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Title: A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller - Written by Himself, Fourth Part
Author: Müller, George, 1805-1898
Language: English
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PREFACE

TO THE

FIRST EDITION OF THE FOURTH PART

Twelve years have elapsed since the period at which the third part of
the Narrative of the Lord's dealings with me closes. It has not been
for want of matter, that this fourth part has not appeared sooner; but
the increased and ever increasing variety of other occupations has kept
me hitherto from arranging the materials for the press. Of late,
however, I have judged, for the following reasons, that I ought
particularly to give myself to this service.

1, It has pleased the Lord so abundantly to bless the former parts of my
Narrative to the comfort, encouragement, strengthening, and instruction
of those who are young and weak in the faith, and to those unacquainted
with the simplicity of the truth, that I consider myself to be the
servant of such; and I feel that responsibility is laid upon me, to do
what further I can, in this way, to serve them. And this, I confess, I
do joyfully; for my spirit has oft times been not a little refreshed
during the eighteen years which have elapsed, since I published the
first part of my Narrative, by the many hundreds of letters I have
received, giving an account of the blessing, which the writers of them
have derived from the perusal of it; and I have thus been again and
again encouraged to go on with the work.

2, I think it important, that the reader of the first three parts of my
Narrative should have a right impression of the work in which I am
engaged. He may not be acquainted with the Reports of the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, which have been published
since 1844, and therefore he may know no more of the work in which I am
especially engaged, than the first three parts of my Narrative give him.
In that case he would not know how the work has been growing since that
period; he would not be aware, that it is now three or four times as
large as it was in 1844, and is still more and more increasing. He would
not know in that case, that the principles of Holy Scripture on which
the work of God in my hands was carried on, when comparatively small,
and which then were found to be sufficient, even in these last days, are
the same on which it is carried on now, though the work is now so large.
This point has especially weighed with me, in desiring the publication
of the continuation of the account of the Lord's dealings with me in
the form of the first three parts, in order that the Living God may be
glorified through this account. I judged, moreover, that, whilst the
first three parts may especially furnish, to the believer in the Lord
Jesus for his private life subjects for comforting and encouraging
reflections; this part, besides doing the same still further, may
especially be of help to the servant of Christ labouring for God on a
large scale, or to the man of God who seeks to carry on business on a
large scale, on Scriptural principles.

3, Though the Reports of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home
and Abroad have been issued generally every year or every two years;
yet, as they are not bound together, they may be lost in part, and thus
the chain be interrupted. Moreover, they contain, sometimes, matters
which may be of moment for the time being, but not so important
afterwards. The Narrative leaves out such points, and introduces on the
other hand things which were scarcely suitable for the Reports. My
desire, therefore, has been to give in this fourth part the substance of
the Reports, which have been published since July 1844, and to bring
thus together in one volume what is contained in these nine different
Reports.

4, The Reports give scarcely anything of the dealings of God with me
personally, irrespective of the work in which I am engaged; but I have
not only to speak well of the name of the Lord with regard to His
service, but also with reference to His dealings with me personally and
with my family; and I desire to serve the saints in relating to them
instance upon instance of His kindness to me, hoping that thus many
others may be encouraged more and more fully, unreservedly and
habitually to trust in God; yea, to do so in the darkest seasons.

The plan on which I have thought it best to bring the materials before
the reader is, to relate in distinct periodical chapters: a, How I have
been provided, simply in answer to prayer, with means for the support of
the various schools of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, for the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts and for the aiding
of Missionary work. b, How I have obtained means for the support of the
hundreds of Orphans under my care. c, How the Lord has led me to, and
provided me with means for, the building of a large Orphan-House, and
how I am now occupied in seeking to build a second still larger. d, To
state, periodically, a variety of miscellaneous points in connexion with
the operations of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, in a separate
chapter. e, To give separately and periodically a chapter, for relating
matters connected with my own personal affairs or the work of the Lord
in my hands, not immediately connected with the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution for Home and Abroad. As, however, the whole book is intended
for the spiritual profit of the believing reader, and to show to those
who know not God, by His blessing, the reality of the things of God,
there will be found interspersed, throughout the book, such practical
remarks, as the subjects may seem to call for.

GEORGE MÜLLER.

21, Paul Street, Kingsdown,

Bristol, June 18, 1856.



A

NARRATIVE,

&c. &c.



FOURTH PART.

Supplies for the School—Bible—Missionary and Tract-Fund, sent in
answer to prayer, from July 14, 1844, to May 26, 1846.

Aug. 10, 1844. In the greatest need, when not one penny was in hand, I
received 5l. from a brother at Hackney. I took half of this sum for
these objects, and half for the Orphans.

Sept. 7. Our poverty has been great ever since the accounts were closed
on July 14th. Our Tract and Bible stock is very small, and we have much
reduced it on account of sending supplies to Demerara. The rents for the
School-Rooms are becoming due, and other expenses are to be met. Under
these circumstances I received today with Philip iv. 6, the sum of 50l.
The donor writes that he thinks he is directed by the Lord to send the
money. How truly is it so! I took of this sum 20l. for the Orphans, and
30l. for these objects.

Oct. 1. This evening I received a bank order for 70l., to be used as the
Lord might direct me. This money came in most seasonably, as I am thus
able to pay to the six teachers who labour in the six Day-schools, their
salaries. I took 30l. of the 70l. for these objects, and 40l. for the
Orphans.

Dec. 14. The means for these objects have been very small for some time
past. Under these circumstances I received this afternoon from a sister
in the Lord, who is near the close of her earthly pilgrimage, a small
box, containing five brooches, two rings set with twelve small
brilliants, five other rings, one mourning ring, a pair of gilt
bracelets, a gold pin, a small silver vinaigrette, some tracts, and a
sovereign. The donor stated on a paper, contained in the box, that the
produce might be used for the Orphans or otherwise, as I might require.
As these funds are in particular need, I took the contents of this
little box for them, and the trinkets were soon disposed of.--The
sister fell asleep very shortly after. Will she need such ornaments
before her Lord? Will she regret having given them for His work? Oh!
no.

Dec. 21. Today I have received the following trinkets, the produce of
which I was at liberty to use for the Orphans, or my own personal
necessities, or the printing of my Narrative, or for the School—,
Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund. I have put the produce to the funds
for these objects. A ring set with twelve small brilliants, a ring set
with one brilliant, another ring set with one brilliant, a ring set with
five brilliants, a paste ring, a large brooch, two large rings, two
wedding rings, two other small rings, a ring set with small pearls,
three other rings, two gold pins, four gold shirt studs, and a gilt
pin.

Dec. 24. I have received still further the following trinkets, the
produce of which was likewise taken for these objects, it being left to
me to use them as most needed. A small gold chain, a ring set with seven
brilliants, five gold seals, an eyeglass silver mounted, a ring set with
a head, a gold pin, a gold buckle, a silver pencil case, a gold brooch,
a brooch set with small pearls, a set of gold shirt studs, a small gold
brooch, nine gold rings, a gold heart, a gilt chain, and a gilt
watch-chain.

Jan. 13, 1845. When there was nothing in hand towards our many
necessities for these objects, I received today the following valuable
donation:--Three forty-franc pieces, two twenty-franc pieces, six
five-franc pieces, seven two-franc pieces, eleven one-franc pieces,
fourteen half-franc pieces, twenty-one quarter of a franc pieces, and
fifty-two other small Italian and French silver coins.

Feb. 3. Today, when I had again nothing at all in hand, I received from
W. P. 5l.

Apr. 8. When, once more, I had nothing in hand, I received today from
Yorkshire 10l., which, being left at my disposal, I used for these
objects.

Apr. 24. Today were sent to me a small old gold watch, a half sovereign,
a half guinea piece, two twenty-franc pieces, six small Turkish gold
coins, a quarter of a franc, a threepenny piece, a silver toothpick, and
a brass pencil-case. The produce of these articles likewise was put to
these funds.

May 5. From Scarborough was sent to day 5l. for these funds, at a time
when I had again nothing left.

May 6. About six weeks ago intimation was kindly given by a brother that
he expected a certain considerable sum of money, and that, if he
obtained it, a certain portion of it should be given to the Lord, so
that 100l. of it should be used for the work in my hands, and the other
part for Brother Craik's and my own personal expenses. However, day
after day passed away, and the money did not come. I did not trust in
this money, yet, as during all this time, with scarcely any exception,
we were more or less needy, I thought again and again about this
brother's promise; though I did not, by the grace of God, trust in the
brother who had made it, but in the Lord. Thus week after week passed
away, and the money did not come. Now this morning it came to my mind,
that such promises ought to be valued, in a certain sense, as nothing,
i.e. that the mind ought never for a moment to be directed to them, but
to the living God, and to the living God only. I saw that such promises
ought not to be of the value of one farthing, so far as it regards
thinking about them for help. I therefore asked the Lord, when, as
usual, I was praying with my beloved wife about the work in my hands,
that He would be pleased to take this whole matter, about that promise,
completely out of my mind, and to help me, not to value it in the least,
yea, to treat it as if not worth one farthing, but to keep my eye
directed only to Himself. I was enabled to do so. We had not yet
finished praying when I received the following letter:

"Beloved Brother, May 5, 1845.

"Are your bankers still Messrs. Stuckey and Co. of Bristol, and are their
hankers still Messrs. Robarts and Co. of London? Please to instruct me
on this; and if the case should be so, please to regard this as a letter
of advice that 70l. are paid to Messrs. Robarts and Co., for Messrs.
Stuckey and Co., for you. This sum apply as the Lord may give you
wisdom. I shall not send to Robarts and Co. until I hear from you.

"Ever affectionately yours,

"* * * *"

Thus the Lord rewarded at once this determination to endeavour not to
look in the least to that promise from a brother, but only to Himself.
But this was not all. About two o'clock this afternoon I received from
the brother, who had, more than forty days ago, made that promise, 166l.
18s., as he this day received the money, on the strength of which he had
made that promise. Of this sum 100l. are to be used for the work in my
hands, and the remainder for brother Craik's and my own personal
expenses.--I took of these two sums, i.e. of the 70l. and the 100l.,
half for the Orphans and half for these objects. When this money came
in, there was only very little in hand. The last tracts had been given
away, two or three days ago, but I had no money to order more: thus I
was able to send off an order for 11,700. Bibles also needed to be
ordered, but I had no money: I am now able to order some. It had been
much on my heart to send a little help to some Missionary brethren, as a
token of affectionate interest, and this I am now able to do. The Lord
be praised for His goodness in helping thus so seasonably!

From May 6, 1845, to May 26, 1846, we experienced no difficulty at all
as to means, the Lord having always seasonably sent in the supplies, so
that, without any one exception, I was always able not only to meet all
the demands connected with the Day-Schools, the Sunday-School, and the
Adult-Schools, but I was also able to do more, so far as it regards
means, in aiding the circulation of Tracts, and helping Missionary
efforts, than at any previous period of the same length. Of the
donations which came in from May 6, 1845, to May 26, 1846, I only
mention the following:--On June 23, with Philip. iv. 6, for
circulation of Tracts and Bibles in foreign lands, or, as needed, 60l.
Oct. 12, 150l. On Feb. 26, 1846, I received 200l., of which 100l. was to
be used for Missionary work in foreign lands, and 100l. for brethren who
labour in England, in the word and doctrine, without any stated salary.
In connexion with this donation three points are particularly to be
noticed:--I. The day before I received this sum, I had given 5l. to a
brother, who was travelling through Bristol, and who was on the point of
going out as a missionary, without being connected with any society.
When I gave him this 5l. I had but very little in hand, but I said
to myself, the Lord can easily give more. And thus it was.
2. Before I received this donation, I had been especially
led to ask the Lord, that He would be pleased to condescend to use me
more largely in helping missionary brethren. For this I had a still
greater desire when I found that the money, which I had sent to British
Guiana, at the end of November, 1845, amounted only to a few pounds for
each brother who labours there, on account of there being so many. I
had, on this account particularly, a desire to be able shortly to send
another sum to British Guiana, which was thus granted to me. 3. I had
also, from time to time, sought, to help brethren, who labour in
dependence on the Lord for temporal supplies in various parts of
England, and my desire especially had been, that, even in this
particular, the Funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home
and Abroad might be more extensively useful. And thus, in this
particular also, this donation cheered my heart, enabling me to assist,
in some measure, several faithful labourers. Concerning this latter
point I would especially notice, that whenever God has put it into my
heart "to devise liberal things," He has not only blessed me in my own
soul in doing so, but has also, more or less given me the means to carry
out such a purpose. I mention further here, in connexion with this
point, that henceforth, as God shall be pleased to supply me with means,
I purpose particularly, in connexion with this work, to endeavour to
assist brethren of good report, who labour in the word and doctrine, in
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, but who have no regular
salary. If, therefore, any donations should be given henceforth for that
particular object, they shall be, by God's help, applied to that; or,
if no donations should be given for that particular object, yet, as God
shall be pleased to intrust me with means, I purpose by His help, to
have my eye particularly on brethren who preach the Gospel without
charge, and who, perhaps, besides, for conscience' sake, have
relinquished former stipends or regular emoluments which they had in
connexion with doing so. Have we not particularly to strive to be
fellow-labourers with those who, seeking not their own things, but the
things of Jesus Christ, preach the Word without being chargeable to any
one? Many whom I know and love in the truth, are mindful of this; but
others may not, perhaps, have sufficiently weighed the matter.

On March 10, 1846, I asked the Lord for still further supplies for
missionary purposes, and while I was in prayer a letter came from C. W.
with 20l. for missionary purposes. Thus also, about the same time, came
in, from the neighbourhood of Ludlow, 2l., and from Keswick 5l. for
Missions, besides other smaller donations for the same purpose.

It must not be supposed that these are all the donations which I
received for the carrying on these objects from July 14, 1844, to May
26, 1846; but those which are referred to came in under remarkable
circumstances, or, more manifestly, as answers to prayer.

I now proceed to give an account of the Lord's goodness in supplying
me with means for the Orphans, from July 14, 1844, up to May 26, 1846;
though here again only the most remarkable instances, on account of the
great number of cases, can be given.

Supplies for the Orphan Fund, sent in answer to Prayer,
from July 14, 1844, to May 26, 1846.

July 25, 1844. The need of today for the Orphans is 2l. 5s. As there
came in yesterday 2l. as the profit of the sale of ladies' bags, which
are made by a sister in the Lord for the benefit of the Orphans; also
two donations of 5s. each, through her; 5s. from a poor sister in the
Lord; and 1l. from Hackney, in all 3l. 15s.; we have 1l. 10s. left.--
In the course of today the Lord was pleased to send in the following
donations:--by the boxes in my house 1l. 10s., in nine small donations
16s. 11d., and the contents of an orphan-box, 3s. 0½ d. This evening
also two Christian servants gave me the following trinkets:--a ring,
a gold pin, two brooches, and a silver toothpick. A precious gift,
because of its seasonableness, and because it gave me joy in seeing
these ornaments given up for the Lord's sake.

Observe, dear reader, only eleven day's after the accounts were
closed, we were again in fresh poverty, and had to go on day by day
waiting upon the Lord for the necessities of about 140 persons.

July 26. Only 6d. has come in today.

July 27, Saturday. July 1l. 14s. was in hand to begin the day with. With
two of my fellow—labourers I besought the Lord between nine and ten
o'clock this morning for help, when, at eleven o'clock came in, by
sale of articles, given for the purpose, 7s. 3d., by sale of Reports 1s.
by sale of ladies' bags 1s. 6d., and by two donations 4s. 6d. There
were sent also anonymously, two coats, a pair of trousers, and three
waistcoats (worn). When this parcel and money came, I was called on for
money from the Orphan-Houses. In the course of the day came in still
further, by sale of articles, 10s. Thus we have been helped through this
day. Late in the evening was given 2s. 6d. besides.

July 28. This morning, when there was now again only 2s. 6d. in hand, I
received from Tavistock 6l.; and this evening from Nailsworth, 2s. 6d.

July 29. Yesterday was anonymously put into the Chapel boxes 2l.; also
by A. A. 1l. Thus we are provided for today and tomorrow. There came in
still further today 1l., from an orphan-box at Barnstaple 1l., and by
the profit of work, done by a sister, 5s. There was likewise given a
little box, containing the following articles: a lady's bag, a pair of
gloves, a silver fruit knife, a gold seal, a needle book with two
farthings, a purse containing two-halfpence, 4½ francs, and a copper
coin; a little tortoiseshell box containing two old sixpences, two
fourpenny pieces, a shilling, a sixpence, and a pebble; a silver
vinaigrette, a seal, two patterns for worsted work, a microscope, and 6
embossed cards. This evening I received two silver pencil cases.

July 30. By the boxes in the Orphan-Houses came in today 2l. 4s. 6d.,
and by sale of Reports 5s.

July 3l. Immediately after having risen from my knees today, to ask the
Lord for further supplies, I received 19s. by sale of stockings, knitted
by the Orphan Boys. This evening was given to mc by A. A. 5l., and
through ditto 2s.

August 1. This morning I was called on for 5l. for the Infant Orphans,
so that again only a few shillings remained, not enough for, the other
expenses of today, when I received, in the bag sent for the money from
the Orphan Houses, the following donations, 1l., and 1s. 6d., 1s. 1d.,
1s. 1d., and 2s. 2d. Likewise came in 1s., and I found 2s. 6d. in an
orphan-box in my house. Thus I had enough for today.

Aug. 2. The day began with 2 ¾ d. in hand. A little before ten
o'clock in the morning the letter-bag was brought from the
Orphan-Houses for money, in which I found a note stating that the need
of today was 1l. 17s., but I had only 2 ¾ d. to send. I wrote so to
brother R. B. master of the Orphan Boys, intending to request him (to
send up again in the afternoon, for what the Lord might have sent in the
mean time. When I was going to put the 2 ¾ d into the purse in the bag,
I found half-a-crown in the bag, slipped into it before it was opened.
This half-crown is a precious earnest that the Lord will help this day
also. It was found by me just after I had risen from my knees, having
been with some of the labourers in the work in prayer for means. Before
I bad yet finished the note to brother B. B., a sovereign was given to
me, so that I had 1l. 2s. 8 ¾ d. to send off. About two o'clock this
afternoon I received by sale of articles 10s. 6d., by sale of stockings
6s. 8d., and by the sale of ladies' bags 9s. 4d. Thus I could send off
the 14s. 6d. which was still needed for today, and had 12s. left.

Aug. 3, Saturday. With the 12s. we began the day. My soul said: "I will
now look out for the way in which the Lord will deliver us this day
again; for He will surely deliver. Many Saturdays, when we were in need,
He helped us, and so He will do this day also."--Between nine and ten
o'clock this morning I gave myself to prayer for means, with three of
my fellow-labourers, in my house. Whilst we were in prayer, there was a
knock at my room door, and I was informed that a gentleman had come to
see me. When we had finished prayer, it was found to be a brother from
Tetbury, who hail brought from Barnstaple 1l. 2s. 6d. for the Orphans.
Thus we have 1l. 14s. 6d., with which I must return the letter-bag to
the Orphan-Houses, looking to the Lord for more. Evening. In the
afternoon one of the labourers received 6s. for himself, which he gave
for the Orphans. This evening I went to the usual prayer meeting, (which
is held on Saturday evening at the Orphan-Houses, to ask the Lord's
blessing upon the work generally), when I found that 2s. had been put
into the boxes in the Orphan Houses in the course of the afternoon; also
7s. had come in by the knitting of the Orphan-Girls, and 3s. 6d. more
one of the labourers was able to give. Thus we hail 2l. 13s., which was
enough for today. How very kind of the Lord thus to listen to the
prayers of His children, and to help us day by day!--We had not yet
separated, after our prayer meeting, when a box was brought from
Scarborough, containing 5s. and a number of articles. When I came home I
found that there had come in still further, by sale of articles given
for the purpose, 15s. 10d., and by sale of stockings knitted by the
Orphans, 7s. 8d. Thus the Lord has greatly helped us today.

Aug. 5, Monday. There came in from A. A. 1s., and anonymously was
yesterday put into the Chapel-boxes 2s. 6d., ditto 2s. 6d.

Aug. 6. Without one single penny in my hands the day began. The post
brought nothing, nor had I yet received anything, when ten minutes after
ten this morning the letter bag was brought from the Orphan-Houses, for
the supplies of today.--Now see the Lord's deliverance! In the bag
I found a note from one of the labourers in the Orphan—Houses,
enclosing two sovereigns, which she sent for the Orphans, stating that
it was part of a present which she had just received unexpectedly, for
herself. —Thus we are supplied for today. In the afternoon, when I had
now again nothing at all in hand, as I had paid out this 2l., there was
brought to me from Oxford 1l. 2s. A sister also gave 2s. 6d.

Aug. 7. There came in, when there was not one penny in my hands, 4s. and
3s. 6d. I only found 3s. in the boxes in my house, 10s. was given as the
profit of the sale of ladies' bags, and 2s. 6d. as the produce of "A
forfeit-box at a young ladies' school." Likewise were given to me, two
gold rings, two gold watch-keys, a pair of earrings, a gold brooch, two
waist-buckles, a pair of bracelets, a watch hook, and a broken brooch.
Thus we have a little towards the need of tomorrow.

Aug. 8. The money which came in yesterday was not enough for the need of
today. The boxes in the Orphan-Houses were therefore opened, as I had
understood that some money had been put into them during the last days,
and they contained 1l. 4s. Thus we have been supplied this day also.

Aug. 9. It is just now striking eleven o'clock, and I have not yet one
single penny towards the need of this day. The bag is brought from the
Orphan-Houses for money, but I have nothing to send, and am therefore
obliged to return the bag without anything. But my soul is waiting for
help. The Lord has so repeatedly helped as again during the last weeks,
and so He will surely do this day also. Evening. At half-past twelve
this morning I received two notes from two sisters who labour in the
Orphan-Houses, the one from the sister who, on the 6th, had sent the
2l., being part of a present which she had received, and who now sent
1l. more. She writes: "The enclosed I thought of applying to another
purpose; but His thoughts are not as ours. Please to use it as you think
fit." The other sister, likewise one of the labourers, sent 10s. This
1l. 10s. met our need for today.

Aug. 10, Saturday. Only 3d., which had come in yesterday afternoon, by
sale of a Report, was in my hands, when the day began. A little after
nine o'clock I received a post-office order for 5l. from Hackney, to
be used as most needed. Of it I took one half for the Orphans, and the
other half for the Day Schools. There came in still further, 2l. 5s.,
5s. 10d., 6d., and 3s. 4d.

Aug. 12. Yesterday I received from a sister 5s., with James i. 17., 2s.
6d., 6d. was put into the boxes at my house, and 6d. was given by an
aged friend. Thus, with what was left on Saturday, we had 1l. 15s. 5d.,
which met our need today.

Aug. 13. Nothing has come in, but one of the labourers, to whom 15s. was
given last evening to buy herself a new gown, gave that. I am looking
for more! The boxes in the Orphan-Houses were opened, in which 5s. was
found. Thus we had enough, except 6s., which one of the labourers gave.

Aug. 14. Nothing at all had come in, when the bag was brought from the
Orphan-Houses for money, and I had therefore to return it without any.
About half an hour after, the labourers had an especial prayer meeting.
At this meeting one of the teachers of the Day-Schools gave me 10s.,
which he had put by to buy himself some little books, but he considered
it now not to be the Lord's will to do so, but that he should give
this money for the present need in the Orphan-Houses. Another of the
labourers in the Orphan-Houses gave 5s. Thus we are provided with the
absolute necessaries till tomorrow after breakfast.

Aug. 15. Last evening I received 2s., just after our last public meeting
about the Orphan-Houses and other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution, at which I had testified afresh of my reliance upon the
living God, though I had not then one single penny in hand for the work,
which, of course, was not stated.--Now this morning, between eight
and nine o'clock sister L. M. came to me and brought me 30s., which
she had received for the Orphans. But this will not be enough for today.
Yesterday and this morning, before this money came in, the trial of
faith had been very sharp.--Evening. At eleven o'clock I received
still further from A. A. 5s., and this afternoon, from one of the
labourers, 5s., and from two donors 6d. each.

Aug. 16. Our poverty is extremely great. The trial of faith as sharp as
ever, or sharper. It is ten o'clock, and there are no means yet for a
dinner. I now thought of some articles which I might be able to do
without, to dispose of them for the benefit of the Orphans, when one of
the labourers gave me 1l., which she had intended for another object,
and which she now considers must be left alone for the present. There
was also taken out of the boxes in the Orphan-Houses 1s. 6d., and by
knitting came in 2s. 3d., and from A. A. 2s.

Aug. 17, Saturday. The Lord has, in tender mercy, helped us, in sending
in 3l. for knitting done by the Orphan Girls, 9s. 10d. for stockings
knitted by the boys, 11s. 11d. for things sold, which were given for the
purpose, and 10s. 7d. put into the boxes at the Orphan-Houses.

Aug. 18. There was put anonymously into the Chapel-boxes 1s., ditto 2s.,
ditto 2s. 6d., and A. A. gave 10s.

Aug. 19, Monday. Only 3s. has come in today.

Aug. 20. This 3s. was all there was in hand for this day, which was
needed at the Boys' Orphan-House towards the dinner. In the other
houses nothing was needed, but at the same time Nothing was left towards
the next meal. Two o'clock came, and we had nothing yet. After two
o'clock I opened the boxes in my house, in which I found a paper
containing a sovereign and a half, and 2 half-crowns loose. Of this I
took 30s. at once to the Orphan-Houses, whereby we were helped for this
day. Our need had not been greater for a long time. Dear reader, join me
in admiring and adoring Him, who caused that money to be put into the
box, and, I have reason to believe, only a very short time before, and
who led my mind to open it, to obtain thus the help which was needed.
— In the afternoon came in still further 3l. 6s. by the sale of some
old silver and a few trinkets.

Aug. 2l. There came in, by sale of Reports, 5s., and from Tewkesbury 1l.
This sovereign came in the greatest need. I took it at once to the
Orphan-Houses, and by it we were supplied for the day. When I returned
home I found that a little old gold watch had been given in the mean
time. There came in also 3s.; and two half-sovereigns were given this
evening by two little girls, through a sister in the Lord from Bath.

Aug. 22. The two half-sovereigns, which were given last evening, were
all we had at the beginning of today. There was found in the boxes in
the Orphan-Houses 5s. 9d., and in a post-office order I received 1l. So
we had enough for one more day.--And it is by the day I live. Were I
to think of how it will be a year or even a month hence, I should be
tried indeed—yea, greatly tried. "Sufficient unto the day is the evil
thereof," is my Lord's own precious warrant for this. He will not have
me to be anxious about tomorrow, and therefore I cast my cares about
tomorrow upon Him. As the weeks pass on, and I go on Saturday evenings
to the prayer meetings at the Orphan-Houses, I praise the Lord for
having sustained me one more week in this service, by enabling me to
look to Him. Yea, as each day closes, I desire to be grateful to the
Lord for having sustained my faith and patience, and enabled me to rely
upon Him, especially in seasons of such great poverty, lasting for
weeks, as we have been in of late. But this I must say to the praise of
the Lord, that my soul is kept in peace at such times, and, through the
riches of His grace, I am kept from questioning whether He will help me
or not. And, indeed, it would be sinful ingratitude, after all the Lord
has been doing for me in this work, not to rely upon Him. May He in
mercy uphold me to the end in this service, and keep me from
dishonouring His holy name, either by unbelief, or in any other way.

Aug. 23. This morning the Lord greatly refreshed my spirit; for after a
long-continued trial of faith, and after long and deep poverty, there
was sent me from Devonshire a check for 20l. There came in 6s. besides.

Aug. 24. 1l. 19s. 7 ¼ d. came in today.

Aug. 25. From A. A. I received today 20l. How exceedingly kind of the
Lord, in an hour of such great need, on account of all the many and
great wants in which I find myself just now, to have sent this sum!
There came in 2l. 0s. 6d. besides.

Aug. 26. Received for Reports 1l. 7s., and 3d. besides.

Aug. 28. Altogether 1l. 11s. 2d. came in today.

Aug. 29. Received 2s. 11d. by sale of Reports, and

7s. 6d. from Bath. The brother in Bath, who sent me this money, wrote me
that the 7s. 6d. was sent to him with the following letter.

27th August, 1844.

"Sir,

"Part of the enclosed 7s. 6d. did belong to your dear Father, J. L.,
Esq., value of which I stole from him in my unconverted state.--I,
now a believer in Jesus, constrained by love to Him, return it to you
with interest, praying that the Lord may richly bless you and yours.

"* * * *."

J. L., Esq. has been dead more than fifteen years, therefore it must be
longer than that period since the theft alluded to was committed.--
This 7s. 6d. came in in especially great need; for though 50l. had been
given during the last seven days, yet on account of our long-continued
poverty, and the heavy expenses which were to be met, this 7s. 6d. was
received when there was nothing at all in hand, and was sent off at once
to the Orphan-Houses.--This evening, when we were still in great
need, and when means were required for tomorrow morning, 10s. was given
to me. This money was sent off this evening to the Orphan-Houses, for
the need of tomorrow morning. About nine o'clock a sister came to my
house, who had been to Shirehampton, and had there received 1l. 10s. 6d.
for the Orphans. She gave also the remaining 6d. of the change of two
sovereigns. The Lord inclined the heart of this sister to bring the
money at once, and we are thus supplied for tomorrow. At half-past nine
this evening I received another precious donation of 10s., with the
following letter:--

"Aug. 29, 1844.

"The history of this money is this. I did some work in the country some
time ago, and thought I should never get the money for it, as I had
repeatedly written about it, and could not get it. But some time ago I
was asking the Lord to incline the heart of the person who owed me the
money, to send it to me, and I told Him, that, if He would do so, I
would give 10s. for the Orphans. Three days ago I had such confidence,
that I should have the money, that I was enabled to praise
the Lord for it; and today I was going up Park Street, and met
the person coming with the money. It had been put into the party's
heart the day before yesterday to pay me the money. Now, dear brother,
I fulfil my promise to the Lord by giving you the money. Help me, dear
brother, to praise Him for it, and that I may be enabled to trust
Him more than ever I have done yet.

"Yours in Jesus,

"* * *"

This brother is a poor tradesman, himself working with his hands.

Aug. 30. Today 6s. 8d. came in by sale of Reports. This evening I met a
sister from Bath, who is staying in Bristol for two or three days. She
gave me her purse, and all that was in it, for the Orphans, being 5s.,
saying, she wanted nothing till she returned to Bath. This goes towards
tomorrow's need, which will be at least 4l., and for which we have as
yet only 1l. 6s. in hand.

Aug. 81, Saturday. There came in a few shillings besides, last evening
and this morning, so that I had 1l. 13s. 8d. to send to the
Orphan-Houses; but I find 4l. 5s. is needed.--Evening.
There came in still further, in the morning, 5s. 6d., by sale
of stockings, 1l. 8s. by sale of Reports, 15s. 1d. by sale of
articles given for the purpose,5s. 5d. by sale of ladies' bags.
And in the evening was received 2l. 10s. 2d. besides, so that I
had 2l. 12s. 10d. more than was actually needed.

Sept. 3, Tuesday. Since Saturday evening there has come in, in donations
18s. 10d., by sale of Reports 2l. 3s. 1d., and by work done by the
Orphan-girls 1l. 3s. 8d. Thus, with what was left on Saturday, we have
been supplied these two days.

Sept. 4. Only one farthing was in my hands this morning. Pause a moment,
dear reader! Only one farthing in hand when the day commenced. Think of
this, and think of nearly 140 persons to be provided for. You, poor
brethren, who have six or eight children and small wages, think of this;
and you, my brethren, who do not belong to the working classes, but
have, as it is called, very limited means, think of this! May you not
do, what we do, under your trials? Does the Lord love you less than He
loves us? Does He not love all His children with no less love than that,
with which He loves His only begotten Son, according to John xvii.
20—23? Or are we better than you? Nay, are we not in ourselves poor
miserable sinners as you are; and have any of the children of God any
claim upon God, on account of their own worthiness? Is not that, which
alone can make us worthy to receive anything from our Heavenly Father,
the righteousness of the Lord Jesus, which is imputed to those who
believe in Him? Therefore, dear reader, as we pray in our every need, of
whatever character it may be, in connexion with this work, to our Father
in Heaven for help, and as he does help us, so is He willing to help all
His children who put their trust in Him. Especially do not think, that
because you may not be called by God to establish Orphan-Houses and
Schools for poor children, therefore you are not warranted to rely upon
God, in all your need; for the blessedness of depending upon the living
God may be enjoyed by all the children of God, though they are not all
called by Him to such a work as this Narrative describes. Nor must you
suppose, that our only trials in this work arise from want of means, so
that, in carrying it on, we have to rely upon God for nothing besides
this. I assure you that the want of means is the smallest trial, and
that I have had far, far greater exercises of faith on account of other
things in connexion with this work than those arising from the want of
means. But the trials connected with the want of means I dwell upon so
particularly, because that is a matter which can be understood by all,
and in which the senses themselves almost force us, so to speak, to
acknowledge the hand of God.--Well, let us hear then, how God helped
when there was only one farthing left in my hands, on the morning of
Sept. 4, 1844.

A little after nine o'clock I received a sovereign from a sister in
the Lord, who does not wish the name of the place, where she resides,
mentioned. Between ten and eleven o'clock the bag was sent from the
Orphan-Houses, in which in a note it was stated that 1l. 2s. was
required for today. Scarcely had I read this, when a fly stopped before
my house, and a gentleman, Mr. —— from the neighbourhood of Manchester,
was announced. I found that he was
a believer, who had come on business to Bristol. He had heard about the
Orphan-Houses, and expressed his surprise, that without any regular
system of collection, and without personal application to any one,
simply by faith and prayer, I obtained 2000l. and more yearly for the
work of the Lord in my hands. This brother, whom I had never seen
before, and whose name I did not even know before he came, gave me 2l.,
as an exemplification of what I had stated to him.--There came in
still further this morning 10s., being profits froth the sale of
ladies' bags. From the same donor who had sent the sovereign this
morning, I received, two hours later, a box containing the following
articles:--Three mourning rings, three other gold rings set with
cameos, two gold watch keys, four gold lockets, a gold brooch, a silver
snuffbox, six medals, three gold ear-drops, a pair of mourning earrings,
a purse, two pairs of babies' shoes, a pair of card-racks, two
necklaces, five ornamental hair pins, a wafer-stamp, a paper-knife, two
book marks, and a great variety of polished pebbles.—Oh! how good is
the Lord, and how seasonably comes His help, in our great, great need,
when so much is required for clothes, &c. There came in likewise through
a sister in Bath 1l., and 5s. 6d. more. Thus, besides all the articles,
which have been mentioned, altogether 41l. 5s. 6d. has come in this day,
at the commencement of which I had only One farthing left.

Sept. 6. Besides the money, spoken of on the 4th, only 6s. 10d. more had
come in, so that, after this day's necessities had been met, there was
now again nothing at all in hand. Soon after I received 3s. 6d. this
also was presently spent, except 9d., when a brother from Essex came,
who gave me 2l.

Sept. 7, Saturday. Having had to pay out 10s. more, immediately after
the receipt of the 2l., this day began with 1l. 10s. 9d. in hand, whilst
the need was 3l. 15s. This 1l. 10s. 9d. I sent off to the Orphan-Houses,
trusting in the Lord for more. And this time also my hope in God was not
put to shame; for in the course of the morning came in 10s. 6d. by sale
of Reports, by a donation 10s., by sale of articles 2l. 8s. 8 ½ d., by
sale of stockings 1s. 8d., and by sale of ladies' bags 4s. It was very
kind of the Lord to send in this money in the course of the morning,
thus providing us not only with the 3l. 15s. which was needed for
housekeeping, but enabling us also to meet other unexpected expenses. In
the Evening I received still further, after the need of the day had been
met, but when all again was expended, a sovereign, four small old silver
coins, a pair of coral earrings, and a brooch.

Sept. 8 There was the sovereign in hand which came in last evening, as a
little towards the need of Monday, when I received this morning 50l., to
be used as most needed. It is impossible to express how seasonably this
help came, as, though our daily wants had been met day by day, yet very
much is required in the way of clothes, &c. But as the need for the
other objects is as great or greater, I took of this sum 30l. for them
and 20l. for the Orphans. We are thus greatly encouraged to continue in
prayer. Our poverty has scarcely ever lasted longer than now, yet the
Lord has helped us as our absolute need has required it. The donor of
this 50l. wished me to enter it with the text Philip iv. 6, judging that
this text must have been often a refreshment to me in seasons of trial,
as indeed it has.

From Sept. 8th to 17th came in 23l. 2s. 6 ½ d.

Sept. 18. From A. A. 5l., by sale of Reports, 13s. 8d., and by the boxes
in the Orphan-Houses 14s. 11d.

Sept. 19. This morning came in 10l. from Scotland. By this 10l., and
what came in yesterday, I am able to meet the expenses of today, which
were more than 16l.

Sept. 21, Saturday. Yesterday came in from Clapham, at an hour of need,
1l. 12s. 10d., together with several articles, also 1l. from Clifton;
and today by sale of Reports, 1l. 15s. 4d., and by sale of articles 14s.
9d. Thus we are brought to the close of another week, though the
expenses of it have not been less than 110l. (part of which had been put
by beforehand). At the close of the week I have not more than 3s. left
but the Lord will provide.

Sept. 22. Lord's-day morning. This morning I received from the
neighbourhood of Crediton 10l., and from Sidmouth 10l., of which 8l. is
for the Orphans, and 2l. for my own personal expenses. Likewise from A.
A. 2s. 2 ½d., for Reports 4s., and in the Chapel boxes was put
anonymously 6d., ditto 2s. 6d. ditto 2s. 6d., ditto 6d. with these
words: "Be still and know that I am God." How precious this word, and
how have I seen today again the truth of it!--Three days ago a sister
in the Lord, who is a servant, came to me, and brought me 9l. 16s. which
she had drawn out of the Savings' Bank, considering it the Lord's
will that she should not keep it there any longer, but spend it for him.
She gave me the money that I might do with it as I thought right.
However, I sent her home again with the money, advising her to weigh the
matter still further, and to pray still further about it, and to count
the cost; and if she was of the same mind, after some days, to come
again to me. Now this afternoon this sister came again, with her little
all, 9l. 16s. As she had now, for a long time, weighed the matter
(according to her own statement), and as there had three days more
passed away since I had sent her home again with the money, and as I
found her grounded upon Scripture for what she was going to do, I could
not refuse the money. See portioned it out thus: 2l. for her father,
brother, and sister, 1l. 10s. for the poor believers in fellowship with
us, 1l. for the Chapel expenses, and 1l. for missionary purposes. This
left 4l. 6s., of which she would give me 2l. which I declined, in order
that there might not be even the appearance as if I had persuaded this
poor servant to draw her money out of the Savings' Bank. She then
wished me to give brother Craik 1l., which I accepted for him, and as I
saw she wept, because I would not receive anything for myself, I said I
would take a sovereign. This I did, that she might not think I refused
her Christian kindness because she was a poor servant. The remaining 2l.
6s. she gave for the Orphans. —By the donations which have come in
today I am able to meet almost all the expenses connected with the
procuring of many articles of clothing and furniture, for which I have
long been praying.

Oct. 1. Since the 22nd many pounds have come in, though not any sums
above 5l. Now this evening I have received a bank order for 70l., to be
used as the Lord might direct me. The donor wishes me to let him know if
anything particular should be connected with this donation. There is
indeed much connected with it, as it comes most manifestly in answer to
prayer; for thus I am able to supply all that is needed in the way of
articles of clothes for the Orphans, for which I have been long waiting
upon the Lord, and as the winter is now drawing near, the winter-clothes
need to be got ready; further, I am able to have the Boys'
Orphan-House painted inside and coloured down, which is much needed; I
am able to furnish all the labourers in the Orphan-Houses with some
money for themselves, which, on account of our long-continued poverty, I
had not been able to do for six months. Yet; though the donation comes
in so seasonably, I cannot write to the kind donor thus, lest he should
be induced to give more, by my exposing our circumstances, and lest also
the hand of God should not be so manifest, in providing me with means
for the work, as otherwise it would.

—I took of this money 40l. for the Orphans, and 30l. for the other
funds.--During the last two weeks I have had to pay out for the work
about 200l., and this week I shall have to pay out again about 60l. Thus
the Lord helps continually.

Nov. 1. Since Oct. 1st there has come in such an abundance, that without
any difficulty I have been able to meet all the expenses for the
Orphans, though during the week ending Oct. 5th I had to pay out 59l.,
during the week ending on the 12th above 40l., during the week ending on
the 19th nearly 40l., and during the week ending on the 26th about 50l.
Of the many donations which came in during this period I will only
mention the following: From a small town in the kingdom of Wirtemburg
1s. 8d.; from Nice, in France, 1l.; from a missionary in the East Indies
14l. 12s. 6d. Notice, dear reader, how the Lord sends donations from
Wirtemburg, France, and the East Indies! Great, however, as our income
had been, we were now again poor, on account of the heavy expenses,
when, in answer to prayer, there came in today, from some sisters near
Coleford, 2l. 10, by sale of Reports 2s., and from A. A. 10l. 7s. 7 ½
d. The post was out this morning and nothing had come; but my heart
said, the Lord still can send, though the post is out; and these
donations were soon after given to me.

Nov. 11. From Nov. 1st up to this day we went on easily. There came in
again many donations. Now, however, we were again very poor, having had
again very heavy expenses. In this great need a ten pound note was this
afternoon put into an Orphan-box in my house. This evening I received
also still further, from a brother who labours in Demerara, 1l., and 1l.
10s. besides.

Nov. 13. Yesterday and today came in again more than 10l. Our expenses
having again been very great, as during these three days above 30l. had
been paid out for the Orphans, we were still poor, notwithstanding the
considerable income during the last three days. Under these
circumstances a ring was given to me this afternoon, set with one large
and six small brilliants. How kind of the Lord, thus to help us
continually in the work, and to listen to our supplications, which, day
after day, we bring to him! Daring no time, since I have been engaged in
this service, have the expenses been heavier than during the last four
months; yet the Lord has always given us what we have needed.

Nov. 18. The produce of the ring, together with about 10l, more, which
had come in since the 13th, was nearly all gone again, on account of the
expenses of the past week having been nearly 50l., when this morning a
Christian gentleman from Devonshire called on me, who, on leaving, left
a letter on my table, containing two five pound notes, of which five
pounds was for the Orphans and five pounds for three other objects. This
evening I found a five pound note in one of the Orphan-boxes in my
house. Thus we are again helped for the present. The name of the Lord be
praised!

Nov. 21. The need of today was 4l. 5s., but there were only a few
shillings in hand. I opened the boxes in my house, in which 1 found a
sovereign and a shilling. The sovereign could have been put in only last
evening. After family prayer I retired again for prayer, about the work
as I do daily, by which means I have been helped not only to meet the
very heavy expenses since July 15th, but have been helped through many
and great difficulties in other respects, and have been enabled to bring
many blessings upon the work. While in prayer, I received a letter from
the neighbourhood of Leeds, with 5l. Thus we are helped for today. This
afternoon came in still further, by sale of articles 1l. 9s., by the
boxes in the Orphan-Houses 1l. 6s. 3 ½ d.; and this evening I received
5l., being the profits from the sale of a Hymn book, which has been
printed for the benefit of the Orphans. Thus we have something for the
need of tomorrow also.

Nov. 23. As yesterday's expenses had to be met out of what had come in
on the 21st, only 11s. 10d. having come in yesterday, and as the need of
today for housekeeping was 4l. 10s., we had not enough in hand. Our
precious universal remedy, prayer, was now again resorted to. About ten
minutes after, I received a Post-office order from Stafford for 2l.
About twelve o'clock this morning came in still further, by the sale
of some books and prints, given for the purpose, 3l. 1s., by the sale of
other articles 3l. 7s. 9d., by the sale of Reports 1s. 1d., by the sale
of ladies' bags 13s. 5d., and by the sale of stockings 2s. 6d. This
afternoon came in still further from Glasgow 5l. Thus the day, which
commenced when we had not enough in hand for its necessities, has ended
in comparative abundance, though there is still little in hand for
present use, as we need to provide for the rent of the houses and for
the purchase of oatmeal, and therefore put by a part of the money given
today. Yet we are brought to the close of another week, having been able
to meet all its expenses.

Nov. 24. This morning I received a letter from the neighbourhood of
Dublin, with four five pound Post-office orders. Thus the Lord has done
according to my expectation; for in our usual weekly prayer meeting last
evening at the Orphan-houses with the labourers in the work, I was
enabled to praise the Lord, that He would provide for the need of this
week also.

Dec. 2, Monday. During the last week the income had been again about
36l. But having had still many extra expenses, and, also to put by money
for the rents due on the next quarter-day, there was nothing left at the
close of the week. Yesterday came in 5s. 10d., 4d., 5s., 19s. 10d., and
1l. By this money we were able to meet the housekeeping expenses of this
day, being only 2l. 5s.; but, having 2l. to pay out, besides the current
expenses, and having understood that a brother in the Lord from
Birmingham, with two other strangers, had visited the Orphan-Houses, and
that money had been put into the boxes, they were opened, and 3l. 3s.
1d. was found in them. Thus I was able to send off the 2l. There came in
also this afternoon 10s. for work done by a young lady, and this
evening, by sale of Reports, 4s.

Dec. 3. As only 1l. 15s. was required for housekeeping today, we had
enough, by what had come in yesterday afternoon and evening, and I had
twopence left.

Dec. 4. The Lord has again, in the love and compassion of His fatherly
heart, multiplied "the handful of meal in the barrel, and the little oil
in the cruse." The twopence have been multiplied more than a thousand
fold. Yesterday came in from Clapton 2s. 6d., from the county of Dorset
10l., and from A. A. 10s., being (as the donor writes) "the produce of a
needless article of jewelery."

Dec. 7, Saturday. Only 2l. 10s. 10d. having come in during the last two
days (among which was a remarkable donation of 10s. from Calv, in the
kingdom of Wirtemberg), I had again, after I had paid out yesterday what
was required, only 2l. 10s. 3d. left, which I knew would not be half
enough for this day. Yesterday afternoon came in from Sherborne 6s. This
morning I had an unusually full assurance that the Lord would help us
this day again, though I knew that more than 8l. would be needed today,
towards which there was only 2l. 16s. 3d. in hand. I praised the Lord
repeatedly this morning beforehand for the help which He again would
grant this day. By the first delivery arrived 10s. from the neighborhood
of Kingsbridge. Thus we had 3l. 6s. 3d.; but for housekeeping we needed
5l. 10s., and for other expenses 3l. 1s. 5d. However, when the Orphan
came with the letter-bag, to fetch the money, I received in it a letter
from Bath, containing 5l. Thus we had enough, and more than enough, for
the momentary need, as to the house-keeping expenses. About twelve
o'clock came in the following sums besides: by sale of articles 4l.
5s. 8d., by sale of Reports 8d., by sale of stockings 2s. 2d., by sale
of ladies' bags 3s. 9d. This evening came in still further, from
Dublin, for Reports 1l. 2s., and 1l. as a donation, together with some
prints, some books, etc. for sale. Thus we had all we needed, to help us
to the close of the week, and were able to put by some money for the
weekly rents and other expenses, to be met on quarter day.

Dec. 9, Monday. Though we had been helped abundantly on Saturday, yet,
as some money needed to be put by, we had still nothing for the
beginning of this week. Yesterday came in for Reports 7s. 4d., and
anonymously was put into the Chapel-boxes 1s. and 2s. 6d. There was also
anonymously put into the Chapel-boxes a 50l. note, with these words:
"25l. for the Orphan-Houses, and 25l. for clothing and blankets for the
poor." Thus we are again most seasonably helped, and are now almost
entirely prepared to meet all the expenses coming upon us a few weeks
hence.

Jan. 18 1845, Saturday. Since Dec. 9th we had always supplies sent,
before the last money was given out; it was a season of rich abundance,
for there came in (including the 25l. last mentioned) about 140l. Now,
however, this evening, after all the expenses of the day had been met,
there was nothing remaining. But admire with me, dear reader, the
goodness of the Lord! This very evening He has again kindly supplied us
with means for the commencement of another week. The boxes at the
Orphan-Houses were opened (our need leading us to do so) in winch was
found 10l. 16s., one of them containing a ten pound note. Is it not,
dear reader, a precious thing to trust in the Lord? Are not ten pounds,
thus received out of the hands of our Heavenly Father,
as the result of faith in God, most precious? Will not
you also seek to trust in Him, and depend on Him alone in all your
everyday's concerns, and in all spiritual matters too? If you have not
done so, do make but trial of the preciousness of this way, and you will
see how pleasant and sweet it is; and if you have done so in a measure,
do so yet more and more, and you will never have cause to regret it.
But, perhaps, you are not a believer; if so, you cannot trust in God,
and go in all circumstances to Him, as to your Father, except you are
first reconciled to him through our Lord Jesus. What you have then to do
is, to learn that you are a lost, ruined, guilty sinner, deserving
nothing but punishment. But, at the same time, you have to remember that
God, in the greatness of His love to sinners, sent His own dear Son,
that He, in their room and stead, might bear the punishment due to them,
make an atonement for their sins, and fulfil the law of God in their
stead, in order that every one, who believes on Him, might obtain the
forgiveness of his sins, and be reckoned righteous before God. If you
believe in the Lord Jesus, i.e., if you receive Him as the one whom God
has declared Him to be, even the Son of God (as to His person), and the
Lamb of God that takes away the sin of the world (as to His work), and
if you rest upon Him, trust in Him for the salvation of your soul, then
all your sins shall be forgiven. Though you have grown old in sin,
though your sins have been very many and very grievous, yet the blood of
Jesus Christ cleanseth from all sin. Do but believe, and you shall be
saved. And when thus you are reconciled to God, through faith in His
dear Son, walk before Him as an obedient child, seek in child-like
simplicity to go to God for every thing, and do really treat God as your
father.

There arrived also this Saturday evening, from the Isle of Wight, a
small box, containing 14s. and many articles for sale.

Jan. 20, Monday. 3l. 11s, has come in besides the 11l. 10s., which came
in on Saturday evening; but as, in addition to the ordinary
house-keeping expenses, I had this afternoon to order material for
boys' clothes, all the money which had come in since Saturday evening
was now again gone. About an hour afterwards I found that two five-pound
notes had been put into one of the boxes at my house, and at the same
time I received a bank order for 16l. from a poor missionary brother,
who labours about 3,000 miles from Bristol~ in dependence upon the Lord
for his temporal supplies. Of this 16l. the sum of 12l. is to be
employed in sending him Bibles and New Testaments, and 4l. he gives to
the Orphans. What ways has not the Lord to help His children who trust
in Him! Who would suppose that a poor missionary would send 4l. for the
Orphans, from a distance of 3,000 miles? But rather must the ravens
again bring supplies, as in the days of Elijah, than that the children
of God, who trust in their Heavenly Father, should not have their need
supplied. —Thus the Lord has again given 14l. for the Orphans, when
all was gone.

Jan. 25, Saturday evening. We have been helped through the heavy
expenses of this week, without lacking any thing; but now we have
nothing left.--This evening, about ten o'clock, I received from
Barnstaple some articles for sale, and a Spanish dollar, two ¼ of a
franc, and a sixpence; also 1l. and 2l. Also sixpence for Reports.

Jan. 27, Monday. Yesterday I received from F. E. B. 2s. 6d., from
"Friends to the Institution" 4l.; and 2s. 6d. was put into the
Chapel-boxes anonymously, ditto 10s., ditto 2s. 6d. Thus, by what came
in on Saturday evening and yesterday, I am able to meet this day's
demands, being 4l. 5s. 6d.--Evening. This afternoon I received from
Camerton 5l., of which 3l. is for the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures, and 2l. for the Orphans. Thus, as the money goes out, the
Lord kindly sends in supplies, and all without speaking to one human
being about our necessities, but making them known to Him only; yea,
determined, by His help and support, rather to endure many trials, in
order that through our difficulties the Church of Christ at large may be
comforted, and those who are weak in faith be strengthened, than to go
away from the door of our Heavenly Father to that of brethren.

Feb. 1, Saturday. We are brought to the close of another week, and have
been supplied with all we needed; but there is now again nothing left.

Feb. 2. When now again there was nothing left last evening in my hands
for the beginning of the coming week, there have been today, by two
different donors, two five-pound notes put into the Chapel-boxes, ditto
2s. 6d., ditto 2s. 6d., and also 2s. 6d. was given besides. Thus we are
again supplied fur the present. O Lord, fill my--heart with lively
gratitude for all Thy goodness! Lord help me, not only to trust in Thee
more and more, but also to love Thee more and more, seeing that Thou
dost condescend to use such a poor sinful servant!

Feb. 8, Saturday evening. Above 30l. has come in during this week; but
as there have been bought eight hundred weight of rice and eight bushels
of peas, besides meeting the regular housekeeping expenses, again only a
few shillings remain.

Feb. 10, Monday. Yesterday 2l. was sent to me, from a physician residing
in Bristol; anonymously was put into the boxes at Bethesda Chapel 2s.,
ditto 1l., and ditto 2s. 6d. Also by A. A. was given to me 7s. 2d. I was
thus able, with the few shillings that were left on Saturday evening, to
meet the expenses of this day, after which 7s. 10d. remained. This
morning I was kept, through pressure of engagements, from having prayer,
on account of the work, at the usual time; but at half-past two I united
with my beloved wife and her sister in prayer, and I asked the Lord,
among other blessings, also for means. As to the latter, we had answer
upon answer before the close of the day. For this afternoon 1l. 5s. 9d.
arrived from Stirling. This afternoon also five sovereigns were put into
the box in my room, which I happened to find out soon after. I received
also this evening 5s., which had yesterday been anonymously put into the
boxes at Salem Chapel. A poor brother likewise gave me 2s. Still further
came in 11s. 5d.

Feb. 11. This morning I received still further a donation of 2l. This
afternoon I received, as the profit of the sale of ladies' bags, 1l.,
and 2l. 17s. 4d. came in by sale of articles.

Feb. 12. After I had sent off this morning the money which was required
for the housekeeping of today, I had again only 16s. 2 ½ d. left, being
only about one-fourth as much as is generally needed for one day, merely
for housekeeping, so that there was now again a fresh call for trusting
in the Lord. In the morning I met again, as usual, with my dear wife and
her sister, for prayer, to ask the Lord for many
blessings, in connexion with this work, and for means also. About one
hour after, I received a letter from Devonshire, containing an order for
22l., of which 10l. was for the Orphans, 2l. for a poor brother in
Bristol, and 10l. for myself.--Besides having thus a fresh proof of
the willingness of our Heavenly Father to answer our requests on behalf
of the Orphans, there is this, moreover, to be noticed. For many months
past the necessities of the poor saints among us have been particularly
laid upon my heart. The word of our Lord: "Ye have the poor with you
always, and whensoever ye will ye may do them good," has again and again
stirred me up to prayer on their behalf, and thus it was again in
particular this morning. It was the coldest morning we have had the
whole winter. In my morning walk for prayer and meditation I thought how
well I was supplied with coals, nourishing food, and warm clothing, and
how many of the dear children of God might be in need; and I lifted up
my heart to God to give me more means for myself, that I might be able,
by actions, to show more abundant sympathy with the poor believers in
their need; and it was but three hours after when I received this 10l.
for myself. —This evening was left at the Infant Orphan-House an
anonymous letter, containing a sovereign for the Orphans, with the
letters C. T. D.

Feb. 15, Saturday evening. 6l. 1s. 4d. has come in since the 12th. All
the wants of this week have been richly supplied, but now there was
again scarcely anything left towards the coming week, when this evening,
just before I was going to our usual Saturday evening prayer meeting at
the Orphan-Houses, a bank post bill for 10l. came to hand, being the
gift of an aged clergyman. Thus we have a little for the next week, and
we have also been able to order two hundred weight of soap, which it was
very desirable to have, in order that there might be no need of using
new soap for washing.

Feb. 16. Today the Lord has given still more. Anonymously were put into
the Chapel-boxes the following sums: A twenty-pound note, a sovereign,
2s. 6d., and 6s. There was given also by A. A. 3s. 7d., and a lady from
Nottingham sent 5s. It was particularly kind of the Lord to send in this
rich supply, because soon again a ton and a half of oatmeal will need to
be ordered from Scotland, the rents need to be provided for, and I
desire soon to be able to give again some money to the labourers in the
Orphan-Houses for their own personal necessities.

March 4, Besides the 32l. 7s. 1d. that had come in on the 15th and 16th
of Feb., there came in up to this day 38l. 17s. 1d., so that there was
not any difficulty to meet all the demands. After I had met the expenses
for housekeeping yesterday, all our means were again gone, and there was
therefore nothing in hand towards the expenses of today. But the Lord
helped us again; for two five-pound notes were found in one of the boxes
at my house, whereby I am able to meet the need of this day, which is
3l.

Dear Reader! does your heart admire the hand of God in these instances?
Does your heart praise the Lord for His goodness to us? Does it, or does
it not? If not, then I beseech you to lay aside this account of His
dealings with us, and fall on your knees, and ask God to have mercy upon
you, and to soften your heart, that you may be sensible of His goodness
to us. Surely if you can read this account of His goodness, and it makes
no impression upon you, it is a sign that your heart is not in a right
state before God. I do not expect that all the readers will, as much as
I do, by the grace of God, see the hand of God in all these matters,
though I could wish that they did so, even a thousand times more than I
do; but yet all should adore God for His great goodness to us, and
should remember that what He does for us, in answering our poor
sin-mixed petitions, for the sake of His dear Son, He is willing to do
for them also.--Particularly notice, that the help never comes too
late. We may be poor, yea, very poor; yet the help comes at the right
time. We may have to wait upon the Lord, yea, even a long time; but at
last He helps. It may seem as if the Lord had forgotten us, by allowing
us to be poor, and very poor, and that week after week; but at last He
helps abundantly, and shows that only for the trial of our faith, both
for our own benefit and the benefit of those who might hear of His
dealings with us, has He allowed us to call so long upon Him. —By the
grace of God my heart is not troubled now, whether there be much or
little in hand. I am sure, that, in the best time and way, God will send
help; and thus it is not only with reference to temporal supplies, but
also as it regards other things that we may need, or when we may be in
peculiar difficulties in other respects. When boys need to be
apprenticed, or situations have to be found for the girls, and there are
difficulties in the way, as we never send them out, except to believing
masters and mistresses, my soul is yet at peace, because I betake myself
to my Heavenly Father. When there have been infectious diseases in the
Orphan-Houses, whereby, looking at it naturally, many children might be
taken away through death, my soul is at peace, because I cast this
burden upon the Lord, and He sustains me. When one or the other of my
fellow-labourers have left the work, and I needed their place supplied,
and knew of no suitable persons, I have been looking to God for help,
and that has kept my heart in peace, though this is no small difficulty,
as not only can no hirelings be engaged in this work, but also, in case,
the individual is a true child of God, there are yet so many things to
be considered as to fitness and call for the work. When all kinds of
lying reports have been spread about the work and about myself in
connexion with it (though they have been very much less than might have
been expected), I have committed my case to the Lord; and such things,
instead of casting me down, often have greatly cheered me, because they
have been a fresh proof to me, that God is at work, and that, therefore,
the devil is angry, and stirs up these lies. When I have had for months
to leave the work, as in the year 1838, for about four months, in
1843-4, for seven months, and in 1845, for three months, being called to
labour on the Continent, or being ill, as in 1838, my heart has been in
perfect peace, committing all the concerns of the whole Institution into
the hand of God, considering that it was not my work but His, and that,
therefore, I might be without carefulness about it. I seek to believe
more and more what God says about Himself in His holy word, and it is
this which gives this rest and peace to my heart, not only with
reference to all the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution for Home and Abroad, but also about my own body and soul, my
dear wife and child, my other dear relations, the temporal supplies for
myself and family, my service in the Church in which I labour, now
consisting of more than 700 believers, and the state of the Church of
Christ at large.

March 8, Saturday. 11l. 17s. 1 ¾ d. more has come in since March 4th.
Thus I have been able fully to meet all the expenses during this week,
but now hare again only a few shillings left towards the necessities of
the coming week.--Late in the Evening.--After our prayer-meeting
this evening four sovereigns were given to me, two for the Orphans, and
two for the other objects. This is the beginning of the help which the
Lord surely will give during the coming week also.

March 11, Tuesday. Only 17s. 6d. had come in since Saturday evening, and
therefore, after the expenses of yesterday had been met, there remained
again only a few shillings in hand, on account of which my prayer was,
that the Lord would be pleased to send in something for this day. When I
came home last evening from the meeting, my dear wife told me, that
there was some money in the box in our parlour. I opened it, and found
it to contain five sovereigns. Thus we are supplied for today.

March 13. Yesterday I had sent off all the money, which was remaining in
my hands, to the Orphan-Houses for housekeeping. Also the boxes were
opened in the Orphan-Houses, but only 10 ½ d. was found in them. We
were comfortably supplied yesterday with all that was required, but
there was no money at all in hand for today. When the letter-bag was
brought this morning for money, I found that the need for housekeeping
for today was 2l. 15s.; but there was nothing at all in hand. Therefore,
while the boy was waiting at my house, I disposed of some trinkets,
which had been sent a few days since, for 2l. 15s. 6d. Thus we had
enough, and 6d. over. There came in also 8d. by sale of Reports.--
Evening. This afternoon came in, by sale of articles, 17s. 6d., and by a
donation 1l.

March 14. The need of today is 2l. There was 1s. 4d. more needed than I
had in hand, when 5s. 6 ½ d. came in from two Orphan-boxes. Thus we are
helped for this day.

March 15. Yesterday afternoon half-a-sovereign was brought to me. In the
evening 19s. 4d. came in by sale of articles. But this was not enough
for the need of today. While the Orphan boy was waiting for the money, I
received the following letter from Bath:--

"Beloved Brother in the Lord,

"My sister E. and myself feel it laid on our hearts to send a little for
your need at this time, thinking it must be increased by the severity of
the weather. We send the inclosed in much love, and thankfulness to the
Lord for permitting us to do it, half for the Orphans, and the rest to
be applied as seems good to you. Etc."

The letter contained two sovereigns, of which I took one for the
Orphans, and the other for the School fund. (The latter sovereign was
needed today towards the payment of the teachers in the Day-schools.)
Thus we had all that was needed today for the Orphans. This evening I
found a sixpence in the box in my room.

March 17, Monday. The sixpence which I took out of the box in my room on
Saturday evening was all there was in hand, when yesterday came in the
following donations:

A. A. 1l. 2s. 4 ½ d., anonymously 6d., ditto 2s. 6d. When this morning
I had the bag sent from the Orphan-Houses, I found that the amount
needed for house-keeping was 2l. 5s.; but there was only 1l. 5s. 10 ½
d. in hand. Immediately after, before the bag was fetched, one of my
fellow-labourers sent me 1l. for the Orphans, so that we had enough for
today, and 10 ½ d. over. When now only 10 ½ d. remained, I received
from Swansea a letter containing a franc and a half, with the words
"Jehovah Jireh."

March 18. "Jehovah Jireh" (i.e. the Lord will provide) has been again
verified in our experience. 10 ½ d. remained in hand, and the need of
this day was 6l. 3s. But the Lord knew what we should need today, and he
helped accordingly. I opened the box in my room, and found a ten-pound
note in it. Thus we have more than is needed for the present moment.

March 19. Yesterday afternoon I had to pay out 3l. more, for one of the
apprentices. Thus the expenses of yesterday were altogether 9l. 3s. How
kind therefore of the Lord to have put it into the heart of the donor of
the ten-pound note to give that money just then. And now we had again
only 17s. 10 ½ d. left towards the need of today, which is 3l. 5s. But
our most faithful Lord has been again mindful of us at this time also.
For there came in yesterday from a lady at Sheffield 1l., by sale of
Reports 8d., by the profit from the sale of ladies' bags 15s., and by
three donations from Bristol donors 12s. Thus there is again all we need
for today, and 6 1/2d. left. Immediately after I had written this in my
journal, the Lord began to increase again "the handful of meal in the
barrel." I received from Barnstaple 5s.

March 20. Yesterday morning, when I was going to send off the money to
the Orphan-Houses, I found 2s. 6d. in the letter bag, slipped in
anonymously. I found also 1l. 5s. in the boxes at my house. Thus we have
1l. 13s. 0 ½ d. for the necessities of today, which I find is
sufficient.

March 21. All the money being spent, the boxes in the Orphan-Houses were
opened yesterday afternoon, in which were found a sovereign,
half-a-crown, and a penny. This is all we have for today.

March 22, Saturday. We were able to get through yesterday with the 1l.
2s. 7d. found in the boxes; but in this way our stores become much
reduced. Now, however, was Saturday before us with its heavy expenses,
and there was nothing yet to meet them, when I went last evening to our
public meeting, to minister in the word. However, my soul has been in
peace, by the grace of God, during all this week and the last, though
again and again we have had nothing. I have reminded the Lord repeatedly
during this week, that it is His commandment to His disciples to be
without anxiety, and that I am so, because it is His commandment that I
should be so, but that now He also, on His part, graciously would be
pleased to continue to help me, as He had done hitherto. And now observe
how the Lord again has helped! After the meeting last evening, between 8
and 9 o'clock, when I had nothing at all in hand, towards meeting the
necessities of this day, which I had every reason to believe would be
several pounds, one of the labourers in the Orphan-Houses gave to my
wife 5s., Miss E. N. sent 10s., and a sister in the Lord, who arrived
last evening from Hull, put the following letter into the hands of my
dear wife, addressed to me:—

"Hull, March 20, 1845.

"Beloved Brother,

"I send you a small box of articles, which perhaps you can dispose of for
the Orphans, and 5l. 5s. 7d. in money. Accept it in the Lord's name as
a tribute of love from the brethren here. We shall be always glad to see
you if you travel this way.

"In haste,

"Yours affectionately in the Lord,

"* * * * "

The box contained the following articles:--a gold cross, two gold
pins, two brooches, three gold rings, a small gold seal, two gold
bracelet snaps, a pair of silver studs, a mourning brooch, necklace and
ear-rings, a silver pencil case, a stone cross and heart, a gilt
waist-buckle, a dozen new cloth caps, two books, two new cotton frocks,
three new pinafores, a new white lace veil, two waistcoats, a gown, a
pair of lady's boots, three veils, two lace capes, two lace shawls,
two muslin aprons, a lady's bag, four waist ribands, three pairs of
cuffs, a little scarf, three necklaces; 4l. 5s. 7d. for the Orphans, and
1l. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.--Today there came in
still further, by sale of articles 8s. 6d., for Reports 8d, and by sale
of stockings 6s. 8d. Also from Thornbury 2s. 6d. Thus we have enough for
today, and something left.

March 24, Monday. Yesterday and today came in only 7s. 6d. altogether.
We have enough for today, and 6s. 6d. left, as the demands were only 2l.
10s.

March 25. When there was again only 6s. 6d. left, 4s. 6d. came in
yesterday evening. There was also 5l. put into one of the boxes at my
house. This morning I received from a brother from the neighbourhood of
Birmingham 2l., and 10s. came in by another donation. Thus I had more
than sufficient for the need of today, which is 4l. 15s. There came in
still further from Bridgenorth 10s., and from a sister in Bristol 2s.
2d.

March 26. Only 3s. 2 ½ d. came in today, by the boxes in my house.

March 27. Yesterday morning I sent off for housekeeping all the money I
had left. It was enough for yesterday, but only enough. Only 1l came in
yesterday, and this morning 4d. This 1l. 0s. 4d. was all I had to send
to the Orphan-Houses. There came in 5s, 4d. besides, and thus we were
helped through this day also.

March 28. Nothing has come in. While the Orphan Boy was waiting for the
bag to be made up, 1l. 5s. 1d. came in for a few trinkets, which I had
sent out to be disposed of. This was all I could send.

March 29. By the 1l. 5s. 1d. we were helped through yesterday. But there
was now again not only nothing at all in hand, but we required the more,
as the last two days there had been so little laid out for housekeeping,
and also because today was Saturday. However, as the Lord never once has
forsaken me in the work during the last eleven years, so it has been at
this time also. About five o'clock yesterday afternoon a note was
given to me in which was enclosed 5l., which a physician of this city
kindly sent. In the evening I received 10s., being the profit from the
sale of ladies' bags, and this morning came in still further by the
sale of articles 9s. 6d., and by the sale of stockings 13s. There were
also last evening, anonymously left at my house, a gold seal, a brass
seal, and a pair of gilt ear-rings. There came in still further 10s.,
and 10s.

March 31. There came in yesterday and today anonymously from Hayes-Town,
near Uxbridge, 1l., and 2l. 10s. besides.

April 1. On account of the expenses of Saturday having been great, and
of yesterday likewise, there remained again but a few shillings. Our
gracious Lord, however, who day after day looks on our need, yea, so to
speak, inspects our stores, knew this, and therefore yesterday caused
ten pounds to be put into one of the boxes at my house. Last evening
came in also still further 1l. 7s. from the Isle of Wight.

April 2. As I had to expend today more than 10l, for the Orphans, I was
again reduced to a few shillings, when this morning 15l. was sent to me
by two donors from Liverpool. Also at the same time came from the
neighbourhood of Worcester 1l.

April 3. After having been comparatively poor, the Lord is now again
pouring in means, which come very seasonably for the replenishing of our
stores, for the obtaining of certain articles of clothing for the
children, etc. Today I received the following donations: 19l. 5s. from
the brethren assembling at Bethesda Chapel, Sunderland, from two sisters
6s., from A. A. 18s. 5d., and by sale of Reports 1s. 4d.

April 4. Still further from Sunderland 15s., from Sherborne 8s. 6d.,
from Sidmouth 1l., and from "S. P., Dublin," 1l. 10s.

April 12, Saturday. 33l. 19s. 7d. more has come in since the 4th. After
the expenses of today had been met, there again remained scarcely
anything, when, in addition to all the ordinary expenses during the
coming week before me, a fresh supply of oatmeal needed to be purchased.
The boxes in the Orphan-Houses therefore were opened, but only 1l. 8s.
6d. was found in them. There came in besides from A. A. 7s.

April 13, Lord's-day. This morning I received a letter from Hampstead,
containing four post-office orders of 5l. each, of which 10l. is for the
poor believers among whom I labour, and 10l, for the Orphans.

April 30. From the 13th to this day came in altogether 57l. 13s. 2d.
Thus we were well supplied with all the means which were needed during
that time; but yesterday morning I had
sent off to the Orphan-Houses the last money I had in hand. In the
afternoon a sister in the Lord from Bath called, and gave me a
sovereign, when I had not one penny in hand towards the need of today.
This morning came in still further 18s. 10 ½ d, by needlework done by
the Orphan-Girls. Also 4d. by sale of a Report. Thus we were supplied
for today.

May 1. When this day began I had only half-a-crown in hand, which I had
taken last evening out of one of the boxes in my house. When I was this
morning, on my usual walk before breakfast, bringing my circumstances
before the Lord, I reminded Him of His word, "Take no thought for the
morrow ", (i.e. be not anxious about the morrow), and I told Him that
yesterday I had not been anxious about today, and prayed that He would
now be pleased to help me. I was in perfect peace, though I had not the
least natural prospect of having the necessities of today supplied. Of
the money put by for the rent I would not take. Our need was my comfort.
When I returned to my house at eight o'clock, I found that there bad
been sent from the Orphan-Houses 5s., given there, and 2s. 6d. for
knitting. Also a person had brought yesterday to the Orphan-Houses the
contents of an Orphan-box, which had in his room, having felt himself,
as he said, much stirred up to do so. It was 3s. 6d. Also a sister from
Worcestershire had sent 10s. Before money was sent for from the
Orphan-Houses, I received this morning from Stafford 10s. Thus I had 1l.
13s. 6d, to send to the Orphan-Houses for the need of today.

May 2. A little after I had sent off yesterday all the money to the
Orphan-Houses, a brother in the Lord from Cornwall called on me and gave
me 1l. In the afternoon a sister, who had received peculiar mercy from
the Lord in the way of temporal help, called on me, and gave 10s.; and a
christian servant, who had received a fee, gave it, the amount being 2s.
Thus I have 1l. 12s. to send for the need of this day.--I had written
this in my journal, but the bag was not yet gone, when I received from a
distance of about 50 miles for Reports 4s. 1d, and from "a Field
Officer" 3l 10s.2d., so that I could send all that was needed today,
being 3l.

May 3. Yesterday afternoon I received half-a-crown more, and this morning
3s. by sale of articles, and from Kendal 1l 10s.
The money from Kendal came about two minutes before the boy came from
the Orphan-Houses to fetch the supply for this day's necessities. It
was a most seasonable help, as this is Saturday, and we needed today 3l.
15s., and I had not nearly enough in hand.--There came in further
this morning 2l. 1s. 2d. by sale of articles, and in the evening 10s.,
being the contents of an Orphan-box in the neighbourhood of Coleford.
— We are thus brought to the close of another week, and have a little
left towards the heavy expenses of the next, as, besides the usual
housekeeping expenses of about 20l., there are ten tons of gravel for
the playgrounds to be bought, and a ton of oatmeal.

July 10. From May 3rd to this day was a season of comparatively rich
abundance. The total amount which was received amounts to 268l. 10s. 6
½ d. Immediately after the 3rd, the Lord sent considerable help, so
that I was able to meet the extraordinary expenses which are referred to
under the last date; for on the 4th came in 6l. 0s. 3d., on the 5th 9s.
6d., on the 6th 70l. and 100l., of which two sums one-half was put to
the Orphan-Fund, and the other half to the fund for the other objects.
On the 10th of May I had to leave Bristol on account of my health, and
was absent three weeks, and had to pay away, for the Orphans, about
100l. within one fortnight after. How seasonably, therefore, came these
two donations! When these two sums came in there was only 10s. 3d. in
hand, and, as has been stated, ten tons of gravel were needed, and a ton
of oatmeal, also money for the apprentices, besides the daily current
expenses. Of the other donations, which came in during this period, I
only mention: from Negro brethren in Demerara, twelve dollars. All the
money, after this long time of comparative abundance, was today, July
10th, reduced to 1l. 6s. 0 ½ d., and 2l. was needed. The boxes in the
Orphan-Houses were opened, in which 16s. 1d. was found. Thus we had
enough, and 2s. 1 ½ d. was left.

July 11. Yesterday afternoon came a box from Newport, in the Isle of
Wight, with many articles for the Orphans, and a little money for the
other objects. This was a precious encouragement to continue to wait
upon the Lord. At the first delivery this morning I received several
letters. The first I opened was from a brother in Devonshire, with a
post-office order for 8s. for the Orphans. He writes thus; "My box for
the Orphans still yields but little, but I have been frequently
inquiring of the Lord, when that little should be sent. For the last
few days it has appeared to me that the time was come to send it to you,
I therefore sent for the amount in an order, which I this day received,
and now send, in hope it may be of some help in a time of need." This
8s. was a further precious encouragement.--The next letter which I
opened was from a christian gentleman at Edinburgh, containing a bank
order for twenty-five guineas, of which twenty guineas are for the work
of the Lord in my hands, and five for my own personal necessities. There
came in still further today, from brethren at Perth 2l., and from the
neighbourhood of Glasgow 5l.

July 12. This morning I received a legacy of 5l. for the Orphans, from
the relatives of a dear departed sister in the Lord, who, from the
commencement of the work up to her last days, had taken the deepest
interest in it. Also from Jersey, together with a gold ring, 4l. Also
3l. 2s. 0 ½ d. by sale of articles and donations, so that during these
two days we have had above 40l. coming in.

From July 13th to 19th, came in 16l. 6s. 8d. more. On July 19th I left
for the Continent, to labour for a season in Germany, and returned to
Bristol on Oct 11th. For about eight months before this, I had seen it
to be the Lord's will that I should go again this year to the
Continent for a season, and had made my journey and service a subject of
prayer from Nov., 1844. Besides asking the Lord's blessing upon my
service, I also sought His help for means, and for this also I had not
to wait on Him in vain. For as the Lord had sent me, before I went in
1843, the sum of 702l. 3s. 7d. for various purposes, and for the work in
Germany in particular, so He gave me again, on May 3rd, 1845, the sum of
500l, for the work in Germany, yet so, that the surplus which there
might be should be employed for the Orphans and other work in my hands.
From the conditions under which this donation was given to me, it was
obvious then, that whilst on the one hand, when it plainly could be seen
that only a certain part of the money would be needed for the present
service in Germany, the remainder might be used for the benefit of the
Orphans, or the other part of the work; yet, on the other hand, we could
not begin at once to apply any part of this money to the objects of the
Scriptural Knowledge Institution; for at the commencement I could not
know how much might be expended on the service in Germany, particularly
as my intention was to do as much as I could for those on the Continent
who are in darkness and in the shadow of death, and also as I wished as
much as possible to help the Church of Christ in that part of the world.
Therefore those who said: "We are quite sure there must be much money in
hand for the Orphans, else Mr. Muller would not have gone to Germany,"
were quite mistaken. Often have I had similar things said to me, or
about the work, when we have been in the deepest poverty, simply because
in faith a certain step had been taken, or a certain thing had been
done, which was connected with great expense. At such times, of course,
my fellow-labourers and I have had to be silent. For we could not say it
was not so, else it would be exposing our poverty, and would look like
asking for help. Therefore we have had to be content with something like
this: "Lord, it is said that there is much money in hand, whereby some
who would otherwise help us, it may be, are kept from doing so; now,
Lord, do Thou nevertheless, as the work is Thine, lay our need, the real
state of things, on the hearts of Thy children, that they may help us."
Thus it was during my service in Germany in the summer of 1845 also. My
fellow-labourers in Bristol and my dear wife and I in Stuttgart, poured
out our hearts before the Lord, seeking His help upon the work, and
asking Him also for means, and He did not despise our cries. There came
in, during the twelve weeks that I was away, for the Orphans alone,
200l. 5s, 5 ½ d. This, together with what was in hand when I left, and
with come money that at the end of my stay in Germany (when I saw that I
should scarcely need one half of the 500l.) I could order to be drawn
out of my bankers' hands in Bristol, richly supplied all the need,
during my absence. But the labourers were repeatedly in straits, and
several times the last money was gone; but the Lord refreshed their
hearts by seasonable help.--Of the 500l. given for the service in
Germany, and for the printing of tracts, there remained 311l. 18s, 1 ½
d., of which I took for the Orphans 161l. 18s. 1 ½ d., and for the
other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution 150l.

Jan. 17, 1846. From the day of my return to Bristol, on Oct. 11, up to
this day, there has been no difficulty at all with regard to means. The
many donations which have come in, together with what came to the
Orphan-Fund from the surplus of the sum given for the work in Germany,
enabled me, without any difficulty, to meet all the expenses, though
they were many and great. Of the donations which came in during this
period I only refer to the following:

On Nov. 19th heft Bristol to labour for a little while at Sunderland. I
had but little money to leave with my dear wife for the work; but my
path was plain to go, and therefore my hope was in God, as to the work
in Bristol during the meantime, being assured that He would care for it.
And thus it was. Rich supplies were granted by Him. On the very next
day, after my departure, Nov. 20th, the following anonymous letter was
left at my house, containing six five-pound notes and two sovereigns.

"My dear Brother in the Lord,

"About six or eight weeks since, anticipating soon a remittance by a
bill, which would become available about a week previous to this date, I
was led to ask the Lord what He would desire to do with the money which
might remain in my hands when I should receive the money for this bill,
and your name was immediately presented to my mind with these words:
"the Lord has need of it." I therefore enclose the amount, viz,
thirty-two pounds, and remain,

"Dear Brother,

"Yours affectionately in the Lord,

"Nov. 20, 1845. &c. &c."

Look at this, dear reader! Is not the hand of God most manifest in such
cases? This unknown donor prays what to do with the money, and my name
is brought to his or her mind. See also how seasonable the help!

This 32l. was put to the Orphan-Fund, as there was but little in hand.
By this and the other sums which came in during my absence, my dear wife
was helped without any difficulty, through all the expenses.

There being now again little in hand, I asked the Lord yesterday (Jan.
16, 1846) that He would be pleased to send in supplies, when almost
immediately after a sister in the Lord, who had unexpectedly received a
rich remittance from distant relatives, gave me 10l.; and today a lady,
who on her way from Cornwall to London was staying for a day or two at
Clifton, kindly sent me 20l. Thus we are again supplied at least for a
week.

March 2. Goodness and mercy have followed us again in many respects with
reference to the work, since the last date, Jan. 17th, up to this day;
and with regard to means, there has been again a rich supply granted to
us, so that I have been able to meet all the expenses of the work,
though they have been for the Orphans alone. 180l. 19s. 1d., and more
than 100l. for the other objects, during these six weeks. But there
remained now scarcely anything in hand, when I received this morning,
from a distance of about 200 miles the following letter with 15l.

"Beloved Brother,

"Enclosed is the produce of the sale of a pianoforte, which I thankfully
send for the Lord's work in your hands, having received blessing to my
own soul by means of that work, and not the least in being weaned from
some of those things I once found pleasure in. I have been waiting
payment of the amount for some time, but, having money now in hand, I
send it without further delay, as you may possibly need it now. The 15l.
you will kindly allot as you see most desirable. That our God would
fulfil in you all the good pleasure of His goodness, and the work of
faith with power, that the name of our Lord Jesus Christ may be
glorified in you, is the prayer of

"Your affectionate Brother,

"* * * * Feb. 28, 1846. * * * *"

March 18. Up to this day also we have been helped, though but little,
comparatively, has come in. When yesterday, March 17, all the means were
gone, a brother gave me 1l. as a thankoffering for having received a sum
of money unexpectedly, as a dividend from a bankruptcy. In the afternoon
I received a half sovereign as the profit of the sale of ladies' bags
made by a sister in the Lord for the benefit of the Orphans, and 2s. 6d.
was put into an Orphan-box at my house. This morning I received the
following letter from Devonshire, together with a Post-office order for
5l.

"Beloved Brother,

"I send you an order for 5l., half of which will you accept for yourself,
and the other half appropriate for the Orphans; or, if they happen to be
well supplied at present, you may apply it to the building you have in
contemplation. Job xxii. 21-30.

"Believe me very affectionately yours,

"* * * *"

The half of this money was taken for the present need of time Orphans.
There was also sent 1l. 13s. from Weymouth. Thus we are again supplied
for the present need.

March 20. Today I have to send more money for housekeeping to the
Orphan-Houses, and the Lord has kindly given me yesterday afternoon and
this morning the means for it. Yesterday came in by sale of trinkets,
&c., 3l. 8s. 4 ½ d. and by two donations 2s., and this morning I
received 11s, from Marlborough.

March 21, Saturday. Since yesterday morning, when I had sent off to the
Orphan-Houses the very last penny in hand, the following sums have come
in: A sister from Worcester gave 2s. 6d., and in the boxes in my house I
found 10l. This morning 10s. came from the neighbourhood of Castle Cary,
from a sister in Bristol 2s. 2d., by sale of articles 1l. 15s. 8d., and
by sale of stockings 5s. Thus I have been enabled, during this week
also, to meet all the expenses, though they have been more than 30l.;
and 7s. 6d. is left towards the coming week. My heart is in perfect
peace, though there are between 140 and 150 Persons to be provided for
(including the teachers and matrons in the Orphan-Houses and the
apprentices), and though there is heavy sickness in two of the houses.
— Saturday Evening, The Lord has already increased "the handful of
meal in the barrel, and the little oil in the cruse." This afternoon I
received 3l. 14s., being the contents of an Orphan-box at Barnstaple.
There came in 3s. 6d, besides.

March 26. On the 23rd came in 3l. 2s. 1d. On the 24th and 25th came in
1l. 5s. Yesterday was also taken out of the boxes in the Orphan-Houses
7s. 6d., our need having led to the opening of them, and in the boxes in
my house was found 2s. 6d.; but we had not quite enough for the need of
today, when about twelve o'clock this morning a box arrived from
Chelsea, containing 17s. 0 ¾ d., many ornaments, etc.--We are thus
helped for this day.

March 27. Today came in 4l. 11s. 7d. by sale of articles. Likewise 1s.
from a little girl. Thus we are again provided for today.

March 28, Saturday. Yesterday afternoon came in still further from
Street, by Sale of Reports 10s. and three donations of 6d., 4d., and 2d.
There was likewise given by a sister a small gold watch-chain. This
morning I received, by sale of articles 4l.14s. 4d., by sale of Reports
1s., and by sale of stockings 6s. Thus, by the income of this week, and
by about 2l. 12s. which I found I had more than was needed for the rent
when paying it on the 25th, having to receive drawbacks from the
landlords, I have been again able to meet the housekeeping expenses
during this week, amounting to 21l. 19s. 10d., besides the rent which is
37l., for which the money had been put by; and I am come to the close of
another week, with 17s. 8d. in hand towards the necessities of the next.
— Late on Saturday. There has come in still further this evening from
A. A. 11s. 3 ½ d., and from Mrs. R. 8s.

March 30, Monday. My heart was particularly in peace on Saturday evening
after the prayer meeting, though I could leave only a few shillings for
each of the four houses towards the housekeeping expenses of this week,
where, besides the ordinary expenses, there is also money needed on
account of heavy sickness in two of the houses. When I emptied the purse
to the last penny, and returned home without anything in hand, I felt
fully assured that we should have again abundant reasons for
thanksgiving next Saturday, and told my dear fellow-labourers so, And,
thus it is. Yesterday was put into the Chapel-boxes for the Orphans
50l., ditto 1s., ditto 10s. This morning I received 5l. from a miner at
a distance, an entire stranger.

Thus our Heavenly Father has helped most seasonably. 1, In giving me
means for present necessities as to housekeeping. 2, In providing me
with means for the extra need on account of the illness of several
children. 3, In giving means for getting a ton and a half of oatmeal
from Scotland.

April 4, Saturday evening. On the 2nd I received anonymously from London
it, besides some money for needlework done by the Orphan-Girls; on the
2nd was sent to me 10l. from Bath, from a lady unknown to me. These two
donations I received the very moment I rose from my knees, having asked
the Lord for more means, as, on account of the heavy expenses just now,
we needed again more money by the end of this week. There was also given
on the 2nd 1l. by a lady who had received a present of 10l. from some
relations, and gave the tenth part of it to the Orphans. On the 3rd and
4th came in 2l. 10s. 7d. The actual expenses of this week, have been 42l.
besides 22l. having been put by for the oatmeal which has been
ordered, and we have a little more than 9l. left.

April 18, Saturday. The Lord has been again good to me since the 4th
with regard to means, 53l. 14s. 0 ½ d. having come in during these two
weeks. Today, having only 2l. 1s. 5 ½ d., in hand, towards the supplies
of the next week, we made known our requests to God, and while I was in
prayer with two of my fellow-labourers, there came a letter, in which F.
from London sent 10s. There came in almost immediately after by sale of
articles 13s. 8d., and by a sister in the Lord from Brixham, who called
this morning, 10s. was given. This afternoon the boxes in the
Orphan-Houses were opened, but only 10s. 10d. found in them. 6s, came in
besides. This afternoon a brother called at the Boys' Orphan-House,
and gave eight sovereigns, saying that he had had a desire to bring this
money for some days past, but had been unable on account of his health,
but now was pressed in spirit to do so, though scarcely able to walk.
The following points are to be noticed concerning the Lord's goodness
today. 1, I purpose, on account of my health, and for the sake of
procuring time for the writing of the Report, to leave Bristol on
Monday, and thus I am able to leave money behind for at least 3 or 4
days. 2, I had been speaking today and yesterday in my prayers to the
Lord, "It is buy will that I should not be anxious. I am not, by Thy
grace; but, Lord, there are about 140 persons to be provided for in the
4 Orphan-Houses, wilt Thou then help me with means!"--I was able to
send altogether 11l. 6s. 11 ½ d. to the matrons.

April 20, Monday morning. The Lord has helped still further. There came
yesterday anonymously from London 5l. with these words: "To Brother
Müller, with the writer's fervent prayer, that the giver of all good
may continue to pour down upon him and all his undertakings the
abundance of His blessings. Half for his own necessities, and half to be
disposed of as he thinks fit." I cannot help noticing here the Lord's
double kindness, both towards the Orphans and towards myself. I now need
for myself more money than usual, as besides the regular housekeeping
expenses at home, I need money for myself and dear wife in going away
for the twofold object of our health and my having thus time to write
the Report: and the Lord supplies me with means. Thus also I received
yesterday 5l. for "change of air," and 5l. was sent to me for myself the
day before yesterday from a brother at Winchester, whom I have never
seen. I find continually, that, without making provision for extra need,
and without reckoning anxiously about the future, the Lord helps me when
I need anything. I find it pleasant and precious, even as to this life,
to walk in the ways of the Lord.

There came in still further yesterday morning for the Orphans from A. A.
13s. 1d., from a brother 1l., from "A friend at Stirling" 6s., and from
an Irish sister 5s.--Thus I could send still further this morning to
the matrons, before my departure, 4l. 11s. 1d., so that I am able to
leave about 16l, behind, and thus the need is supplied for about five
days, humanly speaking; and before that time is gone, I expect to obtain
more, by waiting upon God.

This morning, before we departed, I received a letter in which was the
following sentence: "With regard to property I do not see my way
clearly. I trust it is all indeed at the disposal of the Lord; and if
you would let me know of any need of it in His service, any sum under
200l. shall be at your disposal at about a week's notice." This
brother meant what he said, I have every reason to believe. I might have
written; "The Orphans, my dear brother, are now in need, and it would be
a particular comfort to me, as I am going away, if you would send me
190l.," and I doubt not that I should have had it after a week. I
preferred, however, to continue, as heretofore, to deal with God alone
in this service, that the church of Christ at large still further may be
benefited, particularly those who are weak in the faith, or those who
are recently brought to the knowledge of our Lord Jesus, in seeing how
blessed it is to make known our requests unto God, and that those who
trust in Him are not confounded. I therefore wrote to this brother, with
regard to his kind offer, that I only speak to the Lord about my need.

May, 9, Saturday. This evening, after an absence of 19 days, we returned
to Bristol. During all this time the Lord supplied us with means, but it
was almost always by the day. During the last days, in the course of my
regular meditation on the New Testament, I came to that precious word:
"Casting all your care upon Him: for He careth for you," 1 Peter, v. 7,
and, by God's grace, I was able to cast all my care concerning His
work on the Lord; and when we returned this evening I found, that for
this day also the Lord had not only provided, but there was 1l. 16s. 3
½ d. more than was needed.

May 11, Monday. Yesterday a brother from Hackney gave 2l., and 17s. 1 ¼
d. came in besides. Thus, with what was left on Saturday, I was able to
send 4l. 13s. 5d. to the Orphan-Houses, to be divided among the four
matrons. After having sent this morning to the last penny all the money
I had in hand to the Orphan-Houses, I received 200l., which, being left
entirely at my disposal, was portioned out thus: 100l. for the present
need of the Orphans, 50l. for the other objects, and 50l. for the
Building Fund of the Orphan House. How kind of the Lord to help so
seasonably; for I have very many and heavy expenses before me, besides
the ordinary expenses of about 30l. per week. There are to be bought 4
bags of rice, 4 bushels of peas, 2 cwt. of soap, material for boys'
clothes, the 4 houses are to coloured down, several small sums for
apprentices are to be paid, the Report is to be printed, etc. This also
is to be noticed: The Lord rewarded me thus, for not exposing our
poverty to the brother, who offered on April 20th to give me any sum
under 200l., if I would let him know if I needed anything for the
Lord's work. Thus we had at least a little more than we should have had,
even if I had asked that brother.

