides, it is in times of adequate revenues and
business tranquillity that the Government should prepare for the worst.
We cannot avoid, without serious consequences, the wise consideration
and prompt solution of this question.

The Secretary of the Treasury has outlined a plan, in great detail, for
the purpose of removing the threatened recurrence of a depleted gold
reserve and save us from future embarrassment on that account. To this
plan I invite your careful consideration.

I concur with the Secretary of the Treasury in his recommendation that
National banks be allowed to issue notes to the face value of the bonds
which they have deposited for circulation, and that the tax on
circulating notes secured by deposit of such bonds be reduced to
one-half of one per cent per annum. I also join him in recommending that
authority be given for the establishment of National banks with a
minimum capital of $25,000. This will enable the smaller villages and
agricultural regions of the country to be supplied with currency to meet
their needs.

I recommend that the issue of National bank notes be restricted to the
denomination of ten dollars and upwards. If the suggestions I have
herein made shall have the approval of Congress, then I would recommend
that National banks be required to redeem their notes in gold.

       *       *       *       *       *

           [See Vol. X, pp. 127-136.]


Not a single American citizen is now in arrest or confinement in Cuba of
whom this Government has any knowledge. The near future will demonstrate
whether the indispensable condition of a righteous peace, just alike to
the Cubans and to Spain as well as equitable to all our interests so
intimately involved in the welfare of Cuba, is likely to be attained. If
not, the exigency of further and other action by the United States will
remain to be taken. When that time comes that action will be determined
in the line of indisputable right and duty. It will be faced, without
misgiving or hesitancy in the light of the obligation this Government
owes to itself, to the people who have confided to it the protection of
their interests and honor, and to humanity.

Sure of the right, keeping free from all offense ourselves, actuated
only by upright and patriotic considerations, moved neither by passion
nor selfishness, the Government will continue its watchful care over
the rights and property of American citizens and will abate none of
its efforts to bring about by peaceful agencies a peace which shall
be honorable and enduring. If it shall hereafter appear to be a duty
imposed by our obligations to ourselves, to civilization and humanity
to intervene with force, it shall be without fault on our part and only
because the necessity for such action will be so clear as to command the
support and approval of the civilized world.

By a special message dated the 16th day of June last, I laid before
the Senate a treaty signed that day by the plenipotentiaries of the
United States and of the Republic of Hawaii, having for its purpose
the incorporation of the Hawaiian Islands as an integral part of the
United States and under its sovereignty. The Senate having removed the
injunction of secrecy, although the treaty is still pending before that
body, the subject may be properly referred to in this Message because
the necessary action of the Congress is required to determine by
legislation many details of the eventual union should the fact of
annexation be accomplished, as I believe it should be.

While consistently disavowing from a very early period any aggressive
policy of absorption in regard to the Hawaiian group, a long series of
declarations through three-quarters of a century has proclaimed the
vital interest of the United States in the independent life of the
Islands and their intimate commercial dependence upon this country. At
the same time it has been repeatedly asserted that in no event could the
entity of Hawaiian statehood cease by the passage of the Islands under
the domination or influence of another power than the United States.
Under these circumstances, the logic of events required that annexation,
heretofore offered but declined, should in the ripeness of time come
about as the natural result of the strengthening ties that bind us to
those Islands, and be realized by the free will of the Hawaiian State.

That treaty was unanimously ratified without amendment by the Senate and
President of the Republic of Hawaii on the 10th of September last, and
only awaits the favorable action of the American Senate to effect the
complete absorption of the Islands into the domain of the United States.
What the conditions of such a union shall be, the political relation
thereof to the United States, the character of the local administration,
the quality and degree of the elective franchise of the inhabitants, the
extension of the federal laws to the territory or the enactment of
special laws to fit the peculiar condition thereof, the regulation if
need be of the labor system therein, are all matters which the treaty
has wisely relegated to the Congress.

If the treaty is confirmed as every consideration of dignity and honor
requires, the wisdom of Congress will see to it that, avoiding abrupt
assimilation of elements perhaps hardly yet fitted to share in the
highest franchises of citizenship, and having due regard to the
geographical conditions, the most just provisions for self-rule in local
matters with the largest political liberties as an integral part of our
Nation will be accorded to the Hawaiians. No less is due to a people
who, after nearly five years of demonstrated capacity to fulfill the
obligations of self-governing statehood, come of their free will to
merge their destinies in our body-politic.

The questions which have arisen between Japan and Hawaii by reason of
the treatment of Japanese laborers emigrating to the Islands under the
Hawaiian-Japanese convention of 1888, are in a satisfactory stage of
settlement by negotiation. This Government has not been invited to
mediate, and on the other hand has sought no intervention in that
matter, further than to evince its kindliest disposition toward such a
speedy and direct adjustment by the two sovereign States in interest as
shall comport with equity and honor. It is gratifying to learn that the
apprehensions at first displayed on the part of Japan lest the cessation
of Hawaii's national life through annexation might impair privileges to
which Japan honorably laid claim, have given place to confidence in the
uprightness of this Government, and in the sincerity of its purpose to
deal with all possible ulterior questions in the broadest spirit of
friendliness.

As to the representation of this Government to Nicaragua, Salvador, and
Costa Rica, I have concluded that Mr. William L. Merry, confirmed as
minister of the United States to the States of Nicaragua, Salvador and
Costa Rica, shall proceed to San José, Costa Rica, and there temporarily
establish the headquarters of the United States to those three States.
I took this action for what I regarded as the paramount interests of
this country. It was developed upon an investigation by the Secretary of
State that the Government of Nicaragua, while not unwilling to receive
Mr. Merry in his diplomatic quality, was unable to do so because of the
compact concluded June 20, 1895, whereby that Republic and those of
Salvador and Honduras, forming what is known as the Greater Republic of
Central America, had surrendered to the representative Diet thereof
their right to receive and send diplomatic agents. The Diet was not
willing to accept him because he was not accredited to that body. I
could not accredit him to that body because the appropriation law of
Congress did not permit it. Mr. Baker, the present minister at Managua,
has been directed to present his letters of recall.

Mr. W. Godfrey Hunter has likewise been accredited to the Governments
of Guatemala and Honduras, the same as his predecessor. Guatemala is not
a member of the Greater Republic of Central America, but Honduras is.
Should this latter Government decline to receive him, he has been
instructed to report this fact to his Government and await its further
instructions.

A subject of large importance to our country, and increasing
appreciation on the part of the people, is the completion of the great
highway of trade between the Atlantic and Pacific, known as the
Nicaragua Canal. Its utility and value to American commerce is
universally admitted. The Commission appointed under date of July 24
last "to continue the surveys and examinations authorized by the act
approved March 2, 1895," in regard to "the proper route, feasibility,
and cost of construction of the Nicaragua Canal, with a view of making
complete plans for the entire work of construction of such canal," is
now employed in the undertaking. In the future I shall take occasion to
transmit to Congress the report of this Commission, making at the same
time such further suggestions as may then seem advisable.

Under the provisions of the act of Congress approved March 3, 1897,
for the promotion of an international agreement respecting bimetallism,
I appointed on the 14th day of April, 1897, Hon. Edward O. Wolcott of
Colorado, Hon. Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois, and Hon. Charles J. Paine
of Massachusetts, as special envoys to represent the United States.
They have been diligent in their efforts to secure the concurrence and
cooperation of European countries in the international settlement of the
question, but up to this time have not been able to secure an agreement
contemplated by their mission.

The gratifying action of our great sister Republic of France in joining
this country in the attempt to bring about an agreement among the
principal commercial nations of Europe, whereby a fixed and relative
value between gold and silver shall be secured, furnishes assurance that
we are not alone among the larger nations of the world in realizing the
international character of the problem and in the desire of reaching
some wise and practical solution of it. The British Government has
published a _résumé_ of the steps taken jointly by the French
ambassador in London and the special envoys of the United States, with
whom our ambassador at London actively co-operated in the presentation
of this subject to Her Majesty's Government. This will be laid before
Congress.

Our special envoys have not made their final report, as further
negotiations between the representatives of this Government and the
Governments of other countries are pending and in contemplation.
They believe that doubts which have been raised in certain quarters
respecting the position of maintaining the stability of the parity
between the metals and kindred questions may yet be solved by further
negotiations.

Meanwhile it gives me satisfaction to state that the special envoys have
already demonstrated their ability and fitness to deal with the subject,
and it is to be earnestly hoped that their labors may result in an
international agreement which will bring about recognition of both gold
and silver as money upon such terms, and with such safeguards as will
secure the use of both metals upon a basis which shall work no injustice
to any class of our citizens.

In order to execute as early as possible the provisions of the third and
fourth sections of the Revenue Act, approved July 24, 1897, I appointed
the Hon. John A. Kasson of Iowa, a special commissioner plenipotentiary
to undertake the requisite negotiations with foreign countries desiring
to avail themselves of these provisions. The negotiations are now
proceeding with several Governments, both European and American. It is
believed that by a careful exercise of the powers conferred by that Act
some grievances of our own and of other countries in our mutual trade
relations may be either removed, or largely alleviated, and that the
volume of our commercial exchanges may be enlarged, with advantage to
both contracting parties.

Most desirable from every standpoint of national interest and patriotism
is the effort to extend our foreign commerce. To this end our merchant
marine should be improved and enlarged. We should do our full share of
the carrying trade of the world. We do not do it now. We should be the
laggard no longer. The inferiority of our merchant marine is justly
humiliating to the national pride. The Government by every proper
constitutional means, should aid in making our ships familiar visitors
at every commercial port of the world, thus opening up new and valuable
markets to the surplus products of the farm and the factory.

The efforts which had been made during the two previous years by my
predecessor to secure better protection to the fur seals in the North
Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, were renewed at an early date by this
Administration, and have been pursued with earnestness. Upon my
invitation, the Governments of Japan and Russia sent delegates to
Washington, and an international conference was held during the months
of October and November last, wherein it was unanimously agreed that
under the existing regulations this species of useful animals was
threatened with extinction, and that an international agreement of all
the interested powers was necessary for their adequate protection.

The Government of Great Britain did not see proper to be represented at
this conference, but subsequently sent to Washington, as delegates, the
expert commissioners of Great Britain and Canada who had, during the
past two years, visited the Pribilof Islands, and who met in conference
similar commissioners on the part of the United States. The result of
this conference was an agreement on important facts connected with the
condition of the seal herd, heretofore in dispute, which should place
beyond controversy the duty of the Governments concerned to adopt
measures without delay for the preservation and restoration of the herd.
Negotiations to this end are now in progress, the result of which I hope
to be able to report to Congress at an early day.

International arbitration cannot be omitted from the list of subjects
claiming our consideration. Events have only served to strengthen the
general views on this question expressed in my inaugural address. The
best sentiment of the civilized world is moving toward the settlement
of differences between nations without resorting to the horrors of war.
Treaties embodying these humane principles on broad lines, without in
any way imperiling our interests or our honor, shall have my constant
encouragement.

The acceptance by this Government of the invitation of the Republic of
France to participate in the Universal Exposition of 1900, at Paris, was
immediately followed by the appointment of a special commissioner to
represent the United States in the proposed exposition, with special
reference to the securing of space for an adequate exhibit on behalf of
the United States.

The special commissioner delayed his departure for Paris long enough
to ascertain the probable demand for space by American exhibitors. His
inquiries developed an almost unprecedented interest in the proposed
exposition, and the information thus acquired enabled him to justify
an application for a much larger allotment of space for the American
section than had been reserved by the exposition authorities. The result
was particularly gratifying, in view of the fact that the United States
was one of the last countries to accept the invitation of France.

The reception accorded our special commissioner was most cordial,
and he was given every reasonable assurance that the United States
would receive a consideration commensurate with the proportions of our
exhibit. The report of the special commissioner as to the magnitude
and importance of the coming exposition, and the great demand for
space by American exhibitors, supplies new arguments for a liberal
and judicious appropriation by Congress, to the end that an exhibit
fairly representative of the industries and resources of our country may
be made in an exposition which will illustrate the world's progress
during the nineteenth century. That exposition is intended to be the
most important and comprehensive of the long series of international
exhibitions, of which our own at Chicago was a brilliant example, and
it is desirable that the United States should make a worthy exhibit of
American genius and skill and their unrivaled achievements in every
branch of industry.

The present immediately effective force of the Navy consists of four
battle ships of the first class, two of the second, and forty-eight
other vessels, ranging from armored cruisers to torpedo boats. There are
under construction five battle ships of the first class, sixteen torpedo
boats, and one submarine boat. No provision has yet been made for the
armor of three of the five battle ships, as it has been impossible to
obtain it at the price fixed by Congress. It is of great importance that
Congress provide this armor, as until then the ships are of no fighting
value.

The present naval force, especially in view of its increase by the
ships now under construction, while not as large as that of a few other
powers, is a formidable force; its vessels are the very best of each
type; and with the increase that should be made to it from time to time
in the future, and careful attention to keeping it in a high state of
efficiency and repair, it is well adapted to the necessities of the
country.

The great increase of the Navy which has taken place in recent years was
justified by the requirements for national defense, and has received
public approbation. The time has now arrived, however, when this
increase, to which the country is committed, should, for a time, take
the form of increased facilities commensurate with the increase of our
naval vessels. It is an unfortunate fact that there is only one dock on
the Pacific Coast capable of docking our largest ships, and only one on
the Atlantic Coast, and that the latter has for the last six or seven
months been under repair and therefore incapable of use. Immediate steps
should be taken to provide three or four docks of this capacity on the
Atlantic Coast, at least one on the Pacific Coast, and a floating dock
in the Gulf. This is the recommendation of a very competent Board,
appointed to investigate the subject. There should also be ample
provision made for powder and projectiles, and other munitions of war,
and for an increased number of officers and enlisted men. Some additions
are also necessary to our navy-yards, for the repair and care of our
large number of vessels. As there are now on the stocks five battle
ships of the largest class, which cannot be completed for a year or two,
I concur with the recommendation of the Secretary of the Navy for an
appropriation authorizing the construction of one battle ship for the
Pacific Coast, where, at present, there is only one in commission and
one under construction, while on the Atlantic Coast there are three in
commission and four under construction; and also that several torpedo
boats be authorized in connection with our general system of coast
defense.

The Territory of Alaska requires the prompt and early attention of
Congress. The conditions now existing demand material changes in the
laws relating to the Territory. The great influx of population during
the past summer and fall and the prospect of a still larger immigration
in the spring will not permit us to longer neglect the extension of
civil authority within the Territory or postpone the establishment of a
more thorough government.

A general system of public surveys has not yet been extended to Alaska
and all entries thus far made in that district are upon special surveys.
The act of Congress extending to Alaska the mining laws of the United
States contained the reservation that it should not be construed to put
in force the general land laws of the country. By act approved March 3,
1891, authority was given for entry of lands for town-site purposes and
also for the purchase of not exceeding one hundred and sixty acres then
or thereafter occupied for purposes of trade and manufacture. The
purpose of Congress as thus far expressed has been that only such rights
should apply to that Territory as should be specifically named.

It will be seen how much remains to be done for that vast and remote
and yet promising portion of our country. Special authority was given to
the President by the Act of Congress approved July 24, 1897, to divide
that Territory into two land districts and to designate the boundaries
thereof and to appoint registers and receivers of said land offices, and
the President was also authorized to appoint a surveyor-general for the
entire district. Pursuant to this authority, a surveyor-general and
receiver have been appointed, with offices at Sitka. If in the ensuing
year the conditions justify it, the additional land district authorized
by law will be established, with an office at some point in the Yukon
Valley. No appropriation, however, was made for this purpose, and that
is now necessary to be done for the two land districts into which the
Territory is to be divided.

I concur with the Secretary of War in his suggestions as to the
necessity for a military force in the Territory of Alaska for the
protection of persons and property. Already a small force, consisting of
twenty-five men, with two officers, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel
Randall, of the Eighth Infantry, has been sent to St. Michael to
establish a military post.

As it is to the interest of the Government to encourage the development
and settlement of the country and its duty to follow up its citizens
there with the benefits of legal machinery, I earnestly urge upon
Congress the establishment of a system of government with such
flexibility as will enable it to adjust itself to the future areas of
greatest population.

The startling though possibly exaggerated reports from the Yukon River
country, of the probable shortage of food for the large number of people
who are wintering there without the means of leaving the country are
confirmed in such measure as to justify bringing the matter to the
attention of Congress. Access to that country in winter can be had only
by the passes from Dyea and vicinity, which is a most difficult and
perhaps an impossible task. However, should these reports of the
suffering of our fellow-citizens be further verified, every effort at
any cost should be made to carry them relief.

For a number of years past it has been apparent that the conditions
under which the Five Civilized Tribes were established in the Indian
Territory under treaty provisions with the United States, with the right
of self-government and the exclusion of all white persons from within
their borders, have undergone so complete a change as to render the
continuance of the system thus inaugurated practically impossible. The
total number of the Five Civilized Tribes, as shown by the last census,
is 45,494, and this number has not materially increased; while the white
population is estimated at from 200,000 to 250,000 which, by permission
of the Indian Government has settled in the Territory. The present area
of the Indian Territory contains 25,694,564 acres, much of which is very
fertile land. The United States citizens residing in the Territory, most
of whom have gone there by invitation or with the consent of the tribal
authorities, have made permanent homes for themselves. Numerous towns
have been built in which from 500 to 5,000 white people now reside.
Valuable residences and business houses have been erected in many of
them. Large business enterprises are carried on in which vast sums
of money are employed, and yet these people, who have invested their
capital in the development of the productive resources of the country,
are without title to the land they occupy, and have no voice whatever
in the government either of the Nations or Tribes. Thousands of their
children who were born in the Territory are of school age, but the doors
of the schools of the Nations are shut against them, and what education
they get is by private contribution. No provision for the protection of
the life or property of these white citizens is made by the Tribal
Governments and Courts.

The Secretary of the Interior reports that leading Indians have
absorbed great tracts of land to the exclusion of the common people, and
government by an Indian aristocracy has been practically established, to
the detriment of the people. It has been found impossible for the United
States to keep its citizens out of the Territory, and the executory
conditions contained in the treaties with these Nations have for the
most part become impossible of execution. Nor has it been possible for
the Tribal Governments to secure to each individual Indian his full
enjoyment in common with other Indians of the common property of the
Nations. Friends of the Indians have long believed that the best
interests of the Indians of the Five Civilized Tribes would be found in
American citizenship, with all the rights and privileges which belong to
that condition.

By section 16, of the act of March 3, 1893, the President was authorized
to appoint three commissioners to enter into negotiations with the
Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Muscogee (or Creek), and Seminole Nations,
commonly known as the Five Civilized Tribes in the Indian Territory.
Briefly, the purposes of the negotiations were to be: The extinguishment
of Tribal titles to any lands within that Territory now held by any and
all such Nations or Tribes, either by cession of the same or some part
thereof to the United States, or by allotment and division of the same
in severalty among the Indians of such Nations or Tribes respectively as
may be entitled to the same, or by such other method as may be agreed
upon between the several Nations and Tribes aforesaid, or each of them,
with the United States, with a view to such an adjustment upon the basis
of justice and equity as may, with the consent of the said Nations of
Indians so far as may be necessary, be requisite and suitable to enable
the ultimate creation of a State or States of the Union which shall
embrace the lands within said Indian Territory.

The Commission met much opposition from the beginning. The Indians
were very slow to act, and those in control manifested a decided
disinclination to meet with favor the propositions submitted to them.
A little more than three years after this organization the Commission
effected an agreement with the Choctaw Nation alone. The Chickasaws,
however, refused to agree to its terms, and as they have a common
interest with the Choctaws in the lands of said Nations, the agreement
with the latter Nation could have no effect without the consent of the
former. On April 23, 1897, the Commission effected an agreement with
both tribes--the Choctaws and Chickasaws. This agreement, it is
understood, has been ratified by the constituted authorities of the
respective Tribes or Nations parties thereto, and only requires
ratification by Congress to make it binding.

On the 27th of September, 1897, an agreement was effected with the Creek
Nation, but it is understood that the National Council of said Nation
has refused to ratify the same. Negotiations are yet to be had with the
Cherokees, the most populous of the Five Civilized Tribes, and with the
Seminoles, the smallest in point of numbers and territory.

The provision in the Indian Appropriation Act, approved June 10, 1896,
makes it the duty of the Commission to investigate and determine the
rights of applicants for citizenship in the Five Civilized Tribes,
and to make complete census rolls of the citizens of said Tribes. The
Commission is at present engaged in this work among the Creeks, and has
made appointments for taking the census of these people up to and
including the 30th of the present month.

Should the agreement between the Choctaws and Chickasaws be ratified by
Congress and should the other Tribes fail to make an agreement with the
Commission, then it will be necessary that some legislation shall be had
by Congress, which, while just and honorable to the Indians, shall be
equitable to the white people who have settled upon these lands by
invitation of the Tribal Nations.

Hon. Henry L. Dawes, Chairman of the Commission, in a letter to the
Secretary of the Interior, under date of October 11, 1897, says:
"Individual ownership is, in their (the Commission's) opinion,
absolutely essential to any permanent improvement in present conditions,
and the lack of it is the root of nearly all the evils which so
grievously afflict these people. Allotment by agreement is the only
possible method, unless the United States Courts are clothed with the
authority to apportion the lands among the citizen Indians for whose use
it was originally granted."

I concur with the Secretary of the Interior that there can be no cure
for the evils engendered by the perversion of these great trusts,
excepting by their resumption by the Government which created them.

The recent prevalence of yellow fever in a number of cities and towns
throughout the South has resulted in much disturbance of commerce, and
demonstrated the necessity of such amendments to our quarantine laws
as will make the regulations of the national quarantine authorities
paramount. The Secretary of the Treasury, in the portion of his report
relating to the operation of the Marine Hospital Service, calls
attention to the defects in the present quarantine laws, and recommends
amendments thereto which will give the Treasury Department the requisite
authority to prevent the invasion of epidemic diseases from foreign
countries, and in times of emergency, like that of the past summer, will
add to the efficiency of the sanitary measures for the protection of the
people, and at the same time prevent unnecessary restriction of
commerce. I concur in his recommendation.

In further effort to prevent the invasion of the United States by yellow
fever, the importance of the discovery of the exact cause of the
disease, which up to the present time has been undetermined, is obvious,
and to this end a systematic bacteriological investigation should be
made. I therefore recommend that Congress authorize the appointment of a
commission by the President, to consist of four expert bacteriologists,
one to be selected from the medical officers of the Marine Hospital
Service, one to be appointed from civil life, one to be detailed from
the medical officers of the Army, and one from the medical officers of
the Navy.

The Union Pacific Railway, Main Line, was sold under the decree of the
United States Court for the District of Nebraska, on the 1st and 2d of
November of this year. The amount due the Government consisted of the
principal of the subsidy bonds, $27,236,512, and the accrued interest
thereon, $31,211,711.75, making the total indebtedness, $58,448,223.75.
The bid at the sale covered the first mortgage lien and the entire
mortgage claim of the Government, principal and interest.

The sale of the subsidized portion of the Kansas Pacific Line, upon
which the Government holds a second mortgage lien, has been postponed at
the instance of the Government to December 16, 1897. The debt of this
division of the Union Pacific Railway to the Government on November 1,
1897, was the principal of the subsidy bonds, $6,303,000, and the unpaid
and accrued interest thereon, $6,626,690.33, making a total of
$12,929,690.33.

The sale of this road was originally advertised for November 4, but for
the purpose of securing the utmost public notice of the event it was
postponed until December 16, and a second advertisement of the sale was
made. By the decree of the Court, the upset price on the sale of the
Kansas Pacific will yield to the Government the sum of $2,500,000 over
all prior liens, costs, and charges. If no other or better bid is made,
this sum is all that the Government will receive on its claim of nearly
$13,000,000. The Government has no information as to whether there will
be other bidders or a better bid than the minimum amount herein stated.
The question presented therefore is: Whether the Government shall, under
the authority given it by the act of March 3, 1887, purchase or redeem
the road in the event that a bid is not made by private parties covering
the entire Government claim. To qualify the Government to bid at the
sales will require a deposit of $900,000, as follows: In the Government
cause $500,000 and in each of the first mortgage causes $200,000, and
in the latter the deposit must be in cash. Payments at the sale are as
follows: Upon the acceptance of the bid a sum which with the amount
already deposited shall equal fifteen per cent of the bid; the balance
in installments of twenty-five per cent thirty, forty, and fifty days
after the confirmation of the sale. The lien on the Kansas Pacific
prior to that of the Government on the 30th July, 1897, principal and
interest, amounted to $7,281,048.11. The Government, therefore, should
it become the highest bidder, will have to pay the amount of the first
mortgage lien.

I believe that under the act of 1887 it has the authority to do this and
in absence of any action by Congress I shall direct the Secretary of the
Treasury to make the necessary deposit as required by the Court's decree
to qualify as a bidder and to bid at the sale a sum which will at least
equal the principal of the debt due to the Government; but suggest in
order to remove all controversy that an amendment of the law be
immediately passed explicitly giving such powers and appropriating in
general terms whatever sum is sufficient therefor.

In so important a matter as the Government becoming the possible owner
of railroad property which it perforce must conduct and operate, I feel
constrained to lay before Congress these facts for its consideration and
action before the consummation of the sale. It is clear to my mind that
the Government should not permit the property to be sold at a price
which will yield less than one-half of the principal of its debt and
less than one-fifth of its entire debt, principal and interest. But
whether the Government, rather than accept less than its claim, should
become a bidder and thereby the owner of the property, I submit to the
Congress for action.

The Library building provided for by the act of Congress approved April
15, 1886, has been completed and opened to the public. It should be a
matter of congratulation that through the foresight and munificence of
Congress the nation possesses this noble treasure-house of knowledge. It
is earnestly to be hoped that having done so much toward the cause of
education, Congress will continue to develop the Library in every phase
of research to the end that it may be not only one of the most
magnificent but among the richest and most useful libraries in the
world.

The important branch of our Government known as the Civil Service,
the practical improvement of which has long been a subject of earnest
discussion, has of late years received increased legislative and
Executive approval. During the past few months the service has been
placed upon a still firmer basis of business methods and personal merit.
While the right of our veteran soldiers to reinstatement in deserving
cases has been asserted, dismissals for merely political reasons have
been carefully guarded against, the examinations for admittance to the
service enlarged and at the same time rendered less technical and more
practical; and a distinct advance has been made by giving a hearing
before dismissal upon all cases where incompetency is charged or demand
made for the removal of officials in any of the Departments. This order
has been made to give to the accused his right to be heard but without
in any way impairing the power of removal, which should always be
exercised in cases of inefficiency and incompetency, and which is one
of the vital safeguards of the civil service reform system, preventing
stagnation and deadwood and keeping every employee keenly alive to the
fact that the security of his tenure depends not on favor but on his
own tested and carefully watched record of service.

Much of course still remains to be accomplished before the system can
be made reasonably perfect for our needs. There are places now in the
classified service which ought to be exempted and others not classified
may properly be included. I shall not hesitate to exempt cases which I
think have been improperly included in the classified service or include
those which in my judgment will best promote the public service. The
system has the approval of the people and it will be my endeavor to
uphold and extend it.

I am forced by the length of this Message to omit many important
references to affairs of the Government with which Congress will
have to deal at the present session. They are fully discussed in the
departmental reports, to all of which I invite your earnest attention.

The estimates of the expenses of the Government by the several
Departments will, I am sure, have your careful scrutiny. While the
Congress may not find it an easy task to reduce the expenses of the
Government, it should not encourage their increase. These expenses will
in my judgment admit of a decrease in many branches of the Government
without injury to the public service. It is a commanding duty to keep
the appropriations within the receipts of the Government, and thus avoid
a deficit.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, December 6, 1897_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

The act of Congress, approved July 19, 1897, entitled "An act making
appropriations to supply deficiencies in the appropriations for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, and for prior years, for other
purposes," provided for the acceptance by the Government of the United
States of the invitation extended by the Republic of France to
participate in an international exposition to be held at Paris, from
April 15 to November 15, 1900, and authorized the President to appoint a
special commissioner with a view to securing all attainable information
necessary to a full and complete understanding by Congress in regard to
the participation of this Government in that exposition.

Maj. Moses P. Handy of Chicago, was appointed such special commissioner,
and I now enclose his report, giving the details of his mission. It is
a comprehensive and clear presentation of the situation. He recommends
that an appropriation of $919,600 be granted, so that a creditable
exhibit on behalf of the United States may be made. The details of this
report will show how this appropriation may be profitably expended.

Besides securing a much larger amount of space than had been reserved,
Major Handy obtained the gratifying assurance that the United States
will be placed on a footing with the most favored nations, and "that in
the installation of every important department the United States will
have a location commensurate with the dignity and importance of the
country and adjoining in every case countries of the first rank."

In view of the magnitude and importance of the approaching exposition,
and of our standing among the nations which will be there represented,
and in view also of our increased population and acknowledged progress
in arts, science, and manufactures, I earnestly commend the report of
Major Handy to your consideration, and trust that a liberal
appropriation may be made.

Moreover, the magnificent exhibit of the French Republic at Chicago
in 1893, on which a million dollars were expended, should be a strong
incentive to reciprocal liberality on the part of the Government of the
United States, and suggests to our citizens the necessity as well as the
propriety of installing at the Paris Exposition an exhibit on a par with
that of the Government and people of France at Chicago, and in keeping
with the scope and extent of the preparations which are being made by
nearly all the important nations of the earth for their proposed
exhibits in that exposition.

I suggest that the subject be given timely and favorable consideration.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 14, 1898_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State in regard to
the award of the commissioners appointed pursuant to the stipulations of
the convention of February 8, 1896, between the United States and Great
Britain, providing for the settlement of the claims presented by the
latter against the former in virtue of the convention of February 29,
1892.

The report of the Secretary of State presents a clear epitome of the
award and renders unnecessary any extended observations on my part
further than to say that I cordially coincide with his recommendation
and that our treaty obligations demand prompt and favorable action by
Congress, which I urgently hope may be taken, to the end that these
long-pending questions may be finally and satisfactorily terminated.

The total amount necessary to satisfy the award of the commissioners is
$473,151.26, which I recommend be appropriated.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 18, 1898_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with
accompanying papers, touching the lynching in 1895 at Yreka, Cal., of
Luis Moreno, a Mexican citizen, and the demand of the Mexican Government
for an indemnity for his relatives on account thereof.

Following the course adopted in the case of the lynching of three
Italian subjects at Hahnville, La., on August 8, 1896, I recommend the
appropriation by Congress, out of humane consideration and without
reference to the question of liability of the Government of the United
States in the premises, of the sum of $2,000 to be paid by the Secretary
of State to the Government of Mexico, to be by that Government
distributed among the heirs of the above-named Luis Moreno.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 26, 1898_.

_To the Congress_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State and
accompanying papers presenting the claim of Capt. B. Tellefsen, of the
Norwegian steamer _Albert_, against the Government of the United
States, for $998.96, being the expenses incurred by him in consequence
of a violation of Article XIII of the treaty of commerce and navigation
of 1827 between the United States and Sweden and Norway.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, March 22, 1898_.

_To the Senate_:

In connection with Senate Document No. 39, Fifty-fifth Congress, second
session, and in further response to the resolution of the Senate of July
12, 1897, I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with
additional papers, relating to postal telegraphs, telephones, and postal
savings banks in Austria.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 31, 1898_.

_To the Congress_:

I transmit herewith, for the information of Congress, a communication
from the Secretary of Agriculture covering a detailed report showing the
present condition of the beet-sugar industry in this country and the
results of experiments made by the Department of Agriculture in the
production of sugar from beets in the United States during the past
year.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 4, 1898_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of January 17, 1898,
I transmit a report from the Secretary of State, accompanied by copies
of correspondence exchanged between Henry Woodruff, trustee and of
counsel for the holders of a majority of the first-mortgage bonds
of "The Railway of the East," of Venezuela, _et al._, and the
Department of State, and by a list of claims of citizens of the United
States presented after August 1, 1898, and, so far as appears, not
settled by Venezuela, nor disposed of by the commission of 1889-90.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 7, 1898_.

_To the Senate_:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of February 26, 1898,
requesting the President "if not incompatible with the public interest,
to transmit to the Senate the proceedings of the international
commission authorized in the concurrent resolution of Congress of April
29, 1890, and a subsequent international convention between the United
States and Mexico of May 6, 1896, and also the correspondence relating
thereto with Mexico by the Department of the Interior, Department of
War, and Department of Justice, as well as the Department of State,
relating to the equitable distribution of the waters of the Rio Grande
River, including the draft of an incomplete treaty between said
Governments, negotiated between the late Secretary of State, Mr. Olney,
on the part of the United States, and Mr. Romero, on the part of Mexico,
and all the correspondence between said officials relating thereto," I
transmit herewith reports from the Secretary of State, the Secretary of
War, the Secretary of the Interior, and the Attorney-General, with
accompanying papers.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 15, 1898_.

_To the Senate_:

In connection with Senate Document No. 39, Fifty-fifth Congress, second
session, and in further response to the resolution of the Senate of July
12, 1897, I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with
accompanying papers relating to postal telegraphs, telephones, and
postal savings banks in the colony of Victoria.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 27, 1898_.

_To the Congress_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State and
accompanying papers relating to the claim against the United States of
the Russian subject, Gustav Isak Dahlberg, master and principal owner of
the Russian bark _Hans_, based on his wrongful and illegal arrest
and imprisonment by officers of the United States district court for the
southern district of Mississippi, and in view of the opinion expressed
by the Department of Justice that the said arrest and detention of the
complainant were wrongful and without authority of law, I recommend the
appropriation by Congress of the sum of $5,000 to reimburse the master
and owners of the vessel for all losses and damages incurred by reason
of his said wrongful and illegal arrest and detention.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 16, 1898_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State,
accompanying the annual reports of the consuls of the United States upon
foreign industries and commerce. In view of the value of these reports
to the business interests of the country, I indorse the recommendation
of the Secretary of State that Congress authorize the printing of a
special edition of 10,000 copies of the general summary entitled "Review
of the World's Commerce," and 5,000 copies of Commercial Relations
(including this summary), to enable the Department of State to meet the
demands for such information.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 16, 1898_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I return herewith to the House of Representatives, in which it
originated, House bill No. 2219, entitled "An act for the relief of the
administrators of Isaac P. Tice, deceased, and others," without my
approval.

The object of this bill is to confer upon the Court of Claims
jurisdiction to retry and determine a case brought by the
representatives of Isaac P. Tice against the United States in the Court
of Claims in the year 1873 to recover from the Government the sum of
$25,000, the alleged value of certain meters invented by Isaac P. Tice
for the purpose of measuring the quality and strength of distilled
spirits.

It was claimed that this amount, together with the sum of $733.33 for
storage of said meters, was due to the claimant under a contract made
between Tice and the Commissioner of Internal Revenue in pursuance of
section 15 of the act of March 2, 1867 (14 Stats., 481). From the report
of the case in 13 Court of Claims Reports, 112, it appears that the
matter was fully and deliberately tried and argued both on behalf of the
claimant and of the United States, and that at December term, 1877, the
Court of Claims rendered a decision adverse to the claimant, expressly
stating that the claimants had failed to establish their claim both in
law and on the facts. Not satisfied with this conclusion of the Court of
Claims, the claimants took an appeal to the Supreme Court of the United
States, where the case was again argued and was decided, October term,
1878, the judgment of the Court of Claims being declared to be in
accordance with the law and therefore affirmed. In these two decisions
the law and the facts pertaining to the claim were fully set forth and
discussed.

The bill further confers upon the Court of Claims jurisdiction to try
and determine certain alleged claims of said Tice and others for money
collected on account of the Tice meters, but not paid over to him or
them under the regulations of the Treasury.

The amount of the latter claim, according to the report of the committee
of the House of Representatives to which this bill was referred, is
$140,000. It does not appear from the report of the committee, nor from
any documents to which I have access, who are the other persons by whom
this latter sum is claimed. The claim for $140,000 must have accrued
prior to July, 1871, and therefore at this time is of at least
twenty-seven years' standing.

It will thus be perceived that the object of the bill is to remove from
the pathway of the claimants two legal bars to the prosecution of their
claim in the courts--one, the bar of the statute of limitations, which
requires all claimants against the Government to present their claims
and bring actions thereon within six years from the time the cause of
action accrues; and the other, that bar of estoppel which arises by
reason of a former adverse judgment, rendered in a court of competent
jurisdiction. This is not a general modification of the law in these
respects, but a special application of it to these particular claimants.

If the principle on which the statute of limitations is founded is
wise and beneficent, then the effect of it ought not to be impaired by
special legislative exemptions in favor of particular persons or cases
except upon very clear and just grounds, where no lack of diligence in
the prosecution of the claim is apparent. I cannot find in the papers
submitted to me any sufficient grounds to justify a special exception
from the ordinary rule in favor of these claimants. As to the claim for
$140,000, no reason is stated why it was not included in the original
suit nor why action upon it was not brought against the Government
within the six years allowed by the statute for that purpose. To permit
such an action to be brought now is simply, without any reason of a
special nature, to grant a privilege to these claimants which is denied
to all other citizens of the United States, in accordance with the
provisions of the general statute of limitations. The principle
underlying statutes of limitations and the reasons for the maintenance
of such a rule of litigation are much more cogent when applied to claims
against the Government than when applied to claims against individuals.

These claims do not differ in their character from ordinary business
transactions such as transpire every day between private persons or
business corporations. The Government can only defend itself against
claims of this nature through its public officers and with the use of
such public records as the Departments may furnish. Great difficulties
are experienced by it in contesting fraudulent and unjust claims, and it
is only fair in the interest of the public that a rigorous adherence to
some rule of limitation should be maintained.

The provision of the bill which practically directs a new trial of the
claim for $25,000, decided adversely to the claimants more than twenty
years ago, is still more objectionable. These parties had their day in
court. They produced their witnesses and were heard both originally and
upon appeal, and upon the case they were then able to make the court
decided they had no claim against the Government. It is now suggested
that other witnesses have been discovered who can supply the lack of
proof which was produced on the former trial. Such a ground for a new
trial would never be considered in any court of law in the land in a
case between private parties where such a length of time had intervened
since the former trial. No explanation of a satisfactory nature is
furnished for the failure of the claimants to produce these witnesses
upon the original trial.

The bill further provides that upon a retrial of the original claim, or
upon the trial of the new claim, the claimants shall be at liberty to
offer in evidence the depositions of witnesses now on the files of any
of the committees of Congress in relation to the aforesaid matters,
which may be introduced as evidence in case of the death or disability
of the deponents.

This provision will enable the claimants to present _ex-parte_
affidavits, prepared by the claimants or their attorneys, without
opportunity being afforded to the Government to cross-examine, provided
the claimants can show that the deposing witnesses are either dead or
under disability, by which, no doubt, is intended any such disability by
reason of absence, illness, and the like, as may render them legally
incapable of being produced in person to testify upon the retrial. Such
a provision as this is most dangerous to the interests of the
Government.

I fail to see any reason in the facts connected with these claims for
granting to these parties relief of this extraordinary nature.

The Treasury of the United States ought to be very carefully guarded
against attacks of those who come forward with stale claims, and
especially from the attacks of those who have already been fully heard
according to the methods prescribed by the statutes.

To approve this bill would be to furnish a very dangerous precedent
which would open the door to demands upon Congress in other cases which
have been fully heard and determined.

For these reasons I am constrained to withhold my approval from this
bill.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, June 14, 1898_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

I transmit herewith (having reference to Senate Document No. 4,
Fifty-fifth Congress, second session) a report made by Thomas W.
Cridler, Third Assistant Secretary of State, who, upon the death of
Maj. Moses P. Handy, I designated to continue the work as special
commissioner, under the act of Congress approved July 19, 1897, in
relation to the acceptance by the Government of the United States of the
invitation of France to participate in the International Exposition to
be held at Paris from April 15 to November 5, 1900.

I cordially renew my recommendation that a liberal appropriation be
immediately granted.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _June 23, 1898_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of the Interior relative
to Senate resolution of June 10, 1898, requesting the President "to make
such arrangements as may be necessary to secure at the Trans-Mississippi
and International Exposition to be held in the city of Omaha, Neb., the
attendance of representatives of the Iroquois tribes and Delawares of
Canada and of the Abenakis of St. Francis and Becaucourt, and such other
Indian nations as have emigrated from the territory now of the United
States to Canada."

To carry out this resolution, if it shall be found agreeable to the
Government of Canada, it will be necessary for this Government to send
an agent to visit the tribes and secure their assent, organize the
representative delegations, escort them to the exposition, take charge
of and care for them while there and until they are returned to their
respective tribes.

The resolution seems to presuppose that there are funds which may be
lawfully used to defray the expenses which must necessarily be incurred
in the premises. By reference to the Secretary's report, it will be seen
that there are no moneys lawfully available for that purpose.

It is not to be presumed that the Senate, under such circumstances,
would desire the Executive to take the action indicated in the
resolution, and I am therefore constrained to await the requisite
appropriation by Congress for the payment of the expenses that must be
necessarily incurred in the accomplishment of the proposed objects.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 6, 1898_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

I transmit herewith, for the information of the Congress, the report of
the Hawaiian Commission appointed in pursuance of the "Joint resolution
to provide for annexing the Hawaiian Islands to the United States,"
approved July 7, 1898, together with a copy of the civil and penal laws
of Hawaii.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 5, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of Agriculture on the work
and expenditures of the agricultural experiment stations established
under the act of Congress of March 2, 1887, for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1898, in accordance with the act making appropriations for the
Department of Agriculture for the said fiscal year.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 5, 1899_.

_To the Senate_:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of December 21, 1898,
requesting the President, "If it be not inconsistent with the public
service, to inform the Senate whether authentic information is in
possession of the Government as to the alleged dissolution of the
Government of the United States of Central America." I transmit herewith
a report from the Secretary of State with accompanying papers.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 6, 1899_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith in answer to the resolution of the Senate of
December 15, 1898, a communication from the Secretary of State covering
a preliminary report from the Nicaraguan Canal Commission, dated
December 26, 1898, relative to its progress in investigating the
question of the proper route, the feasibility, and cost of construction
of the Nicaragua Canal.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 6, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State,
inclosing the annual report of the Director of the Bureau of the
American Republics, with accompanying documents. In view of the improved
condition and increasing usefulness of the Bureau, to which I have
already called attention in my annual message, and the welcome
assurances of greater activity on the part of the other American
republics in support of its purposes, I cordially indorse the
recommendations of the Secretary of State. It will doubtless be as
gratifying to Congress as it is to me to be informed that the Argentine
Republic has decided to renew its relations with the Bureau, and that
there are grounds for hoping that the International American Union,
created by the impressive conference of the representatives of our
sister republics and those of the United States in Washington in
1889-90, will soon be perfected by the adhesion of the Republic of Chile
to the compact for the support of the Bureau as the organ of the union.
The interest of the United States in giving the fullest possible effect
to the laudable desire of the international conference to promote not
only trade intercourse but a closer fellowship among the various
republics of this hemisphere is so evident that I am satisfied the
progress made by the bureau, as a practical agency for attaining these
objects, will receive the commendation and support of Congress.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 11, 1899_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of June 6, 1898, I transmit
a report from the Secretary of State, inclosing copies of all papers on
file in the Department of State relating to the case of Hugo O. Loewi,
including those printed in Document No. 186, Senate, Fifty-fifth
Congress, second session.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 17, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

It will be remembered that in the month of October, 1897, reports were
received here of the probable loss of the whaling fleet in the Arctic
regions, and of the likelihood that nearly 300 men, composing the
officers and crews of the fleet, would perish from hunger unless succor
could reach them early in the spring.

The revenue cutter _Bear_ was known to be _en route_ from the
Arctic Ocean to Puget Sound, Washington. Her arrival was anxiously
awaited, as no other suitable Government vessel could be made available
for Arctic work. That ship arrived at Seattle, Wash., on the 6th of
November, after a six-months' cruise in the Arctic, and I at once
ordered an expedition prepared for the relief of the imperiled whalemen.

The preparation of the _Bear_ was commenced on the 11th of
November, under the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury. Her
officers and men of the Revenue-Cutter Service all volunteered for the
perilous work, and the ship was completely fitted out, and, under the
command of Capt. Francis Tuttle, of the Revenue-Cutter Service, sailed
on her errand of mercy November 29, 1897, within nineteen days from the
inception of the movement.

The plan of the expedition was briefly as follows:

The ship was to be fully provided with rations for the ice-imperiled
whalemen, which were to be conveyed to them as soon as the ice
conditions in Bering Strait would permit the passage through. An
overland expedition was to be landed from the _Bear_ as soon as
practicable, at some point on the coast of Alaska, in Bering Sea, to be
determined upon by Captain Tuttle. The problem of getting food to the
imperiled people at the earliest time possible was the all-important
consideration, for it was fully understood that the _Bear_ could
not, under the most favorable conditions of ice navigation in that
region, reach their neighborhood before the following July or August.
The utter lack of transportation of any kind in this far-off land
suggested the idea, which was adopted as the only possible plan, of
driving reindeer overland, to be slaughtered on arrival, for food to
last until the arrival of the _Bear_ with supplies the following
summer. The reindeer were to be collected by the overland expedition
from several points in Alaska, notably Cape Prince of Wales and Point
Rodney, and, with such aid as could be procured from natives and others,
driven to Point Barrow.

The overland expedition was formed, and consisted of First Lieut. David
H. Jarvis, Revenue-Cutter Service, commanding; Second Lieut. Ellsworth
P. Bertholf, Revenue-Cutter Service, and Dr. Samuel J. Call, surgeon of
the _Bear_, all volunteers. This overland expedition was landed
from the _Bear_ at Cape Vancouver, in Bering Sea, Alaska, on the
16th of December, 1897, and commenced its toilsome and dreary journey
through an arctic night to Point Barrow, Captain Tuttle returning with
his command to winter at Dutch Harbor, Alaska, and from there to take
advantage of the first opportunity in the early summer of 1898 to get
north.

The overland expedition worked its way to the reindeer stations named,
and succeeded in getting together about 450 deer. They were materially
aided by Mr. W.T. Lopp, agent of the American Missionary Society at Cape
Prince of Wales, and Artisarlook, a native of that region, both of whom,
at great personal sacrifice, left their families and accompanied the
reindeer herd to Point Barrow.

The overland expedition, after a difficult and hazardous journey of
nearly 2,000 miles through the storms and bitter cold of an arctic
winter, reached Point Barrow with the herd on the 29th of March, 1898,
three months and twelve days from their landing from the _Bear_ at
Cape Vancouver, Alaskan coast of Bering Sea. They arrived none too soon.
From the lack of an authoritative head, supplemented by bad sanitary
conditions and want of proper food, the men from the whale ships
quartered there were found upon the verge of great suffering, while
sickness had broken out among them. Lieutenant Jarvis, under the
instructions given him by the Secretary of the Treasury, at once assumed
charge, in the name of the Government, of the camp and locality of Point
Barrow, and he and Dr. Call devoted themselves with intelligent energy
to correcting the wretched conditions found to exist. Order was at once
inaugurated. Fresh meat from the reindeer herd was supplied, the
sanitary conditions were improved, and the general health and comfort
of the whalemen received immediate attention. Lieutenant Jarvis and
Dr. Call remained at Point Barrow in charge until the arrival of the
_Bear_, July 28, 1898, a period of four months. As soon as the
_Bear_ arrived Captain Tuttle began the distribution of ample
supplies to the whalemen on shipboard and on shore. Having supplied all
demands generously, succored the needy to the number of 275 between
Point Barrow and Kotzebue Sound, taking on board the _Bear_ 146
whalemen, 91 of whom were brought to the Pacific coast (the remainder
having of their own volition left the ship _en route_), the vessel
arrived back at Seattle on the 13th of September, after an absence in
the bleak and dreary regions of Bering Sea and the Arctic Ocean of about
seventeen months.

The hardships and perils encountered by the members of the overland
expedition in their great journey through an almost uninhabited region,
a barren waste of ice and snow, facing death itself every day for nearly
four months, over a route never before traveled by white men, with no
refuge but at the end of the journey, carrying relief and cheer to 275
distressed citizens of our country, all make another glorious page in
the history of American seamen. They reflect by their heroic and gallant
struggles the highest credit upon themselves and the Government which
they faithfully served. I commend this heroic crew to the grateful
consideration of Congress and the American people.

The year just closed has been fruitful of noble achievements in the
field of war; and while I have commended to your consideration the
names of heroes who have shed luster upon the American name in valorous
contests and battles by land and sea, it is no less my pleasure to
invite your attention to a victory of peace the results of which cannot
well be magnified, and the dauntless courage of the men engaged stamps
them as true heroes, whose services cannot pass unrecognized.

I have therefore the honor to submit the following recommendations and
to ask your favorable action thereon:

1. That the thanks of Congress be voted to Capt. Francis Tuttle,
Revenue-Cutter Service, and the officers and enlisted men composing his
command for their able and gallant services.

2. That the thanks of Congress be extended to the members of the
overland expedition; First Lieut. David H. Jarvis, Revenue-Cutter
Service, commanding the overland expedition; to Second Lieut. Ellsworth
P. Bertholf, Revenue-Cutter Service, and to Dr. Samuel J. Call, Surgeon.

3. That gold medals of honor of appropriate design, to be approved by
the Secretary of the Treasury, be awarded to Lieutenants Jarvis and
Bertholf and Dr. Call, commemorative of their heroic struggles in aid of
suffering fellow-men.

4. That the sum of $2,500 be appropriated to be disbursed by the
Secretary of the Treasury in bestowing rewards upon W.T. Lopp,
Artisarlook, and native herders, who rendered material aid to the relief
expedition.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 19, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a second report on the investigations of the
agricultural capabilities of Alaska for the year 1898, in accordance
with the acts of Congress making appropriations for the Department of
Agriculture for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1898, and June 30,
1899.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 19, 1899_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:


I herewith return without approval Senate bill No. 708, entitled "An act
for the relief of Albert E. Redstone."

My objections to the bill are:

First. It assumes that the beneficiary, Albert E. Redstone, sustained a
loss by the incorporation of his preemption claim within the limits of
the Sierra Forest Reserve. This reserve was established by executive
proclamation of February 14, 1893 (27 Stats., 1059), issued under
section 24 of the act of March 8, 1891 (26 Stats., 1103), and contains
the following saving clause for the protection of existing claims under
the public land laws:

  * * * Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands
  which may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal
  entry or covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper
  United States Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been
  made pursuant to law, and the statutory period within which to make
  entry or filing of record has not expired; * * *


Mr. Redstone did not sustain any loss by the creation of this reserve,
because his rights, if he had any at that time, were fully recognized
and protected by this provision in the proclamation.

Second. Mr. Redstone's preemption declaratory statement was filed April
6, 1889, and alleged settlement upon the same day. The land covered
thereby had not been proclaimed for sale, and under sections 2265 and
2267 of the Revised Statutes, Mr. Redstone had thirty-three months from
the date of his settlement within which to make proof and payment for
the land, but in fact he never attempted to make such proof or payment.
His preemption claim had therefore expired by operation of law long
before the creation of this reserve. After his filing had thus expired
Mr. Redstone was cited by the Land Department to show cause why his
claim should not be declared at an end, and his filing formally canceled
upon the public records, but he made no response or defense, and the
filing was accordingly canceled.

Third. The Commissioner of the General Land Office reports that an
investigation, made under the supervision of his office, shows that Mr.
Redstone had actually abandoned the land covered by his preemption claim
before the reserve was established.

Fourth. The Commissioner of the General Land Office reports that an
examination, made under the supervision of his office, shows that the
improvements placed upon this land during the life of this preemption
claim and thereafter abandoned were less than $200 in value, while the
amount appropriated in this bill is $1,800.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

In accordance with a provision in the act making appropriations for
the Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899,
I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of Agriculture "upon the
forestry investigations and work of the Department of Agriculture."

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 9, 1899_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith, in response to a resolution of the Senate of
the 2nd instant, requesting information "whether any franchises or
concessions of any character are being or have been granted by any
municipality in Cuba or Puerto Rico since the military occupation
thereof by the United States," etc., a report from the Secretary of
War and accompanying papers.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 11, 1899_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith the response of the Secretary of State to the
resolution of the House of Representatives of February 4, 1899, calling
for information in his possession concerning certain alleged outrages
committed upon the person of Bishop Earl Cranston and other American
citizens in the city of Peking, China.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 18, 1899_.

_To the Senate_:

I transmit herewith the response of the Secretary of Agriculture to the
resolution of the Senate of February 8, 1899, calling for information
in his possession regarding the practical usefulness of reservoirs to
agriculture in the irrigated region of the United States, especially
as affecting the distribution of water to crops, the area and value of
reclaimed land, and the stability and unprofitableness of farming where
irrigation is practised.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 21, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State,
accompanying the commercial relations of the United States for the
year 1898, being the annual reports of the consular officers upon the
industries and commerce of foreign countries. In view of the value of
these reports to the manufacturing and exporting interests of the
country, I indorse the recommendation of the Secretary of State that
Congress authorize the printing of the usual editions of 10,000 copies
of the general summary, entitled "Review of the World's Commerce" and
of 5,000 copies of "Commercial Relations" (including this summary), to
enable the Department of State to meet the demand for such information.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 1, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith, for the information of Congress, a communication
from the Secretary of Agriculture, covering a report on the progress of
the beet-sugar industry in the United States during the year 1898. It
embraces the results of numerous chemical analyses and the observations
made by a special agent in various parts of the United States.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, March 3, 1899_.

_To the Senate_:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of February 28 last
directed to the Secretary of State, I transmit a report from that
officer submitting a list of claims against Spain, growing out of the
insurrection in Cuba, filed in the Department of State, not embraced
in Senate Document No. 79, Fifty-fourth Congress, second session.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 5, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

At the threshold of your deliberations you are called to mourn with your
countrymen the death of Vice-President Hobart, who passed from this life
on the morning of November 21 last. His great soul now rests in eternal
peace. His private life was pure and elevated, while his public career
was ever distinguished by large capacity, stainless integrity, and
exalted motives. He has been removed from the high office which he
honored and dignified, but his lofty character, his devotion to duty,
his honesty of purpose, and noble virtues remain with us as a priceless
legacy and example.

The Fifty-sixth Congress convenes in its first regular session with the
country in a condition of unusual prosperity, of universal good will
among the people at home, and in relations of peace and friendship with
every government of the world. Our foreign commerce has shown great
increase in volume and value. The combined imports and exports for the
year are the largest ever shown by a single year in all our history.
Our exports for 1899 alone exceeded by more than a billion dollars our
imports and exports combined in 1870. The imports per capita are 20 per
cent less than in 1870, while the exports per capita are 58 per cent
more than in 1870, showing the enlarged capacity of the United States
to satisfy the wants of its own increasing population, as well as to
contribute to those of the peoples of other nations.

Exports of agricultural products were $784,776,142. Of manufactured
products we exported in value $339,592,146, being larger than any
previous year. It is a noteworthy fact that the only years in all our
history when the products of our manufactories sold abroad exceeded
those bought abroad were 1898 and 1899.

Government receipts from all sources for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1899, including $11,798,314.14, part payment of the Central Pacific
Railroad indebtedness, aggregated $610,982,004.35. Customs receipts were
$206,128,481.75, and those from internal revenue $273,437,161.51.

For the fiscal year the expenditures were $700,093,564.02, leaving a
deficit of $89,111,559.67.

The Secretary of the Treasury estimates that the receipts for the
current fiscal year will aggregate $640,958,112, and upon the basis of
present appropriations the expenditures will aggregate $600,958,112,
leaving a surplus of $40,000,000.

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1899, the internal-revenue receipts
were increased about $100,000,000.

The present gratifying strength of the Treasury is shown by the
fact that on December 1, 1899, the available cash balance was
$278,004,837.72, of which $239,744,905.36 was in gold coin and bullion.
The conditions of confidence which prevail throughout the country have
brought gold into more general use and customs receipts are now almost
entirely paid in that coin.

The strong position of the Treasury with respect to cash on hand and the
favorable showing made by the revenues have made it possible for the
Secretary of the Treasury to take action under the provisions of section
3694, Revised Statutes, relating to the sinking fund. Receipts exceeded
expenditures for the first five months of the current fiscal year by
$13,413,389.91, and, as mentioned above, the Secretary of the Treasury
estimates that there will be a surplus of approximately $40,000,000 at
the end of the year. Under such conditions it was deemed advisable and
proper to resume compliance with the provisions of the sinking-fund law,
which for eight years has not been done because of deficiencies in the
revenues. The Treasury Department therefore offered to purchase during
November $25,000,000 of the 5 per cent loan of 1904, or the 4 per cent
funded loan of 1907, at the current market price. The amount offered
and purchased during November was $18,408,600. The premium paid by
the Government on such purchases was $2,263,521 and the net saving
in interest was about $2,885,000. The success of this operation was
sufficient to induce the Government to continue the offer to purchase
bonds to and including the 23d day of December, instant, unless the
remainder of the $25,000,000 called for should be presented in the
meantime for redemption.

Increased activity in industry, with its welcome attendant--a larger
employment for labor at higher wages--gives to the body of the people
a larger power to absorb the circulating medium. It is further true
that year by year, with larger areas of land under cultivation, the
increasing volume of agricultural products, cotton, corn, and wheat,
calls for a larger volume of money supply. This is especially noticeable
at the crop-harvesting and crop-moving period.

In its earlier history the National Banking Act seemed to prove a
reasonable avenue through which needful additions to the circulation
could from time to time be made. Changing conditions have apparently
rendered it now inoperative to that end. The high margin in bond
securities required, resulting from large premiums which Government
bonds command in the market, or the tax on note issues, or both
operating together, appear to be the influences which impair its public
utility.

The attention of Congress is respectfully invited to this important
matter, with the view of ascertaining whether or not such reasonable
modifications can be made in the National Banking Act as will render
its service in the particulars here referred to more responsive to
the people's needs. I again urge that national banks be authorized
to organize with a capital of $25,000.

I urgently recommend that to support the existing gold standard, and to
maintain "the parity in value of the coins of the two metals (gold and
silver) and the equal power of every dollar at all times in the market
and in the payment of debts," the Secretary of the Treasury be given
additional power and charged with the duty to sell United States bonds
and to employ such other effective means as may be necessary to these
ends. The authority should include the power to sell bonds on long and
short time, as conditions may require, and should provide for a rate
of interest lower than that fixed by the act of January 14, 1875.
While there is now no commercial fright which withdraws gold from the
Government, but, on the contrary, such widespread confidence that gold
seeks the Treasury demanding paper money in exchange, yet the very
situation points to the present as the most fitting time to make
adequate provision to insure the continuance of the gold standard and of
public confidence in the ability and purpose of the Government to meet
all its obligations in the money which the civilized world recognizes
as the best. The financial transactions of the Government are conducted
upon a gold basis. We receive gold when we sell United States bonds and
use gold for their payment. We are maintaining the parity of all the
money issued or coined by authority of the Government. We are doing
these things with the means at hand. Happily at the present time we are
not compelled to resort to loans to supply gold. It has been done in the
past, however, and may have to be done in the future. It behooves us,
therefore, to provide at once the best means to meet the emergency when
it arises, and the best means are those which are the most certain and
economical. Those now authorized have the virtue neither of directness
nor economy. We have already eliminated one of the causes of our
financial plight and embarrassment during the years 1893, 1894, 1895,
and 1896. Our receipts now equal our expenditures; deficient revenues
no longer create alarm. Let us remove the only remaining cause by
conferring the full and necessary power on the Secretary of the Treasury
and impose upon him the duty to uphold the present gold standard and
preserve the coins of the two metals on a parity with each other, which
is the repeatedly declared policy of the United States.

In this connection I repeat my former recommendations that a portion of
the gold holdings shall be placed in a trust fund from which greenbacks
shall be redeemed upon presentation, but when once redeemed shall not
thereafter be paid out except for gold.

The value of an American merchant marine to the extension of our
commercial trade and the strengthening of our power upon the sea invites
the immediate action of the Congress. Our national development will be
one-sided and unsatisfactory so long as the remarkable growth of our
inland industries remains unaccompanied by progress on the seas. There
is no lack of constitutional authority for legislation which shall give
to the country maritime strength commensurate with its industrial
achievements and with its rank among the nations of the earth.

The past year has recorded exceptional activity in our shipyards, and
the promises of continual prosperity in shipbuilding are abundant.
Advanced legislation for the protection of our seamen has been enacted.
Our coast trade, under regulations wisely framed at the beginning of the
Government and since, shows results for the past fiscal year unequaled
in our records or those of any other power. We shall fail to realize our
opportunities, however, if we complacently regard only matters at home
and blind ourselves to the necessity of securing our share in the
valuable carrying trade of the world.

Last year American vessels transported a smaller share of our exports
and imports than during any former year in all our history, and the
measure of our dependence upon foreign shipping was painfully manifested
to our people. Without any choice of our own, but from necessity, the
Departments of the Government charged with military and naval operations
in the East and West Indies had to obtain from foreign flags merchant
vessels essential for those operations.

The other great nations have not hesitated to adopt the required means
to develop their shipping as a factor in national defense and as one of
the surest and speediest means of obtaining for their producers a share
in foreign markets. Like vigilance and effort on our part cannot fail
to improve our situation, which is regarded with humiliation at home
and with surprise abroad. Even the seeming sacrifices, which at the
beginning may be involved, will be offset later by more than equivalent
gains.

The expense is as nothing compared to the advantage to be achieved.
The reestablishment of our merchant marine involves in a large measure
our continued industrial progress and the extension of our commercial
triumphs. I am satisfied the judgment of the country favors the policy
of aid to our merchant marine, which will broaden our commerce and
markets and upbuild our sea-carrying capacity for the products of
agriculture and manufacture; which, with the increase of our Navy, mean
more work and wages to our countrymen, as well as a safeguard to
American interests in every part of the world.

Combinations of capital organized into trusts to control the conditions
of trade among our citizens, to stifle competition, limit production,
and determine the prices of products used and consumed by the people,
are justly provoking public discussion, and should early claim the
attention of the Congress.

The Industrial Commission, created by the act of the Congress of June
18, 1898, has been engaged in extended hearings upon the disputed
questions involved in the subject of combinations in restraint of trade
and competition. They have not yet completed their investigation of this
subject, and the conclusions and recommendations at which they may
arrive are undetermined.

The subject is one giving rise to many divergent views as to the nature
and variety or cause and extent of the injuries to the public which may
result from large combinations concentrating more or less numerous
enterprises and establishments, which previously to the formation of the
combination were carried on separately.

It is universally conceded that combinations which engross or control
the market of any particular kind of merchandise or commodity necessary
to the general community, by suppressing natural and ordinary
competition, whereby prices are unduly enhanced to the general consumer,
are obnoxious not only to the common law but also to the public welfare.
There must be a remedy for the evils involved in such organizations. If
the present law can be extended more certainly to control or check these
monopolies or trusts, it should be done without delay. Whatever power
the Congress possesses over this most important subject should be
promptly ascertained and asserted.

President Harrison in his annual message of December 3, 1889, says:

  Earnest attention should be given by Congress to a consideration of the
  question how far the restraint of those combinations of capital commonly
  called "trusts" is matter of Federal jurisdiction. When organized, as
  they often are, to crush out all healthy competition and to monopolize
  the production or sale of an article of commerce and general necessity
  they are dangerous conspiracies against the public good, and should be
  made the subject of prohibitory and even penal legislation.


An act to protect trade and commerce against unlawful restraints
and monopolies was passed by Congress on the 2d of July, 1890. The
provisions of this statute are comprehensive and stringent. It declares
every contract or combination, in the form of a trust or otherwise,
or conspiracy in the restraint of trade or commerce among the several
States or with foreign nations, to be unlawful. It denominates as a
criminal every person who makes any such contract or engages in any
such combination or conspiracy, and provides a punishment by fine or
imprisonment. It invests the several circuit courts of the United States
with jurisdiction to prevent and restrain violations of the act, and
makes it the duty of the several United States district attorneys, under
the direction of the Attorney-General, to institute proceedings in
equity to prevent and restrain such violations. It further confers upon
any person who shall be injured in his business or property by any other
person or corporation by reason of anything forbidden or declared to be
unlawful by the act, the power to sue therefor in any circuit court of
the United States without respect to the amount in controversy, and to
recover threefold the damages by him sustained and the costs of the
suit, including reasonable attorney fees. It will be perceived that the
act is aimed at every kind of combination in the nature of a trust or
monopoly in restraint of interstate or international commerce.

The prosecution by the United States of offenses under the act of 1890
has been frequently resorted to in the Federal courts, and notable
efforts in the restraint of interstate commerce, such as the
Trans-Missouri Freight Association and the Joint Traffic Association,
have been successfully opposed and suppressed.

President Cleveland in his annual message of December 7, 1896--more than
six years subsequent to the enactment of this law--after stating the
evils of these trust combinations, says:

  Though Congress has attempted to deal with this matter by legislation,
  the laws passed for that purpose thus far have proved ineffective, not
  because of any lack of disposition or attempt to enforce them, but
  simply because the laws themselves as interpreted by the courts do not
  reach the difficulty. If the insufficiencies of existing laws can be
  remedied by further legislation, it should be done. The fact must be
  recognized, however, that all Federal legislation on this subject may
  fall short of its purpose because of inherent obstacles, and also
  because of the complex character of our governmental system, which,
  while making the Federal authority supreme within its sphere, has
  carefully limited that sphere by metes and bounds which cannot be
  transgressed. The decision of our highest court on this precise question
  renders it quite doubtful whether the evils of trusts and monopolies can
  be adequately treated through Federal action, unless they seek directly
  and purposely to include in their objects transportation or intercourse
  between States or between the United States and foreign countries.

  It does not follow, however, that this is the limit of the remedy that
  may be applied. Even though it may be found that Federal authority is
  not broad enough to fully reach the case, there can be no doubt of the
  power of the several States to act effectively in the premises, and
  there should be no reason to doubt their willingness to judiciously
  exercise such power.


The State legislation to which President Cleveland looked for relief
from the evils of trusts has failed to accomplish fully that object.
This is probably due to a great extent to the fact that different States
take different views as to the proper way to discriminate between evil
and injurious combinations and those associations which are beneficial
and necessary to the business prosperity of the country. The great
diversity of treatment in different States arising from this cause and
the intimate relations of all parts of the country to each other without
regarding State lines in the conduct of business have made the
enforcement of State laws difficult.

It is apparent that uniformity of legislation upon this subject in
the several States is much to be desired. It is to be hoped that such
uniformity founded in a wise and just discrimination between what is
injurious and what is useful and necessary in business operations may
be obtained and that means may be found for the Congress within the
limitations of its constitutional power so to supplement an effective
code of State legislation as to make a complete system of laws
throughout the United States adequate to compel a general observance of
the salutary rules to which I have referred.

The whole question is so important and far-reaching that I am sure no
part of it will be lightly considered, but every phase of it will have
the studied deliberation of the Congress, resulting in wise and
judicious action.

A review of our relations with foreign States is presented with such
recommendations as are deemed appropriate.

The long-pending boundary dispute between the Argentine Republic and
Chile was settled in March last by the award of an arbitral commission,
on which the United States minister at Buenos Ayres served as umpire.

Progress has been made toward the conclusion of a convention of
extradition with the Argentine Republic. Having been advised and
consented to by the United States Senate and ratified by Argentina, it
only awaits the adjustment of some slight changes in the text before
exchange.

In my last annual message I adverted to the claim of the
Austro-Hungarian Government for indemnity for the killing of certain
Austrian and Hungarian subjects by the authorities of the State of
Pennsylvania, at Lattimer, while suppressing an unlawful tumult of
miners, September 10, 1897. In view of the verdict of acquittal rendered
by the court before which the sheriff and his deputies were tried for
murder, and following the established doctrine that the Government may
not be held accountable for injuries suffered by individuals at the
hands of the public authorities while acting in the line of duty in
suppressing disturbance of the public peace, this Government, after due
consideration of the claim advanced by the Austro-Hungarian Government,
was constrained to decline liability to indemnify the sufferers.

It is gratifying to be able to announce that the Belgian Government has
mitigated the restrictions on the importation of cattle from the United
States, to which I referred in my last annual message.

Having been invited by Belgium to participate in a congress, held at
Brussels, to revise the provisions of the general act of July 2, 1890,
for the repression of the African slave trade, to which the United
States was a signatory party, this Government preferred not to be
represented by a plenipotentiary, but reserved the right of accession
to the result. Notable changes were made, those especially concerning
this country being in the line of the increased restriction of the
deleterious trade in spirituous liquors with the native tribes, which
this Government has from the outset urgently advocated. The amended
general act will be laid before the Senate, with a view to its advice
and consent.

Early in the year the peace of Bolivia was disturbed by a successful
insurrection. The United States minister remained at his post, attending
to the American interests in that quarter, and using besides his good
offices for the protection of the interests of British subjects in the
absence of their national representative. On the establishment of the
new Government, our minister was directed to enter into relations
therewith.

General Pando was elected President of Bolivia on October 23.

Our representative has been instructed to use all permissible friendly
endeavors to induce the Government of Bolivia to amend its marriage laws
so as to give legal status to the non-Catholic and civil marriages of
aliens within its jurisdiction, and strong hopes are entertained that
the Bolivian law in this regard will be brought, as was that of Peru
some years ago, into harmony with the general practice of modern States.

A convention of extradition with Brazil, signed May 14, 1897, has been
ratified by the Brazilian Legislature.

During the past summer two national ships of the United States have
visited Brazilian ports on a friendly mission and been cordially
received. The voyage of the _Wilmington_ up the Amazon River gave
rise to a passing misunderstanding, owing to confusion in obtaining
permission to visit the interior and make surveys in the general
interest of navigation, but the incident found a ready adjustment in
harmony with the close relations of amity which this Government has
always sedulously sought to cultivate with the commonwealths of the
Western Continent.

