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Title: Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1661 N.S.
Author: Pepys, Samuel, 1633-1703
Language: English
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                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.   F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

   TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A.  LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS
                            1661 N.S. COMPLETE

                        JANUARY, FEBRUARY & MARCH
                                1660-61

1660-61.  At the end of the last and the beginning of this year, I do live
in one of the houses belonging to the Navy Office, as one of the principal
officers, and have done now about half a year.  After much trouble with
workmen I am now almost settled; my family being, myself, my wife, Jane,
Will. Hewer, and Wayneman,--[Will Wayneman appears by this to have been
forgiven for his theft (see ante).  He was dismissed on July 8th,
1663.]--my girle's brother.  Myself in constant good health, and in a most
handsome and thriving condition.  Blessed be Almighty God for it. I am now
taking of my sister to come and live with me.  As to things of State.--The
King settled, and loved of all.  The Duke of York matched to my Lord
Chancellor's daughter, which do not please many.  The Queen upon her
return to France with the Princess Henrietta.  The Princess of Orange
lately dead, and we into new mourning for her.  We have been lately
frighted with a great plot, and many taken up on it, and the fright not
quite over.  The Parliament, which had done all this great good to the
King, beginning to grow factious, the King did dissolve it December 29th
last, and another likely to be chosen speedily.  I take myself now to be
worth L300 clear in money, and all my goods and all manner of debts paid,
which are none at all.

1660-61.  January 1st.  Called up this morning by Mr. Moore, who brought
me my last things for me to sign for the last month, and to my great
comfort tells me that my fees will come to L80 clear to myself, and about
L25 for him, which he hath got out of the pardons, though there be no fee
due to me at all out of them.  Then comes in my brother Thomas, and after
him my father, Dr. Thomas Pepys, my uncle Fenner and his two sons
(Anthony's' only child dying this morning, yet he was so civil to come,
and was pretty merry) to breakfast; and I had for them a barrel of
oysters, a dish of neat's tongues, and a dish of anchovies, wine of all
sorts, and Northdown ale.  We were very merry till about eleven o'clock,
and then they went away.  At noon I carried my wife by coach to my cozen,
Thomas Pepys, where we, with my father, Dr. Thomas, cozen Stradwick,
Scott, and their wives, dined.  Here I saw first his second wife, which is
a very respectfull woman, but his dinner a sorry, poor dinner for a man of
his estate, there being nothing but ordinary meat in it.  To-day the King
dined at a lord's, two doors from us.  After dinner I took my wife to
Whitehall, I sent her to Mrs. Pierces (where we should have dined today),
and I to the Privy Seal, where Mr. Moore took out all his money, and he
and I went to Mr. Pierces; in our way seeing the Duke of York bring his
Lady this day to wait upon the Queen, the first time that ever she did
since that great business; and the Queen is said to receive her now with
much respect and love; and there he cast up the fees, and I told the
money, by the same token one L100 bag, after I had told it, fell all about
the room, and I fear I have lost some of it.  That done I left my friends
and went to my Lord's, but he being not come in I lodged the money with
Mr. Shepley, and bade good night to Mr. Moore, and so returned to Mr.
Pierces, and there supped with them, and Mr. Pierce, the purser, and his
wife and mine, where we had a calf's head carboned,

     [Meat cut crosswise and broiled was said to be carboned.  Falstaff
     says in "King Henry IV.," Part L, act v., sc. 3, "Well, if Percy be
     alive, I'll pierce him.  If he do come in my way, so; if he do not,
     if I come in his willingly, let him make a carbonado of me."]

but it was raw, we could not eat it, and a good hen.  But she is such a
slut that I do not love her victualls.  After supper I sent them home by
coach, and I went to my Lord's and there played till 12 at night at cards
at Best with J. Goods and N. Osgood, and then to bed with Mr. Shepley.

2d.  Up early, and being called up to my Lord he did give me many commands
in his business.  As about taking care to write to my uncle that Mr.
Barnewell's papers should be locked up, in case he should die, he being
now suspected to be very ill.  Also about consulting with Mr. W. Montagu
for the settling of the L4000 a-year that the King had promised my Lord.
As also about getting of Mr. George Montagu to be chosen at Huntingdon
this next Parliament, &c.  That done he to White Hall stairs with much
company, and I with him; where we took water for Lambeth, and there coach
for Portsmouth.  The Queen's things were all in White Hall Court ready to
be sent away, and her Majesty ready to be gone an hour after to Hampton
Court to-night, and so to be at Ports mouth on Saturday next.  I by water
to my office, and there all the morning, and so home to dinner, where I
found Pall (my sister) was come; but I do not let her sit down at table
with me, which I do at first that she may not expect it hereafter from me.
After dinner I to Westminster by water, and there found my brother Spicer
at the Leg with all the rest of the Exchequer men (most of whom I now do
not know) at dinner.  Here I staid and drank with them, and then to Mr.
George Montagu about the business of election, and he did give me a piece
in gold; so to my Lord's and got the chest of plate brought to the
Exchequer, and my brother Spicer put it into his treasury.  So to Will's
with them to a pot of ale, and so parted.  I took a turn in the Hall, and
bought the King and Chancellor's speeches at the dissolving the Parliament
last Saturday.  So to my Lord's, and took my money I brought 'thither last
night and the silver candlesticks, and by coach left the latter at
Alderman Backwell's, I having no use for them, and the former home.  There
stood a man at our door, when I carried it in, and saw me, which made me a
little afeard.  Up to my chamber and wrote letters to Huntingdon and did
other business.  This day I lent Sir W. Batten and Captn. Rider my chine
of beef for to serve at dinner tomorrow at Trinity House, the Duke of
Albemarle being to be there and all the rest of the Brethren, it being a
great day for the reading over of their new Charter, which the King hath
newly given them.

3d.  Early in the morning to the Exchequer, where I told over what money I
had of my Lord's and my own there, which I found to be L970.  Thence to
Will's, where Spicer and I eat our dinner of a roasted leg of pork which
Will did give us, and after that to the Theatre, where was acted "Beggars'
Bush," it being very well done; and here the first time that ever I saw
women come upon the stage.

     [Downes does not give the cast of this play.  After the Restoration
     the acting of female characters by women became common.  The first
     English professional actress was Mrs. Coleman, who acted Ianthe in
     Davenant's "Siege of Rhodes," at Rutland House in 1656.]

From thence to my father's, where I found my mother gone by Bird, the
carrier, to Brampton, upon my uncle's great desire, my aunt being now in
despair of life.  So home.

4th.  Office all the morning, my wife and Pall being gone to my father's
to dress dinner for Mr. Honiwood, my mother being gone out of town. Dined
at home, and Mr. Moore with me, with whom I had been early this morning at
White Hall, at the Jewell Office,

     [Several of the Jewel Office rolls are in the British Museum.  They
     recite all the sums of money given to the King, and the particulars
     of all the plate distributed in his name, as well as gloves and
     sweetmeats.  The Museum possesses these rolls for the 4th, 9th,
     18th, 30th, and 31st Eliz.; for the 13th Charles I.; and the 23rd,
     24th, 26th, and 27th of Charles II.--B.]

to choose a piece of gilt plate for my Lord, in return of his offering to
the King (which it seems is usual at this time of year, and an Earl gives
twenty pieces in gold in a purse to the King).  I chose a gilt tankard,
weighing 31 ounces and a half, and he is allowed 30; so I paid 12s. for
the ounce and half over what he is to have; but strange it was for me to
see what a company of small fees I was called upon by a great many to pay
there, which, I perceive, is the manner that courtiers do get their
estates.  After dinner Mr. Moore and I to the Theatre, where was "The
Scornful Lady," acted very well, it being the first play that ever he saw.
Thence with him to drink a cup of ale at Hercules Pillars, and so parted.
I called to see my father, who told me by the way how Will and Mary Joyce
do live a strange life together, nothing but fighting, &c., so that
sometimes her father has a mind to have them divorced.  Thence home.

5th.  Home all the morning.  Several people came to me about business,
among others the great Tom Fuller, who came to desire a kindness for a
friend of his, who hath a mind to go to Jamaica with these two ships that
are going, which I promised to do.  So to Whitehall to my Lady, whom I
found at dinner and dined with her, and staid with her talking all the
afternoon, and thence walked to Westminster Hall.  So to Will's, and drank
with Spicer, and thence by coach home, staying a little in Paul's
Churchyard, to bespeak Ogilby's AEsop's Fables and Tully's Officys to be
bound for me.  So home and to bed.

6th (Lord's day).  My wife and I to church this morning, and so home to
dinner to a boiled leg of mutton all alone.  To church again, where,
before sermon, a long Psalm was set that lasted an hour, while the sexton
gathered his year's contribucion through the whole church.  After sermon
home, and there I went to my chamber and wrote a letter to send to Mr.
Coventry, with a piece of plate along with it, which I do preserve among
my other letters.  So to supper, and thence after prayers to bed.

7th.  This morning, news was brought to me to my bedside, that there had
been a great stir in the City this night by the Fanatiques, who had been
up and killed six or seven men, but all are fled.

     ["A great rising in the city of the Fifth-monarchy men, which did
     very much disturb the peace and liberty of the people, so that all
     the train-bands arose in arms, both in London and Westminster, as
     likewise all the king's guards; and most of the noblemen mounted,
     and put all their servants on coach horses, for the defence of his
     Majesty, and the peace of his kingdom."--Rugge's Diurnal.  The
     notorious Thomas Venner, the Fifth-monarchy man, a cooper and
     preacher to a conventicle in Swan Alley, Coleman Street, with a
     small following (about fifty in number) took arms on the 6th January
     for the avowed purpose of establishing the Millennium.  He was a
     violent enthusiast, and persuaded his followers that they were
     invulnerable.  After exciting much alarm in the City, and
     skirmishing with the Trained Bands, they marched to Caen Wood.  They
     were driven out by a party of guards, but again entered the City,
     where they were overpowered by the Trained Bands.  The men were
     brought to trial and condemned; four, however, were acquitted and
     two reprieved.  The execution of some of these men is mentioned by
     Pepys under date January 19th and 21st.  "A Relation of the
     Arraignment and Trial of those who made the late Rebellious
     Insurrections in London, 1661," is reprinted in "Somers Tracts,"
     vol. vii.  (1812), p. 469.]

My Lord Mayor and the whole City had been in arms, above 40,000.  To the
office, and after that to dinner, where my brother Tom came and dined with
me, and after dinner (leaving 12d. with the servants to buy a cake with at
night, this day being kept as Twelfth day) Tom and I and my wife to the
Theatre, and there saw "The Silent Woman."  The first time that ever I did
see it, and it is an excellent play.  Among other things here, Kinaston,
the boy; had the good turn to appear in three shapes: first, as a poor
woman in ordinary clothes, to please Morose; then in fine clothes, as a
gallant, and in them was clearly the prettiest woman in the whole house,
and lastly, as a man; and then likewise did appear the handsomest man in
the house.  From thence by link to my cozen Stradwick's, where my father
and we and Dr. Pepys, Scott, and his wife, and one Mr. Ward and his; and
after a good supper, we had an excellent cake, where the mark for the
Queen was cut, and so there was two queens, my wife and Mrs. Ward; and the
King being lost, they chose the Doctor to be King, so we made him send for
some wine, and then home, and in our way home we were in many places
strictly examined, more than in the worst of times, there being great
fears of these Fanatiques rising again: for the present I do not hear that
any of them are taken.  Home, it being a clear moonshine and after 12
o'clock at night.  Being come home we found that my people had been very
merry, and my wife tells me afterwards that she had heard that they had
got young Davis and some other neighbours with them to be merry, but no
harm.

8th.  My wife and I lay very long in bed to-day talking and pleasing one
another in discourse.  Being up, Mr. Warren came, and he and I agreed for
the deals that my Lord is to, have.  Then Will and I to Westminster, where
I dined with my Lady.  After dinner I took my Lord Hinchinbroke and Mr.
Sidney to the Theatre, and shewed them "The Widdow," an indifferent good
play, but wronged by the women being to seek in their parts.  That being
done, my Lord's coach waited for us, and so back to my Lady's, where she
made me drink of some Florence wine, and did give me two bottles for my
wife.  From thence walked to my cozen Stradwick's, and there chose a small
banquet and some other things against our entertainment on Thursday next.
Thence to Tom Pepys and bought a dozen of trenchers, and so home.  Some
talk to-day of a head of Fanatiques that do appear about Barnett, but I do
not believe it.  However, my Lord Mayor, Sir Richd. Browne, hath carried
himself very honourably, and hath caused one of their meeting-houses in
London to be pulled down.

9th.  Waked in the morning about six o'clock, by people running up and
down in Mr. Davis's house, talking that the Fanatiques were up in arms in
the City.  And so I rose and went forth; where in the street I found every
body in arms at the doors.  So I returned (though with no good courage at
all, but that I might not seem to be afeared), and got my sword and
pistol, which, however, I had no powder to charge; and went to the door,
where I found Sir R. Ford, and with him I walked up and down as far as the
Exchange, and there I left him.  In our way, the streets full of
Train-band, and great stories, what mischief these rogues have done; and I
think near a dozen have been killed this morning on both sides. Seeing the
city in this condition, the shops shut, and all things in trouble, I went
home and sat, it being office day, till noon.  So home, and dined at home,
my father with me, and after dinner he would needs have me go to my uncle
Wight's (where I have been so long absent that I am ashamed to go).  I
found him at home and his wife, and I can see they have taken my absence
ill, but all things are past and we good friends, and here I sat with my
aunt till it was late, my uncle going forth about business.  My aunt being
very fearful to be alone.  So home to my lute till late, and then to bed,
there being strict guards all night in the City, though most of the
enemies, they say, are killed or taken.  This morning my wife and Pall
went forth early, and I staid within.

10th.  There comes Mr. Hawley to me and brings me my money for the quarter
of a year's salary of my place under Downing that I was at sea. So I did
give him half, whereof he did in his nobleness give the odd 5s, to my
Jane.  So we both went forth (calling first to see how Sir W. Pen do, whom
I found very ill), and at the Hoop by the bridge we drank two pints of
wormwood and sack.  Talking of his wooing afresh of Mrs. Lane, and of his
going to serve the Bishop of London.  Thence by water to Whitehall, and
found my wife at Mrs. Hunt's.  Leaving her to dine there, I went and dined
with my Lady, and staid to talk a while with her.  After dinner Will.
comes to tell me that he had presented my piece of plate to Mr. Coventry,
who takes it very kindly, and sends me a very kind letter, and the plate
back again; of which my heart is very glad.  So to Mrs. Hunt, where I
found a Frenchman, a lodger of hers, at dinner, and just as I came in was
kissing my wife, which I did not like, though there could not be any hurt
in it.  Thence by coach to my Uncle Wight's with my wife, but they being
out of doors we went home, where, after I had put some papers in order and
entered some letters in my book which I have a mind to keep, I went with
my wife to see Sir W. Pen, who we found ill still, but he do make very
much of it.  Here we sat a great while, at last comes in Mr. Davis and his
lady (who takes it very ill that my wife never did go to see her), and so
we fell to talk.  Among other things Mr. Davis told us the particular
examinations of these Fanatiques that are taken: and in short it is this,
of all these Fanatiques that have done all this, viz., routed all the
Trainbands that they met with, put the King's life-guards to the run,
killed about twenty men, broke through the City gates twice; and all this
in the day-time, when all the City was in arms; are not in all about 31.
Whereas we did believe them (because they were seen up and down in every
place almost in the City, and had been about Highgate two or three days,
and in several other places) to be at least 500.  A thing that never was
heard of, that so few men should dare and do so much mischief.  Their word
was, "The King Jesus, and the heads upon the gates."  Few of them would
receive any quarter, but such as were taken by force and kept alive;
expecting Jesus to come here and reign in the world presently, and will
not believe yet but their work will be carried on though they do die.  The
King this day came to town.

11th.  Office day.  This day comes news, by letters from Portsmouth, that
the Princess Henrietta is fallen sick of the meazles on board the London,
after the Queen and she was under sail.  And so was forced to come back
again into Portsmouth harbour; and in their way, by negligence of the
pilot, run upon the Horse sand.  The Queen and she continue aboard, and do
not intend to come on shore till she sees what will become of the young
Princess.  This news do make people think something indeed, that three of
the Royal Family should fall sick of the same disease, one after another.
This morning likewise, we had order to see guards set in all the King's
yards; and so we do appoint who and who should go to them. Sir Wm. Batten
to Chatham, Colonel Slingsby and I to Deptford and Woolwich.  Portsmouth
being a garrison, needs none.  Dined at home, discontented that my wife do
not go neater now she has two maids.  After dinner comes in Kate Sterpin
(whom we had not seen a great while) and her husband to see us, with whom
I staid a while, and then to the office, and left them with my wife.  At
night walked to Paul's Churchyard, and bespoke some books against next
week, and from thence to the Coffeehouse, where I met Captain Morrice, the
upholster, who would fain have lent me a horse to-night to have rid with
him upon the Cityguards, with the Lord Mayor, there being some new
expectations of these rogues; but I refused by reason of my going out of
town tomorrow.  So home to bed.

12th.  With Colonel Slingsby and a friend of his, Major Waters (a deaf and
most amorous melancholy gentleman, who is under a despayr in love, as the
Colonel told me, which makes him bad company, though a most good-natured
man), by water to Redriffe, and so on foot to Deptford (our servants by
water), where we fell to choosing four captains to command the guards, and
choosing the places where to keep them, and other things in order
thereunto.  We dined at the Globe, having our messenger with us to take
care for us.  Never till now did I see the great authority of my place,
all the captains of the fleet coming cap in hand to us.  Having staid very
late there talking with the Colonel, I went home with Mr. Davis,
storekeeper (whose wife is ill and so I could not see her), and was there
most prince-like lodged, with so much respect and honour that I was at a
loss how to behave myself.

13th.  In the morning we all went to church, and sat in the pew belonging
to us, where a cold sermon of a young man that never had preached before.
Here Commissioner came with his wife and daughters, the eldest being his
wife's daughter is a very comely black woman.--[The old expression for a
brunette.]--So to the Globe to dinner, and then with Commissioner Pett to
his lodgings there (which he hath for the present while he is building the
King's yacht, which will be a pretty thing, and much beyond the
Dutchman's), and from thence with him and his wife and daughter-in-law by
coach to Greenwich Church, where a good sermon, a fine church, and a great
company of handsome women.  After sermon to Deptford again; where, at the
Commissioner's and the Globe, we staid long.  And so I to Mr. Davis's to
bed again.  But no sooner in bed, but we had an alarm, and so we rose: and
the Comptroller comes into the Yard to us; and seamen of all the ships
present repair to us, and there we armed with every one a handspike, with
which they were as fierce as could be.  At last we hear that it was only
five or six men that did ride through the guard in the town, without
stopping to the guard that was there; and, some say, shot at them.  But
all being quiet there, we caused the seamen to go on board again: And so
we all to bed (after I had sat awhile with Mr. Davis in his study, which
is filled with good books and some very good song books) I likewise to
bed.

14th.  The arms being come this morning from the Tower, we caused them to
be distributed.  I spent much time walking with Lieutenant Lambert,
walking up and down the yards, who did give me much light into things
there, and so went along with me and dined with us.  After dinner Mrs.
Pett, her husband being gone this morning with Sir W. Batten to Chatham,
lent us her coach, and carried us to Woolwich, where we did also dispose
of the arms there and settle the guards.  So to Mr. Pett's, the
shipwright, and there supped, where he did treat us very handsomely (and
strange it is to see what neat houses all the officers of the King's yards
have), his wife a proper woman, and has been handsome, and yet has a very
pretty hand.  Thence I with Mr. Ackworth to his house, where he has a very
pretty house, and a very proper lovely woman to his wife, who both sat
with me in my chamber, and they being gone, I went to bed, which was also
most neat and fine.

15th.  Up and down the yard all the morning and seeing the seamen
exercise, which they do already very handsomely.  Then to dinner at Mr.
Ackworth's, where there also dined with us one Captain Bethell, a friend
of the Comptroller's.  A good dinner and very handsome.  After that and
taking our leaves of the officers of the yard, we walked to the waterside
and in our way walked into the rope-yard, where I do look into the
tar-houses and other places, and took great notice of all the several
works belonging to the making of a cable.  So after a cup of burnt
wine--[Burnt wine was somewhat similar to mulled wine, and a favourite
drink]--at the tavern there, we took barge and went to Blackwall and
viewed the dock and the new Wet dock, which is newly made there, and a
brave new merchantman which is to be launched shortly, and they say to be
called the Royal Oak. Hence we walked to Dick-Shore, and thence to the
Towre and so home. Where I found my wife and Pall abroad, so I went to see
Sir W. Pen, and there found Mr. Coventry come to see him, and now had an
opportunity to thank him, and he did express much kindness to me.  I sat a
great while with Sir Wm. after he was gone, and had much talk with him.  I
perceive none of our officers care much for one another, but I do keep in
with them all as much as I can.  Sir W.  Pen is still very ill as when I
went. Home, where my wife not yet come home, so I went up to put my papers
in order, and then was much troubled my wife was not come, it being 10
o'clock just now striking as I write this last line.  This day I hear the
Princess is recovered again.  The King hath been this afternoon at
Deptford, to see the yacht that Commissioner Pett is building, which will
be very pretty; as also that that his brother at Woolwich is in making. By
and by comes in my boy and tells me that his mistress do lie this night at
Mrs. Hunt's, who is very ill, with which being something satisfied, I went
to bed.

16th.  This morning I went early to the Comptroller's and so with him by
coach to Whitehall, to wait upon Mr. Coventry to give him an account of
what we have done, which having done, I went away to wait upon my Lady;
but coming to her lodgings I find that she is gone this morning to Chatham
by coach, thinking to meet me there, which did trouble me exceedingly, and
I did not know what to do, being loth to follow her, and yet could not
imagine what she would do when she found me not there.  In this trouble, I
went to take a walk in Westminster Hall and by chance met with Mr. Child,
who went forth with my Lady to-day, but his horse being bad, he come back
again, which then did trouble me more, so that I did resolve to go to her;
and so by boat home and put on my boots, and so over to Southwarke to the
posthouse, and there took horse and guide to Dartford and thence to
Rochester (I having good horses and good way, come thither about
half-an-hour after daylight, which was before 6 o'clock and I set forth
after two), where I found my Lady and her daughter Jem., and Mrs. Browne'
and five servants, all at a great loss, not finding me here, but at my
coming she was overjoyed.  The sport was how she had intended to have kept
herself unknown, and how the Captain (whom she had sent for) of the
Charles had forsoothed

     [To forsooth is to address in a polite and ceremonious manner.
     "Your city-mannerly word forsooth, use it not too often in any
     case."--Ben Jonson's Poetaster, act iv., sc.  1.]

her, though he knew her well and she him.  In fine we supped merry and so
to bed, there coming several of the Charles's men to see me before, I got
to bed.  The page lay with me.

17th.  Up, and breakfast with my Lady.  Then come Captains Cuttance and
Blake to carry her in the barge on board; and so we went through Ham
Creeke to the Soverayne (a goodly sight all the way to see the brave ships
that lie here) first, which is a most noble ship.  I never saw her before.
My Lady Sandwich, my Lady Jemimah, Mrs. Browne, Mrs. Grace, and Mary and
the page, my lady's servants and myself, all went into the lanthorn
together.  From thence to the Charles, where my lady took great pleasure
to see all the rooms, and to hear me tell her how things are when my Lord
is there.  After we had seen all, then the officers of the ship had
prepared a handsome breakfast for her, and while she was pledging my
Lord's health they give her five guns.  That done, we went off, and then
they give us thirteen guns more.  I confess it was a great pleasure to
myself to see the ship that I begun my good fortune in.  From thence on
board the Newcastle, to show my Lady the difference between a great and a
small ship.  Among these ships I did give away L7.  So back again and went
on shore at Chatham, where I had ordered the coach to wait for us.  Here I
heard that Sir William Batten and his lady (who I knew were here, and did
endeavour to avoyd) were now gone this morning to London.  So we took
coach, and I went into the coach, and went through the town, without
making stop at our inn, but left J. Goods to pay the reckoning.  So I rode
with my lady in the coach, and the page on the horse that I should have
rid on--he desiring it.  It begun to be dark before we could come to
Dartford, and to rain hard, and the horses to fayle, which was our great
care to prevent, for fear of my Lord's displeasure, so here we sat up for
to-night, as also Captains Cuttance and Blake, who came along with us.  We
sat and talked till supper, and at supper my Lady and I entered into a
great dispute concerning what were best for a man to do with his
estate--whether to make his elder son heir, which my Lady is for, and I
against, but rather to make all equall.  This discourse took us much time,
till it was time to go to bed; but we being merry, we bade my Lady
goodnight, and intended to have gone to the Post-house to drink, and hear
a pretty girl play of the cittern (and indeed we should have lain there,
but by a mistake we did not), but it was late, and we could not hear her,
and the guard came to examine what we were; so we returned to our Inn and
to bed, the page and I in one bed, and the two captains in another, all in
one chamber, where we had very good mirth with our most abominable
lodging.

18th.  The Captains went with me to the post-house about 9 o'clock, and
after a morning draft I took horse and guide for London; and through some
rain, and a great wind in my face, I got to London at eleven o'clock.  At
home found all well, but the monkey loose, which did anger me, and so I
did strike her till she was almost dead, that they might make her fast
again, which did still trouble me more.  In the afternoon we met at the
office and sat till night, and then I to see my father who I found well,
and took him to Standing's' to drink a cup of ale.  He told me my aunt at
Brampton is yet alive and my mother well there.  In comes Will Joyce to us
drunk, and in a talking vapouring humour of his state, and I know not
what, which did vex me cruelly.  After him Mr. Hollier had learned at my
father's that I was here (where I had appointed to meet him) and so he did
give me some things to take for prevention.  Will Joyce not letting us
talk as I would I left my father and him and took Mr. Hollier to the
Greyhound, where he did advise me above all things, both as to the stone
and the decay of my memory (of which I now complain to him), to avoid
drinking often, which I am resolved, if I can, to leave off.  Hence home,
and took home with me from the bookseller's Ogilby's AEsop, which he had
bound for me, and indeed I am very much pleased with the book.  Home and
to bed.

19th.  To the Comptroller's, and with him by coach to White Hall; in our
way meeting Venner  and Pritchard upon a sledge, who with two more Fifth
Monarchy men were hanged to-day, and the two first drawn and quartered.
Where we walked up and down, and at last found Sir G. Carteret, whom I had
not seen a great while, and did discourse with him about our assisting the
Commissioners in paying off the Fleet, which we think to decline.  Here
the Treasurer did tell me that he did suspect Thos. Hater to be an
informer of them in this work, which we do take to be a diminution of us,
which do trouble me, and I do intend to find out the truth.  Hence to my
Lady, who told me how Mr. Hetley is dead of the small-pox going to
Portsmouth with my Lord.  My Lady went forth to dinner to her father's,
and so I went to the Leg in King Street and had a rabbit for myself and my
Will, and after dinner I sent him home and myself went to the Theatre,
where I saw "The Lost Lady," which do not please me much. Here I was
troubled to be seen by four of our office clerks, which sat in the
half-crown box and I in the 1s. 6d.  From thence by link, and bought two
mouse traps of Thomas Pepys, the Turner, and so went and drank a cup of
ale with him, and so home and wrote by post to Portsmouth to my Lord and
so to bed.

20th (Lord's day).  To Church in the morning.  Dined at home.  My wife and
I to Church in the afternoon, and that being done we went to see my uncle
and aunt Wight.  There I left my wife and came back, and sat with Sir W.
Pen, who is not yet well again.  Thence back again to my wife and supped
there, and were very merry and so home, and after prayers to write down my
journall for the last five days, and so to bed.

21st.  This morning Sir W. Batten, the Comptroller and I to Westminster,
to the Commissioners for paying off the Army and Navy, where the Duke of
Albemarle was; and we sat with our hats on, and did discourse about paying
off the ships and do find that they do intend to undertake it without our
help; and we are glad of it, for it is a work that will much displease the
poor seamen, and so we are glad to have no hand in it. From thence to the
Exchequer, and took L200 and carried it home, and so to the office till
night, and then to see Sir W. Pen, whither came my Lady Batten and her
daughter, and then I sent for my wife, and so we sat talking till it was
late.  So home to supper and then to bed, having eat no dinner to-day.  It
is strange what weather we have had all this winter; no cold at all; but
the ways are dusty, and the flyes fly up and down, and the rose-bushes are
full of leaves, such a time of the year as was never known in this world
before here.  This day many more of the Fifth Monarchy men were hanged.

22nd.  To the Comptroller's house, where I read over his proposals to the
Lord Admiral for the regulating of the officers of the Navy, in which he
hath taken much pains, only he do seem to have too good opinion of them
himself.  From thence in his coach to Mercer's Chappell, and so up to the
great hall, where we met with the King's Councell for Trade, upon some
proposals of theirs for settling convoys for the whole English trade, and
that by having 33 ships (four fourth-rates, nineteen fifths, ten sixths)
settled by the King for that purpose, which indeed was argued very finely
by many persons of honour and merchants that were there.  It pleased me
much now to come in this condition to this place, where I was once a
petitioner for my exhibition in Paul's School; and also where Sir G.
Downing (my late master) was chairman, and so but equally concerned with
me.  From thence home, and after a little dinner my wife and I by coach
into London, and bought some glasses, and then to Whitehall to see Mrs.
Fox, but she not within, my wife to my mother Bowyer, and I met with Dr.
Thomas Fuller, and took him to the Dog, where he tells me of his last and
great book that is coming out: that is, his History of all the Families in
England;' and could tell me more of my own, than I knew myself.  And also
to what perfection he hath now brought the art of memory; that he did
lately to four eminently great scholars dictate together in Latin, upon
different subjects of their proposing, faster than they were able to
write, till they were tired; and by the way in discourse tells me that the
best way of beginning a sentence, if a man should be out and forget his
last sentence (which he never was), that then his last refuge is to begin
with an Utcunque.  From thence I to Mr. Bowyer's, and there sat a while,
and so to Mr. Fox's, and sat with them a very little while, and then by
coach home, and so to see Sir Win. Pen, where we found Mrs. Martha Batten
and two handsome ladies more, and so we staid supper and were very merry,
and so home to bed.

23rd.  To the office all the morning.  My wife and people at home busy to
get things ready for tomorrow's dinner.  At noon, without dinner, went
into the City, and there meeting with Greatorex, we went and drank a pot
of ale.  He told me that he was upon a design to go to Teneriffe to try
experiments there.  With him to Gresham Colledge

     [Gresham College occupied the house of Sir Thomas Gresham, in
     Bishopsgate Street, from 1596, when Lady Gresham, Sir Thomas's
     widow, died.  The meeting which Pepys attended was an early one of
     the Royal Society, which was incorporated by royal charter in 1663.]

(where I never was before), and saw the manner of the house, and found
great company of persons of honour there; thence to my bookseller's, and
for books, and to Stevens, the silversmith, to make clean some plate
against to-morrow, and so home, by the way paying many little debts for
wine and pictures, &c., which is my great pleasure.  Home and found all
things in a hurry of business, Slater, our messenger, being here as my
cook till very late.  I in my chamber all the evening looking over my
Osborn's works and new Emanuel Thesaurus Patriarchae.  So late to bed,
having ate nothing to-day but a piece of bread and cheese at the ale-house
with Greatorex, and some bread and butter at home.

24th.  At home all day.  There dined with me Sir William Batten and his
lady and daughter, Sir W. Pen, Mr. Fox (his lady being ill could not
come), and Captain Cuttance; the first dinner I have made since I came
hither.  This cost me above L5, and merry we were--only my chimney smokes.
In the afternoon Mr. Hater bringing me my last quarter's salary, which I
received of him, and so I have now Mr. Barlow's money in my hands.  The
company all go away, and by and by Sir Wms. both and my Lady Batten and
his daughter come again and supped with me and talked till late, and so to
bed, being glad that the trouble is over.

25th.  At the office all the morning.  Dined at home and Mr. Hater with
me, and so I did make even with him for the last quarter.  After dinner he
and I to look upon the instructions of my Lord Northumberland's, but we
were interrupted by Mr. Salisbury's coming in, who came to see me and to
show me my Lord's picture in little, of his doing.  And truly it is
strange to what a perfection he is come in a year's time.  From thence to
Paul's Churchyard about books, and so back again home.  This night comes
two cages, which I bought this evening for my canary birds, which Captain
Rooth this day sent me.  So to bed.

26th.  Within all the morning.  About noon comes one that had formerly
known me and I him, but I know not his name, to borrow L5 of me, but I had
the wit to deny him.  There dined with me this day both the Pierces' and
their wives, and Captain Cuttance, and Lieutenant Lambert, with whom we
made ourselves very merry by taking away his ribbans and garters, having
made him to confess that he is lately married.  The company being gone I
went to my lute till night, and so to bed.

27th (Lord's day).  Before I rose, letters come to me from Portsmouth,
telling me that the Princess is now well, and my Lord Sandwich set sail
with the Queen and her yesterday from thence for France.  To church,
leaving my wife sick . . . .  at home, a poor dull sermon of a stranger.
Home, and at dinner was very angry at my people's eating a fine pudding
(made me by Slater, the cook, last Thursday) without my wife's leave. To
church again, a good sermon of Mr. Mills, and after sermon Sir W. Pen and
I an hour in the garden talking, and he did answer me to many things, I
asked Mr. Coventry's opinion of me, and Sir W. Batten's of my Lord
Sandwich, which do both please me.  Then to Sir W. Batten's, where very
merry, and here I met the Comptroller and his lady and daughter (the first
time I ever saw them) and Mrs. Turner, who and her husband supped with us
here (I having fetched my wife thither), and after supper we fell to
oysters, and then Mr. Turner went and fetched some strong waters, and so
being very merry we parted, and home to bed.  This day the parson read a
proclamation at church, for the keeping of Wednesday next, the 30th of
January, a fast for the murther of the late King.

28th.  At the office all the morning; dined at home, and after dinner to
Fleet Street, with my sword to Mr. Brigden (lately made Captain of the
Auxiliaries) to be refreshed, and with him to an ale-house, where I met
Mr. Davenport; and after some talk of Cromwell, Ireton and Bradshaw's
bodies being taken out of their graves to-day,

     ["The bodies of Oliver Cromwell, Henry Ireton, John Bradshaw, and
     Thomas Pride, were dug up out of their graves to be hanged at
     Tyburn, and buried under the gallows.  Cromwell's vault having been
     opened, the people crowded very much to see him."--Rugge's Diurnal.]

I went to Mr. Crew's and thence to the Theatre, where I saw again "The
Lost Lady," which do now please me better than before; and here I sitting
behind in a dark place, a lady spit backward upon me by a mistake, not
seeing me, but after seeing her to be a very pretty lady, I was not
troubled at it at all.  Thence to Mr. Crew's, and there met Mr. Moore, who
came lately to me, and went with me to my father's, and with him to
Standing's, whither came to us Dr. Fairbrother, who I took and my father
to the Bear and gave a pint of sack and a pint of claret.

He do still continue his expressions of respect and love to me, and tells
me my brother John will make a good scholar.  Thence to see the Doctor at
his lodging at Mr. Holden's, where I bought a hat, cost me 35s.  So home
by moonshine, and by the way was overtaken by the Comptroller's coach, and
so home to his house with him.  So home and to bed.  This noon I had my
press set up in my chamber for papers to be put in.

29th.  Mr. Moore making up accounts with me all this morning till Lieut.
Lambert came, and so with them over the water to Southwark, and so over
the fields to Lambeth, and there drank, it being a most glorious and warm
day, even to amazement, for this time of the year.  Thence to my Lord's,
where we found my Lady gone with some company to see Hampton Court, so we
three went to Blackfryers (the first time I ever was there since plays
begun), and there after great patience and little expectation, from so
poor beginning, I saw three acts of "The Mayd in ye Mill" acted to my
great content.  But it being late, I left the play and them, and by water
through bridge home, and so to Mr. Turner's house, where the Comptroller,
Sir William Batten, and Mr. Davis and their ladies; and here we had a most
neat little but costly and genteel supper, and after that a great deal of
impertinent mirth by Mr. Davis, and some catches, and so broke up, and
going away, Mr. Davis's eldest son took up my old Lady Slingsby in his
arms, and carried her to the coach, and is said to be able to carry three
of the biggest men that were in the company, which I wonder at.  So home
and to bed.

30th (Fast day).  The first time that this day hath been yet observed: and
Mr. Mills made a most excellent sermon, upon "Lord forgive us our former
iniquities;" speaking excellently of the justice of God in punishing men
for the sins of their ancestors.  Home, and John Goods comes, and after
dinner I did pay him L30 for my Lady, and after that Sir W. Pen and I into
Moorfields and had a brave talk, it being a most pleasant day, and besides
much discourse did please ourselves to see young Davis and Whitton, two of
our clerks, going by us in the field, who we observe to take much pleasure
together, and I did most often see them at play together.  Back to the Old
James in Bishopsgate Street, where Sir W. Batten and Sir Wm. Rider met him
about business of the Trinity House. So I went home, and there understand
that my mother is come home well from Brampton, and had a letter from my
brother John, a very ingenious one, and he therein begs to have leave to
come to town at the Coronacion. Then to my Lady Batten's; where my wife
and she are lately come back again from being abroad, and seeing of
Cromwell, Ireton, and Bradshaw hanged and buried at Tyburn.  Then I home.

     ["Jan. 30th was kept as a very solemn day of fasting and prayer.
     This morning the carcases of Cromwell, Ireton, and Bradshaw (which
     the day before had been brought from the Red Lion Inn, Holborn),
     were drawn upon a sledge to Tyburn, and then taken out of their
     coffins, and in their shrouds hanged by the neck, until the going
     down of the sun.  They were then cut down, their heads taken off,
     and their bodies buried in a grave made under the gallows.  The
     coffin in which was the body of Cromwell was a very rich thing, very
     full of gilded hinges and nails."--Rugge's Diurnal.]

31st.  This morning with Mr. Coventry at Whitehall about getting a ship to
carry my Lord's deals to Lynne, and we have chosen the Gift.  Thence at
noon to my Lord's, where my Lady not well, so I eat a mouthfull of dinner
there, and thence to the Theatre, and there sat in the pit among the
company of fine ladys, &c.; and the house was exceeding full, to see
Argalus and Parthenia, the first time that it hath been acted: and indeed
it is good, though wronged by my over great expectations, as all things
else are.  Thence to my father's to see my mother, who is pretty well
after her journey from Brampton.  She tells me my aunt is pretty well, yet
cannot live long.  My uncle pretty well too, and she believes would marry
again were my aunt dead, which God forbid.  So home.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                               FEBRUARY
                               1660-61

February 1st (Friday).  A full office all this morning, and busy about
answering the Commissioners of Parliament to their letter, wherein they
desire to borrow two clerks of ours, which we will not grant them.  After
dinner into London and bought some books, and a belt, and had my sword new
furbished.  To the alehouse with Mr. Brigden and W. Symons.  At night
home.  So after a little music to bed, leaving my people up getting things
ready against to-morrow's dinner.

2nd.  Early to Mr. Moore, and with him to Sir Peter Ball, who proffers my
uncle Robert much civility in letting him continue in the grounds which he
had hired of Hetley who is now dead.  Thence home, where all things in a
hurry for dinner, a strange cook being come in the room of Slater, who
could not come.  There dined here my uncle Wight and my aunt, my father
and mother, and my brother Tom, Dr. Fairbrother and Mr. Mills, the parson,
and his wife, who is a neighbour's daughter of my uncle Robert's, and
knows my Aunt Wight and all her and my friends there; and so we had
excellent company to-day.  After dinner I was sent for to Sir G.
Carteret's, where he was, and I found the Comptroller, who are upon
writing a letter to the Commissioners of Parliament in some things a
rougher stile than our last, because they seem to speak high to us.  So
the Comptroller and I thence to a tavern hard by, and there did agree upon
drawing up some letters to be sent to all the pursers and Clerks of the
Cheques to make up their accounts.  Then home; where I found the parson
and his wife gone.  And by and by the rest of the company, very well
pleased, and I too; it being the last dinner I intend to make a great
while, it having now cost me almost L15 in three dinners within this
fortnight.  In the evening comes Sir W. Pen, pretty merry, to sit with me
and talk, which we did for an hour or two, and so good night, and I to
bed.

3d (Lord's day).  This day I first begun to go forth in my coat and sword,
as the manner now among gentlemen is.  To Whitehall.  In my way heard Mr.
Thomas Fuller preach at the Savoy upon our forgiving of other men's
trespasses, shewing among other things that we are to go to law never to
revenge, but only to repayre, which I think a good distinction. So to
White Hall; where I staid to hear the trumpets and kettle-drums, and then
the other drums, which are much cried up, though I think it dull, vulgar
musique.  So to Mr. Fox's, unbid; where I had a good dinner and special
company.  Among other discourse, I observed one story, how my Lord of
Northwich, at a public audience before the King of France, made the Duke
of Anjou cry, by making ugly faces as he was stepping to the King, but
undiscovered.

     [This story relates to circumstances which had occurred many years
     previously.  George, Lord Goring, was sent by Charles I. as
     Ambassador Extraordinary to France in 1644, to witness the oath of
     Louis XIV. to the observance of the treaties concluded with England
     by his father, Louis XIII., and his grandfather, Henry IV.  Louis
     XIV. took this oath at Ruel, on July 3rd, 1644, when he was not yet
     six years of age, and when his brother Philippe, then called Duke of
     Anjou, was not four years old.  Shortly after his return home, Lord
     Goring was created, in September, 1644, Earl of Norwich, the title
     by which he is here mentioned.  Philippe, Duke of Anjou, who was
     frightened by the English nobleman's ugly faces, took the title of
     Duke of Orleans after the death of his uncle, Jean Baptiste Gaston,
     in 1660.  He married his cousin, Henrietta of England.--B.]

And how Sir Phillip Warwick's' lady did wonder to have Mr. Darcy' send for
several dozen bottles of Rhenish wine to her house, not knowing that the
wine was his.  Thence to my Lord's; where I am told how Sir Thomas Crew's
Pedro, with two of his countrymen more, did last night kill one soldier of
four that quarrelled with them in the street, about 10 o'clock.  The other
two are taken; but he is now hid at my Lord's till night, that he do
intend to make his escape away.  So up to my Lady, and sat and talked with
her long, and so to Westminster Stairs, and there took boat to the bridge,
and so home, where I met with letters to call us all up to-morrow morning
to Whitehall about office business.

4th.  Early up to Court with Sir W. Pen, where, at Mr. Coventry's chamber,
we met with all our fellow officers, and there after a hot debate about
the business of paying off the Fleet, and how far we should join with the
Commissioners of Parliament, which is now the great business of this month
more to determine, and about which there is a great deal of difference
between us, and then how far we should be assistants to them therein.
That being done, he and I back again home, where I met with my father and
mother going to my cozen Snow's to Blackwall, and had promised to bring me
and my wife along with them, which we could not do because we are to go to
the Dolphin to-day to a dinner of Capt. Tayler's.  So at last I let my
wife go with them, and I to the tavern, where Sir William Pen and the
Comptroller and several others were, men and women; and we had a very
great and merry dinner; and after dinner the Comptroller begun some
sports, among others the naming of people round and afterwards demanding
questions of them that they are forced to answer their names to, which do
make very good sport.  And here I took pleasure to take the forfeits of
the ladies who would not do their duty by kissing of them; among others a
pretty lady, who I found afterwards to be wife to Sir W. Batten's son.
Home, and then with my wife to see Sir W. Batten, who could not be with us
this day being ill, but we found him at cards, and here we sat late,
talking with my Lady and others and Dr. Whistler,

     [Daniel Whistler, M.D., Fellow of Merton College, whose inaugural
     dissertation on Rickets in 1645 contains the earliest printed
     account of that disease.  He was Gresham Professor of Geometry,
     1648-57, and held several offices at the College of Physicians,
     being elected President in 1683.  He was one of the original Fellows
     of the Royal Society.  Dr. Munk, in his "Roll of the Royal College
     of Physicians," speaks very unfavourably of Whistler, and says that
     he defrauded the college.  He died May 11th, 1684.]

who I found good company and a very ingenious man.  So home and to bed.

5th.  Washing-day.  My wife and I by water to Westminster.  She to her
mother's and I to Westminster Hall, where I found a full term, and here I
went to Will's, and there found Shaw and Ashwell and another Bragrave (who
knew my mother wash-maid to my Lady Veere), who by cursing and swearing
made me weary of his company and so I went away.  Into the Hall and there
saw my Lord Treasurer (who was sworn to-day at the Exchequer, with a great
company of Lords and persons of honour to attend him) go up to the
Treasury Offices, and take possession thereof; and also saw the heads of
Cromwell, Bradshaw, and Ireton, set up upon the further end of the Hall.
Then at Mrs. Michell's in the Hall met my wife and Shaw, and she and I and
Captain Murford to the Dog, and there I gave them some wine, and after
some mirth and talk (Mr. Langley coming in afterwards) I went by coach to
the play-house at the Theatre, our coach in King Street breaking, and so
took another.  Here we saw Argalus and Parthenia, which I lately saw, but
though pleasant for the dancing and singing, I do not find good for any
wit or design therein.  That done home by coach and to supper, being very
hungry for want of dinner, and so to bed.