May 26. Up to this day, till the last hours before the commencement of
our public meetings, at which an account is to be given of the Lord's
dealings with us since July 14, 1844, the Lord's goodness has
continued in supplying us with means. About 80l. more has come in during
the last fifteen days. And this very day, the last of this period, I
received 26l. anonymously from Stafford, with an affectionate and
encouraging note; 20l. 1s. 6 ½ d. I took out of the boxes at my house,
two ten pound notes having been put in; and several other little
donations came in besides.

It is scarcely needful to state, at the close of these details, that,
notwithstanding our having been often poor, and very poor, yet the
children have always had the needful articles of clothing and nourishing
food. Those who know what it is to walk in the fear of God, know also,
that God would not help us, in answer to our prayers, if we
hypocritically stated that the children were well provided with
wholesome food, etc., and yet it were not true.

Account of the New Orphan-House, on Ashley Down, Bristol, from its
earliest beginning to June 4, 1846.

I began the service of caring for children who are bereaved of both
parents, by death, born in wedlock, and are in destitute circumstances,
on Dec. 9, 1835. For nearly ten years I never had any desire to build an
Orphan-House. On the contrary, I decidedly preferred spending the means,
which might come in, for present necessities, and desired rather to
enlarge the work according to the means which the Lord might be pleased
to give. Thus it was till the end of October, 1845, when I was led to
consider this matter in a way I had never done before. The occasion of
my doing so was this: On Oct. 30, 1845, I received from a gentleman, who
lived in the street, where the 4 Orphan-Houses were, a polite and
friendly letter, in which he courteously stated to me that the
inhabitants in the adjoining houses were in various ways inconvenienced
by the Orphan-Houses being in Wilson Street. He left to myself the
judgment of the case.

This letter I received on Thursday morning, Oct. 30, 1845. Being very
much occupied that week, I had scarcely any time to consider time
matter. On Monday morning, however, Nov. 3, I set apart some hours for
the prayerful consideration of the subject, and after I had besought the
Lord to guide me to a right decision, I wrote down the reasons which
appeared to me to make it desirable that the Orphans should be removed
from Wilson Street, and also the reasons against removing. As far as
they are suitable for being stated in print, they were those:

I. Reasons for removing from Wilson Street.

1. The neighbours feel themselves inconvenienced by the noise of the
children in the play-hours. This complaint is neither without
foundation, nor unjust; for many persons are very much inconvenienced by
the noise of children, and those living close by the Orphan-Houses must
be so during the play-hours, even though the noise be only of that kind,
that one could not at all find fault with the dear children on account
of it. I should myself feel it trying to my head to live next door to
the Orphan-Houses, on that account I therefore ought to do to others, as
I should wish to be done by. This point had never before appeared to me
in so serious a light.

2 The greatness of the number of the inmates in the houses has several
times prevented the drains from acting properly, and thus has a few
times affected the water in one or two of the neighbours' houses. With
reference to these two reasons, as it regards those living near the
Orphan-Houses, these words, "Let not your good be evil spoken of," Rom.
xiv. 16, and "Let your moderation (i.e. yieldingness) be known unto all
men," Philip iv. 5, seemed to me two important portions of the word of
God to be acted out in this matter.

But in addition to the reasons for removing the Orphans from Wilson
Street, on account of the unavoidable occasional inconvenience that
comes upon the neighbours, there appeared now to me, when once I was led
to consider seriously the reasons for removing the Institution from
Wilson Street, other reasons for doing so, in connexion with the work
itself, which had occurred to me before, but never in so strong a light
as now, when the subject was brought more immediately before me by the
letter, in which I was politely requested to remove the Orphans from
Wilson Street. These reasons are:

1. We have no proper play-grounds in Wilson Street. There is one
play-ground, which, however, is only large enough for the children of
one house at a time; but as there are children in four houses who ought
to have the benefit of it, we can not arrange so that all the children
have the full benefit of that play-ground, as the meals, the
school-hours, the weather, and other hinderances interfere. The dear
Orphans ought, I know, to be trained in habits of industry, but children
are children, and need to be treated as such; and they should, on
account of their health, have the full benefit of a play-ground. But
this they cannot have in Wilson Street: and to take them out into the
fields for the benefit of bodily exercise, as we have been in the habit
of doing, is often very inconvenient.

2. We have no ground for cultivation, near the Orphan-Houses, and hence
there must be more walking for the children, on account of using proper
means for keeping them, with the blessing of God in health, than is, in
other respects, good for them; because frequent walks easily beget in
children habits of idleness, which would be especially felt when boys
are apprenticed. But this difficulty cannot be obviated by remaining in
Wilson Street, and renting a piece of land somewhere else for
cultivation; for to get the children ready and conduct them to the piece
of ground, not only takes a good deal of time, but is connected with
other great inconveniences, yea with insurmountable difficulties, so
that we found it needful to give up a small piece of ground which we
once rented for about two years for the Orphan-Boys, at a distance of
about half a mile from Wilson Street. Thus, by removing from Wilson
Street, and obtaining premises surrounded by land for cultivation, we
should be able to procure a most important moral benefit for the
children, by having the opportunity more fully than we now have, of
training them in habits of industry, besides giving to the boys
occupation which is more suitable for them than knitting, which is now
the only employment they have, besides making their beds, cleaning the
house, and attending to the cooking of their meals. Moreover, this would
be occupation in the open air, which not only would bring their limbs
into exercise, but also make walking, for the sake of health, almost
entirely needless.

3. If we were to remove from Wilson Street, and obtain premises in the
country, we might have all the washing done at home, which now, for want
of room, can be only done in part. Thus the girls also would have more
laborious work at home, a point of great importance for them, so that
they would not feel so much the hardships connected with going out to
service.

4. The situation of Wilson Street is perhaps scarcely bracing enough for
strengthening the constitution of the Orphans, most of whom, being the
offspring of very diseased parents, require a very invigorating place of
abode.

5. The present situation is certainly not desirable for the teachers,
especially as, when their hours of work are over, they have no garden or
fields close to the house, immediately to go into for a little
refreshment of body; and for some of them it is too far to go to fields,
where they might have bracing air.

6. In times of sickness we are too confined in the houses in Wilson
Street. If there were less than 30 children in each house, the average
expenses for each child would be too great, it being desirable, as the
arrangements are now, that there should not be less than 3 labourers in
each house; and yet, if there are 30 children in each house, we are too
lull in time of sickness, as we have not a single spare room in any of
the houses. Now, though the Lord has during all these years most
mercifully helped us through such seasons, yet it has not been without
inconvenience, and without also, perhaps, having more of the children in
one room, at such times, than on account of health is desirable.

7. Even ordinarily, when there is no sickness, it would be desirable to
have more room.

There are no premises to be had in Bristol, or in the immediate
neighbourhood, where we could have these advantages; for I have been
looking about in all directions for this purpose during the last ten
years. But suppose there were a large house to be had in one part of the
city, and a second a mile off, and a third and a fourth in other
directions, such houses, on account of our peculiar position in the
work, would not do. For in seasons of need, the distance of the several
houses would render it very inconvenient for the labourers to meet
together for prayer, to divide the means that may be in hand, etc.
Besides, when in seasons of other peculiar difficulties, connected with
the work, I wished to meet all my fellow-labourers, there would arise
great difficulty by their being divided in different parts of the city.
It would also thus be very inconvenient to persons, who wish to see the
work, to go from place to place, in order to have a view of all the
Orphan-Houses. But this is not all. The more I have considered the
matter, the more am I now persuaded, that no ordinary large houses,
built for private families, and therefore only calculated to accommodate
10 or 15 persons, at most, for any length of time in them, will do for
charitable institutions of any considerable size, as no ordinary house
furnishes the proper advantages of ventilation, a point so needful for
the health of the inmates in a charitable institution. There seemed to
me, therefore to remain nothing but to build premises for the purpose.

II. Reasons for Remaining in Wilson Street.

1. God hitherto has pointed out the spot most plainly. At the
commencement of the work, in 1835, no other house was to be had but No.
6, Wilson Street. After-wards, when in 1830 the Infant Orphan-House was
on the point of being opened, again I was looking about in all
directions, and saw many houses, but found none that was suitable, till
all at once, most unlooked for, the occupiers of No. 1, Wilson Street
were desirous of immediately leaving that house, and I was able thus to
rent it. When in 1837 I was on the point of opening the Boys'
Orphan-House, I looked about again for a house in all directions; for I
knew not at that time, what I have since learned by experience, that it
was so important that all the houses should be near together. After
seeking long in vain, I at last found a very large house, not far from
Wilson Street, which I rented; but when the occupiers of the houses in
the neighbourhood heard that that house had been let for a charitable
institution, they threatened the owner with an action, which led him to
request me to give up the agreement, which, of course, I did
immediately. At last, most unexpectedly, after having looked about in
vain in all directions, the occupiers of No 3 Wilson Street offered it
to me, and I rented it for the Orphan Boys. Lastly, in the year 1843,
when I was led to see it to be the will of God to go forward in this
work, and to establish time Girls' Orphan-House, No. II, for older
girls, one particular feature in the matter was, that the house No. 4,
in Wilson Street, bad been offered to me without being sought after,
when there had not been for about 6 years one single large house to be
let in that street.

[But though hitherto God has pointed out Wilson Street as being the spot
where this work should be carried on, may not now the time have come for
removing?]

2. Perhaps we might also rent Nos. 2, 5, and 7, in Wilson Street, and
use two out of those three houses for Orphan-Houses, and one of them for
an infirmary in case of sickness.

[But then, I said to myself, would not the objection, which the
neighbours on the opposite side of the street might make, on account of
the noise of the children in their play-hours, etc. remain? Also the
drains would be still more unsuitable, not being constructed for so many
inmates; and to alter them would be a heavy expense. The play-ground
would be still less sufficient, if two new houses were added. Lastly,
there was no reason to think that we could rent Nos. 2, 5, and 7.]

3. There are these three great objections against building: The
considerable sum which is required, and which could be spent for present
use upon the Orphans. The pilgrim character of the Christian seems lost
in building. The time that it will necessarily take in making
arrangements for it.

[Do not all these objections only hold good, I said to myself, if I were
needlessly to set about building? If I could rent premises, which are
really in every way suitable for the work, and I preferred building,
then those objections would apply to the case; but when one is forced
to it, it is no more than erecting a large building, because there may
be 800 children of God in fellowship who have been hitherto renting a
meeting-place, but for certain reasons are obliged to leave it, and
cannot rent another. Such could not be accused of needlessly spending
money in building instead of renting; nor could it be justly said that
they have on that account given up the pilgrim character; nor would it
be time wasted if some individuals were to make arrangements about the
building of that meeting-place. Therefore these three objections just
mentioned, which had been for ten years strongly in my own mind, were
removed when once I saw plainly that nothing remained but to build.]

After I had spent a few hours in prayer and consideration over the
subject, I began already to see that the Lord would lead me to build,
and that His intentions were not only the benefit of the Orphans, and
the better ordering of the whole work, but also the bearing still
further testimony that He could and would provide large sums for those
who need them and trust in Him for them; and besides, that He would
enlarge the work so, that, if I once did build a house, it might be
large enough to accommodate three hundred Orphans, with their teachers
and other overseers and servants needful for the work.--Concerning
this latter point, I think it important to remark, that during no period
had the number of applications for the admission of Orphans been greater
than just before I was led to think about building, so that it was quite
painful to me, not to be able to comply with the wishes of all the many
persons who applied for the admission of Orphans. There were many
waiting for admission, particularly Orphan-Boys.

In the afternoon of November 3rd, 1845, I laid the matter before my
fellow-labourers in the Church (eight in number) to get their judgment,
whether I ought not to leave Wilson Street, and to build. All judged
that I ought to leave Wilson Street, and none saw reasons against
building.

On Nov. 4th my dear wife and I began to meet for prayer about this
matter, and purposed to do so morning by morning. We asked God for
clearer light concerning the particular points connected with the
subject; and, being assured that it was His will that I should build, I
began asking the Lord for means.

On Nov. 7th I judged, having considered the matter more fully, that
sufficiently large premises to furnish all needful accommodation for 300
children (from their earliest days up to 15 or 10 years old), together
with a sufficiently large piece of ground in the neighbourhood of
Bristol, for building the premises upon and the remainder for
cultivation by the spade, would cost at least Ten Thousand Pounds. I was
not discouraged by this, but trusted in the living God.

We continued meeting for prayer morning by morning for 15 days, but not
a single donation came in; yet my heart was not discouraged. The more I
prayed the more assured I was, that the Lord would give the means. Yea,
as fully assured was I that the Lord would do so, as if I bad already
seen the new premises actually before me. This assurance arose not from
some vague, enthusiastical feeling, the mere excitement of the moment,
but I, from the reasons already related, and especially from the
commandment contained in Philip iv. 5. For I saw that I should not act
according to the mind of our Lord Jesus, if I did not, as soon as I
could, remove the Orphans from Wilson Street, as it had been stated to
me in the letter referred to, that their living there was an annoyance
to some of the inhabitants in that street. 2. This assurance that I
should build an Orphan-House arose further, from the whole way in which
the Lord has been pleased to lead me in connexion with the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, since its beginning on March
5, 1834, i.e. He has been leading me forward as by an unseen hand, and
enlarging the work more and more from its commencement, and, generally,
without my seeking after it, and bringing things so clearly before me,
that I could not but see that I ought to go forward. 3. Lastly and
chiefly, this my assurance, that I should build unto the Lord this House
of Mercy, arose also particularly from this, that, having strictly
examined my heart as to the motives for doing so, I found that, as
before. God, I could say that my only motives were His honour and glory
and the welfare of the Church of Christ at large, the real temporal and
spiritual welfare of destitute Orphans, and the welfare of all those who
might take care of them, in the building to be erected. And finding
that, after praying again and again about the matter, I still remained
in perfect peace, I judged it assuredly to be the will of God that I
should go forward.

On Nov. 15th brother R. C. arrived, to labour for a little while in
Bristol, I communicated to him my position with reference to having to
remove the Orphans from Wilson Street, and I had his judgment also as to
its being of God that I should build. This dear brother's judgment
greatly encouraged me. His visit was to me of great help in this
particular, especially in stirring me up yet more, to bring everything,
in connexion with this matter, before God. He also laid it on my heart
to seek direction from God with reference to the plan of the building.
He said "You must ask help from God to show you the plan, so that all
may be according to the mind of God."

On Nov. 19th I left with my brother and fellow-labourer, Mr. Craik, for
Sunderland, where we arrived on Nov. 20. Here we laboured till Dec. 4,
when I left alone for Kendal, to labour there for a few days. All the
time that I was at Sunderland, I had very much prayer about the building
of the Orphan-House, and I felt all the time fully assured, that God
would bring the matter to pass. But thirty days had now passed away,
whilst I had been day by day waiting upon God for means for this work,
and not a single penny had been given to me. Nevertheless, this did not
in the least discourage me, but my assurance, that God in His own time
and in His own way would give the means, increased more and more. While
I was at Sunderland the portion which came in course of my meditation,
on the New Testament, was the beginning of the epistle of James. More
than at any period in my life was I struck with these verses: "My
brethren, count it all joy when ye fall into divers temptations (i.e.
trials) knowing this that the trying of your faith worketh
patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect
and entire, wanting nothing." James i. 2—4. It was especially the
last verse, "But let patience have her perfect work, etc." which I found
of exceeding great importance with reference to the building of
the Orphan-House. It led out my soul in prayer day after day, to ask
the Lord to increase my faith and to sustain my patience. I had these
verses so impressed upon my heart, that I could not but think
God meant particularly to bless me by them, with regard to the work
before me, and that I should especially need patience as well as faith,
I stayed at Kendal from the evening of Dec. 4 to Dec. 8, when I left for
Bristol, where I arrived on Dec. 9th. It was now 35 days that I had been
day by day bringing this matter before God, as to the various points
connected with it, and especially also asking the Lord for means; but
nothing whatever had been given to me. On the day after my return I
renewed our united prayer meeting with my dear wife. Now observe: on the
36th day, after having begun to pray, on Dec. 10, 1845, I received
1000l. towards the building of the Orphan-House. This is the largest
donation that I had received up to that time for the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution; but when I received it I was as calm, as quiet,
as if I had only received one shilling. For my heart was looking out for
answers. Day by day I was expecting to receive answers to my prayers.
Therefore, having faith concerning the matter, this donation did not in
the least surprise me. Yea, if Five Thousand Pounds, or Ten Thousand
Pounds, had been given to me, instead of One Thousand Pounds, it would
not have surprised me.

Dec. 13. On the 39th day my sister-in-law, who had been for some weeks
absent in London, and who had now returned to Bristol, told me that she
had met a gentleman in London, who, having quite recently read with deep
interest the Narrative of the Lord's dealings with me, wished to know
as many particulars about the work in my hands as he could. Being told
by my sister-in-law that I purposed to build an Orphan-House, he, an
architect, offered to make the plan, and superintend the building,
gratuitously. Unsolicited he pressed this matter upon her with deep and
lively interest. I hear also that he is a Christian. The fact, that this
offer comes unsolicited and from a Christian architect, shows especially
the hand of God. This is the second proof that God will help me in this
matter.

Dec. 23. This is now the 50th day since I have come to the conclusion to
build, and the 49th day since we have been daily waiting upon God for
help. Nothing more has come in since Dec. 10th, not even one penny. This
morning I have been particularly encouraged by the consideration that
the Lord has sent me the 1000l. and the promise from that pious
architect, whom I have never seen, and of whose name I am as yet in
ignorance, not to mock me, but as an earnest that He will give all that
is needed.

It seems desirable that we should have a large piece of ground of at
least six or seven acres. This piece of ground must be in the vicinity
of Bristol. 1. In order that the Orphan-House may be accessible to me,
as my place at present is fixed by my other work in Bristol. 2. That the
labourers in the Institution and the Orphans may be able to attend our
meetings, at least on the Lord's day. 3. That the inhabitants of
Bristol may have the benefit of seeing with their own eyes this work of
God, which is so manifestly His and not mine. 4. That strangers, who
pass through Bristol, may have an easy access to it, for the same
reason. But then, such a piece of ground, near Bristol, where there is
just now an inordinate desire for building, in the way of speculation,
would cost in all human probability between 2000l. and 3000l. Then the
building itself, however plain, would not cost less than from 6000l. to
8000l., being for 300 Orphans, besides all their overseers, teachers,
and assistants. In addition to this, the fitting up and furnishing the
house for between 300 and 400 inmates, would not cost less than 1500l.
more. This is indeed a large sum of money which I need; but my hope is
in God. I have not sought after this thing. It has not begun with me.
God has altogether unexpectedly, by means of the letter before
mentioned, led me to it. Only the day before I received the letter, I
had no more thought about building premises for the accommodation of the
Orphans, than I had had during the ten previous years.--My especial
prayer is, that God would continue to me faith and patience. If He shall
be pleased to help me, in faith and patience to continue to wait on Him,
help will surely come.

Dec. 24. No further donation yet. But my hope in God is unshaken. He
most assuredly will help.--I have on purpose not issued any circular
in connexion with this matter, in order that the band of God may be the
more manifest. To some persons, residing in or out of Bristol, I have
spoken about my intention of building, when conversation led to it.
Through this, if the Lord please, He can make it known to others, and
thus send means for the Building Fund. Or He can send in such an
abundance of means for the work which is already in existence, that from
that abundance there may be a rich surplus towards the Building Fund.
But howsoever God may help, I do desire to see His hand made most
manifest. There will be, no doubt, many trials connected with this
enlargement of the field of labour (for if with 130 Orphans there has
been so much trial of faith, what is to be expected when the number is
300); and therefore I desire to see as clearly as daylight that God
Himself is leading me onward.

Dec.29. This is the 56th day since I came to the conclusion to build,
and the 55th since I have been day by day waiting upon God concerning
it. Only that one donation had come in till this evening, when I
received 50l. This donation is exceedingly precious to me,
not only because I am sure it is most cheerfully given, nor even
because of its largeness, but because it is another precious proof
that God will bring about the matter, else He would not give me these
earnest. All my business therefore is: to continue in faith and patience
to wait upon God. My assurance has been more and more increasing that
God will build for Himself a large Orphan-House in this city, to show
to the inhabitants, and to all who may read and hear about it, what a
blessed thing it is to trust in Him.--Of late I have seen, by God's
grace, more and more, how entirely unworthy I am of being used by God
for this glorious and honourable service, and I can only say, "Lord
here is thy servant, if thou art pleased to use such a one as I am."

Dec. 30, 1845. This morning I came, in course of my reading, to the
commencement of the book of Ezra. I was particularly refreshed by the
two following points contained in the first chapter, in applying them to
the building of the Orphan-House: 1. Cyrus, an idolatrous king, was used
by God to provide the means for building the temple at Jerusalem: how
easy therefore for God to provide Ten Thousand Pounds for the
Orphan-House, or even Twenty or Thirty Thousand Pounds, if needed. 2.
The people were stirred up by God to help those who went up to
Jerusalem. Thus it is a small matter for Him to put it into the hearts
of His children to help me, in desiring to build this house of mercy
unto His name.—This meditation I had before breakfast. After family
prayer in the morning I had again my usual season for prayer about the
building, and at this time it was particularly coupled with thanksgiving
for the 50l. received last evening, and with entreating blessings on the
donor. I was now looking out for more, as I am doing day by day, when
this afternoon I received from a person at Clevedon 2s. 6d., from her
grandson 6d., and from the sister in the Lord, who brought the money,
the change, which she did not wish back, being another 6d. These
donations, though small, are nevertheless very precious to me, as I take
them as further proofs out of the hands of God, that He will most
assuredly bring this thing to pass. This evening I received One Thousand
Pounds towards the Building Fund. When I received this donation, I was
as calm, yea as perfectly calm, as if I had received a single penny,
because, by God's grace, I have faith in Him, and therefore am looking
for answers to my prayers, and am sure that God will give every shilling
that is needed.

January 2, 1846. This evening I received from Bideford 11s, towards the
Building Fund.

Jan. 3. One of the Orphans gave 6d.

Jan. 6. Received a little bag made of foreign seed, and a shell-flower,
to be sold for the Building Fund. The sister who sent these articles
wrote to me, that the moment she heard of my intention of building an
Orphan-House, this text was before her mind: "Who art thou, O great
mountain? Before Zerubbabel thou shalt become a plain."--Zech. iv. 7.
Also one of the Orphans sent 4d.

Having asked the Lord to go before me, I went out today to look for a
piece of ground. The armory which is to be sold had been several times
mentioned to me, as a suitable place. I did not think so, yet thought I
ought at least to look at it. Having seen it and been confirmed in my
judgment about its unsuitableness, I asked the Lord whether I should
turn towards the city or towards Stapleton. I felt led to go towards the
city, and saw immediately after some fields near the armory. After
having made inquiry to whom they belonged, I have been led to write this
evening to the owner of them, asking him whether he is disposed to sell
them, &c. I am now quietly waiting the Lord's pleasure. If His time is
come to answer our requests as to a suitable piece of land, I shall be
glad; if it is not yet come, I desire that "patience may have her
perfect work, being perfect and entire, wanting nothing."

Jan. 8. This evening I received a reply to my letter. The owner of those
fields writes, that, if he did sell them, it would be only for building
land, and therefore they will be too dear.

Jan 9. Went this morning once more to see those fields, which seem very
suitable. Met there Mr. L., a land agent, who told me that they would be
nearly a Thousand Pounds per acre, and therefore too dear. I asked Mr.
L. to inform me if he should hear of any suitable land for sale.

Jan. 10. One of the Orphans having received half-a-crown from a cousin,
gave 1s. 6d. of it towards building the Orphan-House; a sister in the
Lord also gave me 3s., a ring, a pair of gold earrings, and a gold
brooch.

Jan. 11. Today I received from a gentleman of Liverpool, who has been
staying at Clifton, 5l, and from the sister, through whom this donation
was conveyed to me, I received 1l. more towards the Building-Fund.

Jan. 12. Received a case with ladies' working instruments, to be sold
for the Building Fund. Two of the Infant Orphans also gave 6d. and 4d.

Jan. 13. Half-a-crown was given today.

Jan. 16. From Bideford 1l. 15s.

Jan. 24. The produce of a knitted handkerchief, sold for 2s, was given
today; also 4s. 6d. by sale of two dolls; and some brethren at
Barnstaple sent 12l. as a token of their loving interest in this work.

Jan. 26. A sister in the Lord gave 2s. 6d.

Jan. 31. It is now 89 days since I have been daily waiting upon God
about the building of an Orphan-House. The time seems to me now near
when the Lord will give us a piece of ground, and I told the brethren
and sisters so this evening, after our usual Saturday evening prayer
meeting at the Orphan-Houses.

Feb. 1. A poor widow sent today 10s.

Feb. 2. Today I heard of suitable and cheap land on Ashley Down.

Feb. 3, Saw the land. It is the most desirable of all I have seen.--
There was anonymously put into an Orphan-box at my house a sovereign, in
a piece of paper, on which was written, "The New Orphan-House."

Feb. 4. This evening I called on the owner of the land on Ashley Down,
about which I had heard on the 2nd, but he was not at borne. As I,
however, had been informed that I should find him at his house of
business, I went there, but did not find him there either, as he had
just before left. I might have called again at his residence, at a later
hour, having been informed by one of the servants that he would be sure
to be at home about eight o'clock; but I did not do so, judging that
there was the hand of God in my not finding him at either place: and I
judged it best therefore not to force the matter, but to "let patience
have her perfect work."

Feb. 5. Saw this morning the owner of the land. He told me that he awoke
at three o'clock this morning and could not sleep again till five.
While he was thus lying awake, his mind was all the time occupied about
the piece of land, respecting which inquiry had been made of him for the
building of an Orphan-House, at my request; and he determined, that if I
should apply for it, he would not only let me have it, but for 120l. per
acre, instead of 200l., the price which he had previously asked for it.
How good is the Lord! The agreement was made this morning, and I
purchased a field of nearly seven acres, at 120l. per acre.

Observe the hand of God in my not finding the owner at home last
evening! The Lord meant to speak to His servant first about this matter,
during a sleepless night, and to lead him fully to decide, before I had
seen him.

Feb. 6. Two dolls were given for sale, and one of them was sold for 3s.

Feb. 7. Received from two of the Orphans 8d. and 4d. Also, one of the
labourers in the Orphan-Houses gave 10s, and a poor man 3d.

Feb. 8. I wrote the day before yesterday to the architect, who has
offered his help gratuitously.

Feb. 11. Received from a sister in the Lord 5l. Received also from the
architect the following reply to my letter:

"My dear Sir,

"It will afford me a gratification, beyond what I can communicate by
letter, to lend you a helping hand in the labour of love you are engaged
in, and I shall esteem it a very great privilege being allowed to
exercise my abilities as an architect and surveyor in the erection of
the building you propose to erect for the Orphans. I really do mean what
I say, and, if all is well, by the blessing of God, I will gratuitously
furnish you with plans, elevations, and sections; with specification of
the work, so that the cost may be accurately estimated. I will also make
you an estimate and superintend the works for you gratuitously, &c."

Feb. 12. This afternoon a little parcel was brought to my house,
containing ten sovereigns and a little slip of paper, on which was
written:

"Dear Sir, —I have sent you ten pounds for the New Orphan-House. It is
the Lord's doing. Seek not to know my name."

Feb. 14. There came in 8s. 6d. by sale of articles.

Feb. 15. Received the promise that on March 25th should be paid to me
500l. for the building of the Orphan-House.

Feb. 18. Received 1l. from Sunderland.

Feb. 19. The architect kindly came from London. He considers the ground
to be most suitable as to situation, drainage, water, &c. —I received
also today from a sister 5l.

Feb. 20. Received from a sister 10s., and from a brother 5l. The brother
told me that never in his life does he remember to have given any
donation with so much real pleasure as this 5l. This is of God. I own
God's hand in this. He it is that inclines the hearts of His dear
children towards this service. May He only be pleased to continue to
give me faith amid patience, and I shall most assuredly see this
building erected to the praise of His name!

Feb. 28. Two of the labourers in the Orphan-Houses gave 1s. each—Today
the 500l. which had been promised on the 15th, was paid 25 days sooner
than promised. I rejoiced in this speed; for I remembered that word:

"Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might: for there is
no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom in the grave, whither
thou goest."

March 2. Received 2 rings, 6 brooches, 2 mourning brooches, 3 old silver
thimbles, a silver guard, a small gold chain, 4 pairs of earrings, 3
polished stones, a bracelet, 3 waist buckles, a silver mounting of a
horn, and 2 candlestick ornaments.

March 3. From a brother in the Lord 10l.

March 8. From Clevedon 1s., and from London 6d.

March 13. From a young sister in the Lord 13s. From a little girl at
Bath 2s. 6d.--Also 2 babies' pinafores for sale.--4 little
frocks, a pair of socks, and 4 pincushions (also for sale).--Likewise
a dozen doilies.

March 15. Anonymously 2l. with these lines written in the paper:
"Wishing for the privilege of raising a few stones towards erecting the
New Orphan-House, the enclosed trifle is sent for that purpose.--
There will doubtless be a conspiracy from beneath, to fight against and
to hinder the work; nevertheless let us make our prayer unto our God,
and set a watch against them day and night."

March 19. By sale of some articles 1l. 5s 4 ½ d.

March 22. From a sister in the Lord 10s.

March 25. A pair of knitted cuffs for sale.

March 28. A lady at Clifton gave 2l.

March 31. A brother, having unexpectedly received a sum of money as a
dividend from a Bankruptcy, gave 10l. towards the Building-Fund, as "A
thank-offering to the Lord."

April 5. Anonymously 1l.

April 7. Four pairs of knitted socks were given for sale; and by a
sister in the Lord 10l., as "A thank-offering for mercies received."
This 10l. comes at a season of a very great trial of faith, on account
of a multiplicity of difficulties in which I am just now, and it is
another precious earnest to me from God, that He will give me in every
way what I need, after He has sufficiently tried my faith and
patience.—There were also given 5 stuffed birds and a pincushion. Also
2 cups, 2 shells, a book-mark, and a watch guard. Also a knitted cloth.

April 27. Anonymously 4s., and by sale of articles 3s. 9d. I received
also the following letter from Sunderland:

"Sunderland, April 24, 1846.

"Beloved Brother,

"A year having now elapsed since our chapel was opened, and our God
having signally blessed us in all things, the saints here have been
stirred up to present a thank-offering to our Father, and to give it for
the New Orphan-Houses. I therefore send you in their name, the sum of
17l. Etc."

May 3. From a sister at Bath 10s.

May 9. By sale of articles 1s. "A widow's mite" 1l.

May 11. From a brother 50l.

May 21. From Oxford 1l.

May 27. From a sister in Bristol 1l.

June 2. Through a sister 1s. 3d.

June. 4. From Leicestershire 5s., and from a sister in Bristol 2s. 6d.

That which has been stated above concerning the origin of the New
Orphan-House on Ashley Down, Bristol, was published in the Ninth Report
of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, which was
issued in the year 1846. In that Report were added to the above, the
following remarks, which I likewise give here again, in order that the
reader may have a clear under-standing of the whole, and also the full
particulars concerning this Orphan Establishment.

1. The total amount, which has been given for the Building-Fund, up to
June 4, 1846, is 2710l. 3s. 5 ½ d. This is only a small part of what
will be needed, but, by the grace of God, I am in perfect peace, being
fully assured that God in His own time will send the whole sum which is
required. Many and great have already been the exercises of faith and
patient since I first began to give myself to prayer about this work,
and still greater they may be, before it is accomplished; but God, in
the riches of His grace, will help me through them all. It is now (June
4, 1846) 212 days since I first began to pray about this work, and day
after day, since then, have I been enabled to continue to wait upon God,
and I am more than ever assured that, notwithstanding all my exceeding
great unworthiness, God will condescend to use me, to build this House.
Had it been the excitement of the moment, the difficulties which have
already come upon me in connexion with this work, (which are not stated
here, on account of their occupying too much room) would have
overwhelmed me; but as God Himself, I trust, led me to this work, so He
has helped me, and does help me, and, I doubt not, will help me to the
end.

2. The house is intended to be built, so as to accommodate 140 Orphan
Girls above seven years of age, 80 Orphan Boys above seven, and 80 male
and female Orphans from their earliest days, till they are seven years
old, together with all the overseers and teachers, etc. that may be
needed. The Infants, after having passed the age of seven, will be
removed into the different departments for older boys and girls.

3. The plan of the building is, by the help of God, all but completed.
Scarcely anything more remains to be altered.

4. The building, however, will not commence till all the money, which is
required, has been received.

5. The land and house will be invested in the hands of about ten
brethren, as trustees, who shall be persons well known and of good
report.

6. Only such donations, ordinarily, will be put to time Building-Fund as
are expressly given for it. I should only depart from this my usual
mode, if the Lord by some very great abundance of means corning in, or
in other respects were to point out, that money not expressly given for
the Building-Fund, was to be appropriated to it. It is therefore
requested that donors will kindly state it, if they wish any donation
put to the Building-Fund.

Miscellaneous points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from July 14, 1844, to May
26, 1840.

1. During the whole of this period, 4 Day-Schools, with 278 children in
them, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. Three
Day-Schools besides were assisted. The number of the children that were
taught in the Day-Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the
Institution, from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1846, amounts to 3983.
During the period from July 14, 1844, to May 26, 1846, 628l. 19s. 4 ¾
d. was spent on all the Schools, which were either entirely or in part
supported by the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution.
—Further, during this period there were also entirely supported a
Sunday-School with 80 children, and an Adult-School with 60 persons
attending it. The total number of Adult scholars who received
instruction, from the formation of this Institution to May 26, 1846, is
1146.

2. During this period were circulated 269 Bibles, and 171 Testaments;
and 5079 Bibles, and 3528 Testaments were circulated from the
commencement of the work up to May 26, 1846. 40l. 7s. 10d. was expended
of the Funds of the Institution on this object, from July 14, 1844, to
May 26, 1840.

3. From July 14, 1844, to May 20, 1846, was laid out for Foreign and
Home Missions the sum of 595l. 7s, 9d. Of this sum was spent for Foreign
Missions 447l. 17s. 9d, which was divided among 15 brethren and sisters
who labour in British Guiana, one brother and sister in Jamaica, 2
brethren in India, one brother in Prussia, and 3 brethren in
Switzerland. The remainder, 147l. 10s. was divided among 14 brethren who
labour in England without any salary, and in dependence upon the Lord
for their temporal supplies. During no period previously was so much of
the Funds of this Institution spent on Missionary work, which arose from
the fact, that, the more I corresponded with brethren who laboured in
the word and doctrine in foreign lands, the more I saw how much they
stood in need of assistance, and thus, my heart having been led out in
prayer to God on their behalf, that He would be pleased to send me
means, whereby I might be able to assist them, He was pleased to do so.
This led me to purpose, as God should give me grace, to be still more
mindful of them in future, and to seek to be able still more to assist
them. The same was the case with regard to those brethren who labour in
England, but who have no salary or stipend, but trust in the living God
for the supply of their daily necessities; I did long to help such
brethren, and had no doubt that God would enable me to do so.

When I now, whilst preparing this fourth part of my Narrative for the
press, look back to this period, how greatly has God helped me since
then even in this particular; for, of late years, he has enabled me to
spend on Missionary objects about seven times more than during the
period now referred to.

4. There was laid out for the circulation of tracts, from July 14, 1844,
to May 26, 1846, the sum of 50l. 9s. 9 ½ d., for which Fifty-two
thousand and three such little publications were bought, which, with
5315 in hand on July 14, 1844, makes 57318, of which number 40565 were
circulated The total number circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26,
1846, amounts to 99647.

5. There were received into the four Orphan-Houses, from July 14, 1844,
to May 20, 1840, 30 Orphans, who, together with those who were in the
four Houses on July 14, 1844, make up 151 in all. Of these: 1. One child
died. 2. One boy left the Institution secretly just when he was ready to
be apprenticed, and went to his relatives. [In going over this account,
for time sake of preparing it for the press, I cannot help making a few
remarks on this case, for the sake of teachers, guardians, and parents,
who are greatly afflicted by the bad behaviour of children or young
persons. The boy referred to just now gave us for years much sorrow. All
means, to bring him into a different state, seemed entirely lost. At
last he was going to be apprenticed. His clothes and outfit for leaving
the House were already prepared, when he secretly left and at last
reached on foot the dwelling-place of an elder sister, in the North of
Devon, who is married to a master of a small vessel, a pious man. His
sister and brother-in-law were greatly afflicted by his bad behaviour
towards his friends in Bristol. There remained, however, now nothing to
be done, but that the lad should go with his brother-in-law to sea.
After he had been some time at sea, one night there was a terrific
storm, so that all hope of the vessel or crew being saved was gone. This
poor lad now remembered the instruction which he had received in the
Orphan-House in Bristol, and earnestly prayed to God for mercy, and
turned to Him. From that time, as the brother-in-law himself told me,
this youth was a truly changed character, and proved by his godly
deportment for several months afterwards, that he had the grace of God
in him; for he continued walking in the fear of God, till about 6 months
afterwards, when he was drowned by falling overboard. May this encourage
all who labour among the young, patiently to go on in their service.
"They that sow in tears shall reap in joy." Ps. 126, 5.] 3. Six children
were taken back by their relatives, who by that time were able to
provide for them. 4. Six boys were apprenticed at the expense of the
Institution, and five other boys, ready to be apprenticed, were sent to
their relatives to be apprenticed. 5. Two girls were apprenticed, and
eight sent out to service, and one girl was sent to her relatives to
serve them.

There were on May 28, 1846, One hundred and twenty-one Orphans in the
Four Houses. Besides this, six apprentices were still supported by the
Funds of the Institution, so that the total number was 127. The number
of the Orphans who were under our care from April 1836, to May 26, 1846,
amounts to 213.

I notice further the following points in connexion with the
Orphan-Houses.

1. Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 13,275l. 6s. 9 ¾ d. was given to me as the result of prayer
to God, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1846. This sum
includes the 2710l. 3s. 5 ½ d. which up to June 4, 1846, was given
towards the Building Fund. (It may be interesting to the reader to know
that the total amount which was given as free contributions, for the
other objects, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1846,
amounts to 4833l. 18s. 10 ¾ d.; and that which came in by the sale of
Bibles and Tracts, and by the payments of the children in the
Day-Schools, amounts to 2097l. 18s. 2 ½ d.) 2. Besides this, also a
great variety and number of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions,
etc., were given for the Orphans, as has been stated in the printed
Reports. The total expenditure for the Orphans from July 14, 1844, to
May 26, 1846, was 2732l. 14s. 1 ½ d., and for the other objects 1325l.
7s. 7 ¼ d.

In conclusion I cannot but mention, to the praise of the Lord,
concerning this period, that four of the Sunday-School children were
admitted to communion. Likewise three more of the Orphans were received
into church fellowship, so that up to that time, altogether 32 of the
Orphans had been admitted. I also mention with peculiar joy, and as a
matter for thankfulness, that of those who were apprenticed or sent out
to service, from July 14, 1844, to May 20, 1846, ten were believers,
most of whom had been for several years in fellowship, before they were
sent out to service. But whilst we desire to receive these instances as
precious encouragements from the Lord to continue our service, we cannot
but believe, judging from the many prayers the Lord gives us for the
children and adults under our care and instruction, that that which we
see is but an earnest of a far larger harvest in the day of Christ's
appearing.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, or time work of the Lord
in my hands, not immediately connected with the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution, from January 1, 1844, to May 26, 1846.

Soon after my return from Germany, where I had been labouring for seven
months in 1843, and 1844, of which I have written at length in the third
part of this Narrative, I had it laid on my heart to go there again for
a season; but, before doing so, I felt called upon to prepare for the
press a new edition of the first and second parts, and to write the
third part of my Narrative. For this, however, a large sum of money was
required, as I purposed to print not less than 4000 copies. As I had no
money of my own for this object, I gave myself to prayer, and, after
having prayed several months respecting it, I received on December 30,
1844, unasked for, the sum which would be needed to accomplish this
object.

Dec. 31, 1844. Since Brother Craik and I came to Bristol, 982 believers
have been received into communion, making 1050 with the 68 whom we found
in fellowship. Of these, 97 have fallen asleep, 53 are under church
discipline, 56 have left us but are still in Bristol, and 176 have
removed from Bristol; so that there are only 668 in communion at
present. During this year 73 have been received.

The Lord has been pleased to give me during this year—

1, Through anonymous offerings in money,
put up in paper, and directed to me,
and placed in the boxes for the
poor saints, or the rent,
at the two chapels. £117 11 9

2, Through presents in money,
from believers in Bristol, not given
anonymously 56 0 6

3, Through presents in money,
from believers not residing in
Bristol . .
. . 81 14 6

4, In presents in provisions, clothes,
etc., worth to us at least 12 0 0

£267 6 9

To this is to be added, that, for the first two months and six days of
this year, my expenses, and those of my dear wife, during our stay in
Germany, were met, as also our traveling expenses back, as stated in.
the third part of my Narrative. Also during the whole of this year a
Christian lady gave to our dear child board and schooling without any
remuneration, a present worth to us not less than 50l. On this point I
cannot help making a few remarks. I had clearly seen it to be the will
of God that my daughter should be brought up at school, and not at home.
My reasons for it were these: 1, My dear wife, though well qualified, to
instruct our daughter, so far as knowledge goes, was unable, on account
of being engaged as my wife in a variety of things connected with the
Lord's service, to give herself uninterruptedly to this work; and to
do it partially we judged to be injurious to our daughter. 2, I had seen
instances in which a home education, for an only child, had turned out
very badly. 3, I judged that the mixing with other children would be
beneficial to our daughter, provided that intercourse was under proper
oversight; as thus a child is in early life introduced into a little
world, and things do not all at once come upon a young person, when at
last obliged to leave the parental roof. 4, But that which most of all
led me to this decision was, that, as in the Church of Christ the Lord
has qualified the members of the body for the performance of certain
work, and all have not the same gift and service, so, in the same way,
certain believers are called and qualified above others, for instructing
children, and give themselves to this particular service, and that,
therefore, I ought to make use of the qualifications of such, and of
their having given their whole time to this particular service.--
These reasons led us to place our dear daughter at school, instead of
educating her at home, and we have never had cause to regret the step we
took, but on the contrary, have had abundant reason to praise God for it
I have purposely made these remarks, as I am fully aware that some
believers have different views on this subject, and I desire to serve
them with the measure of light and experience I have obtained.

After our daughter had been at school for half a year, I asked for the
account, when it was stated to me by the Christian lady in whose
establishment she was, that she had a pleasure in educating her
gratuitously. However, as I pressed the matter, I obtained the account.
It was paid, but the exact sum was returned to me anonymously, which, of
course, I found out at once to be from the Christian sister at whose
school my daughter was. From that time I could never more obtain the
account, though my dear child was about six years longer at school. I
refer to this point for this especial reason: God had laid it on my
heart to care about poor destitute Orphans. To this service I had been
led to give myself; He, in return, as a recompense even for this life,
took care that my own beloved child should have a very good education,
free of expense to me. I was able, and well able to pay for her
education, and most willing to do so; but the Lord gave it gratuitously;
thus also showing how ready He is, abundantly to help me and to supply
my wants.

January 6, 1845. Today I received the most painful information that a
false teacher from Switzerland had found his way among the brethren and
sisters at Stuttgart, and that through him several, yea almost all, to a
greater or less degree had been drawn aside, and shaken as to the very
foundations of their faith.

I cannot describe how bitter the trial was to me to see the Lord thus
dishonoured, and my painful service for seven months during the previous
year, to all appearance, entirely frustrated. The Lord, however, laid
these brethren and sisters on my heart in prayer, so that I was day by
day enabled to bring them before God, and also to resolve, that, as soon
as my path was made plain, I would go again to Stuttgart for a season.

May 3, 1845. I have seen it more and more clearly of late, that the time
is drawing near, when I shall go again to Germany, to labour there for a
time; for the brethren who had fallen into grievous errors are now
recovering out of them, but need a helping hand to restore them fully,
or at least to confirm them in the truth. In addition to this I purpose
to publish some tracts in German. But though it is now four months,
since I have been daily praying respecting this object, I never had been
led to ask the Lord to give me means for it, because I felt assured,
that, when His time was come for me to go, He would provide the means;
and also because I had never felt myself led to pray about it. Today,
however, I asked the Lord that He would provide the means for all that
is necessary in connexion with this service; and I had a secret
satisfaction in feeling that so much was required, i.e. means for the
journey to and fro, means for our stay there, means for the publication
of Tracts, means to be left behind for the work in Bristol, to supply
the need at least for a time, for I did not wish to go, unless it were
the Lord's will, and if so, He would give the means. Now see how the
Lord dealt with me! About a quarter of an hour after 1 had been in
prayer with my dear wife respecting this object, and I had now, for the
first time, asked Him for means to carry it out, though for four months
we had daily prayed together respecting spiritual success in this
service, I received a letter containing an order for 500l. In the letter
this was written:

"I enclose * * * * 500l., which will be more useful in your hands than
in mine. I mean it in the first place for all that is needed preparatory
to and attendant upon your journey to Germany, and, whatever the surplus
may be, you will apply as you find there is need in the different parts
of service under your care." Thus the Lord has fully answered our
requests for means, and that so speedily!

On July 19th my dear wife and I left Bristol for Stuttgart. As the
letters, which I wrote to the church in Bristol, in which I gave some
account of my labours on the Continent, have been preserved, I give them
here, as they will furnish the reader with an outline of the Lord's
dealings with me during that period.

Stuttgart, Aug. 16, 1845.

To the Saints, meeting in the name of the Lord Jesus at Bethesda and
Salem Chapels, Bristol.

Dear Brethren,

It is today four weeks since we left you. As I know that your love to us
would like to know how the Lord has been dealing with us since, and as I
have abundant reason to speak well of Him on account of His goodness and
mercy to us since our departure; I gladly relate to you how it has been
with us since we left Bristol It was on Saturday afternoon, July 19th,
that we started for London. On the next day, the Lord's day, I
ministered twice in London, as also on Monday evening. I was much helped
in doing so, especially on the evening of the Lord's day and on Monday
evening, and I could not but recognize the hand of the Lord even in
this, with reference to my leaving Bristol for a season. On Monday and
Tuesday we were much occupied in procuring our passports, and on
Wednesday at twelve o'clock we went on board the steamer for Ostend.
The Lord mercifully carried us over the sea, although we were both very
sea-sick, and about five o'clock the next morning we went on shore at
Ostend. Having in a very little time, without any difficulty, obtained
our luggage out of the Customhouse, we left by the first train for
Cologne, at half-past six, travelled all that day, a distance of about
240 miles, and reached Cologne between nine and ten o'clock in the
evening. We then travelled either in the Rhine steamers, on the
rail-road, or in an omnibus, the four following days also, yet so that
we arranged to have time to ourselves, and reached Stuttgart about eight
o'clock on Monday evening, July 28th. Of the journey I would mention
no more, than that on the last day we travelled with a most lovely and
gracious brother, an English clergyman from Sussex, with whom, after two
or three hours I was so one in heart, that on getting out of the
omnibus, in which we travelled together about 30 miles, in order to walk
up a long hill, we walked together arm-in-arm. It was most refreshing to
our spirits to find so lovely a brother in this dark land. We spent a
few hours together at Stuttgart, and then this dear brother left for the
neighbourhood of Munich, the capital of the kingdom of Bavaria, where
his family is for a season.--I had written from Bristol to one of the
brethren at Stuttgart, Brother M—, an Englishman, to look out for furnished
lodgings for us, and I
therefore called on him the next morning, July 29th, to see how far he
had succeeded. I now learned that he had made every inquiry for me, and
also advertised in the paper, and applied at an intelligence office, but
that he had heard only of three apartments, and even these were
unfurnished; for all the lodgings which were to be had were occupied by
the deputies of the people, a sort of Parliament in Wirtemberg, who have
once every three years their assemblies, and who had been for the last
six months assembled in Stuttgart. This was no small difficulty, as to
stay at an hotel would have been very expensive, especially just now, as
the assembly of the deputies has made a great difference in the hotels
also. However, our comfort was, that, as we had come in the name of the
Lord, and according to His bidding, and that, after having daily prayed
about the matter since the latter part of November last year, He would
help in this thing also. We now went to the only lodging out of the
three which was at all likely to suit; but we found that this was only
to be had on Nov. 10th, and not now, a lady having taken a whole floor
of seven rooms, and wishing to let two of them. We saw the two rooms
which had been offered, found them furnished, and asked to whom they
belonged, when we learned that they were in the use of the owner of the
house, who had sold the house, but would have the use of these rooms, as
well as those in which he lived, till Nov. 1st. 1 now affectionately
asked him, whether he would not let an have these rooms for a time,
offering to pay any price, and give the money before-hand, as I was a
stranger to him. He said he would consider it with his wife a few hours.
My dear wife and I now gave ourselves to prayer, that, if it were good
for us, the Lord would be pleased to incline the hearts of these persons
to let us have those two rooms, but I told Him, at the same time, that I
should not now press the matter further, having offered what I had; for
after all He might have another place for us, where. He wished us to be.
After two or three hours I went again, and as we required little as to
attendance, and were of quiet habits, and required little alteration to
be made in the way of furniture, these persons agreed to let us have
those rooms; and that same afternoon we were able to leave the hotel and
enter our lodging. And now hear the Lord's goodness in this
particular. The dear persons with whom we lodge are both Christians, who
are most kind to us, and obliging in every way. Their servant also who
waits on us is a most kind person. The house is in a healthy and quiet
situation, and not far from our meeting-place, though without the city
gates. In a word, we could not have wished better lodgings. And how did
we get them? Because all the apartments, usually let out as lodgings,
were occupied by these 90 or 100 gentlemen of the Parliament. Moreover,
to this house we came, through a mistake having been made; for the rooms
we now live in were only intended to be let on Nov. 10th. More, the
persons with whom we live are evidently wealthy persons, a surgeon who
has retired from his profession, and his wife, and who never had let
lodgings. Oh! how kind of the Lord, to let circumstances be as they
were, in order that we might, through this very difficulty, obtain such
a dwelling-place. Daily we feel the comfort of living with Christians,
though these dear persons belong to the State Church. May this little
matter lead us all, dear brethren, to leave all our affairs in the hands
of our loving Father; He arranges matters as they are best for us.--
During the first three or four days in Stuttgart, I was especially poor
and needy, and required every particle of courage not to be overwhelmed
by the state of things here. Everything seemed most dark. On Tuesday
evening when I went to the meeting, there were but eight present, and
all I saw and heard gave me the impression of spiritual desolation,
resulting from that false teacher from Switzerland having come among the
brethren here. In addition to this, my dear wife was taken very ill
during the night from Tuesday to Wednesday, July 29 to 30, so that for
two days she kept her bed, and only on the fourth day was pretty well
again. It was the result of sea-sickness and the great fatigue of the
journey, I think. But the Lord had mercy and brightened the prospect by
increasing my faith. In addition to this, circumstances looked better
almost immediately after my arrival, and I was constantly comforted by
the knowledge, that only according to the Lord's will we were here,
and that He would not have sent us, if He had not some purpose to be
accomplished by it. The first thing that occurred was, that, in answer
to our many prayers in England, on the journey, and here, and also in
answer to your prayers, dear brethren, the police gave me permission to
stay here, a thing which, looking at it naturally, could not have been
expected. Still, this had always been my hope, because to Stuttgart I
felt to be my mission. The next thing was, that the moment my arrival
became known, the poor scattered sheep were again drawn together, and
other persons also, believers and unbelievers, came to the meetings, so
that the first evening it was known I should hold a meeting, there were
about 20 persons present, and since then there have been repeatedly 40
and upwards. This is a small number for England, but large here, and for
our position in particular. The next thing was, our landlady told me
that every Monday afternoon a number of pious females met at her house,
for two or three hours, to knit stockings for the Moravian missionaries,
and requested me to come and speak to them. This I now do every Monday
afternoon, expounding the Scriptures to 20 or 25 of these females and
our landlord and to an aged brother, who has been in the habit of
attending these meetings. This is a new field entirely, and something
else to show how the hand of God was in the matter of our lodgings.
Still more. On the last two Friday evenings I have attended a meeting,
at which about 150 persons, belonging to the State Church, meet
together, most of them probably converted, and the others either seeking
the Lord, or religiously inclined. To this meeting I have gone for
love's sake, to show that I really desire to be united, in spirit,
with all who love our Lord Jesus. Now at this meeting also, I have had
opportunity to speak both times. In future also, the Lord willing, I
purpose to go to this meeting, and to embrace the opportunity which thus
I may have of speaking what may be suitable under the circumstances. The
character of the meeting is not in every way that which is according to
the Holy Scriptures, but these dear brethren must be borne with, in
order to help them on. About 8 brethren sit round a table, being more
intimately known to each other. They lead the whole meeting as to
prayer, giving out a hymn, proposing the portion of the Word of God for
consideration, &c. They make remarks on it, and all the other 100 or
200, or more or less, that may be present, listen. As I had called on
one of these leading brethren, he asked me to sit at that table, and
thus I have the right of speaking, which yet must be used very wisely,
as these dear children of God may be able to bear it. But even if I were
not to speak at all, my very presence would do good, with God's
blessing, as they would see that I am desirous of being united with all
who love our Lord Jesus; and I cannot but hope that thus prejudices will
wear away, they will come to our meetings, and read my book. The
Continent is not like England. Every particle of progress one is able to
make here, is highly to be prized. The state of things is most
interesting here. Infidelity is most awfully showing itself,
regardlessly trampling under foot God's word, and shamelessly and most
impudently denouncing the whole as a fabrication; but, on the other
side, there is evidently an inquiry after truth, and a seeking to know
the truth from the Scriptures themselves, and a beginning to be
dissatisfied with cold dead forms. The Lord also begins to work for us
in other respects. The parliament of Wirtemberg has also publicly
considered the matter of the brother and sister who would not be married
at the State Church, and have recommended to the government of the
country to consider the matter once more, and also to grant to us the
privilege of being able to marry, without going to the State Church, as
they had already granted us "the administration of the Lord's Supper
and Baptism," as they call it. Thus, with God's blessing, help will
come in that way also; and I cannot but hope that this poor little
gathering here, in which the devil has recently made such havoc, will
yet be to the praise of the Lord, and to the benefit of His church in
the German States.--God has blessed my being here in bringing brother
R. out of the errors into which he had fallen, having been led away by
that false teacher from Switzerland; but this brother reaps now bitterly
the fruits of his want of watchfulness: that dear young sister who was
converted while I was here before, his youngest daughter, is among those
persons in Switzerland, and another of his daughters is engaged to one
of these persons--Oh! how important, dear brethren, carefully and
prayerfully to compare what we hear with the Word of God. Five days
following, three times each day, this false teacher held meetings, and
thus overpowered these dear saints completely; for they had no time left
to consider and to pray over, and compare with the Holy Scriptures, what
they heard, as, in addition to three meetings a day, they lasted till
after 11 o'clock at night.--I now attend eight meetings every week.
Sunday mornings at nine o'clock, exposition of the Word, and in the
afternoon at two we meet for the breaking of bread. The dear brethren
have gone back to these unsuitable hours. On Monday afternoon at three
the exposition of the Scriptures to those who meet together to knit for
the missionaries, and on Monday and Wednesday evenings from 8 to 10
o'clock, Scripture reading meetings, with the saints only who break
bread. On Tuesday and Thursday evenings from eight to half-past nine,
public exposition of the Word. And on Friday evening from half-past
eight to a quarter before ten, I meet with the brethren who belong to
the State Church. Besides this, my time has hitherto been much occupied
in seeing brethren and sisters privately and the rest of my time,
besides prayer and meditation, for my own soul and the work, has been
occupied in preparing tracts for the press. Five are already finished. I
have translated into German: "The love of God to poor sinners," "The
Serpent of brass," and "The two thieves;" and I have written myself two
tracts, on "Lydia's conversion," and "The conversion of the jailer at
Philippi." In this work I purpose to continue, the Lord willing, while
we remain here, either writing or translating tracts, and then seeking
myself, as much as I can, whilst here, to circulate them--Oh! help me,
beloved brethren, yet more and more with your prayers in all this
important service. My position here is more important, and more
interesting than ever; for God, "who comforteth those who are cast
down," has comforted me, after the first three days of trial, and has
given me a larger field for service than I had before.--We remember
you daily in prayer, and gladly do so, and shall be truly glad to return
to you, as soon as we can see it to be the will of the Lord. Farewell,
beloved brethren. My dear wife sends to you her love in Christ. Should
any of you wish to write to me, I shall be glad to hear from you; but
please to write on very thin paper, on account of the heavy postage. The
letters may be left at my house.

Your affectionate brother and servant in the Lord,

George Müller.

Stuttgart, Sept. 13, 1845.

To the Brethren in Christ, meeting in the name of the Lord Jesus at
Bethesda and Salem Chapels, Bristol.

My dear brethren,

It is eight weeks today since we left Bristol, and we have still
abundant reason to say, that goodness and mercy have followed us every
day. This I have in particular also to say in reference to the last four
weeks, even since I wrote to you last. As we desire your thanksgiving to
the Lord for His goodness to us, and as we earnestly crave the
continuance of your prayers, I write again, especially also as I judge
that your love will be desirous of knowing further particulars about us
and the work of the Lord in my hands. Since I wrote to you, I have
continued to attend eight meetings a week, that is, three for exposition
of the Scriptures at our usual in meeting-place on Lord's day mornings
and Tuesday and Thursday evenings; the breaking of bread on the Lord's
day evenings (as we have altered the hour from 2 in the afternoon to 8
in the evening); two Scripture reading meetings on Monday and Wednesday,
at which, as well as at all our other meetings, there is given to every
brother as much room for prayer, as there may be a desire for it. Then I
attend two other meetings a week, among believers or inquirers who are
in connexion with the State Church, one on Monday afternoon at the house
where we live, which has increased from about ten to about forty. At
this meeting I lead entirely, and am the only speaker. Then there is
every Friday evening another meeting, at which about 150 persons
assemble, which I have continued to attend, and where I have regularly
spoken, together with other brethren. The shyness which there was at
first is evidently wearing off, and last evening, when I took leave of
them, having been there for the last time before our departure, the
brethren were quite cordial. In addition to this, the Lord has opened
another new and important field. At the house of an elderly lady of
title, of one of the ancient noble families of this kingdom, there is a
meeting for ladies who work for charitable purposes. This meeting I have
also been requested to attend for the purpose of expounding the
Scriptures, whilst the ladies work. I was there last Tuesday afternoon,
and shall be there again, the Lord willing, neat Tuesday. To all who
attend this meeting I have therefore an opportunity of giving a copy of
my Narrative in German, about forty in all, as well as a copy of the
eleven tracts which I have published, and thus the truth, with God's
blessing, may be carried into the higher circles of this city, if not of
this kingdom. Truly, the Lord gave, at the beginning of my sojourn here,
to everything apparently the death-blow, that He might give me a larger
field than I had had before. Still it is even now but little in
comparison with England, yet it is much for Germany. Indeed I have now
as much work day by day as I can do. Persons from the establishment come
to see mind converse with me, and I might visit as many as I have time
and strength for, and many more, and should be welcome.

Sept. 14. Thus far I had written yesterday morning, when a pious
gentleman of rank called on me, who, with his wife, feels the deepest
interest about the work of the Lord in Bristol, of which they have
gathered information through my Narrative in German. This gentleman has
been this morning to our poor meeting place also, and has invited me to
his house to meet his friends. Thus a new opening has been given. The
remainder of yesterday was spent in seeing visitors, and the evening I
spent among brethren belonging to the State Church.--I have now been
able to publish eleven different Gospel tracts in German. They are as
follows; 1."The love of God to poor sinners," translation from the
English, 4 pages. 2. "The Serpent of brass," translation, 4 pages. 3.
"The two thieves," translation, 8 pages. 4. "Lydia, the seller of
purple," written by me, 4 pages. 5. "The jailer at Philippi," written by
me, 12 pages. 6. "The four most important questions answered," written
by me, 12 pages. 7. "Grace," translation, 4 pages. 8. "The poor man's
best medicine," translation, 6 pages. 9. "Almost and Altogether,"
translation, 6 pages. 10. "What is a Christian?" translation, 6 pages.
11. "A just God and a Saviour," translation, 6 pages.--Of each of
these tracts twenty thousand copies have been printed, there are
therefore two hundred and twenty thousand copies ready to be used by the
Lord. I tell you all these particulars, dear brethren, that you may now
help me with your prayers, that God may be pleased to use and bless
them. The especial intention respecting these tracts is, to state the
Gospel in a plain and distinct way. Now one of my particular reasons for
leaving you for a season, and labouring here was, to publish these
tracts, and to circulate myself as many of them as I could. The latter I
am now about to do in the following way. I have had a box made which
will hold about thirty thousand tracts. This box will be filled and
fastened behind the conveyance which I purpose hiring. Our portmanteaus
and other packages, as much as room permits, will be filled with copies
of my German Narrative. Thus stored we purpose to leave on Wednesday or
Thursday, Sept. 17 or 18, giving to each person we meet on the road a
tract, and giving away in the towns and villages as many as may be wise,
without raising a mob around us. In addition to this, as far as
opportunity may allow, I purpose to speak with persons on the road. In
this way we purpose to travel on, day after day, giving away tracts, and
also my Narrative, so that in every village and town, of a journey of
500 or 600 miles, at least a few copies of my Narrative will be left,
besides giving them to passengers on the road, and as many tracts as we
can. In order to fill our stores again, I purpose to send to Frankfort a
large bale of tracts and books before us, also to Eisleben, where Luther
was born, and to Cassel. In this way I hope to be able to give away
about 900 copies of my Narrative, and fifty or sixty thousand tracts. In
addition to this, I am seeking to place with trustworthy brethren in
this country, in Switzerland, and in Prussia, smaller quantities, to be
given away as opportunity may occur. Our route, as far as I can see at
present, will be this: To Heilbronn, Heidelberg, Darmstadt, Frankfort,
Fulda, Erfurt, Eisenach, Eisleben. The last place will be the furthest
part of our journey. Then we mean to return towards England by way of
Nordhausen, Gottingen, Cassel, Elberfeld, Dusseldorf, and Cologne. The
whole tour may take from 20 to 25 days, travelling day after day. All
this I write to you, earnestly asking your prayers for us, on account of
the following particulars: 1. That the Lord would be pleased so to
strengthen us in body, as that we may be able to continue travelling day
after day for 20 days or more. 2. That the Lord would be pleased to give
us suitable and kind drivers, that we may not have difficulty in our
work in that way. 3. That the police may not be permitted to obstruct
our service. 4. That our own souls may not suffer through this work, but
rather be benefited. 5. That the Lord would be pleased to direct the
Tracts and Narratives into the hands of those very persons whom He means
to bless by them.

6. That He would also be pleased to allow the weather to be of that
kind, if it seem good to Him, that our work may not be hindered.--
Great unforseen hindrances and difficulties we may meet with in this
service, yet it has now been with me the subject of prayer for several
months, and in the name of the Lord I enter upon it.--The especial
reason why I go towards the North of Germany is, because there this
service is mostly needed, and there my Narrative is not at all, or
scarcely at all known, as the 200 copies which I sent to a beloved
brother in those parts for circulation, he could not conscientiouisly,
as he says, circulate; I therefore mean myself to circulate the book
there. And further, in those parts public meetings in abundance are
held, in which the foundation truths of the Gospel are openly attacked
by persons who call themselves "the Friends of Light." There then I mean
to distribute among the common people as many thousands of Tracts as I
can.--Germany is in great agitation. Light is increasing, there is a
shaking in establishments; but there infidelity is also increasing, as
well as democracy in politics. I watch with deep interest the state of
things in Germany, and were not my position in Bristol what it is, I
should remain longer here; but I judge it well to be back again, if the
Lord prosper our way, about the 12th of October. Gladly should I have
written many more Tracts, they are also greatly needed, especially on
subjects which are more particularly of importance for believers; but I
cannot now stay longer, and must leave it to a time when the Lord may
honour me again to labour for a season in Germany.

Sept. 15. Yesterday I was again interrupted by visitors, so that I could
not finish my letter. The gentleman, who called the day before
yesterday, called again also yesterday. He was Professor of Medicine in
the University of Moscow in Russia, and President of the Evangelical
Consistory in that City. He seems deeply interested in the service in my
hands. He was twice yesterday at our poor meeting place, and has invited
me this evening to his house to meet some friends of his, clergymen and
others. Last evening there were present at the meeting for the breaking
of bread about 40 persons; besides those who broke bread. Our departure
is now fixed for Thursday, Sept. 18th; but after a dry season for 4 or 5
weeks, the Lord has now sent rain, and we are entirely in His hands as
to the weather, as a rainy season ill suit our intended service; but our
Lord, whose work it is, and not ours, will order this matter also as it
shall be for His glory and our welfare. I reckon, beloved brethren, on
the continuance of your prayers. We also, by the grace of God, continue
to remember you day after day. We shall be glad indeed to behold your
faces again, and yet we desire to be happy here, because we are in our
Lord's work: and indeed we are happy here also, though so far absent
from the hundreds of dear saints whom we have so much reason to love.
The little church here consists of 19, of whom 6 do not live in this
city, but in two villages at some distance, who can only from time to
time come to the breaking of bread. That which they especially now need
is, that one or more brethren should labour among them, and I would
particularly commend this matter to your prayer, that the Lord would be
pleased to appear on their behalf in this particular; for it is not
likely that things will go on well among them without pastoral care and
without oversight. In some little measure order has now been restored
among them, and I hope that the coming of that false teacher among them,
nine months since, will finally be used by the Lord for their
furtherance. And now, greatly loved brethren, farewell. May the Lord, as
we continually pray, give to each of you according to your individual
need. My dear wife, who helps me much in the work here in one way or
other, sends her love in Christ to you.

Your affectionate brother and servant in our Lord,

George Müller.

Cassel, Capital of the Electorate of Hesse Cassel, Oct. 1, 1845.

To the saints, assembling in the name of the Lord Jesus at Salem and
Bethesda Chapels, Bristol.

My very dear brethren,

I long to tell you of the Lord's goodness to us, since last I wrote
you, and though this letter may reach you only three or four days before
our arrival among you, still I would wish you to help us in praising the
Lord for His goodness to us. I now record His kindness in our service,
as far as I remember it, from the day where my last letter heft off. I
think it was on Sept. 15th that my last letter was finished. On that
afternoon I had the last meeting among the working females in my house.
It had then increased to at least sixty, from about 10 at the beginning.
The evening of that day I spent among gentlemen and ladies of Stuttgart,
at the house of a gentleman who had invited me. There the Lord gave me
opportunity of testifying for Him about 2 hours and a half. The next
afternoon I had a meeting at which about 25 ladies were working for
charitable purposes, at the house of a lady of title. To these and to
their absent friends, I gave a copy of my Narrative, 40 in number, as
well as a copy of each of the 11 Tracts which I have published. Thus,
with the Lord's blessing, the Narrative and the Tracts may work among
the higher or highest classes of the kingdom of Wirtemberg. I simply
mention this to show, dear brethren, what open doors the Lord has given
me, after the apparent death-blow upon everything at the beginning. How
important that we should not be discouraged by appearances in the
Lord's service! On the same evening the last public meeting among the
brethren at Stuttgart was attended by about 80 persons more than any
previous time, either at this or my former visit. Thus also the Lord
gave still further encouragement. On the following day, Wednesday, Sept.
17th, I took leave of various believers, not in communion with us; among
the rest, of two pious clergymen at Stuttgart, who treated me most
kindly. This day was occupied with making all the arrangements for our
journey, as I had to send many thousands of tracts before us to several
places, not being able to carry in our carriage all the books and
tracts, which we hoped to circulate on the journey. In the evening that
gentleman called once more to see me, in whose house I had spent the
Monday evening, and with whom I had become acquainted a few days before,
and who, since then, had attended all our meetings. I think I told you
before, that he was Professor of Medicine at the Russian University at
Moscow, and also President of the Protestant Consistory in that city.
This dear brother takes a deep interest in my service, and has offered
to circulate 50 copies of my book, and 50 copies of each of the 11
tracts. We parted like old friends.--Our prayer had been for a
suitable carriage, and an obliging driver, on which so much of our
service depended; but we were so occupied, that I could only order a
carriage on the morning of our departure, Thursday, Sept. 18th, and the
Lord most signally answered our prayers; for we obtained a driver who
was one of a hundred. He drove us three days, and was most obliging, so
that we could not have desired a better driver; the carriage also was as
if made for our work. At 10 o'clock on Thursday morning we set out,
furnished with many thousands of tracts, and about 24,000 sent before
us; also carrying with us about 450 copies of my Narrative, and having
to take up 350 copies on the way. About 350 copies I was able to
circulate at Stuttgart whilst there. I should also say that I found
several brethren with whom I could leave smaller quantities of tracts
for circulation at Stuttgart and else-where, especially an English
brother, Dr. M., who lives at Basle, and who spends his whole time in
circulating religious books and tracts, written in German and French.
This brother came, three days before our departure, to Stuttgart, so
that I could arrange with him. Indeed step by step has the Lord
prospered me in my feeble endeavours, mixed with sin as every one of
them has been, and made it manifest, that, this time also, He bad sent
me to Germany. On Thursday, September 18th, then, we set out, and while
yet driving through the city of Stuttgart I began giving away tracts,
thus to begin the service at once, lest my hands should be weakened
through delay. Whilst going on, we continued offering tracts to the
passengers on the road, and giving away now and then a copy of my book,
and seeking especially to put some copies of it into every village and
town. Thus we went on the first day from Stuttgart to Heilbronn, a
distance of about 35 English miles. All went on most quietly. We were
able to give away many hundreds of tracts, and about 50 copies of my
Narrative, and to a few persons I had the opportunity of speaking a
little. The second day's journey was from Heilbronn to Heidelberg. In
the large towns we went on most quietly, lest there should be a running
together of the people, and the appearance be a political disturbance.
On this account I never give away tracts and books in towns, but on the
road, or just before I come to towns, or after I have passed through
them. Yet now and then I have also given them away in towns in a quiet
way; for instance, by going to a baker's shop, and buying a trifle and
then giving a book. The second day from Heilbronn to Heidelberg we went
on as before in our service, but in the afternoon we were tried in
spirit. We observed a carriage at a distance behind us, with a gentleman
in it, and his coachman before. He stopped more than once to converse
with the people to whom I had given tracts. At last he obtained sight of
my book also. Thus he kept on driving behind us. Our nerves were greatly
tried by this. By the grace of God we were willing to suffer for His
name's sake, even greatly, in this work; yet this matter greatly tried
us, not knowing what the result might be. At last the carriage drove
before us. Then it stopped, and the gentleman lifted himself up, to have
a full look at me, then he ordered his coachman to drive on, and they
were soon out of sight. The next thing to be expected was, that in the
next town the police would stop us in our service. However, we continued
the work, and at last arrived at Heidelberg, without having been
stopped, and having given away more books and tracts than even on the
previous day. The steady even course of service, under all difficulties,
without any one's encouragement, and with the discouragement of many,
requires not a little faith! We felt how weak our faith was! The third
day's journey was from Heidelberg. We continued again our blessed
service. I had opportunity this day to put my Narrative and tracts into
the hands of ladies and gentlemen as well as poor persons. Our
opportunities for service were very many this day, and things went on
quietly in the morning. In the afternoon, however, we were even more
tried than the day before. We had travelled through Wirtemberg and also
the Grand Duchy of Baden, and were now in the country of
Hesse-Darmstadt, when I gave some tracts to some lads of a Grammar
School, whom we met before a town. But these lads followed us,
accompanied the carriage through the whole town, and some distance out
of the town, ridiculing us. We sat quiet, saying nothing at all. Then I
was addressed by a mail-guard who had seen me give away tracts and
books, and who, having stopped the mail, asked for tracts for himself
and the passengers, but evidently in a sneering way. This carried the
news of our service before us, as the mail went much faster than we, and
therefore our work was known in the next place, and a man ran out on our
arrival to ask for books, and in consequence of this the attention of
persons was arrested. Nevertheless the Lord helped us to continue the
work, though somewhat tried in mind, being aware how much such work is
opposed on the Continent. A little while after, a light wagon drove
quickly after us, and as I was walking by the side of the carriage, up a
hill, a man got out, joined me, and asked for a tract. He then said:
"Who has allowed you to distribute these books?" I replied. "Nobody, but
I am a servant of Jesus, and I desire to serve my Lord. If, however, you
can show me that what I am now doing is against the laws of the country
I will give it up. As far as I am aware, it is not." He then asked me,
what religion was contained in the tracts. I said not any one in
particular, but that there were in them the truths of Christianity,
about which alone I cared, as I did not design by these books to
increase any particular party. A few words more of this kind passed, and
he then left me, drove on before us, and presently turned off from the
turnpike road into a little bye road in the wood, where he stopped and
read the tract which I had given him, which was, "The conversion of the
jailer at Philippi." I went on as before with the work, not tried in
spirit, but yet my nerves were much affected by it. We meant only to
have gone that day as far as Darmstadt, the capital of Hesse-Darmstadt,
but I engaged the driver 15 miles further, to Frankfort-on-the-Main, in
order that we might be out of the dominion of Hesse-Darmstadt, if
through the mail-guard, or the last-mentioned person, who, to judge from
his dress, was a government officer, the matter should be coming before
the magistrates. At Frankfort we arrived after ten on Saturday evening,
Sept. 20th, having now been able for 3 days to go on with the service.
The next day, being the Lord's day, we purposed to rest at Frankfort
which we much needed for body and spirit, especially also for the sake
of asking the Lord's blessing upon the work up till then, and to ask
guidance for our future steps, mud His help and blessing for what
remained of our work. We had intended, before we left Stuttgart, to go
to Eisleben, such a distance from Frankfort, as would require 4 or 5
days more travelling, and then all the way back to Cologne. But on
account of what had occurred the two previous days, we now began again
to consider our steps, whether we should go on still further or not.
Nature wished to get back to England at once. Nature shrank greatly from
the continuance of this service. But after having strengthened ourselves
in God, we came to the conclusion, that our first purpose was of God,
and that we ought not to alter our plans, except we saw it most clearly
to be the will of God; we therefore purposed (as we could only look upon
the desire of discontinuing our tour as a temptation), to go on with our
service, till by the order of the police we were prohibited. Blessed be
God who enabled us to triumph over the temptation! But to Him is all the
praise due; for had He not strengthened us in that hour, we should have
been as those who, having put their hand to the plough, draw it back. I
now set about making arrangements for the journey, as the carriage and
horses, which I had engaged for the three previous days, had to return
to Stuttgart. Our prayer was for another suitable driver, upon which so
very much depended in our service. In this again we experienced most
evidently the Lord's willingness to answer prayer; for in the same inn
at which our Stuttgart driver had put up, it happened, by the ordering
of the Lord, that there was a driver from Cassel, the place where I am
now writing, who had taken a family to Frankfort, and who was looking
out for a job. With this coachman I agreed, to take us to Eisleben, to
stop there a day and a half, while I saw brethren in that neighbourhood,
and then to take us to Cassel. This engagement was for eight days. It
was the more kind of the Lord to allow me to find this person, as I went
from place to place in Frankfort to obtain a conveyance, but could not
succeed in that large city; and the only one I could have had, would
have been nearly twice as expensive as the one which I hired. On Monday
morning, then, Sept. 22nd, we left Frankfort, determined by the help of
God to pursue our service, and, if need be, to suffer and to endure
hardship in it. Many tracts and books also were given away this day, and
in the evening we reached Schlüchtern, a small town before Fulda. The
next day at Fulda I took up a large bale of tracts and books which I had
sent before, and on Tuesday evening we reached Vacha. Up to that time we
had had fine weather; but we reached Vacha in a heavy storm, it having
rained heavily for 2 hours, and lightened and thundered exceedingly. All
night the rain continued, and in rain we left Vacha for Eisenach. Our
service now seemed over; but yet I managed now and then to put a copy
of my book out of the carriage, when I saw an opportunity
that it could be kept pretty dry. By the time
we reached Eisenach, which stands on the foot of the hill on which is
the old castle called the Wartburg, where Luther translated the Bible,
the rain ceased and we had a fine afternoon, and in a few hours were
able to give away more than 50 books and many tracts. In the evening we
reached Gotha, capital of the small dukedom of Saxe Gotha. On Thursday,
Sept. 28th, we came as far as a small town called Arthern, and on
Friday, about 1 o'clock in the afternoon, we reached Eisleben. All
these five days and a half we went on quietly in our service, none
hindering us, giving away many books and tracts. Here now we stopped two
days, had some intercourse with brethren, and then left for Cassel,
which we reached in two days and a half, arriving here last evening.
This morning I have been writing this letter and doing some other things
needful for the journey, whilst my dear wife has been all the morning
engaged in putting up tracts for the journey. If we can obtain a
suitable conveyance, we purpose to leave this afternoon on our way to
Elberfeld, and, if the Lord gives us grace, to pursue our service till
we come to the Rhine, and then by way of Ostend to cross the sea for
England, so that about 3 or 4 days after this reaches you we may have
the joy of seeing you again face to face. It will be joy to us indeed to
see you all again. Farewell, beloved brethren. My dear wife sends her
love in Christ to you all.

Your affectionate brother and servant in our Lord,

George Müller.

I add a few remarks respecting this my service on the Continent.

1. For about eight months before I left England, I had seen it to be the
Lord's will, that I should go again that year to the Continent for a
season, and had made my journey and service, during that period, a daily
subject of prayer from Nov. 1844. I left Bristol on July 19th and
returned on Oct. 11th, 1845.

2. I should have greatly preferred to preach the Gospel in the streets
or in the market places in Germany; but for that there was no liberty. I
did therefore what I could, in spreading about eleven hundred copies of
my Narrative, and tens of thousands of tracts. In this I was
particularly encouraged by remembering that that great work, at the time
of the Reformation, was chiefly accomplished by means of printed
publications.

3. We travelled in a hired carriage for 17 days, each day about 40 or 45
miles. I had a box, containing about thirty thousand tracts, made on
purpose, behind the carriage, and in the fore-part several portmanteaus
filled with tracts and copies of my Narrative in German. As we went on,
my dear wife and I looked out for travellers who were coming, or persons
on the road side. It was just the time when the potatoes were taken up,
and thousands of people were thus either close to the turnpike road, or
only a little way from it. The front of our carriage had glass windows,
so that we could see all the persons before us, and on each side. As
soon as the carriage was near enough, I held the tracts or a copy of my
Narrative out to them, and requested them to accept them or sometimes
beckoned the working people to come up to the carriage, which almost
without exception they readily did, and then received a book or tract.
In case of genteel persons, whom we sometimes met, I repeatedly ordered
the driver to stop, and I got out of the carriage, and handed the books
or tracts to them. Often also I walked up a hill, and then conversed
with the persons whom I joined, or gave tracts more extensively in this
way.

4. The reason why we pursued this plan of travelling was, a, that I
might myself circulate as many as possible; b, that the tracts and
Narratives might be scattered over as extensive a tract of country as
possible; c, that I might be able to accomplish it, before the police
could prevent it. On the road side, before entering villages and towns,
or after we had left them, I gave away freely. Now suppose this came to
the ears of the police, as no doubt in many instances it did; before any
measures could be taken, we might be at a distance of 5, 10, or 20 miles
from the spot; for we travelled, as I said, from 40 to 45 miles daily.
This was indeed an expensive way of circulating the tracts, and wearing
to body and mind more than can easily be perceived; but it was a most
effectual way, and a precious service to be allowed to be engaged in for
the Lord. When we had finished our journey, lasting 23 days, we were
completely worn out for the time.

5. At first we sometimes threw down the tracts to persons, out of the
carriage, when they were not near enough to have them handed to them.
This, however, we discontinued on the second or third day; for I judged,
that, as we would not throw down Bibles, Testaments, or smaller portions
of the Holy Scriptures, so these tracts also, filled with the truth of
God, and written for the honour of God, should not be thrown down; and
that we would rather not give them at all, than in this way. I purposely
notice this, as many Christians are in the habit of throwing tracts out
of a carriage, as I did at first. I might put them secretly in drawers,
or on the table, or under the table-cover in inns, or elsewhere, where
they afterwards might be found; but I could not feel any longer happy in
not treating them with all reverence, because they contain the truth of
God.

6. Perhaps the reader may ask: What has been the result of this labour
in Germany? My reply is: God only knows. The day of Christ will declare
it. Judging from the constant labour in prayer during 8 months before we
went the second time, and day by day while we were on the Continent, and
day by day for a long time after our return, I am warranted to expect
fruit, and I do expect it. I expect abundant fruit in the day of
Christ's appearing. In the meantime my comfort is, that 220,000 tracts
have been circulated, many of which through the providence of God found
their way not only into the darkest places of the Continent of Europe,
but went also to America and Australia. Further, the 4000 copies of my
Narrative in German, are almost all circulated. And again, the
publishing of my Narrative in German, led me to do the same in French,
which was accomplished about three years later. Further, these tracts
were reprinted at Hamburg and at Cologne, and are circulated by other
Christians; in addition to which, my having published them in Germany
led me to get them stereotyped in England, and they continue to be
circulated in many countries.

7. I only add, we continued our service in a similar way, after we had
left Cassel, from whence I wrote the last letter to the church in
Bristol; and in many respects it was the most interesting part of the
service.

December 31, 1845. There have been received into communion 53 during
this year, and 1055 since our coming to Bristol, which, with 68 whom we
found in fellowship, makes 1123. Of these, 115 have fallen asleep, 65
have been excluded, 57 left us, and 193 left Bristol; so that there are
only 693 brethren and sisters in fellowship at present.

During this year the Lord has been pleased to give to me:--

1. Through anonymous donations in money,
put up in paper and directed to
me, and placed in the boxes for the
poor saints and the rent,
at the two chapels £166 15 10 ¼

2. Through presents in money, from
believers in Bristol, not given
anonymously . . . . . . 102 18 11 ½

3. Through presents in money, from believers,
not residing in Bristol . . 138 0 7

4. Through presents in provisions,
clothes, etc., worth to us at least .
. . 26 3 9

------

Altogether £433 19 1 ¾

To this is to be added, that my dear child had again during the whole of
this year her education free at a boarding school, as stated at the
close of the last year, whereby I saved about 50l. Also my traveling
expenses to and from Germany, and other expenses, connected with my
service in Germany, were paid out of the 500l. to which reference has
been made. Adding these two items to 433l., I had at least 500l.

Esteemed reader, what do you think of this? Is it not a pleasant thing,
in the end, even for this life, really to trust in God? Verily, thus I
have found it to be, and thus do I find it to be, the longer I live.
Only there must be real trust in God, and it must be more than merely
using words. If we trust in God, we look to Him alone, we deal with Him
alone, and we are satisfied with His knowing about our need. Two things
I add, as I write my experience and the Lord's dealings with me for
the profit of the saints.

1. During the last year I resolved, that, by God’s help, I would seek
to be more than ever a channel for the Communication of God's
bounties, and to communicate to those in need, or to give to the work of
God. I acted according to the light which God gave me, and He
condescended to make me His steward in one way or another far more
abundantly than ever before. Would we wish to have means intrusted to us
by the Lord, or to succeed in our trade, business, profession, etc., we
must be truly desirous of being His stewards, and only His stewards.
Read what I have written at length on this subject within the last
twenty pages of the third part of this my Narrative; and, if you have
read it before, read it yet again.

2. In looking over my journal, I find that during this year also I was
more than once without a shilling, yea without a penny, though my income
was about 500l.

April 29, 1846. Today my beloved wife and myself had the inexpressibly
great joy of receiving a letter from our beloved daughter, while we are
staying in the Lord's service at Chippenham, in which she writes that
she has now found peace in the Lord Jesus. Thus our prayers are turned
into praises.

About 18 mouths before this I began especially to pray for the
conversion of my dear child, and the Lord soon after seems to have begun
to work in her heart. I knew little of her state of mind before
receiving her letter, for I did not wish to force anything upon her of a
spiritual character, but leave her to be attracted by the loveliness of
the things of God. After hearing from her in April, 1846, she was not
received at once to communion, but, being so young, I judged it
desirable to watch the work in her soul. Towards the end of the year,
however, my fellow-labourers being fully satisfied, she was baptized and
received into communion, when she was 14 years and 3 months old.

Supplies for the School-Bible—Missionary and Tract Fund, sent in
answer to prayer, from May 26, 1846, to May 26, 1848.

During no period, from the commencement of the operations of this
Institution up to May 26, 1846, was I intrusted by the Lord with such
large sums, as during the one to which this chapter refers. I had never
had more need of pecuniary supplies than during those two years, on
account of the many pressing calls; but, at the same time, I had the
exceeding great joy and privilege of being able to respond to them in
such a way as I had never before been allowed to do. These remarks apply
to all the various objects of the Institution, but especially to the
supplies for brethren who labour at Home and Abroad in word and
doctrine without being connected with any society, or without having
any regular salary for preaching the Word.

On May 26, 1846, after the accounts had been closed, a check for 100l.
was given to me, the application of which was left to my disposal. I put
half the amount to the fund for these objects, and half to the
Orphan-Fund, When the accounts were closed, there was 91l. 4s. 11 ¾ d.
in, and for these objects, to which this 50l. was added; therefore I
began this period with more means than I had had in hand at any time
previously at the beginning of a fresh period; and as was its beginning
so was the continuance. It has often struck me, that one especial reason
why, on the whole, I was allowed to have so little trial with regard to
means for the work during those two years, in comparison with former
times, may have been, that thereby the Lord would say that He was
willing to give what would be needed when once the New Orphan-House
should be built, though the expenses would be about two thousand five
hundred pounds a year more than they were before. Another reason also
may have been, because in many other ways trials of faith and patience
came upon me in connexion with the Institution during those two years,
that therefore the Lord may not have exercised me so much by the want of
pecuniary means as before. But especially also one reason, why the Lord
generally gave me so great an abundance during those two years, seems to
me this, that it might be seen, not only how He can help us day by day
when we are poor, but also how able and willing He is to cause us to
abound, when this is for His honour and for our profit.

June 4, 1846. To day was given to me, just when I rose from my knees,
after having asked the Lord for more means, especially for missionary
purposes, the sum of 150l., with the request to use of it 50l. for the
Orphans, 50l. for labourers in England; and 50l. for labourers abroad.

July 6. Besides several small donations which came in since June 4, I
received today 50l., of which one half is intended by the donor for the
Orphans, the other half for these objects.

July 16. Today I received One Hundred Pounds from a donor who had lost
about one half of his property, and who gives this donation as "A
thank-offering to God for having left to him as much as he has." I put
one half of this donation to the funds for these objects, and the other
half to the Orphan Fund.

Aug. 1. About 24l. more has come in since July 16th. During the last two
days I have sent 110l. to Foreign labourers, and 15l. to brethren who
labour in England; and having thus begun to reduce our Missionary Fund,
the Lord gives fresh supplies. The evening before last was sent to me
5l. from Ludlow. Today I received 5l. from Scarborough, of which 4l. is
for Missionary objects, and 1l. for the Orphans. Thus the Lord gives me
the desire of my heart, to help more and more the dear brethren who
labour in word and doctrine, either in this country or in foreign
lands.

From the commencement of this Institution on March 5th, 1834, it had
been my desire to employ part of the funds with which I might be
intrusted, in aiding missionary brethren in foreign lands, who are not
supported by any regular salary; and for several years I have likewise
had the desire to assist brethren, labouring in similar circumstances,
in Great Britain and Ireland. The Lord also had given me the great
privilege to assist such brethren more or less during the time that this
Institution had been in operation; but especially He began during the
two years, to which this chapter refers, to allow me to do so in a far
greater degree than before. I knew it to be a fact, that many brethren,
who preach the Word, without having any salary for doing so, or property
to live upon, were in need. Now it might be said that such brethren
ought to trust in God; that, if they preach Jesus as the only hope for
the salvation of sinners, they ought to set them a good example by
trusting themselves in God for the supply of their temporal necessities,
in order that unconverted persons thereby might be led to trust in the
Lord Jesus alone for the salvation of their souls. This is true, quite
true. Preachers of the precious good news of salvation to every sinner
who puts his trust in the merits of the Lord Jesus, ought indeed
themselves to depend upon God, their Lord and Father, for the supply of
their temporal necessities; but I also felt that I, as their brother,
ought to seek to help them as far as lay in me. To this I set myself
more than ever after the beginning of the year 1846, as I knew, that,
from particular causes, there was an especial call to help such
brethren; and as my own means would go but a little way, I gave myself
to more earnest prayer than ever for such brethren. The result was,
that, during the two years of this period, the Lord so answered my daily
supplications with regard to this particular, that I was honoured to
send nearly three times as much to Home and Foreign labourers, as during
any previous period of the same length. 1,559l. 11s. 6d. was spent in
this way, by which twenty-one brethren were assisted who laboured in
Foreign lands, and nineteen who laboured in Great Britain and Ireland.
Large as this sum is, in comparison with what I had been able to do in
this particular in former years, yet it is small, very small, in
comparison with what my heart desired to be able to do for these forty
brethren. It has frequently, yea almost always, so happened, that the
assistance which God has allowed me to send to such brethren, has come
to them at a time of great need. Sometimes they had no money at all
left. Sometimes even their last provisions were almost consumed, when I
sent them supplies. Some of them are fathers of large families, or have
sickly wives and children; some were once well off in this world, but
for Christ's sake have become poor; and some have had for Christ's
sake their all taken from them. Is it not an honour to help such
brethren? I could fill hundreds of pages by giving extracts from the
letters of the dear brethren to whom I have sent help, and they would be
greatly to the edification of the reader; but I do not feel free to do
so.--As I have not only been labouring for these brethren in prayer
that God would intrust me with means and allow me the privilege of
helping them, but as I also have asked God to direct me especially to
send to those who might be in particular need, in case I could not help
them all; and as I have sought by an encouraging word to strengthen
their hands in God; there is great reason to believe, that these dear
brethren have not only been helped by these pecuniary supplies in a
temporal point of view, but also that the fact, of God sending them help
in their extremity, has tended to refresh and strengthen their hearts,
and to lead them more and more to trust in Him.

Sep. 4. 38l. more has come in since Aug. 1st for these objects, and
today there was given to me 305l. 17s. 3d. for Home and Foreign
labourers, for present use for the Orphans, and for the other parts of
the work. Thus I have again the desire of my heart given to me in being
able to assist a number of dear brethren at home and abroad, to whom I
desired to send help. Of this sum I took 205l. 17s. 3d. for these
objects, and 100l. for the Orphans.

Sept. 9. Since the 4th I have sent out about 60l. already for brethren
who labour in England and Foreign lands. This morning I received from C.
W. 25l. more for missionary objects.

Oct. 22. This morning's post had brought no means. Whilst walking in
my little garden for meditation and prayer, I said to myself--"Though
the post has brought no means, yet the Lord can send even this day rich
supplies." It was not two minutes after this, when a letter was handed
to me, which had been brought that moment, containing two Fifty Pound
Notes and these words: "My little children, let us not love in word,
neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth."—-40l. for missionaries;
Demerara and others, dependant on God for supplies. 10l. for Home
missionaries, dependant on God for their support. 10l. for the Orphans.
10l. for the poor of Bethesda and Salem Church. 10l. for Mr. Müller.
10l. for Mr. Craik. 5l. for Bibles and Testaments. 5l. for rent, &c. of
chapels."—-Thus I had a fresh answer to my prayers, which had been
again brought before the Lord this morning, that He would enable me
still more to help the dear brethren who labour at home and abroad in
dependence upon Him for supplies.