The claim growing out of the seizure of the American-owned newspaper
"The Panama Star and Herald" by the authorities of Colombia has been
settled, after a controversy of several years, by an agreement assessing
at $30,000 the indemnity to be paid by the Colombian Government, in
three installments of $10,000 each.

The good will of Colombia toward our country has been testified anew by
the cordial extension of facilities to the Nicaraguan Canal Commission
in their approaching investigation of the Panama Canal and other
projected routes across the Isthmus of Darien.

Toward the end of October an insurrectionary disturbance developed in
the Colombian Republic. This movement has thus far not attained any
decisive result and is still in progress.

Discussion of the questions raised by the action of Denmark in imposing
restrictions on the importation of American meats has continued without
substantial result in our favor.

The neighboring island Republic of Santo Domingo has lately been the
scene of revolution, following a long period of tranquillity. It began
with the killing of President Heureaux in July last, and culminated in
the relinquishment by the succeeding Vice-President of the reins of
government to the insurgents. The first act of the provisional
government was the calling of a presidential and constituent election.
Juan Isidro Jimenez, having been elected President, was inaugurated on
the 14th of November. Relations have been entered into with the newly
established Government.

The experimental association of Nicaragua, Honduras, and Salvador, under
the title of the Greater Republic of Central America, when apparently on
the threshold of a complete federal organization by the adoption of a
constitution and the formation of a national legislature, was disrupted
in the last days of November, 1898, by the withdrawal of Salvador.
Thereupon Nicaragua and Honduras abandoned the joint compact, each
resuming its former independent sovereignty. This was followed by the
reception of Minister Merry by the Republics of Nicaragua and Salvador,
while Minister Hunter in turn presented his credentials to the
Government of Honduras, thus reverting to the old distribution of the
diplomatic agencies of the United States in Central America for which
our existing statutes provide. A Nicaraguan envoy has been accredited to
the United States.

An insurrectionary movement, under General Reyes, broke out at
Bluefields in February last, and for a time exercised actual control
in the Mosquito Territory. The _Detroit_ was promptly sent thither
for the protection of American interests. After a few weeks the Reyes
government renounced the conflict, giving place to the restored
supremacy of Nicaragua. During the interregnum certain public dues
accruing under Nicaraguan law were collected from American merchants by
the authorities for the time being in effective administrative control.
Upon the titular government regaining power, a second payment of these
dues was demanded. Controversy arose touching the validity of the
original payment of the debt to the _de facto_ regent of the
territory. An arrangement was effected in April last by the United
States minister and the foreign secretary of Nicaragua whereby the
amounts of the duplicate payments were deposited with the British consul
pending an adjustment of the matter by direct agreement between the
Governments of the United States and Nicaragua. The controversy is still
unsettled.

The contract of the Maritime Canal Company of Nicaragua was declared
forfeited by the Nicaraguan Government on the 10th of October, on the
ground of nonfulfillment within the ten years' term stipulated in the
contract. The Maritime Canal Company has lodged a protest against this
action, alleging rights in the premises which appear worthy of
consideration. This Government expects that Nicaragua will afford the
protestants a full and fair hearing upon the merits of the case.

The Nicaragua Canal Commission, which had been engaged upon the work of
examination and survey for a ship-canal route across Nicaragua, having
completed its labors and made its report, was dissolved on May 31, and
on June 10 a new commission, known as the Isthmian Canal Commission, was
organized under the terms of the act approved March 3, 1899, for the
purpose of examining the American Isthmus with a view to determining the
most practicable and feasible route for a ship canal across that
Isthmus, with its probable cost, and other essential details.

This Commission, under the presidency of Rear-Admiral John G. Walker,
U.S.N. (retired), entered promptly upon the work intrusted to it,
and is now carrying on examinations in Nicaragua along the route of
the Panama Canal, and in Darien from the Atlantic, in the neighborhood
of the Atrato River, to the Bay of Panama, on the Pacific side. Good
progress has been made, but under the law a comprehensive and complete
investigation is called for, which will require much labor and
considerable time for its accomplishment. The work will be prosecuted as
expeditiously as possible and a report made at the earliest practicable
date.

The great importance of this work cannot be too often or too strongly
pressed upon the attention of the Congress. In my message of a year ago
I expressed my views of the necessity of a canal which would link the
two great oceans, to which I again invite your consideration. The
reasons then presented for early action are even stronger now.

A pleasing incident in the relations of this Government with that
of Chile occurred in the generous assistance given to the war ship
_Newark_ when in distress in Chilean waters. Not alone in this way
has the friendly disposition of Chile found expression. That country has
acceded to the convention for the establishment of the Bureau of the
American Republics, in which organization every independent State of the
continent now shares.

The exchange of ratifications of a convention for the revival of the
United States and Chilean Claims Commission and for the adjudication of
claims heretofore presented but not determined during the life of the
previous Commission has been delayed by reason of the necessity for
fresh action by the Chilean Senate upon the amendments attached to the
ratification of the treaty by the United States Senate. This formality
is soon to be accomplished.

In view of disturbances in the populous provinces of northern China,
where are many of our citizens, and of the imminence of disorder near
the capital and toward the seaboard, a guard of marines was landed
from the _Boston_ and stationed during last winter in the legation
compound at Peking. With the restoration of order this protection was
withdrawn.

The interests of our citizens in that vast Empire have not been neglected
during the past year. Adequate protection has been secured for our
missionaries and some injuries to their property have been redressed.

American capital has sought and found various opportunities of competing
to carry out the internal improvements which the Imperial Government is
wisely encouraging, and to develop the natural resources of the Empire.
Our trade with China has continued to grow, and our commercial rights
under existing treaties have been everywhere maintained during the past
year, as they will be in the future.

The extension of the area open to international foreign settlement at
Shanghai and the opening of the ports of Nanking, Tsing-tao (Kiao chao),
and Ta-lien-wan to foreign trade and settlement will doubtless afford
American enterprise additional facilities and new fields, of which it
will not be slow to take advantage.

In my message to Congress of December 5, 1898, I urged that the
recommendation which had been made to the Speaker of the House of
Representatives by the Secretary of the Treasury on the 14th of June,
1898, for an appropriation for a commission to study the commercial
and industrial conditions in the Chinese Empire and report as to the
opportunities for, and obstacles to, the enlargement of markets in China
for the raw products and manufactures of the United States, should
receive at your hands the consideration which its importance and
timeliness merited, but the Congress failed to take action.

I now renew this recommendation, as the importance of the subject has
steadily grown since it was first submitted to you, and no time should
be lost in studying for ourselves the resources of this great field for
American trade and enterprise.

The death of President Faure in February last called forth those sincere
expressions of sympathy which befit the relations of two Republics as
closely allied by unbroken historic ties as are the United States and
France.

Preparations for the representation of the industries, arts, and
products of the United States at the World's Exposition to be held in
Paris next year continue on an elaborate and comprehensive scale, thanks
to the generous appropriation provided by Congress and to the friendly
interest the French Government has shown in furthering a typical exhibit
of American progress.

There has been allotted to the United States a considerable addition
of space, which, while placing our country in the first rank among
exhibitors, does not suffice to meet the increasingly urgent demands
of our manufacturers. The efforts of the Commissioner-General are ably
directed toward a strictly representative display of all that most
characteristically marks American achievement in the inventive arts,
and most adequately shows the excellence of our natural productions.

In this age of keen rivalry among nations for mastery in commerce, the
doctrine of evolution and the rule of the survival of the fittest must
be as inexorable in their operation as they are positive in the results
they bring about. The place won in the struggle by an industrial people
can only be held by unrelaxed endeavor and constant advance in
achievement. The present extraordinary impetus in every line of American
exportation and the astounding increase in the volume and value of our
share in the world's markets may not be attributed to accidental
conditions.

The reasons are not far to seek. They lie deep in our national character
and find expression year by year in every branch of handicraft, in every
new device whereby the materials we so abundantly produce are subdued to
the artisan's will and made to yield the largest, most practical, and
most beneficial return. The American exhibit at Paris should, and I am
confident will, be an open volume, whose lessons of skillfully directed
endeavor, unfaltering energy, and consummate performance may be read by
all on every page, thus spreading abroad a clearer knowledge of the
worth of our productions and the justice of our claim to an important
place in the marts of the world. To accomplish this by judicious
selection, by recognition of paramount merit in whatever walk of trade
or manufacture it may appear, and by orderly classification and
attractive installation is the task of our Commission.

The United States Government building is approaching completion, and no
effort will be spared to make it worthy, in beauty of architectural plan
and in completeness of display, to represent our nation. It has been
suggested that a permanent building of similar or appropriate design be
erected on a convenient site, already given by the municipality, near
the exposition grounds, to serve in commemoration of the part taken by
this country in this great enterprise, as an American National
Institute, for our countrymen resorting to Paris for study.

I am informed by our Commissioner-General that we shall have in the
American sections at Paris over 7,000 exhibitors, from every State in
our country, a number ten times as great as those which were represented
at Vienna in 1873, six times as many as those in Paris in 1878, and four
times as many as those who exhibited in Paris in 1889. This statement
does not include the exhibits from either Cuba, Puerto Rico, or Hawaii,
for which arrangements have been made.

A number of important international congresses on special topics
affecting public interests are proposed to be held in Paris next summer
in connection with the exposition. Effort will be made to have the
several technical branches of our administration efficiently represented
at those conferences, each in its special line, and to procure the
largest possible concourse of State representatives, particularly at the
Congresses of Public Charity and Medicine.

Our relations with Germany continue to be most cordial. The increasing
intimacy of direct association has been marked during the year by the
granting permission in April for the landing on our shores of a cable
from Borkum Eniden, on the North Sea, by way of the Azores, and also
by the conclusion on September 2 of a Parcels Post Convention with the
German Empire. In all that promises closer relations of intercourse and
commerce and a better understanding between two races having so many
traits in common, Germany can be assured of the most cordial cooperation
of this Government and people. We may be rivals in many material paths,
but our rivalry should be generous and open, ever aiming toward the
attainment of larger results and the mutually beneficial advancement of
each in the line of its especial adaptabilities.

The several governments of the Empire seem reluctant to admit the
natural excellence of our food productions and to accept the evidence
we constantly tender of the care with which their purity is guarded
by rigid inspection from the farm, through the slaughterhouse and the
packing establishments, to the port of shipment. Our system of control
over exported food staples invites examination from any quarter and
challenges respect by its efficient thoroughness.

It is to be hoped that in time the two Governments will act in common
accord toward the realization of their common purpose to safeguard the
public health and to insure the purity and wholesomeness of all food
products imported by either country from the other. Were the Congress
to authorize an invitation to Germany, in connection with the pending
reciprocity negotiations, for the constitution of a joint commission of
scientific experts and practical men of affairs to conduct a searching
investigation of food production and exportation in both countries and
report to their respective legislatures for the adoption of such
remedial measures as they might recommend for either, the way might be
opened for the desirable result indicated.

Efforts to obtain for American life insurance companies a full hearing
as to their business operations in Prussia have, after several years of
patient representation, happily succeeded, and one of the most important
American companies has been granted a concession to continue business in
that Kingdom.

I am also glad to announce that the German insurance companies have been
readmitted by the superintendent of insurance to do business in the
State of New York.

Subsequent to the exchange of our peace treaty with Spain, Germany
acquired the Caroline Islands by purchase, paying therefor $5,000,000.
Assurances have been received from the German Government that the rights
of American missionaries and traders there will be considerately
observed.

In my last annual message I referred to the pending negotiations with
Great Britain in respect to the Dominion of Canada. By means of an
executive agreement, a Joint High Commission had been created for the
purpose of adjusting all unsettled questions between the United States
and Canada, embracing twelve subjects, among which were the questions of
the fur seals, the fisheries of the coast and contiguous inland waters,
the Alaskan boundary, the transit of merchandise in bond, the alien
labor laws, mining rights, reciprocity in trade, revision of the
agreement respecting naval vessels in the Great Lakes, a more complete
marking of parts of the boundary, provision for the conveyance of
criminals, and for wrecking and salvage.

Much progress had been made by the Commission toward the adjustment of
many of these questions, when it became apparent that an irreconcilable
difference of views was entertained respecting the delimitation of the
Alaskan boundary. In the failure of an agreement as to the meaning of
Articles III and IV of the treaty of 1825 between Russia and Great
Britain, which defined the boundary between Alaska and Canada, the
American Commissioners proposed that the subject of the boundary be
laid aside, and that the remaining questions of difference be proceeded
with, some of which were so far advanced as to assure the probability
of a settlement. This being declined by the British Commissioners, an
adjournment was taken until the boundary should be adjusted by the two
Governments. The subject has been receiving the careful attention which
its importance demands, with the result that a _modus vivendi_ for
provisional demarcations in the region about the head of Lynn Canal has
been agreed upon; and it is hoped that the negotiations now in progress
between the two Governments will end in an agreement for the
establishment and delimitation of a permanent boundary.

Apart from these questions growing out of our relationship with our
northern neighbor, the most friendly disposition and ready agreement
have marked the discussion of numerous matters arising in the vast and
intimate intercourse of the United States with Great Britain.

This Government has maintained an attitude of neutrality in the
unfortunate contest between Great Britain and the Boer States of
Africa. We have remained faithful to the precept of avoiding entangling
alliances as to affairs not of our direct concern. Had circumstances
suggested that the parties to the quarrel would have welcomed any kindly
expression of the hope of the American people that war might be averted,
good offices would have been gladly tendered. The United States
representative at Pretoria was early instructed to see that all neutral
American interests be respected by the combatants. This has been an easy
task in view of the positive declarations of both British and Boer
authorities that the personal and property rights of our citizens should
be observed.

Upon the withdrawal of the British agent from Pretoria the United States
consul was authorized, upon the request of the British Government and
with the assent of the South African and Orange Free State Governments,
to exercise the customary good offices of a neutral for the care of
British interests. In the discharge of this function, I am happy to say
that abundant opportunity has been afforded to show the impartiality of
this Government toward both the combatants.

For the fourth time in the present decade, question has arisen with
the Government of Italy in regard to the lynching of Italian subjects.
The latest of these deplorable events occurred at Tallulah, Louisiana,
whereby five unfortunates of Italian origin were taken from jail and
hanged.

The authorities of the State and a representative of the Italian Embassy
having separately investigated the occurrence, with discrepant results,
particularly as to the alleged citizenship of the victims, and it not
appearing that the State had been able to discover and punish the
violators of the law, an independent investigation has been set on foot,
through the agency of the Department of State, and is still in progress.
The result will enable the Executive to treat the question with the
Government of Italy in a spirit of fairness and justice. A satisfactory
solution will doubtless be reached.

The recurrence of these distressing manifestations of blind mob fury
directed at dependents or natives of a foreign country suggests that
the contingency has arisen for action by Congress in the direction
of conferring upon the Federal courts jurisdiction in this class of
international cases where the ultimate responsibility of the Federal
Government may be involved. The suggestion is not new. In his annual
message of December 9, 1891, my predecessor, President Harrison, said:

  It would, I believe, be entirely competent for Congress to make offenses
  against the treaty rights of foreigners domiciled in the United States
  cognizable in the Federal courts. This has not, however, been done, and
  the Federal officers and courts have no power in such cases to intervene
  either for the protection of a foreign citizen or for the punishment of
  his slayers. It seems to me to follow, in this state of the law, that
  the officers of the State charged with police and judicial powers in
  such cases must, in the consideration of international questions growing
  out of such incidents, be regarded in such sense as Federal agents as to
  make this Government answerable for their acts in cases where it would
  be answerable if the United States had used its constitutional power to
  define and punish crimes against treaty rights.


A bill to provide for the punishment of violations of treaty rights
of aliens was introduced in the Senate March 1, 1892, and reported
favorably March 30. Having doubtless in view the language of that part
of Article III of the treaty of February 26, 1871, between the United
States and Italy, which stipulates that "The citizens of each of the
high contracting parties shall receive, in the States and Territories of
the other, most constant protection and security for their persons and
property, and shall enjoy in this respect the same rights and privileges
as are or shall be granted to the natives, on their submitting
themselves to the conditions imposed upon the natives," the bill so
introduced and reported provided that any act committed in any State or
Territory of the United States in violation of the rights of a citizen
or subject of a foreign country secured to such citizen or subject
by treaty between the United States and such foreign country and
constituting a crime under the laws of the State or Territory shall
constitute a like crime against the United States and be cognizable in
the Federal courts. No action was taken by Congress in the matter.

I earnestly recommend that the subject be taken up anew and acted
upon during the present session. The necessity for some such provision
abundantly appears. Precedent for constituting a Federal jurisdiction in
criminal cases where aliens are sufferers is rationally deducible from
the existing statute, which gives to the district and circuit courts of
the United States jurisdiction of civil suits brought by aliens where
the amount involved exceeds a certain sum. If such jealous solicitude be
shown for alien rights in cases of merely civil and pecuniary import,
how much greater should be the public duty to take cognizance of matters
affecting the lives and the rights of aliens under the settled
principles of international law no less than under treaty stipulation,
in cases of such transcendent wrongdoing as mob murder, especially when
experience has shown that local justice is too often helpless to punish
the offenders.

After many years of endeavor on the part of this Government to that end
the Italian Government has consented to enter into negotiations for a
naturalization convention, having for one of its objects the regulation
of the status of Italians (except those of an age for active military
service) who, having been naturalized in the United States, may revisit
Italy. It is hoped that with the mutually conciliatory spirit displayed
a successful conclusion will be reached.

The treaty of commerce and navigation between the United States and
Japan on November 22, 1894, took effect in accordance with the terms
of its XIXth Article on the 17th of July last, simultaneously with the
enforcement of like treaties with the other powers, except France, whose
convention did not go into operation until August 4, the United States
being, however, granted up to that date all the privileges and rights
accorded to French citizens under the old French treaty. By this notable
conventional reform Japan's position as a fully independent sovereign
power is assured, control being gained of taxation, customs revenues,
judicial administration, coasting trade, and all other domestic
functions of government, and foreign extra-territorial rights being
renounced.

Comprehensive codes of civil and criminal procedure according to
western methods, public instruction, patents and copyrights, municipal
administration, including jurisdiction over the former foreign
settlements, customs tariffs and procedure, public health, and other
administrative measures have been proclaimed. The working of the new
system has given rise to no material complaints on the part of the
American citizens or interests, a circumstance which attests the ripe
consideration with which the change has been prepared.

Valuable assistance was rendered by the Japanese authorities to the
United States transport ship _Morgan City_ while stranded at Kobe.
Permission has been granted to land and pasture army horses at Japanese
ports of call on the way to the Philippine Islands. These kindly
evidences of good will are highly appreciated.

The Japanese Government has shown a lively interest in the proposition
of the Pacific Cable Company to add to its projected cable lines to
Hawaii, Guam, and the Philippines a branch connection with the coast of
Japan. It would be a gratifying consummation were the utility of the
contemplated scheme enhanced by bringing Japan and the United States
into direct telegraphic relation.

Without repeating the observations of my special message of February 10,
1899, concerning the necessity of a cable to Manila, I respectfully
invite attention to it.

I recommend that, in case the Congress should not take measures
to bring about this result by direct action of the Government, the
Postmaster-General be authorized to invite competitive bids for the
establishment of a cable; the company making the best responsible bid to
be awarded the contract; the successful company to give ample bonds to
insure the completion of the work within a reasonable time.

The year has been marked by constant increase in the intimacy of our
relations with Mexico and in the magnitude of mutually advantageous
interchanges. This Government has omitted no opportunity to show its
strong desire to develop and perpetuate the ties of cordiality now so
long happily unbroken.

Following the termination on January 20, 1899, by Mexico of the
convention of extradition of December 11, 1861, a new treaty more in
accordance with the ascertained needs of both countries was signed
February 22, 1899, and exchanged in the City of Mexico on the 22d of
April last. Its operation thus far has been effective and satisfactory.
A recent case has served to test the application of its IVth Article,
which provides that neither party shall be bound to deliver up its own
citizens, but that the executive authority of each shall have the power
to deliver them up if in its discretion it be deemed proper to do so.

The extradition of Mrs. Mattie Rich, a citizen of the United
States, charged with homicide committed in Mexico, was after mature
consideration directed by me in the conviction that the ends of justice
would be thereby subserved. Similar action, on appropriate occasion,
by the Mexican Executive will not only tend to accomplish the desire
of both Governments that grave crimes go not unpunished, but also to
repress lawlessness along the border of the two countries. The new
treaty stipulates that neither Government shall assume jurisdiction in
the punishment of crimes committed exclusively within the territory of
the other. This will obviate in future the embarrassing controversies
which have heretofore arisen through Mexico's assertion of a claim to
try and punish an American citizen for an offense committed within the
jurisdiction of the United States.

The International Water Boundary Commission, organized by the convention
of March 1, 1889, for the adjustment of questions affecting the Rio
Grande frontier, has not yet completed its labors. A further extension
of its term for one year, until December 24, 1899, was effected by a
convention signed December 2, 1898, and exchanged and proclaimed in
February last.

An invitation extended to the President of Mexico to visit Chicago in
October, on the occasion of laying the corner stone of the United States
Government building in that city, was cordially accepted by him, with
the necessary consent of the Mexican Congress, but the illness of a
member of his family prevented his attendance. The Minister of Foreign
Relations, however, came as the personal representative of President
Diaz, and in that high character was duly honored.

Claims growing out of the seizure of American sealing vessels in Bering
Sea have been under discussion with the Government of Russia for several
years, with the recent happy result of an agreement to submit them to
the decision of a single arbitrator. By this act Russia affords proof
of her adherence to the beneficent principle of arbitration which her
plenipotentiaries conspicuously favored at The Hague Disarmament
Conference when it was advocated by the representatives of the United
States.

A suggestion for a permanent exposition of our products and manufactures
in Russia, although not yet fully shaped, has been so cordially welcomed
by the Imperial Government that it may not inaptly take a fitting place
in whatever legislation the Congress may adopt looking to enlargement of
our commercial opportunities abroad.

Important events have occurred in the Samoan Islands. The election,
according to the laws and customs of Samoa, of a successor to the late
King, Malietoa Laupepa, developed a contest as to the validity of the
result, which issue, by the terms of the General Act, was to be decided
by the Chief Justice. Upon his rendering a judgment in favor of Malietoa
Tanu, the rival chief, Mataafa, took up arms. The active intervention of
American and British war ships became imperative to restore order, at
the cost of sanguinary encounters. In this emergency a joint commission
of representatives of the United States, Germany, and Great Britain
was sent to Samoa to investigate the situation and provide a temporary
remedy. By its active efforts a peaceful solution was reached for the
time being, the kingship being abolished and a provisional government
established. Recommendations unanimously made by the commission
for a permanent adjustment of the Samoan question were taken under
consideration by the three powers parties to the General Act. But the
more they were examined the more evident it became that a radical change
was necessary in the relations of the powers to Samoa.

The inconveniences and possible perils of the tripartite scheme of
supervision and control in the Samoan group by powers having little
interest in common in that quarter beyond commercial rivalry had been
once more emphasized by the recent events. The suggested remedy of the
Joint Commission, like the scheme it aimed to replace, amounted to
what has been styled a _tridominium_, being the exercise of the
functions of sovereignty by an unanimous agreement of three powers.
The situation had become far more intricate and embarrassing from every
point of view than it was when my predecessor, in 1894, summed up its
perplexities and condemned the participation in it of the United States.

The arrangement under which Samoa was administered had proved
impracticable and unacceptable to all the powers concerned. To withdraw
from the agreement and abandon the islands to Germany and Great Britain
would not be compatible with our interests in the archipelago. To
relinquish our rights in the harbor of Pago Pago, the best anchorage in
the Pacific, the occupancy of which had been leased to the United States
in 1878 by the first foreign treaty ever concluded by Samoa, was not to
be thought of either as regards the needs of our Navy or the interests
of our growing commerce with the East. We could not have considered any
proposition for the abrogation of the tripartite control which did not
confirm us in all our rights and safeguard all our national interests in
the islands.

Our views commended themselves to the other powers. A satisfactory
arrangement was concluded between the Governments of Germany and of
England, by virtue of which England retired from Samoa in view of
compensations in other directions, and both powers renounced in favor
of the United States all their rights and claims over and in respect
to that portion of the group lying to the east of the one hundred
and seventy-first degree of west longitude, embracing the islands of
Tutuila, Ofoo, Olosenga, and Manua. I transmit to the Senate, for
its constitutional action thereon, a convention, which besides the
provisions above mentioned also guarantees us the same privileges and
conditions in respect to commerce and commercial vessels in all of the
islands of Samoa as those possessed by Germany.

Claims have been preferred by white residents of Samoa on account of
injuries alleged to have been suffered through the acts of the treaty
Governments in putting down the late disturbances. A convention has been
made between the three powers for the investigation and settlement of
these claims by a neutral arbitrator, to which the attention of the
Senate will be invited.

My annual message of last year was necessarily devoted in great part to
a consideration of the Spanish War and of the results it wrought and the
conditions it imposed for the future. I am gratified to announce that
the treaty of peace has restored friendly relations between the two
powers. Effect has been given to its most important provisions. The
evacuation of Puerto Rico having already been accomplished on the 18th
of October, 1898, nothing remained necessary there but to continue the
provisional military control of the island until the Congress should
enact a suitable government for the ceded territory. Of the character
and scope of the measures to that end I shall treat in another part of
this message.

The withdrawal of the authority of Spain from the island of Cuba was
effected by the 1st of January, so that the full re-establishment of
peace found the relinquished territory held by us in trust for the
inhabitants, maintaining, under the direction of the Executive, such
government and control therein as should conserve public order, restore
the productive conditions of peace so long disturbed by the instability
and disorder which prevailed for the greater part of the preceding three
decades, and build up that tranquil development of the domestic state
whereby alone can be realized the high purpose, as proclaimed in the
joint resolution adopted by the Congress on the 19th of April, 1898,
by which the United States disclaimed any disposition or intention to
exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over Cuba, except for
the pacification thereof, and asserted its determination when that was
accomplished to leave the government and control of the island to its
people. The pledge contained in this resolution is of the highest
honorable obligation and must be sacredly kept.

I believe that substantial progress has been made in this direction.
All the administrative measures adopted in Cuba have aimed to fit it for
a regenerated existence by enforcing the supremacy of law and justice;
by placing wherever practicable the machinery of administration in the
hands of the inhabitants; by instituting needed sanitary reforms; by
spreading education; by fostering industry and trade; by inculcating
public morality, and, in short, by taking every rational step to aid
the Cuban people to attain to that plane of self-conscious respect
and self-reliant unity which fits an enlightened community for
self-government within its own sphere, while enabling it to fulfill
all outward obligations.

This nation has assumed before the world a grave responsibility for the
future good government of Cuba. We have accepted a trust the fulfillment
of which calls for the sternest integrity of purpose and the exercise of
the highest wisdom. The new Cuba yet to arise from the ashes of the past
must needs be bound to us by ties of singular intimacy and strength
if its enduring welfare is to be assured. Whether those ties shall be
organic or conventional, the destinies of Cuba are in some rightful
form and manner irrevocably linked with our own, but how and how far
is for the future to determine in the ripeness of events. Whatever be
the outcome, we must see to it that free Cuba be a reality, not a name,
a perfect entity, not a hasty experiment bearing within itself the
elements of failure. Our mission, to accomplish which we took up the
wager of battle, is not to be fulfilled by turning adrift any loosely
framed commonwealth to face the vicissitudes which too often attend
weaker States whose natural wealth and abundant resources are offset
by the incongruities of their political organization and the recurring
occasions for internal rivalries to sap their strength and dissipate
their energies. The greatest blessing which can come to Cuba is the
restoration of her agricultural and industrial prosperity, which will
give employment to idle men and re-establish the pursuits of peace.
This is her chief and immediate need.

On the 19th of August last an order was made for the taking of the
census in the island, to be completed on the 30th of November. By the
treaty of peace the Spanish people on the island have until April 11,
1900, to elect whether they will remain citizens of Spain or become
citizens of Cuba. Until then it cannot be definitely ascertained who
shall be entitled to participate in the formation of the government of
Cuba. By that time the results of the census will have been tabulated
and we shall proceed to provide for elections which will commit the
municipal governments of the island to the officers elected by the
people. The experience thus acquired will prove of great value in the
formation of a representative convention of the people to draft a
constitution and establish a general system of independent government
for the island. In the meantime and so long as we exercise control over
the island the products of Cuba should have a market in the United
States on as good terms and with as favorable rates of duty as are given
to the West India Islands under treaties of reciprocity which shall be
made.

For the relief of the distressed in the island of Cuba the War
Department has issued supplies to destitute persons through the officers
of the Army, which have amounted to 5,493,000 rations, at a cost of
$1,417,554.07.

To promote the disarmament of the Cuban volunteer army, and in the
interest of public peace and the welfare of the people, the sum of $75
was paid to each Cuban soldier borne upon the authenticated rolls,
on condition that he should deposit his arms with the authorities
designated by the United States. The sum thus disbursed aggregated
$2,547,750, which was paid from the emergency fund provided by the act
of January 5, 1899, for that purpose.

Out of the Cuban island revenues during the six months ending June 30,
1899, $1,712,014.20 was expended for sanitation, $293,881.70 for
charities and hospitals, and $88,944.03 for aid to the destitute.

Following the exchange of ratifications of the treaty of peace the
two Governments accredited ministers to each other, Spain sending
to Washington the Duke of Arcos, an eminent diplomatist, previously
stationed in Mexico, while the United States transferred to Madrid Hon.
Bellamy Storer, its minister at Brussels. This was followed by the
respective appointment of consuls, thereby fully resuming the relations
interrupted by the war. In addition to its consular representation in
the United States, the Spanish Government has appointed consuls for
Cuba, who have been provisionally recognized during the military
administration of the affairs of that island.

Judicial intercourse between the courts of Cuba and Puerto Rico and of
Spain has been established, as provided by the treaty of peace. The
Cuban political prisoners in Spanish penal stations have been and are
being released and returned to their homes, in accordance with Article
VI of the treaty. Negotiations are about to be had for defining the
conventional relations between the two countries, which fell into
abeyance by reason of the war. I trust that these will include a
favorable arrangement for commercial reciprocity under the terms of
sections 3 and 4 of the current tariff act. In these, as in all matters
of international concern, no effort will be spared to respond to the
good disposition of Spain, and to cultivate in all practicable ways the
intimacy which should prevail between two nations whose past history has
so often and in so many ways been marked by sincere friendship and by
community of interests.

I would recommend appropriate legislation in order to carry into
execution Article VII of the Treaty of Peace with Spain, by which the
United States assured the payment of certain claims for indemnity of its
citizens against Spain.

       *       *       *       *       *

The United States minister to Turkey continues, under instructions,
to press for a money payment in satisfaction of the just claims for
injuries suffered by American citizens in the disorders of several years
past and for wrongs done to them by the Ottoman authorities. Some of
these claims are of many years' standing. This Government is hopeful of
a general agreement in this regard.

In the Turkish Empire the situation of our citizens remains
unsatisfactory. Our efforts during nearly forty years to bring about a
convention of naturalization seem to be on the brink of final failure
through the announced policy of the Ottoman Porte to refuse recognition
of the alien status of native Turkish subjects naturalized abroad since
1867. Our statutes do not allow this Government to admit any distinction
between the treatment of native and naturalized Americans abroad, so
that ceaseless controversy arises in cases where persons owing in the
eye of international law a dual allegiance are prevented from entering
Turkey or are expelled after entrance. Our law in this regard contrasts
with that of the European States. The British act, for instance, does
not claim effect for the naturalization of an alien in the event of his
return to his native country, unless the change be recognized by the law
of that country or stipulated by treaty between it and the naturalizing
State.

The arbitrary treatment, in some instances, of American productions in
Turkey has attracted attention of late, notably in regard to our flour.
Large shipments by the recently opened direct steamship line to Turkish
ports have been denied entrance on the score that, although of standard
composition and unquestioned purity, the flour was pernicious to health
because of deficient "elasticity" as indicated by antiquated and
untrustworthy tests. Upon due protest by the American minister, and it
appearing that the act was a virtual discrimination against our product,
the shipments in question were admitted. In these, as in all instances,
wherever occurring, when American products may be subjected in a foreign
country, upon specious pretexts, to discrimination compared with the
like products of another country, this Government will use its earnest
efforts to secure fair and equal treatment for its citizens and their
goods. Failing this, it will not hesitate to apply whatever corrective
may be provided by the statutes.

       *       *       *       *       *

The International Commission of Arbitration, appointed under the
Anglo-Venezuelan treaty of 1897, rendered an award on October 3 last,
whereby the boundary line between Venezuela and British Guiana is
determined, thus ending a controversy which has existed for the greater
part of the century. The award, as to which the arbitrators were
unanimous, while not meeting the extreme contention of either party,
gives to Great Britain a large share of the interior territory in
dispute and to Venezuela the entire mouth of the Orinoco, including
Barima Point and the Caribbean littoral for some distance to the
eastward. The decision appears to be equally satisfactory to both
parties.

Venezuela has once more undergone a revolution. The insurgents, under
General Castro, after a sanguinary engagement in which they suffered
much loss, rallied in the mountainous interior and advanced toward the
capital. The bulk of the army having sided with the movement, President
Andrade quitted Caracas, where General Castro set up a provisional
government with which our minister and the representatives of other
powers entered into diplomatic relations on the 20th of November, 1899.

       *       *       *       *       *

The fourth section of the Tariff Act approved July 24, 1897, appears
to provide only for commercial treaties which should be entered into by
the President and also ratified by the Senate within two years from its
passage. Owing to delays inevitable in negotiations of this nature, none
of the treaties initiated under that section could be concluded in time
for ratification by the Senate prior to its adjournment on the 4th of
March last. Some of the pending negotiations, however, were near
conclusion at that time, and the resulting conventions have since been
signed by the plenipotentiaries. Others, within both the third and
fourth sections of the act, are still under consideration. Acting under
the constitutional power of the Executive in respect to treaties,
I have deemed it my duty, while observing the limitations of concession
provided by the fourth section, to bring to a conclusion all pending
negotiations, and submit them to the Senate for its advice and consent.

Conventions of reciprocity have been signed during the Congressional
recess with Great Britain for the respective colonies of British Guiana,
Barbados, Bermuda, Jamaica, and Turks and Caicos Islands, and with the
Republic of Nicaragua.

Important reciprocal conventions have also been concluded with France
and with the Argentine Republic.

In my last annual message the progress noted in the work of the
diplomatic and consular officers in collecting information as to
the industries and commerce of other countries, and in the care and
promptitude with which their reports are printed and distributed, has
continued during the past year, with increasingly valuable results in
suggesting new sources of demand for American products and in pointing
out the obstacles still to be overcome in facilitating the remarkable
expansion of our foreign trade. It will doubtless be gratifying to
Congress to learn that the various agencies of the Department of State
are co-operating in these endeavors with a zeal and effectiveness
which are not only receiving the cordial recognition of our business
interests, but are exciting the emulation of other Governments. In any
rearrangement of the great and complicated work of obtaining official
data of an economic character which Congress may undertake it is most
important, in my judgment, that the results already secured by the
efforts of the Department of State should be carefully considered with
a view to a judicious development and increased utility to our export
trade.

The interest taken by the various States forming the International Union
of American Republics in the work of its organic bureau is evidenced by
the fact that for the first time since its creation in 1890 all the
Republics of South and Central America are now represented in it.

The unanimous recommendation of the International American Conference,
providing for the International Union of American Republics, stated that
it should continue in force during a term of ten years from the date of
its organization, and no country becoming a member of the union should
cease to be a member until the end of said period of ten years, and
unless twelve months before the expiration of said period a majority
of the members of the union had given to the Secretary of State of the
United States official notice of their wish to terminate the union
at the end of its first period, that the union should continue to be
maintained for another period of ten years, and thereafter, under the
same conditions, for successive periods of ten years each.

The period for notification expired on July 14, 1899, without any of the
members having given the necessary notice of withdrawal. Its maintenance
is therefore assured for the next ten years. In view of this fact and of
the numerous questions of general interest and common benefit to all of
the Republics of America, some of which were considered by the first
International American Conference, but not finally settled, and others
which have since then grown to importance, it would seem expedient that
the various Republics constituting the Union should be invited to hold
at an early date another conference in the capital of one of the
countries other than the United States, which has already enjoyed this
honor.

The purely international character of the work being done by the
bureau and the appreciation of its value are further emphasized by the
active co-operation which the various Governments of the Latin-American
Republics and their diplomatic representatives in this capital are now
exhibiting and the zealous endeavors they are making to extend its
field of usefulness, to promote through it commercial intercourse, and
strengthen the bonds of amity and confidence between its various members
and the nations of this continent.

The act to encourage the holding of the Pan-American Exposition on the
Niagara frontier, within the county of Erie or Niagara, in the State of
New York, in the year 1901, was approved on March 3, 1899.

This exposition, which will be held in the city of Buffalo, in the near
vicinity of the great Niagara cataract, and within a day's journey of
which reside 40,000,000 of our people, will be confined entirely to the
Western Hemisphere. Satisfactory assurances have already been given by
the diplomatic representatives of Great Britain, Mexico, the Central and
South American Republics, and most of the States of the United States
that these countries and States will make an unique, interesting, and
instructive exhibit, peculiarly illustrative of their material progress
during the century which is about to close.

The law provides an appropriation of $500,000 for the purpose of making
an exhibit at the exposition by the Government of the United States
from its Executive Departments and from the Smithsonian Institution and
National Museum, the United States Commission of Fish and Fisheries, the
Department of Labor, and the Bureau of the American Republics. To secure
a complete and harmonious arrangement of this Government exhibit a board
of management has already been created, and charged with the selection,
purchase, preparation, transportation, arrangement, and safe-keeping
of the articles and materials to be exhibited. This board has been
organized and has already entered upon the performance of its duties,
as provided for by the law.

I have every reason to hope and believe that this exposition will tend
more firmly to cement the cordial relations between the nations on this
continent.

In accordance with an act of Congress approved December 21, 1898,
and under the auspices of the Philadelphia Commercial Museum, a most
interesting and valuable exposition of products and manufactures
especially adapted to export trade was held in Philadelphia from the
14th of September to the 1st of December, 1899. The representative
character of the exhibits and the widespread interest manifested in the
special objects of the undertaking afford renewed encouragement to those
who look confidently to the steady growth of our enlarged exportation
of manufactured goods, which has been the most remarkable fact in the
economic development of the United States in recent years. A feature of
this exposition which is likely to become of permanent and increasing
utility to our industries is the collection of samples of merchandise
produced in various countries with special reference to particular
markets, providing practical object lessons to United States
manufacturers as to qualities, styles, and prices of goods such as meet
the special demands of consumers and may be exported with advantage.

In connection with the exposition an International Commercial
Congress was held, upon the invitation of the Philadelphia Commercial
Museum, transmitted by the Department of State to the various foreign
Governments, for an exchange of information and opinions with the
view to the promotion of international trade. This invitation met
with general and cordial acceptance, and the Congress, which began
its sessions at the exposition on the 13th of October, proved to be of
great practical importance, from the fact that it developed a general
recognition of the interdependence of nations in trade and a most
gratifying spirit of accommodation with reference to the gradual removal
of existing impediments to reciprocal relations, without injury to the
industrial interests of either party.

In response to the invitation of His Majesty, the Emperor of Russia,
delegates from twenty-six countries were assembled at The Hague on the
18th of May, as members of a conference in the interest of peace. The
commission from the United States consisted of the Hon. Andrew D. White,
the Hon. Seth Low, the Hon. Stanford Newel, Captain Alfred T. Mahan, of
the United States Navy, Captain William Crozier, of the United States
Army, and the Hon. Frederick W. Holls, secretary. The occasion seemed
to be opportune for the serious consideration of a plan for the pacific
adjustment of international differences, a subject in which the American
people have been deeply interested for many years, and a definite
project for a permanent international tribunal was included in the
instructions to the delegates of the United States.

The final act of the conference includes conventions upon the
amelioration of the laws and customs of war on land, the adaptation to
maritime warfare of the principles of the Geneva Convention of 1864, and
the extension of judicial methods to international cases. The Convention
for the Pacific Settlement of International Conflicts embodies the
leading features of the American plan, with such modifications as were
rendered necessary by the great diversity of views and interests
represented by the delegates. The four titles of the convention provide
for the maintenance of general peace, the exercise of good offices and
mediation, the formation of commissions of inquiry, and international
arbitration.

The mediation provided for by the convention is purely voluntary and
advisory, and is intended to avoid any invasion or limitation of the
sovereign rights of the adhering States. The commissions of inquiry
proposed consists of delegations to be specifically constituted for
particular purposes by means of conventions between the contesting
parties, having for their object the clear understanding of
international differences before resorting to the use of force.
The provision for arbitration contemplates the formation of a permanent
tribunal before which disputed cases may be brought for settlement
by the mutual consent of the litigants in each separate case. The
advantages of such a permanent tribunal over impromptu commissions of
arbitration are conceived to be the actual existence of a competent
court, prepared to administer justice, the greater economy resulting
from a well-devised system, and the accumulated judicial skill and
experience which such a tribunal would soon possess.

While earnestly promoting the idea of establishing a permanent
international tribunal, the delegation of the United States was not
unmindful of the inconveniences which might arise from an obtrusive
exercise of mediation, and in signing the convention carefully guarded
the historic position of the United States by the following declaration:

  Nothing contained in this convention shall be so construed as to require
  the United States of America to depart from its traditional policy of
  not intruding upon, interfering with, or entangling itself in the
  political questions or policy or internal administration of any foreign
  state; nor shall anything contained in the said convention be construed
  to imply a relinquishment by the United States of America of its
  traditional attitude toward purely American questions.


Thus interpreted, the Convention for the Pacific Settlement of
International Conflicts may be regarded as realizing the earnest desire
of great numbers of American citizens, whose deep sense of justice,
expressed in numerous resolutions and memorials, has urged them to labor
for this noble achievement. The general character of this convention,
already signed by the delegates of more than twenty sovereign States,
further commends it to the favorable action of the Senate of the United
States, whose ratification it still awaits.

Since my last annual message, and in obedience to the acts of the
Congress of April 22 and 26, 1898, the remaining volunteer force
enlisted for the Spanish War, consisting of 34,834 regulars and 110,202
volunteers, with over 5,000 volunteer officers, has been discharged from
the military service. Of the volunteers, 667 officers and 14,831 men
were serving in the Philippines, and 1,650 of the regulars, who were
entitled to be mustered out after the ratification of the treaty of
peace. They voluntarily remained at the front until their places could
be filled by new troops. They were returned home in the order in which
they went to Manila, and are now all of them out of the service and in
the ranks of citizenship. I recommend that the Congress provide a
special medal of honor for the volunteers, regulars, sailors, and
marines on duty in the Philippines who voluntarily remained in the
service after their terms of enlistment had expired.

By the act of March 2, 1899, Congress gave authority to increase the
Regular Army to a maximum not exceeding 65,000 enlisted men, and to
enlist a force of 35,000 volunteers, to be recruited from the country at
large. By virtue of this authority the Regular Army has been increased
to the number of 61,999 enlisted men and 2,248 officers, and new
volunteer regiments have been organized aggregating 33,050 enlisted men
and 1,524 officers. Two of these volunteer regiments are made up of
colored men, with colored line officers. The new troops to take the
places of those returning from the Philippines have been transported
to Manila to the number of 581 officers and 26,322 enlisted men of
the Regular Army and 594 officers and 15,388 enlisted men of the new
volunteer force, while 504 officers and 14,119 men of the volunteer
force are on the ocean _en route_ to Manila.

The force now in Manila consists of 905 officers and 30,578 regulars,
and 594 officers and 15,388 of the volunteers, making an aggregate of
1,499 officers and 45,966 men. When the troops now under orders shall
reach Manila the force in the archipelago will comprise 2,051 officers
and 63,483 men. The muster out of the great volunteer army organized
for the Spanish War and the creation of a new army, the transportation
from Manila to San Francisco of those entitled to discharge and the
transportation of the new troops to take their places have been a work
of great magnitude well and ably done, for which too much credit cannot
be given the War Department.

During the past year we have reduced our force in Cuba and Puerto Rico.
In Cuba we now have 334 officers and 10,796 enlisted men; in Puerto
Rico, 87 officers and 2,855 enlisted men and a battalion of 400 men
composed of native Puerto Ricans; while stationed throughout the United
States are 910 officers and 17,317 men, and in Hawaii 12 officers and
453 enlisted men.

The operations of the Army are fully presented in the report of the
Secretary of War. I cannot withhold from officers and men the highest
commendation for their soldierly conduct in trying situations, their
willing sacrifices for their country, and the integrity and ability with
which they have performed unusual and difficult duties in our island
possessions.

In the organization of the volunteer regiments authorized by the
act of March 2, 1899, it was found that no provision had been made for
chaplains. This omission was doubtless from inadvertence. I recommend
the early authorization for the appointment of one chaplain for each of
said regiments. These regiments are now in the Philippines, and it is
important that immediate action be had.

In restoring peaceful conditions, orderly rule, and civic progress in
Cuba, Puerto Rico, and, so far as practicable, in the Philippines, the
rehabilitation of the postal service has been an essential and important
part of the work. It became necessary to provide mail facilities both
for our forces of occupation and for the native population. To meet this
requirement has involved a substantial reconstruction. The existing
systems were so fragmentary, defective, and inadequate that a new and
comprehensive organization had to be created. American trained officials
have been assigned to the directing and executive positions, while
natives have been chiefly employed in making up the body of the force.
In working out this plan the merit rule has been rigorously and
faithfully applied.

The appointment of Director-General of Posts of Cuba was given
to an expert who had been Chief Post-Office Inspector and Assistant
Postmaster-General, and who united large experience with administrative
capacity. For the postmastership at Havana the range of skilled and
available men was scanned, and the choice fell upon one who had been
twenty years in the service as deputy postmaster and postmaster of a
large city. This principle governed and determined the selection of the
American officials sent not only to Cuba, but to Puerto Rico and the
Philippines, and they were instructed to apply it so far as practicable
in the employment of the natives as minor postmasters and clerks. The
postal system in Cuba, though remaining under the general guidance of
the Postmaster-General, was made essentially independent. It was felt
that it should not be a burden upon the postal service of the United
States, and provision was made that any deficit in the postal revenue
should be a charge upon the general revenues of the island.

Though Puerto Rico and the Philippines hold a different relation
to the United States, yet, for convenience of administration, the
same principle of an autonomous system has been extended to them. The
development of the service in all of the islands has been rapid and
successful. It has moved forward on American lines, with free delivery,
money order, and registry systems, and has given the people mail
facilities far greater and more reliable than any they have ever before
enjoyed. It is thus not only a vital agency of industrial, social, and
business progress, but an important influence in diffusing a just
understanding of the true spirit and character of American
administration.

The domestic postal service continues to grow with extraordinary
rapidity. The expenditures and the revenues will each exceed
$100,000,000 during the current year. Fortunately, since the revival
of prosperous times the revenues have grown much faster than the
expenditures, and there is every indication that a short period will
witness the obliteration of the annual deficit. In this connection the
report of the Postmaster-General embodies a statement of some evils
which have grown up outside of the contemplation of law in the treatment
of some classes of mail matter which wrongly exercise the privilege
of the pound rate, and shows that if this matter had been properly
classified and had paid the rate which it should have paid, instead
of a postal deficit for the last fiscal year of $6,610,000, there
would have been on one basis a surplus of $17,637,570, and on another
of $5,733,836. The reform thus suggested, in the opinion of the
Postmaster-General, would not only put the postal service at once on a
self-sustaining basis, but would permit great and valuable improvements,
and I commend the subject to the consideration of the Congress.

The Navy has maintained the spirit and high efficiency which have always
characterized that service, and has lost none of the gallantry in heroic
action which has signalized its brilliant and glorious past. The Nation
has equal pride in its early and later achievements. Its habitual
readiness for every emergency has won the confidence and admiration of
the country. The people are interested in the continued preparation and
prestige of the Navy and will justify liberal appropriations for its
maintenance and improvement. The officers have shown peculiar adaptation
for the performance of new and delicate duties which our recent war has
imposed.

It cannot be doubted that Congress will at once make necessary provision
for the armor plate for the vessels now under contract and building.
Its attention is respectfully called to the report of the Secretary
of the Navy, in which the subject is fully presented. I unite in his
recommendation that the Congress enact such special legislation as may
be necessary to enable the Department to make contracts early in the
coming year for armor of the best quality that can be obtained in this
country for the _Maine_, _Ohio_, and _Missouri_, and that the provision
of the act of March 3, 1899, limiting the price of armor to $300 per ton
be removed.

In the matter of naval construction Italy and Japan, of the great
powers, laid down less tonnage in the year 1899 than this country, and
Italy alone has less tonnage under construction. I heartily concur in
the recommendations for the increase of the Navy, as suggested by the
Secretary.

Our future progress and prosperity depend upon our ability to equal, if
not surpass, other nations in the enlargement and advance of science,
industry, and commerce. To invention we must turn as one of the most
powerful aids to the accomplishment of such a result. The attention of
the Congress is directed to the report of the Commissioner of Patents,
in which will be found valuable suggestions and recommendations.

On the 30th of June, 1899, the pension roll of the United States
numbered 991,519. These include the pensioners of the Army and Navy in
all our wars. The number added to the rolls during the year was 40,991.
The number dropped by reason of death, remarriage, minors by legal
limitation, failure to claim within three years, and other causes, was
43,186, and the number of claims disallowed was 107,919. During the year
89,054 pension certificates were issued, of which 37,077 were for new or
original pensions. The amount disbursed for army and navy pensions
during the year was $138,355,052.95, which was $1,651,461.61 less than
the sum of the appropriations.

The Grand Army of the Republic at its recent national encampment held in
Philadelphia has brought to my attention and to that of the Congress the
wisdom and justice of a modification of the third section of the act of
June 27, 1890, which provides pensions for the widows of officers and
enlisted men who served ninety days or more during the War of the
Rebellion and were honorably discharged, provided that such widows are
without other means of support than their daily labor and were married
to the soldier, sailor, or marine on account of whose service they claim
pension prior to the date of the act.

The present holding of the Department is that if the widow's income
aside from her daily labor does not exceed in amount what her pension
would be, to wit, $96 per annum, she would be deemed to be without
other means of support than her daily labor, and would be entitled to
a pension under this act; while if the widow's income independent of
the amount received by her as the result of her daily labor exceeds
$96, she would not be pensionable under the act. I am advised by the
Commissioner of Pensions that the amount of the income allowed before
title to pension would be barred has varied widely under different
administrations of the Pension Office, as well as during different
periods of the same administration, and has been the cause of just
complaint and criticism.

With the approval of the Secretary of the Interior the Commissioner of
Pensions recommends that, in order to make the practice at all times
uniform and to do justice to the dependent widow, the amount of income
allowed independent of the proceeds of her daily labor should be not
less than $250 per annum, and he urges that the Congress shall so amend
the act as to permit the Pension Office to grant pensionable status to
widows under the terms of the third section of the act of June 27, 1890,
whose income aside from the proceeds of daily labor is not in excess of
$250 per annum. I believe this to be a simple act of justice and
heartily recommend it.

The Dawes Commission reports that gratifying progress has been made in
its work during the preceding year. The field-work of enrollment of four
of the nations has been completed. I recommend that Congress at an early
day make liberal appropriation for educational purposes in the Indian
Territory.

In accordance with the act of Congress approved March 3, 1899, the
preliminary work in connection with the Twelfth Census is now fully
under way. The officers required for the proper administration of the
duties imposed have been selected. The provision for securing a proper
enumeration of the population, as well as to secure evidence of the
industrial growth of the Nation, is broader and more comprehensive than
any similar legislation in the past. The Director advises that every
needful effort is being made to push this great work to completion in
the time limited by the statute. It is believed that the Twelfth Census
will emphasize our remarkable advance in all that pertains to national
progress.

Under the authority of the act of Congress approved July 7, 1898,
the commission consisting of the Secretary of the Treasury, the
Attorney-General, and the Secretary of the Interior has made an
agreement of settlement, which has had my approval, of the indebtedness
to the Government growing out of the issue of bonds to aid in the
construction of the Central Pacific and Western Pacific railroads.
The agreement secures to the Government the principal and interest of
said bonds, amounting to $58,812,715.48. There has been paid thereon
$11,762,543.12, which has been covered into the Treasury, and the
remainder, payable within ten years, with interest at the rate of 3 per
cent per annum, payable semiannually, is secured by the deposit of an
equal amount of first-mortgage bonds of the Pacific Railway companies.
The amounts paid and secured to be paid to the Government on account of
the Pacific Railroad subsidy claims are:


  Union Pacific, cash                          $58,448,223.75
  Kansas Pacific, cash                           6,303,000.00
  Central and Western Pacific, cash             11,798,314.14
  Notes, secured                                47,050,172.36
  Kansas Pacific--dividends for deficiency
    due United States, cash                        821,897.70
                                               --------------
  Making a total of                            124,421,607.95


The whole indebtedness was about $130,000,000, more than half of which
consisted of accrued interest, for which sum the Government has realized
the entire amount less about $6,000,000 within a period of two years.

On June 30, 1898, there were thirty forest reservations (exclusive of
the Afognak Forest and Fish Culture Reserve in Alaska), embracing an
estimated area of 40,719,474 acres. During the past year two of the
existing forest reserves, the Trabuco Canyon (California) and Black
Hills (South Dakota and Wyoming), have been considerably enlarged, the
area of the Mount Rainier Reserve, in the State of Washington, has been
somewhat reduced, and six additional reserves have been established,
namely, the San Francisco Mountains (Arizona), the Black Mesa (Arizona),
Lake Tahoe (California), Gallatin (Montana), Gila River (New Mexico),
and Fish Lake (Utah), the total estimated area of which is 5,205,775
acres. This makes at the present time a total of thirty-six forest
reservations, embracing an estimated area of 46,021,899 acres. This
estimated area is the aggregated areas within the boundaries of the
reserves. The lands actually reserved are, however, only the vacant
public lands therein, and these have been set aside and reserved for
sale or settlement in order that they may be of the greatest use to
the people.

Protection of the national forests, inaugurated by the Department of
the Interior in 1897, has been continued during the past year and much
has been accomplished in the way of preventing forest fires and the
protection of the timber. There are now large tracts covered by forests
which will eventually be reserved and set apart for forest uses. Until
that can be done Congress should increase the appropriations for the
work of protecting the forests.

The Department of Agriculture is constantly consulting the needs of
producers in all the States and Territories. It is introducing seeds and
plants of great value and promoting fuller diversification of crops.
Grains, grasses, fruits, legumes, and vegetables are imported for all
parts of the United States. Under this encouragement the sugar-beet
factory multiplies in the North and far West, semitropical plants are
sent to the South, and congenial climates are sought for the choice
productions of the far East. The hybridizing of fruit trees and grains
is conducted in the search for varieties adapted to exacting conditions.
The introduction of tea gardens into the Southern States promises to
provide employment for idle hands, as well as to supply the home market
with tea. The subject of irrigation where it is of vital importance to
the people is being carefully studied, steps are being taken to reclaim
injured or abandoned lands, and information for the people along these
lines is being printed and distributed.

Markets are being sought and opened up for surplus farm and factory
products in Europe and in Asia. The outlook for the education of the
young farmer through agricultural college and experiment station, with
opportunity given to specialize in the Department of Agriculture, is
very promising. The people of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Philippine
Islands should be helped, by the establishment of experiment stations,
to a more scientific knowledge of the production of coffee, india
rubber, and other tropical products, for which there is demand in the
United States.

There is widespread interest in the improvement of our public highways
at the present time, and the Department of Agriculture is co-operating
with the people in each locality in making the best possible roads
from local material and in experimenting with steel tracks. A more
intelligent system of managing the forests of the country is being put
in operation and a careful study of the whole forestry problem is being
conducted throughout the United States. A very extensive and complete
exhibit of the agricultural and horticultural products of the United
States is being prepared for the Paris Exposition.

       *       *       *       *       *

On the 10th of December, 1898, the treaty of peace between the United
States and Spain was signed. It provided, among other things, that Spain
should cede to the United States the archipelago known as the Philippine
Islands, that the United States should pay to Spain the sum of twenty
millions of dollars, and that the civil rights and political status of
the native inhabitants of the territories thus ceded to the United
States should be determined by the Congress. The treaty was ratified by
the Senate on the 6th of February, 1899, and by the Government of Spain
on the 19th of March following. The ratifications were exchanged on the
11th of April and the treaty publicly proclaimed. On the 2d of March the
Congress voted the sum contemplated by the treaty, and the amount was
paid over to the Spanish Government on the 1st of May.

In this manner the Philippines came to the United States. The islands
were ceded by the Government of Spain, which had been in undisputed
possession of them for centuries. They were accepted not merely by our
authorized commissioners in Paris, under the direction of the Executive,
but by the constitutional and well-considered action of the
representatives of the people of the United States in both Houses of
Congress. I had every reason to believe, and I still believe that this
transfer of sovereignty was in accordance with the wishes and the
aspirations of the great mass of the Filipino people.

From the earliest moment no opportunity was lost of assuring the
people of the islands of our ardent desire for their welfare and of the
intention of this Government to do everything possible to advance their
interests. In my order of the 19th of May, 1898, the commander of the
military expedition dispatched to the Philippines was instructed to
declare that we came not to make war upon the people of that country,
"nor upon any party or faction among them, but to protect them in
their homes, in their employments, and in their personal and religious
rights." That there should be no doubt as to the paramount authority
there, on the 17th of August it was directed that "there must be no
joint occupation with the insurgents"; that the United States must
preserve the peace and protect persons and property within the territory
occupied by their military and naval forces; that the insurgents and
all others must recognize the military occupation and authority of
the United States. As early as December 4, before the cession, and
in anticipation of that event, the commander in Manila was urged to
restore peace and tranquillity and to undertake the establishment of
a beneficent government, which should afford the fullest security for
life and property.

On the 21st of December, after the treaty was signed, the commander of
the forces of occupation was instructed "to announce and proclaim in the
most public manner that we come, not as invaders and conquerors, but as
friends to protect the natives in their homes, in their employments, and
in their personal and religious rights." On the same day, while ordering
General Otis to see that the peace should be preserved in Iloilo, he was
admonished that: "It is most important that there should be no conflict
with the insurgents." On the 1st day of January, 1899, urgent orders
were reiterated that the kindly intentions of this Government should be
in every possible way communicated to the insurgents.

On the 21st of January I announced my intention of dispatching to Manila
a commission composed of three gentlemen of the highest character and
distinction, thoroughly acquainted with the Orient, who, in association
with Admiral Dewey and Major-General Otis, were instructed "to
facilitate the most humane and effective extension of authority
throughout the islands, and to secure with the least possible delay the
benefits of a wise and generous protection of life and property to the
inhabitants." These gentlemen were Dr. Jacob Gould Schurman, president
of Cornell University; the Hon. Charles Denby, for many years minister
to China, and Prof. Dean C. Worcester, of the University of Michigan,
who had made a most careful study of life in the Philippines. While
the treaty of peace was under consideration in the Senate, these
Commissioners set out on their mission of good will and liberation.
Their character was a sufficient guaranty of the beneficent purpose with
which they went, even if they had not borne the positive instructions of
this Government, which made their errand pre-eminently one of peace and
friendship.

But before their arrival at Manila the sinister ambition of a few
leaders of the Filipinos had created a situation full of embarrassment
for us and most grievous in its consequences to themselves. The clear
and impartial preliminary report of the Commissioners, which I transmit
herewith, gives so lucid and comprehensive a history of the present
insurrectionary movement that the story need not be here repeated. It is
enough to say that the claim of the rebel leader that he was promised
independence by an officer of the United States in return for his
assistance has no foundation in fact and is categorically denied by
the very witnesses who were called to prove it. The most the insurgent
leader hoped for when he came back to Manila was the liberation of the
islands from the Spanish control, which they had been laboring for years
without success to throw off.

The prompt accomplishment of this work by the American Army and Navy
gave him other ideas and ambitions, and insidious suggestions from
various quarters perverted the purposes and intentions with which he had
taken up arms. No sooner had our army captured Manila than the Filipino
forces began to assume an attitude of suspicion and hostility which the
utmost efforts of our officers and troops were unable to disarm or
modify. Their kindness and forbearance were taken as a proof of
cowardice. The aggressions of the Filipinos continually increased until
finally, just before the time set by the Senate of the United States for
a vote upon the treaty, an attack, evidently prepared in advance, was
made all along the American lines, which resulted in a terribly
destructive and sanguinary repulse of the insurgents.

Ten days later an order of the insurgent government was issued to its
adherents who had remained in Manila, of which General Otis justly
observes that "for barbarous intent it is unequaled in modern times."
It directs that at 8 o'clock on the night of the 15th of February the
"territorial militia" shall come together in the streets of San Pedro
armed with their _bolos_, with guns and ammunition where convenient;
that Filipino families only shall be respected; but that all other
individuals, of whatever race they may be, shall be exterminated without
any compassion, after the extermination of the army of occupation,
and adds: "Brothers, we must avenge ourselves on the Americans and
exterminate them, that we may take our revenge for the infamies and
treacheries which they have committed upon us. Have no compassion upon
them; attack with vigor." A copy of this fell by good fortune into the
hands of our officers and they were able to take measures to control the
rising, which was actually attempted on the night of February 22, a week
later than was originally contemplated. Considerable numbers of armed
insurgents entered the city by waterways and swamps and in concert with
confederates inside attempted to destroy Manila by fire. They were kept
in check during the night and the next day driven out of the city with
heavy loss.

This was the unhappy condition of affairs which confronted our
Commissioners on their arrival in Manila. They had come with the hope
and intention of co-operating with Admiral Dewey and Major-General Otis
in establishing peace and order in the archipelago and the largest
measure of self-government compatible with the true welfare of the
people. What they actually found can best be set forth in their own
words:

  Deplorable as war is, the one in which we are now engaged was
  unavoidable by us. We were attacked by a bold, adventurous, and
  enthusiastic army. No alternative was left to us except ignominious
  retreat.

  It is not to be conceived of that any American would have sanctioned
  the surrender of Manila to the insurgents. Our obligations to other
  nations and to the friendly Filipinos and to ourselves and our flag
  demanded that force should be met by force. Whatever the future of
  the Philippines may be, there is no course open to us now except the
  prosecution of the war until the insurgents are reduced to submission.
  The Commission is of the opinion that there has been no time since
  the destruction of the Spanish squadron by Admiral Dewey when it was
  possible to withdraw our forces from the island either with honor to
  ourselves or with safety to the inhabitants.


The course thus clearly indicated has been unflinchingly pursued.
The rebellion must be put down. Civil government cannot be thoroughly
established until order is restored. With a devotion and gallantry
worthy of its most brilliant history, the Army, ably and loyally
assisted by the Navy, has carried on this unwelcome but most righteous
campaign with richly deserved success. The noble self-sacrifice with
which our soldiers and sailors whose terms of service had expired
refused to avail themselves of their right to return home as long as
they were needed at the front forms one of the brightest pages in our
annals. Although their operations have been somewhat interrupted and
checked by a rainy season of unusual violence and duration, they have
gained ground steadily in every direction, and now look forward
confidently to a speedy completion of their task.

The unfavorable circumstances connected with an active campaign have
not been permitted to interfere with the equally important work of
reconstruction. Again I invite your attention to the report of the
Commissioners for the interesting and encouraging details of the work
already accomplished in the establishment of peace and order and the
inauguration of self-governing municipal life in many portions of the
archipelago. A notable beginning has been made in the establishment
of a government in the island of Negros which is deserving of special
consideration. This was the first island to accept American sovereignty.
Its people unreservedly proclaimed allegiance to the United States
and adopted a constitution looking to the establishment of a popular
government. It was impossible to guarantee to the people of Negros that
the constitution so adopted should be the ultimate form of government.
Such a question, under the treaty with Spain and in accordance with our
own Constitution and laws, came exclusively within the jurisdiction
of the Congress. The government actually set up by the inhabitants of
Negros eventually proved unsatisfactory to the natives themselves. A new
system was put into force by order of the Major-General Commanding the
Department, of which the following are the most important elements:

It was ordered that the government of the island of Negros should
consist of a military governor appointed by the United States military
governor of the Philippines, and a civil governor and an advisory
council elected by the people. The military governor was authorized
to appoint secretaries of the treasury, interior, agriculture, public
instruction, an attorney-general, and an auditor. The seat of government
was fixed at Bacolod. The military governor exercises the supreme
executive power. He is to see that the laws are executed, appoint to
office, and fill all vacancies in office not otherwise provided for,
and may, with the approval of the military governor of the Philippines,
remove any officer from office. The civil governor advises the military
governor on all public civil questions and presides over the advisory
council. He, in general, performs the duties which are performed by
secretaries of state in our own system of government.

The advisory council consists of eight members elected by the people
within territorial limits which are defined in the order of the
commanding general.

The times and places of holding elections are to be fixed by the
military governor of the island of Negros. The qualifications of voters
are as follows:

(1) A voter must be a male citizen of the island of Negros. (2) Of the
age of 21 years. (3) He shall be able to speak, read, and write the
English, Spanish, or Visayan language, or he must own real property
worth $500, or pay a rental on real property of the value of $1,000. (4)
He must have resided in the island not less than one year preceding, and
in the district in which he offers to register as a voter not less than
three months immediately preceding the time he offers to register. (5)
He must register at a time fixed by law before voting. (6) Prior to such
registration he shall have paid all taxes due by him to the Government.
Provided, that no insane person shall be allowed to register or vote.

The military governor has the right to veto all bills or resolutions
adopted by the advisory council, and his veto is final if not
disapproved by the military governor of the Philippines.

The advisory council discharges all the ordinary duties of a
legislature. The usual duties pertaining to said offices are to be
performed by the secretaries of the treasury, interior, agriculture,
public instruction, the attorney-general, and the auditor.

The judicial power is vested in three judges, who are to be appointed
by the military governor of the island. Inferior courts are to be
established.

Free public schools are to be established throughout the populous
districts of the island, in which the English language shall be taught,
and this subject will receive the careful consideration of the advisory
council.

The burden of government must be distributed equally and equitably among
the people. The military authorities will collect and receive the
customs revenue, and will control postal matters and Philippine
inter-island trade and commerce.

The military governor, subject to the approval of the military governor
of the Philippines, determines all questions not specifically provided
for and which do not come under the jurisdiction of the advisory
council.

The authorities of the Sulu Islands have accepted the succession of
the United States to the rights of Spain, and our flag floats over
that territory. On the 10th of August, 1899, Brig.-Gen. J.C. Bates,
United States Volunteers, negotiated an agreement with the Sultan
and his principal chiefs, which I transmit herewith. By Article I the
sovereignty of the United States over the whole archipelago of Jolo
and its dependencies is declared and acknowledged.

The United States flag will be used in the archipelago and its
dependencies, on land and sea. Piracy is to be suppressed, and the
Sultan agrees to co-operate heartily with the United States authorities
to that end and to make every possible effort to arrest and bring to
justice all persons engaged in piracy. All trade in domestic products of
the archipelago of Jolo when carried on with any part of the Philippine
Islands and under the American flag shall be free, unlimited, and
undutiable. The United States will give full protection to the Sultan in
case any foreign nation should attempt to impose upon him. The United
States will not sell the island of Jolo or any other island of the Jolo
archipelago to any foreign nation without the consent of the Sultan.
Salaries for the Sultan and his associates in the administration of the
islands have been agreed upon to the amount of $760 monthly.

Article X provides that any slave in the archipelago of Jolo shall have
the right to purchase freedom by paying to the master the usual market
value. The agreement by General Bates was made subject to confirmation
by the President and to future modifications by the consent of the
parties in interest. I have confirmed said agreement, subject to the
action of the Congress, and with the reservation, which I have directed
shall be communicated to the Sultan of Jolo, that this agreement is not
to be deemed in any way to authorize or give the consent of the United
States to the existence of slavery in the Sulu archipelago. I
communicate these facts to the Congress for its information and action.

Everything indicates that with the speedy suppression of the Tagalo
rebellion life in the archipelago will soon resume its ordinary course
under the protection of our sovereignty, and the people of those favored
islands will enjoy a prosperity and a freedom which they have never
before known. Already hundreds of schools are open and filled with
children. Religious freedom is sacredly assured and enjoyed. The courts
are dispensing justice. Business is beginning to circulate in its
accustomed channels. Manila, whose inhabitants were fleeing to the
country a few months ago, is now a populous and thriving mart of
commerce. The earnest and unremitting endeavors of the Commission and
the Admiral and Major-General Commanding the Department of the Pacific
to assure the people of the beneficent intentions of this Government
have had their legitimate effect in convincing the great mass of them
that peace and safety and prosperity and stable government can only be
found in a loyal acceptance of the authority of the United States.

The future government of the Philippines rests with the Congress of the
United States. Few graver responsibilities have ever been confided to
us. If we accept them in a spirit worthy of our race and our traditions,
a great opportunity comes with them. The islands lie under the shelter
of our flag. They are ours by every title of law and equity. They cannot
be abandoned. If we desert them we leave them at once to anarchy and
finally to barbarism. We fling them, a golden apple of discord, among
the rival powers, no one of which could permit another to seize them
unquestioned. Their rich plains and valleys would be the scene of
endless strife and bloodshed. The advent of Dewey's fleet in Manila Bay
instead of being, as we hope, the dawn of a new day of freedom and
progress, will have been the beginning of an era of misery and violence
worse than any which has darkened their unhappy past. The suggestion
has been made that we could renounce our authority over the islands
and, giving them independence, could retain a protectorate over them.
This proposition will not be found, I am sure, worthy of your serious
attention. Such an arrangement would involve at the outset a cruel
breach of faith. It would place the peaceable and loyal majority, who
ask nothing better than to accept our authority, at the mercy of the
minority of armed insurgents. It would make us responsible for the acts
of the insurgent leaders and give us no power to control them. It would
charge us with the task of protecting them against each other and
defending them against any foreign power with which they chose to
quarrel. In short, it would take from the Congress of the United States
the power of declaring war and vest that tremendous prerogative in the
Tagal leader of the hour.