6th.  Called up by my Cozen Snow, who sat by me while I was trimmed, and
then I drank with him, he desiring a courtesy for a friend, which I have
done for him.  Then to the office, and there sat long, then to dinner,
Captain Murford with me.  I had a dish of fish and a good hare, which was
sent me the other day by Goodenough the plasterer.  So to the office
again, where Sir W. Pen and I sat all alone, answering of petitions and
nothing else, and so to Sir W. Batten's, where comes Mr. Jessop (one whom
I could not formerly have looked upon, and now he comes cap in hand to us
from the Commissioners of the Navy, though indeed he is a man of a great
estate and of good report), about some business from them to us, which we
answered by letter.  Here I sat long with Sir W., who is not well, and
then home and to my chamber, and some little, music, and so to bed.

7th.  With Sir W.  Batten and Pen to Whitehall to Mr. Coventry's chamber,
to debate upon the business we were upon the other day morning, and thence
to Westminster Hall.  And after a walk to my Lord's; where, while I and my
Lady were in her chamber in talk, in comes my Lord from sea, to our great
wonder.  He had dined at Havre de Grace on Monday last, and came to the
Downs the next day, and lay at Canterbury that night; and so to Dartford,
and thence this morning to White Hall.  All my friends his servants well.
Among others, Mr. Creed and Captain Ferrers tell me the stories of my Lord
Duke of Buckingham's and my Lord's falling out at Havre de Grace, at
cards; they two and my Lord St. Alban's playing.  The Duke did, to my
Lord's dishonour, often say that he did in his conscience know the
contrary to what he then said, about the difference at cards; and so did
take up the money that he should have lost to my Lord.  Which my Lord
resenting, said nothing then, but that he doubted not but there were ways
enough to get his money of him.  So they parted that night; and my Lord
sent for Sir R. Stayner and sent him the next morning to the Duke, to know
whether he did remember what he said last night, and whether he would own
it with his sword and a second; which he said he would, and so both sides
agreed.  But my Lord St. Alban's, and the Queen and Ambassador Montagu,
did waylay them at their lodgings till the difference was made up, to my
Lord's honour; who hath got great reputation thereby.  I dined with my
Lord, and then with Mr. Shepley and Creed (who talked very high of France
for a fine country) to the tavern, and then I home.  To the office, where
the two Sir Williams had staid for me, and then we drew up a letter to the
Commissioners of Parliament again, and so to Sir W. Batten, where I staid
late in talk, and so home, and after writing the letter fair then I went
to bed.

8th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon to the Exchange to meet Mr.
Warren the timber merchant, but could not meet with him.  Here I met with
many sea commanders, and among others Captain Cuttle, and Curtis, and
Mootham, and I, went to the Fleece Tavern to drink; and there we spent
till four o'clock, telling stories of Algiers, and the manner of the life
of slaves there!  And truly Captn. Mootham and Mr. Dawes (who have been
both slaves there) did make me fully acquainted with their condition
there: as, how they eat nothing but bread and water.  At their redemption
they pay so much for the water they drink at the public fountaynes, during
their being slaves.  How they are beat upon the soles of their feet and
bellies at the liberty of their padron.  How they are all, at night,
called into their master's Bagnard; and there they lie.  How the poorest
men do use their slaves best.  How some rogues do live well, if they do
invent to bring their masters in so much a week by their industry or
theft; and then they are put to no other work at all.  And theft there is
counted no great crime at all.  Thence to Mr. Rawlinson's, having met my
old friend Dick Scobell, and there I drank a great deal with him, and so
home and to bed betimes, my head aching.

9th.  To my Lord's with Mr. Creed (who was come to me this morning to get
a bill of imprest signed), and my Lord being gone out he and I to the
Rhenish wine-house with Mr. Blackburne.  To whom I did make known my fears
of Will's  losing of his time, which he will take care to give him good
advice about.  Afterwards to my Lord's and Mr. Shepley and I did make even
his accounts and mine.  And then with Mr. Creed and two friends of his (my
late landlord Jones' son one of them), to an ordinary to dinner, and then
Creed and I to Whitefriars' to the Play-house, and saw "The Mad Lover,"
the first time I ever saw it acted, which I like pretty well, and home.

10th (Lord's day).  Took physique all day, and, God forgive me, did spend
it in reading of some little French romances.  At night my wife and I did
please ourselves talking of our going into France, which I hope to effect
this summer.  At noon one came to ask for Mrs. Hunt that was here
yesterday, and it seems is not come home yet, which makes us afraid of
her.  At night to bed.

11th.  At the office all the morning.  Dined at home, and then to the
Exchequer, and took Mr. Warren with me to Mr. Kennard, the master joiner,
at Whitehall, who was at a tavern, and there he and I to him, and agreed
about getting some of my Lord's deals on board to-morrow.  Then with young
Mr. Reeve home to his house, who did there show me many pretty pleasures
in perspectives,

     ['Telescope' and 'microscope' are both as old as Milton, but for long
     while 'perspective' (glass being sometimes understood and sometimes
     expressed) did the work of these.  It is sometimes written
     'prospective.' Our present use of 'perspective' does not, I suppose,
     date farther back than Dryden.--Trench's Select Glossary.--M. B.]

that I have not seen before, and I did buy a little glass of him cost me
5s.  And so to Mr. Crew's, and with Mr. Moore to see how my father and
mother did, and so with him to Mr. Adam Chard's' (the first time I ever
was at his house since he was married) to drink, then we parted, and I
home to my study, and set some papers and money in order, and so to bed.

12th.  To my Lord's, and there with him all the morning, and then (he
going out to dinner) I and Mr. Pickering, Creed, and Captain Ferrers to
the Leg in the Palace to dinner, where strange Pickering's impertinences.
Thence the two others and I after a great dispute whither to go, we went
by water to Salsbury Court play-house, where not liking to sit, we went
out again, and by coach to the Theatre, and there saw "The Scornfull
Lady," now done by a woman, which makes the play appear much better than
ever it did to me.  Then Creed and I (the other being lost in the crowd)
to drink a cup of ale at Temple Bar, and there we parted, and I (seeing my
father and mother by the way) went home.

13th.  At the office all the morning; dined at home, and poor Mr. Wood
with me, who after dinner would have borrowed money of me, but I would
lend none.  Then to Whitehall by coach with Sir W. Pen, where we did very
little business, and so back to Mr. Rawlinson's, where I took him and gave
him a cup of wine, he having formerly known Mr. Rawlinson, and here I met
my uncle Wight, and he drank with us, and with him to Sir W. Batten's,
whither I sent for my wife, and we chose Valentines' against to-morrow.

     [The observation of St. Valentine's day is very ancient in this
     country.  Shakespeare makes Ophelia sing

                   "To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day,
                    All in the morning betime,
                    And I a maid at your window
                    To be your Valentine."

                         Hamlet, act iv.  sc. 5.--M. B.]

My wife chose me, which did much please me; my Lady Batten Sir W. Pen, &c.
Here we sat late, and so home to bed, having got my Lady Batten to give me
a spoonful of honey for my cold.

14th (Valentine's day).  Up early and to Sir W. Batten's, but would not go
in till I asked whether they that opened the door was a man or a woman,
and Mingo, who was there, answered a woman, which, with his tone, made me
laugh; so up I went and took Mrs. Martha for my Valentine (which I do only
for complacency), and Sir W. Batten he go in the same manner to my wife,
and so we were very merry.  About 10 o'clock we, with a great deal of
company, went down by our barge to Deptford, and there only went to see
how forward Mr. Pett's yacht is; and so all into the barge again, and so
to Woolwich, on board the Rose-bush, Captain Brown's' ship, that is
brother-in-law to Sir W. Batten, where we had a very fine dinner, dressed
on shore, and great mirth and all things successfull; the first time I
ever carried my wife a-ship-board, as also my boy Wayneman, who hath all
this day been called young Pepys, as Sir W. Pen's boy young Pen. So home
by barge again; good weather, but pretty cold.  I to my study, and began
to make up my accounts for my Lord, which I intend to end tomorrow.  To
bed.  The talk of the town now is, who the King is like to have for his
Queen: and whether Lent shall be kept with the strictness of the King's
proclamation;

     ["A Proclamation for restraint of killing, dressing, and eating of
     Flesh in Lent or on fish-dayes appointed by the law to be observed,"
     was dated 29th January, 1660-61].

which it is thought cannot be, because of the poor, who cannot buy fish.
And also the great preparation for the King's crowning is now much thought
upon and talked of.

15th.  At the office all the morning, and in the afternoon at making up my
accounts for my Lord to-morrow; and that being done I found myself to be
clear (as I think) L350 in the world, besides my goods in my house and all
things paid for.

16th.  To my Lord in the morning, who looked over my accounts and agreed
to them.  I did also get him to sign a bill (which do make my heart merry)
for L60 to me, in consideration of my work extraordinary at sea this last
voyage, which I hope to get paid.  I dined with my Lord and then to the
Theatre, where I saw "The Virgin Martyr," a good but too sober a play for
the company.  Then home.

17th (Lord's day).  A most tedious, unreasonable, and impertinent sermon,
by an Irish Doctor.  His text was "Scatter them, O Lord, that delight in
war."  Sir Wm. Batten and I very much angry with the parson.  And so I to
Westminster as soon as I came home to my Lord's, where I dined with Mr.
Shepley and Howe.  After dinner (without speaking to my Lord), Mr. Shepley
and I into the city, and so I home and took my wife to my uncle Wight's,
and there did sup with them, and so home again and to bed.

18th.  At the office all the morning, dined at home with a very good
dinner, only my wife and I, which is not yet very usual.  In the afternoon
my wife and I and Mrs. Martha Batten, my Valentine, to the Exchange, and
there upon a payre of embroydered and six payre of plain white gloves I
laid out 40s. upon her.  Then we went to a mercer's at the end of Lombard
Street, and there she bought a suit of Lutestring--[More properly called
"lustring"; a fine glossy silk.]--for herself, and so home.  And at night
I got the whole company and Sir Wm. Pen home to my house, and there I did
give them Rhenish wine and sugar, and continued together till it was late,
and so to bed.  It is much talked that the King is already married to the
niece of the Prince de Ligne,

     [The Prince de Ligne had no niece, and probably Pepys has made some
     mistake in the name.  Charles at one time made an offer of marriage
     to Mazarin's niece, Hortense Mancini.]

and that he hath two sons already by her: which I am sorry to hear; but
yet am gladder that it should be so, than that the Duke of York and his
family should come to the crown, he being a professed friend to the
Catholiques.

19th.  By coach to Whitehall with Colonel Slingsby (carrying Mrs. Turner
with us) and there he and I up into the house, where we met with Sir G.
Carteret: who afterwards, with the Duke of York, my Lord Sandwich, and
others, went into a private room to consult: and we were a little troubled
that we were not called in with the rest.  But I do believe it was upon
something very private.  We staid walking in the gallery; where we met
with Mr. Slingsby, that was formerly a, great friend of Mons. Blondeau,
who showed me the stamps of the King's new coyne; which is strange to see,
how good they are in the stamp and bad in the money, for lack of skill to
make them.  But he says Blondeau will shortly come over, and then we shall
have it better, and the best in the world.

     [Peter Blondeau, medallist, was invited to London from Paris in
     1649, and appointed by the Council of State to coin their money; but
     the moneyers succeeded in driving him out of the country.  Soon
     after the Restoration he returned, and was appointed engineer to the
     mint.]

The Comptroller and I to the Commissioners of Parliament, and after some
talk away again and to drink a cup of ale.  He tells me, he is sure that
the King is not yet married, as it is said; nor that it is known who he
will have.  To my Lord's and found him dined, and so I lost my dinner, but
I staid and played with him and Mr. Child, &c., some things of four parts,
and so it raining hard and bitter cold (the first winter day we have yet
had this winter), I took coach home and spent the evening in reading of a
Latin play, the "Naufragium Joculare."  And so to bed.

20th.  All the morning at the office, dined at home and my brother Tom
with me, who brought me a pair of fine slippers which he gave me.  By and
by comes little Luellin and friend to see me, and then my coz Stradwick,
who was never here before.  With them I drank a bottle of wine or two, and
to the office again, and there staid about business late, and then all of
us to Sir W.  Pen's, where we had, and my Lady Batten, Mrs. Martha, and my
wife, and other company, a good supper, and sat playing at cards and
talking till 12 at night, and so all to our lodgings.

21st.  To Westminster by coach with Sir W. Pen, and in our way saw the
city begin to build scaffolds against the Coronacion.  To my Lord, and
there found him out of doors.  So to the Hall and called for some caps
that I have a making there, and here met with Mr. Hawley, and with him to
Will's and drank, and then by coach with Mr. Langley our old friend into
the city.  I set him down by the way, and I home and there staid all day
within, having found Mr. Moore, who staid with me till late at night
talking and reading some good books.  Then he went away, and I to bed.

22nd.  All the morning at the office.  At noon with my wife and Pall to my
father's to dinner, where Dr. Thos. Pepys and my coz Snow and Joyce
Norton.  After dinner came The. Turner, and so I home with her to her
mother, good woman, whom I had not seen through my great neglect this half
year, but she would not be angry with me.  Here I staid all the afternoon
talking of the King's being married, which is now the town talk, but I
believe false.  In the evening Mrs. The. and Joyce took us all into the
coach home, calling in Bishopsgate Street, thinking to have seen a new
Harpsicon--[The harpsichord is an instrument larger than a spinet, with
two or three strings to a note.]--that she had a making there, but it was
not done, and so we did not see it.  Then to my home, where I made very
much of her, and then she went home.  Then my wife to Sir W. Batten's, and
there sat a while; he having yesterday sent my wife half-a-dozen pairs of
gloves, and a pair of silk stockings and garters, for her Valentine's
gift.  Then home and to bed.

23rd.  This my birthday, 28 years.  This morning Sir W. Batten, Pen, and I
did some business, and then I by water to Whitehall, having met Mr.
Hartlibb by the way at Alderman Backwell's.  So he did give me a glass of
Rhenish wine at the Steeleyard, and so to Whitehall by water.  He
continues of the same bold impertinent humour that he was always of and
will ever be.  He told me how my Lord Chancellor had lately got the Duke
of York and Duchess, and her woman, my Lord Ossory's and a Doctor, to make
oath before most of the judges of the kingdom, concerning all the
circumstances of their marriage.  And in fine, it is confessed that they
were not fully married till about a month or two before she was brought to
bed; but that they were contracted long before, and time enough for the
child to be legitimate.

     [The Duke of York's marriage took place September 3rd, 1660.  Anne
     Hyde was contracted to the Duke at Breda, November 24th, 1659.]

But I do not hear that it was put to the judges to determine whether it
was so or no.  To my Lord and there spoke to him about his opinion of the
Light, the sea-mark that Captain Murford is about, and do offer me an
eighth part to concern myself with it, and my Lord do give me some
encouragement in it, and I shall go on.  I dined herewith Mr. Shepley and
Howe.  After dinner to Whitehall Chappell with Mr. Child, and there did
hear Captain Cooke and his boy make a trial of an Anthem against tomorrow,
which was brave musique.  Then by water to Whitefriars to the Play-house,
and there saw "The Changeling," the first time it hath been acted these
twenty years, and it takes exceedingly.  Besides, I see the gallants do
begin to be tyred with the vanity and pride of the theatre actors who are
indeed grown very proud and rich.  Then by link home, and there to my book
awhile and to bed.  I met to-day with Mr. Townsend, who tells me that the
old man is yet alive in whose place in the Wardrobe he hopes to get my
father, which I do resolve to put for.  I also met with the Comptroller,
who told me how it was easy for us all, the principal officers, and proper
for us, to labour to get into the next Parliament; and would have me to
ask the Duke's letter, but I shall not endeavour it because it will spend
much money, though I am sure I could well obtain it.  This is now 28 years
that I am born.  And blessed be God, in a state of full content, and great
hopes to be a happy man in all respects, both to myself and friends.

24th (Sunday).  Mr. Mills made as excellent a sermon in the morning
against drunkenness as ever I heard in my life.  I dined at home; another
good one of his in the afternoon.  My Valentine had her fine gloves on at
church to-day that I did give her.  After sermon my wife and I unto Sir
Wm. Batten and sat awhile.  Then home, I to read, then to supper and to
bed.

25th.  Sir Wm. Pen and I to my Lord Sandwich's by coach in the morning to
see him, but he takes physic to-day and so we could not see him.  So he
went away, and I with Luellin to Mr. Mount's chamber at the Cockpit, where
he did lie of old, and there we drank, and from thence to W. Symons where
we found him abroad, but she, like a good lady, within, and there we did
eat some nettle porrige, which was made on purpose to-day for some of
their coming, and was very good.  With her we sat a good while, merry in
discourse, and so away, Luellin and I to my Lord's, and there dined.  He
told me one of the prettiest stories, how Mr. Blurton, his friend that was
with him at my house three or four days ago, did go with him the same day
from my house to the Fleet tavern by Guildhall, and there (by some
pretence) got the mistress of the house into their company, and by and by
Luellin calling him Doctor she thought that he really was so, and did
privately discover her disease to him, which was only some ordinary
infirmity belonging to women, and he proffering her physic, she desired
him to come some day and bring it, which he did.  After dinner by water to
the office, and there Sir W. Pen and I met and did business all the
afternoon, and then I got him to my house and eat a lobster together, and
so to bed.

26th (Shrove Tuesday).  I left my wife in bed, being indisposed .  .  . I
to Mrs. Turner's, who I found busy with The. and Joyce making of things
ready for fritters, so to Mr. Crew's and there delivered Cotgrave's
Dictionary' to my Lady Jemimah, and then with Mr. Moore to my coz Tom
Pepys, but he being out of town I spoke with his lady, though not of the
business I went about, which was to borrow L1000 for my Lord.  Back to
Mrs. Turner's, where several friends, all strangers to me but Mr. Armiger,
dined.  Very merry and the best fritters that ever I eat in my life.
After that looked out at window; saw the flinging at cocks.

     [The cruel custom of throwing at cocks on Shrove Tuesday is of
     considerable antiquity.  It is shown in the first print of Hogarth's
     "Four Stages of Cruelty."]

Then Mrs. The. and I, and a gentleman that dined there and his daughter, a
perfect handsome young and very tall lady that lately came out of the
country, and Mr. Thatcher the Virginall Maister to Bishopsgate Street, and
there saw the new Harpsicon made for Mrs. The.  We offered L12, they
demanded L14.  The Master not being at home, we could make no bargain, so
parted for to-night.  So all by coach to my house, where I found my
Valentine with my wife, and here they drank, and then went away.  Then I
sat and talked with my Valentine and my wife a good while, and then saw
her home, and went to Sir W. Batten to the Dolphin, where Mr. Newborne,
&c., were, and there after a quart or two of wine, we home, and I to bed
.  .  .  .

27th.  At the office all the morning, that done I walked in the garden
with little Captain Murford, where he and I had some discourse concerning
the Light-House again, and I think I shall appear in the business, he
promising me that if I can bring it about, it will be worth L100 per
annum.  Then came into the garden to me young Mr. Powell and Mr. Hooke
that I once knew at Cambridge, and I took them in and gave them a bottle
of wine, and so parted.  Then I called for a dish of fish, which we had
for dinner, this being the first day of Lent; and I do intend to try
whether I can keep it or no.  My father dined with me and did show me a
letter from my brother John, wherein he tells us that he is chosen
Schollar of the house,' which do please me much, because I do perceive now
it must chiefly come from his merit and not the power of his Tutor, Dr.
Widdrington, who is now quite out of interest there and hath put over his
pupils to Mr. Pepper, a young Fellow of the College.  With my father to
Mr. Rawlinson's, where we met my uncle Wight, and after a pint or two
away.  I walked with my father (who gave me an account of the great
falling out between my uncle Fenner and his son Will) as far as Paul's
Churchyard, and so left him, and I home.  This day the Commissioners of
Parliament begin to pay off the Fleet, beginning with the Hampshire, and
do it at Guildhall, for fear of going out of town into the power of the
seamen, who are highly incensed against them.

28th.  Early to wait on my Lord, and after a little talk with him I took
boat at Whitehall for Redriffe, but in my way overtook Captain Cuttance
and Teddiman in a boat and so ashore with them at Queenhithe, and so to a
tavern with them to a barrel of oysters, and so away.  Capt. Cuttance and
I walked from Redriffe to Deptford, where I found both Sir Williams and
Sir G. Carteret at Mr. Uthwayt's, and there we dined, and notwithstanding
my resolution, yet for want of other victualls, I did eat flesh this Lent,
but am resolved to eat as little as I can.  After dinner we went to
Captain Bodilaw's, and there made sale of many old stores by the candle,
and good sport it was to see how from a small matter bid at first they
would come to double and treble the price of things.  After that Sir W.
Pen and I and my Lady Batten and her daughter by land to Redriffe, staying
a little at halfway house, and when we came to take boat, found Sir
George, &c., to have staid with the barge a great while for us, which
troubled us.  Home and to bed.  This month ends with two great secrets
under dispute but yet known to very few: first, Who the King will marry;
and What the meaning of this fleet is which we are now sheathing to set
out for the southward.  Most think against Algier against the Turk, or to
the East Indys against the Dutch who, we hear, are setting out a great
fleet thither.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                MARCH
                               1660-61

March 1st.  All the morning at the office.  Dined at home only upon fish,
and Mr. Shepley and Tom Hater with me.  After dinner Mr. Shepley and I in
private talking about my Lord's intentions to go speedily into the
country, but to what end we know not.  We fear he is to go to sea with
this fleet now preparing.  But we wish that he could get his L4000 per
annum settled before he do go.  Then he and I walked into London, he to
the Wardrobe and I to Whitefryars, and saw "The Bondman" acted; an
excellent play and well done.  But above all that ever I saw, Betterton do
the Bond man the best.  Then to my father's and found my mother ill. After
staying a while with them, I went home and sat up late, spending my
thoughts how to get money to bear me out in my great expense at the
Coronacion, against which all provide, and scaffolds setting up in every
street.  I had many designs in my head to get some, but know not which
will take.  To bed.

2d.  Early with Mr. Moore about Sir Paul Neale's' business with my uncle
and other things all the morning.  Dined with him at Mr. Crew's, and after
dinner I went to the Theatre, where I found so few people (which is
strange, and the reason I did not know) that I went out again, and so to
Salsbury Court, where the house as full as could be; and it seems it was a
new play, "The Queen's Maske," wherein there are some good humours: among
others, a good jeer to the old story of the Siege of Troy, making it to be
a common country tale.  But above all it was strange to see so little a
boy as that was to act Cupid, which is one of the greatest parts in it.
Then home and to bed.

3rd (Lord's day): Mr. Woodcocke preached at our church a very good sermon
upon the imaginacions of the thoughts of man's heart being only evil.  So
home, where being told that my Lord had sent for me I went, and got there
to dine with my Lord, who is to go into the country tomorrow.  I did give
up the mortgage made to me by Sir R. Parkhurst for L2,000.  In the Abby
all the afternoon.  Then at Mr. Pierces the surgeon, where Shepley and I
supped.  So to my Lord's, who comes in late and tells us how news is come
to-day of Mazarin's being dead, which is very great news and of great
consequence.--[This report of the death of Cardinal Mazarin appears to
have been premature, for he did not die until the 9th of March, 1661.]--I
lay tonight with Mr. Shepley here, because of my Lord's going to-morrow.

4th.  My Lord went this morning on his journey to Hinchingbroke, Mr.
Parker with him; the chief business being to look over and determine how,
and in what manner, his great work of building shall be done.  Before his
going he did give me some jewells to keep for him, viz., that that the
King of Sweden did give him, with the King's own picture in it, most
excellently done; and a brave George, all of diamonds, and this with the
greatest expressions of love and confidence that I could imagine or hope
for, which is a very great joy to me.  To the office all the forenoon.
Then to dinner and so to Whitehall to Mr. Coventry about several
businesses, and then with Mr. Moore, who went with me to drink a cup of
ale, and after some good discourse then home and sat late talking with Sir
W. Batten.  So home and to bed.

5th.  With Mr. Pierce, purser, to Westminster Hall, and there met with
Captain Cuttance, Lieut. Lambert, and Pierce, surgeon, thinking to have
met with the Commissioners of Parliament, but they not sitting, we went to
the Swan, where I did give them a barrel of oysters; and so I to my Lady's
and there dined, and had very much talk and pleasant discourse with my
Lady, my esteem growing every day higher and higher in her and my Lord.
So to my father Bowyer's where my wife was, and to the Commissioners of
Parliament, and there did take some course about having my Lord's salary
paid tomorrow when; the Charles is paid off, but I was troubled to see how
high they carry themselves, when in good truth nobody cares for them.  So
home by coach and my wife.  I then to the office, where Sir Williams both
and I set about making an estimate of all the officers' salaries in
ordinary in the Navy till 10 o'clock at night.  So home, and I with my
head full of thoughts how to get a little present money, I eat a bit of
bread and cheese, and so to bed.

6th.  At the office all the morning.  At dinner Sir W. Batten came and
took me and my wife to his house to dinner, my Lady being in the country,
where we had a good Lenten dinner.  Then to Whitehall with Captn. Cuttle,
and there I did some business with Mr. Coventry, and after that home,
thinking to have had Sir W. Batten, &c., to have eat a wigg--[Wigg, a kind
of north country bun or tea-cake, still so called, to my knowledge, in
Staffordshire.--M. B.]--at my house at night.  But my Lady being come home
out of the country ill by reason of much rain that has fallen lately, and
the waters being very high, we could not, and so I home and to bed.

7th.  This morning Sir Williams both went to Woolwich to sell some old
provisions there.  I to Whitehall, and up and down about many businesses.
Dined at my Lord's, then to Mr. Crew to Mr. Moore, and he and I to London
to Guildhall to see the seamen paid off, but could not without trouble,
and so I took him to the Fleece tavern, where the pretty woman that
Luellin lately told me the story of dwells, but I could not see her. Then
towards home and met Spicer, D. Vines, Ruddiard, and a company more of my
old acquaintance, and went into a place to drink some ale, and there we
staid playing the fool till late, and so I home.  At home met with ill
news that my hopes of getting some money for the Charles were spoiled
through Mr. Waith's perverseness, which did so vex me that I could not
sleep at night.  But I wrote a letter to him to send to-morrow morning for
him to take my money for me, and so with good words I thought to coy with
him.  To bed.

8th.  All the morning at the office.  At noon Sir W. Batten, Col. Slingsby
and I by coach to the Tower, to Sir John Robinson's, to dinner; where
great good cheer.  High company; among others the Duchess of Albemarle,
who is ever a plain homely dowdy.  After dinner, to drink all the
afternoon.  Towards night the Duchess and ladies went away.  Then we set
to it again till it was very late.  And at last came in Sir William Wale,
almost fuddled; and because I was set between him and another, only to
keep them from talking and spoiling the company (as we did to others), he
fell out with the Lieutenant of the Tower; but with much ado we made him
under stand his error, and then all quiet.  And so he carried Sir William
Batten and I home again in his coach, and so I almost overcome with drink
went to bed.  I was much contented to ride in such state into the Tower,
and be received among such high company, while Mr. Mount, my Lady
Duchess's gentleman usher, stood waiting at table, whom I ever thought a
man so much above me in all respects; also to hear the discourse of so
many high Cavaliers of things past.  It was a great content and joy to me.

9th.  To Whitehall and there with Mr. Creed took a most pleasant walk for
two hours in the park, which is now a very fair place.  Here we had a long
and candid discourse one to another of one another's condition, and he
giving me an occasion I told him of my intention to get L60 paid me by him
for a gratuity for my labour extraordinary at sea.  Which he did not seem
unwilling to, and therefore I am very glad it is out.  To my Lord's, where
we found him lately come from Hinchingbroke, where he left my uncle very
well, but my aunt not likely to live.  I staid and dined with him. He took
me aside, and asked me what the world spoke of the King's marriage.  Which
I answering as one that knew nothing, he enquired no further of me.  But I
do perceive by it that there is something in it that is ready to come out
that the world knows not of yet.  After dinner into London to Mrs.
Turner's and my father's, made visits and then home, where I sat late
making of my journal for four days past, and so to bed.

10th (Lord's day).  Heard Mr. Mills in the morning, a good sermon.  Dined
at home on a poor Lenten dinner of coleworts and bacon.  In the afternoon
again to church, and there heard one Castle, whom I knew of my year at
Cambridge.  He made a dull sermon.  After sermon came my uncle and aunt
Wight to see us, and we sat together a great while.  Then to reading and
at night to bed.

11th.  At the office all the morning, dined at home and my father and Dr.
Thos. Pepys with him upon a poor dinner, my wife being abroad.  After
dinner I went to the theatre, and there saw "Love's Mistress"  done by
them, which I do not like in some things as well as their acting in
Salsbury Court.  At night home and found my wife come home, and among
other things she hath got her teeth new done by La Roche, and are indeed
now pretty handsome, and I was much pleased with it.  So to bed.

12th.  At the office about business all the morning, so to the Exchange,
and there met with Nick Osborne lately married, and with him to the
Fleece, where we drank a glass of wine.  So home, where I found Mrs. Hunt
in great trouble about her husband's losing of his place in the Excise.
From thence to Guildhall, and there set my hand to the book before Colonel
King for my sea pay, and blessed be God! they have cast me at midshipman's
pay, which do make my heart very glad.  So, home, and there had Sir W.
Batten and my Lady and all their company and Capt. Browne and his wife to
a collation at my house till it was late, and then to bed.

13th.  Early up in the morning to read "The Seaman's Grammar and
Dictionary" I lately have got, which do please me exceeding well.  At the
office all the morning, dined at home, and Mrs. Turner, The. Joyce, and
Mr. Armiger, and my father and mother with me, where they stand till I was
weary of their company and so away.  Then up to my chamber, and there set
papers and things in order, and so to bed.

14th.  With Sir W. Batten and Pen to Mr. Coventry's, and there had a
dispute about my claim to the place of Purveyor of Petty-provisions, and
at last to my content did conclude to have my hand to all the bills for
these provisions and Mr. Turner to purvey them, because I would not have
him to lose the place.  Then to my Lord's, and so with Mr. Creed to an
alehouse, where he told me a long story of his amours at Portsmouth to one
of Mrs. Boat's daughters, which was very pleasant.  Dined with my Lord and
Lady, and so with Mr. Creed to the Theatre, and there saw "King and no
King," well acted.  Thence with him to the Cock alehouse at Temple Bar,
where he did ask my advice about his amours, and I did give him it, which
was to enquire into the condition of his competitor, who is a son of Mr.
Gauden's, and that I promised to do for him, and he to make [what] use he
can of it to his advantage.  Home and to bed.

15th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon Sir Williams both and I at
a great fish dinner at the Dolphin, given us by two tax merchants, and
very merry we were till night, and so home.  This day my wife and Pall
went to see my Lady Kingston, her brother's lady.

16th.  Early at Sir Wm. Pen's, and there before Mr. Turner did reconcile
the business of the purveyance between us two.  Then to Whitehall to my
Lord's, and dined with him, and so to Whitefriars and saw "The Spanish
Curate," in which I had no great content.  So home, and was very much
troubled that Will. staid out late, and went to bed early, intending not
to let him come in, but by and by he comes and I did let him in, and he
did tell me that he was at Guildhall helping to pay off the seamen, and
cast the books late.  Which since I found to be true.  So to sleep, being
in bed when he came.

17th (Lord's day).  At church in the morning, a stranger preached a good
honest and painfull sermon.  My wife and I dined upon a chine of beef at
Sir W. Batten's, so to church again.  Then home, and put some papers in
order.  Then to supper at Sir W. Batten's again, where my wife by chance
fell down and hurt her knees exceedingly.  So home and to bed.

18th.  This morning early Sir W. Batten went to Rochester, where he
expects to be chosen Parliament man.  At the office all the morning, dined
at home and with my wife to Westminster, where I had business with the
Commissioner for paying the seamen about my Lord's pay, and my wife at
Mrs. Hunt's.  I called her home, and made inquiry at Greatorex's and in
other places to hear of Mr. Barlow (thinking to hear that he is dead), but
I cannot find it so, but the contrary.  Home and called at my Lady
Batten's, and supped there, and so home.  This day an ambassador from
Florence was brought into the town in state.  Good hopes given me to-day
that Mrs. Davis is going away from us, her husband going shortly to
Ireland.  Yesterday it was said was to be the day that the Princess
Henrietta was to marry the Duke d'Anjou' in France.  This day I found in
the newes-booke that Roger Pepys is chosen at Cambridge for the town, the
first place that we hear of to have made their choice yet.  To bed with my
head and mind full of business, which do a little put me out of order, and
I do find myself to become more and more thoughtful about getting of money
than ever heretofore.

19th.  We met at the office this morning about some particular business,
and then I to Whitehall, and there dined with my Lord, and after dinner
Mr. Creed and I to White-Fryars, where we saw "The Bondman" acted most
excellently, and though I have seen it often, yet I am every time more and
more pleased with Betterton's action.  From thence with him and young Mr.
Jones to Penell's in Fleet Street, and there we drank and talked a good
while, and so I home and to bed.

20th.  At the office all the morning, dined at home and Mr. Creed and Mr.
Shepley with me, and after dinner we did a good deal of business in my
study about my Lord's accounts to be made up and presented to our office.
That done to White Hall to Mr. Coventry, where I did some business with
him, and so with Sir W. Pen (who I found with Mr. Coventry teaching of him
upon the map to understand Jamaica).

     [Sir William Penn was well fitted to give this information, as it
     was he who took the island from the Spaniards in 1655.]

By water in the dark home, and so to my Lady Batten's where my wife was,
and there we sat and eat and drank till very late, and so home to bed. The
great talk of the town is the strange election that the City of London
made yesterday for Parliament-men; viz.  Fowke, Love, Jones, and .  .  .
men that are so far from being episcopall that they are thought to be
Anabaptists; and chosen with a great deal of zeal, in spite of the other
party that thought themselves very strong, calling out in the Hall, "No
Bishops!  no Lord Bishops!" It do make people to fear it may come to
worse, by being an example to the country to do the same. And indeed the
Bishops are so high, that very few do love them.

21st.  Up very early, and to work and study in my chamber, and then to
Whitehall to my Lord, and there did stay with him a good while discoursing
upon his accounts.  Here I staid with Mr. Creed all the morning, and at
noon dined with my Lord, who was very merry, and after dinner we sang and
fiddled a great while.  Then I by water (Mr. Shepley, Pinkney, and others
going part of the way) home, and then hard at work setting my papers in
order, and writing letters till night, and so to bed.  This day I saw the
Florence Ambassador go to his audience, the weather very foul, and yet he
and his company very gallant.  After I was a-bed Sir W. Pen sent to desire
me to go with him to-morrow morning to meet Sir W. Batten coming from
Rochester.

22nd.  This morning I rose early, and my Lady Batten knocked at her door
that comes into one of my chambers, and called me to know whether I and my
wife were ready to go.  So my wife got her ready, and about eight o'clock
I got a horseback, and my Lady and her two daughters, and Sir W. Pen into
coach, and so over London Bridge, and thence to Dartford.  The day very
pleasant, though the way bad.  Here we met with Sir W. Batten, and some
company along with him, who had assisted him in his election at Rochester;
and so we dined and were very merry.  At 5 o'clock we set out again in a
coach home, and were very merry all the way.  At Deptford we met with Mr.
Newborne, and some other friends and their wives in a coach to meet us,
and so they went home with us, and at Sir W. Batten's we supped, and
thence to bed, my head akeing mightily through the wine that I drank
to-day.

23d.  All the morning at home putting papers in order, dined at home, and
then out to the Red Bull (where I had not been since plays come up again),
but coming too soon I went out again and walked all up and down the
Charterhouse yard and Aldersgate street.  At last came back again and went
in, where I was led by a seaman that knew me, but is here as a servant, up
to the tireing-room, where strange the confusion and disorder that there
is among them in fitting themselves, especially here, where the clothes
are very poor, and the actors but common fellows.  At last into the Pitt,
where I think there was not above ten more than myself, and not one
hundred in the whole house.  And the play, which is called "All's lost by
Lust," poorly done; and with so much disorder, among others, that in the
musique-room the boy that was to sing a song, not singing it right, his
master fell about his ears and beat him so, that it put the whole house in
an uprore.  Thence homewards, and at the Mitre met my uncle Wight, and
with him Lieut.-Col. Baron, who told us how Crofton, the great
Presbyterian minister that had lately preached so highly against Bishops,
is clapped up this day into the Tower.  Which do please some, and
displease others exceedingly.  Home and to bed.

24th (Lord's day).  My wife and I to church, and then home with Sir W.
Batten and my Lady to dinner, where very merry, and then to church again,
where Mr. Mills made a good sermon.  Home again, and after a walk in the
garden Sir W. Batten's two daughters came and sat with us a while, and I
then up to my chamber to read.

25th (Lady day).  This morning came workmen to begin the making of me a
new pair of stairs up out of my parler, which, with other work that I have
to do, I doubt will keep me this two months and so long I shall be all in
dirt; but the work do please me very well.  To the office, and there all
the morning, dined at home, and after dinner comes Mr. Salisbury to see
me, and shewed me a face or two of his paynting, and indeed I perceive
that he will be a great master.  I took him to Whitehall with me by water,
but he would not by any means be moved to go through bridge, and so we
were fain to go round by the Old Swan.  To my Lord's and there I shewed
him the King's picture, which he intends to copy out in little.  After
that I and Captain Ferrers to Salisbury Court by water, and saw part of
the "Queene's Maske."  Then I to Mrs. Turner, and there staid talking
late.  The. Turner being in a great chafe, about being disappointed of a
room to stand in at the Coronacion.  Then to my father's, and there staid
talking with my mother and him late about my dinner to-morrow.  So
homewards and took up a boy that had a lanthorn, that was picking up of
rags, and got him to light me home, and had great discourse with him how
he could get sometimes three or four bushells of rags in a day, and got
3d. a bushell for them, and many other discourses, what and how many ways
there are for poor children to get their livings honestly.  So home and I
to bed at 12 o'clock at night, being pleased well with the work that my
workmen have begun to-day.

26th.  Up early to do business in my study.  This is my great day that
three years ago I was cut of the stone, and, blessed be God, I do yet find
myself very free from pain again.  All this morning I staid at home
looking after my workmen to my great content about my stairs, and at noon
by coach to my father's, where Mrs. Turner, The. Joyce, Mr. Morrice, Mr.
Armiger, Mr. Pierce, the surgeon, and his wife, my father and mother, and
myself and my wife.  Very merry at dinner; among other things, because
Mrs. Turner and her company eat no flesh at all this Lent, and I had a
great deal of good flesh which made their mouths water.  After dinner Mrs.
Pierce and her husband and I and my wife to Salisbury Court, where coming
late he and she light of Col. Boone that made room for them, and I and my
wife sat in the pit, and there met with Mr. Lewes and Tom Whitton, and saw
"The Bondman" done to admiration.  So home by coach, and after a view of
what the workmen had done to-day I went to bed.

27th.  Up early to see my workmen at work.  My brother Tom comes to me,
and among other things I looked over my old clothes and did give him a
suit of black stuff clothes and a hat and some shoes.  At the office all
the morning, where Sir G. Carteret comes, and there I did get him to
promise me some money upon a bill of exchange, whereby I shall secure
myself of L60 which otherwise I should not know how to get.  At noon I
found my stairs quite broke down, that I could not get up but by a ladder;
and my wife not being well she kept her chamber all this day. To the
Dolphin to a dinner of Mr. Harris's, where Sir Williams both and my Lady
Batten, and her two daughters, and other company, where a great deal of
mirth, and there staid till 11 o'clock at night; and in our mirth I sang
and sometimes fiddled (there being a noise of fiddlers there), and at last
we fell to dancing, the first time that ever I did in my life, which I did
wonder to see myself to do.  At last we made Mingo, Sir W. Batten's black,
and Jack, Sir W. Pen's, dance, and it was strange how the first did dance
with a great deal of seeming skill.  Home, where I found my wife all day
in her chamber.  So to bed.

28th.  Up early among my workmen, then Mr. Creed coming to see me I went
along with him to Sir Robert Slingsby (he being newly maister of that
title by being made a Baronett) to discourse about Mr. Creed's accounts to
be made up, and from thence by coach to my cozen Thomas Pepys, to borrow
L1000 for my Lord, which I am to expect an answer to tomorrow. So to my
Lord's, and there staid and dined, and after dinner did get my Lord to
view Mr. Shepley's accounts as I had examined them, and also to sign me a
bond for my L500.  Then with Mr. Shepley to the Theatre and saw "Rollo"
ill acted.  That done to drink a cup of ale and so by coach to London, and
having set him down in Cheapside I went home, where I found a great deal
of work done to-day, and also L70 paid me by the Treasurer upon the bill
of exchange that I have had hopes of so long, so that, my heart in great
content; I went to bed.

29th.  Up among my workmen with great pleasure.  Then to the office, where
I found Sir W. Pen sent down yesterday to Chatham to get two great ships
in readiness presently to go to the East Indies upon some design against
the Dutch, we think, at Goa but it is a great secret yet.  Dined at home,
came Mr. Shepley and Moore, and did business with both of them. After that
to Sir W. Batten's, where great store of company at dinner. Among others
my schoolfellow, Mr. Christmas, where very merry, and hither came letters
from above for the fitting of two other ships for the East Indies in all
haste, and so we got orders presently for the Hampshire and Nonsuch.  Then
home and there put some papers in order, and not knowing what to do, the
house being so dirty, I went to bed.

30th.  At the office we and Sir W. Rider to advise what sort of provisions
to get ready for these ships going to the Indies.  Then the Comptroller
and I by water to Mr. Coventry, and there discoursed upon the same thing.
So to my coz. Tho. Pepys, and got him to promise me L1,000 to lend my Lord
upon his and my uncle Robert's and my security.  So to my Lord's, and
there got him to sign a bond to him, which I also signed too, and he did
sign counter security to us both.  Then into London up and down and drank
a pint of wine with Mr. Creed, and so home and sent a letter and the bonds
to my uncle to sign for my Lord.  This day I spoke with Dr. Castle about
making up the dividend for the last quarter, and agreed to meet about it
on Monday.

31st (Sunday).  At church, where a stranger preached like a fool.  From
thence home and dined with my wife, she staying at home, being unwilling
to dress herself, the house being all dirty.  To church again, and after
sermon I walked to my father's, and to Mrs. Turner's, where I could not
woo The. to give me a lesson upon the harpsicon and was angry at it.  So
home and finding Will abroad at Sir W. Batten's talking with the people
there (Sir W. and my Lady being in the country), I took occasion to be
angry with him, and so to prayers and to bed.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     A lady spit backward upon me by a mistake
     A most tedious, unreasonable, and impertinent sermon
     Comely black woman.--[The old expression for a brunette.]
     Cruel custom of throwing at cocks on Shrove Tuesday
     Day I first begun to go forth in my coat and sword
     Discontented that my wife do not go neater now she has two maids
     Fell to dancing, the first time that ever I did in my life
     Have been so long absent that I am ashamed to go
     I took occasion to be angry with him
     Justice of God in punishing men for the sins of their ancestors
     Lady Batten to give me a spoonful of honey for my cold
     My great expense at the Coronacion
     She hath got her teeth new done by La Roche
     That I might not seem to be afeared
     The monkey loose, which did anger me, and so I did strike her
     Was kissing my wife, which I did not like
     We are to go to law never to revenge, but only to repayre
     Who we found ill still, but he do make very much of it
     Wronged by my over great expectations



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                               APRIL & MAY
                                   1661

April 1st, 1661.  This day my waiting at the Privy Seal comes in again. Up
early among my workmen.  So to the once, and went home to dinner with Sir
W. Batten, and after that to the Goat tavern by Charing Cross to meet Dr.
Castle, where he and I drank a pint of wine and talked about Privy Seal
business.  Then to the Privy Seal Office and there found Mr. Moore, but no
business yet.  Then to Whitefryars, and there saw part of "Rule a wife and
have a wife," which I never saw before, but do not like it.  So to my
father, and there finding a discontent between my father and mother about
the maid (which my father likes and my mother dislikes), I staid till 10
at night, persuading my mother to understand herself, and that in some
high words, which I was sorry for, but she is grown, poor woman, very
froward.  So leaving them in the same discontent I went away home, it
being a brave moonshine, and to bed.