Dec. 22. During the last two months about 70l. more has come in, chiefly
for Missionary purposes. Of these donations, about eighty in number, I
only mention that there was given on Nov. 5, the sum of 6l. 14s., being
the tenth part of profits arising from shares which a brother has in
coal mines. —Now today, Dec. 22, I received 175l. more for these
funds, which I took as a further precious answer to my supplications to
God, for help for home and foreign labourers, and for means to procure a
fresh stock of tracts.

March 7, 1847. Often of late have I besought the Lord that He would be
pleased to give me more means for those objects. For more than nine
months we have on the whole abounded more than at any time during the
thirteen years since this work first began; but now there was only 15l.
left for the support of six day schools, two Sunday schools, an adult
school, and the circulation of Bibles and Tracts. Often also of late had
I entreated the Lord that He would be pleased to condescend to use me
still further as a steward, in allowing me to send help to the many dear
brethren whom I know labouring at home and abroad without any salary,
the need of many of whom I knew. Under these circumstances I received
this morning 150l. with the following lines:

"Dear brother,

"I have pleasure in sending you 100l. on account of labourers in the
Lord's vineyard at home and abroad, and 50l. for other work in your
hands.

"Yours very affectionately,

"* *."

Thus my request was in a measure answered with regard to home and
foreign labourers, and by taking half of the 50l. for the schools and
the circulation of Bibles and Tracts, I had also something for these
objects. The other 25l. I put to the Orphan Fund.

March 12. The 100l. for home and foreign labourers was soon portioned
out. The difficulty was not to spend it, but how to make it do, so that
all, who seemed to me to need, might get a little. On this account I
prayed still further during the last four days for means for home and
foreign labourers, and now this morning, when I arose from my knees,
after having again asked the Lord about tills matter, I received a
letter in which C. W. sent me 30l. for missionaries.

April 5. I have been praying day by day, ever since I was able during
the last month to send about 130l. to home and foreign labourers, that
the Lord would be pleased soon again to give me means for them, on
account of their great need; indeed, all our means were so exhausted,
that I had only just enough, for tomorrow evening, to meet the weekly
expenses connected with the six day schools, when this morning I
received 125l. for these objects. What a precious help! How is my heart
refreshed by this seasonable answer to prayer!--Almost immediately
after this donation had been given to me, I received a letter from
Demerara about the great need among the brethren who labour there, by
which intelligence the seasonable help, just received, has become still
more precious to me.

Thirteen other small donations came in between April 5th and May 13th,
and on May 13th I received 100l. for missionary purposes.

On June 8th was given 100l. for missionary purposes.

June 30. For the whole period, since the accounts were last closed, more
than 13 months since, we have not been so poor with regard to these
funds as today. Last evening I paid out the last money to the brethren
who labour in the day schools, in giving them their weekly salary. Under
these circumstances a brother in the Lord, who resides about 200 miles
from this, and who had been staying in my house two days, gave me 30l.
to dispose of as I thought best, only that missionary brethren should be
remembered. I took therefore 15l. for Missions, and the other 15l. for
the School—Bible and Tract Fund. What a seasonable help!

July 16. Today was given to me, when now again the money received on
June 30th for the schools, &c., had been all but entirely expended (as
only little had come in since), the sum of 110l. for these objects.

Aug. 25. Great had been my desire to send fresh supplies to the home and
foreign labourers. Day by day had I been again praying for means for
them since July 16th. Now also I had nothing in hand for the Bible and
Tract Fund; and as to the schools, there was not nearly enough to pay
the weekly salaries to the teachers next Tuesday evening, when I
received this evening 120l. for these objects.

Aug. 26. This morning I received still further from C. W. 20l. for home
and foreign labourers.

Sept. 14. Day by day I am bringing before the Lord the necessities of
the home and foreign labourers, whom I seek to help, especially as I
found in what great need some brethren were, when a short time since
they received the help which the Lord allowed me to send them. Now this
afternoon 1 received from Norwich 5l. 6s. for missionary purposes, and
also 2 rings, a cornelian necklace., an amber necklace, and a pair of
amber bracelets.

Oct. 4. I have now been again praying much for many days for means for
home and foreign labourers as well as for means for the other objects,
having very little in hand, and having reason to believe that several of
the brethren whom I seek to help are in great need. This evening I
received from a brother, as the first fruits of his salary, a sovereign
for home and foreign labourers. I take this as an earnest out of the
hands of God that He will soon send me more.--Received also 5s.

Oct. S. This morning I received the following letter, at the very moment
while I was on my knees, waiting still further upon the Lord for help
for the various objects, and especially also for means for home and
foreign labourers.

"* * * *, Oct. 3, 1847.

"Beloved Brother,

"The enclosed sum of 30l. is in my hands, and it does not appear that the
Lord has need of it here, either for my own wants, or others under my
notice. It seems likely that He may have need of it for the help of
missionary labourers, who are depending on Himself. Would you kindly
dispense it, as you may see good, to any who are labouring in the Word
at home and abroad; or if you see other pressing need for it among the
saints or for the Orphans, use it rather for them, &c."

I took the whole of this donation for these objects, as evidently coming
in answer to prayer for them.

Oct. 12. The very great need of some of the dear brethren who labour in
the Word, and whom I seek to assist, had led me again day by day to
bring their cases before God. I also needed help for the School—,
Bible and Tract Fund. Now this evening the Lord has once more helped me
by a donation of 180l., of which I took 40l. for the Orphans, 100l. for
home and foreign labourers and 40l. for the School, Bible and Tract
Fund. How seasonable and how precious this help! How precious to me as
the fruit of many prayers, and how seasonable to many who are in need,
and who will be thus assisted! Moreover, I am just now in deep sorrow
and great trial, the cause of which I will not mention here; and thus
God Himself cheers and refreshes my heart, and tells me by this fresh
precious and manifest answer to prayer, that He is mindful of His poor
unworthy servant, and of the work in which he is engaged. There came in
five small donations besides today.

Dec. 30. When in the greatest need, so that I should not have been able
to pay the weekly salaries of the teachers of the day schools next
Tuesday, I received today from C. W. 10l., the disposal of which being
left to me, I took half of it for the school fund and half for the
Orphans.

Dec. 31. The year closes under the smiles of our Heavenly Father upon
this work, in giving us another proof that He is indeed mindful of our
need and attentive to our supplications. I received today 100l., to be
used as most needed. I took of it 50l. for these objects and 50l. for
the Orphans. I scarcely ever received a donation more seasonably; for
there are only means enough for next week for the teachers, Bibles and
tracts are needed, and I have been long waiting upon God for means for
home and foreign labourers. But this donation only furnishes me with
means for present necessities for the schools, and to order some tracts.
As to ordering Bibles and sending help to foreign and home labourers, I
must still further wait upon God.

Jan. 1, 1848. Today I received still further, for the benefit of the day
schools, the sum of 10l.

Jan. 6. Only 1l. 5s. has come in since the first. This evening 120l. was
given to me, of which the donor intends 20l. for home and foreign
labourers. The other 100l. was left at my disposal. I took therefore of
it 70l. for the Orphans, 10l. for the various schools, 10l. for the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and 10l. for the circulation of
tracts.

Feb. 10. There came in about 65l. more for missionary purposes during
the month, of January, and today was given to me a donation of 100l.,
the disposal of which being left to me, I took half of it for these
objects, and half for the Orphans, and thus I am able, after much
waiting upon God for it, to send a little more help to brethren who
labour in the Word.

April 13. This is only the second time, since May 26, 1846, that the
means for these objects have been completely exhausted, though we have
been two or three times besides brought very low in funds. The last
money there was in hand was spent in paying the weekly salaries of the
teachers the day before yesterday. There was therefore nothing for this
purpose for next week, nor were there any means for the circulation of
Bibles and tracts, and for aiding missionary efforts. Under these
circumstances prayer and faith were again resorted to. For my universal
remedy in need of any kind is, to make known my requests unto God, and
then I seek to believe that God has heard me for His dear Son's sake,
and I look out for answers to my petitions, and fully expect them. I had
also particularly requested four brethren, masters of the boys' day
schools, to help me with their prayers, as I should not be able to pay
them their weekly salary, next week, except the Lord were pleased to
send in means.--Thus situated, I received this morning, as the fruit
of many supplications, the sum of 90l., which was a great refreshment to
my spirit. It being left to me to use this money as needed, I put 50l.
of it to the funds for these objects, and 40l. to the Orphan-Fund. Thus
we are once more helped, and my heart is encouraged more and more to
trust in God.

April 29. One of the labourers gave 10l. for missionary purposes,
whereby at least one of the most needy among the brethren who labour in
the Word could be helped.--It has pleased God not to allow me, during
the last five months, to have the honour of helping the dear brethren,
who labour in the Word, to the same extent as the eighteen months
before. I confess that I am not worthy to be used any longer by the Lord
as a steward, to assist these His servants; still my heart craves after
it, and still prays that God would count me worthy for His dear Son's
sake to supply me with means for them, as I know they are in great need,
and many of them, through particular circumstances, in far greater need
than ever.

May 26, 1848. By the Lord's faithful love I have been enabled to meet
all the heavy expenses connected with these objects during the last two
years, amounting to nearly Two Thousand Six Hundred Pounds, and at the
same time owe no one anything, and have a balance of 5l. 19s. 7 ¼ d.
left in hand.


Supplies for the support of the Orphans, sent in answer to prayer, from
May 26, 1846, to May, 26, 1848.


May 26, 1846. Scarcely ever had we so much in hand, and certainly not
for the last eight years, when the accounts were closed, as at this
time. This evening I received 100l. It being left to me to apply this
sum as I felt led, and as it might be needed, I put half of it to the
Orphan Fund, and the other half to the fund for the other objects.

June 4. Today I received 50l. for the Orphans together with 100l. for
the other objects. This money came the instant after I had risen from my
knees, to ask the Lord for more means, as, on account of needing about
75l. for the printing of the Report, 23l. for oatmeal, 19l. for
fittings, 25l. for rent, and 26l. for the sisters who labour in the
Orphan-Houses (which sums are shortly to be paid), we shall soon again
need more.

Jan. 20, 1847. For the whole of this period since May 26, 1846,
therefore nearly eight months, when the accounts were closed, we have
had always an abundance of means, and for the greater part of the time
about 200l. in hand. The sum of One Thousand Sixty-Five Pounds has come
in for the Orphans in less than eight months, to which is to be added
the balance of 85l. 4s. 9 ¾ d. in hand when the accounts were closed.
Invariably I have thus been able to give to the Matrons of the four
Orphan-Houses the money in advance, which was required for the
necessities of one week. But now, after having paid away last evening
45l. 5s. for the house-keeping of a week in advance and for other
expenses, the money which remains in hand is needed for rent, and
oatmeal, which has been ordered from Scotland. This morning therefore I
gave myself particularly to prayer with regard to means for present use
for the Orphans. How blessed to have the living God to go to!
Particularly precious to know Him in these days of widespread distress!
Potatoes are too dear for food for the Orphans at this time. The rice,
which we have substituted instead of them, is twice as dear as usual;
the oatmeal more than twice as dear; and the bread one-half dearer than
usual. But the riches of God are as great as ever. He knows that our
expenses are great. He knows that a little will not do in these days,
when provisions are so dear, as there are about 150 persons to be
provided for, including teachers and apprentices. My soul is at peace.
— Evening. About noon I received from a pious physician the following
note, with a check for 5l.

"My dear sir, I send you something towards buying bread for the Orphans.
The dearness of food must be felt by many; but the Lord in judgment is
nevertheless gracious He will sustain. I am your sincere friend and
well-wisher.

"* * * *"

From Maidenhead I received still further this evening 5s.

Jan. 21. Having had to pay out this morning 5l. 2s. 6d. for oatmeal for
present use, before the arrival of the larger quantity of a ton and a
half ordered from Scotland, there was again only 2s. 6d. left of the
money which had come in yesterday. About 1 o'clock this afternoon I
received 1l. through a Christian lady of Bristol from "a poor gardener."
There came in also-still further 1s. by sale of Reports and 1l. 2s. 6d.
from London.

Jan. 22. A brother from Devonshire came here on business, to obtain some
money which was owed to him. He did not obtain it; but God used him as
an instrument to bring me some money, for he gave me 10s. for the
Orphans. There came in still further by sale of trinkets and old silver
12l. 8s. 5d.

Jan. 23. By sale of books and some music 2l. 10s.

Jan. 24. Profits from the sale of ladies' bags 1l.--During this
period also two sisters kindly made some ladies' bags and baskets, and
gave the profits arising from the sale for the benefit of the Orphans.

On the 25th and 26th came in still further 2l. 4s. 1 ¾ d., so that,
when in the evening of the 26th at our usual weekly meeting for prayer
and conference I met with the brethren and sisters, who labour in the
various day schools and Orphan-Houses (then seventeen in number), I was
again able, by means of the 26l. 1s. 0 ¾ d., which the Lord had sent in
during the week, to give to the four matrons of the Orphan-Houses all
the needful supplies for the coming week. That which remained was put by
towards the rent of the houses. Our prayer now was, that the Lord would
be pleased again to send in fresh supplies, that we might have at the
next meeting all that might be needed for the week after.

Feb. 2, Tuesday. When we met this evening for prayer and conference, it
was found, that, whilst there had been nothing left in hand after our
meeting this day week (except money put by for oatmeal and rent), there
had come in altogether during the week 29l. 18s. 18 ½ d. The way in
which the Lord supplied us with those means was as follows: On the 26th
and 27th I received 10s., and 10s. as profits from the sale of ladies'
bags. On the 27th from London 3l., and also 5s. From C. C. 2l. From
Braunton a purse with 6s. From Barnstaple 1l. On the 28th anonymously
from London, from J. W. A., 5l. with these words: "From the giver of
all, through one of His stewards." On the 29th from Sodbury 2s. 6d. On
the 30th from Droitwich 5s. 6d. Also anonymously by post 5s. worth of
postages with these words: "A sip of milk and a crust of bread for a
poor Orphan." Also from C. C. 10s. On the 31st an old shilling and
sixpence, a small silver pencil case, and a pair of small ear-drops.--
Feb. 1. Before breakfast I took a direction in my usual morning's
walk, in which I had not been for many weeks, feeling drawn in that
direction, just as if God had an intention in leading me in that way.
Returning home I met a Christian gentleman whom formerly I used to meet
almost every morning, but whom I had not met for many weeks, because I
had not been walking in that direction. He stopped me and gave me 21.
for the Orphans. Then I knew why I bad been led thus; for there is not
yet enough in hand, to supply the matrons tomorrow evening with the
necessary means for housekeeping during another week.--There came in
still further today for needlework done by the Orphans 1l. 17s. 7d. Also
4s. 5d., the contents of an Orphan box.--On Feb. 2nd came in 2l. 5s.
11d., by sale of a Report 4d., and by sale of stockings 9s. 3d.--On
Jan. 30th a box came from London. It contained 4 brooches, a gold chain,
2 pairs of earrings, 2 gold watch hooks, a locket, a ring, 2 parts of
gold chains, a rich silk dress, a silk cloak, a glass bottle, some
music, 39 books, 18 knitted doilies, and a pair of knitting pins. Some
of these articles were today, Feb. 2, sold for 8l. 2s. 3d.--There
came in further by the sale of articles and Reports, 4s. 1d., by the
boxes in the Orphan-Houses and at my house 1l. 2s., and anonymously was
sent 5s. worth of postages. Here then, dear reader, you have a specimen
how the Lord does week after week supply us--I said 29l. 18s. 10 ½
d. had come in during the week. As, however, I was informed that the
arrival of the oatmeal from Scotland had been announced, and that it was
much dearer than I had expected, i.e. nearly three times as dear as
formerly, I found that there had not been sufficient money put by, and
took therefore in the first place what was yet needed for that. In
consequence of this I had only 10l. 14s. left for housekeeping, which I
divided among the matrons, being fully assured that the Lord would again
send in means, before that was spent. I went home in great peace, though
all the money I possessed for present use for the Orphans was only three
half-farthings.

Feb. 4. Yesterday nothing had come in. This morning, just before I was
going to give myself to prayer about the Orphans, a sister in the Lord
sent a sovereign, winch she had received, as she writes, "From a friend
who had met the Orphan Boys, and was particularly pleased with their
neat and orderly appearance." After having received this 1l., I prayed
for means for present use, though not confining my prayers to that.
About a quarter of an hour after I had risen from my knees, I received a
letter, with an order for 5l. The donor writes, that it is "the proceeds
of a strip of land, sold to the railway company." What various means
does the Lord employ to send us help, in answer to our prayers!--
About half an hour after having received this 5l., there was sent 10s.,
being the profits from the sale of ladies' bags. This evening was
received still further, by the sale of some trinkets, 1l. 18s. Thus I am
able to send all the remainder of the money, which is yet needed for
housekeeping up to Tuesday, Feb. 9th.

The Lord's holy name be praised for this fresh precious help!

Feb. 5. 1l. 4s. 10d. has come in today.

Feb. 7. Lord's day. Yesterday nothing had come in. In two days again
about 20l. will be needed for housekeeping, and there was only about the
tenth part in hand. But I was not in the least disturbed about this.
There are also new clothes to be found for the 32 Orphans in the Boys'
Orphan-House, which likewise will cost many pounds. That expense also, I
believed, God would help me to meet. Now observe the Lord's kindness!
On returning this morning from the meeting, I found the following letter
containing 50l.

"* * * *, Feb. 6, 1847.

"Beloved Brother,

"Having been led, during the past year, to see the unscripturalness of
life insurance, which I had been carrying on for some years previously,
I now enclose you the sum which I received from the office, on returning
to them my policy, viz. 22l. 8s., and the payment due about this time,
eleven guineas, as a thank-offering to the Lord for having, chiefly by
means of the work in which you are engaged in Bristol, opened my eyes in
some little measure to His will with regard to His pilgrim people here.
I ask your prayers on my behalf, dearest brother, amongst the many who
must be on your heart, for singleness of eye, to walk with God by faith,
that ‘the whole body may be full of light,' and that I may not be
permitted to darken the little light I have, by serving any other
master.

I add also ten pounds, which you will kindly apply to the help of those
who are labouring in the Gospel abroad, or if more urgent, at home. Also
will you oblige me by accepting six pounds for your own use.

Of several Reports (which you sent me for distribution) I have received
payment for three, for which I enclose one shilling. The first items
please apply for the use of the Orphan-Houses, as you may see best."
&c.

Thus the Lord has given by one donation 34l. for the Orphans.--I have
also in this another answer, in receiving 10l. for missionary brethren,
for whom I had of late been especially seeking help from the Lord.--
This evening I received still further from C. C. 1l. 10s. 0 ½ d.

Feb. 9. There was received today by sale of articles 3l. 9s. 8d. When I
met again this evening with my fellow-labourers for prayer and
conference at one of the Orphan-Houses, it was found that 48l. 12s. 6 ½
d. had come in for present use for the Orphans during the past week,
which commenced with three half-farthings in my hands; so that there was
enough for all the expenses connected with the house-keeping of the
coming week, and the rest was put by for the rent, the apprentices, and
the boys' clothes; and as to the necessities of this day week, when
again fresh supplies will need to be given to the matrons, I am looking
to the Lord.

Feb. 10. This evening we hare received already a little towards the
expenses of the coming week. A brother gave me 10l., of which 5l. are
for the poor Irish and 5l. for the Orphans. Also 7s. 1d. from the
Orphan-box of a sister.

Feb. 11. Anonymously 2s. 6d. From Nottingham 1l. 15s.

Feb. 12. Anonymously, from a lady, 2l. to buy coals for the four
Orphan-houses.

Feb. 13. Anonymously from Islington a half-sovereign. By sale of Reports
8d.

Feb. 14. Through a sister 5s., from C. C. 8s. 3d., and anonymously 2s.
6d.

Feb. 15. From a Scotch sister 1l., by sale of stockings, Reports, and
articles 7l. 0s. 4d., from an Orphan- box 3s. O ½ d., from Nice 1l.,
anonymously 10s., from Cork 5s. 2d., and several shillings besides in
small donations, &c.--Thus there had come in again by this Tuesday
evening, Feb. 16th, 21l. 4s. 2d. during the past week. As, however, I
had to put by some money for the boys' clothes and rent, I could only
leave 12l. 4s. with the matrons, quite sufficient for a few days; and my
hope in God is, that He will send more, before this is gone.

Feb. 17. From the neighbourhood of Bridgewater 10s. 6d., and 1s. 1d.
came in besides. On the 18th came in 1l. more.

Feb. 19. This morning I gave myself again to prayer, importuning the
Lord that He would be pleased to send more means, as so little had come
in during the last two days. Almost immediately, after rising from my
knees, I received from Doncaster 3l. 3s. At the same tune I received
from Bromyard 5s., and 4s. from Aberystwith. About an hour later came
from a sister in the neighbourhood of Wotton-under-Edge 12s. 6d., a
lady's bag, and a knitted bread-basket cloth. Thus, with the 12l. 4s.
already given to the matrons, we are supplied till next Tuesday evening,
the 23rd of February.

Feb. 20. Today came in from the neighbourhood of Castle Cary 10s., by
sale of Reports 2l. 6d., and by sale of articles 10s. 6d. Also
anonymously a parcel from Tetbury, containing 2 shillings, a gold coin,
a silver coin, 2 copper coins, a brass coin, 4 gilt brooches, 2 silver
brooches, 3 gold brooches, 5 collars, a waistcoat, a pair of boots, 2
cloaks, and a shawl.

Feb. 21. From C. C. 14s., and 5l. with these words: "Your Heavenly
Father knoweth that ye have need of these things," and Philip iv. 19.
How true! My Heavenly Father knew that we had need of this, and
therefore put it into the heart of this donor to give this 5l. for in
two days we shall again require many pounds more than I had this
morning. Also how truly is again fulfilled in my experience at this time
Philip iv. 19.

Feb. 22. From Westmoreland a half sovereign and 1s. in postages.

Feb. 23. Anonymously a half sovereign. By sale of articles and Reports
3l. 16s. 0 ½ d., and through an Orphan-box in my house 2s. A lady who
met the Orphans today in the fields, gave to one of the girls 2s.
Evening. Tuesday. By what the Lord has been pleased to send in during
the past week, I have enough to supply the matrons with all which is
needed during the coming week and 14s. left.

Feb. 24. From a poor brother 6s.; the produce of an Orphan-box 1s. 7 ½
d. and a shilling bank token.--Feb. 26. From Bath 2s. 6d., and from
Droitwich 9s. 4d.

Feb. 27. Saturday evening. Only these few shillings have come in since
Tuesday evening, so that, having had to pay away several small sums
besides the housekeeping expenses, since Tuesday, nothing is in hand
towards supplying the matrons with housekeeping money next Tuesday.--
Received this evening from C. C. 5l., 6s. 6d. and anonymously from
Totness 1s. 6d. worth of postages.

Feb. 28. Today came in still further from the Hot-wells 3s. 6d., and
10l. as the profits of shares which the donor has in a certain concern.
How kind of the Lord to help us thus so seasonably in our poverty!

March 1. By work and knitting of the Orphans 1l. 4s. 8d. and from E. N.
10s.

March 2. By sale of articles 8l. 10s. 6d., and by sale of a Report 4d.
From H. C. as "A thank-offering to the Lord" 1l. From Manchester 1l.
From London 13s. From Staffordshire 1s.--Thus by this evening the
Lord has again sent in during the past week 29l. 8s. 11 ½ d., whereby I
had enough to advance the house-keeping expenses to the matrons of the
four Orphan-Houses for the coming week, and to meet some other
expenses.

March 3. Received 6s. 7d.--March 4. 1l. from the neighbourhood of
Stroud, as "a thank-offering to God for partial recovery from
sickness."--Also from Bath 5l.--A gentleman gave anonymously to the
governess of the Infant Orphans 2l.--I also received the following
letter today: "Dear Sir, When my dear brother John died, he had one
shilling and fourpence halfpenny owing to him which he intended for the
Orphans. As I received it today, I now send it to you. He said ‘Jesus
will never forsake the Orphans.' M. W." The paper contained 1s. 7 ¾
d. and a quarter of a gilder. This legacy came from a dear boy who I
hear died in the faith.--March 5. From Clevedon 2s. 6d.--March 6.
The proceeds of an Orphan-box 7s. 1d.

March 7. Only 8l. 17s. 9 ¾ d. had come in since the 2nd, and the day
after tomorrow fresh supplies will need to be given to the matrons for
house-keeping, Under these circumstances I received this morning 150l.,
of which the donor intends 100l. for labourers in the Lord's vineyard
at home and abroad, and 50l. for other work in my hands. Of this 50l. I
took 25l. for the Orphans, and 25l. for the School—Bible—and Tract
Fund. Thus we are helped afresh.--There came in besides from C. C.
6s., from a lady 1l., and anonymously 1s. 4d.

March 8. This morning I received still further from Falmouth a bank
order for 4l. from a brother "As a thank-offering to the Lord for
bringing him safely back to his native land;" 2l. of this amount is for
the Orphans, 1l. for Brother Craik, and 1l. for my own personal
necessities. Also 10s. from an Orphan-box, and 10s. from a sister.

March 6. By sale of articles and Reports 4l. 13s. 2d., from a poor
brother 6d., and through the boxes in my house
1l. 1s. 6d.--This evening, Tuesday, I find that since last
Tuesday evening again 44l. 1s. 6 ¾ d. has come in. Thus I have the
means to meet all the house-keeping expenses during the coming week, and
something will be left to put by towards the rent, the current expenses
for the apprentices, &c. How good is the Lord in helping us week after
week through the heavy expenses, especially in this season of deep
distress and dearness of provisions! To His praise I can say, we have
lacked nothing all this winter.

Whilst preparing these extracts from my journal for the press, I
remember to have heard the following remarks made with reference to the
time about which I am just now writing, namely the season of dearth
during the winter of 1846-7: "I wonder how it is now with the Orphans?
If Mr. Miller is now able to provide for them as he has, we will say
nothing." When I heard such remarks, I said nothing except this: "We
lack nothing:" or, "God helps us." Should this fall into the hands of
any who have had such thoughts, let them remember that it is the very
time for faith to work, when sight ceases. The greater the difficulties,
the easier for faith. As long as there remain certain natural prospects,
faith does not get on even as easily (if I may say so), as when all
natural prospects fail. It is true that during the time of the dearth
our expenses were considerably greater than usual it is also true that
many persons, who otherwise might have given, were unable to do so, or
had their surplus directed into other channels, such as Ireland, &c.;
but the gold and silver are the Lord's. To Him we made our prayer. In
Him we put our trust. And He did not forsake us.' For we went as
easily through that winter as through any winter since the work had been
in existence. Nor could it be otherwise; for God had at this very time
an especial opportunity of showing the blessedness of trusting in Him.
Seek, dear reader, more and more to put your trust in Him for
everything, and you will even concerning this life find it most precious
so to do.

March 10. I was able, last evening, to meet most comfortably all the
expenses for the coming week; yet we had then nothing left, as I put by
the rest of the money, that we might not get into debt with regard to
the rent, the expenses of the apprentices, &c. When now there was again
nothing left for future house-keeping expenses, a Christian lady at a
considerable distance informed me by this mornings post, that she has
paid into the hands of Messrs. Stuckey and Co. of Bristol, my bankers,
the sum of 100l. for my use, for the benefit of the Orphans. By the same
post I have received also 10s. from Droitwich. The Lord's holy name be
praised for this seasonable help! I have now all the rent for next
quarter day, am able to purchase two pieces of calico which were needed,
a fresh supply of rice and soap, and to meet other heavy expenses in the
way of certain alterations and improvements to be made in the four
houses, about which I had repeatedly asked the Lord.

May 1. From March 10th up to this day came in the sum of 132l. 10s. 5 ¾
d. Before the means in hand were expended, the Lord always gave a fresh
supply. This evening, Saturday May 1st, I gave myself especially to
prayer for means, as we were now again very poor, there being no means
to meet the house-keeping expenses on next Tuesday evening, when fresh
supplies are to be given to the matrons. About half an hour, after I had
risen from my knees, I received from a Friend to the Institution a
letter, containing 10l. Of this sum 8s. 5d. is from twenty poor Orphans
under his care, who, having read one of my Reports, desired him to send
to the Orphans in Bristol their little donations, each having
contributed from 2d. to 8d., 5s. 6d. is from an aged Christian, 10s.
from a servant of the donor, and 8l. 16s. 1d. from himself, to makeup
the 10l.

May 2. There came in still further from C. C. 1l., from a Christian lady
10s., from a Christian servant 5s., and anonymously 10s.

May 4. Today was received for articles and Reports 1l. 16s. 1d., and
through the boxes at the Orphan-Houses 16s. 8 ½ d. Thus I was able this
evening, by what had come in since Saturday evening, May 1, to meet the
house-keeping expenses of the coming week.

May 11. Another week is gone by. This evening also I have been able to
meet all the expenses connected with house-keeping during the coming
week, through what has come in since May 4th, but at the same time there
is nothing left. Hitherto the children have lacked nothing. Never were
provisions nearly so dear since the commencement of the work, as they
are now. The bread is almost twice as much as eighteen months ago, the
oatmeal nearly three times as much as formerly, the rice more than
double the usual price, and no potatoes can be used, on account of their
exceeding high price. But though I have now returned from the
Orphan-Houses, without any means being left in my hands for further
supplies, yet my heart is in peace, in great peace, being sure that the
Lord will help.

May 12. The Lord is beginning to help already. This evening I have
received 4l. from Scarborough.

May 13. This morning I received 6s. from the neighbourhood of Bideford.
This afternoon was given to me 50l., being left to my disposal, as it
might be most needed. Being so exceedingly poor as to means for the
Orphans, and having heavy expenses to meet, I put this 50l. to the
Orphan-Fund for present use. Thus I am able to order oatmeal from
Scotland, which is nearly out, put by money for the rent, pay for
medical attendance for the children, &c. How good is the Lord, in
helping us so seasonably in this time of great dearness of provisions!
— There came in still further today 5s.--On May 14th from O. 1s.,
"through walking a short distance instead of riding."--On May 16th
from C. C. 13s. 1d. From O. 3s. being "the first fruits of increase of
wages." From the Isle of Wight 17s. 9d., from Hayle 2l., from Plymouth
15s.--On May 17th from a Christian lady 5s., from E. A. B. 13s. 6d.,
and from C. B. 13s. 10 ½ d.--On May 18th by sale of articles and
Reports 2l. 6s. 4d. Though thus since last Tuesday evening, May 11th,
about 63l. has come in, yet as there have been heavy extra expenses to
meet in the course of the week, besides the usual amount required for
housekeeping for the coming week, and as I need to put by about 20l. for
oatmeal which has been ordered from Scotland, we are again without
anything in hand.

May 19. This morning the Lord has again begun to send in a little. I
received from Bath 1l., and from a Colonel in the Presidency of Madras
2l.--May 20th. From Worcester 1l., and from a sick little boy
6d.--May 23rd. From C. C. 5l. 2s. 4d. Also a stranger called at
the infant Orphan-House, bought books to the amount of 8s. 1d., and
gave a sovereign for them.

May 24. By sale of articles came in 3l. 10s. 2d.

May 25. From Shirehampton 2s.

The boxes in the Orphan-Houses contained 1l. 10s 1d. Also an individual
from Taunton gave 10s. Lastly there came in by sale of Reports 6d. and
from M. W. 6d.--Thus the Lord has again sent in since last Tuesday
evening about 161l. This, however, not being nearly enough to meet the
house-keeping expenses of the coming week, I could only give a part of
what was needed, hoping in God to give me more, before that which is in
the hands of the matrons shall have been spent.

May 26. A lady gave 10s.--May 27th. By sale of books, given for the
purpose, came in 1l. 11s. 6d., and through an Orphan-box 8s. 6d. This
2l. 10s. received yesterday and today I sent off to the Orphan-Houses.

May 28. By sale of Reports 1s., the proceeds of an Orphan-box at Street
2s., from Guernsey 1l.—May 29th. The 1l. 3s., which came in yesterday,
was enough for today, Saturday; for only the addition of 1l. was
required to help us till Monday morning, and therefore the Lord had sent
3s. more than was needed. Evening. There has come in this day still
further 1l. 9s. 7d. by sale of some little trinkets, almost all of which
had been given some time since, and which now our poverty led me to pack
up and send out for sale. This money likewise was divided among the
matrons.

May 30. Lord's day morning. I have just now received, in this our
great need, when there was not sufficient in hand to meet the
necessities of tomorrow, 6l. 6s. from a Christian gentleman of title at
Zurich in Switzerland, a distance of about one thousand miles. What a
most seasonable help! Thus I am able to send all the remainder of the
supplies, which are needed till Tuesday evening.

In these days of straitness, the question would naturally arise, If,
when you have only to care for 130 Orphans, you are so poor, what will
you do when there are 300, for whom you are just on the point of
building a house? And further, Is it not an indication not to increase
the work, seeing you are now so poor with only about one-third of the
number of Orphans which you purpose to receive into the New
Orphan-House?--I am not tried, however, with such thoughts; for I
know that 1, Only for the trial of my faith, as heretofore the Lord
allows me now again to be poor. Never at any time have the expenses been
so great for the work, as from May 26, 1846, to May 26, 1847; but also
never has so much come in in the same space of time during any other
period of this work. 2, It is for the profit of the church at large,
that we have now again to pass through these days of poverty. 3, I know
that it is as easy for the Lord to supply us with all the means that the
work will require when once the New Orphan-House is opened, as it is for
Him to give us what we need now, though the expenses in all likelihood
will then be Two Thousand Five Hundred Pounds a year more than they are
at present.

Evening: Received 10s. more anonymously.

June 1. Tuesday, 8l. 9s. 0 ½ d. more has come in since May 30th, of
which, however, only 4l. 9s. 7 ½ d. remained for house-keeping
expenses, during the coming week. This was all I could leave with the
matrons, hoping in God to send in more before this is gone.

June 2. This morning I received the following anonymous note from
Teignmouth, enclosing two halfsovereigns.

"My dear Brother,

I send you with much pleasure the enclosed trifle, to be disposed of as
you judge to be best. Also this precious text, "Only believe," once
spoken by the lips of our blessed glorified Head, now above.

Ever yours in Him."

Thus the Lord has already sent me a little help towards what may be
needed tomorrow. His name be praised! How true that word: "Only
believe."--Evening. This afternoon the Lord has shown afresh in my
experience the truth of that word: "Only believe." I received a letter
containing 40l., of which 10l. are for Brother Craik and myself, 10l.
for Home and Foreign labourers, and 20l. for present use for the
Orphans. Thus I am enabled to send the money required for house-keeping
for this week, till Tuesday the 8th. Oh, how kind of the Lord to help us
again and again!

June 8. There was only about 6l. in hand towards the house-keeping
expenses of the coming week, as comparatively little had come in since
June 2. In addition to the house-keeping, other expenses needed to be
met. Under these circumstances 50l. was given to me this morning to be
laid out as most needed, which I took for the support of the Orphans.
Thus we are again helped for the present moment.

June 17. Only 12l.16s. 0 ½ d. has come in during the last 9 days. After
having advanced on the 15th the money for one week's house-keeping
expenses, and paid also 13l. 10s. for apprentices, all our money was
again expended, except that which had been put by for rent and oatmeal,
which has been ordered. When we were thus once more quite poor, I
received today from a Christian gentleman at Edinburgh, whom God has
repeatedly used to help us in times of need, a bank-order for 35l. Of
this amount 5l. had been given to him by a lady for the Orphans, 25l.
were from himself for the Orphans, and 5l. he kindly intended for my own
personal necessities. Oh, how precious thus continually to see the hand
of God stretched out on our behalf! Will you not, dear reader, taste and
see that the Lord is good, and that it is a blessed thing to put our
trust in Him? Whatever your position in life, though you may not be
called by the Lord to establish Orphan-Houses and Day-Schools for poor
children, or to trust in Him for means for circulating Tracts and Copies
of His Holy Word; yet all children of God, whatever their position in
the world or in the church, ought to put their trust in God for every
thing connected with their body, their soul, their business, their
family, their church position, their service for God, &c. And it is
impossible to do so, without enjoying the blessedness which results from
it, even first that peace which keeps the heart and mind like a
garrison, and secondly true liberty with regard to circumstances, times,
places and persons.

June 29. Tuesday Evening. Having had nearly 50l. coming in since this
day fortnight, I have had the means of meeting all the expenses of these
two weeks; but now having paid out what was required for house-keeping
for the coming week, all is again gone.

June 30. This morning when, as stated, there was again nothing in hand,
I received from Devonshire 20l. for the Orphans.

July 1. This morning I received still further from a Bristol donor 10l.,
and 5l. from M.R. These three donations of yesterday and today came in
most seasonably, not only because they came when there was nothing in
hand, but also because the Lord willing, I am on the point of leaving
Bristol for a few weeks, and am thus able to leave some money behind.

I was absent from Bristol from July 1st to August 2nd. During this time
133l. 11s. 4 ½ d. was received, and the sums came in so seasonably,
that there was not ally difficulty at all experienced with regard to
means, because there was always a sufficient amount of money in hand, to
furnish the house-keeping expenses each week in advance, besides meeting
all other current expenses. At the same time I might say that almost
every one of the donations came in most seasonably to help us on, if not
from day to day, at least from week to week; and if it were not on
account of its taking up too much space, I should mention every one of
the donations which form the total amount referred to, but I shall only
refer to the following.

July 13. The proceeds of an Orphan-box from Stafford 4l. 7s. 6d. The
friend who sent the money wished to know whether it arrived in a time of
need. I have had many similar requests, to which I can reply nothing, or
say at the most that the answer may be learnt from the next Report. It
will be easily perceived, on reflection, that if I said, it came
seasonably, that would imply we had little or nothing at all in hand,
and what would that again mean but this, "As our expenses are so great,
that which you have now sent will be soon gone again, and therefore send
us some more, or get some friend to help us." But by this very thing the
chief object of this work, "To show how blessed it is to deal with God
alone, and how blessed to trust in Him in the darkest moments," would be
hindered. It is also for this very reason that I do not publish the
accounts very frequently, for instance quarterly, as I have been
requested to do; but I am delighted to wait a year, or eighteen months,
or two years, or more; and even then I do not publish them for the sake
of obtaining money (though unquestionably God has used the Reports as
instruments to procure us means), but for the benefit of the Church of
God, to refresh, encourage, exhort, and instruct my brethren in Christ;
and also because it is needful that from time to time. I should give a
public account of the way in which the considerable sums, with which I
have been intrusted, have been spent.

Of the donations which came in between Aug. 2nd and 14th (in amount 51l.
16s. 3 ½ d.), I only refer to the following.--Aug. 9th. A brother,
being some time ago, through a particular circumstance, in danger of
losing all his property, dedicated to the Lord 50l., if He would be
pleased to help him out of the difficulty. Now today I received from
that brother, with his explanation of this, 10l. for the Orphans and 5l.
for my own personal necessities, being a part of that 50l., as the Lord,
in answer to prayer, has delivered him out of the danger.

Aug. 14. Saturday evening. This evening I found that there was only as
much money in hand for present use for the Orphans (i.e. 44l.), as there
were liabilities upon me for rent, &c. On this account I gave myself
particularly to prayer for means for house-keeping expenses, as on
Tuesday evening I shall have to give fresh supplies to the matrons.
About one hour, after I had risen from my knees, two sovereigns were
given to me, which a sister had brought from Ilfracombe.

Aug. 15. Today came in further, from Barnstaple. 5s., anonymously 5l.,
from C. C. 5s. 4d., from a sister in Bristol 1l., from Clifton 4s., and
anonymously 2s. 6d. and 3s. 6d.--Thus the Lord has been pleased to
give me already, within twenty-four hours, after I had sought more
especially His help for means, the sum of 9l. 0s. 4d. My eyes are now
looking to Him for more.

Aug. 16. By sale of articles came in 1l. 10s. 10d.

Aug. 17. Tuesday evening. No more having come in, I have not been able
to give to the matrons the housekeeping expenses for the whole week; I
hope, however, that the Lord will send more before all is expended which
I was able to give, and which will last about three or four days.

Aug. 18. This morning I received from Droitwich a half sovereign, and
from Yorkshire 3l. Thus the Lord has already given 3l. 10s.--There
was also left at my house this afternoon, anonymously, a pair of silver
spectacles; and at the Girls' Orphan-House. No. II were left 3 rings,
a brooch, and a pair of ear-rings.--There was also given 2s. 6d.

Aug. 21. Today more money was needed for housekeeping; but having
receive nothing yesterday, and having sent off what had come in on the
18th, I gave myself to prayer. And now see the precious answer. By the
first delivery this morning a letter came from Birmingham, signed W. R.,
which contained a half-sovereign, of which the anonymous donor wished
7s. 6d. to be used for the Orphans, and 2s. 6d. for Missions. I also
received through two Orphan-boxes 7s. 8d. There came also to hand, three
small parcels from Plymouth, one of which contained an old silver watch
for the benefit of the Orphans, from a blind Orphan; the other contained
two shillings and a franc piece; the third a pair of ear-rings, a
brooch, a fourpenny piece, half a franc piece, and an old sixpence.--
About half an hour, after I had received these three little parcels, a
gentleman, who did not give his name, left at my house two sovereigns
and one shilling. About half an hour after that, a lady called and
wished to put some money into the box at my house. I do not know her
name. But God knows her, and influenced her in answer to my
supplications. May His blessing rest upon her and the unknown gentleman
who left the 2l. 1s.! When the box was opened, it contained a paper with
half a sovereign. Thus the Lord so kindly in this remarkable manner has
helped us in this our time of need, and we have now again all we need
for the present.

Evening. Still further help. About two o'clock this afternoon a
lady from London, who about a year ago had read the Narrative of the
Lord's dealings with me, in passing through Bristol left a sovereign
at my house for the Orphans, feeling that she could not go on without
doing so.--This evening also I received a letter from Scarborough
with five pounds. Also 1l. came in by sale of articles this evening, and
2s. 6d. as a donation.

Aug. 22. I have received still further today from C. C. 2l. 3s. 3d.,
from Wolverhampton 10s., and from a brother in Bristol 1l. 1s. Thus
altogether 14l. 5s. 3d. has come in during these two days.

All, who have spiritual eyes to see, cannot but observe in reading these
facts--1st, the reality of dealing with God Himself directly; 2, the
blessedness of trusting in Him; and 3, His most particular providence.

Aug. 23. I prayed still further for means, as I shall need to give a
fresh supply to the matrons for house-keeping tomorrow evening, besides
meeting other expenses. This afternoon I received from a sister in the
Lord a sovereign, half of which she wished me to use for my own temporal
necessities, and half for the Orphans. Likewise. 10s. as profits from
the sale of ladies' baskets.

Aug. 24. Today came in by sale of articles and Reports 2l. 15s. 10 ½
d.

Aug. 25. Wednesday. Last evening I was able to advance only a part of
the week's house-keeping expenses to the matrons. Today, when I had
nothing in hand, a sister in the Lord brought her Orphan-box, which
contained 10s. 6 ¾ d. in donations, and likewise 9s. 4d. as the
proceeds from the sale of musk plants, reared and sold by her for the
benefit of the Orphans. The box contained also a Spanish silver coin.
Evening. Precious and encouraging as it was to receive those little sums
this afternoon, still, as they came in when no money was in hand, they
were only an encouragement to look to the Lord for further supplies, but
were not enough to supply our need. However the Lord, in His faithful,
loving care over the work, and in His readiness to answer prayer, helped
further this evening. There came in 150l., of which I took 30l. for the
Orphans, and 120l. for the other objects.

Sept. 6. Since August 25th only 20l. 17s. 0 ½ d. had come in. On this
account there was only 3l. 15s. 5 ¾ d. in hand, and tomorrow evening I
have again to supply the matrons with house-keeping expenses. In this
need, whilst walking in my little garden, I lifted up my heart to God
for means, when, in less than five minutes after, I received a letter
from Jersey, containing Five Pounds for the Orphans.--This evening I
received still further, from a little girl 3s., from Margate. 10d.,
anonymously 3s., and 3 dollars from a poor missionary brother in
Demerara.

Sept. 7. Further, by sale of articles 3l. 1s. 3d. through the boxes in
my house 2s. 6d., and through the boxes in the Orphan-houses, which our
need led me to open, 1l. 6s. and a medal. Thus I had for the need of the
coming week, at our usual prayer meeting this evening, 14l. 1s. 6 ¾ d.,
which I divided to the last farthing, with the firm persuasion and hope
in God, that, by the time it was expended, He would give more; for it
was not enough to meet all the demands of this week.

Sept. 8. the Lord has already sent in a little I received from Weymouth
2l. 10s.

Sept. 10. From a dentist in Bristol 10s.

Sept. 11. From a Christian brother, about 200 miles from Bristol, whom
the Lord has repeatedly used to help us in time of need, I received 20l.
What a precious help! We have now all we require for this week, and a
little towards the expenses of the next.--There came in also from
Droitwich 5s.

Sept. 12. Further: From C.C. 10s. 14d., from Clevedon 5s., from Clifton
5s., anonymously 2s., ditto 1s. 5 ½ d.

Sept. 13. Monday morning. As there will be again money needed for
house-keeping tomorrow evening, and as I have not enough in hand to
advance for the expenses of a whole week, which I generally now seek to
do, I gave myself again to prayer for means, and, while I was on my
knees in prayer, there came a letter from Yorkshire, containing 5l. for
the Orphans. There was received also, by sale of stockings at the
Boys' Orphan-house, 7s. 7d.

Sept. 14. By sale of articles and stockings came in 3l. 10s. 0 ½ d.
From Norwich 1l., and also 2s. 6d. Evening. By these sums we have
received altogether since last Tuesday evening 34l. 8s. 5 ½ d. Thus I
have been able to supply the matrons this evening with what they need
for the coming week, and that which was left I put by for the rent and
current expenses connected with the apprentices, and am now looking out
for fresh supplies, as I have again nothing left towards the need of the
following week.

My dear reader, if you are tired of going on with this account of the
Lord's gracious interpositions for us week after week, or day after
day, I beseech you to lay it aside for the present. Take it up at
another time. This Narrative is not of an ordinary character. It does
not contain anecdotes for amusement; it relates no embellished tales; it
gives facts in which the hand of God is seen stretched out on our
behalf, as the result of prayer and faith. Seek to admire God, dear
reader, in this simple Narrative of Facts, which are related to His
praise, and to allure your heart more and more for Him, and which are
brought before you in all simplicity to encourage you and to stir you
up, if it may please God so to use His servant, to put your whole trust
in Him. I judge that it will be the more profitable way to read this
account by little and little.

Sept. 15. A brother, who is staying at my house, gave me a silver table
spoon and two silver dessert spoons. This is the beginning of fresh
supplies from God.

Sept. 16. From the neighbourhood of Glastonbury 5s. Also 5s. worth of
postages from Derby.

Sept. 17. A. Christian lady at Richmond, having received a copy of my
Narrative, read aloud in the hearing of another lady the account about
A. L. (page 156 to 160 of part I.) The lady who heard it read was so
touched by it, that she sent 10l. for the Orphans. God moved her heart
to send me this donation at a time when I had only a few shillings in
hand for the use of the Orphans!--There came in still further from
Clifton 10s., and from Taunton 5s.

Sept. 19. From C. C. 19s.--Sept. 21. Anonymously from Barnstaple 5s.
worth of postages. This anonymous donor has many times sent his
donations thus. It may be that twenty or thirty times the same amount
has been forwarded in the same way.--Also by sale of articles 1l. 8s.
8d. By the boxes in my house 1l. 0s. 6d. Evening: I was able to supply
the matrons only with means for house-keeping for three or four days,
being fully assured, that, by the time more is needed, the Lord will
send further supplies.

Sept. 24. Friday. After I had paid away on Tuesday evening to the last
penny what I had in hand for present use for the Orphans, there came in
a pair of ear-rings from Norwich; also 1s. 6d. besides. On Wednesday and
Thursday nothing came in; but it was needful that I should send more
means to the matrons today. Thus situated I received this morning from
Barnstaple. 19s. 4d. and 17s. About three hours after, came in by sale
of the 3 silver spoons (given on the 15th), an old silver punch ladle,
and a few trinkets lately given, 6l. 14s. 7d. Thus we are once more
helped, and I have been able to send all that which was yet needed for
house-keeping till Tuesday evening. The Lord be praised for His
seasonable help! —Observe, dear reader, we may be poor, very poor; we
may have to wait upon God, even again and again we may have to make
known our requests to Him; but He helps, always helps.

Sept. 25. From C. C. 1l.--Sept. 27. From a Christian lady 1l.--
Sept. 28. 8s. 4d. came in, also 1l. from Scotland, and 1l. 6s. 4 ½ d.
by sale of articles. Also from Wellington an old half-crown, shilling,
and sixpence. 3s. 10d. came in besides. Evening. So little having come
in, I was able to give to the matrons only as much as would last for
about two days for provisions.

Sept. 29. A young man called this morning at my house and gave 2s. 6d. A
brother called and put 2s. 6d. into an Orphan-box in my house. Mrs. W.
C: gave 1l. Also Mrs. K. 5s. These donations came in today, after I had
twice given myself especially to prayer for means, as we are now in so
much need.

Sept. 30. Nothing more having come in, we were in great need today. On
this account the boxes in the Orphan-Houses were opened, which contained
1l. 4s. 2d. This evening sister C. gave me 18s. 9 ½ d., being the
contents of her Orphan-box. Also 15s. 11d. came in by knitting of
stockings. Thus we were helped for the present.

Oct. 2, Saturday. As today more money was needed, and nothing had come
in, one of the labourers supplied the present need till Monday morning,
which took 3l.--Evening. This afternoon, when there was nothing at
all in my hands for the work, I received from a little boy 1s. This
evening a box arrived from Norwich, filled by the contributions of many
believers. It contained in money 1l. 10s., and the following articles: 6
brass and copper coins, a gold pin, 5 gold brooches, 3 pairs of
ear-rings, 3 pairs of silver clasps, a gold clasp, a gold locket, 2
rings, a pair of silver studs, a broken silver tooth-pick, 4 gilt
bracelets, a silver mounted eye-glass, 5 braid watch-guards, a silver
washed watch-guard, 4 waist buckles, a pair of gilt ear-rings, 3
mourning necklaces and a pair of ear-rings, a mourning ring set with
pearls, 2 brass brooches, a mother-o'-pearl cross and clasps, a silver
fruit knife, a pair of coral bracelets, 2 bead necklaces, a snuff-box, 2
little baskets, 12 worked mats, 24 ladies' bags of various kinds, 4
cephalines, 13 book-marks, 8 purses, 5 shells, 45 pin-cushions of
various kinds, 17 needle cases, 9 pairs of babies' shoes, 2 babies'
hoods, 3 neck ties, 2 knitted cloths, 2 netted mats, 4 pairs of watch
pockets, 3 pairs of cogs, 3 little scarfs, 2 collars, a pair of socks, a
nightcap, some knitted fringe, some work and lace, 2 silk winders, 3
waistbands, 5 handkerchiefs, ¼ lb. of tea, 2 pen-wipers, some little
playthings, 2 combs, some slate pencils, 3 chimney ornaments, 4
paintings, 3 books, 16 pamphlets, a fan, a little box, 13 chemises, 2
shirts, a frock and cape, a shawl border, 3 bodkin cases, 2 ½ yards of
print, a gown, and a few other little things.--Great indeed was my
joy in receiving this box, for it was a fresh proof to me, in this our
present great poverty, that the Lord hears our prayers and is mindful of
us.

Oct. 3. Lord's day. Today I received from C. C. 10s. 10d., from a
sister 3l., being the produce of a piece of work done for the Orphans,
and anonymously 2s. 6d. By these donations we are supplied till Tuesday
evening.

Oct. 4. From a Christian gentleman I received today 1l.; from a brother,
as the first fruits of his salary, 2l., of which 1l. is for the Orphans,
and 1l. for home and foreign labourers; from another brother 2s. 6d.;
from a sister 5s.

Oct. 5. By sale of articles 1l. 10s. 4 ½ d. This evening I had only
means enough to give to the matrons supplies for one or two days. When I
came home from our prayer meeting I found unexpectedly another demand
made upon me for 5l., in connexion with the house-keeping expenses,
towards which I had nothing, but which it was desirable to meet as soon
as possible.

Oct. 6. This morning I received the following letter from Kennington,
containing a post-office order for 5l.

* * * *, Kennington, Surrey.

"Beloved and honoured brother in our Lord,

I am permitted to be the unworthy instrument in the Lord's hand of
transmitting to you the enclosed post-office order for 5l., to be
applied either for the Orphans or your own use, as may be most required
at this time, &c.

Your affectionate sister in our Lord,

Oct. 5, 1847. * * * *"

I am now able to send off the 5l. about the need of which I was informed
late last evening, and am again thus graciously helped at this time also
by Him who hears the cries of His children. Do you not discern His hand,
dear reader, in this instance?

Oct. 8. Today 10s. more was required towards housekeeping expenses; but
nothing had come in since the 6th. One of the labourers was able of his
own means to give the amount required.

Oct. 9. Saturday. Yesterday, when there was nothing at all in hand, were
given half-a-crown, 2 silk handkerchiefs, 3 pinafores, a baby's shirt,
a frock, and 2 children's work-bags.--This morning I found in the
boxes at my house 1s. I knew that several pounds would be needed today
for provisions, and therefore my eyes were directed to the Lord for
help. I received accordingly 13s. 6d. "from a London Postman," and from
Cumberland 1l. Thus I had 1l. 17s., but as this was still not enough,
one of the labourers added 1l. 3s. of his own, as 3l. was needed. Thus
we have enough for house-keeping expenses till Monday morning.

Oct 11. Monday. Yesterday came in from a sister 10s., ditto 4s.,
anonymously 2s., through an Orphan-box 8s., and from a sister 2s. 6d.
Thus we have enough for today's necessities, and 1s. 6d. left.

Oct. 12. There came in yesterday afternoon through the boxes at the
Orphan-Houses 5s. 0 ½ d., and through those at my house 1s. Also by
sale of Reports 2s. This morning I received through sister Ch. 1l. 5s.
5d. These donations were very refreshing to my spirit in this time of
great need, and though not nearly enough for all we required today, they
are nevertheless a precious earnest that the Lord will help us further.
— By the first delivery this morning I received an anonymous letter,
containing 5l., with these words:

"It is requested that half of the enclosed sum may be expended on
Brother Müller's own necessities, the other half as he thinks fit, in
furtherance of his Christian schemes: and may the blessing of the
‘Giver of all good' attend him! Oct. 7, 1847."

I put the half of this 5l. to the Orphan-Fund--There came in still
further by sale of articles and Reports 1l. 12s. 6d. Thus we have all
that is needed for the present moment.--Afternoon. This afternoon a
person from the neighbourhood of Chepstow called and left a
half-sovereign. There came in also through needlework, done by the
Orphans, 2l. 5s. 4d. Thus we are still further helped for the present
moment. But all this is not enough. Larger sums are needed, as oatmeal
is to be ordered from Scotland, and several other heavy expenses,
besides those for house-keeping, are to be met. Nevertheless the
precious proofs, which I have had again today of our Father's loving
care over the work, lead me to expect further help.--Evening. This
evening at a quarter to ten o'clock I received 180l. Of this sum I put
100l. to the Missionary-Fund, 40l. to the School—Bible and Tract-Fund,
and 40l. to the Orphan-Fund for present use. How good is the Lord! How
precious this help! How much needed and how seasonable!

From the 13th to the 19th of October came in 8l 6s. 1 ½ d.

On Oct. 19th I left Bristol with my dear wife, partly, because both of
us much needed change of air, and partly, because I had a great desire
to labour in the Word for a few weeks in Westmoreland and Cumberland. I
was not able to leave more means than enough for about three days for
house-keeping expenses. But I could not have stayed in Bristol, though
there had been nothing at all in hand; my hope was that God would help
during my absence. During all the time of my stay at Bowness in
Westmoreland, from Oct. 20th to Nov. 20th, there was day by day, with
the exception of the first three days, after my departure, need to wait
upon God for daily supplies for the Orphans. In consequence of this,
every donation, without exception, which was received daring my absence,
came in most seasonably. Partly on account of my health, and partly on
account of opportunities for service in Westmoreland and elsewhere, I
did not feel it right to return to Bristol sooner than I did, though
there was such great poverty; nor could I have done anything in Bristol
which I could not do in Westmoreland, as it regards procuring means,
since prayer and faith are all the means I make use of to obtain
supplies when we are in need. For the encouragement of the reader, and
also that those, whom God used at that time to enable us day by day to
supply the Orphans with what they needed, may see how they were used by
Him to help us, I mention here every one of the donations which came in
during my absence, with the exception of the articles.

Oct. 21, 1847. From some poor sisters near Kingsbridge. 4s. 6d., in
small donations through Brother F. in Bristol 7s. 5d.--Oct. 22.
Anonymously from Walsall 5l., of which 2l. is intended for missions, 1l.
for the Building Fund, and 2l. for present use for the Orphans.--From
Bath anonymously 10s. with a lace cape.--Oct. 24th. I received while
at Bowness 10s., also 1s. and 2s. This 13s. I forwarded at once to
Bristol by an order. There was also received in Bristol from Droitwich
10s. and from London 2s. 6d.--Oct. 25th. By sale of articles and
Reports 2l. From C. C. 1l. From Wolverhampton 10s.--Oct. 26th.
Through the boxes in the Orphan-Houses 1l. 14s. 6d., our need having
caused them to be opened.--Oct. 28. By sale of Reports 2s. 4d.
Orphan-box in my house 10s. From a Christian gentleman near Crediton 5l.
—Oct. 30. By sale of Reports 2s. 6d. By sale of an improved Rendering
9d. From London 10s.--Nov. 1. By sale of articles, stockings, and
Reports 1l. 14s. 4d.--Nov. 2. Through a brother at Clevedon 5s.
Through the boxes at the Orphan-Houses 3l. 8s. 6d. By sale of a Report
and Rendering 10d. From one of the labourers 3s.--Nov. 4. From a
sister near Wotton-under-Edge 1l.--Nov. 5. From two donors in the
neighborhood of Droitwich 5s. each.--Nov. 6. From sister B. in
Bristol 4s. From C. C. 1l. 2s. 5 ½ d.--Nov. 8. Anonymously by post
5l.--From sister H. C. 3s. —There was also given to me at Kendal,
where I had been labouring, by a brother 10s., and by a poor sister 4d.
This I sent at once to Bristol by an order.--Nov. 9. From a donor in
Bristol 1l. From Switzerland 1l. 4s. 4d. From London 5s. By sale of
articles 5l. 14s. 4 ½ d.--Nov. 11. A lady from Ireland visited the
Orphan-Houses and gave 1l. By sale of a Report 4d.--Proceeds of an
Orphan-box from the neighbourhood of Launceston 1l. 3s. 9d.--Through
an Orphan-box in my house 5s.--Nov. 13. Through the bonds in the
Orphan-Houses 10s. 2d. Through Mrs. T.'s Orphan-box 2s, 1 ½ d.--
Nov. 14. From C. C. 5l.--Anonymously 2s. 6d.--Nov. 16. By sale of
articles and stockings 2l. 11s. 6d.--Nov. 17. By sale of Reports 1s.
Through a box in my house 2s. 6d. By needlework and knitting of the
Orphans 1l. 6s. From sister C. 10s. From one of the labourers
in the work 5l.--Nov. 19. From P. 2s. 6d.--On
Nov. 20th we left Bowness for Keswick in Cumberland. The day before we
left, I received at Bowness 5s., 5s., and 1l., also from Kendal 2s. 6d.
This 1l. 12s. 6d. I sent off at once to Bristol by an order, knowing
that it was needed.--Nov. 21. From C. C. 3l.--Nov. 22. Through the
boxes in the Orphan-Houses 7s.--Nov. 23. By sale of articles and
stockings 2l. 5s. 9d. From one of the labourers 3l.--Nov. 24. By sale
of Reports 3s. 3d. From F. L. in Ireland 1l. From Richmond 1l. 10s.--
From Nov. 20th to 24th we stayed at Keswick. Whilst there I received
10s., 2s., and 1s. 6d. for the Orphans. This 13s. 6d. was at once sent
off to Bristol, by an order, as we were still very poor, with regard to
means for housekeeping expenses for the Orphan-Houses. But
notwithstanding all this great poverty in Bristol, which required that
we should day by day wait upon God, for our daily supplies, I did not
feel at all led to return home, but had an especial drawing to go to
Sunderland to labour there for a little while among the brethren
assembling at "Bethesda Free Chapel." We therefore left Keswick on Nov.
24th for Sunderland.--Nov. 26th came in by sale of articles 2s.,
through the boxes at my house 1L. 2s. 6d., and from Dublin 1l.--Nov.
27. Through a box 8d., by sale of articles 7s., and 2l. from London.--
Nov. 28th. From C. C. 10s. 8d., and by sale of Reports 8d.--Nov. 30.
By sale of stockings and articles 1l. 13s. 6 ½ d. From one of the
labourers 1l. 10s. By sale of articles 1s. 11d. —Dec. 1. From one of
the labourers in the work 10s.--Dec. 2. From sister F. 5s. By sale of
articles 1l. From Newbury 10s. 6d.--Dec. 3. By sale of articles 5s.
By profits from the sale of ladies' bags 1l. 19s. 6d. From Kingstown,
Ireland, 1l. By sale of a Report 4d.--Dec. 5. From C. C. 1l. Through
the boxes in the Orphan-Houses 3s. 10d. By knitting of the Orphans 8s.
6d. From Glasgow 5s.--Dec. 7. By sale of articles and stockings 3l.
7s, 11d. From one of the labourers 2l. From Thornbury 4s.--Dec. 8.
From a village near Keswick 10s., and by sale of articles 6d. From one
of the labourers 10s. From a donor in Ayrshire 2l.--In the evening of
Dec. 8th we returned to Bristol from Sunderland. Day by day while we
were at Sunderland also, the Orphan-Fund was very low, but God helped
day by day, by sending in the means which have been mentioned; and when
we returned there was 1s. 11d, in hand, and 2l. came in that same
evening from Plymouth.

Dec. 9. From the neighbourhood of Pershore came in this morning most
seasonably 5l., as time need for house-keeping expenses today was 4l.,
and there was only 2l. 1s. 11d, in hand. This 5l. came in about an hour
before the 4l. was needed. There was received further today from Bath,
anonymously, 10s., and by sale of articles 2s. 6d.--Will you not,
dear reader, unite with me in admiring and praising the Lord who so
seasonably helped all the time that I was away from the work, engaged in
His service in another way! Do you not see how precious it is to have
God to go to, and to find Him ever willing to help those who trust in
Him, wherever they be? Do you not also see again the hand of God so
manifestly stretched out on our behalf this day Dec. 9th? 4l. was
needed, but only 2l. 1s. 11d, in hand, and, an hour before the 4l. was
called for from the Orphan-Houses for house-keeping expenses, the Lord
sent that 5l. from Pershore.

Dec. 10. Today I received information, in answer to my inquiry, that
10s., which had been sent to me at Sunderland, were intended for the
Orphans. These 10s., together with 3l. 14s. 5d. left in hand yesterday,
are sufficient for this day, as the need of today is only 3l. 10s. for
house-keeping.

Dec. 11. This morning came in 1l. from the neighbourhood of Cockermouth;
thus we had, with the 14s. 5d. left yesterday, 1l. 14s. 5d., which is
enough for today.

Dec. 13. Monday. Yesterday I received from C. C. 1l. 10s., from another
person 2s., as profit from the sale of ladies' bags 1l., and this
morning from Burford 2s. 6d. Thus we have again enough for the
house-keeping expenses of today.

Dec. 14. Yesterday we had enough, but nothing over. When there was again
nothing at all remaining in my hands, there was yesterday afternoon 1s.
put into a box at my house. In the evening came in by sale of stockings
and articles 2l. 6s. 6d., and by a donation 10s--In the evening also
a sister from Norwich brought 10s., 2s. 6d., 6d., and 3s. She also
brought the following articles, to be sold for the benefit of the
Orphans: A bottle of extract of spring flowers, a small box of scent
bottles, a smelling bottle, 8 common seals, a thimble case, a box of
wafers; a china box containing two rings, a mourning brooch, and a bead
watch-guard; a pin-cushion, a pair of little cuffs, and a little box.
Another parcel containing a pair of worked slippers, 2 little bags, 2
books, 2 aprons, a knitted cloth, 3 pin-cushions, a Shetland shawl, and
a pair of card-racks. Further: 2 pairs of cuffs and a necktie. Further:
a child's silver rattle, 3 rings, 3 pairs of ear-rings, and 2
necklaces--There was also a parcel sent from Langport, containing two
toilette cushions, a pair of worked slippers, 2 fans, 2 children's
caps, some gold lace, a pair of silver clasps, 3 brooches, a silver
thimble, a brass clasp, and some bits of gold. This morning I received a
letter from the neighbourhood of Exeter containing a post-office order
for 8s. with these words:

"I had hoped to have accumulated a larger sum in my box for the Orphans,
than I have of late been enabled to obtain. I now, however, send it to
you, though the amount is small, and should be thankful if it should
prove useful for present need, it having been upon my mind for the last
day or two that I ought to forward it to you without further delay. I
therefore send an order for 8s., &c."

Thus we were supplied for the need of this day. This last 8s. was needed
to make up the amount required.

Dec. 15. Yesterday afternoon I received 3l. more, of which 2l. was from
Madeira, and 1l. from the brother through whom the 2l. was remitted.
This 3l. was paid away at once, though not needed for house-keeping, so
that I had still nothing for the need of today, when this day began.--
My prayer last evening and this morning had been especially, that the
Lord would not only be pleased to send me some money for the
house-keeping expenses of today, but also enable me to give at least a
little money to eight of the sisters who labour in the four
Orphan-Houses, who have not had any money for their own personal
necessities for several months. This desire was granted to me, for I
received this morning a letter from Wakefield with 20l., in which the
donor writes: "I hasten to enclose 20l., which I leave to your disposal;
but if the varied funds are so situated as to give no material
preponderance of need to any one, I should divide it as under, viz. 10l.
to the Orphans, 5l. to yourself and colleague, and 5l. for the Bibles,
&c." I took all this 20l. for the Orphans, and have thus the joy of
being able to send at least 16l. to those eight sisters, and am also
supplied with house-keeping money for today; and as for tomorrow, "my
eyes are upon the Lord." The Lord be praised for this precious and
seasonable help!

Dec. 16. Yesterday afternoon a brother in the Lord gave 5l. for the
Orphans. By this money I was able to defray the expenses of today, and
the rest I put away for the rent, so that again we have to look to the
Lord for supplies for tomorrow. Yesterday also a person gave
half-a-crown to one of the teachers of the Orphans, whilst she was
walking out with the children.

Dec. 17. Yesterday afternoon came in 12s. and 5s.--Also a lady and
gentleman called at the Girls' Orphan-House No. II. and gave 10s. for
a copy of my Narrative. Thus we had a little towards the need of today,
but not nearly enough. Before, however, I was called on for money, I
received from Worcester 1l. 10s. Thus we were supplied for the need of
today.

Dec. 18. Saturday. I had reason to believe that our need for
house-keeping today would be about 5l., and I therefore waited upon God
for means, and looked out for help. Yesterday afternoon, accordingly,
came in by sale of trinkets 1l. 8s. This morning I received from
Westmoreland 10l. Also a letter from Edinburgh, containing 15l., with
the following lines without name.

"Dear brother in Christ, I enclose ‘in the name of Jesus' 15l. 5l.
for dear brother Craik, 5l. for dear brother and sister Müller, for
their personal or family expenses, 3l. for the Orphans, and 2l. for the
Christian Knowledge Institution. May the peace of God, which passeth all
understanding, keep your hearts and minds through Jesus Christ our
Lord."

There came in also, at the same time, by sale of Reports 10s. Thus I was
able to meet all the house-keeping expenses of today, being 4l. 15s.
0d., and the rest I was obliged to put by for the rent and the expenses
connected with the apprentices, so that we have yet again to wait upon
the Lord for further supplies for next Monday. However, we are brought
to the close of another week in this service, and He who has helped us
thus far will surely help us further.

Monday, Dec. 20. Only 9s. and a small gold pin and ring from Stowmarket
having come in since Saturday morning, we had not enough for
house-keeping expenses today, which are 2l.; but one of the labourers
was able of his own to give 1l. 11s. 0d., to supply the deficiency.

Dec. 21. Yesterday afternoon a brother sent 2l. for the Orphans. In the
evening a sister gave 2s, 6d. This morning came in through two
Orphan-boxes 14s. 10d.; from Droitwich 10s; and by sale of articles,
Reports and stockings 1l. 7s. 9d. Thus we have all that is needed for
today, the demand being only 3l. 5s. The rest I put by for rent and the
apprentices, and wait upon God for help for tomorrow.

Dec. 22. Yesterday evening came in by sale of Reports 8d., from Plymouth
1s., and from a sister 5s. Our need also led me to open the boxes in the
Orphan-Houses, which contained 15s. 2 ½ d. By sale of articles 2s. 6d.
This was all I was able to send this morning to the Orphan-Houses,
waiting upon the Lord for more.

Dec. 23. The need of today was 11l., having several expenses to meet
besides those of house-keeping, which amounted to 4l. for today. This
sum the Lord gave me thus: last evening I received 1l. together with a
pair of trousers and gaiters, and a remnant of fustian for the Orphans.
But as I knew how much there would be needed today, I waited further
upon the Lord this morning for help, and, in ONE MINUTE, after I had
risen from my knees, I received a letter from Liverpool with 10l. for
the Orphans. The donor writes: "I have had the enclosed Ten Pound Note
in my drawer for some time, intending to send it to you for the Orphans;
but my time is so occupied, that, at a suitable time, when at my desk, I
have overlooked it. I now however enclose it," &c,--How seasonable
this help! How exactly to the very shilling what is needed today! How
remarkable that just now this donor in Liverpool is led to send the Ten
Pounds which had been, according to his own words, for some time in his
drawer for the purpose of sending it! All this abundantly proves the
most minute and particular providence of God and His readiness to answer
the supplications of His children.--I am now looking out again for
supplies for tomorrow.

Dec. 24. Last evening came in from Mrs. O. 1l., by knitting 1s. 10d., by
sale of stockings 2l. 5s., by four half-sovereigns given to the matrons
of the four Orphan-Houses, of which three of them gave their part to the
funds, 30s, and by sale of trinkets 1l. 2s. Thus we are supplied till
next Monday, i.e. for Christmas day (Saturday) and the Lord's day.

Dec. 27. Monday. Before I was called on for fresh supplies, the Lord, in
His great kindness, had given me the means requisite for today. On
Christmas Day was brought to me a parcel from Hereford in which I
received from A. and Z. 3s., also a little box, a silver vinaigrette.,
and half-a-crown. Yesterday, Lord's Day. I received from Kendal 5l.
10s. Also from Stoke Bishop 10s.--Thus I have been again able to meet
all the expenses of today.

Dec. 28. Yesterday came in by sale of Reports from Bath 2s. 6d., ditto
from Street 1s., by the proceeds of an Orphan-box from Street 3s., and
anonymously 5s.—Today I received by sale of articles and stockings 1l.
11s. 8d. As this was not quite enough for the necessities of today, the
boxes in the Orphan-Houses were opened, and 2l. 1s. 0 ½ d. found in
them. Thus we had again more than four pounds for house-keeping to day,
and are supplied with all we need.

Dec. 29. Yesterday evening I met at our usual weekly prayer meeting with
all the labourers in the Schools and Orphan-Houses, to seek the Lord's
blessing upon the work, and upon the children under our care in
particular. Among other points the state of the funds also was a subject
for prayer, on account of the great need in every way. For we need money
for the schools, as I shall not be able next week to pay to the teachers
in the Day Schools their usual weekly salary, except means should come
in for them. The stock of tracts and Bibles is also becoming very small.
Also for eleven weeks I have scarcely at all been able to send help to
home and foreign labourers. This especially we prayed about. And as to
the Orphans, I had again only 9d. in hand for house-keeping expenses,
which had come in at the meeting. However, my heart, by God's
goodness, was at peace, and as I had now with my fellow-labourers been
again able to bring all our necessities before the Lord I was looking
out for help. After the meeting one of the teachers gave me 1s. 6d. for
the Orphans, saying, the Lord will give you more tomorrow morning. This
I expected myself; for we were in need for house-keeping expenses for
today, and we had been waiting upon God for means. Accordingly this
morning, when I had only 2s. 3d. in hand, I received from Devonshire
15l. for the Orphans.--How good is the Lord! How seasonable again
this supply! I had been just again in prayer about the work, and about
this day's necessities, and at the very moment that I rose from my
knees this letter was given to me.--There was also another letter
from Essex, containing 1l. 5s. for the Orphans. Thus I was again
abundantly supplied for this day, and was able to put by the rest for
rent and the expenses connected with the apprentices, trusting in the
Lord for fresh supplies for tomorrow.

Dec. 30. When this day began, we were without any thing for the
necessities of the day, though I had reason to believe that several
pounds would again be required. I was therefore again looking out for
fresh supplies. Accordingly, about ten o'clock this morning, a brother
in the Lord, who had come last evening to stay for a night in my house,
gave me 10l., to be used as it might be most needed. To be noticed in
connexion with this donation is: 1, I had, not long since, received a
donation from him. 2, This brother had generally stated how he wished
his donations to be appropriated, and they had been chiefly for
missionary purposes; but this time he left it to me to use this money as
most needed, and therefore I could take of it what was needed for the
Orphans. 3, We were now extremely poor also with regard to the funds for
all the other objects, so that I was obliged to tell the teachers of the
Day Schools last Tuesday evening, 28th, that if no fresh supplies came
in, I should not be able to give them their weekly salaries, as usual,
next Tuesday evening, being now poorer in this particular than I had
been for years. How kind therefore of the Lord, not only to give me this
money through this brother at this time, but also to dispose his heart
to leave the application of it to me as most needed. I took half of it
for this day's housekeeping expenses for the Orphans, and half for the
School Fund, for the weekly salaries of the teachers next Tuesday.--I
also received further this morning a half-sovereign from Droitwich.--
The little that was left, after the house-keeping expenses were met, was
put by for rent and the expenses for the apprentices, and I was again,
without a penny, looking out for fresh supplies for tomorrow.

Dec. 31, 1847. The last day of another year had now come. Great and many
had been the mercies of God to me this year in every way, particularly
also in connexion with the Orphans; but now I had again nothing for
today, except two shillings which are in one of the boxes in my house. I
was, however, by God's grace, able to look out for supplies for this
last day of another year also, being fully assured that the Lord would
not confound me. And thus it has been, according to my expectation; for,
before being called on for money, I received 100l., which was left to me
to apply to any part of the Lord's service where there seemed the most
need. At the same time I received 5l. for the Orphans from Teignmouth.
Of the 100l. I took half for the Orphans and half for the other objects.
It was indeed a moat seasonable help! I am thus able to meet all the
expenses for house-keeping for today, all the present expenses connected
with the apprentices, and am able to give 16l. to eight of the sisters
who labour in the Orphan-Houses, for their own personal necessities. How
good is the Lord! How can I sufficiently praise Him for this seasonable
help! —Evening. Received still further 3s., and from Banbury 17s., and
the proceeds of an Orphan-box, being 1l. 2s. 6d. Thus the year closes in
blessing and under the manifest help of God.

Jan. 1, 1848. As the old year ended, so the new begins. Early this
morning was sent to me 1l. 12s. 0d., being the proceeds of an
Orphan-box.--A little later I received from Worcester 1l., and from
Scotland 3l.

Jan. 6. On the second and three following days came in many pounds more;
but though so much had been received during the last seven days, I sent
again today the last money to the Orphan-Houses for house-keeping, as
our expenses have been exceedingly heavy during the last few days; and I
am therefore again penniless with regard to the necessities of tomorrow.
— Evening. The Lord has been again exceedingly kind, and has again
helped in His faithful love. This evening I received a check for 120l.,
of which 20l. is intended by the donor for missionary purposes, and the
other 100l. is left to my disposal, either for the Orphans or the other
part of the work. I took therefore 70l. for the Orphans, and 30l. for
the Day Schools, and the circulation of Bibles and Tracts. I received
likewise from D.D. 5l.

Jan. 25. Besides the seventy-five pounds that had come in on the 6th,
the sum of 53l. 18s. 0 ¼ d. more came in up to this day.--Now, after
having paid this evening for the house-keeping expenses for one week in
advance, all the money in my hands for the Orphans is again gone; yet,
by the Lord's goodness, we have our stores pretty well supplied, and
besides this the matrons have the current house-keeping expenses for one
week in hand. May the Lord in His faithful love send fresh supplies for
the coming week!

Jan. 27. This afternoon when there was nothing in hand, 1 received from
Guernsey 2l.

Jan. 28, Received from Plymouth 5l. Also 5s. 6d. from the neighbourhood
of Exeter, and 2s. besides. From the neighbourhood of Nottingham 5s.

Jan. 30. By profits from the sale of ladies' baskets 2s.

Jan. 31. One of the labourers in the work gave 10l., and a brother on
his way to Ireland 1l.

Feb. 1. By sale of articles and stockings 3l. 19s. 7 ½ d., anonymously
2d., from sister F. 10s., proceeds of an Orphan-box 12s. 6 ¾ d., by
sale of stockings 8s. 5d., and by the boxes at the Orphan-Houses 16s.
9d.--When I went this evening to the Orphan-Houses for our usual
prayer meeting on Tuesday evenings, I found that altogether since last
Tuesday evening 25l. 2s. 0 ½ d. had come in; but as there had been many
extra expenses to meet during the week, there was only actually in hand
8l. 8s. 4 ¼ d. Of this I gave to each of the matrons 2l. 2s. 1d, being
only a part of what would be needed during the week, and had then one
farthing left, "like the handful of meal in the barrel."

Feb. 2. This morning on my usual walk before breakfast I felt myself led
out of my usual track, into a direction in which I had not gone for some
months. In stepping over a stile I said to myself: "Perhaps God has a
reason even in this." About five minutes afterwards I met a Christian
gentleman who gave me two sovereigns for the Orphans, and then I knew
the reason, why I had been led this way. Thus the farthing which
remained last evening has been already multiplied.--Evening. This
afternoon I received still further from a brother 1l. 1s., also a letter
from Portsea containing 1l. 10s. The letter from Portsea contained these
words: "Please accept it as another token of the Lord's watchful care
for you and yours." How true! How exemplified in this very donation at
this time!

Feb. 3. This morning I received by the first delivery three letters,
each containing further supplies. The first, from Sherborne, enclosed a
post-office order for 1l. 15s., of which 1l. is for missionary purposes,
and 15s. for the Orphans. The second, from Yorkshire, contained two half
Five Pound Notes, which 10l. is left to my disposal, yet it is requested
that a part of it should go to the destitute Irish. I put therefore 5l.
to the relief of the Irish, and 5l. to the Orphan Fund. The third
letter, from Marlborough, contained 1l. for the Orphans.--Thus I have
now all that is needed in the way of house-keeping money for the
remainder of this week; but I am now waiting upon God for about 25l. to
provide each of the 32 Orphan Boys above seven years old with a new suit
of clothes.

The reader might say, "You are continually in need. No sooner is the one
demand met, than another comes. Do you not find it a trying life, and
are you not tired of it?" My reply is, It is true I am more or less
continually in need in connexion with this work. And if I were to tell
out all my heart to the reader concerning it, he would have still more
reason to say that I am continually in need. For what I have here
written is almost exclusively about the way in which God has been
pleased to supply me with money for carrying on the work; but I do
deliberately state that this, much as it might appear to one or the
other, is by no means the chief thing that I stand in need of from day
to day. I will just hint at a few other things. Sickness among the
children, very difficult and tedious cases, in which, notwithstanding
all the means which are used month after month, yea year after year, the
children remain ill. Nothing remains but either to keep them, or to send
them to the Parish Union to which they belong, as they have no relatives
able to provide for them. The very fact of having cared for them and
watched over them for years, only endears them the more to us, and would
make it the more trying to send them back to their parish. This is a
"need" which brings me to God. Here is prayer required, not only for
means which such sick children call for, but for guidance and wisdom
from on High.--Sometimes children are to be placed out as servants or
apprentices. A suitable place is needed, or else they had better remain
under our care. The obtaining of this suitable place is a "need" indeed.
It is more difficult to be obtained than money. Sometimes for many weeks
have I had to wait upon God, to have this "need" supplied; but He has
always at last helped.--Sometimes great has been my "need" of wisdom
and guidance in order to know how certain children ought to be treated
under particular circumstances; and especially how to behave towards
certain apprentices or servants who were formerly in the Orphan-Houses.
A "need" in this respect is no small thing; though I have found that in
this and in all other matters concerning which I was in "need," I have
been helped, provided I was indeed able to wait patiently upon God. That
word, "godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise of the
life that now is, and of that which is to come" (1 Tim. iv. 8), I have
in times almost without number found to be true in my own experience.
— Further, when one or the other of the labourers needed to leave the
work on account of health, or for other reasons, I have been at such
times in far greater "need" than when I required money for the various
objects of the Institution. I could only have such "need" supplied by
waiting upon God. I could do nothing but speak to my heavenly Father
about this matter, and He has always helped. One of the greatest
difficulties connected with this work is, to obtain suitable Godly
persons for it. So many things are to be taken into the account.
Suitable age, health, gift, experience, love for children, true
godliness, a ready mind to serve God in the work and not themselves, a
ready mind to bear with the many trials and difficulties connected with
it, a manifest purpose to labour not for the sake of the remuneration,
but to serve God in their work; surely, to obtain Godly persons, in whom
these qualifications, even in some measure, are found combined, is not
an easy matter. Not that any one will suppose me to mean that I am
looking out for perfect fellow-labourers. Not that any one will suppose
that my fellow-labourers are referred to by rue, as if they were without
weaknesses, deficiencies, and failings. I am myself far, very far from
being without weaknesses, deficiencies, and failings. Moreover, I never
expect to find fellow-labourers for this work who have not their
weaknesses; but this I do mean to say, that the work of God in my hands
is of that character, and, by God's grace, is really carried on with
such a true purpose to serve God thereby (however much I and my
fellow-labourers may fail), that it is with me a matter of deep moment
to find truly suitable individuals for it, in whom, as much as possible,
the above qualifications should be found united. And, however much there
may be wanting, this is more and more my aim, that I may obtain such
helpers; and hence it can be easily perceived bow great my "need" must
be again and again on this very account. I do here especially advise,
that if any should apply in future for situations in connexion with this
work, they would keep these remarks before them; for, by God's grace,
it is my purpose never to give to any persons a situation in connexion
with the Institution, if they are not suitable for it according to the
light which God gives me.--Further, that the labourers work happily
together among themselves, and that I go on happily in service with
them; that I be their servant, on the one hand, and yet, on the other,
maintain the place which God has given me in this work; surely, if any
one carefully looks at this, he will at once see, that there is a
difficulty and a "need" far greater than any that is connected with
money. Oh, how these matters lead one to call upon God! How they
continually make one sensible of one's "need!" Truly, I am in need, in
continual need. Many more points might be referred to in connexion with
this work, in which I am more or less continually in "need;" but I will
only mention one it is now many years since I have made my boast in the
living God in so public a manner by my publications. On this account
Satan unquestionably is waiting for my halting, and, if left to myself,
I should fall a prey to him. Pride, unbelief, or other sins would be my
ruin, and lead me to bring a most awful disgrace upon the name of Jesus.
Here is then a "need," a great "need." I do feel myself in "need," in
great "need," even to be upheld by God; for I cannot stand for a
moment, if left to myself. Oh, that none of my dear readers might admire
me, and be astonished at my faith, and think of me as if I were beyond
unbelief! Oh, that none of my dear readers might think, that I could not
be puffed up by pride, or in other respects most awfully dishonour God,
and thus at last, though God has used me in blessing hitherto to so
many, become a beacon to the church of Christ! No, I am as weak as ever,
and need as much as ever to be upheld as to faith, and every other
grace. I am therefore in "need," in great "need;" and therefore help me,
dear Christian reader, with your prayers.

I allow, then, moat fully that I am in continual "need." This is the
case with regard to money matters, because the work is now so large. A
few hundred pounds go but a little way. There have been often weeks,
when my demands have been several hundred pounds a week, and it can
therefore easily be supposed that even if large donations come in, they
do not last long. But whilst I allow this, I desire that the Christian
reader may keep in mind that there are other necessities, and even
greater ones than those connected with money.--Should, however, the
reader say that he thinks "I must find this a very trying life, and that
I must be tired of it," I beg to state, that he is entirely mistaken. I
do not find the life in connexion with this work a trying life, but a
very happy one. It is impossible to describe the abundance of peace and
heavenly joy that often has flowed into my soul by means of the fresh
answers which I have obtained from God, after waiting upon Him for help
and blessing; and the longer I have had to wait upon Him, or the greater
my need was, the greater the enjoyment when at last the answer came,
which has often been in a very remarkable way, in order to make the hand
of God the more manifest. I therefore solemnly declare that I do not
find this life a trying life, but a very happy one, and I am
consequently not in the least tired of it. Straits and difficulties I
expected from the very beginning. Before I began this service I expected
them; nay, the chief object of it was, that the church at large might be
strengthened in faith, and be led more simply, habitually, and
unreservedly to trust in the living God, by seeing His hand stretched
out in nay behalf in the hour of need. I did, therefore, expect trials,
great trials and straits; but cheerfully, for the glory of God, and the
profit of God's dear children, did I desire to pass through them, if
only the saints might be benefited by the dealings of God with me. The
longer I go on in this service, the greater the trials of one kind or
another become; but, at the same time, the happier I am in this my
service, and the more assured, that I am engaged as the Lord would have
me to be. How then could I be tired of carrying on the work of God on
such principles as I do?

I now return to the extracts from my journal.

Feb. 4, 1848. Yesterday came in still further: from Norwich 1l. and from
Devonshire 1l.

Feb. S. From a brother at Hereford 5l.--Feb. 5. From "Friends to
Orphans" 2l., and from D.D. 12s 2 ½ d.--Feb. 5. By sale of articles
2l. 6s. 4d. Evening. Since this day week, when I had only one farthing
left, the Lord has been pleased to send in for the Orphans 23l. 16s. 8
½ d; but as I have had to pay away more than 10l., besides making up
the remainder of what was needed for house-keeping expenses for the past
week, there was only 6l. 10s. 10 ¾ d. for the expenses of the coming
week, whilst nearly three times as much was required by the four
matrons. I divided this little, however, among them, in the full
assurance, that, by the time it was consumed, the Lord would send more.

Feb. 9. Today only 2s. 4d. has come in. We are supplied for the present
moment, and shall have enough till tomorrow evening for house-keeping
expenses; but there is about 25l. needed for boys' clothes, and I
greatly desire to give some money to the sisters who labour in the
Orphan-Houses.

Feb. 10. This morning was given to me the sum of One Hundred Pounds,
which being left entirely to my disposal, I took of it 50l. for the
Orphans, and 50l. for the School—, Bible—, Tract—and Missionary
Fund.--The Lord be praised for this most seasonable help! I am thus
helped for the present for all the various parts of the work, and have
especially two precious answers to my prayers concerning the Orphan
work, in that I am able to get a new suit of clothes for all the boys,
and to give some money to the sisters, who labour in the Orphan-Houses,
for their own personal necessities.

From Feb. 10th to 22nd came in 21l. 0s. 1 ½ d. more.

Feb. 25. All money was now again expended. This afternoon I had paid
away the last. About an hour after, I received from a brother the
contents of his Orphan-box, being 2s. 6d. and a gold watch-key. In the
evening was given to me 10l., being the half-yearly profits arising from
shares in a certain company. How kind of the Lord thus to help again so
soon! As soon as the last money was disbursed, He sent more.

Feb. 29. 4l. 18s. 0d. more has come in since the 25th. This evening I
paid away for house-keeping all the money I had, being 12l. 10s. 7d.,
and returned home with an empty purse, trusting in the Lord to give me
again fresh supplies. I shall shortly need again many pounds.

March 1. This morning I received anonymously by post from P. L. A. ten
shillings. Evening. This afternoon a check for 25l. was left at my house
for the benefit of the Orphans.--Thus we are again supplied for a
week for what we need for house-keeping, &c. Oh, how good it is to
depend on the faithful love of our heavenly Father, who never forsakes
His children who put their trust in Him!

March 17. Since the first of this month there has come in, besides the
25l. given on the 1st, altogether 36l. 0s. 3 ½ d. Now today all means
were again gone, when a brother in the Lord from Gloucestershire called
at the Orphan-Houses and bought some tracts and an "Improved Rendering"
for 2s. 6d., and gave 17s. 6d. for the Orphans. This afternoon came in
further, by sale of articles, 2l. 12s. 9d.

March 18. This morning I received from Chelsea 4l., from Tewkesbury
10d., and this evening from D. D. 5s. 2d., and by sale of articles 5s.
There was also 1l. left anonymously at my house.--Thus we are again
supplied for 2 or 3 days.

March 21. Tuesday. As during the last three days only 1l. 15s. had come
in, I had only 2l. this evening towards the house-keeping expenses of
the coming week; but finding that one of the teachers had 5l. in hand
for knitting and needlework, done by the children, I added this to the
2l., and we are thus supplied for 2 or 3 days with provisions.

March 23. Evening. When there was now again no money at all in hand, and
when I had the prospect of needing fresh supplies tomorrow or the day
after, a brother from Switzerland arrived at my house, who brought me
4l., which some brethren at Vevey, in Switzerland, had contributed
towards the support of the Orphans. He also was the bearer of 15s. from
London. What a variety of ways the Lord uses to supply our need! How
remarkable that these Swiss brethren, who are just now in so much trial,
should be led to send help towards this work! A few minutes, after I had
received this 4l. 15s, there came also to hand a letter from Stafford,
containing 4l., of which the donor wished me to take one-half for the
Orphans, and the other half for my own personal expenses.

March 24. This morning I received still further from the Swiss brother,
who had arrived yesterday afternoon, 18 francs, being a donation from
the pupils of a boarding school in Switzerland, and 10 francs from a
German brother.--Also from Norwich 13s. 8d. and 2s. 4d.

March 25. This morning I received from O. W. a letter with 20l., which
the donor wished me to apply to the help of those labouring in the
Gospel, and to the Orphans, if in present need. I took half of this for
time Orphans, and half for Home and Foreign labourers. We are thus
supplied for the Orphans for about three days.

March 28. On the 26th came in anonymously 3s., ditto 10s., ditto 2s.
6d., ditto 1s. 10d.; and 2l. 7s. besides. This evening I had again to
give to the matrons fresh supplies for the coming week, towards which I
had only a few pounds, when I received this morning 20l. from a distance
of about 200 miles.

Between March 28th and April 12th I received, besides the 20l. referred
to, 24l. 0s. 7d.