It does not seem desirable that I should recommend at this time a
specific and final form of government for these islands. When peace
shall be restored it will be the duty of Congress to construct a plan
of government which shall establish and maintain freedom and order and
peace in the Philippines. The insurrection is still existing, and when
it terminates further information will be required as to the actual
condition of affairs before inaugurating a permanent scheme of civil
government. The full report of the Commission, now in preparation, will
contain information and suggestions which will be of value to Congress,
and which I will transmit as soon as it is completed. As long as the
insurrection continues the military arm must necessarily be supreme.
But there is no reason why steps should not be taken from time to time
to inaugurate governments essentially popular in their form as fast
as territory is held and controlled by our troops. To this end I am
considering the advisability of the return of the Commission, or such of
the members thereof as can be secured, to aid the existing authorities
and facilitate this work throughout the islands. I have believed that
reconstruction should not begin by the establishment of one central
civil government for all the islands, with its seat at Manila, but
rather that the work should be commenced by building up from the bottom,
first establishing municipal governments and then provincial
governments, a central government at last to follow.

Until Congress shall have made known the formal expression of its
will I shall use the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the
statutes to uphold the sovereignty of the United States in those distant
islands as in all other places where our flag rightfully floats. I shall
put at the disposal of the Army and Navy all the means which the
liberality of Congress and the people have provided to cause this
unprovoked and wasteful insurrection to cease.

If any orders of mine were required to insure the merciful conduct of
military and naval operations, they would not be lacking; but every step
of the progress of our troops has been marked by a humanity which has
surprised even the misguided insurgents. The truest kindness to them
will be a swift and effective defeat of their present leader. The hour
of victory will be the hour of clemency and reconstruction.

No effort will be spared to build up the waste places desolated by war
and by long years of misgovernment. We shall not wait for the end of
strife to begin the beneficent work. We shall continue, as we have
begun, to open the schools and the churches, to set the courts in
operation, to foster industry and trade and agriculture, and in every
way in our power to make these people whom Providence has brought within
our jurisdiction feel that it is their liberty and not our power, their
welfare and not our gain, we are seeking to enhance. Our flag has never
waved over any community but in blessing. I believe the Filipinos will
soon recognize the fact that it has not lost its gift of benediction in
its world-wide journey to their shores.

       *       *       *       *       *

Some embarrassment in administration has occurred by reason of the
peculiar status which the Hawaiian Islands at present occupy under the
joint resolution of annexation approved July 7, 1898. While by that
resolution the Republic of Hawaii as an independent nation was
extinguished, its separate sovereignty destroyed, and its property and
possessions vested in the United States, yet a complete establishment
for its government under our system was not effected. While the
municipal laws of the islands not enacted for the fulfillment of
treaties and not inconsistent with the joint resolution or contrary to
the Constitution of the United States or any of its treaties remain in
force, yet these laws relate only to the social and internal affairs of
the islands, and do not touch many subjects of importance which are
of a broader national character. For example, the Hawaiian Republic
was divested of all title to the public lands in the islands, and is
not only unable to dispose of lands to settlers desiring to take up
homestead sites, but is without power to give complete title in cases
where lands have been entered upon under lease or other conditions which
carry with them the right to the purchaser, lessee, or settler to have a
full title granted to him upon compliance with the conditions prescribed
by law or by his particular agreement of entry.

Questions of doubt and difficulty have also arisen with reference to
the collection of tonnage tax on vessels coming from Hawaiian ports;
with reference to the status of Chinese in the islands, their entrance
and exit therefrom; as to patents and copyrights; as to the register
of vessels under the navigation laws; as to the necessity of holding
elections in accordance with the provisions of the Hawaiian statutes
for the choice of various officers, and as to several other matters of
detail touching the interests both of the island and of the Federal
Government.

By the resolution of annexation the President was directed to appoint
five commissioners to recommend to Congress such legislation concerning
the islands as they should deem necessary or proper. These commissioners
were duly appointed and after a careful investigation and study of the
system of laws and government prevailing in the islands, and of the
conditions existing there, they prepared a bill to provide a government
under the title of "The Territory of Hawaii." The report of the
Commission, with the bill which they prepared, was transmitted by me to
Congress on December 6, 1898, but the bill still awaits final action.

The people of these islands are entitled to the benefits and privileges
of our Constitution, but in the absence of any act of Congress providing
for Federal courts in the islands, and for a procedure by which appeals,
writs of error, and other judicial proceedings necessary for the
enforcement of civil rights may be prosecuted, they are powerless to
secure their enforcement by the judgment of the courts of the United
States. It is manifestly important, therefore, that an act shall be
passed as speedily as possible erecting these islands into a judicial
district, providing for the appointment of a judge and other proper
officers and methods of procedure in appellate proceedings, and that the
government of this newly acquired territory under the Federal
Constitution shall be fully defined and provided for.

       *       *       *       *       *

A necessity for immediate legislative relief exists in the Territory of
Alaska. Substantially the only law providing a civil government for this
Territory is the act of May 17, 1884. This is meager in its provisions,
and is fitted only for the administration of affairs in a country
sparsely inhabited by civilized people and unimportant in trade and
production, as was Alaska at the time this act was passed. The increase
in population by immigration during the past few years, consequent
upon the discovery of gold, has produced such a condition as calls
for more ample facilities for local self-government and more numerous
conveniences of civil and judicial administration. Settlements have
grown up in various places, constituting in point of population and
business cities of thousands of inhabitants, yet there is no provision
of law under which a municipality can be organized or maintained.

In some localities the inhabitants have met together and voluntarily
formed a municipal organization for the purposes of local government,
adopting the form of a municipal constitution and charter, under
which said officials have been appointed; and ordinances creating and
regulating a police force, a fire department, a department of health,
and making provision for the care of the insane and indigent poor and
sick and for public schools, have been passed. These proceedings and
the ordinances passed by such municipalities are without statutory
authority and have no sanction, except as they are maintained by the
popular sentiment of the community. There is an entire absence of
authority to provide the ordinary instruments of local police control
and administration, the population consisting of the usual percentage
of lawless adventurers of the class that always flock to new fields of
enterprise or discovery, and under circumstances which require more than
ordinary provision for the maintenance of peace, good order, and lawful
conduct.

The whole vast area of Alaska comprises but one judicial district, with
one judge, one marshal, and one district attorney, yet the civil and
criminal business has more than doubled within the past year, and is
many times greater both in volume and importance than it was in 1884.
The duties of the judge require him to travel thousands of miles to
discharge his judicial duties at the various places designated for that
purpose. The Territory should be divided into at least two districts,
and an additional judge, district attorney, marshal, and other
appropriate officers be provided.

There is practically no organized form of government in the Territory.
There is no authority, except in Congress, to pass any law, no matter
how local or trivial, and the difficulty of conveying to the Congress an
adequate conception and understanding of the various needs of the people
in the different communities is easily understood. I see no reason why a
more complete form of Territorial organization should not be provided.
Following the precedent established in the year 1805, when a temporary
government was provided for the recently acquired territory, then
known under the name of Louisiana, it seems to me that it would be
advantageous to confer greater executive power upon the governor and
to establish, as was done in the case of the Territory of Louisiana, a
legislative council having power to adopt ordinances which shall extend
to all the rightful subjects of local legislation, such ordinances not
to take effect until reported to and approved by the Congress if in
session, and if that body is not in session then by the President.
In this manner a system of laws providing for the incorporation and
government of towns and cities having a certain population, giving them
the power to establish and maintain a system of education to be locally
supported, and ordinances providing for police, sanitary, and other such
purposes, could be speedily provided. I believe a provision of this kind
would be satisfactory to the people of the Territory. It is probable
that the area is too vast and the population too scattered and
transitory to make it wise at the present time to provide for an
elective legislative body, but the conditions calling for local
self-government will undoubtedly very soon exist, and will be
facilitated by the measures which I have recommended.

       *       *       *       *       *

I recommend that legislation to the same end be had with reference to
the government of Puerto Rico. The time is ripe for the adoption of a
temporary form of government for this island; and many suggestions made
with reference to Alaska are applicable also to Puerto Rico.

The system of civil jurisprudence now adopted by the people of this
island is described by competent lawyers who are familiar with it, as
thoroughly modern and scientific, so far as it relates to matters of
internal business, trade, production, and social and private right in
general. The cities of the island are governed under charters which
probably require very little or no change. So that with relation to
matters of local concern and private right, it is not probable that
much, if any, legislation is desirable; but with reference to public
administration and the relations of the island to the Federal
Government, there are many matters which are of pressing urgency.
The same necessity exists for legislation on the part of Congress to
establish Federal courts and Federal jurisdiction in the island as has
been previously pointed out by me with reference to Hawaii. Besides the
administration of justice, there are the subjects of the public lands;
the control and improvement of rivers and harbors; the control of the
waters or streams not navigable, which, under the Spanish law, belonged
to the Crown of Spain, and have by the treaty of cession passed to the
United States; the immigration of people from foreign countries; the
importation of contract labor; the imposition and collection of internal
revenue; the application of the navigation laws; the regulation of the
current money; the establishment of post-offices and post-roads; the
regulation of tariff rates on merchandise imported from the island into
the United States; the establishment of ports of entry and delivery; the
regulation of patents and copyrights; these, with various other subjects
which rest entirely within the power of the Congress, call for careful
consideration and immediate action.

It must be borne in mind that since the cession Puerto Rico has been
denied the principal markets she had long enjoyed and our tariffs have
been continued against her products as when she was under Spanish
sovereignty. The markets of Spain are closed to her products except upon
terms to which the commerce of all nations is subjected. The island of
Cuba, which used to buy her cattle and tobacco without customs duties,
now imposes the same duties upon these products as from any other
country entering her ports. She has therefore lost her free intercourse
with Spain and Cuba without any compensating benefits in this market.
Her coffee was little known and not in use by our people, and therefore
there was no demand here for this, one of her chief products. The
markets of the United States should be opened up to her products. Our
plain duty is to abolish all customs tariffs between the United States
and Puerto Rico and give her products free access to our markets.

As a result of the hurricane which swept over Puerto Rico on the 8th of
August, 1899, over 100,000 people were reduced to absolute destitution,
without homes, and deprived of the necessaries of life. To the appeal
of the War Department the people of the United States made prompt and
generous response. In addition to the private charity of our people,
the War Department has expended for the relief of the distressed
$392,342.63, which does not include the cost of transportation.

It is desirable that the government of the island under the law of
belligerent right, now maintained through the Executive Department,
should be superseded by an administration entirely civil in its nature.
For present purposes I recommend that Congress pass a law for the
organization of a temporary government, which shall provide for the
appointment by the President, subject to confirmation by the Senate, of
a governor and such other officers as the general administration of the
island may require, and that for legislative purposes upon subjects of a
local nature not partaking of a Federal character a legislative council,
composed partly of Puerto Ricans and partly of citizens of the United
States, shall be nominated and appointed by the President, subject to
confirmation by the Senate, their acts to be subject to the approval
of the Congress or the President prior to going into effect. In the
municipalities and other local subdivisions I recommend that the
principle of local self-government be applied at once, so as to enable
the intelligent citizens of the island to participate in their own
government and to learn by practical experience the duties and
requirements of a self-contained and self-governing people. I have
not thought it wise to commit the entire government of the island to
officers selected by the people, because I doubt whether in habits,
training, and experience they are such as to fit them to exercise at
once so large a degree of self-government; but it is my judgment and
expectation that they will soon arrive at an attainment of experience
and wisdom and self-control that will justify conferring upon them a
much larger participation in the choice of their insular officers.

The fundamental requirement for these people, as for all people, is
education. The free schoolhouse is the best preceptor for citizenship.
In the introduction of modern educational methods care, however, must
be exercised that changes be not made too abruptly and that the history
and racial peculiarities of the inhabitants shall be given due weight.
Systems of education in these new possessions founded upon common-sense
methods, adapted to existing conditions and looking to the future moral
and industrial advancement of the people, will commend to them in a
peculiarly effective manner the blessings of free government.

       *       *       *       *       *

The love of law and the sense of obedience and submission to the
lawfully constituted judicial tribunals are embedded in the hearts of
our people, and any violation of these sentiments and disregard of their
obligations justly arouses public condemnation. The guaranties of life,
liberty, and of civil rights should be faithfully upheld; the right of
trial by jury respected and defended. The rule of the courts should
assure the public of the prompt trial of those charged with criminal
offenses, and upon conviction the punishment should be commensurate with
the enormity of the crime.

Those who, in disregard of law and the public peace, unwilling to await
the judgment of court and jury, constitute themselves judges and
executioners should not escape the severest penalties for their crimes.

What I said in my inaugural address of March 4, 1897, I now repeat:

  The constituted authorities must be cheerfully and vigorously upheld.
  Lynchings must not be tolerated in a great and civilized country like
  the United States. Courts, not mobs, must execute the penalties of the
  laws. The preservation of public order, the right of discussion, the
  integrity of courts, and the orderly administration of justice must
  continue forever the rock of safety upon which our Government securely
  rests.


In accordance with the act of Congress providing for an appropriate
national celebration in the year 1900 of the establishment of the seat
of Government in the District of Columbia, I have appointed a committee,
consisting of the governors of all the States and Territories of the
United States, who have been invited to assemble in the city of
Washington on the 21st of December, 1899, which, with the committees of
the Congress and the District of Columbia, are charged with the proper
conduct of this celebration.

       *       *       *       *       *

Congress at its last session appropriated five thousand dollars "to
enable the Chief of Engineers of the Army to continue the examination of
the subject and to make or secure designs, calculations, and estimates
for a memorial bridge from the most convenient point of the Naval
Observatory grounds, or adjacent thereto, across the Potomac River
to the most convenient point of the Arlington estate property." In
accordance with the provisions of this act, the Chief of Engineers has
selected four eminent bridge engineers to submit competitive designs
for a bridge combining the elements of strength and durability and such
architectural embellishment and ornamentation as will fitly apply to
the dedication, "A memorial to American patriotism." The designs are
now being prepared, and as soon as completed will be submitted to
the Congress by the Secretary of War. The proposed bridge would be a
convenience to all the people from every part of the country who visit
the national cemetery, an ornament to the Capital of the Nation, and
forever stand as a monument to American patriotism. I do not doubt that
Congress will give to the enterprise still further proof of its favor
and approval.

       *       *       *       *       *

The executive order of May 6, 1896, extending the limits of the
classified service, brought within the operation of the civil-service
law and rules nearly all of the executive civil service not previously
classified.

Some of the inclusions were found wholly illogical and unsuited
to the work of the several Departments. The application of the rules
to many of the places so included was found to result in friction and
embarrassment. After long and very careful consideration, it became
evident to the heads of the Departments, responsible for their
efficiency, that in order to remove these difficulties and promote
an efficient and harmonious administration certain amendments were
necessary. These amendments were promulgated by me in executive order
dated May 29, 1899.

The principal purpose of the order was to except from competitive
examination certain places involving fiduciary responsibilities or
duties of a strictly confidential, scientific, or executive character
which it was thought might better be filled either by noncompetitive
examination, or in the discretion of the appointing officer, than by
open competition. These places were comparatively few in number. The
order provides for the filling of a much larger number of places, mainly
in the outside service of the War Department, by what is known as the
registration system, under regulations to be approved by the President,
similar to those which have produced such admirable results in the
navy-yard service.

All of the amendments had for their main object a more efficient and
satisfactory administration of the system of appointments established
by the civil-service law. The results attained show that under their
operation the public service has improved and that the civil-service
system is relieved of many objectionable features which heretofore
subjected it to just criticism and the administrative officers to the
charge of unbusinesslike methods in the conduct of public affairs. It
is believed that the merit system has been greatly strengthened and its
permanence assured. It will be my constant aim in the administration of
government in our new possessions to make fitness, character, and merit
essential to appointment to office, and to give to the capable and
deserving inhabitants preference in appointments.

The 14th of December will be the One Hundredth Anniversary of the death
of Washington. For a hundred years the Republic has had the priceless
advantage of the lofty standard of character and conduct which he
bequeathed to the American people. It is an inheritance which time,
instead of wasting, continually increases and enriches. We may justly
hope that in the years to come the benignant influence of the Father of
his Country may be even more potent for good than in the century which
is drawing to a close. I have been glad to learn that in many parts of
the country the people will fittingly observe this historic anniversary.

Presented to this Congress are great opportunities. With them come great
responsibilities. The power confided to us increases the weight of our
obligations to the people, and we must be profoundly sensible of them
as we contemplate the new and grave problems which confront us. Aiming
only at the public good, we cannot err. A right interpretation of the
people's will and of duty cannot fail to insure wise measures for the
welfare of the islands which have come under the authority of the United
States, and inure to the common interest and lasting honor of our
country. Never has this Nation had more abundant cause than during the
past year for thankfulness to God for manifold blessings and mercies,
for which we make reverent acknowledgment.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, December 11, 1899_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith, for the consideration of the Congress, a
communication from the secretary of the Chamber of Commerce of the State
of New York, inclosing resolutions unanimously adopted by that chamber
on June 1, 1899, requesting legislation authorizing the appointment of
commercial _attachés_ to the principal embassies and legations of
the United States.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 4, 1900_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of December 20, 1899, I
transmit herewith a copy of the report of the commission appointed by
the President to investigate the conduct of the War Department in the
war with Spain, together with a copy of all the testimony taken by said
commission.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 1, 1900_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of January 24, 1900, I
transmit herewith a copy of the report and all accompanying papers of
Brig-Gen. John C. Bates, in relation to the negotiations of a treaty or
agreement made by him with the Sultan of Sulu on the 20th day of August,
1899.

I reply to the request and said resolution for further information that
the payments of money provided for by the agreement will be made from
the revenues of the Philippine Islands, unless Congress shall otherwise
direct.

Such payments are not for specific services but are a part consideration
due to the Sulu tribe or nation under the agreement, and they have been
stipulated for subject to the action of Congress in conformity with the
practice of this Government from the earliest times in its agreements
with the various Indian nations occupying and governing portions of the
territory subject to the sovereignty of the United States.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1900_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith, for the information of the Congress, a report of a
commission appointed by me on January 20, 1899, to investigate affairs
in the Philippine Islands.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 21, 1900_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, in response to
the resolution of the House of Representatives of February 19, 1900,
calling upon him to inform the House of Representatives--

1. If "Charles E. Macrum, as consul of the American Government, informed
the State Department that his official mail had been opened and read by
the British censor at Durban, and if so, what steps, if any, have been
taken in relation thereto; and

2. "What truth there is in the charge that a secret alliance exists
between the Republic of the United States and the Empire of Great
Britain."

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 5, 1900_.

_To the Senate_:

In response to the following resolution of the Senate of January 17,
1900, requesting the President--


  If in his judgment not incompatible with the public interest, to
  communicate to the Senate all communications which have been received by
  him or by any Department or officer, civil or military, from Aguinaldo
  or any other person undertaking to represent the people in arms against
  the United States in the Philippine Islands, or any alleged government
  or public authority of said people, and all replies to such
  communications;

  Also, the proclamation sent by him to be issued to the people of the
  Philippine Islands, as actually directed by him to be issued, and the
  same as actually proclaimed by General Otis, if in any respect it was
  altered or any part of it was omitted;

  Also, to inform the Senate whether any approval or disapproval was
  expressed by his authority, or that of the War Department, of such
  change, if any;

  Also, all constitutions, forms of government, or proclamations issued
  by Aguinaldo, or any congress or legislative assembly or body claiming
  to be such, or convention of the people of the Philippine Islands, or
  any part thereof, or claiming to represent them or any part thereof,
  of which information may have come to him or to any Department of the
  Government;

  Also, all instructions given by him to the commissioners of the
  Philippine Islands, or either of them;

  Also, any information which may have come to him, or any Department of
  the Government, since January 1, 1898, in regard to any plans of the
  people in arms against the United States for the pillage of Manila, for
  risings in the city, or for the destruction of foreign property and the
  massacre of foreign residents;

  Also, any information that may have come to him, or any Department
  of the Government, of the treatment of the other inhabitants of the
  Philippines by those in arms against the authority of the United States,
  and of the attitude and feeling of such other inhabitants or tribes
  toward the so-called government of Aguinaldo and his armed followers;

  Also, any information that may have come to him, or any Department of
  the Government, of the treatment of prisoners, either Spanish or
  American, by the people in arms against the authority of the United
  States;

  Also, any information that may have come to him, or any Department of
  the Government, as to any aid or encouragement received by Aguinaldo and
  his followers from persons in the United States; as to what pamphlets,
  speeches, or other documents emanating from the United States and
  adverse to its authority and to its policy were circulated in whole or
  in part among the Filipinos in arms against the United States, among the
  other inhabitants of the islands, or among the soldiers of the United
  States, and any information as to the effect, if any, of such pamphlets,
  speeches, and other documents, or of similar utterances in the United
  States upon the course of the rebellion against the United States;

  Also, any further or other information which would tend to throw light
  upon the conduct and events of the insurrection against the authority
  of the United States in the Philippine Islands, and of the military
  movements for its suppression since January 1, 1898.

  And that the President be further requested to communicate, without
  delay, so much of such information as is now in his possession or in
  that of any Department at Washington, without waiting to obtain so much
  of said information as may require considerable delay or communication
  with the Philippine Islands, and to communicate the remainder of the
  information as soon thereafter as it can be obtained,


I transmit herewith the following papers:

First. Copies of all communications which have been received by me, or
by any Department or officer, civil or military, from Aguinaldo, or any
other person undertaking to represent the people in arms against the
United States in the Philippine Islands, or any alleged government or
public authority of said people, and copies of all replies to such
communications, so far as such communications and replies have been
reported to me or to any Executive Department. Said copies of documents
are appended hereto marked "I."

Second. Copy of instructions relating to a proclamation sent to General
Otis and of the proclamation issued by General Otis pursuant thereto.
Said copies of documents are appended hereto, marked "II." No
disapproval of the said proclamation was expressed by my authority or
that of the War Department. It was, in fact, approved by me, although no
formal communication to that effect was sent to General Otis.

Also, among the papers marked "II," a letter of instructions to
Maj.-Gen. Wesley Merritt, commanding the army in the Philippines, under
date of May 28, 1898, and a proclamation issued by him to the people of
the Philippines dated August 14, 1898.

Third. Copies of English translations of all constitutions, forms of
government, or proclamations issued by Aguinaldo, or any congress or
legislative assembly or body claiming to be such, or convention of the
people of the Philippine Islands, or any part thereof, or claiming to
represent them, or any part thereof, of which information has come to me
or to any Department of the Government. Said copies of documents are
appended hereto marked "III."

Fourth. Copies of all written instructions given by me to the
commissioners to the Philippine Islands, or either of them. Said copies
of documents are appended hereto marked "IV."

Fifth. Such information as has come to me, or any Department of the
Government, since January 1, 1898, in regard to any plans of the people
in arms against the United States for the pillage of Manila, for risings
in the city, or for the destruction of foreign property and the massacre
of foreign residents. Said copies of documents are appended hereto
marked "V."

Sixth. The information which has come to me, or any Department of the
Government, of the treatment of the other inhabitants of the Philippines
by those in arms against the authority of the United States, and of the
attitude and feeling of such other inhabitants or tribes toward the
so-called government of Aguinaldo and his armed followers, is contained
in the preliminary statement of the Philippine Commission, dated
November 2, 1899, in the report of the Philippine Commission, dated
January 31, 1900, and transmitted by me to Congress February 2, 1900,
together with the preliminary statement, and the report of Maj.-Gen. E.
S. Otis, United States Volunteers, commanding the Department of the
Pacific and Eighth Army Corps, dated August 31, 1899, and transmitted to
Congress with the report of the Secretary of War, dated November 29,
1899, with the accompanying documents.

Seventh. The information which has come to me, or any Department of the
Government, of the treatment of prisoners, either Spanish or American,
by the people in arms against the authority of the United States, is
contained in the same documents.

Eighth. The information that has come to me, or any Department of the
Government, as to any aid or encouragement received by Aguinaldo and
his followers from persons in the United States, as to what pamphlets,
speeches, or other documents emanating from the United States, and
adverse to its authority and to its policy, were circulated, in whole or
in part, among the Filipinos in arms against the United States, among
the other inhabitants of the islands, or among the soldiers of the
United States, and any information as to the effect, if any, of such
pamphlets, speeches, and other documents, or of similar utterances in
the United States upon the course of the rebellion against the United
States is contained in the same documents, and the copies of documents
appended hereto marked "VI."

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 15, 1900_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of March 12, 1900, calling
for the correspondence touching the request of the Government of the
South African Republics for my intervention with a view to the cessation
of hostilities, I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State
furnishing the requested papers.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 21, 1900_.

_To the Senate_:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of January 23, 1900,
requesting the President, "if in his opinion it is not incompatible
with the public interest, to furnish the Senate with copies of the
correspondence with the Republic of Colombia in relation to the Panama
Canal and to the treaty between this Government and New Granada
concluded December 12, 1846, not heretofore communicated," I transmit
herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with accompanying papers.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, March 27, 1900_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

In response to the resolution of the House of Representatives of March
24, 1900, reading as follows:

  WHEREAS the commercial community of the United States is deeply
  interested in ascertaining the conditions which are to govern trade
  in such parts of the Chinese Empire as are claimed by various foreign
  powers to be within their "areas of interest"; and

  WHEREAS bills are now pending before both Houses of Congress for the
  dispatch of a mission to China to study its economic condition:
  Therefore, be it

  _Resolved_, That the President of the United States be requested
  to transmit to the House of Representatives, if not incompatible with
  the public service, such correspondence as may have passed between the
  Department of State and various foreign Governments concerning the
  maintenance of the "open door" policy in China,


I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with
accompanying papers.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 2, 1900_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a copy of a letter from Mr. Ferdinand W. Peck,
Commissioner-General of the United States to the Paris Exposition of
1900, dated November 17, 1899, submitting a detailed statement of the
expenditures incurred under authority of law.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 17, 1900_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State in response
to the resolution of the House of Representatives of March 23, 1900,
calling for copies of any and all letters on file in the Department of
State from citizens of the United States resident in the South African
Republic from January 1, 1899, to the present time, making complaints
of treatment by the South African Republic.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 3, 1900_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I herewith return, without approval, House bill No. 4001, entitled "An
act authorizing the rights of settlers on the Navajo Indian Reservation,
Territory of Arizona." My objections to the bill are embodied in the
following statement:

This tribe has a population of about 20,500 souls, of whom 1,000 dress
in the manner of white men, 250 can read, and 500 use enough English
for ordinary conversation. Last year they cultivated 8,000 acres, and
possessed approximately 1,000,000 sheep, 250,000 goats, 100,500 cattle,
1,200 swine, and very considerable herds of horses and ponies.

Prior to January last the reservation, which is in the extreme
northeastern portion of the Territory of Arizona, consisted of lands
set apart for the use of these Indians under the treaty of June 1, 1863
(15 Stat., 667), and subsequent executive orders. On account of the
conditions naturally prevailing in that section, the reservation, as
then constituted, was altogether inadequate for the purpose for which
it was set apart. There was not a sufficient supply of grass or water
within its borders for the flocks and herds of the tribe, and in
consequence more than one-third of the Indians were habitually off the
reservation with their flocks and herds, and were in frequent contention
and strife with whites over pasturage and water.

After most careful inquiry and inspection of the reservation as it
then existed, and of adjacent land by efficient officers in the Indian
service, the Commission of Indian Affairs, with the concurrence of
the Secretary of the Interior, recommended that the limits of the
reservation be extended westward so as to embrace the lands lying
between the Navajo and Moqui Indian reservations on the east and the
Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers and the Grand Canyon Forest Reserve
on the west. This recommendation was supported by a very numerously
signed petition from the white residents of that section, and also by a
letter from the Governor of the Territory of Arizona, in which it was
said:

  I understand that a petition has been forwarded asking that the western
  limit be fixed at the Little Colorado River, as being better for all
  concerned and less liable to cause friction between the Indians and the
  whites. I earnestly hope that the prayer of the petitioners be granted,
  for the reason that the Little Colorado could be made a natural dividing
  line, distinct and well defined, and would extend the grazing territory
  of the Navajoes to a very considerable extent without seriously
  encroaching upon the interests of white settlers who have their property
  in that neighborhood.

  I think great care should be exercised in questions of this nature
  because of possible serious friction which may occur if the interests of
  all concerned are not carefully protected.


The investigation which preceded this recommendation, and upon which it
was in part based, showed that with the boundaries of the reservation
thus extended the Indians would be able to obtain within the limits of
the reservation sufficient grass and water for their flocks and herds,
and the Government would therefore be justified in confining them to the
reservation, thus avoiding the prior contention and friction between
them and the whites.

It appearing that but little aid had been extended to these Indians by
the Government for many years, that they had taken on habits of industry
and husbandry, which entitled them to encouragement, and that it was
neither just nor possible to confine them to the limits of a reservation
which would not sustain their flocks and herds, an order was issued by
me January 8 last, extending the reservation boundaries as recommended.
The Indians have accepted this as an evidence of the good faith of the
Government toward them, and it is now the belief of those charged with
the administration of Indian affairs that further contention and
friction between the Indians and whites will be avoided, if this
arrangement is not disturbed.

The present bill proposes to open to miners and prospectors, and to the
operation of the mining laws, a substantial portion of this reservation,
including a part of the lands covered by the recent order. There has
been no effort to obtain from the Indians a concession of this
character, nor has any reason been presented why, if these lands are to
be taken from them--for that will practically result from this bill, if
it becomes a law, even though not so intended--it should not be done in
pursuance of negotiations had with the Indians as in other instances.

The Indians could not understand how lands given to them in January as
necessary for their use should be taken away without previous notice in
May of the same year. While the Indians are the wards of the Government,
and must submit to that which is deemed for their best interests by the
sovereign guardian, they should, nevertheless, be dealt with in a manner
calculated to give them confidence in the Government and to assist them
in passing through the inevitable transition to a state of civilization
and full citizenship. Believing that due consideration has not been
given to the status and interests of the Indians, I withhold my approval
from the bill.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 12, 1900_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In reply to the resolution of the Senate, dated March 2, 1900, I send
herewith copy of an order to the provost marshal general of Manila,
dated March 8, 1900, and the various endorsements and reports thereon,
whereby it appears that the traffic in wine, beer, and liquor in the
city of Manila is now controlled under a rigidly enforced high-license
system; that the number of places where the liquor is sold has greatly
decreased; that all such places are required to be closed at 8:30 in the
evening on week days and to be kept closed on Sundays, and that the
orderly condition of the city compares favorably with cities of similar
size in the United States.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 12, 1900_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In response to a resolution of the Senate of April 11, 1900, reading as
follows:

  _Resolved_, That the President be, and is hereby, requested, if not
  incompatible with public interest, to inform the Senate whether persons
  have been executed in Puerto Rico by the Spanish method of garrote since
  he has been governing that country as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and
  Navy of the United States; and if so, the President is requested to
  inform the Senate why this mode of execution was adopted.


I transmit herewith copies of reports from Brig.-Gen. George W. Davis,
United States Volunteers, military governor of Puerto Rico, which
contain the information called for.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 19, 1900_.

_To the Senate_:

In response to the following resolution of the Senate of April 28, 1900:


  _Resolved_, That the President be, and he is hereby requested, if
  not incompatible with the public interest, to inform the Senate whether
  General Torres, one of the officers of the Philippine army, came to
  General Otis with a flag of truce on February 5, 1899, the day after
  the fighting commenced between our forces and those of the Filipinos,
  and stated to General Otis that General Aguinaldo declared that
  fighting had been begun accidentally, and was not authorized by him,
  and that Aguinaldo wished to have it stopped, and that to bring about
  a conclusion of hostilities he proposed the establishment of a neutral
  zone between the two armies of a width that would be agreeable to
  General Otis, so that during the peace negotiations there might be no
  further danger of conflict between the two armies, and whether General
  Otis replied that fighting having once begun, must go on to the grim
  end. Was General Otis directed by the Secretary of War to make such an
  answer? Did General Otis telegraph the Secretary of War on February 9,
  1899, as follows: "Aguinaldo now applies for a cessation of hostilities
  and conference. Have declined to answer?" And did General Otis
  afterwards reply? Was he directed by the Secretary of War to reply, and
  what answer, if any, did he or the Secretary of War make to the
  application to cease fighting?

  The President is also requested to inform the Senate whether the flag of
  the Philippine Republic was ever saluted by Admiral Dewey or any of the
  vessels of his fleet at any time since May 1, 1898. "Did Admiral Dewey,
  at the request of Aguinaldo, or any officer under him, send the vessels
  _Concord_ and _Raleigh_ to Subig Bay to assist Aguinaldo's
  forces in the capture of the Spanish garrison at that place? Did said
  vessels assist in the capture of the Spanish garrison, and after the
  capture did they turn the prisoners thus taken over to the Philippine
  forces?"


I herewith transmit a copy of a cable dispatch to General Otis, dated
April 30, 1900, and of his reply, dated May 1, 1900.

General Otis was not directed by the Secretary of War to make such
an answer as is set forth in the resolution, nor were any answers
to communications upon the subject of the cessation of hostilities
prescribed by the Secretary of War to General Otis, but he was left to
exercise in respect thereof his own judgment, based upon his superior
knowledge of the conditions surrounding the troops under his command.

I also transmit a copy of a cable dispatch from General Otis, sent from
Manila February 8, 1899, received in Washington February 9, 1899, being
the same dispatch to which he refers in his reply of May 1, 1900 as
misleading. So far as I am informed, General Otis did not afterwards
reply, except as set forth in his dispatch of May 1, 1900. He was not
directed by the Secretary of War to reply, and no answer was made by him
or the Secretary of War to an application to cease fighting. There
appears to have been no such application.

I further transmit a copy of a letter from the Secretary of the Navy to
Admiral George Dewey, dated May 14, 1900, and a copy of the Admiral's
reply, dated May 17, 1900.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 22, 1900_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with
accompanying papers, relative to the status of Chinese persons in the
Philippine Islands.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 22, 1900_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith, for the information of Congress, a communication
from the Secretary of Agriculture, forwarding a report on the progress
of the beet-sugar industry in the United States during the year 1899. It
embraces the observations made by a special agent on the various phases
of the beet-sugar industry of the Hawaiian Islands; also the results of
analyses of sugar-beets received by the Department of Agriculture from
the different States and Territories, together with much other
information relating to the sugar industry.

Your attention is invited to the recommendation of the Secretary of
Agriculture that 20,000 copies of the report be printed for the use of
the Department, in addition to such number as may be desired for the use
of the Senate and House of Representatives.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 26, 1900_.

_To the Senate_:

I transmit herewith, in answer to the resolution of the Senate of May
22, 1900, a report from the Secretary of State showing that the consul
of the United States at Pretoria was directed on May 8, 1900, to forward
copies of the constitutions of the South African Republic and the Orange
Free State by return mail. Translations thereof will be communicated to
the Senate at the earliest practicable date.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, June 2, 1900_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit herewith, in further reply to the resolution of the Senate of
April 10, 1900, having reference to Senate Document No. 336, Fifty-sixth
Congress, first session, a further report from the Secretary of State,
showing the places of residence of experts, clerks, officers, and
employees of the Commission of the United States to the Paris Exposition
of 1900, as well as the items of expenditures of the Commission for the
months of January, February, and March, 1900, amounting to $211,583.25.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, June 6, 1900_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In further response to the resolution of the Senate of January 17, 1900,
requesting, among other things, information tending to throw light upon
the conduct and events of the insurrection against the authority of the
United States in the Philippine Islands, I transmit herewith a
correspondence between the Secretary of War and the officers of the
Second Division of the Eighth Army Corps.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 3, 1900_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

At the outgoing of the old and the incoming of the new century you begin
the last session of the Fifty-sixth Congress with evidences on every
hand of individual and national prosperity and with proof of the growing
strength and increasing power for good of Republican institutions. Your
countrymen will join with you in felicitation that American liberty is
more firmly established than ever before, and that love for it and the
determination to preserve it are more universal than at any former
period of our history.

The Republic was never so strong, because never so strongly intrenched
in the hearts of the people as now. The Constitution, with few
amendments, exists as it left the hands of its authors. The additions
which have been made to it proclaim larger freedom and more extended
citizenship. Popular government has demonstrated in its one hundred and
twenty-four years of trial here its stability and security, and its
efficiency as the best instrument of national development and the best
safeguard to human rights.

When the Sixth Congress assembled in November, 1800, the population
of the United States was 5,308,483. It is now 76,304,799. Then we had
sixteen States. Now we have forty-five. Then our territory consisted
of 909,050 square miles. It is now 3,846,595 square miles. Education,
religion, and morality have kept pace with our advancement in other
directions, and while extending its power the Government has adhered to
its foundation principles and abated none of them in dealing with our
new peoples and possessions. A nation so preserved and blessed gives
reverent thanks to God and invokes His guidance and the continuance of
His care and favor.

In our foreign intercourse the dominant question has been the treatment
of the Chinese problem. Apart from this our relations with the powers
have been happy.

The recent troubles in China spring from the antiforeign agitation which
for the past three years has gained strength in the northern provinces.
Their origin lies deep in the character of the Chinese races and in the
traditions of their Government. The Taiping rebellion and the opening of
Chinese ports to foreign trade and settlement disturbed alike the
homogeneity and the seclusion of China.

Meanwhile foreign activity made itself felt in all quarters, not alone
on the coast, but along the great river arteries and in the remoter
districts, carrying new ideas and introducing new associations among a
primitive people which had pursued for centuries a national policy of
isolation.

The telegraph and the railway spreading over their land, the steamers
plying on their waterways, the merchant and the missionary penetrating
year by year farther to the interior, became to the Chinese mind types
of an alien invasion, changing the course of their national life and
fraught with vague forebodings of disaster to their beliefs and their
self-control.

For several years before the present troubles all the resources of
foreign diplomacy, backed by moral demonstrations of the physical
force of fleets and arms, have been needed to secure due respect for
the treaty rights of foreigners and to obtain satisfaction from the
responsible authorities for the sporadic outrages upon the persons and
property of unoffending sojourners, which from time to time occurred at
widely separated points in the northern provinces, as in the case of the
outbreaks in Sze-chuen and Shan-tung.

Posting of antiforeign placards became a daily occurrence, which the
repeated reprobation of the Imperial power failed to check or punish.
These inflammatory appeals to the ignorance and superstition of the
masses, mendacious and absurd in their accusations and deeply hostile
in their spirit, could not but work cumulative harm. They aimed at no
particular class of foreigners; they were impartial in attacking
everything foreign.

An outbreak in Shan-tung, in which German missionaries were slain, was
the too natural result of these malevolent teachings. The posting of
seditious placards, exhorting to the utter destruction of foreigners and
of every foreign thing, continued unrebuked. Hostile demonstrations
toward the stranger gained strength by organization.

The sect, commonly styled the Boxers, developed greatly in the provinces
north of the Yang-Tse, and with the collusion of many notable officials,
including some in the immediate councils of the Throne itself, became
alarmingly aggressive. No foreigner's life, outside of the protected
treaty ports, was safe. No foreign interest was secure from spoliation.

The diplomatic representatives of the powers in Peking strove in vain
to check this movement. Protest was followed by demand and demand by
renewed protest, to be met with perfunctory edicts from the Palace and
evasive and futile assurances from the Tsung-li Yamen. The circle of the
Boxer influence narrowed about Peking, and while nominally stigmatized
as seditious, it was felt that its spirit pervaded the capital itself,
that the Imperial forces were imbued with its doctrines, and that the
immediate counselors of the Empress Dowager were in full sympathy with
the antiforeign movement.

The increasing gravity of the conditions in China and the imminence of
peril to our own diversified interests in the Empire, as well as to
those of all the other treaty governments, were soon appreciated by this
Government, causing it profound solicitude. The United States from the
earliest days of foreign intercourse with China had followed a policy of
peace, omitting no occasions to testify good will, to further the
extension of lawful trade, to respect the sovereignty of its Government,
and to insure by all legitimate and kindly but earnest means the fullest
measure of protection for the lives and property of our law-abiding
citizens and for the exercise of their beneficent callings among the
Chinese people.

Mindful of this, it was felt to be appropriate that our purposes should
be pronounced in favor of such course as would hasten united action of
the powers at Peking to promote the administrative reforms so greatly
needed for strengthening the Imperial Government and maintaining the
integrity of China, in which we believed the whole western world to be
alike concerned. To these ends I caused to be addressed to the several
powers occupying territory and maintaining spheres of influence in China
the circular proposals of 1899, inviting from them declarations of their
intentions and views as to the desirability of the adoption of measures
insuring the benefits of equality of treatment of all foreign trade
throughout China.

With gratifying unanimity the responses coincided in this common policy,
enabling me to see in the successful termination of these negotiations
proof of the friendly spirit which animates the various powers
interested in the untrammeled development of commerce and industry in
the Chinese Empire as a source of vast benefit to the whole commercial
world.

In this conclusion, which I had the gratification to announce as a
completed engagement to the interested powers on March 20, 1900, I
hopefully discerned a potential factor for the abatement of the distrust
of foreign purposes which for a year past had appeared to inspire the
policy of the Imperial Government, and for the effective exertion by it
of power and authority to quell the critical antiforeign movement in the
northern provinces most immediately influenced by the Manchu sentiment.

Seeking to testify confidence in the willingness and ability of the
Imperial administration to redress the wrongs and prevent the evils we
suffered and feared, the marine guard, which had been sent to Peking in
the autumn of 1899 for the protection of the legation, was withdrawn at
the earliest practicable moment, and all pending questions were
remitted, as far as we were concerned, to the ordinary resorts of
diplomatic intercourse.

The Chinese Government proved, however, unable to check the rising
strength of the Boxers and appeared to be a prey to internal
dissensions. In the unequal contest the antiforeign influences soon
gained the ascendancy under the leadership of Prince Tuan. Organized
armies of Boxers, with which the Imperial forces affiliated, held the
country between Peking and the coast, penetrated into Manchuria up to
the Russian borders, and through their emissaries threatened a like
rising throughout northern China.

Attacks upon foreigners, destruction of their property, and slaughter
of native converts were reported from all sides. The Tsung-li Yamen,
already permeated with hostile sympathies, could make no effective
response to the appeals of the legations. At this critical juncture, in
the early spring of this year, a proposal was made by the other powers
that a combined fleet should be assembled in Chinese waters as a moral
demonstration, under cover of which to exact of the Chinese Government
respect for foreign treaty rights and the suppression of the Boxers.

The United States, while not participating in the joint demonstration,
promptly sent from the Philippines all ships that could be spared for
service on the Chinese coast. A small force of marines was landed at
Taku and sent to Peking for the protection of the American legation.
Other powers took similar action, until some four hundred men were
assembled in the capital as legation guards.

Still the peril increased. The legations reported the development of the
seditious movement in Peking and the need of increased provision for
defense against it. While preparations were in progress for a larger
expedition, to strengthen the legation guards and keep the railway open,
an attempt of the foreign ships to make a landing at Taku was met by a
fire from the Chinese forts. The forts were thereupon shelled by the
foreign vessels, the American admiral taking no part in the attack,
on the ground that we were not at war with China and that a hostile
demonstration might consolidate the anti-foreign elements and strengthen
the Boxers to oppose the relieving column.

Two days later the Taku forts were captured after a sanguinary conflict.
Severance of communication with Peking followed, and a combined force
of additional guards, which was advancing to Peking by the Pei-Ho, was
checked at Langfang. The isolation of the legations was complete.

The siege and the relief of the legations has passed into undying
history. In all the stirring chapter which records the heroism of the
devoted band, clinging to hope in the face of despair, and the undaunted
spirit that led their relievers through battle and suffering to the
goal, it is a memory of which my countrymen may be justly proud that the
honor of our flag was maintained alike in the siege and the rescue, and
that stout American hearts have again set high, in fervent emulation
with true men of other race and language, the indomitable courage that
ever strives for the cause of right and justice.

By June 19 the legations were cut off. An identical note from the Yamen
ordered each minister to leave Peking, under a promised escort, within
twenty-four hours. To gain time they replied, asking prolongation of the
time, which was afterwards granted, and requesting an interview with the
Tsung-li Yamen on the following day. No reply being received, on the
morning of the 20th the German minister, Baron von Ketteler, set out for
the Yamen to obtain a response, and on the way was murdered.

An attempt by the legation guard to recover his body was foiled by the
Chinese. Armed forces turned out against the legations. Their quarters
were surrounded and attacked. The mission compounds were abandoned,
their inmates taking refuge in the British legation, where all the other
legations and guards gathered for more effective defense. Four hundred
persons were crowded in its narrow compass. Two thousand native converts
were assembled in a nearby palace under protection of the foreigners.
Lines of defense were strengthened, trenches dug, barricades raised, and
preparations made to stand a siege, which at once began.

From June 20 until July 17, writes Minister Conger, "there was scarcely
an hour during which there was not firing upon some part of our lines
and into some of the legations, varying from a single shot to a general
and continuous attack along the whole line." Artillery was placed around
the legations and on the over-looking palace walls, and thousands of
3-inch shot and shell were fired, destroying some buildings and damaging
all. So thickly did the balls rain, that, when the ammunition of the
besieged ran low, five quarts of Chinese bullets were gathered in an
hour in one compound and recast.

Attempts were made to burn the legations by setting neighboring houses
on fire, but the flames were successfully fought off, although the
Austrian, Belgian, Italian, and Dutch legations were then and
subsequently burned. With the aid of the native converts, directed by
the missionaries, to whose helpful co-operation Mr. Conger awards
unstinted praise, the British legation was made a veritable fortress.
The British minister, Sir Claude MacDonald, was chosen general commander
of the defense, with the secretary of the American legation, Mr. E.G.
Squiers, as chief of staff.

To save life and ammunition the besieged sparingly returned the
incessant fire of the Chinese soldiery, fighting only to repel attack or
make an occasional successful sortie for strategic advantage, such as
that of fifty-five American, British, and Russian marines led by Captain
Myers, of the United States Marine Corps, which resulted in the capture
of a formidable barricade on the wall that gravely menaced the American
position. It was held to the last, and proved an invaluable acquisition,
because commanding the water gate through which the relief column
entered.

During the siege the defenders lost 65 killed, 135 wounded, and 7 by
disease--the last all children.

On July 14 the besieged had their first communication with the Tsung-li
Yamen, from whom a message came inviting to a conference, which was
declined. Correspondence, however, ensued and a sort of armistice was
agreed upon, which stopped the bombardment and lessened the rifle fire
for a time. Even then no protection whatever was afforded, nor any aid
given, save to send to the legations a small supply of fruit and three
sacks of flour.

Indeed, the only communication had with the Chinese Government related
to the occasional delivery or dispatch of a telegram or to the demands
of the Tsung-li Yamen for the withdrawal of the legations to the coast
under escort. Not only are the protestations of the Chinese Government
that it protected and succored the legations positively contradicted,
but irresistible proof accumulates that the attacks upon them were made
by Imperial troops, regularly uniformed, armed, and officered, belonging
to the command of Jung Lu, the Imperial commander in chief. Decrees
encouraging the Boxers, organizing them under prominent Imperial
officers, provisioning them, and even granting them large sums in the
name of the Empress Dowager, are known to exist. Members of the Tsung-li
Yamen who counseled protection of the foreigners were beheaded. Even in
the distant provinces men suspected of foreign sympathy were put to
death, prominent among these being Chang Yen-hoon, formerly Chinese
minister in Washington.

With the negotiation of the partial armistice of July 14, a proceeding
which was doubtless promoted by the representations of the Chinese envoy
in Washington, the way was opened for the conveyance to Mr. Conger of a
test message sent by the Secretary of State through the kind offices of
Minister Wu Ting-fang. Mr. Conger's reply, dispatched from Peking on
July 18 through the same channel, afforded to the outside world the
first tidings that the inmates of the legations were still alive and
hoping for succor.

This news stimulated the preparations for a joint relief expedition in
numbers sufficient to overcome the resistance which for a month had been
organizing between Taku and the capital. Reinforcements sent by all the
co-operating Governments were constantly arriving. The United States
contingent, hastily assembled from the Philippines or dispatched from
this country, amounted to some 5,000 men, under the able command first
of the lamented Colonel Liscum and afterwards of General Chaffee.

Toward the end of July the movement began. A severe conflict followed at
Tientsin, in which Colonel Liscum was killed. The city was stormed and
partly destroyed. Its capture afforded the base of operations from which
to make the final advance, which began in the first days of August, the
expedition being made up of Japanese, Russian, British, and American
troops at the outset.

Another battle was fought and won at Yangtsun. Thereafter the
disheartened Chinese troops offered little show of resistance. A few
days later the important position of Ho-si-woo was taken. A rapid march
brought the united forces to the populous city of Tung Chow, which
capitulated without a contest.

On August 14 the capital was reached. After a brief conflict beneath
the walls the relief column entered and the legations were saved. The
United States soldiers, sailors, and marines, officers and men alike,
in those distant climes and unusual surroundings, showed the same valor,
discipline, and good conduct and gave proof of the same high degree of
intelligence and efficiency which have distinguished them in every
emergency.

The Imperial family and the Government had fled a few days before.
The city was without visible control. The remaining Imperial soldiery
had made on the night of the 13th a last attempt to exterminate the
besieged, which was gallantly repelled. It fell to the occupying forces
to restore order and organize a provisional administration.

Happily the acute disturbances were confined to the northern provinces.
It is a relief to recall and a pleasure to record the loyal conduct
of the viceroys and local authorities of the southern and eastern
provinces. Their efforts were continuously directed to the pacific
control of the vast populations under their rule and to the scrupulous
observance of foreign treaty rights. At critical moments they did not
hesitate to memorialize the Throne, urging the protection of the
legations, the restoration of communication, and the assertion of the
Imperial authority against the subversive elements. They maintained
excellent relations with the official representatives of foreign powers.
To their kindly disposition is largely due the success of the consuls in
removing many of the missionaries from the interior to places of safety.
In this relation the action of the consuls should be highly commended.
In Shan-tung and eastern Chi-li the task was difficult, but, thanks to
their energy and the cooperation of American and foreign naval
commanders, hundreds of foreigners, including those of other
nationalities than ours, were rescued from imminent peril.

The policy of the United States through all this trying period was
clearly announced and scrupulously carried out. A circular note to the
powers dated July 3 proclaimed our attitude. Treating the condition in
the north as one of virtual anarchy, in which the great provinces of the
south and southeast had no share, we regarded the local authorities in
the latter quarters as representing the Chinese people with whom we
sought to remain in peace and friendship. Our declared aims involved no
war against the Chinese nation. We adhered to the legitimate office of
rescuing the imperiled legation, obtaining redress for wrongs already
suffered, securing wherever possible the safety of American life and
property in China, and preventing a spread of the disorders or their
recurrence.

As was then said, "The policy of the Government of the United States is
to seek a solution which may bring about permanent safety and peace to
China, preserve Chinese territorial and administrative entity, protect
all rights guaranteed to friendly powers by treaty and international
law, and safeguard for the world the principle of equal and impartial
trade with all parts of the Chinese Empire."

Faithful to those professions which, as it proved, reflected the views
and purposes of the other co-operating Governments, all our efforts
have been directed toward ending the anomalous situation in China by
negotiations for a settlement at the earliest possible moment. As soon
as the sacred duty of relieving our legation and its dependents was
accomplished we withdrew from active hostilities, leaving our legation
under an adequate guard in Peking as a channel of negotiation and
settlement--a course adopted by others of the interested powers.
Overtures of the empowered representatives of the Chinese Emperor have
been considerately entertained.

The Russian proposition looking to the restoration of the Imperial power
in Peking has been accepted as in full consonance with our own desires,
for we have held and hold that effective reparation for wrongs suffered
and an enduring settlement that will make their recurrence impossible
can best be brought about under an authority which the Chinese nation
reverences and obeys. While so doing we forego no jot of our undoubted
right to exact exemplary and deterrent punishment of the responsible
authors and abettors of the criminal acts whereby we and other nations
have suffered grievous injury.

For the real culprits, the evil counselors who have misled the Imperial
judgment and diverted the sovereign authority to their own guilty ends,
full expiation becomes imperative within the rational limits of
retributive justice. Regarding this as the initial condition of an
acceptable settlement between China and the powers, I said in my message
of October 18 to the Chinese Emperor:

  I trust that negotiations may begin so soon as we and the other offended
  Governments shall be effectively satisfied of Your Majesty's ability and
  power to treat with just sternness the principal offenders, who are
  doubly culpable, not alone toward the foreigners, but toward Your
  Majesty, under whose rule the purpose of China to dwell in concord with
  the world had hitherto found expression in the welcome and protection
  assured to strangers.


Taking, as a point of departure, the Imperial edict appointing Earl Li
Hung Chang and Prince Ching plenipotentiaries to arrange a settlement,
and the edict of September 25, whereby certain high officials were
designated for punishment, this Government has moved, in concert with
the other powers, toward the opening of negotiations, which Mr. Conger,
assisted by Mr. Rockhill, has been authorized to conduct on behalf of
the United States.

General bases of negotiation formulated by the Government of the French
Republic have been accepted with certain reservations as to details,
made necessary by our own circumstances, but, like similar reservations
by other powers, open to discussion in the progress of the negotiations.
The disposition of the Emperor's Government to admit liability for
wrongs done to foreign Governments and their nationals, and to act upon
such additional designation of the guilty persons as the foreign
ministers at Peking may be in a position to make, gives hope of a
complete settlement of all questions involved, assuring foreign rights
of residence and intercourse on terms of equality for all the world.

I regard as one of the essential factors of a durable adjustment the
securement of adequate guarantees for liberty of faith, since insecurity
of those natives who may embrace alien creeds is a scarcely less
effectual assault upon the rights of foreign worship and teaching than
would be the direct invasion thereof.

The matter of indemnity for our wronged citizens is a question of
grave concern. Measured in money alone, a sufficient reparation may
prove to be beyond the ability of China to meet. All the powers concur
in emphatic disclaimers of any purpose of aggrandizement through
the dismemberment of the Empire. I am disposed to think that due
compensation may be made in part by increased guarantees of security
for foreign rights and immunities, and, most important of all, by the
opening of China to the equal commerce of all the world. These views
have been and will be earnestly advocated by our representatives.

The Government of Russia has put forward a suggestion, that in the event
of protracted divergence of views in regard to indemnities the matter
may be relegated to the Court of Arbitration at The Hague. I favorably
incline to this, believing that high tribunal could not fail to reach a
solution no less conducive to the stability and enlarged prosperity of
China itself than immediately beneficial to the powers.

Ratifications of a treaty of extradition with the Argentine Republic
were exchanged on June 2 last.

While the Austro-Hungarian Government has in the many cases that have
been reported of the arrest of our naturalized citizens for alleged
evasion of military service faithfully observed the provisions of the
treaty and released such persons from military obligations, it has in
some instances expelled those whose presence in the community of their
origin was asserted to have a pernicious influence. Representations have
been made against this course whenever its adoption has appeared unduly
onerous.

We have been urgently solicited by Belgium to ratify the International
Convention of June, 1899, amendatory of the previous Convention of 1890
in respect to the regulation of the liquor trade in Africa. Compliance
was necessarily withheld, in the absence of the advice and consent of
the Senate thereto. The principle involved has the cordial sympathy of
this Government, which in the revisionary negotiations advocated more
drastic measures, and I would gladly see its extension, by international
agreement, to the restriction of the liquor traffic with all uncivilized
peoples, especially in the Western Pacific.

A conference will be held at Brussels December 11, 1900, under the
Convention for the protection of industrial property, concluded at
Paris March 20, 1883, to which delegates from this country have been
appointed. Any lessening of the difficulties that our inventors
encounter in obtaining patents abroad for their inventions and that
our farmers, manufacturers, and merchants may have in the protection of
their trade-marks is worthy of careful consideration, and your attention
will be called to the results of the conference at the proper time.

In the interest of expanding trade between this country and South
America, efforts have been made during the past year to conclude
conventions with the southern republics for the enlargement of postal
facilities. Two such agreements, signed with Bolivia on April 24, of
which that establishing the money-order system is undergoing certain
changes suggested by the Post-Office Department, have not yet been
ratified by this Government. A treaty of extradition with that country,
signed on the same day, is before the Senate.

A boundary dispute between Brazil and Bolivia over the territory of Acre
is in a fair way of friendly adjustment, a protocol signed in December,
1899, having agreed on a definite frontier and provided for its
demarcation by a joint commission.

Conditions in Brazil have weighed heavily on our export trade to that
country in marked contrast to the favorable conditions upon which
Brazilian products are admitted into our markets. Urgent representations
have been made to that Government on the subject and some amelioration
has been effected. We rely upon the reciprocal justice and good will of
that Government to assure to us a further improvement in our commercial
relations.

The Convention signed May 24, 1897, for the final settlement of claims
left in abeyance upon the dissolution of the Commission of 1893, was at
length ratified by the Chilean Congress and the supplemental Commission
has been organized.

It remains for the Congress to appropriate for the necessary expenses of
the Commission.

The insurrectionary movement which disturbed Colombia in the latter part
of 1899 has been practically suppressed, although guerrillas still
operate in some departments. The executive power of that Republic
changed hands in August last by the act of Vice-President Marroquin in
assuming the reins of government during the absence of President San
Clemente from the capital. The change met with no serious opposition,
and, following the precedents in such cases, the United States minister
entered into relations with the new _de facto_ Government on
September 17.

It is gratifying to announce that the residual questions between Costa
Rica and Nicaragua growing out of the Award of President Cleveland in
1888 have been adjusted through the choice of an American engineer,
General E.P. Alexander, as umpire to run the disputed line. His task has
been accomplished to the satisfaction of both contestants.

A revolution in the Dominican Republic toward the close of last year
resulted in the installation of President Jimenez, whose Government was
formally recognized in January. Since then final payment has been made
of the American claim in regard to the Ozama bridge.

The year of the exposition has been fruitful in occasions for displaying
the good will that exists between this country and France. This great
competition brought together from every nation the best in natural
productions, industry, science, and the arts, submitted in generous
rivalry to a judgment made all the more searching because of that
rivalry. The extraordinary increase of exportations from this country
during the past three years and the activity with which our inventions
and wares had invaded new markets caused much interest to center upon
the American exhibit, and every encouragement was offered in the way of
space and facilities to permit of its being comprehensive as a whole and
complete in every part.

It was, however, not an easy task to assemble exhibits that could fitly
illustrate our diversified resources and manufactures. Singularly
enough, our national prosperity lessened the incentive to exhibit. The
dealer in raw materials knew that the user must come to him; the great
factories were contented with the phenomenal demand for their output,
not alone at home, but also abroad, where merit had already won a
profitable trade.

Appeals had to be made to the patriotism of exhibitors to induce them
to incur outlays promising no immediate return. This was especially
the case where it became needful to complete an industrial sequence or
illustrate a class of processes. One manufacturer after another had to
be visited and importuned, and at times, after a promise to exhibit in a
particular section had been obtained, it would be withdrawn, owing to
pressure of trade orders, and a new quest would have to be made.

The installation of exhibits, too, encountered many obstacles and
involved unexpected cost. The exposition was far from ready at the date
fixed for its opening. The French transportation lines were congested
with offered freight. Belated goods had to be hastily installed in
unfinished quarters with whatever labor could be obtained in the
prevailing confusion. Nor was the task of the Commission lightened by
the fact that, owing to the scheme of classification adopted, it was
impossible to have the entire exhibit of any one country in the same
building or more than one group of exhibits in the same part of any
building. Our installations were scattered on both sides of the Seine
and in widely remote suburbs of Paris, so that additional assistants
were needed for the work of supervision and arrangement.

Despite all these drawbacks the contribution of the United States was
not only the largest foreign display, but was among the earliest in
place and the most orderly in arrangement. Our exhibits were shown in
one hundred and one out of one hundred and twenty-one classes, and more
completely covered the entire classification than those of any other
nation. In total number they ranked next after those of France, and the
attractive form in which they were presented secured general attention.

A criterion of the extent and success of our participation and of the
thoroughness with which our exhibits were organized is seen in the
awards granted to American exhibitors by the international jury, namely,
grand prizes, 240; gold medals, 597; silver medals, 776; bronze medals,
541, and honorable mentions, 322--2,476 in all, being the greatest total
number given to the exhibit of any exhibiting nation, as well as the
largest number in each grade. This significant recognition of merit in
competition with the chosen exhibits of all other nations and at the
hands of juries almost wholly made up of representatives of France and
other competing countries is not only most gratifying, but is especially
valuable, since it sets us to the front in international questions of
supply and demand, while the large proportion of awards in the classes
of art and artistic manufactures afforded unexpected proof of the
stimulation of national culture by the prosperity that flows from
natural productiveness joined to industrial excellence.

Apart from the exposition several occasions for showing international
good will occurred. The inauguration in Paris of the Lafayette Monument,
presented by the school children of the United States, and the designing
of a commemorative coin by our Mint and the presentation of the first
piece struck to the President of the Republic, were marked by
appropriate ceremonies, and the Fourth of July was especially observed
in the French capital.

Good will prevails in our relations with the German Empire. An amicable
adjustment of the long-pending question of the admission of our
life-insurance companies to do business in Prussia has been reached. One
of the principal companies has already been readmitted and the way is
opened for the others to share the privilege.

The settlement of the Samoan problem, to which I adverted in my last
message, has accomplished good results. Peace and contentment prevail in
the islands, especially in Tutuila, where a convenient administration
that has won the confidence and esteem of the kindly disposed natives
has been organized under the direction of the commander of the United
States naval station at Pago-Pago.

An Imperial meat-inspection law has been enacted for Germany. While it
may simplify the inspections, it prohibits certain products heretofore
admitted. There is still great uncertainty as to whether our well-nigh
extinguished German trade in meat products can revive under its new
burdens. Much will depend upon regulations not yet promulgated, which we
confidently hope will be free from the discriminations which attended
the enforcement of the old statutes.

The remaining link in the new lines of direct telegraphic communication
between the United States and the German Empire has recently been
completed, affording a gratifying occasion for exchange of friendly
congratulations with the German Emperor.

Our friendly relations with Great Britain continue. The war in
Southern Africa introduced important questions. A condition unusual
in international wars was presented in that while one belligerent had
control of the seas, the other had no ports, shipping, or direct trade,
but was only accessible through the territory of a neutral. Vexatious
questions arose through Great Britain's action in respect to neutral
cargoes, not contraband in their own nature, shipped to Portuguese South
Africa, on the score of probable or suspected ultimate destination to
the Boer States.

Such consignments in British ships, by which alone direct trade is kept
up between our ports and Southern Africa, were seized in application of
a municipal law prohibiting British vessels from trading with the enemy
without regard to any contraband character of the goods, while cargoes
shipped to Delagoa Bay in neutral bottoms were arrested on the ground
of alleged destination to enemy's country. Appropriate representations
on our part resulted in the British Government agreeing to purchase
outright all such goods shown to be the actual property of American
citizens, thus closing the incident to the satisfaction of the
immediately interested parties, although, unfortunately, without a broad
settlement of the question of a neutral's right to send goods not
contraband _per se_ to a neutral port adjacent to a belligerent
area.

The work of marking certain provisional boundary points, for convenience
of administration, around the head of Lynn Canal, in accordance with the
temporary arrangement of October, 1899, was completed by a joint survey
in July last. The _modus vivendi_ has so far worked without
friction, and the Dominion Government has provided rules and regulations
for securing to our citizens the benefit of the reciprocal stipulation
that the citizens or subjects of either power found by that arrangement
within the temporary jurisdiction of the other shall suffer no
diminution of the rights and privileges they have hitherto enjoyed. But
however necessary such an expedient may have been to tide over the grave
emergencies of the situation, it is at best but an unsatisfactory
makeshift, which should not be suffered to delay the speedy and complete
establishment of the frontier line to which we are entitled under the
Russo-American treaty for the cession of Alaska.

In this relation I may refer again to the need of definitely marking
the Alaskan boundary where it follows the one hundred and forty-first
meridian. A convention to that end has been before the Senate for some
two years, but as no action has been taken I contemplate negotiating a
new convention for a joint determination of the meridian by telegraphic
observations. These, it is believed, will give more accurate and
unquestionable results than the sidereal methods heretofore independently
followed, which, as is known, proved discrepant at several points on
the line, although not varying at any place more than 700 feet.

The pending claim of R.H. May against the Guatemalan Government has been
settled by arbitration, Mr. George F.B. Jenner, British minister at
Guatemala, who was chosen as sole arbitrator, having awarded $143,750.73
in gold to the claimant.

Various American claims against Haiti have been or are being advanced to
the resort of arbitration.

As the result of negotiations with the Government of Honduras in regard
to the indemnity demanded for the murder of Frank H. Pears in Honduras,
that Government has paid $10,000 in settlement of the claim of the
heirs.

The assassination of King Humbert called forth sincere expressions of
sorrow from this Government and people, and occasion was fitly taken to
testify to the Italian nation the high regard here felt for the memory
of the lamented ruler.

In my last message I referred at considerable length to the lynching of
five Italians at Tallulah. Notwithstanding the efforts of the Federal
Government, the production of evidence tending to inculpate the authors
of this grievous offense against our civilization, and the repeated
inquests set on foot by the authorities of the State of Louisiana, no
punishments have followed. Successive grand juries have failed to
indict. The representations of the Italian Government in the face of
this miscarriage have been most temperate and just.

Setting the principle at issue high above all consideration of merely
pecuniary indemnification, such as this Government made in the three
previous cases, Italy has solemnly invoked the pledges of existing
treaty and asked that the justice to which she is entitled shall be
meted in regard to her unfortunate countrymen in our territory with the
same full measure she herself would give to any American were his
reciprocal treaty rights contemned.

I renew the urgent recommendations I made last year that the Congress
appropriately confer upon the Federal courts jurisdiction in this class
of international cases where the ultimate responsibility of the Federal
Government may be involved, and I invite action upon the bills to
accomplish this which were introduced in the Senate and House. It is
incumbent upon us to remedy the statutory omission which has led, and
may again lead, to such untoward results. I have pointed out the
necessity and the precedent for legislation of this character. Its
enactment is a simple measure of previsory justice toward the nations
with which we as a sovereign equal make treaties requiring reciprocal
observance.

While the Italian Government naturally regards such action as the
primary and, indeed, the most essential element in the disposal of the
Tallulah incident, I advise that, in accordance with precedent, and in
view of the improbability of that particular case being reached by the
bill now pending, Congress make gracious provision for indemnity to the
Italian sufferers in the same form and proportion as heretofore.

In my inaugural address I referred to the general subject of lynching in
these words:

  Lynching must not be tolerated in a great and civilized country like the
  United States; courts, not mobs, must execute the penalties of the law.
  The preservation of public order, the right of discussion, the integrity
  of courts, and the orderly administration of justice must continue
  forever the rock of safety upon which our Government securely rests.


This I most urgently reiterate and again invite the attention of my
countrymen to this reproach upon our civilization.

The closing year has witnessed a decided strengthening of Japan's
relations to other States. The development of her independent judicial
and administrative functions under the treaties which took effect July
17, 1899, has proceeded without international friction, showing the
competence of the Japanese to hold a foremost place among modern
peoples.

In the treatment of the difficult Chinese problems Japan has acted in
harmonious concert with the other powers, and her generous cooperation
materially aided in the joint relief of the beleaguered legations in
Peking and in bringing about an understanding preliminary to a
settlement of the issues between the powers and China. Japan's
declarations in favor of the integrity of the Chinese Empire and the
conservation of open world trade therewith have been frank and positive.
As a factor for promoting the general interests of peace, order, and
fair commerce in the Far East the influence of Japan can hardly be
overestimated.

The valuable aid and kindly courtesies extended by the Japanese
Government and naval officers to the battle ship _Oregon_ are
gratefully appreciated.

Complaint was made last summer of the discriminatory enforcement
of a bubonic quarantine against Japanese on the Pacific coast and of
interference with their travel in California and Colorado under the
health laws of those States. The latter restrictions have been adjudged
by a Federal court to be unconstitutional. No recurrence of either cause
of complaint is apprehended.

No noteworthy incident has occurred in our relations with our important
southern neighbor. Commercial intercourse with Mexico continues to
thrive, and the two Governments neglect no opportunity to foster their
mutual interests in all practicable ways.

Pursuant to the declaration of the Supreme Court that the awards of
the late Joint Commission in the La Abra and Weil claims were obtained
through fraud, the sum awarded in the first case, $403,030.08, has been
returned to Mexico, and the amount of the Weil award will be returned in
like manner.

A Convention indefinitely extending the time for the labors of the
United States and Mexican International (Water) Boundary Commission has
been signed.

It is with satisfaction that I am able to announce the formal
notification at The Hague, on September 4, of the deposit of
ratifications of the Convention for the Pacific Settlement of
International Disputes by sixteen powers, namely, the United States,
Austria, Belgium, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Italy, Persia,
Portugal, Roumania, Russia, Siam, Spain, Sweden and Norway, and the
Netherlands. Japan also has since ratified the Convention.