2d.  Among my workmen early and then along with my wife and Pall to my
Father's by coach there to have them lie a while till my house be done. I
found my mother alone weeping upon my last night's quarrel and so left
her, and took my wife to Charing Cross and there left her to see her
mother who is not well.  So I into St. James's Park, where I saw the Duke
of York playing at Pelemele,

     [The game was originally played in the road now styled Pall Mall,
     near St. James's Square, but at the Restoration when sports came in
     fashion again the street was so much built over, that it became
     necessary to find another ground.  The Mall in St. James's Park was
     then laid out for the purpose.]

 the first time that ever I saw the sport.  Then to my Lord's, where I
dined with my Lady, and after we had dined in comes my Lord and Ned
Pickering hungry, and there was not a bit of meat left in the house, the
servants having eat up all, at which my Lord was very angry, and at last
got something dressed.  Then to the Privy Seal, and signed some things,
and so to White-fryars and saw "The Little Thiefe," which is a very merry
and pretty play, and the little boy do very well.  Then to my Father's,
where I found my mother and my wife in a very good mood, and so left them
and went home.  Then to the Dolphin to Sir W. Batten, and Pen, and other
company; among others Mr. Delabar; where strange how these men, who at
other times are all wise men, do now, in their drink, betwitt and
reproach one another with their former conditions, and their actions as
in public concernments, till I was ashamed to see it.  But parted all
friends at 12 at night after drinking a great deal of wine.  So home and
alone to bed.

3rd.  Up among my workmen, my head akeing all day from last night's
debauch. To the office all the morning, and at noon dined with Sir W.
Batten and Pen, who would needs have me drink two drafts of sack to-day to
cure me of last night's disease, which I thought strange but I think find
it true.

     [The proverb, "A hair of the dog that bit you," which probably had
     originally a literal meaning, has long been used to inculcate the
     advice of the two Sir Williams.]

Then home with my workmen all the afternoon, at night into the garden to
play on my flageolette, it being moonshine, where I staid a good while,
and so home and to bed.  This day I hear that the Dutch have sent the King
a great present of money, which we think will stop the match with
Portugal; and judge this to be the reason that our so great haste in
sending the two ships to the East Indys is also stayed.

4th.  To my workmen, then to my Lord's, and there dined with Mr. Shepley.
After dinner I went in to my Lord and there we had a great deal of
musique, and then came my cozen Tom Pepys and there did accept of the
security which we gave him for his L1000 that we borrow of him, and so the
money to be paid next week. Then to the Privy Seal, and so with Mr. Moore
to my father's, where some friends did sup there and we with them and late
went home, leaving my wife still there.  So to bed.

5th: Up among my workmen and so to the office, and then to Sir W. Pen's
with the other Sir William and Sir John Lawson to dinner, and after that,
with them to Mr. Lucy's, a merchant, where much good company, and there
drank a great deal of wine, and in discourse fell to talk of the weight of
people, which did occasion some wagers, and where, among others, I won
half a piece to be spent. Then home, and at night to Sir W. Batten's, and
there very merry with a good barrell of oysters, and this is the present
life I lead.  Home and to bed.

6th.  Up among my workmen, then to Whitehall, and there at Privy Seal and
elsewhere did business, and among other things met with Mr. Townsend, who
told of his mistake the other day, to put both his legs through one of his
knees of his breeches, and went so all day.  Then with Mr. Creed and Moore
to the Leg in the Palace to dinner which I gave them, and after dinner I
saw the girl of the house, being very pretty, go into a chamber, and I
went in after her and kissed her.  Then by water, Creed and I, to
Salisbury Court and there saw "Love's Quarrell" acted the first time, but
I do not like the design or words.  So calling at my father's, where they
and my wife well, and so home and to bed.

7th (Lord's day).  All the morning at home making up my accounts (God
forgive me!) to give up to my Lord this afternoon.  Then about 11 o'clock
out of doors towards Westminster and put in at Paul's, where I saw our
minister, Mr. Mills, preaching before my Lord Mayor.  So to White Hall,
and there I met with Dr. Fuller of Twickenham, newly come from Ireland;
and took him to my Lord's, where he and I dined; and he did give my Lord
and me a good account of the condition of Ireland, and how it come to
pass, through the joyning of the Fanatiques and the Presbyterians, that
the latter and the former are in their declaration put together under the
names of Fanatiques.  After dinner, my Lord and I and Mr. Shepley did look
over our accounts and settle matters of money between us; and my Lord did
tell me much of his mind about getting money and other things of his
family, &c.  Then to my father's, where I found Mr. Hunt and his wife at
supper with my father and mother and my wife, where after supper I left
them and so home, and then I went to Sir W. Batten's and resolved of a
journey tomorrow to Chatham, and so home and to bed.

8th.  Up early, my Lady Batten knocking at her door that comes into one of
my chambers.  I did give directions to my people and workmen, and so about
8 o'clock we took barge at the Tower, Sir William Batten and his lady,
Mrs. Turner, Mr. Fowler and I.  A very pleasant passage and so to
Gravesend, where we dined, and from thence a coach took them and me, and
Mr. Fowler with some others came from Rochester to meet us, on horseback.
At Rochester, where alight at Mr. Alcock's and there drank and had good
sport, with his bringing out so many sorts of cheese.  Then to the
Hillhouse at Chatham, where I never was before, and I found a pretty
pleasant house and am pleased with the arms that hang up there.  Here we
supped very merry, and late to bed; Sir William telling me that old
Edgeborrow, his predecessor, did die and walk in my chamber, did make me
some what afeard, but not so much as for mirth's sake I did seem.  So to
bed in the treasurer's chamber.

9th.  And lay and slept well till 3 in the morning, and then waking, and
by the light of the moon I saw my pillow (which overnight I flung from me)
stand upright, but not bethinking myself what it might be, I was a little
afeard, but sleep overcame all and so lay till high morning, at which time
I had a candle brought me and a good fire made, and in general it was a
great pleasure all the time I staid here to see how I am respected and
honoured by all people; and I find that I begin to know now how to receive
so much reverence, which at the beginning I could not tell how to do.  Sir
William and I by coach to the dock and there viewed all the storehouses
and the old goods that are this day to be sold, which was great pleasure
to me, and so back again by coach home, where we had a good dinner, and
among other strangers that come, there was Mr. Hempson and his wife, a
pretty woman, and speaks Latin; Mr. Allen and two daughters of his, both
very tall and the youngest very handsome, so much as I could not forbear
to love her exceedingly, having, among other things, the best hand that
ever I saw.  After dinner, we went to fit books and things (Tom Hater
being this morning come to us) for the sale, by an inch of candle, and
very good sport we and the ladies that stood by had, to see the people
bid.  Among other things sold there was all the State's arms, which Sir W.
Batten bought; intending to set up some of the images in his garden, and
the rest to burn on the Coronacion night.  The sale being done, the ladies
and I and Captain Pett and Mr. Castle took barge and down we went to see
the Sovereign, which we did, taking great pleasure therein, singing all
the way, and, among other pleasures, I put my Lady, Mrs. Turner, Mrs.
Hempson, and the two Mrs. Allens into the lanthorn and I went in and
kissed them, demanding it as a fee due to a principall officer, with all
which we were exceeding merry, and drunk some bottles of wine and neat's
tongue, &c.  Then back again home and so supped, and after much mirth to
bed.

10th.  In the morning to see the Dockhouses.  First, Mr. Pett's, the
builder, and there was very kindly received, and among other things he did
offer my Lady Batten a parrot, the best I ever saw, that knew Mingo so
soon as it saw him, having been bred formerly in the house with them; but
for talking and singing I never heard the like.  My Lady did accept of it:
Then to see Commissioner Pett's house, he and his family being absent, and
here I wondered how my Lady Batten walked up and down with envious looks
to see how neat and rich everything is (and indeed both the house and
garden is most handsome), saying that she would get it, for it belonged
formerly to the Surveyor of the Navy. Then on board the Prince, now in the
dock, and indeed it has one and no more rich cabins for carved work, but
no gold in her.  After that back home, and there eat a little dinner.
Then to Rochester, and there saw the Cathedrall, which is now fitting for
use, and the organ then a-tuning.  Then away thence, observing the great
doors of the church, which, they say, was covered with the skins of the
Danes,

     [Traditions similar to that at Rochester, here alluded to, are to be
     found in other places in England.  Sir Harry Englefield, in a
     communication made to the Society of Antiquaries, July 2nd, 1789,
     called attention to the curious popular tale preserved in the
     village of Hadstock, Essex, that the door of the church had been
     covered with the skin of a Danish pirate, who had plundered the
     church.  At Worcester, likewise, it was asserted that the north
     doors of the cathedral had been covered with the skin of a person
     who had sacrilegiously robbed the high altar.  The date of these
     doors appears to be the latter part of the fourteenth century, the
     north porch having been built about 1385.  Dart, in his "History of
     the Abbey Church of St. Peter's, Westminster," 1723 (vol. i., book
     ii., p. 64), relates a like tradition then preserved in reference to
     a door, one of three which closed off a chamber from the south
     transept--namely, a certain building once known as the Chapel of
     Henry VIII., and used as a "Revestry."  This chamber, he states, "is
     inclosed with three doors, the inner cancellated, the middle, which
     is very thick, lined with skins like parchment, and driven full of
     nails.  These skins, they by tradition tell us, were some skins of
     the Danes, tann'd and given here as a memorial of our delivery from
     them."  Portions of this supposed human skin were examined under the
     microscope by the late Mr. John Quekett of the Hunterian Museum, who
     ascertained, beyond question, that in each of the cases the skin was
     human.  From a communication by the late Mr. Albert Way, F.S.A., to
     the late Lord Braybrooke.]

and also had much mirth at a tomb, on which was "Come sweet Jesu," and I
read "Come sweet Mall," &c., at which Captain Pett and I had good
laughter.  So to the Salutacion tavern, where Mr. Alcock and many of the
town came and entertained us with wine and oysters and other things, and
hither come Sir John Minnes to us, who is come to-day to see "the Henery,"
in which he intends to ride as Vice-Admiral in the narrow seas all this
summer.  Here much mirth, but I was a little troubled to stay too long,
because of going to Hempson's, which afterwards we did, and found it in
all things a most pretty house, and rarely furnished, only it had a most
ill access on all sides to it, which is a greatest fault that I think can
be in a house.  Here we had, for my sake, two fiddles, the one a base
viall, on which he that played, played well some lyra lessons, but both
together made the worst musique that ever I heard.  We had a fine
collacion, but I took little pleasure in that, for the illness of the
musique and for the intentness of my mind upon Mrs. Rebecca Allen. After
we had done eating, the ladies went to dance, and among the men we had, I
was forced to dance too; and did make an ugly shift.  Mrs. R. Allen danced
very well, and seems the best humoured woman that ever I saw.  About 9
o'clock Sir William and my Lady went home, and we continued dancing an
hour or two, and so broke up very pleasant and merry, and so walked home,
I leading Mrs. Rebecca, who seemed, I know not why, in that and other
things, to be desirous of my favours and would in all things show me
respects.  Going home, she would needs have me sing, and I did pretty well
and was highly esteemed by them.  So to Captain Allen's (where we were
last night, and heard him play on the harpsicon, and I find him to be a
perfect good musician), and there, having no mind to leave Mrs. Rebecca,
what with talk and singing (her father and I), Mrs. Turner and I staid
there till 2 o'clock in the morning and was most exceeding merry, and I
had the opportunity of kissing Mrs. Rebecca very often.  Among other
things Captain Pett was saying that he thought that he had got his wife
with child since I came thither.  Which I took hold of and was merrily
asking him what he would take to have it said for my honour that it was of
my getting?  He merrily answered that he would if I would promise to be
godfather to it if it did come within the time just, and I said that I
would.  So that I must remember to compute it when the time comes.

11th.  At 2 o'clock, with very great mirth, we went to our lodging and to
bed, and lay till 7, and then called up by Sir W. Batten, so I arose and
we did some business, and then came Captn. Allen, and he and I withdrew
and sang a song or two, and among others took pleasure in "Goe and bee
hanged, that's good-bye." The young ladies come too, and so I did again
please myself with Mrs. Rebecca, and about 9 o'clock, after we had
breakfasted, we sett forth for London, and indeed I was a little troubled
to part with Mrs. Rebecca, for which God forgive me.  Thus we went away
through Rochester, calling and taking leave of Mr. Alcock at the door,
Capt. Cuttance going with us.  We baited at Dartford, and thence to
London, but of all the journeys that ever I made this was the merriest,
and I was in a strange mood for mirth.

Among other things, I got my Lady to let her maid, Mrs. Anne, to ride all
the way on horseback, and she rides exceeding well; and so I called her my
clerk, that she went to wait upon me.  I met two little schoolboys going
with pitchers of ale to their schoolmaster to break up against Easter, and
I did drink of some of one of them and give him two pence. By and by we
come to two little girls keeping cows, and I saw one of them very pretty,
so I had a mind to make her ask my blessing, and telling her that I was
her godfather, she asked me innocently whether I was not Ned Wooding, and
I said that I was, so she kneeled down and very simply called, "Pray,
godfather, pray to God to bless me," which made us very merry, and I gave
her twopence.  In several places, I asked women whether they would sell me
their children, but they denied me all, but said they would give me one to
keep for them, if I would.  Mrs. Anne and I rode under the man that hangs
upon Shooter's Hill,

     [Shooter's Hill, Kent, between the eighth and ninth milestones on
     the Dover road.  It was long a notorious haunt of highwaymen.  The
     custom was to leave the bodies of criminals hanging until the bones
     fell to the ground.]

and a filthy sight it was to see how his flesh is shrunk to his bones. So
home and I found all well, and a deal of work done since I went.  I sent
to see how my wife do, who is well, and my brother John come from
Cambridge.  To Sir W. Batten's and there supped, and very merry with the
young ladles.  So to bed very sleepy for last night's work, concluding
that it is the pleasantest journey in all respects that ever I had in my
life.

12th.  Up among my workmen, and about 7 o'clock comes my wife to see me
and my brother John with her, who I am glad to see, but I sent them away
because of going to the office, and there dined with Sir W. Batten, all
fish dinner, it being Good Friday.  Then home and looking over my workmen,
and then into the City and saw in what forwardness all things are for the
Coronacion, which will be very magnificent.  Then back again home and to
my chamber, to set down in my diary all my late journey, which I do with
great pleasure; and while I am now writing comes one with a tickett to
invite me to Captain Robert Blake's buriall, for whose death I am very
sorry, and do much wonder at it, he being a little while since a very
likely man to live as any I knew.  Since my going out of town, there is
one Alexander Rosse taken and sent to the Counter by Sir Thomas Allen, for
counterfeiting my hand to a ticket, and we this day at the office have
given order to Mr. Smith to prosecute him.  To bed.

13th.  To Whitehall by water from Towre-wharf, where we could not pass the
ordinary way, because they were mending of the great stone steps against
the Coronacion.  With Sir W. Pen, then to my Lord's, and thence with Capt.
Cuttance and Capt. Clark to drink our morning draught together, and before
we could get back again my Lord was gone out.  So to Whitehall again and,
met with my Lord above with the Duke; and after a little talk with him, I
went to the Banquethouse, and there saw the King heal, the first time that
ever I saw him do it; which he did with great gravity, and it seemed to me
to be an ugly office and a simple one.  That done to my Lord's and dined
there, and so by water with parson Turner towards London, and upon my
telling of him of Mr. Moore to be a fit man to do his business with Bishop
Wren, about which he was going, he went back out of my boat into another
to Whitehall, and so I forwards home and there by and by took coach with
Sir W. Pen and Captain Terne and went to the buriall of Captain Robert
Blake, at Wapping, and there had each of us a ring, but it being dirty, we
would not go to church with them, but with our coach we returned home, and
there staid a little, and then he and I alone to the Dolphin (Sir W.
Batten being this day gone with his wife to Walthamstow to keep Easter),
and there had a supper by ourselves, we both being very hungry, and
staying there late drinking I became very sleepy, and so we went home and
I to bed.

14th (Easter.  Lord's day).  In the morning towards my father's, and by
the way heard Mr. Jacomb, at Ludgate, upon these words, "Christ loved you
and therefore let us love one another," and made a lazy sermon, like a
Presbyterian.  Then to my father's and dined there, and Dr. Fairbrother
(lately come to town) with us. After dinner I went to the Temple and there
heard Dr. Griffith, a good sermon for the day; so with Mr. Moore (whom I
met there) to my Lord's, and there he shewed me a copy of my Lord
Chancellor's patent for Earl, and I read the preamble, which is very
short, modest, and good.  Here my Lord saw us and spoke to me about
getting Mr. Moore to come and govern his house while he goes to sea, which
I promised him to do and did afterwards speak to Mr. Moore, and he is
willing.  Then hearing that Mr. Barnwell was come, with some of my Lord's
little children, yesterday to town, to see the Coronacion, I went and
found them at the Goat, at Charing Cross, and there I went and drank with
them a good while, whom I found in very good health and very merry Then to
my father's, and after supper seemed willing to go home, and my wife
seeming to be so too I went away in a discontent, but she, poor wretch,
followed me as far in the rain and dark as Fleet Bridge to fetch me back
again, and so I did, and lay with her to-night, which I have not done
these eight or ten days before.

15th.  From my father's, it being a very foul morning for the King and
Lords to go to Windsor, I went to the office and there met Mr. Coventry
and Sir Robt. Slingsby, but did no business, but only appoint to go to
Deptford together tomorrow.  Mr. Coventry being gone, and I having at home
laid up L200 which I had brought this morning home from Alderman
Backwell's, I went home by coach with Sir R. Slingsby and dined with him,
and had a very good dinner.  His lady' seems a good woman and very
desirous they were to hear this noon by the post how the election has gone
at Newcastle, wherein he is concerned, but the letters are not come yet.
To my uncle Wight's, and after a little stay with them he and I to Mr.
Rawlinson's, and there staid all the afternoon, it being very foul, and
had a little talk with him what good I might make of these ships that go
to Portugal by venturing some money by them, and he will give me an answer
to it shortly.  So home and sent for the Barber, and after that to bed.

16th.  So soon as word was brought me that Mr. Coventry was come with the
barge to the Towre, I went to him, and found him reading of the Psalms in
short hand (which he is now busy about), and had good sport about the long
marks that are made there for sentences in divinity, which he is never
like to make use of. Here he and I sat till the Comptroller came and then
we put off for Deptford, where we went on board the King's pleasure boat
that Commissioner Pett is making, and indeed it will be a most pretty
thing.  From thence to Commr. Pett's lodging, and there had a good
breakfast, and in came the two Sir Wms. from Walthamstow, and so we sat
down and did a great deal of public business about the fitting of the
fleet that is now going out.  That done we went to the Globe and there had
a good dinner, and by and by took barge again and so home. By the way they
would have me sing, which I did to Mr. Coventry, who went up to Sir
William Batten's, and there we staid and talked a good while, and then
broke up and I home, and then to my father's and there lay with my wife.

17th.  By land and saw the arches, which are now almost done and are very
fine, and I saw the picture of the ships and other things this morning,
set up before the East Indy House, which are well done.  So to the office,
and that being done I went to dinner with Sir W. Batten, and then home to
my workmen, and saw them go on with great content to me.  Then comes Mr.
Allen of Chatham, and I took him to the Mitre and there did drink with
him, and did get of him the song that pleased me so well there the other
day, "Of Shitten come Shites the beginning of love."  His daughters are to
come to town to-morrow, but I know not whether I shall see them or no.
That done I went to the Dolphin by appointment and there I met Sir Wms.
both and Mr. Castle, and did eat a barrel of oysters and two lobsters,
which I did give them, and were very merry.  Here we had great talk of Mr.
Warren's being knighted by the King, and Sir W. B. seemed to be very much
incensed against him.  So home.

18th.  Up with my workmen and then about 9 o'clock took horse with both
the Sir Williams for Walthamstow, and there we found my Lady and her
daughters all; and a pleasant day it was, and all things else, but that my
Lady was in a bad mood, which we were troubled at, and had she been noble
she would not have been so with her servants, when we came thither, and
this Sir W. Pen took notice of, as well as I.  After dinner we all went to
the Church stile, and there eat and drank, and I was as merry as I could
counterfeit myself to be.  Then, it raining hard, we left Sir W. Batten,
and we two returned and called at Mr.----and drank some brave wine there,
and then homewards again and in our way met with two country fellows upon
one horse, which I did, without much ado, give the way to, but Sir W. Pen
would not, but struck them and they him, and so passed away, but they
giving him some high words, he went back again and struck them off their
horse, in a simple fury, and without much honour, in my mind, and so came
away.  Home, and I sat with him a good while talking, and then home and to
bed.

19th.  Among my workmen and then to the office, and after that dined with
Sir W. Batten, and then home, where Sir W. Warren came, and I took him and
Mr. Shepley and Moore with me to the Mitre, and there I cleared with
Warren for the deals I bought lately for my Lord of him, and he went away,
and we staid afterwards a good while and talked, and so parted, it being
so foul that I could not go to Whitehall to see the Knights of the Bath
made to-day, which do trouble me mightily.  So home, and having staid
awhile till Will came in (with whom I was vexed for staying abroad), he
comes and then I went by water to my father's, and then after supper to
bed with my wife.

20th.  Here comes my boy to tell me that the Duke of York had sent for all
the principal officers, &c., to come to him to-day.  So I went by water to
Mr. Coventry's, and there staid and talked a good while with him till all
the rest come.  We went up and saw the Duke dress himself, and in his
night habitt he is a very plain man.  Then he sent us to his closett,
where we saw among other things two very fine chests, covered with gold
and Indian varnish, given him by the East Indy Company of Holland.  The
Duke comes; and after he had told us that the fleet was designed for
Algier (which was kept from us till now), we did advise about many things
as to the fitting of the fleet, and so went away. And from thence to the
Privy Seal, where little to do, and after that took Mr. Creed and Moore
and gave them their morning draught, and after that to my Lord's, where
Sir W. Pen came to me, and dined with my Lord.  After dinner he and others
that dined there went away, and then my Lord looked upon his pages' and
footmen's liverys, which are come home to-day, and will be handsome,
though not gaudy.  Then with my Lady and my Lady Wright to White Hall; and
in the Banqueting-house saw the King create my Lord Chancellor and several
others, Earls, and Mr. Crew and several others, Barons: the first being
led up by Heralds and five old Earls to the King, and there the patent is
read, and the King puts on his vest, and sword, and coronet, and gives him
the patent.  And then he kisseth the King's hand, and rises and stands
covered before the king. And the same for the Barons, only he is led up
but by three of the old Barons, and are girt with swords before they go to
the King.  That being done (which was very pleasant to see their habits),
I carried my Lady back, and I found my Lord angry, for that his page had
let my Lord's new beaver be changed for an old hat; then I went away, and
with Mr. Creed to the Exchange and bought some things, as gloves and
bandstrings, &c.  So back to the Cockpitt, and there, by the favour of one
Mr. Bowman, he and I got in, and there saw the King and Duke of York and
his Duchess (which is a plain woman, and like her mother, my Lady
Chancellor).  And so saw "The Humersome Lieutenant" acted before the King,
but not very well done.

But my pleasure was great to see the manner of it, and so many great
beauties, but above all Mrs. Palmer, with whom the King do discover a
great deal of familiarity.  So Mr. Creed and I (the play being done) went
to Mrs. Harper's, and there sat and drank, it being about twelve at night.
The ways being now so dirty, and stopped up with the rayles which are this
day set up in the streets, I would not go home, but went with him to his
lodging at Mr. Ware's, and there lay all night.

21st (Lord's day).  In the morning we were troubled to hear it rain as it
did, because of the great show tomorrow.  After I was ready I walked to my
father's and there found the late maid to be gone and another come by my
mother's choice, which my father do not like, and so great difference
there will be between my father and mother about it.  Here dined Doctor
Thos. Pepys and Dr. Fayrebrother; and all our talk about to-morrow's show,
and our trouble that it is like to be a wet day.  After dinner comes in my
coz. Snow and his wife, and I think stay there till the show be over.
Then I went home, and all the way is so thronged with people to see the
triumphal arches, that I could hardly pass for them.  So home, people
being at church, and I got home unseen, and so up to my chamber and saw
done these last five or six days' diarys.  My mind a little troubled about
my workmen, which, being foreigners,--[Foreigners were workmen dwelling
outside the city.]--are like to be troubled by a couple of lazy rogues
that worked with me the other day, that are citizens, and so my work will
be hindered, but I must prevent it if I can.

22d.  KING'S GOING FROM YE TOWER TO WHITE HALL.

     [The king in the early morning of the 22nd went from Whitehall to
     the Tower by water, so that he might proceed from thence through the
     City to Westminster Abbey, there to be crowned.]

Up early and made myself as fine as I could, and put on my velvet coat,
the first day that I put it on, though made half a year ago.  And being
ready, Sir W. Batten, my Lady, and his two daughters and his son and wife,
and Sir W. Pen and his son and I, went to Mr. Young's, the flag-maker, in
Corne-hill;

     [The members of the Navy Office appear to have chosen Mr. Young's
     house on account of its nearness to the second triumphal arch,
     situated near the Royal Exchange, which was dedicated to the Navy.]

and there we had a good room to ourselves, with wine and good cake, and
saw the show very well.  In which it is impossible to relate the glory of
this day, expressed in the clothes of them that rid, and their horses and
horses clothes, among others, my Lord Sandwich's.  Embroidery and diamonds
were ordinary among them.  The Knights of the Bath was a brave sight of
itself; and their Esquires, among which Mr. Armiger was an Esquire to one
of the Knights.  Remarquable were the two men that represent the two Dukes
of Normandy and Aquitane.  The Bishops come next after Barons, which is
the higher place; which makes me think that the next Parliament they will
be called to the House of Lords.  My Lord Monk rode bare after the King,
and led in his hand a spare horse, as being Master of the Horse.  The
King, in a most rich embroidered suit and cloak, looked most noble.
Wadlow,

     [Simon Wadlow was the original of "old Sir Simon the king," the
     favourite air of Squire Western in "Tom Jones."

              "Hang up all the poor hop-drinkers,
               Cries old Sim, the king of skinkers."

     Ben Jonson, Verses over the door into the Apollo.]

the vintner, at the Devil; in Fleetstreet, did lead a fine company of
soldiers, all young comely men, in white doublets.  There followed the
Vice-Chamberlain, Sir G. Carteret, a company of men all like Turks; but I
know not yet what they are for.  The streets all gravelled, and the houses
hung with carpets before them, made brave show, and the ladies out of the
windows, one of which over against us I took much notice of, and spoke of
her, which made good sport among us.  So glorious was the show with gold
and silver, that we were not able to look at it, our eyes at last being so
much overcome with it.  Both the King and the Duke of York took notice of
us, as he saw us at the window.  The show being ended, Mr. Young did give
us a dinner, at which we were very merry, and pleased above imagination at
what we have seen.  Sir W. Batten going home, he and I called and drunk
some mum

     [Mum.  Ale brewed with wheat at Brunswick.

              "Sedulous and stout
               With bowls of fattening mum."

     J. Phillips, Cyder, Vol. ii.  p. 231.]

and laid our wager about my Lady Faulconbridge's name,

     [Mary, third daughter of Oliver Cromwell, and second wife of Thomas
     Bellasis, second Viscount Fauconberg, created Earl of Fauconberg,
     April 9th, 1689.]

which he says not to be Mary, and so I won above 20s.  So home, where Will
and the boy staid and saw the show upon Towre Hill, and Jane at T.
Pepys's, The. Turner, and my wife at Charles Glassecocke's, in Fleet
Street. In the evening by water to White Hall to my Lord's, and there I
spoke with my Lord.  He talked with me about his suit, which was made in
France, and cost him L200, and very rich it is with embroidery.  I lay
with Mr. Shepley, and

                             CORONACION DAY.

23d.  About 4 I rose and got to the Abbey, where I followed Sir J. Denham,
the Surveyor, with some company that he was leading in.  And with much
ado, by the favour of Mr. Cooper, his man, did get up into a great
scaffold across the North end of the Abbey, where with a great deal of
patience I sat from past 4 till 11 before the King came in.  And a great
pleasure it was to see the Abbey raised in the middle, all covered with
red, and a throne (that is a chair) and footstool on the top of it; and
all the officers of all kinds, so much as the very fidlers, in red vests.
At last comes in the Dean and Prebends of Westminster, with the Bishops
(many of them in cloth of gold copes), and after them the Nobility, all in
their Parliament robes, which was a most magnificent sight.  Then the
Duke, and the King with a scepter (carried by my Lord Sandwich) and sword
and mond

     [Mond or orb of gold, with a cross set with precious stones, carried
     by the Duke of Buckingham.]

before him, and the crown too.  The King in his robes, bare-headed, which
was very fine.  And after all had placed themselves, there was a sermon
and the service; and then in the Quire at the high altar, the King passed
through all the ceremonies of the Coronacon, which to my great grief I and
most in the Abbey could not see.  The crown being put upon his head, a
great shout begun, and he came forth to the throne, and there passed more
ceremonies: as taking the oath, and having things read to him by the
Bishop; and his lords (who put on their caps as soon as the King put on
his crown)

     [As yet barons had no coronet.  A grant of that outward mark of
     dignity was made to them by Charles soon after his coronation.
     Queen Elizabeth had assigned coronets to viscounts.--B.]

and bishops come, and kneeled before him.  And three times the King at
Arms went to the three open places on the scaffold, and proclaimed, that
if any one could show any reason why Charles Stewart should not be King of
England, that now he should come and speak.  And a Generall Pardon also
was read by the Lord Chancellor, and meddalls flung up and down by my Lord
Cornwallis, of silver, but I could not come by any.  But so great a noise
that I could make but little of the musique; and indeed, it was lost to
every body.  But I had so great a lust to .  .  .  . that I went out
a little while before the King had done all his ceremonies, and went round
the Abbey to Westminster Hall, all the way within rayles, and 10,000
people, with the ground covered with blue cloth; and scaffolds all the
way.  Into the Hall I got, where it was very fine with hangings and
scaffolds one upon another full of brave ladies; and my wife in one little
one, on the right hand.  Here I staid walking up and down, and at last
upon one of the side stalls I stood and saw the King come in with all the
persons (but the soldiers) that were yesterday in the cavalcade; and a
most pleasant sight it was to see them in their several robes.  And the
King came in with his crown on, and his sceptre in his hand, under a
canopy borne up by six silver staves, carried by Barons of the Cinque
Ports,

     [Pepys was himself one of the Barons of the Cinque Ports at the
     Coronation of James II.]

and little bells at every end.  And after a long time, he got up to the
farther end, and all set themselves down at their several tables; and that
was also a brave sight: and the King's first course carried up by the
Knights of the Bath. And many fine ceremonies there was of the Heralds
leading up people before him, and bowing; and my Lord of Albemarle's going
to the kitchin and eat a bit of the first dish that was to go to the
King's table.  But, above all, was these three Lords, Northumberland, and
Suffolk, and the Duke of Ormond, coming before the courses on horseback,
and staying so all dinner-time, and at last to bring up [Dymock] the
King's Champion, all in armour on horseback, with his spear and targett
carried before him.  And a Herald proclaims "That if any dare deny Charles
Stewart to be lawful King of England, here was a Champion that would fight
with him;"

     [The terms of the Champion's challenge were as follows: "If any
     person of what degree soever, high or low, shall deny or gainsay our
     Soveraigne Lord King Charles the Second, King of England, Scotland,
     France and Ireland, defender of the faith, Sonne and next heire to
     our Soveraigne Lord Charles the First, the last King deceased, to be
     right heire to the Imperiall Crowne of this Realme of England, or
     that bee ought not to enjoy the same; here is his champion, who
     sayth that he lyeth and is a false Traytor, being ready in person to
     combate with him, and in this quarrell will venture his life against
     him, on what day soever hee shall be appointed."]

and with these words, the Champion flings down his gauntlet, and all this
he do three times in his going up towards the King's table.  At last when
he is come, the King drinks to him, and then sends him the cup which is of
gold, and he drinks it off, and then rides back again with the cup in his
hand.  I went from table to table to see the Bishops and all others at
their dinner, and was infinitely pleased with it.  And at the Lords'
table, I met with William Howe, and he spoke to my Lord for me, and he did
give me four rabbits and a pullet, and so I got it and Mr. Creed and I got
Mr. Michell to give us some bread, and so we at a stall eat it, as every
body else did what they could get.  I took a great deal of pleasure to go
up and down, and look upon the ladies, and to hear the musique of all
sorts, but above all, the 24 violins: About six at night they had dined,
and I went up to my wife, and there met with a pretty lady (Mrs.
Frankleyn, a Doctor's wife, a friend of Mr. Bowyer's), and kissed them
both, and by and by took them down to Mr. Bowyer's.  And strange it is to
think, that these two days have held up fair till now that all is done,
and the King gone out of the Hall; and then it fell a-raining and
thundering and lightening as I have not seen it do for some years: which
people did take great notice of; God's blessing of the work of these two
days, which is a foolery to take too much notice of such things.  I
observed little disorder in all this, but only the King's footmen had got
hold of the canopy, and would keep it from the Barons of the Cinque Ports,

     [Bishop Kennett gives a somewhat fuller account of this unseemly
     broil: "No sooner had the aforesaid Barons brought up the King to
     the foot of the stairs in Westminster Hall, ascending to his throne,
     and turned on the left hand (towards their own table) out of the
     way, but the King's footmen most insolently and violently seized
     upon the canopy, which the Barons endeavouring to keep and defend,
     were by their number and strength dragged clown to the lower end of
     the Hall, nevertheless still keeping their hold; and had not Mr.
     Owen York Herald, being accidentally near the Hall door, and seeing
     the contest, caused the same to be shut, the footmen had certainly
     carried it away by force.  But in the interim also (speedy notice
     hereof having been given the King) one of the Querries were sent
     from him, with command to imprison the footmen, and dismiss them out
     of his service, which put an end to the present disturbance.  These
     footmen were also commanded to make their submission to the Court of
     Claims, which was accordingly done by them the 30th April following,
     and the canopy then delivered back to the said Barons."  Whilst this
     disturbance happened, the upper end of the first table, which had
     been appointed for the Barons of the Cinque Ports, was taken up by
     the Bishops, judges, &c., probably nothing loth to take precedence
     of them; and the poor Barons, naturally unwilling to lose their
     dinner, were necessitated to eat it at the bottom of the second
     table, below the Masters of Chancery and others of the long
     robe.-B.]

which they endeavoured to force from them again, but could not do it till
my Lord Duke of Albemarle caused it to be put into Sir R. Pye's' hand till
tomorrow to be decided.  At Mr. Bowyer's; a great deal of company, some I
knew, others I did not.  Here we staid upon the leads and below till it
was late, expecting to see the fire-works, but they were not performed
to-night: only the City had a light like a glory round about it with
bonfires.  At last I went to Kingstreet, and there sent Crockford to my
father's and my house, to tell them I could not come home tonight, because
of the dirt, and a coach could not be had.  And so after drinking a pot of
ale alone at Mrs. Harper's I returned to Mr. Bowyer's, and after a little
stay more I took my wife and Mrs. Frankleyn (who I proffered the civility
of lying with my wife at Mrs. Hunt's to-night) to Axe-yard, in which at
the further end there were three great bonfires, and a great many great
gallants, men and women; and they laid hold of us, and would have us drink
the King's health upon our knees, kneeling upon a faggot, which we all
did, they drinking to us one after another.  Which we thought a strange
frolique; but these gallants continued thus a great while, and I wondered
to see how the ladies did tipple.  At last I sent my wife and her
bedfellow to bed, and Mr. Hunt and I went in with Mr. Thornbury (who did
give the company all their wine, he being yeoman of the wine-cellar to the
King) to his house; and there, with his wife and two of his sisters, and
some gallant sparks that were there, we drank the King's health, and
nothing else, till one of the gentlemen fell down stark drunk, and there
lay spewing; and I went to my Lord's pretty well. But no sooner a-bed with
Mr. Shepley but my head began to hum, and I to vomit, and if ever I was
foxed it was now, which I cannot say yet, because I fell asleep and slept
till morning.  Only when I waked I found myself wet with my spewing.  Thus
did the day end with joy every where; and blessed be God, I have not heard
of any mischance to any body through it all, but only to Serjt. Glynne,
whose horse fell upon him yesterday, and is like to kill him, which people
do please themselves to see how just God is to punish the rogue at such a
time as this; he being now one of the King's Serjeants, and rode in the
cavalcade with Maynard, to whom people wish the same fortune.  There was
also this night in King-street, [a woman] had her eye put out by a boy's
flinging a firebrand into the coach.  Now, after all this, I can say that,
besides the pleasure of the sight of these glorious things, I may now shut
my eyes against any other objects, nor for the future trouble myself to
see things of state and show, as being sure never to see the like again in
this world.

24th.  Waked in the morning with my head in a sad taking through the last
night's drink, which I am very sorry for; so rose and went out with Mr.
Creed to drink our morning draft, which he did give me in chocolate

     [Chocolate was introduced into England about the year 1652.  In the
     "Publick Advertiser" of Tuesday, June 16-22, 1657, we find the
     following; "In Bishopsgate Street in Queen's Head Alley, at a
     Frenchman's house, is an excellent West India drink called
     chocolate, to be sold, where you may have it ready at any time, and
     also unmade at reasonable rates."--M. B.]

to settle my stomach.  And after that I to my wife, who lay with Mrs.
Frankelyn at the next door to Mrs. Hunt's, and they were ready, and so I
took them up in a coach, and carried the ladies to Paul's, and there set
her down, and so my wife and I home, and I to the office.  That being done
my wife and I went to dinner to Sir W. Batten, and all our talk about the
happy conclusion of these last solemnities.  After dinner home, and
advised with my wife about ordering things in my house, and then she went
away to my father's to lie, and I staid with my workmen, who do please me
very well with their work.  At night, set myself to write down these three
days' diary, and while I am about it, I hear the noise of the
chambers,--[A chamber is a small piece of ordnance.]--and other things of
the fire-works, which are now playing upon the Thames before the King; and
I wish myself with them, being sorry not to see them.  So to bed.

25th.  All the morning with my workmen with great pleasure to see them
near coming to an end.  At noon Mr. Moore and I went to an Ordinary at the
King's Head in Towre Street, and there had a dirty dinner. Afterwards home
and having done some business with him, in comes Mr. Sheply and Pierce the
surgeon, and they and I to the Mitre and there staid a while and drank,
and so home and after a little rending to bed.

26th.  At the office all the morning, and at noon dined by myself at home
on a piece of meat from the cook's, and so at home all the afternoon with
my workmen, and at night to bed, having some thoughts to order my business
so as to go to Portsmouth the next week with Sir Robert Slingsby.

27th.  In the morning to my Lord's, and there dined with my Lady, and
after dinner with Mr. Creed and Captain Ferrers to the Theatre to see "The
Chances," and after that to the Cock alehouse, where we had a harp and
viallin played to us, and so home by coach to Sir W. Batten's, who seems
so inquisitive when my, house will be made an end of that I am troubled to
go thither.  So home with some trouble in my mind about it.

28th (Lord's day).  In the morning to my father's, where I dined, and in
the afternoon to their church, where come Mrs. Turner and Mrs. Edward
Pepys, and several other ladies, and so I went out of the pew into
another.  And after sermon home with them, and there staid a while and
talked with them and was sent for to my father's, where my cozen Angier
and his wife, of Cambridge, to whom I went, and was glad to see them, and
sent for wine for them, and they supped with my father.  After supper my
father told me of an odd passage the other night in bed between my mother
and him, and she would not let him come to bed to her out of jealousy of
him and an ugly wench that lived there lately, the most ill-favoured slut
that ever I saw in my life, which I was ashamed to hear that my mother
should be become such a fool, and my father bid me to take notice of it to
my mother, and to make peace between him and her.  All which do trouble me
very much.  So to bed to my wife.

29th.  Up and with my father towards my house, and by the way met with
Lieut. Lambert, and with him to the Dolphin in Tower Street and drank our
morning draught, he being much troubled about his being offered a fourth
rate ship to be Lieutenant of her now he has been two years Lieutenant in
a first rate.  So to the office, where it is determined that I should go
to-morrow to Portsmouth. So I went out of the office to Whitehall
presently, and there spoke with Sir W. Pen and Sir George Carteret and had
their advice as to my going, and so back again home, where I directed Mr.
Hater what to do in order to our going to-morrow, and so back again by
coach to Whitehall and there eat something in the buttery at my Lord's
with John Goods and Ned Osgood.  And so home again, and gave order to my
workmen what to do in my absence.  At night to Sir W. Batten's, and by his
and Sir W. Pen's persuasion I sent for my wife from my father's, who came
to us to Mrs. Turner's, where we were all at a collacion to-night till
twelve o'clock, there being a gentlewoman there that did play well and
sang well to the Harpsicon, and very merry we were.  So home and to bed,
where my wife had not lain a great while.

30th.  This morning, after order given to my workmen, my wife and I and
Mr. Creed took coach, and in Fishstreet took up Mr. Hater and his wife,
who through her mask seemed at first to be an old woman, but afterwards I
found her to be a very pretty modest black woman.  We got a small bait at
Leatherhead, and so to Godlyman, where we lay all night, and were very
merry, having this day no other extraordinary rencontre, but my hat
falling off my head at Newington into the water, by which it was spoiled,
and I ashamed of it.  I am sorry that I am not at London, to be at
Hide-parke to-morrow, among the great gallants and ladies, which will be
very fine.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.

                                 MAY 1661

May 1st.  Up early, and bated at Petersfield, in the room which the King
lay in lately at his being there.  Here very merry, and played us and our
wives at bowls.  Then we set forth again, and so to Portsmouth, seeming to
me to be a very pleasant and strong place; and we lay at the Red Lyon,
where Haselrigge and Scott and Walton did hold their councill, when they
were here, against Lambert and the Committee of Safety.  Several officers
of the Yard came to see us to-night, and merry we were, but troubled to
have no better lodgings.

2nd.  Up, and Mr. Creed and I to walk round the town upon the walls. Then
to our inn, and there all the officers of the Yard to see me with great
respect, and I walked with them to the Dock and saw all the stores, and
much pleased with the sight of the place.  Back and brought them all to
dinner with me, and treated them handsomely; and so after dinner by water
to the Yard, and there we made the sale of the old provisions. Then we and
our wives all to see the Montagu, which is a fine ship, and so to the town
again by water, and then to see the room where the Duke of Buckingham was
killed by Felton.--1628.  So to our lodging, and to supper and to bed.
To-night came Mr. Stevens to town to help us to pay off the Fox.

3rd.  Early to walk with Mr. Creed up and down the town, and it was in his
and some others' thoughts to have got me made free of the town, but the
Mayor, it seems, unwilling, and so they could not do it.  Then to the
payhouse, and there paid off the ship, and so to a short dinner, and then
took coach, leaving Mrs. Hater there to stay with her husband's friends,
and we to Petersfield, having nothing more of trouble in all my journey,
but the exceeding unmannerly and most epicure-like palate of Mr. Creed.
Here my wife and I lay in the room the Queen lately lay at her going into
France.

4th.  Up in the morning and took coach, and so to Gilford, where we lay at
the Red Lyon, the best Inn, and lay in the room the King lately lay in,
where we had time to see the Hospital, built by Archbishop Abbott, and the
free school, and were civilly treated by the Mayster.  So to supper, and
to bed, being very merry about our discourse with the Drawers concerning
the minister of the Town, with a red face and a girdle.  So to bed, where
we lay and sleep well.

5th (Lord's day).  Mr. Creed and I went to the red-faced Parson's church,
and heard a good sermon of him, better than I looked for.  Then home, and
had a good dinner, and after dinner fell in some talk in Divinity with Mr.
Stevens that kept us till it was past Church time.  Anon we walked into
the garden, and there played the fool a great while, trying who of Mr.
Creed or I could go best over the edge of an old fountain well, and I won
a quart of sack of him.  Then to supper in the banquet house, and there my
wife and I did talk high, she against and I for Mrs. Pierce (that she was
a beauty), till we were both angry. Then to walk in the fields, and so to
our quarters, and to bed.

6th.  Up by four o'clock and took coach.  Mr. Creed rode, and left us that
we know not whither he went.  We went on, thinking to be at home before
the officers rose, but finding we could not we staid by the way and eat
some cakes, and so home, where I was much troubled to see no more work
done in my absence than there was, but it could not be helped.  I sent my
wife to my father's, and I went and sat till late with my Lady Batten,
both the Sir Williams being gone this day to pay off some ships at
Deptford.  So home and to bed without seeing of them.  I hear to-night
that the Duke of York's son is this day dead, which I believe will please
every body; and I hear that the Duke and his Lady themselves are not much
troubled at it.