April 13. Thursday. On Tuesday evening I had given out for house-keeping
all the money in hand, being 11l. This was enough for three or four
days. This morning I was now looking out for more, having requested the
Lord to look upon our necessities; for tomorrow, or at the latest the
day after tomorrow, fresh supplies will be needed. Now think, my dear
reader, of the Lord's goodness, when I tell you that this very morning
I received 90l. for the Lord's work in my hands, the disposal of which
sum was entirely left with me. I took of this sum 40l. for the Orphans,
and 50l. for the School-, Bible-, Missionary-and Tract Fund.

April 26. Only 18l. 19s. 8 ½ d. had come in since the 13th. As the
income during these thirteen days had been so small, our means were
again reduced to 16s., after I had supplied the day before yesterday the
means for the house-keeping expenses for this week. Today I received
information, that to a sister in Switzerland had been given Fifty Francs
for the Orphans. Thus the Lord is in every way showing that He is
mindful of us.

April 29. Saturday. The expenses of today, in addition to those for
house-keeping, which had been met last Tuesday evening for a whole week
in advance, reduced our little stock of means to only a few shillings.
In addition to this, Tuesday is approaching, when again about 20l. will
be needed. And now see, dear reader, how seasonably the Lord helped us
again, and that from most unexpected quarters. This morning I received
One Hundred Pounds from a brother, who is himself depending upon God for
daily supplies whilst labouring in word and doctrine, but who has lately
come into the possession of this sum, and who does not think it right to
lay up treasure upon earth. Of this 100l. he wishes me to take 10l. for
my own personal necessities, to give to brother Craik 10l., and to take
80l. for the Orphans. Of this 80l. the sum of 50l. has been put to the
Building Fund, and 30l. has been taken for present use for the Orphans.
— But this was not all. There was paid to me today the legacy of 19l.
19s. left to me for the benefit of the Orphans by the late Mrs. B., an
individual whom I do not remember ever to have seen in my life, and whom
I only know by name. Observe this particular providence! At a time of
need, of great need of means, this legacy comes in. The will may have
been made years ago, and the testator has been dead several months; but
just at this time, when not only the 20l. are needed next Tuesday for
house-keeping, but other expenses of about 30l. more are to be met in a
few days, this legacy comes in.--Today also I have received besides,
10l. from Wiltshire, 1l. 4s. from Cumberland, 10s. from Birmingham, and
1l. from a donor in Bristol. Thus in one day, in a time of great need,
62l. 13s. has come in, besides 50l. for the Building Fund.

May 11. 10l. 2s. has come in since April 29th. This morning I received
from a lady at a considerable distance 16l., and from Wandsworth 5l.
These two donations came in especially in answer to prayer, not so much
for immediate need as it regards house-keeping, but on account of other
heavy expenses which are shortly to be met. I have also repeatedly asked
the Lord of late, if it may please Him to send in considerable means,
before the accounts are closed on the 26th, so that there might not be
even the appearance, as if I wrote another Report, because I could get
on no longer without it.

May 26, 1848. On this day the accounts were closed. The total sum which
has come in from the 12th to this day, is 40l, 3s. 7d. Thus the Lord
closes this period under His manifest help! I have been able to meet all
the expenses connected with the support of the four Orphan-Houses during
the last two years, amounting to 3,228l. 5s. 11d., owe no one anything,
and have on this 26th of May, 1848, 1l. 10s. 3 ¾ d. left in hand.

Further Account of the New Orphan-House, on Ashley Down, Bristol, from
May 26, 1846, to May 26, 1848.

Those, who have read the former chapter on this subject, will remember,
how I was obliged to think of building an Orphan-House, and how, when
once led to this, I felt myself also led to build it large enough for
Three Hundred Orphans; and how the Lord, in His great kindness, most
manifestly in answer to prayer, gave me a field of about seven acres for
the purpose; and how, by various donations, 2,710l. 3s. 5 ½ d. had been
already received on May 26, 1848. I shall now give a further account of
the Lord's dealings with me, concerning the New Orphan-House, yet so,
that, for the sake of brevity, only a few of the donations will be
referred to, and chiefly those which seem more particularly to mark the
finger of God.

July 4, 1846. For about three months my faith and patience have been
exceedingly tried about the field, which I have purchased for the
building of the Orphan-House, as the greatest difficulties arose about
my possessing the land after all; but, by God's grace, my heart was
kept in peace, being fully assured, that, if the Lord were to take this
piece of land from me, it would be only for the purpose of giving me a
still better one; for our Heavenly Father never takes any earthly thing
from His children except He means to give them something better instead.
But in the midst of all this great trial of faith, I could not but
think, judging from the way in which God so manifestly had given me this
piece of land, that the difficulties were only allowed for the trial of
my faith and patience. And thus it was. Last evening I received a letter
by which all the difficulties were removed, and now, with the blessing
of God, in a few days the conveyance will be made out.

July 6. The reason why, for several months, there had come in so little
for the Building Fund, appeared to me this, that we did not need the
money at present; and that, when it was needed, and when my faith and
patience had been sufficiently tried, the Lord would send more means.
And thus it has proved; for today was given to me the sum of Two
Thousand and Fifty Pounds, of which Two Thousand Pounds is for the
Building Fund, and Fifty Pounds for present necessities, of which latter
sum I took one half for present use for the Orphans, and the other half
for the School—, Bible—,Tract— and Missionary Fund. This is the
largest donation I have yet had at one time for the work; but I expect
still larger ones, in order that more and more it may be manifest to the
children of God, that there is no happier, no easier, and no better way
for the obtaining of pecuniary means or anything else in connexion with
the work of God, than to deal directly with the Lord Himself.

It is impossible to describe my joy in God when I received this
donation. I was neither excited nor surprised; for I look out for
answers to my prayers. I believe that God hears me. Yet my heart was so
full of joy, that I could only sit before God, and admire him, like
David in 2 Samuel vii. At last I cast myself flat down upon my face, and
burst forth in thanksgiving to God, and in surrendering my heart afresh
to Him for His blessed service.

There came in still further today 2s. 6d.

July 10. Received 120l., of which 100l. is intended by the donor for the
Building Fund, and 20l. for present use in the work, as most needed. I
took of this 20l. one half for the Orphans, and the other half for the
other objects of the Institution.

July 11. By sale of articles, given for the Building Fund, came in 5s.
6d.

July 15. From a sister in the Lord 1l., from a Christian gentleman 5l.,
from a sister 3s., and from another sister an old silver pencil case and
2s.

July 17. From the neighbourhood of Oxford 1l.

July 21. This morning a gentleman from Devonshire, on his way to London,
called on me. When he came I was in prayer, having, among other matters,
brought also before the Lord the following points: 1, I had been asking
Him for some supplies for my own temporal necessities, being in need. 2,
1 had asked Him for more means for the Building Fund, and besought Him
to hasten the matter, on account of the inhabitants in Wilson Street, on
account of the welfare of the children and those who have the oversight
of them in the Orphan-Houses, and lastly, that I might be able to admit
more Orphans, the number of applications being so great. 3, I had also
asked the Lord for means for present use for the Orphans, as the
outgoings are so great. 4, I had asked for means for the other objects.
— When I saw this gentleman from Devonshire, he gave me 20l., of which
10l. is to be used for the Building Fund, 5l. for present use for the
Orphans, 2l. for brother Craik and myself, and the remaining 3l. were
left to my disposal, which I applied to the other objects of the
Scriptural Knowledge Institution. Thus I received, at the very moment
that I had been asking God, FOUR answers to my prayers.

Sept. 7 From a friend, who has many times helped the Orphans almost from
the commencement, I received 50l.

Sept. 9. "Let patience have her perfect work, &c.," must be still my
motto concerning this service. Our position in Wilson Street, where the
Orphan-Houses are now, remains as it was; I also see more and more the
desirableness of commencing the building soon, both on account of the
Orphans, and their teachers and overseers; particularly also, because so
very many applications are made for the admission of very destitute
Orphans, and I am unable at present, to receive all who are applied for;
and yet the Lord is delaying to send the full amount of means required.
I am also asked, when the Building is likely to commence, and can only
answer, I do not know. Now this morning I had again, after family
prayer, my usual season for prayer about this work, when I brought all
these matters in simplicity before the Lord. Immediately, after I had
risen from my knees, the following letter was handed to me, containing
60l.

* * * *, Sept. 8, 1846.

"My dear Brother,

I send Sixty Pounds out of the abundance which the Lord has given to me,
and of which it seems to me that He has need in the work you are
engaged. If you think proper, would you kindly take 25l. for the
Building Fund of the Orphan Asylum, 25l. for missionary labourers, 5l.
for the present use of the Orphans, and 5l. for your own purse; and may
our good Lord bless your labours of love, and give the increase a
hundred fold.

Your unworthy brother,

* * * *"

Thus the Lord encourages me, day by day, to continue to wait on Him. His
time is not yet come; but, when it is, all that is needed will be given.
By God's grace my faith is unshaken. I am as certain that I shall have
every shilling needed for the work, as if I had the money already in
actual possession; and I am as certain that this house of mercy will be
built, as if it were already standing before me.

Oct. 18. Today the Lord has much refreshed my heart by sending from B.
B. 5s., from a young sister 2s. 6d., and through an order on a Bristol
Bank 120l.

Oct. 19. While I was this morning in the very act of praising the Lord
for His goodness, in giving me yesterday the above mentioned donations,
and whilst I was again bringing my arguments before Him, why He would be
pleased soon to give me the whole sum which is requisite, I received an
order for 200l., which was doubly precious, because it was accompanied
by an affectionate and encouraging letter.

Oct. 29. This morning I had been again bringing the ease of the Building
before the Lord in prayer, entreating Him to hasten the matter, if it
might be, when, the very instant I rose from my knees, there was handed
to me a letter with an order for 300l.--About an hour after, I
received from a sister in the neighbourhood of Wotton-under-Edge 10s.
6d.--"From Saints in the neighbourhood of Kingsbridge" 1l. 5s.--
From a sister an old silver thimble.

Nov. 14. By sale of articles 12s.--This evening I received a small
morocco case, containing a gold chain, a pair of gold ear-rings, and a
gold brooch (being a set), with the following letter enclosed:

"Beloved Brother in Jesus,

The contents of the accompanying casket being in my unconverted days a
wedding gift from a very dear husband, has, as you may suppose, been
hither-to preserved as beyond price. But since God, in His great mercy
revealed to my soul His exceeding riches in Christ, and gave to it more
(Oh, how much more!) than He has taken away, they seemed as the
Babylonish garment or wedge of gold, which ought not to be in the
Israelites' possession. I therefore give up that which the flesh would
fain keep, and still prize; but which the spirit rejects, as unworthy a
follower of Jesus. Accept then, dear Brother, those toys, once the pride
of life, and the food of folly; and use them for the building of the
Orphan-House, in which I feel it a privilege to lay one stone; and may
the Lord recompense you a hundred fold, yea, a thousand fold, in this
your great labour of love, is the prayer of yours affectionately in the
best of bonds.

----November 1846. A Sister and a Widow."

The gift was precious to me as a proof of the continued readiness of my
Heavenly Father to help me in this work; but doubly so, on account of
the circumstances under which it was given, and on account of the state
of mind in which the anonymous donor had given these ornaments.

Nov. 19. I am now led more and more to importune the Lord to send me the
means, which are requisite in order that I may be able to commence the
building. Because 1, It has been for some time past publicly stated in
print, that I allow it is not without ground that some of the
inhabitants of Wilson Street consider themselves inconvenienced by the
Orphan-Houses being in that street, and I long therefore to be able to
remove the Orphans from thence as soon as possible. 2, I become more and
more convinced, that it would be greatly for the benefit of the
children, both physically and morally, with God's blessing, to be in
such a position as they are intended to occupy, when the New
Orphan-House shall have been built. And 3, because the number of very
poor and destitute Orphans, that are waiting for admission, is so great,
and there are constantly fresh applications made.--Now whilst, by
God's grace, I would not wish the building to be begun one single day
sooner than is His will; and whilst I firmly believe, that He will give
me, in His own time every shilling which I need; yet I also know, that
He delights in being earnestly entreated, and that He takes pleasure in.
the continuance in prayer, and in the importuning Him, which so clearly
is to be seen from the parable of the widow and the unjust judge. Luke
xviii. 1-8. For these reasons I gave myself again particularly to prayer
last evening, that the Lord would send further means, being also
especially led to do so, in addition to the above reasons, because there
had come in but little comparatively, since the 29th of last month. This
morning, between five and six o'clock I prayed again, among other
points, about the Building Fund, and then had a long season for the
reading of the word of God. In the course of my reading I came to Mark
xi. 24, "What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye
receive them, and ye shall have them." The importance of the truth
contained in this portion I have often felt and spoken about; but this
morning I felt it again most particularly, and, applying it to the New
Orphan-House, said to the Lord: "Lord I believe that Thou wilt give me
all I need for this work. I am sure that I shall have all, because I
believe that I receive in answer to my prayer." Thus, with the heart
full of peace concerning this work, I went on to the other part of the
chapter, and to the next chapter. After family prayer I had again my
usual season for prayer with regard to all the many parts of the work,
and the various necessities thereof, asking also blessings upon my
fellow-labourers, upon the circulation of Bibles and Tracts, and upon
the precious souls in the Adult School, the Sunday Schools, the Six Day
Schools, and the four Orphan-Houses. Amidst all the many things I again
made my requests about means for the Building. And now observe: About
five minutes, after I had risen from my knees, there was given to me a
registered letter, containing a check for 300l., of which 280l. are for
the Building Fund, 10l. for my own personal expenses, and 10l. for
Brother Craik. The Lord's holy name be praised for this precious
encouragement, by which the Building Fund is now increased to more than
six thousand pounds.

Dec. 9. It is now Four Hundred Days, since day after day, I have been
waiting upon God for help with regard to the building of the
Orphan-House; but as yet He keeps me still in the trial of faith and
patience. He is still saying as it were, "Mine hour is not yet come."
Yet He does sustain me in continuing to wait upon Him. By His grace my
faith is not in the least shaken; but I am quite sure that He, in His
own time, will give me everything which I need concerning this work. How
I shall be supplied with the means which are yet requisite, and when, I
know not; but I am sure that God will help me in His own time and way.
In the mean time I have abundant reason to praise God, that I am not
waiting on Him in vain; for since this day twelvemonth He has given me
in answer to prayer, a most suitable piece of ground, and 6,304l. for
the Building Fund, and about 2,700l. for present use for the work, so
that altogether I have received, since this day twelvemonth, solely in
answer to prayer, the sum of Nine Thousand Pounds. Surely, I am not
waiting upon the Lord in vain! By His help, then, I am resolved to
continue this course unto the end.

Dec. 22. Today I have again a precious proof that continuing to wait
upon the Lord is not in vain. During this month, comparatively little
had come in for the Building Fund; yet, by God's grace, I have been
enabled, as before; yea, even with more earnestness perhaps than before
to make known my requests unto God, being more and more convinced that I
ought to seek by earnest prayer soon to be able to begin the building.
In addition to this I had also especially besought the Lord to give me
means for missionary brethren, and also for brethren who labour in the
word in various parts of England and Ireland; as all my means for them
were now gone. I had also been waiting upon God for means to order a
fresh stock of tracts. I had lastly again and again besought the Lord to
give me means for the poor saints in Bristol, of whom there are many,
and whose need is now particularly great. Now today the Lord has granted
me precious answers to my requests concerning these various objects, for
I received this morning one Thousand Pounds with these words: "I send
you some money, part of which you can apply to the Orphans and the other
objects of your Institution, according to their need, and the rest you
can put to the Building Fund. At the present price of provisions your
expenses must be large for the Orphans. Please also take 25l. for your
own need." As I have about 80l. in hand for the Orphans, I took nothing
for present use for them, but took 175l. for the other objects, in order
thus to be able to send some help to Home and Foreign labourers, and to
order a fresh stock of tracts; and 800l. I took for the Building Fund. I
should have taken less for the Building Fund, and more for present use,
did it not appear to me the will of God, that with my might I ought to
give myself to this part of the work.

Jan. 5, 1847. We have just now much sickness in the four Orphan-Houses,
on account of which we are much tried for want of room, and for want of
proper ventilation, the houses having been originally built for private
families. This has again most practically shown me the desirableness of
having the Orphans, as soon as possible, removed to a house built on
purpose for them and my heart says, "Lord, how long?" and importunes Him
the more, yet, by His grace, without being impatient, but willing to
wait His time, which in the end is always found to be the best.

Jan. 9. From a professional Christian gentleman 10l., which I received
from him in paying him his account today.

Jan. 10. From a brother in the Lord 80l.--From C. C. 8s. 2 ½ d.

Jan. 11. From a lady at Bedminster 3l. 10s.

Jan. 25. The season of the year is now approaching, when building may be
begun. Therefore with increased earnestness I have given myself unto
prayer, importuning the Lord that He would be pleased to appear on our
behalf, and speedily send the remainder of the amount which is required,
and I have increasingly, of late, felt that the time is drawing near,
when the Lord will give me all that which is requisite for commencing
the Building. All the various arguments which I have often brought
before God, I brought also again this morning before Him. It is now 14
months and 3 weeks since day by day I have uttered my petitions to God
on behalf of this work. I rose from my knees this morning in full
confidence, not only that God could, but also would, send the means, and
that soon. Never, during all these 14 months and 3 weeks, have I had the
least doubt, that I should have all that which is requisite.--And
now, dear believing reader, rejoice and praise with me. About an hour,
after I had prayed thus, there was given to me the sum of Two Thousand
Pounds for the Building Fund. Thus I have received altogether 9,285l.
3s. 9 ½ d. towards this work.--I cannot describe the joy I had in
God when I received this donation. It must be known from experience, in
order to be felt. 447 days I have had day by day to wait upon God,
before the sum reached the above amount. How great is the blessing which
the soul obtains by trusting in God, and by waiting patiently. Is it not
manifest how precious it is to carry on God's work in this way, even
with regard to the obtaining of means? From December 10, 1845, to
January 25, 1847, being thirteen months and a half, I have received
solely in answer to prayer, Nine Thousand Two Hundred and Eighty-five
Pounds. Add to this what came in during that time for present use for
the various objects of the Institution, and the total is about Twelve
Thousand and Five Hundred Pounds, entirely the fruit of prayer to God.
Can it be said, therefore, with good ground, that this way of carrying
on the work of God may do very well in a limited and small way, but it
would not do on a large scale? The fact brought out here contradicts
such statements.

June 23. This day the Lord in His great goodness, by a donation of One
Thousand Pounds for the Building Fund, has again encouraged my heart
abundantly to trust in Him for all that which I shall yet need, to meet
the remainder of the expenses connected with the fitting up and
furnishing the New Orphan-House, &c.

Jan. 23, 1848. Today I received 350l., concerning which the donor
expressed it as his especial wish that I should take 50l. for myself,
50l. should be for brother Craik, 50l., for the Employment Fund, and the
remaining 200l. as I pleased. I put this 200l. to the Building Fund, as
the donor had not given to this object before, having been prevented
through circumstances, and I knew he would like to contribute towards
it.

Jan. 30. I received from D. D. 35l., of which 30l. are intended for the
Building Fund, and 5l. for the School—, Bible—, Tract and Missionary
Fund.

March 19. From Scotland 10l.

March 21. From the neighbourhood of Dudley 9s. 8d.

March 28. "A thank-offering to the Lord from the Church assembling at
Bethesda Free Chapel, Sunderland, for Church mercies during the past
year." The amount is 21l. 10s. 10d.

April 29. From Cornwall 50l., from a most unexpected quarter, whereby
the hand of God is the more abundantly made manifest.

In the Report, published in 1848, the following account was given
respecting the New Orphan-House, which, except a few verbal alterations,
is here reprinted.

1, The total amount, which I have received for the Building Fund,
amounts to 11,062l. 4s. 11 ½ d. This sum enables me to meet all the
expenses connected with the purchase of the piece of land and with the
erection of the house. I stated before that I did not mean to commence
the Building until I had all the means requisite for it, and this
intention was carried out. It was not until there was a sufficient
amount of means to meet all the sums required for the various
contractors, that a single thing was done; but when I once had as much
as was required for them, I did not consider it right to delay any
longer, though I saw then clearly, and have since seen still more
clearly, that a considerable sum would yet be needed to complete the
work. For whilst in every respect the Building will be most plain and
inexpensive, yet it being intended to be the abode of Three Hundred
Orphans, with all their teachers and overseers, it necessarily must be a
very large Building, and was therefore found to be even somewhat more
expensive than I had thought, as the whole (including fittings and
furniture) cannot be accomplished for less than Fourteen Thousand Five
Hundred Pounds, towards which the Lord has already given me, as stated,
Eleven Thousand and Sixty-two Pounds Four Shillings and Eleven Pence
Halfpenny. The sum still needed is required for all the ordinary
fittings, the heating apparatus, the gas fittings, the furnishing the
whole house, making three large playgrounds and a small road, and for
some additional work which could not be brought into the contracts. I
did not think it needful to delay commencing the Building, though
several thousand pounds more would be required, as all these expenses
needed not to be met till many months after the beginning of the
Building.

2, The work of the Building commenced on July 5, 1847, and has been
going on steadily ever since, with the manifest blessing and help of
God.--Six hundred and seven days I sought the help of God day by day,
before we came so far as to be able to commence the Building; yet at
last He gave me the desire of my heart.--The work is now so far
advanced, with the blessing of God, that a considerable part of the
Buildings has been already roofed in, and the remainder will be ready
for being roofed in a few weeks, that is, in July, 1848.

3, The New Orphan-House has been placed in the hands of eleven trustees,
brethren in the Lord well known to me, whom I have chosen, that they
might watch over the work and care for it, should the Lord Jesus tarry
and take me to Himself. The deeds have been enrolled in Chancery.

4, The New Orphan-House is intended to accommodate 140 Orphan Girls
above seven years, 80 Orphan Boys above seven years, and 80 male and
female Orphans from their earliest days, till they are seven or eight
years of age, together with all the overseers, teachers and assistants
that may be needed. The Infants, after having passed the age of seven or
eight years, will be removed into the different departments for older
boys and girls.

Miscellaneous points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 26, 1846 to May
26, 1848.

1, During the whole of this period six Day Schools, with 330 children,
were supported by the funds of the Institution; two Sunday Schools were
entirely supported by it, and a third was occasionally assisted. Again
four from among the Sunday School children were during these two years
received into Church Fellowship. The total number of the children who
received instruction in the Day Schools of the Institution, from its
commencement up to May 26, 1848, amounted to 4519. The number of the
Adult Scholars, who were instructed during this period in the Adult
School, which was supported by the funds of the Institution, amounted to
292; and the total number of adults who had instruction from March 5,
1834, to May 26, 1848, was 1438. The total of the expenses connected
with all these schools, during these two years, amounted to 886l. 1s. 11
½ d.

2, During this period were circulated 649 Bibles and 232 New Testaments.
There were circulated from March 5, 1834 up to May 26, 1848, 5746 Bibles
and 3760 New Testaments. 74l. 9s. 10d. was expended of the Funds of the
Institution, during this period, on this object.

3, From May 26, 1846 to May 26, 1848 was expended of the Funds of the
Institution on Missionary objects, 1559l. 1l. 6d., whereby 43 labourers
in the Gospel, at Rome and Abroad, were assisted.

4, During this period 64,021 Tracts were circulated, and the sum of 63l.
1s. 5d. was expended on this object of the funds of the Institution. The
total number of Tracts circulated from Nov. 19, 1840 to May 26, 1848,
amounted to 163,668.

5, There were received into the four Orphan-Houses, from May 26, 1846,
to May 26, 1848, Fifty-one Orphans, who, together with those who were in
the four Houses on May 26, 18413, made up 172 in all. Of these: 1. Five
children died, two as decided believers, one not without some hope, and
two as infants. This was the greatest number of deaths we had had for
many years; and yet how small is even the number five out of 172 within
two years, if it be remembered that we received children as young as two
years old; and if it be further remembered that the very fact of such
young children being bereaved of BOTH parents is, generally, a plain
proof that their parents were very sickly and unhealthy persons, as
indeed has generally been the case, since the greater part of the
parents of these children died in consumption, which I learn from the
certificates of their death. 2. One of the Orphans, who had been above
ten years in the house, left the Institution without leave, and went to
her friends for two or three days; and for an example to the other
children was not taken back again, when her friends wished her to
return. 3. Three of the elder girls, who had been several years in the
house, were taken back to their relatives and not suffered to remain any
longer, because of improper behaviour towards their teacher. All three,
however, were of an age to go to service, and would have been shortly
placed out, had they behaved better. 4. Four of the children were
dismissed because of malignant skin or other diseases, remedies having
failed: and in these cases, for the sake of the other children, we were
obliged to send them back to their relatives till they might be cured.
5. Seven children were taken back by their relatives, who by that time
were able to provide for them, after they had been for several years in
the Orphan-Houses. Some of them were able to earn their own bread by
that time, and were of use to their relatives. I always act on the
principle of at once giving up the Orphans, to their relatives, if they
say that they are able to provide for them; having continually a
considerable number of very destitute Orphans waiting for admission. 6.
Nine boys were apprenticed. 7. Twenty-one girls were sent out to
service, eight of whom had been for some time believers.

There were on May 26, 1848, One Hundred and Twenty-two Orphans in the
Four Houses. The number of the Orphans who were under our care from
April 1836, to May 26, 1848, was 264. The total amount of expenditure in
connexion with the support of the Orphans from May 26, 1846, to May 26,
1848, was 3228l. 5s. 11d.

I notice further the following points in connexion with the
Orphan-Houses.

1. Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 24,771l. 19s. 8 ¾ d. was given to me as the result of prayer
to God from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1848. This sum
includes the 11,062l. 4s. 11 1/2 d, which up to May 26, 1848 had been
given towards the Building Fund. (It may be interesting to the reader
to know that the total amount which was given as free contributions, for
the other objects, from the commencement of the work, up to May 26, 1848,
was 7,060l. 14s. 1 ¾ d.; and that which came in by the sale of Bibles and
Tracts, and by the payment of the children in the day-schools, amounted to
2,373l. 3s. 7 ½ d.) 2. Besides this, also a great variety and number
of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, &c. were given for the
use of the Orphans.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, or the work of the Lord
in my hands, not immediately connected with the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution, from May 26, 1846 to May 26, 1848.

July 21, 1846, In very great need respecting my own personal expenses,
and immediately after I had prayed respecting it, I received from a
Christian gentleman of Torquay 1l.

July 23. Immediately after prayer for my own personal expenses, being in
need, I received from the neighbourhood of Leeds 2l.

July 25. While I was on my knees in prayer, asking the Lord for means
for myself, 1l. came to me from Bath.

Aug. 5. Being still much in need, and having asked the Lord for means, I
received yesterday evening 1l. 0s. 3d., being some money due to me, and
today from Teignmouth 1l. as a present.

Dec. 31, 1846. During this year there have been received into Fellowship
66.

The Lord has been pleased to give me during this year

1, Through the boxes. . . . £165 15 1 ½

2, Through believers in Bristol, not anonymously . . . . 81 13 1 ½

3, Through believers not residing in Bristol . . . . . 136 14 8

4, Through presents in articles, worth at least . . . . 15 0 0

------

£399 2 11

To this is again to be added, what I have enlarged on in a former
chapter, that during the whole of this year also my daughter was, free
of all expenses, at a boarding school. This was worth about 50l.

In November, 1847, I had a most remarkable deliverance, which to the
praise of the Lord is here recorded, as it is a further illustration of
how the Lord watches over His children.

I was labouring for a little while at Bowness and Keswick in the
ministry of the Word in October and November When at Keswick, I stayed
with my dear wife in a large boarding-house, in which, however, we were
then alone, except a single gentleman. Just before we left Keswick, on
the morning of Nov. 24th, I heard that the gentleman, lodging in the
same house, had shot himself during the night, but was not quite dead.
We had not heard the report of the pistol, it being a very stormy night,
and the house large. Two days after, I received from a Christian brother
at Keswick the following information respecting the transaction.

Keswick, Nov. 25, 1847.

"Dear Mr. Müller,

The tender and Almighty care of our loving Father was never more over
you, and indeed over all of us, than in your stay at Mrs. . . . .'s.
Mr. . . . . . was quite deranged for two or three days before you left.
Without any control, he had been walking about his room for the last two
days and nights, with loaded-pistols in his hands. Furthermore he had
taken into his head that you were going to kill him. How gracious of
God, that he spread His wings over you, and over dear Mrs. Müller, so
that Satan could not break through the fence, to hurt even a hair of
your heads. Speaking after the manner of men, there was nothing to have
hindered him coming into the room, where we were all at tea, 9 and
firing amongst us; but the Lord was our refuge and fortress, and
preserved us from danger, which we knew not of. He shot himself in the
neck and the breast, but is not dead. He has a strait-waistcoat on. I
assisted in cutting his clothes off, and in other little offices, needed
at such a time, and told him of Christ's love in dying for poor
sinners. ‘I know it,' he said. He shot himself the first time about
three o'clock in the morning, and again about seven. What a scene his
room presented. Pistols lying in gore. Bloody knives, lancets, and
razors strewed about the floor." Etc.

I add an extract from a second letter, written by the same Christian
brother, because it shows still further, how very merciful the Lord was
to us at that time, in protecting us.

"Mr. —— is still alive, and has been removed by his friends into
Yorkshire. It appears, insanity is in his family, his father being at
this time in an asylum. It is evident that he had the pistols in his
pockets, but of this no one knew until after the occurrence took place.
I do not know what time of night you went to bed; but I judge it was
about ten. If so, it was at ten o'clock Mr.--came down from his
bedroom, after having been there six hours. It was a mercy you did not
meet him, as it is plain that he had loaded pistols on his person."

Dec. 31, 1847. There have been received into Fellowship, during this
year, 39: and altogether, since Mr. Craik and I began labouring in
Bristol, 1157, besides the 68 whom we found in Fellowship. Of these
1225, 143 have fallen asleep, 70 are under church discipline, 78 have
left us, and 259 have left Bristol; so that there are only 675 actually
in communion.

During this year the Lord has been pleased to give me.

1, Through the boxes. . . . £140 6 11 ½

2, Through believers in Bristol, not anonymously . . . . . 57 3 6

3, Through believers, not residing in Bristol . . . . . 127 3 6

4, By a legacy of £100 Stock . . 73 4 9

5, Through presents in articles, worth to us at least . . . . 15 0 0

------—

£412 18 84

To this is again to be added the free education of my dear daughter, at
a boarding school, worth to us at least 50l.

In April, 1848, I was enabled, by the help of the Lord, to complete all
the arrangements for the publication of the Narrative of the Lord's
Dealings with me in the French language; and about September of the same
year the book appeared under the following title: Exposé de
quelques-unes des dispensations de Dieu envers Georges Müller. Paris,
librairie Protestante, Rue Tronchet, 2.

Supplies for the School—Bible-—Missionary and Tract Fund, sent in
answer to prayer, from May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850.

When this period of the work commenced, I had for these various objects
5l. 19s. 7 ¼ d. in hand, a sum so small, that, without the help of God,
I could not have gone on even for a few days; for during this period our
average expenditure for one single day, merely for this part of the
work, was as much as the whole balance left in hand. Now see how God
carried me through, in meeting the expenditure of the thousands of
pounds which were laid out for these objects, irrespective of the Orphan
work, from May 26, 1848 to May 26, 1850.

On the very next day, after the accounts were closed, May 27, 1848, I
received from Westmoreland 5l., being the first donation during this
period towards this part of the work, of which sum one half was intended
by the donor for the current expenses of the Orphans, and the other half
for these objects. On the following day, May 28, was anonymously put
into the Chapel boxes for missions 1s. 6d. and 2d. Now it happened that
all the expenses, connected with these objects, during the first two
days amounted only to about 3l., which I was able to meet by what had
come in and the balance left in hand; and on May 29th I received 100l.
As the application of this sum was left to me, I took one half of it for
the Orphans, and the other half for these objects.--Thus I was
supplied with means to meet the expenses which came on me the following
day, May 30th, when I had to pay the weekly salaries of the teachers in
the Day Schools.

June 9. Great has been my desire, and many have been my prayers to God,
that He would be pleased to condescend to use me still further, in
allowing me the privilege of helping brethren who labour in the word and
doctrine, at home and abroad, without any salary, as I have been able to
do but very little for them comparatively during the last four months.
Now at last, in answer to my prayers, I have received this morning 160l.
for home and foreign labourers.--The Lord may see it needful, for the
trial of our faith, to seem for a season not to regard our
supplications; yet, if we patiently and believingly continue to wait
upon Him, it will be manifest in His own time and way, that we did not
call upon Him in vain.

July 12. My soul has been longing for farther supplies for home and
foreign labourers, to whom I have sent of late all I could. Almost all
the letters received from the brethren, to whom I have sent money, have
shown to me their great need. Some were in the greatest necessity when
my remittances were received by them. Under these circumstances a
donation of 117l. 2s. 7d. came in this morning, of which I took 50l. for
these objects, and 67l. 2s. 7d. for the Orphans.

Aug. 19. Today all the means for home and foreign labourers were again
gone. Also for the support of the various schools and the circulation of
the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, scarcely anything remained; 48l. were in
hand, yet, considering the liabilities for rent, &c., not more than 5l.
of this sum at most could be considered available. When I had,
therefore, so little, there came in 267l. Thus my heart is made glad,
for I am able to send help to many brethren in these days of peculiar
distress.

Oct. 26. This evening there was given to me anonymously at Salem Chapel
a sealed paper, which contained two sovereigns and these words: "For
what most needs." I took this donation for these objects, as I have now
scarcely any money left towards paying the weekly salaries of the
teachers in the Day Schools next Tuesday. Oct. 31st. We have not been so
poor with regard to these objects since the accounts were closed. But I
hope in God.

Oct. 28. I received from Calne 2l.

Oct. 30. Received from Bath 1l.

Oct. 31. There having come in this 5l., and 1l. 10s. 9d. besides, by the
sale of Tracts, I had enough to pay the weekly salaries of the
teachers.

Nov. 4. Saturday. There were now again only a few shillings in hand
towards paying next Tuesday the weekly salaries of the teachers in the
Day Schools, when I received this morning from the neighbourhood of
Leeds 5l.

Nov. 5. There was put into the boxes at Bethesda 2s. 6d.

Nov. 6. Received 1l. 0s. 6d.

No-v. 7. This evening I found, that, by what had come in during the 4th,
5th and 6th in the way of donations, and by the sale of Tracts during
this week, there was more than enough to pay the weekly salaries.

Nov. 9. Only a few shillings were left in my hands on Tuesday evening,
the 7th instant, towards the weekly salaries of the teachers, for the
coming week. Also almost all the Tracts are again gone, and it is nearly
four weeks, since I paid out the last money in hand for missionary
objects. As to this latter point, my heart had been especially longing
to be able to send again help to home and foreign labourers, knowing how
very great the need of many is. Thus I was situated with regard to means
when I received today 1000l., of which sum I took 300l. for these
objects, 100l. for the support of the Orphans, and 600l. for the
Building-Fund. The Lord be praised for this most precious help, which is
doubly precious on account of the seasonable time in which it comes!

Nov. 16. Yesterday and today I have sent out more than one hundred
pounds to brethren who labour at home and abroad, and the Lord has sent
again further supplies; for I received today from C. W. 40l. for home
and foreign labourers.

Jan. 15. 1849. The means for the circulation of Bibles and Tracts, and
for all the various Schools, and for helping missionary efforts had now
been reduced to 15l. It had been during the last days especially my
prayer, that the Lord would be pleased to give me fresh supplies for
brethren who labour in the word and doctrine at home and abroad, as I
had not been able to do any thing for any of them during the last
fortnight, for want of means. I desired also more means for the
circulation of Bibles and Tracts, as several thousands of Tracts had
been going out during the last few days, and as also quite recently
there had been many openings found for the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures among very poor persons. Now the Lord has again given me a
precious answer of prayer. I received this morning a donation of 200l.,
to be used as any of the objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution
might need help. The donor, however, kindly wished me to take 25l. for
myself. I took this 175l. for these objects, and thus I am again
supplied with means for the various Schools, for the circulation of
Bibles and Tracts, and have something for aiding brethren who labour in
the word and doctrine, as I purpose to use 100l. for them. The Lord be
praised for this precious help!

I have received still farther today for missions 23l. 5s.

Jan. 17. Today I have received still further help from the Lord in a
donation of 125l. for these objects. How manifest it is by all these
sums, large and small, received from God in answer to prayer, that He
does not allow me to call upon Him in vain!

Feb. 19. A brother in the Lord, who had sold his earthly possession, for
the purpose of spending the proceeds of it for the Lord, sent me 120l.
as a part, of which he wished me to use 100l. for missions, 5l. for the
Orphans, 10l. for another object not to be mentioned, to give 2l. 10s.
to brother Craik, and to take 2l. 10s. for myself.

Feb. 20. Today I have received still further 200l. of which I took 100l.
for these objects, and 100l. for the Orphans, as the disposal of this
sum was entirely left to me.--I do especially rejoice in all these
considerable donations, partly, because they enable me to assist so many
faithful servants of Jesus Christ, who labour for Him in dependence upon
Him for their temporal supplies; and, partly, because they prove that
the work of God may be carried on in dependence upon Him alone for
pecuniary means, not merely on a small but also on a large scale. See!
dear Christian reader, without making any effort whatever, simply in
answer to prayer, without personal application to any one, all these
sums come in. And thus it has now been going on for more than sixteen
years, [was written in 1850]. Persons said to me fifteen years ago, that
it was impossible to carry on such a work for any length of time,
without regular subscriptions; for the interest which was taken in it at
first, would wear off. I never believed such statements. I was assured
in my inmost soul that, if the work of God was carried on in God's
way, that was the best pledge that it would be provided by God with
pecuniary means. Thus I have found it ever since March 5, 1834, when
this work commenced. For since that time I have received above
Forty-four Thousand Pounds altogether, [up to May 26 1850 only]; and the
Lord has so enlarged the work and helped me, that during the last three
years I have had the privilege of paying away in His service, in
connexion with this work, about Twenty-five Thousand Pounds; nor have 1
had during this period in any one instance to meet a payment, without
being previously provided by the Lord with means for it. If it pleased
the Lord to condescend to use me further in this way, He could so order
it that even a still larger field of labour were intrusted to me, which
would require still greater sums. Truly, it must be manifest to all
simple hearted children of God, who will carefully read the accounts
respecting this Institution, that He is most willing to attend to the
supplications of His children, who in their need cry to Him; and to make
this manifest is the great object I aim at, through the means of this
Institution.

March 13. The same donor who sent me on Feb. 19th the donation of 120l.,
sent me today 100l. more for missions.

March 15. From C. W. for missions 30l.

April 1. Anonymously through Bethesda boxes 2d. for missions.
Anonymously through Salem boxes 30l., with these words: "5l. for dear
brother Müller, 5l. for dear brother Craik, 5l. for the poor, 5l: for
the rent, 5l. for missionary work, 5l. for the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution." The last mentioned 5l. I took for the circulation of
Bibles and Tracts, and for the various Schools.

April 15. Anonymously through Salem boxes 1d. for missions.

April 18. Received 250l., which, being entirely left at my disposal, I
took 100l. for the current expenses for the Orphans, and 150l. for
these objects. Thus I have especially the joy, in answer to my daily
supplications, of being able to continue to assist many home and foreign
labourers who labour in the word and doctrine.

May 13. Anonymously for foreign missions 1s.

May 23. Received 360l., of which the kind donor wished me to take 10l.
for my own personal expenses, and the 350l. were left to my disposal,
just as the work of the Lord in my hands might require it. I took
therefore one half for the current expenses for the Orphans, and the
other half for these objects, and I have thus the means to continue to
send help to home and foreign labourers.

May 27. From the same donor, who gave on Feb. 19th 120l., and on March
13th 100l., 20l. more for missions.

Aug. 4. During the last month I had sent to home and foreign labourers
about 150l., and many heavy extra expenses had been met for the Schools
and the circulation of Tracts, on which account our means for these
objects began to be reduced, when I received this morning 200l., which,
being left entirely at my disposal as might be most needed, I took for
these objects.

Aug. 9. Anonymously 5l. for home and foreign labourers in the Word.

Aug. 30. 50l. from the donor spoken of under May 27th. Half this sum lie
intends for the Orphans and half for missions.

Sept. 18. I received 100l., to be used as might be most needed. This sum
came after I had repeatedly asked the Lord for more means, as the money
in hand for these objects was now less than it had been for several
months. I took, therefore, the whole of this sum for these objects.

Nov. 3. The means were now again low, lower than they had been for many
months, when I received 200l., which, being left at my disposal as most
needed, I took entirely for these objects.

Dec. 7. Before our means were exhausted for these objects, when there.
was yet 140l. in hand, I received today a donation of 150l., the
disposal of which was left to me, to use it either for the Orphans or
any part of the work of God in my hands. I took 100l. for these objects,
and 50l. for the Orphans.

Jan. 2, 1850. The new year commences, even as to this part of the work,
with new mercies. There was given to me 160l., to be used as might be
most needed, of which sum I took 100l. for these objects, and 60l. for
the Orphans. Thus, before all means are expended, while there is yet
about 100l. in hand, the Lord sends me again a fresh supply, in answer
to my daily supplications, whereby I am enabled to go on with the
circulation of Bibles and Tracts, the meeting of all the expenses
connected with the various Schools, and still further to help preachers
of the Gospel at home and abroad.--I take this first donation from
the Lord in this new year, as an earnest that He will help me during the
whole of this year also in regard to means for these objects.

Jan. 30. During this month I had been especially led to send much
assistance to home and foreign labourers. Also in other respects the
expenses for these objects had been considerable. On this account the
funds for them had been reduced to about 80l., when I received this
evening 450l., of which the donor kindly wished me to take 50l. for my
own personal expenses, to give to Brother Craik 50l., and to use the
other as might be most needed. I took therefore 200l. for the Orphans,
50l. for foreign missions, 25l. for home missionaries, 25l. for the Day
Schools for poor children and for the Adult School and the Sunday
School, 25l. for the circulation of Gospel Tracts, and 25l. for the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures.

Feb. 10. Received 180l., which the donor left to my disposal, as it
might be most needed for the work of God in my hands; he only desired in
his kindness that I should take 20l. of it for my own purse. As there is
a considerable sum in hand at present for the supplies of the Orphans, I
took the whole of this donation for tile other objects, whereby I am
enabled to go on more and more in aiding missionary work, and in
continuing the circulation of Bibles and Tracts.--I have great
delight in showing also by this and other instances to which reference
has been made, how the Lord is mindful of my own temporal necessities,
whilst I endeavour to serve Him, in entire reliance on Him for what I
need with regard to this life, without any salary or any regular income
whatever, so that He not only gives me as much as I absolutely need, but
most bountifully supplies me; for generally I receive from Him far more
than 1 need for myself and family.

March 23. During the last six weeks has been paid out for the
School—Bible—Tract and Missionary objects alone about 270l., and
very little comparatively has been received. On this account came in
most seasonably, and very manifestly in answer to prayer, a donation of
152l. 3s. 6d., which I received this morning, and which I took for these
objects, to replenish our means for them.

March 30. From C. W. 30l. for foreign missions.

May 3. During the last month but very little was received for these
objects, whilst, for missionary purposes alone, 113l. was paid out. Now
this morning I received a registered letter, containing 60l. with these
words:

"---- May 1, 1850.

"Dear Brother,

"I send you 50l, for the missionaries, and 10l. for the Orphans, having
just sold out part of my property in the funds. It pleases me to find
that your new Report will soon be out.

Believe me to be, dear brother,

Yours truly in Christ,

* * * *"

This donation came after many prayers to the Lord for supplies. The work
is now large. The outgoings are great. During the last month were again
expended about 500l. for the various objects of the Institution, nor
have I any prospect that the expenses will decrease; yea, I have no
desire that they should. I have as great satisfaction, as much joy, in
writing checks for large amounts upon my bankers, as I have joy in
paying over to them checks, or bank orders, or large notes, which I
receive from the living God, by means of donors, for this work. For the
money is of no more value to me than as I can use it for God; and the
more I can pay out for the work of God, the more prospect I have of
being again supplied by Him; and the larger the sum is, which I can
obtain from Him, in answer to prayer only, the greater the proof of the
blessedness and the reality of this mode of dealing directly with the
living God, for what I need; therefore, I say, I have as much joy in
giving out as in receiving. I have been devoting myself, for instance,
with all my might, both of body and mind, but especially by labouring in
spirit, to have the Orphan-House filled with children, not only that
thus three hundred destitute Orphans, might be lodged, boarded, clothed,
instructed, and in every way cared for, bodily, mentally, and
spiritually; but also, in order that thus large sums might be needed and
expended, and I might have a greater call than ever to draw largely upon
the inexhaustible treasures of God. That I do not mean, in thus
speaking, to say that money so obtained by prayer may be wasted, will
scarcely need to be noticed; for if any one would obtain means from God
by prayer only, and then waste them, he would soon find that he is not
able to pray in faith for further supplies.

May 7. The donation of 50l. for the missionary brethren, received four
days ago, was very refreshing to my spirit, and most manifestly to me
another answer to prayer; but it did not hinder me from continuing in
prayer for more means, as I have a great desire to spend again, by
God's help, considerable sums in connexion with these various objects,
in the course of this month. Moreover, I was looking out for answers to
prayer, and therefore expected still further means to come in on the
4th, the 5th, and yesterday; and, as I received nothing, I only prayed
the more earnestly, instead of being discouraged. And thus it was that I
obtained this morning a still further answer to my supplication, in a
donation of 150l., of which I took half for the Orphans and half for
these objects, as the disposal of the money was left to me.

My dear Christian reader, will you not try this way? Will you not know
for yourself, if as yet you have not known it, the preciousness and the
happiness of this way of casting all your cares and burdens and
necessities upon God? This way is as open to you as to me. Every one of
the children of God is not called by Him to be engaged in such a service
as that to which He has condescended to call me; but every one is
invited and commanded to trust in the Lord, to trust in Him with all his
heart, and to cast his burden upon Him, and to call upon Him in the day
of trouble. Will you not do this, my dear brethren in Christ? I long
that you may do so. I desire that you may taste the sweetness of that
state of heart, in which, while surrounded by difficulties and
necessities, you can yet be at peace, because you know that the living
God, your Father in heaven, cares for you. Should, however, any one read
this, who is not reconciled to God, but is still going on in the ways of
sin and carelessness, unbelief and self-righteousness, then let me say
to such, that it is impossible, that you should have confidence to come
boldly to God in such a state, and I therefore ask you to make
confession of your sins to Him, and to put your trust for eternity
entirely in the merits of the Lord Jesus, that you may obtain the
forgiveness of your sins. Again, should any one read this who has
believed in the Lord Jesus, but who is now again living in sin, who is
again regarding iniquity in his heart, let not such a one be surprised
that he has no confidence toward God, and that he does not know the
blessedness of having answers to his prayers; for it is written: "If I
regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me: but verily God
bath heard me; He hath attended to the voice of my prayer." Ps. lxvi.
18, 19. The first thing such a one has to do is, to forsake his evil
course, to make confession of it, and to know afresh the power of the
blood of the Lord Jesus on his conscience, by putting his trust in that
precious blood, in order that he may obtain confidence toward God.

Supplies for the support of the Orphans, sent in answer to prayer, from
May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850.

When the accounts were closed on May 26, 1848, I had in hand a balance
of 1l. 10s. 3 ¾ d. With this amount then we began, whilst day by day
above one hundred and thirty persons were to be provided for in the four
Orphan-Houses in Wilson Street. Nor was there any money besides
available except what had been advanced to the four matrons in the
various Orphan-Houses for the week's house-keeping, which was already
more than half expended; and I had on the 30th to advance again many
pounds for the following week. Place yourself now, dear reader, in my
position, in order that you may the more clearly see the hand of God in
what follows.

On the very next day, after the accounts were closed, May 27, 1848, I
received from Westmoreland five pounds, half of which sum was intended
by the donor for the Orphans, and half for the other objects. This
donation I took as an earnest out of the hands of the living God, that
during the whole of this period also He would provide for these many
Orphans, as He had done in former years.

May 28. Received anonymously 3s. 9 ½ d., and from A. S. A. 10s. 2 ½
d.

May 29. Today I have received 100l., which, being left to me as most
needed, I took half for the Orphans, and half for the other objects. How
kind of the Lord to refresh my heart thus in sending me this seasonable
help at the very commencement of this period, as there was so little
left in hand when the accounts were closed three days since and how
especially kind, as tomorrow evening again nearly 20l. will have to be
advanced for house-keeping!

June 20. 81l. 8s. 4d. had come in since May 26th. Without any difficulty
I had been able to meet all the expenses as they occurred; but now all
our money was gone, and this evening I had again to advance the means
for a week's house-keeping, whilst there was nothing in hand. Now
observe, dear reader, how the Lord helped me! Whilst I was in the very
act of beseeching the Lord for fresh supplies, two sisters in the Lord
called, who desired to see my dear wife for a few minutes. It was for
the purpose of giving her fifteen pounds for the Orphans.--About half
an hour after, a brother from Devonshire called, who, on leaving, gave
me 5l. for the Orphans. This evening I received still further from
Norwich 1l. 1s., together with an eye-glass and a parcel of clothes.
There was received also 1s. for Reports. Also a Christian brother from
Barnstaple gave me half a sovereign. Thus I was able to meet the
house-keeping expenses for the coming week, and to order 2 cwt. of soap,
which was needed, amounting altogether to 20l. 10s., and have 1l. 2s.
left. The day began and I had nothing, and yet the Lord enabled me to
meet all its demands, and I have 1l. 2s. over.

June 21. The Lord is already beginning to give fresh supplies towards
the need of the coming week. This morning was sent to me from Essex a
large silver mug. There has come in further today from Bath 5s., by sale
of Reports 1s., by sale of a book 1s., from South Molton 2s. 6d., from a
lady near Bristol 5s., and through an Orphan-box 11s. 6d. and a silver
thimble.

June. 23. From Merriott 14s. 4d., from Dundry 5s., through A. S. A. 1s.
6d., from a sister 5s., by sale of Reports 3s. 4d, by sale of articles
1l. 4s. 10d., by the children's knitting 4s. 6d., and from the Isle of
Wight 14s. 7d.

June 25. Anonymously from Teignmouth 5l., through Bethesda boxes 6d.,
ditto 2d.

June 26. From L. M. 1s. 1d., brother F.'s Orphan-box 1s. 1d., by
profit from the sale of ladies' baskets 10s., anonymously 1s., ditto
6d., ditto 1d.

June 27. By sale of articles 17s. 3d., from Clifton 10s., from a sister
10s., through a box in my room 10s., from Tiverton 5s., and through the
boxes in the Orphan-Houses 4l. 5s. 2d.--Thus we have bad again this
evening, in answer to prayer, all the means required for the
housekeeping expenses of the coming week, and have a few shillings
left.

July 4. Though this day week I had all the means requisite for advancing
the house-keeping expenses for this week, yet, after having done so,
there remained only a few shillings. I had therefore again to seek help
from God respecting the means requisite for this evening, besides means
for other expenses, which in the course of the week might come upon me,
as the regular house-keeping expenses are not one half of the whole of
the expenses for the Orphans. Now, during this week also, I have been
helped by the Lord in the following manner:--

On June 28th I received from Uppingham 10s., and 10s., and 1s. Also by
sale of Reports came in 6s.--On June 30th was sent from Tetbury 10s.
— On July 1st a brother in the Lord gave me 10l.--On July 2nd from
A. S. A. 1l., and from a sister 5s. Also anonymously 4s., ditto 10s.,
ditto 1s. 6d.--On July 3rd from a brother 1l.—-July 4th. By sale of
articles 2l. 3s. 6 ½ d., and by knitting and needlework 6l. 13s. 10d.
— Thus I was again able to advance this evening the means for the
house-keeping expenses of the coming week, and have a few shillings
left.

July 6. The more the Lord is pleased to help me, the more, by His grace,
I have confidence in Him. Therefore, though there were only a few
shillings left the evening before last, I set myself to prayer that God
would be pleased to send everything requisite for continuing this work.
Accordingly, two ladies left today, anonymously, at the Infant
Orphan-House, 2 old foreign gold watches, an old silver watch, a small
gold chain, 6 gold mourning rings, a pair of gold earrings, and 2
necklaces. There was also given today 10s., and 2s. 2 ½ d. came in by
sale of Reports.

July 7. From Edmonton 1l. From a Christian lettercarrier 10s., from a
sister 2s. 6d., and from M. R. 5l.

July 8. Through sister C. from a friend 2s., from M. 2s., from D. 1s.,
and from sister F. 1s. 1d.

July 9. From A. S. A. 10s. Also a brother has brought me this evening
5l.

July 10. From Street 2s., through Salem boxes 3d., and by knitting 10s.
9d.

July 11. By sale of trinkets, &c. 14l. 13s. 7d. From Gloucester 1l.,
from Tenby 1s. 6d., anonymously 5s., and from one of the labourers in
the work 3s.--Thus I had again this evening enough to meet the
ordinary housekeeping expenses for the coming week, but I am now looking
out for fresh supplies to meet the expenses connected with ordering a
fresh quantity of oatmeal from Scotland, &c.

July 12. The Lord has quickly given me an answer, and granted the desire
of my heart. I received this morning a donation of 117l. 2s. 7d., to be
used as the work of God in my hands might require. Of this sum I took
67l. 2s. 7d. for the Orphans, and 50l. for the other objects.

Aug. 1. From July 12th up to this day we were comfortably provided with
means; but this evening, at our usual prayer-meeting, I had only 8l. to
give to the four matrons towards the house-keeping expenses of the
coming week, which I did give in the full assurance that the Lord would
provide more by the time that this sum was expended, if not before.--
Now see how God at this time also helped in His faithful love, and
thereby proved that we did not call upon Him in vain. On the next day,
Aug. 2, I received from London 1l., from Buttevant 1s. 6d., from "a
Leamington grocer" 2s. 6d., from Bedminster 5s., and by sale of Reports
10s. 6d.--On Aug. 3rd came in by the sale of Reports 1s., from
Langport 7l. 4s., from a very poor widow 2s., and 8s. besides.--On
Aug. 5th was received from Mr. G. B. C. 1l. 1s., from Marbury 6d., from
Brighton 10s., from Ayrshire 1l., and from Newbury 1l.--On Aug. 6,
from the neighbourhood of Wotton-under Edge 7s., and by profit by the
sale of ladies' baskets 10s.--On Aug. 7th from a Christian lady
1l., by sale of Reports 1s., from a sister 10s., through the
Chapel-boxes 2s. 6d., and 6d., from Tockington 1l. 1s., through the
Orphan-boxes in my house 13s. 6d., from Northam 2l., and from Cork 1l.
On Aug. 8th by sale of articles 18s. 2 ½ d. By sale of Reports 8s. Thus
I had everything which was requisite for the expenses of the past week,
and had this evening, Tuesday, even 7l. left to advance towards the
house-keeping expenses of the coming week. My hope and prayer is, that
the Lord will be pleased to send in more means before this is gone, as
it will only suffice till Friday morning.

Aug. 9. The Lord has been very kind today, and proved afresh that none
who trust in Him shall be confounded. There has come in by the sale of
Reports 1l. 13s. 10d., by sale of another book given for sale 9d., and
from Clevedon 10s., together with a pair of gold ear-drops, a buckle,
and a pencil case. This evening, while I was walking in my little
garden, lifting up my heart for further supplies for the work of God in
my hands, there was given to me a registered letter from Liverpool,
containing 20l. for the Orphans. There came also from Lymington 5s. Thus
I am able to send the remainder of the money which is needed for
house-keeping expenses for this week.

Aug. 10. The Lord has sent in still further supplies in answer to
prayer. From a brother I received 1l., from the Isle of Wight 5l., from
Bath 5l., from Barking 2 gold seals, 2 pairs of gold ear-rings, 2 gold
brooches, a gold snap, a bead necklace, and a small telescope.

Aug. 11. By sale of Reports 1l. 9s. 2d. From Bath 5l.

Aug. 12. From Norfolk 1l. 10s.

Aug. 13. Anonymously 2s. 6d., ditto 6d., ditto 1s.

Aug. 14. By profit from the sale of ladies' baskets 1l.

Aug. 15. Through a box in my house 10s., by sale of articles 15s. 2d.,
by sale of Reports 2l. 0s. 6d., anonymously 2s., from Keswick 1s., from
one of the labourers in the work 10s., and from Chelsea with a great
variety of articles 7s. 8d., 7 ¼ d., and 1s. I received also from Bath
2 mourning rings.

Aug. 16, Wednesday. This afternoon I received from a brother, who had
sold the greater part of his little property, 20l., of which he wished
me to take 10l. for the Building Fund and 10l. for present use for the
Orphans. Thus I have received for the Orphans altogether in money,
besides many articles, since yesterday week the 8th, 61l. 15s. 8 ¼ d.,
whereby I have been enabled to supply the means which were yet needed
for house-keeping; and I had likewise sufficient to advance last evening
all that is needed for house-keeping for this week, and to meet 38l. 2s.
6d. extra expenses, which have come upon me during the last eight days.
How seasonable were, therefore, the various donations which the Lord was
pleased to send me since the 8th, and how manifestly did they come in
answer to prayer! But now I have again scarcely anything left, which,
however, does not cast me down, as I shall go afresh, by God's help,
to His inexhaustible treasures.

Aug. 22. Tuesday evening. The Lord has again been pleased to send me
since last Wednesday morning 17l. 14s. 9d., so that, together with the
little which was left last Tuesday evening, I was able to advance the
money needed for house-keeping during the coming week. The Lord was
pleased to provide me with means for this in the following manner. On
Aug. 17th came in 9s. 10d. from Clifton. On Aug. 18th was received by
sale of Reports 2l. 1s., and by a donation from Acklow 1l. Also a
brother from Bath left anonymously at the Boys' Orphan-House two
sovereigns. On Aug 19th a brother from the neighbourhood of Stroud sent
me 5l., of which he kindly wished me to take 1l. for my own personal
expenses and to use the 4l. as most needed, which I took for the
Orphans. Received also 9s. by sale of Reports. On Aug. 20th I received
6s. 6d. and 6s. 10d., being the contents of two Orphan-boxes, also from
the neighbourhood of Keynsham 1l., from the neighbourhood of Royston 1l.
and from Batheaston 10s.--Aug. 21. Through a box in my house 1l.,
from Doncaster 10s., by sale of Reports 18s., and from the Isle of Wight
10s. —Aug. 22. By sale of Reports 17s. 6d, by sale of articles 12s.
3d., anonymously 1s., from Thornbury 2s. 6d., and anonymously 4d. Thus,
then, I had all the means requisite, and had 11 ¾ d. left.--Think of
this, dear reader! 11 ¾ d. I had left and about 130 persons were daily
to be provided for, and yet we did not go into debt at that time for
anything, nor do we now, nor have we from the commencement of this work.
Nor did I make personal application to any one for anything, nor did I
directly or indirectly speak about our need, so that persons might be
influenced to give. But why not, you may say, dear reader? Simply
because this work has for its first and primary end the benefit of the
Church at large and of the unconverted world, to show that there is
verily a God in Heaven whose ears are open to those who call upon Him in
the name of the Lord Jesus, and who put their trust in Him. Cheerfully
have I dedicated myself with all my physical, mental, and spiritual
energies to this life of faith upon the living God, for everything that
I need in connexion with my own personal and family necessities, and in
connexion with the work of God in my hands, if but by any means, through
it, multitudes of believers and unbelievers may be benefited. Thousands
have been benefited by it already, but tens of thousands my heart longs
to benefit. No trial, no difficulty, no hardships, no self-denial, will
I, by God's help, count too much, if but this end may be attained.--
I had then, as I said, 11 ¾ d. left. Now observe how the Lord helped me
again this time in answer to the supplications which the evening before,
Aug. 22nd, my fellow-labourers and myself had offered up to Him.

On Aug. 23rd, the very next day, came in early in the morning 4s. 6d. by
sale of Reports, and a Christian brother from Barnstaple sent 1l. with
Matt. vi. 11 ("Give us this day our daily bread"). Also from Torquay
was sent a half-sovereign. From Budleigh Salterton 1l., and from
Weymouth 2l. together with a gold brooch. There arrived also a parcel
from Stowmarket containing the following little sums; 6d., 7s. 6d., 2s.,
2s. 6d., 10s., 6s., and 5s. There came in also from Bath 18s. for
Reports. Thus I received altogether that day 7l. 5s. 6d., whereby I was
enabled to order 8 cwt. of rice, as I was informed the evening before
that our store of rice was exhausted.

Aug. 24. By knitting of the children 2s. 3d.

Aug. 25. By sale of Reports 1s., and from F. B. B. 2s. 6d.

Aug. 26. Saturday. Next Tuesday evening again a considerable sum will be
needed for house-keeping, whilst at the beginning of this day I had
nothing yet towards meeting this demand. Now observe the kindness of the
Lord in helping me again bountifully this day. I received from a sister
at Tottenham 2l., from Norton St. Philip's 10s., from a village near
Leeds 5l., from Southwell 10s., from Edinburgh 21l., of which the donor
kindly wished me to take 6l. for my own personal expenses, and 15l. for
the Orphans; and from Thornbury for Reports 10s. 6d., as a donation, 2
old three-penny pieces and 20 copper coins, also 5s. from another donor
near Thornbury.

Aug. 27. A half-sovereign was received, but the place of the donor is
not to be mentioned; from an aged Christian woman 3l. and a pair of
silver shirt buttons; and by sale of Reports 10s.

Aug. 28. From a sister as the profit from the sale of ladies' bags 6s.
6d., anonymously 2s. 6d., by sale of Reports 12s., from Weymouth 2l.,
also 4s., 1s., and 1s. 6d., and from Ryde 1l.

Aug.29. Anonymously from Torquay 1l. There came in also by sale of
articles 17s. 6d., by sale of Reports 10s. 6d., and from a sister 2s.
6d.--Thus, by the help of God, we have again received by this Tuesday
evening 42l. 3s. 9d., while last Tuesday evening there was only 11 ¾ d.
left. How kindly has the Lord therefore, in answer to our supplications,
increased "the handful of meal in the barrel!" Thus I have been enabled
to advance the needful sum requisite for the house-keeping expenses till
next Tuesday evening, and to meet several extra expenses. The remainder
of the money has been put by for rent, and towards meeting the current
expenses connected with the apprentices; and I am now again, without
anything on hand, looking to the Lord for fresh supplies.

Now observe, dear reader, how again the Lord helped at this time also,
and notice in particular how, from all parts of the country, yea from
great distances, and sometimes also from foreign lands, the donations
are sent, and most frequently from persons whom I have never seen,
whereby the hand of God is the more strikingly made manifest.--I
relate now how we were helped in answer to our prayers, this time, when
nothing was left.

Aug. 30. Wednesday evening. I had this evening a long season for prayer
for the work in which I am engaged, and sought also especially help from
God as to means for present use for the Orphans. While I was in prayer,
a parcel of clothes was brought from Weymouth for the benefit of the
Orphans, and shortly after another parcel. There were also sent 2s. 6d.
as a donation, and 1s. 6d. for Reports. A few minutes after I had
finished praying, I received an anonymous letter from Teignmouth,
containing 1l. and these lines; "The Lord permits me to send you the
enclosed. Dear brother, ‘Only believe,' ‘O how great is thy
goodness, which Thou hast laid up for them that fear Thee; which Thou
hast wrought for them that trust in Thee before the sons of men.'
Yours ever in Him."--How again has been fulfilled in my experience
that word "Only believe!" I am now looking out for more, for I shall
shortly again need many pounds, for the current expenses for the
Orphans.

Aug. 31. Received from Hull 1l. 8s. 10d., of which 16s. 3 ¾ d. is from
A. Z., who intends of this, 10s. for the Building-Fund, and the
remainder as most needed, which I took for present use for the Orphans.
A young man also sent through A. Z. 6s., and the remaining 6s. 6d. is
for Reports. This morning also a sister in the Lord from Malvern called
on me, who brought from herself and a few other sisters 4l., of which
10s. is intended by a sister for foreign missions, and the rest to be
used as most needed, which I therefore took for the Orphans. I also
received from Cheltenham 6s., and 10s. for Reports from Teignmouth, 10s.
ditto from Street, and 1s. and 6d. as donations from Street.

Sept. 1. Received from several believers at Bowness 3l. 0s. 6d., of
which they kindly intend 1l. for myself, 1l. for foreign missions, and
1l. 0s. 6d., for the Orphans.--From A. S. 5l.--By needlework of
the children 6s. 1d., from Shirehampton 5s., and from a sister 2s. 6d.

Sept. 2. From Ilfracombe 1l. 10s. From Wakefield 10l. From Windsor 8l.
10s., of which 2l. 7s. is for Narratives and Reports. By sale of Reports
1l. 8s. 8d., and for needlework done by the Orphans 1l. 17s. 2d.

Sept. 4. A very poor Christian widow, having come into the possession of
10l. through the death of her mother, gave 1l. of it for the Orphans.

This sister in the Lord has since fallen asleep. Will she regret the
gift now? Our time is short, very short. Let every child of God stand in
the place of service in which He has set him, working while it is called
today, "for the night cometh when no man can work." Again and again,
while looking over my journal, I meet with names of donors, who have
fallen asleep. Shortly, dear reader, your turn and mine may also come.

Sept. 5. The boxes in my house contained 1l. 6s. There came in also by
sale of articles 5l. 1s. 8d., by sale of Reports 14s. 4 ½ d., through
the boxes of the Orphan-Houses 4l. 14s. 9 ½ d., and from a sister 10s.
Thus this evening, Tuesday, it was found that the Lord had sent in again
since last Tuesday evening, when there was nothing in hand, nearly 50l.,
so that I have been able to meet all the extra expenses of the week, and
to advance again this evening money for house-keeping for the coming
week.

Now see how the Lord helped further for the week after this.

Sept. 6. By sale of Reports 13s. 9d. Sept. 8. From a lady 7s. 6d.

Sept. 9. By sale of a small cask of pickles, given for the purpose, 12s.
— A brother and sister gave 3l., as a thank-offering to the Lord for
the conversion of two brothers, in one week, in answer to prayer. From
London 5l. By sale of articles 1s. 4d. From Scotland 12s. 6d. for
Reports, and 3s. 6d. for the Orphans. From Crediton was sent 10s., 3s.
6d., and 11s.

Sept. 10. By sale of Reports 11s. 8d.--From a sister 2s. 6d., and
through ditto 1s. 6d. Anonymously 1s.

Sept. 11. Profit from the sale of bags 10s.--From a brother in London
10s. From Scotland 3l. 18s. 7d. with 1l. for myself.

Sept. 12. Tuesday. By sale of articles 18s. 8d. By sale of Reports 3s.
By a donation 1s. Thus again about 20l. has come in during the past
week, and, with what remained in hand last Tuesday evening, I have had
over and above what is needed for house-keeping expenses for the coming
week.--When I came home this evening from our usual weekly prayer
meeting for the Lord's blessing upon the various objects of the
Scriptural Knowledge Institution, I found that a brother from Tavistock
had left at my house 2l. 2s. 6d.

Sept. 13. By sale of Reports 8s. 2d.--From a Christian lady 2 crown
pieces and 2 pairs of socks.--From East Coker 1l. 10s., together with
many gold articles, &c. Also 1s. 6d. with many articles and some coins.
From Belper 10s. for Reports, and 10s. as three donations.

Sept. 15. From Kingstown 5s. as a donation and 10s. for Reports.--
This evening 1l. was left anonymously at my house; and a brother left 2
sovereigns at the Boys' Orphan-Rouse. A little boy gave 8d., and 6s.
6d. came in by sale of Reports.

Sept. 10. From a brother at Clifton 1l. 10s.

Sept. 17. By sale of Reports 13s. A.S.A. 10s. Anonymously 10s. From a
sister 2s. 6d. Through a sister 10s.

Sept. 19. Tuesday. A gentleman called on me this morning and gave me
half-a-sovereign for the Orphans, but would not give his name.--By
sale of articles 3l. 0s. 6d., by Reports 8s. 6d., through the box at my
house 1l., by a donation 10s. 6d., and paid on behalf of two Orphans 1l.
15s. Evening. Thus again more than 20l. has come in in money during this
week, besides many valuable articles. I was thus able to advance all
that was needed for house-keeping, and what was left I put by for rent
and material for clothes, which have been ordered, trusting in God for
fresh supplies for next Tuesday.

The Lord helped us this time again, as the following shows.

Sept. 20. By sale of a Report 6d.

Sept. 21. From Barnstaple was sent 1l. 5s.--Boxes in my house 10s.
6d.--This morning a Christian from Somersetshire called at my house,
and said, he only wished to put something into the Orphan-box, and then
put in a sovereign.--From Leicester was sent 1l.--This afternoon a
letter was left at my house, containing a five pound note and these
words: "From a Believer in the efficacy of the prayer of faith, to be
appropriated as Mr. Müller may think fit." As there was only 3l. 16s.
in hand for the Orphans, I took this donation for them.--This evening
I had again an especial season for prayer respecting the various objects
of the Institution. Almost immediately, after I had risen from my knees,
I received from Sunderland 1l.

Sept. 23. From Norwich 10s. From Bath 5l. Through a sister in Bristol
5s.

Sept. 24. Anonymously from Liverpool 10s.--From Stourbridge 1l.--
From A. S. A. 6s. 8 ½ d. By sale of Reports 2s. 6d. From Cheshire 2l.
Anonymously 5s.

Sept. 25. The contents of an Orphan-box 18s. 10d.

Sept. 20. From Brighton 5s. By sale of articles 2l. 6s. 8d. By sale of
Reports 1l. 6s. Through Orphan-boxes 5s. 2d. Ditto 2s. 9d. Through the
boxes at the Orphan-Houses 2l. 14s. 11d.--Thus the Lord has again
sent in about 25l. during the week, whereby I have been enabled to meet
all the extra expenses of the week, and to advance for the house-keeping
expenses of the coming week.

Sept. 27. When today there was again only a few shillings in hand, I
received from Sunderland 2l. 19s. 6d. for Reports. Also from a sister in
Bristol 10s. from another 10s. as the profit from the sale of ladies'
baskets, and from Plymouth 1l.

Sept. 28. By the sale of trinkets and old silver 9l. 10s.

—From Scarborough 2l. as a donation, and 6s. for Reports.--From
Barnstaple 2l. 0s. 9 ½ d. By sale of Reports 10s.--From a donor in
Bristol 1l.

Sept. 30. From a Christian gentleman in Bath 1l. From Oswestry 7s. By
sale of Reports 12s.

Oct. 1. By Reports 3s. 4d. From A. S. A. 11s. 10d. Anonymously 10s. From
Devonshire 6s. 6d.

Oct. 2. From Liverpool 2s. 6d. By Reports 7s. 6d. From a Brother in
Bristol 1l.

Oct. 3. By sale of Reports 2s. 6d. and by sale of articles 1l. 9s. 9d.
Thus by this evening, Tuesday, again about 28l. has come in, and I have
been able to meet all the extra expenses of the work, and advance money
for the week's house-keeping; but have now again scarcely anything
left.

Oct. 4. By sale of trinkets came in 2l. 17s. 6d.

Oct. 5. From a sister 2s. 6d. From Kingsbridge 1l. 5s.

Oct. 0. By knitting 15s. 3d.

Oct. 7. Received from Sherborne 1l. 9s. 4d. Received also from the
neighbourhood of Dartmouth 1l. 0s. 6d. There came in likewise through
sister E. Ch. 1l. 5s. 10d.--Also 5l. 14s. 0 ½ d., being part of the
proceeds of a little publication.

Oct. 8. From A. S. A. 5l. Anonymously 1l. Ditto 6s.

Oct. 9. By sale of a Report 6d. From a sister 10s.

Oct. 10. From Cheltenham 10s. By sale of articles 4l. 0s. 1d. By sale of
Reports 6s. 2d.--Thus, by this evening, Tuesday, again the sum of
26l. 2s. 8 ½ d. had come in. I was, therefore, able to meet all the
housekeeping expenses of the coming week, besides having paid away 8l.
15s. for apprentices, &c., and have 12s. 8d. left in hand. My heart is
assured that the Lord will help further.

Now, dear reader, did the Lord help this time also? Yes, He did. Could
it be otherwise? No; for they that trust in the Lord shall never be
confounded. Let me then relate to you the way in which God helped us,
going on with the extracts from my journal.

Oct. 11. At our meeting yesterday evening we made our supplication to
God that He would be pleased to help us further. Immediately after the
meeting I received 10s. Also when I came home I found that 6s. had been
brought from Gosport for Reports, and 1s. 6d. as the proceeds of an
Orphan-box at Gosport. Also 5s. was put by the bearer of the money into
an Orphan-box at my house, who also brought a woollen shawl.--Today
1l. was left at one of the Orphan-Houses by "an aged person of a Bristol
alms-house," who would not give her name. There came in also by sale of
stockings 1l. 4s. 6d. There was likewise left anonymously at my house,
an old silver watch, 2 mourning brooches, and 2 gold pins. Thus the Lord
has already sent in a little.

Oct. 12. Received in an anonymous letter 1s. 8d. From the Isle of Man
2s. 6d. By sale of Reports 1l. 13s. 6d. Through a brother in Scotland
1l.--From two young gentlemen at Clifton 4s.--From Street 1s. 6d.
— Through an Orphan-box 2s. 1d.

Oct. 13. From some believers near Kingsbridge 1l. By sale of articles
15s. Left at the Boys' Orphan-House 5s.

Oct. 14. From Bideford 2l. By sate of Reports 8s. By children's
needlework 19s. 8 ½ d.

Oct. 15. By sale of Reports 2s. 6d. From A. S. A. 13s. 5d. From
Barnstaple 1l. From Yorkshire 5l., with these words: "Please to accept
the enclosed 5l., as a thank-offering to God for an answer to prayer, in
the conversion of a soul. I should like half of it to go to the Orphans,
the other half I leave to your discretion." The other half I put to the
Building-Fund.

Oct. 10. From Horsington 10s.--Through the boxes at my house 15s. 0
½ d.--From a sister 5s.

Oct. 17. From Reading 1l. By sale of Reports 5s. 6d. By sale of articles
4l. 10s. 6d.--Thus by this evening, Tuesday, the Lord had sent in
again 23l. 11s. 3d., whereby I had enough for advancing the
house-keeping expenses of the coming week, and the remainder I put by
for the rent and the current expenses for the apprentices.

Oct. 18. When now there was again nothing in hand, I received by sale of
Reports 12s., by a donation 7s, from Notts 5s. 1d., in small
contributions 12s. 3d., and 1s.

Oct. 19. Anonymously from Tottenham a half-sovereign. From Collumpton
8s. 6d. and 11s. 6d.

Oct. 20. By sale of Reports 4s. From Barnstaple 5s. From a sister 2s.
6d., and from Madeley 1s. From Dublin 5s.

Oct. 21. From Clevedon 1l. 10s. From Cirencester 1l. 13s. 4d. and also
3s.--By sale of Reports 1l. 2s. 6d.

Oct. 22. From A. S. A. 11s. 3 ½ d. Anonymously 10s. Ditto 8d. From a
clergyman 10s. From S. 10s. By sale of Reports 1s. 6d. From a sister 5l.
Oct. 24. By sale of Reports 5s. 4d. Boxes in the Orphan-Houses 1l. 2s.
By sale of articles 3l. 2s. 1d.--Thus by this evening, Tuesday, again
20l. 4s. 11 ½ d, had been received, and as the expenses of the coming
week for house-keeping, together with some extra expenses during the
past week, did not amount to more than 18l. 1s. 6d., I had 2l. 3s. 5 ½
d. left, which I put by for the rent and the current expenses for the
apprentices, and am again looking to the Lord for fresh supplies, and
again assured that He will help me.

Oct. 31. Since last Tuesday evening it has pleased God again to make it
abundantly manifest that we do not wait on Him in vain. Besides many
articles, there came in 24l. 4s. 8 ¾ d. As the money which was needed
for the house-keeping expenses for the coming week, together with a few
other small expenses which I had had to meet during the last week, did
not amount to more than 19l. 19s. 3d., there was more than 4l. left,
which I put by towards the rent and the expenses for the apprentices,
and hope in God for the next week.

Nov. 1. When I came home last evening from our usual weekly prayer
meeting, I found 1l. from R. L. H. Thus the Lord has already given a
little.--There arrived today a box from Reading, containing the
following articles from various donors:

A black feather. Also two pairs of ladies' shoes and a pair of velvet
boots. Also two ladies' bags, 2 pairs of bracelets, 2 waistbands, a
pair of baby's shoes, 2 neck ribands, and some white lace.--Further,
a pair of worked slippers, a thimble case, 2 pin-cushions, a
pair of baby's stays, a lady's bag, a pocket-book, a silver brooch,
2 gilt brooches, a gilt seal, and 12 yards of calico.--Further, a box
of artificial flowers. Also an urn stand. Further, a bible and prayer
book in a case. Further, a little box containing 2 gold rings, a gilt
chain, a bead necklace, some mock pearls, and a gilt buckle.--Likewise
a paper containing a smelling bottle, a pen knife, a waist
buckle, and a card.--Further, a paper containing 2 needle-cases, a
purse, 2 little books, 2 medals, a scent bag, a little smelling bottle,
3 pebbles, and 3 mourning necklaces. Another paper, containing 4 gold
rings, a gold pin, 2 old silver thimbles, the handle of a silver fruit
knife, a snuff-box, 2 silver mounted corks, 7 pin-cushions, a
needle-book, a pair of bracelets, a bead purse, a smelling bottle, a
silver brooch, a gold brooch, a bead necklace, a pair of compasses, a
broken gold watch key, 1 shilling, an old silver thimble, an emery
cushion, a gold ring, a cloak fastener, and a little bead bag.--
Another paper, containing a silk scarf, a shawl, and some muslin for
night-caps. A paper box, containing a silver-mounted smelling bottle, a
toilette cushion, an amethyst brooch, a silver butter-knife, a pair of
gloves, and 2 shillings for missions. Another paper, containing 8 ½
yards of blue print.--Also 50 books and some pamphlets. —Lastly, a
gauze dress, a silk dress, a collar, and 3 caps.--I have on purpose
given here at full length the contents of this box, to show what a
variety of articles, either for sale or for the use of the Orphans, has
been sent.--There arrived also today, anonymously, a box from a
considerable distance, containing more than one hundred different
articles. There was also 5s. in this box, to pay for the carriage. This
day also came in by sale of Reports 2s. 6d., and by needlework of the
Orphans 19s. 1d.

Nov. 2. From the neighbourhood of Lutterworth a half-sovereign, from a
sister in Bristol 10s., through a brother half-a-crown and 4 frocks.

Nov. 3. From S. N. 2s. 6d.

Nov. S. From A. S. A. 8s. Anonymously 2s. 6d. By sale of Reports 1s.
4d.

Nov. 6. By sale of stockings 9s. 2d. From Cumberland 5l. From Ayrshire
1l.

Nov. 7. By sale of articles 2l. 9s. 4 ½ d., and by sale of a Report 6d.
This evening, Tuesday, as only 13l. 3s. 5 ½ d. had come in during the
week, I had only 7l. to advance towards the house-keeping expenses of
the coming week, after having met some other expenses. But I hope in God
for more, before this is gone, which will only last two or three days.

Nov. 5. By sale of Reports came in 3s., and 2s. 6d. was given by a
relative of one of the Orphans.

Nov. 9. Only 5s. 6d. had come in yesterday. Tomorrow more money will be
needed for house-keeping. In this our poverty I received this morning
One Thousand Pounds. The money being left to me for disposal as it might
be most needed, I took of it 600l. for the Building Fund, 300l. for
missionary purposes and the circulation of bibles and tracts, and 100l.
for present use of the Orphans. I have thus the means which are yet
needed for this week's house-keeping expenses, besides being able to
meet other heavy expenses which are before me next week.

Feb. 20, 1849. For three months and ten days, since Nov. 9, 1848, the
donations have always come in so, that we abounded during the whole
period, there having been always fresh donations received, before all
the money in hand was disbursed. The total amount that came in during
this period was 469l. 14s. 10d. Now today there was no money in hand for
advancing the amount needed for the next week's house-keeping. All the
money in hand was due for rent, and therefore unavailable, as I never go
in debt for anything. In this our need there was given to me this
afternoon the sum of 200l., which was left to my disposal for fitting up
the New Orphan-House, or for any of the objects in connexion with the
Scriptural Knowledge Institution that might be in need. As, however, I
have all the means for fitting up and furnishing the New Orphan-House,
as far as I know, and as there is no money in hand for present use for
the Orphans, I took 100l. for that object, and 100l. for the circulation
of Bibles and Tracts, for the Day-Schools, the Sunday-School, and the
Adult-School, and for Home and Foreign labourers in the Word.

March 9. The New Orphan-House is now nearly ready. On this account we
have to get in large supplies for the children's clothes. Within the
last few days I have ordered thousands of yards of material for this
purpose, and thousands more will need to be ordered, besides providing a
stock of many other things. For this large sums are needed. Under these
circumstances I received today a donation of 300l., to be used for the
Building Fund, or the current expenses of the various objects, just as
it might be most required. As I judge that we have all that is needed
for the fitting up and furnishing of the house, and as there is more in
hand than usual for the missionary objects, the circulation of Bibles
and Tracts, and for the various Schools, and as we have only about 60l.
for present use for the Orphans, towards meeting all the heavy expenses
before us, I took the whole of this donation for the Orphans, as the
donor has kindly left the disposal of the money entirely to me. This
donation, coming in just now, has been an exceedingly great refreshment
to my spirit; for it is, at the commencement of the great increase of
our expenses, in connexion with the 300 Orphans, instead of 120, like an
earnest from God, that He will supply us also with means when the
demands for the 300 will be more than twice as great as they are now.
Through this donation I have means to meet all the expenses which will
be incurred in getting in for the new establishment the stores of
provisions, soap, material for clothes, haberdashery, and of the many
other articles of which it would be desirable to buy our supplies on
wholesale terms. The Lord be praised for His kindness!

April 10. Received this afternoon the following letter:--"Dear
Brother,

"I have the pleasure today of sowing a little more seed-corn for
eternity. Employ the enclosed 50l., if you please, for the support of
the Orphans. The remaining 5l. be pleased to divide between yourself and
dear brother Craik.

"Yours very truly in Christ,

"* * * *"

From the same donor I had recently had two donations of 120l. and 100l.

April 11. From the brethren at Sunderland, assembling at Bethesda
chapel, 10l., as a part of their annual thank-offering to the Lord for
Church mercies during the last twelvemonth.

April 18. Today I received a donation of 250l., of which I took 100l.
for the Orphans, and the other 150l. for the other objects. Never were
the current expenses for the Orphans nearly so great as they are now,
but at the same time never was the income nearly so great. Thereby the
Lord, as it were, says, that, when the New Orphan-House shall have been
filled with Orphans, He will likewise give what is requisite for them.
Whilst yet much is in hand, He has been pleased to send this donation.

From April 19th to May 23rd, the Lord was pleased to send in still
further many donations.

May 23. Today I received 360l., of which I took half for the current
expenses for the Orphans, and half for the other objects. By this
donation I am still further provided with means to meet all the expenses
connected with the removal of the children into the New Orphan-House,
the reception and fitting out of many fresh children, the filling the
stores of the New Orphan-House, &c. How does the Lord by all this
clearly say, that, when this house shall have been filled with children,
He will provide the means for their support!

June 18. Today, as the fruit of the prayers of three years and seven
months, the children began to be moved from the four Orphan-Houses in
Wilson Street, Bristol, into the New Orphan-House.

June 23. Saturday Evening. This has been indeed a week of great and many
and peculiar mercies. All the Orphans with their teachers and overseers
have been moved into the New Orphan-House, during Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday; so that there are now about 140 persons under
one roof. The Lord has most signally helped.--As I had for more than
three years sought the help of God concerning all matters connected with
the New Orphan-House, I did expect His help in this particular also; but
He has done beyond my expectations. Though only the day before yesterday
the last children were moved in, there is already such a measure of
order established in the house, by the help of God, as that things can
be done by the minute hands of the timepieces. His name is to be praised
for this, and my soul does magnify Him for His goodness!--Also with
regard to temporal supplies for the dear Orphans, the Lord has been
exceedingly kind. On the second day of receiving the children, there was
sent 20l. On the third day, an individual, who walked with me through
part of the house, said, "These children must consume a great deal of
provisions," and, whilst saying it, took out of his pocket a roll of
Bank of England notes, to the amount of one hundred pounds, and gave
them to me for the Orphans. On the same evening there was also sent for
the Orphans a very large cask of treacle, and for their teachers and
overseers 6 loaves of sugar. Also a cooper made gratuitously two large
new casks for treacle. On the next day I received information that about
10 cwt. of rice had been purchased for the Orphans, which should be
sent. Besides this, several small donations have come in. So bountifully
has the Lord been pleased to help of late, that I have not only been
able to meet all the extraordinary heavy expenses connected with moving
the Orphans from Wilson Street into the New Orphan-House, filling the
stores of the New Orphan-House, &c.; but I have more than five hundred
pounds in hand, to begin house-keeping in the New Orphan-House. How true
that word that those that trust in the Lord shall not be confounded!
After all the many and long-continued seasons of great trial of faith
within these thirteen years and two months, during which the Orphans
were in Wilson Street, the Lord dismisses us from thence in comparative
abundance. His holy name be praised for it!

In order that this chapter may not be too long, I can only mention of
the donations, from June 23, 1849, to May 20, 1850, those which came in
under particular circumstances. The total amount received from June 23,
1849, to May 26, 1850, for the current expenses of the Orphans, was
2,102l. 13s. 4 ¾ d.

Aug. 30. Received a Fifty Pound Note with these words: "I send you
herewith a Fifty Pound Note, half for the Missions, half for the
Orphans, unless you are in any personal need; if so, take 5l. for
yourself. This will be the last large sum I shall be able to transmit to
you. Almost all the rest is already out at interest." I took half of
this 50l. for the Orphans and half for Missionaries. The writer sold
some time since his only earthly possession, and sent me at different
times sums of 120l., of 100l., of 55l., of 50l, and of 20l. for the work
of the Lord in my hands. When he says therefore "the rest is already out
at interest," he means that he has given it away for the Lord, which
indeed both for time and eternity is the very best way of using the
means with which the Lord may be pleased to intrust us, in so far as,
considering in the fear of God all our various claims and duties and
relationships, we may do so. As this is written for the spiritual profit
of the reader, I cannot but add to this extract from my journal under
Aug. 30, 1849, that since that time I have received other donations from
the same donor, and much larger still. He used for God the means with
which He was pleased to intrust him, and, contrary to this brother's
expectation, the above 50l. was not the last large donation; for it
pleased God soon after, to intrust him with another considerable sum,
which he again used for the Lord. This did not at all surprise me; for
it is the Lord's order, that, in whatever way He is pleased to make us
His stewards, whether as to temporal or spiritual things, if we are
indeed acting as stewards and not as owners, He will make us stewards
over more. But for more, on this deeply important subject, I must refer
the reader to the third part of this Narrative, page 575 to 604.

Sept. 27. From friends at Othery 20l.--This donation is very
refreshing to my spirit. Last evening and this morning I had especially
besought the Lord, that He would be pleased to continue to send me
means, as the expenses are now so great; for there are 107 Orphans in
the house, and about 190 persons daily sit down to their meals, and this
number is every week increasing. Now, by this donation, which comes not
only from an entirely new but also most unexpected quarter, the Lord is,
as it were, saying to me, that He will not fail to help me, even when
there shall be about 330 persons in the house, for which number it is
fitted up.

Oct. S. Yesterday again seven Orphans were received. Every week I am now
taking in five, six, seven, or eight; and within the last nine weeks
altogether have been received, and about 200 persons sit down daily to
their meals. This has greatly increased the expenses already, and they
will be still more increased, as I purpose to receive still further 120
Orphans, if God permit, to make up the number 300. Yesterday, after
having received the seven children, I again gave myself to prayer for an
increase of means. Now today I have received from Devonshire a set of
valuable jewels, i.e. a ring set with 5 brilliants, a brooch set with 12
larger and 12 smaller brilliants and 1 large emerald, and a pair of
ear-rings, both together set with 10 brilliants and 2 emeralds. The
bearer brought also 1l. 10s. 4d. and 10s. 2d., being the proceeds of two
Orphan-boxes, likewise 1l. 4s. 6d. At the same time I received from
another brother from Devonshire. 4l.; and from a third 16s. 10d.--
Truly the Lord does not allow me to wait upon Him in vain!

Nov. 1. Today I have again received seven Orphans. There are now about
220 persons daily sitting down to their meals in the Orphan-House.
Before the seven fresh Orphans were brought, I received a letter from a
banker in London, giving me information that a brother in the Lord,
living between 200 and 300 miles from hence, had given order to pay me
40l. for the Orphans.--By the same post I received anonymously from
London 5/. from the same donor, who has now for several years sent twice
every year this amount, of which she kindly wishes me to use half for my
own personal expenses, and half for the work of the Lord in my hands. I
took the half for the Orphans.--This was not all. In the afternoon,
whilst receiving the Orphans, there came in still further 69l. 3s. 8d.,
also 2s. and a few articles.

Nov. 16. About 260l. has been spent within these 16 days, i.e. since the
first of the month, for current expenses for the Orphans alone, and
about 120l. for the other objects, making in all about 380l. within half
a month. Lord look upon the necessities of Thy servant, seeing that now
the outgoings are so large!

Nov. 30. We have been helped through this month most comfortably, though
the expenses for the Orphans have been heavier by far, than in any month
all the 14 years since this work was commenced, having been 380l. 9s.
2d., and, including the expenses for the other objects, about 540l.

Dec. 4. Today was paid to me a legacy of 50l., left for the benefit of
the Orphans.

Dec. 12. Anonymously a Bank Post Bill for 50l. 13s. 6d.

Jan. 9, 1850. Today was sent to me from the Committee of the Cholera
Fund in Bristol 20l., which the gentlemen constituting it had voted for
the benefit of the twenty children who had lost their parents in the
Cholera, and whom I had received into the New Orphan-House.

I had not applied either directly or indirectly for this money; indeed I
was reluctant even to give information as to the number of Cholera
Orphans received, lest there should be even the appearance as if after
all I asked for money, instead of solely trusting in the living God. But
some of the gentlemen on the Committee, knowing the fact that I had
received many Orphans, made such by means of the Cholera, proposed that
there should be paid to the Institution a sovereign on account of each
such child received. This sum was especially remarkable to me as a fresh
proof of the numberless ways, which God has at His command for providing
me with means.

I also cannot help noticing the remarkable coincidence that, at the time
God visited this land with the Cholera, in 1849, I had so much room for
the reception of Orphans. The Lord was pleased to allow me the joy and
sweet privilege of receiving altogether twenty-six children, from ten
months old and upward, who lost their parents in the Cholera at that
time, and many besides, since then, who were bereaved of their parents
through this fearful malady.