The Administrative Council of the Permanent Court of Arbitration has
been organized and has adopted rules of order and a constitution for the
International Arbitration Bureau. In accordance with Article XXIII of
the Convention providing for the appointment by each signatory power
of persons of known competency in questions of international law as
arbitrators, I have appointed as members of this Court, Hon. Benjamin
Harrison, of Indiana, ex-President of the United States; Hon. Melville
W. Fuller, of Illinois, Chief Justice of the United States; Hon. John W.
Griggs, of New Jersey, Attorney-General of the United States; and Hon.
George Gray, of Delaware, a judge of the circuit court of the United
States.

As an incident of the brief revolution in the Mosquito district of
Nicaragua early in 1899 the insurgents forcibly collected from American
merchants duties upon imports. On the restoration of order the
Nicaraguan authorities demanded a second payment of such duties on the
ground that they were due to the titular Government and that their
diversion had aided the revolt.

This position was not accepted by us. After prolonged discussion a
compromise was effected under which the amount of the second payments
was deposited with the British consul at San Juan del Norte in trust
until the two Governments should determine whether the first payments
had been made under compulsion to a _de facto_ authority. Agreement
as to this was not reached, and the point was waived by the act of the
Nicaraguan Government in requesting the British consul to return the
deposits to the merchants.

Menacing differences between several of the Central American States have
been accommodated, our ministers rendering good offices toward an
understanding.

The all-important matter of an interoceanic canal has assumed a new
phase. Adhering to its refusal to reopen the question of the forfeiture
of the contract of the Maritime Canal Company, which was terminated for
alleged nonexecution in October, 1899, the Government of Nicaragua has
since supplemented that action by declaring the so-styled Eyre-Cragin
option void for nonpayment of the stipulated advance. Protests in
relation to these acts have been filed in the State Department and are
under consideration. Deeming itself relieved from existing engagements,
the Nicaraguan Government shows a disposition to deal freely with the
canal question either in the way of negotiations with the United States
or by taking measures to promote the waterway.

Overtures for a convention to effect the building of a canal under the
auspices of the United States are under consideration. In the meantime,
the views of the Congress upon the general subject, in the light of the
report of the Commission appointed to examine the comparative merits of
the various trans-Isthmian ship-canal projects, may be awaited.

I commend to the early attention of the Senate the Convention with Great
Britain to facilitate the construction of such a canal and to remove any
objection which might arise out of the Convention commonly called the
Clayton-Bulwer Treaty.

The long-standing contention with Portugal, growing out of the seizure
of the Delagoa Bay Railway, has been at last determined by a favorable
award of the tribunal of arbitration at Berne, to which it was
submitted. The amount of the award, which was deposited in London
awaiting arrangements by the Governments of the United States and Great
Britain for its disposal, has recently been paid over to the two
Governments.

A lately signed Convention of Extradition with Peru as amended by the
Senate has been ratified by the Peruvian Congress.

Another illustration of the policy of this Government to refer
international disputes to impartial arbitration is seen in the agreement
reached with Russia to submit the claims on behalf of American sealing
vessels seized in Bering Sea to determination by Mr. T.M.C. Asser, a
distinguished statesman and jurist of the Netherlands.

Thanks are due to the Imperial Russian Government for the kindly aid
rendered by its authorities in eastern Siberia to American missionaries
fleeing from Manchuria.

Satisfactory progress has been made toward the conclusion of a general
treaty of friendship and intercourse with Spain, in replacement of the
old treaty, which passed into abeyance by reason of the late war. A new
convention of extradition is approaching completion, and I should be
much pleased were a commercial arrangement to follow. I feel that we
should not suffer to pass any opportunity to reaffirm the cordial ties
that existed between us and Spain from the time of our earliest
independence, and to enhance the mutual benefits of that commercial
intercourse which is natural between the two countries.

By the terms of the Treaty of Peace the line bounding the ceded
Philippine group in the southwest failed to include several small
islands lying westward of the Sulus, which have always been recognized
as under Spanish control. The occupation of Sibutú and Cagayan Sulu by
our naval forces elicited a claim on the part of Spain, the essential
equity of which could not be gainsaid. In order to cure the defect of
the treaty by removing all possible ground of future misunderstanding
respecting the interpretation of its third article, I directed the
negotiation of a supplementary treaty, which will be forthwith laid
before the Senate, whereby Spain quits all title and claim of title to
the islands named as well as to any and all islands belonging to the
Philippine Archipelago lying outside the lines described in said third
article, and agrees that all such islands shall be comprehended in the
cession of the archipelago as fully as if they had been expressly
included within those lines. In consideration of this cession the United
States is to pay to Spain the sum of $100,000.

A bill is now pending to effect the recommendation made in my last
annual message that appropriate legislation be had to carry into
execution Article VII of the Treaty of Peace with Spain, by which the
United States assumed the payment of certain claims for indemnity of its
citizens against Spain. I ask that action be taken to fulfill this
obligation.

The King of Sweden and Norway has accepted the joint invitation of the
United States, Germany, and Great Britain to arbitrate claims growing
out of losses sustained in the Samoan Islands in the course of military
operations made necessary by the disturbances in 1899.

Our claims upon the Government of the Sultan for reparation for injuries
suffered by American citizens in Armenia and elsewhere give promise of
early and satisfactory settlement. His Majesty's good disposition in
this regard has been evinced by the issuance of an irade for rebuilding
the American college at Harpoot.

The failure of action by the Senate at its last session upon the
commercial conventions then submitted for its consideration and
approval, although caused by the great pressure of other legislative
business, has caused much disappointment to the agricultural and
industrial interests of the country, which hoped to profit by their
provisions. The conventional periods for their ratification having
expired, it became necessary to sign additional articles extending the
time for that purpose. This was requested on our part, and the other
Governments interested have concurred with the exception of one
convention, in respect to which no formal reply has been received.

Since my last communication to the Congress on this subject special
commercial agreements under the third section of the tariff act have
been proclaimed with Portugal, with Italy, and with Germany. Commercial
conventions under the general limitations of the fourth section of the
same act have been concluded with Nicaragua, with Ecuador, with the
Dominican Republic, with Great Britain on behalf of the island of
Trinidad, and with Denmark on behalf of the island of St. Croix. These
will be early communicated to the Senate. Negotiations with other
Governments are in progress for the improvement and security of our
commercial relations.

The policy of reciprocity so manifestly rests upon the principles of
international equity and has been so repeatedly approved by the people
of the United States that there ought to be no hesitation in either
branch of the Congress in giving to it full effect.

This Government desires to preserve the most just and amicable
commercial relations with all foreign countries, unmoved by the
industrial rivalries necessarily developed in the expansion of
international trade. It is believed that the foreign Governments
generally entertain the same purpose, although in some instances there
are clamorous demands upon them for legislation specifically hostile to
American interests. Should these demands prevail I shall communicate
with the Congress with the view of advising such legislation as may be
necessary to meet the emergency.

The exposition of the resources and products of the Western Hemisphere
to be held at Buffalo next year promises important results not only
for the United States but for the other participating countries. It is
gratifying that the Latin-American States have evinced the liveliest
interest, and the fact that an International American Congress will
be held in the City of Mexico while the exposition is in progress
encourages the hope of a larger display at Buffalo than might otherwise
be practicable. The work of preparing an exhibit of our national
resources is making satisfactory progress under the direction of
different officials of the Federal Government, and the various States of
the Union have shown a disposition toward the most liberal participation
in the enterprise.

The Bureau of the American Republics continues to discharge, with the
happiest results, the important work of promoting cordial relations
between the United States and the Latin-American countries, all of which
are now active members of the International Union. The Bureau has been
instrumental in bringing about the agreement for another International
American Congress, which is to meet in the City of Mexico in October,
1901. The Bureau's future for another term of ten years is assured by
the international compact, but the congress will doubtless have much to
do with shaping new lines of work and a general policy. Its usefulness
to the interests of Latin-American trade is widely appreciated and shows
a gratifying development.

The practical utility of the consular service in obtaining a wide range
of information as to the industries and commerce of other countries and
the opportunities thereby afforded for introducing the sale of our goods
have kept steadily in advance of the notable expansion of our foreign
trade, and abundant evidence has been furnished, both at home and
abroad, of the fact that the Consular Reports, including many from our
diplomatic representatives, have to a considerable extent pointed out
ways and means of disposing of a great variety of manufactured goods
which otherwise might not have found sale abroad.

Testimony of foreign observers to the commercial efficiency of the
consular corps seems to be conclusive, and our own manufacturers and
exporters highly appreciate the value of the services rendered not only
in the printed reports but also in the individual efforts of consular
officers to promote American trade. An increasing part of the work of
the Bureau of Foreign Commerce, whose primary duty it is to compile and
print the reports, is to answer inquiries from trade organizations,
business houses, etc., as to conditions in various parts of the world,
and, notwithstanding the smallness of the force employed, the work has
been so systematized that responses are made with such promptitude and
accuracy as to elicit flattering encomiums. The experiment of printing
the Consular Reports daily for immediate use by trade bodies, exporters,
and the press, which was begun in January, 1898, continues to give
general satisfaction.

It is gratifying to be able to state that the surplus revenues for
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900, were $79,527,060.18. For the six
preceding years we had only deficits, the aggregate of which from 1894
to 1899, inclusive, amounted to $283,022,991.14. The receipts for the
year from all sources, exclusive of postal revenues, aggregated
$567,240,851.89, and expenditures for all purposes, except for the
administration of the postal department, aggregated $487,713,791.71.
The receipts from customs were $233,164,871.16, an increase over the
preceding year of $27,036,389.41. The receipts from internal revenue
were $295,327,926.76, an increase of $21,890,765.25 over 1899. The
receipts from miscellaneous sources were $38,748,053.97, as against
$36,394,976.92 for the previous year.

It is gratifying also to note that during the year a considerable
reduction is shown in the expenditures of the Government. The War
Department expenditures for the fiscal year 1900 were $134,774,767.78,
a reduction of $95,066,486.69 over those of 1899. In the Navy Department
the expenditures were $55,953,077.72 for the year 1900, as against
$63,942,104.25 for the preceding year, a decrease of $7,989,026.53. In
the expenditures on account of Indians there was a decrease in 1900 over
1899 of $2,630,604.38; and in the civil and miscellaneous expenses for
1900 there was a reduction of $13,418,065.74.

Because of the excess of revenues over expenditures the Secretary of the
Treasury was enabled to apply bonds and other securities to the sinking
fund to the amount of $56,544,556.06. The details of the sinking fund
are set forth in the report of the Secretary of the Treasury, to which
I invite attention. The Secretary of the Treasury estimates that the
receipts for the current fiscal year will aggregate $580,000,000 and
the expenditures $500,000,000, leaving an excess of revenues over
expenditures of $80,000,000. The present condition of the Treasury is
one of undoubted strength. The available cash balance November 30 was
$139,303,794.50. Under the form of statement prior to the financial law
of March 14 last there would have been included in the statement of
available cash gold coin and bullion held for the redemption of United
States notes.

If this form were pursued, the cash balance including the present gold
reserve of $150,000,000, would be $289,303,794.50. Such balance November
30, 1899, was $296,495,301.55. In the general fund, which is wholly
separate from the reserve and trust funds, there was on November 30,
$70,090,073.15 in gold coin and bullion, to which should be added
$22,957,300 in gold certificates subject to issue, against which there
is held in the Division of Redemption gold coin and bullion, making a
total holding of free gold amounting to $93,047,373.15.

It will be the duty as I am sure it will be the disposition of the
Congress to provide whatever further legislation is needed to insure the
continued parity under all conditions between our two forms of metallic
money, silver and gold.

Our surplus revenues have permitted the Secretary of the Treasury
since the close of the fiscal year to call in the funded loan of 1891
continued at 2 per cent, in the sum of $25,364,500. To and including
November 30, $23,458,100 of these bonds have been paid. This sum,
together with the amount which may accrue from further redemptions under
the call, will be applied to the sinking fund.

The law of March 14, 1900, provided for refunding into 2 per cent
thirty-year bonds, payable, principal and interest, in gold coin of the
present standard value, that portion of the public debt represented by
the 3 per cent bonds of 1908, the 4 percents of 1907, and the 5 percents
of 1904, of which there was outstanding at the date of said law
$839,149,930. The holders of the old bonds presented them for exchange
between March 14 and November 30 to the amount of $364,943,750. The net
saving to the Government on these transactions aggregates $9,106,166.

Another effect of the operation, as stated by the Secretary, is to
reduce the charge upon the Treasury for the payment of interest from the
dates of refunding to February 1, 1904, by the sum of more than seven
million dollars annually. From February 1, 1904, to July 1, 1907, the
annual interest charge will be reduced by the sum of more than five
millions, and for the thirteen months ending August 1, 1908, by about
one million. The full details of the refunding are given in the annual
report of the Secretary of the Treasury.

The beneficial effect of the financial act of 1900, so far as it
relates to a modification of the national banking act, is already
apparent. The provision for the incorporation of national banks with a
capital of not less than $25,000 in places not exceeding three thousand
inhabitants has resulted in the extension of banking facilities to many
small communities hitherto unable to provide themselves with banking
institutions under the national system. There were organized from the
enactment of the law up to and including November 30, 369 national
banks, of which 266 were with capital less than $50,000, and 103 with
capital of $50,000 or more.

It is worthy of mention that the greater number of banks being organized
under the new law are in sections where the need of banking facilities
has been most pronounced. Iowa stands first, with 30 banks of the
smaller class, while Texas, Oklahoma, Indian Territory, and the middle
and western sections of the country have also availed themselves largely
of the privileges under the new law.

A large increase in national-bank-note circulation has resulted from the
provision of the act which permits national banks to issue circulating
notes to the par value of the United States bonds deposited as security
instead of only 90 per cent thereof, as heretofore. The increase in
circulating notes from March 14 to November 30 is $77,889,570.

The party in power is committed to such legislation as will better make
the currency responsive to the varying needs of business at all seasons
and in all sections.

Our foreign trade shows a remarkable record of commercial and industrial
progress. The total of imports and exports for the first time in the
history of the country exceeded two billions of dollars. The exports are
greater than they have ever been before, the total for the fiscal year
1900 being $1,394,483,082, an increase over 1899 of $167,459,780, an
increase over 1898 of $163,000,752, over 1897 of $343,489,526, and
greater than 1896 by $511,876,144.

The growth of manufactures in the United States is evidenced by the fact
that exports of manufactured products largely exceed those of any
previous year, their value for 1900 being $433,851,756, against
$339,592,146 in 1899, an increase of 28 per cent.

Agricultural products were also exported during 1900 in greater volume
than in 1899, the total for the year being $835,858,123, against
$784,776,142 in 1899.

The imports for the year amounted to $849,941,184, an increase over 1899
of $152,792,695. This increase is largely in materials for manufacture,
and is in response to the rapid development of manufacturing in the
United States. While there was imported for use in manufactures in 1900
material to the value of $79,768,972 in excess of 1899, it is reassuring
to observe that there is a tendency toward decrease in the importation
of articles manufactured ready for consumption, which in 1900 formed
15.17 per cent of the total imports, against 15.54 per cent in 1899 and
21.09 per cent in 1896.

I recommend that the Congress at its present session reduce the
internal-revenue taxes imposed to meet the expenses of the war with
Spain in the sum of thirty millions of dollars. This reduction should be
secured by the remission of those taxes which experience has shown to be
the most burdensome to the industries of the people.

I specially urge that there be included in whatever reduction is made
the legacy tax on bequests for public uses of a literary, educational,
or charitable character.

American vessels during the past three years have carried about 9 per
cent of our exports and imports. Foreign ships should carry the least,
not the greatest, part of American trade. The remarkable growth of our
steel industries, the progress of shipbuilding for the domestic trade,
and our steadily maintained expenditures for the Navy have created an
opportunity to place the United States in the first rank of commercial
maritime powers.

Besides realizing a proper national aspiration this will mean the
establishment and healthy growth along all our coasts of a distinctive
national industry, expanding the field for the profitable employment of
labor and capital. It will increase the transportation facilities and
reduce freight charges on the vast volume of products brought from the
interior to the seaboard for export, and will strengthen an arm of the
national defense upon which the founders of the Government and their
successors have relied. In again urging immediate action by the Congress
on measures to promote American shipping and foreign trade, I direct
attention to the recommendations on the subject in previous messages,
and particularly to the opinion expressed in the message of 1899:

  I am satisfied the judgment of the country favors the policy of aid to
  our merchant marine, which will broaden our commerce and markets and
  upbuild our sea-carrying capacity for the products of agriculture and
  manufacture, which, with the increase of our Navy, mean more work and
  wages to our countrymen, as well as a safeguard to American interests
  in every part of the world.


The attention of the Congress is invited to the recommendation of the
Secretary of the Treasury in his annual report for legislation in behalf
of the Revenue-Cutter Service, and favorable action is urged.

In my last annual message to the Congress I called attention to the
necessity for early action to remedy such evils as might be found to
exist in connection with combinations of capital organized into trusts,
and again invite attention to my discussion of the subject at that time,
which concluded with these words:

  It is apparent that uniformity of legislation upon this subject in
  the several States is much to be desired. It is to be hoped that such
  uniformity, founded in a wise and just discrimination between what is
  injurious and what is useful and necessary in business operations, may
  be obtained, and that means may be found for the Congress, within the
  limitations of its constitutional power, so to supplement an effective
  code of State legislation as to make a complete system of laws
  throughout the United States adequate to compel a general observance
  of the salutary rules to which I have referred.

  The whole question is so important and far-reaching that I am sure no
  part of it will be lightly considered, but every phase of it will have
  the studied deliberation of the Congress, resulting in wise and
  judicious action.


Restraint upon such combinations as are injurious, and which are within
Federal jurisdiction, should be promptly applied by the Congress.

In my last annual message I dwelt at some length upon the condition of
affairs in the Philippines. While seeking to impress upon you that the
grave responsibility of the future government of those islands rests
with the Congress of the United States, I abstained from recommending
at that time a specific and final form of government for the territory
actually held by the United States forces and in which as long as
insurrection continues the military arm must necessarily be supreme.
I stated my purpose, until the Congress shall have made the formal
expression of its will, to use the authority vested in me by the
Constitution and the statutes to uphold the sovereignty of the United
States in those distant islands as in all other places where our flag
rightfully floats, placing, to that end, at the disposal of the army and
navy all the means which the liberality of the Congress and the people
have provided. No contrary expression of the will of the Congress having
been made, I have steadfastly pursued the purpose so declared, employing
the civil arm as well toward the accomplishment of pacification and the
institution of local governments within the lines of authority and law.

Progress in the hoped-for direction has been favorable. Our forces have
successfully controlled the greater part of the islands, overcoming the
organized forces of the insurgents and carrying order and administrative
regularity to all quarters. What opposition remains is for the most part
scattered, obeying no concerted plan of strategic action, operating only
by the methods common to the traditions of guerrilla warfare, which,
while ineffective to alter the general control now established, are
still sufficient to beget insecurity among the populations that have
felt the good results of our control and thus delay the conferment upon
them of the fuller measures of local self-government, of education, and
of industrial and agricultural development which we stand ready to give
to them.

By the spring of this year the effective opposition of the dissatisfied
Tagals to the authority of the United States was virtually ended, thus
opening the door for the extension of a stable administration over much
of the territory of the Archipelago. Desiring to bring this about, I
appointed in March last a civil Commission composed of the Hon. William
H. Taft, of Ohio; Prof. Dean C. Worcester, of Michigan; the Hon. Luke I.
Wright, of Tennessee; the Hon. Henry C. Ide, of Vermont, and Prof.
Bernard Moses, of California. The aims of their mission and the scope of
their authority are clearly set forth in my instructions of April 7,
1900, addressed to the Secretary of War to be transmitted to them:

  In the message transmitted to the Congress on the 5th of December, 1899,
  I said, speaking of the Philippine Islands: "As long as the insurrection
  continues the military arm must necessarily be supreme. But there is no
  reason why steps should not be taken from time to time to inaugurate
  governments essentially popular in their form as fast as territory is
  held and controlled by our troops. To this end I am considering the
  advisability of the return of the Commission, or such of the members
  thereof as can be secured, to aid the existing authorities and
  facilitate this work throughout the islands."

  To give effect to the intention thus expressed, I have appointed Hon.
  William H. Taft, of Ohio; Prof. Dean C. Worcester, of Michigan; Hon.
  Luke I. Wright, of Tennessee; Hon. Henry C. Ide, of Vermont, and Prof.
  Bernard Moses, of California, Commissioners to the Philippine Islands
  to continue and perfect the work of organizing and establishing civil
  government already commenced by the military authorities, subject in
  all respects to any laws which Congress may hereafter enact.

  The Commissioners named will meet and act as a board, and the Hon.
  William H. Taft is designated as president of the board. It is probable
  that the transfer of authority from military commanders to civil
  officers will be gradual and will occupy a considerable period. Its
  successful accomplishment and the maintenance of peace and order in the
  meantime will require the most perfect co-operation between the civil
  and military authorities in the islands, and both should be directed
  during the transition period by the same Executive Department. The
  Commission will therefore report to the Secretary of War, and all their
  action will be subject to your approval and control.

  You will instruct the Commission to proceed to the city of Manila,
  where they will make their principal office, and to communicate with
  the Military Governor of the Philippine Islands, whom you will at the
  same time direct to render to them every assistance within his power
  in the performance of their duties. Without hampering them by too
  specific instructions, they should in general be enjoined, after making
  themselves familiar with the conditions and needs of the country, to
  devote their attention in the first instance to the establishment of
  municipal governments, in which the natives of the islands, both in the
  cities and in the rural communities, shall be afforded the opportunity
  to manage their own local affairs to the fullest extent of which they
  are capable and subject to the least degree of supervision and control
  which a careful study of their capacities and observation of the
  workings of native control show to be consistent with the maintenance
  of law, order, and loyalty.

  The next subject in order of importance should be the organization of
  government in the larger administrative divisions corresponding to
  counties, departments, or provinces, in which the common interests of
  many or several municipalities falling within the same tribal lines,
  or the same natural geographical limits, may best be subserved by
  a common administration. Whenever the Commission is of the opinion
  that the condition of affairs in the islands is such that the central
  administration may safely be transferred from military to civil control
  they will report that conclusion to you, with their recommendations as
  to the form of central government to be established for the purpose of
  taking over the control.

  Beginning with the 1st day of September, 1900, the authority to
  exercise, subject to my approval, through the Secretary of War, that
  part of the power of government in the Philippine Islands which is of a
  legislative nature is to be transferred from the Military Governor of
  the islands to this Commission, to be thereafter exercised by them in
  the place and stead of the Military Governor, under such rules and
  regulations as you shall prescribe, until the establishment of the civil
  central government for the islands contemplated in the last foregoing
  paragraph, or until Congress shall otherwise provide. Exercise of this
  legislative authority will include the making of rules and orders,
  having the effect of law, for the raising of revenue by taxes, customs
  duties, and imposts; the appropriation and expenditure of public funds
  of the islands; the establishment of an educational system throughout
  the islands; the establishment of a system to secure an efficient civil
  service; the organization and establishment of courts; the organization
  and establishment of municipal and departmental governments, and all
  other matters of a civil nature for which the Military Governor is now
  competent to provide by rules or orders of a legislative character.

  The Commission will also have power during the same period to appoint to
  office such officers under the judicial, educational, and civil-service
  systems and in the municipal and departmental governments as shall be
  provided for. Until the complete transfer of control the Military
  Governor will remain the chief executive head of the government of the
  islands, and will exercise the executive authority now possessed by him
  and not herein expressly assigned to the Commission, subject, however,
  to the rules and orders enacted by the Commission in the exercise of the
  legislative powers conferred upon them. In the meantime the municipal
  and departmental governments will continue to report to the Military
  Governor and be subject to his administrative supervision and control,
  under your direction, but that supervision and control will be confined
  within the narrowest limits consistent with the requirement that the
  powers of government in the municipalities and departments shall be
  honestly and effectively exercised and that law and order and individual
  freedom shall be maintained.

  All legislative rules and orders, establishments of government, and
  appointments to office by the Commission will take effect immediately,
  or at such times as they shall designate, subject to your approval
  and action upon the coming in of the Commission's reports, which are
  to be made from time to time as their action is taken. Wherever civil
  governments are constituted under the direction of the Commission
  such military posts, garrisons, and forces will be continued for the
  suppression of insurrection and brigandage and the maintenance of law
  and order as the Military Commander shall deem requisite, and the
  military forces shall be at all times subject, under his orders, to the
  call of the civil authorities for the maintenance of law and order and
  the enforcement of their authority.

  In the establishment of municipal governments the Commission will take
  as the basis of their work the governments established by the Military
  Governor under his order of August 8, 1899, and under the report of the
  board constituted by the Military Governor by his order of January 29,
  1900, to formulate and report a plan of municipal government, of which
  His Honor Cayetano Arellano, President of the Audiencia, was chairman,
  and they will give to the conclusions of that board the weight and
  consideration which the high character and distinguished abilities of
  its members justify.

  In the constitution of departmental or provincial governments they will
  give especial attention to the existing government of the island of
  Negros, constituted with the approval of the people of that island,
  under the order of the Military Governor of July 22, 1899, and after
  verifying, so far as may be practicable, the reports of the successful
  working of that government they will be guided by the experience thus
  acquired so far as it may be applicable to the condition existing in
  other portions of the Philippines. They will avail themselves, to the
  fullest degree practicable, of the conclusions reached by the previous
  Commission to the Philippines.

  In the distribution of powers among the governments organized by the
  Commission, the presumption is always to be in favor of the smaller
  subdivision, so that all the powers which can properly be exercised by
  the municipal government shall be vested in that government, and all
  the powers of a more general character which can be exercised by the
  departmental government shall be vested in that government, and so
  that in the governmental system, which is the result of the process,
  the central government of the islands, following the example of
  the distribution of the powers between the States and the National
  Government of the United States, shall have no direct administration
  except of matters of purely general concern, and shall have only such
  supervision and control over local governments as may be necessary to
  secure and enforce faithful and efficient administration by local
  officers.

  The many different degrees of civilization and varieties of custom
  and capacity among the people of the different islands preclude very
  definite instruction as to the part which the people shall take in the
  selection of their own officers; but these general rules are to be
  observed: That in all cases the municipal officers who administer the
  local affairs of the people, are to be selected by the people, and that
  wherever officers of more extended jurisdiction are to be selected in
  any way, natives of the islands are to be preferred, and if they can be
  found competent and willing to perform the duties, they are to receive
  the offices in preference to any others.

  It will be necessary to fill some offices for the present with Americans
  which after a time may well be filled by natives of the islands. As
  soon as practicable a system for ascertaining the merit and fitness of
  candidates for civil office should be put in force. An indispensable
  qualification for all offices and positions of trust and authority in
  the islands must be absolute and unconditional loyalty to the United
  States, and absolute and unhampered authority and power to remove and
  punish any officer deviating from that standard must at all times be
  retained in the hands of the central authority of the islands.

  In all the forms of government and administrative provisions which
  they are authorized to prescribe the Commission should bear in mind
  that the government which they are establishing is designed not for our
  satisfaction, or for the expression of our theoretical views, but for
  the happiness, peace, and prosperity of the people of the Philippine
  Islands, and the measures adopted should be made to conform to their
  customs, their habits, and even their prejudices, to the fullest extent
  consistent with the accomplishment of the indispensable requisites of
  just and effective government.

  At the same time the Commission should bear in mind, and the people
  of the islands should be made plainly to understand, that there are
  certain great principles of government which have been made the basis
  of our governmental system which we deem essential to the rule of law
  and the maintenance of individual freedom, and of which they have,
  unfortunately, been denied the experience possessed by us; that there
  are also certain practical rules of government which we have found to
  be essential to the preservation of these great principles of liberty
  and law, and that these principles and these rules of government must
  be established and maintained in their islands for the sake of their
  liberty and happiness, however much they may conflict with the customs
  or laws of procedure with which they are familiar.

  It is evident that the most enlightened thought of the Philippine
  Islands fully appreciates the importance of these principles and rules,
  and they will inevitably within a short time command universal assent.
  Upon every division and branch of the government of the Philippines,
  therefore, must be imposed these inviolable rules:

  That no person shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property without
  due process of law; that private property shall not be taken for public
  use without just compensation; that in all criminal prosecutions the
  accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, to be
  informed of the nature and cause of the accusation, to be confronted
  with the witnesses against him, to have compulsory process for obtaining
  witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his
  defense; that excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines
  imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted; that no person
  shall be put twice in jeopardy for the same offense, or be compelled in
  any criminal case to be a witness against himself; that the right to be
  secure against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated;
  that neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall exist except as a
  punishment for crime; that no bill of attainder or _ex-post-facto_
  law shall be passed; that no law shall be passed abridging the freedom
  of speech or of the press, or the rights of the people to peaceably
  assemble and petition the Government for a redress of grievances; that
  no law shall be made respecting an establishment of religion, or
  prohibiting the free exercise thereof, and that the free exercise and
  enjoyment of religious profession and worship without discrimination or
  preference shall forever be allowed.

  It will be the duty of the Commission to make a thorough investigation
  into the titles to the large tracts of land held or claimed by
  individuals or by religious orders; into the justice of the claims and
  complaints made against such landholders by the people of the island or
  any part of the people, and to seek by wise and peaceable measures a
  just settlement of the controversies and redress of wrongs which have
  caused strife and bloodshed in the past. In the performance of this duty
  the Commission is enjoined to see that no injustice is done; to have
  regard for substantial rights and equity, disregarding technicalities so
  far as substantial right permits, and to observe the following rules:

  That the provision of the Treaty of Paris pledging the United States
  to the protection of all rights of property in the islands, and as
  well the principle of our own Government which prohibits the taking of
  private property without due process of law, shall not be violated;
  that the welfare of the people of the islands, which should be a
  paramount consideration, shall be attained consistently with this rule
  of property right; that if it becomes necessary for the public interest
  of the people of the islands to dispose of claims to property which the
  Commission finds to be not lawfully acquired and held disposition shall
  be made thereof by due legal procedure, in which there shall be full
  opportunity for fair and impartial hearing and judgment; that if the
  same public interests require the extinguishment of property rights
  lawfully acquired and held due compensation shall be made out of the
  public treasury therefor; that no form of religion and no minister of
  religion shall be forced upon any community or upon any citizen of the
  islands; that, upon the other hand, no minister of religion shall be
  interfered with or molested in following his calling, and that the
  separation between State and Church shall be real, entire, and absolute.

  It will be the duty of the Commission to promote and extend, and,
  as they find occasion, to improve the system of education already
  inaugurated by the military authorities. In doing this they should
  regard as of first importance the extension of a system of primary
  education which shall be free to all, and which shall tend to fit the
  people for the duties of citizenship and for the ordinary avocations of
  a civilized community. This instruction should be given in the first
  instance in every part of the islands in the language of the people.
  In view of the great number of languages spoken by the different tribes,
  it is especially important to the prosperity of the islands that a
  common medium of communication may be established, and it is obviously
  desirable that this medium should be the English language. Especial
  attention should be at once given to affording full opportunity to all
  the people of the islands to acquire the use of the English language.

  It may be well that the main changes which should be made in the system
  of taxation and in the body of the laws under which the people are
  governed, except such changes as have already been made by the military
  government, should be relegated to the civil government which is to be
  established under the auspices of the Commission. It will, however, be
  the duty of the Commission to inquire diligently as to whether there
  are any further changes which ought not to be delayed, and if so, they
  are authorized to make such changes subject to your approval. In doing
  so they are to bear in mind that taxes which tend to penalize or repress
  industry and enterprise are to be avoided; that provisions for taxation
  should be simple, so that they may be understood by the people; that
  they should affect the fewest practicable subjects of taxation which
  will serve for the general distribution of the burden.

  The main body of the laws which regulate the rights and obligations of
  the people should be maintained with as little interference as possible.
  Changes made should be mainly in procedure, and in the criminal laws to
  secure speedy and impartial trials, and at the same time effective
  administration and respect for individual rights.

  In dealing with the uncivilized tribes of the islands the Commission
  should adopt the same course followed by Congress in permitting the
  tribes of our North American Indians to maintain their tribal
  organization and government, and under which many of those tribes are
  now living in peace and contentment, surrounded by a civilization to
  which they are unable or unwilling to conform. Such tribal governments
  should, however, be subjected to wise and firm regulation, and, without
  undue or petty interference, constant and active effort should be
  exercised to prevent barbarous practices and introduce civilized
  customs.

  Upon all officers and employees of the United States, both civil and
  military, should be impressed a sense of the duty to observe not merely
  the material but the personal and social rights of the people of the
  islands, and to treat them with the same courtesy and respect for their
  personal dignity which the people of the United States are accustomed
  to require from each other.

  The articles of capitulation of the city of Manila on the 13th of
  August, 1898, concluded with these words:

  "This city, its inhabitants, its churches and religious worship,
  its educational establishments, and its private property of all
  descriptions, are placed under the special safeguard of the faith and
  honor of the American Army."

  I believe that this pledge has been faithfully kept. As high and
  sacred an obligation rests upon the Government of the United States to
  give protection for property and life, civil and religious freedom, and
  wise, firm, and unselfish guidance in the paths of peace and prosperity
  to all the people of the Philippine Islands. I charge this Commission
  to labor for the full performance of this obligation, which concerns
  the honor and conscience of their country, in the firm hope that through
  their labors all the inhabitants of the Philippine Islands may come to
  look back with gratitude to the day when God gave victory to American
  arms at Manila and set their land under the sovereignty and the
  protection of the people of the United States.


Coincidently with the entrance of the Commission upon its labors I
caused to be issued by General MacArthur, the Military Governor of the
Philippines, on June 21, 1900, a proclamation of amnesty in generous
terms, of which many of the insurgents took advantage, among them a
number of important leaders.

This Commission, composed of eminent citizens representing the diverse
geographical and political interests of the country, and bringing
to their task the ripe fruits of long and intelligent service in
educational, administrative, and judicial careers, made great progress
from the outset. As early as August 21, 1900, it submitted a preliminary
report, which will be laid before the Congress, and from which it
appears that already the good effects of returning order are felt; that
business, interrupted by hostilities, is improving as peace extends;
that a larger area is under sugar cultivation than ever before; that the
customs revenues are greater than at any time during the Spanish rule;
that economy and efficiency in the military administration have created
a surplus fund of $6,000,000, available for needed public improvements;
that a stringent civil-service law is in preparation; that railroad
communications are expanding, opening up rich districts, and that a
comprehensive scheme of education is being organized.

Later reports from the Commission show yet more encouraging advance
toward insuring the benefits of liberty and good government to the
Filipinos, in the interest of humanity and with the aim of building up
an enduring, self-supporting, and self-administering community in those
far eastern seas. I would impress upon the Congress that whatever
legislation may be enacted in respect to the Philippine Islands should
be along these generous lines. The fortune of war has thrown upon this
nation an unsought trust which should be unselfishly discharged, and
devolved upon this Government a moral as well as material responsibility
toward these millions whom we have freed from an oppressive yoke.

I have on another occasion called the Filipinos "the wards of the
nation." Our obligation as guardian was not lightly assumed; it must not
be otherwise than honestly fulfilled, aiming first of all to benefit
those who have come under our fostering care. It is our duty so to treat
them that our flag may be no less beloved in the mountains of Luzon and
the fertile zones of Mindanao and Negros than it is at home, that there
as here it shall be the revered symbol of liberty, enlightenment, and
progress in every avenue of development.

The Filipinos are a race quick to learn and to profit by knowledge.
He would be rash who, with the teachings of contemporaneous history in
view, would fix a limit to the degree of culture and advancement yet
within the reach of these people if our duty toward them be faithfully
performed.

The civil government of Puerto Rico provided for by the act of the
Congress approved April 12, 1900, is in successful operation. The courts
have been established. The Governor and his associates, working
intelligently and harmoniously, are meeting with commendable success.

On the 6th of November a general election was held in the island for
members of the Legislature, and the body elected has been called to
convene on the first Monday of December.

I recommend that legislation be enacted by the Congress conferring upon
the Secretary of the Interior supervision over the public lands in
Puerto Rico, and that he be directed to ascertain the location and
quantity of lands the title to which remained in the Crown of Spain
at the date of cession of Puerto Rico to the United States, and that
appropriations necessary for surveys be made, and that the methods of
the disposition of such lands be prescribed by law.

On the 25th of July, 1900, I directed that a call be issued for an
election in Cuba for members of a constitutional convention to frame a
constitution as a basis for a stable and independent government in the
island. In pursuance thereof the Military Governor issued the following
instructions:

  Whereas the Congress of the United States, by its joint resolution of
  April 20, 1898, declared--

  "That the people of the island of Cuba are, and of right ought to be,
  free and independent.

  "That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to
  exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island except
  for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination, when that
  is accomplished, to leave the government and control of the island to
  its people;"

  And whereas, the people of Cuba have established municipal governments,
  deriving their authority from the suffrages of the people given under
  just and equal laws, and are now ready, in like manner, to proceed to
  the establishment of a general government which shall assume and
  exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, and control over the island:

  Therefore, it is ordered that a general election be held in the island
  of Cuba on the third Saturday of September, in the year nineteen
  hundred, to elect delegates to a convention to meet in the city of
  Havana at twelve o'clock noon on the first Monday of November, in the
  year nineteen hundred, to frame and adopt a constitution for the people
  of Cuba, and as a part thereof to provide for and agree with the
  Government of the United States upon the relations to exist between that
  Government and the Government of Cuba, and to provide for the election
  by the people of officers under such constitution and the transfer of
  government to the officers so elected.

  The election will be held in the several voting precincts of the island
  under, and pursuant to, the provisions of the electoral law of April 18,
  1900, and the amendments thereof.


The election was held on the 15th of September, and the convention
assembled on the 5th of November, 1900, and is now in session.

In calling the convention to order, the Military Governor of Cuba made
the following statement:

  As Military Governor of the island, representing the President of the
  United States, I call this convention to order.

  It will be your duty, first, to frame and adopt a constitution for Cuba,
  and when that has been done to formulate what in your opinion ought to
  be the relations between Cuba and the United States.

  The constitution must be adequate to secure a stable, orderly, and free
  government.

  When you have formulated the relations which in your opinion ought to
  exist between Cuba and the United States the Government of the United
  States will doubtless take such action on its part as shall lead to a
  final and authoritative agreement between the people of the two
  countries to the promotion of their common interests.

  All friends of Cuba will follow your deliberations with the deepest
  interest, earnestly desiring that you shall reach just conclusions, and
  that by the dignity, individual self-restraint, and wise conservatism
  which shall characterize your proceedings the capacity of the Cuban
  people for representative government may be signally illustrated.

  The fundamental distinction between true representative government and
  dictatorship is that in the former every representative of the people,
  in whatever office, confines himself strictly within the limits of his
  defined powers. Without such restraint there can be no free
  constitutional government.

  Under the order pursuant to which you have been elected and convened you
  have no duty and no authority to take part in the present government of
  the island. Your powers are strictly limited by the terms of that order.


When the convention concludes its labors I will transmit to the Congress
the constitution as framed by the convention for its consideration and
for such action as it may deem advisable.

I renew the recommendation made in my special message of February 10,
1899, as to the necessity for cable communication between the United
States and Hawaii, with extension to Manila. Since then circumstances
have strikingly emphasized this need. Surveys have shown the entire
feasibility of a chain of cables which at each stopping place shall
touch on American territory, so that the system shall be under our own
complete control. Manila once within telegraphic reach, connection with
the systems of the Asiatic coast would open increased and profitable
opportunities for a more direct cable route from our shores to the
Orient than is now afforded by the trans-Atlantic, continental, and
trans-Asian lines. I urge attention to this important matter.

The present strength of the Army is 100,000 men--65,000 regulars and
35,000 volunteers. Under the act of March 2, 1899, on the 30th of June
next the present volunteer force will be discharged and the Regular Army
will be reduced to 2,447 officers and 29,025 enlisted men.

In 1888 a Board of Officers convened by President Cleveland adopted a
comprehensive scheme of coast-defense fortifications which involved the
outlay of something over one hundred million dollars. This plan received
the approval of the Congress, and since then regular appropriations have
been made and the work of fortification has steadily progressed.

More than sixty millions of dollars have been invested in a great number
of forts and guns, with all the complicated and scientific machinery and
electrical appliances necessary for their use. The proper care of this
defensive machinery requires men trained in its use. The number of men
necessary to perform this duty alone is ascertained by the War
Department, at a minimum allowance, to be 18,420.

There are fifty-eight or more military posts in the United States other
than the coast-defense fortifications.

The number of these posts is being constantly increased by the Congress.
More than $22,000,000 have been expended in building and equipment,
and they can only be cared for by the Regular Army. The posts now in
existence and others to be built provide for accommodations for, and if
fully garrisoned require, 26,000 troops. Many of these posts are along
our frontier or at important strategic points, the occupation of which
is necessary.

We have in Cuba between 5,000 and 6,000 troops. For the present our
troops in that island cannot be withdrawn or materially diminished, and
certainly not until the conclusion of the labors of the constitutional
convention now in session and a government provided by the new
constitution shall have been established and its stability assured.

In Puerto Rico we have reduced the garrisons to 1,636, which includes
879 native troops. There is no room for further reduction here.

We will be required to keep a considerable force in the Philippine
Islands for some time to come. From the best information obtainable we
will need there for the immediate future from 45,000 to 60,000 men.
I am sure the number may be reduced as the insurgents shall come to
acknowledge the authority of the United States, of which there are
assuring indications.

It must be apparent that we will require an army of about 60,000, and
that during present conditions in Cuba and the Philippines the President
should have authority to increase the force to the present number of
100,000. Included in this number authority should be given to raise
native troops in the Philippines up to 15,000, which the Taft Commission
believe will be more effective in detecting and suppressing guerrillas,
assassins, and ladrones than our own soldiers.

The full discussion of this subject by the Secretary of War in his
annual report is called to your earnest attention.

I renew the recommendation made in my last annual message that the
Congress provide a special medal of honor for the volunteers, regulars,
sailors, and marines on duty in the Philippines who voluntarily remained
in the service after their terms of enlistment had expired.

I favor the recommendation of the Secretary of War for the detail
of officers from the line of the Army when vacancies occur in the
Adjutant-General's Department, Inspector-General's Department,
Quartermaster's Department, Subsistence Department, Pay Department,
Ordnance Department, and Signal Corps.

The Army cannot be too highly commended for its faithful and effective
service in active military operations in the field and the difficult
work of civil administration.

The continued and rapid growth of the postal service is a sure index
of the great and increasing business activity of the country. Its most
striking new development is the extension of rural free delivery. This
has come almost wholly within the last year. At the beginning of the
fiscal year 1899-1900 the number of routes in operation was only 391,
and most of these had been running less than twelve months. On the
15th of November, 1900, the number had increased to 2,614, reaching
into forty-four States and Territories, and serving a population of
1,801,524. The number of applications now pending and awaiting action
nearly equals all those granted up to the present time, and by the
close of the current fiscal year about 4,000 routes will have been
established, providing for the daily delivery of mails at the scattered
homes of about three and a half millions of rural population.

This service ameliorates the isolation of farm life, conduces to
good roads, and quickens and extends the dissemination of general
information. Experience thus far has tended to allay the apprehension
that it would be so expensive as to forbid its general adoption or make
it a serious burden. Its actual application has shown that it increases
postal receipts, and can be accompanied by reductions in other branches
of the service, so that the augmented revenues and the accomplished
savings together materially reduce the net cost. The evidences which
point to these conclusions are presented in detail in the annual report
of the Postmaster-General, which with its recommendations is commended
to the consideration of the Congress. The full development of this
special service, however, requires such a large outlay of money that
it should be undertaken only after a careful study and thorough
understanding of all that it involves.

Very efficient service has been rendered by the Navy in connection with
the insurrection in the Philippines and the recent disturbance in China.

A very satisfactory settlement has been made of the long-pending
question of the manufacture of armor plate. A reasonable price has been
secured and the necessity for a Government armor plant avoided.

I approve of the recommendations of the Secretary for new vessels and
for additional officers and men which the required increase of the Navy
makes necessary. I commend to the favorable action of the Congress the
measure now pending for the erection of a statue to the memory of the
late Admiral David D. Porter. I commend also the establishment of a
national naval reserve and of the grade of vice-admiral. Provision
should be made, as recommended by the Secretary, for suitable rewards
for special merit. Many officers who rendered the most distinguished
service during the recent war with Spain have received in return no
recognition from the Congress.

The total area of public lands as given by the Secretary of the Interior
is approximately 1,071,881,662 acres, of which 917,135,880 acres are
undisposed of and 154,745,782 acres have been reserved for various
purposes. The public lands disposed of during the year amount to
13,453,887.96 acres, including 62,423.09 acres of Indian lands, an
increase of 4,271,474.80 over the preceding year. The total receipts
from the sale of public lands during the fiscal year were $4,379,758.10,
an increase of $1,309,620.76 over the preceding year.

The results obtained from our forest policy have demonstrated its wisdom
and the necessity in the interest of the public for its continuance and
increased appropriations by the Congress for the carrying on of the
work. On June 30, 1900, there were thirty-seven forest reserves, created
by Presidential proclamations under section 24 of the act of March 3,
1891, embracing an area of 46,425,529 acres.

During the past year the Olympic Reserve, in the State of Washington,
was reduced 265,040 acres, leaving its present area at 1,923,840 acres.
The Prescott Reserve, in Arizona, was increased from 10,240 acres to
423,680 acres, and the Big Horn Reserve, in Wyoming, was increased from
1,127,680 acres to 1,180,800 acres. A new reserve, the Santa Ynez, in
California, embracing an area of 145,000 acres, was created during this
year. On October 10, 1900, the Crow Creek Forest Reserve, in Wyoming,
was created, with an area of 56,320 acres.

At the end of the fiscal year there were on the pension roll 993,529
names, a net increase of 2,010 over the fiscal year 1899. The number
added to the rolls during the year was 45,344. The amount disbursed for
Army pensions during the year was $134,700,597.24 and for Navy pensions
$3,761,533.41, a total of $138,462,130.65, leaving an unexpended balance
of $5,542,768.25 to be covered into the Treasury, which shows an
increase over the previous year's expenditure of $107,077.70. There were
684 names added to the rolls during the year by special acts passed at
the first session of the Fifty-sixth Congress.

The act of May 9, 1900, among other things provides for an extension
of income to widows pensioned under said act to $250 per annum. The
Secretary of the Interior believes that by the operations of this act
the number of persons pensioned under it will increase and the increased
annual payment for pensions will be between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000.

The Government justly appreciates the services of its soldiers and
sailors by making pension payments liberal beyond precedent to them,
their widows and orphans.

There were 26,540 letters patent granted, including reissues and
designs, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900; 1,660 trademarks,
682 labels, and 93 prints registered. The number of patents which
expired was 19,988. The total receipts for patents were $1,358,228.35.
The expenditures were $1,247,827.58, showing a surplus of $110,400.77.

The attention of the Congress is called to the report of the Secretary
of the Interior touching the necessity for the further establishment of
schools in the Territory of Alaska, and favorable action is invited
thereon.

Much interesting information is given in the report of the Governor of
Hawaii as to the progress and development of the islands during the
period from July 7, 1898, the date of the approval of the joint
resolution of the Congress providing for their annexation, up to April
30, 1900, the date of the approval of the act providing a government for
the Territory, and thereafter.

The last Hawaiian census, taken in the year 1896, gives a total
population of 109,020, of which 31,019 were native Hawaiians. The number
of Americans reported was 8,485. The results of the Federal census,
taken this year, show the islands to have a total population of 154,001,
showing an increase over that reported in 1896 of 44,981, or 41.2 per
cent.

There has been marked progress in the educational, agricultural, and
railroad development of the islands.

In the Territorial act of April 30, 1900, section 7 of said act repeals
Chapter 34 of the Civil Laws of Hawaii whereby the Government was to
assist in encouraging and developing the agricultural resources of the
Republic, especially irrigation. The Governor of Hawaii recommends
legislation looking to the development of such water supply as may exist
on the public lands, with a view of promoting land settlement. The
earnest consideration of the Congress is invited to this important
recommendation and others, as embodied in the report of the Secretary of
the Interior.

The Director of the Census states that the work in connection with the
Twelfth Census is progressing favorably. This national undertaking,
ordered by the Congress each decade, has finally resulted in the
collection of an aggregation of statistical facts to determine the
industrial growth of the country, its manufacturing and mechanical
resources, its richness in mines and forests, the number of its
agriculturists, their farms and products, its educational and religious
opportunities, as well as questions pertaining to sociological
conditions.

The labors of the officials in charge of the Bureau indicate that the
four important and most-desired subjects, namely, population,
agricultural, manufacturing, and vital statistics, will be completed
within the limit prescribed by the law of March 3, 1899.

The field work incident to the above inquiries is now practically
finished, and as a result the population of the States and Territories,
including the Hawaiian Islands and Alaska, has been announced. The
growth of population during the last decade amounts to over 13,000,000,
a greater numerical increase than in any previous census in the history
of the country.

Bulletins will be issued as rapidly as possible giving the population by
States and Territories, by minor civil divisions. Several announcements
of this kind have already been made, and it is hoped that the list will
be completed by January 1. Other bulletins giving the results of the
manufacturing and agricultural inquiries will be given to the public as
rapidly as circumstances will admit.

The Director, while confident of his ability to complete the
different branches of the undertaking in the allotted time, finds
himself embarrassed by the lack of a trained force properly equipped for
statistical work, thus raising the question whether in the interest of
economy and a thorough execution of the census work there should not
be retained in the Government employ a certain number of experts not
only to aid in the preliminary organization prior to the taking of the
decennial census, but in addition to have the advantage in the field and
office work of the Bureau of trained assistants to facilitate the early
completion of this enormous undertaking.

I recommend that the Congress at its present session apportion
representation among the several States as provided by the Constitution.

The Department of Agriculture has been extending its work during the
past year, reaching farther for new varieties of seeds and plants;
co-operating more fully with the States and Territories in research
along useful lines; making progress in meteorological work relating to
lines of wireless telegraphy and forecasts for ocean-going vessels;
continuing inquiry as to animal disease; looking into the extent
and character of food adulteration; outlining plans for the care,
preservation, and intelligent harvesting of our woodlands; studying
soils that producers may cultivate with better knowledge of conditions,
and helping to clothe desert places with grasses suitable to our arid
regions. Our island possessions are being considered that their peoples
may be helped to produce the tropical products now so extensively
brought into the United States. Inquiry into methods of improving our
roads has been active during the year; help has been given to many
localities, and scientific investigation of material in the States and
Territories has been inaugurated. Irrigation problems in our semiarid
regions are receiving careful and increased consideration.

An extensive exhibit at Paris of the products of agriculture has made
the peoples of many countries more familiar with the varied products of
our fields and their comparative excellence.

The collection of statistics regarding our crops is being improved and
sources of information are being enlarged, to the end that producers may
have the earliest advices regarding crop conditions. There has never
been a time when those for whom it was established have shown more
appreciation of the services of the Department.

In my annual message of December 5, 1898, I called attention to the
necessity for some amendment of the alien contract law. There still
remain important features of the rightful application of the eight-hour
law for the benefit of labor and of the principle of arbitration, and I
again commend these subjects to the careful attention of the Congress.

That there may be secured the best service possible in the Philippine
Islands, I have issued, under date of November 30, 1900, the following
order:

  The United States Civil Service Commission is directed to render such
  assistance as may be practicable to the Civil Service Board, created
  under the act of the United States Philippine Commission, for the
  establishment and maintenance of an honest and efficient civil service
  in the Philippine Islands, and for that purpose to conduct examinations
  for the civil service of the Philippine Islands, upon the request of the
  Civil Service Board of said islands, under such regulations as may be
  agreed upon by the said Board and the said United States Civil Service
  Commission.


The Civil Service Commission is greatly embarrassed in its work for
want of an adequate permanent force for clerical and other assistance.
Its needs are fully set forth in its report. I invite attention to
the report, and especially urge upon the Congress that this important
bureau of the public service, which passes upon the qualifications and
character of so large a number of the officers and employees of the
Government, should be supported by all needed appropriations to secure
promptness and efficiency.

I am very much impressed with the statement made by the heads of all the
Departments of the urgent necessity of a hall of public records. In
every departmental building in Washington, so far as I am informed, the
space for official records is not only exhausted, but the walls of rooms
are lined with shelves, the middle floor space of many rooms is filled
with file cases, and garrets and basements, which were never intended
and are unfitted for their accommodation, are crowded with them. Aside
from the inconvenience there is great danger, not only from fire, but
from the weight of these records upon timbers not intended for their
support. There should be a separate building especially designed for the
purpose of receiving and preserving the annually accumulating archives
of the several Executive Departments. Such a hall need not be a costly
structure, but should be so arranged as to admit of enlargement from
time to time. I urgently recommend that the Congress take early action
in this matter.

I transmit to the Congress a resolution adopted at a recent meeting of
the American Bar Association concerning the proposed celebration of John
Marshall Day, February 4, 1901. Fitting exercises have been arranged,
and it is earnestly desired by the committee that the Congress may
participate in this movement to honor the memory of the great jurist.

The transfer of the Government to this city is a fact of great
historical interest. Among the people there is a feeling of genuine
pride in the Capital of the Republic.

It is a matter of interest in this connection that in 1800 the
population of the District of Columbia was 14,093; to-day it is 278,718.
The population of the city of Washington was then 3,210; to-day it is
218,196.

The Congress having provided for "an appropriate national celebration
of the Centennial Anniversary of the Establishment of the Seat of the
Government in the District of Columbia," the committees authorized by it
have prepared a programme for the 12th of December, 1900, which date has
been selected as the anniversary day. Deep interest has been shown in
the arrangements for the celebration by the members of the committees
of the Senate and House of Representatives, the committee of Governors
appointed by the President, and the committees appointed by the citizens
and inhabitants of the District of Columbia generally. The programme, in
addition to a reception and other exercises at the Executive Mansion,
provides commemorative exercises to be held jointly by the Senate and
House of Representatives in the Hall of the House of Representatives,
and a reception in the evening at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in honor
of the Governors of the States and Territories.

In our great prosperity we must guard against the danger it invites of
extravagance in Government expenditures and appropriations; and the
chosen representatives of the people will, I doubt not, furnish an
example in their legislation of that wise economy which in a season of
plenty husbands for the future. In this era of great business activity
and opportunity caution is not untimely. It will not abate, but
strengthen, confidence. It will not retard, but promote, legitimate
industrial and commercial expansion. Our growing power brings with it
temptations and perils requiring constant vigilance to avoid. It must
not be used to invite conflicts, nor for oppression, but for the more
effective maintenance of those principles of equality and justice upon
which our institutions and happiness depend. Let us keep always in mind
that the foundation of our Government is liberty; its superstructure
peace.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, December 4, 1900_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith, for the information of Congress, copy of a letter
from the Commissioner-General of the United States to the Paris
Exposition of 1900, of November 17, 1900, giving a detailed statement of
the expenditures of the commission for the year ended November 15, 1900.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, December 6, 1900_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith the report from the Secretary of State and
accompanying papers relating to the claim against the United States of
the Russian subject, Gustav Isak Dahlberg, master and principal owner of
the Russian bark _Hans_, based on his wrongful and illegal arrest
and imprisonment by officers of the United States District Court for the
southern district of Mississippi, and, in view of the opinion expressed
by the Department of Justice that the said arrest and detention of the
complainant were wrongful and without the authority of law, I recommend
the appropriation by Congress of the sum of $5,000 to reimburse the
master and owners of the vessel for all losses and damages incurred by
reason of his said wrongful and illegal arrest and detention.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, December 6, 1900_.

_To the Congress of the United States_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with
accompanying papers, in relation to the lynching, in La Salle County,
Tex., on October 5, 1895, of Florentine Suaste, a Mexican citizen.

Following the course pursued in the case of the lynching of three
Italian subjects at Hahnville, La., on August 8, 1896, and in that of
the lynching of the Mexican citizen, Luis Moreno, at Yreka, Cal., in
August, 1895, I recommend the appropriation by Congress, out of humane
consideration, and without reference to the question of liability of the
Government of the United States, of the sum of $2,000, to be paid by the
Secretary of State to the Government of Mexico, and by that Government
distributed to the heirs of the above-mentioned Florentino Suaste.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 3, 1901_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

In reply to a resolution of the Senate of December 19, 1900, directing
the Secretary of War "to transmit to the Senate the report of Abraham L.
Lawshe, giving in detail the result of his investigations, made under
the direction of the War Department, into the receipts and expenditures
of Cuban funds," the Senate is informed that for the reasons stated in
the accompanying communication from the Secretary of War, dated December
28, 1900, it is not deemed compatible with the public interest to
transmit the report to the Senate at this time.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 16, 1901_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith for the information of the Congress a letter from
the Secretary of Agriculture, in which he presents a preliminary report
of investigations upon the forests of the southern Appalachian Mountain
region. Upon the basis of the facts established by this investigation
the Secretary of Agriculture recommends the purchase of land for a
national forest reserve in western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee,
and adjacent States. I commend to the favorable consideration of
Congress the reasons upon which this recommendation rests.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 25, 1901_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

For the information of the Congress and with a view to such action on
its part as it may deem wise and appropriate I transmit a report of the
Secretary of War, made to me under date of January 24, 1901, containing
the reports of the Taft commission, its several acts of legislation, and
other important information relating to the conditions and immediate
wants of the Philippine Islands.

I earnestly recommend legislation under which the government of the
islands may have authority to assist in their peaceful industrial
development in the directions indicated by the Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 29, 1901_.

_To the Congress_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State relating to
the treaty between the United States and Spain, signed at Washington,
November 7, 1900, providing for the cession of any and all islands of
the Philippine Archipelago lying outside of the lines described in
Article III of the treaty of peace of December 10, 1898.

I recommend the appropriation by Congress during the present session of
the sum of one hundred thousand dollars for the purpose of carrying out
the obligations of the United States under the treaty.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 29, 1901_.

_To the Congress_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State relating to the
lynching of two Italian subjects at Tallulah, La., on July 20, 1899.

I renew the recommendation made in my annual message to the Congress on
December 3, 1900, that in accordance with precedent Congress make
gracious provision for indemnity to the families of the victims in the
same form as heretofore.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 29, 1901_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State
accompanying the Commercial Relations of the United States for the year
1900, being the annual and other reports of consular and diplomatic
officers upon the industries and commerce of foreign countries, with
particular reference to the growing share of the United States in
international trade. The advance in the general efficiency of our
consular service in promoting trade, which was noted in my message of
March 1, 1900, transmitting the reports for 1899, was even more marked
than last year. The promptitude with which the reports of the consuls
are printed and distributed, the generous recognition which is being
increasingly accorded by our business interests to the practical value
of their efforts for enlarging trade, and the continued testimony of
competent foreign authorities to the general superiority of their
commercial work, have naturally had a stimulating effect upon its
consular corps as a whole, and experience in the discharge of their
duties adds greatly to their efficiency. It is gratifying to be able to
state that the improvement in the service, following closely upon the
steady progress in expediting the publication of reports, has enabled
the Department of State this year to submit the annual reports a month
in advance of the usual time, and to make them as nearly as possible a
contemporaneous picture of the trade of the world. In view of the great
importance of these reports to our producers, manufacturers, exporters,
and business interest generally, I cordially approve the recommendation
of the Secretary of State that Congress shall authorize the printing as
heretofore of an edition of 10,000 copies of the summary, entitled
"Review of the World's Commerce," and of 5,000 copies of Commercial
Relations (including this summary), to be distributed by the Department
of State.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 14, 1901_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

During our recent war with Spain the United States naval force on the
North Atlantic Station was charged with varied and important duties,
chief among which were the maintenance of the blockade of Cuba, aiding
the army, and landing troops and in subsequent operations, and
particularly in the pursuit, blockade, and destruction of the Spanish
Squadron under Admiral Cervera.

This naval campaign, embracing objects of wide scope and grave
responsibilities, was conducted with great ability on the part of the
commander-in-chief, and of the officers and enlisted men under his
command. It culminated in the annihilation of the Spanish fleet in the
battle of July 3, 1898, one of the most memorable naval engagements in
history.

The result of this battle was the freeing of our Atlantic coast from the
possibilities to which it had been exposed from Admiral Cervera's fleet,
and the termination of the war upon the seas.

I recommend that, following our national precedents, especially that
in the case of Admiral Dewey and the Asiatic Squadron, the thanks of
Congress be given to Rear-Admiral William T. Sampson, United States
Navy, and to the officers and men under his command for highly
distinguished conduct in conflict with the enemy, and in carrying on
the blockade and naval campaign on the Cuban coast, resulting in the
destruction of the Spanish fleet at Santiago de Cuba July 3, 1898.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 21, 1901_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith, for the information of the Congress and with a view
to its publication in suitable form, if such action is deemed desirable,
a special report of the United States Board on Geographic Names,
relating to geographic names in the Philippine Islands, and invite
attention to the recommendation of the Board:

"That in addition to the usual number, there be printed 15,000 copies:
2,000 copies for the use of the Senate, 3,000 copies for the use of the
House of Representatives, and 10,000 copies for distribution by the
Board to the Executive Departments and the public."

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 26, 1901_.

_To the Congress_:

I transmit herewith, for the consideration of Congress, in connection
with my message of January 29, 1901, relative to the lynching of certain
Italian subjects at Tallulah, La., a report by the Secretary of State
touching a claim for $5,000 presented by the Italian ambassador at
Washington on behalf of Guiseppe Defina, on account of his being obliged
to abandon his home and business.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 28, 1901_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith, in pursuance of the act of Congress approved July
1, 1898 (U.S. Stat. L., vol. 30, pp. 645, 646), the report of Mr.
Ferdinand W. Peck, commissioner-general of the United States to the
International Exposition held at Paris, France, during the year 1900.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, March 1, 1901_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I return herewith, without approval, House bill No. 3204, entitled "An
act to refer certain claims for Indian depredations to the Court of
Claims."

General relief has been extended to citizens who have lost property by
reason of Indian depredations by the act of March 3, 1891, conferring
jurisdiction upon the Court of Claims to hear and determine such cases.
That act provides for payment for damages growing out of depredations
committed by any Indian or Indians belonging to a band, tribe, or nation
in amity with the United States, excluding from consideration all claims
which originated during the existence of actual hostilities between the
United States and the Indian tribe.

In making this discrimination the act of 1891 follows the general
principle which has been asserted in all general legislation which has
ever been enacted for the payment of claims for property destroyed by
Indians. The first act which promised such indemnity, that of May 19,
1796, contained the same restriction, and it was reported in every
subsequent general act of Congress dealing with the subject. This
policy, which has been clearly manifested from the beginning, is in
accord with the recognized principle that the nation is not liable for
damage to the private property of its citizens caused by the act of the
public enemy. This statute has been thoroughly considered by the Court
of Claims and by the Supreme Court and its interpretation fixed, and it
has been declared to be in accord not only with the policy of Congress
as expressed through the legislation of the century, but with the
general principles of international law.

I am informed that the records of the Court of Claims show that the
claims of four of the five beneficiaries named in the present bill
have been presented to that court under the general law and decided
adversely, the court having held that a state of war existed between
the United States and the Sioux Indians in the year 1862 when the
claims arose. The remaining claim, which originated under the same
circumstances and at the same time, would, of course, be subject to
the same defense if presented.

The bill provides that these claims shall be sent back to the Court of
Claims for trial according to the principles and rules which governed
the commission appointed under the act of February 16, 1863. That act,
which was a special act relating to losses occurring during the
hostilities of the previous year, did not, of course, impose the
requirement of amity, the claims allowed by the commission being paid
out of the funds belonging to the hostile Indians sequestered by the
statute. The effect of this bill, if it became a law, would be to
provide for the payment out of the Treasury of the United States of
these claims which were not presented for payment out of the Indian
funds and which have been rejected by the courts under the general law.
There are many hundreds of cases, aggregating a large amount claimed,
which have been filed in the Court of Claims, but which are excluded
from its jurisdiction for the same reason which necessitated the
dismissal of the petitions filed by these claimants. There is no legal
obligation on the part of the United States, and no promise, express or
implied, for the payment of such claims.

The measure of governmental liability is fulfilled by the passage of the
act of March 3, 1891, and the prompt payment of the judgments rendered
thereunder. To single out for payment a few claims of this large class
to the exclusion of all others would, in my judgment, be unjust; and
such action would also with reason be cited as a precedent for extending
governmental aid in all similar cases.

For the reasons given I am constrained to withhold my approval from the
bill.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 7, 1901_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State in response to
the resolution of the House of Representatives of February 19, 1901,
requesting him to furnish that body "all the information in the
possession of the State Department relating to the shipment of horses
and mules from New Orleans in large numbers for the use of the British
army in the war in South Africa."

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, March 2, 1901_.

_To the House of Representatives_:

I return herewith, without approval, House bill No. 321, entitled "An
act for the relief of the legal representative of Samuel Tewksbury,
deceased."

This bill provides for the payment to the legal representative of Samuel
Tewksbury, late of Scranton, Allegheny County, Pa., the sum of $5,697
in full compensation for the use and occupation by the United States
Government of the brick building and premises owned by him in the city
of Scranton, Pa., as a depot or barracks for United States troops by the
Provost Marshal of the United States from June, 1862, to June, 1865,
inclusive.

The records of the War Department show that about April 26, 1865, Col.
J.G. Johnson, Chief Quartermaster, forwarded to the office of the
Quartermaster-General a claim of Samuel Tewksbury for use of a building
at Scranton, Pa., from February 24, 1864, to February 3, 1865, Stated at
$1,133.33, and damage to said building at $1,400, total $2,533.33.

In forwarding these papers Colonel Johnson states as follows:

  In the spring of 1864 Mr. Samuel Tewksbury presented to me through his
  agents a claim against the United States Government for use of the
  premises mentioned in the enclosed account accompanying the papers.

  I learn from Mr. S.N. Bradford, Provost Marshal of the Twelfth District
  of Pennsylvania at Scranton, that lodgings were furnished to persons in
  military service at that place by Gardiner and Atkinson under a contract
  with the Provost Marshal, also that the contractors rented the building
  used for the above purpose from Mr. Tewksbury.

  Considering it a matter entirely between that gentleman and his tenants,
  Messrs. Gardiner and Atkinson, I at that time refused to take any action
  in the matter whatever.


The claim was again submitted to the office of the Quartermaster-General
on September 30, 1865, by Major W.B. Lane, and was returned on May 1,
1866, with the information that the United States had already paid for
lodging of the troops under the control of the Provost Marshal at
Scranton, Pa., during the time for which charge for rent is made.

The claimant was referred to the officer or person by whom the building
was taken for compensation for its use. No other record of this case is
found in the War Department, although it will be observed that the bill
covers a period from June, 1862, to June, 1865, inclusive, while the
claim as originally presented to the War Department was for occupancy of
the building at Scranton, Pa., from February 24, 1864, to February 3,
1865.

It thus appears that when this claim was originally presented it was
examined by the proper representative of the Government, and was
rejected; that no such use and occupation as the United States
Government had of claimant's building was under a contract between the
Government and the tenants of claimant, and that payment therefor was
duly made by the Government. Now after a lapse of some thirty-seven
years the period of use and occupation covered by the claim has
increased threefold, and the compensation asked therefor has more than
doubled. Under the circumstances of this case I do not feel at liberty
to approve the bill.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S SECOND INAUGURAL ADDRESS.


_My Fellow-Citizens_:

When we assembled here on the 4th of March, 1897, there was great
anxiety with regard to our currency and credit. None exists now. Then
our Treasury receipts were inadequate to meet the current obligations
of the Government. Now they are sufficient for all public needs, and we
have a surplus instead of a deficit. Then I felt constrained to convene
the Congress in extraordinary session to devise revenues to pay the
ordinary expenses of the Government. Now I have the satisfaction to
announce that the Congress just closed has reduced taxation in the sum
of $41,000,000. Then there was deep solicitude because of the long
depression in our manufacturing, mining, agricultural, and mercantile
industries and the consequent distress of our laboring population. Now
every avenue of production is crowded with activity, labor is well
employed, and American products find good markets at home and abroad.

Our diversified productions, however, are increasing in such
unprecedented volume as to admonish us of the necessity of still further
enlarging our foreign markets by broader commercial relations. For this
purpose reciprocal trade arrangements with other nations should in
liberal spirit be carefully cultivated and promoted.

The national verdict of 1896 has for the most part been executed.
Whatever remains unfulfilled is a continuing obligation resting with
undiminished force upon the Executive and the Congress. But fortunate as
our condition is, its permanence can only be assured by sound business
methods and strict economy in national administration and legislation.
We should not permit our great prosperity to lead us to reckless
ventures in business or profligacy in public expenditures. While the
Congress determines the objects and the sum of appropriations, the
officials of the executive departments are responsible for honest and
faithful disbursement, and it should be their constant care to avoid
waste and extravagance.

Honesty, capacity, and industry are nowhere more indispensable than in
public employment. These should be fundamental requisites to original
appointment and the surest guaranties against removal.

Four years ago we stood on the brink of war without the people knowing
it and without any preparation or effort at preparation for the
impending peril. I did all that in honor could be done to avert the war,
but without avail. It became inevitable; and the Congress at its first
regular session, without party division, provided money in anticipation
of the crisis and in preparation to meet it. It came. The result was
signally favorable to American arms and in the highest degree honorable
to the Government. It imposed upon us obligations from which we cannot
escape and from which it would be dishonorable to seek escape. We are
now at peace with the world, and it is my fervent prayer that if
differences arise between us and other powers they may be settled by
peaceful arbitration and that hereafter we may be spared the horrors
of war.