7th.  In the morning to Mr. Coventry, Sir G. Carteret, and my Lord's to
give them an account of my return.  My Lady, I find, is, since my going,
gone to the Wardrobe.  Then with Mr. Creed into London, to several places
about his and my business, being much stopped in our way by the City
traynebands, who go in much solemnity and pomp this day to muster before
the King and the Duke, and shops in the City are shut up every where all
this day.  He carried me to an ordinary by the Old Exchange, where we come
a little too late, but we had very good cheer for our 18d. a-piece, and an
excellent droll too, my host, and his wife so fine a woman; and sung and
played so well that I staid a great while and drunk a great deal of wine.
Then home and staid among my workmen all day, and took order for things
for the finishing of their work, and so at night to Sir W. Batten's, and
there supped and so home and to bed, having sent my Lord a letter to-night
to excuse myself for not going with him to-morrow to the Hope, whither he
is to go to see in what condition the fleet is in.

8th.  This morning came my brother John to take his leave of me, he being
to return to Cambridge to-morrow, and after I had chid him for going with
my Will the other day to Deptford with the principal officers, I did give
him some good counsell and 20s. in money, and so he went away.  All this
day I staid at home with my workmen without eating anything, and took much
pleasure to see my work go forward.  At night comes my wife not well from
my father's, having had a fore-tooth drawn out to-day, which do trouble
me, and the more because I am now in the greatest of all my dirt. My Will
also returned to-night pretty well, he being gone yesterday not very well
to his father's.  To-day I received a letter from my uncle, to beg an old
fiddle of me for my Cozen Perkin, the miller, whose mill the wind hath
lately broke down, and now he hath nothing to live by but fiddling, and he
must needs have it against Whitsuntide to play to the country girls; but
it vexed me to see how my uncle writes to me, as if he were not able to
buy him one.  But I intend tomorrow to send him one.  At night I set down
my journal of my late journey to this time, and so to bed.  My wife not
being well and I very angry with her for her coming hither in that
condition.

9th.  With my workmen all the morning, my wife being ill and in great pain
with her old pain, which troubled me much because that my house is in this
condition of dirt.  In the afternoon I went to Whitehall and there spoke
with my Lord at his lodgings, and there being with him my Lord
Chamberlain, I spoke for my old waterman Payne, to get into White's place,
who was waterman to my Lord Chamberlain, and is now to go master of the
barge to my Lord to sea, and my Lord Chamberlain did promise that Payne
should be entertained in White's place with him.  From thence to Sir G.
Carteret, and there did get his promise for the payment of the remainder
of the bill of Mr. Creed's, wherein of late I have been so much concerned,
which did so much rejoice me that I meeting with Mr. Childe took him to
the Swan Tavern in King Street, and there did give him a tankard of white
wine and sugar,--[The popular taste was formerly for sweet wines, and
sugar was frequently mixed with the wine.]--and so I went by water home
and set myself to get my Lord's accounts made up, which was till nine at
night before I could finish, and then I walked to the Wardrobe, being the
first time I was there since my Lady came thither, who I found all alone,
and so she shewed me all the lodgings as they are now fitted, and they
seem pretty pleasant.  By and by comes in my Lord, and so, after looking
over my accounts, I returned home, being a dirty and dark walk.  So to
bed.

10th.  At the office all the morning, and the afternoon among my workmen
with great pleasure, because being near an end of their work.  This
afternoon came Mr. Blackburn and Creed to see me, and I took them to the
Dolphin, and there drank a great deal of Rhenish wine with them and so
home, having some talk with Mr. Blackburn about his kinsman my Will, and
he did give me good satisfaction in that it is his desire that his kinsman
should do me all service, and that he would give him the best counsel he
could to make him good.  Which I begin of late to fear that he will not
because of the bad company that I find that he do begin to take. This
afternoon Mr. Hater received for me the L225 due upon Mr. Creed's bill in
which I am concerned so much, which do make me very glad.  At night to Sir
W. Batten and sat a while.  So to bed.

11th.  This morning I went by water with Payne (Mr. Moore being with me)
to my Lord Chamberlain at Whitehall, and there spoke with my Lord, and he
did accept of Payne for his waterman, as I had lately endeavoured to get
him to be.  After that Mr. Cooling did give Payne an order to be
entertained, and so I left him and Mr. Moore, and I went to Graye's Inne,
and there to a barber's, where I was trimmed, and had my haire cut, in
which I am lately become a little curious, finding that the length of it
do become me very much.  So, calling at my father's, I went home, and
there staid and saw my workmen follow their work, which this night is
brought to a very good condition.  This afternoon Mr. Shepley, Moore, and
Creed came to me all about their several accounts with me, and we did
something with them all, and so they went away.  This evening Mr. Hater
brought my last quarter's salary, of which I was very glad, because I have
lost my first bill for it, and so this morning was forced to get another
signed by three of my fellow officers for it.  All this evening till late
setting my accounts and papers in order, and so to bed.

12th.  My wife had a very troublesome night this night and in great pain,
but about the morning her swelling broke, and she was in great ease
presently as she useth to be.  So I put in a vent (which Dr. Williams sent
me yesterday) into the hole to keep it open till all the matter be come
out, and so I question not that she will soon be well again.  I staid at
home all this morning, being the Lord's day, making up my private accounts
and setting papers in order.  At noon went with my Lady Montagu at the
Wardrobe, but I found it so late that I came back again, and so dined with
my wife in her chamber.  After dinner I went awhile to my chamber to set
my papers right.  Then I walked forth towards Westminster and at the Savoy
heard Dr. Fuller preach upon David's words, "I will wait with patience all
the days of my appointed time until my change comes;" but methought it was
a poor dry sermon.  And I am afeard my former high esteem of his preaching
was more out of opinion than judgment. From thence homewards, but met with
Mr. Creed, with whom I went and walked in Grayes-Inn-walks, and from
thence to Islington, and there eat and drank at the house my father and we
were wont of old to go to; and after that walked homeward, and parted in
Smithfield: and so I home, much wondering to see how things are altered
with Mr. Creed, who, twelve months ago, might have been got to hang
himself almost as soon as go to a drinking-house on a Sunday.

13th.  All the morning at home among my workmen.  At noon Mr. Creed and I
went to the ordinary behind the Exchange, where we lately were, but I do
not like it so well as I did.  So home with him and to the office, where
we sat late, and he did deliver his accounts to us.  The office being done
I went home and took pleasure to see my work draw to an end.

14th.  Up early and by water to Whitehall to my Lord, and there had much
talk with him about getting some money for him.  He told me of his
intention to get the Muster Master's place for Mr. Pierce, the purser, who
he has a mind to carry to sea with him, and spoke very slightingly of Mr.
Creed, as that he had no opinion at all of him, but only he was forced to
make use of him because of his present accounts.  Thence to drink with Mr.
Shepley and Mr. Pinkny, and so home and among my workmen all day.  In the
evening Mr. Shepley came to me for some money, and so he and I to the
Mitre, and there we had good wine and a gammon of bacon.  My uncle Wight,
Mr. Talbot, and others were with us, and we were pretty merry.  So at
night home and to bed.  Finding my head grow weak now-a-days if I come to
drink wine, and therefore hope that I shall leave it off of myself, which
I pray God I could do.

15th.  With my workmen all day till the afternoon, and then to the office,
where Mr. Creed's accounts were passed.  Home and found all my joyner's
work now done, but only a small job or two, which please me very well.
This afternoon there came two men with an order from a Committee of Lords
to demand some books of me out of the office, in order to the examining of
Mr. Hutchinson's accounts, but I give them a surly answer, and they went
away to complain, which put me into some trouble with myself, but I
resolve to go to-morrow myself to these Lords and answer them.  To bed,
being in great fear because of the shavings which lay all up and down the
house and cellar, for fear of fire.

16th.  Up early to see whether the work of my house be quite done, and I
found it to my mind.  Staid at home all the morning, and about 2 o'clock
went in my velvet coat by water to the Savoy, and there, having staid a
good while, I was called into the Lords, and there, quite contrary to my
expectations, they did treat me very civilly, telling me that what they
had done was out of zeal to the King's service, and that they would joyne
with the governors of the chest with all their hearts, since they knew
that there was any, which they did not before.  I give them very
respectful answer and so went away to the Theatre, and there saw the
latter end of "The Mayd's Tragedy," which I never saw before, and methinks
it is too sad and melancholy.  Thence homewards, and meeting Mr. Creed I
took him by water to the Wardrobe with me, and there we found my Lord
newly gone away with the Duke of Ormond and some others, whom he had had
to the collation; and so we, with the rest of the servants in the hall,
sat down and eat of the best cold meats that ever I eat on in all my life.
From thence I went home (Mr. Moore with me to the waterside, telling me
how kindly he is used by my Lord and my Lady since his coming hither as a
servant), and to bed.

17th.  All the morning at home.  At noon Lieutenant Lambert came to me,
and he and I to the Exchange, and thence to an ordinary over against it,
where to our dinner we had a fellow play well upon the bagpipes and
whistle like a bird exceeding well, and I had a fancy to learn to whistle
as he do, and did promise to come some other day and give him an angell to
teach me.  To the office, and sat there all the afternoon till 9 at night.
So home to my musique, and my wife and I sat singing in my chamber a good
while together, and then to bed.

18th.  Towards Westminster, from the Towre, by water, and was fain to
stand upon one of the piers about the bridge,

     [The dangers of shooting the bridge were so great that a popular
     proverb has it--London Bridge was made for wise men to go over and
     fools to go under.]

before the men could drag their boat through the lock, and which they
could not do till another was called to help them.  Being through bridge I
found the Thames full of boats and gallys, and upon inquiry found that
there was a wager to be run this morning.  So spying of Payne in a gully,
I went into him, and there staid, thinking to have gone to Chelsy with
them.  But upon, the start, the wager boats fell foul one of another, till
at last one of them gives over, pretending foul play, and so the other row
away alone, and all our sport lost. So, I went ashore, at Westminster; and
to the Hall I went, where it was very pleasant to see the Hall in the
condition it is now with the judges on the benches at the further end of
it, which I had not seen all this term till now. Thence with Mr. Spicer,
Creed and some others to drink.  And so away homewards by water with Mr.
Creed, whom I left in London going about business and I home, where I
staid all the afternoon in the garden reading "Faber Fortunae" with great
pleasure. So home to bed.

19th.  (Lord's day) I walked in the morning towards Westminster, and
seeing many people at York House, I went down and found them at mass, it
being the Spanish ambassodors; and so I go into one of the gallerys, and
there heard two masses done, I think, not in so much state as I have seen
them heretofore. After that into the garden, and walked a turn or two, but
found it not so fine a place as I always took it for by the outside.
Thence to my Lord's and there spake with him about business, and then he
went to Whitehall to dinner, and Capt. Ferrers and Mr. Howe and myself to
Mr. Wilkinson's at the Crown, and though he had no meat of his own, yet we
happened to find our cook Mr. Robinson there, who had a dinner for himself
and some friends, and so he did give us a very fine dinner.  Then to my
Lord's, where we went and sat talking and laughing in the drawing-room a
great while.  All our talk about their going to sea this voyage, which
Capt. Ferrers is in some doubt whether he shall go or no, but swears that
he would go, if he were sure never to come back again; and I, giving him
some hopes, he grew so mad with joy that he fell a-dancing and leaping
like a madman.  Now it fell out so that the balcone windows were open, and
he went to the rayle and made an offer to leap over, and asked what if he
should leap over there.  I told him I would give him L40 if he did not go
to sea.  With that thought I shut the doors, and W. Howe hindered him all
we could; yet he opened them again, and, with a vault, leaps down into the
garden:--the greatest and most desperate frolic that ever I saw in my
life.  I run to see what was become of him, and we found him crawled upon
his knees, but could not rise; so we went down into the garden and dragged
him to the bench, where he looked like a dead man, but could not stir;
and, though he had broke nothing, yet his pain in his back was such as he
could not endure.  With this, my Lord (who was in the little new room)
come to us in amaze, and bid us carry him up, which, by our strength, we
did, and so laid him in East's bed, by the door; where he lay in great
pain.  We sent for a doctor and chyrurgeon, but none to be found, till
by-and-by by chance comes in Dr. Clerke, who is afeard of him.  So we sent
to get a lodging for him, and I went up to my Lord, where Captain Cooke,
Mr. Gibbons, and others of the King's musicians were come to present my
Lord with some songs and symphonys, which were performed very finely.
Which being done I took leave and supped at my father's, where was my
cozen Beck come lately out of the country.  I am troubled to see my father
so much decay of a suddain, as he do both in his seeing and hearing, and
as much to hear of him how my brother Tom do grow disrespectful to him and
my mother. I took leave and went home, where to prayers (which I have not
had in my house a good while), and so to bed.

20th.  At home all the morning; paid L50 to one Mr. Grant for Mr. Barlow,
for the last half year, and was visited by Mr. Anderson, my former chamber
fellow at Cambridge, with whom I parted at the Hague, but I did not go
forthwith him, only gave him a morning draft at home.  At noon Mr. Creed
came to me, and he and I to the Exchange, and so to an ordinary to dinner,
and after dinner to the Mitre, and there sat drinking while it rained very
much.  Then to the office, where I found Sir Williams both, choosing of
masters for the new fleet of ships that is ordered to be set forth, and
Pen seeming to be in an ugly humour, not willing to gratify one that I
mentioned to be put in, did vex me.  We sat late, and so home. Mr. Moore
came to me when I was going to bed, and sat with me a good while talking
about my Lord's business and our own and so good night.

21st.  Up early, and, with Sir R. Slingsby (and Major Waters the deaf
gentleman, his friend, for company's sake) to the Victualling-office (the
first time that I ever knew where it was), and there staid while he read a
commission for enquiry into some of the King's lands and houses
thereabouts, that are given his brother.  And then we took boat to
Woolwich, where we staid and gave order for the fitting out of some more
ships presently.  And then to Deptford, where we staid and did the same;
and so took barge again, and were overtaken by the King in his barge, he
having been down the river with his yacht this day for pleasure to try it;
and, as I hear, Commissioner Pett's do prove better than the Dutch one,
and that that his brother built.  While we were upon the water, one of the
greatest showers of rain fell that ever I saw. The Comptroller and I
landed with our barge at the Temple, and from thence I went to my
father's, and there did give order about some clothes to be made, and did
buy a new hat, cost between 20 and 30 shillings, at Mr. Holden's.  So
home.

22nd.  To Westminster, and there missed of my Lord, and so about noon I
and W. Howe by water to the Wardrobe, where my Lord and all the officers
of the Wardrobe dined, and several other friends of my Lord, at a venison
pasty. Before dinner, my Lady Wright and my Lady Jem. sang songs to the
harpsicon. Very pleasant and merry at dinner.  And then I went away by
water to the office, and there staid till it was late.  At night before I
went to bed the barber came to trim me and wash me, and so to bed, in
order to my being clean to-morrow.

23rd.  This day I went to my Lord, and about many other things at
Whitehall, and there made even my accounts with Mr. Shepley at my Lord's,
and then with him and Mr. Moore and John Bowles to the Rhenish wine house,
and there came Jonas Moore, the mathematician, to us, and there he did by
discourse make us fully believe that England and France were once the same
continent, by very good arguments, and spoke very many things, not so much
to prove the Scripture false as that the time therein is not well computed
nor understood.  From thence home by water, and there shifted myself into
my black silk suit (the first day I have put it on this year), and so to
my Lord Mayor's by coach, with a great deal of honourable company, and
great entertainment.  At table I had very good discourse with Mr. Ashmole,
wherein he did assure me that frogs and many insects do often fall from
the sky, ready formed.  Dr. Bates's singularity in not rising up nor
drinking the King's nor other healths at the table was very much observed.

     [Dr. William Bates, one of the most eminent of the Puritan divines,
     and who took part in the Savoy Conference.  His collected writings
     were published in 1700, and fill a large folio volume.  The
     Dissenters called him silver-tongued Bates.  Calamy affirmed that if
     Bates would have conformed to the Established Church he might have
     been raised to any bishopric in the kingdom.  He died in 1699, aged
     seventy-four.]

From thence we all took coach, and to our office, and there sat till it
was late; and so I home and to bed by day-light.  This day was kept a
holy-day through the town; and it pleased me to see the little boys walk
up and down in procession with their broom-staffs in their hands, as I had
myself long ago gone.

     [Pepys here refers to the perambulation of parishes on Holy
     Thursday, still observed.  This ceremony was sometimes enlivened by
     whipping the boys, for the better impressing on their minds the
     remembrance of the day, and the boundaries of the parish, instead of
     beating houses or stones. But this would not have harmonized well
     with the excellent Hooker's practice on this day, when he "always
     dropped some loving and facetious observations, to be remembered
     against the next year, especially by the boys and young people."
     Amongst Dorsetshire customs, it seems that, in perambulating a manor
     or parish, a boy is tossed into a stream, if that be the boundary;
     if a hedge, a sapling from it is applied for the purpose of
     flagellation.--B.]

24th.  At home all the morning making up my private accounts, and this is
the first time that I do find myself to be clearly worth L500 in money,
besides all my goods in my house, &c.  In the afternoon at the office
late, and then I went to the Wardrobe, where I found my Lord at supper,
and therefore I walked a good while till he had done, and I went in to
him, and there he looked over my accounts.  And they were committed to Mr.
Moore to see me paid what remained due to me.  Then down to the kitchen to
eat a bit of bread and butter, which I did, and there I took one of the
maids by the chin, thinking her to be Susan, but it proved to be her
sister, who is very like her.  From thence home.

25th.  All the morning at home about business.  At noon to the Temple,
where I staid and looked over a book or two at Playford's, and then to the
Theatre, where I saw a piece of "The Silent Woman," which pleased me. So
homewards, and in my way bought "The Bondman" in Paul's Churchyard, and so
home, where I found all clean, and the hearth and range, as it is now
enlarged, set up, which pleases me very much.

26th (Lord's day).  Lay long in bed.  To church and heard a good sermon at
our own church, where I have not been a great many weeks.  Dined with my
wife alone at home pleasing myself in that my house do begin to look as if
at last it would be in good order.  This day the Parliament received the
communion of Dr. Gunning at St. Margaret's, Westminster. In the afternoon
both the Sir Williams came to church, where we had a dull stranger.  After
church home, and so to the Mitre, where I found Dr. Burnett, the first
time that ever I met him to drink with him, and my uncle Wight and there
we sat and drank a great deal, and so I to Sir W. Batten's, where I have
on purpose made myself a great stranger, only to get a high opinion a
little more of myself in them.  Here I heard how Mrs. Browne, Sir W.
Batten's sister, is brought to bed, and I to be one of the godfathers,
which I could not nor did deny.  Which, however, did trouble me very much
to be at charge to no purpose, so that I could not sleep hardly all night,
but in the morning I bethought myself, and I think it is very well I
should do it.  Sir W. Batten told me how Mr. Prin (among the two or three
that did refuse to-day to receive the sacrament upon their knees) was
offered by a mistake the drink afterwards, which he did receive, being
denied the drink by Dr. Gunning, unless he would take it on his knees; and
after that by another the bread was brought him, and he did take it
sitting, which is thought very preposterous.  Home and to bed.

27th.  To the Wardrobe, and from thence with my Lords Sandwich and
Hinchinbroke to the Lords' House by boat at Westminster, and there I left
them.  Then to the lobby, and after waiting for Sir G. Downing's coming
out, to speak with him about the giving me up of my bond for my honesty
when I was his clerk, but to no purpose, I went to Clerke's at the Legg,
and there I found both Mr. Pierces, Mr. Rolt, formerly too great a man to
meet upon such even terms, and there we dined very merry, there coming to
us Captain Ferrers, this being the first day of his going abroad since his
leap a week ago, which I was greatly glad to see. By water to the office,
and there sat late, Sir George Carteret coming in, who among other things
did inquire into the naming of the maisters for this fleet, and was very
angry that they were named as they are, and above all to see the maister
of the Adventure (for whom there is some kind of difference between Sir W.
Pen and me) turned out, who has been in her list.  The office done, I went
with the Comptroller to the Coffee house, and there we discoursed of this,
and I seem to be fond of him, and indeed I find I must carry fair with all
as far as I see it safe, but I have got of him leave to have a little room
from his lodgings to my house, of which I am very glad, besides I do open
him a way to get lodgings himself in the office, of which I should be very
glad.  Home and to bed.

28th.  This morning to the Wardrobe, and thence to a little alehouse hard
by, to drink with John Bowies, who is now going to Hinchinbroke this day.
Thence with Mr. Shepley to the Exchange about business, and there, by Mr.
Rawlinson's favour, got into a balcone over against the Exchange; and
there saw the hangman burn, by vote of Parliament, two old acts, the one
for constituting us a Commonwealth, and the others I have forgot.  Which
still do make me think of the greatness of this late turn, and what people
will do tomorrow against what they all, through profit or fear, did
promise and practise this day.  Then to the Mitre with Mr. Shepley, and
there dined with D. Rawlinson and some friends of his very well.  So home,
and then to Cheapside about buying a piece of plate to give away to-morrow
to Mrs. Browne's child.  So to the Star in Cheapside, where I left Mr.
Moore telling L5 out for me, who I found in a great strait for my coming
back again, and so he went his way at my coming.  Then home, where Mr.
Cook I met and he paid me 30s., an old debt of his to me.  So to Sir W.
Pen's, and there sat alone with him till ten at night in talk with great
content, he telling me things and persons that I did not understand in the
late times, and so I home to bed.  My cozen John Holcroft (whom I have not
seen many years) this morning came to see me.

29th (King's birth-day).  Rose early and having made myself fine, and put
six spoons and a porringer of silver in my pocket to give away to-day, Sir
W. Pen and I took coach, and (the weather and ways being foul) went to
Walthamstowe; and being come there heard Mr. Radcliffe, my former school
fellow at Paul's (who is yet a mere boy), preach upon "Nay, let him take
all, since my Lord the King is returned," &c.  He reads all, and his
sermon very simple, but I looked for new matter.  Back to dinner to Sir
William Batten's; and then, after a walk in the fine gardens, we went to
Mrs. Browne's, where Sir W. Pen and I were godfathers, and Mrs. Jordan and
Shipman godmothers to her boy.  And there, before and after the
christening; we were with the woman above in her chamber; but whether we
carried ourselves well or ill, I know not; but I was directed by young
Mrs. Batten.  One passage of a lady that eat wafers with her dog did a
little displease me.  I did give the midwife 10s. and the nurse 5s. and
the maid of the house 2s.  But for as much I expected to give the name to
the child, but did not (it being called John), I forbore then to give my
plate till another time after a little more advice.  All being done, we
went to Mrs. Shipman's, who is a great butter-woman, and I did see there
the most of milk and cream, and the cleanest that ever I saw in my life.
After we had filled our bellies with cream, we took our leaves and away.
In our way, we had great sport to try who should drive fastest, Sir W.
Batten's coach, or Sir W. Pen's chariott, they having four, and we two
horses, and we beat them.  But it cost me the spoiling of my clothes and
velvet coat with dirt.  Being come home I to bed, and give my breeches to
be dried by the fire against to-morrow.

30th.  To the Wardrobe and there, with my Lord, went into his new barge to
try her, and found her a good boat, and like my Lord's contrivance of the
door to come out round and not square as they used to do.  Back to the
Wardrobe with my Lord, and then with Mr. Moore to the Temple, and thence
to.  Greatorex, who took me to Arundell-House, and there showed me some
fine flowers in his garden, and all the fine statues in the gallery, which
I formerly had seen, and is a brave sight, and thence to a blind dark
cellar, where we had two bottles of good ale, and so after giving him
direction for my silver side-table, I took boat at Arundell stairs, and
put in at Milford .  .  .  . So home and found Sir Williams both and my
Lady going to Deptford to christen Captain Rooth's child, and would have
had me with them, but I could not go.  To the office, where Sir R.
Slingsby was, and he and I into his and my lodgings to take a view of
them, out of a desire he has to have mine of me to join to his, and give
me Mr. Turner's. To the office again, where Sir G. Carteret came and sat a
while, he being angry for Sir Williams making of the maisters of this
fleet upon their own heads without a full table.  Then the Comptroller and
I to the Coffee House, and there sat a great while talking of many things.
So home and to bed.  This day, I hear, the Parliament have ordered a bill
to be brought in for the restoring the Bishops to the House of Lords;
which they had not done so soon but to spite Mr. Prin, who is every day so
bitter against them in his discourse in the House.

31st.  I went to my father's thinking to have met with my cozen John
Holcroft, but he came not, but to my great grief I found my father and
mother in a great deal of discontent one with another, and indeed my
mother is grown now so pettish that I know not how my father is able to
bear with it.  I did talk to her so as did not indeed become me, but I
could not help it, she being so unsufferably foolish and simple, so that
my father, poor man, is become a very unhappy man.  There I dined, and so
home and to the office all the afternoon till 9 at night, and then home
and to supper and to bed.  Great talk now how the Parliament intend to
make a collection of free gifts to the King through the Kingdom; but I
think it will not come to much.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     A little while since a very likely man to live as any I knew
     Being sure never to see the like again in this world
     Believe that England and France were once the same continent
     Chocolate was introduced into England about the year 1652
     Did trouble me very much to be at charge to no purpose
     Difference there will be between my father and mother about it
     Eat of the best cold meats that ever I eat on in all my life
     Foolery to take too much notice of such things
     Frogs and many insects do often fall from the sky, ready formed
     I could not forbear to love her exceedingly
     I had the opportunity of kissing Mrs. Rebecca very often
     I was as merry as I could counterfeit myself to be
     I went in and kissed them, demanding it as a fee due
     Jealousy of him and an ugly wench that lived there lately
     Lay with her to-night, which I have not done these eight (days)
     Made a lazy sermon, like a Presbyterian
     She would not let him come to bed to her out of jealousy
     So home and to bed, where my wife had not lain a great while
     The barber came to trim me and wash me
     Troubled to see my father so much decay of a suddain
     What people will do tomorrow
     What they all, through profit or fear, did promise
     Who seems so inquisitive when my, house will be made an end of

               THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                           JUNE, JULY & AUGUST
                                   1661

June 1st.  Having taken our leaves of Sir W. Batten and my Lady, who are
gone this morning to keep their Whitsuntide, Sir W. Pen and I and Mr.
Gauden by water to Woolwich, and there went from ship to ship to give
order for and take notice of their forwardness to go forth, and then to
Deptford and did the like, having dined at Woolwich with Captain Poole at
the tavern there.  From Deptford we walked to Redriffe, calling at the
half-way house, and there come into a room where there was infinite of new
cakes placed that are made against Whitsuntide, and there we were very
merry.  By water home, and there did businesses of the office. Among
others got my Lord's imprest of L1000 and Mr. Creed's of L10,000 against
this voyage their bills signed.  Having wrote letters into the country and
read some things I went to bed.

2nd (Whitsunday).  The barber having done with me, I went to church, and
there heard a good sermon of Mr. Mills, fit for the day.  Then home to
dinner, and then to church again, and going home I found Greatorex (whom I
expected today at dinner) come to see me, and so he and I in my chamber
drinking of wine and eating of anchovies an hour or two, discoursing of
many things in mathematics, and among others he showed me how it comes to
pass the strength that levers have, and he showed me that what is got as
to matter of strength is lost by them as to matter of time.  It rained
very hard, as it hath done of late so much that we begin to doubt a
famine, and so he was forced to stay longer than I desired.  At night
after prayers to bed.

3rd.  To the Wardrobe, where discoursing with my Lord, he did instruct me
as to the business of the Wardrobe, in case, in his absence, Mr. Townsend
should die, and told me that he do intend to joyne me and Mr. Moore with
him as to the business, now he is going to sea, and spoke to me many other
things, as to one that he do put the greatest confidence in, of which I am
proud.  Here I had a good occasion to tell him (what I have had long in my
mind) that, since it has pleased God to bless me with something, I am
desirous to lay out something for my father, and so have pitched upon Mr.
Young's place in the Wardrobe, which I desired he would give order in his
absence, if the place should fall that I might have the refusal.  Which my
Lord did freely promise me, at which I was very glad, he saying that he
would do that at the least.  So I saw my Lord into the barge going to
Whitehall, and I and Mr. Creed home to my house, whither my father and my
cozen Scott came to dine with me, and so we dined together very well, and
before we had done in comes my father Bowyer and my mother and four
daughters, and a young gentleman and his sister, their friends, and there
staid all the afternoon, which cost me great store of wine, and were very
merry.  By and by I am called to the office, and there staid a little.  So
home again, and took Mr. Creed and left them, and so he and I to the
Towre, to speak for some ammunition for ships for my Lord; and so he and
I, with much pleasure, walked quite round the Towre, which I never did
before.  So home, and after a walk with my wife upon the leads, I and she
went to bed.  This morning I and Dr. Peirce went over to the Beare at the
Bridge foot, thinking to have met my Lord Hinchinbroke and his brother
setting forth for France; but they being not come we went over to the
Wardrobe, and there found that my Lord Abbot Montagu being not at Paris,
my Lord hath a mind to have them stay a little longer before they go.

4th.  The Comptroller came this morning to get me to go see a house or two
near our office, which he would take for himself or Mr. Turner, and then
he would have me have Mr. Turner's lodgings and himself mine and Mr.
Davis's.  But the houses did not like us, and so that design at present is
stopped.  Then he and I by water to the bridge, and then walked over the
Bank-side till we came to the Temple, and so I went over and to my
father's, where I met with my cozen J. Holcroft, and took him and my
father and my brother Tom to the Bear tavern and gave them wine, my cozen
being to go into the country again to-morrow.  From thence to my Lord
Crew's to dinner with him, and had very good discourse about having of
young noblemen and gentlemen to think of going to sea, as being as
honourable service as the land war.  And among other things he told us
how, in Queen Elizabeth's time, one young nobleman would wait with a
trencher at the back of another till he came to age himself.  And
witnessed in my young Lord of Kent, that then was, who waited upon my Lord
Bedford at table, when a letter came to my Lord Bedford that the Earldom
of Kent was fallen to his servant, the young Lord; and so he rose from
table, and made him sit down in his place, and took a lower for himself,
for so he was by place to sit.  From thence to the Theatre and saw "Harry
the 4th," a good play.  That done I went over the water and walked over
the fields to Southwark, and so home and to my lute.  At night to bed.

5th.  This morning did give my wife L4 to lay out upon lace and other
things for herself.  I to Wardrobe and so to Whitehall and Westminster,
where I dined with my Lord and Ned Dickering alone at his lodgings. After
dinner to the office, where we sat and did business, and Sir W. Pen and I
went home with Sir R. Slingsby to bowls in his ally, and there had good
sport, and afterwards went in and drank and talked.  So home Sir William
and I, and it being very hot weather I took my flageolette and played upon
the leads in the garden, where Sir W. Pen came out in his shirt into his
leads, and there we staid talking and singing, and drinking great drafts
of claret, and eating botargo

     ["Botarga.  The roe of the mullet pressed flat and dried; that of
     commerce, however, is from the tunny, a large fish of passage which
     is common in the Mediterranean.  The best kind comes from Tunis."
     --Smyth's Sailor's Word-Book.  Botargo was chiefly used to promote
     drinking by causing thirst, and Rabelais makes Gargantua eat it.]

and bread and butter till 12 at night, it being moonshine; and so to bed,
very near fuddled.

6th.  My head hath aked all night, and all this morning, with my last
night's debauch.  Called up this morning by Lieutenant Lambert, who is now
made Captain of the Norwich, and he and I went down by water to Greenwich,
in our way observing and discoursing upon the things of a ship, he telling
me all I asked him, which was of good use to me.  There we went and eat
and drank and heard musique at the Globe, and saw the simple motion that
is there of a woman with a rod in her hand keeping time to the musique
while it plays, which is simple, methinks.  Back again by water, calling
at Captain Lambert's house, which is very handsome and neat, and a fine
prospect at top.  So to the office, where we sat a little, and then the
Captain and I again to Bridewell to Mr. Holland's, where his wife also, a
plain dowdy, and his mother was.  Here I paid Mrs. Holland the money due
from me to her husband.  Here came two young gentlewomen to see Mr.
Holland, and one of them could play pretty well upon the viallin, but,
good God! how these ignorant people did cry her up for it!  We were very
merry.  I staid and supped there, and so home and to bed.  The weather
very hot, this night I left off my wastecoat.

7th.  To my Lord's at Whitehall, but not finding him I went to the
Wardrobe and there dined with my Lady, and was very kindly treated by her.
After dinner to the office, and there till late at night.  So home, and to
Sir William Batten's, who is come this day from Chatham with my Lady, who
is and has been much troubled with the toothache.  Here I staid till late,
and so home and to bed.

8th.  To Whitehall to my Lord, who did tell me that he would have me go to
Mr. Townsend, whom he had ordered to discover to me the whole mystery of
the Wardrobe, and none else but me, and that he will make me deputy with
him for fear that he should die in my Lord's absence, of which I was glad.
Then to the Cook's with Mr. Shepley and Mr. Creed, and dined together, and
then I went to the Theatre and there saw Bartholomew Faire, the first time
it was acted now a-days.  It is a most admirable play and well acted, but
too much prophane and abusive.  From thence, meeting Mr. Creed at the
door, he and I went to the tobacco shop under Temple Bar gate, and there
went up to the top of the house and there sat drinking Lambeth ale a good
while.  Then away home, and in my way called upon Mr. Rawlinson (my uncle
Wight being out of town), for his advice to answer a letter of my uncle
Robert, wherein he do offer me a purchase to lay some money upon, that
joynes upon some of his own lands, and plainly telling me that the reason
of his advice is the convenience that it will give me as to his estate, of
which I am exceeding glad, and am advised to give up wholly the disposal
of my money to him, let him do what he will with it, which I shall do.  So
home and to bed.

9th (Lord's day).  This day my wife put on her black silk gown, which is
now laced all over with black gimp lace, as the fashion is, in which she
is very pretty.  She and I walked to my Lady's at the Wardrobe, and there
dined and was exceeding much made of.  After dinner I left my wife there,
and I walked to Whitehall, and then went to Mr. Pierce's and sat with his
wife a good while (who continues very pretty) till he came, and then he
and I, and Mr. Symons (dancing master), that goes to sea with my Lord, to
the Swan tavern, and there drank, and so again to White Hall, and there
met with Dean Fuller, and walked a great while with him; among other
things discoursed of the liberty the Bishop (by name the of Galloway)
takes to admit into orders any body that will; among others, Roundtree, a
simple mechanique that was a person [parson ?] formerly in the fleet. He
told me he would complain of it.  By and by we went and got a sculler, and
landing him at Worcester House, I and W. Howe, who came to us at
Whitehall, went to the Wardrobe, where I met with Mr. Townsend, who is
very willing he says to communicate anything for my Lord's advantage to me
as to his business.  I went up to Jane Shore's towre, and there W. Howe
and I sang, and so took my wife and walked home, and so to bed. After I
came home a messenger came from my Lord to bid me come to him tomorrow
morning.

10th.  Early to my Lord's, who privately told me how the King had made him
Embassador in the bringing over the Queen.

     [Katherine of Braganza, daughter of John IV. of Portugal, born 1638,
     married to Charles II., May 21st, 1662.  After the death of the king
     she lived for some time at Somerset House, and then returned to
     Portugal, of which country she became Regent in 1704 on the
     retirement of her brother Don Pedro.  She died December 31st, 1705.]

That he is to go to Algier, &c., to settle the business, and to put the
fleet in order there; and so to come back to Lisbone with three ships, and
there to meet the fleet that is to follow him.  He sent for me, to tell me
that he do intrust me with the seeing of all things done in his absence as
to this great preparation, as I shall receive orders from my Lord
Chancellor and Mr. Edward Montagu.  At all which my heart is above measure
glad; for my Lord's honour, and some profit to myself, I hope. By and by,
out with Mr. Shepley Walden, Parliament-man for Huntingdon, Rolt,
Mackworth, and Alderman Backwell, to a house hard by, to drink Lambeth
ale.  So I back to the Wardrobe, and there found my Lord going to Trinity
House, this being the solemn day of choosing Master, and my Lord is
chosen, so he dines there to-day.  I staid and dined with my Lady; but
after we were set, comes in some persons of condition, and so the children
and I rose and dined by ourselves, all the children and I, and were very
merry and they mighty fond of me.  Then to the office, and there sat
awhile.  So home and at night to bed, where we lay in Sir R. Slingsby's
lodgings in the dining room there in one green bed, my house being now in
its last work of painting and whiting.

11th.  At the office this morning, Sir G. Carteret with us; and we agreed
upon a letter to the Duke of York, to tell him the sad condition of this
office for want of money; how men are not able to serve us more without
some money; and that now the credit of the office is brought so low, that
none will sell us any thing without our personal security given for the
same.  All the afternoon abroad about several businesses, and at night
home and to bed.

12th.  Wednesday, a day kept between a fast and a feast, the Bishops not
being ready enough to keep the fast for foul weather before fair weather
came; and so they were forced to keep it between both.

     [A Form of Prayer was published to be used in London on the 12th,
     and in the country on the 19th of June, being the special days
     appointed for a general fast to be kept in the respective places for
     averting those sicknesses and diseases, that dearth and scarcity,
     which justly may be feared from the late immoderate rain and waters:
     for a thanksgiving also for the blessed change of weather; and the
     begging the continuance of it to us for our comfort: And likewise
     for beseeching a Blessing upon the High Court of Parliament now
     assembled: Set forth by his Majesty's authority.  A sermon was
     preached before the Commons by Thomas Greenfield, preacher of
     Lincoln's Inn.  The Lords taxed themselves for the poor--an earl,
     30s., a baron, 20s.  Those absent from prayers were to pay a
     forfeit.--B.]

I to Whitehall, and there with Captain Rolt and Ferrers we went to Lambeth
to drink our morning draft, where at the Three Mariners, a place noted for
their ale, we went and staid awhile very merry, and so away. And wanting a
boat, we found Captain Bun going down the river, and so we went into his
boat having a lady with him, and he landed them at Westminster and me at
the Bridge.  At home all day with my workmen, and doing several things,
among others writing the letter resolved of yesterday to the Duke.  Then
to White Hall, where I met my Lord, who told me he must have L300 laid out
in cloth, to give in Barbary, as presents among the Turks.  At which
occasion of getting something I was very glad. Home to supper, and then to
Sir R. Slingsby, who with his brother and I went to my Lord's at the
Wardrobe, and there staid a great while, but he being now taking his leave
of his friends staid out late, and so they went away.  Anon came my Lord
in, and I staid with him a good while, and then to bed with Mr. Moore in
his chamber.

13th.  I went up and down to Alderman Backwell's, but his servants not
being up, I went home and put on my gray cloth suit and faced white coat,
made of one of my wife's pettycoates, the first time I have had it on, and
so in a riding garb back again and spoke with Mr. Shaw at the Alderman's,
who offers me L300 if my Lord pleases to buy this cloth with, which
pleased me well.  So to the Wardrobe and got my Lord to order Mr. Creed to
imprest so much upon me to be paid by Alderman Backwell.  So with my Lord
to Whitehall by water, and he having taken leave of the King, comes to us
at his lodgings and from thence goes to the garden stairs and there takes
barge, and at the stairs was met by Sir R. Slingsby, who there took his
leave of my Lord, and I heard my Lord thank him for his kindness to me,
which Sir Robert answered much to my advantage.  I went down with my Lord
in the barge to Deptford, and there went on board the Dutch yacht and
staid there a good while, W. Howe not being come with my Lord's things,
which made my Lord very angry.  By and by he comes and so we set sayle,
and anon went to dinner, my Lord and we very merry; and after dinner I
went down below and there sang, and took leave of W. Howe, Captain Rolt,
and the rest of my friends, then went up and took leave of my Lord, who
give me his hand and parted with great respect.  So went and Captain
Ferrers with me into our wherry, and my Lord did give five guns, all they
had charged, which was the greatest respect my Lord could do me, and of
which I was not a little proud.  So with a sad and merry heart I left them
sailing pleasantly from Erith, hoping to be in the Downs tomorrow early.
We toward London in our boat. Pulled off our stockings and bathed our legs
a great while in the river, which I had not done some years before.  By
and by we come to Greenwich, and thinking to have gone on the King's
yacht, the King was in her, so we passed by, and at Woolwich went on
shore, in the company of Captain Poole of Jamaica and young Mr.
Kennersley, and many others, and so to the tavern where we drank a great
deal both wine and beer.  So we parted hence and went home with Mr.
Falconer, who did give us cherrys and good wine.  So to boat, and young
Poole took us on board the Charity and gave us wine there, with which I
had full enough, and so to our wherry again, and there fell asleep till I
came almost to the Tower, and there the Captain and I parted, and I home
and with wine enough in my head, went to bed.

14th.  To Whitehall to my Lord's, where I found Mr. Edward Montagu and his
family come to lie during my Lord's absence.  I sent to my house by my
Lord's order his shipp--[Qy.  glass omitted after shipp.]--and triangle
virginall.  So to my father's, and did give him order about the buying of
this cloth to send to my Lord.  But I could not stay with him myself, for
having got a great cold by my playing the fool in the water yesterday I
was in great pain, and so went home by coach to bed, and went not to the
office at all, and by keeping myself warm, I broke wind and so came to
some ease.  Rose and eat some supper, and so to bed again.

15th.  My father came and drank his morning draft with me, and sat with me
till I was ready, and so he and I about the business of the cloth.  By and
by I left him and went and dined with my Lady, who, now my Lord is gone,
is come to her poor housekeeping again.  Then to my father's, who tells me
what he has done, and we resolved upon two pieces of scarlet, two of
purple, and two of black, and L50 in linen.  I home, taking L300 with me
home from Alderman Backwell's.  After writing to my Lord to let him know
what I had done I was going to bed, but there coming the purser of the
King's yacht for victualls presently, for the Duke of York is to go down
to-morrow, I got him to promise stowage for these things there, and so I
went to bed, bidding Will go and fetch the things from the carrier's
hither, which about 12 o'clock were brought to my house and laid there all
night.

16th (Lord's day).  But no purser coming in the morning for them, and I
hear that the Duke went last night, and so I am at a great loss what to
do; and so this day (though the Lord's day) staid at home, sending Will up
and down to know what to do.  Sometimes thinking to continue my resolution
of sending by the carrier to be at Deal on Wednesday next, sometimes to
send them by sea by a vessel on purpose, but am not yet come to a
resolution, but am at a very great loss and trouble in mind what in the
world to do herein.  The afternoon (while Will was abroad) I spent in
reading "The Spanish Gypsey," a play not very good, though commended much.
At night resolved to hire a Margate Hoy, who would go away to-morrow
morning, which I did, and sent the things all by him, and put them on
board about 12 this night, hoping to have them as the wind now serves in
the Downs to-morrow night.  To-bed with some quiet of mind, having sent
the things away.

17th.  Visited this morning by my old friend Mr. Ch. Carter, who staid and
went to Westminster with me, and there we parted, and I to the Wardrobe
and dined with my Lady.  So home to my painters, who are now about
painting my stairs.  So to the office, and at night we all went to Sir W.
Pen's, and there sat and drank till 11 at night, and so home and to bed.

18th.  All this morning at home vexing about the delay of my painters, and
about four in the afternoon my wife and I by water to Captain Lambert's,
where we took great pleasure in their turret-garden, and seeing the fine
needle-works of his wife, the best I ever saw in my life, and afterwards
had a very handsome treat and good musique that she made upon the
harpsicon, and with a great deal of pleasure staid till 8 at night, and so
home again, there being a little pretty witty child that is kept in their
house that would not let us go without her, and so fell a-crying by the
water-side.  So home, where I met Jack Cole, who staid with me a good
while, and is still of the old good humour that we were of at school
together, and I am very glad to see him.  He gone, I went to bed.

19th.  All the morning almost at home, seeing my stairs finished by the
painters, which pleases me well.  So with Mr. Moore to Westminster Hall,
it being term, and then by water to the Wardrobe, where very merry, and so
home to the office all the afternoon, and at night to the Exchange to my
uncle Wight about my intention of purchasing at Brampton.  So back again
home and at night to bed.  Thanks be to God I am very well again of my
late pain, and to-morrow hope to be out of my pain of dirt and trouble in
my house, of which I am now become very weary.  One thing I must observe
here while I think of it, that I am now become the most negligent man in
the world as to matters of news, insomuch that, now-a-days, I neither can
tell any, nor ask any of others.

20th.  At home the greatest part of the day to see my workmen make an end,
which this night they did to my great content.

21st.  This morning going to my father's I met him, and so he and I went
and drank our morning draft at the Samson in Paul's Churchyard, and eat
some gammon of bacon, &c., and then parted, having bought some green
Say--[A woollen cloth.  "Saye clothe serge."--Palsgrave.]--for curtains in
my parler.  Home, and so to the Exchequer, where I met with my uncle
Wight, and home with him to dinner, where among others (my aunt being out
of town), Mr. Norbury and I did discourse of his wife's house and land at
Brampton, which I find too much for me to buy.  Home, and in the afternoon
to the office, and much pleased at night to see my house begin to be clean
after all the dirt.