Jan. 31. Today five more Orphans are to be received. For the last
fortnight, comparatively little had come in for the Orphans, i.e. not
quite 60l. In the prospect of the Orphans coming today, I said last
evening to my dear wife, that the Lord would send us something for them;
for I have often found, that either He has sent something with the
children, or at the time that they have been received. It was but about
ten minutes after I had said so, when I received 450l. (see the account
of the income for the other objects), of which I took 200l. for the
Orphans. This morning I received further 10l. from a pious countess in
Edinburgh, and 10s. from Deptford. Thus the Lord has indeed sent
something for the Orphans. It is now seven months and thirteen days
since the Orphans began to be received into the New Orphan-House. The
expenses for them have been since then Fifteen Hundred and Twenty
Pounds; and yet we have this day more in hand, than when the New
Orphan-House was opened. Unbelief and natural reason would have said,
and did say, If there have often been scarcely any means in hand, while
the Orphans were in the rented houses, and only about 120 in number, how
will it be when there shall be 300 in the New Orphan-House? But
faith's reply was, Our poverty has been only for the trial of our
faith, and it will be as easy to the Lord to provide for 300 as for 120
Orphans. And thus we have proved it hitherto, and, no doubt, shall prove
it, as long as the Lord shall enable us to trust in Him.

May 25, 1850. The Lord has up to the close of this period helped also
for this as well as for the other parts of the work; for during this
last week I have received about 62l. for the current expenses for the
Orphans. With confidence in the living God I step into the new period,
though our expenses are now far heavier than ever they were, being fully
assured of His faithfulness. May He be pleased to uphold me during the
remainder of my earthly pilgrimage in His fear and truth, and may He
graciously be pleased to give me day by day the faith which my
circumstances may require.

Closing account as to the way in which the means were obtained for the
expenses connected with the erection, fitting up, and furnishing of the
New Orphan-House, Ashley Down, Bristol.

At the time where the last chapter, referring to this subject, closes,
the New Orphan-House was being built. Part of it was already roofed in,
and the remainder was to be roofed not many weeks afterwards. But how
much did there yet remain to be done in other respects! A building so
considerable as to contain about 300 large windows, would require, even
after it was finished, an immense amount of labour, to be fitted up and
furnished for 330 persons. Then, after this was done, the settling in of
the Orphans and their teachers and other overseers, needed still more
abundant help. Further, the obtaining of suitable helpers for this part
of the work, was indeed no small matter. Lastly, though the Lord had
been pleased to give me already above Eleven Thousand Pounds for the New
Orphan-House, yet I needed several thousand pounds more, in order to
bring the whole into such a state, as might render the building fit for
the reception of the Orphans. And now, in looking back, and finding that
I not only was helped in all these matters, but also in every one of
them far beyond my largest expectations —does it not become me to say
to those who love the Lord Jesus, and into whose hands this account may
fall: "0 magnify the Lord with me, and let us exalt His name together!"
Each one of the foregoing difficulties which still existed on the 26th
of May, 1848, was so great, that if only one of them had remained, and I
had not been helped, what would have been the result? But while the
prospect before me would have been overwhelming had I looked at it
naturally, I was never, even for once, permitted to question what would
be the end. For as, from the beginning, I was sure that it was the will
of God, that I should go to the work of building for Him this large
Orphan-House, so also, from the beginning, I was as certain that the
whole would be finished, as if the building had been already before my
natural eyes, and as if the house had been already filled with three
hundred destitute Orphans. I was therefore of good courage, in the midst
of an overwhelming pressure of work yet to be done, and very many
difficulties yet to be overcome, and thousands of pounds yet needed; and
I gave myself still further to prayer, and sought still further to
exercise faith on the promises of God. And now, the work is done, the
difficulties are overcome, all the money that was needed has been
obtained, and even more than I needed; and, as to helpers in the work, I
have obtained even beyond my expectations and prayers. Nearly seven
years have passed away already [1856] since the New Orphan-House was
opened, and about three hundred and thirty persons sit down in it day by
day to their meals.

The Godly reader will feel interested in learning now further
particulars, as to how it pleased God to assist me in accomplishing my
desires, with reference to the preparation of the House for the
reception of the children, and I therefore relate the manner in which I
received further pecuniary supplies; and, whilst doing so, will here and
there make remarks concerning other points, which may throw light on the
subject.

Up to May 26, 1848, I had received altogether towards meeting the
expenses connected with the building of the New Orphan-House the sum of
11,062l. 4s. 11 ½ d. I now state further, some instances, merely as
specimens, as to the manner in which it pleased the Lord, to provide me
further with means for fitting up and furnishing the New Orphan-House,
without applying to a single individual personally for anything, but
only giving myself to prayer.

June 8, 1848. I received 5l. 17s. as the "Proceeds from the sale of a
Tree for the New Orphan-House."

June 17. Received 5l., of which 4l. 1s. is the proceeds from the sale of
"a second tree for the New Orphan-House," and 19s. for present use for
the Orphans.--The reader is here called upon to notice that, whilst I
had yet to obtain several thousand pounds for finishing the New
Orphan-House, all the other current expenses of the various objects of
the Institution were going on; and for none of all these pecuniary
necessities had I any regular certain income whatever, nor did I seek
help from any one but the living God only.

June 20. A brother and sister gave four silver table spoons, twelve
silver tea spoons, and a pair of silver sugar tongs for sale.

Aug. 7. From a sister in the Lord 200l.--With 2 Cor. viii. 12, 1s.
— Anonymously from J. H. W. 5s., as "a thank-offering to the Lord for
His delivering goodness in sickness."--Anonymously 1s.

Aug. 13. From a brother 10s. This brother had worked overtime, and in
prayer he told the Lord that, if his employers gave him anything for it,
he would give it to the Building Fund, as he had a great desire to
contribute something towards this work, from which he had been kept for
want of means.

Aug. 16. A brother in the Lord having sold his little earthly property,
for the sake of spending the money for the Lord, brought 20l. of the
proceeds, of which he wished me to take 10l. for the Building Fund, and
10l. for the orphans.

Aug. 19. It is this day a twelvemonth since the foundation stone of the
New Orphan-House was laid, and now the building is up, and almost
entirely roofed in. Also part of the inside plastering is already done.
How can my soul sufficiently magnify the Lord for all the help which He
has been pleased to give, since this day twelvemonth!--As we are now
so far advanced, I have been increasingly entreating God, that He would
be pleased to give me the means which are yet requisite for fitting up
and furnishing the house; for even now I am completely depending upon
Him for considerable sums, to accomplish this. But while much is still
needed, I have never had, by God's grace, the least misgiving, as to
His willingness to give me all I need; on the contrary, I have been
assured that, when I actually required the money for the fittings and
the furniture, it would come. And now this day the Lord has again
proved, to me, how willing Ha is to act according to my faith; for there
was given to me this morning 887l. under the kind condition that I
should take of it 20l. for my own personal expenses, and the rest for
the Building Fund or the present need of the various objects of the
Institution, as it appeared best to me. I took therefore 600l. for the
Building Fund, and placed 267l. to the School—, Bible—, Tract—and
Missionary Fund, with the especial intention of using the greater part
of this 267l. for helping home and foreign preachers of the Gospel, who
labour without any salary, in dependence upon the Lord for supplies,
knowing the need of many to be very great; for cases of especial
distress among them had again recently come before me. My soul does
magnify the Lord for all His goodness and faithfulness!

Oct. 11. This afternoon I received a letter, containing a check for 50l.
with these words: "1 Peter iv. 12-14. The enclosed draft is for Mr.
Müller, to be disposed of according to his own need, and the need of
the Orphans under his care. May the 37th Psalm continue to be his solace
in the fiery trial through which he is passing." I took the whole of
this sum towards fitting up and furnishing the New Orphan-House.

Oct. 16. This evening I received a fifty pound note as a thank-offering
to the Lord for numberless mercies during a long course of years. The
donor desired that Brother Craik should have 10l., myself 10l. for my
own personal expenses, and 30l. were left to me to dispose of as I
thought best, for the work of God in my hands, which sum I put to the
Building Fund, with the donor's approval.

Oct. 20. From a lady in Ireland 5s.--By sale of turf and grass 3l.
16s. 2d.

Oct. 24. By sale of articles 4s. 4 ½ d.--From a Christian gentleman
in Devonshire 20l. Day by day 1 am waiting upon God for means for
furnishing the house. The last-mentioned sum I received when returning
from the Orphan-Houses from our weekly prayer-meeting, where I had been
again seeking from God further help, together with my fellow labourers
in the work.

Oct. 25. From sisters in the Lord in Devonshire, 5l., of which they
kindly intend one half for the Building Fund, and the other half for
present use for the Orphans.

Nov. 8. The Building is now so far advanced by the help of God, that I
was able to arrange yesterday with the clerk of the works to purchase
today 32 grates for small rooms, two copper furnaces for the wash-house,
and two iron furnaces for the scullery. Thus, therefore, the expenses
for fitting up the house commence. For all this I had the money in hand,
and even some hundreds of pounds more, than the liabilities which are
already upon me; yet I want still many hundred pounds to meet all the
heavy expenses, connected with fitting up and furnishing so large a
building, levelling the ground, making a road through the ground,
pitching three large playgrounds, &c. Under these circumstances I
received this morning anonymously 50l. for the Orphan-House, with Psalm
cxvi. and the request not to notice the post-mark. As I understood the
donor to intend this donation for the Building Fund, I took it for
that.

Nov. 9. Today the Lord has helped still more abundantly. I have received
a donation of One Thousand Pounds, to be used for the Building Fund and
the present necessities of the work generally, as the various objects of
the Institution might require. Of this donation I took, therefore, 600l.
for the Building Fund, 100l. for the present necessities of the Orphans,
200l. for missionary purposes, and 100l. for the circulation of Bibles
and Tracts, and for the various Day Schools, the Sunday School, and the
Adult School of the Institution. All these manifestations of the
Lord's abundant help do not in the least surprise me. I expect help
from Him. I know that He listens to my supplications, and that, for the
sake of the Lord Jesus, He is willing to help me yet more and more, to
the confounding of Satan and to the putting to shame of unbelief.

Nov. 10. Received a bank order for 5l. from the neighbourhood of
Tavistock, which, being left to my disposal, I took for the Building
Fund.

Nov. 15. From the neighbourhood of Launceston 20l.

Dec. 22. Received 100l. This sum being left to my disposal, I took it
for the Building Fund.

Jan. 2, 1849. Received from Devonshire 10l., with these words: "A
moiety of the first fruits of interest on Bristol Dock Shares from
the Town Council of Bristol, towards the New
Orphan Building." Thus even the fact, of Bristol being made a free port,
was used by the Lord as a means to supply me with this sum.

Jan. 17. The time is now drawing near, when further steps are to be
taken to fit up and furnish the house, as more than two-thirds of the
rooms are all but ready. Under these circumstances I have prayed the
more earnestly, day by day, that the Lord would be pleased to give me
the means which are yet needed; and as my heart has been assured from
the beginning, and all through these three years and two months, since I
first began to pray about this subject, that God would in every way help
me in this work, so I have also been particularly satisfied that He
would be pleased to provide the means which may be required to meet all
the heavy expenses, which yet remain to be met. Now, today I have had
again a precious answer to my daily supplications with reference to this
work; for I received this evening 600l., concerning which it was desired
that brother Craik and myself should each take 50l. for ourselves; the
remaining 500l. was left entirely to my disposal; yet an especial
reference was made to the heavy expenses connected with fitting up and
furnishing the New Orphan-House, towards which I might, either in part,
or entirely take this sum.--After prayer I have decided on portioning
out the money thus: 300l. towards fitting up and furnishing the New
Orphan-House, 50l. for present use for the Orphans, 50l. for the support
of the Day Schools, the Sunday School, and the Adult School, 25l. for
the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, 25l. for the circulation of
Gospel Tracts, 25l. for Foreign Missions, and 25l. for the Employment
Fund.

With reference to the present of 50l. for myself, as mentioned just now,
I cannot help calling upon the Christian reader to observe how richly
the Lord supplies my own personal necessities. Since 1830 I have had no
regular salary nor any stated income whatever I then began to rely upon
the living God alone for the supply of all my temporal necessities; and
all these many years have never once been allowed to regret this step,
nor has the Lord at any time failed me. Often, indeed, I have known what
it is to be poor; but for the most part I have abounded. I sought no
payment from man for my service for God, whether in the ministry of the
Word or as director of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution; but though
I did not seek for any payment, the Lord has most abundantly recompensed
me, even as to this life. By far the most important point, however, of
this my way of living, is, that many of the disciples of the Lord Jesus
have had their hearts comforted, and have been encouraged themselves to
trust more in God, than they used to do; and it was, moreover, my
becoming more experimentally acquainted, through this way of living,
with the readiness of God to help, to succour, to relieve, and to answer
prayer, which led me in March 1834 to begin the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution, and in November 1835 to care about destitute Orphans.

Jan. 26. Anonymously from the neighbourhood of Nottingham "A gold
chain."

Jan. 30. From a professional gentleman in Bristol 50l.

Feb. 12. The New Orphan-House is now almost entirely finished. In six
weeks, with the help of God, all will be completed. On this account I
have been during the last fortnight much occupied in making the
necessary arrangements for fitting it up and furnishing it; but the
more. I have been occupied about this, the more I have seen how large a
sum the whole of the fittings and the furniture will require; and this
consideration has led me still more earnestly of late to entreat the
Lord, that He would be pleased to give me the means, which may yet be
needed for the completion of the whole. Under these circumstances a
brother in the Lord came to me this morning, and after a few minutes
conversation gave me Two Thousand Pounds, concerning which sum he kindly
gave me permission to use it for the fitting up and furnishing of the
New Orphan-House, or for any thing else needed in connexion with the
Orphans. I have placed the whole of this sum, at least for the present,
to the Building Fund. Now, dear reader, place yourself in my position.
Eleven hundred and ninety-five days it is since I began asking the Lord
for means for the building and fitting up of an Orphan-House. Day by day
have I, by His grace, since that time, continued to bring this matter
before Him. Without one moment's doubt, or misgiving, or wavering,
have I been enabled to trust in God for the means. From the beginning,
after I had once ascertained the will of God concerning this work, have
I been assured that He would bring it about; yea, as sure have I been
from the beginning that He would do so, as if I had already had all the
means in hand for it, or as if the house had been actually before me,
occupied by the children. But though to faith even three years ago the
whole work was accomplished, to sight there remained many and great
difficulties to be overcome. Even at the commencement of this day there
remained many difficulties, in the way of means, as well as in other
respects; therefore. I was on the point of giving myself again
especially to prayer, at the very moment when I was informed that the
donor of the above mentioned Two Thousand Pounds had called to see me.
Now I have the means, as far as I can see, which will enable me to meet
all the expenses; and in all probability I shall have even several
hundred pounds more than are needed. Thus the Lord shows that He can and
will not only give as much as is absolutely needed for His work, but
also that He can and will give abundantly. It is impossible to describe
the real joy I had in God, when I received this sum. I was calm, not in
the least excited, able to go on immediately with other work that came
upon me at once after I had received the donation; but inexpressible was
the delight which I had in God, who had thus given me the full answer to
my thousands of prayers, during these eleven hundred and ninety-five
days. I notice further concerning this donation: 1, The donor especially
desired me to keep his name entirely concealed; and in order that no one
might know who he is, he gave me not an order on a bank, but brought the
amount in notes. 2, He had intended to leave me this sum for the benefit
of the Orphans after his death, and for years it had been in his last
will; but he judged it more according to the will of God to give the
money during his life time.

March 31. A brother brought me a gold repeater with a gold chain, to
which two gold seals and a gold ring were attached, and told me that he
desired to give the chain, seals, and ring towards fitting up the New
Orphan-House, and wished me to get him for the gold repeater a silver
watch, as the love of Christ had weaned his heart from any desire to use
a gold repeater. He also stated, that whatever was over and above the
sale of the repeater should go for the benefit of the Orphans.

I have thus given a few out of the hundreds of donations, varying from
one farthing to 2000l., as specimens, to show how the Lord was pleased
to furnish me with the means. The total amount, which came in for the
Building Fund, was 15,784l. 18s. 10d. Of this sum 14,914l. 5s. 8d. was
received by donations in money, 60l. 19s. 11d. came in by the sale of
articles, given for the purpose. 66l. 3s. 10d. by the sale of grass and
turf from the field, on which the New Orphan-House was erected. 743l.
9s. 5d. came in for Interest; for I considered that, as a steward of
large sums, which were intrusted to me, I ought to invest the money,
till it was actually needed; and thus the sum was obtained.

After all the expenses had been met for the purchase of the land, the
conveyance of the same, the enrolment of the trust deeds in Chancery,
the building, fitting up and furnishing of the New Orphan-House, there
remained a balance of 776l. 14s. 3 ¾ d., affording a manifest proof
that the Lord can not only supply us with all we need in His service,
simply in answer to prayer, but that He can also give us even more than
we need. It will be seen how this balance was afterwards used.

Miscellaneous points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 26, 1848 to May
26, 1850.

1, During the whole of this period, five Day Schools, with 329 children
in them, were entirely supported by the Funds of this Institution; and
some pecuniary assistance was rendered to four other Day Schools. Also a
Sunday School, with 168 children, was entirely supported, and another
was occasionally assisted. Lastly, an Adult School, with 106 Adult
Scholars, was supported during this period. There was expended on these
various Schools 851l. 1s. 5 ½ d. during these two years.--The number
of all the children that were taught in the Day Schools through the
medium of this Institution, from March 5 1834 to May 26, 1850, amounted
to 5114; the number of those in the Sunday Schools amounted to 2200; and
the number of the persons in the Adult School to 1737. In all 9051.

2, From May 26, 1848 to May 20, 1850, were circulated 719 Bibles and 239
New Testaments. There was expended on this object, during this period,
of the funds of the Institution, 104l. 15s. 11d. There were circulated
altogether, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1850, Six Thousand Four
Hundred and Sixty-Five Bibles and Three Thousand Nine Hundred and
Ninety-Nine New Testaments.

3, From May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850, were spent 2574l. 16s. 6d. of the
funds of the Institution for missionary objects, whereby 40 preachers of
the Gospel in British Guiana, in the East Indies, in Switzerland, in
France, in Germany, in Canada, in Scotland, in Ireland, and in England
were assisted.

The reader will notice how greatly this object of the Institution was
increased during the last four years previous to May 26, 1850. This
arose from the fact, that, in the early part of 1846, the need of
certain brethren who laboured in the word and doctrine came before me,
and God laid them on my heart to labour for them in prayer, in order
that I might obtain means from Him for such brethren to a greater extent
than I had done before. Ever since then the Lord has been pleased
increasingly to use me in this way. For from May 26, 1846 to May 26,
1848, there was spent for that object nearly three times as much as
during any former period of the same length; and during the period from
May 26, 1848 to May 26, 1850, I was not only allowed to do as much as
before, but to expend even 1016l. 5s. more than during the former
period, notwithstanding all the many heavy additional expenses for the
various other objects of the Institution.

It is my sweet privilege to state, that the labours of many of these
forty servants of the Lord, whom I assisted, were especially owned of
God during these two years. There took place very many conversions
through their instrumentality. This applies both to those who laboured
among idolaters and those among nominal Christians.

4, From May 26, 1848 to May 26, 1850 the sum of 184l. 9s. 4 ½ d. was
expended on the circulation of Tracts. There were circulated during this
period 130,464 Tracts. The total number which was circulated from Nov.
19, 1840 up to May 26, 1850 amounted to 294,128.

As the Missionary department was considerably enlarged during these two
years, so the Tract Department also increased to nearly three times the
extent that it was during the former periods, for which I desire to be
grateful to the Lord, and I rejoice in it as a means by which the Lord
may be pleased to do much good; indeed already we can say, we are not
without fruit.

Besides English Tracts, we circulated many in German and French, also
some in Welsh, and a few hundreds in Portuguese and Italian.

On May 26, 1848, there were 122 Orphans in the four Orphan-Houses in
Wilson Street, Bristol. There were admitted, before the New Orphan-House
was opened, 9 fresh Orphans, making 131 in all. Of these, however, one
was taken by her relatives to Australia, to which they emigrated, and
wished her to accompany them. Three were sent to their relatives till
they might be cured, on account of such diseases as made them unfit to
be with other children. Two fell asleep in Jesus as decided believers,
of whom the one had been several years in the house and converted some
months before her death. The other had been only six months under our
care, when she died. Almost immediately after her admission she was
found to be in consumption, but the Lord allowed us the joy of winning
her soul for Him. Two girls were sent out to service, both as believers.
And four boys and one girl were apprenticed. The actual number,
therefore, of Orphans who were removed from the four rented
Orphan-Houses in Wilson Street, Bristol, on June 18th, 19th, 20th, and
21st, 1849, into the New Orphan-House on Ashley Down, Bristol, was 118.
Some of these children had been received when the first and second
Orphan-Houses in Wilson Street were opened, and had therefore been with
us, at the time of our removal, more than twelve years, and they
remained several years afterwards, for we keep them as long as it
appears to us good for them, irrespective of expense. Thus we have the
joy of seeing very delicate and sickly little children grow up and
become healthy young men and women, whilst otherwise, humanly speaking,
they might never have been reared, or, at all events have been sickly
all their lives for want of a healthy place of abode, of cleanliness, or
a sufficient quantity of wholesome and nourishing food. But especially
we have in this way the great joy of seeing many of these Orphans
brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, through the blessing which
God grants to our training them up in His fear from their earliest days.
It is never with me a question how much money each child costs, through
being retained so long, but only that bodily, mentally, and spiritually
they may be benefited through our care. To make them useful for time,
and to win their souls for the Lord, are our great aims concerning
them.

After the New Orphan-House had been opened, and the 118 Orphans from
Wilson Street, with their teachers and other overseers admitted into it,
I did not at once receive fresh Orphans; but, in order that all the
necessary regulations of the new establishment might be properly made,
and especially, in order that I myself might first learn what was the
best way of regulating it, we waited five weeks before the reception of
fresh Orphans. On July 24th, 1849, this commenced, and from that time up
to May 26, 1850, altogether one hundred and seventy Orphans were
received, from ten months old and upwards, so that on May 26, 1850,
there would have been 288 Orphans in the New Orphan-House, including the
118 removed into it from Wilson Street, had there been no changes. But
of this number two young children died, two Orphans were taken back by
their relatives, who were by that time able to provide for them. One boy
was sent back to his relations, partly on account of epileptic fits, and
partly on account of oft-repeated great disobedience, in order that we
might thus make an example of him for the benefit of the rest. Three
boys were sent to their relatives, as ready to be apprenticed, four boys
were apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, and provided with an
outfit accordingly; and one girl was fitted out and sent to service.

There were, therefore, on May 26, 1850, only Two Hundred and
Seventy-five Orphans in the New Orphan-House; and with the teachers,
overseers, nurses, and indoor and out-door servants, &c., the whole
number of persons connected with the establishment was Three Hundred and
Eight. The total number of Orphans, who were under our care from April
1836, up to May 26, 1850, was Four Hundred and Forty-three.

I notice further the following points in connexion with the New
Orphan-House.

1. Without any sectarian distinction whatever, and without favour or
partiality, Orphans are received. There is no interest whatever required
to get a child admitted, nor is it expected that a certain sum be paid
with the Orphans. Three things only are requisite: a, that the children
have been lawfully begotten; b, that they be bereaved of both parents by
death; and c, that they be in destitute circumstances. Respecting these
three points strict investigation is made, and it is expected that each
of them be proved by proper documents; but that having been done,
children may be admitted from any place, provided there is nothing
peculiar in the case that would make them unsuitable inmates for the
establishment.--I particularly request, that persons will kindly
refrain from applying for children, except they are bereaved of both
parents, as I can not receive them, if only bereaved of one; for this
establishment has been from the beginning, only for destitute children
who have neither father nor mother, and there can be no exceptions
made.

2. The attention of the reader is called to the name of the Orphan
Establishment. It is called the "New Orphan-House." I particularly
request that the friends of the Institution will use this name and
earnestly beg, in order to avoid mistake, that it may not be called the
"Orphan Asylum," as there is about half a mile from the spot, where the
"New Orphan-House" has been erected, another charitable establishment,
which has been for many years in existence, called the "Female Orphan
Asylum." But most of all I earnestly request, that the New Orphan-House
be not called "Mr. Muller's Orphan-House." I have now and then been
pained by observing that this appellation has been given to it. I trust
that none, who recognise the finger of God in this work, will be sinning
against Him by giving to me any measure of that honour, which so
manifestly and altogether is only due to Him. The Lord led me to this
work. He gave me faith for it. He sustained my faith for it to the end.
He provided the means. He remarkably helped me through one difficulty
after the other. Had He not upheld me in the midst of them all, I should
have been surely overwhelmed by them. Therefore, by His help, I will not
sin by taking even in the smallest degree that honour to myself, which
entirely belongs to Him; and let none be sinning, by giving the least
degree of this honour to me, or admiring me, instead of honouring and
admiring the Lord.

3. The New Orphan-House was placed in the hands of eleven trustees,
chosen by me. The deeds were enrolled in Chancery.

4. The New Orphan-House is fitted up for the accommodation of 140 Orphan
Girls above seven years of age, 80 Orphan Boys above seven years, and 80
male and female Orphans from their earliest days, till they are about
seven or eight years of age. The infants, after having passed the age of
seven or eight years, are removed into the different departments for
older boys and girls.

5. The New Orphan-House is open to visitors every Wednesday afternoon;
but the arrangements of the establishment make it needful, that it
should be shown only at that time. No exceptions can be made.--The
first party of visitors is shown through the House at half-past two
o'clock precisely, God permitting the second at three o'clock; and,
should there be need for it, the third and last party at half-past three
o'clock.--As it takes at least one hour and a half to see the whole
establishment, it is requested that visitors will be pleased to make
their arrangements accordingly, before they come, as it would be
inconvenient, should one or the other leave, before the whole party has
seen the House.--From March 1st to Nov. 1st there may be three
parties shown through the House every Wednesday afternoon; but from Nov.
1st to March 1st only two parties can be accommodated, on account of the
shortness of the days.

6. Persons who desire to make application for the admission of Orphans
are requested to write to me and address the letter to my house, No. 21,
Paul Street, Kingsdown, Bristol.

7. Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 33,868l. 11s. 1 ¼ d. was given to me for the Orphans, as the
result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work up to May 26,
1850.--It may be also interesting to the reader to know that the
total amount, which was given as free contributions, for the other
objects, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1850, amounted
to 10,531l. 3s. 3 ¾ d.; and that which came in by the sale of Bibles
and Tracts, and by the payments of the children in the schools, up to
May 26, 1850, amounted to 2,707l. 9s. 3 ½ d.--Besides this also a
great variety and number of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions,
&c., were given for the use of the Orphans.

8. The total of the current expenses for the Orphans from May 26, 1848,
to May 26, 1849, was 1,559l. 6s. 9d., and the total of the current
expenses for them from May 26, 1849, to May 26, 1850, was only 2,665l.
13s. 2 ¾ d., i.e. only about Eleven Hundred Pounds more than the
previous year. To avoid misunderstanding, I would request the reader to
keep in mind that, though there were above 300 persons connected with
the New Orphan-House, on May 26, 1850, and only about 130 in the rented
Orphan Houses in Wilson Street, yet above three weeks of the second year
the children were still in Wilson Street, and five weeks afterwards we
had only those children who came from Wilson Street into the New
Orphan-House; and even when we began to receive fresh Orphans, they came
in only four, five, six, seven, or eight a-week, so that only by little
and little our expenses increased.--It is also needful, in order to
have a correct view of the expenses connected with the Orphans, to take
into account the presents in rice, bread, coals, calico, print, shoes,
&c., worth about 200l., which were given during these two years.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, from May 26, 1848, to
May 26, 1850.

Dec. 31, 1848. During this year the Lord was pleased to give me—

1. By anonymous offerings in money, put
up in paper, directed to me, and put
into the boxes for the poor saints or
the rent, at the two chapels. . . . . £156 7 1

2. By presents in money, from believers
in Bristol, not given anonymously . . . . 157 14 6

3. By presents in money, from believers
not residing in Bristol . . . 145 0 0

4. By presents in provisions, clothes, etc.,
from believers in and out of Bristol,
worth to us at least . . . . 15 16 0

--------

£474 17 7

To this is again to be added, for this year also, as before stated, the
free education of my daughter at a boarding school, worth at least 50l.

Dec. 31, 1849. The Lord sent me during this year—

1. By anonymous offerings in money,
through the boxes in the two chapels . . . . . £149 14 9

2. By presents in money from believers in
Bristol, not given anonymously . . 101 3 0

3. By presents in money, from believers
not residing in Bristol . . . 158 19 7

4. By presents in articles, worth at least . 3 5 0

-------

£413 2 4

Full account of the reasons which led me to the enlargement of the
Orphan work, so that One Thousand Orphans might be provided for.

Having written down at full length the exercises of my mind respecting
this deeply important step, I give them here, in the form of a journal,
as recorded at the time.

Dec. 5, 1850. It is now sixteen years and nine months this evening,
since I began the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad.
This Institution was in its beginning exceedingly small. Now it is so
large, that I have not only disbursed, since its commencement, about
Fifty Thousand Pounds sterling, but the current expenses, after the rate
of the last months, amount to above £6,000 a year. I did "open my mouth
wide," this very evening fifteen years ago, and the Lord has filled it.
The New Orphan-House is now inhabited by 300 Orphans; and there are
altogether 335 persons connected with it. My labour is abundant. The
separation from my dear wife and child great, on account of my being the
greater part of the day at the New Orphan-House; sometimes also by
night. But notwithstanding all this, I have again and again thought
about labouring more than ever in serving poor Orphans. Within the last
ten days this matter has much occupied my mind, and for the last five
days I have had much prayer about it. It has passed through my mind to
build another Orphan-House, large enough for Seven Hundred Orphans, so
that I might be able to care for One Thousand altogether. The points
which have led me to this thought are: 1, The many distressing cases of
children, bereaved of both parents, who have no helper. I have received
207 Orphans within the last sixteen months, and have now 78 waiting for
admission, without having vacancies for any. I had about 60 children
waiting for admission about sixteen months since, so about 230 children
have been applied for within these sixteen months. But, humanly
speaking, for the next sixteen months the number of applications will be
far greater, as the work is now so much more widely known; except it be
that persons may hear that the New Orphan-House is quite full, and on
that account may consider it useless to apply. 2, The constitution of
most other charitable Institutions for Orphans makes the admission of a
really destitute Orphan, i.e. a child bereaved of both parents, and
without an influential friend, very difficult, if not hopeless; for
admission by means of the votes of donors precludes really poor persons
from having, in most instances, the benefit of these Institutions, as
they cannot give the time nor expend the money necessary for obtaining
such votes. I have myself seen that certain candidates had several
thousand votes. The necessity of this arrangement being continued may be
much regretted by many who are connected with such Institutions, but
they have no power to alter it. In our case nothing is needed but
application to me; and the very poorest person, without influence,
without friends, without any expense, no matter where he lives, or of
whatever religious denomination, who applies for children born in lawful
wedlock, bereaved of both parents, and in destitute circumstances, may
procure their admission. Now as the new Poor-law is against giving
relief to relatives for Orphan children out of the Poor Houses; and as
there is such difficulty for really poor people to get their Orphan
relatives admitted into ordinary Orphan Establishments; I feel myself
particularly called upon to be the Friend of the Orphan, by making an
easy way for admission, provided it is really a destitute case. 3, The
confidence which God has caused thousands of His children to repose in
me, calls upon me to make use of it to the utmost of my power, and to
seek yet more largely to be their almoner. 4, The experience which I
have had in this service now for fifteen years, during which time I have
gone from the smallest commencement of the work to having at present 300
Orphans under my care, calls upon me to make use of this my experience
to the utmost. No member of a committee, no president of a Society,
could possibly have the same experience, except he himself had
practically been engaged in such a work for a number of years, as I have
been. 5, This very experience makes things light to me, under God's
help, which were difficult formerly, and which would be very difficult
now to many; may I not therefore proceed still further? 6, If 700 more
young souls could be brought under regular godly training, (and their
number would be renewed from time to time,) what blessed service for the
kingdom of Christ, and what profitable expenditure of labour too, with
the blessing of God, even for this realm in a civil and moral point of
view! 7, But that which outweighs every one of these six reasons, is
lastly this: I began this Orphan Work fifteen years ago for the very
purpose of illustrating to the world and to the church that there is
verily a God in heaven who hears prayer; that God is the living God.
(See fully about this in "Narrative of the Lord's dealings with George
Muller," under the reasons why I began the Orphan Work in 1835, 1st
Part, page 143-146 of the Seventh Edition.) Now this last object is the
more fully accomplished the larger the work is, provided I am helped in
obtaining the means simply through prayer and faith.

But whilst such thoughts have passed through my mind, there are others
of another character. For instance, 1, I have already an abundance of
work. 2, My dear wife has already an abundance of work. Her whole time,
with little intermission (except for prayer and reading of the Word of
God) is occupied directly or indirectly about the Orphans. 3, Am I not
undertaking too much for my bodily strength and mental powers, by
thinking about another Orphan-House? 4, Am I not going beyond the
measure of my faith in thinking about enlarging the work so as to double
or treble it? 5, Is not this a delusion of Satan, an attempt to cast me
down altogether from my sphere of usefulness, by making me go beyond my
measure? 6, Is it not also, perhaps, a snare to puff me up, by
attempting to build a very large Orphan-House?

Under these circumstances I can only pray that the Lord in his tender
mercy would not allow Satan to gain an advantage over me. By the grace
of God my heart says: Lord if I could be sure that it is Thy will, that
I should go forward in this matter, I would do so cheerfully; and, on
the other hand, if I could be sure, that these are vain, foolish, proud
thoughts, that they are not from Thee, I would, by Thy grace, hate them,
and entirely put them aside.

My hope is in God; He will help and teach me. Judging, however, from His
former dealings with me, it would not be a strange thing to me, nor
surprising, if He called me to labour yet still more largely in this
way.

The thoughts about enlarging the Orphan Work have not arisen on account
of an abundance of money having lately come in; for I have had of late
to wait for about seven weeks upon God, whilst little, very little
comparatively, came in, i.e., about four times as much was going out as
came in; and, had not the Lord previously sent me large sums, we should
have been distressed indeed.

Lord! How can Thy servant know Thy will in this matter? Wilt Thou be
pleased to teach him!

Dec. 11, 1850. During the last six days, since writing the above, I have
been, day after day, waiting upon God concerning this matter. It has
generally been more or less all the day on my heart. When I have been
awake at night, it has not been far from my thoughts. Yet all this
without the least excitement I am perfectly calm and quiet respecting
it. My soul would be rejoiced to go forward in this service, could I be
sure that the Lord would have me to do so; for then, notwithstanding the
numberless difficulties, all would be well, and His name would be
magnified.

On the other hand, were. I assured that the Lord would have me to be
satisfied with my present sphere of service, and that I should not pray
about enlarging the work, by His grace I could, without an effort,
cheerfully yield to it; for He has brought me into such a state of
heart, that I only desire to please Him in this matter. Moreover,
hitherto I have not spoken about this thing even to my beloved wife, the
sharer of my joys, sorrows and labours for more than twenty years; nor
is it likely that I shall do so for some time to come: for I prefer
quietly to wait on the Lord, without conversing on this subject, in
order that thus I may be kept the more easily, by His blessing, from
being influenced by things from without. The burden of my prayer
concerning this matter is, that the Lord would not allow me to make a
mistake, and that He would teach me His will. As to outward things, I
have had nothing to encourage me during these six days, but the very
reverse; for the income, for the various objects of the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, has been unusually small,
only 6l. 14s. altogether, while the outgoings have been 138l. 11s. 7d.
But all this would not weigh the least with me, could I be quite sure
that the Lord would have me to go forward.

The especial burden of my prayer therefore is, that God would be pleased
to teach me His will. My mind has also been especially pondering, how I
could know His will satisfactorily concerning this particular. Sure I
am, that I shall be taught. I therefore desire patiently to wait for the
Lord's time, when He shall be pleased to shine on my path concerning
this point.

Dec. 26. Fifteen days have elapsed since I wrote the preceding
paragraph. Every day since then I have continued to pray about this
matter, and that with a goodly measure of earnestness, by the help of
God. There has passed scarcely an hour during these days, in which,
whilst awake, this matter has not been more or less before me. But all
without even a shadow of excitement. I converse with no one about it.
Hitherto have I not even done so with my dear wife. From this I refrain
still, and deal with God alone about the matter, in order that no
outward influence, and no outward excitement ay keep me from attaining
unto a clear discovery of His will. I have the fullest and most peaceful
assurance, that He will clearly show me His will. This evening I have
had again an especial solemn season for prayer, to seek to know the will
of God. But whilst I continue to entreat and beseech the Lord, that He
would not allow me to be deluded in this business, I may say I have
scarcely any doubt remaining on my mind as to what will be the issue,
even that I should go forward in this matter. As this, however, is one
of the most momentous steps that I have ever taken, I judge that I
cannot go about this matter with too much caution, prayerfulness, and
deliberation. I am in no hurry about it. I could wait for years, by
God's grace, were this His will, before even taking one single step
towards this thing, or even speaking to any one about it; and, on the
other hand, I would set to work tomorrow, were the Lord to bid me do so.
This calmness of mind, this having no will of my own in the matter, this
only wishing to tease my Heavenly Father in it, this only seeking His
and not my honour in it; this state of heart, I say, is the fullest
assurance to me that my heart is not under a fleshly excitement, and
that, if I am helped thus to go on, I shall know the will of God to the
full. But, while. I write thus, I cannot but add at the same time, that
I do crave the honour and the glorious privilege to be more and more
used by the Lord. I have served Satan much in my younger years, and
desire now with all my might to serve God, during the remaining days of
my earthly pilgrimage. I am forty-five years and three months old. Every
day decreases the number of days that I have to stay on earth. I
therefore desire with all my might to work. There are vast multitudes of
Orphans to be provided for. About five years ago, a brother in the Lord
told me he had seen in an official Report, that there were at that time
six thousand young Orphans in the prisons of England. My heart longs to
be instrumental in preventing such young Orphans from having to go to
prison. I desire to be used by the Lord as an instrument in providing
all the necessary temporal supplies, not only for the 300 now under my
care, but for 700 more. I desire to alleviate yet further the sufferings
of poor dying widows, when looking on their helpless Orphans, about to
be left behind. I desire yet further to assist poor persons to whom
destitute Orphans are left, and who are unable to provide for them. I
desire to be allowed to provide Scriptural Instruction for a thousand
Orphans; instead of doing so for 300. I desire to expound the Holy
Scriptures regularly to a thousand Orphans, instead of doing so to 300.
I desire that thus it may be yet more abundantly manifest that God is
still the hearer and answerer of prayer, and that He is the living God
now, as He ever was and ever will be, when He shall, simply in answer to
prayer, have condescended to provide me with a house for 700 Orphans,
and with means to support them. This last consideration is the most
important point in my mind. The Lord's honour is the principal point
with me in this whole matter; and just because that is the case, if He
would be more glorified by my not going forward in this business, I
should, by His grace, be perfectly content to give up all thoughts about
another Orphan-House. Surely in such a state of mind, obtained by the
Holy Spirit, Thou, O my Heavenly Father, wilt not suffer Thy child to be
mistaken, much less to be deluded! By the help of God I shall continue
further, day by day, to wait upon Him in prayer concerning this thing,
till He shall bid me act.

Jan. 2, 1851. A week ago I wrote the preceding paragraph. During this
week I have still been helped, day by day, and more than once every day,
to seek the guidance of the Lord about another Orphan-House. The burden
of my prayer has still been, that He, in His great mercy, would keep me
from making a mistake. During the last week the Book of Proverbs has
come in the course of my Scripture reading, and my heart has been
refreshed, in reference to this subject, by the following passages:
"Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own
understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct thy
paths." Prov. iii. 5, 6. By the grace of God I do acknowledge the Lord
in my ways, and in this thing in particular; I have therefore the
comfortable assurance that He will direct my paths concerning this part
of my service, as to whether I shall be occupied in it or not. Further:
"The integrity of the upright shall preserve them; but the perverseness
of fools shall destroy them." Prov. xi. 3. By the grace of God I am
upright in this business. My honest purpose is to get glory to God.
Therefore. I expect to be guided aright. Further, "Commit thy works unto
the Lord and thy thoughts shall be established." Prov. xvi. 8. I do
commit my works unto the Lord, and therefore expect that my thoughts
will be established.--My heart is more and more coming to a calm,
quiet, and settled assurance, that the Lord will condescend to use me
yet further in the Orphan Work. Here, Lord, is Thy servant!

Jan. 14. Twelve days have passed away since I wrote the last paragraph.
I have still, day by day, been enabled to wait upon the Lord with
reference to enlarging the Orphan Work, and have been, during the whole
of this period also, in perfect peace, which is the result of seeking in
this thing only the Lord's honour and the temporal and spiritual
benefit of my fellowmen. Without an effort could I, by His grace, put
aside all thoughts about this whole affair, if only assured that it is
the will of God I should do so; and, on the other hand, would at once go
forward, if He would have it to be so. I have still kept this matter
entirely to myself. Though it is now about seven weeks, since day by
day, more or less, my mind has been exercised about it, and since I have
daily prayed concerning it; yet not one human being knows of it. As yet
I have not mentioned it even to my dear wife, in order that thus, by
quietly waiting upon the Lord, I might not be influenced by what might
be said to me on the subject. This evening has been particularly set
apart for prayer, beseeching the Lord once more, not to allow me to be
mistaken in this thing, and much less to be deluded by the Devil. I have
also sought to let all the reasons against building another
Orphan-House, and all the reasons for doing so, pass before my mind; and
now, for the sake of clearness and definiteness, write them down.

Reasons against establishing another Orphan-House for

Seven Hundred Orphans.

1. Would not this be going beyond my measure spiritually? according to
that word: "For I say through the grace given unto me, to every man that
is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to
think; but to think soberly, according as God has dealt to every man the
measure of faith." Rom. xii. 3.

Answer: If the Lord were to leave me to myself, the tenth part of the
difficulties and trials, which befall me now in connexion with the
various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and
Abroad, would be enough to overwhelm me; but, whilst He is pleased to
sustain me, I am able day by day to pass on peacefully, and am carried
through one difficulty after the other: and thus, by God's help, even
with my present measure of faith, if continued to me, should be enabled
to bear up under other difficulties and trials; but I look for an
increase of faith with every fresh difficulty, through which the Lord is
pleased to help me.

2. Would it not be going beyond my measure naturally with reference to
mental and bodily strength? Answer: Of all the objections against
establishing another Orphan-House, there is none that weighs more with
me than this; I might say, it is the only real difficulty. This,
however, too, I am enabled to put aside and to overcome thus: By
husbanding my strength, by great order, by regular habits, by lightening
the work as much as possible, and by using every help that I can, I have
been enabled to get through a vast quantity of work. My immense
correspondence of about 3000 letters a-year, I have been enabled to
accomplish without a secretary. The entire management and direction, and
the whole vast correspondence of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution
has devolved upon myself alone these sixteen years and ten months, and I
have been thinking that, by seeking for an efficient secretary, an
efficient clerk, and an inspector of the schools, I might, with God's
help, accomplish yet more, though much of what I have been doing
hitherto would need to be done by others. There have been several other
arrangements brought before my mind, since I have been exercised about
this matter, whereby, with the blessing of God, the work might be
lightened. I should certainly need efficient helpers to carry out the
plans before me; but with such, I, as director, might be enabled, by
God's help, to accomplish yet more.

3. There must be a limit to my work and service. Answer: That is true,
and if I were quite sure that the present state of the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution were to be the limit, I would at once lay aside
this thing; but I am not sure that I am come as yet to God's limit.
All these sixteen years and ten months, the work has been constantly
progressing, and the Lord has helped me continually; and now my mind is
just in the same way exercised, as when fifteen years ago I began the
Orphan Work, and as when thirteen years ago it was enlarged, and as when
seven years and nine months since it was still further enlarged, and as
when five years and two months since I was led to decide on building the
New Orphan-House. Under these circumstances, having been helped through
all these difficulties, and seeing such a vast field of usefulness
before me, and having so many applications for the admission of very
destitute Orphans, I long to be used still further, and cannot say that
as yet the Lord has brought me to His limit.

4. Is it not like "tempting God," to think of building another
Orphan-House for seven hundred more orphans? Answer: "Tempting God"
means, according to the Holy Scriptures, to limit Him in any of His
attributes by His grace I do not wish to limit His power or His
willingness, to give to me, His poor servant, simply in answer to
prayer, all the means, and every other help and blessing which I shall
need to build another large Orphan-House.

5. You will not get the means for building and fitting up so large an
Orphan-House; and, even if you did, how will you, at the same time, get
the means for carrying on the work, which already exists? Answer:
Looking at the matter naturally, this is indeed a weighty objection.

The New Orphan-House, with its 300 Orphans only, cost about fifteen
thousand pounds to build and to fit up and furnish, and still the
expenses are not all met even now. It will in all probability cost
several hundred pounds yet. And this large sum was needed, though the
style of the building is most simple, and though the field in which it
was built was comparatively cheap. After this rate, a building to
accommodate seven hundred Orphans, with the necessary ground attached to
it for the cultivation of the vegetables used in the Institution, could
not be less than thirty-five thousand pounds. Now, looking at it
naturally, where is this great sum to come from? Though I looked at all
my friends who have given hitherto, and several have done so very
liberally, yet there is no natural prospect whatever of receiving this
amount; especially if it be kept in mind that six or seven thousand
pounds besides, every year, would be needed for carrying on that which
is already in existence. I might, therefore, well tremble, looking at
the matter naturally, and say, I shall never have the money for this
intended Orphan-House for 700 children; for where is this large sum of
thirty-five thousand pounds to come from? And even if I were to get the
money, will not persons, in giving means for such a Building-Fund, take
it away from what they might have given me for carrying on the work
which exists already? But whilst thus, naturally, there is no hope of
succeeding, I am not in the least discouraged spiritually; for by faith
in the living God I say this: He has the power to give me this
thirty-five thousand pounds, and much more, were it needed: and He has
the power, in the mean time., to give me also all the large sums
required, week after week, for meeting the current expenses for the
present state of the work. Moreover, I delight in the greatness of the
difficulty, as it respects the large sum needed for building and fitting
up such an Establishment; for I desire to be most fully assured, from
the very outset, that I go forward in this matter according to the
Lord's bidding. If so, He will give me the means; if not, I shall not
have them. Nor do I mean to apply to any one personally for pecuniary
help, but purpose to give myself to prayer for means, as heretofore.

6. Suppose now, you were even to succeed in getting this large Orphan
House built, how will you be able to provide for 700 other Orphans?
Answer: There is much weight in this objection, looking at it naturally.
I am too much a man of business, and too much a person of calm, quiet,
cool calculation, not to feel its force. And indeed, were I only to look
at the thing naturally, I should at once be ready to own that I am going
too far; for the increase of expenditure for the support of these 700
other Orphans could not be less than eight thousand pounds a-year more,
so that the current expenses of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution,
reckoning its present state, and including those eight thousand pounds,
would be about fifteen thousand pounds a-year. Now, I am free to own,
that I have no human prospect of obtaining such a sum year by year. But
while matters stand thus, looking at them naturally, I see no difficulty
at all in them spiritually. If according to the will of God I am enabled
to go about this intended second Orphan House; and if, with His help, I
shall be enabled to finish it; He will surely provide for those who are
gathered together in it, as long as He shall be pleased to enable me to
trust in Him for supplies. And here I look back upon the way in which
the Lord has led me and dealt with me. When, about seventeen years ago,
I took up, in dependence upon the living God for means, two Charity
Schools, with which the Scriptural Knowledge Institution commenced (and
this involved an expense of less than one hundred pounds a-year), I had
no certain prospect of being able to meet even that small sum; but God
so helped me, that I had shortly six Charity Schools. He helped me then
also, and enabled me to meet all their expenses. When, fifteen years
ago, I began the Orphan Work, which was connected with far heavier
expenses, I had still less prospect, according to natural reason, of
being able to meet them; but I trusted in God, and He helped me, and He
not only enabled me to meet the current expenses for thirty Orphans in
the first house rented for them, but also soon to open another for
thirty-six more, and to meet all those expenses; for as I had begun in
faith in the living God, and not by putting my trust in my brethren in
Christ, so I was not confounded. After I had gone on some time with
these Orphans in the two rented houses, about thirteen years ago the
Lord was pleased greatly to encourage me and to increase my faith by a
donation of 500l. for the Orphans; for up to that period I had never
received more than One Hundred Pounds at once. But this kind donor, a
stranger to me up to that time, suggested to me the propriety of
investing this sum and using only the interest of it, as I could not
expect to have the Orphans supported for a continuance in the way they
had been till then; for that such Institutions must depend upon regular
subscriptions or funded property, otherwise they could not go on. As,
however, this was only a friendly hint, and no condition under which the
money was given, I took this 500l. towards fitting up a third house for
the reception of thirty more Orphans. From that time the work has been
increasing more and more, till it came to what it is at present. Now,
suppose I had said, seventeen years ago, looking at matters according to
natural reason, "the two Charity Schools are enough, I must not go any
further;" then the work would have stopped there. Or, if I had had a
little more trust in my exertions or my friends, I might have taken at
the utmost one or two steps further. Instead of this, however, I looked
in no degree whatever at things according to my natural fallen reason,
and trusted not in the circle of my Christian friends, but in the living
God; and the result has been, that there have been since 1834 ten
thousand souls under our instruction in the various Day Schools, Sunday
Schools and Adult Schools; several hundred Orphans have been brought up,
and many of them from their very tenderest infancy; several hundred
thousand tracts and many thousand copies of the Word of God have been
circulated; about forty preachers of the Gospel at Home and Abroad have
been, for several years, assisted in connection with the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution; and a house has been built and fitted up for the
accommodation of 300 destitute Orphans, each of whom has neither father
nor mother. How blessed therefore it is to trust in God, and in Him
alone, and not in circumstances nor friends There is, however, one thing
which I must record here, because it has taken place since I last wrote
in my journal on this subject on January 2nd. It is this. During these
twelve days I have received for the various objects of the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution in smaller donations 64l. 15s. 6 ½ d., also a
donation of 150l. and one of 3000l. Is not this a plain proof that God
is both able and willing to help simply in answer to prayer? Is not
human reason confounded by such instances? When I first began to write
these exercises of my mind about another Orphan House, I knew not that
on January 4th I should receive a donation of 3000l., yet I was fully
assured that God was able to support one thousand Orphans as easily as
He did the thirty whom I first received in a rented house. Does He not,
however, tell me by all this: Go forward, my servant, and I will help
thee?

7. But it might be said, suppose you were able by prayer to obtain this
large sum for building a house for seven hundred other Orphans; and
suppose you were able to provide for them during your lifetime, what
would become of this Institution after your death? Answer: I am quite
familiar with this objection, having heard it many times as a reason
against the way of obtaining the means for the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution, simply by trusting in God, without any funded property, and
without looking to regular subscribers; but my reply is this. My
business is, with all my might to serve my own generation; in doing so I
shall best serve the next generation, should the Lord Jesus tarry. Soon
He may come again but, if He tarry, and I have to fall asleep before His
return, I shall not have been altogether without profit to the
generation to come, were the Lord only to enable me to serve my own
generation. Suppose this objection were a sound one, I ought never to
have commenced the Orphan. Work at all, for fear of what might become of
it after my death, and thus all the hundreds of destitute children
without father and mother, whom the Lord has allowed me to care for,
during the last fifteen years, would not have been taken up by me. The
same argument was again and again used to Franké, my esteemed
countryman, who at Hallé, in Prussia, commenced about A.D. 1696, the
largest charitable establishment for poor children that, as far as I
know, exists in the world. He trusted in God alone. He went on trusting
in God alone. And God helped him throughout abundantly. Simply by trust
in the living God the Institutions, resembling a large street rather
than a house, were erected, and about two thousand children instructed
in them. For about thirty years all was going on under his own eye,
until 1727, when it pleased God to take His servant to Himself. At his
death these Institutions were directed by his truly pious son-in-law. It
is true that, at the latter part of the last century, and during the
first part of the present, there was little real vital godliness in
these Institutions; still they were a temporal blessing to many tens of
thousands of young persons even then. So then for several tens of years
they were carried on in a truly Godly way, after Franké's death, and
when afterwards there was but little real, vital godliness found in
these schools, yet tens of thousands of children were benefited at least
for this life. Now these Institutions have existed already 150 years,
and are in existence still: and, if the Lord Jesus tarry, are likely,
humanly speaking, to exist hereafter, as they have existed hitherto.
Suppose then, that dear man of God, A. H. Franké, had listened to the
suggestions of unbelief, and said, I must not undertake this work, for
what will become of it after my death, then all the blessing which
spiritually resulted from it to thousands, and all the temporal benefits
which have resulted from it to hundreds of thousands, would have been
lost. I add, however, this. The New Orphan House has been placed in the
hands of eleven trustees, and has been properly enrolled in Chancery,
and so also, should God condescend to honour me further in building for
Him this intended house for 700 Orphans, it would likewise be placed in
the hands of trustees and enrolled in Chancery. One word in conclusion
on this subject: let every one take heed lest, in caring about what will
become of the next generation, he forget to serve his own generation.
The latter each one should seek to do with his might, and thus it should
be with each succeeding generation; then, though we be dead, yet should
we be speaking. A. H. Franké is long since gone to his rest, but he
spoke to my soul in 1826, and he is speaking to my soul now; and to his
example I am greatly indebted for having been stirred up to care about
poor children in general, and about poor Orphans in particular.

8. The last objection which has occurred to my own mind is, that by
building another Orphan House, I should be in danger of being lifted up.
Answer: I should be in danger of it indeed, and am in great danger, even
were I not in the least degree to go forward. Yea, the tenth part of the
honour which the Lord has condescended to bestow upon me, and the tenth
part of service with which He has been pleased to intrust me, would be
enough, if I were left to myself, exceedingly to puff me up. I cannot
say that hitherto the Lord has kept me humble; but I can say, that
hitherto He has given me a hearty desire to give to Him all the glory,
and to consider it a great condescension on His part that He has been
pleased to use me as an instrument in His service. I do not see,
therefore, that fear of being lifted up ought to keep me from going
forward in this work; but that I have rather to beseech the Lord that He
would be pleased to give me a lowly mind, and never suffer me to rob Him
of the glory which is due to Him alone.

Jan. 25. Great pressure of work has kept me from going on writing my
reasons for establishing another Orphan-House till now, but being more
and more convinced that it is of God I should do so, I now proceed in
writing.

Reasons for establishing another Orphan House for Seven Hundred
Orphans.

1. The many applications for the admission of destitute Orphans, which
continue to be made, I consider as a call from God upon me, to do all
that is in my power to provide a Home and Scriptural Education for a
still greater number of Orphans. Nothing but positive inability to go
forward ought to keep me standing still, whilst I have almost daily
fresh entreaties to receive Orphans. Since I began writings on this
subject in my journal, thirty more Orphans have been applied for, from
two years old and upwards. I cannot refuse to help, as long as I see a
door open, and opened by God, as I consider, to help them.

2. The moral state of the Poorhouses greatly influences me to go
forward. I have heard it again and again, from good authority, that
children, placed in the Unions, are corrupted, on account of the
children of vagrants, and other very bad young people who are in such
places; so that many poor relatives of Orphans, though unable to provide
for them, cannot bear the idea of their going there, lest they should be
corrupted. I therefore judge that, even for the sake of keeping Orphans
of poor yet respectable people from being obliged to mix with the
children of vagabonds, I ought to do, to my utmost power, all I can to
help them. For this reason, then, I purpose, in dependence upon the
living God, to go forward and to establish another Orphan House for
seven hundred destitute children, who are bereaved of both parents. When
writing thus about the Poorhouses, I do not wish it to be understood in
the way of reproof; for I know not how these matters could be altered;
but simply state the fact that thus it is.

3. In this purpose I am the more confirmed, since it is a fact, that the
Orphan Houses already in existence in the kingdom are by no means
sufficient to admit even the most deserving and distressing cases, and
far less all that it would be well to provide for. Moreover, there is
great difficulty connected with the admission of Orphans into most of
the ordinary Orphan Establishments, on account of the votes which must
be obtained, so that really needy persons have neither time nor money to
obtain them. Does not the fact that there were six thousand young
Orphans in the prisons of England about five years ago, call aloud for
an extension of Orphan Institutions? By God's help, I will do what I
can, to keep poor Orphans from prison.

4. In this purpose I am still further encouraged by the great help which
the Lord has hitherto given me in this blessed service. When I look at
the small beginning, and consider how the Lord has helped me now for
more than fifteen years in the Orphan work; and when I consider how He
has been pleased to help me through one great difficulty after another;
and when I consider, especially, how, as with an unseen hand, almost
against my will and former desires and thoughts, He has led me on from
one step to another, and has enlarged the work more and more: I say,
when I review all this, and compare with it my present exercise of mind,
I find the great help, the uninterrupted help, which the Lord has given
me for more than fifteen years, a great reason for going forward in this
work. And this, trusting in Him, I am resolved to do.

5. A further reason for going forward in this service I see in the
experience which I have had in it. From the smallest commencement up to
the present state of the establishment, with its 300 Orphans, all has
gone through my own hands. In the work itself I obtained the experience.
It has grown with the work. I have been the sole director of the work,
under God, from its smallest commencement. Now this is not an every day
case. No committee member of a society, no president or vice-president
of an institution, except they had been situated as myself, could have
this experience. Coupled with this is the measure of gift which the Lord
has been pleased to give me for such work, and for the exercise of which
I am responsible to Him. These things, in connexion with the former
reasons, it appears to me, are a call from God to go forward in a
greater degree than ever in this work.

6. The spiritual benefit of still more Orphans is another especial
reason, why I feel called to go forward. The Orphans, who have been
under my care hitherto, were almost all the children of parents who were
naturally weak in body, if not consumptive. The very fact of a child
being deprived of both parents when four, five, six, or seven years old,
shows that, except the parents lost their lives by casualty, they were
constitutionally weak. On this account young Orphans, generally
speaking, require particular care as to their health. In this respect I
desire to care for them; but there is more than that to be attended to.
I further heartily desire to keep them from the corrupting and
demoralizing effect of the lowest sort of children in the streets,
courts and Unions; but I desire more for them than mere decency and
morality. I desire that they should be useful members of society, and
that the prisons of the United Kingdom should not be filled with poor,
destitute, and homeless Orphans. We bring them up therefore in habits of
industry, and seek to instruct them in those things which are useful for
the life that now is; but I desire more than this for the Orphans. I
cannot be satisfied with anything concerning them short of this, that
their souls be won for the Lord. For this reason I long to have them
from their earliest days, yea, the younger the better, under my care,
that thus, under godly nurses and teachers, they may be brought up in
the fear of the Lord. Now as this is the chief and primary aim
concerning the dear Orphans, even the salvation of their souls through
faith in the Lord Jesus, I long to be more extensively used than
hitherto, even that I may have a thousand of them instead of three
hundred under my care.

7. But there is one point which weighs more strongly with me than even
the last mentioned one. It is this. When I began the Orphan Work more
than fifteen years ago, it was for the definite and especial purpose,
that, by means of it, the unconverted might see, through the answers of
prayer that I received in connection with it, that there is verily
reality in the things of God; and that the children of God might have
their faith strengthened by means of it, and be encouraged, in all
simplicity to deal with God under every circumstance, and trust in Him
at all times. But if this would be answered in a measure by the state in
which the Orphan Work has been in former times, and more so by what it
has been since the erection of the New Orphan House, it would be still
more so, by the blessing of God, by my going forward in it to a far
greater degree than before. This point, even the glory of God in the
manifestation of His readiness to hear prayer, has weighed especially
and supremely with me in purposing to enlarge the Orphan Work.

8. Lastly, I am peaceful and happy, spiritually, in the prospect of
enlarging the work, as on former occasions when I had to do so. This
weighs particularly with me as a reason for going forward. After all the
calm, quiet, prayerful consideration of the subject for about eight
weeks, I am peaceful and happy, spiritually, in the purpose of enlarging
the field. This, after all the heart searching which I have had, and the
daily prayer to be kept from delusion and mistake in this thing, and the
be-taking myself to the Word of God, would not be the case, I judge, had
not the Lord purposed to condescend to use me more than ever in this
service.

I, therefore, on the ground of the objections answered, and these eight
reasons for enlarging the work, come to the conclusion that it is the
will of the blessed God, that His poor and most unworthy servant should
yet more extensively serve Him in this work, which he is quite willing
to do.

Up to this day, January 25, 1851, I have not spoken to one human being
about it. As yet even my dear wife knows not about it. I purpose to keep
the matter still for some time entirely to myself, dealing with God
alone about it, in order that no outward excitement may be in the least
degree a stimulus to me. I still pray to be kept from mistake and
delusion in this thing, not that I think I am mistaken or deluded, quite
the reverse; but yet I would distrust myself and cling to God, to be
kept from mistakes and delusions.

January 31st. For several weeks past I have had no doubt that the Lord
would have me to serve Him in the erection and fitting up of another
Orphan-House for seven hundred Orphans, and I am quite decided on doing
so, with His help, and I am now quiet about it, not because I have the
least misgiving in my own mind, but because I know that it is most
suitable that I should still for some time continue to deal quietly with
God alone about it.

March 5th. Nearly five weeks have passed away since I wrote the last
paragraph, and my mind has not been once, during this time, even for a
moment, in uncertainty as to what I ought to do. It is now about fifteen
weeks since I have been especially praying about this subject, and three
months since. I began first to write on the subject in my journal, and
about ten weeks since I have had any doubt as to what is the will of the
Lord concerning this service. I believe that, altogether unworthy though
I am of this great honour, He will condescend to use me further and more
extensively than before in caring for destitute children who are
bereaved of both parents. And this I purpose to do.

April 5th. Another month has passed away, and my mind is just in the
same state as it was when I wrote in my journal on the subject on March
5th.

May 5th. One more month has passed away, and still my mind remains
quietly assured that, utterly unworthy though I am to be allowed to go
forward in this work, and great though the difficulties are, which must
be overcome, yet that it is the will of God I should serve Him in this
way. It is now this day five months since I first wrote on this subject
in my journal, and longer even than that since it has been before rue,
during which time I have day by day prayed concerning this matter.

May 24th. From the time that I began to write down the exercises of my
mind on Dec. 5th, 1850, till this day, ninety-two more Orphans have been
applied for, and seventy-eight were already waiting for admission
before. But this number increases rapidly as the work becomes more and
more known.

On the ground of what has been recorded above, I purpose to go forward
in this service, and to seek to build, to the praise and honour of the
living God, another Orphan-House, large enough to accommodate seven
hundred Orphans.

When I published these exercises of my mind, and made known my purpose
respecting the intended Orphan-House for 700 Orphans, in the Twelfth
Report of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, the following
particulars were added to what has been stated.

1. All this time, though now six months have elapsed since. I first
began to be exercised about this matter, I have never once been led to
ask the Lord for means for this work, but have only continued day by day
to seek guidance from Him as to whether I should undertake it or not.

2. The means requisite, to accomplish the building and fitting up of a
house, which shall be really suitable for my intended purposes, though
the building be quite simple, cannot be less than Thirty-Five Thousand
Pounds, including fifteen or twenty acres of land round the building for
cultivation by the spade, in order to obtain out of our own grounds all
the vegetables, which are so important to the health of the children.

3. I do not mean to begin the building until I have the means requisite
in hand, just as was the case with regard to the New Orphan-House. If
God will condescend to use me in building for Him another Orphan-House
(as I judge He will), He will give me the means for it. Now though I
have not on my mind any doubt left that it is His will I should do so;
yet there is one point still wanting for confirmation, and that is that
He will also furnish me, without personal application to any one, with
all the means requisite for this new part of my service. I the more need
also to my own soul this last of all the proofs that I have not been
mistaken, in order to have unquestionable assurance that, whatever
trials hereafter may be allowed to befall me in connexion with this
work, I did not at my own bidding and according to my own natural desire
undertake it, but that it was under the guidance of God. The greatness
of the sum required affords me a kind of secret joy; for the greater the
difficulty to be overcome, the more will it be seen to the glory of God,
how much can be done by prayer and faith; and also, because, when God
Himself overcomes our difficulties for us, we have, in this very fact,
the assurance that we are engaged in His work and not in our own.

4. It is intended to place this Orphan-House also, as was the New
Orphan-House, in the hands of godly Trustees.

5. Orphans from any part of the world, provided they speak English, if
bereaved of both parents, lawfully begotten, and in destitute
circumstances, are intended to be admitted, as is the ease now,
irrespective of any sectarian feeling or preference whatever. Neither
entrance money nor any particular interest will be required, in order to
obtain a ticket for the admission of destitute Orphans, bereaved of both
parents, as long as there is room.

6. Individuals who desire to contribute towards the Building Fund for
this intended Orphan-House for seven hundred destitute Orphans, are
requested to state that the donation is "for the Building Fund." Indeed
concerning all the donations for any part of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution for Home and Abroad, it is requested that the donors will
kindly state, for what they wish their donations to be applied; or to
say expressly that they leave the application of their donations to me,
as the various objects may more particularly need help.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund, sent in
answer to prayer, from May 26, 1850, to May 26, 1851.

At the commencement of this period it was my purpose to seek help from
the Lord that I might be able, in a still greater degree than before, to
assist brethren who labour in the Gospel, at Home and Abroad, in
dependence upon God for their temporal supplies, and to labour more than
ever in the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and of simple Gospel
Tracts. The following extracts from my journal will now show how kind
the Lord has been in answering my requests, and in furnishing me with
the means for carrying out the desire of my heart.

June 7, 1850. Today I have received 50l. for missions from a Brother
whose heart the Lord has inclined to spend, as a steward of God, a
second property, with which He has intrusted him.

June 10. Received 150l., the disposal of which was left to me. I took
half for the Orphans and half for these objects.

June 11. Received from C. W. 50l. for missions.--By these sums which,
besides smaller donations, came in within the first fifteen days of this
period, I was able to begin to carry out my purpose; and as the Lord
enabled me, without anxious reckoning, to go on giving out as He was
pleased to intrust me with means, so again He sent further supplies
before all was gone. It is a point of great importance in the divine
life, not to be anxiously reckoning about the morrow, nor dealing out
sparingly, on account of possible future wants, which never may come;
but to consider, that only the present moment to serve the Lord is
ours, and that the morrow may never come to us.

July 2. 170l. has come in today. The donor kindly gave me permission to
use this amount as might be most needed. I took therefore 80l. of it for
the Orphans, the other for these objects.

Of the various donations which came in for these objects, between July
2nd and Aug. 13th, I only mention, that I received on Aug. 5th a silver
salver, 2 silver table spoons, a silver sugar spoon, and a silver
mustard spoon; all to be sold for missionary purposes. On Aug. 13th a
Christian Friend gave me 50l., of which I took one half for missionary
operations and the other half for the Orphans, as the donation was left
at my disposal as most needed.

Aug. 15. Today I have received from the same donor, who sent me on June
7th 50l., another donation of 110l, of which he wishes me to apply 10l.
for the use of the Orphans and 100l. for missionary purposes. This day I
have also received a donation of 120l., of which I took half for the
Orphans, and half for these objects.--Several other small donations
came in on the following day.

Aug. 24. Have received from C. W. 30l., of which the donor kindly
intends 10l. for foreign missions, 10l. for the Orphans, and 10l. for my
own personal expenses. I have sent out already during this month 170l.
to Home and Foreign labourers, and the Lord continues to give me means
for this and all the other parts of the work.

Sept. 14. Received again 190l., of which I took half for the Orphans and
half for these objects.

Sept. 19. Today I received a registered letter from the donor referred
to under June 7th and Aug. 15th containing Four Hundred Pounds and these
words:

"Dear Brother,

Herewith I send you 400l., of which three parts are to be expended on
missionaries, the rest you may expend on the Orphans, if needed; else
the whole to be disposed of to the Lord's ministering servants. I
thank you for your prayers that I may not regret this step. Were the
Lord to come tomorrow, how glad I should be that the whole was thus sent
on before me! . . If yourself or dear brother Craik (to whom give my
love in Christ) are at all in need, scruple not to take five pounds
each.

Yours in the Lord Jesus,

* * * * *"

I took the whole amount for labourers in the word and doctrine. My soul
does magnify the Lord for His condescension in listening to my
supplications, and, in answer to them, sending me means, and thus
allowing me more and more to help missionary brethren. During the last
five weeks I have sent again to them about 300l., but I long to be more
than ever their servant. What the donor says about "the money going
before him," is in reference to his having now spent two properties for
the Lord.

Sept. 27. Still further abundant help. Received from a new donor 200l.,
which, being left at my disposal as most needed, I took of it 100l. for
the Orphans, and 100l. for these objects.

Oct. 9. The Lord condescends to use me more and more as His steward.
Today I have again received 200l., which might be used as most needed. I
have therefore taken of it 100l. for the Orphans, and the other half for
these objects.

Oct. 28. Since Oct. 9th many small donations have come in, chiefly for
missions; now today I received again 200l., of which I took one half for
the Orphans, and the other half for these objects. By these donations
(large and small) the Lord enables me to send more and more help to Home
and Foreign labourers. During the last seven weeks, only little,
comparatively, has come in for these objects, while several hundred
pounds have been expended; yet, through the rich abundance which the
Lord had sent me before, I have not only had no lack of means, but had
still about 300l. in hand, before this donation was received today.
Nevertheless it was very sweet to receive it as the fruit of earnest
prayer for several weeks, as so little, comparatively, had come in
during the last seven weeks.

Dec. 18. This evening was given to me 90l. As the donor stated in the
course of conversation, that he felt especially interested about those
brethren who labour in the Gospel in various countries, whom I seek to
assist, I took of this sum 60l. for that object, and 30l. for the
Orphans.

Jan. 4, 1851. This evening I received Three Thousand Pounds, of which I
took half for these objects, and half for the Orphans, as the disposal
of it was entirely left to me. I am thus enabled more and more to
enlarge the work, and to assist increasingly home and foreign labourers
in the Word. When I gave myself more particularly to this part of the
work, now about six years since, I had not the least human prospect of
being able to do so much; but the Lord has been pleased to condescend to
listen to my supplications on behalf of these brethren who trust in Him
for their temporal supplies. I am in this way also furnished with means,
on a larger scale than ever, to circulate copies of the Holy Scriptures
and simple Gospel Tracts, which was always of deep importance, but in
these days of increasing darkness more so than ever.

Jan. 11. A further rich supply. I have received 150l., of which I took
half for the Orphans and half for these objects, as the disposal of it
was left to me.

Feb. 24. The donor, who has spent two properties in the service of the
Lord, receiving a present of 100l., sent me today 50l. of it for
missions. This instance shows, that if we use the means with which the
Lord may intrust us, as stewards for Him, He will make us stewards over
more.

Since Feb. 1851, the donor just now referred to has come into the
possession of a third property, which likewise, as the two previous
ones, he has entirely spent for the Lord.

March 7. Exceedingly little, comparatively, has come in since Jan. 11th;
yet, as I had means, I expended them to the full degree in which it
appeared to me that the Lord pointed out openings, and, in the meantime,
I continued praying for more means. Now the Lord has again given much
encouragement for continuing to wait upon Him, by a donation of 200l.,
received today, of which the donor kindly wishes me to take 20l. for my
own personal expenses, and the 180l. to be used as may be most needed,
which sum I have divided between the Orphans and the other objects.

April 15. From C. W. 40l. for foreign missions.

April 17. Further supplies for missionary purposes. This evening 1 found
a letter containing a check for 50l., of which the donor intends one
half for missionary purposes, and the other for the Orphans.

April 30. Received 200l., of which I took half for the Orphans and half
for these objects. Besides the donations above referred to, of a larger
kind, I received for these objects more than two hundred other donations
in pence, shillings, pounds, five pounds, ten pounds, and upwards,
during this period. In order to save room I have refrained from
particularizing these smaller sums, and especially because it was my
more immediate object to show, by the above, how bountifully the Lord
was pleased to furnish me with means for the carrying out my desires
concerning these objects. Yea, the Lord so abundantly supplied me with
means, that during the whole of this period there came not one single
case before me in which it would have been desirable to help, according
to the measure of light given to me, or to extend the work, without my
having at the same time ample means for doing so. In the midst of the
great depression of the times, which was so generally felt, and on
account of which, humanly speaking, I also might have been exceedingly
tried for want of means, I, on the contrary, at no period of the work
for the seventeen years previous had a greater abundance of means. I do
on purpose lay stress upon this, because I desire that it may become
increasingly known, that there is no easier, no better, and no happier
way in the end than God's way, and this in particular also with regard
to the obtaining of means, simply in answer to prayer, without personal
application to any one. I value all the smaller donations which have not
been referred to, as well as the larger ones; and many of them, in the
sight of the Lord, may have been greater donations than the hundreds of
pounds which have been mentioned; but it appeared to me necessary to
give the above facts, as I could not mention every single donation, in
order to prove the easy way in which prayer and faith may procure means,
if we walk uprightly, and if the work in which we are engaged is really
the work of God. Were the obtaining of money my aim, by thus writing, it
would be bad policy indeed, to bring out all these instances of rich and
most abundant supplies for the work; for persons might be led to think
that I need no money, or that, if I did, I should have only to pray and
it would soon come in, through some one or other, without their helping
me; but since my chief aim in the whole work, and in the writing of
these accounts in particular, is, that the blessedness of the life of
faith may be seen, and that the hearts of the children of God may be
allured more and more to their Heavenly Father, and be led more and more
to cast their every care upon Him, and to trust in Him at all times,
yea, in the darkest moments, therefore I take pleasure in speaking about
this rich abundance which God gave me for His own work.

Some readers may say, And what use was made of the money which was
received in this way? Such a one is referred, for a full answer, to the
next chapter but one, which speaks of the operations of the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad; yet I would give to him here
a few outlines of the operations of the Institution. By the funds, which
were intrusted to me during this period, several hundred poor children
and adults were provided with schooling; many hundreds of copies of the
Holy Scriptures were circulated; about three hundred thousand Gospel
Tracts were distributed; forty-five preachers of the Gospel in the East
Indies, British Guiana, Canada, the United States, France, Switzerland,
Germany, Ireland, Scotland and England were, to a greater or less
degree, assisted with pecuniary help; and, lastly, three hundred Orphans
were provided with everything they needed for this life, besides being
under continual Scriptural instruction. Thus, at least, fifteen thousand
souls were during this period under habitual Scriptural instruction in
connection with this Institution, either in the Sunday Schools, Adult
Schools, Day Schools, and the Orphan House, or through the preachers of
the Gospel referred to.

Supplies for the support of the Orphans, sent in answer to prayer, from
May 26, 1850, to May 26, 1851.

When this period commenced, I had more in hand for the Orphans than for
many years before, under similar circumstances, the balance for current
expenses on May 26, 1850, being 150l. 7s. 10d. Yet, much as this was, in
comparison with what the balance had generally been before, how small
was the amount in reality! About 300 persons were connected with the New
Orphan House, who day by day were to be provided with all they needed,
besides several apprentices who also were still to be supported. On this
account, the one hundred and fifty pounds in hand would only furnish
that which was needed for about fifteen days, as the average expenses of
the Orphan Work alone were about Ten pounds daily.10 Place yourself,
therefore, dear reader, in my position. Three hundred persons daily at
table, and 150l. in hand! Looking at it naturally, it is enough to make
one tremble; but, trusting in the living God, as by His grace I was
enabled to do, I had not the least trial of mind, and was assured that
God would as certainly help me as He had done fourteen years before,
when the number of the Orphans was only the tenth part as large. The
following record will now show that I was not mistaken; and thus another
precious proof is furnished to the believing reader of the truth of that
word: "Whosoever believeth on Him shall not be confounded."

On the very first day of this new period I received from a sister in the
Lord 6l. Another sister gave me 3l., the price of a piece of work done
by her. Thus, as the Lord commenced this period, so He was pleased
generally day by day to send me something, either in small or large
donations. I can, however, only refer to a few instances, to save
space.

Between May 26 and June 30, 1850, God was pleased to send in 193l. 4s.
5d., so that I had more than enough with the balance left in hand, to
meet all the expenses.

July 1. Paid an account to a Christian brother, and received 10l. back
from him for the Orphans. More than 3l. came in besides.

July 2. Received 170l., of which I took 80l. for the Orphans, the rest
for the other objects. 17l. 10s. 1d. came in besides.

On Aug. 16th I had purposed to leave Bristol for a time, having been for
two years and four months uninterruptedly there, in the midst of more
work than I had ever had before. I went, not because I was quite unfit
for work, but in order that, labouring for a little while in a different
air, I might, with the blessing of God, keep off illness. On the 13th,
when going to take lodgings in the country, a Christian, residing at a
distance, whom I met, by God's ordering, no doubt, gave me at the
Railway station, just before starting, 50l., of which I took half for
the Orphans and half for missionary purposes. On the 15th I received
110l., of which 100l. was intended for missions, and 10l. for the
Orphans; and also on the same day 120l. Both donations were from
considerable distances. Besides this I received several small donations,
so that within three days, from the 13th to the 16th, came in about
300l. While absent from the work, from Aug. 16th to Sept. 13th, I was
able to help by my prayers. This was the heaviest month in the way of
current expenses. During no month, all the sixteen years and five months
previously, had there been so much expended for current expenses, as in
August, 1850; but, by what was in hand on August 1, by what came in, as
just related, and by all the many smaller donations, we were most
comfortably helped through. While absent I was also enabled to wait upon
God for means for the work, besides seeking His blessing in other
respects. That this was not in vain, was most evident; for not only did
many donations come in while I was away, but, on my return, God so
abundantly poured in the means, that, within thirteen days after, I
received altogether about One Thousand Pounds; for on the very morning
after my return, Sept. 14th, came in 190l., on Sept 19th 400l., on Sept.
17th 31l. 18s. 3d., on Sept. 25th 50l., on Sept. 27th 200l., besides
many donations of smaller amounts. Truly I do not wait on the Lord in
vain! One thing more I must add here. For several years I had not been
so poor, with regard to means for myself, as when going away for change
of air. But seeing it to be the will of God that I should go, I was sure
that He would help me. Thus it was. On Aug. 13th my dear wife received
from a sister in the Lord 5l. for change of air; and from a Christian
lady near Bridgewater was sent to me for my own personal expenses 1l.,
from Cork 2l., and from a brother in Bristol 1l. On Aug. 15th was sent
for myself from a considerable distance 18l. 11s. 3d. On Aug. 21st from
Glasgow 1l. On Aug. 24th from Sunderland 1s., from Cork 1l., and from
Liverpool 10l. Thus the Lord sent me for my own personal expenses such
an abundance, that from Aug. 13th to Sept. 13th, 1850, I received
altogether 61l. 13s. 6d. Truly I serve a good master, and this I delight
to show. Not only with regard to the obtaining of means for the work, in
which I am engaged, have I found simple trust in the Lord alone the
easiest, the happiest, and the best way; but also in the obtaining of
supplies for my own personal necessities.

Nov. 27. For seven weeks the income has been very small, in comparison
with what has been expended, both for the Orphans and for the various
other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. There has come in
for the Orphans 187l. 16s. 2 ¾ d., and for the other objects 62l. 11s.
1d.; and the expenditure has been for the Orphans during these seven
weeks 477l. 2s. 11d., and for the various other objects 394l. 9s. 8d.
Therefore altogether 871l. 12s. 7d. has been expended, whilst the income
altogether has been only 250l. 7s. 3 ¾ d. Of course, we have not gone
into debt, as we never order anything, except we have the means in hand
for it. Nor has there been even the least difficulty experienced with
regard to means, as the Lord in His kindness had sent in considerable
sums just before this season commenced. About 330 persons now sit down
to their meals in the New Orphan House, day by day, and the expenses for
the Orphans alone are about Ten Pounds daily, and those for the other
parts of the work are also about Ten Pounds daily, so that I need to
receive after the rate of 20l. a day, in order to go on with the work;
but during these forty-nine days there has been only one single day that
I have received about 20l., and for the greater part of the time only a
few pounds daily, and sometimes even only a few shillings. But what was
to be done under these circumstances? I gave myself to prayer. God, whom
I have now been enabled to make my refuge, and my only refuge for more
than twenty years, I have besought day by day. And when now day by day I
still have received only small sums, and sometimes nothing or scarcely
anything at all: the only effect that it has had upon me has been, to
pray the more earnestly. My confidence in God is not at all shaken. I
have never had a thought that He would not help me; nor have I even once
been allowed to look upon these seven weeks in any other way than that
the Lord, for the trial of my faith, has ordered it thus that only so
little should come in. I am sure that, when He has tried me
sufficiently, there will come in again larger sums. In the mean time,
how good has the Lord been, not only to have given all I have needed,
but I have even now money in hand! And as to our stores in the New
Orphan-House, they are as full as usual. We have at least 150 sacks of
potatoes in the house, 20 sacks of flour, 33 barrels of oatmeal, each
containing about 200 lbs., about 300 pairs of new shoes (besides about
900 pairs in use), about ten tons of coal, a large quantity of soap and
rice; and so all other parts of the stores in proportion. Indeed while
there has been little coming in, I have just ordered articles in the
wholesale way as formerly, when our income was perhaps four or five
times as much during the same period. My judgment is, that it will now
soon please the Lord again to send in larger sums, as He has been
pleased to exercise my faith for some time in this way. Let me see the
result!

Nov. 28. This morning the Lord has given me a fresh proof, that I had
not waited on Him in vain, and that my confidence in Him, as recorded
last evening, has not been confounded. I received early this morning a
donation of 200l., of which I took one half for the Orphans and the
other half for the other objects.

Nov. 30. Evening. I am brought to the close of another month. Great have
been the expenses, as I have paid out above 400l. for the Orphans, and
above 200l. for the other objects; but I have always had the means to
meet every payment.

Jan. 4, 1851. Besides a donation of 1l. from Newton Ferrers, 1l. 8s.
from Keswick, 4l. 6s. 9d. from the neighbourhood of Bath, I received
also this morning anonymously from Torquay 5s. worth of postages, with
these words: "Open thy mouth wide, and I will fill it." I am doing this.
I expect much, very much indeed, in every way. I also expect much in the
way of means. Evening. This very day the Lord has given me a most
precious proof, that He delights in our having large expectations from
Him. "My mouth has been filled," according to the portion of Holy
Scripture sent to me this morning. I have received this evening the sum
of Three Thousand Pounds, being the largest donation which I have had as
yet. I have had very many donations of 100l. and of 200l., several of
300l., one of 400l., several of 500l., some from 600l. to 900l., four of
l000l., two of 2000l. and one of 2050l. But I never had more than this
given to me at one time; yet I have expected more than 2050l. in one
donation, and, accordingly, it has pleased the Lord to give me 3000l.
this evening. I now write again that I expect far larger Sums still, in
order that it may be yet more and more manifest, that there is no
happier, no easier, and no better way of obtaining pecuniary means for
the work of the Lord, than the one in which I have been led. How great
my joy in God is, on account of this donation, cannot be described; but
it is not in the least coupled with excitement. I take this donation out
of the hands of the living God; I continually look for His help, and am
perfectly assured that I shall have it, and therefore is my soul calm
and peaceful, without any excitement, though the donation is so large.
This donation is, however, like a voice from heaven, speaking to me
concerning a most deeply important matter respecting which I am seeking
guidance from the Lord, the building of another Orphan-House. For
several years, while the Orphans were living in rented houses in Wilson
Street, Bristol, it pleased the Lord to manifest His power by helping us
from day to day, and sometimes even from meal to meal; but of late years
He has more especially been pleased to show His power by sending us
abundant supplies. Should it please Him, however, hereafter to cause us
again to be similarly situated, He will surely help; and, by His grace,
we will then trust in Him as heretofore. Moreover, though we have not
been so low with regard to means, yet my faith has not been without
trial even in this particular; but especially in other respects it has
pleased God continually to keep my faith in exercise. This sum of 3000l.
was entirely left at my disposal, and it was therefore portioned out
thus: 1500l. for the Orphans, 500l. for foreign labourers in the Gospel,
500l. for home labourers in the Gospel, 200l. for the circulation of
Gospel Tracts, 100l. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and
200l. for the support of Day Schools, Adult Schools, and Sunday
Schools.

As an instance to show in what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to
help me with means, I insert here the following kind but anonymous
letter, which was left at my house on January 27th, 1851.

"Dear Mr. Müller,

" I left at Mr. W—'s last week a donation of 1l. 1s. towards the
Orphan-Houses, which I hope you received safely. It is indeed
encouraging and strengthening to read the account of the many
indubitable answers you have had to prayer, and I pray God, dear sir, to
strengthen your hands, and prolong your life, if it be His will, that
both the servants of Christ and of Satan, the former to their comfort,
the latter to their confusion if not to their conversion, may see that
God alone reigns, and that the hearts of all are in His hand. I now
inclose you some coins (there are 18), which may be disposed of for the
Orphan-Houses. Truly we wish you good luck in the name of the Lord.

"Believe me, dear sir,

"To remain your unknown but true Friend,

"A Minister of the Church of England."

"N.B. I earnestly solicit an interest in your prayers."

The letter contained a two-guinea piece, a small Portuguese gold coin,
15 silver coins, and a copper coin.

March. 7. Very great have been the expenses for the Orphans of late.
During the short month of February alone I spent 386l. for them. For
nearly eight weeks, since Jan. 11th, the expenses have been nearly four
times as great as the income, which, however, I have been able amply to
meet, on account of the previous abundance which the Lord had been
pleased to send in. Now, however, after much prayer for means, the Lord
has been pleased to refresh my heart by a donation of 200l., referred to
under this date in the account of the income for the other objects. I
took of this sum 90l. for the Orphans. I received also this day 4l.
10s., being the bequest of a Swiss brother in the Lord, who fell asleep
in Devonshire, and who desired that what he left should be sold for the
benefit of the Orphans.

April 30. At the morning exposition of the Holy Scriptures at the New
Orphan-House, I was led particularly to dwell upon the blessedness of
the believer having to do with the living God, and referred, in the way
of illustration, to His care in supporting the Orphan Work. Immediately
after the exposition was over, I received a donation of 12l. 12s. for
the Orphans, another of 200l. (which I took half for the Orphans and
half for the other objects), and in the afternoon came in still further
through the boxes in the New Orphan-House 2l. 14s. 4 ½ d. Concerning
the donation of 12l. 12s. the hand of the Lord is the more manifest, in
that it came from a place whence. I had never received any donation, as
far as I know, and towards it a vicar, an archdeacon, and one of the
Queen's chaplains contributed, gentlemen entirely unknown to me, and
yet they felt thus kindly disposed towards this work.

May 26. I am brought to the close of this period. The work is more and
more enlarging. During the last month I have paid out for the Orphans
more than 450l., and for the other objects more than 500l., being nearly
One Thousand Pounds during one month; and yet I have a greater balance
left in hand, through the Lord's kindness, than at the close of any of
the previous periods.

Of the several hundreds of donations, large and small, received during
this period, I have thus taken a few, to show in what way it pleased the
Lord to supply me with means for the Orphan Work.

Miscellaneous Points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 26, 1850 to May
26, 1851.

1. There were during this period four Day Schools in Bristol, with 286
children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution,
and three others in Devonshire, Gloucestershire, and Norfolk, with 180
children in them, were assisted.--Further, one Sunday School in
Bristol, with 184 children, was entirely supported, and two others, in
Devonshire and Gloucestershire, with 213 children, were assisted.--
Lastly, an Adult School in Bristol, with 90 persons in it, was entirely
supported.--The expenses connected with all these various Schools
were, during this period, 379l. 17s.--From the formation of the
Institution, on March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 1851, there were 5,343
children in the various Day Schools in Bristol alone, 2,379 in the
Sunday School, and 1,896 persons in the Adult Schools, besides the
thousands in the Schools out of Bristol, which were assisted.

2. During this period I sought again especially to supply very poor
persons, whose character was known by their being visited, with copies
of the Holy Scriptures; and also to put copies which are printed with
large type in to the hands of aged persons, which seems to me of
especial need, as such Bibles are still expensive, considering the means
of the poor. There was expended during this period, out of the funds of
the Institution, on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, 150l. 16s.
5d. There were 345 Bibles sold and 899 given away; and 30 New Testaments
sold, and 413 given away, during this period. From March 5, 1834, to May
26, 1851, there were circulated 7,709 Bibles and 4,442 New Testaments.

3. During this year was spent of the Funds of the Institution for
Missionary objects the sum of 2000l. 11s. 1d. By this sum, forty-five
labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were
to a greater or less degree assisted. The amount sent to each of these
servants of Christ was as follows.

To No. 1. Labouring in British Guiana 91l. 10s.

To No. 2. Ditto 82l.

To No. 3. Ditto 80l. 10s.

To No. 4. Ditto 55l.

To No. 5. Ditto 55l.

To No. 6. Ditto 30l.

To No. 7. Ditto 20l.

To No. 8. Ditto 10l.

To No. 9. Labouring in the East Indies 100l.

To No. 10. Ditto 40l.

To No. 11. Ditto 40l.

To No. 12. Ditto 20l.

To No. 13 Ditto 14l.

To No. 14 Labouring in Canada 20l.

To No. 15 Ditto 20l.

To No. 16 Labouring in the United States 30l.

To No. 17 Labouring in France 60l.

To No. 18. Labouring in Switzerland 50l.

To No. 19. Ditto 10l.

To No. 20. Ditto 10l.

To No. 21. Labouring in Germany 10l.

To No. 22. Labouring in Ireland 70l.

To No. 23. Labouring in Scotland 115l.

To No. 24. Labouring in England 130l.

To No. 25. Labouring in England 115l.

To No. 26. Ditto 80l.

To No. 27. Ditto 65l.

To No. 28. Ditto 65l.

To No. 29. Ditto 57l.

To No. 30. Ditto 50l.

To No. 31. Ditto 50l.

To No. 32. Ditto 50l.

To No. 33. Ditto 45l.

To No. 34. Ditto 45l

To No. 35. Ditto 30l.

To No. 36. Ditto 30l.

To No. 37. Ditto 30l.

To No. 38. Ditto 20l.

To No. 39. Ditto 15l.

To No. 40. Ditto 10l.

To No. 41. Ditto 10l.

To No. 42. Ditto 10l.

To No. 43. Ditto 10l.

To No. 44. Ditto 5l.

To No. 45. Ditto 5l.

There was also sent to me anonymously
for the support of native preachers of the
Gospel in China 11s. ld., which was forwarded
. . . . . . . 11s. 1d.

The total amount of 2000l. was sent to these forty-five servants of the
Lord Jesus in 264 different sums, generally not less than 5l. and not
more than 10l. at one time to each, except there were especial reasons
pointing to a different course. Almost all these brethren were
habitually assisted; a few needed only occasional assistance.

I have great joy, in being able to inform the believing reader, that it
pleased the Lord again to let great blessing rest upon the labours of
these preachers of the Gospel, whom I sought to assist during this year;
which is alike true both with reference to those who labour in our own
country and those who preach the Word in foreign lands.

I consider it a great privilege to be permitted to defray in part or
altogether, from the funds of this institution, the expenses connected
with the voyage and outfit of brethren who desire to go out as
Missionaries, or to help them after their arrival in their field of
labour; but I do not bind myself to support them habitually, seeing that
thus they would be out of the position of simple dependence upon God for
their temporal supplies.

4. During this period 358l. 7s. 3d. was expended on the circulation of
Tracts, and 303,098 Tracts and Little Books were circulated.