Intrusted by the people for a second time with the office of President,
I enter upon its administration appreciating the great responsibilities
which attach to this renewed honor and commission, promising unreserved
devotion on my part to their faithful discharge and reverently invoking
for my guidance the direction and favor of Almighty God. I should shrink
from the duties this day assumed if I did not feel that in their
performance I should have the co-operation of the wise and patriotic
men of all parties. It encourages me for the great task which I now
undertake to believe that those who voluntarily committed to me the
trust imposed upon the Chief Executive of the Republic will give to
me generous support in my duties to "preserve, protect, and defend,
the Constitution of the United States" and to "care that the laws be
faithfully executed." The national purpose is indicated through a
national election. It is the constitutional method of ascertaining the
public will. When once it is registered it is a law to us all, and
faithful observance should follow its decrees.

Strong hearts and helpful hands are needed, and, fortunately, we have
them in every part of our beloved country. We are reunited. Sectionalism
has disappeared. Division on public questions can no longer be traced
by the war maps of 1861. These old differences less and less disturb
the judgment. Existing problems demand the thought and quicken the
conscience of the country, and the responsibility for their presence, as
well as for their righteous settlement, rests upon us all--no more upon
me than upon you. There are some national questions in the solution
of which patriotism should exclude partisanship. Magnifying their
difficulties will not take them off our hands nor facilitate their
adjustment. Distrust of the capacity, integrity, and high purposes of
the American people will not be an inspiring theme for future political
contests. Dark pictures and gloomy forebodings are worse than useless.
These only becloud, they do not help to point the way of safety and
honor. "Hope maketh not ashamed." The prophets of evil were not the
builders of the Republic, nor in its crises since have they saved or
served it. The faith of the fathers was a mighty force in its creation,
and the faith of their descendants has wrought its progress and
furnished its defenders. They are obstructionists who despair, and who
would destroy confidence in the ability of our people to solve wisely
and for civilization the mighty problems resting upon them. The American
people, intrenched in freedom at home, take their love for it with them
wherever they go, and they reject as mistaken and unworthy the doctrine
that we lose our own liberties by securing the enduring foundations of
liberty to others. Our institutions will not deteriorate by extension,
and our sense of justice will not abate under tropic suns in distant
seas. As heretofore, so hereafter will the nation demonstrate its
fitness to administer any new estate which events devolve upon it, and
in the fear of God will "take occasion by the hand and make the bounds
of freedom wider yet." If there are those among us who would make our
way more difficult, we must not be disheartened, but the more earnestly
dedicate ourselves to the task upon which we have rightly entered. The
path of progress is seldom smooth. New things are often found hard to
do. Our fathers found them so. We find them so. They are inconvenient.
They cost us something. But are we not made better for the effort and
sacrifice, and are not those we serve lifted up and blessed?

We will be consoled, too, with the fact that opposition has confronted
every onward movement of the Republic from its opening hour until now,
but without success. The Republic has marched on and on, and its step
has exalted freedom and humanity. We are undergoing the same ordeal as
did our predecessors nearly a century ago. We are following the course
they blazed. They triumphed. Will their successors falter and plead
organic impotency in the nation? Surely after 125 years of achievement
for mankind we will not now surrender our equality with other powers on
matters fundamental and essential to nationality. With no such purpose
was the nation created. In no such spirit has it developed its full and
independent sovereignty. We adhere to the principle of equality among
ourselves, and by no act of ours will we assign to ourselves a
subordinate rank in the family of nations.

My fellow-citizens, the public events of the past four years have
gone into history. They are too near to justify recital. Some of them
were unforeseen; many of them momentous and far-reaching in their
consequences to ourselves and our relations with the rest of the world.
The part which the United States bore so honorably in the thrilling
scenes in China, while new to American life, has been in harmony with
its true spirit and best traditions, and in dealing with the results its
policy will be that of moderation and fairness.

We face at this moment a most important question--that of the future
relations of the United States and Cuba. With our near neighbors we must
remain close friends. The declaration of the purposes of this Government
in the resolution of April 20, 1898, must be made good. Ever since the
evacuation of the island by the army of Spain the Executive, with all
practicable speed, has been assisting its people in the successive steps
necessary to the establishment of a free and independent government
prepared to assume and perform the obligations of international law
which now rest upon the United States under the treaty of Paris. The
convention elected by the people to frame a constitution is approaching
the completion of its labors. The transfer of American control to the
new government is of such great importance, involving an obligation
resulting from our intervention and the treaty of peace, that I am glad
to be advised by the recent act of Congress of the policy which the
legislative branch of the Government deems essential to the best
interests of Cuba and the United States. The principles which led to
our intervention require that the fundamental law upon which the new
government rests should be adapted to secure a government capable of
performing the duties and discharging the functions of a separate
nation, of observing its international obligations of protecting life
and property, insuring order, safety, and liberty, and conforming to the
established and historical policy of the United States in its relation
to Cuba.

The peace which we are pledged to leave to the Cuban people must
carry with it the guaranties of permanence. We became sponsors for the
pacification of the island, and we remain accountable to the Cubans,
no less than to our own country and people, for the reconstruction of
Cuba as a free commonwealth on abiding foundations of right, justice,
liberty, and assured order. Our enfranchisement of the people will not
be completed until free Cuba shall "be a reality, not a name; a perfect
entity, not a hasty experiment bearing within itself the elements of
failure."

While the treaty of peace with Spain was ratified on the 6th of
February, 1899, and ratifications were exchanged nearly two years ago,
the Congress has indicated no form of government for the Philippine
Islands. It has, however, provided an army to enable the Executive to
suppress insurrection, restore peace, give security to the inhabitants,
and establish the authority of the United States throughout the
archipelago. It has authorized the organization of native troops as
auxiliary to the regular force. It has been advised from time to time
of the acts of the military and naval officers in the islands, of my
action in appointing civil commissions, of the instructions with which
they were charged, of their duties and powers, of their recommendations,
and of their several acts under executive commission, together with the
very complete general information they have submitted. These reports
fully set forth the conditions, past and present, in the islands, and
the instructions clearly show the principles which will guide the
Executive until the Congress shall, as it is required to do by the
treaty, determine "the civil rights and political status of the native
inhabitants." The Congress having added the sanction of its authority to
the powers already possessed and exercised by the Executive under the
Constitution, thereby leaving with the Executive the responsibility for
the government of the Philippines, I shall continue the efforts already
begun until order shall be restored throughout the islands, and as fast
as conditions permit will establish local governments, in the formation
of which the full co-operation of the people has been already invited,
and when established will encourage the people to administer them. The
settled purpose, long ago proclaimed, to afford the inhabitants of the
islands self-government as fast as they were ready for it will be
pursued with earnestness and fidelity. Already something has been
accomplished in this direction. The Government's representatives, civil
and military, are doing faithful and noble work in their mission of
emancipation and merit the approval and support of their countrymen.
The most liberal terms of amnesty have already been communicated to the
insurgents, and the way is still open for those who have raised their
arms against the Government for honorable submission to its authority.
Our countrymen should not be deceived. We are not waging war against the
inhabitants of the Philippine Islands. A portion of them are making war
against the United States. By far the greater part of the inhabitants
recognize American sovereignty and welcome it as a guaranty of order and
of security for life, property, liberty, freedom of conscience, and the
pursuit of happiness. To them full protection will be given. They shall
not be abandoned. We will not leave the destiny of the loyal millions in
the islands to the disloyal thousands who are in rebellion against the
United States. Order under civil institutions will come as soon as those
who now break the peace shall keep it. Force will not be needed or used
when those who make war against us shall make it no more. May it end
without further bloodshed, and there be ushered in the reign of peace
to be made permanent by a government of liberty under law!

MARCH 4, 1901.



PROCLAMATIONS.


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas public interests require that the Congress of the United States
should be convened in extra session at twelve o'clock on the 15th day of
March, 1897, to receive such communication as may be made by the
Executive:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, do hereby proclaim and declare that an extraordinary occasion
requires the Congress of the United States to convene in extra session
at the Capitol in the city of Washington on the 15th day of March, 1897,
at twelve o'clock, noon, of which all persons who shall at that time be
entitled to act as members thereof, are hereby required to take notice.

[SEAL.]

Given under my hand and the seal of the United States at Washington the
6th day of March in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and
ninety-seven, and of the Independence of the United States the one
hundred and twenty-first.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN SHERMAN,
    _Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

THANKSGIVING PROCLAMATION.

In remembrance of God's goodness to us during the past year, which has
been so abundant, "let us offer unto Him our thanksgiving and pay our
vows unto the Most High." Under His watchful providence industry has
prospered, the conditions of labor have been improved, the rewards of
the husbandman have been increased, and the comforts of our homes
multiplied. His mighty hand has preserved peace and protected the
nation. Respect for law and order has been strengthened, love of free
institutions cherished, and all sections of our beloved country brought
into closer bonds of fraternal regard and generous cooperation.

For these great benefits it is our duty to praise the Lord in a spirit
of humility and gratitude and to offer up to Him our most earnest
supplications. That we may acknowledge our obligation as a people to
Him who has so graciously granted us the blessings of free government
and material prosperity, I, William McKinley, President of the United
States, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the twenty-fifth
day of November, for national thanksgiving and prayer, which all of
the people are invited to observe with appropriate religious services
in their respective places of worship. On this day of rejoicing and
domestic reunion let our prayers ascend to the Giver of every good and
perfect gift for the continuance of His love and favor to us, that our
hearts may be filled with charity and good will, and we may be ever
worthy of His beneficent concern.

[SEAL.]

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of October, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-second.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN SHERMAN,
    _Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas satisfactory proof has been given me that vessels of the United
States in ballast which proceed to Mexico with the object of devoting
themselves to pearl fishery and fishing on the Mexican coasts or for the
purpose of receiving and carrying passengers and mail or of loading
cattle, wood, or any other Mexican product and which shall go directly
to ports open to general commerce so that thence they may be dispatched
to their destination, and steam vessels of the United States are
exempted from tonnage duties in Mexican ports;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the act of Congress
approved July 24, 1897, entitled "An act to authorize the President to
suspend discriminating duties imposed on foreign vessels and commerce,"
do hereby declare and proclaim that from and after the date of this, my
proclamation, Mexican vessels in ballast which proceed to the United
States with the object of fishing on the coast thereof or for the
purpose of receiving and carrying passengers and mail or of loading
cattle, wood, or any other product of the United States and which shall
go directly to ports open to general commerce so that thence they may be
despatched to their destination, and Mexican steam vessels shall be
exempted from the payment of the tonnage duties imposed by section 4219
of the Revised Statutes of the United States.

And this proclamation shall remain in force and effect until otherwise
ordered by the President of the United States.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and caused the seal of the United
States to be hereunto affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 12th day of November, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-second.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN SHERMAN,
    _Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled "An act
to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas, the public lands in the Territory of Arizona, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a Public Reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the Territory of Arizona, and within the boundaries
particularly described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the northeast corner of Section twelve (12), Township
thirteen (13) North, Range three (3) West, Gila and Salt River Meridian,
Arizona; thence southerly along the range line to the point for the
southeast corner of Section twenty-five (25), said Township; thence
westerly along the unsurveyed section line to the point for the
southwest corner of Section twenty-eight (28), said Township; thence
northerly along the unsurveyed section line to the point for the
northwest corner of Section nine (9), said Township; thence easterly
along the unsurveyed and surveyed section line to the northeast corner
of Section twelve (12), said Township, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing
of record has not expired; and all mining claims duly located and held
according to the laws of the United States and rules and regulations not
in conflict therewith;

Provided, that this exception shall not continue to apply to any
particular tract of land unless the entryman, settler, or claimant
continues to comply with the law under which the entry, filing,
settlement, or location was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to enter or make
settlement upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 10th day of May, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-second.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  WILLIAM R. DAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled, "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved June
fourth, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, entitled, "An act making
appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the
fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight,
and for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

And whereas the public lands in the Territory of New Mexico, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by the aforesaid acts of Congress, do
hereby make known and proclaim that the boundary lines of the Forest
Reservation in the Territory of New Mexico, known as "The Pecos River
Forest Reserve," created by proclamation of January eleventh, eighteen
hundred and ninety-two, are hereby so changed and enlarged as to include
all those certain tracts, pieces, or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the Territory of New Mexico, and within the boundaries
particularly described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the southwest corner of Township seventeen (17) North,
Range thirteen (13) East, New Mexico Principal Meridian, New Mexico;
thence easterly along the Fourth (4th) Standard Parallel North, to its
intersection with the west boundary line of the Las Vegas Grant; thence
northerly along the west boundary lines of the Las Vegas and Mora Grants
to the point of intersection with the southeast boundary line of the
Rancho del Rio Grande Grant; thence along the boundary line of said
grant in a southwesterly direction to the most southerly point thereof;
thence southerly to the line of the Santa Barbary Grant; thence
southeasterly and southerly to the southeast corner thereof; thence
westerly along the south boundary line of said grant to the southwest
corner thereof, and continuing westerly to the east boundary line of the
Las Trampas Grant; thence in a general southwesterly direction following
the boundary lines of the Las Trampas, Las Truchas, and San Fernando
Santiago Grants to the point of intersection with the unsurveyed range
line between Ranges ten (10) and eleven (11) East; thence southerly
along the range line to the point for the southwest corner of Section
eighteen (18), Fractional Township sixteen (16) North, Range eleven (11)
East; thence easterly along the unsurveyed section line to the point for
the southeast corner of Section thirteen (13), said township; thence
northerly along the range line to the northeast corner of Township
seventeen (17) North, Range eleven (11) East; thence easterly along the
township line to the southeast corner of Township eighteen (18) North,
Range twelve (12) East; thence southerly along the range line to the
southwest corner of Township seventeen (17) North, Range thirteen (13)
East, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; and all mining claims duly located and held
according to the laws of the United States and rules and regulations not
in conflict therewith;

Provided, that this exception shall not continue to apply to any
particular tract of land unless the entry man, settler, or claimant
continues to comply with the law under which the entry, filing,
settlement, or location was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to enter or make
settlement upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 27th day of May, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-second.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  J.B. MOORE,
    _Acting Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas pursuant to section 3 of the act of Congress approved July 24,
1897, entitled "An Act to provide revenue for the Government and to
encourage the industries of the United States," the Governments of the
United States and of the French Republic have in the spirit of amity,
and with a desire to improve their commercial relations, entered into
a Commercial Agreement in which reciprocal and equivalent concessions
have been in the judgment of the President secured according to the
provisions of said section, whereby the following articles of commerce,
being the products and manufactures of the United States, are to be
admitted into France on and after the 1st day of June, 1898, at the
minimum rate of duty, not exceeding the rates respectively appearing
in the following table, namely:


                                                  Francs per 100 kilogs.
  Canned meats                                                    15

  Table fruits, fresh:
    Lemons, oranges, cedrats and their varieties not mentioned     5
    Mandarin oranges                                              10
    Common table grapes                                            8
    Apples and pears:
      For the table                                                2
      For cider and perry                                          1.50
    Other fruits except hothouse grapes and fruits                 3

  Fruits dried or pressed (excluding raisins):
    Apples and pears:
      For the table                                               10
      For cider and perry                                          4
    Prunes                                                        10
    Other fruits                                                   5

  Common woods, logs                                               0.65
    Sawed or squared timber 80 mm. or more in thickness            1
    Squared or sawed lumber exceeding 35 mm.
      and less than 80 mm. in thickness                            1.25
    Wood sawed 35 mm. or less in thickness                         1.75

  Paving blocks                                                    1.75
  Staves                                                           1.75
  Hops                                                            30
  Apples and pears crushed, or cut and dried                       1.50
  Manufactured and prepared Pork meats                            50
  Lard and its compounds                                          25


Therefore, in further execution of the provisions of said section it is
hereby declared that on and after the 1st day of June, 1898, and during
the continuance in force of the Agreement aforesaid, and until otherwise
declared, the imposition and collection of the duties heretofore imposed
and collected upon the following named articles, the products of France,
by virtue of said act are hereby suspended, and in place thereof the
duties shall be imposed and collected thereon according to the
provisions of said section 3 as follows:

On argols, or crude tartar, or wine lees, crude, five _per centum ad
valorem_.

On brandies, or other spirits manufactured or distilled from grain or
other materials, one dollar and seventy-five cents per proof gallon.

On paintings in oil or water colors, pastels, pen and ink drawings, and
statuary, fifteen _per centum ad valorem_.

It is further declared that the rates of duty heretofore imposed and
collected on still wines and vermuth, the product of France, under the
provisions of the United States Tariff Act of 1897 are conditionally
suspended, and in place thereof shall be imposed and collected on and
after the 1st day of June next as follows, namely:

On still wines and vermuth, in casks, thirty-five cents per gallon; in
bottles or jugs, per case of one dozen bottles or jugs containing each
not more than one quart and more than one pint, or twenty-four bottles
or jugs containing each not more than one pint, one dollar and
twenty-five cents per case, and any excess beyond these quantities found
in such bottles or jugs shall be subject to a duty of four cents per
pint or fractional part thereof, but no separate or additional duty
shall be assessed upon the bottles or jugs.

Now, therefore, be it known that I, William McKinley, President of the
United States of America, have caused the above stated modifications of
the customs duties of the respective countries to be made public for the
information of the citizens of the United States of America.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of May, one thousand eight
hundred and ninety-eight, and of the Independence of the United States
of America the one hundred and twenty-second.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  WILLIAM R. DAY,
    _Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the public lands in the State of California, within the limits
hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it appears
that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and reserving
said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by the aforesaid acts of Congress, do
hereby make known and proclaim that the boundary lines of the Forest
Reservation in the State of California, known as "the Pine Mountain
and Zaca Lake Forest Reserve," created by proclamation of March second,
eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, are hereby so changed and enlarged as
to include all those certain tracts, pieces, or parcels of land lying
and being situate in the State of California, and within the boundaries
particularly described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the northwest corner of fractional Township twelve (12)
North, Range thirty (30) West, San Bernardino Base and Meridian,
California; thence southerly along the range line to the southwest
corner of said fractional township; thence westerly along the township
line to the northwest corner of Section three (3), Township eleven (11)
North, Range thirty-one (31) West; thence southerly along the section
line to the southwest corner of Section twenty-two (22), said township;
thence westerly along the section line to the northwest corner of
Section thirty (30), said township; thence southerly along the range
line between Ranges thirty-one (31) and thirty-two (32) West, to
the northern boundary of the rancho Sisquoc; thence in a general
southeasterly direction along the boundaries of the ranchos Sisquoc, La
Laguna, Cañada de los Pinos or College Rancho, Tequepis, San Marcos, and
Los Prietos y Najalayegua, to the range line between Ranges twenty-four
(24) and twenty-five (25) West; thence southerly along said range line
to the southeast corner of Township five (5) North, Range twenty-five
(25) West; thence easterly along the township line between Townships
four (4) and five (5) North, to the western boundary of the rancho
Temascal; thence along the western, northern, and eastern boundary of
said rancho to its intersection with the northern boundary of the rancho
San Francisco; thence along the northern and eastern boundary of said
rancho to its southeast corner and continuing southerly to the northern
boundary of the Ex Mission de San Fernando Grant; thence along the
northern boundary of said grant to its intersection with the range line
between Ranges fourteen (14) and fifteen (15) West; thence northerly
along said range line to the northeast corner of Section twenty-four
(24), Township four (4) North, Range fifteen (15) West; thence easterly
along the section line to the southeast corner of Section thirteen (13),
Township four (4) North, Range thirteen (13) West; thence northerly
along the range line to the southwest corner of Township five (5) North,
Range twelve (12) West; thence easterly along the township line to the
southeast corner of said township; thence northerly along the range line
to the northeast corner of Section twelve (12) of said township; thence
westerly along the section line to the northwest corner of Section seven
(7), said township; thence northerly along the range line to the First
(1st) Standard Parallel North; thence westerly along the First (1st)
Standard Parallel North to the southeast corner of Township six (6)
North, Range thirteen (13) West; thence northerly along the range line
to the northeast corner of Section thirteen (13), said township; thence
westerly along the section line to the northwest corner of Section
thirteen (13), Township six (6) North, Range fourteen (14) West; thence
northerly along the section line to the northeast corner of Section two
(2), said township; thence westerly along the township line to the
northwest corner of Section four (4), said township; thence northerly
along the section line to the northeast corner of Section five (5),
Township seven (7) North, Range fourteen (14) West; thence westerly
along the township line to the northwest corner of fractional Section
one (1), Township seven (7) North, Range seventeen (17) West; thence
northerly along the section line to the intersection with the southern
boundary of the rancho La Liebre; thence northwesterly along the
boundaries of the ranches La Liebre and Los Alamos y Agua Caliente to
the township line between Townships eight (8) and nine (9) North; thence
westerly along said township line to the southeast corner of Township
nine (9) North, Range twenty-two (22) West; thence northerly along the
township line to the northeast corner of said township; thence westerly
along the township line to the intersection with the southern boundary
of the rancho Cuyama; thence westerly and northwesterly along the
southern boundaries of the ranches Cuyama to the Eighth (8th) Standard
Parallel South; thence westerly along said parallel to the northwest
corner of fractional Township twelve (12) North, Range thirty (30) West,
the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all irrigation
rights and lands lawfully acquired therefor and all lands which may have
been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or covered
by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States Land
Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant to
law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; and all mining claims duly located and held
according to the laws of the United States and rules and regulations not
in conflict therewith;

Provided, that this exception shall not continue to apply to any
particular tract of land unless the entryman, settler, or claimant
continues to comply with the law under which the entry, filing,
settlement, or location was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to enter or make
settlement upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 29th day of June, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-second.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  J.B. MOORE,
    _Acting Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas satisfactory proof has been given to me that no tonnage or
light-house dues or any equivalent tax or taxes whatever are imposed
upon vessels of the United States in the port of Copenhagen, in the
Kingdom of Denmark;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by section eleven of
the act of Congress, entitled "An Act to abolish certain fees for
official services to American vessels, and to amend the laws relating
to shipping commissioners, seamen, and owners of vessels, and for other
purposes," approved June nineteenth, one thousand eight hundred and
eighty-six, and in virtue of the further act amendatory thereof,
entitled "An act to amend the laws relating to navigation and for
other purposes," approved April four, one thousand eight hundred and
eighty-eight, do hereby declare and proclaim that from and after the
date of this, my Proclamation, shall be suspended the collection of the
whole of the tonnage duty which is imposed by said section eleven of the
act approved June nineteenth, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six,
upon vessels entered in the ports of the United States directly from the
port of Copenhagen, in the Kingdom of Denmark.

Provided, that there shall be excluded from the benefits of the
suspension hereby declared and proclaimed, the vessels of any foreign
country in whose ports the fees or dues of any kind or nature imposed on
vessels of the United States, or the import or export duties on their
cargoes, are in excess of the fees, dues, or duties imposed on the
vessels of such country or on the cargoes of such vessels; but this
proviso shall not be held to be inconsistent with the special regulation
by foreign countries of duties and other charges on their own vessels,
and the cargoes thereof, engaged in their coasting trade, or with the
existence between such countries and other States of reciprocal
stipulations founded on special conditions and equivalents, and thus not
within the treatment of American vessels under the most favored nation
clause in treaties between the United States and such countries.

And the suspension hereby declared and proclaimed shall continue so long
as the reciprocal exemption of vessels belonging to citizens of the
United States and their cargoes, shall be continued in the said port of
Copenhagen and no longer.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 19th day of July, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  WILLIAM R. DAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas in the opening of the Cherokee Outlet, pursuant to section ten
of the act of Congress, approved March third, eighteen hundred and
ninety-three, the lands known as the Eastern Middle, and Western Saline
Reserves, were excepted from settlement in view of three leases made
by the Cherokee Nation prior to March third, eighteen hundred and
ninety-three, under authority of the act of Congress, approved August
seventh, eighteen hundred and eighty-two;

And whereas it appears that said leases were never approved as provided
by law;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section ten of said act of March
third, eighteen hundred and ninety-three, do hereby declare and make
known that all the lands in said saline reserves, as described in a
proclamation dated August nineteenth, eighteen hundred and ninety-three,
are hereby restored to the public domain and will be disposed of under
the laws of the United States relating to public lands in said Cherokee
Outlet, subject to the policy of the Government in disposing of saline
lands.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of July, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  WILLIAM R. DAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved June
fourth, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, entitled, "An act making
appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the
fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight,
and for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any Executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

And whereas, the public lands in the States of South Dakota and Wyoming,
within the limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with
timber, and it appears that the public good would be promoted by setting
apart and reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by the aforesaid acts of Congress, do
hereby make known and proclaim that the boundary lines of the Forest
Reservation in the State of South Dakota, known as "The Black Hills
Forest Reserve," created by proclamation of February twenty-second,
eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, are hereby so changed and enlarged as
to include all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and
being situate in the States of South Dakota and Wyoming, and within the
boundaries particularly described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the southeast corner of Township five (5) South, Range five
(5) East, Black Hills Meridian, South Dakota; thence northerly to the
northeast corner of said township; thence easterly to the southeast
corner of Section thirty-three (33), Township four (4) South, Range six
(6) East; thence northerly to the southeast corner of Section nine (9),
said township; thence easterly to the southeast corner of Section twelve
(12), said township; thence northerly along the range line to the
northeast corner of Section thirteen (13), Township one (1) North, Range
six (6) East; thence westerly to the northwest corner of said section;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section two (2), said
township; thence westerly to the northwest corner of said section;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section twenty-two (22),
Township two (2) North, Range six (6) East; thence westerly to the
southeast corner of Section seventeen (17), said township; thence
northerly to the northeast corner of said section; thence westerly to
the northwest corner of said section; thence northerly to the southeast
corner of Section thirty (30), Township three (3) North, Range six (6)
East; thence easterly to the southeast corner of Section twenty-seven
(27), said township; thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section
twenty-two (22), said township; thence westerly to the northwest corner
of said section; thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section
sixteen (16), said township; thence westerly to the northwest corner of
said section; thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section eight
(8), said township; thence westerly to the northwest corner of said
section; thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section nineteen
(19), Township four (4) North, Range six (6) East; thence westerly to
the northwest corner of said section; thence northerly to the northeast
corner of Section twelve (12), Township four (4) North, Range five (5)
East; thence westerly to the northwest corner of said section; thence
northerly to the northeast corner of Section thirty-five (35), Township
five (5) North, Range five (5) East; thence westerly to the northwest
corner of said section; thence northerly to the northeast corner of
Section twenty-seven (27), said township; thence westerly to the
northwest corner of said section; thence northerly to the northeast
corner of Section twenty-one (21), said township; thence westerly to
the southeast corner of Section thirteen (13), Township five (5) North,
Range four (4) East; thence northerly to the northeast corner of said
section; thence westerly to the northwest corner of said section; thence
northerly to the northeast corner of Section two (2), said township;
thence westerly to the northwest corner of Section four (4), said
township; thence southerly to the southwest corner of said section;
thence westerly to the southeast corner of Section two (2), Township
five (5) North, Range three (3) East; thence northerly to the northeast
corner of said section; thence westerly to the southeast corner of
Section thirty-five (35), Township six (6) North, Range two (2) East;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section twenty-six (26) said
township; thence westerly to the southeast corner of Section twenty-four
(24), Township six (6) North, Range one (1) East; thence northerly to
the northeast corner of said section; thence westerly along the section
line to its intersection with the boundary line between the States of
South Dakota and Wyoming; thence southerly along said State boundary
line to its intersection with the section line between Sections
twenty-eight (28) and thirty-three (33), Township fifty-two (52) North,
Range sixty (60) West, Sixth (6th) Principal Meridian, Wyoming; thence
westerly to the northwest corner of Section thirty-six (36), Township
fifty-two (52) North, Range sixty-one (61) West; thence southerly along
the section line to its intersection with the Twelfth (12th) Standard
Parallel North; thence easterly along said parallel to its intersection
with the boundary line between the States of Wyoming and South Dakota;
thence southerly along said State boundary line to its intersection with
the section line between Sections eighteen (18) and nineteen (19),
Township three (3) South, Range one (1) East, Black Hills Meridian,
South Dakota; thence easterly to the northwest corner of Section
twenty-two (22), said township, thence southerly to the southwest corner
of Section thirty-four (34), said township; thence easterly to the
southeast corner of said township; thence southerly to the southwest
corner of Section thirty (30), Township four (4) South, Range two (2)
East; thence easterly to the southeast corner of Section twenty-seven
(27), said township; thence southerly to the southwest corner of Section
eleven (11), Township five (5) South, Range two (2) East; thence
easterly to the northwest corner of Section eighteen (18), Township five
(5) South, Range four (4) East; thence southerly to the southwest corner
of said township; thence easterly to the southeast corner of Township
five (5) South, Range five (5) East, the place of beginning; excepting
and excluding from reservation all those certain tracts, pieces or
parcels of land lying and being situate within the boundaries
particularly described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the northeast corner of Section twenty-four (24), Township
five (5) North, Range three (3) East, Black Hills Meridian; thence
westerly to the northwest corner of Section nineteen (19), said
township; thence southerly to the northwest corner of Section thirty-one
(31), said township; thence westerly to the northwest corner of Section
thirty-six (36), Township five (5) North, Range two (2) East; thence
southerly to the southwest corner of Section thirteen (13), Township
four (4) North, Range two (2) East; thence easterly to the southeast
corner of Section fifteen (15), Township four (4) North, Range three (3)
East; thence northerly to the southwest corner of Section two (2), said
township; thence easterly to the southeast corner of said section;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of said section; thence
easterly to the southeast corner of Township five (5) North, Range three
(3) East; thence northerly to the northeast corner of Section
twenty-four (24), said township, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; and all mining claims duly located and held
according to the laws of the United States and rules and regulations not
in conflict therewith; _Provided_, That this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler, or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing, settlement, or location was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to enter or make
settlement upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 19th day of September, in the year
of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  ALVEY A. ADEE,
    _Acting Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by joint resolution "to provide for annexing the Hawaiian
Islands to the United States," approved July 7, 1898, the cession by the
Government of the Republic of Hawaii to the United States of America, of
all rights of sovereignty of whatsoever kind in and over the Hawaiian
Islands and their dependencies, and the transfer to the United States
of the absolute fee and ownership of all public, Government, or crown
lands, public buildings, or edifices, ports, harbors, military
equipment, and all other public property of every kind and description
belonging to the Government of the Hawaiian Islands, was duly accepted,
ratified, and confirmed, and the said Hawaiian Islands and their
dependencies annexed as a part of the territory of the United States and
made subject to the sovereign dominion thereof, and all and singular the
property and rights hereinbefore mentioned vested in the United States
of America; and

Whereas it was further provided in said resolution that the existing
laws of the United States relative to public lands shall not apply to
such lands in the Hawaiian Islands, but the Congress of the United
States shall enact special laws for their management and disposition;
and

Whereas it is deemed necessary in the public interests that certain lots
and plats of land in the city of Honolulu be immediately reserved for
naval purposes;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the authority in me vested, do hereby declare, proclaim, and
make known that the following described lots or plats of land be and the
same are hereby reserved for naval purposes until such time as the
Congress of the United States shall otherwise direct, to wit:

1st. The water front lying between the Bishop Estate and the line of
Richards Street including the site of prospective wharves, slips, and
their approaches.

2d. The blocks of land embracing lots No. 86 to 91, 100 to 131,
including Mililani Street to the intersection of Halekauwali Street; and
the Government water lots lying between the Bishop Estate and Punchbowl
and Allen Streets.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 2d day of November, in the year one
thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and of the Independence of the
United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



HAWAIIAN CABLE CONCESSION.

_To all to whom these presents shall come; greeting_:

Know ye, that: Whereas, by an Indenture made the 2d day of July, in the
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight between
Sanford B. Dole, President of the Republic of Hawaii for and in behalf
of the Hawaiian Government of the one part and the Pacific Cable
Company, a corporation organized and existing under the laws of the
State of New York of the United States of America, of the other part,
there was granted, conceded, and confirmed unto the party of the second
part and its successors and assigns the right and privilege to lay,
construct, land, maintain and operate telegraphic and magnetic lines or
cables from a point or points on the Pacific Coast of the United States
to a suitable landing place or places to be selected by the party of the
second part in the Hawaiian Islands with terminus at Honolulu, Island of
Oahu, and from and beyond the Hawaiian Islands to Japan and any islands
or places necessary for stations for such cables between the Hawaiian
Islands and Japan that lie north of the tenth degree or parallel of
north latitude in the North Pacific Ocean, as an exclusive right and
privilege together with an exemption from duties, charges, and taxes
for and during the term of twenty years from the date expressed in
said Indenture, to wit, the 21st day of June, A.D. 1898,--said right,
privilege, and exemption being subject to the terms and conditions set
forth in said Indenture;

And whereas among said terms and conditions it is declared and agreed by
said Indenture that the party of the second part within two years from
the approval (within eighteen months from the date of said contract) of
an act by the Congress of the United States authorizing the party of the
second part to construct and operate a submarine cable line between the
United States and the Hawaiian Islands shall construct, lay in proper
working order, and establish a submarine telegraph cable from a point or
points on the Pacific coast of the United States to a landing place or
places in the Hawaiian Islands with terminus at Honolulu, Island of
Oahu, according to the specifications of said Indenture, and further,
within three years from the approval of such act by the Congress of the
United States, shall in like manner construct, lay in proper working
order, and establish a submarine telegraph cable from a point or points
at or near said Honolulu to Japan;

And whereas it is provided by said Indenture that the contract therein
made and set forth shall not take effect, if at any time within six
months from the date thereof, to wit, the 2d day of July, A.D., 1898,
"the United States State Department" shall express its disapproval
thereof;

And whereas, pursuant to a Joint Resolution of the Senate and House of
Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
approved July 7, 1898, to provide for annexing the Hawaiian Islands to
the United States, the sovereignty of the said Hawaiian Islands was
yielded up to the United States on the 12th day of August, A.D., 1898,
becoming thenceforth vested in the United States of America.

And whereas, in view of the provisions of said Joint Resolution for the
determination by the Congress of the United States of all matters of
municipal legislation concerning the Hawaiian Islands, and because the
subject matter and provisions of said Indenture are deemed to be proper
subjects for the consideration and determination of the Congress of the
United States, it is deemed expedient and necessary that the Congress of
the United States consider and adopt such legislation, especially in
regard to grants and contractual obligations to be controlled by and
rest upon the United States of America as vested with sovereignty over
said Hawaiian Islands, without let or hindrance by reason of any action
of the Government of the Republic of Hawaii in respect to such grants
and contractual obligations initiated by the said Government of the
Republic of Hawaii prior to and incomplete at the time of the yielding
up of the sovereignty of the Hawaiian Islands to the United States;

Now, therefore, I, John Hay, Secretary of State of the United States, do
hereby express on the part of "the United States State Department" its
disapproval of the contract stipulated in the said Indenture to the end
that the same shall not take effect.

[SEAL.]

Given under my hand and the seal of the Department of State of the
United States, in the city of Washington, D.C., this thirty-first day of
December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and
ninety-eight.

JOHN HAY.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled, "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests, in
any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved June
fourth, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, entitled, "An act making
appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the
fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight,
and for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

And whereas the public lands in the State of California, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by the aforesaid acts of Congress, do
hereby make known and proclaim that the boundary lines of the Forest
Reservation in the State of California, known as "The Trabuco Cañon
Forest Reserve," created by proclamation of February twenty-fifth,
eighteen hundred and ninety-three, are hereby so changed and enlarged as
to include all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and
being situate in the State of California, and within the boundaries
particularly described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the northeast corner of Section thirteen (13), Township
five (5) South, Range six (6) West, San Bernardino Base and Meridian,
California; thence westerly along the section line to the southeast
corner of Section nine (9), said township; thence northerly along the
section line to the northeast corner of Section four (4), said township;
thence westerly along the township line to the northwest corner of
Section three (3), Township five (5) South, Range seven (7) West; thence
southerly along the section line to the southwest corner of Section
thirty-four (34), said township; thence easterly along the township
line to the southeast corner of said township; thence southerly
along the range line between Ranges six (6) and seven (7) West, to its
intersection with the northern boundary of the Rancho Mission Viejo or
La Paz; thence along the northern and eastern boundary of said rancho
to its intersection with the northern boundary of the Rancho Santa
Margarita y Las Flores; thence along the northern boundary of said
rancho to its intersection with the range line between Ranges four
(4) and five (5) West; thence northerly along said range line to its
intersection with the southern boundary of the Rancho Santa Rosa; thence
in a northwesterly and northeasterly direction along the southern and
western boundary of said rancho to its intersection with the township
line between Townships six (6) and seven (7) South; thence westerly
along said township line to the southeast corner of Township six (6)
South, Range six (6) West; thence northerly along the range line to the
northeast corner of Section thirteen (13), Township five (5) South,
Range six (6) West, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler, or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing, or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 30th day of January, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas satisfactory proof has been given to me by the Government of
Mexico that no discriminating duties of tonnage or imposts are imposed
or levied in the ports of Mexico upon vessels wholly belonging to
citizens of the United States, or upon the produce, manufactures, or
merchandise imported in the same from the United States, or from any
foreign country:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States
of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by section four
thousand two hundred and twenty-eight of the Revised Statutes of the
United States, do hereby declare and proclaim that, from and after
the date of this, my proclamation, so long as vessels of the United
States and their cargoes shall be exempt from discriminating duties as
aforesaid, any such duties on Mexican vessels entering the ports of the
United States, or on the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported
in such vessels, shall be suspended and discontinued, and no longer.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, the 9th day of February, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas the public lands in the State of Montana, within the limits
hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it appears
that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and reserving
said lands as public reservations;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there are hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as Public Reservations
all those certain tracts, pieces, or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the State of Montana and particularly described as follows,
to wit:

Sections fourteen (14), twenty-four (24), twenty-six (26), and
thirty-six (36), Township three (3) South, Range five (5) East; Sections
two (2), twelve (12), fourteen (14), twenty-four (24), twenty-six (26),
and thirty-six (36), Township four (4) South, Range five (5) East;
Sections two (2), twelve (12), fourteen (14), and twenty-four (24),
Township five (5) South, Range five (5) East; Sections fourteen (14),
sixteen (16), eighteen (18), twenty (20), twenty-two (22), twenty-four
(24), twenty-six (26), twenty-eight (28), thirty (30), thirty-two (32),
thirty-four (34), and thirty-six (36), Township three (3) South, Range
six (6) East; Sections two (2), four (4), six (6), eight (8), ten (10),
twelve (12), fourteen (14), sixteen (16), eighteen (18), twenty (20),
twenty-two (22), twenty-four (24), twenty-six (26), twenty-eight (28),
thirty (30), thirty-two (32), thirty-four (34), and thirty-six (36),
Township four (4) South, Range six (6) East; Sections two (2), four (4),
six (6), eight (8), ten (10), twelve (12), fourteen (14), sixteen (16),
eighteen (18), twenty (20), twenty-two (22), and twenty-four (24),
Township five (5) South, Range six (6) East; Sections eighteen (18), and
thirty (30), Township three (3) South, Range seven (7) East; Sections
six (6), eighteen (18), and thirty (30), Township four (4) South, Range
seven (7) East; and Sections six (6) and eighteen (18), Township five
(5) South, Range seven (7) East, Principal Meridian, Montana.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler, or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing, or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tracts of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 10th day of February, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled, "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas the public lands in the State of Utah, within the limits
hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it appears
that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and reserving
said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a Public Reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the State of Utah and within the boundaries particularly
described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the northeast corner of Section twenty-four (24), Township
twenty-four (24) South, Range two (2) East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian,
Utah; thence southerly along the range line to the northeast corner of
Section thirteen (13), Township twenty-five (25) South, Range two (2)
East; thence easterly along the section line to the northeast corner of
Section eighteen (18), Township twenty-five (25) South, Range three
(3) East; thence southerly along the section line to the Fifth (5th)
Standard Parallel South; thence westerly along said parallel to the
northeast corner of Township twenty-six (26) South, Range two (2) East;
thence southerly along the range line to the southeast corner of said
township; thence westerly along the township line to the southwest
corner of Section thirty-five (35), Township twenty-six (26) South,
Range one (1) East; thence northerly along the section line to the Fifth
(5th) Standard Parallel South; thence easterly along said parallel to
the southwest corner of Township twenty-five (25) South, Range two (2)
East; thence northerly along the range line to the northwest corner of
Section nineteen (19), Township twenty-four (24) South, Range two (2)
East; thence easterly along the section line to the northeast corner of
Section twenty-four (24), said township, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing, or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 10th day of February, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled, "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas, the public lands in the Territory of New Mexico, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a Public Reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the Territory of New Mexico and within the boundaries
particularly described as follows, to-wit:

Beginning at a point on the boundary line between New Mexico and Arizona
where it is intersected by the north line of Township five (5) South,
Range twenty-one (21) West, New Mexico Principal Meridian, New Mexico;
thence easterly along the township line to the northeast corner of
Township five (5) South, Range sixteen (16) West; thence southerly along
the range line between Ranges fifteen (15) and sixteen (16) West, to the
southeast corner of Township eight (8) South, Range sixteen (16) West;
thence easterly along the township line to the northeast corner of
Township nine (9) South, Range fifteen (15) West; thence southerly along
the range line to the southeast corner of said township; thence easterly
along the township line to the northeast corner of Township ten (10)
South, Range ten (10) West; thence southerly along the First Guide
Meridian West, between Ranges nine (9) and ten (10) West, to its
intersection with the Third (3rd) Standard Parallel South, between
Townships fifteen (15) and sixteen (16) South; thence westerly along the
said Third (3rd) Standard Parallel South to the southwest corner of
Township fifteen (15) South, Range sixteen (16) West; thence northerly
along the range line to the northwest corner of said township; thence
westerly along the township line to the northeast corner of Township
fifteen (15) South, Range nineteen (19) West; thence southerly along the
range line to its intersection with the Third (3rd) Standard Parallel
South; thence westerly along the Third (3rd) Standard Parallel South to
its intersection with the boundary line between New Mexico and Arizona;
thence northerly along said boundary line to the point where it
intersects the north line of Township five (5) South, Range twenty-one
(21) West, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this second day of March, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by a proclamation of the President of the United States, dated
the second day of December, eighteen hundred and ninety one, upon proof
then appearing satisfactory that no tonnage or lighthouse dues or other
equivalent tax or taxes were imposed upon American vessels entering the
ports of the Island of Tobago, one of the British West India Islands,
and that vessels belonging to the United States of America and their
cargoes were not required in the ports of the said Island of Tobago to
pay any fee or due of any kind or nature, or any import due higher than
was payable by vessels from ports or places in the said Island of
Tobago, or their cargoes, in the United States, the President did
therefore declare and proclaim, from and after the date of his said
proclamation of December second, eighteen hundred and ninety one, the
suspension of the collection of the whole of the duty of three cents per
ton, not to exceed fifteen cents per ton per annum, imposed upon vessels
entered in the ports of the United States from any of the ports of the
Island of Tobago by section 11 of the act of Congress approved June
nineteenth, eighteen hundred and eighty six, entitled "An act to abolish
certain fees for official services to American vessels and to amend the
laws relating to shipping commissioners, seamen, and owners of vessels
and for other purposes."

And whereas the President did further declare and proclaim in his
proclamation of December second, eighteen hundred and ninety one, that
the said suspension should continue so long as the reciprocal exemption
of vessels belonging to citizens of the United States and their cargoes
should be continued in the said ports of the Island of Tobago and no
longer;

And whereas it now appears upon satisfactory proof that tonnage or
light-house dues, or a tax or taxes equivalent thereto, are in fact
imposed upon American vessels and their cargoes entered in ports of
the Island of Tobago higher and other than those imposed upon vessels
and their cargoes entered in ports of the Island of Tobago, or
their cargoes, entered in ports of the United States, so that said
proclamation of December second, eighteen hundred and ninety one, in its
operation and effect contravenes the meaning and intent of said section
11 of the act of Congress approved June nineteenth, eighteen hundred and
eighty-six;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the aforesaid section 11 of the act aforesaid, as
well as in pursuance of the terms of said proclamation itself, do hereby
revoke the said proclamation of December second, eighteen hundred and
ninety-one suspending the collection of the whole of the duty of three
cents per ton, not to exceed fifteen cents per ton per annum (which is
imposed by the aforesaid section of said act) upon vessels entered in
the ports of the United States from any of the ports of the Island of
Tobago; this revocation of said proclamation to take effect on and after
the date of this my proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of March, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by a proclamation of the President of the United States,
dated April seventh, eighteen hundred and eighty-five upon proof then
appearing satisfactory that upon vessels of the United States arriving
at the Island of Trinidad, British West Indies, no due was imposed by
the ton as tonnage or as light money and that no other equivalent tax on
vessels of the United States was imposed at said island by the British
Government, the President did declare and proclaim from and after the
date of his said proclamation of April seventh, eighteen hundred and
eighty-five, the suspension of the collection of the tonnage duties of
three cents per ton, not to exceed fifteen cents per ton per annum,
imposed upon vessels entered in ports of the United States from any of
the ports of the Island of Trinidad by section 14 of the act of Congress
approved June twenty-six, eighteen hundred and eighty-four, entitled
"An act to remove certain burdens on the American merchant marine and
encourage the American foreign carrying trade and for other purposes;"

And whereas it now appears upon satisfactory proof that tonnage or
light-house dues, or a tax or taxes equivalent thereto, are in fact
imposed upon American vessels and their cargoes entered in ports of the
Island of Trinidad higher and other than those imposed upon vessels from
ports in the Island of Trinidad or their cargoes entered in ports of the
United States, so that said proclamation of April seventh, eighteen
hundred and eighty-five, in its operation and effect contravenes the
meaning and intent of section 14 of the act of Congress approved June
twenty-six, eighteen hundred and eighty-four, as amended by section 11
of the act of Congress approved June nineteenth, eighteen hundred and
eighty-six, entitled "An act to abolish certain fees for official
services to American vessels and to amend the laws relating to shipping
commissioners, seamen, and owners of vessels and for other purposes;"

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the aforesaid section 14 of the act of Congress
approved June twenty-six, eighteen hundred and eighty-four as amended by
the aforesaid section 11 of the act approved June nineteenth, eighteen
hundred and eighty-six, do hereby revoke the said proclamation of April
seventh, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, suspending the collection of
the whole of the duty of three cents per ton, not to exceed fifteen
cents per ton per annum (which is imposed by the aforesaid sections of
said acts), upon vessels entered in the ports of the United States from
any of the ports of the Island of Trinidad; this revocation of said
proclamation to take effect on and after the date of this my
proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of March, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, it is deemed necessary in the public interests that certain
lands lying to the eastward of the city of San Juan, in Puerto Rico, be
immediately reserved for naval purposes;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the authority in me vested, do hereby, declare, proclaim, and
make known that the following-described lands be and the same are hereby
reserved for naval purposes until such time as the Congress of the
United States shall otherwise direct, to wit:

1st. The public land, natural, reclaimed, partly reclaimed, or which
may be reclaimed, lying south of the Caguas Road, shown on the U.S.
Hydrographic Map No. 1745 of July, 1898, and for 250 feet north of said
Caguas Road, to be bounded on the west by a true north and south line
passing through the eastern corner of the railway station shown on said
map, on the south by the shore of the harbor, and to extend east 2,400
feet, more or less, to include 80 acres.

2nd. The entire island lying to the southward of the above-described
land, and described on the U.S. Hydrographic Map No. 1745, of July,
1898, as Isla Grande, or Manglar.

The Military Governor of the Island of Puerto Rico will make this
transfer through the representative of the Navy, the Commandant of the
United States Naval Station, San Juan, Puerto Rico, who will present
this proclamation.

_March 29, 1899._

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled, "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas, the public lands in the State of California, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a Public Reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the State of California and particularly described as
follows, to wit:

Townships eleven (11), twelve (12) and thirteen (13) North, Range
sixteen (16) East, Mount Diablo Base and Meridian, California; Townships
eleven (11), twelve (12) and thirteen (13) North, Range seventeen (17)
East; and so much of Township eleven (11) North, Range eighteen (18)
East, as lies west of the summit of the Sierra Nevada Range of mountains
in El Dorado County, California.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

The reservation hereby established shall be known as The Lake Tahoe
Forest Reserve.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 13th day of April, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, by the provisions of an act approved February 20, 1895,
entitled "An act to disapprove the treaty heretofore made with the
Southern Ute Indians to be removed to the Territory of Utah, and
providing for settling them down in severalty where they may so elect
and are qualified and to settle all those not electing to take lands
in severalty, on the west forty miles of present reservation and in
portions of New Mexico, and for other purposes, and to carry out the
provisions of the treaty with said Indians June fifteenth, eighteen
hundred and eighty," the agreement made by the commissioners on the part
of the United States with the Southern Ute Indians of Colorado bearing
date November thirteenth, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, was
annulled and the treaty made with said Indians June fifteenth, eighteen
hundred and eighty, was directed to be carried out as therein provided
and as further provided by general law for settling Indians in
severalty; and

Whereas it was further provided by said act that within six months
after the passage thereof, the Secretary of the Interior should cause
allotment of land, in severalty, to be made to such of the Southern Ute
Indians in Colorado, as might elect and be considered by him qualified
to take the same out of the agricultural lands embraced in their present
reservation in Colorado, such allotments to be made in accordance with
the provisions of the act of Congress approved June fifteenth, eighteen
hundred and eighty, entitled "An act to accept and ratify the agreement
submitted by the confederated bands of Ute Indians in Colorado for the
sale of their reservation in said State and for other purposes, and to
make the necessary appropriations for carrying out the same," and the
amendments thereto, as far as applicable, and the treaties theretofore
made with said Indians; and

Whereas it was further provided that for the sole and exclusive use of
such of said Indians as might not elect or be deemed qualified to take
allotments in severalty as provided, there should be set apart and
reserved all that portion of their reservation lying west of the range
line between ranges thirteen and fourteen west of the New Mexico
Principal Meridian, and also all of townships thirty-one and thirty-two
of ranges fourteen, fifteen, and sixteen west of the New Mexico
Principal Meridian and lying in the Territory of New Mexico, subject
to the right of the Government to erect and maintain agency buildings
thereon, and to grant rights of way through the same for railroads,
irrigation ditches, highways and other necessary purposes; and

Whereas under the provisions of section four of said act it was made the
duty of the President of the United States to issue his proclamation
declaring the lands within the reservation of said Indians except such
portions as might have been allotted or reserved under the provisions of
the preceding sections of said act, open to occupancy and settlement,
said unallotted and unreserved lands to be and become a part of the
public domain of the United States and to become subject to entry, under
the desert, homestead, and townsite laws and the laws governing the
disposal of coal, mineral, stone and timber lands, but providing that no
homestead settler should receive a title to any portion of such lands at
less than one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, and such settlers
should be required to make a cash payment of fifty cents per acre at the
time filing is made upon any of said lands; and providing that before
said lands should be open to public settlement the Secretary of the
Interior should cause the improvements belonging to the Indians on the
lands then occupied by them to be appraised and sold at public sale to
the highest bidder, except improvements on lands allotted to the Indians
in accordance with this act; and providing that no sale of such
improvements should be made for less than the appraised value and that
the several purchasers of said improvements should, for thirty days
after the issuance of the President's proclamation have the preference
right of entry of the lands upon which the improvements purchased by
them should be situated, but that the said purchase should not exceed
one hundred and sixty acres and that the proceeds of such improvements
should be paid to the Indians owning the same; and

Whereas it is further provided that the provisions of said act should
take effect only upon the acceptance thereof and consent thereto by a
majority of all the male adult Indians then located or residing upon the
reservation, which acceptance should be at once obtained under such
regulations as the Secretary of the Interior might prescribe; and

Whereas allotments have been made as provided for in said act, and
all the other terms and considerations as required therein have been
complied with, precedent to opening the unallotted and unreserved
lands in said reservation to settlement and entry, except the sale of
improvements on the NE 1/4 NW 1/4, S 1/2 NW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SW 1/4 Sec.
1, T. 33 N., R. 9 W., belonging to Ignacio, an Indian, but said sale
will be immediately ordered and the rights of the purchaser thereof will
be protected for thirty days from date of this proclamation, as provided
by the act, by instructions to the register and receiver of the local
land office having jurisdiction over the same, and as this exception is
not considered a bar to the opening of the unallotted and unreserved
lands to settlement; and

Whereas I issued a proclamation on the 29th day of March, last, intended
to open the lands to settlement and entry as authorized in said act, but
as some question has arisen as to the boundaries proclaimed being
sufficiently definite to cover the lands intended to be opened,

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States,
for the purpose of removing any doubt and making the boundaries of said
lands more definite, by virtue of the power in me vested by said act,
do hereby issue this, my second proclamation, and do hereby declare and
make known that all of the lands embraced in said reservation, saving
and excepting the lands reserved for and allotted to said Indians, and
the lands reserved for other purposes in pursuance of the provisions of
said act, will, at and after the hour of twelve o'clock noon (mountain
standard time) on the 4th day of May, A.D., eighteen hundred and
ninety-nine, and not before, be open to settlement and entry under the
terms of and subject to all the conditions, limitations, reservations
and restrictions contained in said act, and the laws of the United
States applicable thereto.

The lands to be opened to settlement and entry are described as lying
within the following boundaries: Beginning at the point established by
S.S. Gannett, Special Indian Agent, in June, 1897, at the intersection
of the 107th meridian and the 37th parallel of latitude; thence north
15 miles along the eastern boundary of the reservation; thence westerly
along the north boundary of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation to its
intersection with the range line between ranges thirteen and fourteen
west of the New Mexico Principal Meridian; thence south fifteen miles on
said range line to the south boundary of the State of Colorado; thence
easterly along the south boundary of the State of Colorado to the place
of beginning.

The survey of the east boundary of the above tract through townships 32,
33, and 34 N., R. 1 W., and of that part of the north boundary in Tps.
34 N., Rs. 1 and 2 W., being in process of correction owing to errors
found in said survey, notice is hereby given to all parties who may
elect to make entries of lands adjoining the boundary lines subject to
correction, that their entries will be at their own risk, and subject
to such changes as to the boundaries of the several tracts so entered
as may be found necessary in the progress of the correction of the
erroneous survey, and that without recourse to the United States for
any damage that may arise as the result of the correction survey.

The lands allotted to the Indians are for greater convenience
particularly described in the accompanying schedule entitled "Schedule
of lands within the Southern Ute Indian Reservation allotted to the
Indians and withheld from settlement and entry by proclamation of the
President dated April 13, 1899," and which schedule is made a part
thereof.

An error having been made in 1873 in the survey and location of the
eastern boundary of the reservation hereby opened to settlement and
entry whereby certain lands constituting a part of the reservation were
erroneously identified as being outside of the reservation, by reason
of which several persons in good faith settled upon said lands under
the belief that the same were unappropriated public lands open to
settlement, and have since improved and cultivated, and are now residing
upon the same with a view to the entry thereof under the public land
laws, notice is hereby given that in so far as said persons possess the
qualifications required by law, and maintain their said settlement and
residence up to the time of the opening herein provided for, they will
be considered and treated as having initiated and established a lawful
settlement at the very instant at which the lands become open, and as
having the superior right and claim to enter said lands, which right
must be exercised within three months from the time of said opening.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of April, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



SCHEDULE OF LANDS WITHIN THE SOUTHERN UTE INDIAN RESERVATION ALLOTTED
TO THE INDIANS AND WITHHELD FROM SETTLEMENT AND ENTRY BY PROCLAMATION
OF THE PRESIDENT DATED APRIL 13, 1899.

_In Township 32 North, Range 3 West._

Southwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 4; south half of
southeast quarter and southeast quarter of southwest quarter of section
5; north half of northeast quarter, east half of northwest quarter, east
half of southwest quarter and southwest quarter of southwest quarter of
section 8; north half of northwest quarter and southeast quarter of
northwest quarter of section 9; southeast quarter of southwest quarter
and south half of southeast quarter of section 10; southwest quarter of
southwest quarter of section 11; northwest quarter of northwest quarter
of section 13; north half of northeast quarter and north half of
northwest quarter of section 14; northeast quarter of northeast quarter
of section 15; northwest quarter of northwest quarter of section 17; and
northeast quarter of northeast quarter of section 18.

_In Township 33 North, Range 3 West._

East half of section 3; northeast quarter, south half of northwest
quarter and west half of southwest quarter of section 10; south half of
southeast quarter and south half of southwest quarter of section 19;
east half of northeast quarter, southeast quarter, east half of
southwest quarter and southwest quarter of southwest quarter of section
20; northwest quarter and north half of southwest quarter of section 21;
west half of northwest quarter of section 28; east half, east half of
northwest quarter and northwest quarter of northwest quarter of section
29; north half of northeast quarter and north half of northwest quarter
of section 30; and northeast quarter of section 32.

_In Township 34 North, Range 3 West._

Southwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 22; northwest quarter
of northwest quarter, south half of northwest quarter and southwest
quarter of section 27; and north half of northwest quarter, southeast
quarter of northwest quarter, southwest quarter of northeast quarter and
southeast quarter of section 34.

_In Township 32 North, Range 4 West._

Southwest quarter of southeast quarter of section 10; southwest quarter
of southwest quarter of section 13; south half of southeast quarter,
south half of southwest quarter and northwest quarter of southwest
quarter of section 14; west half of northeast quarter, south half of
northwest quarter, west half of southeast quarter and southwest quarter
of section 15; south half of section 16; south half of northeast
quarter, south half of northwest quarter, north half of southeast
quarter and north half of southwest quarter of section 17; south half of
northeast quarter, north half of southeast quarter, southeast quarter of
northwest quarter and northeast quarter of southwest quarter of section
18; north half and north half of southeast quarter of section 21; north
half, north half of southeast quarter and north half of southwest
quarter of section 22; north half, north half of southeast quarter and
north half of southwest quarter of section 23; and west half of
northwest quarter and northwest quarter of southwest quarter of section
24.

_In Township 33 North, Range 4 West_.

South half of northeast quarter, northwest quarter, north half of
southeast quarter, southeast quarter of southeast quarter and northeast
quarter of southwest quarter of section 23; south half of section 24;
and north half of northeast quarter of section 25.

_In Township 34 North, Range 4 West._

All of section 7; all of section 8; north half of section 9; all of
section 10; north half, southwest quarter, north half of southeast
quarter and southwest quarter of southeast quarter of section 11;
northwest quarter and northwest quarter of southwest quarter of section
12; west half of northwest quarter and northwest quarter of southwest
quarter of section 13; all of section 14; east half, east half of
northwest quarter, and southwest quarter of section 15; south half of
southeast quarter of section 16; north half of northeast quarter, north
half of northwest quarter, southwest quarter of northwest quarter, and
southwest quarter of section 18; west half of section 19; east half of
southeast quarter of section 20; east half, east half of northwest
quarter, and southwest quarter of section 21; north half of northeast
quarter, north half of northwest quarter, southwest quarter of northwest
quarter and northwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 22; north
half of the northwest quarter of section 28; and northeast quarter of
northeast quarter of section 29.

_In Township 32 North, Range 5 West._

South half, south half of northeast quarter and south half of northwest
quarter of section 9; south half of northwest quarter, and southwest
quarter of section 10; west half of northwest quarter and west half of
southwest quarter of section 14; all of section 15; east half, northwest
quarter and north half of southwest quarter of section 16; northeast
quarter of southeast quarter of section 19; north half of southeast
quarter and north half of southwest quarter of section 20; and northeast
quarter, south half of northwest quarter, northwest quarter of southeast
quarter and north half of southwest quarter of section 21.

_In Township 33 North, Range 5 West._

West half of northeast quarter, northwest quarter and northwest quarter
of south-west quarter of section 1; east half, east half of northwest
quarter, and southwest quarter of section 2; east half of southeast
quarter and southwest quarter of southeast quarter of section 3; east
half of southeast quarter and southwest quarter of southeast quarter of
section 9; northeast quarter, east half of northwest quarter, southwest
quarter of northwest quarter, northwest quarter of southeast quarter,
and southwest quarter of section 10; northwest quarter of northeast
quarter, and northwest quarter of section 11; west half of northwest
quarter and west half of southwest quarter of section 15; east half,
east half of northwest quarter and east half of southwest quarter of
section 16; north half, north half of southeast quarter and north half
of southwest quarter of section 21; west half of section 28; east half
of section 29; north half of northeast quarter of section 32; and north
half of northwest quarter of section 33.

_In Township 34 North, Range 5 West._

East half, east half of northwest quarter and south half of southwest
quarter of section 12; east half of northeast quarter, northwest quarter
of northeast quarter and west half of northwest quarter of section 13;
east half of northeast quarter of section 14; west half of section 25;
south half of northeast quarter, southeast quarter and east half of
southwest quarter of section 26; and east half of section 35.

_In Township 32 North, Range 7 West._

West half of northwest quarter, west half of southeast quarter, and
southwest quarter of section 3; all of section 4; east half of northeast
quarter and east half of southeast quarter of section 5; east half of
northeast quarter and east half of southeast quarter of section 8; all
of section 9; west half, west half of northeast quarter, and southeast
quarter of section 10; west half, west half of northeast quarter and
west half of southeast quarter of section 15; east half, east half of
northwest quarter, northwest quarter of northwest quarter and east half
of southwest quarter of section 16; northeast quarter of northeast
quarter of section 17; northeast quarter of section 21; and northwest
quarter of section 22.

_In Township 33 North, Range 7 West._

South half of northeast quarter, south half of northwest quarter, and
south half of section 1; south half of northeast quarter, and southeast
quarter of section 2; northwest quarter of northeast quarter, and
northwest quarter of section 4; all of section 5; all of section 6;
north half and northeast quarter of southeast quarter of section 7; all
of section 8; west half of northeast quarter, west half of southeast
quarter, and west half of section 9; east half of section 11; all of
section 12; all of section 13; east half of section 14; southwest
quarter of southwest quarter of section 15; southeast quarter of
northeast quarter, west half of northeast quarter, northwest quarter and
south half of section 16; north half, southeast quarter, north half of
southwest quarter and southeast quarter of southwest quarter of section
17; east half of northeast quarter, southwest quarter of northeast
quarter and north half of southeast quarter of section 18; northeast
quarter, and east half of northwest quarter of section 20; north half,
southeast quarter, east half of southwest quarter and northwest quarter
of southwest quarter of section 21; west half of northwest quarter, and
southwest quarter of section 22; east half of section 23; all of section
24; all of section 25; northeast quarter of section 26; west half of
section 27; east half, east half of northwest quarter, southwest quarter
of northwest quarter, and southwest quarter of section 28; south half of
northeast quarter, and southeast quarter of section 29; east half of
northeast quarter and east half of southeast quarter of section 32; west
half of northeast quarter, west half of southeast quarter, and west half
of section 33; south half of northeast quarter, and southeast quarter of
section 35; and all of section 36.

_In Township 34 North, Range 7 West._

All of section 10; all of section 11; west half of northeast quarter,
west half of southeast quarter, and west half of section 12; north half
and southwest quarter of section 13; all of section 14; all of section
15; north half, southeast quarter, and east half of southwest quarter of
section 21; all of section 22; all of section 23; north half and
southwest quarter of section 24; northwest quarter of section 25; north
half, west half of southeast quarter, and southwest quarter of section
26; all of section 27; northeast quarter, east half of northwest
quarter, east half of southeast quarter, northwest quarter of southeast
quarter and northeast quarter of southwest quarter of section 28; east
half, and south half of southwest quarter of section 32; all of section
33; north half of northeast quarter, southwest quarter of northeast
quarter, northwest quarter and south half of section 34; and west half
of northeast quarter, northwest quarter, and west half of southwest
quarter of section 35.

_In Township 34 North, Range 8 West._

East half, east half of northwest quarter and east half of southwest
quarter of section 7; west half and southeast quarter of section 8; west
half of section 17; east half of section 18; east half and southwest
quarter of section 19; west half of section 20; northwest quarter and
south half of section 25; south half of section 26; west half of section
29; east half, east half of northwest quarter and east half of southwest
quarter of section 30; all of section 31; west half of northwest quarter
and west half of southwest quarter of section 32; north half and
southeast quarter of section 35; and all of section 36.

_In Township 33 North, Range 9 West._

Southwest quarter of northeast quarter, south half of northwest quarter,
southeast quarter, east half of southwest quarter and northwest quarter
of southwest quarter of section 2; south half of northeast quarter,
southeast quarter of northwest quarter, north half of southeast quarter,
southwest quarter of southeast quarter, and southwest quarter of section
3; southeast quarter and south half of southwest quarter of section 4;
east half and southwest quarter of section 8; north half of northwest
quarter of section 9; west half of southeast quarter, and west half of
section 17; east half of southeast quarter, and southwest quarter of
section 18; east half of northeast quarter, northwest quarter, and
southwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 19; northwest quarter,
and east half of southwest quarter of section 20; west half of section
29; east half, south half of northwest quarter, northwest quarter of
northwest quarter, and southwest quarter of section 30; east half, east
half of northwest quarter, and southwest quarter of section 31; and west
half of northwest quarter of section 32.

_In Township 34 North, Range 9 West._

All of sections 12, 13, 24, 25 and 36.

_In Township 33 North, Range 10 West._

All of section 1; west half of section 12; west half and southeast quarter
of section 13; east half of section 24; and east half of section 25.

_In Township 34 North, Range 10 West._

South half of section 13, and all of sections 24, 25 and 36.

_In Township 34 North, Range 11 West._

East half of northeast quarter, and southeast quarter of section 7;
north half, southeast quarter and east half of southwest quarter of
section 8; west half of northwest quarter and west half of southwest
quarter of section 9; west half of northeast quarter and east half of
northwest quarter of section 17; and west half of section 18.

_In Township 33 North, Range 12 West._

West half of northwest quarter, south half of southwest quarter and
northwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 4; east half, east
half of southwest quarter and southwest quarter of southwest quarter of
section 5; northeast quarter, south half of northwest quarter and north
half of southwest quarter of section 7; north half of northeast quarter
and north half of northwest quarter of section 8; south half of
northwest quarter and west half of southwest quarter of section 18; east
half and northwest quarter of section 19; east half of section 30; and
east half of section 31.

_In Township 34 North, Range 12 West._

Southeast quarter and east half of southwest quarter of section 13;
southeast quarter of southeast quarter of section 22; east half of
northeast quarter, southwest quarter of northeast quarter, southeast
quarter of northwest quarter, and south half of section 23; north half,
west half of southeast quarter, and southwest quarter of section 24;
northwest quarter of northeast quarter and north half of northwest
quarter of section 25; north half of northeast quarter, north half of
northwest quarter and southwest quarter of northwest quarter of section
26; east half, south half of northwest quarter, and southwest quarter of
section 27; southeast quarter of section 28; all of section 33; and
north half of northeast quarter, southwest quarter of northeast quarter,
northwest quarter, and north half of southwest quarter of section 34.

_In Township 33 North, Range 13 West._

Southeast quarter of northeast quarter and east half of southeast
quarter of section 12; and east half of northeast quarter, southwest
quarter of northeast quarter and east half of southeast quarter of
section 13.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the Act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled, "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas the public lands in the State of California, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
Act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a Public Reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the State of California and particularly described as
follows, to wit:

Beginning at a point where the northwestern boundary of the rancho Santa
Ana intersects the township line between Townships four (4) and five (5)
North, Range twenty-three (23) West, San Bernardino Base and Meridian,
California; thence westerly along the township line to the southwest
corner of Township five (5) North, Range twenty-four (24) West; thence
northerly along the range line to the southeast corner of the rancho Los
Prietos y Najalayegua; thence in a general northwesterly direction along
the southern boundaries of the ranchos Los Prietos y Najalayegua, San
Marcos, Tequepis, Lomas de la Purificacion and Nojoqui to the eastern
boundary of the rancho Las Cruces; thence in a general southerly
direction along the eastern boundary of the said rancho Las Cruces to
the northern boundary of the rancho Nuestra Señora del Refugio; thence
in a general southeasterly direction along the northern boundaries of
the ranchos Nuestra Señora del Refugio, Cañada del Corral, Los Dos
Pueblos, La Goleta, Pueblo and Mission Lands of Santa Barbara and the
rancho El Rincon (Arellanes) to its most eastern point; thence in a
southwesterly direction along the southern boundary of said rancho to
the point where it intersects the township line between Townships three
(3) and four (4) North, Range twenty-five (25) West; thence easterly
along the township line to the western boundary of the rancho Santa Ana;
thence northeasterly along the western boundary of said rancho to its
intersection with the township line between Townships four (4) and five
(5) North, Range twenty-three (23) West, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this Proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired: _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

The reservation hereby established shall be known as The Santa Ynez
Forest Reserve.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 2d day of October, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the
Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fourth,

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  DAVID J. HILL,
    _Acting Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section 13 of the act of Congress of March 3,
1891, entitled "An Act to amend title sixty, chapter three, of the
Revised Statutes of the United States, relating to copyrights," that
said act "shall only apply to a citizen or subject of a foreign state or
nation when such foreign state or nation permits to citizens of the
United States of America the benefit of copyright on substantially the
same basis as its own citizens; or when such foreign state or nation is
a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in
the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United
States of America may, at its pleasure, become a party to such
agreement;"

And whereas it is also provided by said section that "the existence of
either of the conditions aforesaid shall be determined by the President
of the United States by proclamation made from time to time as the
purposes of this act may require;"

And whereas satisfactory official assurances have been given that in the
Republic of Costa Rica the law permits to citizens of the United States
of America the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as
to the citizens of that Republic:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, do declare and proclaim that the first of the conditions
specified in section 13 of the act of March 3, 1891, now exists and is
fulfilled in respect to the citizens of the Republic of Costa Rica.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 19th day of October, one thousand
eight hundred and ninety-nine and of the Independence of the United
States the one hundred and twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled "An
act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved June
fourth, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, entitled "An act making
appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the
fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight,
and for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

And whereas the public lands in the Territory of Arizona, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by the aforesaid acts of Congress, do
hereby make known and proclaim that the boundary lines of the Forest
Reservation in the Territory of Arizona, known as "The Prescott Forest
Reserve," created by proclamation of May tenth, eighteen hundred and
ninety-eight, are hereby so changed and enlarged as to include all those
certain tracts, pieces, or parcels of land lying and being situate in
the Territory of Arizona, and within the boundaries particularly
described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the northeast corner of township thirteen (13) north, range
one (1) west, Gila and Salt River Meridian, Arizona; thence southerly
along the Gila and Salt River Meridian to the southeast corner of said
township; thence easterly along the Third (3d) Standard Parallel north
to the northeast corner of township twelve (12) north, range one (1)
east; thence southerly along the range line to the southeast corner of
township nine (9) north, range one (1) east; thence westerly along the
township line to the southwest corner of township nine (9) north, range
one (1) west; thence northerly along the range line to the northwest
corner of said township; thence westerly along the township line to the
southwest corner of township ten (10) north, range two (2) west; thence
northerly along the range line to the southeast corner of township
twelve (12) north, range three (3) west; thence westerly along the
township line to the southwest corner of said township; thence northerly
along the range line to the northwest corner of said township; thence
westerly along the township line to the southwest corner of section
thirty-five (35), township thirteen (13) north, range four (4) west;
thence northerly along the section line to a point due west of the
northwest corner of township fourteen (14) north, range three (3) west;
thence easterly to the northeast corner of said township; thence
southerly along the range line to the northwest corner of section
nineteen (19), township thirteen (13) north, range two (2) west; thence
easterly to the northeast corner of section twenty-four (24), said
township; thence northerly to the northwest corner of township thirteen
(13) north, range one (1) west; thence easterly to the northeast corner
of said township, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler, or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing, or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 21st day of October, A.D. 1899, and
of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

THANKSGIVING PROCLAMATION.