22nd.  Abroad all the morning about several businesses.  At noon went and
dined with my Lord Crew, where very much made of by him and his lady. Then
to the Theatre, "The Alchymist,"--[Comedy by Ben Jonson, first printed in
1612.]--which is a most incomparable play.  And that being done I met with
little Luellin and Blirton, who took me to a friend's of theirs in
Lincoln's Inn fields, one Mr. Hodges, where we drank great store of
Rhenish wine and were very merry.  So I went home, where I found my house
now very clean, which was great content to me.

23rd (Lord's day).  In the morning to church, and my wife not being well,
I went with Sir W. Batten home to dinner, my Lady being out of town, where
there was Sir W. Pen, Captain Allen and his daughter Rebecca, and Mr.
Hempson and his wife.  After dinner to church all of us and had a very
good sermon of a stranger, and so I and the young company to walk first to
Graye's Inn Walks, where great store of gallants, but above all the ladies
that I there saw, or ever did see, Mrs. Frances Butler (Monsieur
L'Impertinent's sister) is the greatest beauty.  Then we went to
Islington, where at the great house I entertained them as well as I could,
and so home with them, and so to my own home and to bed.  Pall, who went
this day to a child's christening of Kate Joyce's, staid out all night at
my father's, she not being well.

24th (Midsummer-day).  We kept this a holiday, and so went not to the
office at all.  All the morning at home.  At noon my father came to see my
house now it is done, which is now very neat.  He and I and Dr. Williams
(who is come to see my wife, whose soare belly is now grown dangerous as
she thinks) to the ordinary over against the Exchange, where we dined and
had great wrangling with the master of the house when the reckoning was
brought to us, he setting down exceeding high every thing. I home again
and to Sir W. Batten's, and there sat a good while.  So home.

25th.  Up this morning to put my papers in order that are come from my
Lord's, so that now I have nothing there remaining that is mine, which I
have had till now.  This morning came Mr. Goodgroome

     [Theodore Goodgroome, Pepys's singing-master.  He was probably
     related to John Goodgroome, a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, who is
     also referred to in the Diary.]

to me (recommended by Mr. Mage), with whom I agreed presently to give him
20s. entrance, which I then did, and 20s. a month more to teach me to
sing, and so we began, and I hope I have come to something in it.  His
first song is "La cruda la bella."  He gone my brother Tom comes, with
whom I made even with my father and the two drapers for the cloths I sent
to sea lately.  At home all day, in the afternoon came Captain Allen and
his daughter Rebecca and Mr. Hempson, and by and by both Sir Williams, who
sat with me till it was late, and I had a very gallant collation for them.
At night to bed.

26th.  To Westminster about several businesses, then to dine with my Lady
at the Wardrobe, taking Dean Fuller along with me; then home, where I
heard my father had been to find me about special business; so I took
coach and went to him, and found by a letter to him from my aunt that my
uncle Robert is taken with a dizziness in his head, so that they desire my
father to come down to look after his business, by which we guess that he
is very ill, and so my father do think to go to-morrow.  And so God's will
be done.  Back by water to the office, there till night, and so home to my
musique and then to bed.

27th.  To my father's, and with him to Mr. Starling's to drink our morning
draft, and there I told him how I would have him speak to my uncle Robert,
when he comes thither, concerning my buying of land, that I could pay
ready money L600 and the rest by L150 per annum, to make up as much as
will buy L50 per annum, which I do, though I not worth above L500 ready
money, that he may think me to be a greater saver than I am.  Here I took
my leave of my father, who is going this morning to my uncle upon my
aunt's letter this week that he is not well and so needs my father's help.
At noon home, and then with my Lady Batten, Mrs. Rebecca Allen, Mrs.
Thompson, &c., two coaches of us, we went and saw "Bartholomew Fayre"
acted very well, and so home again and staid at Sir W. Batten's late, and
so home to bed.  This day Mr. Holden sent me a bever, which cost me L4 5s.

     [Whilst a hat (see January 28th, 1660-61, ante) cost only 35s.  See
     also Lord Sandwich's vexation at his beaver being stolen, and a hat
     only left in lieu of it, April 30th, 1661, ante; and April 19th and
     26th, 1662, Post.--B.]

28th.  At home all the morning practising to sing, which is now my great
trade, and at noon to my Lady and dined with her.  So back and to the
office, and there sat till 7 at night, and then Sir W. Pen and I in his
coach went to Moorefields, and there walked, and stood and saw the
wrestling, which I never saw so much of before, between the north and west
countrymen.  So home, and this night had our bed set up in our room that
we called the Nursery, where we lay, and I am very much pleased with the
room.

29th.  By a letter from the Duke complaining of the delay of the ships
that are to be got ready, Sir Williams both and I went to Deptford and
there examined into the delays, and were satisfyed.  So back again home
and staid till the afternoon, and then I walked to the Bell at the Maypole
in the Strand, and thither came to me by appointment Mr. Chetwind,
Gregory, and Hartlibb, so many of our old club, and Mr. Kipps, where we
staid and drank and talked with much pleasure till it was late, and so I
walked home and to bed.  Mr. Chetwind by chewing of tobacco is become very
fat and sallow, whereas he was consumptive, and in our discourse he fell
commending of "Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity," as the best book, and the
only one that made him a Christian, which puts me upon the buying of it,
which I will do shortly.

30th (Lord's day).  To church, where we observe the trade of briefs is
come now up to so constant a course every Sunday, that we resolve to give
no more to them.

     [It appears, from an old MS. account-book of the collections in the
     church of St. Olave, Hart Street, beginning in 1642, still extant,
     that the money gathered on the 30th June, 1661, "for several
     inhabitants of the parish of St. Dunstan in the West towards their
     losse by fire," amounted to "xxs. viiid."  Pepys might complain of
     the trade in briefs, as similar contributions had been levied
     fourteen weeks successively, previous to the one in question at St.
     Olave's church.  Briefs were abolished in 1828.--B.]

A good sermon, and then home to dinner, my wife and I all alone.  After
dinner Sir Williams both and I by water to Whitehall, where having walked
up and down, at last we met with the Duke of York, according to an order
sent us yesterday from him, to give him an account where the fault lay in
the not sending out of the ships, which we find to be only the wind hath
been against them, and so they could not get out of the river.  Hence I to
Graye's Inn Walk, all alone, and with great pleasure seeing the fine
ladies walk there.  Myself humming to myself (which now-a-days is my
constant practice since I begun to learn to sing) the trillo, and found by
use that it do come upon me.  Home very weary and to bed, finding my wife
not sick, but yet out of order, that I fear she will come to be sick.
This day the Portuguese Embassador came to White Hall to take leave of the
King; he being now going to end all with the Queen, and to send her over.
The weather now very fair and pleasant, but very hot. My father gone to
Brampton to see my uncle Robert, not knowing whether to find him dead or
alive.  Myself lately under a great expense of money upon myself in
clothes and other things, but I hope to make it up this summer by my
having to do in getting things ready to send with the next fleet to the
Queen.

Myself in good health, but mighty apt to take cold, so that this hot
weather I am fain to wear a cloth before my belly.



                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.

                                   JULY

                                   1661

July 1st.  This morning I went up and down into the city, to buy several
things, as I have lately done, for my house.  Among other things, a fair
chest of drawers for my own chamber, and an Indian gown for myself.  The
first cost me 33s., the other 34s.  Home and dined there, and Theodore
Goodgroome, my singing master, with me, and then to our singing.  After
that to the office, and then home.

2nd.  To Westminster Hall and there walked up and down, it being Term
time.  Spoke with several, among others my cozen Roger Pepys, who was
going up to the Parliament House, and inquired whether I had heard from my
father since he went to Brampton, which I had done yesterday, who writes
that my uncle is by fits stupid, and like a man that is drunk, and
sometimes speechless.  Home, and after my singing master had done, took
coach and went to Sir William Davenant's Opera; this being the fourth day
that it hath begun, and the first that I have seen it.  To-day was acted
the second part of "The Siege of Rhodes."  We staid a very great while for
the King and the Queen of Bohemia.  And by the breaking of a board over
our heads, we had a great deal of dust fell into the ladies' necks and the
men's hair, which made good sport.  The King being come, the scene opened;
which indeed is very fine and magnificent, and well acted, all but the
Eunuch, who was so much out that he was hissed off the stage. Home and
wrote letters to my Lord at sea, and so to bed.

3rd.  To Westminster to Mr. Edward Montagu about business of my Lord's,
and so to the Wardrobe, and there dined with my Lady, who is in some
mourning for her brother, Mr. Saml.  Crew, who died yesterday of the
spotted fever.  So home through Duck Lane' to inquire for some Spanish
books, but found none that pleased me.  So to the office, and that being
done to Sir W. Batten's with the Comptroller, where we sat late talking
and disputing with Mr. Mills the parson of our parish.  This day my Lady
Batten and my wife were at the burial of a daughter of Sir John Lawson's,
and had rings for themselves and their husbands.  Home and to
bed.

4th.  At home all the morning; in the afternoon I went to the Theatre, and
there I saw "Claracilla" (the first time I ever saw it), well acted. But
strange to see this house, that used to be so thronged, now empty since
the Opera begun; and so will continue for a while, I believe. Called at my
father's, and there I heard that my uncle Robert--[Robert Pepys, of
Brampton, who died on the following day.]--continues to have his fits of
stupefaction every day for 10 or 12 hours together.  From thence to the
Exchange at night, and then went with my uncle Wight to the Mitre and were
merry, but he takes it very ill that my father would go out of town to
Brampton on this occasion and would not tell him of it, which I
endeavoured to remove but could not.  Here Mr. Batersby the apothecary
was, who told me that if my uncle had the emerods--[Haemorrhoids or
piles.]--(which I think he had) and that now they are stopped, he will lay
his life that bleeding behind by leeches will cure him, but I am resolved
not to meddle in it.  Home and to bed.

5th.  At home, and in the afternoon to the office, and that being done all
went to Sir W. Batten's and there had a venison pasty, and were very
merry.  At night home and to bed.

6th.  Waked this morning with news, brought me by a messenger on purpose,
that my uncle Robert is dead, and died yesterday; so I rose sorry in some
respect, glad in my expectations in another respect.  So I made myself
ready, went and told my uncle Wight, my Lady, and some others thereof, and
bought me a pair of boots in St. Martin's, and got myself ready, and then
to the Post House and set out about eleven and twelve o'clock, taking the
messenger with me that came to me, and so we rode and got well by nine
o'clock to Brampton, where I found my father well.  My uncle's corps in a
coffin standing upon joynt-stools in the chimney in the hall; but it begun
to smell, and so I caused it to be set forth in the yard all night, and
watched by two men.  My aunt I found in bed in a most nasty ugly pickle,
made me sick to see it.  My father and I lay together tonight, I greedy to
see the will, but did not ask to see it till to-morrow.

7th (Lord's day).  In the morning my father and I walked in the garden and
read the will; where, though he gives me nothing at present till my
father's death, or at least very little, yet I am glad to see that he hath
done so well for us, all, and well to the rest of his kindred. After that
done, we went about getting things, as ribbands and gloves, ready for the
burial.  Which in the afternoon was done; where, it being Sunday, all
people far and near come in; and in the greatest disorder that ever I saw,
we made shift to serve them what we had of wine and other things; and then
to carry him to the church, where Mr. Taylor buried him, and Mr. Turners
preached a funerall sermon, where he spoke not particularly of him
anything, but that he was one so well known for his honesty, that it spoke
for itself above all that he could say for it. And so made a very good
sermon.  Home with some of the company who supped there, and things being
quiet, at night to bed.

8th, 9th, Loth, 11th, 12th, 13th.  I fell to work, and my father to look
over my uncle's papers and clothes, and continued all this week upon that
business, much troubled with my aunt's base, ugly humours.  We had news of
Tom Trice's putting in a caveat against us, in behalf of his mother, to
whom my uncle hath not given anything, and for good reason therein
expressed, which troubled us also.  But above all, our trouble is to find
that his estate appears nothing as we expected, and all the world
believes; nor his papers so well sorted as I would have had them, but all
in confusion, that break my brains to understand them.  We missed also the
surrenders of his copyhold land, without which the land would not come to
us, but to the heir at law, so that what with this, and the badness of the
drink and the ill opinion I have of the meat, and the biting of the gnats
by night and my disappointment in getting home this week, and the trouble
of sorting all the papers, I am almost out of my wits with trouble, only I
appear the more contented, because I would not have my father troubled.
The latter end of the week Mr. Philips comes home from London, and so we
advised with him and have the best counsel he could give us, but for all
that we were not quiet in our minds.

14th (Lord's day).  At home, and Robert Barnwell with us, and dined, and
in the evening my father and I walked round Portholme and viewed all the
fields, which was very pleasant.  Thence to Hinchingbroke, which is now
all in dirt, because of my Lord's building, which will make it very
magnificent.  Back to Brampton, and to supper and to bed.

15th.  Up by three o'clock this morning, and rode to Cambridge, and was
there by seven o'clock, where, after I was trimmed, I went to Christ
College, and found my brother John at eight o'clock in bed, which vexed
me.  Then to King's College chappell, where I found the scholars in their
surplices at the service with the organs, which is a strange sight to what
it used in my time to be here.  Then with Dr. Fairbrother (whom I met
there) to the Rose tavern, and called for some wine, and there met
fortunately with Mr. Turner of our office, and sent for his wife, and were
very merry (they being come to settle their son here), and sent also for
Mr. Sanchy, of Magdalen, with whom and other gentlemen, friends of his, we
were very merry, and I treated them as well as I could, and so at noon
took horse again, having taken leave of my cozen Angier, and rode to
Impington, where I found my old uncle

     [Talbot Pepys, sixth son of John Pepys of Impington, was born 1583,
     and therefore at this time he was seventy-eight years of age.  He
     was educated at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and called to the bar at
     the Middle Temple in 1605.  He was M.P. for Cambridge in 1625, and
     Recorder of Cambridge from 1624 to 1660, in which year he was
     succeeded by his son Roger.  He died of the plague, March, 1666,
     aged eighty-three.]

sitting all alone, like a man out of the world: he can hardly see; but all
things else he do pretty livelyly.  Then with Dr. John Pepys and him, I
read over the will, and had their advice therein, who, as to the
sufficiency thereof confirmed me, and advised me as to the other parts
thereof.  Having done there, I rode to Gravely with much ado to inquire
for a surrender of my uncle's in some of the copyholders' hands there, but
I can hear of none, which puts me into very great trouble of mind, and so
with a sad heart rode home to Brampton, but made myself as cheerful as I
could to my father, and so to bed.

16th, 17th, 18th, 19th.  These four days we spent in putting things in
order, letting of the crop upon the ground, agreeing with Stankes to have
a care of our business in our absence, and we think ourselves in nothing
happy but in lighting upon him to be our bayly; in riding to Offord and
Sturtlow, and up and down all our lands, and in the evening walking, my
father and I about the fields talking, and had advice from Mr. Moore from
London, by my desire, that the three witnesses of the will being all
legatees, will not do the will any wrong.  To-night Serjeant Bernard, I
hear, is come home into the country.  To supper and to bed.  My aunt
continuing in her base, hypocritical tricks, which both Jane Perkin (of
whom we make great use), and the maid do tell us every day of.

20th.  Up to Huntingdon this morning to Sir Robert Bernard, with whom I
met Jaspar Trice.  So Sir Robert caused us to sit down together and began
discourse very fairly between us, so I drew out the Will and show it him,
and [he] spoke between us as well as I could desire, but could come to no
issue till Tom Trice comes.  Then Sir Robert and I fell to talk about the
money due to us upon surrender from Piggott, L164., which he tells me will
go with debts to the heir at law, which breaks my heart on the other side.
Here I staid and dined with Sir Robert Bernard and his lady, my Lady
Digby, a very good woman.  After dinner I went into the town and spent the
afternoon, sometimes with Mr. Phillips, sometimes with Dr. Symcottes, Mr.
Vinter, Robert Ethell, and many more friends, and at last Mr. Davenport,
Phillips, Jaspar Trice, myself and others at Mother-----over against the
Crown we sat and drank ale and were very merry till 9 at night, and so
broke up.  I walked home, and there found Tom Trice come, and he and my
father gone to Goody Gorum's, where I found them and Jaspar Trice got
before me, and Mr. Greene, and there had some calm discourse, but came to
no issue, and so parted.  So home and to bed, being now pretty well again
of my left hand, which lately was stung and very much swelled.

21st (Lord's day).  At home all the morning, putting my papers in order
against my going to-morrow and doing many things else to that end. Had a
good dinner, and Stankes and his wife with us.  To my business again in
the afternoon, and in the evening came the two Trices, Mr. Greene, and Mr.
Philips, and so we began to argue.  At last it came to some agreement that
for our giving of my aunt L10 she is to quit the house, and for other
matters they are to be left to the law, which do please us all, and so we
broke up, pretty well satisfyed.  Then came Mr. Barnwell and J. Bowles and
supped with us, and after supper away, and so I having taken leave of them
and put things in the best order I could against to-morrow I went to bed.
Old William Luffe having been here this afternoon and paid up his bond of
L20, and I did give him into his hand my uncle's surrender of Sturtlow to
me before Mr. Philips, R. Barnwell, and Mr. Pigott, which he did
acknowledge to them my uncle did in his lifetime deliver to him.

22nd.  Up by three, and going by four on my way to London; but the day
proves very cold, so that having put on no stockings but thread ones under
my boots, I was fain at Bigglesworth to buy a pair of coarse woollen ones,
and put them on.  So by degrees till I come to Hatfield before twelve
o'clock, where I had a very good dinner with my hostess, at my Lord of
Salisbury's Inn, and after dinner though weary I walked all alone to the
Vineyard, which is now a very beautiful place again; and coming back I met
with Mr. Looker, my Lord's gardener (a friend of Mr. Eglin's), who showed
me the house, the chappell with brave pictures, and, above all, the
gardens, such as I never saw in all my life; nor so good flowers, nor so
great gooseberrys, as big as nutmegs.  Back to the inn, and drank with
him, and so to horse again, and with much ado got to London, and set him
up at Smithfield; so called at my uncle Fenner's, my mother's, my Lady's,
and so home, in all which I found all things as well as I could expect.
So weary and to bed.

23rd.  Put on my mourning.  Made visits to Sir W. Pen and Batten.  Then to
Westminster, and at the Hall staid talking with Mrs. Michell a good while,
and in the afternoon, finding myself unfit for business, I went to the
Theatre, and saw "Brenoralt," I never saw before.  It seemed a good play,
but ill acted; only I sat before Mrs. Palmer, the King's mistress, and
filled my eyes with her, which much pleased me.  Then to my father's,
where by my desire I met my uncle Thomas, and discoursed of my uncle's
will to him, and did satisfy [him] as well as I could.  So to my uncle
Wight's, but found him out of doors, but my aunt I saw and staid a while,
and so home and to bed.  Troubled to hear how proud and idle Pall is
grown, that I am resolved not to keep her.

24th.  This morning my wife in bed tells me of our being robbed of our
silver tankard, which vexed me all day for the negligence of my people to
leave the door open.  My wife and I by water to Whitehall, where I left
her to her business and I to my cozen Thomas Pepys, and discoursed with
him at large about our business of my uncle's will.  He can give us no
light at all into his estate, but upon the whole tells me that he do
believe that he has left but little money, though something more than we
have found, which is about L500.  Here came Sir G. Lane by chance, seeing
a bill upon the door to hire the house, with whom my coz and I walked all
up and down, and indeed it is a very pretty place, and he do intend to
leave the agreement for the House, which is L400 fine, and L46 rent a year
to me between them.  Then to the Wardrobe, but come too late, and so dined
with the servants.  And then to my Lady, who do shew my wife and me the
greatest favour in the world, in which I take great content.  Home by
water and to the office all the afternoon, which is a great pleasure to me
again, to talk with persons of quality and to be in command, and I give it
out among them that the estate left me is L200 a year in land, besides
moneys, because I would put an esteem upon myself.  At night home and to
bed after I had set down my journals ever since my going from London this
journey to this house.  This afternoon I hear that my man Will hath lost
his clock with my tankard, at which I am very glad.

25th.  This morning came my box of papers from Brampton of all my uncle's
papers, which will now set me at work enough.  At noon I went to the
Exchange, where I met my uncle Wight, and found him so discontented about
my father (whether that he takes it ill that he has not been acquainted
with things, or whether he takes it ill that he has nothing left him, I
cannot tell), for which I am much troubled, and so staid not long to talk
with him.  Thence to my mother's, where I found my wife and my aunt Bell
and Mrs. Ramsey, and great store of tattle there was between the old women
and my mother, who thinks that there is, God knows what fallen to her,
which makes me mad, but it was not a proper time to speak to her of it,
and so I went away with Mr. Moore, and he and I to the Theatre, and saw
"The Jovial Crew," the first time I saw it, and indeed it is as merry and
the most innocent play that ever I saw, and well performed.  From thence
home, and wrote to my father and so to bed.  Full of thoughts to think of
the trouble that we shall go through before we come to see what will
remain to us of all our expectations.

26th.  At home all the morning, and walking met with Mr. Hill of Cambridge
at Pope's Head Alley with some women with him whom he took and me into the
tavern there, and did give us wine, and would fain seem to be very knowing
in the affairs of state, and tells me that yesterday put a change to the
whole state of England as to the Church; for the King now would be forced
to favour Presbytery, or the City would leave him: but I heed not what he
says, though upon enquiry I do find that things in the Parliament are in a
great disorder.  Home at noon and there found Mr. Moore, and with him to
an ordinary alone and dined, and there he and I read my uncle's will, and
I had his opinion on it, and still find more and more trouble like to
attend it.  Back to the office all the afternoon, and that done home for
all night.  Having the beginning of this week made a vow to myself to
drink no wine this week (finding it to unfit me to look after business),
and this day breaking of it against my will, I am much troubled for it,
but I hope God will forgive me.

27th.  To Westminster, where at Mr. Montagu's chamber I heard a Frenchman
play, a friend of Monsieur Eschar's, upon the guitar, most extreme well,
though at the best methinks it is but a bawble.  From thence to
Westminster Hall, where it was expected that the Parliament was to have
been adjourned for two or three months, but something hinders it for a day
or two.  In the lobby I spoke with Mr. George Montagu, and advised about a
ship to carry my Lord Hinchingbroke and the rest of the young gentlemen to
France, and they have resolved of going in a hired vessell from Rye, and
not in a man of war.  He told me in discourse that my Lord Chancellor is
much envied, and that many great men, such as the Duke of Buckingham and
my Lord of Bristoll, do endeavour to undermine him, and that he believes
it will not be done; for that the King (though he loves him not in the way
of a companion, as he do these young gallants that can answer him in his
pleasures), yet cannot be without him, for his policy and service.  From
thence to the Wardrobe, where my wife met me, it being my Lord of
Sandwich's birthday, and so we had many friends here, Mr. Townsend and his
wife, and Captain Ferrers lady and Captain Isham, and were very merry, and
had a good venison pasty.  Mr. Pargiter, the merchant, was with us also.
After dinner Mr. Townsend was called upon by Captain Cooke: so we three
went to a tavern hard by, and there he did give us a song or two; and
without doubt he hath the best manner of singing in the world.  Back to my
wife, and with my Lady Jem. and Pall by water through bridge, and showed
them the ships with great pleasure, and then took them to my house to show
it them (my Lady their mother having been lately all alone to see it and
my wife, in my absence in the country), and we treated them well, and were
very merry.  Then back again through bridge, and set them safe at home,
and so my wife and I by coach home again, and after writing a letter to my
father at Brampton, who, poor man, is there all alone, and I have not
heard from him since my coming from him, which troubles me.  To bed.

28th (Lord's day).  This morning as my wife and I were going to church,
comes Mrs. Ramsay to see us, so we sent her to church, and we went too,
and came back to dinner, and she dined with us and was wellcome.  To
church again in the afternoon, and then come home with us Sir W. Pen, and
drank with us, and then went away, and my wife after him to see his
daughter that is lately come out of Ireland.  I staid at home at my book;
she came back again and tells me that whereas I expected she should have
been a great beauty, she is a very plain girl.  This evening my wife gives
me all my linen, which I have put up, and intend to keep it now in my own
custody.  To supper and to bed.

29th.  This morning we began again to sit in the mornings at the office,
but before we sat down.  Sir R. Slingsby and I went to Sir R. Ford's to
see his house, and we find it will be very convenient for us to have it
added to the office if he can be got to part with it.  Then we sat down
and did business in the office.  So home to dinner, and my brother Tom
dined with me, and after dinner he and I alone in my chamber had a great
deal of talk, and I find that unless my father can forbear to make profit
of his house in London and leave it to Tom, he has no mind to set up the
trade any where else, and so I know not what to do with him.  After this I
went with him to my mother, and there told her how things do fall out
short of our expectations, which I did (though it be true) to make her
leave off her spending, which I find she is nowadays very free in,
building upon what is left to us by my uncle to bear her out in it, which
troubles me much.  While I was here word is brought that my aunt Fenner is
exceeding ill, and that my mother is sent for presently to come to her:
also that my cozen Charles Glassecocke, though very ill himself, is this
day gone to the country to his brother, John Glassecocke, who is a-dying
there.  Home.

30th.  After my singing-master had done with me this morning, I went to
White Hall and Westminster Hall, where I found the King expected to come
and adjourn the Parliament.  I found the two Houses at a great difference,
about the Lords challenging their privileges not to have their houses
searched, which makes them deny to pass the House of Commons' Bill for
searching for pamphlets and seditious books.  Thence by water to the
Wardrobe (meeting the King upon the water going in his barge to adjourn
the House) where I dined with my Lady, and there met Dr. Thomas Pepys, who
I found to be a silly talking fellow, but very good-natured.  So home to
the office, where we met about the business of Tangier this afternoon.
That done, at home I found Mr. Moore, and he and I walked into the City
and there parted.  To Fleet Street to find when the Assizes begin at
Cambridge and Huntingdon, in order to my going to meet with Roger Pepys
for counsel.  So in Fleet Street I met with Mr. Salisbury, who is now
grown in less than two years' time so great a limner--that he is become
excellent, and gets a great deal of money at it.  I took him to Hercules
Pillars to drink, and there came Mr. Whore (whom I formerly have known), a
friend of his to him, who is a very ingenious fellow, and there I sat with
them a good while, and so home and wrote letters late to my Lord and to my
father, and then to bed.

31st.  Singing-master came to me this morning; then to the office all the
morning.  In the afternoon I went to the Theatre, and there I saw "The
Tamer Tamed"  well done.  And then home, and prepared to go to Walthamstow
to-morrow.  This night I was forced to borrow L40 of Sir W. Batten.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                  AUGUST
                                   1661

August 1st.  This morning Sir Williams both, and my wife and I and Mrs.
Margarett Pen (this first time that I have seen her since she came from
Ireland) went by coach to Walthamstow, a-gossiping to Mrs. Browne, where I
did give her six silver spoons--[But not the porringer of silver.  See May
29th, 1661.--M. B]--for her boy.  Here we had a venison pasty, brought hot
from London, and were very merry.  Only I hear how nurse's husband has
spoken strangely of my Lady Batten how she was such a man's whore, who
indeed is known to leave her her estate, which we would fain have
reconciled to-day, but could not and indeed I do believe that the story is
true.  Back again at night home.

2d.  At the office all the morning.  At noon Dr. Thos. Pepys dined with
me, and after dinner my brother Tom came to me and then I made myself
ready to get a-horseback for Cambridge.  So I set out and rode to Ware,
this night, in the way having much discourse with a fellmonger,--[A dealer
in hides.]--a Quaker, who told me what a wicked man he had been all his
life-time till within this two years.  Here I lay, and

3rd.  Got up early the next morning and got to Barkway, where I staid and
drank, and there met with a letter-carrier of Cambridge, with whom I rode
all the way to Cambridge, my horse being tired, and myself very wet with
rain.  I went to the Castle Hill, where the judges were at the Assizes;
and I staid till Roger Pepys rose and went with him, and dined with his
brother, the Doctor, and Claxton at Trinity Hall.  Then parted, and I went
to the Rose, and there with Mr. Pechell, Sanchy, and others, sat and drank
till night and were very merry, only they tell me how high the old doctors
are in the University over those they found there, though a great deal
better scholars than themselves; for which I am very sorry, and, above
all, Dr. Gunning.  At night I took horse, and rode with Roger Pepys and
his two brothers to Impington, and there with great respect was led up by
them to the best chamber in the house, and there slept.

4th (Lord's day).  Got up, and by and by walked into the orchard with my
cozen Roger, and there plucked some fruit, and then discoursed at large
about the business I came for, that is, about my uncle's will, in which he
did give me good satisfaction, but tells me I shall meet with a great deal
of trouble in it.  However, in all things he told me what I am to expect
and what to do.  To church, and had a good plain sermon, and my uncle
Talbot went with us and at our coming in the country-people all rose with
so much reverence; and when the parson begins, he begins "Right
worshipfull and dearly beloved" to us.  Home to dinner, which was very
good, and then to church again, and so home and to walk up and down and so
to supper, and after supper to talk about publique matters, wherein Roger
Pepys--(who I find a very sober man, and one whom I do now honour more
than ever before for this discourse sake only) told me how basely things
have been carried in Parliament by the young men, that did labour to
oppose all things that were moved by serious men.  That they are the most
prophane swearing fellows that ever he heard in his life, which makes him
think that they will spoil all, and bring things into a warr again if they
can.  So to bed.

5th.  Early to Huntingdon, but was fain to stay a great while at Stanton
because of the rain, and there borrowed a coat of a man for 6d., and so he
rode all the way, poor man, without any.  Staid at Huntingdon for a
little, but the judges are not come hither: so I went to Brampton, and
there found my father very well, and my aunt gone from the house, which I
am glad of, though it costs us a great deal of money, viz. L10.  Here I
dined, and after dinner took horse and rode to Yelling, to my cozen
Nightingale's, who hath a pretty house here, and did learn of her all she
could tell me concerning my business, and has given me some light by her
discourse how I may get a surrender made for Graveley lands.  Hence to
Graveley, and there at an alehouse met with Chancler and Jackson (one of
my tenants for Cotton closes) and another with whom I had a great deal of
discourse, much to my satisfaction.  Hence back again to Brampton and
after supper to bed, being now very quiet in the house, which is a content
to us.

6th.  Up early and went to Mr. Phillips, but lost my labour, he lying at
Huntingdon last night, so I went back again and took horse and rode
thither, where I staid with Thos. Trice and Mr. Philips drinking till
noon, and then Tom Trice and I to Brampton, where he to Goody Gorum's and
I home to my father, who could discern that I had been drinking, which he
did never see or hear of before, so I eat a bit of dinner and went with
him to Gorum's, and there talked with Tom Trice, and then went and took
horse for London, and with much ado, the ways being very bad, got to
Baldwick, and there lay and had a good supper by myself.  The landlady
being a pretty woman, but I durst not take notice of her, her husband
being there.  Before supper I went to see the church, which is a very
handsome church, but I find that both here, and every where else that I
come, the Quakers do still continue, and rather grow than lessen.  To bed.

7th.  Called up at three o'clock, and was a-horseback by four; and as I
was eating my breakfast I saw a man riding by that rode a little way upon
the road with me last night; and he being going with venison in his
pan-yards to London, I called him in and did give him his breakfast with
me, and so we went together all the way.  At Hatfield we bayted and walked
into the great house through all the courts; and I would fain have stolen
a pretty dog that followed me, but I could not, which troubled me.  To
horse again, and by degrees with much ado got to London, where I found all
well at home and at my father's and my Lady's, but no news yet from my
Lord where he is.  At my Lady's (whither I went with Dean Fuller, who came
to my house to see me just as I was come home) I met with Mr. Moore, who
told me at what a loss he was for me, for to-morrow is a Seal day at the
Privy Seal, and it being my month, I am to wait upon my Lord Roberts, Lord
Privy Seal, at the Seal.  Home and to bed.

8th.  Early in the mornink to Whitehall, but my Lord Privy Seal came not
all the morning.  At noon Mr. Moore and I to the Wardrobe to dinner, where
my Lady and all merry and well.  Back again to the Privy Seal; but my Lord
comes not all the afternoon, which made me mad and gives all the world
reason to talk of his delaying of business, as well as of his severity and
ill using of the Clerks of the Privy Seal.  In the evening I took Mons.
Eschar and Mr. Moore and Dr. Pierce's brother (the souldier) to the tavern
next the Savoy, and there staid and drank with them.  Here I met with Mr.
Mage, and discoursing of musique Mons.  Eschar spoke so much against the
English and in praise of the French that made him mad, and so he went
away.  After a stay with them a little longer we parted and I home.

9th.  To the office, where word is brought me by a son-in-law of Mr.
Pierces; the purser, that his father is a dying and that he desires that I
would come to him before he dies.  So I rose from the table and went,
where I found him not so ill as I thought that he had been ill.  So I did
promise to be a friend to his wife and family if he should die, which was
all he desired of me, but I do believe he will recover.  Back again to the
office, where I found Sir G. Carteret had a day or two ago invited some of
the officers to dinner to-day at Deptford.  So at noon, when I heard that
he was a-coming, I went out, because I would see whether he would send to
me or no to go with them; but he did not, which do a little trouble me
till I see how it comes to pass.  Although in other things I am glad of it
because of my going again to-day to the Privy Seal.  I dined at home, and
having dined news is brought by Mr. Hater that his wife is now falling
into labour, so he is come for my wife, who presently went with him.  I to
White Hall, where, after four o'clock, comes my Lord Privy Seal, and so we
went up to his chamber over the gate at White Hall, where he asked me what
deputacon I had from My Lord.  I told him none; but that I am sworn my
Lord's deputy by both of the Secretarys, which did satisfy him.  So he
caused Mr. Moore to read over all the bills as is the manner, and all
ended very well.  So that I see the Lyon is not so fierce as he is
painted.  That being done Mons. Eschar (who all this afternoon had been
waiting at the Privy Seal for the Warrant for L5,000 for my Lord of
Sandwich's preparation for Portugal) and I took some wine with us and went
to visit la belle Pierce, who we find very big with child, and a pretty
lady, one Mrs. Clifford, with her, where we staid and were extraordinary
merry.  From thence I took coach to my father's, where I found him come
home this day from Brampton (as I expected) very well, and after some
discourse about business and it being very late I took coach again home,
where I hear by my wife that Mrs. Hater is not yet delivered, but
continues in her pains.  So to bed.

10th.  This morning came the maid that my wife hath lately hired for a
chamber maid.  She is very ugly, so that I cannot care for her, but
otherwise she seems very good.  But however she do come about three weeks
hence, when my wife comes back from Brampton, if she go with my father. By
and by came my father to my house, and so he and I went and found out my
uncle Wight at the Coffee House, and there did agree with him to meet the
next week with my uncle Thomas and read over the Captain's will before
them both for their satisfaction.  Having done with him I went to my
Lady's and dined with her, and after dinner took the two young gentlemen
and the two ladies and carried them and Captain Ferrers to the Theatre,
and shewed them "The merry Devill of Edmunton," which is a very merry
play, the first time I ever saw it, which pleased me well.  And that being
done I took them all home by coach to my house and there gave them fruit
to eat and wine.  So by water home with them, and so home myself.

11th (Lord's day).  To our own church in the forenoon, and in the
afternoon to Clerkenwell Church, only to see the two

     [A comedy acted at the Globe, and first printed in 1608.  In the
     original entry in the Stationers' books it is said to be by T. B.,
     which may stand for Tony or Anthony Brewer.  The play has been
     attributed without authority both to Shakespeare and to Drayton.]

fayre Botelers;--[Mrs. Frances Butler and her sister.]--and I happened to
be placed in the pew where they afterwards came to sit, but the pew by
their coming being too full, I went out into the next, and there sat, and
had my full view of them both, but I am out of conceit now with them,
Colonel Dillon being come back from Ireland again, and do still court
them, and comes to church with them, which makes me think they are not
honest.  Hence to Graye's-Inn walks, and there staid a good while; where I
met with Ned Pickering, who told me what a great match of hunting of a
stagg the King had yesterday; and how the King tired all their horses, and
come home with not above two or three able to keep pace with him.  So to
my father's, and there supped, and so home.

12th.  At the office this morning.  At home in the afternoon, and had
notice that my Lord Hinchingbroke is fallen ill, which I fear is with the
fruit that I did give them on Saturday last at my house: so in the evening
I went thither and there found him very ill, and in great fear of the
smallpox.  I supped with my Lady, and did consult about him, but we find
it best to let him lie where he do; and so I went home with my heart full
of trouble for my Lord Hinchinabroke's sickness, and more for my Lord
Sandwich's himself, whom we are now confirmed is sick ashore at Alicante,
who, if he should miscarry, God knows in what condition would his family
be.  I dined to-day with my Lord Crew, who is now at Sir H. Wright's,
while his new house is making fit for him, and he is much troubled also at
these things.

13th.  To the Privy Seal in the morning, then to the Wardrobe to dinner,
where I met my wife, and found my young Lord very ill.  So my Lady intends
to send her other three sons, Sidney, Oliver, and John, to my house, for
fear of the small-pox.  After dinner I went to my father's, where I found
him within, and went up to him, and there found him settling his papers
against his removal, and I took some old papers of difference between me
and my wife and took them away.  After that Pall being there I spoke to my
father about my intention not to keep her longer for such and such
reasons, which troubled him and me also, and had like to have come to some
high words between my mother and me, who is become a very simple woman.
By and by comes in Mrs. Cordery to take her leave of my father, thinking
he was to go presently into the country, and will have us to come and see
her before he do go.  Then my father and I went forth to Mr. Rawlinson's,
where afterwards comes my uncle Thomas and his two sons, and then my uncle
Wight by appointment of us all, and there we read the will and told them
how things are, and what our thoughts are of kindness to my uncle Thomas
if he do carry himself peaceable, but otherwise if he persist to keep his
caveat up against us.  So he promised to withdraw it, and seemed to be
very well contented with things as they are.  After a while drinking, we
paid all and parted, and so I home, and there found my Lady's three sons
come, of which I am glad that I am in condition to do her and my Lord any
service in this kind, but my mind is yet very much troubled about my Lord
of Sandwich's health, which I am afeard of.

14th.  This morning Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen and I, waited upon the
Duke of York in his chamber, to give him an account of the condition of
the Navy for lack of money, and how our own very bills are offered upon
the Exchange, to be sold at 20 in the 100 loss.  He is much troubled at
it, and will speak to the King and Council of it this morning.  So I went
to my Lady's and dined with her, and found my Lord Hinchingbroke somewhat
better.  After dinner Captain Ferrers and I to the Theatre, and there saw
"The Alchymist;" and there I saw Sir W. Pen, who took us when the play was
done and carried the Captain to Paul's and set him down, and me home with
him, and he and I to the Dolphin, but not finding Sir W. Batten there, we
went and carried a bottle of wine to his house, and there sat a while and
talked, and so home to bed.  At home I found a letter from Mr. Creed of
the 15th of July last, that tells me that my Lord is rid of his pain
(which was wind got into the muscles of his right side) and his feaver,
and is now in hopes to go aboard in a day or two, which do give me mighty
great comfort.

15th.  To the Privy Seal and Whitehall, up and down, and at noon Sir W.
Pen carried me to Paul's, and so I walked to the Wardrobe and dined with
my Lady, and there told her, of my Lord's sickness (of which though it
hath been the town-talk this fortnight, she had heard nothing) and
recovery, of which she was glad, though hardly persuaded of the latter. I
found my Lord Hinchingbroke better and better, and the worst past. Thence
to the Opera, which begins again to-day with "The Witts," never acted yet
with scenes; and the King and Duke and Duchess were there (who dined
to-day with Sir H. Finch, reader at the Temple, in great state); and
indeed it is a most excellent play, and admirable scenes.  So home and was
overtaken by Sir W. Pen in his coach, who has been this afternoon with my
Lady Batten, &c., at the Theatre.  So I followed him to the Dolphin, where
Sir W. Batten was, and there we sat awhile, and so home after we had made
shift to fuddle Mr. Falconer of Woolwich.  So home.

16th.  At the office all the morning, though little to be done; because
all our clerks are gone to the buriall of Tom Whitton, one of the
Controller's clerks, a very ingenious, and a likely young man to live, as
any in the Office.  But it is such a sickly time both in City and country
every where (of a sort of fever), that never was heard of almost, unless
it was in a plague-time.

Among others, the famous Tom Fuller is dead of it; and Dr. Nichols, Dean
of Paul's; and my Lord General Monk is very dangerously ill.  Dined at
home with the children and were merry, and my father with me; who after
dinner he and I went forth about business.  Among other things we found
one Dr. John Williams at an alehouse, where we staid till past nine at
night, in Shoe Lane, talking about our country business, and I found him
so well acquainted with the matters of Gravely that I expect he will be of
great use to me.  So by link home.  I understand my Aunt Fenner is upon
the point of death.

17th.  At the Privy Seal, where we had a seal this morning.  Then met with
Ned Pickering, and walked with him into St. James's Park (where I had not
been a great while), and there found great and very noble alterations.
And, in our discourse, he was very forward to complain and to speak loud
of the lewdness and beggary of the Court, which I am sorry to hear, and
which I am afeard will bring all to ruin again.  So he and I to the
Wardrobe to dinner, and after dinner Captain Ferrers and I to the Opera,
and saw "The Witts" again, which I like exceedingly.  The Queen of Bohemia
was here, brought by my Lord Craven.  So the Captain and I and another to
the Devil tavern and drank, and so by coach home.  Troubled in mind that I
cannot bring myself to mind my business, but to be so much in love of
plays.  We have been at a great loss a great while for a vessel that I
sent about a month ago with, things of my Lord's to Lynn, and cannot till
now hear of them, but now we are told that they are put into Soale Bay,
but to what purpose I know not.

18th (Lord's day).  To our own church in the morning and so home to
dinner, where my father and Dr. Tom Pepys came to me to dine, and were
very merry.  After dinner I took my wife and Mr. Sidney to my Lady to see
my Lord Hinchingbroke, who is now pretty well again, and sits up and walks
about his chamber.  So I went to White Hall, and there hear that my Lord
General Monk continues very ill: so I went to la belle Pierce and sat with
her; and then to walk in St. James's Park, and saw great variety of fowl
which I never saw before and so home.  At night fell to read in "Hooker's
Ecclesiastical Polity," which Mr. Moore did give me last Wednesday very
handsomely bound; and which I shall read with great pains and love for his
sake.  So to supper and to bed.

19th.  At the office all the morning; at noon the children are sent for by
their mother my Lady Sandwich to dinner, and my wife goes along with them
by coach, and she to my father's and dines there, and from thence with
them to see Mrs. Cordery, who do invite them before my father goes into
the country, and thither I should have gone too but that I am sent for to
the Privy Seal, and there I found a thing of my Lord Chancellor's

     [This "thing" was probably one of those large grants which Clarendon
     quietly, or, as he himself says, "without noise or scandal,"
     procured from the king.  Besides lands and manors, Clarendon states
     at one time that the king gave him a "little billet into his hand,
     that contained a warrant of his own hand-writing to Sir Stephen Fox
     to pay to the Chancellor the sum of L20,000,--[approximately 10
     million dollars in the year 2000]--of which nobody could have
     notice."  In 1662 he received L5,000 out of the money voted to the
     king by the Parliament of Ireland, as he mentions in his vindication
     of himself against the impeachment of the Commons; and we shall see
     that Pepys, in February, 1664, names another sum of L20,000 given to
     the Chancellor to clear the mortgage upon Clarendon Park; and this
     last sum, it was believed, was paid from the money received from
     France by the sale of Dunkirk.--B.]

to be sealed this afternoon, and so I am forced to go to Worcester House,
where severall Lords are met in Council this afternoon.  And while I am
waiting there, in comes the King in a plain common riding-suit and velvet
cap, in which he seemed a very ordinary man to one that had not known him.
Here I staid till at last, hearing that my Lord Privy Seal had not the
seal here, Mr. Moore and I hired a coach and went to Chelsy, and there at
an alehouse sat and drank and past the time till my Lord Privy Seal came
to his house, and so we to him and examined and sealed the thing, and so
homewards, but when we came to look for our coach we found it gone, so we
were fain to walk home afoot and saved our money.  We met with a companion
that walked with us, and coming among some trees near the Neate houses, he
began to whistle, which did give us some suspicion, but it proved that he
that answered him was Mr. Marsh (the Lutenist) and his wife, and so we all
walked to Westminster together, in our way drinking a while at my cost,
and had a song of him, but his voice is quite lost.  So walked home, and
there I found that my Lady do keep the children at home, and lets them not
come any more hither at present, which a little troubles me to lose their
company.  This day my aunt Fenner dyed.

20th.  At the office in the morning and all the afternoon at home to put
my papers in order.  This day we come to some agreement with Sir R. Ford
for his house to be added to the office to enlarge our quarters.