The Lord was pleased to give me such an abundance of opportunities for
circulating tracts by means of godly men, both in this and foreign
countries, that, during this year, I was permitted to send out more
tracts than during the whole of the previous ten years taken together.
Nor must it be withheld from the reader, as matter for thankfulness,
that the Lord was pleased to allow me to hear again and again of
instances of conversion, by means of the distribution of these Tracts
during this period.

5. On May 26, 1850, there were Two Hundred and Seventy-five Orphans in
the New Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol. There were admitted into
it, during this year, 45 Orphans, making 320 in all. Of these, however,
two were removed by their relatives, who were able by that time to
provide for them, seven died during the year, five of the elder girls
were sent out to service, and six of the elder boys were apprenticed; so
that on May 26, 1851, there were 300 Orphans in the New Orphan House.
The total number of Orphans who were under our care from April, 1836, to
May 26, 1851, is Four Hundred and Eighty-Eight. There came in altogether
during this year 4102l. 14s. 9 ¼ d. for the support of the Orphans, and
3,640l. 9s. 1 ¾ d. for the other objects; and, after having met to the
full every demand with reference to the Orphans, the balance of 970l.
13s. 11 ¾ d. remained in hand. Also, after having entered into every
door, which the Lord was pleased to set before me respecting the other
objects, and to do far more than during any one year previously, the
balance of 809l. 10s. 6d. remained in hand on May 26, 1851. Verily we do
not trust in the Lord in vain!

Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 38,018l. 4s. 6 ½ d. was given to me for the Orphans as the
result of prayer to God from the commencement of the work to May 26,
1851.--It may be also interesting to the reader to know, that the
total amount which was given as free contributions, for the other
objects, from the commencement of the work to May 26, 1851, amounted to
13,988l. 11s. 9 ¼ d.; and that which came in by the sale of Bibles and
Tracts, and by the payments of the children in the Day-Schools, amounted
to 2,890l. 9s. 11 ¾ d.--Besides this, also a great variety and
number of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, &e., were given
for the use of the Orphans.

It pleased the Lord greatly to gladden our hearts by the working of His
Holy Spirit among the Orphans during this period.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, or the work of the Lord
in my hands, not immediately connected with the Scriptural Knowledge
institution, from May 26, 1850, to May 26, 1851.

Dec. 31, 1850. During this year there have been received into Fellowship
57, and altogether, from the time that Brother Craik and I began to
labour in Bristol, 1313, which, with the 68 believers whom we found in
Fellowship, make 1381. Of these 174 have fallen asleep, 160 have left us
during these 18 years and a half, 355 have removed from Bristol, and 80
have been excluded from Fellowship; so that there are at present only
612 in communion.

During this year the Lord has been pleased to give me—-

1. By anonymous offerings through the
Chapel boxes ... ... ... £148 11 0

2. By presents in money from believers in
Bristol, not given anonymously 86 1 9

8. By presents in money from believers
not residing in Bristol ... ... 160 0 8

4. By presents in provisions, clothes, &c.,
worth to us at least ... ... 7 11 0

£402 4 5

Further account of the intended Orphan House for Seven Hundred Poor
Children, bereaved of both Parents by

death, from May 26, 1851, to May 26, 1852.

The reader will remember it was stated in the previous chapter on this
subject, that I purposed, not in dependence upon my Christian Friends,
nor upon former donors, but alone in dependence upon the living God,
who, I trust, has called me for it, notwithstanding all my unworthiness,
to enlarge the Orphan Work. The Godly reader will now be desirous to
learn how far I have been helped, in this my intention, to enlarge the
field of labour in caring for the vast numbers of helpless Orphans in
our land. I will, therefore, give an extract, in the way of specimens,
from the account book, kept for the purpose, together with the remarks
and observations which I wrote down at the time of the receipt of the
donations, and make also here and there additional remarks, as the
occasion may call for.

Before I brought before the public my purpose, I gave the record of the
exercises of my mind, on this subject, to a valued Christian friend to
read, the only one who, besides my family, knew anything of my
intention, before it came before the public. I did this particularly in
order that, after waiting for several months in secret upon God for
guidance and direction concerning it, I might also have the counsel of a
prayerful, judicious, and cautious man of God. When this brother
returned the manuscript, he spoke to me words of encouragement
concerning this purpose, and gave me a half-sovereign towards the
Building Fund for this house for 700 destitute Orphans. This was the
first donation, which I received on May 13, 1851, and which, I confess,
was a great refreshment and encouragement to me, the more so as it came
from so cautious a brother, and after I had been for several months,
through secret prayer, assured that I should go forward.

On May 28th, 1851, my intention became publicly known, and in the
evening of May 29th I received from a Christian lady a sovereign towards
the Building Fund.

May 30. One of the Orphans in the New Orphan House gave 6d. for the
Building Fund, and one engaged in the work gave an old silver watch for
sale and 5s.

June. 1. A brother in the Lord, who gives his donations with the letter
"P.," gave me 10s.--I also received a sovereign.--This evening I
received still further 4 half-crowns, with very encouraging words and
expressions of joy, that I have been led to this purpose of building
another Orphan House for 700 more Orphans.--There came to hand also
anonymously 3s. Ditto an old shilling, a small American coin, and two
shillings. Also from a Christian servant in Clifton 2s. 6d.

June. 3. From one of the Orphans in the New Orphan House 6d., and from
another 6d.

June 4. From another Orphan in the New Orphan House, 6d. I received also
8s. 0 ½ d., which the Orphans in the Girls' School of the New Orphan
House gave between them for the Building Fund.

June 5. Through one of the boxes at the New Orphan House twopence and
likewise one half-penny. These two small donations are very sweet to me.
I take them as a further earnest, out of the hands of my heavenly
Father, that He, in His own time, will give me the whole sum requisite.
Evening: From a sister from Norwich 2s. 6d. From a sister in the Lord in
Bristol 1s.

June. 6. Anonymously 5l. 0s. 1d., with these words: "Towards the
Building Fund of the proposed Orphan House 2l., for Brother Müller 1l.
10s., for Brother Craik 1l. 10s."

June 7. Anonymously 1s. 6d.

June. 8. From a brother 5s.--From one of the Orphans formerly under
our care, a believer, a sovereign, of which she intends 5s. for the
Building Fund, 5s. for present use for the Orphans, 5s. for Brother
Craik, and 5s. for my own personal expenses. How sweet a donation!
Anonymously 1s. From "P." 1s. 6d.

June 11. Anonymously, from Sunderland 1l--A lady gave to my daughter
at my house 5l., but would not give her name.

June. 12. From Richmond 5l.

I have thus given minutely an account of the income during the first two
weeks, after my purpose had become known; but shall now only, for the
sake of brevity, refer to some of the donations.

June. 21. Twenty-four days have now passed away since I have been
enabled, day by day, to wait with a goodly measure of earnestness and in
faith upon the Lord for means; but as yet only a little above 28l. has
come in. But I am not discouraged. The less there comes in, the more
earnestly I pray, the more I look out for answers, and the more assured
I am that the Lord, in His own time, after He has tried my faith, will
send me larger sums, and, at last, all I need.

July 27. From a Christian gentleman in Clifton 20l. This donation has
much refreshed my spirit. I am, day by day, expecting help from the
Lord, in large and small sums as He pleases; but as He is trying my
faith, in that only so little as yet has come in, this donation has been
very precious.

Aug. 8. From a Christian lady in London 5l.--From Somersetshire 40l.

Aug. 12, Day by day I am waiting upon the Lord for means for this
object, and generally more than once a day am bowing my knees before God
with reference to it. Moreover, of late I have been enabled, with
increasing earnestness, to beseech the Lord, that He would be pleased
to send in means for the Building Fund. My soul has been all along at
peace, though only so little as yet, comparatively, has come in (in all
127l. 19s. 9d.) and though Satan has, in the most subtle way, sought to
shake my confidence, and to lead me to question, whether, after all, I
had not been mistaken concerning this whole matter. Yet, though he has
aimed after this, to the praise of God I have to confess, that he has
not been allowed to triumph. I have especially besought the Lord of
late, that He would be pleased to refresh my spirit by sending in some
large donation for this part of the work. Under these circumstances, I
received this morning the following letter with 500l.:

"* * * * August 8.

"My Dear Brother,

"Trusting that God has indeed called you to this work, viz., caring for
poor Orphans, and will not allow you to be deceived as to His will
regarding the increasing it, but will greatly use you for His own glory
and for blessing to many poor destitute children, it is my desire, and I
humbly thank our most gracious God and Father for the ability, to have
fellowship with you in this work, as far as He permits. Will you,
therefore, use the enclosed check for 500l. for the Orphans, towards the
present Establishment or the proposed new one, as you may judge best, or
taking any part thereof for one or the other. The Lord Jesus be your
counselor, your joy, your strength, your all.

"Affectionately yours,

"* * * *"

I took the whole amount for the Building Fund. I was not in the least
excited. I look out for means. Even at that very moment, when I received
this donation, I was looking out for means, for large donations; and I
should not have been surprised if 5,000l. had come in, or more. The Lord
be praised for this precious encouragement, which has still further
quickened me for prayer!

Aug. 14. From the neighbourhood of Leeds 10l.--From Essex 5l.

Aug. 15. Anonymously from Hull 5s.--From Cornwall a copy of "Greece"
for sale.

Aug. 19. From Shirehampton 5l.

Aug. 20. From Mirfield 2l. Also 150l. came in today which, being left at
my disposal by the donor, as most needed, I took the whole of this
amount for the Building Fund, having sufficient means in hand for the
current expenses of the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution.

Aug. 30. From M. S. 30l., of which the donor desires 20l. to be used for
missionary objects, and 10l. for the Building Fund. The donor writes:
"My present inducement to remit this is, that God has lately prospered
me in business, and I had been putting by for this and a few other
similar purposes, intending to make bequests in my will, but am
convinced that this is the best course to pursue, if not the only
justifiable one, with what I can spare from my business and other
necessities."

Sept. 1. From a much afflicted sister seven dolls' bonnets for sale.
— A picture in frame.

Sept. 2. From an individual living in Nicholas Street, Bristol, 1l.--
From a brother in the Lord, in Wandsworth Road, London, 5s., with 1l.
for present use for the Orphans, and 15s. for missionary purposes.--
From a poor Christian widow in London 1s., with 1s. for present use for
the Orphans.--I am day by day labouring in prayer for this object,
and with a goodly measure of fervency of spirit, by the grace of God;
and am day by day looking out for answers. These sums last recorded are
but small, yet they tell me that my Heavenly Father is not unmindful of
my supplications, and of those of His dear children who help me with
their prayers, and that, in His own time, He will send me more, and also
large sums. I magnify His holy name that He does not in the least allow
me to question either His power or His willingness to give me all that I
shall need; yea, my soul is as assured that I shall have this my request
fully granted, unworthy though I am of it, as if the whole amount were
already in my hand.

Sept. 4. From a Christian at Keswick 10s., and a lady through ditto 5s.

Sept. 5. From the neighbourhood of Keswick 1l.--From Hull 1l.--
From Shrewsbury 20l.

Sept. 10. As yet the Lord delays sending in larger sums; but I am
looking out for them, and am confidently expecting them. This delay is
only for the trial of my faith; after He has tried it, He will help me.
Applications for the admission of Orphans continue to be made. Within
the last ten days eighteen poor children, bereaved of both parents, have
been applied for; and since Aug. 15th, therefore in twenty-six days,
thirty-two altogether. My heart longs to be allowed of God to help poor
Orphans more extensively than ever. Whence the means are to come for the
building of this house for 700 Orphans, I know not; but still, by
God's help, my confidence in Him is not shaken. To Him it is a very
small matter to give me all I need for this work.

Sept. 11. From Ludgvan 10s. Evening. Only these ten shillings have come
in today, but three more Orphans have been applied for, making
thirty-five in less than a month. Does not the Lord tell me by this,
that He will provide another home for Orphans? I will therefore
patiently wait upon Him for the means, and after He has tried my faith
and patience, He will show Himself as the bearer and answerer of prayer.
Today came in the course of my reading John xiv. 13, 14, "And whatsoever
ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be
glorified in the Son. If ye shall ask anything in my name I will do it."
I pleaded this word of promise, and look for answers, even for the
fulfilment of this promise. Nor do I doubt that the Lord Jesus will
fulfil this His promise in this my case.

Sept. 12. From Guildford 1l. 8s.--From Bath 1l.

Sept. 13. Patience and faith are still called for, and, by God's
grace, my desire is to "let patience have her perfect work," Not one
penny has come in today for the Building Fund, but five more Orphans
have been applied for, so that now forty in less than one single month
have been brought before me, all bereaved of both parents, and all very
destitute. Under these circumstances, how can I but fervently labour in
prayer that the Lord would be pleased to intrust me with means for
building another Orphan-House for 700 Orphans. The more I look at things
according to natural appearances and prospects, the less likely is it
that I should have the sum which is needed; but I have faith in God, and
my expectation is from Him alone. From the beginning I depended upon Him
only, concerning this proposed enlargement of the work, and therefore
have not been disappointed, though as yet only the fortieth part of what
is needed has come in (882l. 18s. 7 ½ d). But how soon, how very soon
can the Lord alter the aspect of things. Even this very evening, while I
am writing, He can give me many thousand pounds. I continue therefore,
to wait upon God, and seek to encourage my heart by His holy word, and
while he delays giving me answers, to be occupied in His blessed
service. Of this, however, my soul has not the least doubt, that, when
the Lord shall have been pleased to exercise my soul by the trial of
faith and patience, He will make bare His arm, and send help. The fact
that the applications for the admission of destitute Orphans are so
many, does both quicken me to prayer, and is also a great encouragement
to me, that the Lord will give me the desire of my heart, to provide
another home for these destitute, fatherless and motherless children.

Sept. 19. Received today a donation of 170l., which the donor kindly
allowed me to use for the work of the Lord in my hands as I pleased. I
therefore took the whole of this donation for the Building Fund, having
at present sufficient means in hand for the current expenses of all, the
various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, and feeling
called to give myself with my might to prepare for the Building of
another Orphan-House.

Sept. 20. About two months since I received a letter, of which I give as
much as refers to the subject in hand.

"My Dear Sir,

"I was once a book collector, and turned my attention to our old English
Bibles, and, among other editions, perfected, almost sheet by sheet, our
first English Coverdale Bible of 1535. It is a sad specimen of time,
attention, and money mis-spent and mis-applied, and as I look upon you
as the receiver of cast off idols, whether watch chains, trinkets, or
old Bibles, I have purposed for some time sending it to you. * * * * Do
with the proceeds as you see fit. I should be glad if a portion were
converted into large printed Testaments for the aged, and should be
thankful if that, which has been cause of humbling to me, should be
converted into the means, through your instrumentality, of raising
others.

* * * * *

"Ever yours,

* * * *."



A day or two after the receipt of this letter, a parcel arrived,
containing the said Coverdale Bible, of A.D. 1535 and another book; the
latter to be sold for the benefit of the Orphans. It was only today that
I had an opportunity of disposing of the old Bible, which fetched 60l.,
together with other books, which had been given for the benefit of the
Orphans, which brought 10l. Of the 60l. I took 10l. for New Testaments
printed with large type for aged poor persons, and 50l. for the Building
Fund.

Oct. 2. Evening. Nothing has come in today for the Building Fund, and
very little during the last ten days. I have had just now again a long
season for prayer respecting this object. Through the support which I
receive from the Lord, I am not cast down, though only so little as yet
has come in. The work is His, and not mine; therefore am I able quietly
to leave it in His hands. Were I to look at what has come in hitherto,
much though it is, in one sense, it would take, after this rate, about
ten years, before I should have the sum needed; but this does not cast
me down; for, when the Lord's time is come I expect larger sums.
Further, there are peculiar natural obstacles in the way to my receiving
donations for this object; for it has now been for several months
reported that I have already Thirty Thousand Pounds in hand for the
Building Fund, though this day it is actually only 1,139l. 19s. 2 ½ d.
Again and again this has been told me, and therefore, were I to look at
things naturally, I should have much reason to be cast down, as the
spread of such reports is calculated, humanly speaking, to keep persons
from contributing towards this object. Another class of persons, true
Christians, and liberal persons too, may be thinking, that the sum
required is so large that it is not likely I shall obtain it, and that
therefore their contributing towards this object would be useless. But
none of these things discourage me. God knows that I have not Thirty
Thousand Pounds in hand. God can influence the minds of His dear
children towards this intended Orphan-House, whatever their thoughts may
have been hitherto on the subject. I therefore seek to "let patience
have her perfect work," and go on in prayer, being fully assured, that
the Lord will not suffer me to be confounded. I am day by day looking
out for help, yea for large sums; and I know I shall have them, after
the Lord has exercised my faith and patience. Lord wilt Thou mercifully
continue to give unto Thy servant faith and patience!

Oct. 3. From the Forest of Dean 1l.

Oct. 4. From Old Aberdeen 5l.--From Dublin the work for an ottoman
and a piece of crochet work.

Oct. 5. Through Bethesda boxes 10s.--From Clifton 7s.--From H. S.
4d.

Oct. 7. From Wellington in Salop 5s. Evening. The trial of my faith and
patience continues still. Again very little has come in during the last
four days for the Building Fund. But my hope in God, by His help,
continues steadfast. I had just now again a long season for prayer,
having spent the whole evening alone for the purpose, and am assured
that, when God's time shall have come, it will be seen that, even
concerning this object, I do not wait upon Him in vain. There are
persons again and again asking me, When I am going to commence the
building; for, they think that I have all, or nearly all, the means
which are required. And there are others who ask me whether I still
purpose to build this Orphan-House. To Thee, my Heavenly Father, Thy
child turns under these circumstances. Thou knowest how small an amount
as yet Thy servant has, in comparison with what is needed; but Thou also
knowest that Thy servant did not act rashly and under excitement in this
matter, but waited upon Thee for six months in secret, before he spoke
about this his intention. Now, Lord, in Thy mercy, sustain Thy
servant's faith and patience, and, if it please Thee, speedily refresh
his heart by sending in larger sums, for which he is looking, and which
he confidently expects!

Oct. 8. Through the boxes at the New Orphan-House 2s. 6d., with Psalm
xxvii. 14. The words of the passage are these: "Wait on the Lord: be of
good courage, and He shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the
Lord." By God's grace I wait on the Lord, and am of good courage, and
He does strengthen my heart, in faith and patience to continue to wait
on Him, though only so little comes in, being assured that, when the
trial of faith and patience is over, He will make bare His arm, and send
in larger sums.

Oct. 28. Nothing at all has come in today for the Building Fund, and
about 70l. only during the last four weeks. Yet, by the grace of God, I
am supported, and have not the least questioning of soul whether I shall
have the means or not. I only look upon this delay, on the part of God,
in sending me larger sums, as an exercise of my patience and faith, and
am sure, that in His own time He will give more largely. Today I have
had again three long seasons for prayer respecting the work in my hands;
and the greater part of this evening have been in prayer, entreating and
beseeching the Lord to help me; and I am now again looking out for
means, as I do day by day.

Oct. 29. This morning I received a letter, containing a check for 50l.,
and these words:

"* * * * Oct. 27, 1851.

"My dear Sir,

I had much pleasure and blessing in perusing the Report you were kind
enough to send me some time ago, and am much obliged to you for it. Is
it not a privilege to be allowed to obtain future good out of present
expending? (Luke xvi. 9)' That when ye fail, etc.' I enclose a check
for 50l., of which I should wish 25l. to be used for the New
Orphan-House, that which you propose to build.

Yours, dear Sir,

Ever faithfully,

* * * * *"



The other 25l. being left to me, to be disposed of as I thought well, I
divided equally between the five objects of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution for Home and Abroad.

By the same post I received also a donation of 10s., with the following
letter.

* * * *, Oct. 27, 1851.

"Dear Mr. Müller,

I enclose you 10s. worth of postages, as a token of gratitude to the
Lord. I had 2l. due to me, and the party told me he would not pay it,
except I summoned him. I consulted the Scripture, and found, as a
Christian, I must not do that; so I put the case into the hand of the
‘wonderful counsellor,' and told the Lord, if He would be pleased to
give me the 2l., I would give Him back half of it. Not long after I had
a message from the party, to say if I would fetch it, I should have the
2l.; so I went, and he paid me without an unpleasant word. I have sent
you one half of the pound (the other half I have designed for another
purpose). If you need it, you will please to take it for your own
personal use; if it is not needed any other way, I should like the
privilege of having a stone in the intended Orphan-House, &c."

I took this 10s. for the Building Fund. The donor is a poor working man.
— This afternoon I received 50l. more from the neighbourhood of
London, with these words: "For the missionaries, and where else most
needed." I took, therefore, 25l. of it for missions, and the other 25l.
for the Building Fund.

Thus the Lord has been pleased this day to refresh my heart greatly in
sending these donations, and has given again a manifest proof that
yesterday I did not wait upon Him in vain. But I look out for more
abundant help, and for larger sums. I cannot help noticing here, that
this afternoon the Lord also refreshed my spirit through a donation of 6
pairs of new shoes, which a young man (whom about twelve years ago I
received as a very destitute Orphan, and who about five years ago was
apprenticed to a shoemaker, and who has lately finished his
apprenticeship), brought me for the Orphans, as a small token of his
gratitude, as he said. He had himself made the shoes, having bought the
leather with the little sums which he had earned in working overtime for
his master.

Such instances occur often. I see now, again and again, fruit resulting
from my labours in this service. It is not at all a rare thing that I
meet with respectable young women, or respectable young men, who, many
years ago, were placed, as very destitute Orphans, under my care, and
who are now a comfort and help to society, instead of being a pest,
which otherwise they might have been. But valuable and pleasant as this
is, I frequently meet with far more in them: I find them to be children
of the living God, through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, and see or
hear that they walk according to their profession. Thus, in the midst of
many difficulties, and with much that, for the present moment, is
discouraging, I see abundant fruit. Yet, if even only one soul were won
from among these Orphans, how abundantly would all labours, trials,
difficulties, and expenditure of money be made up; but, if I know of
scores of them already in heaven, and scores of them now on the road to
heaven, how can I but go on labouring, esteeming it a privilege to be
allowed of God to seek to win more and more of them for Him?
Considerations like these are a mighty impulse to me to go forward with
regard to the intended Orphan House.

Nov. 10. Today I received 200l., of which the donor kindly wished me to
keep 20l. for my own personal expenses, and to apply the rest as most
needed for the Lord's work in my hands. I took, therefore, 100l. for
the Building Fund, and 80l. for missionary objects, the circulation of
the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts, and for the support of all the
various schools which are supported by the funds of the Scriptural
Knowledge. Institution. By this donation my heart has been greatly
refreshed for the following reasons:--lst. During the last twelve
days very little, comparatively, has come in. 2nd. The first four
objects of the Institution, for which I took the 80l., were lower as to
funds than they have been during the last ten months, as only 113l.
remained in hand. 3rd. I had been praying for supplies for my own
personal expenses, in order that I might be able to help in certain
cases of need, which were near my heart. This day week, Nov. 3rd, I
began particularly to pray about this object. On Nov. 7th there was 5l.
put anonymously into the letter box at my house, for my own personal
expenses. The note was signed "H." On the same evening I received 2l.
more. On Nov. 8th I received 1l. from Keswick. On Nov. 9th 1l. 14s. 6d.,
and today 20l. Though this is a digression from the immediate subject
before me, yet, as I write chiefly for the comfort and encouragement of
the children of God, and that their dependence upon God and their trust
in Him may more and more be increased, and also that unbelievers may see
the reality of the things of God, I take delight in mentioning these
cases, to show that He does not merely supply me, in answer to prayer,
with means for His work in which I am occupied, but that He also
bountifully supplies my own personal necessities, simply in answer to
prayer.

Nov. 19. Early this morning came, in the course of my reading through
the Holy Scriptures, Heb. v. and vi., and my heart was greatly
strengthened by Heb. vi. 15., "And so after he had patiently endured, he
obtained the promise." I have not once, even for one moment, been
allowed to doubt, either the power or the willingness of the Lord to
supply me with all that shall be needed for this other Orphan House,
since I came at first to the conclusion that it was His will I should
enlarge the work; yet I have often, very often, been led to ask, that He
would graciously be pleased to sustain my faith and patience to the end;
for great, very great, may yet be the exercises both of my faith and
patience, before. I have the desire of my heart granted.

Nov. 28. The following case will especially show in what a variety of
ways the Lord is pleased to supply me with means. Today I received from
an individual, hitherto an entire stranger to me, the letter which
follows:--

* * * *, London, Nov 27, 1851.

"My dear Brother,

I asked the Lord for help with regard to yourself and your work. The
other night a stranger called at my house, and left a parcel, declining
to give her name, saying, ‘Take charge of this for Mr. George
Müller.' The parcel contained 3l. 14s. 9d., two silver spoons, and
two silver thimbles; 4s. were added to pay the expenses. May the Lord
prosper you, my brother.

Yours affectionately,

* * * * *"

As it was not stated for what object the donation was intended, I took
the whole for the Building Fund.

Dec. 8. From A. Z. at Hull 3l. 5s., of which the donor kindly intends
5s. for my own personal expenses. Through this donor also 5s. besides.
Both these donations are remarkable. The donor who sent the 3l. 5s.,
some years ago, when in very poor circumstances, set apart from his
earnings ¾ d. a-day for the Orphans. From that time God was pleased to
prosper him; and now he is able to send this 3l. 5s. at once. The donor
of the 5s. had about a year ago one of the Reports of the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution lent to him, when he was living in much sin, by
the brother who sent the 3l. 5s., and this Report was the means of his
conversion.

Dec. 28. This morning I received a donation of 200l., which, being left
at my disposal, I took one half for the Building Fund, and the other
half for the School, Bible, Tract and Missionary Objects.

Jan. 28, 1852. From Torquay 5s.--I received also this morning the
following registered letter, enclosing 50l.

"* * * * *Jan. 21, 1852.

"Dear Brother,

"Having this morning received a large present, I hasten to send you
50l., either towards building the New Orphan House, or for the
missionary servants of the Lord; as you may deem best.

" Yours very truly in Christ,

"* * * *"

I am especially labouring in prayer, day by day, that the Lord would be
pleased to furnish me with the means for building another Orphan House,
as the number of applications for destitute children, bereaved of both
parents, is increasing more and more: but I have also of late been
particularly praying to the Lord for means for missionary brethren, as
almost all I have in hand for them is expended. On this account I
purpose to take one half of this donation for the Building Fund, and the
other half for missionary objects.

March 17. Day by day I am waiting upon God for means. With full
confidence, both as to the power of the Lord to give me the means, and
likewise His willingness, I am enabled to continue to wait. But He is
pleased to exercise my faith and patience, and especially has this been
the case of late. Not more than 27l. 11s. has come in, during the last
four weeks, for the Building Fund. Yet, amidst it all, by the help of
God, my heart has been kept looking to the Lord, and expecting help from
Him. Now today my heart has been greatly refreshed by a donation of
999l. 13s. 5d., which, being left to my disposal for the work of God, I
took of it for the Building Fund 600l., for current expenses for the
Orphans 200l., and the remainder for the School, Bible, Tract, and
Missionary objects. I cannot describe to any one how refreshing this
donation is to my spirit. After having been for weeks, day by day,
waiting upon the Lord, and receiving so little, comparatively, either
for current expenses or for the Building Fund, this answer to many
prayers is exceedingly sweet to my spirit.

March 18. From Mallow in Ireland 5s.--From Torquay 5s.--From
Whitby 2l. 3s. 6d., of which 1l. is for the Building Fund, 1l. for
present use for the Orphans, and 3s. 6d. for ditto.--From Kingstanley
1l.--From Lichfield 4l. 15s., and 5s.

March 21. From Clifton 5l., with 3s. for present use for the Orphans.
— Through Salem boxes 1s.

March 23. From Driffield 5l.--Received also further 500l., which,
being entirely left at my disposal, I took 100l. for the Building Fund,
200l. for current expenses for the Orphans, 50l. for the circulation of
the Holy Scriptures, 50l. for the circulation of Gospel Tracts, 50l. for
preachers of the Gospel in foreign lands, and 50l. for preachers of
the Gospel in England, Ireland, and Scotland.

May 16. From two Christian ladies at Clifton 10s.

May 19. From Bishopwearmouth 5l.

May 20. 149l. 8s. 11 ½ d., being the proceeds arising from the sale of
a book in English, and 40l. 14s. from the sale of a book in French, were
given for the Building Fund; and 75l. 18s. 9d., being the balance of a
certain account, for present use for the Orphans.

To the donations received during this year, is to be added 64l. 10s. 6d.
received for interest; for as a steward of the money, with which I was
intrusted for the Building Fund, I felt it right to put out to interest
that which came in. Lastly, there remained in hand from the former
Building Fund the balance of 776l. 14s. 3 ¾ d., which I added to the
present Building Fund, so that on the evening of May 26th, 1852, I had
altogether 3530l. 9s. 0 ¼ d.

I add the following points, which were stated in the Report of 1852, and
which are here reprinted for the better information of the readers.

A. Looking at the comparatively small amount yet in hand towards the
accomplishment of my purpose, some of my readers may suppose that I am
on that account discouraged. My reply is, that I am not at all
discouraged, and that for the following reasons.

1. The many donations which the Lord has been pleased to send me during
the past year expressly for the Building Fund, have been a proof to me
that He condescends to listen to my supplications respecting this part
of the work, and to those of His dear children who help me with their
prayers; for many, I believe, labour with me in prayer.

2. The delay of the Lord in sending still larger sums, and more
speedily, than He has been pleased to do hitherto, I only consider to be
for the exercise of my faith and patience. Were the Lord displeased with
my intention, He would not have dealt with me as He has, and would not
have encouraged me to continue to wait upon Him, by the many donations
which were expressly given for this object, and some from most
unexpected quarters. This exercise of my faith and patience, however, I
believe to be intended not merely for my own individual profit; but
through me, also for the benefit of others. By God's gracious help and
support I will, therefore, continue to wait patiently, till He shall be
pleased more abundantly to send in the means, which I do not in the
least doubt life will do.

3. Even when intending to build the New Orphan-House on Ashley Down,
Bristol, (which was then an undertaking to me greater far than the
second Orphan House now contemplated), I had to wait two years and three
months, before I had all the means needed; and great, and many, and
varied indeed were the trials of my patience and faith, before that work
was accomplished; yet, at last, the Lord so abundantly helped me, and so
altogether carried me through all the difficulties, that the house was
built, fitted up, furnished, and inhabited, and several hundred pounds
remained over and above what was required. And now three years have
already elapsed since the house has been inhabited, and the three
hundred Orphans in it have no cause to speak of want, but only of
abundance. But as the work increases more and more, 1 am not surprised
that my trials of faith and patience should become sharper and sharper,
and should last longer and longer; but yet, by His help, will I hope in
God, whom I shall have to praise further still, and who will help me
further still, on the ground of the worthiness and merits of His holy
child Jesus, though I am most unworthy in myself to be helped.

4. One of the things, which especially encourages me to continue to wait
upon God, and to labour on in prayer Concerning this object, is the
great number of applications which continue to be made for the admission
of children who have been lawfully begotten, but who are by death
bereaved of both parents, and who are in very destitute circumstances.
There were 170 such children waiting for admission a year ago; since
then there have been 183 more applied for, making in all 353. Of these,
as during the last year but few vacancies have occurred, I have only
been able to receive twenty-seven, therefore 326 remain unprovided for.
This number would be far greater still, had not many persons been kept
from applying to me; for they considered it useless, as the number of
Orphans, waiting for admission, was already so great. Now when I
consider all the help which the Lord has been pleased to grant me in
this His service for so many years, and how He has carried me through
one difficulty after another, and when I see one case after another, of
the most pitiable Orphans (some less than one year old) brought before
me; how can I but labour on in prayer on their behalf, fully believing
that God, in His own time, will give me the means for this intended
second home for 700 more Orphans, though I know not when the money will
be sent, and whom He will honour to be the instruments, whether it will
come from many or from few comparatively, and whether more especially
from those donors whom God has used in former times, or whether He may
be pleased to put it into the heart of those to assist me in this
service, whose names I have never heard up to this time.

B. Up to the present I have taken no actual steps towards the erection
of the second Orphan-House, nor do I mean to do anything in the way of
purchasing the land, &c., until I have a sum in hand which may point out
that the Lord's time is come for taking such steps. At present I do
not allow my mind to be occupied with such points, but seek to go on
step by step, and therefore, in the first place, to wait upon God for a
greater amount of means than I have in hand at present; and when the
Lord shall have been pleased to grant me this, I doubt not that He will
also guide and direct me as to carrying out the desire which, I trust,
He has put into my heart, to be still more extensively used as the
Friend of the Orphan.

C. I state again that this second Orphan-House is only intended, as the
one already built, for children who have been lawfully begotten, who
have lost both parents by death, and who are in destitute circumstances;
this, however, being the case, children may be received from any place,
and the more destitute, the fewer patrons and friends they have to plead
their cause, the more likely they are to be received, as neither favour
nor partiality is shown in the admission of the children, but their
cases are considered in the order in which applications are made. I
state again here especially, that no sectarian views prompt me, or even
in the least influence me in the reception of children; I do not belong
to any sect, and am, therefore, not influenced by sectarianism in the
admission of Orphans; but from wheresoever they come, and to whatsoever
religions denomination the parents belonged, or with whatever body the
persons making application may be connected; and whether those who apply
never gave me one penny towards the work, or whether they gave much; it
makes no difference in the admission of the children. Now just as it has
been thus with regard to the admission of Orphans for more than sixteen
years past, so, when God shall be pleased to allow me to accomplish my
purpose concerning another Orphan-House, it is still intended to be the
same concerning that one also. The New Orphan-House on Ashley Down,
Bristol, is not say Orphan-House, not the Orphan-House of any party or
sect, but it is God's Orphan-House, and the Orphan-House for any and
every poor destitute Orphan who has lost both parents; provided, of
course, there be room in the establishment, and that there be nothing so
peculiar in the case of the children as to prevent their being received;
and exactly thus it is intended to be, God helping, with regard to the
Orphan-House for 700 Orphans, now in contemplation.

Supplies for the School—, Bible —, Missionary and Tract Fund, sent
in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1851, to May 26, 1852.

At no time during the past eighteen years did I begin a new period with
so much money in hand, as was the case at the commencement of this.
There was a balance of 809l. 10s. 6d. left for these objects. Long
before this balance was expended, however, the Lord was pleased to send
in further supplies; so that, during all the year, there did not come
before me one single instance in which, according to my judgment, it
would have been desirable to help forward Schools or Missionary objects,
or the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, but I had always
the means in hand for doing so.

I will now notice a few of the more remarkable donations

On the third day already, after the accounts had been closed, May 29,
1851, I received a donation of 150l., of which I took one-half for the
current expenses for the Orphans, and the other half for these objects.
— This was the first donation in this new period, and was a precious
encouragement to me in the work.

July 8. From May 29th to this day have come in twenty-eight donations,
varying from 1d. to 15l. Today I received a donation of 150l. of which
the donor kindly wished me to take 10l. for my own personal expenses,
and to use the rest as the work of God might require it. As I still had
an abundance in hand both for the Orphans and for these objects, I took
one-half for the current expenses for the Orphans, and the other half
for these objects.

Sept. 6. Again fifty-two donations had come in between July 8th and this
day, varying from 1d. to 20l., when today a brother who has often
manifested his deep interest in the spread of the truth, and who is far
from being rich, sent me 80l. for home and foreign labourers in the
Word.

Nov. 10. Forty donations have come in for these objects from Sept. 6th
to this day, varying from 1 ½ d. to 25l. Today I received 200l., of
which, as stated under the particulars given under this date with
reference to the Building Fund, I took 80l. for these objects. This
donation came in most seasonably; for now the funds for these objects
were lower than they had been for the last ten months, as only 113l.
remained in hand.

Dec. 21. The funds for these objects were now reduced to 10l. 14s. 5d.,
as the twenty-two donations from 4d. to 13l., which had come in since
Nov. 10th, did not altogether amount to more than 31l. 9s. 4d., and as
much money had been expended. The means in hand were therefore far less
than they had been at any time during the last sixteen months, when I
received this morning from A. Z., a new donor, by the Clifton post,
10l., which, being left to my disposal, I took for these objects.

Dec. 27. Only 1l. 7s. 6d. had come in since the 21st. After the payments
of this day were met, there remained only 10s. 4d. in hand.

Consider this position, dear reader. Only 10s. 4d. in hand, and the
expenses for all the various schools were to be met, and the circulation
of the Holy Scriptures and of Tracts I desired to go on, and the Fifty
preachers of the Gospel, whom I sought to help, my heart desired to
help still further. Consider also, that whatever my necessities may be,
I never go into debt, nor do I apply to any one personally for any
thing, but give myself unto prayer. Now hear how this matter ended.

Dec. 28. When I came home last evening from the New Orphan-House, I
found a letter from Gloucestershire, containing a sovereign and a half.
The sovereign was half for these objects, and half for the Orphans; and
of the half sovereign, 6s. were intended for the Orphans; and 4s. for
these objects. Thus I had 14s. more But this morning the Lord has opened
His hands still more bountifully. I have received a donation of 200l.
— The disposal of the money was left to me. I took therefore one half
for the School —, Bible —, Missionary and Tract Objects, and the
other half for the Building Fund.--This donation has been a very
great refreshment to my spirit. During the last six weeks very little
has come in, and though we had lacked nothing (for only a few days since
I paid for sixty thousand Tracts at once), yet we were now poorer than
we had been for two or three years, with regard to means for these
objects. This, however, did not in the least cast me down; for I knew it
was only for the trial of my faith and patience, and that, when the
trial was over, the Lord would again send in bountiful supplies. This He
has now commenced to do, but I expect much more than this. Indeed I am
looking out daily for the Lord's help.

Jan. 1, 1852. The old year closed with manifestations of God's loving
help, in the way of means, and the new begins in the same way. Last
evening I received 4s. 5d. for these objects, and this morning, when I
paid an account, I had 10l. returned for the Schools.--In the course
of the day I received still further from Sherborne 3l., of which the
donor wished 1l. to be taken for the Orphans, 1l. for missions, and 1l.
for my own personal expenses. I received also anonymously from Aberdeen
4s. for the Orphans, with 2s. for missions.

Jan. 2. Further: 5l. for the Schools in Bristol.

Jan. 19. All our money for missionary objects, for the circulation of
Bibles and Tracts, and for the support of the various Schools was now
again spent, as only very little, comparatively had come in since Dec.
28th. The last money which I had, I sent off by the mail steamer to
Demerara, which left two days since. Under these circumstances, I
received this evening 20l., which I might either use for the Orphans, or
for missionary objects, according to the donor's wish. I took it for
missionary objects. But I am looking out for larger supplies, as I have
many openings, profitably to lay out considerable sums for missionary
objects, and for the circulation of Bibles and Tracts. It is remarkable,
that, while I have received from the donor of this sum from time to time
donations for the Orphans, I had not received anything for missionary
objects for a very long time. But I have again and again prayed for help
for this part of the work, and this point makes the answer to prayer
only the more manifest.

Jan. 21. After still further repeated waiting upon the Lord for means,
especially for missionary objects and for the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures and Tracts, I received today from Somersetshire 20l., of
which the donor intends 10l. for foreign missions and 10l. towards the
support of the Orphans.

Jan. 22. From London 4l. for missions.

Jan. 23. 50l., of which half is for missions, and half for the Building
Fund.

Jan. 26. 500l. was left at my disposal. I took the whole for these
objects.

This donation came in most seasonably, enabling me to go on helping
preachers of the Gospel, and also to go on with the circulation of
Bibles and Tracts.

March 17. Before all means were gone, when there was yet about 160l. in
hand, there came in again today for these objects 199l. 13s. 5d.

March 23. 200l. more came in today.

March 26. From three brethren 20l. for missions.--On the same day
from a missionary box at Old Aberdeen 2l.

May 12. The 26 donations which have come in for these objects, since
March 26th, were small. Today I received from Cornwall 50l., of which
the donor wished me to take 10l. for my own personal expenses; the rest
being left at my disposal I took the whole for these objects.

May 15. Received 20l. for missions.

May 19. When nearly all the means for these objects were exhausted, I
received 250l., of which I took for these objects 200l., and 50l. for
the current expenses for the Orphans.

Thus I have given some instances to show how the Lord was pleased to
supply me during another year.

Supplies for the support of the Orphans, sent in answer to prayer, from
May 26, 1851, to May 26, 1852.

When this period commenced, I had in hand for the current expenses for
the Orphans 970l. 13s. 11 ¾ d. We had never had so large a balance for
the other objects at the commencement of any new period, as was the case
at the commencement of this, and so it was also with regard to the
Orphan work. This arose from the fact, that, only a little more than
four months before the accounts were closed, a donation of 3000l. had
been given, which, being equally divided between the Orphan Fund and the
Fund for the other objects, had left so large a balance in hand. But
though there was this large balance to begin with, dependence upon God
was still required day by day, as the pecuniary help is only a very
small part of that which is needed; and even as to means, this sum would
not have lasted long, had the Lord not sent in further supplies. This,
however, He did; and thus it was, that, while there were other trials,
varied and many, yet, as to means, we experienced for a long time
scarcely any difficulty at all. I will now very briefly notice some
cases in which God helped us with means for the support of the Orphans,
in answer to prayer.

May 27, 1851. The first donation of this new period came from an aged
Godly clergyman, whom, up to that time, I had never seen, but to whom my
heart had been much knit through correspondence. The donation consisted
of 5l. from himself, and 1s. 6d. from three poor persons through him.

July 3. A brother and sister, having had a legacy left to them, though
very far from being rich, sent 50l. out of it for the Orphans, as they
desire to use the money with which the Lord may intrust them for Him.

Oct. 2. From the ladies who constitute the Bristol Dorcas Society, the
value of 215l. in flannel and unbleached calico.

Feb. 10, 1852. When the accounts were closed, there was in hand 970l.
13s. 11 ¾ d., and there has come in since then 1242l. 19s. 8d. Up to
this time, I had had an abundance of means, to meet all the current
expenses of the New Orphan-House, and there was still 126l. 3s. 8 ½ d.
in hand. But though I had this, the certain expenses of this week alone
were. 102l. 0s. 4d., besides what might be otherwise needed. Under these
circumstances, a Godly merchant at Clifton gave me this evening, through
his son, a Fifty Pound Note for the benefit of the Orphans. This
donation has greatly refreshed my spirit; for though we were not in
actual need, there being 126l. 3s. 8 ½ d. in hand, to meet the expenses
of 102l. 0s. 4d., which I expected to come upon me this week, yet there
would then only have been left 24l. 3s. 4 ½ d. towards meeting the
current expenses of an establishment with more than 300 inmates. There
had not been so little in hand since the New Orphan-House was first
opened. How kind, therefore, of the Lord, to put it into the heart of
this donor, who is not personally known to me, to contribute this sum!

March 16. From Feb. 10th up to March 8th the income had been
comparatively small, only about 130l. altogether having been received
for the current expenses for the Orphans. This, with what was in hand on
Feb. 10th, was, therefore, so reduced, that on March 8th I had only been
able to advance 15l. for house-keeping expenses, instead of 30l., which
I had for a long time been in the habit of doing. After having paid away
this 15l., I had only about 5l. left. Before this 15l., however, was
quite spent, I had received so much, that on the 12th I could advance.
10l. more for house-keeping. Now this money was all gone, and today,
March 16th, more money was needed, but there was none in hand, except
the balance which was last year left from the Building Fund, which I was
most reluctant to use, and concerning which I asked the Lord that there
might be no need for using it, as I wished to take it for the intended
Orphan-House, the number of destitute Orphans who are waiting for
admission being so great. Now observe how God helped me! Just before I
was called on for more money, I received this morning from a noble Lady
as her own gift and that of two of her friends 15l., and also 4s. 1 ½
d. was given to me as the contents of an Orphan-box. Thus I was able to
advance again 15l. for house-keeping.

March 17. For about six weeks past the Lord has been pleased to exercise
my faith and patience much. Very little, comparatively, has come in for
the Building Fund and the current expenses for the various objects; but
now He has this day greatly refreshed my spirit by the donation of 999l.
13s. 5d., referred to under the Building Fund, which, being left to me
for the Lord's work, to be used as I think best, I took of it for the
current expenses for the Orphans 200l.; so that again, before the money,
which came in yesterday, is expended, fresh supplies are received. I
have been particularly also refreshed by this donation, in that I am not
obliged to use the balance of the former Building Fund, but can let that
remain for the present Building Fund.

May 26, 1852. Since March 17th no further difficulties have been
experienced with regard to means; for though the expenses have amounted
since then to about 700l., the Lord has bountifully supplied me with all
I needed; for I received another donation of 200l., one of 75l. 18s.
9d., one of 50l., two of 10l., eighteen of between 5l. and 10l., besides
many between 6d. and 5l.--Thus I am helped to the close of another
year, during which the Lord has enabled me, through waiting upon Him,
and looking to Him for help, to supply all the current expenses of the
New Orphan-House with its 300 Orphans and all their overseers, teachers,
nurses, etc.; the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts has been
going on as before; the various schools have been supported; the same
amount as during the past year, or rather more, has been expended for
missionary objects; and yet, over and above all this, I have been
enabled to gather a goodly sum for the Building Fund of the intended
Orphan-House.

Have I not therefore abundant reason to praise the Lord for His
goodness, to trust in Him for the future, to speak well of His name to
my fellow-believers, and to encourage them, more and more to rely upon
the Lord for everything?

Miscellaneous points respecting the Scriptural Know/edge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 26, 1851, to May
26, 1852.

1. During this period there were entirely supported by the funds of the
Institution four Day Schools in Bristol, with 248 poor children in them,
and three others in Devonshire, Monmouthshire, and Norfolk, were
assisted.--Further, one Sunday School in Bristol, with 243 children,
was entirely supported, and two others in Devonshire and
Gloucestershire, with 230 children, were assisted.--Lastly, one Adult
School in Bristol, with 120 Adult Scholars, was entirely supported
during this period.--From March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 1852, there
were 5,525 children in the Day Schools in Bristol, 2,600 in the Sunday
School, and 2,033 grown up persons in the Adult School.--There was
expended of the Funds of the Institution, for these various Schools,
during this period, 360l. 1s. 9d.

2. During this period there was expended of the Funds of the Institution
207l. 3s. 1d. for the purpose of circulating the Holy Scriptures,
especially among the very poorest of the poor. There were issued during
this period 1,101 Bibles and 409 New Testaments.--There were
altogether circulated from March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 1852, Eight
Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten Bibles, and Four Thousand Eight Hundred
and Fifty-one New Testaments.

For two years previous to May 26, 1852, it was on my heart, to seek to
make some especial effort for the spread of the Holy Scriptures and for
the spread of simple Gospel Tracts, in a way and for a purpose which
would not be accomplished by the giving of copies of the Holy
Scriptures, or the giving of Tracts to poor persons. My wish was, to put
believers of the higher classes in the way of obtaining cheap pocket
Bibles for the purpose of giving them away as presents to more
respectable persons, as well as furnishing them with the opportunity of
purchasing Bibles and New Testaments, at a cheap rate, for giving them
away among the poor; and of furnishing believers in the higher classes,
who are Tract distributors, with an opportunity of purchasing simple
Gospel Tracts for circulation. Connected with this I desired,
especially, to present the truths of the Gospel, in print, before
genteel persons, whom I had not the same opportunity of reaching as
poorer persons to whom Tracts and Bibles might be given. To this my
attention was turned on account of the mighty efforts which were made to
take away the Holy Scriptures, and to spread Tracts which contain most
pernicious errors. Up to this time we had never had, to any considerable
extent, a depository for Bibles and Tracts. The circulation of Tracts
had been almost exclusively by gratuitous distribution; and thus it had
been also, for some years previously, with reference to the circulation
of the Holy Scriptures.--For a very long time, however, we could not
meet with a suitable house, till at last, after much prayer, and waiting
for more than a year, convenient premises were obtained by renting No.
34, Park Street, Bristol. On April 29, 1852, this Bible and Tract
Warehouse was opened with prayer.

3. During this year there was spent of the funds of the Institution, for
missionary objects, the sum of 2005l. 7s. 5d. By this sum fifty-one
labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were
to a greater or less degree assisted.

It is a subject of joy and thankfulness to me, to be able to inform the
believing reader, that the Lord was pleased to grant again much blessing
upon the labours of these brethren during this year. Many sinners were
converted through their instrumentality, some of whom had been in a most
awful state. This remark applies both to foreign and home labourers.

4. There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1851,
to May 26, 1852, the sum of 356l. 11s. 3 ½ d. There were circulated
during the year 489,136 Tracts.

The total number of Tracts, which were circulated from the beginning up
to May 26, 18152, was 1,086,366.

The Lord is pleased to increase this part of the work more and more.

It is not merely, however, of the increase in the number of Tracts that
I have to speak. I heard during this year of one case after another, in
which the tracts, with which the Lord enabled me to furnish the many
brethren who circulate them, were used by Him in the way of
communicating great blessing to believers, or as instruments of
conversion to unbelievers. I would indeed with all my might seek to
spread the truth of God by means of these little publications in greater
and greater numbers; but I would follow them also, day by day, with my
prayers, and never trust in the numbers which have been issued, but in
God, to Grant His blessing, without which all these efforts are in
vain.

A great number of believers, in various parts of the world, aid me in
the circulation of tracts. Up to April 1852, however, almost all the
tracts which were circulated were given away gratuitously, but, as has
been stated already, there was then more particularly commenced the sale
of Tracts also, in connexion with the sale of Bibles, at the Bible and
Tract Warehouse, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol.

5. On May 26, 1851, there were. Three Hundred Orphans in the New Orphan
House on Ashley Down, Bristol. From that day up to May 26, 1852, there
wore admitted into it twenty-seven Orphans, making 327 in all. Of these
327, nine died during the year; one Orphan was sent to Christian
relatives, who by that time were able to provide for him, and who felt
it their duty to do so; one was sent to relatives on account of being in
such a state of health that the Establishment was an unsuitable place
for her; three of the elder girls, who were able to earn their bread by
entering service, but who could not be recommended to any situation,
after they had been long borne with, were at last sent in disgrace from
the Establishment to their relatives. This course was adopted as a last
remedy with regard to themselves, and as a solemn warning for all the
children in the Establishment. Four girls were with comfort sent out to
service, and nine boys were apprenticed at the expense of the
establishment. This makes the removals as many as the reception of new
Orphans, so that the number was still 300 in the New Orphan House, on
May 26, 1852. The total of the expenses, connected with the support of
the Orphans, from May 26, 1851, to May 26, 1852, was 3035l. 3s. 4d. The
total number of Orphans under our care from April 1836, to May 26,
18152, was Five Hundred and Fifteen.

I notice further the following points in connection with the New Orphan
House.

1. Without any one having been personally applied to for anything, by
me, the sum of 42,970l. 17s. 6d. was given to me for the Orphans as the
result of prayer to God from the commencement of the work, up to May 26,
1852. It may be also interesting to the reader to know, that the total
amount, which was given as free contributions, for the other objects,
from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1852, amounted to
15,976l. 10s. 6 ¼ d.; and that, which came in by the sale of Bibles and
Tracts, and by the payments of the children in the Day-Schools, amounted
to 3,073/. 1s. 9 ¾ d. Besides this, also a great variety and number of
articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, &c., were given for the use
of the Orphans.

2. During no period of the work had we such great affliction in the way
of sickness in the Orphan Establishment as during this. For nearly four
months the scarlet fever and other diseases prevailed, so that more than
one hundred children were seriously ill during this period, and at one
time there were 55 Orphans confined to their beds. But the Lord dealt
very mercifully with us. Only 5 died in consequence of the scarlet
fever, though we had 64 decided cases.

3. Several of the Orphans who left the Establishment during this year
went away as believers, having been converted some time before they
left; one also who died gave very decided evidence of a true change of
heart by faith in our Lord Jesus; several who in former years were under
our care, as we heard during this year, took their stand openly on the
Lord's side, and dated their first impressions to the instructions
received whilst with us; and lastly, of those under our care, there were
not a few whose spiritual state gave us joy and comfort. Thus, amidst
many difficulties and trials and some discouragements, we had abundant
cause to praise God for His goodness, and to go forward in the strength
of the Lord.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs.

Dec. 31, 1851. During this year the Lord was pleased to give me—

1. By anonymous offerings through the
Chapel boxes . . . . . £157 4 0 ¾

2. By presents in money from believers in
Bristol, not given anonymously . 135 5 4

3. By presents in money, from believers
not residing in Bristol . . . 156 6 9

4. By presents in provisions, clothes, &c.,
worth to us at least . . . 16 17 0

----

£465 13 1 ¾

Admire, dear reader, the Lord's kindness towards me, in that again,
during this year also, Ha has so abundantly supplied me with means for
my own personal and family necessities, without any regular salary or
other stated income whatever, simply in answer to prayer.

Further account of the intended Orphan House for Seven Hundred Poor
Children, bereaved of both parents by death, from May 26, 1852, to May
26, 1853.

In the last chapter on this subject, it was stated, that on May 26,
1852, 1 had actually in hand towards this object 3,530l. 9s. 0 ¼ d.;
and now I go on to relate how the Lord has been pleased to help me
further since then; but, for the sake of brevity, I can only refer to
the more remarkable donations.

June 18. Received 5s. 7d. from the Orphans in the Girl's Department of
the New Orphan House, in commemoration of the anniversary of the opening
of the New Orphan House, which took place this day three years. Received
also 3s. 9d. from the Orphan Boys. These little sums from these children
have given me much joy. I likewise received this day a donation of
200l., of which the donor kindly wished me to keep 20l. for my own
personal expenses, and to use the 180l. as might be most needed. I took
of this sum 60l. for the Building Fund, 60l. towards the support of the
300 Orphans, and 60l. for the various other objects of the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution.

June 22. Today I was informed that there had been paid into the hands of
my bankers 500l. This sum is from a donor whom I have never seen, but
whom God evidently has led, in answer to my daily supplications, and to
those of my fellow-labourers, to help me in His service. This donation
has exceedingly refreshed my spirit, and has led me to expect more and
more help from God. As this 500l. is left at my disposal, I took of it
one-third for the Building Fund, another third for the current expenses
for the 300 Orphans, and the last third for the School—, Bible—,
Tract—, and Missionary Fund of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution.

July 1. 50l. The money being left to my disposal, I took half for the
Building Fund--and half for the School—, Bible—, Tract— and
Missionary Objects.

July 29. Received from one of the Orphans, formerly under our care, the
following lines: "Dear Sir, will you please to accept the enclosed
silver chain for the Building Fund, and the 3s. 6d. for your personal
use, from your grateful Orphan, * * * *." This donation gave me much
joy.

Aug. 6. From an Irish friend 53l., "As a small acknowledgment of the
donor's gratitude to his Heavenly Father for enriching him with the
unsearchable riches of Christ, and to his dear Redeemer for loving him,
and giving Himself for him."

Aug. 13. From the neighbourhood of London 50l.

Aug. 21. From Southport a gold ring--I received also today the
following letter from Madras, East Indies, enclosing a donation of 50l.
for the Building Fund.

"* * * * * Madras, 9th July, 1852.

"Dear Brother,

"Some time in the year 1842 or 1843 I met with ‘The Lord's dealings
with George Müller,' and, after rending it, was moved to send you
something; but at that time I had not the means. In fact, I had lent,
what little money I had, to a person who was unable to repay me, and I
was nearly destitute. The good hand of God has been on me since that
time, and I have often wondered whether George Müller was still in the
flesh but never had the resolution to inquire. Last December I met in a
friend's house the Twelfth Report, and, after reading it, resolved to
cast a mite into the Lord's treasury towards building the Orphan-House
for Seven Hundred children; and may the God of Jacob, that has fed me
all my life long, unto this day, accept of it, as an acknowledgment of
the thousandth part of the mercies I have received at His hands. I
therefore enclose a bill of exchange * * * *. Value of bill Seventy
Pounds sterling. * * * * I have often mentioned you by name in my
appeals to the throne of grace; and if I meet you not on earth, I hope I
shall in those regions where we shall see the Lamb on His throne and in
His Father's kingdom, and where there is no more sin or sorrow.

My dear Brother,

"Ever yours,

"* * * * *"

This donation and letter have exceedingly refreshed my spirit, and
quickened me yet further to prayer.

Pause a few moments dear Reader. See how faith and prayer bring means
from individuals whom we have never seen, whose very names we have never
heard of, and who live at a distance of more than Ten Thousand miles
from us. Do you not see that it is not in vain, to make known our
requests to the Lord, and to come to Him for everything? When it was
first laid on my heart, to build a second Orphan-House for 700 destitute
children, bereaved of both parents by death, simply in dependence upon
God alone for means, could I have looked for this 70l. from this
Christian brother at Madras? Verily not, for I did not even know of his
existence. Had I other friends, from whom to expect the large sum which
will be needed to accomplish this? No, on the contrary, all human
probability was against my ever receiving this large sum. But I had
faith in God. I believed that He was able and willing to give me what
was needed for this work; and solely in dependence upon Him I purposed
to build another Orphan-House. But now see bow God has helped me
further; for after I had received this donation of 70l., I had still
only 4,127l. 12s. 6 ¾ d. in hand, in other words, only a little more
than the ninth part of the sum which, as far as I am able to calculate,
will be needed to accomplish my object.

Aug. 30. During this month again fourteen destitute Orphans have been
applied for, none of whom we can receive, because the New Orphan-House
is full. There are now 356 Orphans already waiting for admission, from
six months old and upwards, each bereaved of both parents by death.

Sept. 8. During the last five days, only 2l. 14s. had come in for the
Building Fund, and only 9l. 1s. altogether for the current expenses for
the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. Such
seasons try my faith and patience; but, by the grace of God, they do not
discourage me. He helps me to continue in prayer, and to look for
answers, and for a time when He will help again bountifully. During the
past eighteen years and six months, which I have been occupied in this
service, I have again and again found, that, after a season, during
which very little has come in, and my faith has thus been tried, the
Lord has generally the more bountifully helped afterwards. Thus it has
been again this day. I have received a donation of 280l. 10s. 6d., of
which the donor kindly wished me to take 20l. 10s. 6d. for my own
personal expenses, and to use the 260l. as the work of the Lord in my
hands might require. I took of this sum one-third for the Building Fund,
one-third for the current expenses for the Orphans, and one-third for
the other Objects. Thus I had at once a four-fold answer to prayer; 1,
Means for my own personal expenses, about which I had been asking the
Lord; 2, Means for the Building Fund, for which I am day by day
labouring in prayer; 3, Means for the current expenses for the Orphans,
which were greatly needed; and 4, Means for the other Objects, which
were entirely exhausted.

Sept. 28. From Melbourne, in Australia, 50l., from a believer in the
Lord Jesus, whose name even I did not know up to the time that I
received this donation.--See, dear Reader, how the Lord helps me, in
answer to prayer. Do you not perceive that my fellow-labourers and
myself do not wait upon the Lord in vain? Be encouraged by this! Go for
yourself, with all your temporal and spiritual wants, to the Lord. Bring
also the necessities of your friends and relatives to the Lord. Only
make the trial, and you will perceive how able and willing He is to help
you. Should you, however, not at once, obtain answers to your prayers,
be not discouraged; but continue patiently, believingly, perseveringly
to wait upon God: and as assuredly as that, which you ask, would be for
your real good, and therefore for the honour of the Lord; and as
assuredly as you ask it solely on the ground of the worthiness of our
Lord Jesus, so assuredly you will at last obtain the blessing. I myself
have had to wait upon God concerning certain matters for years, before I
obtained answers to my prayers; but at last they came. At this very
time, I have still to renew my requests daily before God, respecting a
certain blessing for which I have besought Him for eleven years and a
half, and which I have as yet obtained only in part, but concerning
which I have no doubt that the full blessing will be granted in the end.
So also, when I was led to build the New Orphan-House, and waited upon
the Lord for means for it, it took two years and three months, whilst
day by day I brought this matter before Him, before I received the full
answer.--But to return to my journal. This donation of 50l. from
Melbourne, refreshed my spirit greatly, and quickened me yet further to
prayer.--On the same day I received from Sheffield 5l., and from
Tottenham 10l.

Oct. 31. Thirteen more Orphans have been applied for during this month.

Nov. 3. This evening I received a check for 300l. for the Building Fund.
— I am continually looking out for help, and am sustained in waiting
upon God, and in being enabled daily, and generally several times every
day, to bring the matter about the Building Fund before Him. I know that
God hears me, on the ground of the worthiness of the Lord Jesus, and
that at last He will give me the full amount needed for accomplishing
this work. How the means are to come, I know not; but I know that God is
almighty, that the hearts of all are in His hands, and that, if He
pleaseth to influence persons, they will send help. In this donation of
300l., received this evening, I have seen afresh, how easily God can
send means. The donor, who sent it, was not even known to me by name
this day month; but, on Oct. 12th, he sent me 200l. for the Orphans, and
now 300l. for the Building Fund. Nothing had come in during the former
part of the day; still, I was looking out, and, when I returned from the
Orphan-House, found that this 300l. had arrived at my house. But I
expect far larger sums.

Nov. 11. From London three boxes and two parcels of books, containing
275 volumes in all, to be sold for the Building Fund.

Nov. 16. 50l.--From the neighbourhood of Stroud 10s.--From one of
the former Orphans 10s., being part of her first quarter's wages. Sent
as a token of gratitude.

Nov. 19. 200l., which, being left to my disposal, I took of it 100l. for
the Building Fund, 60l. for preachers of the Gospel at Home and Abroad,
20l. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and 20l. for the
circulation of Tracts.

Nov. 21. From Malta 5l.

Nov. 27. "From the neighbourhood of Leominster, as a thank-offering,"
2l. Day by day I am waiting upon God, concerning this object. I firmly
believe that the Lord will give me all I require for the accomplishment
of it though I am utterly unworthy. I believe that I shall also have
large sums, very large sums, when the Lord has been pleased sufficiently
to exercise my faith and patience. Today I received 250l., the disposal
of which was left to me. I took, therefore, 125l. for the Building Fund,
25l. for current expenses for the Orphans, 40/. for the home and foreign
labourers in the Word, whom I seek to assist, 20l. for gratuitous
circulation of the Holy Scriptures among very poor persons, 20l. for
gratuitous circulation of Gospel Tracts, and 20l. for all the various
Day schools, Sunday schools, and the Adult school, which the Scriptural
Knowledge Institution either assists or entirely supports.

Nov. 30. During this month, again 25 children, bereaved of both parents
by death, lawfully begotten, and in destitute circumstances, have been
applied for, not one of whom I have any prospect of being able to admit
until the Lord shall have been pleased to enable me to build another
Orphan-House. The many Orphans waiting for admission, whose number is
increasing every month, lead me to continue in earnest supplication,
that the Lord would be pleased to furnish me with means for the erection
of another Orphan-House. Nor do I doubt that He will help me.

Jan. 3. From the neighbourhood of Stroud 1l. 15s. 3d.--Anonymously
in a letter 8d.--From Newtown Limavady 1l.--Also 252l. 17s. 1d.,
which, being left to my disposal, I portioned out thus: 75l. for the
Orphans, 75l. for the School, Bible, Missionary and Tract Fund, and
102l. 17s. 1d. for the Building Fund.

Jan. 4. From London 2s. 6d.--Day by day I have now been waiting upon
God for means for the Building Fund for more than nineteen months, and
almost daily I have received something in answer to prayer. These
donations have been, for the most part, small, in comparison with the
amount which will be required for the completion of this object;
nevertheless they have shown that the Lord, for the sake of His dear
Son, listens to my supplications and to those of my fellow labourers and
helpers in the work; and they have been precious encouragements to me to
continue to wait upon God. I have been for many months assured that the
Lord, in His own time, would give larger sums for this work; and for
this I have been more and more earnestly entreating Him, during the last
months. Now at last He has abundantly refreshed my spirit, and answered
my request. I received today the promise, that, as the joint donation of
several Christians, there should be paid to me a donation of Eight
Thousand and One Hundred Pounds for the work of the Lord in my hands. Of
this sum I purpose to take 6,000l. for the Building Fund, 600l. for the
current expenses for the Orphans, and 1,500l. for the other objects of
the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad. [This joint
donation of several Christians was paid in four installments during
January, February, March, and April.]

It is impossible to describe the spiritual refreshment which my heart
received through this donation. Day by day, for nineteen months, I had
been looking out for more abundant help than I had had. I was fully
assured that God would help me with larger sums; yet the delay was long.
See how precious it is to wait upon God! See how those who do so, are
not confounded! Their faith and patience may long and sharply he tried;
but in the end it will most assuredly be seen, that those who honour God
He will honour, and will not suffer them to be put to shame. The
largeness of the donation, whilst it exceedingly refreshed my spirit,
did not in the least surprise me; for I expect great things from God. I
quote a paragraph from the Twelfth Report, page 27, where under Jan. 4,
1851, this will be found written: "I received this evening the sum of
Three Thousand Pounds, being the largest donation which I have had as
yet. I have had very many donations of 100l. and of 200l., several of
300l., one of 400l., several of 500l., some of from 600l.
to 900l., four of 1,000l., two of 2,000l., and
one of 2,050l., but never had more than this given to me at one time;
yet I have expected more than 2,050l. in one donation, and, accordingly,
it has pleased the Lord to give me 3,000l. this evening. I now write
again that I expect far larger sums still, in order that it may be yet
more and more manifest, that there is no happier, no easier, and no
better way for obtaining pecuniary means for the work of the Lord, than
the one in which I have been led." This, you perceive, dear Reader, was
written more than two years ago. Since then I have again received many
considerable donations, besides thousands of pounds in smaller sums. And
now the largest donation of 3,000l., was surpassed by the one of 8,100l.
Have I then been boasting in God in vain? Is it not manifest that it is
most precious, in every way, to depend upon God? Do I serve God for
nought? Is it not obvious that the principles on which I labour, are not
only applicable to the work of God on a small scale, but also, as I have
so many times affirmed during the past nineteen years, for the most
extensive operations for God? I delight to dwell upon this, if, by any
means, some of my beloved fellow believers might be allured to put their
whole trust in God for every thing; and if, by any means, some
unbelievers thereby might be made to see that God is verily the living
God now as ever, and might be stirred up to seek to be reconciled to Him
by putting their trust in the atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ, and
thus find in God a friend for time and eternity.

Feb. 19. Saturday Evening. The Lord has been pleased to send in the
means as sparingly this month, as He was pleased to send them in
abundantly during the last. But this is for the trial of my faith and
patience. While, however, these graces are exercised by the Lord, He
kindly sustains both. With unshaken confidence and joyful anticipation
am I, by the help of God, enabled to go forward day by day, looking on
to the day when I shall have the whole amount requisite for this object,
just as it was with reference to the building of the New Orphan House on
Ashley Down. I know that I shall not be confounded; for I trust in God,
and for the honour of His name proposed the building of this second
Orphan House. Yet my soul longs, to be able to declare to the Church of
Christ at large, that I have obtained an answer to this my oft repeated
request, which again and again, every day, is brought before Him, and in
which request my fellow labourers in the work join. Moreover, I long to
be able to show to an unbelieving world afresh, by this my petition
being granted, that verily there is reality in the things of God. And
lastly, I long to be able to commence the building of this second Orphan
House, because there are now 438 Orphans waiting for admission. I have
not yet received anything today for this object; but the Lord can even
now give me something this evening; but be that as it may, I know that,
when His time is come, and when my patience has been sufficiently
exercised, He will help me abundantly. That word respecting Abraham:
"And so, after he had patiently endured, he obtained the promise,"
(Hebrew vi, 15), has been repeatedly a precious word to me during the
last days, it having come of late in the course of my reading through
the New Testament.

Feb. 23. This evening, after another long season of prayer respecting
the work of God in my hands, and especially also, that it might please
the Lord to give me soon what I need for the Building Fund, so that I
may be enabled to take active steps in the erection of another Orphan
House, came in the course of my reading and meditation James I. This
forcibly reminded me of the close of November and the beginning of
December in 1845, when, whilst labouring for a season in the Word at
Sunderland, this portion also came in the course of my meditation on the
whole New Testament. James i, 4: "But let patience have her perfect
work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing," was then
particularly impressed on my mind as a portion which I should need to
keep before me. I was at that time, day by day, waiting upon the Lord
for means and every other help which might be needed in connexion with
the Orphan House, which I had purposed to build in dependence upon the
Lord for help. I had not the least doubt that God would help me through
all the difficulties connected with this work. I felt as sure that He
would enable me to accomplish this work, as if I had actually seen the
house before me, inhabited by Orphans; but I had reason to believe, at
the same time, that great and many and varied would be my trials of
faith and patience, before all would be accomplished. I had not at that
time one single shilling in hand towards this work, but often, even
then, whilst staying at Sunderland, and meditating on this first chapter
of the Epistle of James, did I praise God before hand, that He would
give me everything I should need in connexion with this intended Orphan
House. Now this evening, February 23, 1853, I am writing in that very
house, the New Orphan House, with its 300 Orphans, about which I was
then praying. Nearly four years it has been already inhabited by
Orphans. And I now say again, "Let patience have her perfect work," with
reference to the intended Orphan House for 700 more Orphans; but also,
at the same time, am I assured that the Lord will enable me to
accomplish this also.

March 14.--From Scotland 200l., of which the donor kindly wished me
to give 10l. to Mr. Craik, to take 10l. for my own personal expenses,
and to use the 180l. as most needed. I took, therefore, 100l. for the
Building Fund, and 80l. for the current expenses for the Orphans. This
donation has been a great refreshment to my spirit; for since Jan. 4th
only little, comparatively, has come in either for the Building Fund or
for the current expenses.

March 29. For nearly three months the Lord has been pleased to exercise
my patience by the comparatively small amount of means which has come
in. It was more an exercise of patience than of faith; for, during all
this time, we not only abounded, with regard to means for the current
expenses, through the large sums, which had come in at the beginning of
the year, but I had also even now considerable sums in hand, for the
current expenses of the various objects. Still, though not actually in
need of means, yet my spirit had been enabled to labour on in prayer for
means for the Building Fund in particular, and also for means for
current expenses, in order that it may become more and more manifest,
what a happy, easy, and successful way this is. Now, this evening, when
I came home, I found that 300l. had come in. This is a great refreshment
to my spirit.--As the amount is left to my disposal as may be most
needed, I have taken one half of it for the Building Fund, and the other
half for the current expenses for the Orphans. The other objects abound
at present with means, and even for the Orphans I have yet above 200l.
in hand.

April 20. Received from a most unexpected quarter 100l., which I took
half for the Building Fund, and half for the Orphans, as the other
objects were not in immediate need of means. This donation has much
refreshed my spirit.

May 14. Received 260l., of which I took 100l. for the Building Fund, and
160l. for the current expenses for the Orphans.

May 26. From Gloucester 5s.--Through the box at the Bible and Tract
Warehouse in Park Street, Bristol, 2l. 11s. 10d.--By sale of an old
gold watch, a few trinkets, some old silver coins, and some small pieces
of broken silver articles, 10l. 7s. 8d.--Also 80l. 15s. 11d., being
the proceeds arising from the sale of a work published in English and
2l. 10s., being the proceeds arising from the sale of a work published
in French; were given to the Building Fund.--To these sums is to be
added 334l. 16s. 9d., received during this period for interest; for I
felt it my duty, as has been stated before, to invest the money given to
me for the Building Fund until actually required.

Thus closes this period, from May 26, 1852, to May 26, 1853. All the
donations received during this period for the Building Fund, together
with the 3530l. 9s. 0 ¼ d. in hand, on May 26, 1852, made the total of
12,531l. 12s. 0 ¼ d. in hand on May 26, 1853.

The following paragraphs were printed in the Report of 1853, respecting
the intended Orphan House, which are here reprinted for the better
understanding of the subject.

A. Besides having the means to meet all the demands which came upon me
in connexion with the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution for Home and Abroad; and besides enlarging almost all of
them considerably, so that the sum of 7035l. 12s. 0 ½ d. altogether was
expended; I have been enabled to add, during the past twelvemonth,
9,001l. 3s. to the Building Fund. The total sum, which God has been
pleased to give to me, during the year, both for current expenses and
the Building Fund, amounts to 16,042l. 8s. 11d.

B. It is true that very much yet is needed for the Building Fund, before
I shall be enabled to accomplish the desire of my heart, in building
another House for 700 more Orphans. I may have also yet many trials of
faith and patience to pass through; but what the Lord has done for me
during the past 24 years in particular, and all His dealings with me in
connexion with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution; and all His help
afforded for building the New Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol,
which has been now already inhabited for four years encourage me to
continue to wait upon God. By His grace I am not tired of waiting upon
Him for means. Yea, I confess to His praise, that, the longer I live,
the more I am practically assured of the blessedness of waiting upon God
for every thing.

C. There is no decrease as to the application for the admission of
Orphans. This, in addition to all the help and support which the Lord
has granted to me for these many years in the work, and in addition to
the means received for the Building Fund during the past year,
encourages me greatly, to continue to wait upon God for help, to be
enabled to build another Orphan House for 700 Orphans. On May 26, 1852,
there were 326 Orphans waiting for admission. Since then there have been
184 Orphans applied for, making in all 510. Of these, as only few
vacancies have occurred during the past year, not more than 13 could be
received into the New Orphan House, and 17 besides, as I have been
informed by applicants, were otherwise provided for, so that 30 are to
be deducted from 510, which leaves 480 Orphans waiting for admission.
Many of these are very young, some even under one year old. But I have
the fullest reason to believe, that many persons are kept from applying
for the admission of Orphans, because there are already so many waiting,
else the number would be greater still. With such a number of poor
destitute Orphans before me, bereaved of both parents by death, how can
I but labour on in prayer for means, for the accomplishment of this
object; and I have not the least doubt that, after the Lord may have
been pleased to exercise my faith and patience yet somewhat more,
unworthy though I am of it, He will condescend to grant the request for
the whole amount of the means which are needed for the building of this
second Orphan House, in answer to the supplications which my
fellow-labourers and myself continually bring before Him.

D. It must not be supposed that I am discouraged, because two years have
elapsed since I first began to receive donations towards this object,
and as yet only 12,531l. l2s. 0 ¼ d. is in hand. I expected trials of
faith and patience, both for my own profit, and for the benefit of
others, who might hear of the Lord's dealings with me. I was not
without trials, yea, not without many trials of faith and patience, in
building the New Orphan House for 300 Orphans; nor did I obtain the
means then till after the lapse of two years and three months;
therefore, in seeking to build this house for 700 Orphans, I am not
surprised that I should have to wait patiently. But of this I have never
had a doubt that, after the Lord had sufficiently tried my faith and
patience, He would supply me with all I need. I therefore wait His time.
Moreover, the Lord, in a very short time, can give me all I need, it is
not necessary that twice or thrice as much time as has already elapsed
should have to pass away, before I am in a position to be warranted to
take active measures; yet, be this as it may, by the grace of God I am
content to wait His time.

E. Should it be asked, whether I intend to wait till I have the whole
sum of Thirty-Five Thousand Pounds, which will be needed; or whether I
purpose to begin the building before; my reply is this I do not purpose
to delay the beginning of the building till I have what is required for
fitting up and furnishing the house, which is included in that sum; for
I may well trust in the Lord for that amount whilst the House is being
built; but as I, on Scriptural grounds, neither for my own personal
expenses, nor for the work of God, go into debt, I should not begin
building, till I have sufficient to meet the amount of the contracts of
the builders, for which, together with the land, I consider not less
than 25,000l. would be needed, so that I have just half the amount
requisite for that.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund, sent in
answer to prayer, from May 26, 1852, to May 26, 1853.

On May 26, 1852, when the accounts were closed, there was left in hand
for these objects the balance of 45l. 5s. 7 ½ d. Before this balance
was expended, I received, on May 27, 1852, from the neighbourhood of
Whitehaven, 2l. 10s. for missions. On May 29, from Belper 5s. 7d. for
missions. On May 30, through Bethesda boxes 2s. 6d. and 4d. for
missions. On June 7th, I received from Somersetshire. 10l.; and on the
same day I found that a Christian bookseller in London had, paid into
the hands of my bankers 34l. 14s. 4d., which he had been ordered to pay
to me, on behalf of a Christian gentleman, to whom this amount was due.
This sum I took for these objects. But the Lord helped still further.
June 8. 10l. from Y. Z.--June 13. From Y. Z. 33l. 3s. Through
Bethesda boxes for missions 1s. Ditto 1s. Through Salem boxes 1s. 8d.
From "P." 1s. Ditto 4d. —June. 15. From one engaged in the work 1l.
— June 16. From Clifton 4d.--June 18. From W, W. 10l. "for
missionary brethren, labouring in dependence upon God for their temporal
supplies." Also 200l. came in, of which I took 60l. for these objects,
as stated with reference to this donation, in giving an account of the
donations for the Building Fund.--June 22. 500l. came in, as stated
under Building Fund, of which one-third or 166l. 13s. 4d. was taken for
these objects.

This is just a specimen of how the Lord helped me, week after week, to
meet the expenses during this period. About Six Hundred Pounds a month,
or above Seven Thousand Pounds during the year, I had to expend for the
various objects of the Institution; but I had sufficient to meet every
demand; and over and above I was helped by the Lord to increase the
Building Fund Nine Thousand Pounds above what it was the year before.
The current expenses of the Institution were never so great during the
previous nineteen years; but the extent of its operations, and the means
which the Lord was pleased to send in, were also never so great.

I stated, however, before, that I could not give here in detail an
account of every donation. I, therefore, single out a few more
instances, to show the manner in which the Lord helped me.

Aug. 4. The funds for these objects were now reduced to about 4l.; but
there was much required in order to be able to go on with the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and to assist missionary
brethren; when I received this evening 200l., which was left to me to be
applied as seemed best to me. I took therefore one half for the current
expenses for the Orphans, and the other half for these objects, and was
thus again supplied for the present.

Aug. 14. 20l. for missions from W. W.

Sept. 8. Little, comparatively, has come in since August 4th. Only
twenty-seven donations altogether, of which only a few were rather large
sums. Therefore all our means were now gone. On the 3rd of this month I
sent out 40l. to six brethren who labour in the Word, and would on that
day have sent out 35l, more to other six brethren, but had not the
means; and, therefore, could only wait upon God. I also desired to order
more Bibles and Tracts; but had to delay this likewise, as I would not
go into debt for them. Now this morning I received 280l. 10s. 6d.
[referred to under the Building Fund], of which 86l. 13s. 4d. was taken
for these objects. Thus I am helped again for the present, and look for
further supplies.

Oct. 9. Only nineteen donations, almost all small, have come in for
these objects since September 8th. For the last three days I have
especially desired means for these objects. Gladly would I have helped
brethren who labour in the Word at home and abroad; but was unable to do
so, and could only pray for means. Now this morning the Lord gave me the
desire of my-heart in this respect. I received a donation of 230l. 15s.,
which, being left at my disposal, I took one half for these objects, and
the other half for the current expenses for the Orphans.

Nov. 3. "From an Irish friend" 10l. for missions.--I have
particularly prayed within the last few days for means for missionary
objects, as all means are gone; therefore this donation is very
refreshing as an answer to prayer. But I expect more, as I desire to
send out shortly 200l. at least to brethren who labour in the Word.

This I wrote, as the date shows, on November 3rd, and that which follows
will now show to the Reader, that I did not wait upon God in vain.
During no period, within the nineteen years previously, was I enabled to
do so much in the way of aiding missionary operations, as during this
period; and during no previous period so much in the circulation of the
Holy Scriptures and Tracts, as during this; yet once or twice all the
means for these objects were expended, and I had to stand still and to
wait upon God for further supplies. The servant of Christ, who knows
that he is not occupied about his own work, but about that of his
master, can, however, be quiet, and ought to be quiet, under such
circumstances, in order to prove that he is only the servant and not the
master. If he cannot be quiet, and if, in the restlessness of nature, he
will work and take steps when he ought to stand still, and wait upon
God; then let him suspect himself, and let him see well to it, whether
the work in which he is engaged is God's work or not; and whether, if
it be God's work, it is done for the honour of the Master or for the
honour of the servant. In this case God abundantly recompensed me for
standing still for a little, and for calling upon Him. I had not to wait
long, before He was pleased to help me. I now go on with my journal, to
show to the Reader how the Lord answered prayer in this instance.

Nov. 5. Received from Okehampton six silver tea spoons, to be sold for
foreign missions.

Nov. 6. Received 5l. with the following words: "Enclosed is a Post
Office Order, drawn out in your favour by * * * * *, Three Pounds of
which my dear husband is constrained to send to you for foreign
missions. The other two I send; one for your own personal expenses, and
the other to be used for the Orphans, as their need may require, &c."

I have especially prayed, for several days past, for help for brethren
who labour in the Word at home and abroad, as I have no means left for
them, and could lay out at once 200l. or 300l. on their behalf.
Therefore this donation is particularly precious. But I expect more.

Nov. 7. From Braunton 2l. for missions.--Anonymously 2s. 6d. for
missions.

Nov. 10. From some believers at Ludlow 8l. 14s. for foreign missions.

Nov. 11. During the last ten days I have especially asked the Lord for
means for home and foreign labourers. This also was particularly dwelt
upon at our usual weekly prayer meeting of the labourers in the work on
Saturday the 6th of November. Now today I received 237l. 10s. for the
work of the Lord in my hands. As the application of the money was left
to me, I took the whole of this amount for home and foreign labourers in
the Word, as they, greatly need help; and I expect by tomorrow evening
to have sent out the whole amount.--In the course of my reading
through the Holy Scriptures there came today John xvi. 23, "Verily,
verily I say unto you, whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, He
will give it you." I turned to my Father in heaven and said: "Be
pleased, Holy Father, to hear me for the sake of Thy Holy Child Jesus,
and give me means for these dear brethren who labour in the word and
doctrine, whom I seek to help." In about half an hour afterwards I
received this 237l. 10.

Nov. 18. Today were paid to me two legacies, left by a lady at a
distance whom I have never seen, and whose name even I had never heard,
till I was informed about the payment of the legacies. I received the
legacy of 100l. for the Orphans (being 101l. 4s. with the interest due),
and 50l. for the various Schools for poor children under my direction
(being 50l. 12s. with the interest due.)--In portioning out yesterday
the means for the brethren who labour in the Word at home and abroad, to
whom I desire to send help, I found that the 237l. 10s. was not enough,
and also that I needed more means for the various Schools and the
circulation of Bibles and Tracts. On this account the payment of this
legacy of 50l. 12s. for the Schools came in very seasonably. But the
Lord helped still further this evening by a donation of 60l., the
application of which is entirely left to me. I have therefore taken of
it 20l. for missionary brethren, 20l. for the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures, and 20l. for the circulation of Gospel Tracts.

Nov. 19. From Yorkshire 3l. for foreign missions.--From Cumberland
13s. 10d. for missionaries in Demerara—Also 200l., left to my
disposal, as I might be directed by the Lord. I took of it 100l. for the
Building Fund, 60l. for foreign and home labourers in the Word, 20l. for
the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and 20l. for the circulation of
Gospel Tracts.--During the last eight days I had sent out 252l. to
home and foreign labourers in the Word, and 65l. I had paid out for the
circulation of Tracts and the Holy Scriptures. I desired, however, still
further means for brethren who labour in the Word, for I wished to send
out at once 70l. more, and also to lay out more on the circulation of
the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts; but I had only about 90l.
altogether left for these various objects, when I received today the
3l., the 13s. 10d., and this 200l. The Lord be praised for this help,
and may He recompense the donors.

You see, dear Reader, by these instances, that we are richly recompensed
for our waiting upon God. You perceive the readiness of His heart to
listen to the supplications of His children who put their trust in Him.
If you have never made trial of it, do so now. But in order to have your
prayers answered, you need to make your requests unto God on the ground
of the merits and worthiness of the Lord Jesus. You must not depend upon
your own worthiness and merits, but solely on the Lord Jesus, as the
ground of acceptance before God, for your person, for your prayers, for
your labours, and for every thing else. Do you really believe in Jesus?
Do you verily depend upon Him alone for the salvation of your soul? See
to it well, that not the least degree of your own righteousness is
presented unto God as a ground of acceptance. But then, if you believe
in the Lord Jesus, it is further necessary, in order that your prayers
may be answered, that the things which you ask of God should be of such
a kind, that God can give them to you, because they are for His honour
and your real good. If the obtaining of your requests were not for your
real good, or were not tending to the honour of God, you might pray for
a long time, without obtaining what you desire. The glory of God should
be always before the children of God, in what they desire at His hands;
and their own spiritual profit, being so intimately connected with the
honour of God, should never be lost sight of, in their petitions. But
now, suppose we are believers in the Lord Jesus, and make our requests
unto God, depending alone on the Lord Jesus as the ground of having them
granted; suppose also, that, so far as we are able honestly and
uprightly to judge, the obtaining of our requests would be for our real
spiritual good and for the honour of God; we yet need, lastly, to
continue in prayer, until the blessing is granted unto us. It is not
enough to begin to pray, nor to pray aright; nor is it enough to
continue for a time to pray; but we must patiently, believingly continue
in prayer, until we obtain an answer; and further, we have not only to
continue in prayer unto the end, but we have also to believe that God
does hear us, and will answer our prayers. Most frequently we fail in
not continuing in prayer until the blessing is obtained and in not
expecting the blessing. As assuredly as in any individual these various
points are found united, so assuredly answers will be granted to his
requests.

From what I have stated, the Reader will have seen that my prayer had
been especially, that the Lord would be pleased to furnish me with means
for the circulation of Bibles and Tracts, and for missionary operations;
and it has been shown how He granted this my request through the large
sums which He sent me (entirely unasked for, so far as man is
concerned), on November 11, 13 and 19; but even this was but little in
comparison with what He did for me afterwards, when He was pleased to
place far greater sums at my disposal for these objects, to which
reference has been already made, when speaking about the donations which
came in for the Building Fund on November 27, 1852, and on January 3 and
4, 1853.

Thus I was carried through all the expenses for these various objects,
and was enabled to enter into every open door which the Lord set before
me for circulating the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and for aiding
missionary operations; and not only so, but was enabled to do for these
various objects more then during any one period within the nineteen
previous years.

Means for the support of the 300 Orphans already under our care, sent in
answer to Prayer, from May 26, 1852, to May 26, 1853.

When we began this period, we were not only not in debt, but had in hand
the balance of 134l. 8s. 10 ¾ d. To those who are in very poor
circumstances, this amount would appear a considerable sum, and they
might think, this sum would last a long tine. Such need, however, to
know, that it would only furnish the current expenses of two weeks, and
that often in one week much more than that sum has been disbursed for
the Orphans. To those, on the other hand, who would say, "This is very
little, and what will you do, with so small a sum in hand, when day by
day 330 persons need to be provided for?" our reply is, God is able to
send us more, before this sum is gone. We seek for grace, to live by the
day. We seek to be enabled to attend to the commandment and affectionate
counsel of the Lord, to be anxious about nothing. It was in this way
that no care came over our mind with regard to the future, when we
looked at this large Orphan Establishment, with all its large daily
wants; for we were assured, that the Lord would surely give us something
before all was expended. And thus it was.

I will now furnish the Reader with a few instances from my journal of
the particular providence of God, manifested in caring for us, and
granting us help in answer to our prayers; for I do especially desire it
to be understood, that, though the work is now so very much larger than
it was in former years, and therefore far larger sums are needed than
before; yet the principles of trusting in God, and depending upon Him
alone, are now acted upon as formerly, only with this difference, that
year by year, by the grace of God, my soul becomes more and more rooted
and established in them. It would therefore be entirely a mistake, to
suppose that it is no longer a work of faith. If it was formerly a work
of faith on a small scale, it is now a work of faith on a large scale.
If we had trials of faith formerly, about comparatively little things;
we have now trials of faith about comparatively great things. If we
formerly hind no certain income, so now have we none. We have to look to
God for every thing in connexion with the world, of which often,
however, the pecuniary necessities are the smallest matter; but to Him
we are enabled to look, and therefore it is, that we are not
disappointed.

During the very first month, from May 27th to June 27th, 1852, there
came in, by ninety-two different donations or sums, 354l. 1s. 5d.: so
that we had, after a month, more in hand than before. Unbelief, which
said, what will you do with so little as 134l.? was therefore
confounded. The Lord increased thus little, before it was expended.

June 29, 1852. Today I received one of the most remarkable donations
which I ever had. I give the whole account, without the name of the
donor.

"Lyons, June 24, 1852.

"Dear Brother in Christ,

"It is now several years, that I read with great interest, and I hope
with some benefit to my soul, the account of your labours and
experiences. Ever since then your work was the object of many thoughts
and prayers, and I gave many copies of your book to Christian friends.
One of them has read it in Syria, on Mount Lebanon, where he is for
commercial business; and, whilst praying for you and your clear Orphans,
the Lord put it in his heart to send you 2l., to which my husband added
two others: and we beg you to accept that small offering in the name of
the Lord. If you have published anything of the Lord's dealings with
you since the year 1844, we shall be very happy to receive it. You could
forward it to Messrs. * * * *, London, for * * * * of Lyons. And now,
dear Brother, may the grace and peace of the Lord rest on you and your
dear home's inhabitants.

" Affectionately yours in the Lord,

* * * *"

I have had donations from Australia, the East Indies, the West Indies,
the United States, Canada, from the Cape of Good Hope, from France,
Switzerland, Germany, Italy, &c.; and now comes also this donation from
Mount Lebanon, with the prayer of a Christian brother, whose name I
never heard, nor know even now. See, dear Reader, this is the way in
which the Lord has helped me in this precious service for twenty-two
year's [1856]. With my fellow-labourers, or without them, and they
without me, our prayers are offered up unto the Lord for help, and He is
pleased, for Jesus' sake, to listen to our supplications, and to
influence the hearts of some of His children known to us or not, to send
us help. The donors may be rich or poor; they may live near or at a
distance of more than ten thousand miles; they may give much or little;
they may have often given before or never; they may be well known to us
or not at all; in these and many other things there may be constant
variations; but God continually helps us; we are never confounded. And
why not? Simply because we are enabled, by time grace of God, to put our
trust in Him for what we need.

On the very next day, June 30th, I received another donation from a
believing farmer in Jersey of 3l. 1s., which, with 15s. sent by him on
June. 8th, were the proceeds of a small field of potatoes, which he had
cultivated for the benefit of the Orphans. See in what various ways the
Lord helps me! This dear man sent me once more in April 1853, with an
affectionate letter in French, 2l. for the Orphans, and shortly
afterwards fell asleep in Jesus. While writing this account, I met with
many names of worthy disciples of the Lord Jesus, who have entered upon
their rest, since I received their donations; may this speak to my
heart, and to the heart of the reader, and may we learn the lesson which
God intends to teach us thereby!

July 10. 50l. from Liverpool.

Aug. 4. Today I received 200l., of which I took one half for the
Orphans, and the other half for the other objects, the disposal of this
sum being left with me. This is a precious answer to prayer. There will
be about 400l. required during this month for the current expenses for
the Orphans, but there was only about 170l. in hand, when this donation
came in.

As the 127 donations, which had come in since Aug. 4th, were of a
smaller kind, we had on Sept. 8th scarcely anything left, when I
received the 280l. 10s. 6d., spoken of (Sept. 8th, 1852) under the
Building Fund, of which 86l. 13s. 4d. was taken for the current expenses
for the Orphans.