A national custom dear to the hearts of the people calls for the setting
apart of one day in each year as an occasion of special thanksgiving to
Almighty God for the blessings of the preceding year. This honored
observance acquires with time a tenderer significance. It enriches
domestic life. It summons under the family roof the absent children to
glad reunion with those they love.

Seldom has this nation had greater cause for profound thanksgiving. No
great pestilence has invaded our Shores. Liberal employment waits upon
labor. Abundant crops have rewarded the efforts of the husbandmen.
Increased comforts have come to the home. The national finances have
been strengthened, and public credit has been sustained and made firmer.
In all branches of industry and trade there has been an unequaled degree
of prosperity, while there has been a steady gain in the moral and
educational growth of our national character. Churches and schools have
flourished. American patriotism has been exalted. Those engaged in
maintaining the honor of the flag with such signal success have been in
a large degree spared from disaster and disease. An honorable peace has
been ratified with a foreign nation with which we were at war, and we
are now on friendly relations with every power of earth.

The trust which we have assumed for the benefit of the people of Cuba
has been faithfully advanced. There is marked progress toward the
restoration of healthy industrial conditions, and under wise sanitary
regulations the island has enjoyed unusual exemption from the scourge of
fever. The hurricane which swept over our new possession of Puerto Rico,
destroying the homes and property of the inhabitants, called forth the
instant sympathy of the people of the United States, who were swift to
respond with generous aid to the sufferers. While the insurrection still
continues in the island of Luzon, business is resuming its activity, and
confidence in the good purposes of the United States is being rapidly
established throughout the archipelago.

For these reasons and countless others, I, William McKinley, President
of the United States, do hereby name Thursday, the thirtieth day of
November next, as a day of general thanksgiving and prayer, to be
observed as such by all our people on this continent and in our newly
acquired islands, as well as those who may be at sea or sojourning in
foreign lands; and I advise that on this day religious exercises shall
be conducted in the churches or meeting-places of all denominations, in
order that in the social features of the day its real significance may
not be lost sight of, but fervent prayers may be offered to the Most
High for a continuance of the Divine Guidance without which man's
efforts are vain, and for Divine consolation to those whose kindred and
friends have sacrificed their lives for country.

I recommend also that on this day so far as may be found practicable
labor shall cease from its accustomed toil and charity abound toward the
sick, the needy and the poor.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and caused the seal of the United
States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of October, A.D. 1899, and
of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by joint resolution "to provide for annexing the Hawaiian
Islands to the United States," approved July 7, 1898, the cession by the
Government of the Republic of Hawaii to the United States of America, of
all rights of sovereignty of whatsoever kind in and over the Hawaiian
Islands and their dependencies, and the transfer to the United States
of the absolute fee and ownership of all public, Government, or
crown lands, public buildings, or edifices, ports, harbors, military
equipment, and all other public property of every kind and description
belonging to the Government of the Hawaiian Islands, was duly accepted,
ratified, and confirmed, and the said Hawaiian Islands and their
dependencies annexed as a part of the territory of the United States and
made subject to the sovereign dominion thereof, and all and singular the
property and rights hereinbefore mentioned vested in the United States
of America; and

Whereas it was further provided in said resolution that the existing
laws of the United States relative to public lands shall not apply to
such lands in the Hawaiian Islands, but the Congress of the United
States shall enact special laws for their management and disposition;
and

Whereas it is deemed necessary in the public interests that certain lots
and plats of land in the city of Honolulu be immediately reserved for
naval purposes;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the authority in me vested, do hereby declare, proclaim, and
make known that the following described lots or plats of land be and the
same are hereby, subject to such legislative action as the Congress of
the United States may take with respect thereto, reserved for naval
purposes, to wit:

  1st. Esplanade lots Nos. 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, and 99. Beginning at the
  south corner of Richards street and Halekauwila street, which point is
  S. 30° 25' E., 343.6 feet from the east corner of the Hawaiian Electric
  Company building and run by the true Meridian:

  S. 30° 25' E. 304.50 feet along Halekauwila street.

  S. 56° 49' W. 100.12 feet along Mililani street.

  N. 30° 25' W. 300.60 feet along Government Lots Nos. 112-100.

  N. 54° 34' E. 100.38 feet along Richards street to the initial point.
  Area, 30,255 square feet.

  2d. Esplanade lots Nos. 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, and 68. Beginning at the
  north corner of Alakea street and Allen street, as shown on Government
  Survey's Registered Map No. 1867, and running by true bearings:

  N. 30° 25' W. 200 feet along the northeast side of Allen street.

  N. 59° 35' E. 150 feet along the southeast side of Kilauea street.

  S. 30° 25' E. 200 feet along lots 62 and 69.

  S. 59° 35' W. 150 feet along the northwest side of Alakea street to the
  initial point. Area, 30,000 square feet.

  3d. Lot at east corner of Mililani and Halekauwila streets. Beginning at
  the east corner of Halekauwila and Mililani streets, as shown on
  Government Survey's Registered Map No. 1955, and running by true
  bearings:

  N. 56° 49' E. 110.5 feet along Mililani street.

  S. 3° 52' E. 69.5 feet along inner line of Waikahalulu water lots.

  S. 56° 49' W. 79.5 feet along Bishop Estate land.

  N. 30° 25' W. 60.5 feet along Halekauwila street to the initial point.
  Area, 5,728 square feet.

  4th. A plat of land in Kewalo-uka. Beginning at a point on the upper
  side of Punchbowl Drive, which is 863 feet south and 2,817 feet east of
  Puowaina Trig. Station, as shown on Government Survey's Registered Map
  1749, and running:

  N. 00° 10' W. true 630 feet along Punchbowl Drive.

  S. 57° 00' W. true 694 feet along Punchbowl Drive.

  Thence along Punchbowl Drive in a northeasterly direction 900 feet;
  thence due east 840 feet (more or less) to the boundary of the land of
  Kalawahine; thence along boundary of the land of Kalawahine 1040 feet
  (more or less) to south angle of said land; thence S. 78° 30' W. true
  397 feet (more or less) to Punchbowl Drive:

  N. 84° 50' W. true 245 feet along Punchbowl Drive to initial point. Area
  20 acres (more or less).

  5th. Lots on Punchbowl Slope, Nos. 608, 609, and 610. Beginning at a
  point on the east side of Magazine street, 351.5 feet above the concrete
  post marking the east corner of Spencer and Magazine streets, as shown
  on Government Survey's Registered Map No. 1749, and runs:

  N. 18° 10' E. true 150.0 feet along Magazine street.

  N. 49° 12' E. true 226.7 feet along Government land.

  S. 24° 11' E. true 91.0 feet along Government Road Reserve.

  S. 77° 21' E. true 179.5 feet along same.

  S. 13° 45' E. true 109.8 feet along Government land to north angle of
  Gr. 3813 to Dr. Wood.

  S. 73° 30' W. true 121.3 feet along Gr. 3814 to H.M. Dow.

  S. 76° 15' W. true 250.0 feet along Grs. 3999 and 4000.

  N. 71° 50' W. true 102.5 feet along Gr. 4000 to initial point.

  Area, 83,588 square feet.

  6th. Portion of reef of Kaakaukukui. Beginning at the Government Survey
  Station known as the "Battery" [delta] from which, Punchbowl [delta]
  bears N. 48° 18' 30" E. true and the lighthouse vane.

  N. 56° 14' W. distant 1608.1 feet and running as follows:

  N. 37° 40' W. true 760 feet along on the reef of Kaakaukukui.

  S. 39° 00' W. true 3100 feet along the southeast side of main channel to
  a depth of 20 feet of water (more or less).

  S. 9° 25' W. true 987 feet along the reef in about 20 feet of water.

  N. 52° 23' E. true 3585 feet along on the reef to a point on the
  seashore at high-water mark.

  N. 35° 00' W. true 182 feet along the shore at high-water mark.

  N. 5° 35' W. true 446 feet along Allen street extension to the southeast
  corner of the Battery wall.

  S. 87° 20' W. true 120 feet to the initial point.

  Area, 76-25/100 acres.

  7th. Punchbowl street from Halekauwila street to Allen street. Beginning
  at the southwest corner of Halekauwila and Punchbowl streets, as shown
  on the Government blue print, and running in a westerly direction along
  the U.S. Naval Reservation 572 feet to Allen street, thence along Allen
  street 50 feet, thence in an easterly direction along the United States
  Naval Reservation 480 feet to land belonging to the Bishop Estate,
  thence 110 feet to the initial point.


In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 10th day of November, A.D. 1899,
and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section 13 of the act of Congress of March 3,
1891, entitled "An act to amend title sixty, chapter three, of the
Revised Statutes of the United States, relating to copyrights," that
said act "shall only apply to a citizen or subject of a foreign state
or nation when such foreign state or nation permits to citizens of the
United States of America the benefit of copyright on substantially the
same basis as its own citizens; or when such foreign state or nation is
a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in
the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United
States of America may, at its pleasure, become a party to such
agreement;" and

Whereas it is also provided by said section that "the existence of
either of the conditions aforesaid shall be determined by the President
of the United States by proclamation made from time to time as the
purposes of this act may require;" and

Whereas satisfactory official assurances have been given that in the
Kingdom of the Netherlands and in the Netherlands' possessions the law
permits to citizens of the United States of America the benefit of
copyright on substantially the same basis as to subjects of the
Netherlands:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, do declare and proclaim that the first of the conditions
specified in section 13 of the act of March 3, 1891, now exists and is
fulfilled in respect to the subjects of the Netherlands.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of November, A.D. 1899,
and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

_To the People of the United States_:

Garret Augustus Hobart, Vice-President of the United States, died at his
home in Paterson, New Jersey, at 8:30 o'clock this morning. In him the
Nation has lost one of its most illustrious citizens and one of its most
faithful servants. His participation in the business life, and the
law-making body of his native State was marked by unswerving fidelity
and by a high order of talents and attainments; and his too brief career
as Vice-President of the United States and President of the Senate
exhibited the loftiest qualities of upright and sagacious statesmanship.
In the world of affairs he had few equals among his contemporaries. His
private character was gentle and noble. He will long be mourned by his
friends as a man of singular purity and attractiveness whose sweetness
of disposition won all hearts, while his elevated purposes, his
unbending integrity and whole-hearted devotion to the public good
deserved and acquired universal respect and esteem.

In sorrowing testimony of the loss which has fallen upon the country,
I direct that on the day of the funeral the Executive Offices of the
United States shall be closed and all posts and stations of the Army
and Navy shall display the national flag at half-mast, and that the
representatives of the United States in foreign countries shall pay
appropriate tribute to the illustrious dead for a period of thirty days.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and caused the seal of the United
States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 21st day of November, A.D. 1899,
and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas The Olympic Forest Reserve, in the State of Washington, was
established by proclamation dated February 22d, 1897, under and by
virtue of section twenty-four of the act of Congress, approved March
3rd, 1891, entitled, "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for
other purposes," which provides, "That the President of the United
States may, from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or
Territory having public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved June
4th, 1897, entitled, "An act making appropriations for sundry civil
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1898,
and for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States,
by virtue of the power vested in me by the aforesaid act of Congress,
approved June 4th, 1897, do hereby make known and proclaim that there
are hereby withdrawn and excluded from the aforesaid Olympic Forest
Reserve and restored to the public domain all those certain tracts,
pieces or parcels of land particularly described as follows, to wit:

Townships twenty-eight (28) north, ranges thirteen (13) and fourteen
(14) west, Willamette Base and Meridian, Washington; fractional township
twenty-eight (28) north, range fifteen (15) west; sections one (1) to
eighteen (18), both inclusive, townships twenty-nine (29) north, ranges
three (3), four (4) and five (5) west; sections four (4), five (5),
six (6), seven (7) and the north half of section eight (8), township
twenty-nine (29) north, range twelve (12) west; all of township
twenty-nine (29) north, range thirteen (13) west, except sections
thirteen (13), twenty-three (23), twenty-four (24), twenty-five (25) and
twenty-six (26); township twenty-nine (29) north, range fourteen (14)
west; fractional township twenty-nine (29) north, range fifteen (15)
west; sections one (1) to twelve (12), both inclusive, township thirty
(30) north, range nine (9) west; sections twenty-seven (27) to
thirty-four (34), both inclusive, township thirty (30) north, range ten
(10) west; sections twenty-five (25) to thirty-six (36), both inclusive,
township thirty (30) north, range eleven (11) west; sections seventeen
(17) to thirty-six (36), both inclusive, township thirty (30) north,
range twelve (12) west; townships thirty (30) north, ranges thirteen
(13) and fourteen (14) west; and township thirty (30) north, range
fifteen (15) west.

That the lands hereby restored to the public domain shall be open to
settlement from date hereof, but shall not be subject to entry, filing
or selection until after ninety days notice by such publication as the
Secretary of the Interior may prescribe.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 7th day of April, A.D. 1900, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by section one of the act of July 1, 1892 (27 Stat., 62),
entitled "An act to provide for the opening of a part of the Colville
Reservation, in the State of Washington, and for other purposes" it is
provided:

"That subject to the reservations and allotment of lands in severalty to
the individual members of the Indians of the Colville Reservation in the
State of Washington herein provided for, all the following described
tract or portion of said Colville Reservation, namely: Beginning at a
point on the eastern boundary line of the Colville Indian Reservation
where the township line between townships thirty-four and thirty-five
north, of range thirty-seven east, of the Willamette meridian, if
extended west, would intersect the same, said point being in the middle
of the channel of the Columbia river, and running thence west parallel
with the forty-ninth parallel of latitude to the western boundary line
of the said Colville Indian Reservation in the Okanagon river, thence
north following the said western boundary line to the said forty-ninth
parallel of latitude, thence east along the said forty-ninth parallel
of latitude to the northeast corner of the said Colville Indian
Reservation, thence south following the eastern boundary of said
reservation to the place of beginning, containing by estimation one
million five hundred thousand acres, the same being a portion of the
Colville Indian Reservation, created by executive order dated July
second, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, be, and is hereby, vacated and
restored to the public domain, notwithstanding any executive order or
other proceeding whereby the same was set apart as a reservation for any
Indians or bands of Indians, and the same shall be open to settlement
and entry by the proclamation of the President of the United States
and shall be disposed of under the general laws applicable to the
disposition of public lands in the State of Washington,"

and

Whereas it is provided by section three of said act,

"That each entry man under the homestead laws shall, within five
years from the date of his original entry and before receiving a final
certificate for the land covered by his entry, pay to the United States
for the land so taken by him in addition to fees provided by law the sum
of one dollar and fifty cents per acre, one third of which shall be paid
within two years after the date of the original entry; but the rights
of honorably discharged Union soldiers and sailors, as defined and
described in sections twenty-three hundred and four and twenty-three
hundred and five of the Revised Statutes of the United States, shall not
be abridged, except as to the sum to be paid as aforesaid,"

and

Whereas by section six of said act it is provided:

"That the land used and occupied for school purposes at what is known
as Tonasket school, on Bonaparte creek, and the site of the sawmill,
gristmill, and other mill property on said reservation, is hereby
reserved from the operation of this act, unless other lands are selected
in lieu thereof: _Provided_, That such reserve lands shall not
exceed in the aggregate two sections, and must be selected in legal
subdivisions conformably to the public surveys, such selection to be
made by the Indian Agent of the Colville Agency, under the direction of
the Secretary of the Interior and subject to his approval: _Provided,
however_, That said Indians may, in lieu of said sites, or either of
them, select other lands of equal quantity, for such purposes, either
on the vacated or unvacated portions of said reservation, the same
to be designated in legal subdivisions by said Indian Agent, under
the direction of and subject to the approval of the Secretary of the
Interior, in which case said first-designated tracts shall not be exempt
from the operation of this act; such selection to be made and approved
within six months after the survey of said lands and the proclamation of
the President,"

and

Whereas in a clause in the Indian Appropriation Act of July 1, 1898 (30
Stat., 571), it is provided:

"That the mineral lands only in the Colville Indian Reservation, in the
State of Washington, shall be subject to entry under the laws of the
United States in relation to the entry of minerals lands: _Provided_,
That lands allotted to the Indians or used by the Government for any
purpose or by any school shall not be subject to entry under this
provision,"

and in another clause that,

"The Indian allotments in severalty provided for in said act shall be
selected and completed at the earliest practicable time and not later
than six months after the proclamation of the President opening the
vacated portion of said reservation to settlement and entry, which
proclamation may be issued without awaiting the survey of the unsurveyed
lands therein. Said allotments shall be made from lands which shall
at the time of the selection thereof be surveyed, excepting that any
Indian entitled to allotment under said act who has improvements upon
unsurveyed land may select the same for his allotment, whereupon the
Secretary of the Interior shall cause the same to be surveyed and
allotted to him. At the expiration of six months from the date of the
proclamation by the President, and not before, the non-mineral lands
within the vacated portion of said reservation which shall not have been
allotted to Indians as aforesaid, shall be subject to settlement, entry
and disposition under said act of July first, eighteen hundred and
ninety-two: _Provided_, That the land used and occupied for school
purposes at what is known as Tonasket school, on Bonaparte creek, and
the site of the sawmill, gristmill and other mill property on said
reservation, are hereby reserved from the operation of this act, unless
other lands are selected in lieu thereof as provided in section six of
the aforesaid act of July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-two,"

and

Whereas, all the terms, conditions and considerations required by said
acts of July 1, 1892, and July 1, 1898, precedent to the issuance of the
Proclamation provided for therein, have been, as I hereby declare,
complied with:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by the statutes hereinbefore mentioned,
do hereby declare and make known that all of said lands hereinbefore
described, restored by the said act of July 1, 1892, will, at and after
the hour of twelve o'clock noon (Pacific standard time) six months from
date hereof, to wit: the 10th day of October, nineteen hundred, and not
before, be open to settlement and entry under the terms of and subject
to all the conditions, limitations, reservations and restrictions
contained in the statutes above specified, and the laws of the United
States, applicable thereto, saving and excepting such tracts as have
been or may be allotted to or reserved or selected for, the Indians, or
other purposes, under the laws herein referred to.

Sections sixteen and thirty-six in each township will be subject to
such right of the State of Washington thereto as may be ascertained and
determined by the land department in the administration of the grant of
lands in place to that State for the support of common schools.

The lands which have been allotted to the Indians are for greater
convenience particularly described in the accompanying schedule,
entitled "Schedule of lands allotted to the Indians in restored portion
of Colville Reservation, Washington, and withheld from settlement and
entry by proclamation of the President, dated April 10, 1900," and which
schedule is made a part hereof.

Notice, moreover, is hereby given that it is by law enacted that at
the expiration of six months from the date of the proclamation by the
President, and not before, the non-mineral lands within the vacated
portion of said reservation which shall not have been allotted to or
reserved or selected for the Indians, or for other purposes, shall be
subject to settlement, entry and disposition under said act of July 1,
1892; and all persons are hereby warned from attempting to make
settlement on any of said lands prior to the date fixed for the opening
hereof.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 10th day of April, A.D. 1900, and
of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



  SCHEDULE OF LANDS ALLOTTED TO THE INDIANS IN RESTORED PORTION OF
  COLVILLE RESERVATION, WASHINGTON, AND WITHHELD FROM SETTLEMENT AND
  ENTRY BY PROCLAMATION OF THE PRESIDENT, DATED APRIL 10, 1900.

  _Township 35 North, Range 31 East_.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at a large fir tree
  blazed on N. side being S.E. Cor. thence due N. 20 chains set post and
  made a mound thence due west 40 chains set post and made mound thence S.
  20 chains set post being S.W. Cor. thence due E. 40 chains to point of
  beginning, in section 11 or 12.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at N.W. Cor. of 198 due
  W. 40 chains set post being S.E. Cor. thence due N. 20 chains set post
  thence due W. 40 chains set post thence due S. 20 chains set post thence
  due E. 40 chains to point of beginning, in section 10 or 11.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at a post and mound at
  N.W. Cor. thence due S. 20 chains set post thence due E. 40 chains set
  post S.E. Cor. thence due N. 20 chains set post thence due W. 40 chains
  to point of beginning, in section 6 or 7.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.W. Cor. of 200
  thence due S. 20 chains set post thence due E. 40 chains set post thence
  due N. 20 chains, being N.E. Cor. thence due W. 40 chains to point of
  beginning, in section 6 or 7.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.E. Cor. of 201
  thence due S. 40 chains being S.W. Cor. thence due E. 40 chains set post
  thence due N. 20 chains thence due W. 40 chains set post thence due S.
  20 chains to point of beginning, in section 7 or 8.

  _Township 35 North, Range 32 East_.

  A tract of land described as follows: Set post and made mound for N.E.
  Cor. thence due S. 20 chains set post thence due W. 40 chains set post
  and made mound thence due N. 20 chains set post made a mound thence due
  E. 40 chains to point of beginning, in section 7 or 8.

  _Township 35 North, Range 36 East._

  SE 1/4, Sec. 24; NE 1/4 NW 1/4, NW 1/4 NE 1/4, Sec. 25.

  _Township 35 North, Range 37 East._

  E 1/2 SE 1/4, Sec. 9; lots 3, 4 and 5 of Sec. 10; lots 1 and 2 of Sec.
  15; NE 1/4 SW 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Sec. 16; E 1/2 NE 1/4,
  of Sec. 19; W 1/2 NW 1/4, W 1/2 SW 1/4, SE 1/4 SW 1/4 and lots 2, 3 and
  4 of Sec. 20; NW 1/4, W 1/2 SW 1/4 and lots 1, 2 and 4 of Sec. 29; E. NE
  1/4, NW 1/4 and S. 1/2 Sec. 30; NE 1/4 and lots 1 and 2 of Sec. 31; NE
  1/4 NW 1/4, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 of Sec. 32.

  _Township 36 North, Range 28 East._

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at a mound and stake run
  due north 20 chains thence due west 40 chains set post thence due S. 20
  chains set post thence due E. 40 chains to point of beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at NE Cor. of 188 run
  due N. 20 chains set post thence due W. 40 chains set post thence due
  S. 20 chains to N.W. Cor. 188 thence due E. 40 chains to point of
  beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at N.W. Cor. of 188
  thence due W. 40 chains set post thence due N. 20 chains set post thence
  due E. 40 chains to N.W. Cor. of 189 thence due S. 20 chains to the
  point of beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at N.W. Cor. of 190
  thence due N. 20 chains set post thence due E. 40 chains set post thence
  due S. 20 chains to N.E. Cor. of 190 thence due W. 20 chains to point of
  beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at N.W. Cor. of 191
  thence due N. 20 chains set post thence due E. 40 chains set post thence
  due S. 20 chains to N.E. Cor. of 191 thence due W. 40 chains to point of
  beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at N.W. Cor. 190 thence
  due W. 20 chains set post thence due N. 40 chains set post thence due E.
  20 chains to N.W. Cor. 192 thence due S. 40 chains to point of
  beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.E. Cor. Sec. 32,
  Tp. 37, R. 28 run due S. 20 chains set post thence due E. 40 chains made
  rock mound thence due N. 20 chains to quarter Sec. Cor. of Sec. 33 on
  Tp. line, thence due W. 40 chains on Tp. line to point of beginning.

  _Township 36 North, Range 29 East_.

  A tract of land described as follows: Set post and made mound thence due
  N. 20 chains set post thence due E. 40 chains set post thence due S. 20
  chains set post thence due W. 40 chains to point of beginning, in
  section 9.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning on ninth standard
  parallel at quarter Cor. of Sec. 33 thence due S. 40 chains set post
  thence due W. 20 chains set post thence due N. 40 chains set post thence
  due E. on the 9th standard parallel 20 chains to point of beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.W. Cor. of 215 on
  ninth standard parallel thence due E. 40 chains set post thence due S.
  20 chains set post thence due W. 40 chains set post thence due N. 20
  chains to place of beginning, in section 4 or 5.

  _Township 36 North, Range 30 East_.

  E 1/2 of NW 1/4, W 1/2 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NE 1/4, NE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 33;
  SW 1/4 NW 1/4, N 1/2 SW 1/4, W 1/4 SE 1/4, SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 34.

  _Township 36 North, Range 32 East._

  NE 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4, E 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 1; NE 1/4 NE 1/4 and N 1/2 of
  SE 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Sec. 2; E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 11; NW 1/4 and W 1/2 SW
  1/4 of Sec. 12; W 1/2 NW 1/4 and W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 13; E 1/2 NE 1/4
  and E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 14; NE 1/4 and W 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 23; W 1/2
  SE 1/4 of Sec. 26; E 1/2 NW 1/4 and W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 35.

  _Township 36 North, Range 33 East._

  W 1/2 of E 1/2 of NW 1/4 and W 1/2 of NW 1/4 of Sec. 1; E 1/2 of E 1/2
  of NE 1/4 of Sec. 2; NE 1/4, N 1/2 SE 1/4, E 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 4; N 1/2
  NE 1/4 and NW 1/4 NW 1/4 of Sec. 5; N 1/2 NE 1/4; SW 1/4 NE 1/4 and NW
  1/4 of Sec. 6.

  _Township 36 North, Range 37 East._

  SW 1/4 SE 1/4 and lot 4 of Sec. 22; lot 1 of Sec. 26; W 1/2 NE 1/4, W
  1/2 SE 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 of Sec. 27; SE 1/4 NE 1/4, NE 1/4 SE
  1/4 of Sec. 33; NW 1/4 NE 1/4, S 1/2 NW 1/4, SW 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 3, 4
  and 5 of Sec. 34; and lot 1 of Sec. 35.

  _Township 37 North, Range 27 East._

  E 1/2 NE 1/4, E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 1; SE 1/4 NW 1/4 and lots 2, 3 and 4
  of Sec. 3, the E 1/2 NW 1/4 and NE 1/4 of Sec. 12, The W 1/2 of E 1/2 of
  SW 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 of Sec. 16; Lots 1 and 2 of Sec. 20, W
  1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 21.

  _Township 37 North, Range 28 East._

  W 1/2 NE 1/4, E 1/2 NW 1/4, E 1/2 SW 1/4, lots 4, 5, 6 and 7 of Sec. 6;
  N 1/2 NW 1/4 Sec. 7; NW 1/4 NE 1/4, NE 1/4 NW 1/4, Sec. 9; S 1/2 SE 1/4,
  SE 1/4 SW 1/4, Sec. 25; S 1/2 of Sec. 32; S 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 33, N 1/2
  NE 1/4 and NE 1/4 NW 1/4 of Sec. 36.

  _Township 37 North, Range 29 East._

  N 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 27, lot 4 of Sec. 30, E 1/2 NE 1/4, NW 1/4 NE 1/4,
  NE 1/4 NW 1/4 and lot 1 of Sec. 31; S 1/2 NW 1/4, N 1/2 SW 1/4 and SE
  1/4 of Sec. 32, W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 33.

  _Township 37 North, Range 30 East._

  W 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 1, E 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 2; SE 1/4 of Sec. 3; S 1/2
  NE 1/4 of Sec. 8; S 1/2 NE 1/4 and S 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 9; N 1/2 NE 1/4
  and N 1/2 NW 1/4 Sec. 10.

  _Township 37 North, Range 33 East._

  Lots 8 and 9, Sec. 5; Lots 3, 5, 12 and 13 of Sec. 8; E 1/2 NE 1/4, SE
  1/4 SE 1/4 and lots 1, 4, 7 and 8 of Sec. 17; NE 1/4 NW 1/4 and E 1/2 of
  Sec. 20; SW 1/4 NW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 21; NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW
  1/4, N 1/2 SE 1/4, SW 1/4 SE 1/4, E 1/2 SW 1/4 and SW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec.
  29; SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 30; NE 1/4 NE 1/4 of Sec. 31; NW 1/4 NE 1/4, N
  1/2 NW 1/4 and E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 32; SE 1/4 and S 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec.
  33; E 1/2 SE 1/4 and W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 34; W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 35.

  _Township 37 North, Range 37 East._

  Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Sec. 1; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and lot 1 of Sec. 2; S 1/2 SE
  1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 3; NW 1/4 SE 1/4 and lots 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and
  12 of Sec. 4; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and lot 1 of Sec. 5; W 1/2 SW 1/4 and lots
  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 of Sec. 9; N 1/2 NE 1/4, Sec. 10; SW
  1/4 of Sec. 13; S 1/2 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Sec. 14; SW
  1/4 NW 1/4, W 1/2 SW 1/4, SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 15; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and NE
  1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 16. S 1/2 NE 1/4, E 1/2 NW 1/4, NW 1/4, NW 1/4, NE
  1/4 of SW 1/4 and N 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 22; E 1/2 NW 1/4, SW 1/4 NW 1/4,
  E 1/2 SW 1/4, NW 1/4 SW 1/4 and lots 1 and 2 and E 1/2 of Sec. 23; S 1/2
  SE 1/4 and S 1/2 SW 1/4 Sec. 24; N 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 25; N 1/2 SW 1/4
  and lots 9, 10, 11 and 12 of Sec. 26; S 1/2 NE 1/4, N 1/2 SE 1/4, NE 1/4
  SW 1/4 and lots 9, 10, 12, 13 and 14 of Sec. 27; Lots 1, 5, 7, 8, and 12
  of Sec. 28, W 1/2 NE 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4 and lots 2, 3, 4 and 5 of Sec.
  33.

  _Township 37 North, Range 38 East._

  Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 of Sec. 18; Lots 1, 3 and 4 of Sec. 19.

  _Township 38 North, Range 27 East._

  SW 1/4 NW 1/4 and lot 6 of Sec. 2; Lots 6, 7, 8, and 9 of Sec. 3; Lots
  4, 5, and 6 of Sec. 11; SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 and lots 7 and 8 of Sec. 14;
  Lot 3 of Sec. 22; W 1/2 NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 and lots 3, 4, 5, and 6 of Sec.
  23; SE 1/4 SE 1/4 and lot 7 of Sec. 27; E 1/2 NE 1/4, E 1/2 SE 1/4 and
  lots 5, 6, 7, and 8 of Sec. 34.

  _Township 38 North, Range 28 East._

  S 1/2 SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 10; SW 1/4 of Sec. 11; N 1/2 NW
  1/4 Sec. 14; N 1/2 NE 1/4 and N 1/2 NW 1/4, Sec. 15; NE 1/4 NE 1/4 of
  Sec. 16; SW 1/4 of Sec. 26; W 1/2 NE 1/4, E 1/2 SW 1/4 and lots 3 and 4
  of Sec. 31.

  _Township 38 North, Range 29 East._

  S 1/2 NW 1/4 and lots 2, 3, and 4 of Sec. 4; NE 1/4, S 1/2 NW 1/4, N 1/2
  SE 1/4 and lots 3 and 4 of Sec. 5; E 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 6.

  _Township 38 North, Range 30 East._

  E 1/2 SW 1/4 and SW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 25; SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 26; E
  1/2 NE 1/4 and E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 35; W 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 36.

  _Township 38 North, Range 32 East._

  E 1/2 SE 1/4 and SW 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 25; W 1/2 NE 1/4 and SE 1/4 NE
  1/4 of Sec. 36.

  _Township 38 North, Range 33 East._

  W 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 1; S 1/2 NE 1/4 and lots 1 and 2 of Sec. 2; lot 4
  of Sec. 3; lot 1 of Sec. 4; S 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 9; S 1/2 NE 1/4, S 1/2
  NW 1/4, SE 1/4 and E 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 15; NE 1/4 of Sec. 16; S 1/2 NE
  1/4, SE 1/4 and E 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 21; N 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 22; S 1/2
  SE 1/4, Sec. 26; N 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 27; N 1/2 NE 1/4, NE 1/4 NW 1/4,
  SE 1/4 and Lot 1 of Sec. 28; SW 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 30; NW 1/4 NE 1/4 of
  Sec. 31; and N 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 35.

  _Township 38 North, Range 37 East._

  S 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 4; SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 5; NE 1/4 NE 1/4, E 1/2 SE
  1/4, SW 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 8; Sec. 9; SE 1/4 NE 1/4, W 1/2 NW 1/4, E 1/2
  SE 1/4, SW 1/4 SE 1/4 and SW 1/4 of Sec. 10; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and E 1/2 SE
  1/4 of Sec. 11; S 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 12; E 1/2 NE 1/4, N 1/2 NW 1/4 and
  lots 1 and 2 of Sec. 13; E 1/2 NE 1/4, SW 1/4 NE 1/4, W 1/2 NW 1/4, SE
  1/4, E 1/2 SW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 14; Sec. 15; E 1/2, NW 1/4
  and N 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 16; N 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 17; E 1/2 NE 1/4, N
  1/2 SE 1/4, SW 1/4 SE 1/4, SE 1/4 SW 1/4 and lot 5 of Sec. 21; NE 1/4, S
  1/2 NW 1/4, NW 1/4 NW 1/4, N 1/2 SE 1/4, N 1/2 SW 1/4, and SW 1/4 SW 1/4
  of Sec. 22; N 1/2 NE 1/4, NW 1/4 and S 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 23; NW 1/4, NW
  1/4 SW 1/4 and lot 5 of Sec. 25; SW 1/4 SW 1/4 and E 1/2 of Sec. 26; SE
  1/4 SE 1/4 and SW 1/4 of Sec. 27; NW 1/4 NE 1/4, E 1/2 SE 1/4, SW 1/4 SE
  1/4, SE 1/4 SW 1/4 and lots 2, 3, 4, and 5 of Sec. 28; SW 1/4 NE 1/4 and
  lots 3, 4, and 5 of Sec. 29; W 1/2 NE 1/4, N 1/2 SE 1/4, SW 1/4 SE 1/4,
  SE 1/4 SW 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 5, 6, and 8 of Sec. 33; N.E. 1/4 NE 1/4,
  and E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec 35; lots 1, 2, and 3 of Sec. 36.

  _Township 38 North, Range 38 East._

  Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 of Sec. 8; lot 5 of Sec. 19; and lots 1 and 2 of
  Sec. 30.

  _Township 39 North, Range 27 East._

  Lots 3 and 4 of Sec. 10; N 1/2 SW 1/4 and lots 2, 3, 5, and 6 of Sec.
  15; lots 5 and 6 of Sec. 16; E 1/2 NW 1/4, NE 1/4 SE 1/4 and lots 6, 8,
  9, 10, and 11 of Sec. 22; SE 1/4 and lots 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of
  Sec. 27; lots 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 of Sec. 34.

  _Township 39 North, Range 28 East._

  NE 1/4 NE 1/4, S 1/2 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4 and SE 1/4 of Sec. 1; E 1/2
  of Sec. 12; and SE 1/4 of Sec. 36.

  _Township 39 North, Range 29 East._

  W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 3; SE 1/4 and NW 1/4 of Sec. 4; N 1/2 NW 1/4 of
  Sec. 5; W 1/2 NW 1/4 and SW 1/4 of Sec. 6; W 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 7; N
  1/2, SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 9; S 1/2 NW 1/4, and SW 1/4 of Sec
  10; W 1/2 SE 1/4 and E 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec 15; S 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 33.

  _Township 39 North, Range 30 East._

  S 1/2 SE 1/4 and SW 1/4 of Sec. 4; E 1/2 NE 1/4 and E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec.
  8; N 1/2 NE 1/4 and N 1/2 NW 1/4 of Sec. 9.

  _Township 39 North, Range 31 East._

  A tract of land described as follows: Commencing at a stake marked
  "I.A." ran north at variation of 22° 30' E. forty chains and set post at
  N.W. corner of claim thence east 20 chains and set N.E. corner thence
  south 40 chains setting S.E. corner thence west 20 chains to point of
  beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Commencing at N.W. corner of No.
  12 thence east 10 chains to S.W. corner of allotment No. 13 thence due
  north 20 chains and set post thence due east 10 chains and set post
  thence due north 20 chains and set post thence due east 20 chains and
  set post thence due south 20 chains and set post thence due west 10
  chains and set post thence due south 20 chains and set post thence due
  west 20 chains to S.W. corner of allotment No. 13.

  A tract of land described as follows: Commencing at N.W. Cor. of No. 13,
  thence due east 10 chains and set post; thence due N. 20 chains and set
  post; thence due E. 10 chains and set post; thence due N. 20 chains and
  set post, thence due E. 20 chains and set post; thence due S. 20 chains
  and set post thence due W 10 chains and set post thence due S. 20 chains
  and set post thence due W. 20 chains to the S.W. corner of allotment No.
  14.

  A tract of land described as follows: Commencing at N.W. corner of No.
  14 thence due north 40 chains and set post thence due east 20 chains and
  set post thence due S. 40 chains and set post thence due west 20 chains
  on line between Nos. 14 & 15 to place of beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Commencing at the N.W. corner of
  No. 15, thence due east 10 chains and set post thence due north 40
  chains and set post, thence due east 20 chains and set post, thence due
  south 40 chains set post for S.E. corner thence due west 20 chains to
  S.W. corner of No. 16.

  _Township 39 North, Range 32 East._

  SW 1/4 NE 1/4, N 1/2 NW 1/4 and SE 1/4 NW 1/4 of Sec. 2.

  _Township 39 North, Range 33 East_.

  SW 1/4 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4, NW 1/4 SE 1/4 and NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 2;
  lots 1 and 2 of Sec. 9; Lot 1 of Sec. 10; lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 of Sec.
  11; N 1/2 of S 1/2 of NE 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 of
  Sec. 12; N 1/2 SE 1/4 and SW 1/4 of Sec. 13; S 1/2 NE 1/4, S 1/2 NW 1/4,
  SW 1/4 and lots 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 of Sec. 14; SE 1/4 SE 1/4 and lots 1,
  2, and 4 of Sec. 15; NE 1/4 NE 1/4 and lots 1, 5, and 6 of Sec. 16; NW
  1/4 NE 1/4, NE 1/4 NW 1/4 and lots 6, 7, 8, and 9 of Sec. 17; W 1/2 Sec.
  23; W 1/2 Sec. 24; W 1/2 NE 1/4, E 1/2 NW 1/4 and W 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec.
  26; SW 1/4 NW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 29; SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec.
  33; SW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 34; E 1/2 of Sec. 35.

  _Township 39 North, Range 36 East._

  SW 1/4 NE 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 11, N. 1/2 SW 1/4
  of Sec. 13; S 1/2 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4 and NE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 14.

  _Township 39 North, Range 37 East._

  SE 1/4 of Sec 8; S 1/2 NE 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec.
  16; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and SE 1/4 of Sec. 17; N 1/2 NE 1/4, NE 1/4 NW 1/4, S
  1/2 NW 1/4 and SW 1/4 of Sec. 20; NE 1/4, NE 1/4 NW 1/4 and E 1/2 SE 1/4
  of Sec 21; NW 1/4 and E 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 29.

  _Township 39 North, Range 38 East._

  SW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 12; W 1/2 NW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 13; S
  1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 14; NW 1/4 of Sec. 23.

  _Township 39 North, Range 39 East._

  Lots 5, 6, and 7 of Sec. 2; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 7; SW
  1/4 NW 1/4 and W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec 8; SW 1/4 SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of
  Sec. 9; W 1/2 NE 1/4, E 1/2 NW 1/4, SW 1/4 NW 1/4 and lot 3 of Sec. 16;
  E 1/2 NE 1/4, NW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 17; NE 1/4 NE 1/4, SE
  1/4, and E 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 18.

  _Township 40 North, Range 27 East._

  E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 11; SW 1/4 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4 and
  SW 1/4 of Sec. 12; NW 1/4 of Sec. 13; E 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 14; W 1/2 of
  SW 1/4 of NE 1/4, NW 1/4, W 1/2 of W 1/2 of SE 1/4, E 1/2 SW 1/4, and NW
  1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 15; lot 5 of Sec. 21; NE 1/4, N 1/2 SE 1/4, SW 1/4 SE
  1/4, S 1/2 SW 1/4 and lots 2, 3, and 4 of Sec. 22; W 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec.
  27.

  _Township 40 North, Range 28 East._

  S 1/2 SE 1/4 and lots 3 and 4 of Sec. 19; SW 1/4 of Sec. 35.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at a stone monument on
  the international line, being the N.W. Cor. of allotment 116, thence
  running due east on boundary line 40 chains set post at N.E. Cor. thence
  due S. 20 chains set post marked "I.A." being S.E. Cor. thence due W. 40
  chains set post at S.W. Cor. thence due N. 20 chains to the point of
  beginning, in section 2 or 3.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.W. Cor. of 116
  thence due E. 40 chains to S.E. Cor. of 116 thence due S. 20 chains and
  set post being S.E. Cor. of 117 thence due W. 40 chains and set post at
  S.W. Cor. of allotment 117 thence due N. 20 chains to place of beginning
  being N.W. Cor. of No. 117.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.W. Cor. of 117
  thence due E. 40 chains to S.E. Cor. of No. 117 thence due S. 20 chains
  to S.E. Cor. No. 118 and set post "I.A." thence due W. 40 chains to S.W.
  Cor. of No. 118 and set post "I.A." thence due N. 20 chains to point of
  beginning being N.W. Cor. of 118.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.W. Cor. 118 thence
  due E. 40 chains to S.E. Cor. of 118 thence due S. 20 chains to S.E.
  Cor. 119 and set post "I.A." thence due W. 40 chains to S.W. Cor. of 119
  and set post thence due N. 20 chains to N.W. Cor. or point of beginning.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.E. Cor. of 116
  thence due E. 40 chains to N.E. Cor. of 122 and set post "I.A." thence
  S. 20 chains to S.E. Cor. and set post thence due W. 40 chains to S.E.
  Cor. of No. 117 being S.W. Cor. of No. 122 thence due N. 20 chains to
  point of beginning, in Sec. 2 or 3.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.E. Cor. of 117
  thence due E. 40 chains to S.E. Cor. of 122 thence due south 20 chains
  to S.E. Cor. of 123 set post "I.A." thence due W. 40 chains to S.E. Cor.
  of 118 thence due N. 20 chains to point of beginning, in section 2 or 3.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at boundary line N.E.
  Cor. of No. 116 thence due E. on boundary line 40 chains set post thence
  due S. 20 chains to N.E. Cor. of 122 thence due W. on line between 122 &
  222 to N.W. Cor. of 122 thence N. 20 chains to place of beginning, in
  section 1 or 2.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at N.E. Cor. of 222 on
  boundary line thence due E. 40 chains set post thence due S. 20 chains
  set post thence due W. 40 chains to S.E. Cor. of 222 thence due N. 20
  chains to place of beginning, in section 1 or 2.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.E. Cor. of 223
  thence due S. 20 chains set post thence due W. 40 chains to N.E. Cor. of
  123 thence due N. 20 chains to N.E. of 122 thence due E. 40 chains
  between line of 223 and 224 to place of beginning, in section 1 or 2.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.E. Cor. of 224
  thence due S. 20 chains set post thence due W. 40 chains to S.E. Cor. of
  123 thence due N. 20 chains to S.W. Cor. of 224 thence due E. 40 chains
  between line 224 & 225 to place of beginning, in section 1 or 2.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at S.E. Cor. of 225
  thence due S. 20 chains set post thence due W. 40 chains set post thence
  due N. 20 chains to S.W. Cor. 225 thence due E. 40 chains on line
  between 225 & 226 to point of beginning, in section 1 or 2.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning on boundary line at N.E.
  Cor. of 223 thence on boundary line due E. 20 chains set post thence due
  S. 40 chains set post thence due W. 20 chains to S.E. Cor. of 224 thence
  due N. 40 chains to place of beginning, in section 1 or 2.

  _Township 40 North, Range 29 East._

  A tract of land described as follows: Set post on International boundary
  line being N.E. Cor. of 120 thence due S. 20 chains to S.E. Cor. and set
  post "I.A." thence due W. 40 chains and set post being S.W. Cor. of 120
  thence due N. 20 chains to boundary line set post "I.A." being N.W. Cor.
  thence on boundary line 40 chains to point of beginning, in section 5 or
  6.

  A tract of land described as follows: Beginning at SE 1/4 of 120 thence
  due S. 20 chains to S.E. Cor. and set post "I.A." thence W. 40 chains to
  S.W. Cor. and set post thence due N. 20 chains to N.W. Cor. thence due
  East 40 chains to point of beginning, Sec. 5 or 6.

  NE 1/4 and S 1/2 of Sec. 32; S. 1/2 SE 1/4 and S 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 33.

  _Township 40 North, Range 30 East._

  E 1/2 NW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 3; W 1/2 W 1/2 SW 1/4 of Sec. 15; NE 1/4 SE
  1/4 and all that part of the S 1/2 of S 1/2 of N 1/2 of NE 1/4 lying
  south and east of Myers creek, all that part of S 1/2 NE 1/4 lying east
  of Myers creek, and all that part of the NW 1/4 SE 1/4 lying east of
  Myers creek and all that part of the S 1/2 SE 1/4 lying east of Myers
  creek in Sec. 16; W 1/2 of SW 1/4 of NE 1/4, W 1/2 of NW 1/4 of SE 1/4,
  E 1/2 SW 1/4, and all that part of W 1/2 SW 1/4 lying east of Myers
  creek except one acre in Reno Quartz claim of Sec. 21; S 1/2 SE 1/4 of
  Sec. 25; S 3/4 of W 1/2 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4, S 3/4 of E 1/2 of NW 1/4 of
  NW 1/4; S 3/4 of E 1/2 of W 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4; E 3/4 of N 1/2 of
  SW 1/4 of NW 1/4, SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 and N 1/2 of NW 1/4 of SE
  1/4 of NW 1/4 of Sec. 28; W 1/2 SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 29; S 1/2 NW 1/4
  and SW 1/4 of Sec. 30; E 1/2 NE 1/4 and W 1/2 NE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of Sec.
  32; S 1/2 NE 1/4 of NW 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4, W 1/2 of W 1/2 of W 1/2 of NW
  1/4 and NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 33.

  _Township 40 North, Range 31 East._

  S 1/2 NE 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4 and NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 25.

  _Township 40 North, Range 32 East._

  E 1/2 SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and E 1/2 of E 1/2 of SE 1/4 of Sec. 9; SW 1/4 NE
  1/4 S 1/2 NW 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4 and SW 1/4 of Sec. 10; W 1/2 of W 1/2 of
  NE 1/4, W 1/2 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4, NE 1/4 SW 1/4 and SW
  1/4 SW 1/4 and all that part of W 1/2 NW 1/4 lying east of Kettle river,
  and all that part of NE 1/4 NW 1/4 lying east of Kettle river of Sec.
  15; the E 1/2 NE 1/4 NE 1/4 and all that part of SE 1/4 SE 1/4 lying
  east of Kettle river in Sec. 16; lot 5 and all that part of the NW 1/4
  SW 1/4, W 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of SW 1/4, SW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of SW 1/4,
  NE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of SW 1/4, and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 lying east of Kettle river
  in Sec. 22; lot 1, W 1/2 of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, all of NE 1/4 of
  NW 1/4 of NW 1/4, SW 1/4 SW 1/4, and SW 1/4 NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 lying east
  of Kettle river in Sec. 26; E 1/2 of NW 1/4, E 1/2 SW 1/4, W 1/2 SE 1/4,
  SE 1/4 SE 1/4 and lots 2, 3, 4, and 5 of Sec. 27; lot 3 of Sec. 30; E
  1/2 NE 1/4, NW 1/4 NE 1/4, E 1/2 of SW 1/4 of NE 1/4, E 1/2 of NW 1/4 of
  SE 1/4 and E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 34; W 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4,
  W 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 and all that part of SW
  1/4 SW 1/4 lying east of Kettle river.

  _Township 40 North, Range 33 East._

  SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 12; NE 1/4 NE 1/4, W 1/2 NE 1/4, NE 1/4 NW 1/4, N
  1/2 SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 13.

  _Township 40 North, Range 34 East._

  S 1/2 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4 and lots 1, 2 and 3 of Sec. 1; E 1/2 SW 1/4
  and lots 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 of Sec. 3; SW 1/4 NE 1/4, S 1/2 NW 1/4, N 1/2
  SW 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Sec. 4; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and NE 1/4
  SE 1/4 of Sec. 5; SW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 7; E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 8; E 1/2
  NE 1/4, N 1/2 SE 1/4 and lots 1, 4 and 6 of Sec. 9; N 1/2 NW 1/4, SW 1/4
  NW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 10; SW 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 13; S 1/2 NE
  1/4, SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 14; NW 1/4 NE 1/4 and NE 1/4 NW
  1/4 of Sec. 15; E 1/2 NE 1/4 of Sec. 17; NW 1/4 NW 1/4 of Sec. 18; SW
  1/4 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW 1/4, NW 1/4 SE 1/4 and NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 19; N
  1/2 NE 1/4, Sec. 23; NW 1/4 NE 1/4 and lots 1 and 2 of Sec. 30.

  _Township 40 North, Range 35 East._

  N 1/2 of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 and lots 3, 4 and N 1/2 of lot 5 of Sec. 6.

  _Township 40 North, Range 39 East._

  SW 1/4 SE 1/4, SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Sec. 25; SE 1/4 NE 1/4 and lot 1 of Sec.
  35; NE 1/4 NE 1/4, SW 1/4 NE 1/4, NW 1/4 and lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 of Sec.
  36.

  _Township 40 North, Range 40 East._

  SW 1/4 SE 1/4 of Sec. 11; NW 1/4 NE 1/4 of E 1/2 SE 1/4 of Sec. 19; S
  1/2 NE 1/4, S 1/2 NW 1/4 and S 1/2 of Sec. 20; S 1/2 NE 1/4, SE 1/4 NW
  1/4, NW 1/4 SE 1/4, N 1/2 SW 1/4, SW 1/4 SW 1/4 and lot 1 of Sec. 21;
  lots 2 and 3 of Sec. 22, lot 2 of Sec. 28; NE 1/4 NW 1/4 and lots 1 and
  2 of Sec. 29; E 1/2 NE 1/4, SW 1/4 NE 1/4, E 1/2 NW 1/4 and lot 1 of
  Sec. 30; lots 3 and 4 of Sec. 31.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March 3, 1891, entitled, "An act to repeal timber-culture laws,
and for other purposes," "That the President of the United States may,
from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or Territory
having public land bearing forests, in any part of the public lands
wholly or in part covered with timber or undergrowth, whether of
commercial value or not, as public reservations, and the President
shall, by public proclamation, declare the establishment of such
reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved
June 4, 1897 entitled, "An act making appropriations for sundry civil
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898, and
for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

And whereas the public lands in the State of Wyoming, within the limits
hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it appears
that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and reserving
said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by the aforesaid acts of Congress, do
hereby make known and proclaim that the boundary lines of the Forest
Reservation in the State of Wyoming, known as "The Big Horn Forest
Reserve," created by proclamation of February 22, 1897, are hereby so
changed and enlarged as to include all those certain tracts, pieces or
parcels of land lying and being situate in the State of Wyoming, and
within the boundaries particularly described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the southeast corner of township forty-eight (48) north,
range eighty-four (84) west, sixth (6th) principal meridian, Wyoming;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of said township; thence
easterly along the twelfth (12th) standard parallel north to the
southeast corner of section thirty-three (33), township forty-nine (49)
north, range eighty-three (83) west; thence northerly along the section
line to the northeast corner of section four (4), township fifty (50)
north, range eighty-three (83) west; thence westerly to the northeast
corner of section two (2), township fifty (50) north, range eighty-four
(84) west, thence northerly along the section line, allowing for the
proper offset on the thirteenth (13th) standard parallel north, to the
northeast corner of section fourteen (14), township fifty-three (53)
north, range eighty-four (84) west, thence westerly to the northeast
corner of section fourteen (14), township fifty-three (53) north, range
eighty-five (85) west; thence northerly to the northeast corner of
section two (2), said township; thence westerly to the northeast corner
of section two (2), township fifty-three (53) north, range eighty-six
(86) west; thence northerly to the northeast corner of section two (2),
township fifty-four (54) north, range eighty-six (86) west; thence
westerly to the southeast corner of township fifty-five (55) north,
range eighty-seven (87) west; thence northerly to the northeast corner
of said township; thence westerly to the northwest corner of said
township; thence southerly to the southwest corner of said township;
thence westerly to the northwest corner of township fifty-four (54)
north, range eighty-eight (88) west; thence northerly along the range
line, allowing for the proper offset on the fourteenth (14th) standard
parallel north, to the point of intersection with the boundary line
between the States of Wyoming and Montana; thence westerly along said
state boundary line to its intersection with the range line between
ranges ninety-two (92) west, and ninety-three (93) west; thence
southerly along said range line, allowing for the proper offset on the
fourteenth (14th) standard parallel north, to the northwest corner of
township fifty-four (54) north, range ninety-two (92) west; thence
easterly to the northeast corner of said township; thence southerly to
the southeast corner of said township; thence easterly to the northeast
corner of township fifty-three (53) north, range ninety-one (91) west;
thence southerly to the southeast corner of said township; thence
easterly along the thirteenth (13th) standard parallel north to the
northwest corner of township fifty-two (52) north, range eighty-eight
(88) west; thence southerly along the range line to the northwest corner
of township fifty (50) north, range eighty-eight (88) west; thence
easterly to the northwest corner of section three (3), said township;
thence southerly along the section line to the southwest corner of
section thirty-four (34), township forty-nine (49) north, range
eighty-eight (88) west; thence easterly along the twelfth (12th)
standard parallel north to the northwest corner of township forty-eight
(48) north, range eighty-seven (87) west; thence southerly to the
southwest corner of said township; thence easterly along the township
line to the southeast corner of township forty-eight (48) north, range
eighty-four (84) west, the place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired; _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 29th day of June, A.D. 1900, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the German Government has entered into a Commercial Agreement
with the United States in conformity with the provisions of the third
section of the Tariff Act of the United States approved July 24, 1897,
by which agreement in the judgment of the President reciprocal and
equivalent concessions are secured in favor of the products of the
United States:

Therefore, be it known that I, William McKinley, President of the United
States of America, acting under the authority conferred by said act of
Congress, do hereby suspend during the continuance in force of said
agreement the imposition and collection of the duties imposed by the
first section of said act upon the articles hereinafter specified, being
the products of the soil and industry of Germany; and do declare in
place thereof the rates of duty provided in the third section of said
act to be in force and effect from and after the date of this
proclamation, as follows, namely:

"Upon argols, or crude tartar, or wine lees, crude, five _per centum
ad valorem_.

"Upon brandies, or other spirits manufactured or distilled from grain
or other materials, one dollar and seventy-five cents per proof gallon.

"Upon still wines, and vermuth, in casks, thirty-five cents per gallon;
in bottles or jugs, per case of one dozen bottles or jugs containing
each not more than one quart and more than one pint, or twenty-four
bottles or jugs containing each not more than one pint, one dollar and
twenty-five cents per case, and any excess beyond these quantities found
in such bottles or jugs shall be subject to a duty of four cents per
pint or fractional part thereof, but no separate or additional duty
shall be assessed upon the bottles or jugs.

"Upon paintings in oil or water colors, pastels, pen and ink drawings,
and statuary, fifteen _per centum ad valorem_" of which the
officers and citizens of the United States will take due notice.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 13th day of July, A.D. 1900, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas His Majesty the King of Italy has entered into a reciprocal
Commercial Agreement with the United States of America pursuant to and
in accordance with the provisions of section 3 of the Tariff Act of the
United States approved July 24, 1897, which agreement is in the English
text in the words and figures following, to wit:


  The President of the United States of America and His Majesty the King
  of Italy, mutually desirous to improve the commercial relations between
  the two countries by a Special Agreement relative thereto, have
  appointed as their Plenipotentiaries for that purpose, namely:

  The President of the United States of America, the Honorable John A.
  Kasson, Special Commissioner Plenipotentiary, etc., and

  His Majesty the King of Italy, His Excellency the Baron S. Fava, Senator
  of the Kingdom, his Ambassador at Washington, etc.,

  Who being duly empowered thereunto have agreed upon the following
  articles:


  ARTICLE I.

  It is agreed on the part of the United States, pursuant to and in
  accordance with the provisions of the third section of the Tariff Act
  of the United States approved July 24, 1897, and in consideration of
  the concessions hereinafter made on the part of Italy in favor of the
  products and manufactures of the United States, that the existing duties
  imposed upon the following articles, being the product of the soil or
  industry of Italy, imported into the United States shall be suspended
  during the continuance in force of this agreement, and in place thereof
  the duties to be assessed and collected thereon shall be as follows,
  namely:

  On argols, or crude tartar, or wine lees; crude, five _per centum ad
  valorem_.

  On brandies, or other spirits manufactured or distilled from grain or
  other materials, one dollar and seventy-five cents per proof gallon.

  On still wines, and vermuth, in casks, thirty-five cents per gallon;
  in bottles or jugs, per case of one dozen bottles or jugs containing
  each not more than one quart and more than one pint, or twenty-four
  bottles or jugs containing each not more than one pint, one dollar
  and twenty-five cents per case, and any excess beyond these quantities
  found in such bottles or jugs shall be subject to a duty of four cents
  per pint or fractional part thereof, but no separate or additional duty
  shall be assessed upon the bottles or jugs.

  On paintings in oil or water colors, pastels, pen and ink drawings, and
  statuary, fifteen _per centum ad valorem_.


  ARTICLE II.

  It is reciprocally agreed on the part of Italy, in consideration of the
  provisions of the foregoing article, that so long as this convention
  shall remain in force the duties to be assessed and collected on the
  following described merchandise, being the product of the soil or
  industry of the United States, imported into Italy shall not exceed the
  rates hereinafter specified, namely:

    Upon                                                lire per quintal.
    cotton seed oil                                            21.50
    fish, pickled or in oil, excluding the tunny,
      preserved in boxes or barrels, sardines and anchovies    15.00
    other fish, preserved                                      25.00
    agricultural machinery                                      9.00
    detached parts of agricultural machinery:
       (1) of cast iron                                        10.00
       (2) of other iron or steel                              11.00
    scientific instruments:
       (a) of copper, bronze, brass, or steel:
           (1) with spy-glasses or microscopes, or
           graduated scales or circles, spy-glasses for
           use on land, monocles, binocles, lenses,
           detached and mounted                                30.00
           (2) not provided with any optical instrument,
           nor with graduated scales or circles                30.00
       (b) of all kinds, in the construction of which
           iron is evidently predominant                       30.00
    dynamo-electrical machines:
       (1) the weight of which exceeds 1000 kilograms          16.00
       (2) weighing 1000 kilograms or less                     25.00
    detached parts of dynamo-electrical machines               25.00
    sewing machines:
       (1) with stands                                         25.00
       (2) without stands                                      30.00
   varnishes, not containing spirits nor mineral oils          20.00

  The following articles shall be admitted free of duty:

    Turpentine oil.
    Natural fertilizers of all kinds.
    Skins, crude, fresh, or dried, not suitable for fur; and fur skins


  ARTICLE III.

  This agreement is subject to the approval of the Italian Parliament.
  When such approval shall have been given, and official notification
  shall have been given to the United States Government of His Majesty's
  ratification, the President shall publish his proclamation, giving full
  effect to the provisions contained in Article I of this agreement. From
  and after the date of such proclamation this agreement shall be in full
  force and effect, and shall continue in force until the expiration of
  the year 1903, and if not denounced by either party one year in advance
  of the expiration of said term shall continue in force until one year
  from the time when one of the high contracting parties shall have given
  notice to the other of its intention to arrest the operation thereof.

  In witness whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed
  this agreement, in duplicate, in the English and Italian texts, and have
  affixed thereunto our respective seals.

  Done at Washington, this 8th day of February, A.D. 1900.

  JOHN A. KASSON. [SEAL.]

  FAVA.           [SEAL.]


And whereas said convention has been duly ratified on the part of His
Majesty the King of Italy, official notice whereof has been received by
the President,

Now, therefore, be it known that I, William McKinley, President of the
United States of America, acting under the authority conferred by said
act of Congress, do hereby suspend during the continuance in force of
said agreement the imposition and collection of the duties mentioned
in the first section of said act and heretofore collected upon the
specified articles of Italian origin as described in said agreement,
and do declare in place thereof the rates of duty provided in the third
section of said act as recited in said agreement to be in full force
and effect from and after the date of this Proclamation, of which the
officers and citizens of the United States will take due notice.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 18th day of July, A.D. 1900, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March 3rd, 1891, entitled, "An act to repeal timber-culture
laws, and for other purposes," "That the President of the United States
may, from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or Territory
having public land bearing forests, in any part of the public lands
wholly or in part covered with timber or undergrowth, whether of
commercial value or not, as public reservations, and the President
shall, by public proclamation, declare the establishment of such
reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas the public lands in the State of Wyoming, within the limits
hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it appears
that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and reserving
said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a Public Reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the State of Wyoming and particularly described as follows,
to wit:

Beginning at the northeast corner of township fifteen (15) north, range
seventy-one (71) west, sixth (6th) principal meridian, Wyoming; thence
westerly along the township line to the northwest corner of section
three (3), township fifteen (15) north, range seventy-two (72) west;
thence southerly to the southwest corner section thirty-four (34), said
township; thence easterly to the southeast corner of said section;
thence southerly to the southwest corner of section eleven (11),
township fourteen (14) north, range seventy-two (72) west; thence
easterly to the southeast corner of section twelve (12), said township;
thence southerly to the southwest corner of section thirty (30),
township fourteen (14) north, range seventy-one (71) west; thence
easterly to the southeast corner of section twenty-five (25), said
township; thence northerly along the range line to the northeast corner
of township fifteen (15) north, range seventy-one (71) west, the place
of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired: _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

The reservation hereby established shall be known as The Crow Creek
Forest Reserve.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 10th day of October, A.D. 1900, and
of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

_To the People of the United States_:

In the fullness of years and honors, John Sherman, lately Secretary of
State, has passed away.

Few among our citizens have risen to greater or more deserved eminence
in the national councils than he. The story of his public life and
services is as it were the history of the country for half a century.
In the Congress of the United States he ranked among the foremost in the
House, and later in the Senate. He was twice a member of the Executive
Cabinet, first as Secretary of the Treasury, and afterwards as Secretary
of State. Whether in debate during the dark hours of our civil war,
or as the director of the country's finances during the period of
rehabilitation, or as a trusted councilor in framing the nation's laws
for over forty years, or as the exponent of its foreign policy, his
course was ever marked by devotion to the best interests of his beloved
land, and by able and conscientious effort to uphold its dignity and
honor. His countrymen will long revere his memory and see in him a type
of the patriotism, the uprightness and the zeal that go to molding and
strengthening a nation.

In fitting expression of the sense of bereavement that afflicts the
Republic, I direct that on the day of the funeral the Executive Offices
of the United States display the national flag at half mast and that the
Representatives of the United States in foreign countries shall pay in
like manner appropriate tribute to the illustrious dead for a period of
ten days.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 22d day of October, A.D. 1900, and
of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

It has pleased Almighty God to bring our nation in safety and honor
through another year. The works of religion and charity have everywhere
been manifest. Our country through all its extent has been blessed with
abundant harvests. Labor and the great industries of the people have
prospered beyond all precedent. Our commerce has spread over the world.
Our power and influence in the cause of freedom and enlightenment
have extended over distant seas and lands. The lives of our official
representatives and many of our people in China have been marvelously
preserved. We have been generally exempt from pestilence and other great
calamities; and even the tragic visitation which overwhelmed the city of
Galveston made evident the sentiments of sympathy and Christian charity
by virtue of which we are one united people.

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States,
do hereby appoint and set apart Thursday, the 20th of November next, to
be observed by all the people of the United States, at home or abroad,
as a day of thanksgiving and praise to Him who holds the nations in the
hollow of His hand. I recommend that they gather in their several places
of worship and devoutly give Him thanks for the prosperity wherewith He
has endowed us, for seed-time and harvest, for the valor, devotion and
humanity of our armies and navies, and for all His benefits to us as
individuals and as a nation; and that they humbly pray for the
continuance of His Divine favor, for concord and amity with other
nations, and for righteousness and peace in all our ways.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of October, A.D. 1900, and
of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and
twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas public interests require that the Senate of the United States be
convened at 12 o'clock on the 4th day of March next, to receive such
communications as may be made by the Executive:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, do hereby proclaim and declare that an extraordinary occasion
requires the Senate of the United States to convene at the Capitol in
the city of Washington on the 4th day of March next, at 12 o'clock noon,
of which all persons who shall at that time be entitled to act as
members of that body are hereby required to take notice.

[SEAL.]

Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, at Washington,
the 23d day of February, A.D. 1901, and of the Independence of the
United States the one hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, March 14, 1901_.

_To the People of the United States_:

Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States from 1889 to 1893,
died yesterday at 4:45 P.M., at his home in Indianapolis. In his death
the country has been deprived of one of its greatest citizens. A
brilliant soldier in his young manhood, he gained fame and rapid
advancement by his energy and valor. As a lawyer he rose to be a leader
of the bar. In the Senate he at once took and retained high rank as an
orator and legislator; and in the high office of President he displayed
extraordinary gifts as administrator and statesman. In public and in
private life he set a shining example for his countrymen.

In testimony of the respect in which his memory is held by the
Government and people of the United States, I do hereby direct that the
flags on the Executive Mansion and the several Departmental buildings be
displayed at half staff for a period of thirty days; and that suitable
military and naval honors, under the orders of the Secretaries of War
and of the Navy, be rendered on the day of the funeral.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 14th day of March, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas The Washington Forest Reserve, in the State of Washington, was
established by proclamation dated February 22d, 1897, under and by
virtue of section twenty-four of the act of Congress, approved March 3d,
1891, entitled, "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other
purposes," which provides, "That the President of the United States may,
from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or Territory
having public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved June
4th, 1897, entitled, "An act making appropriations for sundry civil
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1898,
and for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States,
by virtue of the power vested in me by the aforesaid act of Congress,
approved June 4th, 1897, do hereby make known and proclaim that there
are hereby withdrawn and excluded from the aforesaid Washington Forest
Reserve and restored to the public domain all those certain tracts,
pieces or parcels of land particularly described as follows to wit:

The southwest quarter of section three (3), sections four (4) and five
(5), the east half of section nine (9), the west half of section ten
(10), the south half of section thirteen (13), the south half of section
fourteen (14), section fifteen (15), the north half and southeast
quarter of section twenty-three (23), sections twenty-four (24),
twenty-five (25) and thirty-six (36), all in township thirty-five (35)
north, range twenty (20) east, Willamette Meridian; what will be when
surveyed the south half of township thirty-two (32) north, range
twenty-one (21) east; what will be when surveyed the north half of
township thirty-three (33) north, range twenty-one (21) east; townships
thirty-four (34) and thirty-five (35) north, range twenty-one (21) east;
townships thirty-one (31) to thirty-four (34), both inclusive, range
twenty-two (22) east; what will be when surveyed sections thirty (30),
thirty-one (31) and thirty-two (32) of township thirty-five (35) north,
range twenty-two (22) east.