21st.  This morning by appointment I went to my father, and after a
morning draft he and I went to Dr. Williams, but he not within we went to
Mrs. Terry, a daughter of Mr. Whately's, who lately offered a proposal of
her sister for a wife for my brother Tom, and with her we discoursed about
and agreed to go to her mother this afternoon to speak with her, and in
the meantime went to Will. Joyce's and to an alehouse, and drank a good
while together, he being very angry that his father Fenner will give him
and his brother no more for mourning than their father did give him and my
aunt at their mother's death, and a very troublesome fellow I still find
him to be, that his company ever wearys me.  From thence about two o'clock
to Mrs. Whately's, but she being going to dinner we went to Whitehall and
there staid till past three, and here I understand by Mr. Moore that my
Lady Sandwich is brought to bed yesterday of a young Lady, and is very
well.  So to Mrs. Whately's again, and there were well received, and she
desirous to have the thing go forward, only is afeard that her daughter is
too young and portion not big enough, but offers L200 down with her.  The
girl is very well favoured,, and a very child, but modest, and one I think
will do very well for my brother: so parted till she hears from Hatfield
from her husband, who is there; but I find them very desirous of it, and
so am I. Hence home to my father's, and I to the Wardrobe, where I supped
with the ladies, and hear their mother is well and the young child, and so
home.

22nd.  To the Privy Seal, and sealed; so home at noon, and there took my
wife by coach to my uncle Fenner's, where there was both at his house and
the Sessions, great deal of company, but poor entertainment, which I
wonder at; and the house so hot, that my uncle Wight, my father and I were
fain to go out, and stay at an alehouse awhile to cool ourselves. Then
back again and to church, my father's family being all in mourning, doing
him the greatest honour, the world believing that he did give us it: so to
church, and staid out the sermon, and then with my aunt Wight, my wife,
and Pall and I to her house by coach, and there staid and supped upon a
Westphalia ham, and so home and to bed.

23rd.  This morning I went to my father's, and there found him and my
mother in a discontent, which troubles me much, and indeed she is become
very simple and unquiet.  Hence he and I to Dr. Williams, and found him
within, and there we sat and talked a good while, and from him to Tom
Trice's to an alehouse near, and there sat and talked, and finding him
fair we examined my uncle's will before him and Dr. Williams, and had them
sign the copy and so did give T. Trice the original to prove, so he took
my father and me to one of the judges of the Court, and there we were
sworn, and so back again to the alehouse and drank and parted.  Dr.
Williams and I to a cook's where we eat a bit of mutton, and away, I to W.
Joyce's, where by appointment my wife was, and I took her to the Opera,
and shewed her "The Witts," which I had seen already twice, and was most
highly pleased with it.  So with my wife to the Wardrobe to see my Lady,
and then home.

24th.  At the office all the morning and did business; by and by we are
called to Sir W. Batten's to see the strange creature that Captain Holmes
hath brought with him from Guiny; it is a great baboon, but so much like a
man in most things, that though they say there is a species of them, yet I
cannot believe but that it is a monster got of a man and she-baboon.  I do
believe that it already understands much English, and I am of the mind it
might be taught to speak or make signs.  Hence the Comptroller and I to
Sir Rd. Ford's and viewed the house again, and are come to a complete end
with him to give him L200 per an. for it.  Home and there met Capt. Isham
inquiring for me to take his leave of me, he being upon his voyage to
Portugal, and for my letters to my Lord which are not ready.  But I took
him to the Mitre and gave him a glass of sack, and so adieu, and then
straight to the Opera, and there saw "Hamlet, Prince of Denmark," done
with scenes very well, but above all, Betterton

     [Sir William Davenant introduced the use of scenery.  The character
     of Hamlet was one of Betterton's masterpieces.  Downes tells us that
     he was taught by Davenant how the part was acted by Taylor of the
     Blackfriars, who was instructed by Shakespeare himself.]

did the prince's part beyond imagination.  Hence homeward, and met with
Mr. Spong and took him to the Sampson in Paul's churchyard, and there
staid till late, and it rained hard, so we were fain to get home wet, and
so to bed.

25th (Lord's day).  At church in the morning, and dined at home alone with
my wife very comfortably, and so again to church with her, and had a very
good and pungent sermon of Mr. Mills, discoursing the necessity of
restitution.  Home, and I found my Lady Batten and her daughter to look
something askew upon my wife, because my wife do not buckle to them, and
is not solicitous for their acquaintance, which I am not troubled at at
all.  By and by comes in my father (he intends to go into the country
to-morrow), and he and I among other discourse at last called Pall up to
us, and there in great anger told her before my father that I would keep
her no longer, and my father he said he would have nothing to do with her.
At last, after we had brought down her high spirit, I got my father to
yield that she should go into the country with my mother and him, and stay
there awhile to see how she will demean herself.  That being done, my
father and I to my uncle Wight's, and there supped, and he took his leave
of them, and so I walked with [him] as far as Paul's and there parted, and
I home, my mind at some rest upon this making an end with Pall, who do
trouble me exceedingly.

26th.  This morning before I went out I made even with my maid Jane, who
has this day been my maid three years, and is this day to go into the
country to her mother.  The poor girl cried, and I could hardly forbear
weeping to think of her going, for though she be grown lazy and spoilt by
Pall's coming, yet I shall never have one to please us better in all
things, and so harmless, while I live.  So I paid her her wages and gave
her 2s. 6d. over, and bade her adieu, with my mind full of trouble at her
going.  Hence to my father, where he and I and Thomas together setting
things even, and casting up my father's accounts, and upon the whole I
find that all he hath in money of his own due to him in the world is but
L45, and he owes about the same sum: so that I cannot but think in what a
condition he had left my mother if he should have died before my uncle
Robert.  Hence to Tom Trice for the probate of the will and had it done to
my mind, which did give my father and me good content.  From thence to my
Lady at the Wardrobe and thence to the Theatre, and saw the "Antipodes,"
wherein there is much mirth, but no great matter else. Hence with Mr.
Bostock whom I met there (a clerk formerly of Mr. Phelps) to the Devil
tavern, and there drank and so away.  I to my uncle Fenner's, where my
father was with him at an alehouse, and so we three went by ourselves and
sat talking a great while about a broker's daughter that he do propose for
a wife for Tom, with a great portion, but I fear it will not take, but he
will do what he can.  So we broke up, and going through the street we met
with a mother and son, friends of my father's man, Ned's, who are angry at
my father's putting him away, which troubled me and my father, but all
will be well as to that.  We have news this morning of my uncle Thomas and
his son Thomas being gone into the country without giving notice thereof
to anybody, which puts us to a stand, but I fear them not.  At night at
home I found a letter from my Lord Sandwich, who is now very well again of
his feaver, but not yet gone from Alicante, where he lay sick, and was
twice let blood.  This letter dated the 22nd July last, which puts me out
of doubt of his being ill.  In my coming home I called in at the Crane
tavern at the Stocks by appointment, and there met and took leave of Mr.
Fanshaw, who goes to-morrow and Captain Isham toward their voyage to
Portugal.  Here we drank a great deal of wine, I too much and Mr. Fanshaw
till he could hardly go.  So we took leave one of another.

27th.  This morning to the Wardrobe, and there took leave of my Lord
Hinchingbroke and his brother, and saw them go out by coach toward Rye in
their way to France, whom God bless.  Then I was called up to my Lady's
bedside, where we talked an hour about Mr. Edward Montagu's disposing of
the L5000 for my Lord's departure for Portugal, and our fears that he will
not do it to my Lord's honour, and less to his profit, which I am to
enquire a little after.  Hence to the office, and there sat till noon, and
then my wife and I by coach to my cozen, Thos. Pepys, the Executor, to
dinner, where some ladies and my father and mother, where very merry, but
methinks he makes but poor dinners for such guests, though there was a
poor venison pasty.  Hence my wife and I to the Theatre, and there saw
"The Joviall Crew," where the King, Duke and Duchess, and Madame Palmer,
were; and my wife, to her great content, had a full sight of them all the
while.  The play full of mirth.  Hence to my father's, and there staid to
talk a while and so by foot home by moonshine.  In my way and at home, my
wife making a sad story to me of her brother Balty's a condition, and
would have me to do something for him, which I shall endeavour to do, but
am afeard to meddle therein for fear I shall not be able to wipe my hands
of him again, when I once concern myself for him.  I went to bed, my wife
all the while telling me his case with tears, which troubled me.

28th.  At home all the morning setting papers in order.  At noon to the
Exchange, and there met with Dr. Williams by appointment, and with him
went up and down to look for an attorney, a friend of his, to advise with
about our bond of my aunt Pepys of L200, and he tells me absolutely that
we shall not be forced to pay interest for the money yet.  I do doubt it
very much.  I spent the whole afternoon drinking with him and so home.
This day I counterfeited a letter to Sir W. Pen, as from the thief that
stole his tankard lately, only to abuse and laugh at him.

29th.  At the office all the morning, and at noon my father, mother, and
my aunt Bell (the first time that ever she was at my house) come to dine
with me, and were very merry.  After dinner the two women went to visit my
aunt Wight, &c., and my father about other business, and I abroad to my
bookseller, and there staid till four o'clock, at which time by
appointment I went to meet my father at my uncle Fenner's.  So thither I
went and with him to an alehouse, and there came Mr. Evans, the taylor,
whose daughter we have had a mind to get for a wife for Tom, and then my
father, and there we sat a good while and talked about the business; in
fine he told us that he hath not to except against us or our motion, but
that the estate that God hath blessed him with is too great to give where
there is nothing in present possession but a trade and house; and so we
friendly ended.  There parted, my father and I together, and walked a
little way, and then at Holborn he and I took leave of one another, he
being to go to Brampton (to settle things against my mother comes)
tomorrow morning.  So I home.

30th.  At noon my wife and I met at the Wardrobe, and there dined with the
children, and after dinner up to my Lady's bedside, and talked and laughed
a good while.  Then my wife end I to Drury Lane to the French comedy,
which was so ill done, and the scenes and company and every thing else so
nasty and out of order and poor, that I was sick all the while in my mind
to be there.  Here my wife met with a son of my Lord Somersett, whom she
knew in France, a pretty man; I showed him no great countenance, to avoyd
further acquaintance.  That done, there being nothing pleasant but the
foolery of the farce, we went home.

31st.  At home and the office all the morning, and at noon comes Luellin
to me, and he and I to the tavern and after that to Bartholomew fair, and
there upon his motion to a pitiful alehouse, where we had a dirty slut or
two come up that were whores, but my very heart went against them, so that
I took no pleasure but a great deal of trouble in being there and getting
from thence for fear of being seen.  From hence he and I walked towards
Ludgate and parted.  I back again to the fair all alone, and there met
with my Ladies Jemimah and Paulina, with Mr. Pickering and Madamoiselle,
at seeing the monkeys dance, which was much to see, when they could be
brought to do so, but it troubled me to sit among such nasty company.
After that with them into Christ's Hospitall, and there Mr. Pickering
bought them some fairings, and I did give every one of them a bauble,
which was the little globes of glass with things hanging in them, which
pleased the ladies very well.  After that home with them in their coach,
and there was called up to my Lady, and she would have me stay to talk
with her, which I did I think a full hour.  And the poor lady did with so
much innocency tell me how Mrs. Crispe had told her that she did intend,
by means of a lady that lies at her house, to get the King to be godfather
to the young lady that she is in childbed now of; but to see in what a
manner my Lady told it me, protesting that she sweat in the very telling
of it, was the greatest pleasure to me in the world to see the simplicity
and harmlessness of a lady.  Then down to supper with the ladies, and so
home, Mr. Moore (as he and I cannot easily part) leading me as far as
Fenchurch Street to the Mitre, where we drank a glass of wine and so
parted, and I home and to bed.

Thus ends the month.  My maid Jane newly gone, and Pall left now to do all
the work till another maid comes, which shall not be till she goes away
into the country with my mother.  Myself and wife in good health. My Lord
Sandwich in the Straits and newly recovered of a great sickness at
Alicante.  My father gone to settle at Brampton, and myself under much
business and trouble for to settle things in the estate to our content.
But what is worst, I find myself lately too much given to seeing of plays,
and expense, and pleasure, which makes me forget my business, which I must
labour to amend.  No money comes in, so that I have been forced to borrow
a great deal for my own expenses, and to furnish my father, to leave
things in order.  I have some trouble about my brother Tom, who is now
left to keep my father's trade, in which I have great fears that he will
miscarry for want of brains and care.  At Court things are in very ill
condition, there being so much emulacion, poverty, and the vices of
drinking, swearing, and loose amours, that I know not what will be the end
of it, but confusion.  And the Clergy so high, that all people that I meet
with do protest against their practice.  In short, I see no content or
satisfaction any where, in any one sort of people. The Benevolence

     [A voluntary contribution made by the subjects to their sovereign.
     Upon this occasion the clergy alone gave L33,743: See May 31st,
     1661.--B]

proves so little, and an occasion of so much discontent every where; that
it had better it had never been set up.  I think to subscribe L20.  We are
at our Office quiet, only for lack of money all things go to rack. Our
very bills offered to be sold upon the Exchange at 10 per cent. loss.  We
are upon getting Sir R. Ford's house added to our Office.  But I see so
many difficulties will follow in pleasing of one another in the dividing
of it, and in becoming bound personally to pay the rent of L200 per annum,
that I do believe it will yet scarce come to pass.  The season very sickly
every where of strange and fatal fevers.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     A great baboon, but so much like a man in most things
     A play not very good, though commended much
     Begun to smell, and so I caused it to be set forth (corpse)
     Bleeding behind by leeches will cure him
     By chewing of tobacco is become very fat and sallow
     Cannot bring myself to mind my business
     Durst not take notice of her, her husband being there
     Faced white coat, made of one of my wife's pettycoates
     Family being all in mourning, doing him the greatest honour
     Fear I shall not be able to wipe my hands of him again
     Finding my wife not sick, but yet out of order
     Found him not so ill as I thought that he had been ill
     Found my brother John at eight o'clock in bed, which vexed me
     Good God! how these ignorant people did cry her up for it!
     Greedy to see the will, but did not ask to see it till to-morrow
     His company ever wearys me
     I broke wind and so came to some ease
     I would fain have stolen a pretty dog that followed me
     Instructed by Shakespeare himself
     King, Duke and Duchess, and Madame Palmer, were
     Lady Batten how she was such a man's whore
     Lately too much given to seeing of plays, and expense
     Lewdness and beggary of the Court
     Look askew upon my wife, because my wife do not buckle to them
     None will sell us any thing without our personal security given
     Quakers do still continue, and rather grow than lessen
     Sat before Mrs. Palmer, the King's mistress, and filled my eyes
     So the children and I rose and dined by ourselves
     Sorry in some respect, glad in my expectations in another respec
     The Alchymist,--Comedy by Ben Jonson
     The Lords taxed themselves for the poor--an earl, s.
     This week made a vow to myself to drink no wine this week
     Those absent from prayers were to pay a forfeit
     To be so much in love of plays
     Woman with a rod in her hand keeping time to the musique



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                           SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER
                                  1661

September 1st (Lord's day).  Last night being very rainy [the rain] broke
into my house, the gutter being stopped, and spoiled all my ceilings
almost.  At church in the morning, and dined at home with my wife.  After
dinner to Sir W. Batten's, where I found Sir W. Pen and Captain Holmes.
Here we were very merry with Sir W. Pen about the loss of his tankard,
though all be but a cheat, and he do not yet understand it; but the
tankard was stole by Sir W. Batten, and the letter, as from the thief,
wrote by me, which makes: very good sport.  Here I staid all the
afternoon, and then Captain Holmes and I by coach to White Hall; in our
way, I found him by discourse, to be a great friend of my Lord's, and he
told me there was many did seek to remove him; but they were old seamen,
such as Sir J. Minnes (but he would name no more, though I do believe Sir
W. Batten is one of them that do envy him), but he says he knows that the
King do so love him, and the Duke of York too, that there is no fear of
him.  He seems to be very well acquainted with the King's mind, and with
all the several factions at Court, and spoke all with so much frankness,
that I do take him to be my Lord's good friend, and one able to do him
great service, being a cunning fellow, and one (by his own confession to
me) that can put on two several faces, and look his enemies in the face
with as much love as his friends.  But, good God! what an age is this, and
what a world is this! that a man cannot live without playing the knave and
dissimulation.  At Whitehall we parted, and I to Mrs. Pierce's, meeting
her and Madam Clifford in the street, and there staid talking and laughing
with them a good while, and so back to my mother's, and there supped, and
so home and to bed.

2nd.  In the morning to my cozen Thos. Pepys, executor, and there talked
with him about my uncle Thomas, his being in the country, but he could not
advise me to anything therein, not knowing what the other has done in the
country, and so we parted.  And so to Whitehall, and there my Lord Privy
Seal, who has been out of town this week, not being yet come, we can have
no seal, and therefore meeting with Mr. Battersby the apothecary in
Fenchurch Street to the King's Apothecary's chamber in Whitehall, and
there drank a bottle or two of wine, and so he and I by water towards
London.  I landed at Blackfriars and so to the Wardrobe and dined, and
then back to Whitehall with Captain Ferrers, and there walked, and thence
to Westminster Hall, where we met with Mr. Pickering, and so all of us to
the Rhenish wine house (Prior's), where the master of the house is laying
out some money in making a cellar with an arch in his yard, which is very
convenient for him.  Here we staid a good while, and so Mr. Pickering and
I to Westminster Hall again, and there walked an hour or two talking, and
though he be a fool, yet he keeps much company, and will tell all he sees
or hears, and so a man may understand what the common talk of the town is,
and I find by him that there are endeavours to get my Lord out of play at
sea, which I believe Mr. Coventry and the Duke do think will make them
more absolute; but I hope, for all this, they will not be able to do it.
He tells me plainly of the vices of the Court, and how the pox is so
common there, and so I hear on all hands that it is as common as eating
and swearing.  From him by water to the bridge, and thence to the Mitre,
where I met my uncle and aunt Wight come to see Mrs. Rawlinson (in her
husband's absence out of town), and so I staid with them and Mr. Lucas and
other company, very merry, and so home, Where my wife has been busy all
the day making of pies, and had been abroad and bought things for herself,
and tells that she met at the Change with my young ladies of the Wardrobe
and there helped them to buy things, and also with Mr. Somerset, who did
give her a bracelet of rings, which did a little trouble me, though I know
there is no hurt yet in it, but only for fear of further acquaintance.  So
to bed.  This night I sent another letter to Sir W. Pen to offer him the
return of his tankard upon his leaving of 30s. at a place where it should
be brought.  The issue of which I am to expect.

3rd.  This day some of us Commissioners went down to Deptford to pay off
some ships, but I could not go, but staid at home all the morning setting
papers to rights, and this morning Mr. Howell, our turner, sent me two
things to file papers on very handsome.  Dined at home, and then with my
wife to the Wardrobe, where my Lady's child was christened (my Lord Crew
and his Lady, and my Lady Montagu, my Lord's mother-in-law, were the
witnesses), and named Katherine

     [Lady Katherine Montagu, youngest daughter of Lord Sandwich,
     married, first, Nicholas Bacon, eldest son and heir of Sir Nicholas
     Bacon, K.B., of Shrubland Hall, co.  Suffolk; and, secondly, the
     Rev. Balthazar Gardeman.  She died January 15th, 1757, at ninety-six
     years, four months.--B.]

(the Queen elect's name); but to my and all our trouble, the Parson of the
parish christened her, and did not sign the child with the sign of the
cross.  After that was done, we had a very fine banquet, the best I ever
was at, and so (there being very little company) we by and by broke up,
and my wife and I to my mother, who I took a liberty to advise about her
getting things ready to go this week into the country to my father, and
she (being become now-a-days very simple) took it very ill, and we had a
great deal of noise and wrangling about it.  So home by coach.

4th.  In the morning to the Privy Seal to do some things of the last
month, my Lord Privy Seal having been some time out of town.  Then my wife
came to me to Whitehall, and we went and walked a good while in St.
James's Park to see the brave alterations, and so to Wilkinson's, the
Cook's, to dinner, where we sent for Mrs. Sarah and there dined and had
oysters, the first I have eat this year, and were pretty good.  After
dinner by agreement to visit Mrs. Symonds, but she is abroad, which I
wonder at, and so missing her my wife again to my mother's (calling at
Mrs. Pierce's, who we found brought to bed of a girl last night) and there
staid and drank, and she resolves to be going to-morrow without fail.
Many friends come in to take their leave of her, but a great deal of stir
I had again tonight about getting her to go to see my Lady Sandwich before
she goes, which she says she will do tomorrow.  So I home.

5th.  To the Privy Seal this morning about business, in my way taking
leave of my mother, who goes to Brampton to-day.  But doing my business at
the Privy Seal pretty soon, I took boat and went to my uncle Fenner's, and
there I found my mother and my wife and Pall (of whom I had this morning
at my own house taken leave, and given her 20s. and good counsel how to
carry herself to my father and mother), and so I took them, it being late,
to Beard's, where they were staid for, and so I put them into the waggon,
and saw them going presently, Pall crying exceedingly.  Then in with my
wife, my aunt Bell and Charles Pepys, whom we met there, and drank, and so
to my uncle Fenner's to dinner (in the way meeting a French footman with
feathers, who was in quest of my wife, and spoke with her privately, but I
could not tell what it was, only my wife promised to go to some place
to-morrow morning, which do trouble my mind how to know whither it was),
where both his sons and daughters were, and there we were merry and dined.
After dinner news was brought that my aunt Kite, the butcher's widow in
London, is sick ready to die and sends for my uncle and me to come to take
charge of things, and to be entrusted with the care of her daughter.  But
I through want of time to undertake such a business, I was taken up by
Antony Joyce, which came at last to very high words, which made me very
angry, and I did not think that he would ever have been such a fool to
meddle with other people's business, but I saw he spoke worse to his
father than to me and therefore I bore it the better, but all the company
was offended with him, so we parted angry he and I, and so my wife and I
to the fair, and I showed her the Italians dancing the ropes, and the
women that do strange tumbling tricks and so by foot home vexed in my mind
about Antony Joyce.

6th.  This morning my uncle Fenner by appointment came and drank his
morning draft with me, and from thence he and I go to see my aunt Kite (my
wife holding her resolution to go this morning as she resolved yesterday,
and though there could not be much hurt in it, yet my own jealousy put a
hundred things into my mind, which did much trouble me all day), whom we
found in bed and not like to live as we think, and she told us her mind
was that if she should die she should give all she had to her daughter,
only L5 apiece to her second husband's children, in case they live to come
out of their apprenticeships, and that if her daughter should die before
marrying, then L10 to be divided between Sarah Kite's children and the
rest as her own daughter shall dispose of it, and this I set down that I
may be able to swear in case there should be occasion. From thence to an
alehouse while it rained, which kept us there I think above two hours, and
at last we were fain to go through the rainy street home, calling on his
sister Utbeck and drank there.  Then I home to dinner all alone, and
thence my mind being for my wife's going abroad much troubled and unfit
for business, I went to the Theatre, and saw "Elder Brother" ill acted;
that done, meeting here with Sir G. Askew, Sir Theophilus Jones, and
another Knight, with Sir W. Pen, we to the Ship tavern, and there staid
and were merry till late at night, and so got a coach, and Sir Wm. and I
home, where my wife had been long come home, but I seemed very angry, as
indeed I am, and did not all night show her any countenance, neither
before nor in bed, and so slept and rose discontented.

7th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon Mr. Moore dined with me, and
then in comes Wm. Joyce to answer a letter of mine I wrote this morning to
him about a maid of his that my wife had hired, and she sent us word that
she was hired to stay longer with her master, which mistake he came to
clear himself of; and I took it very kindly.  So I having appointed the
young ladies at the Wardrobe to go with them to a play to-day, I left him
and my brother Tom who came along with him to dine, and my wife and I took
them to the Theatre, where we seated ourselves close by the King, and Duke
of York, and Madame Palmer, which was great content; and, indeed, I can
never enough admire her beauty.  And here was "Bartholomew Fayre," with
the puppet-show, acted to-day, which had not been these forty years (it
being so satyricall against Puritanism, they durst not till now, which is
strange they should already dare to do it, and the King do countenance
it), but I do never a whit like it the better for the puppets, but rather
the worse.  Thence home with the ladies, it being by reason of our staying
a great while for the King's coming, and the length of the play, near nine
o'clock before it was done, and so in their coach home, and still in
discontent with my wife, to bed, and rose so this morning also.

8th (Lord's day).  To church, it being a very wet night last night and
to-day, dined at home, and so to church again with my wife in the
afternoon, and coming home again found our new maid Doll asleep, that she
could not hear to let us in, so that we were fain to send the boy in at a
window to open the door to us.  So up to my chamber all alone, and
troubled in mind to think how much of late I have addicted myself to
expense and pleasure, that now I can hardly reclaim myself to look after
my great business of settling Gravely business, until now almost too late.
I pray God give me grace to begin now to look after my business, but it
always was, and I fear will ever be, my foible that after I am once got
behind-hand with business, I am hard to set to it again to recover it.  In
the evening I begun to look over my accounts and upon the whole I do find
myself, by what I can yet see, worth near L600, for which God be blessed,
which put me into great comfort.  So to supper and to bed.

9th.  To the Privy Seal in the morning, but my Lord did not come, so I
went with Captain Morrice at his desire into the King's Privy Kitchen to
Mr. Sayres, the Master Cook, and there we had a good slice of beef or two
to our breakfast, and from thence he took us into the wine cellar where,
by my troth, we were very merry, and I drank too much wine, and all along
had great and particular kindness from Mr. Sayres, but I drank so much
wine that I was not fit for business, and therefore at noon I went and
walked in Westminster Hall a while, and thence to Salisbury Court play
house, where was acted the first time "'Tis pity Shee's a Whore,"  a
simple play and ill acted, only it was my fortune to sit by a most pretty
and most ingenious lady, which pleased me much.  Thence home, and found
Sir Williams both and much more company gone to the Dolphin to drink the
30s. that we got the other day of Sir W. Pen about his tankard.  Here was
Sir R. Slingsby, Holmes, Captn.  Allen, Mr. Turner, his wife and daughter,
my Lady Batten, and Mrs. Martha, &c., and an excellent company of
fiddlers; so we exceeding merry till late; and then we begun to tell Sir
W. Pen the business, but he had been drinking to-day, and so is almost
gone, that we could not make him understand it, which caused us more
sport.  But so much the better, for I believe when he do come to
understand it he will be angry, he has so talked of the business himself
and the letter up and down that he will be ashamed to be found abused in
it.  So home and to bed.

10th.  At the office all the morn, dined at home; then my wife into Wood
Street to buy a chest, and thence to buy other things at my uncle Fenner's
(though by reason of rain we had ill walking), thence to my brother Tom's,
and there discoursed with him about business, and so to the Wardrobe to
see my Lady, and after supper with the young ladies, bought a link and
carried it myself till I met one that would light me home for the link.
So he light me home with his own, and then I did give him mine.  This
night I found Mary, my cozen W. Joyce's maid, come to me to be my cook
maid, and so my house is full again.  So to bed.

11th.  Early to my cozen Thomas Trice to discourse about our affairs, and
he did make demand of the L200 and the interest thereof.  But for the L200
I did agree to pay him, but for the other I did desire to be advised.  So
from him to Dr. Williams, who did carry me into his garden, where he hath
abundance of grapes; and did show me how a dog that he hath do kill all
the cats that come thither to kill his pigeons, and do afterwards bury
them; and do it with so much care that they shall be quite covered; that
if but the tip of the tail hangs out he will take up the cat again, and
dig the hole deeper.  Which is very strange; and he tells me that he do
believe that he hath killed above 100 cats.  After he was ready we went up
and down to inquire about my affairs and then parted, and to the Wardrobe,
and there took Mr. Moore to Tom Trice, who promised to let Mr. Moore have
copies of the bond and my aunt's deed of gift, and so I took him home to
my house to dinner, where I found my wife's brother, Balty, as fine as
hands could make him, and his servant, a Frenchman, to wait on him, and
come to have my wife to visit a young lady which he is a servant to, and
have hope to trepan and get for his wife.  I did give way for my wife to
go with him, and so after dinner they went, and Mr. Moore and I out again,
he about his business and I to Dr. Williams: to talk with him again, and
he and I walking through Lincoln's Fields observed at the Opera a new
play, "Twelfth Night"

     [Pepys seldom liked any play of Shakespeare's, and he sadly
     blundered when he supposed "Twelfth Night" was a new play.]

was acted there, and the King there; so I, against my own mind and
resolution, could not forbear to go in, which did make the play seem a
burthen to me, and I took no pleasure at all in it; and so after it was
done went home with my mind troubled for my going thither, after my
swearing to my wife that I would never go to a play without her.  So that
what with this and things going so cross to me as to matters of my uncle's
estate, makes me very much troubled in my mind, and so to bed. My wife was
with her brother to see his mistress today, and says she is young, rich,
and handsome, but not likely for him to get.

12th.  Though it was an office day, yet I was forced to go to the Privy
Seal, at which I was all the morning, and from thence to my Lady's to
dinner at the Wardrobe; and in my way upon the Thames, I saw the King's
new pleasure-boat that is come now for the King to take pleasure in above
bridge; and also two Gundaloes

     ["Two long boats that were made in Venice, called gondolas, were by
     the Duke of Venice (Dominico Contareni) presented to His Majesty;
     and the attending watermen, being four, were in very rich clothes,
     crimson satin; very big were their breeches and doublets; they wore
     also very large shirts of the same satin, very richly laced."
     --Rugge's Diurnal.--B.]

that are lately brought, which are very rich and fine.  After dinner I
went into my Lady's chamber where I found her up now out of her childbed,
which I was glad to see, and after an hour's talk with her I took leave
and to Tom Trice again, and sat talking and drinking with him about our
business a great while.  I do find I am likely to be forced to pay
interest for the L200.  By and by in comes my uncle Thomas, and as he was
always a close cunning fellow, so he carries himself to me, and says
nothing of what his endeavours are, though to my trouble I know that he is
about recovering of Gravely, but neither I nor he began any discourse of
the business.  From thence to Dr. Williams (at the little blind alehouse
in Shoe Lane, at the Gridiron, a place I am ashamed to be seen to go
into), and there with some bland counsel of his we discuss our matters,
but I find men of so different minds that by my troth I know not what to
trust to.  It being late I took leave, and by link home and called at Sir
W. Batten's, and there hear that Sir W. Pen do take our jest of the
tankard very ill, which Pam sorry for.

13th.  This morning I was sent for by my uncle Fenner to come and advise
about the buriall of my aunt, the butcher, who died yesterday; and from
thence to the Anchor, by Doctor's Commons, and there Dr. Williams and I
did write a letter for my purpose to Mr. Sedgewick, of Cambridge, about
Gravely business, and after that I left him and an attorney with him and
went to the Wardrobe, where I found my wife, and thence she and I to the
water to spend the afternoon in pleasure; and so we went to old George's,
and there eat as much as we would of a hot shoulder of mutton, and so to
boat again and home.  So to bed, my mind very full of business and
trouble.

14th.  At the office all the morning, at noon to the Change, and then home
again.  To dinner, where my uncle Fenner by appointment came and dined
with me, thinking to go together to my aunt Kite's that is dead; but
before we had dined comes Sir R. Slingsby and his lady, and a great deal
of company, to take my wife and I out by barge to shew them the King's and
Duke's yachts.  So I was forced to leave my uncle and brother Tom at
dinner and go forth with them, and we had great pleasure, seeing all four
yachts, viz., these two and the two Dutch ones.  And so home again, and
after writing letters by post, to bed.

15th (Lord's day).  To my aunt Kite's in the morning to help my uncle
Fenner to put things in order against anon for the buriall, and at noon
home again; and after dinner to church, my wife and I, and after sermon
with my wife to the buriall of my aunt Kite, where besides us and my uncle
Fenner's family, there was none of any quality, but poor rascally people.
So we went to church with the corps, and there had service read at the
grave, and back again with Pegg Kite who will be, I doubt, a troublesome
carrion to us executors; but if she will not be ruled, I shall fling up my
executorship.  After that home, and Will Joyce along with me where we sat
and talked and drank and ate an hour or two, and so he went away and I up
to my chamber and then to prayers and to bed.

16th.  This morning I was busy at home to take in my part of our freight
of Coles, which Sir G. Carteret, Sir R. Slingsby, and myself sent for,
which is 10 Chaldron, 8 of which I took in, and with the other to repay
Sir W. Pen what I borrowed of him a little while ago.  So that from this
day I should see how long 10 chaldron of coals will serve my house, if it
please the Lord to let me live to see them burned.  In the afternoon by
appointment to meet Dr. Williams and his attorney, and they and I to Tom
Trice, and there got him in discourse to confess the words that he had
said that his mother did desire him not to see my uncle about her L200
bond while she was alive.  Here we were at high words with T. Trice and
then parted, and we to Standing's, in Fleet Street, where we sat and drank
and talked a great while about my going down to Gravely Court,

     [The manorial court of Graveley, in Huntingdonshire, to which
     Impington owed suit or service, and under which the Pepys's copyhold
     estates were held.  See July 8th, 1661, ante.--B.]

which will be this week, whereof the Doctor had notice in a letter from
his sister this week.  In the middle of our discourse word was brought me
from my brother's that there is a fellow come from my father out of the
country, on purpose to speak to me, so I went to him and he made a story
how he had lost his letter, but he was sure it was for me to go into the
country, which I believed, and thought it might be to give me notice of
Gravely Court, but I afterwards found that it was a rogue that did use to
play such tricks to get money of people, but he got none of me.  At night
I went home, and there found letters-from my father informing me of the
Court, and that I must come down and meet him at Impington, which I
presently resolved to do,

17th.  And the next morning got up, telling my wife of my journey, and she
with a few words got me to hire her a horse to go along with me.  So I
went to my Lady's and elsewhere to take leave, and of Mr. Townsend did
borrow a very fine side-saddle for my wife; and so after all things were
ready, she and I took coach to the end of the town towards Kingsland, and
there got upon my horse and she upon her pretty mare that I hired for her,
and she rides very well.  By the mare at one time falling she got a fall,
but no harm; so we got to Ware, and there supped, and to bed very merry
and pleasant.

18th.  The next morning up early and begun our march; the way about
Puckridge--[Puckeridge, a village in Hertfordshire six and a half miles
N.N.E, of Ware.]--very bad, and my wife, in the very last dirty place of
all, got a fall, but no hurt, though some dirt.  At last she begun, poor
wretch, to be tired, and I to be angry at it, but I was to blame; for she
is a very good companion as long as she is well.  In the afternoon we got
to Cambridge, where I left my wife at my cozen Angier's while I went to
Christ's College, and there found my brother in his chamber, and talked
with him; and so to the barber's, and then to my wife again, and remounted
for Impington, where my uncle received me and my wife very kindly.  And by
and by in comes my father, and we supped and talked and were merry, but
being weary and sleepy my wife and I to bed without talking with my father
anything about our business.

19th.  Up early, and my father and I alone into the garden, and there
talked about our business, and what to do therein.  So after I had talked
and advised with my coz Claxton, and then with my uncle by his bedside, we
all horsed away to Cambridge, where my father and I, having left my wife
at the Beare with my brother, went to Mr. Sedgewicke, the steward of
Gravely, and there talked with him, but could get little hopes from
anything that he would tell us; but at last I did give him a fee, and then
he was free to tell me what I asked, which was something, though not much
comfort.  From thence to our horses, and with my wife went and rode
through Sturbridge

     [Sturbridge fair is of great antiquity.  The first trace of it is
     found in a charter granted about 1211 by King John to the Lepers of
     the Hospital of St. Mary Magdalen at Sturbridge by Cambridge, a fair
     to be held in the close of the hospital on the vigil and feast of
     the Holy Cross (see Cornelius Walford's "Fairs Past and Present,"
     1883, p. 54).]

but the fair was almost done.  So we did not 'light there at all, but went
back to Cambridge, and there at the Beare we had some herrings, we and my
brother, and after dinner set out for Brampton, where we come in very good
time, and found all things well, and being somewhat weary, after some talk
about tomorrow's business with my father, we went to bed.

20th.  Will Stankes and I set out in the morning betimes for Gravely,
where to an ale-house and drank, and then, going towards the Court House,
met my uncle Thomas and his son Thomas, with Bradly, the rogue that had
betrayed us, and one Young, a cunning fellow, who guides them.  There
passed no unkind words at all between us, but I seemed fair and went to
drink with them.  I said little till by and by that we come to the Court,
which was a simple meeting of a company of country rogues, with the
Steward, and two Fellows of Jesus College, that are lords of the town
where the jury were sworn; and I producing no surrender, though I told
them I was sure there is and must be one somewhere, they found my uncle
Thomas heir at law, as he is, and so, though I did tell him and his son
that they would find themselves abused by these fellows, and did advise
them to forbear being admitted this Court (which they could have done, but
that these rogues did persuade them to do it now), my uncle was admitted,
and his son also, in reversion after his father, which he did well in to
secure his money.  The father paid a year and a half for his fine, and the
son half a year, in all L48, besides about L3 fees; so that I do believe
the charges of his journeys, and what he gives those two rogues, and other
expenses herein, cannot be less than L70, which will be a sad thing for
them if a surrender be found.  After all was done, I openly wished them
joy in it, and so rode to Offord with them and there parted fairly without
any words.  I took occasion to bid them money for their half acre of land,
which I had a mind to do that in the surrender I might secure Piggott's,
which otherwise I should be forced to lose.  So with Stankes home and
supped, and after telling my father how things went, I went to bed with my
mind in good temper, because I see the matter and manner of the Court and
the bottom of my business, wherein I was before and should always have
been ignorant.

21st.  All the morning pleasing myself with my father, going up and down
the house and garden with my father and my wife, contriving some
alterations.  After dinner (there coming this morning my aunt Hanes and
her son from London, that is to live with my father) I rode to Huntingdon,
where I met Mr. Philips, and there put my Bugden

     [Bugden, or Buckden, a village and parish in the St. Neots district
     of Huntingdonshire, four miles S.W. of Huntingdon.]

matter in order against the Court, and so to Hinchingbroke, where Mr.
Barnwell shewed me the condition of the house, which is yet very backward,
and I fear will be very dark in the cloyster when it is done. So home and
to supper and to bed, very pleasant and quiet.

22nd (Lord's day).  Before church time walking with my father in the
garden contriving.  So to church, where we had common prayer, and a dull
sermon by one Mr. Case, who yet I heard sing very well.  So to dinner, and
busy with my father about his accounts all the afternoon, and people came
to speak with us about business.  Mr. Barnwell at night came and supped
with us.  So after setting matters even with my father and I, to bed.

23rd.  Up, and sad to hear my father and mother wrangle as they used to do
in London, of which I took notice to both, and told them that I should
give over care for anything unless they would spend what they have with
more love and quiet.  So (John Bowles coming to see us before we go) we
took horse and got early to Baldwick; where there was a fair, and we put
in and eat a mouthfull of pork, which they made us pay 14d. for, which
vexed us much.  And so away to Stevenage, and staid till a showre was
over, and so rode easily to Welling, where we supped well, and had two
beds in the room and so lay single, and still remember it that of all the
nights that ever I slept in my life I never did pass a night with more
epicurism of sleep; there being now and then a noise of people stirring
that waked me, and then it was a very rainy night, and then I was a little
weary, that what between waking and then sleeping again, one after
another, I never had so much content in all my life, and so my wife says
it was with her.

24th.  We rose, and set forth, but found a most sad alteration in the road
by reason of last night's rains, they being now all dirty and washy,
though not deep.  So we rode easily through, and only drinking at
Holloway, at the sign of a woman with cakes in one hand and a pot of ale
in the other, which did give good occasion of mirth, resembling her to the
maid that served us, we got home very timely and well, and finding there
all well, and letters from sea, that speak of my Lord's being well, and
his action, though not considerable of any side, at Argier.--[Algiers]--I
went straight to my Lady, and there sat and talked with her, and so home
again, and after supper we to bed somewhat weary, hearing of nothing ill
since my absence but my brother Tom, who is pretty well though again.

25th.  By coach with Sir W. Pen to Covent Garden.  By the way, upon my
desire, he told me that I need not fear any reflection upon my Lord for
their ill success at Argier, for more could not be done than was done. I
went to my cozen, Thos. Pepys, there, and talked with him a good while
about our country business, who is troubled at my uncle Thomas his folly,
and so we parted; and then meeting Sir R. Slingsby in St. Martin's Lane,
he and I in his coach through the Mewes, which is the way that now all
coaches are forced to go, because of a stop at Charing Cross, by reason of
a drain there to clear the streets.  To Whitehall, and there to Mr.
Coventry, and talked with him, and thence to my Lord Crew's and dined with
him, where I was used with all imaginable kindness both from him and her.
And I see that he is afraid that my Lord's reputacon will a little suffer
in common talk by this late success; but there is no help for it now.  The
Queen of England (as she is now owned and called) I hear doth keep open
Court, and distinct at Lisbon.  Hence, much against my nature and will,
yet such is the power of the Devil over me I could not refuse it, to the
Theatre, and saw "The Merry Wives of Windsor," ill done.  And that ended,
with Sir W. Pen and Sir G. More to the tavern, and so home with him by
coach, and after supper to prayers and to bed.  In full quiet of mind as
to thought, though full of business, blessed be God.

26th.  At the office all the morning, so dined at home, and then abroad
with my wife by coach to the Theatre to shew her "King and no King," it
being very well done.  And so by coach, though hard to get it, being
rainy, home.  So to my chamber to write letters and the journal for these
six last days past.

27th.  By coach to Whitehall with my wife (where she went to see Mrs.
Pierce, who was this day churched, her month of childbed being out).  I
went to Mrs. Montagu and other businesses, and at noon met my wife at the
Wardrobe; and there dined, where we found Captain Country (my little
Captain that I loved, who carried me to the Sound), come with some grapes
and millons

     [The antiquity of the cultivation of the melon is very remote.  Both
     the melon (cucaimis melo) and the water-melon (cucumis citrullus)
     were introduced into England at the end of the sixteenth century.
     See vol. i., p. 228.]

from my Lord at Lisbon, the first that ever I saw any, and my wife and I
eat some, and took some home; but the grapes are rare things.  Here we
staid; and in the afternoon comes Mr. Edwd. Montagu (by appointment this
morning) to talk with my Lady and me about the provisions fit to be
bought, and sent to my Lord along with him.  And told us, that we need not
trouble ourselves how to buy them, for the King would pay for all, and
that he would take care to get them: which put my Lady and me into a great
deal of ease of mind.  Here we staid and supped too, and, after my wife
had put up some of the grapes in a basket for to be sent to the King, we
took coach and home, where we found a hampire of millons sent to me also.

28th.  At the office in the morning, dined at home, and then Sir W. Pen
and his daughter and I and my wife to the Theatre, and there saw "Father's
own Son," a very good play, and the first time I ever saw it, and so at
night to my house, and there sat and talked and drank and merrily broke
up, and to bed.

29th (Lord's day).  To church in the morning, and so to dinner, and Sir W.
Pen and daughter, and Mrs. Poole, his kinswoman, Captain Poole's wife,
came by appointment to dinner with us, and a good dinner we had for them,
and were very merry, and so to church again, and then to Sir W. Pen's and
there supped, where his brother, a traveller, and one that speaks Spanish
very well, and a merry man, supped with us, and what at dinner and supper
I drink I know not how, of my own accord, so much wine, that I was even
almost foxed, and my head aked all night; so home and to bed, without
prayers, which I never did yet, since I came to the house, of a Sunday
night: I being now so out of order that I durst not read prayers, for fear
of being perceived by my servants in what case I was.  So to bed.