Oct. 7. This evening there was only 8l. left in hand for the current
expenses for the Orphans. Hitherto we had generally abounded. But though
much had come in, since the commencement of this new period, yet our
expenses had been greater than our income, as every donation almost of
which the disposal was left with me, had been put to the Building Fund.
Thus the balance in hand on May 26, 1852, notwithstanding the large
income since then, was reduced to about 8l. I therefore gave myself
particularly to prayer for means, that this small sum might be
increased. When I came home this evening from the New Orphan House, I
found a letter from London, containing 2l., being two donations from
Kelso, of 1l. each, and another letter from Peterborough, containing
1l.

Oct 8. This morning I received 5l. 5s. more from Willenhall. Thus the
Lord has already been pleased to add 8l. in to the little stock in hand,
which is now increased to 16l. 5s.--Another 6d. was added, by sale of
a Report.--This evening the matron told me that tomorrow she would
need to have more money. I generally advance 30l. at a time for
housekeeping expenses, but I had now only 8l. 14s. left, as I had to pay
out this afternoon 7l. 11s. 6d. This I purposed to give to her, should
it not please the Lord to give more in the meantime, being assured that,
before this amount was gone, He would give more. My prayer to the Lord,
however, was that He would be pleased to send help, and I looked out for
means. When I came home this evening I found a letter from Gosport,
containing 1s., which a little boy has sent for the Orphans, having
received it as a reward for picking up a ring, and giving it to the
owner. Also a letter from Kingstown, Ireland, containing a Post-office
Order for 1l. 7s., of which 1l. 2s. 6d. are for the Building Fund, and
4s. 6d. for Reports. I likewise received 6d. for missions and 6d. for
the Orphans, from two boys in the neighbourhood of Stroud. Thus I have
9l, to advance tomorrow for house-keeping.

Oct. 9. This morning Luke vii. came in the course of my reading before
breakfast. While reading the account about the Centurion and the raising
from death of the widow's son at Nain, I lifted up my heart to the
Lord Jesus thus: "Lord Jesus, Thou hast the same power now. Thou canst
provide me with means for Thy work in my hands. Be pleased to do so."
— About half an hour afterwards I received 230l. 15s. Also 1s. This
230l. 15s. was left at my disposal. I took one half for the current
expenses for the Orphans, and the other half for the other objects, and
am now amply provided for meeting the demands of this day.

The joy which such answers to prayer afford, cannot be described. I was
determined to wait upon God only, and not to work an unscriptural
deliverance for myself. I have thousands of pounds for the Building
Fund; but I would not take of this sum because it was once set apart for
that object. There is also a legacy of 100l. for the Orphans two months
overdue, in the prospect of the payment of which the heart might be
naturally inclined to use some money of the Building Fund, to be
replaced by the legacy money, when it comes in; but I would not thus
step out of God's way of obtaining help. At the very time when this
donation arrived, I had packed up 100l. which I happened to have in
hand, received for the Building Fund, in order to take it to the Bank,
as I was determined not to touch it, but to wait upon God. My soul does
magnify the Lord for His goodness.

This last paragraph is copied out of my journal, written down at the
time, I add a few words more to the last sentences.

The natural mind is ever prone to reason, when we ought to believe; to
be at work, when we ought to be quiet; to go our own way, when we ought
steadily to walk on in God's ways, however trying to nature. When
first converted, I should have said, What harm can there be to take some
of the money, which has been put by for the Building Fund? God will help
me again after some time with means for the Orphans, and then I can
replace it. Or, there is this money due for the legacy of 100l. This
money is quite sure; may I not, therefore, on the strength of it, take
some from the Building Fund, and when the legacy is paid, replace the
money which I have taken? I know that many would act thus. But how does
it work, when we thus anticipate God, by going our own way? We bring, in
many instances, guilt on our conscience; but if not, we certainly weaken
faith, instead of increasing it; and each time we work thus a
deliverance of our own, we find it more and more difficult to trust in
God, till at last we give way entirely to our natural fallen reason, and
unbelief prevails. How different, if one is enabled to wait God's own
time, and to look alone to Him for help and deliverance! When at last
help comes, after many seasons of prayer it may be, and after much
exercise of faith and patience it may be, how sweet it is, and what a
present recompense does the soul at once receive for trusting in God,
and waiting patiently for His deliverance! Dear Christian reader, if you
have never walked in this path of obedience before, do so now, and you
will then know experimentally the sweetness of the joy which results
from it. I now return to Oct. 9, 1852.

Received still further today, from Cirencester, 2l., and also 10l.

Oct. 10. From two little girls at Clifton, 5s.--By sale of a silver
watch given for the purpose, 1l. 10s,--From a donor in Maryport
Street, 3s. 4d.--Through Bethesda boxes 1s. Ditto 2s. 6d. Ditto a
sovereign.--From a believer in Bristol 5s.--By sale of empty
oatmeal barrels, 15s.

Oct. 11. From Sutton Points, 13s. 7d. —Through the boxes in the New
Orphan House, 3s.--From an Orphans formerly under our care, and now
in service, 10s., with 10s. for the Building Fund.--From a Christian
lady, recently come from Edinburgh, 1l.--Through a Christian lady,
staying at Clifton, 5s.

Oct. 12. By sale of rags and bones 12s. 6d. [I copy literally from the
receipt book. We seek to make the best of every thing. As a steward of
public money, I feel it right that even these articles should be turned
into money; nor could we expect answers to our prayers if knowingly
there were any waste allowed in connexion with this work. For just
because the money is received from God, simply in answer to prayer only,
therefore it becomes us the more, to be careful in the use of it].--
By sale of Reports 5s.--From an Orphan box at Plymouth 3s., together
with 8s. as a donation added, and 9s. for Reports. Still further help:
This afternoon a lady of Clifton called at my house, and brought a check
for 200l., which a gentlemen, whose name even I had never heard of, had
sent her for the benefit of tine Orphans. We are not now in actual need,
yet as 62l. lies already been paid out of what I have received since the
9th, and as other heavy payments are before me, in a few days, it is
particularly kind of the Lord, to send this donation from a perfect
stranger.

Nov. 13. Today was paid to me the legacy for the Orphans, to which
reference has been made. I had no doubt it would come in in good time.
Thus it is. The expenses are heavy, week after week. The day after
tomorrow, I shall have again to pay out above 100l. for the Orphans.

On Dec. 20th, in the evening, I had only 16l. 9s. left. Think of this,
dear Reader. So little, for so large an Establishment! From Dec. 20th to
the evening of Dec. 26th, there came in only about 18l.; and as I had
paid out above 13l., I could only advance 15l. for house-keeping on Dec.
27th, instead of the usual 30l., and had then about 5l. left for petty
expenses. I knew that on the 31st I should have to advance again at
least 20l. for house-keeping. Now see how the Lord was pleased to send
in the means from the morning of Dec. 27th to Dec. 31st. Dec. 27. From
Alcombe, near Minehead, 10s.--From a poor widow in Bristol, 5s.--
Anonymously 1l. Ditto a sovereign, with these words: "An Orphan's mite
for the Orphan House."--From Clifton, 1s., and 1s. besides.--Dec.
28. From Newport, in Monmouthshire, 10s. and 10s.--From Birmingham,
2l. 10s. with the same for my own personal expenses.--From Boscrea
7d. from three children.--From Lenwade, 10s.--Dec. 29. From B. B.
at Leamington 5l.--Anonymously, from London, 2s. 5d.--From three
sisters 10s., 5s., 1l., also 10s. 8 ½ d.--By sale of Reports, 3s.
--Through the boxes in the New Orphan House 1l. 6s. 9 ½ d.--Dec.
30. By sale of Reports 2s. 6d.--From Clifton 5l.--From two
Christian ladies in Buckinghamshire 20l.— From some pupils on
Kingsdown 5s. Thus I had on Dec. 31st money enough to advance 25l. for
house-keeping expenses, besides having had the means to pay away 20l.
5s. 9d. After I had given out the money in advance for house-keeping
expenses, I had, at the close of the year, not 2l. left. But my mind was
in full peace. Now see how, before the 25l. which had been advanced was
expended, and before other expenses came upon me, the Lord was pleased
to send in the means from the 1st to the 4th of January, 1853.--Jan.
1. Anonymously 1s.--From Sherborne, 1l.--From Colchester 10s.--
From Manchester 10s.--From a distance 1l. 2s. 6d.--From
Glouchstershire 14s. 6d.--From a brother in the Lord in Bristol 3l.
12s., together with 5s. 7d. from his Orphan box. This brother had it on
his heart, more than a twelvemonth ago, to dispose of an article for the
benefit of the Orphans, but could not meet with an opportunity till
today. Thus, in this time of need, the Lord sends in this money.--
Jan. 2. By sale of Reports 12s.--From two Christian sisters 5s., as a
thank offering to the Lord for the mercies of the past year.--From a
lady at Clifton 10s.--From a Brother in Bristol 1l.—-From Torquay
3s., with 3s. for Reports.--From Worcester 2s. 2d.--From a brother
in Bristol 3l.--Jan. 3. From Waterford 1l.--From Liverpool 5l.--
Also the 75l. being part of the 252l. 17s. 1d. spoken of under the
Building Fund.--From Clifton 10s.--Through Salem boxes 2s. 6d.--
From "P." 1s. Jan. 4. From Ryde 2l.--From Tottenham 10s. Thus God
helped me in a time of great, great need. But before this 4th of January
was over, He did far more than ever in the way of supplying me with
means, for the largest of all the donations I had ever had, and of which
mention has been made before, was given to me, of which 600l. was
portioned out for the current expenses for the Orphans.

I have been thus particular in this last paragraph, on purpose, to give
a practical illustration that those are entirely mistaken who suppose
that the work is now no longer a work of faith, as it used to be in
former years. It is true, we have now a larger income, then we used to
have in the years 1838, 1839, and 1840; but it is also true that our
expenses are three times as great. We have no regular income now; even
as we had not then. We ask no human being now for help; even as we did
not then. We depend alone upon God, by His grace even as we did then.
Who is there in the whole world who will state that I ever asked him for
help in this Orphan work, from its commencement, on Dec. 9, 1835, up
till now? Now, as we have no funds to live upon; as we have no regular
subscribers or donors upon whom we could depend; as we never ask help
from man but God alone; and as, finally, we never did go into debt for
this work, nor do we now: why is it not now a work of faith as formerly?
Will those, who say it is not, place themselves in my position, when, at
the close of the year 1852, I had not two pounds left, and about 330
persons were day by day to be provided for, with all they need, and
prove whether it is now anything else than a work of faith? Every one,
except those who are determined not to see, will have no difficulty in
perceiving that now, as formerly, one could only be kept from being
overwhelmed in such a position by looking day by day to the Lord, and
that not merely for pecuniary supplies, but for help under the
numberless difficulties, which continually are met with in such a work.

On account of the abundance which came in at the beginning of the year,
together with what was received afterwards, there was not the least
difficulty felt, in the way of means, for many weeks afterwards. Of the
donations that came in from Jan. 5 to April 20, and which amounted
altogether to 648l. 8s. 8 ¼ d., in 314 different sums, large and small,
I will only mention the following: Jan. 25. From an aged Christian
merchant at Clifton 50l.--From a Christian merchant in London 20l.,
on Feb. 11.

April 20. In the prospect of having to pay away yet about 500l, before
the accounts are closed on May 26th, and having only 236l. in hand, I
asked the Lord especially this evening, that He would be pleased to help
me with means for the current expenses for the Orphans, for which I
might have far more in hand had I not with all my might given myself to
the Building Fund, in order to be soon able to commence the building of
this second Orphan House. Now, this evening, I found that a donation of
100l. had come in at my house during my absence, the disposal of which
was entirely left to me. I took not the whole of this donation for the
current expenses for the Orphans, but only one half, and the other half
for the Building Fund. The funds for the various Schools, for the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and for missionary
objects, need nothing for at least six weeks to come. This donation has
greatly refreshed my spirit, especially as it came from a most
unexpected quarter.

Before the accounts were closed, I received, between April 20th and May
26th, 1853, in just One Hundred different sums, 422l. 3s. 11 ½ d. more,
so that I was able amply to supply all demands, and had the balance of
117l. 10s. 9d. left in hand. It was chiefly through a donation of 260l.,
given to be employed as most needed, spoken of under the Building Fund
Income on May 14th, 1853, of which I took 160l. for the Orphans, that we
had so large an amount in hand. This donation was indescribably
precious, as it not only, in conjunction with the other money which came
in, carried me easily through all the expenses which absolutely needed
to be met, and which were heavier than they ever had been during any
month since the Orphan work had been in existence; but also enabled me
to do things which were most desirable, though not absolutely needful.

How can I sufficiently praise, and adore, and magnify the Lord, for His
love and faithfulness, in carrying me thus from year to year through
this His service, supplying me with all I need in the way of means,
fellow labourers, mental strength, and, above all, spiritual support!
But for His help and support, I should be completely overpowered in a
very short time; yet, by His help, I go on, and am very happy
spiritually, in my service; nor am I now generally worse in health than
I was twenty years ago, but rather better.

Miscellaneous Points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 26, 1852, to May
26, 1853.

1. During this period there were four Day Schools, with 235 children in
them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. Further, one
Sunday School in Bristol, with 150 children, was entirely supported, and
three others in Devonshire, Somersetshire, and Gloucestershire, with 280
children, were assisted. Lastly, one Adult School, with 103 Adult
Scholars, was entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. There
were under our care, from March 5, 1884, to May 26, 1853, in the various
Day Schools, 5686 children, in the Sunday School 2673 children, and in
the Adult School 2132 persons. There was expended of the funds of the
Institution, during this year, for the various Schools, 349l. 12s. 11d.

2. During thus year there was laid out of the funds of the Institution,
on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, 431l. 5s. 1 ½ d., and there
were circulated 1,666 Bibles and 1,210 New Testaments.--There were
circulated from March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 1853, 10,476 Bibles, and
6.061 New Testaments.

For several years past this part of the work has appeared more and more
important to me, on account of the fearful attempts which have been made
by the powers of darkness to rob the church of Christ of the Holy
Scriptures. I have on this account sought to embrace every opportunity
to circulate the Holy Scriptures in England, Ireland, Canada, British
Guiana, the East Indies, China, Australia, &c. Every open door which the
Lord was pleased to set before me in these or other parts of the world,
I have joyfully entered; yea, I have counted it a privilege, indeed, to
be permitted of God to send forth His Holy Word. Many servants of
Christ, in various parts of the world, have assisted me in this service,
through whose instrumentality copies of the Holy Scriptures have been
circulated. Our endeavour has been, to place the word of God in the
hands of the very poorest persons, and also, in particular, to supply
very aged persons with copies of the Scriptures, printed in large type,
as such copies still remain expensive, considering the means of the
poor. Nor have our efforts been in vain. For we had several cases of
direct conversion, simply through circulating the Holy Scriptures,
brought before us during this year. But we are fully assured, that the
fruit which we have seen, as resulting from this part of the world, is
but little in comparison with what we shall see in the day of Christ's
appearing. The disciples of the Lord Jesus should labour with all their
might in the work of God, as if everything depended upon their own
exertions; and yet, having done so, they should not in the least trust
in their labour and efforts, and in the means which they use for the
spread of the truth, but in God; and they should with all earnestness
seek the blessing of God, in persevering, patient, and believing prayer.
Here is the great secret of success, my Christian Reader. Work with all
your might; but trust not in the least in your work. Pray with all your
might for the blessing of God; but work, at the same time, with all
diligence, with all patience, with all perseverance. Pray then, and
work. Work and pray. And still again pray, and then work. And so on all
the days of your life. The result will surely be, abundant blessing.
Whether you see much fruit or little fruit; such kind of service will be
blessed. We should labour then, for instance, with all earnestness in
seeking to circulate Thousands of copies of the Holy Scriptures, and
Hundreds of Thousands of Tracts, as if everything depended upon the
amount of copies of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts which we circulate;
and yet, in reality, we should not in the least degree put our
dependence upon the number of copies of the Holy Scriptures, and upon
the number of Tracts, but entirely upon God for His blessing, without
which all these efforts are entirely useless. This blessing, however,
should be sought by us habitually and perseveringly in prayer. It should
also be fully expected.

3. During this year there was spent of the funds of the Institution for
missionary objects 2,234l. 2s. 6d. By this sum fifty-four labourers in
the word and doctrine, in various pants of time world, were to a greater
or less degree assisted.

During no period within the nineteen years previous to May 26, 1853, was
so large a portion of the funds of the Institution expended, in one
year, upon Missionary Objects, as during this year; and in every single
case I was enabled to help to the full amount of what appeared
desirable. Refreshing as this is, and thankful as we desire to be to the
Lord for it; yet it were but a very little thing, had there not been
corresponding results. But I have to record to the praise of the Lord,
and to the enjoyment of the Christian Reader, that not five, nor ten,
nor fifty souls only were won for Him through the instrumentality of
these fifty-four dear brethren, but hundreds. I received a great number
of letters from these labourers in the Word, both at home and abroad,
which brought me heart-cheering intelligence. Thank the Lord for this
together with me, dear Christian Reader, and continue to help these
esteemed brethren with your prayers, some of whom labour for the Lord
under peculiar difficulties.

I would repeat that I consider it a great privilege to be permitted to
defray in part or altogether, from time funds of this Institution, the
expenses connected with the voyage and outfit of brethren who desire to
go out as Missionaries, or to help them after their arrival in their
field of labour; but I do not bind myself to support them habitually,
seeing that thus they would be out of the position of simple dependence
upon God for their temporal supplies.

4. There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1852,
to May 26, 1853, the sum of 555l. 16s. 7 ½ d.; and there were
circulated within this year 733,674 Tracts.

The total number of Tracts circulated up to May 26, 1853, was One
Million Eight Hundred Twenty Thousand and Forty.

The Lord is pleased to increase this part of the work more and more, as
will be seen by a comparison of the years in which this part of the
Institution has been in operation. From Nov. 19, 1840, to May 10, 1842,
the first period that the circulation of Tracts was in operation in
connexion with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad,
there were circulated 19,609 from May 10, 1842, to July 14, 1844,
39,473; from July 14, 1844, to May 26, 1846, 40,565; from May 26, 1846,
to May 26, 1848, 64,021; from May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850, 130,464;
from May 26, 1850, to May 26, 1851, 303,098; from May 26, 1851, to May
26, 1852, 489,136; and during this period 733,674.

In these increased opportunities to spread the truth, we rejoice.
Moreover, we would, by the help of God, seek to labour still far more
abundantly in this particular also, and would seek to press into every
open door, which the Lord may set before us. Yea, we would labour, as
has been stated before, as if everything depended upon our diligence and
carefulness in the use of the means; whilst, in reality, we would not
depend upon them in the least degree, but only upon God for His
blessing. This blessing of God we have been enabled to seek upon the
labours of missionary brethren, the circulation of time Holy Scriptures,
and upon the distribution of Tracts. As the days come, so our heart is
drawn out in prayer for blessing upon these objects, in connexion with
the various Schools and the Orphan Work. How, then, could it be
otherwise, but that sooner or later there should come showers of
blessing? Thus it was during this year. This year stands alone, in that
more money came in, than during any year previously. It stands alone, in
that the operations of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution were
extended beyond whatever they mad been before. But it stands alone,
also, in the abundant blessing, which God granted to our efforts, and
which was greater than during any previous period. And, as in other
respects, so in particular likewise, the gratuitous distribution of
Tracts was abundantly owned of God. Instance upon instance, not 2, nor
5, nor 10, but many, in the way of conversion, and also of blessing to
believers, was I informed of by those Godly brethren, who in various
parts of the world, aid me in this service. How can I sufficiently
magnify the Lord for this! By His grace I would desire to labour on,
though I were not to see one single instance of blessing, being assured
that "in due season we shall reap," and that our "labour is not in vain
in the Lord;" yet how kind of the Lord, to grant such abundant blessing
to rest upon our labours!

Often, I fear, Tract distributors have expected little result from their
labour; and therefore they have seen little fruit. According to their
expectation, they have received. Often, also, I fear, the mere
distribution of Tracts has been rested in, and the work done has been
estimated by the number of Tracts which were circulated, without
earnestly preceding their circulation with prayer, and without earnestly
following them with prayer, may I, therefore, be allowed to caution my
fellow-believers on these two points? Look out for blessing, but seek
also the blessing earnestly in prayer; and you will not fail to receive
abundantly.

Should any believer be discouraged, because he has not had much fruit
resulting from the circulation of Tracts, let such a one, with renewed
earnestness and prayerfulness, go on in his work; let him also expect
fruit, and he will surely reap abundantly; if not now, at least in the
day of Christ's appearing.

5. At the beginning of this period, there were Three Hundred Orphans in
the New Orphan-House on Ashley Down, Bristol. During the year there were
admitted into it 13 Orphans, making 313 in all. Of these 313, (we own it
with thankfulness to God,) not one died during the year; for not a
single death occurred for about 15 months. One of the Orphans, who had
been received after he had long had his own way, and who having long
been borne with, and repeatedly been received back again on a confession
of sorrow, at last ran away again, and had then to be placed by his
relatives in the Union. One Orphan was sent to relatives, who were by
that time able to care for her. Five girls were, at the expense of the
Establishment, fitted out for service or learning a business, and were
sent out;--also six boys were, at the expense of the Establishment,
fitted out and apprenticed. Thus makes the number removed as great as
the number received, so that there were still 300 Orphans in tire New
Orphan-House on May 26, 1853. The total number of Orphans, who were
under our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 1853, was Five Hundred and
Twenty-eight.

I notice further the following points in connexion with the Orphan
Work.

a. Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 55,408l. 17s. 5 ¾ d. was given to me for the Orphans, as the
result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work up to May 26,
1853.--It may be also interesting to the reader to know, that the
total amount given for the other objects, from the commencement of the
work up to May 26, 1853, amounted to 19,163l. 14s. 1 ½ d.; and that
which came in by the sale of Bibles and Tracts, and by the payments of
the children in the Day Schools, amounted to 3,490l. 7s. 1 ¾ d.--
Besides this, also a great variety and number of articles of clothing,
furniture, provisions, &c., were given for the use of the Orphans.

b. Our labours continued to be blessed among the Orphans.

c. The expenses in connexion with the support of the 300 Orphans and the
apprentices during this year, were 3,453l. 15s. 1 ½ d.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, or the work of the Lord
in my hands, not immediately connected with the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution, from May 26, 1852, to May 26, 1853.

Dec. 31, 1852. During this year 35 believers have been received into
fellowship. When Brother Craik and I began to labour in the Word in
Bristol, we found 68 in fellowship. Since then there have been received
into communion altogether 1,403, so that the total number would be
1,471, had there been no changes. But 64 are under church discipline,
and separated, for the present, from fellowship; 154 have left us (some
of them, however, in love, and merely through circumstances); 421 have
left Bristol to reside elsewhere; and 197 have fallen asleep. So that
there are at present only 635 actually remaining in communion.

The Lord has been pleased to give unto me during this year—

1. Through believers in and out of Bristol,
in provisions, clothes,
etc., worth to us at least . . . . . 9 0 0

2. Through anonymous offerings in money, put up in paper and directed to
me, and put into the boxes for the poor
saints or the rent, at the chapels . 157 11 4 ½

----—

Carried forward £166 11 4 ½

Brought forward £166 11 4 ½

3. Through presents in money, from believers
in Bristol, not given anonymously . . . . . . 121 5 2

4. Through presents in money, from believers
 not residing in Bristol . . 157 12 2

----——

£445 8 8 ½

My brother-in-law, Mr. A. N. Groves, of whom mention has been made in
the first part of this Narrative, as having been helpful to me by his
example when I began my labours in England in 1829, in that he, without
any visible support, and without being connected with any missionary
society, went with his wife and children to Bagdad, as a missionary,
after having given up a lucrative practice of about 1500l. per year,
returned in Autumn 1852, from the East Indies, a third time, being
exceedingly ill. He lived, however, till May 20th, 1853, when, after a
most blessed testimony for the Lord, he fell asleep in Jesus in my
house. I should more fully dwell on this to myself amid my family's
deeply important event, had not a very full biography been published by
the widow of my dear brother-in-law, in which also full particulars are
given of the last days of this servant of Christ. I therefore refer the
reader to the deeply interesting memoir, which has been published at
Nisbet's, London, and may be had at the Bible and Tract Warehouse of
the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, 84, Park
Street, Bristol, and through all booksellers, under the title: Memoir of
the late Anthony Norris Groves, second edition, with a portrait, cloth,
4s. 6d.; fine paper, cloth, 6s. 6d.

Further account respecting the intended Orphan-House for Seven Hundred
Children, bereaved of both parents by death, from May 26, 1853, to May
26, 1854.

In the last chapter on this subject I stated, that, on May 26, 1853, I
had actually in hand, towards the accomplishment of my object, the sum
of 12,531l. 12s. 0 ¼ d. I will now give some further particulars as to
the manner in which it pleased the Lord to supply me with means, but
must confine myself to those donations which more specially may call for
notice.

June 28, 1853. From Wakefield 40l., with 5l. for Mr. Craik, and 5l. for
my own personal expenses.--Also 220l. from the West of England, of
which the donor kindly wishes me to take 20l. for my own private
expenses, and to use the 200l. as might be most needed. I have taken,
therefore, 100l. for the Building Fund; 60l. for missionary operations,
the circulation of Bibles and Tracts; and 40l. for the Orphans.

July 14. Received 541l. 10s., which being left to me as most needed, I
took 100l. for the current expenses for the Orphans, 100l. for the other
objects, and 341l. 10s. for the Building Fund. Being just now in great
family affliction, this kindness of the Lord has been a great
refreshment to my spirit.

July 15. From Clifton 1s.--Received also 110l. from one who counts it
an honour to have this sum to lay down at the feet of the Lord Jesus. I
took of this amount 60l. for the Building Fund, and 50l. for the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and for missionary
objects.

I cannot help remarking here, that the Lord has used some of the most
unlikely persons during the past twenty-two years, in providing me with
means for His service. So it was particularly in the case of this
brother in the Lord, from whom I received the last-mentioned donation of
110l. I had not the least natural expectation of receiving this sum,
when this brother, sitting before me at the New Orphan-House, took out
of his pocket a packet of Bank Notes, and gave to me this amount,
reserving to himself, as his whole property in this world, a smaller sum
than he gave to me, because of his joy in the Lord, and because of his
being able to enter into the reality of his possessions in the world to
come. I delight in dwelling upon such an instance, because 1, it shows
that there is grace, much grace, to be found among the saints even now;
2, it shows the variety of instrumentality which the Lord is pleased to
employ, in supplying me with means for His service; and 3, because it so
manifestly proves that we do not wait upon Him in vain, when we make
known our requests to Him for means.

July 20. From Philadelphia, in the United States, 5l.

Aug. 20. From the neighbourhood of Mallow in Ireland 17s. 6d, and 2s.
6d.--Anonymously from a "Brother Christian and Well-wisher," through
his bankers in London, 100l.

Aug. 27. From Caistor 5s.--From Gumeracka, near Adelaide, Australia,
2l. 10s. From the same place 10s.--From Cheltenham 2s. 6d.--From
Frampton-on-Severn seven silver coins.

You see, esteemed reader, how much variety there is in the kind of
donations as well as in the amount, the places whence they are sent, and
the friends who send them. But all these donations come from the living
God. All come to us in answer to prayer, and are received by us as
answers to prayer; and with every donation, however small, we receive
thins a fresh encouragement, to continue in prayer, and have, as it
were, another earnest from our Heavenly Father, that at last He not only
will give larger sums, but the whole amount which is needed for the
Building Fund. Every one of these donations comes unsolicited. Ever
since the Orphan Work has been in operation, we have never asked any one
for anything. Be therefore, dear reader, encouraged by this, to make
trial for yourself, to prove the power of prayer, if you have never done
so before.

Dec. 31. This is the last day of another year. Two years and a half I
have new been day by day seeking the Lord's help in player for this
object. He has also been pleased to give us many proofs, that He is
remembering our requests, still as yet I have only 13,670l. 11s. 7 ¾ d.
in hand. Considerably more than double this sum will be needed. But, by
the grace of God, I am not discouraged. The Lord is able and willing to
help us. This is my comfort. In His own time the Almighty God will
manifest His power. In the meantime I desire to continue to wait upon
Him, and to receive every fresh donation, however small, as an earnest,
that in His own time He not only will give larger sums, but the whole
amount needed for this object.

Jan. 17, 1854. This day I received the promise, that there should be
paid to me, for the work of the Lord in my hands, 5,207l., to be
disposed of as I might consider best.

This large donation was shortly after paid to me, and was portioned out
thus: For the Building Fund 3000l.; for the support of the 300 Orphans
707l.; for foreign missions 500l.; for labourers in the Word in England,
Ireland and Scotland 500l.; for the gratuitous circulation of the Holy
Scriptures among the poor 200l.; for the gratuitous circulation of
Gospel Tracts 200l.; and for the various schools, supported or assisted
by the Funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, 100l.

Behold, esteemed reader, the goodness of God! Behold also the
recompense, which sooner or hater, the Lord gives to His children, who
wait upon Him and trust in Him Often it may appear that we wait upon the
Lord in vain; but, in His own time God will abundantly prove, that it
was not in vain. Go on therefore, Christian reader, to wait upon the
Lord. Continue to make known your requests to Him; but do also expect
help from Him. You honour God, by believing that He does hear your
prayers, and that He will answer them.

The joy which such answers to prayer give, cannot be described; and the
impetus which they thus afford to the spiritual life is exceedingly
great. The experience of this happiness I desire for all my Christian
readers. Nor is there anything to hinder any believer from having these
joys. If you believe indeed in the Lord Jesus for the salvation of your
soul, if you walk uprightly and do not regard iniquity in your heart, if
you continue to wait patiently, and believingly upon God; then answers
will surely be given to your prayers. You may not be called upon to
serve the Lord in the way the writer does, and therefore may never have
answers to prayer respecting such things as are recorded here; but in
your various circumstances, as to your family, your business, your
profession, your church position, your labour for the Lord inn army way,
you may have answers as distinct as any here recorded.

Should this, however, be read by any who are not believers in the Lord
Jesus, but any who are going on in the carelessness or
self-righteousness of their unrenewed hearts, then I would
affectionately and solemnly beseech such, first of all to be reconciled
to God by faith in the Lord Jesus. You are sinners. You deserve
punishment. If you do not see this, ask God to show it unto you. Let
this now be your first and especial prayer. Ask Him also to enlighten
you not merely concerning your state by nature, but especially to reveal
the Lord Jesus to your hearts. God sent Him, that He might bear the
punishment, due to us guilty sinners. God accepts the obedience and
sufferings of the Lord Jesus, in the room of those who depend upon Him
for the salvation of their souls; and the moment a sinner believes in
the Lord Jesus, he obtains the forgiveness of all his sins. When thus he
is reconciled to God, by faith in the Lord Jesus, and has obtained the
forgiveness of his sins, he has boldness to enter into the presence of
God, to make known his requests unto God; and the more he is enabled to
realize, that his sins are forgiven, and that God, for Christ's sake,
is well pleased with those who believe on Him, the more ready he will be
to come with all his wants, both temporal and spiritual, to his Heavenly
Father, that He may supply them. But as long as the consciousness of
unpardoned guilt remains, so long shall we be kept at a distance from
God, and especially also as it regards prayer. Therefore, dear reader,
if you are an unforgiven sinner, let your first and especial subject of
your prayer be, that God would be pleased to reveal to your heart the
Lord Jesus, His beloved Son.

March 5. To day it is twenty years since the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution for Home and Abroad made its beginning. When I look back
upon that day, with reference to this work, I desire with gratitude to
exclaim, What has God wrought! His name be magnified for it! I desire to
take courage from all His former goodness, and to go on in His service.

March 6. Received 131l. 1s. 3d., which being left at my disposal, I took
31l. 1s. 3d. for the Building Fund, and 100l. for the support of the
Orphans.--Through Bethesda boxes, as a thank-offering for the mercies
of the past month, 2s. 6d.

April 22. From London, six knives, nine silver forks, three silver table
spoons, three silver dessert spoons, three silver tea spoons, one silver
salt spoon, a silver pencil case, three penholders, one mounted in
silver and two in gold, and a penknife.

May. 3. Anonymously, through banker's in London, 100l.--May 8.
Through Bethesda homes, 2s. 6d., as "A thank-offering to the Lord for
the mercies of the past month."

Month after month, for some time past, 2s. 6d. has been given as "A
thank-offering for the mercies of the past month," I am delighted with
this. Not yearly only may the saints bring their offerings to the Lord,
as He may have prospered them, but monthly. Yea the Holy Ghost, by the
Apostle Paul, gives this exhortation to the believers of the Church at
Corinth, concerning offerings for the poor saints; "Upon the first day
of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath
prospered him." I Cor. xvi. 2. As the Lord had prospered them, so were
they not merely yearly, or monthly, but even weekly to contribute to the
support of the poor. We are strangers and pilgrims on the earth. The
time of our pilgrimage here is very uncertain. The opportunities which
the Lord gives us for His service are therefore readily to be embraced.
All here below is most uncertain. How long we may have the opportunity
to work for the Lord, who can tell? Therefore the present hour is to be
used with all our might. As an encouragement for all this, we have to
look to the return of our Lord Jesus.

May 26. 82l. 18s. 4d., being the proceeds arising from the sale of a
work published in English, and 14s. 3d., from the sale of a work
published in French, were given for the Building Fund.

Thus closes the period from May 26, 1853, to May 26, 1854. The whole
income for this object during the year was 5,285l. 7s. 5d., which,
together with the 12,531l. 12s. 0 ¼ d. in hand on May 26, 1853, made
the total of 17,816l. 12s. 5 ¼ d. in hand on May 26, 1854.

I add the following remarks, with reference to the intended Orphan House
for 700 Orphans, which appeared in the Report for 1854, and which are
here reprinted.

A. During this year the current expenses, for the various Objects of the
Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, amounted to
7,507l. 0s. 11 ½ d., being 471l. 8s, 11d. more than during any previous
year; yet the Lord not only enabled me to meet them all, but to add the
sum of 5,285l. 7s, 5d. to the Building Fund.

B. There is yet a large sum required, before I shall be enabled to build
another house for 700 Orphans; nor have I now, any more than at the
first, any natural prospect of obtaining what is yet needed; but my hope
is in the living God. When I came to the conclusion that it was the will
of God I should build another Orphan House, I had not only no natural
prospect of obtaining the 35,000l. which would be needed for thus
object, but also no natural prospect of being able to provide for the
necessities of the 300 Orphans already under my care. Three years have
elapsed since then, and I have had all I needed for them, amounting to
about 10,500l., and 17,816l. 19s. 5 ¼ d. I have received for the
Building Fund. May I not well trust in the Lord, for what is yet needed
for the Building Fund? By His grace I will do so, and delight in doing
so; for I know that at last all my prayers will be turned into praises
concerning this part of the service.

C. There is one point which is particularly an encouragement to me, to
go on waiting upon the Lord for the remainder of the means, which are
required, viz.: applications for the admission of Orphans continue to be
made. On May 26, 1858, there were 480 Orphans waiting for admission.
Since then 181 more have been applied for, making in all 661. Of these,
however, thirty have been admitted during the past year into the New
Orphan-House, and twenty-nine have been otherwise provided for, so that
there are actually 602 waiting for admission. These children are from
three months old and upwards, and all bereaved of both parents by
death.

Supplies for the School —, Bible—, Missionary and Tract fund, sent
in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1853, to May 26, 1854.

On May 26, 1853, there was left in hand for these objects a balance of
67l. 17s. 7 ¾ d.

June 13. When I had very little in hand, comparatively, there being
about 30l. left, as little only had come in since May 26th, I received a
donation of 301l., of which I took 201l. for the support of the Orphans,
and 100l. for these objects. How much is there needed, to go on with all
these various objects, and to press into every open door, which the Lord
may set before me! How kind, therefore, of Him, to have sent me this
sum!

July 14. Only about 150l. had come in for these objects since June 18.
But though I had not much in hand, I sent out 65l. on the 11th, three
days since, for missionary objects, being assured that the sowing would
bring the reaping. On the very next day, July 12th, I received from
Chelsea 5l. and also 10s. From the north of Devon 10l. Anonymously 5l.
From Norwich, for foreign missions, 5l. The day after that, July 13th, I
received from the neighbourhood of Leeds 10l., and from Oakhill 1s. Now
today I received the 541l. 10s., spoken of under the Building Fund, of
which I took for these objects 100l.

July 15. Today the Lord has been pleased to give still more. I have
received 20l. for the Schools and 50l. for these various objects.

Sept. 15. During the last two days I sent out 85l. to brethren who
labour in the Word at home and abroad; and during the first half of this
month have already sent to them 174l. During the last two days, whilst
sending out almost the last pound in hand for missionary objects, I felt
quite comfortable in doing so, and said to myself: "The Lord can give mc
more." So it has been. This morning I have received from Weston Super
Mare, in a registered letter, 100l. with these words: "The enclosed
100l. for missionaries to the heathen, from H. E. H., Western Super
Mare, Sept, 14th." This is particularly refreshing to me, as I desired
still to send out during this month about 200l. to other brethren.

Oct. 15. During the last six weeks little only, comparatively, has been
received for these objects; but I have sent out much for missionary
objects, and for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts. Thus
the funds for these various objects were this morning reduced to 29l.
15s. 6 ¼ d. Yet my heart desired to send out, before the close of this
month, a considerable amount to preachers of the Gospel, and to spend
further sums on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel
Tracts. This my desire has been in a measure already granted, for I
received this morning 192l. 1s. Of this sum I took 100l. for these
objects, and the remainder for the current expenses for the Orphans. The
Lord be magnified for this kindness! There was also much need for fresh
supplies for the Orphans, when this donation was received. With more
than usual exercise of faith and patience have I had to wait upon God
for the last four weeks, during which time the income has been very
little and the outgoing very great.

Dec. 8. Today I received three autographs of King William IV., one of
Sir Robert Peel, and two of Lord Melbourne (with six postage stamps), to
be sold for the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution.--See
what a variety of donations the Lord sends us for the support of the
work!

Dec. 11. For several years I have not been so poor for these objects, as
during the last six weeks. Day by day have I besought the Lord for more
means, and almost daily has He also sent in something; yet the income
has not been adequate to help the 56 brethren, whom I seek to assist as
preachers of the Word at home and abroad, in the measure I have desired.
I had reason to believe, that several were in need, but I had nothing to
send to them, and could only labour on in prayer, finding relief in the
knowledge that God could help them irrespective of my instrumentality,
and make this their trial of faith and patience a blessing to their
souls, even as I have found this season profitable to myself. But now at
the last the Lord has refreshed my spirit exceedingly, by a donation of
300l., left at my disposal; of which I have taken 150l. for these
objects, and 150l. for the Orphans, for whom also fresh supplies were
greatly needed, so much so, that we had not once been so poor since the
New Orphan-House was first opened.

Jan. 17, 1854. Received from an anonymous donor, through London bankers,
a Bank Post Bill for 50l. "for general purposes." I took of this amount
one half for these various objects, and the other half for the benefit
of the Orphans. This donation came at a time of great need.

But the Lord helped me still mere bountifully; for I received also, on
that day, the promise of the donation of 5,207l., spoken of already
under the Building Fund, and of which donation I took for these objects
altogether 1,500l. whereby I was so abundantly helped, that, with what
the Lord was pleased to send in besides for these objects, up to May 26,
1854, I was enabled to meet all their many and heavy expenses.

The following circumstance is so remarkable, that I give it at full
length as an illustration of the various ways, and the remarkable
manner, in which the Lord is pleased, in answer to prayer, to supply me
with means.

On Aug. 9th, 1853, I received a letter, from a Christian brother,
accompanied by an order for 88l. 2s. 6d. on his bankers, of which 3l.
2s, 6d. were the proceeds of an Orphan-Box in a meeting place of
believers, and 85l. from a poor widow, who had sold her little house,
being all her property, and who had put 90l., the total amount she had
received, into that Orphan-Box two months before, on June 9, 1853. In
this box the money remained till it was opened, and then the 90l., with
a few lines, without name, were found in it. As, however, the fact of
her intending to sell the house, and sending me the money, for the
Lord's work, had been known to the brother, who sent me the money, he
did not feel free to send it to me, without remonstrating with her
through two brethren, whom he sent with the money, offering it again to
her; for he knew her to be very poor, and feared that this might be an
act of excitement, and therefore be regretted afterwards. These brethren
could not prevail on her to receive back the money, but they did
persuade her to receive back 5l. of the amount, and then the brother,
referred to, felt no longer free to keep the money from me, but sent me
the 85l.

On the receipt of this I wrote at once to the poor Godly widow, offering
her the traveling expenses for coming to Bristol, that I might have
personal intercourse with her; for I feared lest this should be an act
of excitement, and the more so, as she had received back 5l. of the sum.
This sister in the Lord, a widow of about 60 years of age, came to
Bristol, and told me in all simplicity how ten years before, in the year
1843, she had purposed that, if ever she should come into the possession
of the little house in which she lived with her husband, she would sell
it, and give the proceeds to the Lord. About five years afterwards her
husband died, and she, having no children, nor any particular claim upon
her, then sought to dispose of her little property. However one
difficulty after the other prevented her being able to effect a sale. At
last she felt in particular difficulty on account of her inability to
pay the yearly ground rent of the house and garden, and she asked the
Lord to enable her to sell the property, in order that she might be able
to carry out her desire, which she had had for ten years. He now helped
her; the house was sold, the money paid, and she put the whole 90l. into
the Orphan Box for me, being assured that the Lord would direct me how
best the money might be used for Him.--I still questioned her again
and again to find out, whether it was not excitement which had led her
to act as she had done; but I not only saw that her mind had been fully
decided about this act for ten years before, but that she was also able
to answer from the word of God all the objections which I purposely
made, in order to probe her, whether she had intelligently and from
right motives acted in what she had done. At last, being fully satisfied
that it was not from impulse nor under excitement that she had given the
money, I stated to her something like this: "You are poor, about sixty
years old, and therefore decreasing in strength, may you not therefore
keep this money for yourself?" Her reply was: "God has always provided
for me, and I have no doubt He will do so in future also. I am able to
work and to earn my bread as well as others, and am willing to work as a
nurse, or in any other way." What could I say against this? This was
just what a child of God would say, and should say.--But the greatest
of all the difficulties about accepting the 85l. remained in my mind. It
was this. The house had been sold for 90l. The whole amount had been put
into the box, but, on the persuasion of the two brethren who were
requested to remonstrate with this widow, she had been induced to take
back 5l. out of the 90l. I therefore said to myself, might she not be
willing, after a time, to take back the whole 90l., how therefore can I
feel happy in accepting this money. On this account I particularly laid
stress upon this point, and now learned the circumstances under which
she had been induced to take back this 5l.

The two brethren who had called for the purpose of pointing out the
propriety of receiving back again the 90l., or part of it, told her that
Barnabas sold his land, but afterwards lived with others on that which
he and others had thrown into the common stock, and that therefore she
might receive at least part of the 90l. back again, if she would not
take the whole. She then said to herself that, "as a child of God she
might take the children's portion," and, as she had given to God this
90l., she might receive 5l. back again. She told me, that she considered
the brethren had shown her from the Holy Scriptures what she might do,
and therefore she had taken this 5l. I did not myself agree with the
judgment of those brethren who had said this (as there is no evidence
that Barnabas ever was supported out of the common stock, the proceeds
of the sale of houses and lands, out of which the poor were supported);
but I purposely said nothing to the widow, lest she should at once be
induced to give me this 5l. also. She had, however, this 5l. untouched,
and showed it to me; and before leaving she would make me take 1l. of it
for the benefit of the Orphans, which I did not refuse, as I had no
intention to keep the 85l. She also gave me a sixpence for the Orphans,
which some one had given her for herself, a few days before.

I now asked her, as this matter concerning the remaining of the 5l. was
satisfactorily explained, as far as it respected her own state of heart,
what she wished me to do with the money, in case I saw it right to keep
it. Her reply was, that she would leave that with me, and God would
direct me concerning it; but that, if she said any thing at all, she
should most like it to be used for the support of brethren who labour in
the Word without salary, and who hazard their lives for the name of
Christ. She wished me to have a part of the money; but this I flatly
refused, lest I should be evil spoken of in this matter. I then offered
to pay her traveling expenses, as she had come to me, which she would
not accept, as she did not stand in need of it. In conclusion I told
her, that I would now further pray respecting this matter, and consider
what to do concerning it. I then prayed with this dear Godly woman,
commended her to God, separated from her, and have not seen her since.

I waited from Aug. 9, 1853, to March 7, 1854, when I wrote to her,
offering her back again the whole 85l., or a part of it. On March 9,
1854, just seven months after I had received the money, amid just nine
months after she had actually given it, and ten years and nine months
after she had made the resolution to give her house and garden to God, I
heard from her, stating that she was of the same mind as she had been
for years. I, therefore, disposed of the money, to aid such foreign
missionary brethren as, according to the best my knowledge resembled
most the class of men whom she wished to assist.

The reasons, why I have so minutely dwelt upon this circumstance, are:
1, If, as a steward of the bounties of the children of God, I should be
blamed for receiving from a poor widow almost literally her all, it may
be seen in what manner I did so. To have refused, on March 9, 1854, also
would be going beyond what I should be warranted to do. 2, I desired
also to give a practical illustration, that I only desire donations in
God's way. It is not the money only, I desire; but money received, in
answer to prayer, in God's order. 3, This circumstance illustrates how
God helps me often in the most unexpected manner. 4, I have also related
this instance, as a fresh proof, that even in these last days the love
of Christ is of constraining power, and may work mightily, as in the
days of the Apostles. I have witnessed many such instances as this,
during the twenty years I have been occupied in this my service. Let us
give thanks to God for such cases, and seek for grace rather to imitate
such Godly men and women than think that they are going too far.

I cannot, however, dismiss this subject, without commending this poor
widow to the prayers of all who love our Lord Jesus, that she may be
kept humble, lest, thinking highly of herself, on account of what she
has been enabled to do, by the grace of God, she should not only lose
blessing in her own soul, but this circumstance should become a snare to
her. Pray also, believing Reader, that she may never be allowed to
regret what she has done for the Lord.

May 23. Yesterday I looked over the list of the 56 labourers in the
Word, whom I seek to assist, in order to see to whom it would be
desirable to send help; and, having drawn out a list, with the
respective amounts for each, I found that it would be desirable to send
out this week 327l., but I wanted at least 50l. more, to be able to
accomplish this. Accordingly I gave myself to prayer, if it might please
the Lord to send me the means. And now, this morning, in answer to
prayer, I received anonymously from bankers in London 100l., which the
donor desired to be applied for the current expenses for the Orphans,
and for labourers in the Gospel at Home and Abroad. I took therefore
50l. for the Orphans, and 50l. for home and foreign labourers.

By the same post I received also from the neighbourhood of Shrewsbury
10l., the disposal of which being left to me, I took for missionary
objects.--I have now the desire of my heart granted, being able to
send out the full amount of what it yesterday appeared to me desirable
that I should send to the brethren whom I seek to help.

Means for the support of the 300 Orphans, already under our care, sent
in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1853, to May 26, 1854.

At the commencement of this period, there was in hand the balance of
117l. 10s. 9d. This was the visible support, in the way of pecuniary
means, which we had to look to for 320 inmates in the New Orphan House,
whilst often two or three days might call for such an amount as this.
But we hoped in God, as in former years, and, by His grace, were upheld,
and our faith was not allowed to fail, though it was not a little tried,
as the following pages will show.

Of the donations which came in between May 26, and June. 13, 1853, I
will only mention the following. On June 1st I received from Cape Town
2l. for the Orphans, and 3l. for tracts. On June 8th I received from
Rhode Island, United States, 20 dollars and 5 dollars (4l. 15s. 9d.
English), when I had scarcely anything left for the Orphans. Observe,
dear Reader, from Africa and from America the Lord sends help to us,
yea from almost all parts of the world. Thus is He saying to us more and
more; "Only believe." On June 10th I received 5l. from a brother in the
Lord at a distance, as a thank-offering to God, that, having been thrown
from his horse, he had not been killed, but only greatly hurt.

June. 13. We were now very poor. Not indeed in debt, nor was even all
the money gone; for there was still about 12l. in hand; but then there
needed to be bought flour, of which we buy generally 10 sacks at a tine,
300 stones of oatmeal, 4 cwt. of soap, and there were many little
repairs going on in the house, with a number of workmen, besides the
regular current expenses of about 70l. per week. Over and above all
this, on Saturday, the day before yesterday, I found that the heating
apparatus needed to be repaired, which would cost in all probability
25l. It was therefore desirable, humanly speaking, to have 100l. for
these heavy extra expenses, besides means for the current expenses. But
I had no human prospect whatever of getting even 100 Pence, much less
100l. In addition to this, today was Monday, when generally the income
is little. But, in walking to the Orphan House this morning, and praying
as I went, I particularly told the Lord in prayer, that on this day,
though Monday, He could send me much. And thus it was. I received this
morning 301l. for the Lord's service, as might be most needed.--The
joy which I had cannot be described. I walked up and down in my room for
a long time, tears of joy and gratitude to the Lord running plentifully
over my cheeks, praising and magnifying the Lord for His goodness, and
surrendering myself afresh, with all my heart, to Him for His blessed
service. I scarcely ever felt more the kindness of the Lord in helping
me.--I took of this money 201l., for the current expenses for the
Orphans, and 100l. for missionary objects, the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures and Gospel Tracts, and for the various Schools.

Of the donations which came in between June 13th and Aug. 31st,
amounting to more than 600l., I will only mention: 50l., through a most
unexpected circumstance, from Glasgow, on June 29th. 2l. from Sunderland
on July 23rd, of which 1l was made up, by an individual putting by one
half-penny daily for the Orphans, and a poor widow one penny per week.
— On Aug. 19th I received from a Christian Negro in Demerara an old
silver watch, a gold pin and brooch, and Five Dollars.

Aug. 31. When there was less than 20l. in, hand, I received today a
donation of 220l., of which the donor kindly wished me to take 20l. for
my own personal expenses, and to use the other for the work of the Lord
as most needed. I therefore took 150l. for the Orphans, and 50l. for the
other objects, and was thus enabled to advance today 30l., as usual, for
the house-keeping expenses; money being called for, which, otherwise, I
should not have been able to supply.

Of the donations received between Aug. 31st and Oct. 24th, amounting to
about 550l., I only notice 2l. 7s. 6d. "From South Africa," 1l. from
Malta, and 6s. 4d. from Demerara.

I will now minutely relate the Lord's dealings with us, with reference
to meeting the expenses for the 300 Orphans, for about three weeks, as a
specimen of how the Lord was pleased to help us during a period when the
flour was twice as dear as for several years before, and when other
expenses were much greater than usual.

Oct. 24. This afternoon I was called on to advance more house-keeping
money; but as I had only about 26l. altogether in hand, I could only
give 20l. this time, instead of the usual 30l. I had then about 6l. left
for all the many other expenses, large and small, connected with the
Establishment, and which are not included in the ordinary house-keeping
expenses. Before the day is over, I have received this evening the
following amounts Through Salem boxes 1s. By sale of Reports 5s. 1d.
with 10s. as a donation. Both sums from Waterford.--From a donor in
Bristol 1l.--From Bayswater 5l.

Oct. 25. From an Orphan-box in Bristol 4s.--From Warminster 1l. 1s.
— From Seven Oaks 1l.1s. 6d. This was an old debt, owed for a long
time to the donor. He expressed in prayer that, if the Lord would cause
the money to be paid, it should be sent to me; and almost immediately
afterwards it was paid.--From Durham 12l., being a dividend on shares
in gas-works.--From Braunton 5s.--From Balham Hill, London, 1l.
10s., with a variety of articles to be sold for the benefit of the
Orphans.--By sale of Reports 2s.

Oct. 26. From Keswick 7s. 6d., 2s. 6d., 1s. 6d., and 3s.--By sale of
Reports 1l. 2s. 11 ½ d.--By sale of some silver coins, a few tea
spoons, and a few trinkets 5l.--By sale of Reports 9s.--There was
found in the visitor's room at the New Orphan House a four-penny
piece.--Through the boxes in the New Orphan House 4l. 14s. This
afternoon was the time in the week when visitors see the establishment.
It was a wet afternoon, but still above 60 persons went over the house.
Being in great need of means, of which the visitors, however, could
perceive nothing, as all our stores were full as usual, I asked the
Lord, that He would be pleased to put it into their hearts to put money
into the boxes: and this sum I found in them this evening.--Yesterday
it was necessary to purchase ten sacks of flout, which, being just now
twice as dear as darning the last years, cost 27l. 10s.; and this day it
was needful to spend 8l. 1s. 2d. for smith's work. How kind,
therefore, of the Lord to have sent me today, yesterday, and the
afternoon of the day before yesterday, 34l. 11s, 4 ½ d. Thus, with the
6l. left before, I am able to meet these two items of above 35l., and
have about 5l. left.

Now observe how the Lord further helped, when I had only Five Pounds
left.

Oct. 27. By sale of Reports 3s.--From West Brixton 5s., and 5s. from
Scotland.--Through a box in the New Orphan House 6d.--By sale of a
Report 6d.

Oct. 28. "From Friends of Petersham" 1l. 2s. 6d., and from Richmond 7s.
6d.--From the neighbourhood of Stourbridge. 1l.--From Wells 3s.
— From a clergyman at Weston-super-Mare 5l.--Anonymously from
Scotland 6d.--From a brother in the Lord 1l., with two pewter plates.
— From Clifton 10s.--From Hackney 1s.

Oct. 29. From Chilton Polden 5s., as "A thank-offering that the
donor's children have not been left Orphans."--From Kingsbridge 5s.
6d.--From Glasgow 7s. 6d.--By sale of articles and Reports 2l.
10s.--From Royston 1l.

Oct. 30. From Lichfield 2s. 6d. and 3s. 8d.--From a medical gentleman
in Bristol 1l.--From Clifton 3s.

Oct. 31. This afternoon more money was required for house-keeping. By
the donations which had come in since the 27th, I was able to pay away
7l. 13s., and 1l. 2s., and had 12l. 17s, 2d. besides. This I gave to the
last penny for house-keeping, and had now literally not one penny left
in hand for the current expenses for the Orphans.

This evening I received, when I had nothing in hand: from Clifton 1l.
— From a sister in the Lord in Bristol 2s. 6d.--Through Bethesda
boxes 5s., "from servants in Scotland,"--From Wiveliscombe 1l.--
From Clifton 10s.--Through the Chapel boxes 2s.--A pair of
silver-mounted spectacles and 2s. 6d. from Clifton.

Nov. 1. By means of those little sums, which came in last evening, I was
able to let the matron have further 2l. 17s. early this morning. Thus we
were able to meet this day's demands. There came in further today: By
sale of old clothes 6s. 4d., and from Launceston, by sale of Reports,
7s. 6d.--There was put into the letter box at my house anonymously,
1s. 6d., with these words: "I had worked hard for this money, and could
not get paid. A thought passed lately through my mind, if I ever get it,
I will devote it to some charitable purpose. To my surprise, without
asking for it, it is paid. I now send it for the Orphans."--Evening.
By sale of Reports 3s.--From Spaldwick 2s. 6d. and 1s.--From the
neighbourhood of Arundel 11s. 6d.

Nov. 2. From Hull 5s.--From Knapp 1s.--From Gosport 2l.--From
six servants at Hampton Court Palace, a parcel, containing a variety of
articles, for the use of the Orphans, or to be sold for their benefit,
with 4s. —Through the boxes in the New Orphan House 1l. 16s. 5 ½ d.
Given also by a visitor from Cornwall 10s., Ditto by another 10s., Ditto
by another 2s. 6d., Ditto by another 1s.--By sale of Reports 6s.--
I was thus further able to advance last evening for house-keeping
expenses 1l. 0s. 4d., this morning 3l. 1s., and this evening 3l. 12s. 11
½ d. Thus, though we are living by the day, as it respects supplies out
of the hands of our Heavenly Father, yet we have lacked nothing!

Received further 12s. by sale of Reports.

Nov. 3. From Helensburgh 2s. and 6d.--From Bideford 12s.--From
Islington 2l.--From Clifton Park 5l.--By sale of some books 3l.
— From a donor in Bristol 5l. From Norwich 5s.--Thus we have
wherewith to meet the expenses for today and tomorrow, and, it may be,
of the day after tomorrow. At all events, before this is gone, the
faithful Lord will send in more.

Nov. 4. By sale of old clothes 11s. 2 ½ d.--From Whitby 1l. Ditto
5s.--From Bodmin 1s.--By sale of rags 7s. 3d. [I transcribe from
the Income book. We think it right to turn every thing to account, so
that nothing be wasted, and that the expenses of the Institution be not
needlessly increased.]

Nov. 5. From Swansea 5s.--From Willenhall 5s.--From Bridgewater
5s.--From Worcester 5s. and 1s.--Evening, Saturday. Thus we have
had during another week everything needed.

Nov. 7. There came in yesterday 1s. from Stafford, and 3s. from Worksop.
— To day from Kilkenny 1l.--When I had nothing at all in hand,
having paid out the last money today, and when more would be needed this
evening or tomorrow morning, I received this afternoon, from a most
unexpected quarter, 6l. This morning the matron had between 11l, and
12l. in hand for house-keeping expenses, but, by the time I arrived at
the New Orphan House, it had all been expended through unexpected
demands, so that she had had to add half a crown of her own. I had
received, however, this morning, at the very time while I was in prayer
for means, 1l. from Kilkenny, which, with, 9s. 3 ½ d. besides, in hand,
I gave to her. Now this afternoon came in the 6l., and we have thus a
manifest answer to prayer. The Lord be magnified.--Evening. Through
Salem boxes 1s. Through Bethesda boxes 2s. 6d. Do. 6d. From P. 2s. 6d.

Nov. 8. From Guildford 1l. 1s.

Nov. 9. By sale of Reports 3s. 6d.--From Clonmell 9s. 5d.--Our
need of means is great, very great. The Lord tries our faith and
patience. This afternoon, a brother and sister in the Lord, from
Gloucestershire, called to see mc at the New Orphan House, before going
through the house. After a few minutes I received from the sister a
sovereign, which she had been requested to bring to me for the Building
Fund, and she gave mc from herself 1l. for my own personal expenses, and
1l. for tine Building Fund, and her husband gave me 5l. for the Orphans,
and 5l. for Foreign Missions. Thus the Lord has refreshed my spirit
greatly; but I look for more, and need much more.--Evening. By sale
of Reports 13s. 2d. By the boxes in the New Orphan House 3l. 1s. 10 ½
d. I received also this evening from Walmer 10l., of which the donor
kindly wished 2l. to be used for the personal expenses of my family, and
the rest for missionary work and the support of the Orphans. I took
therefore one half for missions, and the other half for the Orphans.

Nov. 10. From Oakhill 5s.--By sale of Reports 15s. 10d.--From
Swansea 10s., 4s., and 6s.--From Anglesey 5s. and 2s. 6d.--From
Bath 2l.

Nov. 11. Anonymously from Banbury 1l.

Nov. 12. From Bideford 1l.--From Perth 1l. This evening, while
praying for means, came a little parcel, containing Ten Sovereigns, from
a Christian lady, living not far frown the New Orphan House. This was a
very great refreshment to my spirit. Also from Clydach 10s. and 1s.

Nov. 13. Further precious help. Received this morning through Bankers in
London, an anonymous donation of 50l. in a Bank Post Bill, with the
words: "To be applied to general purposes; to be used as you may judge
best." I took therefore the whole of this donation for the current
expenses of the Orphans. A most welcome and refreshing donation, the
fruit of many prayers, as just now the expenses are very great, and
there were no means in hand to meet them! From Clifton 16s. 5d. From
Easton 5l.

Nov. 14. From Melton Mowbray 2s. By sale of Reports 1s.--From Norwich
2s. 6d. Ditto 2s. 6d.--From Kingsbridge two brooches--Through the
boxes at Bethesda 1s.--From Clevedon 1l.--From F. E. B. 2s. 6d.

Nov. 15. Anonymously from Nottingham 10s.--From Cheltenham 5l.--
From the Isle of Wight 10s.--This evening I received from a Christian
lady a brooch set with amethysts, another brooch set with eight
brilliants and six other small diamonds, and a small gold necklace. My
heart was exceedingly refreshed by this donation, not only because we
arc still in need of supplies on account of our heavy daily expenses
just now; but also because this valuable donation consists of articles
which the Christian donor can spare, without the slightest
inconvenience.

Nov. 16. Anonymously in postages 3s. 6d.--From London 10l., with 5l.
for my own expenses.--By sale of Reports 7s.--Left by a visitor
from Aberdeen, at the New Orphan House 10s. Through the boxes at the New
Orphan House 2l. 11s. 6 ½ d.--From South Brent 1s. 6d.

I have thus given, minutely, the manner in which the Lord was pleased,
for 24 days in succession to supply us with means for the Orphans, from
which the spiritual reader may easily perceive our position. Thus it was
with us not merely during the 24 days of which I have now given the
history, but also to a greater or less degree at other times during this
year. But I refrain from giving minutely the account of every day, for
the sake of brevity.

The particular end, why I have been so minute, is to show that the work
is now, as much as ever, a work carried on entirely in dependence upon
the Living God, who alone is our hope, and to whom alone we look for
help, and who never has forsaken us in the hour of need. There is,
however, one thing different with reference to this year, when compared
with former years, and that is, that, while our trials of faith during
this year were just as great as in previous years, the amount needed in
former times was never so great as during this year, especially as the
bread during the greater part of this year was about twice as dear as
for several years before.

But then, it may be said, if you have had this trial of faith, with
these 300 Orphans, why do you seek to build another Orphan House for 700
more, and thus have a thousand to care for? Will you not have still
greater trials of faith?

My reply is: 1, God has never failed me all the 20 years of this my
service. 2, I am going on as easily now, with 300 Orphans, as with 30,
the number with which I commenced. Their number is ten times as large,
as it was at the first; but God has always helped me. 3, Trials of faith
were anticipated, yea were one chief end of the work, for the profit of
the Church of Christ at large. 4, I had courage given me to go forward,
solely in dependence upon God, being assured that He would help me; yet
I waited in secret upon Him for six months, before I made this my
intention known, in order that I might not take a hasty step; and have
never regretted having gone forward. 5, But it needs to be added, that
the very abundance which the Lord gave me at the time, when my mind was
exercised about this matter, was a great confirmation to me, that I had
not mistaken His mind. And even during this year, how great has been His
help; for the income for the work altogether has been 12,785l. 15s. 7 ¼
d. I am therefore assured that the Lord will, in His own time, not only
allow me to build another Orphan House, but that He will also, when He
shall have been pleased to fill it, find the means to provide for these
children.

I give now a brief reference to some of the more remarkable donations
which came in between Nov. 16, 1853, and May 26, 1854.

Jan. 1, 1854. Received three old guinea pieces, with the following
words: "The enclosed has been too long held in reserve, as an esteemed
memento from a dear departed parent (for which may the Lord grant a
pardon). A conviction of its wrong overpowers the natural desire, of its
being retained, and not expended to the glory of God: for which purpose
it is now sent to dear Mr. Müller, as a new year offering, to be used
in the way he thinks most conducive to the same,"--In this instance I
had a double answer to prayer; for we were not only much in need of
means, when the donation came in, but I had also again and again asked
the Lord to incline the hearts of His dear children to send me their
jewellery, their old gold and silver coins, and other valuable, but
needless, articles, to be turned into money for the work of the Lord.

Jan. 17. Memorable day. Today, in much need, was received from Glasgow
10l., with 10l. for Mr. Craik, and 10l. for my own personal expenses.
— There came in also, a Bank Post Bill for 50l., anonymously, through
London Bankers, which amount was taken half for the Orphans and half for
the other objects.--Likewise from Stroud 10s.--From Reading 6s.
3d.--From Gloucester 2s. 6d.--But the Lord over and above all
this, allowed me to have this day the promise of that large donation
which has been spoken of under the Building Fund, of which 707l. was
taken towards the support of the Orphans, by which, together with
1,119l. 8s. 2 ½ d. which came in for the support of the Orphans from
Jan. 17 up to May 26, 1854, we were helped to the close of this period.

March 1. There was left to me, for the benefit of the Orphans, a year
ago, by an individual in Bristol, whom I had never seen, a legacy of
100l., which was paid this day, less 10l. legacy duty.

April 9. This morning I received from an anonymous donor, through
Bankers in London, a Bank Post Bill for 50l., the application of which
was left to me. I took the whole of it for the support of the Orphans.
This donation has been a great spiritual refreshment to me, as the
expenses for the Orphans are now so very great, and as for five weeks no
large sums have come in.

April 17. Received 150l., of which the donor kindly wished me to take
20l. for my own personal expenses, and to use the rest as might be most
needed for the Lord's work in my hands. I took, therefore, 100l. for
the current expenses for the Orphans, and 30l. for the other Objects.
— This donation has greatly refreshed my spirit, as the expenses for
the Orphans were never so great at any period, since the work commenced,
as during the last six mouths, on account of the high price of
provisions; and as the income, compared with the expenses, has been
small of late, though considerable, were not the expenses so very
great.

May 14. This morning I have received 150l., of which I have taken for
the current expenses for the Orphans 100l., and for the other objects
50l.--Tomorrow I shall have to pay out for the Orphans 107l. 4s. The
total amount I had in hand for them, before this donation was received,
was only 120l. How kind, therefore, of the Lord to replenish our means
again, before they were almost entirely exhausted!--I received, also,
this morning from Clifton 5l.

During the following 12 days there came in further 107l. altogether for
the support of the Orphans.

Miscellaneous points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 26, 1853, to May
26, 1854.

1. During this year 4 Day Schools, with 202 children, were entirely
supported by the funds of the Institution. Further, one Sunday School in
Bristol, with 137 children, was entirely supported, and three others in
Devonshire, Somersetshire, and Gloucestershire, with 300 children, were
assisted. Lastly, one Adult School, with 154 Adult scholars, was
entirely supported. The total amount which was spent during this year,
in connexion with these schools, was 359l. 15s. 10 ½ d.--The number
of all the children, who were under our care, merely in the schools
which were entirely supported by this Institution, from March 5,1834, to
May 26, 1854, was 5,817 in the Day Schools, and 2,748 in the Sunday
Schools, and 2,315 persons in the Adult School.

2. During this year was expended on the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures, of the funds of the Institution, 433l. 2s. 9d. There were
circulated during this year 1890 Bibles and 1288 New Testaments; and
from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1854, Twelve Thousand
Three Hundred and Sixty-six Bibles, and Seven Thousand Three Hundred and
Forty-nine New Testaments.

3. During this year there was spent of the Funds of the Institution for
Missionary objects the sum of 2,249l. 10s. 8 ½ d. By this sum,
fifty-six labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the
world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

During this year, the Lord was pleased to bless again abundantly the
labours of many of those servants of Christ, who were assisted through
the funds of this Institution, and this has been the case in foreign
countries as well as at home.

4. There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1853,
to May 26, 1854, the sum of 563l. 5s. 0 ½ d.; and there were circulated
869,636 Tracts.

The total number of all time Tracts circulated from the beginning up to
May 26, 1854, was Two Millions Six Hundred and Eighty-nine Thousand Six
Hundred and Seventy-six.

We desire to be grateful to the Lord, that, during no period previously
we were enabled to circulate more Tracts, and more copies of the Holy
Scriptures, and aid to a greater degree missionary labours, than during
this period; yet we would not rest in that. It is the blessing of the
Lord upon our labours which we need, which we desire, and which, by His
grace, we also seek. If never so many millions of Tracts, yea even
copies of the Holy Scriptures, were circulated, and the Lord did not
give His blessing, all these efforts would produce no results to the
glory of His name. Yea, if even tens of thousands of preachers of the
gospel could be supported with means, in the darkest places of the
earth, and they enjoyed not the blessing of the Lord upon their labours,
they would labour in vain. For this blessing God will be asked, in order
that He may bestow it; but, when it is sought at His hands, He delights
in giving it. By God's help we were enabled to seek this blessing, and
we obtained again precious answers to our prayers, during this year. It
is not merely that the Lord was pleased to give us answers to our
prayers with regard to means for carrying on the work; but also in that
the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution were
abundantly blessed to the conversion of very many souls; and this was
particularly also the case again with reference to the circulation of
Tracts.

If any of the Christian Readers are in the habit of circulating Tracts,
and yet have never seen fruit, may I suggest to them the following hints
for their prayerful consideration. 1, Seek for such a state of heart,
through Prayer and meditation on the Holy Scriptures, as that you are
willing to let God have all the honour, if any good is accomplished by
your service. If you desire for yourself the honour, yea, though it were
in part only, you oblige the Lord, so to speak, to put you as yet aside
as a vessel not meet for the Master's use. One of the greatest
qualifications for usefulness in the service of the Lord is a heart,
truly desirous of getting honour for Him. 2, Precede all your labours
with earnest, diligent prayer; go to them in a prayerful spirit; and
follow them by prayer. Do not rest on the number of Tracts you have
given. A million of Tracts may not be the means of converting one single
soul; and yet how great, beyond calculation, may be the blessing which
results from one single Tract. Thus it is also with regard to the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and the ministry of the Word itself.
Expect, then, everything from the blessing of the Lord, and nothing at
all from your own exertions. 3, And yet, at the same time, labour, press
into every open door, be instant in season and out of season, as if
everything depended upon your labours. This, as has been stated before,
is one of the great secrets in connexion with successful service for the
Lord; to work, as if everything depended upon our diligence, and yet not
to rest in the least upon our exertions, but upon the blessing of the
Lord. 4, This blessing of the Lord, however, should not merely be sought
in prayer, but should also be expected, looked for, continually looked
for; and the result will be, that we shall surely have it. 5, But
suppose, that, for the trial of our faith, this blessing were for a long
time withheld from our sight; or suppose even that we should have to
fall asleep, before we see much good resulting from our labours; yet
will they, if carried on in such a way and spirit as has been stated, be
at last abundantly owned, and we shall have a much harvest in the day of
Christ.

Now, dear Christian Reader, if you have not seen much blessing resulting
from your labours, or perhaps none at all, consider prayerfully these
hints, which are affectionately given by one who has now for about
thirty years [in 1856] in some measure sought to serve the Lord, and who
has found the blessedness, of what he has suggested, in some measure in
his own experience.

5. At the beginning of this period, there were Three Hundred Orphans in
the New Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol. During the year there were
admitted into it 30 Orphans; making 330 in all. Of these 330, four died,
three were received back again by their relatives, who by that time were
able to provide for them, 17 boys were, at the expense of the
establishment, fitted out and apprenticed, and eight girls were fitted
out and sent to situations, at the expense of the Establishment; so that
there were only 298 Orphans in the house at the close of the period. The
total number of Orphans, who were under our care from April, 1836, to
May 26, 1854, was Five Hundred and Fifty Eight.

I notice further the following points in connexion with the New Orphan
House.

A. The expenses during this year, for the support of the Orphans, were
3,897l. 2s. 0 ½ d.

B. Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 64,591l. 6s. 11 ¼ d. was given to me for the Orphans as the
result of prayer to God from the commencement of the work up to May 26,
1854.--It may be also interesting to the reader to know that the
total amount given for the other objects, from the commencement of the
work up to May 26, 1854, was 22,268l. 2s 11 ¼ d.; and that which came
in by the sale of Bibles and Tracts, and by the payments of the children
in the Day Schools, from the commencement up to May 26, 1854, amounted
to 3,989l. 4s. 5 ¾ d.--Besides this, also, a great variety and
number of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, &c., were given
for the use of the Orphans.

C. Our labours continued to be blessed among the Orphans. We saw also
again fruit of our labours, during this year, with regard to Orphans who
formerly were under our care.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, from May 26, 1853, to
May 26, 1854.

In July 1853 it pleased the Lord to try my faith in a way in which
before it had not been tried. My beloved daughter, an only child, and a
believer since the commencement of the year 1846, was taken ill on June
20th. This illness, at first a low fever, turned to typhus. On July 3rd
there seemed no hope of her recovery. Now was the trial of faith. But
faith triumphed. My beloved wife and I were enabled to give her up into
the hands of the Lord. He sustained us both exceedingly. But I will only
speak about myself. Though my only and beloved child was brought near
the grave, yet was my soul inn perfect peace, satisfied with the will of
my Heavenly Father, being assured that He would only do that for her and
her parents, which in the end would be the best. She continued very ill
till about July 20th, when restoration began. On Aug. 18th she was so
far restored, that she could be removed to Clevedon for change of air,
though exceedingly weak. It was then 59 days mince she was first taken
ill.

While I was in this affliction, this great affliction, besides being at
peace, so far as the Lord's dispensation was concerned, I also felt
perfectly at peace with regard to the cause of the affliction. When in
August 1831 the hand of the Lord was heavily laid on me in my family, as
related in the first part of this Narrative, I had not the least
hesitation in knowing, that it was the Father's rod, applied in
infinite wisdom and love, for the restoration of my soul from a state of
lukewarmness. At this time, however, I had no such feeling. Conscious as
I was of manifold weaknesses, failings, and shortcomings, so that I too
would be ready to say with the Apostle Paul, "O wretched man that I am;"
yet I was assured that this affliction was not upon me in the way of the
fatherly rod, but for the trial of my faith. Persons often have, no
doubt, the idea respecting me, that all my trials of faith regard
matters connected with money, though the reverse has been stated by me
very frequently; now, however, the Lord would try my faith concerning
one of my dearest earthly treasures, yea, next to my beloved wife, the
dearest of all my earthly possessions. Parents know what an only child,
a beloved child is, and what to believing parents an only child, a
believing child must be. Well, the Father in heaven said, as it were, by
this His dispensation, Art thou willing to give up this child to me? My
heart responded, As it seems good to Thee my Heavenly Father. Thy will
be done. But as our hearts were made willing to give back our beloved
child to Him who had given her to us, so He was ready to leave her to
us, and she lived. "Delight thyself also in the Lord; and He shall give
thee the desires of thine heart." Psalm xxxvii. 4. The desires of my
heart were, to retain the beloved daughter, if it were the will of God;
the means to retain her were, to be satisfied with the will of the
Lord.

Of all the trials of faith that as yet I have had to pass through, this
was the greatest; amid by God's abundant mercy, I own it to His
praise, I was enabled to delight myself in the will of God; for I felt
perfectly sure, that, if the Lord took this beloved daughter, it would
be best for her parents, best for herself, and more for the glory of God
than if she lived: this better part I was satisfied with; and thus my
heart had peace, perfect peace, and I had not a moment's anxiety. Thus
would it be under all circumstances, however painful, were the believer
exercising faith.

Dec. 31, 1853. During this year the Lord was pleased to give me

1. By anonymous donations through the
boxes ... ... ... ... £177 9 7 ½

2. Through donations from believers in
Bristol, not anonymously . . . . . . . 143 3 0

3. Through donations from believers not
residing in Bristol ... ... 299 16 1

4. Through presents in clothes, provisions,
&c., worth at least ... ... 18 3 0

----

£638 11 8 ½

----——

Further account respecting the intended Orphan I-louse for Seven Hundred
Poor Orphans, bereaved of both Parents by death, from May 26, 1854, to
May 26, 1855.

On May 26, 1854, I had actually in hand for this intended Orphan House,
as has been stated in the last chapter on this subject, 17,816l. 19s. 5
¼ d. I will now relate further, how the Lord was pleased to supply me
with means, but can only refer, for the sake of brevity, to a few
instances out of many. The receipts of the first month of this year,
however, shall be given entirely, as a specimen.

May 29, 1854. Through Salem Chapel boxes 6d.

May 31. From Finchdean 5l.

June 1. Through the boxes at Bethesda Chapel 1l.--Ditto from P. and
M. E. 10s.--From London 1s. 6d.

June 4. A gold dollar piece and nearly two pennyweights of Californian
gold dust.

June 5. Through Bethesda Chapel boxes 2s. 6d. as a thank-offering to the
Lord for the mercies of the past month.--Through Salem Chapel boxes
1s.--Ditto 6d.--From P. 2s.

June 7. Anonymously through London Bankers 100l.--Through the boxes
at the New Orphan House 1s.

June. 8. From E. 2s. 6d.--Anonymously 2s.

June. 12. Through Bethesda boxes 3s.--Ditto 1s.--Ditto 1l.--
Through Salem boxes 6d.

June 14. Through the boxes at the New Orphan House 5s.--Ditto ¼ d.

June 17. By sale of articles 17s. 7d.

June 18. 3s.--5s.

June-19. 15s.

June 22. A muslin cap, a cape, some worked trimming, and two bags, to be
sold for the Building Fund.

June 25. From Glasgow 2s. 6d.--From K. C. 10s.

June 26. Anonymously 2s. 2d.--Through Salem boxes 6d.--From P.
1s.

These were but little sums, esteemed reader, in comparison with the
total amount required for the accommodation of 700 more Orphans; yea,
they were even small in comparison with what was still required, though
I had then nearly 18,000l. in hand. But as it had been given to me, by
God's grace, to expect help from Him, yea, the full help needed for
this object, so the additional income of a few pounds, of a few
shillings, yea of a penny or two, was an encouragement to me for further
waiting upon Him, as every donation, the smallest even, brings me nearer
the time when all my prayers concerning this object also shall be turned
into praises.

July 1. A large gold brooch, set with two carbuncles, to be sold for the
Building Fund.

July 2. Anonymously through London Bankers 100l.--From Bury 10s.

July 19. A silver tea pot.

Sept. 27. From one of the former Orphans, now in service, 5s.--From
the Orphan Girls, now under our care, 15s. for the Building Fund.--
From the House Girls, i.e. the elder female Orphans, who are more
particularly engaged in doing household work, for the purpose of being
thus trained for situations, I received likewise 11s.--From the
Infant Orphans was also received for the Building Fund today, 6s. 8d.;
and from the Orphan Boys 15s, 0 ½ d.--Oct. 4. From two little
factory girls 1s. 7d.

Oct. 28. From Halifax in Nova Scotia 7l.

Nov. 25. From the neighbourhood of Wheatley 10l.

Dec. 8. From various believers at Hull 12l. 12s.

Dee. 30. From Orleans, in France, five francs.

Thus ended the year 1854. Only 426l. 16s. 4d. altogether had come in for
the Building Fund from May 26 up to the end of the year. My faith and
patience were therefore tried; but, while they were tried, they were, by
God's grace, sustained. Day by day I had been enabled from May 26 to
Dec. 31, 1854, as well as during the three years previously, to bring
this object before the Lord in player; and day by day, by God's grace,
my heart had been fully assured, without wavering, that He, in His own
time, would not only give larger sums, but the whole amount required. I
desired only His honour in the building of premises for 700 more
destitute Orphans, bereaved of both parents; and as God, who cares
infinitely more for poor Orphans than I do, did not consider the time
to have come for the building of another house, I might well be quiet.
My heart longed indeed to begin to build; for there were not only 602
Orphans waiting for admission, when the last report was published but
there had been application made for 125 more since then, so that on Dec.
31, 1854, 714 were waiting for admission, as only 13 could be received
of the total number of 727, no more vacancies having occurred. But
though it was so, I judged it was the will of God, that, by patiently
waiting His own time, I should glorify Him.--I now proceed to relate
how the Lord further dealt with me.

Jan. 1, 1855. 6s. 3d.--From an Orphan 1s., Ditto 1s.--From
Manchester 10s.--From three children in Ireland 5s.--Anonymously
from Culworth 1l.--From P. 2s. 6d.

Jan. 8. On this day I received from several Christian friends the
promise, that 5,700l. should be paid to me for the work of the Lord in
which I am engaged.--This donation was paid to me, in different
installments, by the middle of April. I took of this sum, for the
Building fund 3,400l., for the support of the Orphans 900l., for
missionary objects 1,000l., for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures
150l., for the circulation of Tracts 150l., and for the various day
schools, Sunday schools, and the adult school 100l. Thus the Lord is
hastening on the time when the building may be commenced. His name be
magnified! How refreshing this help was, and how seasonable with regard
to all the various objects, can scarcely be described. The Lord may
allow us, to have our faith and patience tried; but if we are enabled to
continue to look to Him, and to trust in Him alone, a rich recompense
will result from doing so.

Jan. 11. From a distance of several hundred miles 13l. 15s, with a
letter containing the following paragraph: For the last six months, we
(i.e. the donor and his wife) have laboured in prayer for the different
departments of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, and especially that
our Heavenly Father would be pleased this year largely to increase the
Building Fund, and let the work proceed. Two months ago, while
continuing in prayer, it was laid upon our minds, that we should set
apart, whatever monies the Lord might send us between that time and the
new year. The sum contained in the order is what the Lord has given us
and we rejoice in being able to send it." What various ways has the Lord
to help us! The donor of the 13l. 15s. is a brother who serves the Lord
in the ministry of the Gospel among very poor and wretched persons,
whilst he labours in dependence upon Him for his temporal supplies. He
has been greatly encouraged by the accounts of the Lord's dealings
with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution; and now he is a fellow-helper
in prayer, and, as this instance shows, also in contributing out of that
which the Lord gives to him as the fruit of prayer. This donation
greatly refreshed my spirit; for it is so manifest a proof that the Lord
is mindful of this work, that He surely, in His own time, will provide
for the accommodation of 700 more Orphans, and that thus this dear
donor's prayers, and our prayers, will be turned into praises.

Feb. 7. From London 400l., of which the donor kindly wished me to keep
20l. for my family expenses, and to lay out the 380l. for the Lord's
work, as I might think best. I took therefore 100l for the Building
Fund, 140l. for the support of the Orphans, and 140l. for the other
objects.

Feb. 10. Received 197l. 17s. 3d., of which the donor kindly wished me to
take 20l. for my own expenses, and the rest to be used as might be most
needed for the Lord's work. I took therefore 57l. 17s. 3d. for the
Building Fund, 60l. for the support of the Orphans and 60l. for the
other objects.

March 28. From one of the Orphans, formerly for many years under our
care, but now in service, 10s., with the following letter:

"Dear Sir,--Will you graciously accept this mite from one who thinks
of you and yours with gratitude. It is indeed a very small sum. I regret
that I have no more to bestow upon such a noble work. It will perhaps
put a corner stone in the wall of the intended Orphan House. I think I
should like to labour for the Lord in that blessed house, if it is His
own will, and be the means in the Lord's hand of bringing many of the
dear Orphans to know the truth as it is in Jesus. It was in the Orphan
House in Wilson Street, 1846, that first the light of life dawned upon
my benighted soul. It was there, that I first learned to call God my
Father. I have need therefore to love the Orphan House, not only as
concerning temporal things, but especially as its being my spiritual
birth-place. May the Lord reward you, dear Sir, for all you have done
for me. I am sure He will.

"I am, dear Sir, yours most respectfully,

"* * * * * * * *"

I have at full length inserted this letter out of very many of that
kind, received during the past twenty years, that I have been engaged in
the Orphan work, for many of the Orphans who have been with us since.
April 11, 1836, have not only been fitted for this life, through being
under our care, but have been manifestly brought to the knowledge of the
Lord.

April 22. 50l., with 50l. for the labourers in the Gospel.

May 6. From Clifton 20l., with 10l. for missions.--May 26. By the
sale of a publication 69l. 18s. 1 ½ d.--To the sums received during
this year is to be added 767l. 7s. 0d., received for interest. Thus ends
the period from May 26, 1854, to May 26, 1855. The amount which came in
during this year for the Building Fund, together with the 17,816l. 19s.
5 ¼ d. in. hand on May 26, 1854, make the total of 23,059l. 17s. 8 ¼
d. in hand on May 26, 1855.

In. addition to what has been stated relative to the income for the
Building Fund during this year, I furnish the Reader with the following
particulars respecting the building for 700 Orphans, reprinted from the
Report for 1855.

When I had received the kind information, in January 1855, respecting
the donation of 5700l., which should be paid to me by several Christian
friends, of which I was at liberty to take such portion for the Building
Fund as I might deem desirable, I judged that, though I had not such an
amount of means in hand as I considered necessary before being warranted
to begin to build, yet that I might make inquiries respecting land.
Accordingly, I applied in the beginning of February for the purchase of
two fields which join the land on which the New Orphan-House is built.
On these two fields I had had my eye for years, and had purposed to
endeavour to purchase them, whenever I might be in such a position as to
means for the Building Fund, that it would be suitable to do so. I
found, however, that, according to the will of the late owner of these
fields, they could not be sold now. Thus my prospects were blighted.
When I obtained this information, though naturally tried by it and
disappointed, I said, by God's grace, to myself: "The Lord has
something better to give me, instead of these two fields;" and thus my
heart was kept in peace. But when now the matter was fully decided that
I could not obtain those fields, which had appeared to me so desirable
for the object, the question arose, what I was to do for the obtaining
of land. Under these circumstances some of my Christian friends again
asked, as they had done before, why I did not build on the ground which
we have around the New Orphan-House? My reply was, as before, that it
could not be done:--1. Because it would throw the New Orphan-House
for nearly two years into disorder on account of the building going on
round about it. 2. There would not be sufficient room without shutting
in the present house to a great extent. 3. That, as the New Orphan-House
stands in the centre of our ground, there would not be sufficient room
on any of the sides for the erection of a building so large as would be
required.--I was, however, led to consider whether there was any way
whereby we could accomplish the building on the ground belonging to the
New Orphan-House. In doing so, I found that--1. By having a high
temporary boundary made of old boards, the building ground could be
entirely distinct from the present establishment. 2. By building on an
entirely different plan from that of the present house, we should not
only have room enough; but that also, 3. The present house would not be
so enclosed that the health of the inmates of the establishment would
thereby be injured.

But there was in connexion with this another point, which now came under
consideration in addition to the particulars already mentioned: it was
this. Though for four years past I had never had a doubt as to its being
the will of God that I should build accommodation for 700 more Orphans;
yet, at the same time, I had for a long time seen the desirableness of
having two houses, instead of one, for the 700 Orphans. This previously
formed judgment of having two houses for 350 Orphans in each, or 400 in
the one, and 300 in the other, led me now to see whether there could be
another house built on each side of the present New Orphan-House, and I
judged, from measuring the ground, that there was no objection to this
plan. I then called in the aid of architects, to survey the ground, and
to make a rough plan of two houses, one on each side, and it was found
that it could be accomplished. Having arrived thus far, I soon saw, that
we should not only save expense by this plan in various ways, but
especially that thus the direction, and inspection of the whole
establishment would be much more easy and simple, as the buildings would
be so near together. This, indeed, on being further considered, soon
appeared to be a matter of such importance, that, even if land could be
had but a quarter of a mile off, the difficulties would be greatly
increased thereby. At the same time I found, that we still should retain
so much land for cultivation by the spade, as would furnish some
out-door employment for many boys, and would produce such vegetables as
are the most important for young children, to have fresh out of the
ground; or that we could easily rent a piece of ground near for that
purpose, though it could not be bought.

The result, then, at which I have arrived at present is this, that,
having seen what could be accomplished on the ground which we have
already, I decided to build, without any further delay than was
necessary for preparing the plans, at the South side of the New
Orphan-House, another house for 400 children. The plans are now ready,
and in a very short time, God willing, i.e. as soon as all tine
necessary preliminary arrangements can be made, the building will
commence, which I think will be in the early part of July of the present
year, (i.e. 1855). Indeed, the first actual steps are already taken,
since, on May 29th, the sinking of four wells for the new house was
commenced.

This house is intended for 400 female Orphans, bereaved of both parents,
from their earliest days, until they can be placed out in service. With
regard to the other house for 300 Orphans, to be built at the North side
of the New Orphan-House, nothing definitively can be stated at present.
There is enough money in hand to build, fit up, and furnish the house
for 400 Orphans, and it is expected that something will be left; but
there is not sufficient money in hand, at present, to warrant commencing
the building of both. As soon, however, as there is, I shall be
delighted to take active measures with regard to that for 300 Orphans
also. I do not ask persons to help me with their means. I speak to the
Lord about my need in prayer, and I do not wait upon Him in vain. At the
same time I feel it right to state, that there is a loud and an abundant
call for caring for destitute Orphans. On May 26, 1854, there were 602
waiting for admission, each bereaved of both parents by death. Since
then 197 more have been applied for, making in all 799. Of these I have
been able to receive only 39 during the past year, and 45 who were
waiting for admission have been otherwise provided for, or have died
since application was made for them; so that still 715 Orphans are
waiting for admission, from three months old and upward. But this
number, I state unhesitatingly, would be much larger, had not very many
persons refrained from making application, because they judged it would
be of no use, as there are already so many waiting for admission. Indeed
there is every reason to believe, that there are many tens of thousands
of destitute Orphans in this country. And what provision is there in the
way of Orphan establishments, it may be asked? At the last census in
1851, there were in England and Wales 39 Orphan Establishments, and the
total number of Orphans provided for through them, amounted only to
3764; but at the time the New Orphan-House was being built, there were
about 6000 young Orphans in the prisons of England. To prevent their
going to prison, to prevent their being brought up in sin and vice, yea,
to be the honoured instrument to win their souls for God, I desire, by
His help, to enlarge the present establishment, so as to be able to
receive 1000 Orphans; and individuals who purpose not to live for time
but for eternity, and look on their means as in the light of eternity,
will thus have an opportunity of helping me to care for these children.
It is a great honour to be allowed to do anything for the Lord. We can
only give to Him of His own; for all we have is His. When the day of
recompense comes, the regret will only be, that we have done so little
for Him, not that we have done too much.

Supplies for the School —, Bible ——, Missionary —, and Tract
Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1854, to May 26, 1855.

On May 26, 1854, when the accounts were closed, there was in hand 55l.
15s. for these objects. I now mention a few of the instances in which
the Lord, in answer to prayer, supplied us with means.

July 6, 1854. As only about 100l. had come in for these objects during
the past five weeks, all our means were now expended. I desired to help
brethren who labour in the Word, but was unable to do so, when I
received today 50l. from London, which, being left to my disposal, I
took half of it for these objects, and half for the support of the
Orphans.

July 8. Further, from the North of Devon 14l.

July 12. Day by day I have been waiting upon the Lord for means for home
and foreign labourers in the Gospel, for whom I had no means, though
greatly desiring to send them help. Today I received, as the fruit of
many prayers, from London the sum of 100l., of which I took 50l. for the
Orphans, and 50l. for these objects. It was the more remarkable that
this donor should have sent me help at this time, as I had received 25l.
from him on the first day of this month.

About this time I received several other donations for missions.

On July 24th I received a small plate-chest, containing 14 table spoons,
6 dessert spoons, 11 tea spoons, 2 gravy spoons, 2 sauce ladles, 12
forks, 4 salt cellars, 4 salt spoons, a pepper box, a pair of sugar
tongs, a wine funnel, a cream jug, a small salver, a small goblet, a
larger ditto, fish knife, and a coffee pot, all of silver, 3 pairs of
plated nut crackers, a plated salver and a pewter can. The donor, who
desires to be his own executor, wished me to sell these articles, keep
10l. for myself, and to use the rest for missionary objects. The
contents of the box realized 44l. 5s. 10d., and I was thus enabled on
August 1, 1854, to send 40l. to seven brethren labouring in British
Guiana; and about ten weeks afterwards I heard that the Lord had sent
them this help at a time of great need.--On July 25th from Kendal 1l.
for missions.--On July 26th from a visitor at Clifton 30l. for
missions.--From Bath 10s.--From Hackney 10s.--From Brosely 2s.
6d.--July 29. From Whitehaven 2l. 5s. 6d. for missions.--July 30.
From Uppingham 2s. 6d.--August 8. 40l from a distance, of which 30l.
was for missions.--August 18. From C. W. 20l. for missions.