That the lands hereby restored to the public domain shall be open to
settlement from date hereof, but shall not be subject to entry, filing
or selection until after ninety days' notice by such publication as the
Secretary of the Interior may prescribe.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 3rd day of April, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, by Executive Order dated December 27, 1875, sections 8 and 9,
township 15 south, range 2 east, San Bernardino meridian, California,
were with certain other tracts of land withdrawn from the public domain
and reserved for the use of the Capitan Grande band or village of
Mission Indians; and

Whereas the Commission appointed under the provisions of the act of
Congress approved January 12, 1891, entitled "An act for the relief of
the Mission Indians in the State of California" (U.S. Statutes at Large,
vol. 26, page 712), selected for the said Capitan Grande band or village
of Indians certain tracts of land intentionally omitted and excluded
from such selection the said sections 8 and 9, township 15 south, range
2 east, and reported that the tracts thus omitted included the lands
upon which were found the claims of Arthur F. Head and others; and

Whereas, the report and recommendations of the said Commission were
approved by Executive Order dated December 29, 1891, which order also
directed that "All of the lands mentioned in said report are hereby
withdrawn from settlement and entry until patents shall have issued
for said selected reservations and until the recommendations of said
Commission shall be fully executed, and, by the proclamation of the
President of the United States, the lands or any part thereof shall
be restored to the public domain;" and

Whereas a patent was issued March 10, 1894, to the said Indians for the
lands selected by the Commission as aforesaid and which patent also
excluded the said sections 8 and 9, township 15 south, range 2 east; and

Whereas it appears that the said Arthur F. Head cannot make the
requisite filings on the land occupied by him until it shall have been
formally restored to the public domain, and that no good reason appears
to exist for the further reservation of the said sections for the said
band of Indians;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested, do hereby declare and make known that
the Executive Orders dated December 27, 1875, and December 29, 1891, are
so far modified as to except from their provisions sections 8 and 9 of
township 15 south, range 2 east, San Bernardino meridian, and the said
sections are hereby restored to the public domain.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 16th day of April, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the act of Congress entitled "An act to ratify and confirm an
agreement with the Muscogee or Creek tribe of Indians and for other
purposes," approved on the 1st day of March, 1901, contains a provision
as follows:

  That the agreement negotiated between the Commission to the Five
  Civilized Tribes and the Muscogee or Creek tribe of Indians, at the
  city of Washington on the 8th day of March, nineteen hundred, as
  herein amended, is hereby accepted, ratified, and confirmed, and the
  same shall be of full force and effect when ratified by the Creek
  national council. The principal chief, as soon as practicable after
  the ratification of this agreement by Congress, shall call an extra
  session of the Creek national council and lay before it this agreement
  and the act of Congress ratifying it, and if the agreement be ratified
  by said council, as provided in the constitution of said nation, he
  shall transmit to the President of the United States the act of council
  ratifying the agreement, and the President of the United States shall
  thereupon issue his proclamation declaring the same duly ratified, and
  that all the provisions of this agreement have become law according to
  the terms thereof: _Provided_, That such ratification by the Creek
  national council shall be made within ninety days from the approval of
  this act by the President of the United States,


And whereas the principal chief of the said tribe has transmitted to
me an act of the Creek national council entitled "An act to ratify and
confirm an agreement between the United States and the Muscogee Nation
of Indians of the Indian Territory" approved the 25th day of May, 1901,
which contains a provision as follows:

  That said agreement, amended, ratified and confirmed by the Congress of
  the United States, as set forth in said act of Congress approved March
  1, 1901, is hereby accepted, ratified and confirmed on the part of the
  Muscogee Nation and on the part of the Muscogee or Creek tribe of
  Indians constituting said Nation, as provided in said act of Congress
  and as provided in the Constitution of said Nation, and the Principal
  Chief is hereby authorized to transmit this act of the National Council
  ratifying said agreement to the President of the United States as
  provided in said act of Congress.


And whereas paragraph thirty-six of said agreement contains a provision
as follows:

  This provision shall not take effect until after it shall have been
  separately and specifically approved by the Creek national council and
  by the Seminole general council; and if not approved by either, it shall
  fail altogether, and be eliminated from this agreement without impairing
  any other of its provisions.


And whereas there has been presented to me an act of the Creek national
council entitled "An act to disapprove certain provisions, relating to
Seminole citizens, in the agreement between the Muscogee Nation and the
United States, ratified by Congress March 1, 1901," approved the 25th
day of May, 1901, by which the provisions of said paragraph thirty-six
are specifically disapproved:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, do
hereby declare said agreement, except paragraph thirty-six thereof, duly
ratified and that all the provisions thereof, except said paragraph
thirty-six which failed of ratification by the Creek national council,
became law according to the terms thereof upon the 25th day of May,
1901.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 25th day of June, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  DAVID J. HILL,
    _Acting Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the Cascade Range Forest Reserve, in the State of Oregon,
was established by proclamation dated September 28, 1893, under and
by virtue of section twenty-four of the act of Congress, approved
March 3, 1891, entitled, "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and
for other purposes," which provides, "That the President of the United
States may, from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or
Territory having public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved
June 4, 1897, entitled, "An act making appropriations for sundry civil
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898,
and for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at
any time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter
be made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;"

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States,
by virtue of the power vested in me by the aforesaid act of Congress,
approved June 4, 1897, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is
hereby reserved from entry or settlement, and added to and made a part
of the aforesaid Cascade Range Forest Reserve, all those certain tracts,
pieces or parcels of land lying and being situate in the State of Oregon
and particularly described as follows, to wit:

The south half (S. 1/2) of township one (1) south, townships two (2)
south, three (3) south, and four (4) south, range eleven (11) east,
Willamette Meridian; township five (5) south, ranges nine (9) and ten
(10) east; and so much of township six (6) south, ranges nine (9) and
ten (10) east, as lies north of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired: _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of July, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  DAVID J. HILL,
    _Acting Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March 3rd, 1891, entitled "An act to repeal timber-culture
laws, and for other purposes," "That the President of the United States
may, from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or Territory
having public land bearing forests, in any part of the public lands
wholly or in part covered with timber or undergrowth, whether of
commercial value or not, as public reservations, and the President
shall, by public proclamation, declare the establishment of such
reservations and the limits thereof."

And whereas the public lands in the Territory of Oklahoma, within the
limits hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it
appears that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and
reserving said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a public reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the Territory of Oklahoma and particularly described as
follows, to wit:

Beginning at the southeast corner of township three (3) north, range
fourteen (14) west, Indian Meridian, Territory of Oklahoma; thence north
along the township line to the northeast corner of section twenty-four
(24), township three (3) north, range fourteen (14) west; thence east
on the section line to the southeast corner of section thirteen (13),
township three (3) north, range thirteen (13) west; thence north along
the range line between ranges twelve (12) and thirteen (13) west, to
the northeast corner of the southeast quarter of section twelve (12),
township three (3) north, range thirteen (13) west; thence west to
the southwest corner of the northwest quarter of section twelve (12),
township three (3) north, range thirteen (13) west; thence north to the
southwest corner of section one (1), township three (3) north, range
thirteen (13) west; thence west along the section line between sections
two (2) and eleven (11), to the southwest corner of section two (2),
township three (3) north, range thirteen (13) west; thence north along
the section line between sections two (2) and three (3) to the southeast
corner of the northeast quarter of section three (3), township three (3)
north, range thirteen (13) west; thence west along the center line of
sections three (3), four (4), five (5), and six (6), to the southwest
corner of the northwest quarter of section six (6), township three (3)
north, range thirteen (13) west; thence north along the range line
between ranges thirteen (13) and fourteen (14) west to the northeast
corner of section one (1), township three (3) north, range fourteen (14)
west; thence west along the township line between townships three (3)
and four (4) north to the northwest corner of section two (2), township
three (3) north, range fourteen (14) west; thence north to the northeast
corner of section thirty-four (34), township four (4) north, range
fourteen (14) west; thence west to the northwest corner of section
thirty-four (34), township four (4) north, range fourteen (14) west;
thence north to the northeast corner of the southeast quarter of section
twenty-one (21), township four (4) north, range fourteen (14) west;
thence west to the southwest corner of the northwest quarter of section
twenty (20), township four (4) north, range fourteen (14) west; thence
north to the northeast corner of section eighteen (18), township four
(4) north, range fourteen (14) west; thence west to the northwest corner
of section seventeen (17), township four (4) north, range fifteen (15)
west; thence south to the southwest corner of section twenty-nine (29),
township four (4) north, range fifteen (15) west; thence east to the
southeast corner of section twenty-nine (29), township four (4) north,
range fifteen (15) west; thence south to the southwest corner of section
thirty-three (33), township four (4) north, range fifteen (15) west;
thence east to the southeast corner of said section thirty-three (33),
township four (4) north, range fifteen (15) west; thence south to the
southwest corner of the northwest quarter of section ten (10), township
three (3) north, range fifteen (15) west; thence east to the southeast
corner of the northeast quarter of said section ten; thence south to the
southwest corner of section twenty-six (26), township three (3) north,
range fifteen (15) west; thence east to the southeast corner of said
section twenty-six (26); thence south to the southwest corner of the
northwest quarter of section thirty-six (36), township three (3) north,
range fifteen (15) west; thence east to the center of section
thirty-three (33), township three (3) north, range fourteen (14) west;
thence south to the southwest corner of the southeast quarter of said
section thirty-three (33); thence east along the township line between
townships two (2) and three (3) north to the southeast corner of
township three (3) north, range fourteen (14) west, the place of
beginning.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

The reservation hereby established shall be known as the Wichita Forest
Reserve.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 4th day of July, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-sixth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  DAVID J. HILL
    _Acting Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by an agreement between the Wichita and affiliated bands of
Indians on the one part, and certain commissioners of the United States
on the other part, ratified by act of Congress approved March 2, 1895
(28 Stat., 876, 894), the said Indians ceded, conveyed, transferred and
relinquished, forever and absolutely, without any reservation whatever,
unto the United States of America, all their claim, title and interest
of every kind and character in and to the lands embraced in the
following described tract of country now in the Territory of Oklahoma,
to wit:

  Commencing at a point in the middle of the main channel of the Washita
  River, where the ninety-eighth meridian of west longitude crosses the
  same, thence up the middle of the main channel of said river to the line
  of 98° 40' west longitude, thence on said line of 98° 40' due north to
  the middle of the channel of the main Canadian River, thence down the
  middle of the said main Canadian River to where it crosses the
  ninety-eighth meridian, thence due south to the place of beginning.


And whereas, in pursuance of said act of Congress ratifying said
agreement, allotments of land in severalty have been regularly made to
each and every member of said Wichita and affiliated bands of Indians,
native and adopted, and the lands occupied by religious societies or
other organizations for religious or educational work among the Indians
have been regularly allotted and confirmed to such societies and
organizations, respectively;

And whereas, by an agreement between the Comanche, Kiowa and Apache
tribes of Indians on the one part, and certain commissioners of the
United States on the other part, amended and ratified by act of
Congress, approved June 6, 1900 (31 Stat., 672, 676), the said Indian
tribes, subject to certain conditions which have been duly performed,
ceded, conveyed, transferred, relinquished and surrendered forever and
absolutely, without any reservation whatsoever, expressed or implied,
unto the United States of America, all their claim, title and interest
of every kind and character in and to the lands embraced in the
following described tract of country now in the Territory of Oklahoma,
to wit:

  Commencing at a point where the Washita River crosses the ninety-eighth
  meridian west from Greenwich; thence up the Washita River, in the middle
  of the main channel thereof, to a point thirty miles, by river, west of
  Fort Cobb, as now established; thence due west to the north fork of Red
  River, provided said line strikes said river east of the one-hundredth
  meridian of west longitude; if not, then only to said meridian line, and
  thence due south, on said meridian line, to the said north Fork of Red
  River; thence down said north fork, in the middle of the main channel
  thereof, from the point where it may be first intersected by the lines
  above described, to the main Red River; thence down said Red River, in
  the middle of the main channel thereof, to its intersection with the
  ninety-eighth meridian of longitude west from Greenwich; thence north,
  on said meridian line, to the place of beginning.


And whereas, in pursuance of said act of Congress ratifying the
agreement last named, allotments of land in severalty have been
regularly made to each member of said Comanche, Kiowa and Apache
tribes of Indians; the lands occupied by religious societies or other
organizations for religious or educational work among the Indians
have been regularly allotted and confirmed to such societies and
organizations, respectively; and the Secretary of the Interior, out of
the lands ceded by the agreement last named, has regularly selected and
set aside for the use in common for said Comanche, Kiowa and Apache
tribes of Indians, four hundred and eighty thousand acres of grazing
lands;

And whereas, in the act of Congress ratifying the said Wichita
agreement, it is provided--

  That whenever any of the lands acquired by this agreement shall, by
  operation of law or proclamation of the President of the United States,
  be open to settlement, they shall be disposed of under the general
  provisions of the homestead and townsite laws of the United States:
  _Provided_, That in addition to the land-office fees prescribed by
  statute for such entries the entryman shall pay one dollar and
  twenty-five cents per acre for the land entered at the time of
  submitting his final proof: _And provided further_, That in all
  homestead entries where the entryman has resided upon and improved the
  land entered in good faith for the period of fourteen months he may
  commute his entry to cash upon the payment of one dollar and twenty-five
  cents per acre: _And provided further_, That the rights of
  honorably discharged Union soldiers and sailors of the late civil war,
  as defined and described in sections twenty-three hundred and four and
  twenty-three hundred and five of the Revised Statutes, shall not be
  abridged: _And provided further_, That any qualified entryman
  having lands adjoining the lands herein ceded, whose original entry
  embraced less than one hundred and sixty acres, may take sufficient
  land from said reservation to make his homestead entry not to exceed
  one hundred and sixty acres in all, said land to be taken upon the
  same conditions as are required of other entrymen: _Provided_, That
  said lands shall be opened to settlement within one year after said
  allotments are made to the Indians.

         *       *       *       *       *

  That the laws relating to the mineral lands of the United States are
  hereby extended over the lands ceded by the foregoing agreement.


And whereas in the act of Congress ratifying the said Comanche, Kiowa
and Apache agreement, it is provided--

  That the lands acquired by this agreement shall be opened to settlement
  by proclamation of the President within six months after allotments are
  made and be disposed of under the general provisions of the homestead
  and townsite laws of the United States: _Provided_, That in
  addition to the land office fees prescribed by statute for such entries
  the entryman shall pay one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre for the
  land entered at the time of submitting his final proof: _And provided
  further_, That in all homestead entries where the entryman has
  resided upon and improved the land entered in good faith for the period
  of fourteen months he may commute his entry to cash upon the payment of
  one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre: _And provided further_,
  That the rights of honorably discharged Union soldiers and sailors of
  the late civil war, as defined and described in sections twenty-three
  hundred and four and twenty-three hundred and five of the Revised
  Statutes shall not be abridged: _And provided further_, That any
  person who, having attempted to but for any cause failed to secure a
  title in fee to a homestead under existing laws, or who made entry under
  what is known as the commuted provision of the homestead law shall be
  qualified to make a homestead entry upon said lands: _And provided
  further_, That any qualified entryman having lands adjoining the
  lands herein ceded, whose original entry embraced less than one hundred
  and sixty acres in all, shall have the right to enter so much of the
  lands by this agreement ceded lying contiguous to his said entry as
  shall, with the land already entered, make in the aggregate one hundred
  and sixty acres, said land to be taken upon the same conditions as are
  required of other entrymen: _And provided further_, That the
  settlers who located on that part of said lands called and known as the
  "neutral strip" shall have preference right for thirty days on the lands
  upon which they have located and improved.

         *       *       *       *       *

  That should any of said lands allotted to said Indians, or opened to
  settlement under this act, contain valuable mineral deposits, such
  mineral deposits shall be open to location and entry, under the existing
  mining laws of the United States, upon the passage of this act, and the
  mineral laws of the United States are hereby extended over said lands.


And whereas, by the act of Congress approved January 4, 1901 (31 Stat.,
727), the Secretary of the Interior was authorized to extend, for a
period not exceeding eight months from December 6, 1900, the time for
making allotments to the Comanche, Kiowa, and Apache Indians and opening
to settlement the lands so ceded by them;

And whereas, in pursuance of the act of Congress approved March 3, 1901
(31 Stat., 1093), the Secretary of the Interior has regularly subdivided
the lands so as aforesaid respectively ceded to the United States by the
Wichita and affiliated bands of Indians and the Comanche, Kiowa, and
Apache tribes of Indians into counties, attaching portions thereof to
adjoining counties in the Territory of Oklahoma, has regularly
designated the place for the county seat of each new county, has
regularly set aside and reserved at such county seat land for a townsite
to be disposed of in the manner provided by the act of Congress last
named, and has regularly caused to be surveyed, subdivided, and platted
the lands so set aside and reserved for disposition as such townsites;

And whereas, by the act of Congress last named, it is provided:

  The lands to be opened to settlement and entry under the acts of
  Congress ratifying said agreements respectively shall be so opened by
  proclamation of the President, and to avoid the contests and conflicting
  claims which have heretofore resulted from opening similar public lands
  to settlement and entry, the President's proclamation shall prescribe
  the manner in which these lands may be settled upon, occupied, and
  entered by persons entitled thereto under the acts ratifying said
  agreements, respectively; and no person shall be permitted to settle
  upon, occupy, or enter any of said lands except as prescribed in such
  proclamation until after the expiration of sixty days from the time when
  the same are opened to settlement and entry.


And whereas, by the act of Congress last named the President was
authorized to establish two additional United States land districts and
land offices in the Territory of Oklahoma to include the lands so ceded
as aforesaid, which land districts and land offices have been
established by an order of even date herewith;

And whereas all of the conditions required by law to be performed prior
to the opening of said tracts of land to settlement and entry have been,
as I hereby declare, duly performed;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the power vested in me by law, do hereby declare
and make known that all of the lands so as aforesaid ceded by the
Wichita and affiliated bands of Indians, and the Comanche, Kiowa, and
Apache tribes of Indians, respectively, saving and excepting sections
sixteen, thirty-six, thirteen, and thirty-three in each township, and
all lands located or selected by the Territory of Oklahoma as indemnity
school or educational lands, and saving and excepting all lands allotted
in severalty to individual Indians, and saving and excepting all lands
allotted and confirmed to religious societies and other organizations,
and saving and excepting the lands selected and set aside as grazing
lands for the use in common for said Comanche, Kiowa, and Apache tribes
of Indians, and saving and excepting the lands set aside and reserved at
each of said county seats for disposition as townsites, and saving and
excepting the lands now used, occupied, or set apart for military,
agency, school, school farm, religious, Indian cemetery, wood reserve,
forest reserve, or other public uses, will, on the 6th day of August,
1901, at 9 o'clock A.M., in the manner herein prescribed and not
otherwise, be opened to entry and settlement and to disposition under
the general provisions of the homestead and townsite laws of the United
States.

Commencing at 9 o'clock A.M., Wednesday, July 10, 1901, and ending at
6 o'clock P.M., Friday, July 26, 1901, a registration will be had at
the United States land offices at El Reno and Lawton, in the Territory
of Oklahoma (the office at Lawton to occupy provisional quarters
in the immediate vicinity of Fort Sill, Oklahoma Territory, until
suitable quarters can be provided at Lawton), for the purpose of
ascertaining what persons desire to enter, settle upon, and acquire
title to any of said lands under the homestead law and of ascertaining
their qualifications so to do. The registration at each office will be
for both land districts, but at the time of registration each applicant
will be required to elect and state in which district he desires to make
entry. To obtain registration each applicant will be required to show
himself duly qualified to make homestead entry of these lands under
existing laws and to give the registering officer such appropriate
matters of description and identity as will protect the applicant and
the government against any attempted impersonation. Registration cannot
be effected through the use of the mails or the employment of an agent,
excepting that honorably discharged soldiers and sailors entitled to the
benefits of section 2304 of the Revised Statutes of the United States,
as amended by the act of Congress approved March 1, 1901 (31 Stat.,
847), may present their applications for registration and due proofs of
their qualifications through an agent of their own selection, but no
person will be permitted to act as agent for more than one such soldier
or sailor. No person will be permitted to register more than once or
in any other than his true name. Each applicant who shows himself duly
qualified will be registered and given a non-transferable certificate
to that effect, which will entitle him to go upon and examine the lands
to be opened hereunder in the land district in which he elects to make
his entry; but the only purpose for which he may go upon and examine
said lands is that of enabling him later on, as herein provided, to
understandingly select the lands for which he will make entry. No one
will be permitted to make settlement upon any of said lands in advance
of the opening herein provided for, and during the first sixty days
following said opening no one but registered applicants will be
permitted to make homestead settlement upon any of said lands, and then
only in pursuance of a homestead entry duly allowed by the local land
officers or of a soldier's declaratory statement duly accepted by such
officers.

The order in which, during the first sixty days following the opening,
the registered applicants will be permitted to make homestead entry of
the lands opened hereunder, will be determined by drawings for both the
El Reno and Lawton districts publicly held at the United States land
office at El Reno, Oklahoma, commencing at 9 o'clock A.M., Monday, July
29, 1901, and continuing for such period as may be necessary to complete
the same. The drawings will be had under the supervision and immediate
observation of a committee of three persons whose integrity is such as
to make their control of the drawing a guaranty of its fairness. The
members of this committee will be appointed by the Secretary of the
Interior, who will prescribe suitable compensation for their services.
Preparatory to these drawings the registration officers will, at the
time of registering each applicant who shows himself duly qualified,
make out a card, which must be signed by the applicant, stating the land
district in which he desires to make homestead entry, and giving such a
description of the applicant as will enable the local land officers to
thereafter identify him. This card will be at once sealed in a separate
envelope, which will bear no other distinguishing label or mark than
such as may be necessary to show that it is to go into the drawing for
the land district in which the applicant desires to make entry. These
envelopes will be separated according to land districts and will be
carefully preserved and remain sealed until opened in the course of the
drawing as herein provided. When the registration is completed all of
these sealed envelopes will be brought together at the place of drawing
and turned over to the committee in charge of the drawing, who, in such
manner as in their judgment will be attended with entire fairness and
equality of opportunity, shall proceed to draw out and open the separate
envelopes and to give to each enclosed card a number in the order in
which the envelope containing the same is drawn. While the drawings for
the two districts will be separately conducted they will occur as nearly
at the same time as is practicable. The result of the drawing for each
district will be certified by the committee to the officers of the
district and will determine the order in which the applicants may make
homestead entry of said lands and settlement thereon.

Notice of the drawings stating the name of each applicant and number
assigned to him by the drawing will be posted each day at the place
of drawing, and each applicant will be notified of his number by a
postal-card mailed to him at the address, if any, given by him at the
time of registration. Each applicant should, however, in his own behalf
employ such measures as will insure his obtaining prompt and accurate
information of the order in which his application for homestead entry
can be presented as fixed by the drawing. Applications for homestead
entry of said lands during the first sixty days following the opening
can be made only by registered applicants and in the order established
by the drawing. At each land office, commencing Tuesday, August 6, 1901,
at 9 o'clock A.M., the applications of those drawing numbers 1 to 125,
inclusive, for that district must be presented and will be considered
in their numerical order during the first day, and the applications
of those drawing numbers 126 to 250, inclusive, must be presented and
will be considered in their numerical order during the second day,
and so on at that rate until all of said lands subject to entry under
the homestead law, and desired thereunder, have been entered. If any
applicant fails to appear and present his application for entry when the
number assigned to him by the drawing is reached, his right to enter
will be passed until after the other applications assigned for that day
have been disposed of, when he will be given another opportunity to make
entry, failing in which he will be deemed to have abandoned his right to
make entry under such drawing. To obtain the allowance of a homestead
entry each applicant must personally present the certificate of
registration theretofore issued to him, together with a regular
homestead application and the necessary accompanying proofs, and with
the regular land office fees, but an honorably discharged soldier or
sailor may file his declaratory statement through the agent representing
him at the registration. The production of the certificate of
registration will be dispensed with only upon satisfactory proof of
its loss or destruction. If at the time of considering his regular
application for entry it appears that any applicant is disqualified from
making homestead entry of these lands his application will be rejected,
notwithstanding his prior registration. If any applicant shall register
more than once hereunder, or in any other than his true name, or shall
transfer his registration certificate he will thereby lose all the
benefits of the registration and drawing herein provided for, and will
be precluded from entering or settling upon any of said lands during the
first sixty days following said opening.

Because of the provision in the said act of Congress approved June 6,
1900: "That the settlers who located on that part of said lands called
and known as the 'neutral strip' shall have preference right for thirty
days on the lands upon which they have located and improved," the said
lands in the "neutral strip" shall for the period of thirty days after
said opening be subject to homestead entry and townsite entry only by
those who have heretofore located upon and improved the same, and who
are accorded a preference right of entry for thirty days as aforesaid.
Persons entitled to make entry under this preference right will be
permitted to do so at any time during said period of thirty days
following the opening without previous registration, and without regard
to the drawing herein provided for, and at the expiration of that period
the lands in said "neutral strip" for which no entry shall have been
made will come under the general provisions of this proclamation.

The intended beneficiaries of the provision in the said acts of
Congress, approved, respectively, March 2, 1895, and June 6, 1900, which
authorizes a qualified entryman having lands adjoining the ceded lands,
whose original entry embraced less than 160 acres, to enter so much
of the ceded lands as will make his homestead entry contain in the
aggregate not exceeding 160 acres, may obtain such an extension of his
existing entry, without previous registration and without regard to the
drawing herein provided for, only by making appropriate application,
accompanied by the necessary proofs, at the proper new land office at
some time prior to the opening herein provided for.

Any person or persons desiring to found, or to suggest establishing
a townsite upon any of said ceded lands at any point not in the near
vicinity of either of the county seats therein heretofore selected and
designated as aforesaid, may, at any time before the opening herein
provided for, file in the proper local land office a written application
to that effect describing by legal subdivisions the lands intended to be
affected, and stating fully and under oath the necessity or propriety of
founding or establishing a town at that place. The local officers will
forthwith transmit said petition to the Commissioner of the General Land
Office with their recommendation in the premises. Such Commissioner, if
he believes the public interests will be subserved thereby, will, if the
Secretary of the Interior approve thereof, issue an order withdrawing
the lands described in such petition, or any portion thereof, from
homestead entry and settlement and directing that the same be held for
the time being for townsite settlement, entry, and disposition only.
In such event the lands so withheld from homestead entry and settlement
will, at the time of said opening and not before, become subject to
settlement, entry, and disposition under the general townsite laws
of the United States. None of said ceded lands will be subject to
settlement, entry, or disposition under such general townsite laws
except in the manner herein prescribed until after the expiration of
sixty days from the time of said opening.

Attention is hereby especially called to the fact that under the special
provisions of the said act of Congress approved March 3, 1901, the
townsites selected and designated at the county seats of the new
counties into which said lands have been formed cannot be disposed of
under the general townsite laws of the United States, and can only be
disposed of in the special manner provided in said act of Congress,
which declares:

  The lands so set apart and designated shall, in advance of the opening,
  be surveyed, subdivided, and platted, under the direction of the
  Secretary of the Interior, into appropriate lots, blocks, streets,
  alleys, and sites for parks or public buildings, so as to make a
  townsite thereof: _Provided_, That no person shall purchase more than
  one business and one residence lot. Such town lots shall be offered
  and sold at public auction to the highest bidder, under the direction
  of the Secretary of the Interior, at sales to be had at the opening
  and subsequent thereto.


All persons are especially admonished that under the said act of
Congress approved March 3, 1901, it is provided that no person shall
be permitted to settle upon, occupy, or enter any of said ceded lands
except in the manner prescribed in this proclamation until after the
expiration of sixty days from the time when the same are opened to
settlement and entry. After the expiration of the said period of sixty
days, but not before, any of said lands remaining undisposed of may be
settled upon, occupied and entered under the general provisions of the
homestead and townsite laws of the United States in like manner as if
the manner of effecting such settlement, occupancy and entry had not
been prescribed herein in obedience to law.

It appearing that there are fences around the pastures into which, for
convenience, portions of the ceded lands have heretofore been divided,
and that these fences are of considerable value and are still the
property of the Indian tribes ceding said lands to the United States,
all persons going upon examining, entering or settling upon any of
said lands are cautioned to respect such fences as the property of the
Indians and not to destroy, appropriate, or carry away the same, but
to leave them undisturbed so that they may be seasonably removed and
preserved for the benefit of the Indians.

The Secretary of the Interior shall prescribe all needful rules and
regulations necessary to carry into full effect the opening herein
provided for.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this 4th day of July, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-sixth.

[SEAL.]

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  DAVID J. HILL,
    _Acting Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the Olympic Forest Reserve, in the State of Washington, was
established by proclamation dated February 22, 1897, under and by virtue
of section twenty-four of the act of Congress, approved March 3, 1891,
entitled "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes,"
which provides, "That the President of the United States may, from time
to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or Territory having public
lands bearing forests, in any part of the public lands wholly or in part
covered with timber or undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not,
as public reservations, and the President shall, by public proclamation,
declare the establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress, approved
June 4, 1897, entitled, "An act making appropriations for sundry civil
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898, and
for other purposes," that "The President is hereby authorized at any
time to modify any executive order that has been or may hereafter be
made establishing any forest reserve, and by such modification may
reduce the area or change the boundary lines of such reserve, or may
vacate altogether any order creating such reserve;" under which
provision, certain lands were withdrawn and excluded from the said
forest reserve by proclamation dated April 7, 1900;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States,
by virtue of the power vested in me by the aforesaid act of Congress,
approved June 4, 1897, do hereby make known and proclaim that the
boundary lines of the aforesaid Olympic Forest Reserve are hereby
further changed so as to read as follows:

Beginning at the northeast corner of township twenty-one (21) north,
range five (5) west, Willamette Meridian, Washington; thence northerly
to the southeast corner of section twenty-five (25), township
twenty-three (23) north, range five (5) west, thence westerly to the
southwest corner of said section; thence northerly to the northwest
corner of said section; thence westerly to the southwest corner of
section twenty-three (23), said township; thence northerly to the
northwest corner of said section; thence westerly to the southwest
corner of section fifteen (15), said township; thence northerly to the
northwest corner of section ten (10), said township; thence easterly
to the northeast corner of section twelve (12), said township; thence
northerly to the northwest corner of township twenty-three (23) north,
range four (4) west; thence easterly to the northeast corner of said
township; thence northerly to the northwest corner of township
twenty-four (24) north, range three (3) west; thence easterly to the
northeast corner of said township; thence northerly to the southwest
corner of township twenty-eight (28) north, range two (2) west; thence
easterly to the southeast corner of the southwest quarter of section
thirty-three (33), said township; thence northerly along the
quarter-section lines to the northeast corner of the northwest quarter
of section twenty-one (21), township twenty-nine (29) north, range two
(2) west; thence westerly along the section lines to the point for the
southwest corner of section eighteen (18), township twenty-nine (29)
north, range five (5) west; thence northerly to the northwest corner
of said township; thence westerly to the southeast corner of township
thirty (30) north, range eight (8) west; thence northerly to the
northeast corner of section twenty-five (25), said township; thence
westerly to the southwest corner of section twenty (20), said township;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of section eighteen (18), said
township; thence westerly to the point for the northeast corner of
section thirteen (13), township thirty (30) north, range ten (10) west;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of said township; thence
westerly to the northwest corner of township thirty (30) north, range
eleven (11) west; thence southerly to the southwest corner of section
nineteen (19), said township; thence easterly to the southwest corner of
section twenty-three (23), township thirty (30) north, range ten (10)
west; thence southerly to the southwest corner of section thirty-five
(35), said township; thence westerly to the northeast corner of section
three (3), township twenty-nine (29), range eleven (11) west; thence
southerly to the point for the northeast corner of section twenty-seven
(27), said township; thence westerly to the point for the northwest
corner of section thirty (30), said township; thence southerly to the
southwest corner of said township; thence westerly to the northwest
corner of township twenty-eight (28), range twelve (12) west; thence
southerly to the southwest corner of said township; thence easterly to
the northeast corner of township twenty-seven (27) north, range eleven
(11) west; thence southerly to the southeast corner of section one (1),
said township; thence westerly to the northwest corner of section ten
(10), township twenty-seven (27) north, range twelve (12) west; thence
southerly to the southwest corner of section fifteen (15), said
township; thence easterly to the southwest corner of section thirteen
(13), said township; thence southerly to the southwest corner of section
twenty-four (24), said township; thence easterly to the northeast corner
of section twenty-five (25), township twenty-seven (27) north, range
eleven (11) west; thence southerly to the southeast corner of said
township; thence westerly to the southwest corner of said township;
thence southerly to the southwest corner of township twenty-five (25)
north, range eleven (11) west; thence easterly to the northeast corner
of township twenty-four (24) north, range eleven (11) west; thence
southerly to the southeast corner of said township; thence westerly
along the township line to its point of intersection with the north
boundary of the Quinaielt Indian Reservation; thence southeasterly along
the north boundary of said Indian Reservation to the eastern point of
said reservation and southwesterly along the east boundary thereof to
the point of intersection with the township line between townships
twenty-one (21) and twenty-two (22) north; thence easterly to the
northeast corner of township twenty-one (21) north, range ten (10) west;
thence southerly to the southeast corner of section one (1), said
township; thence easterly to the southwest corner of section six (6),
township twenty-one (21) north, range eight (8) west; thence southerly
to the southwest corner of section eighteen (18), said township; thence
easterly to the southeast corner of section sixteen (16), said township;
thence northerly to the northeast corner of section four (4), said
township; thence easterly to the northeast corner of section six (6),
township twenty-one (21) north, range seven (7) west; thence southerly
to the southeast corner of said section; thence easterly to the
northeast corner of section twelve (12), said township; thence southerly
to the southeast corner of said section; thence easterly to the
northeast corner of section sixteen (16), township twenty-one (21)
north, range six (6) west; thence northerly to the point for the
northeast corner of section nine (9), said township; thence easterly to
the southwest corner of section six (6), township twenty-one (21) north,
range five (5) west; thence northerly to the northwest corner of said
township; thence easterly to the northeast corner of said township, the
place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired: _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entry-man,
settler, or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing, or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the lands reserved by this proclamation.

That the lands hereby restored to the public domain shall be open to
settlement from date hereof, but shall not be subject to entry, filing,
or selection until after ninety days' notice by such publication as the
Secretary of the Interior may prescribe.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 15th day of July, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-sixth.

[SEAL.]

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State_.



[CESSATION OF TARIFF--PORTO RICO.]

Whereas, by an act of Congress, approved April 12, 1900, entitled
"an Act Temporarily to Provide Revenues and a Civil Government for
Porto Rico and for other Purposes," it was provided that, "whenever
the legislative assembly of Porto Rico shall have enacted and put into
operation a system of local taxation to meet the necessities of the
government of Porto Rico, by this act established, and shall by resolution
duly passed so notify the President, he shall make proclamation thereof,
and thereupon all tariff duties on merchandise and articles going into
Porto Rico from the United States or coming into the United States
from Porto Rico shall cease, and from and after such date all such
merchandise and articles shall be entered at the several ports of
entry free of duty;" and

Whereas by the same act it was provided, "that as soon as a civil
government for Porto Rico shall have been organized in accordance with
the provisions of this act, and notice thereof shall have been given to
the President, he shall make proclamation thereof, and thereafter all
collections of duties and taxes in Porto Rico under the provisions of
this act shall be paid into the treasury of Porto Rico, to be expended
as required by law for the government and benefit thereof, instead of
being paid into the Treasury of the United States;" and

Whereas the legislative assembly of Porto Rico has enacted and put into
operation a system of local taxation to meet the necessities of the
government of Porto Rico as aforesaid, and has passed and caused to be
communicated to me the following resolution:

  A Joint Resolution of the Legislative Assembly of Porto Rico, notifying
  the President of the United States that the Legislative Assembly of
  Porto Rico has enacted and put into operation a system of local taxation
  to meet the necessities of the Government of Porto Rico, established by
  act of Congress, entitled "An act temporarily to provide revenues and a
  Civil Government for Porto Rico, and for other purposes," duly approved
  April 12th, 1900:

  _Be it Resolved by the Legislative Assembly of Porto Rico_:

  Whereas: A civil government for Porto Rico has been fully and completely
  organized in accordance with the provisions of an act of Congress
  entitled "An act temporarily to provide revenues and a civil government
  for Porto Rico, and for other purposes," duly approved April 12th, 1900,
  and:

  Whereas: It was provided by the terms of said act of Congress, that
  whenever the Legislative Assembly of Porto Rico shall have enacted and
  put into operation a system of local taxation to meet the necessities
  of the Government of Porto Rico, by the aforesaid act established, and
  shall by resolution duly passed so notify the President, he shall make
  proclamation thereof, and thereupon all tariff duties on merchandise and
  articles going into Porto Rico from the United States, or coming into
  the United States from Porto Rico shall cease, and from and after such
  date all such merchandise and articles shall be entered at the several
  ports of entry free of duty:

  Now therefore: The Legislative Assembly of Porto Rico in extraordinary
  session duly called by the Governor and held at San Juan, the Capital,
  on July 4th, A.D. 1901, acting pursuant to the authority and power in
  it vested by the provisions of the said act of Congress above referred
  to, does hereby notify the President of the United States that by
  virtue of an act of the Legislative Assembly of Porto Rico, entitled,
  "An act to provide revenue for the people of Porto Rico, and for other
  purposes," duly approved January 31st, A.D. 1901, and of other acts
  of the Legislative Assembly duly enacted at the first session of the
  Legislative Assembly of Porto Rico, duly held at San Juan, Porto Rico,
  commencing December 3rd, 1900, and ending January 31st, A.D. 1901, it
  has enacted and put into operation a system of local taxation to meet
  the necessities of the Government of Porto Rico, by the aforesaid act
  of Congress established.

  The Legislative Assembly of Porto Rico hereby directs that a copy
  of this joint resolution be presented to the President of the United
  States, and hereby requests the Governor of Porto Rico to deliver the
  same to the President, to the end that proclamation may be made by him
  according to the provisions of the said act of Congress, and if it
  shall seem wise and proper to the President, that such proclamation may
  issue on the 25th day of July, the said day being a legally established
  holiday in Porto Rico commemorating the anniversary of the coming of
  the American flag to the Island.

  WILLIAM H. HUNT,
  _President of the Executive Council_.

  MAN. F. ROSSY,
  _Speaker of the House of Delegates_.

  Approved, July 4th, A.D. 1901.

  CHAS. H. ALLEN,
  _Governor_.


Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, in
pursuance of the provisions of law above quoted, and upon the foregoing
due notification, do hereby issue this my proclamation, and do declare
and make known that a civil government for Porto Rico has been organized
in accordance with the provisions of the said act of Congress;

And I do further declare and make known that the Legislative Assembly of
Porto Rico has enacted and put into operation a system of local taxation
to meet the necessities of the government of Porto Rico.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of July, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-sixth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  DAVID J. HILL,
    _Acting Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, it is provided by section twenty-four of the act of Congress,
approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled "An act
to repeal the timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the
President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and
reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests,
in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or
undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations,
and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the
establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof;"

And whereas, the public lands in the State of Utah, within the limits
hereinafter described, are in part covered with timber, and it appears
that the public good would be promoted by setting apart and reserving
said lands as a public reservation;

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the power in me vested by section twenty-four of the aforesaid
act of Congress, do hereby make known and proclaim that there is hereby
reserved from entry or settlement and set apart as a Public Reservation
all those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land lying and being
situate in the State of Utah and particularly described as follows,
to wit:

Beginning at the northeast corner of section four (4), township ten (10)
south, range three (3) east, Salt Lake base and Meridian, Utah; thence
westerly along the township line to the northwest corner of section five
(5), township ten (10) south, range two (2) east; thence southerly to
the northeast corner of section nineteen (19), said township; thence
westerly to the northwest corner of said section; thence southerly along
the range line to the southwest corner of township twelve (12) south,
range two (2) east; thence easterly to the southeast corner of said
township; thence northerly to the northwest corner of section thirty
(30), township eleven (11) south, range three (3) east; thence easterly
to the southeast corner of section twenty-one (21), said township;
thence northerly along the section line to the northeast corner of
section four (4), township ten (10) south, range three (3) east, to the
place of beginning.

Excepting from the force and effect of this proclamation all lands which
may have been, prior to the date hereof, embraced in any legal entry or
covered by any lawful filing duly of record in the proper United States
Land Office, or upon which any valid settlement has been made pursuant
to law, and the statutory period within which to make entry or filing of
record has not expired: _Provided_, that this exception shall not
continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the entryman,
settler or claimant continues to comply with the law under which the
entry, filing or settlement was made.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all persons not to make settlement
upon the tract of land reserved by this proclamation.

The reservation hereby established shall be known as The Payson Forest
Reserve.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington this 3d day of August, A.D. 1901, and of
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-sixth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  ALVEY A. ADEE,
    _Acting Secretary of State._



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas notice has been given me by the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission, in accordance with the provisions of section 9 of the act
of Congress, approved March 3, 1901, entitled "An act to provide for
celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of the purchase of the
Louisiana territory by the United States by holding an international
exhibition of arts, industries, manufactures, and the products of the
soil, mine, forest and sea, in the city of St. Louis, in the State of
Missouri," that provision has been made for grounds and buildings for
the uses provided for in the said act of Congress:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by
virtue of the authority vested in me by said act, do hereby declare and
proclaim that such International Exhibition will be opened in the city
of St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, not later than the first day of
May, 1903, and will be closed not later than the first day of December
thereafter. And in the name of the Government and of the people of the
United States, I do hereby invite all the nations of the earth to take
part in the commemoration of the Purchase of the Louisiana Territory,
an event of great interest to the United States and of abiding effect
on their development, by appointing representatives and sending such
exhibits to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition as will most fitly and
fully illustrate their resources, their industries and their progress
in civilization.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of August, A.D. 1901, and
of the Independence of the United States, the one hundred and
twenty-sixth.

[SEAL.]

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State_.



EXECUTIVE ORDERS.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 28, 1898._

It is hereby ordered that the following described tract of land situate
on Kadiak Island, District of Alaska, be temporarily reserved and set
apart as an experiment station for the use of the Department of
Agriculture:

Beginning at a point in the easterly boundary line of the property now
occupied by the Russian Greek Church in the village of Kadiak on Kadiak
Island, Alaska; thence southeasterly to the water front on the Bay of
Chiniak; thence following said water front one-half mile northeasterly
to a point; thence northwesterly one-half mile to a point; thence
southwesterly one-half mile to a point; thence southeasterly to a point
of beginning, embracing 160 acres of land, more or less.

Provided that the temporary reservation above described shall not
interfere with any prior rights of the natives or others to land within
said reservation.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _July 27, 1898._

It is hereby ordered that the following described land situated on the
Yukon River in the District of Alaska, be and here is reserved and set
apart for the uses and purposes of a townsite, said land to be held
subject to the townsite law or laws that are or may become applicable
to the public lands in the District of Alaska, and so long as this
reservation remains in force to be subject to disposition in no other
manner whatever, to wit:

A tract of land commencing at a post on the right or north bank of the
Yukon River, about one-half mile below Mayos Landing, marked U.S.M.R.;
thence north from said post one mile; thence east two miles; thence
south to the bank of the Yukon River; thence southwesterly along the
bank of said river to the place of beginning, containing two square
miles, more or less.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _August 6, 1898._

Paragraph 576 of the Consular Regulations is hereby amended so
as to read as follows:

576. Consular Agents will be governed by the foregoing requirements in
relation to official services and will render their quarterly reports in
accordance with the prescribed forms to the principal Consular Officer
who will transmit the same to the Auditor for the State and other
Departments.

The amounts which may be found due at the Treasury on account of
services rendered to American vessels and seamen will in all cases be
sent by Treasury Warrant to the address of and payable to the order of
the officer entitled thereto.

Forms Nos. 190 and 191 are established in full force and authority as
parts of the Consular Regulations of September 30, 1898.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 31, 1899._

It is hereby ordered that the following described tract of land
situate near the north bank of Cook Inlet, adjoining the town of Kenai
on the north, District of Alaska, be and it is hereby set apart as an
agricultural experiment station, subject to any existing legal rights
thereto, it being more particularly described in the field notes of the
survey thereof, executed by C.C. Georgeson, Special Agent in charge of
investigations, in August, 1898, under the direction of the Secretary
of Agriculture, and shown on his plat of survey, all bearings being
magnetic, to wit:

Beginning at a point located near the Russian Parsonage and Church, from
which the nearest log barn belonging to the parsonage bears S. 68° 50'
E. 65 ft.; the spire of the church bearing S. 8° E. to the southeast
corner of the cemetery fence, bearing north 13° W. 361 ft.; thence N. 9°
W. 5,808 ft. to a point for the northeast corner of the tract; thence S.
9° E. 5,808 feet to a point for the southeast corner of the tract;
thence S. 81° W. 2,400 feet to the place of beginning, containing 320
acres of land, more or less.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 3, 1899._

I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by virtue of the
authority vested in me by Sections 3141 and 3142 of the Revised Statutes
of the United States, hereby order:

That the counties of Alger, Baraga, Chippewa, Delta, Dickinson, Gogebic,
Houghton, Iron, Keweenaw, Luce, Mackinac, Marquette, Menominee,
Ontonagon and Schoolcroft, now a part of the First Internal Revenue
Collection District of Michigan be transferred to and made a part of the
Fourth Internal Revenue Collection District of Michigan.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 1, 1899._

Under the Provisions of Section 2060, Revised Statutes, the Headquarters
of the new Neech Lake Indian Agency in Minnesota are hereby ordered to
be established on the tracts of land to be reserved for that purpose and
which are known as parts of township 142, range 31 west, 5th Meridian,
as described in the recommendation of the Commission of Indian Affairs,
approved by the Secretary of the Interior.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 1, 1899._

It is hereby ordered that the Fort Stanton abandoned military
reservation, New Mexico, containing ten thousand two hundred and forty
(10,240) acres, more or less, with the buildings thereon be, and it is
hereby reserved and set apart for the use of the Marine Hospital
Service.

Except that the force and effect of this order shall not apply to any
lands to which, prior to the date hereof, valid claims may have been
attached under the Homestead or Mineral Land Laws.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 1, 1899._

The change in location of the Office of the Humboldt Land District in
California from Humboldt to Eureka is hereby ordered, under the
provision of Section 2251 in the Revised Statutes of the United States.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 3, 1899._

It is fitting that in behalf of the Nation, tribute of honor be paid to
the memories of the noble men who lost their lives in their country's
service during the late war with Spain.

It is more fitting, inasmuch as in consonance with a spirit of our
free institutions, and in obedience to the most exalted prompting of
patriotism, those who were sent to other shores to do battle for their
country's honor, under their country's flag, went freely from every
quarter of our beloved clime; each soldier, each sailor parting from
home ties and putting behind him private interest in the presence of the
stern emergency of unsought war with an alien foe, was an individual
type of that devotion of the citizen to the State which makes our Nation
strong in unity and action.

Those who died in other lands left in many homes the undying memories
that attend the honored dead of all ages. It was fitting with the advent
of peace, won by their sacrifice, their bodies should be gathered with
tender care and restored to home and country. This has been done with
the dead of Cuba and Puerto Rico. Those of the Philippines still rest
where they fell, watched over by their surviving comrades and mourned
with the love of a grateful nation.

The remains of many brought to our shores have been delivered to their
families for private burial, but for others of the brave officers and
men who perished, there has been reserved interment in the ground sacred
to the soldiers and sailors, and amid tributes of national memories they
have so well deserved.

I therefore order:

That upon the arrival of the cortege at the National Cemetery at
Arlington, all proper military and naval honors be paid to the dead
heroes; that suitable ceremonies shall attend their interment; that the
customary salute of mourning be fired at the cemetery, and that on the
same day at two o'clock P.M., Thursday, the sixth day of April, the
National ensign be displayed at half staff on all public buildings,
forts, camps and public vessels of the United States, and that at twelve
o'clock noon of said day all the Departments of the Government at
Washington shall be closed.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 6, 1899._

In accordance with the provision of the Act of Congress approved June 4,
1897 (30 stat., 36), and by virtue of the authority thereby given and
on the recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior, it is hereby
ordered that the east half of the northwest quarter and the west half of
the northeast corner of section twenty (20), township ten (10) south,
range five (5) east, Willamette Meridian, Oregon, with the limits of the
Cascade Range Forest Reservation, be restored to the Public Domain after
sixty days' notice hereof by publication, as required by law, these
tracts having been found better adapted to agricultural than forest
purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., May 6, 1899._

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Commander-in-Chief of the
Army and Navy of the United States, I hereby order and direct that
during the maintenance of the Military Government of the United States
in the Island of Puerto Rico and all Islands in the West Indies, east
of the 74th degree west longitude, evacuated by Spain, there are hereby
created and shall be maintained the offices of Auditor of the Islands,
one Assistant Auditor for auditing the accounts of the Department of
Customs and one Assistant Auditor for auditing the accounts of the
Department of Postoffices who shall be appointed by the Secretary of War
and whose duty shall be to audit all accounts of the Islands.

There is hereby created and shall be maintained the office of Treasurer
of the Islands, which shall be filled by the appointment thereto of an
officer of the regular army of the United States. The Treasurer of the
Islands shall receive and keep all moneys arising from the revenues of
the Islands and shall disburse or transfer the same only upon warrants
issued by the Auditor of the Islands and countersigned by the
Governor-General.

All rules and instructions necessary to carry into effect the provisions
of Executive Orders relating to said Islands shall be issued by the
Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., May 6, 1899._

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Commander-in-Chief of the
Army and Navy of the United States, I hereby order and direct that
during the maintenance of Military Government of the United States in
the Island of Cuba and all Islands in the West Indies, west of the 74th
degree west longitude, evacuated by Spain, there are hereby created and
shall be maintained the offices of the Auditor of the Islands, one
Assistant Auditor for auditing the accounts for the Department of
Customs, and one Assistant Auditor for auditing the accounts of the
Department of Postoffices who shall be appointed by the Secretary of War
and whose duties shall be to audit all accounts of the Islands.

There is hereby created and shall be maintained the office of Treasurer
of the Islands which shall be filled by the appointment thereto of an
officer of the regular army of the United States. The Treasurer of the
Islands shall receive and keep all moneys arising from the revenues of
the Islands and shall disburse or transfer the same only upon warrants
issued by the Auditor of the Islands and countersigned by the
Governor-General.

All rules and instructions necessary to carry into effect the provisions
of Executive Orders relating to said Islands shall be issued by the
Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., May 10, 1899._

In accordance with the provisions of Act of Congress approved June 4th,
1897 (30 Stat. 36), and by virtue of the authority thereby given and on
recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior, it is hereby ordered
that Baker Lake and the surrounding lands within half mile of the shore
thereof within the limits of the Washington Forest Reserve, State of
Washington, be and they are hereby withdrawn from the operation of the
proclamation dated February 22nd, 1897, creating such reserve are hereby
reserved and set apart for the use of the United States Commission of
Fish and Fisheries for the purpose of a Fish Cultural station.

Provided, That the Lake and surrounding land above described shall
again become subject to the operation of the proclamation creating the
Washington Forest Reserve whenever the use thereof for fish cultural
purposes shall be abandoned by the United States Commission of Fish and
Fisheries.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 13, 1899._

In the exercise of the power conferred upon me by the joint resolution
of Congress, approved by the President on July 7, 1898, entitled "Joint
Resolution to provide for annexing the Hawaiian Islands to the United
States" the President of the United States hereby directs that the
General Election provided for by the constitution of the Republic of
Hawaii to be held on the last Wednesday in September next shall not be
held. All elective officers whose terms of office shall expire before
appropriate legislation shall have been enacted by the Congress of the
United States shall be continued in their offices at the pleasure of the
President of the United States.

[SEAL.]

In witness whereof I have caused the seal of the United States to be
hereunto affixed.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., May 23, 1899_.

_To the Heads of the Executive Departments and the Public Printer_:

It is hereby ordered that upon Wednesday, the 24th instant, the
employees of the executive departments and the government printing
office shall be excused from duty at 12:00 o'clock noon to enable them
to participate in the Civic parade and other exercises of the Peace
Jubilee on that day.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _June 10, 1899._

Consular court fees and fines imposed and collected by consular courts
are hereby declared to be official. They are to be used to defer the
expenses of consular courts, and detailed accounts of receipts and
expenditures are to be rendered to the Secretary of State on the 30th of
June of each year. Any surplus remaining at the end of the year after
the expenses of the courts have been paid is to be turned into the
Treasury.

The portions of the Executive Order of July 29, 1897, and the consular
regulations in conflict with this order are hereby amended.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 16, 1899._

Officers of the Customs in the Islands of Cuba may authorize the
clearance under a permit for foreign ports, ports of the United States
of vessels owned prior to June 1st, 1899 by residents of Cuba and owned
at the time of clearance by citizens of Cuba under the signal and coast
permit of Cuba. Such vessels may carry the American flag above the
distinctive signal for the purpose of indicating that the Government of
the United States pursuant to treaty has assumed and will discharge the
obligations that may under International law result from the fact of the
occupation of Cuba for the protection of life and property.

In granting such clearance under a permit vessels of the customs will
advise masters or owners that clearance under permit and the use of the
flag of the United States hereby authorized do not confer upon such
vessels any rights and privileges which are conferred upon vessels of
the United States by the status of treaties of the United States. The
rights and privileges of such a vessel as to enter clearance dues,
charges, etc., in foreign ports and in ports of the United States will
be determined by the laws of the country in which the port may be
situated.

Such vessel upon entering into a port of the United States would be
subject to the provisions of Sections 2497, 4219 and 4225 of the Revised
Statutes and such other laws as may be applicable.

The form and manner of the issuance of permits provided for in this
paragraph shall be prescribed by the Secretary of War.

Tariff Circular No. 71, dated Washington, May 25th, 1899, is hereby
rescinded.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 27, 1899._

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Commander-in-Chief of the
Army and Navy, I hereby order and direct that during the maintenance of
the Military Government of the United States in the Island of Cuba and
all islands of the West Indies west of the 74th degree, west longitude,
evacuated by Spain, there are hereby created and shall be maintained, in
addition to the office created by executive order of May 8, 1899, the
office of Assistant Auditor for auditing the accounts of the departments
of Internal Revenue and one Assistant Treasurer in the office of the
Treasurer of the islands, who shall be appointed by the Secretary of
War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., July 3, 1899._

1. Officers of the Customs in the Island of Puerto Rico, ceded to the
United States by Spain, may issue a certificate of protection, entitling
a vessel to which it is issued to the protection and flag of the United
States on the high seas and in all ports, if the vessel is owned by:

  _a_. A citizen of the United States residing in Puerto Rico.

  _b_. A native inhabitant of Puerto Rico upon taking oath of
  allegiance to the United States.

  _c_. Resident of Puerto Rico before April 11, 1899, hitherto a
  subject of Spain, upon abjuring his allegiance to the crown of Spain and
  taking the oath of allegiance to the United States.


2. The master and the watch officers of a vessel to which a certificate
of protection is issued shall be citizens of the United States or shall
take the oath of allegiance to the United States, providing that the
general commanding the forces of the United States in Puerto Rico may in
his discretion in special cases waive these requirements in whole or in
part.

3. Such certificate of protection shall entitle vessel to the same
privileges and subject it to the same disabilities as are prescribed in
Article XX of the Consular Regulations of 1896 for American or foreign
built vessels transferred abroad to citizens of the United States.

4. The form and manner of the issue of certificates of protection
provided for in this order shall be prescribed by the Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., July 3, 1899._

1. Officers of the Customs in the Philippine Islands, ceded to the
United States by Spain, may issue a certificate of protection entitling
the vessel to which it is issued to the protection and flag of the United
States on the High Seas and in all ports, if the vessel is owned by:

  _a_. A citizen of the United States residing in the Philippine Islands.

  _b_. A native inhabitant of the Philippine Islands upon taking the
  oath of allegiance to the United States.

  _c_. Residents of the Philippine Islands before April 11th, 1899
  hitherto a subject of Spain, upon abjuring his allegiance to the Crown
  of Spain and taking the oath of allegiance to the United States.


2. The master and watch officer of a vessel to which a certificate of
Protection is issued shall be citizens of the United States or shall
take the oath of allegiance to the United States, providing that the
General commanding the forces of the United States in Philippine Islands
may, in his discretion in special cases, waive this requirement in whole
or in part.

3. Such certificate of protection shall entitle the vessel to the same
privileges and subject it to the same disabilities as are prescribed in
Article XX of the Consular Regulations of 1896 for American or foreign
vessels transferred abroad to citizens of the United States.

4. The form and manner of the issue of certificates of protection
provided for in this order shall be prescribed by the Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., July 24, 1899_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--It is provided in the "Act making appropriation for sundry civil
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900,
and for other purposes" that "The President of the United States is
hereby authorized in case of threatened or actual epidemic of cholera,
yellow fever, smallpox, bubonic plague or Chinese plague or black
death to use the unexpended balance of the sums appropriated and
reappropriated by the Sundry Civil Appropriation Act, approved July 1st,
1898, and the act making appropriation to supply discrepancies in the
appropriations approved July 7th, 1898, and one hundred thousand dollars
($100,000.00) in addition thereto or so much thereof as may be necessary
in the aid of State and local boards or otherwise in his discretion
in preventing and suppressing the spread of the same and in such
emergencies in the execution of any quarantine laws which may be then
in force."

You are hereby directed to take charge of this expenditure for the
purpose of enforcing the above provisions, and you are directed to
employ for that purpose the Marine Hospital Service and to provide such
other means as are necessary for the purpose aforesaid and to carry out
such rules and regulations as may have been or shall be made by you in
conformity therewith.

You will carefully supervise and examine all expenditures made in
executing the aforesaid law and submit to me from time to time reports
of such expenditures and statements of the work done.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., August 17, 1899_.

_To the People of Cuba_:

The disorganized condition of your island, resulting from the war
and the absence of any generally recognized authority aside from the
temporary Military Control of the United States, has made it necessary
that the United States should follow the restoration of order and
peaceful industry by giving its assistance and supervision to the
successive steps by which you will proceed to the establishment of an
effective system of self-government.

As a preliminary step in the performance of this duty I have directed
that a census of the people of Cuba be taken, and have appointed
competent and disinterested citizens of Cuba as Enumerators and
Supervisors.

It is important for the proper arrangement of your new Government that
the information sought shall be fully and accurately given and I request
that by every means in your power you aid the officers appointed in the
performance of their duties.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., September 2, 1899_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--You are directed to transfer an additional sum of five thousand
dollars ($5,000.00) from the appropriation made by the Joint Resolution
approved July 7, 1898, entitled, "Joint Resolution to provide for the
annexation of the Hawaiian Islands to the United States," to be expended
at the discretion of the Executive and for the purpose of carrying that
Joint Resolution into effect for the expenditure and enforcement of the
Chinese Exclusion Laws in the Hawaiian Islands under the clause in said
Resolution restricting the emigration of the Chinese to the Islands.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., September 11, 1899._

Hon. JOHN HAY,
  _Secretary of State_

You will notify the President of Hawaii that the Government of Hawaii
has no power to make any sale or dispose of the public lands in the
Islands. That all proceedings taken or pending for such sale or
disposition should be discontinued and that if any sales or agreements
for sale have been made since the adoption of the Resolution of
Annexation the purchasers should be notified that the same are null and
void and any consideration paid to the legal authorities on account
thereof should be refunded.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., September 18, 1899._

In the exercise of the power conferred upon me by the Joint Resolution
of Congress, approved by the President on July 7th, 1898, entitled
"Joint Resolution to provide for annexing the Hawaiian Islands to the
United States," the President of the United States hereby directs that
the issue of Registers to vessels by the Authorities of Hawaii entitling
such vessels to all the rights and privileges of Hawaiian vessels in the
ports of Nations or upon the High Seas, shall hereafter cease.

[SEAL.]

In witness whereof I have caused the seal of the United States to be
hereunto affixed.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., September 29, 1899._

It is hereby ordered that the several Executive Departments, the
Government Printing Office and the Navy Yard and Station at Washington
be closed on Tuesday, October 3rd, to enable the employees to
participate in the ceremonies attending the Reception of Admiral Dewey,
United States Navy, and the presentation of the Sword of Honor to him,
as authorized by a Joint Resolution of Congress, approved June 3rd,
1899.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., November 4, 1899._

In furtherance of interchange between those absent in the service of
their country and their families at home, it is hereby ordered that
packages and parcels of mailable matter and containing only articles
desired as gifts and souvenirs, and so marked, and with no commercial
purpose, and not for sale, from Officers, Soldiers and Sailors serving
in the Army and Navy and other persons employed in the Civil Service of
the United States, in Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, Philippine Islands and
Cuba addressed to members of their families in the United States, or
packages of the same personal character addressed from the United States
to Officers, Soldiers, Sailors and others in the Public Service in said
Islands may be sent through the mails, subject only to the domestic
postal regulations of the United States.

The details of the execution of this order with all necessary safeguards
will devolve on the Secretary of War and Postmaster-General.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., November 10, 1899._

In accordance with the law that prescribes that the Army and Navy
General Hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., "shall be subject to such rules,
regulations, and restrictions as shall be provided by the President of
the United States," the following amendment of the rules and regulations
provided for its government in Executive Order of August 25, 1892, is
authorized:

Enlisted men on the active list while under treatment or on duty in the
hospital shall have the usual allowance of rations commuted at the rate
of not to exceed forty cents (40 c.) per day for enlisted men in the army
and thirty cents (30 c.) per day for enlisted men in the navy, to be paid
to the Senior Medical Officer by the proper officers of the War and Navy
Departments upon the receipt of monthly statements of accounts duly
certified by the Surgeon-General of the Army.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 1, 1899_.

_To all to whom these presents shall come; greeting_:

Know ye, that reposing special trust and confidence in the integrity,
prudence, and ability of John Hay, Secretary of State of the United
States, I have invested him with full and all manner of power and
authority, for me and in the name of the United States, to meet and
confer with any person or persons duly authorized by the Government of
his Imperial Majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, and the
Government of her Britannic Majesty being entrusted with like power and
authority, and with them to negotiate, conclude, and sign a convention
to adjust amicably the questions which have arisen between the three
Governments in respect to the Samoan group of islands, the same to be
transmitted to the President of the United States for his ratification
by and with the advice and consent of the Cabinet thereof.

In testimony whereof I have caused the seal of the United States to be
hereunto affixed.

[SEAL.]

Given under my hand at the city of Washington, the 1st day of December,
in the year of our Lord 1899, and of the Independence of the United
States the one hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President:
  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State._



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., January 3, 1900._

To prevent the introduction of epidemic diseases, it is ordered that
provisions of the act of Congress, approved February 15, 1893, entitled,
"An act granting additional quarantine powers and imposing additional
duties upon the Marine Hospital Service," and all rules and regulations
heretofore or hereafter prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury
under that act are to be given full force and effect in the Philippine
Islands in so far as they are applicable, and the following additional
rules and regulations are hereby promulgated:

The examination in ports of the Philippine Islands of incoming and
outgoing vessels, and the necessary surveillance over their sanitary
condition as well as of cargo, officers, crew and all personal effects
is vested in and will be conducted by the Marine Hospital Service, and
Medical Officers of that service will be detailed by the Secretary of
the Treasury as Quarantine Officers at Ports of Manila and Iloilo
immediately and at other ports in the Philippine Islands as soon as
practicable or necessary.

Quarantine Officers shall have authority over incoming vessels, their
wharfage and anchorage in so far as it is necessary for the proper
enforcement of the quarantine regulations, including vessels of the Army
Transport Service and non-combatant vessels of the Navy.

Collectors of Customs at ports of entry will not permit entry without
quarantine certificates.

Any vessel leaving any port in the Philippine Islands for any port in
the United States or its Dependencies shall obtain a bill of health from
the quarantine officer when such officer is on duty, said bill of health
to correspond to the Consular Bill of Health now required by Treasury
Regulations, and the bill of health shall not be given to the outgoing
vessel unless all quarantine regulations have been complied with. At
ports where no medical officer is detailed, bills of health will be
signed by the Collector of Customs or other officers to whom such duty
has been regularly delegated. Special regulations relating to the bills
of health to be obtained by vessels of the United States Navy will be
promulgated by the Secretary of the Treasury.

The Medical Officer detailed under this order as Quarantine Officer
at the Port of Manila shall be the Chief Quarantine Officer for the
Philippine Islands. It shall be his duty to make appointments and
removals from the service in the Philippines (subject to the approval
of the Secretary of the Treasury), and shall authorize necessary
expenditures under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury
may prescribe.

The regulations for the government of the Marine Hospital Service shall,
so far as practicable, have force and effect in the management of the
Quarantine service in the Philippine Islands.

The expenses of the Quarantine service will be charged against the
revenues of the islands, and a sum not to exceed three hundred thousand
dollars ($300,000.00) in each fiscal year is hereby set aside from the
revenues collected in said islands for this purpose. The expenses shall
be paid therefrom upon a certificate of a detailed quarantine officer
and upon the approval of the Chief Officer for the Philippine Islands.

The Chief Quarantine Officer shall render a report on the last day of
each month to the supervising Surgeon General in the Marine Hospital
Service, who will issue to him necessary instructions.

The Epidemic Fund will be reimbursed from the revenues of the islands
for the cost of this undertaking, plans and materials ordered to be
forwarded to the islands prior to the date of this order.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., January 5, 1900._

By virtue of the authority vested in me by joint resolution of the
Senate and House of Representatives of the United States accepting and
confirming the cession of the Hawaiian Islands to the United States, it
is hereby ordered and directed that out of the Government Reservation
lying to the eastward of the Puowaina or Ruralhouse Hill in the Island
of Ouhu, Hawaiian Islands, seven acres, more or less as hereinafter
described and located, shall be set apart for the use of the United
States Treasury Department as a site for a United States Marine Hospital
for the port of Honolulu. This site shall consist of the seven acres
situated north of the Makiki cemetery and bounded on the north and
east by the sinuosities of the Punch Bowl road; on the south by a
line projecting eastward from the powder magazine to intersect Punch
Bowl road, this line being the southern boundary of the Government
Reservation at that point; and on the west by an arbitrary north and
south line drawn so as to leave seven (7) acres within this designated
tract.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., January 8, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country lying west of the Navajo
and Moqui Reservations, in the Territory of Arizona, embraced within the
following described boundaries, viz: Beginning at the southwest corner
of the Moqui Reservation and running due west to the Little Colorado
River, thence down that stream to the Grand Canyon Forest Reservation,
thence north on the line of that reserve to the northeast corner
thereof, thence west to the Colorado River, thence up that stream to the
Navajo Indian Reservation, be and the same is hereby withdrawn from sale
and settlement until further order.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., January 19, 1900._

In accordance with the law that prescribes that the Army and Navy
General Hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., shall be subject to such rules,
regulations and restrictions as shall be provided by the President of
the United States the following amendment of the rules and regulations
providing for its Government and Executive Order of August 25th, 1892
is authorized: Enlisted men of the Army and Navy and Marine Corps on
the retired list and honorably discharged soldiers and sailors of the
Regular and Volunteer Army and Navy of the United States, shall pay for
substance at the rate of 40 cents per day.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., February 12, 1900._

Authority is hereby granted for the transfer of the sum of four hundred
thousand, seven hundred and seventy-six dollars and sixty-five cents
($400,776.65) from the appropriation "Emergency Fund, War Department"
act of March 13th, 1899, to the appropriation "Substance of the Army
1900" in accordance with the request of the Acting Commissary General of
Subsistence which is approved by the Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 7, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that the Executive Order of June 8, 1866, reserving
for light-house purposes among other lands a tract described as "twenty
(20) acres at a cape about midway between Destruction Island and
Flattery Rocks, falling within unsurveyed lands as laid down in blue
shade upon diagram number 3 herewith," in the Territory of Washington,
be, and the same is, hereby canceled so far as it relates to the above
described tract, and it is hereby ordered that in lieu thereof, lot one
(1) section six (6), township twenty-eight (28) north, range fifteen
(15) west, Willamette Meridian, Washington, containing, according to the
official plat on file in the General Land Office, approved May 29, 1882,
3.25 acres, be, and it is, hereby reserved for light-house purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 20, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that the Executive Order of September 11, 1854,
reserving for light-house purposes among other lands the tract at Cape
Shoalwater, Territory of Washington, shaded blue on the diagram
accompanying the order, be, and it is, hereby canceled so far as it
relates to the tract above described.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 21, 1900._

The Secretary of the Navy is hereby directed to transfer to the
Secretary of War for use in the transport service of the War Department
the vessels _Badger_ and _Resolute_, purchased by the Navy Department
from the funds allotted from the emergency appropriation, national
defense, act of March 8, 1898, at a cost of $842,000, these vessels
being no longer required in the service of the navy.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 1, 1900._

The Collector of Customs of Puerto Rico will pay over to the Treasurer
of Puerto Rico the net proceeds of the collections made by him under
the provisions of the act of Congress approved April 12, 1900, entitled
"An act temporarily to provide revenues and a Civil Government for
Puerto Rico, and for other purposes," under such regulations as the
Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 14, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that the NW 1/4 of section 15, in township 23 north,
of range 13 west, Gila and Salt River Base, and principal meridian in
Arizona, conveyed to the United States by quit claim deed of the Santa
Fe Pacific Railroad Company, dated September 12, 1899, be and the same
is hereby set apart, subject to certain exceptions, reservations, and
conditions made by said company, as set forth in the deed aforesaid, for
Indian school purposes, the Hualapai Indians as an addition to section
10 of the township and range above mentioned, set aside by executive
order dated December 22, 1898, and designated therein as the "Hualapai
Indian School Reserve."