30th.  This morning up by moon-shine, at 5 o'clock, to White Hall, to meet
Mr. Moore at the Privy Seal, but he not being come as appointed, I went
into King Street to the Red Lyon' to drink my morning draft, and there I
heard of a fray between the two Embassadors of Spain and France; and that,
this day, being the day of the entrance of an Embassador from Sweden, they
intended to fight for the precedence!  Our King, I heard, ordered that no
Englishman should meddle in the business,

     [The Comte de Brienne insinuates, in his "Memoirs," that Charles
     purposely abstained from interfering, in the belief that it was for
     his interest to let France and Spain quarrel, in order to further
     his own designs in the match with Portugal.  Louis certainly held
     that opinion; and he afterwards instructed D'Estrades to solicit
     from the English court the punishment of those Londoners who had
     insulted his ambassador, and to demand the dismissal of De
     Batteville.  Either no Londoner had interfered, or Louis's demand
     had not in England the same force as in Spain; for no one was
     punished.  The latter part of his request it was clearly not for
     Charles to entertain, much less enforce.--B.]

but let them do what they would.  And to that end all the soldiers in the
town were in arms all the day long, and some of the train-bands in the
City; and a great bustle through the City all the day.  Then I to the
Privy Seal, and there Mr. Moore and a gentleman being come with him, we
took coach (which was the business I come for) to Chelsy, to my Lord Privy
Seal, and there got him to seal the business.  Here I saw by day-light two
very fine pictures in the gallery, that a little while ago I saw by night;
and did also go all over the house, and found it to be the prettiest
contrived house that ever I saw in my life.  So to coach back again; and
at White Hall light, and saw the soldiers and people running up and down
the streets.  So I went to the Spanish Embassador's and the French, and
there saw great preparations on both sides; but the French made the most
noise and vaunted most, the other made no stir almost at all; so that I
was afraid the other would have had too great a conquest over them.  Then
to the Wardrobe, and dined there, end then abroad and in Cheapside hear
that the Spanish hath got the best of it, and killed three of the French
coach-horses and several men, and is gone through the City next to our
King's coach; at which, it is strange to see how all the City did rejoice.
And indeed we do naturally all love the Spanish, and hate the French.  But
I, as I am in all things curious, presently got to the water-side, and
there took oars to Westminster Palace, thinking to have seen them come in
thither with all the coaches, but they being come and returned, I ran
after them with my boy after me through all the dirt and the streets full
of people; till at last, at the Mewes, I saw the Spanish coach go, with
fifty drawn swords at least to guard it, and our soldiers shouting for
joy.  And so I followed the coach, and then met it at York House, where
the embassador lies; and there it went in with great state. So then I went
to the French house, where I observe still, that there is no men in the
world of a more insolent spirit where they do well, nor before they begin
a matter, and more abject if they do miscarry, than these people are; for
they all look like dead men, and not a word among them, but shake their
heads.  The truth is, the Spaniards were not only observed to fight most
desperately, but also they did outwitt them; first in lining their own
harness with chains of iron that they could not be cut, then in setting
their coach in the most advantageous place, and to appoint men to guard
every one of their horses, and others for to guard the coach, and others
the coachmen.  And, above all, in setting upon the French horses and
killing them, for by that means the French were not able to stir.  There
were several men slain of the French, and one or two of the Spaniards, and
one Englishman by a bullet.  Which is very observable, the French were at
least four to one in number, and had near 100 case of pistols among them,
and the Spaniards had not one gun among them; which is for their honour
for ever, and the others' disgrace. So, having been very much daubed with
dirt, I got a coach, and home where I vexed my wife in telling of her this
story, and pleading for the Spaniards against the French.  So ends this
month; myself and family in good condition of health, but my head full of
my Lord's and my own and the office business; where we are now very busy
about the business of sending forces to Tangier,

     [This place so often mentioned, was first given up to the English
     fleet under Lord Sandwich, by the Portuguese, January 30th, 1662;
     and Lord Peterborough left governor, with a garrison.  The greatest
     pains were    afterwards taken to preserve the fortress, and a fine
     mole was constructed at a vast expense, to improve the harbour.  At
     length, after immense sums of money had been wasted there, the House
     of Commons expressed a dislike to the management of the garrison,
     which they suspected to be a nursery for a popish army, and seemed
     disinclined to maintain it any longer.  The king consequently, in
     1683, sent Lord Dartmouth to bring home the troops, and destroy the
     works; which he performed so effectually, that it would puzzle all
     our engineers to restore the harbour.  It were idle to speculate on
     the benefits which might have accrued to England, by its
     preservation and retention; Tangier fell into the hands of the
     Moors, its importance having ceased, with the demolition of the
     mole.  Many curious views of Tangier were taken by Hollar, during
     its occupation by the English; and his drawings are preserved in the
     British Museum.  Some have been engraved by himself; but the
     impressions are of considerable rarity.--B.]

and the fleet to my Lord of Sandwich, who is now at Lisbon to bring over
the Queen, who do now keep a Court as Queen of England.  The business of
Argier hath of late troubled me, because my Lord hath not done what he
went for, though he did as much as any man in the world could have done.
The want of money puts all things, and above all things the Nary, out of
order; and yet I do not see that the King takes care to bring in any
money, but thinks of new designs to lay out money.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                 OCTOBER
                                   1661

October 1st.  This morning my wife and I lay long in bed, and among other
things fell into talk of musique, and desired that I would let her learn
to sing, which I did consider, and promised her she should.  So before I
rose, word was brought me that my singing master, Mr. Goodgroome, was come
to teach me and so she rose and this morning began to learn also. To the
office, where busy all day.  So to dinner and then to the office again
till night, and then to my study at home to set matters and papers in
order, which, though I can hardly bring myself to do, yet do please me
much when it is done.  So eat a bit of bread and cheese, and to bed.

2nd.  All this morning at Pegg Kite's with my uncle Fenner, and two
friends of his, appraising her goods that her mother has left; but the
slut is like to prove so troublesome that I am out of heart with troubling
myself in her business.  After we had done we all went to a cook's shop in
Bishopsgate Street and dined, and then I took them to the tavern and did
give them a quart of sack, and so parted.  I home and then took my wife
out, and in a coach of a gentlewoman's that had been to visit my Lady
Batten and was going home again our way, we went to the Theatre, but
coming late, and sitting in an ill place, I never had so little pleasure
in a play in my life, yet it was the first time that ever I saw it,
"Victoria Corombona."  Methinks a very poor play.  Then at night troubled
to get my wife home, it being very dark, and so we were forced to have a
coach.  So to supper and to bed.

3rd.  At the office all the morning; dined at home, and in the afternoon
Mr. Moore came to me, and he and I went to Tower Hill to meet with a man,
and so back all three to my house, and there I signed a bond to Mr.
Battersby, a friend of Mr. Moore's, who lends me L50, the first money that
ever I borrowed upon bond for my own occasion, and so I took them to the
Mitre and a Portugal millon with me; there sat and discoursed in matters
of religion till night with great pleasure, and so parted, and I home,
calling at Sir W. Batten's, where his son and his wife were, who had
yesterday been at the play where we were, and it was good sport to hear
how she talked of it with admiration like a fool.  So home, and my head
was not well with the wine that I drank to-day.

4th.  By coach to White Hall with Sir W. Pen.  So to Mr. Montagu, where
his man, Mons. Eschar, makes a great com plaint against the English, that
they did help the Spaniards against the French the other day; and that
their Embassador do demand justice of our King, and that he do resolve to
be gone for France the next week; which I, and all that I met with, are
very glad of.  Thence to Paternoster Row, where my Will did receive the
L50 I borrowed yesterday.  I to the Wardrobe to dinner, and there staid
most of the afternoon very merry with the ladies.  Then Captain Ferrers
and I to the Theatre, and there came too late, so we staid and saw a bit
of "Victoria," which pleased me worse than it did the other day.  So we
staid not to see it out, but went out and drank a bottle or two of China
ale, and so home, where I found my wife vexed at her people for grumbling
to eat Suffolk cheese, which I also am vexed at.  So to bed.

5th.  At the office all the morning, then dined at home, and so staid at
home all the afternoon putting up my Lord's model of the Royal James,
which I borrowed of him long ago to hang up in my room.  And at night Sir
W. Pen and I alone to the Dolphin, and there eat some bloat-herrings

     [To bloat is to dry by smoke, a method chiefly used to cure herrings
     or bloaters.  "I have more smoke in my mouth than would blote a
     hundred herrings."--Beaumont and Fletcher, Island Princess.  "Why,
     you stink like so many bloat-herrings newly taken out of the
     chimney."--Ben Jonson, "Masque of Augurs."]

and drank good sack.  Then came in Sir W. Warren and another and staid a
while with us, and then Sir Arnold Brames, with whom we staid late and
till we had drank too much wine.  So home and I to bed pleased at my
afternoon's work in hanging up the shipp.  So to bed.

6th (Lord's day).  To church in the morning; Mr. Mills preached, who, I
expect, should take in snuffe [anger] that my wife not come to his child's
christening the other day.  The winter coming on, many of parish ladies
are come home and appear at church again; among others, the three sisters
the Thornbury's, a very fine, and the most zealous people that ever I saw
in my life, even to admiration, if it were true zeal.  There was also my
pretty black girl, Mrs. Dekins, and Mrs.  Margaret Pen, this day come to
church in a new flowered satin suit that my wife helped to buy her the
other day.  So me to dinner, and to church in the afternoon to St.
Gregory's, by Paul's, where I saw Mr. Moose in the gallery and went up to
him and heard a good sermon of Dr. Buck's, one I never heard before, a
very able man.  So home, and in the evening I went to my Valentine, her
father and mother being out of town, to fetch her to supper to my house,
and then came Sir W. Pen and would have her to his, so with much sport I
got them all to mine, and we were merry, and so broke up and to bed.

7th.  Up in the morning and to my uncle Fenner's, thinking to have met Peg
Kite about her business but she comes not, so I went to Dr. Williams,
where I found him sick in bed and was sorry for it.  So about business all
day, troubled in my mind till I can hear from Brampton, how things go on
at Sturtlow, at the Court, which I was cleared in at night by a letter,
which tells me that my cozen Tom was there to be admitted, in his father's
name, as heir-at-law, but that he was opposed, and I was admitted by
proxy, which put me out of great trouble of mind.

8th.  At the office all the morning.  After office done, went and eat some
Colchester oysters with Sir W. Batten at his house, and there, with some
company; dined and staid there talking all the afternoon; and late after
dinner took Mrs. Martha out by coach, and carried her to the Theatre in a
frolique, to my great expense, and there shewed her part of the "Beggar's
Bush," without much pleasure, but only for a frolique, and so home again.

9th.  This morning went out about my affairs, among others to put my
Theorbo out to be mended, and then at noon home again, thinking to go with
Sir Williams both to dinner by invitation to Sir W. Rider's, but at home I
found Mrs. Pierce, la belle, and Madam Clifford, with whom I was forced to
stay, and made them the most welcome I could; and I was (God knows) very
well pleased with their beautiful company, and after dinner took them to
the Theatre, and shewed them "The Chances;" and so saw them both at home
and back to the Fleece tavern, in Covent Garden, where Luellin and
Blurton, and my old friend Frank Bagge, was to meet me, and there staid
till late very merry.  Frank Bagge tells me a story of Mrs. Pepys that
lived with my Lady Harvy,  Mr. Montagu's sister, a good woman; that she
had been very ill, and often asked for me; that she is in good condition,
and that nobody could get her to make her will; but that she did still
enquire for me, and that now she is well she desires to have a chamber at
my house.  Now I do not know whether this is a trick of Bagge's, or a good
will of hers to do something for me; but I will not trust her, but told
him I should be glad to see her, and that I would be sure to do all that I
could to provide a place for her.  So by coach home late.

10th.  At the office all the morning; dined at home, and after dinner Sir
W. Pen and my wife and I to the Theatre (she first going into Covent
Garden to speak a word with a woman to enquire of her mother, and I in the
meantime with Sir W. Pen's coach staying at W. Joyce's), where the King
came to-day, and there was "The Traytor"  most admirably acted; and a most
excellent play it is.  So home, and intended to be merry, it being my
sixth wedding night; but by a late bruise .  .  .  .  I am in so much pain
that I eat my supper and in pain to bed, yet my wife and I pretty merry.

11th:  All day in bed with a cataplasm .  .  .  .  and at night rose a
little, and to bed again in more ease than last night.  This noon there
came my brother and Dr. Tom and Snow to dinner, and by themselves were
merry.

12th.  In bed the greatest part of this day also, and my swelling in some
measure gone.  I received a letter this day from my father, that Sir R.
Bernard do a little fear that my uncle has not observed exactly the custom
of Brampton in his will about his lands there, which puts me to a great
trouble in mind, and at, night wrote to him and to my father about it,
being much troubled at it.

13th (Lord's day).  Did not stir out all day, but rose and dined below,
and this day left off half skirts and put on a wastecoate, and my false
taby wastecoate with gold lace; and in the evening there came Sir W.
Batten to see me, and sat and supped very kindly with me, and so to
prayers and to bed.

14th.  This morning I ventured by water abroad to Westminster, but lost my
labour, for Mr. Montagu was not in town.  So to the Wardrobe, and there
dined with my Lady, which is the first time I have seen her dine abroad
since her being brought to bed of my Lady Katherine.  In the afternoon
Captain Ferrers and I walked abroad to several places, among others to Mr.
Pim's, my Lord's Taylour's, and there he went out with us to the Fountain
tavern and did give us store of wine, and it being the Duke of York's
birthday, we drank the more to his health.  But, Lord! what a sad story he
makes of his being abused by a Dr. of Physique who is in one part of the
tenement wherein he dwells.  It would make one laugh, though I see he is
under a great trouble in it.  Thence home by link and found a good answer
from my father that Sir R. Bernard do clear all things as to us and our
title to Brampton, which puts my heart in great ease and quiet.

15th.  At the office all the morning, and in the afternoon to Paul's
Churchyard to a blind place, where Mrs. Goldsborough was to meet me (who
dare not be known where she lives) to treat about the difference which
remains between my uncle and her.  But, Lord! to hear how she talks and
how she rails against my uncle would make one mad.  But I seemed not to be
troubled at it, but would indeed gladly have an agreement with her. So I
appoint Mr. Moore and she another against Friday next to look into our
papers and to see what can be done to conclude the matter.  So home in
much pain by walking too much yesterday .  .  .  .  which much troubles
me.

16th.  In bed till 12 o'clock.  This morning came several maids to my wife
to be hired, and at last she pitched upon one Nell, whose mother, an old
woman, came along with her, but would not be hired under half a year,
which I am pleased at their drollness.  This day dined by appointment with
me, Dr. Thos. Pepys and my Coz: Snow, and my brother Tom, upon a fin of
ling and some sounds, neither of which did I ever know before, but most
excellent meat they are both, that in all my life I never eat the like
fish.  So after dinner came in W. Joyce and eat and drank and were merry.
So up to my chamber, and put all my papers, at rights, and in the evening
our maid Mary.  (who was with us upon trial for a month) did take leave of
us, going as we suppose to be married, for the maid liked us and we her,
but all she said was that she had a mind to live in a tradesman's house
where there was but one maid.  So to supper and to bed.

17th.  At the office all the morning, at noon my wife being gone to my coz
Snow's with Dr. Thomas Pepys and my brother Tom to a venison pasty (which
proved a pasty of salted pork); by appointment I went with Captain David
Lambert to the Exchequer, and from thence by appointment he and I were to
meet at a cook's shop to dine.  But before I went to him Captain. Cock, a
merchant I had not long known, took me to the Sun tavern and gave me a
glass of sack, and being a man of great observation and repute, did tell
me that he was confident that the Parliament, when it comes the next month
to sit again, would bring trouble with it, and enquire how the King had
disposed of offices and money, before they will raise more; which, I fear,
will bring all things to ruin again.  Thence to the Cook's and there dined
with Captain Lambert and his father-in-law, and had much talk of
Portugall; from whence he is lately come, and he tells me it is a very
poor dirty place; I mean the City and Court of Lisbon; that the King is a
very rude and simple fellow; and, for reviling of somebody a little while
ago, and calling of him cuckold, was run into .  .  .  .  with a sword and
had been killed, had he not told them that he was their king.  That there
are there no glass windows, nor will they have any; which makes sport
among our merchants there to talk of an English factor that, being newly
come thither, writ into England that glass would be a good commodity to
send thither, &c.  That the King has his meat sent up by a dozen of lazy
guards and in pipkins, sometimes, to his own table; and sometimes nothing
but fruits, and, now and then, half a hen.  And now that the Infanta is
become our Queen, she is come to have a whole hen or goose to her table,
which is not ordinary.  So home and to look over my papers that concern
the difference between Mrs. Goldsborough and us; which cost me much pains,
but contented me much after it was done.  So at home all the evening and
to supper and to bed.

18th.  To White Hall, to Mr. Montagu's, where I met with Mr. Pierce, the
purser, to advise about the things to be sent to my Lord for the Queen's
provision, and was cleared in it, and now there is all haste made, for the
fleet's going.  At noon to my Lord's to dinner, and in the afternoon,
leaving my wife there, Mr. Moore and I to Mrs. Goldsborough, who sent for
a friend to meet with us, and so we were talking about the difference
between us till 10 at night.  I find it very troublesome, and have brought
it into some hopes of an agreement, I offering to forgive her L10 that is
yet due according to my uncle's accounts to us.  So we left her friend to
advise about it, and I hope to hear of her, for I would not by any means
go to law with a woman of so devilish a tongue as she has.  So to my
Lady's, where I left my wife to lie with Mademoiselle all night, and I by
link home and to bed.  This night lying alone, and the weather cold, and
having this last 7 or 8 days been troubled with a tumor .  .  . which is
now abated by a poultice of a good handful of bran with half a pint of
vinegar and a pint of water boiled till it be thick, and then a spoonful
of honey put to it and so spread in a cloth and laid to it, I first put on
my waistcoat to lie in all night this year, and do not intend to put it
off again till spring.  I met with complaints at home that my wife left no
victuals for them all this day.

19th.  At the office all the morning, and at noon Mr. Coventry, who sat
with us all the morning, and Sir G. Carteret, Sir W. Pen, and myself, by
coach to Captain Marshe's, at Limehouse, to a house that hath been their
ancestors for this 250 years, close by the lime-house which gives the name
to the place.  Here they have a design to get the King to hire a dock for
the herring busses, which is now the great design on foot, to lie up in.
We had a very good and handsome dinner, and excellent wine. I not being
neat in clothes, which I find a great fault in me, could not be so merry
as otherwise, and at all times I am and can be, when I am in good habitt,
which makes me remember my father Osborne's' rule for a gentleman to spare
in all things rather than in that.  So by coach home, and so to write
letters by post, and so to bed.

20th (Lord's day).  At home in bed all the morning to ease my late tumour,
but up to dinner and much offended in mind at a proud trick my man Will
hath got, to keep his hat on in the house, but I will not speak of it to
him to-day; but I fear I shall be troubled with his pride and laziness,
though in other things he is good enough.  To church in the afternoon,
where a sleepy Presbyter preached, and then to Sir W. Batten who is to go
to Portsmouth to-morrow to wait upon the Duke of York, who goes to take
possession and to set in order the garrison there.  Supped at home and to
bed.

21st.  Early with Mr. Moore by coach to Chelsy, to my Lord Privy Seal's,
but have missed of coming time enough; and having taken up Mr. Pargiter,
the goldsmith (who is the man of the world that I do most know and believe
to be a cheating rogue), we drank our morning draft there together of cake
and ale, and did make good sport of his losing so much by the King's
coming in, he having bought much of Crown lands, of which, God forgive me!
I am very glad.  At Whitehall, at the Privy Seal, did with Sir W. Pen take
advice about passing of things of his there that concern his matters of
Ireland.  Thence to the Wardrobe and dined, and so against my judgment and
conscience (which God forgive, for my very heart knows that I offend God
in breaking my vows herein) to the Opera, which is now newly begun to act
again, after some alteracion of their scene, which do make it very much
worse; but the play, "Love and Honour," being the first time of their
acting it, is a very good plot, and well done. So on foot home, and after
a little business done in my study and supper, to bed.

22nd.  At the office all the morning, where we had a deputation from the
Duke in his absence, he being gone to Portsmouth, for us to have the whole
disposal and ordering of the Fleet.  In the afternoon about business up
and down, and at night to visit Sir R. Slingsby, who is fallen sick of
this new disease, an ague and fever.  So home after visiting my aunt Wight
and Mrs. Norbury (who continues still a very pleasant lady), and to
supper, and so to bed.

23rd.  To Whitehall, and there, to drink our morning, Sir W. Pen and I to
a friend's lodging of his (Col. Pr. Swell), and at noon he and I dined
together alone at the Legg in King Street, and so by coach to Chelsy to my
Lord Privy Seal's about business of Sir William's, in which we had a fair
admittance to talk with my Lord, and had his answer, and so back to the
Opera, and there I saw again "Love and Honour," and a very good play it
is.  And thence home, calling by the way to see Sir Robert Slingsby, who
continues ill, and so home.  This day all our office is invited against
Tuesday next, my Lord Mayor's day, to dinner with him at Guildhall.  This
evening Mr. Holliard came and sat with us, and gave us both directions to
observe.

24th.  At the office all morning, at noon Luellin dined with me, and then
abroad to Fleet Street, leaving my wife at Tom's while I went out and did
a little business.  So home again, and went to see Sir Robert [Slingsby],
who continues ill, and this day has not spoke at all, which makes them all
afeard of him.  So home.

25th.  To Whitehall, and so to dinner at the Wardrobe, where my wife met
me, and there we met with a venison pasty, and my Lady very merry and very
handsome, methought.  After dinner my wife and I to the Opera, and there
saw again "Love and Honour," a play so good that it has been acted but
three times and I have seen them all, and all in this week; which is too
much, and more than I will do again a good while.  Coming out of the house
we met Mrs. Pierce and her comrade Mrs. Clifford, and I seeming willing to
stay with them to talk my wife grew angry, and whether she be jealous or
no I know, not, but she loves not that I should speak of Mrs. Pierce.
Home on foot very discontented, in my way I calling at the Instrument
maker, Hunt's, and there saw my lute, which is now almost done, it being
to have a new neck to it and to be made to double strings. So home and to
bed.  This day I did give my man Will a sound lesson about his forbearing
to give us the respect due to a master and mistress.

26th.  This morning Sir W. Pen and I should have gone out of town with my
Lady Batten, to have met Sir William coming back from Portsmouth; at
Kingston, but could not, by reason that my Lord of Peterborough (who is to
go Governor of Tangier) came this morning, with Sir G. Carteret, to advise
with us about completing of the affairs and preparacions for that place.
So at the office all the morning, and in the afternoon Sir W. Pen, my wife
and I to the Theatre, and there saw "The Country Captain," the first time
it hath been acted this twenty-five years, a play of my Lord Newcastle's,
but so silly a play as in all my life I never saw, and the first that ever
I was weary of in my life.  So home again, and in the evening news was
brought that Sir R. Slingsby, our Comptroller (who hath this day been sick
a week), is dead; which put me into so great a trouble of mind, that all
the night I could not sleep, he being a man that loved me, and had many
qualitys that made me to love him above all the officers and commissioners
in the Navy.  Coming home we called at Dan Rawlinson's; and there drank
good sack, and so home.

27th (Lord's day).  At church in the morning; where in the pew both Sir
Williams and I had much talk about the death of Sir Robert, which troubles
me much; and them in appearance, though I do not believe it; because I
know that he was a cheque to their engrossing the whole trade of the Navy
office.  Home to dinner, and in the afternoon to church again, my wife
with me, whose mourning is now grown so old that I am ashamed to go to
church with her.  And after church to see my uncle and aunt Wight, and
there staid and talked and supped with them, and were merry as we could be
in their company.  Among other things going up into their chamber to see
their two pictures, which I am forced to commend against my judgment, and
also she showed us her cabinet, where she had very pretty medals and good
jewels.  So home and to prayers and to bed.

28th.  At the office all the morning, and dined at home, and so to Paul's
Churchyard to Hunt's, and there found my Theorbo done, which pleases me
very well, and costs me 26s. to the altering.  But now he tells me it is
as good a lute as any is in England, and is worth well L10.  Hither I sent
for Captain Ferrers to me, who comes with a friend of his, and they and I
to the Theatre, and there saw "Argalus and Parthenia," where a woman acted
Parthenia, and came afterwards on the stage in men's clothes, and had the
best legs that ever I saw, and I was very well pleased with it.  Thence to
the Ringo alehouse, and thither sent for a belt-maker, and bought of him a
handsome belt for second mourning, which cost me 24s., and is very neat.

29th.  This day I put on my half cloth black stockings and my new coat of
the fashion, which pleases me well, and with my beaver I was (after office
was done) ready to go to my Lord Mayor's feast, as we are all invited; but
the Sir Williams were both loth to go, because of the crowd, and so none
of us went, and I staid and dined with them, and so home, and in evening,
by consent, we met at the Dolphin, where other company came to us, and
should have been merry, but their wine was so naught, and all other things
out of order, that we were not so, but staid long at night, and so home
and to bed.  My mind not pleased with the spending of this day, because I
had proposed a great deal of pleasure to myself this day at Guildhall.
This Lord Mayor, it seems, brings up again the Custom of Lord Mayors going
the day of their installment to Paul's, and walking round about the Cross,
and offering something at the altar.

30th.  All the morning at the office.  At noon played on my Theorbo, and
much pleased therewith; it is now altered with a new neck.  In the
afternoon Captain Lambert called me out by appointment, and we walked
together to Deptford, and there in his ship, the Norwich, I got him to
shew me every hole and corner of the ship, much to my information, and the
purpose of my going.  So home again, and at Sir W. Batten's heard how he
had been already at Sir R. Slingsby's, as we were all invited, and I
intended this night to go, and there he finds all things out of order, and
no such thing done to-night, but pretending that the corps stinks, they
will bury it to-night privately, and so will unbespeak all their guests,
and there shall be no funerall, which I am sorry for, that there should be
nothing done for the honour of Sir Robert, but I fear he hath left his
family in great distraction.  Here I staid till late at cards with my Lady
and Mrs. Martha, and so home.  I sent for a bottle or two of wine thither.
At my coming home I am sorry to find my wife displeased with her maid
Doll, whose fault is that she cannot keep her peace, but will always be
talking in an angry manner, though it be without any reason and to no
purpose, which I am sorry for and do see the inconvenience that do attend
the increase of a man's fortune by being forced to keep more servants,
which brings trouble.  Sir Henry Vane, Lambert, and others, are lately
sent suddenly away from the Tower, prisoners to Scilly; but I do not think
there is any plot as is said, but only a pretence; as there was once
pretended often against the Cavaliers.

31st.  This morning comes Prior of Brampton to me about the house he has
to buy of me, but I was forced to be at the office all the morning, and so
could not talk with him.  And so, after the office was done, and dined at
home, I went to my brother Tom's, and there met him.  He demanded some
abatement, he having agreed with my father for Barton's house, at a price
which I told him I could not meddle with, but that as for anything to
secure his title to them I was ready, and so we parted.  Thence to Sir
Robert Bernard, and as his client did ask his advice about my uncle
Thomas's case and ours as to Gravely, and in short he tells me that there
is little hopes of recovering it or saving his annuity, which do trouble
me much, but God's will be done.  Hence, with my mind full of trouble, to
my uncle Fenner's, when at the alehouse I found him drinking and very
jolly and youthsome, and as one that I believe will in a little time get a
wife.  So home.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     And so by coach, though hard to get it, being rainy, home
     But she loves not that I should speak of Mrs. Pierce
     God! what an age is this, and what a world is this
     In men's clothes, and had the best legs that ever I saw
     Inconvenience that do attend the increase of a man's fortune
     Man cannot live without playing the knave and dissimulation
     My head was not well with the wine that I drank to-day
     She is a very good companion as long as she is well
     So much wine, that I was even almost foxed
     Still in discontent with my wife, to bed, and rose so this morn
     This day churched, her month of childbed being out
     Vices of the Court, and how the pox is so common there
     We do naturally all love the Spanish, and hate the French



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

   TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                           NOVEMBER & DECEMBER
                                  1661

November 1st.  I went this morning with Sir W. Pen by coach to
Westminster, and having done my business at Mr. Montagu's, I went back to
him at Whitehall, and from thence with him to the 3 Tun Tavern, at Charing
Cross, and there sent for up the maister of the house's dinner, and dined
very well upon it, and afterwards had him and his fayre sister (who is
very great with Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen in mirth) up to us, and
looked over some medals that they shewed us of theirs; and so went away to
the Theatre, to "The Joviall Crew," and from hence home, and at my house
we were very merry till late, having sent for his son, Mr. William Pen,

     [The celebrated Quaker, and founder of Pennsylvania.]

lately come from Oxford.  And after supper parted, and to bed.

2d.  At the office all the morning; where Sir John Minnes, our new
comptroller, was fetched by Sir Wm. Pen and myself from Sir Wm. Batten's,
and led to his place in the office.  The first time that he had come
hither, and he seems a good fair condition man, and one that I am glad
hath the office.  After the office done, I to the Wardrobe, and there
dined, and in the afternoon had an hour or two's talk with my Lady with
great pleasure.  And so with the two young ladies by coach to my house,
and gave them some entertainment, and so late at night sent them home with
Captain Ferrers by coach.  This night my boy Wayneman, as I was in my
chamber, I overheard him let off some gunpowder; and hearing my wife chide
him below for it, and a noise made, I call him up, and find that it was
powder that he had put in his pocket, and a match carelessly with it,
thinking that it was out, and so the match did give fire to the powder,
and had burnt his side and his hand that he put into his pocket to put out
the fire.  But upon examination, and finding him in a lie about the time
and place that he bought it, I did extremely beat him, and though it did
trouble me to do it, yet I thought it necessary to do it. So to write by
the post, and to bed.

3rd (Lord's day).  This day I stirred not out, but took physique, and it
did work very well, and all the day as I was at leisure I did read in
Fuller's Holy Warr, which I have of late bought, and did try to make a
song in the praise of a liberall genius (as I take my own to be) to all
studies and pleasures, but it not proving to my mind I did reject it and
so proceeded not in it.  At night my wife and I had a good supper by
ourselves of a pullet hashed, which pleased me much to see my condition
come to allow ourselves a dish like that, and so at night to bed.

4th.  In the morning, being very rainy, by coach with Sir W. Pen and my
wife to Whitehall, and sent her to Mrs. Bunt's, and he and I to Mr.
Coventry's about business, and so sent for her again, and all three home
again, only I to the Mitre (Mr. Rawlinson's), where Mr. Pierce, the
Purser, had got us a most brave chine of beef, and a dish of marrowbones.
Our company my uncle Wight, Captain Lambert, one Captain Davies, and
purser Barter, Mr. Rawlinson, and ourselves; and very merry.  After dinner
I took coach, and called my wife at my brother's, where I left her, and to
the Opera, where we saw "The Bondman," which of old we both did so doat
on, and do still; though to both our thinking not so well acted here
(having too great expectations), as formerly at Salisbury-court.  But for
Betterton he is called by us both the best actor in the world.  So home by
coach, I lighting by the way at my uncle Wight's and staid there a little,
and so home after my wife, and to bed.

5th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon comes my brother Tom and Mr.
Armiger to dine with me, and did, and we were very merry.  After dinner, I
having drunk a great deal of wine, I went away, seeming to go about
business with Sir W. Pen, to my Lady Batten's (Sir William being at
Chatham), and there sat a good while, and then went away (before I went I
called at home to see whether they were gone, and found them there, and
Armiger inviting my wife to go to a play, and like a fool would be
courting her, but he is an ass, and lays out money with Tom, otherwise I
should not think him worth half this respect I shew him).  To the Dolphin,
where he and I and Captain Cocke sat late and drank much, seeing the boys
in the streets flying their crackers, this day being kept all the day very
strictly in the City.  At last broke up, and called at my Lady Batten's
again and would have gone to cards, but Sir W. Pen was so fuddled that we
could not try him to play, and therefore we parted, and I home and to bed.

6th.  Going forth this morning I met Mr. Davenport and a friend of his,
one Mr. Furbisher, to drink their morning draft with me, and I did give it
them in good wine, and anchovies, and pickled oysters, and took them to
the Sun in Fish Street, there did give them a barrel of good ones, and a
great deal of wine, and sent for Mr. W. Bernard (Sir Robert's son), a
grocer thereabouts, and were very merry, and cost me a good deal of money,
and at noon left them, and with my head full of wine, and being invited by
a note from Luellin, that came to my hands this morning in bed, I went to
Nick Osborne's at the Victualling Office, and there saw his wife, who he
has lately married, a good sober woman, and new come to their home.  We
had a good dish or two of marrowbones and another of neats' tongues to
dinner, and that being done I bade them adieu and hastened to Whitehall
(calling Mr. Moore by the way) to my Lord Privy Seal, who will at last
force the clerks to bring in a table of their fees, which they have so
long denied, but I do not join with them, and so he is very respectful to
me.  So he desires me to bring in one which I observe in making of fees,
which I will speedily do.  So back again, and endeavoured to speak with
Tom Trice (who I fear is hatching some mischief), but could not, which
vexed me, and so I went home and sat late with pleasure at my lute, and so
to bed.

7th.  This morning came one Mr. Hill (sent by Mr. Hunt, the Instrument
maker), to teach me to play on the Theorbo, but I do not like his play nor
singing, and so I found a way to put him off.  So to the office. And then
to dinner, and got Mr. Pett the Commissioner to dinner with me, he and I
alone, my wife not being well, and so after dinner parted.  And I to Tom
Trice, who in short shewed me a writt he had ready for my father, and I
promised to answer it.  So I went to Dr. Williams (who is now pretty well
got up after his sickness), and after that to Mr. Moore to advise, and so
returned home late on foot, with my mind cleared, though not satisfied.  I
met with letters at home from my Lord from Lisbone, which speak of his
being well; and he tells me he had seen at the court there the day before
he wrote this letter, the Juego de Toro.--[A bull fight.  See May 24th,
1662.--B:]--So fitted myself for bed. Coming home I called at my uncle
Fenner's, who tells that Peg Kite now hath declared she will have the
beggarly rogue the weaver, and so we are resolved neither to meddle nor
make with her.

8th.  This morning up early, and to my Lord Chancellor's with a letter to
him from my Lord, and did speak with him; and he did ask me whether I was
son to Mr. Talbot Pepys or no (with whom he was once acquainted in the
Court of Requests), and spoke to me with great respect.  Thence to
Westminster Hall (it being Term time) and there met with Commissioner
Pett, and so at noon he and I by appointment to the Sun in New Fish
Street, where Sir J. Minnes, Sir W. Batten, and we all were to dine, at an
invitation of Captain Stoaks and Captain Clerk, and were very merry, and
by discourse I found Sir J. Minnes a fine gentleman and a very good
scholler.  After dinner to the Wardrobe, and thence to Dr. Williams, who
went with me (the first time that he has been abroad a great while) to the
Six Clerks Office to find me a clerk there able to advise me in my
business with Tom Trice, and after I had heard them talk, and had given me
some comfort, I went to my brother Tom's, and took him with me to my coz.
Turner at the Temple, and had his opinion that I should not pay more than
the principal L200, with which I was much pleased, and so home.

9th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon Mr. Davenport, Phillips, and
Mr. Wm.  Bernard and Furbisher, came by appointment and dined with me, and
we were very merry.  After dinner I to the Wardrobe, and there staid
talking with my Lady all the afternoon till late at night.  Among other
things my Lady did mightily urge me to lay out money upon my wife, which I
perceived was a little more earnest than ordinary, and so I seemed to be
pleased with it, and do resolve to bestow a lace upon her, and what with
this and other talk, we were exceeding merry.  So home at night.

10th (Lord's day).  At our own church in the morning, where Mr. Mills
preached.  Thence alone to the Wardrobe to dinner with my Lady, where my
Lady continues upon yesterday's discourse still for me to lay out money
upon my wife, which I think it is best for me to do for her honour and my
own.  Last night died Archibald, my Lady's butler and Mrs. Sarah's
brother, of a dropsy, which I am troubled at.  In the afternoon went and
sat with Mr. Turner in his pew at St. Gregory's, where I hear our Queen
Katherine, the first time by name as such, publickly prayed for, and heard
Dr. Buck upon "Woe unto thee, Corazin," &c., where he started a
difficulty, which he left to another time to answer, about why God should
give means of grace to those people which he knew would not receive them,
and deny to others which he himself confesses, if they had had them, would
have received them, and they would have been effectual too.  I would I
could hear him explain this, when he do come to it.  Thence home to my
wife, and took her to my Aunt Wight's, and there sat a while with her (my
uncle being at Katharine hill), and so home, and I to Sir W. Batten's,
where Captain Cock was, and we sent for two bottles of Canary to the Rose,
which did do me a great deal of hurt, and did trouble me all night, and,
indeed, came home so out of order that I was loth to say prayers to-night
as I am used ever to do on Sundays, which my wife took notice of and
people of the house, which I was sorry for.

11th.  To the Wardrobe, and with Mr. Townsend and Moore to the Saracen's
Head to a barrel of oysters, and so Mr. Moore and I to Tom Trice's, with
whom I did first set my hand to answer to a writt of his this tearm.
Thence to the Wardrobe to dinner, and there by appointment met my wife,
who had by my direction brought some laces for my Lady to choose one for
her.  And after dinner I went away, and left my wife and ladies together,
and all their work was about this lace of hers.  Captain Ferrers and I
went together, and he carried me the first time that ever I saw any gaming
house, to one, entering into Lincoln's-Inn-Fields, at the end of Bell
Yard, where strange the folly of men to lay and lose so much money, and
very glad I was to see the manner of a gamester's life, which I see is
very miserable, and poor, and unmanly.  And thence he took me to a dancing
school in Fleet Street, where we saw a company of pretty girls dance, but
I do not in myself like to have young girls exposed to so much vanity.  So
to the Wardrobe, where I found my Lady had agreed upon a lace for my wife
of L6, which I seemed much glad of that it was no more, though in my mind
I think it too much, and I pray God keep me so to order myself and my
wife's expenses that no inconvenience in purse or honour follow this my
prodigality.  So by coach home.

12th.  At the office all the morning.  Dined at home alone.  So abroad
with Sir W. Pen.  My wife and I to "Bartholomew Fayre," with puppets which
I had seen once before, and Ate play without puppets often, but though I
love the play as much as ever I did, yet I do not like the puppets at all,
but think it to be a lessening to it.  Thence to the Greyhound in Fleet
Street, and there drank some raspberry sack and eat some sasages, and so
home very merry.  This day Holmes come to town; and we do expect hourly to
hear what usage he hath from the Duke and the King about this late
business of letting the Swedish Embassador go by him without striking his
flag.

     [And that, too, in the river Thames itself.  The right of obliging
     ships of all nations to lower topsails, and strike their flag to the
     English, whilst in the British seas, and even on the French coasts,
     had, up to this time, been rigidly enforced.  When Sully was sent by
     Henry IV., in 1603, to congratulate James I. on his accession, and
     in a ship commanded by a vice-admiral of France, he was fired upon
     by the English Admiral Mansel, for daring to hoist the flag of
     France in the presence of that of England, although within sight of
     Calais.  The French flag was lowered, and all Sully's remonstrances
     could obtain no redress for the alleged injury.  According to Rugge,
     Holmes had insisted upon the Swede's lowering his flag, and had even
     fired a shot to enforce the observance of the usual tribute of
     respect, but the ambassador sent his secretary and another gentleman
     on board the English frigate, to assure the captain, upon the word
     and honour of an ambassador, that the king, by a verbal order, had
     given him leave and a dispensation in that particular, and upon this
     false representation he was allowed to proceed on his voyage without
     further question.  This want of caution, and disobedience of orders,
     fell heavily on Holmes, who was imprisoned for two months, and not
     re-appointed to the same ship.  Brahe afterwards made a proper
     submission for the fault he had committed, at his own court.  His
     conduct reminds us of Sir Henry Wotton's definition of an
     ambassador--that he is an honest man sent to lie abroad for the good
     of his country.  A pun upon the term lieger--ambassador.--B.]

13th.  By appointment, we all went this morning to wait upon the Duke of
York, which we did in his chamber, as he was dressing himself in his
riding suit to go this day by sea to the Downs.  He is in mourning for his
wife's grandmother, which is thought a great piece of fondness.

     [Fondness, foolishness.

              "Fondness it were for any, being free,
               To covet fetters, tho' they golden be."
                                   Spenser, Sonnet 37,--M. B.]

After we had given him our letter relating the bad condition of the Navy
for want of money, he referred it to his coming back and so parted, and I
to Whitehall and to see la belle Pierce, and so on foot to my Lord Crew's,
where I found him come to his new house, which is next to that he lived in
last; here I was well received by my Lord and Sir Thomas, with whom I had
great talk: and he tells me in good earnest that he do believe the
Parliament (which comes to sit again the next week), will be troublesome
to the Court and Clergy, which God forbid!  But they see things carried so
by my Lord Chancellor and some others, that get money themselves, that
they will not endure it.  From thence to the Theatre, and there saw
"Father's own Son" again, and so it raining very hard I went home by
coach, with my mind very heavy for this my expensefull life, which will
undo me, I fear, after all my hopes, if I do not take up, for now I am
coming to lay out a great deal of money in clothes for my wife, I must
forbear other expenses.  To bed, and this night began to lie in the little
green chamber, where the maids lie, but we could not a great while get
Nell to lie there, because I lie there and my wife, but at last, when she
saw she must lie there or sit up, she, with much ado, came to bed.

4th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon I went by appointment to the
Sun in Fish Street to a dinner of young Mr. Bernard's for myself, Mr.
Phillips, Davenport, Weaver, &c., where we had a most excellent dinner,
but a pie of such pleasant variety of good things, as in all my life I
never tasted.  Hither came to me Captain Lambert to take his leave of me,
he being this day to set sail for the Straights.  We drank his farewell
and a health to all our friends, and were very merry, and drank wine
enough.  Hence to the Temple to Mr. Turner about drawing up my bill in
Chancery against T. Trice, and so to Salisbury Court, where Mrs. Turner is
come to town to-night, but very ill still of an ague, which I was sorry to
see.  So to the Wardrobe and talked with my Lady, and so home and to bed.

15th.  At home all the morning, and at noon with my wife to the Wardrobe
to dinner, and there, did shew herself to my Lady in the handkercher that
she bought the lace for the other day, and indeed it is very handsome.
Here I left my wife and went to my Lord Privy Seal to Whitehall, and there
did give him a copy of the Fees of the office as I have received them, and
he was well pleased with it.  So to the Opera, where I met my wife and
Captain Ferrers and Madamoiselle Le Blanc, and there did see the second
part of "The Siege of Rhodes" very well done; and so by coach set her
home, and the coach driving down the hill through Thames Street, which I
think never any coach did before from that place to the bridge-foot, but
going up Fish Street Hill his horses were so tired, that they could not be
got to go up the hill, though all the street boys and men did beat and
whip them.  At last I was fain to send my boy for a link, and so light out
of the coach till we got to another at the corner of Fenchurch Street, and
so home, and to bed.

16th.  At the office all the morning.  Dined at home, and so about my
business in the afternoon to the Temple, where I found my Chancery bill
drawn against T. Trice, which I read and like it, and so home.

17th (Lord's day).  To our own church, and at noon, by invitation, Sir W.
Pen dined with me, and I took Mrs. Hester, my Lady Batten's kinswoman, to
dinner from church with me, and we were very merry.  So to church again,
and heard a simple fellow upon the praise of Church musique, and
exclaiming against men's wearing their hats on in the church, but I slept
part of the sermon, till latter prayer and blessing and all was done
without waking which I never did in my life.  So home, and by and by comes
my uncle Wight and my aunt and Mr. Norbury and his lady, and we drank hard
and were very merry till supper time, and then we parted, my wife and I
being invited to Sir W. Pen's, where we also were very merry, and so home
to prayers and to bed.

18th.  By coach with Sir W. Pen; my wife and I toward Westminster, but
seeing Mr. Moore in the street I light and he and I went to Mr.
Battersby's the minister, in my way I putting in at St. Paul's, where I
saw the quiristers in their surplices going to prayers, and a few idle
poor people and boys to hear them, which is the first time I have seen
them, and am sorry to see things done so out of order, and there I
received L50 more, which make up L100 that I now have borrowed of him, and
so I did burn the old bond for L50, and paying him the use of it did make
a new bond for the whole L100. Here I dined and had a good dinner, and his
wife a good pretty woman.  There was a young Parson at the table that had
got himself drunk before dinner, which troubled me to see. After dinner to
Mr. Bowers at Westminster for my wife, and brought her to the Theatre to
see "Philaster," which I never saw before, but I found it far short of my
expectations.  So by coach home.

19th.  At the office all the morning, and coming home found Mr. Hunt with
my wife in the chamber alone, which God forgive me did trouble my head,
but remembering that it was washing and that there was no place else with
a fire for him to be in, it being also cold weather, I was at ease again.
He dined with us, and after dinner took coach and carried him with us as
far as my cozen Scott's, where we set him down and parted, and my wife and
I staid there at the christening of my cozens boy, where my cozen Samuel
Pepys, of Ireland, and I were godfathers, and I did name the child Samuel.
There was a company of pretty women there in the chamber, but we staid
not, but went with the minister into another room and eat and drank, and
at last, when most of the women were gone, Sam and I went into my cozen
Scott, who was got off her bed, and so we staid and talked and were very
merry, my she-cozen, Stradwick, being godmother.  And then I left my wife
to go home by coach, and I walked to the Temple about my law business, and
there received a subpoena for T. Trice.  I carried it myself to him at the
usual house at Doctors Commons and did give it him, and so home and to
bed.  It cost me 20s, between the midwife and the two nurses to-day.

20th.  To Westminster Hall by water in the morning, where I saw the King
going in his barge to the Parliament House; this being the first day of
their meeting again.  And the Bishops, I hear, do take their places in the
Lords House this day.  I walked long in the Hall, but hear nothing of
news, but what Ned Pickering tells me, which I am troubled at, that Sir J.
Minnes should send word to the King, that if he did not remove all my Lord
Sandwich's captains out of this fleet, he believed the King would not be
master of the fleet at its coming again: and so do endeavour to bring
disgrace upon my Lord.  But I hope all that will not do, for the King
loves him.  Hence by water to the Wardrobe, and dined with my Lady, my
Lady Wright being there too, whom I find to be a witty but very conceited
woman and proud.  And after dinner Mr. Moore and I to the Temple, and
there he read my bill and likes it well enough, and so we came back again,
he with me as far as the lower end of Cheapside, and there I gave him a
pint of sack and parted, and I home, and went seriously to look over my
papers touching T. Trice, and I think I have found some that will go near
to do me more good in this difference of ours than all I have before.  So
to bed with my mind cheery upon it, and lay long reading "Hobbs his
Liberty and Necessity," and a little but very shrewd piece, and so to
sleep.