I had thus the joy of being able to send assistance to some of the
brethren whom I desire to help as labourers in the Gospel at Home or
Abroad; yet all this was little in comparison with what I desired to do.
For several months, during this period, that is in June, July, August
and September, up to October 17th, I was day by day waiting upon the
Lord for means for labourers in the Word, as I had reason to believe
that many of them were in need; but little only, comparatively, came in.
I was able to send up to October l7th not more than about one half of
what I had been able to send them for several years previously. My
desire to help these dear brethren was as great as ever. My earnestness
in prayer for them, by God's grace, had not decreased. Their need, I
had full reason to believe (and in some instances I knew) was great. I
could, therefore, only conclude that the Lord allowed these dear
brethren thus to have their faith tried, in order that they might the
better become acquainted with himself. At last, however, the Lord
refreshed my spirit greatly, first on October 17th, and then especially
by that large donation at the commencement of the year 1855, of which I
took a considerable portion for missionary objects, so that, especially
during the last five months of this period, I was able to send help to
brethren who labour in the Gospel to such an extent, as that about the
same amount was disbursed for that object as for several years
previously, but a greater amount for the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures and Tracts than formerly. Of the donations for these objects
between Aug. 18 and Oct. 17, 1854, I only mention the following--On
Sept. 21st, anonymously from Exmonth, a bank post bill for 20l., of
which the donor designed 10l. to be applied to the Missionary Fund, 5l.
for the Orphans, and 5l. where most needed, or for my own necessities,
as a thank-offering for unmerited mercies. This latter 5l., left for my
disposal, I took for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel
Tracts. I wrote in my journal concerning this donation: "A precious
answer to prayer! Great, great is the need."--On Sept. 23rd a
deeply-afflicted mother left at my disposal 20l. I took it for
missionary objects, the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel
Tracts; for which objects much then was needed. Almost all the Tracts
for gratuitous circulation were gone, and many brethren who labour in
the Word I desired to help, but had not the means.--Sept. 26. From
Kensington 11l., which was taken for the circulation of Tracts and
missions, as the disposal of it was left with me.--From
Worcestershire 8l. 6s. 7d., being the balance of an account. It was
taken for missions and the circulation of Gospel Tracts. A most
seasonable help!--Sept. 28. "From two of God's children who can
say, ‘Our hearts trusted in Him, and we are helped,'" Psalm xxviii.
7, 1l. for missions, 1l. for the Orphans, with 1l. for myself.--Sept.
30. This morning, at our usual prayer meeting with my fellow-labourers,
the need of brethren, who labour in the Word, was again especially
brought before the Lord, as I had reason to believe many were in need,
and I had nothing to send them. This evening I received from Shropshire
2 gold chains, a diamond brooch, and a topaz brooch, with the request of
the donor to sell them for the benefit of brethren who labour in the
Word. This donation has greatly refreshed my spirit, but I look out for
more, far more.--Oct. 4. From E. B. 5l. for missions.--From a
Missionary box at Stroud 3l. 0s. 7d.--Oct. 8. From a distance 20l.
for brethren who labour in the Gospel at Home and Abroad, 40l. for the
Orphans, and 20l. for my own expenses. Precious answer to prayer. Great,
great is the need for labourers in the Word. I had, therefore,
particularly again waited upon the Lord yesterday, together with my
fellow-labourers, for this object.--From B. S. 1l. for missions.--
Oct. 11. From Austin Friars, London, 20l.--Oct. 12. From Philadelphia
1l. From Cotham Lane 1l.--Oct. 14. 2s. 6d.--From Weymouth was
received 2l., the disposal of which was left to me. Having just sent
out, to the last pound, 40l. to Demerara, I took it for Missionary
objects.

Oct. 17. This morning at family prayer, came, in the course of reading,
Exodus v, which shows, that, just before the deliverance of the
Israelites out of Egypt, their trials were greater than ever. They had
not only to make the same number of bricks as before, but also to gather
stubble, as no straw was given them any longer. This led me, in
expounding the portion, to observe, that even now the children of God
are often in greater trial than ever, just before help and deliverance
comes. Immediately after family prayer it was found, that by the
morning's post not one penny had come in for the work of the Lord in
which I am engaged, though we needed much, and though but very little
had come in during the three previous days. Thus I had now to remember
Exodus v, and to practise the truths contained therein. In the course of
the day nothing was received. In the evening I had, as usual, a season
for prayer with my dear wife, respecting the various objects of the
Scriptural Knowledge Institution, and then we left the New Orphan House
for our home. When we arrived at our house, about nine o'clock, we
found that 5l. and also 5s. had been sent from Norwich in two Post
Office Orders for the Building Fund, and that 8l. 3s. 11d. had been sent
in for Bibles, Tracts and Reports, which had been sold. This called for
thanksgiving. But a little later, between nine and ten o'clock, a
Christian gentleman called and gave me 1l. for the Orphans and 200l. for
foreign missions. He had received these sums from an aged Christian
woman, whose savings as a servant, during her whole life, made up the
200l., and who, having recently had left to her a little annual income
of about 30l., felt herself constrained, by the love of Christ, to send
the savings of her whole life for foreign missions. This gentleman
stated to me at the same time, that she had never had more than 5l. or
6l. wages a year, during her whole life. Moreover, out of this she has
sent me, year by year, 1l. or more for the benefit of the Orphans, for
many years; though I never knew her circumstances till now, as she
resides at a distance, and I have never seen her. What various ways has
the Lord to supply us with means! I add the following remarks: 1, For
several months past no donation as large as 200l. has been received, a
circumstance which has not occurred for about ten years past. 2, Now an
aged servant is used by the Lord to send this donation as the fruit of
her earnings, from about fifty years' service. 3, Our especial prayer
had been again and again, that the Lord would be pleased to send in
means for missionary brethren, as I had reason to believe they were in
much need of help; and only at eight o'clock this evening I had
particularly besought the Lord to send help for this object. By the last
mail I had sent off 40l. to British Guiana, to help seven brethren there
in some measure. This amount took the last pound in hand for this
object. How gladly would I have sent assistance to other brethren also,
but I had no more. Now I am in some degree supplied for this object. 4,
Very recently our tracts for gratuitous circulation were almost entirely
gone; but, before they were quite exhausted, the Lord sent more means,
so that about 200,000 could be ordered.

Oct. 23 Received 149l. 8s., the disposal of which was left with me. I
took of it 100l. for the support of the Orphans, for whom I had not 5l.
in hand, when it came, and the remainder for these objects, for which
still much is needed, in order to help labourers in the Gospel at home,
as well as foreign labourers, and in order to go on with the circulation
of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and to meet the expenses for the
various schools. This morning I had also the promise, that in about a
month 400l. should be paid to me for the work of the Lord. Thus, after a
season of several months, during which scarcely any large sums have been
received, the Lord is pleased, in answer to many prayers, to cause the
streams of His bounty to flow again more abundantly.

Oct. 26. From a visitor at Clifton 50l., which I took for the School,
Bible, Missionary, and Tract Objects.

Nov. 27. In great need there came in 100l., which was left to my
appropriation as it might be most required. I took, therefore, 50l. for
the Orphans, for whom there was scarcely anything in hand, and 50l. for
these objects, for which we needed much in every way.

Dec. 30. Received 100l., when in the greatest need for these objects,
and for the support of the Orphans. I took one-half for these objects,
and the other for the Orphans, and am thus again helped, in answer to
many prayers.

Jan. 1, 1855. As the year closed with mercies, so another has commenced
with mercies. I received from one engaged in the work 2l. for missions.
— From M. E. for missions 5s.--From E. 0. 5s.--From M. A. E. 4s.
4d.--From B. S. 1l. for missions.--Also 10l. for the support of
the Day Schools.

Jan. 2. From a few believers in Huntingdonshire 15s. 2d. for missions.

Jan. 3. From two Christian ladies in London 10l. for missions, with 10l.
for the Orphans.

Thus we were helped till I received on Jan. 8th the promise of the
donation of 5,700l., of which, as has been stated, 1,400l. was taken for
these objects. This, with what came in besides, from Jan. 8, to May 26,
1855, enabled me so amply to meet every demand afterwards, that no
further difficulty was experienced during this period, in the way of
means.

Means for the support of the 300 Orphans, a/ready under our care, sent
in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1854, to May 26, 1855.

At the beginning of this period there was in hand a balance of 123l. 0s.
7 ½ d. To the poorer class of readers this might appear
a considerable sum; but to such we would say, that
often the expenses of three or four days are more than this for the
Orphan Establishment, with which 335 persons are connected; and,
certainly, the average expenses, even if no extraordinary demands were
to be met, amount to about Twelve Pounds per day in these dear times;
and therefore 123l. would only be enough for about ten days. We had
then, so far as regarded visible/e support, only enough for about ten
days; but whilst we had so little as to visible support, we looked by
faith to Him who is invisible, the Living God, who has upheld this work
for so many years. We believed that He would help us still; and we were
not confounded, though our faith was again and again tried. I can,
however, give only a few out of the many instances which might be
recorded.

June 15, 1854. Though this is only the third week since the new period
commenced, yet as only about 60l. had come in for the support of the
Orphans, in addition to the balance of 123l. 0s. 7 ½ d., we were today
reduced to less than Five Pounds. This had led to much waiting upon the
Lord: and again He gave a gracious answer to prayer. I received 151l.
5s. 8d., which, being left to my disposal, I took the whole for the
support of the Orphans. Also from two little girls was sent to me 8s.,
with the information that one of their sisters had set apart a swarm of
bees, the honey of which should be sold for the benefit of the Orphans.
Thus the Lord has again helped in the hour of need.

July 12. Our means were now again reduced to about 30l., as only about
150l. had come in since June 15. In addition to this, we had very heavy
expenses before us. This morning, in reading through the book of
Proverbs, when I came to chapter xxii. 19— "That thy trust maybe in
the Lord," &c., I said in prayer to Him: "Lord, I do trust in Thee; but
wilt Thou now be pleased to help me; for I am in need of means for the
current expenses of all the various objects of the Institution." By the
first delivery of letters I received an order on a London bank for
100l., to be used for all the various objects, "as the present need
might require." I took, therefore, 50l. for the support of the Orphans,
and 50l. for the other objects, which are also in great need. Received
also from Wandsworth Road 1l. 10s. 8d.; and in the course of the day 2l.
3s. 3d., through the boxes at the New Orphan House. Thus we are again
helped for the present.

July 19. For some time past I have been under an engagement to leave
Bristol at the end of this month, or in the beginning of August, for
about four weeks, to labour at Sunderland. On this account I have
besought the Lord during the last days that He would be pleased to send
me some means for my own expenses, but especially that I might be able
to leave some money behind, to last at least for some time. Yesterday
the Lord was pleased to begin answering my request, in sending means for
the support of the Orphans. I received from Lymington 5l.--From
Tregenda 10s.--From Thetford 10s.--From Perth 1l.--From
Kilmarnock 5l.--By sale of Reports 18s. 10d.--Proceeds of an
Orphan Box 1l. 5s. 9 ½ d. Today I have received from South Brent 1s.
— From Middlesex 50l.--Ditto 18s.--From Clifton 5l.--From
Dudbridge 8s.--Through the boxes in the New Orphan House 7l. 1s. 3d.
— By sale of Reports 1l. 8s.--Returned on paying an account 2s. 4d.
— From a visitor at Clifton 50l. and a gold chain. The donor kindly
wished me to retain 10l. for my own expenses.--From Kingsbridge 2s.

Thus the Lord began to answer prayer; but I expected more, and He sent
me more on the following days. I record the income for the Orphans:--

July 20. From Homerton 3l. 3s.--Anonymously from Birmingham 1s.--
Anonymously left at my house 5l.

July 21. From Bideford 10s.--By sale of Reports 1s.--From
Tavistock 4s. 9d.--In a box from Tavistock, containing specimens of
ores, &c. 3s.

July 22. From Wotton-under-edge 10s.--By sale of Reports 7s.--From
West Brixton 2l.--From the Isle of Wight 1s. 6d. and 3s. 6d.--By
sale of Reports 2s.--From Chippenham 2l. 10s.--From College Green,
Bristol, 10s.

July 23. From Bodmin 5s. and 1s.--From Clifton 5s. Ditto 5s. Ditto
1l. Ditto 1l.

July 24. From Dudley 1l. 0. 6d. Ditto 1s. 8d.--From Clifton 10s.--
With James i. 17l. 2s. 6d.--From P. 2s. 6d.--Through Salem boxes
1s. Ditto 6d.--From Stourbridge 1s. 6d.--From Hastings 1l. 10s.
— From H. B. Esq. 2l.

July 25. From Wells 3s.--12s.--2s. 6d.--From Kendal 2l.--
From London 10l.

July 26. Through the boxes at the New Orphan House 5l. 18s. 11d.--By
sale of Reports 14s. Ditto 6s.--From Torquay 3s. 4d.--From the
neighbourhood of Newton Abbot 11s., with three silver pencil cases, and
two pieces of old silver.--From a visitor at Clifton 100l., of which
the donor wished me to take 20l. for myself, and to use the other as
most needed. I took, therefore, 50l. for the Orphans, and 30l. for
missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts.--From
Hackney 1l. 5s.--From Taunton 2s. and ¼ lb. of tea.--There were
anonymously left at the New Orphan House two vases, a Chinese tea caddy,
a mosaic box, a ring set with a ruby and two brilliants, a double gold
serpent bracelet, a large cameo brooch, a silver snuff-box, a double
gold pin set with two brilliants, a pair of gold ear-rings, a pair of
gold ear-rings set with pearls and emeralds, a gold brooch set with
pearls and emeralds, a gold pin set with pearls and garnets, three gold
shirt studs, a large gold cameo ring, a gold masonic medal, a pair of
small gold ear-rings, a gold ring set with topazes, a gold watch ring,
and a rupee. (These valuable articles did not merely refresh my spirit
on account of their value; but they came as an answer to prayer for
means, and also that the Lord would incline the hearts of His children
to send such valuable, but needless, articles.) There were also given by
the same donors, six Indian table mats, a white lace scarf, a black lace
cap, and two pamphlets.

July 27. "20l. tendered as a thank-offering for singular deliverance at
Llanberis." Ditto 1s. for a Report. —From Reading 1l.--From a
Christian gentleman of Edinburgh, then near Glasgow, 3l. Through ditto
1l. Ditto 1l.--From Grundisburgh 5s. Ditto 1s. Ditto 6d.--
Anonymously in postages 2s. 6d.--From Bath 5s.--From Chillington
10s. 6d.--From Nottingham 10s.

July 28. From Pentonville 1l., with a little box of articles.--From
Yeovil 1s. and 3s. 6d.--From Cannock 5l.--From Blackrock 12s.

July 29. From Higham Ferrers 10s.--From G. D. 1s.--From
Colsterworth 10s.--From Wellesborne 10s.--Anonymously 2s.--By
sale of Reports 3s. 6d.--From Whitehaven 2l. 14s. 6d.--By sale of
a Report 6d.--From Largs 4l.--"From an Orphan Sailor" 2l.

July 30. From Uppingham 2s. 6d.--From Newton Ferrers 2s. 6d.

July 31. From Lenten 6s. 6d.--From Edinburgh 3l. 10s.

Aug. 1. From London 1l. Ditto 1s. 6d. Ditto 5l.--From Chillington 2s.
— From Broseley 5s.--From Warmley 5s. and an old silver watch.--
A little gold dust from a dying believer.--From F. E. B. 2s. 6d.--
From Barnstaple 1l. 3s.--From Northam 5s.--From Hereford 10s.
—By sale of Reports 1s. 6d.--From Newport, near Barnstaple, 1l.
10s.--From Barnstaple 1l. 10s.--From P. 2s. 6d.--Through
Bethesda boxes 3s. 6d.--By sale of articles 4l. 13s. 3d. —By sale
of Reports 10s.

Aug. 2. By sale of Reports 1l. 0s. 6d.--Anonymously 3s.--From Bath
1l. 10s.--From Ilfracombe 10l.--From Mundesley 2l.—Anonymously
given at the New Orphan House 1l. Ditto 1s.--From Kilmersdon 6s.

Aug. 3. By sale of Reports 3s. 6d.--From Birmingham 6s. 6d.--
Through the boxes at the New Orphan House 3l. 18s. 3d.--From
Chapletown 10s.--From London 5l.--From Tavistock 2s. 6d.--
Returned on paying an account 2s. 4d.--By sale of Reports 2s. 6d.--
By sale of trinkets 38l. 11s. 6d.--By sale of Reports 12s. 10d.--
Received also a letter from the neighbourhood of Gumeracha, in
Australia, enclosing a bank order for 10l., of which 2l. was intended
for aged or blind saints in Bristol, 1l. for Bibles and Testaments, and
7l. for the Orphans or the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution. I took this 7l. for the Orphans.

Aug. 4. From Plymouth 2l.—From Ilfracombe 10s.--From London 1l.
13s. 4d.

Aug. 5. From Manchester 10s.--By sale of Reports 3s. 4d.

Aug. 6. From Greenock 5l.--From Cockermouth 1l.--From Islington
1l. 1s.--From Child Okeford 2s. 6d.--From Clifton 2s. 6d. and 3s.
— From Horfield Road 10s. —From Henbury 2l.

Aug. 7. From Melton Abbot 3s.--From Cheltenham Road, Bristol, 1l. 1s.
— From Islington 1l. 4s.--By sale of articles 17s. 3 ½ d.--From
Fowey 5l.--Through Bethesda boxes 6s. 8d.--From St. Philip's,
Bristol, 5s.--From three children 8s. 6d.--From Clifton
1l. 10s.--Through Salem boxes 1s.

Aug. 8. From Lichfield 1l. Ditto 5s.--By sale of books 4l.--From
Calstock 2s. 6d.--From Freshwater 1l.

Aug. 9. Anonymously 10s.--By sale of Reports 2s.--From Yaxham 1l.
— From Gravesend 1l. Through the boxes in the New Orphan-House 4l. 5s.
10d.--From Norwich 16s.--From a brother in the Lord 5l. 17s. 4d.
— From Plymouth 10s.--By sale of Reports 14s. 6d.

Thus the Lord, in answer to prayer, had supplied me so bountifully,
that, when I left home on August 10th, I could leave sufficient in the
bank to last for a little time, and I hoped in God that, by the time
that was gone, He would kindly give more. And thus He did. I have also
given the income for the Orphans day by day, for the above 23 days, in
order that thus the Reader may see how, in large and small sums, and
from various parts of the world, the Lord is pleased to send in the
supplies.

I shall now give a few more instances in which the Lord manifestly, in
answer to prayer, helped us in the time of need.

Aug. 26. A Christian widow, having had left to her by a friend a few
articles, among which was a diamond brooch, sent it to me for the
benefit of the Orphans, and thus had the desire of her heart granted,
which she had often had, to be able to send something for them. On the
other hand, we receive it in answer to prayer, as there is very little
in hand for the Orphans, and as I have again and again asked the Lord to
lead His children to send me such articles for His own work.--There
came in also from Kirriemuir 1l.--From Kingsbridge a guinea piece,
also 1l. From the neighbourhood of Hyde 10s.

Aug. 27. From Douglas 1l.--From the neighbourhood of Sunderland 5s.
— From Sunderland 5s.--Through Salem boxes 1s.--With James, 1,
17, 2s. 6d.--From H. T. and E. E. 2s.

Aug. 28. From Captain J. K., Royal Navy, 2l.--From Mr. C. K. 2l.--
From Mr. P. 1l.--From Bury 10s.

Aug. 29. From Sunderland 1l. Ditto 1s.--From Gloucester 6s.--By
sale of articles 1l. 4s.--From one engaged in the work 2l.--From
the neighbourhood of Crencester 1l.

Aug. 30. From the neighbourhood of Southampton 5l.

Aug. 31. Anonymously, through the boxes at Bethesda chapel, Sunderland,
5l.--From Ilfracombe 2s. 6d.--Through the boxes at the New
Orphan-House 5l. 1 ½ d.--By sale of Reports 16s.--From one
engaged in the work, as a thank-offering for journeying mercies, 10s.
— From the neighbourhood of Sudbury in Derbyshire 10l. —From
Grosmont 5s.--From Hayle 1l.--By sale of the above-mentioned
brooch 6l. 11s.

Sept. 1. From the Isle of Wight 2s. 6d.--From Birmingham 5l.--From
Bath 5l.--From a Christian lady in Bath 10l.

See, dear reader, how good the Lord is, and how ready to help in answer
to prayer! I was then 300 miles from the work in which I am more
especially engaged; but the Lord's assistance was to be obtained in
this distant place. Day by day I sought His help while absent, and day
by day I received intelligence from Bristol. And thus, my
fellow-labourers in Bristol, and I at Sunderland, were seeking the help
of the Lord, and He did condescend to listen to our supplications on
account of His dear Son, the Lord Jesus, and to grant us our requests.

On this day, Sept. 1st, I also received a precious letter, enclosing a
Post-Office Order for 2l. 14s., from a donor, who, for many years, took
a lively interest in the work in which I am engaged. This letter was
doubly precious, not only because of its containing 2l. 14s., which came
just then so particularly in answer to prayer, as since August 2 6th, I
had been especially looking to the Lord for means, there being then
scarcely any thing left; but also because it so strikingly proved the
power of the divine life.

* * * * Aug. 30, 1854.

"Dear Mr. Müller,

"Having been a constant sufferer now for a year, the money I send you is
(humanly speaking) consequently less; and as there is likely to be a
crisis soon, in the shape of a large abscess, and I know not what the
Lord is about to do with me, I send you all the money I have in hand;
and if it should be the last may the Lord add a double blessing to it.
The Lord does not want my poor help to do His own work; but I feel
priviledged to be allowed to contribute, if it is but a nail, or a cup
of milk, to His service. My peace is great—that is, His peace is with
me, though tribulation, to some extent, is mine also. I desire your
prayers, and remain,

"Yours in our precious Lord,

"* * * * *."

"P.S.—I expect to be able to send a box of, it may be, almost useless
articles soon. Whither shall I send it?"

This Christian lady, whom I have never seen in the body, though I
corresponded with her for many years, has entered into her rest. She
fell asleep at the beginning of the year 1855. In looking over my
account books, I meet again and again with the name of one and another
who has finished his course. Soon dear Reader, your turn and mine may
come. Are you prepared for eternity? Affectionately I press this
question upon you. Do not put it away. Nothing is of greater moment than
this point; yea, all other things, however important in their place, are
of exceedingly small importance, in comparison with this matter. Do you
ask, how you may be prepared for eternity, how to be saved, how to
obtain the forgiveness of your sins; the answer is, believe in the Lord
Jesus, trust in Him, depend upon Him alone as it regards the salvation
of your soul. He was punished by God, in order that we guilty sinners,
if we believe in Him, might not be punished. He fulfilled the law of
God, and was obedient even unto death, in order that we disobedient,
guilty sinners, if we believe in Him, might, on His account, be reckoned
righteous by God. Ponder these things, dear Reader, should you have
never done so before. Through faith in the Lord Jesus alone can we
obtain forgiveness of our sins, and be at peace with God; but, believing
in Jesus, we become, through this very faith, the children of God; have
God as our Father, and may come to Him for all the temporal and
spiritual blessings which we need. Thus every one of my readers may
obtain answers to prayers, not only to the same extent that we obtain
them, but far more abundantly. It may be that few, comparatively, of the
children of God are called to serve the Lord in the way of establishing
Orphan-Houses, &c.; but all of them may, yea, are called upon to trust
in God, to rely upon Him, in their various positions and circumstances,
and apply the word of God, faith, and prayer to their family
circumstances, their earthly occupation, their afflictions and
necessities of every kind, both temporally and spiritually; just as we,
by God's help, in some little measure seek to apply the word of God,
faith, and prayer to the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge
Institution for Home and Abroad. Make but trial of it, if you have never
done so before, and you will see how happy a life it is. You may,
perhaps, pity the writer, and think how he must be burdened day by day,
and full of care and anxiety; and you may think that he cannot have any
quietness and peace, but is worn down by the constant questionings, how
the expenses for the various schools are to be met; how further money is
to be obtained for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts;
how the many preachers of the Gospel at Home and Abroad, who are
assisted by the Institution, may once more be helped; how the 300
Orphans are to be provided with all they need; how situations for the
elder female Orphans are to be found; how suitable places may be
obtained for the elder male Orphans when they are ready to be
apprenticed, and so on. Now here is just the true state of the case:--
We are not insensible to any of these points; we do feel them. We do not
put them away lightly and treat them with indifference; but we look them
in the face and feel their deep importance. At the same time, while we
neither treat them with indifference, nor attempt to carry them in our
own strength, we do, by God's grace, cast our burdens upon Him, trust
in Him; and thus are kept in peace in the midst of numberless
difficulties, and almost constant trials of one kind and another. Truly
I prefer by far this life of almost constant trial, if I am only able to
roll all my cares upon my Heavenly Father, and thus become increasingly
acquainted with Him, to a life of outward peace and quietness, without
these constant proofs of His faithfulness, His wisdom, His love, His
power, His over-ruling providence, &c.

Of the donations which came in between Sept. 2nd and Nov. 5th, amounting
to about 600l., in 346 different sums, I mention only, for the sake of
brevity, the following.

Sept. 2. From an anonymous donor through Mr. B. at Geneva, by the hands
of Count G., 1l. 15s.--Sept. 6. Received from Clerkenwell 50l., to be
used one half for missions, and the other half as I thought best. I took
the one half for the support of the Orphans, and find the following
remark in my journal respecting this donation: "What a precious answer
to prayer! Since Aug. 26th we have been day by day coming to the Lord
for our daily supplies. Precious, also, on account of missionary
brethren, whom I seek to help, for whom there was nothing in hand when
this donation was received!"--Sept. 22. From Crediton 3l. 4s. 8d., as
"a thank-offering to God for the very fine harvest which in mercy He has
been pleased to grant."

Nov. 5. There was now again only about 5l. in hand for the support of
the Orphans, when I received 2l. 10s. for them, and 2l. 10s. for myself,
from a donor in London, whom the Lord has been pleased to raise up
during the last two years, and who since then has been often used as an
instrument in helping the work at times of need. A brother in the Lord
also gave me 5l. this morning, saying, "I have of late had the Orphans
much laid on my heart."--From Clifton 1l. 10s.--From H. C. 3s.
—From F. M. 5s.

Nov. 6. Further help. From the Isle of Wight 5s.--Through Bethesda
boxes 2s. 6d.--Ditto 6d.--From P. 1s.--Through Salem boxes 1s.
— From a Gloucestershire Farmer 20l., of which he intended 10l. for
missions, and the other 10l. to be used as most needed. I took it for
the support of the Orphans.

Nov. 7. By sale of Reports 4s. 10d.--Anonymously from York 5s.--
Received back on paying an account 3s. 7 ½ d.--From a relative of
one of the Orphans 1s.--Having had to pay out 18l. for house-keeping
expenses, and having had to meet a few little expenses besides, we had
again only about 5l. left, as was the case three days ago, when I
received this afternoon 5l. from a Bristol donor.--Also 1l. from
London.

Nov. 15. Our means were now again gone. We had scarcely anything in
hand, with very heavy expenses before us, when this morning a Christian
gentleman from Yorkshire called on me, and gave me 50l. for the current
expenses for the Orphans. This was a most precious encouragement to
prayer! There came in further today from Manchester 9s. 6d.--By sale
of Reports 11s. 6d.--Through the boxes in the New Orphan-House 2l.7s.
11d.--Returned on paying an account 3s. 1 ¼ d.--From Exeter 1l.
10s.

Nov. 22. A Brother in the Lord from Manchester came to see the New
Orphan-House, and gave 10l., which came in a time of great need.

Nov. 27. 100l. was sent in the greatest need, from a considerable
distance, of which I took 50l. for the Orphans, and 50l. for the other
objects.

Dec. 20. As since Nov. 27 only about 200l. has come in, I found this
evening that our means for the support of the Orphans were reduced to
10l. 9s. 8d, whilst our current expenses of late have been about 12l.
daily, on account of the high price of provisions. This led to earnest
prayer, that the Lord would be pleased to help us.

Dec. 21. The Lord has already sent a precious answer to the prayer of
last evening. I received today from a noble Lady 10l.--From
Devonshire 15l.--By sale of Reports 6s. 6d.--From Birmingham 2s.
— By sale of a few coins, etc. 19s. 1d.--From Monmouthshire 8s.--
By sale of Reports 2s. 6d.--From Worksop 10s. 6d.--Returned on
paying an account 3s. 3 ¾ d.

Dec. 23. From Cheltenham 2s. 6d.--From London 10s.--From Clondegad
10s.--By sale of articles 3l. 16s. 5d. By sale of a Report 6d.--
From Edinburgh 5l.

Dec. 24. Anonymously 1l.--From Barking 6s.--From Blackheath Hill
6s.

Dec. 25. From B. S. 2s.--Through Bethesda and Salem boxes 7s.--
From P. 2s.

Dec. 26. From a brother in the Lord 6l.--From O. O. at Plymouth 10s.

Dec. 27. From two believers at Plymouth 10s.--From Kingsbridge 10s.
— From Falmouth 1s.--From a little girl 3d.--By sale of Reports
6s.--Through the boxes in the New Orphan-House 1l. 14s. 4d.

Dec. 28. From Adelaide, Australia, 5l.

Dec. 29. From Torquay 5s.--From Exmouth 10s.--From Fulbeck 5s.--
From Sherborne 2s.

Dec. 30. At the beginning of this day our money was again reduced to
19l. 2s. 1 ½ d. for the current expenses for the Orphans, whilst I had
before me the prospect of having to advance this day 30l. for
house-keeping expenses, in order that we might go with ease through the
work, and in order that all expenses might be met. Now see how the Lord
helped us during this day. There came very early this morning, from the
neighbourhood of Norwich, a box, containing the following articles. A
prize medal, 2 salt cellars, 6 pencil cases, 5 thimbles, 2 fruit knives,
a watch chain, 2 vinaigrettes (all of silver), a black necklace, a
silver chain, 2 silver toothpicks, some pieces of silver, 2 pairs of
gilt bracelets, a pincushion, 4 snaps, a pair of gold earrings, a
tortoiseshell comb, a pocket comb, a reading glass, a box of paints, a
bag of coral and other beads, 2 smelling bottles and 2 gilt chains.
Likewise, from another donor, a silver stock buckle, 2 pairs of shoe
buckles, 2 pencil cases, a piece of silver chain, 2 seals, a brooch pin,
2 small gold pins, 6 small silver coins, a metal coin, a small silver
medal, a thimble, a pair of silver studs, 9 pairs ditto set with Bristol
stone, and a gold earring. There was sent with these articles likewise.
1l., and from a poor woman 6d.--In the course of the day came in
further: From Islington 6s.--From A. W. 2s.--From Islington 5s.,
with 8 chemises and 4 shirts.--Also from a great distance 100l.,
which being left at my disposal, I took one half for the Orphans, and
the other half for the other Objects.--By sale of articles 2l.--
Also 2s. 6d., and 2s. 8 ½ d. from an Orphan-box.--Thus I was enabled
to advance this evening 30l. for house-keeping as needed.

This was the last time, during this period of the Institution, that we
were brought so low as to means; for the Lord sent in on Dec. 31 6l.
10s.; on Jan. 1, 1855, in twenty-eight different donations, 14l. 4s.
6d.; on Jan. 2nd 17l. 8s. 3d.; on Jan. 3rd 15l. 1s. 3d.; on Jan. 4th
34l. 11s. 8d., and so on, till the large donation was given of which, as
has been stated, 900l. was taken for the current expenses for the
Orphans. This, with what came in from Dec. 30th 1854, up to May 26th,
1855, for the support of the Orphans, enabled me to meet all the demands
without any difficulty, during the remaining five months. Of all these
donations, making, up the total of 2226l. 10s. 7 ¼ d., I refer only to
the following.

Jan. 1, 1855. From a clergyman in South Africa 1l.

Jan. 4. From a Christian merchant at Clifton 30l. for the Orphans, with
10l. for myself, and 10l. for poor believers.

There have been many instances, in which, along with the donations for
missions, or for the support of the Orphans, or the Building Fund, there
were also presents in money sent for my own personal expenses, or those
of my family. These instances I have gladly recorded, as they came in
connexion with the donations referred to, because they afforded me an
opportunity of speaking well of the kindness and faithfulness of the
Lord in supplying my own personal or family need. It is now [i.e. in
1856] above Twenty Five years, since I have not had any regular income
whatever. In the year 1830, I saw it to be the Lord's will to give up
my regular income in connexion with the ministry of the Word, and to
trust in Him, alone for the supply of all my temporal necessities. I
have been enabled to continue in this path, and have not been allowed to
regret the step which I then took. Thus it is also in my position as
director of the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution.
I have no salary in this position; but the Lord abundantly supplies my
need; yea, though there are many expenses connected with this very
position, He abundantly meets all my wants, and gives me far more than I
need. If with all my might I had sought to obtain a lucrative place,
either as a preacher of the Gospel, or in some other way, I should not
have had more, I have reason to believe, if as much, as, unsought,
unasked for, so far as it regards man, I receive day by day out of the
loving hand of my Heavenly Father. When I look at His kindness to me in
saving my guilty soul, I am overwhelmed with the boundlessness of His
love and grace towards me in Christ Jesus; and when I look at His
kindness to me, even as it regards temporal things, I know not where to
begin, nor where to end, in speaking well of His name. I do desire to
magnify Him, and therefore declare in this public way His great goodness
to me in thus so abundantly supplying my temporal necessities; and I do
so also, if it may please God, by this means, to encourage the hearts of
His children more and more unreservedly to trust in Him. It is now above
twenty-five years since I have asked help for myself from any human
being; but God has been indeed my helper. And now the very work even
with which I am connected, respecting which I had every reason to
believe, when I commenced it, that it would be connected with great
expenses to myself, as well as be the means, looked at naturally, of
decreasing my own income, God has, though unsought for on my part, used
as the instrument to bring along with it many supplies for myself also,
thus not only abundantly meeting my increased expenses, but giving me
far more than I need for myself. How great is His goodness! Dear
Christian Reader, be encouraged by this! Do but trust in God with all
your heart, and you will find that you will not be confounded. Only let
it be trust in God, not in man, not in circumstances, not in any of your
own exertions, but real trust in God, and you will be helped, in your
various necessities.--I refer to a few more of the donations.

Jan. 25. From various believers at Melbourne, Australia, 20l. for the
Orphans, and 20l. for the other objects.

Feb. 23. Received a very valuable gold watch, a gold watch chain, 2 gold
watch keys, a gold seal, a silver mustard pot and spoon, a silver salt
stand, a scent bottle, a china basket, 3 china jugs, a china cup and
saucer and mug 2 taper candlesticks, a ring stand, 2 spill cups, a card
stand, a lamp, a claret jug, a pair of decanters, 6 hock glasses, 14
claret glasses, 6 finger glasses, and a set of china tea things. The
donor has found true riches and peace to his soul in the Lord Jesus; and
he is thus led to send these articles for the benefit of the Orphans.

April 18. 100l. from a distance, of which the donor kindly intends 20l.
for myself, and 80l. for the benefit of the Orphans.

May 5. 219l. 9s. 4d. from a distance, of which the donor kindly wished
me to keep 19l. 9s 4d. for myself, and to use the other as it might be
required for the Lord's work. I took 100l. for the support of the
Orphans, and 100l. for the other objects. This donation was especially
refreshing to my spirit, because of its coming at this period, when the
outgoings are very great.

May 26. Towards the close of this day it was found that the balance left
in hand, for the support of the Orphans, was 110l. 17s. 8 ½ d., as the
amount with which we should have to begin the new period in providing
for the necessities of the Orphans. Before leaving the Orphan-House, I
had my usual daily season for prayer with my dear wife. Having praised
the Lord for His goodness to us and the work, in helping us during
another year, and having sought His blessing upon the various objects of
the Institution, we commended ourselves again to Him, especially, with
reference to means for the coming year, and entreated Him also to
sustain our faith to the end of our course; for the longer I go on in
this path, the more I feel my entire dependence upon the Lord and my
need of being sustained by Him. When we arrived home, we found two more
donations, the last of the present period, sent for the benefit of the
Orphans; one being two little dresses, a piece of print, a piece of
calico, and 20 pocket handkerchiefs; the other a small gold Geneva
watch, quite new. We took these two last donations as the Lord's
earnest that He would be with us during the coming period also, and with
good courage looked forward to it, by His grace.

I add a few remarks to this part of the Narrative:--1. Should any one
suppose, on account of its having been stated in the previous pages that
we were repeatedly brought low as to means, that the Orphans have not
had all that was needful for them; we reply, that never, since the work
has been in existence, has there a meal-time come, but the Orphans have
had good nourishing food in sufficient quantity: and never have they
needed clothes, but I have had the means to provide them with all they
required. Persons living in Bristol can easily satisfy themselves as to
this, not only by seeing week after week our stores for food and
clothes; but also the dress and the healthy countenances of these
hundreds of children (though very many of them were received in a very
weak and diseased state) will amply prove what I state. 2. Never since
the Orphan work has been in existence, have I asked one single human
being for any help for this work; and yet, unasked for, simply in answer
to prayer, from so many parts of the world, as has been stated, the
donations have come in, and that very frequently at a time of the
greatest need. Were I to state what is not true, persons could easily
convict me; to say nothing of the fact that God, whose name I have
continually connected with this work, would disown me as an awful
deceiver, and bring this work to nought; but if these things are true,
as indeed they are, will not my readers own the hand of God, will they
not recognize the minute particular providence of God, and the readiness
of His heart to listen to the supplications of those who come to Him
with their requests in the name of the Lord Jesus? I do not seek a name
for myself in connexion with this work; I do not wish to draw attention
to myself, and am indeed sorry when persons have had their attention
directed only to me; but I do seek honour for my Heavenly Father, and I
do desire that His hand may be owned in this work.

Miscellaneous points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution,
for Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 20, 1854, to
May 26, 1855.

1. During this year four Day Schools in Bristol, with 184 children in
them, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution; and
several other Day Schools in Devonshire, Cornwall, Suffolk, Ireland, and
Scotland were assisted with copies of the Holy Scriptures. Further, one
Sunday School in Bristol, with 158 children, was entirely supported, and
seven others, in Cornwall, Devonshire, Somersetshire, and
Gloucestershire, with about 400 children in them, were assisted. Lastly,
one Adult School, with 183 Adults, was entirely supported during this
year.--The amount expended, during this year, on these various
Schools, was 338l. 2s. 5d.

In connexion with all these Schools, I would suggest the following
important matter for prayer. From March, 1884, to May, 26, 1855, there
were 5,956 children in the Day Schools. In the Adult School there were
2,459 persons. The number of the Sunday School children amounted to
2,817. Thus, without reckoning the Orphans, 11,232 souls were brought
under habitual instruction in the things of God in these Schools;
besides the many thousands in the Schools in various parts of England,
Ireland, Scotland, British Guiana, the West Indies, the East Indies,
&c., which were to a greater or less degree assisted. Now, what I would
especially request is, that all the disciples of the Lord Jesus, who
take an interest in this work, would help me and my fellow-labourers
with their prayers, that not only those who are at present under our
instruction may be spiritually benefited, but particularly also, that
God would be pleased to work mightily in the hearts of those who were
once under our care, in bringing to their remembrance the truth which
was then set before them. I am the more induced to make this request, as
we frequently meet with young men or young women, who many years ago
were under our care and instruction, who thankfully own the benefit they
received when with us, and who are now believers in the Lord Jesus,
though at the time they had given us little or no hope. Thus has the
Lord afterwards been pleased to cause the seed to spring up and to bear
fruit to His praise. During this year also we had again and again most
encouraging instances of this kind brought before us.

The total sum expended during the 21 years, from March 5, 1834, to May
26, 1855, in connexion with the Schools, which were either entirely, or
in part supported by the funds of this Institution, amounted to 7,204l.
12s. 8 ¼ d.

2. Great have been the efforts, made of late years, to spread error;
therefore the disciples of the Lord Jesus should be especially active in
seeking to spread the truth. Fearfully great, in particular, have been
the efforts to rob the Church of Christ of the Word of God; on this
account, all who love our Lord Jesus in sincerity, should seek,
according to their ability, to spread the Holy Scriptures. On account,
therefore, of the especial attempts made, of late years, once more to
deprive the Church of Christ of God's unerring Holy Word, I have had
it particularly laid upon my mind, in every way to embrace opportunities
for circulating it, and especially to place it in the hands of the very
poorest of the poor. In this way, not only in England, Wales and
Scotland, but particularly in Ireland, we have sought to circulate the
Holy Scriptures. And not only there, but also in Canada, British Guiana,
the East Indies, Australia and China. Every open door, which the Lord
was pleased to set before us, I have endeavoured to press into; and, in
this service have been helped by many servants of Christ, who have
sought out the most destitute persons, desirous of possessing a copy of
the Holy Scriptures. With this we have also particularly sought to
combine the supplying of aged persons, who are poor, with copies printed
in large type. Our efforts have not been in vain. We have had instances
brought before us of direct conversion, simply through reading the Holy
Scriptures. Again, during this year also, our labours were owned in this
part of the work. But though we have seen some fruit, we believe that
the greater part by far will be manifested in the Day of the Lord. It
has been given to us, by the help of the Lord, day by day to seek His
blessing upon the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and therefore we
believe that our labour will not be in vain. We expect results.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy
Scriptures, circulated from May 20, 1854, to May 26, 1855, is as
follows:

693 Bibles were sold.

890 Bibles were given away.

950 New Testaments were sold.

748 New Testaments were given away.

82 copies of the Psalms were sold.

186 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures were sold.

There were circulated from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1855, through the
medium of this Institutions 13,949 Bibles, 9047 New Testaments, 188
copies of the Psalms, and 789 other small portions of the Holy
Scriptures.

The total amount of the funds of this Institution, spent on the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures, from March 5, 1834, to May 20, 1855,
is 3389l. 10s. 1d. The amount spent during this year, 476l. 12s. 3d.

3. During this year there was spent of the funds of the Institution for
missionary objects, the sum of 2081l. 3s. 2d. By this sum Fifty Seven
Labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were
to a greater or less degree assisted.

With reference to this part of the operations of the Institution, I have
especially the joy of being able to communicate to the Christian reader,
that the Lord was pleased, during this year, abundantly to bless the
labours of many of the brethren whom I assisted. Again and again I had
refreshing intelligence as to the fruit which resulted from their
efforts. Many souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord, through
their labours during this year. And such heart-refreshing intelligence
came to me not only from those labouring in various parts of the United
Kingdom, but also from those who are serving the Lord in foreign
countries. This calls for especial praise; but at the same time I would
commend these dear brethren to the prayers of the saints, that they may
be upheld by the Lord with reference to their bodily and mental
strength, and especially that they may be sustained with patience,
faith, love, perseverance, and endurance; for great and many are their
difficulties. I would especially also request all, who love the Lord
Jesus, to pray for more labourers in the Gospel; for I hear continually
of fields which are unoccupied, and of open doors not entered into for
lack of labourers.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, spent on Missionary
operations, from March 5, 1834, to May 20, 1855, was 16,115l. 0s. 5 ½
d.

4. The fourth object of the Institution is, the circulation of such
publications as may be beneficial, with the blessing of God, to benefit
both believers and unbelievers. As it respects tracts for unbelievers, I
seek especially to aim after the diffusion of such as contain the truths
of the Gospel clearly and simply expressed; and as it respects
publications for believers, I aim after the circulation of such as may
be instrumental in directing their minds to those truths which in these
last days are more especially needed, or which have been particularly
lost sight of, and may lead believers to return to the written Word of
God.

There was laid out for this object, from May 26, 1854, to May 26, 1855,
the sum of 624l. 8s. 4d.; and there were circulated within this year
895,034 Tracts and Books.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books circulated from the
beginning up to May 26, 1855, was 3,584,710.

The total amount of means, expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 1840,
to May 26, 1855, is 2868l. 15s. 6 ¾ d.

We desire to be truly thankful to the Lord, for having intrusted us
with means, and given us open doors, for the circulation of so many
copies of the Holy Scriptures, and so many thousands of Tracts; and for
having enabled us to assist again to such an extent preachers of the
unsearchable riches of Christ; but we do not rest in this. Our trust was
in the Lord for His blessing upon our efforts. Nor has He allowed us to
wait upon Him in vain, during this year. We had not only very many
answers to our prayers with regard to the obtaining of means, but also
many answers to prayer as it respects fruit resulting from our labours.
Thus also with reference to the circulation of Tracts. Again and again
instances came before us in which souls were converted through the
Tracts, which the Lord had allowed us to send out during the year. Among
others, I would only mention, that an actor on the stage, to whom one of
them was given, was brought to the knowledge of the Lord.

Tract distributors, who can afford to pay for Tracts, and who desire to
procure Tracts from us, may obtain them for this purpose with a discount
of one-half, or 50 per cent., from the retail price. I state this, as
many be1ievers may not like to give away that which cost them nothing,
and yet may, at the same time, wish to obtain as much as possible for
their money. Applications for this should be made verbally or in writing
to Mr. Stanley, at the Bible and Tract Warehouse, No. 34, Park-street,
Bristol. To him, also, application may be made for specimen packets
containing an assortment of the Tracts and small books which are kept.
By sending 3s., 5s., 7s., or 10s. in postages to Mr. Stanley, No. 34,
Park Street, Bristol, packets will be sent to any part of England,
Wales, Ireland, Scotland, Jersey, Guernsey, &c., post paid, containing
specimens to the amount of the postages sent.

A catalogue of the various books and tracts, sold at the above
Warehouse, with their prices, may be had there, by applying either
personally or by letter to Mr. Stanley.

5. The fifth object of the Institution is, to board, clothe, and
Scripturally to educate destitute children who have lost both parents by
death.

At the commencement of this period there were 298 Orphans in the New
Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol. During the year there were
admitted into it 39 Orphans, making 337 in all. Of these 337, two died
during the year. Only two! We record this with particular gratitude. And
even these two died through water on the brain. God helping us, we
desire to trace His hand in everything; at the same time, the longer I
am engaged in the Orphan work, and see the effects which are produced by
regular habits, cleanliness, nourishing food, proper clothing, good
ventilation, a healthy locality, &c., the more I am convinced, that at
least one-half of the children among the poorer classes die for want of
proper attention. I do not state this to find fault with them, but
rather mention it in the way of pity and commiseration, to draw the
attention of the public to the fact. If anywhere the mortality among
children should be great, humanly speaking, it should be so among us,
because we generally receive the children very young, and also, because
the very fact of these children, while so young, having been bereaved of
both parents by death, shows that their parents, generally speaking,
were of a very sickly constitution. Indeed the greater part of the
Orphans whom we have received, lost one or both parents through
consumption. And yet, though such is the case, we have seen again and
again, how children who came to us in a most diseased state, have,
through proper attention, by the blessing of God, been brought out of
that state, and are now very healthy. But we often receive children
whose countenances at once show that they have not had sufficient food,
or were in other respects greatly neglected. It was only as late as
April 26, 1855, that the turn of 4 children came, to be received, all of
the same family, from 5 to 9 years old. When these children were
brought, it was evident that they were in a most deplorable state of
health from the want of proper food. This was now the painful difficulty
in which we found ourselves; if we received them, it was not at all
unlikely, humanly speaking, that we should have great trial with them on
account of their health, as they had been so long neglected; and yet, if
we did not take them, they would, we had great reason to fear, very
shortly sink under their position. Trust in God decided the matter. We
received all four, hoping that, by God's blessing, they would be thus
rescued from sinking under their circumstances. The eldest of the four,
a boy of above nine years old, was for the first evening or two so weak,
that he could not walk up stairs to the dormitory without stopping. This
disappeared, after he had had the food of the New Orphan House for a few
days; and now all the four are so greatly improved, that they do not
look at all like what they were on April 26th, 1855. I have so minutely
entered into this one case out of very many of the kind, which have come
before me in connexion with the Orphan work during the last 20 years, in
order to show how deeply important it is to care for such destitute
Orphans, to rescue them, humanly speaking, from misery or premature
death, to say nothing now with reference to their spiritual welfare,
which is paramount with us.

Besides the two who died out of the 387, we were obliged to expel one
from the establishment. This boy was admitted on Oct. 4, 1849. He was
then not quite eight years old; but though so young, it was soon found
out that he was old in sin, for he was a confirmed liar, thief, &c. He
gloried in it among the other boys, and told them that he had belonged
to a juvenile gang of thieves, before he had been admitted into the
Orphan House, that he had often stolen from the ships iron, brass, &c.,
and sold it. We thought at first that he spoke thus merely in the way of
boasting, but it proved but too true, that he was experienced in such
matters; for twice he ran away from the Orphan House, carrying off
things belonging to the other children. Moreover, he could pick locks,
&c. We received him back twice, after having run away, hoping that, by
bearing with him, admonishing him, speaking to him privately, praying
with him, and using a variety of other means, he might be reclaimed; but
all in vain. At last, having borne with him, and tried him for five
years and four months, he was solemnly, with prayer, before the whole
establishment, expelled, if by any means this last painful remedy might
be blessed to him. Yet we follow even this poor young sinner with our
prayers, and hope that yet the Lord may show him his evil ways, and give
us even now joy concerning him, as we have had before in a similar
instance. This case afresh deeply impressed upon me the importance of
caring for Orphans from their earliest days; for this poor boy, when but
eight years old, was already greatly practiced in stealing.

One of the children, after having been five years and one month under
our care, was taken back by the relatives who had placed him with us, as
they were by that time able to provide for him. One of the girls was
sent out to learn a business, one as a junior teacher in a school, and
13 to take situations; and 21 boys were apprenticed. These 40 vacancies
thus occasioned, left at the end of the year only 297 children in the
New Orphan House. The total number of Orphans, under our care from April
1836, to May 26, 1855, was 597.

I notice further the following points respecting the New Orphan House.

1. Persons who desire to make application for the admission of Orphans,
are requested to write to me, and address the letter to my house, No.
23, Paul Street, Kingsdown, Bristol.

2. I again state, as it regards the funds, that the income for the
Orphans is kept distinct from that for the other objects. Donors may
therefore contribute for one or the other of the objects exclusively, or
have their donations equally divided among them all, just as it may
appear best to themselves. If any of the donors would wish to leave the
application of their donations to my discretion, as the work of God in
my hands more especially may call for it at the time, they are
requested, kindly to say so, when sending their donations.

3. The expenses for the Orphans, during this year, were 4304l. 4s. 7 ½
d.

4. Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 74132l. 6s. 10 ¾ d. was given to me for the Orphans, as the
result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work up to May 26,
1855, which sum includes the 15,055l 3s. 2 ¼ d. paid for the building,
fitting up, and furnishing of the present New Orphan House, the 23,059l.
17s. 8 ¼ d., in hand on the 20th May, 1855, for the Building Fund, and
the 116l. 17s. 8 ½ d., the balance for the current expenses.--It may
also be interesting to the reader to know that the total sum, given for
the other objects, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1855,
amounted to 25,239l. 8s. 10 ¾ d.; and that which came in by the sale of
Bibles and Tracts, and by the payment of the children in the Day
Schools, from the commencement, amounted to 4531l. 12s. 10 ¾ d.--
Besides this, also a great variety and number of articles of clothing,
furniture, provisions, &c., were given for the use of the Orphans.

5. I have the joy of being able to state that we have great cause for
thankfulness, that, in the midst of many difficulties, our labours among
the Orphans continue to be blessed, and that, especially, again and
again instances now come before us in which those, who were formerly
under our care, declare themselves on the Lord's side.

6. Besides being able to meet the expenses for the Orphans and the other
Objects, amounting altogether to 7832l. 7s. 0 ½ d. during this year, I
was able to add to the Building Fund 5242l. 18s. 3d. The total income
during the year was 13,054l. 14s. 4d.

7. The articles given for the benefit of the Orphans, are sold by Miss
Stevens, on the first floor of the Bible and Tract Warehouse of the
Scriptural Knowledge Institution, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, or the work of the Lord
in my hands, not immediately connected with the Scriptural Know/edge
Institution, from May 26, 1854, to May 26, 1855.

Dec. 31, 1854. During this year there have been received into fellowship
61.

The Lord has been pleased to give me during this year—

1. In provisions, clothes, etc., worth at least 8 14 0

2. In anonymous offerings in money, put up in paper and directed to me,
and put into the boxes for the poor saints
or the rent, at the chapels . . 191 1 11 ½

3. In presents in money, from believers in
Bristol, not given anonymously. . 143 12 10

4. In money, from believers not residing
in Bristol . . . . . 854 2 7 ½

-----------

£697 11 5

-----------

Some of my readers may be ready to exclaim, 697l. 11s. 5d.! What a large
sum! Not one out of a hundred ministers has such a large salary, nor one
out of twenty clergymen such a good living! Should you, esteemed reader,
say so, my reply is: Indeed mine is a happy way for the obtaining of my
temporal supplies; but if any one desires to go this way, he must--

1. Not merely say that he trusts in God, but must really do so. Often
individuals profess to trust in God, but they embrace every opportunity,
directly or indirectly, to expose their need, and thus seek to induce
persons to help them. I do not say it is wrong to make known our wants;
but I do say it ill agrees with trust in God, to expose our wants for
the sake of inducing persons to help us. God will take us at our word.
If we say we trust in Him, He will try whether we really do so, or only
profess to do so; and if indeed we trust in Him, we are satisfied to
stand with Him alone.

2. The individual who desires to go this way must be willing to be rich
or poor, as the Lord pleases. He must be willing to know what it is to
have an abundance or scarcely anything. He must be willing to leave this
world without any possessions.

3. He must be willing to take the money in God's way, not merely in
large sums but in small.--Again and again have I had a single
shilling given or sent to me. To have refused such tokens of Christian
love, would have been ungracious.

4. He must be willing to live as the Lord's steward.--If any one
were to begin this way of living, and did not communicate out of that
which the Lord gives to him, but hoard it up; or, if he would live up to
his income, as it is called, then the Lord, who influences the hearts of
His children, to help him with means, would soon cause those channels to
be dried up. How it came that my already good income still more
increased, so as to come to what it is, has been stated in the early
part of this volume; it was when I determined that, by God's help, His
poor and His work should more than ever partake of my means. From that
time the Lord was pleased more and more to intrust me with means for my
own purse. I request the reader carefully to read over once more all I
have said in the first volume of this Narrative, third part, from page
575 to 604, on Matthew 6, 19-21, on Matthew 6, 33, and on
"Stewardship."

Various reasons might have kept me from publishing these accounts; but I
have for my object in writing, the glory of God, and therefore delight
in thus showing what a loving master I serve, and how bountifully He
supplies my necessities; and I write for the comfort and encouragement
of my fellow believers, that they may be led to trust in God more and
more, and therefore I feel it due to them to state, how, even with
regard to this life, I am amply provided for, though that is not what I
seek after.

Further account respecting the intended Orphan Houses for Seven Hundred
Poor Children, bereaved of both parents by death, from May 26, 1855, to
May 26, 1856.

On May 20, 1855, I had in hand for this object 23,059l. 17s. 8 ¼ d., as
stated in the last chapter on this subject. I now relate how the Lord
was pleased to supply me further with means, but must confine myself,
for the sake of brevity, to some of the more remarkable donations.

June. 20. A silver medal "given to the donor for being engaged in the
taking of Java; but he desires to lay down his honour at the feet of the
Lord Jesus, and to have this medal used to lay a stone in the new
building."

Aug. 4. From S. S. 5l., with 5l. for the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures, 5l. for Missions, and 5l. and the following articles for the
support of the Orphans: A pair of gold mounted bracelets, a pair of jet
bracelets, an iron watch guard, a pair of iron bracelets and waist
buckle, a small gold seal, a ring, 2 pencil cases, a gold brooch, a
purse and some mock pearls and beads.

Aug. 22. From Devonshire 100l.

Nov. 21. From Ipswich 2l., "The property of a dear child now in
heaven."

Nov. 23. From London 50l., with 5l. for the circulation of Bibles and
Tracts, 5l. for the Schools, 10l. for Missions, 10l. for the Orphans,
10l. for Mr. Craik, and 10l. for my own expenses.

Dec. 5. This evening I had the kind offer, unsolicited, that all the
glass required, for about 300 large windows in the new house, which is
now being built, should be gratuitously supplied. It is worthy of notice
that the glass was not contracted for, this time, as in the case of the
house already built. This, no doubt, was under the ordering of our
Heavenly Father, who knew beforehand that this offer would be made.

Jan. 10, 1850. From Liverpool: A ring set with a brilliant, a gold
bracelet, a Maltese bracelet, a brooch, a Maltese silver clasp and belt,
a garnet ring, a pair of gold ear-rings, a box of whist markers, and
German cross and chain.

Feb. 19. Now at last the Lord has been pleased, in answer to many
prayers, to give me today 3000l., which being left to my disposal for
the work of the Lord, I took for the Building Fund 1700l., for the
support of the Orphans 300l., and for Missionary objects, the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and the support of the
various Schools in connection with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution
1000l. How I feel at such times cannot be described, when in
answer to many prayers, the Lord is pleased to
open His bountiful hands, and to prove so abundantly how willing He is
to listen to the supplications of His children who put their trust in
Him, though it may be needful, for their own good and that of others,
that for a season He seem but little or not at all to regard their
supplications.

March 18. Received 4000l., which was left at my disposal as the work of
the Lord might require it. I took of this sum 3000l. for the Building
Fund, and 1000l. for Missions, the circulation of Bibles and Tracts, and
the various schools, supported by the Institution.--This donation is
the fruit of many prayers, and of much looking to the Lord for answers.
His holy name be magnified for it. I am thus drawing nearer and nearer
the time when I shall have obtained from the Lord everything needed for
this object. I have not had, from the beginning, by God's grace, one
moment's doubt, that in His own time, He would give me all that is
required.

May 26. By sale of a publication in French 3l.--By sale of a
publication in English 69l. 1s. 10d.--To these donations is to be
added 911l. 8s. 1d., received during this year for interest.

I add a few remarks.

A. Up to May 20, 1856, the total income for the Building Fund was
29,297l. 18s. 11 ½ d., so that only about 5700l. more will be required,
as far as I am able to see, in order to accomplish to the full my
purpose respecting the accommodation for 700 more Orphans.

B. The house for 400 female Orphans, commenced in August, 1855, is
expected, with God's blessing to be ready by about Midsummer 1857 for
the reception of 400 Orphans.

C. As soon as my path is made plain, God willing, the other house for
300 Orphans will also be commenced; but I cannot state, at present, any
further particulars respecting this.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund, sent
in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1855, to May 26, 1856.

On May 26, 1855, when the accounts were closed, there was in hand 41l.
6s. 11 ½ d. for these objects. On June 5, 1855, therefore only a few
days after the commencement of the new period, when only 1l. 0s. 6d.
altogether had come in for these objects, in 8 different donations, I
received 211l. 9s. 5d., of which the donor kindly wished me to retain
11l. 9s. 5d. for my own expenses, and to use the 200l. for the work of
the Lord, as might be needed. I took, therefore, 100l. for the support
of the Orphans, and 100l. for these objects, and had thus some means, to
go on with the work. This donation was a great refreshment and
encouragement to me, at the commencement of this new period.

July 12. Since June 5th little only, comparatively, has come in. All the
donations for these objects were under 5l. Today, however, the Lord, in
answer to many prayers, has sent me 200l., to be used as needed. I took
of this donation 100l. for the Orphans, and 100l. for these objects, and
have thus the means of being able to send some help to brethren who
labour in the Gospel.

Aug. 9. Having had heavy expenses the last ten days, in order to help
foreign labourers in the Gospel, and to procure supplies of Bibles,
Testaments, and Tracts, our means for these objects were now reduced to
7l. 7s. 10 ½ d. Yet I desired far more to help brethren who labour in
the Word, as the greater party of them had not yet been supplied. I
therefore besought the Lord, that He would be pleased to send in means.
When I came home this evening from the New Orphan House, I found the
following letter, from the same believing farmer, whom the Lord has
several times used in previous years, to help me when in need.

"* * * * Aug. 8, 1855.

"Dear Brother in Christ,

"I feel stirred up to help you in the work in which you are engaged, and
therefore beg your acceptance of the enclosed Twenty Pounds, to be used
in any way you please, trusting God will direct you.

Yours affectionately in Christ,

"* * * *"

I took the whole amount for Missionary objects and the circulation of
Bibles and Tracts.

Aug. 25. The outgoings from these objects have been great, during this
month, and the income comparatively small. On this account the means
for these objects were reduced today to
a few shillings. As the opportunities for the gratuitous circulation of
the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts, however, continued to be great,
and as I had been only able to send out about the third part as much to
labourers in the Gospel, as I could have desired, my prayer during this
week had been especially for means for this object. Now the Lord has
somewhat helped us. I have received today a donation of 203l. 14s., the
whole of which I took for these objects, as the application of it was
left with me. The Lord be magnified for this precious help! I shall be
able to send at least 150l. of this sum to labourers in the Gospel.--
About 3 hours, before this donation was received, I had been asking the
Lord, if He would not condescend to use me as an instrument, at this
time, in helping these brethren, He would kindly in some other way
supply them with means.

Sept. 1. From Dublin 5l. for missions.

Sept. 11. From C. W. 20l. for foreign labourers in the Gospel. A
precious help in answer to many prayers.

Sept. 20. Received 190l., of which I took 100l. for these objects, in
order to be able to send some help to brethren who labour in the Word,
and to have means for going on with the circulation of Bibles and
Tracts; and the remaining 90l. I took for the support of the Orphans.
Precious help, the fruit of many prayers!

Sept. 30. From Clerkenwell for missions 10l.

Oct. 13. 20l. from Austin Friars, London. I had been praying again and
again for more means for these objects, and had sent out 100l. within
the last few days to brethren who labour in the Word, but desired to
send out more.

Oct. 23. From London 20l.

Nov. 6th. Since Oct. 16th I had not been able to send any further help
to brethren who labour in the Word, much as I desired to do so, having
only means enough to meet the necessary demands for the Schools, and the
circulation of Bibles and Tracts, which amounted, from that time, to
about 120l. But I prayed daily for means for missionary objects and the
circulation of Bibles and Tracts. Today I received 180l., the whole of
which I have taken for these objects, as the disposal of it was left to
me, having great reason to believe that many labourers in the Gospel are
in need of help, and having still so many openings for the circulation
of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts. The Lord be magnified for this
precious answer to prayer!

Dec. 13. During November I was enabled to send 200l. to brethren who
labour in the Gospel at Home and Abroad, and also 197l. in October; but
during this month I have as yet been only able to send out 12l. My often
repeated prayer has been, that the Lord would give me the joy and
privilege of sending out a considerable sum during this month also. This
prayer was again repeated, when I rose this morning, and saw the windows
covered with ice; for I thought then of the needy brethren in this cold
weather, connected with the high price of provisions. It was not long
after, when I received 153l., to be used in the Lord's service, as
most needed. I took of this, 100l. for brethren labouring in the Gospel
at Home and Abroad, and 53l. for the support of the Orphans, and thus
have the joy of being able to send at least 100l. at once, waiting upon
the Lord for more.

Jan. 31, 1850. As the fruit of very many prayers, I have received today
100l., the whole of which I have put to these funds, the application of
the money being left with me; as there was nothing at all left now for
the circulation of Bibles and Tracts, and the various Schools, and as I
had often asked the Lord to allow me further the joy of sending help to
brethren who labour in the Word, to whom since Dec. 14th I had been able
to send scarcely anything.

From this time there were no further difficulty experienced with regard
to means, for these objects, as on Feb. 19th there was received the
donation of 3000l., and on March 18th the donation of 4000l., of each of
which, as stated before, I took 1000l. for the School—, Bible—,
Missionary—and Tract objects, whereby, together with what came in
besides, I was not only carried to the close of this period, but was
enabled to expend more on Missionary objects, and the circulation of the
Holy Scriptures and Tracts, than during any previous year, since the
Institution commenced in March, 1834. Let it be especially observed by
the Godly reader, that not only does this work continue to exist, after
more than 22 years, carried on solely through the power of prayer and
faith in the Living God; but also year by year its operations have been
extended. Unbelief is thus put to shame. It is plainly proved that the
work of God can be carried on simply by trust in God. If our work is
indeed the work of God, faith and prayer will be found efficient agents;
and if they are not efficient, we may well question, whether we do
indeed make use of them; or, if we do, whether the work, in which we are
occupied, is truly the work of God.

Notice here also, that not only was I enabled, simply through prayer and
faith, to procure means for a greater amount of operations than during
any year since March 1834; but, over and above all this, I was able to
add to the Building Fund during this year 6238l. 1s. 3 ¼ d., whilst the
income for the support of the Orphans was 4070l. 18s. 1 ¼ d., and the
income for the other objects 4279l. 6s. 6 ¼ d. The total amount,
therefore, which the Lord was pleased to send in during the past year,
was 14,588l. 5s. 10 ¾ d. Behold, dear Reader, how effectual this way is
for the obtaining of means; for the amount is large. Behold too, how
pleasant a way it is; for I have not to encounter unpleasant refusals,
in applying for money. Behold how cheap a way; for it involves none of
the heavy expenses, usually attendant on the collection of
contributions; for all I do is, to make known the work in which we are
engaged, by means of the Reports, which are for the most part sold for
the benefit of the Orphans, and they actually brought in during this
year, as the audited accounts show, a little more than they cost.

But, perhaps, you say, Yes, it is just these Reports, why there is
nothing at all remarkable in the matter. Our reply is: We do not pretend
to miracles. We have no desire even, that the work, in which we are
engaged, should be considered an extraordinary one, or even a remarkable
one. We are truly sorry that many persons, inconsiderately, look upon it
almost as a miraculous one. The principles on which we are acting are as
old as the Holy Scriptures. But they are forgotten by many; and they are
not held in living faith by others; and by some they are not known at
all; nay, they are denied even to be Scriptural by not a few, and are
considered as wild and fanatical. It is ascribed to my being a foreigner
that I succeed so well, or to the novelty of the thing, or to some
secret treasure to which I have access; but when all will not account
for the progress of the work, it is said, the Reports produce it all. My
reply to these different objections is: My being a foreigner, looked at
naturally, would be much more likely to hinder my being intrusted with
such large sums, than to induce donors to give. As to the novelty
procuring the money, the time is long gone by for novelty, for this is
June 1856, and the work commenced in March 1834. As to the secret
treasure to which I have access, there is more in this supposition than
the objectors are aware of; for surely God's treasury is
inexhaustible, and I have that (though that alone) to go to, and have
indeed drawn out of it, simply by prayer and faith, more than 113,000l.
since the beginning of the work. But now as to the last objection, that
the Reports are the means by which all the money is obtained: let us
consider this a little, for I do heartily desire that the Reader may not
lose the blessing, which this Institution is intended to convey to his
soul. My reply is: There is nothing unusual in writing Reports. This is
done by public Institutions generally, but the constant complaint is,
that Reports are not read. Our Reports are not extraordinary as to the
power of language, or as to striking appeals to feelings. They are
simple statements of facts. These Reports are not accompanied by
personal application for means; but they are simply sent to the donors,
or to any other individuals who wish to have or purchase them. If they
produce results, which Reports generally do not, I can only ascribe it
to the Lord.

I do not mean to say that God does not use the Reports as instruments in
procuring us means. They are written in order that I may thus give an
account of my stewardship, but particularly, in order that, by these
printed accounts of the work, the chief end of this Institution may be
answered, which is to raise another public testimony to an unbelieving
world, that in these last days the Living God is still the Living God,
listening to the prayers of His children, and helping those who put
their trust in Him; and in order that believers generally may be
benefited and especially be encouraged to trust in God for everything
they may need, and be stirred up to deal in greater simplicity with God
respecting everything connected with their own particular position and
circumstances; in short, that the children of God maybe brought to the
practical use of the Holy Scriptures, as the word of the Living God.--
But while these are the primary reasons for publishing these Reports, we
doubt not that the Lord has again and again used them as instruments in
leading persons to help us with their means. For as we continually stand
in need of considerable sums, and as even hundreds of pounds go but a
very little way, I entreat the Lord day by day, and generally several
times every day, to supply me with means, to speak to the hearts of His
dear children, and to constrain them by the love of Christ to help me
out of the means, with which He has intrusted them; and so it comes to
pass, I doubt not, that the Lord again and again works by His Spirit in
the hearts of those who have read or heard the Reports. But whether we
are supplied with means through the Reports or irrespective of them; in
either case it is God, who is working for us, and it is to this I wish
to direct the mind of the Reader.

Means for the support of the 300 Orphans already under my care, sent in
answer to Prayer, from May 26, 1855, to May 26, 1856.

When this period commenced, I had 116l. 17s. 8 ½ d. in hand for the
support of the Orphans, an amount so small, looking at it naturally,
that one would be ready to say, there would be soon nothing in hand.
Thus indeed it would have been, had the Lord not been pleased further to
send in means; but He, in His fatherly care, never ceased to remember
our need and to provide for its supply. The expenses were very heavy,
month after month, not only because of the greatness of the
Establishment, but in particular also on account of the high price of
provisions, which prevailed during the whole of last year; yet,
notwithstanding this, there was not a single year, since the Orphan work
commenced, in which I went on with greater ease regarding means, than
during the last period. At the close of the first month, June 26th,
though the expenses had been great, there remained 192l. 9s. 11 ½ d. in
hand. At the close of the second month, July 26th, there was a balance
left of 259l. 4s. At the close of the third month, Aug. 26th, there was
left a balance of 291l. 19s. 2d. And in like manner the Lord was pleased
to supply me with means, month after month, so that when He was pleased
to give me on Feb. 19th the donation of 3000l., above referred to, I had
still 160l. in hand for the support of the Orphans. It is particularly
worthy of notice, that the income for the support of the Orphans was not
supplied by some very large donations, previous to the one of 3000l.;
for there was no period for about ten years, when I received fewer large
donations for the support of the Orphans, than during the last. It was
supplied by many donations of 1l., 2l., 5l., 10l., 20l. and upwards, but
not exceeding 100l., except one of 117l. 10s. 0d. received on May 3rd,
and the 300l. which I took for the Orphans out of the 3000l. And again
it is remarkable, that while up to Feb. 19th we had always abounded, and
were never brought low, but generally had had about 200l in hand; almost
immediately after the reception of the 3000l., out of which I took 300l.
for the support of the Orphans, the balance, before in hand, was all
expended, and more money required; so that I had soon to use a part of
the 300l., whereby the hand of God in that large donation was so much
the more made manifest; and yet, again, this 300l., with what the Lord
was pleased to send in besides between Feb. 19th and May 26th, not only
met all the remaining heavy expenses, but left in hand a balance of
167l. 18s. 11 ¾ d.

Observe, dear Reader, while we were in rented houses in Wilson Street,
we had our faith greatly tried, year after year, though the expenses
were only about one-third as much, as during the past year. And thus
also it has been again and again, since the New Orphan House was opened
in 1849; but during the past year we were entirely free from trial of
faith regarding means for the support of the Orphans, though not without
many trials of faith and patience on other accounts. The Lord takes His
own way, and therefore He allows this year to stand by itself, in this
particular. On this I delight to dwell; for I desire that the hand of
God may be recognised in this work, whether it be by His power being
manifested in sustaining us in our poverty from day to day, or by His
causing us to go on easily with regard to means for a day, or a month,
or a year. You see, then, that while there was but like "a handful of
flour in the barrel," at the commencement of the period, the Lord was
pleased to make it last for a whole year, and yet, at the end of the
year, there was more than at the beginning; and during the whole year
all these hundreds had been fed, clothed, and provided with everything
needful; apprentices had been placed out and premiums paid for them, and
their outfit and that of the young women going out to service had been
provided at the expense of the Orphan Establishment. What an answer does
all this furnish to unbelief which said, when I was going to build the
New Orphan House, How will you find the means for the support of these
300 Orphans? Or, when unbelief said, How will you be able to support a
thousand Orphans?

I will now out of the very many donations, received during this year,
single out a few, and make here and there remarks, as the subjects may
call for it.

June 1, 1855. The balance left when the accounts were closed, was only
enough to supply the average expenses of ten days for the support of the
Orphans, and there had only been received during the last 5 days 14l.
13s. 7d. How kind therefore of the Lord, to send me today 50l. from
Liverpool, 1l. from Preston, and 10s. from Milton Abbot!

June 5. 5l. from Lincolnshire "As a thank-offering to the Lord for
preserving the only child of a widow from the path of the destroyer."

June 8. A gold chain, some books for sale, and 15l.

June 19. 5l. as "A thank-offering to the Lord for preservation when
thrown out of a gig."

July 10. From Worcestershire 25l.

July 12. Received from a great distance 200l., of which I took 100l. for
the support of the Orphans, and 100l. for the other objects. There has
also come in today 20l. from Norwich, 1l. from Bath, 4s. from Chepstow,
7s. 6d. from Mallow, 1l. from Dublin, a gold seal and sixpence, and 13s.
and 6s. 9d. besides. The Lord's kindness is great in this, as a fresh
supply of oatmeal, flour, &c., will need to be paid for, other heavy
expenses have to be met, and there is not much in hand.

July 14. An Israelitish gentleman, an entire stranger, brought to my
house this morning 5l. for the support of the Orphans. See in what a
variety of ways the Lord is pleased to supply us with means, and all
unsolicited, simply in answer to prayer!

Aug. 17. From Messrs. * * * 7l. 10s. 0d., being a portion of the money
received for showing the "British Empire" before she left Bristol.
Observe again, esteemed Reader, what a variety of ways the Lord uses to
supply me with means; for I had not before even heard of the name of
this vessel, nor did I know her owners, even by name; yet God inclines
the heart of these gentlemen to send me this 7l. 10s. 0d. towards the
support of the 300 Orphans.--Anonymously from Wilton 4s., as "A
thank-offering to God for His mercies on a journey."

Aug. 21. From Worcestershire 30l.

Sept. 6. From the Bombay Presidency 25l.

On Sept. 12, were sent by the donor who gave so valuable a donation of
jewellery on July 26, 1854, the following articles of jewellery, etc.,
being the last she possessed, and which the love of Christ led her to
give up: A valuable dressing case, 2 little boxes, 2 pomatum pots, a
gold thimble, a large gold brooch set with a ruby and 2 brilliants, a
gold star necklace set with a brilliant, a gold bracelet, a gold
watchguard, a gold cross, 2 rings set with pearls, a ring set with
pearls and small rubies, a ring set with 2 brilliants, a ring set with 3
rubies and 2 brilliants, a pair of gold earrings and brooch set with
pearls, a large ivory brooch, a silver brooch set with pearls, a silver
pencil case, a paste brooch, 5 loose crystals, and some small carved
ornaments.

Sept. 26. Received a large cask containing the wearing apparel of the
late Mrs. H. at J. in the county of Leicester, which this lady, by her
will, had bequeathed to me for the benefit of the Orphans.

Oct. 3. Received the following letter.

"* * *, Oct. 8, 1855.

Dear Mr. Müller,

The enclosed check for 8l. 1s. 4d. is chiefly the product of a sale for
the Orphans, which we held on our sister's wedding-day, and hoping it
will be acceptable,

We remain,

Your's affectionately,

* * * * *."

The Orphans on Ashley Down were to be benefited by the day of gladness
in this Godly family.--The Godly principle, which brought this
donation, refreshed my spirit above the money, and, I doubt not, will
refresh other Godly readers.--Let me here say, by the way, to
believing parents, Seek to cherish in your children early the habit of
being interested about the work of God and about cases of need and
distress, and use them too at suitable times, and under suitable
circumstances, as your almoners, and you will reap fruit from doing so.

Oct. 10. From Surrey 5s. and a gold chain.--From a shepherd in
Australia, who had read my Narrative while tending his flock, 12s.--
See how the lady near London sends her gold chain, and the shepherd in
Australia his 12s.--Thus the Lord, in the greatest variety of ways
supplies me with means, for the greater part through entire strangers.
Thus I received one hundred pounds after another, anonymously, through
London bankers, until a particular circumstance made known to me the
name of the kind Christian donor, whom I have seen but once years ago,
and who had, at the same time, sent me considerable donations with his
name, whilst his bankers, anonymously, sent his still larger donations
of many hundred pounds. I dwell upon this fact, that the reader may be
led to own increasingly the hand of God in this work; for I desire that
He may be honoured, that His hand may be recognised, and that attention
may be drawn to Him, and not to me. It gives me no joy but sorrow, if
persons admire me, in connexion with this work, as if I did anything
great; as if I acted in a remarkable way. What is it that I do? I simply
desire, through this work, to direct the attention of those who need it
to the precious truth, that God is unchangeably the same, and that those
who take Him at His word, as given to us in the Holy Scriptures, will
find how unspeakably blessed it is, even for this life, to do so. To
bring back to the written word of God those of His children, who
practically have departed from it, and to sound again and again in the
ears and consciences of the unbeliever that there is verily a living God
who listens to the prayers of those who put their trust in Him, is, as I
have often before stated, the great end of this work.

Oct. 11. To day I received, unsolicited, a kind and useful present of
flannel and calico, to the amount of 10l., from the ladies constituting
the Bristol Dorcas Society.

Oct. 18. "Articles forwarded by friends at a distance," an anonymous but
most valuable donation, the particulars of which I am not at liberty to
state.--The kind unknown donor or donors should, however, know, that
very many pounds have been realized through the sale of these articles,
and that they were almost all readily sold.

I cannot help noticing here, how much help the Lord has given us, in
disposing of the articles, given for the benefit of the Orphans, and
what a considerable sum has come to the funds of the Institution through
the fact that believers have been led to send their needless articles.
There came in by the sale of articles during the past year, for the
Building Fund 21l. 16s. 7d., for missionary objects 15l. 6s. 4d., and
for the support of the Orphans 426l. 14s. 9d.

Oct. 27. From Devonshire 4l. "The proceeds of the sale of the Orphans
pig." A young pig bought, fattened and sold for the benefit of the
Orphans, and this 4l. was sent as the proceeds.

Nov. 3. From St. Leonard's-on-Sea 50l.

Nov. 4. A ring set with 5 brilliants.

Nov. 16. From Yate 10l. and also 5s.

Nov. 19. From New York 25l. From Bath 10l.

Flour is now 65s. per sack. When we began to bake in the New Orphan
House, it was from 27s. to 32s. We bought at one time 20 sacks at 27s.
Now it is 65s. But the Lord provides us with all we need, though other
provisions are also expensive, as well as flour.

Dec. 11. From the north of Devon a brooch, set with an emerald and 10
brilliants.--I took this as a further answer to my prayers, for gifts
of diamonds, etc.

Jan. 4, 1856. 42l. 4s. 6d. with these words; "This is the answer of
prayers, we have of late without ceasing offered up on behalf the
Orphans."--This is one of the most remarkable donations received
during the whole year. A brother and sister in the Lord, who labour for
Him in seeking to win souls, whilst depending upon Him for all they
need, gave themselves to prayer on behalf of the Orphans, and that which
the Lord gave them towards the close of the yean 1855, in answer to
prayer, enabled them to send this 42l. 4s. 6d. See, dear Reader, that
the saints have power with God. This brother and sister have been
greatly encouraged by this work, and now, even in the way of means,
though they are poor themselves, this work reaps the fruit of their
prayers. Be encouraged, then, for yourself to trust in God for all you
may need.

Jan.30, 1l. 5s. from Stroud, as "a thank-offering for 25 years of family
mercies."

Feb. 3. From Worcestershire 30l.

Feb. 0. From George Town, Demerara, 10 dollars.--From South Town 5l
and also 5s.--From Liverpool 50l.

Feb. 9. From Adelaide, Australia, 2l. and also 10s.

Feb. 15. From Hornley, Staffordshire, 20l.

April 5. Received 74l. 9s. 1d., which being left to my disposal for the
Lord's work, I took the whole for the support of the Orphans.

April 9. From Worcestershire 50l.

April 19. 1l. from the Grand Duchy of Baden.

I have thus, out of more than 2000 donations, taken a few, to show in
what way the Lord is pleased to supply me with means.

Miscellaneous points respecting the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for
Home and Abroad, with reference to the period from May 26, 1855, to May
26, 1856.

1, During this year 4 Day Schools in Bristol, with 203 children, were
entirely supported by the funds of the Institution; and nine Day
Schools, in Devonshire, Cornwall, Gloucestershire, Norfolk, Scotland,
British Guiana and Africa, were assisted.--Further, one Sunday School
in Bristol, with 158 children, was entirely supported, and eight others,
in Gloucestershire, Devonshire, Middlesex, Canada and British Guiana,
were assisted.--Lastly, one Adult School in Bristol, with 158 Adult
scholars, was entirely supported, and two other Adult Schools, in Kent
and Norfolk, were assisted. The amount spent during this year, in
connexion with these schools, was 348l. 5s. 11 ¼ d.; and the sum total
expended during the last 22 years in connexion with the schools, either
entirely, or in part, supported by the funds of this Institution,
amounts to 7552l. 18s. 7 ½ d.--The number of children, who were
under our care, merely in the Schools, entirely supported by this
Institution, from March 5, 1834, to May 20, 1856, was 6104 in the Day
Schools, 2911 in the Sunday Schools, and 2611 persons in the Adult
School. Thus, without reckoning the Orphans, 11,626 persons have been
brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in these various
Schools; besides the many thousands in the Schools in various parts of
England, Ireland, Scotland, British Guiana, the East Indies, etc., which
have been to a greater or lesser degree assisted.

2, During this year was expended on the circulation of the Holy
Scriptures, of the funds of this Institution, 496l. 10s. 0d. There were
circulated during this year 2175 Bibles, 1233 New Testaments, 119 copies
of the Psalms, and 155 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.--
There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of
this Institution, 16,124 Bibles, 10,280 New Testaments, 307 copies of
the Psalms, and 944 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.--The
sum total spent on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, since March
5, 1834, is 3880l. 0s.1d.

3. During this year there were spent of the Funds of the Institution for
Missionary objects 2501l. 9s. 1d. By this sum, sixty one labourers in
the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater
or less degree assisted. The amount sent to each of these servants of
the Lord is as follows.

To No. 1. Labouring in British Guiana (a European) 171l.

To No. 2. Ditto (Ditto) 110l.

To No. 3. Ditto (Ditto) 62l.

To No. 4. Ditto (Ditto) 58l.

To No. 5. Ditto (Ditto) 48l.

To No. 6. Ditto (Ditto) 33l.

To No. 7. Ditto (Ditto) 8l.

To No. 8 Ditto (A Native) 17l.

To No. 9 Ditto (Ditto) 14l.

To No. 10. Labouring in China (a European) 14l.

To No. 11. Labouring in the East Indies (a European) 60l.

To No. 12. Ditto (Ditto) 40l.

To No. 13. Ditto (Ditto) 25l.

To No 14. Ditto (a Native) 15l.

To No. 15 Labouring in Canada 90l.

To No. 16. Ditto 70l.

To No. 17. Labouring in Belgium 45l.

To No. 18. Labouring in Switzerland 30l.

To No. 19. Labouring in France 30l.

To No. 20. Labouring in Ireland 60l.

To No. 21. Ditto 45l.

To No. 22. Labouring in Scotland 60l.

To No. 23 Labouring in England 90l.

To No. 24. Ditto 80l.

To No. 25. Ditto 60l.

To No. 26. Ditto 60l.

To No. 27. Ditto 58l.

To No. 28. Ditto 50l.

To No. 29. Ditto 50l.

To No. 30. Ditto 50l.

To No. 31. Ditto 50l.

To No. 32. Ditto 45l.

To No. 33. Ditto 45l.

To No. 34. Ditto 45l.

To No. 35. Ditto 40l.

To No. 36. Ditto 40l.

To No. 37. Ditto 40l.

To No. 38. Ditto 35l.

To No. 39. Ditto 35l.

To No. 40. Ditto 35l.

To No. 41. Ditto 35l.

To No. 42. Ditto 30l.

To No. 43. Ditto 30l.

To No. 44. Ditto 30l.

To No. 45. Ditto 30l.

To No. 46. Ditto 25l.

To No. 47. Ditto 25l.

To No. 48. Ditto 25l.

To No. 49. Ditto 20l.

To No. 50. Ditto 20l.

To No. 51. Ditto 20l.

To No. 52. Ditto 15l.

To No. 53. Ditto 15l.

To No. 54. Ditto 15l.

To No. 55. Ditto 15l.

To No. 56. Ditto 10l.

To No. 57. Ditto 8l.

To No. 58. Ditto 8l.

To No. 59. Ditto 8l.

To No. 60. Ditto 5l.

To No. 61. Ditto 5l.

There was also expended for fitting up, or renting, lighting, cleaning,
&c., some preaching rooms in spiritually dark villages in Devonshire,
Gloucestershire, and Somersetshire, 38l. 9 1

Respecting this part of the work there is great cause for thanksgiving.
It has pleased the Lord abundantly to bless the labours of many of these
servants of Christ whom I have assisted. Very many souls have been won
through them during the past year. On the labours of some in particular,
both at home and abroad, an unusual blessing has rested. But whilst I
say this to the praise of the Lord, I add the earnest entreaty also, to
the believing reader, to supplicate for these dear brethren, that it may
please God to give unto them strength of voice, mind and body for their
service; but, above all, to renew them in their inward man day by day,
and to make them happy in Himself, so that they may out of a happy
heart, which is under the power of the truth, set forth the unsearchable
riches of Christ. I also request the prayers of the believing reader for
an increase of labourers, especially for foreign countries, as almost
everywhere there is a great lack of them, and from time to time through
death or ill health they are removed from their post of service.

Though more has been expended this year of the funds of the Institution,
than during the previous year, for Missionary objects; yet I long to be
permitted to do far more than this.

The sum total expended on Missionary operations, of the funds of the
Institution, since March 5, 1834, is 18,616l. 9s. 6 ½ d.

4, There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1855,
to May 26, 1856, the sum of 791l. 1s. 0 ½ d., and there were circulated
812,970 Tracts and Books.--The sum total expended on this object,
since. Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to 3659l. 16s. 7 ¼ d.--The total
number of all the Tracts and Books circulated since Nov. 19, 1840, is
4,397,680.

During this year, as for many years past, there has not been a single
open door set before us, where we could profitably have circulated the
Holy Scriptures, or given away Tracts, but the Lord has also been
pleased to enable us to enter those doors. These opportunities have of
late years increased more and more, but the Lord has also been pleased,
along with them, to give increased means; and, we doubt not, He will yet
further open His bountiful hand, and supply us with means for the
circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts.

I have heard again and again of instances, during the past year in which
it had pleased the Lord to bless the circulation of those Tracts and
little books, which He had allowed us to issue.

5, At the beginning of this period, there were 297 Orphans in the New
Orphan House. During the past year, there were admitted into it 25
Orphans, making 322 in all. Of these 322, one died. Only one! She had
been nine years under our care, and we had the great joy of seeing her
depart this life as a decided believer in the Lord Jesus. One boy we
were obliged to expel from the Institution, after we had long borne with
him, but we follow him still with our prayers. 13 boys were fitted out
and apprenticed at the expense of the Establishment. Seven girls were
sent to service and one was apprenticed, each having been provided with
an outfit, at the expense of the Establishment. Several of those who
left the Orphan House, we had the joy of sending out as believers. These
23 vacancies, thus occasioned, left on May 26, 1856, only 299 Orphans
under our care. This one vacancy, however, was the very next Friday
filled up. The total number of Orphans, who have been under our care
since April 1836, is 622.

I notice further the following points respecting the Orphan work:

1, At the beginning of this period, there were 715 Orphans waiting for
admission. Since then 201 more destitute Orphans, bereaved of both
parents by death, and some only a few months old, have been applied for
to be admitted, making 916 in all. Of these 916, we were only able to
receive 25, as has been stated, and 44 either died or were otherwise
provided for, as their relatives or friends informed us; so that there
are still 847 waiting for admission. Dear Reader, think of these 847
destitute Orphans, bereaved of both parents! As for myself, I have now
before me the most pleasant and heart-refreshing prospect, if the Lord
permit, of being able to receive 400 of them about June or July 1857,
and also of being permitted to build the third house for 300 more.

2, The average expense for each of the Orphans under our care, during
the past year; amounted to 12l. 6s. 8d.

3, Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by me,
the sum of 84,441l. 6s. 3 ¼ d. has been given to me for the Orphans, as
the result of prayer to God, since the commencement of the work. The
total sum given for the other objects, since the commencement of the
work, amounts to 28,904l. 11s. 3 ¾ d.; and that which has come in by
the sale of Bibles and Tracts, and by the payments of the children in
the Day Schools, from the commencement up to May 26, 1856, amounts to
5,145l. 17s. 0d. Besides this, also a great variety and number of
articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, etc., have been given for
the use of the Orphans.

4, The Lord is pleased to continue to allow us to see fruit in connexion
with the Orphan work, and we hear still again and again of cases, in
which those, who were formerly under our care, have been led to declare
themselves openly for the Lord, besides those, in whom we saw the work
of grace manifestly begun, before they left the Orphan House.

5, The total of the current expenses for the Orphans and the various
other objects of the Institution, was 8166l. 8s. 5 ¼ d. during the past
year.

Matters connected with my own personal affairs, from May 26, 1855, to
May 26, 1856.

Dec. 31, 1855. During this year the Lord has been pleased to give me

1. By anonymous donations through the
boxes . . . . . . £202 10 9 ¼

2. Through donations from believers in
Bristol, not anonymously . . 149 13 9

3. Through donations from believers not
residing in Bristol . . . 301 15 8

4. Through presents in clothes, provisions,
etc., worth at least . . . 12 16 0

------

£726 10 2 ¼

This, dear Reader, is the writer's statement after having acted on
these principles for more than 25 years. You see, not for a week, a
month, or even a year, how the writer has been dealt with by the Lord,
after he had set out in this way; but, in all simplicity he has related
to you, how it has been with him year after year. And now, after more
than 25 years, he is still acting on these principles, and is more than
ever convinced of their truthfulness and their blessedness; and he is
delighted in being able to prove to you, to God's honour, that even
for this life he has been no loser by acting out the light which the
Lord has been pleased to give to him.

May 26, 1856. Yesterday evening it was 24 years, since I came to labour
in Bristol. In looking back upon this period, as it regards the Lord's
goodness to my family and myself, the Scriptural Knowledge Institution,
and the saints among whom I seek to serve Him, I exclaim, What has God
wrought! I marvel at His kindness, and yet I do not; for such is His
manner; and, if it please Him that I remain longer on earth, I expect,
not fewer manifestations of His love, but more and more.

Since my beloved friend and fellow labourer and I first came to Bristol,
1586 believers have been received into fellowship, which number, with
the 68 we found in communion, makes 1654. But out of that number 252
have fallen asleep, 53 have been separated from fellowship, 145 have
left us, some however merely through circumstances, and in love, and 510
have left Bristol; so that there are only 694 remaining in communion.

Farewell, Christian Reader. I reckon it one of the greatest privileges
which the Lord has been pleased to bestow upon me to be able to finish
this volume. Remember the writer in your prayers. He greatly needs them.
Numberless are his difficulties and trials, as well as his joys and
blessings! Pray that he may be helped of God to finish his course with
joy, and to continue his service without growing weary.

The End.





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