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 26, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that Section 29, Section 30; the N 1/2, the SW 1/4,
the N 1/2 of the SE 1/4, and the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 31, and
Section 32, Township 13, south, Range one (1) east, Montana, be and they
are hereby reserved and set apart for the use of the United States Fish
Commission of Fish and Fisheries for the purposes of a fish cultural
station.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 26, 1900._

Under authority of Section 3648 of the Revised Statutes of the United
States, permission is hereby given that needful advances of money be
made of moneys appropriated for the light-house establishment to the
officers of the Army and Navy acting as Engineers or Inspectors, as
Assistants to Engineers or Inspectors of the third light-house district
for disbursement in carrying on the Puerto Rican light-house service.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _June 12, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that fractional section 11, township 5 south, range
14 west, Florida, be and it is hereby reserved and set apart for
light-house purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _June 22, 1900._

Whereas by the seventy-third section of an act entitled "An act to
provide a government for the Territory of Hawaii," approved April 30,
1900, it was, among other things provided as follows: "That, subject
to the approval of the President, all sales, grants, leases, and other
dispositions of the public domain and agreements concerning the same,
and all franchises granted by the Hawaiian government in conformity with
the laws of Hawaii between the 7th day of July, 1898, and the 28th day
of September, 1899, are hereby ratified and confirmed;" and

Whereas it appears by the certificate of Sanford B. Dole, President of
the Republic of Hawaii, which bears date the 23d day of May, A.D., 1900,
that the Hilo Railroad Company organized for the purpose of building and
operating a Railroad or Railroads between and through the districts of
Hilo Puna Hamakua, Kohala, Kona, and Kau, on the Island of Hawaii,
Hawaiian Islands, was incorporated on the 28th day of March, A.D., 1899,
under a charter of incorporation, a copy whereof is attached to said
certificate; and that said incorporating and granting of said charter of
incorporation were made in conformity with the general incorporating
acts of the Republic of Hawaii, and that the granting of the franchise
conferred thereby and all acts and proceedings contained in the premises
were done and taken in conformity with the laws of the Republic of
Hawaii;

Now, therefore, in conformity with the provision of the act aforesaid,
the said franchise granted by the Hawaiian government to the Hilo
Railroad Company is hereby approved.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _June 27, 1900._

On and after the first day of July, 1900, the classification and pay of
the rating of electrician shall be as follows, but this order shall not
reduce the pay of any enlisted man during his present enlistment below
the pay at which he was enlisted, or which he is now receiving:


                               per month.
  Electrician, third class       $30.00
  Electrician, 2d class           40.00
  Electrician, 1st class          50.00
  Chief Electrician               60.00


WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _June 29, 1900._

On and after July 15, 1900, there shall be detailed on the staff of
the Military Governor of the Island of Cuba as Chief of the Quarantine
Service established by Executive Order January 17, 1899, a commissioned
officer of the Marine Hospital service, who shall on the first day of
each month, or at such other periods as may be directed by the Military
Governor, submit to the Military Governor a detailed estimate of the
quarantine expenses of the Island of Cuba. After the approval of such
estimate by the Military Governor the chief quarantine officer shall
make requisition for the funds required in favor of the disbursing
officer or agent, who shall pay the bills and vouchers on account of
the quarantine service upon the certificate of an officer detailed
under the Executive Order of January 17, 1899, and after approval by the
chief quarantine officer. The disbursing officer or agent shall render
his accounts of such disbursments in accordance with the rules and
instructions to carry into effect the Executive Order of May 8, 1899,
relative to the military government of the United States in the Island
of Cuba, during the maintenance of such government.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _August 2, 1900._

The Island of Guimaras in the Philippine group is assigned to naval
jurisdiction and control with a view to establishing thereon a naval
base and station upon the strait of Iloilo, opposite the town of that
name.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _August 2, 1900._

The sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) or so much thereof as may be
necessary, is hereby allotted from the Emergency Fund, Navy Department,
1901, for the purpose of meeting the expenses of a survey of the Island
of Guimaras in sufficient detail to fix the place of the coal wharf and
shed, of the dry dock, and of the fleet anchorages, and to appraise the
land of private ownership, which need to be condemned for the use of the
government for its uses and for the land defense required.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _August 23, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that the following lands situate in California,
viz: The north half of the southeast quarter, and the north half of the
southwest quarter, section fourteen (14), in township three (3), south
of range one (1), east of the San Bernardino meridian, being lands
withdrawn from the public domain for the Mission Indians by Executive
Order of August 25, 1877, be and the same are hereby restored to the
public domain.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _September 3, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that the following described lands in the State of
Mississippi be and they are hereby reserved for light-house purposes;
viz:

Round Island, Mississippi. All of fractional sections three and four of
township nine (9) south, range six (6) west, east of Pearl River,
containing respectively about 16.50 acres and 33.34 acres.

Horn Island, Mississippi. All of fractional sections 31 of township nine
(9) south, range five (5) west, and thirty-six (36) of township nine (9)
south, range six (6) west, east of Pearl River, containing,
respectively, about 51.69 and 286.20 acres.

Petite Bois Blanc Island, Mississippi. All of fractional section three
(3) of township ten (10) south, range five (5) west, east of Pearl
River, containing approximately 81.27 acres.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _September 19, 1900._

In accordance with the provisions of Section 179 of the Revised
Statutes, as amended by an act making appropriations for the
legislative, executive and judicial expenses of the government, approved
August 5, 1882 (22 Stat, 238) Lieutenant-General Nelson A. Miles,
commanding the Army of the United States is authorized and directed to
perform the duties of Secretary of War during the illness or temporary
absence from the seat of government of the Secretary of War whenever
during such illness or absence the Assistant Secretary of War is also
absent; in accordance with the same provisions, Major-General Henry C.
Corbin, Assistant Adjutant-General of the Army is authorized and
directed to perform the duties of Secretary of War whenever during such
illness or absence the Assistant Secretary of War and the
lieutenant-general commanding the Army are also absent.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _September 20, 1900._

_The Honorable Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--It is provided in the "Act making appropriations for sundry civil
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1901,
and for other purposes," approved June 6, 1900, that "The President of
the United States is hereby authorized in case of threatened or actual
epidemic of cholera, yellow fever, smallpox, bubonic plague, or Chinese
plague or black death to use the unexpended balance of the sums
appropriated and reappropriated by the sundry civil appropriation act
approved June 4, 1897, and $500,000 in addition thereto or so much
thereof as may be necessary in aid of constituting local boards or
otherwise in his discretion in preventing and suppressing the spread
of same; and in such emergency in the execution of any quarantine laws
which may be then in force, the same to be immediately available."

You are hereby directed to take charge of this expenditure for the
purpose of enforcing the above provisions, and you are directed to
employ for that purpose the Marine Hospital Service and to provide such
other means as are necessary for the purpose aforesaid, and to carry out
such rules and regulations as have been or shall be made by you in
conformity therewith.

You will carefully supervise and examine all expenditures made in
executing the aforesaid law and submit to me from time to time reports
of such expenditures and statements of work done.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _October 10, 1900._

On and after October 15, 1900, there shall be detailed on the staff
of the Military Governor of the Islands of the Philippine Archipelago
as chief of the quarantine service established by Executive Order of
January 3, 1900, a commissioned officer of the Marine Hospital Service
who shall on the first day of the month, and at such other periods as
may be directed by the Military Governor submit to the Military Governor
a detailed estimate of the quarantine expenses of the said Islands of
the Philippine Archipelago. After the approval of such estimate by the
Military Governor the Chief Quarantine officer shall make requisition
for the funds required in favor of the disbursing officer or agent of
the Treasury Department who shall pay the bills and vouchers on account
of the quarantine service upon the certificate of an officer detailed
under Executive Order of January 3, 1900 (said order being still in
force except as herein mentioned), and after approval by the Chief
Quarantine officer. The disbursing officer or agent shall be appointed
by the Secretary of the Treasury as soon as practicable, and shall
render his accounts of such disbursements in accordance with the rules
and instructions to carry into effect the Executive Order of May 8,
1899, relative to the military government of the United States in the
Islands of the Philippine Archipelago during the maintenance of such
government.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _October 10, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that Sections 26, 27, 34 and 35 township 14 south,
range 14 east, Gila and Salt River meridian Territory of Arizona, be and
they are hereby reserved and set apart for the use of the United States
Department of Agriculture for the purposes of an agricultural experiment
station.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _October 13, 1900._

By virtue of the authority vested in the President of the United States
by Section 3141, Revised Statutes of the United States, I hereby order


That the county of Greer, which was formerly a part of the State of
Texas, and as such was specifically declared a part of the 4th Internal
Revenue District of Texas by Executive Order of June 29, 1881, be
transferred to and made a part of the Internal Revenue District of
Kansas, said county having been declared by the United States Supreme
Court in decision rendered at the October term of 1895 to be a part of
the Territory of Oklahoma, which Territory was added to the District of
Kansas by Executive Order of March 30, 1886, prior to the date of the
judicial decision above cited.

This order to take effect on the first day of November, 1900.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _October 29, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that lot 5 of the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4, section 31,
township 6 south, range 11 west, Florida, be, and it is, hereby reserved
for light-house purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _November 20, 1900._

The United States Civil Service Commission is directed to render such
assistance as may be practicable to the Civil Service Board created
under the act of the United States Philippine Commission, for the
establishment and maintenance of a necessary and efficient civil service
in the Philippine Island, and for that purpose to conduct examinations
for the Civil Service of the Philippine Islands upon the request of the
Civil Service Board of said Islands, under such regulations as may be
agreed upon by the said Board and the said United States Civil Service
Commission.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 7, 1900._

Whenever upon marches, guards, or in quarters, different corps of the
army happen to join or do duty together and an official of the Marine
Corps or the militia shall command the whole pursuant to the 122d
article of war, such officer shall report his action and the operations
of the force under his command through military channels to the
Secretary of War as well as to his superiors in his own branch of the
service.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 13, 1900_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

The sum of $200,000 is hereby allotted and set apart from the
appropriation made for the benefit and government of Puerto Rico by the
Act of March 24, 1900 (31 Stat., p. 51), to be used for the extension of
public education in Puerto Rico, including building and equipping of
school houses in said Island.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 14, 1900._

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Commander-in-Chief of the
Army and Navy of the United States of America, I hereby empower the
Naval officer in command at the Island of Guam to act as Collector of
Customs for said Island, with authority to appoint a deputy if
necessary.

I further direct that any authority heretofore exercised under the
direction of the commandant at said Naval Station in respect to the
collection of customs be approved as if direct mention of such authority
had been included in the Executive Order of February 1, 1900.

In case the commandant shall make such appointment from civil life he
shall require of the appointee good and sufficient security for the due
performance of the duties of the office.

Any authority heretofore exercised in the premises by the Naval Officer
in command is hereby ratified as if said power to appoint had been
conferred in said Executive Order of February 1, 1900.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _December 19, 1900._

It is hereby ordered that the President's Order of January 9, 1884,
transferring the Fort Yuma Military Reservation to the control of the
Department of the Interior to be used for Indian purposes in connection
with the Indian reservations established by the same order, be, and the
same is, hereby revoked as to that part of said military reservation
lying south of the Colorado River.

Inasmuch as said land has been abandoned for military purposes, as shown
by executive orders of January 9, 1884, and July 22, 1884, it is further
ordered and directed that the portion of said military reservation lying
south of the Colorado River and being in the Territory of Arizona be,
and the same is, hereby placed under the control of the Secretary of the
Interior for disposition under the provisions of the Acts of Congress
approved July 5, 1884 (23 Stat., p. 103), and August 22, 1894 (28 Stat.,
p. 491).

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1900._

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Commander-in-Chief of the
Army and Navy of the United States, I hereby order and direct that that
part of Executive Order dated May 8, 1899, relating to the appointment
and creation of the office of Treasurer of the Island of Cuba, be
amended as follows:

The office of Treasurer of the Island of Cuba shall on and after April
1, 1901, be placed under the jurisdiction of the Department of Finance
of said Island, and shall be filled by the appointment thereto of a
citizen of Cuba. The said appointment to be made by the Military
Governor thereof, subject to the approval of the Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 8, 1901._

On recommendation of the Military Governor of Cuba, approved by the
Secretary of War, I hereby order and direct that the export rates of
duty on tobacco, provided on page 50 of the "Customs Tariff for Ports in
the Island of Cuba" promulgated by Executive Order dated March 31, 1900,
shall be abolished on the 1st day of April, 1901.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 9, 1901._

I, William McKinley, President of the United States, by virtue of the
authority vested in me by Section 3141, Revised Statutes of the United
States, hereby order that the States of North Dakota and South Dakota,
now part of the Internal Revenue District of Nebraska, shall be detached
from said District of Nebraska and constitute one District, to be known
as the Internal Revenue District of Newark, South Dakota.

The Internal Revenue District of Nebraska shall comprise the State of
Nebraska.

This order to take effect on the first day of May, 1901.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



(ENDORSEMENTS.)

WAR DEPARTMENT, _Washington, D.C., March 9, 1901._

_Secretary of War_:

Recommends modification of executive order of June 4, 1892, setting
apart a wood reservation for the post of Fort Fill, Oklahoma Territory,
so as to make the eastern boundary coincident with the new 98 meridian
(the boundary line between the Kiowa and Comanche Reservation and the
Chickasaw Nation) as serving a mark, pursuant to act of Congress of June
28, 1898 (30 Stats., 495).


EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 11, 1901._

The within recommendation is approved. The Secretary of the Interior
will cause this action to be noted on the records of the General Land
Office.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 12, 1901._

The executive order of May 8, 1899, relating to the Island of Cuba, as
promulgated by the Assistant Secretary of War, May 11, 1899, is hereby
amended by substituting the following:

  By virtue of the authority vested in me as the Commander-in-Chief of
  the Army and Navy of the United States, I hereby order and direct that
  during the maintenance of Military Government by the United States in
  the Island of Cuba there is hereby created and shall be maintained the
  office of the Auditor for Cuba, to be filled by appointment of the
  Secretary of War, whose duties shall be to receive and audit all
  accounts of the island.

  There is hereby created and shall be maintained the office of Deputy
  Auditor for Cuba, to be filled by appointment of the Secretary of
  War, whose duties shall be to sign, in the name of the Auditor, such
  official papers as the Auditor may designate, and perform such other
  duties as the Auditor may prescribe. He shall have authority of
  his superior as Acting Auditor in case of the death, resignation,
  sickness, or other absence of the Auditor.

  There is hereby created and shall be maintained in the office of the
  Auditor the office of Chief Clerk, to be filled by appointment of the
  Auditor, and the Chief Clerk shall perform such duties as may be
  prescribed by the Auditor.


All rules and instructions necessary to carry into effect the provisions
of executive orders relating to Cuba shall be issued by the Secretary of
War, and such rules and instructions shall be enforced until the same
are amended or revoked by the Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 14., 1901_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--The sum of two hundred thousand dollars is hereby allotted and set
apart from the appropriation made for the benefit and Government of
Puerto Rico by the Act of March 24, 1900 (31 Stat., p. 51) to be
expended in improving and grading of various roads throughout the island
of Puerto Rico such as "Neighboring Roads" between small municipalities.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 22, 1901_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--The sum of six thousand dollars is hereby allotted and set apart
from the appropriation made for the benefit and Government of Puerto
Rico by the Act of March 24, 1900 (131 Stat., p. 51) to be expended by
the Treasurer of Puerto Rico upon accounts certified by the Auditor of
the Island for refunding customs duties paid by certain contractors on
materials intended for use under their contracts brought into Puerto
Rico since May 1, 1900.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 25, 1901._

Counsular officers will hereafter collect any fees for bills of health
and supplemental bills of health issued foreign war vessels. The tariff
of Consular fees is amended accordingly.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 26, 1901._

It is hereby ordered that the unsurveyed portion of Eliza Island and
Billingham Bay in section five (5), township thirty-six (36) north,
range two (2) East Willamette meridian, Washington be, and it is hereby
reserved for light-house purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., March 30, 1901._

It is hereby ordered that the hereinafter described tracts of land in
the District of Alaska be, and they are hereby reserved and set apart
for Reindeer stations, subject to any legal existing rights to any land
in the limits of the reservation hereby established, to wit:

1. The entire peninsula of which Cape Denbigh forms the southwestern
extremity, situated in latitude 64 degrees, 30 minutes north, longitude
161 degrees, 30 minutes west from Greenwich, approximately fifteen (15)
miles in length and five (5) miles in width.

A tract of land bounded as follows: Beginning at a point about six miles
above the mouth of the Unalaklik river and extending along the north
bank of the Unalaklik river in a generally northeasterly direction ten
miles; thence in a generally northwesterly direction ten miles; thence
in a generally southwesterly direction ten miles; thence in a generally
southeasterly direction to the point of beginning.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 2, 1901._

It is hereby ordered that all of Amaknam Island, District of Alaska,
except the tract of land reserved for light-house purposes by executive
order of Jan. 13th, 1899, and the tract of land embraced in amended
survey M 58 of the North American Commercial Co. be, and it is hereby
reserved for public purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 5, 1901._

The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to enlist in the Insular Force
United States Navy, which is hereby established, not to exceed five
hundred (500) Filipinos in the following ratings at the rates of pay
indicated:


  RATES                         MONTHLY PAY
  Navy Coxswains                  $ 15.00
  Navy Seamen                       12.00
  Navy Ordinary Seamen              10.00
  Navy Machinists; First-class      28.00
  Navy Machinists; Second-class     20.00
  Navy Firemen; First-class         18.00
  Navy Firemen; Second-class        15.00
  Navy Coal Passers                 11.00
  Navy Sutlers                      15.00
  Navy Cooks                        13.00
  Navy Mess-Attendants               8.00


WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 6, 1901._.

It is hereby ordered that upon Tuesday the ninth (9th) instant such
employees of the Executive Departments; the Government Printing Office
and the Navy Yard and Station at Washington, as served in the Military
or Naval services of the United States in the late Civil War of
Spanish-American War, shall be excused from duty at one o'clock P.M. for
the remainder of that day to enable them to participate in the exercises
of the unveiling of the statue erected to the memory of the late General
John A. Logan.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 15, 1901._

In accordance with provisions of act of Congress approved January 4th,
1897 (30 Stat, 34 and 36), and by virtue of the authority thereby given,
and on the recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior, it is hereby
ordered that the tracts hereinafter described and situated in township
fifty-eight (58) north, range eighty-nine (89) west, within the limits
of the Big Horn Forest reserve, in the State of Wyoming, be restored to
the public domain after sixty days' notice hereof by publication, as
required bylaw; these tracts having been found better adapted to
agricultural than forest purposes, to wit:

What will be, when surveyed, all that portion of sections thirteen (13),
fourteen (14), fifteen (15), sixteen (16), seventeen (17), in said
township and range lying south of the said line between Montana and
Wyoming, and all of sections twenty (20), twenty-one (21), twenty-two
(22), twenty-three (23) twenty-four (24), twenty-five (25), twenty-six
(26), and twenty-seven (27), all of said lands being in the State of
Wyoming.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 23, 1901_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--The sum of five hundred thousand dollars is hereby allotted and
set aside from the appropriation made for the benefit and Government
of Puerto Rico by the act of March 24th, 1900 (31 Stat., p. 51), to be
expended for public and permanent improvements in Puerto Rico, under the
supervision and subject to the approval of the Governor and Executive
Council of the Island.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., April 29, 1901._

In case of the death, resignation, absence or sickness of the Secretary
of the Navy, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of the
Bureau of Navigation, Rear Admiral Charles O'Neil, U.S. Navy and Chief
of the Bureau of Ordnance is, in pursuance of the provisions of Sections
177 and 179 of the Revised Statutes, hereby authorized and directed to
perform the duties of Secretary of the Navy until a successor is
appointed or until such absence or sickness shall cease.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 7, 1901._

The following "Classification of Vessels" and "Assignments to man
afloat" are hereby established for the Navy in accordance with an act of
Congress, approved March 3:

  CLASSIFICATION OF VESSELS.

  Torpedo Boat Destroyers: Torpedo boats, tugs, sailing ships and
  receiving ships shall not be rated. Other vessels shall be rated by tons
  of displacement as follows:

  _First Rates_: Men of War when of eight thousand tons and above.

  _Second Rates_: Men of War of four thousand tons and under eight
  thousand tons, and Converted and Auxiliary vessels of six thousand tons
  and above, except Colliers, Refrigerating ships, Distilling ships,
  Tank-steamers, Reporting ships, Hospital ships and other vessels
  constructed or equipped for special purposes.

  _Third Rates_: Men of War from one thousand to four thousand tons
  and Converted and Auxiliary Vessels from one thousand to six thousand
  tons and Colliers, Refrigerating ships, Supply ships, Distilling ships,
  Tank-steamers, Report ships, Hospital ships and other vessels
  constructed or equipped for special purposes of four thousand tons and
  above.

  _Fourth Rates_: All other vessels.


WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 7, 1901._

Commandants to man the following:

An Admiral to man a fleet.

Rear-Admiral to man a fleet or squadron.

A Captain to man a division, or ship of the first or second rating or a
ship not rated.

Commander to man a division or a ship of the second or third rating or
ship not rated.

Lieutenant-Commander to man a ship of the third or fourth rating or a
ship not rated.

A Lieutenant to man a ship of the fourth rating; a torpedo boat
destroyer, torpedo boat, tug, tender or a ship not rated.

A Lieutenant, junior grade, to command a torpedo boat, tug, tender or
ship not rated.

An Ensign to man a torpedo boat, tug or ship not rated.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 10, 1901_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--The sum of five hundred thousand dollars, or so much thereof as
remains unexpended, allotted and set aside by order of April 23, 1901,
from the appropriation made for the benefit and Government of Puerto
Rico by the act of March 24, 1900 (31 Stat, p. 51), is to be devoted to
public and permanent improvements in Puerto Rico and other governmental
and public purposes therein, as provided in the said act, and it is to
be expended under the supervision and subject to the approval of the
Government and administrative authorities of the Island.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 21, 1901._

I hereby order and direct that Executive Order dated May 3, 1899, be
amended so as to authorize the appointment of civilians as Collectors of
Customs in the Philippine Archipelago.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 21, 1901_.

_To the Secretary of War_:

SIR:--Pending the cessation of conditions requiring a continuance of
Military Government in the Philippine Islands, you are authorized to
make the following order:

  On and after the 4th day of July, 1901, until it shall otherwise
  be ordered, the President of the Philippine Commission will exercise
  the Executive Authority in all civil affairs of the Government in
  the Philippine Islands, heretofore exercised in such affairs by the
  Military Governor of the Philippines, and to that end, the Hon. W.H.
  Taft, President of the said Commission is hereby appointed Civil
  Governor of the Philippine Islands. Such executive authority will be
  exercised under and in conformity to the instructions to the Philippine
  Commissioners dated April 7th, 1900, and subject to the approval and
  control of the Secretary of War of the United States. The municipal
  and Provincial Civil Governments will then, or shall hereafter be
  established in said Islands and all persons performing duties pertaining
  to the offices of Civil Government in said Islands will, in respect of
  such duties report to the said Civil Government. The power to appoint
  Civil Officers, heretofore vested in the Philippine Commission or in
  the Military Government will be exercised by the Civil Governor with
  the advice and consent of the Commissioners.


The Military Governor of the Philippines is hereby relieved from the
performance on and after the said fourth day of July of the civil duties
hereinbefore described, but his authority will continue to be exercised
as heretofore in those districts in which insurrection against the
authority of the United States continues to exist or in which public
order is not sufficiently restored to enable the Provincial Civil
Government to be established under the instructions to the Commission
dated April 7th, 1900.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 21, 1901._

In accordance with the provision in Section 2253 of the Revised Statutes
of the United States, and by virtue of the authority thereby given, it
is hereby ordered that the existing boundary line between Coeur d'Alene
and Lewiston Land Districts, State of Idaho, be and it is hereby changed
and re-established as follows: Beginning on the boundary line between
the States of Idaho and Washington at the northwest corner of
directional township forty-two (42) north, range six (6) west, Boise
meridian, thence east along the boundary line between townships
forty-two (42) and forty-three (43) north, to the crest of the Bitter
Root Mountains.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 25, 1901._

The executive order of April 5, 1901, is hereby amended by striking out
the word "Filipinos" and inserting in its stead "natives of the Islands
of the Philippines and of the Island of Guam."

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 25, 1901._

In accordance with the provisions of the act of Congress approved June
4, 1897 (30 Stat, pp. 34-36), and by virtue of the authority thereby
given, and on the recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior, it is
hereby ordered that the tracts hereinafter described and situated within
the limits of the Big Horn Forest Reservation in the State of Wyoming
be restored to the public domain after sixty days' notice hereof by
publication as required by law, these tracts having been found better
adapted to agriculture than forest purposes, to wit: What will be, when
surveyed, sections twenty-four (24) to thirty-six (36), both inclusive,
in township fifty-five (55) north, range ninety-two (92) west; what will
be, when surveyed, sections twenty-eight (28) to thirty-three (33), both
inclusive, in township fifty-five (55) north, range ninety-one (91)
west; sections thirty (30), thirty-one (31), thirty-two (32), and what
will be, when surveyed, sections four (4), five (5), six (6), seven (7),
eight (8), nine (9), sixteen (16), seventeen (17), eighteen (18),
nineteen (19), twenty (20), twenty-one (21), twenty-eight (28),
twenty-nine (29), and thirty-three (33), all in township fifty-four (54)
north, range ninety-one (91) west; the southwest quarter remaining
unsurveyed portion of section eighteen (18), all of sections nineteen
(19), thirty (30), thirty-one (31), and what will be, when surveyed,
sections six (6) and seven (7), all in township fifty-three (53) north,
range ninety (90) west.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., June 29, 1901._

In accordance with provision of the act of Congress approved June 4,
1897 (30 Stat. 34, 36), and by virtue of authority thereby given, and
on the recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior, it is hereby
ordered that township twenty-two (22) south, range nine (9) east, and
township twenty-three (23) south, range nine (9) east, Willamette
meridian, Oregon, within the limits of the Cascade Range Forest
Reservation be restored to the public Domain after sixty days' notice
hereof by publication as required by law, these tracts having been found
better adapted to agriculture than forest purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., July 24, 1901_.

_To the Secretary of the Treasury_:

SIR:--I herewith allot and set apart the funds now remaining in the
Treasury of the United States as a separate fund raised from duties and
taxes collected in the United States under the provisions of the act of
Congress entitled "An act temporarily to provide revenues and a Civil
Government for Puerto Rico and for other purposes" approved April 12th,
1900, for public purposes in Puerto Rico; and these funds hereby
allotted shall be devoted to public and permanent improvements in Puerto
Rico and other Governmental and public purposes therein as set forth in
the act of Congress approved March 24th, 1900 (31 Stat., p. 51), and
shall be expended under the sole supervision and subject to the approval
of the Governor and Administrative heads of the Island.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., August 19, 1901._

It is hereby ordered that so much of the Executive Order of December 28,
1898 as fixes the rates at which the Spanish Alphonsino (_centem_) and
the French Louis shall be accepted in payment of customs, taxes, public
and postal dues in the Island of Cuba is modified to read as follows:

  Alphonsino (25 Peseta Piece)   $4.78
  Louis (20 Frank Piece)          3.83


WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., August 20, 1901._

It is hereby ordered that all tracts and parcels of land belonging to
the United States situated on the Peninsula extending into the harbor
on the south side of the city of San Juan, Puerto Rico, known as Barrio
de la Puntilla, or Puntilla Point, bounded on the north by the south
boundary of the Paseo de la Princesa and on the east, south and west by
the navigable waters of the harbor at such part Warden's line as may be
established by competent authority, be and the same are hereby reserved
for naval purposes.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., August 27, 1901._

It is hereby ordered that the Executive Order of Jan. 4th, 1901, reserve
for light house purposes among other tracts of land or cites in the
District of Alaska a tract described as follows: "Scotch Cap beginning
at a point at low water mark, said point being three miles easterly of
point at low water mark opposite Scotch Cap Pinnacle six (6) due north
one mile, thence north seventy-one (71) degrees east true four (4)
miles, thence south thirty-eight (38) degrees true to low water mark;
thence follow the windings of the low water mark to place of beginning,"
be and the same is hereby canceled so far as it relates to the above
described tract, and it is hereby ordered that in lieu thereof a tract
described as follows: Scotch Cap beginning at point at low water mark on
Unimak Island, said point being three miles easterly of a point at low
water mark opposite Scotch Cap Pinnacle; thence due north one mile;
thence north seventy-one (71) degrees west true to four miles; thence
south thirty-eight degrees west true to low water mark, thence follow
the windings of the low water mark to place of beginning, be and it is
hereby reserved and set apart for light house purposes, subject to any
legal existing rights thereto.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, D.C., August 29, 1901._

In accordance with provisions of Section 179 Revised Statutes as
amended by act approved August 5th, 1882 (22 Stats, at large 238),
Brigadier-General G.S. Gillespie, Corps of Engineers, United States
Army, is authorized and directed to perform the duties of Secretary of
War during the temporary absence from the seat of Government of the
Secretary of War and the Assistant Secretary of War.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.



PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S LAST PUBLIC UTTERANCE TO THE PEOPLE, BUFFALO, N.Y.,
SEPTEMBER 5TH, 1901.

_President Milburn, Director General Buchanan, Commissioners, Ladies
and Gentlemen_:

I am glad to be again in the city of Buffalo and exchange greetings with
her people, to whose generous hospitality I am not a stranger and with
whose good will I have been repeatedly and signally honored. To-day
I have additional satisfaction in meeting and giving welcome to the
foreign representatives assembled here, whose presence and participation
in this exposition have contributed in so marked a degree to its
interest and success. To the Commissioners of the Dominion of Canada and
the British colonies, the French colonies, the republics of Mexico and
Central and South America and the commissioners of Cuba and Puerto Rico,
who share with us in this undertaking, we give the hand of fellowship
and felicitate with them upon the triumphs of art, science, education
and manufacture which the old has bequeathed to the new century.
Expositions are the timekeepers of progress. They record the world's
advancement. They stimulate the energy, enterprise and intellect of the
people and quicken human genius. They go into the home. They broaden and
brighten the daily life of the people. They open mighty storehouses of
information to the student. Every exposition, great or small, has helped
to some onward step. Comparison of ideas is always educational, and
as such instruct the brain and hand of man. Friendly rivalry follows,
which is the spur to industrial improvement, the inspiration to useful
invention and to high endeavor in all departments of human activity.
It exacts a study of the wants, comforts and even the whims of the
people and recognizes the efficiency of high quality and new pieces to
win their favor. The quest for trade is an incentive to men of business
to devise, invent, improve and economize in the cost of production.

Business life, whether among ourselves or with other people, is ever a
sharp struggle for success. It will be none the less so in the future.
Without competition we would be clinging to the clumsy antiquated
processes of farming and manufacture and the methods of business of long
ago, and the twentieth would be no further advanced than the eighteenth
century. But though commercial competitors we are, commercial enemies we
must not be.

The Pan-American exposition has done its work thoroughly, presenting
in its exhibits evidences of the highest skill and illustrating the
progress of the human family in the western hemisphere. This portion of
the earth has no cause for humiliation for the part it has performed in
the march of civilization. It has not accomplished everything from it.
It has simply done its best, and without vanity or boastfulness, and
recognizing the manifold achievements of others, it invites the friendly
rivalry of all the powers in the peaceful pursuits of trade and
commerce, and will co-operate with all in advancing the highest and best
interests of humanity.

The wisdom and energy of all the nations are none too great for the
world's work. The success of art, science, industry and invention is an
international asset and a common glory.

After all, how near one to the other is every part of the world. Modern
inventions have brought into close relation widely separated peoples and
made them better acquainted. Geographic and political divisions will
continue to exist, but distances have been effaced. Swift ships and
swift trains are becoming cosmopolitan. They invade fields which a few
years ago were impenetrable. The world's products are exchanged as never
before, and with increasing transportation facilities come increasing
knowledge and larger trade. Prices are fixed with mathematical precision
by supply and demand. The world's selling prices are regulated by market
and crop reports.

We travel greater distances in a shorter space of time and with more
ease than was ever dreamed of by the fathers. Isolation is no longer
possible or desirable. The same important news is read, though in
different languages, the same day in all Christendom. The telegraph
keeps us advised of what is occurring everywhere, and the press
foreshadows, with more or less accuracy, the plans and purposes of the
nations.

Market prices of products and of securities are hourly known in every
commercial mart, and the investments of the people extend beyond their
own national boundaries into the remotest parts of the earth. Vast
transactions are conducted and international exchanges are made by the
tick of the cable. Every event of interest is immediately bulletined.
The quick gathering and transmission of news, like rapid transit, are of
recent origin and are only made possible by the genius of the inventor
and the courage of the investor. It took a special messenger of the
Government, with every facility known at the time for rapid travel,
nineteen days to go from the city of Washington to New Orleans with a
message to General Jackson that the war with England had ceased and a
treaty of peace had been signed. How different now!

We reached General Miles in Puerto Rico by cable, and he was able,
through the military telegraph, to stop his army on the firing line with
the message that the United States and Spain had signed a protocol
suspending hostilities. We knew almost instantly of the first shots
fired at Santiago, and the subsequent surrender of the Spanish forces
was known at Washington within less than an hour of its consummation.
The first ship of Cervera's fleet had hardly emerged from that historic
harbor when the fact was flashed to our capital, and the swift
destruction that followed was announced immediately through the
wonderful medium of telegraphy.

So accustomed are we to safe and easy communication with distant lands
that its temporary interruption, even in ordinary times, results in loss
and inconvenience. We shall never forget the days of anxious waiting and
awful suspense when no information was permitted to be sent from Pekin,
and the diplomatic representatives of the nations in China, cut off
from all communication, inside and outside of the walled capital, were
surrounded by an angry and misguided mob that threatened their lives;
nor the joy that filled the world when a single message from the
Government of the United States brought through our minister the first
news of the safety of the besieged diplomats.

At the beginning of the nineteenth century there was not a mile of steam
railroad on the globe. Now there are enough miles to make its circuit
many times. Then there was not a line of electric telegraph; now we have
a vast mileage traversing all lands and seas. God and man have linked
the nations together. No nation can longer be indifferent to any other.
And as we are brought more and more in touch with each other the less
occasion there is for misunderstandings and the stronger the
disposition, when we have differences, to adjust them in the court of
arbitration, which is the noblest forum for the settlement of
international disputes.

My fellow citizens, trade statistics indicate that this country is
in a state of unexampled prosperity. The figures are almost appalling.
They show that we are utilizing our fields and forests and mines and
that we are furnishing profitable employment to the millions of
workingmen throughout the United States, bringing comfort and happiness
to their homes and making it possible to lay by savings for old age
and disability. That all the people are participating in this great
prosperity is seen in every American community, and shown by the
enormous and unprecedented deposits in our savings banks. Our duty
is the care and security of these deposits, and their safe investment
demands the highest integrity and the best business capacity of those
in charge of these depositories of the people's earnings.

We have a vast and intricate business, built up through years of
toil and struggle, in which every part of the country has its stake,
and will not permit of either neglect or of undue selfishness. No
narrow, sordid policy will subserve it. The greatest skill and wisdom
on the part of the manufacturers and producers will be required to hold
and increase it. Our industrial enterprises which have grown to such
great proportions affect the homes and occupations of the people and
the welfare of the country. Our capacity to produce has developed so
enormously and our products have so multiplied that the problem of more
markets requires our urgent and immediate attention. Only a broad and
enlightened policy will keep what we have. No other policy will get
more. In these times of marvelous business energy and gain we ought
to be looking to the future, strengthening the weak places in our
industrial and commercial system, that we may be ready for any storm
or strain.

By sensible trade arrangements which will not interrupt our home
production we shall extend the outlets for our increasing surplus.
A system which provides a mutual exchange of commodities, a mutual
exchange is manifestly essential to the continued and healthful growth
of our export trade. We must not repose in fancied security that we can
forever sell everything and buy little or nothing. If such a thing were
possible, it would not be best for us or for those with whom we deal.
We should take from our customers such of their products as we can use
without harm to our industries and labor. Reciprocity is the natural
outgrowth of our wonderful industrial development under the domestic
policy now firmly established. What we produce beyond our domestic
consumption must have a vent abroad. The excess must be relieved through
a foreign outlet and we should sell everywhere we can, and buy wherever
the buying will enlarge our sales and productions, and thereby make a
greater demand for home labor.

The period of exclusiveness is past. The expansion of our trade and
commerce is the pressing problem. Commercial wars are unprofitable.
A policy of good will and friendly trade relations will prevent
reprisals. Reciprocity treaties are in harmony with the spirit of the
times, measures of retaliation are not. If perchance some of our tariffs
are no longer needed, for revenue or to encourage and protect our
industries at home, why should they not be employed to extend and
promote our markets abroad? Then, too, we have inadequate steamship
service. New lines of steamers have already been put in commission
between the Pacific coast ports of the United States and those on the
western coasts of Mexico and Central and South America. These should be
followed up with direct steamship lines between the eastern coast of the
United States and South American ports. One of the needs of the times is
to direct commercial lines from our vast fields of production to the
fields of consumption that we have but barely touched. Next in advantage
to having the thing to sell is to have the convenience to carry it to
the buyer. We must encourage our merchant marine. We must have more
ships. They must be under the American flag, built and manned and owned
by Americans. These will not only be profitable in a commercial sense;
they will be messengers of peace and amity wherever they go. We must
build the Isthmian canal, which will unite the two oceans and give a
straight line of water communication with the western coasts of Central
and South America and Mexico. The construction of a Pacific cable cannot
be longer postponed.

In the furthering of these objects of national interest and concern
you are performing an important part. This exposition would have
touched the heart of that American statesman whose mind was ever alert
and thought ever constant for a larger commerce and a truer fraternity
of the republics of the new world. His broad American spirit is felt
and manifested here. He needs no identification to an assemblage of
Americans anywhere, for the name of Blaine is inseparably associated
with the Pan-American movement, which finds this practical and
substantial expression, and which we all hope will be firmly advanced by
the Pan-American congress that assembles this autumn in the capital of
Mexico. The good work will go on. It cannot be stopped. These buildings
will disappear; this creation of art and beauty and industry will perish
from sight, but their influence will remain to

  Make it live beyond its too short living
  With praises and thanksgiving.


Who can tell the new thoughts that have been awakened, the ambitions
fired and the high achievements that will be wrought through this
exposition? Gentlemen, let us ever remember that our interest is in
concord, not conflict, and that our real eminence rests in the victories
of peace, not those of war. We hope that all who are represented here
may be moved to higher and nobler effort for their own and the world's
good, and that out of this city may come, not only greater commerce and
trade, but more essential than these, relations of mutual respect,
confidence and friendship which will deepen and endure.

Our earnest prayer is that God will graciously vouchsafe prosperity,
happiness and peace to all our neighbors, and like blessings to all the
peoples and powers of earth.



DEATH OF PRESIDENT McKINLEY.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE ASSASSINATION.


_Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 6-7 P.M._

The President was shot about 4 o'clock. One bullet struck him on the
upper portion of the breastbone, glancing and not penetrating; the
second bullet penetrated the abdomen five inches below the left nipple
and one and a half inches to the left of the median line. The abdomen
was opened through the line of the bullet wound. It was found that the
bullet had penetrated the stomach. The opening in the front wall of the
stomach was carefully closed with silk stitches, after which a search
was made for a hole in the back wall of the stomach. This was found and
also closed in the same way. The further course of the bullet could not
be discovered, although careful search was made. The abdominal wound was
closed without drainage. No injury to the intestines or other abdominal
organ was discovered. The patient stood the operation well, pulse of
good quality, rate of 130. Condition at the conclusion of operation was
gratifying. The result cannot be foretold. His condition at present
justifies hope of recovery.

GEORGE B. CORTELYOU,
  _Secretary to the President._



NEWS AT THE WHITE HOUSE.

The official announcement of the President's death was received at the
White House at 2:35 o'clock, September 14, 1901, as follows:


  _Buffalo, September 14._

  _Col. B.F. Montgomery, Executive Mansion, Washington_:

  The President died at 2:15 this morning.

  GEORGE B. CORTELYOU.


Immediately upon receipt of the official dispatch the following was sent
to Secretary Cortelyou:


  Members of the executive staff in Washington are deeply affected, and
  beg to tender their profound sympathy to Mrs. McKinley.

  O.F. PRUDEN,
    _Assistant Secretary._



PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT OF DEATH BY THE PHYSICIANS.


MILBURN HOUSE, _Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 14._

The following report of the autopsy upon the remains of President
McKinley was issued at 5 o'clock:


  The bullet which struck over the breastbone did not pass through the
  skin, and did little harm. The other bullet passed through both walls of
  the stomach near its lower border. Both holes were found to be perfectly
  closed by the stitches, but the tissue around each hole had become
  gangrenous. After passing through the stomach the bullet passed into
  the back walls of the abdomen, hitting and tearing the upper end of
  the kidney. This portion of the bullet track was also gangrenous, the
  gangrene involving the pancreas. The bullet has not yet been found.
  There was no sign of peritonitis or disease of other organs. The heart
  walls were very thin. There was no evidence of any attempt at repair on
  the part of nature, and death resulted from the gangrene, which affected
  the stomach around the bullet wounds as well as the tissues around the
  further course of the bullet. Death was unavoidable by any surgical or
  medical treatment, and was the direct result of the bullet wound.


  HARVEY D. GAYLORD, M.D.
  HERMAN G. MATZINGER, M.D.
  P.M. RIXEY, M.D.
  MATTHEW D. MANN, M.D.
  HERMAN MYNTER, M.D.
  ROSWELL PARK, M.D.
  EUGENE WASDIN, M.D.
  CHARLES G. STOCKTON, M.D.
  EDWARD G. JANEWAY, M.D.
  W.D. JOHNSON, M.D.
  W.P. KENDALL, _Surgeon, U.S.A._
  CHARLES CARY, M.D.
  EDWARD L. MUNSON, _Assistant Surgeon, U.S.A._
  HERMANUS L. BAER, M.D.



ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE VICE-PRESIDENT.

At the residence of Mr. Ansley Wilcox, 641 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo,
N.Y., Mr. Root stepped forward and said, with deep emotion: "Mr.
Vice-President, I have been requested on behalf of the Cabinet of the
late President--at least those who are present in Buffalo, all except
two--to request that for reasons of weight affecting the affairs of
Government you should proceed to take the constitutional oath of
President of the United States."



THE VICE-PRESIDENT'S REPLY.

"I shall take the oath at once in accordance with your request, and in
this hour of deep and terrible national bereavement. I wish to state
that it shall be my aim to continue absolutely unbroken the policy of
President McKinley for the peace and prosperity and honor of our beloved
country."



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE ASSASSINATION TO REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED
STATES ABROAD.

(_From the Washington Post, Sept. 15, 1901_.)


DEPARTMENT OF STATE, _Washington, Sept. 14_.

_Sir_: It is my painful duty to announce to you the death of
William McKinley, President of the United States, in the city of
Buffalo, at fifteen minutes past 2 in the morning of to-day, September
14.

Laid low by the act of an assassin, the week-long struggle to save his
life has been watched with keen solicitude, not alone by the people of
this country, who raised him from their own ranks to the high office he
filled, but by the people of all friendly nations, whose messages of
sympathy and hope, while hope was possible, have been most consolatory
in this time of sore trial.

Now that the end has come, I request you to be the medium of
communicating the sad tidings to the Government of the honored nation
you so worthily represent, and to announce that in obedience to the
prescriptions of the Constitution, the office of President has devolved
upon Theodore Roosevelt, Vice-President of the United States.

Accept, sir, the renewed assurance of my highest consideration.

JOHN HAY.



ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE ARMY.

[GENERAL ORDER No. 13.]


HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
  ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
    _Washington, D.C. Sept. 16, 1901._

With great sorrow, the commanding general announces the death of
William McKinley, President of the United States and, by statute,
Commander-in-Chief of the District of Columbia Militia, which occurred
at Buffalo, N.Y., at 2:15 o'clock A.M. on September 14, 1901.

Throughout his tragically terminated administration President McKinley
was actively interested in the welfare of this organization and
frequently gave it evidence of his sincere friendship. His distinguished
services as soldier and civilian must incite to emulation and will
result in purer patriotism and better citizenship wherever his career
is studied.

The national flag will be displayed at half-staff on all armories
from sunrise to sunset of each day until sunset of Thursday, the 19th
instant, on which day the remains of the late Commander-in-Chief will
be interred at Canton, Ohio.

The officers of the National Guard will wear the usual badge of mourning
upon their swords, and the regimental and battalion colors will be
draped in mourning for a period of thirty days.

By command of BRIG.-GEN. HARRIES.

CHARLES H. OURAND,
  _Major and Inspector General, Acting Adjutant-General._


By direction of the Acting Secretary of War, the National Guard of
the District of Columbia will assemble for escort and parade duty on
Tuesday, September 17, 1901, to participate in the funeral of William
McKinley, late President of the United States and Commander-in-Chief
of the District of Columbia Militia.

The brigade will assemble at 8:30 o'clock A.M., in column of companies,
on Pennsylvania avenue facing east, its right resting on Nineteenth
street northwest.

The order of formation, from right to left, will be as follows:

  General staff and general non-commissioned staff.
  Brigade Band.
  Engineer Corps.
  Second Regiment of Infantry.
  First Regiment of Infantry.
  Corps of field music.
  First Separate Battalion.
  Signal Corps.
  Naval Battalion.
  Ambulance Corps.


Undress uniform, forage caps, leggings, white standing collars, and
white gloves will be worn; the Naval Battalion to be in its prescribed
uniform.

All members of the general staff and general non-commissioned staff, and
the field officers and adjutants of regiments will be mounted, and will
wear the prescribed undress mounted uniform.

All commanding officers will assemble at the adjutant-general's office
at 9:30 o'clock on the evening of September 16, to receive any special
orders that may be issued.

Commanding officers of companies will furnish their battalion adjutants
with "morning reports" immediately after the parade is dismissed, noting
thereon the names of all officers and men absent from the parade without
leave. Commanding officers of regiments, separate battalions, and
separate companies will furnish these headquarters with consolidated
morning reports before 10 o'clock A.M. of the 19th instant; will see
that all enlisted men absent without leave are properly dealt with, and
will report to these headquarters the names of all commissioned officers
so absent.

By command of BRIG.-GEN. HARRIES.

CHARLES H. OURAND,
  _Major and Inspector General, Acting Adjutant-General._



OFFICIAL ORDERS SENT OUT.

SALUTES TO BE FIRED AND FLAGS LOWERED AFLOAT AND ASHORE.

Secretary of State Hay and Secretary of the Treasury Gage, the only
Cabinet officers in town, held a consultation on the morning of the 13th
as a result of which the following order was issued:

  DEPARTMENT OF STATE, _Washington, Sept. 14._

  _To the Secretary of the Navy_:

  Out of respect to the memory of the President, the executive departments
  will be closed to-day and on the day of the funeral.

  JOHN HAY.


A similar order was communicated to all the heads and acting heads of
the executive departments in Washington by government telegraph. They in
turn issued the necessary orders for the closing of their respective
departments, not only in Washington, but throughout the country. In a
short time the large buildings were deserted, except by a few clerks
detailed to aid their chiefs in the promulgation of necessary orders.

In addition to issuing the order closing the Navy Department,
Acting Secretary Hackett dispatched the following order to every
commander-in-chief, to every navy yard, and to every United States ship,
stating simply:

  It is with profound sorrow that the department announces to you the
  death of President McKinley at 2:15, September 14.


The Acting Secretary also issued the following order to the naval branch
of the United States:


  [SPECIAL ORDER No. 12.]

  NAVY DEPARTMENT, _Washington, Sept. 14, 1901._

  The President of the United States died this morning at 2:15, in the
  city of Buffalo, N.Y. Officers and men of the navy and Marine Corps need
  not to be reminded of the public and private virtues of their late
  Commander-in-Chief. The whole people loved William McKinley, for he
  loved and trusted them.

  As soldier, statesman, husband, and as a pure-minded, great-hearted
  American, his fame now belongs to his country.

  Under the Constitution, Theodore Roosevelt, previously Vice-President,
  has become President and Commander-in-Chief of the navy and Marine Corps
  of the United States.

  F.W. HACKETT,
    _Acting Secretary_.


The ceremonies to be observed are provided for in the naval regulations
as follows:

  Upon the receipt of official intelligence of the death of the President
  of the United States, the senior officer shall direct that on the
  following day the ensign and union jack be displayed at half-mast from
  sunrise to sunset, and guns fired every half hour from all ships
  present. Similar orders shall be given at naval stations.


A naval regulation provides that salutes shall not be fired on Sunday
except in cases wherein international courtesy would suffer from the
breach. Therefore the firing of the guns will take place on Monday at
those points where the department's announcement was received yesterday.



ORDER TO THE ARMY.

A dispatch was received at the War Department on the afternoon of the
13th from Secretary Root approving the draft of the order to the army,
announcing the death of President McKinley. It was sent to all officers
in command. The order follows:

  HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
    ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
      _Washington, September 14._

  _General orders_:

  1. The following order of the Secretary of War announces to the army
  the death of William McKinley, President of the United States:


  WAR DEPARTMENT, _Washington, September 14_.

  The distressing duty devolves upon the Secretary of War of announcing to
  the army the death of William McKinley, President of the United States,
  which occurred at Buffalo, N.Y., at 2:15 o'clock A.M., on the 14th day
  of September, 1901.

  The grief into which the nation has been plunged at the untimely death
  of its Chief Magistrate will be keenly felt by the army of the United
  States, in which, in his early manhood, he rendered distinguished and
  patriotic services, and in whose welfare he manifested at all times a
  profound and abiding solicitude.

  Appropriate funeral honors will be paid to the memory of the late
  President and Commander-in-Chief at the headquarters of every military
  division and department, at every military port, at the United States
  Military Academy, West Point, and at every camp of troops of the United
  States in the field.

  The Lieutenant-General of the army will give the necessary instructions
  for carrying this order into effect.

  ELIHU ROOT,
    _Secretary of War_.


  2. On the day after the receipt of this order at the headquarters of
  military commands in the field and at each military station and at the
  Military Academy, at West Point, the troops and cadets will be paraded
  at 10 o'clock, A.M., and the order read to them, after which all labor
  for the day will cease.

  THIRTEEN GUNS AT DAWN.

  3. At dawn thirteen guns will be fired at each military post, and
  afterward at intervals of thirty minutes between the rising and setting
  sun a single gun, and at the close of the day the salute of the Union of
  forty-five guns.

  The national flag will be displayed at half-staff at the headquarters
  of the several military divisions and departments, and at all military
  posts, stations, forts, and buildings and vessels under the control
  of the department until the remains of the late Chief Magistrate are
  consigned to their final resting place at Canton, Ohio, on the afternoon
  of Thursday, the 19th instant, on which day all labor will be suspended
  at all military posts and stations and on all public works under the
  direction of the department, and at 12 o'clock meridian twenty-one
  minute guns will be fired from all military posts and stations.

  The officers of the army of the United States will wear the usual badge
  of mourning on their swords and the colors of the various military
  organizations of the army will be draped in mourning for the period of
  one month.

  4. The following officers of the army will, with a like number of
  officers of the navy selected for the purpose, compose the guard of
  honor, and accompany the remains of their late Commander-in-Chief from
  the National Capital to Canton, Ohio, and continue with them until they
  are consigned to their final resting place:

  The Lieutenant-General of the Army.
  Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke.
  Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis.
  Maj.-Gen. Arthur MacArthur.
  Brig.-Gen. George L. Gillespie.

  By command of Lieut.-Gen. Miles.

  THOMAS WARD,
    _Acting Adjutant-General._


The following order then issued:

  WAR DEPARTMENT, _Washington, Sept. 14._

  The Secretary of War announces to the army that upon the death of
  William McKinley, President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt,
  Vice-President, has succeeded to the office of President of the United
  States, by virtue of the Constitution.

  ELIHU ROOT,
    _Secretary of War._


Secretary Root also gave directions to the officers of the department to
make the necessary arrangements and issue orders for the participation
of the army in the funeral ceremonies, following the Garfield precedent.

The following order was issued by the Secretary of the Treasury to the
Revenue Cutter Service:

  The department announces to the service the sad tidings of the death of
  the President. The flags of all vessels of the Revenue Cutter Service
  will be carried at half-mast until otherwise ordered.



MR. GAGE ANNOUNCES DEATH.

HEAD OF TREASURY PAYS TRIBUTE TO THE LATE PRESIDENT MCKINLEY.

Secretary Gage issued the following announcement of the death of
President McKinley:

  It has been thought proper to make sad but official announcement in this
  issue of Treasury Decisions of the tragic death of William McKinley,
  twenty-fifth President of the United States, and to give some expression
  of that tribute which his character and deeds compel.

  It needed not the shadows of death to make the figure of the late
  President loom large in the estimate of mankind.

  The republic he loved he lived to broaden and unify as no previous
  President had done. Under his prudent and far-seeing statesmanship it
  took exalted place in the community of nations.

  From his place as private citizen, on through many and increasing
  honors to his final post as ruler of his people, he remained true to
  the highest ideals.

  By the people of the nation at large and by the world he was known and
  will live in grateful annals as a gentleman of noble heart, an
  affectionate husband, a sturdy friend, and a faithful and illustrious
  President.

  In a long public life, ever open to his fellows, nothing was ever found,
  even by intemperate partisan zeal, that would cast a shade upon his
  character.

  The kindly and unselfish attributes which his colleagues knew and loved,
  the public felt, and now men of every faith and following join in
  reverent acknowledgment of those distinctive virtues and abilities that
  lift him among the truly great of all ages.

  The passing of Presidents and Kings usually evokes tributes of praise,
  but in William McKinley's life there was an element that made him more
  than ruler, and which, in the hour of his death, is above the tribute
  of speech and tears.

  The ordinary tributes paid to the memory of the great when they pass
  from earth utterly fail to satisfy the mind in an attempted application
  of them to our dead President.

  L.J. GAGE,
    _Secretary._



CERTIFICATE OF THE CORONER.

FORMAL RECORD OF MCKINLEY'S DEATH FOR BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS.

The coroner of Erie County issued the following certificate of death of
the late President:


  CITY OF BUFFALO,
    BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS,
      COUNTY OF ERIE, STATE OF NEW YORK.

  Certificate and record of death of William McKinley:

  I hereby certify that he died on the 14th day of September, 1901, about
  2:15 o'clock A.M., and that to the best of my knowledge and belief the
  cause of death was as hereunder written:

  Cause, gangrene of both walls of stomach and pancreas following gunshot
  wound.

  Witness my hand this 14th day of September, 1901.

  H.R. GAYLORD, M.D.
  H.Z. MATZINGER, M.D.
  JAMES F. WILSON, _Coroner_.


  Date of death--September 14, 1901.
  Age--58 years, 7 months, 15 days.
  Color--White.
  Single, married, etc.--Married.
  Occupation--President of the United States.
  Birthplace--Niles, Ohio.
  How long in the United States, if foreign born--
  Father's name--William McKinley.
  Father's birthplace--Pennsylvania, U.S.
  Mother's name--Nancy McKinley.
  Mother's birthplace--Ohio, U.S.
  Place of death--1168 Delaware avenue.
  Last previous residence--Washington, D.C.
  Direct cause of death--Gangrene of both walls of stomach and pancreas
  following gunshot wound.



OFFICIAL ORDER OF OBSERVANCES.

ORDER OF ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE OBSEQUIES AT WASHINGTON CITY OF WILLIAM
MCKINLEY, LATE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

The remains of the late President will arrive in Washington at 8:30
o'clock P.M. on Monday, the 16th of September, 1901, and will be
escorted to the Executive Mansion by a squadron of United States
Cavalry.

On Tuesday, the 17th instant, at 9 o'clock A.M., they will be borne to
the Capitol, where they will lie in state in the rotunda from 10 o'clock
P.M. until 6 P.M. that date.

The following morning there will be exercises at the Capitol at 10
o'clock. At 1 P.M. the remains will be borne to the depot of the
Pennsylvania Railroad, and thence conveyed to their final resting place
at Canton, Ohio.


FROM WHITE HOUSE TO CAPITOL.

ORDER OF PROCESSION FOR TUESDAY.

SECTION I.

  Funeral Escort,
  Under Command of
  Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke, U.S.A.
  Artillery Band.
  Squadron of Cavalry.
  Company A, United States Engineers.
  Two Batteries C Artillery.
  Marine Band.
  Battalion of Marines.
  Battalion of United States Seamen.
  Brigade of National Guard, District of Columbia.


SECTION II.

  Under Command of Chief Marshal,
  Gen. Henry V. Boynton.
  Clergymen in Attendance.
  Physicians who attended the late President.
  Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States.
  Grand Army of the Republic.
  Guard of Honor.       Guard of Honor.
                 Hearse.
         Bearers.       Bearers.


Officers of the army, Navy and Marine Corps in this city who are not on
duty with the troops forming the escort will form, in full dress, right
in front, on either side of the hearse--the army on the right and the
Navy and Marine Corps on the left--and compose the guard of honor.

  Family of the late President.
  Relatives of the late President.
  Ex-President of the United States.


SECTION III.

  THE PRESIDENT.
  The Cabinet Ministers.
  The Diplomatic Corps.
  The Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the Supreme
    Court of the United States.
  The Senators of the United States.
  Members of the U.S. House of Representatives.
  Governors of States and Territories.
  Commissioners of the District of Columbia.
  The Judges of the Court of Claims, the Judiciary of the District of
    Columbia, and Judges of the United States Courts.
  The Assistant Secretaries of State, Treasury, War, Navy, Interior and
    Agricultural Departments.
  The Assistant Postmasters General.
  The Solicitor General and the Assistant Attorneys General.
  Organized Societies.


The troops designated to form the escort will assemble on the north side
of Pennsylvania avenue, facing the Executive Mansion, left resting on
the eastern entrance to the grounds, and in inverse order, so that when
the column is formed to the left, the organizations will be in the order
above described. The formation will be completed at 9 A.M. on Tuesday,
the 17th instant.

The civic procession will form in accordance with the directions to be
given by the chief marshal.

The officers of the army and navy selected to compose the special guard
of honor will be at the Capitol so as to receive the remains upon
arrival there.


WEDNESDAY'S SOLEMN PAGEANT.

Order of procession for Wednesday:

The military guard will escort the remains from the Capitol to the
railroad station.

The troops on that date will assemble on the east side of the Capitol
and form line fronting the eastern portico of the Capitol precisely at
1 o'clock P.M.

The procession will move, upon the conclusion of the services at the
Capitol (commencing at 1 o'clock P.M.), when minute guns will be fired
at the navy yard, by the vessels of war which may be in port, and at
Fort Myer, and by a battery of artillery stationed near the Capitol for
that purpose.

At the same hour the bells of the several churches, fire engine-houses,
and schoolhouses will be tolled, the firing of the minute-guns and the
tolling of the bells to continue until the departure of the remains of
the late Chief Magistrate for the railroad depot.

At 2:30 o'clock P.M. the officers of the army and navy selected to
compose the special guard of honor will assemble at the Pennsylvania
depot in time to receive the body of the late President, and deposit it
in the car prepared for that purpose.

As the necessary limits of time do not permit personal communication
with the public officers of the United States and of the several States
enumerated in the foregoing order, they are respectfully requested to
accept the invitation to take part in the exercises conveyed through the
publication hereof, and to send notice of their intention to be present
to the Secretary of War at the War Department in Washington.

Organizations and civic societies desiring to take part are requested
to send similar notice at the earliest time practicable to the chief
marshal of the civic procession, Gen. Henry V. Boynton, Wyatt Building,
Washington, D.C.

JOHN HAY,
  _Secretary of State_.

ELIHU ROOT,
  _Secretary of War_.

JOHN D. LONG,
  _Secretary of the Navy_.

HENRY B.F. MACFARLAND,
  _President of the Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia_.


ORDER OF PROCESSION.

The procession then started at slow march up Pennsylvania avenue
toward the White House. It moved in the following order:

  Four mounted police outriders.

  Platoon of forty policemen on foot, Capt. Francis E. Cross, commanding.

  Platoon of sixteen mounted policemen abreast, Sergt. Matthews,
  commanding.

  Cavalry escort from Fort Myer, consisting of Troops I and L, under
  command of Maj. Walter L. Finlay. Staff, Maj. Thomas, Fifth Cavalry;
  Maj. George L. Davis, surgeon; Chaplain C.E. Pierce, Capt. S.H. Elliott,
  adjutant. Troop I, under command of Capt. C.E. Brooks and Second Lieut.
  A.S. Fuger, and Troop L, under command of Lieut. W.B. Scales.

  Three veteran society representatives, Mr. John McElroy, national senior
  vice-commander of the Grand Army of the Republic; Israel W. Stone,
  commander of the Department of the Potomac of the Grand Army of the
  Republic, and Gen. R.G. Dyrenforth, national commander of the Union
  Veteran Union.

  Platoon of representatives of veteran organizations, Col. J.T.
  Wilkinson, Spanish War Veterans; Col. J. Edwin Browne, Union Veteran
  Legion; Chaplain C.E. Stevens, Department of the Potomac, Grand Army of
  the Republic; A.M. Daniels, commander Post No. 6, Department of the
  Potomac; Past Commander George P. Davis, of Burnside Post; A.R. Greene,
  past department commander of Kansas; Grand Commander John M. Meacham,
  Department of the Potomac, Union Veterans' Union; Arthur Hendricks, past
  commander Department of the Potomac, Grand Army of the Republic; L.K.
  Brown, of Burnside Post, Grand Army of the Republic.

  Remains of the President.



ORDERS TO GUARD OF HONOR.

The following special order was issued on the 16th:

  The special guard of honor, composed of general officers of the army
  and admirals of the navy, will not march in the procession contemplated
  for Tuesday. The special guard of honor--general officers of the army,
  active and retired; the admirals of the navy, active and retired--not
  otherwise instructed will assemble in full dress as follows:

  Monday, September 16, 1901, at the White House at 8 P.M.

  Tuesday, September 17, 1901, at the east front of the Capitol at
  9:30 A.M.


Acting Secretary Hackett has issued the following order to govern the
navy in the funeral ceremonies:

  [SPECIAL ORDER No. 13.]

  NAVY DEPARTMENT, _Washington, Sept. 16, 1901._

  All officers on the active list of the navy and Marine Corps on duty
  in Washington will assemble in full dress uniform at 7:30 P.M. Monday
  evening, September 16, at Pennsylvania Railroad station for the purpose
  of meeting the remains of the late President of the United States. They
  will again assemble in the same uniform in the grounds of the Executive
  Mansion and near the eastern gate at 9 A.M. on Tuesday, September 17, to
  march as guard of honor in the procession from the Executive Mansion to
  the Capitol.

  The following special guard of honor is hereby appointed:

  The Admiral of the Navy, Rear Admiral A.S. Crowninshield, Rear Admiral
  Charles O'Neil, Paymaster-General A.S. Kenny, Brig.-Gen. Charles
  Heywood, U.S.M.C.

  The special guard of honor will assemble in special full dress uniform
  at the Executive Mansion at 8 P.M. Monday, September 16, to receive
  the remains of the late President, and will again assemble in the same
  uniform at the Capitol at 10 A.M. Tuesday, September 17, and will thence
  accompany the remains of President McKinley to their final resting place
  in Canton, Ohio.

  All officers of flag rank will constitute an additional special guard of
  honor, and will assemble at the places hereinbefore mentioned for the
  special guard of honor. The additional special guard of honor will not,
  however, accompany the remains of the late President to Canton.

  F.W. HACKETT,
    _Acting Secretary_.


The following official statement, making important changes in the plans
for the funeral services over the remains of President McKinley in this
city, was made public:

  In compliance with the earnest wishes of Mrs. McKinley that the body
  of her husband shall rest in her home at Canton Wednesday night, the
  following changes in the obsequies of the late President will be made:

  Funeral services in the rotunda of the Capitol will be held Tuesday
  morning on the arrival of the escort which will accompany the remains
  from the White House. The body of the late President will lie in state
  in the rotunda for the remainder of Tuesday, and will be escorted to
  the railroad station Tuesday evening. The funeral train will leave
  Washington at or about 8 o'clock Tuesday evening, and thus will arrive
  at Canton during the day Wednesday.

  JOHN HAY,
    _Secretary of State_.

  ELIHU ROOT,
    _Secretary of War_.

  JOHN D. LONG,
    _Secretary of the Navy_.

  H.B.F. MACFARLAND,
    _President Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia_.



HOUSE COMMITTEE NAMED.

LIST WIRED BY SPEAKER HENDERSON.

The following dispatch from Speaker Henderson named the House committee:

  _New York, Sept. 15, 1901._

  _Hon. Henry Casson, Sergeant-at-arms, House of Representatives,
  Washington, D.C._:

  I have appointed the following committee for Presidential funeral and
  escort. Notify them at once, requesting answer. Give each date of
  funeral and hour of leaving Washington:

  Grosvenor, Ohio; Burton, Ohio; Tayler, Ohio; Loud, California; Russell,
  Connecticut; Ball, Delaware; Cannon, Illinois; Hitt, Illinois; Hopkins,
  Illinois; Steele, Indiana; Hepburn, Iowa; Curtis, Kansas; Burleigh,
  Maine; Mudd, Maryland; Gillett, Massachusetts; Corliss, Michigan;
  Fletcher, Minnesota; Mercer, Nebraska; Sulloway, New Hampshire;
  Loudenslager, New Jersey; Payne, New York; Sherman, New York; Marshall,
  North Dakota; Tongue, Oregon; Bingham, Pennsylvania; Grow, Pennsylvania;
  Dalzell, Pennsylvania; Capron, Rhode Island; Burke, South Dakota;
  Foster, Vermont; Cushman, Washington; Dovener, West Virginia; Babcock,
  Wisconsin; Mondell, Wyoming; Richardson, Tennessee; Bankhead, Alabama;
  McRae, Arkansas; Bell, Colorado; Sparkman, Florida; Lester, Georgia;
  Glenn, Idaho; Smith, Kentucky; Robertson, Louisiana; Williams,
  Mississippi; De Armond, Missouri; Edwards, Montana; Newlands, Nevada;
  Cummings, New York; W.W. Kitchin, North Carolina; Norton, Ohio; Elliott,
  South Carolina; Lanham, Texas; Swanson, Virginia; Bodie, New Mexico;
  Flynn, Oklahoma; Smith, Arizona.

  Acknowledge receipt of this telegram. I will be at funeral.

  D.B. HENDERSON.



ACTION OF CONGRESS.

Upon the assembly of the Fifty-seventh Congress in its first session
convened, President Roosevelt referred in touching terms to the
assassination of the late President McKinley. (Page 417.)

The Senate on December 3, 1901, adopted the following resolution:

  _Resolved_, That a committee of eleven Senators be appointed on the
  part of the Senate, to join such committee as may be appointed on the
  part of the House, to consider and report on what token of respect and
  affection it may be proper for the Congress of the United States to
  express the deep sensibility of the nation to the tragic death of the
  late President, William McKinley, and that so much of the message of
  the President as relates to that deplorable event be referred to such
  committee.


The committee on the part of the Senate comprised the following named
gentlemen: Mr. Foraker, Mr. Allison, Mr. Fairbanks, Mr. Kean, Mr. Aldrich,
Mr. Nelson, Mr. Perkins, Mr. Jones of Arkansas, Mr. Morgan, Mr. Cockrell
and Mr. McEnery.

The House of Representatives on December 3, passed the following
resolution:

  _Resolved_, That a committee of one member from each State
  represented in this House be appointed on the part of the House to
  join such committee as may be appointed on the part of the Senate, to
  consider and report by what token of respect and affection it may be
  proper for the Congress of the United States to express the deep
  sensibility of the nation to the tragic death of the late President,
  William McKinley, and that so much of the message of the President as
  relates to that deplorable event be referred to that committee.


The committee on the part of the House of Representatives comprised the
following named gentlemen:

  Ohio, Charles H. Grosvenor; California, Julius Kahn; Connecticut,
  E. Stevens Henry; Delaware, L. Heister Ball; Illinois, Vespasian
  Warner; Indiana, James E. Watson; Iowa, Robert G. Cousins; Idaho,
  Thomas L. Glenn; Kansas, Justin D. Bowersock; Maine, Amos L. Allen;
  Maryland, George A. Pearre; Massachusetts, William C. Lovering;
  Michigan, William Alden Smith; Minnesota, Page Morris; Montana, Caldwell
  Edwards; Nebraska, Elmer J. Burkett; New Hampshire, Frank D. Currier;
  New Jersey, Richard Wayne Parker; New York, John H. Ketcham, North
  Dakota, Thomas F. Marshall; North Carolina, Spencer Blackburn; Oregon,
  Malcolm A. Moody; Pennsylvania, Marlin E. Olmsted; Rhode Island,
  Melville Bull; South Dakota, Eben W. Martin; Utah, George Sutherland;
  Vermont, Kittredge Haskins; Washington, Wesley L. Jones; West Virginia,
  Alston G. Dayton; Wisconsin, Herman B. Dahle; Wyoming, Frank W. Mondell;
  Alabama, Oscar W. Underwood; Arkansas, Hugh A. Dinsmore; Florida,
  Robert W. Davis; Georgia, William H. Fleming; Kentucky, James N. Kehoe;
  Louisiana, Adolph Meyer; Mississippi, Charles E. Hooker; Missouri, Champ
  Clark; South Carolina, W. Jasper Talbert; Tennessee, John A. Moon;
  Texas, John L. Sheppard; Virginia, James Hay; Colorado, John F.
  Shafroth; Nevada, Francis G. Newlands.


The following concurrent resolutions were adopted by both Houses of
Congress on January 15th, 1902:

Whereas the melancholy event of the violent and tragic death of William
McKinley, late President of the United States, having occurred during
the recess of Congress, and the two Houses sharing in the general grief
and desiring to manifest their sensibility upon the occasion of the
public bereavement: Therefore,

_Be it resolved by the House of Representatives_ (_the Senate
concurring_), That the two Houses of Congress will assemble in the
Hall of the House of Representatives on a day and hour fixed and
announced by the joint committee, to wit, Thursday, February 27, 1902,
and that, in the presence of the two Houses there assembled, an address
on the life and character of William McKinley, late President of the
United States, be pronounced by Hon. John Hay, and that the President of
the Senate pro tempore and the Speaker of the House of Representatives
be requested to invite the President and ex-President of the United
States, ex-Vice-Presidents, the heads of the several Departments,
the judges of the Supreme Court, the representatives of the foreign
governments, the governors of the several States, the Lieutenant-General
of the Army and the Admiral of the Navy, and such officers of the Army
and Navy as have received the thanks of Congress who may then be at the
seat of Government to be present on the occasion, and such others as may
be suggested by the executive committee.

_And be it further resolved_, That the President of the United
States be requested to transmit a copy of these resolutions to Mrs.
Ida S. McKinley, and to assure her of the profound sympathy of the
two Houses of Congress for her deep personal affliction, and of their
sincere condolence for the late national bereavement.





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