21st.  In the morning again at looking over my last night's papers, and by
and by comes Mr. Moore, who finds that my papers may do me much good. He
staid and dined with me, and we had a good surloyne of rost beefe, the
first that ever I had of my own buying since I kept house; and after
dinner he and I to the Temple, and there showed Mr. Smallwood my papers,
who likes them well, and so I left them with him, and went with Mr. Moore
to Gray's Inn to his chamber, and there he shewed me his old Camden's
"Britannica", which I intend to buy of him, and so took it away with me,
and left it at St. Paul's Churchyard to be bound, and so home and to the
office all the afternoon; it being the first afternoon that we have sat,
which we are now to do always, so long as the Parliament sits, who this
day have voted the King L 120,000

     [A mistake.  According to the journals, L1,200,000.  And see Diary,
     February 29th, 1663-64.--M. B.]

to be raised to pay his debts.  And after the office with Sir W. Batten to
the Dolphin, and drank and left him there, and I again to the Temple about
my business, and so on foot home again and to bed.

22nd.  Within all the morning, and at noon with my wife, by appointment to
dinner at the Dolphin, where Sir W. Batten, and his lady and daughter
Matt, and Captain Cocke and his lady, a German lady, but a very great
beauty, and we dined together, at the spending of some wagers won and lost
between him and I; and there we had the best musique and very good songs,
and were very merry and danced, but I was most of all taken with Madam
Cocke and her little boy, which in mirth his father had given to me.  But
after all our mirth comes a reckoning of L4, besides 40s. to the
musicians, which did trouble us, but it must be paid, and so I took leave
and left them there about eight at night.  And on foot went to the Temple,
and then took my cozen Turner's man Roger, and went by his advice to
Serjeant Fountaine and told him our case, who gives me good comfort in it,
and I gave him 30s. fee.  So home again and to bed.  This day a good
pretty maid was sent my wife by Mary Bowyer, whom my wife has hired.

23rd.  To Westminster with my wife (she to her father's), and about 10
o'clock back again home, and there I to the office a little, and thence by
coach with Commissioner Pett to Cheapside to one Savill, a painter, who I
intend shall do my picture and my wife's.  Thence I to dinner at the
Wardrobe, and so home to the office, and there all the afternoon till
night, and then both Sir Williams to my house, and in comes Captain Cock,
and they to cards.  By and by Sir W. Batten and Cock, after drinking a
good deal of wine, went away, and Sir W. Pen staid with my wife and I to
supper, very pleasant, and so good night.  This day I have a chine of beef
sent home, which I bespoke to send, and did send it as a present to my
uncle Wight.

24th (Lord's day).  Up early, and by appointment to St. Clement Danes to
church, and there to meet Captain Cocke, who had often commended Mr.
Alsopp, their minister, to me, who is indeed an able man, but as all
things else did not come up to my expectations.  His text was that all
good and perfect gifts are from above.  Thence Cocke and I to the Sun
tavern behind the Exchange, and there met with others that are come from
the same church, and staid and drank and talked with them a little, and so
broke up, and I to the Wardrobe and there dined, and staid all the
afternoon with my Lady alone talking, and thence to see Madame Turner,
who, poor lady, continues very ill, and I begin to be afraid of her.
Thence homewards, and meeting Mr. Yong, the upholster, he and I to the
Mitre, and with Mr. Rawlinson sat and drank a quart of sack, and so I to
Sir W. Batten's and there staid and supped, and so home, where I found an
invitation sent my wife and I to my uncle Wight's on Tuesday next to the
chine of beef which I presented them with yesterday.  So to prayers and to
bed.

25th.  To Westminster Hall in the morning with Captain Lambert, and there
he did at the Dog give me and some other friends of his, his foy, he being
to set sail to-day towards the Streights.  Here we had oysters and good
wine.  Having this morning met in the Hall with Mr. Sanchy, we appointed
to meet at the play this afternoon.  At noon, at the rising of the House,
I met with Sir W. Pen and Major General Massy,

     [Major-General Edward Massey (or Massie), son of John Massie, was
     captain of one of the foot companies of the Irish Expedition, and
     had Oliver Cromwell as his ensign (see Peacock's "Army Lists in
     1642," p. 65).  He was Governor of Gloucester in its obstinate
     defence against the royal forces, 1643; dismissed by the self-
     denying ordinance when he entered Charles II's service.  He was
     taken prisoner at the battle of Worcester, September 3rd, 1651, but
     escaped abroad.]

who I find by discourse to be a very ingenious man, and among other things
a great master in the secresys of powder and fireworks, and another knight
to dinner, at the Swan, in the Palace yard, and our meat brought from the
Legg; and after dinner Sir W. Pen and I to the Theatre, and there saw "The
Country Captain," a dull play, and that being done, I left him with his
Torys

     [This is a strange use of the word Tory, and an early one also.  The
     word originally meant bogtrotters or wild Irish, and as Penn was
     Governor of Kildare these may have been some of his Irish followers.
     The term was not used politically until about 1679.]

and went to the Opera, and saw the last act of "The Bondman," and there
found Mr. Sanchy and Mrs. Mary Archer, sister to the fair Betty, whom I
did admire at Cambridge, and thence took them to the Fleece in Covent
Garden, there to bid good night to Sir W. Pen who staid for me; but Mr.
Sanchy could not by any argument get his lady to trust herself with him
into the tavern, which he was much troubled at, and so we returned
immediately into the city by coach, and at the Mitre in Cheapside there
light and drank, and then yet her at her uncle's in the Old Jewry.  And so
he and I back again thither, and drank till past 12 at night, till I had
drank something too much.  He all the while telling me his intention to
get a girl who is worth L1000, and many times we had her sister Betty's
health, whose memory I love.  At last parted, and I well home, only had
got cold and was hoarse and so to bed.

27th.  This morning our maid Dorothy and my wife parted, which though she
be a wench for her tongue not to be borne with, yet I was loth to part
with her, but I took my leave kindly of her and went out to Savill's, the
painter, and there sat the first time for my face with him; thence to
dinner with my Lady; and so after an hour or two's talk in divinity with
my Lady, Captain Ferrers and Mr. Moore and I to the Theatre, and there saw
"Hamlett" very well done, and so I home, and found that my wife had been
with my aunt Wight and Ferrers to wait on my Lady to-day this afternoon,
and there danced and were very merry, and my Lady very fond as she is
always of my wife.  So to bed.

28th.  At home all the morning; at noon Will brought me from Whitehall,
whither I had sent him, some letters from my Lord Sandwich, from Tangier;
where he continues still, and hath done some execution upon the Turks, and
retaken an Englishman from them, of one Mr. Parker's, a merchant in
Marke-lane.  In the afternoon Mr. Pett and I met at the office; there
being none more there than we two I saw there was not the reverence due to
us observed, and so I took occasion to break up and took Mr. Gawdon along
with me, and he and I (though it rained) were resolved to go, he to my
Lord Treasurer's and I to the Chancellor's with a letter from my Lord
to-day.  So to a tavern at the end of Mark Lane, and there we staid till
with much ado we got a coach, and so to my Lord Treasurer's and lost our
labours, then to the Chancellor's, and there met with Mr. Dugdale, and
with him and one Mr. Simons, I think that belongs to my Lord Hatton, and
Mr. Kipps and others, to the Fountain tavern, and there staid till twelve
at night drinking and singing, Mr. Simons and one Mr. Agar singing very
well.  Then Mr. Gawdon being almost drunk had the wit to be gone, and so I
took leave too, and it being a fine moonshine night he and I footed it all
the way home, but though he was drunk he went such a pace as I did admire
how he was able to go.  When I came home I found our new maid
Sarah--[Sarah did not stay long with Mrs. Pepys, who was continually
falling out with her.  She left to enter Sir William Penn's
service.]--come, who is a tall and a very well favoured wench, and one
that I think will please us.  So to bed.

29th.  I lay long in bed, till Sir Williams both sent me word that we were
to wait upon the Duke of York to-day; and that they would have me to meet
them at Westminster Hall, at noon: so I rose and went thither; and there I
understand that they are gone to Mr. Coventry's lodgings, in the Old
Palace Yard, to dinner (the first time I knew he had any); and there I met
them two and Sir G. Carteret, and had a very fine dinner, and good
welcome, and discourse; and so, by water, after dinner to White Hall to
the Duke, who met us in his closet; and there he did discourse to us the
business of Holmes, and did desire of us to know what hath been the common
practice about making of forrayne ships to strike sail to us, which they
did all do as much as they could; but I could say nothing to it, which I
was sorry for.  So indeed I was forced to study a lie, and so after we
were gone from the Duke, I told Mr. Coventry that I had heard Mr. Selden
often say, that he could prove that in Henry the 7th's time, he did give
commission to his captains to make the King of Denmark's ships to strike
to him in the Baltique.  From thence Sir W. Pen and I to the Theatre, but
it was so full that we could hardly get any room, so he went up to one of
the boxes, and I into the 18d.  places, and there saw "Love at first
sight," a play of Mr. Killigrew's, and the first time that it hath been
acted since before the troubles, and great expectation there was, but I
found the play to be a poor thing, and so I perceive every body else do.
So home, calling at Paul's Churchyard for a "Mare Clausum," having it in
my mind to write a little matter, what I can gather, about the business of
striking sayle, and present it to the Duke, which I now think will be a
good way to make myself known.  So home and to bed.

30th.  In the morning to the Temple, Mr. Philips and Dr. Williams about my
several law matters, and so to the Wardrobe to dinner, and after dinner
stole away, my Lady not dining out of her chamber, and so home and then to
the office all the afternoon, and that being done Sir W. Batten and I and
Captain Cock got a bottle of sack into the office, and there we sat late
and drank and talked, and so home and to bed.  I am this day in very good
health, only got a little cold.  The Parliament has sat a pretty while.
The old condemned judges of the late King have been brought before the
Parliament, and like to be hanged.  I am deep in Chancery against Tom
Trice, God give a good issue; and myself under great trouble for my late
great expending of money vainly, which God stop for the future.  This is
the last day for the old State's coyne

     [In a speech of Lord Lucas in the House of Lords, the 22nd February,
     1670-1 (which speech was burnt by the common hangman), he thus
     adverted to that coin: "It is evident that there is scarcity of
     money; for all the parliament's money called breeches (a fit stamp
     for the coin of the Rump) is wholly vanished--the king's
     proclamation and the Dutch have swept it all away, and of his now
     majesty's coin there appears but very little; so that in effect we
     have none left for common use, but a little old lean coined money of
     the late three former princes.  And what supply is preparing for it,
     my lords?  I hear of none, unless it be of copper farthings, and
     this is the metal that is to vindicate, according to the inscription
     on it, the dominion of the four seas."--Quoted in Penn's "Memorials
     of Sir Wm. Penn," ii.  264.]

to pass in common payments, but they say it is to pass in publique
payments to the King three months still.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                 DECEMBER
                                   1661

December 1st (Lord's day).  In the morning at church and heard Mr. Mills.
At home dined and with me by appointment Mr. Sanchy, who should have
brought his mistress, Mrs. Mary Archer, of Cambridge, but she could not
come, but we had a good dinner for him.  And so in the afternoon my wife
went to church, and he and I stayed at home and drank and talked, and he
stayed with me till night and supped with me, when I expected to have seen
Jack Cole and Lem. Wagstaffe, but they did not come.  We this day cut a
brave collar of brawn from Winchcombe which proves very good, and also
opened the glass of girkins which Captain Cocke did give my wife the other
day, which are rare things.  So at night to bed.  There hath lately been
great clapping up of some old statesmen, such as Ireton, Moyer, and
others, and they say, upon a great plot, but I believe no such thing; but
it is but justice that they should be served as they served the poor
Cavaliers; and I believe it will oftentimes be so as long as I live,
whether there be cause or no.  This evening my brother Tom was with me,
and I did talk again to him about Mr. Townsend's daughter, and I do intend
to put the business in hand.  I pray God give a good end to it.

2nd.  To Savill the painter's, but he not being well I could do nothing
there, and so I returned home, and in my way met Mr. Moore and took him
with me home; where we staid and talked all the morning, and he dined with
me, and after dinner went away to the Privy Seal, this being our first day
this month.  By and by called on by Mr. Sanchy and his mistress, and with
them by coach to the Opera, to see "The Mad Lover," but not much pleased
with the play.  That done home all to my house, where they staid and
supped and were merry, and at last late bid good night and so we to bed.

3rd.  To the Paynter's and sat and had more of my picture done; but it do
not please me, for I fear it will not be like me.  At noon from thence to
the Wardrobe, where dinner not being ready Mr. Moore and I to the Temple
about my little business at Mr. Turner's, and so back again, and dinner
being half done I went in to my Lady, where my Lady Wright was at dinner
with her, and all our talk about the great happiness that my Lady Wright
says there is in being in the fashion and in variety of fashions, in scorn
of others that are not so, as citizens' wives and country gentlewomen,
which though it did displease me enough, yet I said nothing to it.  Thence
by water to the office through bridge, being carried by him in oars that
the other day rowed in a scull faster than my oars to the Towre, and I did
give him 6d.  At the office all the afternoon, and at night home to read
in "Mare Clausum" till bedtime, and so to bed, but had a very bad night by
dreams of my wife's riding with me and her horse throwing her and breaking
her leg, and then I dreamed that I .  .  . [was] in such pain that I waked
with it, and had a great deal of pain there a very great while till I fell
asleep again, and such apprehension I had of it that when I rose and
trussed up myself thinking that it had been no dream.  Till in the daytime
I found myself very well at ease, and remembered that I did dream so, and
that Mr. Creed was with me, and that I did complain to him of it, and he
said he had the same pain in his left that I had in my right .  .  .
which pleased me much to remember.

4th.  To Whitehall with both Sir Williams, thence by water, where I saw a
man lie dead upon Westminster Stairs that had been drowned yesterday.  To
the Temple, and thence to Mr. Phillips and got my copy of Sturtlow lands.
So back to the 3 Tuns at Charing Cross, and there met the two Sir Williams
and Col. Treswell and Mr. Falconer, and dined there at Sir W. Pen's cost,
and after dinner by water to Cheapside to the painter's, and there found
my wife, and having sat a little she and I by coach to the Opera and
Theatre, but coming too late to both, and myself being a little out of
tune we returned, and I settled to read in "Mare Clausum" till bedtime,
and so to bed.

5th.  This morning I went early to the Paynter's and there sat for my
picture the fourth time, but it do not yet please me, which do much
trouble me.  Thence to the Treasury Office, where I found Sir W. Batten
come before me, and there we sat to pay off the St. George.  By and by
came Sir W. Pen, and he and I staid while Sir W. Batten went home to
dinner, and then he came again, and Sir W. Pen and I went and dined at my
house, and had two mince pies sent thither by our order from the messenger
Slater, that had dressed some victuals for us, and so we were very merry,
and after dinner rode out in his coach, he to Whitehall, and my wife and I
to the Opera, and saw "Hamlett" well performed.  Thence to the Temple and
Mrs. Turner's (who continues still very ill), and so home and to bed.

6th.  Lay long in bed, and then to Westminster Hall and there walked, and
then with Mr. Spicer, Hawly, Washington, and little Mr. Ashwell (my old
friends at the Exchequer) to the Dog, and gave them two or three quarts of
wine, and so away to White Hall, where, at Sir G. Carteret's, Sir Williams
both and I dined very pleasantly; and after dinner, by appointment, came
the Governors of the East India Company, to sign and seal the contract
between us

     [Charles II.'s charter to the Company, confirming and extending the
     former charter, is dated April 3rd, 1661.  Bombay, just acquired as
     part of Queen Katherine's dowry, was made over to the Company by
     Letters Patent dated March 27th, 1669.]

(in the King's name) and them.  And that done, we all went to the King's
closet, and there spoke with the King and the Duke of York, who promise to
be very careful of the India trade to the utmost.  So back to Sir G.
Carteret's and ended our business, and so away homewards, but Sir W.
Batten offering to go to the 3 Tuns at Charing Cross, where the pretty
maid the daughter of the house is; I was saying that, that tickled Sir W.
Pen, he seemed to take these words very captiously and angrily, which I
saw, and seemed indifferent to go home in his coach with them, and so took
leave to go to the Council Chamber to speak with my Lord Privy Seal, which
I did, but they did stay for me, which I was pleased at, but no words
passed between him and me in all our way home.  So home and to bed.

7th.  This morning comes Captain Ferrers and the German, Emanuel Luffe,
who goes as one of my Lord's footmen, though he deserves a much better
preferment, to take their leave of me, and here I got the German to play
upon my theorbo, which he did both below and in my wife's chamber, who was
in bed.  He plays bravely.  I find by him that my lute is a most excellent
lute.  I did give them a mince pie and a collar of brawn and some wine for
their breakfast, and were very merry, and sent for Mr. Adamson's neighbour
to drink Mr. Shepley's health.  At last we all parted, but within a
quarter of an hour after they were gone, and my wife and I were talking
about buying of a fine scallop which is brought her this morning by a
woman to be sold, which is to cost her 45s., in comes the German back
again, all in a goare of blood, which I wondered at, and tells me that he
is afeard that the Captain is killed by the watermen at Towre Stayres; so
I presently went thither, and found that upon some rude pressing of the
watermen to ply the Captain, he struck one of them with his cane, which
they would not take, but struck him again, and then the German drew his
sword and ran at one of them, but they were both soundly beaten.

     [See a similar outrage, committed by Captain Ferrers, September
     12th, 1662.  Swords were usually worn by footmen.  See May 4th,
     1662, host.--B.]

The Captain is, however, got to the boy that carries him and the pages to
the Downs, and I went into the alehouse at the Stayres and got them to
deliver the Captain's feathers, which one from the Captain was come to
demand, and went home again, and there found my wife dressing of the
German's head, and so did [give] him a cravett for his neck, and a crown
in his purse, and sent him away again.  Then came Mr. Moore, and he and I
to Westminster and to Worcester House to see Mr. Montagu before he goes
away (this night), but could not see him, nor do I think he has a mind to
see us for fear of our demanding of money of him for anything.  So back to
Whitehall, and eat a bit of meat at Wilkinson's, and then to the Privy
Seal, and sealed there the first time this month; and, among other things
that passed, there was a patent for Roger Palmer (Madam Palmer's husband)
to be Earl of Castlemaine and Baron of Limbricke in Ireland; but the
honour is tied up to the males got of the body of this wife, the Lady
Barbary: the reason whereof every body knows.  That done, by water to the
office, when I found Sir W. Pen had been alone all the night and was just
rose, and so I to him, and with him I found Captain Holmes, who had wrote
his case, and gives me a copy, as he hath many among his friends, and
presented the same to the King and Council.  Which I shall make use of in
my attempt of writing something concerning the business of striking sail,
which I am now about.  But he do cry out against Sir John Minnes, as the
veriest knave and rogue and coward in the world, which I was glad to hear,
because he has given out bad words concerning my Lord, though I am sorry
it is so.  Here Captain Cox then came in, and he and I staid a good while
and so good night.  Home and wrote by the post to my father, and so to
bed.

8th (Lord's day).  In bed all the morning thinking to take physique, but
it being a frost my wife would not have me.  So to dinner at the Wardrobe,
and after a great deal of good discourse with my Lady after dinner, and
among other things of the great christening yesterday at Mr. Rumbell's,
and courtiers and pomp that was there, which I wonder at, I went away up
and down into all the churches almost between that place and my house, and
so home.  And then came my brother Tom, and staid and talked with me, and
I hope he will do very well and get money.  So to supper and to bed.  This
morning as I was in bed, one brings me T. Trice's answer to my bill in
chancery from Mr. Smallwood, which I am glad to see, though I am afraid it
will do me hurt.

9th.  To Whitehall, and thence to the Rhenish wine-house, where I met
Mons. Eschar and there took leave of him, he being to go this night to the
Downs towards Portugall, and so spent all the morning.  At noon to dinner
to the Wardrobe; where my Lady Wright was, who did talk much upon the
worth and the desert of gallantry; and that there was none fit to be
courtiers, but such as have been abroad and know fashions.  Which I
endeavoured to oppose; and was troubled to hear her talk so, though she be
a very wise and discreet lady in other things.  From thence Mr. Moore and
I to the Temple about my law business with my cozen Turner, and there we
read over T. Trice's answer to my bill and advised thereupon what to do in
his absence, he being to go out of town to-morrow.  Thence he and I to Mr.
Walpole, my attorney, whom I never saw before, and we all to an alehouse
hard by, and there we talked of our business, and he put me into great
hopes, but he is but a young man, and so I do not depend so much upon his
encouragement.  So by coach home, and to supper, and to bed, having staid
up till 12 at night writing letters to my Lord Sandwich and all my friends
with him at sea, to send to-morrow by Mons. Eschar, who goes tomorrow post
to the Downs to go along with the fleet to Portugall.

10th.  To Whitehall, and there finding Mons. Eschar to be gone, I sent my
letters by a porter to the posthouse in Southwark to be sent by despatch
to the Downs.  So to dinner to my Lord Crew's by coach, and in my way had
a stop of above an hour and a half, which is a great trouble this
Parliament time, but it cannot be helped.  However I got thither before my
Lord come from the House, and so dined with him, and dinner done, home to
the office, and there sat late and so home.

11th.  My brother Tom and then Mr. Moore came to me this morning, and
staid a while with me, and then I went out, and in my way met with Mr.
Howell the Turner, who invited me to dine this day at Mr. Rawlinson's with
some friends of his, officers of the Towre, at a venison pasty, which I
promised him, and so I went to the Old Bayly, and there staid and drank
with him, who told me the whole story how Pegg Kite has married herself to
a weaver, an ugly fellow, to her undoing, of which I am glad that I have
nothing to do in it.  From thence home and put on my velvet coat, and so
to the Mitre to dinner according to my promise this morning, but going up
into the room I found at least 12 or more persons, and knew not the face
of any of them, so I went down again, and though I met Mr. Yong the
upholster yet I would not be persuaded to stay, but went away and walked
to the Exchequer, and up and down, and was very hungry, and from thence
home, when I understand Mr. Howell was come for me to go thither, but I am
glad I was not at home, and my wife was gone out by coach to Clerkenwell
to see Mrs. Margaret Pen, who is at school there. So I went to see Sir W.
Pen, who for this two or three days has not been well, and he and I after
some talk took a coach and went to Moorfields, and there walked, though it
was very cold, an hour or two, and went into an alehouse, and there I
drank some ale and eat some bread and cheese, but he would not eat a bit,
and so being very merry we went home again. He to his lodgings and I by
promise to Sir W. Batten's, where he and my lady have gone out of town,
and so Mrs. Martha was at home alone, and Mrs. Moore and there I supped
upon some good things left of yesterday's dinner there, where dined a
great deal of company--Sir R. Browne and others--and by and by comes in
Captain Cox who promised to be here with me, but he staid very late, and
had been drinking somewhere and was very drunk, and so very capricious,
which I was troubled to see in a man that I took for a very wise and wary
man.  So I home and left him there, and so to bed.

12th.  We lay long in bed, then up and made me ready, and by and by come
Will Bowyer and Mr. Gregory, my old Exchequer friend, to see me, and I
took them to the Dolphin and there did give them a good morning draft, and
so parted, and invited them and all my old Exchequer acquaintance to come
and dine with me there on Wednesday next.  From thence to the Wardrobe and
dined with my Lady, where her brother, Mr. John Crew, dined also, and a
strange gentlewoman dined at the table as a servant of my Lady's; but I
knew her not, and so I am afeard that poor Madamoiselle was gone, but I
since understand that she is come as housekeeper to my Lady, and is a
married woman.  From thence to Westminster to my Lord's house to meet my
Lord Privy Seal, who appointed to seal there this afternoon, but by and by
word is brought that he is come to Whitehall, and so we are fain to go
thither to him, and there we staid to seal till it was so late that though
I got leave to go away before he had done, yet the office was done before
I could get thither, and so to Sir W. Pen's, and there sat and talked and
drank with him, and so home.

13th.  At home all the morning, being by the cold weather, which for these
two days has been frost, in some pain in my bladder.  Dined at home and
then with my wife to the Paynter's, and there she sat the first time to be
drawn, while I all the while stood looking on a pretty lady's picture,
whose face did please me extremely.  At last, he having done, I found that
the dead colour of my wife is good, above what I expected, which pleased
me exceedingly.  So home and to the office about some special business,
where Sir Williams both were, and from thence with them to the Steelyard,
where my Lady Batten and others came to us, and there we drank and had
musique and Captain Cox's company, and he paid all, and so late back again
home by coach, and so to bed.

14th.  All the morning at home lying in bed with my wife till 11 o'clock.
Such a habit we have got this winter of lying long abed.  Dined at home,
and in the afternoon to the office.  There sat late, and so home and to
bed.

15th (Lord's day).  To church in the morning, where our young Reader begun
the first day to read.  Sir W. Pen dined with me and we were merry. Again
to church and so home, and all alone read till bedtime, and so to prayers
and to bed.  I have been troubled this day about a difference between my
wife and her maid Nell, who is a simple slut, and I am afeard we shall
find her a cross-grained wench.  I am now full of study about writing
something about our making of strangers strike to us at sea; and so am
altogether reading Selden and Grotius, and such other authors to that
purpose.

16th.  Up by five o'clock this morning by candlelight (which I have not
done for many a day), being called upon by one Mr. Bollen by appointment,
who has business to be done with my Lord Privy Seal this morning, and so
by coach, calling Mr. Moore at the Wardrobe, to Chelsy, and there did get
my Lord to seal it.  And so back again to Westminster Hall, and thence to
my Lord Sandwich's lodging, where I met my wife (who had been to see Mrs.
Hunt who was brought to bed the other day of a boy), and got a joint of
meat thither from the Cook's, and she and I and Sarah dined together, and
after dinner to the Opera, where there was a new play ("Cutter of Coleman
Street"),

     [Cutter, an old word for a rough swaggerer: hence the title of
     Cowley's play.  It was originally called "The Guardian," when acted
     before Prince Charles at Trinity College, Cambridge, on March 12th,
     1641.]

made in the year 1658, with reflections much upon the late times; and it
being the first time, the pay was doubled, and so to save money, my wife
and I went up into the gallery, and there sat and saw very well; and a
very good play it is.  It seems of Cowly's making.  From thence by coach
home, and to bed.

17th.  Up and to the Paynter's to see how he went forward in our picture.
So back again to dinner at home, and then was sent for to the Privy Seal,
whither I was forced to go and stay so long and late that I was much
vexed.  At last we got all done, and then made haste to the office, where
they were sat, and there we sat late, and so home to supper and to Selden,
"Mare Clausum," and so to bed.

18th.  At the office upon business extraordinary all the morning, then to
my Lady Sandwich's to dinner, whither my wife, who had been at the
painter's, came to me, and there dined, and there I left her, and to the
Temple my brother and I to see Mrs. Turner, who begins to be better, and
so back to my Lady's, where much made of, and so home to my study till
bed-time, and so to bed.

19th.  This morning my wife dressed herself fine to go to the christening
of Mrs. Hunt's child, and so she and I in the way in the morning went to
the Paynter s, and there she sat till noon, and I all the while looking
over great variety of good prints which he had, and by and by comes my boy
to tell us that Mrs. Hunt has been at our house to tell us that the
christening is not till Saturday next.  So after the Paynter had done I
did like the picture pretty well, and my wife and I went by coach home,
but in the way I took occasion to fall out with my wife very highly about
her ribbands being ill matched and of two colours, and to very high words,
so that, like a passionate fool, I did call her whore, for which I was
afterwards sorry.  But I set her down at home, and went myself by
appointment to the Dolphin, where Sir W. Warren did give us all a good
dinner, and that being done, to the office, and there sat late, and so
home.

20th.  Lay long in bed, and then up, and so to the Wardrobe to dinner, and
from thence out with Mr. Moore towards my house, and in our way met with
Mr. Swan (my old acquaintance), and we to a tavern, where we had enough of
his old simple religious talk, and he is still a coxcomb in these things
as he ever was, and tells me he is setting out a book called "The
unlawfull use of lawfull things;" but a very simple fellow he is, and so I
leave him.  So we drank and at last parted, and Mr. Moore and I into
Cornhill, it being dark night, and in the street and on the Exchange
discoursed about Dominion of the Sea, wherein I am lately so much
concerned, and so I home and sat late up reading of Mr. Selden, and so to
bed.

21st.  To White Hall to the Privy Seal, where my Lord Privy Seal did tell
us he could seal no more this month, for that he goes thirty miles out of
town to keep his Christmas.  At which I was glad, but only afeard lest any
thing of the King's should force us to go after him to get a seal in the
country.  Thence to Westminster Hall (having by the way drank with Mrs.
Sarah and Mrs. Betty at my Lord's lodgings), and thence taken by some
Exchequer men to the Dogg, where, being St. Thomas's day, by custom they
have a general meeting at dinner.  There I was and all very merry, and
there I spoke to Mr. Falconberge to look whether he could out of Domesday
Book, give me any thing concerning the sea, and the dominion thereof;
which he says he will look after.  Thence taking leave to my brother's,
and there by appointment met with Prior of Brampton who had money to pay
me, but desiring some advice he stays till Monday.  So by coach home to
the office, where I was vexed to see Sir Williams both seem to think so
much that I should be a little out of the way, saying that without their
Register they were not a Committee, which I took in some dudgeon, and see
clearly that I must keep myself at a little distance with them and not
crouch, or else I shall never keep myself up even with them.  So home and
wrote letters by the post.  This evening my wife come home from
christening Mrs. Hunt's son, his name John, and a merchant in Mark Lane
came along with her, that was her partner.  So after my business was done,
and read something in Mr. Selden, I went to bed.

22nd.  To church in the morning, where the Reader made a boyish young
sermon.  Home to dinner, and there I took occasion, from the blacknesse of
the meat as it came out of the pot, to fall out with my wife and my maid
for their sluttery, and so left the table, and went up to read in Mr.
Selden till church time, and then my wife and I to church, and there in
the pew, with the rest of the company, was Captain Holmes, in his
gold-laced suit, at which I was troubled because of the old business which
he attempted upon my wife.  So with my mind troubled I sat still, but by
and by I took occasion from the rain now holding up (it raining when we
came into the church) to put my wife in mind of going to the christening
(which she was invited to) of N. Osborne's child, which she did, and so
went out of the pew, and my mind was eased.  So home after sermon and
there came by appointment Dr. T. Pepys, Will. Joyce, and my brother Tom,
and supped with me, and very merry they were, and I seemed to be, but I
was not pleased at all with their company.  So they being gone we went to
bed.

23rd.  Early up and by coach (before daylight) to the Wardrobe, and took
up Mr. Moore, and he and I to Chelsy to my Lord Privy Seal, and there
sealed some things, he being to go out of town for all Christmas
to-morrow.  So back again to Westminster, and from thence by water to the
Treasury Office, where I found Sir W. Pen paying off the Sophia and
Griffen, and there I staid with him till noon, and having sent for some
collar of beef and a mince pie, we eat and drank, and so I left him there
and to my brother's by appointment to meet Prior, but he came not, so I
went and saw Mrs. Turner who continues weak, and by and by word was
brought me that Prior's man was come to Tom's, and so I went and told out
L128 which I am to receive of him, but Prior not coming I went away and
left the money by his desire with my brother all night, and they to come
to me to-morrow morning.  So I took coach, and lighting at my bookseller's
in Paul's Churchyard, I met with Mr. Crumlum and the second master of
Paul's School, and thence I took them to the Starr, and there we sat and
talked, and I had great pleasure in their company, and very glad I was of
meeting him so accidentally, I having omitted too long to go to see him.
Here in discourse of books I did offer to give the school what books he
would choose of L5.  So we parted, and I home, and to Mr. Selden, and then
to bed.

24th.  Home all the morning and dined at home, and in the afternoon to the
office.  So home.

25th.  In the morning to church, where at the door of our pew I was fain
to stay, because that the sexton had not opened the door.  A good sermon
of Mr. Mills.  Dined at home all alone, and taking occasion from some
fault in the meat to complain of my maid's sluttery, my wife and I fell
out, and I up to my chamber in a discontent.  After dinner my wife comes
up to me and all friends again, and she and I to walk upon the leads, and
there Sir W. Pen called us, and we went to his house and supped with him,
but before supper Captain Cock came to us half drunk, and began to talk,
but Sir W. Pen knowing his humour and that there was no end of his
talking, drinks four great glasses of wine to him, one after another,
healths to the king, and by that means made him drunk, and so he went
away, and so we sat down to supper, and were merry, and so after supper
home and to bed.

26th.  This morning Sir W. Pen and I to the Treasury office, and there we
paid off the Amity (Captain Stokes's ship that was at Guinny) and another
ship, and so home, and after dinner Sir William came to me, and he and his
son and Aaugliter, and I and my wife, by coach to Moorfields to walk; but
it was most foul weather, and so we went into an alehouse and there eat
some cakes and ale, and a washeallbowle

             ["The wenches with their wassall bowls
               About the streets are singing."
                         --Wither's Christmas Carol.

     The old custom of carrying the wassail bowl from door to door, with
     songs and merriment, in Christmas week, is still observed in some of
     our rural districts.--B.]

woman and girl came to us and sung to us.  And after all was done I called
my boy (Wayneman) to us to eat some cake that was left, and the woman of
the house told us that he had called for two cakes and a pot of ale for
himself, at which I was angry, and am resolved to correct him for it.  So
home, and Sir W. Pen and his son and daughter to supper to me to a good
turkey, and were merry at cards, and so to bed.

27th.  In the morning to my Bookseller's to bespeak a Stephens's
Thesaurus, for which I offer L4, to give to Paul's School; and from thence
to Paul's Church; and there I heard Dr. Gunning preach a good sermon upon
the day (being St. John's day), and did hear him tell a story, which he
did persuade us to believe to be true, that St. John and the Virgin Mary
did appear to Gregory, a Bishopp, at his prayer to be confirmed in the
faith, which I did wonder to hear from him.  Here I met with Mr. Crumlum
(and told him of my endeavour to get Stephens's Thesaurus for the school),
and so home, and after dinner comes Mr. Faulconberge to see me, and at his
desire I sent over for his kinsman Mr. Knightly, the merchant, and so he
came over and sat and drank with us, and at his request I went over with
him, and there I sat till the evening, and till both Mr. Knightly and Mr.
Faulconberge (for whom I sent my boy to get a coach to carry him to
Westminster) were both drunk, and so home, but better wine I never drank
in all my life.  So home, and finding my wife gone to Sir W. Pen's, I went
thither, and there I sat and played at cards and supped, and so home and
to bed.

28th.  At home all the morning; and in the afternoon all of us at the
office, upon a letter from the Duke for the making up of a speedy estimate
of all the debts of the Navy, which is put into good forwardness.  I home
and Sir W. Pen to my house, who with his children staid playing cards
late, and so to bed.

29th (Lord's day).  Long in bed with my wife, and though I had determined
to go to dine with my wife at my Lady's, (chiefly to put off dining with
Sir W. Pen to-day because Holmes dined there), yet I could not get a coach
time enough to go thither, and so I dined at home, and my brother Tom with
me, and then a coach came and I carried my wife to Westminster, and she
went to see Mrs. Hunt, and I to the Abbey, and there meeting with Mr.
Hooper, he took me in among the quire, and there I sang with them their
service, and so that being done, I walked up and down till night for that
Mr. Coventry was not come to Whitehall since dinner again.  At last I went
thither and he was come, and I spoke with him about some business of the
office, and so took leave of him, and sent for my wife and the coach, and
so to the Wardrobe and supped, and staid very long talking with my Lady,
who seems to doat every day more and more upon us. So home and to prayers,
and to bed.

30th.  At the office about this estimate and so with my wife and Sir W.
Pen to see our pictures, which do not much displease us, and so back
again, and I staid at the Mitre, whither I had invited all my old
acquaintance of the Exchequer to a good chine of beef, which with three
barrels of oysters and three pullets, and plenty of wine and mirth, was
our dinner, and there was about twelve of us, among others Mr. Bowyer, the
old man, and Mr. Faulconberge, Shadwell, Taylor, Spicer, Woodruffe (who by
reason of some friend that dined with him came to us after dinner),
Servington, &c., and here I made them a foolish promise to give them one
this day twelvemonth, and so for ever while I live, but I do not intend
it.  Mere I staid as long as I could keep them, and so home to Sir W. Pen,
who with his children and my wife has been at a play to-day and saw
"D'Ambois," which I never saw.  Here we staid late at supper and playing
at cards, and so home and

31st.  My wife and I this morning to the Paynter's, and there she sat the
last time, and I stood by and did tell him some little things to do, that
now her picture I think will please me very well; and after her, her
little black dogg sat in her lap; and was drawn, which made us very merry;
so home to dinner, and so to the office; and there late finishing our
estimate of the debts of the Navy to this day; and it come to near
L374,000.  So home, and after supper, and my barber had trimmed me, I sat
down to end my journell for this year, and my condition at this time, by
God's blessing, is thus:  my health (only upon catching cold, which brings
great pain in my back .  .  .  as it used to be when I had the stone) is
very good, and so my wife's in all respects: my servants, W. Hewer, Sarah,
Nell, and Wayneman: my house at the Navy Office.  I suppose myself to be
worth about L500 clear in the world, and my goods of my house my own, and
what is coming to me from Brampton, when my father dies, which God defer.
But, by my uncle's death, the whole care and trouble of all, and settling
of all lies upon me, which is very great, because of law-suits, especially
that with T. Trice, about the interest of L200, which will, I hope, be
ended soon.  My chiefest thought is now to get a good wife for Tom, there
being one offered by the Joyces, a cozen of theirs, worth L200 in ready
money.  I am also upon writing a little treatise to present to the Duke,
about our privilege in the seas, as to other nations striking their flags
to us.  But my greatest trouble is, that I have for this last half year
been a very great spendthrift in all manner of respects, that I am afeard
to cast up my accounts, though I hope I am worth what I say above.  But I
will cast them up very shortly. I have newly taken a solemn oath about
abstaining from plays and wine, which I am resolved to keep according to
the letter of the oath which I keep by me.  The fleet hath been ready to
sail for Portugall, but hath lacked wind this fortnight, and by that means
my Lord is forced to keep at sea all this winter, till he brings home the
Queen, which is the expectation of all now, and the greatest matter of
publique talk.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     After dinner my wife comes up to me and all friends again
     Ambassador--that he is an honest man sent to lie abroad
     As all things else did not come up to my expectations
     Coming to lay out a great deal of money in clothes for my wife
     Did extremely beat him, and though it did trouble me to do it
     Dominion of the Sea
     Exclaiming against men's wearing their hats on in the church
     From some fault in the meat to complain of my maid's sluttery
     Gamester's life, which I see is very miserable, and poor
     Get his lady to trust herself with him into the tavern
     Good wine, and anchovies, and pickled oysters (for breakfast)
     Like a passionate fool, I did call her whore
     My wife and I fell out
     Oliver Cromwell as his ensign
     Seemed much glad of that it was no more
     Sir W. Pen was so fuddled that we could not try him to play
     Strange the folly of men to lay and lose so much money
     The unlawfull use of lawfull things
     Took occasion to fall out with my wife very highly
     Took physique, and it did work very well
     Tory--The term was not used politically until about 1679
     We had a good surloyne of rost beefe

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS FOR PEPYS DIARY OF 1961:

     A most tedious, unreasonable, and impertinent sermon
     A play not very good, though commended much
     A great baboon, but so much like a man in most things
     A little while since a very likely man to live as any I knew
     A lady spit backward upon me by a mistake
     After dinner my wife comes up to me and all friends again
     Ambassador--that he is an honest man sent to lie abroad
     And so by coach, though hard to get it, being rainy, home
     As all things else did not come up to my expectations
     Begun to smell, and so I caused it to be set forth (corpse)
     Being sure never to see the like again in this world
     Believe that England and France were once the same continent
     Bleeding behind by leeches will cure him
     But she loves not that I should speak of Mrs. Pierce
     By chewing of tobacco is become very fat and sallow
     Cannot bring myself to mind my business
     Chocolate was introduced into England about the year 1652
     Comely black woman.--[The old expression for a brunette.]
     Coming to lay out a great deal of money in clothes for my wife
     Cruel custom of throwing at cocks on Shrove Tuesday
     Day I first begun to go forth in my coat and sword
     Did extremely beat him, and though it did trouble me to do it
     Did trouble me very much to be at charge to no purpose
     Difference there will be between my father and mother about it
     Discontented that my wife do not go neater now she has two maids
     Dominion of the Sea
     Durst not take notice of her, her husband being there
     Eat of the best cold meats that ever I eat on in all my life
     Exclaiming against men's wearing their hats on in the church
     Faced white coat, made of one of my wife's pettycoates
     Family being all in mourning, doing him the greatest honour
     Fear I shall not be able to wipe my hands of him again
     Fell to dancing, the first time that ever I did in my life
     Finding my wife not sick, but yet out of order
     Foolery to take too much notice of such things
     Found my brother John at eight o'clock in bed, which vexed me
     Found him not so ill as I thought that he had been ill
     Frogs and many insects do often fall from the sky, ready formed
     From some fault in the meat to complain of my maid's sluttery
     Gamester's life, which I see is very miserable, and poor
     Get his lady to trust herself with him into the tavern
     God! what an age is this, and what a world is this
     Good God! how these ignorant people did cry her up for it!
     Good wine, and anchovies, and pickled oysters (for breakfast)
     Greedy to see the will, but did not ask to see it till to-morrow
     Have been so long absent that I am ashamed to go
     His company ever wearys me
     I could not forbear to love her exceedingly
     I took occasion to be angry with him
     I had the opportunity of kissing Mrs. Rebecca very often
     I would fain have stolen a pretty dog that followed me
     I broke wind and so came to some ease
     I was as merry as I could counterfeit myself to be
     I went in and kissed them, demanding it as a fee due
     In men's clothes, and had the best legs that ever I saw
     Inconvenience that do attend the increase of a man's fortune
     Instructed by Shakespeare himself
     Jealousy of him and an ugly wench that lived there lately
     Justice of God in punishing men for the sins of their ancestors
     King, Duke and Duchess, and Madame Palmer, were
     Lady Batten how she was such a man's whore
     Lady Batten to give me a spoonful of honey for my cold
     Lately too much given to seeing of plays, and expense
     Lay with her to-night, which I have not done these eight(days)
     Lewdness and beggary of the Court
     Like a passionate fool, I did call her whore
     Look askew upon my wife, because my wife do not buckle to them
     Made a lazy sermon, like a Presbyterian
     Man cannot live without playing the knave and dissimulation
     My head was not well with the wine that I drank to-day
     My great expense at the Coronacion
     My wife and I fell out
     None will sell us any thing without our personal security given
     Oliver Cromwell as his ensign
     Quakers do still continue, and rather grow than lessen
     Sat before Mrs. Palmer, the King's mistress, and filled my eyes
     Seemed much glad of that it was no more
     She hath got her teeth new done by La Roche
     She would not let him come to bed to her out of jealousy
     She is a very good companion as long as she is well
     Sir W. Pen was so fuddled that we could not try him to play
     So the children and I rose and dined by ourselves
     So home and to bed, where my wife had not lain a great while
     So much wine, that I was even almost foxed
     Sorry in some respect, glad in my expectations in another respec
     Still in discontent with my wife, to bed, and rose so this morn
     Strange the folly of men to lay and lose so much money
     That I might not seem to be afeared
     The Lords taxed themselves for the poor--an earl, s.
     The unlawfull use of lawfull things
     The barber came to trim me and wash me
     "The Alchymist,"--[Comedy by Ben Jonson
     The monkey loose, which did anger me, and so I did strike her
     This week made a vow to myself to drink no wine this week
     This day churched, her month of childbed being out
     Those absent from prayers were to pay a forfeit
     To be so much in love of plays
     Took occasion to fall out with my wife very highly
     Took physique, and it did work very well
     Tory--The term was not used politically until about 1679
     Troubled to see my father so much decay of a suddain
     Vices of the Court, and how the pox is so common there
     Was kissing my wife, which I did not like
     We do naturally all love the Spanish, and hate the French
     We are to go to law never to revenge, but only to repayre
     We had a good surloyne of rost beefe
     What they all, through profit or fear, did promise
     What people will do tomorrow
     Who seems so inquisitive when my, house will be made an end of
     Who we found ill still, but he do make very much of it
     Woman with a rod in her hand keeping time to the musique
     Wronged by my over great expectations





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